WorldWideScience

Sample records for tennessee oversight agreement

  1. Tennessee Oversight Agreement combined annual reports, May 13, 1991--May 12, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Tennessee Oversight Agreement provides independent oversight and monitoring of the Department of Energy's activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation by the State. The agreement obligates the state to provide an annual report to DOE and for public distribution of the results of the DOE Oversight Division's monitoring and analysis activities and its findings of the quality and effectiveness of the Department of Energy's environmental monitoring and surveillance programs. The DOE Oversight Division's first report will discuss the status of the entire oversight agreement for the first two years of its existence. The 1991--1993 combined annual reports include a short history of the Division, a list of the Tennessee Oversight Agreement commitments and a status report on each of DOE Oversight Division's programs. Each Division program includes a descriptive status of its findings and recommendations. These findings and recommendations were also consolidated into a separate segment of the report (Chapter 7). Findings indicate there have been genuine successes in the areas of site access and data availability. More effort, however, is required in both of these areas before the state can verify that DOE and its contractors are meeting its obligations. Ambient surveillance monitoring by DOE is extensive. The DOE Oversight Division reviews this data to assure the state and its citizens that all areas of the environment are adequately protected by DOE operations. There is a noticeable lack of research and development in the technology for environmental remediation and radiological and mixed waste treatment, storage and disposal. The DOE Oversight Division's recommendations for improvement are provided with each of the findings listed in this report

  2. Tennessee Oversight Agreement annual report, May 31, 1994--June 30, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation's DOE Oversight Division (TDEC/DOE-O) is responsible for assuring the citizens of Tennessee that their health, safety and environment on the Oak Ridge Reservation are protected and that appropriate remedial action is taken to provide this protection. TDEC/DOE-O has five program sections that reflect the organizational structure of the TDEC Bureau of Environment Divisions, as well as DOE's Environmental Safety and Health, Waste Management, and Environmental Restoration Programs

  3. Tennessee Oversight Agreement annual report, May 13, 1993 - May 12, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report discusses the activities of the Division of DOE Oversight in the areas of coordination with other State Agencies with regard to environmental restoration, corrective action, and waste management activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation; and the Division's efforts to keep the public informed of those DOE activities that may impact their health and the environment. This report includes the status of the Division's efforts in implementing the Tennessee Oversight Agreement (TOA). Each Program Section provides information concerning the status of its activities. The Administrative Section has been instrumental in achieving access to the ORR without prior notification to DOE and in obtaining documents and environmental, waste management, safety, and health information in a timely manner. The Environmental Restoration Program has provided in-depth document reviews and on-site coordination and monitoring of field activities required under the Federal Facility Agreement. Most notable of the activities are the investigations and planned remediation of the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek and the Watts Bar Reservoir. The Waste Management Program has audited DOE's compliance with air, water, solid, hazardous, and mixed waste storage, treatment, and disposal regulations. Effort was focused on all three DOE Facilities on the ORR. The final portion of this report discusses the Division's findings and recommendations. Most significant of these issues is the Division's request to be an active participant in DOE's prioritization of its TOA commitments. Other issues discussed include long term storage of radioactive waste and the use of environmental restoration funds. A discussion of those findings and recommendations provided in last year's annual report and addressed by DOE are included in this report as well. All documents, logs, files, etc. supporting this report are available for review during routine business hours at the Division's office

  4. Tennessee health studies agreement. Annual report for year 4, January 1 - December 31, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    The Tennessee Department of Health (TDH) has completed the fourth full year of the Oak Ridge Health Studies Agreement grant. This report summarizes the accomplishments and concerns of the State for the period January 1, 1995, to December 31, 1995. The focus of work during the fourth grant year was the actual work on the dose reconstruction. The final work plan for Task 5, Plan to Perform a Systematic Document Search was received in November 1994. Final work plans for Task 1, Investigation of Radioiodine from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing; Task 2, Investigation of Mercury Releases from Lithium Enrichment; Task 3, Investigation of Releases of PCBs from Oak Ridge Facilities; and Task 4, Investigation of Releases of Radionuclides from White Oak Creek to the Clinch River, were received in February 1995. Final work plans for Task 6, Investigation of the Quality of Historical Uranium Effluent Monitoring at Oak Ridge Facilities; and Task 7, Additional Screening of Materials Not Evaluated in the Dose Reconstruction Feasibility Study, were received in April 1995. ChemRisk's 4th Quarterly Report, for October through December 1995, is included in Attachment 1. Attachment 2 contains a study which developed a quality improvement program for data imported to the Tennessee Cancer Reporting System and Birth Defects Verification Program

  5. Congressional Oversight and Related Issues Concerning the Prospective Security Agreement Between the United States and Iraq

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garcia, Michael J; Mason, R. C

    2008-01-01

    .... Pursuant to this Declaration, the parties pledged to "begin as soon as possible, with the aim to achieve, before July 31, 2008, agreements between the two governments with respect to the political...

  6. WTO oversight over bilateral agreements: from a notification to an examination process?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jens Ladefoged

    2014-01-01

    The TTIP will – like other free trade agreements (FTAs) – violate one of the cornerstones of the WTO, i.e. the Most-Favoured-Nation (MFN) principle. However, the multilateral trading system has since 1947 permitted the formation of trading blocks and preferential bilateral trading partnerships...

  7. Federal Facility Agreement Annual Progress Report for Fiscal Year 1999 Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC

    2000-01-01

    Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act and/or the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This plan will be implemented by means of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) incorporating its terms with the United States EPA and TDEC. The majority of projects described in this report are grouped into five watersheds. They are the East Tennessee Technical Park (ETTP) Watershed (formerly the K-25 Site), the Melton Valley (MV) and Bethel Valley (BV) Watersheds at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) and Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) Watersheds at the Y-12 Plant.

  8. Implementation plan for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the Federal Facility Agreement, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    Plans and schedules for meeting the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) commitments for the Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) were initially submitted in ES/ER-17 ampersand D1, Federal Facility Agreement Plans and Schedules for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The information presented in the current document summarizes the progress that has been made to date and provides a comprehensive summary to facilitate understanding of the FFA compliance program for LLLW tank systems and to present the plans and schedules associated with the remediation, through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) process, of LLLW tank systems that have been removed from service. A comprehensive program is under way at ORNL to upgrade the LLLW system as necessary to meet the FFA requirements. The tank systems that are removed from service are being investigated and remediated through the CERCLA process. Waste and risk characterizations have been submitted. Additional data will be submitted to the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (EPA/TDEC) as tanks are taken out of service and as required by the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) process. The plans and schedules for implementing the FFA compliance program that were originally submitted in ES/ER-17 ampersand D 1, Federal Facility Agreement Plans and Schedules for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste tanks Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, are updated in the present document. Chapter I provides general background information and philosophies that lead to the plans and schedules that appear in Chaps. 2 through 5

  9. Implementation Plan for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the Federal Facility Agreement, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This document summarizes the progress that has been made to date in implementing the plans and schedules for meeting the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) commitments for the Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These commitments were initially submitted in ES/ER-17 ampersand Dl, Federal Facility Agreement Plans and Schedules for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Information presented in this document provides a comprehensive summary to facilitate understanding of the FFA compliance program for LLLW tank systems and to present plans and schedules associated with remediation, through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) process, of LLLW tank systems that have been removed from service. ORNL has a comprehensive program underway to upgrade the LLLW system as necessary to meet the FFA requirements. The tank systems that are removed from service are being investigated and remediated through the CERCLA process. Waste and risk characterizations have been submitted. Additional data will be prepared and submitted to EPA/TDEC as tanks are taken out of service and as required by the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) process. The plans and schedules for implementing the FFA compliance program that were submitted in ES/ER-17 ampersand Dl, Federal Facility Agreement Plans and Schedules for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste tanks Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, are updated in this document. Chapter 1 provides general background information and philosophies that lead to the plans and schedules that appear in Chaps. 2 through 5

  10. Implementation plan for liquid low-level radioactive waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the Federal Facility Agreement, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    This document is an annual revision of the plans and schedules for implementing the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) compliance program, originally submitted in ES/ER-17 ampersand D1, Federal Facility Agreement Plans and Schedules for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This document summarizes the progress that has been made to date in implementing the plans and schedules for meeting the FFA commitments for the Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Information presented in this document provides a comprehensive summary to facilitate understanding of the FFA compliance program for LLLW tank systems and to present plans and schedules associated with remediation, through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) process, of LLLW tank systems that have been removed from service. ORNL has a comprehensive program underway to upgrade the LLLW system as necessary to meet the FFA requirements. The tank systems that are removed from service are being investigated and remediated through the CERCLA process. Waste and risk characterizations have been submitted. Additional data will be prepared and submitted to EPA/TDEC as tanks are taken out of service and as required by the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) process. Chapter 1 provides general background information and philosophies that lead to the plans and schedules that appear in Chapters 2 through 5

  11. Federal Facility Agreement plans and schedules for liquid low-level radioactive waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requires a Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for federal facilities placed on the National Priorities List. The Oak Ridge Reservation was placed on that list on December 21, 1989, and the agreement was signed in November 1991 by the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-OR), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The effective date of the FFA was January 1, 1992. Section 9 and Appendix F of the agreement impose design and operating requirements on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW) tank systems and identify several plans, schedules, and assessments that must be submitted to EPA/TDEC for review or approval. The initial issue of this document in March 1992 transmitted to EPA/TDEC those plans and schedules that were required within 60 to 90 days of the FFA effective date. The current revision of this document updates the plans, schedules, and strategy for achieving compliance with the FFA, and it summarizes the progress that has been made over the past year. Chapter 1 describes the history and operation of the ORNL LLLW System, the objectives of the FFA, the organization that has been established to bring the system into compliance, and the plans for achieving compliance. Chapters 2 through 7 of this report contain the updated plans and schedules for meeting FFA requirements. This document will continue to be periodically reassessed and refined to reflect newly developed information and progress

  12. Agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    These columns summarize the different bilateral and multilateral agreements concluded recently between the different OECD countries and concerning the nuclear energy domain: Argentina - Australia: Agreement concerning Co-operation in the Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy (2001). Argentina - Brazil: Joint Declaration regarding the Creation of the Argentinean-Brazilian Agency for Nuclear Energy Applications (2001). Australia - Czech Republic / Australia - Hungary: Agreements on Co-operation in Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy and the Transfer of Nuclear Material (2001). Australia - Indonesia: Arrangement Concerning Co-operation on Nuclear Safeguards and Related Matters (2001). Austria - Switzerland: Agreement on the Early Exchange of Information in the Field of Nuclear Safety and Radiation. Brazil - United States: Extension of the Agreement concerning Research and Development in Nuclear Material Control, Accountancy, Verification, Physical Protection, and Advanced Containment and Surveillance Technologies for International Safeguards Applications (2001). Czech Republic - Republic of Korea: Agreement for Co-operation in the Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy (2001). European Union- Russian Federation: Agreements on Nuclear Safety and Controlled Nuclear Fusion (2001). France - United States: Agreement for Co-operation in Advanced Nuclear Reactor Science and Technology (2001). Japan - United Kingdom: Co-operation Agreement on Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle, Fast Breeder Reactor and Other Related Technologies (2001). Republic OF Korea - United States: Annex IV Joint Project on Cintichem Technology (2000). Morocco - United States: Protocol amending the Co-operation Agreement on the Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy (2001). Multilateral Agreements: Agreement for Information Exchange on Radiological Surveillance in Northern Europe (2001). Status of Conventions in the Field of Nuclear Energy. (author)

  13. Back from the Brink with Something for Everyone - The Final Executed Memorandum of Agreement for Interpretation of the East Tennessee Technology Park and the K-25 Building - 13370

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cusick, Lesley T. [Restoration Services, Inc. (United States)

    2013-07-01

    When the Environmental Management (EM) Program at the Oak Ridge Office of the Department of Energy (DOE) began its major decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) program activities in the mid-1990's, it was understood that the work to demolish the gaseous diffusion process buildings at the K-25 Site, as it was then known, would be challenging. Nothing of that size and breadth had ever been done within the DOE complex and the job brought about a full menu of unique attributes: radiological contamination with enriched materials entrained in certain areas of the system, a facility that was never designed not to operate but had been shut down since 1964, and a loyal following of individuals and organizations who were committed to the physical preservation of at least some portion of the historic Manhattan Project property. DOE was able to solve and resolve the issues related to nuclear materials management, contamination control, and determining the best way to safely and efficiently deconstruct the massive building. However, for a variety of reasons, resolution of the historic preservation questions - what and how much to preserve, how to preserve it, where to preserve it, how to interpret it, how much to spend on preservation, and by and for whom preservation should occur - remained open to debate for over a decade. After a dozen years, countless meetings, phone calls, discussions and other exchanges, and four National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) [1] Memoranda of Agreement (MOA), a final MOA [2] has been executed. The final executed MOA's measures are robust, creative, substantive, and will be effective. They include a multi-story replica of a portion of the K-25 Building, the dedication of the K-25 Building footprint for preservation purposes, an equipment building to house authentic Manhattan Project and Cold War equipment, a virtual museum, an on-site history center, a grant to preserve a historically-significant Manhattan Project-era hotel in

  14. Back from the Brink with Something for Everyone - The Final Executed Memorandum of Agreement for Interpretation of the East Tennessee Technology Park and the K-25 Building - 13370

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cusick, Lesley T.

    2013-01-01

    When the Environmental Management (EM) Program at the Oak Ridge Office of the Department of Energy (DOE) began its major decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) program activities in the mid-1990's, it was understood that the work to demolish the gaseous diffusion process buildings at the K-25 Site, as it was then known, would be challenging. Nothing of that size and breadth had ever been done within the DOE complex and the job brought about a full menu of unique attributes: radiological contamination with enriched materials entrained in certain areas of the system, a facility that was never designed not to operate but had been shut down since 1964, and a loyal following of individuals and organizations who were committed to the physical preservation of at least some portion of the historic Manhattan Project property. DOE was able to solve and resolve the issues related to nuclear materials management, contamination control, and determining the best way to safely and efficiently deconstruct the massive building. However, for a variety of reasons, resolution of the historic preservation questions - what and how much to preserve, how to preserve it, where to preserve it, how to interpret it, how much to spend on preservation, and by and for whom preservation should occur - remained open to debate for over a decade. After a dozen years, countless meetings, phone calls, discussions and other exchanges, and four National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) [1] Memoranda of Agreement (MOA), a final MOA [2] has been executed. The final executed MOA's measures are robust, creative, substantive, and will be effective. They include a multi-story replica of a portion of the K-25 Building, the dedication of the K-25 Building footprint for preservation purposes, an equipment building to house authentic Manhattan Project and Cold War equipment, a virtual museum, an on-site history center, a grant to preserve a historically-significant Manhattan Project-era hotel in Oak Ridge

  15. Design assessment for the Melton Valley Storage Tanks capacity increase at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the Federal Facility Agreement, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    This project was initiated to find ways to increase storage capacity for the liquid low-level waste (LLLW) system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and satisfy the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) requirement for the transfer of LLW from existing tank systems not in full FFA compliance

  16. Oversight and enforcement at DOE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fergus, I.E., Christopher, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    This paper addresses recent changes to the independent oversight and enforcement programs within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and applications to criticality safety. DOE's Office of Oversight (Oversight hereafter), in the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH), independently evaluates whether management systems ensure adequate protection of the worker, public, and environment. Oversight has adopted a new approach to performing evaluations based on the guiding principles for safety management identified by the Secretary of Energy. The principles Oversight evaluates are line management responsibility for safety and health, comprehensive requirements, and competence commensurate with responsibilities. Recently, the DOE codified the implementation of integrated safety management, further expounding on these basic guiding principles and Oversight's role. The Office of Enforcement and Investigations in EH (Enforcement hereafter) is responsible for enforcement, and relevant documents describe its role. This paper briefly discusses criticality safety aspects of the twin initiatives of Oversight and Enforcement

  17. Federal Facility Agreement plans and schedules for liquid low-level radioactive waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    Although the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) addresses the entire Oak Ridge Reservation, specific requirements are set forth for the liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW) storage tanks and their associated piping and equipment, tank systems, at ORNL. The stated objected of the FFA as it relates to these tank systems is to ensure that structural integrity, containment and detection of releases, and source control are maintained pending final remedial action at the site. The FFA requires that leaking LLLW tank systems be immediately removed from service. It also requires the LLLW tank systems that do not meet the design and performance requirements established for secondary containment and leak detection be either upgraded or replaced. The FFA establishes a procedural framework for implementing the environmental laws. For the LLLW tank systems, this framework requires the specified plans and schedules be submitted to EPA and TDEC for approval within 60 days, or in some cases, within 90 days, of the effective date of the agreement

  18. Balanced Integrated Regulatory Oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borchardt, R.W.

    2010-01-01

    Reactor safety, protecting the public health and safety, and protecting the environment must always be the nuclear regulator's top priorities. Enabling the use of nuclear power for the benefit of society, while protecting the public and the environment requires the regulator to balance many factors. In addition, the regulator is only one part of the overall government that must consider many factors as it carries out its societal responsibilities. Some of the factors that must be balanced and the practical impacts on how the regulator carries out its responsibilities will be addressed. The first International Conference on Effective Regulatory Systems, held in Moscow, Russian Federation, in 2006, focused on safety and security challenges with a goal of improving regulatory effectiveness through cooperation and sharing of information and best practices. The challenge of meeting both safety and security objectives is one example of potentially competing programmes that must be balanced. Other balances that must be evaluated include the benefits of safety improvements compared to the cost of implementation, the use of deterministic and probabilistic approaches, communication openness balanced with the protection of information that could be used for detrimental purposes, and timeliness of regulatory decision making balanced with the need to perform quality work in support of oversight responsibilities. A balanced and integrated approach to regulatory oversight is vital to ensuring that the regulatory body remains effective in its mission to enable the use of nuclear power while protecting the public and the environment. This concept is applicable to nations beginning a nuclear programme as well as established and experienced regulatory bodies. (author)

  19. 15 CFR 2008.18 - Information Security Oversight Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Information Security Oversight Committee. 2008.18 Section 2008.18 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Foreign Trade Agreements OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE REGULATIONS TO IMPLEMENT E.O. 12065; OFFICE OF...

  20. [On the implementation by Rospotrebnadzor (Federal service for the oversight of consumer protection and welfare) common principles and rules of technical regulation within the agreement of the Customs Union].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishchenko, G G

    2013-01-01

    In accordance with the Agreement of the Customs Union on sanitary measures between the Government of the Russian Federation, the Republic of Belarus and the Republic of Kazakhstan in the customs territory of the Customs Union the Uniform sanitary and epidemiological and hygienic requirements for goods subject to sanitary-epidemiological control are applied. Common sanitary requirements are binding for executive authorities of the Member States of the Customs union, local authorities, legal persons, whatever legalform, individual entrepreneurs, individuals. Currently, out of 47 planned to take priority technical regulations of the Customs Union 31 regulation, including the safety of railway rolling stock, production of perfumery and cosmetics, toys and products for children and teenagers, food products, grain, and other furniture products was adopted.

  1. Oak Ridge Reservation Federal Facility Agreement quarterly report for the Environmental Restoration Program, Volume 1, October--December 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This quarterly progress report satisfies requirements for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program which are specified in the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) established between the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The reporting period covered is October through December 1992(first quarter of FY 1993). Sections 1.1 and 1.2 provide respectively the milestones scheduled for completion during the reporting period and a list of documents that have been proposed for transmittal during the following quarter but have not been formally approved as FY 1993 commitments. This first section is followed by: significant accomplishments; technical status at Y-12 operable units, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge K-25 site, Clinch River, Oak Ridge Associated Universities, and technical oversight and technical programs; and response action contractor assignments

  2. Developing U.S. oversight strategies for nanobiotechnology: learning from past oversight experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradise, Jordan; Wolf, Susan M; Kuzma, Jennifer; Kuzhabekova, Aliya; Tisdale, Alison W; Kokkoli, Efrosini; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy

    2009-01-01

    The emergence of nanotechnology, and specifically nanobiotechnology, raises major oversight challenges. In the United States, government, industry, and researchers are debating what oversight approaches are most appropriate. Among the federal agencies already embroiled in discussion of oversight approaches are the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Department of Agriculture (USDA), Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and National Institutes of Health (NIH). All can learn from assessment of the successes and failures of past oversight efforts aimed at emerging technologies. This article reports on work funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) aimed at learning the lessons of past oversight efforts. The article offers insights that emerge from comparing five oversight case studies that examine oversight of genetically engineered organisms (GEOs) in the food supply, pharmaceuticals, medical devices, chemicals in the workplace, and gene therapy. Using quantitative and qualitative analysis, the authors present a new way of evaluating oversight.

  3. East Tennessee hydrogen initiative Chattanooga : charting a course for the region's hydrogen transportation infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-30

    This report documents the results of the research project completed by the Center for Energy, Transportation and the Environment (CETE) at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga (UTC) under Federal Transit Administration Cooperative Agreement TN-...

  4. Institutional Oversight of Faculty-Industry Consulting Relationships in U.S. Medical Schools: A Delphi Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morain, Stephanie R; Joffe, Steven; Campbell, Eric G; Mello, Michelle M

    2015-01-01

    The conflicts of interest that may arise in relationships between academic researchers and industry continue to prompt controversy. The bulk of attention has focused on financial aspects of these relationships, but conflicts may also arise in the legal obligations that faculty acquire through consulting contracts. However, oversight of faculty members' consulting agreements is far less vigorous than for financial conflicts, creating the potential for faculty to knowingly or unwittingly contract away important rights and freedoms. Increased regulation could prevent this, but it is unclear what forms of oversight universities view as feasible and effective. In this article, we report on a Delphi study to evaluate several approaches for oversight of consulting agreements by medical schools. The panel was comprised of 11 senior administrators with responsibility for oversight of faculty consulting relationships. We found broad agreement among panelists regarding the importance of institutional oversight to protect universities' interests. There was strong support for two specific approaches: providing educational resources to faculty and submitting consulting agreements for institutional review. Notwithstanding the complexities of asserting authority to regulate private consulting agreements between faculty members and companies, medical school administrators reached consensus that several approaches to improving institutional oversight are feasible and useful. © 2015 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  5. Tennessee Comptroller of the Treasury (TN COMP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Tennessee Comptroller of the Treasury (TN COMP) uses SSA's assistance in administering the Tennessee Property Tax Rebate Program. SSA provides assistance through...

  6. Oversight Institutions Within the United Nations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Caroline Aggestam

    2015-01-01

    This article will give a description of the role of internal audit and governance functions within the United Nations system. The United Nations has, during the last 10 years, worked to establish effective oversight services. Oversight, governance and hereunder the internal audit function has been...

  7. 5 CFR 330.611 - Oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Oversight. 330.611 Section 330.611 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS RECRUITMENT, SELECTION, AND... Employees § 330.611 Oversight. OPM provides advice and assistance to agencies in implementing their Career...

  8. 13 CFR 120.1005 - Bureau of PCLP Oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bureau of PCLP Oversight. 120.1005 Section 120.1005 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Risk-Based Lender Oversight Supervision § 120.1005 Bureau of PCLP Oversight. SBA's Bureau of PCLP Oversight within...

  9. Controls Over Project Management Oversight Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-08

    This is the final report on Federal Transit Administration's (FTA) controls over its Project Management Oversight (PMO) Program. This report reflects Office of Inspector General's (OIG) consideration of information provided in FTA's May 29, 1997, rep...

  10. Regulatory Facility Guide for Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, S.S.; Bock, R.E.; Francis, M.W.; Gove, R.M.; Johnson, P.E.; Kovac, F.M.; Mynatt, J.O. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Rymer, A.C. [Transportation Consulting Services, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1994-02-28

    This guide provides detailed compilations of international, federal, and state transportation related regulations applicable to shipments originating at or destined to Tennessee facilities. Information on preferred routes is also given.

  11. Antinuclear movement in Middle Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwyer, L.E.

    1977-01-01

    This is a social anthropological analysis of the antinuclear movement in Middle Tennessee. This social movement was determined to halt the construction of proposed nuclear power plants in Tennessee, especially one the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) intended to build in Middle Tennessee. The data for the study were gathered by participant-observation interviewing, and the examination of documents from February 1973 through March 1975. The treatment of the data is based on transactional analysis and portions of the network model. This social movement was composed of a series of informally organized cells connected by a loose network of people who visited and talked with one another. Individual cells tended to be organized on a geographical basis, as was communication. Activity-initiators, however, often contacted antinuclear personnel in other Middle Tennessee cells. Movement activity for many of the antinuclear activists was short-lived. The strategic maneuvers of the movement utilized all the structurally and legally possible alternatives and the nuclear opponents hoped that the public would pressure public officials to oppose nuclear plants. Although the antinuclear activists worked very hard, they did not succeed in halting the planned construction of the Middle Tennessee nuclear plant. Indeed, they had not succeeded in the summer of 1977

  12. Nuclear Oversight Function at Krsko NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozin, B.; Kavsek, D.

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear oversight function is used at the Krsko NPP constructively to strengthen safety and improve performance. Nuclear safety is kept under constant examination through a variety of monitoring techniques and activities, some of which provide an independent review. The nuclear oversight function at the Krsko NPP is accomplished by Quality and Nuclear Oversight Division (SKV). SKV has completed its mission through a combination of compliance, performance and effectiveness-based assessments. The performance-based assessment is an assessment using various techniques (observations, interviews, walk-downs, document reviews) to assure compliance with standards and regulations, obtain insight into performance, performance trends and also to identify opportunities to improve effectiveness of implementation. Generally, the performance-based approach to oversight function is based on some essential elements. The most important one which is developed and implemented is an oversight program (procedure). The program focuses on techniques, activities and objectives commensurate with their significance to plant operational safety. These techniques and activities are: self-assessments, assessments, audits, performance indicators, monitoring of corrective action program (CAP), industry independent reviews (such as IAEA's OSART and WANO Peer Review), industry benchmarking etc. Graded approach is an inherent product of a performance based program and ranking process. It is important not only to focus on the highest ranked performance based attributes but to lead to effective utilization of an oversight program. The attributes selected for oversight need to be based on plant specific experience, current industry operating experience, supplier's performance and quality issues. Collaboration within the industry and effective utility oversight of processes and design activities are essential for achieving good plant performance. So the oversight program must integrate relevant

  13. Designing Oversight for Nanomedicine Research in Human Subjects: Systematic Analysis of Exceptional Oversight for Emerging Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Susan M.; Jones, Cortney

    2012-01-01

    The basic procedures and rules for oversight of U.S. human subjects research have been in place since 1981. Certain types of human subjects research, however, have provoked creation of additional mechanisms and rules beyond the Department of Health & Human Services (DHHS) Common Rule and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) equivalent. Now another emerging domain of human subjects research—nanomedicine—is prompting calls for extra oversight. However, in 30 years of overseeing research on human beings, we have yet to specify what makes a domain of scientific research warrant extra oversight. This failure to systematically evaluate the need for extra measures, the type of extra measures appropriate for different challenges, and the usefulness of those measures hampers efforts to respond appropriately to emerging science such as nanomedicine. This article evaluates the history of extra oversight, extracting lessons for oversight of nanomedicine research in human beings. We argue that a confluence of factors supports the need for extra oversight, including heightened uncertainty regarding risks, fast-evolving science yielding complex and increasingly active materials, likelihood of research on vulnerable participants including cancer patients, and potential risks to others beyond the research participant. We suggest the essential elements of the extra oversight needed. PMID:23226969

  14. Designing oversight for nanomedicine research in human subjects: systematic analysis of exceptional oversight for emerging technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Susan M.; Jones, Cortney M.

    2011-04-01

    The basic procedures and rules for oversight of U.S. human subjects research have been in place since 1981. Certain types of human subjects research, however, have provoked creation of additional mechanisms and rules beyond the Department of Health & Human Services (DHHS) Common Rule and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) equivalent. Now another emerging domain of human subjects research—nanomedicine—is prompting calls for extra oversight. However, in 30 years of overseeing research on human beings, we have yet to specify what makes a domain of scientific research warrant extra oversight. This failure to systematically evaluate the need for extra measures, the type of extra measures appropriate for different challenges, and the usefulness of those measures hampers efforts to respond appropriately to emerging science such as nanomedicine. This article evaluates the history of extra oversight, extracting lessons for oversight of nanomedicine research in human beings. We argue that a confluence of factors supports the need for extra oversight, including heightened uncertainty regarding risks, fast-evolving science yielding complex and increasingly active materials, likelihood of research on vulnerable participants including cancer patients, and potential risks to others beyond the research participant. We suggest the essential elements of the extra oversight needed.

  15. Designing oversight for nanomedicine research in human subjects: systematic analysis of exceptional oversight for emerging technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, Susan M.; Jones, Cortney M.

    2011-01-01

    The basic procedures and rules for oversight of U.S. human subjects research have been in place since 1981. Certain types of human subjects research, however, have provoked creation of additional mechanisms and rules beyond the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Common Rule and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) equivalent. Now another emerging domain of human subjects research—nanomedicine—is prompting calls for extra oversight. However, in 30 years of overseeing research on human beings, we have yet to specify what makes a domain of scientific research warrant extra oversight. This failure to systematically evaluate the need for extra measures, the type of extra measures appropriate for different challenges, and the usefulness of those measures hampers efforts to respond appropriately to emerging science such as nanomedicine. This article evaluates the history of extra oversight, extracting lessons for oversight of nanomedicine research in human beings. We argue that a confluence of factors supports the need for extra oversight, including heightened uncertainty regarding risks, fast-evolving science yielding complex and increasingly active materials, likelihood of research on vulnerable participants including cancer patients, and potential risks to others beyond the research participant. We suggest the essential elements of the extra oversight needed.

  16. State Education Finance and Governance Profile: Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Mike

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the state education finance and governance profile of Tennessee. The 17th largest state, Tennessee is home to 2.01% of the nation's inhabitants. Funding of K-12 education in Tennessee is accomplished via a formula known as the Basic Educational Program (BEP). This plan primarily utilizes school district enrollment numbers to…

  17. Tennessee Promise: A Response to Organizational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlepage, Ben; Clark, Teresa; Wilson, Randal; Stout, Logan

    2018-01-01

    Community colleges in Tennessee, either directly or indirectly, experienced unprecedented change as a result of Tennessee Promise. The present study explored how student support service administrators at three community colleges responded to organizational change as a result of the Tennessee Promise legislation. Investigators selected community…

  18. Fourth Tennessee water resources symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sale, M.J.; Presley, P.M.

    1991-01-01

    The annual Tennessee Water Resources Symposium was initiated in 1988 as a means to bring together people with common interests in the state's important water-related resources at a technical, professional level. Initially the symposium was sponsored by the American Institute of Hydrology and called the Hydrology Symposium, but the Tennessee Section of the American Water Resources Association (AWRA) has taken on the primary coordination role for the symposium over the last two years and the symposium name was changed in 1990 to water resources to emphasize a more inter-disciplinary theme. This year's symposium carries on the successful tradition of the last three years. Our goal is to promote communication and cooperation among Tennessee's water resources professionals: scientists, engineers, and researchers from federal, state, academic, and private institutions and organizations who have interests and responsibilities for the state's water resources. For these conference proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base

  19. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility Waste Lot Profile 155.5 for K-1015-A Laundry Pit, East Tennessee Technology Park Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Jacobs, Raymer J.E.

    2008-06-12

    In 1989, the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), which includes the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), was placed on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) National Priorities List. The Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) (DOE 1992), effective January 1, 1992, now governs environmental restoration activities conducted under CERCLA at the ORR. Following signing of the FFA, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the state of Tennessee signed the Oak Ridge Accelerated Cleanup Plan Agreement on June 18, 2003. The purpose of this agreement is to define a streamlined decision-making process to facilitate the accelerated implementation of cleanup, to resolve ORR milestone issues, and to establish future actions necessary to complete the accelerated cleanup plan by the end of fiscal year 2008. While the FFA continues to serve as the overall regulatory framework for remediation, the Accelerated Cleanup Plan Agreement supplements existing requirements to streamline the decision-making process. The disposal of the K-1015 Laundry Pit waste will be executed in accordance with the 'Record of Decision for Soil, Buried Waste, and Subsurface Structure Actions in Zone, 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee' (DOB/ORAH-2161&D2) and the 'Waste Handling Plan for the Consolidated Soil and Waste Sites with Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee' (DOE/OR/01-2328&D1). This waste lot consists of a total of approximately 50 cubic yards of waste that will be disposed at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) as non-containerized waste. This material will be sent to the EMWMF in dump trucks. This profile is for the K-1015-A Laundry Pit and includes debris (e.g., concrete, metal rebar, pipe), incidental soil, plastic and wood, and secondary waste (such as plastic sheeting, hay bales and other erosion control materials, wooden

  20. 12 CFR 985.4 - Finance Board oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Finance Board oversight. 985.4 Section 985.4 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD OFFICE OF FINANCE THE OFFICE OF FINANCE § 985.4 Finance Board oversight. (a) Oversight and enforcement actions. The Finance Board shall have the same regulatory...

  1. 32 CFR 2700.51 - Information Security Oversight Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Information Security Oversight Committee. 2700... MICRONESIAN STATUS NEGOTIATIONS SECURITY INFORMATION REGULATIONS Implementation and Review § 2700.51 Information Security Oversight Committee. The OMSN Information Security Oversight Committee shall be chaired...

  2. 32 CFR 2103.51 - Information Security Oversight Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Information Security Oversight Committee. 2103... BE DECLASSIFIED Implementation and Review § 2103.51 Information Security Oversight Committee. The NCS Information Security Oversight Committee shall be chaired by the Staff Counsel of the National Security...

  3. 76 FR 71081 - Public Aircraft Oversight Safety Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD Public Aircraft Oversight Safety Forum The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) will convene a Public Aircraft Oversight Safety Forum which will begin at 9 a... ``Public Aircraft Oversight Forum: Ensuring Safety for Critical Missions'', are to (1) raise awareness of...

  4. 13 CFR 120.1070 - Lender oversight fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lender oversight fees. 120.1070 Section 120.1070 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Risk-Based Lender Oversight Supervision § 120.1070 Lender oversight fees. Lenders are required to pay to SBA fees to...

  5. 13 CFR 120.1000 - Risk-Based Lender Oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Risk-Based Lender Oversight. 120.1000 Section 120.1000 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Risk-Based Lender Oversight Supervision § 120.1000 Risk-Based Lender Oversight. (a) Risk-Based Lender...

  6. 21st Century jobs initiative - Tennessee`s Resource Valley. Progress report 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-20

    Tennessee`s Resource Valley, a regional economic development organization, was asked to facilitate a two-year, $750,000 grant from the Department of Energy. The grant`s purpose is to make the East Tennessee region less dependent on federal funds for its economic well-being and to increase regional awareness of the advantages of proximity to the Department of Energy facilities in Oak Ridge. Tennessee`s Resource Valley`s mission is to market the mid-East Tennessee region`s business location advantages to corporate decision makers and to facilitate regional initiatives that impact the creation of quality job opportunities. Tennessee`s Resource Valley represents the following fifteen (15) counties in East Tennessee: Anderson, Blount, Campbell, Claiborne, Cocke, Grainger, Jefferson, Knox, Loudon, Monroe, Morgan, Scott, Sevier, and Union.

  7. 21st Century jobs initiative - Tennessee`s Resource Valley. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-23

    Tennessee`s Resource Valley, a regional economic development organization, was asked to facilitate a two-year, $750,000 grant from the Department of Energy. The grant`s purpose was to make the East Tennessee region less dependent on federal funds for its economic well-being and to increase regional awareness of the advantages of proximity to the Department of Energy facilities in Oak Ridge. The mission of Tennessee`s Resource Valley is to market the business location advantages of mid-East Tennessee to corporate decision makers and to facilitate regional initiatives that impact the creation of quality job opportunities. Tennessee`s Resource Valley represents fifteen (15) counties in East Tennessee: Anderson, Blount, Campbell, Claiborne, Cocke, Grainger, Jefferson, Knox, Loudon, Monroe, Morgan, Roane, Scott, Sevier and Union.

  8. Recommendations for oversight of nanobiotechnology: dynamic oversight for complex and convergent technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; Wolf, Susan M.; Paradise, Jordan; Kuzma, Jennifer; Hall, Ralph; Kokkoli, Efrosini; Fatehi, Leili

    2011-01-01

    Federal oversight of nanobiotechnology in the U.S. has been fragmented and incremental. The prevailing approach has been to use existing laws and other administrative mechanisms for oversight. However, this “stay-the-course” approach will be inadequate for such a complex and convergent technology and may indeed undermine its promise. The technology demands a new, more dynamic approach to oversight. The authors are proposing a new oversight framework with three essential features: (a) the oversight trajectory needs to be able to move dynamically between “soft” and “hard” approaches as information and nano-products evolve; (b) it needs to integrate inputs from all stakeholders, with strong public engagement in decision-making to assure adequate analysis and transparency; and (c) it should include an overarching coordinating entity to assure strong inter-agency coordination and communication that can meet the challenge posed by the convergent nature of nanobiotechnology. The proposed framework arises from a detailed case analysis of several key oversight regimes relevant to nanobiotechnology and is informed by inputs from experts in academia, industry, NGOs, and government.

  9. Residential Energy Efficiency Potential: Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Eric J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-02

    Energy used by Tennessee single-family homes that can be saved through cost-effective improvements. Prepared by Eric Wilson and Noel Merket, NREL, and Erin Boyd, U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis.

  10. Routine environmental audit of the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    This report documents the results of the routine environmental audit of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (Y-12 Plant), Anderson County, Tennessee. During this audit, the activities conducted by the audit team included reviews of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), State of Tennessee regulatory, and contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted August 22-September 2, 1994, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). DOE 5482.1 B, {open_quotes}Environment, Safety, and Health Appraisal Program,{close_quotes} establishes the mission of EH-24 to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of DOE environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and minimization of risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission by conducting systematic and periodic evaluations of DOE`s environmental programs within line organizations, and by using supplemental activities that strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations. The audit evaluated the status of programs to ensure compliance with Federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE Orders, guidance, and directives; and conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance. The audit also evaluated the status and adequacy of the management systems developed to address environmental requirements.

  11. Routine environmental audit of the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This report documents the results of the routine environmental audit of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (Y-12 Plant), Anderson County, Tennessee. During this audit, the activities conducted by the audit team included reviews of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), State of Tennessee regulatory, and contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted August 22-September 2, 1994, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). DOE 5482.1 B, open-quotes Environment, Safety, and Health Appraisal Program,close quotes establishes the mission of EH-24 to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of DOE environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and minimization of risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission by conducting systematic and periodic evaluations of DOE's environmental programs within line organizations, and by using supplemental activities that strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations. The audit evaluated the status of programs to ensure compliance with Federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE Orders, guidance, and directives; and conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance. The audit also evaluated the status and adequacy of the management systems developed to address environmental requirements

  12. Regulatory Oversight Program, July 1, 1993 - March 3, 1997. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    On July 1, 1993, a Regulatory Oversight (RO) organization was established within the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) to provide regulatory oversight of the DOE uranium enrichment facilities leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The purpose of the RO program was to ensure continued plant safety, safeguards and security while the Paducah and Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) transitioned to regulatory oversight by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). These activities were performed under the authority of the lease agreement between DOE and USEC until NRC issued a Certificate of Compliance or approved a Compliance Plan pursuant to Section 1701 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, and assumed regulatory responsibility. This report chronicles the formal development, operation and key activities of the RO organization from its beginning in July 1993, until the turnover of the regulatory oversight responsibility to the NRC on March 3, 1997. Through its evolution to closure, the RO program was a formal, proceduralized effort designed to provide consistent regulation and to facilitate transition to NRC. The RO Program was also a first-of-a-kind program for DOE. The process, experience, and lessons learned summarized herein should be useful as a model for transition of other DOE facilities to privatization or external regulation

  13. Regulatory Oversight Program, July 1, 1993--March 3, 1997. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    On July 1, 1993, a Regulatory Oversight (RO) organization was established within the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) to provide regulatory oversight of the DOE uranium enrichment facilities leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The purpose of the RO program was to ensure continued plant safety, safeguards and security while the Paducah and Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) transitioned to regulatory oversight by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). These activities were performed under the authority of the lease agreement between DOE and USEC until NRC issued a Certificate of Compliance or approved a Compliance Plan pursuant to Section 1701 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, and assumed regulatory responsibility. This report chronicles the formal development, operation and key activities of the RO organization from its beginning in July 1993, until the turnover of the regulatory oversight responsibility to the NRC on March 3, 1997. Through its evolution to closure, the RO program was a formal, proceduralized effort designed to provide consistent regulation and to facilitate transition to NRC. The RO Program was also a first-of-a-kind program for DOE. The process, experience, and lessons learned summarized herein should be useful as a model for transition of other DOE facilities to privatization or external regulation.

  14. Corporate social responsibility for nanotechnology oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzma, Jennifer; Kuzhabekova, Aliya

    2011-11-01

    Growing public concern and uncertainties surrounding emerging technologies suggest the need for socially-responsible behavior of companies in the development and implementation of oversight systems for them. In this paper, we argue that corporate social responsibility (CSR) is an important aspect of nanotechnology oversight given the role of trust in shaping public attitudes about nanotechnology and the lack of data about the health and environmental risks of nanoproducts. We argue that CSR is strengthened by the adoption of stakeholder-driven models and attention to moral principles in policies and programs. In this context, we examine drivers of CSR, contextual and leadership factors that influence CSR, and strategies for CSR. To illustrate these concepts, we discuss existing cases of CSR-like behavior in nanotechnology companies, and then provide examples of how companies producing nanomedicines can exhibit morally-driven CSR behavior.

  15. ENSI Approach to Oversight of Safety Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbel Haag, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Claudia Humbel Haag presented developments in ENSI approach to safety culture oversight. ENSI has developed a definition/understanding of Safety Culture and a concept of how to perform oversight of Safety Culture. ENSI defines safety culture in the following way: Safety Culture comprises the behaviour, world views (in the sense of conceptualisations of reality and explanation models), values (in the sense of aims and evaluation scales), and features of the physical environment (specifically, the nuclear power plant and the documents used) which are shared by many members of an organization, in as much as these are of significance to nuclear safety. A model of the accessibility of safety culture was presented ranging from the observable (external aspects of safety culture), to aspects that are accessible by asking questions, through to aspects that are not accessible (internal part of safety culture). ENSI considers observable aspects through the existing systematic safety assessment compliance program. Aspects that are observable by asking questions will be addressed by additional oversight activities outside the systematic assessment program. Aspects that are not accessible are addressed by helping the licensee to re-think its safety culture through proactive discussions on safety culture. Reports are issued to the licensee on assumptions and observations identified through the discussions. The conclusions of the presentation emphasised the importance of basing any interventions in this area on a solid understanding of the concept of safety culture. ENSI safety culture oversight principles were also described. These include licensee responsibility for safety, and the need for the regulator to critically review their own activities to ensure a positive influence on the licensee

  16. Medical Education for Tennessee. A Report of the Tennessee Higher Education Commission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Jerry N.; Woods, Myra S.

