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Sample records for tenosynovitis ligamentous injuries

  1. Aseptic tenosynovitis of the digital flexor tendon sheath, fetlock and pastern annular ligament constriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dik, K J; Dyson, S J; Vail, T B

    1995-08-01

    The anatomy of the digital flexor tendon sheath and related tendons and ligaments is described. Diagnosis and management of acute tenosynovitis and long-term tenosynovitis and associated tendon injuries are discussed, as well as the syndrome of stenosis of the fetlock canal (or fetlock annular ligament constriction) and palmar annular ligament constriction. Desmitis of the palmar annular ligament is also described.

  2. Posterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posterior cruciate ligament injury Overview Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury happens far less often than does injury to the knee's more vulnerable counterpart, the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The posterior cruciate ...

  3. [Posterior cruciate ligament injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüttler, K F; Ziring, E; Ruchholtz, S; Efe, T

    2017-01-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries are still often overlooked and treatment of a ruptured PCL is inherently different in comparison to anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL). Conservative treatment is the first-line therapy for acute isolated PCL injuries leading to good clinical and biomechanical results. Injuries to the PCL combined with rupture of other stabilizing ligaments, such as the collateral ligaments or the posterolateral corner of the knee joint are treated surgically. The same is true for high grade chronic PCL insufficiency. Meticulous classification of PCL injuries taking all stabilizing factors of the knee joint as well as the time from injury into account are essential for successful treatment of PCL injuries.

  4. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruciate ligament injury - anterior; ACL injury; Knee injury - anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ... knee. It prevents the knee from bending out. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is in the middle of the knee. ...

  5. Ankle ligament injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per A.F.H. Renström

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute ankle ligament sprains are common injuries. The majority of these occur during athletic participation in the 15 to 35 year age range. Despite the frequency of the injury, diagnostic and treatment protocols have varied greatly. Lateral ligament complex injuries are by far the most common of the ankle sprains. Lateral ligament injuries typically occur during plantar flexion and inversion, which is the position of maximum stress on the anterotalofibular liagment (ATFL. For this reason, the ATFL is the most commonly torn ligament during an inversion injury. In more severe inversion injuries the calcaneofibular (CFL, posterotalofibular (PTFL and subtalar ligament can also be injured. Most acute lateral ankle ligament injuries recover quickly with nonoperative management. The treatment program, called "functional treatment," includes application of the RICE principle (rest, ice, compression, and elevation immediately after the injury, a short period of immobilization and protection with an elastic or inelastic tape or bandage, and early motion exercises followed by early weight bearing and neuromuscular ankle training. Proprioceptive training with a tilt board is commenced as soon as possible, usually after 3 to 4 weeks. The purpose is to improve the balance and neuromuscular control of the ankle. Sequelae after ankle ligament injuries are very common. As much as 10% to 30% of patients with a lateral ligament injury may have chronic symptoms. Symptoms usually include persistent synovitis or tendinitis, ankle stiffness, swelling, and pain, muscle weakness, and frequent giving-way. A well designed physical therapy program with peroneal strengthening and proprioceptive training, along with bracing and/or taping can alleviate instability problems in most patients. For cases of chronic instability that are refractory to bracing and external support, surgical treatment can be explored. If the chronic instability is associated with subtalar instability

  6. Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries KidsHealth / For Teens / Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries What's in this article? What Are ...

  7. [Anterior cruciate ligament injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haim, Amir; Pritsch, Tamir; Yosepov, Lior; Arbel, Ron

    2006-03-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are common, especially in young individuals who participate in sports activities associated with pivoting, decelerating and jumping. About 70% of ACL injuries do not result from direct contact. Establishing risk factors is important for prevention strategies. Risk factors for ACL injuries include environmental factors (e.g. high level of friction between shoes and the playing surface) and anatomical factors (e.g. narrow femoral intercondylar notch and increased joint laxity). History taking and physical examination provide the basis for diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is highly sensitive and specific and provides information about associated injuries such as meniscal tears. ACL-injury leads to knee instability which is associated with both acute dysfunction and long-term degenerative changes, such as osteoarthritis and meniscal damage. Surgical treatment of ACL-tears is effective in regard to short term rehabilitation but does not necessarily alter the natural course of this injury and its long-term complications. Therefore, surgical treatment should be reserved primarily for young individuals and for those who are high risk for ACL injury. ACL reconstruction is the standard surgery; however, a wide variety of reconstruction procedures is available and a gold standard procedure has not been defined. Nevertheless, arthroscopic reconstruction with either bone-patellar tendon-bone or a hamstring tendon graft is the most widely used method. Surgical timing is important. Early surgical intervention (i.e. within 4 weeks of injury) might increase complications.

  8. Collateral ligament (CL) injury - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... twisting injury. Skiers and people who play basketball, football, or soccer are more likely to have this ... PT will teach you exercises to strengthen the muscles, ligaments, and tendons around your knee. As your ...

  9. Multiple Ligament Knee Injury: Complications

    OpenAIRE

    Manske, Robert C.; Hosseinzadeh, Pooya; Giangarra, Charles E.

    2008-01-01

    Non-operative and operative complications are common following multiple ligament knee injuries. This article will describe common complications seen by the surgeon and physical therapist following this complex injury. Complications include fractures, infections, vascular and neurologic complications following injury and surgery, compartment syndrome, complex regional pain syndrome, deep venous thrombosis, loss of motion and persistent laxity issues. A brief description of these complications ...

  10. Small longitudinal S incision and page turning style of annular ligament partial resection to treat stenosing tenosynovitis of thumb flexor tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-ping; Du, Yan-ying; Wang, Ming-ming; Li, Ming; Liu, Shi-you; Liu, Wei

    2014-04-24

    To present the treatment outcome for patients with stenosing tenosynovitis of thumb flexor tendon treated with a small S incision and page turning style of annular ligament partial resection. During a 2-year period between August 2011 and July 2013, 12 consecutive patients (mean age, 45.8 years) with stenosing tenosynovitis of the thumb flexor tendon were prospectively enrolled into this study. All 12 patients underwent longitudinal S skin incision to expose annular ligament and thumb flexor tendon, and with page turning style of annular ligament partial resection to finish the operation. The average range of motion of metacarpophalangeal thumb joint, Quick disability of arm, shoulder, and hand and Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment Dysfunction score of arm and hand were primary outcome measures. There were 9 cases of stiff metacarpophalangeal joint of thumb and 3 cases of snapping thumb for stenosing tenosynovitis. At 1-year follow-up, all stenosing tenosynovitis had healed by an average of 4 weeks. The average range of motion of the metacarpophalangeal joint was 37.1° (range, 34-40°). No patients had recurrence, cicatricial contraction, or postoperative infection. The average disability of arm, shoulder, and hand was 0.3 out of 100 (range, 0-1.67), and average Short Musculoskeletal Functional Assessment Dysfunction score of arm and hand was 6.9 out of 40 (range, 0-15.6). All 12 patients stated that they were highly satisfied. Small S incision and page turning style of annular ligament partial resection for stenosing tenosynovitis of thumb flexor tendon is a safe, simple, and reliable alternative treatment with minimal soft-tissue irritation, good functional results and recovery can be expected.

  11. Stenosing tenosynovitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuillemin, V.; Guerini, H.; Bard, H.; Morvan, G.

    2012-01-01

    Tenosynovitis refers to an inflammatory condition involving the synovial sheath of a tendon. Stenosing tenosynovitis is a peculiar entity caused by multiple factors, including local anatomy, mechanical factors, and hormonal factors. The main forms include de Quervain tendinopathy; trigger finger (stenosing tenosynovitis involving the flexor digitorum tendons); stenosing tenosynovitis of the extensor carpi ulnaris, extensor carpi radialis, or extensor comunis tendons; stenosing tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis tendon; and stenosing tenosynovitis of the peroneal tendons. The cardinal finding on ultrasonography is the presence of a thickened retinaculum or pulley that constricts the osseofibrous tunnel through which the tendon runs. PMID:23396894

  12. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury -- aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000681.htm Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury - aftercare To use the sharing features ... that connects a bone to another bone. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is located inside your knee joint and ...

  13. MR imaging of posterior cruciate ligament injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Nobuyuki [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Hospital; Niitsu, Mamoru; Itai, Yuji; Sato, Motohiro; Kujiraoka, Yuka; Ikeda, Kotaro; Kanamori, Akihiro

    2001-07-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries are less frequent than anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, but are presumably more common than once thought. Thirty-nine patients with PCL injuries identified on MR images were studied. The criteria for PCL injury were complete tear, partial tear, and avulsion fracture. The approximate site of a partial tear was categorized as proximal, midsubstance, distal, or combination. Fourteen patients (35.9%) had complete tears of the PCL, 21 patients (53.8%) had partial tears, and four patients (10.3%) had avulsion fractures. A total of 12 patients (30.7%) had isolated PCL injuries, while the remaining 27 patients demonstrated evidence of other coexistent knee injuries, such as meniscal tears and ligamentous injuries. Of coexistent knee injuries, meniscal tears (18 patients, 46.2%) were most often seen. (author)

  14. Thumb Ligament Injuries in the Athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owings, F Patterson; Calandruccio, James H; Mauck, Benjamin M

    2016-10-01

    Hand injuries account for up to 15% of sports injuries and are common in contact sports and in sports with a high risk of falling. Appropriate management requires knowledge of the type of injury, demands of the sport and position, competitive level of the athlete, future athletic demands and expectations, and the role of rehabilitation and protective splints for return to play. Management of the athlete requires aggressive and expedient diagnostic intervention and treatment. This article describes ligamentous injuries to the thumb, including thumb carpometacarpal dislocations, thumb metacarpophalangeal dislocations, collateral ligament injuries and interphalangeal dislocations, their evaluation, treatment and outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Guideline on anterior cruciate ligament injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuffels, Duncan E; Poldervaart, Michelle T; Diercks, Ronald; Fievez, Alex W F M; Patt, Thomas W; Hart, Cor P van der; Hammacher, Eric R; Meer, Fred van der; Goedhart, Edwin A; Lenssen, Anton F; Muller-Ploeger, Sabrina B; Pols, Margreet A; Saris, Daniel B F

    The Dutch Orthopaedic Association has a long tradition of development of practical clinical guidelines. Here we present the recommendations from the multidisciplinary clinical guideline working group for anterior cruciate ligament injury. The following 8 clinical questions were formulated by a

  16. Extrinsic wrist ligaments: prevalence of injury by magnetic resonance imaging and association with intrinsic ligament tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneja, Atul K; Bredella, Miriam A; Chang, Connie Y; Joseph Simeone, F; Kattapuram, Susan V; Torriani, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of extrinsic wrist ligament injury by magnetic resonance imaging and its association with intrinsic ligament tears. We reviewed conventional magnetic resonance images performed over a 5-year period from adult patients in the setting of wrist trauma. Two musculoskeletal radiologists examined the integrity of wrist ligaments and presence of bone abnormalities. In a cohort of 75 subjects, extrinsic ligament injury was present in 75%, with radiolunotriquetral being most frequently affected (45%). Intrinsic ligament injury was present in 60%. Almost half of subjects had combined intrinsic and extrinsic ligament injury. Bone abnormalities were seen in 69%. The rate of extrinsic injury was higher in subjects with bone injury (P = 0.008). There is high prevalence of extrinsic ligament injury in the setting of wrist trauma, especially in the presence of bone abnormalities, with combined injury of intrinsic and extrinsic ligaments in about half of cases.

  17. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Wakeboarding

    OpenAIRE

    Starr, Harlan M.; Sanders, Brett,

    2012-01-01

    Background: Wakeboarding is an increasingly popular sport that involves aggressive stunts with high risk for lower extremity injury, including anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Little has been reported on prevalence or mechanism of ACL injury while wakeboarding. Hypothesis: The prevalence of ACL injury in wakeboarding approaches that of other high-risk sports. Analyzing the mechanism of ACL injury may aid in future efforts of prevention. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. M...

  18. How to treat knee ligament injuries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvinen, M; Kannus, P; Johnson, R J

    1991-01-01

    Indications for conservative treatment of knee ligament injuries can be established for all grade I or II sprains (partial tears), as well as isolated grade III sprains (complete tears) of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and medial collateral ligament (MCL). These injuries should be treated with immediate mobilization. Only in isolated partial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears without a positive pivot shift phenomenon is conservative treatment justified. However, many of these injuries may require operative reconstruction later. In complete ACL tears the surgical treatment consists of primary reconstruction or augmented primary repair. Today, the middle third of the patella tendon with the bone blocks is regarded as the "gold standard" for augmented repairs and late reconstructions. For the present, there is no place for synthetic prostheses in the treatment of an acute ACL rupture. Allograft replacement of the ACL must now be considered an experimental procedure. In the reconstruction of the PCL the above mentioned patella tendon graft is also preferable. Lateral collateral ligament (LCL) tears, especially if they are combined with ruptures of posterolateral ligament complex, should be repaired immediately after the injury. In these injuries late reconstructions are difficult and the results are poor. Conservative treatment of partial tears and postoperative treatment of reconstructed ligaments is twofold: on the one hand, the healing tissue should be protected and on the other hand, atrophy and wasting of uninjured tissue should be avoided. Overload and stretching of the injured ligaments should be eliminated with the aid of a suitable knee brace, but early range of motion exercises of the knee are allowed immediately.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Novel Insights into Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Meuffels (Duncan)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAnterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is one of the most common sports injuries of the knee. ACL reconstruction has become, standard orthopaedic practice worldwide with an estimated 175,000 reconstructions per year in the United States.6 The ACL remains the most frequently studied

  20. Causes of anterior cruciate ligament injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristić, Vladimir; Ninković, Srdan; Harhaji, Vladimir; Milankov, Miroslav

    2010-01-01

    In order to prevent anterior cruciate ligament injuries it is necessary to define risk factors and to analyze the most frequent causes of injuries--that being the aim of this study. The study sample consisted of 451 surgically treated patients, including 400 sportsmen (65% of them being active and 35% recreational sportsmen), 29% female and 71% male; of whom 90% were younger than 35. Sports injuries, as the most frequent cause of anterior cruciate ligament injuries, were recorded in 88% of patients (non-contact ones in 78% and contact ones in 22%), injuries occurring in everyday activities in 11% and in traffic in 1%. Among sportsmen, reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament was most frequently performed in football players (48%), then in handball players (22%), basketball players (13%), volleyball players (8%), martial arts fighters (4%). However, the injury incidence was the highest among the active basketball players (1 injured among 91 active players). Type of footwear, warming up before the activity, genetic predisposition and everyday therapy did not have a significant influence on getting injured. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries happened three times more often during matches, in the middle and at the end of a match and training session (79%), at landing after the jump or when changing direction of movement (75%) without a contact with other competitors, on dry surfaces (79%), among not so well prepared sportsmen.

  1. Risk Factors for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Helen C.; Vacek, Pamela; Johnson, Robert J.; Slauterbeck, James R.; Hashemi, Javad; Shultz, Sandra; Beynnon, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee are immediately debilitating and can cause long-term consequences, including the early onset of osteoarthritis. It is important to have a comprehensive understanding of all possible risk factors for ACL injury to identify individuals who are at risk for future injuries and to provide an appropriate level of counseling and programs for prevention. Objective: This review, part 1 of a 2-part series, highlights what is known an...

  2. Risk Factors for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Helen C.; Vacek, Pamela; Johnson, Robert J.; Slauterbeck, James R.; Hashemi, Javad; Shultz, Sandra; Beynnon, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are immediately disabling and are associated with long-term consequences, such as posttraumatic osteoarthritis. It is important to have a comprehensive understanding of all possible risk factors for ACL injury to identify individuals who are at risk for future injuries and to provide an appropriate level of counseling and programs for prevention. Objective: This review, part 2 of a 2-part series, highlights what is known and still unkn...

  3. [Collateral ligament injuries of the metacarpophalangeal joints].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillukat, T; Schädel-Höpfner, M; Windolf, J; Prommersberger, K-J

    2012-07-01

    Collateral ligament injuries of the metacarpal joints of the fingers are rare conditions. The injury should be diagnosed by clinical investigation and standard radiographs. Leading symptoms are local tenderness and joint instability. Instability is verified by clinical stress testing of the metacarpophalangeal joint in 90° of flexion. In Grade I injuries stability is preserved due to ligament attenuation or small partial tears. Grade II injuries show laxity with firm endpoint according to incomplete tear. In Grade III injuries instability without endpoint can be found as a result of complete tears. Radiographs may show avulsed bone fragments.In Grade I and II tears or non- displaced avulsion fragments treatment is conservative with buddy taping for 6 weeks. In case of persistent instability or grade III tears suturing or refixation of the ligament are performed. Small avulsion fragments are removed and the ligament is fixed to the bone. Greater avulsion fragments are fixed by suitable small implants. Adequate treatment will lead to reliable good results. Even in chronic tears reconstruction with local material or tendon transplants is usually successful.

  4. [Acute injuries of lateral ankle joint ligaments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacko, M; Sidor, Z; Stolfa, S; Cellár, R; Vasko, G

    2010-08-01

    Acute injuries of the lateral ankle ligaments are one of the most common form of injury involving the musculoskeletal apparatus. Treatment usually range from cast immobilisation or acute surgical repair to functional rehabilitation. The aim of our study was to evaluate the incidence of different grades of acute injuries of lateral ligaments of the ankle joint in our patients group and to compare the results of non surgical versus surgical treatment of third grade injuries. 3148 patients were treated for acute lateral ankle sprain in a period of 5 years at our department. Each patient had stress X-ray of the ankle for evaluation of instability at the first visit. From the 234 patients with third grade injury, 39 were enrolled in our study with non surgical treatment and 18 with surgical treatment. Each group was divided regarding to the age in two subgroups. Functional outcome was evaluated 12 and 24 months after injury with AOFAS clinical rating scale and Sports Ankle Rating System--Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation. Statistical analysis was done with Pearson's Chi quadrate test with P < 0.05. First grade injury was present in 62%, second grade in 31% and only 7% of the patients had third grade injury of the lateral ankle ligaments. Further only third grade injuries were studied. Statistically significant better results were seen in patients under the age of 25, in the patient group with surgical treatment compared to patients over 25 years of age. Also statistically significant better results were seen in patient with surgical treatment to non surgical treatment in each age group. No significant difference was observed in the non surgical treatment group regarding to age. Although the injuries of the ankle ligaments belong to the most common injuries of the musculoskeletal system, there is no consensus in the treatment of such disorders. Our experiences and the results of our study show, that surgical treatment in indicated cases provides better results in

  5. Syndesmosis and deltoid ligament injuries in the athlete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCollum, Graham A.; van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.; Calder, James D. F.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2013-01-01

    Injury to the syndesmosis and deltoid ligament is less common than lateral ligament trauma but can lead to significant time away from sport and prolonged rehabilitation. This literature review will discuss both syndesmotic and deltoid ligament injuries without fracture in the professional athlete. A

  6. Common types and countermeasures of ankle ligament injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To analyze ankle ligament injury of basketball players caused during movement, summarize injury types, analyze the causes of injury, and put forward corresponding control measures. Methods: The author selected 3100 basketball players with ankle ligament injury during basketball movement and admitted to ...

  7. Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... torn MCL tend to play contact sports, like football and soccer. More severe injuries happen when the outside of the knee is ... the things you love — like running or playing football, field hockey, or ... recovering from an MCL injury, especially a severe one, you might feel angry, ...

  8. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries: etiology and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Robert H; Silvers, Holly J; Mandelbaum, Bert R

    2010-03-01

    The relatively high risk of noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture among female athletes has been a major impetus for investigation into the etiology of this injury. A number of risk factors have been identified, both internal and external to the athlete, including neuromuscular, anatomical, hormonal, shoe-surface interaction, and environmental, such as weather. The anatomic and neuromuscular risk factors, often gender related, are the focus of most ACL injury prevention programs. Although studies have shown that biomechanic- centered prevention programs can reduce the risk of ACL injury, many questions remain unanswered. More research is needed to increase our understanding of the risk factors for ACL injury; how injury prevention programs work and can the clinical application of such programs be optimized.

  9. Deltoid ligament in acute ankle injury: MR imaging analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Min Sun; Choi, Yun Sun; Kim, Yun Jung; Jung, Yoon Young [Eulji University, Department of Radiology, Eulji Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won [Eulji University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Eulji Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    To identify the pattern of deltoid ligament injury after acute ankle injury and the relationship between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirty-six patients (32 male, and 4 female; mean age, 29.8 years) with acute deltoid ligament injury who had undergone MRI participated in this study. The deltoid ligament was classified as having 3 superficial and 2 deep components. An image analysis included the integrity and tear site of the deltoid ligament, and other associated injuries. Association between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear was assessed using Fisher's exact test (P < 0.05). Of the 36 patients, 21 (58.3 %) had tears in the superficial and deep deltoid ligaments, 6 (16.7 %) in the superficial ligaments only, and 4 (11.1 %) in the deep ligaments only. The most common tear site of the three components of the superficial deltoid and deep anterior tibiotalar ligaments was their proximal attachments (94 % and 91.7 % respectively), and that of the deep posterior tibiotalar ligament (pTTL) was its distal attachment (82.6 %). The common associated injuries were ankle fracture (63.9 %), syndesmosis tear (55.6 %), and lateral collateral ligament complex tear (44.4 %). All the components of the deltoid ligament were frequently torn in patients with ankle fractures (tibionavicular ligament, P = 0.009). The observed injury pattern of the deltoid ligament was complex and frequently associated with concomitant ankle pathology. The most common tear site of the superficial deltoid ligament was the medial malleolar attachment, whereas that of the deep pTTL was near its medial talar insertion. (orig.)

  10. Familial predisposition to anterior cruciate ligament injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Goshima

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Although several risk factors for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injury have been evaluated in the literature, there are few reports on familial predisposition. This study investigated the familial predisposition to ACL injury. The study included 350 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction between January 2005 and September 2008. All patients were surveyed by telephone or a written questionnaire about family history (FH of ACL injury, sports played by family members, and mechanisms of injury. We also compared age, sex, height, weight, body mass index, Tegner activity score, general joint laxity, and tibial slope between an FH group (with FH and a control group (without FH. In addition, we compared the incidence of ACL graft rupture and contralateral ACL rupture 2 years after primary surgery. Complete information was obtained from 316 patients, 38 (12.0% of whom had FH of ACL injury. Two families had three members with ACL injuries. Of the 40 family members with ACL injuries, 38 (95% had noncontact injuries and 34 (85% shared a similar mechanism of injury with the related patient. No significant differences were identified between the two groups, except that tibial slope was significantly greater in the FH group than in the control group. Although the incidence of repeat ACL injury was greater in the FH group (23.7% than in the control group (16.4%, there was no significant difference. Our results indicated a high probability of familial predisposition to many of the identified risk factors for ACL injury. In addition, patients with FH of ACL injury might be at high risk for initial and repeat ACL injuries. Therefore, prevention programs should be implemented for patients with FH of ACL injury in order to decrease the risk of these injuries.

  11. Injury of the ligaments of the knee: Magnetic resonance evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Joong Mo; Kang, Heung Sik; Kim, Sung Moon; Seong, Sang Cheol [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-03-15

    To evaluation the value of MR imaging in the examination of ligament injury of the knee, we retrospectively analysed the MR images of 61 injured knees of 60 patients. The presence of tear was determined by arthroscopy in all caes. Anterio/posterior cruciate ligaments(ACL/PCL) were demonstrated by sagittal images. Medial/lateral collateral ligaments(MCL/ LCL) were evaluated on coronal images. The diagnostic accuracy were 91.8%, 96.7% and 100% for ACL, PCL and MCL, respectively. The specificity for the lateral collateral ligament was 100%. It is concluded that magnetic resonance imaging is an accurate method in detecting injury of the ligaments of the knee.

  12. Thumb ulnar collateral and radial collateral ligament injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Nicole S; Goldfarb, Charles A

    2015-01-01

    Thumb metacarpophalangeal ulnar and radial collateral ligament injuries occur frequently in the competitive athlete. Collateral ligament integrity is essential to joint stability, pinch strength, and pain-free motion. Acute rupture of the ulnar collateral ligament is due to a sudden radial deviation force on the abducted thumb and is referred to as skier's thumb. An ulnar-directed force causes injury to the radial collateral ligament. The degree of joint instability on clinical examination allows classification of these injuries and guides management. Surgical repair of acute, complete tears results in good outcomes and allows for return to sporting activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Anterolateral ligament abnormalities are associated with peripheral ligament and osseous injuries in acute ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Helito, Paulo Victor Partezani; Leão, Renata Vidal; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Bordalo-Rodrigues, Marcelo

    2017-04-01

    Few studies have used MRI to identify the ALL. As it was shown that it is not possible to precisely characterize this ligament in all examination, it is important to identify concomitant lesions that can help in diagnosing ALL abnormalities. It is important to characterise this injury due to its association with anterolateral knee instability. Thus, the present study was performed to determine the frequency of ALL injuries in patients with acute ACL rupture and to analyse its associated knee lesions. Patients with acute ACL injuries were evaluated by MRI. Among this population, the ALL was classified as non-visualised, injured or normal. The possible abnormalities of the meniscus, collateral ligaments, popliteus tendon, posterior cruciate ligament, Iliotibial band (ITB), anterolateral capsule and osseus injuries were evaluated. The association of an ALL injury with these other knee structures as well as sex and age was calculated. Among the 228 knees evaluated, the ALL could not be entirely identified in 61 (26.7%). Of the remaining 167, 66 (39.5%) presented an ALL abnormality and only four (6.1%) were Segond fractures. ALL abnormalities were associated with lesions of the lateral collateral ligament, medial collateral ligament, popliteus tendon, ITB, anterolateral capsule and osseous contusions of the femoral condyle and tibial plateau. No correlation was found with medial meniscus, lateral meniscus and posterior cruciate ligament injuries. There was no association between ALL injuries and gender, and older patients were more likely to present an ALL injury. ALL injuries are present in approximately 40% of ACL injuries, and a minority of these are Segond fractures. These injuries are associated with peripheral ligament injuries, anterolateral structures lesions and bone contusions, but there is no association with meniscal injuries. Surgeons must be aware of these associations to consider an ALL lesion even if it is not completely clear in imaging evaluation

  14. Concomitant ligamentous and meniscal injuries in floating knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ya; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Shu; Li, Rui; Yue, Xianhu

    2015-01-01

    To identify and characterize the concomitant ligamentous and meniscal injuries in floating knee. A total of 37 cases of floating knee were enrolled. Arthroscopic or open surgical examination of the knee, Lachman test, posterior drawer's test, and varus and valgus stress tests under anesthesia were carried out to determine the incidence of knee injury. Through arthroscopic and open surgical examinations, a medial meniscal tear was detected in 14 (37.8%) cases and a lateral meniscal tear in 11 (29.7%). Twenty-one (56.8%) patients had anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury including complete injury in 6 and incomplete injury in 15 cases. Three (8.1%) patients had posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) tear, including complete injury in 1 and incomplete injury in 2. Varus and valgus stress tests revealed that 10 (27.0%) and 7 (18.9%) patients had medial and lateral collateral ligament (MCL and LCL) laxity, respectively. Lachman test showed positive in 8 (21.6%) cases. Posterior drawer test showed positive in 3 (8.1%) cases. Twenty-six (70.3%) patients had knee ligamentous injuries. ACL injury was the most common ligamentous injury. ACL injury in 15 (71.4%) cases was associated with meniscal injury, including medial meniscal injury in 9 (42.9%) and lateral meniscal injury in 6 (28.6%). Physicians should pay attention to the concomitant ligamentous and meniscal injuries in floating knee. Careful clinical examination with aid of arthroscopic examination is helpful for the early diagnosis and treatment of these injuries.

  15. De Quervain's Tenosynovitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases and Conditions De Quervain's tenosynovitis By Mayo Clinic Staff De Quervain's tenosynovitis (dih-kwer-VAINS ten-oh-sine-oh-VIE-tis) is a painful ... side of your wrist. If you have de Quervain's tenosynovitis, it will probably hurt when you turn ...

  16. MRI of knee ligament injury and reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshad-Amacker, Nadja A; Potter, Hollis G

    2013-10-01

    Knee ligament instability may lead to meniscal and chondral damage, resulting in early osteoarthritis. Due to its superior soft tissue contrast and avoidance of harmful ionizing radiation, MRI has become the most important imaging modality for early recognition of structural defects of the knee joint. This review aims to the understanding of MRI appearances of knee ligament structures associated with knee instability, and to review the common patterns of altered knee mechanics that lead to ligament failure. Normal anatomy of the knee ligaments, pathologic conditions, and postsurgical appearances of the anterior cruciate ligament, posterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament, and posterolateral corner are described. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Guideline on anterior cruciate ligament injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The Dutch Orthopaedic Association has a long tradition of development of practical clinical guidelines. Here we present the recommendations from the multidisciplinary clinical guideline working group for anterior cruciate ligament injury. The following 8 clinical questions were formulated by a steering group of the Dutch Orthopaedic Association. What is the role of physical examination and additional diagnostic tools? Which patient-related outcome measures should be used? What are the relevant parameters that influence the indication for an ACL reconstruction? Which findings or complaints are predictive of a bad result of an ACL injury treatment? What is the optimal timing for surgery for an ACL injury? What is the outcome of different conservative treatment modalities? Which kind of graft gives the best result in an ACL reconstruction? What is the optimal postoperative treatment concerning rehabilitation, resumption of sports, and physiotherapy? These 8 questions were answered and recommendations were made, using the “Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation” instrument. This instrument seeks to improve the quality and effectiveness of clinical practical guidelines by establishing a shared framework to develop, report, and assess. The steering group has also developed 7 internal indicators to aid in measuring and enhancing the quality of the treatment of patients with an ACL injury, for use in a hospital or practice. PMID:22900914

  18. [Surgical treatment of multiple ligament injuries of knee joints].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hua; Chen, Yi-min; Zhai, Li-feng; Bi, Da-wei

    2016-05-01

    To study operative effects for the treatment of multiple ligament injuries of knee joints. From 2008 to 2013, 26 patients (17 males and 9 females) with multiple ligament injuries of knee joints were treated surgically. The average age was 40.7 years old, ranging from 29 to 55 years old. All the patients were treated with arthroscopic reconstruction of cruiate ligament with autogenous or allogeneic hamstrings and tendon, and at the same time received repair of medial collateral ligament and lateral collateral ligament, as well as the treatment of exterior and interior complex injuries. Nine patients received second stage operation after the initial operation for mistake or missed diagnosis, and other patients were treated at the first stage. The Lysholm scoring system was used to evaluate function and stability of knee joints before and after operation. All the patients were followed up for an average duration of 1.6 years (ranged, 0.8 to 3.2 years). The mean awaiting time for operation was 1.2 months. The Lysholm score was improved from preoperative 42.5 +/- 4.5 (ranged, 33 to 48) to the latest follow-up 78.1 +/- 3.9 (ranged, 57 to 95). The function of knee joint was improved obviously in the arthroscopic reconstruction patients, with joint range of motion exceeding 900 and with Varus & Valgus tests near to normal. All the patients had negative findings in the Lachman test at 70 degrees of flexion. Arthroscopic reconstruction should be the first choice in treating multiple ligament injuries of knee joints. If the anterior and posterior cruciate ligament injuries can't be treated simultaneously, the posterior cruciate ligament injuries should be treated preferentially at the first stage and the anterior cruciate ligament injuries should be treated at the second stage. The diagnosis of posterior cruciate ligament is easy to be missed.

  19. Posttraumatic incarceration of medial collateral ligament into knee joint with anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kini, Sunil-Gurpur; du Pre, Karel; Bruce, Warwick

    2015-01-01

    Medial collateral ligament of the knee is an important coronal stabiliser and often injured in isolation or as combination of injuries. The article reports a case of incarcerated medial collateral ligament (MCL) injury in combination with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in 20 year old male who presented to us 4 weeks after injury. Clinical examination and MRI was correlated to complete ACL tear with torn distal MCL and incarceration into the joint. Patient was taken up for ACL hamstring graft reconstruction with mini-arthrotomy and repair of the torn MCL. Patient was followed up with dedicated rehabilitation protocol with good functional results. At one year follow-up, patient exhibited full range of motion with negative Lachman, Pivot shift and valgus stress tests. This article highlights the rare pattern of MCL tear and also reviews the literature on this pattern of injury.

  20. [Diagnostic value of Blumensaat angle for anterior cruciate ligament injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiang-Yun; Feng, Jiang-Feng; Lu, Yan-Hui; Zhao, Yong-Liang; Yang, Zi-Quan

    2017-08-25

    The receiver operator characteristic(ROC) curve was used to determine the best Blumensaat angle for the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament injury, so as to objectively evaluate the diagnostic value of Blumensaat angle for anterior cruciate ligament injury. Total 167 patients who had knee arthroscopic treatment in a hospital from January 2015 to January 2016 were retrospectively studied, and the patients' age, gender, left and right limb condition were recorded. The patients were divided into two groups according to Blumensaat angle measured on the MRI: group A(Blumensaat angle0°). The ROC curve was drawn from the statistical data of the group B to get the best critical value of the anterior cruciate ligament injury when the Blumensaat angle was more than 0°. According to the best critical value obtained by ROC curve, the coincidence rate of the total sample was obtained. There were no significant differences in patients' age, gender, and affected limbs. There were 51 patients in group A, in which 49 patients were diagnosed as anterior cruciate injury under arthroscopy(gold standard for diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament injury), and 2 patients were diagnosed as no anterior cruciate injury under arthroscopy. When the Blumensaat angle was=15°, the probability of anterior cruciate ligament injury was greater. When the Blumensaat angle was 0° to 15°, the anterior cruciate ligament was more likely to be not injured. The Blumensaat angle=15° were used to diagnose the injury of anterior cruciate ligament. Compared with the results of arthroscopy, the coincidence rate of the total sample was 92.8%. Blumensaat angle is helpful to diagnose the ACL injuries. When the Blumensaat angle was =15°, the probability of ACL injury is greater.

  1. Controversies in knee rehabilitation: anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Failla, Mathew J; Arundale, Amelia J H; Logerstedt, David S; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2015-04-01

    Controversy in management of athletes exists after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and reconstruction. Consensus criteria for evaluating successful outcomes following ACL injury include no reinjury or recurrent giving way, no joint effusion, quadriceps strength symmetry, restored activity level and function, and returning to preinjury sports. Using these criteria, the success rates of current management strategies after ACL injury are reviewed and recommendations are provided for the counseling of athletes after ACL injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Prevention Training in Female Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Noyes, Frank R.; Barber Westin, Sue D.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Many anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention training programs have been published, but few have assessed the effects of training on both ACL injury rates and athletic performance tests. Objective: To determine if ACL injury prevention programs have a positive influence on both injury rates and athletic performance tests in female athletes. Data sources: In August 2011, a search was conducted (1995?August 2011) of the PubMed, Science Direct, and CINAHL databases. Study sel...

  3. A New Snowboard Injury Caused by "FLOW" Bindings A Complete Deltoid Ligament and Anterior Talofibular Ankle Ligament Rupture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkamp, Daniel; Hoornenborg, Daniel; Maas, Mario; Kerkhoffs, Gino

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of a snowboard injury that caused a combination of a complete deltoid and anterior talofibular ligament rupture, without bony or syndesmotic injury. Initial surgical repair for both ligaments was performed. We describe the etiology of this injury to demonstrate the cause and

  4. Chronic multiple knee ligament injuries: epidemiological analysis of more than one hundred cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalvo Zosimo Bispo Júnior

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Diagnosis and treatment of multiple ligament injuries of the knee remain a real challenge for most surgeons. OBJECTIVE: To find out the epidemiological profile of patients surgically treated at a Reference Service with more than one chronic ligament injury in the knee joint. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Of a total of 978 operated patients, 109 presented at least two associated ligament injuries in the same knee. Demographic and clinical variables were evaluated. RESULTS: The anterior cruciate ligament group presented a larger number of cases of ligament injuries related with sports practice and falls, while the posterior cruciate ligament and anterior cruciate ligament + posterior cruciate ligament groups presented more cases related to traffic accidents and trauma with object (weight on the knee (p<0.001. The varus group presented significantly higher values of time since injury (p<0.01. In the group with new anterior cruciate ligament injury (neoligament associated with other ligament injuries the disruption times were higher, showing statistical significance (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Anterior cruciate ligament injury associated with other ligament injuries other than posterior cruciate ligament injury are related to sports practice and falls. Posterior cruciate ligament injury associated to other ligament injuries, including or not anterior cruciate ligament injury, are related to traffic accidents and direct trauma caused by an object on the knee. Significant delay between primary ligament injuries and their reconstructions generates varus deformity of the affected knee. In spite of the large delay in seeking medical treatment, few patients with neoligament anterior cruciate ligament injury and other combined disruptions will develop varus deformity.

  5. Knee-ligament injuries associated with leg fractures. Prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matić, A; Kasić, M; Hudolin, I

    1992-09-01

    It has been proved in 25-35% of the cases that knee-ligament injuries are associated with fracture of the femoral diaphysis. No such association has been confirmed between leg fractures and knee ligaments. In order to find out if this is a coincidence, a prospective study was conducted on 229 patients who had undergone operations for leg fractures at various locations and of variable intensity. It was established in 41 cases (17.34%) that the leg fracture was associated with knee-ligament injuries, resulting in joint instability. A significantly higher percentage of associated ligament lesions was found in open fractures as opposed to closed leg fractures. The examination was carried out with the patient under general or block anesthesia. On the basis of what was established it is recommended that the knee be examined clinically in all leg osteosynthesis cases.

  6. STUDY OF ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT INJURY AND ITS MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tummala Venkata

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The anterior cruciate ligament is the weaker of the two cruciate ligaments stabilizing the knee joint, and therefore gets torn easier than the posterior cruciate ligament. OBJECTIVE To determine pattern of anterior cruciate ligament injury and its management in a tertiary care center. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective study was carried out for two years, 28 patients with ACL injury were included. A detailed history regarding the pattern of injury was noted and ACL reconstruction was done using BT Bautograft with mini-arthrotomy and arthroscopic assisted ACL reconstruction. RESULTS The mean age of the study subjects was 30.6±7.3 years & majority were males. Majority of the ACL injury was sports related & was on the right knee. 64% underwent arthroscopic assisted ACL reconstruction & majority of them had normal range of motion of the knee. CONCLUSION Our present study concludes that most common age group involved was 20-30 years & ACL injury was more common among males. Patients with an early ACL reconstruction were more satisfied with the end result. Also, ACL reconstruction techniques using BTB auto graft leads to good ligamentous stability and function of the knee.

  7. Meniscus and ligament injuries; Meniskus- und Bandlaesionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaser, C.; Trumm, C. [Klinikum Grosshadern der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie (Germany); Scheidler, J.; Heuck, A. [Radiologisches Zentrum Muenchen, Pasing (Germany)

    2006-01-01

    The knee is one of the major weight-bearing joints and is relatively exposed to trauma. Capsuloligamentous structures are essential to provide joint stability and - in turn - persistent instability bears a risk for osteoarthritis that needs timely and comprehensive diagnosis. Using MRI it may be beneficial to routinely apply (T)SE sequences in all three major planes as a basic protocol and to add additional sequences according to the clinical information available and imaging findings in the basic protocol. Especially fat-suppressed sequences (STIR, T2w/PDw FS TSE) are very useful because they sensitively depict bone marrow edema pattern (BMEP)-like changes. This finding often alerts the reader to - sometimes only discrete - underlying pathologies and may - if found in typical locations - give information about the mechanism of injury and thus lead the radiologist to look for specific concomitant capsuloligamentous, cartilage, and/or meniscal injury. BMEP is quite prominent in contusion injury, whereas often it is but discrete in avulsion lesions. There is extensive literature about the signs, possible pitfalls, and the accuracy of MRI for the diagnosis of specific pathologies such as meniscal tears or cruciate or collateral ligament ruptures. However, combined injuries of more than one structure are frequent and affect the therapeutic approach. Thus, the primary goal of the radiologist is to go beyond the description of any isolated lesion and to give a comprehensive description of (or to reliably exclude) any injury to other structures. A necessary prerequisite to accomplish this is a thorough knowledge of the - in some locations - complex anatomic relationships, pitfalls, and locations where lesions typically occur and where they may be overlooked. (orig.) [German] Das Knie ist vergleichsweise exponiert gegenueber Traumata. Sein Kapsel-Band-Apparat ist ein wesentlicher Faktor fuer die Gelenkstabilitaet. Umgekehrt erhoeht persistierende Instabilitaet das Risiko

  8. Reducing time to surgery after anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapsford, H; Sutherland, A G

    2016-05-01

    Recent work suggests that reconstruction of the ruptured anterior cruciate ligament within 12 months of injury results in better outcomes. We present a complete audit cycle examining the effect of establishment of an Acute Knee Clinic on time to surgery. Records of 20 anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions undertaken by the senior author between June 2003 and May 2004 were examined to identify the time to surgery. The Acute Knee Clinic was established in December 2004. Prospectively collected data on patients attending the Acute Knee Clinic between May 2005 and July 2007 and patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction from September 2006 to 2007 were reviewed with respect to referral route, time from injury to specialist review and time to surgery. Mean time from injury to surgery of the initial cohort was 14 months (range 3-56). After establishment of the Acute Knee Clinic, 90% of referrals from Accident and Emergency (A&E) were seen by a specialist within four weeks. Between September 2006 and September 2007, 49 patients underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: 21 came via the Acute Knee Clinic, with a mean time from injury to surgery of 6 months; 28 patients from the elective clinic had a mean time to surgery of 25 months. 95% of Acute Knee Clinic patients and 53 % of elective clinic patients had surgery within 12 months of injury. The Acute Knee Clinic has been shown to reduce the time from injury to anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The Acute Knee Clinic only accounts for the referral of 40% of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions in this series: Further education work is required with A&E staff and GPs regarding the referral of knee injuries. Access to the Acute Knee Clinic could be extended to GPs, although this could create service overload. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Prevention and rehabilitation of paediatric anterior cruciate ligament injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Grindem, Hege; MOKSNES, HÅVARD

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To review the current knowledge on anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention and ACL rehabilitation in individuals who have not yet reached musculoskeletal maturity. Methods: This is a narrative review based on a targeted and systematic literature search for paediatric ACL injury risk factors, injury prevention and rehabilitation. Results: The search strategies resulted in 119 hits on risk factor studies, 57 hits on prevention and 37 hits on rehabilitat...

  10. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fong Daniel TP

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprain injury, prescribing orthosis decreases the risk while increased exercise intensity in soccer raises the risk. For intrinsic factors, a foot size with increased width, an increased ankle eversion to inversion strength, plantarflexion strength and ratio between dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength, and limb dominance could increase the ankle sprain injury risk. Players with a previous sprain history, players wearing shoes with air cells, players who do not stretch before exercising, players with inferior single leg balance, and overweight players are 4.9, 4.3, 2.6, 2.4 and 3.9 times more likely to sustain an ankle sprain injury. The aetiology of most ankle sprain injuries is incorrect foot positioning at landing – a medially-deviated vertical ground reaction force causes an explosive supination or inversion moment at the subtalar joint in a short time (about 50 ms. Another aetiology is the delayed reaction time of the peroneal muscles at the lateral aspect of the ankle (60–90 ms. The failure supination or inversion torque is about 41–45 Nm to cause ligamentous rupture in simulated spraining tests on cadaver. A previous case report revealed that the ankle joint reached 48 degrees inversion and 10 degrees internal rotation during an accidental grade I ankle ligamentous sprain injury during a dynamic cutting trial in laboratory. Diagnosis techniques and grading systems vary, but the management of ankle ligamentous sprain injury is mainly conservative

  11. MR imaging of anterior cruciate ligament injury: associated findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Gi Seok; Kang, Heung Sik; Goo, Jin Mo; Kim, Chu Wan; Cho, Kyu Hyung; Seong, Sang Cheol [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-04-15

    Authors investigated the associated findings and their value in the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in MR image. The knee MR images of 47 patients with ACL injury (complete;24, partial;23) and 61 patients with normal ACL confirmed by the knee arthroscopy or operation were reviewed retrospectively. The degree of anterior translocation of tibia and the degree of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) buckling were evaluated. The prevalence and pattern of associated adjacent bone, ligament and meniscus injuries were studied. The means({+-} 2 standard errors) of anterior translocation were different significantly in statistical analysis ({rho} < 0.001, student t-test) between injury group (7.51 {+-} 1.16 mm) and normal group (-0.56 {+-} 0.92mm). In the level of 5mm of anterior translocation for the criteria of ACL injury, the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy were 78.7%, 89.5%, 84.3% for each. The means of PCL buckling ratio were also different statistically between injury group(0.23 {+-} 0.02) and normal group(0.17 {+-} 0.01)({rho} < 0.001). In the level of 0.20 for diagnostic criteria of ACL injury, the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy were 71.4%, 83.6%, 78.4% for each. Thirty one medial meniscus tear (66%), thirteen lateral meniscus tear (28%), ten medial collateral ligament injury (28%), one PCL injury(2%) were associated with ACL injury. The twenty nine bone marrow changes were found in twenty patients (43%) which included acutely injured seven patients. In acute cases, the bone marrow changes were depicted as diffuse or focal high signal intensity lesions in lateral femoral or tibial condyles in contrast to the changes in chronic cases depicted as focal low signal intensity lesions in variable location. Lateral femoral condylar notch depression were found in nine patients (19%) and avulsion fractures of anterior tibial spine in four patients(9%). The associated findings with ACL injury (anterior translocation, buckling of PCL, associated bone

  12. Tuberculous Peroneal Tenosynovitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Chung Wong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Musculoskeletal tuberculosis accounts for 1–5% of all cases of tuberculosis. Tuberculous tenosynovitis is an uncommon form of musculoskeletal tuberculosis occurring primarily in the hands and wrists and is rarely reported in the tendons of the feet. A case of tuberculous peroneal tenosynovitis is reported. Although tuberculosis is an uncommon cause of tenosynovitis, particularly in the foot, it should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients suffering from persistent swelling and pain in the hind foot, especially in countries where tuberculosis is prevalent.

  13. A study of isokinetic strength and laxity with and without anterior cruciate ligament injury

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kewwan; Jeon, Kyoungkyu; Mullineaux, David R.; Cho, Eunok

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to provide useful information for future treatments and to organize rehabilitation programs for anterior cruciate ligament injury by assessing isokinetic muscle strength and laxity of knee joints in athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injuries. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-one high school athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injuries participated in this study. Isokinetic muscle strength at 60?/sec and anterior cruciate ligament laxity for non...

  14. The effect of anterior cruciate ligament injury on bone curvature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunter, D J; Lohmander, Stefan; Makovey, J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Investigate the 5-year longitudinal changes in bone curvature after acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, and identify predictors of such changes. METHODS: In the KANON-trial (ISRCTN 84752559), 111/121 young active adults with an acute ACL tear to a previously un-injured knee...

  15. SPECT bone scintigraphy of medial collateral ligament/meniscus injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micallef, L.; Larcos, G. [Westmead Medical Imaging, Westmead, NSW (Australia)

    1998-06-01

    Full text: Acute or chronic knee pain is common amongst athletic persons. MRI is generally regarded as the best test, but is not widely available and may lack specificity in meniscal tears and cruciate injury. Bone scan with SPECT is an appealing alternative since it is relatively cheap and easily obtained. Further, a number of investigators have published data indicating sensitivity and specificity exceeding 85%. The purpose of the study is to determine typical scintigraphic findings in medial collateral ligament or medial meniscus injury. We present a small group of patients with acute knee trauma in whom arthroscopy and/or clinical follow-up indicated medial collateral ligament injury. Bone scans were undertaken after 900-1000 MBq of {sup 99m}Tc-MDP with immediate blood pool, delayed planar images and SPECT acquired on a Picker Prism 2000. SPECT was obtained with high resolution collimators and 20 sec/stop for 180 deg each. SPECT images showed focal radiopharmaceutical accumulation in the medial proximal tibial shaft and medial femoral condyle, corresponding to the superficial layer of the medial collateral ligament (best seen on coronal images). Disruption of the deep layer and/or medial meniscus can be suspected with abnormal uptake in part or all of the meniscus (best seen on transverse images). We conclude that acute/chronic medial collateral ligament injury can be detected on bone scintigraphy with abnormal uptake at the predicted anatomic site of attachment

  16. Characteristics of inpatient anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions and concomitant injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Nathaniel A; McPherson, April L; Rao, Marepalli B; Myer, Gregory D; Hewett, Timothy E

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this epidemiologic study was to quantify the incidence, expense, and concomitant injuries for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) procedures in the USA from 2003 to 2011 that required an inpatient stay. It was hypothesized that the relative reported rates of concomitant knee injuries would be greater with the MCL and menisci compared to all other concomitant knee injuries. The National Inpatient Sample from 2003 to 2011 was retrospectively sampled using ICD-9-CM codes to identify ACLR patients and to extrapolate national averages. Between the years of 2003-2011, an average of 9,037 ± 1,728 inpatient hospitalization included ACLRs, of which 4,252 ± 1,824 were primarily due to the ACLR. Inpatient visits primarily due to ACLR involved an average hospitalization of 1.7 ± 0.2 days and cost $30,118 ± 9,066 per patient. Knee injuries that were commonly reported along with inpatient ACLRs included medial meniscus damage (18.1 %), lateral meniscus damage (16.8 %), collateral ligament repairs (12.3 %), and medial collateral ligament strains (6.9 %). Prevalence of meniscus injuries was consistent across years, but MCL-related injuries increased over time. ACLR-related inpatient hospitalizations account for approximately 7.1 % of the total ACLRs performed annually in the USA. Inpatient ACLR procedures continue to decrease in frequency; however, the mean cost per patient increased. Meniscus and collateral ligament injuries were the most commonly reported concomitant knee injuries. The clinical relevance of this investigation is that it informs, on a large clinical cohort of patients, the current state of incidence and expense for ACLR surgeries in an inpatient setting. Prognostic, retrospective study, Level II.

  17. Popliteal artery injury during posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Henrique Frauendorf Cenni

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study reports a case of popliteal artery injury during arthroscopic reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament. The evolution of the injury is described and comments are made regarding the anatomy of this artery and potential risks of this surgical technique. This study had the aims of alerting the medical community, especially knee surgeons, regarding a severe surgical complication and discussing the ways of preventing it.

  18. Sonographic characterization of tenosynovitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Gwy Suk; Lim, Hyo Keum; Lee, In Jae; Lee, Kil Woo; Bae, Sang Hoon; Lee, Kyung Hwan [College of Medicine, Hallym University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-03-15

    Tenosynovitis of the extremities is not uncommon but its diagnosis is not easy owing to its non-specific clinical manifestation. Thus it was beyond the field of imaging diagnosis so far. Recently the development of high resolution ultrasonogram has aided preoperative imaging diagnosis of tenosynovitis. The authors performed a retrospective reviewed of 27 patients who had ultrasonography due to tendon pathology(including 18 tenosynovitis) by observing sonographic findings and evaluation the diagnosis value of each finding. The overall diagnostic accuracy was 81.1% and common sonographic findings were focal swelling of the tendon, well-defined margin of the lesion, preserved fibrillar pattern, echo change of the lesion site and fluid collection. Above all, fluid collection. was the only statistically significant criterion for diagnosis of tenosynovitis(p<0.05). But its sensitivity was as low as 50%. In conclusion the ultrasonography is useful in diagnosis of tenosynovitis and fluid collection is of diagnostic value, but the differentiation between nodular tenosynovitis without fluid collection and other benign tumor is still beyond the scope of ultrasonographic diagnosis.

  19. Diognostic accuracy of MR imaging and pattern of injury in the posterior cruciate ligament injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Hyup; Kim, Jang Ho; Kim, Sung Woo; Kim, Byung Young; Lee, Jong Gil [Fatima Hospital, Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Hae Gyung [St. Fransisco Hospital, CA (United States)

    1996-03-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of MR imaging in posterior cruciate ligament(PCL) injuries, to describe the variety of these injuries and to assess the type and frequency of associated knee injuries. We retrospetively analysed 75 cases with knee injuries. In all cases, the presence of a PCL tear was determined by arthroscopy or surgery and the type of tear and patterns of associated knee injuries were described. Twenty-eight PCL tears were identified with arthroscopy or surgery. Figures for the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MR diagnosis for the PCL injury were 86%, 94% and 91% respectively. Twenty-one cases(75%) had complete PCL tears and seven (25%) had partial tears. The commonest tear site was midsubstance(18 cases, 64.3%). Twenty-seven cases(96%) had associated knee injuries ; the remaining patient (4%) had isolated PCL injuries, There were 19 cases(68%) of ligamentous injuries, ten(36%) of meniscal tear, ten (36%) of bony injuries, and 20 (71%) of joint effusions. Of the ligamentous injuries, those involving the medial collateral ligament were most often seen(10 cases, 36%). MR imaging is an accurate method for the detection and evaluation of PCL injury and associated knee abnormalities.

  20. Surgical Treatment of Acute Grade III Medial Collateral Ligament Injury Combined With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury: Anatomic Ligament Repair Versus Triangular Ligament Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jiangtao; Wang, Xiao Feng; Men, Xiaoqian; Zhu, Junjun; Walker, Garth N; Zheng, Xiao Zuo; Gao, Jin Bao; Chen, Baicheng; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Yingze; Gao, Shi Jun

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical results of medial collateral ligament (MCL) anatomic ligament repair (ALR) and triangular ligament reconstruction (TLR) in treating acute grade III MCL injury with respect to imaging and functional results. Between January 2009 and October 2011, a total of 69 patients with an acute grade III MCL tear combined with an anterior cruciate ligament tear were divided into 2 groups: those who underwent ALR and those who underwent TLR. Single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction was also performed in all patients. A radiographic stress-position imaging test was performed to evaluate excessive medial opening of the knee. In addition, the Slocum test was carried out to assess anteromedial rotatory instability before surgery and at follow-up. The subjective symptoms and functional outcomes were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively with International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) assessment. Sixty-four patients with a mean follow-up period of 34 months were included in the final analysis. The measurement results for medial opening at the last follow-up appointment decreased significantly from the pretreatment measurements and fell within the normal range, without a statistically significant difference between the 2 groups (P > .05). The overall incidence of anteromedial rotatory instability was reduced to 21.9% compared with 62.5% preoperatively. However, the incidence of anteromedial rotatory instability in the TLR group (9.4%) decreased significantly compared with that in the ALR group (34.4%) (P .05). The comparison of IKDC extension and flexion deficit scores between the 2 groups showed no significant differences. Eleven patients in the ALR group and 4 in the TLR group complained of medial knee pain. The comparison between the 2 groups showed no significant difference (P > .05). The clinical outcomes of this study showed that no major difference existed in the ALR and TLR groups based on IKDC

  1. Mechanisms for anterior cruciate ligament injuries in badminton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yuka; Ishibashi, Yasuyuki; Tsuda, Eiichi; Yamamoto, Yuji; Tsukada, Harehiko; Toh, Satoshi

    2010-12-01

    A high incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries related to sports activities has been reported; however, the injury situation of ACL injury in badminton has not been elucidated. This study investigated the mechanism of ACL injury in badminton using a questionnaire. Information on injury mechanism was gathered from interviews with six male and 15 female badminton players who received a non-contact ACL injury playing badminton and underwent ACL reconstruction. The most common injury mechanism (10 of 21 injuries) was single-leg landing after overhead stroke. Nine of 10 players had injured the knee opposite to the racket-hand side. The second most frequent injury mechanism (eight of 21 injuries) was plant-and-cut while side-stepping or backward stepping. All eight players injured the knee of the racket-hand side. Eleven injuries occurred in the rear court, and six of the 11 injuries occurred during single-leg landing after an overhead stroke. The knee opposite to the racket-hand side tended to sustain the ACL injuries during single-leg landing after a backhand overhead stroke, whereas the knee of the racket-hand side tended to be injured by plant-and-cut during side or backward stepping. These injury patterns appear to be due to specific movements during badminton.

  2. Anterior cruciate ligament injury/reinjury in alpine ski racing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordan, Matthew J; Aagaard, Per; Herzog, Walter

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present review was to: 1) provide an overview of the current understanding on the epidemiology, etiology, risk factors, and prevention methods for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in alpine ski racing; and 2) provide an overview of what is known pertaining to ACL reinjury...... and return to sport after ACL injury in alpine ski racing. Given that most of the scientific studies on ACL injuries in alpine ski racing have been descriptive, and that very few studies contributed higher level scientific evidence, a nonsystematic narrative review was employed. Three scholarly databases...... were searched for articles on ACL injury or knee injury in alpine ski racing. Studies were classified according to their relevance in relation to epidemiology, etiology, risk factors, and return to sport/reinjury prevention. Alpine ski racers (skiers) were found to be at high risk for knee injuries...

  3. Anterior cruciate ligament injury: diagnosis, management, and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimino, Francesca; Volk, Bradford Scott; Setter, Don

    2010-10-15

    There are an estimated 80,000 to 100,000 anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repairs in the United States each year. Most ACL tears occur from noncontact injuries. Women experience ACL tears up to nine times more often than men. Evaluation of the ACL should be performed immediately after an injury if possible, but is often limited by swelling and pain. When performed properly, a complete knee examination is more than 80 percent sensitive for an ACL injury. The Lachman test is the most accurate test for detecting an ACL tear. Magnetic resonance imaging is the primary study used to diagnose ACL injury in the United States. It can also identify concomitant meniscal injury, collateral ligament tear, and bone contusions. Treatment consists of conservative management or surgical intervention, with the latter being the better option for patients who want to return to a high level of activity. Patients who undergo surgery must commit to appropriate rehabilitation for the best outcome. Long-term sequelae of ACL injury include knee osteoarthritis in up to 90 percent of patients. Primary prevention of ACL injury includes specific proprioceptive and neuromuscular training exercises to improve knee stability.

  4. Clinically Relevant Injury Patterns After an Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Provide Insight Into Injury Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Jason W.; Kiapour, Ata M.; Quatman, Carmen E.; Wordeman, Samuel C.; Goel, Vijay K.; Hewett, Timothy E.; Demetropoulos, Constantine K.

    2014-01-01

    Background The functional disability and high costs of treating anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries have generated a great deal of interest in understanding the mechanism of noncontact ACL injuries. Secondary bone bruises have been reported in over 80% of partial and complete ACL ruptures. Purpose The objectives of this study were (1) to quantify ACL strain under a range of physiologically relevant loading conditions and (2) to evaluate soft tissue and bony injury patterns associated with applied loading conditions thought to be responsible for many noncontact ACL injuries. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods Seventeen cadaveric legs (age, 45 ± 7 years; 9 female and 8 male) were tested utilizing a custom-designed drop stand to simulate landing. Specimens were randomly assigned between 2 loading groups that evaluated ACL strain under either knee abduction or internal tibial rotation moments. In each group, combinations of anterior tibial shear force, and knee abduction and internal tibial rotation moments under axial impact loading were applied sequentially until failure. Specimens were tested at 25° of flexion under simulated 1200-N quadriceps and 800-N hamstring loads. A differential variable reluctance transducer was used to calculate ACL strain across the anteromedial bundle. A general linear model was used to compare peak ACL strain at failure. Correlations between simulated knee injury patterns and loading conditions were evaluated by the χ2 test for independence. Results Anterior cruciate ligament failure was generated in 15 of 17 specimens (88%). A clinically relevant distribution of failure patterns was observed including medial collateral ligament tears and damage to the menisci, cartilage, and subchondral bone. Only abduction significantly contributed to calculated peak ACL strain at failure (P = .002). While ACL disruption patterns were independent of the loading mechanism, tibial plateau injury patterns (locations) were

  5. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries in the female athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, A P; Cordasco, F A

    2001-01-01

    With the participation of women in athletics growing rapidly over the last two decades, a disturbing gender-specific pre-disposition has emerged regarding anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries of the knee. Female athletes have a two- to eightfold higher incidence of ACL injury than their male counterparts. It is estimated that 38,000 women sustain ACL tears per year. The majority of ACL injuries in female athletes occur through noncontact mechanisms, most often during deceleration activities, such as landing from a jump or cutting. The risk factors for noncontact ACL injuries can be categorized as intrinsic (anatomic and hormonal) and extrinsic (environmental and biomechanical). This article will discuss these risk factors that are thought to contribute to the higher incidence of ACL injuries in women, the development of prevention strategies, and the outcomes of ACL reconstruction in women.

  6. [MRI of the thumb collateral ligament at the metacarpophalangeal joint: anatomy and injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Wei; Zhan, Huili; Bai, Rongjie; Qian, Zhanhua; Li, Yaxiong; Wu, Bodong

    2015-05-05

    To explore the anatomy and injuries features of the thumb collateral ligamentat the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints. The study was reviewed and approved by an institutional review board of hospital. Clinical imaging data of 7 healthy volunteers who without injuries and 20 patients with thumb collateral ligament injuries were retrospectively analyzed. All subjects underwent magnetic resonance examination, then comparative analysis of the normal anatomy and the thumb collateral ligament injury at MCP joints of MRI features in healthy volunteers and patients with injury. Imaging findings were compared with the surgical results and confirmed by followed up in patients. Seven volunteers without ligament injures showed homogeneous low-signal-intensity on T1-weighted and proton fat saturation sequence (PD-FS) images. The average thickness of the ulnarcollateral ligament is about 2.0 to 2.3 mm, however, the normal radial collateral ligament is thinner, the average thickness is about 1.4-1.5 mm. There were 20 patients with thumb collateral ligament injuresat MCP joints, including 12 cases of ulnar collateral ligament injury and 8 cases of radial collateral ligament injury, which demonstrated poor definition, discontinuity and heterogeneously increased signal intensity in proton fat saturation sequence (PD-FS) of the involved collateral ligament. There was edema in the soft tissues surrounding the injured sites. MRI is an accurate method for evaluation of the anatomy and pathologic conditions of the thumb collateral ligamentsat MCP joints, and it is a useful tool for early diagnosis and treatment of the thumb collateral ligaments injuries.

  7. Isolated lateral collateral ligament complex injury in rock climbing and Brazilian Jiu-jitsu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Bryan A; Hiller, Lucas P; Imbesi, Steven G; Chang, Eric Y

    2015-08-01

    We report two occurrences of high-grade tears of the lateral collateral ligament complex (LCLC), consisting of the anterolateral ligament (ALL) and fibular collateral ligament (FCL). One injury occurred in a rock climber and the other in a martial artist. Increasing awareness of isolated injuries of the LCLC will allow for appropriate diagnosis and management. We review and discuss the anatomy of the LCLC, the unique mechanism of isolated injury, as well as physical and imaging examination findings.

  8. Injuries to the Collateral Ligaments of the Metacarpophalangeal Joint of the Thumb, Including Simultaneous Combined Thumb Ulnar and Radial Collateral Ligament Injuries, in National Football League Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Brian C; Belkin, Nicole S; Kennelly, Steve; Weiss, Leigh; Barnes, Ronnie P; Rodeo, Scott A; Warren, Russell F; Hotchkiss, Robert N

    2017-01-01

    Thumb collateral ligament injuries occur frequently in the National Football League (NFL). In the general population or in recreational athletes, pure metacarpophalangeal (MCP) abduction or adduction mechanisms yield isolated ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) and radial collateral ligament (RCL) tears, respectively, while NFL athletes may sustain combined mechanism injury patterns. To evaluate the incidence of simultaneous combined thumb UCL and RCL tears among all thumb MCP collateral ligament injuries in NFL athletes on a single team. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A retrospective review of all thumb injuries on a single NFL team from 1991 to 2014 was performed. All players with a thumb MCP collateral ligament injury were included. Collateral ligament injuries were confirmed by review of both physical examination findings and magnetic resonance imaging. Player demographics, surgical details, and return-to-play data were obtained from the team electronic medical record and surgeons' records. A total of 36 thumbs in 32 NFL players were included in the study, yielding an incidence of 1.6 thumb MCP collateral ligament injuries per year on a single NFL team. Of these, 9 thumbs (25%) had a simultaneous combined UCL and RCL tear injury pattern confirmed on both physical examination and MRI. The remaining 27 thumbs (75%) were isolated UCL injuries. All combined UCL/RCL injuries required surgery due to dysfunction from instability; 63.0% of isolated UCL injuries required surgical repair ( P = .032) due to continued pain and dysfunction from instability. Repair, when required, was delayed until the end of the season. All players with combined UCL/RCL injuries and isolated UCL injuries returned to play professional football the following season. Simultaneous combined thumb UCL and RCL tear is a previously undescribed injury pattern that occurred in 25% of thumb MCP collateral ligament injuries on a single NFL team over a 23-year period. All players with combined thumb UCL

  9. MR imaging of medial collateral ligament injury and associated internal knee joint injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Chae Ha; Lee, Sun Kyoung; Lim, Dong Hun; Kim, Young Sook; Byun, Ju Nam; Kim, Young Chul; Oh, Jae Hee [Chosun Univ. College of Medicine, GwangJu (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-11-01

    To assess the value of MR imaging in the diagnosis of medial collateral ligament injury of the knee, we used MR imaging to evaluate the characteristic findings in MCL tears and the frequency of associated knee joint injury. We retrospectively reviewed 26 patients within four weeks of MCL injury, analysed MR findings and correlated them with surgical findings. We evaluated discontinuity, heterogeneous signal intensity of MCL, thin band- like low signal intensity at MCL, facial edema, loss of clear demarcation of adjacent fat also combined bone injury, meniscus injury and other ligament injury. Complete MCL tears were present in 14 patients and partial tears in 12. Complete tears showed discontinuity of MCL, fascial edema and loss of clear demarcation from adjacent fat in 11 patients(79%);proximal MCL tears are more common than distal tears. Partial tears showed thin band-like low signal intensity within MCL, fascial edema and loss of clear demarcation from adjacent fat in seven patients (58%);all patient s with MCL injury showed fascial edema;in 12 patients there was loss of clear demarcation from adjacent fat. We could not, however, distinguish between complete tears and partial tears when MCL showed heterogeneous high signal intensity. Combined bone injury in MCL tears was found in eight patients(62%);the most common sites of this were the lateral femoral condyle and lateral tibial plateau. There was associated injury involving other ligaments(ACL:50%;PCL:27%). Combined meniscus injury in MCL tears was present in 17 patients and the most common meniscus site(50%) is the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. Complete MCL tears showed discontinuity of MCL and partial tears showed a thin band-like low signal intensity within MCL. All patients with MCL injury showed fascial edema, and loss of clear demarcation from adjacent fat. Various other injuries combine with MCL tears. MR imaging is therefore useful in the evaluation of medial collateral ligament injury and

  10. Noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injuries: risk factors and prevention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, L Y; Agel, J; Albohm, M J; Arendt, E A; Dick, R W; Garrett, W E; Garrick, J G; Hewett, T E; Huston, L; Ireland, M L; Johnson, R J; Kibler, W B; Lephart, S; Lewis, J L; Lindenfeld, T N; Mandelbaum, B R; Marchak, P; Teitz, C C; Wojtys, E M

    2000-01-01

    An estimated 80,000 anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears occur annually in the United States. The highest incidence is in individuals 15 to 25 years old who participate in pivoting sports. With an estimated cost for these injuries of almost a billion dollars per year, the ability to identify risk factors and develop prevention strategies has widespread health and fiscal importance. Seventy percent of ACL injuries occur in noncontact situations. The risk factors for non-contact ACL injuries fall into four distinct categories: environmental, anatomic, hormonal, and biomechanical. Early data on existing neuromuscular training programs suggest that enhancing body control may decrease ACL injuries in women. Further investigation is needed prior to instituting prevention programs related to the other risk factors.

