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Sample records for temporal lobe epilepsy

  1. Neocortical Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercovici, Eduard; Kumar, Balagobal Santosh; Mirsattari, Seyed M.

    2012-01-01

    Complex partial seizures (CPSs) can present with various semiologies, while mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) is a well-recognized cause of CPS, neocortical temporal lobe epilepsy (nTLE) albeit being less common is increasingly recognized as separate disease entity. Differentiating the two remains a challenge for epileptologists as many symptoms overlap due to reciprocal connections between the neocortical and the mesial temporal regions. Various studies have attempted to correctly localize the seizure focus in nTLE as patients with this disorder may benefit from surgery. While earlier work predicted poor outcomes in this population, recent work challenges those ideas yielding good outcomes in part due to better localization using improved anatomical and functional techniques. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the diagnostic workup, particularly the application of recent advances in electroencephalography and functional brain imaging, in neocortical temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:22953057

  2. Temporal lobe epilepsy semiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Robert D G

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy represents a multifaceted group of disorders divided into two broad categories, partial and generalized, based on the seizure onset zone. The identification of the neuroanatomic site of seizure onset depends on delineation of seizure semiology by a careful history together with video-EEG, and a variety of neuroimaging technologies such as MRI, fMRI, FDG-PET, MEG, or invasive intracranial EEG recording. Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the commonest form of focal epilepsy and represents almost 2/3 of cases of intractable epilepsy managed surgically. A history of febrile seizures (especially complex febrile seizures) is common in TLE and is frequently associated with mesial temporal sclerosis (the commonest form of TLE). Seizure auras occur in many TLE patients and often exhibit features that are relatively specific for TLE but few are of lateralizing value. Automatisms, however, often have lateralizing significance. Careful study of seizure semiology remains invaluable in addressing the search for the seizure onset zone.

  3. Semiology of temporal lobe epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Khalil, Bassel W

    2003-07-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsies (TLE) represent the majority of the partial symptomatic/cryptogenic epilepsies. Excellent results of epilepsy surgery in well-selected patients have encouraged a search for localizing and lateralizing signs that could assist in the identification of the best surgical candidates. Seizure types in TLE include simple partial, complex partial and secondarily generalized seizures. Temporal lobe seizures most often arise in the amygdalo-hippocampal region. More than 90% of patients with mesial TLE report an aura, most commonly an epigastric sensation that often has a rising character. Other autonomic symptoms, psychic symptoms, and certain sensory phenomena (such as olfactory) also occur. The complex partial seizures of mesial TLE often involve motor arrest, oroalimentary automatisms or non-specific extremity automatisms at onset. Ictal manifestations that have lateralizing value include dystonic posturing (contralateral), early head turning (usually ipsilateral), and adversive head turning in transition to generalization (contralateral). Well-formed ictal language favors right temporal localization. Ictal vomiting, spitting, and drinking tend to be right sided. The duration of TLE complex partial seizures is generally greater than one minute and postictal confusion usually occurs. When postictal aphasia is noted a left-sided lateralization is favored. A lateral temporal onset is less common in TLE, and is most often suggested by an auditory aura. Somatosensory and visual auras are highly unlikely with TLE, and suggest neocortical extratemporal localization. A cephalic aura is non-specific, but is more common in frontal lobe epilepsy.

  4. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickels, Katherine C.; Wong-Kisiel, Lily C.; Moseley, Brian D.; Wirrell, Elaine C.

    2012-01-01

    The temporal lobe is a common focus for epilepsy. Temporal lobe epilepsy in infants and children differs from the relatively homogeneous syndrome seen in adults in several important clinical and pathological ways. Seizure semiology varies by age, and the ictal EEG pattern may be less clear cut than what is seen in adults. Additionally, the occurrence of intractable seizures in the developing brain may impact neurocognitive function remote from the temporal area. While many children will respond favorably to medical therapy, those with focal imaging abnormalities including cortical dysplasia, hippocampal sclerosis, or low-grade tumors are likely to be intractable. Expedient workup and surgical intervention in these medically intractable cases are needed to maximize long-term developmental outcome. PMID:22957247

  5. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine C. Nickels

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The temporal lobe is a common focus for epilepsy. Temporal lobe epilepsy in infants and children differs from the relatively homogeneous syndrome seen in adults in several important clinical and pathological ways. Seizure semiology varies by age, and the ictal EEG pattern may be less clear cut than what is seen in adults. Additionally, the occurrence of intractable seizures in the developing brain may impact neurocognitive function remote from the temporal area. While many children will respond favorably to medical therapy, those with focal imaging abnormalities including cortical dysplasia, hippocampal sclerosis, or low-grade tumors are likely to be intractable. Expedient workup and surgical intervention in these medically intractable cases are needed to maximize long-term developmental outcome.

  6. Brain SPECT imaging in temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Krausz, Y.; Yaffe, S.; Atlan, H. (Hadassah Univ. Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Medical Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine); Cohen, D. (Hadassah Univ. Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Radiology); Konstantini, S. (Hadassah Univ. Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Neurosurgery); Meiner, Z. (Hadassah Univ. Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Neurology)

    1991-06-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is diagnosed by clinical symptoms and signs and by localization of an epileptogenic focus. A brain SPECT study of two patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, using {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO, was used to demonstrate a perfusion abnormality in the temporal lobe, while brain CT and MRI were non-contributory. The electroencephalogram, though abnormal, did not localize the diseased area. The potential role of the SPECT study in diagnosis and localization of temporal lobe epilepsy is discussed. (orig.).

  7. Frontal lobe function in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stretton, J.; Thompson, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is typically associated with long-term memory dysfunction. The frontal lobes support high-level cognition comprising executive skills and working memory that is vital for daily life functioning. Deficits in these functions have been increasingly reported in TLE. Evidence from both the neuropsychological and neuroimaging literature suggests both executive function and working memory are compromised in the presence of TLE. In relation to executive impairment, particular focus has been paid to set shifting as measured by the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task. Other discrete executive functions such as decision-making and theory of mind also appear vulnerable but have received little attention. With regard to working memory, the medial temporal lobe structures appear have a more critical role, but with emerging evidence of hippocampal dependent and independent processes. The relative role of underlying pathology and seizure spread is likely to have considerable bearing upon the cognitive phenotype and trajectory in TLE. The identification of the nature of frontal lobe dysfunction in TLE thus has important clinical implications for prognosis and surgical management. Longitudinal neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies assessing frontal lobe function in TLE patients pre- and postoperatively will improve our understanding further. PMID:22100147

  8. Resting state networks in temporal lobe epilepsy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cataldi, Mauro; Avoli, Massimo; Villers‐Sidani, Etienne

    2013-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy ( TLE ) is typically described as a neurologic disorder affecting a cerebral network comprising the hippocampus proper and several anatomically related extrahippocampal regions...

  9. Microsurgical techniques in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso Vanegas, Mario A; Lew, Sean M; Morino, Michiharu; Sarmento, Stenio A

    2017-04-01

    Temporal lobe resection is the most prevalent epilepsy surgery procedure. However, there is no consensus on the best surgical approach to treat temporal lobe epilepsy. Complication rates are low and efficacy is very high regarding seizures after such procedures. However, there is still ample controversy regarding the best surgical approach to warrant maximum seizure control with minimal functional deficits. We describe the most frequently used microsurgical techniques for removal of both the lateral and mesial temporal lobe structures in the treatment of medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) due to mesial temporal sclerosis (corticoamygdalohippocampectomy and selective amygdalohippocampectomy). The choice of surgical technique appears to remain a surgeon's preference for the near future. Meticulous surgical technique and thorough three-dimensional microsurgical knowledge are essentials for obtaining the best results. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  10. Imaging memory in temporal lobe epilepsy: predicting the effects of temporal lobe resection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bonelli, Silvia B; Powell, Robert H W; Yogarajah, Mahinda; Samson, Rebecca S; Symms, Mark R; Thompson, Pamela J; Koepp, Matthias J; Duncan, John S

    2010-01-01

    .... In patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy, evaluation of preoperative verbal and visual memory function is important as anterior temporal lobe resections may result in material specific...

  11. Self Injurious Behavior in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    D R Shakya

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Self-injurious behavior (SIB or self-mutilating behavior (SMB is rare but can occur in temporal lobe epilepsy. Such a behavior during seizures is not usually recalled by patient. Here is a case with self mutilating behavior in left temporal lobe epilepsy, presented because of its rare manifestation and diagnostic dilemma. A 19 year old unmarried Muslim student presented to emergency with SMB, guilty rumination and a persecutory delusion. The patient was intermittently confused about place and time. In subsequent assessments, he was found harboring death wishes and suicidal ideation. He transiently had auditory hallucination and thought broadcasting. He episodically tried to harm himself by severely biting only his left ring finger. It was difficult to influence him during such episodes. EEG revealed left temporal lobe seizure. Diagnosis of 'Epilepsy and Organic Psychosis' was made. The patient responded well to Antiepileptic and Antipsychotic medications. Keywords: seizure, self injurious behavior, suicide, temporal epilepsy.

  12. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy in the Elderly

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    L. E. Morillo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of epilepsy has bimodal distribution peaking at the extremes of life. Incidence is greater in younger and older age groups (Hauser et al., 1993, Sidenvall et al., 1993, Forsgren et al., 1996, and Olafsson et al., 2005. As the world population ages more elders with epilepsy will be identified. In the high-income countries with longer life expectancy, the number of elders with epilepsy will be even higher. CPSs account for 40% of all seizure types in the elderly (Hauser et al., 1992; however, the proportion with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is uncertain.

  13. Video electroencephalogram telemetry in temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Jayanti Mani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is the most commonly encountered medically refractory epilepsy. It is also the substrate of refractory epilepsy that gives the most gratifying results in any epilepsy surgery program, with a minimum use of resources. Correlation of clinical behavior and the ictal patterns during ictal behavior is mandatory for success at epilepsy surgery. Video electroencephalogram (EEG telemetry achieves this goal and hence plays a pivotal role in pre-surgical assessment. The role of telemetry is continuously evolving with the advent of digital EEG technology, of high-resolution volumetric magnetic resonance imaging and other functional imaging techniques. Most of surgical selection in patients with TLE can be done with a scalp video EEG monitoring. However, the limitations of the scalp EEG technique demand invasive recordings in a selected group of TLE patients. This subset of the patients can be a challenge to the epileptologist.

  14. Perirhinal cortex and temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Giuseppe eBiagini

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The perirhinal cortex – which is interconnected with several limbic structures and is intimately involved in learning and memory - plays major roles in pathological processes such as the kindling phenomenon of epileptogenesis and the spread of limbic seizures. Both features may be relevant to the pathophysiology of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy that represents the most refractory adult form of epilepsy with up to 30% of patients not achieving adequate seizure control. Compared to other limbic structures such as the hippocampus or the entorhinal cortex, the perirhinal area remains understudied and, in particular, detailed information on its dysfunctional characteristics remains scarce; this lack of information may be due to the fact that the perirhinal cortex is not grossly damaged in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and in models mimicking this epileptic disorder. However, we have recently identified in pilocarpine-treated epileptic rats the presence of selective losses of interneuron subtypes along with increased synaptic excitability. In this review we: (i highlight the fundamental electrophysiological properties of perirhinal cortex neurons; (ii briefly stress the mechanisms underlying epileptiform synchronization in perirhinal cortex networks following epileptogenic pharmacological manipulations; and (iii focus on the changes in neuronal excitability and cytoarchitecture of the perirhinal cortex occurring in the pilocarpine model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Overall, these data indicate that perirhinal cortex networks are hyperexcitable in an animal model of temporal lobe epilepsy, and that this condition is associated with a selective cellular damage that is characterized by an age-dependent sensitivity of interneurons to precipitating injuries, such as status epilepticus.

  15. Optimizing memory function in temporal lobe epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, P.J.; Conn, H.; Baxendale, S. A.; Donnachie, E.; McGrath, K.; Geraldi, C.; Duncan, J.S.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The study aimed to assess whether engagement in a memory training programme and performing internet brain training exercises improve memory function in people with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). METHODS: Seventy-seven people with TLE, complaining of memory difficulties, completed the study. Participants ranged in age from 19 to 67 years and 40 had left TLE. Participants were randomised to one of four conditions; Group 1: traditional memory training, Group 2: Lumosity, an on-line cogni...

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in temporal lobe epilepsy. Usefulness for the etiological diagnosis of temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Mohamed, A.; Lueders, H.O. [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, OH (United States)

    2000-01-01

    With improvement in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques, the ability to identify lesions responsible for temporal lobe epilepsy has increased. MR imaging has also enabled the in vivo diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis. Brain tumors are responsible for 2-4% of epilepsies in adult population and 10-20% of medically intractable epilepsy. The sensitivity of MR imaging in the diagnosis of tumors and other lesions of the temporal lobe (vascular malformations, etc.) is around 90%. Both hippocampal sclerosis and other temporal lobe lesions are amenable to surgical therapy with excellent postsurgical seizure outcome. In this article, we characterize and underline distinguishing features of the different pathological entities. We also suggest an approach to reviewing the MR images of an epileptic patient. (author)

  17. Dynamic perfusion patterns in temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Dupont, Patrick; Paesschen, Wim van [KU Leuven/UZ Gasthuisberg, Nuclear Medicine, Medical Imaging Center and Neurology, Leuven (Belgium); Zaknun, John J. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Nuclear Medicine Section, Division of Human Health, Wagramer Strasse 5, PO BOX 200, Vienna (Austria); University Hospital of Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Maes, Alex [KU Leuven/UZ Gasthuisberg, Nuclear Medicine, Medical Imaging Center and Neurology, Leuven (Belgium); AZ Groeninge, Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium); Tepmongkol, Supatporn; Locharernkul, Chaichon [Chulalongkorn University, Nuclear Medicine and Neurology, Bangkok (Thailand); Vasquez, Silvia; Carpintiero, Silvina [Fleni Instituto de Investigaciones Neurologicas, Nuclear Medicine, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bal, C.S. [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Nuclear Medicine, New Delhi (India); Dondi, Maurizio [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Nuclear Medicine Section, Division of Human Health, Wagramer Strasse 5, PO BOX 200, Vienna (Austria); Ospedale Maggiore, Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy)

    2009-05-15

    To investigate dynamic ictal perfusion changes during temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). We investigated 37 patients with TLE by ictal and interictal SPECT. All ictal injections were performed within 60 s of seizure onset. Statistical parametric mapping was used to analyse brain perfusion changes and temporal relationships with injection time and seizure duration as covariates. The analysis revealed significant ictal hyperperfusion in the ipsilateral temporal lobe extending to subcortical regions. Hypoperfusion was observed in large extratemporal areas. There were also significant dynamic changes in several extratemporal regions: ipsilateral orbitofrontal and bilateral superior frontal gyri and the contralateral cerebellum and ipsilateral striatum. The study demonstrated early dynamic perfusion changes in extratemporal regions probably involved in both propagation of epileptic activity and initiation of inhibitory mechanisms. (orig.)

  18. Patterns of altered functional connectivity in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pittau, Francesca; Grova, Christophe; Moeller, Friederike; Dubeau, François; Gotman, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Purpose:  In mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) the epileptogenic area is confined to the mesial temporal lobe, but other cortical and subcortical areas are also affected and cognitive and psychiatric impairments are usually documented...

  19. Temporal lobe epilepsy, depression, and hippocampal volume.

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    Shamim, Sadat; Hasler, Gregor; Liew, Clarissa; Sato, Susumu; Theodore, William H

    2009-05-01

    To evaluate the relationship between hippocampal volume loss, depression, and epilepsy. There is a significantly increased incidence of depression and suicide in patients with epilepsy. Both epilepsy and depression are associated with reduced hippocampal volumes, but it is uncertain whether patients with both conditions have greater atrophy than those with epilepsy alone. Previous studies used depression measures strongly weighted to current state, and did not necessarily assess the influence of chronic major depressive disorder ("trait"), which could have a greater impact on hippocampal volume. Fifty-five epilepsy patients with complex partial seizures (CPS) confirmed by electroencephalography (EEG) had three-dimensional (3D)-spoiled gradient recall (SPGR) acquisition magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans for hippocampal volumetric analysis. Depression screening was performed with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, 51 patients) and with the structured clinical inventory for DSM-IV (SCID, 34 patients). For the BDI, a score above 10 was considered mild to moderate, above 20 moderate to severe, and above 30 severe depression. MRI and clinical analysis were performed blinded to other data. Statistical analysis was performed with Systat using Student's t test and analysis of variance (ANOVA). There was a significant interaction between depression detected on SCID, side of focus, and left hippocampal volume. Patients with a diagnosis of depression and a right temporal seizure focus had significantly lower left hippocampal volume. A similar trend for an effect of depression on right hippocampal volume in patients with a right temporal focus did not reach statistical significance. Our results suggest that patients with right temporal lobe epilepsy and depression have hippocampal atrophy that cannot be explained by epilepsy alone.

  20. Intellectual functioning in children with epilepsy: Frontal lobe epilepsy, childhood absence epilepsy and benign epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, Ana Filipa; Simões, Mário R.; Monteiro, José Paulo; Fonseca, Maria José; Martins, Cristina; Ventosa, Lurdes; Lourenço, Laura; Robalo, Conceição

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of our study is to describe intellectual functioning in three common childhood epilepsy syndromes - frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) and benign epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes (BECTS). And also to determine the influence of epilepsy related variables, type of epilepsy, age at epilepsy onset, duration and frequency of epilepsy, and treatment on the scores.

  1. Ictal ECG changes in temporal lobe epilepsy

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    L.M. Li; Roche,J.; Sander, J W A S

    1995-01-01

    Changes in cardiac rhythm may occur during epileptic seizures and this has been suggested as a possible mechanism for sudden unexpected death amongst patients with chronic epilepsy (SUDEP). We have studied ECG changes during 61 complex partial seizures of temporal lobe origin in 20 patients. Tachycardia was observed in 24/61 (39%) and bradycardia in 3/61 (5%). The mean and median tachycardia rate was 139 and 140 beats/min (range 120-180). The longest R-R interval observed was 9 seconds. No di...

  2. PET imaging in temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Semah, F. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, DSV-CEA, 91 Orsay (France)

    2006-07-01

    The research projects on epilepsy addressed two main issues: the pathophysiology of the inter-ictal hypo-metabolism in temporal lobe epilepsy and the role of the basal ganglia in the control of seizure. Our research projects focused primarily on temporal lobe epilepsy: The pathophysiology of inter-ictal hypo-metabolism and its correlation with the epileptogenic network was investigated in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Inter-ictal hypo-metabolism is commonly found in mesio-temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) but its pathophysiology remains incompletely understood. We hypothesized that metabolic changes reflect the preferential networks involved in ictal discharges. We analyzed the topography of inter-ictal hypo-metabolism according to electro-clinical patterns in 50 patients with unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (HS) and consistent features of MTLE. Based on electro-clinical correlations we identified 4 groups:1) mesial group characterized by mesial seizure onset without evidence of early spread beyond the temporal lobe; 2) anterior mesio-lateral group (AML) with early anterior spread, involving the anterior lateral temporal cortex and insulo-fronto-opercular areas; 3) widespread mesio-lateral group (WML) with widespread spread, involving both anterior and posterior lateral temporal and peri-sylvian areas; 4) bi-temporal group (BT) with early contralateral temporal spread. Results of FDG-PET imaging in each group were compared to control subjects using statistical parametric mapping software (SPM99). MRI data and surgical outcome in each group were compared to metabolic findings. Hypo-metabolism was limited to the hippocampal gyrus, the temporal pole and the insula in the mesial group. Gradual involvement of the lateral temporal cortex, the insula and the peri-sylvian areas was observed in the AML and WML groups. The BT group differed from the others by mild bi-temporal involvement, bilateral insular hypo-metabolism and longer epilepsy duration. MRI

  3. Surgical Considerations of Intractable Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    Warren W. Boling

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Surgery of temporal lobe epilepsy is the best opportunity for seizure freedom in medically intractable patients. The surgical approach has evolved to recognize the paramount importance of the mesial temporal structures in the majority of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy who have a seizure origin in the mesial temporal structures. For those individuals with medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, a selective amygdalohippocampectomy surgery can be done that provides an excellent opportunity for seizure freedom and limits the resection to temporal lobe structures primarily involved in seizure genesis.

  4. Auditory temporal processing in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavasani, Azam Navaei; Mohammadkhani, Ghassem; Motamedi, Mahmoud; Karimi, Leyla Jalilvand; Jalaei, Shohreh; Shojaei, Fereshteh Sadat; Danesh, Ali; Azimi, Hadi

    2016-07-01

    Auditory temporal processing is the main feature of speech processing ability. Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, despite their normal hearing sensitivity, may present speech recognition disorders. The present study was carried out to evaluate the auditory temporal processing in patients with unilateral TLE. The present study was carried out on 25 patients with epilepsy: 11 patients with right temporal lobe epilepsy and 14 with left temporal lobe epilepsy with a mean age of 31.1years and 18 control participants with a mean age of 29.4years. The two experimental and control groups were evaluated via gap-in-noise and duration pattern sequence tests. One-way ANOVA was run to analyze the data. The mean of the threshold of the GIN test in the control group was observed to be better than that in participants with LTLE and RTLE. Also, it was observed that the percentage of correct responses on the DPS test in the control group and in participants with RTLE was better than that in participants with LTLE. Patients with TLE have difficulties in temporal processing. Difficulties are more significant in patients with LTLE, likely because the left temporal lobe is specialized for the processing of temporal information. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Imaging memory in temporal lobe epilepsy: predicting the effects of temporal lobe resection

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    Bonelli, Silvia B.; Powell, Robert H. W.; Yogarajah, Mahinda; Samson, Rebecca S.; Symms, Mark R.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Koepp, Matthias J.

    2010-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging can demonstrate the functional anatomy of cognitive processes. In patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy, evaluation of preoperative verbal and visual memory function is important as anterior temporal lobe resections may result in material specific memory impairment, typically verbal memory decline following left and visual memory decline after right anterior temporal lobe resection. This study aimed to investigate reorganization of memory functions in temporal lobe epilepsy and to determine whether preoperative memory functional magnetic resonance imaging may predict memory changes following anterior temporal lobe resection. We studied 72 patients with unilateral medial temporal lobe epilepsy (41 left) and 20 healthy controls. A functional magnetic resonance imaging memory encoding paradigm for pictures, words and faces was used testing verbal and visual memory in a single scanning session on a 3T magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Fifty-four patients subsequently underwent left (29) or right (25) anterior temporal lobe resection. Verbal and design learning were assessed before and 4 months after surgery. Event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging analysis revealed that in left temporal lobe epilepsy, greater left hippocampal activation for word encoding correlated with better verbal memory. In right temporal lobe epilepsy, greater right hippocampal activation for face encoding correlated with better visual memory. In left temporal lobe epilepsy, greater left than right anterior hippocampal activation on word encoding correlated with greater verbal memory decline after left anterior temporal lobe resection, while greater left than right posterior hippocampal activation correlated with better postoperative verbal memory outcome. In right temporal lobe epilepsy, greater right than left anterior hippocampal functional magnetic resonance imaging activation on face encoding predicted greater visual memory decline

  6. Imaging memory in temporal lobe epilepsy: predicting the effects of temporal lobe resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonelli, Silvia B; Powell, Robert H W; Yogarajah, Mahinda; Samson, Rebecca S; Symms, Mark R; Thompson, Pamela J; Koepp, Matthias J; Duncan, John S

    2010-04-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging can demonstrate the functional anatomy of cognitive processes. In patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy, evaluation of preoperative verbal and visual memory function is important as anterior temporal lobe resections may result in material specific memory impairment, typically verbal memory decline following left and visual memory decline after right anterior temporal lobe resection. This study aimed to investigate reorganization of memory functions in temporal lobe epilepsy and to determine whether preoperative memory functional magnetic resonance imaging may predict memory changes following anterior temporal lobe resection. We studied 72 patients with unilateral medial temporal lobe epilepsy (41 left) and 20 healthy controls. A functional magnetic resonance imaging memory encoding paradigm for pictures, words and faces was used testing verbal and visual memory in a single scanning session on a 3T magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Fifty-four patients subsequently underwent left (29) or right (25) anterior temporal lobe resection. Verbal and design learning were assessed before and 4 months after surgery. Event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging analysis revealed that in left temporal lobe epilepsy, greater left hippocampal activation for word encoding correlated with better verbal memory. In right temporal lobe epilepsy, greater right hippocampal activation for face encoding correlated with better visual memory. In left temporal lobe epilepsy, greater left than right anterior hippocampal activation on word encoding correlated with greater verbal memory decline after left anterior temporal lobe resection, while greater left than right posterior hippocampal activation correlated with better postoperative verbal memory outcome. In right temporal lobe epilepsy, greater right than left anterior hippocampal functional magnetic resonance imaging activation on face encoding predicted greater visual memory decline

  7. Surgery for Temporal Lobe Epilepsy in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Faraji-rad

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess the efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT in localizing epileptic foci in children with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. This prospective study was conducted on 12 patients including five males and seven females aged between 2 and 16 years old with a clinical diagnosis of TLE. All the patients underwent high-resolution MRI and if no abnormality was identified, SPECT was used for further assessment. In all the patients, visual inspection identified unilateral mesial temporal sclerosis, and the patients underwent craniotomy and lesionectomy.According to the results, eight patients were categorized in class I and two cases were classifies as class II, and all the patients survived. About 25% of the patients showed adequate memory function on the non-operated temporal lobe, and general intelligence quotient increased by 10% in 50% of the patients.According to the results, in patients with clinically suspected TLE, MRI alone is not able to localize the epileptic foci correctly, and SPECT can be helpful to localize these lesions.

  8. Altered structural connectome in temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    DeSalvo, Matthew N; Douw, Linda; Tanaka, Naoaki; Reinsberger, Claus; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2014-03-01

    To study differences in the whole-brain structural connectomes of patients with left temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and healthy control subjects. This study was approved by the institutional review board, and all individuals gave signed informed consent. Sixty-direction diffusion-tensor imaging and magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient-echo (MP-RAGE) magnetic resonance imaging volumes were analyzed in 24 patients with left TLE and in 24 healthy control subjects. MP-RAGE volumes were segmented into 1015 regions of interest (ROIs) spanning the entire brain. Deterministic white matter tractography was performed after voxelwise tensor calculation. Weighted structural connectivity matrices were generated by using the pairwise density of connecting fibers between ROIs. Graph theoretical measures of connectivity networks were compared between groups by using linear models with permutation testing. Patients with TLE had 22%-45% reduced (P < .01) distant connectivity in the medial orbitofrontal cortex, temporal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, and precuneus, compared with that in healthy subjects. However, local connectivity, as measured by means of network efficiency, was increased by 85%-270% (P < .01) in the medial and lateral frontal cortices, insular cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, precuneus, and occipital cortex in patients with TLE as compared with healthy subjects. This study suggests that TLE involves altered structural connectivity in a network that reaches beyond the temporal lobe, especially in the default mode network.

  9. Spike voltage topography in temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Asadollahi, Marjan; Shimamoto, Shoichi; Lorenzo, Matthew; Sperling, Michael R

    2016-07-15

    We investigated the voltage topography of interictal spikes in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) to see whether topography was related to etiology for TLE. Adults with TLE, who had epilepsy surgery for drug-resistant seizures from 2011 until 2014 at Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center were selected. Two groups of patients were studied: patients with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) on MRI and those with other MRI findings. The voltage topography maps of the interictal spikes at the peak were created using BESA software. We classified the interictal spikes as polar, basal, lateral, or others. Thirty-four patients were studied, from which the characteristics of 340 spikes were investigated. The most common type of spike orientation was others (186 spikes; 54.7%), followed by lateral (146; 42.9%), polar (5; 1.5%), and basal (3; 0.9%). Characteristics of the voltage topography maps of the spikes between the two groups of patients were somewhat different. Five spikes in patients with MTS had polar orientation, but none of the spikes in patients with other MRI findings had polar orientation (odds ratio=6.98, 95% confidence interval=0.38 to 127.38; p=0.07). Scalp topographic mapping of interictal spikes has the potential to offer different information than visual inspection alone. The present results do not allow an immediate clinical application of our findings; however, detecting a polar spike in a patient with TLE may increase the possibility of mesial temporal sclerosis as the underlying etiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Cerebral vasospasm following temporal lobe epilepsy surgery.

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    Lackner, P; Koppelstaetter, F; Ploner, P; Sojer, M; Dobesberger, J; Walser, G; Schmutzhard, E; Schmidauer, C; Bauer, R; Unterberger, I; Ortler, M; Trinka, E

    2012-04-17

    Selective amygdalohippocampectomy (AHE) has been associated with postoperative cerebral vasospasm (CVS) in patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. The incidence in temporal lobe resection (TLR) is unknown. This retrospective cohort study evaluates the incidence of and risk factors for the development of CVS in patients with TLR and AHE. A total of 119 patients were included between 1998 and 2009. All patients were evaluated by standardized preoperative and postoperative transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) evaluations and neurologic examinations. Postoperative CT scans were evaluated by an independent radiologist and the volume of bleeding within the resection cavity was quantified. Of 107 patients with longitudinal TCD data, 35 (32.7%) developed postoperative CVS. The incidence of CVS did not differ between patients with TLR and AHE. CVS was associated with female gender and a higher bleeding volume in the postoperative CT scan (p = 0.035 and 0.046). Patients with CVS showed a significantly higher incidence of postoperative neurologic signs and symptoms (48.6%) compared to patients without CVS (25%, p = 0.015). The mean length of stay was significantly prolonged in patients with diffuse CVS compared to patients with localized CVS or no CVS (28.8 ± 10.9, 24.2 ± 6.6, and 18.2 ± 6.1 days, p epilepsy irrespective of the resection method. Important risk factors for the development of postoperative CVS are female gender and a higher amount of bleeding in the postoperative CT. Patients with CVS more frequently have neurologic signs and symptoms resulting in prolonged hospital stay.

  11. Imaging structural and functional brain networks in temporal lobe epilepsy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bernhardt, Boris C; Hong, Seokjun; Bernasconi, Andrea; Bernasconi, Neda

    2013-01-01

    Early imaging studies in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) focused on the search for mesial temporal sclerosis, as its surgical removal results in clinically meaningful improvement in about 70% of patients...

  12. Microsurgical Anatomy of the Temporal Lobe and Its Implications on Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucukyuruk, Baris; Richardson, R. Mark; Wen, Hung Tzu; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan Carlos; Rhoton, Albert L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. We review the neuroanatomical aspects of the temporal lobe related to the temporal lobe epilepsy. The neuronal, the ventricular, and the vascular structures are demonstrated. Methods. The previous articles published from the laboratory of the senior author are reviewed. Results. The temporal lobe has four surfaces. The medial surface has a complicated microanatomy showing close relation to the intraventricular structures, such as the amygdala or the hippocampus. There are many white matter bundles in the temporal lobe showing relation to the extra- and intraventricular structures. The surgical approaches commonly performed to treat temporal lobe epilepsy are discussed under the light of these data. Conclusion. A thorough knowledge of the microanatomy is necessary in cortical, subcortical, and intraventricular structures of the temporal lobe to achieve better results. PMID:22957242

  13. Optimizing memory function in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, P J; Conn, H; Baxendale, S A; Donnachie, E; McGrath, K; Geraldi, C; Duncan, J S

    2016-05-01

    The study aimed to assess whether engagement in a memory training programme and performing internet brain training exercises improve memory function in people with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Seventy-seven people with TLE, complaining of memory difficulties, completed the study. Participants ranged in age from 19 to 67 years and 40 had left TLE. Participants were randomised to one of four conditions; Group 1: traditional memory training, Group 2: Lumosity, an on-line cognitive training programme, Group 3: traditional memory training and Lumosity, and Group 4: no training. Memory efficiency and mood were assessed at baseline and three months later. Group analyses indicated improved verbal recall after training (pLumosity use was not associated with changes in the memory outcome measures but there was a relationship with depression ratings and the number of memory games played (pLumosity the on-line cognitive training programme had specific advantages. Positive change was not universal and larger studies will be required to explore factors associated with successful outcomes. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Intellectual functioning in children with epilepsy: Frontal lobe epilepsy, childhood absence epilepsy and benign epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, Ana Filipa; Simões, Mário Rodrigues; Monteiro, José Paulo; Fonseca, Maria José; Martins, Cristina; Ventosa, Lurdes; Lourenço, Laura; Robalo, Conceição

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of our study is to describe intellectual functioning in three common childhood epilepsy syndromes – frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) and benign epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes (BECTS). And also to determine the influence of epilepsy related variables, type of epilepsy, age at epilepsy onset, duration and frequency of epilepsy, and treatment on the scores. Methods Intellectual functioning was examined in a group of 90 children wit...

  15. Cognitive impairments in patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahgol Tavakoli

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: These findings indicated that WMS-III and WAIS-R can differentiate patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy from normal subjects. However, the obtained cognitive profile could not differentiate between the right and the left TLE.

  16. Extrahippocampal Desynchronization in Nonlesional Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Pastor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is traditionally associated with both hypersynchronous activity in the form of interictal epileptic discharges and hippocampal sclerosis, recent findings suggest that desynchronization also plays a central role in the dynamics of this pathology. The objective of this work is to show the imbalance existing between mesial activities in patients suffering from mesial TLE, with normal mesial structures. Foramen ovale recordings from six patients with mesial TLE and one with lateral TLE were analyzed through a cluster analysis and synchronization matrices. None of the patients present findings in the MRI presurgical evaluation. Numerical analysis was carried out in three different situations: awake and sleep interictal and also during the preictal stage. High levels of desynchronization ipsilateral to the epileptic side were present in mesial TLE patients. Low levels of desynchronization were present in the lateral TLE patient during the interictal stage and almost zero in the preictal stage. Implications of these findings in relation with seizure spreading are discussed.

  17. Surgical Techniques for the Treatment of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Al-Otaibi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is the most common form of medically intractable epilepsy. Advances in electrophysiology and neuroimaging have led to a more precise localization of the epileptogenic zone within the temporal lobe. Resective surgery is the most effective treatment for TLE. Despite the variability in surgical techniques and in the extent of resection, the overall outcomes of different TLE surgeries are similar. Here, we review different surgical interventions for the management of TLE.

  18. Surgical Techniques for the Treatment of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Otaibi, Faisal; Baeesa, Saleh S.; Parrent, Andrew G.; Girvin, John P.; Steven, David

    2012-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common form of medically intractable epilepsy. Advances in electrophysiology and neuroimaging have led to a more precise localization of the epileptogenic zone within the temporal lobe. Resective surgery is the most effective treatment for TLE. Despite the variability in surgical techniques and in the extent of resection, the overall outcomes of different TLE surgeries are similar. Here, we review different surgical interventions for the management of TLE. PMID:22957228

  19. Time-shift homotopic connectivity in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Q; Zhang, Z; Liao, W; Xiang, L; Yang, F; Wang, Z; Chen, G; Tan, Q; Jiao, Q; Lu, G

    2014-09-01

    Voxel-mirrored intrinsic functional connectivity allows the depiction of interhemispheric homotopic connections in the human brain, whereas time-shift intrinsic functional connectivity allows the detection of the extent of brain injury by measuring hemodynamic properties. We combined time-shift voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity analyses to investigate the alterations in homotopic connectivity in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and assessed the value of applying this approach to epilepsy lateralization and the prediction of surgical outcomes in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Resting-state functional MR imaging data were acquired from patients with unilateral mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (n=62) (31 left- and 31 right-side) and healthy controls (n=33). Dynamic interhemispheric homotopic architecture seeding from each hemisphere was individually calculated by 0, 1, 2, and 3 repetition time time-shift voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity. Voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity maps were compared between the patient and control groups by using 1-way ANOVA for each time-shift condition, separately. Group comparisons were further performed on the laterality of voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity in each time-shift condition. Finally, we correlated the interhemispheric homotopic connection to the surgical outcomes in a portion of the patients (n=20). The patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy showed decreased homotopic connectivity in the mesial temporal structures, temporal pole, and striatum. Alterations of the bihemispheric homotopic connectivity were lateralized along with delays in the time-shift in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. The patients with unsuccessful surgical outcomes presented larger interhemispheric voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity differences. This study showed whole patterns of dynamic alterations of interhemispheric homotopic connectivity in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, extending the knowledge of abnormalities in interhemispheric

  20. The neurobiology of cognitive disorders in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Brian; Lin, Jack J.; Seidenberg, Michael; Hermann, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive impairment and especially memory disruption is a major complicating feature of the epilepsies. In this review we begin with a focus on the problem of memory impairment in temporal lobe epilepsy. We start with a brief overview of the early development of knowledge regarding the anatomic substrates of memory disorder in temporal lobe epilepsy, followed by discussion of the refinement of that knowledge over time as informed by the outcomes of epilepsy surgery (anterior temporal lobectomy) and the clinical efforts to predict those patients at greatest risk of adverse cognitive outcomes following epilepsy surgery. These efforts also yielded new theoretical insights regarding the function of the human hippocampus and a few examples of these insights are touched on briefly. Finally, the vastly changing view of temporal lobe epilepsy is examined including findings demonstrating that anatomic abnormalities extend far outside the temporal lobe, cognitive impairments extend beyond memory function, with linkage of these distributed cognitive and anatomic abnormalities pointing to a new understanding of the anatomic architecture of cognitive impairment in epilepsy. Challenges remain in understanding the origin of these cognitive and anatomic abnormalities, their progression over time, and most importantly, how to intervene to protect cognitive and brain health in epilepsy. PMID:21304484

  1. [Temporal lobe epilepsy and active neurocysticercosis: two representative case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Zúñiga, Rodrigo; Pérez-Gómez, Héctor R; Gaytán-Martínez, Luis A; Vega-Ruiz, Brenda; Soto-Rodríguez, Sofía; Rochín-Mozqueda, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    There are limited evidences reported of temporal lobe epilepsy associated with active cysticercosis in cystic stage. The objective is to present the correlation between active cysticercosis in topographical zones associated with temporal lobe epilepsy, with neuropsychiatric manifestations and pattern of secondarily generalized partial seizures. Two cases of adult patients with neuropsychiatric manifestations of one year evolution, refractory to antipsychotic drug treatment, and who subsequently appear late onset partial-secondarily generalized seizures. Cysticercosis active presence in the temporal lobe in one patient, and the insula in the other, is identified. A better clinical control after albendazol treatment and subsequently anticonvulsant therapy only remained to evaluate pertinence of pharmacological withdrawal criteria. Active neurocysticercosis, may be the cause of acquired neuropsychiatric disorders and temporal lobe epilepsy of late onset when the topography is in the mesolimbic circuit. Early etiologic diagnosis and appropriate treatment allows adequate control of their symptoms and potentially final cure.

  2. Decision-making in temporal lobe epilepsy surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijl, S.G.

    2008-01-01

    Epilepsy surgery is a successful treatment option for patients with drug resistant temporal lobe epilepsy. To decide whether patients are surgery candidates, a complex presurgical work-up is performed, starting with basic diagnostic tests (patient history, MRI, video EEG monitoring), followed by

  3. Role of Electroencephalography in Presurgical Evaluation of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seetharam Raghavendra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgery remains a therapeutic option for patients with medically refractory epilepsy. Comprehensive presurgical evaluation includes electroencephalography (EEG and video EEG in identifying patients who are likely to benefit from surgery. Here, we discuss in detail the utility of EEG in presurgical evaluation of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy along with illustrative cases.

  4. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Rolston

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy continue to have seizures despite medical therapy. For these patients, one recourse is surgical resection of the mesial temporal lobe, with its attendant risks. Noninvasive treatment with Gamma Knife radiosurgery is under active investigation as a possible alternative to open surgery. Accumulated evidence from multiple studies shows radiosurgery to be comparable in outcomes to surgical resection. A definitive randomized, controlled trial, the Radiosurgery or Open Surgery for Epilepsy (ROSE trial, is currently underway, and further investigation of this promising treatment is crucial in our advancement of alternative therapies to treat refractory epilepsy.

  5. A Review of the Epidemiology of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose F. Téllez-Zenteno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial-onset epilepsies account for about 60% of all adult epilepsy cases, and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is the most common type of partial epilepsy referred for epilepsy surgery and often refractory to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs. Little is known about the epidemiology of TLE, because it requires advanced neuroimaging, positive EEG, and appropriate clinical semiology to confirm the diagnosis. Moreover, recently recognized incidentally detected mesial temporal sclerosis in otherwise healthy individuals and benign temporal epilepsy indicate that the true epidemiology of TLE is underestimated. Our current knowledge on the epidemiology of TLE derives from data published from tertiary referral centers and/or inferred from population-based studies dealing with epilepsy. This article reviews the following aspects of the epidemiology of TLE: definitions, studies describing epidemiological rates, methodological observations, the interpretation of available studies, and recommendations for future studies.

  6. Astrocyte uncoupling as a cause of human temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedner, Peter; Dupper, Alexander; Hüttmann, Kerstin; Müller, Julia; Herde, Michel K; Dublin, Pavel; Deshpande, Tushar; Schramm, Johannes; Häussler, Ute; Haas, Carola A; Henneberger, Christian; Theis, Martin; Steinhäuser, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Glial cells are now recognized as active communication partners in the central nervous system, and this new perspective has rekindled the question of their role in pathology. In the present study we analysed functional properties of astrocytes in hippocampal specimens from patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy without (n = 44) and with sclerosis (n = 75) combining patch clamp recording, K(+) concentration analysis, electroencephalography/video-monitoring, and fate mapping analysis. We found that the hippocampus of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis is completely devoid of bona fide astrocytes and gap junction coupling, whereas coupled astrocytes were abundantly present in non-sclerotic specimens. To decide whether these glial changes represent cause or effect of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis, we developed a mouse model that reproduced key features of human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis. In this model, uncoupling impaired K(+) buffering and temporally preceded apoptotic neuronal death and the generation of spontaneous seizures. Uncoupling was induced through intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide, prevented in Toll-like receptor4 knockout mice and reproduced in situ through acute cytokine or lipopolysaccharide incubation. Fate mapping confirmed that in the course of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis, astrocytes acquire an atypical functional phenotype and lose coupling. These data suggest that astrocyte dysfunction might be a prime cause of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis and identify novel targets for anti-epileptogenic therapeutic intervention. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. [Effects of temporal lobe epilepsy and idiopathic epilepsy on cognitive function and emotion in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-Yan; Long, Li-Li; Xiao, Bo

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the effects of temporal lobe epilepsy and idiopathic epilepsy on cognitive function and emotion in children and the risk factors for cognitive impairment. A retrospective analysis was performed for the clinical data of 38 children with temporal lobe epilepsy and 40 children with idiopathic epilepsy. The controls were 42 healthy children. All subjects received the following neuropsychological tests: Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) scale, verbal fluency test, digit span test, block design test, Social Anxiety Scale for Children (SASC), and Depression Self-rating Scale for Children (DSRSC). Compared with the control group, the temporal lobe epilepsy and idiopathic epilepsy groups showed significantly lower scores of MoCA, verbal fluency, digit span, and block design (Pepilepsy group, the temporal lobe epilepsy group showed significantly lower scores of MoCA, verbal fluency, digit span, and block design (Ptemporal lobe epilepsy group, MoCA score was negatively correlated with SASC score, DSRSC score, and seizure frequency (r=-0.571, -0.529, and -0.545 respectively; Pepilepsy group, MoCA score was also negatively correlated with SASC score, DSRSC score, and seizure frequency (r=-0.542, -0.487, and -0.555 respectively; Ptemporal lobe epilepsy and idiopathic epilepsy show impaired whole cognition, verbal fluency, memory, and executive function and have anxiety and depression, which are more significant in children with temporal lobe epilepsy. High levels of anxiety, depression, and seizure frequency are risk factors for impaired cognitive function.

  8. Preoperative visual field deficits in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeet S. Grewal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical resection and laser thermoablation have been used to treat drug resistant epilepsy with good results. However, they are not without risk. One of the most commonly reported complications of temporal lobe surgery is contralateral superior homonymous quadrantanopsia. We describe a patient with asymptomatic preoperative quadrantanopsia fortuitously discovered as part of our recently modified protocol to evaluate patients prior to temporal lobe epilepsy surgery. This visual field deficit was subtle and not detected on routine clinical neurological examination. While we understand that this is a single case, we advocate further study for more detailed preoperative visual field examinations to characterize the true incidence of postoperative visual field lesions.

  9. Quantifying interictal metabolic activity in human temporal lobe epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, T.R.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Engel, J. Jr.; Christenson, P.D.; Zhang, J.X.; Phelps, M.E.; Kuhl, D.E. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The majority of patients with complex partial seizures of unilateral temporal lobe origin have interictal temporal hypometabolism on (18F)fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) studies. Often, this hypometabolism extends to ipsilateral extratemporal sites. The use of accurately quantified metabolic data has been limited by the absence of an equally reliable method of anatomical analysis of PET images. We developed a standardized method for visual placement of anatomically configured regions of interest on FDG PET studies, which is particularly adapted to the widespread, asymmetric, and often severe interictal metabolic alterations of temporal lobe epilepsy. This method was applied by a single investigator, who was blind to the identity of subjects, to 10 normal control and 25 interictal temporal lobe epilepsy studies. All subjects had normal brain anatomical volumes on structural neuroimaging studies. The results demonstrate ipsilateral thalamic and temporal lobe involvement in the interictal hypometabolism of unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy. Ipsilateral frontal, parietal, and basal ganglial metabolism is also reduced, although not as markedly as is temporal and thalamic metabolism.

  10. Influence of anxiety on memory performance in temporal lobe epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Franklin C.; Westerveld, Michael; Langfitt, John T.; Hamberger, Marla; Hamid, Hamada; Shinnar, Shlomo; Sperling, Michael R.; Devinsky, Orrin; Barr, William; Tracy, Joseph; Masur, David; Bazil, Carl W.; Spencer, Susan S.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the degree to which anxiety contributed to inconsistent material-specific memory difficulties among 243 temporal lobe epilepsy patients from the Multisite Epilepsy Study. Visual memory performance on the Rey Complex Figure Test (RCFT) was lower for those with high versus low level of anxiety, but was not found to be related to side of TLE. Verbal memory on the California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT) was significantly lower for left than right TLE patients with low anxiety, ...

  11. Seizure semiology identifies patients with bilateral temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loesch, Anna Mira; Feddersen, Berend; Tezer, F Irsel; Hartl, Elisabeth; Rémi, Jan; Vollmar, Christian; Noachtar, Soheyl

    2015-01-01

    Laterality in temporal lobe epilepsy is usually defined by EEG and imaging results. We investigated whether the analysis of seizure semiology including lateralizing seizure phenomena identifies bilateral independent temporal lobe seizure onset. We investigated the seizure semiology in 17 patients in whom invasive EEG-video-monitoring documented bilateral temporal seizure onset. The results were compared to 20 left and 20 right consecutive temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients who were seizure free after anterior temporal lobe resection. The seizure semiology was analyzed using the semiological seizure classification with particular emphasis on the sequence of seizure phenomena over time and lateralizing seizure phenomena. Statistical analysis included chi-square test or Fisher's exact test. Bitemporal lobe epilepsy patients had more frequently different seizure semiology (100% vs. 40%; psemiology for the identification of bilateral TLE was high (100%) with a specificity of 60%. Lateralizing seizure phenomena had a low sensitivity (59%) but a high specificity (89%). The combination of lateralizing seizure phenomena and different seizure semiology showed a high specificity (94%) but a low sensitivity (59%). The analysis of seizure semiology including lateralizing seizure phenomena adds important clinical information to identify patients with bilateral TLE. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Determinants of brain metabolism changes in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassoux, Francine; Artiges, Eric; Semah, Franck; Desarnaud, Serge; Laurent, Agathe; Landre, Elisabeth; Gervais, Philippe; Devaux, Bertrand; Helal, Ourkia Badia

    2016-06-01

    To determine the main factors influencing metabolic changes in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) due to hippocampal sclerosis (HS). We prospectively studied 114 patients with MTLE (62 female; 60 left HS; 15- to 56-year-olds) with (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography and correlated the results with the side of HS, structural atrophy, electroclinical features, gender, age at onset, epilepsy duration, and seizure frequency. Imaging processing was performed using statistical parametric mapping. Ipsilateral hypometabolism involved temporal (mesial structures, pole, and lateral cortex) and extratemporal areas including the insula, frontal lobe, perisylvian regions, and thalamus, more extensively in right HS (RHS). A relative increase of metabolism (hypermetabolism) was found in the nonepileptic temporal lobe and in posterior areas bilaterally. Voxel-based morphometry detected unilateral hippocampus atrophy and gray matter concentration decrease in both frontal lobes, more extensively in left HS (LHS). Regardless of the structural alterations, the topography of hypometabolism correlated strongly with the extent of epileptic networks (mesial, anterior-mesiolateral, widespread mesiolateral, and bitemporal according to the ictal spread), which were larger in RHS. Notably, widespread perisylvian and bitemporal hypometabolism was found only in RHS. Mirror hypermetabolism was grossly proportional to the hypometabolic areas, coinciding partly with the default mode network. Gender-related effect was significant mainly in the contralateral frontal lobe, in which metabolism was higher in female patients. Epilepsy duration correlated with the contralateral temporal metabolism, positively in LHS and negatively in RHS. Opposite results were found with age at onset. High seizure frequency correlated negatively with the contralateral metabolism in LHS. Epileptic networks, as assessed by electroclinical correlations, appear to be the main determinant of

  13. Temporal hypometabolism at the onset of cryptogenic temporal lobe epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matheja, P.; Kuwert, T.; Weckesser, M.; Schober, O. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster Univ. (Germany); Luedemann, P.; Kellinghaus, C.; Diehl, B.; Ringelstein, E.B. [Dept. of Neurology, Muenster Univ. (Germany); Schuierer, G. [Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Muenster Univ. (Germany)

    2001-05-01

    Most patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) exhibit temporal glucose hypometabolism. The reasons for the development of this abnormality are as yet unclear. The current notion is that an initial injury causes seizures, which in turn give rise to hypometabolism. The aim of this study was to assess whether temporal reductions in glucose metabolism in non-lesional TLE are the result of repeated seizures or whether hypometabolism represents an initial disturbance at the onset of disease. Glucose consumption was assessed with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET) in 62 patients with cryptogenic non-refractory TLE in different stages of disease. Twelve subjects without neurological illness served as controls. Patients with onset of epilepsy at least 3 years prior to the PET scan were defined as having chronic TLE. Using this criterion, the whole patient cohort included 27 patients with de novo TLE and 35 patients with chronic TLE. The groups were matched for age and sex. The appearance of high-resolution magnetic resonance images of the brain was unremarkable in all patients. In the total cohort, number, duration and frequency of seizures had a significant relation to the magnitude of hypometabolism. Temporal hypometabolism was exhibited by 26 of the 62 patients (42%), including 8 out of 27 (30%) with newly diagnosed TLE and 18 out of 35 (51%) with chronic TLE. The disturbances were more extensive and more severe in patients with chronic TLE. It is concluded that temporal hypometabolism may already be present at the onset of TLE, but is less frequent and less severe in newly diagnosed than in chronic TLE. The metabolic disturbance correlates with the number of seizures. These findings suggest that an initial dysfunction is present in a considerable number of patients and that hypometabolism is worsened by continuing epileptic activity. (orig.)

  14. Atypical language representation in children with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulisova, Alice; Korman, Brandon; Rey, Gustavo; Bernal, Byron; Duchowny, Michael; Niederlova, Marketa; Krsek, Pavel; Novak, Vilem

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated language organization in children with intractable epilepsy caused by temporal lobe focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) alone or dual pathology (temporal lobe FCD and hippocampal sclerosis, HS). We analyzed clinical, neurological, fMRI, neuropsychological, and histopathologic data in 46 pediatric patients with temporal lobe lesions who underwent excisional epilepsy surgery. The frequency of atypical language representation was similar in both groups, but children with dual pathology were more likely to be left-handed. Atypical receptive language cortex correlated with lower intellectual capacity, verbal abstract conceptualization, receptive language abilities, verbal working memory, and a history of status epilepticus but did not correlate with higher seizure frequency or early seizure onset. Histopathologic substrate had only a minor influence on neuropsychological status. Greater verbal comprehension deficits were noted in children with atypical receptive language representation, a risk factor for cognitive morbidity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Altered cortical anatomical networks in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Bin; He, Huiguang; Lu, Jingjing; Li, Wenjing; Dai, Dai; Li, Meng; Jin, Zhengyu

    2011-03-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is one of the most common epilepsy syndromes with focal seizures generated in the left or right temporal lobes. With the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), many evidences have demonstrated that the abnormalities in hippocampal volume and the distributed atrophies in cortical cortex. However, few studies have investigated if TLE patients have the alternation in the structural networks. In the present study, we used the cortical thickness to establish the morphological connectivity networks, and investigated the network properties using the graph theoretical methods. We found that all the morphological networks exhibited the small-world efficiency in left TLE, right TLE and normal groups. And the betweenness centrality analysis revealed that there were statistical inter-group differences in the right uncus region. Since the right uncus located at the right temporal lobe, these preliminary evidences may suggest that there are topological alternations of the cortical anatomical networks in TLE, especially for the right TLE.

  16. Brain Regions Underlying Word Finding Difficulties in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebuchon-Da Fonseca, Agnes; Guedj, Eric; Alario, F-Xavier; Laguitton, Virginie; Mundler, Olivier; Chauvel, Patrick; Liegeois-Chauvel, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Word finding difficulties are often reported by epileptic patients with seizures originating from the language dominant cerebral hemisphere, for example, in temporal lobe epilepsy. Evidence regarding the brain regions underlying this deficit comes from studies of peri-operative electro-cortical stimulation, as well as post-surgical performance.…

  17. Memory, Metamemory and Their Dissociation in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Charlotte E.; Andres, Pilar; Broks, Paul; Noad, Rupert; Sadler, Martin; Coker, Debbie; Mazzoni, Giuliana

    2010-01-01

    Patients with temporal-lobe epilepsy (TLE) present with memory difficulties. The aim of the current study was to determine to what extent these difficulties could be related to a metamemory impairment. Fifteen patients with TLE and 15 matched healthy controls carried out a paired-associates learning task. Memory recall was measured at intervals of…

  18. Memory Functions following Surgery for Temporal Lobe Epilepsy in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambaque, Isabelle; Dellatolas, Georges; Fohlen, Martine; Bulteau, Christine; Watier, Laurence; Dorfmuller, Georg; Chiron, Catherine; Delalande, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    Surgical treatment appears to improve the cognitive prognosis in children undergoing surgery for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The beneficial effects of surgery on memory functions, particularly on material-specific memory, are more difficult to assess because of potentially interacting factors such as age range, intellectual level,…

  19. Compulsive spitting as manifestation of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renier, W.O.

    2004-01-01

    Spitting as a seizure manifestation is described in an autistic child with a mild expression of epilepsy. Spitting became a predominant automatism of in seizure manifestation. In contrast to most cases in the literature, the epileptic discharges were localized in the left temporal lobe, an uncommon

  20. Structural connectivity differences in left and right temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, Pierre; Dinkelacker, Vera; Valabregue, Romain; Thivard, Lionel; Leclerc, Xavier; Baulac, Michel; Sammler, Daniela; Colliot, Olivier; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Samson, Séverine; Dupont, Sophie

    2014-10-15

    Our knowledge on temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with hippocampal sclerosis has evolved towards the view that this syndrome affects widespread brain networks. Diffusion weighted imaging studies have shown alterations of large white matter tracts, most notably in left temporal lobe epilepsy, but the degree of altered connections between cortical and subcortical structures remains to be clarified. We performed a whole brain connectome analysis in 39 patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy and unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (20 right and 19 left) and 28 healthy subjects. We performed whole-brain probabilistic fiber tracking using MRtrix and segmented 164 cortical and subcortical structures with Freesurfer. Individual structural connectivity graphs based on these 164 nodes were computed by mapping the mean fractional anisotropy (FA) onto each tract. Connectomes were then compared using two complementary methods: permutation tests for pair-wise connections and Network Based Statistics to probe for differences in large network components. Comparison of pair-wise connections revealed a marked reduction of connectivity between left TLE patients and controls, which was strongly lateralized to the ipsilateral temporal lobe. Specifically, infero-lateral cortex and temporal pole were strongly affected, and so was the perisylvian cortex. In contrast, for right TLE, focal connectivity loss was much less pronounced and restricted to bilateral limbic structures and right temporal cortex. Analysis of large network components revealed furthermore that both left and right hippocampal sclerosis affected diffuse global and interhemispheric connectivity. Thus, left temporal lobe epilepsy was associated with a much more pronounced pattern of reduced FA, that included major landmarks of perisylvian language circuitry. These distinct patterns of connectivity associated with unilateral hippocampal sclerosis show how a focal pathology influences global network architecture, and how

  1. Monocarboxylate transporters in temporal lobe epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Fredrik; Eid, Tore; Bergersen, Linda H

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is a serious neurological disorder that affects approximately 1 % of the general population, making it one of the most common disorders of the central nervous system. Furthermore, up to 40 % of all patients with epilepsy cannot control their seizures with current medications. More effica...

  2. Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy - An overview of surgical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzumdar, Dattatraya; Patil, Manoj; Goel, Atul; Ravat, Sangeeta; Sawant, Nina; Shah, Urvashi

    2016-12-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy is one of the commonest indications for epilepsy surgery. Presurgical evaluation for drug resistant epilepsy and identification of appropriate candidates for surgery is essential for optimal seizure freedom. The anatomy of mesial temporal lobe is complex and needs to be understood in the context of the advanced imaging, ictal and interictal Video_EEG monitoring, neuropsychology and psychiatric considerations. The completeness of disconnection of epileptogenic neural networks is paramount and is correlated with the extent of resection of the mesial temporal structures. In the Indian subcontinent, a standard but extended anterior temporal lobectomy is a viable option in view of the diverse socioeconomic, cultural and pathological considerations. The maximum utilization of epilepsy surgery services in this region is also a challenge. There is a need for regional comprehensive epilepsy care teams in a tertiary care academic hospital to form centers of excellence catering to a large population. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Rethinking cognition and behavior in the new classification for childhood epilepsy: Examples from frontal lobe and temporal lobe epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mary Lou

    2016-11-01

    The new approach to classification of the epilepsies emphasizes the role of dysfunction in networks in defining types of epilepsies. This paper reviews the structural and neuropsychological deficits in two types of childhood epilepsy: frontal lobe and temporal lobe epilepsy. The evidence for and against a pattern of specificity of deficits in executive function and memory associated with these two types of epilepsies is presented. The evidence varies with the methodologies used in the studies, but direct comparison of the two types of epilepsies does not suggest a clear-cut mapping of function onto structure. These findings are discussed in light of the concept of network dysfunction. The evidence supports the conceptualization of epilepsy as a network disease. Implications for future work in the neuropsychology of pediatric epilepsy are suggested. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "The new approach to classification: Rethinking cognition and behavior in epilepsy". Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Temporal plus epilepsy is a major determinant of temporal lobe surgery failures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, Carmen; Rheims, Sylvain; Minotti, Lorella; Guénot, Marc; Hoffmann, Dominique; Chabardès, Stephan; Isnard, Jean; Kahane, Philippe; Ryvlin, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    Reasons for failed temporal lobe epilepsy surgery remain unclear. Temporal plus epilepsy, characterized by a primary temporal lobe epileptogenic zone extending to neighboured regions, might account for a yet unknown proportion of these failures. In this study all patients from two epilepsy surgery programmes who fulfilled the following criteria were included: (i) operated from an anterior temporal lobectomy or disconnection between January 1990 and December 2001; (ii) magnetic resonance imaging normal or showing signs of hippocampal sclerosis; and (iii) postoperative follow-up ≥ 24 months for seizure-free patients. Patients were classified as suffering from unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy, bitemporal epilepsy or temporal plus epilepsy based on available presurgical data. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to calculate the probability of seizure freedom over time. Predictors of seizure recurrence were investigated using Cox proportional hazards model. Of 168 patients included, 108 (63.7%) underwent stereoelectroencephalography, 131 (78%) had hippocampal sclerosis, 149 suffered from unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy (88.7%), one from bitemporal epilepsy (0.6%) and 18 (10.7%) from temporal plus epilepsy. The probability of Engel class I outcome at 10 years of follow-up was 67.3% (95% CI: 63.4-71.2) for the entire cohort, 74.5% (95% CI: 70.6-78.4) for unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy, and 14.8% (95% CI: 5.9-23.7) for temporal plus epilepsy. Multivariate analyses demonstrated four predictors of seizure relapse: temporal plus epilepsy (P temporal lobe surgery failure was 5.06 (95% CI: 2.36-10.382) greater in patients with temporal plus epilepsy than in those with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy. Temporal plus epilepsy represents a hitherto unrecognized prominent cause of temporal lobe surgery failures. In patients with temporal plus epilepsy, anterior temporal lobectomy appears very unlikely to control seizures and should not be advised. Whether larger

  5. Cognitive outcomes of temporal lobe epilepsy surgery in older patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, P J; Baxendale, S A; McEvoy, A W; Duncan, J S

    2015-07-01

    To examine the cognitive risks of temporal lobe surgery in patients aged 50 years and older. We analysed data from 55 patients who underwent temporal lobe surgery (26 left-sided:29 right sided) from 1988 to 2012 at our centre. Pre-surgical and one year post-operative memory and naming capacity were compared to data obtained from two younger cohorts; 185 aged 18-30 and 220 aged 31-49. Pre-operative memory impairments were most marked for the oldest cohort and were associated with a longer duration of epilepsy. Naming capacity improved with age and better performance was associated with a later age at epilepsy onset. Post-operative declines were largest in older patients, achieving statistical significance for verbal memory, naming and subjective ratings. Left temporal lobe resections carried the greatest risk of memory and naming decline. Cognitive outcomes were unrelated to seizure outcome, VIQ or mood. Our findings indicate the cognitive risks of TLE surgery are greater for older patients. Cognitive outcomes need to be considered when assessing the efficacy of epilepsy surgery in older cohorts and pre-operative performance levels need to be taken into account. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Adult absence semiology misinterpreted as mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Rebecca; Chiota-McCollum, Nicole; Tatum, William

    2014-12-01

    Correct diagnosis of seizure type and epilepsy syndrome is the foundation for appropriate antiepileptic drug selection. Inappropriate medication choices occur in the treatment of generalized epilepsy and may aggravate some seizure types, including absence seizures, potentially leading to pseudo-drug resistance. Fortunately, a correct diagnosis of absence seizures is usually not difficult, though rarely demonstrates electroclinical overlap with focal seizures. EEG can be especially misleading when secondary bilateral synchronous discharges occur in patients with focal seizures. However, the semiology of focal seizures associated with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy has a characteristic and consistent semiology that is the mark of this common epilepsy syndrome in adulthood. We recently encountered a 53-year-old female with refractory seizures and a semiology strongly suggesting mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Instead of focal seizures, prolonged absence seizures were validated by video-EEG monitoring and she became seizure-free after a change to broad-spectrum antiepileptic drugs. This case further expands our understanding of the complexity of semiology in electroclinical classification and the spectrum that may occur in adult absence seizures. It serves to underscore the need for ictal EEG recordings and the importance of concordance with the clinical course during the pre-surgical evaluation of patients with lesions and drug-resistant epilepsy. [Published with video sequences].

  7. Electroencephalography in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javidan, Manouchehr

    2012-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) has an important role in the diagnosis and classification of epilepsy. It can provide information for predicting the response to antiseizure drugs and to identify the surgically remediable epilepsies. In temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) seizures could originate in the medial or lateral neocortical temporal region, and many of these patients are refractory to medical treatment. However, majority of patients have had excellent results after surgery and this often relies on the EEG and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data in presurgical evaluation. If the scalp EEG data is insufficient or discordant, invasive EEG recording with placement of intracranial electrodes could identify the seizure focus prior to surgery. This paper highlights the general information regarding the use of EEG in epilepsy, EEG patterns resembling epileptiform discharges, and the interictal, ictal and postictal findings in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy using scalp and intracranial recordings prior to surgery. The utility of the automated seizure detection and computerized mathematical models for increasing yield of non-invasive localization is discussed. This paper also describes the sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value of EEG for seizure recurrence after withdrawal of medications following seizure freedom with medical and surgical therapy. PMID:22957235

  8. Microsurgical treatment of temporal lobe arachnoid cysts complicated with epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-qin KUANG

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the technique and precautions of microsurgical treatment of temporal lobe arachnoid cysts complicated with spilepsy.Methods The clinical data of 32 patients with temporal lobe arachnoid cysts complicated with epilepsy,admitted from Nov.2007 to Apr.2010,were analyzed retrospectively.The diagnosis of temporal lobe arachnoid cysts was confirmed before surgical operation by cranial MRI or CT.Continual video-electroencephalogram monitoring with sphenoidal electrodes were employed in all patients,and spike-wave,polyspike-wave and/or sharp-slow-wave was detected at arachnoid cyst side.Craniotomy was performed under general anesthesia,the temporal lobe arachnoid cysts were treated by microsurgical excision.Besides,partial anterior temporal lobectomy,hippocampectomy,amygdalotomy and bipolar electrogulation on functional cortex were conducted in all cases.Intraoperative electroencephalography(EEG monitoring was used in all patients.And an one year follow-up after surgery was carried out.Results No postoperative death occurred.Transient aphasia and hemiplegia were found in 14 patients(10 in left and 4 in right and recovered 7-10 days after treatment.A one-year MRI follow-up showed the temporal lobe arachnoid cysts disappeared in 12 patients(37.5%,shrank in 8(25.0%,and unchanged in 12(37.5%.Epileptic symptom disappeared in 27 cases(84.4% and temporary symptoms could be observed in 5 cases(15.6%.Continual video-electroencephalogram monitoring with sphenoidal electrodes showed no spike-wave,but sharp wave was detected in 8 cases and sharp-slow wave complexes were detected in 4 cases.Conclusion Microsurgery used in resection of the cysts and epileptic foci may achieve good therapeutic effects for temporal lobe arachnoid cysts complicated with epilepsy.