    This study of medical education was conducted as a part of the Tennessee Higher Education Commission's responsibility to design a master plan for higher education in Tennessee. It provides a background of information on Tennessee's needs for physicians and on the production of physicians by the three medical schools in the state. The study…

  17. Regulatory oversight of nuclear safety in Finland. Annual report 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kainulainen, E. (ed.)

    2012-07-01

    The report constitutes the report on regulatory control in the field of nuclear energy which the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) is required to submit once a year to the Ministry of Employment and the Economy pursuant to Section 121 of the Nuclear Energy Decree. The report is also delivered to the Ministry of Environment, the Finnish Environment Institute, and the regional environmental authorities of the localities in which a nuclear facility is located. The regulatory control of nuclear safety in 2011 included the design, construction and operation of nuclear facilities, as well as nuclear waste management and nuclear materials. The first parts of the report explain the basics of nuclear safety regulation included as part of STUK's responsibilities, as well as the objectives of the operations, and briefly introduce the objects of regulation. The chapter concerning the development and implementation of legislation and regulations describes changes in nuclear legislation, as well as the progress of STUK's YVL Guide revision work. The section concerning the regulation of nuclear facilities contains an overall safety assessment of the nuclear facilities currently in operation or under construction. The chapter concerning the regulation of the final disposal project for spent nuclear fuel de-scribes the preparations for the final disposal project and the related regulatory activities. The section concerning nuclear non-proliferation describes the nuclear non-proliferation control for Finnish nuclear facilities and final disposal of spent nuclear fuel, as well as measures required by the Additional Protocol of the Safeguards Agreement. The chapter describing the oversight of security arrangements in the use of nuclear energy discusses oversight of the security arrangements in nuclear power plants and other plants, institutions and functions included within the scope of STUK's regulatory oversight. The chapter also discusses the national and

  18. Sediment Characteristics of Tennessee Streams and Reservoirs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Trimble, Stanley W; Carey, William P

    1984-01-01

    Suspended-sediment and reservoir sedimentation data have been analyzed to determine sediment yields and transport characteristics of Tennessee streams Data from 31 reservoirs plus suspended-sediment...

  19. 1993 Annual performance report for Environmental Oversight and Monitoring at Department of Energy facilities in New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    In October of 1990, the New Mexico Environment Department entered into an agreement with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to create the Department of Energy Oversight and Monitoring Program. This program is designed to create an avenue for the State to ensure DOE facilities are in compliance with applicable environmental regulations, to allow the State oversight and monitoring independent of the DOE, to allow the State valuable input into remediation decision making, and to protect the environment and the public health and safety of New Mexicans concerning DOE facility activities. This agreement, called the Agreement in Principle (AIP), includes all four of New Mexico's DOE facilities: Los Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos; Sandia National Laboratories and the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute on Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque; and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad

  20. 1991 Annual performance report for environmental oversight and monitoring at Department of Energy Facilities in New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    On October 22, 1990 an agreement was entered into between the US DOE and the State of New Mexico. The agreement was designed to assure the citizens of New Mexico that the environment is protected and that public health, as related to the environment is also protected. The Agreement reflects the understanding and commitments between the parties regarding environmental oversight, monitoring, remediation and emergency response at the following DOE facilities: the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI); Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Sandia National Laboratory (SNL); and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These provision are ongoing through a vigorous program of independent monitoring and oversight; prioritization of clean-up and compliance activities; and new commitments by DOE. While the initial assessment of the quality and effectiveness of the facilities' environmental monitoring and surveillance programs is not yet complete, preliminary findings are presented regarding air quality monitoring, environmental monitoring, and groundwater monitoring

  1. Chronic Absenteeism in Tennessee's Early Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attridge, Jonathon

    2016-01-01

    Although the average daily attendance rate for Tennessee students is 95 percent, almost 45,000, or 10 percent, of Tennessee K-3 students missed at least a month's worth of school days during the 2014-15 school year. These "chronically absent" students present a particular problem for schools that are charged with developing foundational…

  2. Bilateral agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Ten bilateral agreements are presented. These are: 1) Co-operation agreement relating to the peaceful uses of nuclear energy between Argentina and EURATOM (1996); 2) Agreement on co-operation in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy between Argentina and Greece (1997); 3) Implementing arrangement for technical exchange and co-operation in the area of peaceful uses of nuclear energy between Argentina and the United States (1997); 4) Agreement concerning co-operation in nuclear science and technology between Australia and Indonesia (1997); 5) Implementation of the 1985 Agreement for co-operation concerning the peaceful uses of nuclear energy between the People's Republic of China and the United States (1998); 6) Protocol of co-operation between France and Lithuania (1997); 7) Agreement on co-operation in energy research, science and technology, and development between Germany and the United States (1998); 8) Agreement on early notification of a nuclear accident and exchange of information on nuclear facilities between Greece and Romania (1997); 9) Agreement on early notification of nuclear accidents and co-operation in the field of nuclear safety between Hungary and the Ukraine (1997); 10) Agreement in the field of radioactive waste management between Switzerland and the United States (1997). (K.A.)

  3. 20 CFR 416.919t - Consultative examination oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Consultative examination oversight. 416.919t... Examination § 416.919t Consultative examination oversight. (a) We will ensure that referrals for consultative... monitoring may include reviews by independent medical specialists under direct contract with SSA. (b) Through...

  4. 20 CFR 404.1519t - Consultative examination oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Consultative examination oversight. 404.1519t... Examination § 404.1519t Consultative examination oversight. (a) We will ensure that referrals for consultative... monitoring may include reviews by independent medical specialists under direct contract with SSA. (b) Through...

  5. 41 CFR 105-53.133 - Information Security Oversight Office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Information Security... FUNCTIONS Central Offices § 105-53.133 Information Security Oversight Office. (a) Creation and authority. The Information Security Oversight Office (ISOO), headed by the Director of ISOO, who is appointed by...

  6. 49 CFR 659.9 - Designation of oversight agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Designation of oversight agency. 659.9 Section 659.9 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAIL FIXED GUIDEWAY SYSTEMS; STATE SAFETY OVERSIGHT Role of the...

  7. 7 CFR 1703.107 - Reporting and oversight requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Program-General § 1703.107 Reporting and oversight requirements. (a) A project performance activity report... financial assistance is expended for approved purposes. (d) Recipients shall diligently monitor performance... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reporting and oversight requirements. 1703.107...

  8. 44 CFR 80.19 - Land use and oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Land use and oversight. 80.19... RELOCATION FOR OPEN SPACE Post-Award Requirements § 80.19 Land use and oversight. This section applies to... and beneficial functions of the floodplain. (ii) In the rare circumstances where the Administrator has...

  9. Navy Acquisition Executive's Management Oversight and Procurement Authority Category I and II Programs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2007-01-01

    .... This report discusses the management oversight and procurement authority within the Navy. Two other reports discussed the management oversight and procurement authority within the Army and Air Force...

  10. Synthetic Biology in the FDA Realm: Toward Productive Oversight Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatehi, Leili; Hall, Ralph F

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology (SB) is expected to create tremendous opportunities in a wide range of areas, including in foods, therapeutics, and diagnostics subject to regulatory oversight by the United States Food and Drug Administration. At the same time, there is substantial basis for concern about the uncertainties of accurately assessing the human health and environmental risks of such SB products. As such, SB is the latest in a string of emerging technologies that is the subject of calls for new approaches to regulation and oversight that involve "thinking ahead" to anticipate governance challenges upstream of technological development and adopting oversight mechanisms that are both adaptive to new information about risks and reflexive to performance data and feedback on policy outcomes over time. These new approaches constitute a marked departure from the status quo, and their development and implementation will require considerable time, resources, and reallocation of responsibilities. Furthermore, in order to develop an appropriate oversight response, adaptive or otherwise, there is first a need to identify the specific types and natures of applications, uncertainties, and regulatory issues that are likely to pose oversight challenges. This article presents our vision for a Productive Oversight Assessment (POA) approach in which the abilities and deficits of an oversight system are evaluated with the aim of enabling productive decisions (i.e., timely, feasible, effective for achieving desired policy outcomes) about oversight while also building capacity to facilitate broader governance efforts. The value ofPOA is two-fold. First, it will advance the development of a generalizable approach for making productive planning and decision-making about the oversight of any given new technology that presents challenges and uncertainties for any given oversight system whose policy goals are implicated by that technology. Second, this effort can enhance the very processes

  11. Bilateral agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2004-01-01

    The bilateral agreements concern Brazil with United States relative to the co operation in nuclear energy, Germany with Russian Federation relative to the elimination and disposal of nuclear weapons; The multilateral agreements concerns the signature of the Protocols to amend the Paris and Brussels Conventions, the multilateral nuclear environmental programme in the Russian Federation, the status of Conventions in the field of nuclear energy. (N.C.)

  12. Regulatory Oversight of Safety Culture — Korea’s Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, S.J.; Choi, Y.S.; Kim, J.T.

    2016-01-01

    In Korea, a regulatory oversight program of safety culture was launched in 2012 to establish regulatory measures against several events caused by weak safety culture in the nuclear industry. This paper is intended to introduce the preliminary regulatory oversight framework, development and validation of safety culture components, pilot safety culture inspection results and lessons learned. The safety culture model should be based on a sound understanding of the national culture and industry characteristics where the model will be applied. The nuclear safety culture oversight model is being developed and built on the Korean regulatory system to independently assess the nuclear power operating organizations’ safety culture.

  13. 1992 Annual performance report for Environmental Monitoring and Oversight at Department of Energy facilities in New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    In October 1990 an Agreement-in-Principle (AIP) was entered into between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of New Mexico for the purpose of supporting State oversight activities at DOE facilities in New Mexico. The State's lead agency for the Agreement is the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). DOE has agreed to provide the State with resources over a five year period to support State activities in environmental oversight, monitoring, access and emergency response to ensure compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), and the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI). The Agreement is designed to assure the citizens of New Mexico that public health, safety and the environment are being protected through existing programs; DOE is in compliance with applicable laws and regulations; DOE has made substantial new commitments; cleanup and compliance activities have been prioritized; and a vigorous program of independent monitoring and oversight by the State is underway. This report relates the quality and effectiveness of the facilities' environmental monitoring and surveillance programs. This report satisfies that requirement for the January--December 1992 time frame

  14. Complementizer Agreement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Koppen, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Complementizers agree in phi-features with the embedded subject in dialects of German and Dutch, in Tense with the embedded clause in Irish and in phi-features with the matrix subject in certain African languages. These complementizer agreement phenomena will be the main empirical focus of this

  15. Oversight of Defense Finance and Accounting Service Corporate Database Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    .... This report is the first in a series related to the DFAS Corporate Database. Specifically, this report discusses DoD oversight of DFAS development of the DFAS Corporate Information Infrastructure, DFAS Corporate Database, and associated applications...

  16. Review of the OSHA framework for oversight of occupational environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Young; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy

    2009-01-01

    The OSHA system for oversight of chemicals in the workplace was evaluated to derive lessons for oversight of nanotechnology. Criteria relating to the development, attributes, evolution, and outcomes of the system were used for evaluation that was based upon quantitative expert elicitation and historical literature analysis. The oversight system had inadequate resources in terms of finances, expertise, and personnel, and insufficient incentive for compliance. The system showed a lack of flexibility in novel situations. There were minimal requirements on companies for data on health and safety of their products. These factors have a strong influence on public confidence and health and safety. The oversight system also scored low on attributes such as public input, transparency, empirical basis, conflict of interest, and informed consent. The experts in our sample tend to believe that the current oversight system for chemicals in the workplace is neither adequate nor effective. It is very likely that the performance of the OSHA oversight system for nanomaterials will be equally inadequate.

  17. Dynamic oversight: implementation gaps and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, John

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology is touted as a transformative technology in that it is predicted to improve many aspects of human life. There are hundreds of products in the market that utilize nanostructures in their design, such as composite materials made out of carbon or metal oxides. Potential risks to consumers, to the environment, and to workers from the most common passive nanomaterial—carbon nanotubes—are emerging through scientific research. Newer more active nanostructures—such as cancer therapies and targeted drug systems—are also increasing in use and are raising similar risk concerns. Governing the risks to workers is the subject of this commentary. The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 grants the Occupational Safety and Health Administration the legal authority to set occupational health standards to insure that no worker suffers material impairment of health from work. However, setting a standard to protect workers from nanotechnology risks may occur some time in the future because the risks to workers have not been well characterized scientifically. Alternative risk governances—such as dynamic oversight through stakeholder partnerships, “soft law” approaches, and national adoption of international consensus standards—are evaluated in this article.

  18. Human factors in nuclear safety oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, K.

    1989-01-01

    The mission of the nuclear safety oversight function at the Savannah River Plant is to enhance the process and nuclear safety of site facilities. One of the major goals surrounding this mission is the reduction of human error. It is for this reason that several human factors engineers are assigned to the Operations assessment Group of the Facility Safety Evaluation Section (FSES). The initial task of the human factors contingent was the design and implementation of a site wide root cause analysis program. The intent of this system is to determine the most prevalent sources of human error in facility operations and to assist in determining where the limited human factors resources should be focused. In this paper the strategy used to educate the organization about the field of human factors is described. Creating an awareness of the importance of human factors engineering in all facets of design, operation, and maintenance is considered to be an important step in reducing the rate of human error

  19. Dynamic oversight: implementation gaps and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, John

    2011-04-01

    Nanotechnology is touted as a transformative technology in that it is predicted to improve many aspects of human life. There are hundreds of products in the market that utilize nanostructures in their design, such as composite materials made out of carbon or metal oxides. Potential risks to consumers, to the environment, and to workers from the most common passive nanomaterial—carbon nanotubes—are emerging through scientific research. Newer more active nanostructures—such as cancer therapies and targeted drug systems—are also increasing in use and are raising similar risk concerns. Governing the risks to workers is the subject of this commentary. The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 grants the Occupational Safety and Health Administration the legal authority to set occupational health standards to insure that no worker suffers material impairment of health from work. However, setting a standard to protect workers from nanotechnology risks may occur some time in the future because the risks to workers have not been well characterized scientifically. Alternative risk governances—such as dynamic oversight through stakeholder partnerships, "soft law" approaches, and national adoption of international consensus standards—are evaluated in this article.

  20. 76 FR 17416 - Proposed Settlement Agreement, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-29

    ... accordance with section 113(g) of the Clean Air Act, as amended (``CAA'' or the ``Act''), 42 U.S.C. 7413(g... AGENCY Proposed Settlement Agreement, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... Tennessee pursuant to CAA, 42 U.S.C. 7401-7671q. The proposed settlement agreement establishes a deadline...

  1. Preventive medicine oversight of splash pads on military installations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardcastle, Lisa Raysby; Perry, Matthew; Browne, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Over the past several years, an increasing number of military installations have installed splash pads that provide fun, recreational water entertainment for Soldiers and their families. The addition of splash pads brings added responsibilities for medical treatment facility preventive medicine oversight and installation facilities maintenance to ensure a safe and healthy environment. Currently, there are no consistent standards or detailed guidance for military installations to follow when installing and maintaining splash pads. The central issues associated with splash pads on military installations are water quality and risk for waterborne illnesses, responsibility for safety and health oversight, and federal energy and water sustainability mandates. This article examines the importance of implementing a standard for design and oversight to ensure the health and safety of Soldiers and their families.

  2. Expanding Exports: Can Tennessee Double Its Exports?

    OpenAIRE

    Steven G. Livingston

    2010-01-01

    In this year's State of the Union Address, President Obama announced a National Export Initiative to double American exports over the next five years. He claimed that this could add two million jobs to the American economy. Could Tennessee actually double its exports over this period? And what would be the impact if it did?

  3. A Survey of Preschool Programs in Tennessee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Beth G.; Rog, Debbra

    One of four volumes dealing with the CARE (Children's Agencies, Resources, Etc.) Linkages Project in Tennessee, this manual reports a survey of preschool programs in 16 counties. The goal of the CARE project was to foster collaboration leading to more effective linkages between publicly funded child care and development programs and other service…

  4. Teenage Drinking in Rural Middle Tennessee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mookherjee, Harsha N.

    1984-01-01

    Investigated the extent to which alcoholic beverages are consumed by high school teenagers (N=622) in rural communities of middle Tennessee. Results showed that about 63 percent of the subjects do drink alcoholic beverages, and that most of the drinking is done in the company of friends. (LLL)

  5. Technology Usage of Tennessee Agriculture Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coley, Michael D.; Warner, Wendy J.; Stair, Kristin S.; Flowers, James L.; Croom, D. Barry

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the accessibility and use of instructional technologies by agriculture teachers in Tennessee. Data were collected using a survey instrument to investigate teachers' adoption of technology, sources of acquired technology skills, accessibility and use of technological equipment, and barriers to technology integration. The study…

  6. 75 FR 10507 - Information Security Oversight Office; National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office; National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) AGENCY: National Archives and Records... individuals planning to attend must be submitted to the Information Security Oversight Office (ISOO) no later...

  7. 77 FR 76076 - Information Security Oversight Office; State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office; State, Local... Administration, Information Security Oversight Office. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the... Committee. To discuss the matters relating to the Classified National Security Information Program for State...

  8. Residency training oversight(s) in surgery: the history and legacy of the accreditation council for graduate medical education reforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauta, Russell J

    2012-02-01

    Despite a quarter century of discourse since a sentinel event in New York City raised the question of appropriate oversight for graduate medical education, many questions remain unanswered. Even with the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education rules in place, some opportunity remains to examine handoff methodology, the relationship of duty hours to education, and the impact of fatigue on resident performance. Neurophysiologic adjuncts applied concomitantly to evaluation of didactic performance offer promise for data-driven definition of the optimal shift. Concurrently, the merits of specialty-specific oversight of graduate medical education remain under active consideration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. 49 CFR 659.29 - Oversight agency safety and security reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Oversight agency safety and security reviews. 659... Role of the State Oversight Agency § 659.29 Oversight agency safety and security reviews. At least... safety program plan and system security plan. Alternatively, the on-site review may be conducted in an on...

  10. 12 CFR 1700.1 - Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight. 1700.1 Section 1700.1 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF FEDERAL HOUSING ENTERPRISE OVERSIGHT, DEPARTMENT OF... of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight. (a) Scope and authority. The Office of Federal Housing...

  11. 20 CFR 667.410 - What are the oversight roles and responsibilities of recipients and subrecipients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the oversight roles and... INVESTMENT ACT Oversight and Monitoring § 667.410 What are the oversight roles and responsibilities of recipients and subrecipients? (a) Roles and responsibilities for all recipients and subrecipients of funds...

  12. Defense Acquisitions: Future Aerostat and Airship Investment Decisions Drive Oversight and Coordination Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    DEFENSE ACQUISITIONS Future Aerostat and Airship Investment Decisions Drive Oversight and Coordination Needs...Future Aerostat and Airship Investment Decisions Drive Oversight and Coordination Needs 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...Future Aerostat and Airship Investment Decisions Drive Oversight and Coordination Needs Why GAO Did This Study Use of lighter-than-air platforms, such

  13. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility Proxy Waste Lot Profile 6.999 for Building K-25 West Wing, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigsby V.P.

    2009-02-12

    In 1989, the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), which includes the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), was placed on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) National Priorities List. The Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) (DOE 1992), effective January 1, 1992, now governs environmental restoration activities conducted under CERCLA at the ORR. Following signing of the FFA, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the state of Tennessee signed the Oak Ridge Accelerated Cleanup Plan Agreement on June 18, 2002. The purpose of this agreement is to define a streamlined decision-making process to facilitate the accelerated implementation of cleanup, resolve ORR milestone issues, and establish future actions necessary to complete the accelerated cleanup plan by the end of fiscal year 2008. While the FFA continues to serve as the overall regulatory framework for remediation, the Accelerated Cleanup Plan Agreement supplements existing requirements to streamline the decision-making process. Decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities of Bldg. K-25, the original gaseous diffusion facility, is being conducted by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) on behalf of the DOE. The planned CERCLA action covering disposal of building structure and remaining components from the K-25 building is scheduled as a non-time-critical CERCLA action as part of DOE's continuous risk reduction strategy for ETTP. The K-25 building is proposed for D&D because of its poor physical condition and the expense of surveillance and maintenance activities. The K-25/K-27 D&D Project proposes to dispose of the commingled waste listed below from the K-25 west side building structure and remaining components and process gas equipment and piping at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) under waste disposal proxy lot (WPXL) 6.999: (1) Building structure (e.g. concrete floors [excluding basement

  14. 49 CFR 240.309 - Railroad oversight responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION QUALIFICATION AND CERTIFICATION OF LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEERS Administration of the Certification Programs § 240.309 Railroad oversight responsibilities. (a) No later than... and analysis concerning the administration of its program for responding to detected instances of poor...

  15. 46 CFR 160.001-5 - Production oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Production oversight. 160.001-5 Section 160.001-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS... with the independent laboratory's name or identifying mark. (j) Lot rejection. Each nonconforming unit...

  16. Accounting Profession: Oversight, Auditor Independence, and Financial Reporting Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-05-03

    Profession: Oversight, Auditor Independence, and Financial Reporting Issues Dear Mr. Chairman: This letter responds to your recent request that we provide...selected financial reporting matters. The sudden and largely unexpected bankruptcy of the Enron Corporation (Enron) and other large corporations... financial reporting restatements have raised questions about the soundness of the current self-regulatory and financial reporting systems and resulted in

  17. 27 | Page OVERSIGHT FUNCTIONS OF THE LEGISLATURE: AN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fr. Ikenga

    2004-09-06

    Sep 6, 2004 ... government based on the principle of separation of powers between the legislature, the executive and the .... is, its representative role.25 The principle behind legislative oversight is that legislative function does not ..... (a) information on the Appropriation Bills, (b) reports on accounting, financial control and.

  18. Oversight on the borderline: quality improvement and pragmatic research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Jonathan A.; Brickman, Andrew L.; Capron, Alexander; Ford, Daniel E.; Gombosev, Adrijana; Greene, Sarah M; Iafrate, R. Peter; Kolaczkowski, Laura; Pallin, Sarah; Pletcher, Mark J.; Staman, Karen L.; Vazquez, Miguel A.; Sugarman, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Pragmatic research that compares interventions to improve the organization and delivery of health care may overlap, in both goals and methods, with quality improvement (QI) activities. When activities have attributes of both research and QI, confusion often arises about what ethical oversight is, or should be, required. For routine QI, in which the delivery of health care is modified in minor ways that create only minimal risks, oversight by local clinical or administrative leaders utilizing institutional policies may be sufficient. However, additional consideration should be given to activities that go beyond routine, local QI to first determine whether such non-routine activities constitute research or QI and, in either case, to ensure that independent oversight will occur. This should promote rigor, transparency, and protection of patients’ and clinicians’ rights, well-being, and privacy in all such activities. Specifically, we recommend: 1. Health care organizations should have systematic policies and processes for designating activities as routine QI, non-routine QI, or QI research, and determining what oversight each will receive. 2. Health care organizations should have formal and explicit oversight processes for non-routine QI activities that may include input from institutional QI experts, health services researchers, administrators, clinicians, patient representatives, and those experienced in the ethics review of health care activities. 3. QI research requires review by an IRB; for such review to be effective, IRBs should develop particular expertise in assessing QI research. 4. Stakeholders should be included in the review of non-routine QI and QI-related research proposals. Only by doing so will we optimally leverage both pragmatic research on health care delivery and local implementation through QI as complementary activities for improving health. PMID:26374685

  19. The Second Tennessee Cavalry in the American Civil War

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-13

    three regions based on naturally occuring geographical features within the state. The fertile plains of West Tennessee closely resemble the low...country of Mississippi. Middle Tennessee is primarily composed of foothills and basin with fertile lands. East Tennessee is composed of upland, often...our army that it was surrounded; and on the 17th day of August an order was read placing the men on half rations of everything except beans and rice

  20. Final report of the NRC-Agreement State Working Group to evaluate control and accountability of licensed devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-10-01

    US NRC staff acknowledged that licensees were having problems maintaining control over and accountability for devices containing radioactive material. In June 1995, NRC approved the staff's suggestion to form a joint NRC-Agreement State Working Group to evaluate the problem and propose solutions. The staff indicated that the Working Group was necessary to address the concerns from a national perspective, allow for a broad level of Agreement State input, and to reflect their experience. Agreement State participation in the process was essential since some Agreement States have implemented effective programs for oversight of device users. This report includes the 5 recommendations proposed by the Working Group to increase regulatory oversight, increase control and accountability of devices, ensure proper disposal, and ensure disposal of orphaned devices. Specifically, the Working Group recommends that: (1) NRC and Agreement States increase regulatory oversight for users of certain devices; (2) NRC and Agreement State impose penalties on persons losing devices; (3) NRC and Agreement States ensure proper disposal of orphaned devices; (4) NRC encourage States to implement similar oversight programs for users of Naturally-Occurring or Accelerator- Produced Material; and (5) NRC encourage non-licensed stakeholders to take appropriate actions, such as instituting programs for material identification

  1. Final report of the NRC-Agreement State Working Group to evaluate control and accountability of licensed devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    US NRC staff acknowledged that licensees were having problems maintaining control over and accountability for devices containing radioactive material. In June 1995, NRC approved the staff`s suggestion to form a joint NRC-Agreement State Working Group to evaluate the problem and propose solutions. The staff indicated that the Working Group was necessary to address the concerns from a national perspective, allow for a broad level of Agreement State input, and to reflect their experience. Agreement State participation in the process was essential since some Agreement States have implemented effective programs for oversight of device users. This report includes the 5 recommendations proposed by the Working Group to increase regulatory oversight, increase control and accountability of devices, ensure proper disposal, and ensure disposal of orphaned devices. Specifically, the Working Group recommends that: (1) NRC and Agreement States increase regulatory oversight for users of certain devices; (2) NRC and Agreement State impose penalties on persons losing devices; (3) NRC and Agreement States ensure proper disposal of orphaned devices; (4) NRC encourage States to implement similar oversight programs for users of Naturally-Occurring or Accelerator- Produced Material; and (5) NRC encourage non-licensed stakeholders to take appropriate actions, such as instituting programs for material identification.

  2. 75 FR 21292 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement Agreement; AVX Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-23

    ... AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement Agreement; AVX Corporation AGENCY... administrative settlement for recovery of projected future response oversight costs and performance of work... with AVX Corporation. The settlement provides for the performance of a portion of a non-time critical...

  3. Technical oversight for installation of TNX piezometers, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pidcoe, W.W. Jr. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1997-06-05

    Science Applications International Corporation was tasked under subcontract C002025P to provide technical oversight for the drilling of one pilot borehole, and the drilling and installation of five piezometers in the TNX Area Swamp. The work was performed in accordance with the Statement of Work in Task Order Proposal No. ER39-129 dated August 6, 1996. This report describes the activities associated with the performance of the task.

  4. Veterans Affairs Contracting: Improved Oversight Needed for Certain Contractual Arrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Contracting Letter 1 Background 3 The Extent to Which VA Used IAAs Is Unknown Due to Incomplete Information 10 Management of the Award and Oversight...of IAAs Varied, and in Some Cases Did Not Comply with Policy 13 VA Obligated Over $244 Million to FFRDCs with Significant Increases for Two VA...Documentation among Selected IAA Orders 14 Table 2: Veterans Affairs Obligations to Federally Funded Research and Development Centers, Fiscal

  5. Oil and gas site contamination risks : improved oversight needed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-02-01

    British Columbia has seen record levels of activities in the oil and gas sector. Upstream petroleum processes include exploration, well completion and production. Site contamination can occur during all of these activities, resulting in potential environmental and human health impacts. Although well operators are responsible by law for site restoration, there is a potential risk that some operators will not fulfill their responsibilities, thereby leaving the province liable for the site restoration costs. In British Columbia, the BC Oil and Gas Commission (OGC) is responsible for managing these risks through oversight activities designed to ensure that industry meets its obligations. The OGC also manages the orphan sites reclamation fund. This report presented an audit of the OGC in order to determine if it is providing adequate oversight of upstream oil and gas site contamination risks. The audit examined whether the agency responsibilities are clear and whether the OGC is fully aware of the environmental and financial risks associated with upstream oil and gas site contamination. The audit also examined if the OGC has established appropriate procedures to oversee the risks and to inform the public of how effectively site contamination risks are being managed. The report presented the audit background, audit expectations, findings, conclusions and recommendations. It was concluded that the OGC's oversight of the environmental and financial risks associated with oil and gas site contamination needs improving. tabs., figs.

  6. Proposed Bak Stabilization Tennessee River, River Mile 466.2 - 466.5 Hamilton County, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    ARAP) application was submitted to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Water Pollution Control (TDEC WPC ) on August 22, 2012 and...on erosion and sediment control measures can be found in the department’s Erosion and Sediment Control Handbook ( www. tn.l!ovfenvironment/ wpc /sed

  7. Routine environmental audit of the K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    This report documents the results of the Routine Environmental Audit of the K-25 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, conducted February 14 through February 25, 1994, by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24) located within the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). The Routine Environmental Audit for the K-25 site was conducted as an environmental management assessment, supported through reviews of the Waste Management Program and the Decontamination and Decommissioning Program. The assessment was conducted jointly with, and built upon, the results provided by the ``DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office Environment, Safety, health and Quality Assurance Appraisal at the K-25 Site.`` DOE 5482.1B, ``Environment, Safety and Health Appraisal Program,`` established the mission of EH-24 to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of Department-wide environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The purpose of this assessment is to provide the Secretary of Energy and senior DOE managers with concise independent information as part of DOE`s continuing effort to improve environmental program performance. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and the minimization of risk to public health and the environment. The routine environmental audit is one method by which EH-24 accomplishes its mission, utilizing systematic and periodic evaluations of the Department`s environmental programs within line organizations.

  8. Routine environmental audit of the K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    This report documents the results of the Routine Environmental Audit of the K-25 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, conducted February 14 through February 25, 1994, by the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24) located within the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). The Routine Environmental Audit for the K-25 site was conducted as an environmental management assessment, supported through reviews of the Waste Management Program and the Decontamination and Decommissioning Program. The assessment was conducted jointly with, and built upon, the results provided by the ''DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office Environment, Safety, health and Quality Assurance Appraisal at the K-25 Site.'' DOE 5482.1B, ''Environment, Safety and Health Appraisal Program,'' established the mission of EH-24 to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of Department-wide environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The purpose of this assessment is to provide the Secretary of Energy and senior DOE managers with concise independent information as part of DOE's continuing effort to improve environmental program performance. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and the minimization of risk to public health and the environment. The routine environmental audit is one method by which EH-24 accomplishes its mission, utilizing systematic and periodic evaluations of the Department's environmental programs within line organizations

  9. Environmental Compliance and Protection Program Description Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2009-02-26

    The objective of the Environmental Compliance and Protection (EC and P) Program Description (PD) is to establish minimum environmental compliance requirements and natural resources protection goals for the Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) Oak Ridge Environmental Management Cleanup Contract (EMCC) Contract Number DE-AC05-98OR22700-M198. This PD establishes the work practices necessary to ensure protection of the environment during the performance of EMCC work activities on the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, by BJC employees and subcontractor personnel. Both BJC and subcontractor personnel are required to implement this PD. A majority of the decontamination and demolition (D and D) activities and media (e.g., soil and groundwater) remediation response actions at DOE sites on the ORR are conducted under the authority of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). CERCLA activities are governed by individual CERCLA decision documents (e.g., Record of Decision [ROD] or Action Memorandum) and according to requirements stated in the Federal Facility Agreement for the Oak Ridge Reservation (DOE 1992). Applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) for the selected remedy are the requirements for environmental remediation responses (e.g., removal actions and remedial actions) conducted under CERCLA.

  10. Fiscal Year 1998 Well Installation, Plugging and Abandonment, and Redevelopment summary report Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-12-01

    This report summarizes the well installation, plugging and abandonment, and redevelopment activities conducted during the federal fiscal year (FY) 1998 at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Five new groundwater monitoring wells were installed at the Y-12 Plant under the FY 1998 drilling program. Two of the wells are located in west Bear Creek Valley, one is in the eastern Y-12 Plant area near Lake Reality, and two are located near the Oil Landfarm Waste Management Area, which were installed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (Bechtel Jacobs) as part of a site characterization activity for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Disposal Cell. Also, two existing wells were upgraded and nine temporary piezometers were installed to characterize hydrogeologic conditions at the Disposal Cell site. In addition, 40 temporary piezometers were installed in the Boneyard/Bumyard area of Bear Creek Valley by Bechtel Jacobs as part of the accelerated remedial actions conducted by the Environmental Restoration Program. Ten monitoring wells at the Y-12 Plant were decommissioned in FY 1998. Two existing monitoring wells were redeveloped during FY 1998 (of these, GW-732 was redeveloped tsvice). All well installation and development (including redevelopment) was conducted following industry-standard methods and approved procedures from the Environmental Surveillance Procedures Quality Control Program (Energy Systems 1988); the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Groundwater Monitoring Technical Enforcement Guidance Document (EPA 1992); and the Monitoring Well Installation Plan for the Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Energy Systems 1997a). Well installation and development of the non-Y-12 Plant GWPP oversight installation projects were conducted using procedures/guidance defined in the following documents: Work Plan for Support to Upper East Fork Poplar Creek East End Volatile Organic Compound Plumes Well Installation Project, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge

  11. Political and Budgetary Oversight of the Ukrainian Intelligence Community: Processes, Problems and Prospects for Reform

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Petrov, Oleksii

    2007-01-01

    This thesis addresses the problem of providing policy and budget oversight of Ukrainian intelligence organizations in accordance with norms and practices developed in contemporary Western democracies...

  12. Regulatory Oversight Program, July 1, 1993--March 3, 1997. Volume 2: Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    On July, 1993, a Regulatory Oversight (RO) organization was established within the US DOE, Oak Ridge Operations to provide regulatory oversight of the DOE uranium enrichment facilities leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The purpose of the OR program was to ensure continued plant safety, safeguards and security while the plants were transitioned to regulatory oversight by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Volume 2 contains copies of the documents which established the relationship between NRC, DOE, USEC, and DOL (Dept of Labor) required to facilitate regulatory oversight transition.

  13. Regulatory Oversight Program, July 1, 1993 - March 3, 1997. Volume 2: Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    On July, 1993, a Regulatory Oversight (RO) organization was established within the US DOE, Oak Ridge Operations to provide regulatory oversight of the DOE uranium enrichment facilities leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The purpose of the OR program was to ensure continued plant safety, safeguards and security while the plants were transitioned to regulatory oversight by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Volume 2 contains copies of the documents which established the relationship between NRC, DOE, USEC, and DOL (Dept of Labor) required to facilitate regulatory oversight transition

  14. License Agreements concerning trademarks

    OpenAIRE

    Dráb, Ladislav

    2014-01-01

    The thesis deals with license agreements in relation to trademarks, specially the trademark license agreement. The thesis contains in its theoretical interpretation of the concept and sources of the license agreement. There are also analyzed various types of license agreements, including modifying the license agreement in the new Civil Code, and related types of contracts as a franchising or merchandising. Another interpretation is more concerned with trademark and trademark license agreement...

  15. Tennessee Valley Region: a year 2000 profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-06-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the potential radiological implications of nuclear facilities in the combined watersheds of the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers, an area covering portions of 7 states of varied topography. The regional population in 1970 was about 4.6 million and is expected to increase to about 7 million by the year 2000. A 1973 projection estimated the installed electric generating capacity of the region to increase from a 1970 value of 45,000 megawatts to a total of 222,000 megawatts by the year 2000. In that year, about 144,000 megawatts were projected to be nuclear plants. The profile of the Tennessee Valley Region in the year 2000, as drawn from this report, contains the essential data for calculation of the radiological dose from operation of nuclear facilities in that year. Those calculations are reported in the companion document, DOE/ET-0064/2. Specifically, Volume I establishes the parameters describing where the people live, what they eat, the activities in which they engage, and the environmental surroundings that enable an evaluation of the potential radiation dose to the population. Airborne radionuclides from nuclear facilities in this zone may enter the study area and be deposited on the ground, on growing food, and on water surfaces. Consideration was not given to waterborne radionuclides external to the study region. 17 references

  16. Tennessee Valley Region: a year 2000 profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-06-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the potential radiological implications of nuclear facilities in the combined watersheds of the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers, an area covering portions of 7 states of varied topography. The regional population in 1970 was about 4.6 million and is expected to increase to about 7 million by the year 2000. A 1973 projection estimated the installed electric generating capacity of the region to increase from a 1970 value of 45,000 megawatts to a total of 222,000 megawatts by the year 2000. In that year, about 144,000 megawatts were projected to be nuclear plants. The profile of the Tennessee Valley Region in the year 2000, as drawn from this report, contains the essential data for calculation of the radiological dose from operation of nuclear facilities in that year. Those calculations are reported in the companion document, DOE/ET-0064/2. Specifically, Volume I establishes the parameters describing where the people live, what they eat, the activities in which they engage, and the environmental surroundings that enable an evaluation of the potential radiation dose to the population. Airborne radionuclides from nuclear facilities in this zone may enter the study area and be deposited on the ground, on growing food, and on water surfaces. Consideration was not given to waterborne radionuclides external to the study region. 17 references. (MCW)

  17. Agreement Workflow Tool (AWT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Agreement Workflow Tool (AWT) is a role-based Intranet application used for processing SSA's Reimbursable Agreements according to SSA's standards. AWT provides...

  18. Health preemption behind closed doors: trade agreements and fast-track authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosbie, Eric; Gonzalez, Mariaelena; Glantz, Stanton A

    2014-09-01

    Noncommunicable diseases result from consuming unhealthy products, including tobacco, which are promoted by transnational corporations. The tobacco industry uses preemption to block or reverse tobacco control policies. Preemption removes authority from jurisdictions where tobacco companies' influence is weak and transfers it to jurisdictions where they have an advantage. International trade agreements relocate decisions about tobacco control policy to venues where there is little opportunity for public scrutiny, participation, and debate. Tobacco companies are using these agreements to preempt domestic authority over tobacco policy. Other transnational corporations that profit by promoting unhealthy foods could do the same. "Fast-track authority," in which Congress cedes ongoing oversight authority to the President, further distances the public from the debate. With international agreements binding governments to prioritize trade over health, transparency and public oversight of the trade negotiation process is necessary to safeguard public health interests.

  19. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William

    2008-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites

  20. Integrating GIS and GPS in environmental remediation oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaletsky, K.; Earle, J.R.; Schneider, T.A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents findings on Ohio EPA Office of Federal Facilities Oversight's (OFFO) use of GIS and GPS for environmental remediation oversight at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Fernald Site. The Fernald site is a former uranium metal production facility within DOE's nuclear weapons complex. Significant uranium contamination of soil and groundwater is being remediated under state and federal regulations. OFFO uses GIS/GPS to enhance environmental monitoring and remediation oversight. These technologies are utilized within OFFO's environmental monitoring program for sample location and parameter selection, data interpretation and presentation. GPS is used to integrate sample data into OFFO's GIS and for permanently linking precise and accurate geographic data to samples and waste units. It is important to identify contamination geographically as all visual references (e.g., buildings, infrastructure) will be removed during remediation. Availability of the GIS allows OFFO to perform independent analysis and review of DOE contractor generated data, models, maps, and designs. This ability helps alleviate concerns associated with open-quotes black boxclose quotes models and data interpretation. OFFO's independent analysis has increased regulatory confidence and the efficiency of design reviews. GIS/GPS technology allows OFFO to record and present complex data in a visual format aiding in stakeholder education and awareness. Presented are OFFO's achievements within the aforementioned activities and some reasons learned in implementing the GIS/GPS program. OFFO's two years of GIS/GPS development have resulted in numerous lessons learned and ideas for increasing effectiveness through the use of GIS/GPS

  1. State safety oversight program : audit of the tri-state oversight committee and the Washington metropolitan area transit authority, final audit report, March 4, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) conducted an on-site audit of the safety program implemented by the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) and overseen by the Tri-State Oversight Committee (TOC) between December 14 and 17, 20...

  2. Real-time Responsiveness for Ethics Oversight During Disaster Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckenwiler, Lisa; Pringle, John; Boulanger, Renaud; Hunt, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    Disaster research has grown in scope and frequency. Research in the wake of disasters and during humanitarian crises--particularly in resource-poor settings--is likely to raise profound and unique ethical challenges for local communities, crisis responders, researchers, and research ethics committees (RECs). Given the ethical challenges, many have questioned how best to provide research ethics review and oversight. We contribute to the conversation concerning how best to ensure appropriate ethical oversight in disaster research and argue that ethical disaster research requires of researchers and RECs a particular sort of ongoing, critical engagement which may not be warranted in less exceptional research. We present two cases that typify the concerns disaster researchers and RECs may confront, and elaborate upon what this ongoing engagement might look like--how it might be conceptualized and utilized--using the concept of real-time responsiveness (RTR). The central aim of RTR, understood here as both an ethical ideal and practice, is to lessen the potential for research conducted in the wake of disasters to create, perpetuate, or exacerbate vulnerabilities and contribute to injustices suffered by disaster-affected populations. Well cultivated and deployed, we believe that RTR may enhance the moral capacities of researchers and REC members, and RECs as institutions where moral agency is nurtured and sustained. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. 76 FR 32983 - Tennessee; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-07

    ... areas of the State of Tennessee resulting from severe storms, tornadoes, straight line winds, and... program in the designated areas, Hazard Mitigation throughout the State, and any other forms of assistance...

  4. Hatchery-borne Salmonella enterica serovar Tennessee infections in broilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, J.P.; Brown, D.J.; Madsen, Mogens

    1997-01-01

    A substantial increase in the prevalence of S. enterica serovar Tennessee was observed in broiler flocks in Denmark at the turn of the year 1994 and in the following months. Epidemiological data indicated that a single hatchery was involved in spreading of the infection. Molecular characterization...... of S. enterica serovar Tennessee isolates from Danish broilers (1992 to 1995), the suspected hatchery and strains from various other sources included for comparison was initiated in order to trace the source of infection of the broilers. In general, strains of S. enterica ser. Tennessee showed only....... Restriction enzyme analysis of the plasmid ensured that the plasmids from broilers and the hatchery were identical. By analysis of cleaning and disinfection procedures and by sampling of different control points in the hatchery it was shown that S. enterica ser. Tennessee had colonized areas of the hatchers...

  5. University of Tennessee deploys force10 switch for CERN work

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Force20 networks, the pioneer in building and securing reliable networks, today announced that the University of Tennessee physics department has deployed the C300 resilient switch to analyze data form CERN's Large Hadron Collider." (1/2 page)

  6. Tennessee long-range transportation plan : financial plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Meeting Tennessees transportation requirements over the next 25 years is a major challenge. The infrastructure demands associated with building and maintaining the states aviation, bicycle and pedestrian, rail, water, highway, and public transp...

