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Sample records for tendon graft model

  1. Augmentation of Distal Biceps Repair With an Acellular Dermal Graft Restores Native Biomechanical Properties in a Tendon-Deficient Model.

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    Conroy, Christine; Sethi, Paul; Macken, Craig; Wei, David; Kowalsky, Marc; Mirzayan, Raffy; Pauzenberger, Leo; Dyrna, Felix; Obopilwe, Elifho; Mazzocca, Augustus D

    2017-07-01

    The majority of distal biceps tendon injuries can be repaired in a single procedure. In contrast, complete chronic tears with severe tendon substance deficiency and retraction often require tendon graft augmentation. In cases with extensive partial tears of the distal biceps, a human dermal allograft may be used as an alternative to restore tendon thickness and biomechanical integrity. Dermal graft augmentation will improve load to failure compared with nonaugmented repair in a tendon-deficient model. Controlled laboratory study. Thirty-six matched specimens were organized into 1 of 4 groups: native tendon, native tendon with dermal graft augmentation, tendon with an attritional defect, and tendon with an attritional defect repaired with a graft. To mimic a chronic attritional biceps lesion, a defect was created by a complete tear, leaving 30% of the tendon's width intact. The repair technique in all groups consisted of cortical button and interference screw fixation. All specimens underwent cyclical loading for 3000 cycles and were then tested to failure; gap formation and peak load at failure were documented. The mean (±SD) load to failure (320.9 ± 49.1 N vs 348.8 ± 77.6 N, respectively; P = .38) and gap formation (displacement) (1.8 ± 1.4 mm vs 1.6 ± 1.1 mm, respectively; P = .38) did not differ between the native tendon groups with and without graft augmentation. In the tendon-deficient model, the mean load to failure was significantly improved with graft augmentation compared with no graft augmentation (282.1 ± 83.8 N vs 199.7 ± 45.5 N, respectively; P = .04), while the mean gap formation was significantly reduced (1.2 ± 1.0 mm vs 2.7 ± 1.4 mm, respectively; P = .04). The mean load to failure of the deficient tendon with graft augmentation (282.1 N) compared with the native tendon (348.8 N) was not significantly different ( P = .12). This indicates that the native tendon did not perform differently from the grafted deficient tendon. In a tendon

  2. Adequacy of palmaris longus and plantaris tendons for tendon grafting.

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    Jakubietz, Michael G; Jakubietz, Danni F; Gruenert, Joerg G; Zahn, Robert; Meffert, Rainer H; Jakubietz, Rafael G

    2011-04-01

    The reconstruction of tendon defects is challenging. The palmaris longus and plantaris tendon are generally considered best for tendon grafting. Only a few studies have examined whether these tendons, when present, meet criteria for successful grafting. The purpose of this study was to evaluate these tendons in regard to adequacy as tendon grafts. To evaluate adequacy for grafting, the palmaris longus and plantaris tendons were harvested from 92 arms and legs of 46 cadavers. Macroscopic evaluation and measurements concerning presence, length, and diameter of the tendons were obtained. Criteria for adequacy were a minimum length of 15 cm with diameter of 3 mm or, alternatively, 30 cm with a diameter of 1.5 mm. The palmaris longus tendon was present bilaterally in 36 cases and was absent bilaterally in 4 cases. The plantaris tendon was present bilaterally in 38 cases and absent bilaterally in 4 cases. In 29 cadavers, the palmaris longus tendon did not meet the criteria to be used as a tendon graft. Only in 8 cases were the tendons satisfactory for grafting bilaterally. The plantaris tendon met criteria for grafting in 20 cases bilaterally. In 17 cases, the tendons were considered inadequate bilaterally. Despite their presence, the palmaris longus and plantaris tendons are adequate for grafting less often than previously thought. In less than 50%, the tendons, although present, would serve as useful grafts. Our findings underscore the importance of choosing a second donor site before surgery in case the primarily selected tendon is not found to be suitable. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Tendon transfer or tendon graft for ruptured finger extensor tendons in rheumatoid hands.

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    Chung, U S; Kim, J H; Seo, W S; Lee, K H

    2010-05-01

    We evaluated the clinical outcome of tendon reconstruction using tendon graft or tendon transfer and the parameters related to clinical outcome in 51 wrists of 46 patients with rheumatoid arthritis with finger extensor tendon ruptures. At a mean follow-up of 5.6 years, the mean metacarpophalangeal (MP) joint extension lag was 8 degrees (range, 0-45) and the mean visual analogue satisfaction scale was 74 (range, 10-100). Clinical outcome did not differ significantly between tendon grafting and tendon transfer. The MP joint extension lag correlated with the patient's satisfaction score, but the pulp-to-palm distance did not correlate with patient satisfaction. We conclude that both tendon grafting and tendon transfer are reliable reconstruction methods for ruptured finger extensor tendons in rheumatoid hands.

  4. [Experimental study of allogenic tendon with sheath grafting in chicken].

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    Zhang, Y L; Wang, S L; Gao, X S

    2001-03-01

    To investigate availability of deep freeze stored allogenic tendon with sheath grafting in repairing the tendon and sheath defect in the II area of flexor digitorum tendon. Sixty chickens with tendon and sheath defect were divided into 2 groups randomly, group A was treated with allogenic grafting and group B was treated with autogenic grafting, these two groups were divided into two subgroups respectively, they were, group A1 allogenic tendon with whole sheath grafting, group A2 allogenic tendon with partial sheath grafting, group B1 autogenic tendon with whole sheath grafting and group B2 autogenic tendon with whole sheath grafting. All the allogenic grafts were treated by deep freeze. Histomorphological study, histoimmunological study and slipping function of the grafts were measured after operation. In group A1 and B1, the local reaction was sever, the nutrition of tendon graft was barricaded by the whole sheath resulting in adhesion, degeneration and necrosis. In group A2 and B2, the tendon graft healed well and little adhesion existed between tendon and sheath. The results showed that there were significant differences between tendon grafting with whole sheath and tendon grafting with partial sheath. Deep freeze store can reduce the immunogenicity of allogenic tendon with sheath. Allogenic tendon with partial sheath grafting can be used as a new biological material for repairing the tendon and sheath defect.

  5. Graft tendon slippage with metallic and bioabsorbable interference screws under cyclic load: a biomechanical study in a porcine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Digiácomo Ocampo Moré

    Full Text Available Introduction The rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL is the most common type of knee injury. Reconstructive surgery is the ‘gold standard’ treatment. During the immediate post-operative period, the fixation of the graft is entirely dependent on the ability of the grafted implant to be secured inside the bone tunnel under the cyclical loads associated with daily tasks. Poor fixation can lead to graft slippage, thus impairing the healing and integration of the graft. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical performance of tendon graft fixation devices with metallic and bioabsorbable interference screws. Methods Twenty ACL reconstructions were carried out in porcine tibias using deep flexor tendons to fix 9 × 20 mm metallic (n=10 and PLLA 70/30 bioabsorbable screws (n=10. To verify the ability of a construct to resist immediate postoperative (PO rehabilitation protocols for immediate load bearing, a cyclic loading test was applied with 50-250 N of tensile force at 1 Hz for 1000 cycles, and the displacement was measured at 10, 50, 100, 500 and 1000 load cycles to quantify the slippage of the graft during the test. After the cyclic loading test, a single-cycle load-to-failure test was applied. Results The slippage of the graft using metallic screws did not differ (P = 0.616 from that observed when using bioabsorbable screws. Conclusion The results obtained in this experiment indicate that metallic screws may promote a similar amount of graft slippage during low cyclic loading as bioabsorbable screws. Additionally, there was no difference in the biomechanical performance of these two types of screws during high failure loads.

  6. Multiple extensor tendons reconstruction with hamstring tendon grafts and flap coverage for severe dorsal hand injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbaydar, M; Orman, O; Ozel, O; Altan, E

    2017-10-10

    Treatment of patients with traumatic loss of skin and multiple extensor tendons on the dorsum of the hand is a challenge. The aim of this study was to assess the outcome after reconstruction of soft tissues and multiple extensor tendons in patients who suffered traumatic loss of skin and multiple extensor tendons. Ten patients were enrolled in the study. These patients underwent single-stage reconstruction with autogenous hamstring tendon grafts for multiple extensor tendon defects and fasciocutaneous flaps for coverage of dorsal hand defects. In total, 25 tendons (2 tendons in 5 patients and 3 tendons in 5 patients) were reconstructed. The semitendinosus tendon was used in all patients and the gracilis tendon was added in five patients for tendon reconstruction. Total tendon length requiring reconstruction was between 9cm and 31cm. Free anterolateral thigh flaps were used in six patients and reverse pedicled forearm flaps were used in four patients. According to Miller's scoring system, 8 fingers had excellent results, 12 fingers had good results and 5 fingers had fair results at the final follow-up. Hamstring tendons can be used satisfactorily for primary reconstruction of multiple digital extensor tendons due to their availability and compatibility, with a fasciocutaneous flap. IV. Copyright © 2017 SFCM. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Experimental studies in chickens on the initial nutrition of tendon grafts.

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    Manske, P R; Lesker, P A; Bridwell, K

    1979-11-01

    A study of nutrition of various tendon graft preparations in adult chickens (up to 2 weeks after grafting), using tritiated proline and a trichloracetic acid extraction technique which separated the free and metabolized amino acid fractions, suggests that diffusion of nutrients is an important process in the initial nutrition of tendon grafts, that tendon grafts are metabolically active and viable structures, that adhesions which are frequently associated with tendon grafts do not appear to be essential to the nutrition of grafts, and that tendon grafts within fibrous pseudosheaths are nourished as effectively as grafts within synovial sheaths.

  8. Novel technique for passing tendon grafts through bone tunnels.

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    Levy, Jeffrey A; Farber, Gerald L; Taylor, Kenneth F

    2012-11-01

    Anatomic reconstruction in orthopedic surgery often requires the passage of soft tissue through bone tunnels. Difficulties may arise due to anatomic constraints surrounding the bone tunnels or the graft size. The authors present a novel technique for passing tendon grafts through bone tunnels that is simple, readily available, effective, and comparatively inexpensive. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Tendon grafts: their natural history, biology and future development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, R; Alam, N; McGrouther, A D; Wong, J K F

    2015-09-01

    The use of tendon grafts has diminished as regimes of primary repairs and rehabilitation have improved, but they remain important in secondary reconstruction. Relatively little is known about the cellular biology of grafts, and the general perception is that they have little biological activity. The reality is that there is a wealth of cellular and molecular changes occurring with the process of engraftment that affect the quality of the repair. This review highlights the historical perspectives and modern concepts of graft take, reviews the different attachment techniques and revisits the biology of pseudosheath formation. In addition, we discuss some of the future directions in tendon reconstruction by grafting, which include surface modification, vascularized tendon transfer, allografts, biomaterials and cell-based therapies. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Local application of strontium in a calcium phosphate cement system accelerates healing of soft tissue tendon grafts in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: experiment using a rabbit model.

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    Kuang, Guan-Ming; Yau, W P; Lu, William W; Chiu, K Y

    2014-12-01

    Healing of soft tissue tendon grafts within the bone tunnel in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is known to be slower than that of bone-patellar tendon-bone grafts. There are attempts to accelerate healing of the graft within the bone tunnel. One of the methods is the use of strontium-enriched calcium phosphate cement (Sr-CPC). Early results in animal studies have been encouraging, although it is not known whether the accelerated healing was solely caused by the effect of strontium within the cement or by the calcium phosphate cement (CPC) itself. There would be differences between Sr-CPC and conventional CPC in terms of the effect on healing of soft tissue tendon grafts within the bone tunnels in ACL reconstruction. Controlled laboratory study. A total of 30 single-bundle ACL reconstruction procedures were performed in 15 rabbits with the use of an Achilles tendon allograft. The graft on the left limb was coated with Sr-CPC, while that on the right limb was coated with CPC. Three animals each were sacrificed for histological and histomorphometric analyses at 3, 6, 9, 12, and 24 weeks after surgery. In the Sr-CPC group, early formation of Sharpey fibers was present at 6 weeks after surgery, while early remodeling of a graft-fibrocartilage-bone junction was noted at 12 weeks. In the CPC group, early formation of Sharpey fibers was only found at 9 to 12 weeks after surgery. At 24 weeks, a direct enthesis was found in both groups. According to the histomorphometric score, graft healing in the Sr-CPC group took place 3 weeks faster than that in the CPC group at and before 12 weeks; however, there was no difference between the groups at 24 weeks. The local application of strontium in a CPC system leads to accelerated graft healing within the bone tunnels. The use of Sr-CPC to enhance graft-bone healing may improve the clinical results of ACL reconstruction using soft tissue tendon grafts. © 2014 The Author(s).

  11. Knee extension and flexion muscle power after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with patellar tendon graft or hamstring tendons graft: a cross-sectional comparison 3 years post surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ageberg, Eva; Roos, Harald; Silbernagel, Karin

    2008-01-01

    Hamstring muscles play a major role in knee-joint stabilization after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Weakness of the knee extensors after ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon (PT) graft, and in the knee flexors after reconstruction with hamstring tendons (HT) graft has been observed up...

  12. [Bone-tendon integration of autologous grafts using different diameter tunnels. An experimental study on sheep].

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    Sánchez Hidalgo, R; Forriol, F

    2012-01-01

    To analyse the bone-ligament integration «ligamentization» of the tendon graft in the reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) performing tunnels of different diameter. We performed the same reconstruction procedure using an autologous tendon graft taken from the superficial tendon of the hoof in 41 adult sheep. In Group A the tibial and femoral tunnels were 5 mm in diameter and in Group B they were 7 mm in diameter. The sheep were sacrificed at 3, 6 and 12 months after the surgery. Histological studies were performed on the graft and the tunnels, as well as a biomechanical analysis of the tibial-femoral complex. In group A we did not observe direct integration of the bone and the tendon graft or any fibres joining both structures, although there was vascularized fibrous tissue. In group B we did not observe any direct binding of the bone and the tendon graft either, although there was abundant fibrous tissue. The tendon graft showed a fascicular structure that increased over time in order to create septa for vascular penetration. Macroscopically the ACL graft had a dense appearance, which was very similar to the original tendon graft. The tendon grafts from group B and with a longer follow up period required a higher strength to produce maximum breakage than the tendon grafts from group A. After one year follow up, the histological study shows that the tendon graft is not transformed into a ligament, and there is no integration of the tendon graft in tunnels regardless of their diameter. Therefore, fixation techniques are essential to maintain the orientation and tension of the tendon graft. Copyright © 2011 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of a surgically optimized graft insertion suture technique to accommodate a tissue-engineered tendon in vivo.

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    Sawadkar, Prasad; Alexander, Susan; Tolk, Marten; Wong, Jason; McGrouther, Duncan; Bozec, Laurent; Mudera, Vivek

    2013-10-01

    The traumatic rupture of tendons is a common clinical problem. Tendon repair is surgically challenging because the tendon often retracts, resulting in a gap between the torn end and its bony insertion. Tendon grafts are currently used to fill this deficit but are associated with potential complications relating to donor site morbidity and graft necrosis. We have developed a highly reproducible, rapid process technique to manufacture compressed cell-seeded type I collagen constructs to replace tendon grafts. However, the material properties of the engineered constructs are currently unsuitable to withstand complete load bearing in vivo. A modified suture technique has been developed to withstand physiological loading and off load the artificial construct while integration occurs. Lapine tendons were used ex vivo to test the strength of different suture techniques with different sizes of Prolene sutures and tissue-engineered collagen constructs in situ. The data were compared to standard modified Kessler suture using a standard tendon graft. Mechanical testing was carried out and a finite element analysis stress distribution model constructed using COMSOL 3.5 software. The break point for modified suture technique with a tissue-engineered scaffold was significantly higher (50.62 N) compared to a standard modified Kessler suture (12.49 N, ptechnique is suitable for testing in vivo, and this will be the next stage of our research.

  14. Surgical Treatment for Failure of Repair of Patellar and Quadriceps Tendon Rupture With Ipsilateral Hamstring Tendon Graft.

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    Maffulli, Nicola; Papalia, Rocco; Torre, Guglielmo; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2017-03-01

    Tears of the patellar and quadriceps tendon are common in the active population, especially in athletes. At present, several techniques for surgical repair and reconstruction are available. When reruptures occur, a reconstruction is mandatory. In the present paper, we describe a surgical technique for patellar and quadriceps tendon reconstruction using ipsilateral hamstring autograft. After routine hamstring tendon harvesting, the tendon ends are prepared using a whip stitch. A transverse tunnel is drilled in the midportion of the patella, the hamstring graft is passed through the patella, and firmly secured to the patellar tunnel openings with sutures. The details of the technique are fully described. Autologous ipsilateral hamstring tendon grafts provide a secure sound means to manage these challenging injuries.

  15. Minimally invasive reconstruction of chronic achilles tendon ruptures using the ipsilateral free semitendinosus tendon graft and interference screw fixation.

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    Maffulli, Nicola; Loppini, Mattia; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Maffulli, Gayle D; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2013-05-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures represent more than 40% of all tendon ruptures requiring surgical management. About 20% of acute Achilles tendon tears are not diagnosed at the time of injury and become chronic, necessitating more complicated management than fresh injuries. Several techniques for the reconstruction of chronic tears of the Achilles tendon have been described, but the superiority of one technique over the others has not been demonstrated. Mini-invasive reconstruction of the Achilles tendon, with a gap lesion larger than 6 cm, using the ipsilateral free semitendinosus tendon graft will result in improvement of the overall function with a low rate of complications. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Between 2008 and 2010, the authors prospectively enrolled 28 consecutive patients (21 men and 7 women; median age, 46 years) with chronic closed ruptures of the Achilles tendon who had undergone reconstruction with a free semitendinosus tendon graft. They assessed the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS), maximum calf circumference, and isometric plantarflexion strength before surgery and at the last follow-up. Outcome of surgery and rate of complications were also recorded. The median follow-up after surgery was 31.4 months. The overall result of surgery was excellent/good in 26 (93%) of 28 patients. The ATRS improved from 42 (range, 29-55) to 86 (range, 78-95) (P tendon, with a gap lesion larger than 6 cm, using the ipsilateral free semitendinosus tendon graft provides a significant improvement of symptoms and function, although calf circumference and ankle plantarflexion strength do not recover fully.

  16. Synthesis, development, characterization and effectiveness of bovine pure platelet gel-collagen-polydioxanone bioactive graft on tendon healing

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    Moshiri, Ali; Oryan, Ahmad; Meimandi-Parizi, Abdolhamid

    2015-01-01

    Bovine platelet gel (BPG) is an accessible and cost-effective source of growth factors which may have a value in tendon regenerative medicine. We produced a collagen implant (CI) as a tendon proper, covered it with polydioxanone (PDS) sheath to simulate paratenon and finally embedded the BPG as an active source of growth factor within the bioimplant to test whether BPG would be able to accelerate and enhance tendon regeneration and repair. After in vitro characterization of the bioactive grafts, the grafts were implanted in rabbit large tendon defect model. Untreated tendons and tendons treated with either CI or CI-PDS were served as controls for the CI-PDS-BPG. The animals were investigated clinically, ultrasonographically and haematologically for 120 days. After euthanasia, dry matter content, water uptake and delivery characteristics and also gross morphological, histopathological and scanning electron microscopic features of the healing tendons were assessed. In vitro, the activated platelets in the scaffold, released their growth factors significantly more than the controls. BPG also increased cell viability, and enhanced cellular differentiation, maturation and proliferation inside the CI-PDS compared with the controls. In vivo, the BPG modulated inflammation, increased quality and rate of fibroplasia and produced a remodelled tendon that had significantly higher collagen content and superior collagen fibril and fibre differentiation than controls. Treatment also significantly improved tendon water uptake and delivery characteristics, animals’ serum PDGF level, CI-PDS biocompatibility and biodegradability and reduced peritendinous adhesions, muscle fibrosis and atrophy. BPG was effective on tendon healing and CI-PDS-BPG may be a valuable bioscaffold in tendon reconstructive surgery. PMID:25702535

  17. Acromioclavicular joint dislocation: a comparative biomechanical study of the palmaris-longus tendon graft reconstruction with other augmentative methods in cadaveric models

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    Sengupta S

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acromioclavicular injuries are common in sports medicine. Surgical intervention is generally advocated for chronic instability of Rockwood grade III and more severe injuries. Various methods of coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction and augmentation have been described. The objective of this study is to compare the biomechanical properties of a novel palmaris-longus tendon reconstruction with those of the native AC+CC ligaments, the modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction, the ACJ capsuloligamentous complex repair, screw and clavicle hook plate augmentation. Hypothesis There is no difference, biomechanically, amongst the various reconstruction and augmentative methods. Study Design Controlled laboratory cadaveric study. Methods 54 cadaveric native (acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments were tested using the Instron machine. Superior loading was performed in the 6 groups: 1 in the intact states, 2 after modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction (WD, 3 after modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction with acromioclavicular joint capsuloligamentous repair (WD.ACJ, 4 after modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction with clavicular hook plate augmentation (WD.CP or 5 after modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction with coracoclavicular screw augmentation (WD.BS and 6 after modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction with mersilene tape-palmaris-longus tendon graft reconstruction (WD. PLmt. Posterior-anterior (horizontal loading was similarly performed in all groups, except groups 4 and 5. The respective failure loads, stiffnesses, displacements at failure and modes of failure were recorded. Data analysis was carried out using a one-way ANOVA, with Student's unpaired t-test for unpaired data (S-PLUS statistical package 2005. Results Native ligaments were the strongest and stiffest when compared to other modes of reconstruction and augmentation except coracoclavicular screw, in both posterior-anterior and superior directions (p WD.ACJ provided additional

  18. Selection of tendon grafts for distal radioulnar ligament reconstruction and report of a modified technique.

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    Jang, Eugene; Dy, Christopher J; Wolfe, Scott W

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the graft length necessary to complete a distal radioulnar ligament reconstruction and assess the suitability of several tendon graft sources. We measured the graft length needed to complete the distal radioulnar ligament reconstruction in 7 fresh-frozen cadaver specimens. The pure tendon lengths of 7 tendon graft sources were measured: palmaris longus, extensor indicis proprius, slips of extensor digiti minimi and abductor pollicis longus, and portions of flexor carpi ulnaris, flexor carpi radialis, and extensor carpi ulnaris. A modified technique that allows for a shorter length of graft is also described, and the suitability of each graft source for this technique was assessed. The mean graft lengths needed to complete the original and modified reconstructions were 138 mm and 89 mm, respectively. The average length of the tendon graft when measured as pure tendon was: palmaris longus (127 mm), slip of extensor digiti minimi (112 mm), extensor indicis proprius (100 mm), partial flexor carpi radialis (87 mm), slip of abductor pollicis longus (69 mm), partial flexor carpi ulnaris (67 mm), and partial extensor carpi ulnaris (67 mm). The palmaris longus was too short for the original technique in the majority of specimens but was sufficient to complete the modified technique in every specimen that had a palmaris longus. Six specimens also had an extensor indicis proprius of suitable length for the modified technique. The length of donor graft required for the modified reconstruction was significantly less than that needed for the original reconstruction. Three specimens had no donor tendons sufficiently long to complete the original technique if a pure tendon graft were used, whereas the modified technique could be completed in all specimens. Many tendon graft sources in the upper extremity are of insufficient length to complete the distal radioulnar ligament reconstruction as described. A modified technique using suture anchors may be a useful

  19. Gastrocnemius tendon length and strain are different when assessed using straight or curved tendon model

    OpenAIRE

    Stosic, Jelena; Finni Juutinen, Taija

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of tendon curvature on measurements of tendon length using 3D-kinematic analysis. Curved and straight tendon models were employed for assessing medial gastrocnemius tendon length and strain during hopping (N = 8). Tendon curvature was identified using small reflective markers placed on the skin surface along the length of the tendon and a sum of vectors between the markers from the calcaneous up to the marker at the origin of tendon was calculated. T...

  20. Ipsilateral free semitendinosus tendon graft transfer for reconstruction of chronic tears of the Achilles tendon

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    Gougoulias Nikolaos

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many techniques have been developed for the reconstruction of the Achilles tendon in chronic tears. In presence of a large gap (greater than 6 centimetres, tendon augmentation is required. Methods We present our method of minimally invasive semitendinosus reconstruction for the Achilles tendon using one para-midline and one midline incision. Results The first incision is a 5 cm longitudinal incision, made 2 cm proximal and just medial to the palpable end of the residual tendon. The second incision is 3 cm long and is also longitudinal but is 2 cm distal and in the midline to the distal end of the tendon rupture. The distal and proximal Achilles tendon stumps are mobilised. After trying to reduce the gap of the ruptured Achilles tendon, if the gap produced is greater than 6 cm despite maximal plantar flexion of the ankle and traction on the Achilles tendon stumps, the ipsilateral semitendinosus tendon is harvested. The semitendinosus tendon is passed through small incisions in the substance of the proximal stump of the Achilles tendon, and it is sutured to the Achilles tendon. It is then passed beneath the intact skin bridge into the distal incision, and passed from medial to lateral through a transverse tenotomy in the distal stump. With the ankle in maximal plantar flexion, the semitendinosus tendon is sutured to the Achilles tendon at each entry and exit point Conclusion This minimally invasive technique allows reconstruction of the Achilles tendon using the tendon of semitendinosus preserving skin integrity over the site most prone to wound breakdown, and can be especially used to reconstruct the Achilles tendon in the presence of large gap (greater than 6 centimetres.

  1. Tendon healing in vivo. An experimental model.

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    Abrahamsson, S O; Lundborg, G; Lohmander, L S

    1989-01-01

    Flexor tendon segments were incubated in a diffusion chamber in the subcutis of rabbits. Tendons incubated up to 6 weeks in the diffusion chamber showed proliferating and migrating cells from the epitenon cell layer as well as viable endotenon cells. Explants frozen in liquid nitrogen prior to incubation showed no signs of extrinsic cell contamination and remained non-viable indicating that no cell penetration occurred through the Millipore filter and that cell division seen in non-frozen and incubated tendons was an expression of intrinsic cellular proliferative capacity of the tendon. In tendon segments incubated in chambers for three weeks, collagen synthesis was reduced by 50% and the rate of cell proliferation measured as 3H-thymidine incorporation, was 15 times that of native tendons. Frozen and incubated tendons showed only traces of remaining matrix synthesis or cell proliferation. With this experimental model we have histologically and biochemically shown that tendons may survive and heal while the nutrition exclusively could be based on diffusion and the tendons have an intrinsic capacity of healing. The described model enables further studies on tendon healing and its regulation.

  2. Acromioclavicular Reconstruction using Autogenous Semitendinosus Tendon Graft and the Importance of Postoperative Rehabilitation: A Case Report

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    Jade PY Ho

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of chronic acromioclavicular joint dislocation (Rockwood type 5 in which the choice of acromioclavicular reconstruction using autogenous semitendinosus tendon graft was made due to its superiority in anatomical reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments, and the impact of postoperative rehabilitation on the recovery of this patient. We also discuss the rationale behind this.

  3. Successful treatment of a fracture of a huge Achilles tendon ossification with autologous hamstring tendon graft and gastrocnemius fascia flap: a case report.

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    Ishikura, Hisatoshi; Fukui, Naoshi; Takamure, Hiroshi; Ohashi, Satoru; Iwasawa, Mitsuyasu; Takagi, Kentaro; Horita, Ayako; Saito, Ikuo; Mori, Toshihito

    2015-11-24

    Fracture of an ossified Achilles tendon is a rare entity, and no standard treatment has been established. This is the first report to describe the use of a hamstring tendon graft and gastrocnemius fascia flap for Achilles tendon reconstruction. We present the case of a 50-year-old woman with fracture of an ossified Achilles tendon. She presented to our clinic with acute right hindfoot pain, which started suddenly while going up the stairs. Plain radiography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a massive ossification on the right Achilles tendon extending over 14 cm in length; the ossification was fractured at 5 cm proximal to the calcaneus insertion. Surgical treatment included removal of the ossified tendon and reconstruction with an autologous hamstring tendon graft and gastrocnemius fascia flap. One year after surgery, she was able to walk with little pain or discomfort and to stand on her right tiptoe. Our novel surgical procedure may be useful in the treatment of fractured ossified Achilles tendons and large Achilles tendon defects.

  4. Press-fit Femoral Fixation in ACL Reconstruction using Bone-Patellar Tendon-Bone Graft

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    Kaseb Mohammad Hasan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Bone-patellar tendon auto graft is probably the most widely used graft for ACL reconstruction. Several methods for graft fixation have been described. To avoid intra-articular hardware we adopt biological fixation with a femoral trapezoidal press-fit fixation. A prospective study was performed on 30 consecutive active people who underwent ACL reconstruction with this technique by two surgeons between september2004 and march2007 (mean follow-up 15.2 months. Results were evaluated by an independent examiner using radiography, subjective and objective evaluation. Assessment using the IKDC knee scoring revealed 92% of the patients with a normal or nearly normal knee joint. Lysholm's score was 63.6(40- 86 preoperatively and 91.88(73-100 at the latest follow up (P < 0.005. No patient complained of instability at latest follow up. The quadriceps muscle showed mild atrophy at 3 and 6 months and at final follow-up. Five Patients complained of anterior knee pain and had a positive kneeling test. We found no graft displacement on follow up radiographs. All cases showed radiological evidence of graft osteointegration at last follow up. Our results show that press-fit fixation of trapezoidal bone graft in femoral tunnel is a simple, reliable, and cost-effective alternative for ACL recon-struction using bone-patellar tendon-bone graft.

  5. Magnetic resonance angiography evaluation of the bone tunnel and graft following ACL reconstruction with a hamstring tendon autograft.

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    Terauchi, Ryu; Arai, Yuji; Hara, Kunio; Minami, Ginjiro; Nakagawa, Shuji; Takahashi, Takeshi; Ikoma, Kazuya; Ueshima, Keiichiro; Shirai, Toshiharu; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    In this study, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was performed in the early phase after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction to analyse the changes in nutrient blood vessels and blood flow to the femoral and tibial tunnels and the intraosseous tendon grafts. The subjects were 30 patients who underwent single-bundle ACL reconstruction with an autogenous hamstring tendon. MRA was performed at 2, 3, and 6 months postoperatively (n = 10 at each time point). The mean overall signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) in the tunnel regions and in the region of the tendon graft were compared in each femur and tibia. Blood vessels from arteries reached the femoral and tibial tunnels 2 months postoperatively. The tunnel walls showed high signal intensity, while the intraosseous tendon grafts had lower intensity. SNRs showed significant differences between the femoral and tibial tunnels overall and the intraosseous tendon grafts. At 3 and 6 months postoperatively, the signal intensity of the tunnel walls was decreased significantly, while that of the intraosseous tendon grafts was also decreased, but not significantly. At these times, the SNRs of the femoral and tibial tunnels did not differ significantly, both overall and in the region of the intraosseous tendon grafts. Revascularization around the femoral and tibial tunnels occurred at 2 months postoperatively, with blood flow subsequently decreasing over time until 6 months. This revascularization may be involved in bone tendon healing and maturation of the tendon graft within the bone tunnels. Evaluations of revascularization by MRA may show the maturation stage of the graft and guide medical rehabilitation. IV.

  6. Application of tendon-derived stem cell sheet for the promotion of graft healing in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

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    Lui, Pauline Po Yee; Wong, On Tik; Lee, Yuk Wa

    2014-03-01

    Both osteointegration and remodeling of graft midsubstance (collectively called graft healing) are slow processes after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) form a cell sheet after treatment with connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and ascorbic acid, which exhibits higher tenogenic and maintains high chondro-osteogenic gene expression of TDSCs. No external scaffold is required for cell delivery. Wrapping the TDSC sheet around the ACL graft would promote early graft healing in a rat model. Controlled laboratory study. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) rat TDSCs were treated with connective tissue growth factor and ascorbic acid to promote cell sheet formation. Rats undergoing unilateral ACL reconstruction were divided into a control group and a TDSC group. The tendon graft was wrapped with the GFP-TDSC sheet before graft insertion in the TDSC group. At weeks 2, 6, and 12 after reconstruction, the samples were harvested for computed tomography imaging and histologic or biomechanical testing. The fate of the transplanted cell sheet was examined by immunohistochemical staining of GFP. There were significantly higher tunnel bone mineral density (BMD) (42.3% increase, P = .047) and bone volume/total volume (BV/TV) (625% increase, P = .009) at the metaphyseal region of the tibial tunnel at week 2 and at the femoral tunnel at week 6 (BMD: 30.8% increase, P = .014; BV/TV: 100% increase, P = .014) in the TDSC group compared with the control group. Only the TDSC group showed a time-dependent increase in tunnel BMD (overall P = .038) and BV/TV (overall P = .015) at the epiphyseal region of the tibial tunnel. Semiquantitative image analysis showed better graft osteointegration and higher intra-articular graft integrity with lower cellularity and vascularity, better cell alignment, and higher collagen birefringence in the TDSC group. The ultimate load at week 2 (52.5% increase, P = .027) and stiffness at week 6 (62% increase, P

  7. The fate of tendon grafts used to reconstruct the digital annular pulleys.

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    Deffino, H L; Barbieri, C H; Velludo, M A

    1991-02-01

    An experimental morphological study on the reconstruction of the digital annular pulleys has been carried out in dogs. The segment corresponding to zones 1 and 2 of the flexor apparatus of the 2nd and 5th digits of the left forepaw was chosen for the experiment. The whole flexor apparatus was resected and a single digital pulley (A 2) was reconstructed, using segments of the animals own deep flexor tendon. A length of silicone rubber tube was used as tendon spacer. The new pulleys showed marked degeneration of the collagen fibres and thinning which increased with time and may be the cause of decrease in strength. A layer of mesothelial cells with secretory properties developed at the interface between the tendon graft and the spacer.

  8. Investigating tendon mineralisation in the avian hindlimb: a model for tendon ageing, injury and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agabalyan, Natacha A; Evans, Darrell J R; Stanley, Rachael L

    2013-01-01

    Mineralisation of the tendon tissue has been described in various models of injury, ageing and disease. Often resulting in painful and debilitating conditions, the processes underlying this mechanism are poorly understood. To elucidate the progression from healthy tendon to mineralised tendon, an appropriate model is required. In this study, we describe the spontaneous and non-pathological ossification and calcification of tendons of the hindlimb of the domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus). The appearance of the ossified avian tendon has been described previously, although there have been no studies investigating the developmental processes and underlying mechanisms leading to the ossified avian tendon. The tissue and cells from three tendons – the ossifying extensor and flexor digitorum longus tendons and the non-ossifying Achilles tendon – were analysed for markers of ageing and mineralisation using histology, immunohistochemistry, cytochemistry and molecular analysis. Histologically, the adult tissue showed a loss of healthy tendon crimp morphology as well as markers of calcium deposits and mineralisation. The tissue showed a lowered expression of collagens inherent to the tendon extracellular matrix and presented proteins expressed by bone. The cells from the ossified tendons showed a chondrogenic and osteogenic phenotype as well as tenogenic phenotype and expressed the same markers of ossification and calcification as the tissue. A molecular analysis of the gene expression of the cells confirmed these results. Tendon ossification within the ossified avian tendon seems to be the result of an endochondral process driven by its cells, although the roles of the different cell populations have yet to be elucidated. Understanding the role of the tenocyte within this tissue and the process behind tendon ossification may help us prevent or treat ossification that occurs in injured, ageing or diseased tendon. PMID:23826786

  9. Tendon Reattachment to Bone in an Ovine Tendon Defect Model of Retraction Using Allogenic and Xenogenic Demineralised Bone Matrix Incorporated with Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

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    Tanujan Thangarajah

    Full Text Available Tendon-bone healing following rotator cuff repairs is mainly impaired by poor tissue quality. Demineralised bone matrix promotes healing of the tendon-bone interface but its role in the treatment of tendon tears with retraction has not been investigated. We hypothesized that cortical demineralised bone matrix used with minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells will result in improved function and restoration of the tendon-bone interface with no difference between xenogenic and allogenic scaffolds.In an ovine model, the patellar tendon was detached from the tibial tuberosity and a complete distal tendon transverse defect measuring 1 cm was created. Suture anchors were used to reattach the tendon and xenogenic demineralised bone matrix + minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells (n = 5, or allogenic demineralised bone matrix + minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells (n = 5 were used to bridge the defect. Graft incorporation into the tendon and its effect on regeneration of the enthesis was assessed using histomorphometry. Force plate analysis was used to assess functional recovery.Compared to the xenograft, the allograft was associated with significantly higher functional weight bearing at 6 (P = 0.047, 9 (P = 0.028, and 12 weeks (P = 0.009. In the allogenic group this was accompanied by greater remodeling of the demineralised bone matrix into tendon-like tissue in the region of the defect (p = 0.015, and a more direct type of enthesis characterized by significantly more fibrocartilage (p = 0.039. No failures of tendon-bone healing were noted in either group.Demineralised bone matrix used with minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells promotes healing of the tendon-bone interface in an ovine model of acute tendon retraction, with superior mechanical and histological results associated with use of an allograft.

  10. Capacity of muscle derived stem cells and pericytes to promote tendon graft integration and ligamentization following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ćuti, Tomislav; Antunović, Maja; Marijanović, Inga; Ivković, Alan; Vukasović, Andreja; Matić, Igor; Pećina, Marko; Hudetz, Damir

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the capacity of muscle tissue preserved on hamstring tendons forming candy-stripe grafts in order to improve tendon to bone ingrowth and ligamentization. We hypothesized that muscle tissue does possess a stem cell population that could enhance the healing process of the ACL graft when preserved on the tendons. Human samples from gracilis and semitendinosus muscles were collected during ACL surgery from ten patients and from these tissue samples human muscle-derived stem cells and tendon-derived stem cells were isolated and propagated. Both stem cell populations were in-vitro differentiated into osteogenic lineage. Alkaline phosphatase activity was determined at days zero and 14 of the osteogenic induction and von Kossa staining to assess mineralization of the cultures. Total RNA was collected from osteoblast cultures and real time quantitative PCR was performed. Western-blot for osteocalcin and collagen type I followed protein isolation. Immunofluorescence double labeling of pericytes in muscle and tendon tissue was performed. Mesenchymal stem cells from muscle and tendon tissue were isolated and expanded in cell culture. More time was needed to grow the tendon derived culture compared to muscle derived culture. Muscle derived stem cells exhibited more alkaline phosphatase actvity compared to tendon derived stem cells, whereas tendon derived stem cells formed more mineralized nodules after 14 days of osteoinduction. Muscle derived stem cells exhibited higher expression levels of bone sialoprotein, and tendon derived stem cells showed higher expression of dental-matrix-protein 1 and osteocalcin. Immunofluorescent staining against pericytes indicated that they are more abundant in muscle tissue. These results indicate that muscle tissue is a better source of stem cells than tendon tissue. Achievement of this study is proof that there is vast innate capacity of muscle tissue for enhancement of bone-tendon integration and

  11. Revascularisation pattern of ruptured flexor tendon grafts in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A histological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, D; Martínez, R; Calvo, R; Scheu, M; Gallegos, M; Vaisman, A; Martínez, C; González, A

    For successful anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, revascularisation and histological maturation are necessary, as their failure can cause graft rupture. The purpose of this study was to describe differences in the histological maturation of early failed plasty (less than 12 months after surgery) and late failed plasty (more than 12 months after surgery) in patients with re-rupture after ACL reconstruction with hamstring tendons. A descriptive observational study was conducted on a consecutive series of 20 patients whose ACL reconstruction had failed. Graft biopsy samples were obtained during the revision surgery from the proximal, medial, and distal graft remnants. The samples were evaluated by light microscopy, and the vascularity and maturation of the samples were established by histological scoring. The most common aetiology of reconstruction failure (86.6%) was a specific event with non-contact mechanism. The patients with re-rupture of their ACL plasty less than 12 months after surgery had substance vessels that were less deep. The distal segment of the graft in those patients showed a delay in histological maturation with fewer collagen fibres. In patients whose ACL grafts failed less than 12 months after surgery, a lower distribution of blood vessels and collagen fibres was found that were less ordered in the distal graft. These results indicate a delay in maturation, which leads to a higher risk of graft failure. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. A Simulation Model for Extensor Tendon Repair

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    Elizabeth Aronstam

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This simulation model is designed for use by emergency medicine residents. Although we have instituted this at the PGY-2 level of our residency curriculum, it is appropriate for any level of emergency medicine residency training. It might also be adapted for use for a variety of other learners, such as practicing emergency physicians, orthopedic surgery residents, or hand surgery trainees. Introduction: Tendon injuries commonly present to the emergency department, so it is essential that emergency physicians be competent in evaluating such injuries. Indeed, extensor tendon repair is included as an ACGME Emergency Medicine Milestone (Milestone 13, Wound Management, Level 5 – “Performs advanced wound repairs, such as tendon repairs…”.1 However, emergency medicine residents may have limited opportunity to develop these skills due to a lack of patients, competition from other trainees, or preexisting referral patterns. Simulation may provide an alternative means to effectively teach these skills in such settings. Previously described tendon repair simulation models that were designed for surgical trainees have used rubber worms4, licorice5, feeding tubes, catheters6,7, drinking straws8, microfoam tape9, sheep forelimbs10 and cadavers.11 These models all suffer a variety of limitations, including high cost, lack of ready availability, or lack of realism. Objectives: We sought to develop an extensor tendon repair simulation model for emergency medicine residents, designed to meet ACGME Emergency Medicine Milestone 13, Level 5. We wished this model to be simple, inexpensive, and realistic. Methods: The learner responsible content/educational handout component of our innovation teaches residents about emergency department extensor tendon repair, and includes: 1 relevant anatomy 2 indications and contraindications for emergency department extensor tendon repair 3 physical exam findings 4 tendon suture techniques and 5 aftercare. During

  13. Clinical Outcomes and Return to Sports in Patients with Chronic Achilles Tendon Rupture after Minimally Invasive Reconstruction with Semitendinosus Tendon Graft Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usuelli, Federico Giuseppe; D'Ambrosi, Riccardo; Manzi, Luigi; Indino, Cristian; Villafañe, Jorge Hugo; Berjano, Pedro

    2017-12-01

    Objective  The purpose of the study is to evaluate the clinical results and return to sports in patients undergoing reconstruction of the Achilles tendon after minimally invasive reconstruction with semitendinosus tendon graft transfer. Methods  Eight patients underwent surgical reconstruction with a minimally invasive technique and tendon graft augmentation with ipsilateral semitendinosus tendon for chronic Achilles tendon rupture (more than 30 days after the injury and a gap of >6 cm). Patients were evaluated at a minimum follow-up of 24 months after the surgery through the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS), the Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Scores (ATRS), the Endurance test, the calf circumference of the operated limb, and the contralateral and the eventual return to sports activity performed before the trauma. Results  The mean age at surgery was 50.5 years. Five men and three women underwent the surgery. The average AOFAS was 92, mean Endurance test was 28.1, and the average ATRS was 87. All patients returned to their daily activities, and six out of eight patients have returned to sports activities prior to the accident (two football players, three runners, one tennis player) at a mean of 7.0 (range: 6.7-7.2) months after the surgery. No patient reported complications or reruptures. Conclusion  Our study confirms encouraging results for the treatment of Achilles tendon rupture with a minimally invasive technique with semitendinosus graft augmentation. The technique can be considered safe and allows patients to return to their sports activity. Level of Evidence  Level IV, therapeutic case series.

  14. Traumatic tibialis anterior tendon rupture: treatment with a two-stage silicone tube and an interposition hamstring tendons graft protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontogeorgakos, Vasileios; Koutalos, Antonios; Hantes, Michael; Manoudis, Gregory; Badras, Leonidas; Malizos, Konstantinos

    2015-03-01

    A novel technique for managing ruptured tibialis anterior tendon complicated by infection and tendon substance loss in a young adult is described. A two-stage reconstruction technique with a silicon tube and tendon autograft was performed. At first, after local control of the infection, scar excision and placement of a silicone tube was performed. Ten weeks later, ipsilateral hamstrings tendons were harvested and bridged the 7 cm tendon gap. Eighteen months later, the patient has excellent clinical and functional outcome.

  15. Mechanical Analysis of Extra-Articular Knee Ligaments. Part two: Tendon grafts used for knee ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Kristof; Bellemans, Johan; Scheys, Lennart; Eijnde, Bert O; Slane, Joshua; Claes, Steven

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to provide information about the mechanical properties of grafts used for knee ligament reconstructions and to compare those results with the mechanical properties of native knee ligaments. Eleven cadaveric knees were dissected for the semitendinosus, gracilis, iliotibial band (ITB), quadriceps and patellar tendon. Uniaxial testing to failure was performed using a standardized method and mechanical properties (elastic modulus, ultimate stress, ultimate strain, strain energy density) were determined. The elastic modulus of the gracilis tendon (1458±476MPa) (Pligament reconstructions often differ significantly from the original knee ligament which the graft is supposed to emulate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Transportal anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with quadrupled hamstring tendon graft: A prospective outcome study

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    Chandan Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction has been one of the most commonly performed procedures throughout the world. Unsatisfactory outcome with conventional ACL reconstruction has been attributed to nonanatomic graft placement. Researchers have advised placing the graft in the native footprint of ACL to avoid nonanatomic graft placement. The goal of this study was to analyze the outcome of anatomic single bundle ACL reconstruction using transportal technique. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective outcome study conducted on 85 consecutive patients of ACL reconstruction of which 62 patients met inclusion and exclusion criteria and were analyzed for final results. All the patients underwent ACL reconstruction by quadrupled hamstring tendon graft using transportal technique and the accessory anteromedial (AAM portal for femoral tunnel creation. The graft was fixed with endobutton on femoral side and bioabsorbable screw on the tibial side. Patients were evaluated for range of motion, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC score, and Lysholm scores at a minimum followup period of 2 years. The mean pre- and postoperative scores were compared using Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: The mean Lysholm and IKDC scores improved significantly (P < 0.0001 from preoperative value. According to IKDC score, 90.3% (n = 56 were either normal or near normal at final followup. According to Lysholm score, 75.8% of patients had excellent and 13.3% had good results. Preoperatively, pivot shift was present in 85.5% (n = 53 of patients which reduced to 4.8% (n = 3 postoperatively. Infection and knee stiffness occurred in two patients, and femoral tunnel blowout and graft re-rupture occurred in one patient each. Conclusion: Anatomic ACL reconstruction by AAM portal is a reproducible technique which gives good clinical outcome at short-term followup.

  17. Tendon graft fixation sites at the coracoid process for reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments: a kinematic evaluation of three different surgical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadpanah, Kaywan; Jaeger, Martin; Maier, Dirk; Ogon, Peter; Honal, Matthias; Vicari, Marco; Hennig, Jürgen; Südkamp, Norbert P; Weigel, Matthias

    2013-02-01

    The virtual graft length kinematics of 3 operative techniques were investigated and compared with kinematics of the native coracoclavicular ligaments. Thirteen healthy volunteers underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the shoulder in 30° increments of abduction (0° to 120°). A 3-dimensional model of the coracoid process (CP) and the clavicle (CL) was created. Footprints of the conoid and the trapezoid ligament were identified. At the CP the potential fixation sites of 3 techniques for reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments (CCLs) were marked. The techniques investigated were (1) horizontal transcoracoid drilling (TH), (2) transclavicular-transcoracoid drilling (TT), and (3) tendon graft passage underneath (PU) the coracoid process. Distances between the clavicular and coracoidal footprints of the coracoclavicular ligaments and to the virtual footprints on the coracoid process were determined for each abduction increment. All methods investigated resulted in a significantly longer virtual trapezoidal graft (P = .001). In PU, in addition, the virtual conoidal graft was significantly longer. TT resulted in a virtual conoidal graft and conoid ligament of equal length. TH showed identical length and distance regulation of the virtual conoidal graft and the conoid ligament, but significant shortening of the virtual trapezoidal graft during abduction. PU showed isometry of the virtual trapezoidal and conoidal grafts. None of the described procedures for graft fixation restores the kinematics of the native coracoclavicular ligaments. Graft fixation techniques should be chosen with respect to the preoperative type of instability. Persisting isolated vertical instability might benefit from fixation of the conoidal grafts at the native clavicular footprint. For horizontal clavicular instabilities, techniques more preserving of trapezoid ligament kinematics might be favorable. The data suggest that the technique of fixation in conoid and trapezoid

  18. Tendon Tissue Engineering and Its Role on Healing of the Experimentally Induced Large Tendon Defect Model in Rabbits: A Comprehensive In Vivo Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meimandi-Parizi, Abdolhamid; Oryan, Ahmad; Moshiri, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Healing of large tendon defects is challenging. We studied the role of collagen implant with or without polydioxanone (PDS) sheath on the healing of a large Achilles tendon defect model, in rabbits. Sixty rabbits were divided into three groups. A 2 cm gap was created in the left Achilles tendon of all rabbits. In the control lesions, no implant was used. The other two groups were reconstructed by collagen and collagen-PDS implants respectively. The animals were clinically examined at weekly intervals and their lesions were observed by ultrasonography. Blood samples were obtained from the animals and were assessed for hematological analysis and determination of serum PDGF level, at 60 days post injury (DPI). The animals were then euthanized and their lesions were assessed for gross and histopathology, scanning electron microscopy, biomechanical testing, dry matter and hydroxyproline content. Another 65 pilot animals were also studied grossly and histopathologically to define the host implant interaction and graft incorporation at serial time points. The treated animals gained significantly better clinical scoring compared to the controls. Treatment with collagen and collagen-PDS implants significantly increased the biomechanical properties of the lesions compared to the control tendons at 60DPI (Plesions (Ptendon. Implantation of the bioimplants had a significant role in initiating tendon healing and the implants were biocompatible, biodegradable and safe for application in tendon reconstructive surgery. The results of the present study may be valuable in clinical practice. PMID:24039851

  19. [LUCL reconstruction using a triceps tendon graft to treat posterolateral rotatory instability of the elbow].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehlinger, F I; Ries, C; Hollinger, B

    2014-08-01

    Re-establishment of radial stability within the elbow joint in cases of arthroscopically or clinically confirmed posterolateral rotatory instability. Posttraumatic or chronic degenerative posterolateral rotatory instability at least grade I-II according to O'Driscoll. Elbow stiffness or elbow arthritis and lateral epicondylitis, if a posterolateral rotatory instability has been excluded as the reason for the symptoms. Reconstruction or augmentation of the insufficient lateral ulnar collateral ligament (LUCL) with an autologous triceps tendon graft. A stripe of the triceps tendon is fixed at the epicondylus humeri radialis and at the base of the annular ligament at the proximal radial ulna with tenodesis screws or buttons, then the extensor origins, which were detached before are fixated as well. Postoperative treatment with an elbow orthesis for 6 weeks, in the first 4 weeks limitation of complete extension and flexion, full weight bearing after 3 months. Retrospective analysis of 47 LUCL reconstructions from 2008-2010 with good results concerning pain reduction and acceptance, improvement of the Mayo Elbow Performance Score from 49 to 82, low complication rate with one elbow stiffness, one temporary ulnar nerve lesion, and one recurrent instability.

  20. Comparing Dimensions of Four-Strand Hamstring Tendon Grafts with Native Anterior and Posterior Cruciate Ligaments

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    Barış Yılmaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of the study was to evaluate whether or not there was any incompatibility between four-strand hamstring tendons taken from the same knee and the dimensions of the ACL and PCL. Methods. 15 fresh frozen cadaver hamstrings were prepared as four-strand grafts and measurements made of the ACL and PCL circumferences in the midsection were made in the narrowest part of the midsection. The cross-section areas and diameters were calculated with geometric calculations used to measure the cross-sectional area of cylinders. Accepting that the geometric insertions were elliptical, the length, width, and area were calculated for entry areas. Results. A significant relationship at 96.2% was determined between the ACL mid and the hamstring diameter. A significant relationship at 96.7% was determined between the ACL and the hamstring mid area. A significant relationship at 96.4% was determined between the PCL mid and the hamstring diameter. A significant relationship at 95.7% was determined between the PCL and the hamstring mid area. Conclusion. For the reconstruction of ACL and PCL, it was determined that there is less incompatibility between the four-strand hamstring tendons taken from the same knee and the dimensions of the midsection PCL compared to the ACL dimensions.

  1. Single-Stage Bipedicle Local Tissue Transfer and Skin Graft for Achilles Tendon Surgery Wound Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Travis J; Avashia, Yash; Mithani, Suhail K; Matson, Andrew P; Lampley, Alexander J; Adams, Samuel B

    2017-02-01

    Achilles tendon and posterior heel wound complications are difficult to treat. These typically require soft tissue coverage via microvascular free tissue transfer at a tertiary referral center. Here, we describe coverage of a series of posterior heel and Achilles wounds via simple, local tissue transfer, called a bipedicle fasciocutaneous flap. This flap can be performed by an orthopaedic foot and ankle surgeon, without resources of tertiary/specialized care or microvascular support. Three patients with separate pathologies were treated with a single-stage bipedicle fasciocutaneous local tissue transfer. Case 1 was a patient with insertional wound breakdown after Achilles debridement and repair to the calcaneus. Case 2 was a heel venous stasis ulcer with calcaneal exposure in a diabetic patient with vasculopathy. Case 3 was a patient with wound breakdown following midsubstance Achilles tendon repair. All three cases were treated with a single-stage bipedicle local tissue transfer for posterior ankle and heel wound complications. All 3 patients demonstrated complete healing of the posterior defect, lateral ankle skin graft recipient site, and the skin graft donor site after surgery. Case 3 had a subsequent recurrent ulceration after initial healing. This was superficial and healed with local wound care. All patients regained full preoperative range of motion and were able to ambulate independently without modified footwear. The bipedicled fasciocutaneous flap described here offers a predictable single stage procedure that can be accomplished by an orthopaedic foot and ankle surgeon without resources of a tertiary care center for posterior foot and ankle defects. This flap can be performed with short operative times and can be customized to facilitate defect coverage. The flap is durable to withstand local tissue stresses required for early ambulation. Despite its reliability, patients require careful follow-up to manage underlying comorbid conditions that may

  2. A novel postoperative immobilization model for murine Achilles tendon sutures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, Yoichiro; Takayama, Yuzo; Kushige, Hiroko; Jacinto, Sandra; Sekido, Mitsuru; Kida, Yasuyuki S

    2016-08-01

    The body's motion and function are all in part effected by a vital tissue, the tendon. Tendon injury often results in limited functioning after postoperative procedures and even for a long time after rehabilitation. Although numerous studies have reported surgical procedures using animal models which have contributed to both basic and clinical research, modeling of tendon sutures or postoperative immobilizations has not been performed on small experimental animals, such as mice. In this study we have developed an easy Achilles tendon suture and postoperative ankle fixation model in a mouse. Right Achilles tendons were incised and 10-0 nylons were passed through the proximal and distal ends using a modified Kessler method. Subsequently, the right ankle was immobilized in a plantarflexed position with novel splints, which were made from readily available extension tubes. Restriction of the tendon using handmade splints reduced swelling, as opposed to fixating with the usual plaster of Paris. Using this method, the usage of the right Achilles tendons began on postoperative days 13.5 ± 4.6, which indicated healing within two weeks. Therefore our simple short-term murine Achilles tendon suture procedure is useful for studying immediate tendon repair mechanisms in various models, including genetically-modified mice. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. The concept of double bundle ACL simulation with a single bundle patellar tendon graft. A cadaveric feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, Matthias; Magnussen, Robert A; Villa, Vincent; Demey, Guillaume; Neyret, Philippe

    2012-06-07

    There is significant interest in the restoration of the double-bundle anatomy of the native ACL when performing ACL reconstruction. Possible techniques include those utilizing two separate grafts with independent tunnels and those that attempt to mimic this anatomy with a single graft and fewer tunnels. Many of the latter techniques require specific instrumentation and are technically challenging. We demonstrate that the double-bundle anatomy of the native ACL can theoretically be mimicked by a single-bundle reconstruction. We performed single bundle ACL reconstruction with a bone-patellar tendon-bone (BTB) graft in two cadaveric knees. Both grafts were placed to mimic the native ACL footprints - one reconstruction was performed with rectangular bone blocks and oval tunnels and one was performed utilizing a standard BTB graft and round tunnels. Qualitative assessment of graft behavior was made as the knees were taken through a range of motion. The ACL graft was able to qualitatively mimic the behavior of the native ACL in both knees provided the bone blocks were correctly orientated. ACL reconstruction with a single BTB graft can qualitatively mimic the behavior of the two bundles of the native ACL. The key to ensuring this behavior was noted to be appropriate orientation of the graft in the tunnels. Quantitative biomechanical investigations are necessary to evaluate the impact of graft orientation on function.

  4. The concept of double bundle ACL simulation with a single bundle patellar tendon graft. A cadaveric feasibility study

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    Jacobi Matthias

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is significant interest in the restoration of the double-bundle anatomy of the native ACL when performing ACL reconstruction. Possible techniques include those utilizing two separate grafts with independent tunnels and those that attempt to mimic this anatomy with a single graft and fewer tunnels. Many of the latter techniques require specific instrumentation and are technically challenging. We demonstrate that the double-bundle anatomy of the native ACL can theoretically be mimicked by a single-bundle reconstruction. Methods We performed single bundle ACL reconstruction with a bone-patellar tendon-bone (BTB graft in two cadaveric knees. Both grafts were placed to mimic the native ACL footprints – one reconstruction was performed with rectangular bone blocks and oval tunnels and one was performed utilizing a standard BTB graft and round tunnels. Qualitative assessment of graft behavior was made as the knees were taken through a range of motion. Results The ACL graft was able to qualitatively mimic the behavior of the native ACL in both knees provided the bone blocks were correctly orientated. Conclusions ACL reconstruction with a single BTB graft can qualitatively mimic the behavior of the two bundles of the native ACL. The key to ensuring this behavior was noted to be appropriate orientation of the graft in the tunnels. Quantitative biomechanical investigations are necessary to evaluate the impact of graft orientation on function.

  5. Engineering Tendon: Scaffolds, Bioreactors, and Models of Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngstrom, Daniel W; Barrett, Jennifer G

    2016-01-01

    Tendons bridge muscle and bone, translating forces to the skeleton and increasing the safety and efficiency of locomotion. When tendons fail or degenerate, there are no effective pharmacological interventions. The lack of available options to treat damaged tendons has created a need to better understand and improve the repair process, particularly when suitable autologous donor tissue is unavailable for transplantation. Cells within tendon dynamically react to loading conditions and undergo phenotypic changes in response to mechanobiological stimuli. Tenocytes respond to ultrastructural topography and mechanical deformation via a complex set of behaviors involving force-sensitive membrane receptor activity, changes in cytoskeletal contractility, and transcriptional regulation. Effective ex vivo model systems are needed to emulate the native environment of a tissue and to translate cell-matrix forces with high fidelity. While early bioreactor designs have greatly expanded our knowledge of mechanotransduction, traditional scaffolds do not fully model the topography, composition, and mechanical properties of native tendon. Decellularized tendon is an ideal scaffold for cultivating replacement tissue and modeling tendon regeneration. Decellularized tendon scaffolds (DTS) possess high clinical relevance, faithfully translate forces to the cellular scale, and have bulk material properties that match natural tissue. This review summarizes progress in tendon tissue engineering, with a focus on DTS and bioreactor systems.

  6. Engineering Tendon: Scaffolds, Bioreactors, and Models of Regeneration

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    Daniel W. Youngstrom

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tendons bridge muscle and bone, translating forces to the skeleton and increasing the safety and efficiency of locomotion. When tendons fail or degenerate, there are no effective pharmacological interventions. The lack of available options to treat damaged tendons has created a need to better understand and improve the repair process, particularly when suitable autologous donor tissue is unavailable for transplantation. Cells within tendon dynamically react to loading conditions and undergo phenotypic changes in response to mechanobiological stimuli. Tenocytes respond to ultrastructural topography and mechanical deformation via a complex set of behaviors involving force-sensitive membrane receptor activity, changes in cytoskeletal contractility, and transcriptional regulation. Effective ex vivo model systems are needed to emulate the native environment of a tissue and to translate cell-matrix forces with high fidelity. While early bioreactor designs have greatly expanded our knowledge of mechanotransduction, traditional scaffolds do not fully model the topography, composition, and mechanical properties of native tendon. Decellularized tendon is an ideal scaffold for cultivating replacement tissue and modeling tendon regeneration. Decellularized tendon scaffolds (DTS possess high clinical relevance, faithfully translate forces to the cellular scale, and have bulk material properties that match natural tissue. This review summarizes progress in tendon tissue engineering, with a focus on DTS and bioreactor systems.

  7. Tendon Mineralization Is Progressive and Associated with Deterioration of Tendon Biomechanical Properties, and Requires BMP-Smad Signaling in the Mouse Achilles Tendon Injury Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kairui; Asai, Shuji; Hast, Michael W.; Liu, Min; Usami, Yu; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Soslowsky, Louis J.; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2016-01-01

    Ectopic tendon mineralization can develop following tendon rupture or trauma surgery. The pathogenesis of ectopic tendon mineralization and its clinical impact have not been fully elucidated yet. In this study, we utilized a mouse Achilles tendon injury model to determine whether ectopic tendon mineralization alters the biomechanical properties of the tendon and whether BMP signaling is involved in this condition. A complete transverse incision was made at the midpoint of the right Achilles tendon in 8-week-old CD1 mice and the gap was left open. Ectopic cartilaginous mass formation was found in the injured tendon by 4 weeks post-surgery and ectopic mineralization was detected at 8–10 weeks post-surgery. Ectopic mineralization grew over time and volume of the mineralized materials of 25-weeks samples was about 2.5 fold bigger than that of 10-weeks samples, indicating that injury-induced ectopic tendon mineralization is progressive. In vitro mechanical testing showed that max force, max stress and mid-substance modulus in the 25-weeks samples were significantly lower than the 10-weeks samples. We observed substantial increases in expression of bone morphogenetic protein family genes in injured tendons 1 week post-surgery. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that phosphorylation of both Smad1 and Smad3 were highly increased in injured tendons as early as 1 week post-injury and remained high in ectopic chondrogenic lesions 4 weeks post-injury. Treatment with the BMP receptor kinase inhibitor (LDN193189) significantly inhibited injury-induced tendon mineralization. These findings indicate that injury-induced ectopic tendon mineralization is progressive, involves BMP signaling and associated with deterioration of tendon biomechanical properties. PMID:26825318

  8. Turkey model for flexor tendon research: in vitro comparison of human, canine, turkey, and chicken tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadar, Assaf; Thoreson, Andrew R; Reisdorf, Ramona L; Amadio, Peter C; Moran, Steven L; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2017-08-01

    Flexor tendon injuries are one of the most common hand injuries and remain clinically challenging for functional restoration. Canine and chicken have been the most commonly used animal models for flexor tendon-related research but possess several disadvantages. The purpose of this study was to explore a potential turkey model for flexor tendon research. The third digit from human cadaveric hands, canine forepaws, turkey foot, and chicken foot were used for this study. Six digits in each of four species were studied in detail, comparing anatomy of the flexor apparatus, joint range of motioņ tendon excursion, tendon cross-sectional area, work of flexion, gliding resistance at the level of the A2 pulley, modulus of elasticity, suture retention strength, and histology across species. Anatomically, the third digit in the four species displayed structural similarities; however, the tendon cross-sectional area of the turkey and human were similar and larger than canine and chicken. Furthermore, the turkey digit resembles the human's finger with the lack of webbing between digits, similar vascularization, tendon excursion, work of flexion, gliding resistance, mechanical properties, and suture holding strength. More importantly, human and turkey tendons were most similar in histological appearance. Turkey flexor tendons have many properties that are comparable to human flexor tendons which would provide a clinically relevant, economical, nonhuman companion large animal model for flexor tendon research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Tendon tissue engineering and its role on healing of the experimentally induced large tendon defect model in rabbits: a comprehensive in vivo study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolhamid Meimandi-Parizi

    Full Text Available Healing of large tendon defects is challenging. We studied the role of collagen implant with or without polydioxanone (PDS sheath on the healing of a large Achilles tendon defect model, in rabbits. Sixty rabbits were divided into three groups. A 2 cm gap was created in the left Achilles tendon of all rabbits. In the control lesions, no implant was used. The other two groups were reconstructed by collagen and collagen-PDS implants respectively. The animals were clinically examined at weekly intervals and their lesions were observed by ultrasonography. Blood samples were obtained from the animals and were assessed for hematological analysis and determination of serum PDGF level, at 60 days post injury (DPI. The animals were then euthanized and their lesions were assessed for gross and histopathology, scanning electron microscopy, biomechanical testing, dry matter and hydroxyproline content. Another 65 pilot animals were also studied grossly and histopathologically to define the host implant interaction and graft incorporation at serial time points. The treated animals gained significantly better clinical scoring compared to the controls. Treatment with collagen and collagen-PDS implants significantly increased the biomechanical properties of the lesions compared to the control tendons at 60DPI (P<0.05. The tissue engineered implants also reduced peritendinous adhesion, muscle fibrosis and atrophy, and increased ultrasonographical echogenicity and homogenicity, maturation and differentiation of the collagen fibrils and fibers, tissue alignment and volume of the regenerated tissue compared to those of the control lesions (P<0.05. The implants were gradually absorbed and substituted by the new tendon. Implantation of the bioimplants had a significant role in initiating tendon healing and the implants were biocompatible, biodegradable and safe for application in tendon reconstructive surgery. The results of the present study may be valuable in

  10. COMPARISON BETWEEN THE RESULTS ACHIEVED IN ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION WITH TWO KINDS OF AUTOLOGOUS GRAFTS: PATELLAR TENDON VERSUS SEMITENDINOUS AND GRACILIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Monteiro, Diego Antico; Dias, Leonardo; Correia, Dárcio Maurício; Cohen, Moisés; Forgas, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    this study aims to compare the arthrometric and isokinetic examination results from two types of autologous grafts: the central third of the patellar ligament and a graft formed by the tendons of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles, within the same rehabilitation protocol, six months after the surgery. the results from examinations carried out on 63 patients were analyzed. These patients were divided in two groups: one group of 30 patients who received a patellar tendon graft and another group of 33 patients who received a graft from the tendons of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles. Both the grafts were attached in the same way, with Endobutton™ for suspensory fixation to the femur and a bioabsorbable interference screw for fixation in the tibial tunnel. arthrometry 30 did not present any statistical difference between the two study groups. On the other hand, the isokinetic evaluation showed that the patellar tendon group had a larger mean peak torque of flexion and greater extension deficit, while the semitendinosus/gracilis group had a better mean flexion/extension ratio and greater percentage of flexion deficit. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups when measuring peak torque extension. therefore, when the patellar tendon was used, there was greater extensor deficit and, when the semitendinosus/gracilis tendons were used, there was greater flexor deficit.

  11. The Effect of Sodium Hyaluronate on Ligamentation and Biomechanical Property of Tendon in Repair of Achilles Tendon Defect with Polyethylene Terephthalate Artificial Ligament: A Rabbit Tendon Repair Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengkun; Ma, Kui; Li, Hong; Jiang, Jia; Chen, Shiyi

    2016-01-01

    The Achilles tendon is the most common ruptured tendon of human body. Reconstruction with polyethylene terephthalate (PET) artificial ligament is recommended in some serious cases. Sodium hyaluronate (HA) is beneficial for the healing of tendon injuries. We aimed to determine the effect of sodium hyaluronate in repair of Achilles tendon defect with PET artificial ligament in an animal tendon repair model. Sixteen New Zealand White rabbits were divided into two groups. Eight rabbits repaired with PET were assigned to PET group; the other eight rabbits repaired with PET along with injection of HE were assigned to HA-PET group. All rabbits were sacrificed at 4 and 8 weeks postoperatively for biomechanical and histological examination. The HA-PET group revealed higher biomechanical property compared with the PET group. Histologically, more collagen tissues grew into the HA-PET group compared with PET group. In conclusion, application of sodium hyaluronate can improve the healing of Achilles tendon reconstruction with polyethylene terephthalate artificial ligament.

  12. Comparative Study of Spiral Oblique Retinacular Ligament Reconstruction Techniques Using Either a Lateral Band or a Tendon Graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Yun Oh

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIn the management of mallet deformities, oblique retinacular ligament (ORL reconstruction provides a mechanism for automatic distal interphalangeal (DIP joint extension upon active proximal interphalangeal joint extension. The two variants of ORL reconstruction utilize either the lateral band or a free tendon graft. This study aims to compare these two surgical techniques and to assess any differences in functional outcome. As a secondary measure, the Mitek bone anchor and pull-in suture methods are compared.MethodsA single-institutional retrospective review of ORL reconstruction was performed. The standard patient demographics, injury mechanism, type of ORL reconstruction, and pre/postoperative degree of extension lag were collected for the 27 cases identified. The cases were divided into lateral band (group A, n=15 and free tendon graft groups (group B, n=12. Group B was subdivided into the pull-in suture technique (B-I and the Mitek bone anchor method (B-II.ResultsOverall, ORL reconstructions had improved the mean DIP extension lag by 10° (P=0.027. Neither the reconstructive technique choice nor bone fixation method identified any statistically meaningful difference in functional outcome (P=0.51 and P=0.83, respectively. Soft-tissue injury was associated with 30.8° of improvement in the extension lag. The most common complications were tendon adhesion and rupture.ConclusionsThe choice of the ORL reconstructive technique or the bone anchor method did not influence the primary functional outcome of extension lag in this study. Both lateral band and free tendon graft ORL reconstructions are valid treatment methods in the management of chronic mallet deformity.