  11. [The value of MRI in diagnosis of ligament injuries of knee joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Chen-Di; Qiu, Qian-De

    2010-10-01

    To study the performance of MRI and its diagnostic value for ligament injuries of knee joint. Form June 2008 to February 2010, the MRI of 74 patients with ligament injuries of knee joint were retrospectively analyzed. There were 47 males and 27 females in the group, which course was from 2 h to 10 d, with an average age of 37.3 years (ranged from 12 to 76). The clinical symptom included knee swelling, pain, joint instability, extension-flexion movement disorder. The physical examination showed valgus test or drawer test positive, and tenderness of medial knee positive. There were ligament injuies in 74 cases, among them, 19 cases were anterior cruciate ligament (25.7%),18 were posterior cruciate ligament (24.3%), 13 were lateral collateral ligament (17.6%), 24 were medial collateral (32.4%), the ligament of 12 cases were completely broken (included 8 cases cruciate ligament and 4 cases collateral ligament presented as discontinued signals of the ligament, and swelling and thickening of the ligament with medium signal in PDWI and high signal intensity in T2WI and in SPIR). The MRI of 62 patients with partial longitudinal tearing ligaments showed continuity, swelling and thickening of the ligaments with medium signal in PDWI and high signal intensity in T2WI and in SPIR. Forty-four cases were examined with surgery and arthroscopy, 41 ligaments were accorded with MRI, diagnosis rate of MRI was 95%. MRI can accurately diagnose the ligament injuries of knee joint,which is an ideal technique in the diagnosis of ligament injuries of knee joint, and should be used as a routine examining method.

  12. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury, Reconstruction, and the Optimization of Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, James Philip

    2017-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) provides an established surgical intervention to control pathological tibiofemoral translational and rotational movement. ACLR is a safe and reproducible intervention, but there remains an underlying rate of failure to return to preinjury sporting activity levels. Postoperative pathological laxity and graft reinjury remain concerns. Previously, unrecognized meniscal lesions, disruption of the lateral capsule, and extracapsular structures offer potential avenues to treat and to therefore improve kinematic outcome and functional results, following reconstruction. Addressing laterally based injuries may also improve the durability of intraarticular ACLR. Improving the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft replication of the normal ACL attachment points on the femur and the tibia, using either double bundle or anatomical single bundle techniques, improves kinematics, which may benefit outcome and functionality, following reconstruction. PMID:28966384

  13. Injury of the ankle joint ligaments; Bandverletzungen des Sprunggelenks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breitenseher, M.J. [Institut fuer Radiologie, Landesklinikum Waldviertel Horn, Horn (Austria); Karl Landsteiner Institut, St. Poelten (Austria)

    2007-03-15

    The diagnosis of lateral collateral ankle ligament trauma is based on patient history, clinical examination and clinical stress tests. If the clinical stress test is positive, stress radiography can be performed. There is, however, no consensus about the usefulness of stress radiography in acute ankle sprain, and in particular about the cut-off talar tilt angle beyond which a two-ligament rupture would be certain, ranging from 5 to 30 . Today, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not used in this area, although it does allow controlled positioning of the foot and defined section visualization of injured lateral collateral ankle ligaments. In acute and chronic sinus tarsi injuries, MRI forms the established basis for diagnostic imaging, and can provide a definitive answer in most cases. MRI is also the method of choice for chronic posttraumatic pain with anterolateral impingement after rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament. Generally, for the evaluation of acute ankle injuries, MRI has developed to be the most important second-step procedure when projection radiology is non-diagnostic. (orig.) [German] Die Diagnose einer lateralen Bandverletzung nach einem Sprunggelenktrauma basiert auf der Anamnese, der klinischen Untersuchung und klinischen Stresstests. Bei positiven klinischen Stresstests kann eine Stressradiographie durchgefuehrt werden. Es gibt keine Uebereinstimmung hinsichtlich des Stellenwerts der Stressradiographie beim frischen Supinationstrauma des Sprunggelenks, insbesondere fuer den Winkel der Aufklappbarkeit bei einer Zweibandverletzung, der von 5 -30 reicht. Die MRT wird bei dieser Indikation zurzeit nur in Einzelfaellen benutzt, obwohl sie mit definierter Fusspositionierung und Ausrichtung der Untersuchungsebene eine ausgezeichnete Beurteilung der Sprunggelenkbaender erlaubt. Sie ist im besonderen Masse geeignet, akute und chronische Verletzungen des Sinus tarsi zu beurteilen. Bei chronischen Beschwerden nach Bandverletzung ist die MRT zur

  14. Anterior cruciate ligament injury and reconstruction among university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, K B; Glasgow, M T; Glasgow, S G; Bernstein, J

    1998-11-01

    The consequences of athletic injuries extend beyond the musculoskeletal system. Depression, anger, and tension have been observed in athletes with athletic injuries. It was hypothesized that among student athletes, the psychologic impact of injury may be seen as a drop in academic performance. Thirty-eight students who had an anterior cruciate ligament injury and subsequent reconstruction were evaluated retrospectively by academic transcript and questionnaire to measure their academic performance before their injury, in the semester of their injury, and in the semester after their surgery. The patients were compared with randomly selected undergraduate control subjects. To evaluate any effect of the timing of the surgery on academic performance, the patients were separated into two groups, according to the timing of their reconstruction: those who had surgery during the academic semester, and those who elected to wait for a school break. There was a significant drop in grade point average of 0.3 grade points during the semester of injury among all injured students. Compared with those who had surgery during a break, the students who had surgery during the semester received more frequently the grade of failure (6% versus 0%) or incomplete (33% versus 9%). These students also missed more school days (10.5 days versus 1.5 days) and examinations (2.2 examinations versus 0.1 examinations). Only 47% of students who had surgery during the semester were satisfied with their decision for surgical timing, compared with 96% satisfied with the timing during an academic break. Acute anterior cruciate ligament rupture, and surgical reconstruction during an academic semester, have a significant academic effect in university students.

  15. Anterolateral ligament abnormalities in patients with acute anterior cruciate ligament rupture are associated with lateral meniscal and osseous injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyck, Pieter van; Smet, Eline de; Gielen, Jan L.; Parizel, Paul M. [Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Antwerp (Belgium); Clockaerts, Stefan [University College Hospitals, Department of Orthopaedics, London (United Kingdom); Vanhoenacker, Filip M. [Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Antwerp (Belgium); Ghent University Hospital and University of Ghent, Department of Radiology, Ghent (Belgium); AZ St-Maarten, Department of Radiology, Antwerp (Belgium); Lambrecht, Valerie [Ghent University Hospital and University of Ghent, Department of Radiology, Ghent (Belgium); Wouters, Kristien [Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Department of Biostatistics, Antwerp (Belgium)

    2016-10-15

    To determine the frequency of anterolateral ligament (ALL) injury in patients with acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture and to analyse its associated injury patterns. Ninety patients with acute ACL rupture for which MRI was obtained within 8 weeks after the initial trauma were retrospectively identified. Two radiologists assessed the status of the ALL on MRI by consensus. The presence or absence of an ALL abnormality was compared with the existence of medial and lateral meniscal tears diagnosed during arthroscopy. Associated collateral ligament and osseous injuries were documented with MRI. Forty-one of 90 knees (46 %) demonstrated ALL abnormalities on MRI. Of 49 knees with intact ALL, 15 (31 %) had a torn lateral meniscus as compared to 25 torn lateral menisci in 41 knees (61 %) with abnormal ALL (p = 0.008). Collateral ligament (p ≤ 0.05) and osseous injuries (p = 0.0037) were more frequent and severe in ALL-injured as compared with ALL-intact knees. ALL injuries are fairly common in patients with acute ACL rupture and are statistically significantly associated with lateral meniscal, collateral ligament and osseous injuries. (orig.)

  16. Anterior cruciate ligament bracing: evidence in providing stability and preventing injury or graft re-rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodendorfer, Blake M; Anoushiravani, Afshin A; Feeley, Brian T; Gallo, Robert A

    2013-09-01

    Ligamentous knee injuries are common and costly, both in financial terms and time missed from work and recreational activities. Furthermore, ligamentous injuries appear to predispose patients to future osteoarthritis and other morbidities. Therefore, prevention strategies are important in limiting the potential impact of these injuries. Knee braces are one of the most often prescribed devices in the billion-dollar orthotic industry. Despite widespread use of prophylactic and functional knee braces, the evidence supporting their efficacy in reducing and/or preventing injury remains limited. Knee braces have been shown to be more effective in preventing medial collateral ligament injuries than anterior cruciate ligament injuries in both cadaveric and clinical studies. The use of functional braces after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction has been supported and refuted in both postoperative and long-term studies.

  17. Effectiveness of anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadoghi, Patrick; von Keudell, Arvind; Vavken, Patrick

    2012-05-02

    The objective of this study was to systematically review the literature on anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention programs and to perform a meta-analysis to address three questions: First, what is the effectiveness of ACL injury prevention programs? Second, is there evidence for a "best" program? Third, what is the quality of the current literature on ACL injury prevention? We conducted a systematic review with use of the online PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health), and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases. Search terms were anterior cruciate ligament, knee, injury, prevention, and control. Data on study design and clinical outcomes were extracted independently in triplicate. After assessment of between-study heterogeneity, DerSimonian-Laird random-effect models were used to calculate pooled risk ratios and risk differences. The risk difference was used to estimate the number needed to treat (the number of individuals who would need to be treated to avoid one ACL tear). The pooled risk ratio was 0.38 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.20 to 0.72), reflecting a significant reduction in the risk of ACL rupture in the prevention group (p = 0.003). The number needed to treat ranged from five to 187 in the individual studies. Stratified by sex, the pooled risk ratio was 0.48 (95% CI, 0.26 to 0.89) for female athletes and 0.15 (95% CI, 0.08 to 0.28) for male athletes. Our study indicated strong evidence in support of a significant effect of ACL injury prevention programs. Our pooled estimates suggest a substantial beneficial effect of ACL injury prevention programs, with a risk reduction of 52% in the female athletes and 85% in the male athletes.

  18. Clinical characteristics of 4355 patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Yu; Ao, Ying-fang; Wang, Jian-quan; Ma, Yong; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Jia-ning; Zhu, Jing-xian

    2013-12-01

    Clinical features of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury are important for its prevention, diagnosis and treatment. However, few studies have reported such data, especially in China. The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics of ACL injury on a large cohort. Between 1993 and 2007, a total of 4355 ACL deficient inpatients (612 athletes and 3743 non-athletes) were registered. Data were collected using a special database system. And the distributions of characteristics in different groups were compared and analyzed statistically. All subjects were confirmed with ACL tear during surgery. Statistical analysis revealed that the percentage of females in Athlete Group was significantly higher than that in Non-athlete Group (56.05% vs. 24.95%, P ACL tears. Soccer, basketball, judo, wrestling and track and field were the five most responsible activities for athletes. The average injury time for athletes was significantly shorter than that for non-athletes (413.3 days vs. 717.5 days, P ACL reconstruction (76.04% single-bundle, 18.30% double-bundle). Three hundred and forty-five patients (7.92%) were combined with other ligaments injuries, 2667 (61.24%) were found with various grades of cartilage lesions, and 3377 (77.54%) were found with meniscal injury. Sports trauma was the main cause of ACL tears in China, and reconstruction had become the principal surgical choice. In order to restore knee joint stability and reduce the incidence of cartilage and meniscal injury, patienttailored ACL reconstruction should be suggested at the right moment.

  19. Graded stress radiography in acute injury to the lateral ligaments of the ankle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rijke, A.M.; Vierhout, P.A. (Virginia Univ., Charlottesville (USA). Dept. of Radiology Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands). Dept. of Surgery)

    1990-03-01

    The diagnostic accuracy of graded stress radiography in 26 patients with acute injury to the lateral ankle ligaments has been compared with findings at arthrography and surgery. Measuring talar tilt angles and anterior talar displacement over a range of pressures applied to the distal tibia using a commercially available stress device allows diagnostic distinction between isolated anterior talofibular ligament injury and a combined lesion that involves the calcaneofibular ligament. The results compare well with arthrographic and surgical findings. (orig.).

  20. approach to and management of acute ankle ligamentous injuries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    The anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL), being the first to get injured ... Treatment protocols range from cast immobilisation to functional rehabilitation to acute ... Right foot: lateral view. Posterior talofibular ligament. Calcaneofibular ligament. Anterior talofibular ligament. Components of lateral. (collateral) ligament of ankle.

  1. Management and rehabilitation of ligamentous injuries to the ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balduini, F C; Vegso, J J; Torg, J S; Torg, E

    1987-01-01

    The management of ligamentous injuries to the ankle is controversial. Neither the methods for classification and diagnosis, or the procedures for treatment are clear cut. Ankle sprains are a common occurrence, with the majority involving the lateral ligament complex. Within this complex, the anterior talofibular ligament is injured most frequently, usually while the foot is in the plantar flexed position. Ankle injuries can be diagnosed through physical exam, including the anterior drawer test and/or a stress exam, or through roentgenographic evaluation. The purpose of the stress roentgenogram is to measure the degree of talar tilt. However, it does not always yield consistent, reliable results. This inconsistency has led to the use of arthrography. There is debate over its use as well, however, Ankle sprains can be classified into three groups, according to functional loss. Treatment for first and second degree sprains is usually non-operative. The best approach to Grade III sprains is debatable. The issues in the treatment of Grade III sprains are first, whether treatment should be operative or non-operative, and second, whether non-operative treatment should emphasise immobilisation or mobilisation. Brostrom's work is cited as noteworthy. He recommended adhesive strapping followed by mobilisation as the treatment of choice, and reserves surgery for cases of chronic instability. Results demonstrated that strapping yielded shorter disability periods, while surgery produced less instability. The prevention of functional instability is a major concern in the treatment of ankle injuries. There is no consensus for treating a lateral ligament rupture. The authors suggest immobilisation followed by a rehabilitative programme. Three methods of immobilisation are plaster casting, adhesive strapping, and the air-stirrup. The physiological mechanism of cryotherapy and thermotherapy are discussed briefly and recommendations for their use are provided. Aspiration is also

  2. The fifty highest cited papers in anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vielgut, Ines; Dauwe, Jan; Leithner, Andreas; Holzer, Lukas A

    2017-07-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most common injured knee ligaments and at the same time, one of the most frequent injuries seen in the sport orthopaedic practice. Due to the clinical relevance of ACL injuries, numerous papers focussing on this topic including biomechanical-, basic science-, clinical- or animal studies, were published. The purpose of this study was to determine the most frequently cited scientific articles which address this subject, establish a ranking of the 50 highest cited papers and analyse them according to their characteristics. The 50 highest cited articles related to Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury were searched in Thomson ISI Web of Science® by the use of defined search terms. All types of scientific papers with reference to our topic were ranked according to the absolute number of citations and analyzed for the following characteristics: journal title, year of publication, number of citations, citation density, geographic origin, article type and level of evidence. The 50 highest cited articles had up to 1624 citations. The top ten papers on this topic were cited 600 times at least. Most papers were published in the American Journal of Sports Medicine. The publication years spanned from 1941 to 2007, with the 1990s and 2000s accounting for half of the articles (n = 25). Seven countries contributed to the top 50 list, with the USA having by far the most contribution (n = 40). The majority of articles could be attributed to the category "Clinical Science & Outcome". Most of them represent a high level of evidence. Scientific articles in the field of ACL injury are highly cited. The majority of these articles are clinical studies that have a high level of evidence. Although most of the articles were published between 1990 and 2007, the highest cited articles in absolute and relative numbers were published in the early 1980s. These articles contain well established scoring- or classification systems. The

  3. Anterior cruciate ligament injury: A persistently difficult diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parwaiz, Hammad; Teo, Alex Q A; Servant, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Historically anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries have been diagnosed poorly. A paper published in Injury in 1996 showed that less than 10% of patients with an ACL injury had the diagnosis made by the first physician to see them and that the average delay from first presentation to diagnosis was 21 months. The aim of our study was to investigate whether an improvement has been made over the last two decades in diagnosing ACL injuries. We identified 160 patients who had an ACL reconstruction performed by a single surgeon between October 2004 and December 2011 and for whom a complete data set was available. Data was extracted retrospectively from the hospital notes and a dedicated patient database. We performed a sub-group analysis comparing patients seen prior to the introduction of an acute knee injury clinic in April 2007 and patients seen after the introduction of the clinic. 75.1% (120/160) of patients presented first to an emergency department (ED) or to their general practitioner (GP), but only 14.4% (23/160) were diagnosed on initial presentation. The median number of healthcare professionals a patient saw prior to a diagnosis of ACL injury was 3. The median delay from injury to presentation was 0 weeks (range 0-885), injury to diagnosis 13 weeks (0-926), presentation to diagnosis 10 weeks (0-924), presentation to a specialist knee clinic 24 weeks (0-1006), and specialist knee clinic to surgery 13 weeks (0-102). The median total time from injury to surgery was 42 weeks (0-1047). Following the implementation of an acute knee injury clinic in 2007, the median delay from presentation to surgery dropped from 59 weeks to 36 weeks (p = 0.050) and there was a significant decrease in the median delay from specialist knee clinic to surgery from 23 to 11 weeks (p=0.002). Over the past two decades there appears to have been little improvement in the early diagnosis of ACL injuries, with only 14.4% of patients being diagnosed correctly at initial presentation. We

  4. Concomitant posterior cruciate ligament injuries with direct injury-related patellar fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yong-Cheol; Jeon, Sung-Soo; Sim, Jae-Ang; Kim, Byung-Kag; Lee, Beom-Koo

    2016-06-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries and direct injury-related patellar fractures have similar causative factors. However, the mechanisms underlying these injuries differ. We aimed to evaluate the incidence and relationship between PCL injuries and direct injury-related patellar fractures. Of the 195 patients diagnosed with a patellar fracture at our clinic during 2007-2011, 104 required surgical treatment and underwent the posterior drawer test under general anesthesia and magnetic resonance imaging. We assessed whether the causes of trauma, fracture classification, compression of the fracture fragment, and fracture displacement were related to the incidence of PCL injuries. Of the 104 patients, 26 had concomitant PCL injuries with direct injury-related patellar fractures. Most of the PCL injuries were grades 1 and 2, observed in 14 and 9 patients, respectively. Among three patients with grade 3 PCL injury, only two required PCL reconstruction. No significant relationship was observed between the causes of trauma and the incidence of PCL injury. According to the fracture classification, lower pole and comminuted fractures were associated with higher incidence rates of PCL injury than transverse and vertical fractures. Compressed and displaced patellar fractures were also associated with higher incidence rates of PCL injury. Although a PCL injury requiring surgical intervention was extremely rare, 25 % patients who required surgery for patellar fractures presented with a PCL injury. The incidence of a PCL injury was higher in the lower pole, comminuted, displaced, and compressed patellar fractures.

  5. What's New in Pediatric and Adolescent Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Travis J; Rush, Jeremy K; Schmitz, Matthew R

    2016-06-02

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears in children and adolescent patients are being diagnosed and treated at an ever-increasing rates. We performed a review of recent literature regarding care of children and adolescent athletes with an ACL injury. PubMed database was searched for all papers related to treatment of children and adolescents with ACL injuries from October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2015, yielding 114 publications. A total of 59 papers were found to have contributed important new findings. Papers were selected based on new findings in the following categories: epidemiology, anatomy, risk factors, sex disparity, prevention, surgical outcomes, timing and associated pathologies, and rehabilitation and return to sport. Pediatric ACL injuries continue to rise and there are multiple surgical procedures that restore clinical function with good outcomes. Early surgical treatment is favored to prevent concomitant articular injuries. Early return to play can increase risk of reinjury and should be met with caution in this age group. Prevention strategies should be further studied and implemented in hopes of decreasing the incidence of this injury and the long-term potential damage. Level 4-titerature review.

  6. LOWER EXTREMITY MALALIGNMENTS AND ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT INJURY HISTORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A. Braham

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available To identify if lower extremity malalignments were associated with increased propensity of a history of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL ruptures in males and females using a case control design. Twenty subjects (10 males, 10 females had a history of ACL injury and twenty (10 males, 10 females had no history of ACL injury. Subjects were assessed for navicular drop, quadriceps angle, pelvic tilt, hip internal and external rotation range of motion, and true and apparent leg length discrepancies. Statistical analysis was performed to identify differences in these measures in regard to injury history and gender, and to identify if any of these measures were predictive of ACL injury history. Increased navicular drop and anterior pelvic tilt were found to be statistically significant predictors of ACL injury history regardless of gender. Limbs that had previously suffered ACL ruptures were found to have increased navicular drop and anterior pelvic tilt compared to uninjured limbs. Based on the results of this retrospective study, the lower extremity malalignments examined do not appear to predispose females to tearing their ACLs more than males.

  7. [Treatment of isolated and multiple ligament injuries of the knee: anatomy, biomechanics, diagnosis, indications for repair, surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yastrebov, O; Lobenhoffer, P

    2009-06-01

    Complex knee ligament injuries are characterized by simultaneous rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and/or the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and at least one collateral ligament. Isolated injury to the medial collateral ligament (MCL) and PCL have a high healing capacity and can be treated conservatively in many cases. Ruptures of the MCL can also be treated conservatively in complex injuries if the cruciate ligaments are reconstructed. Ruptures of the lateral structures usually need surgical reconstruction. Indications for acute surgical repair include meniscus dislocation, entrapment of collateral ligament portions in the joint, knee dislocation with severe knee instability, and displaced bony avulsions. The anatomy of the knee ligaments must be carefully respected in surgical reconstruction. Acute repair of collateral ligament injuries is possible only in the first 2 weeks after trauma. Acute arthroscopy is indicated only in combination with reconstructive surgery.

  8. Dental trauma involving root fracture and periodontal ligament injury: a 10-year retrospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Sônia Regina Panzarini; Denise Pedrini; Wilson Roberto Poi; Celso Koogi Sonoda; Daniela Atili Brandini; José Carlos Monteiro de Castro

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to analyze the cases of traumatic dental injuries involving root fracture and/or periodontal ligament injury (except avulsion) treated at the Discipline of Integrated Clinic, School of Dentistry of Araçatuba, São Paulo State University (UNESP), Brazil, from January 1992 to December 2002. Clinical and radiographic records from 161 patients with 287 traumatized teeth that had sustained root fracture and/or injuries to the periodontal ligament were exa...

  9. Management of anterior cruciate ligament injuries in skeletally immature individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moksnes, Håvard; Engebretsen, Lars; Risberg, May Arna

    2012-03-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in skeletally immature individuals remain a challenge for the child, the parents, orthopaedic surgeons, and physical therapists. The main challenges are the potential risk of recurrent instability, secondary injuries following nonoperative treatment, and the risks involved with surgical treatment due to the vulnerability of the epiphyseal growth plates. We first present the physiological background for considerations that must be made when advising on treatment alternatives for skeletally immature individuals after ACL injury. The implications of continuous musculoskeletal development for treatment decisions are emphasized. No randomized controlled trials have been performed to investigate outcomes of different treatment algorithms. There is no consensus in the literature on clinical treatment decision criteria for whether a skeletally immature child should undergo transphyseal ACL reconstruction, physeal sparing ACL reconstruction, or nonoperative treatment. Additionally, well-described rehabilitation programs designed for either nonoperative treatment or postoperative rehabilitation have not been published. Based on the currently available evidence, we propose a treatment algorithm for the management of ACL injuries in skeletally immature individuals. Finally, we suggest directions for future prospective studies, which should include development of valid and reliable outcome measures and specific rehabilitation programs.

  10. Basic science of anterior cruciate ligament injury and repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiapour, A. M.; Murray, M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most devastating and frequent injuries of the knee. Surgical reconstruction is the current standard of care for treatment of ACL injuries in active patients. The widespread adoption of ACL reconstruction over primary repair was based on early perception of the limited healing capacity of the ACL. Although the majority of ACL reconstruction surgeries successfully restore gross joint stability, post-traumatic osteoarthritis is commonplace following these injuries, even with ACL reconstruction. The development of new techniques to limit the long-term clinical sequelae associated with ACL reconstruction has been the main focus of research over the past decades. The improved knowledge of healing, along with recent advances in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, has resulted in the discovery of novel biologically augmented ACL-repair techniques that have satisfactory outcomes in preclinical studies. This instructional review provides a summary of the latest advances made in ACL repair. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:20–31. PMID:24497504

  11. Scapholunate interosseous ligament injury in professional volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugnai, R; Della Rosa, N; Tarallo, L

    2016-10-01

    Injuries to the scapholunate interosseous ligament (SLIL) are the most common cause of carpal instability. A SLIL injury typically follows a fall on an outstretched hand, with the wrist in hyperextension, ulnar deviation and intercarpal supination. We hypothesize that repetitive axial loading on the wrist in hyperextension, during the reception and digging motions of volleyball, can lead to functional overloading of the SLIL. To identify patients and to determine the clinical history and surgical treatment performed, we analyzed hospital records, X-rays, electronic databases containing all the operations performed, and image files (including before and after surgery and follow-up). We identified three SLIL injury cases in national volleyball team players, also at the libero position, who were treated at our clinic between 2007 and 2013 for scapholunate instability. Open reduction and Berger capsulodesis was performed in all cases. At a mean follow-up of 3 years (range, 22-50 months), the mean pain level on VAS was 0.3 (range, 0-1) at rest and 1.7 (range 1-2) during sport activities. The mean DASH score was 4 (range 2-5). The mean wrist flexion was 60° (range 55-70°) and extension was 80° (range 75-85°). Given the greater susceptibility of these players for developing a SLIL injury, a high index of suspicion is needed when managing athletes presenting with wrist pain or instability. Copyright © 2016 SFCM. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Physiotherapists' experiences of the management of anterior cruciate ligament injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Aesch, Arlene V; Perry, Meredith; Sole, Gisela

    2016-05-01

    While extensive research has been reported for management of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, variation in treatment by physiotherapists is evident. To explore physiotherapists' experiences regarding ACL injury rehabilitation and factors that influenced physiotherapists' decision making for ACL rehabilitation, and to elicit what research physiotherapists perceived would support their management of these patients. Qualitative study. Fifteen physiotherapists from six private clinics in New Zealand participated in semi-structured interviews. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and the general inductive approach was used to develop key themes. Participant's management strengths were evident by their intent and commitment to provide expert rehabilitation, using a biopsychosocial approach and evidence-informed practice. The lengthy management process (including prolonged rehabilitation and referral processes) and interprofessional disconnect concerned participants. Translational research was needed for clear directions for exercise prescription and milestones for return to sports and occupation following ACL injury. Participants provided a biopsychosocial and evidence-based approach to ACL injury management. Potential areas of improvement include simplifying the referral process and enhancing communication between physiotherapists and other health professionals. Future research should focus on clarifying areas of ACL rehabilitation uncertainty, or collating results in an accessible and usable format for clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Craniovertebral Junction Ligaments: Normal Anatomy and Traumatic Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidecker, Anna E.; Shen, Peter Y.

    2016-01-01

    The superb stability and flexibility of the craniovertebral junction (CVJ) are enabled by the ligaments that connect the occipital bone and the C1 and C2 vertebral bodies. Radiographically, these ligaments are best assessed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which has excellent soft tissue contrast, but typically poor spatial resolution. With the advent of advanced MRI techniques, including volumetric sequences, high spatial resolution and contrast resolution can both be attained, allowing for detailed analysis of the ligaments, particularly in trauma settings. We have instituted a cervical spine trauma protocol which utilizes a high resolution (1-mm voxel) volumetric proton density sequence to detect injuries to the ligaments of the CVJ in all trauma patients who receive a cervical spine MRI in our emergency room. In this article, we review techniques for imaging the ligaments at the CVJ, the normal imaging anatomy and the function of the CVJ ligaments, and their appearance in cases of traumatic injury. PMID:27648395

  14. Injuries of the lateral collateral ligaments of the ankle: assessment with MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitner, K.F.; Ferber, A.; Grebe, P.; Thelen, M. [Department of Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (Germany); Runkel, M. [Department of Traumatologic and Reconstructive Surgery, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (Germany); Berger, S. [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (Germany)

    1999-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of MRI to display injuries of the lateral collateral ligamentous complex in patients with an acute ankle distorsion trauma. The MR examinations of 36 patients with ankle pain after ankle distorsion were evaluated retrospectively without knowledge of clinical history, outcome and/or operative findings. The examinations were performed on a 1.5-T whole-body imager using a flexible surface coil. The signs for ligamentous abnormality were as follows: complete or partial discontinuity, increased signal within, and irregularity and waviness of the ligament. The results were compared with operative findings in 18 patients with subsequent surgical repair. Eighteen patients with conservative therapy had a follow-up MR examination after 3 months. There was 1 sprain, 3 partial and 32 complete tears of the anterior talofibular ligament, and 5 sprains, 5 partial, and 7 complete tears of the calcaneofibular ligament. There were no lesions of the posterior talofibular ligament. Compared with surgery, MRI demonstrated in 18 of 18 cases the exact extent of anterior talofibular ligament injuries and underestimated the extent in 2 of 8 cases of calcaneofibular ligament injury. In patients with follow-up MRI after conservative therapy, a thickened band-like structure was found along the course of the injured ligament in 17 of 18 cases. The absence of ligament repair after conservative treatment was confirmed during operative revision in one case. The MRI technique allows for grading of the extent of injury of the lateral collateral ligamentous complex after acute ankle strain. It seems to be suitable for monitoring the healing process after conservative-functional treatment of ligament tears. (orig.) With 5 figs., 2 tabs., 26 refs.

  15. Evaluation and treatment of medial collateral ligament and medial-sided injuries of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Kurt E; Chi, Frederic S

    2006-06-01

    Injuries to the medial side of the knee are not always isolated injuries of the superficial medial collateral ligament. Medial-sided injuries can also involve the deep medial collateral ligament, the posteromedial corner, or the medial meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging is a useful adjunct to the physical examination; however, the extent of medial-sided injuries is frequently underappreciated on these images. An understanding of the anatomy and biomechanics of the medial side of the knee and a thorough physical examination aids the physician in determining the full extent of injury and helping the physician to treat each unique injury pattern.

  16. Injuries to the medial collateral ligament and associated medial structures of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijdicks, Coen A; Griffith, Chad J; Johansen, Steinar; Engebretsen, Lars; LaPrade, Robert F

    2010-05-01

    *The superficial medial collateral ligament and other medial knee stabilizers-i.e., the deep medial collateral ligament and the posterior oblique ligament-are the most commonly injured ligamentous structures of the knee. *The main structures of the medial aspect of the knee are the proximal and distal divisions of the superficial medial collateral ligament, the meniscofemoral and meniscotibial divisions of the deep medial collateral ligament, and the posterior oblique ligament. *Physical examination is the initial method of choice for the diagnosis of medial knee injuries through the application of a valgus load both at full knee extension and between 20 degrees and 30 degrees of knee flexion. *Because nonoperative treatment has a favorable outcome, there is a consensus that it should be the first step in the management of acute isolated grade-III injuries of the medial collateral ligament or such injuries combined with an anterior cruciate ligament tear. *If operative treatment is required, an anatomic repair or reconstruction is recommended.

  17. A study of isokinetic strength and laxity with and without anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kewwan; Jeon, Kyoungkyu; Mullineaux, David R; Cho, Eunok

    2016-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to provide useful information for future treatments and to organize rehabilitation programs for anterior cruciate ligament injury by assessing isokinetic muscle strength and laxity of knee joints in athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injuries. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-one high school athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injuries participated in this study. Isokinetic muscle strength at 60°/sec and anterior cruciate ligament laxity for non-involved and involved sides, classified on the basis of the severity of anterior cruciate ligament injury, were assessed. [Results] A comparison of isokinetic muscle strength measured from the non-involved and involved sides showed a significant difference in the maximum strength and knee flexor muscle strength. For laxity, a significant difference was observed in the anterior drawer test results obtained with a force of 88 N. [Conclusion] In conclusion, this study has shown that the assessment of isokinetic muscle strength and ligament laxity from athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury should be utilized to provide baseline data for prevention and prediction of injury.

  18. Do Tibial Plateau Fractures Worsen Outcomes of Knee Ligament Injuries? A Matched Cohort Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinque, Mark E; Godin, Jonathan A; Moatshe, Gilbert; Chahla, Jorge; Kruckeberg, Bradley M; Pogorzelski, Jonas; LaPrade, Robert F

    2017-08-01

    Tibial plateau fractures account for a small portion of all fractures; however, these fractures can pose a surgical challenge when occurring concomitantly with ligament injuries. The purpose of this study was to compare 2-year outcomes of soft tissue reconstruction with or without a concomitant tibial plateau fracture and open reduction internal fixation. We hypothesized that patients with a concomitant tibial plateau fracture at the time of soft tissue surgery would have inferior outcomes compared with patients without an associated tibial plateau fracture. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Forty patients were included in this study: 8 in the fracture group and 32 in the matched control group. Inclusion criteria for the fracture group included patients who were at least 18 years old at the time of surgery and sustained a tibial plateau fracture and a concomitant injury of the anterior cruciate ligament, posterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament, or fibular collateral ligament in isolation or any combination of cruciate or collateral ligaments and who subsequently underwent isolated or combined ligament reconstruction. Patients were excluded if they underwent prior ipsilateral knee surgery, sustained additional bony injuries, or sustained an isolated extra-articular ligament injury at the time of injury. Each patient with a fracture was matched with 4 patients from a control group who had no evidence of a tibial plateau fracture but underwent the same soft tissue reconstruction procedure. Patients in the fracture group improved significantly from preoperatively to postoperatively with respect to Short Form-12 (P plateau fracture in conjunction with a ligamentous knee injury did not have a negative effect on postoperative patient-reported outcomes. Patient-reported outcome scores after surgery in both the fracture and control groups improved beyond the minimally clinically important difference, indicating that the presence of a fracture did not

  19. Meniscal tears associated with anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagino, Tetsuo; Ochiai, Satoshi; Senga, Shinya; Yamashita, Takashi; Wako, Masanori; Ando, Takashi; Haro, Hirotaka

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the frequency of meniscal tear and the location of tear associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. We studied 549 patients (552 knees) who were diagnosed with ACL injury by arthroscopy at our center between January 2006 and March 2014 (8 years and 3 months). The subjects comprised 289 males and 263 females ranging in age from 13 to 66 (mean 26.1) years. The cause of injury was sports-related in 89.1 %, and the mean interval from injury to initial arthroscopy was 23 months. The patients were divided into two groups: arthroscopy performed within 8 weeks after injury (acute group; 256 knees) and more than 8 weeks after injury (chronic group; 296 knees). Frequency of meniscal tear and location of tear were compared between two groups. The incidence of meniscal tear diagnosed by arthroscopic examination was 79.2 % (437 of 552 knees) in all subjects; 72.7 % (186 of 256 knees) in acute group and 84.8 % (251 of 296 knees) in chronic group, and was significantly higher in chronic group. Regarding the locations of meniscal tears, in acute group (186 knees), medial meniscal tear only was found in 20 knees (10.8 %), lateral meniscal tear only in 129 knees (69.4 %), and bilateral (including medial and lateral) meniscal tears in 37 knees (19.9 %). In chronic group (251 knees), medial meniscal tear only was found in 62 knees (24.7 %), lateral meniscal tear only in 85 knees (33.9 %), and bilateral meniscal tears in 104 knees (41.4 %). Lateral meniscal tear was commonly associated with acute ACL injury, while medial meniscal tear with chronic ACL injury. Bucket handle tear was observed in 25 knees (medial: 17 knees, lateral: 8 knees) in acute group, and 81 knees (medial: 69 knees, lateral: 12 knees) in chronic group, and was more common in the chronic group. The incidence of meniscal tear associated with ACL injury is higher in chronic cases; the number of medial meniscal tears is particularly high, many of which require meniscectomy. Early ACL

  20. Surgical technique: medial collateral ligament reconstruction using Achilles allograft for combined knee ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Robert G; Hetsroni, Iftach

    2012-03-01

    Previous approaches for medial collateral ligament (MCL) reconstruction have been associated with extensive exposure, risk of donor site morbidity with autografts, loss of motion, nonanatomic graft placement, and technical complexity with double-bundle constructs. Therefore, we implemented a technique that uses Achilles allograft, small incisions, and anatomic insertions to reconstruct the MCL. The MCL femoral insertion was identified, and a socket reamed over a guide pin. The Achilles bone plug was fixed in the socket and the tendon passed distally under the skin and fixed on the tibia, creating isometric reconstruction. We evaluated 14 patients who had this MCL reconstruction. We determined range of knee motion, knee ligament laxity, functional outcome scores (International Knee Documentation Committee [IKDC]-subjective, Lysholm, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score [KOOS]), and activity level scores (Tegner, Marx). Followup range was 24 to 61 months. Knee motion was maintained in 12 cases. Grade 0-1 + valgus stability was obtained in all 14 cases. In cases of MCL with primary ACL reconstruction, IKDC-subjective, Lysholm, and KOOS-sports scores were 91 ± 6, 92 ± 6, and 93 ± 12, respectively, and return to preinjury activity levels was achieved. In cases of MCL with revision ACL reconstruction, function was inferior, and patients did not return to their preinjury activity levels. This technique uses allograft that provides bone-to-bone healing on the femur, requires small incisions, and creates isometric reconstruction. When performed with a cruciate reconstruction, knee stability can be restored at 2 to 5 years followup. In patients with MCL with primary ACL reconstruction, return to preinjury activity level in recreational athletes can be achieved.

  1. [Diagnosis of medial collateral ligament injury by stress X-ray and MRI of knee joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Long-Jun; Chen, Jian-Liang; Xu, Yong; Zhu, Shao-Bing

    2012-11-01

    To study the application of stress X-ray of knee joint for the diagnosis ot medial collateral ligament injury. From January 2008 to June 2011, 46 patients with medial collateral ligament injury were reviewed. Among the patients, 32 patients were male and 14 patients were female, ranging in age from 28 to 72 years, with an average of (49.46 +/- 22.54) years. Left knee joint injuries occurred in 22 patients, and 24 patients had injuries in right knee joint. Thirty-one patients were treated with surgical method, and 15 patients were treated with conservative method including 1 patient finally received operation after 3 months treatment with conservative method without effect. The injury side and normal side were observed by X-ray under stress and non-stress, as well as MRI. Operation was used to treat patients with medial gap markedly widen and the deep layer of medial collateral ligament injury in MRI. A line (line A) was drawn from medial condyle to lateral condyle of tibia platform. The line A was translated to the inner margin of condylus medialis femoris, which was line B. The perpendicular distance was measured, which was line C. The ration of space difference (R) was calculated by (space at stress force of injured side-space at non-stress force of injured side)/(space at stress force of normal side-space at non-stress force of normal side). The relationship between R and ligament injury type were investigated. There were 17 patients with injuries of superficial lamella, 21 patients with injuries of deep lamella. Eight patients had associated injuries of articular capsule and posterior cruciate ligament. When R value was between 1.51 to 5.24, the injury of superficial ligament was found in 15 patients, actual injuries were found in 17 patients. When R value between 5.28 and 13.85, the injuries of bathypelagic ligament were found in 19 patients, actual injuries were found in 21 patients. When R value was between 15.61 and 26.25, the associated injuries of

  2. Surgical treatment of grade Ⅲ collateral ligament injury of knee joint caused by military training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang ZHANG

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the method and effect of surgical treatment on grade Ⅲ collateral ligament injuries caused by military training.Methods Sixteen cases of grade Ⅲ collateral ligament injuries caused by military training were involved in the present study.Injuries to insertion of collateral ligament was repaired with suture anchor,fresh rupture of medial collateral ligament parenchyma was sutured directly,old rupture of medial collateral ligament parenchyma was repaired by direct suture and strengthening with autologous semitendinosus-gracilis tendon graft,while both fresh and old rupture of lateral collateral ligament parenchyma was reconstructed with autologous semitendinosus-gracilis tendon graft.Knee function was assessed 1 year after operation by Lysholm scores and compared with that before the operation.Results All the 16 patients were followed-up for 12 to 33 months with a mean of 20.5 months.The Lysholm knee scores of 1 year after peration(92.45±4.03 was significantly higher than that before operation(56.45±11.03,P < 0.05.Conclusions For the grade Ⅲ collateral ligament injuries caused by military training,the treatment principle was early diagnosis and early operation,and different surgical methods should be used according to the injury types for the sake of obtaining best therapeutic effects.

  3. ["Isolated injury" of the alar ligaments: MRI diagnosis and surgical therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomann, K-D; Schomerus, C; Sebestény, T; Rauschmann, M

    2010-03-01

    Spinal distortions caused by traffic collisions play a large role in medical expert opinions. Prolonged or chronic conditions present particular difficulties. The radiologist E. Volle developed and published a system for the classification of isolated injuries of the alar ligaments. As a result, surgery on the craniocervical junction was carried out in a large number of patients and the results published on multiple occasions. This article describes the anatomy of the alar ligaments, complicated injuries, the concept of the isolated lesion of the alar ligaments and their surgical management. German and international publications are evaluated. It was impossible to substantiate isolated injuries to alar ligaments. According to current knowledge, the published results are based on a misinterpretation of MRI findings. These results are to be considered as artefacts. There is no anatomical correlation for the classification of isolated injuries to alar ligaments. Surgical stabilisation due to an allegedly isolated injury to the alar ligaments is therefore not indicated. This statement does not apply to injuries sustained in high-speed trauma in combination with complex injuries of the atlanto-occipital and atlanto-dental-joint (joint capsules, atlanto-occipital membrane) with clear signs of instability.

  4. Management of Medial Collateral Ligament Injury During Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Systematic Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Della Torre, MD, Paul; Stephens, MD, Andrew; Oh, MD, Horng Lii; Kamra, MD, Akshay; Zicat, MD, Bernard; Walker, MD, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Medial collateral ligament injury during primary total knee arthroplasty is a recognised complication potentially resulting in valgus instability, suboptimal patient outcomes and a higher rate of revision or reoperation...

  5. Optimization of the anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention paradigm: novel feedback techniques to enhance motor learning and reduce injury risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariel V. Dowling; Gregory D. Myer; Timothy E. Hewett; Anne Benjaminse; James A. Onate; Alli Gokeler; Avery Faigenbaum; Kevin R. Ford; Bert Otten

    2015-01-01

    Primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention programs effectively reduce ACL injury risk in the short term. Despite these programs, ACL injury incidence is still high, making it imperative to continue to improve cur- rent prevention strategies. A potential limitation of current ACL

  6. Optimization of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Prevention Paradigm : Novel Feedback Techniques to Enhance Motor Learning and Reduce Injury Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benjaminse, Anne; Gokeler, Alli; Dowling, Ariel V.; Faigenbaum, Avery; Ford, Kevin R.; Hewett, Timothy E.; Onate, James A.; Otten, Bert; Myer, Gregory D.

    SYNOPSIS: Primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention programs effectively reduce ACL injury risk in the short term. Despite these programs, ACL injury incidence-is still high, making it imperative to continue to improve current prevention strategies. A potential limitation of current

  7. The Collateral Ligament of the Digits of the Hand: Anatomy, Physiology, Biomechanics, Injury, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozmaryn, Leo M

    2017-11-01

    Ligament injuries are among the most common musculoskeletal injuries seen in clinical practice and ligaments are the most frequently injured structures in a joint. Ligaments play an important role in balancing joint mobility and joint stability. Disruption of joint ligaments severely impairs joint function. Over the past 10 years, a new appreciation of a neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of joint ligaments and its biofeedback loops to surrounding muscles and tendons has emerged to explain the relationship between primary and secondary restraints that allow normal joint motion yet prevent pathological motion. This review focuses on this recent information with a view to new clinical approaches to these common problems. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Importance of Calcified Stylohyoid Ligament to the Neck Injury a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gürcan Altun

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Stylohyoid ligament (LS is an anatomical structure between the styloid processes of temporal bone and cornu minus of hyoid bone. LS may calcify as elongated styloid processes and it may occur partly or completely. Elongated styloid process or calcified stylohyoid ligament gives a complex of symptoms described by Eagle such as craniofacial and cervical pain, dysphagia and foreign body sensation, and it is called Eagle's Syndrome. An 82-year-old man died due to mechanical asphyxia from hanging. Calcified stylohyoid ligaments were showed on examination of the internal structures of his neck. According to forensic medicine, the importance of calcified stylohyoid ligament reviewed to the autopsies has neck injuries. Key words: Neck injury, stylohyoid ligament, hanging

  9. Assessment of the Anterolateral Ligament of the Knee by Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Acute Injuries of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Helito, Paulo Victor Partezani; Costa, Hugo Pereira; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Bordalo-Rodrigues, Marcelo

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the epidemiology of injuries and abnormalities of the anterolateral ligament (ALL) by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in cases of acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. MRIs of patients with acute ACL injury were evaluated. Acute injuries of the ACL were considered in cases in which the patient reported knee trauma occurring less than 3 weeks prior and when bone bruise in the femoral condyles and tibial plateau was identified. ALL abnormality was considered when it showed proximal or distal bone detachment, discontinuity of fibers, or irregular contour associated with periligamentous edema. The ALL was divided into femoral, tibial, and meniscal portions, and the lesions and/or abnormalities of each portion were characterized. The correlation of ALL injury with injuries of the lateral meniscus was evaluated. A total of 101 MRIs were initially evaluated. The ALL was not characterized in 13 (12.8%) examinations, resulting in 88 (87.1%) cases of injury evaluation. Of these, 55 (54.4%) patients had a normal ALL, and 33 (32.6%) showed signs of injury. Among the cases with injury, 24 (72%) patients showed proximal lesions, 7 (21%) showed distal lesions, and 2 (6.0%) patients presented both proximal and distal lesions. The meniscal portion of the ALL appeared abnormal in 16 (48%) patients. No relationship was found between ALL injury and lateral meniscus injury. Based on MRI analysis of acute ACL injuries with bone bruising of the lateral femoral condyle and lateral tibial plateau, approximately a third demonstrated ALL injuries of which the majority was proximal. Level IV, case series. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The popliteal fibular ligament in acute knee trauma: patterns of injury on MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKean, D.; Thomee, E.; Grant, D.; Teh, J.L.; Mansour, R. [Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom); Yoong, P. [Royal Berkshire NHS Foundation Trust, Royal Berkshire Hospital, Reading (United Kingdom); Yanny, S. [Buckinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust, Stoke Mandeville Hospital, Aylesbury (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    To describe the patterns of injury associated with injury to the popliteofibular ligament injury. A retrospective review was performed of 180 MRI scans undertaken for acute knee trauma. Scans were excluded if the time of injury was over 4 weeks from the time of the scan, or if there was a history of septic arthritis, inflammatory arthropathy, previous knee surgery, or significant artefact. An agreed criterion for assessing the structures of the posterolateral ligamentous complex was defined and in each scan, the popliteofibular ligament (PFL) was scored as normal or injured. The menisci, ligaments, and tendons of each knee were also assessed. The mean age was 25.7 years (range, 9-65 years) and 72.2 % (n = 130) patients were male. The PFL was injured in 36 cases (20 %). There is a significant association between PFL injury and ACL rupture (p = 0.0001), ITB injury (p = 0.0001), PCL injury (p = 0.0373), in addition to associations with injury to other posterolateral corner structures including the lateral collateral ligament (p = 0.0001), biceps femoris tendon (p = 0.0014), and popliteus tendon (p = 0.0014). Of our series of PFL injuries, nine cases (25 %) were associated with further injuries of posterolateral corner structures and in 27 cases (75 %) the PFL was the only posterolateral corner structure torn. PFL injury is not uncommon in acute knee trauma and is associated with significant internal derangement of the knee, especially anterior cruciate ligament rupture, ITB sprain, and injury to other structures within the posterolateral corner. (orig.)

  11. The popliteal fibular ligament in acute knee trauma: patterns of injury on MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKean, D; Yoong, P; Yanny, S; Thomee, E; Grant, D; Teh, J L; Mansour, R

    2015-10-01

    To describe the patterns of injury associated with injury to the popliteofibular ligament injury. A retrospective review was performed of 180 MRI scans undertaken for acute knee trauma. Scans were excluded if the time of injury was over 4 weeks from the time of the scan, or if there was a history of septic arthritis, inflammatory arthropathy, previous knee surgery, or significant artefact. An agreed criterion for assessing the structures of the posterolateral ligamentous complex was defined and in each scan, the popliteofibular ligament (PFL) was scored as normal or injured. The menisci, ligaments, and tendons of each knee were also assessed. The mean age was 25.7 years (range, 9-65 years) and 72.2% (n = 130) patients were male. The PFL was injured in 36 cases (20%). There is a significant association between PFL injury and ACL rupture (p = 0.0001), ITB injury (p = 0.0001), PCL injury (p = 0.0373), in addition to associations with injury to other posterolateral corner structures including the lateral collateral ligament (p = 0.0001), biceps femoris tendon (p = 0.0014), and popliteus tendon (p = 0.0014). Of our series of PFL injuries, nine cases (25%) were associated with further injuries of posterolateral corner structures and in 27 cases (75%) the PFL was the only posterolateral corner structure torn. PFL injury is not uncommon in acute knee trauma and is associated with significant internal derangement of the knee, especially anterior cruciate ligament rupture, ITB sprain, and injury to other structures within the posterolateral corner.

  12. Dental trauma involving root fracture and periodontal ligament injury: a 10-year retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sônia Regina Panzarini

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this retrospective study was to analyze the cases of traumatic dental injuries involving root fracture and/or periodontal ligament injury (except avulsion treated at the Discipline of Integrated Clinic, School of Dentistry of Araçatuba, São Paulo State University (UNESP, Brazil, from January 1992 to December 2002. Clinical and radiographic records from 161 patients with 287 traumatized teeth that had sustained root fracture and/or injuries to the periodontal ligament were examined. The results of this survey revealed that subluxation (25.09% was the most common type of periodontal ligament injury, followed by extrusive luxation (19.86%. There was a predominance of young male patients and most of them did not present systemic alterations. Among the etiologic factors, the most frequent causes were falls and bicycle accidents. Injuries on extraoral soft tissues were mostly laceration and abrasion, while gingival and lip mucosa lacerations prevailed on intraoral soft tissues injuries. Radiographically, the most common finding was an increase of the periodontal ligament space. The most commonly performed treatment was root canal therapy. Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that traumatic dental injuries occur more frequently in young male individuals, due to falls and bicycle accidents. Subluxation was the most common type of periodontal ligament injury. Root canal therapy was the type of treatment most commonly planned and performed.

  13. Dental trauma involving root fracture and periodontal ligament injury: a 10-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzarini, Sônia Regina; Pedrini, Denise; Poi, Wilson Roberto; Sonoda, Celso Koogi; Brandini, Daniela Atili; Monteiro de Castro, José Carlos

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to analyze the cases of traumatic dental injuries involving root fracture and/or periodontal ligament injury (except avulsion) treated at the Discipline of Integrated Clinic, School of Dentistry of Araçatuba, São Paulo State University (UNESP), Brazil, from January 1992 to December 2002. Clinical and radiographic records from 161 patients with 287 traumatized teeth that had sustained root fracture and/or injuries to the periodontal ligament were examined. The results of this survey revealed that subluxation (25.09%) was the most common type of periodontal ligament injury, followed by extrusive luxation (19.86%). There was a predominance of young male patients and most of them did not present systemic alterations. Among the etiologic factors, the most frequent causes were falls and bicycle accidents. Injuries on extraoral soft tissues were mostly laceration and abrasion, while gingival and lip mucosa lacerations prevailed on intraoral soft tissues injuries. Radiographically, the most common finding was an increase of the periodontal ligament space. The most commonly performed treatment was root canal therapy. Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that traumatic dental injuries occur more frequently in young male individuals, due to falls and bicycle accidents. Subluxation was the most common type of periodontal ligament injury. Root canal therapy was the type of treatment most commonly planned and performed.

  14. Arthroscopic prevalence of ramp lesion in 868 patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Feng, Hua; Zhang, Hui; Hong, Lei; Wang, Xue Song; Zhang, Jin

    2011-04-01

    A special type of repairable meniscal lesion involving the peripheral attachment of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus is commonly associated with anterior cruciate ligament deficiency and is termed a "ramp lesion." However, there are no previously published articles reporting the epidemiologic characteristics of ramp lesions. The ramp lesion is a special type of medial meniscal tear with high prevalence associated with anterior cruciate ligament rupture; the prevalence increases with time from anterior cruciate ligament injury. Age and gender are risk factors affecting the prevalence of the ramp lesion. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. From April 2002 to October 2007, 868 consecutive knees were diagnosed as having an anterior cruciate ligament injury and received arthroscopic surgery for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. All the patients had verified tears of the ramp area under arthroscopy. The prevalence of the ramp lesion was evaluated retrospectively. Then, all cases were divided into different groups depending on the time interval from anterior cruciate ligament injury to anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and other relevant risk factors such as age and gender. The effects of age, gender, and time from injury on the prevalence of ramp lesions were analyzed. Among 868 knees that underwent surgery for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, 144 knees were diagnosed as having a ramp lesion. The mean age was 24.7 years; there were 113 male and 31 female patients. The mean time from injury to anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction was 27.2 months. The prevalence of ramp lesions was 16.6%, which was analyzed as a logarithmic correlation with time from injury. Patients younger than 30 years of age and male patients had a significantly higher prevalence of ramp lesions. The ramp lesion is a common meniscal injury that can occur at the time of anterior cruciate ligament rupture or as a result of knee laxity associated with

  15. Sonography of injury of the ulnar collateral ligament of the elbow - initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Theodore T. [Department of Radiology, North Shore University Hospital, 825 Northern Boulevard, 11021, Great Neck, NY (United States); Adler, Ronald S. [Department of Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Hospital for Special Surgery, 535 East 70th Street, 10021, New York, NY (United States); Friedman, Lawrence [Department of Radiology, Hamilton Health Sciences - Henderson Division, 711 Concession Street, L8V 1C3, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the sonographic appearance of injuries of the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) of the elbow. Eight non-professional male baseball pitchers, ages 13-35 years, with medial elbow pain and clinical suspicion of ulnar collateral ligament injury, were referred for imaging. All eight underwent sonography of the affected and contralateral asymptomatic elbow, and six also underwent MR imaging. Neither valgus stress nor power Doppler was used during the sonographic examinations. Time from onset of symptoms to imaging was 1.5 weeks to 6 months. Three patients had surgical confirmation of their injuries, with time from imaging to surgery of 2 days to 9 months. In four patients, the UCL was ruptured, manifest sonographically in three cases as discontinuity of the normally hyperechoic ligament with anechoic fluid in the gap and in one case as non-visualization of the ligament with heterogeneous echogenicity in the expected location of the ligament. Two adolescent patients had avulsions of the UCL from the medial epicondyle, with sonographic demonstration of the avulsed echogenic bony fragment in both cases. One patient had a mild sprain, manifest as mild thickening and decreased echogenicity of the ligament sonographically compared with the contralateral normal elbow, with mild surrounding hypoechoic edema. The eighth patient had a small partial tear of the deep surface of the distal aspect of the ligament, visualized as a hypoechoic focus between the deep surface of the ligament and its ulnar attachment. Tears of the ulnar collateral ligament are manifested sonographically as non-visualization of the ligament or alteration of the normal morphology. (orig.)

  16. Neuroplasticity following anterior cruciate ligament injury: a framework for visual-motor training approaches in rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grooms, Dustin; Appelbaum, Gregory; Onate, James

    2015-05-01

    The neuroplastic effects of anterior cruciate ligament injury have recently become more evident, demonstrating underlying nervous system changes in addition to the expected mechanical alterations associated with injury. Interventions to mitigate these detrimental neuroplastic effects, along with the established biomechanical changes, need to be considered in the rehabilitation process and return-to-play progressions. This commentary establishes a link between dynamic movement mechanics, neurocognition, and visual processing regarding anterior cruciate ligament injury adaptations and injury risk. The proposed framework incorporates evidence from the disciplines of neuroscience, biomechanics, motor control, and psychology to support integrating neurocognitive and visual-motor approaches with traditional neuromuscular interventions during anterior cruciate ligament injury rehabilitation. Physical therapists, athletic trainers, strength coaches, and other health care and performance professionals can capitalize on this integration of sciences to utilize visual-training technologies and techniques to improve on already-established neuromuscular training methods. Therapy, level 5.

  17. [Reconstruction for knee dislocation with multiple ligaments injury at stage I].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jun-qin; Lin, Ren; Lin, Wei; Huang, Xian-gui; Xiong, Guo-sheng

    2015-12-01

    To investigate clinical outcomes of tendon allograft reconstruction with arthroscopy minimally invasive technique at stage I for the treatment of knee dislocation with multiple ligaments injury. Forty-eight patients with knee dislocation were reconstructed anterior and posterior ligament under arthroscopy at stage I from January 2008 to January 2012, and repaired ligaments injury of knee joint by minimally invasive technique. There were 38 males and 10 females aged from 20 to 59 years old with an average of 35.6 years old; 22 cases on the left side and 26 cases on the right side; the time from injury to operation ranged from 2 d to 2 weeks. Two cases combined with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), medial collateral ligament (MCL) and posterolateral complex injuries, 36 cases combined with ACL, PCL, and MCL injuries, 10 cases combined with ACL, PCL and PLC injuries; 4 cases combined with peroneal nerve injury. Lysholm scoring were used to compared the cases before operation and final following-up to evaluate knee function. All patients were followed up from 12 to 30 months with an average of (18.2 ± 6.3) months. Activity and stability of joint were obviously improved. Lysholm score were improved from 40.3 ± 4.1 before operation to 87.0 ± 6.4 at final following-up. Reconstruction with arthroscopy minimally invasive technique at stage I for the treatment of knee dislocation with multiple ligaments injury could recover stability of joint better,reserve joint function. Preoperative training and postoperative individualized rehabilitation treatment is the key point of recover knee joint function.

  18. Biomechanical model of knee collateral ligament injury with six degrees of freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozada, Neriman

    2016-05-01

    Knee ligament injuries cannot be fully described using simplified joint models or by experimentation alone. The study objective was to model the contributions of the collateral ligaments over six degrees of freedom (DOF) of knee joint articulation to aid the diagnosis of knee ligament injuries. A kinematic model of the knee joint with six DOF was developed using the Musculoskeletal Joint Modeller software, and the effects of medial collateral ligament (MCL) and lateral collateral ligament (LCL) rupture were evaluated. The centres of mass of the tibia and femur were determined from their surface geometry, and the displacement of the moving tibia was determined by measuring the displacements of the attached ligaments with respect to its centre of mass. Compared to an intact knee, a tibia without the LCL had higher medial translation and lower valgus rotation, while a tibia without the MCL had higher lateral translation and higher valgus rotation. At 0°, 30° and 60° of flexion, the tibia without the LCL had more internal rotation than an intact knee. Understanding the complete kinematics of knee joints may improve the diagnosis of ligament injuries and guide tissue replacement surgery. Predicting joint behaviour in the clinic after treatment might benefit from a combined modelling approach that includes both clinicians and basic researchers.

  19. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries in wakeboarding: prevalence and observations on injury mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Harlan M; Sanders, Brett

    2012-07-01

    Wakeboarding is an increasingly popular sport that involves aggressive stunts with high risk for lower extremity injury, including anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Little has been reported on prevalence or mechanism of ACL injury while wakeboarding. The prevalence of ACL injury in wakeboarding approaches that of other high-risk sports. Analyzing the mechanism of ACL injury may aid in future efforts of prevention. Descriptive epidemiology study. In sum, 1580 surveys were sent internationally to professional and amateur wakeboarders. The survey questioned the participants on their history of an ACL tear while wakeboarding and asked them to describe the mechanism of injury and treatment. A total of 123 surveys were returned. Of this group, 52 (42.3%) acknowledged having had an ACL tear while wakeboarding. The majority described feeling a pop or buckle after attempting to land a high jump. Only 5 participants (13.5%) described a rotational mechanism created by catching the board edge in the water. Thirty-seven participants (71.15%) said that the injury ruined their ability to wakeboard before reconstruction, and 41 (78.85%) had the injury repaired surgically. The prevalence of ACL tears in this data set, 42.3%, is the highest reported in the literature for wakeboarding and one of the highest for any sport. The main mechanism of injury appears to involve axial compression while one lands in a provocative position; it is not related to a rotational force created by fixed bindings. The injury should be surgically repaired to effectively continue the sport. Further study is needed to determine if wakeboarding represents a high-risk sport for ACL injury. Wakeboarding may be a high-risk sport for ACL injury. Noncontact axial compression appears to be the main mechanism of injury.

  20. Outcomes of Medial Collateral Ligament Injuries during Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Marcelo B P; Haller, Kathryn; Mulder, Andrew; Goldblum, Andrew S; Klika, Alison K; Barsoum, Wael K

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative medial collateral ligament (MCL) disruption during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is often managed with either primary repair or use of a constrained implant. A total of 23 patients with an MCL injury during TKA between 2003 and 2009 were compared with 92 matched controls. Of the 23 patients, 10 were treated with an unconstrained implant and primary MCL repair, 8 with constrained implants, 3 with constrained implants and MCL repair, and 2 with unconstrained implants and no MCL repair. After an average 5-year follow-up, patients had lower Knee Society Scores (KSS), 79 versus 87 (p = 0.03), but similar Knee Function Scores (KFS), 68 versus 72 (p = 0.35). The improvement between preoperative and postoperative KSS and KFS did not vary among the two groups (p = 0.88 and p = 0.77, respectively). Postoperative scores did not vary significantly among the four treatment modalities. Conservative treatment can provide satisfactory outcomes and avoid potential complications of increased constraint. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  1. Evaluation of static and dynamic balance in athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury - A controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Tiago Lazzaretti; Felix, Ellen Cristina Rodrigues; Bessa, Felipe; Luna, Natália Ms; Sugimoto, Dai; Greve, Júlia Maria D'Andrea; Hernandez, Arnaldo José

    2016-08-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament injury leads to adaptive responses to maintain postural control. However, there is no consensus regarding whether leg dominance also affects postural control in athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury. The purpose of this study was to evaluate dynamic and static postural control among athletes with and without anterior cruciate ligament injury to the dominant leg. Twenty-eight athletes, twenty-one males and seven females aged 15-45 years, were allocated to one of two groups: the anterior cruciate ligament injury group (26±3 years) or the control group without anterior cruciate ligament injury (25±6.5 years). All subjects performed one legged stance tests under eyes open and eyes closed conditions and squat and kick movement tests using a postural control protocol (AccuSwayPlus force platform, Massachusetts). The center of pressure displacement and speed were measured by the force platform. In addition, the distance traveled on the single-leg hop test was assessed as an objective measure of function. Significantly greater mediolateral sway was found under the eyes closed condition (p=0.04) and during squat movement (p=0.01) in the anterior cruciate ligament injury group than in the control group. Analysis of the single-leg hop test results showed no difference between the groups (p=0.73). Athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury had greater mediolateral displacement of the center of pressure toward the dominant leg under the eyes closed condition and during squat movement compared to control athletes.

  2. [Clinical effect of staged repair and reconstruction of multiple ligament injuries in knee joints].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhen; Liu, Zhi-xiang; Yang, Jun-long; Zhang, Zhao-fei; Chang, Yi-liang

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate clinical outcomes of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction under arthroscopy combined with limited open repair of medial collateral ligament (MCL) for the treatment of multiple ligament injuries of knee joints. From March 2006 and June 2012,the data of 14 patients (14 knees) with multiple injuries of ACL, PCL, and MCL were collected. There were 8 males and 6 females with an average age of (31.8 +/- 8.1) years old (ranged, 20 to 49 years old). All the patients were performed with X-ray and MRI examination, and the results showed that 10 patients had combined with injuries of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and medial collateral ligament (MCL); 4 patients had ALC,PCL and posterolateral corner (PLC) injuries. Four patients had medial meniscus injuries and 2 patients had lateral meniscus injuries. The MCL,PLC and meniscus injuries were treated with operation on the first stage, and functional exercises were performed 3 weeks after fixation. The reconstruction operation of ACL and (or) PCL was performed at the second stage under arthroscopy 3 to 6 months later when the movement range of knee joint recovered to the normal level with obvious relaxation. All incisions healed by primary intention. All the patients were followed up with a mean duration of 48.9 months (ranged, 24 to 80 months). The Lysholm score was improved from preoperative 19.6 +/- 0.9 to the latest follow-up 87.1 +/- 2.8 (t=12.3, Pinjuries in the knee, staged repair and reconstruction can effectively restore knee joint stability and function.

  3. 9 CFR 113.332 - Tenosynovitis Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tenosynovitis Vaccine. 113.332 Section... Virus Vaccines § 113.332 Tenosynovitis Vaccine. Tenosynovitis Vaccine shall be prepared from virus... pure, safe, and immunogenic shall be used for preparing seeds for vaccine production. All serials of...

  4. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries and Outcome of Arthroscopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To study the results of arterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repairs using arthroscopic assisted reconstructions using harmstrings. A follow-up rehabilitation programme of immediate mobilisation, weight bearing and extension. Subjects: Twenty arthroscopic reconstructions of the anterior cruciate ligament using the ...

  5. Disruption of the proximal tibiofibular joint in the setting of multi-ligament knee injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porrino, Jack A. [University of Washington, Department of Radiology, 4245 Roosevelt Way NE, Box 354755, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Instability of the proximal tibiofibular joint is a relatively uncommon condition when in isolation; however, instability of the proximal tibiofibular joint is far more frequent in those presenting with a severe multi-ligament injury of the knee. If this joint is left unstable, repair of a co-existent injury of the posterolateral corner may fail, regardless of the proficiency of the technique. We present two patients with disruption of the proximal tibiofibular joint, including the MRI appearance, who initially presented to our hospital for management of significant polytrauma, as well as multi-ligament injury of the ipsilateral knee. (orig.)

  6. Increased medial tibial slope in teenage pediatric population with open physes and anterior cruciate ligament injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vyas, Shail; van Eck, Carola F.; Vyas, Nina; Fu, Freddie H.; Otsuka, Norman Y.

    2011-01-01

    Variations in bony morphology have been associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk. The primary aim of this study was to compare the tibial slope in the teenage pediatric population with open physes, with and without ACL injury. The secondary aims were to compare the notch width

  7. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury: Return to Play, Function and Long-Term Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda, Fernando; Sánchez, Luis; Amy, Eduardo; Micheo, William

    Anterior cruciate ligament tears are common and affect young individuals who participate in jumping and pivoting sports. After injury many individuals undergo ligament reconstruction (ACLR) but do not return to play, suffer recurrent injury and osteoarthritis. Outcome studies show that after ACLR, 81% of individuals return to sports, 65% return to their preinjury level and 55% return to competitive sports. Systematic reviews place the risk of ipsilateral retears at 5.8% and contralateral injuries at 11.8%, with recent reports of over 20% failure rate. Approximately 20% to 50% of patients will have evidence of OA within 10 to 20 yr. Factors important in reducing complications include timing of surgery, individualized return to play protocols, and prevention programs for injury. Further understanding of the factors that increase return to play percentages, reduce the risk of recurrent injury and improve long-term outcomes after ACL injury is needed to reduce the burden of these injuries on society.