  7. Integrated solid waste management of Sevierville, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1992 cost of the City of Sevierville, Tennessee integrated municipal solid waste management (IMSWM) system, the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environmental performance requirements for each of the system`s waste-processing and disposal facilities. Actual data from records kept by participants is reported in this document. Every effort was made to minimize the use of assumptions, and no attempt is made to interpret the data reported. Analytical approaches are documented so that interested analysts may perform manipulation or further analysis of the data. As such, the report is a reference document for MSW management professionals who are interested in the actual costs and energy consumption for a one-year period, of an operating IMSWM systems.

  8. Whistleblower Protection: DOD Needs to Enhance Oversight of Military Whistleblower Reprisal Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    WHISTLEBLOWER PROTECTION DOD Needs to Enhance Oversight of Military Whistleblower Reprisal Investigations Report...00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Whistleblower Protection: DOD Needs to Enhance Oversight of Military Whistleblower Reprisal...Government Accountability Office Highlights of GAO-15-477, a report to congressional requesters May 2015 WHISTLEBLOWER PROTECTION DOD

  9. 42 CFR 414.39 - Special rules for payment of care plan oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special rules for payment of care plan oversight... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM PAYMENT FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.39 Special rules for payment of care plan oversight. (a) General...

  10. 48 CFR 52.236-24 - Work Oversight in Architect-Engineer Contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Architect-Engineer Contracts. 52.236-24 Section 52.236-24 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Provisions and Clauses 52.236-24 Work Oversight in Architect-Engineer Contracts. As prescribed in 36.609-3, insert the following clause: Work Oversight in Architect-Engineer Contracts (APR 1984) The extent and...

  11. 75 FR 3509 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Order Approving Proposed Rules on Auditing Standard No...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    ... Accounting Oversight Board; Order Approving Proposed Rules on Auditing Standard No. 7, Engagement Quality... standards for public company audits, including a requirement for each registered public accounting firm to... Accounting Oversight Board (the ``Board'' or the ``PCAOB'') filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission...

  12. 78 FR 68872 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rules on Auditing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... Accounting Oversight Board; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rules on Auditing Standard No. 17, Auditing... Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (``PCAOB'') standards. \\1\\ Terms defined in Appendix A... this standard has the same meaning as the term ``affiliates of the accounting firm'' as defined in...

  13. 75 FR 82417 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Order Approving Proposed Rules on Auditing Standards...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-30

    ... Accounting Oversight Board; Order Approving Proposed Rules on Auditing Standards Related to the Auditor's Assessment of and Response to Risk and Related Amendments to PCAOB Standards December 23, 2010. I. Introduction On September 15, 2010, the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (the ``Board'' or the ``PCAOB...

  14. 32 CFR 2400.19 - Declassification by the Director of the Information Security Oversight Office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY INFORMATION SECURITY PROGRAM Declassification and Downgrading § 2400.19 Declassification by the Director of the Information Security Oversight Office. If the Director of the Information... Information Security Oversight Office. 2400.19 Section 2400.19 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to...

  15. 12 CFR 1700.2 - Organization of the Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Organization of the Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight. 1700.2 Section 1700.2 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF FEDERAL HOUSING ENTERPRISE OVERSIGHT... Human Resources Management, the Office of Technology and Information Management, and the Office of...

  16. Oversight of Genomic Data Sharing: What Roles for Ethics and Data Access Committees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, Mahsa; Dove, Edward S; Murtagh, Madeleine; Knoppers, Bartha Maria; Borry, Pascal

    2017-10-01

    Discussions regarding responsible genomic data sharing often center around ethical and legal issues such as the consent, privacy, and confidentiality of individuals, families, and communities. To ensure the ethical grounds of genomic data sharing, oversight by both research ethics and Data Access Committees (DACs) across the research lifecycle is warranted. In this article, we review these oversight practices and argue that they reveal a compelling need to clarify the scope of ethical considerations by oversight bodies and to delineate core elements such as "objectionable" data uses. Ethical oversight of genomic data sharing would be considerably improved if the relevant ethical considerations by research ethics and DACs were coordinated. We therefore suggest several mechanisms to achieve greater clarification of ethical considerations by these committees, as well as greater communication and coordination between both to ensure robust and sustained ethical oversight of genomic data sharing.

  17. A qualitative phenomenological study: Enhanced, risk-based FAA oversight on part 145 maintenance practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Bryan G.

    The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to examine the phenomenon of enhanced, risk-based Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) oversight of Part 145 repair stations that performed aircraft maintenance for Part 121 air carriers between 2007 and 2014 in Oklahoma. Specifically, this research was utilized to explore what operational changes have occurred in the domestic Part 145 repair station industry such as variations in management or hiring practices, training, recordkeeping and technical data, inventory and aircraft parts supply-chain logistics, equipment, and facilities. After interviewing 12 managers from Part 145 repair stations in Oklahoma, six major theme codes emerged from the data: quality of oversight before 2007, quality of oversight after 2007, advantages of oversight, disadvantages of oversight, status quo of oversight, and process improvement . Of those six major theme codes, 17 subthemes appeared from the data that were used to explain the phenomenon of enhanced oversight in the Part 145 repair station industry. Forty-two percent of the participants indicated a weak FAA oversight system that has hindered the continuous process improvement program in their repair stations. Some of them were financially burdened after hiring additional full-time quality assurance inspectors to specifically manage enhanced FAA oversight. Notwithstanding, the participants of the study indicated that the FAA must apply its surveillance on a more standardized and consistent basis. They want to see this standardization in how FAA inspectors interpret regulations and practice the same quality of oversight for all repair stations, particularly those that are repeat violators and fail to comply with federal aviation regulations. They believed that when the FAA enforces standardization on a consistent basis, repair stations can become more efficient and safer in the performance of their scope of work for the U.S. commercial air transportation industry.

  18. Fiscal Year 2008 Phased Construction Completion Report for EU Z2-33 in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2008-09-11

    Completion Report for the Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/OR/01-2317&D2). Remedial actions performed in the Balance of Site (BOS) Laboratory Area of EU Z2-33 and two small areas in EU Z2-42 are described in Sects. 5 through 10 of this Phased Construction Completion Report (PCCR). The purpose of this PCCR is to address the following: (1) Document DVS characterization results for EU Z2-33; (2) Describe and document the risk evaluation and determine if the EU meets the Zone 2 ROD requirements for unrestricted industrial use to 10 ft bgs; (3) Identify additional areas not defined in the Zone 2 ROD that require remediation based on the DVS evaluation results; and (4) Describe RAs performed in the EU Z2-33 BOS Laboratory Area and two small areas in EU Z2-42. Approximately 18 acres in EU Z2-33 are addressed in this PCCR. Based on the results of the DVS evaluation and RAs performed, all 18 acres are recommended for unrestricted industrial use to 10 ft bgs. Three Federal Facility Agreement sites are addressed and recommended for no further action within this acreage, including: (1) K-1004-L Recirculating Cooling Water Lines Leak Sites; (2) K-1044 Heavy Equipment Repair Shop; and (3) K-1015-A Laundry Pit. Remedial actions for EU Z2-33 were developed in response to DVS characterization results described in the EU Z2-33 Technical Memorandum (Appendix A) and to support reindustrialization of the East Tennessee Technology Park as a commercial industrial park. Remediation criteria were designed for the protection of a future industrial worker who normally would not have the potential for exposure to soil below 10ft bgs. Accordingly, the Zone 2 ROD required land use controls to prevent disturbance of soils below 10 ft deep and to restrict future land use to industrial/commercial activities. In response to stakeholder comments, the U.S. Department of Energy agreed to re-evaluate the need for such land use

  19. Recovering Servicemembers and Veterans: Sustained Leadership Attention and Systematic Oversight Needed to Resolve Persistent Problems Affecting Care and Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Oversight, Resources, and Collaboration Lack of Leadership and Oversight Has Limited DOD’s and VA’s Ability to Effectively Manage Programs for...RECOVERING SERVICEMEMBERS AND VETERANS Sustained Leadership Attention and Systematic Oversight Needed to Resolve...Persistent Problems Affecting Care and Benefits Report to Congressional Committees November 2012 GAO-13-5 Don’t have a QR code reader

  20. Independent Verification Survey Report For Zone 1 Of The East Tennessee Technology Park In Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) conducted in-process inspections and independent verification (IV) surveys in support of DOE's remedial efforts in Zone 1 of East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Inspections concluded that the remediation contractor's soil removal and survey objectives were satisfied and the dynamic verification strategy (DVS) was implemented as designed. Independent verification (IV) activities included gamma walkover surveys and soil sample collection/analysis over multiple exposure units (EUs)

  1. Tennessee health studies agreement. Annual report for year 5, January 1--December 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    This report summarizes the Oak Ridge Health Studies project for the period January 1, 1996, to December 31, 1996. Attention is focused on dose reconstruction which is comprised of seven separate tasks. They are: Task 1, investigation of radioiodine from radioactive lanthanum processing; Task 2, investigation of mercury releases from lithium enrichment; Task 3, investigation of releases of PCBs from Oak Ridge facilities; Task 4, investigation of releases of radionuclides from White Oak Creek to the Clinch River; Task 5, plan to perform a systematic document search; Task 6, investigation of the quality of historical uranium effluent monitoring of Oak Ridge facilities; and Task 7, additional screening of materials not evaluated in the dose reconstruction feasibility study.

  2. Tennessee health studies agreement. Annual report for year 5, January 1 - December 31, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    This report summarizes the Oak Ridge Health Studies project for the period January 1, 1996, to December 31, 1996. Attention is focused on dose reconstruction which is comprised of seven separate tasks. They are: Task 1, investigation of radioiodine from radioactive lanthanum processing; Task 2, investigation of mercury releases from lithium enrichment; Task 3, investigation of releases of PCBs from Oak Ridge facilities; Task 4, investigation of releases of radionuclides from White Oak Creek to the Clinch River; Task 5, plan to perform a systematic document search; Task 6, investigation of the quality of historical uranium effluent monitoring of Oak Ridge facilities; and Task 7, additional screening of materials not evaluated in the dose reconstruction feasibility study

  3. Nuclear cooperation agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear cooperation agreements are reviewed in tabular form, especially agreements with developing countries. The reporting countries are the USA, the Federal Republic of Germany, Canada, Australia, Japan, and France. A separate EURATOM list is annexed

  4. Developing an academic health department in Northeast Tennessee: a sustainable approach through student leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Billy; Blackley, David; Masters, Paula; May, Andrew Stephen; Mayes, Gary; Williams, Christian; Pack, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to bridge the gap between public health practice and academia, the Health Resources and Services Administration-funded Tennessee Public Health Training Center (LIFEPATH) has supported establishment of an academic health department (AHD) involving the East Tennessee State University College of Public Health (COPH) and the Sullivan County Regional Health Department (SCRHD). The SCRHD identified a need to increase internal capacity to conduct ongoing community health assessment and community-centered practice. Similarly, the COPH recognized the need to expand evidence-based practice implementation and evaluation opportunities for public health students. Personnel from the SCRHD, LIFEPATH, and the COPH developed a formal AHD agreement during the summer of 2012 and launched the program the subsequent fall semester. One aspect of the COPH/SCRHD/LIFEPATH model that addresses financial barriers experienced by other AHDs is the competitive awarding of the coordinator position to a doctor of public health student from the COPH, demonstrating investment in the model by the college. The doctor of public health student gains leadership experience through project management, coordination of the local health council, and day-to-day facilitation of undergraduate and master's student interns. The SCRHD benefits from the formal academic background of graduate-level interns dedicated to working in the community. This AHD framework offers an opportunity for doctoral-level students to develop practical leadership skills in a health department while enhancing the capacity of the SCRHD and the COPH to serve their community and stakeholders.

  5. Surficial Geologic Map of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park Region, Tennessee and North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southworth, Scott; Schultz, Art; Denenny, Danielle; Triplett, James

    2004-01-01

    The Surficial Geology of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park Region, Tennessee and North Carolina was mapped from 1993 to 2003 under a cooperative agreement between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Park Service (NPS). This 1:100,000-scale digital geologic map was compiled from 2002 to 2003 from unpublished field investigations maps at 1:24,000-scale. The preliminary surficial geologic data and map support cooperative investigations with NPS, the U.S. Natural Resource Conservation Service, and the All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory (http://www.dlia.org/) (Southworth, 2001). Although the focus of our work was within the Park, the geology of the surrounding area is provided for regional context. Surficial deposits document the most recent part of the geologic history of this part of the western Blue Ridge and eastern Tennessee Valley of the Valley and Ridge of the Southern Appalachians. Additionally, there is great variety of surficial materials, which directly affect the different types of soil and associated flora and fauna. The surficial deposits accumulated over tens of millions of years under varied climatic conditions during the Cenozoic era and resulted from a composite of geologic processes.

  6. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Tennessee. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2006 IECC base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Tennessee.

  7. Ground-Water-Quality Data for Selected Wells in the Beaver Creek Watershed, West Tennessee

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, Shannon D

    1996-01-01

    In 1993 the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, began an investigation of the quality of ground water in the Beaver Creek watershed in West Tennessee...

  8. Fiscal year 1994 well installation program summary report, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This report summarizes the well installation activities conducted during the federal fiscal year (FY) 1994 drilling program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Synopses of monitoring well construction/well development data, well location rationale, geological/hydrological observations, quality assurance/quality control methods, and health and safety monitoring are included. Two monitoring wells were installed and one piezometer installation was attempted, but not completed, during the FY 1994 drilling program. In addition, SAIC provided health and safety and geotechnical oversight for two soil borings in support of the Y-12 Underground Storage Tank (UST) Program. All new monitoring wells were developed by either a 2.0-in. diameter swab rig or by hand bailing until nonspecific indicator parameters (pH and specific conductance) attained steady-state levels. Turbidity levels were lowered, if required, to the extent practicable by continued development beyond a steady-state level of pH and conductance. All well installation was conducted following industry-standard methods and approved procedures in the Environment Surveillance Procedures Quality Control Program (Energy Systems 1988), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Groundwater Monitoring Technical Enforcement Guidance Document (EPA 1986), and Guidelines for Installation of Monitor Wells at the Y-12 Plant (Geraghty and Miller 1985). Health and safety monitoring and field screening of drilling returns and development waters were conducted in accordance with approved Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) guidelines. All of the monitoring wells installed during FY 1994 at the Y-12 Plant were of screened construction

  9. Improvements Needed in Managing Scope Changes and Oversight of Construction Projects at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-30

    Improvements Needed in Managing Scope Changes and Oversight of Construction Projects at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti S E P T E M B E R 3 0 , 2 0 1 6 Report...Improvements Needed in Managing Scope Changes and Oversight of Construction Projects at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti Visit us at www.dodig.mil Objective We...Findings (cont’d) ii │ DODIG-2016-141 (Project No. D2014-D000RE-0157.000) Results in Brief Improvements Needed in Managing Scope Changes and Oversight

  10. Testimony of Kevin Huffman, Tennessee Commissioner of Education, before the House Committee on Education and Labor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the testimony of Kevin Huffman, Tennessee Commissioner of Education, before the House Committee on Education and Labor. He talks about the work done by the Tennessee Department of Education to improve education for the nearly 950,000 public school students in Tennessee. He starts by providing some context about his and his…

  11. Voices from the Classroom: Results from the 2016 Tennessee Educator Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Isaiah

    2016-01-01

    The Tennessee Educator Survey, created in partnership with the Tennessee Education Research Alliance at Vanderbilt University (TERA), aims to take the pulse of teacher perceptions, monitor school climate and culture across the state, and include educators' voices in the policy discussion. The survey offers a snapshot of where Tennessee is--and…

  12. Design demonstrations for Category B tank system piping at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    Demonstration of the design of the tank systems described in this report is stipulated by the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-Region IV, the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, and the U.S. Department of Energy. This report provides a design demonstration of the secondary containment and ancillary equipment of 30 piping systems listed in the FFA as Category B (i.e., existing tank systems with secondary containment). The design demonstrations were developed using information obtained from design drawings (as-built when available), construction specifications, and interviews with facility operators. Each design demonstration addresses system conformance to the requirements of the FFA (Appendix F, Section C). Deficiencies or restrictions regarding the ability to demonstrate that each of the containment systems conforms to FFA requirements are noted in the discussion of each piping system

  13. Design demonstrations for category B tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    This document presents design demonstrations conducted of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) storage tank systems located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Demonstration of the design of these tank systems has been stipulated by the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) between the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Region IV; the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC); and the DOE. The FFA establishes four categories of tanks. These are: Category A -- New or replacement tank systems with secondary containment; Category B -- Existing tank systems with secondary containment; Category C -- Existing tank systems without secondary containment; Category D -- Existing tank systems without secondary containment that are removed from service. This document provides a design demonstration of the secondary containment and ancillary equipment of 11 tank systems listed in the FFA as Category B. The design demonstration for each tank is presented

  14. Design demonstrations for category B tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-11-01

    This document presents design demonstrations conducted of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) storage tank systems located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Demonstration of the design of these tank systems has been stipulated by the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) between the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Region IV; the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC); and the DOE. The FFA establishes four categories of tanks. These are: Category A -- New or replacement tank systems with secondary containment; Category B -- Existing tank systems with secondary containment; Category C -- Existing tank systems without secondary containment; Category D -- Existing tank systems without secondary containment that are removed from service. This document provides a design demonstration of the secondary containment and ancillary equipment of 11 tank systems listed in the FFA as Category B. The design demonstration for each tank is presented.

  15. Tennessee Valley and Eastern Kentucky Wind Working Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katie Stokes

    2012-05-03

    In December 2009, the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy (SACE), through a partnership with the Appalachian Regional Commission, EKPC, Kentucky's Department for Energy Development and Independence, SACE, Tennessee's Department of Environment and Conservation, and TVA, and through a contract with the Department of Energy, established the Tennessee Valley and Eastern Kentucky Wind Working Group (TVEKWWG). TVEKWWG consists of a strong network of people and organizations. Working together, they provide information to various organizations and stakeholders regarding the responsible development of wind power in the state. Members include representatives from utility interests, state and federal agencies, economic development organizations, non-government organizations, local decision makers, educational institutions, and wind industry representatives. The working group is facilitated by the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy. TVEKWWG supports the Department of Energy by helping educate and inform key stakeholders about wind energy in the state of Tennessee.

  16. Run-time Assurance for Safe UAS Operations with Reduced Human Oversight, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Current Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) operations in the National Airspace System (NAS) rely heavily on human oversight, with the majority of commercial operations...

  17. Regulatory Oversight Program, July 1, 1993--March 3, 1997. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    On July, 1993, a Regulatory Oversight (RO) organization was established within the US DOE, Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) to provide regulatory oversight of the DOE uranium enrichment facilities leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The purpose of the OR program was to ensure continued plant safety, safeguards and security while the plants were transitioned to regulatory oversight by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Volume 3 contains copies of two reports that document the DOE/ORO regulatory oversight inspection and enforcement history for each gaseous diffusion plant site. Each report provides a formal mechanism by which DOE/ORO could communicate the inspection and enforcement history to NRC. The reports encompass the inspection activities that occurred during July 1, 1993 through March 2, 1997.

  18. Political and Budgetary Oversight of the Ukrainian Intelligence Community: Processes, Problems and Prospects for Reform

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Petrov, Oleksii

    2007-01-01

    .... Official government documents, news reports and other literature on the intelligence system in Ukraine, as well as studies of intelligence oversight within democracies are the primary sources of data...

  19. Regulatory Oversight of Safety Culture in Nuclear Installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-03-01

    Experience across the international nuclear industry and in other technical fields over the past few decades has demonstrated the importance of a healthy safety culture in maintaining the safety of workers, the public and the environment. Both regulators and the nuclear industry recognize the need for licensees to develop a strong safety culture in order to support successful and sustainable nuclear safety performance. Progress over recent years can be observed in the rapid development of approaches to overseeing licensees' safety culture. This publication follows on and complements earlier publications on safety culture, from the publication Safety Culture (Safety Series No. 75-INSAG-4 (1991)), published after the Chernobyl accident, to the more recently published Safety Requirements on The Management System for Facilities and Activities (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-3 (2006)), which states that the management system is to be used to promote and support a strong safety culture. A number of attempts have been made at both the international and national levels to establish practical approaches to regulatory oversight of safety culture. During 2010 and 2011, two projects were conducted by the IAEA under the scope of the Safe Nuclear Energy - Regional Excellence Programme within the Norwegian Cooperation Programme with Bulgaria and Romania. These projects were implemented at the Bulgarian and Romanian regulatory bodies. They encompassed the development of a specific process to oversee licensees' safety culture, and involved 30 experts from 17 countries and 22 organizations. The IAEA continues to support Member States in the area of safety culture through its projects on safety management and capacity building. This publication addresses the basics of regulatory oversight of safety culture, describes the approaches currently implemented at several regulatory bodies around the world and, based on these examples, proposes a path to developing such a process

  20. Student Loans: Oversight of Servicemembers Interest Rate Cap Could Be Strengthened

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    STUDENT LOANS Oversight of Servicemembers’ Interest Rate Cap Could Be Strengthened Report to Ranking Member...Governmental Affairs, U.S. Senate November 2016 STUDENT LOANS Oversight of Servicemembers’ Interest Rate Cap Could Be Strengthened Why GAO Did...This Study SCRA helps servicemembers financially by capping interest rates on student loans during active duty. As of May 2016, about 1.3 million

  1. Shareholders' agreements in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik

    2010-01-01

    The article warns that with effect from 1 March 2010, the new Danish Companies Act (on public and private limited companies) has seriously weakened the effect of shareholders’ agreements which have been entered into on Danish companies. These agreements (in the act’s new terminology: “owners...

  2. Competition for Assistance Agreements

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is EPA policy to promote competition in the award of assistance agreements to the maximum extent practicable.When assistance agreements are awarded competitively, it is EPA policy that the competitive process be fair and open & that no applicant receive

  3. Predicting recidivism among first admissions at Tennessee's state psychiatric hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, E W; Sherwood, V; Fitzpatrick, L J

    1983-10-01

    Using data from computerized patient records, the authors attempted to identify characteristics of first admissions to state psychiatric facilities who would later become recidivists. In an examination of 22,062 first admissions to all state hospitals in Tennessee, they found six variables with significant ability to predict recidivism: age, delusional beliefs, assaultive acts, out-of-state residence, indigence, and living with parents. A risk profile that predicted future recidivism with statistical significance at all five Tennessee state hospitals was subsequently developed, but the predictive accuracy was too low for the profile to be clinically useful. The authors believe the benefits of early identification of patients at risk justify further research.

  4. The role of physician oversight on advanced practice nurses' professional autonomy and empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Polly A; Way, Sandra M

    2017-05-01

    Little is known about the effects of physician oversight on advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs). Examination of these relationships provides insight into the strength of independent practice. The purpose of this study was to examine whether APRNs' perceptions of autonomy and empowerment varied according to type of physician oversight, whether facilitative or restrictive. A cross-sectional survey design was used to examine whether APRNs' perceptions of autonomy and empowerment varied according to physician oversight, geographical location, and practice setting. Five hundred questionnaires were mailed in March 2013 with 274 returned. Participants were asked about autonomy, empowerment, demographics, physician oversight, geographical location, and practice setting. Among surveyed respondents, physician oversight was related to increased empowerment, regardless of whether the oversight was defined in facilitative or restrictive terms; both had similar positive effects on empowerment. If APRNs are to be part of the solution to the growing problem of healthcare access, it is important to study factors that contribute to their success. We speculate that increasing opportunities for collaboration and interaction with physicians, and possibly other healthcare professionals, could facilitate APRN empowerment, optimizing their contribution. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  5. Moving forward responsibly: Oversight for the nanotechnology-biology interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzma, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Challenges and opportunities for appropriate oversight of nanotechnology applied to or derived from biological systems (nano-bio interface) were discussed in a public workshop and dialog hosted by the Center for Science, Technology, and Public Policy of the University of Minnesota on September 15, 2005. This paper discusses the themes that emerged from the workshop, including the importance of analyzing potential gaps in current regulatory systems; deciding upon the general approach taken toward regulation; employing non-regulatory mechanisms for governance; making risk and other studies transparent and available to the public; bolstering mechanisms for public participation in risk analysis; creating more opportunities for meaningful discussion of the social and ethical dimensions of the nano-bio interface; increasing funds for implications and problem-solving research in this area; and having independent and reliable sources for communication. The workshop was successful in identifying ways of moving forward responsibly so that ultimately nanotechnology and its products can succeed in developers', researchers', regulators', and the public's eyes

  6. Regulation and oversight of independent health facilities in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pries, Charlene R; Vanin, Sharon; Cartagena, Rosario G

    2014-02-01

    Independent health facilities ("IHFs") are an important part of Canada's health care system existing at the interface of public and private care. They offer benefits to individual patients and the public at large, such as improved access to care, reduced wait times, improved choice in the delivery of care, and more efficient use of health care resources. They can also provide physicians greater autonomy, control of resources, and opportunity for profit compared to other practice settings, particularly because IHFs can deliver services outside of publicly-funded health care plans. IHFs also present challenges, particularly around quality of care and patient safety, and the potential to breach the principles of "Medicare" under the Canada Health Act. Various measures are in place to address these challenges, while still enabling the benefits IHFs can offer. IHFs are primarily regulated and overseen at the provincial level through legislation, regulations and provincial medical regulatory College by-laws. Health Canada is responsible for administering the overarching framework for "Medicare". Oversight and regulatory provisions vary across Canada, and are notably absent in the Maritime provinces and the territories. This article provides an overview of specific provisions related to IHFs across the country and how they can co-exist with the Canada Health Act.

  7. A Study of Construction Reactor Oversight Process in US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, I.; Kim, S. Y.; Jeong, G. Y.; Kim, S. P.

    2015-01-01

    This process provides a risk-informed approach such as construction significance determination process (SDP) and construction program performance index analogous to those used in the Reactor Oversight Process (ROP). The cROP has been applied to Vogtle units 3, 4 and V.C. Summer units 2, 3 under construction for the regulatory inspection. In this paper, the cROP is dissected to present its major contents and characteristics. The main features of the cROP can be summarized as followings: 1) The cROP which adopts the concept of the ROP used for operating NPPs assesses NPP under construction periodically to determine the appropriate level of regulatory response. 2) The cROP consists of three parts: the CIP, the CAP and the CEP. 3) The inspections for NPPs under construction can be categorized into three parts: vendor inspection, baseline inspection and supplemental and plant specific inspections. USNRC's regulatory resources can be used effectively based on baseline inspection, which is using ITAAC inspections. The construction SDP is used to assign the color scheme to categorize the significance of inspection findings. Regulatory actions are taken from CAM to which the significance of inspection findings input. In this paper, major contents and characteristics of USNRC's cROP have been presented

  8. Restart oversight assessment of Hanford 242-A evaporator: Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    This report summarizes a January 17--28, 1994, oversight assessment of restart activities for the 242-A Evaporator at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site about 25 miles northeast of Hanford, Washington. The assessment was conducted by qualified staff and consultants from the DOE Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). Its focus was the readiness of the facility for the resumption of safe operations, in particular those operations involved in the treatment and disposal of condensate from the evaporation of liquid radioactive waste, a key element of the tank waste remediation project administered by the DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL). Overall, the assessment yielded eight programmatic concerns, supported by 38 individual findings. Of the concerns, four have already been closed, and the other four have been resolved. Results pointed up strengths in management and engineering design, as well as effective support of facility training programs by the management and operating contractor, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). Weaknesses were evident, however, in conduct of operations, maintenance, and radiological practices. Furthermore, problems in the submittal and approval of Compliance Schedule Approvals--that is, WHC documentation of the status of compliance with DOE orders--were indicative of a programmatic breakdown in the DOE Order compliance process. According to the results of this assessment, there are no safety and health issues that would preclude or delay restart of the evaporator

  9. Moving forward responsibly: Oversight for the nanotechnology-biology interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzma, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Challenges and opportunities for appropriate oversight of nanotechnology applied to or derived from biological systems (nano-bio interface) were discussed in a public workshop and dialog hosted by the Center for Science, Technology, and Public Policy of the University of Minnesota on September 15, 2005. This paper discusses the themes that emerged from the workshop, including the importance of analyzing potential gaps in current regulatory systems; deciding upon the general approach taken toward regulation; employing non-regulatory mechanisms for governance; making risk and other studies transparent and available to the public; bolstering mechanisms for public participation in risk analysis; creating more opportunities for meaningful discussion of the social and ethical dimensions of the nano-bio interface; increasing funds for implications and problem-solving research in this area; and having independent and reliable sources for communication. The workshop was successful in identifying ways of moving forward responsibly so that ultimately nanotechnology and its products can succeed in developers', researchers', regulators', and the public's eyes.

  10. Historical Artifact Collection at the East Tennessee Technology Park

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodpasture, S.T.; Wood, S.K.

    2009-01-01

    The East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) was originally built during World War II as part of the Manhattan Project. Known as the K-25 Site, its primary mission was to enrich uranium for use in atomic weapons. During the Cold War, the site's mission was changed to include the enrichment of uranium for nuclear reactor fuel elements and to recycle spent fuel. In the 1980's, a reduction in the demand for nuclear fuel resulted in the shutdown of the enrichment process and production ceased. The emphasis of the mission for the ETTP was then changed to environmental management and restoration operation. Beginning in the 1990's, re-industrialization (conversion of under-utilized government facilities for use by the private sector) became a major mission at the ETTP. These activities involve cleaning and demolishing facilities. Decommission and demolition (D and D) of facilities at the ETTP or Manhattan Project K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) presented significant challenges complying with the requirements of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) that was negotiated with the stakeholders. Development of a process to identify, record and preserve the artifacts and the cooperation of several agencies and contractors were critical to completing the collection of the artifacts without impacting the D and D project schedule. Additional challenges included contaminated and classified artifacts, entry to facilities with hazardous conditions, schedule pressures and funding for collection and permanent storage. A process was developed to achieve compliance with the requirements of the NHPA. The NHPA requirements and implementing instruments at the ETTP as well as the process developed to preserve significant Manhattan Project era artifacts at the ETTP will be discussed. Implementation of the artifact collection process is also summarized. The challenge of complying with the

  11. The Sicomines Agreement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansson, Johanna

    of the global political economy have shifted, and that China’s position as a foreign policy actor is now consolidated. Continuity, since the 2009 amendment of the agreement, which came about partly as a result of China’s ambitions to take up an active role in the International Monetary Fund (IMF......, the investment into the DRC’s mining sector is in itself beneficial for the country, and the renegotiation of the agreement was positive in the sense that the Congolese state guarantee for the mining component was removed. However, the question of whether the Sicomines agreement is a good deal for the DRC...

  12. Trade Agreements PTI

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The objective of the Trade Agreements PTI is to advance CBP’s mission by working with internal and external stakeholders to facilitate legitimate trade and address...

  13. Australia's nuclear safeguards agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This is a compilation of the bilateral agreements concluded by Australia concerning co-operation in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. The publication also includes the agreement with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for the application of safeguards in connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and the agreement with EURATOM on transfers of nuclear materials from Australia to the European Atomic Energy Community. The other agreements were concluded with the following countries: Canada, Egypt, Finland, France, Japan, Republic of Korea, Philippines, Singapore, Sweden, Switzerland, USSR, United Kingdom and United States. They concern transfers of nuclear materials and equipment, research and development, exchange of information, etc. All contain provisions on safeguards, physical protection and restrictions on exports to third countries [fr

  14. Watershed Management Partnership Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    On November 19, 2004, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers signed the Watershed Management Partnership Agreement to promote watershed health, economic sustainability and community vitality through effective manageme

  15. International Fisheries Agreements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pintassilgo, Pedro; Kronbak, Lone Grønbæk; Lindroos, Marko

    2015-01-01

    This paper surveys the application of game theory to the economic analysis of international fisheries agreements. The relevance of this study comes not only from the existence of a vast literature on the topic but especially from the specific features of these agreements. The emphasis of the survey...... is on coalition games, an approach that has become prominent in the fisheries economics literature over the last decade. It is shown that coalition games were first applied to international fisheries agreements in the late 1990s addressing cooperative issues under the framework of characteristic function games....... Then, progres- sively, this cooperative approach was combined with non-cooperative elements such as the stability analysis of the agreements. Finally, partition function games, which model coalition formation endogenously, were introduced and became the standard approach to study the formation...

  16. Digital Learning Compass: Distance Education State Almanac 2017. Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Julia E.; Seaman, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    This brief report uses data collected under the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES) Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) Fall Enrollment survey to highlight distance education data in the state of Tennessee. The sample for this analysis is comprised of all active, degree-granting…

  17. Evaluating the Impact of Performance Funding in Ohio and Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Nicholas W.; Hicklin Fryar, Alisa; Crespín-Trujillo, Valerie

    2018-01-01

    Today, 35 states use performance-based funding models tying appropriations directly to educational outcomes. Financial incentives should induce colleges to improve performance, but there are several well-documented reasons why this is unlikely to occur. We examine how two of the most robust performance funding states--Tennessee and Ohio--responded…

  18. Teaching Tennessee History: Lesson Plans for the Classroom. Volume III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Lisa, Ed.

    These teacher developed lessons focus on the impact of the New Deal and World War II on east Tennessee. The forum for developing the lessons included a series of lectures by experts in 20th-century scholarship and interpretation, tours, and experiences at historic sites in the region. During the week long program, teachers traveled throughout east…

  19. Screening Mammography Utilization in Tennessee Women: The Association with Residence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kathleen C.; Fitzhugh, Eugene C.; Neutens, James J.; Klein, Diane A.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Approximately 70% of US women over age 40 report mammography screening within 2 years. However, rates are likely to vary by age, income, educational level, and residence. Purpose: To describe the prevalence of screening mammography and associated factors in women living in rural and urban areas of Tennessee. Methods: Using pooled data…

  20. Tennessee Scales up Improved Math Instruction through Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Jennifer; Stein, Mary Kay; Correnti, Richard; Bill, Victoria; Booker, Laura; Schwartz, Nate

    2017-01-01

    If students are to meet higher standards, all educators in the system have to learn how to engage students in reasoning about complex ideas. What levers can state boards of education and state education agencies pull to support the professional learning that makes this possible? A research-practice partnership in Tennessee may shed light on this…

  1. Alex Haley: At Home in the Hills of East Tennessee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, Ann

    1992-01-01

    An interview with Alex Haley six months before his death in February 1992 discusses his impressions of life in Appalachia; the media image of Appalachia; reminiscences of his hometown, Henning, Tennessee; race relations in Appalachia; and his plans for future books. Included are photographs and a eulogy from his funeral. (SV)

  2. Tennessee Higher Education Fact Book: 2015-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennessee Higher Education Commission, 2016

    2016-01-01

    In January 2010, the General Assembly passed the Complete College Tennessee Act (CCTA), a comprehensive reform agenda that seeks to transform public higher education through changes in academic, fiscal and administrative policies at the state and institutional level. While the higher education landscape has been shaped by the CCTA, higher…

  3. Discourse Analysis of Tennessee Williams' "The Glass Menagerie"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalliveettil, George Mathew; Gadallah, Mahmoud Sobhi Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    "The Glass Menagerie" is one of the Tennessee Williams' most famous plays which won the New York Drama Critics' Circle award. It elevated him to be one of the greatest playwrights of his generation. As a playwright, he is skilful to make the readers conscious of the unconscious habits and attitudes in everyday life. In "The Glass…

  4. Financial Reporting for Tennessee Public Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennessee Higher Education Commission, Nashville.

    This manual provides a framework for accounting practices, budgeting and reporting procedures for Tennessee public higher education institutions. Emphasis is placed on principles and procedures of accounting and financial reporting; the balance sheet; statement of changes in fund balances; statement of current funds revenues, expenditures, and…

  5. 77 FR 5740 - Tennessee Abandoned Mine Land Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ..., General Reclamation Requirements; Part 876, Acid Mine Drainage Treatment and Abatement Program; Part 879... fires, subsidence, water loss, dangerous impoundments, abandoned structures/equipment, open mine portals... [SATS NO. TN-001-FOR; OSM 2011-0010] Tennessee Abandoned Mine Land Program AGENCY: Office of Surface...

  6. Tennessee Eastman Plant-wide Industrial Process Challenge Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sales-Cruz, Mauricio; Cameron, Ian; Gani, Rafiqul

    2011-01-01

    This chapter presents a comprehensive analysis and modelling of the Tennessee Eastman challenge problem. Both a simplified model of the system as well as a full process model that includes the energy balances is given. In each case a full model analysis is carried out to establish the degrees...

  7. Recommendations for Nanomedicine Human Subjects Research Oversight: An Evolutionary Approach for an Emerging Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatehi, Leili; Wolf, Susan M.; McCullough, Jeffrey; Hall, Ralph; Lawrenz, Frances; Kahn, Jeffrey P.; Jones, Cortney; Campbell, Stephen A.; Dresser, Rebecca S.; Erdman, Arthur G.; Haynes, Christy L.; Hoerr, Robert A.; Hogle, Linda F.; Keane, Moira A.; Khushf, George; King, Nancy M.P.; Kokkoli, Efrosini; Marchant, Gary; Maynard, Andrew D.; Philbert, Martin; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; Siegel, Ronald A.; Wickline, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    The nanomedicine field is fast evolving toward complex, “active,” and interactive formulations. Like many emerging technologies, nanomedicine raises questions of how human subjects research (HSR) should be conducted and the adequacy of current oversight, as well as how to integrate concerns over occupational, bystander, and environmental exposures. The history of oversight for HSR investigating emerging technologies is a patchwork quilt without systematic justification of when ordinary oversight for HSR is enough versus when added oversight is warranted. Nanomedicine HSR provides an occasion to think systematically about appropriate oversight, especially early in the evolution of a technology, when hazard and risk information may remain incomplete. This paper presents the consensus recommendations of a multidisciplinary, NIH-funded project group, to ensure a science-based and ethically informed approach to HSR issues in nanomedicine, and integrate HSR analysis with analysis of occupational, bystander, and environmental concerns. We recommend creating two bodies, an interagency Human Subjects Research in Nanomedicine (HSR/N) Working Group and a Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Nanomedicine (SAC/N). HSR/N and SAC/N should perform 3 primary functions: (1) analysis of the attributes and subsets of nanomedicine interventions that raise HSR challenges and current gaps in oversight; (2) providing advice to relevant agencies and institutional bodies on the HSR issues, as well as federal and federal-institutional coordination; and (3) gathering and analyzing information on HSR issues as they emerge in nanomedicine. HSR/N and SAC/N will create a home for HSR analysis and coordination in DHHS (the key agency for relevant HSR oversight), optimize federal and institutional approaches, and allow HSR review to evolve with greater knowledge about nanomedicine interventions and greater clarity about attributes of concern. PMID:23289677

  8. The role of Quality Oversight in nuclear and hazardous waste management and environmental restoration at Westinghouse Hanford Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouad, H.Y.

    1994-05-01

    The historical factors that led to the waste at Hanford are outlined. Westinghouse Hanford Company mission and organization are described. The role of the Quality Oversight organization in nuclear hazardous waste management and environmental restoration at Westinghouse Hanford Company is delineated. Tank Waste Remediation Systems activities and the role of the Quality Oversight organization are described as they apply to typical projects. Quality Oversight's role as the foundation for implementation of systems engineering and operation research principles is pointed out

  9. Facilitating Institutional Oversight and Program Improvement Through Educational Competency Committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolsek, Kathryn M; Fortune, Rhea F; Nagler, Alisa; Stancil, Chrystal; Kuhn, Catherine; McNeill, Diana

    2016-07-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires programs to engage annually in program evaluation and improvement. We assessed the value of creating educational competency committees (ECCs) that use successful elements of 2 established processes-institutional special reviews and institutional oversight of annual program evaluations. The ECCs used a template to review programs' annual program evaluations. Results were aggregated into an institutional dashboard. We calculated the costs, sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value by comparing programs required to have a special review with those that had ACGME citations, requests for a progress report, or a data-prompted site visit. We assessed the value for professional development through a participant survey. Thirty-two ECCs involving more than 100 individuals reviewed 237 annual program evaluations over a 3-year period. The ECCs required less time than internal reviews. The ECCs rated 2 to 8 programs (2.4%-9.8%) as "noncompliant." One to 13 programs (1.2%-14.6%) had opportunities for improvement identified. Institutional improvements were recognized using the dashboard. Zero to 13 programs (0%-16%) were required to have special reviews. The sensitivity of the decision to have a special review was 83% to 100%; specificity was 89% to 93%; and negative predictive value was 99% to 100%. The total cost was $280 per program. Of the ECC members, 86% to 95% reported their participation enhanced their professional development, and 60% to 95% believed the ECC benefited their program. Educational competency committees facilitated the identification of institution-wide needs, highlighted innovation and best practices, and enhanced professional development. The cost, sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value indicated good value.

  10. Overseeing oversight: governance of quality and safety by hospital boards in the English NHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannion, Russell; Davies, Huw; Freeman, Tim; Millar, Ross; Jacobs, Rowena; Kasteridis, Panos

    2015-01-01

    To contribute towards an understanding of hospital board composition and to explore board oversight of patient safety and health care quality in the English NHS. We reviewed the theory related to hospital board governance and undertook two national surveys about board management in NHS acute and specialist hospital trusts in England. The first survey was issued to 150 trusts in 2011/2012 and was completed online via a dedicated web tool. A total 145 replies were received (97% response rate). The second online survey was undertaken in 2012/2013 and targeted individual board members, using a previously validated standard instrument on board members' attitudes and competencies (the Board Self-Assessment Questionnaire). A total of 334 responses were received from 165 executive and 169 non-executive board members, providing at least one response from 95 of the 144 NHS trusts then in existence (66% response rate). Over 90% of the English NHS trust boards had 10-15 members. We found no significant difference in board size between trusts of different types (e.g. Foundation Trusts versus non-Foundation Trusts and Teaching Hospital Trusts versus non-Teaching Hospital Trusts). Clinical representation on boards was limited: around 62% had three or fewer members with clinical backgrounds. For about two-thirds of the trusts (63%), board members with a clinical background comprised less than 30% of the members. Boards were using a wide range and mix of quantitative performance metrics and soft intelligence (e.g. walk-arounds, patient stories) to monitor their organisations with regard to patient safety. The Board Self-Assessment Questionnaire data showed generally high or very high levels of agreement with desirable statements of practice in each of its six dimensions. Aggregate levels of agreement within each dimension ranged from 73% (for the dimension addressing interpersonal issues) to 85% (on the political). English NHS boards largely hold a wide range of attitudes and

  11. Improving MC and A Oversight in Russia by Implementing Measurement and Training Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokov, Dmitry; Byers, Kenneth R.

