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Sample records for tensor dominance model

  1. Rainbow tensor model with enhanced symmetry and extreme melonic dominance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Itoyama

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We introduce and briefly analyze the rainbow tensor model where all planar diagrams are melonic. This leads to considerable simplification of the large N limit as compared to that of the matrix model: in particular, what are dressed in this limit are propagators only, which leads to an oversimplified closed set of Schwinger–Dyson equations for multi-point correlators. We briefly touch upon the Ward identities, the substitute of the spectral curve and the AMM/EO topological recursion and their possible connections to Connes–Kreimer theory and forest formulas.

  2. Rainbow tensor model with enhanced symmetry and extreme melonic dominance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoyama, H.; Mironov, A.; Morozov, A.

    2017-08-01

    We introduce and briefly analyze the rainbow tensor model where all planar diagrams are melonic. This leads to considerable simplification of the large N limit as compared to that of the matrix model: in particular, what are dressed in this limit are propagators only, which leads to an oversimplified closed set of Schwinger-Dyson equations for multi-point correlators. We briefly touch upon the Ward identities, the substitute of the spectral curve and the AMM/EO topological recursion and their possible connections to Connes-Kreimer theory and forest formulas.

  3. Tensor meson dominance and e+e--physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genz, H.; Karlsruhe Univ.; Mallik, S.

    1983-01-01

    The phenomenological status of tensor meson dominance is reported. Some new results concerning hadronic decays of the 2 ++ -meson chi 2 (3.55) and the heavy lepton tau are also included. Considering experimental errors, tensor meson dominance is in agreement with experiment. (author)

  4. Tensor-meson dominance in the UPSILON system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genz, H.

    1982-01-01

    Tensor-meson dominance is extended to the bb system and a sum rule to test the validity of this extension is derived. The sum rule connects the widths GAMMA(UPSILON''→νf/sub b//sup prime/), GAMMA(UPSILON''→νf/sub b/), GAMMA(f/sub b//sup prime/→νUPSILON'), GAMMA(f/sub b//sup prime/→νUPSILON), GAMMA(UPSILON'→νf/sub b/), and GAMMA(f/sub b/→νUPSILON) to each other (with f/sub b/ and f/sub b//sup prime/ the narrow b-barb tensor mesons predicted by potential models). The corresponding result for the c-barc system is known to predict GAMMA(f/sub c/(3.55)→νpsi) = 700 keV proportional to the experimental GAMMA(psi'→νf/sub c/(3.55))

  5. The 1/ N Expansion of Tensor Models with Two Symmetric Tensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurau, Razvan

    2018-06-01

    It is well known that tensor models for a tensor with no symmetry admit a 1/ N expansion dominated by melonic graphs. This result relies crucially on identifying jackets, which are globally defined ribbon graphs embedded in the tensor graph. In contrast, no result of this kind has so far been established for symmetric tensors because global jackets do not exist. In this paper we introduce a new approach to the 1/ N expansion in tensor models adapted to symmetric tensors. In particular we do not use any global structure like the jackets. We prove that, for any rank D, a tensor model with two symmetric tensors and interactions the complete graph K D+1 admits a 1/ N expansion dominated by melonic graphs.

  6. Colored Tensor Models - a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razvan Gurau

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Colored tensor models have recently burst onto the scene as a promising conceptual and computational tool in the investigation of problems of random geometry in dimension three and higher. We present a snapshot of the cutting edge in this rapidly expanding research field. Colored tensor models have been shown to share many of the properties of their direct ancestor, matrix models, which encode a theory of fluctuating two-dimensional surfaces. These features include the possession of Feynman graphs encoding topological spaces, a 1/N expansion of graph amplitudes, embedded matrix models inside the tensor structure, a resumable leading order with critical behavior and a continuum large volume limit, Schwinger-Dyson equations satisfying a Lie algebra (akin to the Virasoro algebra in two dimensions, non-trivial classical solutions and so on. In this review, we give a detailed introduction of colored tensor models and pointers to current and future research directions.

  7. Tensor meson dominance and e/sup +/e/sup -/-physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genz, H [Miami Univ., Coral Gables, FL (USA). Center for Theoretical Studies; Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Theoretische Kernphysik); Mallik, S [Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Theoretische Kernphysik

    1983-01-01

    The phenomenological status of tensor meson dominance is reported. Some new results concerning hadronic decays of the 2/sup + +/-meson chi/sub 2/(3.55) and the heavy lepton tau are also included. Considering experimental errors, tensor meson dominance is in agreement with experiment.

  8. A supersymmetric SYK-like tensor model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Cheng; Spradlin, Marcus; Volovich, Anastasia [Department of Physics, Brown University,Providence, RI, 02912 (United States)

    2017-05-11

    We consider a supersymmetric SYK-like model without quenched disorder that is built by coupling two kinds of fermionic N=1 tensor-valued superfields, “quarks” and “mesons”. We prove that the model has a well-defined large-N limit in which the (s)quark 2-point functions are dominated by mesonic “melon” diagrams. We sum these diagrams to obtain the Schwinger-Dyson equations and show that in the IR, the solution agrees with that of the supersymmetric SYK model.

  9. A supersymmetric SYK-like tensor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Cheng; Spradlin, Marcus; Volovich, Anastasia

    2017-01-01

    We consider a supersymmetric SYK-like model without quenched disorder that is built by coupling two kinds of fermionic N=1 tensor-valued superfields, “quarks” and “mesons”. We prove that the model has a well-defined large-N limit in which the (s)quark 2-point functions are dominated by mesonic “melon” diagrams. We sum these diagrams to obtain the Schwinger-Dyson equations and show that in the IR, the solution agrees with that of the supersymmetric SYK model.

  10. Correlators in tensor models from character calculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mironov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We explain how the calculations of [20], which provided the first evidence for non-trivial structures of Gaussian correlators in tensor models, are efficiently performed with the help of the (Hurwitz character calculus. This emphasizes a close similarity between technical methods in matrix and tensor models and supports a hope to understand the emerging structures in very similar terms. We claim that the 2m-fold Gaussian correlators of rank r tensors are given by r-linear combinations of dimensions with the Young diagrams of size m. The coefficients are made from the characters of the symmetric group Sm and their exact form depends on the choice of the correlator and on the symmetries of the model. As the simplest application of this new knowledge, we provide simple expressions for correlators in the Aristotelian tensor model as tri-linear combinations of dimensions.

  11. A RENORMALIZATION PROCEDURE FOR TENSOR MODELS AND SCALAR-TENSOR THEORIES OF GRAVITY

    OpenAIRE

    SASAKURA, NAOKI

    2010-01-01

    Tensor models are more-index generalizations of the so-called matrix models, and provide models of quantum gravity with the idea that spaces and general relativity are emergent phenomena. In this paper, a renormalization procedure for the tensor models whose dynamical variable is a totally symmetric real three-tensor is discussed. It is proven that configurations with certain Gaussian forms are the attractors of the three-tensor under the renormalization procedure. Since these Gaussian config...

  12. Abelian tensor models on the lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Soumyadeep; Giraldo-Rivera, Victor I.; Joseph, Anosh; Loganayagam, R.; Yoon, Junggi

    2018-04-01

    We consider a chain of Abelian Klebanov-Tarnopolsky fermionic tensor models coupled through quartic nearest-neighbor interactions. We characterize the gauge-singlet spectrum for small chains (L =2 ,3 ,4 ,5 ) and observe that the spectral statistics exhibits strong evidence in favor of quasi-many-body localization.

  13. Quantum chaos and holographic tensor models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, Chethan [Center for High Energy Physics, Indian Institute of Science,Bangalore 560012 (India); Sanyal, Sambuddha [International Center for Theoretical Sciences, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research,Bangalore 560089 (India); Subramanian, P.N. Bala [Center for High Energy Physics, Indian Institute of Science,Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2017-03-10

    A class of tensor models were recently outlined as potentially calculable examples of holography: their perturbative large-N behavior is similar to the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev (SYK) model, but they are fully quantum mechanical (in the sense that there is no quenched disorder averaging). These facts make them intriguing tentative models for quantum black holes. In this note, we explicitly diagonalize the simplest non-trivial Gurau-Witten tensor model and study its spectral and late-time properties. We find parallels to (a single sample of) SYK where some of these features were recently attributed to random matrix behavior and quantum chaos. In particular, the spectral form factor exhibits a dip-ramp-plateau structure after a running time average, in qualitative agreement with SYK. But we also observe that even though the spectrum has a unique ground state, it has a huge (quasi-?)degeneracy of intermediate energy states, not seen in SYK. If one ignores the delta function due to the degeneracies however, there is level repulsion in the unfolded spacing distribution hinting chaos. Furthermore, there are gaps in the spectrum. The system also has a spectral mirror symmetry which we trace back to the presence of a unitary operator with which the Hamiltonian anticommutes. We use it to argue that to the extent that the model exhibits random matrix behavior, it is controlled not by the Dyson ensembles, but by the BDI (chiral orthogonal) class in the Altland-Zirnbauer classification.

  14. Quantum chaos and holographic tensor models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, Chethan; Sanyal, Sambuddha; Subramanian, P.N. Bala

    2017-01-01

    A class of tensor models were recently outlined as potentially calculable examples of holography: their perturbative large-N behavior is similar to the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev (SYK) model, but they are fully quantum mechanical (in the sense that there is no quenched disorder averaging). These facts make them intriguing tentative models for quantum black holes. In this note, we explicitly diagonalize the simplest non-trivial Gurau-Witten tensor model and study its spectral and late-time properties. We find parallels to (a single sample of) SYK where some of these features were recently attributed to random matrix behavior and quantum chaos. In particular, the spectral form factor exhibits a dip-ramp-plateau structure after a running time average, in qualitative agreement with SYK. But we also observe that even though the spectrum has a unique ground state, it has a huge (quasi-?)degeneracy of intermediate energy states, not seen in SYK. If one ignores the delta function due to the degeneracies however, there is level repulsion in the unfolded spacing distribution hinting chaos. Furthermore, there are gaps in the spectrum. The system also has a spectral mirror symmetry which we trace back to the presence of a unitary operator with which the Hamiltonian anticommutes. We use it to argue that to the extent that the model exhibits random matrix behavior, it is controlled not by the Dyson ensembles, but by the BDI (chiral orthogonal) class in the Altland-Zirnbauer classification.

  15. Emergent symmetries in the canonical tensor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obster, Dennis; Sasakura, Naoki

    2018-04-01

    The canonical tensor model (CTM) is a tensor model proposing a classically and quantum mechanically consistent description of gravity, formulated as a first-class constraint system with structural similarities to the ADM formalism of general relativity. The classical CTM produces a general relativistic system in a formal continuum limit, the emergence of which should be explained by the quantum CTM. In this paper we study the symmetry properties of a wave function that exactly solves the quantum constraints of the CTM. We have found that it has strong peaks at configurations invariant under some Lie groups, as predicted by a mechanism described in our previous paper. A surprising result is the preference for configurations invariant not only under Lie groups with positive definite signature, but also with Lorentzian signature. Such symmetries could characterize the global structures of spacetimes, and our results are encouraging towards showing spacetime emergence in the CTM. To verify the asymptotic convergence of the wave function we have also analyzed the asymptotic behavior, which for the most part seems to be well under control.

  16. Radiative corrections in a vector-tensor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chishtie, F.; Gagne-Portelance, M.; Hanif, T.; Homayouni, S.; McKeon, D.G.C.

    2006-01-01

    In a recently proposed model in which a vector non-Abelian gauge field interacts with an antisymmetric tensor field, it has been shown that the tensor field possesses no physical degrees of freedom. This formal demonstration is tested by computing the one-loop contributions of the tensor field to the self-energy of the vector field. It is shown that despite the large number of Feynman diagrams in which the tensor field contributes, the sum of these diagrams vanishes, confirming that it is not physical. Furthermore, if the tensor field were to couple with a spinor field, it is shown at one-loop order that the spinor self-energy is not renormalizable, and hence this coupling must be excluded. In principle though, this tensor field does couple to the gravitational field

  17. Tensor Excitations in Nambu - Jona-Lasinio Model

    CERN Document Server

    Chizhov, M V

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that in the one-flavour NJL model the vector and axial-vector quasiparticles described by the antisymmetric tensor field are generated. These excitations have tensor interactions with quarks in contrast to usual vector ones. Phenomenological applications are discussed.

  18. Physical states in the canonical tensor model from the perspective of random tensor networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narain, Gaurav [The Institute for Fundamental Study “The Tah Poe Academia Institute”,Naresuan University, Phitsanulok 65000 (Thailand); Sasakura, Naoki [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics,Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Sato, Yuki [National Institute for Theoretical Physics,School of Physics and Centre for Theoretical Physics,University of the Witwartersrand, WITS 2050 (South Africa)

    2015-01-07

    Tensor models, generalization of matrix models, are studied aiming for quantum gravity in dimensions larger than two. Among them, the canonical tensor model is formulated as a totally constrained system with first-class constraints, the algebra of which resembles the Dirac algebra of general relativity. When quantized, the physical states are defined to be vanished by the quantized constraints. In explicit representations, the constraint equations are a set of partial differential equations for the physical wave-functions, which do not seem straightforward to be solved due to their non-linear character. In this paper, after providing some explicit solutions for N=2,3, we show that certain scale-free integration of partition functions of statistical systems on random networks (or random tensor networks more generally) provides a series of solutions for general N. Then, by generalizing this form, we also obtain various solutions for general N. Moreover, we show that the solutions for the cases with a cosmological constant can be obtained from those with no cosmological constant for increased N. This would imply the interesting possibility that a cosmological constant can always be absorbed into the dynamics and is not an input parameter in the canonical tensor model. We also observe the possibility of symmetry enhancement in N=3, and comment on an extension of Airy function related to the solutions.

  19. Four dimensional sigma model coupled to the metric tensor field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghika, G.; Visinescu, M.

    1980-02-01

    We discuss the four dimensional nonlinear sigma model with an internal O(n) invariance coupled to the metric tensor field satisfying Einstein equations. We derive a bound on the coupling constant between the sigma field and the metric tensor using the theory of harmonic maps. A special attention is paid to Einstein spaces and some new explicit solutions of the model are constructed. (author)

  20. Validation of buoyancy driven spectral tensor model using HATS data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, A.; Mann, Jakob; Kelly, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    We present a homogeneous spectral tensor model for wind velocity and temperature fluctuations, driven by mean vertical shear and mean temperature gradient. Results from the model, including one-dimensional velocity and temperature spectra and the associated co-spectra, are shown in this paper....... The model also reproduces two-point statistics, such as coherence and phases, via cross-spectra between two points separated in space. Model results are compared with observations from the Horizontal Array Turbulence Study (HATS) field program (Horst et al. 2004). The spectral velocity tensor in the model...

  1. Tensor Decompositions for Learning Latent Variable Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-08

    and eigenvectors of tensors is generally significantly more complicated than their matrix counterpart (both algebraically [Qi05, CS11, Lim05] and...The reduction First, let W ∈ Rd×k be a linear transformation such that M2(W,W ) = W M2W = I where I is the k × k identity matrix (i.e., W whitens ...approximate the whitening matrix W ∈ Rd×k from second-moment matrix M2 ∈ Rd×d. To do this, one first multiplies M2 by a random matrix R ∈ Rd×k′ for some k′ ≥ k

  2. TENSOR DECOMPOSITIONS AND SPARSE LOG-LINEAR MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johndrow, James E.; Bhattacharya, Anirban; Dunson, David B.

    2017-01-01

    Contingency table analysis routinely relies on log-linear models, with latent structure analysis providing a common alternative. Latent structure models lead to a reduced rank tensor factorization of the probability mass function for multivariate categorical data, while log-linear models achieve dimensionality reduction through sparsity. Little is known about the relationship between these notions of dimensionality reduction in the two paradigms. We derive several results relating the support of a log-linear model to nonnegative ranks of the associated probability tensor. Motivated by these findings, we propose a new collapsed Tucker class of tensor decompositions, which bridge existing PARAFAC and Tucker decompositions, providing a more flexible framework for parsimoniously characterizing multivariate categorical data. Taking a Bayesian approach to inference, we illustrate empirical advantages of the new decompositions. PMID:29332971

  3. The Full Ward-Takahashi Identity for Colored Tensor Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Sánchez, Carlos I.

    2018-03-01

    Colored tensor models (CTM) is a random geometrical approach to quantum gravity. We scrutinize the structure of the connected correlation functions of general CTM-interactions and organize them by boundaries of Feynman graphs. For rank- D interactions including, but not restricted to, all melonic φ^4 -vertices—to wit, solely those quartic vertices that can lead to dominant spherical contributions in the large- N expansion—the aforementioned boundary graphs are shown to be precisely all (possibly disconnected) vertex-bipartite regularly edge- D-colored graphs. The concept of CTM-compatible boundary-graph automorphism is introduced and an auxiliary graph calculus is developed. With the aid of these constructs, certain U (∞)-invariance of the path integral measure is fully exploited in order to derive a strong Ward-Takahashi Identity for CTMs with a symmetry-breaking kinetic term. For the rank-3 φ^4 -theory, we get the exact integral-like equation for the 2-point function. Similarly, exact equations for higher multipoint functions can be readily obtained departing from this full Ward-Takahashi identity. Our results hold for some Group Field Theories as well. Altogether, our non-perturbative approach trades some graph theoretical methods for analytical ones. We believe that these tools can be extended to tensorial SYK-models.

  4. The 1/ N Expansion of Tensor Models Beyond Perturbation Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurau, Razvan

    2014-09-01

    We analyze in full mathematical rigor the most general quartically perturbed invariant probability measure for a random tensor. Using a version of the Loop Vertex Expansion (which we call the mixed expansion) we show that the cumulants write as explicit series in 1/ N plus bounded rest terms. The mixed expansion recasts the problem of determining the subleading corrections in 1/ N into a simple combinatorial problem of counting trees decorated by a finite number of loop edges. As an aside, we use the mixed expansion to show that the (divergent) perturbative expansion of the tensor models is Borel summable and to prove that the cumulants respect an uniform scaling bound. In particular the quartically perturbed measures fall, in the N→ ∞ limit, in the universality class of Gaussian tensor models.

  5. Tensor models, Kronecker coefficients and permutation centralizer algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geloun, Joseph Ben; Ramgoolam, Sanjaye

    2017-11-01

    We show that the counting of observables and correlators for a 3-index tensor model are organized by the structure of a family of permutation centralizer algebras. These algebras are shown to be semi-simple and their Wedderburn-Artin decompositions into matrix blocks are given in terms of Clebsch-Gordan coefficients of symmetric groups. The matrix basis for the algebras also gives an orthogonal basis for the tensor observables which diagonalizes the Gaussian two-point functions. The centres of the algebras are associated with correlators which are expressible in terms of Kronecker coefficients (Clebsch-Gordan multiplicities of symmetric groups). The color-exchange symmetry present in the Gaussian model, as well as a large class of interacting models, is used to refine the description of the permutation centralizer algebras. This discussion is extended to a general number of colors d: it is used to prove the integrality of an infinite family of number sequences related to color-symmetrizations of colored graphs, and expressible in terms of symmetric group representation theory data. Generalizing a connection between matrix models and Belyi maps, correlators in Gaussian tensor models are interpreted in terms of covers of singular 2-complexes. There is an intriguing difference, between matrix and higher rank tensor models, in the computational complexity of superficially comparable correlators of observables parametrized by Young diagrams.

  6. Anisotropic cosmological models and generalized scalar tensor theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper generalized scalar tensor theory has been considered in the background of anisotropic cosmological models, namely, axially symmetric Bianchi-I, Bianchi-III and Kortowski–. Sachs space-time. For bulk viscous fluid, both exponential and power-law solutions have been stud- ied and some assumptions ...

  7. Anisotropic cosmological models and generalized scalar tensor theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper generalized scalar tensor theory has been considered in the background of anisotropic cosmological models, namely, axially symmetric Bianchi-I, Bianchi-III and Kortowski–Sachs space-time. For bulk viscous fluid, both exponential and power-law solutions have been studied and some assumptions among the ...

  8. Retrospective Correction of Physiological Noise in DTI Using an Extended Tensor Model and Peripheral Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Siawoosh; Hutton, Chloe; Nagy, Zoltan; Josephs, Oliver; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging is widely used in research and clinical applications, but this modality is highly sensitive to artefacts. We developed an easy-to-implement extension of the original diffusion tensor model to account for physiological noise in diffusion tensor imaging using measures of peripheral physiology (pulse and respiration), the so-called extended tensor model. Within the framework of the extended tensor model two types of regressors, which respectively modeled small (linear) and strong (nonlinear) variations in the diffusion signal, were derived from peripheral measures. We tested the performance of four extended tensor models with different physiological noise regressors on nongated and gated diffusion tensor imaging data, and compared it to an established data-driven robust fitting method. In the brainstem and cerebellum the extended tensor models reduced the noise in the tensor-fit by up to 23% in accordance with previous studies on physiological noise. The extended tensor model addresses both large-amplitude outliers and small-amplitude signal-changes. The framework of the extended tensor model also facilitates further investigation into physiological noise in diffusion tensor imaging. The proposed extended tensor model can be readily combined with other artefact correction methods such as robust fitting and eddy current correction. PMID:22936599

  9. A Tensor Statistical Model for Quantifying Dynamic Functional Connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yingying; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Kim, Minjeong; Yan, Jin; Wu, Guorong

    2017-06-01

    Functional connectivity (FC) has been widely investigated in many imaging-based neuroscience and clinical studies. Since functional Magnetic Resonance Image (MRI) signal is just an indirect reflection of brain activity, it is difficult to accurately quantify the FC strength only based on signal correlation. To address this limitation, we propose a learning-based tensor model to derive high sensitivity and specificity connectome biomarkers at the individual level from resting-state fMRI images. First, we propose a learning-based approach to estimate the intrinsic functional connectivity. In addition to the low level region-to-region signal correlation, latent module-to-module connection is also estimated and used to provide high level heuristics for measuring connectivity strength. Furthermore, sparsity constraint is employed to automatically remove the spurious connections, thus alleviating the issue of searching for optimal threshold. Second, we integrate our learning-based approach with the sliding-window technique to further reveal the dynamics of functional connectivity. Specifically, we stack the functional connectivity matrix within each sliding window and form a 3D tensor where the third dimension denotes for time. Then we obtain dynamic functional connectivity (dFC) for each individual subject by simultaneously estimating the within-sliding-window functional connectivity and characterizing the across-sliding-window temporal dynamics. Third, in order to enhance the robustness of the connectome patterns extracted from dFC, we extend the individual-based 3D tensors to a population-based 4D tensor (with the fourth dimension stands for the training subjects) and learn the statistics of connectome patterns via 4D tensor analysis. Since our 4D tensor model jointly (1) optimizes dFC for each training subject and (2) captures the principle connectome patterns, our statistical model gains more statistical power of representing new subject than current state

  10. Modeling soft interface dominated systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamorgese, A.; Mauri, R.; Sagis, L.M.C.

    2017-01-01

    The two main continuum frameworks used for modeling the dynamics of soft multiphase systems are the Gibbs dividing surface model, and the diffuse interface model. In the former the interface is modeled as a two dimensional surface, and excess properties such as a surface density, or surface energy

  11. The Schwinger Dyson equations and the algebra of constraints of random tensor models at all orders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurau, Razvan

    2012-01-01

    Random tensor models for a generic complex tensor generalize matrix models in arbitrary dimensions and yield a theory of random geometries. They support a 1/N expansion dominated by graphs of spherical topology. Their Schwinger Dyson equations, generalizing the loop equations of matrix models, translate into constraints satisfied by the partition function. The constraints have been shown, in the large N limit, to close a Lie algebra indexed by colored rooted D-ary trees yielding a first generalization of the Virasoro algebra in arbitrary dimensions. In this paper we complete the Schwinger Dyson equations and the associated algebra at all orders in 1/N. The full algebra of constraints is indexed by D-colored graphs, and the leading order D-ary tree algebra is a Lie subalgebra of the full constraints algebra.

  12. Energy-momentum tensor in the fermion-pairing model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawati, S.; Miyata, H.

    1980-01-01

    The symmetric energy-momentum tensor for the self-interacting fermion theory (psi-barpsi) 2 is expressed in terms of the collective mode within the Hartree approximation. The divergent part of the energy-momentum tensor for the fermion theory induces an effective energy-momentum tensor for the collective mode, and this effective energy-momentum tensor automatically has the Callan-Coleman-Jackiw improved form. The renormalized energy-momentum tensor is structurally equivalent to the Callan-Coleman-Jackiw improved tensor for the Yukawa theory

  13. Cross-scale Efficient Tensor Contractions for Coupled Cluster Computations Through Multiple Programming Model Backends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, Khaled Z. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Computational Research Division; Epifanovsky, Evgeny [Q-Chem, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States); Williams, Samuel W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Computational Research Division; Krylov, Anna I. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2016-07-26

    Coupled-cluster methods provide highly accurate models of molecular structure by explicit numerical calculation of tensors representing the correlation between electrons. These calculations are dominated by a sequence of tensor contractions, motivating the development of numerical libraries for such operations. While based on matrix-matrix multiplication, these libraries are specialized to exploit symmetries in the molecular structure and in electronic interactions, and thus reduce the size of the tensor representation and the complexity of contractions. The resulting algorithms are irregular and their parallelization has been previously achieved via the use of dynamic scheduling or specialized data decompositions. We introduce our efforts to extend the Libtensor framework to work in the distributed memory environment in a scalable and energy efficient manner. We achieve up to 240 speedup compared with the best optimized shared memory implementation. We attain scalability to hundreds of thousands of compute cores on three distributed-memory architectures, (Cray XC30&XC40, BlueGene/Q), and on a heterogeneous GPU-CPU system (Cray XK7). As the bottlenecks shift from being compute-bound DGEMM's to communication-bound collectives as the size of the molecular system scales, we adopt two radically different parallelization approaches for handling load-imbalance. Nevertheless, we preserve a uni ed interface to both programming models to maintain the productivity of computational quantum chemists.

  14. Topics in the generalized vector dominance model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavin, S.

    1976-01-01

    Two topics are covered in the generalized vector dominance model. In the first topic a model is constructed for dilepton production in hadron-hadron interactions based on the idea of generalized vector-dominance. It is argued that in the high mass region the generalized vector-dominance model and the Drell-Yan parton model are alternative descriptions of the same underlying physics. In the low mass regions the models differ; the vector-dominance approach predicts a greater production of dileptons. It is found that the high mass vector mesons which are the hallmark of the generalized vector-dominance model make little contribution to the large yield of leptons observed in the transverse-momentum range 1 less than p/sub perpendicular/ less than 6 GeV. The recently measured hadronic parameters lead one to believe that detailed fits to the data are possible under the model. The possibility was expected, and illustrated with a simple model the extreme sensitivity of the large-p/sub perpendicular/ lepton yield to the large-transverse-momentum tail of vector-meson production. The second topic is an attempt to explain the mysterious phenomenon of photon shadowing in nuclei utilizing the contribution of the longitudinally polarized photon. It is argued that if the scalar photon anti-shadows, it could compensate for the transverse photon, which is presumed to shadow. It is found in a very simple model that the scalar photon could indeed anti-shadow. The principal feature of the model is a cancellation of amplitudes. The scheme is consistent with scalar photon-nucleon data as well. The idea is tested with two simple GVDM models and finds that the anti-shadowing contribution of the scalar photon is not sufficient to compensate for the contribution of the transverse photon. It is found doubtful that the scalar photon makes a significant contribution to the total photon-nuclear cross section

  15. A Givental-like formula and bilinear identities for tensor models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dartois, Stéphane [LIPN, Institut Galilée, CNRS UMR 7030, Université Paris 13,F-93430, Villetaneuse (France); Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, CNRS UMR 8627, Université Paris 11,91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2015-08-26

    In this paper we express some simple random tensor models in a Givental-like fashion i.e. as differential operators acting on a product of generic 1-Hermitian matrix models. Finally we derive Hirota’s equations for these tensor models. Our decomposition is a first step towards integrability of such models.

  16. Extended nonnegative tensor factorisation models for musical sound source separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGerald, Derry; Cranitch, Matt; Coyle, Eugene

    2008-01-01

    Recently, shift-invariant tensor factorisation algorithms have been proposed for the purposes of sound source separation of pitched musical instruments. However, in practice, existing algorithms require the use of log-frequency spectrograms to allow shift invariance in frequency which causes problems when attempting to resynthesise the separated sources. Further, it is difficult to impose harmonicity constraints on the recovered basis functions. This paper proposes a new additive synthesis-based approach which allows the use of linear-frequency spectrograms as well as imposing strict harmonic constraints, resulting in an improved model. Further, these additional constraints allow the addition of a source filter model to the factorisation framework, and an extended model which is capable of separating mixtures of pitched and percussive instruments simultaneously.

  17. Extended Nonnegative Tensor Factorisation Models for Musical Sound Source Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derry FitzGerald

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, shift-invariant tensor factorisation algorithms have been proposed for the purposes of sound source separation of pitched musical instruments. However, in practice, existing algorithms require the use of log-frequency spectrograms to allow shift invariance in frequency which causes problems when attempting to resynthesise the separated sources. Further, it is difficult to impose harmonicity constraints on the recovered basis functions. This paper proposes a new additive synthesis-based approach which allows the use of linear-frequency spectrograms as well as imposing strict harmonic constraints, resulting in an improved model. Further, these additional constraints allow the addition of a source filter model to the factorisation framework, and an extended model which is capable of separating mixtures of pitched and percussive instruments simultaneously.

  18. Decorated tensor network renormalization for lattice gauge theories and spin foam models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittrich, Bianca; Mizera, Sebastian; Steinhaus, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Tensor network techniques have proved to be powerful tools that can be employed to explore the large scale dynamics of lattice systems. Nonetheless, the redundancy of degrees of freedom in lattice gauge theories (and related models) poses a challenge for standard tensor network algorithms. We accommodate for such systems by introducing an additional structure decorating the tensor network. This allows to explicitly preserve the gauge symmetry of the system under coarse graining and straightforwardly interpret the fixed point tensors. We propose and test (for models with finite Abelian groups) a coarse graining algorithm for lattice gauge theories based on decorated tensor networks. We also point out that decorated tensor networks are applicable to other models as well, where they provide the advantage to give immediate access to certain expectation values and correlation functions. (paper)

  19. Decorated tensor network renormalization for lattice gauge theories and spin foam models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Bianca; Mizera, Sebastian; Steinhaus, Sebastian

    2016-05-01

    Tensor network techniques have proved to be powerful tools that can be employed to explore the large scale dynamics of lattice systems. Nonetheless, the redundancy of degrees of freedom in lattice gauge theories (and related models) poses a challenge for standard tensor network algorithms. We accommodate for such systems by introducing an additional structure decorating the tensor network. This allows to explicitly preserve the gauge symmetry of the system under coarse graining and straightforwardly interpret the fixed point tensors. We propose and test (for models with finite Abelian groups) a coarse graining algorithm for lattice gauge theories based on decorated tensor networks. We also point out that decorated tensor networks are applicable to other models as well, where they provide the advantage to give immediate access to certain expectation values and correlation functions.

  20. TENSOR MODELING BASED FOR AIRBORNE LiDAR DATA CLASSIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Feature selection and description is a key factor in classification of Earth observation data. In this paper a classification method based on tensor decomposition is proposed. First, multiple features are extracted from raw LiDAR point cloud, and raster LiDAR images are derived by accumulating features or the “raw” data attributes. Then, the feature rasters of LiDAR data are stored as a tensor, and tensor decomposition is used to select component features. This tensor representation could keep the initial spatial structure and insure the consideration of the neighborhood. Based on a small number of component features a k nearest neighborhood classification is applied.

  1. Dynamics of chaotic maps for modelling the multifractal spectrum of human brain Diffusion Tensor Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Provata, A.; Katsaloulis, P.; Verganelakis, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Calculation of human brain multifractal spectra. ► Calculations are based on Diffusion Tensor MRI Images. ► Spectra are modelled by coupled Ikeda map dynamics. ► Coupled lattice Ikeda maps model well only positive multifractal spectra. ► Appropriately modified coupled lattice Ikeda maps give correct spectra. - Abstract: The multifractal spectra of 3d Diffusion Tensor Images (DTI) obtained by magnetic resonance imaging of the human brain are studied. They are shown to deviate substantially from artificial brain images with the same white matter intensity. All spectra, obtained from 12 healthy subjects, show common characteristics indicating non-trivial moments of the intensity. To model the spectra the dynamics of the chaotic Ikeda map are used. The DTI multifractal spectra for positive q are best approximated by 3d coupled Ikeda maps in the fully developed chaotic regime. The coupling constants are as small as α = 0.01. These results reflect not only the white tissue non-trivial architectural complexity in the human brain, but also demonstrate the presence and importance of coupling between neuron axons. The architectural complexity is also mirrored by the deviations in the negative q-spectra, where the rare events dominate. To obtain a good agreement in the DTI negative q-spectrum of the brain with the Ikeda dynamics, it is enough to slightly modify the most rare events of the coupled Ikeda distributions. The representation of Diffusion Tensor Images with coupled Ikeda maps is not unique: similar conclusions are drawn when other chaotic maps (Tent, Logistic or Henon maps) are employed in the modelling of the neuron axons network.

  2. Tensor-optimized shell model for the Li isotopes with a bare nucleon-nucleon interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myo, Takayuki; Umeya, Atsushi; Toki, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Kiyomi

    2012-08-01

    We study the Li isotopes systematically in terms of the tensor-optimized shell model (TOSM) by using a bare nucleon-nucleon interaction as the AV8' interaction. The short-range correlation is treated in the unitary correlation operator method (UCOM). Using the TOSM + UCOM approach, we investigate the role of the tensor force on each spectrum of the Li isotopes. It is found that the tensor force produces quite a characteristic effect on various states in each spectrum and those spectra are affected considerably by the tensor force. The energy difference between the spin-orbit partner, the p1/2 and p3/2 orbits of the last neutron, in 5Li is caused by opposite roles of the tensor correlation. In 6Li, the spin-triplet state in the LS coupling configuration is favored energetically by the tensor force in comparison with jj coupling shell-model states. In 7,8,9Li, the low-lying states containing extra neutrons in the p3/2 orbit are favored energetically due to the large tensor contribution to allow the excitation from the 0s, orbit to the p1/2 orbit by the tensor force. Those three nuclei show the jj coupling character in their ground states which is different from 6Li.

  3. The effects of the tensor coupling term in the Zimanyi-Moszkowski model for unpolarized nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ru-Keng Su; Li Li; Hong-Qiu Song

    1998-01-01

    The effects of the tensor coupling term on nuclear matter in the Zimanyi-Moszkowki (ZM) model are investigated. It is shown that the tensor coupling term in the ZM model leaves the thermodynamical properties of nuclear matter almost unchanged. The corrections of tensor coupling to the critical point of the liquid-gas phase transition are given. (author)

  4. TensorLy: Tensor Learning in Python

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kossaifi, Jean; Panagakis, Yannis; Pantic, Maja

    2016-01-01

    Tensor methods are gaining increasing traction in machine learning. However, there are scant to no resources available to perform tensor learning and decomposition in Python. To answer this need we developed TensorLy. TensorLy is a state of the art general purpose library for tensor learning.

  5. Performance of unscented Kalman filter tractography in edema: Analysis of the two-tensor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruizhi Liao

    2017-01-01

    Overall, the main contribution of this study is to provide insight into how UKF tractography can work, using a two-tensor model, to begin to address the challenge of fiber tract reconstruction in edematous regions near brain tumors.

  6. Study of the tensor correlation in oxygen isotopes using mean-field-type and shell model methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Satoru

    2007-01-01

    The tensor force plays important roles in nuclear structure. Recently, we have developed a mean-field-type model which can treat the two-particle-two-hole correlation induced by the tensor force. We applied the model to sub-closed-shell oxygen isotopes and found that an sizable attractive energy comes from the tensor force. We also studied the tensor correlation in 16O using a shell model including two-particle-two-hole configurations. In this case, quite a large attractive energy is obtained for the correlation energy from the tensor force

  7. Generalized Tensor Analysis Model for Multi-Subcarrier Analog Optical Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Ying; Yu, Xianbin; Zheng, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    We propose and develop a general tensor analysis framework for a subcarrier multiplex analog optical fiber link for applications in microwave photonics. The goal of this work is to construct an uniform method to address nonlinear distortions of a discrete frequency transmission system. We employ....... In addition, it is demonstrated that each corresponding tensor is formally determined by device structures, which allows for a synthesized study of device combinations more systematically. For implementing numerical methods, the practical significance of the tensor model is it simplifies the derivation...... details compared with series-based approaches by hiding the underlying multi-fold summation and index operation. The integrity of the proposed methodology is validated by investigating the classical intensity modulated system. Furthermore, to give an application model of the tensor formalism, we make...

  8. On the energy-momentum tensor in non-linear σ-models with torsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorn, H.; Otto, H.J.

    1987-10-01

    We study the renormalization properties of the energy-momentum tensor in a σ-model with torsion. Our normal product version contains besides the classical expression and the trace anomaly an off diagonal term proportional to the squared torsion. Specialized to a group manifold this term is crucial to reproduce the correct perturbative expansion of the energy-momentum tensor in Sugawara form. (orig.)

  9. Dynamical analysis for a scalar-tensor model with Gauss-Bonnet and non-minimal couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granda, L.N.; Jimenez, D.F. [Universidad del Valle, Departamento de Fisica, Cali (Colombia)

    2017-10-15

    We study the autonomous system for a scalar-tensor model of dark energy with Gauss-Bonnet and non-minimal couplings. The critical points describe important stable asymptotic scenarios including quintessence, phantom and de Sitter attractor solutions. Two functional forms for the coupling functions and the scalar potential are considered: power-law and exponential functions of the scalar field. For the exponential functions the existence of stable quintessence, phantom or de Sitter solutions, allows for an asymptotic behavior where the effective Newtonian coupling becomes constant. The phantom solutions could be realized without appealing to ghost degrees of freedom. Transient inflationary and radiation-dominated phases can also be described. (orig.)

  10. Modeling Atmospheric Turbulence via Rapid Distortion Theory: Spectral Tensor of Velocity and Buoyancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, Abhijit S.; Mann, Jakob; Kelly, Mark C.

    2017-01-01

    A spectral tensor model is presented for turbulent fluctuations of wind velocity components and temperature, assuming uniform vertical gradients in mean temperature and mean wind speed. The model is built upon rapid distortion theory (RDT) following studies by Mann and by Hanazaki and Hunt, using...... the eddy lifetime parameterization of Mann to make the model stationary. The buoyant spectral tensor model is driven via five parameters: the viscous dissipation rate epsilon, length scale of energy-containing eddies L, a turbulence anisotropy parameter Gamma, gradient Richardson number (Ri) representing...

  11. Comparison of Multi-Tensor Diffusion Models' Performance for White Matter Integrity Estimation in Chronic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena G. Filatova

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Better insight into white matter (WM alterations after stroke onset could help to understand the underlying recovery mechanisms and improve future interventions. MR diffusion imaging enables to assess such changes. Our goal was to investigate the relation of WM diffusion characteristics derived from diffusion models of increasing complexity with the motor function of the upper limb. Moreover, we aimed to evaluate the variation of such characteristics across different WM structures of chronic stroke patients in comparison to healthy subjects. Subjects were scanned with a two b-value diffusion-weighted MRI protocol to exploit multiple diffusion models: single tensor, single tensor with isotropic compartment, bi-tensor model, bi-tensor with isotropic compartment. From each model we derived the mean tract fractional anisotropy (FA, mean (MD, radial (RD and axial (AD diffusivities outside the lesion site based on a WM tracts atlas. Asymmetry of these measures was correlated with the Fugl-Meyer upper extremity assessment (FMA score and compared between patient and control groups. Eighteen chronic stroke patients and eight age-matched healthy individuals participated in the study. Significant correlation of the outcome measures with the clinical scores of stroke recovery was found. The lowest correlation of the corticospinal tract FAasymmetry and FMA was with the single tensor model (r = −0.3, p = 0.2 whereas the other models reported results in the range of r = −0.79 ÷ −0.81 and p = 4E-5 ÷ 8E-5. The corticospinal tract and superior longitudinal fasciculus showed most alterations in our patient group relative to controls. Multiple compartment models yielded superior correlation of the diffusion measures and FMA compared to the single tensor model.

  12. A review of anisotropic conductivity models of brain white matter based on diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhanxiong; Liu, Yang; Hong, Ming; Yu, Xiaohui

    2018-06-01

    The conductivity of brain tissues is not only essential for electromagnetic source estimation (ESI), but also a key reflector of the brain functional changes. Different from the other brain tissues, the conductivity of whiter matter (WM) is highly anisotropic and a tensor is needed to describe it. The traditional electrical property imaging methods, such as electrical impedance tomography (EIT) and magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT), usually fail to image the anisotropic conductivity tensor of WM with high spatial resolution. The diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a newly developed technique that can fulfill this purpose. This paper reviews the existing anisotropic conductivity models of WM based on the DTI and discusses their advantages and disadvantages, as well as identifies opportunities for future research on this subject. It is crucial to obtain the linear conversion coefficient between the eigenvalues of anisotropic conductivity tensor and diffusion tensor, since they share the same eigenvectors. We conclude that the electrochemical model is suitable for ESI analysis because the conversion coefficient can be directly obtained from the concentration of ions in extracellular liquid and that the volume fraction model is appropriate to study the influence of WM structural changes on electrical conductivity. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  13. TensorLy: Tensor Learning in Python

    OpenAIRE

    Kossaifi, Jean; Panagakis, Yannis; Pantic, Maja

    2016-01-01

    Tensors are higher-order extensions of matrices. While matrix methods form the cornerstone of machine learning and data analysis, tensor methods have been gaining increasing traction. However, software support for tensor operations is not on the same footing. In order to bridge this gap, we have developed \\emph{TensorLy}, a high-level API for tensor methods and deep tensorized neural networks in Python. TensorLy aims to follow the same standards adopted by the main projects of the Python scie...

  14. Constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio for non-power-law models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vázquez, J. Alberto; Bridges, M.; Ma, Yin-Zhe; Hobson, M.P.

    2013-01-01

    Recent cosmological observations hint at a deviation from the simple power-law form of the primordial spectrum of curvature perturbations. In this paper we show that in the presence of a tensor component, a turn-over in the initial spectrum is preferred by current observations, and hence non-power-law models ought to be considered. For instance, for a power-law parameterisation with both a tensor component and running parameter, current data show a preference for a negative running at more than 2.5σ C.L. As a consequence of this deviation from a power-law, constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio r are slightly broader. We also present constraints on the inflationary parameters for a model-independent reconstruction and the Lasenby and Doran (LD) model. In particular, the constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio from the LD model are: r LD = 0.11±0.024. In addition to current data, we show expected constraints from Planck-like and CMB-Pol sensitivity experiments by using Markov-Chain-Monte-Carlo sampling chains. For all the models, we have included the Bayesian Evidence to perform a model selection analysis. The Bayes factor, using current observations, shows a strong preference for the LD model over the standard power-law parameterisation, and provides an insight into the accuracy of differentiating models through future surveys

  15. Direct diffusion tensor estimation using a model-based method with spatial and parametric constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanjie; Peng, Xi; Wu, Yin; Wu, Ed X; Ying, Leslie; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Hairong; Liang, Dong

    2017-02-01

    To develop a new model-based method with spatial and parametric constraints (MB-SPC) aimed at accelerating diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) by directly estimating the diffusion tensor from highly undersampled k-space data. The MB-SPC method effectively incorporates the prior information on the joint sparsity of different diffusion-weighted images using an L1-L2 norm and the smoothness of the diffusion tensor using a total variation seminorm. The undersampled k-space datasets were obtained from fully sampled DTI datasets of a simulated phantom and an ex-vivo experimental rat heart with acceleration factors ranging from 2 to 4. The diffusion tensor was directly reconstructed by solving a minimization problem with a nonlinear conjugate gradient descent algorithm. The reconstruction performance was quantitatively assessed using the normalized root mean square error (nRMSE) of the DTI indices. The MB-SPC method achieves acceptable DTI measures at an acceleration factor up to 4. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can estimate the diffusion tensor more accurately than most existing methods operating at higher net acceleration factors. The proposed method can significantly reduce artifact, particularly at higher acceleration factors or lower SNRs. This method can easily be adapted to MR relaxometry parameter mapping and is thus useful in the characterization of biological tissue such as nerves, muscle, and heart tissue. © 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  16. Higgs mass range from standard model false vacuum inflation in scalar-tensor gravity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masina, I.; Notari, A.

    2012-01-01

    If the standard model is valid up to very high energies it is known that the Higgs potential can develop a local minimum at field values around 10(15)-10(17) GeV, for a narrow band of values of the top quark and Higgs masses. We show that in a scalar-tensor theory of gravity such Higgs false vacu....... This prediction could be soon tested at the Large Hadron Collider. Our inflationary scenario could also be further checked by better constraining the spectral index and the tensor-to-scalar ratio....

  17. The π and Tensor Vacuum Susceptibilities from the Global Color Symmetry Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONG Hong-Shi; PING Jia-Lun; YANG Hong-Ting; LU Xiao-Fu; WANG Fan

    2002-01-01

    A modified method for calculating the nonperturbative quark vacuum condensates from the global color symmetry model is derived. Within this approach it is shown that the treatment of quark vacuum condensates is different from that in the previous studies. As a special case we calculate the π and tensor vacuum susceptibilities. A comparison with the results of the other nonperturbative QCD approaches is given.

  18. Implementation of an anisotropic damage material model using general second order damage tensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niazi, Muhammad Sohail; Mori, K.; Wisselink, H.H.; Pietrzyk, M.; Kusiak, J.; Meinders, Vincent T.; ten Horn, Carel; Majta, J.; Hartley, P.; Lin, J.

    2010-01-01

    Damage in metals is mainly the process of the initiation and growth of voids. With the growing complexity in materials and forming proc-esses, it becomes inevitable to include anisotropy in damage (tensorial damage variable). Most of the anisotropic damage models define the damage tensor in the

  19. Standard model false vacuum inflation: correlating the tensor-to-scalar ratio to the top quark and Higgs boson masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masina, Isabella; Notari, Alessio

    2012-05-11

    For a narrow band of values of the top quark and Higgs boson masses, the standard model Higgs potential develops a false minimum at energies of about 10(16)  GeV, where primordial inflation could have started in a cold metastable state. A graceful exit to a radiation-dominated era is provided, e.g., by scalar-tensor gravity models. We pointed out that if inflation happened in this false minimum, the Higgs boson mass has to be in the range 126.0±3.5  GeV, where ATLAS and CMS subsequently reported excesses of events. Here we show that for these values of the Higgs boson mass, the inflationary gravitational wave background has be discovered with a tensor-to-scalar ratio at hand of future experiments. We suggest that combining cosmological observations with measurements of the top quark and Higgs boson masses represent a further test of the hypothesis that the standard model false minimum was the source of inflation in the universe.

  20. The service dominant business model : a service focused conceptualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lüftenegger, E.R.; Comuzzi, M.; Grefen, P.W.P.J.; Weisleder, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    Existing approaches on business model tools are constrained by the goods dominant way of doing business. Nowadays, the shift from goods based approaches towards a service dominant strategy requires novel business model tools specially focused for service business. In this report we present the

  1. Reliable Dual Tensor Model Estimation in Single and Crossing Fibers Based on Jeffreys Prior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianfei; Poot, Dirk H. J.; Caan, Matthan W. A.; Su, Tanja; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.; van Vliet, Lucas J.; Vos, Frans M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This paper presents and studies a framework for reliable modeling of diffusion MRI using a data-acquisition adaptive prior. Methods Automated relevance determination estimates the mean of the posterior distribution of a rank-2 dual tensor model exploiting Jeffreys prior (JARD). This data-acquisition prior is based on the Fisher information matrix and enables the assessment whether two tensors are mandatory to describe the data. The method is compared to Maximum Likelihood Estimation (MLE) of the dual tensor model and to FSL’s ball-and-stick approach. Results Monte Carlo experiments demonstrated that JARD’s volume fractions correlated well with the ground truth for single and crossing fiber configurations. In single fiber configurations JARD automatically reduced the volume fraction of one compartment to (almost) zero. The variance in fractional anisotropy (FA) of the main tensor component was thereby reduced compared to MLE. JARD and MLE gave a comparable outcome in data simulating crossing fibers. On brain data, JARD yielded a smaller spread in FA along the corpus callosum compared to MLE. Tract-based spatial statistics demonstrated a higher sensitivity in detecting age-related white matter atrophy using JARD compared to both MLE and the ball-and-stick approach. Conclusions The proposed framework offers accurate and precise estimation of diffusion properties in single and dual fiber regions. PMID:27760166

  2. Microseismic Full Waveform Modeling in Anisotropic Media with Moment Tensor Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Peidong; Angus, Doug; Nowacki, Andy; Yuan, Sanyi; Wang, Yanyan

    2018-03-01

    Seismic anisotropy which is common in shale and fractured rocks will cause travel-time and amplitude discrepancy in different propagation directions. For microseismic monitoring which is often implemented in shale or fractured rocks, seismic anisotropy needs to be carefully accounted for in source location and mechanism determination. We have developed an efficient finite-difference full waveform modeling tool with an arbitrary moment tensor source. The modeling tool is suitable for simulating wave propagation in anisotropic media for microseismic monitoring. As both dislocation and non-double-couple source are often observed in microseismic monitoring, an arbitrary moment tensor source is implemented in our forward modeling tool. The increments of shear stress are equally distributed on the staggered grid to implement an accurate and symmetric moment tensor source. Our modeling tool provides an efficient way to obtain the Green's function in anisotropic media, which is the key of anisotropic moment tensor inversion and source mechanism characterization in microseismic monitoring. In our research, wavefields in anisotropic media have been carefully simulated and analyzed in both surface array and downhole array. The variation characteristics of travel-time and amplitude of direct P- and S-wave in vertical transverse isotropic media and horizontal transverse isotropic media are distinct, thus providing a feasible way to distinguish and identify the anisotropic type of the subsurface. Analyzing the travel-times and amplitudes of the microseismic data is a feasible way to estimate the orientation and density of the induced cracks in hydraulic fracturing. Our anisotropic modeling tool can be used to generate and analyze microseismic full wavefield with full moment tensor source in anisotropic media, which can help promote the anisotropic interpretation and inversion of field data.

  3. Spectral tensor parameters for wind turbine load modeling from forested and agricultural landscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, Abhijit S.; Mann, Jakob; Segalini, A.

    2015-01-01

    A velocity spectral tensor model was evaluated from the single-point measurements of wind speed. The model contains three parameters representing the dissipation rate of specific turbulent kinetic energy, a turbulence length scale and the turbulence anisotropy. Sonic anemometer measurements taken...... was better than that of the cross-wind component. No significant difference was found between the performance of the model at the forested and the agricultural areas. © 2014 The Authors. Wind Energy published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  4. Charged black holes in a generalized scalar–tensor gravity model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Brihaye

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We study 4-dimensional charged and static black holes in a generalized scalar–tensor gravity model, in which a shift symmetry for the scalar field exists. For vanishing scalar field the solution corresponds to the Reissner–Nordström (RN solution, while solutions of the full scalar-gravity model have to be constructed numerically. We demonstrate that these black holes support Galilean scalar hair up to a maximal value of the scalar–tensor coupling that depends on the value of the charge and can be up to roughly twice as large as that for uncharged solutions. The Hawking temperature TH of the hairy black holes at maximal scalar–tensor coupling decreases continuously with the increase of the charge and reaches TH=0 for the highest possible charge that these solutions can carry. However, in this limit, the scalar–tensor coupling needs to vanish. The limiting solution hence corresponds to the extremal RN solution, which does not support regular Galilean scalar hair due to its AdS2×S2 near-horizon geometry.

  5. 2PI effective action for the SYK model and tensor field theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Dario; Gurau, Razvan

    2018-05-01

    We discuss the two-particle irreducible (2PI) effective action for the SYK model and for tensor field theories. For the SYK model the 2PI effective action reproduces the bilocal reformulation of the model without using replicas. In general tensor field theories the 2PI formalism is the only way to obtain a bilocal reformulation of the theory, and as such is a precious instrument for the identification of soft modes and for possible holographic interpretations. We compute the 2PI action for several models, and push it up to fourth order in the 1 /N expansion for the model proposed by Witten in [1], uncovering a one-loop structure in terms of an auxiliary bilocal action.

  6. The tensor distribution function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leow, A D; Zhu, S; Zhan, L; McMahon, K; de Zubicaray, G I; Meredith, M; Wright, M J; Toga, A W; Thompson, P M

    2009-01-01

    Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging is a powerful tool that can be employed to study white matter microstructure by examining the 3D displacement profile of water molecules in brain tissue. By applying diffusion-sensitized gradients along a minimum of six directions, second-order tensors (represented by three-by-three positive definite matrices) can be computed to model dominant diffusion processes. However, conventional DTI is not sufficient to resolve more complicated white matter configurations, e.g., crossing fiber tracts. Recently, a number of high-angular resolution schemes with more than six gradient directions have been employed to address this issue. In this article, we introduce the tensor distribution function (TDF), a probability function defined on the space of symmetric positive definite matrices. Using the calculus of variations, we solve the TDF that optimally describes the observed data. Here, fiber crossing is modeled as an ensemble of Gaussian diffusion processes with weights specified by the TDF. Once this optimal TDF is determined, the orientation distribution function (ODF) can easily be computed by analytic integration of the resulting displacement probability function. Moreover, a tensor orientation distribution function (TOD) may also be derived from the TDF, allowing for the estimation of principal fiber directions and their corresponding eigenvalues.

  7. A4 see-saw models and form dominance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, M-C; King, Stephen F.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce the idea of Form Dominance in the (type I) see-saw mechanism, according to which a particular right-handed neutrino mass eigenstate is associated with a particular physical neutrino mass eigenstate, leading to a form diagonalizable effective neutrino mass matrix. Form Dominance, which allows an arbitrary neutrino mass spectrum, may be regarded as a generalization of Constrained Sequential Dominance which only allows strongly hierarchical neutrino masses. We consider alternative implementations of the see-saw mechanism in minimal A 4 see-saw models and show that such models satisfy Form Dominance, leading to neutrino mass sum rules which predict closely spaced neutrino masses with a normal or inverted neutrino mass ordering. To avoid the partial cancellations inherent in such models we propose Natural Form Dominance, in which a different flavon is associated with each physical neutrino mass eigenstate.

  8. A model for soft high-energy scattering: Tensor pomeron and vector odderon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewerz, Carlo, E-mail: C.Ewerz@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstraße 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Maniatis, Markos, E-mail: mmaniatis@ubiobio.cl [Departamento de Ciencias Básicas, Universidad del Bío-Bío, Avda. Andrés Bello s/n, Casilla 447, Chillán 3780000 (Chile); Nachtmann, Otto, E-mail: O.Nachtmann@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    A model for soft high-energy scattering is developed. The model is formulated in terms of effective propagators and vertices for the exchange objects: the pomeron, the odderon, and the reggeons. The vertices are required to respect standard rules of QFT. The propagators are constructed taking into account the crossing properties of amplitudes in QFT and the power-law ansätze from the Regge model. We propose to describe the pomeron as an effective spin 2 exchange. This tensor pomeron gives, at high energies, the same results for the pp and pp{sup -bar} elastic amplitudes as the standard Donnachie–Landshoff pomeron. But with our tensor pomeron it is much more natural to write down effective vertices of all kinds which respect the rules of QFT. This is particularly clear for the coupling of the pomeron to particles carrying spin, for instance vector mesons. We describe the odderon as an effective vector exchange. We emphasise that with a tensor pomeron and a vector odderon the corresponding charge-conjugation relations are automatically fulfilled. We compare the model to some experimental data, in particular to data for the total cross sections, in order to determine the model parameters. The model should provide a starting point for a general framework for describing soft high-energy reactions. It should give to experimentalists an easily manageable tool for calculating amplitudes for such reactions and for obtaining predictions which can be compared in detail with data. -- Highlights: •A general model for soft high-energy hadron scattering is developed. •The pomeron is described as effective tensor exchange. •Explicit expressions for effective reggeon–particle vertices are given. •Reggeon–particle and particle–particle vertices are related. •All vertices respect the standard C parity and crossing rules of QFT.

  9. Gene therapy in animal models of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossmiller, Brian; Mao, Haoyu

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy for dominantly inherited genetic disease is more difficult than gene-based therapy for recessive disorders, which can be treated with gene supplementation. Treatment of dominant disease may require gene supplementation partnered with suppression of the expression of the mutant gene either at the DNA level, by gene repair, or at the RNA level by RNA interference or transcriptional repression. In this review, we examine some of the gene delivery approaches used to treat animal models of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa, focusing on those models associated with mutations in the gene for rhodopsin. We conclude that combinatorial approaches have the greatest promise for success. PMID:23077406

  10. Performance of unscented Kalman filter tractography in edema: Analysis of the two-tensor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ruizhi; Ning, Lipeng; Chen, Zhenrui; Rigolo, Laura; Gong, Shun; Pasternak, Ofer; Golby, Alexandra J; Rathi, Yogesh; O'Donnell, Lauren J

    2017-01-01

    Diffusion MRI tractography is increasingly used in pre-operative neurosurgical planning to visualize critical fiber tracts. However, a major challenge for conventional tractography, especially in patients with brain tumors, is tracing fiber tracts that are affected by vasogenic edema, which increases water content in the tissue and lowers diffusion anisotropy. One strategy for improving fiber tracking is to use a tractography method that is more sensitive than the traditional single-tensor streamline tractography. We performed experiments to assess the performance of two-tensor unscented Kalman filter (UKF) tractography in edema. UKF tractography fits a diffusion model to the data during fiber tracking, taking advantage of prior information from the previous step along the fiber. We studied UKF performance in a synthetic diffusion MRI digital phantom with simulated edema and in retrospective data from two neurosurgical patients with edema affecting the arcuate fasciculus and corticospinal tracts. We compared the performance of several tractography methods including traditional streamline, UKF single-tensor, and UKF two-tensor. To provide practical guidance on how the UKF method could be employed, we evaluated the impact of using various seed regions both inside and outside the edematous regions, as well as the impact of parameter settings on the tractography sensitivity. We quantified the sensitivity of different methods by measuring the percentage of the patient-specific fMRI activation that was reached by the tractography. We expected that diffusion anisotropy threshold parameters, as well as the inclusion of a free water model, would significantly influence the reconstruction of edematous WM fiber tracts, because edema increases water content in the tissue and lowers anisotropy. Contrary to our initial expectations, varying the fractional anisotropy threshold and including a free water model did not affect the UKF two-tensor tractography output appreciably in

  11. Anisotropic Bulk Viscous String Cosmological Model in a Scalar-Tensor Theory of Gravitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. K. Reddy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spatially homogeneous, anisotropic, and tilted Bianchi type-VI0 model is investigated in a new scalar-tensor theory of gravitation proposed by Saez and Ballester (1986 when the source for energy momentum tensor is a bulk viscous fluid containing one-dimensional cosmic strings. Exact solution of the highly nonlinear field equations is obtained using the following plausible physical conditions: (i scalar expansion of the space-time which is proportional to the shear scalar, (ii the barotropic equations of state for pressure and energy density, and (iii a special law of variation for Hubble’s parameter proposed by Berman (1983. Some physical and kinematical properties of the model are also discussed.