  8. Value of ultrasonography in assessment of recent injury of anterior talofi bular ligament in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Szczepaniak

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sprained ankle is a very common injury in children. Proper treatment of ligament injuries enables full recovery. X-ray and US examinations are commonly available diagnostic methods. Material and methods: Two hundred and six children (113 girls and 93 boys, mean age 10.6 with recent ankle joint sprain (up to 7 days of injury were subject to a retrospective analysis. All patients underwent an X-ray and US examination of the ankle joint within 7 days of injury. In 19 patients, anterior talofi bular ligament reconstruction was conducted. Results: X-ray failed to visualize a pathology in 129 children (63%; in 24 patients (12%, avulsion fracture of the lateral malleolus was found, and in 36 cases (17%, effusion in the talocrural joint was detected. Ultrasonography failed to visualize a pathology in 19 children (9%; in 60 patients (29%, it showed avulsion fracture of the lateral malleolus involving the attachment of the anterior talofi bular ligament (ATFL; in 34 cases (17%, complete ATFL tear was detected, and in 51 patients (25%, partial ATFL injury was found. Other injuries constituted 19%. The surgeries conducted to repair the anterior talofi bular ligament (19 confi rmed the US/X-ray diagnoses in 100% of cases. Avulsion ATFL injury, i.e. the one that involves the ligament attachment site, is usually found in younger children (median: 8 years of age. Complete ATFL tears (not involving the attachment site concern older children (median: 14 years of age. Conclusions: Since X-ray is of limited value in diagnosing ankle joint pathologies in recent sprain injuries in children, soft tissue imaging, i.e. ultrasonography, is the basic examination to assess the ligament complex. Avulsion fractures, which involve the ATFL attachment site and are usually found in younger children, are a consequence of the incomplete ossifi cation and require urgent diagnosis and orthopedic consultation.

  9. Simultaneous Reconstruction of the Medial and Lateral Collateral Ligaments for Chronic Combined Ligament Injuries of the Ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Toshito; Shima, Hiroaki; Mori, Katsunori; Tsujinaka, Seiya; Neo, Masashi

    2017-07-01

    Objective data on chronic injuries of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) of the ankle are scarce. Chronic MCL injuries are frequently associated with lateral collateral ligament (LCL) injuries. For patients with chronic combined MCL and LCL injuries, the authors have performed simultaneous surgery of the 2 ligaments. Simultaneous surgery of the 2 ligaments may be effectively used to treat chronic combined MCL and LCL injuries. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Surgical outcomes were evaluated in 29 consecutive patients presenting with chronic MCL and LCL injuries (30 ankles; 15 men and 14 women; mean age, 31 years; 13 competitive and 10 recreational athletes). Preoperative and postoperative clinical outcomes were measured with the Karlsson score and the Japanese Society for Surgery of the Foot (JSSF) ankle-hindfoot scale score. The patients underwent preoperative and postoperative functional measurements and a radiological examination. In addition, preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results, arthroscopic findings, and histology of the MCL were evaluated. Preoperatively, the deep fibers of the MCL did not appear striated in 29 ankles, and high-intensity signal changes were observed in 23 ankles on T2-weighted or gradient echo MRI. MCL ruptures were confirmed with arthroscopic surgery. Medial impingement lesions and focal chondral lesions were confirmed in 10 and 21 ankles, respectively. Histology of the reconstructed MCL showed dense collagen fibers with vessels. The mean postoperative follow-up period was 30 months (range, 24-52 months). There was a significant change between preoperative and postoperative Karlsson scores (69.0 vs 96.1 points, respectively; P < .0001) and JSSF scores (69.8 vs 94.5 points, respectively; P < .0001). On varus and valgus stress radiography, the postoperative talar tilt angle was significantly lower than the preoperative angle. Postoperative anterior displacement on stress radiography was significantly lower than

  10. Deltoid ligament and tibiofibular syndesmosis injury in chronic lateral ankle instability: Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation at 3T and comparison with arthroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Ka Young; Choi, Yun Sun; Lee, Seok Hoon; Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won; Jeong, Min Sun; Kim, Dae Jung [Eulji Hospital, Eulji University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To evaluate the prevalence of deltoid ligament and distal tibiofibular syndesmosis injury on 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with chronic lateral ankle instability (CLAI). Fifty patients (mean age, 35 years) who had undergone preoperative 3T MRI and surgical treatment for CLAI were enrolled. The prevalence of deltoid ligament and syndesmosis injury were assessed. The complexity of lateral collateral ligament complex (LCLC) injury was correlated with prevalence of deltoid or syndesmosis injuries. The diagnostic accuracy of ankle ligament imaging at 3T MRI was analyzed using arthroscopy as a reference standard. On MRI, deltoid ligament injury was identified in 18 (36%) patients as follows: superficial ligament alone, 9 (50%); deep ligament alone 2 (11%); and both ligaments 7 (39%). Syndesmosis abnormality was found in 21 (42%) patients as follows: anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (AITFL) alone, 19 (90%); and AITFL and interosseous ligament, 2 (10%). There was no correlation between LCLC injury complexity and the prevalence of an accompanying deltoid or syndesmosis injury on both MRI and arthroscopic findings. MRI sensitivity and specificity for detection of deltoid ligament injury were 84% and 93.5%, and those for detection of syndesmosis injury were 91% and 100%, respectively. Deltoid ligament or syndesmosis injuries were common in patients undergoing surgery for CLAI, regardless of the LCLC injury complexity. 3T MRI is helpful for the detection of all types of ankle ligament injury. Therefore, careful interpretation of pre-operative MRI is essential.

  11. [Combined anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament injury--technique and results of simultaneous arthroscopic reconstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinek, V; Imhoff, A B

    1998-01-01

    Simultaneous ACL and PCL ruptures are rare but serious injuries resulting in distinct instability of the knee joint followed by an early degenerative arthritis. This combined trauma, which is often accompanied by additional ligament lesions, originates from a knee dislocation. While the conservative treatment of this complex instability is abandoned, the operative procedures are not yet standardised. The timing of the cruciate ligament reconstruction depends on the additional injuries, but generally the postprimary treatment is performed. Autografts and allografts, which can be also combined, are available for the reconstruction of the cruciate ligaments. The arthroscopic assisted operation starts with the drilling of all tibial and femoral tunnels using standard ACL and PCL arthroscopic instruments. The PCL is positioned after the graft has been transported into the joint through an anterolateral port, the ACL graft is positioned through the tibial drill hole and both are anchored first on the femoral and then on the tibial site i.e. with interference screws. In the postoperative rehabilitation neither immobilisation nor brace are used and progressive range of motion is allowed. The arthroscopic assisted reconstructions of the ACL and increasingly of the PCL are becoming standard procedures, but the technically difficult combined ACL/PCL reconstruction is restricted to a small number of arthroscopists. The first clinical results demonstrate, that the arthroscopic operation is comparable to the open reconstruction.

  12. Intraarticular injuries associated with anterior cruciate ligament tear: findings at ligament reconstruction in high school and recreational athletes. An analysis of sex-based differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piasecki, Dana P; Spindler, Kurt P; Warren, Todd A; Andrish, Jack T; Parker, Richard D

    2003-01-01

    Despite research on the increased risk of anterior cruciate ligament tears in female athletes, few studies have addressed sex differences in the incidence of associated intraarticular injuries. When patients are stratified by sport and competition level, no sex differences exist in either the mechanism of injury or pattern of intraarticular injuries observed at anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Prospective cohort study. Two hundred twenty-one athletes undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction met our inclusion criteria of anterior cruciate ligament tear as a singular event without reinjury or history of prior injury or surgery in either knee. Data were collected on competition level (high school, amateur), sport (basketball, soccer, skiing), mechanism of injury, articular cartilage injuries, and meniscal tears. Data were statistically analyzed by sex with the chi-square test and Student's t-test. High school athletes had no significant sex differences in mechanism of injury. Female soccer athletes had fewer medial meniscal tears than did male athletes, and female basketball players had fewer medial femoral condyle injuries. At the amateur level, female basketball players had more contact injuries, an earlier onset of swelling, and fewer lateral meniscal tears than did male players. At the high school level, male and female athletes shared a common mechanism of injury, and yet the female athletes had fewer intraarticular injuries in basketball and soccer. If such intraarticular injuries prove to be a significant risk factor for poor long-term outcome, women may enjoy a better prognosis after reconstruction.

  13. [Ligament bracing--augmented primary suture repair in multiligamentous knee injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitmann, M; Gerau, M; Hötzel, J; Giannakos, A; Frosch, K-H; Preiss, A

    2014-02-01

    Reconstruction of knee stability by primary ligament sutures and additional augmentation after knee dislocation. Acute knee dislocation Schenck type III and IV. Operative treatment should be performed within 7 days after injury. Chronic instability after knee dislocation, refixable bony avulsions, critical soft tissue, infection, lack of compliance. Supine position with electric leg holder. Short arthroscopic assessment of concomitant injuries. Schenck type III medial injuries and Schenck IV injuries: anteromedial parapatellar arthrotomy. Injuries type Schenck III lateral: anteromedian arthrotomy. Armoring of ligament stumps for transosseus sutures. Placement of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) drill tunnels. Extracortical diversion of the suture armorings and insertion of augmentation systems. Fixation of the PCL augmentation in 70-90° flexion. Fixation of the ACL augmentation in 20-30° flexion. Knotting of the transosseus ligament sutures. If necessary (postero-)lateral and/or medial stabilization. Limited weight bearing with 20 kg for 6 weeks. Stabilizing brace (e.g., Hypex-Lite®, Albrecht) generally for 12 weeks. Mobilization under tension of the quadriceps muscle for 6 weeks. In total, 20 patients have been treated using the principle of "ligament bracing". So far 8 patients (aged 18-60 years, median 33 years) have been assessed with a follow-up of 10-15 months (median 12 months) postoperatively. In all, 6 patients showed stable knees with good results. Recurrent instability of the ACL was observed in 2 patients; the collateral ligaments and PCL were stable. For the evaluation the following scores were used: IKDC score, Tegner score, and Lysholm score. To objectify the data, stress radiography and physical examination were performed. Using the operative technique mentioned above, no complications occurred. During follow-up 2 patients reported a deficiency of flexion.

  14. Imaging of Athletic Injuries of Knee Ligaments and Menisci: Sports Imaging Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naraghi, Ali M; White, Lawrence M

    2016-10-01

    Acute knee injuries are a common source of morbidity in athletes and if overlooked may result in chronic functional impairment. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the knee has become the most commonly performed musculoskeletal MR examination and is an indispensable tool in the appropriate management of the injured athlete. Meniscal and ligamentous tearing are the most frequent indications for surgical intervention in sports injuries and an understanding of the anatomy, biomechanics, mechanisms of injury, and patterns of injury are all critical to accurate diagnosis and appropriate management. These will be discussed in reference to meniscal tears and injuries of the cruciate ligaments as well as injuries of the posterolateral and posteromedial corners of the knee. (©) RSNA, 2016.

  15. Nonoperative treatment of acute knee ligament injuries. A review with special reference to indications and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannus, P; Järvinen, M

    1990-04-01

    Nonoperative treatment has received little attention in the numerous scientific reports on knee ligament injuries. Great controversy still exists concerning the proper treatment of a knee with a ruptured ligament, especially the anterior cruciate ligament. However, according to the studies of the authors and an extensive review of the literature the indications for conservative management can be established to be all grade I and II sprains (partial tears) of knee ligaments as well as an isolated grade III sprain (complete tear) of the posterior cruciate ligament. In addition, an isolated complete rupture of an anterior cruciate, or medial or lateral collateral ligament may be treated nonoperatively in an older sedentary person. Other injuries obviously call for an operative approach at the acute stage. Nonoperative therapy protocols must be based on the knowledge of the biological phenomenon occurring during connective tissue healing process. In the first phase of ligament healing the injured knee needs 2 to 3 weeks immobilisation for undisturbed fibroblast invasion and proliferation of collagen fibres. This is achieved by immobilising the knee in a rehabilitative knee brace locked in 40 to 45 degrees of flexion. Thereafter, a gradually increasing controlled mobilisation is allowed in the brace to avoid the deleterious effects of immobilisation to cartilage, bone, muscles, tendons and ligaments, and to enhance the orientation of collagen fibres to the stress lines of the healing ligament. After 4 to 8 weeks the goal for rehabilitation is rapid and full recovery to work and sports. A functional knee brace may be used at this phase to give extra protection before final strengthening of the injured ligament. During the mobilisation and muscle training of the therapy protocol various specific techniques can be used for strengthening of the hamstring and quadriceps muscles, including isometric, isotonic, isokinetic and eccentric exercises with or without resistive

  16. Clinical study on the arthroscopic refreshing treatment of anterior cruciate ligament injury combined with stable medial meniscus ramp injury

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, J.; Guan, K; Wang, J. Z.

    2017-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the clinical efficacy of arthroscopic refreshing treatment of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury combined with stable medial meniscus ramp injury. Sixty-eight patients treated between January 2010 and January 2014 were included, and their clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. All patients, after being treated using ACL reconstruction, were divided into 2 groups according to meniscus injury treatment method. The observation group (31 cases) was trea...

  17. Comparison of Plain MRI and MR Arthrography in the Evaluation of Lateral Ligamentous Injury of the Ankle Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Chun Chou

    2006-01-01

    Conclusion: For evaluating ankle disability, using plain MRI alone is not adequate for correctly detecting lateral collateral ligamentous injury of the ankle joint. MR arthrography improves the sensitivity and the accuracy for ATaF and CF ligament injuries. It also helps in assessing coexisting pathologic lesions of ankle joints, especially impingement syndromes and osteochondral lesions, and provides more information for therapeutic decision making.

  18. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Pediatric Athletes Presenting to Sports Medicine Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Stracciolini, Andrea; Stein, Cynthia J.; Zurakowski, David; Meehan, William P.; Myer, Gregory D; Micheli, Lyle J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Limited data exist regarding the effect of the growth process on anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk in male versus female children. Hypothesis: The proportion of ACL injuries/sports injuries presenting to clinic will vary by age, sex, and body mass index (BMI). Study Design: Cross-sectional epidemiologic study. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Methods: The study group consisted of a randomly selected 5% probability sample of all children 5 to 17 years of age presenting to a s...

  19. Kissing knees - factors behind the attraction. Knee abduction in individuals with anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    OpenAIRE

    Cronström, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and patellofemoral pain (PFP) are common sports-related knee injuries. Their consequences include compromised health of the effected individual and substantial financial costs for society. Increased knee abduction or a knee medial to foot position (KMFP), so called “kissing knees”, during weight-bearing activities is reported to be more common in patients with ACL injury or PFP than in non-injured individuals and is also reported to be associated with g...

  20. Infrared Thermal Imaging in Patients with Medial Collateral Ligament Injury of the Knee - A Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HyunJung Yang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Digital infrared thermographic imaging (DITI has been used widely for various inflammatory diseases, circulatory diseases, skin diseases, musculoskeletal diseases and cancers. In cases of ligament injury, obviously the temperature of the damaged area increases due to local inflammation; however, whether the temperature also increases due to DITI has not been determined. The purpose of the present study was to identify whether or not the changes of temperature in patient’s with medial collateral ligament injury were really due to infrared thermography and to determine the applicability of DITI for assessing ligament injuries. Methods: Twenty patient’s who underwent DITI for a medial collateral ligament injury from September 2012 to June 2014 were included in the current study. The thermographic images from the patient’s knees were divided to cover seven sub-areas: the middle of the patella, and the inferomedial, the inferolateral, the superomedial, the superolateral, the medial, and the lateral regions of patella. The temperatures of the seven regions were measured, and the temperature differences between affected and unaffected regions were analyzed by using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results: The 20 patient’s were composed of 14 women (70% and 6 men (30%, with a mean age of 62.15 ± 15.71 (mean ± standard deviation (SD years. The temperature of the affected side, which included the middle of the patella, and the inferomedial, the superomedial, the superolateral, and the medial regions, showed a significant increase compared to that of the unaffected side (P < 0.05. The inferolateral and the lateral regions showed no significant changes. Conclusion: Our study results suggest that DITI can show temperature changes if a patient has a ligament injury and that it can be applied in the evaluation of a medial collateral ligament injury.

  1. Patients with high-grade pivot-shift phenomenon are associated with higher prevalence of anterolateral ligament injury after acute anterior cruciate ligament injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guan-Yang; Zhang, Hui; Wu, Guan; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Xin; Xue, Zhe; Qian, Yi; Feng, Hua

    2017-04-01

    To compare the prevalence of concomitant anterolateral ligament (ALL) injury between patients with high-grade (grades II and III) pivot-shift and those with low-grade (grades 0 and I) pivot-shift phenomenon after acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Sixty-eight patients with an acute ACL injury who showed high-grade (grades II and III) pivot-shift phenomenon were enrolled as the study group. They were matched in a 1:1 fashion to another 68 ACL-injured control participants who showed low-grade (grades 0 and I) pivot-shift phenomenon during the same study period. Patients were matched by age, sex, and time from injury to surgery. A standardized pivot-shift test was performed under anesthesia for all the patients. Two blinded musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans for the presence of concomitant ALL injury. The grade of an ALL injury was divided into grade 0 (normal), grade I (sprain), grade II (partial tear), and grade III (complete tear). The prevalence and the grade of concomitant ALL injury were further compared between the study group and the control group. Overall, the prevalence of concomitant ALL injury in the study group (94.1%, 64/68) was significantly higher than that in the control group [60.3%, (41/68), P < 0.05]. Specifically, there were 49 patients (49/64, 76.6%) who showed grade II/III (partial/complete tear) MRI evidence of concomitant ALL injury, which was also significantly higher than that in the control group (12/41, 29.3%). Patients with high-grade pivot-shift phenomenon showed higher prevalence of concomitant ALL injury compared to those with low-grade pivot-shift phenomenon after acute ACL injuries. Careful assessment and proper treatment of this concomitant injury should be considered especially in knees with high-grade pivot-shift phenomenon. III.

  2. Anterior Cruciate Ligament OsteoArthritis Score (ACLOAS): Longitudinal MRI-based whole joint assessment of anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemer, Frank W; Frobell, Richard; Lohmander, L Stefan; Niu, Jingbo; Guermazi, Ali

    2014-05-01

    To develop a whole joint scoring system, the Anterior Cruciate Ligament OsteoArthritis Score (ACLOAS), for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based assessment of acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and follow-up of structural sequelae, and to assess its reliability. Baseline and follow-up 1.5 T MRI examinations from 20 patients of the KANON study, a randomized controlled study comparing a surgical and non-surgical treatment strategy, were assessed for up to six longitudinal visits using a novel MRI scoring system incorporating acute structural tissue damage and longitudinal changes including osteoarthritis (OA) features. Joint features assessed were acute osteochondral injury, traumatic and degenerative bone marrow lesions (BMLs), meniscus morphology and extrusion, osteophytes, collateral and cruciate ligaments including ACL graft, Hoffa-synovitis and effusion-synovitis. Cross-sectional (baseline) and longitudinal (all time points and change) intra- and inter-observer reliability was calculated using weighted (w) kappa statistics and overall percent agreement on a compartmental basis (medial tibio-femoral, lateral tibio-femoral, patello-femoral). Altogether 87 time points were evaluated. Intra-observer reliability ranged between 0.52 (baseline, Hoffa-synovitis) and 1.00 (several features), percent agreement between 52% (all time points, Hoffa-synovitis) and 100% (several features). Inter-observer reliability ranged between 0.00 and 1.00, which is explained by low frequency of some of the features. Altogether, 73% of all assessed 142 parameters showed w-kappa values between 0.80 and 1.00 and 92% showed agreement above 80%. ACLOAS allows reliable scoring of acute ACL injury and longitudinal changes. This novel scoring system incorporates features that may be relevant for structural outcome not covered by established OA scoring instruments. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Prevention Training in Female Athletes: A Systematic Review of Injury Reduction and Results of Athletic Performance Tests

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Noyes, Frank R; Barber Westin, Sue D

    2012-01-01

    Context: Many anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention training programs have been published, but few have assessed the effects of training on both ACL injury rates and athletic performance tests. Objective...

  4. The Effects of Platelet-Rich-Plasma (PRP Injection on Ligament Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudhistira Pradnyan Kloping

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Soft tissue injuries are becoming a problem especially among active people and athletes, thus doctors are focusing on PRP injection however variety of study results are making the beneficial effects of PRP towards soft tissue healing unclear. The purpose of this study is to clarify the effects of PRP injection on the healing aspect of a ligament injury. Methods: The experimental study used European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus, which was divided into the control and treated group. The 22 samples, ankle ligaments were injured. The treated group was injected with 4 ml PRP taken autologously. On the 2nd day the samples were examined for hematoma. 4 samples from each group were also examined histopathologically. On the 2nd week, the ligament thickness of the remaining samples from each group was examined ultrasonographically. Results: The clinical result showed lower presence of hematoma on the group injected with PRP compared to the control group. The Capillary dilation was less on the treated group compared to the control group. The Inflammatory cells were less on the treated group compared to the control group. The Fibroblasts Cells was less on the treated group compared to the control group. The fibrocytes was more abundant on the treated group compared to the control group. The average of Ligament Thickness was thicker on the treated group compared to the control group. Conclusion: The Injection of PRP is beneficial to a ligament injury based on its effect on enhancing healing on the inflammation, regeneration, and remodeling phases.

  5. Accuracy of MRI findings in chronic lateral ankle ligament injury: Comparison with surgical findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, H.-J. [Department of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Kangwon National University, School of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Cha, S.-D. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Myongji Hospital, Kwandong University, College of Medicine, Koyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S.S. [Department of Radiology, Kangwon National University, School of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Rho, M.-H., E-mail: parkhiji@kangwon.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwag, H.-J. [Department of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, N.-H. [Department of Radiology, Myongji Hospital, Kwandong University, College of Medicine, Koyang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, S.-Y. [Department of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-15

    Aim: To evaluate the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in chronic lateral ankle ligament injury in comparison with that of surgical findings. Materials and methods: Forty-eight cases (25 men, 23 women, mean age 36 years) of clinically suspected chronic ankle ligament injury underwent MRI studies and surgery. Sagittal, coronal, and axial, T1-weighted, spin-echo, proton density and T2-weighted, fast spin-echo images with fat saturation were obtained in all patients. MRI examinations were read in consensus by two fellowship-trained academic musculoskeletal radiologists who evaluated the lateral ankle ligaments, including the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) and calcaneofibular ligament (CFL) without clinical information. The results of the MRI studies were then compared with the surgical findings. Results: The MRI findings of ATFL injury showed a sensitivity of detection of complete tears of 75% and specificity of 86%. The sensitivity of detection of partial tears was 75% and the specificity was 78%. The sensitivity of detection of sprains was 44% and the specificity was 88%. Regarding the MRI findings of CFL injury, the sensitivity of detection of complete tears was 50% and the specificity was 98%. The sensitivity of detection of partial tear was 83% and the specificity was 93%. The sensitivity of detection of sprains was 100% and the specificity was 90%. Regarding the ATFL, the accuracies of detection were 88, 58, 77, and 85% for no injury, sprain, partial tear, and complete tear, respectively, and for the CFL the accuracies of detection were 90, 90, 92, and 96% for no injury, sprain, partial tear, and complete tear, respectively. Conclusions: The diagnosis of a complete tear of the ATFL on MRI is more sensitive than the diagnosis of a complete tear of the CFL. MRI findings of CFL injury are diagnostically specific but are not sensitive. However, only normal findings and complete tears were statistically significant between ATFL and CFL (p

  6. [Effectiveness of traumatic dislocation of knee joint combined with multiple ligament injuries treated by stages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiwei; Liu, Chunlei; Yang, Lezhong; Dai, Zhu; Cao, Shengjun

    2011-02-01

    To observe the effectiveness of traumatic dislocation of the knee joint combined with multiple ligament injuries treated by stages. Between june 2005 and November 2008, 13 cases of traumatic dislocation of the knee joint combined with multiple ligament injuries were treated by stages, including 9 males and 4 females with an average age of 30.7 years (range, 18-54 years). The dislocations were left knee in 3 cases and right knee in 10 cases. The causes of injury were sports injury in 8 cases, traffic accident injury in 2 cases, falling from height injury in 2 cases, and sprain injury in 1 case. The average time from injury to hospitalization was 9 hours (range, 6 hours to 2 days). Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), and medial collateral ligament (MCL) were involved in 8 cases; ACL, PCL, and lateral collateral ligament (LCL) in 3 cases; and ACL, PCL, MCL, and LCL in 2 cases. The valgus stress testing results of 10 knees were ++ to +++; the varus stress testing results of 5 knees were ++ to +++; all knees showed positive in the anterior or the posterior drawer test and ++ to +++ in Lachman test. The nerve, vessel, MCL, LCL, PCL, meniscus were repaired in the first operation. The functional exercise of knee joint was done after fixation for 3-4 weeks. During the second operation, the ACL was reconstructed under arthroscopy after the range of motion (ROM) of knee joint was good with anterior instability of knee within 4-6 months. All wounds healed by first intention after two operations; no complications of infection and compartment syndrome occurred. All cases were followed up 12-60 months with an average of 36 months. Joint effusion of knee occurred in 2 cases at 4 weeks after the first operation and was cured after removal of fluid. At 3 months after the second operation, the results of valgus stress testing and Lachman test were ++ in 1 case, respectively; the results of valgus stress testing, varus stress testing, and Lachman test

  7. Management of acute lateral ankle ligament injury in the athlete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.; McCollum, Graham A.; Calder, James D. F.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2013-01-01

    Inversion injuries involve about 25 % of all injuries of the musculoskeletal system and about 50 % of these injuries are sport-related. This article reviews the acute lateral ankle injuries with special emphasis on a rationale for treatment of these injuries in athletes. A narrative review was

  8. Fewer ligament injuries but no preventive effect on muscle injuries and severe injuries: an 11-year follow-up of the UEFA Champions League injury study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekstrand, Jan; Hägglund, Martin; Kristenson, Karolina; Magnusson, Henrik; Waldén, Markus

    2013-08-01

    Limited information is available on the variation in injury rates over multiple seasons of professional football. To analyse time-trends in injury characteristics of male professional football players over 11 consecutive seasons. A total of 1743 players comprising 27 teams from 10 countries were followed prospectively between 2001 and 2012. Team medical staff recorded individual player exposure and time loss injuries. A total of 8029 time loss injuries were recorded. The match unavailability due to injury was 14% and constant over the study period. On average, a player sustained two injuries per season, resulting in approximately 50 injuries per team and season. The ligament injury rate decreased during the study period (R(2)=0.608, b=-0.040, 95% CI -0.065 to -0.016, p=0.005), whereas the rate of muscle injury (R(2)=0.228, b=-0.013, 95% CI -0.032 to 0.005, p=0.138) and severe injury (R(2)=0.141, b=0.015, 95% CI -0.013 to 0.043, p=0.255) did not change over the study period. In addition, no changes in injury rates over the 11-year period were found for either training (R(2)=0.000, b=0.000, 95% CI -0.035 to 0.034, p=0.988) or match play (R(2)=0.282, b=-0.015, 95% CI -0.032 to 0.003, p=0.093). The injury rate has decreased for ligament injuries over the last 11 years, but overall training, match injury rates and the rates of muscle injury and severe injury remain high.

  9. Psychosocial factors influencing the recovery of athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Wierike, S. C. M.; van der Sluis, A.; van den Akker-Scheek, I.; Elferink-Gemser, M. T.; Visscher, C.

    2013-01-01

    This review describes the psychosocial factors that affect recovery following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and reconstructive surgery in athletes. A systematic search in literature with inclusion and exclusion criteria on PubMed, PsycINFO, and Embase was performed. Articles used in this

  10. Acute Single-Stage Reconstruction of Multiligament Knee Injuries Using the Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jie; Li, Xia; Zhou, Zihui; Zhu, Zhenan

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the study was to report our early outcome in the management of multiligament knee injuries with the ligament advanced reinforcement system (LARS). Subjects and Methods Between 2007 and 2010, 9 of 11 patients operated on for multiligament knee injuries were included in this study; 2 patients were excluded due to complicated neurovascular injuries, open knee dislocations and severe comorbidities. All patients were managed acutely (ligaments with LARS ligament and were followed up for an average of 30 months (18–46 months). Results The mean Lysholm score of the 9 patients at final follow-up was around 90 (range 88–94) with an average Tegner activity score of 5.5. The postoperative function of 1 case of KD-11 and 2 cases of KD-111 was rated as ‘A,’ while the remaining cases were rated ‘B’. At final follow-up, minor osteoarthritic degeneration was detected in 1 case of KD-III and 2 cases of KD-IV. Superficial infection developed in 1 case, and no cases of knee synovitis and premature osteoarthritis were recorded. Conclusion A creditable outcome at mean of 30 months’ follow-up was obtained in acute single-stage reconstruction of uncomplicated multiligament knee injuries with LARS ligament. PMID:23428973

  11. Grading Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Injury after Ligament Reconstruction Surgery: Diagnostic Efficacy of Oblique Coronal MR Imaging of the Knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Sung Gyu; Hong, Sung Hwan; Choi, Ja Young; Jun, Woo Sun; Choi, Jung Ah; Park, Eun Ah; Kang, Heung Sik; Kwon, Jong Won [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    Objective : The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of using additional oblique coronal MRI of the knee for grading anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft injury after ligament reconstruction surgery. Materials and Methods : We retrospectively reviewed 51 consecutive MR knee examinations of 48 patients who underwent both ACL reconstruction and follow-up arthroscopy. The MR examinations included the orthogonal axial, sagittal, coronal images and the oblique coronal T2-weighted images, which were oriented in parallel with the course of the femoral intercondylar roof. Two radiologists independently evaluated the status of the ACL grafts with using the routine knee MRI and then with adding the oblique coronal imaging. The severity of ACL graft injury was graded using a 3-point system from MR images as intact, partial tear or complete tear, and the results were compared with the arthroscopic results. Weighted kappa statistics were used to analyze the diagnostic accuracies of the knee MRI with and without the additional oblique coronal imaging. For each evaluation, the observers reported a confidence level for grading the ACL graft injuries in the two imaging groups. Result : The weighted kappa values according to the routine knee MRI were 0.555 (reader 1) and 0.515 (reader 2). The inclusion of additional oblique coronal imaging increased the weighted kappa values to 0.666 (reader 1) and 0.611 (reader 2). The mean confidence levels by each reader were significantly higher (p < 0.01, paired t-test) with the additional oblique coronal imaging than by using the routine knee MRI alone. Conclusion : The additional use of oblique coronal MRI of the knee improves both the diagnostic accuracy and confidence for grading ACL graft injury.

  12. Is Pre-Injury Leg Length Discrepancy A Risk Factor for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury in the Skeletally Immature Athlete?

    OpenAIRE

    Lazaro, Lionel E; van der List, Jelle P.; Cordasco, Frank A.; Green, Daniel W.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Recognition of modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in children and adolescent athletes is paramount to develop effective strategies for prevention and treatment. We hypothesize that the intrinsic risk factors leg length discrepancy (LLD) and lateral mechanical axis deviation (MAD) are not uncommon in skeletally immature athletes that suffered an acute ACL injury. Methods: We prospectively obtained full-length hip-to-ankle radiog...

  13. MRI of injuries of the lateral ankle ligaments; MRT bei Verletzungen der lateralen und angrenzenden Baender des Sprunggelenks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breitenseher, Martin [Landesklinikum Waldviertel Horn, Horn (Austria). Inst. fuer Radiologie und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2011-09-15

    The most frequent sport injury of the ankle is located in the lateral ankle ligaments. The diagnosis of lateral collateral ankle ligament trauma is based on patient history, clinical examination, and stress radiography, allowing a fair diagnosis for the daily routine. For the direct visualization and precise diagnosis of the lateral ankle ligaments MRI provides the best answer. MRI is used with controlled positioning of the foot, correct angulation of sequenzes, and distinct analysis of MR findings. Sinus tarsi ligaments and ligaments of the distal syndesmosis should be included to the report. In selected patients MRI allows the best evaluation of the extent of the lateral ankle ligaments. MRI is the method of choice for combined osteochondral injuries and soft tissue lesions too. (orig.)

  14. Effectiveness of Knee Injury and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear Prevention Programs: A Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Donnell-Fink, Laurel A; Kristina Klara; Collins, Jamie E.; Yang, Heidi Y.; Goczalk, Melissa G.; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Elena Losina

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Individuals frequently involved in jumping, pivoting or cutting are at increased risk of knee injury, including anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears. We sought to use meta-analytic techniques to establish whether neuromuscular and proprioceptive training is efficacious in preventing knee and ACL injury and to identify factors related to greater efficacy of such programs. Methods: We performed a systematic literature search of studies published in English between 1996 and 2014. In...

  15. Prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of anterior cruciate ligament injuries in children

    OpenAIRE

    Lang PJ; Sugimoto D; Micheli LJ

    2017-01-01

    Pamela J Lang,1,2 Dai Sugimoto,1–3 Lyle J Micheli1–3 1Division of Sports Medicine, Department of Orthopedics, Boston Children’s Hospital, 2Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 3The Micheli Center for Sports Injury Prevention, Waltham, MA, USA Abstract: As more children and adolescents participate in competitive organized sports, there has been an increase in the reported incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in t...

  16. Risk factors and prevention strategies of non-contact anterior cruciate ligament injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laible, Catherine; Sherman, Orrin H

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the number of women playing sports has increased significantly. The passage of Title IX in 1972 had a significant effect in encouraging female participation in sports. This increase in women's sports participation also led to a rise in noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. As ACL injuries in young female athletes have be- come a public health issue, much research has been done on risk factors and prevention strategies.

  17. Return to Play after Nonsurgical Treatment of Elbow Ulnar Collateral Ligament Injuries in Professional Baseball Players

    OpenAIRE

    Ford, Gregory M.; Genuario, James; Noonan, Thomas J.; Kinkartz, Jason D.; Githens, Thomas; Murayama, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Injury to the elbow ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) is relatively common in pitchers. In the 70's reconstructive surgery was developed as a viable option to a potentially career ending injury. Multiple studies have demonstrated return to play (RTP) rates of 74-83% after reconstruction. Studies of RTP after nonoperative treatment in throwing athletes are limited, reporting 42%. There are no studies reporting RTP rates with nonoperative treatment of professional baseball players. Th...

  18. [Surgical treatment of ulnar collateral ligament injuries of the thumb metacarpophalangeal joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, C; Neshkova, I; Schmidt, K; Meffert, R; Jakubietz, M; Jakubietz, R

    2016-04-01

    Reconstruction of the ruptured ulnar collateral ligament of the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joint of the thumb. Ruptured ulnar collateral ligament of the thumb MP joint with instability: joint opening of more than 30° in flexion and more than 20° in extension, Stener lesion, displaced avulsion fractures. Abrasions, wound-healing disturbance, skin disease, osteoarthritis. Curved skin incision dorsoulnar above the thumb MP joint. Protection of the branches of the superficial radial nerve. Incision of the adductor aponeurosis. Exposing the ulnar collateral ligament; opening and examination of the joint. Depending on the injury, primary suture repair, transosseous suture, repair with a bone anchor, osteosynthesis with K-wires or small screws in avulsion fracture, ligament reconstruction in chronic instability or older injury. Cast splint of the MP joint until swelling subsides; cast immobilization for 6 weeks; range-of-motion exercises, avoiding forced radial deviation of the MP joint for 3 months. Complete joint stability 3 months postoperatively in all 34 patients with rupture of the ulnar collateral ligament.

  19. Tears of anterior cruciate ligament and associated injury in the knee joint: MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eui Jong; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Ahn, Jin Whan; Yoon, Yup [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-03-15

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the characteristic findings in tears of the anterior cruciate ligament(ACL) and associated injury at MR imaging. We reviewed the findings of MR images and the corresponding arthroscopic results of 32 patients with ACL tears. We evaluated the signal intensity and contour of ACL surrounding bony structures, menisci and associated injury of the knee joint. Complete ACL tears were present in 25 patients and partial ACL tears were in 7 patients. Complete ACL tears showed heterogenously increased signal intensity with contour bulging of the ACL in 14 patients (56%) and without bulging or absence in 11 patients(44%). Most patients torn ACL with contour bulging(12/14) had bone bruise, but only one patient torn ACL without bulging contour had bone bruise. ACL with thin continuous low signal band surrounding heterogenously increased signal intensity suggests partial tear which was seen in three patients of seven proved partial ACL tears. Combined bone injury in ACL tear were in 23 patients (73%) and most of these(22/23) were at midportion of lateral notch of femur and/or posterior portion of lateral tibial plateu. Deepening of lateral notch of femur were noted in 17 patients(53%). Associated injuries of the other ligaments of knee joint were buckling of the posterior cruciate ligament(16/32, 50%) and tears of the medial collateral ligament(11/32, 34%). Posterior horns of menisci were more frequent site of combined injury within menisci in patients with ACL tear. Acute tearing of ACL in MRI is seen as heterogenously increased signal intensity with contour bulging of ACL and combined bone bruises. Patients with torn ACL frequently have various combined injury. In patient with knee injury, these associated or ancillary findings suggest that ACL tear is present.

  20. Comparison of CT and MRI in patients with tibial plateau fracture: can CT findings predict ligament tear or meniscal injury?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mui, Leonora W.; Engelsohn, Eliyahu; Umans, Hilary [Jacobi Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2007-02-15

    (1) To determine the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) in the evaluation of ligament tear and avulsion in patients with tibial plateau fracture. (2) To evaluate whether the presence or severity of fracture gap and articular depression can predict meniscal injury. A fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologist retrospectively reviewed knee CT and MRI examinations of 41 consecutive patients presenting to a level 1 trauma center with tibial plateau fractures. Fracture gap, articular depression, ligament tear and footprint avulsions were assessed on CT examinations. The MRI studies were examined for osseous and soft tissue injuries, including meniscal tear, meniscal displacement, ligament tear, and ligament avulsion. CT demonstrated torn ligaments with 80% sensitivity and 98% specificity. Only 2% of ligaments deemed intact on careful CT evaluation had partial or complete tears on MRI. Although the degree of fracture gap and articular depression was significantly greater in patients with meniscal injury compared with those without meniscal injury, ROC analysis demonstrated no clear threshold for gap or depression that yielded a combination of high sensitivity and specificity. In the acute setting, CT offers high sensitivity and specificity for depicting osseous avulsions, as well as high negative predictive value for excluding ligament injury. However, MRI remains necessary for the preoperative detection of meniscal injury. (orig.)

  1. The potential role of prophylactic/functional knee bracing in preventing knee ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishiraj, Neetu; Taunton, Jack E; Lloyd-Smith, Robert; Woollard, Robert; Regan, William; Clement, D B

    2009-01-01

    It is estimated that knee injuries account for up to 60% of all sport injuries, with the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) accounting for almost half of these knee injuries. These knee injuries can result in high healthcare costs, as an ACL injury is often associated with surgery, long and costly rehabilitation, differing degrees of impairment and potential long-term consequences such as osteoarthritis. The interest in ACL injury prevention has been extensive for the past decade. Over this period, many ACL (intrinsic and extrinsic) injury risk factors have been identified and investigated by numerous researchers. Although prevention programmes have shown potential in decreasing knee ligament injuries, several researchers have suggested that no conclusive evidence has been presented in reducing the rate and/or severity of ACL injuries during sporting competition. Knee braces have been available for the last 30 years and have been used to assist individuals with ACL-deficient and ACL-reconstructed knees. However, research is limited on the use of knee braces (prophylactic and functional) to potentially prevent knee ligament injury in the non-injured population. One possible explanation for the limited research could be that the use of these devices has raised concerns of decreased or impaired athletic performance. In summary, the review of subjective and some objective publications suggests that a functional knee brace may offer stability to an ACL-deficient knee joint; however, research is limited on the use of a knee brace for prophylactic use in non-injured athletes. The limited research could be a result of fear of performance hindrance that has led to poor knee brace compliance.

  2. Motives for sports participation as predictions of self-reported outcomes after anterior cruciate ligament injury of the knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roessler, K K; Andersen, Tonny Elmose; Lohmander, S

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study was to access how individual's motives for participation in sports impact on self-reported outcomes 2 years after an anterior cruciate ligament injury. Based on a longitudinal cohort study, this secondary analysis present data from the Knee Anterior Cruciate Ligament, Nonsurgical...

  3. Diagnosis of ligament injuries of the ankle joint using pressure during exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jend, H.H.; Daase, M.; Heller, M.; Holzrichter, D.

    1983-11-01

    Pressure exerted against the ankle joint during lateral exposures shows a typical form of subluxation of the talus in respect of the tibia if there has been rupture of the anterior fibulo-talar ligament. This displacement can be quantified by using the standard technique of Seiler and Holzrichter. Retrospective evaluation of exposures carried out with pressure in 206 patients with stretching or rupture of the ligaments of the ankle joint have shown that stretching can be diagnosed if the joint space reaches 7 mm, and a rupture can be diagnosed with a joint space of 11 mm. If there is a difference of more than 5 mm in the joint space of the two joints, a rupture is present. With these criteria, 85% of all ligament injuries can be correctly diagnosed. In the remaining 15%, early arthrography provides the necessary information.

  4. Unrecognized ligamentous instability due to high-energy, low-velocity mechanism of injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusseldorp, J R; Ow-Yang, M; Mobbs, R J

    2010-01-01

    We report a unique mechanism of injury and illustrate the difficulties of diagnosing purely ligamentous injuries to the cervical spine. To our knowledge, there have been no previous reports of this type of high-energy, low-velocity mechanism of injury. The pattern of injury is also unusual, consisting of anterolisthesis of L4 on L5 with bilateral perched facet joints, atlantoaxial instability and bilateral lower limb fractures. We present a 49-year-old man who experienced a high-energy, low-velocity crush injury that led to extreme hyperflexion of his spine. Standard trauma protocols were carried out, yet atlantoaxial instability was not diagnosed until 3 days post-operatively, when the patient went into respiratory failure due to high spinal cord compression. We fused the C1/2 vertebral bodies using Harm's technique; the patient exhibited no long-term spinal cord dysfunction. Although uncommon, if left undiagnosed or not considered, purely ligamentous injuries to the cervical spine can result in catastrophic complications. Such injuries are an important subgroup to be considered at the time of initial assessment. Furthermore, when managing the multi-trauma patient, clinicians must remember not to overlook the atlantoaxial joint, as high-energy, low-velocity injury to the cervical spine may lead to silent, life-threatening instability that may not be apparent on routine imaging. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of functional bracing on knee injury in skiers with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterett, William I; Briggs, Karen K; Farley, Timothy; Steadman, J Richard

    2006-10-01

    The role of knee bracing in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions is controversial. Functional bracing will have an effect on subsequent knee injury in skiers with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. From 1991 to 1997, 11606 skiers at a major destination ski resort underwent preseason knee screening. The anterior cruciate ligament-reconstructed group consisted of 820 skiers who had had an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction 2 years or more earlier. Of these, 257 skiers selected the use of functional knee brace during skiing. The dependent variable was subsequent knee injury, identified via workers' compensation records. Covariates included age, gender, ski occupation, Lachman grade, pivot-shift grade, KT-1000 arthrometer manual maximum displacement, and use of a functional brace. Univariate and multivariate risk factors for subsequent knee injury were determined. In this study, 257 skier-employees with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction wore braces and 563 skier-employees with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction did not. Braced skiers had significantly higher preseason rates of grade II or higher Lachman and pivot-shift tests (braced, 29% and 22%, respectively; nonbraced, 11% and 10%, respectively; P knee injuries were identified, 51 (8.9 injuries/100 knees/ski season) in the nonbraced group and 10 (4.0 injuries/100 knees/ski season) in the braced group (P = .009). Nonbraced skiers were 2.74 times more likely to suffer subsequent injury than were braced skiers (odds ratio, 2.74 [confidence interval, 1.2-4.9]). Logistic regression modeling identified nonbracing as a significant independent multivariate risk factor for subsequent knee injury in the high-demand skiers with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Because of the increased risk of subsequent knee injury in nonbraced skiers, the authors recommend functional bracing for skiers with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Whether the

  6. Management of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury: What's In and What's Out?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raines, Benjamin Todd; Naclerio, Emily; Sherman, Seth L

    2017-01-01

    Sports medicine physicians have a keen clinical and research interest in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The biomechanical, biologic, and clinical data researchers generate, help drive injury management and prevention practices globally. The current concepts in ACL injury and surgery are being shaped by technological advances, expansion in basic science research, resurging interest in ACL preservation, and expanding efforts regarding injury prevention. As new methods are being developed in this field, the primary goal of safely improving patient outcomes will be a unifying principle. With this review, we provide an overview of topics currently in controversy or debate, and we identify paradigm shifts in the understanding, management, and prevention of ACL tears.

  7. A multisport epidemiologic comparison of anterior cruciate ligament injuries in high school athletics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Allan M; Collins, Christy L; Henke, Natalie M; Yard, Ellen E; Fields, Sarah K; Comstock, R Dawn

    2013-01-01

    The knee joint is the second most commonly injured body site after the ankle and the leading cause of sport-related surgeries. Knee injuries, especially of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), are among the most economically costly sport injuries, frequently requiring expensive surgery and rehabilitation. To investigate the epidemiology of ACL injuries among high school athletes by sport and sex. Descriptive epidemiology study. Using an Internet-based data-collection tool, Reporting Information Online (RIO), certified athletic trainers from 100 nationally representative US high schools reported athlete-exposure and injury data for athletes from 9 sports during the 2007/08-2011/12 academic years. The outcome of interest in this study was ACL injuries. During the study period, 617 ACL injuries were reported during 9 452 180 athlete exposures (AEs), for an injury rate of 6.5 per 100 000 AEs. Nationally, in the 9 sports studied, an estimated 215 628 ACL injuries occurred during the study period. The injury rate was higher in competition (17.6) than practice (2.4; rate ratio [RR] = 7.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 6.08, 8.68). Girls' soccer had the highest injury rate (12.2) followed by boys' football (11.1), with boys' basketball (2.3) and boys' baseball (0.7) having the lowest rates. In sex-comparable sports, girls had a higher rate (8.9) than boys (2.6; RR = 3.4, 95% CI = 2.64, 4.47). Overall, 76.6% of ACL injuries resulted in surgery. The most common mechanisms of injury were player-to-player contact (42.8%) and no contact (37.9%). Anterior cruciate ligament injury rates vary by sport, sex, and type of exposure. Recognizing such differences is important when evaluating the effectiveness of evidence-based, targeted prevention efforts.

  8. Tenosynovitis: An unusual presentation of leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukriti Baveja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tenosynovitis is an uncommon presentation of Type 1 reaction in leprosy. Herein, we report a case of bilateral tenosynovitis of wrist joints who after being unsuccessfully treated by a rheumatologist for several months, was finally diagnosed as a case of Hansen's disease (borderline lepromatous with Type 1 reaction.

  9. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Pediatric Athletes Presenting to Sports Medicine Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stracciolini, Andrea; Stein, Cynthia J.; Zurakowski, David; Meehan, William P.; Myer, Gregory D.; Micheli, Lyle J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Limited data exist regarding the effect of the growth process on anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk in male versus female children. Hypothesis: The proportion of ACL injuries/sports injuries presenting to clinic will vary by age, sex, and body mass index (BMI). Study Design: Cross-sectional epidemiologic study. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Methods: The study group consisted of a randomly selected 5% probability sample of all children 5 to 17 years of age presenting to a sports medicine clinic from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2009; 2133 charts were reviewed. Data collected included demographics, height and weight, injury mechanism, diagnosis, treatment, previous injury, and organized sports. Results: A total of 206 ACL tears were analyzed (104 girls, 102 boys). Girls were slightly older than boys (15.1 ± 1.7 vs 14.3 ± 2.1 years; P < 0.01). Male-female comparison of ACL injury/total injury by age revealed that girls had a steeper increase by age than boys. Among 5- to 12-year-olds, boys had a higher ACL injury/total injury ratio than girls (all P < 0.01). Children 13 to 17 years of age showed no significant difference for sex in ACL injury/total injury ratio. As age advanced, the proportion of ACL injuries/total injuries increased for both girls (P < 0.01) and boys (P = 0.04). BMI was independently associated with an ACL injury (P < 0.01). Conclusion: The proportion of ACL injuries/total injuries was similar for boys and girls aged 13 to 17 years. Girls showed a significantly steeper increase in ACL injury proportion versus boys through puberty. Clinical Relevance: This study will increase clinician awareness of ACL injury occurrence in young male and female athletes 5 to 12 years of age. Injury prevention efforts should target young girls before the onset of puberty and before injury occurs. PMID:25984258

  10. Relationships between postural orientation and self reported function, hop performance and muscle power in subjects with anterior cruciate ligament injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trulsson, Anna; Roos, Ewa M; Ageberg, Eva

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is associated not only with knee instability and impaired neuromuscular control, but also with altered postural orientation manifested as observable "substitution patterns". However, tests currently used to evaluate knee function...

  11. Anterior cruciate ligament injury/reinjury in alpine ski racing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordan, Matthew J; Aagaard, Per; Herzog, Walter

    2017-01-01

    and return to sport after ACL injury in alpine ski racing. Given that most of the scientific studies on ACL injuries in alpine ski racing have been descriptive, and that very few studies contributed higher level scientific evidence, a nonsystematic narrative review was employed. Three scholarly databases...... were searched for articles on ACL injury or knee injury in alpine ski racing. Studies were classified according to their relevance in relation to epidemiology, etiology, risk factors, and return to sport/reinjury prevention. Alpine ski racers (skiers) were found to be at high risk for knee injuries...... development of osteoarthritis. International collaborations may be necessary to generate sufficient statistical power for ACL injury/reinjury prevention research in alpine ski racing....

  12. Dentists' level of knowledge of the treatment plans for periodontal ligament injuries after dentoalveolar trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrini, Denise; Panzarini, Sônia Regina; Poi, Wilson Roberto; Sundefeld, Maria Lúcia Marçal Mazza; Tiveron, Adelisa Rodolfo Ferreira

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the level of knowledge held by dentists about the possible treatment plan procedures for periodontal ligament injuries after dentoalveolar trauma. A 5-item self-applied questionnaire was prepared with questions referring to the professional profile of the interviewees and to the treatment plan they would propose for periodontal ligament injuries secondary to dentoalveolar trauma. The questionnaires were filled out by 693 dentists attending the 23rd Annual Meeting of the Brazilian Society for Dental Research, and the data obtained were subjected to descriptive analysis. Either the chi-square test or Fisher's exact test was applied to assess associations among variables, at a 5% level of significance. The results revealed that dentists experienced difficulty in establishing a treatment plan for subluxation, and for extrusive, lateral and intrusive luxations. In general, holding a dental specialty degree had no influence on the knowledge about treatment plan procedures for the most severe injuries. It could be concluded that the dentists participating in this study, whether specialists or not, did not have sufficient knowledge to treat most of the periodontal ligament injuries resulting from dentoalveolar trauma adequately.

  13. Computer aided analysis of gait patterns in patients with acute anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Josef; Kröll, Josef; Strutzenberger, Gerda; Alexander, Nathalie; Ofner, Michael; Schwameder, Hermann

    2016-03-01

    Gait analysis is a useful tool to evaluate the functional status of patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury. Pattern recognition methods can be used to automatically assess walking patterns and objectively support clinical decisions. This study aimed to test a pattern recognition system for analyzing kinematic gait patterns of recently anterior cruciate ligament injured patients and for evaluating the effects of a therapeutic treatment. Gait kinematics of seven male patients with an acute unilateral anterior cruciate ligament rupture and seven healthy males were recorded. A support vector machine was trained to distinguish the groups. Principal component analysis and recursive feature elimination were used to extract features from 3D marker trajectories. A Classifier Oriented Gait Score was defined as a measure of gait quality. Visualizations were used to allow functional interpretations of characteristic group differences. The injured group was evaluated by the system after a therapeutic treatment. The results were compared against a clinical rating of the patients' gait. Cross validation yielded 100% accuracy. After the treatment the score improved significantly (Panterior cruciate ligament injury can be detected automatically. The results of the automatic analysis are comparable with the clinical rating and support the validity of the system. The visualizations allow interpretations on discriminatory features and can facilitate the integration of the results into the diagnostic process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Return to Sport After Pediatric Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Its Effect on Subsequent Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Travis J; Godin, Jonathan A; Dale, Kevin M; Garrett, William E; Taylor, Dean C; Riboh, Jonathan C

    2017-06-07

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft failure and contralateral ACL tears are more frequent in children and adolescents than adults. The reasons for higher subsequent injury rates in this population are incompletely understood. We analyzed a continuous cohort of patients who were physical therapy), and patients' preoperative and postoperative sports involvement (primary and secondary sports, number of sports). A total of 112 subjects met inclusion criteria; of these patients, 85 (76%) had complete follow-up data and were analyzed. The mean age (and standard deviation) was 13.9 ± 2.1 years (range, 6 to 17 years); 77% had open physes. The mean follow-up was 48.3 ± 15.3 months. Seventy-seven patients (91%) returned to sports, and 84% returned to the same sport. The mean Marx activity score at the time of the latest follow-up was 13.7 ± 3.5 points. Patients were involved in fewer sports after ACL reconstruction, 1.48 ± 0.92 compared with 1.83 ± 1.01 sports before reconstruction (p = 0.002). Sixteen patients (19%) sustained an ACL graft rupture, 11 patients (13%) sustained a contralateral ACL tear, and 1 of these patients (1%) sustained both. The overall prevalence of a second ACL injury was 32%. Time to return to sport was the only significant predictor of a second ACL injury, with a slower return being protective (hazard ratio per month, 0.87 [95% confidence interval, 0.73 to 0.99]; p = 0.04). Pediatric athletes return to sports at a high rate (91%) after ACL reconstruction. Unfortunately, the prevalence of a second ACL injury is high at 32%. Within this population, an earlier return to sport is predictive of a second ACL injury. Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  15. Assessment of Knee Proprioception in the Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Risk Position in Healthy Subjects: A Cross-sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Mir, Seyed Mohsen; Talebian, Saeed; Naseri, Nasrin; Hadian, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] Knee joint proprioception combines sensory input from a variety of afferent receptors that encompasses the sensations of joint position and motion. Poor proprioception is one of the risk factors of anterior cruciate ligament injury. Most studies have favored testing knee joint position sense in the sagittal plane and non-weight-bearing position. One of the most common mechanisms of noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury is dynamic knee valgus. No study has measured joint posit...

  16. Risk Factors and Prevention Strategies of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Young Females Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Forcada

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injuries are more common in young female athletes than in males, and its frequency is increasing. The aim of the present study is to determine the risk factors that promote these injuries and study the available strategy to prevent ACL injuries in young female athletes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Different database were used to perform the research (PubMed, Cochrane Plus, Trip Database, using the following keywords: anterior cruciate ligament injury, risk factors, prevention, female and athlete. RESULTS: Risk factors for ACL injuries include: dry weather, high temperatures, playing indoors, artificial boil, sleepless, fatigue, stress, sport specialization, burnout, low self-esteem, incorrect pivoting and landing techniques. Avoiding or modifying these risk factors could prevent ACL injuries as well as performing a specific neuromuscular training. CONCLUSION: There are different ways to prevent ACL injuries that have been proven to be effective, a passive one avoiding the risk factors, and active one, by practicing a specific neuromuscular training.

  17. Management of Medial Collateral Ligament Injury During Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Della Torre, MD

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Medial collateral ligament injury during primary total knee arthroplasty is a recognised complication potentially resulting in valgus instability, suboptimal patient outcomes and a higher rate of revision or reoperation. Options for management include primary repair with or without augmentation, reconstruction or immediate conversion to prosthesis with greater constraint, in conjunction with various postoperative rehabilitation protocols. Inconsistent recommendations throughout the orthopaedic literature have made the approach to managing this complication problematic. The objective of this study was to review the available literature to date comparing intraoperative and postoperative management options for primary total knee arthroplasty complicated by recognised injury to the medial collateral ligament. This systematic literature review was prospectively registered with PROSPERO (#CRD42014008866 and performed in accordance with PRISMA guidelines including a PRISMA flow diagram. Five articles satisfied the inclusion criteria. Each was a retrospective, observational cohort or case series with small numbers reported, inconsistent methodology and incompletely reported outcomes. Four of the five studies managing medial collateral ligament injury during total knee arthroplasty (47/84 patients with direct repair with or without autograft augmentation reported good outcomes with no revision or reoperation required for symptomatic instability over a follow-up period of 16 months to almost 8 years. The fifth study with a follow-up to 10 years and a high rate of conversion to unlinked semi constrained total knee arthroplasty implant (30/37 patients reported a greater incidence of revision due to instability, in patients in whom the medial collateral ligament injury was directly repaired without added constraint. Overall balance of evidence is in favour of satisfactory outcomes without symptomatic instability following direct repair with or without

  18. Radial collateral ligament injury of the little finger proximal interphalangeal joint in young pianists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Hyun Sik; Cho, Hoyune Esther; Rhee, Seung Hwan; Kim, Jihyeong; Lee, Young Ho; Baek, Goo Hyun

    2014-08-01

    To report the features of radial collateral ligament injury of the little finger proximal interphalangeal joint in young piano players. Between 2005 and 2012, we treated 6 cases of radial collateral ligament injury of the little finger proximal interphalangeal joint in young piano players at a single referral center. We conducted a retrospective review of charts and radiographs and telephone-interviewed all patients at a mean follow-up of 33 months (range, 12-66 mo) to evaluate features of this injury. All patients were girls with a mean age of 10 years (range, 8-12 y), and all had injuries in their right hands. Patients had been playing piano for a mean 3.8 years (range, 3-5 y) and practicing for a mean 1.8 hours per day (range, 1-3 h). Pain was commonly aggravated when they played octaves or advanced pieces requiring extensive finger movements. All patients were playing on standard-size piano keyboards and had generalized hypermobility with a mean Beighton and Horan score of 6.3 (range, 5-9). Two patients had an ulnar deviation deformity of 10° and 15° each at the proximal interphalangeal joint whereas the others had no fixed joint deformity. Five patients showed improvement with conservative treatment, but 1 patient underwent surgery. In our practice, all piano-related radial collateral ligament injuries were in female preadolescents with evidence of generalized hypermobility; patients had been playing piano extensively, suggesting that the injury could have resulted from stress on the joint during piano playing. Future studies should further evaluate the efficacy of modifying keyboard size, techniques, and repertoires for piano lessons and of patient education for this type of injury. Therapeutic IV. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Diagnosis of ligament injuries in the superior ankle joint. Roentgendiagnostik der Bandlaesionen des oberen Sprunggelenks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebing, R.; Fiedler, V. (Staedtische Krankenanstalten Krefeld (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik)

    1991-12-01

    Nearly 40 years after ankle arthrography was first introduced, the anterior and inversion stress views of the ankle are still widely preferred as a noninvasive method of evaluating ligament injuries in the upper ankle. We consider the stress test, bilaterally performed using a standardized stress apparatus, as a basic examination by which to differentiate between slight and severe sprain. Intensive muscel splinting due to painful swelling can sometimes be treated by injection of local anesthetic. Like many authors, we perform ankle arthrography in cases where there is a significant difference between the clinical findings and the stress test. The technique of ankle arthrography can be readily learned and is extremely accurate in delineating the extent of ligamentous injury produced by moderate or severe ankle sprains. It can be performed in any X-ray department. (orig.).

  20. ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT INJURY DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT IN A PEDIATRIC PATIENT: A CASE REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Hazle, Charles; Duby, Cherie

    2012-01-01

    The management of the skeletally immature athlete sustaining injury to the anterior cruciate ligament and other knee structures provides multiple challenges for both the treating clinicians and parents of the injured child. The diagnostic process and subsequent decision making present additional complexities because of the developmental anatomy and the potential for disturbance of normal growth patterns by some surgical interventions. In the following case report, the course to appropriate ma...

  1. Meniscus Injuries Alter the Kinematics of Knees With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Hosseini, Ali; Li, Jing-Sheng; Gill, Thomas J.; Li, Guoan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Most knee joint biomechanics studies have involved knees with an isolated anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. However, a large portion of patients with injured ACLs have accompanied meniscus tearing. In this study, the in vivo alteration of knee biomechanics after tearing the ACL with or without combined medial or lateral meniscus tear was investigated during stair-ascending activity. Hypothesis: The kinematic behavior of ACL-deficient knees changes with a combined medial or ...

  2. Smaller Anterior Cruciate Ligament Diameter Is a Predictor of Subjects Prone to Ligament Injuries: An Ultrasound Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parag Suresh Mahajan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To test if diameter of normal anterior cruciate ligament (ACL can be measured by ultrasound (US, to see if there is a relationship between smaller ACL diameter and ACL injury, and to assess agreement between radiologists in measuring ACL diameter in cases and matched controls. Materials and Methods. In this ethics committee-approved study, maximum diameter of ACL near tibial insertion site was measured by static and dynamic US study in 25 normal contralateral knees of subjects who suffered noncontact ACL injury and in 25 matched control subjects. Results. ACL was visualized as a thick linear hypoechoic band inserted approximately 11 mm caudal to the tibial plateau and the intercondylar eminence. Maximum diameter of contralateral ACL near tibial insertion site among injured subjects was significantly smaller than in noninjured subjects (0.62 ± 0.07 cm versus 0.81 ± 0.06 cm; P<0.0001. In the regression analysis, the diameter of ACL near tibial insertion site was found significantly proportional to body weight and not significantly associated to height, gender, and age. Conclusion. Diameter of normal ACL near tibial insertion site can be measured by US and the maximum diameter is significantly smaller among subjects with noncontact ACL injury. US is a promising modality that can be used as an excellent screening test to detect subjects especially aspiring athletes prone to ACL injury. Very strong agreement was observed between radiologists in measuring ACL diameter.

  3. Evaluation of anterior talofibular ligament injury with stress radiography, ultrasonography and MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oae, Kazunori; Uchio, Yuji [Shimane University School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedics, Shimane, Izumo (Japan); Takao, Masato [Teikyo University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Tokyo, Itabashi-ku (Japan); Ochi, Mitsuo [Hiroshima University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hiroshima, Minami-ku (Japan)

    2010-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the efficacy of stress radiography (stress X-P), ultrasonography (US), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the detection of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) injury. Thirty-four patients with ankle sprain were involved. In all patients, Stress X-P, US, MR imaging, and arthroscopy were performed. The arthroscopic results were considered to be the gold standard. The imaging results were compared with the arthroscopic results, and the accuracy calculated. Arthroscopic findings showed ATFL injury in 30 out of 34 cases. The diagnosis of ATFL injury with stress X-P, US, MR imaging were made with an accuracy of 67, 91 and 97%. US and MR imaging demonstrated the same location of the injury as arthroscopy in 63 and 93%. We have clarified the diagnostic value of stress X-P, US, and MR imaging in diagnosis of ATFL injury. We obtained satisfactory results with US and MR imaging. (orig.)

  4. Low Prevalence of Anterior and Posterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Patients With Achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Jaysson T; Ramji, Alim F; Lyapustina, Tatyana A; Yost, Mary T; Ain, Michael C

    2017-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries and their subsequent reconstructions are common in the general population, but there has been no research regarding ACL or PCL injuries in patients with achondroplasia, the most common skeletal dysplasia. Our goals were to (1) evaluate the prevalence of ACL and PCL injuries in adolescents and adults with achondroplasia, (2) compare this prevalence with that reported for the general population, (3) determine how many patients with ACL or PCL injuries underwent ligament reconstruction as treatment, and (4) determine patient activity levels as they relate to the rate of ACL/PCL injuries and reconstructions. We reviewed medical records of 430 patients with achondroplasia seen in the senior author's clinic from 2002 through 2014. Demographic data were reviewed, as well as any documentation of ACL or PCL injury or reconstruction. We called all 430 patients by telephone, and 148 agreed to participate in our survey, whereas 1 declined. We asked these patients about their history of ACL or PCL injury or reconstruction, as well as current and past physical activity levels. No ACL or PCL injuries were found on chart review. One patient reached by telephone reported an ACL injury that did not require reconstruction. This yielded a theoretical prevalence of 3/430 (0.7%). Of the 148 patients surveyed, 43 (29%) reported low physical activity, 75 (51%) reported moderate physical activity, and 26 (17%) reported high physical activity. There was no significant difference in the rate of ACL injury when stratified by physical activity level (P=0.102). ACL and PCL injuries and reconstructions are extremely rare in patients with achondroplasia, which cannot be completely ascribed to a low level of physical activity. One possible explanation is that patients with achondroplasia, on an average, have a more anterior tibial slope compared with those without achondroplasia, which decreases the force generated

  5. Rate and Risk of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Among Sportswomen in Slovenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vauhnik, Renata; Morrissey, Matthew C.; Rutherford, Olga M.; Turk, Zmago; Pilih, Iztok A.; Perme, Maja Pohar

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Context: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-injury rate is greater among female athletes than among male athletes. Objective: To investigate the rate and risk of ACL injury among Slovenian sportswomen playing professional basketball, team handball, or volleyball. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: The Slovenian National Organizations of basketball, team handball, and volleyball. Patients or Other Participants: During the 2003–2004 season, we prospectively followed 585 Slovenian sportswomen registered in the Slovenian National Organizations of basketball, team handball, and volleyball. Main Outcome Measure(s): We asked sportswomen and coaches to document the occurrence of every significant traumatic knee injury requiring medical attention. Injury rate and injury risk were calculated for sportswomen in each sport group. To calculate injury rate, we estimated the average exposure of each sportswoman during the research period. Results: During the 2003–2004 season, 585 Slovenian sportswomen sustained 12 ACL injuries. The ACL-injury risk was different in athletes participating in the various sports, with basketball players having the greatest ACL-injury risk and volleyball players having the lowest ACL-injury risk (P  =  .04). The risk of ACL injury among Slovenian sportswomen was 2.1 per 100 athletes (95% confidence interval  =  0.9, 3.2), whereas the rate of ACL injury was 0.037 per 1000 exposure hours (95% confidence interval  =  0.016, 0.06). Conclusions: Overall differences in injury risk were found among sports, but no differences were noted among divisions within sports. No differences for injury rate were observed between or within sports. The rate and risk of ACL injury among Slovenian sportswomen are high, with basketball players having the greatest ACL-injury risk. PMID:21214356

  6. Value of ultrasonography for detecting chronic injury of the lateral ligaments of the ankle joint compared with ultrasonography findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Y; Cai, Y

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of chronic lateral ankle ligament injury. Methods: A total of 120 ankles in 120 patients with a clinical suspicion of chronic ankle ligament injury were examined by ultrasonography by using a 5- to 17-MHz linear array transducer before surgery. The results of ultrasonography were compared with the operative findings. Results: There were 18 sprains and 24 partial and 52 complete tears of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL); 26 sprains, 27 partial and 12 complete tears of the calcaneofibular ligament (CFL); and 1 complete tear of the posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL) at arthroscopy and operation. Compared with operative findings, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of ultrasonography were 98.9%, 96.2% and 84.2%, respectively, for injury of the ATFL and 93.8%, 90.9% and 83.3%, respectively, for injury of the CFL. The PTFL tear was identified by ultrasonography. The accuracy of identification between acute-on-chronic and subacute–chronic patients did not differ. The accuracies of diagnosing three grades of ATFL injuries were almost the same as those of diagnosing CFL injuries. Conclusion: Ultrasonography provides useful information for the evaluation of patients presenting with chronic pain after ankle sprain. Advances in knowledge: Intraoperative findings are the reference standard. We demonstrated that ultrasonography was highly sensitive and specific in detecting chronic lateral ligments injury of the ankle joint. PMID:24352708

  7. Management of combined anterior or posterior cruciate ligament and posterolateral corner injuries: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochecongar, G; Plaweski, S; Azar, M; Demey, G; Arndt, J; Louis, M-L; Limozin, R; Djian, P; Sonnery-Cottet, B; Bousquet, V; Bajard, X; Wajsfisz, A; Boisrenoult, P

    2014-12-01

    Combined injuries to the posterolateral corner and cruciate ligaments are uncommon. The heterogeneity of injury patterns in many studies complicates the assessment of outcomes. To assess the prognosis and functional outcomes after surgery for combined injuries to the posterolateral corner and to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) or posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). We systematically reviewed the literature for articles reporting outcomes 1 year or more after surgery for combined injuries to the posterolateral corner and ACL (n=4) or PCL (n=9). Patients with bicruciate injuries were not studied. Overall, 65% of patients were IKDC A or B after surgery. The mean Lysholm score improved from 67 to 90. Mean time to surgery was 4.43 months in the group with ACL tears and 18.4 months in the group with PCL tears, and mean follow-up was 34.4 and 40.7 months in these two groups, respectively. In the groups with ACL and PCL tears, the proportions of patients classified as IKDC A or B at last follow-up were 81.6% and 81.0%, respectively, whereas 88% and 99% of patients, respectively, were IKDC grade C or D before surgery. The mean Lysholm score improved from 77 to 92 in the group with ACL tears and from 65 to 89 in the group with PCL tears. Improvements in laxity ranged from 28% to 79% in the group with PCL tears. Most of the articles selected for our review provided level III or IV evidence. Functional outcomes were satisfactory but less good than those reported after surgical reconstruction of isolated cruciate ligament tears. Full reconstruction seems the best strategy in patients with combined ACL/posterolateral corner injuries. Outcomes were also good but more variable in the group with PCL/posterolateral corner injuries. The time to surgery, which reflected the time to diagnosis, was shorter in patients with ACL than with PCL tears in addition to the posterolateral corner injury. Level III (systematic literature review). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All

  8. Fear of re-injury: a hindrance for returning to sports after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvist, Joanna; Ek, Anna; Sporrstedt, Katja; Good, Lars

    2005-07-01

    Unrestricted participation in sports activities and return to the pre-injury level is often reported as an indicator of the success of ACL reconstruction. The athletes' choice not to return to their pre-injury level may depend on the knee function, but some times, social reasons or psychological hindrances such as fear of re-injury may influence their return to sports. The aim of this study was to investigate whether fear of re-injury due to movement is of significance for returning to previous level of activity in patients who have undergone anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (TSK), the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and some general questions were mailed to 87 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction 3-4 years before the study was conducted. Sixty-two patients (74%) answered the questionnaires (34 men and 28 women). Fifty-three percent of the patients returned to their pre-injury activity level. The patients who did not return to their pre-injury activity level had more fear of re-injury, which was reflected in the TSK. In addition, high fear of re-injury was correlated with low knee-related quality of life. Fear of re-injury must be considered in the rehabilitation and evaluation of the effects of an ACL reconstruction.