  9. Creative innovation with temporal lobe epilepsy and lobectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghacibeh, Georges A; Heilman, Kenneth M

    2013-01-15

    Some patients with left temporal degeneration develop visual artistic abilities. These new artistic abilities may be due to disinhibition of the visuo-spatially dominant right hemisphere. Many famous artists have had epilepsy and it is possible that some may have had left temporal seizures (LTS) and this left temporal dysfunction disinhibited their right hemisphere. Alternatively, unilateral epilepsy may alter intrahemispheric connectivity and right anterior temporal lobe seizures (RTS) may have increased these artists' right hemisphere mediated visual artistic creativity. To test the disinhibition versus enhanced connectivity hypotheses we studied 9 participants with RTS and 9 with left anterior temporal seizures (LTS) who underwent unilateral lobectomy for the treatment of medically refractory epilepsy. Creativity was tested using the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking (TTCT). There were no between group differences in either the verbal or figural scores of the TTCT, suggesting that unilateral anterior temporal ablation did not enhance visual artistic ability; however, for the RTS participants' figural creativity scores were significantly higher than verbal scores. Whereas these results fail to support the left temporal lobe disinhibition postulate of enhanced figural creativity, the finding that the patients with RTS had better figural than verbal creativity suggests that their recurrent right hemispheric seizures lead to changes in their right hemispheric networks that facilitated visual creativity. To obtain converging evidence, studies on RTS participants who have not undergone lobectomy will need to be performed. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Unusual ictal foreign language automatisms in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soe, Naing Ko; Lee, Sang Kun

    2014-12-01

    The distinct brain regions could be specifically involved in different languages and the differences in brain activation depending on the language proficiency and on the age of language acquisition. Speech disturbances are observed in the majority of temporal lobe complex motor seizures. Ictal verbalization had significant lateralization value: 90% of patients with this manifestation had seizure focus in the non-dominant temporal lobe. Although, ictal speech automatisms are usually uttered in the patient's native language, ictal speech foreign language automatisms are unusual presentations of non-dominent temporal lobe epilepsy. The release of isolated foreign language area could be possible depending on the pattern of ictal spreading of non-dominant hemisphere. Most of the case reports in ictal speech foreign language automatisms were men. In this case report, we observed ictal foreign language automatisms in middle age Korean woman.

  11. Quantitative analysis of structural neuroimaging of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memarian, Negar; Thompson, Paul M; Engel, Jerome; Staba, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is the most common of the surgically remediable drug-resistant epilepsies. MRI is the primary diagnostic tool to detect anatomical abnormalities and, when combined with EEG, can more accurately identify an epileptogenic lesion, which is often hippocampal sclerosis in cases of MTLE. As structural imaging technology has advanced the surgical treatment of MTLE and other lesional epilepsies, so too have the analysis techniques that are used to measure different structural attributes of the brain. These techniques, which are reviewed here and have been used chiefly in basic research of epilepsy and in studies of MTLE, have identified different types and the extent of anatomical abnormalities that can extend beyond the affected hippocampus. These results suggest that structural imaging and sophisticated imaging analysis could provide important information to identify networks capable of generating spontaneous seizures and ultimately help guide surgical therapy that improves postsurgical seizure-freedom outcomes. PMID:24319498

  12. Immunohistochemical study of Metallothionein in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Rebollar, Daniel; Alonso-Vanegas, Mario; Nava-Ruíz, Concepción; Buentello-García, Masao; Yescas-Gómez, Petra; Díaz-Ruíz, Araceli; Rios, Camilo; Méndez-Armenta, Marisela

    2017-05-01

    Epilepsy is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common serious neurological example of acquired and frequent epilepsy. Oxidative stress is recognized as playing a contributing role in several neurological disorders, and most recently have been implicated in acquired epilepsies. The MTs occur in several brain regions and may serve as neuroprotective proteins against reactive oxygen species causing oxidative damage and stress. The main aim of this work was to describe the immunohistochemical localization of MT in the specimens derived from the patients affected by TLE. Histopathological examination showed NeuN, GFAP and MT immunopositive cells that were analyzed for determinate in hippocampal and parietal cortex samples. An increase in the reactive gliosis associated with increased MT expression was observed in patients with TLE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Natural History of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Antecedents and Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima Shukla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporal lobe epilepsy represents the largest group of patients with treatment resistant/medically intractable epilepsy undergoing epilepsy surgery. The underpinnings of common forms of TLE in many instances begin in early life with the occurrence of an initial precipitating event. The first epileptic seizure often occurs after a variable latency period following this event. The precise natural history and progression following the first seizure to the development of TLE, its subsequent resolution through spontaneous remission or the development of treatment resistant epilepsy remain poorly understood. Our present understanding of the role played by these initial events, the subsequent latency to development of temporal lobe epilepsy, and the emergence of treatment resistance remains incomplete. A critical analysis of published data suggest that TLE is a heterogeneous condition, where the age of onset, presence or absence of a lesion on neuroimaging, the initial precipitating event, association with febrile seizures, febrile status epilepticus, and neurotropic viral infections influence the natural history and outcome. The pathways and processes through which these variables coalesce into a framework will provide the basis for an understanding of the natural history of TLE. The questions raised need to be addressed in future prospective and longitudinal observational studies.

  14. Somnambulism Due to Temporal Lobe Epilepsy - A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh S

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Somnambulism (sleep walking is a disorder of arousal that falls under the parasomnia group. It is more common in children than in adults. (1. The onset of sleep walking in adult life is most unusual and suggests the presence of secondary causes rather than a primary sleep disorder (1. We report a 30-year-old male who presented with repeated episodes of sleep waling possibly due to nocturnal temporal lobe epilepsy.

  15. Memory in children with symptomatic temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina A. Guimarães

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In children with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE, memory deficit is not so well understood as it is in adults. The aim of this study was to identify and describe memory deficits in children with symptomatic TLE, and to verify the influence of epilepsy variables on memory. We evaluated 25 children with TLE diagnosed on clinical, EEG and MRI findings. Twenty-five normal children were compared with the patients. All children underwent a neuropsychological assessment to estimate intellectual level, attention, visual perception, handedness, and memory processes (verbal and visual: short-term memory, learning, and delayed recall. The results allowed us to conclude: besides memory deficits, other neuropsychological disturbances may be found in children with TLE such as attention, even in the absence of overall cognitive deficit; the earlier onset of epilepsy, the worse verbal stimuli storage; mesial lesions correlate with impairment in memory storage stage while neocortical temporal lesions correlate with retrieval deficits.

  16. Memory in children with symptomatic temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimãraes, Catarina A; Rzezak, Patricia; Fuentes, Daniel; Franzon, Renata C; Montenegro, Maria Augusta; Cendes, Fernando; Valente, Kette D; Guerreiro, Marilisa M

    2014-03-01

    In children with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), memory deficit is not so well understood as it is in adults. The aim of this study was to identify and describe memory deficits in children with symptomatic TLE, and to verify the influence of epilepsy variables on memory. We evaluated 25 children with TLE diagnosed on clinical, EEG and MRI findings. Twenty-five normal children were compared with the patients. All children underwent a neuropsychological assessment to estimate intellectual level, attention, visual perception, handedness, and memory processes (verbal and visual: short-term memory, learning, and delayed recall). The results allowed us to conclude: besides memory deficits, other neuropsychological disturbances may be found in children with TLE such as attention, even in the absence of overall cognitive deficit; the earlier onset of epilepsy, the worse verbal stimuli storage; mesial lesions correlate with impairment in memory storage stage while neocortical temporal lesions correlate with retrieval deficits.

  17. Changes in neuropsychological functioning following temporal lobectomy in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shin, M.S.; Lee, S.; Seol, S.H.; Lim, Y.J.; Park, E.H.; Sergeant, J.A.; Chung, C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study was conducted to evaluate the changes in neuropsychological functioning in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) after temporal lobe resection. Methods: Fifty-four TLE patients were evaluated before and after surgery using comprehensive neuropsychological tests to assess

  18. Imaging structural and functional brain networks in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Boris C.; Hong, SeokJun; Bernasconi, Andrea; Bernasconi, Neda

    2013-01-01

    Early imaging studies in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) focused on the search for mesial temporal sclerosis, as its surgical removal results in clinically meaningful improvement in about 70% of patients. Nevertheless, a considerable subgroup of patients continues to suffer from post-operative seizures. Although the reasons for surgical failure are not fully understood, electrophysiological and imaging data suggest that anomalies extending beyond the temporal lobe may have negative impact on outcome. This hypothesis has revived the concept of human epilepsy as a disorder of distributed brain networks. Recent methodological advances in non-invasive neuroimaging have led to quantify structural and functional networks in vivo. While structural networks can be inferred from diffusion MRI tractography and inter-regional covariance patterns of structural measures such as cortical thickness, functional connectivity is generally computed based on statistical dependencies of neurophysiological time-series, measured through functional MRI or electroencephalographic techniques. This review considers the application of advanced analytical methods in structural and functional connectivity analyses in TLE. We will specifically highlight findings from graph-theoretical analysis that allow assessing the topological organization of brain networks. These studies have provided compelling evidence that TLE is a system disorder with profound alterations in local and distributed networks. In addition, there is emerging evidence for the utility of network properties as clinical diagnostic markers. Nowadays, a network perspective is considered to be essential to the understanding of the development, progression, and management of epilepsy. PMID:24098281

  19. The relationship of medial temporal lobe epilepsy with the declarative memory system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halász Péter

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Medial temporal lobe of epilepsy (MTLE is considered as local/regional epilepsy. However, as was discussed in Part I of this review (Halász, 2016a there is more evidence regarding the involvement of both temporal lobes so as to consider MTLE as one of the typical bilateral system epilepsies.

  20. Recurrent diarrhea as a manifestation of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Tomohiko; Tohyama, Teruhiko; Kinoshita, Masako

    2014-01-01

    A woman with temporal lobe epilepsy manifesting with repeated episodes of sudden diarrhea and loss of consciousness is reported. A 63-year-old, right-handed female presented with chief complaints of sudden diarrhea and loss of consciousness for almost three decades. The first attack occurred in her 30s, and similar attacks repeated several times in a year. Her attacks comprised abrupt abdominal discomfort, diarrhea, sudden emergence of old memories relating to when she had played with her brother in her childhood, and loss of consciousness during defecation. She had no convulsion or automatism and fully recovered in a few minutes. Every time she was transferred to emergency hospital by ambulance, she had examinations such as blood test, head computed tomography, electrocardiogram, abdominal ultrasound, and electroencephalography (EEG), but no specific diagnosis was made. On admission to our hospital, vital signs, neurological examination, and blood tests did not show abnormal findings. During long-term video-EEG monitoring for 40 h, she had no habitual event. Interictal EEG showed intermittent irregular delta waves and sharp regional transients in the left anterio-midtemporal area. Sharp transients were not as outstanding from background activities as to be defined as epileptiform discharges, but they were reproducible in morphology and distribution and appeared not only in sleep but also in wakefulness. Brain magnetic resonance imaging was unremarkable. Single-photon emission computed tomography showed a decrease of blood flow in the left frontal and temporal lobes. Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III showed a decline of verbal comprehension. We concluded that the patient was suffering from partial epilepsy originating from the left temporal lobe. Carbamazepine markedly improved her seizures. Temporal lobe epilepsy can manifest with diverse autonomic symptoms and signs. Abdominal sensations often herald the onset of epileptic seizures. Among them is an uncommon

  1. Recurrent diarrhea as a manifestation of temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiko Murai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A woman with temporal lobe epilepsy manifesting with repeated episodes of sudden diarrhea and loss of consciousness is reported. A 63-year-old, right-handed female presented with chief complaints of sudden diarrhea and loss of consciousness for almost three decades. The first attack occurred in her 30s, and similar attacks repeated several times in a year. Her attacks comprised abrupt abdominal discomfort, diarrhea, sudden emergence of old memories relating to when she had played with her brother in her childhood, and loss of consciousness during defecation. She had no convulsion or automatism and fully recovered in a few minutes. Every time she was transferred to emergency hospital by ambulance, she had examinations such as blood test, head computed tomography, electrocardiogram, abdominal ultrasound, and electroencephalography (EEG, but no specific diagnosis was made. On admission to our hospital, vital signs, neurological examination, and blood tests did not show abnormal findings. During long-term video-EEG monitoring for 40 h, she had no habitual event. Interictal EEG showed intermittent irregular delta waves and sharp regional transients in the left anterio-midtemporal area. Sharp transients were not as outstanding from background activities as to be defined as epileptiform discharges, but they were reproducible in morphology and distribution and appeared not only in sleep but also in wakefulness. Brain magnetic resonance imaging was unremarkable. Single-photon emission computed tomography showed a decrease of blood flow in the left frontal and temporal lobes. Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale—III showed a decline of verbal comprehension. We concluded that the patient was suffering from partial epilepsy originating from the left temporal lobe. Carbamazepine markedly improved her seizures. Temporal lobe epilepsy can manifest with diverse autonomic symptoms and signs. Abdominal sensations often herald the onset of epileptic seizures

  2. Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy diminishes functional connectivity during emotion perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiger, Bettina K; Muller, Angela M; Spirig, Esther; Toller, Gianina; Jokeit, Hennric

    2017-08-01

    Unilateral mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) has been associated with impaired recognition of emotional facial expressions. Correspondingly, imaging studies showed decreased activity of the amygdala and cortical face processing regions in response to emotional faces. However, functional connectivity among regions involved in emotion perception has not been studied so far. To address this, we examined intrinsic functional connectivity (FC) modulated by the perception of dynamic fearful faces among the amygdala and limbic, frontal, temporal and brainstem regions. Regions of interest were identified in an activation analysis by presenting a block-design with dynamic fearful faces and dynamic landscapes to 15 healthy individuals. This led to 10 predominately right-hemispheric regions. Functional connectivity between these regions during the perception of fearful faces was examined in drug-refractory patients with left- (n=16) or right-sided (n=17) MTLE, epilepsy patients with extratemporal seizure onset (n=15) and a second group of 15 healthy controls. Healthy controls showed a widespread functional network modulated by the perception of fearful faces that encompassed bilateral amygdalae, limbic, cortical, subcortical and brainstem regions. In patients with left MTLE, a downsized network of frontal and temporal regions centered on the right amygdala was present. Patients with right MTLE showed almost no significant functional connectivity. A maintained network in the epilepsy control group indicates that findings in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy could not be explained by clinical factors such as seizures and antiepileptic medication. Functional networks underlying facial emotion perception are considerably changed in left and right MTLE. Alterations are present for both hemispheres in either MTLE group, but are more pronounced in right MTLE. Disruption of the functional network architecture possibly contributes to deficits in facial emotion recognition frequently

  3. Radiosurgery for Medial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Resulting from Mesial Temporal Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianaris, Thomas; Witt, Thomas; Barbaro, Nicholas M

    2016-01-01

    Medial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) is perhaps the most well-defined epilepsy syndrome that is responsive to structural interventions such as surgery. Several minimally invasive techniques have arisen that provide additional options for the treatment of MTS while potentially avoiding many of open surgery's associated risks. By evading these risks, they also open up treatment options to patients who otherwise are poor surgical candidates. Radiosurgery is one of the most intensively studied of these alternatives and has found a growing role in the treatment of medial temporal lobe epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Language Mapping in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy in Children: Special Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ribaupierre, Sandrine; Wang, An; Hayman-Abello, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) in children is a slightly different entity than TLE in adults not only because of its semiology and pathology but also because of the different approach to surgical treatment. Presurgical investigations for eloquent cortex, especially language, must take these differences into account. Most diagnostic tests were created for adults, and many of the assessment tools need to be adapted for children because they are not just small adults. This paper will highlight the specific challenges and solutions in mapping language in a pediatric population with TLE. PMID:22957246

  5. Complex Partial Epilepsy Associated with Temporal Lobe Developmental Venous Anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohail, Amna; Xiong, Zhengming; Qureshi, Mushtaq H; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2015-05-01

    Developmental venous anomalies (DVA) are found incidentally but sometimes patients with these anomalies present with varying degrees of neurologic manifestations. We report a patient with early onset complex partial epilepsy and associated DVA and discuss the natural history, neuroimaging and clinical characteristics, and management. A 21-year-old man presented with a history of complex partial epilepsy with secondary generalization which started at the age of 4 years. An electroencephalogram (EEG) was performed which demonstrated spike and wave discharges predominantly in the left frontotemporal region. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed which demonstrated a linear flow void suggestive of a DVA. The angiogram demonstrated DVA that connected with the left transverse venous sinus and an anastomotic vein between the straight sinus and the transverse venous sinus traversing the brain parenchyma. He was started on carbamezipine for the treatment of complex partial seizures. Temporal lobe DVA may be associated with complex partial seizures and can be diagnosed by MRI and angiographic findings.

  6. Accelerated cognitive decline in a rodent model for temporal lobe epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, Sandra; Aalbers, Marlien W.; Rijkers, Kim; Lagiere, Melanie; Bogaarts, Jan G.; Blokland, Arjan; Klinkenberg, Sylvia; Hoogland, Govert; Vles, Johan S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Cognitive impairment is frequently observed in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. It is hypothesized that cumulative seizure exposure causes accelerated cognitive decline in patients with epilepsy. We investigated the influence of seizure frequency on cognitive decline in a rodent

  7. On-demand optogenetic control of spontaneous seizures in temporal lobe epilepsy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krook-Magnuson, Esther; Armstrong, Caren; Oijala, Mikko; Soltesz, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is the most common type of epilepsy in adults, is often medically refractory, and due to broad actions and long-time scales, current systemic treatments have major negative side-effects...

  8. Graph theory findings in the pathophysiology of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Sharon; Haneef, Zulfi

    2014-07-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common form of adult epilepsy. Accumulating evidence has shown that TLE is a disorder of abnormal epileptogenic networks, rather than focal sources. Graph theory allows for a network-based representation of TLE brain networks, and has potential to illuminate characteristics of brain topology conducive to TLE pathophysiology, including seizure initiation and spread. We review basic concepts which we believe will prove helpful in interpreting results rapidly emerging from graph theory research in TLE. In addition, we summarize the current state of graph theory findings in TLE as they pertain its pathophysiology. Several common findings have emerged from the many modalities which have been used to study TLE using graph theory, including structural MRI, diffusion tensor imaging, surface EEG, intracranial EEG, magnetoencephalography, functional MRI, cell cultures, simulated models, and mouse models, involving increased regularity of the interictal network configuration, altered local segregation and global integration of the TLE network, and network reorganization of temporal lobe and limbic structures. As different modalities provide different views of the same phenomenon, future studies integrating data from multiple modalities are needed to clarify findings and contribute to the formation of a coherent theory on the pathophysiology of TLE. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical correlates of graph theory findings in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haneef, Zulfi; Chiang, Sharon

    2014-11-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is considered a brain network disorder, additionally representing the most common form of pharmaco-resistant epilepsy in adults. There is increasing evidence that seizures in TLE arise from abnormal epileptogenic networks, which extend beyond the clinico-radiologically determined epileptogenic zone and may contribute to the failure rate of 30-50% following epilepsy surgery. Graph theory allows for a network-based representation of TLE brain networks using several neuroimaging and electrophysiologic modalities, and has potential to provide clinicians with clinically useful biomarkers for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. We performed a review of the current state of graph theory findings in TLE as they pertain to localization of the epileptogenic zone, prediction of pre- and post-surgical seizure frequency and cognitive performance, and monitoring cognitive decline in TLE. Although different neuroimaging and electrophysiologic modalities have yielded occasionally conflicting results, several potential biomarkers have been characterized for identifying the epileptogenic zone, pre-/post-surgical seizure prediction, and assessing cognitive performance. For localization, graph theory measures of centrality have shown the most potential, including betweenness centrality, outdegree, and graph index complexity, whereas for prediction of seizure frequency, measures of synchronizability have shown the most potential. The utility of clustering coefficient and characteristic path length for assessing cognitive performance in TLE is also discussed. Future studies integrating data from multiple modalities and testing predictive models are needed to clarify findings and develop graph theory for its clinical utility. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Corpora amylacea in temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal sclerosis

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    Ribeiro Marlise de Castro

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal sclerosis (HS is the commonest pathology in epileptic patients undergoing temporal lobe epilepsy surgery. Beside, there are an increased density of corpora amylacea (CA founded in 6 to 63% of those cases. OBJECTIVE: verify the presence of CA and the clinical correlates of their occurrence in a consective series of patients undergoing temporal surgery with diagnosis of HS. METHOD: We reviewed 72 hippocampus specimens from January 1997 to July 2000. Student's t test for independent, samples, ANOVA and Tukey test were performed for statistical analysis. RESULTS: CA were found in 35 patients (49%, whose mean epilepsy duration (28.7 years was significantly longer than that group of patients without CA (19.5 years, p= 0.001. Besides, when CA were found, duration was also significantly correlated with distribution within hippocampus: 28.7 years with diffuse distribution of CA, 15.4 with exclusively subpial and 17.4 years with distribution subpial plus perivascular (p= 0.001. CONCLUSION: Our findings corroborate the presence of CA in patients with HS and suggest that a longer duration of epilepsy correlate with a more distribution of CA in hippocampus.

  11. Clinical characteristics of patients with benign nonlesional temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Kim J

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Jiyeon Kim,1 Seong Hoon Kim,2 Sung Chul Lim,2 Woojun Kim,2 Young-Min Shon3 1Department of Neurology, Korea University Ansan Hospital, College of Medicine, Korea University, Ansan, 2Department of Neurology, Catholic Neuroscience Institute, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seocho-gu, 3Department of Neurology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea Purpose: To evaluate the evolution of nonlesional temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE-NL in patients treated exclusively with antiepileptic drugs and to elucidate clinical phenotypes related to the prognosis of these patients.Methods: Clinical, radiological, and electroencephalographic (EEG findings in 84 patients with TLE-NL were reviewed. A good response group (GRG and a poor response group (PRG were defined if the duration of their seizure-free period was >1 year, or <1 year, respectively.Results: There were 46 (54.8% patients in the GRG and 38 (45.2% patients in the PRG. The number of antiepileptic drugs administered was significantly lower in the GRG than that in the PRG (1.3±0.8 vs 2.8±1.0, respectively; P<0.05. The GRG had a significantly older age of onset than the PRG and a lower occurrence of initial precipitating events, such as febrile seizures, central nervous system infection, and head trauma (P<0.05. The prevalence of EEG abnormality, presence of aura, generalized seizures, and automatism was less frequently observed in the GRG (P<0.05. Multivariate analysis showed that the presence of automatism and initial precipitating events were significantly associated with a poor prognosis (P<0.05.Conclusion: In contrast to the commonly assumed intractability of TLE, we found that more than 54% of patients with TLE-NL achieved a long seizure-free period. Older age at onset of TLE-NL was associated with a better prognosis. However, the presence of automatism and initial precipitating events were related to a poor prognosis. Future prospective

  12. Minimally invasive surgical approaches for temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Chang, Edward F.; Englot, Dario J.; Vadera, Sumeet

    2016-01-01

    Surgery can be a highly effective treatment for medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The emergence of minimally invasive resective and nonresective treatment options has led to interest in epilepsy surgery among patients and providers. Nevertheless, not all procedures are appropriate for all patients, and it is critical to consider seizure outcomes with each of these approaches, as seizure freedom is the greatest predictor of patient quality of life. Standard anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) remains the gold standard in the treatment of TLE, with seizure freedom resulting in 60–80% of patients. It is currently the only resective epilepsy surgery supported by randomized controlled trials and offers the best protection against lateral temporal seizure onset. Selective amygdalohippocampectomy techniques preserve the lateral cortex and temporal stem to varying degrees and can result in favorable rates of seizure freedom but the risk of recurrent seizures appears slightly greater than with ATL, and it is not clear whether neuropsychological outcomes are improved with selective approaches. Stereotactic radiosurgery presents an opportunity to avoid surgery altogether, with seizure outcomes now under investigation. Stereotactic laser thermo-ablation allows destruction of the mesial temporal structures with low complication rates and minimal recovery time, and outcomes are also under study. Finally, while neuromodulatory devices such as responsive neurostimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and deep brain stimulation have a role in the treatment of certain patients, these remain palliative procedures for those who are not candidates for resection or ablation, as complete seizure freedom rates are low. Further development and investigation of both established and novel strategies for the surgical treatment of TLE will be critical moving forward, given the significant burden of this disease. PMID:26017774

  13. Characterizing nonlinearity in invasive EEG recordings from temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Casdagli, M. C.; Iasemidis, L. D.; Sackellares, J. C.; Roper, S. N.; Gilmore, R. L.; Savit, R. S.

    Invasive electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings from depth and subdural electrodes, performed in eight patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, are analyzed using a variety of nonlinear techniques. A surrogate data technique is used to find strong evidence for nonlinearities in epileptogenic regions of the brain. Most of these nonlinearities are characterized as “spiking” by a wavelet analysis. A small fraction of the nonlinearities are characterized as “recurrent” by a nonlinear prediction algorithm. Recurrent activity is found to occur in spatio-temporal patterns related to the location of the epileptogenic focus. Residual delay maps, used to characterize “lag-one nonlinearity”, are remarkably stationary for a given electrode, and exhibit striking variations among electrodes. The clinical and theoretical implications of these results are discussed.

  14. Long term changes in the visual fields of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy using vigabatrin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardus, P; Verduin, WM; Postma, G; Stilma, JS; Berendschot, TTJM; van Veelen, CWM

    Aim-To study the long term changes in the concentric contraction of the visual field in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy on vigabatrin medication. Methods-Repeated Goldmann visual field examinations were compared in 27 patients with drug resistant temporal lobe epilepsy and concentric

  15. Episodic and Semantic Autobiographical Memory in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    Claudia P. Múnera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autobiographical memory (AM is understood as the retrieval of personal experiences that occurred in specific time and space. To date, there is no consensus on the role of medial temporal lobe structures in AM. Therefore, we investigated AM in medial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE patients. Twenty TLE patients candidates for surgical treatment, 10 right (RTLE and 10 left (LTLE, and 20 healthy controls were examined with a version of the Autobiographical Interview adapted to Spanish language. Episodic and semantic AM were analyzed during five life periods through two conditions: recall and specific probe. AM scores were compared with clinical and cognitive data. TLE patients showed lower performance in episodic AM than healthy controls, being significantly worst in RTLE group and after specific probe. In relation to semantic AM, LTLE retrieved higher amount of total semantic details compared to controls during recall, but not after specific probe. No significant differences were found between RTLE and LTLE, but a trend towards poorer performance in RTLE group was found. TLE patients obtained lower scores for adolescence period memories after specific probe. Our findings support the idea that the right hippocampus would play a more important role in episodic retrieval than the left, regardless of a temporal gradient.

  16. Lamotrigine improves aggression in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hiroko; Fukatsu, Naofumi; Noguchi, Takahiro; Oshima, Tomohiro; Tadokoro, Yukari; Kanemoto, Kousuke

    2011-06-01

    Aggression in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) may have phenomenological and neurobiological heterogeneity. In the present study, we targeted patients with TLE who showed aggression and evaluated the effects of lamotrigine on this symptom using the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (BAQ), which is based on a four-factor model that includes Physical Aggression, Verbal Aggression, Anger, and Hostility. As compared with the healthy control subjects (n=115), patients with TLE (n=21) had significantly higher BAQ Total, Physical Aggression, Anger, and Hostility scores. Ten weeks after initiation of lamotrigine, the BAQ Total and Anger scores of the patients with TLE were significantly improved. However, the patients with TLE in this study did not exhibit depressive symptoms. Our results suggest that lamotrigine mitigates aggression, especially anger, which represents the emotional factor of aggression in the BAQ. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Impaired executive functions in experimental model of temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Fabiane Ochai Ramos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective The present study aimed to investigate cognitive and behavioural changes consistent with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD -like behavior in male Wistar rats with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. Method Male Wistar rats at 25 day of age were submitted to animal model of TLE by pilocarpine injection (350 mg/kg, ip and a control group received saline 0.9%. The animals were continuously video monitored up to the end of experiments. The behavioural tests (open field, elevated plus maze and operant conditioning box started from 60 days postnatal. Results Animals with TLE exhibited elevated locomotor activity, reduced level of anxiety-related behavior, impulsivity and impaired visuospatial working memory. Conclusion Taken as a whole, we concluded that animals with TLE exhibited some cognitive and behavioural changes consistent with ADHD-like behavior.

  18. Hemispheric lateralization and language skill coherence in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Joseph I; Waldron, Brigid; Glosser, David; Sharan, Ashwini; Mintzer, Scott; Zangaladze, Andro; Skidmore, Christopher; Siddiqui, Imran; Caris, Elizabeth; Sperling, Michael R

    2009-01-01

    Patients with an early onset of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) are at an increased risk for language reorganization. It is unknown whether this reorganization involves a full shift of all language skills to the contralateral hemisphere, or whether it can be partial and involve only a subset of language skills. In this study we report dominance concordance patterns for five separate language skills measured during the Intracarotid Amobarbital Procedure (IAP) for 124 TLE patients. We examined whether the language skills show similar or independent lateralization patterns. We compare these patterns in early versus late seizure onset groups with either a left or right temporal lobe seizure focus. The data showed that the rates of atypical representation ranged from 25.8% for reading to 14.5% of the sample for speech. A majority of patients (60%) showing atypical language representation do so on more than one skill. While multiple atypicalities were common, the proportion of patients showing atypical representation on all five skills was strikingly low (5.6% of the total sample). Our data suggest that language systems are not independent and do not shift and reorganize in isolation, and no pairs of skills seem more likely to reorganize than others. There was also evidence that language is not monolithic with all language skills reorganizing together. The latter suggests that the pressures compelling atypical representation may not work equally on all language skills.

  19. Adaptive visual memory reorganization in right medial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Patrícia; Santana, Isabel; Teixeira, João; Cunha, Catarina; Machado, Egídeo; Sales, Francisco; Almeida, Eduarda; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2008-08-01

    We investigated functional reorganization mechanisms of the human medial temporal lobe (MTL) for episodic memory, in patients suffering from medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) with hippocampal sclerosis (HS). We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure brain activity changes during matched episodic encoding tasks of abstract words (Verbal) and line drawings (Visual), in patients with unilateral right MTLE undergoing presurgical evaluation and healthy controls. As expected, a significant interaction between material type and the side of MTL activity was present in the control group, with preferential involvement of the left hippocampus in verbal encoding and the right parahippocampal region in visual encoding. When compared with controls, right MTLE patients with intact performance activated a region in the left hippocampus more during visual encoding, which resulted in an interaction between group and hemisphere. Importantly, an effect of memory performance on visual encoding activity was observed in the patients, with greater engagement of the left MTL being associated with higher recognition scores. Interestingly, activity in the left MTL also depended on the epileptic seizure frequency, suggesting a role for this clinical parameter in the recruitment of contralateral regions. Taken together, these results indicate functional reorganization of the MTLs in right HS, through transfer of function from the right to the left hemisphere, and strongly suggest an adaptive role for such reorganization mechanism in supporting preserved visual memory.

  20. Visual field defects after temporal lobe resection for epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steensberg, Alvilda T; Olsen, Ane Sophie; Litman, Minna; Jespersen, Bo; Kolko, Miriam; Pinborg, Lars H

    2017-11-20

    To determine visual field defects (VFDs) using methods of varying complexity and compare results with subjective symptoms in a population of newly operated temporal lobe epilepsy patients. Forty patients were included in the study. Two patients failed to perform VFD testing. Humphrey Field Analyzer (HFA) perimetry was used as the gold standard test to detect VFDs. All patients performed a web-based visual field test called Damato Multifixation Campimetry Online (DMCO). A bedside confrontation visual field examination ad modum Donders was extracted from the medical records in 27/38 patients. All participants had a consultation by an ophthalmologist. A questionnaire described the subjective complaints. A VFD in the upper quadrant was demonstrated with HFA in 29 (76%) of the 38 patients after surgery. In 27 patients tested ad modum Donders, the sensitivity of detecting a VFD was 13%. Eight patients (21%) had a severe VFD similar to a quadrant anopia, thus, questioning their permission to drive a car. In this group of patients, a VFD was demonstrated in one of five (sensitivity=20%) ad modum Donders and in seven of eight (sensitivity=88%) with DMCO. Subjective symptoms were only reported by 28% of the patients with a VFD and in two of eight (sensitivity=25%) with a severe VFD. Most patients (86%) considered VFD information mandatory. VFD continue to be a frequent adverse event after epilepsy surgery in the medial temporal lobe and may affect the permission to drive a car in at least one in five patients. Subjective symptoms and bedside visual field testing ad modum Donders are not sensitive to detect even a severe VFD. Newly developed web-based visual field test methods appear sensitive to detect a severe VFD but perimetry remains the golden standard for determining if visual standards for driving is fulfilled. Patients consider VFD information as mandatory. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Multimodality medical image database for temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siadat, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Fotouhi, Farshad A.; Elisevich, Kost

    2003-05-01

    This paper presents the development of a human brain multi-modality database for surgical candidacy determination in temporal lobe epilepsy. The focus of the paper is on content-based image management, navigation and retrieval. Several medical image-processing methods including our newly developed segmentation method are utilized for information extraction/correlation and indexing. The input data includes T1-, T2-Weighted and FLAIR MRI and ictal/interictal SPECT modalities with associated clinical data and EEG data analysis. The database can answer queries regarding issues such as the correlation between the attribute X of the entity Y and the outcome of a temporal lobe epilepsy surgery. The entity Y can be a brain anatomical structure such as the hippocampus. The attribute X can be either a functionality feature of the anatomical structure Y, calculated with SPECT modalities, such as signal average, or a volumetric/morphological feature of the entity Y such as volume or average curvature. The outcome of the surgery can be any surgery assessment such as non-verbal Wechsler memory quotient. A determination is made regarding surgical candidacy by analysis of both textual and image data. The current database system suggests a surgical determination for the cases with relatively small hippocampus and high signal intensity average on FLAIR images within the hippocampus. This indication matches the neurosurgeons expectations/observations. Moreover, as the database gets more populated with patient profiles and individual surgical outcomes, using data mining methods one may discover partially invisible correlations between the contents of different modalities of data and the outcome of the surgery.

  2. Reading in children with temporal lobe epilepsy: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lah, Suncica; Castles, Anne; Smith, Mary Lou

    2017-03-01

    Children with epilepsy have higher rates of reading difficulties compared to the general population. Reading difficulties are associated with lower academic attainments, higher school drop-out rates, greater risk of unemployment, lower income, and poorer adjustment. We examined the literature dealing with reading in children with the most common type of focal epilepsy, temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), in relation to: presence of reading difficulties, contributing factors, and efficacy of treatments for reading difficulties. We searched databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and PubMed) for studies published before September 2016. Included studies (i) reported on a group of children with TLE, (ii) used a standardized reading test or included a control group, (iii) involved original research published in peer reviewed journals in the English language. Of 2018 citations obtained through literature searches, six met inclusion criteria. Reading accuracy and/or reading comprehension were assessed using different tests. All but one study found statistical evidence of reading difficulties in children with TLE. Only two studies examined relations between cognitive deficits and reading. One found that memory contributed to reading accuracy and comprehension. Another found evidence of a small decline in reading accuracy, which was not associated with a decline in memory post-surgery. Several studies were underpowered, giving false negative findings and not allowing relations between epilepsy factors, underlying cognitive deficits, and reading to be adequately examined. No study examined efficacy of reading intervention in this patient population. We showed that reading difficulties that are present in children with TLE are under researched, yet they have significant functional consequences through childhood and into adulthood. There is an urgent need to identify risk factors and investigate efficacy of treatments for reading difficulties in children with TLE, as this will enable

  3. Isolated amygdala enlargement in temporal lobe epilepsy: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beh, S M Jessica; Cook, Mark J; D'Souza, Wendyl J

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the seizure characteristics and treatment outcomes in patient groups with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) identified with isolated amygdala enlargement (AE) on magnetic resonance imaging studies. PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were searched for relevant studies using the keywords 'amygdala enlargement', 'epilepsy', and 'seizures' in April 2015. Human studies, written in English, that investigated cohorts of patients with TLE and AE were included. Of 204 abstracts initially identified using the search strategy, 14 studies met the inclusion criteria (11 epilepsy studies and 3 psychiatry studies). Ultimately, 8 full studies on AE and TLE involving 107 unique patients were analyzed. Gender distribution consisted of 50 males and 57 females. Right amygdala enlargement was seen in 39 patients, left enlargement in 58 patients, and bilateral enlargement in 7 patients. Surgical resection was performed in 28 patients, with the most common finding being dysplasia/hamartoma or focal cortical dysplasia. Most studies involved small samples of less than 12 patients. There was a wide discrepancy in the methods used to measure amygdala volume, in both patients and controls, hindering comparisons. Most TLE with AE studies observed a later age of seizure onset (mean: 32.2years) compared with studies involving TLE with HS (mean of mid- to late childhood). A higher frequency of complex partial seizures compared with that of convulsive seizures is seen in patients with AE (67-100% vs. 26-47%), and they have an excellent response to antiepileptic drugs (81.8%-100% of seizure-free patients). All studies that included controls also found a significant difference in frequency of seizure types between their cases and controls. Reliable assessment of amygdala volume remains a critical issue hindering better understanding of the clinical management and research of this focal epilepsy syndrome. Within these limitations, the literature suggests

  4. Influence of anxiety on memory performance in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Franklin C.; Westerveld, Michael; Langfitt, John T.; Hamberger, Marla; Hamid, Hamada; Shinnar, Shlomo; Sperling, Michael R.; Devinsky, Orrin; Barr, William; Tracy, Joseph; Masur, David; Bazil, Carl W.; Spencer, Susan S.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the degree to which anxiety contributed to inconsistent material-specific memory difficulties among 243 temporal lobe epilepsy patients from the Multisite Epilepsy Study. Visual memory performance on the Rey Complex Figure Test (RCFT) was lower for those with high versus low level of anxiety, but was not found to be related to side of TLE. Verbal memory on the California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT) was significantly lower for left than right TLE patients with low anxiety, but equally impaired for those with high anxiety. These results suggest that we can place more confidence in the ability of verbal memory tests like the CVLT to lateralize to left TLE for those with low anxiety, but that verbal memory will be less likely to produce lateralizing information for those with high anxiety. This suggests that more caution is needed when interpreting verbal memory tests for those with high anxiety. These results indicated that RCFT performance was significantly affected by anxiety and did not lateralize to either side, regardless of anxiety level. This study adds to the existing literature which suggests that drawing-based visual memory tests do not lateralize among TLE patients, regardless of anxiety level. PMID:24291525

  5. Comparative Lateralizing Ability of Multimodality MRI in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    Karabekir Ercan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The objective is to compare lateralizing ability of three quantitative MR (qMRI modalities to depict changes of hippocampal architecture with clinical entities in temporal lobe epilepsy. Methods. We evaluated 14 patients with clinical and EEG proven diagnosis of unilateral TLE and 15 healthy volunteers. T1-weighted 3D dataset for volumetry, single-voxel 1H MR spectroscopy (MRS, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI were performed for bilateral hippocampi of all subjects. Results. Individual volumetric measurements provided accurate lateralization in 85% of the patients, spectroscopy in 57%, and DTI in 57%. Higher lateralization ratios were acquired combining volumetry-spectroscopy (85%, spectroscopy-DTI (85%, and volumetry-DTI (100%. Significantly decreased NAA/(Cho+Cr ratios (p=0.002 and increased FA (p=0.001 values were obtained in ipsilateral to epileptogenic hippocampus. Duration of epilepsy and FA values showed a significant negative correlation (p=0.016, r=-0.847. The history of febrile convulsion associated with ipsilateral increased ADC values (p=0.015, r=0.851 and reduced NAA/(Cho+Cr ratios (p=0.047, r=-761. Conclusion. Volumetry, MRS, and DTI studies provide complementary information of hippocampal pathology. For lateralization of epileptogenic focus and preoperative examination, volumetry-DTI combination may be indicative of diagnostic accuracy.

  6. Influence of anxiety on memory performance in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Franklin C; Westerveld, Michael; Langfitt, John T; Hamberger, Marla; Hamid, Hamada; Shinnar, Shlomo; Sperling, Michael R; Devinsky, Orrin; Barr, William; Tracy, Joseph; Masur, David; Bazil, Carl W; Spencer, Susan S

    2014-02-01

    This study examined the degree to which anxiety contributed to inconsistent material-specific memory difficulties among 243 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy from the Multisite Epilepsy Study. Visual memory performance on the Rey Complex Figure Test (RCFT) was poorer for those with high versus low levels of anxiety but was not found to be related to the TLE side. The verbal memory score on the California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT) was significantly lower for patients with left-sided TLE than for patients with right-sided TLE with low anxiety levels but equally impaired for those with high anxiety levels. These results suggest that we can place more confidence in the ability of verbal memory tests like the CVLT to lateralize to left-sided TLE for those with low anxiety levels, but that verbal memory will be less likely to produce lateralizing information for those with high anxiety levels. This suggests that more caution is needed when interpreting verbal memory tests for those with high anxiety levels. These results indicated that RCFT performance was significantly affected by anxiety and did not lateralize to either side, regardless of anxiety levels. This study adds to the existing literature which suggests that drawing-based visual memory tests do not lateralize among patients with TLE, regardless of anxiety levels. © 2013.

  7. Chronic deep brain stimulation in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boëx, Colette; Seeck, Margitta; Vulliémoz, Serge; Rossetti, Andrea O; Staedler, Claudio; Spinelli, Laurent; Pegna, Alan J; Pralong, Etienne; Villemure, Jean-Guy; Foletti, Giovanni; Pollo, Claudio

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency and the effects of changes in parameters of chronic amygdala-hippocampal deep brain stimulation (AH-DBS) in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Eight pharmacoresistant patients, not candidates for ablative surgery, received chronic AH-DBS (130 Hz, follow-up 12-24 months): two patients with hippocampal sclerosis (HS) and six patients with non-lesional mesial TLE (NLES). The effects of stepwise increases in intensity (0-Off to 2 V) and stimulation configuration (quadripolar and bipolar), on seizure frequency and neuropsychological performance were studied. The two HS patients obtained a significant decrease (65-75%) in seizure frequency with high voltage bipolar DBS (≥1 V) or with quadripolar stimulation. Two out of six NLES patients became seizure-free, one of them without stimulation, suggesting a microlesional effect. Two NLES patients experienced reductions of seizure frequency (65-70%), whereas the remaining two showed no significant seizure reduction. Neuropsychological evaluations showed reversible memory impairments in two patients under strong stimulation only. AH-DBS showed long-term efficiency in most of the TLE patients. It is a valuable treatment option for patients who suffer from drug resistant epilepsy and who are not candidates for resective surgery. The effects of changes in the stimulation parameters suggest that a large zone of stimulation would be required in HS patients, while a limited zone of stimulation or even a microlesional effect could be sufficient in NLES patients, for whom the importance of the proximity of the electrode to the epileptogenic zone remains to be studied. Further studies are required to ascertain these latter observations. Copyright © 2011 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular characterization of febrile seizures and temporal lobe epilepsy : towards unraveling epileptogenesis and febrile seizure susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gassen, K.L.I. van

    2008-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder that is characterized by recurrent seizures and affects about 1% of the population worldwide. Epilepsy can occur because of a genetic predisposition, because of acquired factors or because of a combination between the two (multifactorial). Temporal lobe epilepsy

  9. Role of blood-brain barrier in temporal lobe epilepsy and pharmacoresistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, E.A.; Aronica, E.; Gorter, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common form of focal epilepsies in adults. It is often initiated by an insult or brain injury which triggers a series of alterations which ultimately lead to seizures (epilepsy). In 50-70% of people with TLE the condition cannot be adequately treated by the

  10. Shorter epilepsy duration is associated with better seizure outcome in temporal lobe epilepsy surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Crociati Meguins

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the influence of patient’s age and seizure onset on surgical outcome of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. Method A retrospective observational investigation performed from a cohort of patients from 2000 to 2012. Results A total of 229 patients were included. One-hundred and eleven of 179 patients (62% were classified as Engel I in the group with < 50 years old, whereas 33 of 50 (66% in the group with ≥ 50 years old group (p = 0.82. From those Engel I, 88 (61% reported epilepsy duration inferior to 10 years and 56 (39% superior to 10 years (p < 0.01. From the total of patients not seizure free, 36 (42% reported epilepsy duration inferior to 10 years and 49 (58% superior to 10 years (p < 0.01. Conclusion Patients with shorter duration of epilepsy before surgery had better postoperative seizure control than patients with longer duration of seizures.

  11. Stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, E-S; Sui, C-B; Wang, T-X; Sun, G-L

    2016-12-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (RS) is a potential option for some patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine the pooled seizure-free rate and the time interval to seizure cessation in patients with lesions in the mesial temporal lobe, and who were eligible for either stereotactic or gamma knife RS. We searched the Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases using combinations of the following terms: RS, stereotactic radiosurgery, gamma knife, and TLE. We screened 103 articles and selected 13 for inclusion in the meta-analysis. Significant study heterogeneity was detected; however, the included studies displayed an acceptable level of quality. We show that approximately half of the patients were seizure free over a follow-up period that ranged from 6 months to 9 years [pooled estimate: 50.9% (95% confidence interval: 0.381-0.636)], with an average of 14 months to seizure cessation [pooled estimate: 14.08 months (95% confidence interval: 11.95-12.22 months)]. Nine of 13 included studies reported data for adverse events (AEs), which included visual field deficits and headache (the two most common AEs), verbal memory impairment, psychosis, psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and dysphasia. Patients in the individual studies experienced AEs at rates that ranged from 8%, for non-epileptic seizures, to 85%, for headache. Our findings indicate that RS may have similar or slightly less efficacy in some patients compared with invasive surgery. Randomized controlled trials of both treatment regimens should be undertaken to generate an evidence base for patient decision-making. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Outcome in Patients with Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy in Argentina

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    Silvia Oddo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to compare pre- and postsurgical neuropsychological outcome in individuals suffering from mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE, in order to evaluate prognosis. The selected thirty-five patients had medically mTLE and had undergone an anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL. Neuropsychological evaluation was performed in three different stages: before ATL, 6 months after resection, and a year afterwards. Neuropsychological protocol evaluated attention, verbal memory, visual memory, executive function, language, intelligence, and handedness. There was a significant improvement (=0.030 in the group with visual memory deficit after surgery, whereas no changes were observed across patients with verbal memory deficit. No changes were observed in language after surgery. Executive function showed significant improvement 6 months after surgery (=0.035. Postoperative outcome of cognitive impairments depends on baseline neuropsychological status of the patients with TLE. In our case series, deficits found in patients with mTLE after ATL did not result in a subjective complaint.

  13. Excitatory amino acid transporters EAAT-1 and EAAT-2 in temporal lobe and hippocampus in intractable temporal lobe epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarac, Sinan; Afzal, Shoaib; Broholm, Helle

    2009-01-01

    Intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is an invalidating disease and many patients are resistant to medical treatment. Increased glutamate concentration has been found in epileptogenic foci and may induce local over-excitation and cytotoxicity; one of the proposed mechanisms involves reduced...... extra-cellular clearance of glutamate by excitatory amino acid transporters (EAAT-1 to EAAT-5). EAAT-1 and EAAT-2 are mainly expressed on astroglial cells for the reuptake of glutamate from the extra-cellular space. We have studied the expression of EAAT-1 and EAAT-2 in the hippocampus and temporal lobe...

  14. DEPDC5 mutations are not a frequent cause of familial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striano, Pasquale; Serioli, Elena; Santulli, Lia; Manna, Ida; Labate, Angelo; Dazzo, Emanuela; Pasini, Elena; Gambardella, Antonio; Michelucci, Roberto; Striano, Salvatore; Nobile, Carlo

    2015-10-01

    Mutations in the DEPDC5 (DEP domain-containing protein 5) gene are a major cause of familial focal epilepsy with variable foci (FFEVF) and are predicted to account for 12-37% of families with inherited focal epilepsies. To assess the clinical impact of DEPDC5 mutations in familial temporal lobe epilepsy, we screened a collection of Italian families with either autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) or familial mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (FMTLE). The probands of 28 families classified as ADLTE and 17 families as FMTLE were screened for DEPDC5 mutations by whole exome or targeted massive parallel sequencing. Putative mutations were validated by Sanger sequencing. We identified a DEPDC5 nonsense mutation (c.918C>G; p.Tyr306*) in a family with two affected members, clinically classified as FMTLE. The proband had temporal lobe seizures with prominent psychic symptoms (déjà vu, derealization, and forced thoughts); her mother had temporal lobe seizures, mainly featuring visceral epigastric auras and anxiety. In total, we found a single DEPDC5 mutation in one of (2.2%) 45 families with genetic temporal lobe epilepsy, a proportion much lower than that reported in other inherited focal epilepsies. © 2015 The Authors. Epilepsia published by Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of International League Against Epilepsy.

  15. Lateralizing value of semiology in medial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, S; Samson, Y; Nguyen-Michel, V-H; Zavanone, C; Navarro, V; Baulac, M; Adam, C

    2015-12-01

    Analysing the clinical characteristics of seizures constitutes a fundamental aspect of the presurgical evaluation of patients with medial temporal lobe epilepsy and unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS), the most frequent form of focal epilepsy accessible to surgery. We sought to retrospectively determine whether objective manifestations could have a reliable lateralizing value in a large population of MTLE-HS patients and if their presence could help to identify those patients who would be seizure free after surgery. We analysed the frequency and predictive lateralizing value of objective ictal and postictal signs in 391 patients with MTLE-HS (183 left/208 right). Data were derived from chart review and not from blinded videoEEG analysis. Correlation between the presence of reliable lateralizing signs and postoperative outcome was performed in a subgroup of 302 patients who underwent surgery. Contralateral dystonic posturing was the most frequent and reliable lateralizing sign that correctly lateralized the focus in 96% of patients. Unilateral head/eye deviation was noted in 42% of the patients and predicted unilateral focus in 67%. Ipsilateral postictal nose wiping, contralateral clonus and hypokinesia correctly lateralized the focus in 75%, 81%, respectively, and 100 of patients but were less frequently depicted. Postictal aphasia was a strong lateralizing sign for left MLE-HS. The presence of reliable lateralizing signs was not a predictor of seizure freedom. Seizure semiology is a simple tool that may permit reliable lateralization of the seizure focus in MTLE-HS. The presence of reliable lateralizing signs is not associated with a better postoperative outcome. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy after Refractory Status Epilepticus: An Illustrative Case and Review of the Literature

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    J. Gordon Boyd

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available New onset refractory status epilepticus (NORSE is a relatively newly defined disease entity, where otherwise healthy individuals develop unrelenting seizures that do not respond to conventional anticonvulsant therapy and may require months of therapy with anesthetic drugs. We have described a case of NORSE who subsequently developed mesial temporal lobe sclerosis (MTS and recurrent temporal lobe seizures. We discuss the possible pathophysiological mechanisms by which refractory seizures may contribute to the development of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE.

  17. Surgery for Intractable Temporal Lobe Epilepsy in Young Children

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    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of temporal resection for medically intractable epilepsy in 20 children less than age 5 years with at least 2 years follow-up are reported from Miami Children's Hospital, Florida.

  18. Altered functional connectivity and small-world in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liao, Wei; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Pan, Zhengyong; Mantini, Dante; Ding, Jurong; Duan, Xujun; Luo, Cheng; Lu, Guangming; Chen, Huafu

    2010-01-01

    .... In this study, we investigated alterations related to mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE), using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging on 18 mTLE patients and 27 healthy controls...

  19. Patterns of verbal learning and memory in children with intractable temporal lobe or frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Amanda; Smith, Mary Lou

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to provide a better understanding of the verbal learning and memory (VLM) patterns that might differentiate children with frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE) from children with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and to examine the impact of variables thought to influence outcomes (seizure laterality, age at seizure onset, age at assessment, epilepsy duration, number of antiepileptic drugs). Retrospective analyses were carried out for children with intractable unilateral TLE (n=100) and FLE (n=27) who completed standardized measures of VLM entailing lists of single words or lists of word pairs. Mean intelligent quotients and VLM scores on single words fell within the average range for both groups, whereas scores fell within the low average to borderline range on word pairs. No significant overall differences in VLM were found between the group with TLE and the group with FLE. Older age at assessment and older age at seizure onset were generally associated with better VLM in both groups but were related to better performance in a number of indices in the group with TLE and only fewer intrusions in the group with FLE. The VLM profiles of children with TLE and FLE are generally similar. Older age at assessment and older age at seizure onset have a favorable impact on both groups but are related to better encoding, retrieval, and monitoring processes for the group with TLE and improved memory monitoring (i.e., as indicated by fewer intrusions) in the group with FLE. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Determinants of Autobiographical Memory in Patients with Unilateral Temporal Lobe Epilepsy or Excisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Laurent, Marie; Moscovitch, Morris; Levine, Brian; McAndrews, Mary Pat

    2009-01-01

    Patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy from hippocampal origin and patients with unilateral surgical excision of an epileptic focus located in the medial temporal lobe were compared to healthy controls on a version of the Autobiographical Interview (AI) adapted to assess memory for event-specific and generic personal episodes. For both…

  1. Effect of seizure on hippocampus in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and neocortical epilepsy: an MRS study

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    Lee, S.K.; Kim, D.W.; Kim, K.K. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Chongno ku, Seoul (Korea); Chung, C.K. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Chongno ku, Seoul (Korea); Song, I.C.; Chang, K.H. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Chongno ku, Seoul (Korea)

    2005-12-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effect of seizures on the bilateral hippocampus in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) and neocortical epilepsy by single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Forty-one patients with mTLE having unilateral hippocampal sclerosis and 43 patients with a neocortical epilepsy who underwent subsequent epilepsy surgery were recruited. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals of N-acetyl aspartate/choline (NAA/Cho) and NAA/creatine (NAA/Cr) ratios in 20 healthy control subjects were used as threshold values to determine abnormal NAA/Cho and NAA/Cr. NAA/Cho and NAA/Cr were significantly lower in the ipsilateral hippocampus of mTLE and neocortical epilepsy. Using asymmetry indices for patients with bilaterally abnormal ratios of NAA/Cho and NAA/Cr in addition to using unilateral abnormal ratio, the seizure focus was correctly lateralized in 65.9% of patients with mTLE and 48.8% of neocortical epilepsy patients. Bilateral NAA/Cho abnormality was significantly related to a poor surgical outcome in mTLE. No significant relationship was found between the results of NAA/Cho or NAA/Cr and surgical outcome in neocortical epilepsy. The mean contralateral NAA/Cr ratio of the hippocampus in mTLE was significantly lower in patients with a history of secondary generalized tonic-clonic seizure (SGTCS) than in those without. (orig.)

  2. Semantic Processing Impairment in Patients with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    Amanda G. Jaimes-Bautista

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The impairment in episodic memory system is the best-known cognitive deficit in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. Recent studies have shown evidence of semantic disorders, but they have been less studied than episodic memory. The semantic dysfunction in TLE has various cognitive manifestations, such as the presence of language disorders characterized by defects in naming, verbal fluency, or remote semantic information retrieval, which affects the ability of patients to interact with their surroundings. This paper is a review of recent research about the consequences of TLE on semantic processing, considering neuropsychological, electrophysiological, and neuroimaging findings, as well as the functional role of the hippocampus in semantic processing. The evidence from these studies shows disturbance of semantic memory in patients with TLE and supports the theory of declarative memory of the hippocampus. Functional neuroimaging studies show an inefficient compensatory functional reorganization of semantic networks and electrophysiological studies show a lack of N400 effect that could indicate that the deficit in semantic processing in patients with TLE could be due to a failure in the mechanisms of automatic access to lexicon.

  3. Dissociated multimodal hubs and seizures in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douw, Linda; DeSalvo, Matthew N; Tanaka, Naoaki; Cole, Andrew J; Liu, Hesheng; Reinsberger, Claus; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2015-04-01

    Brain connectivity at rest is altered in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), particularly in "hub" areas such as the posterior default mode network (DMN). Although both functional and anatomical connectivity are disturbed in TLE, the relationships between measures as well as to seizure frequency remain unclear. We aim to clarify these associations using connectivity measures specifically sensitive to hubs. Connectivity between 1000 cortical surface parcels was determined in 49 TLE patients and 23 controls with diffusion and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Two types of hub connectivity were investigated across multiple brain modules (the DMN, motor system, etcetera): (1) within-module connectivity (a measure of local importance that assesses a parcel's communication level within its own subnetwork) and (2) between-module connectivity (a measure that assesses connections across multiple modules). In TLE patients, there was lower overall functional integrity of the DMN as well as an increase in posterior hub connections with other modules. Anatomical between-module connectivity was globally decreased. Higher DMN disintegration (DD) coincided with higher anatomical between-module connectivity, whereas both were associated with increased seizure frequency. DD related to seizure frequency through mediating effects of anatomical connectivity, but seizure frequency also correlated with anatomical connectivity through DD, indicating a complex interaction between multimodal networks and symptoms. We provide evidence for dissociated anatomical and functional hub connectivity in TLE. Moreover, shifts in functional hub connections from within to outside the DMN, an overall loss of integrative anatomical communication, and the interaction between the two increase seizure frequency.

  4. Neurogenesis in the Hippocampus of Patients with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Qin; Ren, Bo-Xu; Tang, Feng-Ru

    2016-02-01

    The mobilization of endogenous neural stem cells in order to substitute lost neurons in the adult brain may reduce the negative effects of patients with chronic neurodegenerative diseases. However, abnormal neurogenesis may be harmful and could lead to the worsening of patients' symptoms. In the brains of patients and animal models with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), increased newly generated neurons in the subgranular zone (SGZ) at early stages after brain insults have been speculated to be involved in epileptogenesis. However, this argument is unsupported by evidence showing that (1) hippocampal neurogenesis is reduced at chronic stages of intractable TLE, (2) decreased neurogenesis is involved in epileptogenesis, and (3) spontaneous recurrent seizures occur before newly generated neurons are integrated into hippocampal neural pathways. Therefore, the hypothesis of increased neurogenesis in epileptogenesis may need to be re-evaluated. In this paper, we systemically reviewed brain neurogenesis and relevant molecules in the regulation of neurogenesis in SGZ. We aimed to update researchers and epileptologists on current progresses on pathophysiological changes of neurogenesis at different stages of TLE in patients and animal models of TLE. The interactions among neurogenesis, epileptogenesis and cognitive impairment, and molecules' mechanism involved in neurogenesis would also be discussed. Future research directions are proposed at the end of this paper.

  5. Seizure-Induced Oxidative Stress in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreekanth Puttachary

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An insult to the brain (such as the first seizure causes excitotoxicity, neuroinflammation, and production of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS. ROS and RNS produced during status epilepticus (SE overwhelm the mitochondrial natural antioxidant defense mechanism. This leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and damage to the mitochondrial DNA. This in turn affects synthesis of various enzyme complexes that are involved in electron transport chain. Resultant effects that occur during epileptogenesis include lipid peroxidation, reactive gliosis, hippocampal neurodegeneration, reorganization of neural networks, and hypersynchronicity. These factors predispose the brain to spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS, which ultimately establish into temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. This review discusses some of these issues. Though antiepileptic drugs (AEDs are beneficial to control/suppress seizures, their long term usage has been shown to increase ROS/RNS in animal models and human patients. In established TLE, ROS/RNS are shown to be harmful as they can increase the susceptibility to SRS. Further, in this paper, we review briefly the data from animal models and human TLE patients on the adverse effects of antiepileptic medications and the plausible ameliorating effects of antioxidants as an adjunct therapy.

  6. Memory for emotional material in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Múnera, Claudia P; Lomlomdjian, Carolina; Terpiluk, Verónica; Medel, Nancy; Solís, Patricia; Kochen, Silvia

    2015-11-01

    Several studies suggest that highly emotional information could facilitate long-term memory encoding and consolidation processes via an amygdala-hippocampal network. Our aim was to assess emotional perception and episodic memory for emotionally arousing material in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) who are candidates for surgical treatment. We did this by using an audiovisual paradigm. Forty-six patients with medically resistant TLE (26 with left TLE and 20 with right TLE) and 19 healthy controls were assessed with a standard narrative test of emotional memory. The experimental task consisted of sequential picture slides with an accompanying narrative depicting a story that has an emotional central section. Subjects were asked to rate their emotional arousal reaction to each stimulus after the story was shown, while emotional memory (EM) was assessed a week later with a multiple choice questionnaire and a visual recognition task. Our results showed that ratings for emotional stimuli for the patients with TLE were significantly higher than for neutral stimuli (p=0.000). It was also observed that patients with TLE recalled significantly less information from each slide compared with controls, with a trend to lower scores on the questionnaire task for the group with LTLE, as well as poorer performance on the visual recognition task for the group with RLTE. Emotional memory was preserved in patients with RTLE despite having generally poorer memory performance compared with controls, while it was found to be impaired in patients with LTLE. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Exercise-induced seizures and lateral asymmetry in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan T. Kamel

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Exercise may be an underrecognized form of reflex epilepsy, which tended to be refractory to both medical and surgical interventions in our patients. Almost all patients in our cohort had seizures localizing to the left temporal lobe. We discuss potential mechanisms by which exercise may precipitate seizures, and its relevance regarding our understanding of temporal lobe epilepsy and lateralization of seizures. Recognition of, as well as advice regarding avoidance of, known triggers forms an important part of management of these patients.

  8. Familial temporal lobe epilepsy due to focal cortical dysplasia type IIIa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabera, Petr; Krijtova, Hana; Tomasek, Martin; Krysl, David; Zamecnik, Josef; Mohapl, Milan; Jiruska, Premysl; Marusic, Petr

    2015-09-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) represents a common cause of refractory epilepsy. It is considered a sporadic disorder, but its occasional familial occurrence suggests the involvement of genetic mechanisms. Siblings with intractable epilepsy were referred for epilepsy surgery evaluation. Both patients were examined using video-EEG monitoring, MRI examination and PET imaging. They underwent left anteromedial temporal lobe resection. Electroclinical features pointed to left temporal lobe epilepsy and MRI examination revealed typical signs of left-sided hippocampal sclerosis and increased white matter signal intensity in the left temporal pole. PET examination confirmed interictal hypometabolism in the left temporal lobe. Histopathological examination of resected tissue demonstrated the presence FCD type IIIa, i.e. hippocampal sclerosis and focal cortical dysplasia in the left temporal pole. We present a unique case of refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy in siblings, characterized by an identical clinical profile and histopathology of FCD type IIIa, who were successfully treated by epilepsy surgery. The presence of such a high concordance between the clinical and morphological data, together with the occurrence of epilepsy and febrile seizures in three generations of the family pedigree points towards a possible genetic nature of the observed FCD type IIIa. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Emotion recognition and social cognition in temporal lobe epilepsy and the effect of epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amlerova, Jana; Cavanna, Andrea E; Bradac, Ondrej; Javurkova, Alena; Raudenska, Jaroslava; Marusic, Petr

    2014-07-01

    The abilities to identify facial expression from another person's face and to attribute mental states to others refer to preserved function of the temporal lobes. In the present study, we set out to evaluate emotion recognition and social cognition in presurgical and postsurgical patients with unilateral refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of TLE surgery and to identify the main risk factors for impairment in these functions. We recruited 30 patients with TLE for longitudinal data analysis (14 with right-sided and 16 with left-sided TLE) and 74 patients for cross-sectional data analysis (37 with right-sided and 37 with left-sided TLE) plus 20 healthy controls. Besides standard neuropsychological assessment, we administered an analog of the Ekman and Friesen test and the Faux Pas Test to assess emotion recognition and social cognition, respectively. Both emotion recognition and social cognition were impaired in the group of patients with TLE, irrespective of the focus side, compared with healthy controls. The performance in both tests was strongly dependent on the intelligence level. Beyond intelligence level, earlier age at epilepsy onset, longer disease duration, and history of early childhood brain injury predicted social cognition problems in patients with TLE. Epilepsy surgery within the temporal lobe seems to have neutral effect on patients' performances in both domains. However, there are a few individual patients who appear to be at risk of postoperative decline, even when seizure freedom is achieved following epilepsy surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Glutamate Imaging (GluCEST) Lateralizes Epileptic Foci in Non-Lesional Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kathryn Adamiak; Nanga, Ravi Prakash Reddy; Das, Sandhitsu; Chen, Stephanie H.; Hadar, Peter N.; Pollard, John R.; Lucas, Timothy H.; Shinohara, Russell T.; Litt, Brian; Hariharan, Hari; Elliott, Mark A.; Detre, John A.; Reddy, Ravinder

    2015-01-01

    When neuroimaging reveals a brain lesion, drug-resistant epilepsy patients show better outcomes after resective surgery than do the one-third of drug resistant epilepsy patients who have normal brain MRIs. We applied a glutamate imaging method, GluCEST (Glutamate Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer), to patients with non-lesional temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) based on conventional MRI. GluCEST correctly lateralized the temporal lobe seizure focus on visual and quantitative analysis in all patients. MR spectra, available in a subset of patients and controls, corroborated the GluCEST findings. Hippocampal volumes were not significantly different between hemispheres. GluCEST allowed for high-resolution functional imaging of brain glutamate and has potential to identify the epileptic focus in patients previously deemed non-lesional. This method may lead to improved clinical outcomes for temporal lobe epilepsy as well as other localization-related epilepsies. PMID:26468323

  11. Temporal lobe origin is common in patients who have undergone epilepsy surgery for hypermotor seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arain, Amir M; Azar, Nabil J; Lagrange, Andre H; McLean, Michael; Singh, Pradumna; Sonmezturk, Hasan; Konrad, Peter; Neimat, Joseph; Abou-Khalil, Bassel

    2016-11-01

    Hypermotor seizures are most often reported from the frontal lobe but may also have temporal, parietal, or insular origin. We noted a higher proportion of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy in our surgical cohort who had hypermotor seizures. We evaluated the anatomic localization and surgical outcome in patient with refractory hypermotor seizures who had epilepsy surgery in our center. We identified twenty three patients with refractory hypermotor seizures from our epilepsy surgery database. We analyzed demographics, presurgical evaluation including semiology, MRI, PET scan, interictal/ictal scalp video-EEG, intracranial recording, and surgical outcomes. We evaluated preoperative variables as predictors of outcome. Most patients (65%) had normal brain MRI. Intracranial EEG was required in 20 patients (86.9%). Based on the presurgical evaluation, the resection was anterior temporal in fourteen patients, orbitofrontal in four patients, cingulate in four patients, and temporoparietal in one patient. The median duration of follow-up after surgery was 76.4months. Fourteen patients (60%) had been seizure free at the last follow up while 3 patients had rare disabling seizures. Hypermotor seizures often originated from the temporal lobe in this series of patients who had epilepsy surgery. This large proportion of temporal lobe epilepsy may be the result of a selection bias, due to easier localization and expected better outcome in temporal lobe epilepsy. With extensive presurgical evaluation, including intracranial EEG when needed, seizure freedom can be expected in the majority of patients. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Network Alterations Supporting Word Retrieval in Patients with Medial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protzner, Andrea B.; McAndrews, Mary Pat

    2011-01-01

    Although the hippocampus is not considered a key structure in semantic memory, patients with medial-temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) have deficits in semantic access on some word retrieval tasks. We hypothesized that these deficits reflect the negative impact of focal epilepsy on remote cerebral structures. Thus, we expected that the networks that…

  13. Evaluation of Posterior Hippocampal Epileptogenicity During Epilepsy Surgery For Temporal Lobe Cavernoma by the Occipital Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Yukinori; Suzuki, Kengo; Ochi, Satoko; Miyamoto, Susumu; Mikuni, Nobuhiro

    2015-11-01

    Cavernomas frequently are associated with intractable epilepsy. When cavernomas located in the temporal lobe are associated with intractable epilepsy, the hippocampus also may have an epileptic focus. The objective in the present study was to clarify the importance of evaluation of the posterior hippocampal epileptogenicity during epilepsy surgery for posteromedial temporal lobe cavernoma. In this study, we describe 2 rare cases of medically intractable epilepsy in patients with posteromedial temporal lobe cavernomas who underwent surgery via the occipital approach. Using longitudinal insertion of depth electrodes into the hippocampus, we evaluated epileptogenicity in both patients from the cavernoma cavity and its surrounding hemosiderin, as well as from the posterior hippocampus near the cavernoma. We show that the transoccipital approach to the posteromedial temporal lobe is compatible with depth electrode insertion and subdural electrode placement on the temporal lobe, enabling an accurate evaluation of potential epileptogenic zones in the posterior part of the hippocampus. Both patients did not experience any seizures and had no postoperative neurologic deficits, and their cognitive functions were intact. The transoccipital approach enables the optimization of the extent of posterior hippocampectomy while avoiding unnecessary resection for seizure control. We suggest resecting the posterior part of the hippocampus in addition to the cavernoma and surrounding areas in patients with medically refractory epilepsy due to a posteromedial temporal cavernoma. Tailored systematic resection guided by intraoperative electrocorticography and electroencephalography with a depth electrode was important and necessary in the present cases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Influence of Resting-State Network on Lateralization of Functional Connectivity in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, L; An, J; Ma, Q; Qiu, S; Hu, D

    2015-08-01

    Although most studies on epilepsy have focused on the epileptogenic zone, epilepsy is a system-level disease characterized by aberrant neuronal synchronization among groups of neurons. Increasingly, studies have indicated that mesial temporal lobe epilepsy may be a network-level disease; however, few investigations have examined resting-state functional connectivity of the entire brain, particularly in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis. This study primarily investigated whole-brain resting-state functional connectivity abnormality in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and right hippocampal sclerosis during the interictal period. We investigated resting-state functional connectivity of 21 patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with right hippocampal sclerosis and 21 neurologically healthy controls. A multivariate pattern analysis was used to identify the functional connections that most clearly differentiated patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with right hippocampal sclerosis from controls. Discriminative analysis of functional connections indicated that the patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with right hippocampal sclerosis exhibited decreased resting-state functional connectivity within the right hemisphere and increased resting-state functional connectivity within the left hemisphere. Resting-state network analysis suggested that the internetwork connections typically obey the hemispheric lateralization trend and most of the functional connections that disturb the lateralization trend are the intranetwork ones. The current findings suggest that weakening of the resting-state functional connectivity associated with the right hemisphere appears to strengthen resting-state functional connectivity on the contralateral side, which may be related to the seizure-induced damage and underlying compensatory mechanisms. Resting-state network-based analysis indicated that the compensatory mechanism among

  15. Circadian rhythm and profile in patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Fukuda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study intended to compare the circadian rhythm and circadian profile between patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME and patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. Method We enrolled 16 patients with JME and 37 patients with TLE from the Outpatient Clinic of UNICAMP. We applied a questionnaire about sleep-wake cycle and circadian profile. Results Fourteen (87% out of 16 patients with JME, and 22 out of 37 (59% patients with TLE reported that they would sleep after seizure (p < 0.05. Three (19% patients with JME, and 17 (46% reported to be in better state before 10:00 AM (p < 0.05. Conclusion There is no clear distinct profile and circadian pattern in patients with JME in comparison to TLE patients. However, our data suggest that most JME patients do not feel in better shape early in the day.