  12. Visualizing Dataflow Graphs of Deep Learning Models in TensorFlow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsuphasawat, Kanit; Smilkov, Daniel; Wexler, James; Wilson, Jimbo; Mane, Dandelion; Fritz, Doug; Krishnan, Dilip; Viegas, Fernanda B; Wattenberg, Martin

    2018-01-01

    We present a design study of the TensorFlow Graph Visualizer, part of the TensorFlow machine intelligence platform. This tool helps users understand complex machine learning architectures by visualizing their underlying dataflow graphs. The tool works by applying a series of graph transformations that enable standard layout techniques to produce a legible interactive diagram. To declutter the graph, we decouple non-critical nodes from the layout. To provide an overview, we build a clustered graph using the hierarchical structure annotated in the source code. To support exploration of nested structure on demand, we perform edge bundling to enable stable and responsive cluster expansion. Finally, we detect and highlight repeated structures to emphasize a model's modular composition. To demonstrate the utility of the visualizer, we describe example usage scenarios and report user feedback. Overall, users find the visualizer useful for understanding, debugging, and sharing the structures of their models.

  13. Genomic Model with Correlation Between Additive and Dominance Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Tao; Christensen, Ole Fredslund; Vitezica, Zulma Gladis; Legarra, Andres

    2018-05-09

    Dominance genetic effects are rarely included in pedigree-based genetic evaluation. With the availability of single nucleotide polymorphism markers and the development of genomic evaluation, estimates of dominance genetic effects have become feasible using genomic best linear unbiased prediction (GBLUP). Usually, studies involving additive and dominance genetic effects ignore possible relationships between them. It has been often suggested that the magnitude of functional additive and dominance effects at the quantitative trait loci are related, but there is no existing GBLUP-like approach accounting for such correlation. Wellmann and Bennewitz showed two ways of considering directional relationships between additive and dominance effects, which they estimated in a Bayesian framework. However, these relationships cannot be fitted at the level of individuals instead of loci in a mixed model and are not compatible with standard animal or plant breeding software. This comes from a fundamental ambiguity in assigning the reference allele at a given locus. We show that, if there has been selection, assigning the most frequent as the reference allele orients the correlation between functional additive and dominance effects. As a consequence, the most frequent reference allele is expected to have a positive value. We also demonstrate that selection creates negative covariance between genotypic additive and dominance genetic values. For parameter estimation, it is possible to use a combined additive and dominance relationship matrix computed from marker genotypes, and to use standard restricted maximum likelihood (REML) algorithms based on an equivalent model. Through a simulation study, we show that such correlations can easily be estimated by mixed model software and accuracy of prediction for genetic values is slightly improved if such correlations are used in GBLUP. However, a model assuming uncorrelated effects and fitting orthogonal breeding values and dominant

  14. Emerging trends in evolving networks: Recent behaviour dominant and non-dominant model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Khushnood; Shang, Mingsheng; Luo, Xin; Abbasi, Alireza

    2017-10-01

    Novel phenomenon receives similar attention as popular one. Therefore predicting novelty is as important as popularity. Emergence is the side effect of competition and ageing in evolving systems. Recent behaviour or recent link gain in networks plays an important role in emergence. We exploited this wisdom and came up with two models considering different scenarios and systems. Where recent behaviour dominates over total behaviour (total link gain) in the first one, and recent behaviour is as important as total behaviour for future link gain in the second one. It supposes that random walker walks on a network and can jump to any node, the probability of jumping or making a connection to other node is based on which node is recently more active or receiving more links. In our assumption, the random walker can also jump to the node which is already popular but recently not popular. We are able to predict emerging nodes which are generally suppressed under preferential attachment effect. To show the performance of our model we have conducted experiments on four real data sets namely, MovieLens, Netflix, Facebook and Arxiv High Energy Physics paper citation. For testing our model we used four information retrieval indices namely Precision, Novelty, Area Under Receiving Operating Characteristic (AUC) and Kendal's rank correlation coefficient. We have used four benchmark models for validating our proposed models. Although our model does not perform better in all the cases but, it has theoretical significance in working better for recent behaviour dominated systems.

  15. Irreducible integrable theories form tensor products of conformal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, S.D.; Warner, N.P.

    1991-01-01

    By using Toda field theories we show that there are perturbations of direct products of conformal theories that lead to irreducible integrable field theories. The same affine Toda theory can be truncated to different quantum integrable models for different choices of the charge at infinity and the coupling. The classification of integrable models that can be obtained in this fashion follows the classification of symmetric spaces of type G/H with rank H = rank G. (orig.)

  16. Determining Predictor Importance in Hierarchical Linear Models Using Dominance Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wen; Azen, Razia

    2013-01-01

    Dominance analysis (DA) is a method used to evaluate the relative importance of predictors that was originally proposed for linear regression models. This article proposes an extension of DA that allows researchers to determine the relative importance of predictors in hierarchical linear models (HLM). Commonly used measures of model adequacy in…

  17. Modelling Dominance Hierarchies Under Winner and Loser Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kura, Klodeta; Broom, Mark; Kandler, Anne

    2015-06-01

    Animals that live in groups commonly form themselves into dominance hierarchies which are used to allocate important resources such as access to mating opportunities and food. In this paper, we develop a model of dominance hierarchy formation based upon the concept of winner and loser effects using a simulation-based model and consider the linearity of our hierarchy using existing and new statistical measures. Two models are analysed: when each individual in a group does not know the real ability of their opponents to win a fight and when they can estimate their opponents' ability every time they fight. This estimation may be accurate or fall within an error bound. For both models, we investigate if we can achieve hierarchy linearity, and if so, when it is established. We are particularly interested in the question of how many fights are necessary to establish a dominance hierarchy.

  18. Structure of Pioncare covariant tensor operators in quantum mechanical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyzou, W.N.; Klink, W.H.

    1988-01-01

    The structure of operators that transform covariantly in Poincare invariant quantum mechanical models is analyzed. These operators are shown to have an interaction dependence that comes from the geometry of the Poincare group. The operators can be expressed in terms of matrix elements in a complete set of eigenstates of the mass and spin operators associated with the dynamical representation of the Poincare group. The matrix elements are factored into geometrical coefficients (Clebsch--Gordan coefficients for the Poincare group) and invariant matrix elements. The geometrical coefficients are fixed by the transformation properties of the operator and the eigenvalue spectrum of the mass and spin. The invariant matrix elements, which distinguish between different operators with the same transformation properties, are given in terms of a set of invariant form factors. copyright 1988 Academic Press, Inc

  19. Two-dimensional NMR measurement and point dipole model prediction of paramagnetic shift tensors in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walder, Brennan J.; Davis, Michael C.; Grandinetti, Philip J. [Department of Chemistry, Ohio State University, 100 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Dey, Krishna K. [Department of Physics, Dr. H. S. Gour University, Sagar, Madhya Pradesh 470003 (India); Baltisberger, Jay H. [Division of Natural Science, Mathematics, and Nursing, Berea College, Berea, Kentucky 40403 (United States)

    2015-01-07

    A new two-dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiment to separate and correlate the first-order quadrupolar and chemical/paramagnetic shift interactions is described. This experiment, which we call the shifting-d echo experiment, allows a more precise determination of tensor principal components values and their relative orientation. It is designed using the recently introduced symmetry pathway concept. A comparison of the shifting-d experiment with earlier proposed methods is presented and experimentally illustrated in the case of {sup 2}H (I = 1) paramagnetic shift and quadrupolar tensors of CuCl{sub 2}⋅2D{sub 2}O. The benefits of the shifting-d echo experiment over other methods are a factor of two improvement in sensitivity and the suppression of major artifacts. From the 2D lineshape analysis of the shifting-d spectrum, the {sup 2}H quadrupolar coupling parameters are 〈C{sub q}〉 = 118.1 kHz and 〈η{sub q}〉 = 0.88, and the {sup 2}H paramagnetic shift tensor anisotropy parameters are 〈ζ{sub P}〉 = − 152.5 ppm and 〈η{sub P}〉 = 0.91. The orientation of the quadrupolar coupling principal axis system (PAS) relative to the paramagnetic shift anisotropy principal axis system is given by (α,β,γ)=((π)/2 ,(π)/2 ,0). Using a simple ligand hopping model, the tensor parameters in the absence of exchange are estimated. On the basis of this analysis, the instantaneous principal components and orientation of the quadrupolar coupling are found to be in excellent agreement with previous measurements. A new point dipole model for predicting the paramagnetic shift tensor is proposed yielding significantly better agreement than previously used models. In the new model, the dipoles are displaced from nuclei at positions associated with high electron density in the singly occupied molecular orbital predicted from ligand field theory.

  20. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging driven growth modeling for radiotherapy target definition in glioblastoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten B; Guldberg, Trine L; Harbøll, Anja

    2017-01-01

    the microscopic tumor cell spread. Gliomas favor spread along the white matter fiber tracts. Tumor growth models incorporating the MRI diffusion tensors (DTI) allow to account more consistently for the glioma growth. The aim of the study was to investigate the potential of a DTI driven growth model to improve...... target definition in glioblastoma (GBM). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eleven GBM patients were scanned using T1w, T2w FLAIR, T1w + Gd and DTI. The brain was segmented into white matter, gray matter and cerebrospinal fluid. The Fisher-Kolmogorov growth model was used assuming uniform proliferation...

  1. Benefits of dominance over additive models for the estimation of average effects in the presence of dominance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duenk, Pascal; Calus, Mario P.L.; Wientjes, Yvonne C.J.; Bijma, Piter

    2017-01-01

    In quantitative genetics, the average effect at a single locus can be estimated by an additive (A) model, or an additive plus dominance (AD) model. In the presence of dominance, the AD-model is expected to be more accurate, because the A-model falsely assumes that residuals are independent and

  2. Tensor Product Model Transformation Based Adaptive Integral-Sliding Mode Controller: Equivalent Control Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoliang Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes new methodologies for the design of adaptive integral-sliding mode control. A tensor product model transformation based adaptive integral-sliding mode control law with respect to uncertainties and perturbations is studied, while upper bounds on the perturbations and uncertainties are assumed to be unknown. The advantage of proposed controllers consists in having a dynamical adaptive control gain to establish a sliding mode right at the beginning of the process. Gain dynamics ensure a reasonable adaptive gain with respect to the uncertainties. Finally, efficacy of the proposed controller is verified by simulations on an uncertain nonlinear system model.

  3. Modeling cellular networks in fading environments with dominant specular components

    KAUST Repository

    Alammouri, Ahmad; Elsawy, Hesham; Salem, Ahmed Sultan; Di Renzo, Marco; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2016-01-01

    to the Nakagami-m fading in some special cases. However, neither the Rayleigh nor the Nakagami-m accounts for dominant specular components (DSCs) which may appear in realistic fading channels. In this paper, we present a tractable model for cellular networks

  4. The Dominance of the Agency Model on Financing Decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bramantyo Djohanputro

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available There are some issues about how companies consider their financing. These issues are related to the amount, source, type, and the structure of such financing. So far, there is no uniform model that is able to explain how companies deal with these issues. There are three competing, dominant theories of financing decision making, i.e. the Pecking Order Theory, the Static Trade-off Theory, and the Agency Model Theory. This study attempts to explore which theory explains the best way for companies in the consumer industry to decide their financing method. There are five hypotheses to be tested in this study. Using data from public listed companies on the Indonesian Stock Exchange from 2008 to 2011, it seems that the Agency Model Theory is more dominant than the other two theories in explaining the way companies fulfill their financing needs.

  5. Tensor surgery and tensor rank

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Christandl (Matthias); J. Zuiddam (Jeroen)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractWe introduce a method for transforming low-order tensors into higher-order tensors and apply it to tensors defined by graphs and hypergraphs. The transformation proceeds according to a surgery-like procedure that splits vertices, creates and absorbs virtual edges and inserts new vertices

  6. Tensor surgery and tensor rank

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Christandl (Matthias); J. Zuiddam (Jeroen)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractWe introduce a method for transforming low-order tensors into higher-order tensors and apply it to tensors defined by graphs and hypergraphs. The transformation proceeds according to a surgery-like procedure that splits vertices, creates and absorbs virtual edges and inserts new

  7. Spectral Elements Analysis for Viscoelastic Fluids at High Weissenberg Number Using Logarithmic conformation Tensor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Azadeh; Deville, Michel O.; Fiétier, Nicolas

    2008-09-01

    This study discusses the capability of the constitutive laws for the matrix logarithm of the conformation tensor (LCT model) within the framework of the spectral elements method. The high Weissenberg number problems (HWNP) usually produce a lack of convergence of the numerical algorithms. Even though the question whether the HWNP is a purely numerical problem or rather a breakdown of the constitutive law of the model has remained somewhat of a mystery, it has been recognized that the selection of an appropriate constitutive equation constitutes a very crucial step although implementing a suitable numerical technique is still important for successful discrete modeling of non-Newtonian flows. The LCT model formulation of the viscoelastic equations originally suggested by Fattal and Kupferman is applied for 2-dimensional (2D) FENE-CR model. The Planar Poiseuille flow is considered as a benchmark problem to test this representation at high Weissenberg number. The numerical results are compared with numerical solution of the standard constitutive equation.

  8. The scalar-scalar-tensor inflationary three-point function in the axion monodromy model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Debika; Sreenath, V.; Sriramkumar, L.

    2016-11-01

    The axion monodromy model involves a canonical scalar field that is governed by a linear potential with superimposed modulations. The modulations in the potential are responsible for a resonant behavior which gives rise to persisting oscillations in the scalar and, to a smaller extent, in the tensor power spectra. Interestingly, such spectra have been shown to lead to an improved fit to the cosmological data than the more conventional, nearly scale invariant, primordial power spectra. The scalar bi-spectrum in the model too exhibits continued modulations and the resonance is known to boost the amplitude of the scalar non-Gaussianity parameter to rather large values. An analytical expression for the scalar bi-spectrum had been arrived at earlier which, in fact, has been used to compare the model with the cosmic microwave background anisotropies at the level of three-point functions involving scalars. In this work, with future applications in mind, we arrive at a similar analytical template for the scalar-scalar-tensor cross-correlation. We also analytically establish the consistency relation (in the squeezed limit) for this three-point function. We conclude with a summary of the main results obtained.

  9. The scalar-scalar-tensor inflationary three-point function in the axion monodromy model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, Debika; Sriramkumar, L.; Sreenath, V.

    2016-01-01

    The axion monodromy model involves a canonical scalar field that is governed by a linear potential with superimposed modulations. The modulations in the potential are responsible for a resonant behavior which gives rise to persisting oscillations in the scalar and, to a smaller extent, in the tensor power spectra. Interestingly, such spectra have been shown to lead to an improved fit to the cosmological data than the more conventional, nearly scale invariant, primordial power spectra. The scalar bi-spectrum in the model too exhibits continued modulations and the resonance is known to boost the amplitude of the scalar non-Gaussianity parameter to rather large values. An analytical expression for the scalar bi-spectrum had been arrived at earlier which, in fact, has been used to compare the model with the cosmic microwave background anisotropies at the level of three-point functions involving scalars. In this work, with future applications in mind, we arrive at a similar analytical template for the scalar-scalar-tensor cross-correlation. We also analytically establish the consistency relation (in the squeezed limit) for this three-point function. We conclude with a summary of the main results obtained.

  10. Benefits of Dominance over Additive Models for the Estimation of Average Effects in the Presence of Dominance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Duenk

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In quantitative genetics, the average effect at a single locus can be estimated by an additive (A model, or an additive plus dominance (AD model. In the presence of dominance, the AD-model is expected to be more accurate, because the A-model falsely assumes that residuals are independent and identically distributed. Our objective was to investigate the accuracy of an estimated average effect (α^ in the presence of dominance, using either a single locus A-model or AD-model. Estimation was based on a finite sample from a large population in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE, and the root mean squared error of α^ was calculated for several broad-sense heritabilities, sample sizes, and sizes of the dominance effect. Results show that with the A-model, both sampling deviations of genotype frequencies from HWE frequencies and sampling deviations of allele frequencies contributed to the error. With the AD-model, only sampling deviations of allele frequencies contributed to the error, provided that all three genotype classes were sampled. In the presence of dominance, the root mean squared error of α^ with the AD-model was always smaller than with the A-model, even when the heritability was less than one. Remarkably, in the absence of dominance, there was no disadvantage of fitting dominance. In conclusion, the AD-model yields more accurate estimates of average effects from a finite sample, because it is more robust against sampling deviations from HWE frequencies than the A-model. Genetic models that include dominance, therefore, yield higher accuracies of estimated average effects than purely additive models when dominance is present.

  11. Towards simplification of hydrologic modeling: Identification of dominant processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markstrom, Steven; Hay, Lauren E.; Clark, Martyn P.

    2016-01-01

    The Precipitation–Runoff Modeling System (PRMS), a distributed-parameter hydrologic model, has been applied to the conterminous US (CONUS). Parameter sensitivity analysis was used to identify: (1) the sensitive input parameters and (2) particular model output variables that could be associated with the dominant hydrologic process(es). Sensitivity values of 35 PRMS calibration parameters were computed using the Fourier amplitude sensitivity test procedure on 110 000 independent hydrologically based spatial modeling units covering the CONUS and then summarized to process (snowmelt, surface runoff, infiltration, soil moisture, evapotranspiration, interflow, baseflow, and runoff) and model performance statistic (mean, coefficient of variation, and autoregressive lag 1). Identified parameters and processes provide insight into model performance at the location of each unit and allow the modeler to identify the most dominant process on the basis of which processes are associated with the most sensitive parameters. The results of this study indicate that: (1) the choice of performance statistic and output variables has a strong influence on parameter sensitivity, (2) the apparent model complexity to the modeler can be reduced by focusing on those processes that are associated with sensitive parameters and disregarding those that are not, (3) different processes require different numbers of parameters for simulation, and (4) some sensitive parameters influence only one hydrologic process, while others may influence many

  12. Differences in Gaussian diffusion tensor imaging and non-Gaussian diffusion kurtosis imaging model-based estimates of diffusion tensor invariants in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzafame, S; Giannelli, M; Garaci, F; Floris, R; Duggento, A; Guerrisi, M; Toschi, N

    2016-05-01

    An increasing number of studies have aimed to compare diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-related parameters [e.g., mean diffusivity (MD), fractional anisotropy (FA), radial diffusivity (RD), and axial diffusivity (AD)] to complementary new indexes [e.g., mean kurtosis (MK)/radial kurtosis (RK)/axial kurtosis (AK)] derived through diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) in terms of their discriminative potential about tissue disease-related microstructural alterations. Given that the DTI and DKI models provide conceptually and quantitatively different estimates of the diffusion tensor, which can also depend on fitting routine, the aim of this study was to investigate model- and algorithm-dependent differences in MD/FA/RD/AD and anisotropy mode (MO) estimates in diffusion-weighted imaging of human brain white matter. The authors employed (a) data collected from 33 healthy subjects (20-59 yr, F: 15, M: 18) within the Human Connectome Project (HCP) on a customized 3 T scanner, and (b) data from 34 healthy subjects (26-61 yr, F: 5, M: 29) acquired on a clinical 3 T scanner. The DTI model was fitted to b-value =0 and b-value =1000 s/mm(2) data while the DKI model was fitted to data comprising b-value =0, 1000 and 3000/2500 s/mm(2) [for dataset (a)/(b), respectively] through nonlinear and weighted linear least squares algorithms. In addition to MK/RK/AK maps, MD/FA/MO/RD/AD maps were estimated from both models and both algorithms. Using tract-based spatial statistics, the authors tested the null hypothesis of zero difference between the two MD/FA/MO/RD/AD estimates in brain white matter for both datasets and both algorithms. DKI-derived MD/FA/RD/AD and MO estimates were significantly higher and lower, respectively, than corresponding DTI-derived estimates. All voxelwise differences extended over most of the white matter skeleton. Fractional differences between the two estimates [(DKI - DTI)/DTI] of most invariants were seen to vary with the invariant value itself as well as with MK

  13. Dark energy in scalar-tensor theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, J.

    2007-12-15

    We investigate several aspects of dynamical dark energy in the framework of scalar-tensor theories of gravity. We provide a classification of scalar-tensor coupling functions admitting cosmological scaling solutions. In particular, we recover that Brans-Dicke theory with inverse power-law potential allows for a sequence of background dominated scaling regime and scalar field dominated, accelerated expansion. Furthermore, we compare minimally and non-minimally coupled models, with respect to the small redshift evolution of the dark energy equation of state. We discuss the possibility to discriminate between different models by a reconstruction of the equation-of-state parameter from available observational data. The non-minimal coupling characterizing scalar-tensor models can - in specific cases - alleviate fine tuning problems, which appear if (minimally coupled) quintessence is required to mimic a cosmological constant. Finally, we perform a phase-space analysis of a family of biscalar-tensor models characterized by a specific type of {sigma}-model metric, including two examples from recent literature. In particular, we generalize an axion-dilaton model of Sonner and Townsend, incorporating a perfect fluid background consisting of (dark) matter and radiation. (orig.)

  14. Dark energy in scalar-tensor theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, J.

    2007-12-01

    We investigate several aspects of dynamical dark energy in the framework of scalar-tensor theories of gravity. We provide a classification of scalar-tensor coupling functions admitting cosmological scaling solutions. In particular, we recover that Brans-Dicke theory with inverse power-law potential allows for a sequence of background dominated scaling regime and scalar field dominated, accelerated expansion. Furthermore, we compare minimally and non-minimally coupled models, with respect to the small redshift evolution of the dark energy equation of state. We discuss the possibility to discriminate between different models by a reconstruction of the equation-of-state parameter from available observational data. The non-minimal coupling characterizing scalar-tensor models can - in specific cases - alleviate fine tuning problems, which appear if (minimally coupled) quintessence is required to mimic a cosmological constant. Finally, we perform a phase-space analysis of a family of biscalar-tensor models characterized by a specific type of σ-model metric, including two examples from recent literature. In particular, we generalize an axion-dilaton model of Sonner and Townsend, incorporating a perfect fluid background consisting of (dark) matter and radiation. (orig.)

  15. Towards simplification of hydrologic modeling: identification of dominant processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Markstrom

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available parameter hydrologic model, has been applied to the conterminous US (CONUS. Parameter sensitivity analysis was used to identify: (1 the sensitive input parameters and (2 particular model output variables that could be associated with the dominant hydrologic process(es. Sensitivity values of 35 PRMS calibration parameters were computed using the Fourier amplitude sensitivity test procedure on 110 000 independent hydrologically based spatial modeling units covering the CONUS and then summarized to process (snowmelt, surface runoff, infiltration, soil moisture, evapotranspiration, interflow, baseflow, and runoff and model performance statistic (mean, coefficient of variation, and autoregressive lag 1. Identified parameters and processes provide insight into model performance at the location of each unit and allow the modeler to identify the most dominant process on the basis of which processes are associated with the most sensitive parameters. The results of this study indicate that: (1 the choice of performance statistic and output variables has a strong influence on parameter sensitivity, (2 the apparent model complexity to the modeler can be reduced by focusing on those processes that are associated with sensitive parameters and disregarding those that are not, (3 different processes require different numbers of parameters for simulation, and (4 some sensitive parameters influence only one hydrologic process, while others may influence many.

  16. Cosmic expansion and growth histories in Galileon scalar-tensor models of dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Tsutomu

    2010-01-01

    We study models of late-time cosmic acceleration in terms of scalar-tensor theories generalized to include a certain class of nonlinear derivative interaction of the scalar field. The nonlinear effect suppresses the scalar-mediated force at short distances to pass solar-system tests of gravity. It is found that the expansion history until today is almost indistinguishable from that of the ΛCDM model or some (phantom) dark energy models, but the fate of the universe depends clearly on the model parameter. The growth index of matter density perturbations is computed to show that its past asymptotic value is given by 9/16, while the value today is as small as 0.4.

  17. Non-Abelian tensor gauge fields and higher-spin extension of standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savvidy, G.

    2006-01-01

    We suggest an extension of the gauge principle which includes non-Abelian tensor gauge fields. The invariant Lagrangian is quadratic in the field strength tensors and describes interaction of charged tensor gauge bosons of arbitrary large integer spin 1,2,l. Non-Abelian tensor gauge fields can be viewed as a unique gauge field with values in the infinite-dimensional current algebra associated with compact Lie group. The full Lagrangian exhibits also enhanced local gauge invariance with double number of gauge parameters which allows to eliminate all negative norm states of the nonsymmetric second-rank tensor gauge field, which describes therefore two polarizations of helicity-two massless charged tensor gauge boson and the helicity-zero ''axion'' The geometrical interpretation of the enhanced gauge symmetry with double number of gauge parameters is not yet known. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  18. Solving the master equation without kinetic Monte Carlo: Tensor train approximations for a CO oxidation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelß, Patrick; Matera, Sebastian; Schütte, Christof

    2016-01-01

    In multiscale modeling of heterogeneous catalytic processes, one crucial point is the solution of a Markovian master equation describing the stochastic reaction kinetics. Usually, this is too high-dimensional to be solved with standard numerical techniques and one has to rely on sampling approaches based on the kinetic Monte Carlo method. In this study we break the curse of dimensionality for the direct solution of the Markovian master equation by exploiting the Tensor Train Format for this purpose. The performance of the approach is demonstrated on a first principles based, reduced model for the CO oxidation on the RuO 2 (110) surface. We investigate the complexity for increasing system size and for various reaction conditions. The advantage over the stochastic simulation approach is illustrated by a problem with increased stiffness.

  19. Solving the master equation without kinetic Monte Carlo: Tensor train approximations for a CO oxidation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelß, Patrick; Matera, Sebastian; Schütte, Christof

    2016-06-01

    In multiscale modeling of heterogeneous catalytic processes, one crucial point is the solution of a Markovian master equation describing the stochastic reaction kinetics. Usually, this is too high-dimensional to be solved with standard numerical techniques and one has to rely on sampling approaches based on the kinetic Monte Carlo method. In this study we break the curse of dimensionality for the direct solution of the Markovian master equation by exploiting the Tensor Train Format for this purpose. The performance of the approach is demonstrated on a first principles based, reduced model for the CO oxidation on the RuO2(110) surface. We investigate the complexity for increasing system size and for various reaction conditions. The advantage over the stochastic simulation approach is illustrated by a problem with increased stiffness.

  20. Solving the master equation without kinetic Monte Carlo: Tensor train approximations for a CO oxidation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelß, Patrick, E-mail: p.gelss@fu-berlin.de; Matera, Sebastian, E-mail: matera@math.fu-berlin.de; Schütte, Christof, E-mail: schuette@mi.fu-berlin.de

    2016-06-01

    In multiscale modeling of heterogeneous catalytic processes, one crucial point is the solution of a Markovian master equation describing the stochastic reaction kinetics. Usually, this is too high-dimensional to be solved with standard numerical techniques and one has to rely on sampling approaches based on the kinetic Monte Carlo method. In this study we break the curse of dimensionality for the direct solution of the Markovian master equation by exploiting the Tensor Train Format for this purpose. The performance of the approach is demonstrated on a first principles based, reduced model for the CO oxidation on the RuO{sub 2}(110) surface. We investigate the complexity for increasing system size and for various reaction conditions. The advantage over the stochastic simulation approach is illustrated by a problem with increased stiffness.

  1. Overcoming the sign problem at finite temperature: Quantum tensor network for the orbital eg model on an infinite square lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnik, Piotr; Dziarmaga, Jacek; Oleś, Andrzej M.

    2017-07-01

    The variational tensor network renormalization approach to two-dimensional (2D) quantum systems at finite temperature is applied to a model suffering the notorious quantum Monte Carlo sign problem—the orbital eg model with spatially highly anisotropic orbital interactions. Coarse graining of the tensor network along the inverse temperature β yields a numerically tractable 2D tensor network representing the Gibbs state. Its bond dimension D —limiting the amount of entanglement—is a natural refinement parameter. Increasing D we obtain a converged order parameter and its linear susceptibility close to the critical point. They confirm the existence of finite order parameter below the critical temperature Tc, provide a numerically exact estimate of Tc, and give the critical exponents within 1 % of the 2D Ising universality class.

  2. Modeling cellular networks in fading environments with dominant specular components

    KAUST Repository

    AlAmmouri, Ahmad

    2016-07-26

    Stochastic geometry (SG) has been widely accepted as a fundamental tool for modeling and analyzing cellular networks. However, the fading models used with SG analysis are mainly confined to the simplistic Rayleigh fading, which is extended to the Nakagami-m fading in some special cases. However, neither the Rayleigh nor the Nakagami-m accounts for dominant specular components (DSCs) which may appear in realistic fading channels. In this paper, we present a tractable model for cellular networks with generalized two-ray (GTR) fading channel. The GTR fading explicitly accounts for two DSCs in addition to the diffuse components and offers high flexibility to capture diverse fading channels that appear in realistic outdoor/indoor wireless communication scenarios. It also encompasses the famous Rayleigh and Rician fading as special cases. To this end, the prominent effect of DSCs is highlighted in terms of average spectral efficiency. © 2016 IEEE.

  3. The algebra of the energy-momentum tensor and the Noether currents in classical non-linear sigma models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forger, M.; Mannheim Univ.; Laartz, J.; Schaeper, U.

    1994-01-01

    The recently derived current algrbra of classical non-linear sigma models on arbitrary Riemannian manifolds is extended to include the energy-momentum tensor. It is found that in two dimensions the energy-momentum tensor θ μv , the Noether current j μ associated with the global symmetry of the theory and the composite field j appearing as the coefficient of the Schwinger term in the current algebra, together with the derivatives of j μ and j, generte a closed algebra. The subalgebra generated by the light-cone components of the energy-momentum tensor consists of two commuting copies of the Virasoro algebra, with central charge c=0, reflecting the classical conformal invariance of the theory, but the current algebra part and the semidirect product structure are quite different from the usual Kac-Moody/Sugawara type contruction. (orig.)

  4. Universal formula for the energy–momentum tensor via a flow equation in the Gross–Neveu model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    For the fermion field in the two-dimensional Gross–Neveu model, we introduce a flow equation that allows a simple 1/N expansion. By employing the 1/N expansion, we examine the validity of a universal formula for the energy–momentum tensor which is based on the small flow-time expansion. We confirm that the formula reproduces a correct normalization and the conservation law of the energy–momentum tensor by computing the translation Ward–Takahashi relation in the leading non-trivial order in the 1/N expansion. Also, we confirm that the expectation value at finite temperature correctly reproduces thermodynamic quantities. These observations support the validity of a similar construction of the energy–momentum tensor via the gradient/Wilson flow in lattice gauge theory

  5. Vanishing of the vacuum amplitude of heterotic string compactified on a tensor product of N=2 superconformal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kei Ito.

    1988-07-01

    The vacuum amplitude of heterotic string compactified on a tensor product of nine copies of c=1, N=2 superconformal models is shown to vanish due to a generalized Riemann's theta identity associated with the 12x12 matrix identity t BB=6 2 I 12 , identity B ij =-5(i=j), 1(i≠j). (author). 4 refs

  6. Simplification and Validation of a Spectral-Tensor Model for Turbulence Including Atmospheric Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chougule, Abhijit; Mann, Jakob; Kelly, Mark; Larsen, Gunner C.

    2018-02-01

    A spectral-tensor model of non-neutral, atmospheric-boundary-layer turbulence is evaluated using Eulerian statistics from single-point measurements of the wind speed and temperature at heights up to 100 m, assuming constant vertical gradients of mean wind speed and temperature. The model has been previously described in terms of the dissipation rate ɛ , the length scale of energy-containing eddies L , a turbulence anisotropy parameter Γ, the Richardson number Ri, and the normalized rate of destruction of temperature variance η _θ ≡ ɛ _θ /ɛ . Here, the latter two parameters are collapsed into a single atmospheric stability parameter z / L using Monin-Obukhov similarity theory, where z is the height above the Earth's surface, and L is the Obukhov length corresponding to Ri,η _θ. Model outputs of the one-dimensional velocity spectra, as well as cospectra of the streamwise and/or vertical velocity components, and/or temperature, and cross-spectra for the spatial separation of all three velocity components and temperature, are compared with measurements. As a function of the four model parameters, spectra and cospectra are reproduced quite well, but horizontal temperature fluxes are slightly underestimated in stable conditions. In moderately unstable stratification, our model reproduces spectra only up to a scale ˜ 1 km. The model also overestimates coherences for vertical separations, but is less severe in unstable than in stable cases.

  7. CONSTRAINTS ON SCALAR AND TENSOR PERTURBATIONS IN PHENOMENOLOGICAL AND TWO-FIELD INFLATION MODELS: BAYESIAN EVIDENCES FOR PRIMORDIAL ISOCURVATURE AND TENSOR MODES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaeliviita, Jussi [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029, Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Savelainen, Matti; Talvitie, Marianne; Kurki-Suonio, Hannu; Rusak, Stanislav, E-mail: jussi.valiviita@astro.uio.no [Department of Physics and Helsinki Institute of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2012-07-10

    We constrain cosmological models where the primordial perturbations have an adiabatic and a (possibly correlated) cold dark matter (CDM) or baryon isocurvature component. We use both a phenomenological approach, where the power spectra of primordial perturbations are parameterized with amplitudes and spectral indices, and a slow-roll two-field inflation approach where slow-roll parameters are used as primary parameters, determining the spectral indices and the tensor-to-scalar ratio. In the phenomenological case, with CMB data, the upper limit to the CDM isocurvature fraction is {alpha} < 6.4% at k = 0.002 Mpc{sup -1} and 15.4% at k = 0.01 Mpc{sup -1}. The non-adiabatic contribution to the CMB temperature variance is -0.030 < {alpha}{sub T} < 0.049 at the 95% confidence level. Including the supernova (SN) (or large-scale structure) data, these limits become {alpha} < 7.0%, 13.7%, and -0.048 < {alpha}{sub T} < 0.042 (or {alpha} < 10.2%, 16.0%, and -0.071 < {alpha}{sub T} < 0.024). The CMB constraint on the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r < 0.26 at k = 0.01 Mpc{sup -1}, is not affected by the non-adiabatic modes. In the slow-roll two-field inflation approach, the spectral indices are constrained close to 1. This leads to tighter limits on the isocurvature fraction; with the CMB data {alpha} < 2.6% at k = 0.01 Mpc{sup -1}, but the constraint on {alpha}{sub T} is not much affected, -0.058 < {alpha}{sub T} < 0.045. Including SN (or LSS) data, these limits become {alpha} < 3.2% and -0.056 < {alpha}{sub T} < 0.030 (or {alpha} < 3.4% and -0.063 < {alpha}{sub T} < -0.008). In addition to the generally correlated models, we study also special cases where the adiabatic and isocurvature modes are uncorrelated or fully (anti)correlated. We calculate Bayesian evidences (model probabilities) in 21 different non-adiabatic cases and compare them to the corresponding adiabatic models, and find that in all cases the data support the pure adiabatic model.

  8. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging driven growth modeling for radiotherapy target definition in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Morten B; Guldberg, Trine L; Harbøll, Anja; Lukacova, Slávka; Kallehauge, Jesper F

    2017-11-01

    The clinical target volume (CTV) in radiotherapy is routinely based on gadolinium contrast enhanced T1 weighted (T1w + Gd) and T2 weighted fluid attenuated inversion recovery (T2w FLAIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences which have been shown to over- or underestimate the microscopic tumor cell spread. Gliomas favor spread along the white matter fiber tracts. Tumor growth models incorporating the MRI diffusion tensors (DTI) allow to account more consistently for the glioma growth. The aim of the study was to investigate the potential of a DTI driven growth model to improve target definition in glioblastoma (GBM). Eleven GBM patients were scanned using T1w, T2w FLAIR, T1w + Gd and DTI. The brain was segmented into white matter, gray matter and cerebrospinal fluid. The Fisher-Kolmogorov growth model was used assuming uniform proliferation and a difference in white and gray matter diffusion of a ratio of 10. The tensor directionality was tested using an anisotropy weighting parameter set to zero (γ0) and twenty (γ20). The volumetric comparison was performed using Hausdorff distance, Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and surface area. The median of the standard CTV (CTVstandard) was 180 cm 3 . The median surface area of CTVstandard was 211 cm 2 . The median surface area of respective CTV γ0 and CTV γ20 significantly increased to 338 and 376 cm 2 , respectively. The Hausdorff distance was greater than zero and significantly increased for both CTV γ0 and CTV γ20 with respective median of 18.7 and 25.2 mm. The DSC for both CTV γ0 and CTV γ20 were significantly below one with respective median of 0.74 and 0.72, which means that 74 and 72% of CTVstandard were included in CTV γ0 and CTV γ20, respectively. DTI driven growth models result in CTVs with a significantly increased surface area, a significantly increased Hausdorff distance and decreased overlap between the standard and model derived volume.

  9. Composite antisymmetric tensor bosons in a four-fermion interaction model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitrasinovic, V.

    2000-01-01

    We discuss the phenomenological consequences of the U A (1) symmetry-breaking two-flavour four-fermion antisymmetric (AS) Lorentz tensor interaction Lagrangians. We use the recently developed methods that respect the 'duality' symmetry of this interaction. Starting from the Fierz transform of the two-flavour 't Hooft interaction (a four-fermion Lagrangian with AS tensor interaction terms augmented by Nambu and Jona-Lasinio (NJL)-type Lorentz scalar interaction responsible for dynamical symmetry breaking and quark mass generation), we find the following. (a) Four antisymmetric tensor and four AS pseudotensor bosons exist which satisfy a mass relation previously derived for scalar and pseudoscalar mesons from the 't Hooft interaction. (b) Antisymmetric tensor bosons mix with vector bosons via one-fermion-loop effective couplings so that both kinds of bosons have their masses shifted and the fermions (quarks) acquire anomalous magnetic moment form factors that explicitly violate chiral symmetry. (c) The mixing of massive AS tensor fields with vector fields leads to two sets of spin-1 states. The second set of spin-1 mesons is heavy and has not been observed. Moreover, at least one member of this second set is tachyonic, under standard assumptions about the source and strength of the AS tensor interaction. The tachyonic state also shows up as a pole in the space-like region of the electromagnetic form factors. (d) The mixing of axial-vector fields with antisymmetric tensor bosons is proportional to the (small) isospin-breaking up-down quark mass difference, so the mixing-induced mass shift is negligible. (e) The AS tensor version of the Veneziano-Witten U A (1) symmetry-breaking interaction does not lead to tachyons, or any AS tensor field propagation to leading order in N C . (author)

  10. Hydro-morphological modelling of small, wave-dominated estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slinger, Jill H.

    2017-11-01

    Small, intermittently open or closed estuaries are characteristic of the coasts of South Africa, Australia, California, Mexico and many other areas of the world. However, modelling attention has tended to focus on big estuaries that drain large catchments and serve a wide diversity of interests e.g. agriculture, urban settlement, recreation, commercial fishing. In this study, the development of a simple, parametric, system dynamics model to simulate the opening and closure of the mouths of small, wave-dominated estuaries is reported. In the model, the estuary is conceived as a basin with a specific water volume to water level relationship, connected to the sea by a channel of fixed width, but variable sill height. Changes in the form of the basin are not treated in the model, while the dynamics of the mouth channel are central to the model. The magnitude and direction of the flow through the mouth determines whether erosion or deposition of sediment occurs in the mouth channel, influencing the sill height. The model is implemented on the Great Brak Estuary in South Africa and simulations reveal that the raised low water levels in the estuary during spring tide relative to neap tide, are occasioned by the constriction of the tidal flow through the shallow mouth. Freshwater inflows to the estuary are shown to be significant in determining the behaviour of the inlet mouth, a factor often ignored in studies on tidal inlets. Further it is the balance between freshwater inflows and wave events that determines the opening or closure of the mouth of a particular estuary.

  11. Detection of high GS risk group prostate tumors by diffusion tensor imaging and logistic regression modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertas, Gokhan

    2018-07-01

    To assess the value of joint evaluation of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures by using logistic regression modelling to detect high GS risk group prostate tumors. Fifty tumors imaged using DTI on a 3 T MRI device were analyzed. Regions of interests focusing on the center of tumor foci and noncancerous tissue on the maps of mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) were used to extract the minimum, the maximum and the mean measures. Measure ratio was computed by dividing tumor measure by noncancerous tissue measure. Logistic regression models were fitted for all possible pair combinations of the measures using 5-fold cross validation. Systematic differences are present for all MD measures and also for all FA measures in distinguishing the high risk tumors [GS ≥ 7(4 + 3)] from the low risk tumors [GS ≤ 7(3 + 4)] (P Logistic regression modelling provides a favorable solution for the joint evaluations easily adoptable in clinical practice. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of solar wind shock models with tensor plasma pressure for data analysis. Final technical report, 1 Aug 1970--31 Dec 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham-shrauner, B.

    1975-01-01

    The development of solar wind shock models with tensor plasma pressure and the comparison of some of the shock models with the satellite data from Pioneer 6 through Pioneer 9 are reported. Theoretically, difficulties were found in non-turbulent fluid shock models for tensor pressure plasmas. For microscopic shock theories nonlinear growth caused by plasma instabilities was frequently not clearly demonstrated to lead to the formation of a shock. As a result no clear choice for a shock model for the bow shock or interplanetary tensor pressure shocks emerged

  13. Probabilistic inference with noisy-threshold models based on a CP tensor decomposition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vomlel, Jiří; Tichavský, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 4 (2014), s. 1072-1092 ISSN 0888-613X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-20012S; GA ČR GA102/09/1278 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Bayesian networks * Probabilistic inference * Candecomp-Parafac tensor decomposition * Symmetric tensor rank Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics Impact factor: 2.451, year: 2014 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2014/MTR/vomlel-0427059.pdf

  14. Link prediction via generalized coupled tensor factorisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ermiş, Beyza; Evrim, Acar Ataman; Taylan Cemgil, A.

    2012-01-01

    and higher-order tensors. We propose to use an approach based on probabilistic interpretation of tensor factorisation models, i.e., Generalised Coupled Tensor Factorisation, which can simultaneously fit a large class of tensor models to higher-order tensors/matrices with com- mon latent factors using...... different loss functions. Numerical experiments demonstrate that joint analysis of data from multiple sources via coupled factorisation improves the link prediction performance and the selection of right loss function and tensor model is crucial for accurately predicting missing links....

  15. Large N Limits in Tensor Models: Towards More Universality Classes of Colored Triangulations in Dimension d≥2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonzom, Valentin

    2016-07-01

    We review an approach which aims at studying discrete (pseudo-)manifolds in dimension d≥ 2 and called random tensor models. More specifically, we insist on generalizing the two-dimensional notion of p-angulations to higher dimensions. To do so, we consider families of triangulations built out of simplices with colored faces. Those simplices can be glued to form new building blocks, called bubbles which are pseudo-manifolds with boundaries. Bubbles can in turn be glued together to form triangulations. The main challenge is to classify the triangulations built from a given set of bubbles with respect to their numbers of bubbles and simplices of codimension two. While the colored triangulations which maximize the number of simplices of codimension two at fixed number of simplices are series-parallel objects called melonic triangulations, this is not always true anymore when restricting attention to colored triangulations built from specific bubbles. This opens up the possibility of new universality classes of colored triangulations. We present three existing strategies to find those universality classes. The first two strategies consist in building new bubbles from old ones for which the problem can be solved. The third strategy is a bijection between those colored triangulations and stuffed, edge-colored maps, which are some sort of hypermaps whose hyperedges are replaced with edge-colored maps. We then show that the present approach can lead to enumeration results and identification of universality classes, by working out the example of quartic tensor models. They feature a tree-like phase, a planar phase similar to two-dimensional quantum gravity and a phase transition between them which is interpreted as a proliferation of baby universes. While this work is written in the context of random tensors, it is almost exclusively of combinatorial nature and we hope it is accessible to interested readers who are not familiar with random matrices, tensors and quantum

  16. The service dominant strategy canvas : towards networked business models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lüftenegger, E.R.; Grefen, P.W.P.J.; Weisleder, C.A.; Camarinha-Matos, L.M.; Xu, L.; Afsarmanesh, H.

    2012-01-01

    Service orientation, customer focus and collaboration between firms are profoundly changing the way of doing business. Marketing scholars are the first academics to conceptualize these changes under a new mindset, known as the Service Dominant Logic. However, management constructs are needed to

  17. On the Landau-de Gennes Elastic Energy of a Q-Tensor Model for Soft Biaxial Nematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucci, Domenico; Nicolodi, Lorenzo

    2017-12-01

    In the Landau-de Gennes theory of liquid crystals, the propensities for alignments of molecules are represented at each point of the fluid by an element Q of the vector space S_0 of 3× 3 real symmetric traceless matrices, or Q-tensors. According to Longa and Trebin (1989), a biaxial nematic system is called soft biaxial if the tensor order parameter Q satisfies the constraint tr(Q^2) = {const}. After the introduction of a Q-tensor model for soft biaxial nematic systems and the description of its geometric structure, we address the question of coercivity for the most common four-elastic-constant form of the Landau-de Gennes elastic free-energy (Iyer et al. 2015) in this model. For a soft biaxial nematic system, the tensor field Q takes values in a four-dimensional sphere S^4_ρ of radius ρ ≤ √{2/3} in the five-dimensional space S_0 with inner product = tr(QP). The rotation group it{SO}(3) acts orthogonally on S_0 by conjugation and hence induces an action on S^4_ρ \\subset {S}_0. This action has generic orbits of codimension one that are diffeomorphic to an eightfold quotient S^3/H of the unit three-sphere S^3, where H={± 1, ± i, ± j, ± k} is the quaternion group, and has two degenerate orbits of codimension two that are diffeomorphic to the projective plane RP^2. Each generic orbit can be interpreted as the order parameter space of a constrained biaxial nematic system and each singular orbit as the order parameter space of a constrained uniaxial nematic system. It turns out that S^4_ρ is a cohomogeneity one manifold, i.e., a manifold with a group action whose orbit space is one-dimensional. Another important geometric feature of the model is that the set Σ _ρ of diagonal Q-tensors of fixed norm ρ is a (geodesic) great circle in S^4_ρ which meets every orbit of S^4_ρ orthogonally and is then a section for S^4_ρ in the sense of the general theory of canonical forms. We compute necessary and sufficient coercivity conditions for the elastic energy by

  18. Statistical properties of the coarse-grained velocity gradient tensor in turbulence: Monte-Carlo simulations of the tetrad model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pumir, Alain; Naso, Aurore

    2010-01-01

    A proper description of the velocity gradient tensor is crucial for understanding the dynamics of turbulent flows, in particular the energy transfer from large to small scales. Insight into the statistical properties of the velocity gradient tensor and into its coarse-grained generalization can be obtained with the help of a stochastic 'tetrad model' that describes the coarse-grained velocity gradient tensor based on the evolution of four points. Although the solution of the stochastic model can be formally expressed in terms of path integrals, its numerical determination in terms of the Monte-Carlo method is very challenging, as very few configurations contribute effectively to the statistical weight. Here, we discuss a strategy that allows us to solve the tetrad model numerically. The algorithm is based on the importance sampling method, which consists here of identifying and sampling preferentially the configurations that are likely to correspond to a large statistical weight, and selectively rejecting configurations with a small statistical weight. The algorithm leads to an efficient numerical determination of the solutions of the model and allows us to determine their qualitative behavior as a function of scale. We find that the moments of order n≤4 of the solutions of the model scale with the coarse-graining scale and that the scaling exponents are very close to the predictions of the Kolmogorov theory. The model qualitatively reproduces quite well the statistics concerning the local structure of the flow. However, we find that the model generally tends to predict an excess of strain compared to vorticity. Thus, our results show that while some physical aspects are not fully captured by the model, our approach leads to a very good description of several important qualitative properties of real turbulent flows.

  19. A new deteriorated energy-momentum tensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duff, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    The stress-tensor of a scalar field theory is not unique because of the possibility of adding an 'improvement term'. In supersymmetric field theories the stress-tensor will appear in a super-current multiplet along with the sypersymmetry current. The general question of the supercurrent multiplet for arbitrary deteriorated stress tensors and their relationship to supercurrent multiplets for models with gauge antisymmetric tensors is answered for various models of N = 1, 2 and 4 supersymmetry. (U.K.)

  20. Identification of θ(f2(1720)) as a tensor glueball

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, K.F.

    1988-01-01

    The energy-momentum tensor matrix element for the tensor glueball is obtained from the tensor dominance model. Branching ratio of θ(f 2 (1720)) in J/ψ radiative decay is thus calculated which is in accord with the observed experimental branching ratio. The decay modes of θ(f 2 (1720)) and results from J/ψ→ γK bar K,ωK bar K, and φK bar K are taken as good indicators for flavor independence of the tensor meson Θ. Suppression of θ(f 2 (1720)) in γγ reaction and K - p → ΛK o s K o s are considered as evidence for the fact that there are no quarks in θ. From the combined theoretical and experimental studies, the authors conclude that θ is by far the best tensor glueball candidate

  1. Temporal diagnostic analysis of the SWAT model to detect dominant periods of poor model performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guse, Björn; Reusser, Dominik E.; Fohrer, Nicola

    2013-04-01

    Hydrological models generally include thresholds and non-linearities, such as snow-rain-temperature thresholds, non-linear reservoirs, infiltration thresholds and the like. When relating observed variables to modelling results, formal methods often calculate performance metrics over long periods, reporting model performance with only few numbers. Such approaches are not well suited to compare dominating processes between reality and model and to better understand when thresholds and non-linearities are driving model results. We present a combination of two temporally resolved model diagnostic tools to answer when a model is performing (not so) well and what the dominant processes are during these periods. We look at the temporal dynamics of parameter sensitivities and model performance to answer this question. For this, the eco-hydrological SWAT model is applied in the Treene lowland catchment in Northern Germany. As a first step, temporal dynamics of parameter sensitivities are analyzed using the Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity test (FAST). The sensitivities of the eight model parameters investigated show strong temporal variations. High sensitivities were detected for two groundwater (GW_DELAY, ALPHA_BF) and one evaporation parameters (ESCO) most of the time. The periods of high parameter sensitivity can be related to different phases of the hydrograph with dominances of the groundwater parameters in the recession phases and of ESCO in baseflow and resaturation periods. Surface runoff parameters show high parameter sensitivities in phases of a precipitation event in combination with high soil water contents. The dominant parameters give indication for the controlling processes during a given period for the hydrological catchment. The second step included the temporal analysis of model performance. For each time step, model performance was characterized with a "finger print" consisting of a large set of performance measures. These finger prints were clustered into

  2. Tensors, relativity, and cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Dalarsson, Mirjana

    2015-01-01

    Tensors, Relativity, and Cosmology, Second Edition, combines relativity, astrophysics, and cosmology in a single volume, providing a simplified introduction to each subject that is followed by detailed mathematical derivations. The book includes a section on general relativity that gives the case for a curved space-time, presents the mathematical background (tensor calculus, Riemannian geometry), discusses the Einstein equation and its solutions (including black holes and Penrose processes), and considers the energy-momentum tensor for various solutions. In addition, a section on relativistic astrophysics discusses stellar contraction and collapse, neutron stars and their equations of state, black holes, and accretion onto collapsed objects, with a final section on cosmology discussing cosmological models, observational tests, and scenarios for the early universe. This fully revised and updated second edition includes new material on relativistic effects, such as the behavior of clocks and measuring rods in m...

  3. Distinction between the model of vector dominance and the model of oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beshtoev, Kh.M.

    2010-01-01

    The distinction between the model of vector dominance and the model of oscillations is considered on the example of γ→ρ 0 transitions. It is shown that transition probabilities in these cases differ by a factor of 2. The physical reason of these transition schemes is also discussed

  4. Beyond Low Rank: A Data-Adaptive Tensor Completion Method

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lei; Wei, Wei; Shi, Qinfeng; Shen, Chunhua; Hengel, Anton van den; Zhang, Yanning

    2017-01-01

    Low rank tensor representation underpins much of recent progress in tensor completion. In real applications, however, this approach is confronted with two challenging problems, namely (1) tensor rank determination; (2) handling real tensor data which only approximately fulfils the low-rank requirement. To address these two issues, we develop a data-adaptive tensor completion model which explicitly represents both the low-rank and non-low-rank structures in a latent tensor. Representing the no...

  5. Tensor-based spatiotemporal saliency detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Hao; Li, Bin; Deng, Qianqian; Zhang, LiRui; Pan, Zhihong; Tian, Jinwen

    2018-03-01

    This paper proposes an effective tensor-based spatiotemporal saliency computation model for saliency detection in videos. First, we construct the tensor representation of video frames. Then, the spatiotemporal saliency can be directly computed by the tensor distance between different tensors, which can preserve the complete temporal and spatial structure information of object in the spatiotemporal domain. Experimental results demonstrate that our method can achieve encouraging performance in comparison with the state-of-the-art methods.

  6. Vicariously learned helplessness: the role of perceived dominance and prestige of a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Sheridan; Hammonds, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Prior research has examined the relationship between various model characteristics (e.g., age, competence, similarity) and the likelihood that the observers will experience vicariously learned helplessness. However, no research in this area has investigated dominance as a relevant model characteristic. This study explored whether the vicarious acquisition of learned helplessness could be mediated by the perceived dominance of a model. Participants observed a model attempting to solve anagrams. Across participant groups, the model displayed either dominant or nondominant characteristics and was either successful or unsuccessful at solving the anagrams. The characteristics displayed by the model significantly affected observers' ratings of his dominance and prestige. After viewing the model, participants attempted to solve 40 anagrams. When the dominant model was successful, observers solved significantly more anagrams than when he was unsuccessful. This effect was not found when the model was nondominant.

  7. A one-dimensional seismic model for Uturuncu volcano, Bolivia, and its impact on full moment tensor inversions

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Weisen

    2016-11-24

    Using receiver functions, Rayleigh wave phase velocity dispersion determined from ambient noise and teleseismic earthquakes, and Rayleigh wave horizontal to vertical ground motion amplitude ratios from earthquakes observed across the PLUTONS seismic array, we construct a one-dimensional (1-D) S-wave velocity (Vs) seismic model with uncertainties for Uturuncu volcano, Bolivia, located in the central Andes and overlying the eastward-subducting Nazca plate. We find a fast upper crustal lid placed upon a low-velocity zone (LVZ) in the mid-crust. By incorporating all three types of measurements with complimentary sensitivity, we also explore the average density and Vp/Vs (ratio of P-wave to S-wave velocity) structures beneath the young silicic volcanic field. We observe slightly higher Vp/Vs and a decrease in density near the LVZ, which implies a dacitic source of the partially molten magma body. We exploit the impact of the 1-D model on full moment tensor inversion for the two largest local earthquakes recorded (both magnitude ∼3), demonstrating that the 1-D model influences the waveform fits and the estimated source type for the full moment tensor. Our 1-D model can serve as a robust starting point for future efforts to determine a three-dimensional velocity model for Uturuncu volcano.

  8. A one-dimensional seismic model for Uturuncu volcano, Bolivia, and its impact on full moment tensor inversions

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Weisen; Alvizuri, Celso; Lin, Fan-Chi; Tape, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Using receiver functions, Rayleigh wave phase velocity dispersion determined from ambient noise and teleseismic earthquakes, and Rayleigh wave horizontal to vertical ground motion amplitude ratios from earthquakes observed across the PLUTONS seismic array, we construct a one-dimensional (1-D) S-wave velocity (Vs) seismic model with uncertainties for Uturuncu volcano, Bolivia, located in the central Andes and overlying the eastward-subducting Nazca plate. We find a fast upper crustal lid placed upon a low-velocity zone (LVZ) in the mid-crust. By incorporating all three types of measurements with complimentary sensitivity, we also explore the average density and Vp/Vs (ratio of P-wave to S-wave velocity) structures beneath the young silicic volcanic field. We observe slightly higher Vp/Vs and a decrease in density near the LVZ, which implies a dacitic source of the partially molten magma body. We exploit the impact of the 1-D model on full moment tensor inversion for the two largest local earthquakes recorded (both magnitude ∼3), demonstrating that the 1-D model influences the waveform fits and the estimated source type for the full moment tensor. Our 1-D model can serve as a robust starting point for future efforts to determine a three-dimensional velocity model for Uturuncu volcano.

  9. Towards operationalization of business models : Designing service compositions for service-dominant business models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suratno, B.; Grefen, P.; Turetken, O.

    2017-01-01

    The new trend of service-dominant business which produces so-called value-in-use as a competitive advantage demands rapidly changing business models and collaboration of organizations in a cross-organizational business network. As information technology nowadays largely contributes to the way of

  10. Models for predicting fuel consumption in sagebrush-dominated ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton S. Wright

    2013-01-01

    Fuel consumption predictions are necessary to accurately estimate or model fire effects, including pollutant emissions during wildland fires. Fuel and environmental measurements on a series of operational prescribed fires were used to develop empirical models for predicting fuel consumption in big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentate Nutt.) ecosystems....

  11. A fuzzy approach to the Weighted Overlap Dominance model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco de los Rios, Camilo Andres; Hougaard, Jens Leth; Nielsen, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    Decision support models are required to handle the various aspects of multi-criteria decision problems in order to help the individual understand its possible solutions. In this sense, such models have to be capable of aggregating and exploiting different types of measurements and evaluations...... is presented for ordering and identifying the best alternatives under an interactive procedure that takes into account the natural imprecision and relevance of information....

  12. Resolution of a Rank-Deficient Adjustment Model Via an Isomorphic Geometrical Setup with Tensor Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-01

    holds an economical advantage. We now formulate 1. from (65) in conjunction with (57): IH]T T I TI (4 L [I R)T(I + RR ) (L*4) where the positive...sizes of the matrices to be inverted, an economical edge of the analytical formulation hecomes apparent as well. Chapter 3 contains one such matrix of...the relat ions Sthat can tie iibta i ned via the tensor vers ion of adjustment quant it ies. Alt Iihut t . ho’ ) mpu it iona I merits of the CholeskI

  13. Berry phase of primordial scalar and tensor perturbations in single-field inflationary models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balajany, Hamideh; Mehrafarin, Mohammad

    2018-06-01

    In the framework of the single-field slow-roll inflation, we derive the Hamiltonian of the linear primordial scalar and tensor perturbations in the form of time-dependent harmonic oscillator Hamiltonians. We find the invariant operators of the resulting Hamiltonians and use their eigenstates to calculate the adiabatic Berry phase for sub-horizon modes in terms of the Lewis-Riesenfeld phase. We conclude by discussing the discrepancy in the results of Pal et al. (2013) [21] for these Berry phases, which is resolved to yield agreement with our results.