  9. Isolated posterior cruciate ligament injuries associated with closed tibial shaft fractures: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Han; Liu, Ping-Cheng; Chien, Sung-Hsiung; Chou, Pei-His; Lu, Cheng-Chang

    2009-07-01

    Knee ligament injuries associated with tibia shaft fractures are usually neglected and treatment is delayed. To our knowledge, no case presentation discusses the clinical result of closed tibial shaft fracture with concomitant ipsilateral isolated PCL injury. In this literature, we report the clinical result of two cases that sustained closed tibial shaft fracture with concomitant PCL injury and discuss the treatment options. We report the clinical result of two cases that sustained closed tibial shaft fracture with concomitant posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury. Case 1 received open reduction with plate fixation for the tibial shaft fracture, and he also received arthroscopic reconstruction of PCL with bone-patellar tendon-bone graft due to neglecting PCL injury 5 months later after fracture fixation. Case 2 sustained left tibial-fibular shaft fracture with isolated PCL injury confirmed by magnetic resonance image on the first day of injury. She received tibia fixation with intramedullary nail and conservative treatment with bracing and rehabilitation for PCL injury. In case 1, the male patient only focused on fracture healing without any knee rehabilitation. His knee flexed deeply for protected weight bearing in the injured leg which may have exacerbated the posterior instability and reduced the possibility of PCL healing. The end result of knee function was poor even though PCL reconstruction was done later. In case 2, the female patient with diagnosed posterior cruciate ligament injury on the day of injury, her knee was immobilized in brace with full extension, which improved PCL healing. In addition, she received rehabilitation of quadriceps strengthening, and hamstring muscle contraction was avoided in her daily activity. After rehabilitation, the female patient did not complain of severe subjective instability even with an obvious posterior translation on posterior drawer test. We need to perform a careful physical examination of ipsilateral knee in

  10. Scapholunate ligament injury adversely alters in vivo wrist joint mechanics: an MRI-based modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joshua E; Lee, Phil; McIff, Terence E; Toby, E Bruce; Fischer, Kenneth J

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the effects of scapholunate ligament injury on in vivo radiocarpal joint mechanics using image-based surface contact modeling. Magnetic resonance images of 10 injured and contralateral normal wrists were acquired at high resolution (hand relaxed) and during functional grasp. Three-dimensional surface models of the radioscaphoid and radiolunate articulations were constructed from the relaxed images, and image registration between the relaxed and grasp images provided kinematics. The displacement driven models were implemented in contact modeling software. Contact parameters were determined from interpenetration of interacting bodies and a linear contact rule. Peak and mean contact pressures, contact forces and contact areas were compared between the normal and injured wrists. Also measured were effective (direct) contact areas and intercentroid distances from the grasp images. Means of the model contact areas were within 10 mm(2) of the direct contact areas for both articulations. With injury, all contact parameters significantly increased in the radioscaphoid articulation, while only peak contact pressure and contact force significantly increased in the radiolunate articulation. Intercentroid distances also increased significantly with injury. This study provides novel in vivo contact mechanics data from scapholunate ligament injury and confirms detrimental alterations as a result of injury. Copyright © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  11. Dual-energy computed tomography of cruciate ligament injuries in acute knee trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltola, Erno K. [Helsinki University Hospital, Toeoeloe Trauma Center, Department of Radiology, Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki (Finland); Koskinen, Seppo K. [Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-09-15

    To examine dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) in evaluating cruciate ligament injuries. More specifically, the purpose was to assess the optimal keV level in DECT gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) images and to examine the usefulness of collagen-specific color mapping and dual-energy bone removal in the evaluation of cruciate ligaments and the popliteus tendon. At a level 1 trauma center, a 29-month period of emergency department DECT examinations for acute knee trauma was reviewed by two radiologists for presence of cruciate ligament injuries, visualization of the popliteus tendon and the optimal keV level in GSI images. Three different evaluating protocols (GSI, bone removal and collagen-specific color mapping) were rated. Subsequent MRI served as a reference standard for intraarticular injuries. A total of 18 patients who had an acute knee trauma, DECT and MRI were found. On MRI, six patients had an ACL rupture. DECT's sensitivity and specificity to detect ACL rupture were 79 % and 100 %, respectively. The DECT vs. MRI intra- and interobserver proportions of agreement for ACL rupture were excellent or good (kappa values 0.72-0.87). Only one patient had a PCL rupture. In GSI images, the optimal keV level was 63 keV. GSI of 40-140 keV was considered to be the best evaluation protocol in the majority of cases. DECT is a usable method to evaluate ACL in acute knee trauma patients with rather good sensitivity and high specificity. GSI is generally a better evaluation protocol than bone removal or collagen-specific color mapping in the evaluation of cruciate ligaments and popliteus tendon. (orig.)

  12. The relative incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injury in men and women at the United States Naval Academy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwinn, D E; Wilckens, J H; McDevitt, E R; Ross, G; Kao, T C

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relative risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury in female versus male midshipmen at the United States Naval Academy. From 1991 to 1997, we recorded the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injury during intercollegiate athletics, intramural athletics, and military training. The subjects were male and female varsity athletes, coed intramural athletes, and participants in military training consisting of the obstacle course and instructional wrestling. All patient data were collected at the time of injury. Records filed at the intramural sports office, along with a questionnaire completed by coaches and trainers, were used to estimate midshipmen exposures. Results showed that in intercollegiate soccer, basketball, and rugby, women had a relative injury risk of 3.96 compared with men. In coed soccer, basketball, softball, and volleyball, the women's relative injury risk was 1.40 compared with men. In military training, women had a relative injury risk of 9.74 compared with men. In comparing overall annual anterior cruciate ligament injury rates among midshipmen, we found that women had a relative injury risk of 2.44 compared with men. We concluded that female midshipmen have an increased relative risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury as compared with men in intercollegiate athletics, basic military training, and throughout their service academy career. This increase was not statistically significant at the intramural level of athletics.

  13. Evaluation of static and dynamic balance in athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury – A controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Lazzaretti Fernandes

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Anterior cruciate ligament injury leads to adaptive responses to maintain postural control. However, there is no consensus regarding whether leg dominance also affects postural control in athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury. The purpose of this study was to evaluate dynamic and static postural control among athletes with and without anterior cruciate ligament injury to the dominant leg. METHODS: Twenty-eight athletes, twenty-one males and seven females aged 15-45 years, were allocated to one of two groups: the anterior cruciate ligament injury group (26±3 years or the control group without anterior cruciate ligament injury (25±6.5 years. All subjects performed one legged stance tests under eyes open and eyes closed conditions and squat and kick movement tests using a postural control protocol (AccuSwayPlus force platform, Massachusetts. The center of pressure displacement and speed were measured by the force platform. In addition, the distance traveled on the single-leg hop test was assessed as an objective measure of function. RESULTS: Significantly greater mediolateral sway was found under the eyes closed condition (p=0.04 and during squat movement (p=0.01 in the anterior cruciate ligament injury group than in the control group. Analysis of the single-leg hop test results showed no difference between the groups (p=0.73. CONCLUSION: Athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury had greater mediolateral displacement of the center of pressure toward the dominant leg under the eyes closed condition and during squat movement compared to control athletes.

  14. Lateral ankle ligament injury : an experimental and clinical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.W.C. van der Ent (Frederik Willem Charles)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractSport has become one of the most popular methods of spending freetime and consequently is of great social importance. fn recent studies concerning sports injuries in the Netherlands (BoersmaSIUtter et al. - 1979, v.Rens 1982) it was estimated that about 20% of all registered sportsmen

  15. Common Types and Countermeasures of Ankle Ligament Injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-14

    Sep 14, 2017 ... frequent competitions, which can lead to athletes' fatigue, serious decline in body function and alertness, make players' defense slow and cause injury.[2]. Players' Training Level is Insufficient: In basketball movement, the training level of athletes is reflected in physical fitness, strength, and speed. In this ...

  16. Anterior cruciate ligament injury/reinjury in alpine ski racing: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Matthew J; Aagaard, Per; Herzog, Walter

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present review was to: 1) provide an overview of the current understanding on the epidemiology, etiology, risk factors, and prevention methods for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in alpine ski racing; and 2) provide an overview of what is known pertaining to ACL reinjury and return to sport after ACL injury in alpine ski racing. Given that most of the scientific studies on ACL injuries in alpine ski racing have been descriptive, and that very few studies contributed higher level scientific evidence, a nonsystematic narrative review was employed. Three scholarly databases were searched for articles on ACL injury or knee injury in alpine ski racing. Studies were classified according to their relevance in relation to epidemiology, etiology, risk factors, and return to sport/reinjury prevention. Alpine ski racers (skiers) were found to be at high risk for knee injuries, and ACL tears were the most frequent diagnosis. Three primary ACL injury mechanism were identified that involved tibial internal rotation and anteriorly directed shear forces from ski equipment and the environment. While trunk muscle strength imbalance and genetics were found to be predictive of ACL injuries in development-level skiers, there was limited scientific data on ACL injury risk factors among elite skiers. Based on expert opinion, research on injury risk factors should focus on equipment design, course settings/speed, and athlete factors (eg, fitness). While skiers seem to make a successful recovery following ACL injury, there may be persistent neuromuscular deficits. Future research efforts should be directed toward prospective studies on ACL injury/reinjury prevention in both male and female skiers and toward the effects of knee injury on long-term health outcomes, such as the early development of osteoarthritis. International collaborations may be necessary to generate sufficient statistical power for ACL injury/reinjury prevention research in alpine ski racing.

  17. Anterior cruciate ligament injury/reinjury in alpine ski racing: a narrative review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Matthew J; Aagaard, Per; Herzog, Walter

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present review was to: 1) provide an overview of the current understanding on the epidemiology, etiology, risk factors, and prevention methods for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in alpine ski racing; and 2) provide an overview of what is known pertaining to ACL reinjury and return to sport after ACL injury in alpine ski racing. Given that most of the scientific studies on ACL injuries in alpine ski racing have been descriptive, and that very few studies contributed higher level scientific evidence, a nonsystematic narrative review was employed. Three scholarly databases were searched for articles on ACL injury or knee injury in alpine ski racing. Studies were classified according to their relevance in relation to epidemiology, etiology, risk factors, and return to sport/reinjury prevention. Alpine ski racers (skiers) were found to be at high risk for knee injuries, and ACL tears were the most frequent diagnosis. Three primary ACL injury mechanism were identified that involved tibial internal rotation and anteriorly directed shear forces from ski equipment and the environment. While trunk muscle strength imbalance and genetics were found to be predictive of ACL injuries in development-level skiers, there was limited scientific data on ACL injury risk factors among elite skiers. Based on expert opinion, research on injury risk factors should focus on equipment design, course settings/speed, and athlete factors (eg, fitness). While skiers seem to make a successful recovery following ACL injury, there may be persistent neuromuscular deficits. Future research efforts should be directed toward prospective studies on ACL injury/reinjury prevention in both male and female skiers and toward the effects of knee injury on long-term health outcomes, such as the early development of osteoarthritis. International collaborations may be necessary to generate sufficient statistical power for ACL injury/reinjury prevention research in alpine ski racing

  18. Return to Play after Nonsurgical Treatment of Elbow Ulnar Collateral Ligament Injuries in Professional Baseball Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Gregory M.; Genuario, James; Noonan, Thomas J.; Kinkartz, Jason D.; Githens, Thomas; Murayama, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Injury to the elbow ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) is relatively common in pitchers. In the 70's reconstructive surgery was developed as a viable option to a potentially career ending injury. Multiple studies have demonstrated return to play (RTP) rates of 74-83% after reconstruction. Studies of RTP after nonoperative treatment in throwing athletes are limited, reporting 42%. There are no studies reporting RTP rates with nonoperative treatment of professional baseball players. The purpose of this study was to identify professional baseball players' ability to return to play after UCL injuries based on nonoperative vs. operative treatment, MRI grade, and player position. Methods: A retrospective review of a single professional baseball organization (6 minor league teams and 1 Major league team) between 2006 & 2011 revealed 72 medial elbow injuries. MRI was performed on all players. UCL injuries were diagnosed in 45 players by physical exam & MRI. Players were treated with rehabilitation, surgery or both. Success was RTP for >1 season. Rates of RTP and return to the same level of play or higher (RTSP) were calculated and correlated with MRI grade, location, and player position. MRI grading used was: 1 intact ligament +/- edema, 2 partial tearing, 3 complete tear, and 4 chronic healed injury. Results: Overall 91% of 45 players had RTP, and 87% had RTSP. Fifteen were treated surgically and 30 nonoperatively with rehab. Of players treated surgically, 73% had RTSP, whereas 93% of nonoperatively treated players had RTSP (p-value 0.07). All players with grade III tears had surgery. Of surgically treated players, none had grade I injuries, 13% had grade II injuries, 53% had grade III injuries, and 33% had grade IV injuries. Of nonoperatively treated players, 13% had grade I injuries, 23% had grade II injuries, none had grade III injuries, and 60% had grade IV injuries. Of all grade II and grade IV injuries, 78% were treated nonoperatively and all but 1 player

  19. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries in soccer: Loading mechanisms, risk factors, and prevention programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyi Dai

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injuries are common in soccer. Understanding ACL loading mechanisms and risk factors for ACL injury is critical for designing effective prevention programs. The purpose of this review is to summarize the relevant literature on ACL loading mechanisms, ACL injury risk factors, and current ACL injury prevention programs for soccer players. Literature has shown that tibial anterior translation due to shear force at the proximal end of tibia is the primary ACL loading mechanism. No evidence has been found showing that knee valgus moment is the primary ACL loading mechanism. ACL loading mechanisms are largely ignored in previous studies on risk factors for ACL injury. Identified risk factors have little connections to ACL loading mechanisms. The results of studies on ACL injury prevention programs for soccer players are inconsistent. Current ACL injury prevention programs for soccer players are clinically ineffective due to low compliance. Future studies are urgently needed to identify risk factors for ACL injury in soccer that are connected to ACL loading mechanisms and have cause-and-effect relationships with injury rate, and to develop new prevention programs to improve compliance.

  20. Soft-stop knee brace for rehabilitation from ligament injuries: Design and pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, James R J; Hwang, Haram Francis; Davies, Claire; McDaid, Andrew J

    2017-07-01

    Ligaments within the human knee are commonly torn or injured as a result of sports that involve sharp direction changes, pivoting and landing. For this reason, athletes are often side-lined from their respective sports for up to 18 months after injury to rehabilitate. As part of the rehabilitation process, knee braces are often prescribed in an attempt to decrease the recovery period of the injured individual by restraining and minimizing the motion at the knee. However, the true efficacy of knee bracing is yet to be fully evaluated as studies show mixed results to whether braces actually decrease the rehabilitation period for patients. This paper describes the design and pilot trials of a simple but novel knee brace design that aims to actively aid the rehabilitation of the knee from ligament injuries, primarily the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The newly developed knee brace uses an angle locking mechanism with dampers to control both the range of motion of the knee joint and the resistance applied to the knee joint at the limits of extension. Using finite element analysis, these dampers were designed help build muscle strength during everyday use of the knee brace and to reduce the 'jarring effect' which causes significant pain and risk to patients using current knee brace designs. Through providing these features, this new knee brace design has the potential to help improve the extent and speed of recovery for ACL impaired patients.

  1. Functional instability in non-contact ankle ligament injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, A; Lee, R J; Williams, R M; Thomson, L C; Forsyth, A

    2000-10-01

    To measure objectively functional standing balance in the acute stages of non-contact ankle sprain, and to compare patients with controls. A Chattanooga balance machine was used to measure postural stability in patients with acute ankle sprain and uninjured controls over a two week period, in one and two legged stance, with eyes open and closed. Participants also completed the Olerud and Molander questionnaire to provide a subjective measure of ankle function. There was a highly significant improvement in questionnaire scores for the patients during the study period (pdifference did not reach significance. There was evidence of improvement over time in the number of tests successfully completed on the injured leg in single legged stance with eyes closed (p = 0.043) between visits 1 and 3. The patient group showed a subjective improvement, which supports clinical experience of treating acute ankle injuries. There is some evidence that on average the patient group appeared to be less stable than controls in all balance tests, although the difference did not reach statistical significance, even on the uninjured leg. There is a need to carry out further studies to confirm the results found in this pilot study and to investigate the hypotheses generated. It would be useful to evaluate a simple test that could be used clinically to monitor progress after ankle injury, and also to identify athletes with decreased functional stability, who may be more at risk of sustaining ankle injury.

  2. Retrospective study of palmar/plantar annular ligament injury in 71 horses: 2001-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, K R; Dyson, S J; Parkin, T D H; Singer, E R; Kristoffersen, M; Mair, T S

    2008-05-01

    Constriction of the digital flexor tendon sheath (DFTS) and its contents by the palmar/plantar annular ligament (PAL) is well recognised. However, primary injury of the PAL has not been well documented. To describe the clinical features of PAL injury, determine its prevalence with or without subcutaneous fibrosis and/or concurrent injury within the DFTS, and assess response to treatment. Horses were selected for inclusion based upon clinical features consistent with PAL injury and the presence of a thickened PAL (> or =2 mm) verified ultrasonographically. A retrospective analysis of case records from 3 clinics was performed. Details of breed, age and use, and results of clinical and ultrasonographic assessments and response to treatment were recorded. Horses were treated conservatively or surgically by desmotomy of the PAL, with or without tenoscopic evaluation of the DFTS. A telephone questionnaire was performed to assess response to treatment. Seventy-one horses were included in the study and middle aged or older general purpose riding horses predominated. PAL desmopathy occurred more frequently in hind- than in forelimbs. The method of treatment, thickness of the PAL or presence of subcutaneous fibrosis did not significantly affect prognosis; however, fetlock, associated with thickening of the ligament with or without subcutaneous fibrosis. Bilateral PAL thickening is common in older horses, ponies and cobs; however, bilateral PAL enlargement is often present with only unilateral lameness. Treatment methods used in this study did not appear to influence outcome significantly.

  3. MR imaging of tibial collateral ligament injury: comparison with clinical examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, L. [Dept. of Radiological Sciences, UCLA Center for the Health Sciences, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Dungan, D. [Dept. of Radiological Sciences, UCLA Center for the Health Sciences, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Seeger, L.L. [Dept. of Radiological Sciences, UCLA Center for the Health Sciences, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1994-10-01

    We sought to clarify the capability of routine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the knee to detect and grade tibial collateral ligament (TCL) injury. We also wanted to define the exact MR findings that were the most important for diagnosis. Sixty-three patients were clinically evaluated for TCL injury prior to MR imaging of the knee on a 1.5-tesla system. MR studies were scored with respect to multiple direct and indirect findings. By discriminant analysis, the overall accuracy of classification (into clinical grades 1, 2, 3 and normal) on the basis of MR was 65%. Accuracy for detection of abnormal TCLs was 87%. The most useful MR findings for detection and grading of TCL injury were direct signs: subcutaneous edema over the TCL, focal disruption of the TCL, increased signal in the TCL on T2-weighted images, and longitudinal striations within the TCL. Indirect signs such as trabecular trauma were less useful for TCL evaluation. The presence of a tear of the anterior cruciate ligament, however, correlated with TCL injury of a higher grade. T2-weighted coronal images, by better depicting intraligamentous edema and fiber disruption, improved the MR assessment of the TCL. (orig.)

  4. De Quervain disease caused by abductor pollicis longus tenosynovitis: a report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Masahiro; Takahara, Masatoshi; Kikuchi, Noriaki; Ito, Kazuo; Watanabe, Tadayoshi; Ogino, Toshihiko

    2009-01-01

    De Quervain disease is caused by a stenosing tenosynovitis in the first dorsal compartment, and the main aetiology is extensor pollicis brevis (EPB) tenosynovitis. We encountered three cases in which EPB tenosynovitis was absent and abductor pollicis longus (APL) tenosynovitis was confirmed during operation. In the treatment of de Quervain disease, APL tenosynovitis should be paid as much attention as EPB tenosynovitis.

  5. The anatomy in relation to injury of the lateral collateral ligaments of the ankle: a current concepts review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; Oostra, Roelof Jan; Alvarez, Pau Golano; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2008-01-01

    Injuries to the lateral ligament complex of the ankle are common problems in acute care practice. We believe that a well-developed knowledge of the anatomy provides a foundation for understanding the basic mechanism of injury, diagnosis, and treatment, especially surgical treatment, of lateral

  6. The correlation between anterior cruciate ligament injury in elite alpine skiers and their parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westin, Maria; Reeds-Lundqvist, Sandra; Werner, Suzanne

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether a familiar correlation with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury exists between competitive alpine skiers and their parents. All 593 (293 males, 300 females) elite alpine skiers who have studied at a Swedish alpine Ski High School during 2006 and 2012 answered a questionnaire whether they or their parents had suffered an ACL injury. A total of 418 skiers (70%) answered the questionnaire. Twenty-nine per cent (n = 19) out of the 65 ACL-injured skiers reported that they had a parent (mother or father) who have had an ACL injury. In skiers without an ACL injury (n = 353), the result was 18% (n = 64). An odds ratio of 1.95 (95% confidence interval 1.04-3.65) was found to suffer an ACL injury if you have a parent who has had an ACL injury compared with if you have a parent without any ACL injury. The findings of the current study demonstrated a family history to tear the ACL between alpine skiers who had studied at a Swedish Ski High School and ACL injuries of their parents. III.

  7. Case study of Physical Therapy approach of patient with Anterior. Cruciate Ligament rupture after traumatic injury in skiing

    OpenAIRE

    Tsichlakis, Emmanouil

    2013-01-01

    Title: Physical Therapy program in a patient with total rupture of Anterior Cruciate Ligament and partial rupture of Medial Collateral Ligament of the right knee joint after ski accident. Název bakalářské práce: Author: Emmanouil Tsichlakis The current Bachelor Thesis is divided into two parts, theoritical and practical one. In the theoritical part an overview of the general anatomy of the knee joint and the biomechanics of the knee ligaments are presented. Also the mechanisms of the injury o...

  8. Intra-articular pathology associated with isolated posterior cruciate ligament injury on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringler, Michael D.; Collins, Mark S.; Howe, B.M. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Shotts, Ezekiel E. [NEA Baptist Clinic, Jonesboro, AR (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Unlike with anterior cruciate ligament injury, little is known about the prevalence of intra-articular pathology associated with isolated posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury in the knee. The objectives of this study were to characterize and identify the frequency of meniscal tears and osteochondral injuries in these patients, and to see if management might be affected. Altogether, 48 knee MRI exams with isolated PCL tears were evaluated for the presence of: grade and location of PCL tear, meniscal tear, articular chondral lesion, bone bruise, and fracture. Comparisons between PCL tear grade and location, as well as mechanism of injury when known, with the presence of various intra-articular pathologies, were made using the chi-square or Fisher's exact test as appropriate. In all, 69 % of isolated PCL tears occur in the midsubstance, 27 % proximally. Meniscal tears were seen in 25 % of knees, involving all segments of both menisci, except for the anterior horn medial meniscus. Altogether, 23 % had focal cartilage lesions, usually affecting the central third medial femoral condyle and medial trochlea, while 12.5 % of knees had fractures, and 48 % demonstrated bone bruises, usually involving the central to anterior tibiofemoral joint. The presence of a fracture (p = 0.0123) and proximal location of PCL tear (p = 0.0016) were both associated with the hyperextension mechanism of injury. There were no statistically significant associations between PCL tear grade and presence of intra-articular abnormality. Potentially treatable meniscal tears and osteochondral injuries are relatively prevalent, and demonstrable on MRI in patients with isolated acute PCL injury of the knee. (orig.)

  9. Young women's anterior cruciate ligament injuries: an expanded model and prevention paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Diane L; Goldberg, Linn; Kuehl, Kerry S

    2010-05-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries among young female athletes occur at rates three- to eight-times greater than in male competitors and, in general, females experience more sports injuries than males, when balanced for activity and playing time. ACL injuries are a particular concern, as they result in immediate morbidity, high economic costs and may have long-term adverse effects. While several closely monitored ACL injury preventive programmes have been effective, those efforts have not been uniformly protective nor have they achieved widespread use. To date, ACL injury prevention has focused on neuromuscular and anatomical factors without including issues relating more broadly to the athlete. Coincident with greater female sport participation are other influences that may heighten their injury risk. We review those factors, including early single sport specialization, unhealthy dietary behaviours, chronic sleep deprivation and higher levels of fatigue, substance use and abuse, and psychological issues. We augment existing models of ACL injury with these additional dimensions. The proposed expanded injury model has implications for designing injury prevention programmes. High school athletic teams are natural settings for bonded youth and influential coaches to promote healthy lifestyles, as decisions that result in better athletes also promote healthy lifestyles. As an example of how sport teams could be vehicles to address an expanded injury model, we present an existing evidenced-based sport team-centered health promotion and harm reduction programme for female athletes. Widening the lens on factors influencing ACL injury expands the prevention paradigm to combine existing training with activities to promote psychological well-being and a healthy lifestyle. If developed and shown to be effective, those programmes might better reduce injuries and, in addition, provide life skills that would benefit young female athletes both on and off the playing field.

  10. Current Concepts for Injury Prevention in Athletes After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewett, Timothy E.; Di Stasi, Stephanie L.; Myer, Gregory D.

    2013-01-01

    Ligament reconstruction is the current standard of care for active patients with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Although the majority of ACL reconstruction (ACLR) surgeries successfully restore the mechanical stability of the injured knee, postsurgical outcomes remain widely varied. Less than half of athletes who undergo ACLR return to sport within the first year after surgery, and it is estimated that approximately 1 in 4 to 1 in 5 young, active athletes who undergo ACLR will go on to a second knee injury. The outcomes after a second knee injury and surgery are significantly less favorable than outcomes after primary injuries. As advances in graft reconstruction and fixation techniques have improved to consistently restore passive joint stability to the preinjury level, successful return to sport after ACLR appears to be predicated on numerous postsurgical factors. Importantly, a secondary ACL injury is most strongly related to modifiable postsurgical risk factors. Biomechanical abnormalities and movement asymmetries, which are more prevalent in this cohort than previously hypothesized, can persist despite high levels of functional performance, and also represent biomechanical and neuromuscular control deficits and imbalances that are strongly associated with secondary injury incidence. Decreased neuromuscular control and high-risk movement biomechanics, which appear to be heavily influenced by abnormal trunk and lower extremity movement patterns, not only predict first knee injury risk but also reinjury risk. These seminal findings indicate that abnormal movement biomechanics and neuromuscular control profiles are likely both residual to, and exacerbated by, the initial injury. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) strategies should be used to develop effective, efficacious interventions targeted to these impairments to optimize the safe return to high-risk activity. In this Current Concepts article, the authors present the latest evidence related to risk

  11. Medial collateral ligament reconstruction using bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft for chronic medial knee instability combined with multi-ligament injuries: a new technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaozuo; Li, Tong; Wang, Juan; Dong, Jiangtao; Gao, Shijun

    2016-07-22

    The medial collateral ligament (MCL) is the main static stabilizer of the medial knee. The surgical treatment was recommended in cases with serious medial collateral ligament insufficiency combined with multi-ligament injuries and chronic symptomatic medial instability. Several surgical techniques have been described for the MCL reconstruction, while potential problems including donor site morbidity, complicated procedure, and high risk of femoral tunnel collision were reported. In order to minimize such potential limitations, we describe a new medial reconstruction technique for MCL injury using bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) allograft. A longitudinal incision at the medial knee was made. The centers of femoral and tibial attachments were gained through repeated isometricity test. Then, the bone grooves were made around the femoral and tibial centers. The appropriate BPTB allograft was selected, and both ends were trimmed. The prepared bone blocks were embedded into the grooves and fixed with cancellous screws. The programmed rehabilitation exercises were performed after the operation. A strong graft and bone-to-bone healing on both femoral and tibial attachment sites were obtained, and femoral tunnel collision during multi-ligament reconstruction was avoided. Satisfactory valgus and rotatory stability were gained. This novel MCL reconstruction technique using BPTB allograft can be safely performed, and the clinical outcome was favorable with satisfactory valgus and rotatory stability. More cases and additional follow-up results are needed to verify the overall effect of this technique.

  12. Tenosynovitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cuts to the hand, wrist, ankle, and foot. Alternative Names Inflammation of the tendon sheath References Biundo JJ. Bursitis, tendinitis, and other periarticular disorders and sports medicine. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman- ...

  13. Management of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury: What's In and What's Out?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raines, Benjamin Todd; Naclerio, Emily; Sherman, Seth L

    2017-01-01

    Sports medicine physicians have a keen clinical and research interest in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The biomechanical, biologic, and clinical data researchers generate, help drive injury management and prevention practices globally. The current concepts in ACL injury and surgery are being shaped by technological advances, expansion in basic science research, resurging interest in ACL preservation, and expanding efforts regarding injury prevention. As new methods are being developed in this field, the primary goal of safely improving patient outcomes will be a unifying principle. With this review, we provide an overview of topics currently in controversy or debate, and we identify paradigm shifts in the understanding, management, and prevention of ACL tears. PMID:28966380

  14. Primary Repair of Iatrogenic Medial Collateral Ligament Injury During TKA: A Modified Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Alisina; Tan, Timothy L; Tarabichi, Samih; Maher, Ahmed; Della Valle, Craig; Saleh, Usama Hassan

    2015-05-01

    Intraoperative injury to the medial collateral ligament (MCL) is a rare but important complication of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). While described treatment methods are mainly primary repair and revision with a more constrained implant, a few studies have investigated the outcomes of primary repair without constrained implants. A retrospective study was performed to evaluate the prevalence of iatrogenic injury to the MCL during primary TKA and determine the clinical outcomes of MCL repair augmented with synthetic material without the use of a constrained device. The incidence of intraoperative tear of the MCL was 0.43% (15/3432). No patient demonstrated instability during the follow-up period. Primary repair of iatrogenic MCL injury without the use of constrained implants appears to be a potential alternative that warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Talonavicular ligament: prevalence of injury in ankle sprains, histological analysis and hypothesis of its biomechanical function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Dea, Miriam; L Loizou, Constantinos; Allen, Georgina M; Wilson, David J; Athanasou, Nick; Uchihara, Yoshinobu; Cooke, Paul; Cosker, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    To assess the prevalence of injury of the talonavicular ligament (TNL) in ankle sprains, its anatomy and the stability of the talonavicular joint (TNJ) before and after dividing the TNL in a cadaver. During a prospective study of 100 patients to assess the outcome of ankle injuries, we noted high incidence of TNL injuries; we will discuss here the TNL findings. Each patient had undergone ultrasound and cone beam CT examination of the ankle. Six TNLs were dissected off fresh-frozen cadaveric feet for histological analysis. In further six cadaveric feet, the stability of the TNJ was assessed by mechanical stress before and after division of the TNL; movement at the joint was assessed by measuring the distance between the talus and navicular bone [talonavicular distance (TD)] using ultrasound. The TD was measured on ten randomly selected ultrasound images by three independent observers and repeated twice by a single observer to determine the inter- and intraobserver reliability. 21% of the patients had an injury to the TNL. Histological examination demonstrated a dense connective tissue composed of bundles of collagen in parallel arrangement along the ligament length. The interobserver and intraobserver reliability of the TD showed almost perfect agreement. Displacement at the TNJ after stress with the TNL intact measured 0.18 ± 0.08 cm and 0.29 ± 0.07 cm (p ankle sprains. Its anatomy and histology suggest a role in tensile force transmission during the windlass mechanism in gait. Advances in knowledge: Injury to the TNL is common and has not been described. Its anatomy suggests resistance to tensile forces and its injury allows excessive movement at the TNJ.

  16. [SEMITENDINOUS AND GRACILIS TRANSFER FOR TREATMENT OF MEDIAL COLLATERAL LIGAMENT INJURY CAUSED BY TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao Jiangang; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Huiwen; Liu, Jun

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of semitendinous and gracilis transfer for the treatment of medial collateral ligament (MCL) injury caused by total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Between March 2009 and May 2014, 11 patients (11 knees) with MCL injuries caused by primary TKA were treated by semitendinous and gracilis transfer in primary TKA (injury group). Another 18 patients (21 knees) without MCL injury were included as the control group. There was no significant difference in gender, age, injury sides, disease duration, body mass index, knee varus deformity, and preoperative Knee Society Score (KSS) between 2 groups (P>0.05), with comparability. KSS score was used to evaluate the function after operation. Primary healing of incision was obtained in all patients, and no complications of joint instability and pain occurred. The follow-up time was-6-29 months in injury group and was 7-34 months in control group. At last follow-up, the KSS clinical score and ftinctional score were significantly increased to 89.82 +/- 3.76 and 89.54 +/- 3.50 in the injury group (Pinjury caused by TKA. The insertions of semitendinous tendon and gracilis are close to that of the knee MCL, which can effectively improve knee function.

  17. Motor coordination during gait after anterior cruciate ligament injury: a systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Leporace

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the state of art about motor coordination during gait in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injury. Searches were carried out, limited from 1980 to 2010, in various databases with keywords related to motor coordination, gait and ACL injury. From the analysis of titles and applying the inclusion/exclusion criteria 24 studies were initially selected and, after reading the abstract, eight studies remained in the final analysis. ACL deficient patients tend to have a more rigid and less variable gait, while injured patients with ACL reconstruction have less rigid and more variable gait with respect to healthy individuals. The overall results suggest the existence of differences in motor coordination between the segments with intact and those with injured knee, regardless of ligament reconstruction. ACL injured patients present aspects related to the impairment of the capability to adapt the gait pattern to different environmental conditions, possibly leading to premature knee degeneration. However, the techniques used for biomechanical gait data processing are limited with respect to obtaining information that leads to the development of intervention strategies aimed at the rehabilitation of that injury, since it is not possible to identify the location within the gait cycle where the differences could be explained.

  18. The Relationship between Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury and Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, David; Saltzman, Bryan M.; Rollins, Meaghan; Bach, Bernard R.; MacDonald, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are a common injury, particularly in the athletic and youth populations. The known association between ACL injury and subsequent osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee merits a more in-depth understanding of the relationship between the ACL-injured knee and osteoarthritis. ACL injury, especially with concomitant meniscal or other ligamentous pathology, predisposes the knee to an increased risk of osteoarthritis. ACL insufficiency results in deterioration of the normal physiologic knee bending culminating in increased anterior tibial translation and increased internal tibial rotation. This leads to increased mean contact stresses in the posterior medial and lateral compartments under anterior and rotational loading. However, surgical reconstruction of the ACL has not been shown to reduce the risk of future OA development back to baseline and has variability based on operative factors of graft choice, timing of surgery, presence of meniscal and chondral abnormalities, and surgical technique. Known strategies to prevent OA development are applicable to patients with ACL deficiency or after ACL reconstruction and include weight management, avoidance of excessive musculoskeletal loading, and strength training. Reconstruction of the ACL does not necessarily prevent osteoarthritis in many of these patients and may depend on several external variables. PMID:25954533

  19. Effectiveness of electrical stimulation on rehabilitation after ligament and meniscal injuries: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Mizusaki Imoto

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Electrical stimulation (ES is widely used to strengthen muscles following ligament and meniscal injuries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of ES for rehabilitation after soft tissue injuries of the knee treated surgically or conservatively. DESIGN AND SETTING: Systematic review at the Brazilian Cochrane Center. METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (2010, Issue 12, Medline (Medical Analysis and Retrieval System Online via PubMed (1966 to December 2010, Embase (Excerpta Medica database, 1980 to December 2010, Lilacs (Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde, 1982 to December 2010, and PEDro (Physiotherapy Evidence Database, 1929 to December 2010. The studies included were randomized controlled trials using ES to increase muscle strength for rehabilitation of patients with soft tissue injuries of the knee. Two authors independently evaluated studies for inclusion and performed data extraction and methodological quality assessment. RESULTS: Seventeen studies evaluating ES after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and two studies evaluating ES after meniscectomy were included. There was a statistically significant improvement in quadriceps strength through ES (mean difference, MD: -32.7; 95% confidence interval, CI: -39.92 to -25.48; n = 56 and in functional outcomes (MD -7; -12.78 to -1.22; n = 43 six to eight weeks after surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. CONCLUSION: There is evidence that ES coupled with conventional rehabilitation exercises may be effective in improving muscle strength and function two months after surgery

  20. Reconstruction of Bile Duct Injury and Defect with the Round Ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokmak, Safi; Aussilhou, Béatrice; Ragot, Emilia; Tantardini, Camille; Cauchy, François; Ponsot, Philippe; Belghiti, Jacques; Sauvanet, Alain; Soubrane, Olivier

    2017-07-10

    Lateral injury of the bile duct can occur after cholecystectomy, bile duct dissection, or exploration. If direct repair is not possible, conversion to bilioenteric anastomosis can be needed with the risk of long-term bile duct infections and associated complications. We developed a new surgical technique which consist of reconstructing the bile duct with the round ligament. The vascularized round ligament is completely mobilized until its origin and used for lateral reconstruction of the bile duct to cover the defect. T tube was inserted and removed after few months. Patency of the bile duct was assessed by cholangiography, the liver function test and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Two patients aged 33 and 59 years old underwent lateral reconstruction of the bile duct for defects secondary to choledocotomy for stone extraction or during dissection for Mirizzi syndrome. The defects measured 2 and 3 cm and occupied half of the bile duct circumference. The postoperative course was marked by low output biliary fistula resolved spontaneously. In one patient, the T tube was removed at 3 months after surgery and MRI at 9 months showed strictly normal aspect of the bile duct with normal liver function test. The second patient is going very well 2 months after surgery and the T tube is closed. Lateral reconstruction of the bile duct can be safely achieved with the vascularized round ligament. We will extend our indications to tubular reconstruction.

  1. A method to characterize average cervical spine ligament response based on raw data sets for implementation into injury biomechanics models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattucci, Stephen F E; Cronin, Duane S

    2015-01-01

    Experimental testing on cervical spine ligaments provides important data for advanced numerical modeling and injury prediction; however, accurate characterization of individual ligament response and determination of average mechanical properties for specific ligaments has not been adequately addressed in the literature. Existing methods are limited by a number of arbitrary choices made during the curve fits that often misrepresent the characteristic shape response of the ligaments, which is important for incorporation into numerical models to produce a biofidelic response. A method was developed to represent the mechanical properties of individual ligaments using a piece-wise curve fit with first derivative continuity between adjacent regions. The method was applied to published data for cervical spine ligaments and preserved the shape response (toe, linear, and traumatic regions) up to failure, for strain rates of 0.5s(-1), 20s(-1), and 150-250s(-1), to determine the average force-displacement curves. Individual ligament coefficients of determination were 0.989 to 1.000 demonstrating excellent fit. This study produced a novel method in which a set of experimental ligament material property data exhibiting scatter was fit using a characteristic curve approach with a toe, linear, and traumatic region, as often observed in ligaments and tendons, and could be applied to other biological material data with a similar characteristic shape. The resultant average cervical spine ligament curves provide an accurate representation of the raw test data and the expected material property effects corresponding to varying deformation rates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Is it safe to reconstruct the knee Anterolateral Ligament with a femoral tunnel? Frequency of Lateral Collateral Ligament and Popliteus Tendon injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; da Mota E Albuquerque, Roberto Freire; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis; Demange, Marco Kawamura

    2016-04-01

    This study sought to determine the safety limits for performing a femoral bone tunnel to reconstruct the knee anterolateral ligament (ALL) by establishing its distance from the lateral collateral ligament (LCL) and the popliteus muscle tendon (PT) on the lateral femoral condyle. Anatomic study on 48 knee cadaveric specimens. The femoral attachments of the studied structures were isolated, and the distance between them was measured. For each cadaver, the percentage of cases in which at least 50 % of the LCL and PT would be injured when using 4- to 12-mm-diameter drills in an ALL reconstruction procedure was evaluated. The LCL and PT were 3.8 mm and 10.2 mm distant from the ALL, respectively. A 4-mm tunnel would cause LCL injury in 8.3 % of cases, with increasing incidence of injury up to 87.5 % with a 12-mm drill. Injury to the PT would start with the 10-mm drill, causing injury in 2.0 % of cases. Performing a tunnel in the center of the ALL may cause an iatrogenic injury to the LCL origin. No cases of PT injury are expected to occur with drills smaller than 10 mm.

  3. Risk factors for posterior lateral meniscus root tears in anterior cruciate ligament injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feucht, Matthias J; Bigdon, Sebastian; Mehl, Julian; Bode, Gerrit; Müller-Lantzsch, Catharina; Südkamp, Norbert P; Niemeyer, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    To identify risk factors for posterior lateral meniscus root tears (PLRT) in patients with a tear of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). A database of 268 patients undergoing primary ACL reconstruction between 2011 and 2013 was used to identify all patients with isolated ACL tears and patients with an associated PLRT. Patients with other concomitant injuries and patients who underwent surgery >6 months after the injury were excluded. Univariate analysis was performed by comparing the two groups with regard to gender, age, age groups (30 years), height, weight, body mass index (BMI), BMI groups (30), type of injury (high-impact sports, low-impact sports, and not sports-related), and mechanism of injury (non-contact vs. contact). Multivariate logistic regression was carried out to identify independent risk factors for PLRT and to calculate odds ratios (ORs). One-hundred and forty-two patients met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Of those, 120 (85%) had an isolated ACL tear and 22 (15%) had an associated PLRT. No significant differences between patients with and without a PLRT were found for age, age groups, height, weight, BMI, BMI groups, and type of injury (p > 0.05). Univariate analysis revealed a statistically significant difference between both groups for gender distribution (p = 0.034) and mechanism of injury (p contact mechanism being more common in patients with PLRT. The sole independent risk factor for an associated PLRT identified in the multivariate logistic regression analysis was a contact mechanism with an OR of 17.52. An associated PLRT is more common in male patients and patients who sustained a contact injury. Patients with a contact injury mechanism have an approximately 17-fold increased risk for a PLRT compared to patients with a non-contact injury. Special attention for this injury pattern is therefore necessary in those patients, and early referral to magnetic resonance imaging or arthroscopy is recommended. IV.

  4. Common Peroneal Nerve Palsy with Multiple-Ligament Knee Injury and Distal Avulsion of the Biceps Femoris Tendon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Oshima

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A multiple-ligament knee injury that includes posterolateral corner (PLC disruption often causes palsy of the common peroneal nerve (CPN, which occurs in 44% of cases with PLC injury and biceps femoris tendon rupture or avulsion of the fibular head. Approximately half of these cases do not show functional recovery. This case report aims to present a criteria-based approach to the operation and postoperative management of CPN palsy that resulted from a multiple-ligament knee injury in a 22-year-old man that occurred during judo. We performed a two-staged surgery. The first stage was to repair the injuries to the PLC and biceps femoris. The second stage involved anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The outcomes were excellent, with a stable knee, excellent range of motion, and improvement in the palsy. The patient was able to return to judo competition 27 weeks after the injury. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report describing a return to sports following CPN palsy with multiple-ligament knee injury.

  5. Mapping current research trends on anterior cruciate ligament injury risk against the existing evidence: In vivo biomechanical risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharir, Raihana; Rafeeuddin, Radin; Staes, Filip; Dingenen, Bart; George, Keith; Vanrenterghem, Jos; Robinson, Mark A

    2016-08-01

    Whilst many studies measure large numbers of biomechanical parameters and associate these to anterior cruciate ligament injury risk, they cannot be considered as anterior cruciate ligament injury risk factors without evidence from prospective studies. A review was conducted to systematically assess the in vivo biomechanical literature to identify biomechanical risk factors for non-contact anterior cruciate ligament injury during dynamic sports tasks; and to critically evaluate the research trends from retrospective and associative studies investigating non-contact anterior cruciate ligament injury risk. An electronic literature search was undertaken on studies examining in vivo biomechanical risk factors associated with non-contact anterior cruciate ligament injury. The relevant studies were assessed by classification; level 1 - a prospective cohort study, level 2 - a retrospective study or level 3 - an associative study. An initial search revealed 812 studies but this was reduced to 1 level 1 evidence study, 20 level 2 evidence studies and 175 level 3 evidence studies that met all inclusion criteria. Level 1 evidence showed that the knee abduction angle, knee abduction moment and ground reaction force were biomechanical risk factors. Nine level 2 studies and eighty-three level 3 studies used these to assess risk factors in their study. Inconsistencies in results and methods were observed in level 2 and 3 studies. There is a lack of high quality, prospective level 1 evidence related to biomechanical risk factors for non-contact anterior cruciate ligament injury. More prospective cohort studies are required to determine risk factors and provide improved prognostic capability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Imaging study of ankle injury in professional soccer player of males].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shaolin; Zhao, Wenji; Hao, Shuai; Hu, Shaoyong; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Xintao

    2015-05-05

    51.0%), 25 ankles were calcanofibular ligaments injury (incidence was 49.0%), 29 ankles was the synovitis and local effusion at posterior ankle (incidence was 56.9%), the partial ligaments injured of deltoid ligaments were usually found and entirely torn were very rare (only three ankles). The former groups and shallow ligaments of deltoid ligaments were prone to injury. The common tendon disease of injury was tenosynovitis, 18 flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis, 13 posterior tibialis tenosynovitis,7 flexor digitorium tenosynovitis, 5 peroneus longus tenosynovitis, 2 peroneus brevis tenosynovitis and 6 Achilles tendinopathy. Tendinosis and tendon degeneration was relatively rare. The professional soccer players have been easily lead to the anatomic abnormal and pathological changes in the bones, ligaments and tendons due to long-term training and competition. The majority changes were chronic injury. Imaging examination can be found the abnormal changes of ankle and could help athletes, coachs, doctors to understand and assess the ankle structure and functional status.

  7. Anterior cruciate ligament injury/reinjury in alpine ski racing: a narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan MJ

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Matthew J Jordan,1 Per Aagaard,2 Walter Herzog1 1Human Performance Laboratory, The University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 2Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, SDU Muscle Research Cluster (SMRC, University of Southern Denmark, Odense M, Denmark Abstract: The purpose of the present review was to: 1 provide an overview of the current understanding on the epidemiology, etiology, risk factors, and prevention methods for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injury in alpine ski racing; and 2 provide an overview of what is known pertaining to ACL reinjury and return to sport after ACL injury in alpine ski racing. Given that most of the scientific studies on ACL injuries in alpine ski racing have been descriptive, and that very few studies contributed higher level scientific evidence, a nonsystematic narrative review was employed. Three scholarly databases were searched for articles on ACL injury or knee injury in alpine ski racing. Studies were classified according to their relevance in relation to epidemiology, etiology, risk factors, and return to sport/reinjury prevention. Alpine ski racers (skiers were found to be at high risk for knee injuries, and ACL tears were the most frequent diagnosis. Three primary ACL injury mechanism were identified that involved tibial internal rotation and anteriorly directed shear forces from ski equipment and the environment. While trunk muscle strength imbalance and genetics were found to be predictive of ACL injuries in development-level skiers, there was limited scientific data on ACL injury risk factors among elite skiers. Based on expert opinion, research on injury risk factors should focus on equipment design, course settings/speed, and athlete factors (eg, fitness. While skiers seem to make a successful recovery following ACL injury, there may be persistent neuromuscular deficits. Future research efforts should be directed toward prospective studies on ACL injury/reinjury prevention in both

  8. Torn lateral collateral ligament (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... LCL), is an injury to the lateral collateral ligament, a ligament extending from the top-outside surface of the ... the bottom-outside surface of the femur. The ligament prevents the knee joint from side-to-side ( ...

  9. Torn medial collateral ligament (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MCL), is an injury to the medial collateral ligament. This ligament extends from the upper-inside surface of the ... the bottom-inside surface of the femur. The ligament prevents the knee joint from medial instability, that ...

  10. Validation of varus stress radiographs for anterior cruciate ligament and posterolateral corner knee injuries: A biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Lucas S; Waltz, Robert A; Carney, Joseph R; Dewing, Christopher B; Lynch, Joseph R; Asher, Dean B; Schuett, Dustin J; LeClere, Lance E

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of isolated anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insufficiency on the radiographic varus stress test, and to provide reference data for the increase in lateral compartment opening under varus stress for a combined ACL and PLC injury. Ten cadaveric lower extremities were fixed to a jig in 20° of knee flexion. Twelve Newton-meter (Nm) and clinician-applied varus loads were tested, first with intact knee ligaments, followed by sequential sectioning of the ACL, fibular collateral ligament (FCL), popliteus tendon and the popliteofibular ligament (PFL). Lateral compartment opening was measured after each sequential sectioning. Maximum increase in lateral compartment opening for an isolated ACL deficient knee was 1.06mm with mean increase of 0.52mm (p=0.021) for the clinician-applied load. Mean increase in lateral compartment opening in an ACL and FCL deficient knee compared to the intact knee was 1.48mm (pAnterior cruciate ligament deficiency contributes to lateral compartment opening on varus stress radiographs though not sufficiently to confound previously established standards for lateral ligament knee injuries. We did not demonstrate the same magnitude of lateral compartment opening with sectioning of the PLC structures as previously reported, questioning the reproducibility of varus stress radiographic testing among institutions. Clinicians are cautioned against making surgical decisions based solely on current standards for radiographic stress examinations. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Dynamic Evaluation of the Contact Characteristics and Three-Dimensional Motion for the Ankle Joint with Lateral Ligament Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Kensaku; Omori, Go; Terashima, Shojiro; Sakamoto, Makoto; Hara, Toshiaki

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the dynamic changes in contact pressure distribution and three-dimensional ankle joint motion before and after lateral ligament injuries. Five fresh and frozen intact cadaveric ankles were examined. Each ankle was mounted on a specially designed frame that preserved five degrees of freedom motion. The direct linear transformation technique was used to measure the three-dimensional ankle motion, and a pressure-sensitive conductive rubber sensor was inserted into the talocrural joint space to determine the contact pressure distribution. The contact area on the talus for intact ankle moved anteriorly and laterally with increasing dorsiflexion. An area of high pressure was observed in the medial aspect of the articular surface after the ligament was cut. Supination significantly increased after a combined anterior talofibular ligament (ATF) and calcaneofibular ligament (CF) were cut in comparison with after only an ATF was cut, and no significant differences were observed in motional properties under each experimental condition.

  12. Effectiveness of Knee Injury and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear Prevention Programs: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurel A Donnell-Fink

    Full Text Available Individuals frequently involved in jumping, pivoting or cutting are at increased risk of knee injury, including anterior cruciate ligament (ACL tears. We sought to use meta-analytic techniques to establish whether neuromuscular and proprioceptive training is efficacious in preventing knee and ACL injury and to identify factors related to greater efficacy of such programs.We performed a systematic literature search of studies published in English between 1996 and 2014. Intervention efficacy was ascertained from incidence rate ratios (IRRs weighted by their precision (1/variance using a random effects model. Separate analyses were performed for knee and ACL injury. We examined whether year of publication, study quality, or specific components of the intervention were associated with efficacy of the intervention in a meta-regression analysis.Twenty-four studies met the inclusion criteria and were used in the meta-analysis. The mean study sample was 1,093 subjects. Twenty studies reported data on knee injury in general terms and 16 on ACL injury. Maximum Jadad score was 3 (on a 0-5 scale. The summary incidence rate ratio was estimated at 0.731 (95% CI: 0.614, 0.871 for knee injury and 0.493 (95% CI: 0.285, 0.854 for ACL injury, indicating a protective effect of intervention. Meta-regression analysis did not identify specific intervention components associated with greater efficacy but established that later year of publication was associated with more conservative estimates of intervention efficacy.The current meta-analysis provides evidence that neuromuscular and proprioceptive training reduces knee injury in general and ACL injury in particular. Later publication date was associated with higher quality studies and more conservative efficacy estimates. As study quality was generally low, these data suggest that higher quality studies should be implemented to confirm the preventive efficacy of such programs.

  13. Effectiveness of Knee Injury and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear Prevention Programs: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnell-Fink, Laurel A; Klara, Kristina; Collins, Jamie E; Yang, Heidi Y; Goczalk, Melissa G; Katz, Jeffrey N; Losina, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Individuals frequently involved in jumping, pivoting or cutting are at increased risk of knee injury, including anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears. We sought to use meta-analytic techniques to establish whether neuromuscular and proprioceptive training is efficacious in preventing knee and ACL injury and to identify factors related to greater efficacy of such programs. We performed a systematic literature search of studies published in English between 1996 and 2014. Intervention efficacy was ascertained from incidence rate ratios (IRRs) weighted by their precision (1/variance) using a random effects model. Separate analyses were performed for knee and ACL injury. We examined whether year of publication, study quality, or specific components of the intervention were associated with efficacy of the intervention in a meta-regression analysis. Twenty-four studies met the inclusion criteria and were used in the meta-analysis. The mean study sample was 1,093 subjects. Twenty studies reported data on knee injury in general terms and 16 on ACL injury. Maximum Jadad score was 3 (on a 0-5 scale). The summary incidence rate ratio was estimated at 0.731 (95% CI: 0.614, 0.871) for knee injury and 0.493 (95% CI: 0.285, 0.854) for ACL injury, indicating a protective effect of intervention. Meta-regression analysis did not identify specific intervention components associated with greater efficacy but established that later year of publication was associated with more conservative estimates of intervention efficacy. The current meta-analysis provides evidence that neuromuscular and proprioceptive training reduces knee injury in general and ACL injury in particular. Later publication date was associated with higher quality studies and more conservative efficacy estimates. As study quality was generally low, these data suggest that higher quality studies should be implemented to confirm the preventive efficacy of such programs.

  14. Hip joint biomechanics in those with and without post-traumatic knee osteoarthritis after anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellsandt, E; Zeni, J A; Axe, M J; Snyder-Mackler, L

    2017-12-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament injury results in altered kinematics and kinetics in the knee and hip joints that persist despite surgical reconstruction and rehabilitation. Abnormal movement patterns and a history of osteoarthritis are risk factors for articular cartilage degeneration in additional joints. The purpose of this study was to determine if hip joint biomechanics early after anterior cruciate ligament injury and reconstruction differ between patients with and without post-traumatic knee osteoarthritis 5years after reconstruction. The study's rationale was that individuals who develop knee osteoarthritis after anterior cruciate ligament injury may also demonstrate large alterations in hip joint biomechanics. Nineteen athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury completed standard gait analysis before (baseline) and after (post-training) extended pre-operative rehabilitation and at 6months, 1year, and 2years after reconstruction. Weightbearing knee radiographs were completed 5years after reconstruction to identify medial compartment osteoarthritis. Five of 19 patients had knee osteoarthritis at 5years after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Patients with knee osteoarthritis at 5years walked with smaller sagittal plane hip angles (P: 0.043) and lower sagittal (P: 0.021) and frontal plane (P: 0.042) external hip moments in the injured limb before and after reconstruction compared to those without knee osteoarthritis. The current findings suggest hip joint biomechanics may be altered in patients who develop post-traumatic knee osteoarthritis. Further study is needed to confirm whether the risk of non-traumatic hip pathology is increased after anterior cruciate ligament injury and if hip joint biomechanics influence its development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Military movement training program improves jump-landing mechanics associated with anterior cruciate ligament injury risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Brett D; Cameron, Kenneth L; Duffey, Michele L; Vargas, Donna; Duffey, Michael J; Mountcastle, Sally B; Padua, Darin; Nelson, Bradley J

    2013-01-01

    As part of the physical education program at the United States Military Academy, all cadets complete a movement training course designed to develop skills and improve performance in military-related physical tasks as well as obstacle navigation. The purpose of this study was to determine if completion of this course would also result in changes in jump-landing technique that reduce the risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Analysis of landing mechanics on a two-footed jump landing from a height of 30 cm with a three-dimensional motion capture system synchronized with two force plates revealed both positive and negative changes. Video assessment using the Landing Error Scoring System (LESS) revealed an overall improved landing technique (p=.001) when compared to baseline assessments. The studied military movement course appears to elicit mixed but overall improved lower extremity jump-landing mechanics associated with risk for ACL injury.

  16. Patient Understanding, Expectations, Outcomes, and Satisfaction Regarding Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries and Surgical Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Brian J; Cotter, Eric J; Wang, Kevin C; Davey, Annabelle

    2017-05-01

    Patient satisfaction has become an increasingly important outcome metric in orthopaedics and medicine in general as many initiatives at both the state and national levels aim to improve the efficiency and quality of health care. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries are among the most common injuries in orthopaedics, with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) surgery consistently reported as one of the most frequently performed procedures by orthopaedic surgeons. Patient-reported outcomes are frequently used to evaluate outcomes from the patient's perspective, and many physicians also ask patients about their satisfaction with treatment. A growing volume of literature has investigated the relation between preoperative patient expectations and postoperative patient satisfaction. The quality of online resources, patient expectations for ACLR, and factors associated with and/or predictive of either poor or good to excellent outcomes after surgery are described. This article critically reviews the orthopaedic literature on this important topic and identifies variables that influence patient expectations and satisfaction to help treating physicians better counsel and evaluate patients and ultimately improve outcomes of and satisfaction with ACLR surgery. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Control observation between mild moxibustion and TDP for obsolete collateral ligament injury of interphalangeal joints].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yulei; Li, Weihua; Xu, Xiaokang; Ding, Chenguang; Tian, Ling; Duan, Jiaqiang; Zhang, Zhifang; Sun, Lihong

    2016-01-01

    To compare the effects between mild moxibustion and specific electromagnetic spectrum therapy apparatus (TDP) for obsolete collateral ligament injury of interphalangeal joints. Sixty patients were randomly divided into a mild moxibustion group and a TDP group, 30 cases in each one. In the mild moxibustion group, pure moxa sticks were used at the affected digital joints locally for 20-30 min a time. In the TDP group, TDP was applied at the affected digital joints locally for 20-30 min a time. The treatment was given once a day for two courses, and 10-day treatment was made into a course. Visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain, swelling degree of the affected digital joints before and after treatment were observed and the clinical efficacy and safety were evaluated in the two groups. The excellent rate was 56.7% (17/30) and the excellent and, good rate was 83.4% (25/30) in the mild moxibustion group,which were better than 36.7% (11/30) and 76.7% (23/30) in the TDP group respectively (both P ligament injury of interphalangeal joints, which is superior to TDP.

  18. Mechanisms of anterior cruciate ligament injury in World Cup alpine skiing: a systematic video analysis of 20 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bere, Tone; Flørenes, Tonje Wåle; Krosshaug, Tron; Koga, Hideyuki; Nordsletten, Lars; Irving, Christopher; Muller, Erich; Reid, Robert Cortas; Senner, Veit; Bahr, Roald

    2011-07-01

    There is limited insight into the mechanisms of anterior cruciate ligament injuries in alpine skiing, particularly among professional ski racers. This study was undertaken to qualitatively describe the mechanisms of anterior cruciate ligament injury in World Cup alpine skiing. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Twenty cases of anterior cruciate ligament injuries reported through the International Ski Federation Injury Surveillance System for 3 consecutive World Cup seasons (2006-2009) were obtained on video. Seven international experts in the field of skiing biomechanics and sports medicine related to alpine skiing performed visual analyses of each case to describe the injury mechanisms in detail (skiing situation, skier behavior, biomechanical characteristics). Three main categories of injury mechanisms were identified: slip-catch, landing back-weighted, and dynamic snowplow. The slip-catch mechanism accounted for half of the cases (n = 10), and all these injuries occurred during turning, without or before falling. The skier lost pressure on the outer ski, and while extending the outer knee to regain grip, the inside edge of the outer ski caught abruptly in the snow, forcing the knee into internal rotation and valgus. The same loading pattern was observed for the dynamic snowplow (n = 3). The landing back-weighted category included cases (n = 4) where the skier was out of balance backward in flight after a jump and landed on the ski tails with nearly extended knees. The suggested loading mechanism was a combination of tibiofemoral compression, boot-induced anterior drawer, and quadriceps anterior drawer. Based on this video analysis of 20 injury situations, the main mechanism of anterior cruciate ligament injury in World Cup alpine skiing appeared to be a slip-catch situation where the outer ski catches the inside edge, forcing the outer knee into internal rotation and valgus. A similar loading pattern was observed for the dynamic snowplow. Injury prevention

  19. MR imaging of the combined anterior and posterior cruciate ligament tears: focussing on the ratterns of injuries and associated findings

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    Kwon, Seon Young; Choi, Chang Lak; Park, Dal Soo; Park, Eun Hee; Lee, Sang Ho; Song, Mun Kab; Lee, Kwang Won [Eulji Medical College, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Soon Tae [Chungnam National Univ. College of Medicine, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-09-01

    To evaluate the patterns of injuries and frequency of associated findings on MR imaging in patients with both anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL)tears;to compare the associated findings, as seen on MR imaging, in cases with both ACL and PCL tears with those with ACL or PCL tears. Ten patients with compbined ACL and PCL tears, 16 with ACL tears and 18 with PCL tears, all confirmed by arthroscopy or open surgery, were involved in this study. To identify the associated knee injuries, MR images were retrospectively evaluated. In ten patients with combined ACL and PCL tears, open surgery led to the identification of six complete ACL tears (60%), four partial ACL tears (40%), eitht complete PCL tears (80%) and two partial PCL tears (20%). Injuries associated with these combined tears, and revealed by MR imaging, comprised six medial collateral ligament injuries (60%), six lateral collateral ligament jnjuries (60%), five medial meniscal injuries (50%), three lateral meniscal injuries (30%), nine bony injuries (90%), two posterior capsular injuries (20%), and three popliteus muscle injuries (30%). The frequency of popliteus muscle injury was significantly different (p<0.05, Fisher's exact test) between the group with both ACL and PCL tears and that with ACL or PCL tears. Associated findings in patients with combined ACL and PCL tears are more frequent than in those with ACL or PCL tears. In cases involving combined ACL and PCL tears, associated findings-as seen on MR images-should thus be carefully examined.

  20. Clinical study on the arthroscopic refreshing treatment of anterior cruciate ligament injury combined with stable medial meniscus ramp injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J; Guan, K; Wang, J Z

    2017-06-01

    This study sought to investigate the clinical efficacy of arthroscopic refreshing treatment of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury combined with stable medial meniscus ramp injury. Sixty-eight patients treated between January 2010 and January 2014 were included, and their clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. All patients, after being treated using ACL reconstruction, were divided into 2 groups according to meniscus injury treatment method. The observation group (31 cases) was treated by arthroscopic refreshing, which removed the tissue on both sides of the tear edge using a cutting knife, while the control group (37 cases) was treated using Fast-fix sutures. All patients were followed up for at least 24 months. Surgical duration, postoperative function recovery time, and hospital stay for patients in the observation group were significantly shorter than for those of the control group (P⟨0.05). Both groups showed significant post-operative improvement for Lysholm scores, IKDC scores, and average knee range of motion at 12 and 24 months post-operation (P⟨0.05), but no significant differences between groups were observed (P⟩0.05). Regarding the difference in movement range between the healthy and injured sides, both groups showed significant decrease post-operation (P⟨0.05). Ultimately, there was no significant difference in the recovery of ramp damage and objective symptoms between the two groups (P⟩0.05). Arthroscopic refreshing treatment of patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury combined with stable ramp lesion can achieve similar clinical curative effects as the Fast-fix suture, thereby providing a simple alternative for patient treatment worth popularizing.

  1. Optimization of the anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention paradigm: novel feedback techniques to enhance motor learning and reduce injury risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjaminse, Anne; Gokeler, Alli; Dowling, Ariel V; Faigenbaum, Avery; Ford, Kevin R; Hewett, Timothy E; Onate, James A; Otten, Bert; Myer, Gregory D

    2015-03-01

    Primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention programs effectively reduce ACL injury risk in the short term. Despite these programs, ACL injury incidence is still high, making it imperative to continue to improve current prevention strategies. A potential limitation of current ACL injury prevention training may be a deficit in the transfer of conscious, optimal movement strategies rehearsed during training sessions to automatic movements required for athletic activities and unanticipated events on the field. Instructional strategies with an internal focus of attention have traditionally been utilized, but may not be optimal for the acquisition of the control of complex motor skills required for sports. Conversely, external-focus instructional strategies may enhance skill acquisition more efficiently and increase the transfer of improved motor skills to sports activities. The current article will present insights gained from the motor-learning domain that may enhance neuromuscular training programs via improved skill development and increased retention and transfer to sports activities, which may reduce ACL injury incidence in the long term.

  2. Prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of anterior cruciate ligament injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Pamela J; Sugimoto, Dai; Micheli, Lyle J

    2017-01-01

    As more children and adolescents participate in competitive organized sports, there has been an increase in the reported incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in these age groups. ACL injuries in skeletally immature athletes present a challenge, as reconstruction must preserve the physis of the distal femur and of the proximal tibia to avoid growth disturbances. Historically, a skeletally immature athlete with an ACL injury was treated with a brace and activity modification until skeletal maturity, with ACL reconstruction being performed at that time in the "non-copers" who experienced instability. More recently, evidence has shown that delayed reconstruction may lead to increased damage to the meniscus and articular cartilage. As a result, early reconstruction is favored to protect the meniscus and allow continued physical activity. While adolescents at or those near skeletal maturity may be treated with standard reconstruction techniques, they may result in growth disturbances in younger athletes with significant growth remaining. In response to the growing need for ACL reconstruction techniques in skeletally immature individuals, physeal-sparing and physeal-respecting reconstruction techniques have been developed. In addition to the advancements in surgical technique, ACL injury prevention has also gained attention. This growing interest in ACL prevention is in part related to the high risk of ACL re-tear, either of the ACL graft or of the contralateral ACL, in children and adolescents. Recent reports indicate that well-designed neuromuscular training programs may reduce the risk of primary and subsequent ACL injuries.