  16. Auras in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and mesial temporal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Nei, Maromi; Sharan, Ashwini; Sperling, Michael R

    2016-05-15

    We investigated auras in patients with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). We also investigated the clinical differences between patients with MTS and abdominal auras and those with MTS and non-mesial temporal auras. All patients with drug-resistant TLE and unilateral MTS who underwent epilepsy surgery at Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center from 1986 through 2014 were evaluated. Patients with good postoperative seizure outcome were investigated. One hundred forty-nine patients (71 males and 78 females) were studied. Thirty-one patients (20.8%) reported no auras, while 29 patients (19.5%) reported abdominal aura, and 30 patients (20.1%) reported non-mesial temporal auras; 16 patients (10.7%) had sensory auras, 11 patients (7.4%) had auditory auras, and five patients (3.4%) reported visual auras. A history of preoperative tonic-clonic seizures was strongly associated with non-mesial temporal auras (odds ratio 3.8; 95% CI: 1.15-12.98; p=0.02). About one-fifth of patients who had MTS in their MRI and responded well to surgery reported auras that are historically associated with non-mesial temporal structures. However, the presence of presumed non-mesial temporal auras in a patient with MTS may herald a more widespread epileptogenic zone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Spatial memory for asymmetrical dot locations predicts lateralization among patients with presurgical mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Franklin C; Hirsch, Lawrence J; Spencer, Dennis D

    2015-11-01

    This study examined the ability of an asymmetrical dot location memory test (Brown Location Test, BLT) and two verbal memory tests (Verbal Selective Reminding Test (VSRT) and California Verbal Learning Test, Second Edition (CVLT-II)) to correctly lateralize left (LTLE) or right (RTLE) mesial temporal lobe epilepsy that was confirmed with video-EEG. Subjects consisted of 16 patients with medically refractory RTLE and 13 patients with medically refractory LTLE who were left hemisphere language dominant. Positive predictive values for lateralizing TLE correctly were 87.5% for the BLT, 72.7% for the VSRT, and 80% for the CVLT-II. Binary logistic regression indicated that the BLT alone correctly classified 76.9% of patients with left temporal lobe epilepsy and 87.5% of patients with right temporal lobe epilepsy. Inclusion of the verbal memory tests improved this to 92.3% of patients with left temporal lobe epilepsy and 100% correct classification of patients with right temporal lobe epilepsy. Though of a limited sample size, this study suggests that the BLT alone provides strong laterality information which improves with the addition of verbal memory tests. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Semantic and episodic memory in children with temporal lobe epilepsy: do they relate to literacy skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lah, Suncica; Smith, Mary Lou

    2014-01-01

    Children with temporal lobe epilepsy are at risk for deficits in new learning (episodic memory) and literacy skills. Semantic memory deficits and double dissociations between episodic and semantic memory have recently been found in this patient population. In the current study we investigate whether impairments of these 2 distinct memory systems relate to literacy skills. 57 children with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy completed tests of verbal memory (episodic and semantic) and literacy skills (reading and spelling accuracy, and reading comprehension). For the entire group, semantic memory explained over 30% of variance in each of the literacy domains. Episodic memory explained a significant, but rather small proportion (memory impairments (intact semantic/impaired episodic, intact episodic/impaired semantic) were compared, significant reductions in literacy skills were evident only in children with semantic memory impairments, but not in children with episodic memory impairments relative to the norms and to children with temporal lobe epilepsy who had intact memory. Our study provides the first evidence for differential relations between episodic and semantic memory impairments and literacy skills in children with temporal lobe epilepsy. As such, it highlights the urgent need to consider semantic memory deficits in management of children with temporal lobe epilepsy and undertake further research into the nature of reading difficulties of children with semantic memory impairments.

  19. Seizure control of current shunt on rats with temporal lobe epilepsy and neocortical epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limin Zhang

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To examine the effects of current shunt on rats with temporal lobe epilepsy and neocortex epilepsy. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: A kainic acid (KA-induced model of temporal lobe seizure and a penicillin-induced model of neocortical partial seizure were used in this study. Rats of each model were randomly allocated into two groups: control and model groups. The model group was further divided into the KA or penicillin group, sham conduction group and conduction group. The current shunt was realized through the implantation of a customized conduction electrode. After surgery, electroencephalogram (EEG was recorded for two hours for each rat under anesthesia. Subsequently, the rats were video monitored for 72 h to detect the occurrence of behavioral seizures upon awakening. The average number and duration of seizures on EEG and the number of behavioral seizures were measured. RESULTS: In KA model, the number of total EEG seizures in conduction group (9.57±2.46 was significantly less than that in sham conduction group (15.13±3.45 (p<0.01. The duration of EEG seizures in conduction group (26.13±7.81 s was significantly shorter than that in sham conduction group (34.17±7.25 s (p = 0.001. A significant reduction of behavioral seizures was observed in the conduction group compared with KA (p = 0.000 and sham conduction groups (p = 0.000. In penicillin model, there was a 61% reduction in total EEG seizures in conduction group compared with sham conduction group (p<0.01, and the duration of EEG seizures in conduction group (6.29±2.64 s was significantly shorter than that in the sham conduction group (12.07±3.81 s (p = 0.002. A significant reduction of behavioral seizures was observed in conduction group compared with penicillin (p<0.01 and sham conduction groups (p<0.01. CONCLUSION: Current shunt effectively reduces the onset and severity of seizures. Current shunt therapy could be an effective alternative minimally invasive

  20. Non-invasive examinations successfully select patients with medial temporal lobe epilepsy for anterior temporal lobectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morioka, Takato; Nishio, Shunji; Kawamura, Tadao; Fukui, Kimiko; Sasaki, Masayuki; Fukui, Masashi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Graduate School of Medical Sciences

    2001-06-01

    We retrospectively analyzed 8 patients with intractable medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) who underwent the anterior temporal lobectomy with hippocampectomy (ATL) without invasive examinations such as chronic subdural electrode recording. Five patients had a history of febrile convulsion. While all 8 patients had oral automatism, automatism of ipsilateral limbs with dystonic posture of contralateral limbs was demonstrated in 2 patients. Bilateral temporal paroxysmal activities on interictal EEG was observed in 4 patients and all patients had clear ictal onset zone on unilateral anterior temporal region. MRI demonstrated unilateral hippocampal sclerosis in 5 cases. Interictal FDG-PET depicted hypometabolism of the unilateral temporal lobe in all cases, however, ECD-SPECT failed to reveal the hypoperfusion of the unilateral temporal lobe in a case. Postoperatively, 7 cases became seizure free, and one had rare seizure. Non-invasive examinations, especially ictal EEG and concordant FDG-PET findings, in patients with oral automatism in seizure semiology, successfully select patients with MTLE for ATL. (author)

  1. Peri-ictal water drinking: a rare automatic behaviour in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrafusa, Nicola; Trivisano, Marina; de Palma, Luca; Serino, Domenico; Moavero, Romina; Benvenga, Antonella; Cappelletti, Simona; Boero, Giovanni; Vigevano, Federico; La Neve, Angela; Specchio, Nicola

    2015-12-01

    Peri-ictal water drinking (PIWD) has been reported as the action of drinking during or within two minutes of an electroclinical seizure. It is considered a peri-ictal vegetative symptom, evident both during childhood and adulthood epilepsy. The aim of this paper was to describe the clinical and electroencephalographic features of two new adult subjects suffering from symptomatic temporal lobe epilepsy with episodes of PIWD recorded by VIDEO-EEG and to review literature data in order to better define this peculiar event during seizures, a rare and probably underestimated semiological sign. To date, 51 cases with focal epilepsy and seizures associated with PIWD have been reported. All patients presented with temporal lobe epilepsy. All cases but one had symptomatic epilepsy. Most of the patients had an involvement of the right hemisphere. Water drinking was reported as an ictal sign in the majority of patients, and less frequently was reported as postictal. We believe that PIWD might be considered a rare automatic behaviour, like other automatisms. Automatisms are more frequently described in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. PIWD was reported also to have lateralizing significance in the non-dominant temporal lobe, however, because of its rarity, this finding remains unclear.

  2. Verbal memory after temporal lobe epilepsy surgery in children: Do only mesial structures matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Nicole; Benifla, Mony; Rutka, James; Smith, Mary Lou

    2017-02-01

    Previous findings have been mixed regarding verbal memory outcome after left temporal lobectomy in children, and there are few studies comparing verbal memory change after lateral versus mesial temporal lobe resections. We compared verbal memory outcome associated with sparing or including the mesial structures in children who underwent left or right temporal lobe resection. We also investigated predictors of postsurgical verbal memory change. We retrospectively assessed verbal memory change approximately 1 year after unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy surgery using a list learning task. Participants included 23 children who underwent temporal lobe surgery with sparing of the mesial structures (13 left), and 40 children who had a temporal lobectomy that included resection of mesial structures (22 left). Children who underwent resection from the left lateral and mesial temporal lobe were the only group to show decline in verbal memory. Furthermore, when we considered language representation in the left temporal resection group, patients with left language representation and spared mesial structures showed essentially no change in verbal memory from preoperative to follow-up, whereas those with left language representation and excised mesial structures showed a decline. Postoperative seizure status had no effect on verbal memory change in children after left temporal lobe surgery. Finally, we found that patients with intact preoperative verbal memory experienced a significant decline compared to those with below average preoperative verbal memory. Our findings provide evidence of significant risk factors for verbal memory decline in children, specific to left mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Children who undergo left temporal lobe surgery that includes mesial structures may be most vulnerable for verbal memory decline, especially when language representation is localized to the left hemisphere and when preoperative verbal memory is intact. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Levels of Processing with Free and Cued Recall and Unilateral Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lespinet-Najib, Veronique; N'Kaoua, Bernard; Sauzeon, Helene; Bresson, Christel; Rougier, Alain; Claverie, Bernard

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates the role of the temporal lobes in levels-of-processing tasks (phonetic and semantic encoding) according to the nature of recall tasks (free and cued recall). These tasks were administered to 48 patients with unilateral temporal epilepsy (right ''RTLE''=24; left ''LTLE''=24) and a normal group (n=24). The results indicated…

  4. Pharmacodynamics of remifentanil. Induced intracranial spike activity in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Troels Wesenberg; Hogenhaven, Hans; Lee, Andrea P

    2017-01-01

    activity in the temporal neocortex and hippocampus. We examined 65 patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy during surgery, prior to resection. We used a 20-lead grid on the cortex and a 4-lead strip in the lateral ventricle on the hippocampus. At least two 3-min periods of ECoG were recorded - before...

  5. Variability in clinical assessment of neuroimaging in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struck, Aaron F; Westover, Michael B

    2015-08-01

    Neuroimaging is critical in deciding candidacy for epilepsy surgery. Currently imaging is primarily assessed qualitatively, which may affect patient selection and outcomes. The epilepsy surgery database at MGH was reviewed for temporal lobectomy patients from the last 10 years. Radiology reports for MRI and FDG-PET were compared to the epilepsy conference consensus. First, specific findings of ipsi/contra hippocampal atrophy and T2 signal changes were directly compared. Next the overall impression of presence of hippocampal sclerosis (HS) for MRI and temporal hypometabolism for PET was used for sensitivity/specificity analysis. To assess predictive power of imaging findings logistic regression was used. 104 subjects were identified. 70% of subjects were ILAE class I at 1-year. Radiology reports and the conference consensus differed in 31% of FDG-PET studies and 41% of MRIs. For PET most disagreement (50%) stemmed for discrepancy regarding contralateral temporal hypometabolism. For MRI discrepancy in ipsilateral hippocampal atrophy/T2 signal accounted for 59% of disagreements. When overall impression of the image was used the overall reliability between groups was high with only MRI sensitivity to detect HS (0.75 radiology, 0.91 conference, p=0.02) was significantly different between groups. On logistic regression MRI was a significant predictor of HS, but still 36% of patients with normal MRI as read by both groups had HS on pathology. Despite some difference in specific radiologic findings, overall accuracy for MRI and PET is similar in clinical practice between radiology and conference; nonetheless there are still cases of hippocampal pathology not detected by standard imaging methods. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Elemental spatial and temporal association formation in left temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher F A Benjamin

    Full Text Available The mesial temporal lobe (MTL is typically understood as a memory structure in clinical settings, with the sine qua non of MTL damage in epilepsy being memory impairment. Recent models, however, understand memory as one of a number of higher cognitive functions that recruit the MTL through their reliance on more fundamental processes, such as "self-projection" or "association formation". We examined how damage to the left MTL influences these fundamental processes through the encoding of elemental spatial and temporal associations. We used a novel fMRI task to image the encoding of simple visual stimuli, either rich or impoverished, in spatial or spatial plus temporal information. Participants included 14 typical adults (36.4 years, sd. 10.5 years and 14 patients with left mesial temporal lobe damage as evidenced by a clinical diagnosis of left temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE and left MTL impairment on imaging (34.3 years, sd. 6.6 years. In-scanner behavioral performance was equivalent across groups. In the typical group whole-brain analysis revealed highly significant bilateral parahippocampal activation (right > left during spatial associative processing and left hippocampal/parahippocampal deactivation in joint spatial-temporal associative processing. In the left TLE group identical analyses indicated patients used MTL structures contralateral to the seizure focus differently and relied on extra-MTL regions to a greater extent. These results are consistent with the notion that epileptogenic MTL damage is followed by reorganization of networks underlying elemental associative processes. In addition, they provide further evidence that task-related fMRI deactivation can meaningfully index brain function. The implications of these findings for clinical and cognitive neuropsychological models of MTL function in TLE are discussed.

  7. Declarative long-term memory and the mesial temporal lobe: Insights from a 5-year postsurgery follow-up study on refractory temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvato, Gerardo; Scarpa, Pina; Francione, Stefano; Mai, Roberto; Tassi, Laura; Scarano, Elisa; Lo Russo, Giorgio; Bottini, Gabriella

    2016-11-01

    It is largely recognized that the mesial temporal lobe and its substructure support declarative long-term memory (LTM). So far, different theories have been suggested, and the organization of declarative verbal LTM in the brain is still a matter of debate. In the current study, we retrospectively selected 151 right-handed patients with temporal lobe epilepsy with and without hippocampal sclerosis, with a homogeneous (seizure-free) clinical outcome. We analyzed verbal memory performance within a normalized scores context, by means of prose recall and word paired-associate learning tasks. Patients were tested at presurgical baseline, 6months, 2 and 5years after anteromesial temporal lobe surgery, using parallel versions of the neuropsychological tests. Our main finding revealed a key involvement of the left temporal lobe and, in particular, of the left hippocampus in prose recall rather than word paired-associate task. We also confirmed that shorter duration of epilepsy, younger age, and withdrawal of antiepileptic drugs would predict a better memory outcome. When individual memory performance was taken into account, data showed that females affected by left temporal lobe epilepsy for longer duration were more at risk of presenting a clinically pathologic LTM at 5years after surgery. Taken together, these findings shed new light on verbal declarative memory in the mesial temporal lobe and on the behavioral signature of the functional reorganization after the surgical treatment of temporal lobe epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Time reversibility of intracranial human EEG recordings in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heyden, M. J.; Diks, C.; Pijn, J. P. M.; Velis, D. N.

    1996-02-01

    Intracranial electroencephalograms from patients suffering from mesial temporal lobe epilepsy were tested for time reversibility. If the recorded time series is irreversible, the input of the recording system cannot be a realisation of a linear Gaussian random process. We confirmed experimentally that the measurement equipment did not introduce irreversibility in the recorded output when the input was a realisation of a linear Gaussian random process. In general, the non-seizure recordings are reversible, whereas the seizure recordings are irreversible. These results suggest that time reversibility is a useful property for the characterisation of human intracranial EEG recordings in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

  9. Indication for anterior temporal lobectomy in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, M

    2000-01-01

    The chronicity and severity of epilepsy, as well as the presence of temporal lobe toci, appear to correlate with psychopathology. A high prevalence of psychopathology has been reported among patients who are candidates for anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL). A review of the literature indicates that episodic psychosis may diminish when patients become free of seizures after surgery and that chronic psychosis neither improves notr worsens after ATL. If this is the case, patients with episodic psychosis may benefit from ATL. Patients with chronic psychosis may benefit if they become free from seizures after the operation, even if the psychosis persists. Case reports of maladjustment to seizure-free life after surgery, and de novo psychopathology, underline the importance of preoperative psychiatric evaluation and postoperative psychiatric intervention in patients undergoing epilepsy surgery. Although there is a need for each epilepsy center to state its policy with regard to patients with psychopathology who undergo epilepsy surgery, it would be unwise to make a decision on whether to reject a patient simply on the grounds of psychosis. A detailed psychiatric evaluation of each individual patient is required.

  10. Preoperative automated fibre quantification predicts postoperative seizure outcome in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Simon S; Glenn, G Russell; Weber, Bernd; Kreilkamp, Barbara A K; Jensen, Jens H; Helpern, Joseph A; Wagner, Jan; Barker, Gareth J; Richardson, Mark P; Bonilha, Leonardo

    2017-01-01

    Approximately one in every two patients with pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy will not be rendered completely seizure-free after temporal lobe surgery. The reasons for this are unknown and are likely to be multifactorial. Quantitative volumetric magnetic resonance imaging techniques have provided limited insight into the causes of persistent postoperative seizures in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. The relationship between postoperative outcome and preoperative pathology of white matter tracts, which constitute crucial components of epileptogenic networks, is unknown. We investigated regional tissue characteristics of preoperative temporal lobe white matter tracts known to be important in the generation and propagation of temporal lobe seizures in temporal lobe epilepsy, using diffusion tensor imaging and automated fibre quantification. We studied 43 patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal sclerosis and 44 healthy controls. Patients underwent preoperative imaging, amygdalohippocampectomy and postoperative assessment using the International League Against Epilepsy seizure outcome scale. From preoperative imaging, the fimbria-fornix, parahippocampal white matter bundle and uncinate fasciculus were reconstructed, and scalar diffusion metrics were calculated along the length of each tract. Altogether, 51.2% of patients were rendered completely seizure-free and 48.8% continued to experience postoperative seizure symptoms. Relative to controls, both patient groups exhibited strong and significant diffusion abnormalities along the length of the uncinate bilaterally, the ipsilateral parahippocampal white matter bundle, and the ipsilateral fimbria-fornix in regions located within the medial temporal lobe. However, only patients with persistent postoperative seizures showed evidence of significant pathology of tract sections located in the ipsilateral dorsal fornix and in the contralateral parahippocampal white matter bundle

  11. Accelerated cognitive decline in a rodent model for temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, Sandra; Aalbers, Marlien W; Rijkers, Kim; Lagiere, Melanie; Bogaarts, Jan G; Blokland, Arjan; Klinkenberg, Sylvia; Hoogland, Govert; Vles, Johan S H

    2016-12-01

    Cognitive impairment is frequently observed in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. It is hypothesized that cumulative seizure exposure causes accelerated cognitive decline in patients with epilepsy. We investigated the influence of seizure frequency on cognitive decline in a rodent model for temporal lobe epilepsy. Neurobehavioral assessment was performed before and after surgery, after the induction of self-sustaining limbic status epilepticus (SSLSE), and in the chronic phase in which rats experienced recurrent seizures. Furthermore, we assessed potential confounders of memory performance. Rats showed a deficit in spatial working memory after the induction of the SSLSE, which endured in the chronic phase. A progressive decline in recognition memory developed in SSLSE rats. Confounding factors were absent. Seizure frequency and also the severity of the status epilepticus were not correlated with the severity of cognitive deficits. The effect of the seizure frequency on cognitive comorbidity in epilepsy has long been debated, possibly because of confounders such as antiepileptic medication and the heterogeneity of epileptic etiologies. In an animal model of temporal lobe epilepsy, we showed that a decrease in spatial working memory does not relate to the seizure frequency. This suggests for other mechanisms are responsible for memory decline and potentially a common pathophysiology of cognitive deterioration and the occurrence and development of epileptic seizures. Identifying this common denominator will allow development of more targeted interventions treating cognitive decline in patients with epilepsy. The treatment of interictal symptoms will increase the quality of life of many patients with epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. MRI and brain spect findings in patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy and normal CT scan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.G. Carrilho

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available 26 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy clinically documented by several abnormal interictal surface EEGs with typical unitemporal epileptiform activity and a normal CT scan were studied. Interictal99mTC HMPAO brain SPECT and MRI were performed in all subjects. Abnormalities were shown in 61.5% of MRI (n=16 and 65.4% of SPECT (n=17. Hippocampal atrophy associated to a high signal on T2-weighted MRI slices suggesting mesial temporal sclerosis was the main finding (n=12; 75% of abnormal MRI. MRI correlated well to surface EEG in 50% (n=13. There was also a good correlation between MRI and SPECT in 30.7% (n=8. SPECT and EEG were in agreement in 57.7% (n=l5. MRI, SPECT and EEG were congruent in 26.9% (n=7. These results support the usefulness of interictal brain SPECT and MRI in detecting lateralized abnormalities in temporal lobe epilepsy. On the other hand, in two cases, interictal SPECT correlated poorly with surface EEG. This functional method should not be used isolately in the detection of temporal lobe foci. MRI is more useful than CT as a neuroimaging technique in temporal lobe epilepsy. It may detect small structural lesions and mesial temporal lobe sclerosis which are not easily seen with traditional CT scanning.

  13. Temporal-spatial characteristics of phase-amplitude coupling in electrocorticogram for human temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruihua; Ren, Ye; Liu, Chunyan; Xu, Na; Li, Xiaoli; Cong, Fengyu; Ristaniemi, Tapani; Wang, YuPing

    2017-09-01

    Neural activity of the epileptic human brain contains low- and high-frequency oscillations in different frequency bands, some of which have been used as reliable biomarkers of the epileptogenic brain areas. However, the relationship between the low- and high-frequency oscillations in different cortical areas during the period from pre-seizure to post-seizure has not been completely clarified. We recorded electrocorticogram data from the temporal lobe and hippocampus of seven patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. The modulation index based on the Kullback-Leibler distance and the phase-amplitude coupling co-modulogram were adopted to quantify the coupling strength between the phase of low-frequency oscillations (0.2-10Hz) and the amplitude of high-frequency oscillations (11-400Hz) in different seizure epochs. The time-varying phase-amplitude modulogram was used to analyze the phase-amplitude coupling pattern during the entire period from pre-seizure to post-seizure in both the left and right temporal lobe and hippocampus. Channels with strong modulation index were compared with the seizure onset channels identified by the neurosurgeons and the resection channels in the clinical surgery. The phase-amplitude coupling strength (modulation index) increased significantly in the mid-seizure epoch and decrease significantly in seizure termination and post-seizure epochs (ptemporal cortex and hippocampus. The "fall-max" phase-amplitude modulation pattern, i.e., high-frequency amplitudes were largest in the low-frequency phase range [-π, 0], which corresponded to the falling edges of low-frequency oscillations, appeared in the middle period of the seizures at epileptic focus channels. Channels with strong modulation index appeared on the corresponding left or right temporal cortex of surgical resection and overlapped with the clinical resection zones in all patients. The "fall-max" pattern between the phase of low-frequency oscillation and amplitude of high

  14. Altered organization of face-processing networks in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Jeffrey D; Fling, Brett W; Cramer, Steven C; Lin, Jack J

    2015-05-01

    Deficits in social cognition are common and significant in people with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), but the functional and structural underpinnings remain unclear. The present study investigated how the side of seizure focus impacts face-processing networks in temporal lobe epilepsy. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of a face-processing paradigm to identify face-responsive regions in 24 individuals with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy (left = 15; right = 9) and 19 healthy controls. fMRI signals of face-responsive regions ipsilateral and contralateral to the side of seizure onset were delineated in TLE and compared to the healthy controls with right and left sides combined. Diffusion tensor images were acquired to investigate structural connectivity between face regions that differed in fMRI signals between the two groups. In TLE, activation of the cortical face-processing networks varied according to side of seizure onset. In temporal lobe epilepsy, the laterality of amygdala activation was shifted to the side contralateral to the seizure focus, whereas controls showed no significant asymmetry. Furthermore, compared to controls, patients with TLE showed decreased activation of the occipital face-responsive region on the ipsilateral side and an increased activity of the anterior temporal lobe in the side contralateral to the seizure focus. Probabilistic tractography revealed that the occipital face area and anterior temporal lobe are connected via the inferior longitudinal fasciculus, which in individuals with TLE showed reduced integrity. Taken together, these findings suggest that brain function and white matter integrity of networks subserving face processing are impaired on the side of seizure onset, accompanied by altered responses on the side contralateral to the seizure. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  15. The right hemisphere's contribution to discourse processing: A study in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomlomdjian, Carolina; Múnera, Claudia P; Low, Daniel M; Terpiluk, Verónica; Solís, Patricia; Abusamra, Valeria; Kochen, Silvia

    2017-08-01

    Discourse skills - in which the right hemisphere has an important role - enables verbal communication by selecting contextually relevant information and integrating it coherently to infer the correct meaning. However, language research in epilepsy has focused on single word analysis related mainly to left hemisphere processing. The purpose of this study was to investigate discourse abilities in patients with right lateralized medial temporal lobe epilepsy (RTLE) by comparing their performance to that of patients with left temporal lobe epilepsy (LTLE). 74 pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients were evaluated: 34 with RTLE and 40 with LTLE. Subjects underwent a battery of tests that measure comprehension and production of conversational and narrative discourse. Disease related variables and general neuropsychological data were evaluated. The RTLE group presented deficits in interictal conversational and narrative discourse, with a disintegrated speech, lack of categorization and misinterpretation of social meaning. LTLE group, on the other hand, showed a tendency to lower performance in logical-temporal sequencing. RTLE patients showed discourse deficits which have been described in right hemisphere damaged patients due to other etiologies. Medial and anterior temporal lobe structures appear to link semantic, world knowledge, and social cognition associated areas to construct a contextually related coherent meaning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Detecting Differential Memory Performance Among Spanish-speaking Patients with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Marquez de la Plata, C.; Lacritz, L.H.; Mitschke, R.; Ness, P; Agostini, M.; Diaz-Arrastia, R.; Cullum, C M

    2009-01-01

    There is relatively little research pertaining to neuropsychological assessment of Spanish-speaking individuals with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The current study examined verbal and visual memory performances in 38 primarily Spanish-speaking patients with TLE (Right = 15, Left = 23) of similar epilepsy duration to determine if lateralizing differences can be found using verbal and nonverbal memory tests. On a test specifically designed to assess auditory learning and memory amo...

  17. Insular epilepsy: similarities to temporal lobe epilepsy case report Epilepsia insular: similaridades à epilepsia do lobo temporal - relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARTHUR CUKIERT

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Insular epilepsy has been rarely reported and its clinical and electrographic features are poorly understood. The electrographic study of the insula is difficult since it is hidden from the brain surface by the frontal and temporal lobe. A 48 years-old woman started having simple partial autonomic and complex partial seizures with automatisms and ictal left arm paresis 8 years prior to admission. Seizure's frequency was 1 per week. Pre-operative EEG showed a right temporal lobe focus. Neuropsychological testing disclosed right fronto-temporal dysfunction. MRI showed a right anterior insular cavernous angioma. Intraoperative ECoG obtained after spliting of the sylvian fissure showed independent spiking from the insula and temporal lobe and insular spikes that spread to the temporal lobe. The cavernous angioma and the surrounding gliotic tissue were removed and the temporal lobe was left in place. Post-resection ECoG still disclosed independent temporal and insular spiking with a lower frequency. The patient has been seizure-free since surgery. Insular epilepsy may share many clinical and electroencephalographic features with temporal lobe epilepsy.A epilepsia insular tem sido raramente relatada e suas características clínicas e eletrencefalográficas são pobremente conhecidas. O estudo eletrográfico da ínsula é difícil já que ela se encontra recoberta pelos lobos frontal e temporal. Uma paciente, de 48 anos, começou a ter crises parciais simples autonômicas e crises parciais complexas com automatismos e paresia crítica de membro superior esquerdo 8 anos antes desta internação. A frequência de crises era de 1/semana . O EEG pré-operatório mostrou foco temporal direito. Testagem neuropsicológica demonstrou disfunção fronto-temporal direita. RMN demonstrou cavernoma insular anterior direito. A eletrocorticografia intraoperatória obtida após a abertura da fissura sylviana demonstrou a presença de espículas independentes na

  18. Factors affecting reorganisation of memory encoding networks in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, M K; Stretton, J; Winston, G P; Symms, M; Thompson, P J; Koepp, M J; Duncan, J S

    2015-02-01

    In temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) due to hippocampal sclerosis reorganisation in the memory encoding network has been consistently described. Distinct areas of reorganisation have been shown to be efficient when associated with successful subsequent memory formation or inefficient when not associated with successful subsequent memory. We investigated the effect of clinical parameters that modulate memory functions: age at onset of epilepsy, epilepsy duration and seizure frequency in a large cohort of patients. We studied 53 patients with unilateral TLE and hippocampal sclerosis (29 left). All participants performed a functional magnetic resonance imaging memory encoding paradigm of faces and words. A continuous regression analysis was used to investigate the effects of age at onset of epilepsy, epilepsy duration and seizure frequency on the activation patterns in the memory encoding network. Earlier age at onset of epilepsy was associated with left posterior hippocampus activations that were involved in successful subsequent memory formation in left hippocampal sclerosis patients. No association of age at onset of epilepsy was seen with face encoding in right hippocampal sclerosis patients. In both left hippocampal sclerosis patients during word encoding and right hippocampal sclerosis patients during face encoding, shorter duration of epilepsy and lower seizure frequency were associated with medial temporal lobe activations that were involved in successful memory formation. Longer epilepsy duration and higher seizure frequency were associated with contralateral extra-temporal activations that were not associated with successful memory formation. Age at onset of epilepsy influenced verbal memory encoding in patients with TLE due to hippocampal sclerosis in the speech-dominant hemisphere. Shorter duration of epilepsy and lower seizure frequency were associated with less disruption of the efficient memory encoding network whilst longer duration and higher seizure

  19. Treatment of Proper Name Retrieval Deficits in an Individual with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkina, Irene; Ojemann, Jeffrey G.; Grabowski, Thomas J.; Silkes, JoAnn P.; Phatak, Vaishali; Kendall, Diane L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Studies investigating language deficits in individuals with left temporal-lobe epilepsy have consistently demonstrated impairments in proper name retrieval. The aim of this Phase I rehabilitation study was to investigate the effects of a linguistically distributed word retrieval treatment on proper name retrieval in an individual with…

  20. Factors Predictive of Seizure Outcome in New-Onset Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A community-based cohort of 77 children with new-onset temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE were followed prospectively and reviewed at 7 and 14 years after seizure onset, and clinical, EEG, and neuroimaging findings and seizure outcome are reported from the Royal Children's Hospital and University of Melbourne, Australia, and Starship Children's Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand.

  1. Improved Cerebral Function in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy after Subtemporal Amygdalohippocampectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaya, Shigetoshi; Mikuni, Nobuhiro; Mitsueda, Takahiro; Satow, Takeshi; Taki, Junya; Kinoshita, Masako; Miyamoto, Susumu; Hashimoto, Nobuo; Ikeda, Akio; Fukuyama, Hidenao

    2009-01-01

    The functional changes that occur throughout the human brain after the selective removal of an epileptogenic lesion remain unclear. Subtemporal selective amygdalohippocampectomy (SAH) has been advocated as a minimally invasive surgical procedure for patients with medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). We evaluated the effects…

  2. Fluoxetine Restores Spatial Learning but Not Accelerated Forgetting in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkas, Lisa; Redhead, Edward; Taylor, Matthew; Shtaya, Anan; Hamilton, Derek A.; Gray, William P.

    2012-01-01

    Learning and memory dysfunction is the most common neuropsychological effect of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, and because the underlying neurobiology is poorly understood, there are no pharmacological strategies to help restore memory function in these patients. We have demonstrated impairments in the acquisition of an allocentric spatial task,…

  3. Hippocampal GABA transporter distribution in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijns, O.; Karaca, U.; Andrade, P.; Nijs, L. de; Kusters, B.; Peeters, A.; Dings, J.; Pannek, H.; Ebner, A.; Rijkers, K.; Hoogland, G.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine hippocampal expression of neuronal GABA-transporter (GAT-1) and glial GABA-transporter (GAT-3) in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and hippocampal sclerosis (HS). METHODS: Hippocampal sections were immunohistochemically stained for GABA-transporter 1 and

  4. Suggestive linkage of familial mesial temporal lobe epilepsy to chromosome 3q26.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanciulli, Manuela; Di Bonaventura, Carlo; Egeo, Gabriella; Fattouch, Jinane; Dazzo, Emanuela; Radovic, Slobodanka; Spadotto, Alessandro; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Nobile, Carlo

    2014-02-01

    To describe the clinical findings in a family with a benign form of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and to identify the causative genetic factors. All participants were personally interviewed and underwent neurologic examination. The affected subjects underwent EEG and most of them neuroradiological examinations (MRI). All family members were genotyped with the HumanCytoSNP-12 v1.0 beadchip and linkage analysis was performed with Merlin and Simwalk2 programs. Exome sequencing was performed on HiSeq2000, after exome capture with SureSelect 50 Mb kit v2.0. The family had 6 members with temporal lobe epilepsy. Age at seizure onset ranged from 8 to 13 years. Five patients had epigastric auras often associated to oro-alimentary automatic activity, 3 patients presented loss of contact, and 2 experienced secondary generalizations. Febrile seizures occurred in 2 family members, 1 of whom also had temporal lobe epilepsy. EEG showed focal slow waves and epileptic abnormalities on temporal regions in 1 patient and was normal in the other affected individuals. MRI was normal in all temporal lobe epilepsy patients. We performed single nucleotide polymorphism-array linkage analysis of the family and found suggestive evidence of linkage (LOD score=2.106) to a region on chromosome 3q26. Haplotype reconstruction supported the linkage data and showed that the majority of unaffected family members carried the haplotype at risk. Whole exome sequencing failed to identify pathogenic mutations in genes of the candidate region. Our data suggest the existence of a novel locus for benign familial mesial temporal lobe epilepsy on chromosome 3q26. Our failure to identify pathogenic mutations in genes of this region may be due to limitations of the exome sequencing technology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Continuous Intraoperative Monitoring of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Surgery.

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    Tyrand, Rémi; Momjian, Shahan; Pollo, Claudio; Lysakowski, Christopher; Lascano, Agustina M; Vulliémoz, Serge; Schaller, Karl; Boëx, Colette

    2016-01-01

    The monitoring of interictal epileptiform discharge rates (IEDRs) all along anterior temporal lobe resections (ATLRs) has never been reported. Here the effect of ATLR on continuous IEDR monitoring is described. IEDRs computed automatically during entire interventions were recorded in 34 patients (38.2%, 13/34 depth; 61.8%, 21/34 scalp electrodes only). Monitorings were invalidated when burst suppression occurred or if initial IEDRs were <5. Monitoring was successful for 69.2% (9/13) of the patients with depth recordings and for 4.8% (1/21) of the patients with scalp recordings. Burst suppressions precluded it in 30.8% (4/13) of the depth and in 57.1% (12/21) of the scalp recordings. Initial IEDRs were <5 for 38.1% (8/21) of the scalp recordings. Significant IEDR decreases were observed in 8/10 patients with successful monitoring. These decreases started with resection of the superior temporal gyrus. IEDRs decreased further with amygdalohippocampectomy in 3/5 patients. At the 12-month follow-up, all patients with IEDR decreases remained seizure free; both patients without did not. IEDR monitoring was possible with depth, but not with scalp electrodes. IEDR decreases started with resection of the superior temporal gyrus. A larger patient cohort is necessary to confirm the high predictive values of IEDR monitoring that could become a tool for surgery customization. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. T2 hyperintense signal in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy with MRI signs of hippocampal sclerosis and in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy with normal MRI.

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    Kubota, Bruno Yukio; Coan, Ana Carolina; Yasuda, Clarissa Lin; Cendes, Fernando

    2015-05-01

    Increased MRI T2 signal is commonly present not only in the hippocampus but also in other temporal structures of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), and it is associated with histological abnormalities related to the epileptogenic lesion. This study aimed to verify the distribution of T2 increased signal in temporal lobe structures and its correlations with clinical characteristics of TLE patients with (TLE-HS) or without (TLE-NL) MRI signs of hippocampal sclerosis. We selected 203 consecutive patients: 124 with TLE-HS and 79 with TLE-NL. Healthy controls (N=59) were used as a comparison group/comparative group. T2 multiecho images obtained via a 3-T MRI were evaluated with in-house software. T2 signal decays were computed from five original echoes in regions of interest in the hippocampus, amygdala, and white matter of the anterior temporal lobe. Values higher than 2 standard deviations from the mean of controls were considered as abnormal. T2 signal increase was observed in the hippocampus in 78% of patients with TLE-HS and in 17% of patients with TLE-NL; in the amygdala in 13% of patients with TLE-HS and in 14% of patients with TLE-NL; and in the temporal lobe white matter in 22% of patients with TLE-HS and in 8% of patients with TLE-NL. Group analysis demonstrated a significant difference in the distribution of the T2 relaxation times of the hippocampus (ANOVA, ptemporal lobe white matter (ptemporal lobe white matter (ANOVA, p=0.025) for patients with TLE-NL compared with controls. The average signal from the hippocampus ipsilateral to the epileptogenic zone was significantly higher in patients with no family history of epilepsy (two-sample T-test, p=0.005). Increased T2 signal occurs in different temporal structures of patients with TLE-HS and in patients with TLE-NL. The hippocampal hyperintense signal is more pronounced in patients without family history of epilepsy and is influenced by earlier seizure onset. These changes in T2 signal may be

  7. Triple pathological findings in a surgically amenable patient with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumin Tong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS is a well-recognized cause of intractable epilepsy; however, coexistence with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD is less common. Middle fossa epidermoid cysts are rare and may involve the temporal lobe. Most epidermoids are clinically silent, slow-growing, and seldom associated with overt symptomatology, including seizures. We describe a patient with multiple comorbidities including left MTS and a large epidermoid cyst involving the left quadrigeminal plate cistern compressing upon the cerebellar vermis and tail of the left hippocampus, resulting in refractory left temporal lobe epilepsy. The patient underwent left anterior temporal lobectomy. The surgical pathology demonstrated a third pathological finding of left temporal FCD type Ia. The patient has been seizure-free since the surgery. This case provides additional information with regard to the understanding of epileptogenicity and surgical planning in patients with MTS and epidermoid cysts.

  8. Gangliogliomas: characteristic imaging findings and role in the temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Adachi, Y.; Yagishita, A. [Tokyo Metropolitan Neurological Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2008-10-15

    Ganglioglioma is an uncommon neoplasm of the central nervous system, most frequently seen in the temporal lobe, and usually associated with medically refractory epilepsy in children and young adults. Few reports have considered ganglioglioma-associated epileptogenicity arising in the temporal lobe. The purpose of our study was to define the imaging features of ganglioglioma in the temporal lobe and their relation to the seizure foci revealed by electrocorticograms. We reviewed 24 patients with pathologically confirmed ganglioglioma in the temporal lobe. Computed tomography (CT) images showed gangliogliomas to be isodense (91.7%), and on T1-weighted images (T1-WI) most gangliogliomas (79.2%) were isointense to the gray matter. A cystic lesion was seen in 14 of 24 of the gangliogliomas (58.3%). Mass effects were not seen in any of the ten tumors without cystic components. One patient showed tumor recurrence. Dual pathology was seen in two cases (8.3%). In 23 cases, epileptogenicity was confirmed in the tumors by intraoperative electrocorticogram. The remaining case had no epileptogenicity. A tumor presenting isointensity to gray matter on T1-WI without mass effects in the medial temporal lobe in a young patient with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) might be the characteristic imaging of temporal lobe ganglioglioma. However, such tumors are not always associated with epileptogenicity, even if a ganglioglioma is found in a patient with TLE. The seizure foci may be contralateral to the ganglioglioma. Therefore, we need to investigate the hippocampus, white matter abnormalities of the ipsilateral and contralateral anterior temporal lobe, and other focal lesions closely. (orig.)

  9. Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy in a patient with spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 (SCA13).

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    Bürk, Katrin; Strzelczyk, Adam; Reif, Philipp S; Figueroa, Karla P; Pulst, Stefan M; Zühlke, Christine; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Hamer, Hajo M; Rosenow, Felix

    2013-04-01

    We report a female patient of German descent with a molecular diagnosis of SCA13 who presented with a history of cerebellar ataxia and epilepsy. The underlying mutation R420H had been shown to cause a dominant negative effect on the functional properties of the voltage-gated potassium channel KCNC3. Despite widespread KCNC3 expression in the central nervous system, the patient presented with a left mesiotemporal electroencephalogram focus and left hippocampal sclerosis. This is the first case, which reports an association between mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and spinocerebellar ataxia type 13. This demonstrates that epilepsy of structural-metabolic cause may be contingent upon genetically defined channelopathies.

  10. Characterization of neurons in the cortical white matter in human temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Richter, Zsófia; Janszky, József; Sétáló, György; Horváth, Réka; Horváth, Zsolt; Dóczi, Tamás; Seress, László; Ábrahám, Hajnalka

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present work was to characterize neurons in the archi- and neocortical white matter, and to investigate their distribution in mesial temporal sclerosis. Immunohistochemistry and quantification of neurons were performed on surgically resected tissue sections of patients with therapy-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy. Temporal lobe tissues of patients with tumor but without epilepsy and that from autopsy were used as controls. Neurons were identified with immunohistochemistry using antibodies against NeuN, calcium-binding proteins, transcription factor Tbr1 and neurofilaments. We found significantly higher density of neurons in the archi- and neocortical white matter of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy than in that of controls. Based on their morphology and neurochemical content, both excitatory and inhibitory cells were present among these neurons. A subset of neurons in the white matter was Tbr-1-immunoreactive and these neurons coexpressed NeuN and neurofilament marker SMI311R. No colocalization of Tbr1 was observed with the inhibitory neuronal markers, calcium-binding proteins. We suggest that a large population of white matter neurons comprises remnants of the subplate. Furthermore, we propose that a subset of white matter neurons was arrested during migration, highlighting the role of cortical maldevelopment in epilepsy associated with mesial temporal sclerosis. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Social inference deficits in temporal lobe epilepsy and lobectomy: risk factors and neural substrates.

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    Cohn, Melanie; St-Laurent, Marie; Barnett, Alexander; McAndrews, Mary Pat

    2015-05-01

    In temporal lobe epilepsy and lobectomy, deficits in emotion identification have been found consistently, but there is limited evidence for complex social inference skills such as theory of mind. Furthermore, risk factors and the specific neural underpinnings of these deficits in this population are unclear. We investigated these issues using a comprehensive range of social inference tasks (emotion identification and comprehension of sincere, deceitful and sarcastic social exchanges) in individuals with temporal lobe epilepsy or lobectomy (n = 87). We observed deficits across patient groups which were partly related to the presence of mesial temporal lobe sclerosis, early age of seizure onset and left lobectomy. A voxel-based morphometry analysis conducted in the pre-operative group confirmed the importance of the temporal lobe by showing a relationship between left hippocampal atrophy and overall social inference abilities, and between left anterior neocortex atrophy and sarcasm comprehension. These findings are in keeping with theoretical proposals that the hippocampus is critical for binding diverse elements in cognitive domains beyond canonical episodic memory operations, and that the anterior temporal cortex is a convergence zone of higher-order perceptual and emotional processes, and of stored representations. As impairments were frequent, we require further investigation of this behavioural domain and its impact on the lives of people with epilepsy. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Age-dependent seizure semiology in temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Fogarasi, András; Tuxhorn, Ingrid; Janszky, József; Janszky, Imre; Rásonyi, György; Kelemen, Anna; Halász, Péter

    2007-09-01

    To examine the effects of age on different aspects of temporal lobe seizure semiology. We performed a video analysis of 605 archived seizures from 155 consecutive patients (age 10 months to 49 years) selected by seizure freedom after temporal lobectomy. Eighty patients had hippocampal sclerosis (HS). Beside semiological seizure classification, we assessed age dependency of several axes of seizure semiology: (1) aura, (2) number of different lateralizing signs, occurrence of ictal (3) emotional signs, (4) autonomic symptoms, (5) automatisms, and (6) secondary generalization as well as (7) the ratio of motor seizure components. From the 155 patients, 117 reported aura, 39 had ictal emotional signs, 51 had autonomic symptoms, 130 presented automatisms, while 18 patients showed secondary generalization at least once during their seizures. Altogether 369 (median: 2/patient) different lateralizing signs were recorded. Frequency of HS (p semiology. Conversely, other aspects (aura, emotional, and autonomic signs) are independent of the maturation process. This is the first report investigating age dependency of epileptic seizure semiology comparing all age groups.

  13. Metals and electrolytes in sclerotic hippocampi in patients with drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Ristić, Aleksandar J; Sokić, Dragoslav; Baščarević, Vladimir; Spasić, Snežana; Vojvodić, Nikola; Savić, Slobodan; Raičević, Savo; Kovačević, Maša; Savić, Danijela; Spasojević, Ivan

    2014-05-01

    An altered metal and electrolyte profile has been implicated in the pathologic mechanisms of chronic epilepsy; however, no study has comprehensively measured hippocampal concentrations of these elements in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis (mTLE-HS). We therefore analyzed hippocampi of 24 patients with drug-resistant mTLE-HS (mean age 35.6 ± 9.4 years) who underwent anterior temporal lobe resection and amygdalohippocampectomy and 17 hippocampi obtained by autopsy from 13 controls (mean age 40.5 ± 12.9 years), using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Epileptic hippocampi showed significantly lower concentrations (μg/g of tissue) of copper (HS: 2.34 ± 0.12; control [C]: 3.57 ± 0.33; p electrolytes in the pathology of HS. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  14. Epilepsy surgery in a liver-transplanted girl with temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis following PRES with status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilena, Robertino; Nebbia, Gabriella; Fiorica, Lorenzo; Farallo, Marcello; Degrassi, Irene; Gozzo, Francesca; Pelliccia, Veronica; Barbieri, Sergio; Cossu, Massimo; Tassi, Laura

    2016-07-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) with status epilepticus may occur after liver transplant. This may rarely lead to refractory epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis (HS). We report the first case of epilepsy surgery in a liver-transplanted patient with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. A 3-year-old girl underwent liver transplant for congenital biliary atresia. Four days after transplant she manifested PRES with status epilepticus, but she recovered within a couple of weeks. At the age of 5 years she started presenting complex partial seizures, that became refractory to antiepileptic drugs (AED), worsening psychosocial performances. The pre-surgical work-up identified a left HS and temporal pole alterations. A left antero-mesial temporal lobectomy was performed, leading to epilepsy remission and allowing AED withdrawal. Drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy and HS may occur as sequelae of PRES with status epilepticus related to liver transplant and cyclosporine use. In this setting early epilepsy surgery may reduce the time of chronic exposure to AED and severe illness due to repeated seizures. This option might have additional advantages in the subgroup of epileptic patients with liver transplant, preserving the liver from the potential damage due to multiple AED trials and their interaction with commonly used immunosuppressant drugs. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Role of the temporal pole in temporal lobe epilepsy seizure networks: an intracranial electrode investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Taylor J; Woodroffe, Royce W; Nourski, Kirill V; Moritani, Toshio; Capizzano, Aristides A; Kirby, Patricia; Kawasaki, Hiroto; Howard, Matthew; Werz, Mary Ann

    2017-10-13

    OBJECTIVE A convergence of clinical research suggests that the temporal pole (TP) plays an important and potentially underappreciated role in the genesis and propagation of seizures in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Understanding its role is becoming increasingly important because selective resections for medically intractable TLE spare temporopolar cortex (TPC). The purpose of this study was to characterize the role of the TPC in TLE after using dense electrocorticography (ECoG) recordings in patients undergoing invasive monitoring for medically intractable TLE. METHODS Chronic ECoG recordings were obtained in 10 consecutive patients by using an array customized to provide dense coverage of the TP as part of invasive monitoring to localize the epileptogenic zone. All patients would eventually undergo cortico-amygdalohippocampectomy. A retrospective review of the patient clinical records including ECoG recordings, neuroimaging studies, neuropathology reports, and clinical outcomes was performed. RESULTS In 7 patients (70%), the TP was involved at seizure onset; in 7 patients (70%), there were interictal discharges from the TP; and in 1 case, there was early spread to the TP. Seizure onset in the TP did not necessarily correlate with preoperative neuroimaging abnormalities of the TP. CONCLUSIONS These data demonstrate that TPC commonly plays a crucial role in temporal lobe seizure networks. Seizure onset from the TP would not have been predicted based on available neuroimaging data or interictal discharges. These findings illustrate the importance of thoroughly considering the role of the TP prior to resective surgery for TLE, particularly when selective mesial resection is being considered.

  16. Small temporal pole encephalocele: A hidden cause of "normal" MRI temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledano, Rafael; Jiménez-Huete, Adolfo; Campo, Pablo; Poch, Claudia; García-Morales, Irene; Gómez Angulo, Juan Carlos; Coras, Roland; Blümcke, Ingmar; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Gil-Nagel, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Small temporal pole encephalocele (STPE) can be the pathologic substrate of epilepsy in a subgroup of patients with noninformative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Herein, we analyzed the clinical, neurophysiologic, and radiologic features of the epilepsy found in 22 patients with STPE, and the frequency of STPE in patients with refractory focal epilepsy (RFE). We performed an observational study of all patients with STPE identified at our epilepsy unit from January 2007 to December 2014. Cases were detected through a systematic search of our database of RFE patients evaluated for surgery, and a prospective collection of patients identified at the outpatient clinic. The RFE database was also employed to analyze the frequency of STPE among the different clinical subgroups. We identified 22 patients with STPE (11 women), including 12 (4.0%) of 303 patients from the RFE database, and 10 from the outpatient clinic. The median age was 51.5 years (range 29-75) and the median age at seizure onset was 38.5 years (range 15-73). Typically, 12 (80%) of 15 patients with left STPE reported seizures with impairment of language. Among the RFE cases, STPE were found in 9.6% of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), and in 0.5% of those with extra-TLE (p = 0.0001). STPEs were more frequent in TLE patients with an initial MRI study reported as normal (23.3%) than in those with MRI-visible lesions (1.4%; p = 0.0002). Stereo-electroencephalography was performed in four patients, confirming the localization of the epileptogenic zone at the temporal pole with late participation of the hippocampus. Long-term seizure control was achieved in four of five operated patients. STPE can be a hidden cause of TLE in a subgroup of patients with an initial report of "normal" MRI. Early identification of this lesion may help to select patients for presurgical evaluation and tailored resection. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  17. Sex differences in verbal and nonverbal learning before and after temporal lobe epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Justus; Oltmanns, Frank; Holtkamp, Martin; Bengner, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Women outperform men in a host of episodic memory tasks, yet the neuroanatomical basis for this effect is unclear. It has been suggested that the anterior temporal lobe might be especially relevant for sex differences in memory. In the current study, we investigated whether temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) has an influence on sex effects in learning and memory and whether women and men with TLE differ in their risk for memory deficits after epilepsy surgery. 177 patients (53 women and 41 men with left TLE, 42 women and 41 men with right TLE) were neuropsychologically tested before and one year after temporal lobe resection. We found that women with TLE had better verbal, but not figural, memory than men with TLE. The female advantage in verbal memory was not affected by temporal lobe resection. The same pattern of results was found in a more homogeneous subsample of 84 patients with only hippocampal sclerosis who were seizure-free after surgery. Our findings challenge the concept that the anterior temporal lobe plays a central role in the verbal memory advantage for women. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Did Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky suffer from mesial temporal lobe epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Christian R; Novikov, Vladimir P I; Regard, Marianne; Siegel, Adrian M

    2005-07-01

    Many scientific authors--among them famous names such as Henri Gastaut or Sigmund Freud--dealt with the question from what kind of epilepsy Fyodor Mikhailovitch Dostoevsky (1821-1881) might had suffered. Because of the tight interplay between Dostoevsky's literary work and his own disease we throw light on the author's epilepsy against the background of his epileptic fictional characters. Moreover, we attempt to classify Dostoevsky's epilepsy on the basis of his bibliography, language, and literary work.

  19. Outcome of temporal lobe epilepsy surgery predicted by statistical parametric PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, C Y; Geller, E B; Chen, E Q; MacIntyre, W J; Morris, H H; Raja, S; Saha, G B; Lüders, H O; Cook, S A; Go, R T

    1996-07-01

    PET is useful in the presurgical evaluation of temporal lobe epilepsy. The purpose of this retrospective study is to assess the clinical use of statistical parametric imaging in predicting surgical outcome. Interictal 18FDG-PET scans in 17 patients with surgically-treated temporal lobe epilepsy (Group A-13 seizure-free, group B = 4 not seizure-free at 6 mo) were transformed into statistical parametric imaging, with each pixel representing a z-score value by using the mean and s.d. of count distribution in each individual patient, for both visual and quantitative analysis. Mean z-scores were significantly more negative in anterolateral (AL) and mesial (M) regions on the operated side than the nonoperated side in group A (AL: p cut-off z-score value of -1.5, statistical parametric imaging correctly classified 92% of temporal lobes from group A and 88% of those from Group B. The preliminary results indicate that statistical parametric imaging provides both clinically useful information for lateralization in temporal lobe epilepsy and a reliable predictive indicator of clinical outcome following surgical treatment.

  20. [Vildagliptin suppresses temporal lobe epilepsy by up-regulating glucagon-like peptide-1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yue-Tao; Wu, Kun-Lun; Shi, Quan-Hong

    2017-01-20

    To investigate the effect of vildagliptin on pentamethazol (PTZ)-induced epilepsy in rats and explore the molecular mechanism. Samples of temporal cortex from 23 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy were collected as epilepsy group and samples of temporal cortex from 14 patients with brain trauma were used as control group. Ninety male SD rats were randomly divided into control group (group A), PTZ-induced epilepsy group (group B), saline 2 mL/kg group (group C), vildagliptin 2.5 mg/kg group (group D), vildagliptin 5mg/kg group (group D) and vildagliptin 10 mg/kg group (group F). Use chronic model of epilepsy induced by PTZ (35 mg/kg) intraperitoneal injection for 3 consecutive weeks, and changes of behavior were observed. The expression of GLP-1R was detected by Western blotting and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining, and the expression of GLP-1 was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The location of GLP-1R was detected by immunofluorescent staining. Immunofluorescent staining showed that the GLP-1R located in the neurons, and GLP-1R expression was obviously decreased both in patients with TLE and in rats with epilepsy. The latency time was prolonged and epilepsy attack time was decreased after vildagliptin treatment (P<0.05). GLP-1R expression was increased after vildagliptin treatment (P<0.05). ELISA showed the change of GLP-1 expression was the same as GLP-1R. Vildagliptin can suppress temporal lobe epilepsy in rats by up-regulating GLP-1 and GLP-1R expressions.

  1. Expression of Toll-like receptor 4 in hippocampus of rat model with temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAN Li-ping

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 protein in hippocampus of rat model with temporal lobe epilepsy after status epilepticus (SE and explore its function in the pathogenesis of temporal lobe epilepsy. Methods Rat model with temporal lobe epilepsy was induced by lithium chloride (LiCl-pilocarpine. Total protein was extracted from hippocampus and rat brain slices were obtained at different time points (0, 1, 6, 12, 24, 48 h and 7, 10, 30, 50 d after SE. Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining were used for detection of the expression of TLR4 in the hippocampus. Results The results of Western blotting showed the TLR4 protein expression at 0, 1, 6, 12, 24, 48 h and 7, 10, 30 d after SE was higher than that in the control group (P 0.05. Conclusion TLR4 protein was mainly expressed in cytoplasm of pyramidal cells in CA3 area of hippocampus. TLR4 protein expression in the hippocampus was increased in varying degrees at different observation time points after SE, indicating that TLR4 may play an important role in the development of epilepsy.

  2. Bostezo y epilepsia del lóbulo temporal Yawning and temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Muchnik

    2003-04-01

    particular de epilepsia temporal.Temporal lobe epilepsy is a partial epileptic disorder in which mesial structures are responsible for the principal ictal symptoms. Its characteristic feature is the recurrence of simple and complex partial seizures, associated with postictal confusion and amnesia of the event. The facilitating effect of NREM sleep on the propagation of the seizure, as well as the sleep abnormalities provoked by epilepsy were evident in our two patients. Yawning is a physiological reflex induced by arousal and drowsiness and may appear in different neurological conditions. Its relation with epilepsy of limbic origen has been rarely reported. We describe in a 95 year old male patient, the occurrence of yawning followed by complex partial seizure during a state of drowsiness. His EEG showed independent bilateral interictal foci of temporal sharp waves and after being medicated with carbamazepine 400mg/day, the episode did not recur. Another patient, a 17 year old female, displayed complex partial seizures and secondarily generalized seizures with yawning during the posictal period, after naps. The EEG was normal and her polysomnography showed bilateral synchronous temporal spikes and slow waves with secondarily generalization during stage 2 of NREM sleep that produce paroxysmal microarousals and increased stages 1 and 2 of NREM sleep and REM sleep diminished. After being medicated with divalproex sodium 750 mg/day, she suffered no futher seizures. Temporal lobe epilepsy, sleep- wake cycles and yawning seem not only to share the same anatomic structures but also the same neurochemical mechanisms. The fact that endogenous opiods are considered as part of a protective system that stop and prevent seizures may allow us to postulate that yawning would be the expression of the endogenous opiods induced mechanisms that stop and prevent the recurrence of the temporal lobe epilepsy. Another hypothesis may be that this is only a particular form of temporal lobe epilepsy.

  3. Ipsiversive ictal eye deviation in inferioposterior temporal lobe epilepsy-Two SEEG cases report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Liu, Xingzhou; Zuo, Lijun; Guo, Qiang; Chen, Qi; Wang, Yongjun

    2017-02-21

    Versive seizure characterized by conjugate eye movement during epileptic seizure has been considered commonly as one of the most valuable semiological signs for epilepsy localization, especially for frontal lobe epilepsy. However, the lateralizing and localizing significance of ictaleye deviation has been questioned by clinical observation of a series of focal epilepsy studies, including frontal, central, temporal, parietal and occipital epilepsy. Two epileptic cases characterized by ipsiversive eye deviation as initial clinical sign during the habitual epileptic seizures are presented in this paper. The localization of the epileptogenic zone of both of the cases has been confirmed as inferioposterior temporal region by the findings of ictalstereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) and a good result after epileptic surgery. Detailed analysis of the exact position of the key contacts of the SEEG electrodes identified the overlap between the location of the epileptogenic zone and human MT/MST complex, which play a crucial role in the control of smooth pursuit eye movement. Ipsiversive eye deviation could be the initial clinical sign of inferioposterior temporal lobe epilepsy and attribute to the involvement of human MT/MST complex, especially human MST whichwas located on the anterior/dorsal bank of the anterior occipital sulcus (AOS).

  4. A functional magnetic resonance imaging study mapping the episodic memory encoding network in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Meneka K.; Stretton, Jason; Winston, Gavin P.; Bonelli, Silvia; Centeno, Maria; Vollmar, Christian; Symms, Mark; Thompson, Pamela J.; Koepp, Matthias J.

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging has demonstrated reorganization of memory encoding networks within the temporal lobe in temporal lobe epilepsy, but little is known of the extra-temporal networks in these patients. We investigated the temporal and extra-temporal reorganization of memory encoding networks in refractory temporal lobe epilepsy and the neural correlates of successful subsequent memory formation. We studied 44 patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis (24 left) and 26 healthy control subjects. All participants performed a functional magnetic resonance imaging memory encoding paradigm of faces and words with subsequent out-of-scanner recognition assessments. A blocked analysis was used to investigate activations during encoding and neural correlates of subsequent memory were investigated using an event-related analysis. Event-related activations were then correlated with out-of-scanner verbal and visual memory scores. During word encoding, control subjects activated the left prefrontal cortex and left hippocampus whereas patients with left hippocampal sclerosis showed significant additional right temporal and extra-temporal activations. Control subjects displayed subsequent verbal memory effects within left parahippocampal gyrus, left orbitofrontal cortex and fusiform gyrus whereas patients with left hippocampal sclerosis activated only right posterior hippocampus, parahippocampus and fusiform gyrus. Correlational analysis showed that patients with left hippocampal sclerosis with better verbal memory additionally activated left orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and left posterior hippocampus. During face encoding, control subjects showed right lateralized prefrontal cortex and bilateral hippocampal activations. Patients with right hippocampal sclerosis showed increased temporal activations within the superior temporal gyri bilaterally and no increased extra-temporal areas of activation compared with

  5. The effects of cognitive rehabilitation on memory outcome after temporal lobe epilepsy surgery.

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    Helmstaedter, Cristoph; Loer, Barbara; Wohlfahrt, Rainer; Hammen, Axel; Saar, Josef; Steinhoff, Bernhard J; Quiske, Ansgar; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas

    2008-04-01

    Epilepsy surgery is a valuable treatment option for patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsy, but seizure freedom is often achieved at the cost of cognitive impairments caused by surgery. The aim of this study was to investigate the short-term effects of cognitive rehabilitation on memory outcome after temporal lobe epilepsy surgery. Two groups of patients who underwent temporal lobe resection, one followed (n=55) and one not followed (n=57) by postoperative rehabilitation, were evaluated with respect to memory and attention before and 3 months after temporal lobe surgery. The groups came from different epilepsy centers, but were largely matched with respect to age, sex, type of surgery, and seizure outcome. After surgery, 78% of the patients were seizure-free. Repeated-measures MANOVA revealed a significant "side x surgery" effect on verbal recognition and a "rehabilitation x surgery" effect on verbal learning and recognition. There were no effects for loss in verbal delayed recall or figural memory. Detailed analyses indicated gains as a result of rehabilitation, particularly after right temporal lobe surgery. Attention generally improved. The risk of manifesting losses in verbal memory was about four times higher without than with rehabilitation. Rehabilitation can counteract the verbal memory decline that is normally seen after temporal lobe resection. Its positive effects were evident particularly with respect to the more cortically associated aspects of verbal learning rather than to the mesial aspects of long-term consolidation/retrieval. Figural memory was not affected at all, and attention improved independent of rehabilitation. Interestingly, left temporal lobe-resected patients, who were most in need of an efficacious rehabilitation, profited less than right temporal lobe-resected patients, indicating that left-sided surgery may reduce the capacity needed for efficient training of verbal memory. Thus, rehabilitation has a positive effect on memory

  6. White matter abnormalities in the anterior temporal lobe suggest the side of the seizure foci in temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Adachi, Y.; Yagishita, A. [Tokyo Metropolitan Neurological Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Fuchu, Tokyo (Japan); Arai, N. [Tokyo Metropolitan Neurological Institute, Department of Clinical Neuropathology, Fuchu, Tokyo (Japan)

    2006-07-15

    White matter abnormalities in the anterior temporal lobe (WAATL) are sometimes observed on magnetic resonance (MR) images of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Our purpose was to determine whether WAATL could indicate if the seizure foci are ipsilateral on electroencephalograms (EEG) in TLE patients. We reviewed 112 consecutive patients with medically intractable TLE. We compared the side of seizure foci on EEG (preoperative and intraoperative) and MR images. Both loss of gray-white matter demarcation and increased signal intensity changes in the anterior white matter (positive WAATL) were observed in 54 of 112 patients (48.2%) with TLE. WAATL were present on the same side as the seizure foci on preoperative intracranial EEG with subdural electrodes (iEEG) and on intraoperative electrocorticography (ECG) in all the patients. In 47 patients, MR images showed WAATL and focal lesions that were possibly epileptogenic for TLE. In 2 of the 47 patients, the seizure foci on iEEG and ECG were contralateral to the focal lesion; in the remaining 45 patients, the seizure foci on surface EEG (sEEG) and ECG and the focal lesion were on the same side. In three patients, no focal lesions were seen but WAATL were present on the same side as the seizure foci on sEEG and ECG. In four patients, MR images showed focal lesions for which epileptogenicity was questionable, and WAATL on the same side as the seizure foci on EEG. WAATL are clinically useful because they indicate the side of the seizure foci. (orig.)