  13. Structural mechanical properties of radiation-sterilized human Bone-Tendon-Bone grafts preserved by different methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gut, Grzegorz; Marowska, Joanna; Jastrzebska, Anna; Olender, Ewa; Kamiński, Artur

    2016-06-01

    To avoid the risk of infectious disease transmission from donor to recipient, allografts should be terminally sterilized. In the previous paper (Kaminski et al. in Cell Tissue Bank 10:215-219, 2009) we presented the effect of various methods of preservation (deep fresh freezing, glycerolization, lyophilization), followed by irradiation with different doses of electron beam (EB), on material (intrinsic) mechanical properties of human patellar tendons cut out as for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, obtained in failure tensile test. As structural mechanical properties are equally important to predict the behaviour of the graft as a whole functional unit, the purpose of the present paper was to show the results for failure load and elongation, obtained in the same experiment. Paired Bone-Tendon-Bone grafts (BTB) were prepared from cadaveric human patella tendons with both patellar and tibial attachments. They were preserved by deep freezing, glycerolization or lyophilization and subsequently EB-irradiated with the doses of 25, 35, 50 or 100 kGy (fresh-frozen grafts) or a single dose of 35 kGy (glycerolized and lyophilized grafts). Each experimental (irradiated) group was provided with control (non-irradiated), donor-matched group. The specimens from all groups were subjected to mechanical failure tensile test with the use of Instron system in order to measure their structural properties (failure load and elongation). All lyophilized grafts were rehydrated before mechanical testing. In our study we did not observe significant deterioration of structural mechanical properties of BTB grafts processed by fresh-freezing and then terminal sterilized with growing doses of EB up to 100 kGy. In contrast, BTB grafts processed by glycerolization or lyophilization and irradiated with 35 kGy showed significant decrease of failure load. Obtained results suggest that deep-frozen irradiated grafts retain their initial mechanical properties to an extent which does not

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of patellar tendon graft remodelling after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with or without platelet-rich plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seijas, Roberto; Ares, Oscar; Catala, Jordi; Alvarez-Diaz, Pedro; Cusco, Xavier; Cugat, Ramon

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the stages of patellar tendon graft remodelling using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with or without platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection. 98 patients aged 18 to 65 years with complete rupture of the ACL were randomised to undergo reconstruction with the autologous patellar tendon grafts with or without PRP injection. For the PRP group, 8 ml of PRP was obtained in the surgery room and was percutaneously injected into the suprapatellar joint after portal suture. MRI was obtained at months 4, 6, and 12. Remodelling stages of the grafts were classified as hypointense, mildly hyperintense, moderately hyperintense, severely hyperintense, and diffusely hyperintense by a radiologist blinded to treatment allocation. More patients in the PRP group than controls attained higher stages of remodelling at month 4 (p=0.003), month 6 (p=0.0001), and month 12 (p=0.354). PRP enabled faster remodelling of patellar tendon grafts.

  15. A mathematical model characterising Achilles tendon dynamics in flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzistefani, N; Chappell, M J; Hutchinson, C; Kletzenbauer, S; Evans, N D

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to acquire mechanistic knowledge of the gastrocnemius muscle-Achilles tendon complex behaviour during specific movements in humans through mathematical modelling. Analysis of this muscle-tendon complex was performed to see if already existing muscle-tendon models of other parts of the body could be applied to the leg muscles, especially the gastrocnemius muscle-Achilles tendon complex, and whether they could adequately characterise its behaviour. Five healthy volunteers were asked to take part in experiments where dorsiflexion and plantar flexion of the foot were studied. A model of the Achilles tendon-gastrocnemius muscle was developed, incorporating assumptions regarding the mechanical properties of the muscle fibres and the tendinous tissue in series. Ultrasound images of the volunteers, direct measurements and additional mathematical calculations were used to parameterise the model. Ground reaction forces, forces on specific joints and moments and angles for the ankle were obtained from a Vicon 3D motion capture system. Model validation was performed from the experimental data captured for each volunteer and from reconstruction of the movements of specific trajectories of the joints, muscles and tendons involved in those movements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Reconstruction of a chronic Achilles tendon lesion with autologous peroneus brevis graft].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada-Malacón, Ciro Arturo; García-Estrada, Gustavo Adolfo

    2009-01-01

    The calcaneal tendon lesion is very important due to the role of this tendon on gait performance, therefore a treatment strategy allowing the patient to resume activities of daily living as soon as possible is of the utmost importance. Treatment with a surgical approach involving the lateral peroneus brevis tendon facilitates bipodal support and immediate rehabilitation allowing the patient to resume activities of daily living as soon as possible.

  17. Converting round tendons to flat tendon constructs: Does the preparation process have an influence on the structural properties?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domnick, C; Herbort, M; Raschke, M J; Schliemann, B; Siebold, R; Śmigielski, R; Fink, C

    2017-05-01

    The structural properties of hamstring tendon grafts were evaluated in a porcine model, after processing it to a flat shape, to better replace or augment anatomic flat structures (e.g. ACL, MPFL or MCL). In this biomechanical study, porcine flexor tendons were used which have a comparable shape to semitendinosus and gracilis tendons. One part of the tendon was prepared to a flat tendon construct by splitting the tendon longitudinally with a knife to half of the diameter of the tendon. The semi-split tendon was scratched out to a flat shape. The other matched part was tested in its original round shape. The tendons (n = 40) have been fixed in a uniaxial testing machine (Zwick/Roell) by cryo-clamps after preparing the fixed ends by 2-0 polyester sutures (2-0 Ethibond(®) EXCEL, Ethicon, Somerville, NJ). In every specimen, there was a free 60-mm tendon part between both clamps. The tendons have been loaded to failure to evaluate typical biomechanical parameters such as stiffness, yield load and maximum load. No statistically significant differences (n.s.) regarding stiffness, yield load and maximum load between natively round and processed flat tendons could be detected. A prepared flat-shaped tendon does not show any different structural properties compared with an original round tendon. Therefore, a flat tendon seems to be a biomechanical stable graft option for anatomic reconstruction or augmentation of injured natively flat-shaped structures such as MCL, MPFL or ACL.

  18. The Effect of Phospholipids (Surfactant on Adhesion and Biomechanical Properties of Tendon: A Rat Achilles Tendon Repair Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kursat Dabak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adhesion of the tendon is a major challenge for the orthopedic surgeon during tendon repair. Manipulation of biological environment is one of the concepts to prevent adhesion. Lots of biochemicals have been studied for this purpose. We aimed to determine the effect of phospholipids on adhesion and biomechanical properties of tendon in an animal tendon repair model. Seventy-two Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups. Achilles tendons of rats were cut and repaired. Phospholipids were applied at two different dosages. Tendon adhesion was determined histopathologically and biomechanical test was performed. At macroscopic evaluation of adhesion, there are statistically significant differences between multiple-dose phospholipid injection group and Control group and also hyaluronic acid group and Control group (p0.008. Ultimate strength was highest at hyaluronic acid injection group and lowest at multiple-dose phospholipid injection group. Single-dose phospholipids (surfactant application may have a beneficial effect on the tendon adhesion. Although multiple applications of phospholipids seem the most effective regime to reduce the tendon adhesion among groups, it deteriorated the biomechanical properties of tendon.

  19. Science to Practice: Quantitative US Elastography Can Be Used to Quantify Mechanical and Histologic Tendon Healing in a Rabbit Model of Achilles Tendon Transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kenneth S; Martin, Jack; Thelen, Darryl

    2017-05-01

    Compression-based ultrasonographic (US) elastography is associated with time-dependent mechanical and histologic changes of the healing tendon in a transected rabbit model of the Achilles tendon. This finding will lead to continued development of quantitative US, which can be used to objectively assess a diseased or healing tendon. With advances in the method used, clinical translation of tendon elastography may enable clinicians to diagnose tendon damage and track healing, which should improve both treatment and outcome.

  20. Presence of lymphatics in a rat tendon lesion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempfer, Herbert; Kaser-Eichberger, Alexandra; Korntner, Stefanie; Lehner, Christine; Kunkel, Nadja; Traweger, Andreas; Trost, Andrea; Strohmaier, Clemens; Bogner, Barbara; Runge, Christian; Bruckner, Daniela; Krefft, Karolina; Heindl, Ludwig M; Reitsamer, Herbert A; Schrödl, Falk

    2015-04-01

    Tendons lack sufficient blood supply and represent a bradytroph tissue with prolonged healing time under pathological conditions. While the role of lymphatics in wound/defect healing in tissues with regular blood supply is well investigated, its involvement in tendon defects is not clear. We here try to identify the role of the lymphatic system in a tendon lesion model with morphological methods. A rat Achilles tendon lesion model (n = 5) was created via surgical intervention. Two weeks after surgery, animals were killed and lesioned site removed and prepared for polarization microscopy (picrosirius red) and immunohistochemistry using the lymphatic markers PROX1, VEGFR3, CCL21, LYVE-1, PDPN, and the vascular marker CD31. Additionally, DAPI was applied. Untreated tendons served as controls, confocal laser-scanning microscopy was used for documentation. At the lesion site, polarization microscopy revealed a structural reintegration while immunohistochemistry detected band-like profiles immunoreactive for PDPN, VEGFR3, CCL21, LYVE1, and CD31, surrounding DAPI-positive nuclei. PROX1-positive nuclei were detected within the lesion forming lines and opposed to each other. These PROX1-positive nuclei were surrounded by LYVE-1- or VEGFR3-positive surfaces. Few CD31-positive profiles contained PROX1-positive nuclei, while the majority of CD31-positive profiles lacked PROX1-positive nuclei. VEGFR3-, PDPN-, and LYVE-1-positive profiles were numerous within the lesion site, but absent in control tissue. Within 2 weeks, a structural rearrangement takes place in this lesion model, with dense lymphatic supply. The role of lymphatics in tendon wound healing is unclear, and proposed model represents a good possibility to study healing dynamics and lymphangiogenesis in a tissue almost completely lacking lymphatics in physiological conditions.

  1. Patellar tendon strain is increased at the site of the jumper's knee lesion during knee flexion and tendon loading: results and cadaveric testing of a computational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavagnino, Michael; Arnoczky, Steven P; Elvin, Niell; Dodds, Julie

    2008-11-01

    Patellar tendinopathy (jumper's knee) is characterized by localized tenderness of the patellar tendon at its origin on the inferior pole of the patella and a characteristic increase in signal intensity on magnetic resonance imaging at this location. However, it is unclear why the lesion typically occurs in this area of the patellar tendon as surface strain gauge studies of the patellar tendon through the range of motion have produced conflicting results. The predicted patellar tendon strains that occur as a result of the tendon loads and patella-patellar tendon angles (PPTAs) experienced during a jump landing will be significantly increased in the area of the patellar tendon associated with patellar tendinopathy. Descriptive laboratory study. A 2-dimensional, computational, finite element model of the patella-patellar tendon complex was developed using anatomic measurements taken from lateral radiographs of a normal knee. The patella was modeled with plane strain rigid elements, and the patellar tendon was modeled with 8-node plane strain elements with neo-Hookean material properties. A tie constraint was used to join the patellar tendon and patella. Patella-patellar tendon angles corresponding to knee flexion angles between 0 degrees and 60 degrees and patellar tendon strains ranging from 5% to 15% were used as input variables into the computational model. To determine if the location of increased strain predicted by the computational model could produce isolated tendon fascicle damage in that same area, 5 human cadaveric patella-patellar tendon-tibia specimens were loaded under conditions predicted by the model to significantly increase localized tendon strain. Pre- and posttesting ultrasound images of the patella-patellar tendon specimens were obtained to document the location of any injured fascicles. Localized tendon strain at the classic location of the jumper's knee lesion was found to increase in association with an increase in the magnitude of applied

  2. An in vitro scratch tendon tissue injury model: effects of high frequency low magnitude loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adekanmbi, Isaiah; Zargar, Nasim; Hulley, Philippa

    2017-03-01

    The healing process of ruptured tendons is suboptimal, taking months to achieve tissue with inferior properties to healthy tendon. Mechanical loading has been shown to positively influence tendon healing. However, high frequency low magnitude (HFLM) loads, which have shown promise in maintaining healthy tendon properties, have not been studied with in vitro injury models. Here, we present and validate an in vitro scratch tendon tissue injury model to investigate effects of HFLM loading on the properties of injured rat tail tendon fascicles (RTTFs). A longitudinal tendon tear was simulated using a needle aseptically to scratch a defined length along individual RTTFs. Tissue viability, biomechanical, and biochemical parameters were investigated before and 7 days after culture . The effects of static, HFLM (20 Hz), and low frequency (1 Hz) cyclic loading or no load were also investigated. Tendon viability was confirmed in damaged RTTFs after 7 days of culture, and the effects of a 0.77 ± 0.06 cm scratch on the mechanical property (tangent modulus) and tissue metabolism in damaged tendons were consistent, showing significant damage severity compared with intact tendons. Damaged tendon fascicles receiving HFLM (20 Hz) loads displayed significantly higher mean tangent modulus than unloaded damaged tendons (212.7 ± 14.94 v 92.7 ± 15.59 MPa), and damaged tendons receiving static loading (117.9 ± 10.65 MPa). HFLM stimulation maintained metabolic activity in 7-day cultured damaged tendons at similar levels to fresh tendons immediately following damage. Only damaged tendons receiving HFLM loads showed significantly higher metabolism than unloaded damaged tendons (relative fluorescence units -7021 ± 635.9 v 3745.1 ± 641.7). These validation data support the use of the custom-made in vitro injury model for investigating the potential of HFLM loading interventions in treating damaged tendons.

  3. Increased mast cell numbers in a calcaneal tendon overuse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Wienecke, Jacob; Kongsgaard Madsen, Mads

    2013-01-01

    Tendinopathy is often discovered late because the initial development of tendon pathology is asymptomatic. The aim of this study was to examine the potential role of mast cell involvement in early tendinopathy using a high-intensity uphill running (HIUR) exercise model. Twenty-four male Wistar ra...

  4. A fibre-reinforced poroviscoelastic model accurately describes the biomechanical behaviour of the rat Achilles tendon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanifeh Khayyeri

    Full Text Available Computational models of Achilles tendons can help understanding how healthy tendons are affected by repetitive loading and how the different tissue constituents contribute to the tendon's biomechanical response. However, available models of Achilles tendon are limited in their description of the hierarchical multi-structural composition of the tissue. This study hypothesised that a poroviscoelastic fibre-reinforced model, previously successful in capturing cartilage biomechanical behaviour, can depict the biomechanical behaviour of the rat Achilles tendon found experimentally.We developed a new material model of the Achilles tendon, which considers the tendon's main constituents namely: water, proteoglycan matrix and collagen fibres. A hyperelastic formulation of the proteoglycan matrix enabled computations of large deformations of the tendon, and collagen fibres were modelled as viscoelastic. Specimen-specific finite element models were created of 9 rat Achilles tendons from an animal experiment and simulations were carried out following a repetitive tensile loading protocol. The material model parameters were calibrated against data from the rats by minimising the root mean squared error (RMS between experimental force data and model output.All specimen models were successfully fitted to experimental data with high accuracy (RMS 0.42-1.02. Additional simulations predicted more compliant and soft tendon behaviour at reduced strain-rates compared to higher strain-rates that produce a stiff and brittle tendon response. Stress-relaxation simulations exhibited strain-dependent stress-relaxation behaviour where larger strains produced slower relaxation rates compared to smaller strain levels. Our simulations showed that the collagen fibres in the Achilles tendon are the main load-bearing component during tensile loading, where the orientation of the collagen fibres plays an important role for the tendon's viscoelastic response. In conclusion, this

  5. A fibre-reinforced poroviscoelastic model accurately describes the biomechanical behaviour of the rat Achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayyeri, Hanifeh; Gustafsson, Anna; Heuijerjans, Ashley; Matikainen, Marko K; Julkunen, Petro; Eliasson, Pernilla; Aspenberg, Per; Isaksson, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Computational models of Achilles tendons can help understanding how healthy tendons are affected by repetitive loading and how the different tissue constituents contribute to the tendon's biomechanical response. However, available models of Achilles tendon are limited in their description of the hierarchical multi-structural composition of the tissue. This study hypothesised that a poroviscoelastic fibre-reinforced model, previously successful in capturing cartilage biomechanical behaviour, can depict the biomechanical behaviour of the rat Achilles tendon found experimentally. We developed a new material model of the Achilles tendon, which considers the tendon's main constituents namely: water, proteoglycan matrix and collagen fibres. A hyperelastic formulation of the proteoglycan matrix enabled computations of large deformations of the tendon, and collagen fibres were modelled as viscoelastic. Specimen-specific finite element models were created of 9 rat Achilles tendons from an animal experiment and simulations were carried out following a repetitive tensile loading protocol. The material model parameters were calibrated against data from the rats by minimising the root mean squared error (RMS) between experimental force data and model output. All specimen models were successfully fitted to experimental data with high accuracy (RMS 0.42-1.02). Additional simulations predicted more compliant and soft tendon behaviour at reduced strain-rates compared to higher strain-rates that produce a stiff and brittle tendon response. Stress-relaxation simulations exhibited strain-dependent stress-relaxation behaviour where larger strains produced slower relaxation rates compared to smaller strain levels. Our simulations showed that the collagen fibres in the Achilles tendon are the main load-bearing component during tensile loading, where the orientation of the collagen fibres plays an important role for the tendon's viscoelastic response. In conclusion, this model can capture

  6. Full-Thickness Skin Grafting with De-Epithelization of the Wound Margin for Finger Defects with Bone or Tendon Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Hee Lee

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundFull-thickness skin grafts (FTSGs are generally considered unreliable for coverage of full-thickness finger defects with bone or tendon exposure, and there are few clinical reports of its use in this context. However, animal studies have shown that an FTSG can survive over an avascular area ranging up to 12 mm in diameter. In our experience, the width of the exposed bones or tendons in full-thickness finger defects is <7 mm. Therefore, we covered the bone- or tendon-exposed defects of 16 fingers of 10 patients with FTSGs.MethodsThe surgical objectives were healthy granulation tissue formation in the wound bed, marginal de-epithelization of the normal skin surrounding the defect, preservation of the subdermal plexus of the central graft, and partial excision of the dermis along the graft margin. The donor site was the mastoid for small defects and the groin for large defects.ResultsMost of the grafts (15 of 16 fingers survived without significant surgical complications and achieved satisfactory functional and aesthetic results. Minor complications included partial graft loss in one patient, a minimal extension deformity in two patients, a depression deformity in one patient, and mild hyperpigmentation in four patients.ConclusionsWe observed excellent graft survival with this method with no additional surgical injury of the normal finger, satisfactory functional and aesthetic outcomes, and no need for secondary debulking procedures. Potential disadvantages include an insufficient volume of soft tissue and graft hyperpigmentation. Therefore, FTSGs may be an option for treatment of full-thickness finger defects with bone or tendon exposure.

  7. The Effect of Sodium Hyaluronate on Ligamentation and Biomechanical Property of Tendon in Repair of Achilles Tendon Defect with Polyethylene Terephthalate Artificial Ligament: A Rabbit Tendon Repair Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengkun Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Achilles tendon is the most common ruptured tendon of human body. Reconstruction with polyethylene terephthalate (PET artificial ligament is recommended in some serious cases. Sodium hyaluronate (HA is beneficial for the healing of tendon injuries. We aimed to determine the effect of sodium hyaluronate in repair of Achilles tendon defect with PET artificial ligament in an animal tendon repair model. Sixteen New Zealand White rabbits were divided into two groups. Eight rabbits repaired with PET were assigned to PET group; the other eight rabbits repaired with PET along with injection of HE were assigned to HA-PET group. All rabbits were sacrificed at 4 and 8 weeks postoperatively for biomechanical and histological examination. The HA-PET group revealed higher biomechanical property compared with the PET group. Histologically, more collagen tissues grew into the HA-PET group compared with PET group. In conclusion, application of sodium hyaluronate can improve the healing of Achilles tendon reconstruction with polyethylene terephthalate artificial ligament.

  8. The role of macrophages in early healing of a tendon graft in a bone tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Peyton L; Kawamura, Sumito; Deng, Xiang-Hua; Dagher, Elias; Mithoefer, Kai; Ying, Liang; Rodeo, Scott A

    2008-03-01

    Macrophages accumulate following tendon-to-bone repair and may contribute to the formation of a scar-tissue interface rather than to the reformation of a normal insertion site. We hypothesized that macrophage depletion may lead to improved insertion site regeneration, in a form of "scar-less" healing rather than reactive scar-tissue formation. One hundred and ninety-two Sprague-Dawley rats underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with use of a flexor tendon autograft and were divided into a control group (ninety-six rats) and a liposomal clodronate-injected group (ninety-six rats). Clodronate is a bisphosphonate that selectively induces macrophage apoptosis. Animals in the liposomal clodronate group received weekly intraperitoneal injections of liposomal clodronate (1.33 mL/100 g of body weight). Rats were killed at serial time points from three to forty-two days. Immunostaining identified macrophages and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) at the tendon-bone interface. Fibrous interface width, osteoid formation, and collagen fiber continuity were evaluated with use of histomorphometry. Serial fluorochrome labeling was used to measure mineral apposition rate. Additional rats were killed for biomechanical testing at seven, fourteen, twenty-eight, and forty-two days. Liposomal clodronate significantly decreased macrophages and TGF-beta accumulation at the tendon-bone interface (p collagen fiber continuity and a greater degree of interface remodeling between tendon and bone. There were significant increases in osteoid formation (p < 0.05) and mineral apposition rates (p < 0.05) among experimental specimens. At forty-two days, the specimens from the liposomal clodronate group had significantly greater increases than the control specimens with respect to load to failure (mean and standard deviation, 13.5 +/- 4.2 N and 9.7 +/- 3.9 N, respectively; p < 0.05) and stiffness (mean, 11.5 +/- 5.0 N/mm and 7.5 +/- 3.2 N/mm; p < 0.05). Macrophage depletion

  9. Morphological changes in tibial tunnels after anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with hamstring tendon graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohori, Tomoki; Mae, Tatsuo; Shino, Konsei; Tachibana, Yuta; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Nakata, Ken

    2017-09-15

    Three-dimensional (3D) reconstructed computed tomography (CT) is crucial for the reliable and accurate evaluation of tunnel enlargement after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the tibial tunnel enlargement at the tunnel aperture and inside the tunnel and to clarify the morphological change at the tunnel footprint 1 year after the anatomic triple-bundle (ATB) ACL reconstruction using 3D CT models. Eighteen patients with unilateral ACL rupture were evaluated. The ATB ACL reconstruction with a semitendinosus tendon autograft was performed. 3D computer models of the tibia and the three tibial tunnels were reconstructed from CT data obtained 3 weeks and 1 year after surgery. The cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of the two anterior and the one posterior tunnels were measured at the tunnel aperture and 5 and 10 mm distal from the aperture and compared between the two periods. The locations of the center and the anterior, posterior, medial, and lateral edges of each tunnel footprint were also measured and compared between the two periods. The CSA of the posterior tunnel was significantly enlarged at the aperture by 40.4%, whereas that of the anterior tunnels did not change significantly, although the enlargement rate was 6.1%. On the other hand, the CSA was significantly reduced at 10 mm distal from the aperture in the anterior tunnels. The enlargement rate in the posterior tunnel was significantly greater than that in the anterior tunnels at the aperture. The center of the posterior tunnel footprint significantly shifted postero-laterally. The anterior and posterior edges of the posterior tunnel footprint demonstrated a significant posterior shift, while the lateral edge significantly shifted laterally. There was no significant shift of the center or all the edges of the anterior tunnels footprint. The posterior tibial tunnel was significantly enlarged at the aperture by 40% with the morphological change in the

  10. Prevention of primary vascular graft infection with silver-coated polyester graft in a porcine model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, H; Sandermann, J; Prag, J

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a silver-coated vascular polyester graft in the prevention of graft infection after inoculation with Staphylococcus aureus in a porcine model.......To evaluate the efficacy of a silver-coated vascular polyester graft in the prevention of graft infection after inoculation with Staphylococcus aureus in a porcine model....

  11. Factors affecting return to sports after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with patellar tendon and hamstring graft: a prospective clinical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbi, Alberto; Francisco, Ramces

    2006-10-01

    In athletes, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is recommended after injury to restore the normal knee function and allow subsequent return to sport. Successful ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon (PT) and hamstring tendon (HT) grafts combined with a well-structured rehabilitation program could bring athletes back to their previous level of sport activities. We prospectively followed-up 100 athletes who underwent ACL reconstruction with either PT (n=50) or HT grafts (n=50). Evaluation was done pre-operatively and post-operatively (3, 6, 12, and 24 months) using International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), Lysholm, Noyes, and Tegner scales. Subjective assessment numeric evaluation (SANE), knee activity rating scale (Marx) and a psychological profile questionnaire (psychovitality) were also utilized. Objective evaluations included isokinetic tests and computerized knee motion analysis. Data gathered were statistically analyzed using the Mann-Whitney non-parametric U-test. Among the 100 patients who have undergone ACL reconstruction, 65% returned to the same level of sports, 24% changed sports and 11% ceased sport activities. No significant difference (P>0.05) in outcome between PT and HT grafts were observed. No significant differences (P>0.05) were noted between athletes who "returned" to their previous sport and those who "did not return" to sports at the same level when using the IKDC, Lysholm, Noyes, and Tegner knee evaluation scales. However, significant difference was observed with the knee scores obtained by those who returned and those who completely ceased participation in sport activities. Computerized laxity test revealed that 90% of these patients have less than 3 mm side-to-side difference with no significant difference between HT and PT groups. Patients who "returned to sports" obtained significantly better scores with the Marx scale (P=0.001) and the psychovitality questionnaire (P=0.001) than those who did not. Conventional knee

  12. Adaptive Remodeling of Achilles Tendon: A Multi-scale Computational Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenson, Jonas; Umberger, Brian

    2016-01-01

    While it is known that musculotendon units adapt to their load environments, there is only a limited understanding of tendon adaptation in vivo. Here we develop a computational model of tendon remodeling based on the premise that mechanical damage and tenocyte-mediated tendon damage and repair processes modify the distribution of its collagen fiber lengths. We explain how these processes enable the tendon to geometrically adapt to its load conditions. Based on known biological processes, mechanical and strain-dependent proteolytic fiber damage are incorporated into our tendon model. Using a stochastic model of fiber repair, it is assumed that mechanically damaged fibers are repaired longer, whereas proteolytically damaged fibers are repaired shorter, relative to their pre-damage length. To study adaptation of tendon properties to applied load, our model musculotendon unit is a simplified three-component Hill-type model of the human Achilles-soleus unit. Our model results demonstrate that the geometric equilibrium state of the Achilles tendon can coincide with minimization of the total metabolic cost of muscle activation. The proposed tendon model independently predicts rates of collagen fiber turnover that are in general agreement with in vivo experimental measurements. While the computational model here only represents a first step in a new approach to understanding the complex process of tendon remodeling in vivo, given these findings, it appears likely that the proposed framework may itself provide a useful theoretical foundation for developing valuable qualitative and quantitative insights into tendon physiology and pathology. PMID:27684554

  13. Runx2-Modified Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Promote Tendon Graft Integration in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Ma, Yong; Fu, Xin; Liu, Qiang; Shao, Zhenxing; Dai, Linghui; Pi, Yanbin; Hu, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Jiying; Duan, Xiaoning; Chen, Wenqing; Chen, Ping; Zhou, Chunyan; Ao, Yingfang

    2016-01-08

    Runx2 is a powerful osteo-inductive factor and adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) are multipotent. However, it is unknown whether Runx2-overexpressing ADSCs (Runx2-ADSCs) could promote anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. We evaluated the effect of Runx2-ADSCs on ACL reconstruction in vitro and in vivo. mRNA expressions of osteocalcin (OCN), bone sialoprotein (BSP) and collagen I (COLI) increased over time in Runx2-ADSCs. Runx2 overexpression inhibited LPL and PPARγ mRNA expressions. Runx2 induced alkaline phosphatase activity markedly. In nude mice injected with Runx2-ADSCs, promoted bone formation was detected by X-rays 8 weeks after injection. The healing of tendon-to-bone in a rabbit model of ACL reconstruction treated with Runx2-ADSCs, fibrin glue only and an RNAi targeting Runx2, was evaluated with CT 3D reconstruction, histological analysis and biomechanical methods. CT showed a greater degree of new bone formation around the bone tunnel in the group treated with Runx2-ADSCs compared with the fibrin glue group and RNAi Runx2 group. Histology showed that treatment with Runx2-ADSCs led to a rapid and significant increase at the tendon-to-bone compared with the control groups. Biomechanical tests demonstrated higher tendon pullout strength in the Runx2-ADSCs group at early time points. The healing of the attachment in ACL reconstruction was enhanced by Runx2-ADSCs.

  14. FUNCTIONAL OUTCOME OF ACCELERATED REHABILITATION IN ARTHROSCOPIC ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION WITH BONE PATELLAR TENDON BONE GRAFT A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

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    Hiranyakumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION An ideal rehabilitation program post anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction enables an individual to return to pre injury levels at a faster rate with minimal to no risk of reinjury to the graft. Rehabilitation protocols have changed considerably over time in the past. It has become “aggressive”, meaning an intensive rehabilitation which includes greater variety of exercises and sports related training. AIM OF THE STUDY The aim of our study is to assess the outcome of accelerated rehabilitation post anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction. METHODOLOGY 106 patients were operated by a single surgeon underwent arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using bone patella tendon bone graft and partial meniscectomy for associated meniscal tear. Patients were put on an accelerated rehabilitation protocol designed in our institute on first post-operative day, under the guidance of a physical therapist in consultation with the operated surgeon. Patients were followed up at 3 weeks, 6 months and 9 months, post onset of rehabilitation, patients were assessed using KT1000 Arthrometer and Lysholm knee scoring system. RESULTS Out of 106 patients, who were selected, 96(91% were males and 10(9% were females. The mean pre-operative Lysholm score was 55.09. Post operatively, while on accelerated rehabilitation program the Lysholm scores were 69.73 at 3 weeks, 89.13 at 6 months and 89.19 at 9 months. In our pre-operative evaluation mean KT 1000 arthrometer score was 10.53 and post-operative at six months was 3.49. At nine months 105 patients had excellent results whereas 1 patient had good result. CONCLUSION Accelerated rehabilitation protocol enables the patient to functionally recover faster to pre injury levels. A rehabilitation protocol for 6 months is sufficient in enabling a patient to get back to pre-injury levels. Functional outcome is the same with or without associated meniscal injuries.

  15. Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using autologous graft from quadriceps tendon to treat recurrent patellar dislocation

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    Constantino Jorge Calapodopulos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the surgical technique using the quadriceps tendon as a graft in static reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament. METHODS: This was a prospective case series study in which the participants were 22 patients with a diagnosis of recurrent patellar dislocation without any other anatomical alterations that required surgical treatment. The functional results from the technique were evaluated using clinical data and the Lysholm questionnaire, one year after the operation. RESULTS: It was observed that the patients were predominantly female (86% and under 21 years of age (73%, just like in the literature. At the first annual return after the surgery, there was no significant pain on medium efforts, no loss of range of motion and a positive apprehension test. According to the questionnaire used, the results were graded as good. The patients who reported having severe pain on greater effort were involved in employment-related legal disputes. CONCLUSION: This technique showed low morbidity and good functional results over the short term.

  16. Single-tunnel double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with anatomical placement of hamstring tendon graft: can it restore normal knee joint kinematics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadikota, Hemanth R; Wu, Jia-Lin; Seon, Jong Keun; Sutton, Karen; Gill, Thomas J; Li, Guoan

    2010-04-01

    Anatomical reconstruction techniques that can restore normal joint kinematics without increasing surgical complications could potentially improve clinical outcomes and help manage anterior cruciate ligament injuries more efficiently. Single-tunnel double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with anatomical placement of hamstring tendon graft can more closely restore normal knee anterior-posterior, medial-lateral, and internal-external kinematics than can conventional single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Controlled laboratory study. Kinematic responses after single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and single-tunnel double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with anatomical placement of hamstring tendon graft were compared with the intact knee in 9 fresh-frozen human cadaveric knee specimens using a robotic testing system. Kinematics of each knee were determined under an anterior tibial load (134 N), a simulated quadriceps load (400 N), and combined torques (10 N.m valgus and 5 N.m internal tibial torques) at 0 degrees , 15 degrees , 30 degrees , 60 degrees , and 90 degrees of flexion. Anterior tibial translations were more closely restored to the intact knee level after single-tunnel double-bundle reconstruction with anatomical placement of hamstring tendon graft than with a single-bundle reconstruction under the 3 external loading conditions. Under simulated quadriceps load, the mean internal tibial rotations after both reconstructions were lower than that of the anterior cruciate ligament-intact knee with no significant differences between these 3 knee conditions at 0 degrees and 30 degrees of flexion (P > .05). The increased medial tibial shifts of the anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knees were restored to the intact level by both reconstruction techniques under the 3 external loading conditions. Single-tunnel double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with anatomical placement of

  17. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF CLINICAL OUTCOME OF ARTHROSCOPIC ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION BONE PATELLAR TENDON BONE GRAFT V/S HAMSTRING GRAFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyank

    2015-08-01

    fulfilling the predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria were included in the study. STATISTICAL METHODS : Intergroup comparison was analysed by K - Independent sample t test. Intragroup comparison was analysed by Paired t - test. RESULTS : Patients were divided into two groups and treated with using Bone - patellar tendon - bone graft and Hamstring graft respectively. Mean age group of patients was 29.16 yrs. (range 16 - 51yrs and 30.88 yrs. (range 19 - 48yrs in group A and B respectively we found the incidence of ACL injury in 15 - 44 years age group to be greater than twice the general population. A mean delay in surgery of 4.66 months (range 2 - 12 months since the time of injury in group A and 4.46 months (range 2 - 7 months in group B was observed. Subjective IKDC evaluation was done at the end of 12 months. Ther e was no difference in both the groups in the terms of effusion, passive motion, knee compartment findings, ligament examination, X - ray findings. Functional test and IKDC grade of both the groups showed statistically very highly significant improvement. Ho wever, there was statistically very high Harvest site pathology in group A. CONCLUSION : We found that there is statistically no significant difference in the overall clinical outcome between hamstring autograft with transfix and bone - patellar tendon bone autograft with interference screw except that the patellar tendon group had a greater tendency of having donor site morbidity compared to the hamstring tendon group.

  18. How does a cadaver model work for testing ultrasound diagnostic capability for rheumatic-like tendon damage?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janta, Iustina; Morán, Julio; Naredo, Esperanza

    2016-01-01

    To establish whether a cadaver model can serve as an effective surrogate for the detection of tendon damage characteristic of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition, we evaluated intraobserver and interobserver agreement in the grading of RA-like tendon tears shown by US, as well as the concordance...... between the US findings and the surgically induced lesions in the cadaver model. RA-like tendon damage was surgically induced in the tibialis anterior tendon (TAT) and tibialis posterior tendon (TPT) of ten ankle/foot fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens. Of the 20 tendons examined, six were randomly assigned...

  19. A Fibre-Reinforced Poroviscoelastic Model Accurately Describes the Biomechanical Behaviour of the Rat Achilles Tendon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuijerjans, Ashley; Matikainen, Marko K.; Julkunen, Petro; Eliasson, Pernilla; Aspenberg, Per; Isaksson, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Background Computational models of Achilles tendons can help understanding how healthy tendons are affected by repetitive loading and how the different tissue constituents contribute to the tendon’s biomechanical response. However, available models of Achilles tendon are limited in their description of the hierarchical multi-structural composition of the tissue. This study hypothesised that a poroviscoelastic fibre-reinforced model, previously successful in capturing cartilage biomechanical behaviour, can depict the biomechanical behaviour of the rat Achilles tendon found experimentally. Materials and Methods We developed a new material model of the Achilles tendon, which considers the tendon’s main constituents namely: water, proteoglycan matrix and collagen fibres. A hyperelastic formulation of the proteoglycan matrix enabled computations of large deformations of the tendon, and collagen fibres were modelled as viscoelastic. Specimen-specific finite element models were created of 9 rat Achilles tendons from an animal experiment and simulations were carried out following a repetitive tensile loading protocol. The material model parameters were calibrated against data from the rats by minimising the root mean squared error (RMS) between experimental force data and model output. Results and Conclusions All specimen models were successfully fitted to experimental data with high accuracy (RMS 0.42-1.02). Additional simulations predicted more compliant and soft tendon behaviour at reduced strain-rates compared to higher strain-rates that produce a stiff and brittle tendon response. Stress-relaxation simulations exhibited strain-dependent stress-relaxation behaviour where larger strains produced slower relaxation rates compared to smaller strain levels. Our simulations showed that the collagen fibres in the Achilles tendon are the main load-bearing component during tensile loading, where the orientation of the collagen fibres plays an important role for the tendon

  20. Evaluation of synthetic vascular grafts in a mouse carotid grafting model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex H P Chan

    Full Text Available Current animal models for the evaluation of synthetic grafts are lacking many of the molecular tools and transgenic studies available to other branches of biology. A mouse model of vascular grafting would allow for the study of molecular mechanisms of graft failure, including in the context of clinically relevant disease states. In this study, we comprehensively characterise a sutureless grafting model which facilitates the evaluation of synthetic grafts in the mouse carotid artery. Using conduits electrospun from polycaprolactone (PCL we show the gradual development of a significant neointima within 28 days, found to be greatest at the anastomoses. Histological analysis showed temporal increases in smooth muscle cell and collagen content within the neointima, demonstrating its maturation. Endothelialisation of the PCL grafts, assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis and CD31 staining, was near complete within 28 days, together replicating two critical aspects of graft performance. To further demonstrate the potential of this mouse model, we used longitudinal non-invasive tracking of bone-marrow mononuclear cells from a transgenic mouse strain with a dual reporter construct encoding both luciferase and green fluorescent protein (GFP. This enabled characterisation of mononuclear cell homing and engraftment to PCL using bioluminescence imaging and histological staining over time (7, 14 and 28 days. We observed peak luminescence at 7 days post-graft implantation that persisted until sacrifice at 28 days. Collectively, we have established and characterised a high-throughput model of grafting that allows for the evaluation of key clinical drivers of graft performance.

  1. Reconstruction of closed rupture of thumb flexor tendon pulleys with a single free palmaris longus tendon graft: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazilleau, F; Cheval, D; Richou, J; Le Nen, D

    2014-02-01

    Closed rupture of thumb flexor tendon pulleys is extremely rare. Several techniques have already been described for finger pulley reconstruction. Various techniques based on prior anatomic and biomedical studies have been proposed for thumb pulley reconstruction, in which one or two of the three pulleys are replaced. In the present study, we describe an original technique using a single, free palmaris longus (PL) autograft for thumb pulley reconstruction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Firm anchoring between a calcium phosphate-hybridized tendon and bone for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in a goat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutsuzaki, Hirotaka [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Sciences, 4669-2 Ami Ami-machi, Inashiki-gun, Ibaraki 300-0394 (Japan); Sakane, Masataka; Ochiai, Naoyuki [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575 (Japan); Hattori, Shinya; Kobayashi, Hisatoshi, E-mail: sakane-m@md.tsukuba.ac.j [Biomaterial Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2009-08-15

    Using an alternative soaking process improved the tendon-bone attachment for a calcium phosphate (CaP)-hybridized tendon graft. We characterized the deposited CaP on and in tendons and analyzed the histology and mechanical properties of the tendon-bone interface in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in goats. The tendon grafts to be implanted were soaked ten times alternately in a Ca-containing solution and a PO{sub 4}-containing solution for 30 s each. Needlelike CaP nanocrystals including low-crystalline apatite were deposited on and between collagen fibrils from the surface to a depth of 200{mu}m inside the tendon. The structure resembles the extracellular matrix of bone. In animal experiments, the CaP-hybridized tendon directly bonded with newly formed bone at 6 weeks (n = 3), while fibrous bonding was observed in the control (n = 3). The ultimate failure load was not statistically different between the CaP (n = 7) and control (n = 7). However, in the failure mode, all the tendon-bone interfaces were intact in the CaP group, while three of seven specimens were pulled out from bone tunnels in the control. The result suggested that the strength of the tendon-bone interface in the CaP group is superior to that in the control group. Clinically, firm tendon-bone anchoring may lead to good results without the knee instability associated with the loosening of the bone-tendon junction in ACL reconstruction.

  3. Non-linear finite element model to assess the effect of tendon forces on the foot-ankle complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Orcajo, Enrique; Souza, Thales R; Bayod, Javier; Barbosa de Las Casas, Estevam

    2017-11-01

    A three-dimensional foot finite element model with actual geometry and non-linear behavior of tendons is presented. The model is intended for analysis of the lower limb tendon forces effect in the inner foot structure. The geometry of the model was obtained from computational tomographies and magnetic resonance images. Tendon tissue was characterized with the first order Ogden material model based on experimental data from human foot tendons. Kinetic data was employed to set the load conditions. After model validation, a force sensitivity study of the five major foot extrinsic tendons was conducted to evaluate the function of each tendon. A synergic work of the inversion-eversion tendons was predicted. Pulling from a peroneus or tibialis tendon stressed the antagonist tendons while reducing the stress in the agonist. Similar paired action was predicted for the Achilles tendon with the tibialis anterior. This behavior explains the complex control motion performed by the foot. Furthermore, the stress state at the plantar fascia, the talocrural joint cartilage, the plantar soft tissue and the tendons were estimated in the early and late midstance phase of walking. These estimations will help in the understanding of the functional role of the extrinsic muscle-tendon-units in foot pronation-supination. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Tendon healing: an experimental model in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, C L; Snyder, D M

    1977-03-01

    Based upon the studies of the healing process in dogs in which profundus tendons were severed partially by a method in which the cut surfaces remained in contact and the area of division was in an undamaged area of the sheath, it was shown that healing of the tendon took place without evidence of vascular contribution from the sheath. Vascular loop patterns, similar to those seen in synovial lining of joints or on either side of the growth plate of growing bone, were found on the surface of the tendons in the area of mesotenon reflection, the osseotendinous junctions, where the vinculum joined the tendon, and in various areas of the tendon sheath. No other vessels were found. A theory for nutrition of the tendon is proposed analagous to that postulated for maintenance of cartilage, first with the formation of synovial fluid by the vascular loop system and then a diffusion phase dependent upon the repetitive loading and unloading of the tissue to force the fluid into the system of canaliculi in the tendon.

  5. Resurfacing with Chemically Modified Hyaluronic Acid and Lubricin for Flexor Tendon Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Hashimoto, Takahiro; Kirk, Ramona L.; Thoreson, Andrew R.; Jay, Gregory D.; Moran, Steven L.; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    We assessed surface coating with carbodiimide derivatized hyaluronic acid combined with lubricin (cd-HA-Lubricin) as a way to improve extrasynovial tendon surface quality and, consequently, the functional results in flexor tendon reconstruction, using a canine in vivo model. The second and fifth flexor digitorum profundus tendons from 14 dogs were reconstructed with autologs peroneus longus (PL) tendons 6 weeks after a failed primary repair. One digit was treated with cd-HA-Lubricin, and the other was treated with saline as the control. Six weeks following grafting, the digits and graft tendons were functionally and histologically evaluated. Adhesion score, normalized work of flexion, graft friction in zone II, and adhesion breaking strength at the proximal repair site in zone III were all lower in the cd-HA-Lubricin treated group compared to the control group. The strength at the distal tendon/bone interface was decreased in the cd-HA-Lubricin treated grafts compared to the control grafts. Histology showed inferior healing in the cd-HA-Lubricin group at both proximal and distal repair sites. However, cd-HA-Lubricin treatment did not result in any gap or rupture at either the proximal or distal repair sites. These results demonstrate that cd-HA-Lubricin can eliminate graft adhesions and improve digit function, but that treatment may have an adverse effect on tendon healing. PMID:23335124

  6. Striatal grafts in a rat model of Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guzman, R; Meyer, M; Lövblad, K O

    1999-01-01

    Survival and integration into the host brain of grafted tissue are crucial factors in neurotransplantation approaches. The present study explored the feasibility of using a clinical MR scanner to study striatal graft development in a rat model of Huntington's disease. Rat fetal lateral ganglionic...... eminences grown as free-floating roller-tube cultures can be successfully grafted in a rat Huntington model and that a clinical MR scanner offers a useful noninvasive tool for studying striatal graft development....

  7. Decellularized and Engineered Tendons as Biological Substitutes: A Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna B. Lovati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tendon ruptures are a great burden in clinics. Finding a proper graft material as a substitute for tendon repair is one of the main challenges in orthopaedics, for which the requirement of a biological scaffold would be different for each clinical application. Among biological scaffolds, the use of decellularized tendon-derived matrix increasingly represents an interesting approach to treat tendon ruptures. We analyzed in vitro and in vivo studies focused on the development of efficient protocols for the decellularization and for the cell reseeding of the tendon matrix to obtain medical devices for tendon substitution. Our review considered also the proper tendon source and preclinical animal models with the aim of entering into clinical trials. The results highlight a wide panorama in terms of allogenic or xenogeneic tendon sources, specimen dimensions, physical or chemical decellularization techniques, and the cell type variety for reseeding from terminally differentiated to undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells and their static or dynamic culture employed to generate implantable constructs tested in different animal models. We try to identify the most efficient approach to achieve an optimal biological scaffold for biomechanics and intrinsic properties, resembling the native tendon and being applicable in clinics in the near future, with particular attention to the Achilles tendon substitution.

  8. Animal Models for Tendon Repair Experiments: A Comparison of Pig, Sheep and Human Deep Flexor Tendons in Zone II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltz, Tim Sebastian; Hoffman, Stuart William; Scougall, Peter James; Gianoutsos, Mark Peter; Savage, Robert; Oliver, Rema Antoinette; Walsh, William Robert

    2017-09-01

    This laboratory study compared pig, sheep and human deep flexor tendons in regards to their biomechanical comparability. To investigate the relevant biomechanical properties for tendon repair experiments, the tendons resistance to cheese-wiring (suture drag/splitting) was assessed. Cheese-wiring of a suture through a tendon is an essential factor for repair gapping and failure in a tendon repair. Biomechanical testing showed that forces required to pulling a uniform suture loop through sheep or pig tendons in Zone II were higher than in human tendons. At time point zero of testing these differences did not reach statistical significance, but differences became more pronounced when forces were measured beyond initial cheese-wiring (2 mm, 5 mm and 10 mm). The stronger resistance to cheese-wiring was more pronounced in the pig tendons. Also regarding size and histology, sheep tendons were more comparable to human tendons than pig tendons. Differences in tendon bio-properties should be kept in mind when comparing and interpreting the results of laboratory tendon experiments.

  9. Eccentric Training for Tendon Healing After Acute Lesion: A Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaux, Jean-François; Libertiaux, Vincent; Leprince, Pierre; Fillet, Marianne; Denoel, Vincent; Wyss, Clémence; Lecut, Christelle; Gothot, André; Le Goff, Caroline; Croisier, Jean-Louis; Crielaard, Jean-Michel; Drion, Pierre

    2017-05-01

    The tendon is a dynamic entity that remodels permanently. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection has been shown to have a beneficial effect on tendon healing after lesion in rats. Furthermore, eccentric exercise seems to improve the mechanical quality of the tendon. A combination of PRP injection and eccentric training might be more effective than either treatment alone. Controlled laboratory study. Adult male rats were anesthetized, an incision was performed in the middle of their left patellar tendon and an injection of physiological fluid (PF) or homologous PRP was randomly made at the lesion level. The rats were then divided into 2 groups: the eccentric group, undergoing eccentric training 3 times a week, and the untrained group, without any training. Thus, 4 groups were compared. After 5 weeks, the tendons were removed and their ultimate tensile strength and energy were measured. Tendons were frozen for proteomic analyses when all biomechanical tests were completed. Statistical analysis was performed with linear mixed effect models. No significant difference was found between the treatments using PF injection or PRP injection alone. However, the value of the ultimate tensile force at rupture was increased by 4.5 N (108% of control, P = .006) when eccentric training was performed. An intragroup analysis revealed that eccentric training significantly improved the ultimate force values for the PRP group. Proteomic analysis revealed that eccentric training led to an increase in abundance of several cytoskeletal proteins in the PF group, while a decrease in abundance of enzymes of the glycolytic pathway occurred in the PRP-treated groups, indicating that this treatment might redirect the exercise-driven metabolic plasticity of the tendon. Eccentric training altered the metabolic plasticity of tendon and led to an improvement of injured tendon resistance regardless of the treatment injected (PF or PRP). This study demonstrates the necessity of eccentric rehabilitation

  10. Mechanical Loading Improves Tendon-Bone Healing in a Rabbit Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Model by Promoting Proliferation and Matrix Formation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Tendon Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanglong Song

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study investigated the effect of mechanical stress on tendon-bone healing in a rabbit anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction model as well as cell proliferation and matrix formation in co-culture of bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs and tendon cells (TCs. Methods: The effect of continuous passive motion (CPM therapy on tendon-bone healing in a rabbit ACL reconstruction model was evaluated by histological analysis, biomechanical testing and gene expressions at the tendon-bone interface. Furthermore, the effect of mechanical stretch on cell proliferation and matrix synthesis in BMSC/TC co-culture was also examined. Results: Postoperative CPM therapy significantly enhanced tendon-bone healing, as evidenced by increased amount of fibrocartilage, elevated ultimate load to failure levels, and up-regulated gene expressions of Collagen I, alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, Tenascin C and tenomodulin at the tendon-bone junction. In addition, BMSC/TC co-culture treated with mechanical stretch showed a higher rate of cell proliferation and enhanced expressions of Collagen I, Collagen III, alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, Tenascin C and tenomodulin than that of controls. Conclusion: These results demonstrated that proliferation and differentiation of local precursor cells could be enhanced by mechanical stimulation, which results in enhanced regenerative potential of BMSCs and TCs in tendon-bone healing.

  11. Quantitative US Elastography Can Be Used to Quantify Mechanical and Histologic Tendon Healing in a Rabbit Model of Achilles Tendon Transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yohei; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Sasho, Takahisa; Fukawa, Taisuke; Akatsu, Yorikazu; Akagi, Ryuichiro; Yamaguchi, Tadashi; Takahashi, Kenji; Nagashima, Kengo; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2017-05-01

    Purpose To determine the time-dependent change in strain ratios (SRs) at the healing site of an Achilles tendon rupture in a rabbit model of tendon transection and to assess the correlation between SRs and the mechanical and histologic properties of the healing tissue. Materials and Methods Experimental methods were approved by the institutional animal care and use committee. The Achilles tendons of 24 New Zealand white rabbits (48 limbs) were surgically transected. The SRs of Achilles tendons were calculated by using compression-based quantitative ultrasonographic elastography measurements obtained 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after transection. After in vivo elastography, the left Achilles tendon was harvested for mechanical testing of ultimate load, ultimate stress, elastic modulus, and linear stiffness, and the right tendons were harvested for tissue histologic analysis with the Bonar scale. Time-dependent changes in SRs, mechanical parameters, and Bonar scale scores were evaluated by using repeated-measures analysis of variance. The correlation between SRs and each measured variable was evaluated by using the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Results Mean SRs and Bonar scale values decreased as a function of time after transection, whereas mechanical parameters increased (P tendon. (©) RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  12. A New Method for Modeling Spatial Prestressing Tendons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Wang, Yuqian; Liu, Gao

    2010-05-01

    As a standard simulation procedure for curved lines and curved surfaces, spline has been widely used in the domain of computer-aided design. This paper presents a simple but relatively accurate procedure for the description of prestressing tendons. Cubic splines instead of conventional parabolic ones are introduced to obtain the characteristic parameters of the curved tendon profiles. The direct internal load method is adopted to obtain the equivalent load and loss of tendon force. In comparison with the traditional methods, Cubic splines needs less parameter for pre-processor and leads to higher accuracy in calculation. The direct internal load method can demonstrate the regularity of prestressing force acting on the structure, which modifies the prevalent equivalent load method. The results of the analysis presented in this paper indicate that the proposed method turns out to be convenient and reasonably accurate in the analysis of prestressed concrete bridges.

  13. Experimental model of cultured skin graft

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alfredo Gragnani; Jeffrey R. Morgan; Lydia Masako Ferreira

    2004-01-01

    .... It permits the xenografting evaluation of cultured cells graft or of the genetically modified cells and of the association of the cultured cells and the dermal substitutes, the composite grafts, and of the autografting...

  14. Early Ankle Mobilization Promotes Healing in a Rabbit Model of Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Asilehan, Batiza; Wupuer, Aikeremu; Qianman, Bayixiati; Jialihasi, Ayidaer; Tangkejie, Wulanbai; Maimaitiaili, Abudouheilil; Shawutali, Nuerai; Badelhan, Aynaz; Niyazebieke, Hadelebieke; Aizezi, Adili; Aisaiding, Amuding; Bakyt, Yerzat; Aibek, Rakimbaiev; Wuerliebieke, Jianati

    2016-01-01

    The use of early mobilization of the ankle joint without orthosis in the treatment of Achilles tendon rupture has been advocated as the optimal management. The goal of this study was to compare outcomes in a postoperative rabbit model of Achilles tendon rupture between early mobilization and immobilized animals using a differential proteomics approach. In total, 135 rabbits were randomized into the control group (n=15), the postoperative cast immobilization (PCI) group (n=60), and the early mobilization (EM) group (n=60). A rupture of the Achilles tendon was created in each animal model and repaired microsurgically, and tendon samples were removed at 3, 7, 14, and 21 days postoperatively. Proteins were separated using 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and identified using peptide mass fingerprinting, tandem mass spectrometry, NCBI database searches, and bioinformatics analyses. A series of differentially expressed proteins were identified between groups, some of which may play an important role in Achilles tendon healing. Notable candidate proteins that were upregulated in the EM group were identified, such as CRMP-2, galactokinase 1, tropomyosin-4, and transthyretin. The healing of ruptured Achilles tendons appears to be affected at the level of protein expression with the use of early mobilization. The classic postoperative treatment of Achilles tendon rupture with an orthosis ignored the self-protecting instinct of humans. With a novel operative technique, the repaired tendon can persist the load that comes from traction in knee and ankle joint functional movement. In addition, kinesitherapy provided an excellent experimental outcome via a mechanobiological mechanism. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Therapeutic Mechanisms of Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Rat Tendon Injury Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Yoon; Kwon, Bomi; Lee, Kyoungbun; Son, Young Hoon; Chung, Sun G

    2017-05-01

    Although survival of transplanted stem cells in vivo and differentiation of stem cells into tenocytes in vitro have been reported, there have been no in vivo studies demonstrating that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) could secrete their own proteins as differentiated tenogenic cells. Purpose/Hypothesis: Using a xenogeneic MSC transplantation model, we aimed to investigate whether MSCs could differentiate into the tenogenic lineage and secrete their own proteins. The hypothesis was that human MSCs would differentiate into the human tenogenic lineage and the cells would be able to secrete human-specific proteins in a rat tendon injury model. Controlled laboratory study. The Achilles tendons of 57 Sprague Dawley rats received full-thickness rectangular defects. After the modeling, the defective tendons were randomly assigned to 3 groups: (1) cell group, implantation with human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs) and fibrin glue (106 cells in 60 μL); (2) fibrin group, implantation with fibrin glue and same volume of cell media; and (3) sham group, identical surgical procedure without any treatment. Gross observation and biomechanical, histopathological, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot analyses were performed at 2 and 4 weeks after modeling. hASCs implanted into the defective rat tendons were viable for 4 weeks as detected by immunofluorescence staining. Tendons treated with hASCs showed better gross morphological and biomechanical recovery than those in the fibrin and sham groups. Furthermore, the expression of both human-specific collagen type I and tenascin-C was significantly higher in the cell group than in the other 2 groups. Transplantation of hASCs enhanced rat tendon healing biomechanically. hASCs implanted into the rat tendon defect model survived for at least 4 weeks and secreted human-specific collagen type I and tenascin-C. These findings suggest that transplanted MSCs may be able to differentiate into the tenogenic lineage and contribute

  16. Subject-specific tendon-aponeurosis definition in Hill-type model predicts higher muscle forces in dynamic tasks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Gerus

    Full Text Available Neuromusculoskeletal models are a common method to estimate muscle forces. Developing accurate neuromusculoskeletal models is a challenging task due to the complexity of the system and large inter-subject variability. The estimation of muscles force is based on the mechanical properties of tendon-aponeurosis complex. Most neuromusculoskeletal models use a generic definition of the tendon-aponeurosis complex based on in vitro test, perhaps limiting their validity. Ultrasonography allows subject-specific estimates of the tendon-aponeurosis complex's mechanical properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of subject-specific mechanical properties of the tendon-aponeurosis complex on a neuromusculoskeletal model of the ankle joint. Seven subjects performed isometric contractions from which the tendon-aponeurosis force-strain relationship was estimated. Hopping and running tasks were performed and muscle forces were estimated using subject-specific tendon-aponeurosis and generic tendon properties. Two ultrasound probes positioned over the muscle-tendon junction and the mid-belly were combined with motion capture to estimate the in vivo tendon and aponeurosis strain of the medial head of gastrocnemius muscle. The tendon-aponeurosis force-strain relationship was scaled for the other ankle muscles based on tendon and aponeurosis length of each muscle measured by ultrasonography. The EMG-driven model was calibrated twice - using the generic tendon definition and a subject-specific tendon-aponeurosis force-strain definition. The use of subject-specific tendon-aponeurosis definition leads to a higher muscle force estimate for the soleus muscle and the plantar-flexor group, and to a better model prediction of the ankle joint moment compared to the model estimate which used a generic definition. Furthermore, the subject-specific tendon-aponeurosis definition leads to a decoupling behaviour between the muscle fibre and muscle-tendon unit

  17. Towards kinematic modeling of a multi-DOF tendon driven robotic catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Peng; Liu, Hongbin; Seneviratne, Lakmal; Althoefer, Kaspar

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a recent study on kinematic modeling of a remote-controlled active catheter. The tip steering motion of the catheter is actuated in a tendon-driven manner. Two antagonistic groups of tendon actuation realize the distal tip deflecting with two-degree-of-freedom (2-DOF) allowing it to reach a considerable large spatial workspace without catheter shaft rotation. However, when modeling such bending deformation, the sequential rotation approach is easily misapplied. We address this problem and introduce a novel and unified modeling methodology based on the concept of simultaneous rotation and the use of Rodrigues' rotation formula. An accurate model is created for robotic catheters and also can be generalized to common multi-tendon-driven continuum manipulators. It is essential in achieving accurate control and improving autonomous execution of command tracking tasks.

  18. Pseudo-hyperelastic model of tendon hysteresis from adaptive recruitment of collagen type I fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarletta, Pasquale; Dario, Paolo; Micera, Silvestro

    2008-02-01

    Understanding the functional relationship between the viscoelasticity and the morphology of soft collagenous tissues is fundamental for many applications in bioengineering science. This work presents a pseudo-hyperelastic constitutive theory aiming at describing the time-dependant hysteretic response of tendons subjected to uniaxial tensile loads. A macroscopic tendon is modeled as a composite homogeneous tissue with the anisotropic reinforcement of collagen type I fibrils. The tissue microstructure is considered as an adaptive network of fibrillar units connected in temporary junctions. The processes of breakage and reformation of active fibrils are thermally activated, and are occurring at random times. An internal softening variable and a dissipation energy function account for the adaptive arrangement of the fibrillar network in the pseudo-hyperelastic model. Cyclic uniaxial tensile tests have been performed in vitro on porcine flexor digital tendons. The theoretical predictions fit accurately the experimental stress-strain data both for the loading and the unloading processes. The hysteresis behavior reflects the improvement in the efficiency and performance of the motion of the muscle-tendon unit at high strain rates. The results of the model demonstrate the microstructural importance of proteoglycans in determining the functional viscoelastic adaptability of the macroscopic tendon.

  19. Parameter optimization for the visco-hyperelastic constitutive model of tendon using FEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, C Y; Ng, G Y F; Wang, Z W; Tsui, C P; Zhang, G

    2011-01-01

    Numerous constitutive models describing the mechanical properties of tendons have been proposed during the past few decades. However, few were widely used owing to the lack of implementation in the general finite element (FE) software, and very few systematic studies have been done on selecting the most appropriate parameters for these constitutive laws. In this work, the visco-hyperelastic constitutive model of the tendon implemented through the use of three-parameter Mooney-Rivlin form and sixty-four-parameter Prony series were firstly analyzed using ANSYS FE software. Afterwards, an integrated optimization scheme was developed by coupling two optimization toolboxes (OPTs) of ANSYS and MATLAB for estimating these unknown constitutive parameters of the tendon. Finally, a group of Sprague-Dawley rat tendons was used to execute experimental and numerical simulation investigation. The simulated results showed good agreement with the experimental data. An important finding revealed that too many Maxwell elements was not necessary for assuring accuracy of the model, which is often neglected in most open literatures. Thus, all these proved that the constitutive parameter optimization scheme was reliable and highly efficient. Furthermore, the approach can be extended to study other tendons or ligaments, as well as any visco-hyperelastic solid materials.

  20. Biomechanical evaluation of acellular collagen matrix augmented Achilles tendon repair in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lin; Olsen, Raymond E; Spalazzi, Jeffrey P; Davisson, Twana

    2010-01-01

    The rate of rerupture of repaired Achilles tendon in young and athletic populations remains high despite improvement in surgical techniques, suture design, and postsurgical management. Acellular biological matrices can be used to enhance the immediate strength of repaired tendons and to serve as scaffolds for cell in-growth and constructive tissue remodeling. A number of commercially available matrices have been used clinically, albeit with varying degrees of success and failure. The disparity is likely attributable to the different physical and biochemical properties of individual matrices. In this study, we investigated the biomechanical characteristics of 2 different acellular collagen matrices, namely TissueMend and GraftJacket, using a sheep Achilles tendon repair model. Static and cyclic creep, cyclic and linear construct stiffness, maximum load to failure, and displacement at maximum load were determined at time zero. We found that the maximum load to failure, displacement, and ultimate failure mode were similar between tendons augmented with either acellular collagen matrix; however, TissueMend augmentation yielded lower creep and smaller construct elongation than did GraftJacket. The results indicated that the strength of TissueMend-augmented tendons and GraftJacket-augmented tendons was not statistically significantly different, although tendons augmented with TissueMend displayed greater stiffness, which may be clinically advantageous in the restoration of ruptured tendons. Copyright 2010 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hamstrings tendon graft preparation for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using the WhipKnotTM soft tissue cinch technique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Masoumiganjgah

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAppropriate graft tension and secure graft incorporation inbone tunnels are essential for successful anterior cruciateligament (ACL reconstruction using hamstrings tendonautografts. The WhipKnot™ soft tissue cinch, introduced bySmith and Nephew in 2004, is an alternative option to thecommonly used whipstitch technique during preparation ofthe hamstring autograft in ACL reconstruction.AimsTo investigate the effectiveness of the WhipKnot™ softtissue cinch and technique during the preparation of thetendon graft for ACL reconstruction.MethodA total of 33 ACL reconstruction operations performedbetween February 2011 and December 2011 were includedin this study. These were performed by a single seniorsurgeon who used the Whipknot™ technique for thepreparation of each graft. Four were used for eachoperation; two for each end of the harvested hamstringstendons, including semitendinosus and gracilis tendonsrespectively.ResultsIn total, 132 WhipKnots were used during the kneeoperations. Use of the WhipKnot™ technique resulted insuccessful graft preparations, tensioning and effective graftplacement in the tibial and femoral tunnels in almost allinstances. Only one case of WhipKnot™ failure (slippagewas recorded.ConclusionThese results indicate that the Whipknot™ technique is asafe, reliable and practical option for the preparation of thehamstrings autografts.

  2. Using pre-operative MRI to predict intraoperative hamstring graft size for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, Jeff; Elkurbo, Mohamed; McRae, Sheila; Chiu, James; Froese, Warren; MacDonald, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Large variation in tendon size between individuals makes hamstring graft diameter for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction unpredictable. Inadequate graft diameter may necessitate an alternative source of tissue requiring pre-operative planning. The purpose of this study was to determine whether magnetic resonance image (MRI) measurements and clinical anthropometric data are predictive of hamstring tendon graft diameter. Data from 109 patients having ACL reconstruction with semitendinosus-gracilis (STGT) autograft were retrospectively evaluated. Cross-sectional area (CSA) of the gracilis tendon (GT) and semitendinosus tendon (ST) were determined from pre-operative MRI scans. Variables included pre-operative height, weight, body mass index (BMI), age and gender; and intra-operative graft diameter. Correlations between anthropometric variables, hamstring tendons CSA and intra-operative graft diameter were calculated. Multiple stepwise regression was performed to assess the predictive value of these variables to graft diameter. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated to evaluate the utility of MRI CSA measurements in accurately identifying inadequate graft diameter (<8 mm). All anthropometric variables were positively correlated with intraoperative graft diameter (p < 0.01). Semitendinosus-gracilis tendon CSA (p < 0.001) and STGT CSA and weight (p < 0.001) were significantly predictive models of graft diameter. Sensitivity and specificity were 79 and 74 %, respectively. The strongest indicators of a four-stranded STGT graft for primary ACL reconstruction were STGT CSA on MRI plus weight. Measurement of graft diameter can be performed pre-operatively via MRI to identify tendons that may be of inadequate size for ACL reconstruction. This can assist with surgical planning to determine the most appropriate graft choice. III.

  3. Transplantation of tendon-derived stem cells pre-treated with connective tissue growth factor and ascorbic acid in vitro promoted better tendon repair in a patellar tendon window injury rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Pauline Po Yee; Wong, On Tik; Lee, Yuk Wa

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) with connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and ascorbic acid promoted their tenogenic differentiation. We investigated the effects of TDSCs pre-treated with CTGF and ascorbic acid on tendon repair in a patellar tendon window injury rat model. Green fluorescent protein-TDSCs (GFP-TDSCs) were pre-treated with or without CTGF and ascorbic acid for 2 weeks before transplantation. The patellar tendons of rats were injured and divided into three groups: fibrin glue-only group (control group), untreated and treated TDSC group. The rats were followed up until week 16. The treated TDSCs accelerated and enhanced the quality of tendon repair compared with untreated TDSCs up to week 8, which was better than that in the controls up to week 16 as shown by histology, ultrasound imaging and biomechanical test. The fibrils in the treated TDSC group showed better alignment and larger size compared with those in the control group at week 8 (P = 0.004). There was lower risk of ectopic mineralization after transplantation of treated or untreated TDSCs (all P ≤ 0.050). The transplanted cells proliferated and could be detected in the window wound up to weeks 2 to 4 and week 8 for the untreated and treated TDSC groups, respectively. The transplantation of TDSCs promoted tendon repair up to week 16, with CTGF and ascorbic acid pre-treatment showing the best results up to week 8. Pre-treatment of TDSCs with CTGF and ascorbic acid may be used to further enhance the rate and quality of tendon repair after injury. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The force-length relationship of a muscle-tendon complex : experimental results and model calculations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, Maarten F.; Ettema, Gertjan C.; Huijing, Peter A.

    1990-01-01

    Models are useful when studying how architectural and physiological properties of muscle-tendon complexes are related to function, because they allow for the simulation of the behaviour of such complexes during natural movements. In the construction of these models, evaluation of their accuracy is

  5. Local administration of Trolox, a vitamin E analog, reduced tendon adhesion in a chicken model of flexor digitorum profundus tendon injury

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Yuk Wa; Fu, Sai Chuen; Mok, Tsui Yu; Chan, Kai Ming; Hung, Leung Kim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hand flexor tendon injuries are compromised with tendon adhesion. Tendon adhesion forms between flexor tendon and tendon sheath, reduces the range of motion of fingers, and affects their function. Oxidative stress is increased in flexor tendon after injury and might play a role in tendon adhesion formation. Trolox (6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid), a water-soluble analog of vitamin E, is antioxidative. Trolox reduced oxidative stress and the expression of fi...

  6. Achilles Tendonitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You Treat Achilles Tendonitis? en español Tendinitis de Aquiles Kim didn't do much over the summer ... Achilles Tendonitis and Who Gets It? Your Achilles tendon is located at the back of your foot, ...