  3. Prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of anterior cruciate ligament injuries in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Pamela J; Sugimoto, Dai; Micheli, Lyle J

    2017-01-01

    As more children and adolescents participate in competitive organized sports, there has been an increase in the reported incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in these age groups. ACL injuries in skeletally immature athletes present a challenge, as reconstruction must preserve the physis of the distal femur and of the proximal tibia to avoid growth disturbances. Historically, a skeletally immature athlete with an ACL injury was treated with a brace and activity modification until skeletal maturity, with ACL reconstruction being performed at that time in the “non-copers” who experienced instability. More recently, evidence has shown that delayed reconstruction may lead to increased damage to the meniscus and articular cartilage. As a result, early reconstruction is favored to protect the meniscus and allow continued physical activity. While adolescents at or those near skeletal maturity may be treated with standard reconstruction techniques, they may result in growth disturbances in younger athletes with significant growth remaining. In response to the growing need for ACL reconstruction techniques in skeletally immature individuals, physeal-sparing and physeal-respecting reconstruction techniques have been developed. In addition to the advancements in surgical technique, ACL injury prevention has also gained attention. This growing interest in ACL prevention is in part related to the high risk of ACL re-tear, either of the ACL graft or of the contralateral ACL, in children and adolescents. Recent reports indicate that well-designed neuromuscular training programs may reduce the risk of primary and subsequent ACL injuries. PMID:28652828

  4. The incidence of knee and anterior cruciate ligament injuries over one decade in the Belgian Soccer League.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quisquater, Laurent; Bollars, Peter; Vanlommel, Luc; Claes, Steven; Corten, Kristoff; Bellemans, Johan

    2013-10-01

    In an epidemiological study we assessed the evolution in the incidence and possible risk factors of knee injuries, especially anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, in Belgian soccer over one decade. Two soccer seasons (1999-2000 and 2009-2010) were compared and 56,364 injury reports registered by the KBVB-URBSFA were retrieved. Knee injuries totaled 9.971 cases, 5.495 in the first season (1999-2000) and 4.476 in the second (2009-2010): a significant decrease in incidence from 1.5 per 100 players in 2000 to 1.2 knee injuries in 2010. Six percent of all knee injuries were ACL injuries. The reported incidence of ACL tears slightly increased from 0.081 to 0.084 per 100 players. Female gender, competition and age over 18 years were prognosticators for ACL injuries. Enhanced prevention programs for ACL injuries, especially in those sports groups are warranted.

  5. Association of Tibial Plateau Fracture Morphology With Ligament Disruption in the Context of Multiligament Knee Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porrino, Jack; Richardson, Michael L; Hovis, Keegan; Twaddle, Bruce; Gee, Albert

    2017-09-12

    We identified common morphologies of tibial plateau fractures that arise with multiligament knee injuries (MLKIs), and investigated the relationship of the fracture with ligament tears. We also evaluated the correlation of 3 tibial plateau fracture classification systems (Schatzker, AO, and Duparc). Over a 2-year period, a single orthopaedic surgeon at our institution managed 90 MLKIs. Images of those knees with a tibial plateau fracture were retrospectively reviewed and classified per Schatzker, AO, and Duparc systems. Correlation among the 3 systems was evaluated using Spearman nonparametric correlation coefficient. Associations between fracture grading system and ligament tears were estimated using logistic regression. Associations between ligament tears and tibial plateau fracture location (medial vs lateral) were estimated using exact logistic regression. A total of 19 of 90 knees suffered tibial plateau fractures. There was reasonable correlation among the 3 tibial plateau classification systems. Increasing grade under the Schatzker system showed statistically significant associations with medial collateral ligament (MCL) (P = 0.056) and posterolateral corner (PLC) (P = 0.035) tears. Increasing grade under the Duparc system showed statistically significant associations with MCL (P = 0.032) and PLC (P = 0.058) tears. PLC tears had a statistically significant association with medial plateau fractures (P = 0.003); odds ratio of 121.1 (95% CI: 2.2-∞). MCL tears had a statistically significant association with lateral plateau fractures (P = 0.004); odds ratio of 18.4 (95% CI: 2.1-∞). Although not statistically significant, 8 out of 9 knees with a lateral plateau fracture demonstrated tear of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). As the grade of designation increases within the Schatzker and Duparc tibial plateau fracture classifications, as does the likelihood of MCL and PLC tear. The majority of tibial plateau fractures that occur in the context of MLKI are

  6. The scintigraphic appearance of de Quervain tenosynovitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, William D

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the scintigraphic pattern of de Quervain tenosynovitis, a common inflammatory condition of the thumb tendon sheaths related to repetitive use. The author conducted a retrospective audit of consecutive cases with independent clinical validation of the final diagnosis. There were 7 cases of clinically confirmed de Quervain tenosynovitis. The typical scintigraphic finding was a focal area of superficial linear hyperemia and skeletal uptake along the radial aspect of the distal radius corresponding to the anatomic location of the abductor pollicis longus and extensor pollicis brevis. All cases showed an abnormality on at least one phase of the bone scan. Bone scanning appears to be of value in the differential diagnosis of dorsolateral wrist pain when clinical findings are nondiagnostic. The scintigraphic appearance of de Quervain tenosynovitis can help to confirm the diagnosis while excluding other causes of wrist pain. Determining the sensitivity and specificity of this pattern will require further research.

  7. Clinical features and injury patterns of medial collateral ligament tibial side avulsions: "wave sign" on magnetic resonance imaging is essential for diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taketomi, Shuji; Uchiyama, Eiji; Nakagawa, Takumi; Takeda, Hideki; Nakayama, Shuichi; Fukai, Atsushi; Sanada, Takaki; Iwaso, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    Medial collateral ligament tibial avulsion is rare. Consequently, diagnostic criteria and a treatment regimen for medial collateral ligament tibial side avulsions remain to be established. The purpose of this study is to clarify the clinical features of medial collateral ligament tibial side avulsions. We performed a retrospective clinical and magnetic resonance imaging review of a consecutive series of 12 medial collateral ligament tibial side avulsions. All patients were treated operatively and the final diagnosis was made based on the intraoperative findings. Post-injury magnetic resonance imaging studies were reviewed to assess injury patterns with respect to the intraoperative findings. Eleven of 12 cases (92%) had grade III valgus laxity (unstable to valgus stress at both 0° and 30° of flexion) on an examination under anesthesia. Concomitant anterior cruciate ligament tear was noticed in all cases. Intraoperative findings were classified into 3 types depending on the location of the ruptured end of the superficial medial collateral ligament with respect to the pes anserinus tendons. Magnetic resonance imaging depicted characteristic waving ("wave sign") of the superficial layer of medial collateral ligament in all cases. "Wave sign" of the superficial layer of medial collateral ligament on magnetic resonance imaging is essential for diagnosing medial collateral ligament tibial side avulsions. Based on the clinical features and injury patterns, operative treatment is primarily recommended for medial collateral ligament tibial side avulsions. Case series, Level IV. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. An In Vitro Robotic Assessment of the Anterolateral Ligament, Part 1: Secondary Role of the Anterolateral Ligament in the Setting of an Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Matthew T; Nitri, Marco; Williams, Brady T; Moulton, Samuel G; Cruz, Raphael Serra; Dornan, Grant J; Goldsmith, Mary T; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-03-01

    Recent investigations have described the structural and functional behavior of the anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee through pull-apart and isolated sectioning studies. However, the secondary stabilizing role of the ALL in the setting of a complete anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear has not been fully defined for common simulated clinical examinations, such as the pivot-shift, anterior drawer, and internal rotation tests. Combined sectioning of the ALL and ACL would lead to increased internal rotation and increased axial plane translation during a pivot-shift test when compared with isolated sectioning of the ACL. Controlled laboratory study. Ten fresh-frozen human cadaveric knees were subjected to a simulated pivot-shift test with coupled 10-N·m valgus and 5-N·m internal rotation torques from 0° to 60° of knee flexion and a 5-N·m internal rotation torque and an 88-N anterior tibial load, both from 0° to 120° of knee flexion via a 6 degrees of freedom robotic system. Kinematic changes were measured and compared with the intact state for isolated sectioning of the ACL and combined sectioning of the ACL and ALL. Combined sectioning of the ACL and ALL resulted in a significant increase in axial plane tibial translation during a simulated pivot shift at 0°, 15°, 30°, and 60° of knee flexion and a significant increase in internal rotation at 0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75°, 90°, 105°, and 120° when compared with the intact and ACL-deficient states. Based on the model results, ALL sectioning resulted in an additional 2.1 mm (95% CI, 1.4-2.9 mm; P < .001) of axial plane translation during the pivot shift when compared with ACL-only sectioning, when pooling evidence over all flexion angles. Likewise, when subjected to IR torque, the ACL+ALL-deficient state resulted in an additional 3.2° of internal rotation (95% CI, 2.4°-4.1°; P < .001) versus the intact state, and the additional sectioning of the ALL increased internal rotation by 2.7° (95

  9. [EFFECTIVENESS OF ONE-STAGE REPAIR AND RECONSTRUCTION OF TRAUMATIC DISLOCATION OF KNEE JOINT COMBINED WITH MULTIPLE LIGAMENT INJURIES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wu; Yao, Jianhua; Kong, Dejia; Sun, Wei; Huang, Yan; Zheng, Huayong; Liu, Chen; Bao, Xianguo

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of one-stage repair and reconstruction of multiple ligament injuries of the knee under arthroscopy. Between March 2007 and March 2009, 25 patients (25 knees) with multiple ligament injuries of the knee underwent one-stage repair and reconstruction under arthroscopy. Of 25 cases, 16 were male and 9 were female with an average age of 29.6 years (range, 18-43 years). The causes of injury were traffic accident injury in 20 cases, falling injury from height in 3 cases, and sport injury in 2 cases. The time between injury and surgery was 8-14 days (mean, 10.5 days). The preoperative Lysholm score was 37.92 ± 3.57. The X-ray film and MRI examinations showed that 17 patients had tears of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), and medial collateral ligament, and 8 patients had tears of ACL, PCL, and posterolateral corner (PLC); 5 cases had medial meniscus injury and 7 cases had lateral meniscus injury. The ACL, PCL, and PLC were reconstructed under arthroscopy with autologous tendon or allogeneic tendon, and the MCL was repaired. Early active and passive functional exercises were done postoperatively. All the incisions healed by first intention, and there was no complications of infection and deep venous thrombosis. Twenty-five patients were followed up 24-78 months (mean, 50.9 months). Six patients had knee stiff postoperatively; after manipulation under anesthsia, 5 patients lost less than 15° of flexion and only 1 patient lost 26° of flexion. At last follow-up, the stability of the knee joint was significantly improved. There were significant differences in the anterior drawer test, posterior drawer test, Lachman test, and varus stress and valgus stress testing at 30° between at last follow-up and at preoperation (P Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) rating was nearly normal in 16 cases (64%), abnormal in 8 cases (32%), and obviously abnormal in 1 case (4%). One-stage repair and reconstruction of

  10. Risk of Secondary Injury in Younger Athletes After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Amelia J.; Grandhi, Ravi K.; Schneider, Daniel K.; Stanfield, Denver; Webster, Kate E.; Myer, Gregory D.

    2017-01-01

    Background Injury to the ipsilateral graft used for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) or a new injury to the contralateral ACL are disastrous outcomes after successful ACL reconstruction (ACLR), rehabilitation, and return to activity. Studies reporting ACL reinjury rates in younger active populations are emerging in the literature, but these data have not yet been comprehensively synthesized. Purpose To provide a current review of the literature to evaluate age and activity level as the primary risk factors in reinjury after ACLR. Study Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods A systematic review of the literature was conducted via searches in PubMed (1966 to July 2015) and EBSCO host (CINAHL, Medline, SPORTDiscus [1987 to July 2015]). After the search and consultation with experts and rating of study quality, 19 articles met inclusion for review and aggregation. Population demographic data and total reinjury (ipsilateral and contralateral) rate data were recorded from each individual study and combined using random-effects meta-analyses. Separate meta-analyses were conducted for the total population data as well as the following subsets: young age, return to sport, and young age + return to sport. Results Overall, the total second ACL reinjury rate was 15%, with an ipsilateral reinjury rate of 7% and contralateral injury rate of 8%. The secondary ACL injury rate (ipsilateral + contralateral) for patients younger than 25 years was 21%. The secondary ACL injury rate for athletes who return to a sport was also 20%. Combining these risk factors, athletes younger than 25 years who return to sport have a secondary ACL injury rate of 23%. Conclusion This systematic review and meta-analysis demonstrates that younger age and a return to high level of activity are salient factors associated with secondary ACL injury. These combined data indicate that nearly 1 in 4 young athletic patients who sustain an ACL injury and return to high-risk sport

  11. The Association Between Knee Confidence and Muscle Power, Hop Performance, and Postural Orientation in People With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ageberg, Eva; Roos, Ewa M

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional. Background The association between muscle function and lack of knee confidence in people with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury has not been well investigated. Such knowledge would help in the design of training programs for this population. Objective...

  12. Epidemiology of Joint Dislocations and Ligamentous/Tendinous Injuries among 2,700 Patients: Five-year Trend of a Tertiary Center in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabian, Mohammad H; Zadegan, Shayan Abdollah; Zanjani, Leila Oryadi; Mehrpour, Saeed R

    2017-11-01

    The epidemiology of traumatic dislocations and ligamentous/tendinous injuries is poorly understood. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the prevalence and distribution of various dislocations and ligamentous/tendinous injuries in a tertiary orthopedic hospital in Iran. Musculoskeletal injuries in an academic tertiary health care center in Tehran February 2005 to October 2010 were recorded. The demographic details of patients with pure dislocations and ligamentous/tendinous injuries were extracted and the type and site of injuries were classified according to their specific age/gender groups. Among 18,890 admitted patients, 628 (3.3%) were diagnosed with dislocations and 2.081 (11%) with ligamentous/tendinous injuries. The total male/female ratio was 4.2:1 in patients with dislocations and 1.7:1 in patients with ligamentous/tendinous injuries. Shoulder was the most prevalent site of dislocation (50.6%), followed by fingers (10.1%), toes (7.6%), hip (7.3%), and elbow (6.5%). Ankle was the most common site of ligamentous/tendinous injury (53.5%), followed by midfoot (12.3%), knee (8.3%), hand (7%), and shoulder (5%). The mean ages of the patients in dislocations and ligamentous/tendinous injuries were 35.0±18.2 and 31.3± 15.1, respectively. There was no seasonal variation. Shoulder dislocation and ankle ligamentous injury are the most frequent injuries especially in younger population and have different distribution patterns in specific age and sex groups. Epidemiologic studies can help develop and evaluate the injury prevention strategies, resource allocation, and training priorities.

  13. Effects of an anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention program on performance in adolescent female soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vescovi, J D; VanHeest, J L

    2010-06-01

    Female soccer players are three times more likely to suffer a non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear compared with male soccer players. Several ACL injury prevention programs have been developed and are used to reduce injury risk. However, to date there is limited information on how such programs affect physical performance. The aim of this randomized controlled study was to investigate the effects of the Prevent Injury Enhance Performance (PEP) program in adolescent female soccer players. Four soccer teams were randomly assigned to an intervention (PEP) or control (CON) group and assessed at baseline, 6 weeks, and 12 weeks on linear sprinting, countermovement jump (CMJ), and two agility tests. A mixed model factorial ANOVA with repeated measures was used to assess for treatment effects on the dependent variables. Improvements in 27.3 and 36.6 m sprint times (ACL injury prevention programs designed as a structured warm-up routine seem to lack the necessary stimulus to enhance athletic performance.

  14. deal Rehabilitation Programme after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury: Review of Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeel Nazir AHMAD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Knee injuries are the second most common musculoskeletal injuries in primary care, with anterior cruciate the most commonly injured ligament. It is caused by contact / non - contact and accelerating/decelerating twisting injury of the knee. Typical presentation includes trauma with pain and swellin g, with laxity of the knee joint. Management includes rehabilitation alone or surgery combined with rehabilitation. Pre - surgery rehabilitation with graded physiotherapy programme results in improved postoperative recovery, reduced pain, swelling, better s tability and improved range of movement. No consensus exists on an ideal rehabilitation programme, as various factors, including injury to other knee structures, choice of graft, type of surgery performed and patient preference exist. Rehabilitation includ es accelerated vs. conservative, closed vs. open kinetic chain and techniques involving bracing, neuromuscular training and cryotherapy. Ideal personalised rehabilitation plan should include educating athletes to improve adherence, providing realistic stra tegies and approximate time frame for a return to sport. Studies support accelerated rehabilitation before and after surgery, in a clinic and home setting, with combined kinetic exercises. Accelerated rehabilitation protocol involving exercises to increas e muscle strength, knee ROM and proprioception along with reducing pain, inflammation and swelling can lead to better knee stability and a less complicated rehabilitation course.

  15. Pilot study of female high school basketball players' anterior cruciate ligament injury knowledge, attitudes, and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, M D; Friden, C

    2009-08-01

    An anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention program was evaluated. One hundred and thirteen female high school varsity and junior varsity basketball players and 12 coaches participated in an 8-week educational and skills program. Demographic and injury history data were collected. At pre-intervention and at the end of season, knowledge, attitudes, and practices about ACL risk and injury prevention were assessed via questionnaires, and frequency of two-footed landings were videotaped during games. Univariate statistics described the sample. Paired t-tests evaluated the program's impact. Cronbach's alpha, correlations, and kappa statistics assessed the validity and reliability of questionnaires and video analysis. Of the 113 players, 74 completed the study. The players' mean age was 16.25 years (SD=1.07; range=14.2-18.8). Baseline knowledge score was 57.2%, practice 58.4%, and attitude 73.5%. The mean baseline knowledge score of the 12 coaches (mean age=40.8 years; SD=10.3; range=26.9-56.3) was 68.7%. Players' knowledge about ACL injury prevention improved (t=2.57; Pskills.

  16. Semitendinosus and gracilis transfer for treatment of medial collateral ligament injury of total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, J-G; Wang, L; Zhao, H-W; Liu, J

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the study is to evaluate the clinic effectiveness of semitendinosus and gracilis transfer for the treatment of medial collateral ligament (MCL) injury of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). From March 2009 to May 2014, a series of 11 patients with MCL injuries of primary TKA were treated by semitendinosus and gracilis transfer. Another 18 patients (21 knees) were recruited as control group. The two groups of patients were comparable for gender, age, body mass index, varus knee deformity, KSS score, joint activity degree and type of prosthesis comparison without significant difference (p > 0.05). All the patients were regularly followed-up using the American Knee Society Scoring System (KSS). No patient of either group reported impaired wound healing, joint instability, pain, prosthesis loosening and other complications. At the final follow-up, the mean knee objective score and the functional score of the injury group include (89.82 ± 3.76) points and (89.54 ± 3.50) points, respectively. The control group includes (90.19 ± 3.39) and (90 ± 3.53) points. They were significantly higher than the preoperative conditions. The difference was not statistically significant. The difference of KSS score was not statistically significant (t = 0.158, p = 0.877; t = 0.820, p = 0.432). The semitendinosus and gracilis transfer are reliable for the treatment of MCL injury of TKA. The semitendinosus and gracilis are close to the knee MCL, which can effectively improve knee function.

  17. Treatment of Medial Malleolus or Pure Deltoid Ligament Injury in Patients with Supination-External Rotation Type IV Ankle Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Zhang, Chao; Yin, Jian-Wen; Wang, Chen; Huang, Jia-Zhang; Ma, Xin; Wang, Cheng-Wei; Wang, Xue

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the effect of internal fixation on postoperative ankle function in patients with supination-external rotation type IV ankle fractures, including medial malleolus fractures and deltoid ligament injury. Between January 2012 and June 2014, patients with medial structure injuries were enrolled in this study and assigned to the medial malleolus fracture group or the deltoid ligament group. The surgical procedures for the two groups were documented. The follow-up endpoint was the time point when the steel plate or screw was removed from the lateral ankle. The Olerud-Molander ankle scoring system was used to assess ankle function. A total of 84 patients with supination-external rotation type IV ankle fractures had complete medical records and were included in this study. The average age of the patients was 44.16 years (range, 15-75). The patient sample included 39 males and 45 females. Overall, 49 patients (19 males and 30 females) suffered a medial malleolus fracture. The average age of these patients was 40.20 years (range, 15-75). Patients with a posterior malleolar fracture fragment >25% of the articular surface accounted for 81.6% (40 patients) of these patients. Overall, 35 patients (20 males and 15 females) experienced a deltoid ligament injury. The average age of these patients was 44.21 years (range, 17-73). Patients with a posterior malleolar fracture fragment >25% of the articular surface accounted for 11.5% (four patients) of these patients. Open reduction was performed in patients with medial malleolus fractures, and two 4.0-mm cannulated screws were used to fixate the posterior malleolus and the medial malleolus. The suture-anchor technique was used to repair the ligaments in patients with deltoid ligament injuries. The follow-up endpoint was the time point when the steel plate and screws were removed from the lateral ankle in patients. The average follow-up period was 13.4 months (range, 11-17). The Olerud-Molander ankle scoring system was

  18. Feedback Techniques to Target Functional Deficits Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction : Implications for Motor Control and Reduction of Second Injury Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gokeler, Alli; Benjaminse, Anne; Hewett, Timothy E.; Paterno, Mark V.; Ford, Kevin R.; Otten, Egbert; Myer, Gregory D.

    2013-01-01

    Primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention training has been shown to reduce the risk of injury. Less is known about the effect of prevention on second injury after ACL reconstruction (ACLR). Given recent findings that second injury rates exceed 20 % in only the first year following

  19. Feedback techniques to target functional deficits following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: implications for motor control and reduction of second injury risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egbert Otten; Mark V. Paterno; Timothy E. Hewett; Anne Benjaminse; Alli Gokeler; Gregory D. Myer; Kevin R. Ford

    2013-01-01

    Primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention training has been shown to reduce the risk of injury. Less is known about the effect of prevention on second injury after ACL reconstruction (ACLR). Given recent findings that second injury rates exceed 20 % in only the first year following

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of ankle ligaments and tendon injuries; Trauma von Bandapparat und Sehnen. Untersuchungstechnik und Nachweis in der MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breitenseher, M. [Abt. fuer Osteoradiologie, Universitaetsklinik und MR-Institut der Medizinischen Fakultaet, Univ. Wien (Austria)]|[Ludwig Boltzmann-Institut fuer Radiologische Tumordiagnostik, Wien (Austria); Trattnig, S. [Abt. fuer Osteoradiologie, Universitaetsklinik und MR-Institut der Medizinischen Fakultaet, Univ. Wien (Austria)]|[Ludwig Boltzmann-Institut fuer Radiologische Tumordiagnostik, Wien (Austria); Kukla, C. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Unfallchirurgie, Wien (Austria); Daebler, C. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Unfallchirurgie, Wien (Austria); Helbich, T. [Abt. fuer Osteoradiologie, Universitaetsklinik und MR-Institut der Medizinischen Fakultaet, Univ. Wien (Austria)]|[Ludwig Boltzmann-Institut fuer Radiologische Tumordiagnostik, Wien (Austria); Haller, J. [Abt. fuer Osteoradiologie, Universitaetsklinik und MR-Institut der Medizinischen Fakultaet, Univ. Wien (Austria)]|[Ludwig Boltzmann-Institut fuer Osteologie, Wien (Austria); Imhof, H. [Abt. fuer Osteoradiologie, Universitaetsklinik und MR-Institut der Medizinischen Fakultaet, Univ. Wien (Austria)]|[Ludwig Boltzmann-Institut fuer Radiologische Tumordiagnostik, Wien (Austria)

    1995-07-01

    Today MRI allows evaluation of the integrity of injured ankle ligaments. The major difficulty in MRI is inconsistency in visualization by inadequate appreciation of the three-dimensional orientation of each ankle ligament. Using this technique, 52 patients with sprained ankles underwent MRI. The integrity of rupture of the collateral lateral ligaments was obtained in all 52 ankles. Full-lenght visualization is essential for evaluation of the ankle ligaments with MRI. In these 52 patients the angle of tilt on the stress X-ray was compared with the rate of MRI findings showing an injury affecting two ligaments. We found that none of the patients in whom the angle of lateral tilt was less than 5 had rupture of two laterial ligaments, while 32% of patients with angles of tilt of 6-14 and 42% of those with angles of tilt over 15 on stress X-ray had two ruptured lateral ligaments. The advantages of MRI are that it offers the best visualization of the extent of the tendon lesion. MRI, however, seems to be superior to US in detecting and quantifying lesions of the Achilles tendon. Therefore, MRI may be indicated in particularly difficult cases of tendons injuries in the foot. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die MRT erlaubt die ausgezeichnete direkte Darstellung und sicheren Nachweis der Bandverletzung. Mit dieser Methode wurden 52 Patienten untersucht. In allen Faellen konnten die lateralen Sprunggelenkbaender bzw. Bandrupturen nachgewiesen werden. Zur optimalen Banddarstellung am Sprunggelenk ist es notwendig, die Untersuchungsebene dem Banverlauf anzupassen. Bei diesen 52 Patienten wurde der Winkel der Aufklappbarkeit in der Stressradiographie mit der Rate von Zeibandverleztungen in der MRT verglichen. Es zeigte sich, dass in der Gruppe mit einer lateralen Aufklappbarkeit {<=}5 keine Zweibandverletzung, in der Gruppe von 6-14 in 32% Zweibandverletzungen und in der Gruppe von {>=}15 42% Zweibandverletzungen vorlagen. Bei inkonklusivem Ultraschall und komplexen Sehnenveraenderungen ist

  1. Prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of anterior cruciate ligament injuries in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lang PJ

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Pamela J Lang,1,2 Dai Sugimoto,1–3 Lyle J Micheli1–3 1Division of Sports Medicine, Department of Orthopedics, Boston Children’s Hospital, 2Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 3The Micheli Center for Sports Injury Prevention, Waltham, MA, USA Abstract: As more children and adolescents participate in competitive organized sports, there has been an increase in the reported incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injuries in these age groups. ACL injuries in skeletally immature athletes present a challenge, as reconstruction must preserve the physis of the distal femur and of the proximal tibia to avoid growth disturbances. Historically, a skeletally immature athlete with an ACL injury was treated with a brace and activity modification until skeletal maturity, with ACL reconstruction being performed at that time in the “non-copers” who experienced instability. More recently, evidence has shown that delayed reconstruction may lead to increased damage to the meniscus and articular cartilage. As a result, early reconstruction is favored to protect the meniscus and allow continued physical activity. While adolescents at or those near skeletal maturity may be treated with standard reconstruction techniques, they may result in growth disturbances in younger athletes with significant growth remaining. In response to the growing need for ACL reconstruction techniques in skeletally immature individuals, physeal-sparing and physeal-respecting reconstruction techniques have been developed. In addition to the advancements in surgical technique, ACL injury prevention has also gained attention. This growing interest in ACL prevention is in part related to the high risk of ACL re-tear, either of the ACL graft or of the contralateral ACL, in children and adolescents. Recent reports indicate that well-designed neuromuscular training programs may reduce the risk of primary and subsequent ACL injuries. Keywords

  2. "It's just de Quervain's tenosynovitis" : case report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Douglas, Robert; Nguyen, Anthony; Saies, Andrew; Asopa, Vipin

    2014-01-01

    .... She neither drank nor smoked. An X-ray of the wrist was reported to be normal. A diagnosis of de Quervain's tenosynovitis was made and she was treated with anti-inflammatory drugs and physiotherapy, and received an injection of corticosteroid...

  3. Corticosteroid injection for de Quervain's tenosynovitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters-Veluthamaningal, Cyriac; van der Windt, Danielle A. W. M.; Winters, Jan C.; Jong, Betty Meyboom-de

    2009-01-01

    Back ground De Quervain's tenosynovitis is a disorder characterised by pain on the radial (thumb) side of the wrist and functional disability of the hand. It can be treated by corticosteroid injection, splinting and surgery. Objectives To summarise evidence on the efficacy and safety of

  4. Prevalence and Classification of Injuries of Anterolateral Complex in Acute Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, Andrea; Monaco, Edoardo; Fabbri, Mattia; Maestri, Barbara; De Carli, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    To report on the prevalence of injuries of the lateral compartment occurring in cases of apparently isolated acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears and to present a classification system of anterolateral complex injuries based on the data obtained. Sixty patients operated on for an acute apparently isolated ACL tear, revealed by clinical examination and confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging, were prospectively selected. The lateral compartment was exposed and injuries were detected. Based on the data obtained, lesions of the anterolateral complex were classified as follows: Type I: multilevel rupture with individual layers torn at different levels with macroscopic hemorrhage involving the area of the anterolateral ligament (ALL) and extended to the anterolateral capsule. Type II: multilevel rupture with individual layers torn at different levels with macroscopic hemorrhage extended from the area of the ALL and capsule to the posterolateral capsule. Type III: complete transverse tear involving the area of the ALL near its insertion to the lateral tibial plateau, distal to the lateral meniscus. Type IV: bony avulsion (Segond fracture). The pivot-shift test was repeated intraoperatively after repair of lateral tears before the ACL reconstruction. Although magnetic resonance imaging was able to detect only bony injuries (Segond fracture), macroscopic tears of the lateral capsule were clearly identified at surgery in 54 of 60 patients and classified as follows: Type I: 19/60 Type II: 16/60 Type III: 13/60 Type IV: 6/60 In all cases, repair resulted in a marked reduction or apparent disappearance of the pivot-shift phenomenon. Statistical analysis showed a positive correlation between lesions of the lateral compartment, regardless of the type described, and a pivot shift graded 2 or 3. Because injuries of secondary restraints often occur in cases of acute ACL tears, recognition and repair of such lesions could be considered to help ACL reconstruction to better

  5. Purely Ligamentous Flexion-Distraction Injury in a Five-Year-Old Child Treated with Surgical Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiedo, Ryan M; Lavelle, William; Ordway, Nathaniel R; Rustagi, Tarush; Sun, Mike H

    2017-04-03

    Chance fractures by definition are a type of flexion-distraction injury with concomitant vertebral body fracture. Although uncommon in the pediatric population, they are associated with motor vehicle accidents and typically involve the thoraco-lumbar spine. Injury occurs when the spine rotates about a fixed axis, such as a lap belt. Our case reports the management of a five-year-old girl involved in a head-on collision who suffered a purely ligamentous flexion-distraction injury (Chance-type injury, without bone involvement) at the L2-L3 vertebral level. Previously these injuries were managed conservatively with serial casting; however, we present a case in which surgical management was used. A five-year-old girl sustained multiple injuries after being involved in a high-speed motor vehicle accident. At presentation, there was obvious abdominal bruising with a seat-belt sign and marked kyphosis of the spine with severe tenderness at the L2-L3 level. She required immediate exploratory laparotomy for her intraabdominal injuries. After stabilization, an orthopedic consult was deemed necessary. She was found to have occipital-cervical injury with mild anterolisthesis of C2 on C3 and disruption of the apical ligament. There was evidence of bilateral dislocation of the L2-L3 facet joints with marked disruption of the posterior ligaments and a hematoma sack. She required open reduction and internal fixation with an L2-L3 laminectomy, pedicle screw and rod placement. The kyphotic deformity was reduced using a compression device and stable alignment was achieved intraoperatively. This was a rare and difficult case with limited evidence on the appropriate management of such an injury. Due to the severe instability of her injury, a surgical approach was taken. At two years postoperative, the patient is neurologically intact and pain free. Imaging revealed stable alignment of her lumbar hardware. Ultimately, this has resulted in an excellent outcome at the current follow-up.

  6. Acute Management of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries Using Novel Canine Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozynski, Chantelle C; Stannard, James P; Smith, Pat; Hanypsiak, Bryan T; Kuroki, Keiichi; Stoker, Aaron; Cook, Cristi; Cook, James L

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare treatment options for acute management of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries using preclinical models. Twenty-seven adult purpose-bred research hounds underwent knee surgery (sham control, exposed ACL, or partial-tear ACL) and were assessed over the following 8 weeks. Dogs were randomized into three treatment groups: standard of care (i.e., rest and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]), washout, or leukoreduced platelet-rich plasma (PRP) so that a total of nine dogs received each treatment. Data from the two ACL-injury groups were pooled for each treatment ( n  = 6 per treatment group) and analyzed for treatment effects. The washout and PRP groups experienced less lameness, pain, and effusion, and greater function and comfortable range of motion compared with the NSAID group, with the PRP group showing most benefits. PRP was associated with the lowest severity of ACL pathology based on arthroscopic assessment. Measurable levels of inflammatory and degradative biomarkers were present in synovial fluid with significant differences noted over time. Based on these findings, washout had positive clinical effects compared with the standard-of-care group especially within the first week of treatment, but became less beneficial over time. A single injection of leukoreduced PRP was associated with favorable clinical results. However, no treatment was significantly "protective" against progression toward osteoarthritis after ACL injury. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  7. Mechanisms of anterior cruciate ligament injuries in elite women's netball: a systematic video analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuelcken, Max C; Mellifont, Daniel B; Gorman, Adam D; Sayers, Mark G L

    2016-08-01

    This study involved a systematic video analysis of 16 anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries sustained by elite-level netball players during televised games in order to describe the game situation, the movement patterns involved, the player's behaviour, and a potential injury mechanism. Eight of the ACL injuries were classified as "indirect contact" and eight as "non-contact". Two common scenarios were identified. In Scenario A the player was jumping to receive or intercept a pass and whilst competing for the ball experienced a perturbation in the air. As a result the player's landing was unbalanced with loading occurring predominantly on the knee of the injured side. In Scenario B the player was generally in a good position at ground contact, but then noticeably altered the alignment of the trunk before the landing was completed. This involved rotating and laterally flexing the trunk without altering the alignment of the feet. Apparent knee valgus collapse on the knee of the injured side was observed in 3/6 Scenario A cases and 5/6 Scenario B cases. Players may benefit from landing training programmes that incorporate tasks that use a ball and include decision-making components or require players to learn to cope with being unbalanced.

  8. The effect of bracing on proprioception of knees with anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beynnon, Bruce D; Good, Lars; Risberg, May Arna

    2002-01-01

    This paper is a comprehensive review on the effect of bandaging, bracing, and neoprene sleeves on knee proprioception following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and reconstruction with a focus on studies that have measured joint position sense and threshold to detection of passive knee motion. Disruption of the ACL does not appear to alter joint position sense soon after injury, although there is evidence that in some subjects deterioration may occur over time. An ACL tear creates a deficit in the threshold to detection of passive knee motion soon after injury and in those with chronic tears. The magnitude of worsening is less then 1.0 degree of movement in flexion-extension and of questionable concern from a clinical and functional perspective. Application of a functional brace or neoprene sleeve to the ACL-deficient limb does not improve the threshold to detection of passive knee motion; however, application of an elastic bandage to a knee with an ACL tear improves joint position sense. Reconstruction of a torn ACL is associated with a deficit in the threshold to detection of passive knee motion, and during the first year of healing the use of a neoprene sleeve provides improvement. Two years following ACL reconstruction there is no deficit in the threshold to detection of passive knee motion and the use of a brace has no effect on this outcome.

  9. Tips and tricks for uterosacral ligament suspension: how to avoid ureteral injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manodoro, Stefano; Frigerio, Matteo; Milani, Rodolfo; Spelzini, Federico

    2018-01-01

    Uterosacral ligament (USL) suspension is an effective and versatile surgical technique for repairing pelvic organ prolapse. However, ureteral injury is a feared complication that may act as a significant deterrent to the use of USL suspension. The aim of the video is to provide key steps to minimize the risk of ureteral injury while achieving successful transvaginal USL suspension. The featured video provides a series of surgical tips and tricks that can be applied to protect the ureters while achieving USL suspension whether the procedure contemplated is vaginal hysterectomy, vaginal vault repair after hysterectomy, or hysteropexy. The tips and tricks are classified into four categories: identification of the USLs, identification of the ureters, passage of the sutures, and final measures. The USL suspension technique requires adequate surgical training and an understanding of pelvic anatomy. This tips and tricks video tutorial may be an important tool for improving surgical know-how, and thus for reducing the risk of ureteral injury. In particular, identification of the USLs and ureters, proper suture positioning and final cystoscopy are key points to minimize ureteral damage.

  10. Psychosocial factors influencing the recovery of athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    te Wierike, S C M; van der Sluis, A; van den Akker-Scheek, I; Elferink-Gemser, M T; Visscher, C

    2013-10-01

    This review describes the psychosocial factors that affect recovery following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and reconstructive surgery in athletes. A systematic search in literature with inclusion and exclusion criteria on PubMed, PsycINFO, and Embase was performed. Articles used in this review were divided in five different parts according to the biopsychosocial model of Wiese-Bjornstal, with the addition of intervention studies. The results showed that a high internal Health Locus of Control and a high self-efficacy were useful cognitive factors to facilitate the recovery. Athletes with a low level of fear of reinjury had the best knee outcome after the injury followed by a reconstruction. In addition, athletes who returned to sport had less fear of reinjury and were more experienced and established athletes compared with athletes who did not return to sport. Furthermore, researchers showed that there was a positive relation between goal setting and adherence, which in turn yielded a positive relation with the outcome of the rehabilitation of an ACL injury. There were several psychosocial interventions that appeared to be facilitating the rehabilitation process. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Assessment of neuromuscular risk factors for anterior cruciate ligament injury through tensiomyography in male soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Alvarez-Diaz, Pedro; Ramon, Silvia; Marin, Miguel; Steinbacher, Gilbert; Boffa, Juan José; Cuscó, Xavier; Ballester, Jordi; Cugat, Ramon

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the role of mechanical and contractile properties of skeletal muscles of the thigh, assessed through tensiomyography (TMG), as risk factors for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in male soccer players. Male soccer players with confirmed ACL tear included in this study underwent resting TMG assessment of thigh muscles of the uninjured side. The same values were obtained from a sex-, sports level-matched control group in both sides. The maximal displacement (Dm), delay time (Td), contraction time (Tc), sustained time (Ts), and half-relaxation time (Tr) were obtained for the following muscles in all subjects: vastus medialis (VM), vastus laterals (VL), rectus femoris (RF), semitendinosus (ST), and biceps femoris (BF). TMG values of the uninjured side in ACL-injured group were compared to mean values between both sides in the control subjects. There were 40 ACL-injured and 38 control individuals. The vast majority of TMG parameters were higher in the uninjured side of ACL-injured individuals compared to the control group. The VL-Tr, RF-Tc, RF-Ts, RF-Tr, and BF-Dm values were significantly higher in the uninjured side compared to the control group. Quadriceps muscles demonstrated more significant between-group differences than hamstring muscles. Specifically, RF was the muscle where most significant between-group differences were found. Resistance to fatigue and muscle stiffness in the hamstring muscles may be risk factors for ACL injury in male soccer players. In addition, a predominant impairment in TMG characteristics of the quadriceps over hamstrings may indicate an altered muscular co-contraction (imbalance) between both muscle groups, which might be another risk factor for ACL injury in this population. These findings should be taken into account when screening athletes at high risk of ACL injury and also to design adequate prevention programs for ACL injury in male soccer players.

  12. Cutting mechanics: relation to performance and anterior cruciate ligament injury risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havens, Kathryn L; Sigward, Susan M

    2015-04-01

    Quick changes of direction during running (cutting) are necessary for successful performance of many sports but are associated with noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Currently, it is not known how biomechanics associated with fast performance of cutting tasks relate to the mechanics associated with increased risk for injury. Without this knowledge, the technique emphasized in injury prevention programs may be at odds with the demands of cutting tasks. The purposes of this study were to 1) identify whole body and/or joint mechanics that are related to completion times of 45° and 90° cuts and, from these variables, 2) determine which variables are predictors of performance (i.e., completion time) and/or ACL injury risk (i.e., peak knee adductor moment). Whole body and joint biomechanics were analyzed during the execution of two sidestep cutting maneuvers (to 45° and 90°) in 25 healthy experienced soccer players. Pearson correlation coefficients and stepwise multiple regression were used to analyze relations between variables. The variables predictive of 45° cut performance included hip extensor moment and hip sagittal plane power generation as well as medial-lateral center-of-mass to center-of-pressure separation distance. This separation distance was also predictive of peak knee adductor moment. During the 90° cut, medial-lateral ground reaction force impulse and hip frontal plane power generation were predictive of performance whereas hip internal rotation and knee extensor moment were predictive of peak knee adductor moment. These relations have important implications for ACL injury prevention programs. Although restricting frontal and transverse plane movement has been emphasized in many programs, these movement recommendations may not be appropriate for cutting tasks performed at greater angles.

  13. Risk factors for anterior cruciate ligament injury: a review of the literature-part 2: hormonal, genetic, cognitive function, previous injury, and extrinsic risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Helen C; Vacek, Pamela; Johnson, Robert J; Slauterbeck, James R; Hashemi, Javad; Shultz, Sandra; Beynnon, Bruce D

    2012-03-01

    Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are immediately disabling and are associated with long-term consequences, such as posttraumatic osteoarthritis. It is important to have a comprehensive understanding of all possible risk factors for ACL injury to identify individuals who are at risk for future injuries and to provide an appropriate level of counseling and programs for prevention. This review, part 2 of a 2-part series, highlights what is known and still unknown regarding hormonal, genetic, cognitive function, previous injury, and extrinsic risk factors for ACL injury. Studies were identified from MEDLINE (1951-March 2011) using the MeSH terms anterior cruciate ligament, knee injury, and risk factors. The bibliographies of relevant articles and reviews were cross-referenced to complete the search. Prognostic case-control and prospective cohort study designs to evaluate risk factors for ACL injury were included in this review. A total of 50 case-control and prospective cohort articles were included in parts 1 and 2. Twenty-one focused on hormonal, genetic, cognitive function, previous injury, and extrinsic risk factors. Several risk factors are associated with increased risk of suffering ACL injury-such as female sex, prior reconstruction of the ACL, and familial predisposition. These risk factors most likely act in combination with the anatomic factors reviewed in part 1 of this series to influence the risk of suffering ACL injury.

  14. Repair of Intraoperative Injury to the Medial Collateral Ligament During Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohl, Daniel D; Wetters, Nathan G; Del Gaizo, Daniel J; Jacobs, Joshua J; Rosenberg, Aaron G; Della Valle, Craig J

    2016-01-06

    Optimal treatment for intraoperative injury to the medial collateral ligament (MCL) during primary total knee arthroplasty remains controversial. While some advocate primary ligament repair and a period of bracing, others suggest conversion to a knee prosthesis with increased intrinsic constraint. The purpose of this study was to characterize the outcomes of primary repair followed by bracing. We performed a retrospective review of consecutive primary total knee arthroplasties to identify patients with intraoperative MCL laceration or avulsion treated with primary repair. Midsubstance lacerations were treated with end-to-end suture repair, whereas a screw-and-washer construct, suture, and/or suture anchors were used for reattachment of avulsions. All patients were instructed to wear an unlocked hinged knee brace for six weeks postoperatively. Patients were evaluated at a minimum of two years postoperatively for evidence of instability or other modes of failure and complications. An intraoperative MCL injury occurred during forty-eight (1.2%) of the 3922 total knee arthroplasties that had been performed. One patient died less than two years postoperatively, one was lost to follow-up, and one underwent an intraoperative conversion to a constrained total knee arthroplasty, leaving forty-five total knee arthroplasties available for study. There were twenty-four midsubstance lacerations and twenty-one avulsions; thirty-five of these injuries occurred during a cruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty and ten, during a posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty. At a mean of ninety-nine months (range, twenty-four to 214 months), there were no symptoms or physical examination findings of instability. The mean Hospital for Special Surgery knee score increased from 47 preoperatively to 85 at the time of follow-up (p knees required intervention for stiffness (four manipulations and one revision), and two required revision for aseptic loosening. Our results suggest that

  15. Are MRI high-signal changes of alar and transverse ligaments in acute whiplash injury related to outcome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eide Geir E

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Upper neck ligament high-signal changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI have been found in patients with whiplash-associated disorders (WAD but also in non-injured controls. The clinical relevance of such changes is controversial. Their prognostic role has never been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to examine if alar and transverse ligament high-signal changes on MRI immediately following the car accident are related to outcome after 12 months for patients with acute WAD grades 1-2. Methods Within 13 days after a car accident, 114 consecutive acute WAD1-2 patients without prior neck injury or prior neck problems underwent upper neck high-resolution proton-weighted MRI. High-signal changes of the alar and transverse ligaments were graded 0-3. A questionnaire including the impact of event scale for measuring posttraumatic stress response and questions on patients' expectations of recovery provided clinical data at injury. At 12 months follow-up, 111 (97.4% patients completed the Neck Disability Index (NDI and an 11-point numeric rating scale (NRS-11 on last week neck pain intensity. Factors potentially related to these outcomes were assessed using multiple logistic regression analyses. Results Among the 111 responders (median age 29.8 years; 63 women, 38 (34.2% had grades 2-3 alar ligament changes and 25 (22.5% had grades 2-3 transverse ligament changes at injury. At 12 months follow-up, 49 (44.1% reported disability (NDI > 8 and 23 (20.7% neck pain (NRS-11 > 4. Grades 2-3 ligament changes in the acute phase were not related to disability or neck pain at 12 months. More severe posttraumatic stress response increased the odds for disability (odds ratio 1.46 per 10 points on the impact of event scale, p = 0.007 and so did low expectations of recovery (odds ratio 4.66, p = 0.005. Conclusions High-signal changes of the alar and transverse ligaments close after injury did not affect outcome for acute WAD1-2 patients

  16. Are MRI high-signal changes of alar and transverse ligaments in acute whiplash injury related to outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Upper neck ligament high-signal changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been found in patients with whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) but also in non-injured controls. The clinical relevance of such changes is controversial. Their prognostic role has never been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to examine if alar and transverse ligament high-signal changes on MRI immediately following the car accident are related to outcome after 12 months for patients with acute WAD grades 1-2. Methods Within 13 days after a car accident, 114 consecutive acute WAD1-2 patients without prior neck injury or prior neck problems underwent upper neck high-resolution proton-weighted MRI. High-signal changes of the alar and transverse ligaments were graded 0-3. A questionnaire including the impact of event scale for measuring posttraumatic stress response and questions on patients' expectations of recovery provided clinical data at injury. At 12 months follow-up, 111 (97.4%) patients completed the Neck Disability Index (NDI) and an 11-point numeric rating scale (NRS-11) on last week neck pain intensity. Factors potentially related to these outcomes were assessed using multiple logistic regression analyses. Results Among the 111 responders (median age 29.8 years; 63 women), 38 (34.2%) had grades 2-3 alar ligament changes and 25 (22.5%) had grades 2-3 transverse ligament changes at injury. At 12 months follow-up, 49 (44.1%) reported disability (NDI > 8) and 23 (20.7%) neck pain (NRS-11 > 4). Grades 2-3 ligament changes in the acute phase were not related to disability or neck pain at 12 months. More severe posttraumatic stress response increased the odds for disability (odds ratio 1.46 per 10 points on the impact of event scale, p = 0.007) and so did low expectations of recovery (odds ratio 4.66, p = 0.005). Conclusions High-signal changes of the alar and transverse ligaments close after injury did not affect outcome for acute WAD1-2 patients without previous

  17. The extent of ligament injury and its influence on pelvic stability following type II anteroposterior compression pelvic injuries--A computer study to gain insight into open book trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhme, Jörg; Lingslebe, Uwe; Steinke, Hanno; Werner, Michael; Slowik, Volker; Josten, Christoph; Hammer, Niels

    2014-07-01

    Surgical stabilization of the pelvis following type II anteroposterior compression pelvic injuries (APCII) is based on the assumption that the anterior sacroiliac, sacrospinous, and sacrotuberous ligaments disrupt simultaneously. Recent data on the ligaments contradict this concept. We aimed at determining the mechanisms of ligament failure in APCII computationally. In an individual osteoligamentous computer model of the pelvis, ligament load, and strain were observed for the two-leg stance, APCII with 100-mm symphyseal widening and for two-leg stance with APCII-related ligament failure, and validated with body donors. The anterior sacroiliac and sacrotuberous ligaments had the greatest load with 80% and 17% of the total load, respectively. APCII causes partial failure of the anterior sacroiliac ligament and the pelvis to become horizontally instable. The other ligaments remained intact. The sacrospinous ligament was negligibly loaded but stabilized the pelvis vertically. The interosseous sacroiliac and sacrotuberous ligaments are likely responsible for reducing the symphysis and might serve as an indicator of vertical stability. The sacrospinous ligament appears to be of minor significance in APCII but plays an important role in vertical stabilization. Further research is necessary to determine the influence of alterations in ligament and bone material properties. © 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Major League Baseball pitch velocity and pitch type associated with risk of ulnar collateral ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Robert A; Marshall, Nathan E; Guest, John-Michael; Okoroha, Kelechi R; Jung, Edward K; Moutzouros, Vasilios

    2016-04-01

    The number of Major League Baseball (MLB) pitchers requiring ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) reconstructions is increasing. Recent literature has attempted to correlate specific stresses placed on the throwing arm to risk for UCL injury, with limited results. Eighty-three MLB pitchers who underwent primary UCL reconstruction were evaluated. Pitching velocity and percent of pitch type thrown (fastball, curve ball, slider, and change-up) were evaluated 2 years before and after surgery. Data were compared with control pitchers matched for age, position, size, innings pitched, and experience. The evaluation of pitch velocity compared with matched controls found no differences in pre-UCL reconstruction pitch velocities for fastballs (91.5 vs. 91.2 miles per hour [mph], P = .69), curveballs (78.2 vs. 77.9 mph, P = .92), sliders (83.3 vs. 83.5 mph, P = .88), or change-ups (83.9 vs. 83.8 mph, P = .96). When the percentage of pitches thrown was evaluated, UCL reconstructed pitchers pitch significantly more fastballs than controls (46.7% vs. 39.4%, P = .035). This correlated to a 2% increase in risk for UCL injury for every 1% increase in fastballs thrown. Pitching more than 48% fastballs was a significant predictor of UCL injury, because pitchers over this threshold required reconstruction (P = .006). MLB pitchers requiring UCL reconstruction do not pitch at higher velocities than matched controls, and pitch velocity does not appear to be a risk factor for UCL reconstruction. However, MLB pitchers who pitch a high percentage of fastballs may be at increased risk for UCL injury because pitching a higher percent of fastballs appears to be a risk factor for UCL reconstruction. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Postural stability does not differ among female sports with high risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Nelson; Porter, Larissa D; Ambegaonkar, Jatin P; Caswell, Shane V

    2014-12-01

    Dancers have a lower incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury compared to athletes in sports that involve cutting and landing motions. Balance can impact ACL injury risk and is related to neuromuscular control during movement. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether balance differences exist among female dancers and female soccer and basketball athletes. Fifty-eight female dancers, soccer, and basketball athletes (16.5 ± 1.6 yrs, 1.6 ± 0.2 m, 60.2 ± 14.1 kg) completed the Stability Evaluation Test (SET) on the NeuroCom VSR Sport (NeuroCom International, Clackamas, OR) to measure sway velocity. Video records of the SET test were used for Balance Error Scoring System (BESS) test scoring. A oneway ANCOVA compared composite sway velocity and BESS scores among sports. There was no statistically significant difference for sway velocity or BESS among sports (sway velocity soccer 2.3 ± 0.4, dance 2.2 ± 0.4, and basketball 2.4 ± 0.4; BESS soccer 13.6 ± 5.0, dance 11.9 ± 5.5, and basketball 14.9 ± 5.1, p>0.05). Balance was similar among athletes participating in different sports (dance, basketball, and soccer). Quasi-static balance may not play a significant role in neuromuscular control during movement and not be a significant risk factor to explain the disparity in ACL injury incidence among sports. Future research should examine the effects of dynamic balance and limb asymmetries among sports to elucidate on the existing differences on ACL injury incidence rates.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging study of alteration of tibiofemoral joint articulation after posterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Sivashankar; Scarvell, Jennifer M; Buirski, Graham; Woods, Kevin R; Smith, Paul N

    2012-01-01

    Cadaveric studies have shown that the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is an important constraint to posterior translation of the tibia. Arthroscopic studies have shown that chronic PCL injuries predispose to articular cartilage lesions in the medial compartment and the patellofemoral joint. The aim of the present study was to investigate sagittal plane articulation of the tibiofemoral joint of subjects with an isolated PCL injury. Magnetic resonance was used to generate sagittal images of 10 healthy knees and 10 knees with isolated PCL injuries. The subjects performed a supine leg press against a 150N load. Images were generated at 15° intervals as the knee flexed from 0 to 90°. The tibiofemoral contact and the flexion facet centre (FFC) were measured from the posterior tibial cortex. The contact pattern and FFC was significantly more anterior in the injured knee from 45 to 90° of knee flexion in the medial compartment compared to the healthy knee. The greatest difference between the mean TFC points of both groups occurred at 75 and 90°, the difference being 4mm and 5mm respectively. The greatest difference between the mean FFC of both groups occurred at 75° of flexion, which was 3mm. There was no significant difference in the contact pattern and FFC between the injured and healthy knees in the lateral compartment. Our findings show that there is a significant difference in the medial compartment sagittal plane articulation of the tibiofemoral joint in subjects with an isolated PCL injury. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Intra-articular Findings After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Ice Hockey Versus Other Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluczynski, Melissa A; Kang, Jeansol V; Marzo, John M; Bisson, Leslie J

    2016-05-01

    The prevalence of comorbid knee pathology has been examined for sports-related anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, but it has not been examined in ice hockey players. To compare concomitant bone bruising, collateral ligament injuries, and intra-articular injuries in ACL injuries suffered during ice hockey versus other sports. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 20 patients with ACL injuries sustained during ice hockey were identified from a prospective registry, of which 95% were male and 90% had a contact mechanism of injury (MOI). Thirteen cases and 46 controls who sustained ACL injuries from ice hockey and other sports, respectively, were included. Inclusion criteria for cases and controls were male sex, contact MOI, no prior knee surgery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) within 6 weeks of injury, and surgery within 3 months of injury. Age, body mass index (BMI), MRI findings (bone bruising, medial and lateral collateral ligament [MCL, LCL] injuries), and arthroscopic findings (meniscus tears, chondral injuries) were compared for cases versus controls using t tests or exact chi-square tests. Age (22.9 ± 8.8 vs 23.4 ± 10.4 years, P = .88) and BMI ≥25 kg/m(2) (50% vs 65.9%, P = .66) did not differ between cases and controls. Cases had less lateral bone bruising (lateral femoral condyle: 54.6% vs 93%, P = .01; lateral tibial plateau: 72.7% vs 93%, P = .09) and no medial bone bruising (medial femoral condyle: 0% vs 7%, P = .06; medial tibial plateau: 0% vs 32.6%, P = .05) compared with controls. Cases had less frequent lateral meniscus tears than controls (23.1% vs 58.5%, P = .05). There were no significant differences in MCL (40% vs 31.2%, P = .77), LCL (0% vs 3.9%, P > .999), medial meniscus tears (7.7% vs 37%, P = .08), and chondral injuries (10% vs 9.4%, P > .999) for cases versus controls. Male ice hockey players with ACL injuries had less lateral femoral condyle and medial tibial plateau bone bruising compared with other sports

  2. Meniscus Injuries Alter the Kinematics of Knees With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Ali; Li, Jing-Sheng; Gill, Thomas J; Li, Guoan

    2014-08-01

    Most knee joint biomechanics studies have involved knees with an isolated anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. However, a large portion of patients with injured ACLs have accompanied meniscus tearing. In this study, the in vivo alteration of knee biomechanics after tearing the ACL with or without combined medial or lateral meniscus tear was investigated during stair-ascending activity. The kinematic behavior of ACL-deficient knees changes with a combined medial or lateral meniscus tear. Controlled laboratory study. Twenty-one patients with injured ACLs (contralateral side intact) were recruited before undergoing ACL reconstruction. Among these patients, 5 had isolated ACL injuries (group I), 8 had combined ACL and medial meniscus injuries (group II), and 8 had combined ACL and lateral meniscus injuries (group III). Bilateral magnetic resonance scans were obtained on each patient to construct 3-dimensional anatomic knee models. Both knees were then scanned during stair-climbing activity using a dual fluoroscopic imaging system. The knee kinematics during stair climbing were reproduced using a bone model image matching method. Anteroposterior and mediolateral translations and axial tibial rotation of the knee during stair ascent were then compared between the injured and intact contralateral knees of the patients. On average, injured knees in groups I and III showed more than 2 mm increased anterior tibial translation close to full knee extension. In group II, no statistically significant difference was observed between the injured and contralateral side in anteroposterior translation. Near full extension, in groups I and III, injured knees had less than 1 mm of increased medial tibial translation compared with the contralateral side, whereas in group II, a 1.0-mm increase in lateral tibial shift was observed in the injured knees. With regard to axial tibial rotation, group I showed an increased external tibial rotation (approximately 5°), group II had little

  3. Medial patellofemoral ligament injury patterns and associated pathology in lateral patella dislocation: an MRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guerrero Patrick

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lateral Patella dislocations are common injuries seen in the active and young adult populations. Our study focus was to evaluate medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL injury patterns and associated knee pathology using Magnetic Resonance Imaging studies. Methods MRI studies taken at one imaging site between January, 2007 to January, 2008 with the final diagnosis of patella dislocation were screened for this study. Of the 324 cases that were found, 195 patients with lateral patellar dislocation traumatic enough to cause bone bruises on the lateral femoral trochlea and the medial facet of the patella were selected for this study. The MRI images were reviewed by three independent observers for location and type of MPFL injury, osteochondral defects, loose bodies, MCL and meniscus tears. The data was analyzed as a single cohort and by gender. Results This study consisted of 127 males and 68 females; mean age of 23 yrs. Tear of the MPFL at the patellar attachment occurred in 93/195 knees (47%, at the femoral attachment in 50/195 knees (26%, and at both the femoral and patella attachment sites in 26/195 knees (13%. Attenuation of the MPFL without rupture occurred in 26/195 knees (13%. Associated findings included loose bodies in 23/195 (13%, meniscus tears 41/195 (21%, patella avulsion/fracture in 14/195 (7%, medial collateral ligament sprains/tears in 37/195 (19% and osteochondral lesions in 96/195 knees (49%. Statistical analysis showed females had significantly more associated meniscus tears than the males (27% vs. 17%, p = 0.04. Although not statistically significant, osteochondral lesions were seen more in male patients with acute patella dislocation (52% vs. 42%, p = 0.08. Conclusion Patients who present with lateral patella dislocation with the classic bone bruise pattern seen on MRI will likely rupture the MPFL at the patellar side. Females are more likely to have an associated meniscal tear than males; however, more males

  4. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries in elite and high school rugby players: a 11-year review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takazawa, Yuji; Nagayama, Masataka; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Kawasaki, Takayuki; Ishijima, Muneaki; Saita, Yoshitomo; Kaneko, Haruka; Kobayashi, Yohei; Hada, Shinnosuke; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Over a 11-year period, we investigated the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries and the clinical outcomes after ACL reconstruction with hamstring autografts in two homogenous cohorts of rugby players. Two teams, including those in elite (94 players) and high school (290 players) clubs, were followed. Isolated ACL injuries occurred in 28 players (12 elite, 16 high school). The incidence during match play was 1.26 per 1000 player-hours (95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 0.48-2.05) among elite players and 0.97 per 1000 player-hours (95% CI: 0.30-1.64) among high school players. After ACL reconstruction, 26 players (12 elite, 14 high school) were successfully contacted for follow-up at a mean of 71.9 months. None (0%) of the elite and 4 (29%) of the high school players experienced graft ruptures. Seven (58%) elite and 10 (91%) high school players were fearful of reinjury; the mean time to overcome this fear was 6.1 ± 4.9 months among elite players and 17.5 ± 26.0 months among high school players. In conclusion, young rugby players experienced inferior outcomes after ACL reconstruction with hamstring autografts compared with their older counterparts.

  5. Stereoscopic filming for investigating evasive side-stepping and anterior cruciate ligament injury risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Marcus J. C.; Bourke, Paul; Alderson, Jacqueline A.; Lloyd, David G.; Lay, Brendan

    2010-02-01

    Non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are serious and debilitating, often resulting from the performance of evasive sides-stepping (Ssg) by team sport athletes. Previous laboratory based investigations of evasive Ssg have used generic visual stimuli to simulate realistic time and space constraints that athletes experience in the preparation and execution of the manoeuvre. However, the use of unrealistic visual stimuli to impose these constraints may not be accurately identifying the relationship between the perceptual demands and ACL loading during Ssg in actual game environments. We propose that stereoscopically filmed footage featuring sport specific opposing defender/s simulating a tackle on the viewer, when used as visual stimuli, could improve the ecological validity of laboratory based investigations of evasive Ssg. Due to the need for precision and not just the experience of viewing depth in these scenarios, a rigorous filming process built on key geometric considerations and equipment development to enable a separation of 6.5 cm between two commodity cameras had to be undertaken. Within safety limits, this could be an invaluable tool in enabling more accurate investigations of the associations between evasive Ssg and ACL injury risk.

  6. Effects of knee injury primary prevention programs on anterior cruciate ligament injury rates in female athletes in different sports: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelidis, Michael; Koumantakis, George A

    2014-08-01

    Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) injury is frequently encountered in sports. To analyze the effects of ACL injury prevention programs on injury rates in female athletes between different sports. A comprehensive literature search was performed in September 2012 using Pubmed Central, Science Direct, CINAHL, PEDro, Cochrane Library, SCOPUS, SPORTDiscus. The key words used were: 'anterior cruciate ligament', 'ACL', 'knee joint', 'knee injuries', 'female', 'athletes', 'neuromuscular', 'training', 'prevention'. The inclusion criteria applied were: (1) ACL injury prevention training programs for female athletes; (2) Athlete-exposure data reporting; (3) Effect of training on ACL incidence rates for female athletes. 13 studies met the inclusion criteria. Three training programs in soccer and one in handball led to reduced ACL injury incidence. In basketball no effective training intervention was found. In season training was more effective than preseason in ACL injury prevention. A combination of strength training, plyometrics, balance training, technique monitoring with feedback, produced the most favorable results. Comparing the main components of ACL injury prevention programs for female athletes, some sports-dependent training specificity issues may need addressing in future studies, related primarily to the individual biomechanics of each sport but also their most effective method of delivery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Feedback Techniques to Target Functional Deficits Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Implications for Motor Control and Reduction of Second Injury Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Gokeler, Alli; Benjaminse, Anne; Hewett, Timothy E.; Paterno, Mark V.; Ford, Kevin R.; Otten, Egbert; Myer, Gregory D.

    2013-01-01

    Primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention training has been shown to reduce the risk of injury. Less is known about the effect of prevention on second injury after ACL reconstruction (ACLR). Given recent findings that second injury rates exceed 20 % in only the first year following the return to sport, it is imperative that rehabilitation after ACLR is scrutinized so that second injury preventative strategies can be optimized. A potential limitation of current rehabilitative ...

  8. Management of combined injuries of the posterior cruciate ligament and posterolateral corner of the knee: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrillo, Stefano; Volpi, Piero; Papalia, Rocco; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2017-09-01

    Approximately 60% of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury are associated with a posterolateral corner (PLC) tear. We performed a systematic review of the literature according to the PRISMA guidelines. The following key words were searched on Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, Google Scholar, and Ovid: 'posterior cruciate ligament' or 'PCL' with 'posterolateral corner' or 'PLC' and 'chronic'; 'injury'; 'management'; 'reconstruction'; 'outcomes'; 'complications'. There was a statistically significant improvement of all clinical scores after surgery regardless of the procedure performed to reconstruct both PCL and PLC. No randomized control trials were identified on the topic. Standardized methods of functional outcomes assessment are necessary to improve communication on the functional results of the management of PC-PLC. Single stage surgical reconstruction of PCL and PLC is recommended in patients with posterolateral rotatory instability of the knee. Adequately powered randomized trials with appropriate subjective and objective outcome measures are necessary to reach definitive conclusions.

  9. De quervain tenosynovitis of the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyas, Asif M; Ilyas, Asif; Ast, Michael; Schaffer, Alyssa A; Thoder, Joseph

    2007-12-01

    De quervain disease, or stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal compartment of the wrist, is a common wrist pathology. Pain results from resisted gliding of the abductor pollicis longus and the extensor pollicis brevis tendons in the fibro-osseus canal. de Quervain tenosynovitis of the wrist is more common in women than men. Diagnosis may be made on physical examination. Radiographs are helpful in ruling out offending bony pathology. Nonsurgical management, consisting of corticosteroid injections and supportive thumb spica splinting, is usually successful. In resistant cases, surgical release of the first dorsal compartment is done, taking care to protect the radial sensory nerve and identify all accessory compartments. Repair of the extensor retinaculum by step-cut lengthening or other techniques is rarely required.