  14. Neurite density imaging versus imaging of microscopic anisotropy in diffusion MRI: A model comparison using spherical tensor encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampinen, Björn; Szczepankiewicz, Filip; Mårtensson, Johan; van Westen, Danielle; Sundgren, Pia C; Nilsson, Markus

    2017-02-15

    In diffusion MRI (dMRI), microscopic diffusion anisotropy can be obscured by orientation dispersion. Separation of these properties is of high importance, since it could allow dMRI to non-invasively probe elongated structures such as neurites (axons and dendrites). However, conventional dMRI, based on single diffusion encoding (SDE), entangles microscopic anisotropy and orientation dispersion with intra-voxel variance in isotropic diffusivity. SDE-based methods for estimating microscopic anisotropy, such as the neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI) method, must thus rely on model assumptions to disentangle these features. An alternative approach is to directly quantify microscopic anisotropy by the use of variable shape of the b-tensor. Along those lines, we here present the 'constrained diffusional variance decomposition' (CODIVIDE) method, which jointly analyzes data acquired with diffusion encoding applied in a single direction at a time (linear tensor encoding, LTE) and in all directions (spherical tensor encoding, STE). We then contrast the two approaches by comparing neurite density estimated using NODDI with microscopic anisotropy estimated using CODIVIDE. Data were acquired in healthy volunteers and in glioma patients. NODDI and CODIVIDE differed the most in gray matter and in gliomas, where NODDI detected a neurite fraction higher than expected from the level of microscopic diffusion anisotropy found with CODIVIDE. The discrepancies could be explained by the NODDI tortuosity assumption, which enforces a connection between the neurite density and the mean diffusivity of tissue. Our results suggest that this assumption is invalid, which leads to a NODDI neurite density that is inconsistent between LTE and STE data. Using simulations, we demonstrate that the NODDI assumptions result in parameter bias that precludes the use of NODDI to map neurite density. With CODIVIDE, we found high levels of microscopic anisotropy in white matter

  15. Fitting measurement models to vocational interest data: are dominance models ideal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Louis; Drasgow, Fritz; Rounds, James; Williams, Bruce A

    2009-09-01

    In this study, the authors examined the item response process underlying 3 vocational interest inventories: the Occupational Preference Inventory (C.-P. Deng, P. I. Armstrong, & J. Rounds, 2007), the Interest Profiler (J. Rounds, T. Smith, L. Hubert, P. Lewis, & D. Rivkin, 1999; J. Rounds, C. M. Walker, et al., 1999), and the Interest Finder (J. E. Wall & H. E. Baker, 1997; J. E. Wall, L. L. Wise, & H. E. Baker, 1996). Item response theory (IRT) dominance models, such as the 2-parameter and 3-parameter logistic models, assume that item response functions (IRFs) are monotonically increasing as the latent trait increases. In contrast, IRT ideal point models, such as the generalized graded unfolding model, have IRFs that peak where the latent trait matches the item. Ideal point models are expected to fit better because vocational interest inventories ask about typical behavior, as opposed to requiring maximal performance. Results show that across all 3 interest inventories, the ideal point model provided better descriptions of the response process. The importance of specifying the correct item response model for precise measurement is discussed. In particular, scores computed by a dominance model were shown to be sometimes illogical: individuals endorsing mostly realistic or mostly social items were given similar scores, whereas scores based on an ideal point model were sensitive to which type of items respondents endorsed.

  16. Tucker tensor analysis of Matern functions in spatial statistics

    KAUST Repository

    Litvinenko, Alexander

    2018-04-20

    Low-rank Tucker tensor methods in spatial statistics 1. Motivation: improve statistical models 2. Motivation: disadvantages of matrices 3. Tools: Tucker tensor format 4. Tensor approximation of Matern covariance function via FFT 5. Typical statistical operations in Tucker tensor format 6. Numerical experiments

  17. Vector and tensor meson production in quasi-two-body final states using the dual fermion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, L.; Matthaeus, E.; Weigt, G.

    1976-01-01

    Phenomenological dual fermion amplitudes are obtained by using Neveu-Schwarz-Ramond model as a guide to incorporate half-integer spin. The model relates the production mechanism of different resonances lying on the same degenerate Regge trajectory, thus allowing a simultaneous description of vector and tensor meson production. A characteristic feature of the amplitudes is their non-evasive coupling structure. Predictions of the model for rho 0 -f-g 0 , ω-A 2 - and anti K*(890)-anti K*(1420) production in quasi-two-body reactions are compared with experimental data. The differential cross sections for natural and unnatural spin-parity t-channel exchanges as well as their contributions to different helicities of the produced resonances are given. In particular, new properties arise from the non-evasive pion exchange. Reasonable agreement with the data is found. (Auth.)

  18. Vector and tensor meson production in quasi-two-body final states using the dual fermion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, L.; Matthaeus, E.; Weigt, G.

    1975-01-01

    Phenomenological dual fermion amplitudes are obtained by using the Neveu-Schwarz-Ramond model as a guide to incorporate half-integer spin. The model relates the production mechanism of different resonances lying on the same degenerated Regge trajectory, thus allowing a simultaneous description of vector and tensor meson production. A characteristic feature of the amplitudes is their non-evasive coupling structure. Predictions of the model for rho 0 - f - g 0 , ω - A 2 - and anti K-890 and anti K-1420 resonances production in quasi-two-body reactions are compared with experimental data. The differential cross sections for natural and unnatural spin-parity t-channel exchanges as well as their contributions to different helicities of the produced resonances are given. In particular, new properties arise from the non-evasive pion exchange. Reasonable agreement with the data is found. (author)

  19. Tensor Transpose and Its Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Ran

    2014-01-01

    Tensor transpose is a higher order generalization of matrix transpose. In this paper, we use permutations and symmetry group to define? the tensor transpose. Then we discuss the classification and composition of tensor transposes. Properties of tensor transpose are studied in relation to tensor multiplication, tensor eigenvalues, tensor decompositions and tensor rank.

  20. Optimisation of NMR dynamic models II. A new methodology for the dual optimisation of the model-free parameters and the Brownian rotational diffusion tensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Auvergne, Edward J.; Gooley, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    Finding the dynamics of an entire macromolecule is a complex problem as the model-free parameter values are intricately linked to the Brownian rotational diffusion of the molecule, mathematically through the autocorrelation function of the motion and statistically through model selection. The solution to this problem was formulated using set theory as an element of the universal set U-the union of all model-free spaces (d'Auvergne EJ and Gooley PR (2007) Mol BioSyst 3(7), 483-494). The current procedure commonly used to find the universal solution is to initially estimate the diffusion tensor parameters, to optimise the model-free parameters of numerous models, and then to choose the best model via model selection. The global model is then optimised and the procedure repeated until convergence. In this paper a new methodology is presented which takes a different approach to this diffusion seeded model-free paradigm. Rather than starting with the diffusion tensor this iterative protocol begins by optimising the model-free parameters in the absence of any global model parameters, selecting between all the model-free models, and finally optimising the diffusion tensor. The new model-free optimisation protocol will be validated using synthetic data from Schurr JM et al. (1994) J Magn Reson B 105(3), 211-224 and the relaxation data of the bacteriorhodopsin (1-36)BR fragment from Orekhov VY (1999) J Biomol NMR 14(4), 345-356. To demonstrate the importance of this new procedure the NMR relaxation data of the Olfactory Marker Protein (OMP) of Gitti R et al. (2005) Biochem 44(28), 9673-9679 is reanalysed. The result is that the dynamics for certain secondary structural elements is very different from those originally reported

  1. Can a Wind Model Mimic a Convection-Dominated Accretion Flow Model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Heon-Young

    2001-06-01

    In this paper we investigate the properties of advection-dominated accretion flows(ADAFs) in case that outflows carry away infalling matter with its angular momentum and energy. Positive Bernoulli numbers in ADAFs allow a fraction of the gas to be ex-pelled in a form of outflows. The ADAFs are also unstable to convection. We present self-similar solutions for advection-dominated accretion flows in the presence of out-flows from the accretion flows (ADIOS). The axisymmetric flow is treated in variables integrated over polar sections and the effects of outflows on the accretion rlow are parameterized for possible configurations compatible with the one dimensional self-similar ADAF solution. We explicitly derive self-similar solutions of ADAFs in the presence of outflows and show that the strong outflows in the accretion flows result in a flatter density profile, which is similar to that of the convection-dominated accretion flows (CDAFs) in which convection transports the a! ngular momentum inward and the energy outward. These two different versions of the ADAF model should show similar behaviors in X-ray spectrum to some extent. Even though the two models may show similar behaviors, they should be distinguishable due to different physical properties. We suggest that for a central object of which mass is known these two different accretion flows should have different X-ray flux value due to deficient matter in the wind model.

  2. Can a Wind Model Mimic a Convection-Dominated Accretion Flow Model?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heon-Young Chang

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate the properties of advection-dominated accretion flows(ADAFs in case that outflows carry away infalling matter with its angular momentum and energy. Positive Bernoulli numbers in ADAFs allow a fraction of the gas to be ex-pelled in a form of outflows. The ADAFs are also unstable to convection. We present self-similar solutions for advection-dominated accretion flows in the presence of out-flows from the accretion flows (ADIOS. The axisymmetric flow is treated in variables integrated over polar sections and the effects of outflows on the accretion rlow are parameterized for possible configurations compatible with the one dimensional self-similar ADAF solution. We explicitly derive self-similar solutions of ADAFs in the presence of outflows and show that the strong outflows in the accretion flows result in a flatter density profile, which is similar to that of the convection-dominated accretion flows (CDAFs in which convection transports the a! ngular momentum inward and the energy outward. These two different versions of the ADAF model should show similar behaviors in X-ray spectrum to some extent. Even though the two models may show similar behaviors, they should be distinguishable due to different physical properties. We suggest that for a central object of which mass is known these two different accretion flows should have different X-ray flux value due to deficient matter in the wind model.

  3. Analysis of structural correlations in a model binary 3D liquid through the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the atomic stress tensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levashov, V. A.

    2016-01-01

    It is possible to associate with every atom or molecule in a liquid its own atomic stress tensor. These atomic stress tensors can be used to describe liquids’ structures and to investigate the connection between structural and dynamic properties. In particular, atomic stresses allow to address atomic scale correlations relevant to the Green-Kubo expression for viscosity. Previously correlations between the atomic stresses of different atoms were studied using the Cartesian representation of the stress tensors or the representation based on spherical harmonics. In this paper we address structural correlations in a 3D model binary liquid using the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the atomic stress tensors. This approach allows to interpret correlations relevant to the Green-Kubo expression for viscosity in a simple geometric way. On decrease of temperature the changes in the relevant stress correlation function between different atoms are significantly more pronounced than the changes in the pair density function. We demonstrate that this behaviour originates from the orientational correlations between the eigenvectors of the atomic stress tensors. We also found correlations between the eigenvalues of the same atomic stress tensor. For the studied system, with purely repulsive interactions between the particles, the eigenvalues of every atomic stress tensor are positive and they can be ordered: λ 1 ≥ λ 2 ≥ λ 3 ≥ 0. We found that, for the particles of a given type, the probability distributions of the ratios (λ 2 /λ 1 ) and (λ 3 /λ 2 ) are essentially identical to each other in the liquids state. We also found that λ 2 tends to be equal to the geometric average of λ 1 and λ 3 . In our view, correlations between the eigenvalues may represent “the Poisson ratio effect” at the atomic scale.

  4. Analysis of structural correlations in a model binary 3D liquid through the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the atomic stress tensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levashov, V. A. [Technological Design Institute of Scientific Instrument Engineering, Novosibirsk 630058 (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-07

    It is possible to associate with every atom or molecule in a liquid its own atomic stress tensor. These atomic stress tensors can be used to describe liquids’ structures and to investigate the connection between structural and dynamic properties. In particular, atomic stresses allow to address atomic scale correlations relevant to the Green-Kubo expression for viscosity. Previously correlations between the atomic stresses of different atoms were studied using the Cartesian representation of the stress tensors or the representation based on spherical harmonics. In this paper we address structural correlations in a 3D model binary liquid using the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the atomic stress tensors. This approach allows to interpret correlations relevant to the Green-Kubo expression for viscosity in a simple geometric way. On decrease of temperature the changes in the relevant stress correlation function between different atoms are significantly more pronounced than the changes in the pair density function. We demonstrate that this behaviour originates from the orientational correlations between the eigenvectors of the atomic stress tensors. We also found correlations between the eigenvalues of the same atomic stress tensor. For the studied system, with purely repulsive interactions between the particles, the eigenvalues of every atomic stress tensor are positive and they can be ordered: λ{sub 1} ≥ λ{sub 2} ≥ λ{sub 3} ≥ 0. We found that, for the particles of a given type, the probability distributions of the ratios (λ{sub 2}/λ{sub 1}) and (λ{sub 3}/λ{sub 2}) are essentially identical to each other in the liquids state. We also found that λ{sub 2} tends to be equal to the geometric average of λ{sub 1} and λ{sub 3}. In our view, correlations between the eigenvalues may represent “the Poisson ratio effect” at the atomic scale.

  5. Tensor formulation of the model equations on strong conservation form for an incompressible flow in general coordinates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Bo Hoffmann

    2003-01-01

    This brief report expresses the basic equations of an incompressible flow model in a form which can be translated easily into the form used by a numerical solver. The application of tensor notation makes is possible to effectively address the issue ofnumerical robustness and stating the model...... equations on a general form which accommodate curvilinear coordinates. Strong conservation form is obtained by formulating the equations so that the flow variables, velocity and pressure, are expressed in thephysical coordinate system while the location of evaluation is expressed within the transformed...... form of the equations is included which allows for special solutions to be developed in the transformedcoordinate system. Examples of applications are atmospheric flows over complex terrain, aerodynamically flows, industrial flows and environmental flows....

  6. Genomic selection models for directional dominance: an example for litter size in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varona, Luis; Legarra, Andrés; Herring, William; Vitezica, Zulma G

    2018-01-26

    The quantitative genetics theory argues that inbreeding depression and heterosis are founded on the existence of directional dominance. However, most procedures for genomic selection that have included dominance effects assumed prior symmetrical distributions. To address this, two alternatives can be considered: (1) assume the mean of dominance effects different from zero, and (2) use skewed distributions for the regularization of dominance effects. The aim of this study was to compare these approaches using two pig datasets and to confirm the presence of directional dominance. Four alternative models were implemented in two datasets of pig litter size that consisted of 13,449 and 11,581 records from 3631 and 2612 sows genotyped with the Illumina PorcineSNP60 BeadChip. The models evaluated included (1) a model that does not consider directional dominance (Model SN), (2) a model with a covariate b for the average individual homozygosity (Model SC), (3) a model with a parameter λ that reflects asymmetry in the context of skewed Gaussian distributions (Model AN), and (4) a model that includes both b and λ (Model Full). The results of the analysis showed that posterior probabilities of a negative b or a positive λ under Models SC and AN were higher than 0.99, which indicate positive directional dominance. This was confirmed with the predictions of inbreeding depression under Models Full, SC and AN, that were higher than in the SN Model. In spite of differences in posterior estimates of variance components between models, comparison of models based on LogCPO and DIC indicated that Model SC provided the best fit for the two datasets analyzed. Our results confirmed the presence of positive directional dominance for pig litter size and suggested that it should be taken into account when dominance effects are included in genomic evaluation procedures. The consequences of ignoring directional dominance may affect predictions of breeding values and can lead to biased

  7. A new approach to passivity preserving model reduction : the dominant spectral zero method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ionutiu, R.; Rommes, J.; Antoulas, A.C.; Roos, J.; Costa, L.R.J.

    2010-01-01

    A new model reduction method for circuit simulation is presented, which preserves passivity by interpolating dominant spectral zeros. These are computed as poles of an associated Hamiltonian system, using an iterative solver: the subspace accelerated dominant pole algorithm (SADPA). Based on a

  8. Estimation of additive and dominance variance for reproductive traits from different models in Duroc purebred

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talerngsak Angkuraseranee

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The additive and dominance genetic variances of 5,801 Duroc reproductive and growth records were estimated usingBULPF90 PC-PACK. Estimates were obtained for number born alive (NBA, birth weight (BW, number weaned (NW, andweaning weight (WW. Data were analyzed using two mixed model equations. The first model included fixed effects andrandom effects identifying inbreeding depression, additive gene effect and permanent environments effects. The secondmodel was similar to the first model, but included the dominance genotypic effect. Heritability estimates of NBA, BW, NWand WW from the two models were 0.1558/0.1716, 0.1616/0.1737, 0.0372/0.0874 and 0.1584/0.1516 respectively. Proportionsof dominance effect to total phenotypic variance from the dominance model were 0.1024, 0.1625, 0.0470, and 0.1536 for NBA,BW, NW and WW respectively. Dominance effects were found to have sizable influence on the litter size traits analyzed.Therefore, genetic evaluation with the dominance model (Model 2 is found more appropriate than the animal model (Model 1.

  9. Seismic moment tensor inversion using 3D velocity model and its application to the 2013 Lushan earthquake sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lupei; Zhou, Xiaofeng

    2016-10-01

    Source inversion of small-magnitude events such as aftershocks or mine collapses requires use of relatively high frequency seismic waveforms which are strongly affected by small-scale heterogeneities in the crust. In this study, we developed a new inversion method called gCAP3D for determining general moment tensor of a seismic source using Green's functions of 3D models. It inherits the advantageous features of the ;Cut-and-Paste; (CAP) method to break a full seismogram into the Pnl and surface-wave segments and to allow time shift between observed and predicted waveforms. It uses grid search for 5 source parameters (relative strengths of the isotropic and compensated-linear-vector-dipole components and the strike, dip, and rake of the double-couple component) that minimize the waveform misfit. The scalar moment is estimated using the ratio of L2 norms of the data and synthetics. Focal depth can also be determined by repeating the inversion at different depths. We applied gCAP3D to the 2013 Ms 7.0 Lushan earthquake and its aftershocks using a 3D crustal-upper mantle velocity model derived from ambient noise tomography in the region. We first relocated the events using the double-difference method. We then used the finite-differences method and reciprocity principle to calculate Green's functions of the 3D model for 20 permanent broadband seismic stations within 200 km from the source region. We obtained moment tensors of the mainshock and 74 aftershocks ranging from Mw 5.2 to 3.4. The results show that the Lushan earthquake is a reverse faulting at a depth of 13-15 km on a plane dipping 40-47° to N46° W. Most of the aftershocks occurred off the main rupture plane and have similar focal mechanisms to the mainshock's, except in the proximity of the mainshock where the aftershocks' focal mechanisms display some variations.

  10. SWAT Modeling for Depression-Dominated Areas: How Do Depressions Manipulate Hydrologic Modeling?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Tahmasebi Nasab

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling hydrologic processes for depression-dominated areas such as the North American Prairie Pothole Region is complex and reliant on a clear understanding of dynamic filling-spilling-merging-splitting processes of numerous depressions over the surface. Puddles are spatially distributed over a watershed and their sizes, storages, and interactions vary over time. However, most hydrologic models fail to account for these dynamic processes. Like other traditional methods, depressions are filled as a required preprocessing step in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT. The objective of this study was to facilitate hydrologic modeling for depression-dominated areas by coupling SWAT with a Puddle Delineation (PD algorithm. In the coupled PD-SWAT model, the PD algorithm was utilized to quantify topographic details, including the characteristics, distribution, and hierarchical relationships of depressions, which were incorporated into SWAT at the hydrologic response unit (HRU scale. The new PD-SWAT model was tested for a large watershed in North Dakota under real precipitation events. In addition, hydrologic modeling of a small watershed was conducted under two extreme high and low synthetic precipitation conditions. In particular, the PD-SWAT was compared against the regular SWAT based on depressionless DEMs. The impact of depressions on the hydrologic modeling of the large and small watersheds was evaluated. The simulation results for the large watershed indicated that SWAT systematically overestimated the outlet discharge, which can be attributed to the failure to account for the hydrologic effects of depressions. It was found from the PD-SWAT modeling results that at the HRU scale surface runoff initiation was significantly delayed due to the threshold control of depressions. Under the high precipitation scenario, depressions increased the surface runoff peak. However, the low precipitation scenario could not fully fill depressions to reach

  11. Tensors for physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hess, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the science of tensors in a didactic way. The various types and ranks of tensors and the physical basis is presented. Cartesian Tensors are needed for the description of directional phenomena in many branches of physics and for the characterization the anisotropy of material properties. The first sections of the book provide an introduction to the vector and tensor algebra and analysis, with applications to physics,  at undergraduate level. Second rank tensors, in particular their symmetries, are discussed in detail. Differentiation and integration of fields, including generalizations of the Stokes law and the Gauss theorem, are treated. The physics relevant for the applications in mechanics, quantum mechanics, electrodynamics and hydrodynamics is presented. The second part of the book is devoted to  tensors of any rank, at graduate level.  Special topics are irreducible, i.e. symmetric traceless tensors, isotropic tensors, multipole potential tensors, spin tensors, integration and spin-...

  12. Random tensors

    CERN Document Server

    Gurau, Razvan

    2017-01-01

    Written by the creator of the modern theory of random tensors, this book is the first self-contained introductory text to this rapidly developing theory. Starting from notions familiar to the average researcher or PhD student in mathematical or theoretical physics, the book presents in detail the theory and its applications to physics. The recent detections of the Higgs boson at the LHC and gravitational waves at LIGO mark new milestones in Physics confirming long standing predictions of Quantum Field Theory and General Relativity. These two experimental results only reinforce today the need to find an underlying common framework of the two: the elusive theory of Quantum Gravity. Over the past thirty years, several alternatives have been proposed as theories of Quantum Gravity, chief among them String Theory. While these theories are yet to be tested experimentally, key lessons have already been learned. Whatever the theory of Quantum Gravity may be, it must incorporate random geometry in one form or another....

  13. Tensor rank is not multiplicative under the tensor product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christandl, Matthias; Jensen, Asger Kjærulff; Zuiddam, Jeroen

    2018-01-01

    The tensor rank of a tensor t is the smallest number r such that t can be decomposed as a sum of r simple tensors. Let s be a k-tensor and let t be an ℓ-tensor. The tensor product of s and t is a (k+ℓ)-tensor. Tensor rank is sub-multiplicative under the tensor product. We revisit the connection b...

  14. Tensor rank is not multiplicative under the tensor product

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Christandl (Matthias); A. K. Jensen (Asger Kjærulff); J. Zuiddam (Jeroen)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractThe tensor rank of a tensor t is the smallest number r such that t can be decomposed as a sum of r simple tensors. Let s be a k-tensor and let t be an ℓ-tensor. The tensor product of s and t is a (k+ℓ)-tensor. Tensor rank is sub-multiplicative under the tensor product. We revisit the

  15. Tensor rank is not multiplicative under the tensor product

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Christandl (Matthias); A. K. Jensen (Asger Kjærulff); J. Zuiddam (Jeroen)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe tensor rank of a tensor is the smallest number r such that the tensor can be decomposed as a sum of r simple tensors. Let s be a k-tensor and let t be an l-tensor. The tensor product of s and t is a (k + l)-tensor (not to be confused with the "tensor Kronecker product" used in

  16. Applications of tensor functions in creep mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betten, J.

    1991-01-01

    Within this contribution a short survey is given of some recent advances in the mathematical modelling of materials behaviour under creep conditions. The mechanical behaviour of anisotropic solids requires a suitable mathematical modelling. The properties of tensor functions with several argument tensors constitute a rational basis for a consistent mathematical modelling of complex material behaviour. This paper presents certain principles, methods, and recent successfull applications of tensor functions in solid mechanics. The rules for specifying irreducible sets of tensor invariants and tensor generators for material tensors of rank two and four are also discussed. Furthermore, it is very important that the scalar coefficients in constitutive and evolutional equations are determined as functions of the integrity basis and experimental data. It is explained in detail that these coefficients can be determined by using tensorial interpolation methods. Some examples for practical use are discussed. (orig./RHM)

  17. Information contraction and extraction by multivariate autoregressive (MAR) modelling. Pt. 2. Dominant noise sources in BWRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishima, N.

    1996-01-01

    The multivariate autoregressive (MAR) modeling of a vector noise process is discussed in terms of the estimation of dominant noise sources in BWRs. The discussion is based on a physical approach: a transfer function model on BWR core dynamics is utilized in developing a noise model; a set of input-output relations between three system variables and twelve different noise sources is obtained. By the least-square fitting of a theoretical PSD on neutron noise to an experimental one, four kinds of dominant noise sources are selected. It is shown that some of dominant noise sources consist of two or more different noise sources and have the spectral properties of being coloured and correlated with each other. By diagonalizing the PSD matrix for dominant noise sources, we may obtain an MAR expression for a vector noise process as a response to the diagonal elements(i.e. residual noises) being white and mutually-independent. (Author)

  18. Some heavy vector and tensor meson decay constants in light-front quark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Chao-Qiang [Chongqing Jiaotong University, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing (China); National Tsing Hua University, Department of Physics, Hsinchu (China); National Center for Theoretical Sciences, Physics Division, Hsinchu (China); Lih, Chong-Chung [National Center for Theoretical Sciences, Physics Division, Hsinchu (China); Shu-Zen College of Medicine and Management, Department of Optometry, Kaohsiung Hsien (China); Xia, Chuanhui [Chongqing Jiaotong University, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing (China)

    2016-06-15

    We study the decay constants (f{sub M}) of the heavy vector (D{sup *}, D{sub s}{sup *}, B{sup *}, B{sub s}{sup *}, B{sub c}{sup *}) and tensor (D{sub 2}{sup *}, D{sub s2}{sup *}, B{sub 2}{sup *}, B{sub s2}{sup *}) mesons in the light-front quarkmodel.With the known pseudoscalar meson decay constants of f{sub D}, f{sub Ds}, f{sub B}, f{sub Bs}, and f{sub Bc} as the input parameters to determine the light-front meson wave functions, we obtain f{sub D{sup *},D{sub s{sup *}B{sup *}B{sub s{sup *},B{sub c{sup *}}}}} = (252.0{sub -11.6}{sup +13.8}, 318.3{sub -12.6}{sup +15.3}, 201.9{sub -41.4}{sup +43.2}, 244.2 ± 7.0, 473.4 ± 18.2) and (264.9{sub -9.5}{sup +10.2}, 330.9{sub -9.0}{sup +9.9}, 220.2{sub -46.2}{sup +49.1}, 265.7 ± 8.0, 487.6 ± 19.2) MeV with Gaussian and power-law wave functions, respectively, while we have f{sub D{sub 2{sup *},D{sub s{sub 2{sup *}B{sub 2{sup *}B{sub s{sub 2{sup *}}}}}}}} = (143.6{sub -21.8}{sup +24.9}, 209.5{sub -24.2}{sup +29.1}, 80.9{sub -27.7}{sup +33.8}, 109.7{sub -15.0}{sup +15.7}) MeV with only Gaussian wave functions. (orig.)

  19. Equivalent circuit modeling of space charge dominated magnetically insulated transmission lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraoka, Kazuki; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    1997-12-31

    A new equivalent circuit model for space charge dominated MITLs (Magnetically Insulated Transmission Lines) was developed. MITLs under high power operation are dominated with space charge current flowing between anode and cathode. Conventional equivalent circuit model does not account for space charge effects on power flow. The model was modified to discuss the power transportation through the high power MITLs. With this model, it is possible to estimate the effects of space charge current on the power flow efficiency, without using complicated particle code simulations. (author). 3 figs., 3 refs.

  20. Should I use TensorFlow

    OpenAIRE

    Schrimpf, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Google's Machine Learning framework TensorFlow was open-sourced in November 2015 [1] and has since built a growing community around it. TensorFlow is supposed to be flexible for research purposes while also allowing its models to be deployed productively. This work is aimed towards people with experience in Machine Learning considering whether they should use TensorFlow in their environment. Several aspects of the framework important for such a decision are examined, such as the heterogenity,...

  1. Diffusion tensor and volumetric magnetic resonance measures as biomarkers of brain damage in a small animal model of HIV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret R Lentz

    Full Text Available There are currently no widely accepted neuro-HIV small animal models. We wanted to validate the HIV-1 Transgenic rat (Tg as an appropriate neuro-HIV model and then establish in vivo imaging biomarkers of neuropathology, within this model, using MR structural and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI.Young and middle-aged Tg and control rats were imaged using MRI. A subset of middle-aged animals underwent longitudinal repeat imaging six months later. Total brain volume (TBV, ventricular volume (VV and parenchymal volume (PV = TBV-VV were measured. Fractional anisotropy (FA and mean diffusivity (MD values of the corpus callosum (CC were calculated from DTI data.TBV and PV were smaller in Tg compared to control rats in young and middle-aged cohorts (p0.05.We detected brain volume loss in the Tg rat, probably due to astrocytic dysfunction/loss, loss of structural/axonal matrix and striatal neuronal loss as suggested by immunofluorescence. Increased MD and decreased FA in the CC probably reflect microstructural differences between the Tg and Control rats which could include increased extracellular space between white matter tracts, demyelination and axonal degeneration, among other pathologies. We believe that the Tg rat is an adequate model of neuropathology in HIV and that volumetric MR and DTI measures can be potentially used as biomarkers of disease progression.

  2. Determination of 13C CSA Tensors: Extension of the Model-independent Approach to an RNA Kissing Complex Undergoing Anisotropic Rotational Diffusion in Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravindranathan, Sapna; Kim, Chul-Hyun; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2005-01-01

    Chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensor parameters have been determined for the protonated carbons of the purine bases in an RNA kissing complex in solution by extending the model-independent approach [Fushman, D., Cowburn, D. (1998) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 120, 7109-7110]. A strategy for determining CSA tensor parameters of heteronuclei in isolated X-H two-spin systems (X = 13 C or 15 N) in molecules undergoing anisotropic rotational diffusion is presented. The original method relies on the fact that the ratio κ 2 =R 2 auto /R 2 cross of the transverse auto- and cross-correlated relaxation rates involving the X CSA and the X-H dipolar interaction is independent of parameters related to molecular motion, provided rotational diffusion is isotropic. However, if the overall motion is anisotropic κ 2 depends on the anisotropy D parallel /D -perpendicular of rotational diffusion. In this paper, the field dependence of both κ 2 and its longitudinal counterpart κ 1 =R 1 auto /R 1 cross are determined. For anisotropic rotational diffusion, our calculations show that the average κ av = 1/2 (κ 1 +κ 2 ), of the ratios is largely independent of the anisotropy parameter D parallel /D -perpendicular . The field dependence of the average ratio κ av may thus be utilized to determine CSA tensor parameters by a generalized model-independent approach in the case of molecules with an overall motion described by an axially symmetric rotational diffusion tensor

  3. Tensor rank is not multiplicative under the tensor product

    OpenAIRE

    Christandl, Matthias; Jensen, Asger Kjærulff; Zuiddam, Jeroen

    2017-01-01

    The tensor rank of a tensor t is the smallest number r such that t can be decomposed as a sum of r simple tensors. Let s be a k-tensor and let t be an l-tensor. The tensor product of s and t is a (k + l)-tensor. Tensor rank is sub-multiplicative under the tensor product. We revisit the connection between restrictions and degenerations. A result of our study is that tensor rank is not in general multiplicative under the tensor product. This answers a question of Draisma and Saptharishi. Specif...

  4. Tensor gauge condition and tensor field decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ben-Chao; Chen, Xiang-Song

    2015-10-01

    We discuss various proposals of separating a tensor field into pure-gauge and gauge-invariant components. Such tensor field decomposition is intimately related to the effort of identifying the real gravitational degrees of freedom out of the metric tensor in Einstein’s general relativity. We show that as for a vector field, the tensor field decomposition has exact correspondence to and can be derived from the gauge-fixing approach. The complication for the tensor field, however, is that there are infinitely many complete gauge conditions in contrast to the uniqueness of Coulomb gauge for a vector field. The cause of such complication, as we reveal, is the emergence of a peculiar gauge-invariant pure-gauge construction for any gauge field of spin ≥ 2. We make an extensive exploration of the complete tensor gauge conditions and their corresponding tensor field decompositions, regarding mathematical structures, equations of motion for the fields and nonlinear properties. Apparently, no single choice is superior in all aspects, due to an awkward fact that no gauge-fixing can reduce a tensor field to be purely dynamical (i.e. transverse and traceless), as can the Coulomb gauge in a vector case.

  5. Modeling heat dominated electric breakdown in air, with adaptivity to electron or ion time scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agnihotri, A.; Hundsdorfer, W.; Ebert, U.

    2017-01-01

    We model heat dominated electrical breakdown in air in a short planar gap. We couple the discharge dynamics in fluid approximation with the hydrodynamic motion of the air heated by the discharge. To be computationally efficient, we derive a reduced model on the ion time scale, and we switch between

  6. Tensor structure for Nori motives

    OpenAIRE

    Barbieri-Viale, Luca; Huber, Annette; Prest, Mike

    2018-01-01

    We construct a tensor product on Freyd's universal abelian category attached to an additive tensor category or a tensor quiver and establish a universal property. This is used to give an alternative construction for the tensor product on Nori motives.

  7. Dictionary-Based Tensor Canonical Polyadic Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jeremy Emile; Gillis, Nicolas

    2018-04-01

    To ensure interpretability of extracted sources in tensor decomposition, we introduce in this paper a dictionary-based tensor canonical polyadic decomposition which enforces one factor to belong exactly to a known dictionary. A new formulation of sparse coding is proposed which enables high dimensional tensors dictionary-based canonical polyadic decomposition. The benefits of using a dictionary in tensor decomposition models are explored both in terms of parameter identifiability and estimation accuracy. Performances of the proposed algorithms are evaluated on the decomposition of simulated data and the unmixing of hyperspectral images.

  8. Tensor eigenvalues and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, Liqun; Chen, Yannan

    2018-01-01

    This book offers an introduction to applications prompted by tensor analysis, especially by the spectral tensor theory developed in recent years. It covers applications of tensor eigenvalues in multilinear systems, exponential data fitting, tensor complementarity problems, and tensor eigenvalue complementarity problems. It also addresses higher-order diffusion tensor imaging, third-order symmetric and traceless tensors in liquid crystals, piezoelectric tensors, strong ellipticity for elasticity tensors, and higher-order tensors in quantum physics. This book is a valuable reference resource for researchers and graduate students who are interested in applications of tensor eigenvalues.

  9. Harmonic d-tensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohmann, Manuel [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Tartu (Estonia)

    2016-07-01

    Tensor harmonics are a useful mathematical tool for finding solutions to differential equations which transform under a particular representation of the rotation group SO(3). In order to make use of this tool also in the setting of Finsler geometry, where the objects of relevance are d-tensors instead of tensors, we construct a set of d-tensor harmonics for both SO(3) and SO(4) symmetries and show how these can be used for calculations in Finsler geometry and gravity.

  10. Monograph On Tensor Notations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirlin, Samuel W.

    1993-01-01

    Eight-page report describes systems of notation used most commonly to represent tensors of various ranks, with emphasis on tensors in Cartesian coordinate systems. Serves as introductory or refresher text for scientists, engineers, and others familiar with basic concepts of coordinate systems, vectors, and partial derivatives. Indicial tensor, vector, dyadic, and matrix notations, and relationships among them described.

  11. The Topology of Symmetric Tensor Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Yingmei; Batra, Rajesh; Hesselink, Lambertus; Levy, Yuval

    1997-01-01

    Combinatorial topology, also known as "rubber sheet geometry", has extensive applications in geometry and analysis, many of which result from connections with the theory of differential equations. A link between topology and differential equations is vector fields. Recent developments in scientific visualization have shown that vector fields also play an important role in the analysis of second-order tensor fields. A second-order tensor field can be transformed into its eigensystem, namely, eigenvalues and their associated eigenvectors without loss of information content. Eigenvectors behave in a similar fashion to ordinary vectors with even simpler topological structures due to their sign indeterminacy. Incorporating information about eigenvectors and eigenvalues in a display technique known as hyperstreamlines reveals the structure of a tensor field. The simplify and often complex tensor field and to capture its important features, the tensor is decomposed into an isotopic tensor and a deviator. A tensor field and its deviator share the same set of eigenvectors, and therefore they have a similar topological structure. A a deviator determines the properties of a tensor field, while the isotopic part provides a uniform bias. Degenerate points are basic constituents of tensor fields. In 2-D tensor fields, there are only two types of degenerate points; while in 3-D, the degenerate points can be characterized in a Q'-R' plane. Compressible and incompressible flows share similar topological feature due to the similarity of their deviators. In the case of the deformation tensor, the singularities of its deviator represent the area of vortex core in the field. In turbulent flows, the similarities and differences of the topology of the deformation and the Reynolds stress tensors reveal that the basic addie-viscosity assuptions have their validity in turbulence modeling under certain conditions.

  12. A Continuum Damage Mechanics Model to Predict Kink-Band Propagation Using Deformation Gradient Tensor Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergan, Andrew C.; Leone, Frank A., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    A new model is proposed that represents the kinematics of kink-band formation and propagation within the framework of a mesoscale continuum damage mechanics (CDM) model. The model uses the recently proposed deformation gradient decomposition approach to represent a kink band as a displacement jump via a cohesive interface that is embedded in an elastic bulk material. The model is capable of representing the combination of matrix failure in the frame of a misaligned fiber and instability due to shear nonlinearity. In contrast to conventional linear or bilinear strain softening laws used in most mesoscale CDM models for longitudinal compression, the constitutive response of the proposed model includes features predicted by detailed micromechanical models. These features include: 1) the rotational kinematics of the kink band, 2) an instability when the peak load is reached, and 3) a nonzero plateau stress under large strains.

  13. Analytic model of the radiation-dominated decay of a compact toroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, S.P.

    1981-01-01

    The coaxial-gun, compact-torus experiments at LLNL and LASNL are believed to be radiation-dominated, in the sense that most or all of the input energy is lost by impurity radiation. This paper presents a simple analytic model of the radiation-dominated decay of a compact torus, and demonstrates that several striking features of the experiment (finite lifetime, linear current decay, insensitivity of the lifetime to density or stored magnetic energy) may also be explained by the hypothesis that impurity radiation dominates the energy loss. The model incorporates the essential features of the more elaborate 1 1/2-D simulations of Shumaker et al., yet is simple enough to be solved exactly. Based on the analytic results, a simple criterion is given for the maximum tolerable impurity density

  14. Bowen-York tensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beig, Robert; Krammer, Werner

    2004-01-01

    For a conformally flat 3-space, we derive a family of linear second-order partial differential operators which sends vectors into trace-free, symmetric 2-tensors. These maps, which are parametrized by conformal Killing vectors on the 3-space, are such that the divergence of the resulting tensor field depends only on the divergence of the original vector field. In particular, these maps send source-free electric fields into TT tensors. Moreover, if the original vector field is the Coulomb field on R 3 {0}, the resulting tensor fields on R 3 {0} are nothing but the family of TT tensors originally written by Bowen and York

  15. Longitudinal diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging study of radiation-induced white matter damage in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Silun; Wu, Ed X; Qiu, Deqiang; Leung, Lucullus H T; Lau, Ho-Fai; Khong, Pek-Lan

    2009-02-01

    Radiation-induced white matter (WM) damage is a major side effect of whole brain irradiation among childhood cancer survivors. We evaluate longitudinally the diffusion characteristics of the late radiation-induced WM damage in a rat model after 25 and 30 Gy irradiation to the hemibrain at 8 time points from 2 to 48 weeks postradiation. We hypothesize that diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) indices including fractional anisotropy (FA), trace, axial diffusivity (lambda(//)), and radial diffusivity (lambda( perpendicular)) can accurately detect and monitor the histopathologic changes of radiation-induced WM damage, measured at the EC, and that these changes are dose and time dependent. Results showed a progressive reduction of FA, which was driven by reduction in lambda(//) from 4 to 40 weeks postradiation, and an increase in lambda( perpendicular) with return to baseline in lambda(//) at 48 weeks postradiation. Histologic evaluation of irradiated WM showed reactive astrogliosis from 4 weeks postradiation with reversal at 36 weeks, and demyelination, axonal degeneration, and necrosis at 48 weeks postradiation. Moreover, changes in lambda(//) correlated with reactive astrogliosis (P histopathologic changes of WM damage and our results support the use of DTI as a biomarker to noninvasively monitor radiation-induced WM damage.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging and tensor-based morphometry in the MPTP non-human primate model of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Modo

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder producing a variety of motor and cognitive deficits with the causes remaining largely unknown. The gradual loss of the nigrostriatal pathway is currently considered the pivotal pathological event. To better understand the progression of PD and improve treatment management, defining the disease on a structural basis and expanding brain analysis to extra-nigral structures is indispensable. The anatomical complexity and the presence of neuromelanin, make the use of non-human primates an essential element in developing putative imaging biomarkers of PD. To this end, ex vivo T2-weighted magnetic resonance images were acquired from control and 1-methyl-4 phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP-treated marmosets. Volume measurements of the caudate, putamen, and substantia nigra indicated significant atrophy and cortical thinning. Tensor-based morphometry provided a more extensive and hypothesis free assessment of widespread changes caused by the toxin insult to the brain, especially highlighting regional cortical atrophy. The results highlight the importance of developing imaging biomarkers of PD in non-human primate models considering their distinct neuroanatomy. It is essential to further develop these biomarkers in vivo to provide non-invasive tools to detect pre-symptomatic PD and to monitor potential disease altering therapeutics.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging and tensor-based morphometry in the MPTP non-human primate model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modo, Michel; Crum, William R; Gerwig, Madeline; Vernon, Anthony C; Patel, Priya; Jackson, Michael J; Rose, Sarah; Jenner, Peter; Iravani, Mahmoud M

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder producing a variety of motor and cognitive deficits with the causes remaining largely unknown. The gradual loss of the nigrostriatal pathway is currently considered the pivotal pathological event. To better understand the progression of PD and improve treatment management, defining the disease on a structural basis and expanding brain analysis to extra-nigral structures is indispensable. The anatomical complexity and the presence of neuromelanin, make the use of non-human primates an essential element in developing putative imaging biomarkers of PD. To this end, ex vivo T2-weighted magnetic resonance images were acquired from control and 1-methyl-4 phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated marmosets. Volume measurements of the caudate, putamen, and substantia nigra indicated significant atrophy and cortical thinning. Tensor-based morphometry provided a more extensive and hypothesis free assessment of widespread changes caused by the toxin insult to the brain, especially highlighting regional cortical atrophy. The results highlight the importance of developing imaging biomarkers of PD in non-human primate models considering their distinct neuroanatomy. It is essential to further develop these biomarkers in vivo to provide non-invasive tools to detect pre-symptomatic PD and to monitor potential disease altering therapeutics.

  18. Dynamical behaviour of a discrete selection-migration model with arbitrary dominance

    Science.gov (United States)

    James F. Selgrade; Jordan West Bostic; James H. Roberds

    2009-01-01

    To study the effects of immigration of genes (possibly transgenic) into a natural population, a one-island selection-migration model with density-dependent regulation is used to track allele frequency and population size. The existence and uniqueness of a polymorphic genetic equilibrium is proved under a general assumption about dominance in fitnesses. Also, conditions...

  19. Three-dimensional semi-idealized model for estuarine turbidity maxima in tidally dominated estuaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, Mohit; Schuttelaars, Henk M.; Roos, Pieter C.

    2017-01-01

    We develop a three-dimensional idealized model that is specifically aimed at gaining insight in the physical mechanisms resulting in the formation of estuarine turbidity maxima in tidally dominated estuaries. First, the three-dimensional equations for water motion and suspended sediment

  20. Numerical modelling of hydro-morphological processes dominated by fine suspended sediment in a stormwater pond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Mingfu; Ahilan, Sangaralingam; Yu, Dapeng; Peng, Yong; Wright, Nigel

    2018-01-01

    Fine sediment plays crucial and multiple roles in the hydrological, ecological and geomorphological functioning of river systems. This study employs a two-dimensional (2D) numerical model to track the hydro-morphological processes dominated by fine suspended sediment, including the prediction of sediment concentration in flow bodies, and erosion and deposition caused by sediment transport. The model is governed by 2D full shallow water equations with which an advection-diffusion equation for fine sediment is coupled. Bed erosion and sedimentation are updated by a bed deformation model based on local sediment entrainment and settling flux in flow bodies. The model is initially validated with the three laboratory-scale experimental events where suspended load plays a dominant role. Satisfactory simulation results confirm the model's capability in capturing hydro-morphodynamic processes dominated by fine suspended sediment at laboratory-scale. Applications to sedimentation in a stormwater pond are conducted to develop the process-based understanding of fine sediment dynamics over a variety of flow conditions. Urban flows with 5-year, 30-year and 100-year return period and the extreme flood event in 2012 are simulated. The modelled results deliver a step change in understanding fine sediment dynamics in stormwater ponds. The model is capable of quantitatively simulating and qualitatively assessing the performance of a stormwater pond in managing urban water quantity and quality.

  1. Effective Connectivity Reveals Right-Hemisphere Dominance in Audiospatial Perception: Implications for Models of Spatial Neglect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friston, Karl J.; Mattingley, Jason B.; Roepstorff, Andreas; Garrido, Marta I.

    2014-01-01

    Detecting the location of salient sounds in the environment rests on the brain's ability to use differences in sounds arriving at both ears. Functional neuroimaging studies in humans indicate that the left and right auditory hemispaces are coded asymmetrically, with a rightward attentional bias that reflects spatial attention in vision. Neuropsychological observations in patients with spatial neglect have led to the formulation of two competing models: the orientation bias and right-hemisphere dominance models. The orientation bias model posits a symmetrical mapping between one side of the sensorium and the contralateral hemisphere, with mutual inhibition of the ipsilateral hemisphere. The right-hemisphere dominance model introduces a functional asymmetry in the brain's coding of space: the left hemisphere represents the right side, whereas the right hemisphere represents both sides of the sensorium. We used Dynamic Causal Modeling of effective connectivity and Bayesian model comparison to adjudicate between these alternative network architectures, based on human electroencephalographic data acquired during an auditory location oddball paradigm. Our results support a hemispheric asymmetry in a frontoparietal network that conforms to the right-hemisphere dominance model. We show that, within this frontoparietal network, forward connectivity increases selectively in the hemisphere contralateral to the side of sensory stimulation. We interpret this finding in light of hierarchical predictive coding as a selective increase in attentional gain, which is mediated by feedforward connections that carry precision-weighted prediction errors during perceptual inference. This finding supports the disconnection hypothesis of unilateral neglect and has implications for theories of its etiology. PMID:24695717

  2. Efficient Tensor Completion for Color Image and Video Recovery: Low-Rank Tensor Train.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengua, Johann A; Phien, Ho N; Tuan, Hoang Duong; Do, Minh N

    2017-05-01

    This paper proposes a novel approach to tensor completion, which recovers missing entries of data represented by tensors. The approach is based on the tensor train (TT) rank, which is able to capture hidden information from tensors thanks to its definition from a well-balanced matricization scheme. Accordingly, new optimization formulations for tensor completion are proposed as well as two new algorithms for their solution. The first one called simple low-rank tensor completion via TT (SiLRTC-TT) is intimately related to minimizing a nuclear norm based on TT rank. The second one is from a multilinear matrix factorization model to approximate the TT rank of a tensor, and is called tensor completion by parallel matrix factorization via TT (TMac-TT). A tensor augmentation scheme of transforming a low-order tensor to higher orders is also proposed to enhance the effectiveness of SiLRTC-TT and TMac-TT. Simulation results for color image and video recovery show the clear advantage of our method over all other methods.

  3. Evaluation of Soft Tissue Sarcoma Tumors Electrical Conductivity Anisotropy Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Numerical Modeling on Electroporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazikhanlou-sani K.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is many ways to assessing the electrical conductivity anisotropy of a tumor. Applying the values of tissue electrical conductivity anisotropy is crucial in numerical modeling of the electric and thermal field distribution in electroporation treatments. This study aims to calculate the tissues electrical conductivity anisotropy in patients with sarcoma tumors using diffusion tensor imaging technique. Materials and Method: A total of 3 subjects were involved in this study. All of patients had clinically apparent sarcoma tumors at the extremities. The T1, T2 and DTI images were performed using a 3-Tesla multi-coil, multi-channel MRI system. The fractional anisotropy (FA maps were performed using the FSL (FMRI software library software regarding the DTI images. The 3D matrix of the FA maps of each area (tumor, normal soft tissue and bone/s was reconstructed and the anisotropy matrix was calculated regarding to the FA values. Result: The mean FA values in direction of main axis in sarcoma tumors were ranged between 0.475–0.690. With assumption of isotropy of the electrical conductivity, the FA value of electrical conductivity at each X, Y and Z coordinate axes would be equal to 0.577. The gathered results showed that there is a mean error band of 20% in electrical conductivity, if the electrical conductivity anisotropy not concluded at the calculations. The comparison of FA values showed that there is a significant statistical difference between the mean FA value of tumor and normal soft tissues (P<0.05. Conclusion: DTI is a feasible technique for the assessment of electrical conductivity anisotropy of tissues. It is crucial to quantify the electrical conductivity anisotropy data of tissues for numerical modeling of electroporation treatments.

  4. Relativistic particles with spin and antisymmetric tensor fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandoval Junior, L.

    1990-09-01

    A study is made on antisymmetric tensor fields particularly on second order tensor field as far as his equivalence to other fields and quantization through the path integral are concerned. Also, a particle model is studied which has been recently proposed and reveals to be equivalent to antisymmetric tensor fields of any order. (L.C.J.A.)

  5. Generating scale-invariant tensor perturbations in the non-inflationary universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Mingzhe

    2014-01-01

    It is believed that the recent detection of large tensor perturbations strongly favors the inflation scenario in the early universe. This common sense depends on the assumption that Einstein's general relativity is valid at the early universe. In this paper we show that nearly scale-invariant primordial tensor perturbations can be generated during a contracting phase before the radiation dominated epoch if the theory of gravity is modified by the scalar–tensor theory at that time. The scale-invariance protects the tensor perturbations from suppressing at large scales and they may have significant amplitudes to fit BICEP2's result. We construct a model to achieve this purpose and show that the universe can bounce to the hot big bang after long time contraction, and at almost the same time the theory of gravity approaches to general relativity through stabilizing the scalar field. Theoretically, such models are dual to inflation models if we change to the frame in which the theory of gravity is general relativity. Dual models are related by the conformal transformations. With this study we reinforce the point that only the conformal invariant quantities such as the scalar and tensor perturbations are physical. How did the background evolve before the radiation time depends on the frame and has no physical meaning. It is impossible to distinguish different pictures by later time cosmological probes.

  6. Generating scale-invariant tensor perturbations in the non-inflationary universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingzhe Li

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available It is believed that the recent detection of large tensor perturbations strongly favors the inflation scenario in the early universe. This common sense depends on the assumption that Einstein's general relativity is valid at the early universe. In this paper we show that nearly scale-invariant primordial tensor perturbations can be generated during a contracting phase before the radiation dominated epoch if the theory of gravity is modified by the scalar–tensor theory at that time. The scale-invariance protects the tensor perturbations from suppressing at large scales and they may have significant amplitudes to fit BICEP2's result. We construct a model to achieve this purpose and show that the universe can bounce to the hot big bang after long time contraction, and at almost the same time the theory of gravity approaches to general relativity through stabilizing the scalar field. Theoretically, such models are dual to inflation models if we change to the frame in which the theory of gravity is general relativity. Dual models are related by the conformal transformations. With this study we reinforce the point that only the conformal invariant quantities such as the scalar and tensor perturbations are physical. How did the background evolve before the radiation time depends on the frame and has no physical meaning. It is impossible to distinguish different pictures by later time cosmological probes.

  7. Centroid moment tensor catalogue using a 3-D continental scale Earth model: Application to earthquakes in Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejrani, Babak; Tkalčić, Hrvoje; Fichtner, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    Although both earthquake mechanism and 3-D Earth structure contribute to the seismic wavefield, the latter is usually assumed to be layered in source studies, which may limit the quality of the source estimate. To overcome this limitation, we implement a method that takes advantage of a 3-D heterogeneous Earth model, recently developed for the Australasian region. We calculate centroid moment tensors (CMTs) for earthquakes in Papua New Guinea (PNG) and the Solomon Islands. Our method is based on a library of Green's functions for each source-station pair for selected Geoscience Australia and Global Seismic Network stations in the region, and distributed on a 3-D grid covering the seismicity down to 50 km depth. For the calculation of Green's functions, we utilize a spectral-element method for the solution of the seismic wave equation. Seismic moment tensors were calculated using least squares inversion, and the 3-D location of the centroid is found by grid search. Through several synthetic tests, we confirm a trade-off between the location and the correct input moment tensor components when using a 1-D Earth model to invert synthetics produced in a 3-D heterogeneous Earth. Our CMT catalogue for PNG in comparison to the global CMT shows a meaningful increase in the double-couple percentage (up to 70%). Another significant difference that we observe is in the mechanism of events with depth shallower then 15 km and Mw region.

  8. Categorical Tensor Network States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob D. Biamonte

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We examine the use of string diagrams and the mathematics of category theory in the description of quantum states by tensor networks. This approach lead to a unification of several ideas, as well as several results and methods that have not previously appeared in either side of the literature. Our approach enabled the development of a tensor network framework allowing a solution to the quantum decomposition problem which has several appealing features. Specifically, given an n-body quantum state |ψ〉, we present a new and general method to factor |ψ〉 into a tensor network of clearly defined building blocks. We use the solution to expose a previously unknown and large class of quantum states which we prove can be sampled efficiently and exactly. This general framework of categorical tensor network states, where a combination of generic and algebraically defined tensors appear, enhances the theory of tensor network states.

  9. Domination, Eternal Domination, and Clique Covering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klostermeyer William F.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Eternal and m-eternal domination are concerned with using mobile guards to protect a graph against infinite sequences of attacks at vertices. Eternal domination allows one guard to move per attack, whereas more than one guard may move per attack in the m-eternal domination model. Inequality chains consisting of the domination, eternal domination, m-eternal domination, independence, and clique covering numbers of graph are explored in this paper.

  10. MONITORING CANOPY AND AIR TEMPERATURE OF DOMINANT VEGETATION IN TROPICAL SEMI-ARID USING BIOCLIMATIC MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiclêda Domiciano Galvíncio

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Typical vegetation of arid environments consist of few dominant species highly threatened by climate change. Jurema preta (Mimosa tenuiflora (Willd. Poiret is one of these successful species that now is dominant in extensive semiarid areas in the world. The development of a simple bioclimatic model using climate change scenarios based on optimistic and pessimistic predictions of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC shown as a simple tool to predict possible responses of dominant species under dry land conditions and low functional biodiversity. The simple bioclimatic model proved satisfactory in creating climate change scenarios and impacts on the canopy temperature of Jurema preta in semiarid Brazil. The bioclimatic model was efficient to obtain spatially relevant estimations of air temperature from determinations of the surface temperature using satellite images. The model determined that the average difference of 5oC between the air temperature and the leaf temperature for Jurema preta, and an increase of 3oC in air temperature, promote an increase of 2oC in leaf temperature. It lead to disturbances in vital physiological mechanisms in the leaf, mainly the photosynthesis and efficient use of water.

  11. An enhanced structure tensor method for sea ice ridge detection from GF-3 SAR imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, T.; Li, F.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, S.; Spreen, G.; Dierking, W.; Heygster, G.

    2017-12-01

    In SAR imagery, ridges or leads are shown as the curvilinear features. The proposed ridge detection method is facilitated by their curvilinear shapes. The bright curvilinear features are recognized as the ridges while the dark curvilinear features are classified as the leads. In dual-polarization HH or HV channel of C-band SAR imagery, the bright curvilinear feature may be false alarm because the frost flowers of young leads may show as bright pixels associated with changes in the surface salinity under calm surface conditions. Wind roughened leads also trigger the backscatter increasing that can be misclassified as ridges [1]. Thus the width limitation is considered in this proposed structure tensor method [2], since only shape feature based method is not enough for detecting ridges. The ridge detection algorithm is based on the hypothesis that the bright pixels are ridges with curvilinear shapes and the ridge width is less 30 meters. Benefited from GF-3 with high spatial resolution of 3 meters, we provide an enhanced structure tensor method for detecting the significant ridge. The preprocessing procedures including the calibration and incidence angle normalization are also investigated. The bright pixels will have strong response to the bandpass filtering. The ridge training samples are delineated from the SAR imagery in the Log-Gabor filters to construct structure tensor. From the tensor, the dominant orientation of the pixel representing the ridge is determined by the dominant eigenvector. For the post-processing of structure tensor, the elongated kernel is desired to enhance the ridge curvilinear shape. Since ridge presents along a certain direction, the ratio of the dominant eigenvector will be used to measure the intensity of local anisotropy. The convolution filter has been utilized in the constructed structure tensor is used to model spatial contextual information. Ridge detection results from GF-3 show the proposed method performs better compared to the

  12. Non-negative Tensor Factorization with missing data for the modeling of gene expressions in the Human Brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Føns Vind; Mørup, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Non-negative Tensor Factorization (NTF) has become a prominent tool for analyzing high dimensional multi-way structured data. In this paper we set out to analyze gene expression across brain regions in multiple subjects based on data from the Allen Human Brain Atlas [1] with more than 40 % data m...

  13. Cartesian tensors an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Temple, G

    2004-01-01

    This undergraduate text provides an introduction to the theory of Cartesian tensors, defining tensors as multilinear functions of direction, and simplifying many theorems in a manner that lends unity to the subject. The author notes the importance of the analysis of the structure of tensors in terms of spectral sets of projection operators as part of the very substance of quantum theory. He therefore provides an elementary discussion of the subject, in addition to a view of isotropic tensors and spinor analysis within the confines of Euclidean space. The text concludes with an examination of t

  14. Linear Invariant Tensor Interpolation Applied to Cardiac Diffusion Tensor MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahm, Jin Kyu; Wisniewski, Nicholas; Kindlmann, Gordon; Kung, Geoffrey L.; Klug, William S.; Garfinkel, Alan; Ennis, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Various methods exist for interpolating diffusion tensor fields, but none of them linearly interpolate tensor shape attributes. Linear interpolation is expected not to introduce spurious changes in tensor shape. Methods Herein we define a new linear invariant (LI) tensor interpolation method that linearly interpolates components of tensor shape (tensor invariants) and recapitulates the interpolated tensor from the linearly interpolated tensor invariants and the eigenvectors of a linearly interpolated tensor. The LI tensor interpolation method is compared to the Euclidean (EU), affine-invariant Riemannian (AI), log-Euclidean (LE) and geodesic-loxodrome (GL) interpolation methods using both a synthetic tensor field and three experimentally measured cardiac DT-MRI datasets. Results EU, AI, and LE introduce significant microstructural bias, which can be avoided through the use of GL or LI. Conclusion GL introduces the least microstructural bias, but LI tensor interpolation performs very similarly and at substantially reduced computational cost. PMID:23286085

  15. p-Norm SDD tensors and eigenvalue localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qilong Liu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a new class of nonsingular tensors (p-norm strictly diagonally dominant tensors, which is a subclass of strong H $\\mathcal{H}$ -tensors. As applications of the results, we give a new eigenvalue inclusion set, which is tighter than those provided by Li et al. (Linear Multilinear Algebra 64:727-736, 2016 in some case. Based on this set, we give a checkable sufficient condition for the positive (semidefiniteness of an even-order symmetric tensor.