  7. Temporal lobe epilepsy in patients with nonlesional MRI and normal memory: an SEEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Suraj; Sweet, Jennifer; Fastenau, Philip S; Lüders, Hans; Landazuri, Patrick; Miller, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) in the absence of MRI abnormalities and memory deficits is often presumed to have an extramesial or even extratemporal source. In this paper the authors report the results of a comprehensive stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) analysis in patients with TLE with normal MRI images and memory scores. Eighteen patients with medically refractory epilepsy who also had unremarkable MR images and normal verbal and visual memory scores on neuropsychological testing were included in the study. All patients had seizure semiology and video electroencephalography (EEG) findings suggestive of TLE. A standardized SEEG investigation was performed for each patient with electrodes implanted into the mesial and lateral temporal lobe, temporal tip, posterior temporal neocortex, orbitomesiobasal frontal lobe, posterior cingulate gyrus, and insula. This information was used to plan subsequent surgical management. Interictal SEEG abnormalities were observed in the mesial temporal structures in 17 patients (94%) and in the temporal tip in 6 (33%). Seizure onset was exclusively from mesial structures in 13 (72%), exclusively from lateral temporal cortex and/or temporal tip structures in 2 (11%), and independently from mesial and neocortical foci in 3 (17%). No seizure activity was observed arising from any extratemporal location. All patients underwent surgical intervention targeting the temporal lobe and tailored to the SEEG findings, and all experienced significant improvement in seizure frequency with a postoperative follow-up observation period of at least 1 year. This study demonstrates 3 important findings: 1) normal memory does not preclude mesial temporal seizure onset; 2) onset of seizures exclusively from mesial temporal structures without early neocortical involvement is common, even in the absence of memory deficits; and 3) extratemporal seizure onset is rare when video EEG and semiology are consistent with focal TLE.

  8. Evidence on Use of Neuroimaging for Surgical Treatment of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Amy L; Cascino, Gregory D

    2016-04-01

    Surgery is an effective treatment for drug-resistant focal epilepsy. Neuroimaging studies are considered essential in the diagnostic evaluation of individuals with medically refractory focal seizures being considered for surgical treatment. To review the evidence for the use of neuroimaging studies in the selection of patients with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy for focal cortical resection and discuss the prognostic importance of selected techniques. Randomized clinical trials, meta-analyses, and clinical retrospective case studies (≥20 patients with ≥1 year of follow-up) were identified using Medical Subject Headings and indexed text terms in EMBASE (1988-November 29, 2014); MEDLINE (1946-December 2, 2014), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (1991-October 31, 2014), and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (2005-October 31, 2014). Twenty-seven articles describing 3163 patients were included. Neuroimaging techniques analyzed included magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Subpopulations and prognostic factors were identified. Of the 27 studies evaluated (3163 patients), 7 showed the outcome was more favorable in patients with MRI-identified hippocampal atrophy indicating mesial temporal sclerosis. Five additional studies indicated that the outcome was less favorable in patients with unremarkable MRI studies. There are conflicting findings regarding the prognostic importance of PET-identified focal hypometabolism; however, 2 investigations indicated that the presence of a PET imaging study demonstrating abnormalities in individuals with unremarkable MRI results showed an operative outcome similar to that in patients with mesial temporal sclerosis. The studies assessing SPECT use in temporal lobe epilepsy did not reveal a correlation with outcome. There is strong evidence that preoperative MRI-identified hippocampal atrophy consistent with mesial temporal

  9. Potential role of a cognitive rehabilitation program following left temporal lobe epilepsy surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila de Vasconcelos Geraldi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Research into memory and epilepsy has focused on measuring problems and exploring causes with limited attention directed at the role of neuropsychological rehabilitation in alleviating post-operative memory difficulties. Objectives To assess the effects of a memory rehabilitation program in patients with left temporal lobe epilepsy following surgery. Methods Twenty-four patients agreed to participate and 18 completed the study; nine received memory rehabilitation while nine had no input and were designated as controls. Verbal learning efficiency, naming abilities, memory subjective ratings, ecological activity measures and a language fMRI paradigm were used as outcome measures. Results Improved verbal learning and naming test performance, increase in memory strategy use and improved self-perception were observed following the rehabilitation. Changes in fMRI activation patterns were seen in the rehabilitation group over the long term. Conclusion The findings support the potential role of a cognitive rehabilitation program following left temporal lobe surgery.

  10. Anticonvulsant effects of antiaris toxicaria aqueous extract: investigation using animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mante, Priscilla Kolibea; Adongo, Donatus Wewura; Woode, Eric

    2017-04-26

    Antiaris toxicaria has previously shown anticonvulsant activity in acute animal models of epilepsy. The aqueous extract (AAE) was further investigated for activity in kindling with pentylenetetrazole and administration of pilocarpine and kainic acid which mimic temporal lobe epilepsy in various animal species. ICR mice and Sprague-Dawley rats were pre-treated with AAE (200-800 mg kg(-1)) and convulsive episodes induced using pentylenetetrazole, pilocarpine and kainic acid. The potential of AAE to prevent or delay onset and alter duration of seizures were measured. In addition, damage to hippocampal cells was assessed in kainic acid-induced status epilepticus test. 800 mg kg(-1) of the extract suppressed the kindled seizure significantly (P toxicaria may be effective in controlling temporal lobe seizures in rodents.

  11. Confrontation naming in individuals with temporal lobe epilepsy: a quantitative analysis of paraphasic error subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargo, Jamison D; Schefft, Bruce K; Dulay, Mario F; Privitera, Michael D; Yeh, Hwa-Shain

    2005-09-01

    Although confrontation naming deficits have been observed in dominant temporal lobe epilepsy (DTLE), the relative contribution of impoverished phonologic word retrieval and/or semantic knowledge remains unclear. Analysis of verbal-semantic, phonemic-literal, and combination paraphasias produced during confrontation naming by participants with seizure disorders (52 DTLE; 47 nondominant temporal lobe epilepsy [NDTLE]; 54 psychogenic nonepileptic seizures [PNES]) indicated that the frequency of: (a) verbal-semantic paraphasias was similar across groups, (b) phonemic-literal paraphasias was highest in DTLE, and (c) combination paraphasias was lowest in PNES. Confrontation naming ability was most strongly related to phonemic-literal paraphasia frequency in DTLE and to verbal IQ in both NDTLE and PNES. Greater confrontation naming deficits in DTLE may be attributed to impairments in phonological processing. Copyright (c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. Alterations of the microvascular network in the sclerotic hippocampus of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Nanclares, Lidia; DeFelipe, Javier

    2014-09-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis is the most frequent pathology encountered in resected tissue obtained from patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. The main hallmarks of hippocampal sclerosis are neuronal loss and gliosis. Several authors have proposed that an increase in blood vessel density is a further indicator, based on interpretations from staining of markers related to both blood-brain barrier disruption and the formation of new blood vessels. However, previous studies performed in our laboratory using correlative light and electron microscopy revealed that many of these "blood vessels" are in fact atrophic vascular structures with a reduced or virtually absent lumen and are often filled with processes of reactive astrocytes. Thus, "normal" vasculature within the sclerotic CA1 field is drastically reduced. Since this decrease is consistently observed in the human sclerotic CA1, this feature can be considered another key pathological indicator of hippocampal sclerosis associated with temporal lobe epilepsy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Visual memory deficits in temporal lobe epilepsy: toward a multifactorial approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucci, M

    2007-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsies (TLE) are associated with material-specific memory deficits depending on the side of seizure origin. However, while verbal memory deficits have been consistently reported in patients with left-sided TLE, the relationship between visual memory deficits and right-sided TLE is more complex. Here, we review factors that influence the pattern of lateralization and the nature of visual memory impairments in TLE and discuss the possible relationship between these deficits and perceptual impairments in TLE patients.

  14. Thalamic glucose metabolism in temporal lobe epilepsy measured with 18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, N; Leenders, KL; Hajek, M; Maguire, P; Missimer, J; Wieser, HG

    1997-01-01

    Thalamic glucose metabolism has been studied in 24 patients suffering from temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) using interictal F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). A total of 17 patients had a unilateral TL seizure onset, 11 of these patients had a mesial temporal lobe

  15. Ictal and interictal respiratory changes in temporal lobe and absence epilepsy in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Katrien; Varon, Carolina; Van Huffel, Sabine; Lagae, Lieven

    2013-10-01

    Autonomic dysfunctions occur during but also in between seizures. During seizures, the direct involvement of central autonomic control centers cause specific changes in heart rate and respiration. The pathophysiology of autonomic dysfunctions that are observed in the interictal period is more difficult to explain. These alterations are most likely due to changes in the epileptic network and/or to a lesser extent due to direct interictal spike activity disturbing central autonomic centers. The aim of our study is to investigate whether ictal and interictal respiratory changes do occur in temporal lobe and absence epilepsy in children. We hypothesize that the interictal autonomic changes are due to changes in the neuronal network, by studying epilepsy patients with normal interictal background EEG. Ictal and interictal single-lead ECG signals were extracted from 24h video-EEG recordings in 10 children with refractory temporal lobe seizures, in 10 children with absence seizures with occasional interictal discharges and 10 control subjects. RR interval time series were calculated and respiration parameters were derived from the ECG signal. ECG-derived respiration (EDR) signals were computed and time and frequency domain parameters were extracted to characterize the respiratory function. In the ictal registrations we observed bradypnea in 10 out of the 12 recorded seizures from the temporal lobe. In absence seizures, we observed a variable ictal effect on respiratory rate. In the analysis of the interictal data, the most remarkable finding was the higher power in the low frequency band and lower power in the high frequency band of the EDR signals in patients with absence seizures compared to control subjects, indicating a shift of respiratory rate to the lower frequencies. In conclusion we found a uniform pattern in ictal respiratory changes in temporal lobe seizures, due to direct involvement of central respiratory centers. In absence epilepsy, we found a disturbed

  16. Functional connectivity estimated from intracranial EEG predicts surgical outcome in intractable temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun R Antony

    Full Text Available This project aimed to determine if a correlation-based measure of functional connectivity can identify epileptogenic zones from intracranial EEG signals, as well as to investigate the prognostic significance of such a measure on seizure outcome following temporal lobe lobectomy. To this end, we retrospectively analyzed 23 adult patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE who underwent an invasive stereo-EEG (SEEG evaluation between January 2009 year and January 2012. A follow-up of at least one year was required. The primary outcome measure was complete seizure-freedom at last follow-up. Functional connectivity between two areas in the temporal lobe that were sampled by two SEEG electrode contacts was defined as Pearson's correlation coefficient of interictal activity between those areas. SEEG signals were filtered between 5 and 50 Hz prior to computing this correlation. The mean and standard deviation of the off diagonal elements in the connectivity matrix were also calculated. Analysis of the mean and standard deviation of the functional connections for each patient reveals that 90% of the patients who had weak and homogenous connections were seizure free one year after temporal lobectomy, whereas 85% of the patients who had stronger and more heterogeneous connections within the temporal lobe had recurrence of seizures. This suggests that temporal lobectomy is ineffective in preventing seizure recurrence for patients in whom the temporal lobe is characterized by weakly connected, homogenous networks. This pilot study shows promising potential of a simple measure of functional brain connectivity to identify epileptogenicity and predict the outcome of epilepsy surgery.

  17. Female verbal memory advantage in temporal, but not frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Justus; Demin, Katharina; Holtkamp, Martin; Bengner, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Women show better performance than men on a range of episodic memory tasks. Evidence regarding a neuroanatomical localization of this effect remains ambiguous. It has been suggested that anterior temporal lobe structures are responsible for sex differences in verbal memory, yet temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and TLE surgery do not affect women's verbal memory advantage. Instead, frontal lobe regions may be relevant for female verbal memory superiority, i.e. by enabling more efficient encoding and retrieval strategies in women. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether women's verbal memory advantage can be found in patients with frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), and how patients with FLE and those with TLE differ with regard to sex differences in verbal memory. Fifty patients with unilateral FLE (26 women, 24 men) were compared with 183 patients with unilateral TLE (90 women, 93 men) on both verbal learning and delayed memory. We found that women showed better verbal memory than men in the TLE group, but not in the FLE group. In addition, we found that patients with TLE showed worse verbal learning than those with FLE. Our findings support the idea that women's advantage in verbal memory may be related to frontal lobe function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Transneuronal degeneration in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy: evaluation by MR imaging

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    Kodama, Fumiko; Ogawa, Toshihide; Sugihara, Shuji; Kamba, Masayuki; Kinoshita, Toshibumi [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine' ' Tottori University, 36-1 Nishi-cho, 683-8504, Yonago, Tottori (Japan); Kohaya, Norimasa; Kondo, Shinji [Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine' ' Tottori University, 36-1 Nishi-cho, 683-8504, Yonago, Tottori (Japan)

    2003-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the MR imaging findings of transneuronal degeneration of limbic system in the patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, and to detect the influence of surgery on the anatomy of the limbic system. Axial and coronal T1- and T2-weighted MR images were retrospectively analyzed in 34 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, focusing on transneuronal degeneration. In 17 of the 34 patients, MR images were also analyzed after selective amygdalo-hippocampectomy. Atrophy of the fornix, mamillary body, mamillothalamic tract (MTT), and thalamus ipsilateral to the epileptic focus was demonstrated on MR images in 14.7, 17.6, 8.8, and 11.8% of the 34 patients, respectively. Focal hyperintensity of the thalamus was found on T2-weighted images in 8.8% of the 34 patients. In 17 patients who were evaluated before and after surgery, transneuronal degeneration was seen more frequently after surgery: fornix (11.8 vs 29.4%), mamillary body (11.8 vs 52.9%), MTT (5.9 vs 11.8%), and thalamus (11.8 vs 11.8%). Transneuronal degeneration of the limbic system is clearly demonstrated by MR imaging in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, and surgical intervention induces transneuronal degeneration more frequently. (orig.)

  19. Electroclinical findings of minor motor events during sleep in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Loretta; Uccello, Denise; Fatuzzo, Daniela; Mainieri, Greta; Zappia, Mario; Sofia, Vito

    2017-07-01

    It is well known that sleep-related motor seizures can originate from the temporal lobe. However, little is known about the clinical features of minor motor manifestations during sleep in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. The main objective of our study was to verify the existence of minor motor events during sleep in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) and to define their clinical features and electroencephalography (EEG) correlations. We enrolled in the study patients with diagnosis of symptomatic MTLE and a group of healthy controls. All patients and controls underwent long-term video -EEG monitoring, including at least one night of nocturnal sleep. We analyzed all the movements recorded during nocturnal sleep of patients and controls and their electroencephalographic correlations. We analyzed the nocturnal sleep of 15 patients with symptomatic MTLE (8 males and 7 females; mean age ± standard deviation [SD]31.8 ± 14.9 years) and of 15 healthy controls (6 males and 9 females; mean age ± SD 32.8 ± 11.2 years). The analysis of movements during sleep revealed significant differences between groups, with the patients presenting significantly more movements in sleep than healthy controls (56.7 ± 39.2 vs. 15 ± 6.1; p Epilepsy.

  20. Seizure outcomes of temporal lobe epilepsy surgery in patients with normal MRI and without specific histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovic, Jugoslav; Larsson, Pål G; Østby, Ylva; Hald, John; Krossnes, Bård K; Fjeld, Jan G; Pripp, Are H; Alfstad, Kristin Å; Egge, Arild; Stanisic, Milo

    2017-05-01

    Seizure outcome following surgery in pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy patients with normal magnetic resonance imaging and normal or non-specific histopathology is not sufficiently presented in the literature. In a retrospective design, we reviewed data of 263 patients who had undergone temporal lobe epilepsy surgery and identified 26 (9.9%) who met the inclusion criteria. Seizure outcomes were determined at 2-year follow-up. Potential predictors of Engel class I (satisfactory outcome) were identified by logistic regression analyses. Engel class I outcome was achieved in 61.5% of patients, 50% being completely seizure free (Engel class IA outcome). The strongest predictors of satisfactory outcome were typical ictal seizure semiology (p = 0.048) and localised ictal discharges on scalp EEG (p = 0.036). Surgery might be an effective treatment choice for the majority of these patients, although outcomes are less favourable than in patients with magnetic resonance imaging-defined lesional temporal lobe epilepsy. Typical ictal seizure semiology and localised ictal discharges on scalp EEG were predictors of Engel class I outcome.

  1. Predictors of meaningful improvement in quality of life after temporal lobe epilepsy surgery: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, Carla; Schwarzbold, Marcelo Liborio; Diaz, Alexandre Paim; de Oliveira Thais, Maria Emilia Rodrigues; Kondageski, Charles; Linhares, Marcelo Neves; Guarnieri, Ricardo; de Lemos Zingano, Bianca; Ben, Juliana; Nunes, Jean Costa; Markowitsch, Hans Joachim; Wolf, Peter; Wiebe, Samuel; Lin, Katia; Walz, Roger

    2017-05-01

    To investigate prospectively the independent predictors of a minimum clinically important change (MCIC) in quality of life (QOL) after anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) for drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy related to hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) in Brazilian patients. Multiple binary logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the clinical, demographic, radiologic, and electrophysiologic variables independently associated with MCIC in the Quality of Life in Epilepsy-31 Inventory (QOLIE-31) overall score 1 year after ATL in 77 consecutive patients with unilateral MTLE-HS. The overall QOLIE-31 score and all its subscale scores increased significantly (p Canadian patients showing that presurgical depression and complete seizure control after surgery are independent predictors for meaningful improvement in QOL after ATL, and have implications for the surgical management of MTLE patients. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  2. Temporal lobe epilepsy and focal cortical dysplasia in children: A tip to find the abnormality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolini, Luca; Whitehead, Matthew T; Ho, Cheng-Ying; Sepeta, Leigh N; Oluigbo, Chima O; Havens, Kathryn; Freilich, Emily R; Schreiber, John M; Gaillard, William D

    2017-01-01

    To demonstrate an association between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and pathologic characteristics in children who had surgery for medically refractory epilepsy due to focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). We retrospectively studied 110 children who had epilepsy surgery. Twenty-seven patients with FCD were included. Thirteen had temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and 14 had extra-temporal lobe epilepsy (ETLE). Three patients had associated mesial temporal sclerosis. Preoperative 3T MRIs interleaved with nine controls were blindly re-reviewed and categorized according to signal alteration. Pathologic specimens were classified according to the 2011 International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) classification and compared to MRI studies. Rates of pathology subtypes differed between TLE and ETLE (χ2 (3) = 8.57, p = 0.04). FCD type I was more frequent in TLE, whereas FCD type II was more frequent in ETLE. In the TLE group, nine patients had temporal tip abnormalities. They all exhibited gray-white matter blurring with decreased myelination and white matter hyperintense signal. Blurring involved the whole temporal tip, not just the area of dysplasia. These patients were less likely to demonstrate cortical thickening compared to those without temporal tip findings (χ2 (1) = 9.55, p = 0.002). Three of them had FCD Ib, three had FCD IIa, two had FCD IIIa, and one had FCD IIb; MRI features could not entirely distinguish between FCD subtypes. TLE patients showed more pronounced findings than ETLE on MRI (χ2 (1) = 11.95, p = 0.003, odds ratio [OR] 18.00). In all cases of FCD, isolated blurring was more likely to be associated with FCD II, whereas blurring with decreased myelination was seen with FCD I (χ2 (6) = 13.07, p = 0.042). Our study described associations between MRI characteristics and pathology in children with FCD and offered a detailed analysis of temporal lobe tip abnormalities and FCD subtypes in children with TLE. These findings may contribute to the

  3. Whole-brain voxel-based morphometry of white matter in medial temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Yu Aihong [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100053 (China); Li Kuncheng [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100053 (China)], E-mail: Likuncheng@vip.sina.com; Li Lin; Shan Baoci [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Wang Yuping; Xue Sufang [Department of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences (China)

    2008-01-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze whole-brain white matter changes in medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Materials and methods: We studied 23 patients with MTLE and 13 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) on T1-weighted 3D datasets. The seizure focus was right sided in 11 patients and left sided in 12. The data were collected on a 1.5 T MR system and analyzed by SPM 99 to generate white matter density maps. Results: Voxel-based morphometry revealed diffusively reduced white matter in MTLE prominently including bilateral frontal lobes, bilateral temporal lobes and corpus callosum. White matter reduction was also found in the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres in the left MTLE group. Conclusion: VBM is a simple and automated approach that is able to identify diffuse whole-brain white matter reduction in MTLE.

  4. Longer epilepsy duration and multiple lobe involvement predict worse seizure outcomes for patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy associated with neurocysticercosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Crociati Meguins

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To investigate the surgical outcomes of temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal sclerosis (TLE-HS and neurocysticercosis (NCC. Methods A retrospective investigation of patients with TLE-HS was conducted in a tertiary center. Results Seventy-nine (62.2%, 37 (29.1%, 6 (4.7%, and 5 (3.9% patients were Engel class I, II, III, and IV, respectively. Fifty-two (71.2% patients with epilepsy durations ≤ 10 years prior to surgery were seizure-free 1 year after the operation compared to 27 (50.0% patients with epilepsy durations > 10 years (p = 0.0121. Forty-three (72.9% patients with three or fewer lobes affected by NCC were seizure-free one year after the operation, and 36 (52.9% patients with more than three involved lobes were seizure-free after surgery (p = 0.0163. Conclusions Longer epilepsy durations and multiple lobe involvement predicted worse seizure outcomes in TLE-HS plus NCC patients.

  5. Cognitive changes in people with temporal lobe epilepsy over a 13-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mameniškienė, Rūta; Rimšienė, Justė; Puronaitė, Roma

    2016-10-01

    The aims of our study were to evaluate cognitive decline in people with temporal lobe epilepsy over a period of 13years and to determine what clinical and treatment characteristics may have been associated with these. Thirty-three individuals with temporal lobe epilepsy underwent the same neuropsychological assessment of verbal and nonverbal memory, attention, and executive functions using the same cognitive test battery as one used 13years ago. Long-term verbal and nonverbal memory was tested four weeks later. Results were compared with those carried out 13years earlier. There was no significant change in verbal and verbal-logical memory tests; however, nonverbal memory worsened significantly. Long-term verbal memory declined for 21.9% of participants, long-term verbal-logical memory for 34.4%, and long-term nonverbal memory for 56.3%. Worsening of working verbal and verbal-logical memory was associated with longer epilepsy duration and lower levels of patients' education; worsening of verbal delayed recall and long-term verbal-logical memory was associated with higher seizure frequency. Decline in long-term nonverbal memory had significant association with a longer duration of epilepsy. The worsening of reaction and attention inversely correlated with the symptoms of depression. Over a 13-year period, cognitive functions did not change significantly. Good seizure control and reduced symptoms of depression in this sample of people with temporal lobe epilepsy were associated with better cognitive functioning. The predictors of change of cognitive functions could be complex and require further study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Atypical language organization in temporal lobe epilepsy revealed by a passive semantic paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is the most common type of focal epilepsy in adults and can be successfully cured by surgery. One of the main complications of this surgery however is a decline in language abilities. The magnitude of this decline is related to the degree of language lateralization to the left hemisphere. Most fMRI paradigms used to determine language dominance in epileptic populations have used active language tasks. Sometimes, these paradigms are too complex and may result in patient underperformance. Only a few studies have used purely passive tasks, such as listening to standard speech. Methods In the present study we characterized language lateralization in patients with MTLE using a rapid and passive semantic language task. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study 23 patients [12 with Left (LMTLE), 11 with Right mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (RMTLE)] and 19 healthy right-handed controls using a 6 minute long semantic task in which subjects passively listened to groups of sentences (SEN) and pseudo sentences (PSEN). A lateralization index (LI) was computed using a priori regions of interest of the temporal lobe. Results The LI for the significant contrasts produced activations for all participants in both temporal lobes. 81.8% of RMTLE patients and 79% of healthy individuals had a bilateral language representation for this particular task. However, 50% of LMTLE patients presented an atypical right hemispheric dominance in the LI. More importantly, the degree of right lateralization in LMTLE patients was correlated with the age of epilepsy onset. Conclusions The simple, rapid, non-collaboration dependent, passive task described in this study, produces a robust activation in the temporal lobe in both patients and controls and is capable of illustrating a pattern of atypical language organization for LMTLE patients. Furthermore, we observed that the atypical right-lateralization patterns in LMTLE patients was

  7. Postoperative seizure freedom does not normalize altered connectivity in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccotta, Luigi; Lopez, Mayra A; Adeyemo, Babatunde; Ances, Beau M; Day, Brian K; Eisenman, Lawrence N; Dowling, Joshua L; Leuthardt, Eric C; Schlaggar, Bradley L; Hogan, Robert Edward

    2017-11-01

    Specific changes in the functional connectivity of brain networks occur in patients with epilepsy. Yet whether such changes reflect a stable disease effect or one that is a function of active seizure burden remains unclear. Here, we longitudinally assessed the connectivity of canonical cognitive functional networks in patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), both before and after patients underwent epilepsy surgery and achieved seizure freedom. Seventeen patients with intractable TLE who underwent epilepsy surgery with Engel class I outcome and 17 matched healthy controls took part in the study. The functional connectivity of a set of cognitive functional networks derived from typical cognitive tasks was assessed in patients, preoperatively and postoperatively, as well as in controls, using stringent methods of artifact reduction. Preoperatively, functional networks in TLE patients differed significantly from healthy controls, with differences that largely, but not exclusively, involved the default mode and temporal/auditory subnetworks. However, undergoing epilepsy surgery and achieving seizure freedom did not lead to significant changes in network connectivity, with postoperative functional network abnormalities closely mirroring the preoperative state. This result argues for a stable chronic effect of the disease on brain connectivity, with changes that are largely "burned in" by the time a patient with intractable TLE undergoes epilepsy surgery, which typically occurs years after the initial diagnosis. The result has potential implications for the treatment of intractable epilepsy, suggesting that delaying surgical intervention that may achieve seizure freedom may lead to functional network changes that are no longer reversible by the time of epilepsy surgery. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  8. Ictal and postictal semiology in patients with bilateral temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Řehulka, Pavel; Doležalová, Irena; Janoušová, Eva; Tomášek, Martin; Marusič, Petr; Brázdil, Milan; Kuba, Robert

    2014-12-01

    Bilateral temporal lobe epilepsy is characterized by evidence of seizure onset independently in both temporal lobes. The main aim of the present study was to determine whether patients with evidence of independent bilateral temporal lobe epilepsy (biTLE) can be identified noninvasively on the basis of seizure semiology analysis. Thirteen patients with biTLE, as defined by invasive EEG, were matched with 13 patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy (uniTLE). In all 26 patients, the frequency of predefined clusters of ictal and periictal signs were evaluated: ictal motor signs (IMSs), periictal motor signs (PIMSs), periictal vegetative signs (PIVSs), the frequency of early oroalimentary automatisms (EOAs), and the duration of postictal unresponsiveness (PU). Some other noninvasive and clinical data were also evaluated. A lower frequency of IMSs was noted in the group with biTLE (patients = 46.2%, seizures = 20.7%) than in the group with uniTLE (patients = 92.3%, seizures = 61.0%) (p = 0.030; p < 0.001, respectively). The individual IMS average per seizure was significantly lower in the group with biTLE (0.14; range = 0-1.0) than in the group with uniTLE (0.80; range = 0-2.6) (p = 0.003). Postictal unresponsiveness was longer than 5 min in more patients (75.0%) and seizures (42.9%) in the group with biTLE than in the group with uniTLE (patients = 30.8%, seizures = 18.6%) (p = 0.047; p = 0.002). The frequency of EOAs, PIMSs, PIVSs, and other clinical data did not differ significantly. There is a lower frequency of ictal motor signs and longer duration of postictal unresponsiveness in patients with biTLE. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Hippocampal deep brain stimulation in nonlesional refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hongbo; Li, Wenling; Dong, Changzheng; Wu, Jiang; Zhao, Wenqing; Zhao, Zengyi; Ma, Li; Ma, Fa; Chen, Yao; Liu, Qianwei

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of chronic continuous hippocampal deep brain stimulation (DBS) in nonlesional refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Three adult patients with medically intractable epilepsy treated with hippocampal DBS were studied. Two patients underwent invasive recordings with depth stereo-electroencephalography (SEEG) electrodes to localize ictal onset zone prior to implantation of DBS electrodes. All the patients with no lesion in brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan received bilateral implantation of DBS electrodes. Chronic continuous high-frequency hippocampal stimulation was applied during treatment. The number of seizures in each patient before and after stimulation was compared. Long-term hippocampal stimulation produced a median reduction in seizure frequency of 93%. Two out of these patients received unilateral activation of the electrodes and experienced a 95% and 92% reduction in seizure frequency after hippocampal DBS respectively. The last patient had bilateral electrode activation and had a seizure-frequency reduction of 91%. None of the patients had neuropsychological deterioration and showed side effects. Generalized tonic-clonic seizures disappeared completely after hippocampal DBS. Chronic continuous hippocampal DBS demonstrated a potential efficiency and safety in nonlesional refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and might represent an effective therapeutic option for these patients. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Ictal semiology in patients with medial temporal lobe epilepsy: value in lateralizing the seizure focus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamida, T; Baba, H; Ono, K; Yonekura, M

    2001-09-01

    We have evaluated useful lateralizing signs in 28 patients with medial temporal lobe epilepsy who were seizure-free after anterior temporal lobectomy by reviewing videotapes during video-EEG monitoring. The most frequent types of aura were epigastric sensation and psychic symptom in 8, respectively, both of which did not predict lateralization of the focus. Of the motor signs, early head deviation and unilateral upper extremity automatism predicted an ipsilateral focus in 72 and 80%, respectively. On the other hand, late head deviation(head deviation, unilateral upper extremity automatism and dystonic posturing were not a little noted and provided additional information as to the side of seizure origin.

  11. A Review on the Pathophysiology of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: from Neuroplasticity to Neuronal Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán L. Pereno

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This review is focused and tries to introduce the reader in the basic concepts of the epilepsy, specially of the temporal lobe epilepsy. From the knowledge provided by different animal models, it’s introduced to the physiopathology of this type of epilepsy recognizing the participation of two systems of neurotransmition: the gabaergic and glutamatergic. It is known that an excess of glutamate has as a consequence neuronal death, this is the excitotoxicity. It’s enumerated different reports that, although they sometimes proved contradictory results, the majority find neuronal death in areas of the limbic system after a status epilepticus in experimental animals.Finally, since the brain is not immutable to this death, the principal concepts of the neuroplasticidad are review, providing reports that demonstrate that plastic processes happen in epileptic brains, both in the hippocampus and in the amygdala.

  12. Evaluation of ictal brain SPET using statistical parametric mapping in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.D.; Kim, H.-J.; Jeon, T.J.; Kim, M.J. [Div. of Nuclear Medicine, Yonsei University Medical College, Seoul (Korea); Lee, B.I.; Kim, O.J. [Dept. of Neurology, Yonsei University Medical College, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-11-01

    An automated voxel-based analysis of brain images using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) is accepted as a standard approach in the analysis of activation studies in positron emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging. This study aimed to investigate whether or not SPM would increase the diagnostic yield of ictal brain single-photon emission tomography (SPET) in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Twenty-one patients (age 27.14{+-}5.79 years) with temporal lobe epilepsy (right in 8, left in 13) who had a successful seizure outcome after surgery and nine normal subjects were included in the study. The data of ictal and interictal brain SPET of the patients and baseline SPET of the normal control group were analysed using SPM96 software. The t statistic SPM(t) was transformed to SPM(Z) with various thresholds of P<0.05, 0.005 and 0.001, and corrected extent threshold P value of 0.05. The SPM data were compared with the conventional ictal and interictal subtraction method. On group comparison, ictal SPET showed increased uptake within the epileptogenic mesial temporal lobe. On single case analysis, ictal SPET images correctly lateralized the epileptogenic temporal lobe in 18 cases, falsely lateralized it in one and failed to lateralize it in two as compared with the mean image of the normal group at a significance level of P<0.05. Comparing the individual ictal images with the corresponding interictal group, 15 patients were correctly lateralized, one was falsely lateralized and four were not lateralized. At significance levels of P<0.005 and P<0.001, correct lateralization of the epileptogenic temporal lobe was achieved in 15 and 13 patients, respectively, as compared with the normal group. On the other hand, when comparison was made with the corresponding interictal group, only 7 out of 21 patients were correctly lateralized at the threshold of P<0.005 and five at P<0.001. The result of the subtraction method was close to the single case analysis on

  13. Clinical characteristics, surgical and neuropsychological outcomes in drug resistant tumoral temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravat, Sangeeta; Iyer, Vivek; Muzumdar, Dattatraya; Shah, Urvashi; Pradhan, Pranjali; Jain, Neeraj; Godge, Yogesh

    2016-12-01

    Glioneuronal tumors are found in nearly one third patients who undergo surgery for pharmacoresistant epilepsy with temporal lobe being the most common location. Few studies, however have concentrated on the neurological and neuropsychological outcomes after surgery, hitherto none from India. We studied 34 patients with temporal lobe tumors and drug resistant epilepsy. These patients underwent anterior temporal lobectomy or lesionectomy based on the involvement of the hippocampus and mesial temporal structures. The clinical history, EEG, neuropsychology profile and MRI were compared. Seizure outcome was categorized using Engel's classification. At a mean follow up of 62 months, 85.29% of the patients were seizure free (Engel's Class I). All 8 patients with intraoperative electrocorticography (ECoG) guided resection were seizure free. Presence of a residual lesion was significantly associated with persistence of seizures post surgery (p = 0.002). Group analysis revealed no significant shifts in IQ and memory scores postoperatively. There was a significant improvement in the quality of life scores (total and across all subdomains) in all patients (p temporal lobe tumors and refractory epilepsy offers complete seizure freedom in majority. Complete surgical excision of the epileptogenic zone is of paramount importance in achieving seizure freedom. Intraoperative electrocorticography (EcoG) is a useful adjunct to ensure complete removal of epileptogenic zone, thus achieving optimal seizure freedom. There is a significant improvement in the quality of life scores (p < 0.001) with no negative impact of surgery on memory and intelligence. Even the patients who are not seizure free can achieve worthwhile improvement post surgery. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [A surgical case of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal sclerosis and traumatic neocortical lesion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazawa, Yu; Jin, Kazutaka; Iwasaki, Masaki; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Nakasato, Nobukazu

    2017-11-25

    A 26-year-old right-handed woman, with a history of left temporal lobe contusion caused by a fall at the age of 9 months, started to have complex partial seizures with oral automatism at the age of 7 years. The seizures occurred once or twice a month despite combination therapy with several antiepileptic agents. Her history and imaging studies suggested the diagnosis of epilepsy arising from traumatic neocortical temporal lesion. Comprehensive assessment including long-term video EEG monitoring, MRI, FDG-PET, MEG, and neuropsychological evaluation was performed at the age of 26 years. The diagnosis was left mesial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal atrophy and traumatic temporal cortical lesion. The patient was readmitted for surgical treatment at the age of 27 years. Intracranial EEG monitoring showed that ictal discharges started in the left hippocampus and spread to the traumatic lesion in the left posterior superior temporal gyrus 10 seconds after the onset. This case could not be classified as dual pathology exactly, because the traumatic left temporal cortical lesion did not show independent epileptogenicity. However, the traumatic lesion was highly likely to be the source of the epileptogenicity, and she had right hemispheric dominance for language and functional deterioration in the whole temporal cortex. Therefore, left amygdalo-hippocampectomy and left temporal lobectomy including the traumatic lesion were performed according to the diagnosis of dual pathology. Subsequently, she remained seizure-free for 3 years. Comprehensive assessment of seizure semiology, neurophysiology, neuroradiology, and neuropsychology is important to determine the optimum therapeutic strategies for drug-resistant epilepsy.

  15. Nocturnal Frontal Lobe Epilepsy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ryvlin, Philippe; Rheims, Sylvain; Risse, Gail

    2006-01-01

    Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) is a condition primarily characterized by seizures occurring exclusively or predominantly during sleep, the semiology of which suggest a frontal lobe origin and, more specifically, the involvement...

  16. Impaired Facial Expression Recognition in Children with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Impact of Early Seizure Onset on Fear Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golouboff, Nathalie; Fiori, Nicole; Delalande, Olivier; Fohlen, Martine; Dellatolas, Georges; Jambaque, Isabelle

    2008-01-01

    The amygdala has been implicated in the recognition of facial emotions, especially fearful expressions, in adults with early-onset right temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The present study investigates the recognition of facial emotions in children and adolescents, 8-16 years old, with epilepsy. Twenty-nine subjects had TLE (13 right, 16 left) and…

  17. Long-Term Effects of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy on Local Neural Networks: A Graph Theoretical Analysis of Corticography Recordings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dellen, Edwin; Douw, Linda; Baayen, Johannes C.; Heimans, Jan J.; Ponten, Sophie C.; Vandertop, W. Peter; Velis, Demetrios N.; Stam, Cornelis J.; Reijneveld, Jaap C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Pharmaco-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is often treated with surgical intervention at some point. As epilepsy surgery is considered a last resort by most physicians, a long history of epileptic seizures prior to surgery is not uncommon. Little is known about the effects of ongoing

  18. Long-term effects of temporal lobe epilepsy on local neural networks: A graph theoretical analysis of corticography recordings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dellen, E.; Douw, L.; Baayen, J.C.; Heimans, J.J.; Ponten, S.C.; Vandertop, W.P.; Velis, D.N.; Stam, C.J.; Reijneveld, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Pharmaco-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is often treated with surgical intervention at some point. As epilepsy surgery is considered a last resort by most physicians, a long history of epileptic seizures prior to surgery is not uncommon. Little is known about the effects of ongoing

  19. Gray, White Matter Concentration Changes and Their Correlation with Heterotopic Neurons in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tae, Woo Suk; Joo, Eun Yun; Kim, Sung Tae; Hong, Seung Bong [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    To identify changes in gray and white matter concentrations (GMC, WMC), and their relation to heterotopic neuron numbers in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE). The gray matter or white matter concentrations of 16 left and 15 right mTLE patients who achieved an excellent surgical outcome were compared with those of 24 healthy volunteers for the left group and with 23 healthy volunteers for the right group, by optimized voxel-based morphometry using unmodulated and modulated images. A histologic count of heterotopic neurons was obtained in the white matter of the anterior temporal lobe originating from the patients' surgical specimens. In addition, the number of heterotopic neurons were tested to determine if there was a correlation with the GMC or WMC. The GMCs of the left and right mTLE groups were reduced in the ipsilateral hippocampi, bilateral thalami, precentral gyri, and in the cerebellum. The WMCs were reduced in the ipsilateral white matter of the anterior temporal lobe, bilateral parahippocampal gyri, and internal capsules, but increased in the pons and bilateral precentral gyri. The heterotopic neuron counts in the left mTLE group showed a positive correlation (r = 0.819, p < 0.0001) with GMCs and a negative correlation (r = - 0.839, p < 0.0001) with WMCs in the white matter of the anterior temporal lobe. The present study shows the abnormalities of the cortico-thalamo- hippocampal network including a gray matter volume reduction in the anterior frontal lobes and an abnormality of brain tissue concentration in the pontine area. Furthermore, heterotopic neuron numbers were significantly correlated with GMC or WMC in the left white matter of anterior temporal lobe.

  20. Prognostic factors in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PREVEDELLO DANIEL M. S.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Eighty-four patients submitted to anterior temporal lobectomy were evaluated retrospectively in order to correlate the different type of simple partial seizure (SPS and their prognostic implications in patients with mesial temporal sclerosis. The patients were divided in two groups following the classification of Engel; Group 1 (53 patients included patients Class I (without seizures or of good outcome and Group 2 (31 patients included Classes II, III and IV (with seizures or of bad outcome. The two groups were compared and results showed no statistical difference in relation to the demographic aspects as sex, side of surgery, age at onset of seizures and time of the patients' postoperative follow-up. Statistical analysis revealed no relationship between type of SPS and outcome. SPS did not show a statistical value in localizing the side of pathology. However, when the two groups were compared statistically in terms of patients' ages at the time of surgery, and the time elapsed from the onset of the seizures to the surgical intervention, it was observed that Group 1 (of good outcome had seizures for smaller interval (p <0.05 and was operated at an earlier age (p<0.02 than Group 2 (of bad outcome. The presence or the type of SPS can not be used as a prognostic measure; surgical therapy must be considered as soon as clinical resistance is demonstrated.

  1. Frontal gray matter abnormalities predict seizure outcome in refractory temporal lobe epilepsy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, Gaelle E; He, Xiaosong; Sperling, Michael; Sharan, Ashwini; Tracy, Joseph I

    2015-01-01

    Developing more reliable predictors of seizure outcome following temporal lobe surgery for intractable epilepsy is an important clinical goal. In this context, we investigated patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) before and after temporal resection. In detail, we explored gray matter (GM) volume change in relation with seizure outcome, using a voxel-based morphometry (VBM) approach. To do so, this study was divided into two parts. The first one involved group analysis of differences in regional GM volume between the groups (good outcome (GO), e.g., no seizures after surgery; poor outcome (PO), e.g., persistent postoperative seizures; and controls, N = 24 in each group), pre- and post-surgery. The second part of the study focused on pre-surgical data only (N = 61), determining whether the degree of GM abnormalities can predict surgical outcomes. For this second step, GM abnormalities were identified, within each lobe, in each patient when compared with an ad hoc sample of age-matched controls. For the first analysis, the results showed larger GM atrophy, mostly in the frontal lobe, in PO patients, relative to both GO patients and controls, pre-surgery. When comparing pre-to-post changes, we found relative GM gains in the GO but not in the PO patients, mostly in the non-resected hemisphere. For the second analysis, only the frontal lobe displayed reliable prediction of seizure outcome. 81% of the patients showing pre-surgical increased GM volume in the frontal lobe became seizure free, post-surgery; while 77% of the patients with pre-surgical reduced frontal GM volume had refractory seizures, post-surgery. A regression analysis revealed that the proportion of voxels with reduced frontal GM volume was a significant predictor of seizure outcome (p = 0.014). Importantly, having less than 1% of the frontal voxels with GM atrophy increased the likelihood of being seizure-free, post-surgery, by seven times. Overall, our results suggest that using pre

  2. Altered functional connectivity and small-world in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The functional architecture of the human brain has been extensively described in terms of functional connectivity networks, detected from the low-frequency coherent neuronal fluctuations that can be observed in a resting state condition. Little is known, so far, about the changes in functional connectivity and in the topological properties of functional networks, associated with different brain diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we investigated alterations related to mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE, using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging on 18 mTLE patients and 27 healthy controls. Functional connectivity among 90 cortical and subcortical regions was measured by temporal correlation. The related values were analyzed to construct a set of undirected graphs. Compared to controls, mTLE patients showed significantly increased connectivity within the medial temporal lobes, but also significantly decreased connectivity within the frontal and parietal lobes, and between frontal and parietal lobes. Our findings demonstrated that a large number of areas in the default-mode network of mTLE patients showed a significantly decreased number of connections to other regions. Furthermore, we observed altered small-world properties in patients, along with smaller degree of connectivity, increased n-to-1 connectivity, smaller absolute clustering coefficients and shorter absolute path length. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We suggest that the mTLE alterations observed in functional connectivity and topological properties may be used to define tentative disease markers.

  3. The Opioid System in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Functional Role and Therapeutic Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Burtscher

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Temporal lobe epilepsy is considered to be one of the most common and severe forms of focal epilepsies. Patients often develop cognitive deficits and emotional blunting along the progression of the disease. The high incidence of resistance to antiepileptic drugs and a frequent lack of admissibility to surgery poses an unmet medical challenge. In the urgent quest of novel treatment strategies, neuropeptides are interesting candidates, however, their therapeutic potential has not yet been exploited. This review focuses on the functional role of the endogenous opioid system with respect to temporal lobe epilepsy, specifically in the hippocampus. The role of dynorphins and kappa opioid receptors (KOPr as modulators of neuronal excitability is well understood: both the reduced release of glutamate as well of postsynaptic hyperpolarization were shown in glutamatergic neurons. In line with this, low levels of dynorphin in humans and mice increase the risk of epilepsy development. The role of enkephalins is not understood so well. On one hand, some agonists of the delta opioid receptors (DOPr display pro-convulsant properties probably through inhibition of GABAergic interneurons. On the other hand, enkephalins play a neuro-protective role under hypoxic or anoxic conditions, most probably through positive effects on mitochondrial function. Despite the supposed absence of endorphins in the hippocampus, exogenous activation of the mu opioid receptors (MOPr induces pro-convulsant effects. Recently-expanded knowledge of the complex ways opioid receptors ligands elicit their effects (including biased agonism, mixed binding, and opioid receptor heteromers, opens up exciting new therapeutic potentials with regards to seizures and epilepsy. Potential adverse side effects of KOPr agonists may be minimized through functional selectivity. Preclinical data suggest a high potential of such compounds to control seizures, with a strong predictive validity toward human

  4. Temporal Lobe Resective Surgery for Medically Intractable Epilepsy: A Review of Complications and Side Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iordanis Georgiadis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Object. It is widely accepted that temporal resective surgery represents an efficacious treatment option for patients with epilepsy of temporal origin. The meticulous knowledge of the potential complications, associated with temporal resective procedures, is of paramount importance. In our current study, we attempt to review the pertinent literature for summating the complications of temporal resective procedures for epilepsy. Method. A PubMed search was performed with the following terms: “behavioral,” “cognitive,” “complication,” “deficit,” “disorder,” “epilepsy,” “hemianopia,” “hemianopsia,” “hemorrhage,” “lobectomy,” “medial,” “memory,” “mesial,” “neurobehavioral,” “neurocognitive,” “neuropsychological,” “psychological,” “psychiatric,” “quadranopia,” “quadranopsia,” “resective,” “side effect,” “surgery,” “temporal,” “temporal lobe,” and “visual field.” Results. There were six pediatric, three mixed-population, and eleven adult surgical series examining the incidence rates of procedure-related complications. The reported mortality rates varied between 0% and 3.5%, although the vast majority of the published series reported no mortality. The cumulative morbidity rates ranged between 3.2% and 88%. Conclusions. Temporal resective surgery for epilepsy is a safe treatment modality. The reported morbidity rates demonstrate a wide variation. Accurate detection and frank reporting of any surgical, neurological, cognitive, and/or psychological complications are of paramount importance for maximizing the safety and improving the patients’ overall outcome.

  5. Temporal lobe epilepsy and cavernous malformations: surgical strategies and long-term outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Fernando L; Vivas, Andrew C; Manwaring, Jotham; Schoenberg, Mike R; Benbadis, Selim R

    2015-11-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM) of the temporal lobe often present with seizures. Surgical resection of these lesions can offer durable seizure control. There is, however, no universally accepted methodology for assessing and surgically treating these patients. We propose an algorithm to maximize positive surgical outcomes (seizure control) while minimizing post-surgical neurological deficit. A retrospective review of 34 patients who underwent epilepsy surgery for radiographically proven temporal lobe CCM was conducted. Patients underwent a relatively standard work-up for seizure localization. In patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE), a complete resection of the epileptogenic zone was performed including amygdalo-hippocampectomy in addition to a lesionectomy if not contraindicated by pre-operative work-up. Patients with neocortical epilepsy underwent intraoperative electrocorticography (ECoG)-guided lesionectomy. Seizure-free rate for mesial and neocortical (anterior, lateral, and basal) location was 90 vs. 83 %, respectively. Complete resection of the lesion, irrespective of location, was statistically significant for seizure control (p = 0.018). There was no difference in seizure control based on disease duration or location (p > 0.05). Patients with mesial temporal CCM who presented with MTLE were presumed to also have mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS), or dual pathology. These patients underwent routine resection of the mesial structures. Interestingly, patients who had MTLE and basal (neocortical) lesions who underwent a mesial resection for suspected MTS were found not to have dual pathology. Patients with temporal lobe CCM should be offered resection for durable seizure control, prevention of secondary epileptogenic foci, and elimination of hemorrhage risk. The preoperative work-up should follow a team approach. Surgical intervention should include complete lesionectomy in all cases. Intra or extra-operative ECoG for neocortical

  6. Ictal hyperperfusion of cerebellum and basal ganglia in temporal lobe epilepsy: SPECT subtraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Won Chul; Hong, Seung Bong; Tae, Woo Suk; Seo, Dae Won; Kim, Sang Eun [School of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-02-01

    The ictal perfusion patterns of cerebellum and basal ganglia have not been systematically investigated in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Their ictal perfusion patterns were analyzed in relation with temporal lobe and frontal lobe hyperperfusion during TLE seizures using SPECT subtraction. Thirty-three TLE patients had interictal and ictal SPECT, video-EEG monitoring. SPGR MRI, and SPECT subtraction with MRI co-registration. The vermian cerebellar hyperperfusion (CH) was observed in 26 patients (78.8%) and hemispheric CH in 25 (75.8%). Compared to the side of epileptogenic temporal lobe, there were seven ipsilateral hemispheric CH (28.0%), fifteen contralateral hemispheric CH( 60.0%) and three bilateral hemispheric CH( 12.0%). CH was more frequently observed in patients with additional frontal hyperperfusion (15/15, 93.3%) than in patients without frontal hyperperfusion (11/18, 61.1 %). The basal ganglia hyperperfusion (14/15, 93.3%) than in patients without frontal hyperperfusion (BGH) was seen in 11 of the 15 patients with frontotemporal hyperperfusion (73.3%) and 11 of the 18 with temporal hyperperfusion only (61.1%). In 17 patients with unilateral BGH, contralateral CH to the BGH was observed in 14 (82.5%) and ipsilateral CH to BGH in 2 (11.8%) and bilateral CH in 1 (5.9%). The cerebellar hyperperfusion and basal ganglia hyperperfusion during seizures of TLE can be contralateral, ipsilateral or bilateral to the seizure focus. The presence of additional frontal or basal ganglia hyperperfusion was more frequently associated with contralateral hemispheric CH to their sides. However, temporal lobe hyperperfusion appears to be related with both ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheric CH.

  7. Machine learning approach for the outcome prediction of temporal lobe epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armañanzas, Rubén; Alonso-Nanclares, Lidia; Defelipe-Oroquieta, Jesús; Kastanauskaite, Asta; de Sola, Rafael G; Defelipe, Javier; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy surgery is effective in reducing both the number and frequency of seizures, particularly in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Nevertheless, a significant proportion of these patients continue suffering seizures after surgery. Here we used a machine learning approach to predict the outcome of epilepsy surgery based on supervised classification data mining taking into account not only the common clinical variables, but also pathological and neuropsychological evaluations. We have generated models capable of predicting whether a patient with TLE secondary to hippocampal sclerosis will fully recover from epilepsy or not. The machine learning analysis revealed that outcome could be predicted with an estimated accuracy of almost 90% using some clinical and neuropsychological features. Importantly, not all the features were needed to perform the prediction; some of them proved to be irrelevant to the prognosis. Personality style was found to be one of the key features to predict the outcome. Although we examined relatively few cases, findings were verified across all data, showing that the machine learning approach described in the present study may be a powerful method. Since neuropsychological assessment of epileptic patients is a standard protocol in the pre-surgical evaluation, we propose to include these specific psychological tests and machine learning tools to improve the selection of candidates for epilepsy surgery.

  8. Machine Learning Approach for the Outcome Prediction of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFelipe-Oroquieta, Jesús; Kastanauskaite, Asta; de Sola, Rafael G.; DeFelipe, Javier; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy surgery is effective in reducing both the number and frequency of seizures, particularly in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Nevertheless, a significant proportion of these patients continue suffering seizures after surgery. Here we used a machine learning approach to predict the outcome of epilepsy surgery based on supervised classification data mining taking into account not only the common clinical variables, but also pathological and neuropsychological evaluations. We have generated models capable of predicting whether a patient with TLE secondary to hippocampal sclerosis will fully recover from epilepsy or not. The machine learning analysis revealed that outcome could be predicted with an estimated accuracy of almost 90% using some clinical and neuropsychological features. Importantly, not all the features were needed to perform the prediction; some of them proved to be irrelevant to the prognosis. Personality style was found to be one of the key features to predict the outcome. Although we examined relatively few cases, findings were verified across all data, showing that the machine learning approach described in the present study may be a powerful method. Since neuropsychological assessment of epileptic patients is a standard protocol in the pre-surgical evaluation, we propose to include these specific psychological tests and machine learning tools to improve the selection of candidates for epilepsy surgery. PMID:23646148

  9. Machine learning approach for the outcome prediction of temporal lobe epilepsy surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Armañanzas

    Full Text Available Epilepsy surgery is effective in reducing both the number and frequency of seizures, particularly in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. Nevertheless, a significant proportion of these patients continue suffering seizures after surgery. Here we used a machine learning approach to predict the outcome of epilepsy surgery based on supervised classification data mining taking into account not only the common clinical variables, but also pathological and neuropsychological evaluations. We have generated models capable of predicting whether a patient with TLE secondary to hippocampal sclerosis will fully recover from epilepsy or not. The machine learning analysis revealed that outcome could be predicted with an estimated accuracy of almost 90% using some clinical and neuropsychological features. Importantly, not all the features were needed to perform the prediction; some of them proved to be irrelevant to the prognosis. Personality style was found to be one of the key features to predict the outcome. Although we examined relatively few cases, findings were verified across all data, showing that the machine learning approach described in the present study may be a powerful method. Since neuropsychological assessment of epileptic patients is a standard protocol in the pre-surgical evaluation, we propose to include these specific psychological tests and machine learning tools to improve the selection of candidates for epilepsy surgery.

  10. An evaluation of lateralizing signs in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataoğlu, Esra Erkoç; Yıldırım, İrem; Bilir, Erhan

    2015-06-01

    Resective epilepsy surgery has been accepted as an effective treatment for patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) to control the seizures and to limit cognitive dysfunction. Complete resection of the epileptic zone, and therefore the success of the surgery, depends on the identification of the seizure focus. Reliable lateralizing semiologic signs, together with other presurgical assessments, are of great importance for an accurate identification of the seizure focus. In this respect, this study evaluated the frequency of semiologic signs in medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) together with the lateralizing values and variations according to the age and gender groups. Two hundred seventy-three seizures of 55 patients of the Adult Epilepsy Monitoring Unit of Gazi University Faculty of Medicine with the diagnosis of medically intractable TLE, whose epileptic foci were detected through noninvasive presurgical procedures and seizures were controlled successfully after anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL), were analyzed retrospectively. Seizure semiologies of the patients were evaluated in terms of lateralizing values, and it was inquired whether age/gender causes any variation. Versive head rotation, unilateral dystonic limb posturing, asymmetric tonic limb posturing, and the combination of unilateral hand automatisms and dystonic posturing were determined as the semiologic signs with the highest lateralizing values (90-100%). While hand automatisms were observed frequently in the group with early seizure-onset age (onset age ≤ 2), asymmetric tonic limb posturing was detected as more frequent in the group with later seizure-onset age (onset age > 2; p < .005). In addition to this, semiologic signs were noted to be different between male and female groups; psychic and autonomic auras and ictal emotional signs were associated with women (p < .005). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Temporal lobe epilepsy surgery in children versus adults: from etiologies to outcomes

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    Yun-Jin Lee

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is the most common type of medically intractable epilepsy in adults and children, and mesial temporal sclerosis is the most common underlying cause of TLE. Unlike in the case of adults, TLE in infants and young children often has etiologies other than mesial temporal sclerosis, such as tumors, cortical dysplasia, trauma, and vascular malformations. Differences in seizure semiology have also been reported. Motor manifestations are prominent in infants and young children, but they become less obvious with increasing age. Further, automatisms tend to become increasingly complex with age. However, in childhood and especially in adolescence, the clinical manifestations are similar to those of the adult population. Selective amygdalohippocampectomy can lead to excellent postoperative seizure outcome in adults, but favorable results have been seen in children as well. Anterior temporal lobectomy may prove to be a more successful surgery than amygdalohippocampectomy in children with intractable TLE. The presence of a focal brain lesion on magnetic resonance imaging is one of the most reliable independent predictors of a good postoperative seizure outcome. Seizure-free status is the most important predictor of improved psychosocial outcome with advanced quality of life and a lower proportion of disability among adults and children. Since the brain is more plastic during infancy and early childhood, recovery is promoted. In contrast, long epilepsy duration is an important risk factor for surgically refractory seizures. Therefore, patients with medically intractable TLE should undergo surgery as early as possible.

  12. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Language Mapping in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is a noninvasive technique that is increasingly used to understand the cerebral cortical networks and organizations. In this paper, we describe the role of fMRI for mapping language networks in the presurgical workup of patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. Studies comparing fMRI with the intracarotid sodium amobarbital (Wada test and fMRI with intraoperative cortical stimulation mapping for language lateralization and/or localization in medically intractable TLE are discussed.

  13. Surgical outcome in patients with MRI-negative, PET-positive temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Capraz, Irem Yıldırım; Kurt, Gökhan; Akdemir, Özgür; Hirfanoglu, Tugba; Oner, Yusuf; Sengezer, Tugba; Kapucu, Lütfiye Ozlem Atay; Serdaroglu, Ayse; Bilir, Erhan

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term surgical outcomes of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-negative, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)-positive patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and compare them with those of patients with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). One hundred forty-one patients with TLE who underwent anterior temporal lobectomy were included in the study. The surgical outcomes of 24 patients with unilateral temporal hypometabolism on FDG-PET without an epileptogenic lesion on MRI were compared with that of patients with unilateral temporal hypometabolism on FDG-PET with MTS on MRI (n=117). The outcomes were compared using Engel's classification at 2 years after surgery. Clinical characteristics, unilateral interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs), histopathological data and operation side were considered as probable prognostic factors. Class I surgical outcomes were similar in MRI-negative patients and the patients with MTS on MRI (seizure-free rate at postoperative 2 years was 79.2% and 82% in the MRI-negative and MTS groups, respectively). In univariate analysis, history of febrile convulsions, presence of unilateral IEDs and left temporal localization were found to be significantly associated with seizure free outcome. Multivariate analysis revealed that independent predictors of a good outcome were history of febrile convulsions and presence of unilateral IEDs. Our results suggest that epilepsy surgery outcomes of MRI-negative, PET positive patients are similar to those of patients with MTS. This finding may aid in the selection of best candidates for epilepsy surgery. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Temporal lobe epilepsy with varying severity: MRI study of 222 patients

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    Lehericy, S.; Hasboun, D.; Dormont, D.; Marsault, C. [Department of Neuroradiology, Batiment Tete, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, 47 Bd de l`Hopital, F-75013 Paris (France); Semah, F.; Baulac, M. [Department of Neurology, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); Clemenceau, S. [Department of Neurosurgery, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); Granat, O. [Department of Radiology, Hopital Saint Joseph, Paris (France)

    1997-11-01

    MRI was performed in 222 consecutive adult patients with temporal lobe epilepsy of varying severity from January 1991 to May 1993. The diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis was established visually by three independent observers. The accuracy of visual assessment of hippocampal asymmetry was compared with volumetric measurements. Neuropathological correlations were obtained in 63 patients with refractory seizures. Temporal lobe abnormalities were observed in 180 patients (81 %) as follows: hippocampal sclerosis in 122 (55 %); developmental abnormalities in 16 (7.2 %); tumours in 15 (6.8 %); scars in 11 (5 %); cavernous angiomas in 10 (4.5 %); miscellaneous lesions in 6. MRI was normal or showed unrelated changes in 42 patients (19 %). Visual assessment correctly lateralised hippocampal sclerosis in 79 of the 84 patients measured (94 %). Temporal lobectomy confirmed the MRI data (side and aetiology) in all 63 operated patients. Patients with normal MRI had an older age of seizure onset and were more often drug-responsive than patients with hippocampal sclerosis. MRI showed temporal lobe abnormalities in 81 % of epileptic patients with varying severity with good neuropathological correlation. Patients with normal MRI had a less severe form of the disease. (orig.) With 5 figs., 1 tab., 32 refs.

  15. Uncinate fasciculus fiber tracking in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Initial findings

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    Rodrigo, S.; Oppenheim, C.; Meder, J.F. [Universite Paris-Descartes, Faculte de Medecine, Centre Hospitalier Sainte-Anne, Departement d' Imagerie Morphologique et Fonctionnelle, Paris (France); Chassoux, F. [Universite Paris-Descartes, Faculte de Medecine, Service de Neurochirurgie, Centre Hospitalier Sainte-Anne, Paris (France); Golestani, N.; Cointepas, Y.; Poupon, C.; Semah, F.; Mangin, J.F.; Le Bihan, D. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, CEA, Orsay (France)

    2007-07-15

    In temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) due to hippocampal sclerosis (HS), ictal discharge spread to the frontal and insulo-perisylvian cortex is commonly observed. The implication of white matter pathways in this propagation has not been investigated. We compared diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measurements along the uncinate fasciculus (UF), a major tract connecting the frontal and temporal lobes, in patients and controls. Ten right-handed patients referred for intractable TLE due to a right HS were investigated on a 1.5-T MR scanner including a DTI sequence. All patients had interictal fluorodeoxyglucose PET showing an ipsilateral temporal hypometabolism associated with insular and frontal or perisylvian hypometabolism. The controls consisted of ten right-handed healthy subjects. UF fiber tracking was performed, and its fractional anisotropy (FA) values were compared between patients and controls, separately for the right and left UF. The left-minus-right FA UF asymmetry index was computed to test for intergroup differences. Asymmetries were found in the control group with right-greater-than-left FA. This asymmetrical pattern was lost in the patient group. Right FA values were lower in patients with right HS versus controls. Although preliminary, these findings may be related to the preferential pathway of seizure spread from the mesial temporal lobe to frontal and insulo-perisylvian areas. (orig.)

  16. Differential DNA methylation profiles of coding and non-coding genes define hippocampal sclerosis in human temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Delaney, Suzanne F C; Bryan, Kenneth; Das, Sudipto; McKiernan, Ross C; Bray, Isabella M; Reynolds, James P; Gwinn, Ryder; Stallings, Raymond L; Henshall, David C

    2015-03-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is associated with large-scale, wide-ranging changes in gene expression in the hippocampus. Epigenetic changes to DNA are attractive mechanisms to explain the sustained hyperexcitability of chronic epilepsy. Here, through methylation analysis of all annotated C-phosphate-G islands and promoter regions in the human genome, we report a pilot study of the methylation profiles of temporal lobe epilepsy with or without hippocampal sclerosis. Furthermore, by comparative analysis of expression and promoter methylation, we identify methylation sensitive non-coding RNA in human temporal lobe epilepsy. A total of 146 protein-coding genes exhibited altered DNA methylation in temporal lobe epilepsy hippocampus (n = 9) when compared to control (n = 5), with 81.5% of the promoters of these genes displaying hypermethylation. Unique methylation profiles were evident in temporal lobe epilepsy with or without hippocampal sclerosis, in addition to a common methylation profile regardless of pathology grade. Gene ontology terms associated with development, neuron remodelling and neuron maturation were over-represented in the methylation profile of Watson Grade 1 samples (mild hippocampal sclerosis). In addition to genes associated with neuronal, neurotransmitter/synaptic transmission and cell death functions, differential hypermethylation of genes associated with transcriptional regulation was evident in temporal lobe epilepsy, but overall few genes previously associated with epilepsy were among the differentially methylated. Finally, a panel of 13, methylation-sensitive microRNA were identified in temporal lobe epilepsy including MIR27A, miR-193a-5p (MIR193A) and miR-876-3p (MIR876), and the differential methylation of long non-coding RNA documented for the first time. The present study therefore reports select, genome-wide DNA methylation changes in human temporal lobe epilepsy that may contribute to the molecular architecture of the epileptic brain. © The

  17. Pathology-Based Approach to Seizure Outcome After Surgery for Pharmacoresistant Medial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinoni, Matteo; Berti, Pier Paolo; Marucci, Gianluca; Rubboli, Guido; Volpi, Lilia; Riguzzi, Patrizia; Marliani, Federica; Toni, Francesco; Bisulli, Francesca; Tinuper, Paolo; Michelucci, Roberto; Baruzzi, Agostino; Giulioni, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis (HS) is the most common cause of drug-resistant medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Structural abnormalities such as HS, granule cell pathology (GCP), and focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) have been classified histopathologically, possibly allowing a more accurate assessment of prognostic seizure and neuropsychologic outcomes. We correlated seizure outcome with comprehensive temporal lobe pathologic findings, identified according to the most recent classification systems of HS, GCP, and FCD. All the 83 patients who underwent anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) for drug-resistant MTLE and with a proven diagnosis of HS between April 2001 and May 2014 were collected. Patients were divided in 2 main groups: 1) isolated HS with/without GCP (HS +/- GCP); and 2) HS associated with FCD with/without GCP (HS+FCD +/- GCP). Patients were followed up at least 1 year, and seizure outcome was reported in accordance with Engel classification. Group I: HS +/- GCP: Statistical analysis confirmed a better outcome in HS + GCP patients than in HS-no GCP (P epilepsy surgery might improve the interpretation of the results, could predict which cases will enjoy a better seizure outcome, and could help to the comprehension of the causes of failures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Benign mesial temporal lobe epilepsy: A clinical cohort and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlQassmi, Amal; Burneo, Jorge G; McLachlan, Richard S; Mirsattari, Seyed M

    2016-12-01

    We present a single-center retrospective study of benign mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (bMTLE) between 1995 and 2014. Hospital records and clinic charts were reviewed. The clinical, Eelectroencephalographic (EEG), imaging features, and response to treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) were documented. Patients were included in this study if they were seizure-free for a minimum of 24months with or without an AED. Twenty-seven patients were identified. There were 19 (70%) females, mean age at first seizure was 32.2 (range: 15-80years). In all patients, seizures were mild, and seizure freedom was readily achieved with the initiation of AED therapy. Sixteen patients (59%) had mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). In three patients, we attempted to discontinue AED therapy after a prolonged period of remission (5-8years), but all had seizure recurrence within 2 to 4weeks. Not all temporal lobe epilepsy is refractory to medication, despite the presence of MTS. Until clinical trials indicate otherwise, surgery is not indicated but life-long medical treatment is advocated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Postoperative recovery of hippocampal contralateral diffusivity in medial temporal lobe epilepsy correlates with memory functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeuty, Micha; Thivard, Lionel; Dupont, Sophie; Adam, Claude; Baulac, Michel; Samson, Séverine

    2011-03-01

    This study aimed at determining if the recovery of mean diffusivity (MD) in the contralateral non sclerotic hippocampus is correlated with a change in memory outcome after surgery in patients with medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Verbal and non-verbal memory scores and MD were assessed in 23 patients with MTLE before and after surgical treatment of epilepsy. The recovery of MD in the left hippocampus was correlated with the performance on verbal memory tests, and the recovery of MD in all patients was correlated with the performance on non-verbal memory tests. This finding strengthens the hypothesis that reversible diffusion abnormalities in the contralateral hippocampus in MTLE are linked to the active epileptic process that seems to interfere with memory abilities.