  10. Joint Stability Characteristics of the Ankle Complex After Lateral Ligamentous Injury, Part I: A Laboratory Comparison Using Arthrometric Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleski, John E.; Heitman, Robert J.; Gurchiek, Larry R.; Hollis, J. M.; Liu, Wei; IV, Albert W. Pearsall

    2014-01-01

    Context: The mechanical property of stiffness may be important to investigating how lateral ankle ligament injury affects the behavior of the viscoelastic properties of the ankle complex. A better understanding of injury effects on tissue elastic characteristics in relation to joint laxity could be obtained from cadaveric study. Objective: To biomechanically determine the laxity and stiffness characteristics of the cadaver ankle complex before and after simulated injury to the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) and calcaneofibular ligament (CFL) during anterior drawer and inversion loading. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Seven fresh-frozen cadaver ankle specimens. Intervention(s): All ankles underwent loading before and after simulated lateral ankle injury using an ankle arthrometer. Main Outcome Measure(s): The dependent variables were anterior displacement, anterior end-range stiffness, inversion rotation, and inversion end-range stiffness. Results: Isolated ATFL and combined ATFL and CFL sectioning resulted in increased anterior displacement but not end-range stiffness when compared with the intact ankle. With inversion loading, combined ATFL and CFL sectioning resulted in increased range of motion and decreased end-range stiffness when compared with the intact and ATFL-sectioned ankles. Conclusions: The absence of change in anterior end-range stiffness between the intact and ligament-deficient ankles indicated bony and other soft tissues functioned to maintain stiffness after pathologic joint displacement, whereas inversion loading of the CFL-deficient ankle after pathologic joint displacement indicated the ankle complex was less stiff when supported only by the secondary joint structures. PMID:24568232

  11. Anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention training in female athletes: a systematic review of injury reduction and results of athletic performance tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, Frank R; Barber Westin, Sue D

    2012-01-01

    Many anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention training programs have been published, but few have assessed the effects of training on both ACL injury rates and athletic performance tests. To determine if ACL injury prevention programs have a positive influence on both injury rates and athletic performance tests in female athletes. In August 2011, a search was conducted (1995-August 2011) of the PubMed, Science Direct, and CINAHL databases. Selected studies determined the effect of ACL intervention training programs on ACL incidence rates (determined by athlete-exposures) and athletic performance tests, such as isokinetic strength, vertical jump height, speed, agility, and dynamic balance. Because no single article contained both criteria, investigations were cross-referenced to obtain data on both factors from the same training programs. The authors reviewed the selected studies for cohort population numbers, age, sports, duration of study, program components, duration of training, number of athlete-exposures, ACL injury incidence rates, and results of athletic performance tests. Initially, 57 studies were identified that described 42 ACL injury prevention training programs. Of these, 17 studies that investigated 5 programs met the inclusion criteria. Two programs significantly reduced ACL injury rates and improved athletic performance tests: Sportsmetrics and the Prevent Injury and Enhance Performance program (PEP). Sportsmetrics produced significant increases in lower extremity and abdominal strength, vertical jump height, estimated maximal aerobic power, speed, and agility. Prevent Injury and Enhance Performance significantly improved isokinetic knee flexion strength but did not improve vertical jump height, speed, or agility. The other 3 programs (Myklebust, the "11," and Knee Ligament Injury Prevention) did not improve both ACL injury rates and athletic performance tests. Only the Sportsmetrics and PEP ACL intervention training programs had a

  12. [Internal fixation with one-hole microplate for the treatment of collateral ligament injuries of the metacarpophalangeal joint of the thumb combined with fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi-Xun; Sun, De-Tao; Chen, Xu-Hui; Li, Jun; Cui, Yan; Hu, Ji-Chao; Shu, Zheng-Hua; He, Jian; Ding, Chao-Qi; Chen, Bo

    2015-03-01

    To study clinical effects of one-hole microplate internal fixation for the treatment of collateral ligament injuries of the metacarpophalangeal joint of the thumb combined with fracture. Twenty-two patients (16 males, 6 females) with collateral ligament injuries of the metacarpophalangeal joint of the thumb combined fracture were treated with one-hole microplate internal fixation. The age of the patients ranged from 18 to 53 years old with a mean age of 28.5 years old. The duration from injury to surgery ranged from 2 hours to 2 months, and the mean time was 6 days. All the patients had collateral ligament injuries combined with fracture of the metacarpophalangeal joint of the thumb. Thirteen patients had injuries in the right hand and 9 patients had injuries in the left hand. There were 18 cases of closed wound and 4 cases of open wound. Eighteen patients had fresh injuries ( 2 weeks). Sixteen patients had injuries in the ulnar collateral ligament of the thumb combined with fracture, 6 patients had radial collateral ligament injuries of the thumb combined with fracture, 4 cases of which were complicated with injuries of abductor pollicis brevis and the end of the flexor pollicis brevis tender. The size of the avulsed fragment was about 3.0 mm x 4.0 mm to 6.0 mm x 7.0 mm. The incisions of 22 patients healed by first intention. The follow-up periods ranged from 6 months to 5 years old,with an average of 2.5 years old. The thumb function was evaluated by Saetta and other evaluation criteria, and 20 patients got an excellent result and 2 good. The application of one-hole microplate internal fixation in treating collateral ligament injuries with fracture of the metacarpophalangeal joint of the thumb is an effective method.

  13. A systematic review to evaluate exercise for anterior cruciate ligament injuries: does this approach reduce the incidence of knee osteoarthritis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan KJ

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Koji J Duncan, Jaclyn N Chopp-Hurley, Monica R Maly School of Rehabilitation Science, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada Purpose: Among a variety of conservative and surgical options to treat anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injuries, we do not understand which options could potentially prevent knee osteoarthritis (OA. The aim of this systematic review was to examine the evidence pertaining to exercise treatment of ACL injuries in the context of knee OA. Methods: Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PubMed, and PEDro (Physiotherapy Evidence Database databases were systematically searched using keywords encompassed within four primary key terms: knee, osteoarthritis, anterior cruciate ligament, and exercise. Clinical studies evaluating the effect of an exercise treatment for ACL injuries on the development of knee OA in adult humans were included. The PEDro scale was used to critically assess the studies included in the review. Results: Eighteen studies were included in this review, with a median PEDro score of 6/11 (range, 2/11–9/11. Three studies provided statistical evidence that exercise following ACL injury lowered the risk for knee OA development. Nine studies demonstrated no benefit of exercise in preventing knee OA incidence relative to either operative treatment or the contralateral, unaffected knee. However, exercise resulted in higher knee instability. Nonetheless, there were no significant differences in subjective or objective knee outcomes for early versus late ACL reconstruction. Limitations: This review was not registered through PROSPERO. Conclusion: The relationship between a rehabilitative exercise for ACL injuries and long-term knee OA prevalence is inconclusive. However, research suggests initial conservative treatment with optional late ACL reconstruction because this treatment strategy may reduce the risk of knee OA. More research, ideally randomized controlled trials or comparable designs, is required prior to establishing

  14. Risk Stratification for Ulnar Collateral Ligament Injury in Major League Baseball Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFroda, Steven F.; Kriz, Peter K.; Hall, Amber M.; Zurakowski, David; Fadale, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) injury has become increasingly common in Major League Baseball (MLB) players in recent years. Hypothesis: There is a significant difference in preinjury fastball velocity between MLB pitchers with tears and matched controls without UCL injury. Pitchers with injuries are throwing harder and getting injured earlier in their MLB careers. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: From 2007 to 2014, a total of 170 documented UCL injuries (156 pitchers, 14 position players) occurred in MLB. Inclusion criteria for this study consisted of any player who tore his UCL in MLB during this time frame. There were 130 regular-season tears (April-September). From this group, 118 players who pitched more than 100 innings prior to tear were matched to subjects with no tear and were compared using a logistic regression analysis. A subgroup of “early tear” players who threw less than 100 career innings (n = 37) was also identified and compared with the larger tear group using a logistic regression analysis. Results: Of the 130 tears that occurred during the regular season, a significantly larger number (62%) occurred in the first 3 months (P = .011). The rate of UCL tears per MLB player (P = .001) was statistically significant. In the group of 118 matched tears, the mean fastball velocity was greater in the tear group (91.7 mph) compared with the control group (91.0 mph; P = .014). Furthermore, relief pitchers made up a greater percentage of the early tear group (<100 innings) compared with the later tear group (P = .011). Sixteen of the 170 UCL tears (9.4%) were recurrent tears, with 5 of 16 experiencing both tear and retear within the past 4 years. Conclusion: There is a statistically significant difference in the mean fastball velocity of pitchers who injure their UCL. Small increases in pitcher fastball velocity are a main contribution to the increased rate of tear in MLB. In addition, there has been an increased

  15. Decreased Knee Joint Loading Associated With Early Knee Osteoarthritis After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellsandt, Elizabeth; Gardinier, Emily S; Manal, Kurt; Axe, Michael J; Buchanan, Thomas S; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury predisposes individuals to early-onset knee joint osteoarthritis (OA). Abnormal joint loading is apparent after ACL injury and reconstruction. The relationship between altered joint biomechanics and the development of knee OA is unknown. Altered knee joint kinetics and medial compartment contact forces initially after injury and reconstruction are associated with radiographic knee OA 5 years after reconstruction. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Individuals with acute, unilateral ACL injury completed gait analysis before (baseline) and after (posttraining) preoperative rehabilitation and at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after reconstruction. Surface electromyographic and knee biomechanical data served as inputs to an electromyographically driven musculoskeletal model to estimate knee joint contact forces. Patients completed radiographic testing 5 years after reconstruction. Differences in knee joint kinetics and contact forces were compared between patients with and those without radiographic knee OA. Patients with OA walked with greater frontal plane interlimb differences than those without OA (nonOA) at baseline (peak knee adduction moment difference: 0.00 ± 0.08 N·m/kg·m [nonOA] vs -0.15 ± 0.09 N·m/kg·m [OA], P = .014; peak knee adduction moment impulse difference: -0.001 ± 0.032 N·m·s/kg·m [nonOA] vs -0.048 ± 0.031 N·m·s/kg·m [OA], P = .042). The involved limb knee adduction moment impulse of the group with osteoarthritis was also lower than that of the group without osteoarthritis at baseline (0.087 ± 0.023 N·m·s/kg·m [nonOA] vs 0.049 ± 0.018 N·m·s/kg·m [OA], P = .023). Significant group differences were absent at posttraining but reemerged 6 months after reconstruction (peak knee adduction moment difference: 0.02 ± 0.04 N·m/kg·m [nonOA] vs -0.06 ± 0.11 N·m/kg·m [OA], P = .043). In addition, the OA group walked with lower peak medial compartment contact forces of the involved limb

  16. Relative strain in the anterior cruciate ligament and medial collateral ligament during simulated jump landing and sidestep cutting tasks: implications for injury risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Nathaniel A; Nesbitt, Rebecca J; Shearn, Jason T; Myer, Gregory D; Hewett, Timothy E

    2015-09-01

    The medial collateral (MCL) and anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) are, respectively, the primary and secondary ligamentous restraints against knee abduction, which is a component of the valgus collapse often associated with ACL rupture during athletic tasks. Despite this correlation in function, MCL ruptures occur concomitantly in only 20% to 40% of ACL injuries. The purpose of this investigation was to determine how athletic tasks load the knee joint in a manner that could lead to ACL failure without concomitant MCL failure. It was hypothesized that (1) the ACL would provide greater overall contribution to intact knee forces than the MCL during simulated motion tasks and (2) the ACL would show greater relative peak strain compared with the MCL during simulated motion tasks. Controlled laboratory study. A 6-degrees-of-freedom robotic manipulator articulated 18 cadaveric knees through simulations of kinematics recorded from in vivo drop vertical jump and sidestep cutting tasks. Specimens were articulated in the intact-knee and isolated-ligament conditions. After simulation, each ACL and MCL was failed in uniaxial tension along its fiber orientations. During a drop vertical jump simulation, the ACL experienced greater peak strain than the MCL (6.1% vs 0.4%; P anterior force (4.8% vs 0.3% body weight; P < .01), medial force (1.6% vs 0.4% body weight; P < .01), flexion torque (8.4 vs 0.4 N·m; P < .01), abduction torque (2.6 vs 0.3 N·m; P < .01), and adduction torque (0.5 vs 0.0 N·m; P = .03) than the isolated MCL. During failure testing, ACL specimens preferentially loaded in the anteromedial bundle failed at 637 N, while MCL failure occurred at 776 N. During controlled physiologic athletic tasks, the ACL provides greater contributions to knee restraint than the MCL, which is generally unstrained and minimally loaded. Current findings support that multiplanar loading during athletic tasks preferentially loads the ACL over the MCL, leaving the ACL more susceptible to

  17. Editorial Commentary: A Positive "Half Dial Test" Is Seen in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury, so Get Out Your Goniometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Michael J

    2017-07-01

    Isolated anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-deficient knees have roughly 7° of increased external rotation at both 30° and 90° of flexion compared with both the contralateral knee and the ACL reconstructed knee. This positive "Half Dial test" may be a new approach to confirming ACL injury but requires confirmation that the posterolateral corner itself is not injured. In the ACL-deficient knee, it is suggested that a greater cutoff (>15°) for the true Dial test be used to confirm posterolateral corner injuries. Goniometer measurements are reproducible and necessary for confirmation. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Events leading to anterior cruciate ligament injury in World Cup Alpine Skiing: a systematic video analysis of 20 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bere, Tone; Flørenes, Tonje Wåle; Krosshaug, Tron; Nordsletten, Lars; Bahr, Roald

    2011-12-01

    The authors have recently identified three main mechanisms for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries among World Cup (WC) alpine skiers, termed as "the slip-catch", "the landing back-weighted" and "the dynamic snowplow". However, for a more complete understanding of how these injuries occur, a description of the events leading to the injury situations is also needed. To describe the skiing situation leading to ACL injuries in WC alpine skiing. Twenty cases of ACL injuries reported through the International Ski Federation Injury Surveillance System (FIS ISS)for three consecutive WC seasons (2006-2009) were obtained on video. Ten experts (9 WC coaches, 1 former WC athlete) performed visual analyses of each case to describe in their own words, factors they thought may have contributed to the injury situation related to different predefined categories: (1) skier technique, (2) skier strategy, (3) equipment, (4) speed and course setting, (5) visibility, snow and piste conditions and (6) any other factors. Factors related to the three categories, namely skier technique, skier strategy, and visibility, snow and piste conditions, were assumed to be the main contributors to the injury situations. Skier errors, technical mistakes and inappropriate tactical choices, were the dominant factors. In addition, bumpy conditions, aggressive snow, reduced visibility and course difficulties were assumed to contribute. Based on this systematic video analysis of 20 injury situations, factors related to skier technique, skier strategy and specific race conditions were identified as the main contributors leading to injury situations.

  19. Incarceration of the intermeniscal ligament in tibial eminence injury: a block to closed reduction identified using MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archibald-Seiffer, Noah; Jacobs, John [University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Zbojniewicz, Andrew [University of Cincinnati Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Shea, Kevin [University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); St. Luke' s Health System, Boise, ID (United States); St. Luke' s Sports Medicine, Boise, ID (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Tibial eminence fractures are a relatively uncommon injury, but most frequently occur in children and adolescents with open physes. Entrapment of the intermeniscal ligament or the meniscus itself can occur in the setting of a tibial eminence fracture and when present, poses a significant obstacle to successful closed or surgical reduction. Identification of these entrapped structures on preoperative imaging may be helpful to the physicians caring for these patients and assist with preoperative planning. We present a case of a 13-year-old male who sustained a tibial eminence fracture while playing football. Review by the orthopedic surgeon identified entrapment of the intermeniscal ligament. Subsequently, a closed reduction attempt under anesthesia prior to surgery was unsuccessful and arthroscopy was needed to remove the entrapped intermeniscal ligament and reduce the tibial eminence fracture. Pre-operative knowledge of entrapped soft tissue structures under the fracture plane, particularly the meniscus and intermeniscal ligament, provides the surgeon with valuable insight as to how to best counsel patients on the success of treatment options, how to best prepare for operative treatment, and can guide the surgeon during open reduction to maximize treatment success. (orig.)

  20. Motives for sports participation as predictions of self-reported outcomes after anterior cruciate ligament injury of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessler, K K; Andersen, T E; Lohmander, S; Roos, E M

    2015-06-01

    Aim of the study was to access how individual's motives for participation in sports impact on self-reported outcomes 2 years after an anterior cruciate ligament injury. Based on a longitudinal cohort study, this secondary analysis present data from the Knee Anterior Cruciate Ligament, Nonsurgical versus Surgical Treatment (KANON) study, a randomized controlled trial. At baseline, 121 patients recorded in an initial questionnaire that their motives for sports participation fell into four categories: achievement, health, social integration, or fun and well-being. These four categories were used as variables in the analyses. All 121 subjects completed the 2-year follow-up. The largest improvement was seen in the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) subscale sports and recreation function, with an effect size of 2.43. KOOS sports and recreation function was also the subscale score best predicted by the motives for sports participation. Baseline motives achievement and fun and well-being predicted worse levels of pain and function 2 years after the injury, even after adjusting for age, gender, treatment and baseline scores. Psychological aspects, such as motives for participation in sport, can be factors in predicting of patient-reported outcomes 2 years after injury. Evaluating motives for sports participation may help predict the outcome 2 years after ACL injury. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Surgical management of anterior cruciate ligament injuries in Belgium anno 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Bracht, Hans; Goubau, Laurent; Stuyts, Bart; Schepens, Alexander; Verdonk, Peter; Victor, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Anatomic ACL surgery, including double bundle ACL reconstruction, has been investigated widely. The purpose of this study was to gain insight in the currently used surgical management of anterior cruciate ligament injuries amongst Belgian orthopaedic surgeons. A survey consisting of epidemiological questions, ACL surgery related questions and questions concerning rehabilitation was submitted to all members of the Belgian Knee Society. Anatomic single bundle ACL repair with transportal femoral tunnel drilling, using an autologous hamstring graft fixed with a cortical suspension system proximal and an interference screw distal is currently the most common technique. The surgery is usually performed under general anesthesia with a one-night stay in the hospital. Postoperatively a hinge brace is mostly used. Although much research concerning double bundle ACL surgery is performed, only few surgeons perform this technique. Most surgeons perform an anatomic single bundle repair. This is in accordance with the current knowledge regarding cost effective care. Performing this procedure in day care with the aid of loco-regional anesthesia and avoidance of a hinged brace can help to reduce the cost for the healthcare system without compromising the outcome.

  2. Current practice variations in the management of anterior cruciate ligament injuries in Delhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishya, Raju; Agarwal, Amit Kumar; Ingole, Sachin; Vijay, Vipul

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the current practices and preferences of the arthroscopic surgeons of Delhi in the diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. It was a cross-sectional descriptive study conducted among arthroscopic surgeons of Delhi. A survey was conducted using a questionnaire that was sent either by e-mail or by direct contact to all sixty arthroscopic surgeons of Delhi. Forty-eight (80%) surgeons responded to our questionnaire. Maximum participants (83.3%) used semitendinosus/gracilis tendon autograft for ACL reconstruction (ACLR) and only 2.1% were using bone-patellar-tendon-bone (BPTB) autograft. Most preferred method of graft fixation was an 'interference screw' on the tibial side and an 'endobutton' on the femoral side, which was preferred by 95.83% and 93.75% surgeons, respectively. Almost all respondents (97%) used a bio-absorbable interference screw for tibial side graft fixation. Postoperative bracing was advised for timing of surgery, rehab after surgery, pain management, etc.

  3. Morphologic evaluation of remnant anterior cruciate ligament bundles after injury with three-dimensional computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Nobuo; Ochi, Mitsuo; Takazawa, Kobun; Ishifuro, Minoru; Deie, Masataka; Nakamae, Atsuo; Kamei, Goki

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the morphological patterns of remnant anterior cruciate ligament bundles after injury (ACL remnant) on three-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) and compare them with those on arthroscopy. Sixty-three patients (33 males and 30 females; mean age 25.2 ± 10.1 years) who had undergone primary ACL reconstruction between March 2011 and December 2012 were included in this study. The average durations between traumas and 3DCT and between 3DCT and surgery were 101.7 ± 87.2 and 38.2 ± 38.7 days, respectively. ACL remnants were classified into four morphological patterns on 3DCT. 3DCT findings were compared with arthroscopic findings with and without probing. The morphological patterns of the ACL remnants on 3DCT were well matched with those on arthroscopy without probing (the concordance rate was 77.8%). However, the concordance rate was reduced to 49.2% when arthroscopic probing was used to confirm the femoral attachment of ACL remnants (p ≤ 0.05). This study demonstrates that the morphological patterns of ACL remnants on 3DCT were well matched with those on arthroscopy without probing. Therefore, the technique can be useful for preoperative planning of the ACL reconstruction or informed consent to the patients. However, for definitive diagnosis, arthroscopic probing is required. IV.

  4. Online registration of monthly sports participation after anterior cruciate ligament injury: a reliability and validity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindem, Hege; Eitzen, Ingrid; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Risberg, May Arna

    2014-05-01

    The current methods measuring sports activity after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury are commonly restricted to the most knee-demanding sports, and do not consider participation in multiple sports. We therefore developed an online activity survey to prospectively record the monthly participation in all major sports relevant to our patient-group. To assess the reliability, content validity and concurrent validity of the survey and to evaluate if it provided more complete data on sports participation than a routine activity questionnaire. 145 consecutively included ACL-injured patients were eligible for the reliability study. The retest of the online activity survey was performed 2 days after the test response had been recorded. A subsample of 88 ACL-reconstructed patients was included in the validity study. The ACL-reconstructed patients completed the online activity survey from the first to the 12th postoperative month, and a routine activity questionnaire 6 and 12 months postoperatively. The online activity survey was highly reliable (κ ranging from 0.81 to 1). It contained all the common sports reported on the routine activity questionnaire. There was a substantial agreement between the two methods on return to preinjury main sport (κ=0.71 and 0.74 at 6 and 12 months postoperatively). The online activity survey revealed that a significantly higher number of patients reported to participate in running, cycling and strength training, and patients reported to participate in a greater number of sports. The online activity survey is a highly reliable way of recording detailed changes in sports participation after ACL injury. The findings of this study support the content and concurrent validity of the survey, and suggest that the online activity survey can provide more complete data on sports participation than a routine activity questionnaire.

  5. Online registration of monthly sports participation after anterior cruciate ligament injury: a reliability and validity study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindem, Hege; Eitzen, Ingrid; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Risberg, May Arna

    2013-01-01

    Background Current methods measuring sports activity after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury are commonly restricted to the most knee-demanding sport, and do not consider participation in multiple sports. We therefore developed an online activity survey to prospectively record monthly participation in all major sports relevant to our patient-group. Objective To assess the reliability, content validity, and concurrent validity of the survey, and evaluate if it provided more complete data on sports participation than a routine activity questionnaire. Methods One hundred and forty-five consecutively included ACL-injured patients were eligible for the reliability study. The retest of the online activity survey was performed two days after the test response had been recorded. A subsample of 88 ACL-reconstructed patients were included in the validity study. The ACL-reconstructed patients completed the online activity survey from the first to the twelfth postoperative month, and a routine activity questionnaire 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Results The online activity survey was highly reliable (κ ranging from 0.81 to 1). It contained all the common sports reported on the routine activity questionnaire. There was substantial agreement between the two methods on return to preinjury main sport (κ = 0.71 and 0.74 at 6 and 12 months postoperatively). The online activity survey revealed that a significantly higher number of patients reported to participate in running, cycling and strength training, and patients reported to participate in a greater number of sports. Conclusion The online activity survey is a highly reliable way of recording detailed changes in sports participation after ACL injury. The findings of this study support the content and concurrent validity of the survey, and suggest that the online activity survey can provide more complete data on sports participation than a routine activity questionnaire. PMID:23645830

  6. [Repair of old injury of knee medial collateral ligament by a combination of dynamic and static stability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng'en; Li, Renhe; Liu, Yanfen; Li, Yuchun

    2011-01-01

    To observe the effectiveness of the combination of dynamic and static stability in the treatment of old knee medial collateral ligament injury. Between March 2004 and June 2008, 26 cases of old knee medial collateral ligament injury were treated, including 19 males and 7 females with a mean age of 38 years (range, 21-48 years). Injury was caused by traffic accident in 6 cases, by sprains in 12 cases, by falling from height in 8 cases. The location was left knee in 15 cases and right knee in 11 cases. Of them, 24 patients showed the positive result of knee valgus test, 2 cases showed slightly relaxed knee tendon. The knee X-ray films of valgus stress position showed that the medial joint space differences between both knees were 3-5 mm in 2 cases and 5-12 mm in 24 cases. The injuries included avulsion of the medial femoral condyle starting point in 19 cases, central laceration in 6 cases, and tibial point laceration concomitant meniscus injury in 1 case. The time from injury to hospitalization was 3-14 months (mean, 6.4 months). Gracilis muscle was used to repair knee medial collateral ligament and the sartorius muscle transfer to reconstruct the medial rotation of knee stability function. All incisions healed by first intention. No joint infection, deep vein thrombosis, or other postoperative complications occurred. Twenty-six cases were followed up 12-58 months with an average of 30 months. The results of knee valgus stress test were negative with no joint tenderness. At 3 months after operation, the knee X-ray films of valgus stress position showed the medial joint space differences between both knees were less than 1 mm. According to the modified Lysholm-Scale score, the results were excellent in 18 cases, good in 7 cases, and fair in 1 case with an excellent and good rate of 96% at last follow-up. A combination of dynamic and static stability in repairing old knee medial collateral ligament injury is easy-to-operate and has the advantages to perform the

  7. Tubercular tenosynovitis of extensor tendons of foot--a rare ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuberculosis of soft tissues as a result of spread from adjacent bone or joint is a well recognized entity. However isolated tuberculous pyomyositis, bursitis and tenosynovitis are rare, constituting about 1% of skeletal tuberculosis. Tubercular tenosynovitis commonly involves tendon sheaths of wrist and hand. Cases of ...

  8. Risk factors for anterior cruciate ligament injury: a review of the literature - part 1: neuromuscular and anatomic risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Helen C; Vacek, Pamela; Johnson, Robert J; Slauterbeck, James R; Hashemi, Javad; Shultz, Sandra; Beynnon, Bruce D

    2012-01-01

    Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee are immediately debilitating and can cause long-term consequences, including the early onset of osteoarthritis. It is important to have a comprehensive understanding of all possible risk factors for ACL injury to identify individuals who are at risk for future injuries and to provide an appropriate level of counseling and programs for prevention. This review, part 1 of a 2-part series, highlights what is known and still unknown regarding anatomic and neuromuscular risk factors for injury to the ACL from the current peer-reviewed literature. Studies were identified from MEDLINE (1951-March 2011) using the MeSH terms anterior cruciate ligament, knee injury, and risk factors. The bibliographies of relevant articles and reviews were cross-referenced to complete the search. Prognostic studies that utilized the case-control and prospective cohort study designs to evaluate risk factors for ACL injury were included in this review. A total of 50 case-control and prospective cohort articles were included in the review, and 30 of these studies focused on neuromuscular and anatomic risk factors. Several anatomic and neuromuscular risk factors are associated with increased risk of suffering ACL injury-such as female sex and specific measures of bony geometry of the knee joint, including decreased intercondylar femoral notch size, decreased depth of concavity of the medial tibial plateau, increased slope of the tibial plateaus, and increased anterior-posterior knee laxity. These risk factors most likely act in combination to influence the risk of ACL injury; however, multivariate risk models that consider all the aforementioned risk factors in combination have not been established to explore this interaction.

  9. Ankle tenosynovitis in rheumatoid arthritis: clinical and ultrasonographic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza Naves Pereira

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate ankle tenosynovitis in rheumatoid arthritis patients, regarding its presence, the kind of tendon involved and the concordance between clinical and ultrasound findings. Methods: Twenty patients with rheumatoid arthritis and pain or swollen ankle joint were evaluated. Tendon involvement was evaluated with ultrasound imaging. The Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ was performed for disability evaluation. Age, sex, disease duration, and vocational activity levels were also obtained. The statistical analysis included Fisher’s exact test. The significance level was 0.05. Results: Tenosynovitis was found in 13 of 20 (65.0% patients in 19 joints, in which 6 were bilaterally (46.1% and unilateral in 7 (53.8%. Tibialis posterior tenosynovitis was seen in nine (45.0% patients, Achilles tenosynovitis in seven (35.0%, tibialis anterior tenosynovitis in three (15.0%, and peroneal tenosynovitis in three (15.0% patients. We found concordance between symptomatic ankle and ultrasonographic findings in 92.3% of the patients with tenosynovitis. Association between severe HAQ with tendon involvement was not found (p>0.05. Disease duration was not associated with tenosynovitis. Patients were predominantly older, female, with mean age around 50.8 years. The long disease duration of patients presented a mean of 11.4 years and, most of them, with no vocational activity (65.0%. Conclusions: The results indicate that ankle tenosynovitis is very common in rheumatoid arthritis patients, both unilateral and bilateral. Tibialis posterior was the most common tendon involvement found. Finally, we found concordance between the clinical and ultrasound findings in almost all rheumatoid arthritis patients with ankle tenosynovitis.

  10. Muscle strength and functional performance in patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury treated with training and surgical reconstruction or training only: a two to five-year followup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ageberg, Eva; Thomeé, Roland; Neeter, Camille

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study muscle strength and functional performance in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury with or without surgical reconstruction 2 to 5 years after injury. Good muscle function is important in preventing early-onset osteoarthritis (OA), but the role of reconstructive...... surgery in restoring muscle function is unclear. METHODS: Of 121 patients with ACL injury included in a randomized controlled trial on training and surgical reconstruction versus training only (the Knee, Anterior cruciate ligament, NON-surgical versus surgical treatment [KANON] study, ISRCTN: 84752559...

  11. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Injuries in Children With First-Time Lateral Patellar Dislocations: A Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Arthroscopic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askenberger, Marie; Arendt, Elizabeth A; Ekström, Wilhelmina; Voss, Ulrika; Finnbogason, Throstur; Janarv, Per-Mats

    2016-01-01

    A lateral patellar dislocation (LPD) is the most common knee injury in children with traumatic knee hemarthrosis. The medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL), the important passive stabilizer against LPDs, is injured in more than 90% of cases. The MPFL injury pattern is most often defined in adults or in mixed-age populations. The injury pattern in the skeletally immature patient may be different. To describe MPFL injuries in the skeletally immature patient by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to compare the results with the injury pattern found at arthroscopic surgery. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. This was a prospective series of patients aged 9 to 14 years with acute, first-time traumatic LPDs in whom clinical examinations, radiographs, MRI, and arthroscopic surgery were performed within 2 weeks from the index injury. The MPFL injury was divided into 3 different groups according to the location: patellar site, femoral site, or multifocal. The MPFL injury site was confirmed on MRI by soft tissue edema. The length of the MPFL injury at the patellar site was measured at arthroscopic surgery, and those ≥2 cm were defined as total ruptures. A total of 74 patients (40 girls and 34 boys; mean age, 13.1 years) were included; 73 patients (99%) had an MPFL injury according to MRI and arthroscopic surgery. The MRI scans showed an isolated MPFL injury at the patellar attachment site in 44 of 74 patients (60%), a multifocal injury in 26 patients (35%), an injury at the femoral site in 3 patients (4%), and no injury in 1 patient (1%). Arthroscopic surgery disclosed an isolated MPFL injury at the patellar site in 60 of 74 patients (81%) and a multifocal injury in 13 patients (18%); the MPFL injury at the patellar site was a total rupture in 49 patients (66%). Edema at the patellar attachment site on MRI was proven to be an MPFL rupture at the same site at arthroscopic surgery in 99% of the patients. A patellar-based injury, isolated or as part of a multifocal injury

  12. Different functional treatment strategies for acute lateral ankle ligament injuries in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkhoffs, G M M J; Struijs, P A A; Marti, R K; Assendelft, W J J; Blankevoort, L; van Dijk, C N

    2002-01-01

    Acute lateral ankle ligament ruptures are common problems in present health care. Early mobilisation and functional treatment are advocated as a preferable treatment strategy. However, functional treatment comprises a broad spectrum of treatment strategies and as of yet no optimal strategy has been identified. The objective of this review is to assess different functional treatment strategies for acute lateral ankle ligament ruptures in adults. We searched the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Injuries Group specialised register (December 2001), the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (The Cochrane Library, Issue 4, 2001), MEDLINE (1966 to May 2000), EMBASE (1980 to May 2000), CURRENT CONTENTS (1993 to 1999), BIOSIS (to 1999), reference lists of articles, and contacted organisations and researchers in the field. Randomised clinical trials describing skeletally mature individuals with an acute lateral ankle ligament rupture and comparing different functional treatment strategies were evaluated for inclusion. Two reviewers independently assessed the quality of included trials and extracted relevant data on treatment outcome. Where appropriate, results of comparable studies were pooled. Individual and pooled statistics are reported as relative risks (RR) for dichotomous outcome and (weighted) mean differences (WMD) for continuous outcome measures with 95 per cent confidence intervals (95%CI). Heterogeneity between trials was tested using a standard chi-squared test. Nine trials involving 892 participants were included. Lace-up ankle support had significantly better results for persistent swelling at short-term follow up when compared with semi-rigid ankle support (RR 4.19, 95% CI 1.26 to 13.98); elastic bandage (RR 5.48; 95% CI 1.69 to 17.76); and to tape (RR 4.07, 95% CI 1.21 to 13.68). Use of a semi-rigid ankle support resulted in a significantly shorter time to return to work when compared with an elastic bandage (WMD (days) 4.24; 95% CI 2.42 to 6.06); one trial found the

  13. YouTube provides poor information regarding anterior cruciate ligament injury and reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, J T; Fitzgerald, E; Cassidy, E S; Cleary, M; Byrne, D P; Devitt, B M; Baker, J F

    2017-03-17

    YouTube is a global medium used predominantly by young adults (aged 18-49 years). This study examined the quality of YouTube information regarding ACL injury and reconstruction. YouTube was searched on the 13th of June 2015 for "ACL" and "anterior cruciate ligament" with/without associated terms of "injury", "reconstruction", and "surgery". Videos were evaluated by two independent reviewers [EF (Reviewer 1), (Reviewer 2)] using two recognized information scoring systems (Modified DISCERN (MD) 0-5 and JAMA Benchmark 0-4) and an adaptation of a score designed for written ACL information [ACL Specific Score (ASS) 0-25]. The ASS categorized scores as very good (21-25), good (16-20), moderate (11-15), poor (6-10), and very poor (0-5). Number of views/likes/dislikes, animation, and continent of origin and source (e.g., corporate/educational) were recorded. Correlation of video characteristics with number of views was examined using the analysis of variance (ANOVA) model. Agreement between reviewers was assessed by Interclass Correlation Co-efficient (ICC). Following a filtering process of the 964,770 identified videos, 39 videos were retained. The mean MD score was 2.3 (standard deviation (SD) ±0.9) for Reviewer 1 and 2.2 (SD ±0.9) for Reviewer 2 (ICC = 0.7). The mean JAMA score was 2.5(SD ±0.7) for Reviewer 1 and 2.3 (SD ±0.7) for Reviewer 2 (ICC = 0.8). The mean ASS was 6.3 (SD ±3.5) for Reviewer 1 and 4.6 (SD ±2.9) for Reviewer 2 (ICC = 0.9). Five videos achieved moderate score (13%), while 15 (38%) and 19 (49%) scored as poor and very poor, respectively. There was no correlation between number of views and video quality/video source for any scoring system. The majority of videos viewed on YouTube regarding ACL injury and treatment are of low quality.

  14. Epidemiological survey of anterior cruciate ligament injury in Japanese junior high school and high school athletes: cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Saeko; Okuwaki, Toru

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries among athletes in junior high school and high school by retrospectively reviewing Japan Sports Council notification data registered over a period of 10 years. The total number of ACL injuries during the 10-year period was 30,458, with an incidence of 0.81 per 1000 athlete-years. Among those with ACL injuries, the ratio of girls to boys was 2.8, and incidence of injury was significantly greater among girls than boys (1.36 as against 0.48). Athletes in the 11th grade demonstrated the highest incidence of ACL injuries. We also found that the greatest incidence of ACL injuries was among female high school basketball players; the second highest being among female high school Judo athletes. For sports with a greater number of ACL injuries and a higher injury rate, it is necessary to obtain more detailed data and analysis to determine an effective prevention programme.

  15. Lower extremity muscle strength after anterior cruciate ligament injury and reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Abbey C; Villwock, Mark; Wojtys, Edward M; Palmieri-Smith, Riann M

    2013-01-01

    Quadriceps and hamstrings weakness occurs frequently after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and reconstruction. Evidence suggests that knee injury may precipitate hip and ankle muscle weakness, but few data support this contention after ACL injury and reconstruction. To determine if hip, knee, and ankle muscle weakness present after ACL injury and after rehabilitation for ACL reconstruction. Case-control study. University research laboratory. Fifteen individuals with ACL injury (8 males, 7 females; age = 20.27 ± 5.38 years, height = 1.75 ± 0.10 m, mass = 74.39 ± 13.26 kg) and 15 control individuals (7 men, 8 women; age = 24.73 ± 3.37 years, height = 1.75 ± 0.09 m, mass = 73.25 ± 13.48 kg). Bilateral concentric strength was assessed at 60°/s on an isokinetic dynamometer. The participants with ACL injury were tested preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively. Control participants were tested on 1 occasion. Hip-flexor, -extensor, -abductor, and -adductor; knee-extensor and -flexor; and ankle-plantar-flexor and -dorsiflexor strength (Nm/kg). The ACL-injured participants demonstrated greater hip-extensor (percentage difference = 19.7, F1,14 = 7.28, P = .02) and -adductor (percentage difference = 16.3, F1,14 = 6.15, P = .03) weakness preoperatively than postoperatively, regardless of limb, and greater postoperative hip-adductor strength (percentage difference = 29.0, F1,28 = 10.66, P = .003) than control participants. Knee-extensor and -flexor strength were lower in the injured than in the uninjured limb preoperatively and postoperatively (extensor percentage difference = 34.6 preoperatively and 32.6 postoperatively, t14 range = -4.59 to -4.23, P ≤ .001; flexor percentage difference = 30.6 preoperatively and 10.6 postoperatively, t14 range = -6.05 to -3.24, P strength preoperatively but not postoperatively (extensor: t28 = -1.79, P = .08; flexor: t28 = 0.57, P = .58) than control participants. Ankle-plantar-flexor weakness was greater preoperatively than

  16. Early Operative Versus Delayed or Nonoperative Treatment of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Kristina L; Lam, Kenneth C; Valovich McLeod, Tamara C

    2016-05-01

    Reference: Ramski DE, Kanj WW, Franklin CC, Baldwin KD, Ganley TJ. Anterior cruciate ligament tears in children and adolescents: a meta-analysis of nonoperative versus operative treatment. Am J Sports Med. 2014;42(11):2769-2776. Clinical Questions: In pediatric patients, does early operative treatment of an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury result in decreased knee instability compared with delayed or nonoperative treatment? This review focused on the PubMed/MEDLINE and EMBASE databases. The following query searches were used: ACL or anterior cruciate ligament and young or child or children or pediatric or immature. Dates searched were not specified. A separate search was also conducted of abstracts published between 2009 and 2011 from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons; American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine; International Society of Arthroscopy, Knee Surgery, and Orthopaedic Sports Medicine; European Society of Sports Traumatology, Knee Surgery, and Arthroscopy; American Orthopaedic Association; Arthroscopy Association of North America; Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America; and American Academy of Pediatrics conferences. Available studies were included only if they were written in English; were of level 1, 2, or 3 evidence (grading taxonomy not stated); were cohort designs that compared nonoperative and operative treatments; involved an early versus delayed ACL reconstruction that could be prospective or retrospective; and reported primary outcome interest measures. Animal studies, basic science studies, case series, reviews, commentaries, and editorials were excluded from the review. A systematic assessment tool, Guide to Community Preventive Services: Systematic Reviews and Evidence-Based Recommendations, was used by 2 of the authors to independently grade the quality of each study that met the inclusion criteria. The tool focused on 6 areas: intervention and study description, sampling, measurement, analysis, interpretation

  17. Corticosteroid injection for de Quervain's tenosynovitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters-Veluthamaningal, Cyriac; van der Windt, Daniëlle A W M; Winters, Jan C; Meyboom-de Jong, Betty

    2009-07-08

    De Quervain's tenosynovitis is a disorder characterised by pain on the radial (thumb) side of the wrist and functional disability of the hand. It can be treated by corticosteroid injection, splinting and surgery. To summarise evidence on the efficacy and safety of corticosteroid injections for de Quervain's tenosynovitis. We searched the following databases: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1966 to April 2009), EMBASE (1956 to April 2009), CINAHL (1982 to April 2009), AMED (1985 to April 2009), DARE, Dissertation Abstracts and PEDro (physiotherapy evidence database). Randomised and controlled clinical trials evaluating the efficacy and safety of corticosteroid injections for de Quervain's tenosynovitis. After screening abstracts of studies identified by the search we obtained full text articles of studies which fulfilled the selection criteria. We extracted data using a predefined electronic form. We assessed the methodological quality of included trials by using the checklist developed by Jadad and the Delphi list. We extracted data on the primary outcome measures: treatment success; severity of pain or tenderness at the radial styloid; functional impairment of the wrist or hand; and outcome of Finkelstein's test, and the secondary outcome measures: proportion of patients with side effects; type of side effects and patient satisfaction with injection treatment. We found one controlled clinical trial of 18 participants (all pregnant or lactating women) that compared one steroid injection with methylprednisolone and bupivacaine to splinting with a thumb spica. All patients in the steroid injection group (9/9) achieved complete relief of pain whereas none of the patients in the thumb spica group (0/9) had complete relief of pain, one to six days after intervention (number needed to treat to benefit (NNTB) = 1, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.8 to 1.2). No side effects or local complications of

  18. Evaluation of the effectiveness of anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention programme training components: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jeffrey B; Waxman, Justin P; Richter, Scott J; Shultz, Sandra J

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention programmes have shown mixed results, which may be due to differing emphasis on training components. The purpose of this study was to (1) quantify the overall and relative duration of each training component encompassed within these programmes and (2) examine the effect of these durations on ACL injury rates. A systematic review was completed and meta-analyses performed on eligible studies to produce a pooled OR estimate of the effectiveness of these programmes. Meta-regression was used to detect any relationship that programme duration and the duration of individual training components had on ACL injury rates. 13 studies were included for review. Results of the meta-analyses revealed a significant reduction of injuries after preventative training programmes for all ACL injuries (pooled OR estimate of 0.612, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.85; p=0.004) and for non-contact ACL injuries (OR 0.351, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.54; ptraining was associated with a higher injury risk for ACL injury (p=0.04), while greater durations of static stretching was associated with a lower injury risk for non-contact ACL injuries (p=0.04). While ACL prevention programmes are successful in reducing the risk of ACL injury, the ideal combination and emphasis of training components within these programmes remains unclear. Evidence indicates that greater emphases on balance training and static stretching may be associated with an increase and decrease in injury risk, respectively. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Anterior cruciate ligament injury alters preinjury lower extremity biomechanics in the injured and uninjured leg: the JUMP-ACL study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerger, Benjamin M; Marshall, Stephen W; Beutler, Anthony I; Blackburn, J Troy; Wilckens, John H; Padua, Darin A

    2015-02-01

    Information as to how anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and reconstructive surgery (ACLR) alter lower extremity biomechanics may improve rehabilitation and return to play guidelines, reducing the risk for repeat ACL injury. To compare lower extremity biomechanics before ACL injury and after subsequent ACLR for the injured and uninjured leg. Baseline unilateral lower extremity biomechanics were collected on the dominant leg of participants without ACL injury when they entered the Joint Undertaking to Monitor and Prevent ACL (JUMP-ACL) study. Thirty-one participants with subsequent ACL injury, reconstructive surgery and full return to physical activity completed repeat, follow-up biomechanical testing, as did 39 uninjured, matched controls. Not all injured participants suffered injury to the dominant leg, requiring separation of those with ACL injury into two groups: ACLR-injured leg group (n=12) and ACLR-uninjured leg group (n=19). We compared the landing biomechanics of these three groups (ACLR-injured leg, ACLR-uninjured leg, control) before ACL injury (baseline) with biomechanics after ACL injury, surgery and return to physical activity (follow-up). ACL injury and ACLR altered lower extremity biomechanics, as both ACLR groups demonstrated increases in frontal plane movement (increased hip adduction and knee valgus). The ACLR-injured leg group also exhibited decreased sagittal plane loading (decreased anterior tibial shear force, knee extension moment and hip flexion moment). No high-risk biomechanical changes were observed in control group participants. ACL injury and ACLR caused movement pattern alterations of the injured and uninjured leg that have previously shown to increase the risk for future non-contact ACL injury. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Association of the type of trauma, occurrence of bone bruise, fracture and joint effusion with the injury to the menisci and ligaments in MRI of knee trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezeshki, Sina; Vogl, Thomas J; Pezeshki, Mohammad Zakaria; Daghighi, Mohammad Hossein; Pourisa, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a noninvasive diagnostic tool may help clinicians in the evaluation of injuries to menisci and ligaments. this study assessed the associations between type of trauma to knee joint, bone bruise, fracture and pathological joint effusion with injuries to menisci and ligaments of knee joint. we reviewed knee joint MRI of 175 patients aged less than 45 years old who were referred to MRI center of our University. statistical analysis showed that tearing of medial meniscus (MM) is significantly more common in sport related trauma (p= 0.045) but tearing of medial collateral ligament (MCL) is significantly more common in non-sport related trauma (p= 0.005). Existence of bone bruise in knee MRI is negatively associated with tearing of medial meniscus (MM) (p=0.004) and positively associated with tearing of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) (p=0.00047) and medial collateral ligament (MCL) (p = 0.0001). Existence of fracture is associated with decreased risk of the tearing of ACL and MM (p=0.04, p=0.001 respectively). Pathologic joint effusion is significantly more common in ACL and MCL tearing (p=0.0001, p=0.004 respectively). as diagnostic clues, bone bruise, fracture and joint effusion may help radiologists for better assessment of injury to menisci and ligaments in MRI of patients with knee trauma.

  1. Prospectively Identified Deficits in Sagittal Plane Hip-Ankle Coordination in Female Athletes who Sustain a Second Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Return to Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterno, Mark V.; Kiefer, Adam W.; Bonnette, Scott; Riley, Michael A.; Schmitt, Laura C.; Ford, Kevin R.; Myer, Gregory D.; Shockley, Kevin; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Athletes who return to sport after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction are at increased risk of future ACL injury. Altered coordination of lower extremity motion may increase this risk. The purpose of this study was to prospectively determine if altered lower extremity coordination patterns exist in athletes who go on to sustain a 2nd anterior cruciate ligament injury. Methods Sixty-one female athletes who were medically cleared to return to sport after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction were included. Hip-ankle coordination was assessed prior to return to sport with a dynamic postural coordination task. Within 12 months, 14 patients sustained a 2nd ACL injury. Fourteen matched subjects were selected for comparative analysis. Cross-recurrence quantification analysis characterized hip-ankle coordination patterns. A group × target speed (slow vs. fast) × leg (involved vs. uninvolved) analysis of variance was used to identify coordination differences. Findings A main effect of group (p = 0.02) indicated that the single injury group exhibited more stable hip-ankle coordination [166.2 (18.9)] compared to the 2nd injury group [108.4 (10.1)]. A leg × group interaction was also observed (p = .04). The affected leg of the single injury group exhibited more stable coordination [M = 187.1 (23.3)] compared to the affected leg of the 2nd injury group [M = 110.13 (9.8)], p = 0.03. Interpretation Hip-ankle coordination was altered in female athletes who sustained a 2nd anterior cruciate ligament injury after return to sport. Failure to coordinate lower extremity movement in the absence of normal knee proprioception may place the knee at high-risk. PMID:26416200

  2. Traction Induced Vertical Displacement of Odontoid due to Type III Odontoid Fracture with Unrecognized Ligamentous Injury: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Min-Ho; Hur, Hyuk; Jang, Jae-Won; Kim, Jae-Hyoo; Kim, Soo-Han

    2014-01-01

    Dens fractures are a common traumatic cervical spine injury. Among them, a type III fracture is the second common fracture. Although there are several treatment options, it has been accepted that type III fracture is usually healed by non-surgical method. After adequate reduction with traction, subsequent external immobilization has been associated with successful union rates. However, in the review of literatures, there are some cases with neurological deterioration after application of skull traction. So, the authors report a case of type III dens fracture with initially unrecognized ligamentous injury in which vertical dissociation and quadriplegia occurred after only five-pound Gardner-Well tongs traction. And also, the authors raise awareness of this potentially injury. PMID:27169054

  3. Anterior cruciate ligament injury profile in Italian Serie A1-A2 women's volleyball league.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devetag, Francesca; Mazzilli, Massimiliano; Benis, Roberto; La Torre, Antonio; Bonato, Matteo

    2016-10-28

    The aim of this study was to assess how anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures with subsequently surgery reconstruction were sustaining during the professional career of women's' volleyball players of A1-A2 Italian volleyball league. Using an observational study with a retrospective case-series design for ACL ruptures, 125 teams with 1488 players were monitored. Subjects had to report level, role, injury modality, lower limb injured, laterality, period of the season and age. A total of 34 ACL ruptures were reported. Thirty-three (97%) were non-contact and 1 (3%) with contact. Twenty-one (61.7%) occurred in landing from a jump attack, 3 (8.8%) in landing from wall jump, 1 (3%) with apparent contact and 9 (26.5%) in other landing conditions. The most injured knee was the left limb (22, 64.7%) respect to the right limb (12, 35.3%). Fourteen (41.2%) ruptures occurred in spikers, 10 (29.4%) in middle blockers, 6 (17.6%) in setters, 3 (8.8%) in liberos and 1 (3%) in opposite hitters. Nine (26.5%) occurred in pre-season period, 16 (47%) in the first round, 4 (11.8%) in the second round, and 5 (14.7%) during play-off. The average age of the first ACL rupture was 23±3 years. We observed that female volleyball players of A1-A2 Italian volleyball league occurred mostly in a left non contact ACL rupture during a landing condition and the spikers were the players most a risk. Therefore, it is desirable that coaches teach players variations of landing in order to avoid possible chronic overloading of ACL.

  4. Mystery of alar ligament rupture: Value of MRI in whiplash injuries - biomechanical, anatomical and clinical studies; Mysterium Ligamentum alare Ruptur: Stellenwert der MRT-Diagnostik des Schleudertraumas - biomechanische, anatomische und klinische Studien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitterling, H.; Brueckmann, H. [Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie, Klinikum der LMU, Muenchen (Germany); Staebler, A. [Radiologische Praxis, Radiologie in Muenchen, Harlaching (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: Whiplash injury of the cervical spine is a frequent issue in medical expertise and causes enormous consequential costs for motor insurance companies. Some authors accuse posttraumatic changes of alar ligaments to be causative for consequential disturbances. Materials and methods: Review of recent studies on biomechanics, anatomical and clinical MR imaging. Results: Biomechanical experiments can not induce according injuries of alar ligaments. Although MRI provides excellent visualization of alar ligaments, the range of normal variants is high. (orig.)

  5. Eight clinical conundrums relating to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in sport: recent evidence and a personal reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renström, Per A

    2013-04-01

    Over two million anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries occur worldwide annually, and the greater prevalence for ACL injury in young female athletes is one of the major problems in sports medicine. Optimal treatment of ACL injury requires individualised management. Patient selection is of utmost importance, and so is respect for the patient's functional demands and interests. All patients with an ACL tear may not need surgery, however athletes and persons with an active lifestyle with high knee functional demands including cutting motions need and should be offered surgery. In many cases it may not be the choice of graft or technique that is the key for success, but the choice of surgeon. The surgeon should be experienced and use a reconstructive procedure he/she knows very well and is comfortable with. The development of osteoarthritis after an ACL injury depends very much on the injury mechanism and concurrent meniscal injury, as knee articular cartilage continues to heal for 1-2 years after an ACL injury. Therefore the surgeon and rehabilitation team must pay attention to the rehabilitation process and to the decision when to return to sport. Return to sport must be carefully considered, as top-level sport in itself is one main risk factor for osteoarthritis after ACL injury. The present criteria for return to sport need to be revisited, also due to the fact that recurrent injury seems to be an increasing problem. ACL injury prevention programmes are now available in some sports. The key issue for a prevention programme to be successful is proper implementation. Vital factors for success include the individual coaching of the player and well controlled compliance with the training programme. Preventive activities should be more actively supported by the involved athletic community. Despite substantial advances in the field of ACL injury over the past 40 years, substantial management challenges remain.

  6. EFFECTIVENESS OF SURGICAL RECONSTRUCTION TO RESTORE RADIOCARPAL JOINT MECHANICS AFTER SCAPHOLUNATE LIGAMENT INJURY. AN IN VIVO MODELING STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joshua E.; Lee, Phil; McIff, Terence E; Toby, E. Bruce; Fischer, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of the scapholunate ligament can cause a loss of normal scapholunate mechanics and eventually lead to osteoarthritis. Surgical reconstruction attempts to restore scapholunate relationship and shows improvement in functional outcomes, but postoperative effectiveness in restoring normal radiocarpal mechanics still remains a question. The objective of this study was to investigate the benefits of surgical repair by observing changes in contact mechanics on the cartilage surface before and after surgical treatment. Six patients with unilateral scapholunate dissociation were enrolled in the study, and displacement driven magnetic resonance image based-surface contact modeling was used to investigate normal, injured and postoperative radiocarpal mechanics. Model geometry was acquired from images of wrists taken in a relaxed position. Kinematics were acquired from image registration between the relaxed images, and images taken during functional loading. Results showed a trend for increase in radiocarpal contact parameters with injury. Peak and mean contact pressures significantly decreased after surgery in the radiolunate articulation and there were no significant differences between normal and postoperative wrists. Results indicated surgical repair improves contact mechanics after injury and that contact mechanics can be surgically restored to be similar to normal. This study provides novel contact mechanics data on the effects of surgical repair after scapholunate ligament injury. With further work, it may be possible to more effectively differentiate between treatments and degenerative changes based on in vivo contact mechanics data. PMID:23618131

  7. Effects of sports injury prevention training on the biomechanical risk factors of anterior cruciate ligament injury in high school female basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Bee-Oh; Lee, Yong Seuk; Kim, Jin Goo; An, Keun Ok; Yoo, Jin; Kwon, Young Hoo

    2009-09-01

    Female athletes have a higher risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury than their male counterparts who play at similar levels in sports involving pivoting and landing. The competitive female basketball players who participated in a sports injury prevention training program would show better muscle strength and flexibility and improved biomechanical properties associated with anterior cruciate ligament injury than during the pretraining period and than posttraining parameters in a control group. Controlled laboratory study. A total of 22 high school female basketball players were recruited and randomly divided into 2 groups (the experimental group and the control group, 11 participants each). The experimental group was instructed in the 6 parts of the sports injury prevention training program and performed it during the first 20 minutes of team practice for the next 8 weeks, while the control group performed their regular training program. Both groups were tested with a rebound-jump task before and after the 8-week period. A total of 21 reflective markers were placed in preassigned positions. In this controlled laboratory study, a 2-way analysis of variance (2 x 2) experimental design was used for the statistical analysis (P training effects on all strength parameters (P = .004 to .043) and on knee flexion, which reflects increased flexibility (P = .022). The experimental group showed higher knee flexion angles (P = .024), greater interknee distances (P = .004), lower hamstring-quadriceps ratios (P = .023), and lower maximum knee extension torques (P = .043) after training. In the control group, no statistical differences were observed between pretraining and posttraining findings (P = .084 to .873). At pretraining, no significant differences were observed between the 2 groups for any parameter (P = .067 to .784). However, a comparison of the 2 groups after training revealed that the experimental group had significantly higher knee flexion angles (P = .023

  8. Forgotten but Not Gone! Syphilis Induced Tenosynovitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicia Ratnaraj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Tenosynovitis, inflammation of a tendon and its synovial sheath, is a rare manifestation of secondary syphilis and if diagnosed early is reversible. Background. A 52-year-old male with past medical history of untreated syphilis presented with gradual onset of swelling and pain of the right fourth metacarpophalangeal joint (MCP. He reported a history of painless penile lesions after having sexual intercourse with a new partner approximately five months ago which was treated with sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. An RPR done at that time came back positive with a high titer; however, patient was lost to follow-up. On examination, patient had an edematous, nonerythematous right fourth proximal interphalangeal (PIP joint. Urgent irrigation, debridement, and exploration of the right hand into the tendon sheath were performed. With his history of syphillis, an RPR was done, which was reactive with a titer of 1 : 64. A confirmatory FTA-ABS test was completed, rendering a positive result. Based on his history of untreated syphilis, dormancy followed by clinical scenario of swelling of the right fourth finger, and a high RPR titer, he was diagnosed with secondary syphilis manifesting as tenosynovitis.

  9. Differences in Isokinetic Strength of the Knee Extensors and Flexors in Men With Isolated and Combined Cruciate-Ligament Knee Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminska, Ewa; Piontek, Tomasz; Wiernicka, Marzena; Cywinska-Wasilewska, Grazyna; Lewandowski, Jacek; Lochynski, Dawid

    2015-08-01

    The extent of knee extensor and flexor weakness after disruption of knee ligaments affects a rehabilitation output and functional recovery and may give prognostic information on a possible risk of development of knee osteoarthritis. The hypothesis tested was whether patients with a multiple-ligament tear would have larger abnormalities in strength of the knee extensors and flexors than patients with an isolated-ligament rupture. Cross-sectional study, level III. Outpatient orthopedic clinic. 3 groups of recreationally active men: noninjured control (CON, n = 12), with an anterior cruciate ligament injury (ACLI, n = 10), and with combined anterior and posterior cruciate ligament injury (APCLI, n = 9), matched according to age, body mass, and height. All patients received conservative treatment and rehabilitation and awaited ligament reconstruction surgery. Isokinetic maximum-repetition peak torque per body mass (PT/BM) and total work (TW), PT and TW limb-symmetry index (LSI), and flexor-to- extensor PT ratio were evaluated during concentric knee extension-flexion movements at lower (60°/s) and higher (240°/s) isokinetic velocities. The main finding was that compared with the individuals with ACLI, patients with APCLI produced in their injured limbs lower mean TW (extension: 30.3%, flexion: 28.2%) and had lower mean TW LSI (extension 74% in APCLI vs. 91.6% in ACLI; flexion 61.3% in APCLI vs. 90.8% in ACLI) at the higher but not lower speed of isokinetic testing. However, at the lower velocity the quantified size of reduction in PT/BM and TW was greater in subjects with APCLI than ACLI as compared with the CON individuals. After bi-cruciate-ligament injury the capacity to produce torque by concentric muscle contractions throughout knee-extension and -flexion movements performed with high speed is lower in injured limbs than after isolated anterior cruciate ligament tear.

  10. Sonography on injury of the medial patellofemoral ligament after acute traumatic lateral patellar dislocation: Injury patterns and correlation analysis with injury of articular cartilage of the inferomedial patella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang-Ying; Zheng, Lei; Shi, Hao; Qu, Su-Hui; Ding, Hong-Yu

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of high-frequency ultrasonography in the diagnosis of injuries of medial patellofemoral ligaments (MPFLs), analyse the characteristics of MPFL injury and correlations between injury of the MPFL and articular cartilage of the inferomedial patella in patients with acute traumatic lateral patellar dislocation. High-frequency sonographic images of 49 patients with acute traumatic lateral patellar dislocations treated surgically were reviewed. The χ(2) tests were performed for statistical analysis. Twenty-eight cases of complete MPFL tear and 21 cases of partial MPFL tear were identified in operation, with 27 cases of MPFL tear located at their femoral attachment, 21 cases of tear at the patellar attachment and one case of midsubstance tear. The diagnostic accuracy of sonography regarding partial MPFL tear and complete MPFL tear was 89.8% and 89.8%. Among the patients with MPFL tear at the patellar attachment, eight and six cases were concomitant with chondral and osteochondral lesions in the inferomedial patella, respectively, in contrast to nine and six cases in patients with MPFL tear at the femoral attachment, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two locations described above regarding the prevalence rates of chondral or osteochondral lesions of the inferomedial patella (P=0.732, P=0.614). Among the patients with complete MPFL tear, 12 and 10 cases were concomitant with chondral and osteochondral lesions in the inferomedial patella, respectively, while six and two cases were concomitant with partial MPFL tear. There was no significant difference between the two types of injuries discussed above on the prevalence rates of chondral lesions of the inferomedial patella (P=0.305), but the prevalence rate of osteochondral lesions between the two types of injuries discussed above was statistically different (P=0.035). The MPFL is most easily injured at the femoral attachment, secondly at

  11. Treatment of anterior cruciate ligament injuries with special reference to surgical technique and rehabilitation: an assessment of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Daniel; Samuelsson, Kristian; Karlsson, Jón

    2009-06-01

    The primary aim was to investigate and assess the current evidence of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, with special reference to the choice of surgical techniques and aspects of rehabilitation. A secondary aim was to clarify relative strengths and weaknesses of the selected studies, resolve literature conflicts, and finally, evaluate the need for further studies. A PubMed database search using the key words "anterior cruciate ligament" was performed. The search was limited to only RCTs published in English during the period of January 1995 to March 2009. Articles concerning surgical technique and rehabilitation were obtained. After initial screening and subsequent quality appraisal based on the CONSORT (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials) Statement, a total of 70 articles were included in this review. Initial graft tension and the use of a ligament augmentation device do not affect clinical outcome. Bioabsorbable screws and titanium screws produced equal clinical outcome, regardless of graft type. Radiographic signs of osteoarthritis develop in 50% of ACL-injured patients, regardless of treatment. Meniscectomy further increases the risk. Furthermore, the use of a postoperative knee brace does not affect the clinical outcome after ACL reconstruction. Closed kinetic chain exercises produced less pain and laxity while promoting better subjective outcome than open kinetic chain exercises after patellar tendon reconstruction. In terms of quality assessment, several weaknesses pertaining to study design were discovered among the included RCTs, which intelligibly stress the need for further high-quality studies. Level II, systematic review of RCTs.

  12. The use of history to identify anterior cruciate ligament injuries in the acute trauma setting: the 'LIMP index'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayre, Colin; Hardy, Maryann; Scally, Andrew; Radcliffe, Graham; Venkatesh, Ram; Smith, Jon; Guy, Stephen

    2017-05-01

    To identify the injury history features reported by patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries and determine whether history may be used to identify patients requiring follow-up appointments from acute trauma services. Multisite cross-sectional service evaluation using a survey questionnaire design conducted in the UK. The four injury history features investigated were 'leg giving way at the time of injury', 'inability to continue activity immediately following injury', 'marked effusion' and 'pop (heard or felt) at the time of injury'(LIMP). 194 patients with ACL injury were identified, of which 165 (85.5%) attended an acute trauma service. Data on delay was available for 163 (98.8%) of these patients of which 120 (73.6%) had a follow-up appointment arranged. Patients who had a follow-up appointment arranged waited significantly less time for a correct diagnosis (geometric mean 29 vs 198 days; p<0.001) and to see a specialist consultant (geometric mean 61 vs 328 days; p<0.001). Using a referral threshold of any two of the four LIMP injury history features investigated, 95.8% of patients would have had a follow-up appointment arranged. Findings support the value of questioning patients on specific injury history features in identifying patients who may have suffered ACL injury. Using a threshold of two or more of the four LIMP history features investigated would have reduced the percentage of patients inappropriately discharged by 22.2%. Evidence presented suggests that this would significantly reduce the time to diagnosis and specialist consultation minimising the chance of secondary complications. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. [Return to sport after surgical treatment of a posterior cruciate ligament injury : A retrospective study of 60 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrend, M; Ateschrang, A; Döbele, S; Stöckle, U; Grünwald, L; Schröter, S; Ihle, C

    2016-12-01

    Injuries of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) lead to an initial reduction of sporting activity. However, in previous studies, return to sport after operative treatment of PCL injuries has been analysed insufficiently. The aim of this study was (1) to determine the rate of return to sport in physically active patients, (2) to analyse possible changes in sporting activities and (3) to examine the influence of the severity of the initial injury. Within a retrospective clinical and radiological follow-up at least 24 months after surgery (80.3 ± 28.2 months), 60 patients (44.8 ± 12.1 years) with surgically treated isolated or combined PCL injuries were included in the study. Pre-accidental and post-operative sporting activities were queried and compared in a standardised questionnaire. Possible differences with respect to the initial injury severity (Cooper classification) were examined. The return-to-sport rate of the physically active patients was 87.0 %. 17.6 % of patients with a combined PCL injury and 4.8 % of patients with isolated PCL injury were not able to return to sport. Significant reductions in the frequency of exercise (p = 0.0087), the duration of exercise (p = 0.0003) and the amount of regularly performed sports (p sports to low-impact sports was noted. Patients with operatively treated PCL injuries can return to sport. However, for competitive athletes an injury to the PCL can lead to the end of their career. A reduction of sporting activities and a change from high-impact sports to low-impact sports can be expected. A persisting inability to return to sporting activities in patients with isolated PCL injuries cannot be assumed.

  14. Cone-beam computed tomography arthrography: an innovative modality for the evaluation of wrist ligament and cartilage injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramdhian-Wihlm, Reeta [University Hospital of Strasbourg, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Strasbourg (France); Le Minor, Jean-Marie [University of Strasbourg, Institute of Anatomy, Strasbourg (France); University of Strasbourg, Faculty of Dentistry, Strasbourg (France); Schmittbuhl, Matthieu [University of Strasbourg, Faculty of Dentistry, Strasbourg (France); Jeantroux, Jeremy; Veillon, Francis; Dosch, Jean-Claude; Dietemann, Jean-Louis; Bierry, Guillaume [University Hospital of Strasbourg, Department of Radiology, Strasbourg (France); Mahon, Peter Mac [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has become an important modality in dento-facial imaging but remains poorly used in the exploration of the musculoskeletal system. The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate the performance and radiation exposure of CBCT arthrography in the evaluation of ligament and cartilage injuries in cadaveric wrists, with gross pathology findings as the standard of reference. Conventional arthrography was performed under fluoroscopic guidance on 10 cadaveric wrists, followed by MDCT acquisition and CBCT acquisition. CBCT arthrography and MDCT arthrography images were independently analyzed by two musculoskeletal radiologists working independently and then in consensus. The following items were observed: scapholunate and lunotriquetral ligaments, triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) (tear, integrity), and proximal carpal row cartilage (chondral tears). Wrists were dissected and served as the standard of reference for comparisons. Interobserver agreement, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were determined. Radiation dose (CTDI) of both modalities was recorded. CBCT arthrography provides equivalent results to MDCT arthrography in the evaluation of ligaments and cartilage with sensitivity and specificity between 82 and 100%, and interobserver agreement between 0.83 and 0.97. However, radiation dose was significantly lower (p < 0.05) for CBCT arthrography than for MDCT arthrography with a mean CTDI of 2.1 mGy (range 1.7-2.2) versus a mean of 15.1 mGy (range 14.7-16.1). CBCT arthrography appears to be an innovative alternative to MDCT arthrography of the wrist as it allows an accurate and low radiation dose evaluation of ligaments and cartilage. (orig.)

  15. Neuromuscular Retraining in Female Adolescent Athletes: Effect on Athletic Performance Indices and Noncontact Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank R. Noyes

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available While many anterior cruciate ligament (ACL prevention programs have been published, few have achieved significant reductions in injury rates and improvements in athletic performance indices; both of which may increase compliance and motivation of athletes to participate. A supervised neuromuscular retraining program (18 sessions was developed, aimed at achieving both of these objectives. The changes in neuromuscular indices were measured after training in 1000 female athletes aged 13–18 years, and the noncontact ACL injury rate in 700 of these trained athletes was compared with that of 1120 control athletes. There were significant improvements in the drop-jump test, (p < 0.0001, effect size [ES] 0.97, the single-leg triple crossover hop (p < 0.0001, ES 0.47, the t-test (p < 0.0001, ES 0.64, the multi-stage fitness test (p < 0.0001, ES 0.57, hamstring strength (p < 0.0001, and quadriceps strength (p < 0.01. The trained athletes had a significant reduction in the noncontact ACL injury incidence rate compared with the controls (1 ACL injury in 36,724 athlete-exposures [0.03] and 13 ACL injuries in 61,244 exposures [0.21], respectively, p = 0.03. The neuromuscular retraining program was effective in reducing noncontact ACL injury rate and improving athletic performance indicators.