  16. Multi-objective calibration of a reservoir model: aggregation and non-dominated sorting approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Numerical reservoir models can be helpful tools for water resource management. These models are generally calibrated against historical measurement data made in reservoirs. In this study, two methods are proposed for the multi-objective calibration of such models: aggregation and non-dominated sorting methods. Both methods use a hybrid genetic algorithm as an optimization engine and are different in fitness assignment. In the aggregation method, a weighted sum of scaled simulation errors is designed as an overall objective function to measure the fitness of solutions (i.e. parameter values). The contribution of this study to the aggregation method is the correlation analysis and its implication to the choice of weight factors. In the non-dominated sorting method, a novel method based on non-dominated sorting and the method of minimal distance is used to calculate the dummy fitness of solutions. The proposed methods are illustrated using a water quality model that was set up to simulate the water quality of Pepacton Reservoir, which is located to the north of New York City and is used for water supply of city. The study also compares the aggregation and the non-dominated sorting methods. The purpose of this comparison is not to evaluate the pros and cons between the two methods but to determine whether the parameter values, objective function values (simulation errors) and simulated results obtained are significantly different with each other. The final results (objective function values) from the two methods are good compromise between all objective functions, and none of these results are the worst for any objective function. The calibrated model provides an overall good performance and the simulated results with the calibrated parameter values match the observed data better than the un-calibrated parameters, which supports and justifies the use of multi-objective calibration. The results achieved in this study can be very useful for the calibration of water

  17. Efficient Tensor Strategy for Recommendation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aboagye Emelia Opoku

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The era of big data has witnessed the explosion of tensor datasets, and large scale Probabilistic Tensor Factorization (PTF analysis is important to accommodate such increasing trend of data. Sparsity, and Cold-Start are some of the inherent problems of recommender systems in the era of big data. This paper proposes a novel Sentiment-Based Probabilistic Tensor Analysis technique senti-PTF to address the problems. The propose framework first applies a Natural Language Processing technique to perform sentiment analysis taking advantage of the huge sums of textual data generated available from the social media which are predominantly left untouched. Although some current studies do employ review texts, many of them do not consider how sentiments in reviews influence recommendation algorithm for prediction. There is therefore this big data text analytics gap whose modeling is computationally expensive. From our experiments, our novel machine learning sentiment-based tensor analysis is computationally less expensive, and addresses the cold-start problem, for optimal recommendation prediction.

  18. Improved tensor multiplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wit, B. de; Rocek, M.

    1982-01-01

    We construct a conformally invariant theory of the N = 1 supersymmetric tensor gauge multiplet and discuss the situation in N = 2. We show that our results give rise to the recently proposed variant of Poincare supergravity, and provide the complete tensor calculus for the theory. Finally, we argue that this theory cannot be quantized sensibly. (orig.)

  19. Diffusion Dominant Solute Transport Modelling In Deep Repository Under The Effect of Emplacement Media Degradation - 13285

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwong, S.; Jivkov, A.P.

    2013-01-01

    Deep geologic disposal of high activity and long-lived radioactive waste is being actively considered and pursued in many countries, where low permeability geological formations are used to provide long term waste contaminant with minimum impact to the environment and risk to the biosphere. A multi-barrier approach that makes use of both engineered and natural barriers (i.e. geological formations) is often used to further enhance the containment performance of the repository. As the deep repository system subjects to a variety of thermo-hydro-chemo-mechanical (THCM) effects over its long 'operational' lifespan (e.g. 0.1 to 1.0 million years, the integrity of the barrier system will decrease over time (e.g. fracturing in rock or clay)). This is broadly referred as media degradation in the present study. This modelling study examines the effects of media degradation on diffusion dominant solute transport in fractured media that are typical of deep geological environment. In particular, reactive solute transport through fractured media is studied using a 2-D model, that considers advection and diffusion, to explore the coupled effects of kinetic and equilibrium chemical processes, while the effects of degradation is studied using a pore network model that considers the media diffusivity and network changes. Model results are presented to demonstrate the use of a 3D pore-network model, using a novel architecture, to calculate macroscopic properties of the medium such as diffusivity, subject to pore space changes as the media degrade. Results from a reactive transport model of a representative geological waste disposal package are also presented to demonstrate the effect of media property change on the solute migration behaviour, illustrating the complex interplay between kinetic biogeochemical processes and diffusion dominant transport. The initial modelling results demonstrate the feasibility of a coupled modelling approach (using pore-network model and reactive

  20. Time integration of tensor trains

    OpenAIRE

    Lubich, Christian; Oseledets, Ivan; Vandereycken, Bart

    2014-01-01

    A robust and efficient time integrator for dynamical tensor approximation in the tensor train or matrix product state format is presented. The method is based on splitting the projector onto the tangent space of the tensor manifold. The algorithm can be used for updating time-dependent tensors in the given data-sparse tensor train / matrix product state format and for computing an approximate solution to high-dimensional tensor differential equations within this data-sparse format. The formul...

  1. Homogenization and implementation of a 3D regional velocity model in Mexico for its application in moment tensor inversion of intermediate-magnitude earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Cardozo, Félix; Hjörleifsdóttir, Vala; Caló, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Moment tensor inversions for intermediate and small earthquakes (M. < 4.5) are challenging as they principally excite relatively short period seismic waves that interact strongly with local heterogeneities. Incorporating detailed regional 3D velocity models permits obtaining realistic synthetic seismograms and recover the seismic source parameters these smaller events. Two 3D regional velocity models have recently been developed for Mexico, using surface waves and seismic noise tomography (Spica et al., 2016; Gaite et al., 2015), which could be used to model the waveforms of intermediate magnitud earthquakes in this region. Such models are parameterized as layered velocity profiles and for some of the profiles, the velocity difference between two layers are considerable. The "jump" in velocities between two layers is inconvenient for some methods and algorithms that calculate synthetic waveforms, in particular for the method that we are using, the spectral element method (SPECFEM3D GLOBE, Komatitsch y Tromp, 2000), when the mesh does not follow the layer boundaries. In order to make the velocity models more easily implementec in SPECFEM3D GLOBE it is neccesary to apply a homogenization algorithm (Capdeville et al., 2015) such that the (now anisotropic) layer velocities are smoothly varying with depth. In this work, we apply a homogenization algorithm to the regional velocity models in México for implementing them in SPECFEM3D GLOBE, calculate synthetic waveforms for intermediate-magnitude earthquakes in México and invert them for the seismic moment tensor.

  2. Elucidating fluctuating diffusivity in center-of-mass motion of polymer models with time-averaged mean-square-displacement tensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaguchi, Tomoshige

    2017-10-01

    There have been increasing reports that the diffusion coefficient of macromolecules depends on time and fluctuates randomly. Here a method is developed to elucidate this fluctuating diffusivity from trajectory data. Time-averaged mean-square displacement (MSD), a common tool in single-particle-tracking (SPT) experiments, is generalized to a second-order tensor with which both magnitude and orientation fluctuations of the diffusivity can be clearly detected. This method is used to analyze the center-of-mass motion of four fundamental polymer models: the Rouse model, the Zimm model, a reptation model, and a rigid rodlike polymer. It is found that these models exhibit distinctly different types of magnitude and orientation fluctuations of diffusivity. This is an advantage of the present method over previous ones, such as the ergodicity-breaking parameter and a non-Gaussian parameter, because with either of these parameters it is difficult to distinguish the dynamics of the four polymer models. Also, the present method of a time-averaged MSD tensor could be used to analyze trajectory data obtained in SPT experiments.

  3. Evolving Non-Dominated Parameter Sets for Computational Models from Multiple Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Peter C. R.; Gobet, Fernand

    2013-03-01

    Creating robust, reproducible and optimal computational models is a key challenge for theorists in many sciences. Psychology and cognitive science face particular challenges as large amounts of data are collected and many models are not amenable to analytical techniques for calculating parameter sets. Particular problems are to locate the full range of acceptable model parameters for a given dataset, and to confirm the consistency of model parameters across different datasets. Resolving these problems will provide a better understanding of the behaviour of computational models, and so support the development of general and robust models. In this article, we address these problems using evolutionary algorithms to develop parameters for computational models against multiple sets of experimental data; in particular, we propose the `speciated non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm' for evolving models in several theories. We discuss the problem of developing a model of categorisation using twenty-nine sets of data and models drawn from four different theories. We find that the evolutionary algorithms generate high quality models, adapted to provide a good fit to all available data.

  4. Data-driven models of dominantly-inherited Alzheimer's disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxtoby, Neil P; Young, Alexandra L; Cash, David M; Benzinger, Tammie L S; Fagan, Anne M; Morris, John C; Bateman, Randall J; Fox, Nick C; Schott, Jonathan M; Alexander, Daniel C

    2018-03-22

    Dominantly-inherited Alzheimer's disease is widely hoped to hold the key to developing interventions for sporadic late onset Alzheimer's disease. We use emerging techniques in generative data-driven disease progression modelling to characterize dominantly-inherited Alzheimer's disease progression with unprecedented resolution, and without relying upon familial estimates of years until symptom onset. We retrospectively analysed biomarker data from the sixth data freeze of the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network observational study, including measures of amyloid proteins and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain, regional brain volumes and cortical thicknesses, brain glucose hypometabolism, and cognitive performance from the Mini-Mental State Examination (all adjusted for age, years of education, sex, and head size, as appropriate). Data included 338 participants with known mutation status (211 mutation carriers in three subtypes: 163 PSEN1, 17 PSEN2, and 31 APP) and a baseline visit (age 19-66; up to four visits each, 1.1 ± 1.9 years in duration; spanning 30 years before, to 21 years after, parental age of symptom onset). We used an event-based model to estimate sequences of biomarker changes from baseline data across disease subtypes (mutation groups), and a differential equation model to estimate biomarker trajectories from longitudinal data (up to 66 mutation carriers, all subtypes combined). The two models concur that biomarker abnormality proceeds as follows: amyloid deposition in cortical then subcortical regions (∼24 ± 11 years before onset); phosphorylated tau (17 ± 8 years), tau and amyloid-β changes in cerebrospinal fluid; neurodegeneration first in the putamen and nucleus accumbens (up to 6 ± 2 years); then cognitive decline (7 ± 6 years), cerebral hypometabolism (4 ± 4 years), and further regional neurodegeneration. Our models predicted symptom onset more accurately than predictions that used familial estimates: root mean squared error of 1

  5. Neonatal erythropoietin mitigates impaired gait, social interaction and diffusion tensor imaging abnormalities in a rat model of prenatal brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Shenandoah; Corbett, Christopher J; Winer, Jesse L; Chan, Lindsay A S; Maxwell, Jessie R; Anstine, Christopher V; Yellowhair, Tracylyn R; Andrews, Nicholas A; Yang, Yirong; Sillerud, Laurel O; Jantzie, Lauren L

    2018-04-01

    Children who are born preterm are at risk for encephalopathy of prematurity, a leading cause of cerebral palsy, cognitive delay and behavioral disorders. Current interventions are limited and none have been shown to reverse cognitive and behavioral impairments, a primary determinant of poor quality of life for these children. Moreover, the mechanisms of perinatal brain injury that result in functional deficits and imaging abnormalities in the mature brain are poorly defined, limiting the potential to target interventions to those who may benefit most. To determine whether impairments are reversible after a prenatal insult, we investigated a spectrum of functional deficits and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) abnormalities in young adult animals. We hypothesized that prenatal transient systemic hypoxia-ischemia (TSHI) would induce multiple functional deficits concomitant with reduced microstructural white and gray matter integrity, and tested whether these abnormalities could be ameliorated using postnatal erythropoietin (EPO), an emerging neurorestorative intervention. On embryonic day 18 uterine arteries were transiently occluded for 60min via laparotomy. Shams underwent anesthesia and laparotomy for 60min. Pups were born and TSHI pups were randomized to receive EPO or vehicle via intraperitoneal injection on postnatal days 1 to 5. Gait, social interaction, olfaction and open field testing was performed from postnatal day 25-35 before brains underwent ex vivo DTI to measure fractional anisotropy, axial diffusivity and radial diffusivity. Prenatal TSHI injury causes hyperactivity, impaired gait and poor social interaction in young adult rats that mimic the spectrum of deficits observed in children born preterm. Collectively, these data show for the first time in a model of encephalopathy of prematurity that postnatal EPO treatment mitigates impairments in social interaction, in addition to gait deficits. EPO also normalizes TSHI-induced microstructural abnormalities

  6. Massless and massive quanta resulting from a mediumlike metric tensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soln, J.

    1985-01-01

    A simple model of the ''primordial'' scalar field theory is presented in which the metric tensor is a generalization of the metric tensor from electrodynamics in a medium. The radiation signal corresponding to the scalar field propagates with a velocity that is generally less than c. This signal can be associated simultaneously with imaginary and real effective (momentum-dependent) masses. The requirement that the imaginary effective mass vanishes, which we take to be the prerequisite for the vacuumlike signal propagation, leads to the ''spontaneous'' splitting of the metric tensor into two distinct metric tensors: one metric tensor gives rise to masslesslike radiation and the other to a massive particle. (author)

  7. Trace and Ward-Takahashi identity anomalies in an SU(3) current model with energy-momentum tensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacrep, D.B.; Young, B.

    1975-01-01

    We discuss the validity of the naive Ward-Takahashi identities and trace identities for arbitrary n-point functions (n-pf's) of scalar, pseudoscalar, vector, and axial-vector currents and the improved energy-momentum tensor, thus extending the previous investigations in a unified way. We show that the validity of the naive Ward-Takahashi identities of the energy-momentum tensor implies the satisfaction of those of the vector currents. This removes an ambiguity concerning the minimal sets of anomalous current Ward-Takahashi identities. We find that all the anomalous Ward-Takahashi identities for the broad structure of n-pf's are again restricted to the axial-vector current of n-pf's of abnormal parity in a well-defined pattern, and the trace identity anomalies occur only in normal-parity n-pf's. We give all these anomalies. Our results show that there are no new anomalies associated with the inclusion of the energy-momentum tensor in the n-pf's

  8. Zealotry promotes coexistence in the rock-paper-scissors model of cyclic dominance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Gunjan; Chan, Kevin; Swami, Ananthram

    2015-11-01

    Cyclic dominance models, such as the classic rock-paper-scissors (RPS) game, have found real-world applications in biology, ecology, and sociology. A key quantity of interest in such models is the coexistence time, i.e., the time until at least one population type goes extinct. Much recent research has considered conditions that lengthen coexistence times in an RPS model. A general finding is that coexistence is promoted by localized spatial interactions (low mobility), while extinction is fostered by global interactions (high mobility). That is, there exists a mobility threshold which separates a regime of long coexistence from a regime of rapid collapse of coexistence. The key finding of our paper is that if zealots (i.e., nodes able to defeat others while themselves being immune to defeat) of even a single type exist, then system coexistence time can be significantly prolonged, even in the presence of global interactions. This work thus highlights a crucial determinant of system survival time in cyclic dominance models.

  9. Tensor interaction in heavy-ion scattering. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishioka, H.; Johnson, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    The Heidelberg shape-effect model for heavy-ion tensor interactions is reformulated and generalized using the Hooton-Johnson formulation. The generalized semiclassical model (the turning-point model) predicts that the components of the tensor analysing power anti Tsub(2q) have certain relations with each other for each type of tensor interaction (Tsub(R), Tsub(P) and Tsub(L) types). The predicted relations between the anti Tsub(2q) are very simple and have a direct connection with the properties of the tensor interaction at the turning point. The model predictions are satisfied in quantum-mechanical calculations for 7 Li and 23 Na elastic scattering from 58 Ni in the Fresnel-diffraction energy region. As a consequence of this model, it becomes possible to single out effects from a Tsub(P)- or Tsub(L)-type tensor interaction in polarized heavy-ion scattering. The presence of a Tsub(P)-type tensor interaction is suggested by measured anti T 20 /anti T 22 ratios for 7 Li + 58 Ni scattering. In the turning-point model the three types of tensor operator are not independent, and this is found to be true also in a quantum-mechanical calculation. The model also predicts relations between the components of higher-rank tensor analysing power in the presence of a higher-rank tensor interaction. The rank-3 tensor case is discussed in detail. (orig.)

  10. Surface tensor estimation from linear sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kousholt, Astrid; Kiderlen, Markus; Hug, Daniel

    From Crofton's formula for Minkowski tensors we derive stereological estimators of translation invariant surface tensors of convex bodies in the n-dimensional Euclidean space. The estimators are based on one-dimensional linear sections. In a design based setting we suggest three types of estimators....... These are based on isotropic uniform random lines, vertical sections, and non-isotropic random lines, respectively. Further, we derive estimators of the specific surface tensors associated with a stationary process of convex particles in the model based setting....

  11. Surface tensor estimation from linear sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kousholt, Astrid; Kiderlen, Markus; Hug, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    From Crofton’s formula for Minkowski tensors we derive stereological estimators of translation invariant surface tensors of convex bodies in the n-dimensional Euclidean space. The estimators are based on one-dimensional linear sections. In a design based setting we suggest three types of estimators....... These are based on isotropic uniform random lines, vertical sections, and non-isotropic random lines, respectively. Further, we derive estimators of the specific surface tensors associated with a stationary process of convex particles in the model based setting....

  12. Cosmological evolution in vector-tensor theories of gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran Jimenez, Jose; Maroto, Antonio L.

    2009-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the cosmological evolution in general vector-tensor theories of gravity without potential terms. We consider the evolution of the vector field throughout the expansion history of the Universe and carry out a classification of models according to the behavior of the vector field in each cosmological epoch. We also analyze the case in which the Universe is dominated by the vector field, performing a complete analysis of the system phase map and identifying those attracting solutions which give rise to accelerated expansion. Moreover, we consider the evolution in a universe filled with a pressureless fluid in addition to the vector field and study the existence of attractors in which we can have a transition from matter domination to vector domination with accelerated expansion so that the vector field may play the role of dark energy. We find that the existence of solutions with late-time accelerated expansion is a generic prediction of vector-tensor theories and that such solutions typically lead to the presence of future singularities. Finally, limits from local gravity tests are used to get constraints on the value of the vector field at small (Solar System) scales.

  13. Tensor network method for reversible classical computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi-Cheng; Kourtis, Stefanos; Chamon, Claudio; Mucciolo, Eduardo R.; Ruckenstein, Andrei E.

    2018-03-01

    We develop a tensor network technique that can solve universal reversible classical computational problems, formulated as vertex models on a square lattice [Nat. Commun. 8, 15303 (2017), 10.1038/ncomms15303]. By encoding the truth table of each vertex constraint in a tensor, the total number of solutions compatible with partial inputs and outputs at the boundary can be represented as the full contraction of a tensor network. We introduce an iterative compression-decimation (ICD) scheme that performs this contraction efficiently. The ICD algorithm first propagates local constraints to longer ranges via repeated contraction-decomposition sweeps over all lattice bonds, thus achieving compression on a given length scale. It then decimates the lattice via coarse-graining tensor contractions. Repeated iterations of these two steps gradually collapse the tensor network and ultimately yield the exact tensor trace for large systems, without the need for manual control of tensor dimensions. Our protocol allows us to obtain the exact number of solutions for computations where a naive enumeration would take astronomically long times.

  14. Water injection into vapor- and liquid-dominated reservoirs: Modeling of heat transfer and mass transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruess, K.; Oldenburg, C.; Moridis, G.; Finsterle, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    This paper summarizes recent advances in methods for simulating water and tracer injection, and presents illustrative applications to liquid- and vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs. High-resolution simulations of water injection into heterogeneous, vertical fractures in superheated vapor zones were performed. Injected water was found to move in dendritic patterns, and to experience stronger lateral flow effects than predicted from homogeneous medium models. Higher-order differencing methods were applied to modeling water and tracer injection into liquid-dominated systems. Conventional upstream weighting techniques were shown to be adequate for predicting the migration of thermal fronts, while higher-order methods give far better accuracy for tracer transport. A new fluid property module for the TOUGH2 simulator is described which allows a more accurate description of geofluids, and includes mineral dissolution and precipitation effects with associated porosity and permeability change. Comparisons between numerical simulation predictions and data for laboratory and field injection experiments are summarized. Enhanced simulation capabilities include a new linear solver package for TOUGH2, and inverse modeling techniques for automatic history matching and optimization.

  15. Large-x dependence of νW2 in the generalized vector-dominance model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argyres, E.N.; Lam, C.S.

    1977-01-01

    It is well known that the usual generalized vector-meson-dominance (GVMD) model gives too large a contribution to νW 2 for large x. Various heuristic modifications, for example making use of the t/sub min/ effect, have been proposed in order to achieve a reduction of this contribution. In this paper we examine within the GVMD context whether such reductions can rigorously be achieved. This is done utilizing a potential as well as a relativistic eikonal model. We find that whereas a reduction equivalent to that of t/sub min/ can be arranged in vector-meson photoproduction, the same is not true for virtual-photon Compton scattering in such diagonal models. The reason for this difference is discussed in detail. Finally we show that the desired reduction can be obtained if nondiagonal vector-meson scattering terms are properly taken into account

  16. Unsupervised Tensor Mining for Big Data Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalexakis, Evangelos E; Faloutsos, Christos

    2016-09-01

    Multiaspect data are ubiquitous in modern Big Data applications. For instance, different aspects of a social network are the different types of communication between people, the time stamp of each interaction, and the location associated to each individual. How can we jointly model all those aspects and leverage the additional information that they introduce to our analysis? Tensors, which are multidimensional extensions of matrices, are a principled and mathematically sound way of modeling such multiaspect data. In this article, our goal is to popularize tensors and tensor decompositions to Big Data practitioners by demonstrating their effectiveness, outlining challenges that pertain to their application in Big Data scenarios, and presenting our recent work that tackles those challenges. We view this work as a step toward a fully automated, unsupervised tensor mining tool that can be easily and broadly adopted by practitioners in academia and industry.

  17. Loop optimization for tensor network renormalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuo; Gu, Zheng-Cheng; Wen, Xiao-Gang

    We introduce a tensor renormalization group scheme for coarse-graining a two-dimensional tensor network, which can be successfully applied to both classical and quantum systems on and off criticality. The key idea of our scheme is to deform a 2D tensor network into small loops and then optimize tensors on each loop. In this way we remove short-range entanglement at each iteration step, and significantly improve the accuracy and stability of the renormalization flow. We demonstrate our algorithm in the classical Ising model and a frustrated 2D quantum model. NSF Grant No. DMR-1005541 and NSFC 11274192, BMO Financial Group, John Templeton Foundation, Government of Canada through Industry Canada, Province of Ontario through the Ministry of Economic Development & Innovation.

  18. Upscaling Empirically Based Conceptualisations to Model Tropical Dominant Hydrological Processes for Historical Land Use Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toohey, R.; Boll, J.; Brooks, E.; Jones, J.

    2009-12-01

    Surface runoff and percolation to ground water are two hydrological processes of concern to the Atlantic slope of Costa Rica because of their impacts on flooding and drinking water contamination. As per legislation, the Costa Rican Government funds land use management from the farm to the regional scale to improve or conserve hydrological ecosystem services. In this study, we examined how land use (e.g., forest, coffee, sugar cane, and pasture) affects hydrological response at the point, plot (1 m2), and the field scale (1-6ha) to empirically conceptualize the dominant hydrological processes in each land use. Using our field data, we upscaled these conceptual processes into a physically-based distributed hydrological model at the field, watershed (130 km2), and regional (1500 km2) scales. At the point and plot scales, the presence of macropores and large roots promoted greater vertical percolation and subsurface connectivity in the forest and coffee field sites. The lack of macropores and large roots, plus the addition of management artifacts (e.g., surface compaction and a plough layer), altered the dominant hydrological processes by increasing lateral flow and surface runoff in the pasture and sugar cane field sites. Macropores and topography were major influences on runoff generation at the field scale. Also at the field scale, antecedent moisture conditions suggest a threshold behavior as a temporal control on surface runoff generation. However, in this tropical climate with very intense rainstorms, annual surface runoff was less than 10% of annual precipitation at the field scale. Significant differences in soil and hydrological characteristics observed at the point and plot scales appear to have less significance when upscaled to the field scale. At the point and plot scales, percolation acted as the dominant hydrological process in this tropical environment. However, at the field scale for sugar cane and pasture sites, saturation-excess runoff increased as

  19. Tensor spherical harmonics and tensor multipoles. II. Minkowski space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daumens, M.; Minnaert, P.

    1976-01-01

    The bases of tensor spherical harmonics and of tensor multipoles discussed in the preceding paper are generalized in the Hilbert space of Minkowski tensor fields. The transformation properties of the tensor multipoles under Lorentz transformation lead to the notion of irreducible tensor multipoles. We show that the usual 4-vector multipoles are themselves irreducible, and we build the irreducible tensor multipoles of the second order. We also give their relations with the symmetric tensor multipoles defined by Zerilli for application to the gravitational radiation

  20. Modelling hydrological processes and dissolved organic carbon dynamics in a rehabilitated Sphagnum-dominated peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard-Jannin, Léonard; Binet, Stéphane; Gogo, Sébastien; Leroy, Fabien; Perdereau, Laurent; Laggoun-Défarge, Fatima

    2017-04-01

    Sphagnum-dominated peatlands represent a global major stock of carbon (C). Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) exports through runoff and leaching could reduce their potential C sink function and impact downstream water quality. DOC production in peatlands is strongly controlled by the hydrology, especially water table depth (WTD). Therefore, disturbances such as drainage can lead to increase DOC exports by lowering the WTD. Hydrological restoration (e.g. rewetting) can be undertaken to restore peatland functioning with an impact on DOC exports. The objective of this study is to assess the impact of drainage and rewetting on hydrological processes and their interactions with DOC dynamics in a Sphagnum dominated peatland. A hydrological model has been applied to a drained peatland (La Guette, France) which experienced a rewetting action on February 2014 and where WTD has been recorded in four piezometers at a 15 min time step since 2009. In addition, DOC concentrations in the peatland have been measured 6 times a year since 2014. The hydrological model is a WTD dependent reservoir model composed by two reservoirs representing the micro and macro porosity of the peatland (Binet et al., 2013). A DOC production module in both reservoirs was implemented based on temperature and WTD. The model was calibrated against WTD and DOC concentrations for each piezometer. The results show that the WTD in the study area is strongly affected by local meteorological conditions that could hide the effect of the rewetting action. The preliminary results evidenced that an additional source of water, identified as groundwater supply originating from the surrounding sandy layer aquifer, is necessary to maintain the water balance, especially during wet years (NS>0.8). Finally, the DOC module was able to describe DOC concentrations measured in the peatland and could be used to assess the impact of rewetting on DOC dynamics at different locations and to identify the factors of control of DOC

  1. Modelling both dominance and species distribution provides a more complete picture of changes to mangrove ecosystems under climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crase, Beth; Vesk, Peter A; Liedloff, Adam; Wintle, Brendan A

    2015-08-01

    Dominant species influence the composition and abundance of other species present in ecosystems. However, forecasts of distributional change under future climates have predominantly focused on changes in species distribution and ignored possible changes in spatial and temporal patterns of dominance. We develop forecasts of spatial changes for the distribution of species dominance, defined in terms of basal area, and for species occurrence, in response to sea level rise for three tree taxa within an extensive mangrove ecosystem in northern Australia. Three new metrics are provided, indicating the area expected to be suitable under future conditions (Eoccupied ), the instability of suitable area (Einstability ) and the overlap between the current and future spatial distribution (Eoverlap ). The current dominance and occurrence were modelled in relation to a set of environmental variables using boosted regression tree (BRT) models, under two scenarios of seedling establishment: unrestricted and highly restricted. While forecasts of spatial change were qualitatively similar for species occurrence and dominance, the models of species dominance exhibited higher metrics of model fit and predictive performance, and the spatial pattern of future dominance was less similar to the current pattern than was the case for the distributions of species occurrence. This highlights the possibility of greater changes in the spatial patterning of mangrove tree species dominance under future sea level rise. Under the restricted seedling establishment scenario, the area occupied by or dominated by a species declined between 42.1% and 93.8%, while for unrestricted seedling establishment, the area suitable for dominance or occurrence of each species varied from a decline of 68.4% to an expansion of 99.5%. As changes in the spatial patterning of dominance are likely to cause a cascade of effects throughout the ecosystem, forecasting spatial changes in dominance provides new and

  2. A Tour of TensorFlow

    OpenAIRE

    Goldsborough, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Deep learning is a branch of artificial intelligence employing deep neural network architectures that has significantly advanced the state-of-the-art in computer vision, speech recognition, natural language processing and other domains. In November 2015, Google released $\\textit{TensorFlow}$, an open source deep learning software library for defining, training and deploying machine learning models. In this paper, we review TensorFlow and put it in context of modern deep learning concepts and ...

  3. The modified indeterminate couple stress model: Why Yang et al.'s arguments motivating a symmetric couple stress tensor contain a gap and why the couple stress tensor may be chosen symmetric nevertheless

    OpenAIRE

    Münch, Ingo; Neff, Patrizio; Madeo, Angela; Ghiba, Ionel-Dumitrel

    2015-01-01

    We show that the reasoning in favor of a symmetric couple stress tensor in Yang et al.'s introduction of the modified couple stress theory contains a gap, but we present a reasonable physical hypothesis, implying that the couple stress tensor is traceless and may be symmetric anyway. To this aim, the origin of couple stress is discussed on the basis of certain properties of the total stress itself. In contrast to classical continuum mechanics, the balance of linear momentum and the balance of...

  4. Assessment of the Dominant Path Model and Field Measurements for NLOS DTV Signal Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adonias, Geoflly L.; Carvalho, Joabson N.

    2018-03-01

    In Brazil, one of the most important telecommunications systems is broadcast television. Such relevance demands an extensive analysis to be performed chasing technical excellence in order to offer a better digital transmission to the user. Therefore, it is mandatory to evaluate the quality and strength of the Digital TV signal, through studies of coverage predictions models, allowing stations to be projected in a way that their respective signals are harmoniously distributed. The purpose of this study is to appraise measurements of digital television signal obtained in the field and to compare them with numerical results from the simulation of the Dominant Path Model. The outcomes indicate possible blocking zones and a low accumulated probability index above the reception threshold, as well as characterise the gain level of the receiving antenna, which would prevent signal blocking.

  5. Degree of multicollinearity and variables involved in linear dependence in additive-dominant models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Petrini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to assess the degree of multicollinearity and to identify the variables involved in linear dependence relations in additive-dominant models. Data of birth weight (n=141,567, yearling weight (n=58,124, and scrotal circumference (n=20,371 of Montana Tropical composite cattle were used. Diagnosis of multicollinearity was based on the variance inflation factor (VIF and on the evaluation of the condition indexes and eigenvalues from the correlation matrix among explanatory variables. The first model studied (RM included the fixed effect of dam age class at calving and the covariates associated to the direct and maternal additive and non-additive effects. The second model (R included all the effects of the RM model except the maternal additive effects. Multicollinearity was detected in both models for all traits considered, with VIF values of 1.03 - 70.20 for RM and 1.03 - 60.70 for R. Collinearity increased with the increase of variables in the model and the decrease in the number of observations, and it was classified as weak, with condition index values between 10.00 and 26.77. In general, the variables associated with additive and non-additive effects were involved in multicollinearity, partially due to the natural connection between these covariables as fractions of the biological types in breed composition.

  6. Floc size distributions of suspended kaolinite in an advection transport dominated tank: measurements and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiaoteng; Maa, Jerome P.-Y.

    2017-11-01

    In estuaries and coastal waters, floc size and its statistical distributions of cohesive sediments are of primary importance, due to their effects on the settling velocity and thus deposition rates of cohesive aggregates. The development of a robust flocculation model that includes the predictions of floc size distributions (FSDs), however, is still in a research stage. In this study, a one-dimensional longitudinal (1-DL) flocculation model along a streamtube is developed. This model is based on solving the population balance equation to find the FSDs by using the quadrature method of moments. To validate this model, a laboratory experiment is carried out to produce an advection transport-dominant environment in a cylindrical tank. The flow field is generated by a marine pump mounted at the bottom center, with its outlet facing upward. This setup generates an axially symmetric flow which is measured by an acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV). The measurement results provide the hydrodynamic input data required for this 1-DL model. The other measurement results, the FSDs, are acquired by using an automatic underwater camera system and the resulting images are analyzed to validate the predicted FSDs. This study shows that the FSDs as well as their representative sizes can be efficiently and reasonably simulated by this 1-DL model.

  7. Modelling the landslide area and sediment discharge in landslide-dominated region, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Tse-Yang; Huang, -Chuan, Jr.; Lee, Tsung-Yu; Chen, Yi-Chin; Jan, Ming-Young; Liu, Cheng-Chien

    2016-04-01

    Many studies have indicated the magnified increase of rainfall intensification, landsliding and subsequent sediment discharge due to the global warming effect. However, a few works synthesized the "chain reaction" from rainfall, landsliding to sediment discharge at the same time because of the limited observations of landslide area and sediment discharge during episodes. Besides, the sediment transport strongly depends on the sediment supply and stream power which interact conditionally. In this study, our goal is to build a model that can simulate time-series landslide area and subsequent sediment discharge. The synthesized model would be applied onto Tsengwen Reservoir watershed in southern Taiwan, where lots of landslides occur every year. Unlike other studies, our landslide model considers not only rainfall effect but also previous landslide status, which may be applied to landslide-dominated regions and explains the irrelevant relationship between typhoon rainfall and landslide area. Furthermore, our sediment transport model considers the sediment budget which couples transport- and supply-limited of sediment. The result shows that the simulated time-series landslide area and the sediment transport agree with the observation and the R2 are 0.88 and 0.56, respectively. Reactivated ratio of previous landslide area is 72.7% which indicates the high reoccurrence of historical landslide in landslide-dominated regions. We divided nine historical typhoons into three periods to demonstrate the effect of sediment supply/supply-limited condition upon sediment transport. For instance, the rainfall is smaller in period 3 than in period 1 but the sediment transport is higher in period 3 due to the catastrophic landslide (typhoon Morakot) during period 2. We argue that quantifying sediment transport should couple not only with water discharge but sediment budget, which is rarely considered in calculating sediment transport. Moreover, the parameterization of the controlling

  8. Drought resilience across ecologically dominant species: An experiment-model integration approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felton, A. J.; Warren, J.; Ricciuto, D. M.; Smith, M. D.

    2017-12-01

    Poorly understood are the mechanisms contributing to variability in ecosystem recovery following drought. Grasslands of the central U.S. are ecologically and economically important ecosystems, yet are also highly sensitive to drought. Although characteristics of these ecosystems change across gradients of temperature and precipitation, a consistent feature among these systems is the presence of highly abundant, dominant grass species that control biomass production. As a result, the incorporation of these species' traits into terrestrial biosphere models may constrain predictions amid increases in climatic variability. Here we report the results of a modeling-experiment (MODEX) research approach. We investigated the physiological, morphological and growth responses of the dominant grass species from each of the four major grasslands of the central U.S. (ranging from tallgrass prairie to desert grassland) following severe drought. Despite significant differences in baseline values, full recovery in leaf physiological function was evident across species, of which was consistently driven by the production of new leaves. Further, recovery in whole-plant carbon uptake tended to be driven by shifts in allocation from belowground to aboveground structures. However, there was clear variability among species in the magnitude of this dynamic as well as the relative allocation to stem versus leaf production. As a result, all species harbored the physiological capacity to recover from drought, yet we posit that variability in the recovery of whole-plant carbon uptake to be more strongly driven by variability in the sensitivity of species' morphology to soil moisture increases. The next step of this project will be to incorporate these and other existing data on these species and ecosystems into the community land model in an effort to test the sensitivity of this model to these data.

  9. Tensors and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Islam, Nazrul

    2006-01-01

    About the Book: The book is written is in easy-to-read style with corresponding examples. The main aim of this book is to precisely explain the fundamentals of Tensors and their applications to Mechanics, Elasticity, Theory of Relativity, Electromagnetic, Riemannian Geometry and many other disciplines of science and engineering, in a lucid manner. The text has been explained section wise, every concept has been narrated in the form of definition, examples and questions related to the concept taught. The overall package of the book is highly useful and interesting for the people associated with the field. Contents: Preliminaries Tensor Algebra Metric Tensor and Riemannian Metric Christoffel`s Symbols and Covariant Differentiation Riemann-Christoffel Tensor The e-Systems and the Generalized Krönecker Deltas Geometry Analytical Mechanics Curvature of a Curve, Geodesic Parallelism of Vectors Ricci`s Coefficients of Rotation and Congruence Hyper Surfaces

  10. Symmetric Tensor Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brachat, Jerome; Comon, Pierre; Mourrain, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    We present an algorithm for decomposing a symmetric tensor, of dimension n and order d, as a sum of rank-1 symmetric tensors, extending the algorithm of Sylvester devised in 1886 for binary forms. We recall the correspondence between the decomposition of a homogeneous polynomial in n variables...... of polynomial equations of small degree in non-generic cases. We propose a new algorithm for symmetric tensor decomposition, based on this characterization and on linear algebra computations with Hankel matrices. The impact of this contribution is two-fold. First it permits an efficient computation...... of the decomposition of any tensor of sub-generic rank, as opposed to widely used iterative algorithms with unproved global convergence (e.g. Alternate Least Squares or gradient descents). Second, it gives tools for understanding uniqueness conditions and for detecting the rank....

  11. Tensor Basis Neural Network v. 1.0 (beta)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-03-28

    This software package can be used to build, train, and test a neural network machine learning model. The neural network architecture is specifically designed to embed tensor invariance properties by enforcing that the model predictions sit on an invariant tensor basis. This neural network architecture can be used in developing constitutive models for applications such as turbulence modeling, materials science, and electromagnetism.

  12. Social insect colony as a biological regulatory system: modelling information flow in dominance networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Anjan K; Sumana, Annagiri; Bhattacharya, Kunal

    2014-12-06

    Social insects provide an excellent platform to investigate flow of information in regulatory systems since their successful social organization is essentially achieved by effective information transfer through complex connectivity patterns among the colony members. Network representation of such behavioural interactions offers a powerful tool for structural as well as dynamical analysis of the underlying regulatory systems. In this paper, we focus on the dominance interaction networks in the tropical social wasp Ropalidia marginata-a species where behavioural observations indicate that such interactions are principally responsible for the transfer of information between individuals about their colony needs, resulting in a regulation of their own activities. Our research reveals that the dominance networks of R. marginata are structurally similar to a class of naturally evolved information processing networks, a fact confirmed also by the predominance of a specific substructure-the 'feed-forward loop'-a key functional component in many other information transfer networks. The dynamical analysis through Boolean modelling confirms that the networks are sufficiently stable under small fluctuations and yet capable of more efficient information transfer compared to their randomized counterparts. Our results suggest the involvement of a common structural design principle in different biological regulatory systems and a possible similarity with respect to the effect of selection on the organization levels of such systems. The findings are also consistent with the hypothesis that dominance behaviour has been shaped by natural selection to co-opt the information transfer process in such social insect species, in addition to its primal function of mediation of reproductive competition in the colony. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  13. Graded tensor calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheunert, M.

    1982-10-01

    We develop a graded tensor calculus corresponding to arbitrary Abelian groups of degrees and arbitrary commutation factors. The standard basic constructions and definitions like tensor products, spaces of multilinear mappings, contractions, symmetrization, symmetric algebra, as well as the transpose, adjoint, and trace of a linear mapping, are generalized to the graded case and a multitude of canonical isomorphisms is presented. Moreover, the graded versions of the classical Lie algebras are introduced and some of their basic properties are described. (orig.)

  14. Analysis of normal-appearing white matter of multiple sclerosis by tensor-based two-compartment model of water diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Yasuhiko; Obata, Takayuki; Yoshida, Mariko; Hori, Masaaki; Kamagata, Koji; Suzuki, Michimasa; Fukunaga, Issei; Kamiya, Kouhei; Aoki, Shigeki; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Hattori, Nobutaka; Inoue, Tomio

    2015-01-01

    To compare the significance of the two-compartment model, considering diffusional anisotropy with conventional diffusion analyzing methods regarding the detection of occult changes in normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) of multiple sclerosis (MS). Diffusion-weighted images (nine b-values with six directions) were acquired from 12 healthy female volunteers (22-52 years old, median 33 years) and 13 female MS patients (24-48 years old, median 37 years). Diffusion parameters based on the two-compartment model of water diffusion considering diffusional anisotropy was calculated by a proposed method. Other parameters including diffusion tensor imaging and conventional apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were also obtained. They were compared statistically between the control and MS groups. Diffusion of the slow diffusion compartment in the radial direction of neuron fibers was elevated in MS patients (0.121 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) in comparison to control (0.100 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s), the difference being significant (P = 0.001). The difference between the groups was not significant in other comparisons, including conventional ADC and fractional anisotropy (FA) of diffusion tensor imaging. The proposed method was applicable to clinically acceptable small data. The parameters obtained by this method improved the detectability of occult changes in NAWM compared to the conventional methods. (orig.)

  15. Analysis of normal-appearing white matter of multiple sclerosis by tensor-based two-compartment model of water diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachibana, Yasuhiko [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, Chiba (Japan); Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Yokohama (Japan); Juntendo University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Obata, Takayuki [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, Chiba (Japan); Yoshida, Mariko; Hori, Masaaki; Kamagata, Koji; Suzuki, Michimasa; Fukunaga, Issei; Kamiya, Kouhei; Aoki, Shigeki [Juntendo University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Hattori, Nobutaka [Juntendo University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Tokyo (Japan); Inoue, Tomio [Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Yokohama (Japan)

    2015-06-01

    To compare the significance of the two-compartment model, considering diffusional anisotropy with conventional diffusion analyzing methods regarding the detection of occult changes in normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) of multiple sclerosis (MS). Diffusion-weighted images (nine b-values with six directions) were acquired from 12 healthy female volunteers (22-52 years old, median 33 years) and 13 female MS patients (24-48 years old, median 37 years). Diffusion parameters based on the two-compartment model of water diffusion considering diffusional anisotropy was calculated by a proposed method. Other parameters including diffusion tensor imaging and conventional apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were also obtained. They were compared statistically between the control and MS groups. Diffusion of the slow diffusion compartment in the radial direction of neuron fibers was elevated in MS patients (0.121 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) in comparison to control (0.100 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s), the difference being significant (P = 0.001). The difference between the groups was not significant in other comparisons, including conventional ADC and fractional anisotropy (FA) of diffusion tensor imaging. The proposed method was applicable to clinically acceptable small data. The parameters obtained by this method improved the detectability of occult changes in NAWM compared to the conventional methods. (orig.)

  16. Current density tensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzeretti, Paolo

    2018-04-01

    It is shown that nonsymmetric second-rank current density tensors, related to the current densities induced by magnetic fields and nuclear magnetic dipole moments, are fundamental properties of a molecule. Together with magnetizability, nuclear magnetic shielding, and nuclear spin-spin coupling, they completely characterize its response to magnetic perturbations. Gauge invariance, resolution into isotropic, deviatoric, and antisymmetric parts, and contributions of current density tensors to magnetic properties are discussed. The components of the second-rank tensor properties are rationalized via relationships explicitly connecting them to the direction of the induced current density vectors and to the components of the current density tensors. The contribution of the deviatoric part to the average value of magnetizability, nuclear shielding, and nuclear spin-spin coupling, uniquely determined by the antisymmetric part of current density tensors, vanishes identically. The physical meaning of isotropic and anisotropic invariants of current density tensors has been investigated, and the connection between anisotropy magnitude and electron delocalization has been discussed.

  17. Thermal Analysis of a Finite Element Model in a Radiation Dominated Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Arthur T.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of thermal analysis, evaluating the University of Arizona mirror design, for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) Pre-Phase A vehicle concept. Model building begins using Thermal Desktop(TM), by Cullimore and Ring Technologies, to import a NASTRAN bulk data file from the structural model of the mirror assembly. Using AutoCAD(R) capabilities, additional surfaces are added to simulate the thermal aspects of the problem which, for due reason, are not part of the structural model. Surfaces are then available to accept thermophysical and thermo-optical properties. Thermal Desktop(TM) calculates radiation conductors using Monte Carlo simulations. Then Thermal Desktop(TM) generates the SINDA input file having a one-to-one correspondence with the NASTRAN node and element definitions. A model is now available to evaluate the mirror design in the radiation dominated environment, conduct parametric trade studies of the thermal design, and provide temperatures to the finite element structural model.

  18. Generalized network modeling of capillary-dominated two-phase flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeini, Ali Q; Bijeljic, Branko; Blunt, Martin J

    2018-02-01

    We present a generalized network model for simulating capillary-dominated two-phase flow through porous media at the pore scale. Three-dimensional images of the pore space are discretized using a generalized network-described in a companion paper [A. Q. Raeini, B. Bijeljic, and M. J. Blunt, Phys. Rev. E 96, 013312 (2017)2470-004510.1103/PhysRevE.96.013312]-which comprises pores that are divided into smaller elements called half-throats and subsequently into corners. Half-throats define the connectivity of the network at the coarsest level, connecting each pore to half-throats of its neighboring pores from their narrower ends, while corners define the connectivity of pore crevices. The corners are discretized at different levels for accurate calculation of entry pressures, fluid volumes, and flow conductivities that are obtained using direct simulation of flow on the underlying image. This paper discusses the two-phase flow model that is used to compute the averaged flow properties of the generalized network, including relative permeability and capillary pressure. We validate the model using direct finite-volume two-phase flow simulations on synthetic geometries, and then present a comparison of the model predictions with a conventional pore-network model and experimental measurements of relative permeability in the literature.

  19. Generalized network modeling of capillary-dominated two-phase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeini, Ali Q.; Bijeljic, Branko; Blunt, Martin J.

    2018-02-01

    We present a generalized network model for simulating capillary-dominated two-phase flow through porous media at the pore scale. Three-dimensional images of the pore space are discretized using a generalized network—described in a companion paper [A. Q. Raeini, B. Bijeljic, and M. J. Blunt, Phys. Rev. E 96, 013312 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevE.96.013312]—which comprises pores that are divided into smaller elements called half-throats and subsequently into corners. Half-throats define the connectivity of the network at the coarsest level, connecting each pore to half-throats of its neighboring pores from their narrower ends, while corners define the connectivity of pore crevices. The corners are discretized at different levels for accurate calculation of entry pressures, fluid volumes, and flow conductivities that are obtained using direct simulation of flow on the underlying image. This paper discusses the two-phase flow model that is used to compute the averaged flow properties of the generalized network, including relative permeability and capillary pressure. We validate the model using direct finite-volume two-phase flow simulations on synthetic geometries, and then present a comparison of the model predictions with a conventional pore-network model and experimental measurements of relative permeability in the literature.

  20. Sediment transport and deposition on a river-dominated tidal flat: An idealized model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Christopher R.; Chen, Shih-Nan; Geyer, W. Rockwell; Ralston, David K.

    2010-01-01

    A 3-D hydrodynamic model is used to investigate how different size classes of river-derived sediment are transported, exported and trapped on an idealized, river-dominated tidal flat. The model is composed of a river channel flanked by sloping tidal flats, a configuration motivated by the intertidal region of the Skagit River mouth in Washington State, United States. It is forced by mixed tides and a pulse of freshwater and sediment with various settling velocities. In this system, the river not only influences stratification but also contributes a significant cross-shore transport. As a result, the bottom stress is strongly ebb-dominated in the channel because of the seaward advance of strong river flow as the tidal flats drain during ebbs. Sediment deposition patterns and mass budgets are sensitive to settling velocity. The lateral sediment spreading scales with an advective distance (settling time multiplied by lateral flow speed), thereby confining the fast settling sediment classes in the channel. Residual sediment transport is landward on the flats, because of settling lag, but is strongly seaward in the channel. The seaward transport mainly occurs during big ebbs and is controlled by a length scale ratio Ld/XWL, where Ld is a cross-shore advective distance (settling time multiplied by river outlet velocity), and XWL is the immersed cross-shore length of the intertidal zone. Sediment trapping requires Ld/XWL stratification and reducing tidal range both favor sediment trapping, whereas varying channel geometries and asymmetry of tides has relatively small impacts. Implications of the modeling results on the south Skagit intertidal region are discussed.

  1. Quantifying the performance of two conceptual models for snow dominated catchments in Austria and Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensoy, Aynur; Parajka, Juraj; Coskun, Cihan; Sorman, Arda; Ertas, Cansaran

    2014-05-01

    In many mountainous regions, snowmelt makes significant contribution to streamflow, particularly during spring and summer months. Understanding the magnitude and timing of this contribution and hydrological forecasts are essential for a range of purposes concerning the implications with water resources management. Conceptual hydrological models have been widely applied for mountain catchments both for operational and scientific applications. Hydrologiska Byran Vattenbalansavdelning (HBV) and Snowmelt Runoff Model (SRM) are selected in this study as the commonly used conceptual models in hydrological modeling forecasting for a number of basins in several countries. Moreover, this selection is also supported by the experiences on the improvement and application in remote sensing techniques in snow dominated regions. The greatest similarity between the two models is that each uses a temperature index method to predict melt rate whereas the greatest difference lies in the way snow cover is handled. In mountainous regions, data limitations prevent detailed understanding of the variability of snow cover and melt. In situ snowpack measurements are sparsely distributed relative to snowpack heterogeneity therefore, to supplement ground measurements; remotely sensed images of snow covered area (SCA) provide useful information for runoff prediction during the snowmelt season. SCA has been used as a direct input to SRM and as a means of checking the internal validity for HBV model. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) daily snow cover products with 500 m spatial resolution are used to derive SCA data in this study. A number of studies have been reported in the literature indicated that the model performance can vary depending on several factors, including the scale and characteristics of the catchment, availability of the data required and runoff producing mechanism. Therefore, five different catchments including data scare and rich basins, areas and reliefs

  2. Parental Conflict and Dominance in Late Adolescent Maladjustment: A Triple Interaction Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, J. Conrad; Getter, Herbert

    1980-01-01

    Ninety-two undergraduates were administered three questionnaires on parental conflict and dominance in late adolescent maladjustment. Results indicated that more neurotic daughters come from high conflict families with dominant fathers, while more neurotic sons come from high conflict families with dominant mothers. (Author/CL)

  3. A Review of Tensors and Tensor Signal Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammoun, L.; Castaño-Moraga, C. A.; Muñoz-Moreno, E.; Sosa-Cabrera, D.; Acar, B.; Rodriguez-Florido, M. A.; Brun, A.; Knutsson, H.; Thiran, J. P.

    Tensors have been broadly used in mathematics and physics, since they are a generalization of scalars or vectors and allow to represent more complex properties. In this chapter we present an overview of some tensor applications, especially those focused on the image processing field. From a mathematical point of view, a lot of work has been developed about tensor calculus, which obviously is more complex than scalar or vectorial calculus. Moreover, tensors can represent the metric of a vector space, which is very useful in the field of differential geometry. In physics, tensors have been used to describe several magnitudes, such as the strain or stress of materials. In solid mechanics, tensors are used to define the generalized Hooke’s law, where a fourth order tensor relates the strain and stress tensors. In fluid dynamics, the velocity gradient tensor provides information about the vorticity and the strain of the fluids. Also an electromagnetic tensor is defined, that simplifies the notation of the Maxwell equations. But tensors are not constrained to physics and mathematics. They have been used, for instance, in medical imaging, where we can highlight two applications: the diffusion tensor image, which represents how molecules diffuse inside the tissues and is broadly used for brain imaging; and the tensorial elastography, which computes the strain and vorticity tensor to analyze the tissues properties. Tensors have also been used in computer vision to provide information about the local structure or to define anisotropic image filters.

  4. Human-induced geomorphology: Modeling slope failure in Dominical, Costa Rica using Landsat imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew J.

    Unchecked human development has ravaged the region between Dominical and Uvita, Costa Rica. Much of the development transition has been driven by tourism and further foreign direct investment in residential, service and commercial enterprises. The resulting land-use/land-cover change has removed traditional forest cover in exchange for impervious surfaces, physical structures, and bare ground which is no longer mechanically supported by woody vegetation. Combined with a tropical climate, deeply weathered soils and lithography which are prone to erosion, land cover change has led to an increase in slope failure occurrences. Given the remoteness of the Dominical-Uvita region, its rate of growth and the lack of monitoring, new techniques for monitoring land use and slope failure susceptibility are needed. Two new indices are presented here that employ a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) and widely available Landsat imagery to assist in this endeavor. The first index, or Vegetation Influenced Landslide Index (VILI), incorporates slope derived from a DEM and Lu et al.'s (2007) Surface Cover Index to quantify vegetative cover as a means of mechanical stabilization in landslide prone areas. The second index, or Slope Multiplier Index (SMI), uses individual Landsat data bands and basic Landsat band ratios as environmental proxies to replicate soil, vegetative and hydrologic properties. Both models achieve accuracy over 70% and rival results from more complicated published literature. The accuracy of the indices was assessed with the creation of a landslide inventory developed from field observations occurring in December 2007 and November 2008. The creation of these indices represents an efficient and accurate way of determining landslide susceptibility zonation in data poor areas where environmental protection practitioners may be overextended, under-trained or both.

  5. Modelling Carbon Emissions in Calluna vulgaris–Dominated Ecosystems when Prescribed Burning and Wildfires Interact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Victor M.; Alday, Josu G.; Lee, HyoHyeMi; Allen, Katherine A.; Marrs, Rob H.

    2016-01-01

    A present challenge in fire ecology is to optimize management techniques so that ecological services are maximized and C emissions minimized. Here, we modeled the effects of different prescribed-burning rotation intervals and wildfires on carbon emissions (present and future) in British moorlands. Biomass-accumulation curves from four Calluna-dominated ecosystems along a north-south gradient in Great Britain were calculated and used within a matrix-model based on Markov Chains to calculate above-ground biomass-loads and annual C emissions under different prescribed-burning rotation intervals. Additionally, we assessed the interaction of these parameters with a decreasing wildfire return intervals. We observed that litter accumulation patterns varied between sites. Northern sites (colder and wetter) accumulated lower amounts of litter with time than southern sites (hotter and drier). The accumulation patterns of the living vegetation dominated by Calluna were determined by site-specific conditions. The optimal prescribed-burning rotation interval for minimizing annual carbon emissions also differed between sites: the optimal rotation interval for northern sites was between 30 and 50 years, whereas for southern sites a hump-backed relationship was found with the optimal interval either between 8 to 10 years or between 30 to 50 years. Increasing wildfire frequency interacted with prescribed-burning rotation intervals by both increasing C emissions and modifying the optimum prescribed-burning interval for minimum C emission. This highlights the importance of studying site-specific biomass accumulation patterns with respect to environmental conditions for identifying suitable fire-rotation intervals to minimize C emissions. PMID:27880840

  6. Modelling Carbon Emissions in Calluna vulgaris-Dominated Ecosystems when Prescribed Burning and Wildfires Interact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Victor M; Alday, Josu G; Lee, HyoHyeMi; Allen, Katherine A; Marrs, Rob H

    2016-01-01

    A present challenge in fire ecology is to optimize management techniques so that ecological services are maximized and C emissions minimized. Here, we modeled the effects of different prescribed-burning rotation intervals and wildfires on carbon emissions (present and future) in British moorlands. Biomass-accumulation curves from four Calluna-dominated ecosystems along a north-south gradient in Great Britain were calculated and used within a matrix-model based on Markov Chains to calculate above-ground biomass-loads and annual C emissions under different prescribed-burning rotation intervals. Additionally, we assessed the interaction of these parameters with a decreasing wildfire return intervals. We observed that litter accumulation patterns varied between sites. Northern sites (colder and wetter) accumulated lower amounts of litter with time than southern sites (hotter and drier). The accumulation patterns of the living vegetation dominated by Calluna were determined by site-specific conditions. The optimal prescribed-burning rotation interval for minimizing annual carbon emissions also differed between sites: the optimal rotation interval for northern sites was between 30 and 50 years, whereas for southern sites a hump-backed relationship was found with the optimal interval either between 8 to 10 years or between 30 to 50 years. Increasing wildfire frequency interacted with prescribed-burning rotation intervals by both increasing C emissions and modifying the optimum prescribed-burning interval for minimum C emission. This highlights the importance of studying site-specific biomass accumulation patterns with respect to environmental conditions for identifying suitable fire-rotation intervals to minimize C emissions.

  7. Diffusion Dominant Solute Transport Modelling in Fractured Media Under Deep Geological Environment - 12211

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwong, S. [National Nuclear Laboratory (United Kingdom); Jivkov, A.P. [Research Centre for Radwaste and Decommissioning and Modelling and Simulation Centre, University of Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    Deep geologic disposal of high activity and long-lived radioactive waste is gaining increasing support in many countries, where suitable low permeability geological formation in combination with engineered barriers are used to provide long term waste contaminant and minimise the impacts to the environment and risk to the biosphere. This modelling study examines the solute transport in fractured media under low flow velocities that are relevant to a deep geological environment. In particular, reactive solute transport through fractured media is studied using a 2-D model, that considers advection and diffusion, to explore the coupled effects of kinetic and equilibrium chemical processes. The effects of water velocity in the fracture, matrix porosity and diffusion on solute transport are investigated and discussed. Some illustrative modelled results are presented to demonstrate the use of the model to examine the effects of media degradation on solute transport, under the influences of hydrogeological (diffusion dominant) and microbially mediated chemical processes. The challenges facing the prediction of long term degradation such as cracks evolution, interaction and coalescence are highlighted. The potential of a novel microstructure informed modelling approach to account for these effects is discussed, particularly with respect to investigating multiple phenomena impact on material performance. The GRM code is used to examine the effects of media degradation for a geological waste disposal package, under the combined hydrogeological (diffusion dominant) and chemical effects in low groundwater flow conditions that are typical of deep geological disposal systems. An illustrative reactive transport modelling application demonstrates the use of the code to examine the interplay of kinetic controlled biogeochemical reactive processes with advective and diffusive transport, under the influence of media degradation. The initial model results are encouraging which show the

  8. A Game-Theoretical Winner and Loser Model of Dominance Hierarchy Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kura, Klodeta; Broom, Mark; Kandler, Anne

    2016-06-01

    Many animals spend large parts of their lives in groups. Within such groups, they need to find efficient ways of dividing available resources between them. This is often achieved by means of a dominance hierarchy, which in its most extreme linear form allocates a strict priority order to the individuals. Once a hierarchy is formed, it is often stable over long periods, but the formation of hierarchies among individuals with little or no knowledge of each other can involve aggressive contests. The outcome of such contests can have significant effects on later contests, with previous winners more likely to win (winner effects) and previous losers more likely to lose (loser effects). This scenario has been modelled by a number of authors, in particular by Dugatkin. In his model, individuals engage in aggressive contests if the assessment of their fighting ability relative to their opponent is above a threshold [Formula: see text]. Here we present a model where each individual can choose its own value [Formula: see text]. This enables us to address questions such as how aggressive should individuals be in order to take up one of the first places in the hierarchy? We find that a unique strategy evolves, as opposed to a mixture of strategies. Thus, in any scenario there exists a unique best level of aggression, and individuals should not switch between strategies. We find that for optimal strategy choice, the hierarchy forms quickly, after which there are no mutually aggressive contests.