    2004-01-01

    As the Russian State regulatory agency responsible for oversight of nuclear material control and accounting (MC and A), Gosatomnadzor of Russia (GAN) determines the status of the MC and A programs at Russian facilities. Last year, GAN developed and implemented their Nuclear Material Measurement Program Plan which documents current non-destructive assay (NDA) measurement capability in all regions of GAN; provides justification for upgrades to equipment, procedures and training; and defines the inspector-facility operator interface as it relates to NDA measurement equipment use. This Program Plan has helped to give the GAN inspection measurements more legal and official status as an oversight tool, and has also helped to improve other GAN MC and A oversight activities. These improvements include developing a tamper-indicating device program, conducting NDA workshops at specific Russian nuclear facilities to better train MC and A inspectors, and developing training evaluation programs. The Program is an important tool to address the GAN role in oversight of the Russian Federal Information System nuclear material database. This paper describes the feedback received from the GAN regional offices on the implementation of the Program Plan during its first year in operation and how the Program Plan has affected other GAN inspection activities to improve MC and A oversight.

  12. Regulatory Oversight of Safety Culture in Finland: A Systemic Approach to Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oedewald, P.; Väisäsvaara, J.

    2016-01-01

    In Finland the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority STUK specifies detailed regulatory requirements for good safety culture. Both the requirements and the practical safety culture oversight activities reflect a systemic approach to safety: the interconnections between the technical, human and organizational factors receive special attention. The conference paper aims to show how the oversight of safety culture can be integrated into everyday oversight activities. The paper also emphasises that the scope of the safety culture oversight is not specific safety culture activities of the licencees, but rather the overall functioning of the licence holder or the new build project organization from safety point of view. The regulatory approach towards human and organizational factors and safety culture has evolved throughout the years of nuclear energy production in Finland. Especially the recent new build projects have highlighted the need to systematically pay attention to the non-technical aspects of safety as it has become obvious how the HOF issues can affect the design processes and quality of construction work. Current regulatory guides include a set of safety culture related requirements. The requirements are binding to the licence holders and they set both generic and specific demands on the licencee to understand, monitor and to develop safety culture of their own organization but also that of their supplier network. The requirements set for the licence holders has facilitated the need to develop the regulator’s safety culture oversight practices towards a proactive and systemic approach.

  13. Deep Residential Retrofits in East Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; Hendrick, Timothy P [ORNL; Christian, Jeffrey E [ORNL; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL

    2012-04-01

    Executive Summary Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is furthering residential energy retrofit research in the mixed-humid climate of East Tennessee by selecting 10 homes and guiding the homeowners in the energy retrofit process. The homeowners pay for the retrofits, and ORNL advises which retrofits to complete and collects post-retrofit data. This effort is in accordance with the Department of Energy s Building America program research goal of demonstrating market-ready energy retrofit packages that reduce home energy use by 30 50%. Through this research, ORNL researchers hope to understand why homeowners decide to partake in energy retrofits, the payback of home energy retrofits, and which retrofit packages most economically reduce energy use. Homeowner interviews help the researchers understand the homeowners experience. Information gathered during the interviews will aid in extending market penetration of home energy retrofits by helping researchers and the retrofit industry understand what drives homeowners in making positive decisions regarding these retrofits. This report summarizes the selection process, the pre-retrofit condition, the recommended retrofits, the actual cost of the retrofits (when available), and an estimated energy savings of the retrofit package using EnergyGauge . Of the 10 households selected to participate in the study, only five completed the recommended retrofits, three completed at least one but no more than three of the recommended retrofits, and two households did not complete any of the recommended retrofits. In the case of the two homes that did none of the recommended work, the pre-retrofit condition of the homes and the recommended retrofits are reported. The five homes that completed the recommended retrofits are monitored for energy consumption of the whole house, appliances, space conditioning equipment, water heater, and most of the other circuits with miscellaneous electric loads (MELs) and lighting. Thermal comfort is

  14. Brief introduction of USA new reactor oversight process and suggestions for our country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Xiaofeng; Chen Rui; Zhou Limin; Wang Xiuqing

    2002-01-01

    The NRC New Reactor Oversight Process focuses the nuclear safety supervision on the 3 areas: Reactor Safety, Radiation safety and Plant Security. Within the 3 areas, 7 cornerstones are detailed for the purpose. They are Initiating Events, Mitigating Systems, Barrier Integrity, Emergency Preparedness, Occupational Radiation Protection, Public Radiation Safety and Physical Protection. On cooperating with the inspections, the new process ensures a more effective, objective and timely evaluation of the safety level of the operating nuclear power plants. On considering the practices and the status in China nuclear safety supervision, the authors have to learn something from the NRC New Reactor Oversight Process. The authors must make an optimization on Chinese limited resources and put the emphasis on the issues with high risk in order to prevent the occurrence of the accidents. Properly inducing some ideas and methodology from the NRC New Reactor Oversight Process will benefit the development and perfection of the supervision mode of the NNSA

  15. Biological Select Agents and Toxins: Risk-Based Assessment Management and Oversight.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnett, LouAnn Crawford; Brodsky, Benjamin H.

    2016-12-01

    Sandia National Laboratories' International Biological and Chemical Threat Reduction (SNL/IBCTR) conducted, on behalf of the Federal Select Agent Program (FSAP), a review of risk assessment in modern select agent laboratories. This review and analysis consisted of literature review, interviews of FSAP staff, entities regulated by FSAP, and deliberations of an expert panel. Additionally, SNL/IBCTR reviewed oversight mechanisms used by industries, US agencies, and other countries for high-consequence risks (e.g, nuclear, chemical, or biological materials, aviation, off-shore drilling, etc.) to determine if alternate oversight mechanisms existed that might be applicable to FSAP oversight of biological select agents and toxins. This report contains five findings, based on these reviews and analyses, with recommendations and suggested actions for FSAP to consider.

  16. Fiscal Year 2014: Comprehensive Oversight Plan for Southwest Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    391-13-004-P Audit of USAID/Pakistan’s Agribusiness Project (Project: GG100513) 06/12/2013 PK 1010 6-267-13-031-N Audit of the Fund Accountability...Audit of the Program Titled: “USAID Agribusiness Project,” USAID/Pakistan Agreement No. AID-391-A-12-00001, Managed by Agribusiness Support Fund

  17. FFTF Authorization Agreement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAUTEL, W.A.

    2000-02-25

    The purpose of the Authorization Agreement is to serve as a mechanism whereby the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) and Fluor Hanford (FH) jointly clarify and agree to key conditions for conducting work safely and efficiently.

  18. International environmental agreements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Zeeuw, Aart

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of environmental externalities at the global level requires international agreements between sovereign states. Game theory provides an appropriate theoretical tool for analysis. However, game theory can result in a wide range of outcomes, and therefore it is important to discuss the

  19. Institutional Oversight of Occupational Health and Safety for Research Programs Involving Biohazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Melissa C; Carpenter, Calvin B; Colby, Lesley A

    2017-06-01

    Research with hazardous biologic materials (biohazards) is essential to the progress of medicine and science. The field of microbiology has rapidly advanced over the years, partially due to the development of new scientific methods such as recombinant DNA technology, synthetic biology, viral vectors, and the use of genetically modified animals. This research poses a potential risk to personnel as well as the public and the environment. Institutions must have appropriate oversight and take appropriate steps to mitigate the risks of working with these biologic hazards. This article will review responsibilities for institutional oversight of occupational health and safety for research involving biologic hazards.

  20. Year 2000 estimated population dose for the Tennessee Valley region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, J.F.; Strauch, S.; Siegel, G.R.; Witherspoon, J.P.

    1976-01-01

    A comprehensive study has recently been completed of the potential regional radiological dose in the Tennessee and Cumberland river basins in the year 2000, resulting from the operation of nuclear facilities. This study, sponsored jointly by the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration and the Tennessee Valley Authority, was performed by the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL), the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Laboratory (ATDL). This study considered the operation in the year 2000 of 33,000 MWe of nuclear capacity within the study area, and of 110,000 MWe in adjacent areas, together with supporting nuclear fuel fabrication and reprocessing facilities. Air and water transport models used and methods for calculating nuclide concentrations on the ground are discussed

  1. Whistleblower Protection: DOD Has Improved Oversight for Reprisal Investigations, but Can Take Additional Actions to Standardize Process and Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-07

    WHISTLEBLOWER PROTECTION DOD Has Improved Oversight for Reprisal Investigations, but Can Take Additional Actions to...House of Representatives September 7, 2016 WHISTLEBLOWER PROTECTION DOD Has Improved Oversight for Reprisal Investigations, but Can Take Additional...improve its tracking of the timeliness of military whistleblower reprisal investigations in response to recommendations that GAO made in 2012 and 2015

  2. A Comparative Analysis of the Cost of Oversight of Major Defense Acquisition Programs Strictly under the Direction of the Department of Defense 5000 Series of Instructions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rousseau, Gary

    2004-01-01

    .... The only truth learned throughout this process is that defense acquisition does need oversight and that there is no cookie cutter pattern for oversight that will fit all types of acquisition programs equally well...

  3. Signatures in Lightning Activity during Tennessee Valley Severe Storms of 5-6 May 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatlin, Patrick N.; Goodman, Steven J.

    2004-01-01

    During the first week of May 2003, the Tennessee Valley experienced 14 tornadoes. Those that moved across the Tennessee Valley Region of northern Alabama and southern Tennessee provided an opportunity for study us- ing the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA). On 5 May a classic supercell trekked across southern Tennessee spawning several tornadoes producing FO-F3 damage; on 6 May a high precipitation supercell moved across northern Alabama producing several FO-F1 tornadoes. The life cycle of these supercells will be discussed by presenting their electrical and radar evolution.

  4. University of Tennessee Comparative Animal Research Laboratory accident in 1971

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vodopick, H.; Andrews, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    On 4 February 1971, a 32-year-old research technologist performing seed irradiated experiments at the University of Tennessee Comparative Animal Research Laboratory was exposed to a Cobalt 60 source of 7700 curies for 40 seconds. Details of the accident, dose estimates from dosimetry studies, and acute biological clinical findings are discussed. Follow-up clinical data on the hematopoietic system, biochemistry, fingers, and blood counts are discussed

  5. Solar heating system installed at Jackson, Tennessee. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-10-01

    The solar energy heating system installed at the Coca-Cola Bottling Works in Jackson, Tennessee is described. The system consists of 9480 square feet of Owens-Illinois evacuated tubular solar collectors with attached specular cylindrical reflectors and will provide space heating for the 70,000 square foot production building in the winter, and hot water for the bottle washing equipment the remainder of the year. Component specifications and engineering drawings are included. (WHK)

  6. Raising Awareness of Farm Equipment on Public Roadways in Tennessee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlhorn, Sandy; Darroch, Barbara; Jackson, Staci Williams

    2017-11-20

    A program was developed to educate young drivers about laws and guidelines governing farm equipment on public roadways in Tennessee. The goal of the program was to make young drivers aware of their responsibilities and the responsibilities of farm equipment drivers when sharing public roadways. A presentation was developed outlining the topics and was accompanied by identical pre- and post-surveys. The material was presented to drivers' education classes and agriculture science classes at several high schools in west and middle Tennessee. A total of 365 students between the ages of 13 and 19 participated in the program. The pre- and post-survey scores were used to determine the effectiveness of the program. The average score of the pre-survey for all participants was 66.0%. This score significantly improved to 89.3% for the post-survey (p 0.0001 for paired t-test). Based on these scores, the students were able to gain a better understanding of the laws and guidelines in Tennessee concerning farm equipment on public roadways. Copyright© by the American Society of Agricultural Engineers.

  7. QSource quality initiative. Reversing the diabetes epidemic in Tennessee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, James E; Gibson, Deborah V; Jain, Manoj; Connelly, Stephanie A; Ryder, Kathryn M; Dagogo-Jack, Samuel

    2003-12-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a recent report on diabetes in Tennessee. Diabetes has reached epidemic proportions in Tennessee. In 2001, an estimated 7.7% of the population was diabetic, an increase from 5.8% a decade earlier. This increase is largely due to widespread unhealthy eating habits, physical inactivity, and associated obesity. The majority of diabetes is preventable and can be effectively treated through daily exercise and a healthy diet. Diabetes prevention efforts in Tennessee schools and communities, however, are grossly inadequate. Providers and payers underemphasize prevention. Since the causes of diabetes can be traced to childhood habits, early prevention is the key to reversing the diabetes epidemic. Immediate statewide action must be taken to promote daily exercise and decrease access to high-calorie, high-fat "junk" food in our schools and communities. Physicians, health professional organizations, health plans, government, churches, schools, and employers must work together to battle the diabetes epidemic through public education, community-wide health promotion programs, and efforts to improve quality of diabetes care for all Tennesseans.

  8. Evaluating oversight of human drugs and medical devices: a case study of the FDA and implications for nanobiotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradise, Jordan; Tisdale, Alison W; Hall, Ralph F; Kokkoli, Efrosini

    2009-01-01

    This article evaluates the oversight of drugs and medical devices by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) using an integration of public policy, law, and bioethics approaches and employing multiple assessment criteria, including economic, social, safety, and technological. Criteria assessment and expert elicitation are combined with existing literature, case law, and regulations in an integrative historical case studies approach. We then use our findings as a tool to explore possibilities for effective oversight and regulatory mechanisms for nanobiotechnology. Section I describes oversight mechanisms for human drugs and medical devices and presents current nanotechnology products. Section II describes the results of expert elicitation research. Section III highlights key criteria and relates them to the literature and larger debate. We conclude with broad lessons for the oversight of nanobiotechnology informed by Sections I-III in order to provide useful analysis from multiple disciplines and perspectives to guide discussions regarding appropriate FDA oversight.

  9. REAL ESTATE PURCHASE AGREEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bujorel FLOREA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study presented herein represents a field with good present and future perspectives, especially because real estate property is not under the incidence of a single normative act regarding the sale-purchase agreement of such goods, and given the fact that there are specific legal provisions with respect to various real estate categories and the localization of such property. The article deals with the sale-purchase agreement of various real estate categories, such as fields, buildings, the correspondent lots, urban area, farm, and forests fields, focusing on some particularities. A special care is attributed to examining the applicable laws with regard to the purchase agreements of field lands, the special conditions to be taken into account, the persons that may act as buyers, including foreigners, those without citizenship, and legal persons of a nationality other than Romanian. Finally, a special concern is given to the formalities required for legally exerting the pre-emptive right and the applicable sanctions in that respect.

  10. 77 FR 71803 - Guidance on Food and Drug Administration Oversight of Positron Emission Tomography Drug Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-D-0080] Guidance on Food and Drug Administration Oversight of Positron Emission Tomography Drug Products--Questions and Answers; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food...

  11. 77 FR 11553 - Draft Guidance on Food and Drug Administration Oversight of Positron Emission Tomography Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-D-0080] Draft Guidance on Food and Drug Administration Oversight of Positron Emission Tomography Drug Products--Questions and Answers; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The...

  12. 48 CFR 936.609-3 - Work oversight in architect-engineer contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... architect-engineer contracts. 936.609-3 Section 936.609-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Architect-Engineer Services 936.609-3 Work oversight in architect-engineer contracts. In addition to the clause at 48...

  13. 48 CFR 36.609-3 - Work oversight in architect-engineer contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... architect-engineer contracts. 36.609-3 Section 36.609-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Architect-Engineer Services 36.609-3 Work oversight in architect-engineer contracts. The contracting officer...

  14. 42 CFR 54.9 - Assurances and State oversight of the Charitable Choice requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Assurances and State oversight of the Charitable Choice requirements. 54.9 Section 54.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... PREVENTION AND TREATMENT BLOCK GRANTS AND/OR PROJECTS FOR ASSISTANCE IN TRANSITION FROM HOMELESSNESS GRANTS...

  15. 75 FR 11210 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Order Approving Proposed Amendment to Board Rules...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-10

    ... the target threshold for U.S. market capitalization for 2009. The PCAOB was unable to conduct the... the U.S. market capitalization of the aforementioned 49 firms' issuer audit clients. The proposed rule... jurisdictions have or soon will have a local auditor oversight authority with which the Board would seek to work...

  16. Secrecy and oversight in the European Union: The law and practice of classified information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abazi, V.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis examines the law and practice of official secrets in order to appraise whether and how they restrict democratic oversight and fundamental rights in the European Union. It provides a systematic and in-depth analysis of what the rules of official secrets are, who establishes them and how

  17. 77 FR 2576 - Order Approving Public Company Accounting Oversight Board Budget and Annual Accounting Support...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-18

    ... Accounting Oversight Board Budget and Annual Accounting Support Fee for Calendar Year 2012 The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as amended (the ``Sarbanes-Oxley Act''),\\1\\ established the Public Company Accounting... through registration of public accounting firms and standard setting, inspection, and disciplinary...

  18. 75 FR 81684 - Order Approving Public Company Accounting Oversight Board Budget and Annual Accounting Support...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ... Accounting Oversight Board Budget and Annual Accounting Support Fee for Calendar Year 2011 The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as amended (the ``Sarbanes-Oxley Act''), established the Public Company Accounting... through registration of public accounting firms and standard setting, inspection, and disciplinary...

  19. 78 FR 11915 - Order Approving Public Company Accounting Oversight Board Budget and Annual Accounting Support...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    ... Accounting Oversight Board Budget and Annual Accounting Support Fee for Calendar Year 2013 The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as amended (the ``Sarbanes-Oxley Act''),\\1\\ established the Public Company Accounting... through registration of public accounting firms and standard setting, inspection, and disciplinary...

  20. 29 CFR 37.53 - What are a Governor's oversight responsibilities regarding recipients' recordkeeping?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true What are a Governor's oversight responsibilities regarding... NONDISCRIMINATION AND EQUAL OPPORTUNITY PROVISIONS OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT OF 1998 (WIA) Governor's Responsibilities To Implement the Nondiscrimination and Equal Opportunity Requirements of WIA § 37.53 What are a...

  1. 29 CFR 37.51 - What are a Governor's oversight responsibilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true What are a Governor's oversight responsibilities? 37.51... OPPORTUNITY PROVISIONS OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT OF 1998 (WIA) Governor's Responsibilities To Implement the Nondiscrimination and Equal Opportunity Requirements of WIA § 37.51 What are a Governor's...

  2. Management process invaded Ames as the Center shifted from NACA to NASA oversight. Ames constructed

    Science.gov (United States)

    1968-01-01

    Management process invaded Ames as the Center shifted from NACA to NASA oversight. Ames constructed a review room in its headquarters building where, in the graphical style that prevailed in the 1960's, Ames leadership could review progress against schedule, budget and performance measures. Shown, in October 1965 is Merrill Mead chief of Ames' program and resources office. (for H Julian Allen Retirement album)

  3. 77 FR 57407 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rules on Auditing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-17

    ... financial statements or an audit of financial statements only. 2. Other Public Company Accounting Oversight..., including significant discussions regarding the application of accounting principles and auditing standards... policies and practices.\\15\\ \\15\\ See, e.g., Financial Accounting Standards Board Accounting Standards...

  4. DOD Advertising: Better Coordination, Performance Measurement, and Oversight Needed to Help Meet Recruitment Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    designated to work closely with its advertising agency in monitoring and analyzing performance across key areas. • Officials from the Army, which has the... advertising funds across different types of advertising (e.g., television, print, Internet , etc.), which was a key planning best practice cited by...DOD ADVERTISING Better Coordination, Performance Measurement, and Oversight Needed to Help Meet Recruitment Goals

  5. Policy, Practice, and Research Agenda for Emergency Medical Services Oversight: A Systematic Review and Environmental Scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taymour, Rekar K; Abir, Mahshid; Chamberlin, Margaret; Dunne, Robert B; Lowell, Mark; Wahl, Kathy; Scott, Jacqueline

    2018-02-01

    Introduction In a 2015 report, the Institute of Medicine (IOM; Washington, DC USA), now the National Academy of Medicine (NAM; Washington, DC USA), stated that the field of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) exhibits signs of fragmentation; an absence of system-wide coordination and planning; and a lack of federal, state, and local accountability. The NAM recommended clarifying what roles the federal government, state governments, and local communities play in the oversight and evaluation of EMS system performance, and how they may better work together to improve care. This systematic literature review and environmental scan addresses NAM's recommendations by answering two research questions: (1) what aspects of EMS systems are most measured in the peer-reviewed and grey literatures, and (2) what do these measures and studies suggest for high-quality EMS oversight? To answer these questions, a systematic literature review was conducted in the PubMed (National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Institutes of Health; Bethesda, Maryland USA), Web of Science (Thomson Reuters; New York, New York USA), SCOPUS (Elsevier; Amsterdam, Netherlands), and EMBASE (Elsevier; Amsterdam, Netherlands) databases for peer-reviewed literature and for grey literature; targeted web searches of 10 EMS-related government agencies and professional organizations were performed. Inclusion criteria required peer-reviewed literature to be published between 1966-2016 and grey literature to be published between 1996-2016. A total of 1,476 peer-reviewed titles were reviewed, 76 were retrieved for full-text review, and 58 were retained and coded in the qualitative software Dedoose (Manhattan Beach, California USA) using a codebook of themes. Categorizations of measure type and level of application were assigned to the extracted data. Targeted websites were systematically reviewed and 115 relevant grey literature documents were retrieved. A total of 58 peer-reviewed articles met inclusion

  6. International nuclear agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miatello, A.; Severino, R.

    1988-01-01

    This multilingual glossary, in the laborious compilation of which the authors have been greatly assisted by a group of professional translators and experts, presents for the first time a substantial number of entries in four languages (English, French, German and Italian), whose terminology and phraseology, all bearing the appropriate normative reference, has been drawn from the official text of the most relevant international agreements on nuclear policy. It is complemented by a thorough critical study on the status of nonproliferation by Lawrence Scheinman and Josef Pilat. Librarians, translators and interpreters as well as scholars and researchers in international law will find this volume a reference tool of specific interest

  7. Agreement in Persian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lofti, Ahmad R.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates agreement as a number marking mechanism in Persian. The mechanism differs from number marking on nominals in that with an inanimate plural subject, the SG verbal ending signals a collective conceptualization of the experience where the members of the group are considered together as a single unit. The PL ending, on the other hand, signals a distributive conceptualization where the entities are individuated; hence, they are considered to be dispersed over space, or distinct in sort or time. Autonomy - whether the entity is conceived of as governing the course of events or not - seems to underlie the choice between SG and PL.

  8. THE PLEA BARGAIN AGREEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Daniel ONIȘOR

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Alongside major changes in Romanian criminal law, the plea bargain agreement gave a new approach on the mechanisms of criminal procedure in national law, thus creating a series of problems and divergent interpretations of the content and limits of this mechanism in solving criminal litigation. What motivated us in our scientific analysis was the novelty of the issues that arose both in the doctrine and interpretation of the legal provisions and in the practice of prosecution offices and national courts, the high impact that the new proceedings can have on criminal policy and the need for clear and efficient provisions that can ensure legal certainty. Our paper is divided in four major parts: the nature and object of the agreement, the conditions of plea bargain, the prosecutorial phase, court validation and appeal procedure, in each of these sections taking into account the legal provisions, analyzing working hypothesis, identifying probable issues and problems and providing our opinion on possible solutions. Our findings prove the fact that the novelty aspect of this procedure determined a number of gaps in the law, aspects that can dramatically influence the result of the criminal case and the guarantees that the parties have in criminal law. Moreover it will underline the unclear provisions that make the new law inapplicable in certain cases and leave a number of situations without any lawful solution.

  9. Master Plan for Tennessee Schools, 1995: Preparing for the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennessee State Board of Education, Nashville.

    The Tennessee State Legislature passed the Education Improvement Act (EIA) in 1992, which established the Basic Education Program (BEP) as the funding formula for providing adequate, equitable, and sustainable school funding. This document presents the 1995 Master Plan for Tennessee Schools, which focuses on the priority issues that must be…

  10. 77 FR 60919 - Tennessee: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ...: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions AGENCY: Environmental..., Division of Solid Waste Management, 5th Floor, L & C Tower, 401 Church Street, Nashville, Tennessee 37243... RCRA hazardous waste management program. We granted authorization for changes to Tennessee's program on...

  11. 40 CFR 81.120 - Middle Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Middle Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.120 Section 81.120 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.120 Middle Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The...

  12. Tennessee Education Lottery Scholarship Program Annual Report: Recipient Outcomes through Fall 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennessee Higher Education Commission, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The Tennessee Education Lottery Scholarship (TELS) program was designed to meet the unique needs of the state of Tennessee while also incorporating the hallmark elements of existing merit-based aid programs in other states. Developed through a process involving elected officials and members of the academic community, the TELS program aims to…

  13. 40 CFR 81.119 - Western Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.119 Section 81.119 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.119 Western Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Western Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by...

  14. Relaxation of the Summer Gasoline Volatility Standard for Shelby County (Memphis), Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is taking direct final action to approve a request from the the Middle Tennessee Area for the EPA to relax the Reid Vapor Pressure standard applicable to gasoline introduced into commerce in the summer time for the Middle Tennessee Area.

  15. Recovery Act: Tennessee Energy Efficient Schools Initiative Ground Source Heat Pump Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Townsend, Terry [Townsend Engineering, Inc., Davenport, IA (United States); Slusher, Scott [Townsend Engineering, Inc., Davenport, IA (United States)

    2017-04-24

    The Tennessee Energy Efficient Schools Initiative (EESI) Hybrid-Water Source Heat Pump (HY-GSHP) Program sought to provide installation costs and operation costs for different Hybrid water source heat pump systems’ configurations so that other State of Tennessee School Districts will have a resource for comparison purposes if considering a geothermal system.

  16. Engaging the Learner. Annual Instructional Technology Conference (12th, Murfreesboro, Tennessee, April 1-3, 2007)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Carter F.; Schneider, Gary F.; Kontos, George; Kuzat, Hanan; Janossy, James; Thurmond, Karen; Moore, Beth; Whitledge, Lynn; Speer, Priscilla; Harber, Annette; Bailey, Kathrine; Penney, Samantha

    2007-01-01

    The following is a collection of papers presented at the 12th annual Instructional Technology Conference at Middle Tennessee State University in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. This conference is an opportunity for higher-education professionals from across the country to discuss opportunities and challenges presented by instructional technology. The…

  17. Independent oversight review of the Department of Energy Quality Assurance Program for suspect/counterfeit parts. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    To address the potential threat that suspect/counterfeit parts could pose to DOE workers and the public, the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Oversight initiated a number of activities beginning in mid-1995. Oversight placed increased emphasis on the field's quality assurance-suspect/counterfeit parts programs during safety management evaluations, in keeping with the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) oversight responsibilities, which include oversight of the Department's quality assurance (QA) programs. In addition, Oversight reviewed relevant policy documents and occurrence reports to determine the nature and magnitude of the problem within the Department. The results of that review, contained in an Office of Oversight report, Independent Oversight Analysis of Suspect/Counterfeit Parts Within the Department of Energy (November 1995), indicate a lack of consistency and comprehensiveness in the Department's QA-suspect/counterfeit parts program. A detailed analysis of the causes and impacts of the problem was recommended. In response, this review was initiated to determine the effectiveness of the Department's QA program for suspect/counterfeit parts. This study goes beyond merely assessing and reporting the status of the program, however. It is the authors intention to highlight the complex issues associated with suspect/counterfeit parts in the Department today and to present approaches that DOE managers might consider to address these issues

  18. Predicative Adjective Agreement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikner, Sten

    2001-01-01

    German is a complicated language. Any speaker of e.g. French or Danish who has ever tried to learn German would agree to this. Coming from languages with only two genders and with no case outside the pronoun system, German, with three genders and with four cases throughout the nominal system, seems...... unjustifiably complicated, as if it had been specially designed to torment poor students. However, there is one area where German agreement morphology could not possibly be simpler, and where German is much easier for non-native speakers than e.g. French or Danish: predicative adjectives. Both gender and number...... distinctions, disappear when adjectives are used predicatively. This paper will try to account for why the Germanic languages that inflect attiributive adjectives but not predicative ones are all SOV-languages (e.g. German, Dutch, Frisian and Yiddish)....

  19. Identification of aggregates for Tennessee bituminous surface courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, Heather Jean

    Tennessee road construction is a major venue for federal and state spending. Tax dollars each year go to the maintenance and construction of roads. One aspect of highway construction that affects the public is the safety of its state roads. There are many factors that affect the safety of a given road. One factor that was focused on in this research was the polish resistance capabilities of aggregates. Several pre-evaluation methods have been used in the laboratory to predict what will happen in a field situation. A new pre-evaluation method was invented that utilized AASHTO T 304 procedure upscaled to accommodate surface bituminous aggregates. This new method, called the Tennessee Terminal Textural Condition Method (T3CM), was approved by Tennessee Department of Transportation to be used as a pre-evaluation method on bituminous surface courses. It was proven to be operator insensitive, repeatable, and an accurate indication of particle shape and texture. Further research was needed to correlate pre-evaluation methods to the current field method, ASTM E 274-85 Locked Wheel Skid Trailer. In this research, twenty-five in-place bituminous projects and eight source evaluations were investigated. The information gathered would further validate the T3CM and find the pre-evaluation method that best predicted the field method. In addition, new sources of aggregates for bituminous surface courses were revealed. The results of this research have shown T3CM to be highly repeatable with an overall coefficient of variation of 0.26% for an eight sample repeatability test. It was the best correlated pre-evaluation method with the locked wheel skid trailer method giving an R2 value of 0.3946 and a Pearson coefficient of 0.710. Being able to predict field performance of aggregates prior to construction is a powerful tool capable of saving time, money, labor, and possibly lives.

  20. Education of the rural surgeon: experience from Tennessee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, W Heath; Arnold, Joshua D; Layman, Thomas S; Sumida, Michael P; Brown, Preston W; Burns, R Phillip; Cofer, Joseph B

    2009-12-01

    The rural surgery rotation that is contained within the general surgery residency program at The University of Tennessee College of Medicine-Chattanooga is described in this article. The advantages of this experience, including the extensive endoscopy experience and the close exposure to practicing general surgeons, are also outlined. The rotation receives uniformly positive evaluations from residents at completion, and it has become the primary gastrointestinal endoscopy educational experience in this program. The description serves as a model that can be used by other programs to construct a rural surgery rotation.

  1. Tennessee and Cumberland River Basins radionuclide transport: a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dotson, W.L.; Peterson, D.E.

    1976-01-01

    The current estimates of increased utilization of nuclear power have brought into focus the problem of the cumulative interaction of several nuclear facilities with the biosphere of a region. An engineering analysis tool to make the necessary calculations from which reasonable estimates of potential radiation dose and dose commitment to individuals and population groups in such a region has been devised by Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL). This paper discusses the application of the radionuclide transport elements of this computer code to the Tennessee and Cumberland River Basins. The radionuclide transport simulator codes (HERMES) were designed to evaluate the environment impact of nuclear facilities in or near the year 2000

  2. COMIDA, MUJERES Y PODER EN LA OBRA DE TENNESSEE WILLIAMS

    OpenAIRE

    Torres Zúñiga, Laura

    2013-01-01

    La comida es un código semiótico que trasciende lo biológico y se integra en lo cultural –las normas, restricciones y tradiciones culinarias son indicativas de las relaciones establecidas entre los miembros de una comunidad. En este trabajo se revisan diferentes ejemplos de referencias alimenticias en las obras del dramaturgo estadounidense Tennessee Williams para descubrir cómo los personajes femeninos más indomables –especialmente en sus relatos– hacen uso de la comida como herr...

  3. Design demonstrations for Category B tank systems piping at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    Demonstration of the design of the piping systems described in this report is stipulated by the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Region IV, the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This report provides a design demonstration of the secondary containment and ancillary equipment of 30 piping systems designated in the FFA as Category B (i.e., existing tank systems with secondary containment). Based on the findings of the Design Demonstrations for the Remaining 19 Category B Tank Systems, (DOE/OR/03-1150 ampersand D2), three tank systems originally designated as Category B have been redesignated as Category C (i.e., existing tank systems without secondary containment). The design demonstrations were developed using information obtained from design drawings (as-built when available), construction specifications, and interviews with facility operators. Each design demonstration addresses system conformance to the requirements of the FFA (Appendix F, Section C). Deficiencies or restrictions regarding the ability to demonstrate that each of the containment systems conforms to FFA requirements are noted in the discussion of each piping system and presented in Table 2.0-1

  4. Remedial design work plan for Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    The Remedial Design Work Plan (RDWP) for Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) Operable Unit (OU) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This remedial action fits into the overall Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) cleanup strategy by addressing contaminated floodplain soil. The objective of this remedial action is to minimize the risk to human health and the environment from contaminated soil in the Lower EFPC floodplain pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) (1992). In accordance with the FFA, a remedial investigation (RI) (DOE 1994a) and a feasibility study (DOE 1994b) were conducted to assess contamination of the Lower EFPC and propose remediation alternatives. The remedial investigation determined that the principal contaminant is mercury, which originated from releases during Y-12 Plant operations, primarily between 1953 and 1963. The recommended alternative by the feasibility study was to excavate and dispose of floodplain soils contaminated with mercury above the remedial goal option. Following the remedial investigation/feasibility study, and also in accordance with the FFA, a proposed plan was prepared to more fully describe the proposed remedy.

  5. Environmental monitoring plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This document presents an Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG 6) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This document updates a draft monitoring plan developed in 1993. The draft plan was never finalized awaiting resolution of the mechanisms for addressing RCRA concerns at a site where the CERCLA process resulted in a decision to defer action, i.e., postpone closure indefinitely. Over the past two years the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), US Department of Energy (DOE), and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IV, have agreed that RCRA authority at the site will be maintained through a post- closure permit; ''closure'' in this case referring to deferred action. Both a Revised Closure Plan (DOE 1995a) and a Post-Closure Permit Application (DOE 1995b) have been developed to document this agreement; relevant portions of the EMP will be included in the RCRA Post-Closure Permit Application. As the RCRA issues were being negotiated, DOE initiated monitoring at WAG 6. The purpose of the monitoring activities was to (1) continue to comply with RCRA groundwater quality assessment requirements, (2) install new monitoring equipment, and (3) establish the baseline conditions at WAG 6 against which changes in contaminant releases could be measured. Baseline monitoring is scheduled to end September 30, 1995. Activities that have taken place over the past two years are summarized in this document

  6. VHA Data Sharing Agreement Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The VHA Data Sharing Agreement Repository serves as a centralized location to collect and report on agreements that share VHA data with entities outside of VA. It...

  7. Seismic contracts and agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, N.M.; Krause, V.

    1999-01-01

    Some points to consider regarding management of seismic projects within the Canadian petroleum industry were reviewed. Seismic projects involve the integration of many services. This paper focused on user-provider relationships, the project planning process, competitive bid considerations, the types of agreement used for seismic and their implications, and the impact that certain points of control may have on a company: (1) initial estimate versus actual cost, (2) liability, (3) safety and operational performance, and (4) quality of deliverables. The objective is to drive home the point that in today's environment where companies are forming, merging, or collapsing on a weekly basis , chain of command and accountability are issues that can no longer be dealt with casually. Companies must form business relationships with service providers with a full knowledge of benefits and liabilities of the style of relationship they choose. Diligent and proactive management tends to optimize cost, safety and liability issues, all of which have a bearing on the points of control available to the company

  8. Notification: Audit of EPA's Adherence to Policies, Procedures and Oversight Controls Pertaining to the Administrator’s Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project #OA-FY17-0382, August 28, 2017. The EPA OIG plans to begin preliminary research on the EPA’s adherence to policies, procedures and oversight controls pertaining to the Administrator’s travel to Oklahoma.

  9. NASA S and MA at the Crossroads; The Role of NASA Quality Insight/Oversight for Commercial Crewed Launch Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Roy W., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    The presentation slides examine: The Journey, Current Safety and Mission Assurance (S and MA) Oversight/Insight, The Change, The Issue, Potential NASA relationship with Commercial Partners, and Commercial "X" FRR - Are you Go.

  10. Fiscal Year 2010 Phased Construction Completion Report for EU Z2-32 in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2010-02-01

    The Record of Decision for Soil, Buried Waste, and Subsurface Structure Actions in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOEIORJO 1-2161 &D2) (Zone 2 ROD) acknowledged that most of the 800 acres in Zone 2 were contaminated, but that sufficient data to confirm the levels of contamination were lacking. The Zone 2 ROD further specified that a sampling strategy for filling the data gaps would be developed. The Remedial Design Report/Remedial Action Work Plan for Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOEIORIO 1 -2224&D3) (RDRJRAWP) defined the sampling strategy as the Dynamic Verification Strategy (DVS), generally following the approach used for characterization of the Zone I exposure units (EUs). The Zone 2 ROD divided the Zone 2 area into seven geographic areas and 44 EUs. To facilitate the data quality objectives (DQOs) of the DVS process, the RDR/RAWP regrouped the 44 EUs into 12 DQO scoping EU groups. These groups facilitated the DQO process by placing similar facilities and their support facilities together, which allowed identification of data gaps. The EU groups were no longer pertinent after DQO planning was completed and characterization was conducted as areas became accessible. As the opportunity to complete characterization became available, the planned DVS program was completed for the EU addressed in this document (EU Z2-32). The purpose of this Phased Construction Completion Report (PCCR) is to address the following: (1) Document DVS characterization results for EU Z2-32. (2) Describe and document the risk evaluation and determine if the EU meets the Zone 2 ROD requirements for unrestricted industrial use to 10 ft bgs. (3) Identify additional areas not defined in the Zone 2 ROD that require remediation based on the DVS evaluation results. (4) Describe the remedial action performed in the K-1066-G Yard in EU Z2-32. Approximately 18.4 acres are included in the EU

  11. A Framework for Navigating Institutional Review Board (IRB) Oversight in the Complicated Zone of Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Gretchen E

    2016-10-25

    The treatment therapies and technologies currently emerging from the rapidly evolving health care industry must undergo full examination in a clinical setting if they are to be marketed to the public. All elements of clinical studies involving human subjects must undergo thorough IRB review before study activities can commence. Regulations regarding IRB oversight apply to all clinical studies-including retrospective examinations of private medical data and identifiable biological samples. It is not uncommon for researchers to be unsure whether, or on what level, IRB review and oversight are required for a particular project. Yet, if human subjects or their private medical data are utilized in a study, peer-reviewed journals will require relevant IRB approval information be provided as a requirement for publication. This article examines IRB processes and review types, offers insight into the IRB decision-making process, and emphasizes the importance of engaging an IRB consultant early in the clinical study design process.

  12. The Nuclear Regulator's Role in Assessing Licensee. Oversight of Vendor and Other Contracted Services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Contracted services are an integral part of the design, construction and operation of a nuclear facility. Changes in the nuclear industry sector, including varied availability of nuclear expertise, the expansion of the international supply market and the introduction of new technologies, have tended to increase licensees' use of contracted services. These changes have created challenges for licensees and regulators related to the retention of nuclear expertise, the effective management of the interfaces between the licensees and contractors, and the oversight of contractor manufacturing quality in the context of greater multinational diversity. The regulatory body must address these challenges to provide assurance that the licensees maintain their responsibility for the safety of the facilities, regardless of who provides goods and services or where the activities involved in the supply chain take place. This report is intended to assist regulatory bodies in assessing their current practices for the regulatory oversight of licensees' use of contractors, and adapting them where necessary to meet the evolving situation

  13. Oversight and management of a cell therapy clinical trial network: experience and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyé, Lemuel A; Sayre, Shelly L; Westbrook, Lynette; Jorgenson, Beth C; Handberg, Eileen; Anwaruddin, Saif; Wagner, Kristi A; Skarlatos, Sonia I

    2011-09-01

    The Cardiovascular Cell Therapy Research Network (CCTRN), sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), was established to develop, coordinate, and conduct multiple collaborative protocols testing the effects of cell therapy on cardiovascular diseases. The Network was born into a difficult political and ethical climate created by the recent removal of a dozen drugs from the US formulary and the temporary halting of 27 gene therapy trials due to safety concerns. This article describes the Network's challenges as it initiated three protocols in a polarized cultural atmosphere at a time when oversight bodies were positioning themselves for the tightest vigilance of promising new therapies. Effective strategies involving ongoing education, open communication, and relationship building with the oversight community are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The February 21, 1993 tornadoes of East Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fricke, K.E.; Kornegay, F.C.

    1993-01-01

    A series of tornadoes struck the east Tennessee area on Sunday afternoon, February 21, 1993 around Knoxville, Lenoir City, and Oak Ridge causing millions of dollars worth of damage to both homes and businesses in the area, killing one, injuring a number of persons, and leaving a large area without power for many hours or even days due to damage to the local TVA transmission line network. One tornado touched down in the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation near the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, continued through the Union Valley business district located just east of the plant, through the adjacent University of Tennessee Arboretum and then continued into the communities of Claxton and Powell. The path length of the tornado was approximately 13 miles. Damage to the Y-12 Plant was minimal, but the Union Valley business district was seriously damaged, including the Fusion Energy Design Center (FEDC) which houses a number of DOE related projects. The preliminary cost estimate of the damage to DOE facilities (both at Y-12 and at the FEDC) was around $520,000. This paper describes the local meteorological data, the tornado that struck near the Y-12 plant, the resulting damage both to the DOE facilities and to the surrounding communities, the plant emergency response and recovery activities, and the current hazard analyses being undertaken at the plant

  15. The February 21, 1993 tornadoes of East Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fricke, K.E.; Kornegay, F.C. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1993-08-11

    A series of tornadoes struck the east Tennessee area on Sunday afternoon, February 21, 1993 around Knoxville, Lenoir City, and Oak Ridge causing millions of dollars worth of damage to both homes and businesses in the area, killing one, injuring a number of persons, and leaving a large area without power for many hours or even days due to damage to the local TVA transmission line network. One tornado touched down in the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation near the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, continued through the Union Valley business district located just east of the plant, through the adjacent University of Tennessee Arboretum and then continued into the communities of Claxton and Powell. The path length of the tornado was approximately 13 miles. Damage to the Y-12 Plant was minimal, but the Union Valley business district was seriously damaged, including the Fusion Energy Design Center (FEDC) which houses a number of DOE related projects. The preliminary cost estimate of the damage to DOE facilities (both at Y-12 and at the FEDC) was around $520,000. This paper describes the local meteorological data, the tornado that struck near the Y-12 plant, the resulting damage both to the DOE facilities and to the surrounding communities, the plant emergency response and recovery activities, and the current hazard analyses being undertaken at the plant.

  16. Predicting word sense annotation agreement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Alonso, Hector; Johannsen, Anders Trærup; Lopez de Lacalle, Oier

    2015-01-01

    High agreement is a common objective when annotating data for word senses. However, a number of factors make perfect agreement impossible, e.g. the limitations of the sense inventories, the difficulty of the examples or the interpretation preferences of the annotations. Estimating potential...... agreement is thus a relevant task to supplement the evaluation of sense annotations. In this article we propose two methods to predict agreement on word-annotation instances. We experiment with a continuous representation and a three-way discretization of observed agreement. In spite of the difficulty...