  7. Comparison of tendon-bone healing between autografts and allografts after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yunshen; Li, Hong; Tao, Hongyue; Hua, Yinghui; Chen, Jiwu; Chen, Shiyi

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the study is to compare tendon-bone healing between autograft tendons and allograft tendons after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using 3.0T magnetic resonance imaging. A total of 36 participants (18 with autograft and 18 with allograft reconstruction) underwent MRI scans at least 2 years after the ACL reconstruction operation. Oblique axial images were obtained on three-dimensional dual-echo steady-state images and imported into solid modelling software for three-dimensional model reconstruction of the bone tunnel. The graft signal intensity in the tunnel, tendon-bone interface, tunnel morphology, and tunnel area was analysed using the Siemens software packages to determine the tendon-bone healing between the groups. For the tunnel morphology, both groups exhibited bone tunnel enlargement either at the femoral or tibial tunnel aperture. For the tendon-bone interface, one patient in the autograft group and two patients in the allograft group exhibited a significant fibrous scar tissue bands at the tendon-bone interface. The graft signal/noise quotient values of the allograft group were higher than the autograft group. However, there was no significant difference in the tunnel area between the allograft group and the autograft group. Although the autograft tendons exhibited a better remodelling effect than did the allograft tendons in the bone tunnel, there was no significant difference in the tendon-bone healing between the autograft tendons and the allograft tendons postoperatively. These findings indicate that the biomechanical effect of graft motion may play a significant role in the tunnel aperture. III.

  8. Sensitivity of subject-specific models to Hill muscle-tendon model parameters in simulations of gait

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carbone, Vincenzo; van der Krogt, Marjolein; Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Subject-specific musculoskeletal (MS) models of the lower extremity are essential for applications such as predicting the effects of orthopedic surgery. We performed an extensive sensitivity analysis to assess the effects of potential errors in Hill muscle–tendon (MT) model parameters for each of

  9. Sensitivity of subject-specific models to Hill muscle-tendon model parameters in simulations of gait

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carbone, V.; Krogt, M.M. van der; Koopman, H.F.J.M.; Verdonschot, N.J.

    2016-01-01

    Subject-specific musculoskeletal (MS) models of the lower extremity are essential for applications such as predicting the effects of orthopedic surgery. We performed an extensive sensitivity analysis to assess the effects of potential errors in Hill muscle-tendon (MT) model parameters for each of

  10. One-dimensional Arterial Network Model for Bypass Grafts Assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Ghigo, Arthur; Wang, Xiaofei; Lagrée, Pierre-Yves; Fullana, Jose-Maria

    2016-01-01

    We propose an arterial network model based on 1D blood hemodynamic equations to study the behavior of different vascular surgical bypass grafts in case of an arterial occlusive pathology: an obliteration or stenosis of the iliac artery. We investigate the performances of three different bypass grafts (Aorto-Femoral, Axillo-Femoral and cross-over Femoral) depending on the degree of obliteration of the stenosis. Numerical simulations show that all bypass grafts are efficient since we retrieve in all cases the normal hemodynamics in the stenosed region while ensuring at the same time a global healthy circulation. We analyze in particular the Axillo-Femoral bypass graft by performing hundreds of simulations by varying the values of the Young's modulus [0.1--50 MPa] and the radius [0.01--5 cm] of the bypass graft. We show that the Young's modulus and radius of commercial bypass grafts are optimal in terms of hemodynamic considerations. The numerical findings prove that this approach could be used to optimize or pl...

  11. Single-stage reconstruction of flexor tendons with vascularized tendon transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavadas, P C; Pérez-García, A; Thione, A; Lorca-García, C

    2015-03-01

    The reconstruction of finger flexor tendons with vascularized flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) tendon grafts (flaps) based on the ulnar vessels as a single stage is not a popular technique. We reviewed 40 flexor tendon reconstructions (four flexor pollicis longus and 36 finger flexors) with vascularized FDS tendon grafts in 38 consecutive patients. The donor tendons were transferred based on the ulnar vessels as a single-stage procedure (37 pedicled flaps, three free flaps). Four patients required composite tendon and skin island transfer. Minimum follow-up was 12 months, and functional results were evaluated using a total active range of motion score. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to evaluate the factors that could be associated with the postoperative total active range of motion. The average postoperative total active range of motion (excluding the thumbs) was 178.05° (SD 50°). The total active range of motion was significantly lower for patients who were reconstructed with free flaps and for those who required composite tendon and skin island flap. Age, right or left hand, donor/motor tendon and pulley reconstruction had no linear effect on total active range of motion. Overall results were comparable with a published series on staged tendon grafting but with a lower complication rate. Vascularized pedicled tendon grafts/flaps are useful in the reconstruction of defects of finger flexor tendons in a single stage, although its role in the reconstructive armamentarium remains to be clearly established. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. A new strain energy function for modelling ligaments and tendons whose fascicles have a helical arrangement of fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Tom

    2015-09-18

    A new strain energy function for the hyperelastic modelling of ligaments and tendons whose fascicles have a helical arrangement of fibrils is derived. The stress-strain response of a single fascicle whose fibrils exhibit varying levels of crimp throughout its radius is calculated and used to determine the form of the strain energy function. The new constitutive law is used to model uniaxial extension test data for human patellar tendon and is shown to provide an excellent fit, with the average relative error being 9.8%. It is then used to model shear and predicts that the stresses required to shear a tendon are much smaller than those required to uniaxially stretch it to the same strain level. Finally, the strain energy function is used to model ligaments and tendons whose fascicles are helical, and the relative effects of the fibril helix angle, the fascicle helix angle and the fibril crimp variable are compared. It is shown that they all have a significant effect; the fibril crimp variable governs the non-linearity of the stress-strain curve, whereas the helix angles primarily affect its stiffness. Smaller values of the helix angles lead to stiffer tendons; therefore, the model predicts that one would expect to see fewer helical sub-structures in stiff positional tendons, and more in those that are required to be more flexible. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Substance P accelerates hypercellularity and angiogenesis in tendon tissue and enhances paratendinitis in response to Achilles tendon overuse in a tendinopathy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Gustav; Backman, Ludvig J; Scott, Alexander; Lorentzon, Ronny; Forsgren, Sture; Danielson, Patrik

    2011-10-01

    Tenocytes produce substance P (SP), and its receptor (neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R)) is expressed throughout the tendon tissue, especially in patients with tendinopathy and tissue changes (tendinosis) including hypercellularity and vascular proliferation. Considering the known effects of SP, one might ask whether SP contributes to these changes. To test whether development of tendinosis-like changes (hypercellularity and angiogenesis) is accelerated during a 1-week course of exercise with local administration of SP in an established Achilles tendinopathy model. Rabbits were subjected to a protocol of Achilles tendon overuse for 1 week, in conjunction with SP injections in the paratenon. Exercised control animals received NaCl injections or no injections, and unexercised, uninjected controls were also used. Tenocyte number and vascular density, as well as paratendinous inflammation, were evaluated. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridisation to detect NK-1R were conducted. Results There was a significant increase in tenocyte number in the SP-injected and NaCl-injected groups compared with both unexercised and exercised, uninjected controls. Tendon blood vessels increased in number in the SP-injected group compared with unexercised controls, a finding not seen in NaCl-injected controls or in uninjected, exercised animals. Paratendinous inflammation was more pronounced in the SP-injected group than in the NaCl controls. NK-1R was detected in blood vessel walls, nerves, inflammatory cells and tenocytes. SP accelerated the development of tendinosis-like changes in the rabbit Achilles tendon, which supports theories of a potential role of SP in tendinosis development; a fact of clinical interest since SP effects can be effectively blocked. The angiogenic response to SP injections seems related to paratendinitis.

  14. Graft Flow Unaffected by Full Occlusion of Left Anterior Descending Artery during Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting in a Porcine Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torstensson, Gustav Nils Johannes; Torp, Thomas Lee; Rasuli-Oskuii, Nader

    2013-01-01

    Background: We investigated in a porcine model whether measuring both the flow distal to an anastomosis and the graft transit time flow (TTF) gives a more accurate picture of the true blood flow in the left anterior descending artery (LAD) than graft TTF measurement alone.Methods: We performed off...

  15. Magnesium inference screw supports early graft incorporation with inhibition of graft degradation in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pengfei; Han, Pei; Zhao, Changli; Zhang, Shaoxiang; Zhang, Xiaonong; Chai, Yimin

    2016-05-01

    Patients after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery commonly encounters graft failure in the initial phase of rehabilitation. The inhibition of graft degradation is crucial for the successful reconstruction of the ACL. Here, we used biodegradable high-purity magnesium (HP Mg) screws in the rabbit model of ACL reconstruction with titanium (Ti) screws as a control and analyzed the graft degradation and screw corrosion using direct pull-out tests, microCT scanning, and histological and immunohistochemical staining. The most noteworthy finding was that tendon graft fixed by HP Mg screws exhibited biomechanical properties substantially superior to that by Ti screws and the relative area of collagen fiber at the tendon-bone interface was much larger in the Mg group, when severe graft degradation was identified in the histological analysis at 3 weeks. Semi-quantitative immunohistochemical results further elucidated that the MMP-13 expression significantly decreased surrounding HP Mg screws with relatively higher Collagen II expression. And HP Mg screws exhibited uniform corrosion behavior without displacement or loosening in the femoral tunnel. Therefore, our results demonstrated that Mg screw inhibited graft degradation and improved biomechanical properties of tendon graft during the early phase of graft healing and highlighted its potential in ACL reconstruction.

  16. Transplantation of Achilles Tendon Treated With Bone Morphogenetic Protein 7 Promotes Meniscus Regeneration in a Rat Model of Massive Meniscal Defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeki, Nobutake; Muneta, Takeshi; Koga, Hideyuki; Katagiri, Hiroki; Otabe, Koji; Okuno, Makiko; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Kobayashi, Eiji; Matsumoto, Kenji; Saito, Hirohisa; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study was undertaken to examine whether bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP-7) induces ectopic cartilage formation in the rat tendon, and whether transplantation of tendon treated with BMP-7 promotes meniscal regeneration. Additionally, we analyzed the relative contributions of host and donor cells on the healing process after tendon transplantation in a rat model. Methods BMP-7 was injected in situ into the Achilles tendon of rats, and the histologic findings and gene profile were evaluated. Achilles tendon injected with 1 μg of BMP-7 was transplanted into a meniscal defect in rats. The regenerated meniscus and articular cartilage were evaluated at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Achilles tendon from LacZ-transgenic rats was transplanted into the meniscal defect in wild-type rats, and vice versa. Results Injection of BMP-7 into the rat Achilles tendon induced the fibrochondrocyte differentiation of tendon cells and changed the collagen gene profile of tendon tissue to more closely approximate meniscal tissue. Transplantation of the rat Achilles tendon into a meniscal defect increased meniscal size. The rats that received the tendon treated with BMP-7 had a meniscus matrix that exhibited increased Safranin O and type II collagen staining, and showed a delay in articular cartilage degradation. Using LacZ-transgenic rats, we determined that the regeneration of the meniscus resulted from contribution from both donor and host cells. Conclusion Our findings indicate that BMP-7 induces ectopic cartilage formation in rat tendons. Transplantation of Achilles tendon treated with BMP-7 promotes meniscus regeneration and prevents cartilage degeneration in a rat model of massive meniscal defect. Native cells in the rat Achilles tendon contribute to meniscal regeneration. PMID:23897174

  17. Quadriceps tendon allografts as an alternative to Achilles tendon allografts: a biomechanical comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabe, Isaac; Hunter, Shawn

    2014-12-01

    Quadriceps tendon with a patellar bone block may be a viable alternative to Achilles tendon for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) if it is, at a minimum, a biomechanically equivalent graft. The objective of this study was to directly compare the biomechanical properties of quadriceps tendon and Achilles tendon allografts. Quadriceps and Achilles tendon pairs from nine research-consented donors were tested. All specimens were processed to reduce bioburden and terminally sterilized by gamma irradiation. Specimens were subjected to a three phase uniaxial tension test performed in a custom environmental chamber to maintain the specimens at a physiologic temperature (37 ± 2 °C) and misted with a 0.9 % NaCl solution. There were no statistical differences in seven of eight structural and mechanical between the two tendon types. Quadriceps tendons exhibited a significantly higher displacement at maximum load and significantly lower stiffness than Achilles tendons. The results of this study indicated a biomechanical equivalence of aseptically processed, terminally sterilized quadriceps tendon grafts with bone block to Achilles tendon grafts with bone block. The significantly higher displacement at maximum load, and lower stiffness observed for quadriceps tendons may be related to the failure mode. Achilles tendons had a higher bone avulsion rate than quadriceps tendons (86 % compared to 12 %, respectively). This was likely due to observed differences in bone block density between the two tendon types. This research supports the use of quadriceps tendon allografts in lieu of Achilles tendon allografts for ACL-R.

  18. Tendon Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What OT Can Do: Video For Professionals Ethics Tendon Injuries When a person experiences a tendon injury in the hand that affects the ability ... plan. What can a person with a hand tendon injury do? Implement a home exercise program recommended ...

  19. Biomechanical and histological evaluations of the doubled semitendinosus tendon autograft after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Eiji; Yasuda, Kazunori; Katsura, Taro; Hayashi, Riku; Kotani, Yoshihisa; Tohyama, Harukazu

    2012-02-01

    A sheep or goat anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction model with the semitendinosus tendon autograft has not as of yet been established. The semitendinosus tendon graft may be necrotized after ACL reconstruction until 12 weeks. Structural properties of the femur-graft-tibia complex may not be restored to the normal ACL level even at 12 months after surgery. Controlled laboratory study. Thirty-eight mature sheep were used. In each animal, the right knee underwent ACL reconstruction using the semitendinosus tendon autograft. Two of them were not tested because of pneumonia. Twenty of 36 sheep were used for biomechanical evaluations. Five randomly selected animals were sacrificed at 0, 12, 24, or 52 weeks after surgery. In each animal, both the knees were harvested, and the left knee was used to obtain the control data. The remaining 16 sheep were used for histological evaluation. Two or 3 randomly selected animals were sacrificed at 0, 2, 6, 12, 24, or 52 weeks after surgery. The tendon graft was predominantly acellular at 2 weeks. Although cell infiltration increased at 6 weeks, the core portion remained necrotic even at 12 weeks. At 24 and 52 weeks, the necrotic lesion disappeared in the core portion. In each period, the anteroposterior translation of the reconstructed knee remained significantly greater than that of the control (P tendon autograft until 12 weeks. Although the structural properties of the femur-graft-tibia complex gradually improved, they were not completely restored to the femur-ACL-tibia complex level even at 52 weeks. Remodeling of the semitendinosus tendon autograft after ACL reconstruction is not different from that of the bone-tendon-bone graft. This study has suggested that vigorous activity should not be permitted for patients in the early periods after ACL reconstruction using semitendinosus tendon autografts, which are necrotized and weakened after surgery.

  20. Acceleration of tendon healing using US guided intratendinous injection of bevacizumab: First pre-clinical study on a murine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dallaudière, Benjamin, E-mail: bendallau64@hotmail.fr [Service de Radiologie, Hôpital universitaire Bichat, Paris (France); Inserm U698, Hôpital universitaire Bichat, Paris (France); Université de Médecine Paris Diderot (France); Lempicki, Marta [Service de Radiologie, Hôpital universitaire Bichat, Paris (France); Université de Médecine Paris Diderot (France); Pesquer, Lionel [Centre d’Imagerie Ostéo Articulaire, Clinique du Sport de Bordeaux-Mérignac (France); Louedec, Liliane [Inserm U698, Hôpital universitaire Bichat, Paris (France); Preux, Pierre Marie [Laboratoire de Biostatistiques, Faculté de médecine, Limoges (France); Meyer, Philippe [Centre d’Imagerie Ostéo Articulaire, Clinique du Sport de Bordeaux-Mérignac (France); Hess, Agathe [Service de Radiologie, Hôpital universitaire Bichat, Paris (France); Université de Médecine Paris Diderot (France); Durieux, Marie Hèlène Moreau [Centre d’Imagerie Ostéo Articulaire, Clinique du Sport de Bordeaux-Mérignac (France); Hummel, Vincent; Larbi, Ahmed [Service de Radiologie, Hôpital universitaire Bichat, Paris (France); Deschamps, Lydia [Service d’ Anatomopathologie, Hôpital universitaire Bichat, Paris (France); and others

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Tendinopathy shows early disorganized collagen fibers with neo-angiogenesis on histology. Peri-tendinous injection of corticosteroid is the commonly accepted strategy despite the abscence of inflammation in tendinosis. The aim of our study was to assess the potential of intratendinous injection of an anti-angiogenic drug (bevacizumab, AA) to treat tendinopathy in a murine model of patellar and Achilles tendinopathy, and to evaluate its local toxicity. Materials and method: Forty rats (160 patellar and Achilles tendons) were used for this study. We induced tendinosis (T+) in 80 tendons by injecting under ultrasonography (US) guidance Collagenase 1{sup ®} (day 0 = D0, patellar = 40 and Achilles = 40). Clinical examination and tendon US were performed at D3, immediately followed by either AA (AAT+, n = 40) or physiological serum (PST+, n = 40, control) US-guided intratendinous injection. Follow-up at D6 and D13 using clinical, US and histology, and comparison between the 2 groups were performed. To study AA toxicity we compared the 80 remaining normal tendons (T−) after injecting AA in 40 (AAT−). Results: All AAT+ showed a better joint mobilization compared to PST+ at D6 (p = 0.004) with thinner US tendon diameters (p < 0.004), and less disorganized collagen fibers and neovessels on histology (p < 0.05). There was no difference at D13 regarding clinical status, US tendon diameter and histology (p > 0.05). Comparison between AAT− and T− showed no AA toxicity on tendon (p = 0.18). Conclusion: Our study suggests that high dose mono-injection of AA in tendinosis, early after the beginning of the disease, accelerates tendon's healing, with no local toxicity.

  1. Human flexor tendon tissue engineering: decellularization of human flexor tendons reduces immunogenicity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Shyam S; Woon, Colin Y L; Kraus, Armin; Megerle, Kai; Choi, Matthew S S; Pridgen, Brian C; Pham, Hung; Chang, James

    2012-04-01

    In mutilating hand injuries, tissue engineered tendon grafts may provide a reconstructive solution. We have previously described a method to decellularize cadaveric human flexor tendons while preserving mechanical properties and biocompatibility. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the immunogenicity and strength of these grafts when implanted into an immunocompetent rat model. Cadaveric human flexor tendons were divided into two groups. Group 1 was untreated, and Group 2 was decellularized by treatment with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and peracetic acid (PAA). Both groups were then analyzed for the presence of major histocompatibility complexes by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Pair-matched tendons from each group were then placed into the dorsal subcutaneous tissue and anchored to the spinal ligaments of Wistar rats for 2 or 4 weeks, and harvested. The infiltration of B-cells and macrophages was determined using IHC. The explants where then subjected to mechanical testing to determine the ultimate tensile stress (UTS) and elastic modulus (EM). Statistical analysis was performed using a paired Student's t-test. The decellularization protocol successfully removed cells and MHC-1 complexes. At 2 weeks after implantation, there was increased infiltration of B-cells in Group 1 (untreated) compared with Group 2 (acellular), both in the capsule and tendon substance. There was improved ultimate tensile stress (UTS, 42.7 ± 8.3 vs. 22.8 ± 7.8 MPa, ptendons that were decellularized. At 4 weeks, there was continued B-cell infiltration in Group 1 (untreated) compared with Group 2 (acellular). There was no appreciable difference in macrophage infiltration at both time points. At 4 weeks Group 2 (acellular) demonstrated persistently greater UTS (40.5 ± 9.1 vs. 14.6 ± 4.2 MPa, ptendons that were decellularized with SDS, EDTA, and PAA resulted in removal of cellular antigens and a decreased immune response when placed into Wistar

  2. Striated muscle fiber apoptosis after experimental tendon lesion in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Carla; Rovesta, Claudio; Ferretti, Marzia

    2012-10-01

    Tendon lesions induce muscular atrophy, the nature of which has not yet been clearly related to lesion etiology and entity. In the present study, tendon and muscle alterations were assessed after experimental tendon lesion of the Infraspinatus muscle in young rats. The consequences of lesions differed on the basis of both extension and injured tissue vascularization, that is apoptosis and/or degeneration, differing mainly by energy demands: apoptosis requires high energy levels (proportional to vascular supply), but degeneration does not. It is well known that tendons are poorly supplied with blood compared with muscular masses, which are abundantly vascularized. Five weeks after tendon surgical section, tendon/muscle samples were taken for TUNEL and transmission electron microscopy. The structural results reported here identified different tendon/muscle alterations: degeneration of tendon without signs of apoptosis, and atrophy of muscle fibers due only to apoptosis. This led to the formulation of the following hypothetical sequence of events: a tendon lesion, not recovering quickly due to the poor tendon blood supply, results in degeneration of the injured tendon, which, in turn, induces a partial disuse of the muscle mass, which consequently atrophies (proportionally to the severity of tendon lesion) by striated muscular fiber apoptosis. The authors suggest that the different behavior of the two tissues depends on the marked difference in their vascularization. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Anatomy © 2012 Anatomical Society.

  3. Face Graft Scaffold Production in a Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duisit, Jérôme; Amiel, Hadrien; Orlando, Giuseppe; Dedriche, Adeline; Behets, Catherine; Gianello, Pierre; Lengelé, Benoît

    2018-01-01

    As a route toward face bioengineering, the authors previously reported the production of a complete scaffold by perfusion-decellularization of a porcine ear subunit graft and partial recellularization. To extend the scaffold to the whole face and to down-scale it, they applied their findings to a rodent hemifacial graft model. After the animals were killed, seven full-thickness rat hemiface grafts were harvested with the common carotid artery and the external jugular vein as a pedicle, and cannulated. Grafts were decellularized by a detergent-based protocol: either by perfusion through the common carotid artery, or by mechanical agitation. After decellularization, samples were analyzed for DNA quantification and histology by hematoxylin and eosin, Masson trichrome, Sirius red, or Safranin O staining. Vascular tree patency was assessed by microangiographic computed tomography after contrast injection. Cell-friendly extracellular matrix was assessed by seeding of human adipose-derived stem cells and vital staining after 7 days of culture. Decellularization was effective in both groups, with a cell clearance at all levels, with the exception of cartilage areas in the agitation-treated groups. Microscopic assessment found a well-preserved extracellular matrix in both groups. Vascular contrast was found in all regions of the scaffolds. After the animals were killed, seeded cells were found viable and well distributed on all scaffolds. The authors successfully decellularized face grafts in a rodent model, with a preserved vascular tree. Perfusion-decellularization led to better and faster results compared with mechanical agitation but is not mandatory in this model. The rat face is an interesting scaffold model for further recellularization studies, in the final goal of human face bioengineering.

  4. Modeling and motion compensation of a bidirectional tendon-sheath actuated system for robotic endoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhenglong; Wang, Zheng; Phee, Soo Jay

    2015-04-01

    Recent study shows that tendon-sheath system (TSS) has great potential in the development of surgical robots for endoscopic surgery. It is able to deliver adequate power in a light-weight and compact package. And the flexibility and compliance of the tendon-sheath system make it capable of adapting to the long and winding path in the flexible endoscope. However, the main difficulties in precise control of such system fall on the nonlinearities of the system behavior and absence of necessary sensory feedback at the surgical end-effectors. Since accurate position control of the tool is a prerequisite for efficacy, safety and intuitive user-experience in robotic surgery, in this paper we propose a system modeling approach for motion compensation. Based on a bidirectional actuated system using two separate tendon-sheaths, motion transmission is firstly characterized. Two types of positional errors due to system backlash and environment loading are defined and modeled. Then a model-based feedforward compensation method is proposed for open-loop control, giving the system abilities to adjust according to changes in the transmission route configuration without any information feedback from the distal end. A dedicated experimental platform emulating a bidirectional TSS robotic system for endoscopic surgery is built for testing. Proposed positional errors are identified and verified. The performance of the proposed motion compensation is evaluated by trajectory tracking under different environment loading conditions. And the results demonstrate that accurate position control can be achieved even if the transmission route configuration is updated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Semitendinosus Tendon for Solitary Use in Anterior Cruciate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament requires adequate tendon length (>28 cm) and four strand construct diameter (>8 mm). This study sought to determine the dimensions of the semitendinosus tendon graft among Kenyans. Methods: Forty pairs of ST tendons were harvested from formalin fixed cadavers by ...

  6. Influence of joint models on lower-limb musculo-tendon forces and threedimensional joint reaction forces during gait

    OpenAIRE

    Dumas, Raphaël; Moissenet, Florent; GASPARUTTO, Xavier; Cheze, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Several three-dimensional (3D) lower-limb musculo-skeletal models have been developed for gait analysis and different hip, knee and ankle joint models have been considered in the literature. Conversely to the influence of the musculotendon geometry, the influence of the joint models - i.e. number of degrees of freedom and passive joint moments - on the estimated musculo-tendon forces and 3D joint reaction forces has not been extensively examined. In this paper musculo-tendon forces and 3D joi...

  7. Regeneration of Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tendon Tear After Ultrasound-Guided Injection With Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Rabbit Model

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Gi-Young; Kwon, Dong Rak; Lee, Sang Chul

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic effects of ultrasound-guided human umbilical cord blood (UBC)-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) injection to regenerate a full-thickness subscapularis tendon tear in a rabbit model were studied. Gross morphology and histology of the injected tendon were evaluated, and improvement in functional ability was assessed by motion analysis. Histology revealed that UCB-derived MSCs induced regeneration of the rotator cuff tendon; motion analysis showed improved walking capacity.

  8. Minimally invasive, endoscopic Achilles tendon reconstruction using semitendinosus and gracilis tendons with Endobutton stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piontek, Tomasz; Bąkowski, Paweł; Ciemniewska-Gorzela, Kinga; Grygorowicz, Monika

    2016-06-03

    Plantaris tendon, peronus brevis tendon and flexor hallucis longus tendon augmentation, commonly used in Achilles tendon rupture, often lead to weakening of injured foot and they require the immobilization after the surgery. It is essential to develop the technique, which gives no such limitation and allows for immediate functional improvement. We present our method of minimally invasive, endoscopic Achilles tendon reconstruction using semitendinosus and gracilis tendons with Endobutton stabilization. Posterolateral and posteromedial portals were made approximately 3 cm above the posterosuperior part of the calcaneus to clean the area of the Achilles tendon endoscopically. Then the hamstrings are harvested and prepared for the "Endobutton" system. A midline incision of the skin is performed approximately 1 cm above the posterosuperior part of the calcaneus to approach to the posterosuperior part of the calcaneus. Then under fluoroscopy the calcaneus was drilled through using K-wire. The distal end of the graft equipped with an Endobutton loop was entered into the drilled tunnel in the calcaneus. Later, 8 consecutive skin incisions are performed. Proximal ends of the graft were brought out through the native Achilles tendon reaching medial and lateral skin incisions. The final step was to transfer and tie the graft ends through the most proximal skin incision. This minimally invasive, endoscopic technique allows reconstruction of the Achilles tendon using semitendinosus and gracilis tendons with Endobutton stabilization and can be used in so-called "difficult", resistant cases as a "salvage procedure".

  9. Alteration of the material properties of the normal supraspinatus tendon by nicotine treatment in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Ryogo; Sano, Hirotaka; Kishimoto, Koshi N; Sakamoto, Naoya; Sato, Masaaki; Itoi, Eiji

    2010-10-01

    Several studies have shown that nicotine has a detrimental effect on the development of rotator cuff tear. However, little is known about its mechanism. We evaluated the effect of nicotine on the maximum tensile load, the maximum tensile stress, and the elastic modulus of the supraspinatus tendon in a rat model. 27 rats were randomly assigned to 3 groups. Subcutaneously implanted osmotic pumps delivered two different concentrations of nicotine solution (high dose: 45 ng/mL; low dose: 22.5 ng/mL) or saline solution (controls) over a 12-week period. The level of serum cotinine, a breakdown product of nicotine, was evaluated. We performed tensile testing using the left supraspinatus tendon in each rat. The maximum load of the supraspinatus tendon was measured, and the maximum tensile stress and elastic modulus were calculated. Serum cotinine levels showed controlled systemic release of nicotine. The maximum tensile load and stress were similar in the three groups. The elastic modulus was, however, higher in the nicotine groups than in the control group. In a rat model, nicotine caused a change in the material properties of the supraspinatus tendon. This change may predispose to a tear in the supraspinatus tendon.

  10. Rule-based model of vein graft remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minki Hwang

    Full Text Available When vein segments are implanted into the arterial system for use in arterial bypass grafting, adaptation to the higher pressure and flow of the arterial system is accomplished thorough wall thickening and expansion. These early remodeling events have been found to be closely coupled to the local hemodynamic forces, such as shear stress and wall tension, and are believed to be the foundation for later vein graft failure. To further our mechanistic understanding of the cellular and extracellular interactions that lead to global changes in tissue architecture, a rule-based modeling method is developed through the application of basic rules of behaviors for these molecular and cellular activities. In the current method, smooth muscle cell (SMC, extracellular matrix (ECM, and monocytes are selected as the three components that occupy the elements of a grid system that comprise the developing vein graft intima. The probabilities of the cellular behaviors are developed based on data extracted from in vivo experiments. At each time step, the various probabilities are computed and applied to the SMC and ECM elements to determine their next physical state and behavior. One- and two-dimensional models are developed to test and validate the computational approach. The importance of monocyte infiltration, and the associated effect in augmenting extracellular matrix deposition, was evaluated and found to be an important component in model development. Final model validation is performed using an independent set of experiments, where model predictions of intimal growth are evaluated against experimental data obtained from the complex geometry and shear stress patterns offered by a mid-graft focal stenosis, where simulation results show good agreements with the experimental data.

  11. Grafting norms onto the BDI agent model

    OpenAIRE

    Tufis, Mihnea; Ganascia, Jean-Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    This is an author-created version, to serve the purpose of HAL archiving. The copyright holder of the original contribution is Springer (URL specified in this deposit).; International audience; This chapter proposes an approach on the design of a normative rational agent based on the Belief-Desire-Intention model. Starting from the famous BDI model, an extension of the BDI execution loop will be presented; this will address such issues as norm instantiation and norm internalization, with a pa...

  12. Constitutive modeling of coronary artery bypass graft with incorporated torsion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horný, L.; Chlup, Hynek; Žitný, R.; Adámek, T.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 2 (2009), s. 273-277 ISSN 0543-5846 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/08/0557 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : coronary artery bypass graft * constitutive model * digital image correlation Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 0.439, year: 2009 http://web.tuke.sk/sjf-kamam/mmams2009/contents.pdf

  13. Males have Inferior Achilles Tendon Material Properties Compared to Females in a Rodent Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardes, A M; Freedman, B R; Fryhofer, G W; Salka, N S; Bhatt, P R; Soslowsky, L J

    2016-10-01

    The Achilles tendon is the most commonly ruptured tendon in the human body. Numerous studies have reported incidence of these injuries to be upwards of five times as common in men than women. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the sex- and hormone-specific differences between Achilles tendon and muscle between female, ovariectomized female (ovarian hormone deficient), and male rats. Uninjured tissues were collected from all groups for mechanical, structural, and histological analysis. Our results showed that while cross-sectional area and failure load were increased in male tendons, female tendons exhibited superior tendon material properties and decreased muscle fiber size. Specifically, linear and dynamic moduli were increased while viscoelastic properties (e.g., hysteresis, percent relaxation) were decreased in female tendons, suggesting greater resistance to deformation under load and more efficient energy transfer, respectively. No differences were identified in tendon organization, cell shape, cellularity, or proteoglycan content. Additionally, no differences in muscle fiber type distribution were observed between groups. In conclusion, inferior tendon mechanical properties and increased muscle fiber size may explain the increased susceptibility for Achilles tendon injury observed clinically in men compared to women.

  14. [Comparative study on animal model of acute Achilles tendon rupture with surgical treatment using platelet-rich plasma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Martínez, J C; Vásquez, C R; Ceja, C B; Fuentes, C C E; Sesma, J F; Benítez, A G

    2012-01-01

    To compare the functional and histologicalal course of two animal model groups with acute Achilles tendon tears using platelet rich plasma. An open clinical trial was conducted with dogs donated by the animal facility of the Autonomous University of Puebla (BUAP, for its acronym in Spanish). Dogs were divided into 2 groups: a control group and a problem group. Intentional surgical Achilles tendon tear was performed to them. The Krackow technique was used to repair the tendon and the control group received platelet rich plasma (PRP) as a clot; the other group did not receive PRP. The dogs were seen at 4 weeks to check functionality using the Farell and Schwarz scale to assess the degree of limping. They were sacrificed at week 5; the tendons were removed and sent to the histopathology lab. Functionality results according to the Farell and Schwarz scale showed grades I and II in the problem group, and grades IV and V in the control group. Histologically, the problem group showed moderate vascular proliferation and abundant fibroblastic proliferation. The control group had mild to moderate vascular proliferation and moderate fibroblastic proliferation. PRP improves tendon healing and this has repercussions on functional recovery.

  15. Increased proteolysis of collagen in an in vitro tensile overload tendon model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Thomas L; Labow, Rosalind S; Avery, Nicholas C; Lee, J Michael

    2007-11-01

    Presently, there is a lack of fundamental understanding regarding changes in collagen's molecular state due to mechanical damage. The bovine tail tendon (BTT; steers approximately 30 months) was characterized and used as an in vitro model for investigating the effect of tensile mechanical overload on collagen susceptibility to proteolysis by acetyltrypsin and alpha-chymotrypsin. Two strain rates with a 1000-fold difference (0.01 and 10 s(-1)) were used, since molecular mechanisms that determine mechanical behavior were presumed to be strain rate dependent. First, it was determined that the BTTs were normal but immature tendons. Water content and collagen content (approx. 60% of wet weight and 80% of dry weight, respectively) and mechanical properties were all within the expected range. The collagen crosslinking was dominated by the intermediate crosslink hydroxylysinonorleucine. Second, tensile overload damage significantly enhanced proteolysis by acetyltrypsin and, to a lesser degree, by alpha-chymotrypsin. Interestingly, proteolysis by acetyltrypsin was greatest for specimens ruptured at 0.01 s(-1) and seemed to occur throughout the specimen. Understanding damage is important for insight into injuries (as in sports and trauma) and for better understanding of collagen fiber stability, durability, and damage mechanisms, aiding in the development of durable tissue-based products for mechanically demanding surgical applications.

  16. Effect of simvastatin on rat supraspinatus tendon mechanical and histological properties in a diet-induced hypercholesterolemia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Jennica J; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2016-11-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a common condition and is a risk factor for tendon rupture, specifically in the supraspinatus tendon. In the clinic, statins are commonly prescribed to lower cholesterol, but little information is available examining the effect of statin treatment on the musculoskeletal system. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the biomechanical and histological effects of statin treatment in a diet-induced hypercholesterolemia model. We hypothesized that hypercholesterolemic rats treated with statins would have improved tendon biomechanical and histological properties compared to hypercholesterolemic rats not receiving daily statin treatment. Thirty adult male Sprague-Dawley rats ate either high-cholesterol (HC) diet (n = 20) or normal chow (CTL, n = 10). After 6 months, a subset of HC rats began daily oral simvastatin dosing (HC+S) at 20 mg/kg. All rats were sacrificed after a total of 9 months (3 months of statin treatment) and evaluated for histology and mechanics. For mechanics, at the insertion region, HC+S group had increased tendon cross-sectional area decreased and modulus. No differences were noted in mechanical properties at the midsubstance. For histology, no differences were noted in the insertion region. In the midsubstance region, HC+S group had more spindle shaped cells. Our results suggest that 3 months of simvastatin treatment in a diet-induced hypercholesterolemia rat model alters some tendon mechanical and histological properties, although a strong conclusion in support of improved parameters cannot be drawn. Therefore, we conclude that simvastatin treatment does not negatively affect tendon properties. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:2009-2015, 2016. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. A 3D steady-state model of a tendon-driven continuum soft manipulator inspired by the octopus arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renda, F; Cianchetti, M; Giorelli, M; Arienti, A; Laschi, C

    2012-06-01

    Control and modelling of continuum robots are challenging tasks for robotic researchers. Most works on modelling are limited to piecewise constant curvature. In many cases they neglect to model the actuators or avoid a continuum approach. In particular, in the latter case this leads to a complex model hardly implemented. In this work, a geometrically exact steady-state model of a tendon-driven manipulator inspired by the octopus arm is presented. It takes a continuum approach, fast enough to be implemented in the control law, and includes a model of the actuation system. The model was experimentally validated and the results are reported. In conclusion, the model presented can be used as a tool for mechanical design of continuum tendon-driven manipulators, for planning control strategies or as internal model in an embedded system.

  18. Comparative biomechanic performances of locked cruciate four-strand flexor tendon repairs in an ex vivo porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croog, Alexander; Goldstein, Rachel; Nasser, Philip; Lee, Steve K

    2007-02-01

    To investigate the effects of 3 different locking configurations on repair strength when used in a cruciate four-strand repair. Sixty fresh porcine flexor tendons were transected and repaired with cruciate four-strand core suture repairs with 3 different locking configurations: simple locks (a modification of the Pennigton method), circle locks, and cross locks. Half of the repairs in each locking group were reinforced with a peripheral suture. The tendon repairs were subjected to linear load-to-failure testing. Outcome measures were 2-mm gap force and ultimate tensile strength. The cross lock repair had significantly greater 2-mm gap force and ultimate tensile strength than the simple lock repair, both with and without a peripheral suture. The cross lock repair showed significantly greater 2-mm gap force without a peripheral suture and significantly greater ultimate tensile strength with a peripheral suture than the circle lock repair. With peripheral reinforcement, the cross lock cruciate repair had a mean 2-mm gap force of 92 N and ultimate tensile strength of 119 N. The cross lock cruciate repair consistently produced the strongest biomechanic performance in all outcome measures. Locking configuration influences the biomechanic performance of cruciate four-strand flexor tendon repairs. Our results suggest that the cruciate repair with cross locks is stronger than repairs with simple locks or circle locks. Whether the results of this ex vivo porcine linear model can be translated to the clinical arena is unknown, because the factors of tendon/sheath friction, tendon healing, and compromised tendon viability from the lock were not addressed.

  19. Application of molecular modeling to polymer grafted nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiga, Shashishekar P.

    Polymer chains undergo conformational transitions in response to a change in solvent quality of their environment, making them strong candidates to be used in smart nanometer-scale devices. In the present work molecular modeling is used to explore grafted polymer structures with various functionalities. The first part of this research focuses on two examples of selective transport through nanopores modified with polymer brush structures. The first is the investigation of solvent flow through nanopores grafted with linear chains. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to demonstrate how a stretch-collapse transition in grafted polymer chains can be used to control solvent flow rate through a nanopore in response to environmental stimuli. A continuum fluid dynamics method based on porous layer model for describing flow through the smart nanopore is described and its accuracy is analyzed by comparing with the results from MD simulations. The continuum method is then applied to determine regulation of water permeation in response to pH through a poly(L-glutamic acid) grafted nanoporous membrane. A second example is use of a rod-coil transition in "bottle brush" molecules that are grafted to the inside of a nanopore to size select macromolecules as they diffuse through the functionalized nanopores. These stimuli-responsive nanopores have a variety of potential applications including molecular sorting, smart drug delivery, and ultrafiltration, as well as controlled chemical release. Tethered polymers play an important role in biological structures as well. In the second part of the research, application of atomistic simulations to characterize the effect of phosphorylation on neurofilament structure is presented. Neurofilaments are intermediate filaments that regulate axonal diameter through their long, flexible side arms extending from the central core. Their functionality is imparted by polymer brush like structure that causes steric repulsion between the

  20. Clinical results of arthroscopic polyglycolic acid sheet patch graft for irreparable rotator cuff tears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Mochizuki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The high retear rates after surgery for irreparable rotator cuff tears can be explained by the healing capacity potential of tendons and the native rotator cuff enthesis characterised by complex morphological structures, called direct insertion. Many experimental researches have focused on biologically augmenting the rotator cuff reconstruction and improving tendon–bone healing of the rotator cuff. The results of the experimental study showed that the polyglycolic acid sheet scaffold material allows for the regeneration of not only tendon-to-tendon, but also tendon-to-bone interface in an animal model. We performed a clinical study of the arthroscopic polyglycolic acid sheet patch graft used for the repair of irreparable rotator cuff tears. One-year clinical results of the repair of irreparable rotator cuff tears by arthroscopic patch graft with a polyglycolic acid sheet demonstrated improved shoulder function and a significantly lower retear rate, compared with patients treated with a fascia lata patch.

  1. Modeling and design of a tendon actuated soft robotic exoskeleton for hemiparetic upper limb rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nycz, Christopher J; Delph, Michael A; Fischer, Gregory S

    2015-01-01

    Robotic technology has recently been explored as a means to rehabilitate and assist individuals suffering from hemiparesis of their upper limbs. Robotic approaches allow for targeted rehabilitation routines which are more personalized and adaptable while providing quantitative measurements of patient outcomes. Development of these technologies into inherently safe and portable devices has the potential to extend the therapy outside of the clinical setting and into the patient's home with benefits to the cost and accessibility of care. To this end, a soft, cable actuated robotic glove and sleeve was designed, modeled, and constructed to provide assistance of finger and elbow movements in a way that mimics the biological function of the tendons. The resulting design increases safety through greater compliance as well as greater tolerance for misalignment with the user's skeletal frame over traditional rigid exoskeletons. Overall this design provides a platform to expand and study the concepts around soft robotic rehabilitation.

  2. Studies in flexor tendon reconstruction: biomolecular modulation of tendon repair and tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, James

    2012-03-01

    The Andrew J. Weiland Medal is presented each year by the American Society for Surgery of the Hand and the American Foundation for Surgery of the Hand for a body of work related to hand surgery research. This essay, awarded the Weiland Medal in 2011, focuses on the clinical need for flexor tendon reconstruction and on investigations into flexor tendon biology. Reconstruction of the upper extremity is limited by 2 major problems after injury or degeneration of the flexor tendons. First, adhesions formed after flexor tendon repair can cause decreased postoperative range of motion and hand function. Second, tendon losses can result from trauma and degenerative diseases, necessitating additional tendon graft material. Tendon adhesions are even more prevalent after tendon grafting; therefore these 2 problems are interrelated and lead to considerable disability. The total costs in terms of disability and inability to return to work are enormous. In this essay, published work from the past 12 years in our basic science laboratory is summarized and presented with the common theme of using molecular techniques to understand the cellular process of flexor tendon wound healing and to create substances and materials to improve tendon repair and regeneration. These are efforts to address 2 interrelated and clinically relevant problems that all hand surgeons face in their practice. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Experimental model of arteriovenous malformation in vitro using biological grafts

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    Sandu Aurelia Mihaela

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs represent a serious health problem all around the world. Experimental models help to better understand the pathophysiology of these lesions. Experiment: We performed an experimental model of AVM using biological grafts, arteries and veins harvested from chicken wings at the elbow joint. We used 14 vessels and we performed 20 end-to-end anastomoses to create a nidus with a single feeding artery and a single draining vein. The system was irrigated with colored solution. The experiment was done according with law in force regarding experimental research activity. Conclusions: Experimental models allow us to understand the hemodynamics and predict the outcome of brain AVMs in humans. This experimental model is a useful tool in understanding the hemodynamic properties of brain AVMs. It is very useful in vascular anastomosis training

  4. Biomechanical evaluation of double Krackow sutures versus the three-loop pulley suture in a canine gastrocnemius tendon avulsion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, L; Banks, Ta; Luckman, P; Smith, B

    2014-11-01

    To compare two Krackow sutures with a three-loop pulley suture for the reattachment of canine gastrocnemius tendons, using a tendon avulsion model. In vitro biomechanical study. Ten paired gastrocnemius tendons were severed at their insertions on the calcaneal tuberosity and repaired with either two modified Krackow sutures or a modified three-loop pulley suture. Sutures were placed in the tendon ends and through diverging bone tunnels in the medial and lateral processes of the calcaneal tuberosity. Tensile loads required to (a) create a 3-mm gap and (b) induce construct failure were measured. The mean load to achieve a 3-mm gap was 77.22 ± 9.72 and 55.85 ± 9.91 N, and to result in construct failure was 106.88 ± 12.74 and 80.86 ± 12.23 N for the Krackow and three-loop pulley suture patterns, respectively. These differences were statistically significant (P sutures were superior to the three-loop pulley pattern in both resistance to 3-mm gap formation and load to failure in a canine gastrocnemius avulsion model. The prevention of gap formation is critical for the success of tenorrhaphy. These results indicate that a suture pattern using two Krackow sutures may be clinically superior to the three-loop pulley suture pattern in the repair of canine gastrocnemius avulsion. Further work is required to determine if this superiority is mirrored in the repair of other tendon avulsion or laceration scenarios. © 2014 Australian Veterinary Association.

  5. Eletroacupuntura no reparo do tendão calcanear comum em coelhos após enxertia com peritônio bovino Eletro-acupuncture in the rabbit acchiles tendon repair using bovine peritoneum graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.M.C. Freitas

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se o efeito da eletroacupuntura (EA sobre os aspectos macroscópicos e microscópicos em 36 coelhos que tiveram o tendão calcanear comum seccionado e que, após 30 dias, receberam enxerto de peritônio bovino conservado em solução saturada de sal. Após a cirurgia, os animais foram distribuídos em três grupos de igual número: os do grupo E10 foram estimulados pela EA do segundo ao 11º dia de pós-operatório, os do grupo E20 do 11º ao 31º dia de pós-operatório e os do grupo C não foram estimulados. Posteriormente, os animais foram redistribuídos em três subgrupos de igual número, os quais foram observados no pós-operatório por 11, 31 e 91 dias. Nos coelhos do E10 e E20, ocorreu diminuição de aderência da área enxertada aos tecidos circunvizinhos. Aos 31 dias de pós-operatório, observou-se nos do E10 tecido conjuntivo. Verificou-se intensa neovascularização no local enxertado em todos os animais que receberam estímulo pela EA. Nos coelhos do E10, aos 91 dias, verificou-se intensa quantidade de tecido conjuntivo, com fibras colágenas organizadas e paralelas ao eixo do tendão. O estímulo pela EA na fase precoce do pós-operatório estimulou a maturação cicatricial com mínima reação inflamatória.The effects of eletro-acupuncture (EA were evaluated on clinical and histological aspects in 36 rabbits that had the acchiles tendon sectioned and grafted after 30 days using bovine peritoneum graft preserved in saturated salt solution. The animals were randomly distributed into three groups. They were stimulated by EA from the 2nd to the 11th post-operative day (S10 group, from the 11th to the 31st post-operative day (S20 group, and were not stimulated (C group. Then, the rabbits were distributed into three sub-groups and were observed for 11, 31, and 91 days. The rabbits from S10 and S20 groups presented decreased adhesions between graft and adjacent tissues. The rabbits from S10 group showed connective tissue at

  6. Effect of Postoperative Passive Motion on Rotator Cuff Reconstruction With Acellular Dermal Matrix Grafts in a Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uezono, Keiji; Ide, Junji; Tokunaga, Takuya; Arimura, Hitoshi; Sakamoto, Hidetoshi; Nakanishi, Yoshitaka; Mizuta, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    Although postoperative rehabilitation is critical for rotator cuff tendon-to-bone healing and shoulder function recovery, no standardized protocol has been established. Postoperative immediate passive motion is detrimental to tendon-to-bone remodeling and tendon maturation after rotator cuff acellular dermal matrix (ADM) grafting, although postoperative delayed passive motion does no harm. Controlled laboratory study. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent rotator cuff reconstruction with ADM grafts. Their shoulders were immobilized for 2 weeks thereafter. The rats were assigned to 3 different rehabilitation protocols: (1) immobilization without passive motion (nonpassive motion [N-PM], controls), (2) immobilization with immediate passive motion (I-PM), and (3) immobilization with delayed passive motion (D-PM). Specimens obtained 2, 6, and 12 weeks postoperatively were analyzed histologically, and semiquantitative histomorphological measurements of collagen organization, vascularity, and cellularity were obtained; the area of interest was divided into 2 zones, the midsubstance of the graft and the graft-bone interface. Another set of samples taken at 12 weeks was subjected to biomechanical analysis. At 2 weeks, there was no significant difference among the groups in terms of semiquantitative histomorphological measurements of collagen organization, vascularity, and cellularity. At 6 weeks, collagen organization at the insertion site was significantly poorer in I-PM than in N-PM and D-PM rats (P = .0095). At 12 weeks, collagen organization at the insertion site and midsubstance of ADM grafts was also significantly poorer in I-PM rats (P = .0125 and P = .0018, respectively), and ultimate load-to-failure was lower in this group (P = .0043). While postoperative immediate passive motion was detrimental to remodeled tendon-to-bone healing and to the tendon maturation of ADM grafts placed in the rotator cuff tendon defects, delayed passive motion did no harm. For patients

  7. Aging contributes to inflammation in upper extremity tendons and declines in forelimb agility in a rat model of upper extremity overuse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Kietrys

    Full Text Available We sought to determine if tendon inflammatory and histopathological responses increase in aged rats compared to young rats performing a voluntary upper extremity repetitive task, and if these changes are associated with motor declines. Ninety-six female Sprague-Dawley rats were used in the rat model of upper extremity overuse: 67 aged and 29 young adult rats. After a training period of 4 weeks, task rats performed a voluntary high repetition low force (HRLF handle-pulling task for 2 hrs/day, 3 days/wk for up to 12 weeks. Upper extremity motor function was assessed, as were inflammatory and histomorphological changes in flexor digitorum and supraspinatus tendons. The percentage of successful reaches improved in young adult HRLF rats, but not in aged HRLF rats. Forelimb agility decreased transiently in young adult HRLF rats, but persistently in aged HRLF rats. HRLF task performance for 12 weeks lead to increased IL-1beta and IL-6 in flexor digitorum tendons of aged HRLF rats, compared to aged normal control (NC as well as young adult HRLF rats. In contrast, TNF-alpha increased more in flexor digitorum tendons of young adult 12-week HRLF rats than in aged HRLF rats. Vascularity and collagen fibril organization were not affected by task performance in flexor digitorum tendons of either age group, although cellularity increased in both. By week 12 of HRLF task performance, vascularity and cellularity increased in the supraspinatus tendons of only aged rats. The increased cellularity was due to increased macrophages and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF-immunoreactive fibroblasts in the peritendon. In conclusion, aged rat tendons were overall more affected by the HRLF task than young adult tendons, particularly supraspinatus tendons. Greater inflammatory changes in aged HRLF rat tendons were observed, increases associated temporally with decreased forelimb agility and lack of improvement in task success.

  8. Isokinetic eccentric exercise can induce skeletal muscle injury within the physiologic excursion of muscle-tendon unit: a rabbit model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Pei-Yu

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Purpose Intensive eccentric exercise can cause muscle damage. We simulated an animal model of isokinetic eccentric exercise by repetitively stretching stimulated triceps surae muscle-tendon units to determine if such exercise affects the mechanical properties of the unit within its physiologic excursion. Methods Biomechanical parameters of the muscle-tendon unit were monitored during isokinetic eccentric loading in 12 rabbits. In each animal, one limb (control group was stretched until failure. The other limb (study group was first subjected to isokinetic and eccentric cyclic loading at the rate of 10.0 cm/min to 112% (group I or 120% (group II of its initial length for 1 hour and then stretched to failure. Load-deformation curves and biomechanical parameters were compared between the study and control groups. Results When the muscle-tendon unit received eccentric cyclic loading to 112%, changes in all biomechanical parameters – except for the slope of the load-deformation curve – were not significant. In contrast, most parameters, including the slope of the load-deformation curve, peak load, deformation at peak load, total energy absorption, and energy absorption before peak load, significantly decreased after isokinetic eccentric cyclic loading to 120%. Conclusion We found a threshold for eccentrically induced injury of the rabbit triceps surae muscle at between 12% and 20% strain, which is within the physiologic excursion of the muscle-tendon units. Our study provided evidence that eccentric exercise may induce changes in the biomechanical properties of skeletal muscles, even within the physiologic range of the excursion of the muscle-tendon unit.

  9. Ultrasonography and Low-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Common Calcanean Tendon in a Rabbit Model for Tendinopathy Research: a Descriptive Study of Normal Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalec, A; Przyborowska-Zhalniarovich, P; Janus, I; Kirstein, K; Mieszkowska, M; Adamiak, Z; Chrószcz, A; Janeczek, M

    2016-09-01

    In spite of recent advances in treatment protocols, tendinopathies continue to challenge orthopaedists and surgeons. Due to the complexity of both tendon injuries and the healing processes, animal models are essential for addressing fundamental questions in tendinopathy research. Diagnostic imaging could contribute to the evaluation of animal models, thus providing information, which could be translated to human tendinopathies. The objective of our study was to evaluate in situ appearance of the rabbit common calcanean tendon with ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. Additionally, we sought to assess and compare the feasibility and usefulness of these techniques in a rabbit model while focusing on the imaging of the particular structures involved in calcaneal tendon disorders. Eight California rabbits were used for post-mortem sonographic and low-field magnetic resonance examination. Morphometry was performed on longitudinal sonograms and sagittal MRI scans. The craniocaudal diameter of the tendon was measured at four points of interest. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance provided good visualisation of the tendon origin, the paratenon and the pre-Achilles fat pad. Magnetic resonance images presented in more detail the structure of the calcaneal insertion. Both modalities failed to visualise the individual components of the common calcanean tendon and the bursa of the calcaneal tendon. Statistical analysis of measurements obtained showed that the craniocaudal diameter of the common calcanean tendon in a rabbit increases significantly with a growing length from the calcaneal tuber. Both magnetic resonance and ultrasonography are feasible, and should be considered complementary, not alternative imaging techniques in a rabbit common calcanean tendon model.

  10. Damage-induced hydrolyses modelling of biodegradable polymers for tendons and ligaments repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, André C; Guedes, Rui M; Tita, Volnei

    2015-09-18

    The use of biodegradable synthetic grafts to repair injured ligaments may overcome the disadvantages of other solutions. Apart from biological compatibility, these devices shall also be functionally compatible and temporarily displayed, during the healing process, adequate mechanical support. Laxity of these devices is an important concern. This can cause failure since it may result in joint instability. Laxity results from a progressive accumulation of plastic strain during the cyclic loading. The functional compatibility of a biodegradable synthetic graft and, therefore, the global mechanical properties of the scaffold during degradation, can be optimised using computer-aiding and numerical tools. Therefore, in this work, the ability of numerical tools to predict the mechanical behaviour of the device during its degradation is discussed. Computational approaches based on elastoplastic and viscoplastic constitutive models are also presented. These models enable to simulate the plastic strain accumulation. These computational approaches, where the material model parameters depend on the hydrolytic degradation damage, are calibrated using experimental data measured from biodegradable suture fibres at different degradation steps. Due to durability requirements the selected materials are polydioxone (PDO) and polylactic acid and poly-caprolactone blend (PLA-PCL). Computational approaches investigated are able to predict well the experimental results for both materials, in full strain range until rupture and for different degradation steps. These approaches can be further used in more complex fibrous structures, to predict its global mechanical behaviour during degradation process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Two-Stage Nerve Graft in Severe Scar: A Time-Course Study in a Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadegan, Shayan Abdollah; Firouzi, Masoumeh; Nabian, Mohammad Hossein; Zanjani, Leila Oriady; Ashtiani, Ahmad Mohebbi; Kamrani, Reza Shahryar

    2015-04-01

    Peripheral nerve repair outcomes are suboptimal in the presence of severe soft tissue injury and excessive scarring paralleling the process in tendon reconstruction of the hand. Inspired by the advantages of the two-stage technique in tendon grafting and with encouraging preliminary results, we aimed to investigate the two-stage nerve grafting technique as an alternative method of secondary nerve repair. Thirty female rats (~200 g) were randomly distributed into two groups (n=15). A 15 mm gap was created in the sciatic nerve of the animals and an excessive extraneural scar was induced using the "mincing" method. In this method, a thin strip of muscle was removed, minced in a petri dish and returned to the peripheral nerve. In the two-stage nerve graft group, a silicone tube was interposed in the first stage. After 4 weeks, in the second stage, the silicone tube was removed and a median nerve autograft was interposed through the newly formed vascularized sheath. In the conventional graft group, two nerve ends were protected with silicone caps in the first stage. After 4 weeks the caps were removed and the median graft was interposed. Behavioral assessments were performed at week 15 after surgery with the withdrawal reflex latency (WRL) and extensor postural thrust (EPT) and at the 3, 6 and 15-week time points with the TOA (toe out angle). Masson Trichrome staining method was used for histological assessments at week 15. According to the EPT and WRL, the two-stage nerve graft showed significant improvement (P=0.020 and P=0.017 respectively). The TOA showed no significant difference between the two groups. The total vascular index was significantly higher in the two-stage nerve graft group (P<0.001). Two-stage nerve graft using a silicone tube enhances vascularity of the graft and improves functional recovery.

  12. Transcription factor EGR1 directs tendon differentiation and promotes tendon repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerquin, Marie-Justine; Charvet, Benjamin; Nourissat, Geoffroy; Havis, Emmanuelle; Ronsin, Olivier; Bonnin, Marie-Ange; Ruggiu, Mathilde; Olivera-Martinez, Isabel; Robert, Nicolas; Lu, Yinhui; Kadler, Karl E.; Baumberger, Tristan; Doursounian, Levon; Berenbaum, Francis; Duprez, Delphine

    2013-01-01

    Tendon formation and repair rely on specific combinations of transcription factors, growth factors, and mechanical parameters that regulate the production and spatial organization of type I collagen. Here, we investigated the function of the zinc finger transcription factor EGR1 in tendon formation, healing, and repair using rodent animal models and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Adult tendons of Egr1–/– mice displayed a deficiency in the expression of tendon genes, including Scx, Col1a1, and Col1a2, and were mechanically weaker compared with their WT littermates. EGR1 was recruited to the Col1a1 and Col2a1 promoters in postnatal mouse tendons in vivo. Egr1 was required for the normal gene response following tendon injury in a mouse model of Achilles tendon healing. Forced Egr1 expression programmed MSCs toward the tendon lineage and promoted the formation of in vitro–engineered tendons from MSCs. The application of EGR1-producing MSCs increased the formation of tendon-like tissues in a rat model of Achilles tendon injury. We provide evidence that the ability of EGR1 to promote tendon differentiation is partially mediated by TGF-β2. This study demonstrates EGR1 involvement in adult tendon formation, healing, and repair and identifies Egr1 as a putative target in tendon repair strategies. PMID:23863709

  13. Enhancement of tendon-bone healing via the combination of biodegradable collagen-loaded nanofibrous membranes and a three-dimensional printed bone-anchoring bolt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ying-Chao; Yeh, Wen-Lin; Chao, Chien-Lin; Hsu, Yung-Heng; Yu, Yi-Hsun; Chen, Jan-Kan; Liu, Shih-Jung

    A composite biodegradable polymeric model was developed to enhance tendon graft healing. This model included a biodegradable polylactide (PLA) bolt as the bone anchor and a poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanofibrous membrane embedded with collagen as a biomimic patch to promote tendon-bone interface integration. Degradation rate and compressive strength of the PLA bolt were measured after immersion in a buffer solution for 3 months. In vitro biochemical characteristics and the nanofibrous matrix were assessed using a water contact angle analyzer, pH meter, and tetrazolium reduction assay. In vivo efficacies of PLGA/collagen nanofibers and PLA bolts for tendon-bone healing were investigated on a rabbit bone tunnel model with histological and tendon pullout tests. The PLGA/collagen-blended nanofibrous membrane was a hydrophilic, stable, and biocompatible scaffold. The PLA bolt was durable for tendon-bone anchoring. Histology showed adequate biocompatibility of the PLA bolt on a medial cortex with progressive bone ingrowth and without tissue overreaction. PLGA nanofibers within the bone tunnel also decreased the tunnel enlargement phenomenon and enhanced tendon-bone integration. Composite polymers of the PLA bolt and PLGA/collagen nanofibrous membrane can effectively promote outcomes of tendon reconstruction in a rabbit model. The composite biodegradable polymeric system may be useful in humans for tendon reconstruction.

  14. Basic mechanisms of tendon fatigue damage

    OpenAIRE

    Neviaser, Andrew; Andarawis-Puri, Nelly; Flatow, Evan

    2012-01-01

    Pathologic processes intrinsic and extrinsic to the tendons have been proposed as the underlying cause of rotator cuff disease, but the precise etiology is not known. Tear formation is, in part, attributable to the accumulation of subrupture tendon fatigue damage. We review the molecular, mechanical, and structural changes induced in tendons subjected to controlled amounts of fatigue loading in an animal model of early tendinopathy. The distinct tendon responses to low and moderate levels of ...

  15. Alteration of the material properties of the normal supraspinatus tendon by nicotine treatment in a rat model

    OpenAIRE

    Ichinose, Ryogo; Sano, Hirotaka; Kishimoto, Koshi N.; Sakamoto, Naoya; Sato, Masaaki; Itoi, Eiji

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Several studies have shown that nicotine has a detrimental effect on the development of rotator cuff tear. However, little is known about its mechanism. We evaluated the effect of nicotine on the maximum tensile load, the maximum tensile stress, and the elastic modulus of the supraspinatus tendon in a rat model. Methods 27 rats were randomly assigned to 3 groups. Subcutaneously implanted osmotic pumps delivered two different concentrations of nicotine solution (high dos...

  16. In Vivo Measurements of Flexor Tendon and Suspensory Ligament Forces During Trotting Using the Thoroughbred Forelimb Model

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Toshiyuki; MUKAI, Kazutaka; Ohmura, Hajime; AIDA, Hiroko; HIRAGA, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to create a lower forelimb model of the Thoroughbred horse for measuring the force in the superficial and deep digital flexor tendons (SDFT and DDFT), and the suspensory ligament (SL) during a trot. The mass, centers of gravity, and inertial moments in the metacarpus, pastern, and hoof segments were measured in 4 Thoroughbred horses. The moment arms of the SDFT, DDFT, and SL in the metacarpophalangeal (fetlock) and distal interphalangeal (coffin) joints ...

  17. Optimization and Standardization of the Immunodeficient Mouse Model for Assessing Fat Grafting Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokai, Lauren E; Jones, Taraneh L; Silowash, Russell; Theisen, Brian; DiBernardo, Gabriella; Lu, Andrew; Yi, Bowen; Marra, Kacey G; Rubin, J Peter

    2017-12-01

    Animal models are often used to assess interventions that might improve fat grafting outcomes; however, there is great variability in the models. The authors sought to determine the predictive value of the immunocompromised mouse model for fat grafting so that experiments could be standardized and optimized. Human lipoaspirate injections at different volumes and time points were assessed in a nude mouse model and compared with control injections of nonviable fat. Volume retention and explant histologic score were compared. In a separate study, interanimal reproducibility was determined by implanting a highly consistent hydrogel and measuring variability in volume retention. Injection volume significantly affects adipose resorption kinetics at 6 and 12 weeks. Masson trichrome staining revealed that macrophages were unable to infiltrate large (1 ml) grafts, and oil cysts were not absorbed by 18 weeks, which interfered with interpretation of volume retention data. Nonviable tissue was resorbed when grafts were 0.3 ml, and quantification of graft histologic viability correlated well with graft retention at all study time points. Interanimal variability was measured to be 8.44 percent of the mean retention volume for small graft volumes. Human fat graft retention in the immunodeficient mouse correlates with graft viability in small, 0.3-ml-volume grafts. However, centralized oil cysts in nonviable 1.0-ml grafts were not resorbed by 18 weeks and thus volume measurements were confounded and not significantly different from viable samples. In addition, tissue injury scores increased in initially healthy fat grafts at 18 weeks, possibly because of a delayed immune reaction.

  18. The effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on tendon-bone healing in a transosseous-equivalent sheep rotator cuff model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovric, Vedran; Ledger, Michael; Goldberg, Jerome; Harper, Wade; Bertollo, Nicky; Pelletier, Matthew H; Oliver, Rema A; Yu, Yan; Walsh, William R

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects Low-intensity Pulsed Ultrasound has on initial tendon-bone healing in a clinically relevant extra-articular transosseous-equivalent ovine rotator cuff model. Eight skeletally mature wethers, randomly allocated to either control group (n = 4) or treatment group (n = 4), underwent rotator cuff surgery following injury to the infraspinatus tendon. All animals were killed 28 days post surgery to allow examination of early effects of Low-intensity Pulsed Ultrasound treatment. General improvement in histological appearance of tendon-bone integration was noted in the treatment group. Newly formed woven bone with increased osteoblast activity along the bone surface was evident. A continuum was observed between the tendon and bone in an interdigitated fashion with Sharpey's fibres noted in the treatment group. Low-intensity Pulsed Ultrasound treatment also increased bone mineral density at the tendon-bone interface (p < 0.01), while immunohistochemistry results revealed an increase in the protein expression patterns of VEGF (p = 0.038), RUNX2 (p = 0.02) and Smad4 (p = 0.05). The results of this study indicate that Low-intensity Pulsed Ultrasound may aid in the initial phase of tendon-bone healing process in patients who have undergone rotator cuff repair. This treatment may also be beneficial following other types of reconstructive surgeries involving the tendon-bone interface.

  19. The effect of platelet-rich plasma on Achilles tendon healing in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamura, Masaki; Yasuda, Toshito; Nakano, Atsushi; Shima, Hiroaki; Neo, Masashi

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of PRP on Achilles tendon healing in rabbits during the inflammatory, proliferative, and remodeling phases by histological examination and quantitative assessments. Fifty mature male Japanese albino rabbits with severed Achilles tendons were divided into two equal groups and treated with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or left untreated. Tendon tissue was harvested at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 weeks after treatment, and sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and monoclonal antibodies against CD31 and type I collagen. Collagen fibers proliferated more densely early after severance, and subsequent remodeling of the collagen fibers and approximation of normal tendinous tissue occurred earlier in the PRP group than in the control group. The fibroblast number was significantly higher in the PRP group than in the control group at 1 and 2 weeks. Similarly, the area ratio of CD31-positive cells was significantly higher in the PRP group than in the control group at 1 and 2 weeks. Positive staining for type I collagen was more intense in the PRP group than in the control group after 3 weeks, indicating tendon maturation. Administration of PRP shortened the inflammatory phase and promoted tendon healing during the proliferative phase. Copyright © 2016 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Correlation of tunnel widening and tunnel positioning with short-term functional outcomes in single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using patellar tendon versus hamstring graft: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswal, Udit Kumar; Balaji, Gopisankar; Nema, Sandeep; Poduval, Murali; Menon, Jagdish; Patro, Dilip Kumar

    2016-08-01

    To study the correlation between tunnel widening and tunnel position with short-term functional outcomes post-ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon and hamstring autografts in young adults. A total of 33 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction between October 2013 and February 2015 were included and followed up for 6 months. A standardized surgical technique was used for each graft type. Intra-op arthroscopy findings and drilled tunnel diameters were noted. They were followed up for 3 and 6 months. Radiological assessment was done at 3 and 6 months with clinical score assessment at 6 months. At 6 months, clinical scores were comparable in both groups. Tunnel widening in both femoral and tibial tunnel at 3 and 6 months were significantly higher in STG group (p values <0.05). The rate of widening was higher in 0-3 months and reduced in 3-6 months. There was statistically significant negative correlation between femoral tunnel widening by CT and IKDC score at 6 months (p value 0.049). We found a positive correlation between posterior positioning of femoral tunnel and Lysholm and IKDC scores. The correlation with Lysholm scores was statistically significant (p value 0.046). To conclude, tunnel widening is more with hamstrings graft. Femoral tunnel widening has significant negative correlation with that of IKDC scores at 6 months. Posterior femoral tunnel positioning and Lysholm scores at 6 months had significant correlation.

  1. Glenohumeral joint motion after subscapularis tendon repair: an analysis of cadaver shoulder models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Teiichi; Aoki, Mitsuhiro; Tanaka, Yoshitaka; Izumi, Tomoki; Fujimiya, Mineko; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2014-05-23

    As for the surgical treatment of the rotator cuff tears, the subscapularis tendon tears have recently received much attention for the mini-open or arthroscopic repair. The results of surgical repair for the subscapularis tendon tear are satisfactory, but the range of external rotation is reported to be restricted after the repair. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the range of glenohumeral joint motion after repairs of various sizes of subscapularis tendon tears. Using eight fresh frozen human cadaveric shoulders (mean age at death, 81.5 years), three sizes of subscapularis tendon tear (small, medium, and large) were made and then repaired. With the scapula fixed to the wooden jig, the end-range of glenohumeral motion was measured with passive movement applied through 1.0-Nm torque in the directions of scapular elevation, flexion, abduction, extension, horizontal abduction, and horizontal adduction. The passive end-ranges of external and internal rotation in various positions with rotational torque of 1.0 Nm were also measured. Differences in the ranges among the three type tears were analyzed. As tear size increased, range of glenohumeral motion in horizontal abduction after repair decreased gradually and was significantly decreased with the large size tear (P size in every glenohumeral position. The prominent decrease in external rotation (around 40° reduction from intact shoulders) was observed in shoulders after repair of large size tear at 30° to 60° of scapular elevation and abduction. As the size of the subscapularis tendon tear increased, the passive ranges of horizontal abduction and external rotation of the glenohumeral joint after repair decreased significantly. In shoulders with a subscapularis tendon tear, it is necessary to consider the reduction of external rotation depending on tear size.