  9. Tensor spaces and exterior algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Yokonuma, Takeo

    1992-01-01

    This book explains, as clearly as possible, tensors and such related topics as tensor products of vector spaces, tensor algebras, and exterior algebras. You will appreciate Yokonuma's lucid and methodical treatment of the subject. This book is useful in undergraduate and graduate courses in multilinear algebra. Tensor Spaces and Exterior Algebra begins with basic notions associated with tensors. To facilitate understanding of the definitions, Yokonuma often presents two or more different ways of describing one object. Next, the properties and applications of tensors are developed, including the classical definition of tensors and the description of relative tensors. Also discussed are the algebraic foundations of tensor calculus and applications of exterior algebra to determinants and to geometry. This book closes with an examination of algebraic systems with bilinear multiplication. In particular, Yokonuma discusses the theory of replicas of Chevalley and several properties of Lie algebras deduced from them.

  10. Diffusion tensor tractography of the arcuate fasciculus in patients with brain tumors: Comparison between deterministic and probabilistic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhixi; Peck, Kyung K; Brennan, Nicole P; Jenabi, Mehrnaz; Hsu, Meier; Zhang, Zhigang; Holodny, Andrei I; Young, Robert J

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the deterministic and probabilistic tracking methods of diffusion tensor white matter fiber tractography in patients with brain tumors. We identified 29 patients with left brain tumors probabilistic method based on an extended Monte Carlo Random Walk algorithm. Tracking was controlled using two ROIs corresponding to Broca's and Wernicke's areas. Tracts in tumoraffected hemispheres were examined for extension between Broca's and Wernicke's areas, anterior-posterior length and volume, and compared with the normal contralateral tracts. Probabilistic tracts displayed more complete anterior extension to Broca's area than did FACT tracts on the tumor-affected and normal sides (p probabilistic tracts than FACT tracts (p probabilistic tracts than FACT tracts (p = 0.01). Probabilistic tractography reconstructs the arcuate fasciculus more completely and performs better through areas of tumor and/or edema. The FACT algorithm tends to underestimate the anterior-most fibers of the arcuate fasciculus, which are crossed by primary motor fibers.

  11. 3D Inversion of SQUID Magnetic Tensor Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhdanov, Michael; Cai, Hongzhu; Wilson, Glenn

    2012-01-01

    Developments in SQUID-based technology have enabled direct measurement of magnetic tensor data for geophysical exploration. For quantitative interpretation, we introduce 3D regularized inversion for magnetic tensor data. For mineral exploration-scale targets, our model studies show that magnetic...... tensor data have significantly improved resolution compared to magnetic vector data for the same model. We present a case study for the 3D regularized inversion of magnetic tensor data acquired over a magnetite skarn at Tallawang, Australia. The results obtained from our 3D regularized inversion agree...

  12. Tensor analysis for physicists

    CERN Document Server

    Schouten, J A

    1989-01-01

    This brilliant study by a famed mathematical scholar and former professor of mathematics at the University of Amsterdam integrates a concise exposition of the mathematical basis of tensor analysis with admirably chosen physical examples of the theory. The first five chapters incisively set out the mathematical theory underlying the use of tensors. The tensor algebra in EN and RN is developed in Chapters I and II. Chapter II introduces a sub-group of the affine group, then deals with the identification of quantities in EN. The tensor analysis in XN is developed in Chapter IV. In chapters VI through IX, Professor Schouten presents applications of the theory that are both intrinsically interesting and good examples of the use and advantages of the calculus. Chapter VI, intimately connected with Chapter III, shows that the dimensions of physical quantities depend upon the choice of the underlying group, and that tensor calculus is the best instrument for dealing with the properties of anisotropic media. In Chapte...

  13. Generalized dielectric permittivity tensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borzdov, G.N.; Barkovskii, L.M.; Fedorov, F.I.

    1986-01-01

    The authors deal with the question of what is to be done with the formalism of the electrodynamics of dispersive media based on the introduction of dielectric-permittivity tensors for purely harmonic fields when Voigt waves and waves of more general form exist. An attempt is made to broaden and generalize the formalism to take into account dispersion of waves of the given type. In dispersive media, the polarization, magnetization, and conduction current-density vectors of point and time are determined by the values of the electromagnetic field vectors in the vicinity of this point (spatial dispersion) in the preceding instants of time (time dispersion). The dielectric-permittivity tensor and other tensors of electrodynamic parameters of the medium are introduced in terms of a set of evolution operators and not the set of harmonic function. It is noted that a magnetic-permeability tensor and an elastic-modulus tensor may be introduced for an acoustic field in dispersive anisotropic media with coupling equations of general form

  14. Tensor SOM and tensor GTM: Nonlinear tensor analysis by topographic mappings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Tohru; Furukawa, Tetsuo

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we propose nonlinear tensor analysis methods: the tensor self-organizing map (TSOM) and the tensor generative topographic mapping (TGTM). TSOM is a straightforward extension of the self-organizing map from high-dimensional data to tensorial data, and TGTM is an extension of the generative topographic map, which provides a theoretical background for TSOM using a probabilistic generative model. These methods are useful tools for analyzing and visualizing tensorial data, especially multimodal relational data. For given n-mode relational data, TSOM and TGTM can simultaneously organize a set of n-topographic maps. Furthermore, they can be used to explore the tensorial data space by interactively visualizing the relationships between modes. We present the TSOM algorithm and a theoretical description from the viewpoint of TGTM. Various TSOM variations and visualization techniques are also described, along with some applications to real relational datasets. Additionally, we attempt to build a comprehensive description of the TSOM family by adapting various data structures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Properties of the tensor correlation in He isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myo, Takayuki; Sugimoto, Satoru; Kato, Kiyoshi; Toki, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Kiyomi

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the roles of the tensor correlation on the structures of 4,5 He. For 4 He, we take the high angular momentum states as much as possible with the 2p2h excitations of the shell model type method to describe the tensor correlation. Three specific configurations are found to be favored for the tensor correlation. This correlation is also important to describe the scattering phenomena of the 4 He+nsystem including the higher partial waves consistently

  16. Hypothalamic-mediated model for systemic lupus erythematosis: relation to hemispheric chemical dominance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurup, Ravi Kumar; Kurup, Parameswara Achutha

    2003-11-01

    The isoprenoid pathway including endogenous digoxin was assessed in systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE). All the patients with SLE were right-handed/left hemispheric dominant by the dichotic listening test. This was also studied for comparison in patients with right hemispheric and left hemispheric dominance. The isoprenoid pathway was upregulated with increased digoxin synthesis in patients with SLE and in those with right hemispheric dominance. In this group of patients (i) the tryptophan catabolites were increased and the tyrosine catabolites reduced, (ii) the dolichol and glycoconjugate levels were elevated, (iii) lysosomal stability was reduced, (iv) ubiquinone levels were low and free radical levels increased, and (v) the membrane cholesterol:phospholipid ratios were increased and membrane glycoconjugates reduced. On the other hand, in patients with left hemispheric dominance the reverse patterns were obtained. The biochemical patterns obtained in SLE is similar to those obtained in left-handed/right hemispheric chemically dominant individuals. But all the patients with SLE were right-handed/left hemispheric dominant by the dichotic listening test. Hemispheric chemical dominance has no correlation with handedness or the dichotic listening test. SLE occurs in right hemispheric chemically dominant individuals, and is a reflection of altered brain function. The role of the isoprenoid pathway in the pathogenesis of SLE and its relation to hemispheric dominance is discussed.

  17. Crossover to potential energy landscape dominated dynamics in a model glass-forming liquid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Thomas; Sastry, S.; Dyre, Jeppe

    2000-01-01

    An equilibrated model glass-forming liquid is studied by mapping successive configurations produced by molecular dynamics simulation onto a time series of inherent structures (local minima in the potential energy). Using this "inherent dynamics" approach we find direct numerical evidence for the ......An equilibrated model glass-forming liquid is studied by mapping successive configurations produced by molecular dynamics simulation onto a time series of inherent structures (local minima in the potential energy). Using this "inherent dynamics" approach we find direct numerical evidence...... for the long held view that below a crossover temperature, Tx, the liquid's dynamics can be separated into (i) vibrations around inherent structures and (ii) transitions between inherent structures [M. Goldstein, J. Chem. Phys. 51, 3728 (1969)], i.e., the dynamics become "dominated" by the potential energy...... landscape. In agreement with previous proposals, we find that Tx is within the vicinity of the mode-coupling critical temperature Tc. We further find that near Tx, transitions between inherent structures occur via cooperative, stringlike rearrangements of groups of particles moving distances substantially...

  18. Dominance of objects over context in a mediotemporal lobe model of schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia M Talamini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A large body of evidence suggests impaired context processing in schizophrenia. Here we propose that this impairment arises from defective integration of mediotemporal 'what' and 'where' routes, carrying object and spatial information to the hippocampus. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: We have previously shown, in a mediotemporal lobe (MTL model, that the abnormal connectivity between MTL regions observed in schizophrenia can explain the episodic memory deficits associated with the disorder. Here we show that the same neuropathology leads to several context processing deficits observed in patients with schizophrenia: 1 failure to choose subordinate stimuli over dominant ones when the former fit the context, 2 decreased contextual constraints in memory retrieval, as reflected in increased false alarm rates and 3 impaired retrieval of contextual information in source monitoring. Model analyses show that these deficits occur because the 'schizophrenic MTL' forms fragmented episodic representations, in which objects are overrepresented at the expense of spatial contextual information. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: These findings highlight the importance of MTL neuropathology in schizophrenia, demonstrating that it may underlie a broad spectrum of deficits, including context processing and memory impairments. It is argued that these processing deficits may contribute to central schizophrenia symptoms such as contextually inappropriate behavior, associative abnormalities, conversational drift, concreteness and delusions.

  19. Killing tensors and conformal Killing tensors from conformal Killing vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rani, Raffaele; Edgar, S Brian; Barnes, Alan

    2003-01-01

    Koutras has proposed some methods to construct reducible proper conformal Killing tensors and Killing tensors (which are, in general, irreducible) when a pair of orthogonal conformal Killing vectors exist in a given space. We give the completely general result demonstrating that this severe restriction of orthogonality is unnecessary. In addition, we correct and extend some results concerning Killing tensors constructed from a single conformal Killing vector. A number of examples demonstrate that it is possible to construct a much larger class of reducible proper conformal Killing tensors and Killing tensors than permitted by the Koutras algorithms. In particular, by showing that all conformal Killing tensors are reducible in conformally flat spaces, we have a method of constructing all conformal Killing tensors, and hence all the Killing tensors (which will in general be irreducible) of conformally flat spaces using their conformal Killing vectors

  20. Tensor Galileons and gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatzistavrakidis, Athanasios [Van Swinderen Institute for Particle Physics and Gravity, University of Groningen,Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Khoo, Fech Scen [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, Jacobs University Bremen,Campus Ring 1, 28759 Bremen (Germany); Roest, Diederik [Van Swinderen Institute for Particle Physics and Gravity, University of Groningen,Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Schupp, Peter [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, Jacobs University Bremen,Campus Ring 1, 28759 Bremen (Germany)

    2017-03-13

    The particular structure of Galileon interactions allows for higher-derivative terms while retaining second order field equations for scalar fields and Abelian p-forms. In this work we introduce an index-free formulation of these interactions in terms of two sets of Grassmannian variables. We employ this to construct Galileon interactions for mixed-symmetry tensor fields and coupled systems thereof. We argue that these tensors are the natural generalization of scalars with Galileon symmetry, similar to p-forms and scalars with a shift-symmetry. The simplest case corresponds to linearised gravity with Lovelock invariants, relating the Galileon symmetry to diffeomorphisms. Finally, we examine the coupling of a mixed-symmetry tensor to gravity, and demonstrate in an explicit example that the inclusion of appropriate counterterms retains second order field equations.

  1. Moment tensor inversions using strong motion waveforms of Taiwan TSMIP data, 1993–2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kaiwen; Chi, Wu-Cheng; Gung, Yuancheng; Dreger, Douglas; Lee, William H K.; Chiu, Hung-Chie

    2011-01-01

    Earthquake source parameters are important for earthquake studies and seismic hazard assessment. Moment tensors are among the most important earthquake source parameters, and are now routinely derived using modern broadband seismic networks around the world. Similar waveform inversion techniques can also apply to other available data, including strong-motion seismograms. Strong-motion waveforms are also broadband, and recorded in many regions since the 1980s. Thus, strong-motion data can be used to augment moment tensor catalogs with a much larger dataset than that available from the high-gain, broadband seismic networks. However, a systematic comparison between the moment tensors derived from strong motion waveforms and high-gain broadband waveforms has not been available. In this study, we inverted the source mechanisms of Taiwan earthquakes between 1993 and 2009 by using the regional moment tensor inversion method using digital data from several hundred stations in the Taiwan Strong Motion Instrumentation Program (TSMIP). By testing different velocity models and filter passbands, we were able to successfully derive moment tensor solutions for 107 earthquakes of Mw >= 4.8. The solutions for large events agree well with other available moment tensor catalogs derived from local and global broadband networks. However, for Mw = 5.0 or smaller events, we consistently over estimated the moment magnitudes by 0.5 to 1.0. We have tested accelerograms, and velocity waveforms integrated from accelerograms for the inversions, and found the results are similar. In addition, we used part of the catalogs to study important seismogenic structures in the area near Meishan Taiwan which was the site of a very damaging earthquake a century ago, and found that the structures were dominated by events with complex right-lateral strike-slip faulting during the recent decade. The procedures developed from this study may be applied to other strong-motion datasets to compliment or fill

  2. Generalized cardassian expansion: a model in which the universe is flat, matter dominated, and accelerating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freese, Katherine

    2003-01-01

    The Cardassian universe is a proposed modification to the Friedmann Robertson Walker equation (FRW) in which the universe is flat, matter dominated, and accelerating. In this presentation, we generalize the original Cardassian proposal to include additional variants on the FRW equation, specific examples are presented. In the ordinary FRW equation, the right hand side is a linear function of the energy density, H 2 ∼ ρ. Here, instead, the right hand side of the FRW equation is a different function of the energy density, H 2 ∼ g(ρ). This function returns to ordinary FRW at early times, but modifies the expansion at a late epoch of the universe. The only ingredients in this universe are matter and radiation: in particular, there is NO vacuum contribution. Currently the modification of the FRW equation is such that the universe accelerates; we call this period of acceleration the Cardassian era. The universe can be flat and yet consist of only matter and radiation, and still be compatible with observations. The energy density required to close the universe is much smaller than in a standard cosmology, so that matter can be sufficient to provide a flat geometry. The new term required may arise, e.g., as a consequence of our observable universe living as a 3-dimensional brane in a higher dimensional universe. The Cardassian model survives several observational tests, including the cosmic background radiation, the age of the universe, the Friedmann Robertson , and structure formation. As will be shown in future work, he predictions for observational tests of the generalized Cardassian models can be very different from generic quintessence models, whether the equation of state is constant or time dependent

  3. Small-angle X-ray scattering tensor tomography: model of the three-dimensional reciprocal-space map, reconstruction algorithm and angular sampling requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebi, Marianne; Georgiadis, Marios; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Holler, Mirko; Raabe, Jörg; Usov, Ivan; Menzel, Andreas; Schneider, Philipp; Bunk, Oliver; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel

    2018-01-01

    Small-angle X-ray scattering tensor tomography, which allows reconstruction of the local three-dimensional reciprocal-space map within a three-dimensional sample as introduced by Liebi et al. [Nature (2015), 527, 349-352], is described in more detail with regard to the mathematical framework and the optimization algorithm. For the case of trabecular bone samples from vertebrae it is shown that the model of the three-dimensional reciprocal-space map using spherical harmonics can adequately describe the measured data. The method enables the determination of nanostructure orientation and degree of orientation as demonstrated previously in a single momentum transfer q range. This article presents a reconstruction of the complete reciprocal-space map for the case of bone over extended ranges of q. In addition, it is shown that uniform angular sampling and advanced regularization strategies help to reduce the amount of data required.

  4. Federated Tensor Factorization for Computational Phenotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yejin; Sun, Jimeng; Yu, Hwanjo; Jiang, Xiaoqian

    2017-01-01

    Tensor factorization models offer an effective approach to convert massive electronic health records into meaningful clinical concepts (phenotypes) for data analysis. These models need a large amount of diverse samples to avoid population bias. An open challenge is how to derive phenotypes jointly across multiple hospitals, in which direct patient-level data sharing is not possible (e.g., due to institutional policies). In this paper, we developed a novel solution to enable federated tensor factorization for computational phenotyping without sharing patient-level data. We developed secure data harmonization and federated computation procedures based on alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM). Using this method, the multiple hospitals iteratively update tensors and transfer secure summarized information to a central server, and the server aggregates the information to generate phenotypes. We demonstrated with real medical datasets that our method resembles the centralized training model (based on combined datasets) in terms of accuracy and phenotypes discovery while respecting privacy. PMID:29071165

  5. Exploring extra dimensions through inflationary tensor modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Sang Hui; Nilles, Hans Peter; Trautner, Andreas

    2018-03-01

    Predictions of inflationary schemes can be influenced by the presence of extra dimensions. This could be of particular relevance for the spectrum of gravitational waves in models where the extra dimensions provide a brane-world solution to the hierarchy problem. Apart from models of large as well as exponentially warped extra dimensions, we analyze the size of tensor modes in the Linear Dilaton scheme recently revived in the discussion of the "clockwork mechanism". The results are model dependent, significantly enhanced tensor modes on one side and a suppression on the other. In some cases we are led to a scheme of "remote inflation", where the expansion is driven by energies at a hidden brane. In all cases where tensor modes are enhanced, the requirement of perturbativity of gravity leads to a stringent upper limit on the allowed Hubble rate during inflation.

  6. Cosmic microwave background probes models of inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Richard L.; Hodges, Hardy M.; Smoot, George F.; Steinhardt, Paul J.; Turner, Michael S.

    1992-01-01

    Inflation creates both scalar (density) and tensor (gravity wave) metric perturbations. We find that the tensor-mode contribution to the cosmic microwave background anisotropy on large-angular scales can only exceed that of the scalar mode in models where the spectrum of perturbations deviates significantly from scale invariance. If the tensor mode dominates at large-angular scales, then the value of DeltaT/T predicted on 1 deg is less than if the scalar mode dominates, and, for cold-dark-matter models, bias factors greater than 1 can be made consistent with Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) DMR results.

  7. Modeling of flow-dominated MHD instabilities at WiPPAL using NIMROD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, K.; McCollam, K. J.; Milhone, J.; Mirnov, V. V.; Nornberg, M. D.; Peterson, E. E.; Siller, R.; Forest, C. B.

    2017-10-01

    Using the NIMROD (non-ideal MHD with rotation - open discussion) code developed at UW-Madison, we model two different flow scenarios to study the onset of MHD instabilities in flow-dominated plasmas in the Big Red Ball (BRB) and the Plasma Couette Experiment (PCX). Both flows rely on volumetric current drive, where a large current is drawn through the plasma across a weak magnetic field, injecting J × B torque across the whole volume. The first scenario uses a vertical applied magnetic field and a mostly radial injected current to create Couette-like flows which may excite the magnetorotational instability (MRI). In the other scenario, a quadrupolar field is applied to create counter-rotating von Karman-like flow that demonstrates a dynamo-like instability. For both scenarios, the differences between Hall and MHD Ohm's laws are explored. The implementation of BRB geometry in NIMROD, details of the observed flows, and instability results are shown. This work was funded by DoE and NSF.

  8. Fourier decomposition of spatial localization errors reveals an idiotropic dominance of an internal model of gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sá Teixeira, Nuno Alexandre

    2014-12-01

    Given its conspicuous nature, gravity has been acknowledged by several research lines as a prime factor in structuring the spatial perception of one's environment. One such line of enquiry has focused on errors in spatial localization aimed at the vanishing location of moving objects - it has been systematically reported that humans mislocalize spatial positions forward, in the direction of motion (representational momentum) and downward in the direction of gravity (representational gravity). Moreover, spatial localization errors were found to evolve dynamically with time in a pattern congruent with an anticipated trajectory (representational trajectory). The present study attempts to ascertain the degree to which vestibular information plays a role in these phenomena. Human observers performed a spatial localization task while tilted to varying degrees and referring to the vanishing locations of targets moving along several directions. A Fourier decomposition of the obtained spatial localization errors revealed that although spatial errors were increased "downward" mainly along the body's longitudinal axis (idiotropic dominance), the degree of misalignment between the latter and physical gravity modulated the time course of the localization responses. This pattern is surmised to reflect increased uncertainty about the internal model when faced with conflicting cues regarding the perceived "downward" direction.

  9. Extended vector meson dominance model for the baryon octet electromagnetic form factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.A.; Puckett-Truman, C.

    1996-01-01

    An unresolved issue in the present understanding of nucleon structure is the effect of hidden strangeness on electromagnetic observables such as G n E (q 2 ). Previously, we have shown that G n E (q 2 ) is sensitive to small φNN couplings. A complementary approach for understanding effects due to strangeness content and the Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka (OZI) rule is to investigate the electromagnetic structure of hyperons. We apply Sakurai close-quote s universality limit of the SU(3) F symmetry relations and a prescription based on the OZI rule to calculate the electromagnetic form factors of the baryon octet states (p,n,Λ,Σ + ,Σ 0 ,Σ - ,Ξ 0 ,Ξ - ) within the framework of an extended vector meson dominance model. To provide additional motivation for experimental investigation, we discuss the possibility of extracting the ratio G M Λ (q 2 )/G M ΣΛ (q 2 ) from the Λ/Σ polarization ratio in kaon electroproduction experiments. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  10. Extraction and representation of nested catchment areas from digital elevation models in lake-dominated topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, D. Scott; Band, Lawrence E.

    1998-04-01

    This paper presents a new method for extracting flow directions, contributing (upslope) areas, and nested catchments from digital elevation models in lake-dominated areas. Existing tools for acquiring descriptive variables of the topography, such as surface flow directions and contributing areas, were developed for moderate to steep topography. These tools are typically difficult to apply in gentle topography owing to limitations in explicitly handling lakes and other flat areas. This paper addresses the problem of accurately representing general topographic features by first identifying distinguishing features, such as lakes, in gentle topography areas and then using these features to guide the search for topographic flow directions and catchment marking. Lakes are explicitly represented in the topology of a watershed for use in water routing. Nonlake flat features help guide the search for topographic flow directions in areas of low signal to noise. This combined feature-based and grid-based search for topographic features yields improved contributing areas and watershed boundaries where there are lakes and other flat areas. Lakes are easily classified from remotely sensed imagery, which makes automated representation of lakes as subsystems within a watershed system tractable with widely available data sets.

  11. Mapping Cropland in Smallholder-Dominated Savannas: Integrating Remote Sensing Techniques and Probabilistic Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Sweeney

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Traditional smallholder farming systems dominate the savanna range countries of sub-Saharan Africa and provide the foundation for the region’s food security. Despite continued expansion of smallholder farming into the surrounding savanna landscapes, food insecurity in the region persists. Central to the monitoring of food security in these countries, and to understanding the processes behind it, are reliable, high-quality datasets of cultivated land. Remote sensing has been frequently used for this purpose but distinguishing crops under certain stages of growth from savanna woodlands has remained a major challenge. Yet, crop production in dryland ecosystems is most vulnerable to seasonal climate variability, amplifying the need for high quality products showing the distribution and extent of cropland. The key objective in this analysis is the development of a classification protocol for African savanna landscapes, emphasizing the delineation of cropland. We integrate remote sensing techniques with probabilistic modeling into an innovative workflow. We present summary results for this methodology applied to a land cover classification of Zambia’s Southern Province. Five primary land cover categories are classified for the study area, producing an overall map accuracy of 88.18%. Omission error within the cropland class is 12.11% and commission error 9.76%.

  12. The simplicial Ricci tensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsing, Paul M; McDonald, Jonathan R; Miller, Warner A

    2011-01-01

    The Ricci tensor (Ric) is fundamental to Einstein's geometric theory of gravitation. The three-dimensional Ric of a spacelike surface vanishes at the moment of time symmetry for vacuum spacetimes. The four-dimensional Ric is the Einstein tensor for such spacetimes. More recently, the Ric was used by Hamilton to define a nonlinear, diffusive Ricci flow (RF) that was fundamental to Perelman's proof of the Poincare conjecture. Analytic applications of RF can be found in many fields including general relativity and mathematics. Numerically it has been applied broadly to communication networks, medical physics, computer design and more. In this paper, we use Regge calculus (RC) to provide the first geometric discretization of the Ric. This result is fundamental for higher dimensional generalizations of discrete RF. We construct this tensor on both the simplicial lattice and its dual and prove their equivalence. We show that the Ric is an edge-based weighted average of deficit divided by an edge-based weighted average of dual area-an expression similar to the vertex-based weighted average of the scalar curvature reported recently. We use this Ric in a third and independent geometric derivation of the RC Einstein tensor in arbitrary dimensions.

  13. The simplicial Ricci tensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsing, Paul M.; McDonald, Jonathan R.; Miller, Warner A.

    2011-08-01

    The Ricci tensor (Ric) is fundamental to Einstein's geometric theory of gravitation. The three-dimensional Ric of a spacelike surface vanishes at the moment of time symmetry for vacuum spacetimes. The four-dimensional Ric is the Einstein tensor for such spacetimes. More recently, the Ric was used by Hamilton to define a nonlinear, diffusive Ricci flow (RF) that was fundamental to Perelman's proof of the Poincarè conjecture. Analytic applications of RF can be found in many fields including general relativity and mathematics. Numerically it has been applied broadly to communication networks, medical physics, computer design and more. In this paper, we use Regge calculus (RC) to provide the first geometric discretization of the Ric. This result is fundamental for higher dimensional generalizations of discrete RF. We construct this tensor on both the simplicial lattice and its dual and prove their equivalence. We show that the Ric is an edge-based weighted average of deficit divided by an edge-based weighted average of dual area—an expression similar to the vertex-based weighted average of the scalar curvature reported recently. We use this Ric in a third and independent geometric derivation of the RC Einstein tensor in arbitrary dimensions.

  14. Applied tensor stereology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziegel, Johanna; Nyengaard, Jens Randel; Jensen, Eva B. Vedel

    In the present paper, statistical procedures for estimating shape and orientation of arbitrary three-dimensional particles are developed. The focus of this work is on the case where the particles cannot be observed directly, but only via sections. Volume tensors are used for describing particle s...

  15. The evolution of tensor polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.; Lee, S.Y.; Ratner, L.

    1993-01-01

    By using the equation of motion for the vector polarization, the spin transfer matrix for spin tensor polarization, the spin transfer matrix for spin tensor polarization is derived. The evolution equation for the tensor polarization is studied in the presence of an isolate spin resonance and in the presence of a spin rotor, or snake

  16. Tensor Calculus: Unlearning Vector Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wha-Suck; Engelbrecht, Johann; Moller, Rita

    2018-01-01

    Tensor calculus is critical in the study of the vector calculus of the surface of a body. Indeed, tensor calculus is a natural step-up for vector calculus. This paper presents some pitfalls of a traditional course in vector calculus in transitioning to tensor calculus. We show how a deeper emphasis on traditional topics such as the Jacobian can…

  17. Tensor modes in pure natural inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Yasunori; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2018-05-01

    We study tensor modes in pure natural inflation [1], a recently-proposed inflationary model in which an axionic inflaton couples to pure Yang-Mills gauge fields. We find that the tensor-to-scalar ratio r is naturally bounded from below. This bound originates from the finiteness of the number of metastable branches of vacua in pure Yang-Mills theories. Details of the model can be probed by future cosmic microwave background experiments and improved lattice gauge theory calculations of the θ-angle dependence of the vacuum energy.

  18. Convergence of scalar-tensor theories towards general relativity and primordial nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serna, A; Alimi, J-M; Navarro, A

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we analyse the conditions for convergence towards general relativity of scalar-tensor gravity theories defined by an arbitrary coupling function α (in the Einstein frame). We show that, in general, the evolution of the scalar field (φ) is governed by two opposite mechanisms: an attraction mechanism which tends to drive scalar-tensor models towards Einstein's theory, and a repulsion mechanism which has the contrary effect. The attraction mechanism dominates the recent epochs of the universe evolution if, and only if, the scalar field and its derivative satisfy certain boundary conditions. Since these conditions for convergence towards general relativity depend on the particular scalar-tensor theory used to describe the universe evolution, the nucleosynthesis bounds on the present value of the coupling function, α 0 , strongly differ from some theories to others. For example, in theories defined by α ∝ |φ| analytical estimates lead to very stringent nucleosynthesis bounds on α 0 (∼ -19 ). By contrast, in scalar-tensor theories defined by α ∝ φ much larger limits on α 0 (∼ -7 ) are found

  19. Convergence of scalar-tensor theories towards general relativity and primordial nucleosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serna, A [Dept. Fisica y Computacion, Universidad Miguel Hernandez, E03202-Elche (Spain); Alimi, J-M [LAEC, CNRS-UMR 8631, Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, F92195-Meudon (France); Navarro, A [Dept. Fisica, Universidad de Murcia, E30071-Murcia (Spain)

    2002-03-07

    In this paper, we analyse the conditions for convergence towards general relativity of scalar-tensor gravity theories defined by an arbitrary coupling function {alpha} (in the Einstein frame). We show that, in general, the evolution of the scalar field ({phi}) is governed by two opposite mechanisms: an attraction mechanism which tends to drive scalar-tensor models towards Einstein's theory, and a repulsion mechanism which has the contrary effect. The attraction mechanism dominates the recent epochs of the universe evolution if, and only if, the scalar field and its derivative satisfy certain boundary conditions. Since these conditions for convergence towards general relativity depend on the particular scalar-tensor theory used to describe the universe evolution, the nucleosynthesis bounds on the present value of the coupling function, {alpha}{sub 0}, strongly differ from some theories to others. For example, in theories defined by {alpha} {proportional_to} |{phi}| analytical estimates lead to very stringent nucleosynthesis bounds on {alpha}{sub 0}({approx}<10{sup -19}). By contrast, in scalar-tensor theories defined by {alpha} {proportional_to} {phi} much larger limits on {alpha}{sub 0}({approx}<10{sup -7}) are found.

  20. When technological discontinuities and disruptive business models challenge dominant industry logics: insights from the drugs industry

    OpenAIRE

    Sabatier , Valérie; Kennard , Adrienne; Mangematin , Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Working paper serie RMT (WPS 12-04) - 39 p; International audience; An industry's dominant logic is the general scheme of value creation and capture shared by its actors. In high technology fields, technological discontinuities are not enough to disrupt an industry's dominant logic. Identifying the factors that might trigger change in that logic can help companies develop strategies to enable them to capture greater value from their innovations by disrupting that logic. Based on analyzing the...

  1. Diffusion tensor image registration using hybrid connectivity and tensor features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Yap, Pew-Thian; Wu, Guorong; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-07-01

    Most existing diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) registration methods estimate structural correspondences based on voxelwise matching of tensors. The rich connectivity information that is given by DTI, however, is often neglected. In this article, we propose to integrate complementary information given by connectivity features and tensor features for improved registration accuracy. To utilize connectivity information, we place multiple anchors representing different brain anatomies in the image space, and define the connectivity features for each voxel as the geodesic distances from all anchors to the voxel under consideration. The geodesic distance, which is computed in relation to the tensor field, encapsulates information of brain connectivity. We also extract tensor features for every voxel to reflect the local statistics of tensors in its neighborhood. We then combine both connectivity features and tensor features for registration of tensor images. From the images, landmarks are selected automatically and their correspondences are determined based on their connectivity and tensor feature vectors. The deformation field that deforms one tensor image to the other is iteratively estimated and optimized according to the landmarks and their associated correspondences. Experimental results show that, by using connectivity features and tensor features simultaneously, registration accuracy is increased substantially compared with the cases using either type of features alone. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Evaluation of the Differences of Myocardial Fibers between Acute and Chronic Myocardial Infarction: Application of Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a Rhesus Monkey Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuqing [Department of Radiology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Sichuan 610041 (China); CAS Key Laboratory for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology of China, Beijing 100190 (China); Cai, Wei [Department of Radiology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Sichuan 610041 (China); Department of Radiology, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, 4th Clinical Medical College of Peking University, Beijing 100035 (China); Wang, Lei [Department of Radiology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Sichuan 610041 (China); Xia, Rui [Department of Radiology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Sichuan 610041 (China); Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chen, Wei [Department of Radiology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Sichuan 610041 (China); Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Yunnan 650032 (China); Zheng, Jie [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, School of Medicine, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Gao, Fabao [Department of Radiology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Sichuan 610041 (China)

    2016-11-01

    To understand microstructural changes after myocardial infarction (MI), we evaluated myocardial fibers of rhesus monkeys during acute or chronic MI, and identified the differences of myocardial fibers between acute and chronic MI. Six fixed hearts of rhesus monkeys with left anterior descending coronary artery ligation for 1 hour or 84 days were scanned by diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fractional anisotropy (FA) and helix angle (HA). Comparing with acute MI monkeys (FA: 0.59 ± 0.02; ADC: 5.0 ± 0.6 × 10{sup -4} mm{sup 2}/s; HA: 94.5 ± 4.4°), chronic MI monkeys showed remarkably decreased FA value (0.26 ± 0.03), increased ADC value (7.8 ± 0.8 × 10{sup -4}mm{sup 2}/s), decreased HA transmural range (49.5 ± 4.6°) and serious defects on endocardium in infarcted regions. The HA in infarcted regions shifted to more components of negative left-handed helix in chronic MI monkeys (-38.3 ± 5.0°–11.2 ± 4.3°) than in acute MI monkeys (-41.4 ± 5.1°–53.1 ± 3.7°), but the HA in remote regions shifted to more components of positive right-handed helix in chronic MI monkeys (-43.8 ± 2.7°–66.5 ± 4.9°) than in acute MI monkeys (-59.5 ± 3.4°–64.9 ± 4.3°). Diffusion tensor MRI method helps to quantify differences of mechanical microstructure and water diffusion of myocardial fibers between acute and chronic MI monkey's models.

  3. Evaluation of the differences of myocardial fibers between acute and chronic myocardial infarction: Application of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging INA Rhesus monkey model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yu Qing; Cai, Wei; Wang, Lei; Xia, Rui; Chen, Wei; Zheng, Jie [Dept. of Radiology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Sichuan (China); Gao, Fabao [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, School of Medicine, Washington University, St. Louis (United States)

    2016-09-15

    To understand microstructural changes after myocardial infarction (MI), we evaluated myocardial fibers of rhesus monkeys during acute or chronic MI, and identified the differences of myocardial fibers between acute and chronic MI. Six fixed hearts of rhesus monkeys with left anterior descending coronary artery ligation for 1 hour or 84 days were scanned by diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fractional anisotropy (FA) and helix angle (HA). Comparing with acute MI monkeys (FA: 0.59 ± 0.02; ADC: 5.0 ± 0.6 × 10{sup -4} mm{sup 2}/s; HA: 94.5 ± 4.4°), chronic MI monkeys showed remarkably decreased FA value (0.26 ± 0.03), increased ADC value (7.8 ± 0.8 × 10{sup -4} mm{sup 2}/s), decreased HA transmural range (49.5 ± 4.6°) and serious defects on endocardium in infarcted regions. The HA in infarcted regions shifted to more components of negative left-handed helix in chronic MI monkeys (-38.3 ± 5.0°–11.2 ± 4.3°) than in acute MI monkeys (-41.4 ± 5.1°–53.1 ± 3.7°), but the HA in remote regions shifted to more components of positive right-handed helix in chronic MI monkeys (-43.8 ± 2.7°–66.5 ± 4.9°) than in acute MI monkeys (-59.5 ± 3.4°–64.9 ± 4.3°). Diffusion tensor MRI method helps to quantify differences of mechanical microstructure and water diffusion of myocardial fibers between acute and chronic MI monkey's models.

  4. Evaluation of the differences of myocardial fibers between acute and chronic myocardial infarction: Application of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging INA Rhesus monkey model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yu Qing; Cai, Wei; Wang, Lei; Xia, Rui; Chen, Wei; Zheng, Jie; Gao, Fabao

    2016-01-01

    To understand microstructural changes after myocardial infarction (MI), we evaluated myocardial fibers of rhesus monkeys during acute or chronic MI, and identified the differences of myocardial fibers between acute and chronic MI. Six fixed hearts of rhesus monkeys with left anterior descending coronary artery ligation for 1 hour or 84 days were scanned by diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fractional anisotropy (FA) and helix angle (HA). Comparing with acute MI monkeys (FA: 0.59 ± 0.02; ADC: 5.0 ± 0.6 × 10 -4 mm 2 /s; HA: 94.5 ± 4.4°), chronic MI monkeys showed remarkably decreased FA value (0.26 ± 0.03), increased ADC value (7.8 ± 0.8 × 10 -4 mm 2 /s), decreased HA transmural range (49.5 ± 4.6°) and serious defects on endocardium in infarcted regions. The HA in infarcted regions shifted to more components of negative left-handed helix in chronic MI monkeys (-38.3 ± 5.0°–11.2 ± 4.3°) than in acute MI monkeys (-41.4 ± 5.1°–53.1 ± 3.7°), but the HA in remote regions shifted to more components of positive right-handed helix in chronic MI monkeys (-43.8 ± 2.7°–66.5 ± 4.9°) than in acute MI monkeys (-59.5 ± 3.4°–64.9 ± 4.3°). Diffusion tensor MRI method helps to quantify differences of mechanical microstructure and water diffusion of myocardial fibers between acute and chronic MI monkey's models

  5. RNA interference gene therapy in dominant retinitis pigmentosa and cone-rod dystrophy mouse models caused by GCAP1 mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li eJiang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi knockdown is an efficacious therapeutic strategy for silencing genes causative for dominant retinal dystrophies. To test this, we used self-complementary (sc AAV2/8 vector to develop an RNAi-based therapy in two dominant retinal degeneration mouse models. The allele-specific model expresses transgenic bovine GCAP1(Y99C establishing a rapid RP-like phenotype, whereas the nonallele-specific model expresses mouse GCAP1(L151F producing a slowly progressing cone/rod dystrophy (CORD. The late onset GCAP1(L151F-CORD mimics the dystrophy observed in human GCAP1-CORD patients. Subretinal injection of scAAV2/8 carrying shRNA expression cassettes specific for bovine or mouse GCAP1 showed strong expression at one week post-injection. In both allele-specific (GCAP1(Y99C-RP and nonallele-specific (GCAP1(L151F-CORD models of dominant retinal dystrophy, RNAi-mediated gene silencing enhanced photoreceptor survival, delayed onset of degeneration and improved visual function. Such results provide a proof of concept toward effective RNAi-based gene therapy mediated by scAAV2/8 for dominant retinal disease based on GCAP1 mutation. Further, nonallele-specific RNAi knockdown of GCAP1 may prove generally applicable toward the rescue of any human GCAP1-based dominant cone-rod dystrophy.

  6. Joint Tensor Feature Analysis For Visual Object Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wai Keung; Lai, Zhihui; Xu, Yong; Wen, Jiajun; Ho, Chu Po

    2015-11-01

    Tensor-based object recognition has been widely studied in the past several years. This paper focuses on the issue of joint feature selection from the tensor data and proposes a novel method called joint tensor feature analysis (JTFA) for tensor feature extraction and recognition. In order to obtain a set of jointly sparse projections for tensor feature extraction, we define the modified within-class tensor scatter value and the modified between-class tensor scatter value for regression. The k-mode optimization technique and the L(2,1)-norm jointly sparse regression are combined together to compute the optimal solutions. The convergent analysis, computational complexity analysis and the essence of the proposed method/model are also presented. It is interesting to show that the proposed method is very similar to singular value decomposition on the scatter matrix but with sparsity constraint on the right singular value matrix or eigen-decomposition on the scatter matrix with sparse manner. Experimental results on some tensor datasets indicate that JTFA outperforms some well-known tensor feature extraction and selection algorithms.

  7. On the cosmology of scalar-tensor-vector gravity theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, Sara; Roshan, Mahmood; Amendola, Luca

    2018-01-01

    We consider the cosmological consequences of a special scalar-tensor-vector theory of gravity, known as MOG (for MOdified Gravity), proposed to address the dark matter problem. This theory introduces two scalar fields G(x) and μ(x), and one vector field phiα(x), in addition to the metric tensor. We set the corresponding self-interaction potentials to zero, as in the standard form of MOG. Then using the phase space analysis in the flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker background, we show that the theory possesses a viable sequence of cosmological epochs with acceptable time dependency for the cosmic scale factor. We also investigate MOG's potential as a dark energy model and show that extra fields in MOG cannot provide a late time accelerated expansion. Furthermore, using a dynamical system approach to solve the non-linear field equations numerically, we calculate the angular size of the sound horizon, i.e. θs, in MOG. We find that 8× 10‑3rad<θs<8.2× 10‑3 rad which is way outside the current observational bounds. Finally, we generalize MOG to a modified form called mMOG, and we find that mMOG passes the sound-horizon constraint. However, mMOG also cannot be considered as a dark energy model unless one adds a cosmological constant, and more importantly, the matter dominated era is still slightly different from the standard case.

  8. The Twist Tensor Nuclear Norm for Video Completion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenrui; Tao, Dacheng; Zhang, Wensheng; Xie, Yuan; Yang, Yehui

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a new low-rank tensor model based on the circulant algebra, namely, twist tensor nuclear norm (t-TNN). The twist tensor denotes a three-way tensor representation to laterally store 2-D data slices in order. On one hand, t-TNN convexly relaxes the tensor multirank of the twist tensor in the Fourier domain, which allows an efficient computation using fast Fourier transform. On the other, t-TNN is equal to the nuclear norm of block circulant matricization of the twist tensor in the original domain, which extends the traditional matrix nuclear norm in a block circulant way. We test the t-TNN model on a video completion application that aims to fill missing values and the experiment results validate its effectiveness, especially when dealing with video recorded by a nonstationary panning camera. The block circulant matricization of the twist tensor can be transformed into a circulant block representation with nuclear norm invariance. This representation, after transformation, exploits the horizontal translation relationship between the frames in a video, and endows the t-TNN model with a more powerful ability to reconstruct panning videos than the existing state-of-the-art low-rank models.

  9. Susceptibility tensor imaging (STI) of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Liu, Chunlei; Duong, Timothy Q; van Zijl, Peter C M; Li, Xu

    2017-04-01

    Susceptibility tensor imaging (STI) is a recently developed MRI technique that allows quantitative determination of orientation-independent magnetic susceptibility parameters from the dependence of gradient echo signal phase on the orientation of biological tissues with respect to the main magnetic field. By modeling the magnetic susceptibility of each voxel as a symmetric rank-2 tensor, individual magnetic susceptibility tensor elements as well as the mean magnetic susceptibility and magnetic susceptibility anisotropy can be determined for brain tissues that would still show orientation dependence after conventional scalar-based quantitative susceptibility mapping to remove such dependence. Similar to diffusion tensor imaging, STI allows mapping of brain white matter fiber orientations and reconstruction of 3D white matter pathways using the principal eigenvectors of the susceptibility tensor. In contrast to diffusion anisotropy, the main determinant factor of the susceptibility anisotropy in brain white matter is myelin. Another unique feature of the susceptibility anisotropy of white matter is its sensitivity to gadolinium-based contrast agents. Mechanistically, MRI-observed susceptibility anisotropy is mainly attributed to the highly ordered lipid molecules in the myelin sheath. STI provides a consistent interpretation of the dependence of phase and susceptibility on orientation at multiple scales. This article reviews the key experimental findings and physical theories that led to the development of STI, its practical implementations, and its applications for brain research. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Susceptibility Tensor Imaging (STI) of the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Liu, Chunlei; Duong, Timothy Q.; van Zijl, Peter C.M.; Li, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Susceptibility tensor imaging (STI) is a recently developed MRI technique that allows quantitative determination of orientation-independent magnetic susceptibility parameters from the dependence of gradient echo signal phase on the orientation of biological tissues with respect to the main magnetic field. By modeling the magnetic susceptibility of each voxel as a symmetric rank-2 tensor, individual magnetic susceptibility tensor elements as well as the mean magnetic susceptibility (MMS) and magnetic susceptibility anisotropy (MSA) can be determined for brain tissues that would still show orientation dependence after conventional scalar-based quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) to remove such dependence. Similar to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), STI allows mapping of brain white matter fiber orientations and reconstruction of 3D white matter pathways using the principal eigenvectors of the susceptibility tensor. In contrast to diffusion anisotropy, the main determinant factor of susceptibility anisotropy in brain white matter is myelin. Another unique feature of susceptibility anisotropy of white matter is its sensitivity to gadolinium-based contrast agents. Mechanistically, MRI-observed susceptibility anisotropy is mainly attributed to the highly ordered lipid molecules in myelin sheath. STI provides a consistent interpretation of the dependence of phase and susceptibility on orientation at multiple scales. This article reviews the key experimental findings and physical theories that led to the development of STI, its practical implementations, and its applications for brain research. PMID:27120169

  11. Gogny interactions with tensor terms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anguiano, M.; Lallena, A.M.; Bernard, R.N. [Universidad de Granada, Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Granada (Spain); Co' , G. [INFN, Lecce (Italy); De Donno, V. [Universita del Salento, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica ' ' E. De Giorgi' ' , Lecce (Italy); Grasso, M. [Universite Paris-Sud, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, IN2P3-CNRS, Orsay (France)

    2016-07-15

    We present a perturbative approach to include tensor terms in the Gogny interaction. We do not change the values of the usual parameterisations, with the only exception of the spin-orbit term, and we add tensor terms whose only free parameters are the strengths of the interactions. We identify observables sensitive to the presence of the tensor force in Hartree-Fock, Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov and random phase approximation calculations. We show the need of including two tensor contributions, at least: a pure tensor term and a tensor-isospin term. We show results relevant for the inclusion of the tensor term for single-particle energies, charge-conserving magnetic excitations and Gamow-Teller excitations. (orig.)

  12. The geomagnetic field gradient tensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotsiaros, Stavros; Olsen, Nils

    2012-01-01

    We develop the general mathematical basis for space magnetic gradiometry in spherical coordinates. The magnetic gradient tensor is a second rank tensor consisting of 3 × 3 = 9 spatial derivatives. Since the geomagnetic field vector B is always solenoidal (∇ · B = 0) there are only eight independent...... tensor elements. Furthermore, in current free regions the magnetic gradient tensor becomes symmetric, further reducing the number of independent elements to five. In that case B is a Laplacian potential field and the gradient tensor can be expressed in series of spherical harmonics. We present properties...... of the magnetic gradient tensor and provide explicit expressions of its elements in terms of spherical harmonics. Finally we discuss the benefit of using gradient measurements for exploring the Earth’s magnetic field from space, in particular the advantage of the various tensor elements for a better determination...

  13. The tensor bi-spectrum in a matter bounce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, Debika; Sreenath, V.; Sriramkumar, L., E-mail: debika@physics.iitm.ac.in, E-mail: sreenath@lsu.edu, E-mail: sriram@physics.iitm.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2015-11-01

    Matter bounces are bouncing scenarios wherein the universe contracts as in a matter dominated phase at early times. Such scenarios are known to lead to a scale invariant spectrum of tensor perturbations, just as de Sitter inflation does. In this work, we examine if the tensor bi-spectrum can discriminate between the inflationary and the bouncing scenarios. Using the Maldacena formalism, we analytically evaluate the tensor bi-spectrum in a matter bounce for an arbitrary triangular configuration of the wavevectors. We show that, over scales of cosmological interest, the non-Gaussianity parameter h{sub NL} that characterizes the amplitude of the tensor bi-spectrum is quite small when compared to the corresponding values in de Sitter inflation. During inflation, the amplitude of the tensor perturbations freeze on super-Hubble scales, a behavior that results in the so-called consistency condition relating the tensor bi-spectrum and the power spectrum in the squeezed limit. In contrast, in the bouncing scenarios, the amplitude of the tensor perturbations grow strongly as one approaches the bounce, which suggests that the consistency condition will not be valid in such situations. We explicitly show that the consistency relation is indeed violated in the matter bounce. We discuss the implications of the results.

  14. Singular Poisson tensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littlejohn, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    The Hamiltonian structures discovered by Morrison and Greene for various fluid equations were obtained by guessing a Hamiltonian and a suitable Poisson bracket formula, expressed in terms of noncanonical (but physical) coordinates. In general, such a procedure for obtaining a Hamiltonian system does not produce a Hamiltonian phase space in the usual sense (a symplectic manifold), but rather a family of symplectic manifolds. To state the matter in terms of a system with a finite number of degrees of freedom, the family of symplectic manifolds is parametrized by a set of Casimir functions, which are characterized by having vanishing Poisson brackets with all other functions. The number of independent Casimir functions is the corank of the Poisson tensor J/sup ij/, the components of which are the Poisson brackets of the coordinates among themselves. Thus, these Casimir functions exist only when the Poisson tensor is singular

  15. Improving Tensor Based Recommenders with Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leginus, Martin; Dolog, Peter; Zemaitis, Valdas

    2012-01-01

    Social tagging systems (STS) model three types of entities (i.e. tag-user-item) and relationships between them are encoded into a 3-order tensor. Latent relationships and patterns can be discovered by applying tensor factorization techniques like Higher Order Singular Value Decomposition (HOSVD),...... of the recommendations and execution time are improved and memory requirements are decreased. The clustering is motivated by the fact that many tags in a tag space are semantically similar thus the tags can be grouped. Finally, promising experimental results are presented...

  16. Fine-mapping additive and dominant SNP effects using group-LASSO and Fractional Resample Model Averaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabourin, Jeremy; Nobel, Andrew B.; Valdar, William

    2014-01-01

    Genomewide association studies sometimes identify loci at which both the number and identities of the underlying causal variants are ambiguous. In such cases, statistical methods that model effects of multiple SNPs simultaneously can help disentangle the observed patterns of association and provide information about how those SNPs could be prioritized for follow-up studies. Current multi-SNP methods, however, tend to assume that SNP effects are well captured by additive genetics; yet when genetic dominance is present, this assumption translates to reduced power and faulty prioritizations. We describe a statistical procedure for prioritizing SNPs at GWAS loci that efficiently models both additive and dominance effects. Our method, LLARRMA-dawg, combines a group LASSO procedure for sparse modeling of multiple SNP effects with a resampling procedure based on fractional observation weights; it estimates for each SNP the robustness of association with the phenotype both to sampling variation and to competing explanations from other SNPs. In producing a SNP prioritization that best identifies underlying true signals, we show that: our method easily outperforms a single marker analysis; when additive-only signals are present, our joint model for additive and dominance is equivalent to or only slightly less powerful than modeling additive-only effects; and, when dominance signals are present, even in combination with substantial additive effects, our joint model is unequivocally more powerful than a model assuming additivity. We also describe how performance can be improved through calibrated randomized penalization, and discuss how dominance in ungenotyped SNPs can be incorporated through either heterozygote dosage or multiple imputation. PMID:25417853

  17. TensorFlow Distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Dillon, Joshua V.; Langmore, Ian; Tran, Dustin; Brevdo, Eugene; Vasudevan, Srinivas; Moore, Dave; Patton, Brian; Alemi, Alex; Hoffman, Matt; Saurous, Rif A.

    2017-01-01

    The TensorFlow Distributions library implements a vision of probability theory adapted to the modern deep-learning paradigm of end-to-end differentiable computation. Building on two basic abstractions, it offers flexible building blocks for probabilistic computation. Distributions provide fast, numerically stable methods for generating samples and computing statistics, e.g., log density. Bijectors provide composable volume-tracking transformations with automatic caching. Together these enable...

  18. Behavioral modeling of the dominant dynamics in input-output transfer of linear(ized) circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beelen, T.G.J.; Maten, ter E.J.W.; Sihaloho, H.J.; Eijndhoven, van S.J.L.

    2010-01-01

    We present a powerful procedure for determining both the dominant dynamics of the inputoutput transfer and the corresponding most influential circuit parameters of a linear(ized) circuit. The procedure consists of several steps in which a specific (sub)problem is solved and its solution is used in

  19. Service-Dominant Business Engineering with Base/X : Business Modeling Handbook

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grefen, P.W.P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Many business domains are currently transitioning towards a service-dominant business setting. After the transition, business will be centered on the provisioning of solution-oriented, composed services to customers. The emphasis shifts from the value of the individual product or service to the

  20. Counselor-Advocate-Scholar Model: Changing the Dominant Discourse in Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratts, Manivong J.; Greenleaf, Arie T.

    2018-01-01

    Discourse represents the languages, ideas, and images that together shape one's understanding of the world. In counseling, discourse determines clinical practice. The authors posit that dominant discourse in counseling promotes an intrapsychic status quo that discounts the relationship between individuals and their environment, which often leads…

  1. Topics on domination

    CERN Document Server

    Hedetniemi, ST

    1991-01-01

    The contributions in this volume are divided into three sections: theoretical, new models and algorithmic. The first section focuses on properties of the standard domination number &ggr;(G), the second section is concerned with new variations on the domination theme, and the third is primarily concerned with finding classes of graphs for which the domination number (and several other domination-related parameters) can be computed in polynomial time.

  2. An SDP Approach for Multiperiod Mixed 0–1 Linear Programming Models with Stochastic Dominance Constraints for Risk Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Escudero, Laureano F.; Monge, Juan Francisco; Morales, Dolores Romero

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we consider multiperiod mixed 0–1 linear programming models under uncertainty. We propose a risk averse strategy using stochastic dominance constraints (SDC) induced by mixed-integer linear recourse as the risk measure. The SDC strategy extends the existing literature to the multist...

  3. Effect of bottom stress formulation on modelled flow and turbidity maxima in cross-sections of tide-dominated estuaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schramkowski, G.P.; de Swart, H.E.; Schuttelaars, H.

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional numerical model with a prognostic salinity field is used to investigate the effect of a partial slip bottom boundary condition on lateral flow and sediment distribution in a transect of a tidally dominated channel. The transect has a symmetrical Gaussian cross-channel bottom

  4. Fermionic topological quantum states as tensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, C.; Buerschaper, O.; Eisert, J.

    2017-06-01

    Tensor network states, and in particular projected entangled pair states, play an important role in the description of strongly correlated quantum lattice systems. They do not only serve as variational states in numerical simulation methods, but also provide a framework for classifying phases of quantum matter and capture notions of topological order in a stringent and rigorous language. The rapid development in this field for spin models and bosonic systems has not yet been mirrored by an analogous development for fermionic models. In this work, we introduce a tensor network formalism capable of capturing notions of topological order for quantum systems with fermionic components. At the heart of the formalism are axioms of fermionic matrix-product operator injectivity, stable under concatenation. Building upon that, we formulate a Grassmann number tensor network ansatz for the ground state of fermionic twisted quantum double models. A specific focus is put on the paradigmatic example of the fermionic toric code. This work shows that the program of describing topologically ordered systems using tensor networks carries over to fermionic models.

  5. Higher-order tensors in diffusion imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultz, T.; Fuster, A.; Ghosh, A.; Deriche, R.; Florack, L.M.J.; Lim, L.H.; Westin, C.-F.; Vilanova, A.; Burgeth, B.

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion imaging is a noninvasive tool for probing the microstructure of fibrous nerve and muscle tissue. Higher-order tensors provide a powerful mathematical language to model and analyze the large and complex data that is generated by its modern variants such as High Angular Resolution Diffusion

  6. Primordial tensor modes from quantum corrected inflation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Jakob; Sannino, Francesco; Svendsen, Ole

    2014-01-01

    . Finally we confront these theories with the Planck and BICEP2 data. We demonstrate that the discovery of primordial tensor modes by BICEP2 require the presence of sizable quantum departures from the $\\phi^4$-Inflaton model for the non-minimally coupled scenario which we parametrize and quantify. We...

  7. Tensor Permutation Matrices in Finite Dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Christian, Rakotonirina

    2005-01-01

    We have generalised the properties with the tensor product, of one 4x4 matrix which is a permutation matrix, and we call a tensor commutation matrix. Tensor commutation matrices can be constructed with or without calculus. A formula allows us to construct a tensor permutation matrix, which is a generalisation of tensor commutation matrix, has been established. The expression of an element of a tensor commutation matrix has been generalised in the case of any element of a tensor permutation ma...

  8. Tensor Based Representation and Analysis of Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmpoutis, Angelos

    2009-01-01

    Cartesian tensor bases have been widely used to model spherical functions. In medical imaging, tensors of various orders can approximate the diffusivity function at each voxel of a diffusion-weighted MRI data set. This approximation produces tensor-valued datasets that contain information about the underlying local structure of the scanned tissue.…

  9. MathGR: a tensor and GR computation package to keep it simple

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yi

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the MathGR package, written in Mathematica. The package can manipulate tensor and GR calculations with either abstract or explicit indices, simplify tensors with permutational symmetries, decompose tensors from abstract indices to partially or completely explicit indices and convert partial derivatives into total derivatives. Frequently used GR tensors and a model of FRW universe with ADM type perturbations are predefined. The package is built around the philosophy to "keep it si...

  10. Tensor Factorization for Low-Rank Tensor Completion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Pan; Lu, Canyi; Lin, Zhouchen; Zhang, Chao

    2018-03-01

    Recently, a tensor nuclear norm (TNN) based method was proposed to solve the tensor completion problem, which has achieved state-of-the-art performance on image and video inpainting tasks. However, it requires computing tensor singular value decomposition (t-SVD), which costs much computation and thus cannot efficiently handle tensor data, due to its natural large scale. Motivated by TNN, we propose a novel low-rank tensor factorization method for efficiently solving the 3-way tensor completion problem. Our method preserves the low-rank structure of a tensor by factorizing it into the product of two tensors of smaller sizes. In the optimization process, our method only needs to update two smaller tensors, which can be more efficiently conducted than computing t-SVD. Furthermore, we prove that the proposed alternating minimization algorithm can converge to a Karush-Kuhn-Tucker point. Experimental results on the synthetic data recovery, image and video inpainting tasks clearly demonstrate the superior performance and efficiency of our developed method over state-of-the-arts including the TNN and matricization methods.

  11. Octet dominance of nonleptonic hyperon decays in a nonrelativistic quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riazuddin; Fayyazuddin

    1978-01-01

    Extracting an effective Hamiltonian by taking the nonrelativistic limit of quark-quark scattering through W-boson exchange, it is shown that we obtain octet dominance for the matrix elements , where B/sub r/,B/sub s/ denote ordinary baryons. Further, it is shown that the above matrix elements are enhanced so as to compensate the Cabibbo suppression factor sintheta/sub C/ to some extent

  12. A life-cycle model for wave-dominated tidal inlets along passive margin coasts of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seminack, Christopher T.; McBride, Randolph A.