  17. F-35 Joint Strike Fighter: Continued Oversight Needed as Program Plans to Begin Development of New Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    below), which would qualify it as a major defense acquisition program in its own right . F-35 Joint Strike Fighter Block 4 Development Costs Increase...F-35 JOINT STRIKE FIGHTER Continued Oversight Needed as Program Plans to Begin Development of New Capabilities...Accountability Office Highlights of GAO-16-390, a report to congressional committees April 2016 F-35 JOINT STRIKE FIGHTER Continued Oversight

  18. Why budget accountability fails? The elusive links between parliaments and audit agencies in the oversight of the budget

    OpenAIRE

    CARLOS SANTISO

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTParliaments and audit agencies have critical and complementary roles in the oversight of the budget and the enforcement of government accountability. Yet, the nexus between parliaments and audit agencies is one of the weakest links in the accountability chain, generating an accountability gap in the budget process. This articles analyses the interactions between parliaments and audit agencies in the oversight of government finances during the latter stages of the budget process. Using...

  19. Prepositioned Stocks: Marine Corps Needs to Improve Cost Estimate Reliability and Oversight of Inventory Systems for Equipment in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    PREPOSITIONED STOCKS Marine Corps Needs to Improve Cost Estimate Reliability and Oversight of Inventory Systems for...REPORT DATE SEP 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Prepostioned Stocks : Marine Corps Needs to...Senate September 2015 PREPOSITIONED STOCKS Marine Corps Needs to Improve Cost Estimate Reliability and Oversight of Inventory Systems for

  20. Streamflow-Characteristic Estimation Methods for Unregulated Streams of Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, George S.; Tasker, Gary D.; Ladd, David E.

    2009-01-01

    Streamflow-characteristic estimation methods for unregulated rivers and streams of Tennessee were developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation. Streamflow estimates are provided for 1,224 stream sites. Streamflow characteristics include the 7-consecutive-day, 10-year recurrence-interval low flow, the 30-consecutive-day, 5-year recurrence-interval low flow, the mean annual and mean summer flows, and the 99.5-, 99-, 98-, 95-, 90-, 80-, 70-, 60-, 50-, 40-, 30-, 20-, and 10-percent flow durations. Estimation methods include regional regression (RRE) equations and the region-of-influence (ROI) method. Both methods use zero-flow probability screening to estimate zero-flow quantiles. A low flow and flow duration (LFFD) computer program (TDECv301) performs zero-flow screening and calculation of nonzero-streamflow characteristics using the RRE equations and ROI method and provides quality measures including the 90-percent prediction interval and equivalent years of record. The U.S. Geological Survey StreamStats geographic information system automates the calculation of basin characteristics and streamflow characteristics. In addition, basin characteristics can be manually input to the stand-alone version of the computer program (TDECv301) to calculate streamflow characteristics in Tennessee. The RRE equations were computed using multivariable regression analysis. The two regions used for this study, the western part of the State (West) and the central and eastern part of the State (Central+East), are separated by the Tennessee River as it flows south to north from Hardin County to Stewart County. The West region uses data from 124 of the 1,224 streamflow sites, and the Central+East region uses data from 893 of the 1,224 streamflow sites. The study area also includes parts of the adjacent States of Georgia, North Carolina, Virginia, Alabama, Kentucky, and Mississippi. Total drainage area, a geology

  1. A Framework for Navigating Institutional Review Board (IRB) Oversight in the Complicated Zone of Research

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Gretchen E

    2016-01-01

    The treatment therapies and technologies currently emerging from the rapidly evolving health care industry must undergo full examination in a clinical setting if they are to be marketed to the public. All elements of clinical studies involving human subjects must undergo thorough IRB review before study activities can commence. Regulations regarding IRB oversight apply to all clinical studies?including retrospective examinations of private medical data and identifiable biological samples. It ...

  2. Environment, safety, and health. Status of DOE's reorganization of its safety oversight function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannerman, Carl J.; Cannon, Doris E.; Jones, Gary L.; Ulrich, Timothy W.

    1990-01-01

    Several major events that preceded the Secretary's decision to restructure DOE's management of its nuclear facilities were identified. The proposed restructuring plan, in concept, is designed to set in place an oversight framework, which will provide confidence in DOE's ability to operate its nuclear facilities in a safe manner. Further, on the basis of the previous work in this area as well as other independent studies, several issues were identified that may affect the success of the proposed restructuring plan

  3. Institutional Oversight of Occupational Health and Safety for Research Programs Involving Biohazards

    OpenAIRE

    Dyson, Melissa C; Carpenter, Calvin B; Colby, Lesley A

    2017-01-01

    Research with hazardous biologic materials (biohazards) is essential to the progress of medicine and science. The field of microbiology has rapidly advanced over the years, partially due to the development of new scientific methods such as recombinant DNA technology, synthetic biology, viral vectors, and the use of genetically modified animals. This research poses a potential risk to personnel as well as the public and the environment. Institutions must have appropriate oversight and take app...

  4. Ideal Police Oversight and Review: The Next Piece of the Community Policing Puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    to police misconduct towards ethnic minorities. Criminology professors Brad Smith and Malcolm Holmes discuss concerns about misconduct and...Brutality: An Examination of Civil Rights Criminal Complaints,” Criminology 41, no. 4 (2003): 1037– 1038. 13 Hryniewicz, “Civilian Oversight as a Public...minorities into the complaint process. As mentioned in the literature review, criminology professors Brad Smith and Malcolm Holmes voice concern that a

  5. VA Health Care: Improved Monitoring Needed for Effective Oversight of Care for Women Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    clerk stations and a lack of privacy curtains in examination rooms, as required by VHA policy. GAO also found weaknesses in VHA’s oversight of the...VHA officials said not all facilities require onsite gynecologists and facilities may authorize gynecological services from non-VA providers. They...does not have such measures for women veterans’ sex-specific care, such as mammography, maternity care, or gynecology . VHA’s data show poor

  6. Maintaining Oversight of Licensee Safety Culture. CSNI/WGHOF Survey Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    In preparation for this workshop, a survey was sent to members of the WGHOF in Autumn 2006. Purpose of the Survey was to explore and share the methods and approaches used to maintain oversight of licensee safety culture. 13 countries responded to the survey. The responses were used in the development of discussion topics and themes for this workshop. This presentation (slides) summarizes the results of the survey

  7. A survey of front-line paramedics examining the professional relationship between paramedics and physician medical oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foerster, Christopher R; Tavares, Walter; Virkkunen, Ilkka; Kämäräinen, Antti

    2017-06-07

    Paramedicine is often dependent on physician medical directors and their associated programs for direction and oversight. A positive relationship between paramedics and their oversight physicians promotes safety and quality care while a strained or ineffective one may threaten these goals. The objective of this study was to explore and understand the professional relationship between paramedics and physician medical oversight as viewed by front-line paramedics. All active front-line paramedics from four municipal paramedic services involving three medical oversight groups in Ontario were invited to complete an online survey. Five hundred and four paramedics were invited to participate in the study, with 242 completing the survey (48% response rate); 66% male, 76% primary care paramedics with an average of 13 (SD=9) years of experience. Paramedics had neutral or positive perceptions regarding their autonomy, opportunities to interact with their medical director, and medical director understanding of the prehospital setting. Paramedics perceived medical directives as rigid and ambiguous. A significant amount of respondents reported a perception of having provided suboptimal patient care due to fear of legal or disciplinary consequences. Issues of a lack of support for critical thinking and a lack of trust between paramedics and medical oversight groups were often raised. Paramedic perceptions of physician medical oversight were mixed. Concerning areas identified were perceptions of ambiguous written directives and concerns related to the level of trust and support for critical thinking. These perceptions may have implications for the system of care and should be explored further.

  8. Building a GIS database in the Eastern Tennessee Seismic Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinpelu, M. O.; Vlahovic, G.; Arroucau, P.; Malhotra, R.; Powell, C. A.

    2010-12-01

    Eastern Tennessee contains one of the most seismically active regions in the eastern North America. The Eastern Tennessee Seismic Zone (ETSZ) is about 300 kilometers long and extends from northwestern Georgia through eastern Tennessee [Study Area: 34°N to 37°N; 86°W to 82.5°W]. It is the second most active earthquake zone of the United States east of the Rocky Mountains. Only the New Madrid Seismic Zone is releasing more seismic strain energy. Unlike the New Madrid Seismic Zone, the ETSZ did not experience any destructive earthquake in historical time; however, its seismogenic potential is not well understood. The spatial dimensions of the ETSZ and its association with potential field anomalies suggest that collecting and organizing all the relevant data into a GIS geodatabase could increase our understanding of that region. Geographic Information System (GIS) software can be used to acquire, share, maintain and modify geospatial data sets. In this work, ArcGIS 9.3.2 is used to build a geodatabase which includes topography, earthquake information such as locations, magnitudes and focal mechanisms, potential field data, P and S wave velocity anomalies inferred from local tomographic inversions of local events, seismic transects, digital geological maps and others relevant datasets. Raw datasets were downloaded from several earth science institutions and were edited before being imported to ArcGIS. Various geoprocessing techniques, such as geo-referencing, digitizing, and surface interpolation were used to manipulate and analyze these data. We show how this compilation can be used to analyze the spatial relationships between earthquake locations and other data layers. The long-term idea behind this project is to build an information resource that will be continuously updated and will eventually encompass data related to intraplate seismicity in the entire central and eastern United States. It will be made available to researchers, students, the general public and

  9. State Water Resources Control Board, California Agreement in Principle 1995 summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laudon, L.

    1996-03-01

    The Agreement in Principle (AIP) was established as part of the Secretary of Energy's Ten-Point Initiative which was announced in 1989. One of the Secretary's goals was to integrate the Department of Energy's (DOE) national security mission with their environmental restoration and compliance responsibilities. In an effort to accomplish this goal, DOE increased the role of the states in the oversight of DOE's monitoring programs through AIPs. The State of California and DOE negotiated the California AIP beginning in 1989 and signed the Agreement in September 1990. The AIP identified six DOE facilities to be evaluated under the program. The six facilities evaluated by the AIP program were: (1) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) including LLNL's Site 300; (2) Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA); (3) Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL); (4) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC); (5) Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC); and (6) Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR)

  10. Implementation plan for liquid low-level radioactive waste systems under the FFA for Fiscal years 1996 and 1997 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requires a Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for federal facilities placed on the National Priorities List. The Oak Ridge Reservation was placed on that list on December 21, 1989, and the agreement was signed in November 1991 by the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The effective date of the FFA was January 1, 1992. Section IX and Appendix F of the agreement impose design and operating requirements on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW) tank systems and identify several plans, schedules, and assessments that must be submitted to EPA/TDEC for review of approval. The issue of ES/ER-17&D1 Federal Facility Agreement Plans and Schedules for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee in March 1992 transmitted to EPA/TDEC those plans and schedules that were required within 60 to 90 days of the FFA effective date. This document updates the plans, schedules, and strategy for achieving compliance with the FFA as presented in ES/ER-17&D I and summarizes the progress that has been made to date. This document supersedes all updates of ES/ER- 17&D 1. Chapter 1 describes the history and operation of the ORNL LLLW System and the objectives of the FFA. Chapters 2 through 5 contain the updated plans and schedules for meeting FFA requirements. This document will continue to be periodically reassessed and refined to reflect newly developed information and progress.

  11. Implementation plan for liquid low-level radioactive waste systems under the FFA for Fiscal years 1996 and 1997 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-10-01

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requires a Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for federal facilities placed on the National Priorities List. The Oak Ridge Reservation was placed on that list on December 21, 1989, and the agreement was signed in November 1991 by the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The effective date of the FFA was January 1, 1992. Section IX and Appendix F of the agreement impose design and operating requirements on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW) tank systems and identify several plans, schedules, and assessments that must be submitted to EPA/TDEC for review of approval. The issue of ES/ER-17 ampersand D1 Federal Facility Agreement Plans and Schedules for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee in March 1992 transmitted to EPA/TDEC those plans and schedules that were required within 60 to 90 days of the FFA effective date. This document updates the plans, schedules, and strategy for achieving compliance with the FFA as presented in ES/ER-17 ampersand D I and summarizes the progress that has been made to date. This document supersedes all updates of ES/ER- 17 ampersand D 1. Chapter 1 describes the history and operation of the ORNL LLLW System and the objectives of the FFA. Chapters 2 through 5 contain the updated plans and schedules for meeting FFA requirements. This document will continue to be periodically reassessed and refined to reflect newly developed information and progress

  12. Voluntary agreements in environmental policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torvanger, Asbjoern

    2001-01-01

    A typically voluntary agreement is signed between the authorities and an industrial sector in order to reduce the emission of environmentally harmful substances. There are many different types of agreements. Voluntary agreements are not strictly voluntary, since in the background there is often some kind of ''threat'' about taxation or fees if the industry is unwilling to cooperate. This type of agreements has become popular in many OECD countries during the last decades. In Norway there are only a few agreements of this type. Experience with the use of voluntary agreements as well as research show that they are less cost-effective than market-based instruments such as taxes and quota systems. If there are great restrictions on the use of taxes and quota systems because of information- or measurement problems, or because these instruments are not politically acceptable, then voluntary agreements may be an interesting alternative. Thus, voluntary agreements are best used as a supplement to other instruments in some niche areas of the environmental policy. In some cases, voluntary agreements may be used between two countries or at a regional level, for example within the EU

  13. Labor Agreement Information System (LAIRS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — The Labor Agreement Information Retrieval System (LAIRS) is a database containing historical information on labor-management relations in the Federal Government. It...

  14. Experience and grammatical agreement: statistical learning shapes number agreement production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskell, Todd R; Thornton, Robert; Macdonald, Maryellen C

    2010-02-01

    A robust result in research on the production of grammatical agreement is that speakers are more likely to produce an erroneous verb with phrases such as the key to the cabinets, with a singular noun followed by a plural one, than with phrases such as the keys to the cabinet, where a plural noun is followed by a singular. These asymmetries are thought to reflect core language production processes. Previous accounts have attributed error patterns to a syntactic number feature present on plurals but not singulars. An alternative approach is presented in which a process similar to structural priming contributes to the error asymmetry via speakers' past experiences with related agreement constructions. A corpus analysis and two agreement production studies test this account. The results suggest that agreement production is shaped by statistical learning from past language experience. Implications for accounts of agreement are discussed. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Tennessee State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive-waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-08-01

    The Tennessee State Briefing Book is one of a series of State briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist State and Federal Agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Tennessee. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Tennessee. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Tennessee

  16. Tennessee State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-08-01

    The Tennessee State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Tennessee. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Tennessee. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Tennessee

  17. Advanced Technologies for Transportation Research Program at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-30

    This report documents the results of the research program completed by the Advanced Technologies for Transportation Research Program (ATTRP) at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga (UTC) under Federal Transit Administration Cooperative Agreemen...

  18. An Assessment of the Effectiveness of Selected Aerospace Education Workshops in Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupin, Pauline Hicks

    1976-01-01

    Data from questionnaires indicated that the Tennessee Aerospace Education Workshops were successful in reaching their stated goals, which included developing a greater awareness of aerospace education and helping teachers incorporate more aerospace education in classroom activities. (MLH)

  19. Seat belt, DWI, and other traffic violations among recent immigrants in Florida and Tennessee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Phase I of this project identified two States, Florida and Tennessee, that maintain information on drivers traffic violations and residency status. : Phase II analyzed State databases to examine seat belt nonuse, DWI, and other traffic safety viol...

  20. Tennessee State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-08-01

    The Tennessee State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Tennessee. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Tennessee. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Tennessee.

  1. Ecology of Virginia big-eared bats in North Carolina and Tennessee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-24

    The researchers conducted a study of the springtime ecology of an isolated North Carolina-Tennessee population of the Virginia big-eared bat (Corynorhinus townsendii virginianus), a federally endangered species. With limited data on the whereabouts o...

  2. An economic analysis of a monitored retrievable storage site for Tennessee. Final report and appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, W.F.; Mayo, J.W.; Hansen, L.T.; Quindry, K.E.

    1985-12-17

    The United States Department of Energy is charged with the task of identifying potential sites for a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facility and reporting the results of its analysis to Congress by January 1986. DOE chose three finalist sites from 11 sites DOE analysts evaluated earlier. All three are in Tennessee, including two in Oak Ridge and one in Trousdale/Smith Counties. This paper is a summary of research undertaken on the economic effects of establishing the MRS facility in Tennessee. All three locations were considered in the analysis, but on some occasions attention is focused on the site preferred by DOE. The research was undertaken by the Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER), College of Business Administration, the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, under contract with the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development.

  3. An economic analysis of a monitored retrievable storage site for Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, W.F.; Mayo, J.W.; Hansen, L.T.; Quindry, K.E.

    1985-12-17

    The United States Department of Energy is charged with the task of identifying potential sites for a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facility and reporting the results of its analysis to Congress by January 1986. DOE chose three finalist sites from 11 sites DOE analysts evaluated earlier. All three are in Tennessee, including two in Oak Ridge and one in Trousdale/Smith Counties. This paper is a summary of research undertaken on the economic effects of establishing the MRS facility in Tennessee. All three locations were considered in the analysis, but on some occasions attention is focused on the site preferred by DOE. The research was undertaken by the Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER), College of Business Administration, the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, under contract with the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development.

  4. Tennessee Williams in the 50s: A Mirror Competing Discourses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anushiravani A.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article was a study of different but synchronized discourses mirrored in Tennessee Williams’s Hollywood adaptations in the 50s. It discussed the effect of artistic agencies of censorship on the hows and whys of Willaims’s adaptations. Most notably, PCA and HUAC were in charge of cultural and political regulations that no Hollywood film was immune from. Until the early 60, HUAC and PCA imposed religious values to supplant Communism, happy ending to replace the intellectual fad of pessimism and strict dressing code to restore the innocence of the Freud-conscious moviegoers. However, these agencies were not omnipotent. The voice of those discourses that the agencies were fighting against were heard in Hollywood. Hollywood achieved the subversion with the help of William’s controversial plots albeit tamed by some reinforcing discourses of optimism and diluted religious values.

  5. Tennessee Valley Authority National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautney, J.

    1991-01-01

    The National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center (NFERC) is a unique part of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), a government agency created by an Act of Congress in 1933. The Center, located in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, is a national laboratory for research, development, education and commercialization for fertilizers and related agricultural chemicals including their economic and environmentally safe use, renewable fuel and chemical technologies, alternatives for solving environmental/waste problems, and technologies which support national defense- NFERC projects in the pesticide waste minimization/treatment/disposal areas include ''Model Site Demonstrations and Site Assessments,'' ''Development of Waste Treatment and Site Remediation Technologies for Fertilizer/Agrichemical Dealers,'' ''Development of a Dealer Information/Education Program,'' and ''Constructed Wetlands.''

  6. Lithology and shear-wave velocity in Memphis, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, J.; Waldron, B.; Schweig, E.; Hwang, H.; Webbers, A.; Van Arsdale, R.; Tucker, K.; Williams, R.; Street, R.; Mayne, P.; Stephenson, W.; Odum, J.; Cramer, C.; Updike, R.; Hutson, S.; Bradley, M.

    2003-01-01

    We have derived a new three-dimensional model of the lithologic structure beneath the city of Memphis, Tennessee, and examined its correlation with measured shear-wave velocity profiles. The correlation is sufficiently high that the better-constrained lithologic model may be used as a proxy for shear-wave velocities, which are required to calculate site-amplification for new seismic hazard maps for Memphis. The lithologic model and its uncertainties are derived from over 1200 newly compiled well and boring logs, some sampling to 500 m depth, and a moving-least-squares algorithm. Seventy-six new shear-wave velocity profiles have been measured and used for this study, most sampling to 30 m depth or less. All log and velocity observations are publicly available via new web sites.

  7. University of Tennessee and Oak Ridge environmental restoration education program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yalcintas, M.G.; Swindle, D.W. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A joint program of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Tennessee at Knoxville (UTK) has been initiated to provide education and research on environmental restoration and waste management. The program will provide opportunity for formal education and research for area businesses, while integrating their efforts in mixed-waste management with those of UTK and ORNL. Following successful results demonstrated at ORNL and UTK, the program will be integrated with other universities and research institutions in the country. During this presentation, the programs's objective, scope, and goals will be described, and details of the program structure will be explained. Also, it will be demonstrated how experience gained in environmental restoration technology transfer activities could be applied in an educational program, providing a focal point for technology transfer and information exchange. Expected accomplishments and industry benefits will also be discussed

  8. Public Interest in Microclimate Data in Knoxville, Tennessee, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Reyes Mason

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available New technologies can sense urban environmental conditions at finer scales than previously possible. This has paved the way for monitoring microclimates between and within neighborhoods. Equally vital, though much less studied, is stakeholder engagement in understanding and using such data. This study examines interests and preferences for accessing neighborhood-scale microclimate data among residents of Knoxville, Tennessee, USA. Data are from randomly sampled phone surveys (N = 200 and purposively sampled focus group participants (N = 25. Survey participants expressed high interest in neighborhood air quality, temperature, and rainfall. Focus groups revealed four themes for designing smartphone applications or websites for neighborhood-scale data: easy access to integrated data, clear and intuitive design, information for everyday living and healthy behavior, and tools for civic engagement. Results support the value of creating meaningful, usable science interfaces with which the public can readily engage.

  9. Indoor air quality study of forty east Tennessee homes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, A.R.; Gammage, R.B.; Dudney, C.S.

    1984-12-01

    Over a one-year period, measurements of indoor air pollutants (CO/sub x/, NO/sub x/, formaldehyde, volatile organics, particulates, and radon) were made in 40 homes in East Tennessee. The houses were of various ages with different types of insulation and heating. Over one-half of the houses exceeded the ASHRAE indoor ceiling guideline of 0.1 ppM for formaldehyde on at least one occasion. Over the duration of the study, older houses averaged 0.04 ppM of formaldehyde while houses less than 5 years old averaged 0.08 ppM (P -1 when the duct fan was operated (measurements prior to December 1982). This report presents the study design and implementation, describes the monitoring protocols, and provides a complete set of the data collected during the project. 25 references, 29 figures, 42 tables

  10. Man-induced channel adjustment in Tennessee streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, C.H.; Simon, Andrew

    1983-01-01

    Channel modifications in Tennessee, particularly in the western part, have led to large-scale instabilities in the channelized rivers and may have contributed to several bridge failures. These modifications, together with land-use practices, led to downcutting, headward erosion, downstream aggradation, accelerated scour, and bank instabilities. Changes in gradient by channel straightening caused more severe channel response than did dredging or clearing. Large-scale changes continue to occur in all the channelized rivers: the Obion River, its forks, and the South Fork Forked Deer River. However, the non-channelized Hatchie River in west Tennessee not only withstood the natural stresses imposed by the wet years of 1973 to 1975 but continues to exhibit characteristics of stability. Water-surface slope, the primary dependent variable, proved to be a sensitive and descriptive parameter useful in determining channel adjustment. Adjustments to man-induced increases in channel-slope are described by inverse exponential functions of the basic form S=ae(-b(t)); where ' S ' is some function describing channel-slope, ' t ' is the number of years since completion of channel work, and ' a ' and ' b ' are coefficients. Response times for the attainment of ' equilibrium ' channel slopes are a function of the magnitude and extent of the imposed modifications. The adjusted profile gradients attained by the streams following channelization are similar to the predisturbed profile gradients, where no alteration to channel length was made. Where the channels were straightened by constructing cut-offs, thus shortening channel length, then slope adjustments (reduction) proceed past the predisturbed profile gradients, to new profiles with lower gradients. (USGS)

  11. Fiscal year 1993 well plugging and abandonment program, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    This report is a synopsis of the progress of the well plugging and abandonment program at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, from December 1992 through August 20, 1993. A total of 70 wells and borings were plugged and abandoned during the period of time covered in this report. All wells and borings were plugged and abandoned in accordance with the Monitoring Well Plugging and Abandonment Plan for the US Department of Energy, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (HSW, Inc. 1991).

  12. Fiscal Year 1993 Well Plugging and Abandonment Program Summary Report Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    This report is a synopsis of the progress of the well plugging and abandonment program at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, from October 1993 through August 1994. A total of 57 wells and borings were plugged and abandoned during the period of time covered in this report. All wells and borings were plugged and abandoned in accordance with the Monitoring Well Plugging and Abandonment Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

  13. Baseline Environmental Analysis Report for the K-1251 Barge Facility at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Winkle J.E.

    2007-08-24

    This report documents the baseline environmental conditions of the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) K-1251 Barge Facility, which is located at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). DOE is proposing to lease the facility to the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET). This report provides supporting information for the use, by a potential lessee, of government-owned facilities at ETTP. This report is based upon the requirements of Sect. 120(h) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The lease footprint is slightly over 1 acre. The majority of the lease footprint is defined by a perimeter fence that surrounds a gravel-covered area with a small concrete pad within it. Also included is a gravel drive with locked gates at each end that extends on the east side to South First Avenue, providing access to the facility. The facility is located along the Clinch River and an inlet of the river that forms its southern boundary. To the east, west, and north, the lease footprint is surrounded by DOE property. Preparation of this report included the review of government records, title documents, historic aerial photos, visual and physical inspections of the property and adjacent properties, and interviews with current and former employees involved in the operations on the real property to identify any areas on the property where hazardous substances and petroleum products or their derivatives and acutely hazardous wastes were known to have been released or disposed. Radiological surveys were conducted and chemical samples were collected to assess the facility's condition.

  14. Ethical oversight in quality improvement and quality improvement research: new approaches to promote a learning health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiscella, Kevin; Tobin, Jonathan N; Carroll, Jennifer K; He, Hua; Ogedegbe, Gbenga

    2015-09-17

    Institutional review boards (IRBs) distinguish health care quality improvement (QI) and health care quality improvement research (QIR) based primarily on the rigor of the methods used and the purported generalizability of the knowledge gained. Neither of these criteria holds up upon scrutiny. Rather, this apparently false dichotomy may foster under-protection of participants in QI projects and over-protection of participants within QIR. Minimal risk projects should entail minimal oversight including waivers for informed consent for both QI and QIR projects. Minimizing the burdens of conducting QIR, while ensuring minimal safeguards for QI projects, is needed to restore this imbalance in oversight. Potentially, such ethical oversight could be provided by the integration of Institutional Review Boards and Clinical Ethical Committees, using a more integrated and streamlined approach such as a two-step process involving a screening review, followed by a review by committee trained in QIR. Standards for such ethical review and training in these standards, coupled with rapid review cycles, could facilitate an appropriate level of oversight within the context of creating and sustaining learning health care systems. We argue that QI and QIR are not reliably distinguishable. We advocate for approaches that improve protections for QI participants while minimizing over-protection for participants in QIR through reasonable ethical oversight that aligns risk to participants in both QI and QIR with the needs of a learning health care system.

  15. Institutional Oversight of the Graduate Medical Education Enterprise: Development of an Annual Institutional Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amedee, Ronald G; Piazza, Janice C

    2016-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) fully implemented all aspects of the Next Accreditation System (NAS) on July 1, 2014. In lieu of periodic accreditation site visits of programs and institutions, the NAS requires active, ongoing oversight by the sponsoring institutions (SIs) to maintain accreditation readiness and program quality. The Ochsner Health System Graduate Medical Education Committee (GMEC) has instituted a process that provides a structured, process-driven improvement approach at the program level, using a Program Evaluation Committee to review key performance data and construct an annual program evaluation for each accredited residency. The Ochsner GMEC evaluates the aggregate program data and creates an Annual Institutional Review (AIR) document that provides direction and focus for ongoing program improvement. This descriptive article reviews the 2014 process and various metrics collected and analyzed to demonstrate the program review and institutional oversight provided by the Ochsner graduate medical education (GME) enterprise. The 2014 AIR provided an overview of performance and quality of the Ochsner GME program for the 2013-2014 academic year with particular attention to program outcomes; resident supervision, responsibilities, evaluation, and compliance with duty-hour standards; results of the ACGME survey of residents and core faculty; and resident participation in patient safety and quality activities and curriculum. The GMEC identified other relevant institutional performance indicators that are incorporated into the AIR and reflect SI engagement in and contribution to program performance at the individual program and institutional levels. The Ochsner GME office and its program directors are faced with the ever-increasing challenges of today's healthcare environment as well as escalating institutional and program accreditation requirements. The overall commitment of this SI to advancing our GME enterprise is

  16. Design demonstrations for Category B tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    This document presents design demonstrations conducted of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) storage tank systems located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL has conducted research in energy related fields since 1943. The facilities used to conduct the research include nuclear reactors, chemical pilot plants, research laboratories, radioisotope production laboratories, and support facilities. These facilities have produced a variety of radioactive and/or hazardous wastes. These wastes have been stored and transported through an extensive network of piping and tankage. Demonstration of the design of these tank systems has been stipulated by the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) between the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) - Region IV; the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC); and the DOE. The FFA establishes four categories of tanks. These are: Category A -- New or Replacement Tank Systems with Secondary Containment; Category B -- Existing Tank Systems with Secondary Containment; Category C -- Existing Tank Systems without Secondary Containment; and Category D -- Existing Tank Systems without Secondary Containment that are; Removed from Service. This document provides a design demonstration of the secondary containment and ancillary equipment of 11 tank systems listed in the FFA as Category ''B.'' The design demonstration for each tank is presented in Section 2. The design demonstrations were developed using information obtained from the design drawings (as-built when available), construction specifications, and interviews with facility operators. The assessments assume that each tank system was constructed in accordance with the design drawings and construction specifications for that system unless specified otherwise. Each design demonstration addresses system conformance to the requirements of the FFA (Appendix F, Subsection C)

  17. EXPERT PANEL OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE ASSESSMENT OF FY2008 CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING SIMULANT TESTING PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOOMER KD

    2009-01-08

    The Expert Panel Oversight Committee (EPOC) has been overseeing the implementation of selected parts of Recommendation III of the final report, Expert Panel workshop for Hanford Site Double-Shell Tank Waste Chemistry Optimization, RPP-RPT-22126. Recommendation III provided four specific requirements necessary for Panel approval of a proposal to revise the chemistry control limits for the Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs). One of the more significant requirements was successful performance of an accelerated stress corrosion cracking (SCC) experimental program. This testing program has evaluated the optimization of the chemistry controls to prevent corrosion in the interstitial liquid and supernatant regions of the DSTs.

  18. [Oversight and monitoring of fundamental rights of people suffering mental disorder: the Canadian experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerberg, Joaquín

    2008-01-01

    This paper has as its objective the generation of a debate over different alternatives of models of oversight and monitoring of fundamental rights of people suffering mental disorder. The Consent and Capacity Board of the province of Ontario, Canada will be considered. The Board is one of the oldest and leading administrative tribunals in the area of mental health. The paper will analyse the place of the Board in the Canadian legal system and the fundamental distinctions with similar Canadian mental health tribunals. The Board's administrative structure and jurisdiction will be examined, as well as its procedures and mechanisms of review of its decisions.

  19. Federal Facility Agreement progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    The (SRS) Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) was made effective by the US. Environmental Protection Agency Region IV (EPA) on August 16, 1993. To meet the reporting requirements in Section XXV of the Agreement, the FFA Progress Report was developed. The FFA Progress Report is the first of a series of quarterly progress reports to be prepared by the SRS. As such this report describes the information and action taken to September 30, 1993 on the SRS units identified for investigation and remediation in the Agreement. This includes; rubble pits, runoff basins, retention basin, seepage basin, burning pits, H-Area Tank 16, and spill areas.

  20. Federal Facility Agreement progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    The (SRS) Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) was made effective by the US. Environmental Protection Agency Region IV (EPA) on August 16, 1993. To meet the reporting requirements in Section XXV of the Agreement, the FFA Progress Report was developed. The FFA Progress Report is the first of a series of quarterly progress reports to be prepared by the SRS. As such this report describes the information and action taken to September 30, 1993 on the SRS units identified for investigation and remediation in the Agreement. This includes; rubble pits, runoff basins, retention basin, seepage basin, burning pits, H-Area Tank 16, and spill areas

  1. PUC review of LDC gas purchasing practices and transportation agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemon, R.

    1992-01-01

    The optimal paradigm for the PUC review of LDC purchasing and contracting starts with a regulatory paradigm that assigns risk upon the LDC. There are profits and risks in a market economy. Being exposed to risk causes firms to expend costs to minimize the risk, including lowering costs and altering input combinations. The transition within the industry implies greater need for planning, for optimization based on both economics and engineering, and less upon political directives. But the transition is far more encompassing than adding a new layer of regulatory oversight at the state level. States must revise their regulation to get out front - to give those incentives. The management audits will be internally profitable to the firms. If LDCs don't adjust, there will be other firms that will evaluate where poor management exists within this industry, and they will buy them out and lower the costs both for the profit they can obtain and to the betterment of ratepayers who experience lower rates. An a priori incentive process needs to govern PUC review of purchasing practices and transportation agreements. Lessons can be learned from the competitive market on how to structure this dynamic process which yields consumer benefits. This paper is organized as follows. First it identifies the forces which drive change - both historical bias and new options stemming from federal policy. Second, problems with 'improved' traditional regulatory review are discussed. Third, dimensions to an optimal PUC review process are set forth

  2. Material Transfer Agreement (MTA) | FNLCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Material Transfer Agreements are appropriate for exchange of materials into or out of the Frederick National Laboratory for research or testing purposes, with no collaborative research by parties involving the materials.

  3. Corporate Integrity Agreement (CIA) documents

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — OIG negotiates corporate integrity agreements (CIA) with health care providers and other entities as part of the settlement of Federal health care program...

  4. Beta-Testing Agreement | FNLCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beta-Testing Agreements are appropriate forlimited term evaluation and applications development of new software, technology, or equipment platforms by the Frederick National Laboratory in collaboration with an external commercial partner. It ma

  5. Pesticide Worker Safety Cooperative Agreements

    Science.gov (United States)

    The worker safety program cooperative agreements fund projects to educate pesticide applicators, handlers, and farmworkers on working safely with, and around, pesticides. Read about pesticide related grant opportunities and reports from previous grants.

  6. Oak Ridge Reservation Federal Facility Agreement. Quarterly report for the Environmental Restoration Program. Volume 4, July 1995--September 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    This quarterly progress report satisfies requirements for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program that are specified in the Oak Ridge Reservation Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) established between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The reporting period covered herein is July through September 1995 (fourth quarter of FY 1995). Sections 1.1 and 1.2 provide respectively the milestones scheduled for completion during the reporting period and a list of documents that have been proposed for transmittal during the following quarter but have not been approved as FY 1995 commitments

  7. Application Agreement and Integration Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Kevin R.; Hall, Brendan; Schweiker, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Application agreement and integration services are required by distributed, fault-tolerant, safety critical systems to assure required performance. An analysis of distributed and hierarchical agreement strategies are developed against the backdrop of observed agreement failures in fielded systems. The documented work was performed under NASA Task Order NNL10AB32T, Validation And Verification of Safety-Critical Integrated Distributed Systems Area 2. This document is intended to satisfy the requirements for deliverable 5.2.11 under Task 4.2.2.3. This report discusses the challenges of maintaining application agreement and integration services. A literature search is presented that documents previous work in the area of replica determinism. Sources of non-deterministic behavior are identified and examples are presented where system level agreement failed to be achieved. We then explore how TTEthernet services can be extended to supply some interesting application agreement frameworks. This document assumes that the reader is familiar with the TTEthernet protocol. The reader is advised to read the TTEthernet protocol standard [1] before reading this document. This document does not re-iterate the content of the standard.

  8. Finding of No Significant Impact: Proposed Bank Stabilization Tennessee River River Mile 466.2 - 466.5, Hamilton County, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-02

    submitted to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Water Pollution Control (TDEC WPC ) on August 22, 2012 and certification was...found in the department’s Erosion and Sediment Control Handbook ( www. tn.l!ovfenvironment/ wpc /sed ero controlhandbook!). 6) Erosion and sediment

  9. Peer-reviewed forensic consultation in practice: multidisciplinary oversight in common expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welner, Michael; Davey, Emily E; Bernstein, Adam

    2014-09-01

    The fallibility of forensic science consultation is an ongoing and major justice concern. Prospective peer-reviewed forensic consultation has over 10 years of application in American criminal and civil courts, adapting from the traditional oversight of teaching hospitals, rules of evidence and discovery, conventions of testimony of expert witnesses, and attorneys' overall trial strategy. In systematizing heightened oversight, this process ensures greater accountability in forensic science consultation. The integration of peer reviewers' complementary expertise and experience enhances the sophistication and overall quality of assessment. Forensic examination frequently involves the interface of different specialties. Multidisciplinary peer review augments expert proficiency with that of professional peers having different vantage points from relevant scientific disciplines. This approach ensures greater sophistication of a case inquiry, built-in accountability, and streamlined processes when multiple experts are necessitated. Here, the authors present examples of several cases and the primary and secondary benefits of this collaborative, rigorous, cross-disciplinary exercise. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  10. Establishing an Ambulatory Medicine Quality and Safety Oversight Structure: Leveraging the Fractal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravet, Steven J; Bailey, Jennifer; Demski, Renee; Pronovost, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Academic health systems face challenges in the governance and oversight of quality and safety efforts across their organizations. Ambulatory practices, which are growing in number, size, and complexity, face particular challenges in these areas. In February 2014, leaders at Johns Hopkins Medicine (JHM) implemented a governance, oversight, and accountability structure for quality and safety efforts across JHM ambulatory practices. This model was based on the fractal approach, which balances independence and interdependence and provides horizontal and vertical support. It set expectations of accountability at all levels from the Board of Trustees to frontline staff and featured a cascading structure that reached all units and ambulatory practices. This model leveraged an Ambulatory Quality Council led by a physician and nurse dyad to provide the infrastructure to share best practices, continuously improve, and define accountable local leaders. This model was incorporated into the quality and safety infrastructure across JHM. Improved outcomes in the domains of patient safety/risk reduction, externally reported quality measures, patient care/experience, and value have been demonstrated. An additional benefit was an improvement in Medicaid value-based purchasing metrics, which are linked to several million dollars of revenue. As this model matures, it will serve as a mechanism to align quality standards and programs across regional, national, and international partners and to provide a clear quality structure as new practices join the health system. Future efforts will link this model to JHM's academic mission, enhancing education to address Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies.

  11. Interweaving Curriculum Committees: A New Structure to Facilitate Oversight and Sustain Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Hugh A; Brownfield, Erica D; Churchward, Gordon; Eley, J William

    2016-01-01

    Undergraduate medical education curricula have increased in complexity over the past 25 years; however, the structures for administrative oversight of those curricula remain static. Although expectations for central oversight of medical school curricula have increased, individual academic departments often expect to exert control over the faculty and courses that are supported by the department. The structure of a governance committee in any organization can aid or inhibit that organization's functioning. In 2013, following a major curriculum change in 2007, the Emory University School of Medicine (EUSOM) implemented an "interwoven" configuration for its curriculum committee to better oversee the integrated curriculum. The new curriculum committee structure involves a small executive committee and 10 subcommittees. Each subcommittee performs a specific task or oversees one element of the curriculum. Members, including students, are appointed to two subcommittees in a way that each subcommittee is composed of representatives from multiple other subcommittees. This interweaving facilitates communication between subcommittees and also encourages members to become experts in specific tasks while retaining a comprehensive perspective on student outcomes. EUSOM's previous structure of a single committee with members representing individual departments did not promote cohesive management. The interwoven structure aligns neatly with the goals of the integrated curriculum. Since the restructuring, subcommittee members have been engaged in discussions and decisions on many key issues and expressed satisfaction with the format. The new structure corresponds to EUSOM's educational goals, although the long-term impact on student outcomes still needs to be assessed.

  12. Lessons Learned from a Five-year Evaluation of the Belgian Safety Culture Oversight Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, B.

    2016-01-01

    The Belgian Regulatory Body has implemented a Safety Culture oversight process since 2010. In a nutshell, this process is based on field observations provided by inspectors or safety analysts during any contact with a licencee (inspections, meetings, phone calls, etc). These observations are recorded within an observation (excel) sheet—aiming at describing factual and contextual issues — and are linked to IAEA Safety Culture attributes. It should be stressed that the purpose of the process is not to give a comprehensive view of a licencee safety culture but to address findings that require attention or action on the part of a licencee. In other words, gathering safety culture observations aims at identifying cultural, organizational or behavioural issues in order to feed a regulatory response to potential problems. Safety Culture Observations (SCO) are then fully integrated in routine inspection activities and must be seen as an input of the overall oversight process. As a result, the assessment of the SCO is inserted within the yearly safety evaluation report performed by Bel V and transmitted to the licencee. However, observing safety culture is not a natural approach for engineers. Guidance, training and coaching must be provided in order to open up safety dimensions to be captured. In other words, a SCO process requires a continuous support in order to promote a holistic and systemic view of safety.

  13. Nanotechnology, voluntary oversight, and corporate social performance: does company size matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzma, Jennifer; Kuzhabekova, Aliya

    2011-04-01

    In this article, we examine voluntary oversight programs for nanotechnology in the context of corporate social performance (CSP) in order to better understand the drivers, barriers, and forms of company participation in such programs. At the theoretical level, we use the management framework of CSP to understand the voluntary behavior of companies. At the empirical level, we investigate nanotech industry participation in the Environmental Protection Agency's Nanoscale Materials Stewardship Program (NMSP) as an example of CSP, in order to examine the effects of company characteristics on CSP outcomes. The analysis demonstrates that, on the average, older and larger companies for which nanotech is one of the many business activities demonstrate greater CSP as judged by company actions, declarations, and self-evaluations. Such companies tended to submit more of the requested information to the NMSP, including specific information about health and safety, and to claim fewer of the submitted items as confidential business information. They were also more likely to have on-line statements of generic and nano-specific corporate social responsibility principles, policies, and achievements. The article suggests a need to encourage smaller and younger companies to participate in voluntary oversight programs for nanotechnology and presents options for better design of these programs.

  14. Nanotechnology, voluntary oversight, and corporate social performance: does company size matter?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzma, Jennifer; Kuzhabekova, Aliya

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we examine voluntary oversight programs for nanotechnology in the context of corporate social performance (CSP) in order to better understand the drivers, barriers, and forms of company participation in such programs. At the theoretical level, we use the management framework of CSP to understand the voluntary behavior of companies. At the empirical level, we investigate nanotech industry participation in the Environmental Protection Agency’s Nanoscale Materials Stewardship Program (NMSP) as an example of CSP, in order to examine the effects of company characteristics on CSP outcomes. The analysis demonstrates that, on the average, older and larger companies for which nanotech is one of the many business activities demonstrate greater CSP as judged by company actions, declarations, and self-evaluations. Such companies tended to submit more of the requested information to the NMSP, including specific information about health and safety, and to claim fewer of the submitted items as confidential business information. They were also more likely to have on-line statements of generic and nano-specific corporate social responsibility principles, policies, and achievements. The article suggests a need to encourage smaller and younger companies to participate in voluntary oversight programs for nanotechnology and presents options for better design of these programs.