  2. A new strain energy function for the hyperelastic modelling of ligaments and tendons based on fascicle microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Tom

    2015-01-21

    A new strain energy function for the hyperelastic modelling of ligaments and tendons based on the geometrical arrangement of their fibrils is derived. The distribution of the crimp angles of the fibrils is used to determine the stress-strain response of a single fascicle, and this stress-strain response is used to determine the form of the strain energy function, the parameters of which can all potentially be directly measured via experiments - unlike those of commonly used strain energy functions such as the Holzapfel-Gasser-Ogden (HGO) model, whose parameters are phenomenological. We compare the new model with the HGO model and show that the new model gives a better match to existing stress-strain data for human patellar tendon than the HGO model, with the average relative error in matching this data when using the new model being 0.053 (compared with 0.57 when using the HGO model), and the average absolute error when using the new model being 0.12 MPa (compared with 0.31 MPa when using the HGO model). Copyright © 2014 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on new trabecular bone during bone-tendon junction healing in a rabbit model: a synchrotron radiation micro-CT study.

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    Hongbin Lu

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate the effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on bone regeneration during the bone-tendon junction healing process and to explore the application of synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography in three dimensional visualization of the bone-tendon junction to evaluate the microarchitecture of new trabecular bone. Twenty four mature New Zealand rabbits underwent partial patellectomy to establish a bone-tendon junction injury model at the patella-patellar tendon complex. Animals were then divided into low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment (20 min/day, 7 times/week and placebo control groups, and were euthanized at week 8 and 16 postoperatively (n = 6 for each group and time point. The patella-patellar tendon specimens were harvested for radiographic, histological and synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography detection. The area of the newly formed bone in the ultrasound group was significantly greater than that of control group at postoperative week 8 and 16. The high resolution three dimensional visualization images of the bone-tendon junction were acquired by synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment promoted dense and irregular woven bone formation at week 8 with greater bone volume fraction, number and thickness of new trabecular bone but with lower separation. At week 16, ultrasound group specimens contained mature lamellar bone with higher bone volume fraction and thicker trabeculae than that of control group; however, there was no significant difference in separation and number of the new trabecular bone. This study confirms that low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment is able to promote bone formation and remodeling of new trabecular bone during the bone-tendon junction healing process in a rabbit model, and the synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography could be applied for three dimensional visualization to quantitatively evaluate

  4. Two-Stage Nerve Graft in Severe Scar: A Time-Course Study in a Rat Model

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    Shayan Zadegan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available excessive scarring; paralleling the process in tendon reconstruction of the hand. Inspired by the advantages of the two-stage technique in tendon grafting and with encouraging preliminary results, we aimed to investigate the two-stage nerve grafting technique as an alternative method of secondary nerve repair. Methods:  Thirty female rats (~200 g were randomly distributed into two groups (n=15. A 15 mm gap was created in the sciatic nerve of all the animals and an excessive extraneural scar was induced using the “mincing” method. In this method, a thin strip of muscle was removed, minced in a petri dish and returned to the peripheral nerve. In the two stage nerve graft group, a silicone tube was interposed in the first stage. After 4 weeks, in the second stage, the silicone tube was removed and a median nerve autograft was interposed through the newly formed vascularized sheath. In the conventional graft group, two nerve ends were protected with silicone caps in the first stage. After 4 weeks the caps were removed and the median graft was interposed. Behavioral assessments were performed at week 15 after surgery with the withdrawal reflex latency (WRL and extensor postural thrust (EPT and at the 3, 6 and 15-week time points with the TOA (toe out angle. Masson Trichrome staining method was used for histological assessments at week 15. Results: According to the EPT and WRL, the two-stage nerve graft showed significant improvement (P=0.020 and P =0.017 respectively. The TOA showed no significant difference between the two groups. The total vascular index was significantly higher in the two-stage nerve graft group (P

  5. A model of the human triceps surae muscle-tendon complex applied to jumping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, Maarten F.; Huijing, Peter A.; van Ingen Schenau, Gerrit Jan

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain more insight into the behavior of the muscle-tendon complex of human m. triceps surae in jumping. During one-legged vertical jumps of ten subjects ground reaction forces as well as cinematographic data were registered, and electromyograms were recorded from m.

  6. Enhancement of tendon-bone healing with the use of bone morphogenetic protein-2 inserted into the suture anchor hole in a rabbit patellar tendon model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Gyoon; Kim, Hak Jun; Kim, Sung Eun; Bae, Ji Hoon; Ko, You Jin; Park, Jung Ho

    2014-06-01

    Suture anchor fixation failure has been reported as a result of anchor loosening and migration during the tendon-bone repair. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) inserted into the suture anchor hole on bone formation and the tendon-bone healing. Both back legs of 24 New Zealand White rabbits (n = 48) were used in this study. A metal suture anchor was then placed 5 mm below the cortex. In the control group, the space over the eyelet of the anchor (suture anchor hole) was not filled. In the experimental group, the suture anchor hole was filled with 0.1 mL of fibrin glue (group 2) or collagen gel (group 3) with 1 μg BMP-2. Histologic analysis, real-time-polymerase chain reaction, bone density and failure load measurement were performed, and differences were analyzed at 4 and 8 weeks. Histologic analysis revealed more abundant new bone, mature bone and organized fibrocartilage at the tendon-bone interface at 4 and 8 weeks in groups in which BMP-2 was applied. At 8 weeks, the failure load of groups 1, 2 and 3 was significantly different among the three groups (P = 0.01). After post hoc Tukey test, the failure load of group 2 was significantly higher than that of group 1 (P = 0.01). BMP-2, administrated as described in this study, improved tendon-bone healing and bone formation, resulting in improved biomechanical strength of the tendon-bone junction. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Modelling ultrasound-induced mild hyperthermia of hyperplasia in vascular grafts

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    Cheung Alfred K

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE vascular grafts frequently develop occlusive neointimal hyperplasia as a result of myofibroblast over-growth, leading to graft failure. ePTFE exhibits higher ultrasound attenuation than native soft tissues. We modelled the selective absorption of ultrasound by ePTFE, and explored the feasibility of preventing hyperplasia in ePTFE grafts by ultrasound heating. Specifically, we simulated the temperature profiles of implanted grafts and nearby soft tissues and blood under ultrasound exposure. The goal was to determine whether ultrasound exposure of an ePTFE graft can generate temperatures sufficient to prevent cell growth on the graft without damaging nearby soft tissues and blood. Methods Ultrasound beams from two transducers (1.5 and 3.2 MHz were simulated in two graft/tissue models, with and without an intra-graft cellular layer mimicking hyperplasia, using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD method. The resulting power deposition patterns were used as a heat source for the Pennes bioheat equation in a COMSOL® Multiphysics heat transfer model. 50°C is known to cause cell death and therefore the transducer powers were adjusted to produce a 13°C temperature rise from 37°C in the ePTFE. Results Simulations showed that both the frequency of the transducers and the presence of hyperplasia significantly affect the power deposition patterns and subsequent temperature profiles on the grafts and nearby tissues. While neither transducer significantly raised the temperature of the blood, the 1.5-MHz transducer was less focused and heated larger volumes of the graft and nearby soft tissues than the 3.2-MHz transducer. The presence of hyperplasia had little effect on the blood's temperature, but further increased the temperature of the graft and nearby soft tissues in response to either transducer. Skin cooling and blood flow play a significant role in preventing overheating of the native

  8. Two-step grafting significantly enhances the survival of foetal dopaminergic transplants and induces graft-derived vascularisation in a 6-OHDA model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büchele, Fabian; Döbrössy, Máté; Hackl, Christina; Jiang, Wei; Papazoglou, Anna; Nikkhah, Guido

    2014-08-01

    Following transplantation of foetal primary dopamine (DA)-rich tissue for neurorestaurative treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), only 5-10% of the functionally relevant DAergic cells survive both in experimental models and in clinical studies. The current work tested how a two-step grafting protocol could have a positive impact on graft survival. DAergic tissue is divided in two portions and grafted in two separate sessions into the same target area within a defined time interval. We hypothesized that the first graft creates a "DAergic" microenvironment or "nest" similar to the perinatal substantia nigra that stimulates and protects the second graft. 6-OHDA-lesioned rats were sequentially transplanted with wild-type (GFP-, first graft) and transgenic (GFP+, second graft) DAergic cells in time interims of 2, 5 or 9days. Each group was further divided into two sub-groups receiving either 200k (low cell number groups: 2dL, 5dL, 9dL) or 400k cells (high cell number groups: 2dH, 5dH, 9dH) as first graft. During the second transplantation, all groups received the same amount of 200k GFP+ cells. Controls received either low or high cell numbers in one single session (standard protocol). Drug-induced rotations, at 2 and 6weeks after grafting, showed significant improvement compared to the baseline lesion levels without significant differences between the groups. Rats were sacrificed 8weeks after transplantation for post-mortem histological assessment. Both two-step groups with the time interval of 2days (2dL and 2dH) showed a significantly higher survival of DAergic cells compared to their respective standard control group (2dL, +137%; 2dH, +47%). Interposing longer intervals of 5 or 9days resulted in the loss of statistical significance, neutralising the beneficial two-step grafting effect. Furthermore, the transplants in the 2dL and 2dH groups had higher graft volume and DA-fibre-density values compared to all other two-step groups. They also showed intense growth of

  9. Establishment of an animal model of a pasteurized bone graft, with a preliminary analysis of muscle coverage or FGF-2 administration to the graft

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    Nakayama Koichi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pasteurized bone grafting is used following the excision of a bone tumor for the purpose of eliminating neoplastic cells while preserving bone-inducing ability. In the hopes of guaranteeing the most favourable results, the establishment of an animal model has been urgently awaited. In the course of establishing such a model, we made a preliminary examination of the effect of muscle coverage or fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2 administration radiographically. Methods Forty pasteurized intercalary bone grafts of the Wistar rat femur treated at 60°C for 30 min were reimplanted and stabilized with an intramedullary nail (1.1 mm in diameter. Some grafts were not covered by muscle after the implantation, so that they could act as a clinical model for wide resection, and/or these were soaked with FGF-2 solution prior to implantation. The grafts were then divided into 3 groups, comprising 12 grafts with muscle-covering but without FGF-2 (MC+; FGF2-, 12 grafts without muscle-covering and without FGF-2 (MC-; FGF2- and 16 grafts without muscle covering but with FGF-2 (MC-; FGF2+. Results At 2 weeks after grafting, the pasteurized bone model seemed to be successful in terms of eliminating living cells, including osteocytes. At 4 weeks after grafting, partial bone incorporation was observed in half the (MC+; FGF2- cases and in half the (MC-; FGF2+ cases, but not in any of the (MC-; FGF2- cases. At 12 weeks after grafting, bone incorporation was seen in 3 out of 4 in the (MC+; FGF2- group (3/4: 75% and in 3 out of 8 in the (MC-; FGF2+ group (3/8: 38%. However, most of the grafted bones without FGF-2 were absorbed in all the cases, massively, regardless of whether there had been muscle-covering (MC+; FGF2-; 4/4: 100% or no muscle-covering (MC-; FGF2-; 4/4: 100%, while bone absorption was noted at a lower frequency (2/8: 25% and to a lower degree in the (MC-; FGF2+ group. Conclusion In conclusion, we have established an animal pasteurized

  10. The vasculature and its role in the damaged and healing tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, Steven A; Hazleman, Brian L; Riley, Graham P

    2002-01-01

    Tendon pathology has many manifestations, from spontaneous rupture to chronic tendinitis or tendinosis; the etiology and pathology of each are very different, and poorly understood. Tendon is a comparatively poorly vascularised tissue that relies heavily upon synovial fluid diffusion to provide nutrition. During tendon injury, as with damage to any tissue, there is a requirement for cell infiltration from the blood system to provide the necessary reparative factors for tissue healing. We describe in this review the response of the vasculature to tendon damage in a number of forms, and how and when the revascularisation or neovascularisation process occurs. We also include a section on the revascularisation of tendon during its use as a tendon graft in both ligament reconstruction and tendon-tendon grafting.

  11. Achilles Tendon Rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Achilles tendon rupture. Obesity. Excess weight puts more strain on the tendon. Prevention To reduce your chance of developing Achilles tendon problems, follow these tips: Stretch and strengthen calf muscles. Stretch your calf until you feel a noticeable ...

  12. Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    .org Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction Page ( 1 ) Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction is one of the most common problems of the foot and ankle. It occurs when the posterior tibial tendon becomes inflamed or torn. As a result, the ...

  13. Achilles tendon repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilles tendon rupture-surgery; Percutaneous Achilles tendon rupture repair ... To fix your torn Achilles tendon, the surgeon will: Make a cut down the back of your heel Make several small cuts rather than one large ...

  14. Perivenous application of cyanoacrylate tissue sealants reduces intimal and medial thickening of the vein graft and inflammatory responses in a rabbit model of carotid artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Longsheng; Gao, Mingxin; Gu, Chengxiong; Zhang, Fan; Yu, Yang

    2016-02-01

    Effective therapies to prevent vein graft failure after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) are still lacking. α-Cyanoacrylate (α-CA, 99% n-octyl-α-cyanoacrylate + n-butyl-α-cyanoacrylate) has been increasingly used as a tissue sealant for wound closure because of its bacteriostatic, biodegradable and haemostatic properties. As a strong tissue adhesive, α-CA might prevent an arterial circulation-induced mechanical stretch on vein graft to attenuate intimal hyperplasia. Here, we investigated the effects of perivenous application of α-CA on the vein graft in a rabbit model of carotid artery bypass grafting. Healthy New Zealand white rabbits were randomized into no graft, graft or graft + α-CA group (n = 10 per group). Rabbit carotid artery was bypassed with the jugular vein. α-CA sealants were sprayed on the entire jugular graft including both anastomotic sites after completion of anastomoses. Blood flow parameters and histological characteristics of the vein grafts including vessel wall thickness, number of medial elastic lamina and proliferation index were evaluated 4 weeks after the surgery. The mRNA or protein levels of proinflammatory factors, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand-2 (CCL-2) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were measured 4 weeks after the operation by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Compared with the untreated vein grafts at Week 4 after the operation, the α-CA spray significantly improved graft flow (39.4 ± 1.5 vs 27.8 ± 2.9 ml/min, P sealants exerts short-term beneficial effects on the vein graft and reduces inflammatory responses in a rabbit model of carotid artery bypass grafting. Long-term effects of α-CA on vein graft remodelling and the clinical significance of α-CA in CABG remain to be determined in future studies. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  15. A Rabbit Model for Testing Helper-Dependent Adenovirus-Mediated Gene Therapy for Vein Graft Atherosclerosis

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    Lianxiang Bi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery bypass vein grafts are a mainstay of therapy for human atherosclerosis. Unfortunately, the long-term patency of vein grafts is limited by accelerated atherosclerosis. Gene therapy, directed at the vein graft wall, is a promising approach for preventing vein graft atherosclerosis. Because helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd efficiently transduces grafted veins and confers long-term transgene expression, HDAd is an excellent candidate for delivery of vein graft-targeted gene therapy. We developed a model of vein graft atherosclerosis in fat-fed rabbits and demonstrated long-term (≥20 weeks persistence of HDAd genomes after graft transduction. This model enables quantitation of vein graft hemodynamics, wall structure, lipid accumulation, cellularity, vector persistence, and inflammatory markers on a single graft. Time-course experiments identified 12 weeks after transduction as an optimal time to measure efficacy of gene therapy on the critical variables of lipid and macrophage accumulation. We also used chow-fed rabbits to test whether HDAd infusion in vein grafts promotes intimal growth and inflammation. HDAd did not increase intimal growth, but had moderate—yet significant—pro-inflammatory effects. The vein graft atherosclerosis model will be useful for testing HDAd-mediated gene therapy; however, pro-inflammatory effects of HdAd remain a concern in developing HDAd as a therapy for vein graft disease.

  16. Overcoming the learning curve: a curriculum-based model for teaching zone II flexor tendon repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bari, Ali Sina; Woon, Colin Y; Pridgen, Brian; Chang, James

    2012-08-01

    Repairs of zone II flexor tendons have benefited in recent years from modifications involving suture technique and configuration. These advances, however, present new obstacles in resident training. A focused tutorial incorporating a practical, hands-on exercise and standardization of technique may offer an effective low-risk, low-cost strategy for overcoming these challenges. Plastic surgery residents (n=14) were asked to perform their preferred zone II flexor tendon repair using a tabletop exercise before and after a focused tutorial. The tutorial reviewed primary literature and presented a standardized technique. Repairs were photographed, tested for load strength, and analyzed to determine effectiveness of this teaching approach. Participants were retested at 6 months to evaluate for persistence of findings. Posttutorial repairs required higher loads to generate a 2-mm gap (plearning curve. Training programs can use this hands-on teaching exercise as part of a hand surgery simulation curriculum.

  17. Patellar tendon donor-site healing during six and twelve months after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanshenas, Hamed; Madadi, Firooz; Madadi, Firoozeh; Washington, Eleby Rudolph; Jones, Kristofer; Shamie, Arya Nick

    2015-12-01

    Bone-Patellar Tendon-Bone Graft is one of the most acceptable methods of treatment for Anterior Cruciate Ligament rupture (ACL). This study evaluates the recovery process of the graft donor site. This study evaluates the graft donor site recovery in 23 patients with ACL reconstruction, 6 and 12 months after the patellar tendon graft surgery. In 70 percent of the cases, the healing process was completed after 6 months and the remaining 30 percent recovered after 12 months. Time is an important factor in the recovery process of the patellar tendon for reconstruction of the ACL.

  18. Computational model of blood flow in the aorto-coronary bypass graft

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    Ghista Dhanjoo N

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary artery bypass grafting surgery is an effective treatment modality for patients with severe coronary artery disease. The conduits used during the surgery include both the arterial and venous conduits. Long- term graft patency rate for the internal mammary arterial graft is superior, but the same is not true for the saphenous vein grafts. At 10 years, more than 50% of the vein grafts would have occluded and many of them are diseased. Why do the saphenous vein grafts fail the test of time? Many causes have been proposed for saphenous graft failure. Some are non-modifiable and the rest are modifiable. Non-modifiable causes include different histological structure of the vein compared to artery, size disparity between coronary artery and saphenous vein. However, researches are more interested in the modifiable causes, such as graft flow dynamics and wall shear stress distribution at the anastomotic sites. Formation of intimal hyperplasia at the anastomotic junction has been implicated as the root cause of long- term graft failure. Many researchers have analyzed the complex flow patterns in the distal sapheno-coronary anastomotic region, using various simulated model in an attempt to explain the site of preferential intimal hyperplasia based on the flow disturbances and differential wall stress distribution. In this paper, the geometrical bypass models (aorto-left coronary bypass graft model and aorto-right coronary bypass graft model are based on real-life situations. In our models, the dimensions of the aorta, saphenous vein and the coronary artery simulate the actual dimensions at surgery. Both the proximal and distal anastomoses are considered at the same time, and we also take into the consideration the cross-sectional shape change of the venous conduit from circular to elliptical. Contrary to previous works, we have carried out computational fluid dynamics (CFD study in the entire aorta-graft-perfused artery domain

  19. Biomimetic Scaffold Design for Functional and Integrative Tendon Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinzhi; Bogdanowicz, Danielle; Erisken, Cevat; Lee, Nancy M.; Lu, Helen H.

    2012-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears represent the most common shoulder injuries in the United States. The debilitating effect of this degenerative condition coupled with the high incidence of failure associated with existing graft choices underscore the clinical need for alternative grafting solutions. The two critical design criteria for the ideal tendon graft would require the graft to not only exhibit physiologically relevant mechanical properties but also be able to facilitate functional graft integration by promoting the regeneration of the native tendon-to-bone interface. Centered on these design goals, this review will highlight current approaches to functional and integrative tendon repair. In particular, the application of biomimetic design principles through the use of nanofiber- and nanocomposite-based scaffolds for tendon tissue engineering will be discussed. This review will begin with nanofiber-based approaches to functional tendon repair, followed by a section highlighting the exciting research on tendon-to-bone interface regeneration, with an emphasis on implementation of strategic biomimicry in nanofiber scaffold design and the concomitant formation of graded multi-tissue systems for integrative soft tissue repair. This review will conclude with a summary and future directions section. PMID:22244070

  20. Exploiting elasticity: Modeling the influence of neural control on mechanics and energetics of ankle muscle-tendons during human hopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Benjamin D; Sawicki, Gregory S

    2014-07-21

    We present a simplified Hill-type model of the human triceps surae-Achilles tendon complex working on a gravitational-inertial load during cyclic contractions (i.e. vertical hopping). Our goal was to determine the role that neural control plays in governing muscle, or contractile element (CE), and tendon, or series elastic element (SEE), mechanics and energetics within a compliant muscle-tendon unit (MTU). We constructed a 2D parameter space consisting of many combinations of stimulation frequency and magnitude (i.e. neural control strategies). We compared the performance of each control strategy by evaluating peak force and average positive mechanical power output for the system (MTU) and its respective components (CE, SEE), force-length (F-L) and -velocity (F-V) operating point of the CE during active force production, average metabolic rate for the CE, and both MTU and CE apparent efficiency. Our results suggest that frequency of stimulation plays a primary role in governing whole-MTU mechanics. These include the phasing of both activation and peak force relative to minimum MTU length, average positive power, and apparent efficiency. Stimulation amplitude was primarily responsible for governing average metabolic rate and within MTU mechanics, including peak force generation and elastic energy storage and return in the SEE. Frequency and amplitude of stimulation both played integral roles in determining CE F-L operating point, with both higher frequency and amplitude generally corresponding to lower CE strains, reduced injury risk, and elimination of the need for passive force generation in the CE parallel elastic element (PEE). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy regenerates the native bone-tendon junction after surgical repair in a degenerative rat model.

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    Geoffroy Nourissat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The enthesis, which attaches the tendon to the bone, naturally disappears with aging, thus limiting joint mobility. Surgery is frequently needed but the clinical outcome is often poor due to the decreased natural healing capacity of the elderly. This study explored the benefits of a treatment based on injecting chondrocyte and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC in a new rat model of degenerative enthesis repair. METHODOLOGY: The Achilles' tendon was cut and the enthesis destroyed. The damage was repaired by classical surgery without cell injection (group G1, n = 52 and with chondrocyte (group G2, n = 51 or MSC injection (group G3, n = 39. The healing rate was determined macroscopically 15, 30 and 45 days later. The production and organization of a new enthesis was assessed by histological scoring of collagen II immunostaining, glycoaminoglycan production and the presence of columnar chondrocytes. The biomechanical load required to rupture the bone-tendon junction was determined. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The spontaneous healing rate in the G1 control group was 40%, close to those observed in humans. Cell injection significantly improved healing (69%, p = 0.0028 for G2 and p = 0.006 for G3 and the load-to-failure after 45 days (p<0.05 over controls. A new enthesis was clearly produced in cell-injected G2 and G3 rats, but not in the controls. Only the MSC-injected G3 rats had an organized enthesis with columnar chondrocytes as in a native enthesis 45 days after surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Cell therapy is an efficient procedure for reconstructing degenerative entheses. MSC treatment produced better organ regeneration than chondrocyte treatment. The morphological and biomechanical properties were similar to those of a native enthesis.

  2. Do Needleless Knots have Similar Strength as the Krackow Suture? An In Vitro Porcine Tendon Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Chih-Kai; Kuo, Ting-Hsuan; Yeh, Ming-Long; Jou, I-Ming; Lin, Cheng-Li; Su, Wei-Ren

    2017-02-01

    Numerous needleless techniques for tendon graft fixation that feature several advantages have been reported. However, there are few studies that have compared the holding strength between the needleless techniques (rolling hitch and modified rolling hitch) and traditional suture methods. To compare the tendon graft-holding strength of the rolling hitch and modified rolling hitch with the Krackow stitch in an in vitro porcine biomechanical model. Thirty fresh-frozen porcine flexor profundus tendons were randomly divided into three groups of 10 specimens. The experimental procedure was designed to assess elongation of the suture-tendon construct across the needleless tendon-grasping techniques and the Krackow stitch. All suture configurations were completed with a braided nonabsorbable suture. Each tendon was pretensioned to 100 N for three cycles, cyclically loaded from 50 to 200 N for 200 cycles, and then finally loaded to failure. Elongation, load to failure, and mode of failure were recorded for each specimen. Five of the 10 rolling hitch specimens failed during cyclic loading. With the numbers available, elongation after cyclic loading was not different among the successful rolling hitch specimens (19% [1.19 cm/6.17 cm] ± 6%), modified rolling hitch fixations (19% [1.11 cm/ 5.93 cm] ± 6%), and Krackow stitch fixations (26% [1.41 cm/5.43 cm] ± 6%); ultimate failure loads also were not different among the rolling hitch fixations (316 ± 35 N), modified rolling hitch fixations (342 ± 14 N), and Krackow stitches (327 ± 33 N) with the numbers available. With the numbers available, the rolling hitch, modified rolling hitch, and Krackow stitch techniques were not different in terms of elongation after cyclic loading and to failure in this in vitro biomechanical evaluation. Based on the biomechanical properties from this in vitro animal study, the modified rolling hitch may be an attractive alternative for tendon graft fixation in ligament-reconstruction surgery

  3. Endogenous substance P production in the Achilles tendon increases with loading in an in vivo model of tendinopathy-peptidergic elevation preceding tendinosis-like tissue changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backman, L J; Andersson, G; Wennstig, G; Forsgren, S; Danielson, P

    2011-06-01

    To quantify the intratendinous levels of substance P (SP) at different stages of overload in an established model for Achilles tendinopathy (rabbit). Also, to study the distribution of the SP-receptor, the NK-1R, and the source of SP, in the tendon. Animals were subjected to the overuse protocol for 1, 3 or 6 weeks. One additional group served as unexercised controls. Immunoassay (EIA), immunohistochemistry (IHC), and in situ hybridisation (ISH) were performed. EIA revealed increased SP-levels in the Achilles tendon of the exercised limb in all the experimental groups as compared to in the controls (statistically significant; p=0.01). A similar trend in the unexercised Achilles tendon was observed but was not statistically significant (p=0.14). IHC and in ISH illustrated reactions of both SP and NK-1R mainly in blood vessel walls, but the receptor was also found on tenocytes. Achilles tendon SP-levels are elevated already after 1 week of loading. This shows that increased SP-production precedes tendinosis, as tendinosis-like changes occur only after a minimum of 3 weeks of exercise, as shown in a recent study using this model. We propose that central neuronal mechanism may be involved as similar trends were observed in the contralateral Achilles tendon.

  4. Antecedent thermal injury worsens split-thickness skin graft quality: A clinically relevant porcine model of full-thickness burn, excision and grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Anders H; Rose, Lloyd F; Fletcher, John L; Wu, Jesse C; Leung, Kai P; Chan, Rodney K

    2017-02-01

    Current standard of care for full-thickness burn is excision followed by autologous split-thickness skin graft placement. Skin grafts are also frequently used to cover surgical wounds not amenable to linear closure. While all grafts have potential to contract, clinical observation suggests that antecedent thermal injury worsens contraction and impairs functional and aesthetic outcomes. This study evaluates the impact of antecedent full-thickness burn on split-thickness skin graft scar outcomes and the potential mediating factors. Full-thickness contact burns (100°C, 30s) were created on the backs of anesthetized female Yorkshire Pigs. After seven days, burn eschar was tangentially excised and covered with 12/1000th inch (300μm) split-thickness skin graft. For comparison, unburned wounds were created by sharp excision to fat before graft application. From 7 to 120days post-grafting, planimetric measurements, digital imaging and biopsies for histology, immunohistochemistry and gene expression were obtained. At 120days post-grafting, the Observer Scar Assessment Scale, colorimetry, contour analysis and optical graft height assessments were performed. Twenty-nine porcine wounds were analyzed. All measured metrics of clinical skin quality were significantly worse (pskin graft quality, likely by multiple mechanisms including burn-related inflammation, microscopically inadequate excision, and dysregulation of tissue remodeling. A valid, reliable, clinically relevant model of full-thickness burn, excision and skin replacement therapy has been demonstrated. Future research to enhance quality of skin replacement therapies should be directed toward modulation of inflammation and assessments for complete excision. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  5. Dynamics in coarse-grained models for oligomer-grafted silica nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Bingbing

    2012-01-01

    Coarse-grained models of poly(ethylene oxide) oligomer-grafted nanoparticles are established by matching their structural distribution functions to atomistic simulation data. Coarse-grained force fields for bulk oligomer chains show excellent transferability with respect to chain lengths and temperature, but structure and dynamics of grafted nanoparticle systems exhibit a strong dependence on the core-core interactions. This leads to poor transferability of the core potential to conditions different from the state point at which the potential was optimized. Remarkably, coarse graining of grafted nanoparticles can either accelerate or slowdown the core motions, depending on the length of the grafted chains. This stands in sharp contrast to linear polymer systems, for which coarse graining always accelerates the dynamics. Diffusivity data suggest that the grafting topology is one cause of slower motions of the cores for short-chain oligomer-grafted nanoparticles; an estimation based on transition-state theory shows the coarse-grained core-core potential also has a slowing-down effect on the nanoparticle organic hybrid materials motions; both effects diminish as grafted chains become longer. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  6. Flexor tendon nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manske, P R; Lesker, P A

    1985-02-01

    The concepts regarding nutrient pathways to flexor tendons within the digital sheath are reviewed. Historically, both diffusion and perfusion have been considered significant pathways to the flexor tendon. Theories of tendon healing and adhesion formation, as well as techniques employed by the surgeon in the repair of tendons, are based on these concepts.

  7. Compromised Neurotrophic and Angiogenic Regenerative Capability during Tendon Healing in a Rat Model of Type-II Diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha S Ahmed

    Full Text Available Metabolic diseases such as diabetes mellitus type-II (DM-II may increase the risk of suffering painful connective tissue disorders and tendon ruptures. The pathomechanisms, however, by which diabetes adversely affects connective tissue matrix metabolism and regeneration, still need better definition. Our aim was to study the effect of DM-II on expressional changes of neuro- and angiotrophic mediators and receptors in intact and healing Achilles tendon. The right Achilles tendon was transected in 5 male DM-II Goto-Kakizaki (GK and 4 age-matched Wistar control rats. The left Achilles tendons were left intact. At week 2 post-injury, NGF, BDNF, TSP, and receptors TrkA, TrkB and Nk1 gene expression was studied by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR and their protein distribution by immunohistochemistry in intact and injured tendons. The expression of tendon-related markers, Scleraxis (SCX and Tenomodulin (TNMD, was evaluated by qRT-PCR in intact and injured tendons. Injured tendons of diabetic GK rats exhibited significantly down-regulated Ngf and Tsp1 mRNA and corresponding protein levels, and down-regulated Trka gene expression compared to injured Wistar controls. Intact tendons of DM-II GK rats displayed reduced mRNA levels for Ngf, Tsp1 and Trkb compared to corresponding intact non-diabetic tendons. Up-regulated Scx and Tnmd gene expression was observed in injured tendons of normal and diabetic GK rats compared to intact Wistar controls. However, these molecules were not up-regulated in injured DM-II GK rats compared to their corresponding controls. Our results suggest that DM-II has detrimental effects on neuro- and angiotrophic pathways, and such effects may reflect the compromised repair seen in diabetic Achilles tendon. Thus, novel approaches for regeneration of injured, including tendinopathic, and surgically repaired diabetic tendons may include therapeutic molecular modulation of neurotrophic pathways such as NGF and its receptors.

  8. Daily Suction Provided by External Volume Expansion Inducing Regeneration of Grafted Fat in a Murine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yuan; Liao, Yunjun; Lu, Feng; Gao, Jianhua

    2017-02-01

    Fat grafting has variable and sometimes poor outcomes, and therefore new methods are needed. Multiple studies have demonstrated the excellent performance of external volume expansion and focused only on preexpansion with emphasis on the recipient. Two mouse models (a suction model and a fat-exchange transplantation model) were established to investigate changes in the origins and biological behaviors of regeneration-related cells in grafted fat under daily suction provided by external volume expansion. Blood supply increased from new host-derived capillaries or macrophage infiltration under suction. CD34-positive cells showed increased migration from the host into the grafts under suction. At week 12, nearly half of the mature adipocytes regenerated in the grafts in the suction group were derived from the host. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ expression of the suction group was significantly higher than that of controls at weeks 2 and 4 during adipogenesis. The normalized sample weight of the grafted fat was significantly greater than that of controls at 1 (0.081 ± 0.001 versus 0.072 ± 0.005; p suction provided by external volume expansion favors the regeneration of grafted fat and improves retention by promoting the migration of regeneration-related cells and the differentiation of adipocytes. Thus, more mature fat tissue with a well-organized structure was formed under suction.

  9. Iliopsoas Tendon Reformation after Psoas Tendon Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Garala

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Internal snapping hip syndrome, or psoas tendonitis, is a recognised cause of nonarthritic hip pain. The majority of patients are treated conservatively; however, occasionally patients require surgical intervention. The two surgical options for iliopsoas tendinopathy are step lengthening of the iliopsoas tendon or releasing the tendon at the lesser trochanter. Although unusual, refractory snapping usually occurs soon after tenotomy. We report a case of a 47-year-old active female with internal snapping and pain following an open psoas tenotomy. Postoperatively she was symptom free for 13 years. An MRI arthrogram revealed reformation of a pseudo iliopsoas tendon reinserting into the lesser trochanter. The pain and snapping resolved after repeat iliopsoas tendon release. Reformation of tendons is an uncommon sequela of tenotomies. However the lack of long-term studies makes it difficult to calculate prevalence rates. Tendon reformation should be included in the differential diagnosis of failed tenotomy procedures after a period of symptom relief.

  10. Rabbit Achilles tendon full transection model – wound healing, adhesion formation and biomechanics at 3, 6 and 12 weeks post-surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Meier Bürgisser

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available After tendon rupture repair, two main problems may occur: re-rupture and adhesion formation. Suitable non-murine animal models are needed to study the healing tendon in terms of biomechanical properties and extent of adhesion formation. In this study 24 New Zealand White rabbits received a full transection of the Achilles tendon 2 cm above the calcaneus, sutured with a 4-strand Becker suture. Post-surgical analysis was performed at 3, 6 and 12 weeks. In the 6-week group, animals received a cast either in a 180 deg stretched position during 6 weeks (adhesion provoking immobilization, or were re-casted with a 150 deg position after 3 weeks (adhesion inhibiting immobilization, while in the other groups (3 and 12 weeks a 180 deg position cast was applied for 3 weeks. Adhesion extent was analyzed by histology and ultrasound. Histopathological scoring was performed according to a method by Stoll et al. (2011, and the main biomechanical properties were assessed. Histopathological scores increased as a function of time, but did not reach values of healthy tendons after 12 weeks (only around 15 out of 20 points. Adhesion provoking immobilization led to an adhesion extent of 82.7±9.7%, while adhesion inhibiting immobilization led to 31.9±9.8% after 6 weeks. Biomechanical properties increased over time, however, they did not reach full strength nor elastic modulus at 12 weeks post-operation. Furthermore, the rabbit Achilles tendon model can be modulated in terms of adhesion formation to the surrounding tissue. It clearly shows the different healing stages in terms of histopathology and offers a suitable model regarding biomechanics because it exhibits similar biomechanics as the human flexor tendons of the hand.

  11. Rabbit Achilles tendon full transection model – wound healing, adhesion formation and biomechanics at 3, 6 and 12 weeks post-surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier Bürgisser, Gabriella; Calcagni, Maurizio; Bachmann, Elias; Fessel, Gion; Snedeker, Jess G.; Giovanoli, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT After tendon rupture repair, two main problems may occur: re-rupture and adhesion formation. Suitable non-murine animal models are needed to study the healing tendon in terms of biomechanical properties and extent of adhesion formation. In this study 24 New Zealand White rabbits received a full transection of the Achilles tendon 2 cm above the calcaneus, sutured with a 4-strand Becker suture. Post-surgical analysis was performed at 3, 6 and 12 weeks. In the 6-week group, animals received a cast either in a 180 deg stretched position during 6 weeks (adhesion provoking immobilization), or were re-casted with a 150 deg position after 3 weeks (adhesion inhibiting immobilization), while in the other groups (3 and 12 weeks) a 180 deg position cast was applied for 3 weeks. Adhesion extent was analyzed by histology and ultrasound. Histopathological scoring was performed according to a method by Stoll et al. (2011), and the main biomechanical properties were assessed. Histopathological scores increased as a function of time, but did not reach values of healthy tendons after 12 weeks (only around 15 out of 20 points). Adhesion provoking immobilization led to an adhesion extent of 82.7±9.7%, while adhesion inhibiting immobilization led to 31.9±9.8% after 6 weeks. Biomechanical properties increased over time, however, they did not reach full strength nor elastic modulus at 12 weeks post-operation. Furthermore, the rabbit Achilles tendon model can be modulated in terms of adhesion formation to the surrounding tissue. It clearly shows the different healing stages in terms of histopathology and offers a suitable model regarding biomechanics because it exhibits similar biomechanics as the human flexor tendons of the hand. PMID:27635037

  12. Brief report: biomarkers of aortic vascular prosthetic graft infection in a porcine model with Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langerhuus, S. N.; Tønnesen, E. K.; Jensen, K. H.

    2010-01-01

    Aortic vascular prosthetic graft infection (AVPGI) with Staphylococcus aureus is a feared post-operative complication. This study was conducted to evaluate the clinical signs and potential biomarkers of infection in a porcine AVPGI model. The biomarkers evaluated were: C-reactive protein (CRP......), fibrinogen, white blood cells (WBC), major histocompatibility complex II (MHC II) density, lymphocyte CD4:CD8 ratio and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in vitro responsiveness. Sixteen pigs were included in the study, and randomly assigned into four groups (n = 4): “SHAM” pigs had their infra-renal...... aorta exposed by laparotomy; “CLEAN” pigs had an aortic graft inserted; “LOW” and “HIGH” pigs had an aortic graft inserted and, subsequently, S. aureus were inoculated on the graft material (5 × 104 colony-forming units [CFU] and 1 × 106 CFU, respectively). Biomarkers were evaluated prior to surgery...

  13. Peroneal tendon disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Davda, Kinner; Malhotra, Karan; O'Donnell, Paul; Singh, Dishan; Cullen, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Pathological abnormality of the peroneal tendons is an under-appreciated source of lateral hindfoot pain and dysfunction that can be difficult to distinguish from lateral ankle ligament injuries. Enclosed within the lateral compartment of the leg, the peroneal tendons are the primary evertors of the foot and function as lateral ankle stabilisers. Pathology of the tendons falls into three broad categories: tendinitis and tenosynovitis, tendon subluxation and dislocation, and tendon splits and ...

  14. A one-dimensional arterial network model for bypass graft assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghigo, A R; Abou Taam, S; Wang, X; Lagrée, P-Y; Fullana, J-M

    2017-05-01

    We propose an arterial network model based on one-dimensional hemodynamic equations to study the behavior of different vascular surgical bypass grafts in the case of an arterial occlusive pathology: a stenosis of the Right Iliac artery. We investigate the performances of three different bypass grafts (Aorto-Femoral, Axillo-Femoral and cross-over Femoral) depending on the degree of obstruction of the stenosis. Numerical simulations show that all bypass grafts are efficient since we retrieve in each case the healthy hemodynamics downstream of the stenosed region while ensuring at the same time a global healthy circulation. We analyze in detail the behavior of the Axillo-Femoral bypass graft by performing hundreds of simulations where we vary the values of its Young's modulus [0.1-50 MPa] and radius [0.01-5 cm]. Our analysis shows that Young's modulus and radius of commercial bypass grafts are optimal in terms of hemodynamic considerations. Our numerical findings prove that this model approach can be used to optimize or plan patient-specific surgeries, to numerically assess the viability of bypass grafts and to perform parametric analysis and error propagation evaluations by running extensive simulations. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Endoscopic adhesiolysis for extensive tibialis posterior tendon and Achilles tendon adhesions following compound tendon rupture

    OpenAIRE

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2013-01-01

    Tendon adhesion is one of the most common causes of disability following tendon surgery. A case of extensive peritendinous adhesions of the Achilles tendon and tibialis posterior tendon after compound rupture of the tendons was reported. This was managed by endoscopic adhesiolysis of both tendons. The endoscopic approach allows early postoperative mobilisation which can relieve the tendon adhesion.

  16. Engaging Stem Cells for Customized Tendon Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatim Thaker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for a consistent therapeutic approach to tendon injury repair is long overdue. Patients with tendon microtears or full ruptures are eligible for a wide range of invasive and non invasive interventions, often subjectively decided by the physician. Surgery produces the best outcomes, and while studies have been conducted to optimize graft constructs and to track outcomes, the data from these studies have been inconclusive on the whole. What has been established is a clear understanding of healthy tendon architecture and the inherent process of healing. With this knowledge, tissue regeneration efforts have achieved immense progress in scaffold design, cell line selection, and, more recently, the appropriate use of cytokines and growth factors. This paper evaluates the plasticity of bone-marrow-derived stem cells and the elasticity of recently developed biomaterials towards tendon regeneration efforts. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, hematopoietic progenitor cells, and poly(1,8-octanediol co-citrate scaffolds (POC are discussed in the context of established grafting strategies. With POC scaffolds to cradle the growth of MSCs and hematopoietic progenitor cells, developing a fibroelastic network guided by cytokines and growth factors may contribute towards consistent graft constructs, enhanced functionality, and better patient outcomes.

  17. Simulation of tendon energy storage in pedaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, John; Damsgaard, Michael; Christensen, Søren Tørholm

    2001-01-01

    system is based on inverse dynamics, where the redundancy problem is solved by a minimum fatigue criterion guaranteeing maximuminter-muscular collaboration. The tendons are assumed to be linearly elastic. It is concluded that tendon elasticity is responsible for metabolic power loss......The role of elastic energy stored in tendons during pedaling is investigated by means of numerical simulation using the AnyBody body modeling system. The loss of metabolic energy due to tendon elasticity is computed and compared to the mechanical work involved in the process. The AnyBody simulation...

  18. Evaluating the Femoral-Side Critical Corner in Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: The Effect of Outside-In Versus Inside-Out Creation of Femoral Tunnels on Graft Contact Pressure in a Synthetic Knee Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narvy, Steven J; Hatch, George F; Ihn, Hansel E; Heckmann, Nathanael D; McGarry, Michelle H; Tibone, James E; Lee, Thay Q

    2017-07-01

    To characterize and compare the graft contact characteristics of outside-in (OI) and inside-out (IO) femoral tunnels during single-bundle reconstruction of the anterolateral bundle of the posterior cruciate ligament in a synthetic knee model. Femoral tunnels were separately made in 16 synthetic femora (8 OI and 8 IO). Achilles tendon allografts were fixed using suspensory fixation with a pressure sensor between the allograft and femoral tunnel. Grafts were cyclically loaded; force, contact area, contact pressure, and peak pressure at the aperture were measured. This process was repeated using the same allograft to assess the other tunnel angle in a separate specimen. IO specimens showed higher mean contact pressure at all loading cycles, with significance shown at 50 N (P = .02). Peak pressure was also greater in IO specimens at all loading cycles and reached statistical significance at 100 N (P = .04). IO specimens had a lower contact area at 150 N (P = .04). No statistically significant differences in force were observed between the 2 groups. OI creation of the femoral tunnel for anterolateral bundle reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament resulted in decreased mean and peak contact pressures at the femoral aperture compared with IO tunnel creation at the specific trajectories and loading parameters tested in this synthetic femoral model. These biomechanical data suggest that OI creation of the femoral tunnel may help reduce in vivo graft contact pressure at the femoral aperture. These data suggest that a tunnel drilled from OI may result in less graft pressure at the femoral aperture, which may prevent graft elongation and optimize graft survival. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of joint models on lower-limb musculo-tendon forces and three-dimensional joint reaction forces during gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Raphaël; Moissenet, Florent; Gasparutto, Xavier; Cheze, Laurence

    2012-02-01

    Several three-dimensional (3D) lower-limb musculo-skeletal models have been developed for gait analysis and different hip, knee and ankle joint models have been considered in the literature. Conversely to the influence of the musculo-tendon geometry, the influence of the joint models--i.e. number of degrees of freedom and passive joint moments--on the estimated musculo-tendon forces and 3D joint reaction forces has not been extensively examined. In this paper musculo-tendon forces and 3D joint reaction forces have been estimated for one subject and one gait cycle with nine variations of a musculoskeletal model and outputs have been compared to measured electromyographic signals and knee joint contact forces. The model outputs are generally in line with the measured signals. However, the 3D joint reaction forces were higher than published values and the contact forces measured for the subject. The results of this study show that, with more degrees of freedom in the model, the musculo-tendon forces and the 3D joint reaction forces tend to increase but with some redistribution between the muscles. In addition, when taking into account passive joint moments, the 3D joint reaction forces tend to decrease during the stance phase and increase during the swing phase. Although further investigations are needed, a five-degree-of-freedom lower-limb musculo-skeletal model with some angle-dependent joint coupling and stiffness seems to provide satisfactory musculo-tendon forces and 3D joint reaction forces.

  20. In Vivo Measurements of Flexor Tendon and Suspensory Ligament Forces During Trotting Using the Thoroughbred Forelimb Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    TAKAHASHI, Toshiyuki; MUKAI, Kazutaka; OHMURA, Hajime; AIDA, Hiroko; HIRAGA, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to create a lower forelimb model of the Thoroughbred horse for measuring the force in the superficial and deep digital flexor tendons (SDFT and DDFT), and the suspensory ligament (SL) during a trot. The mass, centers of gravity, and inertial moments in the metacarpus, pastern, and hoof segments were measured in 4 Thoroughbred horses. The moment arms of the SDFT, DDFT, and SL in the metacarpophalangeal (fetlock) and distal interphalangeal (coffin) joints were measured in 7 Thoroughbred horses. The relationship between the fetlock joint angle and the force in the SL was assessed in 3 limbs of 2 Thoroughbred horses. The forces in the SDFT, DDFT, and SL during a trot were also measured in 7 Thoroughbred horses. The mass of the 3 segments, and the moment arms of the SDFT and DDFT in the fetlock joint of the Thoroughbred horses were smaller than those of the Warmblood horses, whereas the other values were almost the same in the 2 types. The calculated force in the SDFT with this Thoroughbred model reached a peak (4,615 N) at 39.3% of the stance phase, whereas that in the DDFT reached a peak (5,076 N) at 51.2% of the stance phase. The force in the SL reached a peak (11,957 N) at 49.4% of the stance phase. This lower forelimb model of the Thoroughbred can be applied to studying the effects of different shoe types and change of hoof angle for the flexor tendon and SL forces. PMID:24834009

  1. In vivo measurements of flexor tendon and suspensory ligament forces during trotting using the thoroughbred forelimb model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Mukai, Kazutaka; Ohmura, Hajime; Aida, Hiroko; Hiraga, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to create a lower forelimb model of the Thoroughbred horse for measuring the force in the superficial and deep digital flexor tendons (SDFT and DDFT), and the suspensory ligament (SL) during a trot. The mass, centers of gravity, and inertial moments in the metacarpus, pastern, and hoof segments were measured in 4 Thoroughbred horses. The moment arms of the SDFT, DDFT, and SL in the metacarpophalangeal (fetlock) and distal interphalangeal (coffin) joints were measured in 7 Thoroughbred horses. The relationship between the fetlock joint angle and the force in the SL was assessed in 3 limbs of 2 Thoroughbred horses. The forces in the SDFT, DDFT, and SL during a trot were also measured in 7 Thoroughbred horses. The mass of the 3 segments, and the moment arms of the SDFT and DDFT in the fetlock joint of the Thoroughbred horses were smaller than those of the Warmblood horses, whereas the other values were almost the same in the 2 types. The calculated force in the SDFT with this Thoroughbred model reached a peak (4,615 N) at 39.3% of the stance phase, whereas that in the DDFT reached a peak (5,076 N) at 51.2% of the stance phase. The force in the SL reached a peak (11,957 N) at 49.4% of the stance phase. This lower forelimb model of the Thoroughbred can be applied to studying the effects of different shoe types and change of hoof angle for the flexor tendon and SL forces.

  2. Biomechanical Comparison Between Bashti Bone Plug Technique and Biodegradable Screw for Fixation of Grafts in Ligament surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashti, Kaveh; Tahmasebi, Mohammad N; Kaseb, Hasan; Farahmand, Farzam; Akbar, Mohammad; Mobini, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ligament reconstruction is a common procedure in orthopedic surgery. Although several popular techniques are currently in use, new methods are proposed for secure fixation of the tendon graft into the bone tunnel. Purposes: We sought to introduce our new technique of Bashti bone plug for fixation of soft tissue graft in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and to compare its biomechanical features with conventional absorbable interference screw technique in a bovine model. Methods: Twenty pairs of bovine knees were harvested after death. Soft tissue was removed and the Achilles tendon was harvested to be used as an ACL graft. It was secured into the bone tunnel on the tibial side via two different methods: Bashti Bone Plug technique and conventional screw method. Biomechanical strength was measured using 200 N and 300 N cyclic loading on the graft. Pull out strength was also tested until the graft fails. Results: No graft failure was observed after 200 N and 300 N cyclic loading in either fixation methods. When testing for pull out failure, 21 tendons (53%) were torn and 19 tendons (48%) slipped out. No fixation failure occurred, which did not reveal a significant difference between the bone plug or interference screw group (P=0.11). The mean pull out force until failure of the graft was 496±66 N in the screw group and 503±67 N in the bone plug group (P=0.76). Conclusions: Our suggested fixation technique of Bashti bone plug is a native, cheap, and feasible method that provides comparable biomechanical strength with interference screw when soft tissue fixation was attempted in bovine model. PMID:25692166

  3. Biomechanical Comparison Between Bashti Bone Plug Technique and Biodegradable Screw for Fixation of Grafts in Ligament surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Bashti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ligament reconstruction is a common procedure in orthopedic surgery. Although several popular techniques are currently in use, new methods are proposed for secure fixation of the tendon graft into the bone tunnel. Purposes: We sought to introduce our new technique of Bashti bone plug for fixation of soft tissue graft in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction and to compare its biomechanical features with conventional absorbable interference screw technique in a bovine model. Methods: Twenty pairs of bovine knees were harvested after death. Soft tissue was removed and the Achilles tendon was harvested to be used as an ACL graft. It was secured into the bone tunnel on the tibial side via two different methods: Bashti Bone Plug technique and conventional screw method. Biomechanical strength was measured using 200 N and 300 N cyclic loading on the graft. Pull out strength was also tested until the graft fails. Results: No graft failure was observed after 200 N and 300 N cyclic loading in either fixation methods. When testing for pull out failure, 21 tendons (53% were torn and 19 tendons (48% slipped out. No fixation failure occurred, which did not reveal a significant difference between the bone plug or interference screw group (P=0.11. The mean pull out force until failure of the graft was 496±66 N in the screw group and 503±67 N in the bone plug group (P=0.76. Conclusions: Our suggested fixation technique of Bashti bone plug is a native, cheap, and feasible method that provides comparable biomechanical strength with interference screw when soft tissue fixation was attempted in bovine model.

  4. Effect of tendon tensioning: an in vitro study in porcine extensor tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, David; Calvo, Rafael; Vaisman, Alex; Meleán, Patricio; Figueroa, Francisco

    2010-06-01

    Graft tensioning is a controversial issue in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) that has not achieved consensus between peers. The purpose of this study is to determine if after tensioning tendon length and resistance to maximal load changes. We performed an in vitro study with 50 porcine extensors tendons. The first group (P=25) was tensioned with 80 N (19.97 lb) for 10 min, using an ACL graft preparation board. The second group (C=25) was used as control and was not tensioned. The average initial (groups P and C) and post tensioning tendon length (group C) were measured; the average initial and post tensioning tendon diameter were measured as well. All samples were fixated in a tube-clamp system connected to a tension sensor. The samples were stressed with continuous and progressive tension until ultimate failure at maximum load (UFML) occurs. The initial mean length was: P before tensioning=13.4 mm+/-1.4 mm (range 10.5-16.5); P after tensioning=13.8 mm+/-1.4 mm (range 11.5-16.5); C=13 mm+/-1.35 mm (p=0.005). The mean diameter was: P=5.6 mm (4.5-6); C=5.5 mm (range 4.5-6) (p>0.05). The UFML was: P=189.7 N (114-336); C=229.9 N (143-365) (p=0.029). Tendon tensioning with 80 N for 10 min produced 3% average elongation. These could be beneficial in ACLR since tendon tensioning decreases elongation of the graft after fixation. Regardless, tendon tensioning is not innocuous since it diminishes their resistance when continuously stressed until complete failure occurs.

  5. Cost effectiveness analysis of graft options in spinal fusion surgery using a Markov model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virk, Sohrab; Sandhu, Harvinder S; Khan, Safdar N

    2012-10-01

    Statistical decision model. To determine the most cost-effective graft option in spinal fusion. Spinal fusion has been shown to be an effective technique to treat lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis. There have been significant advances in bone graft options to improve outcomes related to spinal fusion. RhBMP-2 (RhBMP), iliac crest bone graft (ICBG), local bone alone (LBG), demineralized bone matrix with local bone (DBM), local bone with corticocancellous allograft chips (CCA) have all been used as graft options. There has not been significant research in which graft option is most cost effective. A Markov decision model has been created to identify the most cost-effective graft option for use in spinal fusion to treat 1-level (L4-L5) degenerative spondylolisthesis in a cohort of 60-year-old patients. Costs and effectiveness of successful spinal fusion surgery and revision surgery associated with each graft option was estimated through published data. The quality adjusted life years (QALYs) from these surgeries were compared with the amount of QALYs associated with living with chronic back pain. : In the base case, the incremental cost-effective ratio for each graft option when compared with living with chronic back pain was $21,308/QALY for ICBG, $16,595/QALY for RhBMP, $21,204/QALY for LBG, $21,287/QALY for DBM, and $28,153/QALY for CCA. Therefore, the most cost-effective graft option in the base case was RhBMP. Sensitivity analysis shows that RhBMP is not the most cost-effective option if the revision rate is significantly raised. If the cost of treatment with RhBMP rises >$42,250 then LBG becomes the likely cost-effective treatment. RhBMP is the most cost-effective graft option for L4-L5 fusion for degenerative spondylolisthesis largely due to the reduced rate of revision spine surgery. The increased upfront cost and list of complications associated with RhBMP is offset by the reduced rate of revision surgery.

  6. Four-Strand Core Suture Improves Flexor Tendon Repair Compared to Two-Strand Technique in a Rabbit Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Wichelhaus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This study was designed to investigate the influence of the amount of suture material on the formation of peritendinous adhesions of intrasynovial flexor tendon repairs. Materials and Methods. In 14 rabbits, the flexor tendons of the third and the fourth digit of the right hind leg were cut and repaired using a 2- or 4-strand core suture technique. The repaired tendons were harvested after three and eight weeks. The range of motion of the affected toes was measured and the tendons were processed histologically. The distance between the transected tendon ends, the changes in the peritendinous space, and cellular and extracellular inflammatory reaction were quantified by different staining. Results. A 4-strand core suture resulted in significantly less gap formation. The 2-strand core suture showed a tendency to less adhesion formation. Doubling of the intratendinous suture material was accompanied by an initial increase in leukocyte infiltration and showed a greater amount of formation of myofibroblasts. From the third to the eighth week after flexor tendon repair, both the cellular and the extracellular inflammation decreased significantly. Conclusion. A 4-strand core suture repair leads to a significantly better tendon healing process with less diastasis between the sutured tendon ends despite initially pronounced inflammatory response.

  7. Knee function after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with patellar or hamstring tendon: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Dong-Liang; Yao, Zhen-Jun

    2011-12-01

    There is currently no consensus regarding the best graft type for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of patellar and hamstring tendon grafts on long-term knee function after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. This meta-analysis was conducted according to the methodological guidelines outlined by the Cochrane Collaboration. An electronic search of the literature was performed and all trials published between January 1966 and August 2011 comparing knee function after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using patellar tendon grafts with knee function after reconstruction with hamstring tendon grafts were pooled. Six studies were included in the final meta-analysis. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using hamstring tendon grafts resulted in greater pain upon kneeling than reconstruction using patellar tendon grafts (P = 0.001). However, both grafts resulted in similar levels of anterior tibial translation, and similar results regarding isokinetic extension/flexion tests, Lysholm scores, and the stair-hop test (P > 0.05). Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using patellar or hamstring tendon grafts results in similar long-term knee function.

  8. A new beating-heart off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting training model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, Wobbe; Kuijpers, Michiel; Bijleveld, Aanke; De Maat, Gijs E.; Koene, Bart M.; Erasmus, Michiel E.; Natour, Ehsan; Mariani, Massimo A.

    OBJECTIVES: Training models are essential in mastering the skills required for off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB). We describe a new, high-fidelity, effective and reproducible beating-heart OPCAB training model in human cadavers. METHODS: Human cadavers were embalmed according to the

  9. Elongamento do enxerto de tendões do músculo grácial e semitendinoso humanos: estudo realizado em cadáveres de adultos jovens Graft semitendinosus and gracilis human muscle tendons elongation: a study carried out on young adult human cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Rocha Piedade

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Na cirurgia de reconstrução do ligamento cruzado anterior do joelho, os enxertos de tendões autólogos são a principal opção como substitutos ligamentares. Entretanto, uma das razões da falha da reconstrução ligamentar com tecidos moles é o estiramento ou elongamento do enxerto com o tempo. Neste trabalho, foram ensaiados oito tendões do músculo grácil e oito do músculo semitendinoso humanos, obtidos de quatro cadáveres do sexo masculino, com idade média de 24,5 anos. Cada tendão foi submetido a uma deformação relativa constante de 2,5% durante 600 s, com registro contínuo do relaxamento de força. A seguir, o tendão retornava ao seu comprimento inicial e era mantido num período de repouso de 300 s. Após este intervalo, um segundo ensaio, semelhante ao primeiro, era realizado. A velocidade de carregamento empregada foi de 10% do comprimento inicial do corpo de prova por segundo. Foram obtidos valores de força inicial, com 300 s e 600 s nos dois ensaios. A análise estatística sugere um comportamento mecânico mais uniforme para o tendão do músculo semitendinoso quando comparado ao tendão do músculo grácil.In the anterior cruciate ligament knee surgery reconstruction, autologous tendons graft remains as a main option as substitutive ligaments. However time effect on graft elongation is the main reason of ligament reconstruction failure. Traction tests have been performed on eight gracilis as well as on eight semitendinosus human muscles tendons obtained from four male cadavers at an average of 24.5 years. Each tendon specimen has been submitted to a deformation of 2.5% of its initial length for a time interval of 600 s with continuous recording of the corresponding force relaxation. The tendon specimen was then kept at rest for 300 s as soon as it returned to its initial length. The same specimen was then submitted to a similar test. Deformation rate for both tests was 10% of its initial length per second. Initial

  10. Diseases of the tendons and tendon sheaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Adrian; Anderson, David E; Desrochers, André

    2014-03-01

    Contracted flexor tendon leading to flexural deformity is a common congenital defect in cattle. Arthrogryposis is a congenital syndrome of persistent joint contracture that occurs frequently in Europe as a consequence of Schmallenberg virus infection of the dam. Spastic paresis has a hereditary component, and affected cattle should not be used for breeding purposes. The most common tendon avulsion involves the deep digital flexor tendon. Tendon disruptions may be successfully managed by tenorrhaphy and external coaptation or by external coaptation alone. Medical management alone is unlikely to be effective for purulent tenosynovitis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Questions concerning two-stage reconstruction of injured flexor tendons. III. Ultrastructure of the tenosynovium in the pseudo-tendon sheath created by using a silicone rod].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamon, A; Bíró, V; Vámhidy, L; Trombitás, K; Józsa, L

    1993-01-01

    Authors have investigated the ultrastructure of the pseudo tendon sheath, formed with silicon rod and man. They have observed a superficial structure, resembling the normal tendon sheath in scanning electron microscopic examination. With transmission electron microscopy phagocyte "A" type and secretion "B" type synovial cells were found. Authors state that the newly formed tenosynovium has an important role in the nutrition of the tendon graft and the prevention of adhesions.

  12. Reproduction of superior sagittal sinus animal model by bypass transplantation of biomaterial graft

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    Qing-yong LUO

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To establish the beagles model of superior sagittal sinus bypass graft,and explore the feasibility of reconstruction of superior sagittal sinus with biomaterials using this model.Methods Eight adult male beagles(weight: 12.5-22.0kg were involved in the present study.The superior sagittal sinus was exposed and blocked via bone window,and then anastomosed side-to-end to the biomaterial graft under the dedicated microscope of neurosurgery surgery,expectant treatment such as anti-inflammatory was given for the animals.The digital subtraction venography(DSV and color Doppler flow imaging(CDFI of superior sagittal sinus were performed in 1,2,4 and 8 weeks after the operation.Eight weeks after the operation,all the animals were sacrificed and the material graft was examined histologically.Results The DSV and CDFI of superior sagittal sinus showed that the stomas of 2 beagles were with slight stenosis and high flow velocity,of 1 beagle with small leakage and low flow velocity,while of other 5 beagles were normal.The histological examination showed endothelial cells were growing on the graft and superior sagittal sinus,and crawling toward the lumen of graft 8 weeks after the operation.Conclusion The beagles model of superior sagittal sinus bypass graft was established successfully.The short-term effect of the model was satisfactory,while further work should be performed to determine the long-term effects.

  13. Peroneal Tendon Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the type of peroneal tendon injury. Options include: Immobilization. A cast or splint may be used to ... arthritis, gout, tendonitis, fracture, nerve compression (tarsal tunnel syndrome), infection and... Founded in 1942, the American College ...

  14. Chronic Achilles Tendon Rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffulli, Nicola; Via, Alessio Giai; Oliva, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Background: The Achilles tendon, the largest and strongest tendon in the human body, is nevertheless one of the tendons which most commonly undergoes a complete subcutaneous tear. Achilles tendon ruptures are especially common in middle aged men who occasionally participate in sport. Even though Achilles tendon ruptures are frequent, up to 25% of acute injuries are misdiagnosed, and present as chronic injuries. Methods: This is a review article about diagnosis and management of chronic Achilles tendon ruptures. Minimally invasive Achilles tendon reconstruction is discussed. Results: The optimal surgical procedure is still debated, however, less invasive peroneus brevis reconstruction technique and free hamstring autograft provide good functional results. Conclusion: The management of chronic ruptures is more demanding than acute tears, because of the retraction of the tendon ends, and the gap makes primary repair impossible. Wound complications and infections are frequent after open procedures. Minimally invasive treatments provide good functional results and lower complications rate. PMID:29081863

  15. Biology and augmentation of tendon-bone insertion repair

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    Lui PPY

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Surgical reattachment of tendon and bone such as in rotator cuff repair, patellar-patella tendon repair and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction often fails due to the failure of regeneration of the specialized tissue ("enthesis" which connects tendon to bone. Tendon-to-bone healing taking place between inhomogenous tissues is a slow process compared to healing within homogenous tissue, such as tendon to tendon or bone to bone healing. Therefore special attention must be paid to augment tendon to bone insertion (TBI healing. Apart from surgical fixation, biological and biophysical interventions have been studied aiming at regeneration of TBI healing complex, especially the regeneration of interpositioned fibrocartilage and new bone at the healing junction. This paper described the biology and the factors influencing TBI healing using patella-patellar tendon (PPT healing and tendon graft to bone tunnel healing in ACL reconstruction as examples. Recent development in the improvement of TBI healing and directions for future studies were also reviewed and discussed.

  16. The effect of glucocorticoids on tendon cell viability in human tendon explants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Wai Ting; Chuen Fu, Sai; Man Lee, Kwong

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose Previous studies on the culture of human tenocytes have shown that dexamethasone and triamcino-lone reduce cell viability, suppress cell proliferation, and reduce collagen synthesis. However, such cell cultures lack the extracellular matrix and three-dimensional structure of normal tendons, which affects their response to stimuli. We established a human tendon explant culture system and tested the effects of dexamethasone and triamcinolone on cell viability. Methods Primary human tendon explant cultures were prepared from healthy hamstring tendons. Tendon strips were harvested from hamstring tendons and cultured in 24-well plates in Dulbecco’s modification of Eagle’s Medium (DMEM) supplemented with 2% fetal calf serum. The tendon explants were treated with 0 μM (control), 10 μM, or 100 μM dexamethasone sodium phosphate or 0 μM (control), 10 μM, or 100 μM triamcinolone acetonide in DMEM for 96 h. Cell viability was measured by Alamar blue assay before and after glucocorticoid treatment. Results Incubation with 10 μM and 100 μM dexamethasone reduced cell viability in human tendon explants by 35% and 45%, respectively, as compared to a 6% increase in the controls (p = 0.01, mixed-effects ANOVA). Triamcinolone at 10 μM and 100 μM reduced cell viability by 33% and 36%, respectively, as compared to a 9% increase in the controls (p = 0.07, mixed-effects ANOVA). Interpretation Human tendon explant cultures can be used to study the effects of glucocorticoids on human tendon. Dexamethasone and triamcinolone suppress the cell viability of human tendon in its natural 3-dimensional environment with matrix anchorage. Human tendon explant cultures provide a species-specific model for further investigation of the effects of glucocorticoids on the metabolism of the extracellular matrix of human tendon, and on its mechanical properties. PMID:19421908

  17. Effects of Hydroxyapatite on Bone Graft Resorption in an Experimental Model of Maxillary Alveolar Arch Defects

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    Ozgur Pilanci

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Most commonly used treatments use autologous bone grafts to address bony defects in patients with cleft palate. Major disadvantages of autogenous bone grafts include donor site morbidity and resorption. Suggestions to overcome such problems include biomaterials that can be used alone or in combination with bone. We examined the effect of hydroxyapatite cement on bone graft resorption in a rabbit maxillary alveolar defect model. We divided 16 young adult albino New Zealand rabbits into two groups. A defect 1 cm wide was created in each rabbit's maxillary arch. In Group 1, the removed bone was disrupted, and the pieces were replaced in the defect. In the other group, the pieces were replaced after mixing (1:1 with hydroxyapatite cement. Quantitative computed tomographic evaluation of these grafts was performed in axial and coronal planes for each rabbit at 2 and 12 weeks. In axial images at 12 weeks, the group without cement showed mean bone resorption of 15%. In the cement group, a mean volumetric increase of 68% was seen. No resorption occurred when bone grafts were mixed with hydroxyapatite cement. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2013; 2(3.000: 170-175

  18. Short-term cast immobilisation is effective in reducing lesion propagation in a surgical model of equine superficial digital flexor tendon injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, F; Cadby, J; Bosch, G; Brama, P; van Weeren, R; van Schie, H

    2012-09-01

    Larger superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) injuries have a poorer prognosis than smaller lesions. During the inflammatory phase enlargement of the initial lesion is frequently noted, with biomechanical loading being recently proposed to play an important role. To evaluate the effect of lower limb cast immobilisation on tendon lesion propagation in an equine model of surgically induced SDFT injury. Core lesions were surgically induced in both front SDFTs of 6 young mature horses. At the end of surgery, one leg was randomly placed in a lower limb cast and the other leg (control) was bandaged for 10 days. Computerised ultrasonographic tissue characterisation performed at Days 10, 15, 21, 28, 35 and 42 allowed measurement of lesion length (cm) and width (expressed as a percentage of whole tendon cross-section). On Day 42 horses were subjected to euthanasia and both SDFTs were sectioned every centimetre to assess the lesion length macroscopically. Statistics were performed to compare cast vs. control legs with significance set at Plesion length was 19% shorter (Plesion width 57% smaller (P = 0.0002) in the cast legs (6.13 ± 0.12 cm; 6.90 ± 0.64%) than in the control legs (7.30 ± 0.21 cm; 10.85 ± 1.22%). On Day 42 the lesion length on macroscopic evaluation was 19% shorter (P = 0.04) in the cast (7.00 ± 0.36 cm) than in the control legs (8.33 ± 0.33 cm). Cast immobilisation for 10 days effectively reduced lesion propagation (length and width) compared to bandaging in an in vivo model of artificially-induced tendon lesions. A short period of cast immobilisation during the early phase of tendon healing may be an easy and cost-effective way to reduce the initial enlargement of lesion size and hence to improve prognosis. © 2011 EVJ Ltd.