  16. Treatment of Ulnar Collateral Ligament Injuries and Superior Labral Tears by Major League Baseball Team Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Brandon J; Harris, Joshua D; Fillingham, Yale A; Cvetanovich, Gregory L; Bush-Joseph, Charles A; Bach, Bernard R; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2016-07-01

    To determine practice patterns of Major League Baseball (MLB) team orthopaedic surgeons in addressing the controversial topics of ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) tears, type II SLAP tears, and partial-thickness rotator cuff tear. Seventy-four MLB team orthopaedic surgeons were surveyed via an online survey system. A 14-question survey was used to assess surgeon experience, technique, and graft choice for UCL reconstruction (UCLR), treatment of type II SLAP tears, and other common pathologic conditions. Thirty team orthopaedic surgeons (41%) responded (mean experience as team physicians: 9.37 ± 6.33 years). Seventeen (56.7%) surgeons use the docking technique for UCLR whereas 20% use the modified Jobe technique. Nineteen (63.3%) use palmaris longus autograft in UCLR. Overall, 28 (93.3%) do not routinely perform elbow arthroscopy or perform an obligatory transposition of the ulnar nerve in patients without preoperative ulnar nerve symptoms. Twenty-eight (93.3%) would repair a type II SLAP tear, whereas only 1 (3.3%) would debride the tear. No surgeon would perform a concomitant biceps tenodesis, either open or arthroscopic. Most MLB team orthopaedic surgeons perform a UCLR using the docking technique with a palmaris longus autograft without concomitant elbow arthroscopy or obligatory transposition of the ulnar nerve. The overwhelming majority of these surgeons would also treat an operative type II SLAP tear with a SLAP repair. The number of UCLRs and SLAP repairs performed on MLB pitchers has significantly increased over the past 10 years. To properly treat these conditions in elite, college, and recreational athletes, it is important to understand how the surgeons who take care of the most elite-level athletes treat them, and how they are able to reproducibly attain excellent outcomes. This study shows how these common shoulder and elbow injuries are treated by those surgeons who care for the most elite overhead-throwing athletes in the world. Copyright © 2016

  17. Accuracy of the Lever Sign Test in the Diagnosis of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarbo, Keith A; Hartigan, David E; Scott, Kelly L; Patel, Karan A; Chhabra, Anikar

    2017-10-01

    The lever sign test is a new physical examination tool to diagnose anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears. Preliminary results suggest almost 100% sensitivity and specificity to diagnose acute and chronic complete ACL tears and clinically significant partial tears as compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To assess the sensitivity and specificity of the lever sign test for the diagnosis of acute ACL injuries, as compared to MRI. We also aimed to determine the accuracy of the lever sign test compared with 3 other tests (anterior drawer, Lachman, and pivot shift) when performed by providers of various training levels, and with the patient awake or under anesthesia. Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. We evaluated patients with a chief concern of acute (≤4 weeks) knee pain seen between October 2014 and January 2015, with a thorough history, physical examination, and standard radiographs. MRI was the reference standard; patients without an MRI evaluation were excluded. The 4 physical examination maneuvers were performed on each symptomatic knee during the initial clinic visit (for nonsurgical patients) or under anesthesia in the operating room (for surgical patients) by a randomly assigned undergraduate student, medical student, orthopaedic resident, or orthopaedic fellow. The senior author trained all staff to perform the lever sign test. Statistical analyses were performed. Of 102 patients, 54 were surgical (28 female, 26 male), and 48 were nonsurgical (16 female, 32 male); the mean patient age was 23 years (range, 15-66 years). The overall accuracy of the lever sign test was 77% (63% sensitivity, 90% specificity); the accuracy was similar between patients under anesthesia and awake (77% vs 76%, respectively). There were no significant differences when comparing the sensitivity and specificity of the lever sign test with patients under anesthesia and awake (sensitivity: under anesthesia, 86%, and awake, 68% [P = .40]; specificity: under

  18. Intravitreal injections inducing de quervain tenosynovitis: injector's wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belliveau, Michel J; Leung, Christina; Abouammoh, Marwan A

    2015-01-01

    To describe a case of de Quervain tenosynovitis triggered by the repetitive performance of intravitreal injections. Case report of a 32-year-old ophthalmologist. The ophthalmologist experienced de Quervain tenosynovitis while performing 425 intravitreal injections a month. These were predominantly performed in condensed sessions (injection clinics). Symptoms resolved with nonsurgical management. The repetitive performance of intravitreal injections may be an unrecognized occupational hazard for ophthalmologists.

  19. Neuromuscular Training Availability and Efficacy in Preventing Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury in High School Sports: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jared J; Renier, Colleen M; Ahern, Jenny J; Elliott, Barbara A

    2017-11-01

    To document neuromuscular training (NMT) availability and its relationship to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in 4 major high school sports by gender, sport, and rural/urban geography, with the hypothesis that increased exposure to NMT would be associated with fewer ACL injuries. A retrospective cohort study. All Minnesota high schools identified in the Minnesota State High School League (MSHSL) database for fall 2014 boys' football and soccer, and girls' volleyball and soccer. All high school athletic directors were surveyed to report their school's fall 2014 experience; 53.5% returned the survey reporting experience with one or more of the sports. Athletic directors documented each sport's preseason and in-season exposure to NMT (plyometric exercises, proximal/core muscle strengthening, education and feedback regarding proper body mechanics, and aerobics) and licensed athletic trainers. Reported ACL injuries by sport, gender and rural/urban. More than two-thirds of teams incorporated facets of NMT into their sport. Among male athletes, soccer players exposed to licensed athletic trainers experienced significantly fewer ACL injuries (P girl soccer players in rural settings reported fewer ACL injures compared with urban teams (P sports teams were exposed to NMT, which was associated with fewer ACL injuries for male, but not for female athletes. Improved gender- and sport-specific preventive training programs are indicated.

  20. Collateral ligament reconstruction of the chronic thumb injury with bio-tenodesis screw fixation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gvozdenovic, Robert; Boeckstyns, Michel

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new technique for the reconstruction of chronic lesions of the collateral ligaments of the metacarpophalangeal ligaments of the thumb, using a Bio-Tenodesis screw for the fixation of a tendon graft in a triangular manner with proximal apex and allowing early mobilization, starting 2...... weeks after operation. Short-term results after 12 to 43 months (mean, 26 mo), showed no significant differences in grip and pinch strength compared with the opposite thumb and restricted loss of motion in the metacarpophalangeal joints (10%) and the interphalangeal joints (4%). We conclude...

  1. Longitudinal assessment of noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury risk factors during maturation in a female athlete: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myer, Gregory D; Ford, Kevin R; Divine, Jon G; Wall, Eric J; Kahanov, Leamor; Hewett, Timothy E

    2009-01-01

    To present a unique case of a young pubertal female athlete who was prospectively monitored for previously identified anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk factors for 3 years before sustaining an ACL injury. In prospective studies, previous investigators have examined cross-sectional measures of anatomic, hormonal, and biomechanical risk factors for ACL injury in young female athletes. In this report, we offer a longitudinal example of measured risk factors as the participant matured. Partial or complete tear of the ACL. The participant was identified from a cohort monitored from 2002 until 2007. No injury prevention training or intervention was included during this time in the study cohort. The injury occurred in the year after the third assessment during the athlete's club basketball season. Knee examination, magnetic resonance imaging findings, and arthroscopic evaluation confirmed a complete ACL rupture. The athlete was early pubertal in year 1 of the study and pubertal during the next 2 years; menarche occurred at age 12 years. At the time of injury, she was 14.25 years old and postpubertal, with closing femoral and tibial physes. For each of the 3 years before injury, she demonstrated incremental increases in height, body mass index, and anterior knee laxity. She also displayed decreased hip abduction and knee flexor strength, concomitant with increased knee abduction loads, after each year of growth. During puberty, the participant increased body mass and height of the center of mass without matching increases in hip and knee strength. The lack of strength and neuromuscular adaptation to match the increased demands of her pubertal stature may underlie the increased knee abduction loads measured at each annual visit and may have predisposed her to increased risk of ACL injury.

  2. Comparison of CT versus MRI measurements of transverse atlantal ligament integrity in craniovertebral junction injuries. Part 1: A clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Orribo, Luis; Snyder, Laura A; Kalb, Samuel; Elhadi, Ali M; Hsu, Forrest; Newcomb, Anna G U S; Malhotra, Devika; Crawford, Neil R; Theodore, Nicholas

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Craniovertebral junction (CVJ) injuries complicated by transverse atlantal ligament (TAL) disruption often require surgical stabilization. Measurements based on the atlantodental interval (ADI), atlas lateral diameter (ALD1), and axis lateral diameter (ALD2) may help clinicians identify TAL disruption. This study used CT scanning to evaluate the reliability of these measurements and other variants in the clinical setting. METHODS Patients with CVJ injuries treated at the authors' institution between 2004 and 2011 were evaluated retrospectively for demographics, mechanism and location of CVJ injury, classification of injury, treatment, and modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association score at the time of injury and follow-up. The integrity of the TAL was evaluated using MRI. The ADI, ALD1, and ALD2 were measured on CT to identify TAL disruption indirectly. RESULTS Among the 125 patients identified, 40 (32%) had atlas fractures, 59 (47.2%) odontoid fractures, 31 (24.8%) axis fractures, and 4 (3.2%) occipital condyle fractures. TAL disruption was documented on MRI in 11 cases (8.8%). The average ADI for TAL injury was 1.8 mm (range 0.9-3.9 mm). Nine (81.8%) of the 11 patients with TAL injury had an ADI of less than 3 mm. In 10 patients (90.9%) with TAL injury, overhang of the C-1 lateral masses on C-2 was less than 7 mm. ADI, ALD1, ALD2, ALD1 - ALD2, and ALD1/ALD2 did not correlate with the integrity of the TAL. CONCLUSIONS No current measurement method using CT, including the ADI, ALD1, and ALD2 or their differences or ratios, consistently indicates the integrity of the TAL. A more reliable CT-based criterion is needed to diagnose TAL disruption when MRI is unavailable.

  3. Sagittal Plane Hip, Knee, and Ankle Biomechanics and the Risk of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppänen, Mari; Pasanen, Kati; Krosshaug, Tron; Kannus, Pekka; Vasankari, Tommi; Kujala, Urho M; Bahr, Roald; Perttunen, Jarmo; Parkkari, Jari

    2017-12-01

    Stiff landings with less knee flexion and high vertical ground-reaction forces have been shown to be associated with an increased risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. The literature on the association between other sagittal plane measures and the risk of ACL injuries with a prospective study design is lacking. To investigate the relationship between selected sagittal plane hip, knee, and ankle biomechanics and the risk of ACL injury in young female team-sport athletes. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 171 female basketball and floorball athletes (age range, 12-21 years) participated in a vertical drop jump test using 3-dimensional motion analysis. All new ACL injuries, as well as match and training exposure data, were recorded for 1 to 3 years. Biomechanical variables, including hip and ankle flexion at initial contact (IC), hip and ankle ranges of motion (ROMs), and peak external knee and hip flexion moments, were selected for analysis. Cox regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% CIs. The combined sensitivity and specificity of significant test variables were assessed using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. A total of 15 noncontact ACL injuries were recorded during follow-up (0.2 injuries/1000 player-hours). Of the variables investigated, landing with less hip flexion ROM (HR for each 10° increase in hip ROM, 0.61 [95% CI, 0.38-0.99]; P sport players. Studies with larger populations are needed to confirm these findings and to determine the role of ankle flexion ROM as a risk factor for ACL injury. Increasing knee and hip flexion ROMs to produce soft landings might reduce knee loading and risk of ACL injury in young female athletes.

  4. A novel medial collateral ligament reconstruction procedure using semitendinosus tendon autograft in patients with multiligamentous knee injuries: clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Nobuto; Ogawa, Munehiro; Kondo, Eiji; Kitayama, Soichiro; Tohyama, Harukazu; Yasuda, Kazunori

    2013-06-01

    Several new procedures for medial collateral ligament (MCL) reconstruction using a hamstring tendon graft have been reported in the 2000s. However, the midterm and long-term clinical outcomes of these procedures have not been reported. Postoperative medial stability of the knee that underwent our MCL reconstruction may not be significantly different from that of the noninjured knee. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A total of 37 patients who sustained multiligamentous knee injuries underwent combined MCL and cruciate ligament reconstruction at our institution between 1994 and 2007. Thirty of the 37 patients were clinically evaluated at least 2 years after surgery. Sixteen had combined MCL and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, 5 had combined MCL and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction, and 9 had combined MCL, ACL, and PCL reconstruction. The International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) evaluation form and Lysholm score were used to evaluate postoperative knee function. Anteroposterior knee laxity was examined with a KT-2000 arthrometer. To assess objective medial instability, we performed a stress radiograph examination under valgus stress with the knee at 20° of flexion. At the final follow-up, 1 patient showed a loss of knee extension of more than 3°. Five patients revealed a loss of knee flexion of 6° to 15° and 2 patients of 16° to 25°. Lysholm scores averaged 94.8 points. In the IKDC evaluation, 9 patients were graded as A, 17 were graded as B, 3 were graded as C, and 1 was graded as D. In the stress radiograph examination, the mean medial joint opening was 8.5 ± 1.6 mm in the reconstructed knee and 8.0 ± 1.2 mm in the healthy opposite knee. There was no significant difference in the medial joint opening between reconstructed and intact knees. Medial collateral ligament reconstruction for chronic combined knee instabilities can be safely performed using hamstring tendon autografts, and the clinical outcome with a

  5. Randomized comparison of tape versus semi-rigid and versus lace-up ankle support in the treatment of acute lateral ankle ligament injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bekerom, M. P. J.; van Kimmenade, Robert; Sierevelt, I. N.; Eggink, Karin; Kerkhoffs, G. M. M. J.; van Dijk, C. N.; Raven, E. E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Functional treatment is the optimal non-surgical treatment for acute lateral ankle ligament injury (ALALI) in favour of immobilization treatment. There is no single most effective functional treatment (tape, semi-rigid brace or lace-up brace) based on currently available randomized trials. This

  6. An anterior cruciate ligament injury does not affect the neuromuscular function of the non-injured leg except for dynamic balance and voluntary quadriceps activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zult, Tjerk; Gokeler, Alli; van Raay, Jos J. A. M.; Brouwer, Reinoud W.; Zijdewind, Inge; Hortobagyi, Tibor

    The function of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) patients' non-injured leg is relevant in light of the high incidence of secondary ACL injuries on the contralateral side. However, the non-injured leg's function has only been examined for a selected number of neuromuscular outcomes and often

  7. Grading medial collateral ligament injury: comparison of MR imaging and instrumented valgus-varus laxity test-device. A prospective double-blind patient study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasenberg, E. I.; Lemmens, J. A.; van Kampen, A.; Schoots, F.; Bloo, H. J.; Wagemakers, H. P.; Blankevoort, L.

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: The role of MR imaging in grading medial collateral ligament (MCL) injury of the knee in comparison to other grading methods (clinical findings and instrumental measurement) is hardly documented in the literature. The purpose of this study is to compare the results of MR imaging in grading

  8. Tendon and ligament imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, R J; O'Connor, P J; Grainger, A J

    2012-01-01

    MRI and ultrasound are now widely used for the assessment of tendon and ligament abnormalities. Healthy tendons and ligaments contain high levels of collagen with a structured orientation, which gives rise to their characteristic normal imaging appearances as well as causing particular imaging artefacts. Changes to ligaments and tendons as a result of disease and injury can be demonstrated using both ultrasound and MRI. These have been validated against surgical and histological findings. Novel imaging techniques are being developed that may improve the ability of MRI and ultrasound to assess tendon and ligament disease. PMID:22553301

  9. Gender Differences in Anterior Cruciate Ligament injury Vary With Activity: Epidemiology of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in a Young, Athletic Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Beynnon B. Gender difference in knee injury epidemiology among competitive alpine ski racers. Iowa Orthop J. 1998;18:64-66. 16. van Mechelen W. Sports injury surveillance systems. “One size fits all”? Sports Med. 1997;24:164-168. ...proportion of ACL recon- structions among male and female cadets during a 10-year period (1987-1997) (Taylor, unpublished data). To further explore...such as free-time skiing . Physical Activity Requirements All students are required to participate in intramural, club, or intercollegiate sports in

  10. Predictive parameters for return to pre-injury level of sport 6 months following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Ulrike; Krüger-Franke, Michael; Schmidt, Michael; Rosemeyer, Bernd

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study was to find predictive parameters for a successful resumption of pre-injury level of sport 6 months post anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. In a prospective study, 40 patients with a ruptured ACL were surgically treated with semitendinosus tendon autograft. Six months after surgery, strength of knee extensors and flexors, four single-leg hop tests, Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Return to Sport after Injury Scale (ACL-RSI), subjective International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) 2000 and the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia-11 (TSK-11) were assessed. Seven months post-operatively, a standardized interview was conducted to identify "return to sport" (RS) and "non-return to sport" (nRS) patients. Logistic regression and "Receiver Operating Characteristic" (ROC) analyses were used to determine predictive parameters. No significant differences could be detected between RS and nRS patients concerning socio-demographic data, muscle tests, square hop and TSK-11. In nRS patients, the Limb Symmetry Index (LSI) of single hop for distance (p = 0.005), crossover hop (p = 0.008) and triple hop (p = 0.001) were significantly lower, in addition to the ACL-RSI (p = 0.013) and IKDC 2000 (p = 0.037). The cut-off points for LSI single hop for distance were 75.4 % (sensitivity 0.74; specificity 0.88), and for ACL-RSI 51.3 points (sensitivity 0.97; specificity 0.63). Logistic regression distinguished between RS and nRS subjects (sensitivity 0.97; specificity 0.63). The single hop for distance and ACL-RSI were found to be the strongest predictive parameters, assessing both the objective functional and the subjective psychological aspects of returning to sport. Both tests may help to identify patients at risk of not returning to pre-injury sport. II.

  11. Assessment of the alpha angle and mobility of the hip in patients with noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Osmar Valadao; Tragnago, Gustavo; Gatelli, Cristiano; Costa, Rogério Nascimento; de Freitas Spinelli, Leandro; Saggin, Paulo Renato Fernandes; Kuhn, André

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the alpha angle of the hip in patients with noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and compare it with patients without injury. In addition, external and internal rotation of the hip was assessed and correlated with the alpha angle. The alpha angle of the ipsilateral hip was assessed in 41 subjects with non-contact ACL tear and compared with 39 subjects with no tear. The external and internal rotation of the ipsilateral hip was also evaluated. The alpha angle was larger in subjects with noncontact ACL injury. The mean was 70.31° (±13.92°) compared with 58.55° (±13.95°) in the control group (p angle and decreased rotational range of motion of the hip in either group (p > 0.05). Patients with noncontact ACL injury presented a greater alpha angle when compared with the group without tear. There was no difference in the rotational mobility of the hip between groups, nor was there a correlation between the increase in the alpha angle and the decrease in the rotational mobility of the hip.

  12. Association of polymorphisms rs1800012 in COL1A1 with sports-related tendon and ligament injuries: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunguang; Li, Hao; Chen, Kang; Wu, Bing; Liu, Haifeng

    2017-01-01

    It has been reported that the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1800012 in COL1A1 might be associated with the susceptibility to sports-related tendon and ligament injuries such as ACL injuries, Achilles tendon injuries, shoulder dislocations and tennis elbow. But the data from different studies have been conflicting. Here we attempted to systematically summarize and clarify the association between the SNP and sports-related tendon and ligament injuries risk. Six eligible studies including 933 cases and 1,381 controls were acquired from PubMed, Web Of Science and Cochrane library databases. Significant association was identified in homozygote model (TT versus GG: OR=0.17, 95%CI 0.08-0.35, PH=0.00) and recessive model (TT versus GT/GG: OR=0.21, 95%CI 0.10-0.44, PH=0.00). Our results indicated that COL1A1 rs1800012 polymorphism may be associated with the reduced risk of sports-related tendon or ligament injuries, especially in ACL injuries, and that rare TT may played as a protective role. PMID:28206959

  13. Prevenção de lesões do ligamento cruzado anterior em futebolistas Prevention of Injuries of the anterior cruciate ligament in soccer players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Brito

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A lesão do joelho é a mais comum entre as lesões graves apresentadas por futebolistas, destacando-se o ligamento cruzado anterior como um dos ligamentos do joelho mais frequentemente lesados. Assim, a prevenção de lesões do ligamento cruzado anterior em futebolistas deve ser encarada como uma preocupação constante para todos os agentes ligados à modalidade, independentemente do nível competitivo, idade e sexo dos praticantes. OBJETIVOS: O objetivo deste trabalho é a análise da importância do trabalho de prevenção de lesões do LCA em futebolistas que possa ser incorporado no treino de futebol. METODOLOGIA: A metodologia utilizada neste trabalho foi uma revisão da literatura. CONCLUSÕES: Propõe-se um programa de prevenção de lesões do ligamento cruzado anterior em futebolistas, com três sessões de treino semanais, englobando treino neuromuscular e treino proprioceptivo.Knee injury is the commonest severe injury presented by football players and the anterior cruciate ligament appears as one of the most frequently injured knee ligaments. Thus, prevention of anterior cruciate ligament injuries must be a priority in soccer practice, regardless of the athletes' competitive level, age or sex. OBJECTIVES: the objective of this work is to analyze the importance of prevention of the anterior cruciate ligament injury in soccer players which can be incorporated in the training program. METHODOLOGY: the methodology used was a review of the literature. CONCLUSIONS: A program with three weekly sessions, composed by neuromuscular and proprioceptive training is proposed to prevent anterior cruciate ligament injuries in soccer players.

  14. Comparison of CT versus MRI measurements of transverse atlantal ligament integrity in craniovertebral junction injuries. Part 2: A new CT-based alternative for assessing transverse ligament integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Orribo, Luis; Kalb, Samuel; Snyder, Laura A; Hsu, Forrest; Malhotra, Devika; Lefevre, Richard D; Elhadi, Ali M; Newcomb, Anna G U S; Theodore, Nicholas; Crawford, Neil R

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE The rule of Spence is inaccurate for assessing integrity of the transverse atlantal ligament (TAL). Because CT is quick and easy to perform at most trauma centers, the authors propose a novel sequence of obtaining 2 CT scans to improve the diagnosis of TAL impairment. The sensitivity of a new CT-based method for diagnosing a TAL injury in a cadaveric model was assessed. METHODS Ten human cadaveric occipitocervical specimens were mounted horizontally in a supine posture with wooden inserts attached to the back of the skull to maintain a neutral or flexed (10°) posture. Specimens were scanned in neutral and flexed postures in a total of 4 conditions (3 conditions in each specimen): 1) intact (n = 10); either 2A) after a simulated Jefferson fracture with an intact TAL (n = 5) or 2B) after a TAL disruption with no Jefferson fracture (n = 5); and 3) after TAL disruption and a simulated Jefferson fracture (n = 10). The atlantodental interval (ADI) and cross-sectional canal area were measured. RESULTS From the neutral to the flexed posture, ADI increased an average of 2.5% in intact spines, 6.25% after a Jefferson fracture without TAL disruption, 34% after a TAL disruption without fracture, and 25% after TAL disruption with fracture. The increase in ADI was significant with both TAL disruption and TAL disruption and fracture (p 0.6). Changes in spinal canal area were not significant (p > 0.70). CONCLUSIONS This novel method was more sensitive than the rule of Spence for evaluating the integrity of the TAL on CT and does not increase the risk of further neurological damage.

  15. Are Female Soccer Players at an Increased Risk of Second Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Compared With Their Athletic Peers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Melissa M; Pareek, Ayoosh; Krych, Aaron J; Hewett, Timothy E; Levy, Bruce A; Stuart, Michael J; Dahm, Diane L

    2016-10-01

    Female soccer players have a well-known risk for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, but few studies have reported on second ACL injuries in this population. To (1) report the rates of subsequent ACL injury (ipsilateral graft rupture or contralateral tear) in competitive female soccer players, (2) compare these rates with those of other female athletes of similar competitive level, (3) determine risk factors for second ACL injury, and (4) report clinical outcome scores in this population. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. The medical records at a single institution were reviewed for female patients who were injured during a competitive athletic event and treated with primary ACL reconstruction (ACLR) between 1998 and 2013. Patients were followed for a mean of 68.8 months postoperatively (range, 24-115.2 months). Clinical outcome was obtained via Lysholm and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores. Soccer players were matched 1:1 to non-soccer athletes for age, activity level, and graft type. A total of 180 female ACLR patients with a mean ± SD age of 19.6 ± 6.9 years met the study inclusion and exclusion criteria (90 soccer players and 90 non-soccer players). Soccer players sustained more second ACL injuries, including both graft failures (11% vs 1%; P follow-up. Twenty-eight percent of all female soccer players and 34% of those players who returned to soccer had a second ACL tear. Soccer players had an increased rate of both graft tear and contralateral ACL injury compared with similar non-soccer athletes. Older age and return to soccer were significant risk factors for graft rupture. © 2016 The Author(s).

  16. Modern aspects of physical rehabilitation after football injuries of the capsule-ligament knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parish Mokhammad Reza

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available It is considered the most typical causes of damage to the musculoskeletal system in football. Showing contemporary approaches to physical rehabilitation, reconstruction of the capsule-ligament knee athletes after surgery by arthroscopy. It is shown the various recovery tools and terms of use. It is established that the widespread development of arthroscopy, requires a balanced complex of physical rehabilitation. Complexes should reduce postoperative complications and gradual adaptation to favor the player to the training load.

  17. Ankle joint - value of different radiological examinations especially in external ligament injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dengel, H.

    1984-03-01

    For a correct radiological positioning of the ankle joint the bimalleolar line is helpful as well for the A.P.-view as for the lateral view. For the examination of external ligament lacerations Radiography with functional test is not always sufficient. After critical comparison of functional radiographs, clinical symptoms and case history arthrography is necessary in certain cases to come to a final conclusion. Indications for arthrography are stated and explained.

  18. [Effects of vacuum sealing drainage technique in acute and chronic suppurative tenosynovitis of hand].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H; Xia, F; Xing, D M; Ren, D; Feng, W; Chen, Y; Xiao, Z H; Zhao, Z M

    2017-05-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of vacuum sealing drainage technique in acute and chronic suppurative tenosynovitis of hand. Methods: A total of 9 cases acute and chronic suppurative tenosynovitis patients from January 2013 to April 2015 in Puai Hospital Affiliated to Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology were retrospectively reviewed. There were 6 males and 3 females, aging from 27 to 65 years, the average age was 55 years. There were 3 cases of index finger, 3 cases of middle finger, 2 cases of ring finger, 1 case include three fingers. The infection causes included stabbing with fishbone in 3 cases, stabbing with animal bone fragments in 3 cases, wound by sawdust in 3 cases, meat grinder injury in 1 case, multiple fingers crush injury postoperative infection of garbage truck in 1 case. Bacterial infection included 2 cases with Staphylococcus aureus, 2 cases with Staphylococcus epidermidis, 1 case with normal Escherichia coli, 1 case with mixed infection of Enterobacter aerogenes, Klebsiella oxytoca and Staphylococcus, 1 case with Bauman Acinetobacter bacillus, 1 case with Proteus mirabilis and 1 case of no growth of pathogenic bacteria culture. After thorough debridement, vacuum sealing drainage was used to observe the characteristics of irrigation fluid, the formation of cavity inflammation, the prognosis of infection and the recovery of finger function. Results: Seven patients with suppurative tenosynovitis were treated for 7 to 14 days, replaced the vacuum sealing drainage dressing once; 1 patient was an illustration of the finger tip defect flap infected patients after 21 days of treatment, replaced the vacuum sealing drainage dressing twice, 1 patient was an illustration of the central refers to trauma, postoperative infection patients 28 d, replaced three times in the VSD. The follow-up time was 3 to 12 months (mean 8.2 months), 7 patients without tendon necrosis, secondary suture with no infection, 2 cases of

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging for the diagnosis of chondral, meniscal and cruciate ligaments injuries of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karam, Francisco Consoli; Fridmann, Marcos William; Arbo, Rodrigo Di Mare; Vieira, Jose Francisco [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Faculty of Medicine]. E-mail: franciscokaram@terra.com.br; Silva, Jefferson Luis Braga da; Pires, Luiz Antonio Simoes [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Faculty of Medicine. Hospital Sao Lucas; Abreu, Armando; Abreu, Marcelo [Hospital Mae de Deus, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Servico de Radiologia

    2007-05-15

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee. Materials and methods: Seventy-two patients have been submitted to MRI previously to arthroscopy of the knee performed by a single surgeon and utilized as a comparative standard method. Sensitivity, specificity, values of likelihood and rate of interobserver agreement have been evaluated. Results: The kappa agreement coefficient between MRI and arthroscopy was very good for lesions in the anterior cruciate ligament (0.84), good for lateral meniscus (0.75), reasonable for medial meniscus (0.50) and poor for chondral lesions (< 0.50). MRI has demonstrated high sensitivity for tears in the anterior cruciate ligament (94%) and in the medial meniscus (92%), good sensitivity for lesions in the lateral meniscus (80%), and low sensitivity for lesions in all of the chondral zones (< 50%), while the specificity has been excellent for all the chondral, and ligamentous structures, besides the lateral menisci analyzed (more than 97%), and reasonable (65%) for the medial meniscus. Conclusion: MRI is an useful tool in the clinical diagnosis of intra-articular knee lesions, as already demonstrated by similar results reported both in the Brazilian and international literature. (author)

  20. The prevalence of tenosynovitis of the interosseous tendons of the hand in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowbotham, Emma L. [Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Musculoskeletal Radiology Department, Leeds (United Kingdom); Freeston, Jane E. [Department of Rheumatology, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Emery, Paul [University of Leeds, Arthritis Research UK, Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, LTHT Leeds Institute of Rheumatic Musculoskeletal Medicine, Leeds (United Kingdom); Grainger, Andrew J. [Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Musculoskeletal Radiology Department, Leeds (United Kingdom); Chapel Allerton Hospital, NIHR Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-15

    The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of tenosynovitis affecting the interosseous tendons of the hand in a rheumatoid arthritis (RA) population and to assess for association with metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint synovitis, flexor tendon tenosynovitis or ulnar drift. Forty-four patients with RA underwent hand MRI along with 20 normal controls. Coronal 3D T1 VIBE sequences pre- and post-contrast were performed and reconstructed. The presence of interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was recorded alongside MCP joint synovitis, flexor tendon tenosynovitis and ulnar drift. Twenty-one (47.7 %) patients with RA showed interosseous tendon tenosynovitis. Fifty-two (14.8 %) interosseous tendons showed tenosynovitis amongst the RA patients. Interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was more commonly seen in association with adjacent MCP joint synovitis (p < 0.001), but nine MCP joints (5.1 %) showed adjacent interosseous tenosynovitis in the absence of joint synovitis. Interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was more frequently seen in fingers which also showed flexor tendon tenosynovitis (p < 0.001) and in patients with ulnar drift of the fingers (p = 0.01). Tenosynovitis of the hand interosseous tendons was found in 47.7 % of patients with RA. In the majority of cases this was adjacent to MCP joint synovitis; however, interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was also seen in isolation. (orig.)

  1. Surgical Repair of Medial Collateral Ligament and Posteromedial Corner Injuries of the Knee: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLong, Jeffrey M; Waterman, Brian R

    2015-11-01

    To systematically evaluate surgical techniques and objective clinical outcomes of primary repair of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) and posteromedial corner of the knee. A systematic review of the PubMed/Medline Database (1966 to August 2014) was performed to identify all clinical studies describing MCL and other medial-based repairs of the knee. Exclusion criteria were applied to reconstruction techniques, animal models, and non-English publications. Descriptive analysis identified surgical technique, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) objective form valgus stability subscore, functional outcome measures, and laxity on valgus stress. After exclusion of 165 references, 16 publications with 355 knees were included in the final analysis. Fixation construct included suture-only repair (49.5%), staples (12.1%), suture anchors (11.2%), and mixed or unknown fixation (27.0%). When isolating knees with available relative valgus stress opening (n = 223), 75.8% had side-to-side difference of knees (90.0%; 6 studies; range, 60% to 100%). Of 93 knees with quantified values, the mean side-to-side difference in medial joint space opening was 1.25 mm (SD ± 0.85) after primary repair. Thirteen of 212 knees (6.1%) met the criteria for failure, and the average Lysholm score was 91.6 (n = 210; range, 85.5 to 98.5). This systematic review demonstrated that repair of the MCL and posteromedial corner of the knee may be an effective and reliable treatment for medial-sided knee injuries, resulting in improved valgus stability and patient-reported functional scores with low rates of secondary failure. However, repair techniques may vary significantly depending on the chronicity and extent of medial ligamentous knee injuries, and appropriate patient selection is critical in determining ultimate clinical outcomes. IV. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. SHORT COMMUNICATION ON THE INFLUENCE OF POSITION ON ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT INJURY AND RECONSTRUCTION IN RECREATIONAL RUGBY FOOTBALL UNION PARTICIPANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Dawes

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The different player positions in rugby union may place varying demands on a reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament (ACL in regards to 'cutting manoeuvres', this in turn may effect performance. In order to investigate sporting performance post reconstruction, a questionnaire was sent to amateur rugby clubs affiliated to the Oxfordshire Rugby Football Union (R.F.U. From the returned questionnaires player positions were placed into categories based on similar 'cutting manoeuvre' demands. Seventy five percent of Individuals playing in the category 1 (low 'cutting manoeuvre' demands at slow running speeds could play a full game with a damaged ACL and post-reconstruction the majority returned to play at a higher level. Fifty percent of ACL injuries occurred on category 2 (high 'cutting manoeuvre' demands at medium running speeds suggesting they may be more prone to ACL injury than other positions. The majority of individuals playing in category 3 (high 'cutting manoeuvre' demands at fast speeds played at a lower level of rugby post reconstruction. Positional demands may influence ACL injury and post reconstruction sporting performance. However, more research is needed

  3. Management of anterior cruciate ligament injury? What's in and what's out?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Benjamin Raines; Emily Naclerio; Seth Sherman

    2017-01-01

    .... The current concepts in ACL injury and surgery are being shaped by technological advances, expansion in basic science research, resurging interest in ACL preservation, and expanding efforts regarding injury prevention...

  4. Effect of unstable meniscal injury on three-dimensional knee kinematics during gait in anterior cruciate ligament-deficient patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harato, Kengo; Niki, Yasuo; Kudo, Yutaka; Sakurai, Aiko; Nagura, Takeo; Hasegawa, Takayuki; Masumoto, Ko; Otani, Toshiro

    2015-10-01

    Our purpose was to clarify the differences of three-dimensional knee kinematics in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-deficient patients between with and without meniscal injury using gait analysis. A total of 72 knees in 36 young athletes with primary and unilateral ACL injury, with a mean age of 22 years, participated. Gait analysis was done before surgery. According to the arthroscopic findings, patients were divided into two groups. The patients with an unstable meniscal tear were allocated to the meniscal injury group (ACL+M group), and the patients without a meniscal tear were allocated to the no meniscal injury group (ACL group). In the gait analysis, three-dimensional knee kinematics was evaluated and compared. The patients in both groups exhibited lower sagittal plane knee excursions and peak knee extension angles on the affected limb than on the unaffected limb during the mid-stance. In terms of the axial plane, a rotation angle was significantly smaller in the affected knees than in the unaffected knees in the ACL group. On the other hand, an opposite phenomenon was observed in the ACL+M group. Moreover, a significantly larger rotation angle in the affected knees during the stance phase and the whole gait cycle was observed in the ACL+M group than in the ACL group. Increased rotational motion during the gait was observed in the ACL-deficient knees combined with unstable meniscal injuries. Meniscal condition may be a key factor for compensatory gait mechanics to prevent rotatory instability in ACL-deficient patients patients. III. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Anterior cruciate ligament and meniscal injuries in sports: incidence, time of practice until injury, and limitations caused after trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Costa Astur

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To analyze the incidence of ACL and meniscal injuries in a population of recreational and elite athletes from Brazil and the relation of these injuries with their sports activities. METHODS: This was a prospective observational study of 240 patients with ACL and/or meniscal injuries submitted to surgical treatment. Data of patients and sport modality, as well as Tegner score were registered in the first clinical evaluation. The patients were divided into three groups: (1 isolated rupture of the ACL; (2 ACL injury associated with meniscal injury; (3 isolated menisci injury. RESULTS: The majority of the patients belonged to group 1 (44.58%, followed by group 2 (30.2% and 3 (25%. Most patients were soccer players. The mean time from sport practice to injury in group 1 was 17.81 years. In group 2, it was 17.3 years, and in group 3, 26.91 years. Soccer athletes presented ACL injury in 0.523/1000 h of practice and meniscal injury in 0.448/1000 h of practice. Before the injury, the mean Tegner score obtained for groups 1, 2, and 3 were 7.18, 7.34, and 6.53, respectively. After knee injury, those values were 3.07, 3.18, and 2.87, respectively. CONCLUSION: Soccer was the sport that caused the majority of lesions, regardless the group. Furthermore, patients from groups 1 and 2 had less time of practice prior to the injury (17.81 and 17.3 years than the patients of group 3 (26.91 years. Women presented a higher risk to develop ACL and meniscal injuries in 1000 h of game/practice. Running, volleyball, and weightlifting are in ascending order of risk for ACL and/or meniscal injury. Regarding the return to sport practice, the efficiency of all athletes was impaired because of the injury.

  6. Tuberculous Tenosynovitis Presenting as Ganglion of Wrist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahaji Chavan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is still endemic in many developed countries. Involvement of the hand and wrist at presentation is extremely rare, and the diagnosis is often missed. A 57 years old male presented with swelling over the left wrist since 3 years Three swellings over dorsal aspect of the left wrist Soft in consistency Non tender Non compressible Mobile at right angles to the plane of the wrist joint. ESR: 45 mm in 1 hr and rest blood investigations were normal. Ultrsonography showed giant cell tumor of Extensor Digitorum sheath. X-ray: soft tissue swelling and MRI was suggestive of extensor tendon sheath extraskeletal synovial Koch’s, or giant cell tumor of tendon sheath. Excision of swelling was planned and intraoperatively, rice bodies were seen inside it. Histopathological examination showed caseous necrosis with granuloma formation. Patient was put on DOT1 therapy. Tuberculous tenosynovitis was first described by Acrel in 1777. Rice bodies occurring in joints affected by tuberculosis were first described in 1895 by Reise. Rice bodies will be diagnosed on plain radiographs when mineralization occurs. More than 50% of cases recur within 1 year of treatment. The currently recommended 6-month course is often adequate with extensive curettage lavage and synovectomy should be performed. Surgery is essential, but the extent of surgical debridement is still debatable. The surgeon has to be aware of the significance of loose bodies when performing routine excision of innocuous looking wrist ganglia.

  7. Patellar dislocations in children, adolescents and adults: A comparative MRI study of medial patellofemoral ligament injury patterns and trochlear groove anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcarek, Peter, E-mail: peter.balcarek@med.uni-goettingen.de [Department of Trauma Surgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University Medicine, 37075 Goettingen (Germany); Walde, Tim Alexander; Frosch, Stephan; Schuettrumpf, Jan P.; Wachowski, Martin M.; Stuermer, Klaus M. [Department of Trauma Surgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University Medicine, 37075 Goettingen (Germany); Frosch, Karl-Heinz [Department of Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, Asklepios Clinic St. Georg, Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: The first aim was to compare medial patellofemoral ligament injury patterns in children and adolescents after first-time lateral patellar dislocations with the injury patterns in adults. The second aim was to evaluate the trochlear groove anatomy at different developmental stages of the growing knee joint. Materials and methods: Knee magnetic resonance (MR) images were collected from 22 patients after first-time patellar dislocations. The patients were aged 14.2 years (a range of 11-15 years). The injury pattern of the medial patellofemoral ligament was analysed, and trochlear dysplasia was evaluated with regard to sulcus angle, trochlear depth and trochlear asymmetry. The control data consisted of MR images from 21 adult patients who were treated for first-time lateral patellar dislocation. Results: After patellar dislocation, injury to the medial patellofemoral ligament was found in 90.2% of the children and in 100% of the adult patients. Injury patterns of the medial patellofemoral ligament were similar between the study group and the control group with regard to injury at the patellar attachment site (Type I), to the midsubstance (Type II) and to injury at the femoral origin (Type III) (all p > 0.05). Combined lesions (Type IV) were significantly less frequently observed in adults when compared to the study group (p = 0.02). The magnitude of trochlear dysplasia was similar in children, adolescents and adults with regard to all three of the measured parameter-values (all p > 0.05). In addition, the articular cartilage had a significant effect on the distal femur geometry in both paediatrics and adults. Conclusion: First, the data from our study indicated that the paediatric medial patellofemoral ligament injury patterns, as seen on MR images, were similar to those in adults. Second, the trochlear groove anatomy and the magnitude of trochlear dysplasia, respectively, did not differ between adults and paediatrics with patellar instability. Thus

  8. The Effectiveness of Injury Prevention Programs to Modify Risk Factors for Non-Contact Anterior Cruciate Ligament and Hamstring Injuries in Uninjured Team Sports Athletes: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monajati, Alireza; Larumbe-Zabala, Eneko; Goss-Sampson, Mark; Naclerio, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Hamstring strain and anterior cruciate ligament injuries are, respectively, the most prevalent and serious non-contact occurring injuries in team sports. Specific biomechanical and neuromuscular variables have been used to estimate the risk of incurring a non-contact injury in athletes. The aim of this study was to systematically review the evidences for the effectiveness of injury prevention protocols to modify biomechanical and neuromuscular anterior cruciate and/or hamstring injuries associated risk factors in uninjured team sport athletes. PubMed, Science Direct, Web of Science, Cochrane Libraries, U.S. National Institutes of Health clinicaltrials.gov, Sport Discuss and Google Scholar databases were searched for relevant journal articles published until March 2015. A manual review of relevant articles, authors, and journals, including bibliographies was performed from identified articles. Nineteen studies were included in this review. Four assessment categories: i) landing, ii) side cutting, iii) stop-jump, and iv) muscle strength outcomes, were used to analyze the effectiveness of the preventive protocols. Eight studies using multifaceted interventions supported by video and/or technical feedback showed improvement in landing and/or stop-jump biomechanics, while no effects were observed on side-cutting maneuver. Additionally, multifaceted programs including hamstring eccentric exercises increased hamstring strength, hamstring to quadriceps functional ratio and/or promoted a shift of optimal knee flexion peak torque toward a more open angle position. Multifaceted programs, supported by proper video and/or technical feedback, including eccentric hamstring exercises would positively modify the biomechanical and or neuromuscular anterior cruciate and/or hamstring injury risk factors.

  9. The Effectiveness of Injury Prevention Programs to Modify Risk Factors for Non-Contact Anterior Cruciate Ligament and Hamstring Injuries in Uninjured Team Sports Athletes: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Monajati

    Full Text Available Hamstring strain and anterior cruciate ligament injuries are, respectively, the most prevalent and serious non-contact occurring injuries in team sports. Specific biomechanical and neuromuscular variables have been used to estimate the risk of incurring a non-contact injury in athletes.The aim of this study was to systematically review the evidences for the effectiveness of injury prevention protocols to modify biomechanical and neuromuscular anterior cruciate and/or hamstring injuries associated risk factors in uninjured team sport athletes.PubMed, Science Direct, Web of Science, Cochrane Libraries, U.S. National Institutes of Health clinicaltrials.gov, Sport Discuss and Google Scholar databases were searched for relevant journal articles published until March 2015. A manual review of relevant articles, authors, and journals, including bibliographies was performed from identified articles.Nineteen studies were included in this review. Four assessment categories: i landing, ii side cutting, iii stop-jump, and iv muscle strength outcomes, were used to analyze the effectiveness of the preventive protocols. Eight studies using multifaceted interventions supported by video and/or technical feedback showed improvement in landing and/or stop-jump biomechanics, while no effects were observed on side-cutting maneuver. Additionally, multifaceted programs including hamstring eccentric exercises increased hamstring strength, hamstring to quadriceps functional ratio and/or promoted a shift of optimal knee flexion peak torque toward a more open angle position.Multifaceted programs, supported by proper video and/or technical feedback, including eccentric hamstring exercises would positively modify the biomechanical and or neuromuscular anterior cruciate and/or hamstring injury risk factors.

  10. Intraneural ganglion in superficial radial nerve mimics de quervain tenosynovitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Justin M; Potter, Michael Q; Sinclair, Micah; Hutchinson, Douglas T

    2014-11-01

    Background Intraneural ganglions in peripheral nerves of the upper extremity are extremely rare and poorly understood. Case Description We report a patient with symptoms consistent with de Quervain tenosynovitis who was found to have an intraneural ganglion in the superficial radial nerve. The ganglion did not communicate with the wrist joint. We removed the intraneural ganglion, and the patient's symptoms resolved. At her 6-month postoperative follow-up, she remained asymptomatic.  There is only one case report of intraneural ganglion in the superficial radial nerve. In that case, the patient had symptoms consistent with nerve irritation, including radiating pain and paresthesias. In contrast to that previous report, the patient in the current case had only localized pain, no paresthesias, and a physical exam consistent with de Quervain tenosynovitis. Clinical Relevance This case demonstrates that an intraneural ganglion cyst can mimic the symptoms of de Quervain tenosynovitis without the more usual presentation of painful paresthesias.

  11. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries in pediatric athletes presenting to sports medicine clinic: a comparison of males and females through growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stracciolini, Andrea; Stein, Cynthia J; Zurakowski, David; Meehan, William P; Myer, Gregory D; Micheli, Lyle J

    2015-03-01

    Limited data exist regarding the effect of the growth process on anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk in male versus female children. The proportion of ACL injuries/sports injuries presenting to clinic will vary by age, sex, and body mass index (BMI). Cross-sectional epidemiologic study. Level 3. The study group consisted of a randomly selected 5% probability sample of all children 5 to 17 years of age presenting to a sports medicine clinic from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2009; 2133 charts were reviewed. Data collected included demographics, height and weight, injury mechanism, diagnosis, treatment, previous injury, and organized sports. A total of 206 ACL tears were analyzed (104 girls, 102 boys). Girls were slightly older than boys (15.1 ± 1.7 vs 14.3 ± 2.1 years; P < 0.01). Male-female comparison of ACL injury/total injury by age revealed that girls had a steeper increase by age than boys. Among 5- to 12-year-olds, boys had a higher ACL injury/total injury ratio than girls (all P < 0.01). Children 13 to 17 years of age showed no significant difference for sex in ACL injury/total injury ratio. As age advanced, the proportion of ACL injuries/total injuries increased for both girls (P < 0.01) and boys (P = 0.04). BMI was independently associated with an ACL injury (P < 0.01). The proportion of ACL injuries/total injuries was similar for boys and girls aged 13 to 17 years. Girls showed a significantly steeper increase in ACL injury proportion versus boys through puberty. This study will increase clinician awareness of ACL injury occurrence in young male and female athletes 5 to 12 years of age. Injury prevention efforts should target young girls before the onset of puberty and before injury occurs.

  12. Incidence of de Quervain's tenosynovitis in a young, active population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Jennifer Moriatis; Sturdivant, Rodney X; Owens, Brett D

    2009-01-01

    De Quervain's tenosynovitis is thought to occur most frequently in women, with presentation of pain and swelling in the first dorsal extensor sheath. The epidemiology of this extensor tendinitis is not well described. We evaluated the incidence and demographic risk factors for de Quervain's tenosynovitis using a large database of military personnel. The Defense Medical Epidemiology Database (DMED) collects International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, and Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) coding information for every patient encounter occurring for United States military personnel. We queried the DMED system by race, gender, military service, rank, and age for the years 1998-2006 using the ICD-9 code 727.04, limiting data to first presentations. Multivariate Poisson regression was used to estimate the rate of de Quervain's tenosynovitis per 1000 person-years, as well as incidence rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals. There were 11,332 cases of de Quervain's tenosynovitis in the population at risk of 12,117,749 person-years. Women had a significantly higher rate of de Quervain's tenosynovitis at 2.8 cases per 1000 person-years, compared to men at 0.6 per 1000 person-years. Age greater than 40 was also a significant risk factor, with this age category showing a rate of 2.0 per 1000 person-years compared to 0.6 per 1000 in personnel under 20 years. There was also a racial difference, with blacks affected at 1.3 per 1000 person-years compared to whites at 0.8. In analysis of a large population, we have described the epidemiology of stenosing tenosynovitis of the first extensor compartment. Risk factors for de Quervain's in our population include female gender, age greater than 40, and black race. Prognostic II.

  13. A Progressive 5-Week Exercise Therapy Program Leads to Significant Improvement in Knee Function Early After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    EITZEN, INGRID; MOKSNES, HÅVARD; SNYDER-MACKLER, LYNN; RISBERG, MAY ARNA

    2011-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Prospective cohort study without a control group. OBJECTIVES Firstly, to present our 5-week progressive exercise therapy program in the early stage after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Secondly, to evaluate changes in knee function after completion of the program for patients with ACL injury in general and also when classified as potential copers or noncopers, and, finally, to examine potential adverse events. BACKGROUND Few studies concerning early-stage ACL rehabilitation protocols exist. Consequently, little is known about the tolerance for, and outcomes from, short-term exercise therapy programs in the early stage after injury. METHODS One-hundred patients were included in a 5-week progressive exercise therapy program, within 3 months after injury. Knee function before and after completion of the program was evaluated from isokinetic quadriceps and hamstrings muscle strength tests, 4 single-leg hop tests, 2 different self-assessment questionnaires, and a global rating of knee function. A 2-way mixed-model analysis of variance was conducted to evaluate changes from pretest to posttest for the limb symmetry index for muscle strength and single-leg hop tests, and the change in scores for the patient-reported questionnaires. In addition, absolute values and the standardized response mean for muscle strength and single-leg hop tests were calculated at pretest and posttest for the injured and uninjured limb. Adverse events during the 5-week period were recorded. RESULTS The progressive 5-week exercise therapy program led to significant improvements (Ptherapy programs are well tolerated and should be incorporated in early-stage ACL rehabilitation, either to improve knee function before ACL reconstruction or as a first step in further nonoperative management. PMID:20710097

  14. High prevalence of knee osteoarthritis, pain, and functional limitations in female soccer players twelve years after anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmander, L S; Ostenberg, A; Englund, M; Roos, H

    2004-10-01

    To determine the prevalence of radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA) as well as knee-related symptoms and functional limitations in female soccer players 12 years after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Female soccer players who sustained an ACL injury 12 years earlier were examined with standardized weight-bearing knee radiography and 2 self-administered patient questionnaires, the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score questionnaire and the Short Form 36-item health survey. Joint space narrowing and osteophytes were graded according to the radiographic atlas of the Osteoarthritis Research Society International. The cutoff value to define radiographic knee OA approximated a Kellgren/Lawrence grade of 2. Of the available cohort of 103 female soccer players, 84 (82%) answered the questionnaires and 67 (65%) consented to undergo knee radiography. The mean age at assessment was 31 years (range 26-40 years) and mean body mass index was 23 kg/m2 (range 18-40 kg/m2). Fifty-five women (82%) had radiographic changes in their index knee, and 34 (51%) fulfilled the criterion for radiographic knee OA. Of the subjects answering the questionnaires, 63 (75%) reported having symptoms affecting their knee-related quality of life, and 28 (42%) were considered to have symptomatic radiographic knee OA. Slightly more than 60% of the players had undergone reconstructive surgery of the ACL. Using multivariate analyses, surgical reconstruction was found to have no significant influence on knee symptoms. A very high prevalence of radiographic knee OA, pain, and functional limitations was observed in young women who sustained an ACL tear during soccer play 12 years earlier. These findings constitute a strong rationale to direct increased efforts toward prevention and better treatment of knee injury. Copyright 2004 American College of Rheumatology

  15. Strain Response of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament to Uniplanar and Multiplanar Loads During Simulated Landings: Implications for Injury Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiapour, Ata M; Demetropoulos, Constantine K; Kiapour, Ali; Quatman, Carmen E; Wordeman, Samuel C; Goel, Vijay K; Hewett, Timothy E

    2016-08-01

    Despite basic characterization of the loading factors that strain the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), the interrelationship(s) and additive nature of these loads that occur during noncontact ACL injuries remain incompletely characterized. In the presence of an impulsive axial compression, simulating vertical ground-reaction force during landing (1) both knee abduction and internal tibial rotation moments would result in increased peak ACL strain, and (2) a combined multiplanar loading condition, including both knee abduction and internal tibial rotation moments, would increase the peak ACL strain to levels greater than those under uniplanar loading modes alone. Controlled laboratory study. A cadaveric model of landing was used to simulate dynamic landings during a jump in 17 cadaveric lower extremities (age, 45 ± 7 years; 9 female and 8 male). Peak ACL strain was measured in situ and characterized under impulsive axial compression and simulated muscle forces (baseline) followed by addition of anterior tibial shear, knee abduction, and internal tibial rotation loads in both uni- and multiplanar modes, simulating a broad range of landing conditions. The associations between knee rotational kinematics and peak ACL strain levels were further investigated to determine the potential noncontact injury mechanism. Externally applied loads, under both uni- and multiplanar conditions, resulted in consistent increases in peak ACL strain compared with the baseline during simulated landings (by up to 3.5-fold; P ≤ .032). Combined multiplanar loading resulted in the greatest increases in peak ACL strain (P anterior tibial shear force, knee abduction, and internal tibial rotation moments significantly increases ACL strain, which could result in ACL failure. These findings support multiplanar knee valgus collapse as one the primary mechanisms of noncontact ACL injuries during landing. Intervention programs that address multiple planes of loading may decrease the risk of ACL

  16. Rotator Cuff Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Many baseball players suffer from shoulder injuries related to the rotator cuff muscles. These injuries may be classified as muscular strain, tendonitis or tenosynovitis, and impingement syndrome. Treatment varies from simple rest to surgery, so it is important to be seen by a physician as soon as possible. In order to prevent these injuries, the…

  17. Balance index score as a predictive factor for lower sports results or anterior cruciate ligament knee injuries in Croatian female athletes--preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrbanić, Tea Schnurrer-Luke; Ravlić-Gulan, Jagoda; Gulan, Gordan; Matovinović, Damir

    2007-03-01

    Female athletes participating in high-risk sports suffer anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) knee injury at a 4- to 6-fold greater rate than do male athletes. ACL injuries result either from contact mechanisms or from certain unexplained non-contact mechanisms occurring during daily professional sports activities. The occurrence of non-contact injuries points to the existence of certain factors intrinsic to the knee that can lead to ACL rupture. When knee joint movement overcomes the static and the dynamic constraint systems, non-contact ACL injury may occur. Certain recent results suggest that balance and neuromuscular control play a central role in knee joint stability, protection and prevention of ACL injuries. The purpose of this study is to evaluate balance neuromuscular skills in healthy Croatian female athletes by measuring their balance index score, as well as to estimate a possible correlation between their balance index score and balance effectiveness. This study is conducted in an effort to reduce the risk of future injuries and thus prevent female athletes from withdrawing from sports prematurely. We analysed fifty-two female athletes in the high-risk sports of handball and volleyball, measuring for their static and dynamic balance index scores, using the Sport KAT 2000 testing system. This method may be used to monitor balance and coordination systems and may help to develop simpler measurements of neuromuscular control, which can be used to estimate risk predictors in athletes who withdraw from sports due to lower sports results or ruptured anterior cruciate ligament and to direct female athletes to more effective, targeted preventive interventions. The tested Croatian female athletes with lower sports results and ACL knee injury incurred after the testing were found to have a higher balance index score compared to healthy athletes. We therefore suggest that a higher balance index score can be used as an effective risk predictor for lower sports results

  18. Biomechanical characteristics of an anterior cruciate ligament injury in javelin throwing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyi Dai

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: The ACL injury in this study occurred during the first 30% of the delivery phase, most likely during the first 25% of the delivery phase. A stiff landing of the left leg with a small knee flexion angle was the primary contributor to this injury. Javelin throwers may have a soft left leg landing with a flexed knee, which may help them prevent ACL injuries without compromising performance.

  19. Alar ligaments: radiological aspects in the diagnosis of patients with whiplash injuries; Stellenwert bildgebender Verfahren in der Diagnostik der Ligg. alaria nach Beschleunigungsverletzung der Halswirbelsaeule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhle, C. [Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Christian-Albrechts-Univ. zu Kiel (Germany); Brossmann, J.; Biederer, J.; Jahnke, Th.; Grimm, J.; Heller, M. [Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Christian-Albrechts-Univ. zu Kiel (Germany)

    2002-04-01

    Post-traumatic changes of the alar ligaments have been proposed to be the cause of chronic pain in patients after whiplash injury of the cervical spine. In addition to an asymmetric dens position, widening of the atlantodental distance to more than 12 mm can be an indirect sign of an alar ligament rupture. CT is recommended for detection of a avulsion fracture of the occipital condyle. Isolated ruptures of the alar ligaments are best visualized on MRI. In patients with chronic impairments after whiplash injuries changes of the alar ligaments on MRI must be differentiated from normal variants in healthy individuals. (orig.) [German] Posttraumatische Veraenderungen der Ligg. alaria werden als ursaechlich fuer chronische Beschwerden bei Patienten mit Beschleunigungsverletzungen der Halswirbelsaeule angesehen. Eine asymmetrische Densposition sowie eine Erweiterung der anterioren atlantoaxialen Distanz auf ueber 12 mm koennen auf konventionellen Roentgenaufnahmen ein indirektes Zeichen fuer das Vorliegen einer Fluegelbandverletzung sein. Die Computertomographie ist die Methode der Wahl zum Nachweis einer kondylaeren Ausrissfraktur des Lig. alare. Isolierte akute Bandverletzungen der Ligg. alaria sind hingegen in der MRT direkt nachweisbar. Bei Patienten mit chronischen Beschwerden nach Beschleunigungsverletzungen der Halswirbelsaeule muessen allerdings morphologische Auffaelligkeiten der Ligg. alaria im MRT von Normvarianten abgegrenzt werden. (orig.)

  20. Influence of the Injury-to-Surgery Interval on the Healing Potential of Human Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Derived Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inokuchi, Takao; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Takayama, Koji; Nakano, Naoki; Zhang, Shurong; Araki, Daisuke; Matsushita, Takehiko; Kuroda, Ryosuke

    2017-05-01

    Vascular CD34+ cells in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tissue have the potential for high proliferation and multilineage differentiation that can accelerate tendon-bone healing. While patient characteristics, such as age, can affect tendon-bone healing, the influence of elapsed time after injury on the healing process is unclear. Cells obtained during the early phase after injury will exhibit a greater tendon-bone healing potential compared with chronic phase counterparts when applied to an immunodeficient rat model of ACL reconstruction. Controlled laboratory study. Adult human ACL-ruptured tissue was harvested from patients undergoing arthroscopic primary ACL reconstruction and classified into 2 groups based on the time elapsed between injury and surgery: (1) early group (≤3 months from injury) and (2) chronic group (>3 months from injury). In addition, 76 ten-week-old female immunodeficient rats underwent ACL reconstruction, followed by intracapsular administration of one of the following: (1) ACL-derived cells from the early group (n = 5), (2) ACL-derived cells from the chronic group (n = 5), or (3) phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) only (n = 5). During the 8 weeks after surgery, histological (weeks 2, 4, 8), immunohistochemical (week 2), radiographic (weeks 0, 2, 4, 8), and biomechanical (week 8) analyses were performed to evaluate tendon-bone healing. In the early group, the histological evaluation showed early healing, induction of endochondral ossification-like integration, and mature bone ingrowth. Micro-computed tomography showed that the tibial bone tunnels at week 4 and week 8 were significantly reduced in the early group compared with those in the chronic group and PBS group ( P potential in the early group was further demonstrated by the enhancement of intrinsic angiogenesis/osteogenesis and human-derived vasculogenesis/osteogenesis. Compared with human ACL-derived cells obtained during the chronic phase, cells obtained during the early phase after

  1. LAMINOPLASTY FUSION FOR CERVICAL SPINAL CORD INJURY WITH OSSIFICATION OF POSTERIOR LONGITUDINAL LIGAMENT: Combination technique for better result (Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. G. B. Mahadewa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: This was a retrospective study of 10 cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI, concomitant with ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL, that were treated by the author at Sanglah General Hospital-Bali during 2013-2014. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of combination technique of laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fusion for canal compression due to OPLL in CSCI. There were 9 male patients of 10, average age was 58,3 years old. American Spinal Cord Injury Association (ASIA scale preoperative was average in C scale and ASIA scale postoperative was in D. Mean JOA score preoperative was 9,5 and mean Japan orthopedic association (JOA score postoperative was 13,3. Improvement after surgery using improvement formula of JOA was achieved by mean of 19,16%. All patients survived and improved neurologically, there was no surgical complication and implant failure in this series. No kyphotic deformity was observed in follow up cervical spine x-ray after 6 months. The author present a combination technique of 10 consecutive patients who underwent laminoplasty fusion for OPLL in CSCI with better result.

  2. Lower extremity mechanics during landing after a volleyball block as a risk factor for anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahradnik, David; Jandacka, Daniel; Uchytil, Jaroslav; Farana, Roman; Hamill, Joseph

    2015-02-01

    To compare lower extremity mechanics and energy absorption during two types of landing after a successful or unsuccessful block in volleyball and assess the risks of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Cohort study. Fourteen elite male volleyball players (aged 24.5 ± 4.6 years; height 1.94 ± 0.06 m; mass 86.6 ± 7.6 kg). Subjects were required to land on force platforms using stick landing or step-back landing (with the right lower extremity stepping back away from the net) techniques after performing a standing block jump movement. Vertical ground reaction force (body weight); knee flexion (degrees); knee moments (Nm/kg); and hip, knee and ankle energy absorption (J/kg). The right lower extremity showed a greater first peak of vertical ground reaction force, a greater valgus moment, lower energy absorption by the knee, and higher energy absorption by the hip and ankle joints during step-back landing. The lower extremity may be exposed to a greater risk of ACL injury when stepping back from the net during the initial impact phase after a step-back landing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Initial therapeutic evaluation of arthroscopic reconstruction of anterior and posterior cruciate ligament injury with anterior tibialis tendon allograft].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Meng, Chunqing; Duan, Deyu; Yang, Shuhua; Ye, Shunan; Shao, Zengwu

    2009-05-01

    To study the operative procedure and effect of arthroscopic reconstruction of both anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) with anterior tibialis tendon allograft. From February 2005 to July 2006, 10 cases of both ACL and PCL rupture were reconstructed with anterior tibialis tendon allograft, including 7 men and 3 women, aging 18-45 years with an average of 30.2 years. The locations were left knee in 6 cases and right knee in 4 cases. All of them had identified trauma history. The disease course was about 1-3 weeks (mean 1.8 weeks). Both ACL and PCL were reconstructed under arthroscope with allograft anterior tibialis tendon of 26-28 cm in length and immobilization with extention position brace was given for 4 weeks after operation. The active flex knee exercise was done from 0-90 degrees at 4 weeks and more than 90 degrees at 6 weeks. All operations were finished successfully, there were no blood vessel and nerve injury. The operative time was 90-110 minutes (mean 100 minutes). The wound healed by first intention and no early complication occurred. Ten cases were followed up for 12 months to 15 months with an average of 13.5 months. Thier gait was normal, knee activity degree was 0-135 degrees. The anterior drawing tests and media and lateral stress tests were negative after operation in 10 cases; and the posterior drawing tests were negative in 8 cases and 2 cases was at grade I. Hydra arthrosis of knee occurred in 2 cases and was cured after remove of fluid and injection of sodium hyaluronate. The Lysholm knee function score was increases from 24.89 +/- 5.39 before operation to 96.00 +/- 4.59 at 12 months after operation, showing significant difference (P anterior tibialis tendon allograft has the advantages of short operation time, less complications and good clinical effects.

  4. Surgical Techniques for the Reconstruction of Medial Collateral Ligament and Posteromedial Corner Injuries of the Knee: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLong, Jeffrey M; Waterman, Brian R

    2015-11-01

    To systematically review reconstruction techniques of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) and associated medial structures of the knee (e.g., posterior oblique ligament). A systematic review of Medline/PubMed Database (1966 to November 2013), reference list scanning and citation searches of included articles, and manual searches of high-impact journals (2000 to July 2013) and conference proceedings (2009 to July 2013) were performed to identify publications describing MCL reconstruction techniques of the knee. Exclusion criteria included (1) MCL primary repair techniques or advancement procedures, (2) lack of clear description of MCL reconstruction technique, (3) animal models, (4) nonrelevant study design, (5) and foreign language articles without available translation. After review of 4,600 references, 25 publications with 359 of 388 patients (92.5%) were isolated for analysis, including 18 single-bundle MCL and 10 double-bundle reconstruction techniques. Only 2 techniques were classified as anatomic reconstructions, and clinical and objective outcomes (n = 28; 100% techniques (n = 114; 52.6% techniques have been used in the treatment of isolated and combined medial knee injuries in the existent literature. Many variations exist among reconstruction techniques and may differ by graft choices, method of fixation, number of bundles, tensioning protocol, and degree of anatomic restoration of medial and posteromedial corner knee restraints. Further studies are required to better ascertain the comparative clinical outcomes with anatomic, non-anatomic, and tendon transfer techniques for medial knee reconstruction. Level IV, systematic review of level IV studies and surgical techniques. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Assessment of the diagnostic value of dual-energy CT and MRI in the detection of iatrogenically induced injuries of anterior cruciate ligament in a porcine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fickert, S.; Niks, M.; Lehmann, L. [University Medical Center Mannheim, Center of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Mannheim (Germany); Dinter, D.J.; Hammer, M.; Weckbach, S.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Jochum, S. [University Medical Center Mannheim, Department of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Mannheim (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the standard of reference for the non-invasive evaluation of ligament injuries of the knee. The development of dual-energy CT (DE-CT) made it possible to differentiate between tissues of different density by two simultaneous CT measurements with different tube voltages. This approach enables DE-CT to discriminate ligament structures without intra-articular contrast media injection. The aims of this study were on the one hand to determine the delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and on the other hand to assess the diagnostic value of DE-CT and MRI in the detection of iatrogenically induced injury of the ACL in a porcine knee joint model. Twenty porcine hind legs, which were placed in a preformed cast in order to achieve a standardized position, were scanned using DE-CT. Thereafter, a 1.5-T MRI using a standard protocol was performed. The imaging procedures were repeated with the same parameters after inducing defined lesions (total or partial incision) on the ACL arthroscopically. After post-processing, two radiologists and two orthopedic surgeons first analyzed the delineation of the ACL and then, using a consensus approach, the iatrogenically induced lesions. The result of the arthrotomy was defined as the standard of reference. The ACL could be visualized both on DE-CT and MRI in 100% of the cases. As for the MRI, the sensitivity and specificity of detecting the cruciate ligament lesion respectively compared with the defined arthrotomy was 66.7% and 78.6% for intact cruciate ligaments, 100% and 75% in the case of a complete lesion, 33.3% and 78.6% for lesions of the anteromedial bundle, and 0% and 100% for lesions of the posterolateral bundle. In comparison, DE-CT demonstrated a sensitivity and specificity of 66.7% and 71.4% in the case of intact cruciate ligaments, 75% and 68.8% in the case of completely discontinued ACLs, 0% and 92.9% in the case of lesions of the anteromedial bundle, and 25% and 87.5% in the

  6. Effect of Fatigue Protocols on Lower Limb Neuromuscular Function and Implications for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Prevention Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber-Westin, Sue D; Noyes, Frank R

    2017-03-01

    Approximately two-thirds of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are sustained during noncontact situations when an athlete is cutting, pivoting, decelerating, or landing from a jump. Some investigators have postulated that fatigue may result in deleterious alterations in lower limb biomechanics during these activities that could increase the risk of noncontact ACL injuries. However, prior studies have noted a wide variation in fatigue protocols, athletic tasks studied, and effects of fatigue on lower limb kinetics and kinematics. First, to determine if fatigue uniformly alters lower limb biomechanics during athletic tasks that are associated with noncontact ACL injuries. Second, to determine if changes should be made in ACL injury prevention training programs to alter the deleterious effects of fatigue on lower limb kinetics and kinematics. Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. A systematic review of the literature using MEDLINE was performed. Key terms were fatigue, neuromuscular, exercise, hop test, and single-legged function tests. Inclusion criteria were original research studies involving healthy participants, use of a fatigue protocol, study of at least 1 lower limb task that involved landing from a hop or jump or cutting, and analysis of at least 1 biomechanical variable. Thirty-seven studies involving 806 athletes (485 female, 321 male; mean age, 22.7 years) met the inclusion criteria. General fatigue protocols were used in 20 investigations, peripheral protocols were used in 17 studies, and 21 different athletic tasks were studied (13 single-legged, 8 double-legged). There was no consistency among investigations regarding the effects of fatigue on hip, knee, or ankle joint angles and moments or surface electromyography muscle activation patterns. The fatigue protocols typically did not produce statistically significant changes in ground-reaction forces. Published fatigue protocols did not uniformly produce alterations in lower limb neuromuscular

  7. The early work-up for isolated ligamentous injury of the cervical spine: does computed tomography scan have a role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Jose J; Aulino, Joseph M; Collier, Bryan; Roman, Christopher; May, Addison K; Miller, Richard S; Guillamondegui, Oscar; Morris, John A

    2005-10-01

    Helical computed tomography (HCT) scan is the preferred modality for diagnosing fractures of the cervical spine in blunt trauma. We hypothesize that HCT can be used as a screening tool for isolated ligamentous injury (LI) in blunt trauma. A prospective, consecutive series study design was used to include patients that could not have their cervical spine cleared clinically. All patients underwent HCT (occiput-T1) and plain radiographs (PR) with five views of the cervical spine. Patients with clinical or radiographic abnormalities without fracture underwent cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Demographic and outcome data were collected. The attending radiologist's interpretation was used for clinical management. Three neuroradiologists in a blinded fashion re-reviewed the studies (HCT, PR, and MRI) of the MRI subgroup. One thousand five hundred seventy-seven patients met the study criteria. Two hundred seventy-eight had 416 cervical spine fractures. PR failed to identify 299 of 416 (72%) cervical spine fractures in 208 of 278 (74.8%) patients. Of the 1,299 (82%) patients who had no fracture, 85 (6.5%) required an MRI. The mean time from admission to MRI was 3 days for the LI subgroup. Of these, 21 of 85 (25%) had LI by MRI. Seven of 21 (33.3%) patients had an abnormal HCT versus 3 of 21 (14.3%) patients who had an abnormal PR. Four of 85 (4.7%) patients had spinal cord injury without radiographic abnormality. One (1.2%) patient required surgical stabilization of LI, as seen on all studies performed (PR, HCT, and MRI). Sensitivities for PR and HCT for LI were 16% and 32%, respectively. Negative predictive values for PR and HCT for LI were 74% and 78%, respectively. Measurements of interrater reliability for MRI, HCT, and PR had kappa values of 0.60, 0.14, and 0.41, respectively. HCT is the most sensitive, specific, and cost-effective modality for screening the cervical spine bony injuries, but it is not an effective modality for screening for cervical LI. MRI

  8. An Alternative Technique to Avoid Injury to the Medial Femoral Condyle When Reaming the Femoral Tunnel During Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Bonner, Kevin F.; Mannino, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    Contemporary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction attempts to replicate the anatomical insertion sites on both the femoral and tibial sides to restore knee stability. Creation of the femoral tunnel by independently reaming through an anteromedial portal may allow surgeons to more reproducibly place the tunnel within the anatomic femoral footprint relative to a transtibial approach. However, inherent to the technique is the risk of iatrogenic injury to the articular cartilage of the media...