  15. Control, oversight and related terms in the international guidance on geological disposal of radioactive waste - Review of definitions and use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This document presents the most complete analysis of the use of the words control, oversight, etc. as used in NEA, IAEA and ICRP literature connected to radioactive waste disposal. It reveals the many different ways the same word, 'control', has been used in international guidance and ambiguities than can arise, especially so for the post-closure phase of the repository. The newly introduced ICRP terminology, namely the use of the words 'oversight' and 'built-in controls', represents a step forward in terminology and resolves the ambiguity

  16. The concept of oversight, its connection to memory keeping and its relevance for the medium term: The findings of the RK and M initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotzel, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    The medium term was introduced as the period of indirect oversight after repository closure, with timescales in the order of a few hundred years. While the importance of intrinsic control or 'passive' safety features in the post-closure phase of a geological repository has been recognised and stressed before, the role of oversight, by providing the capability to reduce or avoid some exposures, has come to the fore only recently. Oversight for the time being generally refers to 'watchful care' and society 'keeping an eye' on the technical system and the actual implementation of plans and decisions. In some regulatory frameworks oversight is indirectly required, for instance when mandating the creation of a land exclusion zone. In other frameworks, oversight is directly required, as illustrated, for instance, by the long-term stewardship concept of the US Environmental Protection Agency. Although sheer memory of the presence of the facility cannot be enough to constitute oversight, oversight and RK and M preservation do go hand in hand. For example, monitoring after repository closure fosters RK and M preservation, and vice versa. The presenter focused on terminology, potential oversight measures, and on roles and responsibilities of different stakeholders

  17. Reporting on nuclear power: the Tennessee Valley case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapley, D.

    1977-01-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), by deciding to have 90 percent of its new generating capacity nuclear, has made the valley a testing ground for civilian nuclear power, but valley newspapers have not provided consumers with enough information on either the pros or cons. A 1975 Browns Ferry plant fire, the most serious in the history of the civilian nuclear industry, prompted some nuclear critics to question TVA's competence to plan and manage the program. Newspapers carried wire-service stories of the fire, while their editorials gave strong support to TVA and the effort to reopen the plant. Valley newspapers have traditionally favored TVA as a powerful economic and political force which has brought many benefits. Local pride in the Oak Ridge Laboratory and plant facilities and the Federal fast-breeder reactor project headquarters also enhanced the positive attitude of the press, which tended to report details but not question nuclear safety or TVA ability. Newspapers have also failed to question TVA's claims that rates will decline as nuclear plants begin operating. A review of relevant news stories during the 1975--1976 period addresses the press coverage and notes its failure to question whether power demands justify TVA's plant construction program. Knowledgeable consultants are available to provide information on the issues, while editors are advised to give comprehensive, critical coverage and avoid promotion

  18. Health physics educational program in the Tennessee Valley Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holley, Wesley L.

    1978-01-01

    In the spring of 1977, the Radiological Hygiene Branch of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) instituted a training program for health physics technicians to ensure availability of qualified personnel for the agency, which is rapidly becoming the world's largest nuclear utility. From this, a health physics education program is developing to also include health physics orientation and retraining for unescorted entry into nuclear power plants, health physics training for employees at other (non-TVA) nuclear plants, specialized health physics training, and possibly theoretical health physics courses to qualify technician-level personnel for professional status. Videotaped presentations are being used extensively, with innovations such as giving examinations by videotape of real-life, in-plant experiences and acted out scenarios of health physics procedures; and teaching health physics personnel to observe, detect, and act on procedural, equipment, and personnel deficiencies promptly. Video-taped lectures are being used for review and to complement live lectures. Also, a 35-mm slide and videotape library is being developed on all aspects of the operational health physics program for nuclear plants using pressurized and boiling water reactors. (author)

  19. Signs and Stage Props in Tennessee Williams' Camino Real

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Ghasemi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Humans from the early times have used signs to facilitate the communication in the early societies. Semiotics is an approach wherein howness is dominant; it is the investigation of how meaning is created and communicated through systems of signs. In the dramatic texts meanings are conveyed by two different forms of language, stage direction and dialogue. Stage direction and dialogue are complementary and interdependent signifying systems. Stage directions are integral to the structure of dramatic texts and have important functions in their semantic construction. Tennessee Williams is one of the dramatists who use notes or stage directions in his plays. Through such stage devices as lighting, music and sound effects, colors, objects as symbols, transparent walls, the fluctuation of time, etc., he is after the representation of an abstract or spiritual meaning through concrete or material form. This study aims at analysis and examination of Williams’ Camino Real’s stage props and devices as signs and their relationships in the play with regard to semiotics as the theoretical framework and approach

  20. Inventory of karst subsidence in the Valley and Ridge Province of East Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketelle, R.H.; Newton, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    The first regional inventory of karst activity in the Valley and Ridge Province of East Tennessee was performed as a part of ongoing studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory pertaining to environmental impact assessment of waste disposal in karst settings. More than half the land area in the Valley and Ridge Province of East Tennessee is underlain by karst-prone carbonate bedrock. The regional karst inventory was initiated to obtain current information on the extent of active karst subsidence in the region for use in decision making by the Department of Energy in planning future waste disposal facilities at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The inventory was performed by contacting personnel of federal, state, and county agencies to obtain reports of known active karst subsidence within the region. Data from these interviews were tabulated resulting in identificaton of more than 250 karst subsidence incidents in East Tennessee, most of which have occurred since 1980. Although the infomation obtained was largely anecdotal, approximate location, date, size, and circumstances under which the collapses occurred were recorded for as many cases as could be documented. The study also included detailed reconnaissance of selected areas similar in geology and hydrology to a study area at Oak Ridge, Tennessee to identify causative factors which contribute to karst subsidence in the region and for comparison of the occurrence of visible karst features at different sites. Human activities affecting site hydrology such as large scale land clearing and earthmoving projects were related to most of the subsidence incidents inventoried

  1. Is the Level of Student Academic Performance in Tennessee Public School Systems Related to Level of Expenditures for School Systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuthold, Frank O.

    The 1992 Tennessee Education Improvement Act resulted from a successful law suit by smaller and poorer school systems in Tennessee concerning equity of funding. The Act established the Basic Education Program (BEP), which increased the state sales tax rate, shifted state funds from better funded to poorer school systems, and required systematic…

  2. 78 FR 53675 - Eighth Coast Guard District Annual Safety Zones; Boomsday Festival; Tennessee River 646.0-649.0...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ...-AA00 Eighth Coast Guard District Annual Safety Zones; Boomsday Festival; Tennessee River 646.0-649.0... Guard will enforce a Safety Zone for the Boomsday Festival Fireworks on the Tennessee River 646.0-649.0... Festival Fireworks. During the enforcement period, entry into, transiting or anchoring in the Safety Zone...

  3. Framework agreements in public procurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrecka, Marta; Telles, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Interview with Dr. Marta Andrecka, Postdoctoral Fellow at the Department of Law at the University of Aarhus, where she is currently working on a project called "Dealing with legal loopholes and uncertainties within EU public procurement law regarding framework agreements" sponsored by the Carlsberg...... Foundation. Before taking up her present position she carried out her doctoral research in Denmark and Australia and worked at law offices in both Poland and the UK. The topic for today’s talk is framework agreements, a relatively popular way of undertaking public procurement...

  4. The Global Fund's paradigm of oversight, monitoring, and results in Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Ashley; Cordon, Roberto; Told, Michaela; de Savigny, Don; Kickbusch, Ilona; Tanner, Marcel

    2017-12-12

    The Global Fund is one of the largest actors in global health. In 2015 the Global Fund was credited with disbursing close to 10 % of all development assistance for health. In 2011 it began a reform process in response to internal reviews following allegations of recipients' misuse of funds. Reforms have focused on grant application processes thus far while the core structures and paradigm have remained intact. We report results of discussions with key stakeholders on the Global Fund, its paradigm of oversight, monitoring, and results in Mozambique. We conducted 38 semi-structured in-depth interviews in Maputo, Mozambique and members of the Global Fund Board and Secretariat in Switzerland. In-country stakeholders were representatives from Global Fund country structures (eg. Principle Recipient), the Ministry of Health, health or development attachés bilateral and multilateral agencies, consultants, and the NGO coordinating body. Thematic coding revealed concerns about the combination of weak country oversight with stringent and cumbersome requirements for monitoring and evaluation linked to performance-based financing. Analysis revealed that despite the changes associated with the New Funding Model, respondents in both Maputo and Geneva firmly believe challenges remain in Global Fund's structure and paradigm. The lack of a country office has many negative downstream effects including reliance on in-country partners and ineffective coordination. Due to weak managerial and absorptive capacity, more oversight is required than is afforded by country team visits. In-country partners provide much needed support for Global Fund recipients, but roles, responsibilities, and accountability must be clearly defined for a successful long-term partnership. Furthermore, decision-makers in Geneva recognize in-country coordination as vital to successful implementation, and partners welcome increased Global Fund engagement. To date, there are no institutional requirements for

  5. Project management plan for Waste Area Grouping 5 Old Hydrofracture Facility tanks contents removal at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-06-01

    On January 1, 1992, the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) signed a Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) concerning the Oak Ridge Reservation. The FFA requires that inactive liquid low-level (radioactive) waste (LLLW) tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) be remediated in accordance with requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). This revision is to update the schedule and designation of responsibilities for the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) tanks contents removal project. The scope of this project is to transfer inventory from the five inactive LLLW tanks at the OHF into the active LLLW system

  6. 1996 structural integrity assessments for the Category C Liquid Low-Level Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    This document provides a report of the efforts made to satisfy the Federal Facility Agreement for the structural integrity certification of ten Category C Liquid Low Level Waste (LLLW) tank systems on the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Within this document, each Category C tank system is described including the associated pipeline segments evaluated as a part of those tank systems. A separate structural integrity assessment was conducted for each of the LLLW Tank Systems, four of which are located in Melton Valley, and six of which are located in Bethel Valley. The results of the structural integrity assessments are reported herein. The assessments are based on (1) a review of available tank design drawings, (2) a qualitative assessment of corrosion on the tank and pipelines, and primarily (3) leak testing program results.

  7. 1996 structural integrity assessments for the Category C Liquid Low-Level Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    This document provides a report of the efforts made to satisfy the Federal Facility Agreement for the structural integrity certification of ten Category C Liquid Low Level Waste (LLLW) tank systems on the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Within this document, each Category C tank system is described including the associated pipeline segments evaluated as a part of those tank systems. A separate structural integrity assessment was conducted for each of the LLLW Tank Systems, four of which are located in Melton Valley, and six of which are located in Bethel Valley. The results of the structural integrity assessments are reported herein. The assessments are based on (1) a review of available tank design drawings, (2) a qualitative assessment of corrosion on the tank and pipelines, and primarily (3) leak testing program results

  8. Update and Expansion of the Center of Automotive Technology Excellence Under the Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irick, David

    2012-08-30

    The Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville has completed its seventh year of operation under this agreement, its thirteenth year in total. During this period the Center has involved eleven GATE Fellows and three GATE Research Assistants in preparing them to contribute to advanced automotive technologies in the center’s focus area: Advanced Hybrid Propulsion and Control Systems. In addition to the impact that the Center has had on the students and faculty involved, the presence of the center has led to the acquisition of resources that probably would not have been obtained if the GATE Center had not existed. Significant industry interaction such as equipment donations, and support for GATE students has been realized. The value of the total resources brought to the university (including related research contracts) exceeds $2,000,000.

  9. Report: Enhanced EPA Oversight and Action Can Further Protect Water Resources From the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #15-P-0204, July 16, 2015. Enhanced EPA oversight of the permitting process for diesel fuel use during hydraulic fracturing can further EPA efforts to protect water resources, and establishment of a plan for determining whether to propose a chemical

  10. 76 FR 53683 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Oversight of Clinical Investigations: A Risk-Based Approach to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-29

    ... 200N, Rockville, MD 20852-1448; or the Office of Communication, Education and Radiation Programs... describes a modern, risk-based approach to monitoring that focuses on critical study parameters and relies... appropriate, and other forms of information technology. Title: Draft Guidance for Industry: Oversight of...

  11. The impact of masculinity on safety oversights, safety priority and safety violations in two male-dominated occupations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kent; Hansen, Claus D.; Bloksgaard, Lotte

    2015-01-01

    Background Although men have a higher risk of occupational injuries than women the role of masculinity for organizational safety outcomes has only rarely been the object of research. Aim The current study investigated the association between masculinity and safety oversights, safety priority and ...

  12. The World Bank Inspection Panel and Quasi-Judicial Oversight: In Search of the 'Judicial Spirit' in Public International Law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Naudé Fourie (Andria)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThis PhD dissertation conceptualizes the World Bank Inspection Panel as a mechanism of quasi-judicial review or oversight, aimed at enhancing the accountability and legitimacy of the World Bank – which is conceived as an international institution exercising public power. The author

  13. Better Planning and Oversight Could Have Reduced Construction Delays and Costs at the Kabul Military Training Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-26

    Representative CSTC-A Combined Security Transition Command - Afghanistan DNC Discrepancy and Non-Compliance DPW Department of Public Works ECC ECC...Discrepancy and Non-Compliance ( DNC ) log, stating that SIGAR Audit-12-2 Contractor Performance and Oversight / Kabul Military Training Center Page 15

  14. Federal Research: Opportunities Exist to Improve the Management and Oversight of Federally Funded Research and Development Centers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Woods, William; Mittal, Anu; Neumann, John; Williams, Cheryl; Candon, Sharron; Sterling, Suzanne; Wade, Jacqueline; Zwanzig, Peter

    2008-01-01

    ..., and (2) agency oversight processes used to ensure that FFRDCs are well-managed. GAO's work is based on a review of documents and interviews with officials from eight FFRDCs sponsored by the departments of Defense (DoD), Energy (DOE...

  15. Uranium ore purchase and custom milling agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, B.T.

    1976-01-01

    Important considerations involved in structuring agreements for ore sale or other disposition are discussed. Payment provisions in ore purchase agreements and custom milling agreement provisions are considered. Proposed forms of Ore Purchase Agreement and Custom Milling Agreement are included as appendices

  16. 46 CFR Sec. 4 - Service agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Service agreements. Contract MA ___ Service Agreement, Federal Port Controller This agreement, made as of... compensation after the contract comes into force will be negotiated, if appropriate. Employee service expenses... secure this agreement upon any agreement for a commission, percentage, brokerage, or contingent fee...

  17. Between voluntary agreement and legislation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gwozdz, Wencke; Hedegaard, Liselotte; Reisch, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    Voluntary agreements and self-imposed standards are broadly applied to restrict the influence food advertising exerts on children’s food choices – yet their effects are unknown. The current project will therefore investigate whether and, if yes, how the Danish Code for Responsible Food Marketing...

  18. Governance of material transfer agreements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez, V.F.

    2008-01-01

    The governance of material transfer agreements (MTAs) is crucial for research and the progress of science. When developing a research project, researchers face the problem of availability of research material or restrictive provisions imposed by providers. This article discusses the governance of

  19. Form 6 - gas balancing agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    In 1988, a special Committee of the Rocky Mountain Mineral Law Foundation undertook a project to draft a model from gas balancing agreement. This project was initiated at the request of a number of Foundation members who felt that a model form gas balancing agreement would facilitate the negotiation of operating agreement, since gas balancing issues had become sticking points in the process. The Committee was composed of attorneys representing a wide cross-section of the oil and gas industry including both major and independent oil companies, production companies with interstate pipeline affiliates, and private practitioners. The Committee attempted to address the more controversial issues in gas balancing with optional provisions in the Form. To facilitate the negotiation process, the number of optional provisions was minimized. This form may be used as an Appendix to the new A.A.P.L. Form 610-1989 Model Form Operating Agreement. This book includes provision of this Form which are: Ownership of gas production; Balancing of production accounts; Cash balancing upon depletion; Deliverability tests; Nominations; Statements; Payment of taxes; Operating expenses; Overproducing allowable; Payment of leasehold burdens; Operator's liability; Successors and assigns; Audits; Arbitration; and Operator's fees

  20. Patterns of cave biodiversity and endemism in the Appalachians and Interior Plateau of Tennessee, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew L Niemiller

    Full Text Available Using species distribution data, we developed a georeferenced database of troglobionts (cave-obligate species in Tennessee to examine spatial patterns of species richness and endemism, including >2000 records for 200 described species. Forty aquatic troglobionts (stygobionts and 160 terrestrial troglobionts are known from caves in Tennessee, the latter having the greatest diversity of any state in the United States. Endemism was high, with 25% of terrestrial troglobionts (40 species and 20% of stygobionts (eight species known from just a single cave and nearly two-thirds of all troglobionts (130 species known from five or fewer caves. Species richness and endemism were greatest in the Interior Plateau (IP and Southwestern Appalachians (SWA ecoregions, which were twice as diverse as the Ridge and Valley (RV. Troglobiont species assemblages were most similar between the IP and SWA, which shared 59 species, whereas the RV cave fauna was largely distinct. We identified a hotspot of cave biodiversity with a center along the escarpment of the Cumberland Plateau in south-central Tennessee defined by both species richness and endemism that is contiguous with a previously defined hotspot in northeastern Alabama. Nearly half (91 species of Tennessee's troglobiont diversity occurs in this region where several cave systems contain ten or more troglobionts, including one with 23 species. In addition, we identified distinct troglobiont communities across the state. These communities corresponded to hydrological boundaries and likely reflect past or current connectivity between subterranean habitats within and barriers between hydrological basins. Although diverse, Tennessee's subterranean fauna remains poorly studied and many additional species await discovery and description. We identified several undersampled regions and outlined conservation and management priorities to improve our knowledge and aid in protection of the subterranean biodiversity in

  1. Whole Genome DNA Sequence Analysis of Salmonella subspecies enterica serotype Tennessee obtained from related peanut butter foodborne outbreaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R Wilson

    Full Text Available Establishing an association between possible food sources and clinical isolates requires discriminating the suspected pathogen from an environmental background, and distinguishing it from other closely-related foodborne pathogens. We used whole genome sequencing (WGS to Salmonella subspecies enterica serotype Tennessee (S. Tennessee to describe genomic diversity across the serovar as well as among and within outbreak clades of strains associated with contaminated peanut butter. We analyzed 71 isolates of S. Tennessee from disparate food, environmental, and clinical sources and 2 other closely-related Salmonella serovars as outgroups (S. Kentucky and S. Cubana, which were also shot-gun sequenced. A whole genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP analysis was performed using a maximum likelihood approach to infer phylogenetic relationships. Several monophyletic lineages of S. Tennessee with limited SNP variability were identified that recapitulated several food contamination events. S. Tennessee clades were separated from outgroup salmonellae by more than sixteen thousand SNPs. Intra-serovar diversity of S. Tennessee was small compared to the chosen outgroups (1,153 SNPs, suggesting recent divergence of some S. Tennessee clades. Analysis of all 1,153 SNPs structuring an S. Tennessee peanut butter outbreak cluster revealed that isolates from several food, plant, and clinical isolates were very closely related, as they had only a few SNP differences between them. SNP-based cluster analyses linked specific food sources to several clinical S. Tennessee strains isolated in separate contamination events. Environmental and clinical isolates had very similar whole genome sequences; no markers were found that could be used to discriminate between these sources. Finally, we identified SNPs within variable S. Tennessee genes that may be useful markers for the development of rapid surveillance and typing methods, potentially aiding in traceback efforts

  2. Regulatory Oversight of Radioactive Sources through the Integrated Management of Safety and Security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, K.

    2016-01-01

    The Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority (HAEA) has full regulatory competence; its mission is to oversee the safety and security of all the peaceful applications of atomic energy. All the radioactive sources having activity above the exemption level is registered and licensed both from safety and security points of view. The Hungarian central register of radioactive sources contains about 7,000 radioactive sources and 450 license holders. In order to use its limited resources the HAEA has decided to introduce an integrated regulatory oversight programme. Accordingly, during the licensing process and inspection activities the HAEA intends to assess both safety and security aspects at the same time. The article describes the Hungarian the various applications of radioactive materials, and summarizes the preparation activities of the HAEA. (author)

  3. The Cost of Social Relations Oversight in the Adaptive Appropriation of Japanese Management Practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tackney, Charles T.

    2006-01-01

    a comparative legal ecology model of the modern enterprise to gain theoretical and empirical insight into the economic and societal costs of combining Japanese manufacturing techniques with managerial prerogative pursued "the American way." I begin by introducing the comparative legal ecology of the workplace...... as a theoretical concept to compare and contrast national differences in the modern industrial enterprise. This provides a standard to evaluate the extent to which General Motors had appropriately adapted the Japanese modes of social relations within the firm. The events associated with the Flint strikes evidence...... the cost of this oversight. The paper concludes by discussing the need to appropriately emulate Japanese modes of social relation when firms seek to successfully adapt their modes of production....

  4. Nonverbal contention and contempt in U.K. parliamentary oversight hearings on fiscal and monetary policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonhardt-Bailey, Cheryl

    2017-01-01

    In parliamentary committee oversight hearings on fiscal policy, monetary policy, and financial stability, where verbal deliberation is the focus, nonverbal communication may be crucial in the acceptance or rejection of arguments proffered by policymakers. Systematic qualitative coding of these hearings in the 2010-15 U.K. Parliament finds the following: (1) facial expressions, particularly in the form of anger and contempt, are more prevalent in fiscal policy hearings, where backbench parliamentarians hold frontbench parliamentarians to account, than in monetary policy or financial stability hearings, where the witnesses being held to account are unelected policy experts; (2) comparing committees across chambers, hearings in the House of Lords committee yield more reassuring facial expressions relative to hearings in the House of Commons committee, suggesting a more relaxed and less adversarial context in the former; and (3) central bank witnesses appearing before both the Lords and Commons committees tend toward expressions of appeasement, suggesting a willingness to defer to Parliament.

  5. Reindustrialization: East Tennessee Technology Park - a year later

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, L.W.

    1997-01-01

    DOE''s Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) continues to be a vital part of the nation''s energy and defense complex. Accordingly ORO must continue to position itself to take advantage of unique strengths and capabilities developed over the past five decades. This repositioning must always occur in the context of national policy debates and sometimes harsh budget realities. One important fact needs to be reinforced, the long-term budget situation, which has been termed the billion-dollar challenge, is going to cast a long shadow over every strategic decision made at ORO. A little less than two years ago Jim Hall, Manager of Oak Ridge Operations, began an effort to refocus the long term goals of the DOE Oak Ridge Complex. He called this new road map for the future Oak Ridge Vision 2010, and this vision statement acknowledges DOE''s significant economic and technical ties in the East Tennessee region and its role in maintaining a vigorous economic climate. Reindustrialization, a key component in the Oak Ridge vision, has been defined as a method of accomplishment for decontamination and decommissioning, that uses the value of DOE assets in the form of surplus materials and underutilized equipment and facilities, to attract private sector investment in facility clean-up. Reindustrialization is one of the vehicles through which ORO is realizing its vision of transforming the Oak Ridge Complex into an economically viable integrated science, education, technology, and industrial complex operated in partnership with the private sector. Reindustrialization is also an opportunity for this region to 'privatize' and reduce its dependence on an ever-decreasing federal budget

  6. Improving oversight of the graduate medical education enterprise: one institution's strategies and tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin, Lawrence B; Arana, George W; Medio, Franklin J; Ybarra, Angela F N; Clarke, Harry S

    2006-05-01

    Accreditation organizations, financial stakeholders, legal systems, and regulatory agencies have increased the need for accountability in educational processes and curricular outcomes of graduate medical education. This demand for greater programmatic monitoring has placed pressure on institutions with graduate medical education (GME) programs to develop greater oversight of these programs. Meeting these challenges requires development of new GME management strategies and tools for institutional GME administrators to scrutinize programs, while still allowing these programs the autonomy to develop and implement educational methods to meet their unique training needs. At the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), senior administrators in the college of medicine felt electronic information management was a critical strategy for success and thus proceeded to carefully select an electronic residency management system (ERMS) to provide functionality for both individual programs and the GME enterprise as a whole. Initial plans in 2002 for a phased deployment had to be changed to a much more rapid deployment due to regulatory issues. Extensive communication and cooperation among MUSC's GME leaders resulted in a successful deployment in 2003. Evaluation completion rates have substantially improved, duty hours are carefully monitored, patient safety has improved through more careful oversight of residents' procedural privileges, regulators have been pleased, and central GME administrative visibility of program performance has dramatically improved. The system is now being expanded to MUSC's medical school and other health professions colleges. The authors discuss lessons learned and opportunities and challenges ahead, which include improving tracking of development of procedural competency, establishing and monitoring program performance standards, and integrating the ERMS with GME reimbursement systems.

  7. Creating an oversight infrastructure for electronic health record-related patient safety hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Hardeep; Classen, David C; Sittig, Dean F

    2011-12-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) have potential quality and safety benefits. However, reports of EHR-related safety hazards are now emerging. The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology recently sponsored an Institute of Medicine committee to evaluate how health information technology use affects patient safety. In this article, we propose the creation of a national EHR oversight program to provide dedicated surveillance of EHR-related safety hazards and to promote learning from identified errors, close calls, and adverse events. The program calls for data gathering, investigation/analysis, and regulatory components. The first 2 functions will depend on institution-level EHR safety committees that will investigate all known EHR-related adverse events and near-misses and report them nationally using standardized methods. These committees should also perform routine safety self-assessments to proactively identify new risks. Nationally, we propose the long-term creation of a centralized, nonpartisan board with an appropriate legal and regulatory infrastructure to ensure the safety of EHRs. We discuss the rationale of the proposed oversight program and its potential organizational components and functions. These include mechanisms for robust data collection and analyses of all safety concerns using multiple methods that extend beyond reporting, multidisciplinary investigation of selected high-risk safety events, and enhanced coordination with other national agencies to facilitate broad dissemination of hazards information. Implementation of this proposed infrastructure can facilitate identification of EHR-related adverse events and errors and potentially create a safer and more effective EHR-based health care delivery system.

  8. Prospective regional studies: The Rhine Meuse study and the Tennessee Valley study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, A.

    1980-01-01

    Within the scope of this report two regional studies are presented: - the 'Rhein-Maas-Study' within which the expected radiological impact of the population in the Rhein and Maas basin - which is situated within Central Europe - is assessed on the basis of the planned and forecasted development of nuclear energy in the coming decades. - The 'Tennessee Valley Study' within which the expected radiological impact of the population in the Tennessee-Cumberland basis - which is situated within North America - is assessed likewise on the basis of the planned and forecasted development of nuclear energy in the coming decades. (orig./RW)

  9. Design demonstrations for the remaining 19 Category B tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This document presents design demonstrations conducted of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) storage tank systems located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Demonstration of the design of these tank systems has been stipulated by the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) between the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)--Region IV; the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC); and the DOE. The FFA establishes four categories of tank systems: Category A--New or Replacement Tank Systems with Secondary Containment; Category B--Existing Tank Systems with Secondary Containment; Category C--Existing Tank Systems Without Secondary Containment; and Category D--Existing Tank Systems Without Secondary Containment That are Removed from Service. This document provides a design demonstration of the secondary containment and ancillary equipment of 19 tank systems listed in the FFA as Category B. Three tank systems originally designated as Category B have been redesignated as Category C and one tank system originally designated as Category B has been redesignated as Category D. The design demonstration for each tank is presented in Section 2. The design demonstrations were developed using information obtained from the design drawings (as-built when available), construction specifications, and interviews with facility operators. The assessments assume that each tank system was constructed in accordance with the design drawings and construction specifications for that system unless specified otherwise. Each design demonstration addresses system conformance to the requirements of the FFA

  10. Design demonstrations for the remaining 19 Category B tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    This document presents design demonstrations conducted of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) storage tank systems located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL has conducted research in energy related fields since 1943. The facilities used to conduct the research include nuclear reactors, chemical pilot plants, research laboratories, radioisotope production laboratories, and support facilities. These facilities have produced a variety of radioactive and/or hazardous wastes that have been transported and stored through an extensive network of piping and tankage. Demonstration of the design of these tank systems has been stipulated by the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) between the EPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency)-Region IV; the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC); and the DOE. The FFA establishes four categories of tank systems: Category A-New or Replacement Tank Systems with Secondary Containment; Category B-Existing Tank Systems with Secondary Containment; Category C-Existing Tank Systems Without Secondary Containment, and Category D-Existing Tank Systems Without Secondary Containment That are Removed from Service. This document provides a design demonstration of the secondary containment and ancillary equipment of 19 tank systems listed in the FFA as Category B. The design demonstration for each tank is presented in Section 2. The assessments assume that each tank system was constructed in accordance with the design drawings and construction specifications for that system unless specified otherwise. Each design demonstration addresses system conformance to the requirements of the FFA (Appendix F, Section C)

  11. Confirmatory Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek operable unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    On December 21, 1989, the EPA placed the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) on the National Priorities List (NPL). On January 1, 1992, a Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) between the DOE Field Office in Oak Ridge (DOE-OR), EPA Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) went into effect. This FFA establishes the procedural framework and schedule by which DOE-OR will develop, coordinate, implement and monitor environmental restoration activities on the ORR in accordance with applicable federal and state environmental regulations. The DOE-OR Environmental Restoration Program for the ORR addresses the remediation of areas both within and outside the ORR boundaries. This sampling and analysis plan focuses on confirming the cleanup of the stretch of EFPC flowing from Lake Reality at the Y-12 Plant through the City of Oak Ridge, to Poplar Creek on the ORR and its associated floodplain. Both EFPC and its floodplain have been contaminated by releases from the Y-12 Plant since the mid-1950s. Because the EFPC site-designated as an ORR operable unit (OU) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) is included on the NPL, its remediation must follow the specific procedures mandated by CERCLA, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act in 1986

  12. Confirmatory Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek operable unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    On December 21, 1989, the EPA placed the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) on the National Priorities List (NPL). On January 1, 1992, a Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) between the DOE Field Office in Oak Ridge (DOE-OR), EPA Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) went into effect. This FFA establishes the procedural framework and schedule by which DOE-OR will develop, coordinate, implement and monitor environmental restoration activities on the ORR in accordance with applicable federal and state environmental regulations. The DOE-OR Environmental Restoration Program for the ORR addresses the remediation of areas both within and outside the ORR boundaries. This sampling and analysis plan focuses on confirming the cleanup of the stretch of EFPC flowing from Lake Reality at the Y-12 Plant through the City of Oak Ridge, to Poplar Creek on the ORR and its associated floodplain. Both EFPC and its floodplain have been contaminated by releases from the Y-12 Plant since the mid-1950s. Because the EFPC site-designated as an ORR operable unit (OU) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) is included on the NPL, its remediation must follow the specific procedures mandated by CERCLA, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act in 1986.

  13. 76 FR 20668 - Notice of Agreements Filed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... Agreement. Agreement No.: 012105-001. Title: SCM Lines Transportes/CCNI Agreement. Parties: Compania Chilena de Navegacion Interoceanica S.A. and SCM Lines Transportes Maritimos Sociedade Unipessoal, LDA...

  14. 76 FR 16420 - Notice of Agreements Filed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    .... Title: Hanjin and WHS Transpacific Vessel Sharing and Slot Allocation Agreement. Parties: Hanjin... amendment would add COSCON as a party to the Agreement and revise the name of the Agreement to Hanjin/WHS...

  15. 78 FR 35270 - Notice of Agreements Filed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-12

    ... Russia from the geographic scope of the agreement. Agreement No.: 012210. Title: Siem Car Carrier Pacific AS/Eukor Car Carriers Inc. Space Charter Agreement. Parties: Siem Car Carrier Pacific AS and Eukor...

  16. International agreements on nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dombey, N.

    1982-01-01

    The satellite detection of a nuclear explosion in the South Atlantic and Israel's destruction of a research reactor in Iraq make it essential to strengthen existing monitoring and enforcement programs to prevent proliferation. While there was no reliable evidence that either South Africa or Iraq was violating non-proliferation agreements, worst case scenarios can demonstrate to unfriendly countries that South Africa had diverted fuel to test a nuclear weapon and that Iraq is intending to produce weapons-grade plutonium 239. The situation can be improved by formulating better terms and conditions for internationalizing access to materials. Nuclear suppliers need to agree on terms that will assure their customers that contracts for civil programs will be honored. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which includes both nuclear suppliers and customers, could achieve stronger agreements that take into account recent technological advances that will expand enrichment and reprocessing activities. 23 references, 1 figure

  17. Assessing implementation mechanisms for an international agreement on research and development for health products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Steven J; Røttingen, John-Arne

    2012-11-01

    The Member States of the World Health Organization (WHO) are currently debating the substance and form of an international agreement to improve the financing and coordination of research and development (R&D) for health products that meet the needs of developing countries. In addition to considering the content of any possible legal or political agreement, Member States may find it helpful to reflect on the full range of implementation mechanisms available to bring any agreement into effect. These include mechanisms for states to make commitments, administer activities, manage financial contributions, make subsequent decisions, monitor each other's performance and promote compliance. States can make binding or non-binding commitments through conventions, contracts, declarations or institutional reforms. States can administer activities to implement their agreements through international organizations, sub-agencies, joint ventures or self-organizing processes. Finances can be managed through specialized multilateral funds, financial institutions, membership organizations or coordinated self-management. Decisions can be made through unanimity, consensus, equal voting, modified voting or delegation. Oversight can be provided by peer review, expert review, self-reports or civil society. Together, states should select their preferred options across categories of implementation mechanisms, each of which has advantages and disadvantages. The challenge lies in choosing the most effective combinations of mechanisms for supporting an international agreement (or set of agreements) that achieves collective aspirations in a way and at a cost that are both sustainable and acceptable to those involved. In making these decisions, WHO's Member States can benefit from years of experience with these different mechanisms in health and its related sectors.

  18. System Description for the K-25/K-27 D&D Project Polyurethane Foam Delivery System, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boris, G.

    2008-02-21

    The Foam Delivery System used in the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) project for the K-25/K-27 Buildings at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) is comprised of a trailer-mounted Gusmer{reg_sign} H20/35 Pro-TEC Proportioning Unit and the associated equipment to convey electrical power, air, and foam component material to the unit. This high-pressure, plural-component polyurethane foam pouring system will be used to fill process gas and non-process equipment/piping (PGE/P) within the K-25/K-27 Buildings with polyurethane foam to immobilize contaminants prior to removal. The system creates foam by mixing isocyanate and polyol resin (Resin) component materials. Currently, the project plans to utilize up to six foaming units simultaneously during peak foaming activities. Also included in this system description are the foam component material storage containers that will be used for storage of the component material drums in a staging area outside of the K-25/K-27 Buildings. The Foam Delivery System and foam component material storage enclosures (i.e., Foaming Component Protective Enclosures) used to store polymeric methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (PMDI) component material are identified as Safety Significant (SS) Structures, Systems and Components (SSC) in the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) for the project, Documented Safety Analysis for the K-25 and K-27 Facilities at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, DSA-ET-K-25/K-27-0001.

  19. Master Plan for Tennessee Schools: Preparing for the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennessee State Board of Education, Nashville.

    The Education Improvement Act (EIA) was passed in Tennessee in 1992. It established the Basic Education Program (BEP) as the funding formula used to provide adequate, equitable, and sustainable school funding. The 1997 master plan is consistent with the national Goals 2000 legislation and addresses each of the eight national goals. The plan…

  20. Downy mildew on coleus (Plectranthus scutellarioides) caused by Peronospora belbahrii sensu lato in Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleus (Plectranthus scutellarioides [syn. = Solenostemon scutellarioides]) is a popular ornamental plant in the mint family (Lamiaceae), prized for its colorful and showy foliage. In August 2015, disease symptoms typical of downy mildew were observed at two sites in Nashville, Tennessee: (i) at the...

  1. 76 FR 52652 - National Fuel Gas Supply Corporation; Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Availability of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ... and Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company's (TGP) proposed Station 230C Project in the above referenced dockets. National Fuel and TGP request authorization to construct facilities in Pennsylvania and New York... environmental effects of the construction and operation of National Fuel's and TGP's proposed projects in...

  2. 76 FR 39864 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Dominion Gas Transmission, Inc.; Notice of Availability of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... environmental assessment (EA) for Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company's (TGP) proposed Northeast Supply Diversification Project (TGP's Project) and Dominion Transmission, Inc.'s (DTI) proposed Ellisburg to Craigs Project (DTI's Project) in the above referenced dockets. TGP and DTI request authorization to construct...

  3. Productivity, Performance and Return on Investment: A Baseline Analysis of Tennessee Public Institutions of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennessee Higher Education Commission, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Tennessee needs to continuously increase its degree productivity by four percent every year from now until 2025. In the midst of this need for increased degree production, the state's current economic realities indicate public institutions will receive little to no new state appropriated revenues for the foreseeable future. The Master Plan Annual…

  4. 77 FR 71454 - Notice of Atomic Safety And Licensing Board Reconstitution, Tennessee Valley Authority (Watts Bar...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-30

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 50-391-OL; ASLBP No. 09-893-01-OL-BD01] Notice of Atomic Safety And Licensing Board Reconstitution, Tennessee Valley Authority (Watts Bar, Unit 2) Pursuant to 10... Bar, Unit 2 operating license application proceeding is hereby reconstituted by appointing...

  5. 76 FR 5194 - Tennessee National Wildlife Refuge, Henry, Benton, Decatur, and Humphreys Counties, TN; Final...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-28

    ... Tennessee NWR include the Migratory Bird Conservation Act (16 U.S.C. 715-715r) and Fish and Wildlife... plants, 303 species of birds, and 280 species of mammals, fish, reptiles, and amphibians. We announce our... migration. We will conduct population and habitat surveys to evaluate shorebird use and invertebrate...

  6. Changes in Tennessee's secondary hardwood processing and sawmill industries from 2005 to 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    William G. Luppold; Delton Alderman; Doug. Schnabel

    2012-01-01

    Tennessee is in the center of the Eastern hardwood region and has experienced large declines in employment by primary and secondary hardwood processors since 2005 in a pattern similar to the one these processors have experienced nationally. The objective of this article is to examine changes in national hardwood processing industries between 2005 and 2009 and compare...

  7. Happy, healthy, smart cities symposium in Knoxville, Tennessee : a TPCB peer exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    The Happy, Healthy, Smart Cities Symposium was a two-day event, held on March 29-30, 2016 in Knoxville, Tennessee, focused on exploring the impacts that transportation and land use decisions have on health, safety, and quality of life. The event was ...

  8. Transportation impacts on the Tennessee highway system proposed monitored retrievable storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobble, C.

    1985-12-12

    The issue of the transport of spent fuels to the proposed monitored retrievable storage facility in Tennessee is discussed. Relevant issues include the ability of the roads and bridges on the transport routes to handle the weight of the trucks. (CBS)

  9. Transportation impacts on the Tennessee highway system proposed monitored retrievable storage. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobble, C.

    1985-12-12

    The issue of the transport of spent fuels to the proposed monitored retrievable storage facility in Tennessee is discussed. Relevant issues include the ability of the roads and bridges on the transport routes to handle the weight of the trucks. (CBS)

  10. Precipitation Change and Soil Leaching: Field Results and Simulations from Walker Branch Watershed, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.W. Johnson; P.J. Hanson; D.E. Todd; R.B. Susfalk; Carl C. Trettin

    1998-01-01

    Abstract. To investigate the potential effects of changing precipitation on a deciduous forest ecosystem, an experiment was established on Walker Branch Watershed, Tennessee that modified the amount of throughfall at 4 -33 %. ambient (no change), and +33 % using a system of rain gutters and sprinklers. We hypothesized that the drier treatments would...

  11. A PROGRAM OF ADULT EDUCATION FOR THE MARSHALL COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL SERVICE AREA, LEWISBURG, TENNESSEE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BARNES, JOHN O., JR.

    THE NEED FOR AN ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAM IN THE MARSHALL COUNTY (TENNESSEE) HIGH SCHOOL SERVICE AREA WAS STUDIED THROUGH QUESTIONNAIRES COMPLETED BY 207 ADULTS, EXAMINATION OF SCHOOL AND GOVERNMENT RECORDS, AND PERSONAL INTERVIEWS. IT WAS FOUND THAT OVER HALF OF THE AREA RESIDENTS WERE NOT HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES, AND THAT MANY ADULTS DESIRED MORE…

  12. 78 FR 71502 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Tennessee; Revisions to the Knox County...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    ... the definition of ``Modification'' in Knox County Air Quality Management Regulation Section 13 Definitions. TDEC considers Knox County's SIP revision to be as or more stringent than the Tennessee SIP... at the Regulatory Development Section, Air Planning Branch, Air, Pesticides and Toxics Management...

  13. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Tennessee's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  14. Report to the State Board of Education on the Status of Minority Classroom Teachers in Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennessee Department of Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The school systems of Tennessee are continuing to make efforts to recruit and retain African-American and other minority teachers. As school systems in the state become more and more diverse, these efforts must increase. The number of classroom teachers with 30+ years of experience further emphasizes the accelerated need to establish and implement…

  15. Psychology Educators of Tennessee (PET): A Regional Learning Community for Psychology Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kiesa; Jones, Linda; Brinthaupt, Thomas M.; Hart, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a regional psychology teaching organisation, Psychology Educators of Tennessee (PET). PET is designed to enhance collaboration among teachers from local colleges, universities, and high schools. We discuss the history of PET, the themes and pragmatics associated with our annual conference, plans for…

  16. First report of Alternaria alternata causing leaf spot on Ruth's golden aster (Pityopsis ruthii) in Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth’s golden aster, Pityopsis ruthii (Small), is an endangered, herbaceous perennial plant that is only endemic to small sections of the Hiwassee and Ocoee Rivers, in Polk County, Tennessee. In July 2015, a greenhouse grown plant exhibited symptoms of disease that included elongated brown lesions o...

  17. 77 FR 44481 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Tennessee: Prevention of Significant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-30

    ..., in light of Tennessee request in its May 1, 2012, letter and EPA's intention to amend the definition...'' Provision In the NSR PM 2.5 Rule, EPA revised the definition of ``regulated NSR pollutant'' for PSD to add a... definition of ``regulated NSR pollutant'' promulgated in the NSR PM 2.5 Rule regarding the PM condensable...

  18. 78 FR 44886 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Tennessee: New Source Review-Prevention of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-25

    ... Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) through the Division of Air Pollution Control, to EPA on October 4, 2012, for parallel processing. TDEC submitted the final version of this SIP... comments adverse or otherwise. TDEC submitted the final version of its SIP revision on May 10, 2013...