  19. Biologics for tendon repair☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docheva, Denitsa; Müller, Sebastian A.; Majewski, Martin; Evans, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    Tendon injuries are common and present a clinical challenge to orthopedic surgery mainly because these injuries often respond poorly to treatment and require prolonged rehabilitation. Therapeutic options used to repair ruptured tendons have consisted of suture, autografts, allografts, and synthetic prostheses. To date, none of these alternatives has provided a successful long-term solution, and often the restored tendons do not recover their complete strength and functionality. Unfortunately, our understanding of tendon biology lags far behind that of other musculoskeletal tissues, thus impeding the development of new treatment options for tendon conditions. Hence, in this review, after introducing the clinical significance of tendon diseases and the present understanding of tendon biology, we describe and critically assess the current strategies for enhancing tendon repair by biological means. These consist mainly of applying growth factors, stem cells, natural biomaterials and genes, alone or in combination, to the site of tendon damage. A deeper understanding of how tendon tissue and cells operate, combined with practical applications of modern molecular and cellular tools could provide the long awaited breakthrough in designing effective tendon-specific therapeutics and overall improvement of tendon disease management. PMID:25446135

  20. Dermal substitutes for full-thickness wounds in a one-stage grafting model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, H. J.; Mekkes, J. R.; Middelkoop, E.; Hinrichs, W. L.; Wildevuur, C. R.; Westerhof, W.

    1993-01-01

    We tested different biodegradable matrix materials as dermal substitutes in a porcine wound model. Matrixes were covered with a split-skin mesh graft and protected with a microporous, semipermeable membrane, which prevents blister formation, wound infection and provides ultimate healing conditions.

  1. Reconstrução do ligamento cruzado anterior com duplo feixe utilizando os tendões dos músculos semitendíneo e grácil: fixação com dois parafusos de interferência Arthroscopic double- bundle reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament using hamstring tendon grafts: fixation with two interference screws

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    Mario Carneiro

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Procedimentos cirúrgicos de reconstrução do ligamento cruzado anterior com duplo feixe dos tendões dos músculos semitendíneo e grácil têm sido descritos na última década. A maioria das técnicas descritas utiliza o dobro de material de síntese empregado na reconstrução com feixe único. Relatamos uma técnica original para a reconstrução do ligamento cruzado anterior com duplo feixe, na qual mantemos as inserções tibiais dos tendões dos músculos semitendíneo e grácil e realizamos dois túneis tibiais e dois túneis femorais. Os túneis femorais são realizados "de fora para dentro" e a fixação do enxerto é realizada somente com dois parafusos de interferência.Surgical procedures for double-bundle reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament, which currently use semitendinous and gracilis tendon grafts, have been described in the last decade. Most of the techniques utilize twice the hardware used in single-bundle reconstructions. We report an original anterior cruciate ligament double-bundle reconstruction technique using semitendinous and gracilis tendon grafts, maintaining their tibial bone insertions with two tibial and two femoral tunnels. A simplified and precise outside-in femoral drilling technique is utilized, and the graft fixation is made utilizing only two interference screws.

  2. The phenomenon of "ligamentization": anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with autogenous patellar tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiel, D; Kleiner, J B; Roux, R D; Harwood, F L; Akeson, W H

    1986-01-01

    Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) with patellar tendon (PT) is a common procedure for the symptomatic ACL-deficient knee. Questions regarding graft incorporation, viability, and nutrition of the transplanted tissue are of concern. This relates to the graft's response to its new intrasynovial milieu and new physical forces. These factors were studied in a rabbit model of ACL reconstruction using PT and were evaluated with histological and biochemical parameters with respect to time. A histological and biochemical metamorphosis of the grafted PT occurred in this study. Autografts demonstrated a gradual assumption of the microscopic properties of normal ACL; by 30 weeks postoperatively, cell morphology was ligamentous in appearance. Normally, type III collagen is not observed in PT, however, a gradual increase in its concentration was seen in the grafts; by 30 weeks its concentration (10%) was the same as in normal ACL. Similarly, glycosaminoglycans content increased from its normally low level in PT to that found in native ACL. Collagen-reducible crosslink analysis demonstrated that grafted tissue changed from the normal PT pattern of low dihydroxylysinonorleucine (DHLNL) and high histidinohydroxymerodesmosine (HHMD) to the pattern seen in normal ACL (high DHLNL and low HHMD) by 30 weeks. These data suggest that when PT is placed in the anatomic and environmental milieu of the ACL, a "ligamentization" of the grafted tissue results; also the autograft initially depends on synovial fluid nutrition, as revascularization occurs after 6 weeks.

  3. Composite coating of 58S bioglass and hydroxyapatite on a poly (ethylene terepthalate) artificial ligament graft for the graft osseointegration in a bone tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Hong; Wu Yang; Ge Yunsheng; Jiang Jia; Gao Kai [Department of Sports Medicine, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Zhang Pengyun; Wu Lingxiang [Shanghai Research Center of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai (China); Chen Shiyi, E-mail: cshiyi@163.com [Department of Sports Medicine, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China)

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the combination of hydroxyapatite (HA) and bioglass (BG) on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) artificial ligament graft osseointegration within the bone tunnel. The results of in vitro culturing of MC3T3-E1 mouse osteoblastic cells proved that this HA/BG composite coating can promote the cell compatibility of grafts. A rabbit extraarticular tendon-to-bone healing model was used to evaluate the effect of this composite coating on PET artificial ligaments in vivo. The final results demonstrated that HA/BG coating improved new bone formation at the graft-bone interface and increased the load-to-failure property of graft in bone tunnel compared to the control group at early time. The study has shown that HA/BG composite coating on the PET artificial ligament surface has a positive effect in the induction of artificial ligament osseointegration within the bone tunnel.

  4. Effectiveness of xenogenous-based bovine-derived platelet gel embedded within a three-dimensional collagen implant on the healing and regeneration of the Achilles tendon defect in rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshiri, Ali; Oryan, Ahmad; Meimandi-Parizi, Abdolhamid; Koohi-Hosseinabadi, Omid

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective: Tissue engineering is an option in reconstructing large tendon defects and managing their healing and regeneration. We designed and produced a novel xenogeneic-based bovine platelet, embedded it within a tissue-engineered collagen implant (CI) and applied it in an experimentally induced large tendon defect model in rabbits to test whether bovine platelets could stimulate tendon healing and regeneration in vivo. Methods: One hundred twenty rabbits were randomly divided into two experimental and pilot groups. In all the animals, the left Achilles tendon was surgically excised and the tendon edges were aligned by Kessler suture. Each group was then divided into three groups of control (no implant), treated with CI and treated with collagen-platelet implant. The pilot groups were euthanized at 10, 15, 30 and 40 days post-injury (DPI), and their gross and histologic characteristics were evaluated to study host–graft interaction mechanism. To study the tendon healing and its outcome, the experimental animals were tested during the experiment using hematologic, ultrasonographic and various methods of clinical examinations and then euthanized at 60 DPI and their tendons were evaluated by gross pathologic, histopathologic, scanning electron microscopic, biophysical and biochemical methods. Results: Bovine platelets embedded within a CI increased inflammation at short term while it increased the rate of implant absorption and matrix replacement compared with the controls and CI alone. Treatment also significantly increased diameter, density, amount, alignment and differentiation of the collagen fibrils and fibers and approximated the water uptake and delivery behavior of the healing tendons to normal contralaterals (p tendons and reduced peritendinous adhesion, muscle fibrosis and atrophy, and therefore, it improved the clinical scores and physical activity related to the injured limb when compared with the controls (p Achilles tendon in rabbit

  5. Pain level after ACL reconstruction: A comparative study between free quadriceps tendon and hamstring tendons autografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buescu, Cristian Tudor; Onutu, Adela Hilda; Lucaciu, Dan Osvald; Todor, Adrian

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the pain levels and analgesic consumption after single bundle ACL reconstruction with free quadriceps tendon autograft versus hamstring tendon autograft. A total of 48 patients scheduled for anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction were randomized into two groups: the free quadriceps tendon autograft group (24 patients) and the hamstring tendons autograft group (24 patients). A basic multimodal analgesic postoperative program was used for all patients and rescue analgesia was provided with tramadol, at pain scores over 30 on the Visual Analog Scale. The time to the first rescue analgesic, the number of doses of tramadol and pain scores were recorded. The results within the same group were compared with the Wilcoxon signed test. Supplementary analgesic drug administration proved significantly higher in the group of subjects with hamstring grafts, with a median (interquartile range) of 1 (1.3) dose, compared to the group of subjects treated with a quadriceps graft, median = 0.5 (0.1.25) (p = 0.009). A significantly higher number of subjects with a quadriceps graft did not require any supplementary analgesic drug (50%) as compared with subjects with hamstring graft (13%; Z-statistics = 3.01, p = 0.002). The percentage of subjects who required a supplementary analgesic drug was 38% higher in the HT group compared with the FQT group. The use of the free quadriceps tendon autograft for ACL reconstruction leads to less pain and analgesic consumption in the immediate postoperative period compared with the use of hamstrings autograft. Level I Therapeutic study. Copyright © 2017 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. FIBRILLINS IN TENDON

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    Betti Giusti

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tendons among connective tissue, mainly collagen, contain also elastic fibres made of fibrillin 1, fibrillin 2 and elastin that are broadly distributed in tendons and represent 1-2% of the dried mass of the tendon. Only in the last years, studies on structure and function of elastic fibres in tendons have been performed. Aim of this review is to revise data on the organization of elastic fibres in tendons, in particular fibrillin structure and function, and on the clinical manifestations associated to alterations of elastic fibres in tendons. Indeed, microfibrils may contribute to tendon mechanics; therefore, their alterations may cause joint hypermobility and contractures which have been found to be clinical features in patients with Marfan syndrome and Beals syndrome. The two diseases are caused by mutations in genes FBN1 and FBN2 encoding fibrillin 1 and fibrillin 2, respectively.

  7. Scapholunate ligament reconstruction using the palmaris longus tendon and suture anchor fixation in chronic scapholunate instability

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    Maulik Jagdish Gandhi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: This technique avoids the use of drill holes to weave tendon through bone, uses an easy to access graft, and exploits the superior pullout strength of anchors while offering satisfactory functional outcomes that are comparable to alternative tenodesis techniques.

  8. MicroRNA29a Treatment Improves Early Tendon Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Ashlee E; Millar, Neal L; Platt, Josh; Kitson, Susan M; Akbar, Moeed; Rech, Raquel; Griffin, Jay; Pool, Roy; Hughes, Tom; McInnes, Iain B; Gilchrist, Derek S

    2017-10-04

    Tendon injuries (tendinopathies) are common in human and equine athletes and characterized by dysregulated collagen matrix, resulting in tendon damage. We have previously demonstrated a functional role for microRNA29a (miR29a) as a post-transcriptional regulator of collagen 3 expression in murine and human tendon injury. Given the translational potential, we designed a randomized, blinded trial to evaluate the potential of a miR29a replacement therapy as a therapeutic option to treat tendinopathy in an equine model that closely mimics human disease. Tendon injury was induced in the superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) of 17 horses. Tendon lesions were treated 1 week later with an intralesional injection of miR29a or placebo. miR29a treatment reduced collagen 3 transcript levels at week 2, with no significant changes in collagen 1. The relative lesion cross-sectional area was significantly lower in miR29a tendons compared to control tendons. Histology scores were significantly better for miR29a-treated tendons compared to control tendons. These data support the mechanism of microRNA-mediated modulation of early pathophysiologic events that facilitate tissue remodeling in the tendon after injury and provides a strong proof of principle that a locally delivered miR29a therapy improves early tendon healing. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. All rights reserved.

  9. Objective assessment of surgical training in flexor tendon repair: the utility of a low-cost porcine model as demonstrated by a single-subject research design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetlitz, Elisabeth; Wearing, Scott Cameron; Nicol, Alexander; Hart, Andrew Mackay

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the utility of a porcine flexor tendon model and standard biomechanical testing procedures to quantify the acquisition of surgical skills associated with Zone II flexor tendon repair in a trainee by benchmarking task performance outcomes relative to evidence-based standards. Single-subject repeated measures research design. Bench-top set-up of apparatus undertaken in a University Research laboratory. After initial directed learning, a trainee repaired 70 fresh flexor digitorum profundus tendons within the flexor sheath using either a Pennington or ventral-locking-loop modification of a two-strand Kessler core repair. Tendon repairs were then preconditioned and distracted to failure. Key biomechanical parameters of the repair, including the ultimate tensile strength (UTS), yield strength, 3 mm gap force and stiffness, were calculated. Repairs were divided into 3 categories, early (first 10 days), intermediate (ensuing 10 days), and late repairs (final 10 days), and potential changes in repair properties over the training period were evaluated using a general linear modeling approach. There was a significant change in the mechanical characteristics of the repairs over the training period, evidencing a clear learning effect (p < 0.05). Irrespective of the repair technique employed, early and intermediate repairs were characterized by a significantly lower UTS (29% and 20%, respectively), 3 mm gap (21% and 16%, respectively), and yield force (18% and 23%, respectively), but had a higher stiffness (33% and 38%, respectively) than late repairs (p < 0.05). The UTS of late repairs (47-48 N) were comparable to those published within the literature (45-51 N), suggesting surgical competence of the trainee. This simple, low-cost porcine model appears to be useful for providing preclinical training in flexor tendon repair techniques and has the potential to provide a quantitative index to evaluate the competency of surgical trainees. Further research is now

  10. Multi-Layer Electrospun Membrane Mimicking Tendon Sheath for Prevention of Tendon Adhesions

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    Shichao Jiang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Defect of the tendon sheath after tendon injury is a main reason for tendon adhesions, but it is a daunting challenge for the biomimetic substitute of the tendon sheath after injury due to its multi-layer membrane-like structure and complex biologic functions. In this study, a multi-layer membrane with celecoxib-loaded poly(l-lactic acid-polyethylene glycol (PELA electrospun fibrous membrane as the outer layer, hyaluronic acid (HA gel as middle layer, and PELA electrospun fibrous membrane as the inner layer was designed. The anti-adhesion efficacy of this multi-layer membrane was compared with a single-layer use in rabbit flexor digitorum profundus tendon model. The surface morphology showed that both PELA fibers and celecoxib-loaded PELA fibers in multi-layer membrane were uniform in size, randomly arrayed, very porous, and smooth without beads. Multi-layer membrane group had fewer peritendinous adhesions and better gliding than the PELA membrane group and control group in gross and histological observation. The similar mechanical characteristic and collagen expression of tendon repair site in the three groups indicated that the multi-layer membrane did not impair tendon healing. Taken together, our results demonstrated that such a biomimetic multi-layer sheath could be used as a potential strategy in clinics for promoting tendon gliding and preventing adhesion without poor tendon healing.

  11. Functional integration of grafted neural stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons monitored by optogenetics in an in vitro Parkinson model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Tønnesen

    Full Text Available Intrastriatal grafts of stem cell-derived dopamine (DA neurons induce behavioral recovery in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD, but how they functionally integrate in host neural circuitries is poorly understood. Here, Wnt5a-overexpressing neural stem cells derived from embryonic ventral mesencephalon of tyrosine hydroxylase-GFP transgenic mice were expanded as neurospheres and transplanted into organotypic cultures of wild type mouse striatum. Differentiated GFP-labeled DA neurons in the grafts exhibited mature neuronal properties, including spontaneous firing of action potentials, presence of post-synaptic currents, and functional expression of DA D₂ autoreceptors. These properties resembled those recorded from identical cells in acute slices of intrastriatal grafts in the 6-hydroxy-DA-induced mouse PD model and from DA neurons in intact substantia nigra. Optogenetic activation or inhibition of grafted cells and host neurons using channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2 and halorhodopsin (NpHR, respectively, revealed complex, bi-directional synaptic interactions between grafted cells and host neurons and extensive synaptic connectivity within the graft. Our data demonstrate for the first time using optogenetics that ectopically grafted stem cell-derived DA neurons become functionally integrated in the DA-denervated striatum. Further optogenetic dissection of the synaptic wiring between grafted and host neurons will be crucial to clarify the cellular and synaptic mechanisms underlying behavioral recovery as well as adverse effects following stem cell-based DA cell replacement strategies in PD.

  12. How the fixation method stiffness and initial tension affect anterior load-displacement of the knee and tension in anterior cruciate ligament grafts: a study in cadaveric knees using a double-loop hamstrings graft

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eagar, Paul; Hull, M L; Howell, S M

    2004-01-01

    ... load-displacement behavior of knees reconstructed with a double-loop hamstrings tendon graft. The second was to determine the corresponding graft tensions at 225 N of anterior force applied to the knee...

  13. Quadriceps Tendon Rupture and Contralateral Patella Tendon Avulsion Post Primary Bilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Sharma

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Extensor mechanism failure secondary to knee replacement could be due to tibial tubercle avulsion, Patellar tendon rupture, patellar fracture or quadriceps tendon rupture. An incidence of Patella tendon rupture of 0.17% and Quadriceps tendon rupture of around 0.1% has been reported after Total knee arthroplasty. These are considered a devastating complication that substantially affects the clinical results and are challenging situations to treat with surgery being the mainstay of the treatment. Case Description: We report here an interesting case of a patellar tendon rupture of one knee and Quadriceps tendon rupture of the contralateral knee following simultaneous bilateral knee replacement in a case of inflammatory arthritis patient. End to end repair for Quadriceps tear and augmentation with Autologous Hamstring tendon graft was done for Patella tendon rupture. OUTCOME: Patient was followed up for a period of 1 year and there was no Extension lag with a flexion of 100 degrees in both the knees. DISCUSSION: The key learning points and important aspects of diagnosing these injuries early and the management techniques are described in this unique case of bilateral extensor mechanism disruption following knee replacements.

  14. An Animal Model of Local Breast Cancer Recurrence in the Setting of Autologous Fat Grafting for Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Wakako; Valentin, Jolene E; Marra, Kacey G; Donnenberg, Albert D; Donnenberg, Vera S; Rubin, J Peter

    2018-01-01

    Autologous fat grafting after breast cancer surgery is commonly performed, but concerns about oncologic risk remain. To model the interaction between fat grafting and breast cancer cells, two approaches were employed. In the first approach, graded numbers of viable MDA-MB-231 or BT-474 cells were admixed directly into human fat grafts and injected subcutaneously into immune-deficient mice to determine if the healing graft is a supportive environment for the tumor. In the second approach, graded doses of MDA-MB-231 cells were suspended in Matrigel and injected into the mammary fat pads of mice. Two weeks after the tumor cells engrafted, 100 μL of human adipose tissue was grafted into the same site. Histologically, MDA-MB-231 cells seeded within fat grafts were observed and stained positive for human-specific pan-cytokeratin and Ki67. The BT-474 cells failed to survive when seeded within fat grafts at any dose. In the second approach, MDA-MB-231 cells had a strong trend toward lower Ki67 staining at all doses. Regression analysis on all groups with fat grafts and MDA-MB-231 revealed fat tissue was associated with lower cancer cell Ki67 staining. Healing fat grafts do not support the epithelial BT-474 cell growth, and support the mesenchymal MDA-MB-231 cell growth only at doses ten times greater than in Matrigel controls. Moreover, fat grafts in association with MDA-MB-231 cancer cells already present in the wound resulted in decreased tumor proliferation and increased fibrosis. These findings suggest that clinical fat grafting does not induce breast cancer cell growth, and may even have a suppressive effect. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2018;7:125-134. © 2017 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  15. Assessment of Human Acellular Dermis Graft in Porcine Models for Ventral Hernia Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Sambit; Baker, Andrew R; Haskins, Ivy N; Krpata, David M; Rosen, Michael J; Derwin, Kathleen A

    2017-08-03

    Preclinical evaluation of hernia meshes is commonly performed in porcine models. We recently developed two surgically induced porcine hernia models-an incisional and an excisional model-that formed persistent hernias in the absence of graft repair. Herein, we investigate if these models will continue to form a hernia after graft repair. Ten pigs were used to create two hernia models-a 10-cm partial-thickness incisional defect (n = 5) and an 8 × 8-cm full-thickness excisional defect (n = 5). The defects were repaired using a 12 × 12-cm human acellular dermis graft placed in a preperitoneal/retrorectus sublay position and fixed using transfascial sutures. Postoperative management included the use of suction drainage for 1 week and an abdominal binder for 4 weeks in the more severe excisional model. Hernia development was assessed clinically, and hernia defect size and volume were measured using postoperative computed tomography (CT) imaging over 12 weeks. Radiographic inflation testing (2 L inflation), biaxial mechanical testing, and histological evaluation were also performed at 12 weeks. All pigs with the excisional model, but none with the incisional model, developed a clinically relevant hernia. At the end of 12 weeks, the excisional model had a significantly greater hernia defect size (259 ± 51 cm(2) vs. 47 ± 16 cm(2)) and repair volume (865 ± 414 cm(3) vs. 85 ± 52 cm(3)) compared with the incisional model. The excisional model also showed an order of magnitude greater increase in repair volume (280 cm(3) vs. 47 cm(3)) compared with the incisional model upon 2 L inflation. Furthermore, the excisional model showed a trend of having higher dilatational strain at average biaxial load of 250 N and lower stiffness compared with the incisional model. The excisional model had a thin, hypercellular hernia sac spanning the defect, whereas the incisional model had a thick densely fibrotic scar bridging the defect

  16. Tendon functional extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Screen, Hazel R C; Berk, David E; Kadler, Karl E; Ramirez, Francesco; Young, Marian F

    2015-06-01

    This article is one of a series, summarizing views expressed at the Orthopaedic Research Society New Frontiers in Tendon Research Conference. This particular article reviews the three workshops held under the "Functional Extracellular Matrix" stream. The workshops focused on the roles of the tendon extracellular matrix, such as performing the mechanical functions of tendon, creating the local cell environment, and providing cellular cues. Tendon is a complex network of matrix and cells, and its biological functions are influenced by widely varying extrinsic and intrinsic factors such as age, nutrition, exercise levels, and biomechanics. Consequently, tendon adapts dynamically during development, aging, and injury. The workshop discussions identified research directions associated with understanding cell-matrix interactions to be of prime importance for developing novel strategies to target tendon healing or repair. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Use of the semitendinosus tendon for foot and ankle tendon reconstructions,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Lutti Guerra de Aguiar Zink

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To demonstrate the results obtained from foot and ankle tendon reconstructions using the tendon of the semitendinosus muscle. The clinical results, the patient's degree of satisfaction and complications in the graft donor and recipient areas were evaluated.Methods:This was a retrospective study in which the medical files of 38 patients who underwent this surgical procedure between 2006 and 2010 were surveyed. The functional results from this technique, the complications in the donor and recipient areas and the patients' degree of satisfaction were evaluated.Results:Three patients presented complications in the recipient area (skin necrosis; one patient showed complications in the donor area (pain and insensitivity; and all patients had satisfactory functional results, with complete range of motion.Conclusion:The semitendinosus muscle is a good option for treatments for foot and ankle tendon injuries.

  18. Endoscopic-assisted achilles tendon reconstruction with free hamstring tendon autograft for chronic rupture of achilles tendon: clinical and isokinetic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Shazly, Ossama; Abou El Soud, Maged M; El Mikkawy, Dalia M E; El Ganzoury, Ibrahim; Ibrahim, Ayman Mohamed

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the clinical and functional outcome of endoscopic-assisted reconstruction of chronic ruptures of the Achilles tendon using free hamstring tendon autograft. We present a case series of 15 patients who had chronic ruptures of the Achilles tendon (>6 weeks earlier) and underwent endoscopic-assisted reconstruction with a free hamstring autograft. The graft loop was passed through and fixed to the proximal stump of the tendon. The graft was then passed through suture to the distal stump and finally inserted into a tunnel in the anterior calcaneus to the Achilles tendon insertion and fixed with an bioabsorbable interference screw. The mean follow-up period was 27 months (SD, 3 months; range, 24 to 33 months). All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging preoperatively, immediately postoperatively, and at follow-up 2 years postoperatively. All patients were functionally evaluated with the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) score for the hindfoot preoperatively and postoperatively. Calf muscle power was evaluated by isokinetic strength testing at 2 years' follow-up. The mean size of the gap on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging was 49 mm (SD, 9 mm). The mean preoperative AOFAS score was 32.6 (SD, 7.5). There was a statistically significant improvement in the postoperative AOFAS score after 2 years to 90.8 (SD, 3.54) (P Achilles tendon reconstruction with free hamstring tendon autograft for chronic ruptures of the Achilles tendon showed good to excellent results in all patients. Isokinetic testing showed a nonsignificant deficit between the involved and uninvolved sides at 2 years' follow-up. Level IV, therapeutic cases series. Copyright © 2014 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Botulinum Neurotoxin A injections influence stretching of the gastrocnemius muscle-tendon unit in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haubruck, Patrick; Mannava, Sandeep; Plate, Johannes F; Callahan, Michael F; Wiggins, Walter F; Schmidmaier, Gerhard; Tuohy, Christopher J; Saul, Katherine R; Smith, Thomas L

    2012-08-01

    Botulinum Neurotoxin A (BoNT-A) injections have been used for the treatment of muscle contractures and spasticity. This study assessed the influence of (BoNT-A) injections on passive biomechanical properties of the muscle-tendon unit. Mousegastrocnemius muscle (GC) was injected with BoNT-A (n = 18) or normal saline (n = 18) and passive, non-destructive, in vivo load relaxation experimentation was performed to examine how the muscle-tendon unit behaves after chemical denervation with BoNT-A. Injection of BoNT-A impaired passive muscle recovery (15% vs. 35% recovery to pre-stretching baseline, p stretch reflex; thereby modulating in vivo passive muscle properties. However, it is also possible that BoNT-A injection may alter the structure of skeletal muscle; thus modulating the in vivo passive biomechanical properties of the muscle-tendon unit.

  20. Percutaneous Achilles Tendon Lengthening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ligament Reconstruction Lateral Ankle Stabilization Mosaicplasty for Osteochondral Lesions of the Talus Peroneus Longus to Achilles Tendon Transfer Pilon Fracture Surgery Posterior Ankle Endoscopy or ...

  1. Tendon and ligament imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, R J; O'Connor, P J; Grainger, A J

    2012-01-01

    MRI and ultrasound are now widely used for the assessment of tendon and ligament abnormalities. Healthy tendons and ligaments contain high levels of collagen with a structured orientation, which gives rise to their characteristic normal imaging appearances as well as causing particular imaging artefacts. Changes to ligaments and tendons as a result of disease and injury can be demonstrated using both ultrasound and MRI. These have been validated against surgical and histological findings. Novel imaging techniques are being developed that may improve the ability of MRI and ultrasound to assess tendon and ligament disease. PMID:22553301

  2. Shear Wave Measurements for Evaluation of Tendon Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chia-Lun; Kuo, Po-Ling; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Brum, Javier; Tanter, Mickael; Li, Pai-Chi

    2016-11-01

    This paper investigated the feasibility of using supersonic shear wave measurements to quantitatively differentiate normal and damaged tendons based on their mechanical properties. Five freshly harvested porcine tendons excised from pig legs were used. Tendon damage was induced by incubating the tendons with a 1% w/v collagenase solution. Values of shear modulus were derived both by a time-of-flight (TOF) approach and a transverse isotropic plate model (TI-model). The results show that as the preload applied to the tendon increased from 0 to 3 N, the mean shear modulus derived based on the TOF approach, the TI-model, and Young's modulus estimated from mechanical testing increased from 14.6 to 89.9 kPa, 53.9 to 348 kPa, and from 1.45 to 10.36 MPa, respectively, in untreated tendons, and from 8.4 to 67 kPa, 28 to 258 kPa, and from 0.93 to 7.2 MPa in collagenase-treated tendons. Both the TOF approach and the TI-model correlated well with the changes in Young's modulus. Although there is bias on the estimation of shear modulus using the TOF approach, it still provides statistical significance to differentiate normal and damaged tendons. Our data indicate that supersonic shear wave imaging is a valuable imaging technique to assess tendon stiffness dynamics and characterize normal and collagenase-damaged tendons.

  3. Engineering an endothelialized vascular graft: a rational approach to study design in a non-human primate model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre E J Anderson

    Full Text Available After many years of research, small diameter, synthetic vascular grafts still lack the necessary biologic integration to perform ideally in clinical settings. Endothelialization of vascular grafts has the potential to improve synthetic graft function, and endothelial outgrowth cells (EOCs are a promising autologous cell source. Yet no work has established the link between endothelial cell functions and outcomes of implanted endothelialized grafts. This work utilized steady flow, oscillatory flow, and tumor necrosis factor stimulation to alter EOC phenotype and enable the formulation of a model to predict endothelialized graft performance. To accomplish this, EOC in vitro expression of coagulation and inflammatory markers was quantified. In parallel, in non-human primate (baboon models, the platelet and fibrinogen accumulation on endothelialized grafts were quantified in an ex vivo shunt, or the tissue ingrowth on implanted grafts were characterized after 1mth. Oscillatory flow stimulation of EOCs increased in vitro coagulation markers and ex vivo platelet accumulation. Steady flow preconditioning did not affect platelet accumulation or intimal hyperplasia relative to static samples. To determine whether in vitro markers predict implant performance, a linear regression model of the in vitro data was fit to platelet accumulation data-correlating the markers with the thromboprotective performance of the EOCs. The model was tested against implant intimal hyperplasia data and found to correlate strongly with the parallel in vitro analyses. This research defines the effects of flow preconditioning on EOC regulation of coagulation in clinical vascular grafts through parallel in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo analyses, and contributes to the translatability of in vitro tests to in vivo clinical graft performance.

  4. Semitendinosus Tendon for Solitary Use in Anterior Cruciate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The use of a combined graft of both semitendinosus (ST) and gracilis (G) tendons in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction may cause weakness in knee flexion. It has since been proposed that ST be used alone since sparing G leads to near complete preservation of flexion strength. The use of the ...

  5. Standardized Rat Model Testing Effects of Inflammation and Grafting on Extraction Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Emily S; Liu, Jingpeng; Berke, Molly; Giannini, Peter J; Schmid, Marian; Jia, Zhenshan; Wang, Xiaobei; Wang, Xiaoyan; Samson, Kaeli; Yu, Fang; Wang, Dong; Nawshad, Ali; Reinhardt, Richard A

    2017-08-01

    Loss of alveolar ridge width and height after tooth extraction is well documented, but models to evaluate ridge preservation are neither standardized nor cost-effective. This rat model characterizes the pattern of bone turnover and inflammation after extraction and bone grafting with or without local simvastatin (SIM). Fifty retired-breeder rats underwent extraction of the maxillary right first molar and standard surgical defect creation under inhalation/local anesthesia. The left side of each animal served as unmanipulated control. Untreated groups (n = 8 to 9 per group) were compared (analysis of variance, t test) at days 0, 7, 14, and 28 for alveolar ridge height and width and for markers of inflammation and bone turnover by microcomputed tomography, histology, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Seventeen additional specimens had defects grafted with either bone mineralized matrix (BMM) or a BMM+SIM conjugate. Extraction-induced bone loss (BL) was noted on buccal, palatal, and interproximal height (P standard defect used in the current study paralleled human postextraction alveolar BL. Defect grafting, especially BMM+SIM, reduced inflammation and preserved bone.

  6. Predicition models for delayed graft function: external validation on The Dutch Prospective Renal Transplantation Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kers, Jesper; Peters-Sengers, Hessel; Heemskerk, Martin B A; Berger, Stefan P; Betjes, Michiel G H; van Zuilen, Arjan D; Hilbrands, Luuk B; de Fijter, Johan W; Nurmohamed, Azam S; Christiaans, Maarten H; Homan van der Heide, Jaap J; Debray, Thomas P A; Bemelman, Fréderike J

    2018-02-16

    Delayed graft function (DGF) is a common complication after kidney transplantation in the era of accepting an equal number of brain- and circulatory-death donor kidneys in the Netherlands. To identify those cases with an increased risk of developing DGF, various multivariable algorithms have been proposed. The objective was to validate the reproducibility of four predictive algorithms by Irish et al. (A risk prediction model for delayed graft function in the current era of deceased donor renal transplantation. Am J Transplant 2010;10:2279-2286) (USA), Jeldres et al. (Prediction of delayed graft function after renal transplantation. Can Urol Assoc J 2009;3:377-382) (Canada), Chapal et al. (A useful scoring system for the prediction and management of delayed graft function following kidney transplantation from cadaveric donors. Kidney Int 2014;86:1130-1139) (France) and Zaza et al. (Predictive model for delayed graft function based on easily available pre-renal transplant variables. Intern Emerg Med 2015;10:135-141) (Italy) according to a novel framework for external validation. We conducted a prospective observational study with data from the Dutch Organ Transplantation Registry (NOTR). Renal transplant recipients from all eight Dutch academic medical centers between 2002 and 2012 who received a deceased allograft were included (N = 3333). The four prediction algorithms were reconstructed from donor, recipient and transplantation data. Their predictive value for DGF was validated by c-statistics, calibration statistics and net benefit analysis. Case-mix (un)relatedness was investigated with a membership model and mean and standard deviation of the linear predictor. The prevalence of DGF was 37%. Despite a significantly different case-mix, the US algorithm by Irish was best reproducible, with a c-index of 0.761 (range 0.756 - 0.762), and well-calibrated over the complete range of predicted probabilities of having DGF. The US model had a net benefit of 0.242 at a

  7. Computer modeling for the prediction of thoracic aortic stent graft collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasta, Salvatore; Cho, Jae-Sung; Dur, Onur; Pekkan, Kerem; Vorp, David A

    2013-05-01

    To assess the biomechanical implications of excessive stent protrusion into the aortic arch in relation to thoracic aortic stent graft (TASG) collapse by simulating the structural load and quantifying the fluid dynamics on the TASG wall protrusion extended into a model arch. One-way coupled fluid-solid interaction analyses were performed to investigate the flow-induced hemodynamic and structural loads exerted on the proximal protrusion of the TASG and aortic wall reconstructed from a patient who underwent traumatic thoracic aortic injury repair. Mechanical properties of a Gore TAG thoracic endoprosthesis (W. L. Gore and Assoc, Flagstaff, Ariz) were assessed via experimental radial compression testing and incorporated into the computational modeling. The TASG wall protrusion geometry was characterized by the protrusion extension (PE) and by the angle (θ) between the TASG and the lesser curvature of the aorta. The effect of θ was explored with the following four models with PE fixed at 1.1 cm: θ = 10 degrees, 20 degrees, 30 degrees, and 40 degrees. The effect of PE was evaluated with the following four models with θ fixed at 10 degrees: PE = 1.1 cm, 1.4 cm, 1.7 cm and 2.0 cm. The presence of TASG wall protrusion into the aortic arch resulted in the formation of swirling, complex flow regions in the proximal luminal surface of the endograft. High PE values (PE = 2.0 cm) led to a markedly reduced left subclavian flow rate (0.27 L/min), low systolic perfusion pressure (98 mm Hg), and peak systolic TASG diameter reduction (2 mm). The transmural pressure load across the TASG was maximum for the model with the highest PE and θ, 15.2 mm Hg for the model with PE = 2.0 cm and θ = 10 degrees, and 11.6 mm Hg for PE = 1.1 cm and θ = 40 degrees. The findings of this study suggest that increased PE imparts an apparent risk of distal end-organ malperfusion and proximal hypertension and that both increased PE and θ lead to a markedly increased transmural pressure across the

  8. Three-dimensional muscle-tendon geometry after rectus femoris tendon transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, Deanna S; Blemker, Silvia S; Rab, George T; Bagley, Anita; Delp, Scott L

    2004-02-01

    Rectus femoris tendon transfer is performed in patients with cerebral palsy to improve knee flexion during walking. This procedure involves detachment of the muscle from its insertion into the quadriceps tendon and reattachment to one of the knee flexor muscles. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the muscle-tendon geometry and to assess the formation of scar tissue between the rectus femoris and adjacent structures. Magnetic resonance images of the lower extremities were acquired from five subjects after bilateral rectus femoris tendon transfer. A three-dimensional computer model of the musculoskeletal geometry of each of the ten limbs was created from these images. The three-dimensional paths of the rectus femoris muscles after transfer demonstrated that the muscle does not follow a straight course from its origin to its new insertion. The typical muscle-tendon path included an angular deviation; this deviation was sharp (>35 degrees ) in seven extremities. In addition, scar tissue between the transferred rectus femoris and the underlying muscles was visible on the magnetic resonance images. The angular deviations in the rectus femoris muscle-tendon path and the presence of scar tissue between the rectus femoris and the underlying muscles suggest that the beneficial effects of rectus femoris tendon transfer are derived from reducing the effects of the rectus femoris muscle as a knee extensor rather than from converting the muscle to a knee flexor. These findings clarify our understanding of the mechanism by which rectus femoris tendon transfer improves knee flexion.

  9. Tendon lengthening and transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitoussi, F; Bachy, M

    2015-02-01

    Tendon lengthening and transfer are usually indicated for certain neuromuscular disorders, peripheral or central nerve injury, congenital disorder or direct traumatic or degenerative musculotendinous lesion. In musculotendinous lengthening, technique depends on muscle anatomy, degree of correction required, and the need to avoid excessive loss of force. Lengthening within the muscle or aponeurosis is stable. In the tendon, however, it may provide greater gain but is not stable and requires postoperative immobilization to avoid excessive lengthening. Tendon transfer consists in displacing a muscle's tendon insertion in order to restore function. The muscle to be transferred is chosen according to strength, architecture and course, contraction timing, intended direction, synergy and the joint moment arm to be restored. Functions to be restored have to be prioritized, and alternatives to transfer should be identified. The principles of tendon transfer require preoperative assessment of the quality of the tissue through which the transfer is to pass and of the suppleness of the joints concerned. During the procedure, transfer tension should be optimized and the neurovascular bundle should be protected. The method of fixation, whether tendon-to-bone or tendon-to-tendon suture, should be planned according to local conditions and the surgeon's experience. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Anatomical repair of zone 1 flexor tendon injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, T C; Dionyssiou, Dimitrios; Armenio, Andrea; Ng, Darren; Skillman, Joanna

    2009-02-01

    Repair and rehabilitation of the flexor digitorum profundus tendon in zone I may be demanding. The aim of the authors' study was to assess a new technique for reinsertion of the distal flexor digitorum profundus tendon. The authors' series consisted of 18 patients who required primary (n = 10) or secondary (n = 8) repair of the flexor digitorum profundus tendon in zone I. A half-Bruner incision was extended into the distal volar skin to expose the insertion site. Two drill holes were made through the base of the distal phalanx obliquely from the insertion of the profundus tendon in a dorsolateral direction. A modified Kessler suture was passed through the tendon and then through these holes and tied anteriorly, providing transosseous, internal fixation. Range of movement was assessed according to Moiemen's categories. Fourteen patients had excellent or good results, two patients had fair results, and one patient had a poor result. One patient failed to complete physiotherapy and was lost to follow-up. No tendon rupture was documented during a mean follow-up period of 8 months. The authors' technique anchors the flexor digitorum profundus tendon or the graft in an anatomical position on the distal phalanx, without the need for external sutures or additional incisions. Furthermore, this is accomplished with minimal morbidity to the surrounding highly specialized tissue. The authors' results compare favorably with those of other techniques in the literature.

  11. A biomimetic approach for designing stent-graft structures: Caterpillar cuticle as design model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Charanpreet; Wang, Xungai

    2014-02-01

    Stent-graft (SG) induced biomechanical mismatch at the aortic repair site forms the major reason behind postoperative hemodynamic complications. These complications arise from mismatched radial compliance and stiffness property of repair device relative to native aortic mechanics. The inability of an exoskeleton SG design (an externally stented rigid polyester graft) to achieve optimum balance between structural robustness and flexibility constrains its biomechanical performance limits. Therefore, a new SG design capable of dynamically controlling its stiffness and flexibility has been proposed in this study. The new design is adopted from the segmented hydroskeleton structure of a caterpillar cuticle and comprises of high performance polymeric filaments constructed in a segmented knit architecture. Initially, conceptual design models of caterpillar and SG were developed and later translated into an experimental SG prototype. The in-vitro biomechanical evaluation (compliance, bending moment, migration intensity, and viscoelasticity) revealed significantly better performance of hydroskeleton structure than a commercial SG device (Zenith(™) Flex SG) and woven Dacron(®) graft-prosthesis. Structural segmentation improved the biomechanical behaviour of new SG by inducing a three dimensional volumetric expansion property when the SG was subjected to hoop stresses. Interestingly, this behaviour matches the orthotropic elastic property of native aorta and hence proposes segmented hydroskeleton structures as promising design approach for future aortic repair devices. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Medical chilling device designed for hypothermic hydration graft storage system: Design, thermohydrodynamic modeling, and preliminary testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jung Hwan [Hongik University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Hypothermic hydration graft storage is essential to reduce the metabolic demand of cells in vitro. The alleviated metabolic demands reduce the emergence rate of anaerobic metabolism generating adenosine triphosphate (ATP) energy that creates free radicals. The cessive free radicals can damage cells and tissues due to their highly oxidative power with molecules. Current cooling systems such as a conventional air cooling system and an ice pack system are inappropriate for chilling cell tissues in vitro because of inconvenience in use and inconsistent temperature sustainability caused by large size and progressive melting, respectively. Here, we develop a medical chilling device (MCD) for hypothermic hydration graft storage based on thermo-hydrodynamic modeling and thermal electric cooling technology. Our analysis of obtained hydrodynamic thermal behavior of the MCD revealed that the hypothermic condition of 4 .deg. C was continuously maintained, which increased the survival rates of cells in vitro test by reduced free radicals. The validated performance of the MCD promises future development of an optimal hypothermic hydration graft storage system designed for clinical use.

  13. Testing of a bioactive, moldable bone graft substitute in an infected, critically sized segmental defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Matt E; Zou, Yuan; Peyyala, Rebecca; Huja, Sarandeep S; Cunningham, Larry L; Milbrandt, Todd A; Dziubla, Thomas D; Puleo, David A

    2017-09-19

    Large infected bone defects, often resulting from high energy traumas, are difficult to treat due to their variability in complexity and location. Standard treatment for infected bone defects begins with a protocol that includes a series of debridements in conjunction with an extended course of systemic antibiotics. Only after the infection has been eliminated will repair of the defect commence, typically with implantation of autologous bone. To address some of the shortcomings of the standard treatment methods, such as serial procedures, limited grafting material, and the need for a second surgical site for autologous bone, a sequential, dual drug-releasing, moldable, calcium sulfate-based bone graft substitute was developed previously. In the present studies, the effectiveness of the material for treating both the infection with vancomycin and bone defect with simvastatin was evaluated in vivo using a critically sized, infected segmental defect model in rat femurs. Although the infection was not fully eliminated, the local release of vancomycin increased survivorship of infected animals by 464% compared to nontreated controls. Infected animals receiving antimicrobial treatment showed comparable amounts of new bone formation within the defect site when compared to noninfected controls. Incorporating agents capable of disrupting established biofilms into bone graft substitutes may enhance effectiveness in treating a biofilm infection within a bone defect. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Histological evaluation of human amniotic membrane graft on oral keratinizing mucosa in the rabbit model (A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samandari Najafabadi MH

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: One of the complications following major oral surgeries is mucosal defects and delayed healing process. Up to now, various mucocutaneous grafts have been used in this field and recently, amniotic membrane has been proposed as a biological dressing in dermatologic, ophthalmologic and otolaryngologic practices. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the healing process following human amniotic membrane graft on oral keratinized mucosa of rabbit.Materials and Methods: In this experimental animal study, two surgical mucosal defects with the same size were made in palatal mucosa of 10 rabbits with the same weight, gender and race and a graft of human amniotic membrane was used on one of the defects. On the 7th, 14th and 28th postoperative days, surgical biopsies were randomly obtained from grafted and ungrafted regions of 3, 4 and 3 rabbits, respectively and submitted for microscopic study. Results: According to the results, grafted regions showed more surface epithelialization and thicker newly formed epithelium. Also inflammatory cells infiltration was less in these areas. In all cases, there was a remarkable cartilage formation in the connective tissue of the recipient sites.Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that the use of amniotic membrane graft in oral surgery could be effective in healing process. Additional studies should be done using animal and human models with more samples. Furthermore, the formation of cartilage in the grafted sites and its possible potential in reconstruction of bone defects, needs to be studied.

  15. Platelet adhesion on endothelium early after vein grafting mediates leukocyte recruitment and intimal hyperplasia in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chi-Nan; Chang, Ya-Ting; Lengquist, Mariette; Kronqvist, Malin; Hedin, Ulf; Eriksson, Einar E

    2015-04-01

    Intimal hyperplasia (IH) is the substrate for accelerated atherosclerosis and limited patency of vein grafts. However, there is still no specific treatment targeting IH following graft surgery. In this study, we used a mouse model of vein grafting to investigate the potential for early intervention with platelet function for later development of graft IH. We transferred the inferior vena cava (IVC) from donor C57BL/6 mice to the carotid artery in recipients using a cuff technique. We found extensive endothelial injury and platelet adhesion one hour following grafting. Adhesion of leukocytes was distinct in areas of platelet adhesion. Platelet and leukocyte adhesion was strongly reduced in mice receiving a function-blocking antibody against the integrin αIIbβ3. This was followed by a reduction of IH one month following grafting. Depletion of platelets using antiserum also reduced IH at later time points. These findings indicate platelets as pivotal to leukocyte recruitment to the wall of vein grafts. In conclusion, the data also highlight early intervention of platelets and inflammation as potential treatment for later formation of IH and accelerated atherosclerosis following bypass surgery.

  16. Comparison of Temporary Open Arterial Revascularization Using Stent Grafts vs. Standard Vascular Shunts in a Porcine (Sus scrofa) Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-24

    feasible strategy for damage control management of peripheral vascular injury and offers increased blood flow when compared to temporary shunts...survival model of porcine vascular injury . Methods: 12 Yorkshire-cross swine received a 2cm long near-circumferential defect in the iliac arteries. A14...shunts was greater than that of the stent grafts. Conclusion: Open sutureless direct site repair using stent grafts to treat vascular injury is a

  17. Assessment of Novel Anti-thrombotic Fusion Proteins for Inhibition of Stenosis in a Porcine Model of Arteriovenous Graft.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christi M Terry

    Full Text Available Hemodialysis arteriovenous synthetic grafts (AVG provide high volumetric blood flow rates shortly after surgical placement. However, stenosis often develops at the vein-graft anastomosis contributing to thrombosis and early graft failure. Two novel fusion proteins, ANV-6L15 and TAP-ANV, inhibit the tissue factor/factor VIIa coagulation complex and the factor Xa/factor Va complex, respectively. Each inhibitor domain is fused to an annexin V domain that targets the inhibitor activity to sites of vascular injury to locally inhibit thrombosis. This study's objective was to determine if these antithrombotic proteins are safe and effective in inhibiting AVG stenosis.A bolus of either TAP-ANV or ANV-6L15 fusion protein was administered intravenously immediately prior to surgical placement of a synthetic graft between the external jugular vein and common carotid artery in a porcine model. At surgery, the vein and artery were irrigated with the anti-thrombotic fusion protein. Control animals received intravenous heparin. At 4 weeks, MRI was performed to evaluate graft patency, the pigs were then euthanized and grafts and attached vessels were explanted for histomorphometric assessment of neointimal hyperplasia at the vein-graft anastomosis. Blood was collected at surgery, immediately after surgery and at euthanasia for serum metabolic panels and coagulation chemistries.No acute thrombosis occurred in the control group or in either experimental group. No abnormal serum chemistries, activated clotting times or PT, PTT values were observed after treatment in experimental or control animals. However, at the vein-graft anastomosis, there was no difference between the control and experimental groups in cross-sectional lumen areas, as measured on MRI, and no difference in hyperplasia areas as determined by histomorphometry. These results suggest that local irrigation of TAP-ANV or ANV-6L15 intra-operatively was as effective in inhibiting acute graft thrombosis

  18. Comparação entre os resultados obtidos na reconstrução do ligamento cruzado anterior do joelho utilizando dois tipos de enxertos autólogos: tendão patelar versus semitendíneo e grácil Comparison between the results achieved in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with two kinds of autologous grafts: patellar tendon versus semitendinous and gracilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Jorge Abdalla

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste trabalho é comparar os resultados da artrometria e do exame isocinético entre dois tipos de enxertos autólogos: o terço central do ligamento patelar e o formado pelos tendões dos músculos semitendíneo e grácil, dentro de um mesmo protocolo de reabilitação no sexto mês pós-operatório. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foram analisados os resultados obtidos dos exames realizados em 63 pacientes divididos em dois grupos. Em um grupo de 30 pacientes, utilizou-se o tendão patelar como enxerto e em outro grupo de 33 pacientes, utilizou-se o tendão dos músculos semitendíneo e grácil. Ambos os enxertos foram fixados da mesma forma, com EndobuttonTM para fixação suspensória no fêmur e um parafuso de interferência bioabsorvível para fixação no túnel tibial. RESULTADOS: A artrometria 30 não apresentou diferença estatística entre os dois grupos observados. Já na avaliação isocinética, constatou-se que o grupo de tendão patelar possui em média maior pico de torque de flexão e maior déficit de extensão e o grupo de flexores possui, em média, melhor relação flexão/extensão e maior déficit de flexão percentual. Não há diferença estatística significante entre os grupos quanto à medida de pico de torque de extensão. CONCLUSÃO: portanto, no presente estudo, quando o tendão patelar é utilizado, há maior déficit extensor e quando são utilizados os tendões flexores, há maior déficit flexor.OBJECTIVE: this study aims to compare the arthrometric and isokinetic examination results from two types of autologous grafts: the central third of the patellar ligament and a graft formed by the tendons of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles, within the same rehabilitation protocol, six months after the surgery. METHODS: the results from examinations carried out on 63 patients were analyzed. These patients were divided in two groups: one group of 30 patients who received a patellar tendon graft and

  19. Release of tensile strain on engineered human tendon tissue disturbs cell adhesions, changes matrix architecture, and induces an inflammatory phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayer, Monika L; Schjerling, Peter; Herchenhan, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    -inflammatory mediators and tendon phenotypic specific molecules, in an in vitro model where tendon-like tissue was engineered from human tendon cells. Tissue sampling was performed 1, 2, 4 and 6 days after surgical de-tensioning of the tendon construct. When tensile stimulus was removed, integrin type collagen receptors...

  20. Tendon Gradient Mineralization for Tendon to Bone Interface Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Jin; Thoreson, Andrew R.; Chen, Qingshan; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2014-01-01

    Tendon-to-bone integration is a great challenge for tendon or ligament reconstruction regardless of use of autograft or allograft tendons. We mineralized the tendon, thus transforming the tendon-to-bone into a “bone-to-bone” interface for healing. Sixty dog flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendons were divided randomly into 5 groups: 1) normal FDP tendon, 2) CaP (Non-extraction and mineralization without fetuin), 3) CaPEXT (Extraction by Na2HPO4 and mineralization without fetuin), 4) CaPFetuin (Non-extraction and mineralization with fetuin), and 5) CaPEXTFetuin (Extraction and mineralization with fetuin). The calcium and phosphate content significantly increased in tendons treated with combination of extraction and fetuin compared to the other treatments. Histology also revealed a dense mineral deposition throughout the tendon outer layers and penetrated into the tendon to a depth of 200 μm in a graded manner. Compressive moduli were significantly lower in the four mineralized groups compared with normal control group. No significant differences in maximum failure strength or stiffness were found in the suture pull-out test among all groups. Mineralization of tendon alters the interface from tendon to bone into mineralized tendon to bone, which may facilitate tendon-to-bone junction healing following tendon or ligament reconstruction. PMID:23939935

  1. Peroneal tendon disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davda, Kinner; Malhotra, Karan; O'Donnell, Paul; Singh, Dishan; Cullen, Nicholas

    2017-06-01

    Pathological abnormality of the peroneal tendons is an under-appreciated source of lateral hindfoot pain and dysfunction that can be difficult to distinguish from lateral ankle ligament injuries.Enclosed within the lateral compartment of the leg, the peroneal tendons are the primary evertors of the foot and function as lateral ankle stabilisers.Pathology of the tendons falls into three broad categories: tendinitis and tenosynovitis, tendon subluxation and dislocation, and tendon splits and tears. These can be associated with ankle instability, hindfoot deformity and anomalous anatomy such as a low lying peroneus brevis or peroneus quartus.A thorough clinical examination should include an assessment of foot type (cavus or planovalgus), palpation of the peronei in the retromalleolar groove on resisted ankle dorsiflexion and eversion as well as testing of lateral ankle ligaments.Imaging including radiographs, ultrasound and MRI will help determine the diagnosis. Treatment recommendations for these disorders are primarily based on case series and expert opinion.The aim of this review is to summarise the current understanding of the anatomy and diagnostic evaluation of the peroneal tendons, and to present both conservative and operative management options of peroneal tendon lesions. Cite this article: EFORT Open Rev 2017;2:281-292. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.2.160047.

  2. How Obesity Affects Tendons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Michele; Salini, Vincenzo; Andia, Isabel

    Several epidemiological and clinical observations have definitely demonstrated that obesity has harmful effects on tendons. The pathogenesis of tendon damage is multi-factorial. In addition to overload, attributable to the increased body weight, which significantly affects load-bearing tendons, systemic factors play a relevant role. Several bioactive peptides (chemerin, leptin, adiponectin and others) are released by adipocytes, and influence tendon structure by means of negative activities on mesenchymal cells. The ensuing systemic state of chronic, sub-clinic, low-grade inflammation can damage tendon structure. Metabolic disorders (diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance, and dislipidemia), frequently associated with visceral adiposity, are concurrent pathogenetic factors. Indeed, high glucose levels increase the formation of Advanced Glycation End-products, which in turn form stable covalent cross-links within collagen fibers, modifying their structure and functionality.Sport activities, so useful for preventing important cardiovascular complications, may be detrimental for tendons if they are submitted to intense acute or chronic overload. Therefore, two caution rules are mandatory: first, to engage in personalized soft training program, and secondly to follow regular check-up for tendon pathology.

  3. Biomimetic tendon extracellular matrix composite gradient scaffold enhances ligament-to-bone junction reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huanhuan; Yang, Long; Zhang, Erchen; Zhang, Rui; Cai, Dandan; Zhu, Shouan; Ran, Jisheng; Bunpetch, Varitsara; Cai, Youzhi; Heng, Boon Chin; Hu, Yejun; Dai, Xuesong; Chen, Xiao; Ouyang, Hongwei

    2017-07-01

    Management of ligament/tendon-to-bone-junction healing remains a formidable challenge in the field of orthopedic medicine to date, due to deficient vascularity and multi-tissue transitional structure of the junction. Numerous strategies have been employed to improve ligament-bone junction healing, including delivery of stem cells, bioactive factors, and synthetic materials, but these methods are often inadequate at recapitulating the complex structure-function relationships at native tissue interfaces. Here, we developed an easily-fabricated and effective biomimetic composite to promote the regeneration of ligament-bone junction by physically modifying the tendon extracellular matrix (ECM) into a Random-Aligned-Random composite using ultrasound treatment. The differentiation potential of rabbit bone marrow stromal cells on the modified ECM were examined in vitro. The results demonstrated that the modified ECM enhanced expression of chondrogenesis and osteogenesis-associated epigenetic genes (Jmjd1c, Kdm6b), transcription factor genes (Sox9, Runx2) and extracellular matrix genes (Col2a1, Ocn), resulting in higher osteoinductivity than the untreated tendon ECM in vitro. In the rabbit anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction model in vivo, micro-computed tomography (Micro-CT) and histological analysis showed that the modified Random-Aligned-Random composite scaffold enhanced bone and fibrocartilage formation at the interface, more efficaciously than the unmodified tendon ECM. Therefore, these results demonstrated that the biomimetic Random-Aligned-Random composite could be a promising scaffold for ligament/tendon-bone junction repair. The native transitional region consists of several distinct yet contiguous tissue regions, composed of soft tissue, non-calcified fibrocartilage, calcified fibrocartilage, and bone. A stratified graft whose phases are interconnected with each other is essential for supporting the formation of functionally continuous multi

  4. Clinical Risk Factors and Prognostic Model for Primary Graft Dysfunction after Lung Transplantation in Patients with Pulmonary Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porteous, Mary K; Lee, James C; Lederer, David J; Palmer, Scott M; Cantu, Edward; Shah, Rupal J; Bellamy, Scarlett L; Lama, Vibha N; Bhorade, Sangeeta M; Crespo, Maria M; McDyer, John F; Wille, Keith M; Localio, A Russell; Orens, Jonathan B; Shah, Pali D; Weinacker, Ann B; Arcasoy, Selim; Wilkes, David S; Ware, Lorraine B; Christie, Jason D; Kawut, Steven M; Diamond, Joshua M

    2017-10-01

    Pulmonary hypertension from pulmonary arterial hypertension or parenchymal lung disease is associated with an increased risk for primary graft dysfunction after lung transplantation. We evaluated the clinical determinants of severe primary graft dysfunction in pulmonary hypertension and developed and validated a prognostic model. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients in the multicenter Lung Transplant Outcomes Group with pulmonary hypertension at transplant listing. Severe primary graft dysfunction was defined as PaO2/FiO2 ≤200 with allograft infiltrates at 48 or 72 hours after transplantation. Donor, recipient, and operative characteristics were evaluated in a multivariable explanatory model. A prognostic model derived using donor and recipient characteristics was then validated in a separate cohort. In the explanatory model of 826 patients with pulmonary hypertension, donor tobacco smoke exposure, higher recipient body mass index, female sex, listing mean pulmonary artery pressure, right atrial pressure and creatinine at transplant, cardiopulmonary bypass use, transfusion volume, and reperfusion fraction of inspired oxygen were associated with primary graft dysfunction. Donor obesity was associated with a lower risk for primary graft dysfunction. Using a 20% threshold for elevated risk, the prognostic model had good negative predictive value in both derivation and validation cohorts (89.1% [95% confidence interval, 85.3-92.8] and 83.3% [95% confidence interval, 78.5-88.2], respectively), but low positive predictive value. Several recipient, donor, and operative characteristics were associated with severe primary graft dysfunction in patients with pulmonary hypertension, including several risk factors not identified in the overall transplant population. A prognostic model with donor and recipient clinical risk factors alone had low positive predictive value, but high negative predictive value, to rule out high risk for primary graft dysfunction.

  5. Comparison of the effect of intra-tendon applications of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB, platelet-rich plasma, steroids in a rat achilles tendon collagenase model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solchaga, Luis A; Bendele, Alison; Shah, Vivek; Snel, Leo B; Kestler, Hans K; Dines, Joshua S; Hee, Christopher K

    2014-01-01

    This study compared the effect of intra-tendon (IT) delivery of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB (rhPDGF-BB), platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and corticosteroids in a rat tendinopathy model. Seven days after collagenase induction of tendinopathy, a 30-µl IT injection was administered. Treatments included: saline; 3 µg rhPDGF-BB; 10 µg rhPDGF-BB; PRP; and 300 µg triamcinolone acetonide (TCA). Outcomes were assessed 7 and 21 days after treatment. All groups exhibited good to excellent repair. Relative to saline, cell proliferation increased 65% in the 10 µg rhPDGF-BB group and decreased 74% in the TCA group; inflammation decreased 65% in the TCA group. At 7 days, maximum load-to-failure was increased in the 3 µg rhPDGF-BB group relative to saline, PRP, and TCA (p BB group relative to saline, PRP, and TCA (p BB group compared to saline and TCA (p BB group was increased compared to saline, PRP, and TCA (p BB increased maximum load-to-failure (3 and 10 µg) and stiffness (10 µg) relative to controls and commonly used treatments. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 32:145-150, 2014. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Optoelectronic property modeling of carbon nanotubes grafted with gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heltzel, Alex J; Qu, Liangti; Dai, Liming

    2008-06-18

    A three-dimensional (3D) electrodynamic model is built using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method to investigate the optical response of carbon nanotubes grafted with gold nanoparticles. Theoretical characterizations suggest an anisotropic response, in line with previously observed absorption peaks of such systems in the optical range. An investigation of geometric and wavelength dependences is conducted, predicting the ability to tune the sub-wavelength intensity enhancement for efficient localization and propagation. The support of electric field enhancement along the nanotube walls raises the possibility of utilizing such systems as plasmon generators and waveguides for optical signal propagation.

  7. Ex vivo biomechanical comparison of barbed suture and standard polypropylene suture for acute tendon laceration in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, D J; Main, R P; Moore, G E; Breur, G J; Millard, R P

    2015-01-01

    Evaluate performance and resistance to gap formation of a non-absorbable, barbed, monofilament suture, in comparison with a non-absorbable, smooth, monofilament polypropylene suture, in two different suture patterns: three-loop pulley (3LP) and modified Bunnell-Mayer (BM). Seventy-two medium-sized cadaveric superficial digital flexor muscle tendon units. After manual transection and suture repair, individual specimens were placed in an electromechanical tensile testing machine and tested to monotonic failure using tensile ramp loading. Video data acquisition allowed evaluation of failure mode and quantification of gap formation. Incidence of gap formation between tendon ends was significantly greater in tenorrhaphies repaired with barbed suture compared to those repaired with smooth polypropylene. Use of a 3LP suture pattern caused significantly less gapping between tendon ends when compared to the BM pattern. Smooth polypropylene suture was consistently superior in load performance than a unidirectional barbed suture. The 3LP pattern was more resistant than a BM pattern at preventing gap formation. Smooth polypropylene should be recommended over barbed unidirectional suture for use in canine tendinous repair to provide increased resistance to gap formation. The 3LP is superior to the BM suture pattern, requiring significantly more force to cause tenorrhaphy gap formation and failure, which may translate to increased accrual of repair site strength and tendinous healing in clinical situations.

  8. Effect of phototherapy with light-emitting diodes (890 nm) on tendon repair: an experimental model in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mattos, Luiz Henrique Lima; Álvarez, Luis Emiliano Cisneros; Yamada, Ana Lúcia Miluzzi; Hussni, Carlos Alberto; Rodrigues, Celso Antonio; Watanabe, Marcos Jun; Alves, Ana Liz Garcia

    2015-01-01

    The effect of phototherapy with 890-nm light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on the healing of experimentally induced tendinitis in sheep was evaluated in this study. Partial tenotomies measuring 0.2 cm wide × 0.5 cm long were performed on the second third of the superficial digital flexor tendons of 10 healthy sheep. The animals were divided into two groups: "treated" (TG), treated with LEDs at the aforementioned wavelength, and "control" (CG), a control group treated with a placebo. Kinesiotherapy, which consisted of 5-min walks on grassy ground, was performed on both groups. B-mode and power Doppler ultrasonographies (US) were performed to evaluate the tendon healing process during the first 14 days after surgery and on the 21st and 28th postoperative days. Biopsies were performed on day 28 for the histopathological assessment of neovascularisation and the pattern of the tendon fibres. The absence of lameness and a significant improvement (p lesion was found. There was a histological difference (p < 0.05) in neovascularisation in the treated group. Phototherapy with 890-nm light-emitting diodes decreases the inflammatory process.

  9. Suture materials and suture techniques used in tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketchum, L D

    1985-02-01

    Immediately after a tendon repair, the tendon contributes nothing to the strength of repair. During that time, the suture itself and suture technique are the sole contributors to the strength of repair. Although stainless steel is the strongest material that can be used at the time of repair, it has serious disadvantages. It is difficult to work with and makes a bulky knot. Conversely, all absorbable sutures become too weak too soon to be of value. At this time, nonabsorbable, synthetic fibers that are relatively strong, such as Supramid or prolene, are the most desirable materials available. Regarding suture techniques, the lateral trap and end-weave techniques produce the strongest repairs; however, the end-weave technique can only be used with tendon grafts and the lateral trap, though it can be used for end-to-end primary repairs. It is too bulky for use in the fingers and hand but is ideal for the forearm and wrist. In the hand and fingers, the strongest repair techniques available are the Bunnell, Kessler, and Mason-Allen; however, the Bunnell stitch is more strangulating to the microcirculation of the tendon than the latter two stitches; thus, it contributes to tendomalacia and gap formation. The simplest and least traumatic suture technique, though weakest at first, will allow tendon healing to proceed more rapidly. If such a repair is protected from tension by splinting the wrist and metacarpophalangeal joints in flexion during healing (while allowing controlled passive motion of the finger joints), there will be a rapid increase in tensile strength of the tendon juncture with minimal gap formation, as the repaired hand is progressively stressed up until about 90 days postrepair. At that point, strength plateaus and maximum stress can be applied to the repaired tendon. Somewhere between three and six weeks post-tendon repair, the suture material and technique become secondary to tendon healing as the primary provider of tensile strength to the tendon wound

  10. Flexor tendons repair: effect of core sutures caliber with increased number of suture strands and peripheral sutures. A sheep model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uslu, M; Isik, C; Ozsahin, M; Ozkan, A; Yasar, M; Orhan, Z; Erkan Inanmaz, M; Sarman, H

    2014-10-01

    Surgeons have aimed to achieve strong repair so as to begin early active rehabilitation programs for flexor tendon injury. Multi-strand suture techniques were developed to gain improved gap resistance and ultimate force compared with the respective two-strand techniques. In vivo studies indicate that multiple strands may cause ischemia during the intrinsic healing process by decreasing the total cross-sectional area of the injured site, unless the total cross-sectional area of the sutures is not decreased. The hypothesis was to design an in vitro study to understand the biomechanical relationship between suture calibers of core sutures with increased number of suture strands and peripheral suture on final repair strength. Sixty fresh sheep forelimb flexor digitorum profundus tendons were randomly placed into three groups (A, B, and C), each containing 20 specimens, for tendon repair. Two-, four-, and eight-strand suture techniques were respectively used in Groups A, B, and C. A simple running peripheral suture technique was used in Subgroups A2, B2, and C2. For each repaired tendon, the 2-mm gap-formation force, 2-mm gap-formation strength, maximum breaking force and maximum breaking strength were determined. Differences in 2-mm gap-formation force and 2-mm gap-formation strength were found between Subgroups A1 and A2, B1 and B2, and C1 and C2. Between Groups A and B, A and C, and B and C, there was no difference as well. Both the number of strands and the ratio between the total suture volume and tendon volume at the repair site are important for ideal repair. If the total cross-sectional area of the sutures is equal in 2-strand, 4-strand, and 8-strand procedure, there is no difference in the strength of the repair. A decrease in caliber size suture requires more passes to achieve the same strength. Instead, it is much better to use peripheral suture techniques to improve the strength of the repair with larger diameter 2-strand core sutures. Copyright © 2014

  11. What is the impact of inflammation on the critical interplay between mechanical signaling and biochemical changes in tendon matrix?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Michael; Bayer, Monika L; Eliasson, Pernilla

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical loading can influence tendon collagen homeostasis in animal models, while the dynamics of the human adult tendon core tissue are more debatable. Currently available data indicate that human tendon adaptation to loading may happen primarily in the outer tendon region. A role of inflamma......Mechanical loading can influence tendon collagen homeostasis in animal models, while the dynamics of the human adult tendon core tissue are more debatable. Currently available data indicate that human tendon adaptation to loading may happen primarily in the outer tendon region. A role...... of inflammation in this peritendinous adaptation is supported by a rise in inflammatory mediators in the peritendinous area after physiological mechanical loading in humans. This plays a role in the exercise-induced rise in tendon blood flow and peritendinous collagen synthesis. Although inflammatory activity can...... at rest nor after acute exercise display any enhanced inflammatory activity, and thus the basis for using anti-inflammatory medication to treat tendon overuse seems limited....

  12. Blood supply of the flexor digital tendon in the hand and its clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z Z; Zhong, S Z; Sun, B; Ho, G T

    1990-01-01

    An anatomical study on the blood sources and vascularity of the flexor digital tendon was conducted in the upper extremities of fresh cadavers by means of arterial injection and meticulous dissection of the transparent tendon under the microscope. According to whether or not synovial membrane surrounded the tendon, the flexor digital tendon can be divided into 2 regions: non-synovial and synovial. The major intrinsic blood supply of the digital tendon was in the form of longitudinal vascular bundles, while the transverse anastomotic branches were short and sparse. The non-synovial region of the tendon was covered by paratenon and the vascular distribution of this region was uniform. In the synovial sheath, the blood vessels distributed only on the dorsal side, while the volar side was devoid of vessels. The profundus and superficialis tendons had an avascular zone at the proximal interphalangeal and metacarpophalangeal joints respectively. It was considered that the difference of the vascular architecture might be related to the mechanical force to which the tendon was subjected. The nutrition of tendon was discussed and the selection of tendon graft at operation was suggested.