  9. Clinical benefit of the FIFA 11 programme for the prevention of hamstring and lateral ankle ligament injuries among amateur soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouni-Garcia, Rauf; Carratala-Munuera, Concepcion; Orozco-Beltran, Domingo; Lopez-Pineda, Adriana; Asensio-Garcia, María Rosario; Gil-Guillen, Vicente F

    2017-06-22

    To analyse the relationship between the implementation of 'the 11' protocol during the regular season in a men's amateur soccer team and the rate of hamstring and lateral ankle ligament (LAL) injuries, and to estimate the clinical benefit of the programme according to the type of injury and the position field. This cohort study was conducted in two different men's amateur soccer teams. During two seasons, the exposed group (43 players) performed 'the 11' protocol twice a week, and the unexposed group (43 players) performed the regular training programme. All players trained three times per week for 1.5 hours per day. Data collection was performed for every 1000 hours of play. 18 hamstring injuries (injury rate (IR) of 2.26 injuries/1000 training+competition hours) and 15 LAL injuries (IR of 1.88 injuries/1000) were registered in the exposed group. In the unexposed group, there were 25 LAL injuries (IR of 3.14 injuries/1000) and 35 hamstring injuries (IR of 4.39 injuries/1000). The number needed to treat to prevent one new case was 3.9 in LAL injuries, 3.31 in biceps femoris injuries and 10.7 in recurrent hamstring injuries. 'The 11' programme reduced the incidence of hamstring and LAL injuries in amateur players. According to the field position, the programme was effective for defenders and midfielders. In accordance with the type of injury, the exposed group had a lower risk of LAL, biceps femoris and hamstring injuries compared with those in the unexposed group. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. The effective of preventive training programme on the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injuries in female soccer players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atakan Çağlayan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to prevent non-contact Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL injuries that occur more frequently because of anatomic, hormonal and muscular differences in female athletes, with a training programme including neuromuscular, proprioceptive and flexilibity training drills and seeing the changes on physical and physiological parameters on female athletes. Material and Methods: Our study consists of 76 female soccer players (Experimental Group (EG: 20, age:17.2±3.38years and Control Group (CG: 56, age:17.5±3.14years whom participated in Turkish Female Soccer 1. League. EG were given a training programme for six weeks, three days a week, nearly 30 minutes. Retrospective questionnaire that enclosed six months was applied to both EG and CG. For the assesment of physical and physological affects of training programme; leg strength, speed, vertical jump, aerobic and anaerobic capacity, balance, flexibility, height, weight and skinfold thickness were measured. Results: As a result of statistical analysises there wasn’t seen any significant difference on the incidence of ACL injury between EG and CG (p>0.05. A significant difference was detected on vertical jump, aerobic-anaerobic power, balance, leg strength and body fat percentage at the level of (p<0.01, speed and flexibility at the level of p<0.05. Conclusion: After six-week recovery training program there was’t not seen any ACL injury until the end of the season. Furthermore, we observed significant differences after evaulation of biomotor properties of female athletes. We suggest that this kind of researchs must be made perennial with the participation of more athletes with multidisipliner workship.

  11. The effectiveness of pre-operative exercise physiotherapy rehabilitation on the outcomes of treatment following anterior cruciate ligament injury: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshewaier, Shady; Yeowell, Gillian; Fatoye, Francis

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of pre-operative exercise physiotherapy rehabilitation on the outcomes of treatment following anterior cruciate ligament injury. The following databases were searched: PubMed, Ovid, The Cochrane Library and Web of Science. Studies published between the inception of the databases and December 2015 were sought using appropriate keywords in various combinations. This search was supplemented with a manual search of the references of selected studies. Studies were assessed for methodological quality using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database scale. A total of 500 studies were identified, of which eight studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in the present review. The average Physiotherapy Evidence Database score for the studies included was 5.8, which reflects an overall moderate methodological quality. The eight studies investigated a total of 451 subjects of which 71% ( n=319) were males. The age of the participants in the eight studies ranged from 15 to 57 years. The duration of the intervention in the studies ranged from 3 to 24 weeks. This review found that pre-operative physiotherapy rehabilitation is effective for improving the outcomes of treatment following anterior cruciate ligament injury, including increasing knee-related function and improving muscle strength. However, whilst there was a significant improvement in quality of life from baseline following intervention, no significant difference in quality of life was found between the control and intervention groups. There is evidence to suggest that pre-operative physiotherapy rehabilitation is beneficial to patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury.

  12. Osteoid osteoma of the radial styloid mimicking de quervain tenosynovitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chloros, George D; Themistocleous, George S; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J; Khaldi, Lubna; Efstathopoulos, Dimitrios G; Soucacos, Panayotis N

    2007-10-01

    A very unusual location of osteoid osteoma arising in the radial styloid is presented, which strongly mimicked de Quervain tenosynovitis, thereby resulting in the patient undergoing an additional unnecessary operation and a substantial delay of more than 2 years in diagnosis.

  13. Shear wave elastography findings of de Quervain tenosynovitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkay, Rustu; Inci, Ercan; Aydeniz, Banu; Vural, Meltem

    2017-10-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the feasibility of using shear wave elastography (SWE) to assess first extensor compartment tendons rigidity and its alterations with tenosynovitis. We performed B-mode ultrasound and SWE to total number of 80 participants. All participants were evaluated clinically to call the diagnosis of de Quervain tenosynovitis or to rule out the diagnosis. We composed 2 groups. Group 1 included 40 healthy volunteers (33 females and 7 male participants with ages ranging from 24 to 60 years, median age was 37.5 years) and group 2 had 40 de Quervain patients (32 females and 8 male patients with ages ranging from 25 to 51 years, median age was 34 years). SWE measurements were repeated 3 times and arithmetic average was used for the final SWE value. The median SWE value of healthy group (group 1) was 72kPa and the de Quervain patient group (group 2) was 29kPa. Two groups demonstrated statistically significant difference (p<0.001). The ROC curve analysis was performed and the SWE value of 40.5kPA was calculated as a cut-off value for the diagnosis of de Quervain tenosynovitis with 95% specificity and 85% sensitivity. SWE modality can provide useful data regarding de Quervain tenosynovitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Tendo-ligamentous pathologies of the wrist joint: Can ultrasonography replace magnetic resonance imaging?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunwarpal Singh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Characterization of tendo-ligamentous pathologies of wrist remains problematic, despite advances in imaging. By using clinical history and imaging appearance, one can determine the diagnosis. USG is used as first imaging modality whereas MRI aids in making a specific diagnosis of few of the lesions. Aims: To investigate the etiological spectrum of tendo-ligamentous pathologies of wrist on USG & MRI with statistical correlation. Patients and methods: 80 patients (male/female = 46/34 with complaint of swelling or pain in wrist were included and underwent USG and MRI of both the wrists. Results: The spectrum included ganglion cysts, vascular malformations, tenosynovitis, tendinopathy, ligament tears and fibrosis. The analysis was done using kappa coefficient and spearman's rho correlation coefficient. The strength of agreement between USG and MRI for the diagnosis of ganglion cysts, vascular malformations, tenosynovitis and tendinopathy was found to be very good. Conclusion: USG provides detailed depiction of superficial structures, is less expensive, and allows dynamic examinations of the wrist. It should be the first choice of investigation for majority of the cystic, tendinous, vascular, and fibrotic pathologies of the wrist. However, less promising results were observed for ligamentous pathologies on USG in our study. Keywords: Tendo-ligamentous pathologies, Ganglion cyst, Tenosynovitis, Ultrasonography, MRI

  15. Is there a correlation between posterior tibial slope and non-contact anterior cruciate ligament injuries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohmann, Erik; Bryant, Adam; Reaburn, Peter; Tetsworth, Kevin

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was (1) to determine differences in posterior tibial slope (PTS) between subjects who underwent ACL reconstruction following a non-contact ACL injury and a matched control uninjured group and (2) to investigate gender differences between ACL-injured subjects and gender-matched controls. A retrospective chart review was conducted of all 316 ACL-deficient patients at a large regional academic teaching hospital. A control group was established searching the database of the same hospital for subjects who underwent knee radiographs for acute knee complaints with no ACL injury. Subjects (n = 272; males n = 199; females n = 73) were included if a non-contact mechanism could be established. Exclusion criteria included previous ipsilateral knee injury and/or knee previous surgery. PTS was measured on a digitalized lateral radiograph using the axis of the posterior tibial cortex as a reference. There was a significant difference (P = 0.008) within the ACL injury group between males and females. There was no significant difference in the PTS angle between those patients with an ACL injury (5.8 ± 3.5 degrees) and the uninjured control group (5.6 ± 3.2 degrees), or between the male ACL injury patients (5.5 ± 3.4) and their control group (5.8 ± 3.1). However, there was a significant difference between the female ACL injury patients (6.7 ± 3.7) and their uninjured control group (5.0 ± 3.4) (P = 0.004). The results of this study suggest that increased posterior tibial slope appears to contribute to non-contact ACL injuries in females, but not in males.

  16. Prevention of non-contact anterior cruciate ligament injuries in soccer players. Part 1: Mechanisms of injury and underlying risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Myer, Gregory D; Silvers, Holly J; Samitier, Gonzalo; Romero, Daniel; Lázaro-Haro, Cristina; Cugat, Ramón

    2009-07-01

    Soccer is the most commonly played sport in the world, with an estimated 265 million active soccer players by 2006. Inherent to this sport is the higher risk of injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) relative to other sports. ACL injury causes the most time lost from competition in soccer which has influenced a strong research focus to determine the risk factors for injury. This research emphasis has afforded a rapid influx of literature defining potential modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors that increase the risk of injury. The purpose of the current review is to sequence the most recent literature that reports potential mechanisms and risk factors for non-contact ACL injury in soccer players. Most ACL tears in soccer players are non-contact in nature. Common playing situations precluding a non-contact ACL injury include: change of direction or cutting maneuvers combined with deceleration, landing from a jump in or near full extension, and pivoting with knee near full extension and a planted foot. The most common non-contact ACL injury mechanism include a deceleration task with high knee internal extension torque (with or without perturbation) combined with dynamic valgus rotation with the body weight shifted over the injured leg and the plantar surface of the foot fixed flat on the playing surface. Potential extrinsic non-contact ACL injury risk factors include: dry weather and surface, and artificial surface instead of natural grass. Commonly purported intrinsic risk factors include: generalized and specific knee joint laxity, small and narrow intercondylar notch width (ratio of notch width to the diameter and cross sectional area of the ACL), pre-ovulatory phase of menstrual cycle in females not using oral contraceptives, decreased relative (to quadriceps) hamstring strength and recruitment, muscular fatigue by altering neuromuscular control, decreased "core" strength and proprioception, low trunk, hip, and knee flexion angles, and high

  17. A longitudinal study on cardiac effects of deconditioning and physical reconditioning using the anterior cruciate ligament injury as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steding-Ehrenborg, Katarina; Hedén, Bo; Herbertsson, Pär; Arheden, Håkan

    2013-11-01

    Studies of cardiovascular deconditioning are primarily carried out after experimental bed rest. No previous study has followed the cardiovascular effects of decreased and resumed physical activity in athletes after acute physical injury and convalescence. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury causes a significantly decreased activity level over a long period, making it an ideal model for studying effects of deconditioning and reconditioning. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate how cardiac dimensions and maximal exercise capacity change after an ACL-injury. Seventeen athletes (5 women) were included. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) was performed within 5 days of the injury (CMR1), before endurance training was resumed (CMR2) and 6 months after the second scan (CMR3). Maximal exercise testing was performed on the same day as CMR2 and 3. The deconditioning phase between CMR1 and CMR2 was 59 ± 28 days. Total heart volume (THV) decreased with -3·1 ± 6·7%, P = 0·056. Between CMR2 and 3 (reconditioning), THV increased significantly (2·5 ± 4·6%, Pdeconditioning (-3·0 ± 5·6% and -4·7 ± 6·6%) and increased during reconditioning (1·7 ± 3·9% and 2·6 ± 6·2%) however not statistically significant. Left ventricular mass (LVM) remained unchanged. VO2 peak (mlmin(-1) kg(-1) ) increased significantly during the reconditioning phase (6·1 ± 5·3%, Pdeconditioning and reconditioning caused by severe knee injury with maintained normal daily living during convalescence was smaller than previously shown in bed rest studies. Total heart volume and VO2 peak were significantly affected by reconditioning whilst LVEDV, RVEDV and LVM remained unchanged over the study period. © 2013 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Modification of Knee Flexion Angle Has Patient-Specific Effects on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Risk Factors During Jump Landing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favre, Julien; Clancy, Caitlin; Dowling, Ariel V; Andriacchi, Thomas P

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries may be decreased through the use of intervention programs that focus on increasing the knee flexion angle during jump landing, which decreases strain on the ACL. To investigate whether intervention training designed to change the knee flexion angle during landing causes secondary changes in other known measures associated with the risk of ACL injuries and to examine the time points when these secondary measures change. Controlled laboratory study. A total of 39 healthy recreational athletes performed a volleyball block jump task in an instrumented gait laboratory. The participants first completed the jumps without any modification to their normal landing technique. They were then given oral instruction to land softly and to increase their knee flexion angle during landing. Lower body kinematics and kinetics were measured before and after the modification using an optoelectronic motion capture system. The knee flexion angle after the modification significantly increased from 11.2° to 15.2° at initial contact and from 67.8° to 100.7° at maximum flexion, and the time between initial contact and maximum flexion increased from 177.4 to 399.4 milliseconds. The flexion modification produced a substantial reduction in vertical ground-reaction force (243.1 to 187.8 %BW) with a concomitant reduction in the maximum flexion moment. Interestingly, the flexion modification only affected the abduction angle and abduction moment for the group of participants that landed in an initial adducted position before the modification and had no significant effect on the group that landed in an abducted position. Increasing the knee flexion angle during jump landing may be an effective intervention to improve knee biomechanical risk factors associated with an ACL injury. However, the fact that the flexion modification only influenced critical risk factors (the abduction angle and abduction moment) in participants who initially

  19. Risk Stratification for Ulnar Collateral Ligament Injury in Major League Baseball Players: A Retrospective Study From 2007 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFroda, Steven F; Kriz, Peter K; Hall, Amber M; Zurakowski, David; Fadale, Paul D

    2016-02-01

    Ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) injury has become increasingly common in Major League Baseball (MLB) players in recent years. There is a significant difference in preinjury fastball velocity between MLB pitchers with tears and matched controls without UCL injury. Pitchers with injuries are throwing harder and getting injured earlier in their MLB careers. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. From 2007 to 2014, a total of 170 documented UCL injuries (156 pitchers, 14 position players) occurred in MLB. Inclusion criteria for this study consisted of any player who tore his UCL in MLB during this time frame. There were 130 regular-season tears (April-September). From this group, 118 players who pitched more than 100 innings prior to tear were matched to subjects with no tear and were compared using a logistic regression analysis. A subgroup of "early tear" players who threw less than 100 career innings (n = 37) was also identified and compared with the larger tear group using a logistic regression analysis. Of the 130 tears that occurred during the regular season, a significantly larger number (62%) occurred in the first 3 months (P = .011). The rate of UCL tears per MLB player (P = .001) was statistically significant. In the group of 118 matched tears, the mean fastball velocity was greater in the tear group (91.7 mph) compared with the control group (91.0 mph; P = .014). Furthermore, relief pitchers made up a greater percentage of the early tear group (<100 innings) compared with the later tear group (P = .011). Sixteen of the 170 UCL tears (9.4%) were recurrent tears, with 5 of 16 experiencing both tear and retear within the past 4 years. There is a statistically significant difference in the mean fastball velocity of pitchers who injure their UCL. Small increases in pitcher fastball velocity are a main contribution to the increased rate of tear in MLB. In addition, there has been an increased incidence of injury in the first 3 months of the season. Finally, early

  20. Performance and Injury Characteristics of Pitchers Entering the Major League Baseball Draft After Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wymore, Lucas; Chin, Paul; Geary, Christopher; Carolan, Gregory; Keefe, Daniel; Hoenecke, Heinz; Fronek, Jan

    2016-12-01

    Ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) reconstruction (UCLR) has been studied and shown to be a successful procedure for returning overhead athletes to sport. Many studies of Major League Baseball (MLB) players have shown high levels of return to play with successful statistical performance. No study has followed professional advancement of drafted pitchers who underwent UCLR as amateurs when compared with drafted pitchers who did not undergo the procedure before selection in the MLB draft. There would be no difference in professional advancement, statistical performance, or injury rate between the UCLR and control groups. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Thirty-eight pitchers with a UCLR as an amateur and 114 controls were identified in the MLB draft between 2006 and 2010. Highest level of professional baseball achieved was collected from all players, as well as statistical performance metrics including velocity, wins, earned run average (ERA), and walks and hits per inning pitched (WHIP). Additional data on future injuries were analyzed for days on the disabled list (DL), risk of being placed on the DL, and DL assignment for elbow injury. Thirteen of 38 UCLR pitchers reached the major league level (34.2%) compared with 29 of 114 (25.4%) control pitchers, which was not statically significant (P = .295). The UCLR and control groups were similar for average velocity, peak velocity, innings pitched, games, games started, innings per game, ERA, WHIP, wins, losses, saves, batters faced, and innings pitched per year, as well as hits, runs, home runs allowed, strikeouts, batters walked, and batters struck per inning. The UCLR group had a significantly increased rate of DL assignment when compared with controls (86.8% vs 64.0%; P = .008); however, days on DL (152.8 vs 135.6; P = .723) and DL assignment for elbow injury (45.5% vs 43.8%; P = .877) were similar. There was no difference in the rate of professional advancement among pitchers drafted by the MLB who had undergone

  1. WITHDRAWN: Different functional treatment strategies for acute lateral ankle ligament injuries in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkhoffs, Gino M M J; Struijs, Peter A A; Marti, Rene K; Assendelft, Willem J J; Blankevoort, Leendert; van Dijk, C N

    2013-03-28

    Acute lateral ankle ligament ruptures are common problems in present health care. Early mobilisation and functional treatment are advocated as a preferable treatment strategy. However, functional treatment comprises a broad spectrum of treatment strategies and as of yet no optimal strategy has been identified. The objective of this review is to assess different functional treatment strategies for acute lateral ankle ligament ruptures in adults. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group specialised register (December 2001), the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (The Cochrane Library, Issue 4, 2001), MEDLINE (1966 to May 2000), EMBASE (1980 to May 2000), CURRENT CONTENTS (1993 to 1999), BIOSIS (to 1999), reference lists of articles, and contacted organisations and researchers in the field. Randomised clinical trials describing skeletally mature individuals with an acute lateral ankle ligament rupture and comparing different functional treatment strategies were evaluated for inclusion. Two reviewers independently assessed the quality of included trials and extracted relevant data on treatment outcome. Where appropriate, results of comparable studies were pooled. Individual and pooled statistics are reported as relative risks (RR) for dichotomous outcome and (weighted) mean differences (WMD) for continuous outcome measures with 95 per cent confidence intervals (95%CI). Heterogeneity between trials was tested using a standard chi-squared test. Nine trials involving 892 participants were included. Lace-up ankle support had significantly better results for persistent swelling at short-term follow up when compared with semi-rigid ankle support (RR 4.19, 95% CI 1.26 to 13.98); elastic bandage (RR 5.48; 95% CI 1.69 to 17.76); and to tape (RR 4.07, 95% CI 1.21 to 13.68). Use of a semi-rigid ankle support resulted in a significantly shorter time to return to work when compared with an elastic bandage (WMD (days) 4.24; 95% CI 2.42 to 6.06); one trial found

  2. A systematic review of the use of platelet-rich plasma in sports medicine as a new treatment for tendon and ligament injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Drew W; Petrera, Massimo; Hendry, Mike; Theodoropoulos, John S

    2011-07-01

    To evaluate, through a systematic review of the current literature, the evidence-based outcomes of the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for the treatment of tendon and ligament injuries. A search of English-language articles was performed in PubMed and EMBASE using keywords "PRP," "platelet plasma," and "platelet concentrate" combined with "tendon" and then "ligament" independently. The search was conducted through September 2010. Search was limited to in vivo studies. Nonhuman studies were excluded. Tissue engineering strategies, which included a combination of PRP with additional cell types (bone marrow), were also excluded. Articles with all levels of evidence were included. Thirteen of 32 retrieved articles respected the inclusion criteria. The authors reviewed and tabulated data according to the year of study and journal, study type and level of evidence, patient demographics, method of PRP preparation, site of application, and outcomes. The selected studies focused on the application of PRP in the treatment of patellar and elbow tendinosis, Achilles tendon injuries, rotator cuff repair, and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Seven studies demonstrated favorable outcomes in tendinopathies in terms of improved pain and functional scores. In 3 studies on the use of PRP in ACL reconstruction, no statistically significant differences were seen with regard to clinical outcomes, tunnel widening, and graft integration. One study examined the systemic effects after the local PRP application for patellar and elbow tendinosis. Presently, PRP use in tendon and ligament injuries has several potential advantages, including faster recovery and, possibly, a reduction in recurrence, with no adverse reactions described. However, only 3 randomized clinical trials have been conducted.

  3. An Osteochondral Lesion of the Distal Tibia and Fibula in Patients With an Osteochondral Lesion of the Talus on MRI: Prevalence, Location, and Concomitant Ligament and Tendon Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Ja Yeon; Lee, Guen Young; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Eugene; Kang, Heung Sik

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and common location of a coexisting osteochondral lesion of the distal tibia and fibula and of associated abnormalities of the ankle ligaments and tendons on MRI in patients with an osteochondral lesion of the talus (OLT). A search of a database of MRI studies performed between July 2003 and January 2014 yielded MRI examinations of 297 feet with OLTs. Two readers reviewed the MRI examinations independently for the presence of an osteochondral lesion of the distal tibia and fibula and for concomitant ligament and tendon injuries. If an osteochondral lesion of the distal tibia and fibula was present, the reviewers also recorded the location (zones 1-10) and stage. Interobserver and intraobserver reliabilities were assessed using kappa statistics. The associations between a coexisting osteochondral lesion of the distal tibia and fibula and an OLT or a concomitant ankle injury were evaluated using the chi-square test. Readers A and B identified 61 (20.5%) and 47 (15.8%) coexisting osteochondral lesions of the distal tibia and fibula, respectively, with good interobserver (κ = 0.73) and excellent intraobserver (κ = 0.97) reliabilities. The most common location of a coexisting osteochondral lesion of the distal tibia and fibula was zone 4 (29.5%) by reader A and zone 2 (21.3%) by reader B. Stage I and stage IIA were common (> 85%). The frequency of osteochondral lesions of the distal tibia and fibula was not significantly different according to the location or stage of OLT. Abnormalities in the tibialis posterior tendon and in the anterior and posterior talofibular, calcaneofibular, and deltoid ligaments were significantly more common in patients with a coexisting osteochondral lesion of the distal tibia and fibula than in those with an isolated OLT (p lesion of the distal tibia and fibula is not rare on MRI in patients with an OLT and is related to a higher frequency of concomitant ankle ligament and tendon

  4. Evaluation of manual test for anterior cruciate ligament injury using a body-mounted sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, R.; Sagawa, K.; Tsukamoto, T.; Ishibashi, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Diagnosis method of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using body-mounted sensor is discussed. A wide variety of diagnosis method such as Pivot Shift Test (PST), Lachman Test and monitoring of jump motion (JT) are applied to examine the injured ACL. These methods, however, depend on the ability and the experience of examiner. The proposed method numerically provides three dimensional translation and rotation of the knee by using a newly developed 3D sensor. The 3D sensor is composed of three accelerometers and three gyroscopes. Measured acceleration of the knee during the examination is converted to the fixed system of coordinate according the acceleration of gravity and 3D rotation of the sensor, and is numerically integrated to derive 3D trajectory and rotation angle around the tibia. The experimental results of JT suggest that unsymmetrical movement of rotation angle of the tibia and sudden movement of estimated 3D trajectory show instability of knee joint. From the results of PST analysis, it is observed that the tibial angular velocity around the flexed position changes 41.6 [deg/s] at the injured side and 21.7 [deg/s] at the intact side. This result suggests the reposition of injured knee from subluxation.

  5. Examining the feasibility of a Microsoft Kinect ™ based game intervention for individuals with anterior cruciate ligament injury risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhiyu Huo; Griffin, Joseph; Babiuch, Ryan; Gray, Aaron; Willis, Bradley; Marjorie, Skubic; Shining Sun

    2015-01-01

    We describe a feasibility study in which the Microsoft Kinect is used for a game-based exercise to strengthen posterior chain muscles which are often weak in those at high risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. In the game, subjects perform a single posterior chain strengthening exercise. The game uses a side-scrolling video display driven by a hip abduction exercise while a player lies down on the floor. Leg lifts beyond a predetermined angle trigger the jumping action of an animated tiger. We describe the scene and game control, which uses depth images from the Kinect. Although Kinect-based skeletal data are used for many games, the skeletal model does not yield good estimates for positions on the floor. Our proposed system uses multiple leg angle estimators for different angle regions to recognize the player lying down and capture the angle between two legs. We conducted an experiment that validates our system with marker-based Vicon ground truth data. We also present results of an end-to-end test using the game, showing feasibility.

  6. Accuracy of simple plain radiographic signs and measures to diagnose acute scapholunate ligament injuries of the wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dornberger, Jenny E. [Unfallkrankenhaus Berlin, Department of Plastic Surgery and Burn Care, Berlin (Germany); Rademacher, Grit; Mutze, Sven [Unfallkrankenhaus Berlin, Institute of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Eisenschenk, Andreas [Unfallkrankenhaus Berlin, Department of Hand-, Replantation- and Microsurgery, Berlin (Germany); University Medicine Greifswald, Department of Hand Surgery and Microsurgery, Greifswald (Germany); Stengel, Dirk [Unfallkrankenhaus Berlin, Centre for Clinical Research, Berlin (Germany); Charite Medical University Centre, Julius Wolff Institute, Centre for Musculoskeletal Surgery, Berlin (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    To determine the accuracy of common radiological indices for diagnosing ruptures of the scapholunate (SL) ligament, the most relevant soft tissue injury of the wrist. This was a prospective diagnostic accuracy study with independent verification of index test findings by a reference standard (wrist arthroscopy). Bilateral digital radiographs in posteroanterior (pa), lateral and Stecher's projection were evaluated by two independent expert readers. Diagnostic accuracy of radiological signs was expressed as sensitivity, specificity, positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values with 95 % confidence intervals (CI). The prevalence of significant acute SL tears (grade ≥ III according to Geissler's classification) was 27/72 (38 %, 95 % CI 26-50 %). The SL distance on Stecher's projection proved the most accurate index to rule the presence of an SL rupture in and out. SL distance on plain pa radiographs, Stecher's projection and the radiolunate angle contributed independently to the final diagnostic model. These three simple indices explained 97 % of the diagnostic variance. In the era of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, plain radiographs remain a highly sensitive and specific primary tool to triage patients with a suspected SL tear to further diagnostic work-up and surgical care. (orig.)

  7. 3-T MRI assessment of osteophyte formation in patients with unilateral anterior cruciate ligament injury and reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panzer, Stephanie [Department of Radiology, Trauma Center Murnau, Murnau (Germany); Augat, Peter [Trauma Center Murnau and Paracelsus Medical University, Institute of Biomechanics, Murnau (Germany); Atzwanger, Joerg; Hergan, Klaus [University Hospital Salzburg, Paracelsus Medical University, Department of Radiology, Salzburg (Austria)

    2012-12-15

    To define the number and distribution of osteophytes (OPs) in bilateral knee MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) of patients with unilateral anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Bilateral knee MRIs of 20 patients with unilateral ACL rupture and reconstruction were retrospectively analyzed for OPs. OPs were graded following the KOSS (knee OA scoring system) classification and their compartmental distribution was assessed following the WORMS (Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score) classification. All examined knees revealed OPs. Knees with ACL rupture showed significant (p < 0.001) higher total numbers of OPs (mean 11.6; SD {+-} 4.4) than knees with intact ACL (mean 5.1; SD {+-} 2.3). Knees with ACL rupture showed increased OP formation in all knee compartments with predominance of marginal OPs in the lateral femorotibial compartment especially on the tibia. Our results show that after knee injury with ACL rupture and reconstruction, all knee compartments were involved in post-traumatic increase of OP formation. The most affected compartment was the lateral femorotibial compartment on the tibial side. (orig.)

  8. Effects of treadmill versus overground soccer match simulations on biomechanical markers of anterior cruciate ligament injury risk in side cutting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azidin, R M Firhad Raja; Sankey, Sean; Drust, Barry; Robinson, Mark A; Vanrenterghem, Jos

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether treadmill versus overground soccer match simulations have similar effects on knee joint mechanics during side cutting. Nineteen male recreational soccer players completed a 45-min treadmill and overground match simulation. Heart rate (HR) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were recorded every 5 min. Prior to exercise (time 0 min), at "half-time" (time 45 min) and 15 min post-exercise (time 60 min), participants performed five trials of 45° side-cutting manoeuvres. Knee abduction moments and knee extension angles were analysed using two-way repeated measures analysis of variance (α = 0.05). Physiological responses were significantly greater during the overground (HR 160 ± 7 beats ∙ min(-1); RPE 15 ± 2) than the treadmill simulation (HR 142 ± 5 beats ∙ min(-1); RPE 12 ± 2). Knee extension angles significantly increased over time and were more extended at time 60 min compared with time 0 min and time 45 min. No significant differences in knee abduction moments were observed. Although knee abduction moments were not altered over time during both simulations, passive rest during half-time induced changes in knee angles that may have implications for anterior cruciate ligament injury risk.

  9. Detecting ICRS grade 1 cartilage lesions in anterior cruciate ligament injury using T1ρ and T2 mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishioka, Hiroaki, E-mail: kinuhnishiok@fc.kuh.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Hirose, Jun, E-mail: hirojun-mk@umin.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kumamoto University Hospital, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Nakamura, Eiichi, E-mail: h@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Okamoto, Nobukazu, E-mail: nobuoka9999@fc.kuh.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Karasugi, Tatsuki, E-mail: tatsukik@fc.kuh.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Taniwaki, Takuya, E-mail: takuyataniwaki@fc.kuh.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Okada, Tatsuya, E-mail: tatsuya-okada@fc.kuh.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Yamashita, Yasuyuki, E-mail: yama@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Mizuta, Hiroshi, E-mail: mizuta@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan)

    2013-09-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to clarify the detectability of the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) grade 1 cartilage lesions in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)–injured knees using T1ρ and T2 mapping. Materials and Methods: We performed preoperative T1ρ and T2 mapping and 3D gradient–echo with water–selective excitation (WATS) sequences on 37 subjects with ACL injuries. We determined the detectability on 3D WATS based on arthroscopic findings. The T1ρ and T2 values (ms) were measured in the regions of interest that were placed on the weight–bearing cartilage of the femoral condyle. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve based on these values was constructed using the arthroscopic findings as a reference standard. The evaluation of cartilage was carried out only in the weight–bearing cartilage. The cut–off values for determining the presence of a cartilage injury were determined using each ROC curve, and the detectability was calculated for the T1ρ and T2 mapping. Results: The cut–off values for the T1ρ and T2 were 41.6 and 41.2, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of T1ρ were 91.2% and 89.5%, respectively, while those of T2 were 76.5% and 81.6%, respectively. For the 3D WATS images, the same values were 58.8% and 78.9%, respectively. Conclusions: Our study demonstrated that the T1ρ and T2 values were significantly higher for ICRS grade 1 cartilage lesions than for normal cartilage and that the two mappings were able to non–invasively detect ICRS grade 1 cartilage lesions in the ACL–injured knee with a higher detectability than were 3D WATS images.

  10. The relationships among sagittal-plane lower extremity moments: implications for landing strategy in anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokochi, Yohei; Yong Lee, Sae; Shultz, Sandra J; Schmitz, Randy J

    2009-01-01

    Excessive quadriceps contraction with insufficient hamstrings muscle cocontraction has been shown to be a possible contributing factor for noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Assessing the relationships among lower extremity internal moments may provide some insight into avoiding muscle contraction patterns that increase ACL injury risk. To examine the relationships of knee-extensor moment with ankle plantar-flexor and hip-extensor moments and to examine the relationship between knee moment and center of pressure as a measure of neuromuscular response to center-of-mass position. Cross-sectional study. Applied Neuromechanics Research Laboratory. Eighteen healthy, recreationally active women (age = 22.3 +/- 2.8 years, height = 162.5 +/- 8.1 cm, mass = 57.8 +/- 9.3 kg). Participants performed a single-leg landing from a 45-cm box onto a force plate. Kinetic and kinematic data were collected. Pearson product moment correlation coefficients were calculated among the net peak knee-extensor moment (KEMpk), sagittal-plane ankle (AM) and hip (HM) net internal moments, and anterior-posterior center of pressure relative to foot center of mass at KEMpk (COP). Lower KEMpk related to both greater AM (r = -0.942, P < .001) and HM (r = -0.657, P = .003). We also found that more anterior displacement of COP was related to greater AM (r = -0.750, P < .001) and lower KEMpk (r = 0.618, P = .006). Our results suggest that participants who lean the whole body forward during landing may produce more plantar-flexor moment and less knee-extensor moment, possibly increasing hip-extensor moment and decreasing knee-extensor moment production. These results suggest that leaning forward may be a technique to decrease quadriceps contraction demand while increasing hamstrings cocontraction demand during a single-leg landing.

  11. Arthrogaphy as a diagnostic measure in injuries of ligament and capsule of the ankle joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollmann, J.; Langenbruch, K.

    1982-06-01

    The application of monocontrast arthrogaphy in examining the ankle joint is demonstrated by means of an extensive series of examinations. It is evident that this method of examination is more reliable than X-ray films of the forced extreme joint position, especially in combined injuries of the ligamentus apparatus, so that it enables better planning of the necessary therapeutic procedure.

  12. Injuries of the scapholunate and lunotriquetral ligaments as well as the TFCC in intra-articular distal radius fractures. Prevalence assessed with MDCT arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klempka, A.; Wagner, M.; Fodor, S.; Schmitt, R. [Cardiovascular Center Bad Neustadt an der Saale, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Bad Neustadt an der Saale (Germany); Prommersberger, K.J. [Clinic for Hand Surgery, Bad Neustadt an der Saale (Germany); Uder, M. [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuernberg (FAU), Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    To evaluate the prevalence of injuries of the scapholunate and lunotriquetral interosseous ligaments (SLIL, LTIL) as well as the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) in intra-articular distal radius fractures (iaDRF). Two hundred and thirty-three patients with acute iaDRF underwent MDCT arthrography. The SLIL and LTIL were described as normal, partially or completely ruptured. Major injuries of the SLIL were defined as completely ruptured dorsal segments, those of the LTIL as completely ruptured palmar segments. The TFCC was judged as normal or injured. Interobserver variability was calculated. Injury findings were correlated with the types of iaDRF (AO classification). In 159 patients (68.2 %), no SLIL injuries were seen. Minor SLIL injuries were detected in 54 patients (23.2 %), major injuries in 20 patients (8.6 %). No correlation was found between the presence of SLIL lesions and the types of iaDRF. Minor LTIL injuries were seen in 23 patients (9.9 %), major injuries in only 5 patients (2.2 %). The TFCC was altered in 141 patients (60.5 %). Interobserver variability was high for MDCT arthrography in assessing SLIL and TFC lesions, and fair for LTIL lesions. In iaDRF, prevalence of major injuries of the most relevant SLIL is about 9 % as evaluated with CT arthrography. (orig.)

  13. THE DIAGNOSTIC ACCURACY OF THE LEVER SIGN FOR DETECTING ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT INJURY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Amanda; Watson, Seth; Dimeff, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    Background An alternative physical examination procedure for evaluating the integrity of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has been proposed in the literature but has not been validated in a broad population of patients with a symptomatic complaint of knee pain for its diagnostic value. Purpose To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of the Lever Sign to detect ACL tears and compare the results to Lachman testing in both supine and prone positions. Study design Prospective, blinded, diagnostic accuracy study. Methods Sixty-two consecutive patients with a complaint of knee pain were independently evaluated for the status of the ACL's integrity with the Lever Sign and the Lachman test in a prone and supine by a blinded examiner before any other diagnostic assessments were completed. Results Twenty-four of the 60 patients included in the analysis had a torn ACL resulting in a prevalence of 40%. The sensitivity of the Lever Sign, prone, and supine Lachman tests were 38, 83, and 67 % respectively and the specificity was 72, 89, and 97% resulting in positive likelihood ratios of 1.4, 7.5, and 24 and negative likelihood ratios of 0.86, 0.19, and 0.34 respectively. The positive predictive values were 47, 83, and 94% and the negative predictive values were 63, 89, and 81% respectively. The diagnostic odds ratios were 1.6, 40, and 70 with a number needed to diagnose of 10.3, 1.4, and 1.6 respectively. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that Lever Sign, in isolation, does not accurately detect the status of the ACL. During the clinical examination, the Lever Sign should be used as an adjunct to the gold standard assessment technique of anterior tibial translation assessment as employed in the Lachman tests in either prone or supine position. Level of Evidence 2 PMID:29234557

  14. The Effect of Socioeconomic Status on the Choice of Treatment for Patients With Cruciate Ligament Injuries in the Knee: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordenvall, Richard; Marcano, Alejandro I; Adami, Johanna; Palme, Mårten; Mattila, Ville M; Bahmanyar, Shahram; Felländer-Tsai, Li

    2017-03-01

    The socioeconomic status (SES) of patients has been widely recognized as playing an important role in many health-related conditions, including orthopaedic conditions, in which a higher SES has been associated with a higher utilization of more advanced medical treatments such as drugs, diagnostics, and surgery. However, the association between SES and cruciate ligament surgery has not been thoroughly investigated. To evaluate the association between SES and choice of treatment in patients with a cruciate ligament injury. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. All Swedish patients with a diagnosed cruciate ligament injury between 1987 and 2010 were identified from the Swedish National Patient Register (N = 98,349). The Longitudinal Integration Database for Health Insurance and Labor Market Studies (LISA) provided information on household income and highest achieved educational level, which were used as socioeconomic indices. The exposure was the SES of patients as determined by the household income and educational level, and the main outcome measure was treatment choice (surgical reconstruction vs nonoperative treatment). Poisson regression models estimated the association. A total of 52,566 patients were included in the study; of these, 20,660 (39%) were treated operatively. Patients in the highest quartile of household income had a significantly higher likelihood of undergoing surgery than those in the lowest quartile (relative risk [RR], 1.16; 95% CI, 1.11-1.20). Patients classified as highly educated had a significantly increased likelihood of being treated operatively compared with those with a low education (RR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.19-1.39). This study provides a population-based validation that having a higher SES as determined by the household income and/or level of education increases the likelihood of undergoing operative treatment after a cruciate ligament injury. All Swedish citizens are entitled by law to the same quality of health care; therefore, unmotivated

  15. Repair of acute ulnar collateral ligament injuries of the thumb metacarpophalangeal joint: a retrospective comparison of pull-out sutures and bone anchor techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katolik, Leonid I; Friedrich, Jeffrey; Trumble, Thomas E

    2008-11-01

    The use of intraosseous suture anchors in the treatment of ruptures of the ulnar collateral ligament of the thumb metacarpophalangeal joint has previously been described. However, no direct comparisons exist of ulnar collateral ligament repair with bone anchor versus repair with a pull-out button and immobilization. Two cohorts of patients with complete rupture of the ulnar collateral ligament of the thumb metacarpophalangeal joint were compared. Thirty patients in each cohort underwent repair of the ulnar collateral ligament with either an intraosseous suture anchor followed by early mobilization or a pull-out suture tied over a button with cast immobilization. Average follow-up was 29 months. At follow-up, range of motion at the metacarpophalangeal and interphalangeal joints for the anchor group averaged 97 percent of that of the contralateral side compared with 86 percent and 87 percent, respectively, for the button group. For the anchor group, pinch strength averaged 101 percent that of the contralateral side compared with 95 percent for the button group. No significant difference was noted between the groups for grip strength. Average tourniquet time for the anchor group was 28 minutes compared with 43 minutes for the button group. Soft-tissue complications were present in 27 percent of patients (eight of 30) in the pull-out button group compared with 7 percent (two of 30) in the anchor group. Cost analysis demonstrates an approximately $140-per-patient savings when using the suture anchor. Both repair methods are safe and effective for treating thumb ulnar collateral ligament injuries. Suture anchors allow for an accelerated rehabilitation protocol, which may account for the improved range of motion and pinch strength at follow-up.

  16. STRATEGY OF VISUAL PROPRIOCEPTIVE CONTROL IN PATIENTS WITH INJURY TO THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT OF THE KNEE AND HEALTHY INDIVIDUALS (SOCCER PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Piontek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Knee joint dysfunction resulting from injury to the anterior crucial ligament (ACL is associated not only with mechanical joint instability but also with damage of ligamentous receptors responsible for the joint proprioception. It was found that disturbances of signals from the damaged joint produce disorders in movement perception and position of the analogous joint in the normal limb. This study is aimed at evaluating the control strategy in patients with an injury to the anterior crucial ligament.Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Subjects/Patients- 84 men, aged 15 to 55 years (mean age 27 years were included in this study. Methods- Patients were divided into two groups: those with unilateral injury to the ACL (33 patients and a control group of healthy volunteers (soccer players; 51 men. Anterior crucial ligament damage was confirmed with arthroscopic knee joint examination in every patient. The way of visual proprioceptive control was assessed with both dynamic (DRT and static (SRT Riva tests standing on one leg. Tests were performed with the Delos Postural Proprioceptive System (Delos s.r.l., Corso Lecce, Torino, Italy in the biomechanical evaluation laboratory at Rehasport Clinic in Poznań. Results: A statistically significant difference for deviations from the averaged axis in SRT (static Riva test with closed eyes was found between the limb with a damaged ACL and the normal limb in the group of patients with injury to the ACL (p=0.006 and between the limb with a damaged ACL and normal limbs in healthy volunteers (p=0.022. A statistically significant difference for deviations from the averaged axis in SRT with closed eyes was also found between the dominant and non-dominant limb in healthy volunteers (p=0.013. No significant differences in the results of tests with open eyes were noted. Conclusions: The results of systems and their contribution to the visual proprioceptive control suggest an important role of the

  17. Blocking landing techniques in volleyball and the possible association with anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahradnik, David; Jandacka, Daniel; Holcapek, Michal; Farana, Roman; Uchytil, Jaroslav; Hamill, Joseph

    2017-06-30

    The number and type of landings performed after blocking during volleyball matches has been related to the potential risk of ACL injury. The aim of the present study was to determine whether gender affects the frequency of specific blocking landing techniques with potential risk of ACL injury from the perspective of foot contact and subsequent movement after the block used by volleyball players during competitive matches. Three matches involving four female volleyball teams (fourteen sets) and three matches involving four male volleyball teams (thirteen sets) in the Czech Republic were analyzed for this study. A Pearson chi-square test of independence was used to detect the relationship between gender and different blocking techniques. The results of the present study showed that gender affected single-leg landings with subsequent movement in lateral direction and double-leg landings. Although the total number of landings was lower for male athletes than for female athletes, a larger portion of male athletes demonstrated single leg landings with a subsequent movement than female athletes. Single leg landings with a subsequent movement have a higher potential risk of ACL injury.

  18. Recycling and Reinforcing Intimomedial Flap of the Infrarenal Aorta Using Anterior Longitudinal Ligament in Patients With Acute Trauma With Bowel Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic, Milan; Radojkovic, Milan; Djordjevic, Predrag; Rancic, Dejan; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Rancic, Zoran

    2017-10-01

    We present a patient with blunt abdominal trauma with severe acute right limb ischemia and clinical signs of diffuse peritonitis. Computed tomography angiography showed circumferential dissection of the infrarenal aorta with occlusion of the right common iliac artery. We opted for simultaneous abdomen exploration and open repair of injured aorta. Critical weakening of the aortic wall with imminent rupture was identified intraoperatively. Aortotomy cranially from bifurcation showed circumferential intimomedial dissection. The fixation of fragile intimomedial flap of aortic dissection was achieved with reinforcement using an anterior longitudinal ligament. The long aortoiliac arteriotomy was repaired using a great saphenous vein patch. Patient had uneventful postoperative course and was discharged after 7 days. In patients with abdominal polytrauma with peritonitis, and no available endovascular tools, open surgery for circumferential aortic dissection is possible and successful. Described reinforcement of the posterior aortic wall to the anterior longitudinal ligament should be added to the armamentarium of aortic injury treatment.

  19. ACL Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is an ACL injury? ACL refers to the anterior cruciate ligament. It is 1 of 4 ligaments in your ... best results. After surgery, you will need intense physical therapy to ... allow the ligament to heal naturally. Living with an ACL injury ...

  20. Diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound for detecting posterior ligamentous complex injuries of the thoracic and lumbar spine: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcalá-Cerra Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Posterior ligamentous complex injuries of the thoracolumbar (TL spine represent a major consideration during surgical decision-making. However, X-ray and computed tomography imaging often does not identify those injuries and sometimes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is not available or is contraindicated. Objective: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of the ultrasound for detecting posterior ligamentous complex injuries in the TL spine. Materials and Methods: A systematic review was carried out through four international databases and proceedings of scientific meetings. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio, diagnostic odds ratio, and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs were estimated, by using weighted averages according to the sample size of each study. Summary receiver operating characteristic was also estimated. Results: A total of four articles were included in the meta-analysis, yielding a summary estimate: Sensitivity, 0.89 (95% CI, 0.86-0.92; specificity, 1.00 (95% CI, 0.98-1.00; positive likelihood ratio, 224.49 (95% CI, 30.43-1656.26; negative likelihood ratio, 0.11 (95% CI, 0.05-0.19; and diagnostic odds ratio, 2,268.13 (95% CI, 265.84-19,351.24. There was no statistically significant heterogeneity among results of included studies. Summary: Receiver operating characteristic (±standard error was 0.928 ± 0.047. Conclusion and Recommendation: The present meta-analysis showed that ultrasound has a high accuracy for diagnosing posterior ligamentous complex injuries in patients with flexion distraction, compression, or burst TL fractures. On the basis of present results, ultrasound may be considered as a useful alternative when magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is unavailable or contraindicated, or when its results are inconclusive.

  1. Hyperparathyroidism-related extensor tenosynovitis at the wrist: a general review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihara, Satoshi; Hidalgo-Diaz, Juan Jose; Prunières, Guillaume; Facca, Sybille; Bodin, Frédéric; Boucher, Stéphanie; Liverneaux, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    Extensor tenosynovitis often occurs accompanying with rheumatoid arthritis, gout, trauma, mycobacterium and dialysis-related amyloidosis. However, there is no recognition of extensor tenosynovitis accompanying with hyperparathyroidism. The purpose of this general review was to describe the clinical condition and to report the results of surgical intervention in the extensor tenosynovitis at the wrist related to hyperparathyroidism. Hyperparathyroidism is thought to be a rare disease in adult. Although renal symptoms are the commonest symptom, musculoskeletal complaints also occur in hyperparathyroidism. From our general review, hyperparathyroidism deserves consideration in the differential diagnosis of extensor tenosynovitis at the wrist.

  2. Mycoplasma Corogypsi–Associated Polyarthritis and Tenosynovitis in Black Vultures (Coragyps atratus)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wettere, A. J. Van; Ley, D. H; Scott, D. E; Buckanoff, H. D; Degernes, L. A

    2013-01-01

    .... Prolonged antibiotic therapy administered in 2 birds did not improve the clinical signs. Necropsy and histological examination demonstrated a chronic lymphoplasmacytic arthritis involving multiple joints and gastrocnemius tenosynovitis...

  3. Simulated activity but real trauma: a systematic review on Nintendo Wii injuries based on a case report of an acute anterior cruciate ligament rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Sebastian A; Vavken, Patrick; Pagenstert, Geert

    2015-03-01

    Video gaming injuries are classically regarded as eccentric accidents and novelty diagnoses. A case of an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear sustained during Wii boxing spurned us to review the literature for other Wii-related injuries and Wii-based posttraumatic rehabilitation. The English literature listed in PubMed was systematically reviewed by searching for "Wii (trauma or injury or fracture)." Full-text articles were included after duplicate, blinded review. The type and treatment of injury as well as the Wii-based rehabilitation programs found were analyzed. Additionally, a new case of an acute ACL tear-sustained playing, Wii boxing, is additionally presented. After exclusion of irrelevant articles, 13 articles describing Wii-related injuries were included reporting on 3 fractures, 6 nonosseous, 2 overuse injuries, and 2 rehabilitation programs using Wii for posttraumatic rehabilitation. Among the presented Wii-related injuries, only 12.5% were treated conservatively, whereas 87.5% underwent either surgical or interventional treatment. Because of the reported case, the literature search was limited to Wii-related injuries excluding other video games. Another limitation of this article lies in the fact that mainly case reports but no controlled trials exist on the topic. Assumingly, primarily the more severe injuries are reported in the literature with an unknown number of possibly minor injuries. Motion-controlled video games, such as Wii, are becoming increasingly popular as a recreational entertainment. Because of their wide acceptance and entertaining nature, they are also increasingly recognized as a tool in rehabilitation. However, although the activity is simulated, injuries are real. Our systematic review shows that Wii gaming can lead to severe injuries, sometimes with lasting limitations.

  4. Synovitis and tenosynovitis in Brazil: analysis of sickness benefit claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Dilma Maria de; Barbosa-Branco, Anadergh

    2015-01-01

    To analyse the personal and occupational factors associated with the prevalence and duration of sickness benefit claims due to synovitis and tenosynovitis (CID10 M65). Cross-sectional study regarding sickness benefit claims due to synovitis and tenosynovitis granted to employees by National Institute of Social Security in Brazil in 2008. Data on economic activity (Economic Activities National Classification - CNAE division, class), sex, age, type and duration of benefits were collected from the Unified Benefit System. The study's population consists of the average monthly employment contracts declared to the National Register of Social Information. In 2008, 35,601 employees were granted sickness benefits due to synovitis and tenosynovitis, with a prevalence of 10.9/10,000 employments. Sickness benefits showed higher prevalence rates (PR) for work-related claims (PR 1,2), mostly made by females (PR 3.3) and by workers older than 39 years (PR 1,4). The CNAE 37-Sewage (55.4) and 60-Broadcasting Activity (47.1) had the highest overall prevalence. However, the 64-Financial service activities, except insurance and pension funding and 6422-Multiple banks with commercial service had the highest rates of work-related claims (RP 3.2 and 3.8, respectively), and the longer duration (70 and 73 days, respectively). Workers older than 39 years had the highest durations of work disability claims. Both the CNAE-division 60-Broadcasting Activity, and the CNAE-class 6010-Radio showed a high activity ratio of females (PR 8.1 and 10.8, respectively). The work disability due to synovitis and tenosynovitis presents prevalence and duration associated with economic activity, sex, age and kind of benefit (non work-related and work-related claims).

  5. The pyramidalis-anterior pubic ligament-adductor longus complex (PLAC) and its role with adductor injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schilders, Ernest; Bharam, Srino; Golan, Elan

    2017-01-01

    crest and anterior pubic ligament and attaches to the linea alba on the medial border. The proximal adductor longus attaches to the pubic crest and anterior pubic ligament. The anterior pubic ligament is also a fascial anchor point connecting the lower anterior abdominal aponeurosis and fascia lata....... The rectus abdominis, however, is not attached to the adductor longus; its lateral tendon attaches to the cranial border of the pubis; and its slender internal tendon attaches inferiorly to the symphysis with fascia lata and gracilis. CONCLUSION: The study demonstrates a strong direct connection between...

  6. Muscle Activity Onset Prior to Landing in Patients after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Theisen

    Full Text Available Muscle activation during landing is paramount to stabilise lower limb joints and avoid abnormal movement patterns. Delayed muscle activity onset measured by electromyography (EMG has been suggested to be associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injury. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to test the hypothesis if ACL-injured patients display different results for muscle onset timing during standard deceleration tasks compared to healthy control participants. PubMed, Embase, Scopus and ScienceDirect databases were systematically searched over the period from January 1980 to February 2015, yielding a total of 1461 citations. Six studies meeting inclusion criteria underwent quality assessment, data extraction and re-computing procedures for the meta-analysis. The quality was rated "moderate" for 2 studies and "poor" for 4. Patients included and procedures used were highly heterogeneous. The tasks investigated were single leg hopping, decelerating from running or walking, tested on a total of 102 ACL-injured participants and 86 controls. EMG analyses of the muscles vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, lateral and medial hamstrings revealed trivial and non-significant standardised mean differences (SMD0.05 between patients and control participants. Furthermore, no differences were found between the contralateral leg of patients and controls for muscle activity onset of the medial and lateral gastrocnemius (SMD0.05. Based on 3 studies, the involved legs of ACL-injured patients showed overall earlier muscle activity onset compared to control participants for the medial gastrocnemius (SMD = 0.5; p = 0.05. Similar results were found for the lateral gastrocnemius (SMD = 2.1; p<0.001, with a greater effect size but based only on a single study. We conclude that there are no differences between leg muscles of ACL-injured patients and healthy controls regarding the muscle activity onset during landing. However, current

  7. Muscle Activity Onset Prior to Landing in Patients after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theisen, Daniel; Rada, Isabel; Brau, Amélie; Gette, Paul; Seil, Romain

    2016-01-01

    Muscle activation during landing is paramount to stabilise lower limb joints and avoid abnormal movement patterns. Delayed muscle activity onset measured by electromyography (EMG) has been suggested to be associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to test the hypothesis if ACL-injured patients display different results for muscle onset timing during standard deceleration tasks compared to healthy control participants. PubMed, Embase, Scopus and ScienceDirect databases were systematically searched over the period from January 1980 to February 2015, yielding a total of 1461 citations. Six studies meeting inclusion criteria underwent quality assessment, data extraction and re-computing procedures for the meta-analysis. The quality was rated "moderate" for 2 studies and "poor" for 4. Patients included and procedures used were highly heterogeneous. The tasks investigated were single leg hopping, decelerating from running or walking, tested on a total of 102 ACL-injured participants and 86 controls. EMG analyses of the muscles vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, lateral and medial hamstrings revealed trivial and non-significant standardised mean differences (SMD0.05) between patients and control participants. Furthermore, no differences were found between the contralateral leg of patients and controls for muscle activity onset of the medial and lateral gastrocnemius (SMD0.05). Based on 3 studies, the involved legs of ACL-injured patients showed overall earlier muscle activity onset compared to control participants for the medial gastrocnemius (SMD = 0.5; p = 0.05). Similar results were found for the lateral gastrocnemius (SMD = 2.1; pmuscles of ACL-injured patients and healthy controls regarding the muscle activity onset during landing. However, current evidence is scarce and weak, which highlights the need for further research in this area.

  8. Anatomy of the ankle ligaments: a pictorial essay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golanó, P.; Vega, J.; de Leeuw, P.A.J.; Malagelada, F.; Manzanares, M.C.; Götzens, V.; van Dijk, C.N.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the anatomy of the ankle ligaments is important for correct diagnosis and treatment. Ankle ligament injury is the most frequent cause of acute ankle pain. Chronic ankle pain often finds its cause in laxity of one of the ankle ligaments. In this pictorial essay, the ligaments around the

  9. Anatomy of the ankle ligaments: a pictorial essay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi; de Leeuw, Peter A. J.; Malagelada, Francesc; Manzanares, M. Cristina; Götzens, Víctor; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the anatomy of the ankle ligaments is important for correct diagnosis and treatment. Ankle ligament injury is the most frequent cause of acute ankle pain. Chronic ankle pain often finds its cause in laxity of one of the ankle ligaments. In this pictorial essay, the ligaments around the

  10. Evidence-based concepts for prevention of knee and ACL injuries. 2017 guidelines of the ligament committee of the German Knee Society (DKG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, Julian; Diermeier, Theresa; Herbst, Elmar; Imhoff, Andreas B; Stoffels, Thomas; Zantop, Thore; Petersen, Wolf; Achtnich, Andrea

    2017-10-05

    Knee injuries and especially anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are frequent in athletes. Therefore, primary and secondary prevention of sports-related lower limb injuries is an ongoing topic of interest. The aim of present study was to establish guidelines for the prevention of knee and ACL injuries on the basis of evidence-based concepts represented in current literature. A comprehensive literature review regarding prevention programs for knee and ACL injuries was conducted. Several modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors for knee injuries in athletes have been reported in literature. Referring to the ACL, specific injury mechanisms have been identified and are well understood. In particular, it has been demonstrated that dynamic valgus is one of the most important modifiable risk factors. Simple tests like the drop jump test have shown their efficacy in screening and detecting athletes at risk. There is only few evidence for the preventive effect on knee and ACL injuries by single exercises. However, in order to prevent or correct endangering movement patterns including dynamic valgus, several complex prevention programs have been developed in the past. These prevention programs are included in standard warm-up exercises and are focusing on muscle strength, balance, and proprioception, as well as running and flexibility. It is reported that these training programs can reduce the incidence of knee injuries by up to 27% and ACL injuries by up to 51%. Screening, identification, and correction of endangering movement patterns like the dynamic valgus are the first crucial steps in order to prevent knee and ACL injuries in athletes. Furthermore, jumping, running and flexibility exercises as well as balance and strength training are proven to reduce the incidence of these injuries and should, therefore, be integrated into the regular warm up program. Appropriate complete prevention programs are freely accessible via the Internet and should be adapted to the

  11. Compliance with neuromuscular training and anterior cruciate ligament injury risk reduction in female athletes: a meta-analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sugimoto, Dai; Myer, Gregory D; Bush, Heather M; Klugman, Maddie F; Medina McKeon, Jennifer M; Hewett, Timothy E

    2012-01-01

    .... We searched PubMed, SPORTDiscus, CINAHL, and MEDLINE for articles published from 1995 to 2010 using the key words anterior cruciate ligament prevention, ACL prevention, knee prevention, prospective...

  12. [Case-control study on measurement of coracoclavicular and acromioclavicular ligament injuries during internal fixation operation for the treatment of fresh acromioclavicular joint dislocation of Tossy type III].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Ting-Jin; Sun, Peng; Zheng, Liang-Guo; Qi, Xiang-Yang

    2014-01-01

    To study measurement methods of acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligament injuries,its therapeutic effects and complications during internal fixation operation for the treatment of fresh acromioclavicular joint dislocations of Tossy type III. From July 2003 to May 2012,127 patients with acromioclavicular joint dislocations of Tossy type III were treated with wire fixation from coracoid process to clavicle or hook-plate fixation. The patients were divided into group A (63 cases) and group B (64 cases) according to whether acromioclavicular ligament and coracoclavicular ligament were repaired or not. In group A (ligaments repaired), there were 39 males and 24 females with an average age of (33.25 +/- 8.46) years old (ranged from 17 to 59 years). And in group B (no ligaments repaired), there were 41 males and 23 females with an average age of (34.10 +/- 7.19) years (ranged from 19 to 57 years). The operation times, intraoperative blood loss, postoperative infections, internal fixation failure, recurrence and other complications, together with therapeutic effects were compared between two groups. The outcome was analyzed according to Karlsson standard. In group A, 54 patients got an excellent result and 9 good according to Karlsson standard;the average operative time was (55.90 +/- 26.56) min; the average intraoperative bleeding amount was (99.80 +/- 50.30) ml; 1 patient had wire broken without re-dislocation at 16 weeks after operation, 3 patients got wound fat liquefaction and recovered after treatment, 1 patient had pain after shoulder joint motion and pain disappeared after implants were taken out. In group B, 52 patients got an excellent result and 12 good according to Karlsson standard; the average operative time was (49.50 +/- 23.14) min; the average intraoperative bleeding amount was (87.30 +/- 46.41) ml; 2 patients got wound fat liquefaction, and 2 patients had pain after shoulder joint motion. All the patients were followed up, and the duration ranged

  13. Three distinct mechanisms predominate in non-contact anterior cruciate ligament injuries in male professional football players: a systematic video analysis of 39 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldén, Markus; Krosshaug, Tron; Bjørneboe, John; Andersen, Thor Einar; Faul, Oliver; Hägglund, Martin

    2015-11-01

    Current knowledge on anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury mechanisms in male football players is limited. To describe ACL injury mechanisms in male professional football players using systematic video analysis. We assessed videos from 39 complete ACL tears recorded via prospective professional football injury surveillance between 2001 and 2011. Five analysts independently reviewed all videos to estimate the time of initial foot contact with the ground and the time of ACL tear. We then analysed all videos according to a structured format describing the injury circumstances and lower limb joint biomechanics. Twenty-five injuries were non-contact, eight indirect contact and six direct contact injuries. We identified three main categories of non-contact and indirect contact injury situations: (1) pressing (n=11), (2) re-gaining balance after kicking (n=5) and (3) landing after heading (n=5). The fourth main injury situation was direct contact with the injured leg or knee (n=6). Knee valgus was frequently seen in the main categories of non-contact and indirect contact playing situations (n=11), but a dynamic valgus collapse was infrequent (n=3). This was in contrast to the tackling-induced direct contact situations where a knee valgus collapse occurred in all cases (n=3). Eighty-five per cent of the ACL injuries in male professional football players resulted from non-contact or indirect contact mechanisms. The most common playing situation leading to injury was pressing followed by kicking and heading. Knee valgus was frequently seen regardless of the playing situation, but a dynamic valgus collapse was rare. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  14. Feedback Techniques to Target Functional Deficits Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Implications for Motor Control and Reduction of Second Injury Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjaminse, Anne; Hewett, Timothy E.; Paterno, Mark V.; Ford, Kevin R.; Otten, Egbert; Myer, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    Primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention training has been shown to reduce the risk of injury. Less is known about the effect of prevention on second injury after ACL reconstruction (ACLR). Given recent findings that second injury rates exceed 20 % in only the first year following the return to sport, it is imperative that rehabilitation after ACLR is scrutinized so that second injury preventative strategies can be optimized. A potential limitation of current rehabilitative processes following ACLR could be a deficiency in the transition from conscious awareness achieved during rehabilitation sessions to unexpected and automatic movements required for athletic activities on the field. Learning strategies with an internally directed focus have traditionally been utilized but may be less suitable for acquisition of control of complex motor skills required for sport reintegration. Conversely, an externally focused rehabilitation strategy may enhance skill acquisition more efficiently and increase the potential to transfer to competitive sport. This article presents new insights gained from the motor learning domain that may improve neuromuscular training programmes via increased retention from improved techniques and may ultimately reduce the incidence of second ACL injuries. PMID:24062274

  15. Feedback techniques to target functional deficits following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: implications for motor control and reduction of second injury risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokeler, Alli; Benjaminse, Anne; Hewett, Timothy E; Paterno, Mark V; Ford, Kevin R; Otten, Egbert; Myer, Gregory D

    2013-11-01

    Primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention training has been shown to reduce the risk of injury. Less is known about the effect of prevention on second injury after ACL reconstruction (ACLR). Given recent findings that second injury rates exceed 20 % in only the first year following the return to sport, it is imperative that rehabilitation after ACLR is scrutinized so that second injury preventative strategies can be optimized. A potential limitation of current rehabilitative processes following ACLR could be a deficiency in the transition from conscious awareness achieved during rehabilitation sessions to unexpected and automatic movements required for athletic activities on the field. Learning strategies with an internally directed focus have traditionally been utilized but may be less suitable for acquisition of control of complex motor skills required for sport reintegration. Conversely, an externally focused rehabilitation strategy may enhance skill acquisition more efficiently and increase the potential to transfer to competitive sport. This article presents new insights gained from the motor learning domain that may improve neuromuscular training programmes via increased retention from improved techniques and may ultimately reduce the incidence of second ACL injuries.

  16. Randomised controlled trial of local corticosteroid injections for de Quervain's tenosynovitis in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters-Veluthamaningal, Cyriac; Winters, Jan C.; Groenier, Klaas H.; Meyboom-deJong, Betty

    2009-01-01

    Background: De Quervain's tenosynovitis is a stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal compartment of the wrist and leads to wrist pain and to impaired function of the wrist and hand. It can be treated by splinting, local corticosteroid injection and operation. In this study effectiveness of local

  17. Quantification of functional brace forces for posterior cruciate ligament injuries on the knee joint: an in vivo investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPrade, Robert F; Smith, Sean D; Wilson, Katharine J; Wijdicks, Coen A

    2015-10-01

    Counteracting posterior translation of the tibia with an anterior force on the posterior proximal tibia has been demonstrated clinically to improve posterior knee laxity following posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury. This study quantified forces applied to the posterior proximal tibia by two knee braces designed for treatment of PCL injuries. The forces applied by two knee braces to the posterior proximal tibia and in vivo three-dimensional knee kinematics of six adult, male, healthy volunteer subjects (mean ± standard deviation: height, 182.5 ± 5.2 cm; body mass, 83.2 ± 9.3 kg; body mass index, 24.9 ± 1.5 kg/m(2); age, 25.8 ± 2.9 years) were measured using a custom pressure mapping technique and traditional surface marker motion capture techniques, while subjects performed three functional activities. The activities included seated unloaded knee flexion, squatting, and stair descent in a new generation dynamic force (DF) PCL brace and a static force (SF) PCL brace. During unloaded flexion at t