  19. The Association of Sleep Duration and Depressive Symptoms in Rural Communities of Missouri, Tennessee, and Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jen Jen; Salas, Joanne; Habicht, Katherine; Pien, Grace W.; Stamatakis, Katherine A.; Brownson, Ross C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the association between sleep duration and depressive symptoms in a rural setting. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study using data from Wave 3 of the Walk the Ozarks to Wellness Project including 12 rural communities in Missouri, Arkansas, and Tennessee (N = 1,204). Sleep duration was defined based on average…

  20. An Assessment of Future Demands for and Benefits of Public Transit Services in Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southworth, F.

    2003-06-10

    This report documents results from a study carried out by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee at Knoxville for the Office of Public Transportation, Tennessee Department of Transportation. The study team was tasked with developing a process and a supporting methodology for estimating the benefits accruing to the State from the operation of state supported public transit services. The team was also tasked with developing forecasts of the future demands for these State supported transit services at five year intervals through the year 2020, broken down where possible to the local transit system level. Separate ridership benefits and forecasts were also requested for the State's urban and rural transit operations. Tennessee's public transit systems are subsidized to a degree by taxpayers. It is therefore in the public interest that assessments of the benefits of such systems be carried out at intervals, to determine how they are contributing to the well-being of the state's population. For some population groups within the State of Tennessee these transit services have become essential as a means of gaining access to workplaces and job training centers, to educational and health care facilities, as well as to shops, social functions and recreational sites.

  1. An Assessment of Future Demands for and Benefits of Public Transit Srevices in Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southworth, F.

    2004-04-29

    This report documents results from a study carried out by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee at Knoxville for the Office of Public Transportation, Tennessee Department of Transportation. The study team was tasked with developing a process and a supporting methodology for estimating the benefits accruing to the State from the operation of state supported public transit services. The team was also tasked with developing forecasts of the future demands for these State supported transit services at five year intervals through the year 2020, broken down where possible to the local transit system level. Separate ridership benefits and forecasts were also requested for the State's urban and rural transit operations. Tennessee's public transit systems are subsidized to a degree by taxpayers. It is therefore in the public interest that assessments of the benefits of such systems be carried out at intervals, to determine how they are contributing to the well-being of the state's population. For some population groups within the State of Tennessee these transit services have become essential as a means of gaining access to workplaces and job training centers, to educational and health care facilities, as well as to shops, social functions and recreational sites.

  2. Tennessee's timber industry-an assessment of timber product output and use, 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    James W. Bentley; Doug Schnabel

    2007-01-01

    In 2005, roundwood output from Tennessee’s forests was 325 million cubic feet. Mill byproducts generated from primary manufacturers totaled 119 million cubic feet. Seventy-three percent of the plant residues were used primarily for fuel and fiber products. Saw logs were the leading roundwood product at 189 million cubic feet; pulpwood ranked second at 121 million cubic...

  3. Analysis of the Subscales of the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellen, Murray I.; Hoffman, Roy A.

    1984-01-01

    Factor analyzed the item responses comprising each of the five external dimensions and the three internal dimensions of the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale. The results indicated that seven of the eight subscales are essentially single-factor scales. Implications for counseling are discussed. (Author)

  4. 29 CFR 1908.10 - Cooperative Agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CONSULTATION AGREEMENTS § 1908.10 Cooperative Agreements. (a) Who may make Agreements. The Assistant Secretary... consultation services to private sector employers. (3) Renegotiation of existing Agreements funded under this part shall be initiated within 30 days of the effective date of these revisions. (c) Contents of...

  5. 77 FR 42310 - Notice of Agreements Filed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-18

    ...; Washington, DC 20006-4007. Synopsis: The agreement would provide for delivery of data to the Port of Oakland... delivery. Agreement No.: 201217. Title: Port of Long Beach Data Services Agreement. Parties: Port of Long... 1100; Washington, DC 20006-4007. Synopsis: The agreement would provide for delivery of data to the Port...

  6. 7 CFR 947.111 - Marketing agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Definitions § 947.111 Marketing agreement. Marketing agreement means Marketing Agreement No. 114, as amended. ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Marketing agreement. 947.111 Section 947.111 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing...

  7. 77 FR 27227 - Notice of Agreements Filed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-09

    ... agreement. Agreement No.: 011275-032. Title: Australia and New Zealand-United States Discussion Agreement....G. Filing Party: Tara L. Leiter, Esquire; Blank Rome LLP; 600 New Hampshire Avenue NW., Washington... trade between the U.S. East Coast and China. Agreement No.: 012169. Title: Crowley/ELJSA Space Charter...

  8. Public-supply water use and self-supplied industrial water use in Tennessee, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, John A.

    2018-04-26

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Division of Water Resources, prepared this report and displayed and analyzed water use by self-supplied industrial and public-supply water systems in Tennessee for 2010. Public-supply water systems in Tennessee provide water for domestic, industrial, and commercial uses and for municipal services. In 2010, 474 public-supply water systems distributed 917 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of surface water (67 percent, 617 Mgal/d) and groundwater (33 percent, 300 Mgal/d) to a population of 5.7 million in Tennessee. Gross per capita water use in Tennessee during 2010 was 162 gallons per day.Since 1950, water withdrawals by public-supply water systems in Tennessee have increased from 160 Mgal/d to 917 Mgal/d in 2010. Each of the 95 counties in Tennessee was served by at least 1 public-supply water system in 2010. Tennessee public-supply water systems withdraw less groundwater than surface water, and surface-water use has increased at a faster rate than groundwater use. Since 2005, surface-water withdrawals have increased by 26 Mgal/d, and groundwater withdrawals have decreased by 29 Mgal/d, which is the first decrease in groundwater withdrawals since 1950; however, 29 systems reported increased groundwater withdrawals during 2010, and 12 of these 29 systems reported increases of 1 Mgal/d or more. Davidson County had the largest surface-water withdrawal rate (136 Mgal/d) in 2010. The largest groundwater withdrawal rate (151 Mgal/d) by a single public-supply water system was reported by Memphis Light, Gas and Water, which served more than 669,000 people in Shelby County in 2010.Self-supplied industrial water use includes water for such purposes as fabrication, processing, washing, diluting, cooling, or transporting a product; incorporating water into a product; or for sanitation needs in facilities that manufacture various products. Water withdrawals for self

  9. The height of Tennessee convicts: another piece of the "antebellum puzzle".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunder, Marco

    2004-03-01

    Average height of the free population in the United States born in the mid-1830s began to decline despite growing per capita incomes. Explanations for this "antebellum puzzle" revolve around a possibly deteriorating disease environment promoted by urban agglomeration and increases in the relative price of protein-rich foods. However, several groups were immune to the effect, including members of the middle class, whose income was high enough, and increased enough to overcome the adverse developments and maintain their nutritional status. Although at the opposite end of the social spectrum, the height of male slaves also increased, as it was in their owners' interest to raise their slaves' food allotments. The height of Tennessee convicts, analyzed in this article, also increased in the late-1830s, being the third exception to the "antebellum puzzle." Mid-19th century Tennessee was integrated into interstate commerce in cotton and tobacco and experienced considerable movement of people who would have brought with them diseases from elsewhere, hence, it would have been integrated into the US disease pool, and the fact that heights did not decline in the 1830s is therefore an indication that the antebellum puzzle cannot be explained exclusively by the spread of diseases. Yet, Tennessee's economy was quite different to that of the rest of the country. Although it did export live swine to the South, these exports did not increase during the antebellum decades. Hence, Tennessee remained self-sufficient in pork, and consumption of pork did not decline. Thus, the evidence presented here is consistent with the economic interpretation of the "antebellum puzzle": self-sufficiency in protein production protected even the members of the lower-classes of Tennessee from the negative externalities associated with the onset of industrialization.

  10. Empirical analysis of the solar incentive policy for Tennessee solar value chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawhney, Rapinder; Thakur, Kaveri; Venkatesan, Bharadwaj; Ji, Shuguang; Upreti, Girish; Sanseverino, John

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Tennessee solar value chain (TNSVC) is modeled to analyze effect of policy on demand. • TNSVC model replicates realistic scenarios to gauge the economic impact on state. • Simulation study determines that the TNSVC capacity is greater than demand. • Direct cash incentives have greater impact on demand than indirect incentives. • The model portrays a holistic approach to assist strategic energy policy analysis. - Abstract: The market for solar energy in the US has grown exponentially due to increased consumer demand resulting from price reduction via economies of scale, technological progress, and a variety of incentives from federal and state governments as well as utility companies. The installation of solar power in Tennessee has more than doubled each year from 2009 to 2011. In this paper, we focus on the behavior of the Tennessee Solar Value Chain (TNSVC) to study the factors that influence growth of solar industry in the state. The impact of existing incentives on the TNSVC is analyzed. The TNSVC is simulated based on inputs from on-site survey to estimate economic impact in terms of the number of jobs added and the tax revenue generated in the state. In addition, a sensitivity analysis for the impact on the TNSVC under different policies those may be adopted by the state of Tennessee in the future is conducted. This paper employs a holistic model which can predict PV installation demand, understand solar value chain capacity, and estimate the revenue generation. It should be noted that the method employed in this study is not unique to the solar energy industry in Tennessee. The data utilized in this study is a combination of public domain information and surveys of suppliers, manufacturers, distributors, and installers. This makes the model in this paper flexible enough to be applied to assess the solar value chain in other state or country

  11. Analysis of international negotiations and trade agreements

    OpenAIRE

    Górriz Gonzalo, Verónica

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to analyze international trade agreements and negotiations. For that purpose, two agreements made by the United States are chosen to be analyzed. In the first place, the North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) agreement, that was signed by the United States, Canada and Mexico in 1994 in order to create a free trade area. In addition, the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) will be analyze, an agreement that is still being negotiated between the United Stat...

  12. Military Personnel: Actions Needed to Strengthen Implementation and Oversight of DOD's and the Coast Guard's Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Programs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farrell, Brenda S; Wasleski, Marilyn K; Chan, Joanna; Davis, Pawnee A; Harms, K. N; Johnson, Wesley A; La Due Lake, Ronald; Miller, Amanda K; Weissman, Cheryl A

    2008-01-01

    .... Though not required to do so, the Coast Guard has established a similar policy. This statement addresses implementation and oversight of DoD's and the Coast Guard's programs to prevent and respond to sexual assault incidents...

  13. Notification: Audit of EPA’s Adherence to Policies, Procedures and Oversight Controls Pertaining to the Administrator’s Travel (2nd notification)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project #OA-FY17-0382, October 6, 2017 - The EPA OIG plans to expand the scope of preliminary research on the EPA’s adherence to policies, procedures and oversight controls pertaining to the Administrator’s travel.

  14. Can the FDA improve oversight of foreign clinical trials?: Closing the information gap and moving towards a globalized regulatory scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ourso, André

    2012-01-01

    Currently, pharmaceutical companies' utilization of foreign clinical trial data is a ubiquitous and indispensable aspect of gaining approval to market drugs in the United States. Cost benefits, a larger pool of ready volunteer subjects, and greater efficiency in clinical testing are some of the reasons for conducting clinical trials overseas. Despite these advantages, lack of proper oversight may have serious public health implications regarding the integrity of clinical research, ethical treatment of human subjects, and drug safety. Due to the expansive global nature of foreign clinical trials, there are concerns with the FDA's ability to monitor and regulate these trials. This article examines the FDA's oversight of foreign clinical trials and the agency's limitations regulating these trials. In addition to looking at steps the FDA is taking to address these limitations, the article examines other potential regulatory and cooperative actions that can be taken to effectively monitor foreign clinical trials and to ensure data integrity and patient safety.

  15. National Program of Inspection of Non-Federal Dams, Tennessee. Red Boiling Springs Dam Number 1 (Inventory Number TN 11104), Barren River Basin, near Red Boiling Springs, Macon County, Tennessee. Phase I Investigation Report,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    Creek at Witcher Hollow Date of Inspection........................January 8, 1981 This investigation and evaluation was prepared by the Tennessee...Macon Stream......................Tributary of Salt Lick Creek at Witcher Hollow Date of Inspection..........January 8, 1981 ABSTRACT The damn...DESCRIPTION 2.1 Location - Red Boiling Springs Dam # 1 is located in Macon County, Tennessee, 1.6 miles east of Red Boiling Springs in Witcher Hollow on an

  16. Los Alamos National Laboratory Facilities, Security and Safeguards Division, Safeguards and Security Program Office, Protective Force Oversight Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to identify and describe the duties and responsibilities of Facility Security and Safeguards (FSS) Safeguards and Security (SS) organizations (groups/offices) with oversight functions over the Protection Force (PF) subcontractor. Responsible organizations will continue their present PF oversight functions under the Cost Plus Award Fee (CPAF) assessment, but now will be required to also coordinate, integrate, and interface with other FSS S and S organizations and with the PF subcontractor to measure performance, assess Department of Energy (DOE) compliance, reduce costs, and minimize duplication of effort. The role of the PF subcontractor is to provide the Laboratory with effective and efficient protective force services. PF services include providing protection for the special nuclear material, government property and classified or sensitive information developed and/or consigned to the Laboratory, as well as protection for personnel who work or participate in laboratory activities. FSS S and S oversight of both performance and compliance standards/metrics is essential for these PF objectives to be met

  17. Improving academic leadership and oversight in large industry-sponsored clinical trials: the ARO-CRO model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Neil A; Spyropoulos, Alex C; Halperin, Jonathan L; Kessler, Craig M; Schulman, Sam; Turpie, Alexander G G; Skene, Allan M; Cutler, Neal R; Hiatt, William R

    2011-02-17

    Standards for clinical trial design, execution, and publication have increased in recent years. However, the current structure for interaction among the pharmaceutical sponsor funding a drug or device development program, the contract research organization (CRO) that typically assists in executing the trial, regulatory agencies, and academicians, provides inadequate leadership and oversight of the development process. Conventional academic steering committees are not provided with the independent infrastructure by which to verify statistical analyses and conclusions regarding safety and efficacy. We propose an alternative approach centered on partnerships between CROs and university-based academic research organizations (AROs). In this model, the ARO takes responsibility for processes that address journal requirements and regulatory expectations for independent academic oversight (including oversight of Steering Committee and Data and Safety Monitoring Board activities), whereas the CRO provides infrastructure for efficient trial execution, site monitoring, and data management. The ARO engages academic experts throughout the trial process and minimizes conflicts of interest in individual industry relationships via diversification of sponsors, agents, and therapeutic areas. Although numerous models can be entertained, the ARO-CRO model is uniquely structured to meet the demand for greater assurance of integrity in clinical trials and the needs of each stakeholder in the process.

  18. Comparison of Management Oversight and Risk Tree and Tripod-Beta in Excavation Accident Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamadfam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Accident investigation programs are a necessary part in identification of risks and management of the business process. Objectives One of the most important features of such programs is the analysis technique for identifying the root causes of accidents in order to prevent their recurrences. Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP was used to compare management oversight and risk tree (MORT with Tripod-Beta in order to determine the superior technique for analysis of fatal excavation accidents in construction industries. Materials and Methods MORT and Tripod-Beta techniques were used for analyzing two major accidents with three main steps. First, these techniques were applied to find out the causal factors of the accidents. Second, a number of criteria were developed for the comparison of the techniques and third, using AHP, the techniques were prioritized in terms of the criteria for choosing the superior one. Results The Tripod-Beta investigation showed 41 preconditions and 81 latent causes involved in the accidents. Additionally, 27 root causes of accidents were identified by the MORT analysis. Analytical hierarchy process (AHP investigation revealed that MORT had higher priorities only in two criteria than Tripod-Beta. Conclusions Our findings indicate that Tripod-Beta with a total priority of 0.664 is superior to MORT with the total priority of 0.33. It is recommended for future research to compare the available accident analysis techniques based on proper criteria to select the best for accident analysis.

  19. Addressing conflicts of interest in nanotechnology oversight: lessons learned from drug and pesticide safety testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Kevin C., E-mail: ke@sc.edu [University of South Carolina, Department of Philosophy, USC NanoCenter (United States); Volz, David C. [University of South Carolina, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Arnold School of Public Health (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Financial conflicts of interest raise significant challenges for those working to develop an effective, transparent, and trustworthy oversight system for assessing and managing the potential human health and ecological hazards of nanotechnology. A recent paper in this journal by Ramachandran et al., J Nanopart Res, 13:1345-1371 (2011) proposed a two-pronged approach for addressing conflicts of interest: (1) developing standardized protocols and procedures to guide safety testing; and (2) vetting safety data under a coordinating agency. Based on past experiences with standardized test guidelines developed by the international Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and implemented by national regulatory agencies such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA), we argue that this approach still runs the risk of allowing conflicts of interest to influence toxicity tests, and it has the potential to commit regulatory agencies to outdated procedures. We suggest an alternative approach that further distances the design and interpretation of safety studies from those funding the research. In case the two-pronged approach is regarded as a more politically feasible solution, we also suggest three lessons for implementing this strategy in a more dynamic and effective manner.

  20. Addressing conflicts of interest in nanotechnology oversight: lessons learned from drug and pesticide safety testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Kevin C.; Volz, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Financial conflicts of interest raise significant challenges for those working to develop an effective, transparent, and trustworthy oversight system for assessing and managing the potential human health and ecological hazards of nanotechnology. A recent paper in this journal by Ramachandran et al., J Nanopart Res, 13:1345-1371 (2011) proposed a two-pronged approach for addressing conflicts of interest: (1) developing standardized protocols and procedures to guide safety testing; and (2) vetting safety data under a coordinating agency. Based on past experiences with standardized test guidelines developed by the international Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and implemented by national regulatory agencies such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA), we argue that this approach still runs the risk of allowing conflicts of interest to influence toxicity tests, and it has the potential to commit regulatory agencies to outdated procedures. We suggest an alternative approach that further distances the design and interpretation of safety studies from those funding the research. In case the two-pronged approach is regarded as a more politically feasible solution, we also suggest three lessons for implementing this strategy in a more dynamic and effective manner.

  1. Addressing conflicts of interest in nanotechnology oversight: lessons learned from drug and pesticide safety testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, Kevin C.; Volz, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Financial conflicts of interest raise significant challenges for those working to develop an effective, transparent, and trustworthy oversight system for assessing and managing the potential human health and ecological hazards of nanotechnology. A recent paper in this journal by Ramachandran et al., J Nanopart Res, 13:1345–1371 (2011) proposed a two-pronged approach for addressing conflicts of interest: (1) developing standardized protocols and procedures to guide safety testing; and (2) vetting safety data under a coordinating agency. Based on past experiences with standardized test guidelines developed by the international Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and implemented by national regulatory agencies such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA), we argue that this approach still runs the risk of allowing conflicts of interest to influence toxicity tests, and it has the potential to commit regulatory agencies to outdated procedures. We suggest an alternative approach that further distances the design and interpretation of safety studies from those funding the research. In case the two-pronged approach is regarded as a more politically feasible solution, we also suggest three lessons for implementing this strategy in a more dynamic and effective manner.

  2. University of Tennessee deploys force10 C-series to analyze data from CERN's Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Force20 networks, the pioneer in building and securing reliable networks, today announced that the University of Tennessee physics department has deployed the C300 resilient switch to analyze data form CERN's Large Hadron Collider." (1 page)

  3. Annotated Administrative Record Site-Specific Document Index, American Drum & Pallet Co. Removal Site, Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contains annotated index of site specific documents for the American Drum & Pallet Co. Removal Site in Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee, January 9, 2008 Region ID: 04 DocID: 10517016, DocDate: 01-09-2008

  4. Fiscal Year 2007 Phased Construction Completion Report for the Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RSI

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this Phased Construction Completion Report (PCCR) is to present the fiscal year (FY) 2007 results of characterization activities and recommended remedial actions (RAs) for 11 exposure units (EUs) in Zone 2 (Z2-01, Z2-03, Z2-08, Z2-23, Z2-24, Z2-28, Z2-34, Z2-37, Z2-41, Z2-43, and Z2-44) at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), which is located in the northwest corner of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Fig. 1). ETTP encompasses a total land area of approximately 5000 acres that has been subdivided into three zones--Zone 1 ({approx}1400 acres), Zone 2 ({approx}800 acres), and the Boundary Area ({approx}2800 acres). Zone 2, which encompasses the highly industrialized portion of ETTP shown in Fig. 1, consists of all formerly secured areas of the facility, including the large processing buildings and direct support facilities; experimental laboratories and chemical and materials handling facilities; materials storage and waste disposal facilities; secure document records libraries; and shipping and receiving warehouses. The Zone 2 Record of Decision for Soil, Buried Waste, and Subsurface Structure Actions in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2005) (Zone 2 ROD) specifies the future end use for Zone 2 acreage as uncontrolled industrial for the upper 10 ft of soils. Characterization activities in these areas were conducted in compliance with the Zone 2 ROD and the Dynamic Verification Strategy (DVS) and data quality objectives (DQOs) presented in the Remedial Design Report/Remedial Action Work Plan for Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2007) (Zone 2 RDR/RAWP). The purpose of this PCCR is to address the following: (1) Document DVS characterization results for the accessible EUs in FY 2007; (2) Describe and document the risk evaluation for each EU, and determine if the EU met the Zone 2 ROD requirements

  5. World Record Earned Value Management System Certification for Cleanup of the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA - 13181

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haynes, Ray; Hirschy, Anita

    2013-01-01

    On projects that require Earned Value Management (EVMS) Certification, it is critical to quickly prepare for and then successfully obtain certification. This is especially true for government contracts. Projects that do poorly during the review are subject to financial penalties to their company and they lose creditability with their customer creating problems with the project at the outset. At East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), we began preparing for Department of Energy (DOE) certification early during proposal development. Once the contract was awarded, while still in transition phase from the previous contractor to our new company, we immediately began reviewing the project controls systems that were in place on the project and determined if any replacements needed to be made immediately. The ETTP contract required the scheduling software to be upgraded to Primavera P6 and we determined that no other software changes would be done prior to certification. Next, preparation of the Project Controls System Description (PCSD) and associated procedures began using corporate standards as related to the project controls systems. During the transition phase, development was started on the Performance Measurement Baseline which is the resource loaded schedule used to measure our performance on the project and which is critical to good Earned Value Management of the project. Early on, and throughout the baseline review, there was positive feedback from the Department of Energy that the quality of the new baseline was good. Having this superior baseline also contributed to our success in EVMS certification. The combined companies of URS and CH2M Hill had recent experience with certifications at other Department of Energy sites and we were able to capitalize on that knowledge and experience. Generic PCSD and procedures consistent with our co-operations approach to Earned Value Management were available to us and were easily tailorable to the specifics of our contract

  6. 75 FR 31438 - Notice of Agreements Filed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    ... Lines Joint Service Agreement. Filing Party: Tara L. Leiter, Esq.; Blank Rome, LLP; Watergate; 600 New... Service Agreement. Filing Party: Tara L. Leiter, Esq.; Blank Rome, LLP; Watergate; 600 New Hampshire...

  7. 75 FR 42445 - Notice of Agreement Filed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-21

    ...)-523-5793 or [email protected] . Agreement No.: 012105. Title: SCM Lines Transportes/CCNI Agreement. Parties: Compania Chilena de Navegacion Interoceanica S.A. and SCM Lines Transportes Maritimos Sociedade...

  8. 75 FR 8719 - Notice of Agreements Filed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ....; Nixon Peabody LLP; 555 West Fifth Street, 46th Floor, Los Angeles, CA 20573. Synopsis: The agreement... ports of Miami, FL and George Town, Grand Cayman. Agreement No.: 012091. Title: HLAG/HSDG Slot Charter...

  9. 27 CFR 70.485 - Closing agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Relating to Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives Administrative Remedies § 70.485 Closing agreements... disadvantage through consummation of such an agreement. (b) Scope of closing agreement—(1) In general. A...

  10. 78 FR 26779 - Notice of Agreements Filed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-08

    .... (Operating as one party). Agreement No.: 012206. Title: Industria Armamento Meridionale S.P.A./K-Line Space Charter Agreement. Parties: Industria Armamento Meridionale S.P.A. (``Inarme'') and Kawasaki Kisen Kaisha...

  11. 48 CFR 1542.1203 - Processing agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... MANAGEMENT CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION Novation and Change of Name Agreements 1542.1203 Processing agreements. (a... required documentary evidence. (2) Verify the accuracy of the list of contracts through the Contract...

  12. 78 FR 64940 - Notice of Agreements Filed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-30

    ... filing of the following agreements under the Shipping Act of 1984. Interested parties may submit comments... Charter Agreement. Parties: Nippon Yusen Kaisha and Eukor Car Carrier Inc. [[Page 64941

  13. 78 FR 6325 - Notice of Agreements Filed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-30

    ... Enterprises LLC. Agreement No.: 012193-000. Title: Siem Car Carrier Pacific AS/Compania Sud Americana de Vapores S.A. Space Charter Agreement. Parties: Siem Car Carrier Pacific AS and Compania Sud Americana de...

  14. 77 FR 71001 - Notice of Agreements Filed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-28

    .... Agreement No.: 012187-000. Title: Siem Car Carrier Pacific AS/Hoegh Autoliners, Inc. Space Charter Agreement. Parties: Siem Car Carrier Pacific AS and Hoegh Autoliners, Inc. Filing Party: Ashley W. Craig Esq...

  15. 77 FR 16838 - Notice of Agreements Filed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... the U.S. Pacific Coast and the Middle East and Asia. Agreement No.: 012161. Title: Siem Car Carrier Pacific AS/Hyundai Glovis Co., Ltd. Space Charter Agreement. Parties: Siem Car Carrier Pacific AS; Hyundai...

  16. 75 FR 19402 - Notice of Agreements Filed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-14

    ... cargo from ports on the U.S. east coast to ports in Chile, Ecuador, Peru, Panama, Colombia, and Venezuela. Agreement No.: 012042-002. Title: MOL/ELJSA Slot Exchange Agreement. Parties: Evergreen Line...

  17. TRIPs Agreement, Important Multilateral WTO Treaty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana-Maria Florescu

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at presenting the content and the frame of the TRIPs. Agreement. It starts by introducing the reader to the terms that defined the world economical climate by the time of the Agreement negociation. Also, it explains the need of having an Agreement on intellectual property rights with impact on the business world. Moreover, the article reviews the main provisions of the Agreement and the most important intellectual property rights.

  18. 7 CFR 946.101 - Marketing agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... WASHINGTON Rules and Regulations Definitions § 946.101 Marketing agreement. Marketing agreement means... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Marketing agreement. 946.101 Section 946.101 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing...

  19. 7 CFR 966.111 - Marketing Agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... and Regulations Definitions § 966.111 Marketing Agreement. Marketing Agreement means Marketing... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Marketing Agreement. 966.111 Section 966.111 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing...

  20. 7 CFR 917.101 - Marketing agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... CALIFORNIA Rules and Regulations Definitions § 917.101 Marketing agreement. Marketing agreement means... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Marketing agreement. 917.101 Section 917.101 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing...

  1. 25 CFR 502.5 - Collateral agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Collateral agreement. 502.5 Section 502.5 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.5 Collateral agreement. Collateral agreement means any contract, whether or not in writing...

  2. 7 CFR 1499.5 - Agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... of any other applicable civil and criminal penalties. (f) The agreement will prohibit the sale or... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Agreements. 1499.5 Section 1499.5 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS FOOD FOR PROGRESS PROGRAM § 1499.5 Agreements. (a) After...

  3. 7 CFR 1599.5 - Agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... any other applicable civil and criminal penalties. (f) The agreement will prohibit the sale or... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Agreements. 1599.5 Section 1599.5 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE McGOVERN-DOLE INTERNATIONAL FOOD FOR EDUCATION AND CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAM § 1599.5 Agreements. (a...

  4. 7 CFR 900.109 - Mediation agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mediation agreement. 900.109 Section 900.109 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing... Mediation agreement. An agreement arrived at by mediation shall not become effective until approved by the...

  5. 78 FR 21364 - Notice of Agreements Filed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    .... West Coast on the one hand, and China and South Korea, on the other hand. The agreement also authorizes... parties accordingly. Agreement No.: 012116-002. Title: NYK/Hanjin/Yang Ming/Evergreen Americas North South... No.: 012199. Title: NYK/Hanjin/Hyundai Americas North South Service Slot Charter Agreement. Parties...

  6. 22 CFR 120.23 - Distribution agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Distribution agreement. 120.23 Section 120.23... § 120.23 Distribution agreement. An agreement (e.g., a contract) to establish a warehouse or distribution point abroad for defense articles exported from the United States for subsequent distribution to...

  7. 75 FR 14159 - Notice of Agreements Filed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    ... the foregoing, and restates the agreement. Agreement No.: 012085-001. Title: 2007 Crane Purchase...; 301 K Street, NW. Suite 1100-East Tower; Washington, DC 20005. Synopsis: The agreement details and clarifies the parties' authority to discuss and agree on matters related to use of cranes by third parties...

  8. The Pros and Cons of Petroleum Agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Charles J.

    1980-01-01

    A mineral agreements expert discusses the options open to tribes, from the most standard lease form to arrangements as yet untried by Indian Nations. Discussion covers 18 basic provisions for inclusion in agreements, tax considerations, and basic forms of petroleum agreements (leases, joint ventures, production sharing, and service contracts).…

  9. Helmets Matter: Kentucky Motorcycle Crash Victims Seen at a Tennessee Trauma Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testerman, George M; Prior, Daniel C; Wells, Tamie D; Sumner, William C; Johnston, Jeffrey T; Rollins, Sarah E; Meyer, Jeremy M

    2018-01-01

    Motorcycle helmet laws vary by state, with Kentucky requiring helmets only for younger riders. We hypothesized that motorcyclists injured in Kentucky and seen at a Tennessee trauma center would be more likely to be unhelmeted, have more severe head injuries, and sustain more fatal injuries than those injured in Tennessee or Virginia. A Trauma Registry review of 729 injured motorcyclists from January 2005 through June 2015 examined state location of crash, demographics, helmet use, and clinical outcomes. Multivariate logistic regression analysis evaluated predictors for head injury severity and death. Unhelmeted motorcycle rider status predicted more severe head injuries (relative risk 15.3, P motorcycle helmet laws for all ages in states where they are in effect and for upgrading helmet laws that apply only to some riders.

  10. Remedial investigation/feasibility study for the David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 Site, Knoxville, Tennessee: Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-10-01

    This remedial investigation (RI)/feasibility study (FS) supports the selection of remedial actions for the David Witherspoon, Inc. 901 Maryville Pike Site in Knoxville, Tennessee. Operations at the site, used as a recycling center, have resulted in past, present, and potential future releases of hazardous substances in to the environment. This Site is a Tennessee Superfund site. A phased approach was planned to (1) gather existing data from previous investigations managed by the Tenn. Dept. of Environment and Conservation; (2) perform a preliminary RI, including risk assessments, and an FS with existing data to identify areas where remedial action may be necessary; (3) gather additional field data to adequately define the nature and extent of risk-based contaminants that present identifiable threats to human and/or ecological receptors; and (4) develop remedial action alternatives to reduce risks to acceptable levels

  11. Geographic variation in helminth parasites from the digestive tract of Tennessee raccoons, Procyon lotor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bafundo, K W; Wilhelm, W E; Kennedy, M L

    1980-02-01

    The stomachs and intestinal tracts of 253 raccoons, Procyon lotor, were examined for helminth parasites. Sixteen species of helminths were found including eight trematodes, two cestodes, five nematodes, and one acanthocephalan. Fourteen of these helminths are new geographic records for the state of Tennessee. Multivariate statistical techniques were used to analyze two-state and multistate character sets. Matrices of correlation among characters were computed and the first three principal components were extracted, accounting for 79.7% and 66.5% of the variation in the respective character sets. Three-dimensional projections of Tennessee's eight geographic localities onto two-state and multistate principal components demonstrated that raccoons in western localities were parasitized most heavily by Atriotaenia procyonis. Mesocestoides variabilis, Gnathostoma procyonis, and Pharyngostomoides procyonis. Parallelorchis diglossus, Euparyphium beaveri. Eurytrema procyonis, Euryhelmis squamala, Molineus barbatus, and Macracanthorhynchus ingens were most common to P. lotor from eastern areas.

  12. Geographic access to hospice care for children with cancer in Tennessee, 2009 to 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindley, Lisa C; Edwards, Sheri L

    2015-12-01

    The geographic interface between the need for and the supply of pediatric hospice may be critical in whether children with cancer access care. This study sought to describe the geographic distribution of pediatric hospice need and supply and identify areas lacking pediatric hospice care in Tennessee over a 3-year time period. Using ArcGIS, a series of maps were created. There was a consistent need for care among children with cancer across the state. Most urban areas were supplied by pediatric hospices, except the Knoxville area. Areas within the state were identified where the supply of pediatric hospice care declined, while the need for hospice care was unchanging. This study has important regulatory implications for clinicians practicing in certificate of need states such as Tennessee. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Remedial investigation/feasibility study for the David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 Site, Knoxville, Tennessee: Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    This remedial investigation (RI)/feasibility study (FS) supports the selection of remedial actions for the David Witherspoon, Inc. 901 Maryville Pike Site in Knoxville, Tennessee. Operations at the site, used as a recycling center, have resulted in past, present, and potential future releases of hazardous substances in to the environment. This Site is a Tennessee Superfund site. A phased approach was planned to (1) gather existing data from previous investigations managed by the Tenn. Dept. of Environment and Conservation; (2) perform a preliminary RI, including risk assessments, and an FS with existing data to identify areas where remedial action may be necessary; (3) gather additional field data to adequately define the nature and extent of risk-based contaminants that present identifiable threats to human and/or ecological receptors; and (4) develop remedial action alternatives to reduce risks to acceptable levels.

  14. Processing and Monthly Summaries of Downscaled Climate Data for Knoxville, Tennessee and Surrounding Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sylvester, Linda M [ORNL; Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL; Parish, Esther S [ORNL; Allen, Melissa R [ORNL

    2016-09-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the City of Knoxville, Tennessee have partnered to work on a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project towards investigating climate change, mitigation, and adaptation measures in mid-sized cities. ORNL has statistically and dynamically downscaled ten Global Climate Models (GCMs) to both 1 km and 4 km resolutions. The processing and summary of those ten gridded datasets for use in a web-based tool is described. The summaries of each model are shown individually to assist in determining the similarities and differences between the model scenarios. The variables of minimum and maximum daily temperature and total monthly precipitation are summarized for the area of Knoxville, Tennessee for the periods of 1980-2005 and 2025-2050.

  15. Preliminary evaluation of the Central Basin aquifer system in Tennessee for receiving injected wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, M.W.

    1985-01-01

    An aquifer may be allowed to receive injected wastes where the aquifer meets criteria established in the Environmental Protection Agency 's Underground Injection Control program. The Central Basin aquifer system in Tennessee consists of Ordovician to Devonian carbonate rocks and it occurs from the Valley and Ridge province to west of the Tennessee River. This aquifer system is currently used for drinking water in the Central Basin and western Highland Rim, but is not used for drinking water in the northern Highland Rim nor the Cumberland Plateau provinces. Part of the northern Highland Rim and the Cumberland Plateau, according to the Environmental Protection Agency 's Underground Injection Control criteria, will not be used as a source of drinking water in the future and may be eligible to receive injected wastes. (USGS)

  16. ‘We all want to succeed, but we’ve also got to be realistic about what is happening’: an ethnographic study of relationships in trial oversight and their impact

    OpenAIRE

    Daykin, Anne; Selman, Lucy E.; Cramer, Helen; McCann, Sharon; Shorter, Gillian W.; Sydes, Matthew R.; Gamble, Carrol; Macefield, Rhiannon; Lane, J. Athene; Shaw, Alison

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundThe oversight and conduct of a randomised controlled trial involves several stakeholders, including a Trial Steering Committee (TSC), Trial Management Group (TMG), Data Monitoring Committee (DMC), funder, and sponsor. We aimed to examine how the relationships between these stakeholders affect the trial oversight process and its rigour, to inform future revision of Good Clinical Practice guidelines.MethodsUsing an ethnographic study design, we observed the oversight processes of eigh...

  17. State Water Resources Control Board, California Agreement in Principle 1995 summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laudon, L.

    1996-03-01

    The Agreement in Principle (AIP) was established as part of the Secretary of Energy`s Ten-Point Initiative which was announced in 1989. One of the Secretary`s goals was to integrate the Department of Energy`s (DOE) national security mission with their environmental restoration and compliance responsibilities. In an effort to accomplish this goal, DOE increased the role of the states in the oversight of DOE`s monitoring programs through AIPs. The State of California and DOE negotiated the California AIP beginning in 1989 and signed the Agreement in September 1990. The AIP identified six DOE facilities to be evaluated under the program. The six facilities evaluated by the AIP program were: (1) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) including LLNL`s Site 300; (2) Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA); (3) Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL); (4) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC); (5) Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC); and (6) Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR).

  18. A Citation Tracking System to Facilitate Sponsoring Institution Oversight of ACGME-Accredited Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Timothy R; Poe, John D; Zimmerman, Richard S; Rose, Steven H

    2012-12-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires the graduate medical education committee and the designated institutional official to ensure that citations for noncompliance with the accreditation standards and institutional trends in citations are reviewed and corrected. To describe a citation tracking system (CTS) that uses Microsoft Office Access to efficiently catalogue, monitor, and document resolution of citations. The CTS was implemented in a sponsoring institution with oversight of 133 ACGME-accredited programs. The designated institutional official and the graduate medical education committee review all program letters of notification and enter citations into the CTS. A program-correction plan is required for each citation and is entered into the database. Open citations and action plans are reviewed by the graduate medical education committee and the designated institutional official on a quarterly basis, with decisions ranging from "closing" the citation to approving the action plan in process to requiring a new or modified action plan. Citation categories and subcategories are accessed on the ACGME website and entered into the CTS to identify trends. All 236 citations received since the 2006 Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education institutional site visit were entered into the CTS. On November 22, 2011, 26 of 236 citations (11%) were in active status with ongoing action plans, and 210 (89%) citations had been resolved and were closed. The CTS uses commercially available software to ensure citations are monitored and addressed and to simplify analysis of citation trends. The approach requires minimal staff time for data input and updates and can be performed without institutional information technology assistance.

  19. Economic impact analysis of energy facilities with particular reference to the Hartsville, Tennessee, area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isard, W.; Reiner, T.A.; Van Zele, R.

    1979-05-01

    The study focuses on the economic impacts of construction of the Hartsville, Tennessee, nuclear power plant. Four reactor units are now under construction. Investigated are the consequences likely to be felt in a six-county region, including the site and the city of Nashville. Estimates were made by applying to the construction and operating requirements of the plant an economic multiplier which yields an estimate of the induced and indirect effects of the power plant

  20. Athens automation and control experiment project review meeting, Knoxville, Tennessee, December 3-5, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braithwait, S.D.; Broadaway, E.R.; Fortson, N.D.; Gellings, C.W.; Hu, P.S.; Lawler, J.S.; Markel, L.C.; McKinley, K.F.; Monteen, L.D.; Newton, B.K.

    1986-08-01

    The AACE is an electric power distribution automation project involving research and development of both hardware and software. Equipment for the project is being installed on the electric distribution system in Athens, Tennessee. Purposes of the AACE are to develop and test load control, volt/var control, and system reconfiguration capabilities on an electric distribution system and to transfer what is learned to the electric utility industry. Expected benefits include deferral of costly power generation plants and increased electric service reliability.

  1. The 13th Regiment, Tennessee Volunteer Calvary: Transition from Irregular to Conventional Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Tennessee in Carter County, went a step further. Adopting an idea originally conceived by Unionist leader William G. "Parson" Brownlow, Carter initiated...collapsed in general retreat. Likewise Gillem’s main body was crushed at Russellville. Some men took weeks to straggle back to Strawberry Plains, and the...the conventional battlefield. Still the unit did regroup at Strawberry Plains to stop the enemy’s advance near Flat Creek railroad bridge. Far more can

  2. Patterns of Cave Biodiversity and Endemism in the Appalachians and Interior Plateau of Tennessee, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemiller, Matthew L.; Zigler, Kirk S.

    2013-01-01

    Using species distribution data, we developed a georeferenced database of troglobionts (cave-obligate species) in Tennessee to examine spatial patterns of species richness and endemism, including >2000 records for 200 described species. Forty aquatic troglobionts (stygobionts) and 160 terrestrial troglobionts are known from caves in Tennessee, the latter having the greatest diversity of any state in the United States. Endemism was high, with 25% of terrestrial troglobionts (40 species) and 20% of stygobionts (eight species) known from just a single cave and nearly two-thirds of all troglobionts (130 species) known from five or fewer caves. Species richness and endemism were greatest in the Interior Plateau (IP) and Southwestern Appalachians (SWA) ecoregions, which were twice as diverse as the Ridge and Valley (RV). Troglobiont species assemblages were most similar between the IP and SWA, which shared 59 species, whereas the RV cave fauna was largely distinct. We identified a hotspot of cave biodiversity with a center along the escarpment of the Cumberland Plateau in south-central Tennessee defined by both species richness and endemism that is contiguous with a previously defined hotspot in northeastern Alabama. Nearly half (91 species) of Tennessee’s troglobiont diversity occurs in this region where several cave systems contain ten or more troglobionts, including one with 23 species. In addition, we identified distinct troglobiont communities across the state. These communities corresponded to hydrological boundaries and likely reflect past or current connectivity between subterranean habitats within and barriers between hydrological basins. Although diverse, Tennessee’s subterranean fauna remains poorly studied and many additional species await discovery and description. We identified several undersampled regions and outlined conservation and management priorities to improve our knowledge and aid in protection of the subterranean biodiversity in Tennessee

  3. Nuclear criticality safety program at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basoglu, B.; Bentley, C.; Brewer, R.; Dunn, M.; Haught, C.; Plaster, M.; Wilkinson, A.; Dodds, H. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)); Elliott, E.; Waddell, W. (Martin Marietta Energy Systems Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States))

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the nuclear criticality safety (NCS) educational program at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville. The program is an academic specialization for nuclear engineering graduate students pursuing either the MS or PhD degree and includes special NCS courses and NCS research projects. Both the courses and the research projects serve as partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree being pursued.

  4. Tennessee – Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Law and Documentation of Discrimination

    OpenAIRE

    Sears, Brad

    2009-01-01

    Tennessee‟s anti-discrimination law, known as the Tennessee Human Rights Act, does not explicitly address either sexual orientation or gender identity discrimination. Further, the state does not provide protection to state or private employees against discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity. In addition, no executive orders, local laws or state government personnel policies exist that prohibit job discrimination on either basis. The formal state employee grievance policy...

  5. Tiger team assessment of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1990-02-01

    This document contains findings identified during the Tiger Team Compliance Assessment of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The Y-12 Plant Tiger Team Compliance Assessment is comprehensive in scope. It covers the Environmental, Safety, and Health (including Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) compliance), and Management areas and determines the plant's compliance with applicable federal (including DOE), state, and local regulations and requirements. 4 figs., 12 tabs.