  20. Hyperphosphorylated tau in patients with refractory epilepsy correlates with cognitive decline: a study of temporal lobe resections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Xin You; Koepp, Matthias; Duncan, John S; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Pamela; Baxendale, Sallie; Liu, Joan Y W; Reeves, Cheryl; Michalak, Zuzanna; Thom, Maria

    2016-09-01

    SEE BERNASCONI DOI101093/AWW202 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: Temporal lobe epilepsy, the most prevalent form of chronic focal epilepsy, is associated with a high prevalence of cognitive impairment but the responsible underlying pathological mechanisms are unknown. Tau, the microtubule-associated protein, is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. We hypothesized that hyperphosphorylated tau pathology is associated with cognitive decline in temporal lobe epilepsy and explored this through clinico-pathological study. We first performed pathological examination on tissue from 33 patients who had undergone temporal lobe resection between ages 50 and 65 years to treat drug-refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. We identified hyperphosphorylated tau protein using AT8 immunohistochemistry and compared this distribution to Braak patterns of Alzheimer's disease and patterns of chronic traumatic encephalopathy. We quantified tau pathology using a modified tau score created specifically for analysis of temporal lobectomy tissue and the Braak staging, which was limited without extra-temporal brain areas available. Next, we correlated tau pathology with pre- and postoperative cognitive test scores and clinical risk factors including age at time of surgery, duration of epilepsy, history of secondary generalized seizures, history of head injury, handedness and side of surgery. Thirty-one of 33 cases (94%) showed hyperphosphorylated tau pathology in the form of neuropil threads and neurofibrillary tangles and pre-tangles. Braak stage analysis showed 12% of our epilepsy cohort had a Braak staging III-IV compared to an age-matched non-epilepsy control group from the literature (8%). We identified a mixture of tau pathology patterns characteristic of Alzheimer's disease and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. We also found unusual patterns of subpial tau deposition, sparing of the hippocampus and

  1. Quantitative relaxometry and diffusion MRI for lateralization in MTS and non-MTS temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ali R; Goubran, Maged; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine; Hammond, Robert R; Burneo, Jorge G; Parrent, Andrew G; Peters, Terry M

    2014-03-01

    We developed novel methodology for investigating the use of quantitative relaxometry (T1 and T2) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for lateralization in temporal lobe epilepsy. Patients with mesial temporal sclerosis confirmed by pathology (N=8) and non-MTS unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy (N=6) were compared against healthy controls (N=19) using voxel-based analysis restricted to the anterior temporal lobes, and laterality indices for each MRI metric (T1, T2, fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity, axial and radial diffusivities) were computed based on the proportion of significant voxels on each side. The diffusivity metrics were the most lateralizing MRI metrics in MTS and non-MTS subsets, with significant differences also seen with FA, T1 and T2. Patient-specific multi-modal laterality indices were also computed and were shown to clearly separate the left-onset and right-onset patients. Marked differences between left-onset and right-onset patients were also observed, with left-onset patients exhibiting stronger laterality indices. Finally, neocortical abnormalities were found to be more common in the non-MTS patients. These preliminary results on a small sample size support the further investigation of quantitative MRI and multi-modal image analysis in clinical determination of seizure onset. The presence of more neocortical abnormalities in the non-MTS group suggests a role in seizure onset or propagation and motivates the investigation of more sensitive histopathological analysis to detect and delineate potentially subtle neocortical pathology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of seizure propagation on ictal brain SPECT using statistical parametric mapping in temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Jeon, Tae Joo; Lee, Jong Doo; Kim, Hee Joung; Lee, Byung In; Kim, Ok Joon; Kim, Min Jung [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Jeong Dong [College of Medicine, Inje Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-07-01

    Ictal brain SPECT has a high diagnostic sensitivity exceeding 90 % in the localization of seizure focus, however, it often shows increased uptake within the extratemporal areas due to early propagation of seizure discharge. This study aimed to evaluate seizure propagation on ictal brian SPECT in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) by statistical parametric mapping (SPM). Twenty-one patients (age 27.14 5.79 y) with temporal lobe epilepsy (right in 8, left in 13) who had successful seizure outcome after surgery and nine normal control were included. The data of ictal and interictal brain SPECT of the patients and baseline SPECT of normal control group were analyzed using automatic image registration and SPM96 softwares. The statistical analysis was performed to compare the mean SPECT image of normal group with individual ictal SPECT, and each mean image of the interictal groups of the right or left TLE with individual ictal scans. The t statistic SPM [t] was transformed to SPM [Z] with a threshold of 1.64. The statistical results were displayed and rendered on the reference 3 dimensional MRI images with P value of 0.05 and uncorrected extent threshold p value of 0.5 for SPM [Z]. SPM data demonstrated increased uptake within the epileptic lesion in 19 patients (90.4 %), among them, localized increased uptake confined to the epileptogenic lesion was seen in only 4 (19%) but 15 patients (71.4%) showed hyperperfusion within propagation sites. Bi-temporal hyperperfusion was observed in 11 out of 19 patients (57.9%, 5 in the right and 6 in the left); higher uptake within the lesion than contralateral side in 9, similar activity in 1 and higher uptake within contralateral lobe in one. Extra-temporal hyperperfusion was observed in 8 (2 in the right, 3 in the left, 3 in bilateral); unilateral hyperperfusion within the epileptogenic temporal lobe and extra-temporal area in 4, bi-temporal with extra-temporal hyperperfusion in remaining 4. Ictal brain SPECT is highly

  3. Processamento auditivo em indivíduos com epilepsia de lobo temporal Auditory processing in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Meneguello

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available A epilepsia do lobo temporal ocasiona descargas elétricas excessivas onde a via auditiva tem sua estação final. É uma das formas mais comuns e de mais difícil controle da doença. O correto processamento dos estímulos auditivos necessita da integridade anatômica e funcional de todas as estruturas envolvidas na via auditiva. OBJETIVO: Verificar o Processamento Auditivo de pacientes portadores de epilepsia do lobo temporal quanto aos mecanismos de discriminação de sons em seqüência e de padrões tonais, discriminação da direção da fonte sonora e atenção seletiva para sons verbais e não-verbais. MÉTODO: Foram avaliados oito indivíduos com epilepsia do lobo temporal confirmada e com foco restrito a essa região, através dos testes auditivos especiais: Teste de Localização Sonora, Teste de Padrão de Duração, Teste Dicótico de Dígitos e Teste Dicótico Não-Verbal. O seu desempenho foi comparado ao de indivíduos sem alteração neurológica (estudo caso-controle. RESULTADO: Os sujeitos com epilepsia do lobo temporal apresentaram desempenho semelhante aos do grupo controle quanto ao mecanismo de discriminação da direção da fonte sonora e desempenho inferior quanto aos demais mecanismos avaliados. CONCLUSÃO: Indivíduos com epilepsia do lobo temporal apresentaram maior prejuízo no processamento auditivo que os sem danos corticais, de idades semelhantes.Temporal epilepsy, one of the most common presentation of this pathology, causes excessive electrical discharges in the area where we have the final station of the auditory pathway. Both the anatomical and functional integrity of the auditory pathway structures are essential for the correct processing of auditory stimuli. AIM: to check the Auditory Processing in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy regarding the auditory mechanisms of discrimination from sequential sounds and tone patterns, discrimination of the sound source direction and selective attention to verbal

  4. Effect of pregabalin on apoptotic regulatory genes in hippocampus of rats with chronic temporal lobe epilepsy

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    ZHANG Yi-dan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the effect of pregabalin on the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax in hippocampus of chronic epileptic rats induced by pilocarpine, to explore the anti-epileptic pharmacology mechanism of pregabalin, and its anti-apoptotic effect on hippocampal neurons of rats. Methods The model of chronic temporal lobe epileptic rats induced by lithium-pilocarpine was established, then the rats in pregabalin treatment group received intraperitoneal injection of pregabalin (40 mg/kg once daily for three weeks. The expression of Bcl-2 and Bax in hippocampus of all rats was detected by immunohistochemical technique and Western blotting. Results Compared with normal saline group rats, the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax in hippocampus of rats with chronic temporal lobe epilepsy was significantly increased (P = 0.000, for all. Pregabalin can down-regulate the expression of Bax and up-regulate the expression of Bcl-2 in hippocampus of rats compared to model group rats (P = 0.000, for all. Conclusion Pregabalin may have the effects of inhibiting cell apoptosis and protecting neurons through lowing Bax level and increasing Bcl-2 level in hippocampus of chronic temporal lobe epileptic rats.

  5. Visual and auditory socio-cognitive perception in unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy in children and adolescents: a prospective controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Agathe; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Panagiotakaki, Eleni; Sfaello, Ignacio; Kahane, Philippe; Ryvlin, Philippe; Hirsch, Edouard; de Schonen, Scania

    2014-12-01

    A high rate of abnormal social behavioural traits or perceptual deficits is observed in children with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy. In the present study, perception of auditory and visual social signals, carried by faces and voices, was evaluated in children or adolescents with temporal lobe epilepsy. We prospectively investigated a sample of 62 children with focal non-idiopathic epilepsy early in the course of the disorder. The present analysis included 39 children with a confirmed diagnosis of temporal lobe epilepsy. Control participants (72), distributed across 10 age groups, served as a control group. Our socio-perceptual evaluation protocol comprised three socio-visual tasks (face identity, facial emotion and gaze direction recognition), two socio-auditory tasks (voice identity and emotional prosody recognition), and three control tasks (lip reading, geometrical pattern and linguistic intonation recognition). All 39 patients also benefited from a neuropsychological examination. As a group, children with temporal lobe epilepsy performed at a significantly lower level compared to the control group with regards to recognition of facial identity, direction of eye gaze, and emotional facial expressions. We found no relationship between the type of visual deficit and age at first seizure, duration of epilepsy, or the epilepsy-affected cerebral hemisphere. Deficits in socio-perceptual tasks could be found independently of the presence of deficits in visual or auditory episodic memory, visual non-facial pattern processing (control tasks), or speech perception. A normal FSIQ did not exempt some of the patients from an underlying deficit in some of the socio-perceptual tasks. Temporal lobe epilepsy not only impairs development of emotion recognition, but can also impair development of perception of other socio-perceptual signals in children with or without intellectual deficiency. Prospective studies need to be designed to evaluate the results of appropriate re

  6. Social cognition dysfunctions in patients with epilepsy: Evidence from patients with temporal lobe and idiopathic generalized epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Realmuto, Sabrina; Zummo, Leila; Cerami, Chiara; Agrò, Luigi; Dodich, Alessandra; Canessa, Nicola; Zizzo, Andrea; Fierro, Brigida; Daniele, Ornella

    2015-06-01

    Despite an extensive literature on cognitive impairments in focal and generalized epilepsy, only a few number of studies specifically explored social cognition disorders in epilepsy syndromes. The aim of our study was to investigate social cognition abilities in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and in patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). Thirty-nine patients (21 patients with TLE and 18 patients with IGE) and 21 matched healthy controls (HCs) were recruited. All subjects underwent a basic neuropsychological battery plus two experimental tasks evaluating emotion recognition from facial expression (Ekman-60-Faces test, Ek-60F) and mental state attribution (Story-based Empathy Task, SET). In particular, the latter is a newly developed task that assesses the ability to infer others' intentions (i.e., intention attribution - IA) and emotions (i.e., emotion attribution - EA) compared with a control condition of physical causality (i.e., causal inferences - CI). Compared with HCs, patients with TLE showed significantly lower performances on both social cognition tasks. In particular, all SET subconditions as well as the recognition of negative emotions were significantly impaired in patients with TLE vs. HCs. On the contrary, patients with IGE showed impairments on anger recognition only without any deficit at the SET task. Emotion recognition deficits occur in patients with epilepsy, possibly because of a global disruption of a pathway involving frontal, temporal, and limbic regions. Impairments of mental state attribution specifically characterize the neuropsychological profile of patients with TLE in the context of the in-depth temporal dysfunction typical of such patients. Impairments of socioemotional processing have to be considered as part of the neuropsychological assessment in both TLE and IGE in view of a correct management and for future therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Socrates and temporal lobe epilepsy: a pathographic diagnosis 2,400 years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramoto, Osamu; Englert, Walter G

    2006-03-01

    Some enigmatic remarks and behaviors of Socrates have been a subject of debate among scholars. We investigated the possibility of underlying epilepsy in Socrates by analyzing pathographic evidence in ancient literature from the viewpoint of the current understanding of seizure semiology. We performed a case study from a literature survey. In 399 BCE, Socrates was tried and executed in Athens on the charge of "impiety." His charges included the "introduction of new deities" and "not believing in the gods of the state," because he publicly claimed that he was periodically and personally receiving a "divine sign," or daimonion, that directed him in various actions. We found textual evidence that his daimonion was probably a simple partial seizure (SPS) of temporal lobe origin. It was a brief voice that usually prohibited Socrates from initiating certain actions. It started when he was a child, and it visited Socrates unpredictably. Moreover, we found at least two descriptions of Socrates' unique behavior that are consistent with complex partial seizures (CPSs). The fact that Socrates had been experiencing both SPSs and CPSs periodically since childhood makes the diagnosis of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) likely. We hypothesize that Socrates had a mild case of TLE without secondary generalization. This is the first report in 2,400 years to present a pathographic diagnosis of TLE in Socrates based on specific diagnostic features in the ancient textual evidence. Our study demonstrates that the knowledge of modern epileptology could help understand certain behaviors of historic figures.

  8. Are vesicular neurotransmitter transporters potential treatment targets for temporal lobe epilepsy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joeri eVan Liefferinge

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The vesicular neurotransmitter transporters (VNTs are small proteins responsible for packing synaptic vesicles with neurotransmitters thereby determining the amount of neurotransmitter released per vesicle through fusion in both neurons and glial cells. Each transporter subtype was classically seen as a specific neuronal marker of the respective nerve cells containing that particular neurotransmitter or structurally related neurotransmitters. More recently, however, it has become apparent that common neurotransmitters can also act as co-transmitters, adding complexity to neurotransmitter release and suggesting intriguing roles for VNTs therein. We will first describe the current knowledge on vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1/2/3, the vesicular excitatory amino acid transporter (VEAT, the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT, vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT1/2, the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT and the vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA transporter (VGAT in the brain. We will focus on evidence regarding transgenic mice with disruptions in VNTs in different models of seizures and epilepsy. We will also describe the known alterations and reorganizations in the expression levels of these VNTs in rodent models for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE and in human tissue resected for epilepsy surgery. Finally, we will discuss perspectives on opportunities and challenges for VNTs as targets for possible future epilepsy therapies.

  9. Investigation of phase synchronization of interictal EEG in right temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haitao; Cai, Lihui; Wu, Xinyu; Song, Zhenxi; Wang, Jiang; Xia, Zijie; Liu, Jing; Cao, Yibin

    2018-02-01

    Epilepsy is commonly associated with abnormally synchronous activity of neurons located in epileptogenic zones. In this study, we investigated the synchronization characteristic of right temporal lobe epilepsy (RTLE). Multichannel electroencephalography (EEG) data were recorded from the RTLE patients during interictal period and normal controls. Power spectral density was first used to analyze the EEG power for two groups of subjects. It was found that the power of epileptics is increased in the whole brain compared with that of the control. We calculated phase lag index (PLI) to measure the phase synchronization between each pair of EEG signals. A higher degree of synchronization was observed in the epileptics especially between distant channels. In particular, the regional synchronization degree was negatively correlated with power spectral density and the correlation was weaker for epileptics. Moreover, the synchronization degree decayed with the increase of relative distance of channels for both the epilepsy and control, but the dependence was weakened in the former. The obtained results may provide new insights into the generation mechanism of epilepsy.

  10. MRI-negative temporal lobe epilepsy-What do we know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhlhofer, Wolfgang; Tan, Yee-Leng; Mueller, Susanne G; Knowlton, Robert

    2017-05-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common focal epilepsy in adults. TLE has a high chance of becoming medically refractory, and as such, is frequently considered for further evaluation and surgical intervention. Up to 30% of TLE cases, however, can have normal ("nonlesional" or negative) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results, which complicates the presurgical workup and has been associated with worse surgical outcomes. Helped by contributions from advanced imaging techniques and electrical source localization, the number of surgeries performed on MRI-negative TLE has increased over the last decade. Thereby new epidemiologic, clinical, electrophysiologic, neuropathologic, and surgical data of MRI-negative TLE has emerged, showing characteristics that are distinct from those of lesional TLE. This review article summarizes what we know today about MRI-negative TLE, and discusses the comprehensive assessment of patients with MRI-negative TLE in a structured and systematic approach. It also includes a concise description of the most recent developments in structural and functional imaging, and highlights postprocessing imaging techniques that have been shown to add localization value in MRI-negative epilepsies. We evaluate surgical outcomes of MRI-negative TLE, identify prognostic makers of postoperative seizure freedom, and discuss strategies for optimizing the selection of surgical candidates in this group. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  11. Theory of mind and social functioning in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Wang, Wei-Han; Shih, Yang-Hsin; Yu, Hsiang-Yu; Yen, Der-Jen; Lin, Yung-Yang; Kwan, Shang-Yeong; Chen, Chien; Hua, Mau-Sun

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to explore the effects of theory of mind (ToM) and related potential risk factors, including cognitive functions, psychiatric status, and seizure-related clinical variables, on social functioning in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Sixty-seven patients with intractable TLE who were potential candidates for epilepsy surgery and 30 matched controls were included. All participants completed four tasks measuring different levels of ToM (False Belief, Faux Pas Recognition, Implication Stories, and Visual Cartoon), the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R), the Social and Occupational Functioning Scale for Epilepsy (SOFSE), and neuropsychological tests. The patients exhibited impairments in both basic and advanced ToM. Multiple regression analyses revealed the following: (1) the SOFSE total score was significantly predicted by the Faux Pas Recognition (FPR), Global Severity Index (GSI) score of the SCL-90-R, and Full-Scale intelligence quotient (IQ) of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS), which accounted for 38%, 11%, and 8% of the variance, respectively; and (2) the FPR was a significant predictor of all SOFSE subscales, whereas the GSI score contributed substantially to the Interpersonal Relationships, Communication, and Occupation subscales of the SOFSE. Advanced ToM, measured by impaired faux pas recognition, is a relatively strong predictor of poor social functioning in surgical candidates for intractable TLE. Identifying ToM impairment may help plan nonpharmacologic treatment for improving social functions in patients with intractable TLE. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  12. Association between Vitamin D Receptor Gene Polymorphisms with Childhood Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Jiang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D (VD is implicated in multiple aspects of human physiology and vitamin D receptor (VDR polymorphisms are associated with a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders. Although VD deficiency is highly prevalent in epilepsy patients and converging evidence indicates a role for VD in the development of epilepsy, no data is available on the possible relationship between epilepsy and genetic variations of VDR. In this study, 150 controls and 82 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE were genotyped for five common VDR polymorphisms (Cdx-2, FokI, BsmI, ApaI and TaqI by the polymerase chain reaction-ligase detection reaction method. Our results revealed that the frequency of FokI AC genotype was significantly higher in the control group than in the patients (p = 0.003, OR = 0.39, 95% CI = 0.21–0.73, whereas the AA genotype of ApaI SNP was more frequent in patients than in controls (p = 0.018, OR = 2.92, 95% CI = 1.2–7.1. However, no statistically significant association was found between Cdx-2, BsmI and TaqI polymorphisms and epilepsy. Additionally, in haplotype analysis, we found the haplotype GAT (BsmI/ApaI/TaqI conferred significantly increased risk for developing TLE (p = 0.039, OR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.02–2.56. As far as we know, these results firstly underline the importance of VDR polymorphisms for the genetic susceptibility to epilepsy.

  13. Neuronal zinc-α2-glycoprotein is decreased in temporal lobe epilepsy in patients and rats.

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    Liu, Ying; Wang, Teng; Liu, Xi; Wei, Xin; Xu, Tao; Yin, Maojia; Ding, Xueying; Mo, Lijuan; Chen, Lifen

    2017-08-15

    Zinc-α2-glycoprotein (ZAG) is a 42-kDa protein encoded by the AZGP1 gene that is known as a lipid mobilizing factor and is highly homologous to major histocompatibility complex class I family molecules. Recently, transcriptomic research has shown that AZGP1 expression is reduced in the brain tissue of epilepsy patients. However, the cellular distribution and biological role of ZAG in the brain and epilepsy are unclear. Patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and brain trauma were included in this study, and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-kindled rats were also used. The existence and level of ZAG in the brain were identified using immunohistochemistry, double-labeled immunofluorescence and western blot, and the expression level of AZGP1 mRNA was determined with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qrt-PCR). To explore the potential biological role of ZAG in the brain, co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) of phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK), TGF-β1 and ZAG was also performed. ZAG was found in the cytoplasm of neurons in brain tissue from both patients and rats. The levels of AZGP1 mRNA and ZAG were lower in refractory TLE patients and PTZ-kindled rats than in controls. In addition, the ZAG level decreased as PTZ kindling continued. Co-IP identified direct binding between p-ERK, TGF-β1 and ZAG. ZAG was found to be synthesized in neurons, and both the AZGP1 mRNA and ZAG protein levels were decreased in epilepsy patients and rat models. The reduction in ZAG may participate in the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of epilepsy by interacting with p-ERK and TGF-β1, promoting inflammation, regulating the metabolism of ketone bodies, or affecting other epilepsy-related molecules. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Long-term epilepsy surgery outcomes in patients with PET-positive, MRI-negative temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Yang, Peng-Fan; Pei, Jia-Sheng; Zhang, Hui-Jian; Lin, Qiao; Mei, Zhen; Zhong, Zhong-Hui; Tian, Jun; Jia, Yan-Zeng; Chen, Zi-Qian; Zheng, Zhi-Yong

    2014-12-01

    This study compared the long-term efficacy of anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) for the treatment of medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) in patients who presented with ipsilateral temporal PET hypometabolism and nonlesional magnetic resonance imaging (PET+/MRI-) with that in patients who had mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) on MRI. We described the electroclinical, MRI, PET, and pathological characteristics and seizure outcome of 28 PET+/MRI--patients without discordant ictal and interictal electroencephalography (EEG) who underwent ATL (2004-2007) for medically refractory partial epilepsy while avoiding intracranial monitoring. The primary outcome was the percentages of Engel Class I outcomes at 2 and 5 years of PET+/MRI--patients compared with those of patients with MTS on MRI; neuropsychological testing was used as the secondary outcome. At 2-year follow-up, 21 (75%) patients in the PET+/MRI--group were in Engel Class I compared with 66 (75.9%) patients with MTS, and at 5-year follow-up, 20 (71.4%) patients in the PET+/MRI--group were in Engel Class I compared with 64 (73.6%) patients in the group with MTS. There were no significant differences between the groups at either time period. We concluded that normal MRI results should not preclude presurgical evaluations in patients with medically refractory TLE, as favorable long-term postoperative seizure outcomes are possible, especially in patients with unilateral anterior interictal epileptiform discharges and ipsilateral temporal PET hypometabolism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Dream recall frequency and content in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Bentes, Carla; Costa, João; Peralta, Rita; Pires, Joana; Sousa, Paula; Paiva, Teresa

    2011-11-01

    To evaluate morning dream recall frequency and content in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Fifty-two patients with pharmacoresistant TLE submitted to a written dream diary during five consecutive days and continuous video-electroencephalographic (video-EEG) monitoring. A matched control group of 41 healthy subjects completed the same diary at home. The number of recalled dreams (including long dreams) and nonrecalled dream mentation were collected, and the Dream Recall Rate (DRR) was calculated. Hall and Van de Castle dream content analysis was performed. Greater than 70% of patients with TLE (37 of 52) recall their dreams, but DRR rate in these patients is lower than in controls (p ≤ 0.001). Dream recall does not appear to be influenced by the presence of neuropsychological deficits nor seizure frequency. In dreams descriptions, TLE patients (vs. controls) have a higher percentage of familiarity in settings and fewer dreams with at least one success. Onirical activity of patients with TLE is different from that of healthy subjects. Our results support the role of mesial and neocortical temporal structures in dream experience. The selective activation of dysfunctional mesial structures may be responsible for some of the observed variability. However, dream content changes can also mirror social and psychological comorbidities of patients with epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2011 International League Against Epilepsy.

  16. Brain-responsive neurostimulation in patients with medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Eric B; Skarpaas, Tara L; Gross, Robert E; Goodman, Robert R; Barkley, Gregory L; Bazil, Carl W; Berg, Michael J; Bergey, Gregory K; Cash, Sydney S; Cole, Andrew J; Duckrow, Robert B; Edwards, Jonathan C; Eisenschenk, Stephan; Fessler, James; Fountain, Nathan B; Goldman, Alicia M; Gwinn, Ryder P; Heck, Christianne; Herekar, Aamar; Hirsch, Lawrence J; Jobst, Barbara C; King-Stephens, David; Labar, Douglas R; Leiphart, James W; Marsh, W Richard; Meador, Kimford J; Mizrahi, Eli M; Murro, Anthony M; Nair, Dileep R; Noe, Katherine H; Park, Yong D; Rutecki, Paul A; Salanova, Vicenta; Sheth, Raj D; Shields, Donald C; Skidmore, Christopher; Smith, Michael C; Spencer, David C; Srinivasan, Shraddha; Tatum, William; Van Ness, Paul C; Vossler, David G; Wharen, Robert E; Worrell, Gregory A; Yoshor, Daniel; Zimmerman, Richard S; Cicora, Kathy; Sun, Felice T; Morrell, Martha J

    2017-06-01

    Evaluate the seizure-reduction response and safety of mesial temporal lobe (MTL) brain-responsive stimulation in adults with medically intractable partial-onset seizures of mesial temporal lobe origin. Subjects with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) were identified from prospective clinical trials of a brain-responsive neurostimulator (RNS System, NeuroPace). The seizure reduction over years 2-6 postimplantation was calculated by assessing the seizure frequency compared to a preimplantation baseline. Safety was assessed based on reported adverse events. There were 111 subjects with MTLE; 72% of subjects had bilateral MTL onsets and 28% had unilateral onsets. Subjects had one to four leads placed; only two leads could be connected to the device. Seventy-six subjects had depth leads only, 29 had both depth and strip leads, and 6 had only strip leads. The mean follow-up was 6.1 ± (standard deviation) 2.2 years. The median percent seizure reduction was 70% (last observation carried forward). Twenty-nine percent of subjects experienced at least one seizure-free period of 6 months or longer, and 15% experienced at least one seizure-free period of 1 year or longer. There was no difference in seizure reduction in subjects with and without mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS), bilateral MTL onsets, prior resection, prior intracranial monitoring, and prior vagus nerve stimulation. In addition, seizure reduction was not dependent on the location of depth leads relative to the hippocampus. The most frequent serious device-related adverse event was soft tissue implant-site infection (overall rate, including events categorized as device-related, uncertain, or not device-related: 0.03 per implant year, which is not greater than with other neurostimulation devices). Brain-responsive stimulation represents a safe and effective treatment option for patients with medically intractable epilepsy, including patients with unilateral or bilateral MTLE who are not candidates for

  17. [Re-evaluation of using acupuncture needle as sphenoidal electrode in temporal lobe epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Nai-Shin

    2009-06-01

    In 1965, Feng of the Peking Union Hospital published an article entitled "Innovation in electroencephalography: the use of acupuncture needles as sphenoidal electrodes". It was a preliminary report, but surprisingly EEG records in the figures did not show definite spikes or sharp waves in the sphenoidal leads. In 1983, Feng and his colleagues reported a summary of 2,000 cases studied with acupuncture needle sphenoidal electrodes. This time, spikes or sharp waves were shown in EEG recordings. However, cases studied were several "paroxysmal disorders", including psychomotor seizure (155 cases), generalized seizure (765 cases), epileptic cephalgia (101 cases), syncope (104 cases), abdominal epilepsy (24 cases), encephalopathy (135 cases), brain tumor (32 cases), hemiplegia of unknown cause (43 cases), psychosis (34 cases), and others (607 cases). Therefore, there were many unknown cases and many cases that were not related to temporal lobe epilepsy. Surprisingly, the increase in detection by acupuncture needle electrode was higher for hemiplegia of unknown cause, brain tumors, and encephalopathies than for the temporal lobe epilepsy. Furthermore, the issue of no insulation of the acupuncture needle was not addressed. Therefore, we began in 1988 to reinvestigate the usefulness of uninsulated acupuncture needles as sphenoidal electrodes. We also compared the efficacy of anterior temporal electrodes (T1, T2) with those of acupuncture needle and EMG needle. Our results showed that when compared to the routine EEG recordings, acupuncture needle sphenoidal electrodes increased the yield of detecting anterior temporal spikes from 41% to 70%. Our data further showed that when compared to the EMG needle recordings, acupuncture needle recordings had the same detection rate, but the spike amplitude was slightly smaller (129 microv vs. 135 microv). Interestingly, we also found that anterior temporal surface electrode recordings were nearly as good as those of acupuncture needle

  18. Interictal epileptic discharge correlates with global and frontal cognitive dysfunction in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkelacker, Vera; Xin, Xu; Baulac, Michel; Samson, Séverine; Dupont, Sophie

    2016-09-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with hippocampal sclerosis has widespread effects on structural and functional connectivity and often entails cognitive dysfunction. EEG is mandatory to disentangle interactions in epileptic and physiological networks which underlie these cognitive comorbidities. Here, we examined how interictal epileptic discharges (IEDs) affect cognitive performance. Thirty-four patients (right TLE=17, left TLE=17) were examined with 24-hour video-EEG and a battery of neuropsychological tests to measure intelligence quotient and separate frontal and temporal lobe functions. Hippocampal segmentation of high-resolution T1-weighted imaging was performed with FreeSurfer. Partial correlations were used to compare the number and distribution of clinical interictal spikes and sharp waves with data from imagery and psychological tests. The number of IEDs was negatively correlated with executive functions, including verbal fluency and intelligence quotient (IQ). Interictal epileptic discharge affected cognitive function in patients with left and right TLE differentially, with verbal fluency strongly related to temporofrontal spiking. In contrast, IEDs had no clear effects on memory functions after corrections with partial correlations for age, age at disease onset, disease duration, and hippocampal volume. In patients with TLE of long duration, IED occurrence was strongly related to cognitive deficits, most pronounced for frontal lobe function. These data suggest that IEDs reflect dysfunctional brain circuitry and may serve as an independent biomarker for cognitive comorbidity. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Seizure semiology and electroencephalography in young children with lesional temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Rui-Juan; Sun, Zhen-Rong; Cui, Tao; Shao, Xiao-Qiu

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to discuss the clinical features of seizure semiology and electroencephalography (EEG) in young children with lesional temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Children with lesional TLE received presurgical evaluation for intractable epilepsy. They were followed up for more than one year after temporal lobectomy. We reviewed the medical history and video-EEG monitoring of children with TLE to analyze the semiology of seizures and EEG findings and compared the semiology of seizures and EEG findings of childhood TLE and adult TLE. A total of 84 seizures were analyzed in 11 children (aged 23-108 months). The age of seizure onset was from 1 month to 26 months (a mean of 17.6 months). All of the patients exhibited prominent motor manifestations including epileptic spasm, tonic seizure, and unilateral clonic seizure. Seven children manifested behavioral arrest similar to an automotor seizure in adult TLE but with a shorter duration and higher frequency. The automatisms were typically orofacial, whereas manual automatisms were rarely observed. The EEG recordings revealed that diffuse discharge patterns were more common in younger children, whereas focal or unilateral patterns were more typical in older children. All of the patients were seizure-free after temporal lobectomy with more than one-year follow-up. All of the children had a mental development delay or regression; however, there was improvement after surgery, especially in those with surgery performed early. In contrast to TLE in adults, young children with lesional TLE probably represent a distinct nosological and probably less homogeneous syndrome. Although they had generalized clinical and electrographic features, resective epilepsy surgery should be considered as early as possible to obtain seizure control and improvement in mental development. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The extratemporal lobe epilepsies in the epilepsy monitoring unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Deepa; Tripathi, Manjari

    2014-01-01

    Extratemporal lobe epilepsies (ETLE) are characterized by the epileptogenic foci outside the temporal lobe. They have a wide spectrum of semiological presentation depending upon the site of origin. They can arise from frontal, parietal, occipital lobes and from hypothalamic hamartoma. We discuss in this review the semiology of different types of ETLE encountered in the epilepsy monitoring unit. PMID:24791090

  1. Role of Functional MRI in Presurgical Evaluation of Memory Function in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chusak Limotai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many diagnostic tools have been employed to predict the likelihood of a postoperative memory decline after a standard temporal lobectomy, including the intracarotid amobarbital testing (IAT or Wada, regarded as the gold standard test for over the past half a century. Functional MRI (fMRI is also a promising tool in that regard. Its routine use to predict the postoperative memory decline has been limited because of the varied study paradigms, discrepancies in analysis, and interpretation of the results. Based on the existing literatures, fMRI cannot replace IAT for the routine presurgical evaluation of the patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE yet. Large multicentre studies with a panel of memory test are required to determine the full potential of fMRI and use it reliably to replace IAT in the routine clinical practice. In this paper, we review various aspects of memory fMRI, including the experimental designs, data analysis, and findings.

  2. Treatment of immune-mediated temporal lobe epilepsy with GAD antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malter, M P; Frisch, C; Zeitler, H; Surges, R; Urbach, H; Helmstaedter, C; Elger, C E; Bien, C G

    2015-08-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy with antibodies (abs) against the glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 isoform (GAD-TLE) is known as an immune-mediated neurological syndrome. Here we evaluate the therapy response to various immunotherapies and epilepsy surgery in this syndrome. All patients with GAD-TLE and follow-up data and stored serum and CSF samples, identified and treated at the Bonn centre from 2002 to 2010, were studied retrospectively. Seizure freedom for ≥1 year and reduction of ≥50%, i.e. therapy response, were assessed. GAD-ab titres and neuropsychological performances were documented prior and after individual interventions. Thirteen patients with GAD-TLE were identified with the following seizure responses: corticosteroids (5 responders out of 11 treated patients); i.v. immunoglobulins (1/5), apheresis therapy (1/8); and natalizumab (1/1), selective amygdala-hippocampectomy (2/3). None of the patients achieved sustained seizure freedom apart from one patient. This patient was on antiepileptic drug treatment after discontinuation of immunotherapy. The seizure response to immunotherapies in patients with GAD-TLE was poor. Corticosteroids were the most effective regarding seizure response. Especially the poor effects of apheresis therapies support the idea that GAD-abs are not directly pathogenic. None of three patients was seizure-free after temporal lobe surgery suggesting that GAD-TLE patients respond worse than others to this type of intervention. Our results reflect the chronic course of the disease with low likelihood for patients with GAD-TLE to attain long-term seizure freedom. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Mortality in patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy at a tertiary center in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Machado, René; Benjumea-Cuartas, Vanessa; Santos-Santos, Aisel; Sosa-Dubón, Miguel Amilcar; García-Espinosa, Arlety; Andrade-Gutierrez, Greisys

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to investigate the prevalence and risk of mortality in patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. Eligible patients included all adults referred to the National Institute of Neurology (NIN) in Havana, Cuba. All patients were followed up for 9 years. All analyses were made with the data available at the last follow-up. The frequency of death related to refractory TLE was analyzed taking into account the total number of patients included in the study. We analyzed the causes of death for each case. Multivariate analysis was made to determine the specific variables related to the death. All values were statistically significant if p<0.05. Six out of 117 patients died during follow-up. Fifty percent of patients died because of suicide. Only the presence of aura, specifically experiential psychic auras, and prodromal depressive disorders were associated significantly with the deaths (p<0.05). Patients who died had a higher concern about their seizures than patients who were still alive at last follow-up (p<0.01); they also had a poor perception of the overall QOL (p<0.01); and they were more concerned about the possible medication side effects than patients who did not die (p<0.05). Logistic regression provided only one variable related to the deaths in our cohort in multivariate analysis: presence of prodromal depressive disorder. The causes of death in patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy were similar to those documented in the general population of patients with epilepsy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy modifies histamine turnover and H3 receptor function in the human hippocampus and temporal neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañuelos-Cabrera, Ivette; Cuéllar-Herrera, Manola; Velasco, Ana Luisa; Velasco, Francisco; Alonso-Vanegas, Mario; Carmona, Francia; Guevara, Rosalinda; Arias-Montaño, José-Antonio; Rocha, Luisa

    2016-04-01

    Experiments were designed to evaluate the tissue content of tele-methylhistamine (t-MeHA) and histamine as well as H3 receptor (H3 Rs) binding and activation of the heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide binding αi/o proteins (Gαi/o) coupled to these receptors in the hippocampus and temporal neocortex of patients (n = 10) with pharmacoresistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Patients with MTLE showed elevated tissue content of t-MeHA in the hippocampus. Analyses revealed that a younger age at seizure onset was correlated with a higher tissue content of t-MeHA, lower H3 R binding, and lower efficacy of Gαi/o protein activation in the hippocampus. We conclude that the hippocampus shows a reduction in the H3 R function associated with enhanced histamine. In contrast, the temporal neocortex displayed a high efficacy of H3 Rs Gαi/o protein activation that was associated with low tissue contents of histamine and t-MeHA. These results indicate an overactivation of H3 Rs leading to decreased histamine in the temporal neocortex. However, this situation was lessened in circumstances such as a longer duration of epilepsy or higher seizure frequency. It is concluded that decrease in H3 Rs function and enhanced levels of histamine may contribute to the epileptic activity in the hippocampus and temporal neocortex of patients with pharmacoresistant MTLE. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  5. Magnetoencephalographic correlates of different types of aura in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukao, Kenjiro; Inoue, Yushi; Yagi, Kazuichi

    2010-09-01

    To estimate magnetoencephalography (MEG) correlates of different types of aura in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). MEG study was performed on 57 patients (26 male and 31 female) with TLE, whose ages ranged from 14-46 years (mean 27 years). Interictal magnetoencephalograms showing discharges were analyzed, and spike-dipole clusters were categorized into left and right inferotemporal-horizontal (IH) and superotemporal-vertical (SV) types. Auras were classified into autonomic, auditory, and psychic seizures. The correlation between the four types of interictal spike-dipole and three types of aura was analyzed using Fisher's exact probability test. IH type correlated with autonomic seizures (p = 0.0004), whereas SV type correlated with both auditory (p = 0.0002) and psychic seizures (p = 0.042). When subdivided into left and right, left IH type correlated with autonomic seizures (p = 0.046), but right IH type did not. Right SV type correlated with both auditory (p = 0.014) and psychic seizures (p = 0.002), but left SV did not correlate with either. Both types did not correlate with "no aura." Using our proposed classification of spike-dipoles, MEG distinguishes auras of mesial temporal origin from those of lateral temporal region. Furthermore, by adopting our classification, laterality of spike-dipoles is clearly demonstrated in auditory and psychic seizures. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2010 International League Against Epilepsy.

  6. Enriched environment attenuates behavioral seizures and depression in chronic temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrinda, Marigowda; Sasidharan, Arun; Aparna, Sahajan; Srikumar, Bettadapura N; Kutty, Bindu M; Shankaranarayana Rao, Byrathnahalli S

    2017-07-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is commonly associated with depression, anxiety, and cognitive impairment. Despite significant progress in our understanding of the pathophysiology of TLE, it remains the most common form of refractory epilepsy. Enriched environment (EE) has a beneficial effect in many neuropsychiatric disorders. However, the effect of EE on cognitive changes in chronic TLE has not been evaluated. Accordingly, the present study evaluated the effects of EE on chronic epilepsy-induced alterations in cognitive functions, electrophysiology, and cellular changes in the hippocampus. Status epilepticus (SE) was induced in 2-month-old male Wistar rats with lithium and pilocarpine. Six weeks' post SE, epileptic rats were either housed in their respective home cages or in an enrichment cage (6 h/day) for 14 days. Seizure behavior was video-monitored 2 weeks before and during exposure to EE. Depression-like behavior, anxiety-like behavior, and spatial learning and memory were assessed using the sucrose preference test (SPT), elevated plus maze (EPM), and Morris water maze (MWM), respectively. Delta and theta power in the CA1 region of hippocampus was assessed from recordings of local field potentials (LFPs). Cellular changes in hippocampus were assessed by histochemistry followed by unbiased stereologic analysis. EE significantly reduced seizure episodes and seizure duration in epileptic rats. In addition, EE alleviated depression and hyperactivity, and restored delta and theta power of LFP in the hippocampal CA1 region. However, EE neither ameliorated epilepsy-induced spatial learning and memory deficits nor restored cell density in hippocampus. This is the first study that evaluates the role of EE in a chronic TLE model, where rats were exposed to EE after occurrence of spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS). Given that 30% of TLE patients are refractory to drug treatment, therapeutic strategies that utilize components of EE could be designed to alleviate

  7. Absolute spike frequency as a predictor of surgical outcome in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Ly; Sperling, Michael R; Skidmore, Christopher; Mintzer, Scott; Nei, Maromi

    2017-04-01

    Frequent interictal epileptiform abnormalities may correlate with poor prognosis after temporal lobe resection for refractory epilepsy. To date, studies have focused on limited resections such as selective amygdalohippocampectomy and apical temporal lobectomy without hippocampectomy. However, it is unclear whether the frequency of spikes predicts outcome after standard anterior temporal lobectomy. Preoperative scalp video-EEG monitoring data from patients who subsequently underwent anterior temporal lobectomy over a three year period and were followed for at least one year were reviewed for the frequency of interictal epileptiform abnormalities. Surgical outcome for those patients with frequent spikes (>60/h) was compared with those with less frequent spikes. Additionally, spike frequency was evaluated as a continuous variable and correlated with outcome to determine if increased spike frequency correlated with worse outcome, as assessed by modified Engel Class outcome. Forty-seven patients (18 men, 29 women; mean age 40 years at surgery) were included. Forty-six patients had standard anterior temporal lobectomy (24 right, 22 left) and one had a modified left temporal lobectomy. There was no significant difference in seizure outcome between those with frequent (57% Class I) vs. those with less frequent (58% Class I) spikes. Increased spike frequency did not correlate with worse outcome. Greater than 20 complex partial seizures/month and generalized tonic-clonic seizures within one year of surgery correlated with worse outcome. This study suggests that absolute spike frequency does not predict seizure outcome after anterior temporal lobectomy unlike in selective procedures, and should not be used as a prognostic factor in this population. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Relative frequency, clinical, neuroimaging, and postsurgical features of pediatric temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V. Sales

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe the relative frequency, clinical features, neuroimaging and pathological results, and outcome after pharmacological or surgical intervention for a series of pediatric patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE from an epilepsy center in Brazil. The medical records of children younger than 12 years with features strongly suggestive of TLE were reviewed from January 1999 to June 1999. Selected children were evaluated regarding clinical, EEG, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI investigation and divided into three groups according to MRI: group 1 (G1, N = 9, patients with hippocampal atrophy; group 2 (G2, N = 10, patients with normal MRI, and group 3 (G3, N = 12, patients with other specific temporal lesions. A review of 1732 records of children with epilepsy revealed 31 cases with TLE (relative frequency of 1.79%. However, when the investigation was narrowed to cases with intractable seizures that needed video-EEG monitoring (N = 68 or epilepsy surgery (N = 32, the relative frequency of TLE increased to 19.11 (13/68 and 31.25% (10/32, respectively. At the beginning of the study, 25 of 31 patients had a high seizure frequency (80.6%, which declined to 11 of 31 (35.5% at the conclusion of the study, as a consequence of pharmacological and/or surgical therapy. This improvement in seizure control was significant in G1 (P 0.1, McNemar's test. These results indicate that the relative frequency of TLE in children was low, but increased considerably among cases with pharmacoresistant seizures. Patients with specific lesions were likely to undergo surgery, with good postoperative outcomes.

  9. Automated T2 relaxometry of the hippocampus for temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, Gavin P; Vos, Sjoerd B; Burdett, Jane L; Cardoso, M Jorge; Ourselin, Sebastien; Duncan, John S

    2017-09-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis (HS), the most common cause of refractory temporal lobe epilepsy, is associated with hippocampal volume loss and increased T2 signal. These can be identified on quantitative imaging with hippocampal volumetry and T2 relaxometry. Although hippocampal segmentation for volumetry has been automated, T2 relaxometry currently involves subjective and time-consuming manual delineation of regions of interest. In this work, we develop and validate an automated technique for hippocampal T2 relaxometry. Fifty patients with unilateral or bilateral HS and 50 healthy controls underwent T1 -weighted and dual-echo fast recovery fast spin echo scans. Hippocampi were automatically segmented using a multi-atlas-based segmentation algorithm (STEPS) and a template database. Voxelwise T2 maps were determined using a monoexponential fit. The hippocampal segmentations were registered to the T2 maps and eroded to reduce partial volume effect. Voxels with T2 >170 msec excluded to minimize cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contamination. Manual determination of T2 values was performed twice in each subject. Twenty controls underwent repeat scans to assess interscan reproducibility. Hippocampal T2 values were reliably determined using the automated method. There was a significant ipsilateral increase in T2 values in HS (p epilepsy. © 2017 The Authors. Epilepsia published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International League Against Epilepsy.

  10. Apoptosis through Death Receptors in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy-Associated Hippocampal Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Ananias Teocchi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Seizure models have demonstrated that neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration are preponderant characteristics of epilepsy. Considering the lack of clinical studies, our aim is to investigate the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis in pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE associated with hippocampal sclerosis (HS patients, TLE(HS. By a specific death receptor-mediated apoptosis array plate, 31 upregulated targets were revealed in the sclerotic hippocampus from TLE(HS patients. Amongst them are the encoding genes for ligands (FASLG, TNF, and TNFSF10 and death receptors (FAS, TNFRSF1A, TNFRSF10A, and TNFRSF10B. In addition, we evaluated the hippocampal relative mRNA expression of the two TNF receptors, TNFRSF1A and TNFRSF1B, in patients, being both upregulated (n=14; P<0.01 and P<0.04, resp. when compared to the post mortem control group (n=4. Our results have clearly suggested that three different death receptor apoptotic systems may be associated with the maintenance and progression of TLE-associated HS: (1 TNF-TNFRSF1A, (2 FASLG-FAS, and (3 TNFSF10-TNFRSF10A/B. Their effects on epilepsy are still scarcely comprehended. Our study points out to TNF and TNF receptor superfamily pathways as important targets for pharmacological studies regarding the benefits of an anti-inflammatory therapy in these patients.

  11. Application of dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Wu; Wang, Xiaoyi; Xie, Fangfang; Liao, Weihua [Dept. of Radiology, Xiangya Hospital of Central South Univ., Changsha (China)], e-mail: doctoring@sina.com

    2013-02-15

    Background: Accurately locatithe epileptogenic focus in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is important in clinical practice. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron-emission tomography (PET) have been widely used in the lateralization of TLE, but both have limitations. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging can accurately and reliably reflect differences in cerebral blood flow and volume. Purpose: To investigate the diagnostic value of dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced (DSC) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the lateralization of the epileptogenic focus in TLE. Material and Methods: Conventional MRI and DSC-MRI scanning was performed in 20 interictal cases of TLE and 20 healthy volunteers. The relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of the bilateral mesial temporal lobes of the TLE cases and healthy control groups were calculated. The differences in the perfusion asymmetry indices (AIs), derived from the rCBV and rCBF of the bilateral mesial temporal lobes, were pared between the two groups. Results: In the control group, there were no statistically significant differences between the left and right sides in terms of rCBV (left 1.55 {+-} 0.32, right 1.57 {+-} 0.28) or rCBF (left 99.00 {+-} 24.61, right 100.38 {+-} 23.46) of the bilateral mesial temporal lobes. However, in the case group the ipsilateral rCBV and rCBF values (1.75 {+-} 0.64 and 96.35 {+-} 22.63, respectively) were markedly lower than those of the contralateral side (2.01 {+-} 0.79 and 108.56 {+-} 26.92; P < 0.05). Both the AI of the rCBV (AIrCBV; 13.03 {+-} 10.33) and the AI of the rCBF (AIrCBF; 11.24 {+-} 8.70) of the case group were significantly higher than that of the control group (AIrCBV 5.55 {+-} 3.74, AIrCBF 5.12 {+-} 3.48; P < 0.05). The epileptogenic foci of nine patients were correctly lateralized using the 95th percentile of the AIrCBV and AIrCBF of the control group as the normal upper limits. Conclusion: In

  12. White matter in temporal lobe epilepsy: clinico-pathological correlates of water diffusion abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cruces, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    Using magnetic resonance imaging, it is possible to measure the behavior of diffusing water molecules, and the metrics derived can be used as indirect markers of tissue micro-architectural properties. Numerous reports have demonstrated that patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) have water diffusion abnormalities in several white matter structures located within and beyond the epileptogenic temporal lobe, showing that TLE is not a focal disorder, but rather a brain network disease. Differences in severity and spatial extent between patients with or without mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS), as well as differences related to hemispheric seizure onset, are suggestive of different pathophysiological mechanisms behind different forms of TLE, which in turn result in specific cognitive disabilities. The biological interpretation of diffusion abnormalities is based on a wealth of information from animal models of white matter damage, and is supported by recent reports that directly correlate diffusion metrics with histological characteristics of surgical specimens of TLE patients. Thus, there is now more evidence showing that the increased mean diffusivity (MD) and concomitant reductions of diffusion anisotropy that are frequently observed in several white matter bundles in TLE patients reflect reduced axonal density (increased extra-axonal space) due to smaller-caliber axons, and abnormalities in the myelin sheaths of the remaining axons. Whether these histological and diffusion features are a predisposing factor for epilepsy or secondary to seizures is still uncertain; some reports suggest the latter. This article summarizes recent findings in this field and provides a synopsis of the histological features seen most frequently in post-surgical specimens of TLE patients in an effort to aid the interpretation of white matter diffusion abnormalities. PMID:25853084

  13. MRI-based brain structure volumes in temporal lobe epilepsy patients and their unaffected siblings: a preliminary study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Scanlon, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    Investigating the heritability of brain structure may be useful in simplifying complicated genetic studies in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). A preliminary study is presented to determine if volume deficits of candidate brain structures present at a higher rate in unaffected siblings than controls subjects.

  14. Blood plasma inflammation markers during epileptogenesis in post-status epilepticus rat model for temporal lobe epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtman, Linda; van Vliet, Erwin A.; Aronica, Eleonora; Wouters, Diana; Wadman, Wytse J.; Gorter, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    Brain inflammation occurs during epileptogenesis and may contribute to the development and progression of temporal lobe epilepsy. Recently, several studies have indicated that seizures may also increase specific blood plasma cytokine levels in animal models as well as in human patients with

  15. Blood plasma inflammation markers during epileptogenesis in post-status epilepticus rat model for temporal lobe epilepsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtman, L.; van Vliet, E.A.; Aronica, E.; Wouters, D.; Wadman, W.J.; Gorter, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Brain inflammation occurs during epileptogenesis and may contribute to the development and progression of temporal lobe epilepsy. Recently, several studies have indicated that seizures may also increase specific blood plasma cytokine levels in animal models as well as in human patients with

  16. Dissociation of Short- and Long-Term Face Memory: Evidence from Long-Term Recency Effects in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengner, T.; Malina, T.

    2007-01-01

    We tested whether memory deficits in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) are better described by a single- or dual-store memory model. To this aim, we analyzed the influence of TLE and proactive interference (PI) on immediate and 24-h long-term recency effects during face recognition in 16 healthy participants and 18 right and 21 left non-surgical TLE…

  17. Disruption of Spelling-to-Sound Correspondence Mapping during Single-Word Reading in Patients with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledoux, Kerry; Gordon, Barry

    2011-01-01

    Processing and/or hemispheric differences in the neural bases of word recognition were examined in patients with long-standing, medically-intractable epilepsy localized to the left (N = 18) or right (N = 7) temporal lobe. Participants were asked to read words that varied in the frequency of their spelling-to-sound correspondences. For the right…

  18. Interstitial deletion of chromosome 4p associated with mild mental retardation, epilepsy and polymicrogyria of the left temporal lobe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, R S; Hansen, C P; Jackson, G D

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we present a 38-year-old woman with an interstitial deletion of 4p15.1-15.3, mild mental retardation, epilepsy and polymicrogyria adjacent to an arachnoid cyst of the left temporal lobe. The deletion was ascertained through array-comparative genome hybridization screening of patien...

  19. Neuroimaging observations linking neurocysticercosis and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchin, Marino M; Velasco, Tonicarlo R; Wichert-Ana, Lauro; Araújo, David; Alexandre, Veriano; Scornavacca, Francisco; Escorsi-Rosset, Sara R; dos Santos, Antonio Carlos; Carlotti, Carlos G; Takayanagui, Osvaldo M; Sakamoto, Américo C

    2015-10-01

    To test if chronic calcificed neurocysticercosis (cNCC) and hippocampal sclerosis occur more often than by chance ipsilateral to the same brain hemisphere or brain region in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) plus neurocysticercosis. This proof-of-concept would provide important evidence of a direct pathogenic relationship between neurocysticercosis and MTLE-HS. A cohort of 290 consecutive MTLE-HS surgical patients was studied. A test of proportions was used to analyze if the proportion of patients with a single cNCC lesion matching the same brain hemisphere or region of hippocampal sclerosis was significantly greater than 50%, as expected by the chance. Neuroimaging findings of cNCC were observed in 112 (38.6%) of 290 MTLE-HS patients and a single cNCC lesion occurred in 58 (51.8%) of them. There were no differences in main basal clinical characteristics of MTLE-HS patients with single or multiple cNCC lesions. In patients with single cNCC lesions, the lesion matched the side in which hippocampal sclerosis was observed in 43 (74.1%) patients, a proportion significantly greater than that expected to occur by chance (p=0.008). Neurocysticercosis in temporal lobe was ipsilateral to hippocampal sclerosis in 85.0% of patients and accounted mostly for this result. This work is a proof-of-concept that the association of neurocysticercosis and MTLE-HS cannot be explained exclusively by patients sharing common biological or socio-economic predisposing variables. Instead, our results suggest the involvement of more direct pathogenic mechanisms like regional inflammation, repetitive seizures or both. Neurocysticercosis within temporal lobes was particularly related with ipsilateral hippocampal sclerosis in MTLE-HS, a finding adding new contributions for understanding MTLE-HS plus cNCC or perhaps to other forms of dual pathology in MTLE-HS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Pathophysiogenesis of Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Is Prevention of Damage Antiepileptogenic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curia, G.; Lucchi, C.; Vinet, J.; Gualtieri, F.; Marinelli, C.; Torsello, A.; Costantino, L.; Biagini*,, G.

    2014-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is frequently associated with hippocampal sclerosis, possibly caused by a primary brain injury that occurred a long time before the appearance of neurological symptoms. This type of epilepsy is characterized by refractoriness to drug treatment, so to require surgical resection of mesial temporal regions involved in seizure onset. Even this last therapeutic approach may fail in giving relief to patients. Although prevention of hippocampal damage and epileptogenesis after a primary event could be a key innovative approach to TLE, the lack of clear data on the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to TLE does not allow any rational therapy. Here we address the current knowledge on mechanisms supposed to be involved in epileptogenesis, as well as on the possible innovative treatments that may lead to a preventive approach. Besides loss of principal neurons and of specific interneurons, network rearrangement caused by axonal sprouting and neurogenesis are well known phenomena that are integrated by changes in receptor and channel functioning and modifications in other cellular components. In particular, a growing body of evidence from the study of animal models suggests that disruption of vascular and astrocytic components of the blood-brain barrier takes place in injured brain regions such as the hippocampus and piriform cortex. These events may be counteracted by drugs able to prevent damage to the vascular component, as in the case of the growth hormone secretagogue ghrelin and its analogues. A thoroughly investigation on these new pharmacological tools may lead to design effective preventive therapies. PMID:24251566

  1. {sup 1}H MR spectroscopy in histopathological subgroups of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajek, Milan; Dezortova, Monika [Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, MR Unit, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Prague (Czech Republic); Krsek, Pavel; Komarek, Vladimir [Charles University, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Prague 5 (Czech Republic); Marusic, Petr; Tomasek, Martin; Krijtova, Hana [Charles University, Department of Neurology, Prague (Czech Republic); Zamecnik, Josef [Charles University, Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Prague (Czech Republic); Kyncl, Martin [Charles University, Department of Radiology, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2009-02-15

    The aim of the study was to analyze the lateralizing value of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H MRS) in histopathologically different subgroups of mesial temporal lobe epilepsies (MTLE) and to correlate results with clinical, MRI and seizure outcome data. A group of 35 patients who underwent resective epilepsy surgery was retrospectively studied. Hippocampal {sup 1}H MR spectra were evaluated. Metabolite concentrations were obtained using LCModel and NAA/Cr, NAA/Cho, NAA/(Cr+Cho), Cho/Cr ratios and coefficients of asymmetry were calculated. MRI correctly lateralized 89% of subjects and {sup 1}H MRS 83%. MRI together with {sup 1}H MRS correctly lateralized 100% of patients. Nineteen subjects had 'classical' hippocampal sclerosis (HS), whereas the remaining 16 patients had 'mild' HS. Nineteen patients had histopathologically proven malformation of cortical development (MCD) in the temporal pole; 16 subjects had only HS. No difference in {sup 1}H MRS findings was found between patients in different histopathological subgroups of MTLE. Our results support the hypothesis that {sup 1}H MRS abnormalities do not directly reflect histopathological changes in MTLE patients. Subjects with non-lateralized {sup 1}H MRS abnormalities did not have a worse postoperative seizure outcome. We found no significant impact of contralateral {sup 1}H MRS abnormality on post-surgical seizure outcome. (orig.)

  2. The relationship between emotional intelligence and task-switching in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Amara; Hussain, Imtiaz

    2016-01-01

    To examine the role of emotional intelligence (EI) in task-switching performance of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). An experimental research design conducted at Sheikh Zayed Hospital, Rahim Yar Khan, Mayo and Services Hospital, Lahore, Pakistan from March 2013 to October 2014. Twenty-five patients with TLE and 25 healthy individuals from local community participated in the study. Participants completed measures of intelligence, EI, depression, anxiety, stress, and task-switching experiment. Patients and controls showed an average intelligence quotient, and normal levels of depression, anxiety, and stress. In contrast to controls, patients showed lower EI and impaired task-switching abilities. This result can be seen in the context of disintegrated white matter and cerebral connectivity in patients with TLE. Emotional intelligence was found to be a significant predictor of task-switching performance. Emotional intelligence is a potential marker of higher order cognitive functioning in patients with TLE.

  3. Brain SPECT in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy: comparison between visual analysis and SPM (Statistical Parametric Mapping)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amorim, Barbara Juarez; Ramos, Celso Dario; Santos, Allan Oliveira dos; Lima, Mariana da Cunha Lopes de; Camargo, Edwaldo Eduardo; Etchebehere, Elba Cristina Sa de Camargo, E-mail: juarezbarbara@hotmail.co [State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). School of Medical Sciences. Dept. of Radiology; Min, Li Li; Cendes, Fernando [State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). School of Medical Sciences. Dept. of Neurology

    2010-04-15

    Objective: to compare the accuracy of SPM and visual analysis of brain SPECT in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Method: interictal and ictal SPECTs of 22 patients with MTLE were performed. Visual analysis were performed in interictal (VISUAL(inter)) and ictal (VISUAL(ictal/inter)) studies. SPM analysis consisted of comparing interictal (SPM(inter)) and ictal SPECTs (SPM(ictal)) of each patient to control group and by comparing perfusion of temporal lobes in ictal and interictal studies among themselves (SPM(ictal/inter)). Results: for detection of the epileptogenic focus, the sensitivities were as follows: VISUAL(inter)=68%; VISUAL(ictal/inter)=100%; SPM(inter)=45%; SPM(ictal)=64% and SPM(ictal/inter)=77%. SPM was able to detect more areas of hyperperfusion and hypoperfusion. Conclusion: SPM did not improve the sensitivity to detect epileptogenic focus. However, SPM detected different regions of hypoperfusion and hyperperfusion and is therefore a helpful tool for better understand pathophysiology of seizures in MTLE. (author)

  4. Type of preoperative aura may predict postsurgical outcome in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and mesial temporal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Nei, Maromi; Sharan, Ashwini; Sperling, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    As the initial symptoms of epileptic seizures, many types of auras have significant localizing or lateralizing value. In this study, we hypothesized that the type of aura may predict postsurgical outcome in patients with medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). In this retrospective study, all patients with a clinical diagnosis of medically refractory TLE due to unilateral mesial temporal sclerosis who underwent epilepsy surgery at the Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center were recruited. Patients were prospectively registered in a database from 1986 through 2014. Postsurgical outcome was classified into two groups: seizure freedom or relapse. Outcome was compared between seven groups of patients according to their preoperative auras. Two hundred thirty-seven patients were studied. The chance of becoming free of seizures after surgery in patients with abdominal aura was 65.1%, while in other patients, this was 43.3% (P=0.01). In two-by-two comparisons, no other significant differences were observed. Patients with medically refractory TLE-MTS who reported abdominal auras preceding their seizures fared better postoperatively with regard to seizure control compared with those who did not report auras, which may indicate bitemporal dysfunction, and to patients with other auras, which may indicate a widespread epileptogenic zone in the latter group of patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Activation of LILRB2 signal pathway in temporal lobe epilepsy patients and in a pilocarpine induced epilepsy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Jiong; Li, Wei; Liang, Chao; Chen, Bing; Chen, Xin; Wang, Lukang; Zang, Zhenle; Yu, Sixun; Liu, Shiyong; Li, Song; Yang, Hui

    2016-11-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a frequent form of focal intractable epilepsy in adults, but the specific mechanism underlying the epileptogenesis of TLE is still unknown. Human leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor B2 (LILRB2) (the murine homolog gene called paired immunoglobulin-like receptor B, or PirB), participates in the process of synaptic plasticity and neurite growth in the central nervous system (CNS), suggesting a potential role of LILRB2 in epilepsy. However, the expression pattern of LILRB2 and the downstream molecular signal in intractable TLE remains poorly understood. In the present study, western blotting and immunohistochemistry results showed that LILRB2 expression was upregulated in the temporal neocortex of patients with TLE. Moreover, protein levels of LILRB2 negatively correlated with the frequency of seizures in TLE patients. In the pilocarpine-induced C57BL/6 mouse model, PirB upregulation in the hippocampus began 12h after status epilepticus (SE), reached a peak at 7days and then maintained a significantly high level until day 60. Similarly, we found a remarkable increase in PirB expression at 1day, 7days and30days post-SE in the temporal cortex. Double-labeled immunofluorescence showed that LILRB2/PirB were highly expressed in neurons and astrocytes but not microglia. In addition, protein levels of POSH, SHROOM3, ROCK1 and ROCK2, the important downstream factors of the LILRB2 pathway, were significantly increased in the epileptic foci of TLE patients and located on the NeuN-positive neurons and GFAP-positive astrocytes. Taken together, our results indicate that LILRB2/PirB may be involved in the process of TLE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Neuronal death in the neocortex of drug resistant temporal lobe epilepsy patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorigados Pedre, L; Orozco Suárez, S; Morales Chacón, L; García Maeso, I; Estupiñán Diaz, B; Bender del Busto, J E; Pavón Fuentes, N; Paula Piñero, B; Rocha Arrieta, L

    2008-11-01

    Introduction. Participation of apoptotic death mechanisms in drug resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (DRTLE) is currently under great debate. We have investigated if there is neuronal loss and the immunodetection to different markers in neocortical tissue death in eigth patients with DRTLE. The neocortexes of five patients deceased due to non-neurological causes, paired in age and gender were evaluated as control tissue. Methods. The evaluation of neuronal loss was made by means of a stereological study and with immunohistochemical techniques with the synaptophysin marker. Immunopositivity to different apoptotic markers (annexin V, caspase 3 and 8, bcl-2 and p53) and detection of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragmentation (TUNEL) were analyzed and double labeling with synaptophysin was performed in every case. The results were evaluated with confocal microscope and analyzed with the Zeiss LSM 5 Image Browser Program, 2.80.1113 (Germany). Results. A statistically significant decrease in the total number of cells (p < 0.05) and the synaptophysin cells+ (p<0.01) in the neocortex (layer IV) of the patients with DRTLE when compared with the control tissue was found. No significant differences were found in the apoptotic markers bcl-2, p53, caspase 3 and 8 for any of the neocortex layers while there was a statistically significant increase in the number of TUNEL cells+ (p<0.05) and annexin V+ (p<0.05) in the neocortical layer IV of the patients. Conclusions. This group of evidence speaks in favor of the existence of an effect on the neuronal number in the neocortex layer IV that may be associated with noncaspase dependent apoptotic death process, without being able to rule out death by necrosis. Key words: Drug resistant temporal lobe epilepsy. Apoptosis. Necrosis. Neuronal loss. Neurología 2008;23(9):555-565.