    2018-03-01

    A regional overview of 107 wave-dominated tidal inlets along the U.S. Atlantic coast, U.S. Gulf of Mexico coast, and Canadian Gulf of St. Lawrence coast yielded a generalized wave-dominated tidal inlet life-cycle model that recognized the rotational nature of tidal inlets. Tidal inlets are influenced by concurrently acting processes transpiring over two timescales: short-term, event-driven processes and long-term, evolutionary processes. Wave-dominated tidal inlets are classified into three rotational categories based on net longshore sediment transport direction and rotation direction along the landward (back-barrier) portion of the inlet channel: downdrift channel rotation, updrift channel rotation, or little-to-no channel rotation. Lateral shifting of the flood-tidal delta depocenter in response to available estuarine accommodation space appears to control inlet channel rotation. Flood-tidal delta deposits fill accommodation space locally within the estuary (i.e., creating bathymetric highs), causing the tidal-inlet channel to rotate. External influences, such as fluvial discharge, pre-existing back-barrier channels, and impeding salt marsh will also influence inlet-channel rotation. Storm events may rejuvenate the tidal inlet by scouring sediment within the flood-tidal delta, increasing local accommodation space. Wave-dominated tidal inlets are generally unstable and tend to open, concurrently migrate laterally and rotate, infill, and close. Channel rotation is a primary reason for wave-dominated tidal inlet closure. During rotation, the inlet channel lengthens and hydraulic efficiency decreases, thus causing tidal prism to decrease. Tidal prism, estuarine accommodation space, and sediment supply to the flood-tidal delta are the primary variables responsible for tidal inlet rotation. Stability of wave-dominated tidal inlets is further explained by: stability (S) = tidal prism (Ω) + estuarine accommodation space (V) - volume of annual sediment supply (Mt

  13. Tensor estimation for double-pulsed diffusional kurtosis imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Calvin B; Hui, Edward S; Helpern, Joseph A; Jensen, Jens H

    2017-07-01

    Double-pulsed diffusional kurtosis imaging (DP-DKI) represents the double diffusion encoding (DDE) MRI signal in terms of six-dimensional (6D) diffusion and kurtosis tensors. Here a method for estimating these tensors from experimental data is described. A standard numerical algorithm for tensor estimation from conventional (i.e. single diffusion encoding) diffusional kurtosis imaging (DKI) data is generalized to DP-DKI. This algorithm is based on a weighted least squares (WLS) fit of the signal model to the data combined with constraints designed to minimize unphysical parameter estimates. The numerical algorithm then takes the form of a quadratic programming problem. The principal change required to adapt the conventional DKI fitting algorithm to DP-DKI is replacing the three-dimensional diffusion and kurtosis tensors with the 6D tensors needed for DP-DKI. In this way, the 6D diffusion and kurtosis tensors for DP-DKI can be conveniently estimated from DDE data by using constrained WLS, providing a practical means for condensing DDE measurements into well-defined mathematical constructs that may be useful for interpreting and applying DDE MRI. Data from healthy volunteers for brain are used to demonstrate the DP-DKI tensor estimation algorithm. In particular, representative parametric maps of selected tensor-derived rotational invariants are presented. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Relativistic interpretation of the nature of the nuclear tensor force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Yao-Yao; Sun, Bao-Yuan

    2018-02-01

    The spin-dependent nature of the nuclear tensor force is studied in detail within the relativistic Hartree-Fock approach. The relativistic formalism for the tensor force is supplemented with an additional Lorentz-invariant tensor formalism in the σ-scalar channel, so as to take into account almost fully the nature of the tensor force brought about by the Fock diagrams in realistic nuclei. Specifically, the tensor sum rules are tested for the spin and pseudo-spin partners with and without nodes, to further understand the nature of the tensor force within the relativistic model. It is shown that the interference between the two components of nucleon spinors causes distinct violations of the tensor sum rules in realistic nuclei, mainly due to the opposite signs on the κ quantities of the upper and lower components, as well as the nodal difference. However, the sum rules can be precisely reproduced if the same radial wave functions are taken for the spin/pseudo-spin partners in addition to neglecting the lower/upper components, revealing clearly the nature of the tensor force. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375076, 11675065) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (lzujbky-2016-30)

  15. Comparing a diffusion tensor and non-tensor approach to white matter fiber tractography in chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auriat, A M; Borich, M R; Snow, N J; Wadden, K P; Boyd, L A

    2015-01-01

    not DTI. CSD identified ipsilesional CST pathways in 9 stroke participants who did not have tracts identified with DTI. Additionally, CSD differentiated between stroke ipsilesional and healthy control non-dominant CST for several measures (number of tracts, tract volume, FA, ADC, and RD) whereas DTI only detected group differences for number of tracts. In the stroke group, motor behavior correlated with fewer diffusion metrics derived from the DTI as compared to CSD-reconstructed ipsilesional CST and CC. CSD is superior to DTI-based tractography in detecting differences in diffusion characteristics between the nondominant healthy control and ipsilesional CST. CSD measures of microstructure tissue properties related to more motor outcomes than DTI measures did. Our results suggest the potential utility and functional relevance of characterizing complex fiber organization using tensor-free diffusion modeling approaches to investigate white matter pathways in the brain after stroke.

  16. Comparing a diffusion tensor and non-tensor approach to white matter fiber tractography in chronic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Auriat

    2015-01-01

    using CSD but not DTI. CSD identified ipsilesional CST pathways in 9 stroke participants who did not have tracts identified with DTI. Additionally, CSD differentiated between stroke ipsilesional and healthy control non-dominant CST for several measures (number of tracts, tract volume, FA, ADC, and RD whereas DTI only detected group differences for number of tracts. In the stroke group, motor behavior correlated with fewer diffusion metrics derived from the DTI as compared to CSD-reconstructed ipsilesional CST and CC. CSD is superior to DTI-based tractography in detecting differences in diffusion characteristics between the nondominant healthy control and ipsilesional CST. CSD measures of microstructure tissue properties related to more motor outcomes than DTI measures did. Our results suggest the potential utility and functional relevance of characterizing complex fiber organization using tensor-free diffusion modeling approaches to investigate white matter pathways in the brain after stroke.

  17. Tensor Train Neighborhood Preserving Embedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenqi; Aggarwal, Vaneet; Aeron, Shuchin

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a Tensor Train Neighborhood Preserving Embedding (TTNPE) to embed multi-dimensional tensor data into low dimensional tensor subspace. Novel approaches to solve the optimization problem in TTNPE are proposed. For this embedding, we evaluate novel trade-off gain among classification, computation, and dimensionality reduction (storage) for supervised learning. It is shown that compared to the state-of-the-arts tensor embedding methods, TTNPE achieves superior trade-off in classification, computation, and dimensionality reduction in MNIST handwritten digits and Weizmann face datasets.

  18. Notes on super Killing tensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, P.S. [Department of Mathematics, King’s College London,The Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Lindström, University [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Theoretical Physics, Uppsala University,SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Theoretical Physics, Imperial College London,Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-14

    The notion of a Killing tensor is generalised to a superspace setting. Conserved quantities associated with these are defined for superparticles and Poisson brackets are used to define a supersymmetric version of the even Schouten-Nijenhuis bracket. Superconformal Killing tensors in flat superspaces are studied for spacetime dimensions 3,4,5,6 and 10. These tensors are also presented in analytic superspaces and super-twistor spaces for 3,4 and 6 dimensions. Algebraic structures associated with superconformal Killing tensors are also briefly discussed.

  19. Tensor norms and operator ideals

    CERN Document Server

    Defant, A; Floret, K

    1992-01-01

    The three chapters of this book are entitled Basic Concepts, Tensor Norms, and Special Topics. The first may serve as part of an introductory course in Functional Analysis since it shows the powerful use of the projective and injective tensor norms, as well as the basics of the theory of operator ideals. The second chapter is the main part of the book: it presents the theory of tensor norms as designed by Grothendieck in the Resumé and deals with the relation between tensor norms and operator ideals. The last chapter deals with special questions. Each section is accompanied by a series of exer

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging and tensor-based morphometry in the MPTP non-human primate model of Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crum, William R.; Gerwig, Madeline; Vernon, Anthony C.; Patel, Priya; Jackson, Michael J.; Rose, Sarah; Jenner, Peter; Iravani, Mahmoud M.

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder producing a variety of motor and cognitive deficits with the causes remaining largely unknown. The gradual loss of the nigrostriatal pathway is currently considered the pivotal pathological event. To better understand the progression of PD and improve treatment management, defining the disease on a structural basis and expanding brain analysis to extra-nigral structures is indispensable. The anatomical complexity and the presence of neuromelanin, make the use of non-human primates an essential element in developing putative imaging biomarkers of PD. To this end, ex vivo T2-weighted magnetic resonance images were acquired from control and 1-methyl-4 phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated marmosets. Volume measurements of the caudate, putamen, and substantia nigra indicated significant atrophy and cortical thinning. Tensor-based morphometry provided a more extensive and hypothesis free assessment of widespread changes caused by the toxin insult to the brain, especially highlighting regional cortical atrophy. The results highlight the importance of developing imaging biomarkers of PD in non-human primate models considering their distinct neuroanatomy. It is essential to further develop these biomarkers in vivo to provide non-invasive tools to detect pre-symptomatic PD and to monitor potential disease altering therapeutics. PMID:28738061

  1. DEA models equivalent to general Nth order stochastic dominance efficiency tests

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Branda, Martin; Kopa, Miloš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 2 (2016), s. 285-289 ISSN 0167-6377 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-25911S; GA ČR GA15-00735S Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA15-02938S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Nth order stochastic dominance efficiency * Data envelopment analysis * Convex NSD efficiency * NSD portfolio efficiency Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 0.657, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/E/branda-0458120.pdf

  2. Viable tensor-to-scalar ratio in a symmetric matter bounce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath Raveendran, Rathul; Chowdhury, Debika; Sriramkumar, L.

    2018-01-01

    Matter bounces refer to scenarios wherein the universe contracts at early times as in a matter dominated epoch until the scale factor reaches a minimum, after which it starts expanding. While such scenarios are known to lead to scale invariant spectra of primordial perturbations after the bounce, the challenge has been to construct completely symmetric bounces that lead to a tensor-to-scalar ratio which is small enough to be consistent with the recent cosmological data. In this work, we construct a model involving two scalar fields (a canonical field and a non-canonical ghost field) to drive the symmetric matter bounce and study the evolution of the scalar perturbations in the model. We find that the model can be completely described in terms of a single parameter, viz. the ratio of the scale associated with the bounce to the value of the scale factor at the bounce. We evolve the scalar perturbations numerically across the bounce and evaluate the scalar power spectra after the bounce. We show that, while the scalar and tensor perturbation spectra are scale invariant over scales of cosmological interest, the tensor-to-scalar ratio proves to be much smaller than the current upper bound from the observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies by the Planck mission. We also support our numerical analysis with analytical arguments.

  3. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Kinetic Models for Chiral Dominance in Soft Condensed Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxvaerd, Søren

    2001-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation, models for isomerization kinetics, origin of biomolecular chirality......Molecular dynamics simulation, models for isomerization kinetics, origin of biomolecular chirality...

  4. Monte Carlo Volcano Seismic Moment Tensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, G. P.; Brill, K. A.; Lanza, F.

    2015-12-01

    Inverse modeling of volcano seismic sources can provide insight into the geometry and dynamics of volcanic conduits. But given the logistical challenges of working on an active volcano, seismic networks are typically deficient in spatial and temporal coverage; this potentially leads to large errors in source models. In addition, uncertainties in the centroid location and moment-tensor components, including volumetric components, are difficult to constrain from the linear inversion results, which leads to a poor understanding of the model space. In this study, we employ a nonlinear inversion using a Monte Carlo scheme with the objective of defining robustly resolved elements of model space. The model space is randomized by centroid location and moment tensor eigenvectors. Point sources densely sample the summit area and moment tensors are constrained to a randomly chosen geometry within the inversion; Green's functions for the random moment tensors are all calculated from modeled single forces, making the nonlinear inversion computationally reasonable. We apply this method to very-long-period (VLP) seismic events that accompany minor eruptions at Fuego volcano, Guatemala. The library of single force Green's functions is computed with a 3D finite-difference modeling algorithm through a homogeneous velocity-density model that includes topography, for a 3D grid of nodes, spaced 40 m apart, within the summit region. The homogenous velocity and density model is justified by long wavelength of VLP data. The nonlinear inversion reveals well resolved model features and informs the interpretation through a better understanding of the possible models. This approach can also be used to evaluate possible station geometries in order to optimize networks prior to deployment.

  5. Probing white-matter microstructure with higher-order diffusion tensors and susceptibility tensor MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunlei; Murphy, Nicole E.; Li, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion MRI has become an invaluable tool for studying white matter microstructure and brain connectivity. The emergence of quantitative susceptibility mapping and susceptibility tensor imaging (STI) has provided another unique tool for assessing the structure of white matter. In the highly ordered white matter structure, diffusion MRI measures hindered water mobility induced by various tissue and cell membranes, while susceptibility sensitizes to the molecular composition and axonal arrangement. Integrating these two methods may produce new insights into the complex physiology of white matter. In this study, we investigated the relationship between diffusion and magnetic susceptibility in the white matter. Experiments were conducted on phantoms and human brains in vivo. Diffusion properties were quantified with the diffusion tensor model and also with the higher order tensor model based on the cumulant expansion. Frequency shift and susceptibility tensor were measured with quantitative susceptibility mapping and susceptibility tensor imaging. These diffusion and susceptibility quantities were compared and correlated in regions of single fiber bundles and regions of multiple fiber orientations. Relationships were established with similarities and differences identified. It is believed that diffusion MRI and susceptibility MRI provide complementary information of the microstructure of white matter. Together, they allow a more complete assessment of healthy and diseased brains. PMID:23507987

  6. Design Principles for Business-Model-based Management Methods—A Service-dominant Logic Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Blaschke, Michael; Haki, Kazem; Riss, Uwe; Aier, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    Extant research gives rise to the notion of business-model-based management that stresses the pivotal role of the business model concept in organizational management. This role entails a shift in research from predominantly examining business model representation to the use of the business model concept in the design of management methods. In designing respective management methods, managers need to not only account for the business model concept, but also consider the characteristics of the ...

  7. Improved population balance model for straining-dominant deep bed filtration using network calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Hao; You, Zhenjiang; Shapiro, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Colloidal-suspension flow in porous media is modelled simultaneously by the large scale population balance equations and by the microscale network model. The phenomenological parameter of the correlation length in the population balance model is determined from the network modelling. It is found...... out that the correlation length in the population balance model depends on the particle size. This dependency calculated by two-dimensional network has the same tendency as that obtained from the laboratory tests in engineered porous media....

  8. Exact tensor network ansatz for strongly interacting systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaletel, Michael P.

    It appears that the tensor network ansatz, while not quite complete, is an efficient coordinate system for the tiny subset of a many-body Hilbert space which can be realized as a low energy state of a local Hamiltonian. However, we don't fully understand precisely which phases are captured by the tensor network ansatz, how to compute their physical observables (even numerically), or how to compute a tensor network representation for a ground state given a microscopic Hamiltonian. These questions are algorithmic in nature, but their resolution is intimately related to understanding the nature of quantum entanglement in many-body systems. For this reason it is useful to compute the tensor network representation of various `model' wavefunctions representative of different phases of matter; this allows us to understand how the entanglement properties of each phase are expressed in the tensor network ansatz, and can serve as test cases for algorithm development. Condensed matter physics has many illuminating model wavefunctions, such as Laughlin's celebrated wave function for the fractional quantum Hall effect, the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer wave function for superconductivity, and Anderson's resonating valence bond ansatz for spin liquids. This thesis presents some results on exact tensor network representations of these model wavefunctions. In addition, a tensor network representation is given for the time evolution operator of a long-range one-dimensional Hamiltonian, which allows one to numerically simulate the time evolution of power-law interacting spin chains as well as two-dimensional strips and cylinders.

  9. Tensor squeezed limits and the Higuchi bound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordin, Lorenzo [SISSA, via Bonomea 265, 34136, Trieste (Italy); Creminelli, Paolo [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Strada Costiera 11, 34151, Trieste (Italy); Mirbabayi, Mehrdad [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Noreña, Jorge, E-mail: lbordin@sissa.it, E-mail: creminel@ictp.it, E-mail: mehrdadm@ias.edu, E-mail: jorge.norena@pucv.cl [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Avenida Universidad 330, Curauma, Valparaíso (Chile)

    2016-09-01

    We point out that tensor consistency relations—i.e. the behavior of primordial correlation functions in the limit a tensor mode has a small momentum—are more universal than scalar consistency relations. They hold in the presence of multiple scalar fields and as long as anisotropies are diluted exponentially fast. When de Sitter isometries are approximately respected during inflation this is guaranteed by the Higuchi bound, which forbids the existence of light particles with spin: de Sitter space can support scalar hair but no curly hair. We discuss two indirect ways to look for the violation of tensor consistency relations in observations, as a signature of models in which inflation is not a strong isotropic attractor, such as solid inflation: (a) graviton exchange contribution to the scalar four-point function; (b) quadrupolar anisotropy of the scalar power spectrum due to super-horizon tensor modes. This anisotropy has a well-defined statistics which can be distinguished from cases in which the background has a privileged direction.

  10. Renormalization of nonabelian gauge theories with tensor matter fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemes, Vitor; Renan, Ricardo; Sorella, Silvio Paolo

    1996-03-01

    The renormalizability of a nonabelian model describing the coupling between antisymmetric second rank tensor matter fields and Yang-Mills gauge fields is discussed within the BRS algebraic framework. (author). 12 refs

  11. Typesafe Abstractions for Tensor Operations

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Tongfei

    2017-01-01

    We propose a typesafe abstraction to tensors (i.e. multidimensional arrays) exploiting the type-level programming capabilities of Scala through heterogeneous lists (HList), and showcase typesafe abstractions of common tensor operations and various neural layers such as convolution or recurrent neural networks. This abstraction could lay the foundation of future typesafe deep learning frameworks that runs on Scala/JVM.

  12. Indicial tensor manipulation on MACSYMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogen, R.A.; Pavelle, R.

    1977-01-01

    A new computational tool for physical calculations is described. It is the first computer system capable of performing indicial tensor calculus (as opposed to component tensor calculus). It is now operational on the symbolic manipulation system MACSYMA. The authors outline the capabilities of the system and describe some of the physical problems considered as well as others being examined at this time. (Auth.)

  13. Comparison of Damage Models for Predicting the Non-Linear Response of Laminates Under Matrix Dominated Loading Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuecker, Clara; Davila, Carlos G.; Rose, Cheryl A.

    2010-01-01

    Five models for matrix damage in fiber reinforced laminates are evaluated for matrix-dominated loading conditions under plane stress and are compared both qualitatively and quantitatively. The emphasis of this study is on a comparison of the response of embedded plies subjected to a homogeneous stress state. Three of the models are specifically designed for modeling the non-linear response due to distributed matrix cracking under homogeneous loading, and also account for non-linear (shear) behavior prior to the onset of cracking. The remaining two models are localized damage models intended for predicting local failure at stress concentrations. The modeling approaches of distributed vs. localized cracking as well as the different formulations of damage initiation and damage progression are compared and discussed.

  14. Non-Newtonian stress tensor and thermal conductivity tensor in granular plane shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Meheboob; Saha, Saikat

    2014-11-01

    The non-Newtonian stress tensor and the heat flux in the plane shear flow of smooth inelastic disks are analysed from the Grad-level moment equations using the anisotropic Gaussian as a reference. Closed-form expressions for shear viscosity, pressure, first normal stress difference (N1) and the dissipation rate are given as functions of (i) the density or the area fraction (ν), (ii) the restitution coefficient (e), (iii) the dimensionless shear rate (R), (iv) the temperature anisotropy [ η, the difference between the principal eigenvalues of the second moment tensor] and (v) the angle (ϕ) between the principal directions of the shear tensor and the second moment tensor. Particle simulation data for a sheared hard-disk system is compared with theoretical results, with good agreement for p, μ and N1 over a large range of density. In contrast, the predictions from a Navier-Stokes order constitutive model are found to deviate significantly from both the simulation and the moment theory even at moderate values of e. We show that the gradient of the deviatoric part of the kinetic stress drives a heat current and the thermal conductivity is characterized by an anisotropic 2nd rank tensor for which explicit expressions are derived.

  15. Killing-Yano tensors and Nambu mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baleanu, D.

    1998-01-01

    Killing-Yano tensors were introduced in 1952 by Kentaro-Yano from mathematical point of view. The physical interpretation of Killing-Yano tensors of rank higher than two was unclear. We found that all Killing-Yano tensors η i 1 i 2 . .. i n with covariant derivative zero are Nambu tensors. We found that in the case of flat space case all Killing-Yano tensors are Nambu tensors. In the case of Taub-NUT and Kerr-Newmann metric Killing-Yano tensors of order two generate Nambu tensors of rank 3

  16. VVER-1000 dominance ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorodkov, S.

    2009-01-01

    Dominance ratio, or more precisely, its closeness to unity, is important characteristic of large reactor. It allows evaluate beforehand the number of source iterations required in deterministic calculations of power spatial distribution. Or the minimal number of histories to be modeled for achievement of statistical error level desired in large core Monte Carlo calculations. In this work relatively simple approach for dominance ratio evaluation is proposed. It essentially uses core symmetry. Dependence of dominance ratio on neutron flux spatial distribution is demonstrated. (author)

  17. WWER-1000 dominance ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorodkov, S.S.

    2009-01-01

    Dominance ratio, or more precisely, its closeness to unity, is important characteristic of large reactor. It allows evaluate beforehand the number of source iterations required in deterministic calculations of power spatial distribution. Or the minimal number of histories to be modeled for achievement of statistical error level desired in large core Monte Carlo calculations. In this work relatively simple approach for dominance ratio evaluation is proposed. It essentially uses core symmetry. Dependence of dominance ratio on neutron flux spatial distribution is demonstrated. (Authors)

  18. Elitism and Stochastic Dominance

    OpenAIRE

    Bazen, Stephen; Moyes, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic dominance has typically been used with a special emphasis on risk and inequality reduction something captured by the concavity of the utility function in the expected utility model. We claim that the applicability of the stochastic dominance approach goes far beyond risk and inequality measurement provided suitable adpations be made. We apply in the paper the stochastic dominance approach to the measurment of elitism which may be considered the opposite of egalitarianism. While the...

  19. Step wise, multiple objective calibration of a hydrologic model for a snowmelt dominated basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, L.E.; Leavesley, G.H.; Clark, M.P.; Markstrom, S.L.; Viger, R.J.; Umemoto, M.

    2006-01-01

    The ability to apply a hydrologic model to large numbers of basins for forecasting purposes requires a quick and effective calibration strategy. This paper presents a step wise, multiple objective, automated procedure for hydrologic model calibration. This procedure includes the sequential calibration of a model's simulation of solar radiation (SR), potential evapotranspiration (PET), water balance, and daily runoff. The procedure uses the Shuffled Complex Evolution global search algorithm to calibrate the U.S. Geological Survey's Precipitation Runoff Modeling System in the Yampa River basin of Colorado. This process assures that intermediate states of the model (SR and PET on a monthly mean basis), as well as the water balance and components of the daily hydrograph are simulated, consistently with measured values.

  20. Tensor force and debye screening in quarkonium-type mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, L.B.; Kovacs, T.G.; Lovas, I.

    1990-01-01

    We use a non-relativistic quantum-mechanical model to investigate the effect of a screening plasma on two quarkonium-type mesons: the charmonium and bottonium. The stability of these mesons in the plasma is estimated in two cases: including the tensor and spin-orbit term in the potential and without these terms. It turns out that while the bottonium is somewhat stabilized by the tensor force, the charmonium becomes less stabil due to this modification of the potential. Thus the charmonium seems to be a more sensitive probe of the quark-gluon plasma formation than it was thought to be without including the tensor force. (Authors)

  1. Extracting the diffusion tensor from molecular dynamics simulation with Milestoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mugnai, Mauro L.; Elber, Ron

    2015-01-01

    We propose an algorithm to extract the diffusion tensor from Molecular Dynamics simulations with Milestoning. A Kramers-Moyal expansion of a discrete master equation, which is the Markovian limit of the Milestoning theory, determines the diffusion tensor. To test the algorithm, we analyze overdamped Langevin trajectories and recover a multidimensional Fokker-Planck equation. The recovery process determines the flux through a mesh and estimates local kinetic parameters. Rate coefficients are converted to the derivatives of the potential of mean force and to coordinate dependent diffusion tensor. We illustrate the computation on simple models and on an atomically detailed system—the diffusion along the backbone torsions of a solvated alanine dipeptide

  2. Tensor valuations and their applications in stochastic geometry and imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Kiderlen, Markus

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this volume is to give an up-to-date introduction to tensor valuations and their applications. Starting with classical results concerning scalar-valued valuations on the families of convex bodies and convex polytopes, it proceeds to the modern theory of tensor valuations. Product and Fourier-type transforms are introduced and various integral formulae are derived. New and well-known results are presented, together with generalizations in several directions, including extensions to the non-Euclidean setting and to non-convex sets. A variety of applications of tensor valuations to models in stochastic geometry, to local stereology and to imaging are also discussed.

  3. Scalar-Tensor Black Holes Embedded in an Expanding Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretyakova, Daria; Latosh, Boris

    2018-02-01

    In this review we focus our attention on scalar-tensor gravity models and their empirical verification in terms of black hole and wormhole physics. We focus on a black hole, embedded in an expanding universe, describing both cosmological and astrophysical scales. We show that in scalar-tensor gravity it is quite common that the local geometry is isolated from the cosmological expansion, so that it does not backreact on the black hole metric. We try to extract common features of scalar-tensor black holes in an expanding universe and point out the gaps that must be filled.

  4. Scalar-Tensor Black Holes Embedded in an Expanding Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Tretyakova

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we focus our attention on scalar-tensor gravity models and their empirical verification in terms of black hole and wormhole physics. We focus on black holes, embedded in an expanding universe, describing both cosmological and astrophysical scales. We show that in scalar-tensor gravity it is quite common that the local geometry is isolated from the cosmological expansion, so that it does not backreact on the black hole metric. We try to extract common features of scalar-tensor black holes in an expanding universe and point out the issues that are not fully investigated.

  5. Efficient non-linear model reduction via a least-squares Petrov-Galerkin projection and compressive tensor approximations

    KAUST Repository

    Carlberg, Kevin

    2010-10-28

    A Petrov-Galerkin projection method is proposed for reducing the dimension of a discrete non-linear static or dynamic computational model in view of enabling its processing in real time. The right reduced-order basis is chosen to be invariant and is constructed using the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition method. The left reduced-order basis is selected to minimize the two-norm of the residual arising at each Newton iteration. Thus, this basis is iteration-dependent, enables capturing of non-linearities, and leads to the globally convergent Gauss-Newton method. To avoid the significant computational cost of assembling the reduced-order operators, the residual and action of the Jacobian on the right reduced-order basis are each approximated by the product of an invariant, large-scale matrix, and an iteration-dependent, smaller one. The invariant matrix is computed using a data compression procedure that meets proposed consistency requirements. The iteration-dependent matrix is computed to enable the least-squares reconstruction of some entries of the approximated quantities. The results obtained for the solution of a turbulent flow problem and several non-linear structural dynamics problems highlight the merit of the proposed consistency requirements. They also demonstrate the potential of this method to significantly reduce the computational cost associated with high-dimensional non-linear models while retaining their accuracy. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Efficient non-linear model reduction via a least-squares Petrov-Galerkin projection and compressive tensor approximations

    KAUST Repository

    Carlberg, Kevin; Bou-Mosleh, Charbel; Farhat, Charbel

    2010-01-01

    A Petrov-Galerkin projection method is proposed for reducing the dimension of a discrete non-linear static or dynamic computational model in view of enabling its processing in real time. The right reduced-order basis is chosen to be invariant and is constructed using the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition method. The left reduced-order basis is selected to minimize the two-norm of the residual arising at each Newton iteration. Thus, this basis is iteration-dependent, enables capturing of non-linearities, and leads to the globally convergent Gauss-Newton method. To avoid the significant computational cost of assembling the reduced-order operators, the residual and action of the Jacobian on the right reduced-order basis are each approximated by the product of an invariant, large-scale matrix, and an iteration-dependent, smaller one. The invariant matrix is computed using a data compression procedure that meets proposed consistency requirements. The iteration-dependent matrix is computed to enable the least-squares reconstruction of some entries of the approximated quantities. The results obtained for the solution of a turbulent flow problem and several non-linear structural dynamics problems highlight the merit of the proposed consistency requirements. They also demonstrate the potential of this method to significantly reduce the computational cost associated with high-dimensional non-linear models while retaining their accuracy. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. An Embedded 3D Fracture Modeling Approach for Simulating Fracture-Dominated Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Geothermal Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Henry [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wang, Cong [Colorado School of Mines; Winterfeld, Philip [Colorado School of Mines; Wu, Yu-Shu [Colorado School of Mines

    2018-02-14

    An efficient modeling approach is described for incorporating arbitrary 3D, discrete fractures, such as hydraulic fractures or faults, into modeling fracture-dominated fluid flow and heat transfer in fractured geothermal reservoirs. This technique allows 3D discrete fractures to be discretized independently from surrounding rock volume and inserted explicitly into a primary fracture/matrix grid, generated without including 3D discrete fractures in prior. An effective computational algorithm is developed to discretize these 3D discrete fractures and construct local connections between 3D fractures and fracture/matrix grid blocks of representing the surrounding rock volume. The constructed gridding information on 3D fractures is then added to the primary grid. This embedded fracture modeling approach can be directly implemented into a developed geothermal reservoir simulator via the integral finite difference (IFD) method or with TOUGH2 technology This embedded fracture modeling approach is very promising and computationally efficient to handle realistic 3D discrete fractures with complicated geometries, connections, and spatial distributions. Compared with other fracture modeling approaches, it avoids cumbersome 3D unstructured, local refining procedures, and increases computational efficiency by simplifying Jacobian matrix size and sparsity, while keeps sufficient accuracy. Several numeral simulations are present to demonstrate the utility and robustness of the proposed technique. Our numerical experiments show that this approach captures all the key patterns about fluid flow and heat transfer dominated by fractures in these cases. Thus, this approach is readily available to simulation of fractured geothermal reservoirs with both artificial and natural fractures.

  8. Applying Business Model Canvas with Service-Dominant Logic for Child Sponsorship

    OpenAIRE

    Salo, Erkki

    2014-01-01

    Child sponsorship organizations serve millions of children and their communities around the world as beneficiary customers. To ensure this also in the futures, child sponsorship organizations have to have value propositions that meet the needs of the current and future donating customers. Starting point of the thesis is that the Business Model Canvas (BMC) as a tool for creating business models that can help child sponsorship organizations to understand connections between their value pr...

  9. MATLAB tensor classes for fast algorithm prototyping.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bader, Brett William; Kolda, Tamara Gibson (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2004-10-01

    Tensors (also known as mutidimensional arrays or N-way arrays) are used in a variety of applications ranging from chemometrics to psychometrics. We describe four MATLAB classes for tensor manipulations that can be used for fast algorithm prototyping. The tensor class extends the functionality of MATLAB's multidimensional arrays by supporting additional operations such as tensor multiplication. The tensor as matrix class supports the 'matricization' of a tensor, i.e., the conversion of a tensor to a matrix (and vice versa), a commonly used operation in many algorithms. Two additional classes represent tensors stored in decomposed formats: cp tensor and tucker tensor. We descibe all of these classes and then demonstrate their use by showing how to implement several tensor algorithms that have appeared in the literature.

  10. Gravity Gradient Tensor of Arbitrary 3D Polyhedral Bodies with up to Third-Order Polynomial Horizontal and Vertical Mass Contrasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhengyong; Zhong, Yiyuan; Chen, Chaojian; Tang, Jingtian; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Maurer, Hansruedi; Li, Yang

    2018-03-01

    During the last 20 years, geophysicists have developed great interest in using gravity gradient tensor signals to study bodies of anomalous density in the Earth. Deriving exact solutions of the gravity gradient tensor signals has become a dominating task in exploration geophysics or geodetic fields. In this study, we developed a compact and simple framework to derive exact solutions of gravity gradient tensor measurements for polyhedral bodies, in which the density contrast is represented by a general polynomial function. The polynomial mass contrast can continuously vary in both horizontal and vertical directions. In our framework, the original three-dimensional volume integral of gravity gradient tensor signals is transformed into a set of one-dimensional line integrals along edges of the polyhedral body by sequentially invoking the volume and surface gradient (divergence) theorems. In terms of an orthogonal local coordinate system defined on these edges, exact solutions are derived for these line integrals. We successfully derived a set of unified exact solutions of gravity gradient tensors for constant, linear, quadratic and cubic polynomial orders. The exact solutions for constant and linear cases cover all previously published vertex-type exact solutions of the gravity gradient tensor for a polygonal body, though the associated algorithms may differ in numerical stability. In addition, to our best knowledge, it is the first time that exact solutions of gravity gradient tensor signals are derived for a polyhedral body with a polynomial mass contrast of order higher than one (that is quadratic and cubic orders). Three synthetic models (a prismatic body with depth-dependent density contrasts, an irregular polyhedron with linear density contrast and a tetrahedral body with horizontally and vertically varying density contrasts) are used to verify the correctness and the efficiency of our newly developed closed-form solutions. Excellent agreements are obtained

  11. Efficient tensor completion for color image and video recovery: Low-rank tensor train

    OpenAIRE

    Bengua, Johann A.; Phien, Ho N.; Tuan, Hoang D.; Do, Minh N.

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel approach to tensor completion, which recovers missing entries of data represented by tensors. The approach is based on the tensor train (TT) rank, which is able to capture hidden information from tensors thanks to its definition from a well-balanced matricization scheme. Accordingly, new optimization formulations for tensor completion are proposed as well as two new algorithms for their solution. The first one called simple low-rank tensor completion via tensor tra...

  12. Random SU(2) invariant tensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Youning; Han, Muxin; Ruan, Dong; Zeng, Bei

    2018-04-01

    SU(2) invariant tensors are states in the (local) SU(2) tensor product representation but invariant under the global group action. They are of importance in the study of loop quantum gravity. A random tensor is an ensemble of tensor states. An average over the ensemble is carried out when computing any physical quantities. The random tensor exhibits a phenomenon known as ‘concentration of measure’, which states that for any bipartition the average value of entanglement entropy of its reduced density matrix is asymptotically the maximal possible as the local dimensions go to infinity. We show that this phenomenon is also true when the average is over the SU(2) invariant subspace instead of the entire space for rank-n tensors in general. It is shown in our earlier work Li et al (2017 New J. Phys. 19 063029) that the subleading correction of the entanglement entropy has a mild logarithmic divergence when n  =  4. In this paper, we show that for n  >  4 the subleading correction is not divergent but a finite number. In some special situation, the number could be even smaller than 1/2, which is the subleading correction of random state over the entire Hilbert space of tensors.

  13. Which processes dominate the uncertainties in the modelling of the transfer of radionuclides in lake ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundblad, B.

    1991-01-01

    There are several processes governing the transfer of radionuclides in the aquatic environment. These processes are usually lumped together into specific parameters describing those processes, such as distribution coefficients and bioaccumulation factors. One can conclude from the B3 scenario that the differences in results were explained more by difference in the selection of parameter values than they were by differences in assumed lake type or model structure. The parameters contributing most to the uncertainty in model predictions were the distribution coefficient between water and sediment and the fish bioaccumulation factor. In a site specific assessment it may be possible to limit the level of consideration necessary for each process according to lake type, the chemical and physical characteristics of the radionuclides released. In the B5 scenario it was found that no new processes were identified in spite of the site specific data given. However most users changed their model according to the new information given. The A5 scenario showed that the predictions were in fairly good agreement with the observed values. Other results from this study are the importance of including resuspension, chemical form. Predictions of concentration of cesium in fish were performed by applying a constant bioaccumulation factor approach or a dynamic modelling approach. It showed that it was necessary to apply the dynamic modelling to be able to calculate the initial concentration in fish. This was also discussed in Scenario B3 and thus has been verified in Scenario A5. (3 refs., 10 figs.)

  14. Fitted Hanbury-Brown Twiss radii versus space-time variances in flow-dominated models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frodermann, Evan; Heinz, Ulrich; Lisa, Michael Annan

    2006-04-01

    The inability of otherwise successful dynamical models to reproduce the Hanbury-Brown Twiss (HBT) radii extracted from two-particle correlations measured at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is known as the RHIC HBT Puzzle. Most comparisons between models and experiment exploit the fact that for Gaussian sources the HBT radii agree with certain combinations of the space-time widths of the source that can be directly computed from the emission function without having to evaluate, at significant expense, the two-particle correlation function. We here study the validity of this approach for realistic emission function models, some of which exhibit significant deviations from simple Gaussian behavior. By Fourier transforming the emission function, we compute the two-particle correlation function, and fit it with a Gaussian to partially mimic the procedure used for measured correlation functions. We describe a novel algorithm to perform this Gaussian fit analytically. We find that for realistic hydrodynamic models the HBT radii extracted from this procedure agree better with the data than the values previously extracted from the space-time widths of the emission function. Although serious discrepancies between the calculated and the measured HBT radii remain, we show that a more apples-to-apples comparison of models with data can play an important role in any eventually successful theoretical description of RHIC HBT data.

  15. Fitted Hanbury-Brown-Twiss radii versus space-time variances in flow-dominated models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frodermann, Evan; Heinz, Ulrich; Lisa, Michael Annan

    2006-01-01

    The inability of otherwise successful dynamical models to reproduce the Hanbury-Brown-Twiss (HBT) radii extracted from two-particle correlations measured at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is known as the RHIC HBT Puzzle. Most comparisons between models and experiment exploit the fact that for Gaussian sources the HBT radii agree with certain combinations of the space-time widths of the source that can be directly computed from the emission function without having to evaluate, at significant expense, the two-particle correlation function. We here study the validity of this approach for realistic emission function models, some of which exhibit significant deviations from simple Gaussian behavior. By Fourier transforming the emission function, we compute the two-particle correlation function, and fit it with a Gaussian to partially mimic the procedure used for measured correlation functions. We describe a novel algorithm to perform this Gaussian fit analytically. We find that for realistic hydrodynamic models the HBT radii extracted from this procedure agree better with the data than the values previously extracted from the space-time widths of the emission function. Although serious discrepancies between the calculated and the measured HBT radii remain, we show that a more apples-to-apples comparison of models with data can play an important role in any eventually successful theoretical description of RHIC HBT data

  16. Fitted HBT radii versus space-time variances in flow-dominated models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisa, Mike; Frodermann, Evan; Heinz, Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    The inability of otherwise successful dynamical models to reproduce the 'HBT radii' extracted from two-particle correlations measured at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is known as the 'RHIC HBT Puzzle'. Most comparisons between models and experiment exploit the fact that for Gaussian sources the HBT radii agree with certain combinations of the space-time widths of the source which can be directly computed from the emission function, without having to evaluate, at significant expense, the two-particle correlation function. We here study the validity of this approach for realistic emission function models some of which exhibit significant deviations from simple Gaussian behaviour. By Fourier transforming the emission function we compute the 2-particle correlation function and fit it with a Gaussian to partially mimic the procedure used for measured correlation functions. We describe a novel algorithm to perform this Gaussian fit analytically. We find that for realistic hydrodynamic models the HBT radii extracted from this procedure agree better with the data than the values previously extracted from the space-time widths of the emission function. Although serious discrepancies between the calculated and measured HBT radii remain, we show that a more 'apples-to-apples' comparison of models with data can play an important role in any eventually successful theoretical description of RHIC HBT data. (author)

  17. EXPOSURE TO MASS MEDIA AS A DOMINANT FACTOR INFLUENCING PUBLIC STIGMA TOWARD MENTAL ILLNESS BASED ON SUNRISE MODEL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Made Sintha Pratiwi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The person suffering mental disorders is not only burdened by his condition but also by the stigma. The impact of stigma extremely influences society that it is considered to be the obstacle in mental disorders therapy. Stigma as the society adverse view toward severe mental disorders is related with the cultural aspect. The interaction appeared from each component of nursing model namely sunrise model, which a model developed by Madeleine Leininger is connected with the wide society views about severe mental disorders condition in society. Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the factors related to public stigma and to find out the dominant factors related to public stigma about severe mental illness through sunrise model approach in Sukonolo Village, Malang Regency. Methods: This study using observational analytical design with cross sectional approach. There were 150 respondents contributed in this study. The respondents were obtained using purposive sampling technique. Results: The results showed a significant relationship between mass media exposure, spiritual well-being, interpersonal contact, attitude, and knowledge with public stigma about mental illness. The result from multiple logistic regression shows the low exposure of mass media has the highest OR value at 26.744. Conclusion: There were significant correlation between mass media exposure, spiritual well-being, interpersonal contact, attitude, and knowledge with public stigma toward mental illness. Mass media exposure as a dominant factor influencing public stigma toward mental illness.

  18. Tensor-GMRES method for large sparse systems of nonlinear equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Dan; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    1994-01-01

    This paper introduces a tensor-Krylov method, the tensor-GMRES method, for large sparse systems of nonlinear equations. This method is a coupling of tensor model formation and solution techniques for nonlinear equations with Krylov subspace projection techniques for unsymmetric systems of linear equations. Traditional tensor methods for nonlinear equations are based on a quadratic model of the nonlinear function, a standard linear model augmented by a simple second order term. These methods are shown to be significantly more efficient than standard methods both on nonsingular problems and on problems where the Jacobian matrix at the solution is singular. A major disadvantage of the traditional tensor methods is that the solution of the tensor model requires the factorization of the Jacobian matrix, which may not be suitable for problems where the Jacobian matrix is large and has a 'bad' sparsity structure for an efficient factorization. We overcome this difficulty by forming and solving the tensor model using an extension of a Newton-GMRES scheme. Like traditional tensor methods, we show that the new tensor method has significant computational advantages over the analogous Newton counterpart. Consistent with Krylov subspace based methods, the new tensor method does not depend on the factorization of the Jacobian matrix. As a matter of fact, the Jacobian matrix is never needed explicitly.

  19. Uniqueness of polymorphism for a discrete, selection-migration model with genetic dominance

    Science.gov (United States)

    James F. Selgrade; James H. Roberds

    2009-01-01

    The migration into a natural population of a controlled population, e.g., a transgenic population, is studied using a one island selection-migration model. A 2-dimensional system of nonlinear difference equations describes changes in allele frequency and population size between generations. Biologically reasonable conditions are obtained which guarantee the existence...

  20. Vertical sorting and the morphodynamics of bed form-dominated rivers : a sorting evolution model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, Astrid; Ribberink, Jan S.; Parker, Gary

    2008-01-01

    Existing sediment continuity models for nonuniform sediment suffer from a number of shortcomings, as they fail to describe vertical sorting fluxes other than through net aggradation or degradation of the bed and are based on a discrete representation of the bed material interacting with the flow. We

  1. Modelling accumulation of marine plastics in the coastal zone; what are the dominant physical processes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critchell, Kay; Lambrechts, Jonathan

    2016-03-01

    Anthropogenic marine debris, mainly of plastic origin, is accumulating in estuarine and coastal environments around the world causing damage to fauna, flora and habitats. Plastics also have the potential to accumulate in the food web, as well as causing economic losses to tourism and sea-going industries. If we are to manage this increasing threat, we must first understand where debris is accumulating and why these locations are different to others that do not accumulate large amounts of marine debris. This paper demonstrates an advection-diffusion model that includes beaching, settling, resuspension/re-floating, degradation and topographic effects on the wind in nearshore waters to quantify the relative importance of these physical processes governing plastic debris accumulation. The aim of this paper is to prioritise research that will improve modelling outputs in the future. We have found that the physical characteristic of the source location has by far the largest effect on the fate of the debris. The diffusivity, used to parameterise the sub-grid scale movements, and the relationship between debris resuspension/re-floating from beaches and the wind shadow created by high islands also has a dramatic impact on the modelling results. The rate of degradation of macroplastics into microplastics also have a large influence in the result of the modelling. The other processes presented (settling, wind drift velocity) also help determine the fate of debris, but to a lesser degree. These findings may help prioritise research on physical processes that affect plastic accumulation, leading to more accurate modelling, and subsequently management in the future.

  2. Vector-tensor interaction of gravitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yuan-zhong; Guo han-ying

    1982-11-01

    In the paper, by using the equation of motion a particle, we show that the antigravity exist in the vector-tensor model of gravitation. Thus the motion of a particle deviates from the geodesic equation. In Newtonian approximation and weak gravitational field, acceleration of a particle in a spherically symmetric and astatic gravitation field is zero. The result is obviously not in agreement with gravitational phenomena.

  3. Multi-objective calibration of a reservoir water quality model in aggregation and non-dominated sorting approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yongtai

    2014-03-01

    Numerical water quality models are developed to predict contaminant fate and transport in receiving waters such as reservoirs and lakes. They can be helpful tools for water resource management. The objective of this study is to calibrate a water quality model which was set up to simulate the water quality conditions of Pepacton Reservoir, Downsville, New York, USA, using an aggregation hybrid genetic algorithm (AHGA) and a non-dominated sorting hybrid genetic algorithm (NSHGA). Both AHGA and NSHGA use a hybrid genetic algorithm (HGA) as optimization engines but are different in fitness assignment. In the AHGA, a weighted sum of scaled simulation errors is designed as an overall objective function to measure the fitness of solutions (i.e., parameter values). In the NSHGA, a method based on non-dominated sorting and Euclidean distances is proposed to calculate the dummy fitness of solutions. In addition, this study also compares the AHGA and the NSHGA. The purpose of this comparison is to determine whether the objective function values (i.e., simulation errors) and simulated results obtained by the AHGA and the NSHGA are significantly different from each other. The results show that the objective function values from the two HGAs are good compromises between all objective functions, and the calibrated model results match the observed data reasonably well and are comparable to other studies, supporting and justifying the use of multi-objective calibration.

  4. Analytical performance bounds for multi-tensor diffusion-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed Sid, Farid; Abed-Meraim, Karim; Harba, Rachid; Oulebsir-Boumghar, Fatima

    2017-02-01

    To examine the effects of MR acquisition parameters on brain white matter fiber orientation estimation and parameter of clinical interest in crossing fiber areas based on the Multi-Tensor Model (MTM). We compute the Cramér-Rao Bound (CRB) for the MTM and the parameter of clinical interest such as the Fractional Anisotropy (FA) and the dominant fiber orientations, assuming that the diffusion MRI data are recorded by a multi-coil, multi-shell acquisition system. Considering the sum-of-squares method for the reconstructed magnitude image, we introduce an approximate closed-form formula for Fisher Information Matrix that has the simplicity and easy interpretation advantages. In addition, we propose to generalize the FA and the mean diffusivity to the multi-tensor model. We show the application of the CRB to reduce the scan time while preserving a good estimation precision. We provide results showing how the increase of the number of acquisition coils compensates the decrease of the number of diffusion gradient directions. We analyze the impact of the b-value and the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR). The analysis shows that the estimation error variance decreases with a quadratic rate with the SNR, and that the optimum b-values are not unique but depend on the target parameter, the context, and eventually the target cost function. In this study we highlight the importance of choosing the appropriate acquisition parameters especially when dealing with crossing fiber areas. We also provide a methodology for the optimal tuning of these parameters using the CRB. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. On deformed tensor potential for inelastic deuteron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raynal, Jacques.

    1980-08-01

    Tensor analysing powers for inelastic deuteron scattering have been measured around 12 to 15 MeV. There is no problem to use such a tensor potential for the excited states in coupled channel calculations. However, for transition potentials, form factors are very different. A fit has been done with the first order vibrational model for 64 Ni(d,d') 64 Ni*, 2 + at 1,344 MeV

  6. Modeling an emittance-dominated elliptical sheet beam with a 212-dimensional particle-in-cell code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsten, Bruce E.

    2005-01-01

    Modeling a 3-dimensional (3-D) elliptical beam with a 212-D particle-in-cell (PIC) code requires a reduction in the beam parameters. The 212-D PIC code can only model the center slice of the sheet beam, but that can still provide useful information about the beam transport and distribution evolution, even if the beam is emittance dominated. The reduction of beam parameters and resulting interpretation of the simulation is straightforward, but not trivial. In this paper, we describe the beam parameter reduction and emittance issues related to the initial beam distribution. As a numerical example, we use the case of a sheet beam designed for use with a planar traveling-wave amplifier for high power generator for RF ranging from 95 to 300GHz [Carlsten et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 33 (2005) 85]. These numerical techniques also apply to modeling high-energy elliptical bunches in RF accelerators

  7. Consistent scalar and tensor perturbation power spectra in single fluid matter bounce with dark energy era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacalhau, Anna Paula; Pinto-Neto, Nelson; Vitenti, Sandro Dias Pinto

    2018-04-01

    We investigate cosmological scenarios containing one canonical scalar field with an exponential potential in the context of bouncing models, in which the bounce happens due to quantum cosmological effects. The only possible bouncing solutions in this scenario (discarding an infinitely fine-tuned exception) must have one and only one dark energy phase, occurring either in the contracting era or in the expanding era. Hence, these bounce solutions are necessarily asymmetric. Naturally, the more convenient solution is the one in which the dark energy phase happens in the expanding era, in order to be a possible explanation for the current accelerated expansion indicated by cosmological observations. In this case, one has the picture of a Universe undergoing a classical dust contraction from very large scales, the initial repeller of the model, moving to a classical stiff-matter contraction near the singularity, which is avoided due to the quantum bounce. The Universe is then launched to a dark energy era, after passing through radiation- and dust-dominated phases, finally returning to the dust expanding phase, the final attractor of the model. We calculate the spectral indices and amplitudes of scalar and tensor perturbations numerically, considering the whole history of the model, including the bounce phase itself, without making any approximation nor using any matching condition on the perturbations. As the background model is necessarily dust dominated in the far past, the usual adiabatic vacuum initial conditions can be easily imposed in this era. Hence, this is a cosmological model in which the presence of dark energy behavior in the Universe does not turn the usual vacuum initial conditions prescription for cosmological perturbation in bouncing models problematic. Scalar and tensor perturbations end up being almost scale invariant, as expected. The background parameters can be adjusted, without fine-tunings, to yield the observed amplitude for scalar

  8. Tensor Product of Polygonal Cell Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Chien, Yu-Yen

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the tensor product of polygonal cell complexes, which interacts nicely with the tensor product of link graphs of complexes. We also develop the unique factorization property of polygonal cell complexes with respect to the tensor product, and study the symmetries of tensor products of polygonal cell complexes.

  9. The Einstein tensor characterizing some Riemann spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, M.S.

    1993-07-01

    A formal definition of the Einstein tensor is given. Mention is made of how this tensor plays a role of expressing certain conditions in a precise form. The cases of reducing the Einstein tensor to a zero tensor are studied on its merit. A lucid account of results, formulated as theorems, on Einstein symmetric and Einstein recurrent spaces is then presented. (author). 5 refs

  10. Regional scale hydrologic modeling of a karst-dominant geomorphology: The case study of the Island of Crete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagò, Anna; Efstathiou, Dionissios; Bouraoui, Fayçal; Nikolaidis, Nikolaos P.; Franchini, Marco; Bidoglio, Giovanni; Kritsotakis, Marinos

    2016-09-01

    Crete Island (Greece) is a karst dominated region that faces limited water supply and increased seasonal demand, especially during summer for agricultural and touristic uses. In addition, due to the mountainous terrain, interbasin water transfer is very limited. The resulting water imbalance requires a correct quantification of available water resources in view of developing appropriate management plans to face the problem of water shortage. The aim of this work is the development of a methodology using the SWAT model and a karst-flow model (KSWAT, Karst SWAT model) for the quantification of a spatially and temporally explicit hydrologic water balance of karst-dominated geomorphology in order to assess the sustainability of the actual water use. The application was conducted in the Island of Crete using both hard (long time series of streamflow and spring monitoring stations) and soft data (i.e. literature information of individual processes). The KSWAT model estimated the water balance under normal hydrological condition as follows: 6400 Mm3/y of precipitation, of which 40% (2500 Mm3/y) was lost through evapotranspiration, 5% was surface runoff and 55% percolated into the soil contributing to lateral flow (2%), and recharging the shallow (9%) and deep aquifer (44%). The water yield was estimated as 22% of precipitation, of which about half was the contribution from spring discharges (9% of precipitation). The application of the KSWAT model increased our knowledge about water resources availability and distribution in Crete under different hydrologic conditions. The model was able to capture the hydrology of the karst areas allowing a better management and planning of water resources under scarcity.

  11. Fundamental study on REV based on crack tensor at the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanno, Takeo; Sato, Toshinori; Sanada, Hiroyuki; Hikima, Ryoichi; Kumasaka, Hiroo; Tada, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    The crack tensor model which is a kind of equivalent continuum model has been studied in rock mechanical investigation in the MIU. The fractured rock mass is modeled as the elastic continuum model with this crack tensor. In this study, this crack tensor based on the geological observation in the MIU project was calculated, and Representative Elementary Volume (REV) in the ventilation shaft and -300 m access/research gallery was studied based on the relative error of this crack tensor. As a result, the convergence of the relative error was faster in the -300 m access/research gallery than in the ventilation shaft. (author)

  12. Ultrafast traveling wave dominates the electric organ discharge of Apteronotus leptorhynchus: an inverse modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shifman, Aaron R; Longtin, André; Lewis, John E

    2015-10-30

    Identifying and understanding the current sources that give rise to bioelectric fields is a fundamental problem in the biological sciences. It is very difficult, for example, to attribute the time-varying features of an electroencephalogram recorded from the head surface to the neural activity of specific brain areas; model systems can provide important insight into such problems. Some species of fish actively generate an oscillating (c. 1000 Hz) quasi-dipole electric field to communicate and sense their environment in the dark. A specialized electric organ comprises neuron-like cells whose collective signal underlies this electric field. As a step towards understanding the detailed biophysics of signal generation in these fish, we use an anatomically-detailed finite-element modelling approach to reverse-engineer the electric organ signal over one oscillation cycle. We find that the spatiotemporal profile of current along the electric organ constitutes a travelling wave that is well-described by two spatial Fourier components varying in time. The conduction velocity of this wave is faster than action potential conduction in any known neuronal axon (>200 m/s), suggesting that the spatiotemporal features of high-frequency electric organ discharges are not constrained by the conduction velocities of spinal neuron pathways.

  13. The probability distribution model of air pollution index and its dominants in Kuala Lumpur

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Dhurafi, Nasr Ahmed; Razali, Ahmad Mahir; Masseran, Nurulkamal; Zamzuri, Zamira Hasanah

    2016-11-01

    This paper focuses on the statistical modeling for the distributions of air pollution index (API) and its sub-indexes data observed at Kuala Lumpur in Malaysia. Five pollutants or sub-indexes are measured including, carbon monoxide (CO); sulphur dioxide (SO2); nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and; particulate matter (PM10). Four probability distributions are considered, namely log-normal, exponential, Gamma and Weibull in search for the best fit distribution to the Malaysian air pollutants data. In order to determine the best distribution for describing the air pollutants data, five goodness-of-fit criteria's are applied. This will help in minimizing the uncertainty in pollution resource estimates and improving the assessment phase of planning. The conflict in criterion results for selecting the best distribution was overcome by using the weight of ranks method. We found that the Gamma distribution is the best distribution for the majority of air pollutants data in Kuala Lumpur.

  14. AGN Obscuration Through Dusty Infrared Dominated Flows. II. Multidimensional, Radiation-Hydrodynamics Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorodnitsyn, Anton; Kallman, Tim; Bisno\\vatyiI-Kogan, Gennadyi

    2011-01-01

    We explore a detailed model in which the active galactic nucleus (AGN) obscuration results from the extinction of AGN radiation in a global ow driven by the pressure of infrared radiation on dust grains. We assume that external illumination by UV and soft X-rays of the dusty gas located at approximately 1pc away from the supermassive black hole is followed by a conversion of such radiation into IR. Using 2.5D, time-dependent radiation hydrodynamics simulations in a ux-limited di usion approximation we nd that the external illumination can support a geometrically thick obscuration via out ows driven by infrared radiation pressure in AGN with luminosities greater than 0:05 L(sub edd) and Compton optical depth, Tau(sub T) approx > & 1.

  15. Modeling responses of the meadow steppe dominated by Leymus chinensis to climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yuhui; Zhou, Guangsheng; Wang, Yonghe

    2007-01-01

    Grassland is one of the most widespread vegetation types worldwide and plays a significant role in regional climate and global carbon cycling. Understanding the sensitivity of Chinese grassland ecosystems to climate change and elevated atmospheric CO2 and the effect of these changes on the grassland ecosystems is a key issue in global carbon cycling. China encompasses vast grassland areas of 354 million ha of 17 major grassland types, according to a national grassland survey. In this study, a process-based terrestrial model the CENTURY model was used to simulate potential changes in net primary productivity (NPP) and soil organic carbon (SOC) of the Leymus chinensis meadow steppe (LCMS) under different scenarios of climatic change and elevated atmospheric CO2. The LCMS sensitivities, its potential responses to climate change, and the change in capacity of carbon stock and sequestration in the future are evaluated. The results showed that the LCMS NPP and SOC are sensitive to climatic change and elevated CO2. In the next 100 years, with doubled CO2 concentration, if temperature increases from 2.7-3.9C and precipitation increases by 10% NPP and SOC will increase by 7-21% and 5-6% respectively. However, if temperature increases by 7.5-7.8C and precipitation increases by only 10% NPP and SOC would decrease by 24% and 8% respectively. Therefore, changes in the NPP and SOC of the meadow steppe are attributed mainly to the amount of temperature and precipitation change and the atmospheric CO2 concentration in the future

  16. Simultaneous tensor decomposition and completion using factor priors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Lei; Hsu, Chiou-Ting; Liao, Hong-Yuan Mark

    2014-03-01

    The success of research on matrix completion is evident in a variety of real-world applications. Tensor completion, which is a high-order extension of matrix completion, has also generated a great deal of research interest in recent years. Given a tensor with incomplete entries, existing methods use either factorization or completion schemes to recover the missing parts. However, as the number of missing entries increases, factorization schemes may overfit the model because of incorrectly predefined ranks, while completion schemes may fail to interpret the model factors. In this paper, we introduce a novel concept: complete the missing entries and simultaneously capture the underlying model structure. To this end, we propose a method called simultaneous tensor decomposition and completion (STDC) that combines a rank minimization technique with Tucker model decomposition. Moreover, as the model structure is implicitly included in the Tucker model, we use factor priors, which are usually known a priori in real-world tensor objects, to characterize the underlying joint-manifold drawn from the model factors. By exploiting this auxiliary information, our method leverages two classic schemes and accurately estimates the model factors and missing entries. We conducted experiments to empirically verify the convergence of our algorithm on synthetic data and evaluate its effectiveness on various kinds of real-world data. The results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed method and its potential usage in tensor-based applications. It also outperforms state-of-the-art methods on multilinear model analysis and visual data completion tasks.