  13. Tendon Transfers for Tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednar, Michael S

    2016-08-01

    It is estimated that 65% to 75% of patients with cervical spinal cord injuries could benefit from upper extremity tendon transfer surgery. The goals of surgery are to restore elbow extension, as well as hand pinch, grasp, and release. Patients who have defined goals, actively participate in therapy, and understand expected outcomes, appear to have the highest satisfaction following tendon transfer procedures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Liver Graft Allocation by Means of a New, Regionally Shared "Mixed" Model: The Experience in Lazio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccaria, R; Teti, G; Mecule, A; Torlone, N; Valeri, M; Adorno, D

    2015-09-01

    Since 2013, the regional network of transplantation centers "LAZIO TRANSPLANT" have adopted a new, mixed system for the allocation of liver grafts. The organs from donors aged 65 are allocated to patients with higher MELD scores on a specific local waiting list (LWL) at each center, on a rotational basis. The new mixed allocation model grants a more rational allocation of the "standard" organs to the patients with the actual worst MELD score in the entire region, avoiding the possibility that a patient in relatively better clinical condition might be transplanted before a more severely ill patient on another center's waiting list. Nonstandard organs, presenting slightly increased transplant risks, are still allocated on a rotational basis among the different transplant centers, ensuring them the possibility to select, on the basis of a global clinical risk evaluation, those patients in their LWL whose MELD score would not grant any possibility to compete for the "standard" organ allocation. The application of the new model had no negative impact on the overall number of transplants performed or on the global list-satisfaction percentages, but has slightly improved the cumulative mortality of the patients in the waiting list, granting to the clinically worst patients a prompt graft allocation, independent of the local center belonging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Static tensioning promotes hamstring tendons force relaxation more reliably than cycling tensioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piedade, Sérgio Rocha; Dal Fabbro, Inácio Maria; Mischan, Martha Maria; Piedade, Cezar; Maffulli, Nicola

    2017-08-01

    Graft elongation might be a major reason for increased anterior laxity after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. This study analyzed the force relaxation values and their stabilization when single strands of the gracilis and semitendinosus tendons underwent cyclic and static tensioning at 2.5% strain level, and compared the efficiency of static and cyclic tensioning in promoting force relaxation. Eighteen gracilis tendons and 18 semitendinosus tendons from nine male cadavers (mean age: 22.44years) were subjected to 10 in vitro cyclic loads at 2.5% strain level, or to a static load at 2.5% strain level. During cyclic loading, the reduction in force values tended to stabilize after the sixth cyclic load, while, in the case of static loading, this stabilization occurred by the second minute. Comparing static and cyclic loading, the gracilis tendon had similar mechanical responses in both conditions, while the semitendinosus tendon showed greater force relaxation in static compared with cyclic loading. Considering that the semitendinosus tendon is the main component of the hamstring graft, its biomechanical response to loading should guide the tensioning protocol. Therefore, static tensioning seems more effective for promoting force relaxation of the semitendinosus tendon than cyclic tensioning. The gracilis tendon showed a similar mechanical response to either tensioning protocols. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Tension Regulation at the Suture Lines for Repair of Neglected Achilles Tendon Laceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoud, Elsayed Ibraheem Elsayed

    2017-03-01

    Operative intervention is the preferred option for management of the neglected laceration of the Achilles tendon. However, the commonly used techniques rarely follow the principles of the regenerative medicine for the restoration of the lost tissue. This study postulated that incorporation of the autogenous tendon graft would properly progress when the interplay between mechanical loading and healing phases was correctly applied. A prospective study included 15 patients who were treated for neglected Achilles tendon laceration using the technique of lengthening of the proximal tendon stump. An absorbable reinforcement suture was used for control of the mechanical environment at the suture lines. By an average 5 years of the prospective follow-up, all the repaired tendons had restored continuity and length. The calf circumference equalized to the uninjured side in 12 patients. However, 3 patients had calf atrophy but they improved compared to the preoperative measurements. Sonogram confirmed the restoration of the normal thickness and the gliding characteristics of the repaired tendon. The technique restored continuity and tension of the repaired tendon, preserved the calf circumference, and prevented peritendinous adhesions. The absorbable reinforcement suture spontaneously allowed for the mechanical loading of the grafted tendon. Level IV, case series.

  17. History of flexor tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manske, Paul R

    2005-05-01

    The first issue of Hand Clinics published 20 years ago was devoted to flexor tendon injuries. This was most appropriate, because no subject in hand surgery has sparked more interest or discussion. That inaugural issue included excellent presentations on the basic science of tendon injuries (anatomy, biomechanics, nutrition, healing, adhesions) and the clinical practice of tendon repair. Of interest, there was no presentation on the fascinating history of flexor tendon surgery. It is most appropriate, therefore, that this current update of the flexor tendon begins with a historical review of the evolution of flexor tendon repair.

  18. Ring-Mesh Model of Proteoglycan Glycosaminoglycan Chains in Tendon based on Three-dimensional Reconstruction by Focused Ion Beam Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takafumi; Kametani, Kiyokazu; Koyama, Yoh-Ichi; Suzuki, Daisuke; Imamura, Yasutada; Takehana, Kazushige; Hiramatsu, Kohzy

    2016-11-04

    Tendons are composed of collagen fibrils and proteoglycan predominantly consisting of decorin. Decorin is located on the d-band of collagen fibrils, and its glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains have been observed between collagen fibrils with transmission electron microscopy. GAG chains have been proposed to interact with each other or with collagen fibrils, but its three-dimensional organization remains unclear. In this report, we used focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy to examine the three-dimensional organization of the GAG chain in the Achilles tendon of mature rats embedded in epoxy resin after staining with Cupromeronic blue, which specifically stains GAG chains. We used 250 serial back-scattered electron images of longitudinal sections with a 10-nm interval for reconstruction. Three-dimensional images revealed that GAG chains form a ring mesh-like structure with each ring surrounding a collagen fibril at the d-band and fusing with adjacent rings to form the planar network. This ring mesh model of GAG chains suggests that more than two GAG chains may interact with each other around collagen fibrils, which could provide new insights into the roles of GAG chains. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Anterior transfer of tibialis posterior tendon for treating drop foot: Technique of enforcing tendon implantation to improve success rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chi-Chuan; Tai, Ching-Lung

    2015-03-01

    An absolutely convincing technique of anterior transfer of the tibialis posterior (TP) tendon for treating drop foot has not been developed. Thirty-seven consecutive adult patients with drop foot owing to deep peroneal nerve injury were treated with bone-to-bone TP tendon transfer. The TP tendon with a small bony attachment was procured from the undersurface of the navicula and then transferred through a tunnel of the interosseous membrane. The navicular attachment was implanted in the tunnel of the navicula or intermediate cuneiform. Cancellous bone graft procured from the distal tibial metaphysis was packed into the tunnel inlet. Side-to-side tendon suturing was performed between the TP tendon and tibialis anterior tendon. Thirty-one patients were followed for a mean of 2.8 years (range, 1.2-4.8 years), and all achieved satisfactory outcome for the ankle. All patients achieved a normal gait after one year and at the latest follow-up. The described technique may provide a high success rate. This surgical technique is not complex, and complications are few.

  20. Tendon progenitor cells in injured tendons have strong chondrogenic potential: the CD105-negative subpopulation induces chondrogenic degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Shuji; Otsuru, Satoru; Candela, Maria Elena; Cantley, Leslie; Uchibe, Kenta; Hofmann, Ted J; Zhang, Kairui; Wapner, Keith L; Soslowsky, Louis J; Horwitz, Edwin M; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2014-12-01

    To study the cellular mechanism of the tendon repair process, we used a mouse Achilles tendon injury model to focus on the cells recruited to the injured site. The cells isolated from injured tendon 1 week after the surgery and uninjured tendons contained the connective tissue progenitor populations as determined by colony-forming capacity, cell surface markers, and multipotency. When the injured tendon-derived progenitor cells (inTPCs) were transplanted into injured Achilles tendons, they were not only integrated in the regenerating area expressing tenogenic phenotype but also trans-differentiated into chondrogenic cells in the degenerative lesion that underwent ectopic endochondral ossification. Surprisingly, the micromass culture of the inTPCs rapidly underwent chondrogenic differentiation even in the absence of exogenous bone morphogenetic proteins or TGFβs. The cells isolated from human ruptured tendon tissues also showed connective tissue progenitor properties and exhibited stronger chondrogenic ability than bone marrow stromal cells. The mouse inTPCs contained two subpopulations one positive and one negative for CD105, a coreceptor of the TGFβ superfamily. The CD105-negative cells showed superior chondrogenic potential in vitro and induced larger chondroid degenerative lesions in mice as compared to the CD105-positive cells. These findings indicate that tendon progenitor cells are recruited to the injured site of tendons and have a strong chondrogenic potential and that the CD105-negative population of these cells would be the cause for chondroid degeneration in injured tendons. The newly identified cells recruited to the injured tendon may provide novel targets to develop therapeutic strategies to facilitate tendon repair. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  1. [Achilles tendon rupture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thermann, H; Hüfner, T; Tscherne, H

    2000-03-01

    The treatment of acute of Achilles tendon rupture experienced a dynamic development in the last ten years. Decisive for this development was the application of MRI and above all the ultrasonography in the diagnostics of the pathological changes and injuries of tendons. The question of rupture morphology as well as different courses of healing could be now evaluated objectively. These advances led consequently to new modalities in treatment concepts and rehabilitation protocols. The decisive input for improvements of the outcome results and particularly the shortening of the rehabilitation period came with introduction of the early functional treatment in contrast to immobilizing plaster treatment. In a prospective randomized study (1987-1989) at the Trauma Dept. of the Hannover Medical School could show no statistical differences comparing functional non-operative with functional operative therapy with a special therapy boot (Variostabil/Adidas). The crucial criteria for therapy selection results from the sonographically measured position of the tendon stumps in plantar flexion (20 degrees). With complete adaptation of the tendons' ends surgical treatment does not achieve better results than non-operative functional treatment in term of tendon healing and functional outcome. Regarding the current therapeutic standards each method has is advantages and disadvantages. Both, the operative and non-operative functional treatment enable a stable tendon healing with a low risk of re-rupture (1-2%). Meanwhile there is consensus for early functional after-treatment of the operated Achilles' tendons. There seems to be a trend towards non-operative functional treatment in cases of adequate sonographical findings, or to minimal invasive surgical techniques.

  2. Cell fate analysis of embryonic ventral mesencephalic grafts in the 6-OHDA model of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonya Carvalho Neto

    Full Text Available Evidence from carefully conducted open label clinical trials suggested that therapeutic benefit can be achieved by grafting fetal dopaminergic (DAergic neurons derived from ventral mesencephalon (VM into the denervated striatum of Parkinson's disease (PD patients. However, two double-blind trials generated negative results reporting deleterious side effects such as prominent dyskinesias. Heterogeneous composition of VM grafts is likely to account for suboptimal clinical efficacy.We consider that gene expression patterns of the VM tissue needs to be better understood by comparing the genetic signature of the surviving and functioning grafts with the cell suspensions used for transplantation. In addition, it is crucial to assess whether the grafted cells exhibit the DAergic phenotype of adult substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc. To investigate this further, we used a GFP reporter mouse as source of VM tissue that enabled the detection and dissection of the grafts 6 weeks post implantation. A comparative gene expression analysis of the VM cell suspension and grafts revealed that VM grafts continue to differentiate post-implantation. In addition, implanted grafts showed a mature SNpc-like molecular DAergic phenotype with similar expression levels of TH, Vmat2 and Dat. However, by comparing gene expression of the adult SNpc with dissected grafts we detected a higher expression of progenitor markers in the grafts. Finally, when compared to the VM cell suspension, post-grafting there was a higher expression of markers inherent to glia and other neuronal populations.In summary, our data highlight the dynamic development of distinctive DAergic and non-DAergic gene expression markers associated with the maturation of VM grafts in vivo. The molecular signature of VM grafts and its functional relevance should be further explored in future studies aimed at the optimization of DAergic cell therapy approaches in PD.

  3. Influence of neglecting the curved path of the Achilles tendon on Achilles tendon length change at various ranges of motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukutani, Atsuki; Hashizume, Satoru; Kusumoto, Kazuki; Kurihara, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Achilles tendon length has been measured using a straight‐line model. However, this model is associated with a greater measurement error compared with a curved‐line model. Therefore, we examined the influence of neglecting the curved path of the Achilles tendon on its length change at various ranges of motion. Ten male subjects participated in this study. First, the location of the Achilles tendon was confirmed by using ultrasonography, and markers were attached on the skin over the Achilles tendon path. Then, the three‐dimensional coordinates of each marker at dorsiflexion (DF) 15°, plantarflexion (PF) 0°, PF15°, and PF30° were obtained. Achilles tendon length in the curved‐line model was calculated as the sum of the distances among each marker. On the other hand, Achilles tendon length in the straight‐line model was calculated as the straight distance between the two most proximal and distal markers projected onto the sagittal plane. The difference of the Achilles tendon length change between curved‐line and straight‐line models was calculated by subtracting the Achilles tendon length change obtained in curved‐line model from that obtained in straight‐line model with three different ranges of motion (i.e., PF0°, PF15°, and PF30° from DF15°, respectively). As a result, the difference in Achilles tendon length change between the two models increased significantly as the range of motion increased. In conclusion, neglecting the curved path of the Achilles tendon induces substantial overestimation of its length change when the extent of ankle joint angle change is large. PMID:25303951

  4. Comparison of Graft Failure Rate Between Autografts Placed via an Anatomic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Technique: A Systematic Review, Meta-analysis, and Meta-regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabler, Conrad M; Jacobs, Cale A; Howard, Jennifer Sebert; Mattacola, Carl G; Johnson, Darren L

    2016-04-01

    Recent data from the Danish anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) registry demonstrated increased reoperation rates for hamstring tendon autografts when an anatomic ACL reconstruction is performed. This is consistent with reports of greater time needed for hamstring tendon autografts to mature compared with other autografts. To review the literature comparing graft failure rate between patellar and hamstring tendon autografts placed anatomically and to determine if there are differences in return to preinjury activity levels between autografts. Systematic review with meta-analysis and meta-regression. The PubMed, MEDLINE, SPORTDiscus, and CINAHL databases were used to identify studies published from January 1, 2000, through March 7, 2014. To compare postoperative outcomes between patellar tendon and hamstring tendon autografts, summary event rates for graft failure and return to preinjury activity level were calculated. A meta-analysis was performed to calculate a summary odds ratio (OR) for graft failure between autografts using the studies that directly compared the 2 autografts. Meta-regression analyses were performed to assess the influence of postoperative follow-up time on graft failure rate. A total of 28 studies reported graft failures for patellar tendon (6 studies) and hamstring tendon (26 studies) autografts used with anatomic ACL reconstruction; 4 of the 28 were comparison studies. Graft failure rate was not significantly different between patellar tendon (7.0% [95% CI, 4.6%-10.5%]) and hamstring tendon autografts (3.9% [95% CI, 2.7%-5.6%]). The odds of graft failure were slightly higher for hamstring tendon autografts (OR, 1.21 [95% CI, 0.63-2.33]), but this difference was not significant (P = .57). The rate of patients returning to preinjury activity levels was not significantly different between patellar (n = 1 study; 58.1% [95% CI, 40.4%-73.9%]) and hamstring tendon autografts (n = 5 studies; 75.6% [95% CI, 43.7%-92.5%]). Overall graft failure rate was

  5. Biomechanical analysis of partial flexor tendon lacerations in zone II of human cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, David W; Spiguel, Andre R; Mass, Daniel P

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to examine nonrepaired 90% partial lacerations of human cadaver flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendon after simulated active motion, and to assess the residual ultimate tensile strength. Partial, transverse zone II flexor tendon lacerations were made in the volar 90% of the tendon substance in 10 FDP tendons from 5 fresh-frozen human cadaver hands. The tendons were cycled in the curvilinear fashion described by Greenwald 500 times to a tension 25% greater than the maximum in vivo active FDP flexion force measured by Schuind and colleagues. The tendons were then loaded to failure using the same curvilinear model. No tendons ruptured during cycling. Triggering occurred in 3 tendons. All 3 began triggering early in the cycling process, and continued to trigger throughout the remainder of the 500 cycles. The observed triggering mechanics in each case involved the interaction of the proximal face of the lacerated tendon with Camper's chiasm and the pulley edges during extension. The load to failure value of the 90% partially lacerated tendons averaged 141.7 +/- 13 N (mean +/- standard deviation). Tendon failure occurred by delamination of the intact collagen fibers from the distal, discontinuous 90% of the tendon. Cadaveric transverse zone II partial flexor tendon lacerations have residual tensile strength greater than the force required for protected active mobilization. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Steroid injections - tendon, bursa, joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/007678.htm Steroid injections - tendon, bursa, joint To use the sharing features on this ... can be injected into a joint, tendon, or bursa. Description Your health care provider inserts a small ...

  7. Reconstrução do LCA com o uso dos tendões dos músculos flexores mediais do joelho e fixação femoral com o sistema de Rigidifix®: relato preliminar Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using double hamstrings tendon graft and the femoral fixation by Rigidifix®: preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Cury Faustino

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available O autor descreve a técnica de reconstrução do LCA no tratamento das instabilidades anterior do joelho, utilizando os tendões dos músculos flexores mediais do joelho (semitendíneo e grácil, fixados no fêmur pelo sistema de Rigidfix®; e na tíbia, com parafuso de interferência absorvível, através de um estudo preliminar de 54 joelhos operados. Na avaliação final pela escala de Lysholm os pacientes evoluíram de 46 pontos no pré-operatório para 92 pontos no pós-operatório.The author describes the reconstruction technique of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using the hamstrings tendon (semitendinosus and gracilis in the management of anterior instabilities of the knee joint. Rigidfix® system is used to fix the graft on the femur and an absorbable interference screw was used for tibial fixation in a preliminary study in 54 knees. The final evaluation based on Lysholm score showed an improvement from 46 (preoperative to 92 (postoperative.

  8. Factors affecting extension lag after tendon reconstruction for finger extensor tendon rupture due to distal radioulnar lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itsubo, Toshiro; Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Masanori; Nakamura, Koichi; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Although extensor tendon rupture associated with distal radioulnar joint disorder is often encountered, its treatment has not yet been established. We report the postoperative results for reconstruction of finger extensor tendon rupture due to distal radioulnar lesion and analyse the factors affecting postoperative extension lag. We examined 74 index, middle, ring, or little fingers with extensor tendon rupture of 34 hands. Primary diseases were rheumatoid arthritis in 24 hands and osteoarthritis in 10. Reconstruction methods included tendon graft in 45 fingers, extensor indicis proprius tendon transfer in 15, and end-to-side adjacent tendon suture in 14. At final postoperative follow-up ranging from 12 to 40 (mean: 18) months, we measured metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint range of motion and extension lag and statistically evaluated the relationship between postoperative extension lag and several clinical factors. We encountered no cases of re-rupture or worsening of finger flexion range after reconstruction. Mean postoperative active flexion of the MCP joint was 78.1 (range: 45-95) degrees. Mean postoperative extension lag was 10.3 (range: 0-50) degrees. We observed that postoperative extension lag was significantly larger in fingers associated with extensor tendon rupture in two or three additional fingers in the affected hand or in fingers of patients aged 80 years or over. The interval from rupture to reconstruction, reconstruction method, or arthritis type did not remarkably affect outcome. This study uncovered that surgical intervention for extensor tendon rupture should be performed before three fingers become affected. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Tendon Driven Finger Actuation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reich, David M. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor); Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); hide

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a robotic hand having at least one finger. An actuation system for the robotic finger includes an actuator assembly which is supported by the robot and is spaced apart from the finger. A tendon extends from the actuator assembly to the at least one finger and ends in a tendon terminator. The actuator assembly is operable to actuate the tendon to move the tendon terminator and, thus, the finger.

  10. Clinical aspects of tendon healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C.H.M. van der Meulen (Jacques)

    1974-01-01

    textabstractWe know that healing of a tendon wound takes place by an invasion of fibreblasts from the surrounding tissues; the tendon itself has no intrinsic healing capacity. lt was Potenza (1962) who proved that a traumatic suture of the tendons within their sheath is followed by disintegration of

  11. The Effect of Platelet-Rich Plasma on Survival of the Composite Graft and the Proper Time of Injection in a Rabbit Ear Composite Graft Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Nam Choi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAdministration of growth factors has been associated with increased viability of composite grafts greater than 1-cm in diameter. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP contains many of the growth factors studied. In this study, we evaluate the effect of PRP injection on composite graft viability and the proper time for injection.MethodsA total of 24 New Zealand White rabbits were divided into four groups. Autologous PRP was injected into the recipient sites three days before grafting in group 1, on the day of grafting in group 2, and three days after grafting in group 3. Group 4 served as control without PRP administration. Auricular composite grafts of 3-cm diameter were harvested and grafted back into place after being rotated 180 degrees. Median graft viability and microvessel density were evaluated at day 21 of graft via macroscopic photographs and immunofluorescent staining, respectively.ResultsThe median graft survival rate was 97.8% in group 1, 69.2% in group 2, 55.7% in group 3, and 40.8% in the control group. The median vessel counts were 34 (per ×200 HPF in group 1, 24.5 in group 2, 19.5 in group 3, and 10.5 in the control group.ConclusionsThis study demonstrates that PRP administration is associated with increased composite graft viability. All experimental groups showed a significantly higher survival rate and microvessel density, compared with the control group. Pre-administration of PRP was followed by the highest graft survival rate and revascularization. PRP treatments are minimally invasive, fast, easily applicable, and inexpensive, and offer a potential clinical pathway to larger composite grafts.

  12. Nonsurgical treatment and early return to activity leads to improved Achilles tendon fatigue mechanics and functional outcomes during early healing in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Benjamin R; Gordon, Joshua A; Bhatt, Pankti R; Pardes, Adam M; Thomas, Stephen J; Sarver, Joseph J; Riggin, Corinne N; Tucker, Jennica J; Williams, Alexis W; Zanes, Robert C; Hast, Michael W; Farber, Daniel C; Silbernagel, Karin G; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2016-12-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures are common and devastating injuries; however, an optimized treatment and rehabilitation protocol has yet to be defined. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the effects of surgical repair and return to activity on joint function and Achilles tendon properties after 3 weeks of healing. Sprague-Dawley rats (N = 100) received unilateral blunt transection of their Achilles tendon. Animals were then randomized into repaired or non-repaired treatments, and further randomized into groups that returned to activity after 1 week (RTA1) or after 3 weeks (RTA3) of limb casting in plantarflexion. Limb function, passive joint mechanics, and tendon properties (mechanical, organizational using high frequency ultrasound, histological, and compositional) were evaluated. Results showed that both treatment and return to activity collectively affected limb function, passive joint mechanics, and tendon properties. Functionally, RTA1 animals had increased dorsiflexion ROM and weight bearing of the injured limb compared to RTA3 animals 3-weeks post-injury. Such functional improvements in RTA1 tendons were evidenced in their mechanical fatigue properties and increased cross sectional area compared to RTA3 tendons. When RTA1 was coupled with nonsurgical treatment, superior fatigue properties were achieved compared to repaired tendons. No differences in cell shape, cellularity, GAG, collagen type I, or TGF-β staining were identified between groups, but collagen type III was elevated in RTA3 repaired tendons. The larger tissue area and increased fatigue resistance created in RTA1 tendons may prove critical for optimized outcomes in early Achilles tendon healing following complete rupture. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:2172-2180, 2016. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The development of zebrafish tendon and ligament progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jessica W.; Galloway, Jenna L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the importance of tendons and ligaments for transmitting movement and providing stability to the musculoskeletal system, their development is considerably less well understood than that of the tissues they serve to connect. Zebrafish have been widely used to address questions in muscle and skeletal development, yet few studies describe their tendon and ligament tissues. We have analyzed in zebrafish the expression of several genes known to be enriched in mammalian tendons and ligaments, including scleraxis (scx), collagen 1a2 (col1a2) and tenomodulin (tnmd), or in the tendon-like myosepta of the zebrafish (xirp2a). Co-expression studies with muscle and cartilage markers demonstrate the presence of scxa, col1a2 and tnmd at sites between the developing muscle and cartilage, and xirp2a at the myotendinous junctions. We determined that the zebrafish craniofacial tendon and ligament progenitors are neural crest derived, as in mammals. Cranial and fin tendon progenitors can be induced in the absence of differentiated muscle or cartilage, although neighboring muscle and cartilage are required for tendon cell maintenance and organization, respectively. By contrast, myoseptal scxa expression requires muscle for its initiation. Together, these data suggest a conserved role for muscle in tendon development. Based on the similarities in gene expression, morphology, collagen ultrastructural arrangement and developmental regulation with that of mammalian tendons, we conclude that the zebrafish tendon populations are homologous to their force-transmitting counterparts in higher vertebrates. Within this context, the zebrafish model can be used to provide new avenues for studying tendon biology in a vertebrate genetic system. PMID:24803652

  14. Sex Hormones and Tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette; Kjaer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The risk of overuse and traumatic tendon and ligament injuries differ between women and men. Part of this gender difference in injury risk is probably explained by sex hormonal differences which are specifically distinct during the sexual maturation in the teenage years and during young adulthood....... The effects of the separate sex hormones are not fully elucidated. However, in women, the presence of estrogen in contrast to very low estrogen levels may be beneficial during regular loading of the tissue or during recovering after an injury, as estrogen can enhance tendon collagen synthesis rate. Yet...

  15. Open Achilles tendon lacerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, M Nader; Al Ateeq Al Dosari, Mohamed; Al Subaii, Nasser; Kawas, Alaa; Al Mas, Ali; Al Ser, Yaser; Abuodeh, Yousef; Shakil, Malik; Habash, Ali; Mukhter, Khalid

    2015-04-01

    In contrast to closed Achilles tendon ruptures, open injuries are rarely reported in the literature. This paper provides information about open Achilles tendon wounds that are eventually seen in the Middle East. The reporting unit, Hamad Medical Corporation, is one of the biggest trauma centers in the Gulf area and the major health provider in Qatar. This is a retrospective study including patients admitted and operated for open Achilles tendon injuries between January 2011 and December 2013. Two hundred and five cases of open Achilles tendon lacerations were operated in Hamad General Hospital in this period. Forty-eight cases showed partial injuries, and the remaining are complete tendons cut. In the same period, fifty-one closed ruptured Achilles tendons were operated in the same trauma unit. In the majority of cases, the open injury resulted from a slip in the floor-leveled traditional toilette seats. Local damage to the toilette seats resulted in sharp edges causing the laceration of the heel if the patient was slipping over the wet floor. This occurrence is the cause in the vast majority of the cases. Wounds were located 1-5 cm proximal to tendon insertion. Standard treatment principles were applied. This included thorough irrigation in the emergency room, intravenous antibiotics, surgical debridement and primary repair within 24 h. Patients were kept in the hospital 1-7 days for intravenous antibiotics and possible dressing changes. Postoperatively below knee slabs were applied in the majority of patients and were kept for about 4 weeks followed by gradual weight bearing and range of motion exercises. Outpatients follow up in 1-2 weeks. Further follow-up visits at around 2-, 4-, 8- and 12-week intervals until complete wound healing and satisfactory rehabilitation outcome. Sixteen cases needed a second procedure. A high incidence of Achilles tendon open injuries is reported. This seems to be related to partially damaged floor-level toilettes in the

  16. Biomedical implications from a morphoelastic continuum model for the simulation of contracture formation in skin grafts that cover excised burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppenol, Daniël C; Vermolen, Fred J

    2017-08-01

    A continuum hypothesis-based model is developed for the simulation of the (long term) contraction of skin grafts that cover excised burns in order to obtain suggestions regarding the ideal length of splinting therapy and when to start with this therapy such that the therapy is effective optimally. Tissue is modeled as an isotropic, heterogeneous, morphoelastic solid. With respect to the constituents of the tissue, we selected the following constituents as primary model components: fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, collagen molecules, and a generic signaling molecule. Good agreement is demonstrated with respect to the evolution over time of the surface area of unmeshed skin grafts that cover excised burns between outcomes of computer simulations obtained in this study and scar assessment data gathered previously in a clinical study. Based on the simulation results, we suggest that the optimal point in time to start with splinting therapy is directly after placement of the skin graft on its recipient bed. Furthermore, we suggest that it is desirable to continue with splinting therapy until the concentration of the signaling molecules in the grafted area has become negligible such that the formation of contractures can be prevented. We conclude this study with a presentation of some alternative ideas on how to diminish the degree of contracture formation that are not based on a mechanical intervention, and a discussion about how the presented model can be adjusted.

  17. Functional integration of grafted neural stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons monitored by optogenetics in an in vitro Parkinson model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, Jan; Parish, Clare L; Sørensen, Andreas T

    2011-01-01

    Intrastriatal grafts of stem cell-derived dopamine (DA) neurons induce behavioral recovery in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD), but how they functionally integrate in host neural circuitries is poorly understood. Here, Wnt5a-overexpressing neural stem cells derived from embryonic ventral...

  18. A Novel Design for Adjustable Stiffness Artificial Tendon for the Ankle Joint of a Bipedal Robot: Modeling & Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiman Omer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bipedal humanoid robots are expected to play a major role in the future. Performing bipedal locomotion requires high energy due to the high torque that needs to be provided by its legs’ joints. Taking the WABIAN-2R as an example, it uses harmonic gears in its joint to increase the torque. However, using such a mechanism increases the weight of the legs and therefore increases energy consumption. Therefore, the idea of developing a mechanism with adjustable stiffness to be connected to the leg joint is introduced here. The proposed mechanism would have the ability to provide passive and active motion. The mechanism would be attached to the ankle pitch joint as an artificial tendon. Using computer simulations, the dynamical performance of the mechanism is analytically evaluated.

  19. The normal anterior cruciate ligament as a model for tensioning strategies in anterior cruciate ligament grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, MP; Verdonschot, N; van Kampen, A

    Background: There is some confusion about the relationship between the tension placed on the graft and the joint position used in the fixation of anterior cruciate ligament grafts. This is because of deficiency in accurate basic science about this important interaction in the normal and

  20. The normal anterior cruciate ligament as a model for tensioning strategies in anterior cruciate ligament grafts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, M.P.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Kampen, A. van

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is some confusion about the relationship between the tension placed on the graft and the joint position used in the fixation of anterior cruciate ligament grafts. This is because of deficiency in accurate basic science about this important interaction in the normal and

  1. Rotator cuff tendon assessment using magic-angle insensitive 3D ultrashort echo time cones magnetization transfer (UTE-Cones-MT) imaging and modeling with histological correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanchun; Cheng, Xin; Ma, Yajun; Wong, Jonathan H; Xie, Yaoqin; Du, Jiang; Chang, Eric Y

    2017-12-08

    Rotator cuff tendons (RCTs) are challenging to image due to the "magic angle effect" and their short T2 . To assess the degree of magic angle sensitivity of human RCTs and to utilize a 3D ultrashort echo time Cones sequence with magnetization transfer preparation (UTE-Cones-MT) and two-pool quantitative MT modeling with histological correlation. We hypothesized that MT parameters would be less sensitive to the magic angle compared with conventional T2 measurements. Prospective imaging pathologic correlation. Twenty cadaveric rotator cuff tendons were imaged at five sample orientations ranging from 0-90° relative to the B0 field. 3T/3D UTE-Cones-MT and Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG). Two-pool quantitative MT modeling parameters and T2 values were calculated in regions of interest drawn by a medical physicist. Histopathological analysis was performed and mild and severe tendinopathy groups were assigned by a histopathologist and histotechnician. Coefficients of variations (CVs) were calculated for measures between the different orientations and group means were compared for each measure. CVs of T2 and macromolecular fractions between orientations were 26.14 ± 16.82% and 6.18 ± 2.77% (mean ± SD), respectively. T2 measurements at 0°, 27°, 70°, and 90° showed significant differences between the two histological groups (P = 0.004, 0.008, 0.003, and 0.015, respectively), but not at 55° (P = 0.611). Mean T2 value ranges between orientations for the mild and severe tendinopathy groups were 15.27-30.32 msec and 20.81-35.85 msec, respectively, showing overlap despite statistically significant differences (P = 0.003). Macromolecular fractions at all angles showed significant differences between the two groups (P Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  2. Histological advantages of the tumor graft: a murine model involving transplantation of human pancreatic cancer tissue fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Yoshimasa; Oda, Tatsuya; Ohara, Yusuke; Miyamoto, Ryoichi; Hashimoto, Shinji; Enomoto, Tsuyoshi; Yamada, Keiichi; Kobayashi, Akihiko; Fukunaga, Kiyoshi; Ohkochi, Nobuhiro

    2013-11-01

    Experimental data based on cell line-derived xenograft models (cell xenograft) seldom reproduce the clinical situation, and therefore we demonstrated here the superiority of a murine model involving transplantation of human pancreatic cancer tissue fragments (tumor graft), focusing on the histological features and drug delivery characteristics. Tumor pieces from 10 pancreatic cancer patients were transplanted into SCID (severe combined immunodeficient) mice. Histological characteristics of tumor grafts, including morphology, desmoplastic reaction, and vascularization, were compared with those of cell xenografts. Drug delivery was evaluated by quantifying the concentrations of injected drug, and the results were compared with its histological features. Eight of the 10 transplanted tumors successfully engrafted. Histological comparisons between tumor grafts and cell xenografts revealed the following: the amount of stroma was more (22.9% ± 11.8% vs 10.8% ± 5.4%; P cancer cell distance was longer (35.3 ± 39.0 vs 3.9 ± 3.1 μm; P Pancreatic tumor grafts better reproduce the histological nature of clinical cancer and thus provide a more realistic model that is applicable for pharmacokinetic studies.

  3. Propagation of Neuronal Damage to Embryonic Grafts Transplanted in the Hippocampus of Murine Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadallah, Mohcene; Labat-Gest, Vivien; Tempia, Filippo

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia, characterized by the presence of two principal hallmarks-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. The primary cause of the majority of AD cases is not known. Likewise, the mechanisms underlying the propagation of the pathology from affected tissue to neighboring healthy neurons are largely unknown, but knowledge about them could be helpful to design strategies aimed at halting the progression of the disease. To throw light on the mechanisms of propagation of neuronal damage to healthy tissue, wild-type (WT) hippocampal solid tissue chunks derived from green fluorescent protein (GFP)-positive embryos were grafted into the hippocampus of 6-month-old WT and 3xTg-AD mice, a triple-transgenic mouse model that exhibits both amyloid-beta (Aβ) and tau protein pathology. The histological and morphological alterations of the grafted tissues were assessed 3 months post-transplantation. Tissues grafted in 3xTg-AD hosts, compared to those grafted in WT recipients, presented a significant decrease in neurite outgrowth (35.4%) and dendritic spine density (41.3%), mainly due to a reduction of stubby and thin-shaped spines. Moreover, some cells of the tissue transplanted in 3xTg-AD hosts accumulated intracellular amyloid peptide deposits similar to the cells of the host. Furthermore, the immunohistochemical examination of reactive astrocytes and microglia revealed the presence of more inflammation in the grafted tissues hosted in 3xTg-AD compared to WT recipients. These results show a propagation of neuronal damage to initially healthy embryonic grafts, validating this methodology for future studies on the mechanisms of the progression of AD pathology to surrounding regions.

  4. Embryonic Cell Grafts in a Culture Model of Spinal Cord Lesion: Neuronal Relay Formation is Essential for Functional Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Tscherter

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Presently there exists no cure for spinal cord injury. However, transplantation of embryonic tissue into spinal cord lesions resulted in axon outgrowth across the lesion site and some functional recovery, fostering hope for future stem cell therapies. Although in vivo evidence for functional recovery is given, the exact cellular mechanism of the graft support remains elusive: either the grafted cells provide a permissive environment for the host tissue to regenerate itself or the grafts actually integrate functionally into the host neuronal network reconnecting the separated spinal cord circuits. We tested the two hypotheses in an in vitro spinal cord lesion model that is based on propagation of activity between two rat organotypic spinal cord slices in culture. Transplantation of dissociated cells from E14 rat spinal cord or forebrain re-established the relay of activity over the lesion site and, thus, provoked functional regeneration. Combining patch-clamp recordings from transplanted cells with network activity measurements from the host tissue on multi-electrode arrays we here show that neurons differentiate from the grafted cells and integrate into the host circuits. Optogenetic silencing of neurons developed from transplanted embryonic mouse forebrain cells provides clear evidence that they replace the lost neuronal connections to relay and synchronize activity between the separated spinal cord circuits. In contrast, transplantation of neurospheres induced neither the differentiation of mature neurons from the grafts nor an improvement of functional regeneration. Together these findings suggest, that the formation of neuronal relays from grafted embryonic cells is essential to re-connect segregated spinal cord circuits.

  5. Achilles tendon rupture - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will cover your foot and go to your knee. Your toes will be pointing downward. The cast will be changed every 2 to 3 weeks to help stretch your tendon. If you have a leg brace, splint, or boot, it will keep you from ...

  6. Structural and mechanical properties of the human Achilles tendon: Sex and strength effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Sidney M; Dick, Taylor J M; Wakeling, James M

    2015-09-18

    Tendons are elastic structures that connect muscle to the skeletal system and transmit force relative to the amount of stretch they experience. The mechanical properties of human tendons are difficult to measure non-invasively, so generic values are often assumed in musculoskeletal models to represent all subjects. We aimed to determine the in vivo mechanical properties of the human Achilles tendon by calculating tendon stiffness and resting length in 10 male and 10 female trained cyclists. B-mode ultrasound coupled with motion capture was used to track the tendon lengths for the medial and lateral gastrocnemii concurrently with ankle torque measurements during ramped isometric contractions. Achilles tendon stiffness was calculated as the slope of the linear portion of the force-length curve, and this was extrapolated to zero force to yield the tendon resting length. Average Achilles tendon stiffness was 201.8 ± 5.9 N mm(-1). There was no difference in Achilles tendon stiffness or maximum isometric force between males and females, however tendon stiffness varied between individuals. The resting lengths of the MG and LG tendon were 0.209 ± 0.002 m and 0.222 ± 0.002 m respectively, and regression models determined that shank length was the best predictor of resting tendon length. Our results indicate that Achilles tendon stiffness varies with muscle strength and not sex. The variability in Achilles tendon stiffness between subjects support the need for experimentally measured subject-specific tendon properties as input parameters to improve the accuracy of musculoskeletal models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Tendon injuries of the hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöffl, Volker; Heid, Andreas; Küpper, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Tendon injuries are the second most common injuries of the hand and therefore an important topic in trauma and orthopedic patients. Most injuries are open injuries to the flexor or extensor tendons, but less frequent injuries, e.g., damage to the functional system tendon sheath and pulley or dull avulsions, also need to be considered. After clinical examination, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging have proved to be important diagnostic tools. Tendon injuries mostly require surgical repair, dull avulsions of the distal phalanges extensor tendon can receive conservative therapy. Injuries of the flexor tendon sheath or single pulley injuries are treated conservatively and multiple pulley injuries receive surgical repair. In the postoperative course of flexor tendon injuries, the principle of early passive movement is important to trigger an “intrinsic” tendon healing to guarantee a good outcome. Many substances were evaluated to see if they improved tendon healing; however, little evidence was found. Nevertheless, hyaluronic acid may improve intrinsic tendon healing. PMID:22720265

  8. Different Achilles Tendon Pathologies Show Distinct Histological and Molecular Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franka Klatte-Schulz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Reasons for the development of chronic tendon pathologies are still under debate and more basic knowledge is needed about the different diseases. The aim of the present study was therefore to characterize different acute and chronic Achilles tendon disorders. Achilles tendon samples from patients with chronic tendinopathy (n = 7, chronic ruptures (n = 6, acute ruptures (n = 13, and intact tendons (n = 4 were analyzed. The histological score investigating pathological changes was significantly increased in tendinopathy and chronic ruptures compared to acute ruptures. Inflammatory infiltration was detected by immunohistochemistry in all tendon pathology groups, but was significantly lower in tendinopathy compared to chronic ruptures. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR analysis revealed significantly altered expression of genes related to collagens and matrix modeling/remodeling (matrix metalloproteinases, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases in tendinopathy and chronic ruptures compared to intact tendons and/or acute ruptures. In all three tendon pathology groups markers of inflammation (interleukin (IL 1β, tumor necrosis factor α, IL6, IL10, IL33, soluble ST2, transforming growth factor β1, cyclooxygenase 2, inflammatory cells (cluster of differentaition (CD 3, CD68, CD80, CD206, fat metabolism (fatty acid binding protein 4, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α, adiponectin, and innervation (protein gene product 9.5, growth associated protein 43, macrophage migration inhibitory factor were detectable, but only in acute ruptures significantly regulated compared to intact tendons. The study gives an insight into structural and molecular changes of pathological processes in tendons and might be used to identify targets for future therapy of tendon pathologies.

  9. Genetic factors influencing the development of chronic graft-versus-host disease in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slayback, D L; Dobkins, J A; Harper, J M; Allen, R D

    2000-11-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major complication of bone marrow transplantation that can occur in either acute or chronic forms. Much of the long-term pathology seen in chronic GVHD is a result of autoantibody production. In the DBA/2-->B6D2F1 murine model of chronic GVHD, anti-ssDNA autoantibodies can be detected by 14 days post cell transfer. These autoantibodies are not observed in B6D2F1 recipients of cells from C57BL/6 or B10.D2 donors, which develop acute rather than chronic GVHD. Therefore, in this model, donor genetic factors predispose to the development of chronic GVHD in recipients. We performed a genetic analysis aimed at mapping donor loci that influence the magnitude of early autoantibody production in B6D2F1 recipients of cells from DBA/2 donor mice. Linkage analysis suggested an influence of two loci: a locus on chromosome 11 linked to D11Mit278 and a locus on chromosome 4 linked to D4Mit226. The locus on chromosome 11 also appeared to influence the development of renal pathology associated with chronic GVHD.

  10. [Successive ruptures of patellar and Achilles tendons. Anabolic steroids in competitive sports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, J; Prokop, A; Skouras, E

    2008-01-01

    Derivatives of testosterone or of 19-nor-testosterone are used as anabolics for the purpose of improving performance although the effect of anabolics is known still to be under discussion. The use of anabolic steroids continues among competitive athletes despite increased controls and increasingly frequent dramatic incidents connected with them. Whereas metabolic dysfunction during anabolic use is well documented, ruptures of the large tendons are rarely reported. Within 18 months, a 29-year-old professional footballer needed surgery for rupture of the patellar tendon and of both Achilles tendons. Carefully directed questioning elicited confirmation that he had taken different anabolic steroids regularly for 3 years with the intention of improving his strength. After each operation anabolic steroids were taken again at a high dosage during early convalescence and training. Minimally invasive surgery and open suturing techniques led to complete union of the Achilles tendons in good time. Training and anabolic use (metenolon 300 mg per week) started early after suturing of the patellar tendon including bone tunnels culminated in histologically confirmed rerupture after 8 weeks. After a ligament reconstruction with a semitendinosus tendon graft with subsequent infection, the tendon and reserve traction apparatus were lost. Repeated warnings of impaired healing if anabolic use was continued had been given without success. In view of the high number of unrecorded cases in competitive and athletic sports, we can assume that the use of anabolic steroids is also of quantitative relevance in the operative treatment of tendon ruptures.

  11. Biomechanical evaluation of the long head of the biceps brachii tendon fixed by three techniques: a sheep model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henrique Ramos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the biomechanical properties of the fixation of the long head of the biceps brachii into the humeral bone with suture anchors, interference screw, and soft tissue suture, comparing strength, highest traction load, and types of fixation failure. METHODS: Thirty fresh-frozen sheep shoulders were used, separated into three groups of ten for each technique. After fixation, the tendons were subjected to longitudinal continuous loading, obtaining load-to-failure (N and displacement (mm. RESULTS: The mean load-to-failure for suture anchors was 95 ± 35.3 N, 152.7 ± 52.7 N for interference screw, and 104.7 ± 23.54 N for soft tissue technique. There was a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05, with interference screw demonstrating higher load-to-failure than suture anchor fixation (p = 0.00307 and soft tissue (p = 0.00473. The strength of interference screw was also superior when compared with the other two methods (p = 0.0000127 and p = 0.00000295, respectively. There were no differences between suture anchors and soft tissue technique regarding load-to-failure (p = 0.9420 and strength (p = 0.141. CONCLUSION: Tenodesis of the long head of the biceps brachii with interference screw was stronger than the suture anchors and soft tissue techniques. The other two techniques did not differ between themselves.

  12. Cyclosporine mitigates graft coronary artery disease in murine cardiac allografts: description and validation of a novel fully allogeneic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masashi; Mokhtari, Golnaz K; Balsam, Leora B; Cooke, David T; Kofidis, Theo; Zwierzchonievska, Monika; Robbins, Robert C

    2005-04-01

    The effect of cyclosporine (CsA) on the development of graft coronary artery disease (GCAD) is controversial. We developed a novel allogeneic mouse model of heart transplantation and investigated the effect of CsA on acute rejection and GCAD. Hearts of FVB mice (H-2(q)) were heterotopically transplanted into 60 C57BL/6 mice (H-2(b)). CsA was administered to recipients at 10, 20 or 30 mg/kg/day for 10 or 30 days after transplantation. Untreated recipients as well as isograft recipients served as controls. Viability of the grafts was assessed daily by palpation. Parenchymal rejection was scored in grafts surviving 30 days in the 30-day treatment groups. GCAD was evaluated by the percentage of luminal narrowing, intima/media ratio and percentage of diseased vessels. Blood CsA and creatinine levels were also evaluated. Results were evaluated statistically. All groups except the untreated control group and the allograft groups treated with 10 or 20 mg for 10 days showed significant graft survival (>/=33% survival for 30 days). An inverse correlation was observed between CsA treatment dose, parenchymal rejection score and degree of GCAD in the 30-day treatment groups. However, graft survival in the 20-mg/kg/day group was significantly better than that in the 30-mg/kg/day group. Serum creatine levels showed no nephrotoxicity. Relatively high-dose CsA mitigated parenchymal rejection and GCAD of the mouse cardiac allografts. In addition, a valuable mouse model mimicking the clinical course of GCAD was achieved with CsA treatment of 20 mg/kg/day for 30 days.

  13. A new beating-heart off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting training model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouma, Wobbe; Kuijpers, Michiel; Bijleveld, Aanke; De Maat, Gijs E; Koene, Bart M; Erasmus, Michiel E; Natour, Ehsan; Mariani, Massimo A

    2015-01-01

    Training models are essential in mastering the skills required for off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB). We describe a new, high-fidelity, effective and reproducible beating-heart OPCAB training model in human cadavers. Human cadavers were embalmed according to the 'Thiel method' which allows their long-term and repeated use. The training model was constructed by bilateral ligation of the pulmonary veins, cross-clamping of the aorta, positioning of an intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) in the left ventricle (LV) through the apex (tightened with pledget-reinforced purse strings) and finally placing of a fluid line in the LV through the left atrial appendage (tightened with a pledget-reinforced purse string). The LV was filled with saline to the desired pressure through the fluid line and the IABP was switched on and set to a desired frequency [usually 60-80 beats per minute (bpm)]. A high-fidelity simulation has known limitations, but a more complex, realistic training environment with an actual beating (human) heart strengthens the entire training exercise and is of incremental value. All types of coronary artery anastomosis can be trained with this model. Training should be performed under the supervision of an experienced OPCAB surgeon and training progress is best evaluated with serial Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS). A score of at least 48 points on the final OSATS ('good' on all components) is recommended before trainees can start their training on patients. The entire set-up provides a versatile training model to help develop and improve the skills required to safely perform beating heart OPCAB anastomoses. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  14. Matrix metalloproteinase inhibition reduces intimal hyperplasia in a porcine arteriovenous-graft model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rotmans, J.I.; Velema, E.; Verhagen, H.J.; Blankensteijn, J.D.; Kleijn, D.P. de; Stroes, E.S.; Pasterkamp, G.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The patency of arteriovenous (AV) polytetrafluoroethylene grafts for hemodialysis is impaired by intimal hyperplasia (IH) at the venous outflow tract. IH mainly consists of vascular smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, and extracellular matrix proteins. Because matrix metalloproteinases

  15. Matrix metalloproteinase inhibition reduces intimal hyperplasia in a porcine arteriovenous-graft model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rotmans, JI; Velema, E; Verhagen, HJM; Blankensteijn, JD; de Kleijn, DPV; Stroes, ESG; Pasterkamp, G

    Background: The patency of arteriovenous (AV) polytetrafluoroethylene grafts for hemodialysis is impaired by intimal hyperplasia (IH) at the venous outflow tract. IH mainly consists of vascular smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, and extracellular matrix proteins. Because matrix metalloproteinases

  16. Future Economics of Liver Transplantation: A 20-Year Cost Modeling Forecast and the Prospect of Bioengineering Autologous Liver Grafts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dany Habka

    Full Text Available During the past 20 years liver transplantation has become the definitive treatment for most severe types of liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma, in both children and adults. In the U.S., roughly 16,000 individuals are on the liver transplant waiting list. Only 38% of them will receive a transplant due to the organ shortage. This paper explores another option: bioengineering an autologous liver graft. We developed a 20-year model projecting future demand for liver transplants, along with costs based on current technology. We compared these cost projections against projected costs to bioengineer autologous liver grafts. The model was divided into: 1 the epidemiology model forecasting the number of wait-listed patients, operated patients and postoperative patients; and 2 the treatment model forecasting costs (pre-transplant-related costs; transplant (admission-related costs; and 10-year post-transplant-related costs during the simulation period. The patient population was categorized using the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score. The number of patients on the waiting list was projected to increase 23% over 20 years while the weighted average treatment costs in the pre-liver transplantation phase were forecast to increase 83% in Year 20. Projected demand for livers will increase 10% in 10 years and 23% in 20 years. Total costs of liver transplantation are forecast to increase 33% in 10 years and 81% in 20 years. By comparison, the projected cost to bioengineer autologous liver grafts is $9.7M based on current catalog prices for iPS-derived liver cells. The model projects a persistent increase in need and cost of donor livers over the next 20 years that's constrained by a limited supply of donor livers. The number of patients who die while on the waiting list will reflect this ever-growing disparity. Currently, bioengineering autologous liver grafts is cost prohibitive. However, costs will decline rapidly with the introduction of new

  17. Miscellaneous conditions of tendons, tendon sheaths, and ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, S J; Dik, K J

    1995-08-01

    The use of diagnostic ultrasonography has greatly enhances our ability to diagnose injuries of tendons and tendon sheaths that were previously either unrecognized or poorly understood. For may of these injuries, there is currently only a small amount of follow-up data. This article considers injuries of the deep digital flexor tendon and its accessory ligament, the carpal tunnel syndrome soft tissue swellings on the dorsal aspect of the carpus, intertubercular (bicipital) bursitis and bicipital tendinitis, injuries of the gastrocnemius tendon, common calcaneal tendinitis, rupture of peroneus (fibularis tertius) and ligaments injuries of the back.

  18. Graft intolerance syndrome requiring graft nephrectomy after late kidney graft failure: can it be predicted? A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunthof, Kim L W; Verhoeks, Carmen M; van den Brand, Jan A J G; Hilbrands, Luuk B

    2018-02-01

    Graft nephrectomy is recommended in case of early graft failure. When the graft fails more than 3-6 months after transplantation, it is current practice to follow a wait-and-see policy. A common indication for graft removal is the graft intolerance syndrome. We aimed to create a risk prediction model for the occurrence of graft intolerance resulting in graft nephrectomy. We collected data of kidney transplantations performed in our center between 1980 and 2010 that failed at least 6 months after transplantation. We evaluated the association between baseline characteristics and the occurrence of graft nephrectomy because of graft intolerance using a competing risk regression model. Prognostic factors were included in a multivariate prediction model. In- and exclusion criteria were met in 288 cases. In 48 patients, the graft was removed because of graft intolerance. Donor age, the number of rejections, and shorter graft survival were predictive factors for graft nephrectomy because of the graft intolerance syndrome. These factors were included in a prediction rule. Using donor age, graft survival, and the number of rejections, clinicians can predict the need for graft nephrectomy with a reasonable accuracy. © 2017 Steunstichting ESOT.

  19. Biomarkers in Ocular Chronic Graft Versus Host Disease: Tear Cytokine- and Chemokine-Based Predictive Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocho, Lidia; Fernández, Itziar; Calonge, Margarita; Martínez, Verónica; González-García, María J; Caballero, Dolores; López-Corral, Lucía; García-Vázquez, Carmen; Vázquez, Lourdes; Stern, Michael E; Enríquez-de-Salamanca, Amalia

    2016-02-01

    To develop a tear molecule level-based predictive model based on a panel of tear cytokines and their correlation with clinical features in ocular chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD). Twenty-two ocular cGVHD patients and 21 healthy subjects were evaluated in a controlled environmental research laboratory (CERLab). Clinical parameters were recorded, and tears were collected. Levels of 15 molecules (epidermal growth factor [EGF], IL receptor antagonist [IL-1Ra], IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8/CXCL8, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-17A, interferon inducible protein [IP]-10/CXCL10, IFN-γ, VEGF, TNF-α, eotaxin 1, and regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted [RANTES]) were measured by multiplex-bead assay and correlated with clinical parameters. Logistic regression was used to develop a predictive model. Leave-one-out cross-validation was applied. Classification capacity was evaluated in a cohort of individuals with dry eye (DE) of other etiologies different from GVHD. Epidermal growth factor and IP-10/CXCL10 levels were significantly decreased in ocular cGVHD, positively correlating with tear production and stability and negatively correlating with symptoms, hyperemia, and vital staining. Interleukin-1Ra, IL-8/CXCL8, and IL-10 were significantly increased in ocular cGVHD, and the first two correlated positively with symptoms, hyperemia, and ocular surface integrity while negatively correlating with tear production and stability. Predictive models were generated, and the best panel was based on IL-8/CXCL8 and IP-10/CXCL10 tear levels along with age and sex, with an area under the receiving operating curve of 0.9004, sensitivity of 86.36%, and specificity of 95.24%. A predictive model based on tear levels of IL-8/CXCL8 and IP-10/CXCL10 resulted in optimal sensitivity and specificity. These results add further knowledge to the search for potential biomarkers in this devastating ocular inflammatory disease.

  20. Does treatment of split-thickness skin grafts with negative-pressure wound therapy improve tissue markers of wound healing in a porcine experimental model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Christopher; Ciraulo, David; Coulter, Michael; Desjardins, Steven; Liaw, Lucy; Peterson, Sarah

    2012-08-01

    Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been used for to treat wounds for more than 15 years and, more recently, has been used to secure split-thickness skin grafts. There are some data to support this use of NPWT, but the actual mechanism by which NPWT speeds healing or improves skin graft take is not entirely known. The purpose of this project was to assess whether NPWT improved angiogenesis, wound healing, or graft survival when compared with traditional bolster dressings securing split-thickness skin grafts in a porcine model. We performed two split-thickness skin grafts on each of eight 30 kg Yorkshire pigs. We took graft biopsies on postoperative days 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 and submitted the samples for immunohistochemical staining, as well as standard hematoxylin and eosin staining. We measured the degree of vascular ingrowth via immunohistochemical staining for von Willenbrand's factor to better identify blood vessel epithelium. We determined the mean cross-sectional area of blood vessels present for each representative specimen, and then compared the bolster and NPWT samples. We also assessed each graft for incorporation and survival at postoperative day 10. Our analysis of the data revealed that there was no statistically significant difference in the degree of vascular ingrowth as measured by mean cross-sectional capillary area (p = 0.23). We did not note any difference in graft survival or apparent incorporation on a macroscopic level, although standard hematoxylin and eosin staining indicated that microscopically, there seemed to be better subjective graft incorporation in the NPWT samples and a nonsignificant trend toward improved graft survival in the NPWT group. We were unable to demonstrate a significant difference in vessel ingrowth when comparing NPWT and traditional bolster methods for split-thickness skin graft fixation. More studies are needed to elucidate the manner by which NPWT exerts its effects and the true clinical magnitude of these

  1. MRI of the Achilles tendon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naegele, M.; Lienemann, A.; Hahn, D.; Lissner, J.; Boehm, P.

    1987-06-01

    The Achilles tendon and preachillar space of 30 patients was studied by MRI. A surface coil (Helmholtz' principle) was applied and all patients were examined with a superconducting magnet operating at 1.0 Tesla field strength. The purpose of the study was to illustrate pathological changes of the tendon and the surrounding soft tissue. In 3 cases MRI diagnosed a total rupture of the Achilles tendon. Furthermore, the strain of the tendon and side effects of an inflammatory process could be demonstrated. The use of a surface coil yields a high resolution of the normal anatomy of the region and of the pathological changes of the tendon and the surrounding soft tissue structures. The advantages of MRI for Achilles tendon diagnostics against competitive modalities are 1) excellent soft tissue contrast, 2) multiplanar imaging, 3) as well as exact delineation and visualisation of the lesion.

  2. Human Bone Derived Collagen for the Development of an Artificial Corneal Endothelial Graft. In Vivo Results in a Rabbit Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Vázquez

    Full Text Available Corneal keratoplasty (penetrating or lamellar using cadaveric human tissue, is nowadays the main treatment for corneal endotelial dysfunctions. However, there is a worldwide shortage of donor corneas available for transplantation and about 53% of the world's population have no access to corneal transplantation. Generating a complete cornea by tissue engineering is still a tough goal, but an endothelial lamellar graft might be an easier task. In this study, we developed a tissue engineered corneal endothelium by culturing human corneal endothelial cells on a human purified type I collagen membrane. Human corneal endothelial cells were cultured from corneal rims after corneal penetrating keratoplasty and type I collagen was isolated from remnant cancellous bone chips. Isolated type I collagen was analyzed by western blot, liquid chromatography -mass spectrometry and quantified using the exponentially modified protein abundance index. Later on, collagen solution was casted at room temperature obtaining an optically transparent and mechanically manageable membrane that supports the growth of human and rabbit corneal endothelial cells which expressed characteristic markers of corneal endothelium: zonula ocluddens-1 and Na+/K+ ATPase. To evaluate the therapeutic efficiency of our artificial endothelial grafts, human purified type I collagen membranes cultured with rabbit corneal endothelial cells were transplanted in New Zealand white rabbits that were kept under a minimal immunosuppression regimen. Transplanted corneas maintained transparency for as long as 6 weeks without obvious edema or immune rejection and maintaining the same endothelial markers that in a healthy cornea. In conclusion, it is possible to develop an artificial human corneal endothelial graft using remnant tissues that are not employed in transplant procedures. This artificial endothelial graft can restore the integrality of corneal endothelium in an experimental model of

  3. The adaptability of tendon to loading differs in men and women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnusson, S Peter; Hansen, Mette; Langberg, Henning

    2007-01-01

    The reason why women sustain more soft tissue injury than men during physical activity is unknown. Connective tissue properties and extracellular matrix adaptability in human tendon were investigated in models that addressed biochemical, physiological and biomechanical aspects of tendon connective...... tissue in response to mechanical loading. Habitual training resulted in a larger patellar tendon in men but not in women. Following an acute bout of exercise, men had an elevated tendon collagen synthesis rate and this effect was less pronounced or absent in women. Moreover, levels of circulating...... oestrogen affected the acute exercise-related increase in collagen synthesis. Finally, the mechanical strength of isolated tendon collagen fascicles in men surpassed that of women. Thus, compared to men, women have (i) an attenuated tendon hypertrophy response to habitual training; (ii) a lower tendon...

  4. Biomechanical evaluation of the long head of the biceps brachii tendon fixed by three techniques: a sheep model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Carlos Henrique; Coelho, Júlio Cezar Uili

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the biomechanical properties of the fixation of the long head of the biceps brachii into the humeral bone with suture anchors, interference screw, and soft tissue suture, comparing strength, highest traction load, and types of fixation failure. Thirty fresh-frozen sheep shoulders were used, separated into three groups of ten for each technique. After fixation, the tendons were subjected to longitudinal continuous loading, obtaining load-to-failure (N) and displacement (mm). The mean load-to-failure for suture anchors was 95 ± 35.3 N, 152.7 ± 52.7 N for interference screw, and 104.7 ± 23.54 N for soft tissue technique. There was a statistically significant difference ( p  < 0.05), with interference screw demonstrating higher load-to-failure than suture anchor fixation ( p  = 0.00307) and soft tissue ( p  = 0.00473). The strength of interference screw was also superior when compared with the other two methods ( p  = 0.0000127 and p  = 0.00000295, respectively). There were no differences between suture anchors and soft tissue technique regarding load-to-failure ( p  = 0.9420) and strength ( p  = 0.141). Tenodesis of the long head of the biceps brachii with interference screw was stronger than the suture anchors and soft tissue techniques. The other two techniques did not differ between themselves.

  5. Autologous nerve graft repair of different degrees of sciatic nerve defect: stress and displacement at the anastomosis in a three-dimensional fnite element simulation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-dong Piao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the repair of peripheral nerve injury using autologous or synthetic nerve grafting, the magnitude of tensile forces at the anastomosis affects its response to physiological stress and the ultimate success of the treatment. One-dimensional stretching is commonly used to measure changes in tensile stress and strain however, the accuracy of this simple method is limited. Therefore, in the present study, we established three-dimensional finite element models of sciatic nerve defects repaired by autologous nerve grafts. Using PRO E 5.0 finite element simulation software, we calculated the maximum stress and displacement of an anastomosis under a 5 N load in 10-, 20-, 30-, 40-mm long autologous nerve grafts. We found that maximum displacement increased with graft length, consistent with specimen force. These findings indicate that three-dimensional finite element simulation is a feasible method for analyzing stress and displacement at the anastomosis after autologous nerve grafting.

  6. Repair of Tympanic Membrane Perforations with Customized Bioprinted Ear Grafts Using Chinchilla Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Che-Ying; Wilson, Emmanuel; Fuson, Andrew; Gandhi, Nidhi; Monfaredi, Reza; Jenkins, Audrey; Romero, Maria; Santoro, Marco; Fisher, John P; Cleary, Kevin; Reilly, Brian

    2017-09-01

    The goal of this work is to develop an innovative method that combines bioprinting and endoscopic imaging to repair tympanic membrane perforations (TMPs). TMPs are a serious health issue because they can lead to both conductive hearing loss and repeated otitis media. TMPs occur in 3-5% of cases after ear tube placement, as well as in cases of acute otitis media (the second most common infection in pediatrics), chronic otitis media with or without cholesteatoma, or as a result of barotrauma to the ear. About 55,000 tympanoplasties, the surgery performed to reconstruct TMPs, are performed every year, and the commonly used cartilage grafting technique has a success rate between 43% and 100%. This wide variability in successful tympanoplasty indicates that the current approach relies heavily on the skill of the surgeon to carve the shield graft into the shape of the TMP, which can be extremely difficult because of the perforation's irregular shape. To this end, we hypothesized that patient specific acellular grafts can be bioprinted to repair TMPs. In vitro data demonstrated that our approach resulted in excellent wound healing responses (e.g., cell invasion and proliferations) using our bioprinted gelatin methacrylate constructs. Based on these results, we then bioprinted customized acellular grafts to treat TMP based on endoscopic imaging of the perforation and demonstrated improved TMP healing in a chinchilla study. These ear graft techniques could transform clinical practice by eliminating the need for hand-carved grafts. To our knowledge, this is the first proof of concept of using bioprinting and endoscopic imaging to fabricate customized grafts to treat tissue perforations. This technology could be transferred to other medical pathologies and be used to rapidly scan internal organs such as intestines for microperforations, brain covering (Dura mater) for determination of sites of potential cerebrospinal fluid leaks, and vascular systems to determine arterial

  7. Tendon and ligament adaptation to exercise, immobilization, and remobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, T A; Beaupré, G S; Carter, D R

    2000-01-01

    This study provides a theoretical and computational basis for understanding and predicting how tendons and ligaments adapt to exercise, immobilization, and remobilization. In a previous study, we introduced a model that described the growth and development of tendons and ligaments. In this study, we use the same model to predict changes in the cross-sectional area, modulus, and strength of tendons and ligaments due to increased or decreased loading. The model predictions are consistent with the results of experimental exercise and immobilization studies performed by other investigators. These results suggest that the same fundamental principles guide both development and adaptation. A basic understanding of these principles can contribute both to prevention of tendon and ligament injuries and to more effective rehabilitation when injury does occur.

  8. Diffusion and Perfusion: The Keys to Fat Grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger K. Khouri, Jr, BS

    2014-09-01

    Conclusions: These models confirm that initial fat grafting survival is limited by oxygen diffusion. Preoperative expansion increases oxygen diffusion capacity allowing for additional graft retention. These models provide a scientific framework for testing the current fat grafting theories.

  9. Experimental flexor tendon healing without adhesion formation--a new concept of tendon nutrition and intrinsic healing mechanisms. A preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundborg, G

    1976-10-01

    An experimental model is presented enabling an analysis of the healing process of completely cut and re-sutured free segments of rabbit flexor tendons, kept avascular in a synovial milieu and completely isolated from adhesion formation. Under these conditions the cut tendons heal within a few weeks. It can be shown that this healing process is a result of intrinsic tendon cell activity only.

  10. Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Derived Stem Cells Transduced With BMP2 Accelerate Graft-Bone Integration After ACL Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Yohei; Takayama, Koji; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Tang, Ying; Wang, Bing; Mifune, Yutaka; Cummins, James H; Warth, Ryan J; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Fu, Freddie H; Huard, Johnny

    2017-03-01

    Strong graft-bone integration is a prerequisite for successful graft remodeling after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using soft tissue grafts. Novel strategies to accelerate soft tissue graft-bone integration are needed to reduce the need for bone-tendon-bone graft harvest, reduce patient convalescence, facilitate rehabilitation, and reduce total recovery time after ACL reconstruction. The application of ACL-derived stem cells with enhanced expression of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) onto soft tissue grafts in the form of cell sheets will both accelerate and improve the quality of graft-bone integration after ACL reconstruction in a rat model. Controlled laboratory study. ACL-derived CD34+ cells were isolated from remnant human ACL tissues, virally transduced to express BMP2, and embedded within cell sheets. In a rat model of ACL injury, bilateral single-bundle ACL reconstructions were performed, in which cell sheets were wrapped around tendon autografts before reconstruction. Four groups containing a total of 48 rats (96 knees) were established (n = 12 rats; 24 knees per group): CD34+BMP2 (100%), CD34+BMP2 (25%), CD34+ (untransduced), and a control group containing no cells. Six rats from each group were euthanized 2 and 4 weeks after surgery, and each graft was harvested for immunohistochemical and histological analyses. The remaining 6 rats in each group were euthanized at 4 and 8 weeks to evaluate in situ tensile load to failure in each femur-graft-tibia complex. In vitro, BMP2 transduction promoted the osteogenic differentiation of ACL-derived CD34+ cells while retaining their intrinsic multipotent capabilities. Osteoblast densities were greatest in the BMP2 (100%) and BMP2 (25%) groups. Bone tunnels in the CD34+BMP2 (100%) and CD34+BMP2 (25%) groups had the smallest cross-sectional areas according to micro-computed tomography analyses. Graft-bone integration occurred most rapidly in the CD34+BMP2 (25%) group. Tensile load to

  11. Urethral Reconstruction Using Everted Saphenous Vein Graft in a Rabbit Model: One-Year Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yujie; Shen, Zhou; Liu, Gang; Liu, Bing; Hua, Xiaoliang; Xiang, Yechen; Dong, Chuanjiang; Li, Bing

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the efficacy of using everted saphenous vein graft for urethral reconstruction. Thirty-five adult male rabbits were divided into 7 groups randomly: experimental group A, B, C, D, E, stricture control group and normal control group (n = 5). In experimental groups and the stricture control group, a urethral mucosa defect (1.5 × 0.8 cm) was created in each rabbit. In experimental groups, a 2-cm long saphenous vein graft was harvested and incised longitudinally and urethral reconstruction was carried out using the everted saphenous vein patch. Rabbits in experimental group A-E were killed respectively at 1 week, 2 weeks, 1 month, 3 months, and 1 year postoperatively, and the specimens were obtained for histo-pathological examination. Retrograde urethrography was performed to evaluate urethral patency before sacrifice in group D and the stricture control group. In the histo-pathological study, the vein grafts were visible within first week. The vein graft was completely covered by epithelium 1 month postoperatively. Retrograde urethrograms showed the urethral caliber of experimental rabbits were similar to those of normal. While the stricture control group showed a narrow urethral lumen and urothelium defect. For urethral reconstruction, everted saphenous vein graft can be an ideal substitute material because of its longer survival time and rapid epithelization capacity. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Using a double-layered palmaris longus tendon for suspension of facial paralysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toyserkani, Navid Mohamadpour; Bakholdt, Vivi; Sørensen, Jens Ahm

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Facial palsy is a debilitating condition entailing both cosmetic and functional limitations. Static suspension procedures can be performed when more advanced dynamic techniques are not indicated. Since 2006, we have used a double-layered palmaris longus tendon graft through an ovula...