  7. Are auras a reliable clinical indicator in medial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, S; Samson, Y; Nguyen-Michel, V-H; Zavanone, C; Clémenceau, S; Miles, R; Baulac, M; Adam, C

    2015-09-01

    Medial temporal lobe epilepsy with unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) is the most frequent form of surgical temporal lobe epilepsy. In this study, it was aimed to determine whether different types of aura represent a cardinal and characteristic feature of MTLE-HS and might provide a diagnostic complement to help identify patients who will be seizure-free after surgery. All types of auras and associations of auras reported by 400 MTLE-HS patients referred for surgery were retrospectively collected and their statistical correlation with the postoperative outcome was examined in a subgroup of 305 patients who underwent surgery. A total of 876 auras were collected, classified into 12 categories. Globally, MTLE-HS patients reported widely variable auras and groupings of auras. Most common were autonomic and abdominal visceral auras, followed by psychoaffective and experiential auras; less common, but seen in 10%-15% of patients, were non-specific auras, somatosensory auras and visual auras, and least common, reported by less than 10% of patients, were auditory, gustatory, vestibular, olfactory and intellectual auras. No auras were reported in 10% of patients. 65% of patients experienced more than one type of aura (two to seven). No specific groupings of aura type were apparent. No evidence was found for correlation between postoperative outcome and (i) any category of aura, (ii) the number of categories of aura per patient and (iii) any association of categories of auras. Auras and association of auras vary widely in MTLE-HS and provide no useful insight into surgical outcome. © 2015 EAN.

  8. MRI-negative temporal lobe epilepsy: A network disorder of neocortical connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, David N; Rayner, Genevieve; Tailby, Chris; Jackson, Graeme D

    2016-11-01

    To define the functional network changes that characterize MRI-negative temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and TLE with hippocampal sclerosis (HS-TLE). We studied 36 patients with medically refractory unilateral TLE, having either a normal clinical MRI (n = 18) or unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (n = 18). Patients were compared to healthy controls of equivalent age and sex (n = 27). Functional connectivity in 10 minutes of task-free functional MRI was assessed using a voxel-resolution graph theoretic analysis, using the metrics of degree, clustering coefficient, eigenvector, and betweenness centrality. Significant clusters were further explored with a seed-based analysis. MRI-negative TLE showed decreased connectivity at the ipsilateral superior and middle temporal gyri compared to controls (decreased eigenvector centrality). No functional abnormality was detected within mesial temporal structures. In contrast, HS-TLE showed increased connectivity within the affected hippocampus and anterior thalamus (increased clustering coefficient) and decreased connectivity of the ventromesial prefrontal cortex (decreased betweenness centrality). Using the detected clusters as seed regions revealed decreased connectivity from the sclerotic hippocampus to both the contralateral temporal lobe and regions of the default mode network. MRI-negative TLE is associated with impaired interictal connectivity of the temporal neocortex, lateralized to the epileptic side. HS-TLE shows a different pattern, with functional segregation of the sclerotic hippocampus and impairment of its long-range connectivity. This suggests that MRI-negative TLE is not merely a subtle version of hippocampal sclerosis, but is rather a separate condition that involves distinct brain networks. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  9. Memory functioning in children with epilepsy: frontal lobe epilepsy, childhood absence epilepsy, and benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Filipa Lopes; José Paulo Monteiro; Maria José Fonseca; Conceição Robalo; Mário Rodrigues Simões

    2014-01-01

    Specific cognitive deficits have been identified in children with epilepsy irrespective of results on intelligence tests. Memory deficits are traditionally attributed to temporal lobe epilepsy, whereas the impact of frontal lobe epilepsy on memory functions has remained controversial. The aim of this study was the examination of memory abilities in other childhood common epilepsy syndromes (frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), childhood absence epilepsy (CAE), and benign epilepsy with centrotemporal ...

  10. Familial mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and the borderland of déjà vu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perucca, Piero; Crompton, Douglas E; Bellows, Susannah T; McIntosh, Anne M; Kalincik, Tomas; Newton, Mark R; Vajda, Frank J E; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Kwan, Patrick; O'Brien, Terence J; Tan, K Meng; Berkovic, Samuel F

    2017-08-01

    The cause of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is often unknown. We ascertained to what extent newly diagnosed nonlesional MTLE actually represents familial MTLE (FMTLE). We identified all consecutive patients presenting to the Austin Health First Seizure Clinic with MTLE and normal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or MRI evidence of hippocampal sclerosis over a 10-year period. Patients' first-degree relatives and pairwise age- and sex-matched controls underwent a comprehensive epilepsy interview. Each interview transcript was reviewed independently by 2 epileptologists, blinded to relative or control status. Reviewers classified each subject as follows: epilepsy, specifying if MTLE; manifestations suspicious for epilepsy; or unaffected. Physiological déjà vu was noted. Forty-four patients were included. At the Clinic, MTLE had been recognized to be familial in 2 patients only. Among 242 subjects interviewed, MTLE was diagnosed in 9 of 121 relatives versus 0 of 121 controls (p = 0.008). All affected relatives had seizures with intense déjà vu and accompanying features; 6 relatives had not been previously diagnosed. Déjà vu experiences that were suspicious, but not diagnostic, of MTLE occurred in 6 additional relatives versus none of the controls (p = 0.04). Physiological déjà vu was common, and did not differ significantly between relatives and controls. After completing the relatives' interviews, FMTLE was diagnosed in 8 of 44 patients (18.2%). FMTLE accounts for almost one-fifth of newly diagnosed nonlesional MTLE, and it is largely unrecognized without direct questioning of relatives. Relatives of patients with MTLE may experience déjà vu phenomena that clinically lie in the "borderland" between epileptic seizures and physiological déjà vu. Ann Neurol 2017;82:166-176. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  11. Everyday memory impairment in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy caused by hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzezak, Patrícia; Lima, Ellen Marise; Gargaro, Ana Carolina; Coimbra, Erica; de Vincentiis, Silvia; Velasco, Tonicarlo Rodrigues; Leite, João Pereira; Busatto, Geraldo F; Valente, Kette D

    2017-04-01

    Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy caused by hippocampal sclerosis (TLE-HS) have episodic memory impairment. Memory has rarely been evaluated using an ecologic measure, even though performance on these tests is more related to patients' memory complaints. We aimed to measure everyday memory of patients with TLE-HS to age- and gender-matched controls. We evaluated 31 patients with TLE-HS and 34 healthy controls, without epilepsy and psychiatric disorders, using the Rivermead Behavioral Memory Test (RBMT), Visual Reproduction (WMS-III) and Logical Memory (WMS-III). We evaluated the impact of clinical variables such as the age of onset, epilepsy duration, AED use, history of status epilepticus, and seizure frequency on everyday memory. Statistical analyses were performed using MANCOVA with years of education as a confounding factor. Patients showed worse performance than controls on traditional memory tests and in the overall score of RBMT. Patients had more difficulties to recall names, a hidden belonging, to deliver a message, object recognition, to remember a story full of details, a previously presented short route, and in time and space orientation. Clinical epilepsy variables were not associated with RBMT performance. Memory span and working memory were correlated with worse performance on RBMT. Patients with TLE-HS demonstrated deficits in everyday memory functions. A standard neuropsychological battery, designed to assess episodic memory, would not evaluate these impairments. Impairment in recalling names, routes, stories, messages, and space/time disorientation can adversely impact social adaptation, and we must consider these ecologic measures with greater attention in the neuropsychological evaluation of patients with memory complaints. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Reduced Pumilio-2 expression in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and in the lithium-pilocarpine induced epilepsy rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xu-Ling; Huang, Hao; Huang, Yun-Yi; Yuan, Jin-Xian; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Yang-Mei

    2015-09-01

    Drosophila Pumilio (Pum), a homolog of mammalian Pum2, plays an important role in translational regulation in the central nervous system (CNS), particularly for dendrite outgrowth and neuronal excitability. We investigated the expression pattern and cellular distribution of Pum2 in patients with drug-refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and rats with lithium chloride-pilocarpine-induced epilepsy. Real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), Western blot, immunohistochemistry, and double-labeled immunofluorescence were utilized to determine the expression level and distribution of Pum2 in temporal neocortex tissues from patients with intractable TLE (n=20) and patients with severe head trauma (n=20) in addition to the hippocampus and adjacent cortex of rats with lithium chloride-pilocarpine-induced TLE and controls. Pum2 was expressed in the cell bodies and dendrites of neurons but did not colocalize with glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes or propidium iodide (PI) in nuclei. The expression of Pum2 was significantly reduced in patients and rats with TLE in comparison to controls (Pepilepsy, suggesting that decreased expression of Pum2 may be involved in the pathogenesis of TLE. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Altered fMRI connectivity dynamics in temporal lobe epilepsy might explain seizure semiology

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    Helmut eLaufs

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE can be conceptualized as a network disease. The network can be characterized by inter-regional functional connectivity, i.e. blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD signal correlations between any two region pairs. However, functional connectivity is not constant over time, thus computing correlation at a given time and then at some later time could give different results (non-stationarity. We hypothesized (1 that non-stationarities can be induced by epilepsy (e.g. interictal epileptic activity increasing local signal variance and that (2 these transient events contribute to fluctuations in connectivity leading to pathological functioning, i.e. TLE semiology. We analyzed fMRI data from 27 patients with TLE and 22 healthy controls focusing on EEG-confirmed wake epochs only to protect against sleep-induced connectivity changes. Testing hypothesis (1, we identified brain regions where the BOLD signal variance was significantly greater in TLE than in controls: the temporal pole - including the hippocampus. Taking the latter as the seed region and testing hypothesis (2 we calculated the time-varying interregional correlation values (dynamic functional connectivity to other brain regions and found greater connectivity variance in the TLE than the control group mainly in the precuneus, the supplementary and sensori-motor and the frontal cortices.We conclude that the highest BOLD signal variance in the hippocampi is highly suggestive of a specific epilepsy-related effect. The altered connectivity dynamics in TLE patients might help to explain the hallmark semiological features of dyscognitive seizures including impaired consciousness (precuneus, frontal cortex, sensory disturbance and motor automatisms (sensorimotor cortices, supplementary motor cortex. Accounting for the non-stationarity and state-dependence of functional connectivity are a prerequisite in the search for potential connectivity-derived biomarkers in TLE.

  14. Altered FMRI connectivity dynamics in temporal lobe epilepsy might explain seizure semiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufs, Helmut; Rodionov, Roman; Thornton, Rachel; Duncan, John Sydney; Lemieux, Louis; Tagliazucchi, Enzo

    2014-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) can be conceptualized as a network disease. The network can be characterized by inter-regional functional connectivity, i.e., blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal correlations between any two regions. However, functional connectivity is not constant over time, thus computing correlation at a given time and then at some later time could give different results (non-stationarity). We hypothesized (1) that non-stationarities can be induced by epilepsy (e.g., interictal epileptic activity) increasing local signal variance and that (2) these transient events contribute to fluctuations in connectivity leading to pathological functioning, i.e., TLE semiology. We analyzed fMRI data from 27 patients with TLE and 22 healthy controls focusing on EEG-confirmed wake epochs only to protect against sleep-induced connectivity changes. Testing hypothesis (1), we identified brain regions where the BOLD signal variance was significantly greater in TLE than in controls: the temporal pole - including the hippocampus. Taking the latter as the seed region and testing hypothesis (2), we calculated the time-varying inter-regional correlation values (dynamic functional connectivity) to other brain regions and found greater connectivity variance in the TLE than the control group mainly in the precuneus, the supplementary and sensorimotor, and the frontal cortices. We conclude that the highest BOLD signal variance in the hippocampi is highly suggestive of a specific epilepsy-related effect. The altered connectivity dynamics in TLE patients might help to explain the hallmark semiological features of dyscognitive seizures including impaired consciousness (precuneus, frontal cortex), sensory disturbance, and motor automatisms (sensorimotor cortices, supplementary motor cortex). Accounting for the non-stationarity and state-dependence of functional connectivity are a prerequisite in the search for potential connectivity-derived biomarkers in TLE.

  15. Focal cortical dysplasia of the temporal lobe with late-onset partial epilepsy: serial quantitative MRI

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    Rademacher, J.; Seitz, R.J. [Department of Neurology, Heinrich-Heine University Duesseldorf (Germany); Aulich, A. [Department of Radiology, Heinrich-Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Reifenberger, G. [Department of Neuropathology, Heinrich-Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Kiwit, J.C.W. [Department of Neurosurgery, Heinrich-Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Langen, K.J.; Schmidt, D. [Institute of Medicine, Research Center Juelich, Heinrich-Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2000-06-01

    We describe serial studies of focal cortical dysplasia causing temporal lobe seizures and progressive aphasia in a 54-year-old woman. Initially, MRI volumetry of the temporal lobes showed significant left cortical thickening corresponding to an elevated aminoacid uptake in the left temporoparietal and inferior frontal cortex on SPECT using 3-[{sup 123}I]iodo-{alpha}-methyl-l-tyrosine (IMT). After 1 year there was severe shrinkage of the left temporal lobe, possibly the result of recurrent complex partial seizures. (orig.)

  16. Laser interstitial thermal therapy for medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Joon Y; Wu, Chengyuan; Tracy, Joseph; Lorenzo, Matthew; Evans, James; Nei, Maromi; Skidmore, Christopher; Mintzer, Scott; Sharan, Ashwini D; Sperling, Michael R

    2016-02-01

    To describe mesial temporal lobe ablated volumes, verbal memory, and surgical outcomes in patients with medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) treated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided stereotactic laser interstitial thermal therapy (LiTT). We prospectively tracked seizure outcome in 20 patients at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital with drug-resistant mTLE who underwent MRI-guided LiTT from December 2011 to December 2014. Surgical outcome was assessed at 6 months, 1 year, 2 years, and at the most recent visit. Volume-based analysis of ablated mesial temporal structures was conducted in 17 patients with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) and results were compared between the seizure-free and not seizure-free groups. Following LiTT, proportions of patients who were free of seizures impairing consciousness (including those with auras only) are as follows: 8 of 15 patients (53%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 30.1-75.2%) after 6 months, 4 of 11 patients (36.4%, 95% CI 14.9-64.8%) after 1 year, 3 of 5 patients (60%, 95% CI 22.9-88.4%) at 2-year follow-up. Median follow-up was 13.4 months after LiTT (range 1.3 months to 3.2 years). Seizure outcome after LiTT suggests an all or none response. Four patients had anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) after LiTT; three are seizure-free. There were no differences in total ablated volume of the amygdalohippocampus complex or individual volumes of hippocampus, amygdala, entorhinal cortex, parahippocampal gyrus, and fusiform gyrus between seizure-free and non-seizure-free patients. Contextual verbal memory performance was preserved after LiTT, although decline in noncontextual memory task scores were noted. We conclude that MRI-guided stereotactic LiTT is a safe alternative to ATL in patients with medically intractable mTLE. Individualized assessment is warranted to determine whether the reduced odds of seizure freedom are worth the reduction in risk, discomfort, and recovery time. Larger prospective

  17. Temporal lobe epilepsy is a predisposing factor for sleep apnea: A questionnaire study in video-EEG monitoring unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, F Gokcem; Tezer, F Irsel; Saygi, Serap

    2015-07-01

    The interaction between epilepsy and sleep is known. It has been shown that patients with epilepsy have more sleep problems than the general population. However, there is no recent study that compares the frequency of sleep disorders in groups with medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and extratemporal lobe epilepsy (ETLE). The main purpose of this study was to investigate the occurrence of sleep disorders in two subtypes of epilepsy by using sleep questionnaire forms. One hundred and eighty-nine patients, out of 215 who were monitored for refractory epilepsy and were followed by the video-EEG monitoring unit, were divided into a group with TLE and a group with ETLE. The medical outcome study-sleep scale (MOS-SS), Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS), and sleep apnea scale of the sleep disorders questionnaire (SD-SDQ) were completed after admission to the video-EEG monitoring unit. The total scores in the group with TLE and group with ETLE were compared. Of the patients, TLE was diagnosed in 101 (53.4%) (45 females), and ETLE was diagnosed in 88 (46.6%) (44 females). Comparison of MOS-SS and Epworth sleepiness scale scores in the two subgroups did not reveal significant differences. In the group with TLE, SD-SDQ scores were significantly higher compared to that in the group with ETLE. Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy have higher risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) according to their reported symptoms. Detection of OSA in patients with epilepsy by using questionnaire forms may decrease the risk of ictal or postictal respiratory-related 'Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy'. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Subfield-specific loss of hippocampal N-acetyl aspartate in temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Vielhaber, Stefan; Niessen, Heiko G; Debska-Vielhaber, Grazyna; Kudin, Alexei P; Wellmer, Jörg; Kaufmann, Jörn; Schönfeld, Mircea Ariel; Fendrich, Robert; Willker, Wieland; Leibfritz, Dieter; Schramm, Johannes; Elger, Christian E; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Kunz, Wolfram S

    2008-01-01

    In patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) it remains an unresolved issue whether the interictal decrease in N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) detected by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) reflects the epilepsy-associated loss of hippocampal pyramidal neurons or metabolic dysfunction. To address this problem, we applied high-resolution (1)H-MRS at 14.1 Tesla to measure metabolite concentrations in ex vivo tissue slices from three hippocampal subfields (CA1, CA3, dentate gyrus) as well as from the parahippocampal region of 12 patients with MTLE. In contrast to four patients with lesion-caused MTLE, we found a large variance of NAA concentrations in the individual hippocampal regions of patients with Ammon's horn sclerosis (AHS). Specifically, in subfield CA3 of AHS patients despite of a moderate preservation of neuronal cell densities the concentration of NAA was significantly lowered, while the concentrations of lactate, glucose, and succinate were elevated. We suggest that these subfield-specific alterations of metabolite concentrations in AHS are very likely caused by impairment of mitochondrial function and not related to neuronal cell loss. A subfield-specific impairment of energy metabolism is the probable cause for lowered NAA concentrations in sclerotic hippocampi of MTLE patients.

  19. Memory rehabilitation and brain training for surgical temporal lobe epilepsy patients: a preliminary report.

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    Koorenhof, Loes; Baxendale, Sallie; Smith, Natalie; Thompson, Pam

    2012-04-01

    The short term impact of a memory rehabilitation programme on verbal memory test performance and subjective ratings of memory in everyday life was assessed in healthy controls and left temporal lobe epilepsy (LTLE) surgical patients. The intervention involved training in the use of external and internal memory support strategies. Half of the sample in addition undertook computerised brain training exercises as homework. LTLE patients were seen either before surgery or 3-6 months after their operation. Improvements in verbal memory were observed in both groups. An effect of brain training was recorded but this did not occur in a consistent direction. Subjective ratings of memory indicated improvements that were significant for the LTLE group but not the controls. Positive changes in the memory outcome measures were associated with improvements in mood. Pre-operative memory rehabilitation was not associated with better outcomes than post-operative intervention. Further research is needed to explore the persistence of the changes observed and to explore if pre-operative rehabilitation offsets post-operative memory decline. Copyright © 2011 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy lateralization using SPHARM-based features of hippocampus and SVM

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    Esmaeilzadeh, Mohammad; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh

    2012-02-01

    This paper improves the Lateralization (identification of the epileptogenic hippocampus) accuracy in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (mTLE). In patients with this kind of epilepsy, usually one of the brain's hippocampi is the focus of the epileptic seizures, and resection of the seizure focus is the ultimate treatment to control or reduce the seizures. Moreover, the epileptogenic hippocampus is prone to shrinkage and deformation; therefore, shape analysis of the hippocampus is advantageous in the preoperative assessment for the Lateralization. The method utilized for shape analysis is the Spherical Harmonics (SPHARM). In this method, the shape of interest is decomposed using a set of bases functions and the obtained coefficients of expansion are the features describing the shape. To perform shape comparison and analysis, some pre- and post-processing steps such as "alignment of different subjects' hippocampi" and the "reduction of feature-space dimension" are required. To this end, first order ellipsoid is used for alignment. For dimension reduction, we propose to keep only the SPHARM coefficients with maximum conformity to the hippocampus shape. Then, using these coefficients of normal and epileptic subjects along with 3D invariants, specific lateralization indices are proposed. Consequently, the 1536 SPHARM coefficients of each subject are summarized into 3 indices, where for each index the negative (positive) value shows that the left (right) hippocampus is deformed (diseased). Employing these indices, the best achieved lateralization accuracy for clustering and classification algorithms are 85% and 92%, respectively. This is a significant improvement compared to the conventional volumetric method.

  1. Scale invariance properties of intracerebral EEG improve seizure prediction in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Kais Gadhoumi

    Full Text Available Although treatment for epilepsy is available and effective for nearly 70 percent of patients, many remain in need of new therapeutic approaches. Predicting the impending seizures in these patients could significantly enhance their quality of life if the prediction performance is clinically practical. In this study, we investigate the improvement of the performance of a seizure prediction algorithm in 17 patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy by means of a novel measure. Scale-free dynamics of the intracerebral EEG are quantified through robust estimates of the scaling exponents--the first cumulants--derived from a wavelet leader and bootstrap based multifractal analysis. The cumulants are investigated for the discriminability between preictal and interictal epochs. The performance of our recently published patient-specific seizure prediction algorithm is then out-of-sample tested on long-lasting data using combinations of cumulants and state similarity measures previously introduced. By using the first cumulant in combination with state similarity measures, up to 13 of 17 patients had seizures predicted above chance with clinically practical levels of sensitivity (80.5% and specificity (25.1% of total time under warning for prediction horizons above 25 min. These results indicate that the scale-free dynamics of the preictal state are different from those of the interictal state. Quantifiers of these dynamics may carry a predictive power that can be used to improve seizure prediction performance.

  2. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (TLE , “déjà vu” phenomenon and religious experiences

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    Sanda M. Deme

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A lot of controversies appear regarding temporal lobe epilepsy to bridge the gap between religion and neuroscience. TLE was described in literature in 1869 by Russian writer Dostoievski (who suffered from epilepsy, in his work ”The Idiot”, when the hero Prince Myshkin described his epileptic feelings of sublime sacredness of the inner light. Neurotheology is the science trying to understand the brain activities and to find an integration in religion concepts. TLE aura or psychic crisis is defined by simple or complex hallucinations, mystic divine experience, unpleasant experience of fear and déjà vu phenomenon. Neppe and Funkhouser (2006 described the notion as already seen, but it means also already heard,met, heard or visited. The“déjà vu” phenomenon is always a subjective experience which can appear in normal subjects or in pathologic states like TLE, schizophrenia or other types of psychosis. It can also be a subjective paranormal experience. Neppe’s definition is now universally used, defined as ‘any subjectively inappropriate impression of familiarity of the present experience with an undefined past’ (Neppe, 1983. Déjà vu has an impact on neuroscience and descriptions from history and literature and the multitude of descriptions from experiences demand various scientific explanations.

  3. Cerebral small vessel disease predisposes to temporal lobe epilepsy in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Emilio; Leo, Antonio; Scicchitano, Francesca; Donato, Annalidia; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Gasparini, Sara; Cianci, Vittoria; Mignogna, Chiara; Donato, Giuseppe; Citraro, Rita; Aguglia, Umberto; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2017-04-01

    The link between cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) and epilepsy has been poorly investigated. Some reports suggest that CSVD may predispose to temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Aim of this study was to evaluate whether spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs), an established model of systemic hypertension and CSVD, have a propensity to develop TLE more than generalized seizures. To this aim, amygdala kindling, as a model of TLE, and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced kindling, as a model of generalized seizures, have been used to ascertain whether SHRs are more prone to TLE as compared to Wistar Kyoto control rats. While young SHRs (without CSVD) do not differ from their age-matched controls in both models, old SHRs (with CSVD) develop stage 5 seizures in the amygdala kindling model (TLE) faster than age-matched control rats without CSVD. At odds, no differences between old SHRs and age-matched controls was observed in the development of PTZ kindling. Enalapril pre-treatment prevented the development of CSVD and normalized kindling development to control levels in SHRs. No difference was observed in the response to pharmacological treatment with carbamazepine or losartan. Overall, our study suggests that uncontrolled hypertension leading to CSVD might represent a risk factor for TLE. Further experimental studies are needed to unravel other risk factors that, along with CSVD, may predispose to TLE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Detecting differential memory performance among Spanish-speaking patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Marquez de la Plata, C; Lacritz, L H; Mitschke, R; Van Ness, P; Agostini, M; Diaz-Arrastia, R; Cullum, C M

    2009-01-01

    There is relatively little research pertaining to neuropsychological assessment of Spanish-speaking individuals with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The current study examined verbal and visual memory performances in 38 primarily Spanish-speaking patients with TLE (Right = 15, Left = 23) of similar epilepsy duration to determine if lateralizing differences can be found using verbal and nonverbal memory tests. On a test specifically designed to assess auditory learning and memory among Spanish-speaking individuals, the Spanish Verbal Learning Test (SVLT), patients with left TLE performed significantly worse than patients with right TLE. In contrast, no significant differences in story or visual memory were seen using common memory tests translated into Spanish. Similar to what has been found in English speakers, these results show that verbal memory differences can be seen between left and right sided TLE patients who are Spanish-speaking to aid in providing lateralizing information; however, these differences may be best detected using tests developed for and standardized on Spanish-speaking patients.

  5. Asymmetrical hippocampal connectivity in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy: evidence from resting state fMRI

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    Castellano Gabriela

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE, the most common type of focal epilepsy in adults, is often caused by hippocampal sclerosis (HS. Patients with HS usually present memory dysfunction, which is material-specific according to the hemisphere involved and has been correlated to the degree of HS as measured by postoperative histopathology as well as by the degree of hippocampal atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Verbal memory is mostly affected by left-sided HS, whereas visuo-spatial memory is more affected by right HS. Some of these impairments may be related to abnormalities of the network in which individual hippocampus takes part. Functional connectivity can play an important role to understand how the hippocampi interact with other brain areas. It can be estimated via functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI resting state experiments by evaluating patterns of functional networks. In this study, we investigated the functional connectivity patterns of 9 control subjects, 9 patients with right MTLE and 9 patients with left MTLE. Results We detected differences in functional connectivity within and between hippocampi in patients with unilateral MTLE associated with ipsilateral HS by resting state fMRI. Functional connectivity resulted to be more impaired ipsilateral to the seizure focus in both patient groups when compared to control subjects. This effect was even more pronounced for the left MTLE group. Conclusions The findings presented here suggest that left HS causes more reduction of functional connectivity than right HS in subjects with left hemisphere dominance for language.

  6. Electrode location and clinical outcome in hippocampal electrical stimulation for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondallaz, Percy; Boëx, Colette; Rossetti, Andrea O; Foletti, Giovanni; Spinelli, Laurent; Vulliemoz, Serge; Seeck, Margitta; Pollo, Claudio

    2013-06-01

    To study the clinical outcome in hippocampal deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of patients with refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) according to the electrode location. Eight MTLE patients implanted in the hippocampus and stimulated with high-frequency DBS were included in this study. Five underwent invasive recordings with depth electrodes to localize ictal onset zone prior to chronic DBS. Position of the active contacts of the electrode was calculated on postoperative imaging. The distances to the ictal onset zone were measured as well as atlas-based hippocampus structures impacted by stimulation were identified. Both were correlated with seizure frequency reduction. The distances between active electrode location and estimated ictal onset zone were 11±4.3 or 9.1±2.3mm for patients with a >50% or 50% seizure frequency reduction, 100% had the active contacts located 3mm to the subiculum. Decrease of epileptogenic activity induced by hippocampal DBS in refractory MTLE: (1) seems not directly associated with the vicinity of active electrode to the ictal focus determined by invasive recordings; (2) might be obtained through the neuromodulation of the subiculum. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Verbal and Figural Fluency in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Does Hippocampal Sclerosis Affect Performance?

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    Zalonis, Ioannis; Christidi, Foteini; Artemiadis, Artemios; Psarros, Constantinos; Papadopoulos, George; Tsivgoulis, George; Gatzonis, Stergios; Siatouni, Anna; Velonakis, Georgios; Karavasilis, Efstratios; Kararizou, Evangelia; Triantafyllou, Nikolaos

    2017-06-01

    Clinicians commonly use verbal and nonverbal measures to test fluency in patients with epilepsy, either during routine cognitive assessment or as part of pre- and postsurgical evaluation. We hypothesized that patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with hippocampal sclerosis would perform worse than patients with lateral TLE in both verbal and design fluency. We assessed semantic, phonemic, and nonverbal fluency in 49 patients with TLE: 31 with lateral TLE and 18 with mesial TLE plus hippocampal sclerosis. We also gave non-fluency cognitive measures: psychomotor speed, attentional set shifting, selective attention, abstract reasoning, verbal and visual episodic memory, and incidental memory. Patients with mesial TLE performed significantly worse on figural fluency than patients with lateral TLE. Even though group differences on verbal fluency measures were not significant, the patients with mesial TLE had a pattern of poorer performance. The patients with mesial TLE scored significantly worse on measures of selective attention, verbal episodic memory, and incidental memory. Our study underlines differences in cognitive function between patients with mesial and lateral TLE, particularly in figural fluency. Although we cannot directly assess the role of the hippocampus in cognitive aspects of creative and divergent thinking related to figural fluency, the cognitive discrepancies between these two TLE groups could be ascribed to the mesial TLE hippocampal pathology shown in our study and addressed in the literature on hippocampal involvement in divergent thinking. Our findings could benefit cognitive rehabilitation programs tailored to the needs of patients with TLE.

  8. The role of histopathologic subtype in the setting of hippocampal sclerosis-associated mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gales, Jordan M; Jehi, Lara; Nowacki, Amy; Prayson, Richard A

    2017-05-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis (HS) and focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) are among the most common neuropathological findings in those undergoing surgery for refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Existing data regarding differences among the most recent International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) HS subtypes remain limited. This study sought to characterize the roles of HS subtype and coexistent FCD. Epilepsy surgery pathologic specimens in 307 cases of temporal lobe epilepsy with HS were reviewed (mean age±SD, 37±15years; 56% women). HS and coexistent FCD were classified according to ILAE guidelines. Medical records were reviewed for data on seizure recurrence and seizure burden (clinical follow-up mean duration ± SD, 5±4years). Cases of typical HS (ILAE type I) predominated (ILAE type Ia: 41%, Ib: 47%, II: 11%, and III: 0.7%]. The HS subtypes shared similar demographic and etiologic characteristics, as well as associated pathology and postoperative seizure outcomes. Individuals with type Ib HS were more likely to remain seizure free at long-term follow-up when compared with other subtypes, and they had a later age of seizure onset. Two hundred forty-three cases (79%) demonstrated FCD within the adjacent temporal lobe. Its presence was associated with a significantly decreased risk of seizure recurrence (P=.02). When present, FCD was predominantly type I (98%). HS subtype does not appear to affect epilepsy surgery outcomes despite some clinical differences between the subgroups. FCD is often observed in association with HS in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy; the finding of FCD was associated with better postoperative outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Interictal depression, anxiety, personality traits, and psychological dissociation in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and extra-TLE.

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    Swinkels, Wilhelmina A M; van Emde Boas, Walter; Kuyk, Jarl; van Dyck, Richard; Spinhoven, Philip

    2006-12-01

    This study was performed to investigate the relation between symptoms of interictal depression, anxiety, personality traits, and psychological dissociation with the localization and lateralization of the epileptogenic zone in patients with partial epilepsy. All patients were diagnosed according to the localization-related concept of the 1989 International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) Classification of Epilepsies and Epileptic Syndromes, and the localization and lateralization of the epileptogenic zone was established by using the clinical criteria for noninvasive presurgical evaluation. This resulted in 67 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and 64 patients with extra-TLE. All patients were assessed on the various aspects of psychopathology by using a comprehensive battery of standardized diagnostic instruments. We did not find the hypothesized excess of psychiatric symptoms in patients with (mesial) TLE in comparison with patients with extra-TLE. We also found no differences between patients with the lateralization of epilepsy in the left versus the right hemisphere. TLE per se cannot be considered a risk factor in developing more or more severe symptoms of psychopathology in patients with partial epilepsy. Concomitant factors, such as the duration of epilepsy, seizure frequency, and frontal lobe dysfunction may play an additional role. Our findings support the hypothesis of a multifactorial explanation for the psychiatric symptoms in patients with epilepsy.

  10. Relation of callosal structure to cognitive abilities in temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Christine eSchneider

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to analyse the influence of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE on the morphology of the corpus callosum (CC and its relation to cognitive abilities. More specifically, we investigated correlations between intellectual abilities and callosal morphology, while additionally exploring the modulating impact of (a side of seizure onset (b age of disease onset.For this reason a large representative sample of patients with hippocampal sclerosis (n=79; 35 males; 44 females; age: 18-63 years with disease onset ranging from 0 to 50 years of age, and consisting of 46 left and 33 right TLE patients was recruited. Intelligence was measured using the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale Revised (WAIS-R.To get localizations of correlations with high anatomic precision, callosal morphology was examined using computational mesh-based modeling methods, applied to anatomical brain MRI scans.Intellectual performance was positively associated with callosal thickness in anterior and midcallosal callosal regions, with anterior parts being slightly more affected by age of disease onset and side of seizure onset than posterior parts. Earlier age at onset of epilepsy was associated with lower thickness in anterior and midcallosal regions. In addition, laterality of seizure onset had a significant influence on anterior CC morphology, with left hemispheric origin having stronger effects.We found that in TLE, anterior and midcallosal CC morphology are related to cognitive performance. The findings support recent findings of detrimental effects of early onset mTLE on anterior brain regions and of a distinct effect particularly of left TLE on frontal lobe functioning and structure. The causal nature of the relationship remains an open question, i.e., whether CC morphology impacts IQ development or whether IQ development impacts CC morphology, or both.

  11. Late onset temporal lobe epilepsy with MRI evidence of mesial temporal sclerosis following acute neurocysticercosis. Case report

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    Kobayashi, Eliane; Guerreiro, Carlos A.M.; Cendes, Fernando [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas. Dept. de Neurologia]. E-mail: fcendes@unicamp.br

    2001-06-01

    The objective of this case report is to describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evidence of mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) in a patient with new onset temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and acute neurocysticercosis with multiple cysts. A 56 years old man with new onset headache, Simple Partial Seizures and Complex Partial Seizures underwent CT scan and lumbar puncture as diagnose proceeding. Multiple cysts and meningitis were identified, with a positive immunology for cysticercosis. Seizures were recorded over the left temporal region in a routine EEG. Treatment with al bendazole was performed for 21 days, with clinical improvement and seizure remission after 4 months. An MRI scan 11 months after treatment, showed complete resolution of those cystic lesions and a left hippocampal atrophy (HA) with hyperintense T2 signal. The presence of HA and hyperintense T 2 signal in this patient has not, to date, been associated with a poor seizure control. Conclusions: This patient presented with MRI evidence of left MTS after new onset partial seizures of left temporal lobe origin. Although we did not have a previous MRI scan, it is likely that this hippocampal abnormality was due to the acute inflammatory response to cysticercosis associated to repeated partial seizures. This suggests that acute neurocysticercosis associated with repeated seizures may cause MTS and late onset TLE. (author)

  12. Medial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal sclerosis is a distinctive syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    No, Young Joo; Zavanone, Chiara; Bielle, Franck; Nguyen-Michel, Vi-Huong; Samson, Yves; Adam, Claude; Navarro, Vincent; Dupont, Sophie

    2017-05-01

    Epileptic syndromes are distinctive disorders with specific features, which when taken together, permit a specific diagnosis. There is actually a debate on that medial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis is an epileptic syndrome. To address this issue, we searched for discriminative semiological features between temporal lobe epilepsy patients with hippocampal sclerosis (TLE-HS patients or group 1), TLE patients with medial structural lesion other than hippocampal sclerosis or in MRI-negative cases with medial onset on further investigations (group 2) and lateral TLE patients (LTLE or group 3). We retrospectively collected data from medical and EEG-video records of 523 TLE patients, referred for surgery to the Pitié-Salpêtrière Epileptology Unit between 1991 and 2014. We identified 389 patients belonging to group 1, 61 patients belonging to group 2, and 73 patients belonging to group 3 and performed a comparative analysis of their clinical data and surgical outcomes. TLE-HS patients (group 1): (1) began epilepsy earlier (11 ± 9 vs. 20 ± 10 vs. 15 ± 9 years); (2) exhibited more frequently early febrile convulsions (FC) (59 vs 7 vs 5%); (3) presented more: ictal gestural automatisms (90 vs 54 vs 67%), dystonic posturing (47 vs 20 vs 23%), and secondary generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) (70 vs 44% vs 48%) as compared to both groups 2 and 3 patients (all p < 0.001). With respect to auras, abdominal visceral auras were more reported by TLE-HS than by LTLE patients (49 vs 16%). Three cardinal criteria correctly classified 94% of patients into TLE-HS group: history of FC, dystonic posturing, and secondary GTCS. Postoperative outcome was significantly better in TLE-HS group than in the two other groups (p = 0.03 and 0.003). Our study demonstrates that cardinal criteria are reliably helpful to distinguish patients with TLE-HS from those with other TLE and may allow considering TLE-HS as a distinctive syndrome.

  13. Complications After Surgery for Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Associated with Hippocampal Sclerosis.

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    Mathon, Bertrand; Navarro, Vincent; Bielle, Franck; Nguyen-Michel, Vi-Huong; Carpentier, Alexandre; Baulac, Michel; Cornu, Philippe; Adam, Claude; Dupont, Sophie; Clemenceau, Stéphane

    2017-06-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis is the most common cause of drug-resistant epilepsy amenable for surgical treatment and seizure control. This study aimed to analyze morbidities related to surgery of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal sclerosis and to identify possible risk factors for complications. A retrospective analysis of postoperative complications was made for 389 operations performed between 1990 and 2015 on patients aged 15-67 years (mean 36.8). Three surgical approaches were used: anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) (n = 209), transcortical selective amygdalohippocampectomy (SAH) (n = 144), and transsylvian SAH (n = 36). Complications were classified as minor or major if there was a neurologic impairment or if further surgical or medical treatment was necessary. Complications followed 15.4% of operations. They were classed as major for 4.1% of patients, but there were no mortalities. Persistent neurologic deficits occurred in 0.5% of patients. In 3 cases (0.8%) additional surgery was necessary to treat an intracranial hematoma, a delayed hydrocephalus, and a subdural empyema. Symptomatic visual field defects (VFDs) were frequent and included contralateral superior quadrantanopia (8.2%) or hemianopia (1.3%). Overall complications (P = 0.04) and symptomatic VFDs (P = 0.04) were most frequent in operations on men. Major complications occurred most often with the ATL surgical approach than with transcortical SAH (P = 0.03). Major complications occur rarely after mesial temporal surgery on epileptic patients. They occur more often following the ATL rather than transcortical SAH approach. Complications tend to be temporary with symptoms of limited duration for surgery performed by experienced teams on carefully selected and evaluated patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Sex differences in lateralization of semantic verbal fluency in temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Eichstaedt, Katie E; Soble, Jason R; Kamper, Joel E; Bozorg, Ali M; Benbadis, Selim R; Vale, Fernando L; Schoenberg, Mike R

    2015-02-01

    When differences exist, women tend to outperform men on measures of verbal fluency, possibly due to greater bilateral language representation. Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) have a higher rate of atypical cortical language representation than the general population, making them a population of interest for the study of language. For the current study, 78 TLE patients (51% male, 51% left temporal focus) underwent pre-surgical neuropsychological evaluations. Retrospective data analyses investigated the impact of seizure laterality and sex on letter and semantic verbal fluency. Results indicated an interaction between sex and laterality for semantic, but not letter, verbal fluency. Males with left TLE exhibited significantly worse semantic fluency than males with right TLE, whereas females' semantic fluency did not differ by seizure focus. These data indicate that females with TLE may indeed engage in more bilateral hemispheric processing of semantic verbal fluency, whereas males may be more reliant on left temporal cortical function for this task. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Resting state functional network disruptions in a kainic acid model of temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Ravnoor Singh Gill

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the graph topological properties of brain networks derived from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging in a kainic acid induced model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE in rats. Functional connectivity was determined by temporal correlation of the resting-state Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD signals between two brain regions during 1.5% and 2% isoflurane, and analyzed as networks in epileptic and control rats. Graph theoretical analysis revealed a significant increase in functional connectivity between brain areas in epileptic than control rats, and the connected brain areas could be categorized as a limbic network and a default mode network (DMN. The limbic network includes the hippocampus, amygdala, piriform cortex, nucleus accumbens, and mediodorsal thalamus, whereas DMN involves the medial prefrontal cortex, anterior and posterior cingulate cortex, auditory and temporal association cortex, and posterior parietal cortex. The TLE model manifested a higher clustering coefficient, increased global and local efficiency, and increased small-worldness as compared to controls, despite having a similar characteristic path length. These results suggest extensive disruptions in the functional brain networks, which may be the basis of altered cognitive, emotional and psychiatric symptoms in TLE.

  16. Resting state functional network disruptions in a kainic acid model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Gill, Ravnoor Singh; Mirsattari, Seyed M; Leung, L Stan

    2017-01-01

    We studied the graph topological properties of brain networks derived from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging in a kainic acid induced model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) in rats. Functional connectivity was determined by temporal correlation of the resting-state Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) signals between two brain regions during 1.5% and 2% isoflurane, and analyzed as networks in epileptic and control rats. Graph theoretical analysis revealed a significant increase in functional connectivity between brain areas in epileptic than control rats, and the connected brain areas could be categorized as a limbic network and a default mode network (DMN). The limbic network includes the hippocampus, amygdala, piriform cortex, nucleus accumbens, and mediodorsal thalamus, whereas DMN involves the medial prefrontal cortex, anterior and posterior cingulate cortex, auditory and temporal association cortex, and posterior parietal cortex. The TLE model manifested a higher clustering coefficient, increased global and local efficiency, and increased small-worldness as compared to controls, despite having a similar characteristic path length. These results suggest extensive disruptions in the functional brain networks, which may be the basis of altered cognitive, emotional and psychiatric symptoms in TLE.

  17. Evaluation of feature selection algorithms for classification in temporal lobe epilepsy based on MR images

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    Lai, Chunren; Guo, Shengwen; Cheng, Lina; Wang, Wensheng; Wu, Kai

    2017-02-01

    It's very important to differentiate the temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients from healthy people and localize the abnormal brain regions of the TLE patients. The cortical features and changes can reveal the unique anatomical patterns of brain regions from the structural MR images. In this study, structural MR images from 28 normal controls (NC), 18 left TLE (LTLE), and 21 right TLE (RTLE) were acquired, and four types of cortical feature, namely cortical thickness (CTh), cortical surface area (CSA), gray matter volume (GMV), and mean curvature (MCu), were explored for discriminative analysis. Three feature selection methods, the independent sample t-test filtering, the sparse-constrained dimensionality reduction model (SCDRM), and the support vector machine-recursive feature elimination (SVM-RFE), were investigated to extract dominant regions with significant differences among the compared groups for classification using the SVM classifier. The results showed that the SVM-REF achieved the highest performance (most classifications with more than 92% accuracy), followed by the SCDRM, and the t-test. Especially, the surface area and gray volume matter exhibited prominent discriminative ability, and the performance of the SVM was improved significantly when the four cortical features were combined. Additionally, the dominant regions with higher classification weights were mainly located in temporal and frontal lobe, including the inferior temporal, entorhinal cortex, fusiform, parahippocampal cortex, middle frontal and frontal pole. It was demonstrated that the cortical features provided effective information to determine the abnormal anatomical pattern and the proposed method has the potential to improve the clinical diagnosis of the TLE.

  18. Functional and structural correlates of memory in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Alexander James Barnett

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with medial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE often show material-specific memory impairment (verbal for left, visuospatial for right hemisphere which can be exacerbated following surgery aimed at the epileptogenic regions of medial and anterolateral temporal cortex. There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that characterization of structural and functional integrity of these regions using MRI can aid in prediction of post-surgical risk of further memory decline. We investigated the nature of the relationship between structural and functional indices of hippocampal integrity with preoperative memory performance in a group of 26 patients with unilateral mTLE. Structural integrity was assessed using hippocampal volumes, while functional integrity was assessed using hippocampal activation during the encoding of novel scenes. We quantified structural and functional integrity in terms of asymmetry, calculated as (L - R / (L + R. Factor scores for verbal and visual memory were calculated from a clinical database and an asymmetry score (verbal – visual was used to characterize memory performance. We found, as expected, a significant difference between left and right mTLE groups for hippocampal volume asymmetry, with each group showing an asymmetry favoring the unaffected temporal lobe. Encoding activation asymmetry showed a similar pattern, with left mTLE patients showing activation preferential to the right hemisphere and right mTLE patients showing the reverse. Finally, we demonstrated that functional integrity mediated the relationship between structural integrity and memory performance for memory asymmetry, suggesting that even if structural changes are evident, ultimately it is the functional integrity of the tissue that most closely explains behavioral performance. Our findings argue for the incorporation of functional imaging data in clinical protocols aimed at determining the functional integrity of the MTL in surgical planning.

  19. Mesial frontal lobe epilepsy.

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    Unnwongse, Kanjana; Wehner, Tim; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy

    2012-10-01

    Mesial frontal lobe epilepsies can be divided into epilepsies arising from the anterior cingulate gyrus and those of the supplementary sensorimotor area. They provide diagnostic challenges because they often lack lateralizing or localizing features on clinical semiology and interictal and ictal scalp electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings. A number of unique semiologic features have been described over the last decade in patients with mesial frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE). There are few reports of applying advanced neurophysiologic techniques such as electrical source imaging, magnetoencephalography, EEG/functional magnetic resonance imaging, or analysis of high-frequency oscillations in patients with mesial FLE. Despite these diagnostic challenges, it seems that patients with mesial FLE benefit from epilepsy surgery to the same extent or even better than patients with FLE do, as a whole.

  20. Navigation-assisted trans-inferotemporal cortex selective amygdalohippocampectomy for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy; preserving the temporal stem.

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    Kishima, Haruhiko; Kato, Amami; Oshino, Satoru; Tani, Naoki; Maruo, Tomoyuki; Khoo, Hui Ming; Yanagisawa, Takufumi; Edakawa, Kotaro; Kobayashi, Maki; Tanaka, Masataka; Hosomi, Koichi; Hirata, Masayuki; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2017-03-01

    Selective amygdalohippocampectomy (SAH) can be used to obtain satisfactory seizure control in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Several SAH procedures have been reported to achieve satisfactory outcomes for seizure control, but none yield fully satisfactory outcomes for memory function. We hypothesized that preserving the temporal stem might play an important role. To preserve the temporal stem, we developed a minimally invasive surgical procedure, 'neuronavigation-assisted trans-inferotemporal cortex SAH' (TITC-SAH). TITC-SAH was performed in 23 patients with MTLE (MTLE on the language-non-dominant hemisphere, n = 11). The inferior horn of the lateral ventricle was approached via the inferior or middle temporal gyrus along the inferior temporal sulcus under neuronavigation guidance. The hippocampus was dissected in a subpial manner and resected en bloc together with the parahippocampal gyrus. Seizure control at one year and memory function at 6 months postoperatively were evaluated. One year after TITC-SAH, 20 of the 23 patients were seizure-free (ILAE class 1), 2 were class 2, and 1 was class 3. Verbal memory improved significantly in 13 patients with a diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis, for whom WMS-R scores were available both pre- and post-operatively. Improvements were seen regardless of whether the SAH was on the language-dominant or non-dominant hemisphere. No major complication was observed. Navigation-assisted TITC-SAH performed for MTLE offers a simple, minimally invasive procedure that appears to yield excellent outcomes in terms of seizure control and preservation of memory function, because this procedure does not damage the temporal stem. TITC-SAH should be one of the feasible surgical procedures for MTLE. SAH: Amygdalohippocampectomy; MTLE: Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE); TITC-SAH: Ttrans-inferotemporal cortex SAH; ILAE: International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE); MRI: Magnetic resonance imaging; EEG

  1. The vulnerability of calretinin-containing hippocampal interneurons in temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Zsofia eMagloczky

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the vulnerability of a special interneuron type – the calretinin (CR-containing interneurons – in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE.CR is a calcium-binding protein expressed mainly by GABAergic interneurons in the hippocampus. Despite their morphological heterogeneity, CR-containing interneurons form a distinct subpopulation of inhibitory cells, innervating other interneurons in rodents and to some extent principal cells in the human. Their dendrites are strongly connected by zona adherentiae and presumably by gap junctions both in rats and humans. CR-containing interneurons are suggested to play a key role in the hippocampal inhibitory network, since they can effectively synchronize dendritic inhibitory interneurons.The sensitivity of CR-expressing interneurons to epilepsy was discussed in several reports, both in animal models and in humans. In the sclerotic hippocampus the density of CR-immunopositive cells is decreased significantly. In the non-sclerotic hippocampus, the CR-containing interneurons are preserved, but their dendritic tree is varicose, segmented, and zona-adherentia-type contacts can be less frequently observed among dendrites.Therefore, the dendritic inhibition of pyramidal cells may be less effective in TLE. This can be partially explained by the impairment of the CR-containing interneuron ensemble in the epileptic hippocampus, which may result in an asynchronous and thus less effective dendritic inhibition of the principal cells. This phenomenon, together with the sprouting of excitatory pathway axons and enhanced innervation of principal cells, may be involved in seizure generation.Preventing the loss of CR-positive cells and preserving the integrity of CR-positive dendrite gap junctions may have antiepileptic effects, maintaining proper inhibitory function and helping to protect principal cells in epilepsy.

  2. Restriction spectrum imaging reveals decreased neurite density in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loi, Richard Q; Leyden, Kelly M; Balachandra, Akshara; Uttarwar, Vedang; Hagler, Donald J; Paul, Brianna M; Dale, Anders M; White, Nathan S; McDonald, Carrie R

    2016-11-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has become a popular tool for delineating the location and extent of white matter injury in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). However, DTI yields nonspecific measures that are confounded by changes occurring within both the intracellular and extracellular environments. This study investigated whether an advanced diffusion method, restriction spectrum imaging (RSI) could provide a more robust measure of white matter injury in TLE relative to DTI due to RSI's ability to separate intraaxonal diffusion (i.e., neurite density; ND) from diffusion associated with extraaxonal factors (e.g., inflammation; crossing fibers). RSI and DTI scans were obtained on 21 patients with TLE and 11 age-matched controls. RSI-derived maps of ND, isotropic-hindered (IH) and isotropic-free (IF) water, and crossing fibers (CFs) were compared to DTI-derived fractional anisotropy (FA) maps. Voxelwise and tract-based analyses were performed comparing patients with TLE to controls on each diffusion metric. Reductions in FA were seen primarily in frontotemporal white matter in TLE, and they were most pronounced proximal to the seizure focus. Reductions in ND corresponded to those seen in the FA maps; however, ND reductions were greater in magnitude, more lateralized to the epileptogenic hemisphere, and showed a broader pattern. Increases in IF/IH and effects from CFs also contributed to reduced FA in the ipsilateral parahippocampal cingulum and fornix, with decreases in IH extending into extratemporal regions. Reduced ND of the uncinate fasciculus was associated with longer disease duration, whereas FA was not associated with any clinical variables. RSI may provide a more specific measure of white matter pathology in TLE, distinguishing regions primarily affected by axonal/myelin loss from those where CFs and increases in extracellular water also play a role. By providing a more specific measure of axonal/myelin loss, RSI-derived ND may better reflect overall white

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging connectivity for the prediction of seizure outcome in temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Morgan, Victoria L; Englot, Dario J; Rogers, Baxter P; Landman, Bennett A; Cakir, Ahmet; Abou-Khalil, Bassel W; Anderson, Adam W

    2017-07-01

    Currently, approximately 60-70% of patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) remain seizure-free 3 years after surgery. The goal of this work was to develop a presurgical connectivity-based biomarker to identify those patients who will have an unfavorable seizure outcome 1-year postsurgery. Resting-state functional and diffusion-weighted 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was acquired from 22 unilateral (15 right, 7 left) patients with TLE and 35 healthy controls. A seizure propagation network was identified including ipsilateral (to seizure focus) and contralateral hippocampus, thalamus, and insula, with bilateral midcingulate and precuneus. Between each pair of regions, functional connectivity based on correlations of low frequency functional MRI signals, and structural connectivity based on streamline density of diffusion MRI data were computed and transformed to metrics related to healthy controls of the same age. A consistent connectivity pattern representing the network expected in patients with seizure-free outcome was identified using eight patients who were seizure-free at 1-year postsurgery. The hypothesis that increased similarity to the model would be associated with better seizure outcome was tested in 14 other patients (Engel class IA, seizure-free: n = 5; Engel class IB-II, favorable: n = 4; Engel class III-IV, unfavorable: n = 5) using two similarity metrics: Pearson correlation and Euclidean distance. The seizure-free connectivity model successfully separated all the patients with unfavorable outcome from the seizure-free and favorable outcome patients (p = 0.0005, two-tailed Fisher's exact test) through the combination of the two similarity metrics with 100% accuracy. No other clinical and demographic predictors were successful in this regard. This work introduces a methodologic framework to assess individual patients, and demonstrates the ability to use network connectivity as a potential clinical tool for epilepsy surgery outcome

  4. Altered intrinsic functional connectivity in the latent period of epileptogenesis in a temporal lobe epilepsy model.

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    Lee, Hyoin; Jung, Seungmoon; Lee, Peter; Jeong, Yong

    2017-10-01

    The latent period, a seizure-free phase, is the duration between brain injury and the onset of spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRSs) during epileptogenesis. The latent period is thought to involve several progressive pathophysiological events that lead to the evolution of the chronic epilepsy phase. Hence, it is vital to investigate the changes in the latent period during epileptogenesis in order to better understand temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), and to achieve early diagnosis and appropriate management of the condition. Accordingly, recent studies with patients with TLE using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) have reported that alterations of resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) during the chronic period are associated with some clinical manifestations, including learning and memory impairments, emotional instability, and social behavior deficits, in addition to repetitive seizure episodes. In contrast, the changes in the intrinsic rsFC during epileptogenesis, particularly during the latent period, remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the alterations in intrinsic rsFC during the latent and chronic periods in a pilocarpine-induced TLE mouse model using intrinsic optical signal imaging (IOSI). This technique can monitor the changes in the local hemoglobin concentration according to neuronal activity and can help investigate large-scale brain intrinsic networks. After seeding on the anatomical regions of interest (ROIs) and calculating the correlation coefficients between each ROI, we established and compared functional correlation matrices and functional connectivity maps during the latent and chronic periods of epilepsy. We found a decrease in the interhemispheric rsFC at the frontal and temporal regions during both the latent and chronic periods. Furthermore, a significant decrease in the interhemispheric rsFC was observed in the somatosensory area during the chronic period. Changes in network configurations during

  5. Temporal lobe epilepsy and surgery selectively alter the dorsal, not the ventral, default-mode network

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    Gaelle Eve Doucet

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The default-mode network (DMN is a major resting-state network. It can be divided in 2 distinct networks: one is composed of dorsal and anterior regions (referred to as the dorsal DMN, dDMN, while the other involves the more posterior regions (referred to as the ventral DMN, vDMN. To date, no studies have investigated the potentially distinct impact of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE on these networks. In this context, we explored the effect of TLE and anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL on the dDMN and vDMN. We utilized 2 resting-state fMRI sessions from left, right TLE patients (pre-/post-surgery and normal controls (NCs, sessions 1/2. Using independent component analysis, we identified the 2 networks. We then evaluated for differences in spatial extent for each network between the groups, and across the scanning sessions. The results revealed that, pre-surgery, the dDMN showed larger differences between the three groups than the vDMN, and more particularly between right and left TLE than between the TLE patients and controls. In terms of change post-surgery, in both TLE groups, the dDMN also demonstrated larger changes than the vDMN. For the vDMN, the only changes involved the resected temporal lobe for each ATL group. For the dDMN, the left ATL group showed post-surgical increases in several regions outside the ictal temporal lobe. In contrast, the right ATL group displayed a large reduction in the frontal cortex. The results highlight that the 2 DMNs are not impacted by TLE and ATL in an equivalent fashion. Importantly, the dDMN was the more affected, with right ATL having a more deleterious effects on the dDMN than left ATL. We are the first to highlight that the dDMN more strongly bears the negative impact of TLE than the vDMN, suggesting there is an interaction between the side of pathology and DM subnetwork activity. Our findings have implications for understanding the impact TLE and subsequent ATL on the functions implemented by the distinct

  6. Cerebral Hemispheric Lateralization Associated with Hippocampal Sclerosis May Affect Interictal Cardiovascular Autonomic Functions in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    Rokia Ghchime

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that the temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is linked to the autonomic nervous system dysfunctions. Seizures alter the function of different systems such as the respiratory, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and urogenital systems. The aim of this work was to evaluate the possible factors which may be involved in interictal cardiovascular autonomic function in temporal lobe epilepsy with complex partial seizures, and with particular attention to hippocampal sclerosis. The study was conducted in 30 patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (19 with left hippocampal sclerosis, 11 with right hippocampal sclerosis. All subjects underwent four tests of cardiac autonomic function: heart rate changes in response to deep breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure variations throughout resting activity and during hand grip, mental stress, and orthostatic tests. Our results show that the right cerebral hemisphere predominantly modulates sympathetic activity, while the left cerebral hemisphere mainly modulates parasympathetic activity, which mediated tachycardia and excessive bradycardia counterregulation, both of which might be involved as a mechanism of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy patients (SUDEP.

  7. 3T MRI quantification of hippocampal volume and signal in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy improves detection of hippocampal sclerosis.

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    Coan, A C; Kubota, B; Bergo, F P G; Campos, B M; Cendes, F

    2014-01-01

    In mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, MR imaging quantification of hippocampal volume and T2 signal can improve the sensitivity for detecting hippocampal sclerosis. However, the current contributions of these analyses for the diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis in 3T MRI are not clear. Our aim was to compare visual analysis, volumetry, and signal quantification of the hippocampus for detecting hippocampal sclerosis in 3T MRI. Two hundred three patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy defined by clinical and electroencephalogram criteria had 3T MRI visually analyzed by imaging epilepsy experts. As a second step, we performed automatic quantification of hippocampal volumes with FreeSurfer and T2 relaxometry with an in-house software. MRI of 79 healthy controls was used for comparison. Visual analysis classified 125 patients (62%) as having signs of hippocampal sclerosis and 78 (38%) as having normal MRI findings. Automatic volumetry detected atrophy in 119 (95%) patients with visually detected hippocampal sclerosis and in 10 (13%) with visually normal MR imaging findings. Relaxometry analysis detected hyperintense T2 signal in 103 (82%) patients with visually detected hippocampal sclerosis and in 15 (19%) with visually normal MR imaging findings. Considered together, volumetry plus relaxometry detected signs of hippocampal sclerosis in all except 1 (99%) patient with visually detected hippocampal sclerosis and in 22 (28%) with visually normal MR imaging findings. In 3T MRI visually inspected by experts, quantification of hippocampal volume and signal can increase the detection of hippocampal sclerosis in 28% of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

  8. The influence of seizure frequency on anterograde and remote memory in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Voltzenlogel, Virginie; Vignal, Jean-Pierre; Hirsch, Edouard; Manning, Liliann

    2014-10-01

    Seizure frequency, although considered as an important factor in memory impairment in mesial temporal epilepsy (mTLE), is mostly confounded with other clinical variables, making it unclear to what extent recurrent seizures actually interfere with memory. The present study focuses on the influence of seizure frequency, studied as a main variable, on anterograde and remote memory. Seventy-one patients with unilateral mTLE were divided into two subgroups, as a function of their seizure frequency (monthly versus weekly seizures). Other seizure-related variables were controlled, namely, lateralisation and type of lesion, age at onset, years of ongoing seizures, etiologic factors, and number of AED. A comprehensive neuropsychological examination, including anterograde memory (verbal and non verbal recognition memory and free recall) tasks together with a large range of tests exploring different domains of remote memory, was carried out. Despite similar results on IQ, executive functions and attention, the low seizure-frequency group performed significantly better than the high seizure-frequency group on anterograde memory tests. Loss of autobiographical episodes and public-events memory, concomitant with spared personal semantic knowledge, was observed in both patient groups compared with healthy subjects. A worsening effect of high seizure frequency was recorded for autobiographical incidents and news-events memory, but unexpectedly, not for memory for famous people. The study of seizure frequency as the main variable leads us to suggest that high seizure frequency, itself, potentiates the effects of mesial temporal lobe damage on episodic memory deficits. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Differential gene expression in dentate granule cells in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with and without hippocampal sclerosis.

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    Griffin, Nicole G; Wang, Yu; Hulette, Christine M; Halvorsen, Matt; Cronin, Kenneth D; Walley, Nicole M; Haglund, Michael M; Radtke, Rodney A; Skene, J H Pate; Sinha, Saurabh R; Heinzen, Erin L

    2016-03-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis is the most common neuropathologic finding in cases of medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. In this study, we analyzed the gene expression profiles of dentate granule cells of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with and without hippocampal sclerosis to show that next-generation sequencing methods can produce interpretable genomic data from RNA collected from small homogenous cell populations, and to shed light on the transcriptional changes associated with hippocampal sclerosis. RNA was extracted, and complementary DNA (cDNA) was prepared and amplified from dentate granule cells that had been harvested by laser capture microdissection from surgically resected hippocampi from patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with and without hippocampal sclerosis. Sequencing libraries were sequenced, and the resulting sequencing reads were aligned to the reference genome. Differential expression analysis was used to ascertain expression differences between patients with and without hippocampal sclerosis. Greater than 90% of the RNA-Seq reads aligned to the reference. There was high concordance between transcriptional profiles obtained for duplicate samples. Principal component analysis revealed that the presence or absence of hippocampal sclerosis was the main determinant of the variance within the data. Among the genes up-regulated in the hippocampal sclerosis samples, there was significant enrichment for genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation. By analyzing the gene expression profiles of dentate granule cells from surgically resected hippocampal specimens from patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with and without hippocampal sclerosis, we have demonstrated the utility of next-generation sequencing methods for producing biologically relevant results from small populations of homogeneous cells, and have provided insight on the transcriptional changes associated with this pathology. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016

  10. Developing a comprehensive presurgical functional MRI protocol for patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy: a pilot study

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    Deblaere, K.; Vandemaele, P.; Achten, E. [MRI Department -1 K12, Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Backes, W.H.; Hofman, P.; Wilmink, J. [Department of Neuroradiology, University Hospital Maastricht, Postbus 5800, 6202 AZ Maastricht (Netherlands); Boon, P.A.; Vonck, K. [Department of Neurology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Boon, P. [Department of Medical Psychology, University Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands); Troost, J. [Department of Neurology, University Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands); Vermeulen, J. [S.E.I.N Heemstede, Psychological Laboratory, Achterweg 5, 2103 SW Heemstede (Netherlands); Aldenkamp, A. [Epilepsy Center ' Kempenhaeghe' , Postbus 61, 5900 AB Heeze (Netherlands)

    2002-08-01

    Our aim was to put together and test a comprehensive functional MRI (fMRI) protocol which could compete with the intracarotid amytal (IAT) or Wada test for the localisation of language and memory function in patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. The protocol was designed to be performed in under 1 h on a standard 1.5 tesla imager. We used five paradigms to test nine healthy right-handed subjects: complex scene-encoding, picture-naming, reading, word-generation and semantic-decision tasks. The combination of these tasks generated two activation maps related to memory in the mesial temporal lobes, and three language-related maps of activation in a major part of the known language network. The functional maps from the encoding and naming tasks showed typical and symmetrical posterior mesial temporal lobe activation related to memory in all subjects. Only four of nine subjects also showed symmetrical anterior hippocampal activation. Language lateralisation was best with the word generation and reading paradigms and proved possible in all subjects. The reading paradigm enables localisation of language function in the left anterior temporal pole and middle temporal gyrus, areas typically resected during epilepsy surgery. The combined results of this comprehensive f MRI protocol are adequate for a comparative study with the IAT in patients with epilepsy being assessed for surgery. (orig.)

  11. A Comparative Study of Feature Selection Methods for the Discriminative Analysis of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    Chunren Lai

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available It is crucial to differentiate patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE from the healthy population and determine abnormal brain regions in TLE. The cortical features and changes can reveal the unique anatomical patterns of brain regions from structural magnetic resonance (MR images. In this study, structural MR images from 41 patients with left TLE, 34 patients with right TLE, and 58 normal controls (NC were acquired, and four kinds of cortical measures, namely cortical thickness, cortical surface area, gray matter volume (GMV, and mean curvature, were explored for discriminative analysis. Three feature selection methods including the independent sample t-test filtering, the sparse-constrained dimensionality reduction model (SCDRM, and the support vector machine-recursive feature elimination (SVM-RFE were investigated to extract dominant features among the compared groups for classification using the support vector machine (SVM classifier. The results showed that the SVM-RFE achieved the highest performance (most classifications with more than 84% accuracy, followed by the SCDRM, and the t-test. Especially, the surface area and GMV exhibited prominent discriminative ability, and the performance of the SVM was improved significantly when the four cortical measures were combined. Additionally, the dominant regions with higher classification weights were mainly located in the temporal and the frontal lobe, including the entorhinal cortex, rostral middle frontal, parahippocampal cortex, superior frontal, insula, and cuneus. This study concluded that the cortical features provided effective information for the recognition of abnormal anatomical patterns and the proposed methods had the potential to improve the clinical diagnosis of TLE.

  12. Single-subject voxel-based relaxometry for clinical assessment of temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Kosior, Robert K; Lauzon, M Louis; Frayne, Richard; Federico, Paolo

    2009-09-01

    T2 relaxometry, quantitative assessment of T2 relaxation time in magnetic resonance (MR) data, typically uses manually drawn regions of interest (ROIs). This approach is limited by its subjectivity and its restricted scope of investigation. A recently developed approach called voxel-based relaxometry (VBR) provides an unbiased statistical analysis of the whole brain. Our objective was to assess the clinical utility of single-subject VBR for patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Forty-five patients with TLE confirmed by history, EEG, and structural MRI and 25 control subjects were scanned at 3T using a modified Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill MR sequence. ROIs were drawn for each patient and control subject, and measurements were made on unregistered T2 maps. VBR was performed on a single-subject basis at a significance level of alpha=0.05. Patients were grouped according to seizure focus (left mesial, right mesial, other), and whether structural MR imaging was normal or abnormal. Up to 85% of patients in the temporal lobe groups demonstrated T2 abnormalities. VBR detected abnormalities either in equal numbers or in more patients (up to 23% more) than ROI analysis for each group. The number of detected abnormalities per patient was higher using VBR (3.38 versus 2.04, p<0.05). VBR also identified abnormalities that were missed by ROI analysis. The rate of VBR detection of abnormalities was higher for patients than controls (76% versus 36%). VBR can be performed on single subjects with TLE and it detects considerably more abnormalities than ROI analysis. VBR may be a clinically useful tool for the detection of T2 abnormalities at the seizure focus and sites remote from it.