  17. Deuteron D-wave and the non-eikonal effects in tensor asymmetries in elastic proton-deuteron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberi, G.; Bleszynski, M.; California Univ., Los Angeles; Santos, S.; Jaroszewicz, T.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that the tensor asymmetries in the elastic proton-deuteron scattering at medium energies are very sensitive to the non-eikonal corrections to the Glauber model. This sensitivity originates from the fact that, in double scattering, the non-eikonal corrections affect in a different way the contributions coming from the S- and D-wave parts of the deuteron wave function. This leads to considerable change of the tensor asymmetries not only in the region of the interference between single and double scatterings, but also in the region of dominance of the double scattering. It is suggested that these effects should be taken into account in any careful analysis of the proton-deuteron polarization data, which has as a goal the extraction of the NN amplitudes. (author)

  18. Tensor products of process matrices with indefinite causal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ding; Sakharwade, Nitica

    2018-03-01

    Theories with indefinite causal structure have been studied from both the fundamental perspective of quantum gravity and the practical perspective of information processing. In this paper we point out a restriction in forming tensor products of objects with indefinite causal structure in certain models: there exist both classical and quantum objects the tensor products of which violate the normalization condition of probabilities, if all local operations are allowed. We obtain a necessary and sufficient condition for when such unrestricted tensor products of multipartite objects are (in)valid. This poses a challenge to extending communication theory to indefinite causal structures, as the tensor product is the fundamental ingredient in the asymptotic setting of communication theory. We discuss a few options to evade this issue. In particular, we show that the sequential asymptotic setting does not suffer the violation of normalization.

  19. Distance Adaptive Tensor Discriminative Geometry Preserving Projection for Face Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziqiang Wang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing interest in dimensionality reduction techniques for face recognition, however, the traditional dimensionality reduction algorithms often transform the input face image data into vectors before embedding. Such vectorization often ignores the underlying data structure and leads to higher computational complexity. To effectively cope with these problems, a novel dimensionality reduction algorithm termed distance adaptive tensor discriminative geometry preserving projection (DATDGPP is proposed in this paper. The key idea of DATDGPP is as follows: first, the face image data are directly encoded in high-order tensor structure so that the relationships among the face image data can be preserved; second, the data-adaptive tensor distance is adopted to model the correlation among different coordinates of tensor data; third, the transformation matrix which can preserve discrimination and local geometry information is obtained by an iteration algorithm. Experimental results on three face databases show that the proposed algorithm outperforms other representative dimensionality reduction algorithms.

  20. Traffic Speed Data Imputation Method Based on Tensor Completion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Ran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traffic speed data plays a key role in Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS; however, missing traffic data would affect the performance of ITS as well as Advanced Traveler Information Systems (ATIS. In this paper, we handle this issue by a novel tensor-based imputation approach. Specifically, tensor pattern is adopted for modeling traffic speed data and then High accurate Low Rank Tensor Completion (HaLRTC, an efficient tensor completion method, is employed to estimate the missing traffic speed data. This proposed method is able to recover missing entries from given entries, which may be noisy, considering severe fluctuation of traffic speed data compared with traffic volume. The proposed method is evaluated on Performance Measurement System (PeMS database, and the experimental results show the superiority of the proposed approach over state-of-the-art baseline approaches.

  1. Traffic speed data imputation method based on tensor completion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Bin; Tan, Huachun; Feng, Jianshuai; Liu, Ying; Wang, Wuhong

    2015-01-01

    Traffic speed data plays a key role in Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS); however, missing traffic data would affect the performance of ITS as well as Advanced Traveler Information Systems (ATIS). In this paper, we handle this issue by a novel tensor-based imputation approach. Specifically, tensor pattern is adopted for modeling traffic speed data and then High accurate Low Rank Tensor Completion (HaLRTC), an efficient tensor completion method, is employed to estimate the missing traffic speed data. This proposed method is able to recover missing entries from given entries, which may be noisy, considering severe fluctuation of traffic speed data compared with traffic volume. The proposed method is evaluated on Performance Measurement System (PeMS) database, and the experimental results show the superiority of the proposed approach over state-of-the-art baseline approaches.

  2. Tensor Completion Algorithms in Big Data Analytics

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Qingquan; Ge, Hancheng; Caverlee, James; Hu, Xia

    2017-01-01

    Tensor completion is a problem of filling the missing or unobserved entries of partially observed tensors. Due to the multidimensional character of tensors in describing complex datasets, tensor completion algorithms and their applications have received wide attention and achievement in areas like data mining, computer vision, signal processing, and neuroscience. In this survey, we provide a modern overview of recent advances in tensor completion algorithms from the perspective of big data an...

  3. Estimating planktonic diversity through spatial dominance patterns in a model ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soccodato, Alice; d'Ovidio, Francesco; Lévy, Marina; Jahn, Oliver; Follows, Michael J; De Monte, Silvia

    2016-10-01

    In the open ocean, the observation and quantification of biodiversity patterns is challenging. Marine ecosystems are indeed largely composed by microbial planktonic communities whose niches are affected by highly dynamical physico-chemical conditions, and whose observation requires advanced methods for morphological and molecular classification. Optical remote sensing offers an appealing complement to these in-situ techniques. Global-scale coverage at high spatiotemporal resolution is however achieved at the cost of restrained information on the local assemblage. Here, we use a coupled physical and ecological model ocean simulation to explore one possible metrics for comparing measures performed on such different scales. We show that a large part of the local diversity of the virtual plankton ecosystem - corresponding to what accessible by genomic methods - can be inferred from crude, but spatially extended, information - as conveyed by remote sensing. Shannon diversity of the local community is indeed highly correlated to a 'seascape' index, which quantifies the surrounding spatial heterogeneity of the most abundant functional group. The error implied in drastically reducing the resolution of the plankton community is shown to be smaller in frontal regions as well as in regions of intermediate turbulent energy. On the spatial scale of hundreds of kms, patterns of virtual plankton diversity are thus largely sustained by mixing communities that occupy adjacent niches. We provide a proof of principle that in the open ocean information on spatial variability of communities can compensate for limited local knowledge, suggesting the possibility of integrating in-situ and satellite observations to monitor biodiversity distribution at the global scale. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Why the coastal plain of Paraiba do Sul river not be denominated the classical model of wave dominated delta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, L.

    1987-01-01

    Existing coastal sedimentation models have not properly incorporated the fundamental role of Holocene sea-level history in the development of modern coastal regions. For example the classical work by COLEMAN and WRIGHT (1975), although analyzing the influence of as many as 400 parameters on the geometry of deltaic sand bodies, did not address the effects of Holocene sea-level oscillations. Previous work on the central portion of the Brazilian coastline indicated that the relative construction of the coastal plains. Detailed mapping and radiocarbon dating have allowed us to establish the different phases involved in the depositional history of the plain situated at the Paraiba do Sul river mouth. This history is not in keeping with the classical model of wave dominated delta. (author)

  5. Modeling serotonin uptake in the lung shows endothelial transporters dominate over cleft permeation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassingthwaighte, James B.

    2013-01-01

    A four-region (capillary plasma, endothelium, interstitial fluid, cell) multipath model was configured to describe the kinetics of blood-tissue exchange for small solutes in the lung, accounting for regional flow heterogeneity, permeation of cell membranes and through interendothelial clefts, and intracellular reactions. Serotonin uptake data from the Multiple indicator dilution “bolus sweep” experiments of Rickaby and coworkers (Rickaby DA, Linehan JH, Bronikowski TA, Dawson CA. J Appl Physiol 51: 405–414, 1981; Rickaby DA, Dawson CA, and Linehan JH. J Appl Physiol 56: 1170–1177, 1984) and Malcorps et al. (Malcorps CM, Dawson CA, Linehan JH, Bronikowski TA, Rickaby DA, Herman AG, Will JA. J Appl Physiol 57: 720–730, 1984) were analyzed to distinguish facilitated transport into the endothelial cells (EC) and the inhibition of tracer transport by nontracer serotonin in the bolus of injectate from the free uninhibited permeation through the clefts into the interstitial fluid space. The permeability-surface area products (PS) for serotonin via the inter-EC clefts were ∼0.3 ml·g−1·min−1, low compared with the transporter-mediated maximum PS of 13 ml·g−1·min−1 (with Km = ∼0.3 μM and Vmax = ∼4 nmol·g−1·min−1). The estimates of serotonin PS values for EC transporters from their multiple data sets were similar and were influenced only modestly by accounting for the cleft permeability in parallel. The cleft PS estimates in these Ringer-perfused lungs are less than half of those for anesthetized dogs (Yipintsoi T. Circ Res 39: 523–531, 1976) with normal hematocrits, but are compatible with passive noncarrier-mediated transport observed later in the same laboratory (Dawson CA, Linehan JH, Rickaby DA, Bronikowski TA. Ann Biomed Eng 15: 217–227, 1987; Peeters FAM, Bronikowski TA, Dawson CA, Linehan JH, Bult H, Herman AG. J Appl Physiol 66: 2328–2337, 1989) The identification and quantitation of the cleft pathway conductance from these

  6. Development of the Tensoral Computer Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferziger, Joel; Dresselhaus, Eliot

    1996-01-01

    The research scientist or engineer wishing to perform large scale simulations or to extract useful information from existing databases is required to have expertise in the details of the particular database, the numerical methods and the computer architecture to be used. This poses a significant practical barrier to the use of simulation data. The goal of this research was to develop a high-level computer language called Tensoral, designed to remove this barrier. The Tensoral language provides a framework in which efficient generic data manipulations can be easily coded and implemented. First of all, Tensoral is general. The fundamental objects in Tensoral represent tensor fields and the operators that act on them. The numerical implementation of these tensors and operators is completely and flexibly programmable. New mathematical constructs and operators can be easily added to the Tensoral system. Tensoral is compatible with existing languages. Tensoral tensor operations co-exist in a natural way with a host language, which may be any sufficiently powerful computer language such as Fortran, C, or Vectoral. Tensoral is very-high-level. Tensor operations in Tensoral typically act on entire databases (i.e., arrays) at one time and may, therefore, correspond to many lines of code in a conventional language. Tensoral is efficient. Tensoral is a compiled language. Database manipulations are simplified optimized and scheduled by the compiler eventually resulting in efficient machine code to implement them.

  7. Bayesian CP Factorization of Incomplete Tensors with Automatic Rank Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qibin; Zhang, Liqing; Cichocki, Andrzej

    2015-09-01

    CANDECOMP/PARAFAC (CP) tensor factorization of incomplete data is a powerful technique for tensor completion through explicitly capturing the multilinear latent factors. The existing CP algorithms require the tensor rank to be manually specified, however, the determination of tensor rank remains a challenging problem especially for CP rank . In addition, existing approaches do not take into account uncertainty information of latent factors, as well as missing entries. To address these issues, we formulate CP factorization using a hierarchical probabilistic model and employ a fully Bayesian treatment by incorporating a sparsity-inducing prior over multiple latent factors and the appropriate hyperpriors over all hyperparameters, resulting in automatic rank determination. To learn the model, we develop an efficient deterministic Bayesian inference algorithm, which scales linearly with data size. Our method is characterized as a tuning parameter-free approach, which can effectively infer underlying multilinear factors with a low-rank constraint, while also providing predictive distributions over missing entries. Extensive simulations on synthetic data illustrate the intrinsic capability of our method to recover the ground-truth of CP rank and prevent the overfitting problem, even when a large amount of entries are missing. Moreover, the results from real-world applications, including image inpainting and facial image synthesis, demonstrate that our method outperforms state-of-the-art approaches for both tensor factorization and tensor completion in terms of predictive performance.

  8. General scalar-tensor cosmology: analytical solutions via noether symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massaeli, Erfan; Motaharfar, Meysam; Sepangi, Hamid Reza [Shahid Beheshti University, Department of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    We analyze the cosmology of a general scalar-tensor theory which encompasses generalized Brans-Dicke theory, Gauss-Bonnet gravity, non-minimal derivative gravity, generalized Galilean gravity and also the general k-essence type models. Instead of taking into account phenomenological considerations we adopt a Noether symmetry approach, as a physical criterion, to single out the form of undetermined functions in the action. These specified functions symmetrize equations of motion in the simplest possible form which result in exact solutions. Demanding de Sitter, power-law and bouncing universe solutions in the absence and presence of matter density leads to exploring new as well as well-investigated models. We show that there are models for which the dynamics of the system allows a transition from a decelerating phase (matter dominated era) to an accelerating phase (dark energy epoch) and could also lead to general Brans-Dicke with string correction without a self-interaction potential. Furthermore, we classify the models based on a phantom or quintessence dark energy point of view. Finally, we obtain the condition for stability of a de Sitter solution for which the solution is an attractor of the system. (orig.)

  9. Physical and Geometric Interpretations of the Riemann Tensor, Ricci Tensor, and Scalar Curvature

    OpenAIRE

    Loveridge, Lee C.

    2004-01-01

    Various interpretations of the Riemann Curvature Tensor, Ricci Tensor, and Scalar Curvature are described. Also, the physical meanings of the Einstein Tensor and Einstein's Equations are discussed. Finally a derivation of Newtonian Gravity from Einstein's Equations is given.

  10. Uncertainty in 14C model ages of groundwater: The influence of soil gas in terranes dominated by C3 plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, S.; Hart, R.; Eggett, D.

    2009-12-01

    Groundwater is the largest source of fresh water readily available to humanity and aquifers with long residence times are particularly susceptible to overuse. Thus, it is important to have quantitative estimates of the residence time of water in such aquifers. Many models used to calculate 14C ages of groundwater depend on an estimate of the δ13C value of carbon dioxide in soil at the time of recharge, a value that must be estimated. Other work has suggested that for terranes dominated by C3 plants, -23‰ is an appropriate value, and sensitivity calculations show that the apparent age of a groundwater is strongly dependent on the choice of this parameter. This is especially true where the measured values of δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) are used to estimate the contribution of “dead” carbon to the DIC load via the dissolution of calcite in the aquifer and soil zones. To better understand the temporal and spatial isotopic and abundance variability of soil carbon dioxide, we established soil gas sampling sites that encompassed a wide variety of settings in terms of season, elevation, climate, and plant community that were sampled monthly throughout regions of the state of Utah where C3 flora dominate. Direct measurements of soil gas suggest a value of -21.8 ± 1.4‰ (1σ) is a good input variable as long as: a) C3 vegetation dominates, and b) extreme aridity does not prevail such that plant densities and soil microbial activities are minimized. If recharge is envisaged to occur during spring and early summer in highly vegetated uplands, a value of -24.0 ± 0.6‰ may be more appropriate as statistical analysis reveals that seasonality and plant density are most clearly correlated to the carbon isotope composition of carbon dioxide in soil gas. Although the two values and ranges cited above values do not diverge strongly from other published estimates, they place fairly narrow limits on the uncertainty of ±500 and ±200 yr., respectively, in

  11. Diffusion tensor imaging using multiple coils for mouse brain connectomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouls, John C; Badea, Alexandra; Anderson, Robert B J; Cofer, Gary P; Allan Johnson, G

    2018-04-19

    The correlation between brain connectivity and psychiatric or neurological diseases has intensified efforts to develop brain connectivity mapping techniques on mouse models of human disease. The neural architecture of mouse brain specimens can be shown non-destructively and three-dimensionally by diffusion tensor imaging, which enables tractography, the establishment of a connectivity matrix and connectomics. However, experiments on cohorts of animals can be prohibitively long. To improve throughput in a 7-T preclinical scanner, we present a novel two-coil system in which each coil is shielded, placed off-isocenter along the axis of the magnet and connected to a receiver circuit of the scanner. Preservation of the quality factor of each coil is essential to signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) performance and throughput, because mouse brain specimen imaging at 7 T takes place in the coil-dominated noise regime. In that regime, we show a shielding configuration causing no SNR degradation in the two-coil system. To acquire data from several coils simultaneously, the coils are placed in the magnet bore, around the isocenter, in which gradient field distortions can bias diffusion tensor imaging metrics, affect tractography and contaminate measurements of the connectivity matrix. We quantified the experimental alterations in fractional anisotropy and eigenvector direction occurring in each coil. We showed that, when the coils were placed 12 mm away from the isocenter, measurements of the brain connectivity matrix appeared to be minimally altered by gradient field distortions. Simultaneous measurements on two mouse brain specimens demonstrated a full doubling of the diffusion tensor imaging throughput in practice. Each coil produced images devoid of shading or artifact. To further improve the throughput of mouse brain connectomics, we suggested a future expansion of the system to four coils. To better understand acceptable trade-offs between imaging throughput and connectivity

  12. Mathematical modeling of the implications of dominant tolerance for tumor biology and the response to combination therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, Kalet; Garcia, Karina; Lage, Agustin

    2008-01-01

    The existence of regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs) that can control effector lymphocytes within the context of autoimmune, infectious and tumoral diseases is definitely accepted in current immunological research. Tregs confirm the theory of dominant tolerance, which holds that the choice of antigen rejection or tolerance in the immune system is the result of a dynamic equilibrium between populations of effector and regulatory T lymphocytes. The present paper summarizes the result of a recent theoretical study using mathematical modeling to analyze the dynamic interplay between T lymphocyte populations in the absence or presence of tumors and in response to different therapeutic treatments. The resulting model, developed at the Center of Molecular Immunology, which received an award from the Cuban Academy of Sciences in 2002, includes tumor cells and can simulate the effect of antitumoral mono- or combination therapies, by taking into account the way in which certain dynamic properties of tumors can, under specific circumstances, lead to the spontaneous expansion of Tregs populations. One of the advantages of the model is the prediction of several new strategies for the differential treatment of tumors, depending upon their ability of inducing the expansion of regulatory T cells. This is the first model available for the study of the impact of Tregs on the growth of malignant tumors, with results supported by international publications. Additionally, the model predicts the practical effects of several combination therapies, including vaccines, the excision of the tumor and depletion of lymphocyte populations. (Author)

  13. Effective field theory approaches for tensor potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, Maximilian

    2016-11-14

    Effective field theories are a widely used tool to study physical systems at low energies. We apply them to systematically analyze two and three particles interacting via tensor potentials. Two examples are addressed: pion interactions for anti D{sup 0}D{sup *0} scattering to dynamically generate the X(3872) and dipole interactions for two and three bosons at low energies. For the former, the one-pion exchange and for the latter, the long-range dipole force induce a tensor-like structure of the potential. We apply perturbative as well as non-perturbative methods to determine low-energy observables. The X(3872) is of major interest in modern high-energy physics. Its exotic characteristics require approaches outside the range of the quark model for baryons and mesons. Effective field theories represent such methods and provide access to its peculiar nature. We interpret the X(3872) as a hadronic molecule consisting of neutral D and D{sup *} mesons. It is possible to apply an effective field theory with perturbative pions. Within this framework, we address chiral as well as finite volume extrapolations for low-energy observables, such as the binding energy and the scattering length. We show that the two-point correlation function for the D{sup *0} meson has to be resummed to cure infrared divergences. Moreover, next-to-leading order coupling constants, which were introduced by power counting arguments, appear to be essential to renormalize the scattering amplitude. The binding energy as well as the scattering length display a moderate dependence on the light quark masses. The X(3872) is most likely deeper bound for large light quark masses. In a finite volume on the other hand, the binding energy significantly increases. The dependence on the light quark masses and the volume size can be simultaneously obtained. For bosonic dipoles we apply a non-perturbative, numerical approach. We solve the Lippmann-Schwinger equation for the two-dipole system and the Faddeev

  14. The tensor rank of tensor product of two three-qubit W states is eight

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Lin; Friedland, Shmuel

    2017-01-01

    We show that the tensor rank of tensor product of two three-qubit W states is not less than eight. Combining this result with the recent result of M. Christandl, A. K. Jensen, and J. Zuiddam that the tensor rank of tensor product of two three-qubit W states is at most eight, we deduce that the tensor rank of tensor product of two three-qubit W states is eight. We also construct the upper bound of the tensor rank of tensor product of many three-qubit W states.

  15. Quasi-two-layer morphodynamic model for bedload-dominated problems: bed slope-induced morphological diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Sergio; Borthwick, Alistair G L

    2018-02-01

    We derive a two-layer depth-averaged model of sediment transport and morphological evolution for application to bedload-dominated problems. The near-bed transport region is represented by the lower (bedload) layer which has an arbitrarily constant, vanishing thickness (of approx. 10 times the sediment particle diameter), and whose average sediment concentration is free to vary. Sediment is allowed to enter the upper layer, and hence the total load may also be simulated, provided that concentrations of suspended sediment remain low. The model conforms with established theories of bedload, and is validated satisfactorily against empirical expressions for sediment transport rates and the morphodynamic experiment of a migrating mining pit by Lee et al. (1993 J. Hydraul. Eng. 119 , 64-80 (doi:10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9429(1993)119:1(64))). Investigation into the effect of a local bed gradient on bedload leads to derivation of an analytical, physically meaningful expression for morphological diffusion induced by a non-zero local bed slope. Incorporation of the proposed morphological diffusion into a conventional morphodynamic model (defined as a coupling between the shallow water equations, Exner equation and an empirical formula for bedload) improves model predictions when applied to the evolution of a mining pit, without the need either to resort to special numerical treatment of the equations or to use additional tuning parameters.

  16. Quasi-two-layer morphodynamic model for bedload-dominated problems: bed slope-induced morphological diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Sergio; Borthwick, Alistair G. L.

    2018-02-01

    We derive a two-layer depth-averaged model of sediment transport and morphological evolution for application to bedload-dominated problems. The near-bed transport region is represented by the lower (bedload) layer which has an arbitrarily constant, vanishing thickness (of approx. 10 times the sediment particle diameter), and whose average sediment concentration is free to vary. Sediment is allowed to enter the upper layer, and hence the total load may also be simulated, provided that concentrations of suspended sediment remain low. The model conforms with established theories of bedload, and is validated satisfactorily against empirical expressions for sediment transport rates and the morphodynamic experiment of a migrating mining pit by Lee et al. (1993 J. Hydraul. Eng. 119, 64-80 (doi:10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9429(1993)119:1(64))). Investigation into the effect of a local bed gradient on bedload leads to derivation of an analytical, physically meaningful expression for morphological diffusion induced by a non-zero local bed slope. Incorporation of the proposed morphological diffusion into a conventional morphodynamic model (defined as a coupling between the shallow water equations, Exner equation and an empirical formula for bedload) improves model predictions when applied to the evolution of a mining pit, without the need either to resort to special numerical treatment of the equations or to use additional tuning parameters.

  17. Reduced model prediction of electron temperature profiles in microtearing-dominated National Spherical Torus eXperiment plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaye, S. M., E-mail: skaye@pppl.gov; Guttenfelder, W.; Bell, R. E.; Gerhardt, S. P.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Maingi, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    A representative H-mode discharge from the National Spherical Torus eXperiment is studied in detail to utilize it as a basis for a time-evolving prediction of the electron temperature profile using an appropriate reduced transport model. The time evolution of characteristic plasma variables such as β{sub e}, ν{sub e}{sup ∗}, the MHD α parameter, and the gradient scale lengths of T{sub e}, T{sub i}, and n{sub e} were examined as a prelude to performing linear gyrokinetic calculations to determine the fastest growing micro instability at various times and locations throughout the discharge. The inferences from the parameter evolutions and the linear stability calculations were consistent. Early in the discharge, when β{sub e} and ν{sub e}{sup ∗} were relatively low, ballooning parity modes were dominant. As time progressed and both β{sub e} and ν{sub e}{sup ∗} increased, microtearing became the dominant low-k{sub θ} mode, especially in the outer half of the plasma. There are instances in time and radius, however, where other modes, at higher-k{sub θ}, may, in addition to microtearing, be important for driving electron transport. Given these results, the Rebut-Lallia-Watkins (RLW) electron thermal diffusivity model, which is based on microtearing-induced transport, was used to predict the time-evolving electron temperature across most of the profile. The results indicate that RLW does a good job of predicting T{sub e} for times and locations where microtearing was determined to be important, but not as well when microtearing was predicted to be stable or subdominant.

  18. X-ray strain tensor imaging: FEM simulation and experiments with a micro-CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae G; Park, So E; Lee, Soo Y

    2014-01-01

    In tissue elasticity imaging, measuring the strain tensor components is necessary to solve the inverse problem. However, it is impractical to measure all the tensor components in ultrasound or MRI elastography because of their anisotropic spatial resolution. The objective of this study is to compute 3D strain tensor maps from the 3D CT images of a tissue-mimicking phantom. We took 3D micro-CT images of the phantom twice with applying two different mechanical compressions to it. Applying the 3D image correlation technique to the CT images under different compression, we computed 3D displacement vectors and strain tensors at every pixel. To evaluate the accuracy of the strain tensor maps, we made a 3D FEM model of the phantom, and we computed strain tensor maps through FEM simulation. Experimentally obtained strain tensor maps showed similar patterns to the FEM-simulated ones in visual inspection. The correlation between the strain tensor maps obtained from the experiment and the FEM simulation ranges from 0.03 to 0.93. Even though the strain tensor maps suffer from high level noise, we expect the x-ray strain tensor imaging may find some biomedical applications such as malignant tissue characterization and stress analysis inside the tissues.

  19. Unified cosmology with scalar-tensor theory of gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajahmad, Behzad [Faculty of Physics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sanyal, Abhik Kumar [Jangipur College, Department of Physics, Murshidabad (India)

    2017-04-15

    Unlike the Noether symmetry, a metric independent general conserved current exists for non-minimally coupled scalar-tensor theory of gravity if the trace of the energy-momentum tensor vanishes. Thus, in the context of cosmology, a symmetry exists both in the early vacuum and radiation dominated era. For slow roll, symmetry is sacrificed, but at the end of early inflation, such a symmetry leads to a Friedmann-like radiation era. Late-time cosmic acceleration in the matter dominated era is realized in the absence of symmetry, in view of the same decayed and redshifted scalar field. Thus, unification of early inflation with late-time cosmic acceleration with a single scalar field may be realized. (orig.)

  20. Unified cosmology with scalar-tensor theory of gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajahmad, Behzad; Sanyal, Abhik Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Unlike the Noether symmetry, a metric independent general conserved current exists for non-minimally coupled scalar-tensor theory of gravity if the trace of the energy-momentum tensor vanishes. Thus, in the context of cosmology, a symmetry exists both in the early vacuum and radiation dominated era. For slow roll, symmetry is sacrificed, but at the end of early inflation, such a symmetry leads to a Friedmann-like radiation era. Late-time cosmic acceleration in the matter dominated era is realized in the absence of symmetry, in view of the same decayed and redshifted scalar field. Thus, unification of early inflation with late-time cosmic acceleration with a single scalar field may be realized. (orig.)

  1. Scalar-tensor cosmology with cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslanka, K.

    1983-01-01

    The equations of scalar-tensor theory of gravitation with cosmological constant in the case of homogeneous and isotropic cosmological model can be reduced to dynamical system of three differential equations with unknown functions H=R/R, THETA=phi/phi, S=e/phi. When new variables are introduced the system becomes more symmetrical and cosmological solutions R(t), phi(t), e(t) are found. It is shown that when cosmological constant is introduced large class of solutions which depend also on Dicke-Brans parameter can be obtained. Investigations of these solutions give general limits for cosmological constant and mean density of matter in plane model. (author)

  2. Differentiation of the infarct core from ischemic penumbra within the first 4.5 hours, using diffusion tensor imaging-derived metrics: A rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Duen Pang [Dept. of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei (China); Lu, Chia Feng [Research Center of Translational Imaging, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei (China); Chen, Yung Chieh [Dept. of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei (China); Liou, Michelle [Institute of Statistical Science, Academia Sinica, Taipei (China); Chung, Hsiao Wen [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Electrics and Bioinformatics, National Taiwan University, Taipei (China)

    2017-04-15

    To investigate whether the diffusion tensor imaging-derived metrics are capable of differentiating the ischemic penumbra (IP) from the infarct core (IC), and determining stroke onset within the first 4.5 hours. All procedures were approved by the local animal care committee. Eight of the eleven rats having permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion were included for analyses. Using a 7 tesla magnetic resonance system, the relative cerebral blood flow and apparent diffusion coefficient maps were generated to define IP and IC, half hour after surgery and then every hour, up to 6.5 hours. Relative fractional anisotropy, pure anisotropy (rq) and diffusion magnitude (rL) maps were obtained. One-way analysis of variance, receiver operating characteristic curve and nonlinear regression analyses were performed. The evolutions of tensor metrics were different in ischemic regions (IC and IP) and topographic subtypes (cortical, subcortical gray matter, and white matter). The rL had a significant drop of 40% at 0.5 hour, and remained stagnant up to 6.5 hours. Significant differences (p < 0.05) in rL values were found between IP, IC, and normal tissue for all topographic subtypes. Optimal rL threshold in discriminating IP from IC was about -29%. The evolution of rq showed an exponential decrease in cortical IC, from -26.9% to -47.6%; an rq reduction smaller than 44.6% can be used to predict an acute stroke onset in less than 4.5 hours. Diffusion tensor metrics may potentially help discriminate IP from IC and determine the acute stroke age within the therapeutic time window.

  3. Diagnosis of Lumbar Foraminal Stenosis using Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Eguchi, Yawara; Ohtori, Seiji; Suzuki, Munetaka; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Yamanaka, Hajime; Tamai, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Miyako; Aoki, Yasuchika; Watanabe, Atsuya; Kanamoto, Hirohito; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of lumbar foraminal stenosis remains difficult. Here, we report on a case in which bilateral lumbar foraminal stenosis was difficult to diagnose, and in which diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was useful. The patient was a 52-year-old woman with low back pain and pain in both legs that was dominant on the right. Right lumbosacral nerve compression due to a massive uterine myoma was apparent, but the leg pain continued after a myomectomy was performed. No abnormalities were observed dur...

  4. arXiv Tensor to scalar ratio from single field magnetogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2017-08-10

    The tensor to scalar ratio is affected by the evolution of the large-scale gauge fields potentially amplified during an inflationary stage of expansion. After deriving the exact evolution equations for the scalar and tensor modes of the geometry in the presence of dynamical gauge fields, it is shown that the tensor to scalar ratio is bounded from below by the dominance of the adiabatic contribution and it cannot be smaller than one thousands whenever the magnetogenesis is driven by a single inflaton field.

  5. Transport modeling of convection dominated helicon discharges in Proto-MPEX with the B2.5-Eirene code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, L. W.; Rapp, J.; Canik, J.; Lore, J. D.

    2017-11-01

    Data-constrained interpretative analyses of plasma transport in convection dominated helicon discharges in the Proto-MPEX linear device, and predictive calculations with additional Electron Cyclotron Heating/Electron Bernstein Wave (ECH/EBW) heating, are reported. The B2.5-Eirene code, in which the multi-fluid plasma code B2.5 is coupled to the kinetic Monte Carlo neutrals code Eirene, is used to fit double Langmuir probe measurements and fast camera data in front of a stainless-steel target. The absorbed helicon and ECH power (11 kW) and spatially constant anomalous transport coefficients that are deduced from fitting of the probe and optical data are additionally used for predictive simulations of complete axial distributions of the densities, temperatures, plasma flow velocities, particle and energy fluxes, and possible effects of alternate fueling and pumping scenarios. The somewhat hollow electron density and temperature radial profiles from the probe data suggest that Trivelpiece-Gould wave absorption is the dominant helicon electron heating source in the discharges analyzed here. There is no external ion heating, but the corresponding calculated ion temperature radial profile is not hollow. Rather it reflects ion heating by the electron-ion equilibration terms in the energy balance equations and ion radial transport resulting from the hollow density profile. With the absorbed power and the transport model deduced from fitting the sheath limited discharge data, calculated conduction limited higher recycling conditions were produced by reducing the pumping and increasing the gas fueling rate, resulting in an approximate doubling of the target ion flux and reduction of the target heat flux.

  6. Spectral Tensor-Train Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigoni, Daniele; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter; Marzouk, Youssef M.

    2016-01-01

    The accurate approximation of high-dimensional functions is an essential task in uncertainty quantification and many other fields. We propose a new function approximation scheme based on a spectral extension of the tensor-train (TT) decomposition. We first define a functional version of the TT...... adaptive Smolyak approach. The method is also used to approximate the solution of an elliptic PDE with random input data. The open source software and examples presented in this work are available online (http://pypi.python.org/pypi/TensorToolbox/)....

  7. Confinement through tensor gauge fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salam, A.; Strathdee, J.

    1977-12-01

    Using the 0(3,2)-symmetric de Sitter solution of Einstein's equation describing a strongly interacting tensor field it is shown that hadronic bags confining quarks can be represented as de Sitter ''micro-universes'' with radii given 1/R 2 =lambdak 2 /6. Here k 2 and lambda are the strong coupling and the ''cosmological'' constant which apear in the Einstein equation used. Surprisingly the energy spectrum for the two-body hadronic states is the same as that for a harmonic oscillator potential, though the wave functions are completely different. The Einstein equation can be extended to include colour for the tensor fields

  8. Tensor product of quantum logics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulmannová, Sylvia

    1985-01-01

    A quantum logic is the couple (L,M) where L is an orthomodular σ-lattice and M is a strong set of states on L. The Jauch-Piron property in the σ-form is also supposed for any state of M. A ``tensor product'' of quantum logics is defined. This definition is compared with the definition of a free orthodistributive product of orthomodular σ-lattices. The existence and uniqueness of the tensor product in special cases of Hilbert space quantum logics and one quantum and one classical logic are studied.

  9. Inflationary tensor fossils in large-scale structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimastrogiovanni, Emanuela [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Fasiello, Matteo [Department of Physics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Jeong, Donghui [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kamionkowski, Marc, E-mail: ema@physics.umn.edu, E-mail: mrf65@case.edu, E-mail: duj13@psu.edu, E-mail: kamion@jhu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 3400 N. Charles St., Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Inflation models make specific predictions for a tensor-scalar-scalar three-point correlation, or bispectrum, between one gravitational-wave (tensor) mode and two density-perturbation (scalar) modes. This tensor-scalar-scalar correlation leads to a local power quadrupole, an apparent departure from statistical isotropy in our Universe, as well as characteristic four-point correlations in the current mass distribution in the Universe. So far, the predictions for these observables have been worked out only for single-clock models in which certain consistency conditions between the tensor-scalar-scalar correlation and tensor and scalar power spectra are satisfied. Here we review the requirements on inflation models for these consistency conditions to be satisfied. We then consider several examples of inflation models, such as non-attractor and solid-inflation models, in which these conditions are put to the test. In solid inflation the simplest consistency conditions are already violated whilst in the non-attractor model we find that, contrary to the standard scenario, the tensor-scalar-scalar correlator probes directly relevant model-dependent information. We work out the predictions for observables in these models. For non-attractor inflation we find an apparent local quadrupolar departure from statistical isotropy in large-scale structure but that this power quadrupole decreases very rapidly at smaller scales. The consistency of the CMB quadrupole with statistical isotropy then constrains the distance scale that corresponds to the transition from the non-attractor to attractor phase of inflation to be larger than the currently observable horizon. Solid inflation predicts clustering fossils signatures in the current galaxy distribution that may be large enough to be detectable with forthcoming, and possibly even current, galaxy surveys.

  10. Segmented seismicity of the Mw 6.2 Baladeh earthquake sequence (Alborz mountains, Iran) revealed from regional moment tensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donner, Stefanie; Rössler, Dirk; Krüger, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The M w 6.2 Baladeh earthquake occurred on 28 May 2004 in the Alborz Mountains, northern Iran. This earthquake was the first strong shock in this intracontinental orogen for which digital regional broadband data are available. The Baladeh event provides a rare opportunity to study fault geometry...... model, regional waveform data of the mainshock and larger aftershocks (M w  ≥3.3) were inverted for moment tensors. For the Baladeh mainshock, this included inversion for kinematic parameters. All analysed earthquakes show dominant thrust mechanisms at depths between 14 and 26 km, with NW–SE striking...

  11. The simplest classical models of topological transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstantinov, M.Yu.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that simplest classical models of topologigal transitions possess scalar singularity of curvature with a point carrier being a source of space-time incompleteness. It is also shown that the condition of energy dominance is broken near the topological transition, asymptotic behaviour of the curvature tensor (growth of curvature at approximation to the topological transition) and energy-momentum tensor of (breaking the condition of energy dominance) being a common property of the considered models and being completely determined by the type of topological transition

  12. Effect on Tensor Correlations on Gamow- Teller States in 90Zr and 208Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, C. L.; Sagawa, H.; Zhang, H. Q.

    2009-01-01

    The tensor terms of the Skyrme effective interaction are included in the self-consistent Hartree-Fock plus Random Phase Approximation (HF-RPA) model. The Gamow-Teller (GT) strength function of 9 0Z r and 2 08P b are calculated with and without the tensor terms. The main peaks are moved downwards by about 2 MeV when including the tensor contribution. About 10% of the non-energy weighted sum rule is shifted to the excitation energy region above 30 MeV by the RPA tensor correlations. The contribution of the tensor terms to the energy weighted sum rule is given analytically, and compared to the outcome of RPA. A microscopic origin of the quenching of GT sum rule is discussed in relation with the coupling to giant spin-quadrupole excitations by the tensor interactions.(author)

  13. Effect of Tensor Correlations on Gamow-Teller States in 90Zr and 208Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, C. L.; Zhang, H. Q.; Zhang, X. Z.

    2009-01-01

    The tensor terms of the Skyrme effective interaction are included in the self-consistent Hartree-Fock plus Random Phase Approximation (HF-RPA) model. The Gamow-Teller (GT) strength functions of 9 0Z r and 2 08P b is calculated with and without the tensor terms. The main peaks are moved downwards by about 2 MeV when including the tensor contribution. About 10% of the non-energy weighted sum rule is shifted to the excitation energy region above 30 MeV by the RPA tensor correlations. The contribution of the tensor terms to the energy weighted sum rule is given analytically, and compared to the outcome of RPA. A microscopic origin of the quenching of GT sum rule due to the tensor force is discussed.(author)

  14. Diffusion tensor imaging depicting damage to the arcuate fasciculus in patients with conduction aphasia: a study of the Wernicke-Geschwind model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yumei; Wang, Chunxue; Zhao, Xingquan; Chen, Hongyan; Han, Zaizhu; Wang, Yongjun

    2010-09-01

    In contrast with disorders of comprehension and spontaneous expression, conduction aphasia is characterized by poor repetition, which is a hallmark of the syndrome. There are many theories on the repetition impairment of conduction aphasia. The disconnection theory suggests that a damaged in the arcuate fasciculus, which connects Broca's and Wernicke's area, is the cause of conduction aphasia. In this study, we examined the disconnection theory. We enrolled ten individuals with conduction aphasia and ten volunteers, and analysed their arcuate fasciculus using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and obtained fractional anisotropy (FA) values. Then, the results of the left hemisphere were compared with those of the right hemisphere, and the results of the conduction aphasia cases were compared with those of the volunteers. There were significant differences in the FA values between the left and right hemispheres of volunteers and conduction cases. In volunteers, there was an increase in fiber in the left hemisphere compared with the right hemisphere, whereas there was an increase in fiber in the right hemisphere compared with the left hemisphere in conduction aphasia patients. The results of diffusion tensor tractography suggested that the configuration of the arcuate fasciculus was different between conduction aphasia patients and volunteers, suggesting that there was damage to the arcuate fasciculus of conduction aphasia cases. The damage seen in the arcuate fasciculus of conduction aphasia cases in this study supports the Wernicke-Geschwind disconnection theory. A disconnection between Broca's area and Wernicke's area is likely to be one mechanism of conduction aphasia repetition impairment.

  15. Domination versus disjunctive domination in graphs | Henning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Domination versus disjunctive domination in graphs. Michael A Henning, Sinclair A Marcon. Abstract. A dominating set in a graph G is a set S of vertices of G such that every vertex not in S is adjacent to a vertex of S. The domination number of G is the minimum cardinality of a dominating set of G. For a positive integer b, ...

  16. Clonal Dominance With Retroviral Vector Insertions Near the ANGPT1 and ANGPT2 Genes in a Human Xenotransplant Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhard Haemmerle

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Insertional leukemogenesis represents the major risk factor of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC based gene therapy utilizing integrating viral vectors. To develop a pre-clinical model for the evaluation of vector-related genotoxicity directly in the relevant human target cells, cord blood CD34+ HSCs were transplanted into immunodeficient NOD.SCID.IL2rg−/− (NSG mice after transduction with an LTR-driven gammaretroviral vector (GV. Furthermore, we specifically investigated the effect of prolonged in vitro culture in the presence of cytokines recently described to promote HSC expansion or maintenance. Clonality of human hematopoiesis in NSG mice was assessed by high throughput insertion site analyses and validated by insertion site-specific PCR depicting a GV typical integration profile with insertion sites resembling to 25% those of clinical studies. No overrepresentation of integrations in the vicinity of cancer-related genes was observed, however, several dominant clones were identified including two clones harboring integrations in the ANGPT1 and near the ANGPT2 genes associated with deregulated ANGPT1- and ANGPT2-mRNA levels. While these data underscore the potential value of the NSG model, our studies also identified short-comings such as overall low numbers of engrafted HSCs, limited in vivo observation time, and the challenges of in-depth insertion site analyses by low contribution of gene modified hematopoiesis.

  17. An Input and Output Analysis of the Quaternity-Dominating Energy Engineering Model from China’s Countryside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xing Long; Xian Xue, Wei

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study is to qualitatively and quantitatively explore an energy engineering model termed quaternity-dominating pattern emerging in North China’s countryside. This study finds methane produced in this model serves household activities such as cooking, inducing reduction of coal or biomass spending, which otherwise would provoke air pollution, water loss and land erosion, and ultimately leading to ecological environment betterment. Additionally, this project generates byproducts, biogas liquids and residuals, which can, as a category of fertilizer, can promote straightening of fertility preservation capacity and improvement in the chemical and physical quality of land as well as increasing crop output and quality. This study also finds this engineering could encourage social stability via efficiently allocating bucolic surplus labor during winter and successful running this engineering project would trigger an increase of scientific and technological qualifications for rural citizens. Moreover, cost-profit analysis indicates this pattern can allow one rural home to obtain access to a hygienic energy resource of biogas in the yearly volume of 375m3, generate annual net earnings of US3458.82 and make investment return in about 2.73 years. Especially for poverty-stricken areas, this energy engineering project enjoys high values and great significance, which can lift these impoverished areas from poverty both in economics and energy. The paper concludes with pointing out practical proposals on launching and operating this energy engineering project.

  18. A BABCOCK–LEIGHTON SOLAR DYNAMO MODEL WITH MULTI-CELLULAR MERIDIONAL CIRCULATION IN ADVECTION- AND DIFFUSION-DOMINATED REGIMES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belucz, Bernadett; Forgács-Dajka, Emese; Dikpati, Mausumi

    2015-01-01

    Babcock–Leighton type-solar dynamo models with single-celled meridional circulation are successful in reproducing many solar cycle features. Recent observations and theoretical models of meridional circulation do not indicate a single-celled flow pattern. We examine the role of complex multi-cellular circulation patterns in a Babcock–Leighton solar dynamo in advection- and diffusion-dominated regimes. We show from simulations that the presence of a weak, second, high-latitude reverse cell speeds up the cycle and slightly enhances the poleward branch in the butterfly diagram, whereas the presence of a second cell in depth reverses the tilt of the butterfly wing to an antisolar type. A butterfly diagram constructed from the middle of convection zone yields a solar-like pattern, but this may be difficult to realize in the Sun because of magnetic buoyancy effects. Each of the above cases behaves similarly in higher and lower magnetic diffusivity regimes. However, our dynamo with a meridional circulation containing four cells in latitude behaves distinctly differently in the two regimes, producing solar-like butterfly diagrams with fast cycles in the higher diffusivity regime, and complex branches in butterfly diagrams in the lower diffusivity regime. We also find that dynamo solutions for a four-celled pattern, two in radius and two in latitude, prefer to quickly relax to quadrupolar parity if the bottom flow speed is strong enough, of similar order of magnitude as the surface flow speed

  19. A BABCOCK–LEIGHTON SOLAR DYNAMO MODEL WITH MULTI-CELLULAR MERIDIONAL CIRCULATION IN ADVECTION- AND DIFFUSION-DOMINATED REGIMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belucz, Bernadett; Forgács-Dajka, Emese [Eötvös University, Department of Astronomy, 1518 Budapest, Pf. 32 (Hungary); Dikpati, Mausumi, E-mail: bbelucz@astro.elte.hu, E-mail: dikpati@ucar.edu [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, 3080 Center Green, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States)

    2015-06-20

    Babcock–Leighton type-solar dynamo models with single-celled meridional circulation are successful in reproducing many solar cycle features. Recent observations and theoretical models of meridional circulation do not indicate a single-celled flow pattern. We examine the role of complex multi-cellular circulation patterns in a Babcock–Leighton solar dynamo in advection- and diffusion-dominated regimes. We show from simulations that the presence of a weak, second, high-latitude reverse cell speeds up the cycle and slightly enhances the poleward branch in the butterfly diagram, whereas the presence of a second cell in depth reverses the tilt of the butterfly wing to an antisolar type. A butterfly diagram constructed from the middle of convection zone yields a solar-like pattern, but this may be difficult to realize in the Sun because of magnetic buoyancy effects. Each of the above cases behaves similarly in higher and lower magnetic diffusivity regimes. However, our dynamo with a meridional circulation containing four cells in latitude behaves distinctly differently in the two regimes, producing solar-like butterfly diagrams with fast cycles in the higher diffusivity regime, and complex branches in butterfly diagrams in the lower diffusivity regime. We also find that dynamo solutions for a four-celled pattern, two in radius and two in latitude, prefer to quickly relax to quadrupolar parity if the bottom flow speed is strong enough, of similar order of magnitude as the surface flow speed.

  20. A mechanistic model to study the thermal ecology of a southeastern pacific dominant intertidal mussel and implications for climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finke, G R; Bozinovic, F; Navarrete, S A

    2009-01-01

    Developing mechanistic models to predict an organism's body temperature facilitates the study of physiological stresses caused by extreme climatic conditions the species might have faced in the past or making predictions about changes to come in the near future. Because the models combine empirical observation of different climatic variables with essential morphological attributes of the species, it is possible to examine specific aspects of predicted climatic changes. Here, we develop a model for the competitively dominant intertidal mussel Perumytilus purpuratus that estimates body temperature on the basis of meteorological and tidal data with an average difference (+/-SE) of 0.410 degrees +/- 0.0315 degrees C in comparison with a field-deployed temperature logger. Modeled body temperatures of P. purpuratus in central Chile regularly exceeded 30 degrees C in summer months, and values as high as 38 degrees C were found. These results suggest that the temperatures reached by mussels in the intertidal zone in central Chile are not sufficiently high to induce significant mortality on adults of this species; however, because body temperatures >40 degrees C can be lethal for this species, sublethal effects on physiological performance warrant further investigation. Body temperatures of mussels increased sigmoidally with increasing tidal height. Body temperatures of individuals from approximately 70% of the tidal range leveled off and did not increase any further with increasing tidal height. Finally, body size played an important role in determining body temperature. A hypothetical 5-cm-long mussel (only 1 cm longer than mussels found in nature) did reach potentially lethal body temperatures, suggesting that the biophysical environment may play a role in limiting the size of this small species.

  1. Exploring a matter-dominated model with bulk viscosity to drive the accelerated expansion of the Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avelino, Arturo; Nucamendi, Ulises, E-mail: avelino@ifm.umich.mx, E-mail: ulises@ifm.umich.mx [Instituto de Física y Matemáticas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Edificio C-3, Ciudad Universitaria, CP. 58040, Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico)

    2010-08-01

    We explore the viability of a bulk viscous matter-dominated Universe to explain the present accelerated expansion of the Universe. The model is composed by a pressureless fluid with bulk viscosity of the form ζ = ζ{sub 0}+ζ{sub 1}H where ζ{sub 0} and ζ{sub 1} are constants and H is the Hubble parameter. The pressureless fluid characterizes both the baryon and dark matter components. We study the behavior of the Universe according to this model analyzing the scale factor as well as some curvature scalars and the matter density. On the other hand, we compute the best estimated values of ζ{sub 0} and ζ{sub 1} using the type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) probe. We find that from all the possible scenarios for the Universe, the preferred one by the best estimated values of (ζ{sub 0},ζ{sub 1}) is that of an expanding Universe beginning with a Big-Bang, followed by a decelerated expansion at early times, and with a smooth transition in recent times to an accelerated expansion epoch that is going to continue forever. The predicted age of the Universe is a little smaller than the mean value of the observational constraint coming from the oldest globular clusters but it is still inside of the confidence interval of this constraint. A drawback of the model is the violation of the local second law of thermodynamics in redshifts z∼>1. However, when we assume ζ{sub 1} = 0, the simple model ζ = ζ{sub 0} evaluated at the best estimated value for ζ{sub 0} satisfies the local second law of thermodynamics, the age of the Universe is in perfect agreement with the constraint of globular clusters, and it also has a Big-Bang, followed by a decelerated expansion with the smooth transition to an accelerated expansion epoch in late times, that is going to continue forever.

  2. The 'gravitating' tensor in the dualistic theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahanta, M.N.

    1989-01-01

    The exact microscopic system of Einstein-type field equations of the dualistic gravitation theory is investigated as well as an analysis of the modified energy-momentum tensor or so called 'gravitating' tensor is presented

  3. Tensor calculus for physics a concise guide

    CERN Document Server

    Neuenschwander, Dwight E

    2015-01-01

    Understanding tensors is essential for any physics student dealing with phenomena where causes and effects have different directions. A horizontal electric field producing vertical polarization in dielectrics; an unbalanced car wheel wobbling in the vertical plane while spinning about a horizontal axis; an electrostatic field on Earth observed to be a magnetic field by orbiting astronauts—these are some situations where physicists employ tensors. But the true beauty of tensors lies in this fact: When coordinates are transformed from one system to another, tensors change according to the same rules as the coordinates. Tensors, therefore, allow for the convenience of coordinates while also transcending them. This makes tensors the gold standard for expressing physical relationships in physics and geometry. Undergraduate physics majors are typically introduced to tensors in special-case applications. For example, in a classical mechanics course, they meet the "inertia tensor," and in electricity and magnetism...

  4. Mean template for tensor-based morphometry using deformation tensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leporé, Natasha; Brun, Caroline; Pennec, Xavier; Chou, Yi-Yu; Lopez, Oscar L; Aizenstein, Howard J; Becker, James T; Toga, Arthur W; Thompson, Paul M

    2007-01-01

    Tensor-based morphometry (TBM) studies anatomical differences between brain images statistically, to identify regions that differ between groups, over time, or correlate with cognitive or clinical measures. Using a nonlinear registration algorithm, all images are mapped to a common space, and statistics are most commonly performed on the Jacobian determinant (local expansion factor) of the deformation fields. In, it was shown that the detection sensitivity of the standard TBM approach could be increased by using the full deformation tensors in a multivariate statistical analysis. Here we set out to improve the common space itself, by choosing the shape that minimizes a natural metric on the deformation tensors from that space to the population of control subjects. This method avoids statistical bias and should ease nonlinear registration of new subjects data to a template that is 'closest' to all subjects' anatomies. As deformation tensors are symmetric positive-definite matrices and do not form a vector space, all computations are performed in the log-Euclidean framework. The control brain B that is already the closest to 'average' is found. A gradient descent algorithm is then used to perform the minimization that iteratively deforms this template and obtains the mean shape. We apply our method to map the profile of anatomical differences in a dataset of 26 HIV/AIDS patients and 14 controls, via a log-Euclidean Hotelling's T2 test on the deformation tensors. These results are compared to the ones found using the 'best' control, B. Statistics on both shapes are evaluated using cumulative distribution functions of the p-values in maps of inter-group differences.

  5. Holographic duality from random tensor networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayden, Patrick; Nezami, Sepehr; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Thomas, Nathaniel; Walter, Michael; Yang, Zhao [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, Stanford University,382 Via Pueblo, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2016-11-02

    Tensor networks provide a natural framework for exploring holographic duality because they obey entanglement area laws. They have been used to construct explicit toy models realizing many of the interesting structural features of the AdS/CFT correspondence, including the non-uniqueness of bulk operator reconstruction in the boundary theory. In this article, we explore the holographic properties of networks of random tensors. We find that our models naturally incorporate many features that are analogous to those of the AdS/CFT correspondence. When the bond dimension of the tensors is large, we show that the entanglement entropy of all boundary regions, whether connected or not, obey the Ryu-Takayanagi entropy formula, a fact closely related to known properties of the multipartite entanglement of assistance. We also discuss the behavior of Rényi entropies in our models and contrast it with AdS/CFT. Moreover, we find that each boundary region faithfully encodes the physics of the entire bulk entanglement wedge, i.e., the bulk region enclosed by the boundary region and the minimal surface. Our method is to interpret the average over random tensors as the partition function of a classical ferromagnetic Ising model, so that the minimal surfaces of Ryu-Takayanagi appear as domain walls. Upon including the analog of a bulk field, we find that our model reproduces the expected corrections to the Ryu-Takayanagi formula: the bulk minimal surface is displaced and the entropy is augmented by the entanglement of the bulk field. Increasing the entanglement of the bulk field ultimately changes the minimal surface behavior topologically, in a way similar to the effect of creating a black hole. Extrapolating bulk correlation functions to the boundary permits the calculation of the scaling dimensions of boundary operators, which exhibit a large gap between a small number of low-dimension operators and the rest. While we are primarily motivated by the AdS/CFT duality, the main

  6. Reciprocal mass tensor : a general form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, C.L.

    1978-01-01

    Using the results of earlier treatment of wave packets, a general form of reciprocal mass tensor has been obtained. The elements of this tensor are seen to be dependent on momentum as well as space coordinates of the particle under consideration. The conditions under which the tensor would reduce to the usual space-independent form, are discussed and the impact of the space-dependence of this tensor on the motion of Bloch electrons, is examined. (author)

  7. The direct tensor solution and higher-order acquisition schemes for generalized diffusion tensor imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Erik M.

    2010-01-01

    Both in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and in generalized diffusion tensor imaging (GDTI) the relation between the diffusion tensor and the measured apparent diffusion coefficients is given by a tensorial equation, which needs to be inverted in order to solve the diffusion tensor. The traditional

  8. Weyl tensors for asymmetric complex curvatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, C.G.

    Considering a second rank Hermitian field tensor and a general Hermitian connection the associated complex curvature tensor is constructed. The Weyl tensor that corresponds to this complex curvature is determined. The formalism is applied to the Weyl unitary field theory and to the Moffat gravitational theory. (Author) [pt

  9. Spherical Tensor Calculus for Local Adaptive Filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisert, Marco; Burkhardt, Hans

    In 3D image processing tensors play an important role. While rank-1 and rank-2 tensors are well understood and commonly used, higher rank tensors are rare. This is probably due to their cumbersome rotation behavior which prevents a computationally efficient use. In this chapter we want to introduce the notion of a spherical tensor which is based on the irreducible representations of the 3D rotation group. In fact, any ordinary cartesian tensor can be decomposed into a sum of spherical tensors, while each spherical tensor has a quite simple rotation behavior. We introduce so called tensorial harmonics that provide an orthogonal basis for spherical tensor fields of any rank. It is just a generalization of the well known spherical harmonics. Additionally we propose a spherical derivative which connects spherical tensor fields of different degree by differentiation. Based on the proposed theory we present two applications. We propose an efficient algorithm for dense tensor voting in 3D, which makes use of tensorial harmonics decomposition of the tensor-valued voting field. In this way it is possible to perform tensor voting by linear-combinations of convolutions in an efficient way. Secondly, we propose an anisotropic smoothing filter that uses a local shape and orientation adaptive filter kernel which can be computed efficiently by the use spherical derivatives.

  10. Analytical effective tensor for flow-through composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sviercoski, Rosangela De Fatima [Los Alamos, NM

    2012-06-19

    A machine, method and computer-usable medium for modeling an average flow of a substance through a composite material. Such a modeling includes an analytical calculation of an effective tensor K.sup.a suitable for use with a variety of media. The analytical calculation corresponds to an approximation to the tensor K, and follows by first computing the diagonal values, and then identifying symmetries of the heterogeneity distribution. Additional calculations include determining the center of mass of the heterogeneous cell and its angle according to a defined Cartesian system, and utilizing this angle into a rotation formula to compute the off-diagonal values and determining its sign.

  11. Numerical evaluation of the tensor bispectrum in two field inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raveendran, Rathul Nath [The Institute of Mathematical Sciences, HBNI, CIT Campus, Chennai, 600113 India (India); Sriramkumar, L., E-mail: rathulnr@imsc.res.in, E-mail: sriram@physics.iitm.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, 600036 India (India)

    2017-07-01

    We evaluate the dimensionless non-Gaussianity parameter h {sub NL}, that characterizes the amplitude of the tensor bispectrum, numerically for a class of two field inflationary models such as double inflation, hybrid inflation and aligned natural inflation. We compare the numerical results with the slow roll results which can be obtained analytically. In the context of double inflation, we also investigate the effects on h {sub NL} due to curved trajectories in the field space. We explicitly examine the validity of the consistency relation governing the tensor bispectrum in the squeezed limit. Lastly, we discuss the contribution to h {sub NL} due to the epoch of preheating in two field models.

  12. 3D inversion of full tensor magnetic gradiometry (FTMG) data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhdanov, Michael; Cai, Hongzhu; Wilson, Glenn

    2011-01-01

    Following recent advances in SQUID technology, full tensor magnetic gradiometry (FTMG) is emerging as a practical exploration method. We introduce 3D regularized focusing inversion for FTMG data. Our model studies show that inversion of magnetic tensor data can significantly improve resolution...... compared to inversion of magnetic vector data for the same model. We present a case study for the 3D inversion of GETMAG® FTMG data acquired over a magnetite skarn at Tallawang, Australia. The results obtained from our 3D inversion agree very well with the known geology of the area....

  13. Numerical evaluation of the tensor bispectrum in two field inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raveendran, Rathul Nath; Sriramkumar, L.

    2017-01-01

    We evaluate the dimensionless non-Gaussianity parameter h NL , that characterizes the amplitude of the tensor bispectrum, numerically for a class of two field inflationary models such as double inflation, hybrid inflation and aligned natural inflation. We compare the numerical results with the slow roll results which can be obtained analytically. In the context of double inflation, we also investigate the effects on h NL due to curved trajectories in the field space. We explicitly examine the validity of the consistency relation governing the tensor bispectrum in the squeezed limit. Lastly, we discuss the contribution to h NL due to the epoch of preheating in two field models.

  14. A new Weyl-like tensor of geometric origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwakarma, Ram Gopal

    2018-04-01

    A set of new tensors of purely geometric origin have been investigated, which form a hierarchy. A tensor of a lower rank plays the role of the potential for the tensor of one rank higher. The tensors have interesting mathematical and physical properties. The highest rank tensor of the hierarchy possesses all the geometrical properties of the Weyl tensor.