  13. Multilayered polycaprolactone/gelatin fiber-hydrogel composite for tendon tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Lin, Hang; Rothrauff, Benjamin B; Yu, Shuting; Tuan, Rocky S

    2016-04-15

    Regeneration of injured tendon and ligament (T&L) remains a clinical challenge due to their poor intrinsic healing capacity. Tissue engineering provides a promising alternative treatment approach to facilitate T&L healing and regeneration. Successful tendon tissue engineering requires the use of three-dimensional (3D) biomimetic scaffolds that possess the physical and biochemical features of native tendon tissue. We report here the development and characterization of a novel composite scaffold fabricated by co-electrospinning of poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) and methacrylated gelatin (mGLT). We found that photocrosslinking retained mGLT, resulted in a uniform distribution of mGLT throughout the depth of scaffold and also preserved scaffold mechanical strength. Moreover, photocrosslinking was able to integrate stacked scaffold sheets to form multilayered constructs that mimic the structure of native tendon tissues. Importantly, cells impregnated into the constructs remained responsive to topographical cues and exogenous tenogenic factors, such as TGF-β3. The excellent biocompatibility and highly integrated structure of the scaffold developed in this study will allow the creation of a more advanced tendon graft that possesses the architecture and cell phenotype of native tendon tissues. The clinical challenges in tendon repair have spurred the development of tendon tissue engineering approaches to create functional tissue replacements. In this study, we have developed a novel composite scaffold as a tendon graft consisting of aligned poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) microfibers and methacrylated gelatin (mGLT). Cell seeding and photocrosslinking between scaffold layers can be performed simultaneously to create cell impregnated multilayered constructs. This cell-scaffold construct combines the advantages of PCL nanofibrous scaffolds and photocrosslinked gelatin hydrogels to mimic the structure, mechanical anisotropy, and cell phenotype of native tendon tissue. The scaffold

  14. Assessment of Bonelike (registered) graft with a resorbable matrix using an animal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobato, J.V. [CHVNG-Servico de Estomatologia, Centro Hospitalar de Vila Nova de Gaia (Portugal); ICBAS-Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas de Abel Salazar, Universidade do Porto, Largo Professor Abel Salazar, 2, 4099-003 Porto (Portugal); CECA/ICETA-Centro de Estudos de Ciencia Animal, Instituto de Ciencias e Tecnologias Agrarias e Agro-Alimentares, Campus Agrario de Vairao, Rua Padre Armando Quintas, 4485-661 Vairao (Portugal); Hussain, N. Sooraj [INEB-Instituto de Engenharia Biomedica, Laboratorio de Biomateriais, Rua Campo Alegre, 823, 4150-180, Porto (Portugal); FEUP-Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, DEMM, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Botelho, C.M. [INEB-Instituto de Engenharia Biomedica, Laboratorio de Biomateriais, Rua Campo Alegre, 823, 4150-180, Porto (Portugal); FEUP-Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, DEMM, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Mauricio, A.C. [ICBAS-Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas de Abel Salazar, Universidade do Porto, Largo Professor Abel Salazar, 2, 4099-003 Porto (Portugal); CECA/ICETA-Centro de Estudos de Ciencia Animal, Instituto de Ciencias e Tecnologias Agrarias e Agro-Alimentares, Campus Agrario de Vairao, Rua Padre Armando Quintas, 4485-661 Vairao (Portugal); Afonso, A. [FMDUP-Faculdade de Medicina Dentaria da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Manuel Pereira da Silva, 4200-393 Porto (Portugal); Ali, N. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Santos, J.D. [INEB-Instituto de Engenharia Biomedica, Laboratorio de Biomateriais, Rua Campo Alegre, 823, 4150-180, Porto (Portugal) and FEUP-Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, DEMM, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)]. E-mail: jdsantos@fe.up.pt

    2006-09-25

    Synthetic bone grafts have been developed to provide an alternative to autografts and allografts. Bonelike (registered) is a patented synthetic osteoconductive bone graft that mimics the mineral composition of natural bone. In the present preliminary animal studies a user-friendly version of synthetic bone graft Bonelike (registered) have been developed by using a resorbable matrix, Floseal (registered) , as a vehicle and raloxifene hydrochloride as a therapeutic molecule, that is known to decrease osteoclast activity and therefore enhanced bone formation. From histological and scanning electron microscopy evaluations, the use of Bonelike (registered) associated with Floseal (registered) and raloxifene hydrochloride showed that new bone was rapidly apposed on implanted granules and also that the presence of the matrix and therapeutic molecule does not alter the proven highly osteoconductivity properties of Bonelike (registered) . Therefore, this association may be one step-forward for the clinical applications of Bonelike (registered) scaffolds since it is much more easy-to-handle when compared to granular materials.

  15. Wide-Awake Primary Flexor Tendon Repair, Tenolysis, and Tendon Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Jin Bo

    2015-01-01

    Tendon surgery is unique because it should ensure tendon gliding after surgery. Tendon surgery now can be performed under local anesthesia without tourniquet, by injecting epinephrine mixed with lidocaine, to achieve vasoconstriction in the area of surgery. This method allows the tendon to move actively during surgery to test tendon function intraoperatively and to ensure the tendon is properly repaired before leaving the operating table. I applied this method to primary flexor tendon repair ...

  16. Knee flexor strength recovery following hamstring tendon harvest for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Ardern

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The hamstring tendons are an increasingly popular graft choice for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction due to preservation of quadriceps function and the absence of anterior knee pain post-operatively. Two commonly used hamstring grafts are a quadruple strand semitendinosus graft (4ST and a double strand semitendinosus-double strand gracilis graft (2ST-2G. It has been suggested that concurrent harvest of the semitendinsous and gracilis tendons may result in sub-optimal hamstring strength recovery as the gracilis may play a role in reinforcing the semitendinosus particularly in deep knee flexion angles. The objective of this systematic review was to synthesize the findings of available literature and determine whether semitendinosus and gracilis harvest lead to post-operative hamstring strength deficits when compared to semitendinosus harvest alone. Seven studies were identified which compared hamstring strength outcomes between the common hamstring graft types. The methodological quality of each paper was assessed, and where possible effect sizes were calculated to allow comparison of results across studies. No differences were reported between the groups in isokinetic hamstring strength. Deficits in hamstring strength were reported in the 2ST-2G groups when compared to the 4ST groups in isometric strength testing at knee flexion angles ≥70°, and in the standing knee flexion angle. Preliminary evidence exists to support the hypothesis that harvesting the semitendinosus tendon alone is preferable to harvesting in combination with the gracilis tendon for minimizing post-operative hamstring strength deficits at knee flexion angles greater than 70°. However, due to the paucity of research comparing strength outcomes between the common hamstring graft types, further investigation is warranted to fully elucidate the implications for graft harvest.

  17. Bipedicled flap reconstruction of soft tissue defect with Achilles tendon exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Ta Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Soft tissue defects exposing the Achilles tendon are common in patients who have undergone trauma or in those with pressure ulcers associated with vascular diseases. Here, we present our recent experience of using a bipedicled fasciocutaneous flap to resurface the complex soft tissue defect and provide a gliding surface for the exposed Achilles tendon. The donor-sites were covered with split-thickness skin grafts and healed well without complications. The bipedicled fasciocutaneous flap survived completely, and the wound healed satisfactorily at 2 months follow-up. The bipedicled fasciocutaneous flap is a reliable flap for coverage of defects overlying the Achilles tendon, especially in patients with vascular problems and/or advanced age. The ease of handling, short operative time, and early recovery of mobilization function are of great benefit to patients. This method can be a valuable alternative for defect reconstructions overlying the Achilles tendon, with satisfactory results both functionally and cosmetically.

  18. Novel methods for tendon investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Michael; Langberg, Henning; Bojsen-Møller, J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose. Tendon structures have been studied for decades, but over the last decade, methodological development and renewed interest for metabolic, circulatory and tissue protein turnover in tendon tissue has resulted in a rising amount of investigations. Method. This paper will detail the various...

  19. Inferring Muscle-Tendon Unit Power from Ankle Joint Power during the Push-Off Phase of Human Walking: Insights from a Multiarticular EMG-Driven Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C Honert

    Full Text Available Inverse dynamics joint kinetics are often used to infer contributions from underlying groups of muscle-tendon units (MTUs. However, such interpretations are confounded by multiarticular (multi-joint musculature, which can cause inverse dynamics to over- or under-estimate net MTU power. Misestimation of MTU power could lead to incorrect scientific conclusions, or to empirical estimates that misguide musculoskeletal simulations, assistive device designs, or clinical interventions. The objective of this study was to investigate the degree to which ankle joint power overestimates net plantarflexor MTU power during the Push-off phase of walking, due to the behavior of the flexor digitorum and hallucis longus (FDHL-multiarticular MTUs crossing the ankle and metatarsophalangeal (toe joints.We performed a gait analysis study on six healthy participants, recording ground reaction forces, kinematics, and electromyography (EMG. Empirical data were input into an EMG-driven musculoskeletal model to estimate ankle power. This model enabled us to parse contributions from mono- and multi-articular MTUs, and required only one scaling and one time delay factor for each subject and speed, which were solved for based on empirical data. Net plantarflexing MTU power was computed by the model and quantitatively compared to inverse dynamics ankle power.The EMG-driven model was able to reproduce inverse dynamics ankle power across a range of gait speeds (R2 ≥ 0.97, while also providing MTU-specific power estimates. We found that FDHL dynamics caused ankle power to slightly overestimate net plantarflexor MTU power, but only by ~2-7%.During Push-off, FDHL MTU dynamics do not substantially confound the inference of net plantarflexor MTU power from inverse dynamics ankle power. However, other methodological limitations may cause inverse dynamics to overestimate net MTU power; for instance, due to rigid-body foot assumptions. Moving forward, the EMG-driven modeling

  20. Non-contact scanning diffuse correlation tomography system for three-dimensional blood flow imaging in a murine bone graft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Songfeng; Johansson, Johannes; Mireles, Miguel; Proctor, Ashley R; Hoffman, Michael D; Vella, Joseph B; Benoit, Danielle S W; Durduran, Turgut; Choe, Regine

    2015-07-01

    A non-contact galvanometer-based optical scanning system for diffuse correlation tomography was developed for monitoring bone graft healing in a murine femur model. A linear image reconstruction algorithm for diffuse correlation tomography was tested using finite-element method based simulated data and experimental data from a femur or a tube suspended in a homogeneous liquid phantom. Finally, the non-contact system was utilized to monitor in vivo blood flow changes prior to and one week after bone graft transplantation within murine femurs. Localized blood flow changes were observed in three mice, demonstrating a potential for quantification of longitudinal blood flow associated with bone graft healing.

  1. Tissue Responses to Stent Grafts with Endo-Exo-Skeleton for Saccular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in a Canine Model

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Young Il; Choi, Young Ho; Chung, Jin Wook; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; So, Young Ho; Kim, Hyun Beom; Min, Seung-Kee; Park, Jae Hyung

    2014-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the effect of close contact between the stent and the graft on the induction of endothelial covering on the stent graft placed over an aneurysm. Materials and Methods Saccular abdominal aortic aneurysms were made with Dacron patch in eight dogs. The stent graft consisted of an inner stent, a expanded polytetrafluoroethylene graft, and an outer stent. After sacrificing the animals, the aortas with an embedded stent graft were excised. The aortas were inspected grossly an...

  2. Ultrasound-guided tendon fenestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiavaras, Mary M; Jacobson, Jon A

    2013-02-01

    A potential treatment for chronic tendinosis or tendinopathy is percutaneous ultrasound-guided tendon fenestration, also termed dry needling or tenotomy. This procedure involves gently passing a needle through the abnormal tendon multiple times to change a chronic degenerative process into an acute condition that is more likely to heal. This article reviews the literature on tendon fenestration and describes the technical aspects of this procedure including postprocedural considerations. Although peer-reviewed literature on this topic is limited, studies to date have shown that ultrasound-guided tendon fenestration can improve patient symptoms. Several other percutaneous treatments for tendinopathy that include prolotherapy, autologous whole-blood injection, and autologous platelet-rich plasma injection are often performed in conjunction with fenestration. It is currently unknown if these other percutaneous procedures have any benefit over ultrasound-guided tendon fenestration alone. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  3. Athletic training affects the uniformity of muscle and tendon adaptation during adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mersmann, Falk; Bohm, Sebastian; Schroll, Arno; Marzilger, Robert; Arampatzis, Adamantios

    2016-10-01

    With the double stimulus of mechanical loading and maturation acting on the muscle-tendon unit, adolescent athletes might be at increased risk of developing imbalances of muscle strength and tendon mechanical properties. This longitudinal study aims to provide detailed information on how athletic training affects the time course of muscle-tendon adaptation during adolescence. In 12 adolescent elite athletes (A) and 8 similar-aged controls (C), knee extensor muscle strength and patellar tendon mechanical properties were measured over 1 yr in 3-mo intervals. A linear mixed-effects model was used to analyze time-dependent changes and the residuals of the model to quantify fluctuations over time. The cosine similarity (CS) served as a measure of uniformity of the relative changes of tendon force and stiffness. Muscle strength and tendon stiffness increased significantly in both groups (P uniformity of changes of tendon force and stiffness was lower in athletes (CS A, -0.02 ± 0.5; C, 0.5 ± 0.4; P uniformity of muscle and tendon adaptation, which increases the demand on the tendon with potential implications for tendon injury. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Stretching Your Energetic Budget: How Tendon Compliance Affects the Metabolic Cost of Running.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas K Uchida

    Full Text Available Muscles attach to bones via tendons that stretch and recoil, affecting muscle force generation and metabolic energy consumption. In this study, we investigated the effect of tendon compliance on the metabolic cost of running using a full-body musculoskeletal model with a detailed model of muscle energetics. We performed muscle-driven simulations of running at 2-5 m/s with tendon force-strain curves that produced between 1 and 10% strain when the muscles were developing maximum isometric force. We computed the average metabolic power consumed by each muscle when running at each speed and with each tendon compliance. Average whole-body metabolic power consumption increased as running speed increased, regardless of tendon compliance, and was lowest at each speed when tendon strain reached 2-3% as muscles were developing maximum isometric force. When running at 2 m/s, the soleus muscle consumed less metabolic power at high tendon compliance because the strain of the tendon allowed the muscle fibers to operate nearly isometrically during stance. In contrast, the medial and lateral gastrocnemii consumed less metabolic power at low tendon compliance because less compliant tendons allowed the muscle fibers to operate closer to their optimal lengths during stance. The software and simulations used in this study are freely available at simtk.org and enable examination of muscle energetics with unprecedented detail.

  5. Loops, tails and trains: A simple model for structural transformations of grafted adsorbing neutral polymer brushes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manciu, Marian; Ruckenstein, Eli

    2011-02-01

    The structure of grafted adsorbing polymers on surfaces is described as a statistical ensemble of loops generated by an one-dimensional random walk perpendicular to the surface. The configuration of each chain is considered as a succession of closed loops ended by an open loop (a tail). The probability of formation of each individual loop is the product between the probability of first return to the surface and a Boltzmann factor containing the free energy of the Flory-Huggins kind, which is approximated by the minimum free energy of all possible configurations of that loop. At high grafting densities, the attractive interactions between monomers and surface control the fraction of polymer belonging to either closed loops or tails, hence the formation of a stretched grafted brush. At low grafting densities, the increase of that interaction above a critical value generates an abrupt collapse of the brush on the surface. Whereas for long polymers (with more than about 100 Kuhn segments), the structure of the brush can be determined, in general, only via Monte-Carlo sampling, it is argued that the two structural transitions indicated above can be well predicted by simple approximations. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Grafting of carboxyl groups using CO2/C2H4/Ar pulsed plasma: Theoretical modeling and XPS derivatization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manakhov, Anton; Kiryukhantsev-Korneev, Philip; Michlíček, Miroslav; Permyakova, Elizaveta; Dvořáková, Eva; Polčák, Josef; Popov, Zakhar; Visotin, Maxim; Shtansky, Dmitry V.

    2018-03-01

    The grafting of carboxyl groups enhances cell adhesion and can be used for immobilization of different biomolecules onto plasma-treated materials. The process, however, was not well optimized due to lack of clear understanding of the mechanisms of carboxylic group incorporation into plasma and their grafting to polymer surface. In this work the deposition of COOH plasma polymers from CO2/C2H4/Ar pulsed discharge has been studied depending on the gas mixture and duty cycle. We have demonstrated that the CO2/C2H4/Ar plasma with adjustable thickness of COOH functionalized layer and high stability of the grafted functions in water is a better solution for the COOH surface functionalization compared to the thoroughly analyzed CO2 plasma. The concentration of different carbon environments and the density of COOH groups have been measured by using chemical derivatization combined with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It has been found that the CO2/C2H4/Ar plasma mainly contains ester groups (COOC), the COOH/COOC ratio being between 0.03 and 0.08. The water stability of the COOH groups was significantly higher compared to ester environment, so immersing in water for 24 h allowed to increase the COOH/COOC ratio by a factor of 3. The mechanisms of the CO2 molecule attachment to hydrocarbon chains on the polymer surface and those located inside the plasma were modeled using ab initio calculations.

  7. Fibroblasts accelerate islet revascularization and improve long-term graft survival in a mouse model of subcutaneous islet transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Perez-Basterrechea

    Full Text Available Pancreatic islet transplantation has been considered for many years a promising therapy for beta-cell replacement in patients with type-1 diabetes despite that long-term clinical results are not as satisfactory. This fact points to the necessity of designing strategies to improve and accelerate islets engraftment, paying special attention to events assuring their revascularization. Fibroblasts constitute a cell population that collaborates on tissue homeostasis, keeping the equilibrium between production and degradation of structural components as well as maintaining the required amount of survival factors. Our group has developed a model for subcutaneous islet transplantation using a plasma-based scaffold containing fibroblasts as accessory cells that allowed achieving glycemic control in diabetic mice. Transplanted tissue engraftment is critical during the first days after transplantation, thus we have gone in depth into the graft-supporting role of fibroblasts during the first ten days after islet transplantation. All mice transplanted with islets embedded in the plasma-based scaffold reversed hyperglycemia, although long-term glycemic control was maintained only in the group transplanted with the fibroblasts-containing scaffold. By gene expression analysis and histology examination during the first days we could conclude that these differences might be explained by overexpression of genes involved in vessel development as well as in β-cell regeneration that were detected when fibroblasts were present in the graft. Furthermore, fibroblasts presence correlated with a faster graft re-vascularization, a higher insulin-positive area and a lower cell death. Therefore, this work underlines the importance of fibroblasts as accessory cells in islet transplantation, and suggests its possible use in other graft-supporting strategies.

  8. Neuro-peptide treatment with Cerebrolysin improves the survival of neural stem cell grafts in an APP transgenic model of Alzheimer disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Rockenstein

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells (NSCs have been considered as potential therapy in Alzheimer's disease (AD but their use is hampered by the poor survival of grafted cells. Supply of neurotrophic factors to the grafted cells has been proposed as a way to augment survival of the stem cells. In this context, we investigated the utility of Cerebrolysin (CBL, a peptidergic mixture with neurotrophic-like properties, as an adjunct to stem cell therapy in an APP transgenic (tg model of AD. We grafted murine NSCs into the hippocampus of non-tg and APP tg that were treated systemically with CBL and analyzed after 1, 3, 6 and 9 months post grafting. Compared to vehicle-treated non-tg mice, in the vehicle-treated APP tg mice there was considerable reduction in the survival of the grafted NSCs. Whereas, CBL treatment enhanced the survival of NSCs in both non-tg and APP tg with the majority of the surviving NSCs remaining as neuroblasts. The NSCs of the CBL treated mice displayed reduced numbers of caspase-3 and TUNEL positive cells and increased brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and furin immunoreactivity. These results suggest that CBL might protect grafted NSCs and as such be a potential adjuvant therapy when combined with grafting.

  9. [Achilles tendon suturing and reconstruction with the plantaris muscle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janco, M; Pikus, P

    2002-01-01

    The authors present the first experience in the treatment of fresh ruptures of the Achilles tendon by their own surgical technique--suture end to end with augmentation using plantaris tendon graft. The results were evaluated on a small group of 9 patients (average age 45 years) operated on in the period of 1999-2000. The most important criterion was the subjective evaluation of the patient and the post-operative limitation in sport, job and ordinary activity. We did not record any preoperative or post-operative complication and the limitation of the range of motion was negligible with regard to the needs of the patient. The authors are aware of the fact that post-operative follow-up of the patients is relatively short-term. The surgical technique is described in detail.

  10. The effect of lubricin on the gliding resistance of mouse intrasynovial tendon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Hayashi

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of lubricin on the gliding resistance of intrasynovial tendons by comparing lubricin knockout, heterozygous, and wild type mice. A total of thirty-six deep digital flexor (DDF tendons in the third digits of each hind paw from eighteen adult mice were used, including six lubricin knockout mice (Prg4 -/-, six heterozygous mice (Prg4 +/-, and six wild type mice (Prg4 +/+. The tendon gliding resistance was measured using a custom-made device. Tendon structural changes were evaluated by scanning electron and light microscopy. The gliding resistance of intrasynovial tendons from lubricin knockout mice was significantly higher than the gliding resistance of either wild type or heterozygous mice. The surface of the lubricin knockout tendons appeared to be rougher, compared to the wild type and heterozygous tendons. Synovial hyperplasia was found in the lubricin knockout mice. Cartilage-like tissue was found in the tendon and pulley of the lubricin knockout mice. Our findings confirm the importance of lubricin in intrasynovial tendon lubrication. This knockout model may be useful in determining the effect of lubricin on tendon healing and the response to injury.

  11. The effect of lubricin on the gliding resistance of mouse intrasynovial tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Masanori; Zhao, Chunfeng; Thoreson, Andrew R; Chikenji, Takako; Jay, Gregory D; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of lubricin on the gliding resistance of intrasynovial tendons by comparing lubricin knockout, heterozygous, and wild type mice. A total of thirty-six deep digital flexor (DDF) tendons in the third digits of each hind paw from eighteen adult mice were used, including six lubricin knockout mice (Prg4 -/-), six heterozygous mice (Prg4 +/-), and six wild type mice (Prg4 +/+). The tendon gliding resistance was measured using a custom-made device. Tendon structural changes were evaluated by scanning electron and light microscopy. The gliding resistance of intrasynovial tendons from lubricin knockout mice was significantly higher than the gliding resistance of either wild type or heterozygous mice. The surface of the lubricin knockout tendons appeared to be rougher, compared to the wild type and heterozygous tendons. Synovial hyperplasia was found in the lubricin knockout mice. Cartilage-like tissue was found in the tendon and pulley of the lubricin knockout mice. Our findings confirm the importance of lubricin in intrasynovial tendon lubrication. This knockout model may be useful in determining the effect of lubricin on tendon healing and the response to injury.

  12. Future Economics of Liver Transplantation: A 20-Year Cost Modeling Forecast and the Prospect of Bioengineering Autologous Liver Grafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habka, Dany; Mann, David; Landes, Ronald; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    During the past 20 years liver transplantation has become the definitive treatment for most severe types of liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma, in both children and adults. In the U.S., roughly 16,000 individuals are on the liver transplant waiting list. Only 38% of them will receive a transplant due to the organ shortage. This paper explores another option: bioengineering an autologous liver graft. We developed a 20-year model projecting future demand for liver transplants, along with costs based on current technology. We compared these cost projections against projected costs to bioengineer autologous liver grafts. The model was divided into: 1) the epidemiology model forecasting the number of wait-listed patients, operated patients and postoperative patients; and 2) the treatment model forecasting costs (pre-transplant-related costs; transplant (admission)-related costs; and 10-year post-transplant-related costs) during the simulation period. The patient population was categorized using the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score. The number of patients on the waiting list was projected to increase 23% over 20 years while the weighted average treatment costs in the pre-liver transplantation phase were forecast to increase 83% in Year 20. Projected demand for livers will increase 10% in 10 years and 23% in 20 years. Total costs of liver transplantation are forecast to increase 33% in 10 years and 81% in 20 years. By comparison, the projected cost to bioengineer autologous liver grafts is $9.7M based on current catalog prices for iPS-derived liver cells. The model projects a persistent increase in need and cost of donor livers over the next 20 years that’s constrained by a limited supply of donor livers. The number of patients who die while on the waiting list will reflect this ever-growing disparity. Currently, bioengineering autologous liver grafts is cost prohibitive. However, costs will decline rapidly with the introduction of new manufacturing

  13. Automated freeze-thaw cycles for decellularization of tendon tissue - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Susanne Pauline; Glauche, Sina Marie; Plenge, Amelie; Erbe, Ina; Heller, Sandra; Burk, Janina

    2017-02-14

    Decellularization of tendon tissue plays a pivotal role in current tissue engineering approaches for in vitro research as well as for translation of graft-based tendon restoration into clinics. Automation of essential decellularization steps like freeze-thawing is crucial for the development of more standardized decellularization protocols and commercial graft production under good manufacturing practice (GMP) conditions in the future. In this study, a liquid nitrogen-based controlled rate freezer was utilized for automation of repeated freeze-thawing for decellularization of equine superficial digital flexor tendons. Additional tendon specimens underwent manually performed freeze-thaw cycles based on an established procedure. Tendon decellularization was completed by using non-ionic detergent treatment (Triton X-100). Effectiveness of decellularization was assessed by residual nuclei count and calculation of DNA content. Cytocompatibility was evaluated by culturing allogeneic adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells on the tendon scaffolds. There were no significant differences in decellularization effectiveness between samples decellularized by the automated freeze-thaw procedure and samples that underwent manual freeze-thaw cycles. Further, we inferred no significant differences in the effectiveness of decellularization between two different cooling and heating rates applied in the automated freeze-thaw process. Both the automated protocols and the manually performed protocol resulted in roughly 2% residual nuclei and 13% residual DNA content. Successful cell culture was achieved with samples decellularized by automated freeze-thawing as well as with tendon samples decellularized by manually performed freeze-thaw cycles. Automated freeze-thaw cycles performed by using a liquid nitrogen-based controlled rate freezer were as effective as previously described manual freeze-thaw procedures for decellularization of equine superficial digital flexor tendons

  14. Bone augmentation using a new injectable bone graft substitute by combining calcium phosphate and bisphosphonate as composite--an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlickewei, Carsten W; Laaff, Georg; Andresen, Anne; Klatte, Till O; Rueger, Johannes M; Ruesing, Johannes; Epple, Matthias; Lehmann, Wolfgang

    2015-07-25

    The aim of this study was to create a new injectable bone graft substitute by combining the features of calcium phosphate and bisphosphonate as a composite bone graft to support bone healing and to evaluate the effect of alendronate to the bone healing process in an animal model. In this study, 24 New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into two groups: a calcium phosphate alendronate group and a calcium phosphate control group. A defect was created at the proximal medial tibia and filled with the new created injectable bone graft substitute calcium phosphate alendronate or with calcium phosphate. Healing process was documented by fluoroscopy. To evaluate the potential of the bone graft substitute, the proximal tibia was harvested 2, 4, and 12 weeks after operation. Histomorphological analysis was focused on the evaluation of the dynamic bone parameters using the Osteomeasure system. Radiologically, the bone graft materials were equally absorbed. No fracture was documented. The bones healed normally. After 2 weeks, the histological analysis showed an increased new bone formation for both materials. The osteoid volume per bone volume (OV/BV) was significantly higher for the calcium phosphate group. After 4 weeks, the results were almost equal. The trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) increased in comparison to week 2 in both groups with a slight advantage for the calcium phosphate group. The total mass of the bone graft (KEM.Ar) and the bone graft substitute surface density (KEM.Pm) were consistently decreasing. After 12 weeks, the new bone volume per tissue volume (BV/TV) was still constantly growing. Both bone grafts show a good integration. New bone was formed on the surface of both bone grafts. The calcium phosphate as well as the calcium phosphate alendronate paste had been enclosed by the bone. The trabecular thickness was higher in both groups compared to the first time point. Calcium phosphate proved its good potential as a bone graft substitute

  15. Validation of an image registration and segmentation method to measure stent graft motion on ECG-gated CT using a physical dynamic stent graft model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenrades, Maaike A.; Struijs, Ella M.; Klein, Almar; Kuipers, Henny; Geelkerken, Robert H.; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2017-01-01

    The application of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair has expanded over the last decade. However, the long-term performance of stent grafts, in particular durable fixation and sealing to the aortic wall, remains the main concern of this treatment. The sealing and fixation are challenged at every

  16. Functionally distinct tendon fascicles exhibit different creep and stress relaxation behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Jennifer H; Legerlotz, Kirsten; Demirci, Taylan; Klemt, Christian; Riley, Graham P; Screen, Hazel R C

    2014-01-01

    Most overuse tendinopathies are thought to be associated with repeated microstrain below the failure threshold, analogous to the fatigue failure that affects materials placed under repetitive loading. Investigating the progression of fatigue damage within tendons is therefore of critical importance. There are obvious challenges associated with the sourcing of human tendon samples for in vitro analysis so animal models are regularly adopted. However, data indicates that fatigue life varies significantly between tendons of different species and with different stresses in life. Positional tendons such as rat tail tendon or the bovine digital extensor are commonly applied in in vitro studies of tendon overuse, but there is no evidence to suggest their behaviour is indicative of the types of human tendon particularly prone to overuse injuries. In this study, the fatigue response of the largely positional digital extensor and the more energy storing deep digital flexor tendon of the bovine hoof were compared to the semitendinosus tendon of the human hamstring. Fascicles from each tendon type were subjected to either stress or strain controlled fatigue loading (cyclic creep or cyclic stress relaxation respectively). Gross fascicle mechanics were monitored after cyclic stress relaxation and the mean number of cycles to failure investigated with creep loading. Bovine extensor fascicles demonstrated the poorest fatigue response, while the energy storing human semitendinosus was the most fatigue resistant. Despite the superior fatigue response of the energy storing tendons, confocal imaging suggested a similar degree of damage in all three tendon types; it appears the more energy storing tendons are better able to withstand damage without detriment to mechanics.

  17. Infrapatellar Straps Decrease Patellar Tendon Strain at the Site of the Jumper’s Knee Lesion

    OpenAIRE

    Lavagnino, Michael; Arnoczky, Steven P.; Dodds, Julie; Elvin, Niell

    2011-01-01

    Background: The impetus for the use of patellar straps in the treatment of patellar tendinopathy has largely been based on empirical evidence and not on any mechanistic rationale. A computational model suggests that patellar tendinopathy may be a result of high localized tendon strains that occur at smaller patella–patellar tendon angles (PPTAs). Hypothesis: Infrapatellar straps will decrease the mean localized computational strain in the area of the patellar tendon commonly involved in jumpe...

  18. Simulation and modelling of slip flow over surfaces grafted with polymer brushes and glycocalyx fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Mingge; Li, Xuejin; Liang, Haojun; Caswell, Bruce; Karniadakis, George Em

    2012-11-01

    Fabrication of functionalized surfaces using polymer brushes is a relatively simple process and parallels the presence of glycocalyx filaments coating the luminal surface of our vasculature. In this paper, we perform atomistic-like simulations based on dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) to study both polymer brushes and glycocalyx filaments subject to shear flow, and we apply mean-field theory to extract useful scaling arguments on their response. For polymer brushes, a weak shear flow has no effect on the brush density profile or its height, while the slip length is independent of the shear rate and is of the order of the brush mesh size as a result of screening by hydrodynamic interactions. However, for strong shear flow, the polymer brush is penetrated deeper and is deformed, with a corresponding decrease of the brush height and an increase of the slip length. The transition from the weak to the strong shear regime can be described by a simple 'blob' argument, leading to the scaling γ̇0 ∝ σ3/2, where γ̇0 is the critical transition shear rate and σ is the grafting density. Furthermore, in the strong shear regime, we observe a cyclic dynamic motion of individual polymers, causing a reversal in the direction of surface flow. To study the glycocalyx layer, we first assume a homogeneous flow that ignores the discrete effects of blood cells, and we simulate microchannel flows at different flow rates. Surprisingly, we find that, at low Reynolds number, the slip length decreases with the mean flow velocity, unlike the behaviour of polymer brushes, for which the slip length remains constant under similar conditions. (The slip length and brush height are measured with respect to polymer mesh size and polymer contour length, respectively.) We also performed additional DPD simulations of blood flow in a tube with walls having a glycocalyx layer and with the deformable red blood cells modelled accurately at the spectrin level. In this case, a plasma cell-free layer

  19. Rectus Femoris Tendon Calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zini, Raul; Panascì, Manlio; Papalia, Rocco; Franceschi, Francesco; Vasta, Sebastiano; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Background: Since it was developed, hip arthroscopy has become the favored treatment for femoroacetabular impingement. Due to recent considerable improvements, the indications for this technique have been widely extended. Injuries of the rectus femoris tendon origin, after an acute phase, could result in a chronic tendinopathy with calcium hydroxyapatite crystal deposition, leading to pain and loss of function. Traditionally, this condition is addressed by local injection of anesthetic and corticosteroids or, when conservative measures fail, by open excision of the calcific lesion by an anterior approach. Purpose: To assess whether arthroscopic excision of calcification of the proximal rectus is a safe and effective treatment. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Outcomes were studied from 6 top amateur athletes (age range, 30-43 years; mean, 32.6 years) affected by calcification of the proximal rectus who underwent arthroscopic excision of the calcification. Patients were preoperatively assessed radiographically, and diagnosis was confirmed by a 3-dimensional computed tomography scan. To evaluate the outcome, standardized hip rating scores were used pre- and postoperatively (at 6 and 12 months): the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, Oxford Hip Score, and Modified Harris Hip Score. Moreover, visual analog scales (VAS) for pain, sport activity level (SAL), and activities of daily living (ADL) were also used. Results: One year after surgery, all patients reported satisfactory outcomes, with 3 of 6 rating their return-to-sport level as high as preinjury level, and the remaining 3 with a percentage higher than 80%. Five patients ranked their ability to carry on daily activities at 100%. Statistical analysis showed significant improvement of the Oxford Hip Score, the Modified Harris Hip Score, and all 3 VAS subscales (pain, SAL, and ADL) from pre- to latest postoperative assessment (P < .05). Conclusion: Arthroscopic excision of

  20. Biceps Tendon Rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M Polvino

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 55-year-old male presented to the emergency department with a chief complaint of right arm pain. Five days prior to arrival, he attempted to lift himself up on his van and experienced what he described as a “rubber band snapping” in his right arm. He reported severe pain at the time that persisted but lessened in severity. Additionally, he reported increasing bruising over the proximal right arm. He had no history of prior right arm or shoulder injury. Significant findings: Physical exam was significant for ecchymosis and mild swelling of the right bicep. When the right arm was flexed at the elbow, a prominent mass was visible and palpable over the right bicep. Right upper extremity strength was 4/5 with flexion at the elbow. Discussion: The biceps brachii muscle is comprised of a long and short head, which share a common attachment at the bicipital tuberosity on the radius. The short head originates from the coracoid process of the scapula and the long head originates from the supraglenoid tubercle.1 Biceps tendon rupture has been found to occur at a rate of 0.53/100,000 over five years, and is three times more likely to occur in men than women.2 Risk factors for biceps tendon rupture include male sex, old age, increased body mass index, smoking, and pre-existing shoulder pathology.3,4 Diagnosis of biceps tendon rupture is typically a clinical diagnosis utilizing inspection and palpation as well as special testing such as the Speed’s and/or Yergason’s tests. Ultrasound may be used to aid in diagnosis; in full-thickness tears, ultrasound was found to have a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 98%. However, in partial thickness tears ultrasound has a sensitivity of 27% and a specificity of 100%.5 Often considered the gold standard in diagnosis, MRI has been found to have a sensitivity of only 67% and specificity of 98% in detecting complete tears6. Treatment initially consists of rest, ice, compression

  1. [Pathophysiology of overuse tendon injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannus, P; Paavola, M; Paakkala, T; Parkkari, J; Järvinen, T; Järvinen, M

    2002-10-01

    Overuse tendon injury is one of the most common injuries in sports. The etiology as well as the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to tendinopathy are of crucial medical importance. At the moment intrinsic and extrinsic factors are assumed as mechanisms of overuse tendon injury. Except for the acute, extrinsic trauma, the chronic overuse tendon injury is a multifactorial process. There are many other factors, such as local hypoxia, less of nutrition, impaired metabolism and local inflammatory that may also contribute to the development of tissue damage. The exact interaction of these factors cannot be explained entirely at the moment. Further studies will be necessary in order to get more information.

  2. A locus on chromosome 2 influences the development of acute graft-versus-host disease in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, J M; Slayback, D L; Dobkins, J A; Allen, R D

    1999-06-01

    Despite contemporary typing procedures for bone marrow transplantation (BMT), graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) continues to be a major complication of transplants performed between MHC-matched donors and recipients. Although GVHD can be alleviated by T cell depletion, this procedure increases the risk of graft failure and leukemic relapse and therefore is not a solution to the GVHD problem. The high degree of variation in the intensity of GVHD observed in different patients suggests that multiple non-MHC genetic factors influence GVHD severity. We hypothesize that, in addition to minor histocompatibility antigen disparities, polymorphisms in genes encoding immunologic effector molecules may be important factors influencing GVHD development. This study aims to explore this hypothesis by identifying non-MHC genes that influence the outcome of BMT in a murine model. In this model, B10.D2 donor leukocytes cause acute GVHD in (C57BL/6xDBA/2)F1 (B6D2F1) recipients, whereas DBA/2 donor leukocytes do not. To date, a locus on chromosome 1 has been identified as influencing the severity of GVHD in this model. Our current study shows that a locus on chromosome 2 acts independently of the chromosome 1 locus to also influence GVHD severity in this model. The region of chromosome 2 implicated in our study contains genes encoding beta2-microglobulin, the minor histocompatibility antigen H-3 and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1.

  3. 6-year old Sheep as a Clinically Relevant Large Animal Model for Aortic Valve Replacement using Tissue-Engineered Grafts Based on Decellularized Allogenic Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoridis, Karolina; Tudorache, Igor; Cebotari, Serghei; Meyer, Tanja; Calistru, Alexandru; Sarikouch, Samir; Bara, Cristoph; Haverich, Axel; Hilfiker, Andres

    2017-09-19

    Tissue-engineered (TE) grafts based on decellularized grafts have shown very promising results in preclinical and clinical studies. However, in animal models valves have either been tested in juvenile models or in the clinically less relevant pulmonary valve position. In this study, we tested the grafts in the aortic valve (AV) position of 6-year old sheep, as geriatric patients in need of an aortic valve substitute due to calcification are the largest patient group benefiting from TE grafts. Decellularized AV (n=4) and decellularized AV additionally re-endothelialized with autologous cells (n=3) were implanted in the aortic valve position of 6-year-old female sheep. Function was investigated at implantation and explantation 12 months later. Regeneration capacity was analyzed by the repopulation degree of the graft with recipient's cells, by the generation of a new endothelial layer and by intracellular staining against pro-collagen type I. Decellularized and re-endothelialized AV demonstrated excellent function with only two valves developing mild insufficiencies (1°). Of the repopulating cells only few cells were identified as inflammation cells, while the majority was found to be interstitial cells producing pro-collagen type I. Endothelial coverage was found, but seemed to be reduced. The regenerative capacity of decellularized matrix is not only a feature exhibited when implanted in juvenile individuals but is also evident when implanted in the high-pressure aortic valve position of older sheep, revealing the potential of TE grafts in age-advanced patients.

  4. An Approach to Modeling Drug Release from Polymersome Nanoparticles Based on PNIPAM-g-PEO Graft Copolymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumiana Blagoeva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The recently proposed by the authors numerical approach to modelling of drug release from polymersome nanoparticles based on PNIPAM-g-PEO graft copolymer is generalized on the basis of different model dependent methods. It takes into account the specific features of the experimental procedure and equipment used during the experimental study of the drug release kinetics. The rate parameters are numerically evaluated when fitting each model curve to the available experimental data for indomethacin. Numerical simulation of drug release for 5% and 20% ethanol content is performed and the reliability of the used approach is discussed. It is established that the drug release rate is strongly influenced by the ethanol content. The considered numerical approach enables modeling of different drugs release under the same experimental equipment as well as inclusion of some new model functions describing other mechanisms controlling the release kinetics.

  5. Molecular basis for elastic energy storage in mineralized tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, F H; Freeman, J W; Horvath, I; Landis, W J

    2001-01-01

    Animals store elastic energy in leg and foot tendons during locomotion. In the turkey, much of the locomotive force generated by the gastrocnemius muscle is stored as elastic energy during tendon deformation. Little energy storage occurs within the muscle. During growth of some avians, including the turkey, leg tendons mineralize in the portions distal to the attached muscle and show increased tensile strength and modulus as a result. The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that the degree of elastic energy storage in mineralizing turkey tendon is directly related to the tendon mineral content. To test this hypothesis, the stress-strain behavior of tendons was separated into elastic and viscous components. Both the elastic spring constant and the elastic energy stored, calculated up to a strain of 20%, were found to be proportional to tendon mineral content. It is concluded that mineralization is an efficient means for increasing the amount of elastic energy storage that is required for increased load-bearing ability needed for locomotion of adult birds. Examination of molecular models of the hole region, where mineralization is initiated within the collagen fibril, leads to the hypothesis that elastic energy is stored in the tendon by direct stretching of the flexible regions. Flexible regions within the collagen molecule fall within the positively stained bands of the collagen D period. It is proposed that mineralization increases the stored elastic energy by preventing flexible regions within the positively stained bands from stretching. These observations suggest that mineralization begins in the hole region due to the large number of charged amino acid residues found in the d and e bands.

  6. Ultrasonographic assessment of flexor tendon mobilization: Effect of different protocols on tendon excursion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.-W.H. Korstanje (Jan-Wiebe); J. Soeters (Johannes); A.R. Schreuders (Ton); P.C. Amadio (Peter ); S.E.R. Hovius (Steven); H.J. Stam (Henk); R.W. Selles (Ruud)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Different mobilization protocols have been proposed for rehabilitation after hand flexor tendon repair to provide tendon excursion sufficient to prevent adhesions. Several cadaver studies have shown that the position of the neighboring fingers influences tendon excursions of

  7. A Comparative Outcome Study of Hamstring Versus Tibialis Anterior and Synthetic Grafts for Deltoid to Triceps Transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Jennifer A; Mohammed, Khalid D; Beadel, Gordon P; Rothwell, Alastair G; Simcock, Jeremy W

    2017-10-01

    To assess elbow extension strength and complications after deltoid-triceps transfers using hamstring tendon graft compared with tibialis anterior and synthetic tendon grafts. A retrospective review of deltoid-triceps transfers in patients with tetraplegia performed between 1983 and 2014. Seventy-five people (136 arms) had surgery performed, with the majority undergoing simultaneous bilateral surgery (n = 61; 81%). Tibialis anterior tendon grafts were used in 68 arms, synthetic grafts in 23 arms, and hamstring tendon grafts in 45 arms. The average age at surgery was 31 years. Sixty-three arms (46%) were assessed between 12 and 24 months after surgery. Seventy percent of the group (n = 54) were able to extend their elbow against gravity (grade 3 of 5 or greater) following surgery. Seventy-nine percent of those with hamstring grafts achieved grade 3 of 5 or more compared with 77% with tibialis anterior and 33% with synthetic grafts. There was a statistically significant difference in postsurgery elbow extension between the tibialis anterior group and the synthetic graft group and the hamstring and the synthetic graft group but not between the tibialis anterior and the hamstring group. Complications occurred in 19 arms (14%), the majority occurring immediately after surgery and associated with the wounds. The remaining complications were with the synthetic graft group in which dehiscence of the proximal attachment occurred in 30% of the arms. Autologous tendon grafting is associated with achievement of antigravity elbow extension in a greater proportion of individuals than with prosthetic grafting. Therapeutic IV. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Long lasting pain hypersensitivity following ligation of the tendon of the masseter muscle in rats: A model of myogenic orofacial pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubner Ronald

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major subgroup of patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ disorders have masticatory muscle hypersensitivity. To study myofacial temporomandibular pain, a number of preclinical models have been developed to induce myogenic pain of the masseter muscle, one of the four muscles involved in mastication. The currently used models, however, generate pain that decreases over time and only lasts from hours to weeks and hence are not suitable for studying chronicity of the myogenic pain in TMJ disorders. Here we report a model of constant myogenic orofacial pain that lasts for months. Results The model involves unilateral ligation of the tendon of the anterior superficial part of the rat masseter muscle (TASM. The ligation of the TASM was achieved with two chromic gut (4.0 ligatures via an intraoral approach. Nocifensive behavior of the rat was assessed by probing the skin site above the TASM with a series of von Frey filaments. The response frequencies were determined and an EF50 value, defined as the von Frey filament force that produces a 50% response frequency, was derived and used as a measure of mechanical sensitivity. Following TASM ligation, the EF50 of the injured side was significantly reduced and maintained throughout the 8-week observation period, suggesting the presence of mechanical hyperalgesia/allodynia. In sham-operated rats, the EF50 of the injured side was transiently reduced for about a week, likely due to injury produced by the surgery. Somatotopically relevant Fos protein expression was indentified in the subnucleus caudalis of the spinal trigeminal sensory complex. In the same region, persistent upregulation of NMDA receptor NR1 phosphorylation and protein expression and increased expression of glial markers glial fibrillary acidic protein (astroglia and CD11b (microglia were found. Morphine (0.4-8 mg/kg, s.c. and duloxetine (0.4-20 mg/kg, i.p., a selective serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor

  9. MRI-Based Assessment of Intralesional Delivery of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Model of Equine Tendonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Scharf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound-guided intralesional injection of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs is held as the benchmark for cell delivery in tendonitis. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the immediate cell distribution following intralesional injection of MSCs. Unilateral superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT lesions were created in the forelimb of six horses and injected with 10 × 106 MSCs labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs under ultrasound guidance. Assays were performed to confirm that there were no significant changes in cell viability, proliferation, migration, or trilineage differentiation due to the presence of SPIOs. Limbs were imaged on a 1.5-tesla clinical MRI scanner postmortem before and after injection to determine the extent of tendonitis and detect SPIO MSCs. Clusters of labeled cells were visible as signal voids in 6/6 subjects. Coalescing regions of signal void were diffusely present in the peritendinous tissues. Although previous reports have determined that local injury retains cells within a small radius of the site of injection, our study shows greater than expected delocalization and relatively few cells retained within collagenous tendon compared to surrounding fascia. Further work is needed if this is a reality in vivo and to determine if directed intralesional delivery of MSCs is as critical as presently thought.

  10. Neural Stem Cell or Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived GABA-ergic Progenitor Cell Grafting in an Animal Model of Chronic Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhya, Dinesh; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Shetty, Geetha A.; Zanirati, Gabriele; Kodali, Maheedhar; Shetty, Ashok K.

    2016-01-01

    Grafting of neural stem cells (NSCs) or GABA-ergic progenitor cells (GPCs) into the hippocampus could offer an alternative therapy to hippocampal resection in patients with drug-resistant chronic epilepsy, which afflicts >30% of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) cases. Multipotent, self-renewing NSCs could be expanded from multiple regions of the developing and adult brain, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). On the other hand, GPCs could be generated from the medial and lateral ganglionic eminences of the embryonic brain and from hESCs and hiPSCs. To provide comprehensive methodologies involved in testing the efficacy of transplantation of NSCs and GPCs in a rat model of chronic TLE, NSCs derived from the rat medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) and MGE-like GPCs derived from hiPSCs are taken as examples in this unit. The topics comprise description of the required materials, reagents and equipment, methods for obtaining rat MGE-NSCs and hiPSC-derived MGE-like GPCs in culture, generation of chronically epileptic rats, intrahippocampal grafting procedure, post-grafting evaluation of the effects of grafts on spontaneous recurrent seizures and cognitive and mood impairments, analyses of the yield and the fate of graft-derived cells, and the effects of grafts on the host hippocampus. PMID:27532817

  11. Cryopreservation with glycerol improves the in vitro biomechanical characteristics of human patellar tendon allografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhodolčan, Lovro; Brojan, Miha; Kosel, Franc; Drobnič, Matej; Alibegović, Armin; Brecelj, Janez

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the in vitro biomechanical characteristics of patellar tendon ligaments (BTB) when stored as fresh frozen or as glycerol cryopreserved allografts. Seventy patellar tendons were harvested from 35 cadaveric human donors and randomly assigned into seven groups. Grafts in group FRESH were mechanically tested within 2 h of harvesting. FROZ-3, FROZ-6, and FROZ-9 were deep-frozen to -80 °C for 3, 6, and 9 months, respectively. Grafts in groups CRYO-3, CRYO-6, and CRYO-9 were initially incubated with 10% glycerol in a phosphate-buffered saline for 1 h and then stored in glycerol solution (10% glycerol in PBS) at -80 °C for 3, 6, and 9 months, respectively. Grafts were mechanically tested with two cycling modes (50-250 °N and 150-500 °N) and then loaded to failure. Cryopreserved grafts demonstrated more consistent results and expressed lower elongation rates after both cycling loading protocols compared to their frozen counterparts at all storage times. During load-to-failure analysis, ultimate stiffness levels were predominantly higher (23.9-61.5%) in cryopreserved grafts compared with frozen grafts, and ultimate stress levels were 26% (13.3-47.7%) higher, regardless of the storage time. Moreover, cryopreserved grafts revealed similar ultimate elongation and uniformly higher ultimate stiffness and ultimate stress levels compared to fresh grafts. The results of this in vitro study demonstrated superior mechanical properties of cryopreserved grafts compared to frozen grafts within a preservation period of 9 months. Cryopreservation with glycerol solution might be used to further improve the quality of preserved soft-tissue allografts.

  12. In vitro and in vivo research on using Antheraea pernyi silk fibroin as tissue engineering tendon scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang Qian [College of Life Sciences, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou, Fujian350108 (China); Chen Denglong [College of Chemistry and Materials Sciences, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou, Fujian350108 (China); Yang Zhiming [Division of Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Li Min, E-mail: mli@fjnu.edu.cn [College of Life Sciences, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou, Fujian350108 (China)

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of using Antheraea pernyi silk fibroin as tissue engineering tendon scaffold was investigated in vitro and in vivo, respectively, utilizing tenocytes and animal model. The animal model used here was an adult New Zealand White rabbit with a 15-mm gap defect in both sides of the Achilles tendon. The Achilles tendon defects in one side of hind legs were repaired using the braided A. pernyi silk fibroin scaffold in experimental group (n = 24), while the other side left untreated as negative group (n = 24). The recovery of the defect tendons were evaluated postoperatively at the 2nd, 6th, 12th, and 16th week using macroscopic, histological, immunohistochemical, scanning electron micrograph and biomechanical test techniques. In vitro results examined by scanning electron micrograph showed that A. pernyi silk fibroin promote the adhesion and propagation of the tenocytes. In vivo, at 16 weeks after implantation, morphological results showed that neo-tendons were formed, and bundles of collagen fibers in the neo-tendons were uniform and well oriented. Immunohistochemical results showed that collagen type in the regenerated tendons was predominantly type I. The maximum load of regenerated tendon at 16 weeks reached 55.46% of the normal tendon values. Preliminary, we concluded that A. pernyi silk fibroin promoted the recovery of Achilles tendon defect of rabbit and the application of A. pernyi silk fibroin as tissue engineering tendon scaffold is feasible.

  13. The tendon approximator device in traumatic injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forootan, Kamal S; Karimi, Hamid; Forootan, Nazilla-Sadat S

    2015-01-01

    Precise and tension-free approximation of two tendon endings is the key predictor of outcomes following tendon lacerations and repairs. We evaluate the efficacy of a new tendon approximator device in tendon laceration repairs. In a comparative study, we used our new tendon approximator device in 99 consecutive patients with laceration of 266 tendons who attend a university hospital and evaluated the operative time to repair the tendons, surgeons' satisfaction as well as patient's outcomes in a long-term follow-up. Data were compared with the data of control patients undergoing tendon repair by conventional method. Totally 266 tendons were repaired by approximator device and 199 tendons by conventional technique. 78.7% of patients in first group were male and 21.2% were female. In approximator group 38% of patients had secondary repair of cut tendons and 62% had primary repair. Patients were followed for a mean period of 3years (14-60 months). Time required for repair of each tendon was significantly reduced with the approximator device (2 min vs. 5.5 min, ptendon repair were identical in the two groups and were not significantly different. 1% of tendons in group A and 1.2% in group B had rupture that was not significantly different. The new nerve approximator device is cheap, feasible to use and reduces the time of tendon repair with sustained outcomes comparable to the conventional methods.

  14. Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Topics / Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting What Is Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) ... multiple coronary arteries during one surgery. Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Figure A shows the location of the ...

  15. Reconstruction of the Abdominal Vagus Nerve Using Sural Nerve Grafts in Canine Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Fen; Wang, Zhiming; Wang, Yin

    2013-01-01

    Background Recently, vagus nerve preservation or reconstruction of vagus has received increasing attention. The present study aimed to investigate the feasibility of reconstructing the severed vagal trunk using an autologous sural nerve graft. Methods Ten adult Beagle dogs were randomly assigned to two groups of five, the nerve grafting group (TG) and the vagal resection group (VG). The gastric secretion and emptying functions in both groups were assessed using Hollander insulin and acetaminophen tests before surgery and three months after surgery. All dogs underwent laparotomy under general anesthesia. In TG group, latency and conduction velocity of the action potential in a vagal trunk were measured, and then nerves of 4 cm long were cut from the abdominal anterior and posterior vagal trunks. Two segments of autologous sural nerve were collected for performing end-to-end anastomoses with the cut ends of vagal trunk (8–0 nylon suture, 3 sutures for each anastomosis). Dogs in VG group only underwent partial resections of the anterior and posterior vagal trunks. Laparotomy was performed in dogs of TG group, and latency and conduction velocity of the action potential in their vagal trunks were measured. The grafted nerve segment was removed, and stained with anti-neurofilament protein and toluidine blue. Results Latency of the action potential in the vagal trunk was longer after surgery than before surgery in TG group, while the conduction velocity was lower after surgery. The gastric secretion and emptying functions were weaker after surgery in dogs of both groups, but in TG group they were significantly better than in VG group. Anti-neurofilament protein staining and toluidine blue staining showed there were nerve fibers crossing the anastomosis of the vagus and sural nerves in dogs of TG group. Conclusion Reconstruction of the vagus nerve using the sural nerve is technically feasible. PMID:23555604

  16. A new method of modelling early plasma creatinine changes predicts 1-year graft function after kidney transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogstrup, Nicoline V; Bibby, Bo Martin; Aulbjerg, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    modelled for each patient using an exponential, logistic, or linear model, and the time to a 50% decrease in p-cr (tCr50) was estimated. RESULTS: Linear regression analysis showed a negative correlation between tCr50 and eGFR 1 year post-transplant (n = 96, r = -0.369, β = -0.112, p = 0.......0002). The correlation was maintained when corrected for the relevant recipient and donor characteristics. tCr50 correlated positively with the number of hospitalisation days, the number of graft ultrasound examinations, and the number of biopsies. CONCLUSIONS: A modelled time to a 50% decrease in p-cr predicts 1-year...

  17. Establishment of the evaluation method of the tendon effective stress in the containment building and the concrete material nonlinear model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Chul Hun; Kim, S. G.; Park, J. G. [Dankook Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2005-12-15

    To evaluate the structural soundness of the NPP confinement building more rigorously, the effective prestress, which is one of the most affecting elements, needs to be estimated exactly and it requires a method that can be used to predict the amount of prestress loss in time precisely. The study of this year includes collection and analysis of related data and evaluation of the applicabilities of previously proposed prestress measuring methods. Another requirement or the rigorous evaluation of the structural soundness is the fast and exact analysis of structural responses under such heavy loads as earthquakes. To achieve this goal, we need analysis models that can describe nonlinear behavior of each material well. In this year, we established nonlinear models of concrete and performed nonlinear analyses, leading to comparison with test results.

  18. Patellar tendon rerupture in a footballer: our personal surgical technique and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, L; Vicenti, G; Abate, A; Pesce, V; Moretti, B

    2014-02-01

    Patellar tendon rerupture is a relatively uncommon condition that severely compromises the function of the extensor mechanism of the knee. Few cases described in the literature does not show a unique mode of treatment for this type of lesion. We report the case of a young athlete with traumatic patellar tendon rerupture. The first rupture was treated with the use of Statak anchors. Following a second rerupture incident as a result of a sporting accodent, the tendon was reconstructed with the use of an autologous graft tendon of semitendinosus and biological augmentation with gracilis tendon. For both tendons the distal insertion part was preserved to facilitate the healing process. The treatment was completed with the application of a neutralization cerclage wire and with local injection of plateket reach plasma (PRP). At 12 months follow up, a full recovery of the structure and function of the extensor mechanism was observed and the patient was able to resume normal sports competitive activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. On the fail-safe design of tendon-driven manipulators with redundant tendons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheu, Jinn Biau; Liu, Tyng; Lee, Jyh Jone [National Taiwan University, Taipei (China)

    2012-06-15

    A tendon-driven manipulator having redundant tendons may possess more flexibility in operation, such as optimizing the performance of tendons, reducing the burden of each tendon, and providing fail-safe features. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the design of tendon-driven manipulators with a fail-safe feature, that is, to synthesize a system that may still remain controllable as any of the tendons have broken down or malfunctioned. Characteristics of tendon-driven manipulators are briefly discussed. Criteria for tendon-driven manipulators with redundant tendons and fail-safe feature are then established. Subsequently, constraints for such system are derived from the structure of tendon-driven manipulator. Associated with the criteria, manipulators can remain controllable when any of the tendons fails to function. Finally, a geometric method for determining the structure is developed. Examples of two-DOF and three-DOF tendondriven manipulators are demonstrated.

  20. The Influence of External Load on Quadriceps Muscle and Tendon Dynamics during Jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earp, Jacob E; Newton, Robert U; Cormie, Prue; Blazevich, Anthony J

    2017-11-01

    Tendons possess both viscous (rate-dependent) and elastic (rate-independent) properties that determine tendon function. During high-speed movements external loading increases both the magnitude (FT) and rate (RFDT) of tendon loading. The influence of external loading on muscle and tendon dynamics during maximal vertical jumping was explored. Ten resistance-trained men performed parallel-depth, countermovement vertical jumps with and without additional load (0%, 30%, 60%, and 90% of maximum squat lift strength), while joint kinetics and kinematics, quadriceps tendon length (LT) and patellar tendon FT and RFDT were estimated using integrated ultrasound, motion analysis and force platform data and muscle tendon modelling. Estimated FT and RFDT, but not peak LT, increased with external loading. Temporal comparisons between 0% and 90% loads revealed that FT was greater with 90% loading throughout the majority of the movement (11%-81% and 87%-95% movement duration). However, RFDT was greater with 90% load only during the early movement initiation phase (8%-15% movement duration) but was greater in the 0% load condition later in the eccentric phase (27%-38% movement duration). LT was longer during the early movement (12%-23% movement duration) but shorter in the late eccentric and early concentric phases (48%-55% movement duration) with 90% load. External loading positively influenced peak FT and RFDT but tendon strain appeared unaffected, suggesting no additive effect of external loading on patellar tendon lengthening during human jumping. Temporal analysis revealed that external loading resulted in a large initial RFDT that may have caused dynamic stiffening of the tendon and attenuated tendon strain throughout the movement. These results suggest that external loading influences tendon lengthening in both a load- and movement-dependent manner.

  1. Axial speed of sound for the monitoring of injured equine tendons: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergari, Claudio; Pourcelot, Philippe; Ravary-Plumioën, Bérangère; Dupays, Anne-Gaëlle; Jacquet, Sandrine; Audigié, Fabrice; Denoix, Jean-Marie; Laugier, Pascal; Mitton, David; Crevier-Denoix, Nathalie

    2012-01-03

    Equine superficial digital flexor tendons (SDFT) are often injured, and they represent an excellent model for human sport tendinopathies. While lesions can be precisely diagnosed by clinical evaluation and ultrasonography, a prognosis is often difficult to establish; the knowledge of the injured tendon's mechanical properties would help in anticipating the outcome. The objectives of the present study were to compare the axial speed of sound (SOS) measured in vivo in normal and injured tendons and to investigate their relationship with the tendons' mechanical parameters, in order to assess the potential of quantitative axial ultrasound to monitor the healing of the injured tendons. SOS was measured in vivo in the right fore SDFTs of 12 horses during walk, before and 3.5 months after the surgical induction of a bilateral core lesion. The 12 horses were then euthanized, their SDFTs isolated and tested in tension to measure their elastic modulus and maximal load (and corresponding stress). SOS significantly decreased from 2179.4 ± 31.4 m/s in normal tendons to 2065.8 ± 67.1 m/s 3.5 months after the surgical induction, and the tendons' elastic modulus (0.90 ± 0.17 GPa) was found lower than what has been reported in normal tendons. While SOS was not correlated to tendon maximal load and corresponding stress, the SOS normalized on its value in normal tendons was correlated to the tendons' elastic modulus. These preliminary results confirm the potential of axial SOS in helping the functional assessment of injured tendon. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. HGF mediates the anti-inflammatory effects of PRP on injured tendons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianying Zhang

    Full Text Available Platelet-rich plasma (PRP containing hepatocyte growth factor (HGF and other growth factors are widely used in orthopaedic/sports medicine to repair injured tendons. While PRP treatment is reported to decrease pain in patients with tendon injury, the mechanism of this effect is not clear. Tendon pain is often associated with tendon inflammation, and HGF is known to protect tissues from inflammatory damages. Therefore, we hypothesized that HGF in PRP causes the anti-inflammatory effects. To test this hypothesis, we performed in vitro experiments on rabbit tendon cells and in vivo experiments on a mouse Achilles tendon injury model. We found that addition of PRP or HGF decreased gene expression of COX-1, COX-2, and mPGES-1, induced by the treatment of tendon cells in vitro with IL-1β. Further, the treatment of tendon cell cultures with HGF antibodies reduced the suppressive effects of PRP or HGF on IL-1β-induced COX-1, COX-2, and mPGES-1 gene expressions. Treatment with PRP or HGF almost completely blocked the cellular production of PGE2 and the expression of COX proteins. Finally, injection of PRP or HGF into wounded mouse Achilles tendons in vivo decreased PGE2 production in the tendinous tissues. Injection of platelet-poor plasma (PPP however, did not reduce PGE2 levels in the wounded tendons, but the injection of HGF antibody inhibited the effects of PRP and HGF. Further, injection of PRP or HGF also decreased COX-1 and COX-2 proteins. These results indicate that PRP exerts anti-inflammatory effects on injured tendons through HGF. This study provides basic scientific evidence to support the use of PRP to treat injured tendons because PRP can reduce inflammation and thereby reduce the associated pain caused by high levels of PGE2.

  3. Histopathological findings in chronic tendon disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvinen, M; Józsa, L; Kannus, P; Järvinen, T L; Kvist, M; Leadbetter, W

    1997-04-01

    Tendon injuries and other tendon disorders represent a common diagnostic and therapeutic challenge in sports medicine, resulting in chronic and long-lasting problems. Tissue degeneration is a common finding in many sports-related tendon complaints. In the great majority of spontaneous tendon ruptures, chronic degenerative changes are seen at the rupture site of the tendon (1). Systemic diseases and diseases specifically deteriorating the normal structure of the tendon (i.e. foreign bodies, and metabolic, inherited and infectious tendon diseases) are only rarely the cause of tendon pathology. Inherited diseases, such as various hereditary diseases with disturbed collagen metabolism and characteristic pathological structural alterations (Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Marfani syndrome, homocystinuria (ochronosis)), represent approximately 1% of the causes of chronic tendon complaints (2), whereas foreign bodies are somewhat more common and are found in less than 10% of all chronic tendon problems (1). Rheumatoid arthritis and sarcoidosis are typical systemic diseases that cause chronic inflammation in tendon and peritendinous tissues. Altogether, these 'specific' disorders represented less than 2% of the pathological alterations found in the histological analysis of more than 1000 spontaneously ruptured tendons (1, 3, 4). In this material, degenerative changes were seen in a great majority of the tendons, indicating that a spontaneous tendon rupture is a typical clinical end-state manifestation of a degenerative process in the tendon tissue. The role of overuse in the pathogenesis of chronic tendon injuries and disorders is not completely understood. It has been speculated that when tendon is overused it becomes fatigued and loses its basal reparative ability, the repetitive microtraumatic processes thus overwhelming the ability of the tendon cells to repair the fiber damage. The intensive repetitive activity, which often is eccentric by nature, may lead to cumulative

  4. Achilles Tendon Loading During Heel-Raising and -Lowering Exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revak, Andrew; Diers, Keith; Kernozek, Thomas W; Gheidi, Naghmeh; Olbrantz, Christina

    2017-02-01

    Achilles tendinopathies are common injuries during sport participation, although men are more prone to Achilles tendon injuries than women. Heel-raising and -lowering exercises are typically suggested for Achilles tendon rehabilitation. To compare the estimated Achilles tendon loading variables and the ankle range of motion (ROM) using a musculoskeletal model during commonly performed heel-raising and -lowering exercises. Controlled laboratory study. University biomechanics laboratory. Twenty-one healthy men (age = 21.59 ± 1.92 years, height = 178.22 ± 8.02 cm, mass = 75.81 ± 11.24 kg). Each participant completed 4 exercises: seated heel raising and lowering, bilateral standing heel raising and lowering, bilateral heel raising and unilateral lowering, and unilateral heel raising and lowering. A repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variance (α = .05) was used to compare Achilles tendon stress, force, and strain and ankle ROM for each exercise. Kinematic data were recorded at 180 Hz with 15 motion-analysis cameras synchronized with kinetic data collected from a force platform sampled at 1800 Hz. These data were then entered in a musculoskeletal model to estimate force in the triceps surae. For each participant, we determined Achilles tendon stress by measuring cross-sectional images using ultrasound. Peak Achilles tendon loading was lowest when performing the seated heel-raising and -lowering exercise and highest when performing the unilateral heel-raising and -lowering exercise. Loading was greater for the unilateral exercise or portions of the exercise that were performed unilaterally. Bilateral and seated exercises with less weight-bearing force resulted in less Achilles tendon loading. These exercises may serve as progressions during the rehabilitation process before full-body weight-bearing, unilateral exercises are allowed. Ankle ROM did not follow the same order as loading and may need additional monitoring or instruction during rehabilitation.

  5. Bioreactor-based engineering of osteochondral grafts: from model systems to tissue manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, David; Jakob, Marcel; Martin, Ivan

    2005-11-01

    Osteochondral defects (i.e., those that affect both the articular cartilage and underlying subchondral bone) are often associated with mechanical instability of the joint, and therefore with the risk of inducing osteoarthritic degenerative changes. The in vitro fabrication of osteochondral grafts of predefined size and shape, starting from autologous cells combined with three-dimensional porous biomaterials, is a promising approach for the treatment of osteochondral defects. However, the quality of ex vivo generated cartilage and bone-like tissues is currently restricted by a limited understanding of the regulatory role of physicochemical culture parameters on tissue development. By allowing reproducible and controlled changes in specific biochemical and biomechanical factors, bioreactor systems provide the technological means to reveal fundamental mechanisms of cell function in a three-dimensional environment and the potential to improve the quality of engineered tissues. In addition, by automating and standardizing the manufacturing process in controlled closed systems, bioreactors could reduce production costs and thus facilitate broader clinical impact of engineered osteochondral grafts.