  13. Laser ablation therapy: An alternative treatment for medically resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy after age 50.

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    Waseem, Hena; Osborn, Katie E; Schoenberg, Mike R; Kelley, Valerie; Bozorg, Ali; Cabello, Daniel; Benbadis, Selim R; Vale, Fernando L

    2015-10-01

    Selective anterior mesial temporal lobe (AMTL) resection is considered a safe and effective treatment for medically refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). However, as with any open surgical procedure, older patients (aged 50+) face greater risks. Magnetic resonance-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy (MRgLITT) has shown recent potential as an alternative treatment for MTLE. As a less invasive procedure, MRgLITT could be particularly beneficial to older patients. To our knowledge, no study has evaluated the safety and efficacy of MRgLITT in this population. Seven consecutive patients (aged 50+) undergoing MRgLITT for MTLE were followed prospectively to assess surgical time, complications, postoperative pain control, length of stay (LOS), operating room (OR) charges, total hospitalization charges, and seizure outcome. Five of these patients were assessed at the 1-year follow-up for seizure outcome. These data were compared with data taken from 7 consecutive patients (aged 50+) undergoing AMTL resection. Both groups were of comparable age (mean: 60.7 (MRgLITT) vs. 53 (AMTL)). One AMTL resection patient had a complication of aseptic meningitis. One MRgLITT patient experienced an early postoperative seizure, and two MRgLITT patients had a partial visual field deficit. Seizure-freedom rates were comparable (80% (MRgLITT) and 100% (AMTL) (p>0.05)) beyond 1year postsurgery (mean follow-up: 1.0years (MRgLITT) vs. 1.8years (AMTL)). Mean LOS was shorter in the MRgLITT group (1.3days vs. 2.6days (p<0.05)). Neuropsychological outcomes were comparable. Short-term follow-up suggests that MRgLITT is safe and provides outcomes comparable to AMTL resection in this population. It also decreases pain medication requirement and reduces LOS. Further studies are necessary to assess the long-term efficacy of the procedure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Graph Theoretical Analysis of Structural Neuroimaging in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy with and without Psychosis.

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    Daichi Sone

    Full Text Available Psychosis is one of the most important psychiatric comorbidities in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE, and its pathophysiology still remains unsolved. We aimed to explore the connectivity differences of structural neuroimaging between TLE with and without psychosis using a graph theoretical analysis, which is an emerging mathematical method to investigate network connections in the brain as a small-world system.We recruited 11 TLE patients with unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (HS presenting psychosis or having a history of psychosis (TLE-P group. As controls, 15 TLE patients with unilateral HS without any history of psychotic episodes were also recruited (TLE-N group. For graph theoretical analysis, the normalized gray matter images of both groups were subjected to Graph Analysis Toolbox (GAT. As secondary analyses, each group was compared to 14 age- and gender-matched healthy subjects.The hub node locations were found predominantly in the ipsilateral hemisphere in the TLE-N group, and mainly on the contralateral side in the TLE-P group. The TLE-P group showed significantly higher characteristic path length, transitivity, lower global efficiency, and resilience to random or targeted attack than those of the TLE-N group. The regional comparison in betweenness centrality revealed significantly decreased connectivity in the contralateral temporal lobe, ipsilateral middle frontal gyrus, and bilateral postcentral gyri in the TLE-P group. The healthy subjects showed well-balanced nodes/edges distributions, similar metrics to TLE-N group except for higher small-worldness/modularity/assortativity, and various differences of regional betweenness/clustering.In TLE with psychosis, graph theoretical analysis of structural imaging revealed disrupted connectivity in the contralateral hemisphere. The network metrics suggested that the existence of psychosis can bring vulnerability and decreased efficiency of the whole-brain network. The sharp differences in

  15. Proton MR Spectroscopy in Patients with Structural MRI-Negative Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

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    Xu, Michael Y; Ergene, Erhan; Zagardo, Michael; Tracy, Patrick T; Wang, Huaping; Liu, WenChing; Machens, Nancy A

    2015-01-01

    With conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 20-30% of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) have negative pathological MRI findings. Further investigations of the role of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in the pre-surgical evaluation of patients with MRI-negative TLE are important to avoid intracranial EEG recording and to better understand the mechanism of the epileptogenic process. This study aimed to compare the measurements of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), creatine (Cr), and choline (Cho) in the hippocampi of MRI-negative TLE patients and normal subjects. Twenty patients with MRI-negative TLE and 10 age-matched healthy control subjects underwent MRI and MRS. The concentrations of NAA, Cr, and Cho and the ratios of NAA/Cr and NAA/(Cr+Cho) were measured. Seven of these 20 patients also underwent surgical treatment for TLE. Their pathological results and surgical outcomes were evaluated. In the hippocampi ipsilateral to the seizure side, the NAA/Cr and NAA/(Cr+Cho) ratios were significantly decreased compared with the ratios of the hippocampi contralateral to the seizure side and the normal control hippocampi. There was no significant difference between the hippocampi contralateral to the seizure side and the normal control hippocampi. The pathological results from the patients who underwent temporal lobe resection indicated mild to moderate gliosis and minimal loss of neurons. Five patients were seizure-free during the follow-up period of 9- 47 months (mean 27.7 months). In MRI-negative TLE, significant reductions in the NAA/Cr and NAA/(Cr+Cho) ratios ipsilateral to the seizure side may help lateralize and localize the epileptogenic zone. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  16. Quantitative MRI in refractory temporal lobe epilepsy: relationship with surgical outcomes

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    Bonilha, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) remains a serious health problem. Across treatment centers, up to 40% of patients with TLE will continue to experience persistent postoperative seizures at 2-year follow-up. It is unknown why such a large number of patients continue to experience seizures despite being suitable candidates for resective surgery. Preoperative quantitative MRI techniques may provide useful information on why some patients continue to experience disabling seizures, and may have the potential to develop prognostic markers of surgical outcome. In this article, we provide an overview of how quantitative MRI morphometric and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data have improved the understanding of brain structural alterations in patients with refractory TLE. We subsequently review the studies that have applied quantitative structural imaging techniques to identify the neuroanatomical factors that are most strongly related to a poor postoperative prognosis. In summary, quantitative imaging studies strongly suggest that TLE is a disorder affecting a network of neurobiological systems, characterized by multiple and inter-related limbic and extra-limbic network abnormalities. The relationship between brain alterations and postoperative outcome are less consistent, but there is emerging evidence suggesting that seizures are less likely to remit with surgery when presurgical abnormalities are observed in the connectivity supporting brain regions serving as network nodes located outside the resected temporal lobe. Future work, possibly harnessing the potential from multimodal imaging approaches, may further elucidate the etiology of persistent postoperative seizures in patients with refractory TLE. Furthermore, quantitative imaging techniques may be explored to provide individualized measures of postoperative seizure freedom outcome. PMID:25853080

  17. Frequency Specificity of fMRI in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

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    Shuyan Song

    Full Text Available Medial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE is a system-level disease characterized by aberrant neuronal synchronization and widespread alterations in function. Previous studies have focused on the amplitude analysis of the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD signals to reveal the aberrant alterations in mTLE. However, these methods did not work well in the cases where the amplitudes of two oscillations are correlated but the underlying oscillations are neither phase coherent nor frequency consistent. To address this problem, we investigated the differences of frequency specificity between patients with mTLE and healthy controls using the extreme-point symmetric mode decomposition (ESMD method. In this method, the BOLD signals were decomposed into a set of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs and the instantaneous frequency of each IMF was calculated using the direct interpolation strategy. The intrinsic frequency (denoted as Freq for every voxel was obtained by the weighted sum of the instantaneous frequencies of all the IMFs. The Freq was used as an index to evaluate the altered frequency specificity of 41 patients with mTLE (17 right-side, 24 left-side and 24 healthy control subjects. The results show that the peak of frequency distribution curve for the patients moves towards the higher frequency than that for the healthy controls. Compared with the healthy control group, the patients with left mTLE demonstrate higher Freq in the default mode network, middle frontal gyrus, insula, middle temporal gyrus and calcarine gyrus; the patients with right mTLE demonstrate higher Freq in the precuneus and occipital lobe. For the three groups, the distinct frequency distribution appears in the left and right hippocampus due to the hippocampal structural and functional asymmetries. The preliminary results imply that the frequency-specific correlated oscillations in the distributed brain regions can provide information about the nature of diseases affecting the

  18. Frequency Specificity of fMRI in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

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    Song, Shuyan; Ding, Mingyue; Li, Hong; Song, Xiaopeng; Fan, Wenliang; Zhang, Xuming; Xu, Haibo

    2016-01-01

    Medial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) is a system-level disease characterized by aberrant neuronal synchronization and widespread alterations in function. Previous studies have focused on the amplitude analysis of the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals to reveal the aberrant alterations in mTLE. However, these methods did not work well in the cases where the amplitudes of two oscillations are correlated but the underlying oscillations are neither phase coherent nor frequency consistent. To address this problem, we investigated the differences of frequency specificity between patients with mTLE and healthy controls using the extreme-point symmetric mode decomposition (ESMD) method. In this method, the BOLD signals were decomposed into a set of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) and the instantaneous frequency of each IMF was calculated using the direct interpolation strategy. The intrinsic frequency (denoted as Freq) for every voxel was obtained by the weighted sum of the instantaneous frequencies of all the IMFs. The Freq was used as an index to evaluate the altered frequency specificity of 41 patients with mTLE (17 right-side, 24 left-side) and 24 healthy control subjects. The results show that the peak of frequency distribution curve for the patients moves towards the higher frequency than that for the healthy controls. Compared with the healthy control group, the patients with left mTLE demonstrate higher Freq in the default mode network, middle frontal gyrus, insula, middle temporal gyrus and calcarine gyrus; the patients with right mTLE demonstrate higher Freq in the precuneus and occipital lobe. For the three groups, the distinct frequency distribution appears in the left and right hippocampus due to the hippocampal structural and functional asymmetries. The preliminary results imply that the frequency-specific correlated oscillations in the distributed brain regions can provide information about the nature of diseases affecting the brain and the

  19. Comparing CAT12 and VBM8 for Detecting Brain Morphological Abnormalities in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

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    Farnaz Farokhian

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The identification of the brain morphological alterations that play important roles in neurodegenerative/neurological diseases will contribute to our understanding of the causes of these diseases. Various automated software programs are designed to provide an automatic framework to detect brain morphological changes in structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data. A voxel-based morphometry (VBM analysis can also be used for the detection of brain volumetric abnormalities. Here, we compared gray matter (GM and white matter (WM abnormality results obtained by a VBM analysis using the Computational Anatomy Toolbox (CAT12 via the current version of Statistical Parametric Mapping software (SPM12 with the results obtained by a VBM analysis using the VBM8 toolbox implemented in the older software SPM8, in adult temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE patients with (n = 51 and without (n = 57 hippocampus sclerosis (HS, compared to healthy adult controls (n = 28. The VBM analysis using CAT12 showed that compared to the healthy controls, significant GM and WM reductions were located in ipsilateral mesial temporal lobes in the TLE-HS patients, and slight GM amygdala swelling was present in the right TLE-no patients (n = 27. In contrast, the VBM analysis via the VBM8 toolbox showed significant GM and WM reductions only in the left TLE-HS patients (n = 25 compared to the healthy controls. Our findings thus demonstrate that compared to VBM8, a VBM analysis using CAT12 provides a more accurate volumetric analysis of the brain regions in TLE. Our results further indicate that a VBM analysis using CAT12 is more robust and accurate against volumetric alterations than the VBM8 toolbox.

  20. MRI in temporal lobe epilepsy. Correlation between EEG, SPECT and clinical features

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    Uesugi, Hideji; Onuma, Teiichi; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Ishida, Shiro [National Center Hospital for Mental, Nervous and Muscular Disorders, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-02-01

    The relationship between MRI, SPECT, EEG and clinical features in temporal lobe epilepsy was investigated. Subjects were 162 patients (84 males, 78 females) whose average age was 38.1{+-}12.1 years. SPECT was carried out in 45 patients. The results were as follows: abnormal MR images were obtained in 36% of the group without epileptic discharge, and in 42% of the group with temporal spikes. There was no correlation between epileptic discharge in EEG and MRI abnormality. The lateralities of epileptic discharge and MRI were in disagreement in 9 of 39 patients (23%), indicating that determining the epileptic focus from scalp EEG was difficult. There was no correlation between the basic activity in EEG and abnormality in MRI. The rate of abnormal SPECT (89%) was higher than that of abnormal MRI (40%). The rate of the group with ictal automatism (52%) was higher than that of the group without ictal automatism (35%). The rate of abnormal MR images was high in the group with encephalitis (73%). The rate was higher in the group with febrile convulsion (62%) than in the group without it (28%). The rate of the abnormal MR images was higher in the group with a seizure frequency of at least several mal/month (48%) than in the group with a seizure frequency of less than several mal/year (29%). (author).

  1. Abnormalities of hippocampal-cortical connectivity in temporal lobe epilepsy patients with hippocampal sclerosis

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    Li, Wenjing; He, Huiguang; Lu, Jingjing; Wang, Chunheng; Li, Meng; Lv, Bin; Jin, Zhengyu

    2011-03-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis (HS) is the most common damage seen in the patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). In the present study, the hippocampal-cortical connectivity was defined as the correlation between the hippocampal volume and cortical thickness at each vertex throughout the whole brain. We aimed to investigate the differences of ipsilateral hippocampal-cortical connectivity between the unilateral TLE-HS patients and the normal controls. In our study, the bilateral hippocampal volumes were first measured in each subject, and we found that the ipsilateral hippocampal volume significantly decreased in the left TLE-HS patients. Then, group analysis showed significant thinner average cortical thickness of the whole brain in the left TLE-HS patients compared with the normal controls. We found significantly increased ipsilateral hippocampal-cortical connectivity in the bilateral superior temporal gyrus, the right cingulate gyrus and the left parahippocampal gyrus of the left TLE-HS patients, which indicated structural vulnerability related to the hippocampus atrophy in the patient group. However, for the right TLE-HS patients, no significant differences were found between the patients and the normal controls, regardless of the ipsilateral hippocampal volume, the average cortical thickness or the patterns of hippocampal-cortical connectivity, which might be related to less atrophies observed in the MRI scans. Our study provided more evidence for the structural abnormalities in the unilateral TLE-HS patients.

  2. The Role of Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway in Disrupted Hippocampal Neurogenesis of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: A Potential Therapeutic Target?

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    Huang, Cheng; Fu, Xiang-Hui; Zhou, Dong; Li, Jin-Mei

    2015-07-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is one of the most common clinical neurological disorders. One of the major pathological findings in temporal lobe epilepsy is hippocampal sclerosis, characterized by massive neuronal loss and severe gliosis. The epileptogenesis process of temporal lobe epilepsy usually starts with initial precipitating insults, followed by neurodegeneration, abnormal hippocampus circuitry reorganization, and the formation of hypersynchronicity. Experimental and clinical evidence strongly suggests that dysfunctional neurogenesis is involved in the epileptogenesis. Recent data demonstrate that neurogenesis is induced by acute seizures or precipitating insults, whereas the capacity of neuronal recruitment and proliferation substantially decreases in the chronic phase of epilepsy. Participation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in neurogenesis reveals its importance in epileptogenesis; its dysfunction contributes to the structural and functional abnormality of temporal lobe epilepsy, while rescuing this pathway exerts neuroprotective effects. Here, we summarize data supporting the involvement of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in the epileptogenesis of temporal lobe epilepsy. We also propose that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway may serve as a promising therapeutic target for temporal lobe epilepsy treatment.

  3. Administration of simvastatin after kainic acid-induced status epilepticus restrains chronic temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Chuncheng Xie

    Full Text Available In this study, we examined the effect of chronic administration of simvastatin immediately after status epilepticus (SE on rat brain with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. First, we evaluated cytokines expression at 3 days post KA-lesion in hippocampus and found that simvastatin-treatment suppressed lesion-induced expression of interleukin (IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α. Further, we quantified reactive astrocytosis using glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP staining and neuron loss using Nissl staining in hippocampus at 4-6 months after KA-lesion. We found that simvastatin suppressed reactive astrocytosis demonstrated by a significant decrease in GFAP-positive cells, and attenuated loss of pyramidal neurons in CA3 and interneurons in dentate hilar (DH. We next assessed aberrant mossy fiber sprouting (MFS that is known to contribute to recurrence of spontaneous seizure in epileptic brain. In contrast to the robust MFS observed in saline-treated animals, the extent of MFS was restrained by simvastatin in epileptic rats. Attenuated MFS was related to decreased neuronal loss in CA3 and DH, which is possibly a mechanism underlying decreased hippocampal susceptibility in animal treated with simvastatin. Electronic encephalography (EEG was recorded during 4 to 6 months after KA-lesion. The frequency of abnormal spikes in rats with simvastatin-treatment decreased significantly compared to the saline group. In summary, simvastatin treatment suppressed cytokines expression and reactive astrocytosis and decreased the frequency of discharges of epileptic brain, which might be due to the inhibition of MFS in DH. Our study suggests that simvastatin administration might be a possible intervention and promising strategy for preventing SE exacerbating to chronic epilepsy.

  4. Effect of invasive EEG monitoring on cognitive outcome after left temporal lobe epilepsy surgery.

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    Busch, Robyn M; Love, Thomas E; Jehi, Lara E; Ferguson, Lisa; Yardi, Ruta; Najm, Imad; Bingaman, William; Gonzalez-Martinez, Jorge

    2015-10-27

    The objective of this cohort study was to compare neuropsychological outcomes following left temporal lobe resection (TLR) in patients with epilepsy who had or had not undergone prior invasive monitoring. Data were obtained from an institutional review board-approved, neuropsychology registry for patients who underwent epilepsy surgery at Cleveland Clinic between 1997 and 2013. A total of 176 patients (45 with and 131 without invasive EEG) met inclusion criteria. Primary outcome measures were verbal memory and language scores. Other cognitive outcomes were also examined. Outcomes were assessed using difference in scores from before to after surgery and by presence/absence of clinically meaningful decline using reliable change indices (RCIs). Effect of invasive EEG on cognitive outcomes was estimated using weighting and propensity score adjustment to account for differences in baseline characteristics. Linear and logistic regression models compared surgical groups on all cognitive outcomes. Patients with invasive monitoring showed greater declines in confrontation naming; however, when RCIs were used to assess clinically meaningful change, there was no significant treatment effect on naming performance. No difference in verbal memory was observed, regardless of how the outcome was measured. In secondary outcomes, patients with invasive monitoring showed greater declines in working memory, which were no longer apparent using RCIs to define change. There were no outcome differences on other cognitive measures. Results suggest that invasive EEG monitoring conducted prior to left TLR is not associated with greater cognitive morbidity than left TLR alone. This information is important when counseling patients regarding cognitive risks associated with this elective surgery. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  5. Detection of hippocampal atrophy in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy: a 3-Tesla MRI shape.

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    Mumoli, Laura; Labate, Angelo; Vasta, Roberta; Cherubini, Andrea; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Aguglia, Umberto; Quattrone, Aldo; Gambardella, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    In patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE), brain MRI often detects hippocampal sclerosis (HS). Almost half of patients with MTLE do not show any hippocampal damage on visual or volumetric assessment. Here, we wished to prospectively assess 65 patients with MTLE (41 women, mean age: 39±10years, range: 21-69; right (12/65 patients) (MRI-negative) nMTLE; right (14/65 patients) (MRI-positive with HS) pMTLE; left (24/65 patients) nMTLE; and left (15/65 patients) pMTLE) using shape analysis (SA). There were significant differences among pMTLE versus nMTLE for age at seizure onset (20.2±12.8 vs. 31.8±16.7years; p=.0029), duration of epilepsy (14.6±12.7 vs. 21.3±9.6years; p=.0227), risk of refractoriness (p=.0067), frequency of antecedent febrile convulsions (FCs) (pShape analysis of hippocampal formation was conducted comparing each group versus 44 matched controls. In all four subgroups, SA detected a significant atrophy in the corresponding hippocampus that coincided with the epileptogenic area. The damage was significantly more severe in patients with pMTLE (F value: 5.00) than in subgroups with nMTLE (F value: 3.50) and mainly corresponded to the CA1 subregion and subiculum. In the patients with MTLE, SA detects hippocampal damage that lateralizes with the epileptogenic area. Such damage is most prominent in the CA1 subregion and subiculum that are crucial in the pathogenesis of MTLE. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. What do temporal lobe epilepsy and progressive mild cognitive impairment have in common?

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    Höller eYvonne

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE and mild cognitive impairment (MCI are both subject to intensive memory research. Memory problems are a core characteristic of both conditions and we wonder if there are analogies which would enrich the two distinct research communities.In this review we focus on memory decline in both conditions, that is, the most feared psychosocial effect. While it is clear that memory decline in MCI is highly likely and would lead to the more severe diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, it is a debate if TLE is a dementing disease or not. As such, like for MCI, one can differentiate progressive from stable TLE subtypes, mainly depending on the age of onset.Neuroimaging techniques such as volumetric analysis of the hippocampus, entorhinal, and perirhinal cortex show evidence of pathological changes in TLE and are predictive for memory decline in MCI. Several studies emphasize that it is necessary to extend the region of interest - even whole-brain characteristics can be predictive for conversion from MCI to Alzheimer's disease.Electroencephalography is increasingly subject to computational neuroscience, revealing new approaches for analyzing frequency, spatial synchronization, and information content of the signals. These methods together with event-related designs that assess memory functions are highly promising for understanding the mechanisms of memory decline in both TLE and MCI populations. Finally, there is evidence that the potential of such markers for memory decline is far from being exhausted.Similar structural and neurophysiological characteristics are linked to memory decline in TLE and MCI. We raise the hope that interdisciplinary research and cross-talk between fields such as research on epilepsy and dementia, will shed further light on the dementing characteristics of the pathological basis of MCI and TLE and support the development of new memory enhancing treatment strategies.

  7. Characterization and prediction of theory of mind disorders in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennion, Sophie; Delbeuck, Xavier; Duhamel, Alain; Lopes, Renaud; Semah, Franck; Tyvaert, Louise; Derambure, Philippe; Szurhaj, William

    2015-05-01

    Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) have impaired theory of mind (ToM). However, ToM involves a variety of processes, such as understanding a person's intentions ("cognitive" ToM) and emotional states ("affective" ToM). The objectives of the present study were to characterize ToM disorders in TLE patients, identify patients at risk of ToM disorders, and study the relationships between psychobehavioral and quality of life factors and ToM disorders. Fifty TLE patients and 50 controls performed ToM tasks assessing their understanding of verbal clumsiness (faux pas), sarcastic remarks, and mentalistic actions. Demographic, cognitive, and psychobehavioral data, and (for TLE patients) clinical and quality of life factors, were recorded. Compared with controls, TLE patients showed impairments in all ToM tasks: 84% misunderstood faux pas, and around 50% misunderstood sarcasm. A long duration of epilepsy and young age at onset were risk factors for ToM impairments. In TLE patients, ToM impairments were associated with impaired empathy and anhedonia. Their affective states were less positively and more negatively valenced than in controls. Low positive affectivity was predictive of greater cognitive and affective ToM impairments for the faux pas task, and high negative affectivity was predictive of greater cognitive ToM abilities for the sarcasm task. The lack of social support was correlated with impaired ToM but was not a predictive factor. Both cognitive and affective ToM processes are impaired in TLE patients. Impaired ToM has an impact on empathy abilities and is related to affective disturbances in TLE patients. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Mapping the neuropsychological profile of temporal lobe epilepsy using cognitive network topology and graph theory.

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    Kellermann, Tanja S; Bonilha, Leonardo; Eskandari, Ramin; Garcia-Ramos, Camille; Lin, Jack J; Hermann, Bruce P

    2016-10-01

    Normal cognitive function is defined by harmonious interaction among multiple neuropsychological domains. Epilepsy has a disruptive effect on cognition, but how diverse cognitive abilities differentially interact with one another compared with healthy controls (HC) is unclear. This study used graph theory to analyze the community structure of cognitive networks in adults with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) compared with that in HC. Neuropsychological assessment was performed in 100 patients with TLE and 82 HC. For each group, an adjacency matrix was constructed representing pair-wise correlation coefficients between raw scores obtained in each possible test combination. For each cognitive network, each node corresponded to a cognitive test; each link corresponded to the correlation coefficient between tests. Global network structure, community structure, and node-wise graph theory properties were qualitatively assessed. The community structure in patients with TLE was composed of fewer, larger, more mixed modules, characterizing three main modules representing close relationships between the following: 1) aspects of executive function (EF), verbal and visual memory, 2) speed and fluency, and 3) speed, EF, perception, language, intelligence, and nonverbal memory. Conversely, controls exhibited a relative division between cognitive functions, segregating into more numerous, smaller modules consisting of the following: 1) verbal memory, 2) language, perception, and intelligence, 3) speed and fluency, and 4) visual memory and EF. Overall node-wise clustering coefficient and efficiency were increased in TLE. Adults with TLE demonstrate a less clear and poorly structured segregation between multiple cognitive domains. This panorama suggests a higher degree of interdependency across multiple cognitive domains in TLE, possibly indicating compensatory mechanisms to overcome functional impairments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Interleukin-1β secretion in hippocampal sclerosis patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Nihal Olgac Dundar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS is a common medically intractable epilepsy syndrome. Although pathogenesis of HS still remains highly controversial, genetics may play a role as a predisposing factor. Previous evidence in a Japanese population revealed that the homozygotes for allele T at position −511 of the interleukin (IL-1β gene promoter region (IL-1β-511 T/T confers susceptibility to the development of HS. However, whether this polymorphism has an effect on IL-1β levels in MTLE-HS patients was not demonstrated. This study aimed to analyze the distribution of this particular polymorphism in a group of Turkish HS patients and correlate the polymorphism with IL-1β secretion from the lymphocytes, thus revealing a functional role for IL-1β in the etiopathogenesis of HS. A single base pair polymorphism at position −511 in the promoter region of the IL-1β gene was analyzed. The spontaneous and 1 ng/mL lipopolysaccharide-stimulated production of IL-1β by peripheral blood mononuclear cells after 4 and 24 h of incubation were measured by ELISA method. The heterozygous type (−511 C/T was the most common genotype. There was no difference in frequency of allele −511 T between patients and controls. Analysis of IL-1β levels, genotype and allele distributions showed no significant difference among the groups (P>0.05. Nevertheless, it was seen that patients who carry a T allele at position -511 of the IL-1β gene had increased IL-1β levels. T-allele carriage may be important. Only IL-1β secretion from the lymphocytes has been assessed in this study. Considering the importance of IL-1β in the etiopathogenesis of HS, further studies are needed to evaluate locally produced IL-1β levels.

  10. Concomitant fractional anisotropy and volumetric abnormalities in temporal lobe epilepsy: cross-sectional evidence for progressive neurologic injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon S Keller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and associated hippocampal sclerosis (TLEhs there are brain abnormalities extending beyond the presumed epileptogenic zone as revealed separately in conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI studies. However, little is known about the relation between macroscopic atrophy (revealed by volumetric MRI and microstructural degeneration (inferred by DTI. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: For 62 patients with unilateral TLEhs and 68 healthy controls, we determined volumes and mean fractional anisotropy (FA of ipsilateral and contralateral brain structures from T1-weighted and DTI data, respectively. We report significant volume atrophy and FA alterations of temporal lobe, subcortical and callosal regions, which were more diffuse and bilateral in patients with left TLEhs relative to right TLEhs. We observed significant relationships between volume loss and mean FA, particularly of the thalamus and putamen bilaterally. When corrected for age, duration of epilepsy was significantly correlated with FA loss of an anatomically plausible route - including ipsilateral parahippocampal gyrus and temporal lobe white matter, the thalamus bilaterally, and posterior regions of the corpus callosum that contain temporal lobe fibres - that may be suggestive of progressive brain degeneration in response to recurrent seizures. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Chronic TLEhs is associated with interrelated DTI-derived and volume-derived brain degenerative abnormalities that are influenced by the duration of the disorder and the side of seizure onset. This work confirms previously contradictory findings by employing multi-modal imaging techniques in parallel in a large sample of patients.

  11. [Temporal lobe epilepsy due to an intracranial meningocele in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughammoura, A; Daoussi, N; Younes, S; Kilani, M; Chebel, S; Hattab, M; Frih-Ayed, M

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy has been rarely reported in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (formally known as von Recklinghausen disease), which may occur in 3 to 6% of cases. This condition is generally related to neuronal migration anomalies or cortical malformations. We report a case of temporal epilepsy secondary to temporal meningocele due to sphenoidal dysplasia in a patient who presented with neurofibromatosis type 1 and also discuss this association. © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. On the relationship between neurocysticercosis and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal sclerosis: coincidence or a pathogenic relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchin, Marino Muxfeldt; Velasco, Tonicarlo Rodrigues; dos Santos, Antonio Carlos; Sakamoto, Américo Ceiki

    2012-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) are two common worldwide forms of focal epilepsy. In regions where NCC is endemic, both diseases can be observed in the same patient. There is recent and growing evidence suggesting that NCC might contribute to or even cause MTLE-HS. In this article, we review the literature regarding NCC and temporal lobe epilepsy, specifically addressing the relationship between NCC and MTLE-HS. In addition, we review some scenarios where NCC seems to emerge as a causative agent or contributor to the development of MTLE-HS in some patients. This association is important because it may have an impact on the evaluation and treatment of a sizable proportion of patients with epilepsy. Insights from these clinical observations might also contribute to the understanding of the neurobiology of both NCC and MTLE-HS. We hope that our review might shed some light on this interesting interplay between two of the most common worldwide conditions associated with human focal epilepsy. PMID:23265552

  13. Dentate gyrus expression of nestin-immunoreactivity in patients with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis.

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    D'Alessio, L; Konopka, H; Escobar, E; Acuña, A; Oddo, S; Solís, P; Seoane, E; Kochen, S

    2015-04-01

    Granule cells pathology in dentate gyrus, have received considerable attention in terms of understanding the pathophysiology of temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis. The aim of this study was to determine the nestin (an intermediate filament protein expressed by newly formed cells), immunoreactivity (IR) in granular cells layers of hippocampal tissue extirpated during epilepsy surgical procedure, in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. Hippocampal sections of 16 patients with hippocampal sclerosis and drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy were processed using immunoperoxidase with antibody to nestin. Archival material from 8 normal post-mortem hippocampus, were simultaneously processed. Reactive area for nestin-IR, the total number of positive nestin cells per field (20×), and the MGV (mean gray value) was determined by computerized image analysis (ImageJ), and compared between groups. Student's t test was used for statistical analysis. Nestin-IR cells were found in granule cells layers of both controls and patients. Larger reactive somas (p sclerosis (p sclerosis. Further studies are required to determine the clinical implications on memory an emotional alterations such as depression. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Temporal pole abnormalities in temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis: Clinical significance and seizure outcome after surgery.

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    Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; D'Aniello, Alfredo; De Risi, Marco; Grillea, Giovanni; Quarato, Pier Paolo; Mascia, Addolorata; Grammaldo, Liliana G; Casciato, Sara; Morace, Roberta; Esposito, Vincenzo; Picardi, Angelo

    2015-11-01

    To assess the clinical significance of temporal pole abnormalities (temporopolar blurring, TB, and temporopolar atrophy, TA) in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and hippocampal sclerosis (HS) with a long post-surgical follow-up. We studied 60 consecutive patients with TLE-HS and 1.5 preoperative MRI scans who underwent surgery and were followed up for at least 5 years (mean follow-up 7.3 years). Based on findings of pre-surgical MRI, patients were classified according to the presence of TB or TA. Groups were compared on demographic, clinical, neuropsychological data, and seizure outcome. TB was found in 37 (62%) patients, while TA was found in 35 (58%) patients, always ipsilateral to HS, with a high degree of overlap (83%) between TB and TA (pepilepsy onset, side of surgery, seizure frequency, seizure outcome, and neuropsychological outcome. On the other hand, they were significantly older, had a longer duration of epilepsy, and displayed lower preoperative scores on several neuropsychological tests. Similar findings were observed for TA. Multivariate analysis corroborated the association between temporopolar abnormalities and age at onset, age at surgery (for TB only), and lower preoperative scores on some neuropsychological tests. Temporopolar abnormalities are frequent in patients with TLE-HS. Our data support the hypothesis that TB and TA are caused by seizure-related damages. These abnormalities did not influence seizure outcome, even after a long-term post-surgical follow-up. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cerebral blood flow in temporal lobe epilepsy: a partial volume correction study

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    Giovacchini, Giampiero [University Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Bonwetsch, Robert; Theodore, William H. [National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Strokes, Clinical Epilepsy Section, Bethesda, MD (United States); Herscovitch, Peter [National Institutes of Health, PET Department, Clinical Center, Bethesda, MD (United States); Carson, Richard E. [Yale PET Center, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2007-12-15

    Previous studies in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) have shown that, owing to brain atrophy, positron emission tomography (PET) can overestimate deficits in measures of cerebral function such as glucose metabolism (CMR{sub glu}) and neuroreceptor binding. The magnitude of this effect on cerebral blood flow (CBF) is unexplored. The aim of this study was to assess CBF deficits in TLE before and after magnetic resonance imaging-based partial volume correction (PVC). Absolute values of CBF for 21 TLE patients and nine controls were computed before and after PVC. In TLE patients, quantitative CMR{sub glu} measurements also were obtained. Before PVC, regional values of CBF were significantly (p<0.05) lower in TLE patients than in controls in all regions, except the fusiform gyrus contralateral to the epileptic focus. After PVC, statistical significance was maintained in only four regions: ipsilateral inferior temporal cortex, bilateral insula and contralateral amygdala. There was no significant difference between patients and controls in CBF asymmetry indices (AIs) in any region before or after PVC. In TLE patients, AIs for CBF were significantly smaller than for CMR{sub glu} in middle and inferior temporal cortex, fusiform gyrus and hippocampus both before and after PVC. A significant positive relationship between disease duration and AIs for CMR{sub glu}, but not CBF, was detected in hippocampus and amygdala, before but not after PVC. PVC should be used for PET CBF measurements in patients with TLE. Reduced blood flow, in contrast to glucose metabolism, is mainly due to structural changes. (orig.)

  16. Remote preoperative tonic-clonic seizures do not influence outcome after surgery for temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Rabiei, Amin H; Gracely, Edward J; Sperling, Michael R

    2016-10-15

    Tonic-clonic seizures are associated with greater chance of seizure relapse after anterior temporal lobectomy. We investigated whether the interval between the last preoperative tonic-clonic seizure and surgery relates to seizure outcome in patients with drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). In this retrospective study, patients were prospectively registered in a database from 1986 through 2014. Postsurgical outcome was categorized as seizure freedom or relapse. The relationship between surgical outcome and the interval between the last preoperative tonic-clonic seizure and surgery was investigated. One-hundred seventy-one patients were studied. Seventy nine (46.2%) patients experienced tonic-clonic seizures before surgery. Receiver operating characteristic curve of timing of the last preoperative tonic-clonic seizure was a moderate indicator to anticipate surgery failure (area under the curve: 0.657, significance; 0.016). The best cutoff that maximizes sensitivity and specificity was 27months; with a sensitivity of 0.76 and specificity of 0.60. Cox-Mantel analysis confirmed that the chance of becoming free of seizures after surgery in patients with no or remote history of preoperative tonic-clonic seizures was significantly higher compared with patients with a recent history (i.e., in 27months before surgery) (p=0.0001). The more remote the occurrence of preoperative tonic-clonic seizures, the better the postsurgical seizure outcome, with at least a two year gap being more favorable. A recent history of tonic-clonic seizures in a patient with MTLE may reflect more widespread epileptogenicity extending beyond the borders of mesial temporal structures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Relationship between imaging and pathological features and clinical factors in surgical cases of temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Uesugi, Hideji; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Onuma, Teiichi [National Hospital for Mental, Nervous and Muscular Disorders, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan); Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Arai, Nobutaka; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Maehara, Taketoshi; Yanashita, Akira

    1998-03-01

    The relationships between imaging, pathology and presumed causes in surgical cases of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) was studied. The subject was 62 patients. MRI, PET and SPECT were performed. Hematoxylin and eosin was used for pathological judgement. On MRI, mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) was detected in 48 of 52 patients (92%); 32 (62%) had high-signal intensity on T2-weighted images; 31 (60%) had atrophy {l_brace}23 (44%) had high-signal intensity on T2+atrophy{r_brace}; 5 (10%) had calcified lesions; and 2 (4%) had cystic lesions. On PET and SPECT, abnormal cerebral blood flow was noted in 33 of 36 (92%). On pathological findings (61 cases), Ammon`s horn sclerosis (AHS), tumors, gliosis in lateral temporal and meningeal inflammatory finding were detected in 42 (69%), 10 (23%) and 8 (13%) cases, respectively, whereas 2 showed no abnormalities. The 2 patients with normal pathology showed both high-signal intensity and atrophy on MRI. The presumed causes of TLE were encephalitis/meningitis and/or suspected of these diseases in 15 patients (24%), injuries at birth in 5 (8%), and none in 42 (68%). The presumed causes in the 43 patients with AHS were encephalitis/meningitis in 11, injuries at birth in 3, and none in 29. Of the 15 patients in whom encephalitis/meningitis was estimated as the causes of TLE, only 6 (40%) had pathological evidence of meningeal inflammatory finding. Of the 42 patients in whom cause could not be determined, 2 had pathological evidence of meningeal inflammatory finding. (K.H.)

  18. Relationship between resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging and memory function in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shenggen; Chen, Lin; Huang, Huapin; Lin, Wanhui

    2017-01-15

    To study memory impairment mechanisms of the medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) by analyzing the functional connectivity (FC) through resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI). Rs-fMRI data were acquired from 13 patients with left MTLE and 11 patients with right MTLE. Another 13 healthy volunteers were selected as controls. The altered FC pattern between the unilateral hippocampus and other regions of the brain in MTLE patients was compared to that of the normal control group. Then the correlation between the strength of FC and the clinical memory scale scores in patients with MTLE was determined. The scores of the following check points of MTLE patients including point to memory, recognition of nonsense figure, associative learning, the image free recall, portrait characteristic recall and memory quotient were significantly lower than those in the normal group (all Pmemory and recognition of nonsense figure were different between R-MTLE and L-MTLE patients. Different correlations between the strength of FC and the clinical memory scale scores were detected between R-MTLE and L-MTLE patients. The memory function of patients with MTLE was impaired. Patients with L-MTLE showed lower score on pure verbal memory test and those with R-MTLE showed weaker performance on pure visual memory test. Patients with MTLE showed extensive abnormal FC between hippocampus and particular encephalic regions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Ictal central apnea and bradycardia in temporal lobe epilepsy complicated by obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Nishimura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a 12-year-old boy who developed temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE with daily complex partial seizures (CPS and monthly generalized seizures. Moreover, he frequently snored while asleep since early childhood. Polysomnography (PSG revealed severe obstructive sleep apnea with apnea–hypopnea index (AHI of 37.8/h. Video-PSG with simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG recording captured two ictal apneic episodes during sleep, without any motor manifestations. The onset of rhythmic theta activity in the midtemporal area on EEG was preceded by the onset of apnea by several seconds and disappeared soon after cessation of central apnea. One episode was accompanied by ictal bradycardia of <48 beats/min which persisted for 50 s beyond the end of epileptic activity. After treatment with carbamazepine and tonsillectomy/adenoidectomy, the seizures were well controlled and AHI decreased to 2.5/h. Paroxysmal discharges also disappeared during this time. Uncontrolled TLE complicated by sleep apnea should be evaluated for the presence of ictal central apnea/bradycardia.

  20. Arousal in response to neutral pictures is modified in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennion, Sophie; Sequeira, Henrique; D'Hondt, Fabien; Duhamel, Alain; Lopes, Renaud; Tyvaert, Louise; Derambure, Philippe; Szurhaj, William; Delbeuck, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    The objectives of the present study were to (i) better characterize visual emotional experience in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), (ii) identify clinical risk factors that might be predictive of a change in emotional experience, and (iii) study the relationships between emotional experience and psychobehavioral/quality-of-life factors. Fifty patients with TLE and fifty matched controls evaluated the emotional content of unpleasant, pleasant, and neutral pictures with respect to their valence (unpleasant-to-pleasant) and arousal (low-to-high) levels. Demographic, cognitive, and psychobehavioral data were recorded for all participants, and clinical data and factors related to quality of life were also collected for patients with TLE. There were no significant differences between the group with TLE and the control group in terms of valence evaluations. However, arousal scores for neutral pictures were significantly higher in patients with TLE than in controls. There was also a nonsignificant trend towards lower arousal scores for pleasant pictures in patients with TLE than in controls. Although none of the recorded clinical factors were found to be related to emotional experience, the level of apathy was predictive of greater arousal experience for neutral pictures in patients with TLE. In conclusion, emotional experience appears to be modified in TLE and might be related to apathy. Changes in emotional experience should be taken into account in studies in which neutral stimuli are used to establish a baseline level when assessing emotional and cognitive processing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A functional MRI study of language networks in left medial temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Yu Aihong, E-mail: yuaihong163@tom.com [Department of Radiology, the 4th Medical College of Peking University, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Beijing 100035 (China); Wang Xiaoyi; Xu Guoqing [Beijing Normal University, State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing 100875 (China); Li Yongjie [Beijing Institute of Functional Neurosurgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100053 (China); Qin Wen; Li Kuncheng [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences (China); Wang, Yuping [Department of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences (China)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the abnormality of language networks in left medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) using fMRI. Materials and methods: Eight patients with left MTLE and 15 healthy subjects were evaluated. An auditory semantic judgment (AJ) paradigm was used. The fMRI data were collected on a 3T MR system and analyzed by AFNI (analysis of functional neuroimages) to generate the activation map. Results: Behavioral data showed that the reaction time of the left MTLE patients was significantly longer than that of controls on the AJ task (t = -3.396, P < 0.05). The left MTLE patients also exhibited diffusively decreased activation in the AJ task. Right hemisphere dominance of Broca's and Wernicke's areas was demonstrated in left MTLE patients. Conclusions: Long-term activation of spikes in left MTLE patients results in language impairment, which is associated with an abnormality of the brain neural network.

  2. Multimodal imaging of language reorganization in patients with left temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Hsuan A; Kemmotsu, Nobuko; Leyden, Kelly M; Kucukboyaci, N Erkut; Iragui, Vicente J; Tecoma, Evelyn S; Kansal, Leena; Norman, Marc A; Compton, Rachelle; Ehrlich, Tobin J; Uttarwar, Vedang S; Reyes, Anny; Paul, Brianna M; McDonald, Carrie R

    2017-07-01

    This study explored the relationships among multimodal imaging, clinical features, and language impairment in patients with left temporal lobe epilepsy (LTLE). Fourteen patients with LTLE and 26 controls underwent structural MRI, functional MRI, diffusion tensor imaging, and neuropsychological language tasks. Laterality indices were calculated for each imaging modality and a principal component (PC) was derived from language measures. Correlations were performed among imaging measures, as well as to the language PC. In controls, better language performance was associated with stronger left-lateralized temporo-parietal and temporo-occipital activations. In LTLE, better language performance was associated with stronger right-lateralized inferior frontal, temporo-parietal, and temporo-occipital activations. These right-lateralized activations in LTLE were associated with right-lateralized arcuate fasciculus fractional anisotropy. These data suggest that interhemispheric language reorganization in LTLE is associated with alterations to perisylvian white matter. These concurrent structural and functional shifts from left to right may help to mitigate language impairment in LTLE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Differences in graph theory functional connectivity in left and right temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Sharon; Stern, John M; Engel, Jerome; Levin, Harvey S; Haneef, Zulfi

    2014-12-01

    To investigate lateralized differences in limbic system functional connectivity between left and right temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) using graph theory. Interictal resting state fMRI was performed in 14 left TLE patients, 11 right TLE patients, and 12 controls. Graph theory analysis of 10 bilateral limbic regions of interest was conducted. Changes in edgewise functional connectivity, network topology, and regional topology were quantified, and then left and right TLE were compared. Limbic edgewise functional connectivity was predominantly reduced in both left and right TLE. More regional connections were reduced in right TLE, most prominently involving reduced interhemispheric connectivity between the bilateral insula and bilateral hippocampi. A smaller number of limbic connections were increased in TLE, more so in left than in right TLE. Topologically, the most pronounced change was a reduction in average network betweenness centrality and concurrent increase in left hippocampal betweenness centrality in right TLE. In contrast, left TLE exhibited a weak trend toward increased right hippocampal betweenness centrality, with no change in average network betweenness centrality. Limbic functional connectivity is predominantly reduced in both left and right TLE, with more pronounced reductions in right TLE. In contrast, left TLE exhibits both edgewise and topological changes that suggest a tendency toward reorganization. Network changes in TLE and lateralized differences thereof may have important diagnostic and prognostic implications. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Hippocampus shape analysis for temporal lobe epilepsy detection in magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohan, Zohreh; Azmi, Reza

    2016-03-01

    There are evidences in the literature that Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (TLE) causes some lateralized atrophy and deformation on hippocampus and other substructures of the brain. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), due to high-contrast soft tissue imaging, is one of the most popular imaging modalities being used in TLE diagnosis and treatment procedures. Using an algorithm to help clinicians for better and more effective shape deformations analysis could improve the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. In this project our purpose is to design, implement and test a classification algorithm for MRIs based on hippocampal asymmetry detection using shape and size-based features. Our method consisted of two main parts; (1) shape feature extraction, and (2) image classification. We tested 11 different shape and size features and selected four of them that detect the asymmetry in hippocampus significantly in a randomly selected subset of the dataset. Then, we employed a support vector machine (SVM) classifier to classify the remaining images of the dataset to normal and epileptic images using our selected features. The dataset contains 25 patient images in which 12 cases were used as a training set and the rest 13 cases for testing the performance of classifier. We measured accuracy, specificity and sensitivity of, respectively, 76%, 100%, and 70% for our algorithm. The preliminary results show that using shape and size features for detecting hippocampal asymmetry could be helpful in TLE diagnosis in MRI.

  5. Olfactory dysfunction in temporal lobe epilepsy: a case of ictus-related parosmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacek, Sarah; Stevenson, Richard J; Miller, Laurie A

    2007-11-01

    Olfactory abnormalities in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) usually involve either brief hallucinations prior to seizures or chronic impairments in odor discrimination and identification. We describe the case of a man (B.C.) with TLE with an unusual presentation, an ictus-related parosmia. B.C. reported distorted perception of odor quality and hedonics that could provoke nausea and gagging, typically at its most extreme in the week or so following a seizure. Measures of B.C.'s olfactory functioning were obtained at stages of the ictal cycle when parosmia symptoms were severe and when they had decreased. Unlike other parosmics, B.C.'s detection thresholds were always normal, and unlike others with TLE, he evidenced little impairment in identification or discrimination. Testing during a period of more severe parosmia suggested that B.C.'s experiences might be the result of hedonic changes. We argue this may be the effect of seizure activity on the amygdala, which is known to be involved in mediating emotive reactions to odors.

  6. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of semantic verbal fluency in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaimes-Bautista, A G; Rodríguez-Camacho, M; Martínez-Juárez, I E; Rodríguez-Agudelo, Y

    2017-08-29

    Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) perform poorly on semantic verbal fluency (SVF) tasks. Completing these tasks successfully involves multiple cognitive processes simultaneously. Therefore, quantitative analysis of SVF (number of correct words in one minute), conducted in most studies, has been found to be insufficient to identify cognitive dysfunction underlying SVF difficulties in TLE. To determine whether a sample of patients with TLE had SVF difficulties compared with a control group (CG), and to identify the cognitive components associated with SVF difficulties using quantitative and qualitative analysis. SVF was evaluated in 25 patients with TLE and 24 healthy controls; the semantic verbal fluency test included 5 semantic categories: animals, fruits, occupations, countries, and verbs. All 5 categories were analysed quantitatively (number of correct words per minute and interval of execution: 0-15, 16-30, 31-45, and 46-60seconds); the categories animals and fruits were also analysed qualitatively (clusters, cluster size, switches, perseverations, and intrusions). Patients generated fewer words for all categories and intervals and fewer clusters and switches for animals and fruits than the CG (P.05). Our results suggest an association between SVF difficulties in TLE and difficulty activating semantic networks, impaired strategic search, and poor cognitive flexibility. Attention, inhibition, and working memory are preserved in these patients. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Predicting the laterality of temporal lobe epilepsy from PET, MRI, and DTI: A multimodal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorian Pustina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pre-surgical evaluation of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE relies on information obtained from multiple neuroimaging modalities. The relationship between modalities and their combined power in predicting the seizure focus is currently unknown. We investigated asymmetries from three different modalities, PET (glucose metabolism, MRI (cortical thickness, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI; white matter anisotropy in 28 left and 30 right TLE patients (LTLE and RTLE. Stepwise logistic regression models were built from each modality separately and from all three combined, while bootstrapped methods and split-sample validation verified the robustness of predictions. Among all multimodal asymmetries, three PET asymmetries formed the best predictive model (100% success in full sample, >95% success in split-sample validation. The combinations of PET with other modalities did not perform better than PET alone. Probabilistic classifications were obtained for new clinical cases, which showed correct lateralization for 7/7 new TLE patients (100% and for 4/5 operated patients with discordant or non-informative PET reports (80%. Metabolism showed closer relationship with white matter in LTLE and closer relationship with gray matter in RTLE. Our data suggest that metabolism is a powerful modality that can predict seizure laterality with high accuracy, and offers high value for automated predictive models. The side of epileptogenic focus can affect the relationship of metabolism with brain structure. The data and tools necessary to obtain classifications for new TLE patients are made publicly available.

  8. Hippocampal GABA transporter distribution in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schijns, Olaf; Karaca, Ümit; Andrade, Pablo; de Nijs, Laurence; Küsters, Benno; Peeters, Andrea; Dings, Jim; Pannek, Heinz; Ebner, Alois; Rijkers, Kim; Hoogland, Govert

    2015-10-01

    To determine hippocampal expression of neuronal GABA-transporter (GAT-1) and glial GABA-transporter (GAT-3) in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and hippocampal sclerosis (HS). Hippocampal sections were immunohistochemically stained for GABA-transporter 1 and GABA-transporter-3, followed by quantification of the immunoreactivity in the hilus by optical density measurements. GABA-transporter 3 positive hilar cells were counted and GABA-transporter protein expression in sections that included all hippocampal subfields was quantified by Western blot. The hilar GABA-transporter 1 expression of patients with severe hippocampal sclerosis was about 7% lower compared to that in the mild hippocampal sclerosis/control group (psclerosis group than in the mild hippocampal sclerosis/control group (non-significant). Also, severe hippocampal sclerosis samples contained 34% less (non-significant) GABA-transporter 3 positive cells compared to that of controls. Protein expression as assessed by Western blot showed that GABA-transporter 1 was equally expressed in mild and severe hippocampal sclerosis samples, whereas GABA-transporter 3 was reduced by about 62% in severe hippocampal sclerosis samples (psclerosis. Implications for the use of GABAergic antiepileptic therapies in hippocampal sclerosis vs non-hippocampal sclerosis patients remain to be studied. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. MRI findings of temporal lobe epilepsy; Findings on superconducting MRI and a quantitative analysis of the hippocampus

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    Nakahara, Ichiro; Yin, Dali; Fukami, Masahiro; Kondo, Seiji; Takeuchi, Juji; Kanemoto, Kousuke; Sengoku, Akira; Kawai, Itsuo (National Utano Hospital, Kyoto (Japan))

    1992-12-01

    MRI findings were analyzed retrospectively in 46 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy in which the side of epileptogenic focus had been confirmed by EEG studies. T[sub 1]- and T[sub 2]-weighted images were obtained by the use of a 1.0 or 1.5 T superconducting-type MRI machine with a coronal scan perpendicular to the axis of the temporal horn of the lateral ventricle. Additional axial and sagittal scans were performed in some cases. The area of the hippocampal body was measured quantitatively using a computerized image-analysis system in 26 cases in which the hippocampus had been visualized with enough contrast on T[sub 1]-weighted coronal images. Abnormal findings were observed in 31/46 (67%) cases. Hippocampal (HC) and temporal lobe (TL) atrophy were observed in 18/46 (39%) and 23/46 (50%) cases respectively, and the side of the atrophy corresponded with the side of the epileptogenic focus, as confirmed by EEG studies, with specificities of 89% and 74% respectively. A quantitative measurement of the area of the hippocampal body showed unilateral hippocampal atrophy more than 10% in 18/25 (69%) cases (10-25%: 10 cases, 25-50%: 7 cases, 50%<: 1 case), with a specificity of 89%. A medial temporal T[sub 2] abnormality was observed in only 4 cases. Structural lesions were observed in 4 cases including an arachnoid cyst, an astrocytoma in amygdala, the Dandy-Walker syndrome, and tuberous sclerosis, using the more efficient imaging qualities than the CT scan. From these observations, it is apparant that superconducting MRI is extremely useful in the diagnosis of the epileptogenic topography of temporal lobe epilepsy. Particularly, hippocampal atrophy was found to correspond with the side of the epileptogenic focus on EEG with a high specificity; its quantitative evaluation could be one of the most important standards in detecting the operative indications for temporal lobe epilepsy. (author).

  10. Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis is a network disorder with altered cortical hubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Seung-Hyun; Jeong, Woorim; Chung, Chun Kee

    2015-05-01

    Electrophysiologic hubs within the large-scale functional networks in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) with hippocampal sclerosis (HS) have not been investigated. We hypothesized that mTLE with HS has different resting-state network hubs in their large-scale functional networks compared to the hubs in healthy controls (HC). We also hypothesized that the hippocampus would be a functional hub in mTLE patients with HS. Resting-state functional networks, identified by using magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals in the theta, alpha, beta, and gamma frequency bands, were evaluated. Networks in 44 mTLE patients with HS (left mTLE = 22; right mTLE = 22) were compared with those in 46 age-matched HC. We investigated betweenness centrality at the source-level MEG network. The main network hubs were at the pole of the left superior temporal gyrus in the beta band, the pole of the left middle temporal gyrus in the beta and gamma bands, left hippocampus in the theta and alpha bands, and right posterior cingulate gyrus in all four frequency bands in mTLE patients; all of which were different from the main network hubs in HC. Only patients with left mTLE showed profound differences from HC at the left hippocampus in the alpha band. Our analysis of resting-state MEG signals shows that altered electrophysiologic functional hubs in mTLE patients reflect pathophysiologic brain network reorganization. Because we detected network hubs in both hippocampal and extrahippocampal areas, it is probable that mTLE is a large-scale network disorder rather than a focal disorder. The hippocampus was a network hub in left mTLE but not in right mTLE patients, which may be due to intrinsic functional and structural asymmetries between left and right mTLE patients. The evaluation of cortical hubs, even in the spike-free resting-state, could be a clinical diagnostic marker of mTLE with HS. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  11. Ictal onset patterns of local field potentials, high frequency oscillations, and unit activity in human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Shennan Aibel; Alvarado-Rojas, Catalina; Bragin, Anatol; Behnke, Eric; Fields, Tony; Fried, Itzhak; Engel, Jerome; Staba, Richard

    2016-01-01

    To characterize local field potentials, high frequency oscillations, and single unit firing patterns in microelectrode recordings of human limbic onset seizures. Wide bandwidth local field potential recordings were acquired from microelectrodes implanted in mesial temporal structures during spontaneous seizures from six patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. In the seizure onset zone, distinct epileptiform discharges were evident in the local field potential prior to the time of seizure onset in the intracranial EEG. In all three seizures with hypersynchronous (HYP) seizure onset, fast ripples with incrementally increasing power accompanied epileptiform discharges during the transition to the ictal state (p local level. Patterns of incrementally increasing fast ripple power are consistent with observations in rats with experimental hippocampal epilepsy, suggesting that limbic seizures arise when small clusters of synchronously bursting neurons increase in size, coalesce, and reach a critical mass for propagation. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  12. A Prediction Algorithm for Drug Response in Patients with Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Based on Clinical and Genetic Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Alves, Mariana S; Secolin, Rodrigo; Carvalho, Benilton S; Yasuda, Clarissa L; Bilevicius, Elizabeth; Alvim, Marina K M; Santos, Renato O; Maurer-Morelli, Claudia V; Cendes, Fernando; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia

    2017-01-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy is the most common form of adult epilepsy in surgical series. Currently, the only characteristic used to predict poor response to clinical treatment in this syndrome is the presence of hippocampal sclerosis. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in genes encoding drug transporter and metabolism proteins could influence response to therapy. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate whether combining information from clinical variables as well as SNPs in candidate genes could improve the accuracy of predicting response to drug therapy in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. For this, we divided 237 patients into two groups: 75 responsive and 162 refractory to antiepileptic drug therapy. We genotyped 119 SNPs in ABCB1, ABCC2, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP1B1, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, CYP3A4, and CYP3A5 genes. We used 98 additional SNPs to evaluate population stratification. We assessed a first scenario using only clinical variables and a second one including SNP information. The random forests algorithm combined with leave-one-out cross-validation was used to identify the best predictive model in each scenario and compared their accuracies using the area under the curve statistic. Additionally, we built a variable importance plot to present the set of most relevant predictors on the best model. The selected best model included the presence of hippocampal sclerosis and 56 SNPs. Furthermore, including SNPs in the model improved accuracy from 0.4568 to 0.8177. Our findings suggest that adding genetic information provided by SNPs, located on drug transport and metabolism genes, can improve the accuracy for predicting which patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy are likely to be refractory to drug treatment, making it possible to identify patients who may benefit from epilepsy surgery sooner.

  13. The course of language functions after temporal lobe epilepsy surgery: a prospective study.

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    Giovagnoli, A R; Parente, A; Didato, G; Manfredi, V; Deleo, F; Tringali, G; Villani, F

    2016-12-01

    Anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) within the language-dominant hemisphere can impair naming. This prospective study examined the pre-operative to post-operative course of different language components, clarifying which changes are relevant within the short-term and long-term outcome of language. Patients with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) were evaluated using the Token, Boston Naming and Word Fluency tests assessing sentence comprehension and word-finding on visual, semantic or phonemic cues. A total of 106 patients were evaluated before and 6 months, 1 and 2 years after ATL; 60 patients were also evaluated after 5 years and 38 controls were assessed at baseline. Seizure outcome was comparable between the left and right TLE patients. Before surgery, naming and word fluency were impaired in the left and right TLE patients, whereas sentence comprehension was normal. After left or right ATL, word fluency progressively improved, naming showed early worsening and late improvement after left ATL and progressive improvement after right ATL, and sentence comprehension did not change. At the 5-year follow-up, naming improvement was clinically significant in 31% and 71% of the left and right TLE patients, respectively. Pre-operative naming, ATL laterality, schooling, and post-operative seizure frequency and number of antiepileptic drugs predicted post-operative naming. Pre-operative word fluency and schooling predicted post-operative word fluency. Left or right TLE can impair word-finding but not sentence comprehension. After ATL, word-finding may improve for a long time, depending on TLE laterality, seizure control and mental reserve. These findings may clarify prognosis prior to treatment. © 2016 EAN.

  14. Temporal Lobe White Matter Asymmetry and Language Laterality in Epilepsy Patients

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    Ellmore, Timothy M.; Beauchamp, Michael S.; Breier, Joshua I.; Slater, Jeremy D.; Kalamangalam, Giridhar P.; O’Neill, Thomas J.; Disano, Michael A.; Tandon, Nitin

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have advanced our knowledge of the organization of white matter subserving language function. It remains unclear, however, how DTI may be used to predict accurately a key feature of language organization: its asymmetric representation in one cerebral hemisphere. In this study of epilepsy patients with unambiguous lateralization on Wada testing (19 left and 4 right lateralized subjects; no bilateral subjects), the predictive value of DTI for classifying the dominant hemisphere for language was assessed relative to the existing standard - the intra-carotid Amytal (Wada) procedure. Our specific hypothesis is that language laterality in both unilateral left- and right-hemisphere language dominant subjects may be predicted by hemispheric asymmetry in the relative density of three white matter pathways terminating in the temporal lobe implicated in different aspects of language function: the arcuate (AF), uncinate (UF), and inferior longitudinal fasciculi (ILF). Laterality indices computed from asymmetry of high anisotropy AF pathways, but not the other pathways, classified the majority (19 of 23) of patients using the Wada results as the standard. A logistic regression model incorporating information from DTI of the AF, fMRI activity in Broca’s area, and handedness was able to classify 22 of 23 (95.6%) patients correctly according to their Wada score. We conclude that evaluation of highly anisotropic components of the AF alone has significant predictive power for determining language laterality, and that this markedly asymmetric distribution in the dominant hemisphere may reflect enhanced connectivity between frontal and temporal sites to support fluent language processes. Given the small sample reported in this preliminary study, future research should assess this method on a larger group of patients, including subjects with bihemispheric dominance. PMID:19874899

  15. Large-scale brain networks are distinctly affected in right and left mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    de Campos, Brunno Machado; Coan, Ana Carolina; Lin Yasuda, Clarissa; Casseb, Raphael Fernandes; Cendes, Fernando

    2016-09-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) with hippocampus sclerosis (HS) is associated with functional and structural alterations extending beyond the temporal regions and abnormal pattern of brain resting state networks (RSNs) connectivity. We hypothesized that the interaction of large-scale RSNs is differently affected in patients with right- and left-MTLE with HS compared to controls. We aimed to determine and characterize these alterations through the analysis of 12 RSNs, functionally parceled in 70 regions of interest (ROIs), from resting-state functional-MRIs of 99 subjects (52 controls, 26 right- and 21 left-MTLE patients with HS). Image preprocessing and statistical analysis were performed using UF(2) C-toolbox, which provided ROI-wise results for intranetwork and internetwork connectivity. Intranetwork abnormalities were observed in the dorsal default mode network (DMN) in both groups of patients and in the posterior salience network in right-MTLE. Both groups showed abnormal correlation between the dorsal-DMN and the posterior salience, as well as between the dorsal-DMN and the executive-control network. Patients with left-MTLE also showed reduced correlation between the dorsal-DMN and visuospatial network and increased correlation between bilateral thalamus and the posterior salience network. The ipsilateral hippocampus stood out as a central area of abnormalities. Alterations on left-MTLE expressed a low cluster coefficient, whereas the altered connections on right-MTLE showed low cluster coefficient in the DMN but high in the posterior salience regions. Both right- and left-MTLE patients with HS have widespread abnormal interactions of large-scale brain networks; however, all parameters evaluated indicate that left-MTLE has a more intricate bihemispheric dysfunction compared to right-MTLE. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3137-3152, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by

  16. A macaque model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy induced by unilateral intrahippocampal injection of kainic Acid.

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    Ning Chen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In order to better investigate the cause/effect relationships of human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE, we hereby describe a new non-human primate model of mTLE. METHODS: Ten macaques were studied and divided into 2 groups: saline control group (n = 4 and kainic acid (KA injection group (n = 6. All macaques were implanted bilaterally with subdural electrodes over temporal cortex and depth electrodes in CA3 hippocampal region. KA was stereotaxically injected into the right hippocampus of macaques. All animals were monitored by video and electrocorticography (ECoG to assess status epilepticus (SE and subsequent spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS. Additionally, in order to evaluate brain injury produced by SE or SRS, we used both neuroimaging, including magnetic resonance image (MRI & magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS, and histological pathology, including Nissl stainning and glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP immunostaining. RESULTS: The typical seizures were observed in the KA-injected animal model. Hippocampal sclerosis could be found by MRI & MRS. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E staining and GFAP immunostaining showed neuronal loss, proliferation of glial cells, formation of glial scars, and hippocampal atrophy. Electron microscopic analysis of hippocampal tissues revealed neuronal pyknosis, partial ribosome depolymerization, an abnormal reduction in rough endoplasmic reticulum size, expansion of Golgi vesicles and swollen star-shaped cells. Furthermore, we reported that KA was able to induce SE followed by SRS after a variable period of time. Similar to human mTLE, brain damage is confined to the hippocampus. Accordingly, hippocampal volume is in positive correlations with the neuronal cells count in the CA3, especially the ratio of neuron/glial cell. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that a model of mTLE can be developed in macaques by intra-hippocampal injection of KA. Brain damage is confined to the hippocampus which

  17. Prognostic factors for seizure outcome in patients with MRI-negative temporal lobe epilepsy: A meta-analysis and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiu; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Yao; Hu, Wenhan; Shao, Xiaoqiu; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Kai

    2016-05-01

    To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to identify predictors of postoperative seizure freedom in patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-negative temporal lobe epilepsy. Publications were screened from electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE), epilepsy archives, and bibliographies of relevant articles that were written in English. We recorded all possible risk factors that might predict seizure outcome after surgery. We calculated odds ratio (OR) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) of predictors for postoperative seizure freedom. Heterogeneity was assessed with I(2). All meta-analyses were performed using Review Manager. Epilepsy duration (OR=2.57, 95% CI=1.21-5.47, pepilepsy duration and scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) signals localized precisely in the temporal lobe predicted a better seizure outcome in patients with MRI-negative temporal lobe epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. "Tell me how do I feel"--emotion recognition and theory of mind in symptomatic mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broicher, Sarah D; Kuchukhidze, Giorgi; Grunwald, Thomas; Krämer, Günter; Kurthen, Martin; Jokeit, Hennric

    2012-01-01

    Specific interictal personality characteristics in epilepsy, sometimes referred to as "Waxman-Geschwind Syndrome", have been recognized for centuries and extensively described. Despite the persevering clinical impression that patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsies (MTLE) suffer from problems in communication and interpersonal relations, uncertainties and controversies remain as to the precise origin of these psychosocial difficulties. Here, we investigated social-cognitive and decision-making abilities using a set of tasks that combine behavioural and psychological measures of social and emotional variables to answer the question of whether patients with MTLE are specifically impaired in social cognition compared to both an epilepsy and a healthy control group. MTLE patients, an epilepsy control group (extra-MTLE; patients with epilepsy, not originating within the frontal or mesial temporal lobe) and healthy controls (HC) were assessed according to their general cognitive status as well as with our Social Cognition Battery, which included tests of basic processes of social cognition, theory of mind, decision making, and various aspects of psychopathology and quality of life. MTLE patients were significantly impaired compared to HC on most measures of the Social Cognition Battery. MTLE patients were predominantly impaired in general emotion recognition compared to extra-MTLE patients. Performance in the epilepsy control group, although not significantly differing from performance in either the MTLE or the healthy control group, lay between these two groups. MTLE can be considered a significant risk factor for the development of deficits in social cognition beyond weaknesses that might be associated with epilepsy as a stigmatized chronic neurological disorder. The presence of deficits in social cognition may explain various behavioural symptoms that have historically driven concepts such as "epileptic personality" or "interictal personality disorder" and may

  19. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) based assessment of gray matter loss in medial temporal lobe epilepsy; comparison with FDG PET

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    Kang, Hye Jin; Lee, Ho Young; Lee, Jae Sung; Kang, Eun Joo; Lee, Sang Gun; Chang, Kee Hyun; Lee, Dong Soo [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-02-01

    The aims of this study were to find brain regions in which gray matter volume was reduced and to show the capability of voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis for lateralizing epileptogenic zones in medial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE). The findings were compared with fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET). MR T1-weighted images of 12 left mTLE and 11 right mTLE patients were compared with those of 37 normal controls. Images were transformed to standard MNI space and averaged in order to create study-specific brain template. Each image was normalized to this local template and brain tissues were segmented. Modulation VBM analysis was performed in order to observe gray matter volume change. Gray matter was smoothed with a Gaussian kernel. After these preprocessing, statistical analysis was performed using statistical parametric mapping software (SPM99). FDG PET images were compared with those of 22 normal controls using SPM. Gray matter volume was significantly reduced in the left amygdala and hippocampus in left mTLE. In addition, volume of cerebellum, anterior cingulate, and fusiform gyrus in both sides and left insula was reduced. In right mTLE, volume was reduced significantly in right hippocampus. In contrast, FDG uptake was decreased in broad areas of left or right temporal lobes in left TLE and right TLE, respectively. Gray matter loss was found in the ipsilateral hippocampus by modulation VBM analysis in medial temporal lobe epilepsy. This VBM analysis might be useful in lateralizing the epileptogenic zones in medial temporal lobe epilepsy, while SPM analysis of FDG PET disclosed hypometabolic epileptogenic zones.