  15. Shaping the Development of Prejudice: Latent Growth Modeling of the Influence of Social Dominance Orientation on Outgroup Affect in Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratt, Christopher; Sidanius, Jim; Sheehy-Skeffington, Jennifer

    2016-12-01

    Social dominance orientation (SDO) has been theorized as a stable, early-emerging trait influencing outgroup evaluations, a view supported by evidence from cross-sectional and two-wave longitudinal research. Yet, the limitations of identifying causal paths with cross-sectional and two-wave designs are increasingly being acknowledged. This article presents the first use of multi-wave data to test the over-time relationship between SDO and outgroup affect among young people. We use cross-lagged and latent growth modeling (LGM) of a three-wave data set employing Norwegian adolescents (over 2 years, N = 453) and a five-wave data set with American university students (over 4 years, N = 748). Overall, SDO exhibits high temporal rank-order stability and predicts changes in outgroup affect. This research represents the strongest test to date of SDO's role as a stable trait that influences the development of prejudice, while highlighting LGM as a valuable tool for social and political psychology. © 2016 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  16. A 'cost-effective' probabilistic model to select the dominant factors affecting the variation of the component failure rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchsteiger, C.

    1992-11-01

    Within the framework of a Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA), the component failure rate λ is a key parameter in the sense that the study of its behavior gives the essential information for estimating the current values as well as the trends in the failure probabilities of interest. Since there is an infinite variety of possible underlying factors which might cause changes in λ (e.g. operating time, maintenance practices, component environment, etc.), an 'importance ranking' process of these factors is considered most desirable to prioritize research efforts. To be 'cost-effective', the modeling effort must be small, i.e. essentially involving no estimation of additional parameters other than λ. In this paper, using a multivariate data analysis technique and various statistical measures, such a 'cost-effective' screening process has been developed. Dominant factors affecting the failure rate of any components of interest can easily be identified and the appropriateness of current research plans (e.g. on the necessity of performing aging studies) can be validated. (author)

  17. Reduced-order aeroelastic model for limit-cycle oscillations in vortex-dominated unsteady airfoil flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh Babu, Arun Vishnu; Ramesh, Kiran; Gopalarathnam, Ashok

    2017-11-01

    In previous research, Ramesh et al. (JFM,2014) developed a low-order discrete vortex method for modeling unsteady airfoil flows with intermittent leading edge vortex (LEV) shedding using a leading edge suction parameter (LESP). LEV shedding is initiated using discrete vortices (DVs) whenever the Leading Edge Suction Parameter (LESP) exceeds a critical value. In subsequent research, the method was successfully employed by Ramesh et al. (JFS, 2015) to predict aeroelastic limit-cycle oscillations in airfoil flows dominated by intermittent LEV shedding. When applied to flows that require large number of time steps, the computational cost increases due to the increasing vortex count. In this research, we apply an amalgamation strategy to actively control the DV count, and thereby reduce simulation time. A pair each of LEVs and TEVs are amalgamated at every time step. The ideal pairs for amalgamation are identified based on the requirement that the flowfield in the vicinity of the airfoil is least affected (Spalart, 1988). Instead of placing the amalgamated vortex at the centroid, we place it at an optimal location to ensure that the leading-edge suction and the airfoil bound circulation are conserved. Results of the initial study are promising.

  18. A scalar-tensor bimetric brane world cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youm, Donam

    2001-08-01

    We study a scalar-tensor bimetric cosmology in the Randall-Sundrum model with one positive tension brane, where the biscalar field is assumed to be confined on the brane. The effective Friedmann equations on the brane are obtained and analyzed. We comment on resolution of cosmological problems in this bimetric model. (author)

  19. Autosomal dominant hypercalciuria in a mouse model due to a mutation of the epithelial calcium channel, TRPV5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nellie Y Loh

    indicate that the TRPV5 S682P mutant is functionally significant and study of HCALC1, a novel model for autosomal dominant hypercalciuria, may help further our understanding of renal calcium reabsorption and hypercalciuria.

  20. Non-image-forming light driven functions are preserved in a mouse model of autosomal dominant optic atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Perganta

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA is a slowly progressive optic neuropathy that has been associated with mutations of the OPA1 gene. In patients, the disease primarily affects the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs and causes optic nerve atrophy and visual loss. A subset of RGCs are intrinsically photosensitive, express the photopigment melanopsin and drive non-image-forming (NIF visual functions including light driven circadian and sleep behaviours and the pupil light reflex. Given the RGC pathology in ADOA, disruption of NIF functions might be predicted. Interestingly in ADOA patients the pupil light reflex was preserved, although NIF behavioural outputs were not examined. The B6; C3-Opa1(Q285STOP mouse model of ADOA displays optic nerve abnormalities, RGC dendropathy and functional visual disruption. We performed a comprehensive assessment of light driven NIF functions in this mouse model using wheel running activity monitoring, videotracking and pupillometry. Opa1 mutant mice entrained their activity rhythm to the external light/dark cycle, suppressed their activity in response to acute light exposure at night, generated circadian phase shift responses to 480 nm and 525 nm pulses, demonstrated immobility-defined sleep induction following exposure to a brief light pulse at night and exhibited an intensity dependent pupil light reflex. There were no significant differences in any parameter tested relative to wildtype littermate controls. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in the number of melanopsin-expressing RGCs, cell morphology or melanopsin transcript levels between genotypes. Taken together, these findings suggest the preservation of NIF functions in Opa1 mutants. The results provide support to growing evidence that the melanopsin-expressing RGCs are protected in mitochondrial optic neuropathies.

  1. Assessment of groundwater response to droughts in a complex runoff-dominated watershed by using an integrated hydrologic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolfenden, L. R.; Hevesi, J. A.; Nishikawa, T.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater is an important component of the water supply, especially during droughts, within the Santa Rosa Plain watershed (SRPW), California, USA. The SRPW is 680 km2 and includes a network of natural and engineered stream channels. Streamflow is strongly seasonal, with high winter flows, predominantly intermittent summer flows, and comparatively rapid response time to larger storms. Groundwater flow is influenced primarily by complex geology, spatial and temporal variation in recharge, and pumping for urban, agricultural, and rural demands. Results from an integrated hydrologic model (GSFLOW) for the SRPW were analyzed to assess the effect of droughts on groundwater resources during water years 1976-2010. Model results indicate that, in general, below-average precipitation during historical drought periods reduced groundwater recharge (focused within stream channels and diffuse outside of channels on alluvial plains), groundwater evapotranspiration (ET), and groundwater discharge to streams (baseflow). In addition, recharge during wet periods was not sufficient to replenish groundwater-storage losses caused by drought and groundwater pumping, resulting in an overall 150 gigaliter loss in groundwater storage for water years 1976-2010. During drought periods, lower groundwater levels from reduced recharge broadly increased the number and length of losing-stream reaches, and seepage losses in streams became a higher percentage of recharge relative to the diffuse recharge outside of stream channels (for example, seepage losses in streams were 36% of recharge in 2006 and 57% at the end of the 2007-09 drought). Reductions in groundwater storage during drought periods resulted in decreased groundwater ET (loss of riparian habitat) and baseflow, especially during the warmer and dryer months (May through September) when groundwater is the dominant component of streamflow.

  2. Comparison of Magnetic Susceptibility Tensor and Diffusion Tensor of the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Liu, Chunlei

    2013-10-01

    Susceptibility tensor imaging (STI) provides a novel approach for noninvasive assessment of the white matter pathways of the brain. Using mouse brain ex vivo , we compared STI with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), in terms of tensor values, principal tensor values, anisotropy values, and tensor orientations. Despite the completely different biophysical underpinnings, magnetic susceptibility tensors and diffusion tensors show many similarities in the tensor and principal tensor images, for example, the tensors perpendicular to the fiber direction have the highest gray-white matter contrast, and the largest principal tensor is along the fiber direction. Comparison to DTI fractional anisotropy, the susceptibility anisotropy provides much higher sensitivity to the chemical composition of the white matter, especially myelin. The high sensitivity can be further enhanced with the perfusion of ProHance, a gadolinium-based contrast agent. Regarding the tensor orientations, the direction of the largest principal susceptibility tensor agrees with that of diffusion tensors in major white matter fiber bundles. The STI fiber tractography can reconstruct the fiber pathways for the whole corpus callosum and for white matter fiber bundles that are in close contact but in different orientations. There are some differences between susceptibility and diffusion tensor orientations, which are likely due to the limitations in the current STI reconstruction. With the development of more accurate reconstruction methods, STI holds the promise for probing the white matter micro-architectures with more anatomical details and higher chemical sensitivity.

  3. Tensor voting for robust color edge detection

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno, Rodrigo; García, Miguel Ángel; Puig, Domenec

    2014-01-01

    The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-7584-8_9 This chapter proposes two robust color edge detection methods based on tensor voting. The first method is a direct adaptation of the classical tensor voting to color images where tensors are initialized with either the gradient or the local color structure tensor. The second method is based on an extension of tensor voting in which the encoding and voting processes are specifically tailored to ...

  4. The Physical Interpretation of the Lanczos Tensor

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Mark D.

    1999-01-01

    The field equations of general relativity can be written as first order differential equations in the Weyl tensor, the Weyl tensor in turn can be written as a first order differential equation in a three index tensor called the Lanczos tensor. The Lanczos tensor plays a similar role in general relativity to that of the vector potential in electro-magnetic theory. The Aharonov-Bohm effect shows that when quantum mechanics is applied to electro-magnetic theory the vector potential is dynamicall...

  5. Fourth meeting entitled “Visualization and Processing of Tensors and Higher Order Descriptors for Multi-Valued Data”

    CERN Document Server

    Vilanova, Anna; Burgeth, Bernhard; Visualization and Processing of Tensors and Higher Order Descriptors for Multi-Valued Data

    2014-01-01

    Arising from the fourth Dagstuhl conference entitled Visualization and Processing of Tensors and Higher Order Descriptors for Multi-Valued Data (2011), this book offers a broad and vivid view of current work in this emerging field. Topics covered range from applications of the analysis of tensor fields to research on their mathematical and analytical properties. Part I, Tensor Data Visualization, surveys techniques for visualization of tensors and tensor fields in engineering, discusses the current state of the art and challenges, and examines tensor invariants and glyph design, including an overview of common glyphs. The second Part, Representation and Processing of Higher-order Descriptors, describes a matrix representation of local phase, outlines mathematical morphological operations techniques, extended for use in vector images, and generalizes erosion to the space of diffusion weighted MRI. Part III, Higher Order Tensors and Riemannian-Finsler Geometry, offers powerful mathematical language to model and...

  6. Tensor perturbations during inflation in a spatially closed Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonga, Béatrice; Gupt, Brajesh; Yokomizo, Nelson, E-mail: bpb165@psu.edu, E-mail: bgupt@gravity.psu.edu, E-mail: yokomizo@gravity.psu.edu [Institute for Gravitation and the Cosmos and Physics Department, The Pennsylvania State University, 104 Lavey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2017-05-01

    In a recent paper [1], we studied the evolution of the background geometry and scalar perturbations in an inflationary, spatially closed Friedmann-Lemaȋtre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) model having constant positive spatial curvature and spatial topology S{sup 3}. Due to the spatial curvature, the early phase of slow-roll inflation is modified, leading to suppression of power in the scalar power spectrum at large angular scales. In this paper, we extend the analysis to include tensor perturbations. We find that, similarly to the scalar perturbations, the tensor power spectrum also shows suppression for long wavelength modes. The correction to the tensor spectrum is limited to the very long wavelength modes, therefore the resulting observable CMB B-mode polarization spectrum remains practically the same as in the standard scenario with flat spatial sections. However, since both the tensor and scalar power spectra are modified, there are scale dependent corrections to the tensor-to-scalar ratio that leads to violation of the standard slow-roll consistency relation.

  7. Robust estimation of adaptive tensors of curvature by tensor voting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wai-Shun; Tang, Chi-Keung

    2005-03-01

    Although curvature estimation from a given mesh or regularly sampled point set is a well-studied problem, it is still challenging when the input consists of a cloud of unstructured points corrupted by misalignment error and outlier noise. Such input is ubiquitous in computer vision. In this paper, we propose a three-pass tensor voting algorithm to robustly estimate curvature tensors, from which accurate principal curvatures and directions can be calculated. Our quantitative estimation is an improvement over the previous two-pass algorithm, where only qualitative curvature estimation (sign of Gaussian curvature) is performed. To overcome misalignment errors, our improved method automatically corrects input point locations at subvoxel precision, which also rejects outliers that are uncorrectable. To adapt to different scales locally, we define the RadiusHit of a curvature tensor to quantify estimation accuracy and applicability. Our curvature estimation algorithm has been proven with detailed quantitative experiments, performing better in a variety of standard error metrics (percentage error in curvature magnitudes, absolute angle difference in curvature direction) in the presence of a large amount of misalignment noise.

  8. Antisymmetric tensor generalizations of affine vector fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houri, Tsuyoshi; Morisawa, Yoshiyuki; Tomoda, Kentaro

    2016-02-01

    Tensor generalizations of affine vector fields called symmetric and antisymmetric affine tensor fields are discussed as symmetry of spacetimes. We review the properties of the symmetric ones, which have been studied in earlier works, and investigate the properties of the antisymmetric ones, which are the main theme in this paper. It is shown that antisymmetric affine tensor fields are closely related to one-lower-rank antisymmetric tensor fields which are parallelly transported along geodesics. It is also shown that the number of linear independent rank- p antisymmetric affine tensor fields in n -dimensions is bounded by ( n + 1)!/ p !( n - p )!. We also derive the integrability conditions for antisymmetric affine tensor fields. Using the integrability conditions, we discuss the existence of antisymmetric affine tensor fields on various spacetimes.

  9. Symmetric Topological Phases and Tensor Network States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shenghan

    Classification and simulation of quantum phases are one of main themes in condensed matter physics. Quantum phases can be distinguished by their symmetrical and topological properties. The interplay between symmetry and topology in condensed matter physics often leads to exotic quantum phases and rich phase diagrams. Famous examples include quantum Hall phases, spin liquids and topological insulators. In this thesis, I present our works toward a more systematically understanding of symmetric topological quantum phases in bosonic systems. In the absence of global symmetries, gapped quantum phases are characterized by topological orders. Topological orders in 2+1D are well studied, while a systematically understanding of topological orders in 3+1D is still lacking. By studying a family of exact solvable models, we find at least some topological orders in 3+1D can be distinguished by braiding phases of loop excitations. In the presence of both global symmetries and topological orders, the interplay between them leads to new phases termed as symmetry enriched topological (SET) phases. We develop a framework to classify a large class of SET phases using tensor networks. For each tensor class, we can write down generic variational wavefunctions. We apply our method to study gapped spin liquids on the kagome lattice, which can be viewed as SET phases of on-site symmetries as well as lattice symmetries. In the absence of topological order, symmetry could protect different topological phases, which are often referred to as symmetry protected topological (SPT) phases. We present systematic constructions of tensor network wavefunctions for bosonic symmetry protected topological (SPT) phases respecting both onsite and spatial symmetries.

  10. Pedigree-based estimation of covariance between dominance deviations and additive genetic effects in closed rabbit lines considering inbreeding and using a computationally simpler equivalent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, E N; Legarra, A; Martínez, R; Sánchez, J P; Baselga, M

    2017-06-01

    Inbreeding generates covariances between additive and dominance effects (breeding values and dominance deviations). In this work, we developed and applied models for estimation of dominance and additive genetic variances and their covariance, a model that we call "full dominance," from pedigree and phenotypic data. Estimates with this model such as presented here are very scarce both in livestock and in wild genetics. First, we estimated pedigree-based condensed probabilities of identity using recursion. Second, we developed an equivalent linear model in which variance components can be estimated using closed-form algorithms such as REML or Gibbs sampling and existing software. Third, we present a new method to refer the estimated variance components to meaningful parameters in a particular population, i.e., final partially inbred generations as opposed to outbred base populations. We applied these developments to three closed rabbit lines (A, V and H) selected for number of weaned at the Polytechnic University of Valencia. Pedigree and phenotypes are complete and span 43, 39 and 14 generations, respectively. Estimates of broad-sense heritability are 0.07, 0.07 and 0.05 at the base versus 0.07, 0.07 and 0.09 in the final generations. Narrow-sense heritability estimates are 0.06, 0.06 and 0.02 at the base versus 0.04, 0.04 and 0.01 at the final generations. There is also a reduction in the genotypic variance due to the negative additive-dominance correlation. Thus, the contribution of dominance variation is fairly large and increases with inbreeding and (over)compensates for the loss in additive variation. In addition, estimates of the additive-dominance correlation are -0.37, -0.31 and 0.00, in agreement with the few published estimates and theoretical considerations. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Micromechanics based framework with second-order damage tensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmorat, R.; Desmorat, B.; Olive, M.; Kolev, B.

    2018-05-01

    The harmonic product of tensors---leading to the concept of harmonic factorization---has been defined in a previous work (Olive et al, 2017). In the practical case of 3D crack density measurements on thin or thick walled structures, this mathematical tool allows us to factorize the harmonic (irreducible) part of the fourth-order damage tensor as an harmonic square: an exact harmonic square in 2D, an harmonic square over the set of so-called mechanically accessible directions for measurements in the 3D case. The corresponding micro-mechanics framework based on second---instead of fourth---order damage tensors is derived. An illustrating example is provided showing how the proposed framework allows for the modeling of the so-called hydrostatic sensitivity up to high damage levels.

  12. On the axial anomalies in external tensor fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khudaverdyan, O.M.; Mkrtchyan, R.L.; Zurabyan, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    Computation of the axial anomaly for Dirac fermions in external tensor fields is studied. The sequence of the supersymmetric one-dimensional models is presented. Their supercharges are equal, after quantization, to Dirac operators in external tensor fields, and the density of Witten's partition function gives the anomaly. It is shown that action in the corresponding path integral differs from the classical one. Gaussian approximation gives the anomaly only in the case of third-rank tensor with zero exterior derivative and in that case anomaly is calculated in all dimensions. The interpretation of that field as the torsion of gravitational field and also connection with the results of Witten and Alvarez-Gaume and Atiyah-Singer index theorem are discussed

  13. Effective gravitational wave stress-energy tensor in alternative theories of gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, Leo C.; Yunes, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    The inspiral of binary systems in vacuum is controlled by the stress-energy of gravitational radiation and any other propagating degrees of freedom. For gravitational waves, the dominant contribution is characterized by an effective stress-energy tensor at future null infinity. We employ perturbation theory and the short-wavelength approximation to compute this stress-energy tensor in a wide class of alternative theories. We find that this tensor is generally a modification of that first computed by Isaacson, where the corrections can dominate over the general relativistic term. In a wide class of theories, however, these corrections identically vanish at asymptotically flat, future, null infinity, reducing the stress-energy tensor to Isaacson's. We exemplify this phenomenon by first considering dynamical Chern-Simons modified gravity, which corrects the action via a scalar field and the contraction of the Riemann tensor and its dual. We then consider a wide class of theories with dynamical scalar fields coupled to higher-order curvature invariants and show that the gravitational wave stress-energy tensor still reduces to Isaacson's. The calculations presented in this paper are crucial to perform systematic tests of such modified gravity theories through the orbital decay of binary pulsars or through gravitational wave observations.

  14. Extended vector-tensor theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Rampei; Naruko, Atsushi; Yoshida, Daisuke, E-mail: rampei@th.phys.titech.ac.jp, E-mail: naruko@th.phys.titech.ac.jp, E-mail: yoshida@th.phys.titech.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

    2017-01-01

    Recently, several extensions of massive vector theory in curved space-time have been proposed in many literatures. In this paper, we consider the most general vector-tensor theories that contain up to two derivatives with respect to metric and vector field. By imposing a degeneracy condition of the Lagrangian in the context of ADM decomposition of space-time to eliminate an unwanted mode, we construct a new class of massive vector theories where five degrees of freedom can propagate, corresponding to three for massive vector modes and two for massless tensor modes. We find that the generalized Proca and the beyond generalized Proca theories up to the quartic Lagrangian, which should be included in this formulation, are degenerate theories even in curved space-time. Finally, introducing new metric and vector field transformations, we investigate the properties of thus obtained theories under such transformations.

  15. Scalar-tensor linear inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artymowski, Michał [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Łojasiewicza 11, 30-348 Kraków (Poland); Racioppi, Antonio, E-mail: Michal.Artymowski@uj.edu.pl, E-mail: Antonio.Racioppi@kbfi.ee [National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Rävala 10, 10143 Tallinn (Estonia)

    2017-04-01

    We investigate two approaches to non-minimally coupled gravity theories which present linear inflation as attractor solution: a) the scalar-tensor theory approach, where we look for a scalar-tensor theory that would restore results of linear inflation in the strong coupling limit for a non-minimal coupling to gravity of the form of f (φ) R /2; b) the particle physics approach, where we motivate the form of the Jordan frame potential by loop corrections to the inflaton field. In both cases the Jordan frame potentials are modifications of the induced gravity inflationary scenario, but instead of the Starobinsky attractor they lead to linear inflation in the strong coupling limit.

  16. General scalar-tensor theories for induced gravity inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutaleb J, H.; Marrakchi, A.L.

    1992-07-01

    Some cosmological implications of a general scalar-tensor theory for induced gravity are discussed. The model exhibits a slow-rolling phase provided that the coupling function ε(φ) varies slowly enough such that φ dlnε(φ)/dφ much less than 2 during almost the inflationary epoch. It is then shown that, as in the ordinary induced gravity inflation, the chaotic scenario is more natural than the new scenario which proves to be even not self-consistent. The results are applied, for illustration, to a scalar-tensor theory of the Barker type. (author). 25 refs

  17. The tensor product in Wadler's analysis of lists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    1992-01-01

    We consider abstract interpretation (in particular strictness analysis) for pairs and lists. We begin by reviewing the well-known fact that the best known description of a pair of elements is obtained using the tensor product rather than the cartesian product. We next present a generalisation...... of Wadler's strictness analysis for lists using the notion of open set. Finally, we illustrate the intimate connection between the case analysis implicit in Wadler's strictness analysis and the precision that the tensor product allows for modelling the inverse cons operation....

  18. The tensor product in Wadler's analysis of lists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    1994-01-01

    We consider abstract interpretation (in particular strictness analysis) for pairs and lists. We begin by reviewing the well-known fact that the best known description of a pair of elements is obtained using the tensor product rather than the cartesian product. We next present a generalisation...... of Wadler's strictness analysis for lists (1987) using the notion of open set. Finally, we illustrate the intimate connection between the case analysis implicit in Wadler's strictness analysis and the precision that the tensor product allows for modelling the inverse cons operation...

  19. Quark-gluon mixing in pseudoscalar and tensor mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eremyan, Sh.S.; Nazaryan, A.E.

    1986-01-01

    A mixing model of quark-antiquark ang gluonium states in η, η', i(1440) pseudoscalar and f, f', Θ(1690) tensor mesons is considered. Description of and predictions for 68 two-particle decays with these particles taking part in them are obtained. It is shown that i(1440) by 85% consists of gluonium and Θ(1690) is a pure gluonic state. The quark-gluon and gluon-gluon couplings in the pseudoscalar sector are obtained to be stronger as compared to the corresponding ones in the tensor case

  20. Diffusion tensor optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Daniel L.; Blackmon, Richard L.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2018-01-01

    In situ measurements of diffusive particle transport provide insight into tissue architecture, drug delivery, and cellular function. Analogous to diffusion-tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI), where the anisotropic diffusion of water molecules is mapped on the millimeter scale to elucidate the fibrous structure of tissue, here we propose diffusion-tensor optical coherence tomography (DT-OCT) for measuring directional diffusivity and flow of optically scattering particles within tissue. Because DT-OCT is sensitive to the sub-resolution motion of Brownian particles as they are constrained by tissue macromolecules, it has the potential to quantify nanoporous anisotropic tissue structure at micrometer resolution as relevant to extracellular matrices, neurons, and capillaries. Here we derive the principles of DT-OCT, relating the detected optical signal from a minimum of six probe beams with the six unique diffusion tensor and three flow vector components. The optimal geometry of the probe beams is determined given a finite numerical aperture, and a high-speed hardware implementation is proposed. Finally, Monte Carlo simulations are employed to assess the ability of the proposed DT-OCT system to quantify anisotropic diffusion of nanoparticles in a collagen matrix, an extracellular constituent that is known to become highly aligned during tumor development.

  1. Sex-linked dominant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inheritance - sex-linked dominant; Genetics - sex-linked dominant; X-linked dominant; Y-linked dominant ... can be either an autosomal chromosome or a sex chromosome. It also depends on whether the trait ...

  2. A dielectric tensor for magnetoplasmas comprising components with generalized Lorentzian distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mace, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    We report on a new form for the dielectric tensor for a plasma containing superthermal particles. The individual particle components are modelled by 3-dimensional isotropic kappa, or generalized Lorentzian, distributions with arbitrary real-valued index κ. The new dielectric tensor is valid for arbitrary wavevectors. The dielectric tensor, which resembles Trubnikov's dielectric tensor for a relativistic plasma, is compared with the familiar Maxwellian form. When the dielectric tensor is used in the plasma dispersion relation for waves propagating parallel to the magnetic field it reproduces previously derived dispersion relations for various electromagnetic and electrostatic waves in plasmas modelled by Lorentzian particle distributions. Within the constraints of propagation parallel to the ambient magnetic field, we extend the above results to incorporate loss-cone Lorentzian particle distributions, which have important applications in laboratory mirror devices, as well as in space and astrophysical environments. (orig.)

  3. All-at-once Optimization for Coupled Matrix and Tensor Factorizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evrim, Acar Ataman; Kolda, Tamara G.; Dunlavy, Daniel M.

    2011-01-01

    .g., the person by person social network matrix or the restaurant by category matrix, and higher-order tensors, e.g., the "ratings" tensor of the form restaurant by meal by person. In this paper, we are particularly interested in fusing data sets with the goal of capturing their underlying latent structures. We...... formulate this problem as a coupled matrix and tensor factorization (CMTF) problem where heterogeneous data sets are modeled by fitting outer-product models to higher-order tensors and matrices in a coupled manner. Unlike traditional approaches solving this problem using alternating algorithms, we propose...... an all-at-once optimization approach called CMTF-OPT (CMTF-OPTimization), which is a gradient-based optimization approach for joint analysis of matrices and higher-order tensors. We also extend the algorithm to handle coupled incomplete data sets. Using numerical experiments, we demonstrate...

  4. Hydrological response to dynamical downscaling of climate model outputs: A case study for western and eastern snowmelt-dominated Canada catchments

    OpenAIRE

    Magali Troin; Daniel Caya; Juan Alberto Velázquez; François Brissette

    2015-01-01

    Study region: An analysis of hydrological response to a dynamically downscaled multi-member multi-model global climate model (GCM) ensemble of simulations based on the Canadian Regional Climate Model (CRCM) is presented for three snowmelt-dominated basins in Canada. The basins are situated in the western mountainous (British Columbia) and eastern level (Quebec) regions in Canada, providing comprehensive experiments to validate the CRCM over various topographic features. Study focus: The ev...

  5. Sparse alignment for robust tensor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhihui; Wong, Wai Keung; Xu, Yong; Zhao, Cairong; Sun, Mingming

    2014-10-01

    Multilinear/tensor extensions of manifold learning based algorithms have been widely used in computer vision and pattern recognition. This paper first provides a systematic analysis of the multilinear extensions for the most popular methods by using alignment techniques, thereby obtaining a general tensor alignment framework. From this framework, it is easy to show that the manifold learning based tensor learning methods are intrinsically different from the alignment techniques. Based on the alignment framework, a robust tensor learning method called sparse tensor alignment (STA) is then proposed for unsupervised tensor feature extraction. Different from the existing tensor learning methods, L1- and L2-norms are introduced to enhance the robustness in the alignment step of the STA. The advantage of the proposed technique is that the difficulty in selecting the size of the local neighborhood can be avoided in the manifold learning based tensor feature extraction algorithms. Although STA is an unsupervised learning method, the sparsity encodes the discriminative information in the alignment step and provides the robustness of STA. Extensive experiments on the well-known image databases as well as action and hand gesture databases by encoding object images as tensors demonstrate that the proposed STA algorithm gives the most competitive performance when compared with the tensor-based unsupervised learning methods.

  6. Shape anisotropy: tensor distance to anisotropy measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldeselassie, Yonas T.; El-Hilo, Saba; Atkins, M. S.

    2011-03-01

    Fractional anisotropy, defined as the distance of a diffusion tensor from its closest isotropic tensor, has been extensively studied as quantitative anisotropy measure for diffusion tensor magnetic resonance images (DT-MRI). It has been used to reveal the white matter profile of brain images, as guiding feature for seeding and stopping in fiber tractography and for the diagnosis and assessment of degenerative brain diseases. Despite its extensive use in DT-MRI community, however, not much attention has been given to the mathematical correctness of its derivation from diffusion tensors which is achieved using Euclidean dot product in 9D space. But, recent progress in DT-MRI has shown that the space of diffusion tensors does not form a Euclidean vector space and thus Euclidean dot product is not appropriate for tensors. In this paper, we propose a novel and robust rotationally invariant diffusion anisotropy measure derived using the recently proposed Log-Euclidean and J-divergence tensor distance measures. An interesting finding of our work is that given a diffusion tensor, its closest isotropic tensor is different for different tensor distance metrics used. We demonstrate qualitatively that our new anisotropy measure reveals superior white matter profile of DT-MR brain images and analytically show that it has a higher signal to noise ratio than fractional anisotropy.

  7. Tensor Susceptibilities of the Vacuum from Constituent Quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broniowski, W.; Polyakov, M.; Goeke, K.; Hyun-Chul Kim

    1998-01-01

    We show that the constituent quark model leads to simple expression for the isoscalar and isovector tensor susceptibilities of the vacuum. The found values are negative and of magnitude compatible with QCD-sum-rule parametrizations of spectral densities in appropriate L=1-meson channels. (author)

  8. Collineations of the curvature tensor in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Curvature collineations for the curvature tensor, constructed from a fundamental Bianchi Type-V metric, are studied. We are concerned with a symmetry property of space-time which is called curvature collineation, and we briefly discuss the physical and kinematical properties of the models.

  9. Cosmic no-hair conjecture in scalar–tensor theories

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have shown that, within the context of scalar–tensor theories, the anisotropic Bianchi-type cosmological models evolve towards de Sitter Universe. A similar result holds in the case of cosmology in Lyra manifold. Thus the analogue of cosmic no-hair theorem of Wald [1] hold in both the cases. In fact, during inflation there ...

  10. Tensor Susceptibilities of the Vacuum from Constituent Quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broniowski, W [The H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland); Polyakov, M; Goeke, K [Institute for Theoretical Physics II, Ruhr-Universitaet-Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Kim, Hyun-Chul [Pusan National University, Department of Physics, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-05-15

    We show that the constituent quark model leads to simple expression for the isoscalar and isovector tensor susceptibilities of the vacuum. The found values are negative and of magnitude compatible with QCD-sum-rule parametrizations of spectral densities in appropriate L=1-meson channels. (author)

  11. Transposes, L-Eigenvalues and Invariants of Third Order Tensors

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Liqun

    2017-01-01

    Third order tensors have wide applications in mechanics, physics and engineering. The most famous and useful third order tensor is the piezoelectric tensor, which plays a key role in the piezoelectric effect, first discovered by Curie brothers. On the other hand, the Levi-Civita tensor is famous in tensor calculus. In this paper, we study third order tensors and (third order) hypermatrices systematically, by regarding a third order tensor as a linear operator which transforms a second order t...

  12. In vivo Modeling Implicates APOL1 in Nephropathy: Evidence for Dominant Negative Effects and Epistasis under Anemic Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blair R Anderson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available African Americans have a disproportionate risk for developing nephropathy. This disparity has been attributed to coding variants (G1 and G2 in apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1; however, there is little functional evidence supporting the role of this protein in renal function. Here, we combined genetics and in vivo modeling to examine the role of apol1 in glomerular development and pronephric filtration and to test the pathogenic potential of APOL1 G1 and G2. Translational suppression or CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing of apol1 in zebrafish embryos results in podocyte loss and glomerular filtration defects. Complementation of apol1 morphants with wild-type human APOL1 mRNA rescues these defects. However, the APOL1 G1 risk allele does not ameliorate defects caused by apol1 suppression and the pathogenicity is conferred by the cis effect of both individual variants of the G1 risk haplotype (I384M/S342G. In vivo complementation studies of the G2 risk allele also indicate that the variant is deleterious to protein function. Moreover, APOL1 G2, but not G1, expression alone promotes developmental kidney defects, suggesting a possible dominant-negative effect of the altered protein. In sickle cell disease (SCD patients, we reported previously a genetic interaction between APOL1 and MYH9. Testing this interaction in vivo by co-suppressing both transcripts yielded no additive effects. However, upon genetic or chemical induction of anemia, we observed a significantly exacerbated nephropathy phenotype. Furthermore, concordant with the genetic interaction observed in SCD patients, APOL1 G2 reduces myh9 expression in vivo, suggesting a possible interaction between the altered APOL1 and myh9. Our data indicate a critical role for APOL1 in renal function that is compromised by nephropathy-risk encoding variants. Moreover, our interaction studies indicate that the MYH9 locus is also relevant to the phenotype in a stressed microenvironment and suggest that consideration of

  13. Validation of diffusion tensor MRI measurements of cardiac microstructure with structure tensor synchrotron radiation imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Irvin; McClymont, Darryl; Zdora, Marie-Christine; Whittington, Hannah J; Davidoiu, Valentina; Lee, Jack; Lygate, Craig A; Rau, Christoph; Zanette, Irene; Schneider, Jürgen E

    2017-03-10

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is widely used to assess tissue microstructure non-invasively. Cardiac DTI enables inference of cell and sheetlet orientations, which are altered under pathological conditions. However, DTI is affected by many factors, therefore robust validation is critical. Existing histological validation is intrinsically flawed, since it requires further tissue processing leading to sample distortion, is routinely limited in field-of-view and requires reconstruction of three-dimensional volumes from two-dimensional images. In contrast, synchrotron radiation imaging (SRI) data enables imaging of the heart in 3D without further preparation following DTI. The objective of the study was to validate DTI measurements based on structure tensor analysis of SRI data. One isolated, fixed rat heart was imaged ex vivo with DTI and X-ray phase contrast SRI, and reconstructed at 100 μm and 3.6 μm isotropic resolution respectively. Structure tensors were determined from the SRI data and registered to the DTI data. Excellent agreement in helix angles (HA) and transverse angles (TA) was observed between the DTI and structure tensor synchrotron radiation imaging (STSRI) data, where HA DTI-STSRI  = -1.4° ± 23.2° and TA DTI-STSRI  = -1.4° ± 35.0° (mean ± 1.96 standard deviation across all voxels in the left ventricle). STSRI confirmed that the primary eigenvector of the diffusion tensor corresponds with the cardiomyocyte long-axis across the whole myocardium. We have used STSRI as a novel and high-resolution gold standard for the validation of DTI, allowing like-with-like comparison of three-dimensional tissue structures in the same intact heart free of distortion. This represents a critical step forward in independently verifying the structural basis and informing the interpretation of cardiac DTI data, thereby supporting the further development and adoption of DTI in structure-based electro-mechanical modelling and routine clinical

  14. Seamless warping of diffusion tensor fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Dongrong; Hao, Xuejun; Bansal, Ravi

    2008-01-01

    To warp diffusion tensor fields accurately, tensors must be reoriented in the space to which the tensors are warped based on both the local deformation field and the orientation of the underlying fibers in the original image. Existing algorithms for warping tensors typically use forward mapping...... of seams, including voxels in which the deformation is extensive. Backward mapping, however, cannot reorient tensors in the template space because information about the directional orientation of fiber tracts is contained in the original, unwarped imaging space only, and backward mapping alone cannot...... transfer that information to the template space. To combine the advantages of forward and backward mapping, we propose a novel method for the spatial normalization of diffusion tensor (DT) fields that uses a bijection (a bidirectional mapping with one-to-one correspondences between image spaces) to warp DT...

  15. On improving the efficiency of tensor voting

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno, Rodrigo; Garcia, Miguel Angel; Puig, Domenec; Pizarro, Luis; Burgeth, Bernhard; Weickert, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes two alternative formulations to reduce the high computational complexity of tensor voting, a robust perceptual grouping technique used to extract salient information from noisy data. The first scheme consists of numerical approximations of the votes, which have been derived from an in-depth analysis of the plate and ball voting processes. The second scheme simplifies the formulation while keeping the same perceptual meaning of the original tensor voting: The stick tensor v...

  16. Efficient Low Rank Tensor Ring Completion

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wenqi; Aggarwal, Vaneet; Aeron, Shuchin

    2017-01-01

    Using the matrix product state (MPS) representation of the recently proposed tensor ring decompositions, in this paper we propose a tensor completion algorithm, which is an alternating minimization algorithm that alternates over the factors in the MPS representation. This development is motivated in part by the success of matrix completion algorithms that alternate over the (low-rank) factors. In this paper, we propose a spectral initialization for the tensor ring completion algorithm and ana...

  17. The Riemann-Lovelock Curvature Tensor

    OpenAIRE

    Kastor, David

    2012-01-01

    In order to study the properties of Lovelock gravity theories in low dimensions, we define the kth-order Riemann-Lovelock tensor as a certain quantity having a total 4k-indices, which is kth-order in the Riemann curvature tensor and shares its basic algebraic and differential properties. We show that the kth-order Riemann-Lovelock tensor is determined by its traces in dimensions 2k \\le D

  18. Tensor categories and the mathematics of rational and logarithmic conformal field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Yi-Zhi; Lepowsky, James

    2013-01-01

    We review the construction of braided tensor categories and modular tensor categories from representations of vertex operator algebras, which correspond to chiral algebras in physics. The extensive and general theory underlying this construction also establishes the operator product expansion for intertwining operators, which correspond to chiral vertex operators, and more generally, it establishes the logarithmic operator product expansion for logarithmic intertwining operators. We review the main ideas in the construction of the tensor product bifunctors and the associativity isomorphisms. For rational and logarithmic conformal field theories, we review the precise results that yield braided tensor categories, and in the rational case, modular tensor categories as well. In the case of rational conformal field theory, we also briefly discuss the construction of the modular tensor categories for the Wess–Zumino–Novikov–Witten models and, especially, a recent discovery concerning the proof of the fundamental rigidity property of the modular tensor categories for this important special case. In the case of logarithmic conformal field theory, we mention suitable categories of modules for the triplet W-algebras as an example of the applications of our general construction of the braided tensor category structure. (review)

  19. Degenerate Perturbation Theory for Electronic g Tensors: Leading-Order Relativistic Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; de Almeida, Katia Julia; Oprea, Cornel I; Vahtras, Olav; Ågren, Hans; Ruud, Kenneth

    2008-11-11

    A new approach for the evaluation of the leading-order relativistic corrections to the electronic g tensors of molecules with a doublet ground state is presented. The methodology is based on degenerate perturbation theory and includes all relevant contributions to the g tensor shift up to order O(α(4)) originating from the one-electron part of the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian-that is, it allows for the treatment of scalar relativistic, spin-orbit, and mixed corrections to the spin and orbital Zeeman effects. This approach has been implemented in the framework of spin-restricted density functional theory and is in the present paper, as a first illustration of the theory, applied to study relativistic effects on electronic g tensors of dihalogen anion radicals X2(-) (X = F, Cl, Br, I). The results indicate that the spin-orbit interaction is responsible for the large parallel component of the g tensor shift of Br2(-) and I2(-), and furthermore that both the leading-order scalar relativistic and spin-orbit corrections are of minor importance for the perpendicular component of the g tensor in these molecules since they effectively cancel each other. In addition to investigating the g tensors of dihalogen anion radicals, we also critically examine the importance of various relativistic corrections to the electronic g tensor of linear molecules with Σ-type ground states and present a two-state model suitable for an approximate estimation of the g tensor in such molecules.

  20. Characteristics of the Residual Stress tensor when filter width is larger than the Ozmidov scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bragança Alves, Felipe Augusto; de Bruyn Kops, Stephen

    2017-11-01

    In stratified turbulence, the residual stress tensor is statistically anisotropic unless the smallest resolved length scale is smaller than the Ozmidov scale and the buoyancy Reynolds number is sufficiently high for there to exist a range of scales that is statistically isotropic. We present approximations to the residual stress tensor that are derived analytically. These approximations are evaluated by filtering data from direct numerical simulations of homogeneous stratified turbulence, with unity Prandtl number, resolved on up to 8192 × 8192 × 4096 grid points along with an isotropic homogeneous case resolved on 81923 grid points. It is found that the best possible scaling of the strain rate tensor yields a residual stress tensor (RST) that is less well statistically aligned with the exact RST than a randomly generated tensor. It is also found that, while a scaling of the strain rate tensor can dissipate the right amount of energy, it produces incorrect anisotropic dissipation, removing energy from the wrong components of the velocity vector. We find that a combination of the strain rate tensor and a tensor related to energy redistribution caused by a Newtonian fluid viscous stress yields an excellent tensorial basis for modelling the RST.

  1. Bayesian regularization of diffusion tensor images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Jesper; Hobolth, Asger; Østergaard, Leif

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a powerful tool in the study of the course of nerve fibre bundles in the human brain. Using DTI, the local fibre orientation in each image voxel can be described by a diffusion tensor which is constructed from local measurements of diffusion coefficients along...... several directions. The measured diffusion coefficients and thereby the diffusion tensors are subject to noise, leading to possibly flawed representations of the three dimensional fibre bundles. In this paper we develop a Bayesian procedure for regularizing the diffusion tensor field, fully utilizing...

  2. The effects of stereotypes of women's performance in male-dominated hierarchies: Stereotype threat activation and reduction through role models

    OpenAIRE

    Latu, V.; Schmid Mast, M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent progress in increasing gender equality in organizations, workplace hierarchies remain male-dominated in most domains. We discuss how gender stereotypes contribute to holding women back in leadership and workplace domains and how we can reduce the negative effects of gender stereotypes. In the first part of the chapter we discuss how awareness of negative stereotypes of women in leadership can decrease women's performance and self-related cognitions in leadership tasks such as m...

  3. A higher-order tensor vessel tractography for segmentation of vascular structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, Suheyla; Unal, Gozde

    2015-10-01

    A new vascular structure segmentation method, which is based on a cylindrical flux-based higher order tensor (HOT), is presented. On a vessel structure, the HOT naturally models branching points, which create challenges for vessel segmentation algorithms. In a general linear HOT model embedded in 3D, one has to work with an even order tensor due to an enforced antipodal-symmetry on the unit sphere. However, in scenarios such as in a bifurcation, the antipodally-symmetric tensor embedded in 3D will not be useful. In order to overcome that limitation, we embed the tensor in 4D and obtain a structure that can model asymmetric junction scenarios. During construction of a higher order tensor (e.g. third or fourth order) in 4D, the orientation vectors lie on the unit 3-sphere, in contrast to the unit 2-sphere in 3D tensor modeling. This 4D tensor is exploited in a seed-based vessel segmentation algorithm, where the principal directions of the 4D HOT is obtained by decomposition, and used in a HOT tractography approach. We demonstrate quantitative validation of the proposed algorithm on both synthetic complex tubular structures as well as real cerebral vasculature in Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) datasets and coronary arteries from Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA) volumes.

  4. The tensor network theory library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Assam, S.; Clark, S. R.; Jaksch, D.

    2017-09-01

    In this technical paper we introduce the tensor network theory (TNT) library—an open-source software project aimed at providing a platform for rapidly developing robust, easy to use and highly optimised code for TNT calculations. The objectives of this paper are (i) to give an overview of the structure of TNT library, and (ii) to help scientists decide whether to use the TNT library in their research. We show how to employ the TNT routines by giving examples of ground-state and dynamical calculations of one-dimensional bosonic lattice system. We also discuss different options for gaining access to the software available at www.tensornetworktheory.org.

  5. Dirac tensor with heavy photon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bytev, V.V.; Kuraev, E.A. [Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation). Bogoliubov Lab. of Theoretical Physics; Scherbakova, E.S. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 1. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2012-01-15

    For the large-angles hard photon emission by initial leptons in process of high energy annihilation of e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} to hadrons the Dirac tensor is obtained, taking into account the lowest order radiative corrections. The case of large-angles emission of two hard photons by initial leptons is considered. This result is being completed by the kinematics case of collinear hard photons emission as well as soft virtual and real photons and can be used for construction of Monte-Carlo generators. (orig.)

  6. Theoretical study of the relativistic molecular rotational g-tensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aucar, I. Agustín, E-mail: agustin.aucar@conicet.gov.ar; Gomez, Sergio S., E-mail: ssgomez@exa.unne.edu.ar [Institute for Modeling and Technological Innovation, IMIT (CONICET-UNNE) and Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, Northeastern University of Argentina, Avenida Libertad 5400, W3404AAS Corrientes (Argentina); Giribet, Claudia G.; Ruiz de Azúa, Martín C. [Physics Department, Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, University of Buenos Aires and IFIBA CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, Pab. I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-11-21

    An original formulation of the relativistic molecular rotational g-tensor valid for heavy atom containing compounds is presented. In such formulation, the relevant terms of a molecular Hamiltonian for non-relativistic nuclei and relativistic electrons in the laboratory system are considered. Terms linear and bilinear in the nuclear rotation angular momentum and an external uniform magnetic field are considered within first and second order (relativistic) perturbation theory to obtain the rotational g-tensor. Relativistic effects are further analyzed by carrying out the linear response within the elimination of the small component expansion. Quantitative results for model systems HX (X=F, Cl, Br, I), XF (X=Cl, Br, I), and YH{sup +} (Y=Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, Rn) are obtained both at the RPA and density functional theory levels of approximation. Relativistic effects are shown to be small for this molecular property. The relation between the rotational g-tensor and susceptibility tensor which is valid in the non-relativistic theory does not hold within the relativistic framework, and differences between both molecular parameters are analyzed for the model systems under study. It is found that the non-relativistic relation remains valid within 2% even for the heavy HI, IF, and XeH{sup +} systems. Only for the sixth-row Rn atom a significant deviation of this relation is found.

  7. Theoretical study of the relativistic molecular rotational g-tensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aucar, I. Agustín; Gomez, Sergio S.; Giribet, Claudia G.; Ruiz de Azúa, Martín C.

    2014-01-01

    An original formulation of the relativistic molecular rotational g-tensor valid for heavy atom containing compounds is presented. In such formulation, the relevant terms of a molecular Hamiltonian for non-relativistic nuclei and relativistic electrons in the laboratory system are considered. Terms linear and bilinear in the nuclear rotation angular momentum and an external uniform magnetic field are considered within first and second order (relativistic) perturbation theory to obtain the rotational g-tensor. Relativistic effects are further analyzed by carrying out the linear response within the elimination of the small component expansion. Quantitative results for model systems HX (X=F, Cl, Br, I), XF (X=Cl, Br, I), and YH + (Y=Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, Rn) are obtained both at the RPA and density functional theory levels of approximation. Relativistic effects are shown to be small for this molecular property. The relation between the rotational g-tensor and susceptibility tensor which is valid in the non-relativistic theory does not hold within the relativistic framework, and differences between both molecular parameters are analyzed for the model systems under study. It is found that the non-relativistic relation remains valid within 2% even for the heavy HI, IF, and XeH + systems. Only for the sixth-row Rn atom a significant deviation of this relation is found

  8. Tensor product of no-signaling boxes in the framework of quantum logics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tylec, T I; Kuś, M

    2017-01-01

    In the quantum logic framework we show that the no-signaling box model is a particular type of tensor product with single box logics. Such notion of a tensor product is too strong to apply in the category of logics of quantum mechanical systems. In the light of the obtained results, the statement that no-signaling box models are generalizations of quantum models is questionable. (letter)

  9. AN ENERGY-CONSERVING, PARTICLE-DOMINATED, TIME-DEPENDENT MODEL OF 3C 58 AND ITS OBSERVABILITY AT HIGH ENERGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Diego F.; Martin Rodriguez, Jonatan [Institute of Space Sciences (IEEC-CSIC), Campus UAB, Torre C5, 2a planta, E-08193 Barcelona (Spain); Cillis, Analia N. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, Casilla de Correo 67-Suc. 28 (C1428ZAA), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2013-01-20

    We present a time-dependent spectral model of the nebula 3C 58 and compare it with available data. The model is for a leptonic nebula in which particles are subject to synchrotron, inverse Compton, self-synchrotron Compton, adiabatic, and bremsstrahlung processes. We find that 3C 58 is compatible with being a particle-dominated nebula, with a magnetic field of 35 {mu}G. A broken power-law injection fits well the multi-frequency data, with a break energy at about 40 GeV. We find that 3C 58 is not expected to appear in VERITAS or MAGIC II, unless the local IR background is a factor of {approx}20 off Galactic models' averages. For cases in which the cosmic microwave background dominates the inverse Compton contribution, we find that 3C 58 will not be visible either for the Cherenkov Telescope Array.

  10. 3D reconstruction of tensors and vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defrise, Michel; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2005-01-01

    Here we have developed formulations for the reconstruction of 3D tensor fields from planar (Radon) and line-integral (X-ray) projections of 3D vector and tensor fields. Much of the motivation for this work is the potential application of MRI to perform diffusion tensor tomography. The goal is to develop a theory for the reconstruction of both Radon planar and X-ray or line-integral projections because of the flexibility of MRI to obtain both of these type of projections in 3D. The development presented here for the linear tensor tomography problem provides insight into the structure of the nonlinear MRI diffusion tensor inverse problem. A particular application of tensor imaging in MRI is the potential application of cardiac diffusion tensor tomography for determining in vivo cardiac fiber structure. One difficulty in the cardiac application is the motion of the heart. This presents a need for developing future theory for tensor tomography in a motion field. This means developing a better understanding of the MRI signal for diffusion processes in a deforming media. The techniques developed may allow the application of MRI tensor tomography for the study of structure of fiber tracts in the brain, atherosclerotic plaque, and spine in addition to fiber structure in the heart. However, the relations presented are also applicable to other fields in medical imaging such as diffraction tomography using ultrasound. The mathematics presented can also be extended to exponential Radon transform of tensor fields and to other geometric acquisitions such as cone beam tomography of tensor fields

  11. Image denoising using non linear diffusion tensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benzarti, F.; Amiri, H.

    2011-01-01

    Image denoising is an important pre-processing step for many image analysis and computer vision system. It refers to the task of recovering a good estimate of the true image from a degraded observation without altering and changing useful structure in the image such as discontinuities and edges. In this paper, we propose a new approach for image denoising based on the combination of two non linear diffusion tensors. One allows diffusion along the orientation of greatest coherences, while the other allows diffusion along orthogonal directions. The idea is to track perfectly the local geometry of the degraded image and applying anisotropic diffusion mainly along the preferred structure direction. To illustrate the effective performance of our model, we present some experimental results on a test and real photographic color images.

  12. Diffusion tensor in electron swarm transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makabe, T.; Mori, T.

    1983-01-01

    Expression for the diffusion tensor of the electron (or light ion) swarm is presented from the higher-order expansion of the velocity distribution in the Boltzmann equation in hydrodynamic stage. Derived diffusion coefficients for the transverse and longitudinal directions include the additional terms representative of the curvature effect under the action of an electric field with the usual-two-term expressions. Numerical analysis is given for the electron swarm in model gases having the momentum transfer cross section Qsub(m)(epsilon)=Q 0 epsilon sup(beta) (β=0, 1/2, 1) using the present theory. As the result, appreciable degree of discrepancy appears between the transverse diffusion coefficient defined here and the conventional expression with increasing of β in Qsub(m). (Author)

  13. Dissipation consistent fabric tensor definition from DEM to continuum for granular media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X. S.; Dafalias, Y. F.

    2015-05-01

    In elastoplastic soil models aimed at capturing the impact of fabric anisotropy, a necessary ingredient is a measure of anisotropic fabric in the form of an evolving tensor. While it is possible to formulate such a fabric tensor based on indirect phenomenological observations at the continuum level, it is more effective and insightful to have the tensor defined first based on direct particle level microstructural observations and subsequently deduce a corresponding continuum definition. A practical means able to provide such observations, at least in the context of fabric evolution mechanisms, is the discrete element method (DEM). Some DEM defined fabric tensors such as the one based on the statistics of interparticle contact normals have already gained widespread acceptance as a quantitative measure of fabric anisotropy among researchers of granular material behavior. On the other hand, a fabric tensor in continuum elastoplastic modeling has been treated as a tensor-valued internal variable whose evolution must be properly linked to physical dissipation. Accordingly, the adaptation of a DEM fabric tensor definition to a continuum constitutive modeling theory must be thermodynamically consistent in regards to dissipation mechanisms. The present paper addresses this issue in detail, brings up possible pitfalls if such consistency is violated and proposes remedies and guidelines for such adaptation within a recently developed Anisotropic Critical State Theory (ACST) for granular materials.

  14. Raman scattering tensors of tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, M; Ezaki, Y; Aida, M; Suzuki, M; Yimit, A; Ushizawa, K; Ueda, T

    1998-01-01

    Polarized Raman scattering measurements have been made of a single crystal of L-tyrosine by the use of a Raman microscope with the 488.0-nm exciting beam from an argon ion laser. The L-tyrosine crystal belongs to the space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) (orthorhombic), and Raman scattering intensities corresponding to the aa, bb, cc, ab and ac components of the crystal Raman tensor have been determined for each prominent Raman band. A similar set of measurements has been made of L-tyrosine-d4, in which four hydrogen atoms on the benzene ring are replaced by deuterium atoms. The effects of NH3-->ND3 and OH-->OD on the Raman spectrum have also been examined. In addition, depolarization ratios of some bands of L-tyrosine in aqueous solutions of pH 13 and pH 1 were examined. For comparison with these experimental results, on the other hand, ab initio molecular orbital calculations have been made of the normal modes of vibration and their associated polarizability oscillations of the L-tyrosine molecule. On the basis of these experimental data and by referring to the results of the calculations, discussions have been presented on the Raman tensors associated to some Raman bands, including those at 829 cm-1 (benzene ring breathing), 642 cm-1 (benzene ring deformation), and 432 cm-1 (C alpha-C beta-C gamma bending).

  15. Algebraic classification of the Weyl tensor in higher dimensions based on its 'superenergy' tensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senovilla, Jose M M

    2010-01-01

    The algebraic classification of the Weyl tensor in the arbitrary dimension n is recovered by means of the principal directions of its 'superenergy' tensor. This point of view can be helpful in order to compute the Weyl aligned null directions explicitly, and permits one to obtain the algebraic type of the Weyl tensor by computing the principal eigenvalue of rank-2 symmetric future tensors. The algebraic types compatible with states of intrinsic gravitational radiation can then be explored. The underlying ideas are general, so that a classification of arbitrary tensors in the general dimension can be achieved. (fast track communication)

  16. Dilaton and second-rank tensor fields as supersymmetric compensators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Hitoshi; Rajpoot, Subhash

    2007-01-01

    We formulate a supersymmetric theory in which both a dilaton and a second-rank tensor play roles of compensators. The basic off-shell multiplets are a linear multiplet (B μν ,χ,φ) and a vector multiplet (A μ ,λ;C μνρ ), where φ and B μν are, respectively, a dilaton and a second-rank tensor. The third-rank tensor C μνρ in the vector multiplet is ''dual'' to the conventional D field with 0 on-shell or 1 off-shell degree of freedom. The dilaton φ is absorbed into one longitudinal component of A μ , making it massive. Initially, B μν has 1 on-shell or 3 off-shell degrees of freedom, but it is absorbed into the longitudinal components of C μνρ . Eventually, C μνρ with 0 on-shell or 1 off-shell degree of freedom acquires in total 1 on-shell or 4 off-shell degrees of freedom, turning into a propagating massive field. These basic multiplets are also coupled to chiral multiplets and a supersymmetric Dirac-Born-Infeld action. Some of these results are also reformulated in superspace. The proposed mechanism may well provide a solution to the long-standing puzzle of massless dilatons and second-rank tensors in supersymmetric models inspired by string theory

  17. Partition-based Collaborative Tensor Factorization for POI Recommendation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenjing Luan; Guanjun Liu; Changjun Jiang; Liang Qi

    2017-01-01

    The rapid development of location-based social networks (LBSNs) provides people with an opportunity of better understanding their mobility behavior which enables them to decide their next location.For example,it can help travelers to choose where to go next,or recommend salesmen the most potential places to deliver advertisements or sell products.In this paper,a method for recommending points of interest (POIs) is proposed based on a collaborative tensor factorization (CTF) technique.Firstly,a generalized objective function is constructed for collaboratively factorizing a tensor with several feature matrices.Secondly,a 3-mode tensor is used to model all users' check-in behaviors,and three feature matrices are extracted to characterize the time distribution,category distribution and POI correlation,respectively.Thirdly,each user's preference to a POI at a specific time can be estimated by using CTF.In order to further improve the recommendation accuracy,PCTF (Partitionbased CTF) is proposed to fill the missing entries of a tensor after clustering its every mode.Experiments on a real checkin database show that the proposed method can provide more accurate location recommendation.

  18. Factors affecting competitive dominance of rainbow trout over brook trout in southern Appalachian streams: Implications of an individual-based model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, M.E. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Rose, K.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-01-01

    We used an individual-based model to examine possible explanations for the dominance of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss over brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis in southern Appalachian streams. Model simulations were used to quantify the effects on interspecific competition of (1) competitive advantage for feeding sites by rainbow trout, (2) latitudinal differences in stream temperatures, flows, and daylight, (3) year-class failures, (4) lower fecundity of brook trout, and (5) reductions in spawning habitat. The model tracks the daily spawning, growth, and survival of individuals of both species throughout their lifetime in a series of connected stream habitat units (pools, runs, or riffles). Average densities of each species based on 100-year simulations were compared for several levels of each of the five factors and for sympatric and allopatric conditions. Based on model results and empirical information, we conclude that more frequent year-class failures and the lower fecundity of brook trout are both possible and likely explanations for rainbow trout dominance, that warmer temperatures due to latitude and limited spawning habitat are possible but unlikely explanations, and that competitive advantage for feeding sites by rainbow trout is an unlikely explanation. Additional field work should focus on comparative studies of the reproductive success and the early life stage mortalities of brook and rainbow trout among Appalachian streams with varying rainbow trout dominance. 53 refs., 11 figs.

  19. Gravitational Metric Tensor Exterior to Rotating Homogeneous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The covariant and contravariant metric tensors exterior to a homogeneous spherical body rotating uniformly about a common φ axis with constant angular velocity ω is constructed. The constructed metric tensors in this gravitational field have seven non-zero distinct components.The Lagrangian for this gravitational field is ...

  20. Tensor Network Quantum Virtual Machine (TNQVM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-11-18

    There is a lack of state-of-the-art quantum computing simulation software that scales on heterogeneous systems like Titan. Tensor Network Quantum Virtual Machine (TNQVM) provides a quantum simulator that leverages a distributed network of GPUs to simulate quantum circuits in a manner that leverages recent results from tensor network theory.