  6. Living nanofiber yarn-based woven biotextiles for tendon tissue engineering using cell tri-culture and mechanical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaohua; Wang, Ying; Streubel, Philipp N; Duan, Bin

    2017-10-15

    Non-woven nanofibrous scaffolds have been developed for tendon graft application by using electrospinning strategies. However, electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds face some obstacles and limitations, including suboptimal scaffold structure, weak tensile and suture-retention strengths, and compact structure for cell infiltration. In this work, a novel nanofibrous, woven biotextile, fabricated based on electrospun nanofiber yarns, was implemented as a tissue engineered tendon scaffold. Based on our modified electrospinning setup, polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofiber yarns were fabricated with reproducible quality, and were further processed into plain-weaving fabrics interlaced with polylactic acid (PLA) multifilaments. Nonwoven nanofibrous PCL meshes with random or aligned fiber structures were generated using typical electrospinning as comparative counterparts. The woven fabrics contained 3D aligned microstructures with significantly larger pore size and obviously enhanced tensile mechanical properties than their nonwoven counterparts. The biological results revealed that cell proliferation and infiltration, along with the expression of tendon-specific genes by human adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (HADMSC) and human tenocytes (HT), were significantly enhanced on the woven fabrics compared with those on randomly-oriented or aligned nanofiber meshes. Co-cultures of HADMSC with HT or human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) on woven fabrics significantly upregulated the functional expression of most tenogenic markers. HADMSC/HT/HUVEC tri-culture on woven fabrics showed the highest upregulation of most tendon-associated markers than all the other mono- and co-culture groups. Furthermore, we conditioned the tri-cultured constructs with dynamic conditioning and demonstrated that dynamic stretch promoted total collagen secretion and tenogenic differentiation. Our nanofiber yarn-based biotextiles have significant potential to be used as engineered scaffolds to

  7. Noninvasive Imaging of Human Immune Responses in a Human Xenograft Model of Graft-Versus-Host Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Elssen, Catharina H M J; Rashidian, Mohammad; Vrbanac, Vladimir; Wucherpfennig, Kai W; Habre, Zeina El; Sticht, Jana; Freund, Christian; Jacobsen, Johanne T; Cragnolini, Juanjo; Ingram, Jessica; Plaisier, Loes; Spierings, Eric; Tager, Andrew M; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2017-06-01

    The immune system plays a crucial role in many diseases. Activation or suppression of immunity is often related to clinical outcome. Methods to explore the dynamics of immune responses are important to elucidate their role in conditions characterized by inflammation, such as infectious disease, cancer, or autoimmunity. Immuno-PET is a noninvasive method by which disease and immune cell infiltration can be explored simultaneously. Using radiolabeled antibodies or fragments derived from them, it is possible to image disease-specific antigens and immune cell subsets. Methods: We developed a method to noninvasively image human immune responses in a relevant humanized mouse model. We generated a camelid-derived single-domain antibody specific for human class II major histocompatibility complex products and used it to noninvasively image human immune cell reconstitution in nonobese diabetic severe combined immune deficiency γ-/- mice reconstituted with human fetal thymus, liver, and liver-derived hematopoietic stem cells (BLT mice). Results: We showed imaging of infiltrating immunocytes in BLT mice that spontaneously developed a graft-versus-host-like condition, characterized by alopecia and blepharitis. In diseased animals, we showed an increased PET signal in the liver, attributable to infiltration of activated class II major histocompatibility complex+ T cells. Conclusion: Noninvasive imaging of immune infiltration and activation could thus be of importance for diagnosis and evaluation of treatment of graft-versus-host disease and holds promise for other diseases characterized by inflammation. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  8. Adsorptive removal of indole and quinoline from model fuel using adenine-grafted metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, Mithun; Song, Ji Yoon; Jeong, Ah Rim; Min, Kil Sik; Jhung, Sung Hwa

    2017-10-28

    A highly porous metal-organic framework (MOF), MIL-101, was modified for the first time with the nucleobase adenine (Ade) by grafting onto the MOF. The Ade-grafted MOF, Ade-MIL-101, was further protonated to obtain P-Ade-MIL-101, and these MOFs were utilized to remove nitrogen-containing compounds (NCCs) (such as indole (IND) and quinoline (QUI)) from a model fuel by adsorption. These functionalized MOFs exhibited remarkable adsorption performance for NCCs compared with that shown by commercial activated carbon (AC) and pristine MIL-101, even though the porosities of the functionalized-MOFs were lower than that of pristine MIL-101. P-Ade-MIL-101 has 12.0 and 10.8 times capacity to that of AC for IND and QUI adsorption, respectively; its adsorption performance was competitive with that of other reported adsorbents. The remarkable adsorption of IND and QUI by Ade-MIL-101 was attributed to H-bonding. H-bonding combined with cation-π interactions was proposed as the mechanism for the removal of IND by P-Ade-MIL-101, whereas acid-base interactions were thought to be responsible for QUI adsorption by P-Ade-MIL-101. Moreover, P-Ade-MIL-101 can be regenerated without any severe degradation and used for successive adsorptions. Therefore, P-Ade-MIL-101 was recommended as an effective adsorbent for fuel purification by adsorptive removal of NCCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Use of platelet-rich plasma solution applied with composite chondrocutaneous graft technique: an experimental study in rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevim, Kamuran Zeynep; Yazar, Memet; Irmak, Fatih; Tekkeşin, Merva Soluk; Yildiz, Kemalettin; Sirvan, Selami Serhat

    2014-07-01

    Composite chondrocutaneous grafts have been used widely for patients with cleft lip nasal deformity, alar defects, and septal perforations; however, the graft viability can be easily compromised. The aim of the present study was to extend the safe length of the composite chondrocutaneous grafts by enhancement of angiogenesis and re-epithelialization through platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and to investigate the changes that occur when PRP is administered to the graft and the recipient site. Composite grafts of critical sizes (1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 cm) were planned on the rabbit ears on 1 side. Group A consisted of grafts pretreated with PRP, group B consisted of recipient beds pretreated with PRP, and group C was the control group in which defects 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 cm in size were formed on the right ears of the rabbits. On postoperative day 7, matching size chondrocutaneous grafts were adapted to the defect areas without PRP. In all groups, graft viability was evaluated 7 days after graft adaptation in group C and 14 days after PRP administration in groups A and B. Wound healing was scored histopathologically and immunohistologically using hematoxylin and eosin, CD34, and smooth muscle actin staining. The terminal transferase fluorescein-dUTP nick end labeling assay was performed to quantitatively demonstrate the apoptosis ratio among the groups. In groups A, B, and C, the mean graft survival of the 2.0-cm equilateral triangle-shaped composite grafts was 65.43% ± 15.7%, 78.12% ± 12.8%, and 41.31% ± 37.4%, respectively (P = .0364). PRP pretreatment accelerated composite graft survival in the 2.0-cm equilateral triangle grafts by increasing epithelial regeneration and fibrosis, inducing neovascularization, and ameliorating apoptosis rates. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Botulinum Neurotoxin A Injections Influence Stretching of the Gastrocnemius Muscle-Tendon Unit in an Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Tuohy

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum Neurotoxin A (BoNT-A injections have been used for the treatment of muscle contractures and spasticity. This study assessed the influence of (BoNT-A injections on passive biomechanical properties of the muscle-tendon unit. Mouse gastrocnemius muscle (GC was injected with BoNT-A (n = 18 or normal saline (n = 18 and passive, non-destructive, in vivo load relaxation experimentation was performed to examine how the muscle-tendon unit behaves after chemical denervation with BoNT-A. Injection of BoNT-A impaired passive muscle recovery (15% vs. 35% recovery to pre-stretching baseline, p < 0.05 and decreased GC stiffness (0.531 ± 0.061 N/mm vs. 0.780 ± 0.037 N/mm, p < 0.05 compared to saline controls. The successful use of BoNT-A injections as an adjunct to physical therapy may be in part attributed to the disruption of the stretch reflex; thereby modulating in vivo passive muscle properties. However, it is also possible that BoNT-A injection may alter the structure of skeletal muscle; thus modulating the in vivo passive biomechanical properties of the muscle-tendon unit.

  11. Simvastatin and atorvastatin reduce the mechanical properties of tendon constructs in vitro and introduce catabolic changes in the gene expression pattern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliasson, Pernilla; Svensson, Rene B; Giannopoulos, Antonis

    2017-01-01

    investigated the effect of statin treatment on mechanical strength, cell proliferation, collagen content and gene expression pattern in a tendon-like tissue made from human tenocytes in vitro. Human tendon fibroblasts were grown in a 3D tissue culture model (tendon constructs), and treated with either...... expression pattern and a reduced collagen content indicated a disturbed balance in matrix production of tendon due to statin administration....

  12. Anterior cruciate ligament- and hamstring tendon- derived cells: in vitro differential properties of cells involved in ACL reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghebes, C.A.; Kelder, C.; Schot, T.; Renard, A.J.S.; Pakvis, D.F.M.; Fernandes, H.; Saris, Daniël B.F.

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction involves the replacement of the torn ligament with a new graft, often a hamstring tendon (HT). Described as similar, the ACL and HT have intrinsic differences related to their distinct anatomical locations. From a cellular perspective, identifying

  13. Acute calcific tendinitis simulating tendon sheath infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omololu, B; Alonge, T O; Ogunlade, S O

    2001-01-01

    Tendon sheath infection has catastrophic consequences if not diagnosed. We present acute calcific tendinitis, a simulator of tendon sheath infection with a good prognosis in a 14 year old athletic tennis player.

  14. Evaluation of the ability of xanthan gum/gellan gum/hyaluronan hydrogel membranes to prevent the adhesion of postrepaired tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Shyh Ming; Chang, Shwu Jen; Wang, Hung-Yi; Tang, Shu Ching; Yang, Shan-Wei

    2014-12-19

    After tendon-repair surgery, adhesion between the surgical tendon and the synovial sheath is often presented resulting in poor functional repair of the tendon. This may be prevented using a commercially available mechanical barrier implant, Seprafilm, which is composed of hyaluronan (HA) and carboxymethyl cellulose hydrogels. In a rat model, prepared membranes of various compositions of gellan gum (GG), xanthan gum (XG) and HA as well as Seprafilm were wrapped around repaired tendons and the adhesion of the tendons was examined grossly and histologically after 3 weeks of healing. Certain formulations of the XG/GG/HA hydrogel membranes reduced tendon adhesion with equal efficacy but without reducing the tendon strength compared to Seprafilm. The designed membranes swelled rapidly and blanketed onto the tendon tissue more readily and closely than Seprafilm. Also they degraded slowly, which allowed the membranes to function as barriers for extended periods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Tissue Responses to Stent Grafts with Endo-Exo-Skeleton for Saccular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in a Canine Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Il Young; Chung, Jin Wook; Kim, Hyo Cheol [Dept. of Radiology and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Clinical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young Ho; So Young Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Beom [Dept. of Radiology, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Min, Seung Kee [Dept. of Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Hyung [Dept. of Radiology, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    We evaluated the effect of close contact between the stent and the graft on the induction of endothelial covering on the stent graft placed over an aneurysm. Saccular abdominal aortic aneurysms were made with Dacron patch in eight dogs. The stent graft consisted of an inner stent, a expanded polytetrafluoroethylene graft, and an outer stent. After sacrificing the animals, the aortas with an embedded stent graft were excised. The aortas were inspected grossly and evaluated microscopically. The animals were sacrificed at two (n = 3), six (n = 3), and eight months (n = 2) after endovascular repair. In two dogs, the aortic lumen was occluded at two months after the placement. On gross inspection of specimens from the other six dogs with a patent aortic lumen, stent grafts placed over the normal aortic wall were covered by glossy white neointima, whereas, stent grafts placed over the aneurysmal aortic wall were covered by brownish neointima. On microscopic inspection, stent grafts placed over the normal aortic wall were covered by thin neointima (0.27 ± 0.05 mm, mean ± standard deviation) with an endothelial layer, and stent grafts placed over the aneurysmal aortic wall were covered by thick neointima (0.62 ± 0.17 mm) without any endothelial lining. Transgraft cell migration at the normal aortic wall was more active than that at the aneurysmal aortic wall. Close contact between the stent and the graft, which was achieved with stent grafts with endo-exo-skeleton, could not enhance endothelial covering on the stent graft placed over the aneurysms.

  16. Tissue responses to stent grafts with endo-exo-skeleton for saccular abdominal aortic aneurysms in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Il; Choi, Young Ho; Chung, Jin Wook; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; So, Young Ho; Kim, Hyun Beom; Min, Seung-Kee; Park, Jae Hyung

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of close contact between the stent and the graft on the induction of endothelial covering on the stent graft placed over an aneurysm. Saccular abdominal aortic aneurysms were made with Dacron patch in eight dogs. The stent graft consisted of an inner stent, a expanded polytetrafluoroethylene graft, and an outer stent. After sacrificing the animals, the aortas with an embedded stent graft were excised. The aortas were inspected grossly and evaluated microscopically. The animals were sacrificed at two (n = 3), six (n = 3), and eight months (n = 2) after endovascular repair. In two dogs, the aortic lumen was occluded at two months after the placement. On gross inspection of specimens from the other six dogs with a patent aortic lumen, stent grafts placed over the normal aortic wall were covered by glossy white neointima, whereas, stent grafts placed over the aneurysmal aortic wall were covered by brownish neointima. On microscopic inspection, stent grafts placed over the normal aortic wall were covered by thin neointima (0.27 ± 0.05 mm, mean ± standard deviation) with an endothelial layer, and stent grafts placed over the aneurysmal aortic wall were covered by thick neointima (0.62 ± 0.17 mm) without any endothelial lining. Transgraft cell migration at the normal aortic wall was more active than that at the aneurysmal aortic wall. Close contact between the stent and the graft, which was achieved with stent grafts with endo-exo-skeleton, could not enhance endothelial covering on the stent graft placed over the aneurysms.

  17. Stent graft placement for dysfunctional arteriovenous grafts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Gyeong Sik [Dept. of Radiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, College of Medicine, CHA University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Byung Seok; Ohm, Joon Young; Ahn, Moon Sang [Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness and outcomes of stent graft use in dysfunctional arteriovenous grafts. Eleven patients who underwent stent graft placement for a dysfunctional hemodialysis graft were included in this retrospective study. Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene covered stent grafts were placed at the venous anastomosis site in case of pseudoaneurysm, venous laceration, elastic recoil or residual restenosis despite the repeated angioplasty. The patency of the arteriovenous graft was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Primary and secondary mean patency was 363 days and 741 days. Primary patency at 3, 6, and 12 months was 82%, 73%, and 32%, respectively. Secondary patency at the 3, 6, 12, 24, and 36 months was improved to 91%, 82%, 82%, 50%, and 25%, respectively. Fractures of the stent graft were observed in 2 patients, but had no effect on the patency. Stent graft placement in dysfunctional arteriovenous graft is useful and effective in prolonging graft patency.

  18. MRI of normal achilles tendon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rollandi, G.A. [Institute of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Bertolotto, M. [Institute of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Perrone, R. [Institute of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Garlaschi, G. [Institute of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Derchi, L.E. [Institute of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy)

    1995-12-01

    To investigate the normal internal structure of tendons 11 volunteers without clinical evidence of tendinopathy were examined using conventional spin-echo T1-, T2- and proton-density weighted sequences. The Achilles tendon was chosen because of its high frequency of injury in athletic activity, large size, superficial position and because it is oriented nearly parallel to the static magnetic field, therefore minimizing the ``magic angle phenomenon``. The tendons exhibited areas of slighly increased signal in four T1-weighted and in all but one proton-density-weighted scans. No intratendinous signal was detected in T2-weighted images. The possible origin of these findings is discussed. We conclude that the knowledge of these normal signals may be useful to avoid incorrectly diagnosing as pathological. (orig.). With 2 figs.

  19. Achilles tendon reflex measuring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szebeszczyk, Janina; Straszecka, Joanna

    1995-06-01

    The examination of Achilles tendon reflex is widely used as a simple, noninvasive clinical test in diagnosis and pharmacological therapy monitoring in such diseases as: hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, diabetic neuropathy, the lower limbs obstructive angiopathies and intermittent claudication. Presented Achilles tendon reflect measuring system is based on the piezoresistive sensor connected with the cylinder-piston system. To determinate the moment of Achilles tendon stimulation a detecting circuit was used. The outputs of the measuring system are connected to the PC-based data acquisition board. Experimental results showed that the measurement accuracy and repeatability is good enough for diagnostics and therapy monitoring purposes. A user friendly, easy-to-operate measurement system fulfills all the requirements related to recording, presentation and storing of the patients' reflexograms.

  20. Efficacy of linezolid, teicoplanin, and vancomycin in prevention of an experimental polytetrafluoroethylene graft infection model caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mese, Bulent; Bozoglan, Orhan; Elveren, Serdal; Eroglu, Erdinc; Gul, Mustafa; Celik, Ahmet; Ciralik, Harun; Yildirimdemir, Halil Ibrahim; Yasim, Alptekin

    2015-03-27

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of linezolid, teicoplanin, and vancomycin in prevention of prosthetic vascular graft infections in a vascular graft infection model. Fifty rats were divided into 5 groups. A polytetrafluoroethylene graft was implanted on the back of each rat. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strain was inoculated into all rats except Group 1. Group 2 was not given any treatment, Group 3 received linezolid, Group 4 received vancomycin, and Group 5 received teicoplanin. The grafts were removed for microbiological and histological examinations on the 7th day. In addition, C-reactive protein and prealbumin levels and leukocyte counts in obtained blood specimens were determined. Group 1 did not have infection. Group 2 had bacteria 5.7 × 10(4) CFU/cm(2). Group 3 and Group 4 had less bacterial growth. Group 5 had no bacterial growth. The number of bacteria was significantly higher in Group 2 than in the other experimental groups and the control group (pteicoplanin, and vancomycin are effective in prevention of prosthetic vascular graft infections.

  1. Evaluation of a laminin-alginate biomaterial, adipocytes, and adipocyte-derived stem cells interaction in animal autologous fat grafting model using 7-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yo-Shen; Hsueh, Yu-Sheng; Chen, Yen-Yu; Lo, Cheng-Yu; Tai, Hao-Chih; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2017-01-01

    Biomaterials are often added to autologous fat grafts both as supporting matrices for the grafted adipocytes and as cell carrier for adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). This in vivo study used an autologous fat graft model to test a lamininalginate biomaterial, adipocytes, and ADSCs in immune-competent rats. We transplanted different combinations of shredded autologous adipose tissue [designated "A" for adipose tissue]), laminin-alginate beads [designated "B" for bead], and ADSCs [designated "C" for cell]) into the backs of 15 Sprague-Dawley rats. Group A received only adipocytes, Group B received only laminin-alginate beads, Group AB received adipocytes mixed with laminin-alginate beads, Group BC received laminin-alginate beads encapsulating ADSCs, and Group ABC received adipocytes and laminin-alginate beads containing ADSCs. Seven-tesla magnetic resonance imaging was used to evaluate the rats at the 1st, 6th, and 12th weeks after transplantation. At the 12th week, the rats were sacrificed and the implanted materials were retrieved for gross examination and histological evaluation. The results based on MRI, gross evaluation, and histological data all showed that implants in Group ABC had better resorption of the biomaterial, improved survival of the grafted adipocytes, and adipogenic differentiation of ADSCs. Volume retention of grafts in Group ABC (89%) was also significantly greater than those in Group A (58%) (p < 0.01). Our findings support that the combination of shredded adipose tissue with ADSCs in laminin-alginate beads provided the best overall outcome.

  2. Midportion Achilles tendinosis and the plantaris tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfredson, Håkan

    2011-10-01

    When re-operating patients with midportion Achilles tendinosis, having had a poor effect of ultrasound (US) and Doppler-guided scraping, the author found the involvement of the plantaris tendon to be a likely reason for the poor result. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of a plantaris tendon in close relation to the Achilles tendon in consecutive patients with midportion Achilles tendinosis undergoing treatment with US and Doppler-guided scraping. This study includes 73 consecutive tendons with chronic painful midportion Achilles tendinosis, where US+Doppler examination showed thickening, irregular tendon structure, hypo-echoic regions, and localised high blood flow outside and inside the ventral Achilles midportion. The tendons were treated with US+Doppler-guided scraping, via a medial incision. If there was a plantaris tendon located in close relation to the medial Achilles, it was extirpated. An invaginated, or 'close by located', enlarged plantaris tendon was found in 58 of 73 (80%) tendons. Preliminary clinical results of the combined procedure, US + Doppler-guided surgical scraping and extirpation of the plantaris tendon, are very promising. A thickened plantaris tendon located in close relation to the medial Achilles seems common in patients with chronic painful midportion tendinosis. The role of the plantaris tendon in midportion Achilles tendinosis needs to be further evaluated and should be kept in mind when treating this condition.

  3. Heel pain and Achilles tendonitis -- aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Your Injury The Achilles tendon connects your calf muscles to your heel bone. Together, they help ... running or jumping. Do activities that do not strain the tendon, such as ... and strengthen the muscles and tendon. Range of motion exercises will help ...

  4. Spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture in alkaptonuria | Mohammed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spontaneous Achilles tendon ruptures are uncommon. We present a 46-year-old man with spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture due to ochronosis. To our knowledge, this has not been previously reported in Sudan literature. The tendon of the reported patient healed well after debridement and primary repairs.

  5. Hamstring Graft Incorporation According to the Length of the Graft Inside Tunnels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaignac, Etienne; Marot, Vincent; Faruch, Marie; Reina, Nicolas; Murgier, Jérôme; Accadbled, Franck; Berard, Emilie; Chiron, Philippe

    2018-02-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with a quadrupled semitendinosus (ST4) graft is an evolution of the standard technique with 2 hamstring tendons (semitendinosus + gracilis [STG]). However, there is no published comparison of how well these 2 types of hamstring grafts are incorporated into the bone tunnels. Because the ST4 graft is shorter, there is less graft material inside the tunnels. To use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to compare graft incorporation in the tibial bone tunnels 1 year after ACL reconstruction with either an STG graft or ST4 graft. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Sixty-two patients who underwent ACL reconstruction were enrolled prospectively: 31 with an ST4 graft and 31 with an STG graft. The same surgical technique, fixation method, and postoperative protocol were used in both groups. Graft incorporation and ligamentization were evaluated with MRI after 1 year of follow-up. The following parameters were evaluated: signal-to-noise quotient (SNQ), tibial tunnel enlargement, signal intensity at the bone-graft interface, and graft signal according to the Howell scale. The number of participants needed to show that the mean SNQ did not differ between the 2 techniques was 31 in each group (with a 1-sided alpha of 2.5% and a 1-sided beta of 10.0%). The Student t test was used to compare the distribution of continuous secondary endpoints. The mean SNQ was 5.2 ± 4.5 for the STG group and 5.9 ± 3.7 for the ST4 group ( P = .5100). The mean tibial tunnel widening was 93.7% ± 51.7% for the STG group versus 80.0% ± 42.9% for the ST4 group ( P = .2605). The groups did not differ in signal intensity at the bone-graft interface ( P = .7502) or in graft signal according to the Howell scale ( P = .4544). At the 1-year postoperative follow-up, incorporation and ligamentization of the STG and ST4 grafts were the same based on MRI analysis. The results were at least as good with the ST4 technique as with the standard STG technique in terms

  6. In vivo evaluation of the elastic anisotropy of the human Achilles tendon using shear wave dispersion analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brum, J.; Bernal, M.; Gennisson, J. L.; Tanter, M.

    2014-02-01

    Non-invasive evaluation of the Achilles tendon elastic properties may enhance diagnosis of tendon injury and the assessment of recovery treatments. Shear wave elastography has shown to be a powerful tool to estimate tissue mechanical properties. However, its applicability to quantitatively evaluate tendon stiffness is limited by the understanding of the physics on the shear wave propagation in such a complex medium. First, tendon tissue is transverse isotropic. Second, tendons are characterized by a marked stiffness in the 400 to 1300 kPa range (i.e. fast shear waves). Hence, the shear wavelengths are greater than the tendon thickness leading to guided wave propagation. Thus, to better understand shear wave propagation in tendons and consequently to properly estimate its mechanical properties, a dispersion analysis is required. In this study, shear wave velocity dispersion was measured in vivo in ten Achilles tendons parallel and perpendicular to the tendon fibre orientation. By modelling the tendon as a transverse isotropic viscoelastic plate immersed in fluid it was possible to fully describe the experimental data (deviation<1.4%). We show that parallel to fibres the shear wave velocity dispersion is not influenced by viscosity, while it is perpendicularly to fibres. Elasticity (found to be in the range from 473 to 1537 kPa) and viscosity (found to be in the range from 1.7 to 4 Pa.s) values were retrieved from the model in good agreement with reported results.

  7. Tear patterns, surgical repair, and clinical outcomes of patellar tendon ruptures after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with a bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, Rodney W; Shelbourne, K Donald; Urch, Scott E; Lazarus, David

    2012-08-01

    Patellar tendon ruptures are rare after graft harvest for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Few reports are available in the literature. To report the common tear patterns and results of treatment with tendon repair and cable augmentation. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. All tendon ruptures were repaired to bone with suture anchors and augmented with a Dall-Miles cable, followed by an aggressive rehabilitation protocol. The tear location was recorded. Range of motion, strength, and subjective survey testing were conducted preoperatively and postoperatively. Thirteen patellar tendon ruptures were found from our database of 5364 ACL reconstructions, for an incidence of 0.24%. Seven ruptures occurred from the patellar origin medially and the tibial attachment laterally in a Z-shaped pattern. Four were completely distal, and 2 were completely proximal ruptures. All patients exhibited early flexion loss, but 11 of 13 patients maintained full, terminal hyperextension throughout treatment. The mean postoperative side-to-side flexion deficit was 33° at 1 month, 6° at 3 months, and 3° at latest follow-up at a mean of 4.8 years after tendon repair (range, 1-16 years). By International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) criteria, 10 patients had normal flexion, and 3 were nearly normal at latest follow-up. Twelve patients had normal extension, and 1 had nearly normal extension at latest follow-up. Mean isokinetic quadriceps muscle strength was 68.7% of the other side at 3 months after repair and 100.0% at latest follow-up, occurring at a mean of 47.5 months (range, 12-120 months). At a mean of 2 years (range, 1-4 years) after repair, the mean modified Noyes subjective score was 89.8 ± 9.2. Patellar tendon ruptures are rare after ACL graft harvest. These ruptures usually occur in either a proximal-medial and distal-lateral pattern or an entirely distal pattern, in contrast to the proximal-only tear pattern commonly observed in unharvested patellar

  8. Chromium (VI) ion adsorption by grafted cross-linked chitosan beads in aqueous solution - a mathematical and statistical modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igberase, E; Osifo, P; Ofomaja, A

    2017-12-01

    Chitosan outstanding qualities and efficient way of binding metal ions even to near zero concentration is the major reason for special attention. Modification of chitosan allows the polymer to be applied in numerous field of research. Depending on the modification techniques, chitosan possesses increased adsorption capacity. In this study chitosan beads (CS) were formulated from chitosan flakes, the beads were cross-linked with glutaraldehyde and thereafter grafted with ethyldiaminetetraacetic acid. The stability and amine concentration of the beads were determined. The chemical functionalities of the beads were obtained by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). However, in the adsorption studies with Cr(VI), the number of runs in the experiment was obtained by response surface methodology (RSM), and the maximum adsorption capacity (Qm) from each run was determined from the Langmuir model. The results of the experiment showed that the non-modified beads were soluble at pH 1-4 and insoluble at pH 5, while the modified beads were insoluble at pH 1-6. The amine concentration of CS, CCS and grafted cross-linked chitosan beads (GCCS) were 4.4, 3.8 and 5.0 mmol/g, respectively. The point of zero charge (pHPZC) of GCCS was found to be 4.4. The quadratic model was significant and adequate in describing the experimental data. The difference between experimental and predicted Qm was negligible. From the design matrix and results, increased Qm was achieved at pH 5, contact time 70 min, temperature 45°C, adsorbent dosage 5 g and initial concentration 70 mg/l. The desorption of the beads loaded with Cr(VI) was successful with 0.5 M HCl eluant and contact time of 180 min, leading to cost minimization.

  9. The effect of dry needling and treadmill running on inducing pathological changes in rat Achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bom Soo; Joo, Young Chae; Choi, Byung Hyune; Kim, Kil Hwan; Kang, Joon Soon; Park, So Ra

    2015-11-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a common degenerative condition without a definitive treatment. An adequate chronic animal model of Achilles tendinopathy has not yet been developed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the individual and combined effects of dry needling and treadmill running on the Achilles tendon of rats. Percutaneous dry needling, designed to physically replicate microrupture of collagen fibers in overloaded tendons, was performed on the right Achilles tendon of 80 Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were randomly divided into two groups: a treadmill group, which included rats that underwent daily uphill treadmill running (n = 40), and a cage group, which included rats that could move freely within their cages (n = 40). At the end of weeks 1 and 4, 20 rats from each group were sacrificed, and bilateral Achilles tendons were collected. The harvested tendons were subjected to mechanical testing and histological analysis. Dry needling induced histological and mechanical changes in the Achilles tendons at week 1, and the changes persisted at week 4. The needled Achilles tendons of the treadmill group tended to show more severe histological and mechanical changes than those of the cage group, although these differences were not statistically significant. Dry needling combined with free cage activity or treadmill running produced tendinopathy-like changes in rat Achilles tendons up to 4 weeks after injury. Dry needling is an easy procedure with a short induction period and a high success rate, suggesting it may have relevance in the design of an Achilles tendinopathy model.

  10. New pull out technique for flexor tendon repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamrani RS

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Flexor tendon injury is one of the unanswered problems in reconstructive surgery of the hand. Although pull out method is one of the best reconstructive approaches but still is controversial. Surgeons prefer immobilization to prevent laceration at the site of the suture but it may cause adhesion and lead to surgical failure. The aim of this study was to perform a new surgical method to achieve a tendon repair without these problems."n"nMethods: In this case-series study, 80 fingers with flexor tendon impairment selected and divided into four groups (tendon laceration & avulsion, tendon graft reconstructed in 1 & 2 stages then patients were surgically treated by the new technique. The most important aspect of the technique is the placement of the suture in the direction of strength therefore, following any tension the suture would be tighter and this point help us to mobilize the injured tendon immediately after the surgery then we analyzed the results depends on the patient's group."n"nResults: The pull out and surgical (functional results were evaluated. 97% of the pull out results were good and 3% were poor and surgical results were 23.9% excellent, 52.2% good, 17.9% fair and 6% poor

  11. Bipedicled flap for the reconstruction of soft tissue defects of the Achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chin-Ta; Chen, Shyi-Gen; Chen, Tim-Mo; Dai, Niann-Tzyy; Chang, Shun-Cheng

    2015-04-01

    Soft tissue defects exposing the Achilles tendon are common in patients who have undergone trauma or in those with pressure ulcers associated with vascular diseases. The purpose of this article was to present our experience of 11 patients who underwent reconstruction of soft tissue defects of the Achilles tendon using bipedicled fasciocutaneous flaps. Between August 2008 and August 2012, 11 patients were admitted to our hospital, presenting with soft tissue defects overlying the Achilles tendon. After adequate debridement, the 11 patients underwent bipedicled fasciocutaneous flap placement to resurface the complex soft tissue defects and provide a gliding surface for the exposed Achilles tendon. The patients' age, comorbidity, etiology, defect size and location, wound culture, skin graft size, complications, surgery duration, and follow-up period were reviewed. The 11 fasciocutaneous bipedicled flaps survived completely, and the wounds healed satisfactorily at a mean follow-up period of 20.9 months (range, 6-48 months). Only 1 flap was complicated with wound dehiscence and superficial necrosis of its lateral edge, which healed conservatively. The donor sites were covered with split-thickness skin grafts and healed well without complications. The bipedicled fasciocutaneous flap is a reliable flap for coverage of defects overlying the Achilles tendon, especially in patients with vascular problems and/or elderly patients. The ease of handling, short operative time, and early recovery of mobilization function are of great benefit to patients. Thus, the bipedicled fasciocutaneous flap can be a valuable alternative for defect reconstructions overlying the Achilles tendon, with satisfactory results both functionally and cosmetically.

  12. Comparison of outside-in and inside-out technique for tibial fixation of a soft-tissue graft in ACL reconstruction using the Shim technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenschow, S; Schliemann, B; Schulze, M; Raschke, M; Kösters, C

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the biomechanical properties of tibial fixation of a free tendon graft in ACL reconstruction using the Shim, a new wedge-shaped implant, in an outside-in technique to fixation by the Shim used in an inside-out technique and fixation by interference screw in a porcine model. Porcine tibia and flexor tendons were used. In Group 1, the Shim was applied outside-in. In Group 2, the Shim was inserted inside-out. In the Group 3, an 8-mm interference screw was used. Ten specimens were tested in each group. Load-to-failure, elongation, stiffness and failure mode were recorded. Cyclic loading was performed between 5 and 250 N for 1,000 cycles, followed by a load to failure testing. Mean maximum load-to-failure was 629.53 N in Group 1,648.54 N in Group 2 and 749.53 N in Group 3. There was no significant difference between the groups. Stiffness varied between 127.34 N/mm in Group 1, 151.27 N/mm in Group 2 and 182.25 N/mm in Group 3. No significant differences were found between outside-in Shim and interference screw fixation. No significant difference was found for elongation among the three groups. The main failure mode was a rupture of the tendon in the IFS group and a slippage of either the implant or the tendon in both groups using the Shim. As no statistically significant difference could be seen concerning load to failure, stiffness and elongation between the inside-out and the outside-in techniques, the Shim can be used for tibial fixation in an outside-in or inside-out technique depending on the preference of the surgeon. To prevent slippage of the graft a hybrid fixation should be considered.

  13. Chronic Achilles tendon rupture reconstructed using hamstring tendon autograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Philip; Mason, Lyndon William; Molloy, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Chronic rupture of the Achilles tendon (delayed diagnosis of more than 4 weeks) can result in retraction of the tendon and inadequate healing. Direct repair may not be possible and augmentation methods are challenging when the defect exceeds 5-6 cm, especially if the distal stump is grossly tendinopathic. We describe our method of Achilles tendon reconstruction with ipsilateral semitendinosis autograft and interference screw fixation in a patient with chronic rupture, a 9 cm defect and gross distal tendinopathy. Patient reported outcome measures consistently demonstrated improved health status at 12 months post surgery: MOXFQ-Index 38-25, EQ5D-5L 18-9, EQ VAS 70-90 and VISA-A 1-64. The patient was back to full daily function, could single leg heel raise and was gradually returning to sport. No complications or adverse events were recorded. Reconstruction of chronic tears of the Achilles tendon with large defects and gross tendinopathy using an ipsilateral semitendinosis autograft and interference screw fixation can achieve satisfactory improvements in patient reported outcomes up to 1 year post-surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Hot callusing for propagation of American beech by grafting

    Science.gov (United States)

    David W. Carey; Mary E. Mason; Paul Bloese; Jennifer L. Koch

    2013-01-01

    To increase grafting success rate, a hot callus grafting system was designed and implemented as part of a multiagency collaborative project to manage beech bark disease (BBD) through the establishment of regional BBD-resistant grafted seed orchards. Five years of data from over 2000 hot callus graft attempts were analyzed using a logistic regression model to determine...

  15. The Biomechanical Role of Scaffolds in Augmented Rotator Cuff Tendon Repairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    double-row suture anchor repair for rotator cuff tears: a random- ized controlled trial. Am J Sports Med 2007;35:1254-60. doi:10.1177/ 0363546507302218... sutures cutting through the tendon was reduced, occurring in 17 of 20 nonaugmented repairs but in only 7 of 20 augmented repairs. In another study...tuberosity using a double-row transosseous technique with 2 Mason Allen sutures per row.20 The prototypical augmen- tation graft used for the augmented

  16. Anterior cruciate ligament graft tensioning. Is the maximal sustained one-handed pull technique reproducible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirpara Kieran M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tensioning of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction grafts affects the clinical outcome of the procedure. As yet, no consensus has been reached regarding the optimum initial tension in an ACL graft. Most surgeons rely on the maximal sustained one-handed pull technique for graft tension. We aim to determine if this technique is reproducible from patient to patient. Findings We created a device to simulate ACL reconstruction surgery using Ilizarov components and porcine flexor tendons. Six experienced ACL reconstruction surgeons volunteered to tension porcine grafts using the device to see if they could produce a consistent tension. None of the surgeons involved were able to accurately reproduce graft tension over a series of repeat trials. Conclusions We conclude that the maximal sustained one-handed pull technique of ACL graft tensioning is not reproducible from trial to trial. We also conclude that the initial tension placed on an ACL graft varies from surgeon to surgeon.

  17. Anterior cruciate ligament graft tensioning. Is the maximal sustained one-handed pull technique reproducible?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, Barry J

    2011-07-20

    Abstract Background Tensioning of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction grafts affects the clinical outcome of the procedure. As yet, no consensus has been reached regarding the optimum initial tension in an ACL graft. Most surgeons rely on the maximal sustained one-handed pull technique for graft tension. We aim to determine if this technique is reproducible from patient to patient. Findings We created a device to simulate ACL reconstruction surgery using Ilizarov components and porcine flexor tendons. Six experienced ACL reconstruction surgeons volunteered to tension porcine grafts using the device to see if they could produce a consistent tension. None of the surgeons involved were able to accurately reproduce graft tension over a series of repeat trials. Conclusions We conclude that the maximal sustained one-handed pull technique of ACL graft tensioning is not reproducible from trial to trial. We also conclude that the initial tension placed on an ACL graft varies from surgeon to surgeon.

  18. Nutrition of flexor tendons in monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manske, P R; Bridwell, K; Whiteside, L A; Lesker, P A

    1978-10-01

    The hydrogen washout technique was used to investigate the role of synovial diffusion versus vascular perfusion in the nutrition of monkey flexor tendons within the digital sheath. There was no significant difference in the uptake and washout of hydrogen tracer by tendons in contact with synovium but detached from the surrounding vasculature, compared to control tendons. However, there was insignificant uptake of tracer by tendons with intact vasculature, but separated from synovium. Synovial diffusion is a primary nutrient pathway of monkey flexor tendons within the digital sheath.

  19. Can PRP effectively treat injured tendons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, James H-C

    2014-01-01

    PRP is widely used to treat tendon and other tissue injuries in orthopaedics and sports medicine; however, the efficacy of PRP treatment on injured tendons is highly controversial. In this commentary, I reason that there are many PRP- and patient-related factors that influence the outcomes of PRP treatment on injured tendons. Therefore, more basic science studies are needed to understand the mechanism of PRP on injured tendons. Finally, I suggest that better understanding of the PRP action mechanism will lead to better use of PRP for the effective treatment of tendon injuries in clinics.

  20. Two-Stage Nerve Graft in Severe Scar: A Time-Course Study in a Rat Model

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    Shayan Zadegan

    2015-04-01

    According to the EPT and WRL, the two-stage nerve graft showed significant improvement (P=0.020 and P =0.017 respectively. The TOA showed no significant difference between the two groups. The total vascular index was significantly higher in the two-stage nerve graft group (P

  1. Changes in aortic pulse wave velocity of four thoracic aortic stent grafts in an ex vivo porcine model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Beaufort, Hector W L; Coda, Margherita; Conti, Michele; van Bakel, Theodorus M J; Nauta, Foeke J H; Lanzarone, Ettore; Moll, Frans L|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070246882; van Herwaarden, Joost A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304814733; Auricchio, Ferdinando; Trimarchi, Santi

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has been shown to lead to increased aortic stiffness. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of stent graft type and stent graft length on aortic stiffness in a controlled, experimental setting. METHODS: Twenty porcine thoracic

  2. A New Method for Xenogeneic Bone Graft Deproteinization: Comparative Study of Radius Defects in a Rabbit Model.

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    Pengfei Lei

    Full Text Available Deproteinization is an indispensable process for the elimination of antigenicity in xenograft bones. However, the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 deproteinized xenograft, which is commonly used to repair bone defect, exhibits limited osteoinduction activity. The present study was designed to develop a new method for deproteinization and compare the osteogenic capacities of new pepsin deproteinized xenograft bones with those of conventional H2O2 deproteinized ones.Bones were deproteinized in H2O2 or pepsin for 8 hours. The morphologies were compared by HE staining. The content of protein and collagen I were measured by the Kjeldahl method and HPLC-MS, respectively. The physical properties were evaluated by SEM and mechanical tests. For in vivo study, X-ray, micro-CT and HE staining were employed to monitor the healing processes of radius defects in rabbit models transplanted with different graft materials.Compared with H2O2 deproteinized bones, no distinct morphological and physical changes were observed. However, pepsin deproteinized bones showed a lower protein content, and a higher collagen content were preserved. In vivo studies showed that pepsin deproteinized bones exhibited better osteogenic performance than H2O2 deproteinized bones, moreover, the quantity and quality of the newly formed bones were improved as indicated by micro-CT analysis. From the results of histological examination, the newly formed bones in the pepsin group were mature bones.Pepsin deproteinized xenograft bones show advantages over conventional H2O2 deproteinized bones with respect to osteogenic capacity; this new method may hold potential clinical value in the development of new biomaterials for bone grafting.

  3. Remodeling of injectable, low-viscosity polymer/ceramic bone grafts in a sheep femoral defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, Anne D; McEnery, Madison A; Kalpakci, Kerem N; Zienkiewicz, Katarzyna J; Shimko, Daniel A; Guelcher, Scott A

    2017-11-01

    Ceramic/polymer composite bone grafts offer the potential advantage of combining the osteoconductivity of ceramic component with the ductility of polymeric component, resulting in a graft that meets many of the desired properties for bone void fillers (BVF). However, the relative contributions of the polymer and ceramic components to bone healing are not well understood. In this study, we compared remodeling of low-viscosity (LV) ceramic/poly(ester urethane) composites to a ceramic BVF control in a sheep femoral condyle plug defect model. LV composites incorporating either ceramic (LV/CM) or allograft bone (LV/A) particles were evaluated. We hypothesized that LV/CM composites which have the advantageous handling properties of injectability, flowability, and settability would heal comparably to the CM control, which was evaluated for up to 2 years to study its long-term degradation properties. Remodeling of LV/CM was comparable to that observed for the CM control, as evidenced by new bone formation on the surface of the ceramic particles. At early time points (4 months), LV/CM composites healed similar to the ceramic clinical control, while LV/A components showed more variable healing due to osteoclast-mediated resorption of the allograft particles. At longer time points (12-15 months), healing of LV/CM composites was more variable due to the nonhomogeneous distribution and lower concentration of the ceramic particles compared to the ceramic clinical control. Resorption of the ceramic particles was almost complete at 2 years. This study highlights the importance of optimizing the loading and distribution of ceramic particles in polymer/ceramic composites to maximize bone healing. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 2333-2343, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Effects of Local Administration of Boric Acid on Posterolateral Spinal Fusion with Autogenous Bone Grafting in a Rodent Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kömürcü, Erkam; Özyalvaçlı, Gülzade; Kaymaz, Burak; Gölge, Umut Hatay; Göksel, Ferdi; Cevizci, Sibel; Adam, Gürhan; Ozden, Raif

    2015-09-01

    Spinal fusion is among the most frequently applied spinal surgical procedures. The goal of the present study was to evaluate whether the local administration of boric acid (BA) improves spinal fusion in an experimental spinal fusion model in rats. Currently, there is no published data that evaluates the possible positive effects if the local administration of BA on posterolateral spinal fusion. Thirty-two rats were randomly divided into four independent groups: no material was added at the fusion area for group 1; an autogenous morselized corticocancellous bone graft was used for group 2; an autogenous morselized corticocancellous bone graft with boric acid (8.7 mg/kg) for group 3; and only boric acid was placed into the fusion area for group 4. The L4-L6 spinal segments were collected at week 6, and the assessments included radiography, manual palpation, and histomorphometry. A statistically significant difference was determined between the groups with regard to the mean histopathological scores (p = 0.002), and a paired comparison was made with the Mann-Whitney U test to detect the group/groups from which the difference originated. It was determined that only the graft + BA practice increased the histopathological score significantly with regard to the control group (p = 0.002). Whereas, there was no statistically significant difference between the groups in terms of the manual assessment of fusion and radiographic analysis (respectively p = 0.328 and p = 0.196). This preliminary study suggests that BA may clearly be useful as a therapeutic agent in spinal fusion. However, further research is required to show the most effective dosage of BA on spinal fusion, and should indicate whether BA effects spinal fusion in the human body.

  5. [Anatomic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament with the autologous quadriceps tendon. Primary and revision surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forkel, P; Petersen, W

    2014-02-01

    Restore function of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Chronic functional instability with rupture of the ACL, giving way phenomena, acute rupture of the ACL with concomitant meniscus repair, rerupture of ACL graft with anatomical tunnels. Local infection of the skin at the knee joint, local soft tissue damage, after rupture of the quadriceps tendon, enthesopathia of the quadriceps tendon, lack of patient compliance. Harvest quadriceps tendon graft with a bone block via a 4-5 cm long incision, starting from the middle third of the proximal patella pole without damaging the tendon fibers. Drill the femoral tunnel via a deep anteromedial portal with the knee flexed of more than 110° (tunnel diameter 0.5-1 mm smaller in diameter than bone block). Gentle tunnel preparation using dilators. In absence of an ACL stump the lateral meniscus anterior horn serves as tibial landmark. In case of revision surgery, remove graft material and implants from the tunnel. Graft fixation using press fit method in the femoral tunnel. Tibial graft fixation archieved with a resorbable interference screw and a button. Goal of the inflammatory phase (weeks 1-2) is pain and inflammation control (20 kg partial weight bearing). During the proliferative phase (weeks 2-6), load and mobility slowly increased (closed-chain exercises). During the remodeling phase (> 6 weeks), strength and coordination exercises are performed. In revision cases and in case of concomitant injuries, longer partial weight-bearing period might be necessary. Athletes should not return to competitive sports before 6-8 months. In a prospective study, 33 patients (age 16-48 years) were examined after replacement of the ACL with a quadriceps tendon graft after a minimum follow-up (FU) of 2 years (12 revision; 21 primary surgery). No post- or perioperative complications. Postoperative radiographs showed an anatomical tunnel location and no dislocation of the bone block. After 2 years the difference of a-p translation

  6. Ultrasound elasticity imaging of human posterior tibial tendon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liang

    Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD) is a common degenerative condition leading to a severe impairment of gait. There is currently no effective method to determine whether a patient with advanced PTTD would benefit from several months of bracing and physical therapy or ultimately require surgery. Tendon degeneration is closely associated with irreversible degradation of its collagen structure, leading to changes to its mechanical properties. If these properties could be monitored in vivo, it could be used to quantify the severity of tendonosis and help determine the appropriate treatment. Ultrasound elasticity imaging (UEI) is a real-time, noninvasive technique to objectively measure mechanical properties in soft tissue. It consists of acquiring a sequence of ultrasound frames and applying speckle tracking to estimate displacement and strain at each pixel. The goals of my dissertation were to 1) use acoustic simulations to investigate the performance of UEI during tendon deformation with different geometries; 2) develop and validate UEI as a potentially noninvasive technique for quantifying tendon mechanical properties in human cadaver experiments; 3) design a platform for UEI to measure mechanical properties of the PTT in vivo and determine whether there are detectable and quantifiable differences between healthy and diseased tendons. First, ultrasound simulations of tendon deformation were performed using an acoustic modeling program. The effects of different tendon geometries (cylinder and curved cylinder) on the performance of UEI were investigated. Modeling results indicated that UEI accurately estimated the strain in the cylinder geometry, but underestimated in the curved cylinder. The simulation also predicted that the out-of-the-plane motion of the PTT would cause a non-uniform strain pattern within incompressible homogeneous isotropic material. However, to average within a small region of interest determined by principal component analysis (PCA

  7. Mesenchymal stem cells for tendon healing: what is on the horizon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronesi, Francesca; Salamanna, Francesca; Tschon, Matilde; Maglio, Melania; Nicoli Aldini, Nicolo; Fini, Milena

    2017-11-01

    Tendon injuries are a noteworthy morbidity but at present there are few effective scientifically proven treatments. In recent decades, a number of new strategies including tissue engineering with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been proposed to enhance tendon healing. Although MSCs are an interesting and promising approach, many questions regarding their use in tendon repair remain unanswered. This descriptive overview of the literature of the last decade explores the in vivo studies on tendon healing, in small and large animal models, which used MSCs harvested from different tissues, and the state of the art in clinical applications. It was observed that there are still doubts about the optimum amount of MSCs to use and their source and the type of scaffolds to deliver the cells. Thus, further studies are needed to determine the best protocol for MSC use in tendon healing. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Transplantation of fetal instead of adult fibroblasts reduces the probability of ectopic ossification during tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zhi; Zhu, Ting; Shen, Wei Liang; Tang, Qiao Mei; Chen, Jia Lin; Yin, Zi; Ji, Jun Feng; Heng, Boon Chin; Ouyang, Hong Wei; Chen, Xiao

    2014-07-01

    Although cell transplantation therapy can effectively promote functional tendon repair, occasional ectopic ossification during tendon regeneration undermines its efficacy. The effect of transplanted cell types on ectopic ossification has not yet been systematically evaluated. This study compared the rate of ectopic ossification during tendon repair upon transplantation with mouse fetal fibroblasts (FFs) and their adult counterparts (adult fibroblasts [AFs]). Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining, immunofluorescence, and gene expression analysis were used to compare the spontaneous osteogenic differentiation of FFs and AFs in vitro. X-ray, histology, and gene expression analysis were used to investigate the ectopic ossification in a mouse Achilles tendon repair model in vivo. ALP staining and immunofluorescence data in vitro showed that FFs had less spontaneous osteogenic differentiation capacity, and lower expression of runt-related transcription factor 2 (runx2). For the in vivo study, the FFs transplant group displayed reduced ectopic ossification (2/7 vs. 7/7, Mann-Whitney test ptransplantation and enhanced tendon repair (general histological score at week 6, 7.53 vs. 10.56, ptransplantation in the AFs transplant group. Gene expression analysis of the regenerated tissue showed significantly higher expression levels of transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-β1) and transforming growth factor beta3 (TGF-β3) in the AFs group during the early stages of tendon repair. Our study demonstrates that transplantation of fetal instead of AFs is more promising for tendon repair, underscoring the importance of the origin of seed cells for tendon repair.

  9. Adipose derived stromal vascular fraction improves early tendon healing: an experimental study in rabbits

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    Mehdi Behfar

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Tendon never restores the complete biological and mechanical properties after healing. Bone marrow and recently adipose tissue have been used as the sources of mesenchymal stem cells, which have been proven to enhance tendon healing. Stromal vascular fraction (SVF, derived from adipose tissue by an enzymatic digestion, represents an alternative source of multipotent cells, which undergo differentiation into multiple lineages to be used in regenerative medicine. In the present study, we investigated potentials of this source on tendon healing. Twenty rabbits were divided into control and treatment groups. Five rabbits were used as donors of adipose tissue. The injury model was unilateral complete transection through the middle one third of deep digital flexor tendon. Immediately after suture repair, either fresh stromal vascular fraction from enzymatic digestion of adipose tissue or placebo was intratendinously injected into the suture site in treatments and controls, respectively. Cast immobilization was continued for two weeks after surgery. Animals were sacrificed at the third week and tendons underwent histological, immunohistochemical, and mechanical evaluations. By histology, improved fibrillar organization and remodeling of neotendon were observed in treatment group. Immunohistochemistry revealed an insignificant increase in collagen type III and I expression in treatments over controls. Mechanical testing showed significant increase in maximum load and energy absorption in SVF treated tendons. The present study showed that intratendinous injection of uncultured adipose derived stromal vascular fraction improved structural and mechanical properties of repaired tendon and it could be an effective modality for treating tendon laceration.

  10. Influence of ischemia before vein grafting on early hyperplasia of the graft and the dynamic changes of the intima after grafting

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    Zou RongJiang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate both the influence of ischemia before grafting on early hyperplasia of the vein grafts, and the dynamic changes of the intima after grafting in a rabbit model of vein graft disease. Methods We performed paired vein graft experiments under different ischemic conditions (15 vs. 60 min; 15 vs. 90 min in the neck of the rabbits and compared the differences between the grafts. Clopidogrel, an anti-platelet agent, was administered before and after surgery. Twenty-eight days after the grafting procedure, the veins were evaluated microscopically. The dynamic changes of the intima after grafting were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy over time. Results The vein grafts subjected to 60- or 90-min ischemia exhibited no differences compared to those subjected to 15-min ischemia in terms of the mean thickness of the intimal, medial, and adventitial layers of the graft. Similarly, there was no difference in the Ki-67 labeling index (proliferation marker between the vein grafts. Vein grafts with 15-min ischemia lost endothelial cells (ECs but healed by 3 days post graft, whereas vein grafts with 90-min ischemia suffered serious EC loss, which was restored with new ECs during days 2 to 14 post graft. Conclusions Ninety-minute ischemia before vein grafting can cause serious EC loss, but does not increase early intimal hyperplasia when clopidogrel is administered. Protecting the vein from ischemia and reperfusion injury preserves ECs.

  11. Hemodynamic determinants of aortic dissection propagation by 2D computational modeling: implications for endovascular stent-grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitsaz, S; Azadani, A N; Matthews, P B; Chuter, T A; Tseng, E E; Ge, L

    2012-10-01

    Aortic dissection is a life-threatening aortic catastrophe where layers of the aortic wall are separated allowing blood flow within the layers. Propagation of aortic dissection is strongly linked to the rate of rise of pressure (dp/dt) experienced by the aortic wall but the hemodynamics is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to perform computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to determine the relationship between dissection propagation in the distal longitudinal direction (the tearing force) and dp/dt. Five computational models of aortic dissection in a 2D pipe were constructed. Initiation of dissection and propagation were represented in 4 single entry tear models, 3 of which investigated the role of length of dissection and antegrade propagation, 1 of which investigated retrograde propagation. The 5th model included a distal re-entry tear. Impact of pressure field distribution on tearing force was determined. Tearing force in the longitudinal direction for dissections with a single entry tear was approximately proportional to dp/dt and L2 where L is the length of dissection. Tearing force was much lower under steady flow than pulsatile flow conditions. Introduction of a second tear distally along the dissection away from the primary entry tear significantly reduced tearing force. The hemodynamic mechanism for dissection propagation demonstrated in these models support the use of β-blockers in medical management. Endovascular stent-graft treatment of dissection should ideally cover both entry and re-entry tears to reduce risk of retrograde propagation of aortic dissection.

  12. Bioreactor Design for Tendon/Ligament Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Gardiner, Bruce S.; Lin, Zhen; Rubenson, Jonas; Kirk, Thomas B.; Wang, Allan; Xu, Jiake

    2013-01-01

    Tendon and ligament injury is a worldwide health problem, but the treatment options remain limited. Tendon and ligament engineering might provide an alternative tissue source for the surgical replacement of injured tendon. A bioreactor provides a controllable environment enabling the systematic study of specific biological, biochemical, and biomechanical requirements to design and manufacture engineered tendon/ligament tissue. Furthermore, the tendon/ligament bioreactor system can provide a suitable culture environment, which mimics the dynamics of the in vivo environment for tendon/ligament maturation. For clinical settings, bioreactors also have the advantages of less-contamination risk, high reproducibility of cell propagation by minimizing manual operation, and a consistent end product. In this review, we identify the key components, design preferences, and criteria that are required for the development of an ideal bioreactor for engineering tendons and ligaments. PMID:23072472

  13. Imaging grafted cells with [18F]FHBG using an optimized HSV1-TK mammalian expression vector in a brain injury rodent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salabert, Anne-Sophie; Vaysse, Laurence; Beaurain, Marie; Alonso, Mathieu; Arribarat, Germain; Lotterie, Jean-Albert; Loubinoux, Isabelle; Tafani, Mathieu; Payoux, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Cell transplantation is an innovative therapeutic approach after brain injury to compensate for tissue damage. To have real-time longitudinal monitoring of intracerebrally grafted cells, we explored the feasibility of a molecular imaging approach using thymidine kinase HSV1-TK gene encoding and [18F]FHBG as a reporter probe to image enzyme expression. A stable neuronal cell line expressing HSV1-TK was developed with an optimised mammalian expression vector to ensure long-term transgene expression. After [18F]FHBG incubation under defined parameters, calibration ranges from 1 X 104 to 3 X 106 Neuro2A-TK cells were analysed by gamma counter or by PET-camera. In parallel, grafting with different quantities of [18F]FHBG prelabelled Neuro2A-TK cells was carried out in a rat brain injury model induced by stereotaxic injection of malonate toxin. Image acquisition of the rats was then performed with PET/CT camera to study the [18F]FHBG signal of transplanted cells in vivo. Under the optimised incubation conditions, [18F]FHBG cell uptake rate was around 2.52%. In-vitro calibration range analysis shows a clear linear correlation between the number of cells and the signal intensity. The PET signal emitted into rat brain correlated well with the number of cells injected and the number of surviving grafted cells was recorded via the in-vitro calibration range. PET/CT acquisitions also allowed validation of the stereotaxic injection procedure. Technique sensitivity was evaluated under 5 X 104 grafted cells in vivo. No [18F]FHBG or [18F]metabolite release was observed showing a stable cell uptake even 2 h post-graft. The development of this kind of approach will allow grafting to be controlled and ensure longitudinal follow-up of cell viability and biodistribution after intracerebral injection.

  14. Imaging grafted cells with [18F]FHBG using an optimized HSV1-TK mammalian expression vector in a brain injury rodent model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Sophie Salabert

    Full Text Available Cell transplantation is an innovative therapeutic approach after brain injury to compensate for tissue damage. To have real-time longitudinal monitoring of intracerebrally grafted cells, we explored the feasibility of a molecular imaging approach using thymidine kinase HSV1-TK gene encoding and [18F]FHBG as a reporter probe to image enzyme expression.A stable neuronal cell line expressing HSV1-TK was developed with an optimised mammalian expression vector to ensure long-term transgene expression. After [18F]FHBG incubation under defined parameters, calibration ranges from 1 X 104 to 3 X 106 Neuro2A-TK cells were analysed by gamma counter or by PET-camera. In parallel, grafting with different quantities of [18F]FHBG prelabelled Neuro2A-TK cells was carried out in a rat brain injury model induced by stereotaxic injection of malonate toxin. Image acquisition of the rats was then performed with PET/CT camera to study the [18F]FHBG signal of transplanted cells in vivo.Under the optimised incubation conditions, [18F]FHBG cell uptake rate was around 2.52%. In-vitro calibration range analysis shows a clear linear correlation between the number of cells and the signal intensity. The PET signal emitted into rat brain correlated well with the number of cells injected and the number of surviving grafted cells was recorded via the in-vitro calibration range. PET/CT acquisitions also allowed validation of the stereotaxic injection procedure. Technique sensitivity was evaluated under 5 X 104 grafted cells in vivo. No [18F]FHBG or [18F]metabolite release was observed showing a stable cell uptake even 2 h post-graft.The development of this kind of approach will allow grafting to be controlled and ensure longitudinal follow-up of cell viability and biodistribution after intracerebral injection.

  15. Imaging grafted cells with [18F]FHBG using an optimized HSV1-TK mammalian expression vector in a brain injury rodent model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaurain, Marie; Alonso, Mathieu; Arribarat, Germain; Lotterie, Jean-Albert; Loubinoux, Isabelle; Tafani, Mathieu; Payoux, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Cell transplantation is an innovative therapeutic approach after brain injury to compensate for tissue damage. To have real-time longitudinal monitoring of intracerebrally grafted cells, we explored the feasibility of a molecular imaging approach using thymidine kinase HSV1-TK gene encoding and [18F]FHBG as a reporter probe to image enzyme expression. Methods A stable neuronal cell line expressing HSV1-TK was developed with an optimised mammalian expression vector to ensure long-term transgene expression. After [18F]FHBG incubation under defined parameters, calibration ranges from 1 X 104 to 3 X 106 Neuro2A-TK cells were analysed by gamma counter or by PET-camera. In parallel, grafting with different quantities of [18F]FHBG prelabelled Neuro2A-TK cells was carried out in a rat brain injury model induced by stereotaxic injection of malonate toxin. Image acquisition of the rats was then performed with PET/CT camera to study the [18F]FHBG signal of transplanted cells in vivo. Results Under the optimised incubation conditions, [18F]FHBG cell uptake rate was around 2.52%. In-vitro calibration range analysis shows a clear linear correlation between the number of cells and the signal intensity. The PET signal emitted into rat brain correlated well with the number of cells injected and the number of surviving grafted cells was recorded via the in-vitro calibration range. PET/CT acquisitions also allowed validation of the stereotaxic injection procedure. Technique sensitivity was evaluated under 5 X 104 grafted cells in vivo. No [18F]FHBG or [18F]metabolite release was observed showing a stable cell uptake even 2 h post-graft. Conclusion The development of this kind of approach will allow grafting to be controlled and ensure longitudinal follow-up of cell viability and biodistribution after intracerebral injection. PMID:28926581

  16. Keratocyte apoptosis and not myofibroblast differentiation mark the graft/host interface at early time-points post-DSAEK in a cat model.

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    Adam J Weis

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate myofibroblast differentiation as an etiology of haze at the graft-host interface in a cat model of Descemet's Stripping Automated Endothelial Keratoplasty (DSAEK. METHODS: DSAEK was performed on 10 eyes of 5 adult domestic short-hair cats. In vivo corneal imaging with slit lamp, confocal, and optical coherence tomography (OCT were performed twice weekly. Cats were sacrificed and corneas harvested 4 hours, and 2, 4, 6, and 9 days post-DSAEK. Corneal sections were stained with the TUNEL method and immunohistochemistry was performed for α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA and fibronectin with DAPI counterstain. RESULTS: At all in vivo imaging time-points, corneal OCT revealed an increase in backscatter of light and confocal imaging revealed an acellular zone at the graft-host interface. At all post-mortem time-points, immunohistochemistry revealed a complete absence of α-SMA staining at the graft-host interface. At 4 hours, extracellular fibronectin staining was identified along the graft-host interface and both fibronectin and TUNEL assay were positive within adjacent cells extending into the host stroma. By day 2, fibronectin and TUNEL staining diminished and a distinct acellular zone was present in the region of previously TUNEL-positive cells. CONCLUSIONS: OCT imaging consistently showed increased reflectivity at the graft-host interface in cat corneas in the days post-DSAEK. This was not associated with myofibroblast differentiation at the graft-host interface, but rather with apoptosis and the development of a subsequent acellular zone. The roles of extracellular matrix changes and keratocyte cell death and repopulation should be investigated further as potential contributors to the interface optical changes.

  17. High-intensity focused ultrasound ablation of ex vivo bovine achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratore, Robert; Akabas, Tal; Muratore, Isabella B

    2008-12-01

    Small tears in tendons are a common occurrence in athletes and others involved in strenuous physical activity. Natural healing in damaged tendons can result in disordered regrowth of the underlying collagen matrix of the tendon. These disordered regions are weaker than surrounding ordered regions of normal tendon and are prone to re-injury. Multiple cycles of injury and repair can lead to chronic tendinosis. Current treatment options either are invasive or are relatively ineffective in tendinosis without calcifications. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has the potential to treat tendinosis noninvasively. HIFU ablation of tendons is based on a currently-used surgical analog, viz., needle tenotomy. This study tested the ability of HIFU beams to ablate bovine tendons ex vivo. Two ex vivo animal models were employed: a bare bovine Achilles tendon (deep digital flexor) on an acoustically absorbent rubber pad, and a layered model (chicken breast proximal, bovine Achilles tendon central and a glass plate distal to the transducer). The bare-tendon model enables examination of lesion formation under simple, ideal conditions; the layered model enables detection of possible damage to intervening soft tissue and consideration of the possibly confounding effects of distal bone. In both models, the tissues were degassed in normal phosphate-buffered saline. The bare tendon was brought to 23 degrees C or 37 degrees C before insonification; the layered model was brought to 37 degrees C before insonification. The annular array therapy transducer had an outer diameter of 33 mm, a focal length of 35 mm and a 14-mm diameter central hole to admit a confocal diagnostic transducer. The therapy transducer was excited with a continuous sinusoidal wave at 5.25 MHz to produce nominal in situ intensities from 0.23-2.6 kW/cm(2). Insonification times varied from 2-10 s. The focus was set over the range from the proximal tendon surface to 7 mm deep. The angle of incidence ranged from 0

  18. Functionally Distinct Tendons From Elastin Haploinsufficient Mice Exhibit Mild Stiffening and Tendon-Specific Structural Alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eekhoff, Jeremy D; Fang, Fei; Kahan, Lindsey G; Espinosa, Gabriela; Cocciolone, Austin J; Wagenseil, Jessica E; Mecham, Robert P; Lake, Spencer P

    2017-11-01

    Elastic fibers are present in low quantities in tendon, where they are located both within fascicles near tenocytes and more broadly in the interfascicular matrix (IFM). While elastic fibers have long been known to be significant in the mechanics of elastin-rich tissue (i.e., vasculature, skin, lungs), recent studies have suggested a mechanical role for elastic fibers in tendons that is dependent on specific tendon function. However, the exact contribution of elastin to properties of different types of tendons (e.g., positional, energy-storing) remains unknown. Therefore, this study purposed to evaluate the role of elastin in the mechanical properties and collagen alignment of functionally distinct supraspinatus tendons (SSTs) and Achilles tendons (ATs) from elastin haploinsufficient (HET) and wild type (WT) mice. Despite the significant decrease in elastin in HET tendons, a slight increase in linear stiffness of both tendons was the only significant mechanical effect of elastin haploinsufficiency. Additionally, there were significant changes in collagen nanostructure and subtle alteration to collagen alignment in the AT but not the SST. Hence, elastin may play only a minor role in tendon mechanical properties. Alternatively, larger changes to tendon mechanics may have been mitigated by developmental compensation of HET tendons and/or the role of elastic fibers may be less prominent in smaller mouse tendons compared to the larger bovine and human tendons evaluated in previous studies. Further research will be necessary to fully elucidate the influence of various elastic fiber components on structure-function relationships in functionally distinct tendons.

  19. [Biomechanic analysis of the sewed tendons for the reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieven Filho, Edmar; Malafaia, Osvaldo; Ribas-Filho, Jurandir Marcondes; Diniz, Otaviano Esteves dos Santos; Borges, Paulo César; Albano, Mauro; Kume, Márcio; da Silva, João Luiz Vieira; Namba, Mario

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate the difference of the mechanical behavior of bended tied (sewed) and not tied hamstring tendons in order to evaluate if it has any effective function. Twenty-four fresh bovine digital tendons had been used. Alginate to determine the area of the tendon transversal section was used. Ten bovine tendons had been bended and tied following the manufacturer orientation, ten others pairs had not been tied. Claws had been developed for the grafts fixation to the universal machine, for the setting simulation. The superior one was characterized to be bipartite and to have controlled passage for the pins and the inferior claw is characterized to have alternating teeth. The maximum load of the not tied samples of the test was 849,4 N +/- 386,8 the area was 30,4 mm(2) +/- 7,7, and 29 +/- 17 Mpa of tension. The tied ones had gotten maximum load of 871,8 N +/- 484,9, area of 35 mm(2) +/- 5,8, and 24 +/- 10 Mpa of tension. It did not have statistical difference between the two groups (p>0,05). The probability distribution showed that with 400 N the not tied tendons represents 83,8% of trustworthiness and the tied ones represents 78,5%.

  20. Hyperuricemic PRP in Tendon Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Andia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-rich plasma (PRP is injected within tendons to stimulate healing. Metabolic alterations such as the metabolic syndrome, diabetes, or hyperuricemia could hinder the therapeutic effect of PRP. We hypothesise that tendon cells sense high levels of uric acid and this could modify their response to PRP. Tendon cells were treated with allogeneic PRPs for 96 hours. Hyperuricemic PRP did not hinder the proliferative actions of PRP. The gene expression pattern of inflammatory molecules in response to PRP showed absence of IL-1b and COX1 and modest expression of IL6, IL8, COX2, and TGF-b1. IL8 and IL6 proteins were secreted by tendon cells treated with PRP. The synthesis of IL6 and IL8 proteins induced by PRP is decreased significantly in the presence of hyperuricemia (P = 0.017 and P = 0.012, resp.. Concerning extracellular matrix, PRP-treated tendon cells displayed high type-1 collagen, moderate type-3 collagen, decorin, and hyaluronan synthase-2 expression and modest expression of scleraxis. Hyperuricemia modified the expression pattern of extracellular matrix proteins, upregulating COL1 (P = 0.036 and COMP (P = 0.012 and downregulating HAS2 (P = 0.012. Positive correlations between TGF-b1 and type-1 collagen (R = 0.905, P = 0.002 and aggrecan (R = 0.833, P = 0.010 and negative correlations between TGF-b1 and IL6 synthesis (R = −0.857, P = 0.007 and COX2 (R = −0.810, P = 0.015 were found.

  1. The effect of platelet-rich plasma in bone-tendon integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ağır, İsmail; Aytekin, Mahmut Nedim; Küçükdurmaz, Fatih; Kocaoğlu, Barış; Çetinel, Sule; Karahan, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    The operative reconstruction of a torn or insufficient anterior cruciate ligament has become a routine surgical procedure in orthopedics. The long-term success of an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction depends on the ability of the graft to heal adequately in a bone tunnel. Investigators studying reconstructions described healing within a tunnel as osseous ingrowth and incorporation. In particular, helping the healing using autologous material for the best integration process was a new idea that helped us to set up this study. The purpose of this study is to show the effect of platelet-rich plasma on bone-tendon healing. Ten New Zealand rabbits were used. The study had 2 groups: (1) a study group including the right extremities of rabbits in which tendon-bone integration was strengthened by plateletrich plasma and (2) a control group including the left extremities of rabbits in which tendon-bone integration was without platelet-rich plasma. On the 56th day postoperatively, the portion of the distal femur containing the tunnel was amputated following the euthanization process for histological evaluation. In the histological evaluation of the tendon-integrated bone segments with platelet-rich plasma, the integration of tendon in the bone was successful without any necrosis formation in most of the tissues. However, in the control group without platelet-rich plasma, the integration was distorted in many zones and some cystic morphologies were present. The findings of this study showed that using platelet-rich plasma during tendon-to-bone implantation has positive effects histologically. In the literature, many studies are available that have investigated the effect of platelet-rich plasma on an