  6. 78 FR 28897 - Tennessee Valley Authority; Establishment of Atomic Safety and Licensing Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket Nos. 50-327-LR, 50-328-LR; ASLBP No. 13-927-01-LR-BD01] Tennessee Valley Authority; Establishment of Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Pursuant to delegation by the Commission dated December 29, 1972, see 37 FR 28710 (1972), and the Commission's regulations, see, e.g., 10 CFR 2.104, 2.105, 2.300, 2.309, 2.31...

  7. Unwrapping Court-Connected Mediation Agreements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adrian, Lin; Mykland, Solfrid

    2018-01-01

    Court-connected mediated agreements seem to both fulfil and fail the ideal of self-determination in mediation theory. In a study of 134 agreements from court-connected mediation, we found that the majority of agreements contain creative elements and display great variation in the provisions...... and understand them. The judicial language is well known for the drafters of the agreement but not the parties. Thus, court-connected mediation seems to fail aspects of self-determination when it comes to drafting agreements. We draw on new-institutional theory when we explore and explain this apparent...... contradiction within the court-connected mediation practice....

  8. Sudden cardiac arrests, automated external defibrillators, and medical emergency response plans in Tennessee high schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Mark L; Watson, Andrew M; Gregory, Andrew; Givens, Timothy G; Abramo, Thomas J; Kannankeril, Prince J

    2013-03-01

    Schools are important public locations of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), and the American Heart Association (AHA) recommends medical emergency response plans (MERPs), which may include an automated external defibrillator (AED) in schools. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of SCA and the prevalence of AEDs and MERPs in Tennessee high schools. Tennessee Secondary School Athletic Association member schools were surveyed regarding SCA on campus within 5 years, AED presence, and MERP characteristics. Of 378 schools, 257 (68%) completed the survey. There were 21 (5 student and 16 adult) SCAs on school grounds, yielding a 5-year incidence of 1 SCA per 12 high schools. An AED was present at 11 of 21 schools with SCA, and 6 SCA victims were treated with an AED shock. A linear increase in SCA frequency was noted with increasing school size (schools, 71% had an MERP, 48% had an AED, and only 4% were fully compliant with AHA recommendations. Schools with a history of SCA were more likely to be compliant (19% vs. 3%, P = 0.011). The 5-year incidence of SCA in Tennessee high schools is 1 in 12, but increases to 1 in 7 for schools with more than 1000 students. Compliance with AHA guidelines for MERPs is poor, but improved in schools with recent SCA. Future recommendations should encourage the inclusion of AED placement in schools with more than 1000 students.

  9. Unfolding the phenomenon of interrater agreement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slaug, Björn; Schilling, Oliver; Helle, Tina

    2012-01-01

    accounted for 6-11%, the items for 32-33%, and the residual for 57-60% of the variation. Multilevel regression analysis showed barrier prevalence and raters' familiarity with using standardized instruments to have the strongest impact on agreement. CONCLUSION: Supported by a conceptual analysis, we propose......OBJECTIVE: The overall objective was to unfold the phenomenon of interrater agreement: to identify potential sources of variation in agreement data and to explore how they can be statistically accounted for. The ultimate aim was to propose recommendations for in-depth examination of agreement...... shares of agreement variation were calculated. Multilevel regression analysis was carried out, using rater and item characteristics as predictors of agreement variation. RESULTS: Following a conceptual decomposition, the agreement variation was statistically disentangled into relative shares. The raters...

  10. Phased Construction Completion Report for Bldg. K-1401 of the Remaining Facilities Demolition Project at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2008-10-01

    This Phased Construction Completion Report documents the demolition of Bldg. K-1401, Maintenance Building, addressed in the Action Memorandum for the Remaining Facilities Demolition Project at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2003a) as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 non-time-critical removal action. The objectives of the removal action (DOE 2003a) - to eliminate the source of potential contamination, to eliminate the threat of potential future releases, and/or to eliminate the threats to the general public and the environment - were met. The end state of this action is for the slab to remain with all penetrations sealed and grouted or backfilled. The basement and pits remain open. There is residual radiological and polychlorinated biphenyl contamination on the slab and basement. A fixative was applied to the area on the pad contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls. Interim land-use controls will be maintained until final remediation decisions are made under the Zone 2 Record of Decision (DOE 2005a).

  11. Phased Construction Completion Report for Building K-1401 of the Remaining Facilities Demolition Project at the East Tennessee Technology Park Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garland S.

    2008-03-01

    This Phased Construction Completion Report documents the demolition of Bldg. K-1401, Maintenance Building, addressed in the Action Memorandum for the Remaining Facilities Demolition Project at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2003a) as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 non-time-critical removal action. The objectives of the removal action (DOE 2003a) - to eliminate the source of potential contamination, to eliminate the threat of potential future releases, and/or to eliminate the threats to the general public and the environment - were met. The end state of this action is for the slab to remain with all penetrations sealed and grouted or backfilled. The basement and pits remain open. There is residual radiological and polychlorinated biphenyl contamination on the slab and basement. A fixative was applied to the area on the pad contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls. Interim land-use controls will be maintained until final remediation decisions are made under the Zone 2 Record of Decision (DOE 2005a).

  12. Environmental Baseline Survey Report for the Title Transfer of Parcel ED-9 at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SAIC

    2010-05-01

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Parcel ED-9 at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). Parcel ED-9 consists of about 13 acres that DOE proposes to transfer to Heritage Center, LLC (hereafter referred to as 'Heritage Center'), a subsidiary of the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET). The 13 acres include two tracts of land, referred to as ED-9A (7.06 acres) and ED-9B (5.02 acres), and a third tract consisting of about 900 linear feet of paved road and adjacent right-of-way, referred to as ED-9C (0.98 acres). Transfer of the title to ED-9 will be by deed under a Covenant Deferral Request (CDR) pursuant to Section 120(h)(3)(C) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). This report provides a summary of information to support the transfer of this government-owned property at ETTP to a non-federal entity.

  13. Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956)- An Assessment of Quantities released, Off-Site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer, Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apostoaei, A.I.; Burns, R.E.; Hoffman, F.O.; Ijaz, T.; Lewis, C.J.; Nair, S.K.; Widner, T.E.

    1999-01-01

    In the early 1990s, concern about the Oak Ridge Reservation's past releases of contaminants to the environment prompted Tennessee's public health officials to pursue an in-depth study of potential off-site health effects at Oak Ridge. This study, the Oak Ridge dose reconstruction, was supported by an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Tennessee, and was overseen by a 12-member panel appointed by Tennessee's Commissioner of Health. One of the major contaminants studied in the dose reconstruction was radioactive iodine, which was released to the air by X-10 (now called Oak Ridge National Laboratory) as it processed spent nuclear reactor fuel from 1944 through 1956. The process recovered radioactive lanthanum for use in weapons development. Iodine concentrates in the thyroid gland so health concerns include various diseases of the thyroid, such as thyroid cancer. The large report, ''Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956) - An Assessment of Quantities Released, Off-site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer,'' is in two volumes. Volume 1 is the main body of the report, and Volume 1A, which has the same title, consists of 22 supporting appendices. Together, these reports serve the following purposes: (1) describe the methodologies used to estimate the amount of iodine-131 (I-131) released; (2) evaluate I-131's pathway from air to vegetation to food to humans; (3) estimate doses received by human thyroids; (4) estimate excess risk of acquiring a thyroid cancer during ones lifetime; and (5) provide equations, examples of historical documents used, and tables of calculated values. Results indicate that females born in 1952 who consumed milk from a goat pastured a few miles east of X-10 received the highest doses from I-131 and would have had the highest risks of contracting thyroid cancer. Doses from cow's milk are considerably less . Detailed

  14. Oversight of EU medical data transfers - an administrative law perspective on cross-border biomedical research administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichel, Jane

    2017-01-01

    The notion of privacy has long had a central role in human rights law, not least in connection to health and medicine. International, regional and national bodies have enacted a number of binding and non-binding document for physicians and researchers to adhere to, in order to protect the autonomy, dignity and privacy of patients and research subjects. With the development of new technologies, the right to privacy has gained a new perspective; the right to protection of personal data within information and communication technologies. The right to data protection has been attributed an increasing importance within EU law. Accordingly, the use of health data in medical research in general and in biobank-related medical research in particular, has made data protection law highly relevant. In medical research involving biobanks, transferring human biological samples and/or individual health data is taking place on a daily basis. These transfers involve several oversight bodies, institutional review boards (IRBs), research ethics committees, or even data protection authorities. This article investigates the role of these national oversight bodies in the transfer of health data in cross-border research, from an EU law point of view. A special focus is laid on transfer of health data for research purposes from the EU to the US, in the light of the recently enacted EU-US Privacy Shield. The main question posed is how American oversight bodies for medical research can be expected to handle the increasingly strict EU requirements for the processing of health data in medical research review.

  15. Reduction of central venous catheter associated blood stream infections following implementation of a resident oversight and credentialing policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    West Cheri E

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study assesses the impact that a resident oversight and credentialing policy for central venous catheter (CVC placement had on institution-wide central line associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI. We therefore investigated the rate of CLABSI per 1,000 line days during the 12 months before and after implementation of the policy. Methods This is a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data at an academic medical center with four adult ICUs and a pediatric ICU. All patients undergoing non-tunneled CVC placement were included in the study. Data was collected on CLABSI, line days, and serious adverse events in the year prior to and following policy implementation on 9/01/08. Results A total of 813 supervised central lines were self-reported by residents in four departments. Statistical analysis was performed using paired Wilcoxon signed rank tests. There were reductions in median CLABSI rate (3.52 vs. 2.26; p = 0.015, number of CLBSI per month (16.0 to 10.0; p = 0.012, and line days (4495 vs. 4193; p = 0.019. No serious adverse events reported to the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority. Conclusions Implementation of a new CVC resident oversight and credentialing policy has been significantly associated with an institution-wide reduction in the rate of CLABSI per 1,000 central line days and total central line days. No serious adverse events were reported. Similar resident oversight policies may benefit other teaching institutions, and support concurrent organizational efforts to reduce hospital acquired infections.

  16. Environmental monitoring report, May 10, 1993--June 1, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) DOE Oversight Division (DOE-O) monitoring effort will serve as oversight with ongoing compliance and ambient sampling by Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor staff programs. These sources provide a comprehensive database which must be reviewed and analyzed in order to streamline DOE-O sampling efforts. DOE-O monitoring is necessary to provide quality control, to ensure compliance, to ensure completeness, and to assure protection of public health and the environment. The Tennessee Oversight Agreement (TOA), includes a section on Environmental Monitoring as Attachment A. To accomplish these objectives, DOE-O will implement the following monitoring programs: surface waters; ground water; air; fish and wildlife. In addition, radiation monitoring has been conducted in all of these areas

  17. 48 CFR 225.403 - World Trade Organization Government Procurement Agreement and Free Trade Agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false World Trade Organization Government Procurement Agreement and Free Trade Agreements. 225.403 Section 225.403 Federal Acquisition... FOREIGN ACQUISITION Trade Agreements 225.403 World Trade Organization Government Procurement Agreement and...

  18. 46 CFR 298.38 - Partnership agreements and limited liability company agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Partnership agreements and limited liability company... FINANCING ASSISTANCE OBLIGATION GUARANTEES Documentation § 298.38 Partnership agreements and limited liability company agreements. Partnership and limited liability company agreements must be in form and...

  19. Teamwork for Oversight of Processes and Systems (TOPS). Implementation guide for TOPS version 2.0, 10 August 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Albert A.; Jackson, Darryl J.

    1992-01-01

    As the nation redefines priorities to deal with a rapidly changing world order, both government and industry require new approaches for oversight of management systems, particularly for high technology products. Declining defense budgets will lead to significant reductions in government contract management personnel. Concurrently, defense contractors are reducing administrative and overhead staffing to control costs. These combined pressures require bold approaches for the oversight of management systems. In the Spring of 1991, the DPRO and TRW created a Process Action Team (PAT) to jointly prepare a Performance Based Management (PBM) system titled Teamwork for Oversight of Processes and Systems (TOPS). The primary goal is implementation of a performance based management system based on objective data to review critical TRW processes with an emphasis on continuous improvement. The processes are: Finance and Business Systems, Engineering and Manufacturing Systems, Quality Assurance, and Software Systems. The team established a number of goals: delivery of quality products to contractual terms and conditions; ensure that TRW management systems meet government guidance and good business practices; use of objective data to measure critical processes; elimination of wasteful/duplicative reviews and audits; emphasis on teamwork--all efforts must be perceived to add value by both sides and decisions are made by consensus; and synergy and the creation of a strong working trust between TRW and the DPRO. TOPS permits the adjustment of oversight resources when conditions change or when TRW systems performance indicate either an increase or decrease in surveillance is appropriate. Monthly Contractor Performance Assessments (CPA) are derived from a summary of supporting system level and process-level ratings obtained from objective process-level data. Tiered, objective, data-driven metrics are highly successful in achieving a cooperative and effective method of measuring

  20. Analyzing rater agreement manifest variable methods

    CERN Document Server

    von Eye, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Agreement among raters is of great importance in many domains. For example, in medicine, diagnoses are often provided by more than one doctor to make sure the proposed treatment is optimal. In criminal trials, sentencing depends, among other things, on the complete agreement among the jurors. In observational studies, researchers increase reliability by examining discrepant ratings. This book is intended to help researchers statistically examine rater agreement by reviewing four different approaches to the technique.The first approach introduces readers to calculating coefficients that allow one to summarize agreements in a single score. The second approach involves estimating log-linear models that allow one to test specific hypotheses about the structure of a cross-classification of two or more raters'' judgments. The third approach explores cross-classifications or raters'' agreement for indicators of agreement or disagreement, and for indicators of such characteristics as trends. The fourth approach compa...

  1. Safety-Related Contractor Activities at Nuclear Power Plants. New Challenges for Regulatory Oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chockie, Alan

    2005-09-01

    The use of contractors has been an integral and important part of the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of nuclear power plants. To ensure the safe and efficient completion of contracted tasks, each nuclear plant licensee has developed and refined formal contract management processes to meet their specific needs and plant requirements. Although these contract management processes have proven to be effective tools for the procurement of support and components tailored to the needs of nuclear power plants, contractor-related incidents and accidents have revealed some serious weaknesses with the implementation of these processes. Identifying and addressing implementation problems are becoming more complicated due to organizational and personnel changes affecting the nuclear power industry. The ability of regulators and licensees to effectively monitor and manage the safety-related performance of contractors will likely be affected by forthcoming organization and personnel changes due to: the aging of the workforce; the decline of the nuclear industry; and the deregulation of nuclear power. The objective of this report is to provide a review of current and potential future challenges facing safety-related contractor activities at nuclear power plants. The purpose is to assist SKI in establishing a strategy for the proactive oversight of contractor safety-related activities at Swedish nuclear power plants and facilities. The nature and role of contractors at nuclear plants is briefly reviewed in the first section of the report. The second section describes the essential elements of the contract management process. Although organizations have had decades of experience with the a contract management process, there remain a number of common implantation weaknesses that have lead to serious contractor-related incidents and accidents. These implementation weaknesses are summarized in the third section. The fourth section of the report highlights the

  2. Safety-Related Contractor Activities at Nuclear Power Plants. New Challenges for Regulatory Oversight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chockie, Alan [Chockie Group International, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

    2005-09-15

    The use of contractors has been an integral and important part of the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of nuclear power plants. To ensure the safe and efficient completion of contracted tasks, each nuclear plant licensee has developed and refined formal contract management processes to meet their specific needs and plant requirements. Although these contract management processes have proven to be effective tools for the procurement of support and components tailored to the needs of nuclear power plants, contractor-related incidents and accidents have revealed some serious weaknesses with the implementation of these processes. Identifying and addressing implementation problems are becoming more complicated due to organizational and personnel changes affecting the nuclear power industry. The ability of regulators and licensees to effectively monitor and manage the safety-related performance of contractors will likely be affected by forthcoming organization and personnel changes due to: the aging of the workforce; the decline of the nuclear industry; and the deregulation of nuclear power. The objective of this report is to provide a review of current and potential future challenges facing safety-related contractor activities at nuclear power plants. The purpose is to assist SKI in establishing a strategy for the proactive oversight of contractor safety-related activities at Swedish nuclear power plants and facilities. The nature and role of contractors at nuclear plants is briefly reviewed in the first section of the report. The second section describes the essential elements of the contract management process. Although organizations have had decades of experience with the a contract management process, there remain a number of common implantation weaknesses that have lead to serious contractor-related incidents and accidents. These implementation weaknesses are summarized in the third section. The fourth section of the report highlights the

  3. Barge loading facilities in conjunction with wood chipping and sawlog mill, Tennessee River Mile 145. 9R: Environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-08-01

    The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to evaluate the environmental consequences of approving, denying, or adopting reasonable alternatives to a request for barge loading facilities. These facilities would serve a proposed wood chipping and sawlog products operation at Tennessee River Mile (TRM) 145.9, right descending bank, (Kentucky Lake), in Perry County, Tennessee. The site is located between Short Creek and Peters Landing. The applicant is Southeastern Forest Products, L.P. (SFP), Box 73, Linden, Tennessee and the proposed facilities would be constructed on or adjacent to company owned land. Portions of the barge terminal would be constructed on land over which flood easement rights are held by the United States of America and administered by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The US Army Corps of Engineers (CE) and TVA have regulatory control over the proposed barge terminal facilities since the action would involve construction in the Tennessee River which is a navigable water of the United States. The wood chipping and sawlog products facilities proposed on the upland property are not regulated by the CE or TVA. On the basis of the analysis which follows, it has been determined that a modified proposal (as described herein) would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment, and does not require the preparation of an environmental impact statement. 8 refs.

  4. Select metal and metalloid surveillance of free-ranging Eastern box turtles from Illinois and Tennessee (Terrapene carolina carolina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allender, Matthew C; Dreslik, Michael J; Patel, Bishap; Luber, Elizabeth L; Byrd, John; Phillips, Christopher A; Scott, John W

    2015-08-01

    The Eastern box turtle (Terrapene carolina carolina) is a primarily terrestrial chelonian distributed across the eastern US. It has been proposed as a biomonitor due to its longevity, small home range, and reliance on the environment to meet its metabolic needs. Plasma samples from 273 free-ranging box turtles from populations in Tennessee and Illinois in 2011 and 2012 were evaluated for presence of heavy metals and to characterize hematologic variables. Lead (Pb), arsenic (As), zinc (Zn), chromium (Cr), selenium (Se), and copper (Cu) were detected, while cadmium (Cd) and silver (Ag) were not. There were no differences in any metal detected among age class or sex. However, Cr and Pb were higher in turtles from Tennessee, while As, Zn, Se, and Cu were higher in turtles from Illinois. Seasonal differences in metal concentrations were observed for Cr, Zn, and As. Health of turtles was assessed using hematologic variables. Packed cell volume was positively correlated with Cu, Se, and Pb in Tennessee. Total solids, a measure of plasma proteins, in Tennessee turtles were positively correlated with Cu and Zn. White blood cell count, a measure of inflammation, in Tennessee turtles was negatively correlated with Cu and As, and positively correlated with Pb. Metals are a threat to human health and the health of an ecosystem, and the Eastern Box Turtle can serve as a monitor of these contaminants. Differences established in this study can serve as baseline for future studies of these or related populations.

  5. Separation of Powers in Classifying International Agreements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Duffy, James F

    1996-01-01

    ... are the exclusive means by which the United States assumes an international commitment Through the use of executive agreements, presidents have concluded a large variety of international commitments...

  6. 75 FR 24702 - Notice of Agreements Filed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-05

    ... Bay International Terminals, Inc. Operating Agreement. Parties: Tampa Bay International Terminals, Inc. and Tampa Port Authority. Filing Parties: Greg Lovelace, Director Cargo & Cruise Marketing; Tampa Port...

  7. Agreements on emission of greenhouse gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aulstad, Johan Greger

    2001-01-01

    Agreements on emission of greenhouse gases is one of the instruments used by Norwegian authorities to meet their obligations with respect to the Climate Convention and the Kyoto Protocol. This book discusses the legal issues raised by these agreements. A main topic is how the industrial emissions conform to the Pollution Act. Does the Pollution Act apply to these emissions? What is the impact of the sanction rules in this act on the emissions? The book also deals with the following general questions that arise in connection with the application of public authority: (1) Can the administration grant concessions and permits in the form of agreements? (2) What commitments can be imposed on a private party by the administration by agreement? (3) Should the procedures set down in the Pollution Act and in the Public Administration Act be followed fully when the pollution authorities make agreements? Is the opportunity of the administration to reverse more restricted when they make agreements than when they make one-sided decisions? Although this discussion primarily deals with the emission of greenhouse gases, the reasoning and conclusions are relevant in many other types of agreements in which the public administration is one of the parties. The agreement that regulates the emissions of greenhouse gases from the Norwegian aluminium industry is described in a special section. The book also gives a brief account of how agreements are used in the Danish climate policy

  8. Current practice and perspectives in CRO oversight based on a survey performed among members of the German Association of Research-Based Pharmaceutical Companies (vfa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Michael; Hundt, Ferdinand; Busta, Susanne; Mikus, Stefan; Sanden, Per-Holger; Sörgel, Andrea; Ruppert, Thorsten

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the number and scope of outsourced activities in the pharmaceutical industry have increased heavily. In addition, also the type of outsourcing has changed significantly in that time. This raises the question of whether and how sponsors retain the capability to select and to control the contract research organizations (CROs) involved and what expertise still has to be present in the development department as well as other relevant departments to ensure adequate oversight, also in line with the expectations of regulators and health authorities. In order to answer these questions, a survey was conducted among the German vfa member companies. The survey describes the latest developments and experiences in outsourcing by 18 German vfa member companies. It concentrates on measures how to implement Quality Assurance (QA) when performing outsourced clinical studies. This study shows that the majority of companies apply a full-outsourcing, preferred-provider model of clinical trial services, with the clinical research department playing the major role in this process. A large amount of guiding documents, processes and tools are used to ensure an adequate oversight of the services performed by the CRO(s). Finally the guiding principles for all oversight processes should be transparent communication, a clearly established expectation for quality, a precise definition of accountability and responsibility while avoiding silo mentality, and a comprehensive documentation of the oversight's evidence. For globally acting and outsourcing sponsors, oversight processes need to be aligned with regards to local and global perspectives. This survey shows that the current implementation of oversight processes in the participating companies covers all relevant areas to ensure highest quality and integrity of the data produced by the outsourced clinical trial.

  9. Evaluation of Skills Needed in College Education by Colleges of Agriculture Alumni from 1862 and 1890 Land Grant Universities in Alabama and Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekeri, Andrew A.; Baba, Pauline A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine college skills Alumni from 1862 and 1890 Land-Grant universities in Alabama and Tennessee rated as essential to acquire in their college education. The data are from a survey of colleges of agriculture alumni who graduated from six land-grant universities in Alabama and Tennessee. IBM SPSS Statistical…

  10. Historic low-level radioactive waste federal policies, programs and oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchette, M.; Kenney, J.; Zelmer, B.

    2011-01-01

    'Full text:' The management of radioactive waste is one of the most serious environmental problems facing Canadians. From the early industrial uses of radioactive material in the 1930s to the development of nuclear power reactors and the medical and experimental use of radio-isotopes today, there has been a steady accumulation of waste products. Historic waste is low-level radioactive waste for which the federal government has accepted responsibility for long-term management. This paper will outline the policy framework used to govern institutional and financial arrangements for the disposal of radioactive waste by waste producers and owners and the major radioactive projects in which the Government of Canada is currently involved. It will provide an overview of the organizations established for the management of historic radioactive waste and NRCan's oversight role. Finally, an overview of the historic waste program activities managed on behalf of the federal government through these organizations in the Port Hope area, the Greater Toronto Area, in Fort McMurray, Alberta and along the Northern Transportation Route is provided. Canada's Policy Framework for Radioactive Waste, sets out principles that govern the institutional and financial arrangements for disposal of radioactive waste by waste producers and owners. According to the Policy Framework: The federal government will ensure that radioactive waste disposal is carried out in a safe, environmentally sound, comprehensive, cost-effective and integrated manner; The federal government has the responsibility to develop policy, to regulate, and to oversee producers and owners; and, The waste producers and owners are responsible, in accordance with the principle of 'polluter pays', for the funding, organization, management and operation of disposal and other facilities required for their wastes. Arrangements may be different for nuclear fuel waste, low-level radioactive waste and

  11. A Critical Review of the Oversight Role of the Office of the Auditor-General in Financial Accountability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogochukwu Nzewi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Accountability is the very essence of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa (Act No. 108 of 1996. In this regard, the Auditor-General of South Africa (AGSA as the supreme audit institution of the Republic of South Africa plays an important oversight role of promoting financial accountability in government. The purpose of this article is to examine the challenges facing the office of the Auditor-General in executing its oversight role of promoting financial accountability in the sphere of provincial government. Information and sources for this article was gathered through literature review. The article gives some background on the establishment and rationale of Supreme Audit Institutions (SAI. It explores some policy framework that informs public finance management in the Republic of South Africa, establishing the role of the AGSA within this purview. Based on the data gathered through literature review, the key challenges facing the office of the Auditor-General are discussed. Finally, possible solutions are recommended to the challenges that were identified.

  12. From cradle-to-grave at the nanoscale: gaps in U.S. regulatory oversight along the nanomaterial life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudrie, Christian E H; Kandlikar, Milind; Satterfield, Terre

    2013-06-04

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) promise great benefits for society, yet our knowledge of potential risks and best practices for regulation are still in their infancy. Toward the end of better practices, this paper analyzes U.S. federal environmental, health, and safety (EHS) regulations using a life cycle framework. It evaluates their adequacy as applied to ENMs to identify gaps through which emerging nanomaterials may escape regulation from initial production to end-of-life. High scientific uncertainty, a lack of EHS and product data, inappropriately designed exemptions and thresholds, and limited agency resources are a challenge to both the applicability and adequacy of current regulations. The result is that some forms of engineered nanomaterials may escape federal oversight and rigorous risk review at one or more stages along their life cycle, with the largest gaps occurring at the postmarket stages, and at points of ENM release to the environment. Oversight can be improved through pending regulatory reforms, increased research and development for the monitoring, control, and analysis of environmental and end-of-life releases, introduction of periodic re-evaluation of ENM risks, and fostering a "bottom-up" stewardship approach to the responsible management of risks from engineered nanomaterials.

  13. Why budget accountability fails? The elusive links between parliaments and audit agencies in the oversight of the budget

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARLOS SANTISO

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTParliaments and audit agencies have critical and complementary roles in the oversight of the budget and the enforcement of government accountability. Yet, the nexus between parliaments and audit agencies is one of the weakest links in the accountability chain, generating an accountability gap in the budget process. This articles analyses the interactions between parliaments and audit agencies in the oversight of government finances during the latter stages of the budget process. Using proxies to evaluate the quality of those linkages, such as the follow-up to audit findings and the discharge of government, it shows important dysfunctions in the interactions between parliaments and audit agencies due to a combination of technical capacity constraints and political economy disincentives. It suggests that the effective functioning of the system of checks and balances in public budgeting critically hinges on the agility of the linkages between accountability institutions. As such, the failure of budget accountability is due to systemic dysfunctions in the systems of accountability, rather than the failure of an individual accountability institution acting in isolation. In addition, the effectiveness of the horizontal accountability architecture depends on the political economy incentives shaping the budget process, which are generated by the interactions between the choice of institutional design and budget rules, with the degree of political competition and electoral rules.

  14. Experience with Regulatory Strategies in Nuclear Power Oversight. Part 1: An International Exploratory Study. Part 2: Workshop Discussions and Conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melber, Barbara [Melber Consulting, Seattle, WA (United States); Durbin, Nancy E. [Nancy E. Durbin Consulting, Kirkland, WA (United States); Tael, Irene (ed.) [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-03-01

    This report presents the results of a study which explored the use of six different regulatory strategies for oversight of commercial nuclear power facilities: prescriptive, case-based, outcome-based, risk-based, process-based, and self-assessment strategies. Information was collected on experiences with the use of these different regulatory strategies from experts from nuclear regulatory agencies in Canada, Finland, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States. Systematic, structured open-ended interviews with expert regulators with extensive experience were used in order to understand how regulatory strategies are applied in practice. Common patterns were identified regarding: Experts' perspectives on the major benefits and difficulties of using specific regulatory strategies; Experts' experiences with using regulatory strategies for three areas of oversight-design and modifications, quality systems, and training and qualifications; Expert views of the consequences of different regulatory strategies; Issues that emerged in the interviews regarding regulatory strategies. The major benefit of a prescriptive strategy was that it is clear about requirements and expectations. The major difficulties were that it takes responsibility away from the licensee, it requires a high use of regulator resources and is rigid and difficult to change. A case-based strategy had the key benefit of flexibility for adapting regulatory responses to unique situations, but the difficulties of being considered arbitrary, inconsistent, and unfair and requiring heavy resource use. An outcome-based strategy had the main benefit of allowing licensees to decide the best way to operate m order to meet safety goals, but the major difficulty of identifying appropriate ways to measure safety performance. The major benefit of a risk strategy was its use co prioritize safety issues and allocate resources. However, it was considered inappropriate to use as a stand alone strategy

  15. Experience with Regulatory Strategies in Nuclear Power Oversight. Part 1: An International Exploratory Study. Part 2: Workshop Discussions and Conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melber, Barbara; Durbin, Nancy E.; Tael, Irene

    2005-03-01

    This report presents the results of a study which explored the use of six different regulatory strategies for oversight of commercial nuclear power facilities: prescriptive, case-based, outcome-based, risk-based, process-based, and self-assessment strategies. Information was collected on experiences with the use of these different regulatory strategies from experts from nuclear regulatory agencies in Canada, Finland, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States. Systematic, structured open-ended interviews with expert regulators with extensive experience were used in order to understand how regulatory strategies are applied in practice. Common patterns were identified regarding: Experts' perspectives on the major benefits and difficulties of using specific regulatory strategies; Experts' experiences with using regulatory strategies for three areas of oversight-design and modifications, quality systems, and training and qualifications; Expert views of the consequences of different regulatory strategies; Issues that emerged in the interviews regarding regulatory strategies. The major benefit of a prescriptive strategy was that it is clear about requirements and expectations. The major difficulties were that it takes responsibility away from the licensee, it requires a high use of regulator resources and is rigid and difficult to change. A case-based strategy had the key benefit of flexibility for adapting regulatory responses to unique situations, but the difficulties of being considered arbitrary, inconsistent, and unfair and requiring heavy resource use. An outcome-based strategy had the main benefit of allowing licensees to decide the best way to operate m order to meet safety goals, but the major difficulty of identifying appropriate ways to measure safety performance. The major benefit of a risk strategy was its use co prioritize safety issues and allocate resources. However, it was considered inappropriate to use as a stand alone strategy and a

  16. Assessment of subsidence in karst terranes at selected areas in East Tennessee and comparison with a candidate site at Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, J.G.; Tanner, J.M.

    1987-09-01

    Work in the respective areas included assessment of conditions related to sinkhole development. Information collected and assessed involved geology, hydrogeology, land use, lineaments and linear trends, identification of karst features and zones, and inventory of historical sinkhole development and type. Karstification of the candidate, Rhea County, and Morristown study areas, in comparison to other karst areas in Tennessee, can be classified informally as youthful, submature, and mature, respectively. Historical sinkhole development in the more karstified areas is attributed to the greater degree of structural deformation by faulting and fracturing, subsequent solutioning of bedrock, thinness of residuum, and degree of development by man. Sinkhole triggering mechanisms identified are progressive solution of bedrock, water-level fluctuations, piping, and loading. 68 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. Prehistoric parasitism in Tennessee: evidence from the analysis of desiccated fecal material collected from Big Bone Cave, Van Buren County, Tennessee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, C T; Patton, S; Johnson, S S

    1989-06-01

    Eight samples of desiccated human feces collected from Big Bone Cave (40VB103), Van Buren County, Tennessee, were analyzed to determine the presence of ecto- and endoparasitic infection among the prehistoric population using the cave. Radiocarbon-dated torch material from the cave indicated that it was a locus of human activity 2,177 +/- 145 yr ago. Parasitic species identified were: Ascaris lumbricoides, Enterobius vermicularis, fleas of the tribe Phalacropsyllini, and protozoan cysts. The cysts were identified as Giardia using an indirect immunofluorescent antibody test. The only report of Giardia in a prehistoric context is the identification of cysts in 2 1,800-yr-old paleofecal specimens from a cave in Israel. This is the first report of Giardia from paleofeces in the New World.

  18. 49 CFR 32.620 - Cooperative agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cooperative agreement. 32.620 Section 32.620 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE... term does not include cooperative research and development agreements as defined in 15 U.S.C. 3710a. ...

  19. 23 CFR 710.307 - Project agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Project agreement. 710.307 Section 710.307 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RIGHT-OF-WAY AND ENVIRONMENT RIGHT-OF-WAY AND REAL ESTATE Project Development § 710.307 Project agreement. As a condition of Federal-aid, the STD...

  20. Distributivity and Agreement mismatches in Serbian

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosnic, Ana

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a truth value judgment study done on two types of numerals in the Serbian numerical system and corresponding verbal agreement mismatch that is characteristic for the numerals in question. Recent work on agreement and distributivity suggests that singular verbal marking promotes

  1. Emerging practices in community development agreements | Loutit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emerging practices in community development agreements. ... Journal of Sustainable Development Law and Policy (The) ... Community Development Agreements (CDAs) have the potential to facilitate the delivery of tangible benefits from large-scale investment projects, such as mines or forestry concessions, to affected ...

  2. 78 FR 51757 - Negotiated Service Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-21

    ... Services (GEPS) 3 negotiated service agreement (Agreement).\\1\\ The Postal Service seeks inclusion of the... statement, and supporting financial workpapers. Id., Attachment 4 at 3. The Postal Service filed redacted versions of the financial workpapers publically. In the Notice, the Postal Service asserts that the...

  3. 77 FR 32115 - Notice of Agreements Filed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-31

    .... Title: CMA CGM/SSL Puerto Rico-Leeward Islands Space Charter Agreement. Parties: CMA CGM S.A. and Sea Star Line LLC. Filing Party: Wayne R. Rohde, Esquire; Cozen O'Connor; 1627 I Street NW., Suite 1100; Washington, DC 20006-4007. Synopsis: The agreement authorizes CMA to charter space to Sea Star in the trade...

  4. 7 CFR 1424.5 - Agreement process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Agreement process. 1424.5 Section 1424.5 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS BIOENERGY PROGRAM § 1424.5 Agreement process. (a) To...

  5. 76 FR 56194 - Proposed Settlement Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-12

    ... issue in an EPA rule that, among other things, beginning in June, 2014, forbade the production of diesel... through Friday, excluding legal holidays. Comments on a disk or CD-ROM should be formatted in Word or... Commenting on the Proposed Settlement Agreement A. How can I get a copy of the settlement agreement? The...

  6. 77 FR 35680 - Notice of Agreement Filed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-14

    ... or [email protected] . Agreement No.: 201215. Title: Port of Los Angeles Data Delivery Agreement. Parties: Port of Los Angeles; PierPass Inc.; APM Terminals Pacific; California United Terminals, Inc... data to the Port of Los Angeles by the participating marine terminal operators and PierPass Inc., and...

  7. 43 CFR 24.5 - International agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false International agreements. 24.5 Section 24.5 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE POLICY: STATE-FEDERAL RELATIONSHIPS § 24.5 International agreements. (a) International conventions...

  8. Can altruism stabilise international climate agreements?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, van der T.D.; Weikard, H.P.; Ierland, van E.C.

    2012-01-01

    We study the impact of altruism on the stability of international climate agreements. We consider the standard two-stage game for the analysis of international environmental agreements where countries announce their participation at the first stage and abatement levels are chosen at the second

  9. 30 CFR 208.9 - Agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-party agreements, relating to the method and costs of delivery of royalty oil, or crude oil exchanged... royalty oil, must be processed into refined petroleum products in the purchaser's refinery. ... FEDERAL ROYALTY OIL General Provisions § 208.9 Agreements. (a) A purchaser must submit to MMS two copies...

  10. Cooperative monitoring of regional security agreements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pregenzer, A.L.; Vannoni, M.; Biringer, K.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nonproliferation and Arms Control Analysis Dept.

    1996-11-01

    This paper argues that cooperative monitoring plays a critical role in the implementation of regional security agreements and confidence building measures. A framework for developing cooperative monitoring options is proposed and several possibilities for relating bilateral and regional monitoring systems to international monitoring systems are discussed. Three bilateral or regional agreements are analyzed briefly to illustrate different possibilities. These examples illustrate that the relationship of regional or bilateral arms control or security agreements to international agreements depends on a number of factors: the overlap of provisions between regional and international agreements; the degree of interest in a regional agreement among the international community; efficiency in implementing the agreement; and numerous political considerations. Given the importance of regional security to the international community, regions should be encouraged to develop their own infrastructure for implementing regional arms control and other security agreements. A regional infrastructure need not preclude participation in an international regime. On the contrary, establishing regional institutions for arms control and nonproliferation could result in more proactive participation of regional parties in developing solutions for regional and international problems, thereby strengthening existing and future international regimes. Possible first steps for strengthening regional infrastructures are identified and potential technical requirements are discussed.

  11. 75 FR 150 - Notice of Agreements Filed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-04

    ... No: E9-31187] FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Notice of Agreements Filed The Commission hereby gives... submit comments on the agreements to the Secretary, Federal Maritime Commission, Washington, DC 20573...; Orient Overseas Container Line Limited; Yangming Marine Transport Corp.; and Zim Integrated Shipping...

  12. 77 FR 33459 - Notice of Agreements Filed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    ... . Agreement No.: 011275-033. Title: Australia and New Zealand-United States Discussion Agreement. Parties: ANL...'Connor; 1627 I Street NW., Suite 1100; Washington, DC 20006-4007. Synopsis: The amendment would add a new... authorizes Hyundai to charter space to MOL and APL in the relevant trade and to authorize the parties to...

  13. 77 FR 64991 - Notice of Agreements Filed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-24

    ... Containers, Inc., and SSA Ventures, Inc. Filing Party: David F. Smith, Esq.; Cozen O'Connor; 1627 I Street NW.... Agreement No.: 201162-009. Title: NYSA-ILA Assessment Agreement. Parties: International Longshoremen's Association and New York Shipping Association. Filing Parties: Donato Caruso, Esq.; The Lambos Firm; 303 South...

  14. Hubs and spokes in Regional Trade Agreements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaal, A. de

    2017-01-01

    In the plethora of Regional Trade Agreements (RTAs) some countries are involved in much more RTAs than others. Furthermore, some countries take in a position as a hub: they have trade agreements with many other countries, while their partner countries are much less involved in RTA relations. Even

  15. 48 CFR 18.118 - Trade agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Trade agreements. 18.118 Section 18.118 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES EMERGENCY ACQUISITIONS Available Acquisition Flexibilities 18.118 Trade agreements...

  16. 7 CFR 1720.9 - Guarantee Agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... to absorb losses relative to risk in the guaranteed lender's portfolio and requirements on the guaranteed lender to hold additional capital against the risk of default; (16) Payment by RUS; (17) RUS... Agreement. (a) The guaranteed lender will be required to sign a guarantee agreement with the Secretary...

  17. 76 FR 64944 - Notice of Agreements Filed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    ..., and New Zealand. Agreement No.: 012140. Title: CSAV/Siem Turkey Space Charter Agreement. Parties: Compania Sud Americana de Vapores, S.A. and Siem Car Carriers (Pacific) AS. Filing Party: Walter H. Lion... CSAV and Siem to cross charter space for the movement of motorized vehicles in the trade from Turkey to...

  18. Nuclear arbitration: Interpreting non-proliferation agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzeng, Peter

    2015-01-01

    At the core of the nuclear non-proliferation regime lie international agreements. These agreements include, inter alia, the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty, nuclear co-operation agreements and nuclear export control agreements.1 States, however, do not always comply with their obligations under these agreements. In response, commentators have proposed various enforcement mechanisms to promote compliance. The inconvenient truth, however, is that states are generally unwilling to consent to enforcement mechanisms concerning issues as critical to national security as nuclear non-proliferation.3 This article suggests an alternative solution to the non-compliance problem: interpretation mechanisms. Although an interpretation mechanism does not have the teeth of an enforcement mechanism, it can induce compliance by providing an authoritative interpretation of a legal obligation. Interpretation mechanisms would help solve the non-compliance problem because, as this article shows, in many cases of alleged non-compliance with a non-proliferation agreement, the fundamental problem has been the lack of an authoritative interpretation of the agreement, not the lack of an enforcement mechanism. Specifically, this article proposes arbitration as the proper interpretation mechanism for non-proliferation agreements. It advocates the establishment of a 'Nuclear Arbitration Centre' as an independent branch of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and recommends the gradual introduction of arbitration clauses into the texts of non-proliferation agreements. Section I begins with a discussion of international agreements in general and the importance of interpretation and enforcement mechanisms. Section II then discusses nuclear non-proliferation agreements and their lack of interpretation and enforcement mechanisms. Section III examines seven case studies of alleged non-compliance with non-proliferation agreements in order to show that the main problem in many cases

  19. New Danish Company Act on Shareholders' Agreements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik

    2011-01-01

    Section 82 of the Danish Company Act, in force from 1 March 2010, provides that ‘Shareholders’ agreements are neither binding on the company nor on decisions taken by the general assembly’. This has far-reaching consequences for shareholders’ agreements, also for already existing agreements....... The substantial elements in many agreements are clauses on (1) voting for board candidates, (2) voting for dividends of certain proportions, and (3) first refusal rights, respectively, call options for shares in the company. Such clauses are at the very roots of corporate law, dealing with the shareholders’ (1......) organizational rights, (2) financial rights, and (3) rights of disposal, or in plainer words, the corporate (1) power, (2) money, and (3) exit. If a shareholders’ agreement is thoroughly kept and respected by all parties, both in the way they vote at general assemblies and in the way they act when wishing...

  20. Bayesian methods for measures of agreement

    CERN Document Server

    Broemeling, Lyle D

    2009-01-01

    Using WinBUGS to implement Bayesian inferences of estimation and testing hypotheses, Bayesian Methods for Measures of Agreement presents useful methods for the design and analysis of agreement studies. It focuses on agreement among the various players in the diagnostic process.The author employs a Bayesian approach to provide statistical inferences based on various models of intra- and interrater agreement. He presents many examples that illustrate the Bayesian mode of reasoning and explains elements of a Bayesian application, including prior information, experimental information, the likelihood function, posterior distribution, and predictive distribution. The appendices provide the necessary theoretical foundation to understand Bayesian methods as well as introduce the fundamentals of programming and executing the WinBUGS software.Taking a Bayesian approach to inference, this hands-on book explores numerous measures of agreement, including the Kappa coefficient, the G coefficient, and intraclass correlation...