  20. Localizing value of seizure manifestations of temporal lobe epilepsies and the consequence of analyzing their sequential appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihara, T; Inoue, Y; Hiyoshi, T; Watanabe, Y; Kubota, Y; Tottori, T; Matsuda, K; Yagi, K; Seino, M

    1993-06-01

    We investigated the localizing and lateralizing value of principal seizure manifestations in temporal lobe epilepsies (signal symptoms, oroalimentary automatisms, somatomotor manifestations, unilateral dystonic posturing, ictal speech, motionless stare) of 223 complex partial seizures in 50 patients. All the patients had invasive long-term monitoring with the combined implantation of intracerebral electrodes in and subdural electrodes on the bilateral temporal lobes. Postoperative freedom from seizures was ascertained for longer than one year. We found that 35 patients had amygdalohippocampal seizures and 15 had lateral temporal seizures. The value of the manifestations was established in relation to the site and side of seizure origin and to the progression of seizure discharges within the unilateral temporal lobe or to the contralateral cerebral hemisphere. Several signs among the manifestations were found to be reliable in predicting the site or side of the temporal lobe seizure focus. We emphasized the importance of investigating sequential changes of seizure manifestations in relation to ictal EEG findings by means of simultaneous recording.

  1. Right fronto-limbic atrophy is associated with reduced empathy in refractory unilateral mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toller, Gianina; Adhimoolam, Babu; Rankin, Katherine P; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen; Kurthen, Martin; Jokeit, Hennric

    2015-11-01

    Refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is the most frequent focal epilepsy and is often accompanied by deficits in social cognition including emotion recognition, theory of mind, and empathy. Consistent with the neuronal networks that are crucial for normal social-cognitive processing, these impairments have been associated with functional changes in fronto-temporal regions. However, although atrophy in unilateral MTLE also affects regions of the temporal and frontal lobes that underlie social cognition, little is known about the structural correlates of social-cognitive deficits in refractory MTLE. In the present study, a psychometrically validated empathy questionnaire was combined with whole-brain voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to investigate the relationship between self-reported affective and cognitive empathy and gray matter volume in 55 subjects (13 patients with right MTLE, 9 patients with left MTLE, and 33 healthy controls). Consistent with the brain regions underlying social cognition, our results show that lower affective and cognitive empathy was associated with smaller volume in predominantly right fronto-limbic regions, including the right hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, thalamus, fusiform gyrus, inferior temporal gyrus, dorsomedial and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices, and in the bilateral midbrain. The only region that was associated with both affective and cognitive empathy was the right mesial temporal lobe. These findings indicate that patients with right MTLE are at increased risk for reduced empathy towards others' internal states and they shed new light on the structural correlates of impaired social cognition frequently accompanying refractory MTLE. In line with previous evidence from patients with neurodegenerative disease and stroke, the present study suggests that empathy depends upon the integrity of right fronto-limbic and brainstem regions and highlights the importance of the right mesial temporal lobe and midbrain

  2. Mesial temporal lobe morphology in intractable pediatric epilepsy: so-called hippocampal malrotation, associated findings, and relevance to presurgical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, James L; Awwad, Reem; Greiner, Hansel M; Vannest, Jennifer J; Miles, Lili; Mangano, Francesco T

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Diagnostic criteria for hippocampal malrotation (HIMAL) on brain MRI typically include a rounded hippocampus, vertical collateral sulcus, and architectural blurring. Relationship to epileptogenesis remains speculative, and usefulness for surgical guidance is unknown. The study was performed to determine the prevalence of hippocampal rotational anomalies in a cohort of pediatric patients with intractable epilepsy undergoing evaluation for surgery and to determine the significance of this finding in the context of surgical planning. METHODS Forty-eight surgically treated children with intractable epilepsy were compared with matched healthy subjects; reviewers were blinded to surgical side. Each temporal lobe was evaluated for rounded hippocampus, blurring, vertical collateral sulcus, wide choroidal fissure, enlarged temporal horn, low fornix, hippocampal signal, and findings of hippocampal sclerosis. A mesial temporal lobe (MTL) score was calculated by summing the number of features, and the collateral sulcus angle (CSA) was measured in each temporal lobe. Surgical side, pathological diagnosis, and imaging findings elsewhere in the brain were tabulated. Presence of HIMAL, associated imaging features, and MTL score were compared between sides, between epilepsy and control groups, in relationship to side of surgery, and in relationship to postoperative outcome. RESULTS Only 3 epilepsy patients (6.2%) and no controls exhibited all 3 features of HIMAL (p = 0.12). Eight of 48 (16.7%) epilepsy versus 2 of 48 (4.6%) control subjects had both a rounded hippocampus and vertical collateral sulcus (suggesting HIMAL) (p = 0.045). In control and epilepsy subjects, most findings were more prevalent on the left, and the left CSA was more vertical (p Epilepsy subjects had higher MTL scores (z = -2.95, p = 0.002) and more acute CSAs (p = 0.04) than controls. Only lateralizing raw MTL score had a significant association with surgical side (p = 0.03, OR 7.33); however, this

  3. Validation of diagnostic tests for depressive disorder in drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lemos Zingano, Bianca; Guarnieri, Ricardo; Diaz, Alexandre Paim; Schwarzbold, Marcelo Liborio; Bicalho, Maria Alice Horta; Claudino, Lucia Sukys; Markowitsch, Hans J; Wolf, Peter; Lin, Katia; Walz, Roger

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Depression subscale (HADS-D) as diagnostic tests for depressive disorder in drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS). One hundred three patients with drug-resistant MTLE-HS were enrolled. All patients underwent a neurological examination, interictal and ictal video-electroencephalogram (V-EEG) analyses, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Psychiatric interviews were based on DSM-IV-TR criteria and ILAE Commission of Psychobiology classification as a gold standard; HRSD, BDI, HADS, and HADS-D were used as psychometric diagnostic tests, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to determine the optimal threshold scores. For all the scales, the areas under the curve (AUCs) were approximately 0.8, and they were able to identify depression in this sample. A threshold of ≥9 on the HRSD and a threshold of ≥8 on the HADS-D showed a sensitivity of 70% and specificity of 80%. A threshold of ≥19 on the BDI and HADS-D total showed a sensitivity of 55% and a specificity of approximately 90%. The instruments showed a negative predictive value of approximately 87% and a positive predictive value of approximately 65% for the BDI and HADS total and approximately 60% for the HRSD and HADS-D. HRSD≥9 and HADS-D≥8 had the best balance between sensitivity (approximately 70%) and specificity (approximately 80%). However, with these thresholds, these diagnostic tests do not appear useful in identifying depressive disorder in this population with epilepsy, and their specificity (approximately 80%) and PPV (approximately 55%) were lower than those of the other scales. We believe that the BDI and HADS total are valid diagnostic tests for depressive disorder in patients with MTLE-HS, as

  4. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy and Hippocampal Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San-Juan, Daniel; Espinoza López, Dulce Anabel; Vázquez Gregorio, Rafael; Trenado, Carlos; Fernández-González Aragón, Maricarmen; Morales-Quezada, León; Hernandez Ruiz, Axel; Hernandez-González, Flavio; Alcaraz-Guzmán, Alejandro; Anschel, David J; Fregni, Felipe

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been evaluated in medication refractory epilepsy patients. The results have been inconclusive and protocols have varied between studies. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of two protocols of tDCS in adult patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS). This is a randomized placebo-controlled, double-blinded clinical trial, with 3 arms, 3 sessions, 5 sessions and placebo stimulation. Frequency of seizures (SZs), interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) and adverse effects (AEs) were registered before and after treatment, and at 30 and 60 days follow-up. Descriptive statistics, k-related samples, Friedman's test, and relative risk (RR) estimation were used for analysis. We included twenty-eight subjects (3d n = 12, 5d n = 8, placebo n = 8), 16/28 (57%) men, age 37.8(±10.9) years old. There was a significant reduction of the frequency of SZs at one (p = 0.001) and two (p = 0.0001) months following cathodal tDCS compared to baseline in the 3 arms (p = 0.0001). The mean reduction of SZ frequency at two months in both active groups was significantly higher than placebo (-48% vs. -6.25%, p < 0.008). At 3 days (-43.4% vs. -6.25%, p < 0.007) and 5 days (-54.6% vs. -6.25%, p < 0.010) individual groups showed a greater reduction of SZs. A significant IED reduction effect was found between baseline and immediately after interventions (p = 0.041) in all groups. Side effects were minor. Cathodal tDCS technique of 3 and 5 sessions decreased the frequency of SZs and IEDs (between baseline and immediately post-tDCS) in adult patients with MTLE-HS compared to placebo tDCS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Sleep affects cortical source modularity in temporal lobe epilepsy: A high-density EEG study.

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    Del Felice, Alessandra; Storti, Silvia Francesca; Manganotti, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) constitute a perturbation of ongoing cerebral rhythms, usually more frequent during sleep. The aim of the study was to determine whether sleep influences the spread of IEDs over the scalp and whether their distribution depends on vigilance-related modifications in cortical interactions. Wake and sleep 256-channel electroencephalography (EEG) data were recorded in 12 subjects with right temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) differentiated by whether they had mesial or neocortical TLE. Spikes were selected during wake and sleep. The averaged waking signal was subtracted from the sleep signal and projected on a bidimensional scalp map; sleep and wake spike distributions were compared by using a t-test. The superimposed signal of sleep and wake traces was obtained; the rising phase of the spike, the peak, and the deflections following the spike were identified, and their cortical generator was calculated using low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) for each group. A mean of 21 IEDs in wake and 39 in sleep per subject were selected. As compared to wake, a larger IED scalp projection was detected during sleep in both mesial and neocortical TLE (pEEG deflections followed the spike, the cortical sources of which displayed alternating activations of different cortical areas in wake, substituted by isolated, stationary activations in sleep in mesial TLE and a silencing in neocortical TLE. During sleep, the IED scalp region increases, while cortical interaction decreases. The interaction of cortical modules in sleep and wake in TLE may influence the appearance of IEDs on scalp EEG; in addition, IEDs could be proxies for cerebral oscillation perturbation. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Characterization and prediction of the recognition of emotional faces and emotional bursts in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennion, Sophie; Szurhaj, William; Duhamel, Alain; Lopes, Renaud; Tyvaert, Louise; Derambure, Philippe; Delbeuck, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The present study sought to characterize and predict the recognition of emotional stimuli (presented in a visual or auditory modality) by patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Fifty TLE patients and 50 matched controls performed two emotion recognition tasks (emotional faces and emotional bursts). Neutral stimuli were also presented, and emotional biases were monitored by analyzing errors. Demographic, cognitive, psychobehavioral and (in TLE patients only) clinical and quality of life data were also recorded. Compared with controls, TLE patients were impaired in the recognition of fear expressions in both visual and auditory modality tasks. However, impairments in the two channels were not always concomitant on the individual level. In the visual modality, recognition of disgust and neutral expressions was significantly worse in TLE patients. In the auditory modality, nonsignificant trends toward poor recognition of disgust and neutral expressions were observed. Negative biases were noted in TLE patients; expressions of fear (faces and bursts) were more frequently misinterpreted as disgust, and neutral facial expressions were more frequently misinterpreted as sadness. Impairments in the recognition of facial fear were less pronounced in left TLE patients who (according to structural magnetic resonance imaging, MRI) did not have any brain lesions. In TLE patients, low levels of social support (a quality of life parameter) were associated with worse recognition of facial disgust, and higher levels of apathy were associated with better recognition of neutral faces. TLE patients are impaired in some aspects of emotion recognition with both visual and auditory stimuli, although the differential impact of TLE on these modalities requires further research. These emotional impairments are related to quality of life and psychobehavioral parameters.

  7. Histopathology of 3 Tesla MRI-negative temporal lobe epilepsies.

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    Kogias, Evangelos; Altenmüller, Dirk-Matthias; Klingler, Jan-Helge; Schmeiser, Barbara; Urbach, Horst; Doostkam, Soroush

    2018-01-01

    Histopathology of MRI-negative temporal lobe epilepsies (TLE) shows heterogeneous findings. The use of either 1.5 or 3 Tesla MRI for the selection of MRI-negative cases and use of older classification systems instead of the current ILAE classification system may account for this heterogeneity. We focus on histopathology of 3 Tesla MRI-negative TLE according to ILAE criteria and investigate potential correlation to seizure outcome 1 year postoperatively. Twenty specimens (9 neocortical, 11 hippocampal) from eleven 3 Tesla MRI-negative patients with TLE were examined in two steps. Standard stains and immunohistochemical reactions as well as Palmini and Wyler criteria were used prospectively during the initial examination. Retrospectively, all specimens were re-examined and re-evaluated. Phospho-6 and calretinin stains and the ILAE criteria were used during the review examination. Initial examination revealed 7 focal cortical dysplasias (FCDs) Palmini type 1, two cases of cortical gliosis, 4 cases of hippocampal sclerosis (HS) Wyler grade 1 and seven cases of hippocampal gliosis. The review examination according to ILAE criteria revealed 4 FCDs type I and 5 mild malformations of cortical development. All hippocampal specimens showed "no HS/gliosis only" after the review examination. Histopathology showed no correlation to seizure outcome. This is the first histopathological study to include only 3 Tesla MRI-negative cases. The use of ILAE criteria lead to the diagnosis of "no HS/gliosis only" of all hippocampal specimens, a finding not in line with previously reported series. The spectrum of diagnoses within neocortical specimens showed accordingly more mild findings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Abnormalities of hippocampal signal intensity in patients with familial mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coan A.C.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE is associated with hippocampal atrophy and hippocampal signal abnormalities. In our series of familial MTLE (FMTLE, we found a high proportion of hippocampal abnormalities. To quantify signal abnormalities in patients with FMTLE we studied 152 individuals (46 of them asymptomatic with FMTLE. We used NIH-Image® for volumetry and signal quantification in coronal T1 inversion recovery and T2 for all cross-sections of the hippocampus. Values diverging by 2 or more SD from the control mean were considered abnormal. T2 hippocampal signal abnormalities were found in 52% of all individuals: 54% of affected subjects and 48% of asymptomatic subjects. T1 hippocampal signal changes were found in 34% of all individuals: 42.5% of affected subjects and 15% of asymptomatic subjects. Analysis of the hippocampal head (first three slices revealed T2 abnormalities in 73% of all individuals (74% of affected subjects and 72% of asymptomatic subjects and T1 abnormalities in 59% (67% of affected subjects and 41% of asymptomatic subjects. Affected individuals had smaller volumes than controls (P < 0.0001. There was no difference in hippocampal volumes between asymptomatic subjects and controls, although 39% of asymptomatic patients had hippocampal atrophy. Patients with an abnormal hippocampal signal (133 individuals had smaller ipsilateral volume, but no linear correlation could be determined. Hippocampal signal abnormalities in FMTLE were more frequently found in the hippocampal head in both affected and asymptomatic family members, including those with normal volumes. These results indicate that subtle abnormalities leading to an abnormal hippocampal signal in FMTLE are not necessarily related to seizures and may be determined by genetic factors.

  9. Multivariate pattern analysis reveals anatomical connectivity differences between the left and right mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Peng; An, Jie; Zeng, Ling-Li; Shen, Hui; Chen, Fanglin; Wang, Wensheng; Qiu, Shijun; Hu, Dewen

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated differences of clinical signs and functional brain network organizations between the left and right mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE), but the anatomical connectivity differences underlying functional variance between the left and right mTLE remain uncharacterized. We examined 43 (22 left, 21 right) mTLE patients with hippocampal sclerosis and 39 healthy controls using diffusion tensor imaging. After the whole-brain anatomical networks were constructed for each subject, multivariate pattern analysis was applied to classify the left mTLE from the right mTLE and extract the anatomical connectivity differences between the left and right mTLE patients. The classification results reveal 93.0% accuracy for the left mTLE versus the right mTLE, 93.4% accuracy for the left mTLE versus controls and 90.0% accuracy for the right mTLE versus controls. Compared with the right mTLE, the left mTLE exhibited a different connectivity pattern in the cortical-limbic network and cerebellum. The majority of the most discriminating anatomical connections were located within or across the cortical-limbic network and cerebellum, thereby indicating that these disease-related anatomical network alterations may give rise to a portion of the complex of emotional and memory deficit between the left and right mTLE. Moreover, the orbitofrontal gyrus, cingulate cortex, hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus, which exhibit high discriminative power in classification, may play critical roles in the pathophysiology of mTLE. The current study demonstrated that anatomical connectivity differences between the left mTLE and the right mTLE may have the potential to serve as a neuroimaging biomarker to guide personalized diagnosis of the left and right mTLE.

  10. Mitochondrial respiration deficits driven by reactive oxygen species in experimental temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, Shane; Liang, Li-Ping; Fulton, Ruth; Shimizu, Takahiko; Day, Brian; Patel, Manisha

    2015-03-01

    Metabolic alterations have been implicated in the etiology of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), but whether or not they have a functional impact on cellular energy producing pathways (glycolysis and/or oxidative phosphorylation) is unknown. The goal of this study was to determine if alterations in cellular bioenergetics occur using real-time analysis of mitochondrial oxygen consumption and glycolytic rates in an animal model of TLE. We hypothesized that increased steady-state levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) initiated by epileptogenic injury result in impaired mitochondrial respiration. We established methodology for assessment of bioenergetic parameters in isolated synaptosomes from the hippocampus of Sprague-Dawley rats at various times in the kainate (KA) model of TLE. Deficits in indices of mitochondrial respiration were observed at time points corresponding with the acute and chronic phases of epileptogenesis. We asked if mitochondrial bioenergetic dysfunction occurred as a result of increased mitochondrial ROS and if it could be attenuated in the KA model by pharmacologically scavenging ROS. Increased steady-state ROS in mice with forebrain-specific conditional deletion of manganese superoxide dismutase (Sod2(fl/fl)NEX(Cre/Cre)) in mice resulted in profound deficits in mitochondrial oxygen consumption. Pharmacological scavenging of ROS with a catalytic antioxidant restored mitochondrial respiration deficits in the KA model of TLE. Together, these results demonstrate that mitochondrial respiration deficits occur in experimental TLE and ROS mechanistically contribute to these deficits. Furthermore, this study provides novel methodology for assessing cellular metabolism during the entire time course of disease development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. P-glycoprotein expression and function in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, Maria; Asselin, Marie-Claude; Liu, Joan; Wang, Shaonan; McMahon, Adam; Anton-Rodriguez, José; Walker, Matthew; Symms, Mark; Brown, Gavin; Hinz, Rainer; Matthews, Julian; Bauer, Martin; Langer, Oliver; Thom, Maria; Jones, Terry; Vollmar, Christian; Duncan, John S; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Koepp, Matthias J

    2013-08-01

    Studies in rodent models of epilepsy suggest that multidrug efflux transporters at the blood-brain barrier, such as P-glycoprotein, might contribute to pharmacoresistance by reducing target-site concentrations of antiepileptic drugs. We assessed P-glycoprotein activity in vivo in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. We selected 16 patients with pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy who had seizures despite treatment with at least two antiepileptic drugs, eight patients who had been seizure-free on antiepileptic drugs for at least a year after 3 or more years of active temporal lobe epilepsy, and 17 healthy controls. All participants had a baseline PET scan with the P-glycoprotein substrate (R)-[(11)C]verapamil. Pharmacoresistant patients and healthy controls then received a 30-min infusion of the P-glycoprotein-inhibitor tariquidar followed by another (R)-[(11)C]verapamil PET scan 60 min later. Seizure-free patients had a second scan on the same day, but without tariquidar infusion. Voxel-by-voxel, we calculated the (R)-[(11)C]verapamil plasma-to-brain transport rate constant, K1 (mL/min/cm(3)). Low baseline K1 and attenuated K1 increases after tariquidar correspond to high P-glycoprotein activity. Between October, 2008, and November, 2011, we completed (R)-[(11)C]verapamil PET studies in 14 pharmacoresistant patients, eight seizure-free patients, and 13 healthy controls. Voxel-based analysis revealed that pharmacoresistant patients had lower baseline K1, corresponding to higher baseline P-glycoprotein activity, than seizure-free patients in ipsilateral amygdala (0·031 vs 0·036 mL/min/cm(3); p=0·014), bilateral parahippocampus (0·032 vs 0·037; pEURIPIDES number 201380). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Disrupted Structural and Functional Networks and Their Correlation with Alertness in Right Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: A Graph Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenyu; Li, Jianping; Chen, Xuemei; Ye, Wei; Zheng, Jinou

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) involves abnormal structural or functional connectivity in specific brain areas. However, limited comprehensive studies have been conducted on TLE associated changes in the topological organization of structural and functional networks. Additionally, epilepsy is associated with impairment in alertness, a fundamental component of attention. In this study, structural networks were constructed using diffusion tensor imaging tractography, and functional networks were obtained from resting-state functional MRI temporal series correlations in 20 right temporal lobe epilepsy (rTLE) patients and 19 healthy controls. Global network properties were computed by graph theoretical analysis, and correlations were assessed between global network properties and alertness. The results from these analyses showed that rTLE patients exhibit abnormal small-world attributes in structural and functional networks. Structural networks shifted toward more regular attributes, but functional networks trended toward more random attributes. After controlling for the influence of the disease duration, negative correlations were found between alertness, small-worldness, and the cluster coefficient. However, alertness did not correlate with either the characteristic path length or global efficiency in rTLE patients. Our findings show that disruptions of the topological construction of brain structural and functional networks as well as small-world property bias are associated with deficits in alertness in rTLE patients. These data suggest that reorganization of brain networks develops as a mechanism to compensate for altered structural and functional brain function during disease progression.

  13. Disrupted Structural and Functional Networks and Their Correlation with Alertness in Right Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: A Graph Theory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyu Jiang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE involves abnormal structural or functional connectivity in specific brain areas. However, limited comprehensive studies have been conducted on TLE associated changes in the topological organization of structural and functional networks. Additionally, epilepsy is associated with impairment in alertness, a fundamental component of attention. In this study, structural networks were constructed using diffusion tensor imaging tractography, and functional networks were obtained from resting-state functional MRI temporal series correlations in 20 right temporal lobe epilepsy (rTLE patients and 19 healthy controls. Global network properties were computed by graph theoretical analysis, and correlations were assessed between global network properties and alertness. The results from these analyses showed that rTLE patients exhibit abnormal small-world attributes in structural and functional networks. Structural networks shifted toward more regular attributes, but functional networks trended toward more random attributes. After controlling for the influence of the disease duration, negative correlations were found between alertness, small-worldness, and the cluster coefficient. However, alertness did not correlate with either the characteristic path length or global efficiency in rTLE patients. Our findings show that disruptions of the topological construction of brain structural and functional networks as well as small-world property bias are associated with deficits in alertness in rTLE patients. These data suggest that reorganization of brain networks develops as a mechanism to compensate for altered structural and functional brain function during disease progression.

  14. Comparative analysis of MR imaging, Ictal SPECT and EEG in temporal lobe epilepsy: a prospective IAEA multi-center study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaknun, John J. [University Hospital of Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Nuclear Medicine Section, Division of Human Health, Vienna (Austria); IAEA, Nuclear Medicine Section, Division of Human Health, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100, Wien (Austria); Bal, Chandrasekhar [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Medicine, New Delhi (India); Maes, Alex [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); AZ Groeninge, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium); Tepmongkol, Supatporn [Chulalongkorn University, Nuclear Medicine Division, Department of Radiology, Bangkok (Thailand); Vazquez, Silvia [Instituto de Investigaciones Neurologicas, FLENI, Department of Radiology, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Dupont, Patrick [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Dondi, Maurizio [Ospedale Maggiore, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Nuclear Medicine Section, Division of Human Health, Vienna (Austria)

    2008-01-15

    MR imaging, ictal single-photon emission CT (SPECT) and ictal EEG play important roles in the presurgical localization of epileptic foci. This multi-center study was established to investigate whether the complementary role of perfusion SPECT, MRI and EEG for presurgical localization of temporal lobe epilepsy could be confirmed in a prospective setting involving centers from India, Thailand, Italy and Argentina. We studied 74 patients who underwent interictal and ictal EEG, interictal and ictal SPECT and MRI before surgery of the temporal lobe. In all but three patients, histology was reported. The clinical outcome was assessed using Engel's classification. Sensitivity values of all imaging modalities were calculated, and the add-on value of SPECT was assessed. Outcome (Engel's classification) in 74 patients was class I, 89%; class II, 7%; class III, 3%; and IV, 1%. Regarding the localization of seizure origin, sensitivity was 84% for ictal SPECT, 70% for ictal EEG, 86% for MRI, 55% for interictal SPECT and 40% for interictal EEG. Add-on value of ictal SPECT was shown by its ability to correctly localize 17/22 (77%) of the seizure foci missed by ictal EEG and 8/10 (80%) of the seizure foci not detected by MRI. This prospective multi-center trial, involving centers from different parts of the world, confirms that ictal perfusion SPECT is an effective diagnostic modality for correctly identifying seizure origin in temporal lobe epilepsy, providing complementary information to ictal EEG and MRI. (orig.)

  15. Aberrant expression of miR-218 and miR-204 in human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis-Convergence on axonal guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaalund, Sanne S; Venø, Morten T; Bak, Mads

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is one of the most common types of the intractable epilepsies and is most often associated with hippocampal sclerosis (HS), which is characterized by pronounced loss of hippocampal pyramidal neurons. microRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to be dysregul...

  16. Learning and memory and its relationship with the lateralization of epileptic focus in subjects with temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Fuentes

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background : In medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE, previous studies addressing the hemispheric laterality of epileptogenic focus and its relationship with learning and memory processes have reported controversial findings. Objective : To compare the performance of MTLE patients according to the location of the epileptogenic focus on the left (MTLEL or right temporal lobe (MTLER on tasks of episodic learning and memory for verbal and visual content. Methods : One hundred patients with MTLEL and one hundred patients with MTLER were tested with the following tasks: the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT and the Logical Memory-WMS-R to evaluate verbal learning and memory; and the Rey Visual Design Learning Test (RVDLT and the Visual Reproduction-WMS-R to evaluate visual learning and memory. Results : The MTLEL sample showed significantly worse performance on the RAVLT (p < 0.005 and on the Logical Memory tests (p < 0.01 than MTLER subjects. However, there were no significant between-group differences in regard to the visual memory tests. Discussion : Our findings suggest that verbal learning and memory abilities are dependent on the structural and functional integrity of the left temporal lobe, while visual abilities are less dependent on the right temporal lobe.

  17. Comparison of manual tracing versus a semiautomatic radial measurement method in temporal lobe MRI volumetry for pharmacoresistant epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Christian-Andreas; Scorzin, Jasmin; Schramm, Johannes [University of Bonn, Department of Neurosurgery, Bonn (Germany); Koenig, Roy; Urbach, Horst [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology Neuroradiology, Bonn (Germany); Fimmers, Rolf [University of Bonn, Institute of Medical Biometry, Informatics and Epidemiology, Bonn (Germany); Zentner, Josef [University of Freiburg, Department of Neurosurgery, Freiburg (Germany); Lehmann, Thomas-Nicolas [Charite-University Medicine Berlin, Department of Neurosurgery, Berlin (Germany)

    2007-03-15

    The aim of this study was to test a modified radial semiautomated volumetry technique (radial divider technique, RDT) versus the manual volumetry technique (MVT) for proportionality of temporal subvolumes in 30 patients with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy. Included in the study were 30 patients (15 female, 15 male; mean age 39.6 years) with pharmacoresistant epilepsy (mean duration 26.6 years). MRI studies were performed preoperatively on a 1.5-T scanner. All image processing steps and volume measurements were performed using ANALYZE software. The volumes of six subregions were measured bilaterally; these included the superior temporal gyrus (STG), middle + inferior temporal gyrus (MITG), fusiform gyrus (FG), parahippocampal gyrus (PHG), amygdala (AM), and hippocampus (HP). Linear regression was used to investigate the relationship between the comparable subvolumes obtained with MVT and RDT. Very high correlations (R {sup 2} >0.95) between RDT and MVT were observed for the STG + MITG and the STG + MITG + FG, but low correlations for the PHG subvolumes and the combined PHG + HP + AM subvolumes. These observations were independent of the side of the pathology and of hemisphere. The two measurement techniques provided highly reliable proportional results. This series in a homogeneous group of TLE patients suggests that the much quicker RDT is suitable for determining the volume of temporolateral and laterobasal temporal lobe compartments, of both the affected and the non-affected side and the right and left hemisphere. (orig.)

  18. Involvement of fast-spiking cells in ictal sequences during spontaneous seizures in rats with chronic temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Adam R; Raedt, Robrecht; Steenland, Hendrik W; Sprengers, Mathieu; Bzymek, Katarzyna; Navratilova, Zaneta; Mesina, Lilia; Xie, Jeanne; Lapointe, Valerie; Kloosterman, Fabian; Vonck, Kristl; Boon, Paul A J M; Soltesz, Ivan; McNaughton, Bruce L; Luczak, Artur

    2017-09-01

    See Lenck-Santini (doi:10.1093/awx205) for a scientific commentary on this article. Epileptic seizures represent altered neuronal network dynamics, but the temporal evolution and cellular substrates of the neuronal activity patterns associated with spontaneous seizures are not fully understood. We used simultaneous recordings from multiple neurons in the hippocampus and neocortex of rats with chronic temporal lobe epilepsy to demonstrate that subsets of cells discharge in a highly stereotypical sequential pattern during ictal events, and that these stereotypical patterns were reproducible across consecutive seizures. In contrast to the canonical view that principal cell discharges dominate ictal events, the ictal sequences were predominantly composed of fast-spiking, putative inhibitory neurons, which displayed unusually strong coupling to local field potential even before seizures. The temporal evolution of activity was characterized by unique dynamics where the most correlated neuronal pairs before seizure onset displayed the largest increases in correlation strength during the seizures. These results demonstrate the selective involvement of fast spiking interneurons in structured temporal sequences during spontaneous ictal events in hippocampal and neocortical circuits in experimental models of chronic temporal lobe epilepsy. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain.

  19. The evaluation of FDG-PET imaging for epileptogenic focus localization in patients with MRI positive and MRI negative temporal lobe epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gok, Beril [Drexel University, Department of Radiology, Mercy Catholic Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Johns Hopkins University, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Baltimore, MD (United States); Jallo, George [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Neurosurgery, Baltimore, MD (United States); Hayeri, Reza [Drexel University, Department of Radiology, Mercy Catholic Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Wahl, Richard [Johns Hopkins University, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Baltimore, MD (United States); Aygun, Nafi [Johns Hopkins University, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2013-05-15

    We studied the contribution of interictal FDG-PET ([18 F] fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography) in epileptic focus identification in temporal lobe epilepsy patients with positive, equivocal and negative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ninety-eight patients who underwent surgical treatment for drug resistant temporal lobe epilepsy after neuropsychological evaluation, scalp video EEG monitoring, FDG-PET, MRI and/or long-term intracranial EEG and with >12 months clinical follow-up were included in this study. FDG-PET findings were compared to MRI, histopathology, scalp video EEG and long-term intracranial EEG monitoring. FDG-PET lateralized the seizure focus in 95 % of MRI positive, 69 % of MRI equivocal and 84 % of MRI negative patients. There was no statistically significant difference between the surgical outcomes among the groups with Engel class I and II outcomes achieved in 86 %, 86 %, 84 % of MRI positive, equivocal and negative temporal lobe epilepsy patients, respectively. The patients with positive unilateral FDG-PET demonstrated excellent postsurgical outcomes, with 96 % Engel class I and II. Histopathology revealed focal lesions in 75 % of MRI equivocal, 84 % of MRI positive, and 23 % of MRI negative temporal lobe epilepsy cases. FDG-PET is an accurate noninvasive method in lateralizing the epileptogenic focus in temporal lobe epilepsy, especially in patients with normal or equivocal MRIs, or non-lateralized EEG monitoring. Very subtle findings in MRI are often associated with histopathological lesions and should be described in MRI reports. The patients with negative or equivocal MRI temporal lobe epilepsy are good surgical candidates with comparable postsurgical outcomes to patients with MRI positive temporal lobe epilepsy. (orig.)

  20. [Surgery for intractable epilepsy in a patient with encephalocele of the temporal lobe: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, M S; Belyakova-Bodina, A I; Murtazina, A F; Brutyan, A G; Golovteev, A L; Aziatskaya, G A; Samoylov, A S; Zabelin, M V; Udalov, Yu D

    2017-01-01

    We describe a case of surgical treatment of intractable temporal epilepsy in a female patient with congenital middle cranial fossa encephalocele. We present clinical-anamnestic and neuroimaging data as well as the microscopic and macroscopic pictures of encephalocele. We analyze outcomes of surgery for this pathology, which have been reported in the literature. To date, there have been a few articles on this subject in the domestic literature. The development of neuroimaging techniques and a growing number of verified encephalocele cases promote the widespread use of surgery for treatment of intractable epilepsy. Congenital encephalocele should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intractable temporal epilepsy, and, if verified, surgical treatment is the method of choice in most cases.

  1. Temporal lobe epilepsy as a model to understand human memory: the distinction between explicit and implicit memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leritz, Elizabeth C; Grande, Laura J; Bauer, Russell M

    2006-08-01

    Decades of research have provided substantial evidence of memory impairments in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), including deficits in the encoding, storage, and retrieval of new information. These findings are not surprising, given the associated underlying neuroanatomy, including the hippocampus and surrounding medial temporal lobe structures. Because of its associated anatomic and cognitive characteristics, TLE has provided an excellent model by which to examine specific aspects of human memory functioning, including classic distinctions such as that between explicit and implicit memory. Various clinical and experimental research studies have supported the idea that both conscious and unconscious processes support memory functioning, but the role of relevant brain structures has been the subject of debate. This review is concerned with a discussion of the current status of this research and, importantly, how TLE can inform future studies of memory distinctions.

  2. Extratemporal hypometabolism on FDG PET in temporal lobe epilepsy as a predictor of seizure outcome after temporal lobectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Joon Young; Kim, Sun Jung; Kim, Byung-Tae; Kim, Sang Eun [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-dong, 135-710, Kangnam-ku, Seoul (Korea); Hong, Seung Bong; Seo, Dae Won [Department of Neurology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Hong, Seung Chyul [Department of Neurosurgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea)

    2003-04-01

    We investigated the relationship between the presence of extratemporal hypometabolism on fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) and seizure outcome after temporal lobectomy in patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). In 47 patients with intractable unilateral mesial TLE, regional metabolic changes on FDG PET images obtained during the 2 months preceding anterior temporal lobectomy were compared with postoperative seizure outcome. Postoperative seizure outcome was evaluated with a mean follow-up period of 6.1{+-}0.6 years (range 5.2-7.2 years). Forty-two (89%) of the 47 patients achieved a good postoperative seizure outcome (Engel class I or II). All patients had hypometabolism in the temporal cortex ipsilateral to the epileptogenic region on FDG PET scans. Fourteen (78%) of the 18 patients with hypometabolism only in the ipsilateral temporal cortex were completely seizure free (Engel class Ia) after surgery. In contrast, five (45%) of the 11 patients with extratemporal cortical hypometabolism confined to the ipsilateral cerebral hemisphere and only four (22%) of the 18 patients with hypometabolism in the contralateral cerebral cortex were completely seizure free after surgery. The postoperative seizure-free rates were significantly different across the three groups of patients with different cortical metabolic patterns (P<0.005). Furthermore, all of the nine patients with a non-class I outcome (Engel class II-IV) had extratemporal (including contralateral temporal) cortical hypometabolism. Thalamic hypometabolism was noted in 20 (43%) of the 47 patients (ipsilateral in 12, bilateral in 8). Sixteen (59%) of the 27 patients with normal thalamic metabolism were completely seizure free after surgery, while only seven (35%) of the 20 patients with thalamic hypometabolism became completely seizure free (P<0.05). Multivariate analysis revealed that among variables including clinical, EEG, magnetic resonance imaging

  3. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy and the Selective Reminding Test: The Conventional 30-Minute Delay Suffices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Brian D.; Fine, Jason; Dow, Christian; Seidenberg, Michael; Hermann, Bruce P.

    2005-01-01

    Conventional memory assessment may fail to identify memory dysfunction characterized by intact recall for a relatively brief period but rapid forgetting thereafter. This study assessed learning and retention after 30-min and 24-hr delays on auditory and visual selective reminding tests (SRTs) in right (n=20) and left (n=22) temporal lobe epilepsy…

  4. Age at onset in patients with medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy and mesial temporal sclerosis: impact on clinical manifestations and postsurgical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Sperling, Michael R

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the demographic and clinical manifestations and postsurgical outcome of childhood-onset mesial temporal sclerosis and temporal lobe epilepsy (MTS-TLE) and establishing the potential differences as compared to the patients with adult-onset MTS-TLE. In this retrospective study all patients with a clinical diagnosis of medically refractory TLE due to mesial temporal sclerosis, who underwent epilepsy surgery at Jefferson comprehensive epilepsy center, were recruited. Patients were prospectively registered in a database from 1986 through 2014. Postsurgical outcome was classified into two groups; seizure-free or relapsed. Clinical manifestations and outcome were compared between patients with childhood-onset MTS-TLE (i.e., age at onset of the first afebrile habitual seizure below 10 years) and those with adult-onset MTS-TLE (i.e., age at onset of the first afebrile habitual seizure 20 years or above). One hundred and twelve patients had childhood-onset MTS-TLE and 76 had adult-onset MTS-TLE. Demographic, clinical, EEG and MRI characteristics of these two groups were similar. Postoperative outcome was not statistically different between these two groups of patients (P=0.9). Temporal lobe epilepsy due to mesial temporal sclerosis is a common cause of epilepsy that can start from early childhood to late adulthood. The etiology of MTS-TLE may be different in various age groups, but it seems that when mesial temporal sclerosis is the pathological substrate of TLE, clinical manifestations and response to surgical treatment of patients are very similar in patients with childhood-onset MTS-TLE compared to those with adult-onset disease. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Historical Risk Factors Associated with Seizure Outcome After Surgery for Drug-Resistant Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Nei, Maromi; Sharan, Ashwini; Sperling, Michael R

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the possible influence of risk factors on seizure outcome after surgery for drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). This retrospective study recruited patients with drug-resistant MTS-TLE who underwent epilepsy surgery at Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center and were followed for a minimum of 1 year. Patients had been prospectively registered in a database from 1986 through 2014. After surgery outcome was classified into 2 groups: seizure-free or relapsed. The possible risk factors influencing long-term outcome after surgery were investigated. A total of 275 patients with MTS-TLE were studied. Two thirds of the patients had Engel's class 1 outcome and 48.4% of the patients had sustained seizure freedom, with no seizures since surgery. Patients with a history of tonic-clonic seizures in the year preceding surgery were more likely to experience seizure recurrence (odds ratio, 2.4; 95% confidence interval 1.19-4.80; P = 0.01). Gender, race, family history of epilepsy, history of febrile seizure, history of status epilepticus, duration of disease before surgery, intelligence quotient, and seizure frequency were not predictors of outcome. Many patients with drug-resistant MTS-TLE respond favorably to surgery. It is critical to distinguish among different types and etiologies of TLE when predicting outcome after surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Predictive value of hippocampal internal architecture asymmetry in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ver Hoef, Lawrence W; Williams, Frank B; Kennedy, Richard E; Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Knowlton, Robert C

    2013-09-01

    Asymmetry of hippocampal internal architecture (HIA) clarity has been suggested to be a sign of hippocampal sclerosis (HS) and is frequently associated with other MRI findings of HS. The goal of this work is to use a previously developed HIA visual scoring system (Ver Hoef et al., 2013) to quantify HIA asymmetry in a retrospective series of consecutive temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients and evaluate its value in predicting laterality of seizure onset both in patients with other signs of HS (HS+) and those without (HS-). The HIA scoring system was used to rate hippocampal asymmetry and to assess the agreement between HIA and seizure lateralization. The median values of the average HIA scores for each hippocampus were compared for HS+ epileptogenic hippocampi, HS- epileptogenic hippocampi, and non-epileptogenic hippocampi with a Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance by ranks. Pair-wise differences between groups were evaluated with the two-tailed Mann-Whitney U test. A logistic regression model examined the utility of average HIA asymmetry score in predicting the true laterality of seizure onset as determined by video-EEG. Sensitivity and specificity are calculated using various asymmetry thresholds in each patient group. Fifty-five patients were identified who met inclusion criteria. Thirteen patients (24%) were found to have hippocampal atrophy and/or signal abnormality indicative of HS (HS+) and 42 did not (HS-). Significant differences were observed in the distribution of individual and average HIA scores between each of the groups of hippocampi, with HS+ hippocampi having the lowest HIA scores and non-epileptogenic hippocampi having the highest. Logistic regression analysis showed that the average HIA asymmetry score was a strong predictor of the laterality of seizure onset (β=3.93508, pthreshold value of 0.5, the specificity for correctly predicting the side of seizure onset was between 95% and 100% with a sensitivity of 40-45%. Among HS+ patients, a

  7. Accelerated long-term forgetting in children with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascoigne, Michael B; Smith, Mary Lou; Barton, Belinda; Webster, Richard; Gill, Deepak; Lah, Suncica

    2014-07-01

    Adults with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) have been found to have accelerated long-term forgetting, but this phenomenon has not yet been investigated in children. Although deficits in recall of materials after short (20- to 30-minute) delays have been shown to slowly emerge from childhood to adolescence in patients with TLE, it is unknown whether such a trend will also be found in recall of materials after long delays. This study examined the presence of accelerated long-term forgetting in children with TLE and how it relates to chronological age. Twenty-three children with TLE and 58 healthy controls of similar age, sex distribution and socioeconomic status completed a battery of neuropsychological tests, including standardised tests of story recall and design location, as well as two experimental tests requiring the learning of words and design locations to a criterion, both of which assessed recall after short (30-min) and long (7-day) delays. Word recall at the 7-day delay (relative to the 30-min recall) was significantly poorer in the TLE group, compared to the control group. The TLE group also exhibited worse 30-min recall performance on a standardised test of story recall. Individual patient analyses revealed dissociation between performance on the experimental and standardised verbal memory tests; children who were impaired on the experimental test (7-day delay) were not impaired on the standardised test (30-min delay). Compared to controls, patients with a left-hemisphere seizure focus recalled fewer words at short and long delays while patients with an abnormal hippocampus recalled fewer words at the long delay. No between-group differences were found with respect to the design location task. Age negatively correlated with the recall of words after short- and long-term delays within the TLE group, where older age was associated with worse memory. This association was not present in the control group. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show

  8. Increased Intrinsic Connectivity of the Default Mode Network in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Evidence from Resting-State MEG Recordings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Jung Hsiao

    Full Text Available The electrophysiological signature of resting state oscillatory functional connectivity within the default mode network (DMN during spike-free periods in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE remains unclear. Using magnetoencephalographic (MEG recordings, this study investigated how the connectivity within the DMN was altered in TLE, and we examined the effect of lateralized TLE on functional connectivity. Sixteen medically intractable TLE patients and 22 controls participated in this study. Whole-scalp 306-channel MEG epochs without interictal spikes generated from both MEG and EEG data were analyzed using a minimum norm estimate (MNE and source-based imaginary coherence analysis. With this processing, we obtained the cortical activation and functional connectivity within the DMN. The functional connectivity was increased between DMN and the right medial temporal (MT region at the delta band and between DMN and the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC regions at the theta band. The functional change was associated with the lateralization of TLE. The right TLE showed enhanced DMN connectivity with the right MT while the left TLE demonstrated increased DMN connectivity with the bilateral MT. There was no lateralization effect of TLE upon the DMN connectivity with ACC. These findings suggest that the resting-state functional connectivity within the DMN is reinforced in temporal lobe epilepsy during spike-free periods. Future studies are needed to examine if the altered functional connectivity can be used as a biomarker for treatment responses, cognitive dysfunction and prognosis in patients with TLE.

  9. Pathophysiology of mood disorders in temporal lobe epilepsy Fisiopatologia dos transtornos de humor na epilepsia do lobo temporal

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    Ludmyla Kandratavicius

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: There is accumulating evidence that the limbic system is pathologically involved in cases of psychiatric comorbidities in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE patients. Our objective was to develop a conceptual framework describing how neuropathological, neurochemical and electrophysiological aspects might contribute to the development of psychiatric symptoms in TLE and the putative neurobiological mechanisms that cause mood disorders in this patient subgroup. METHODS: In this review, clinical, experimental and neuropathological findings, as well as neurochemical features of the limbic system were examined together to enhance our understanding of the association between TLE and psychiatric comorbidities. Finally, the value of animal models in epilepsy and mood disorders was discussed. CONCLUSIONS:TLE and psychiatric symptoms coexist more frequently than chance would predict. Alterations and neurotransmission disturbance among critical anatomical networks, and impaired or aberrant plastic changes might predispose patients with TLE to mood disorders. Clinical and experimental studies of the effects of seizures on behavior and electrophysiological patterns may offer a model of how limbic seizures increase the vulnerability of TLE patients to precipitants of psychiatric symptoms.OBJETIVO: Há evidências crescentes do envolvimento do sistema límbico nas comorbidades psiquiátricas associadas à epilepsia do lobo temporal (ELT. Nosso objetivo foi descrever o panorama atual das alterações neuropatológicas, neuroquímicas e eletrofisiológicas que podem contribuir para o desenvolvimento de sintomas psiquiátricos na ELT e explorar possíveis mecanismos neurobiológicos que podem levar ao aparecimento das desordens de humor nesse subgrupo de pacientes. MÉTODOS: Achados clínicos, de modelos experimentais e neuropatológicos foram revistos, assim como características neuroquímicas do sistema límbico foram examinadas em conjunto para auxiliar

  10. Interictal brain SPECT in patients with medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy; SPECT cerebral interictal em pacientes com epilepsia do lobo temporal de dificil controle

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    Andraus, Maria Emilia Cosenza

    2000-06-01

    The brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is s functional neuroimaging method that can detect localized changes in cerebral blood flow. The temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common epileptic syndrome in adults, and more than 50% are medically refractory. The SPECT can contribute to investigation of epileptogenic focus and is one of the methods of pre-surgical evaluation of these patients. (author)

  11. Temporal lobe epilepsy and emotion recognition without amygdala: a case study of Urbach-Wiethe disease and review of the literature.

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    Meletti, Stefano; Cantalupo, Gaetano; Santoro, Francesca; Benuzzi, Francesca; Marliani, Anna Federica; Tassinari, Carlo Alberto; Rubboli, Guido

    2014-12-01

    We describe the epilepsy features and emotion recognition abilities (recognition of basic facial emotions and recognition of emotional prosody) in a patient with Urbach-Wiethe disease with bilateral amygdala calcifications. Our data, supported by ictal video-EEG recording, indicated that our patient suffered from mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Emotion recognition abilities were compared to those of healthy controls and those of patients with bilateral mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Our patient showed a selective impairment of the recognition of facial expression of fear, whereas recognition of emotional prosody was preserved, in contrast to bilateral mesial temporal lobe epilepsy patients that presented with deficits in both domains. We also reviewed the literature on epilepsy in Urbach-Wiethe disease (41 patients). Our findings suggest that in Urbach-Wiethe disease, the circumscribed damage of both amygdalae results in a selective dysfunction of fearful face processing, in contrast to bilateral mesial temporal lobe epilepsy patients who present with a widespread and multimodal impairment in the judgement of emotional stimuli.

  12. Combined18F-FDG-PET and diffusion tensor imaging in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis.

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    Aparicio, Javier; Carreño, Mar; Bargalló, Núria; Setoain, Xavier; Rubí, Sebastià; Rumià, Jordi; Falcón, Carles; Calvo, Anna; Martí-Fuster, Berta; Padilla, Nelly; Boget, Teresa; Pintor, Luís; Donaire, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Several studies using 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ( 18 F-FDG-PET) or diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have found both temporal and extratemporal abnormalities in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with ipsilateral hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS), but data are lacking about the findings of both techniques in the same patients. We aimed to determine whether the extent of 18 F-FDG-PET hypometabolism is related to DTI abnormalities. Twenty-one patients with MTLE-HS underwent comprehensive preoperative evaluation; 18 (86%) of these underwent epilepsy surgery. We analyzed and compared the pattern of white matter (WM) alterations on DTI and cortical hypometabolism on 18 F-FDG-PET. We found widespread temporal and extratemporal 18 F-FDG-PET and DTI abnormalities. Patterns of WM abnormalities and cortical glucose hypometabolism involved similar brain regions, being more extensive in the left than the right MTLE-HS. We classified patients into three groups according to temporal 18 F-FDG-PET patterns: hypometabolism restricted to the anterior third (n = 7), hypometabolism extending to the middle third (n = 7), and hypometabolism extending to the posterior third (n = 7). Patients with anterior temporal hypometabolism showed DTI abnormalities in anterior association and commissural tracts while patients with posterior hypometabolism showed WM alterations in anterior and posterior tracts. Patients with MTLE-HS have widespread metabolic and microstructural abnormalities that involve similar regions. The distribution patterns of these gray and white matter abnormalities differ between patients with left or right MTLE, but also with the extent of the 18 F-FDG-PET hypometabolism along the epileptogenic temporal lobe. These findings suggest a variable network involvement among patients with MTLE-HS.

  13. Automated tractography in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy using TRActs Constrained by UnderLying Anatomy (TRACULA).

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    Kreilkamp, Barbara A K; Weber, Bernd; Richardson, Mark P; Keller, Simon S

    2017-01-01

    A detailed understanding of white matter tract alterations in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is important as it may provide useful information for likely side of seizure onset, cognitive impairment and postoperative prognosis. However, most diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) studies have relied on manual reconstruction of tract bundles, despite the recent development of automated techniques. In the present study, we used an automated white matter tractography analysis approach to quantify temporal lobe white matter tract alterations in TLE and determine the relationships between tract alterations, the extent of hippocampal atrophy and the chronicity and severity of the disorder. We acquired preoperative T1-weighted and DTI data in 64 patients with well-characterized TLE, with imaging and histopathological evidence of hippocampal sclerosis. Identical acquisitions were collected for 44 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. We employed automatic probabilistic tractography DTI analysis using TRActs Constrained by UnderLying Anatomy (TRACULA) available in context of Freesurfer software for the reconstruction of major temporal lobe tract bundles. We determined the factors influencing probabilistic tract reconstruction and investigated alterations of DTI scalar metrics along white matter tracts with respect to hippocampal volume, which was automatically estimated using Freesurfer's morphometric pipelines. We also explored the relationships between white matter tract alterations and duration of epilepsy, age of onset of epilepsy and seizure burden (defined as a function of seizure frequency and duration of epilepsy). Whole-tract diffusion characteristics of patients with TLE differed according to side of epilepsy and were significantly different between patients and controls. Waypoint comparisons along each tract revealed that patients had significantly altered tissue characteristics of the ipsilateral inferior-longitudinal, uncinate fasciculus, superior

  14. Memory assessment in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy to predict memory impairment after surgery: A systematic review.

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    Parra-Díaz, P; García-Casares, N

    2017-04-19

    Given that surgical treatment of refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy may cause memory impairment, determining which patients are eligible for surgery is essential. However, there is little agreement on which presurgical memory assessment methods are best able to predict memory outcome after surgery and identify those patients with a greater risk of surgery-induced memory decline. We conducted a systematic literature review to determine which presurgical memory assessment methods best predict memory outcome. The literature search of PubMed gathered articles published between January 2005 and December 2015 addressing pre- and postsurgical memory assessment in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy patients by means of neuropsychological testing, functional MRI, and other neuroimaging techniques. We obtained 178 articles, 31 of which were included in our review. Most of the studies used neuropsychological tests and fMRI; these methods are considered to have the greatest predictive ability for memory impairment. Other less frequently used techniques included the Wada test and FDG-PET. Current evidence supports performing a presurgical assessment of memory function using both neuropsychological tests and functional MRI to predict memory outcome after surgery. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Distinctive Structural and Effective Connectivity Changes of Semantic Cognition Network across Left and Right Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Patients

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    Fan, Xiaotong; Shang, Kun; Wang, Xiaocui; Wang, Peipei; Shan, Yongzhi; Lu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Occurrence of language impairment in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) patients is common and left mTLE patients always exhibit a primary problem with access to names. To explore different neuropsychological profiles between left and right mTLE patients, the study investigated both structural and effective functional connectivity changes within the semantic cognition network between these two groups and those from normal controls. We found that gray matter atrophy of left mTLE patients was more severe than that of right mTLE patients in the whole brain and especially within the semantic cognition network in their contralateral hemisphere. It suggested that seizure attacks were rather targeted than random for patients with hippocampal sclerosis (HS) in the dominant hemisphere. Functional connectivity analysis during resting state fMRI revealed that subregions of the anterior temporal lobe (ATL) in the left HS patients were no longer effectively connected. Further, we found that, unlike in right HS patients, increased causal linking between ipsilateral regions in the left HS epilepsy patients cannot make up for their decreased contralateral interaction. It suggested that weakened contralateral connection and disrupted effective interaction between subregions of the unitary, transmodal hub of the ATL may be the primary cause of anomia in the left HS patients. PMID:28018680

  16. Biopsychosocial approaches to a patient with vomiting of 10 years' duration – a case of temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Kitamura Kana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vomiting is commonly encountered in clinical medicine. When organic gastrointestinal, metabolic, and brain diseases are ruled out, many cases are considered to be functional. We experienced an adult patient with epilepsy whose main symptom was vomiting. Biopsychosocial approaches were needed to control the symptoms. Case presentation A 26-year-old female with a 10-year history of persistent vomiting was found to have temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. Throughout this time, during which the vomiting had become part of a vicious cycle, her epilepsy was poorly controlled by medication. Biopsychosocial approaches were employed successfully and the patient subsequently undertook training to become a home-helper, started a job, and was able to leave her parents' house and live independently. All of her symptoms resolved after she became self-sufficient. Discussion Vomiting without impaired consciousness is seldom considered to be a manifestation of epilepsy. Difficulty in recording an electroencephalogram (EEG because of the presence of persistent vomiting delayed the diagnosis. The improvement of symptoms was thought to have been due to the patient's emotional stabilization and physical improvement, which may have stabilized the limbic system. Conclusion When an illness persists for many years and conditioning and a vicious cycle occur secondarily, systematic biopsychosocial approaches are needed in addition to general treatment. Also, secondary symptoms make the diagnosis more difficult when efforts at treatment are ineffective.

  17. The overall pathological status of the left hippocampus determines preoperative verbal memory performance in left mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Witt, Juri-Alexander; Coras, Roland; Schramm, Johannes; Becker, Albert J; Elger, Christian E; Blümcke, Ingmar; Helmstaedter, Christoph

    2014-04-01

    Studies on hippocampal cell loss in epilepsy have produced diverging evidence as to which subfields are specifically related to memory. This may be due to rather small and often heterogeneous samples, or to different memory measures. Therefore, the current study examined hippocampal cell densities and memory in a large sample of patients with solely mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE), employing measures with proven sensitivity to mesiotemporal pathology. In 104 patients who had undergone epilepsy surgery for mTLE, we evaluated the role of segmental hippocampal cell loss and its underlying factor structure with regard to presurgical verbal and figural memory while controlling for side-of-surgery and hemispheric dominance. First of all, patients showed material-specific memory impairment concordant with the lateralization of epilepsy. Factor analysis of segmental cell loss revealed a single factor reflecting the overall integrity of the hippocampus. The overall pathological status of the left hippocampus correlated with verbal memory parameters (r = 0.33-0.34, P hippocampus and memory function were found, nor did left or right hippocampal pathology explain figural memory parameters. The results suggest that the overall pathological status of the left hippocampus - rather than a specific subfield pathology - is predictive for verbal memory in mTLE. The finding that figural memory parameters, although sensitive to right mTLE, were not related to neuronal cell densities of the right hippocampus, puts the left/right hippocampus verbal/nonverbal memory dichotomy into perspective. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Decision-making in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy: Delay gratification ability is not impaired in patients with hippocampal sclerosis.

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    Rzezak, Patricia; Lima, Ellen Marise; Pereira, Fabricio; Gargaro, Ana Carolina; Coimbra, Erica; de Vincentiis, Silvia; Velasco, Tonicarlo Rodrigues; Leite, João Pereira; Busatto, Geraldo F; Valente, Kette D

    2016-07-01

    Decision-making abilities have rarely been examined in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy related to hippocampal sclerosis (TLE-HS). We aimed to investigate the ability to delay gratification, a decision-making subdomain, in patients with intractable TLE-HS and to verify the association of delay gratification performance and cool executive function tests. We evaluated 27 patients with TLE-HS (mean age: 35.46 [±13.31] years; 7 males) and their cognitive performance was compared with that of 27 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (mean age: 35.33 [±12.05] years; 7 males), without epilepsy and psychiatric disorders. Patients were assessed using the delay discounting task (DDT) and tests of attention, shifting, inhibitory control, and concept formation. Results were correlated with clinical epilepsy variables such as age of onset, epilepsy duration, AED use, history of status epilepticus, febrile seizures, and the presence of generalized seizures. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way ANCOVA with years of education as a confounding factor. Patients and controls demonstrated similar performance on DDT, showing similar discount rate (p=0.935) and probability rate (p=0.585). Delay gratification was not related to cool executive function tests (Digit Span, Stroop Color Test, Trail Making Test, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, and Connors' CPT). History of status epilepticus, presence of generalized seizures and higher seizure frequency, age at onset, and epilepsy duration had a significant impact on DDT. Patients with intractable TLE-HS showed unimpaired delay gratification abilities, being able to accept a higher delay and a lower amount of chance for receiving a higher reward in the future. Clinical variables related to the epilepsy severity impacted the performance on delay gratification. Impairment on cool aspects of executive function was unrelated to this decision-making domain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Age at onset and seizure frequency affect white matter diffusion coefficient in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Nagy, Szilvia A; Horváth, Réka; Perlaki, Gábor; Orsi, Gergely; Barsi, Péter; John, Flóra; Horváth, Andrea; Kovács, Norbert; Bogner, Péter; Ábrahám, Hajnalka; Bóné, Beáta; Gyimesi, Csilla; Dóczi, Tamás; Janszky, József

    2016-08-01

    In mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS), structural abnormalities are present not only in the hippocampus but also in the white matter with ipsilateral predominance. Although the timing of epilepsy onset is commonly associated with clinical and semiological dissimilarities, limited data exist regarding white matter diffusion changes with respect to age at epilepsy onset. The aim of this study was to investigate diffusion changes in the white matter of patients with unilateral MTLE-HS with respect to clinical parameters and to compare them with an age- and sex-matched healthy control group. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were derived using monoexponential approaches from 22 (11 early and 11 late age at onset) patients with unilateral MTLE-HS and 22 age- and sex-matched control subjects after acquiring diffusion-weighted images on a 3T MRI system. Data were analyzed using two-tailed t-tests and multiple linear regression models. In the group with early onset MTLE-HS, ADC was significantly elevated in the ipsilateral hemispheric (p=0.04) and temporal lobe white matter (p=0.01) compared with that in controls. These differences were not detectable in late onset MTLE-HS patients. Apparent diffusion coefficient of the group with early onset MTLE-HS was negatively related to age at epilepsy onset in the ipsilateral hemispheric white matter (p=0.03) and the uncinate fasciculus (p=0.03), while in patients with late onset MTLE-HS, ADC was no longer dependent on age at epilepsy onset itself but rather on the seizure frequency in the ipsilateral uncinate fasciculus (p=0.03). Such diffusivity pattern has been associated with chronic white matter degeneration, reflecting myelin loss and higher extracellular volume which are more pronounced in the frontotemporal regions and also depend on clinical features. In the group with early onset MTLE-HS, the timing of epilepsy seems to be the major cause of white matter abnormalities while in late

  20. Topiramate and its effect on fMRI of language in patients with right or left temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Allendorfer, Jane B

    2012-05-01

    Topiramate (TPM) is well recognized for its negative effects on cognition, language performance and lateralization results on the intracarotid amobarbital procedure (IAP). But, the effects of TPM on functional MRI (fMRI) of language and the fMRI signals are less clear. Functional MRI is increasingly used for presurgical evaluation of epilepsy patients in place of IAP for language lateralization. Thus, the goal of this study was to assess the effects of TPM on fMRI signals. In this study, we included 8 patients with right temporal lobe epilepsy (RTLE) and 8 with left temporal lobe epilepsy (LTLE) taking TPM (+TPM). Matched to them for age, handedness and side of seizure onset were 8 patients with RTLE and 8 with LTLE not taking TPM (-TPM). Matched for age and handedness to the patients with TLE were 32 healthy controls. The fMRI paradigm involved semantic decision/tone decision task (in-scanner behavioral data were collected). All epilepsy patients received a standard neuropsychological language battery. One sample t-tests were performed within each group to assess task-specific activations. Functional MRI data random-effects analysis was performed to determine significant group activation differences and to assess the effect of TPM dose on task activation. Direct group comparisons of fMRI, language and demographic data between patients with R/L TLE +TPM vs. -TPM and the analysis of the effects of TPM on blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal were performed. Groups were matched for age, handedness and, within the R/L TLE groups, for the age of epilepsy onset/duration and the number of AEDs/TPM dose. The in-scanner language performance of patients was worse when compared to healthy controls - all psignal differences between groups (increases in left cingulate gyrus and decreases in left superior temporal gyrus in the patients with LTLE +TPM; increases in the right BA 10 and left visual cortex and decreases in the left BA 47 in +TPM RTLE). Further, TPM dose

  1. Chronic temporal lobe epilepsy is associated with enhanced Alzheimer-like neuropathology in 3×Tg-AD mice.

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    Xiao-Xin Yan

    Full Text Available The comorbidity between epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease (AD is a topic of growing interest. Senile plaques and tauopathy are found in epileptic human temporal lobe structures, and individuals with AD have an increased incidence of spontaneous seizures. However, why and how epilepsy is associated with enhanced AD-like pathology remains unknown. We have recently shown β-secretase-1 (BACE1 elevation associated with aberrant limbic axonal sprouting in epileptic CD1 mice. Here we sought to explore whether BACE1 upregulation affected the development of Alzheimer-type neuropathology in mice expressing mutant human APP, presenilin and tau proteins, the triple transgenic model of AD (3×Tg-AD. 3×Tg-AD mice were treated with pilocarpine or saline (i.p. at 6-8 months of age. Immunoreactivity (IR for BACE1, β-amyloid (Aβ and phosphorylated tau (p-tau was subsequently examined at 9, 11 or 14 months of age. Recurrent convulsive seizures, as well as mossy fiber sprouting and neuronal death in the hippocampus and limbic cortex, were observed in all epileptic mice. Neuritic plaques composed of BACE1-labeled swollen/sprouting axons and extracellular AβIR were seen in the hippocampal formation, amygdala and piriform cortices of 9 month-old epileptic, but not control, 3×Tg-AD mice. Densities of plaque-associated BACE1 and AβIR were elevated in epileptic versus control mice at 11 and 14 months of age. p-Tau IR was increased in dentate granule cells and mossy fibers in epileptic mice relative to controls at all time points examined. Thus, pilocarpine-induced chronic epilepsy was associated with accelerated and enhanced neuritic plaque formation and altered intraneuronal p-tau expression in temporal lobe structures in 3×Tg-AD mice, with these pathologies occurring in regions showing neuronal death and axonal dystrophy.

  2. Hippocampal serotonin depletion is related to the presence of generalized tonic-clonic seizures, but not to psychiatric disorders in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    da Fonseca, Natascha C; Joaquim, Helena P G; Talib, Leda L; de Vincentiis, Silvia; Gattaz, Wagner F; Valente, Kette D

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies suggest that concentration of serotonin ([5-HT]) plays a pathogenic role in various types of epilepsy inhibiting seizures. However, most have not considered the clinical variables of epilepsy, and all of these studies included small and heterogeneous samples with refractory epilepsy, regardless of etiology. In this work, we measured [5-HT]s in hippocampal tissues from a large series of patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy caused by hippocampal sclerosis who underwent epilepsy surgery and evaluated the relationship between [5HT] and epilepsy-related clinical variables and psychiatric disorders. We included 44 patients with refractory unilateral TLE-HS who underwent surgical treatment for epilepsy. Hippocampal samples were collected, and serotonin concentrations were measured with high-pressu