WorldWideScience

Sample records for temporal gravity variation

  1. Calculation of the temporal gravity variation from spatially variable water storage change in soils and aquifers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leiriao, Silvia; He, Xin; Christiansen, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Total water storage change in the subsurface is a key component of the global, regional and local water balances. It is partly responsible for temporal variations of the earth's gravity field in the micro-Gal (1 mu Gal = 10(-8) m s(-2)) range. Measurements of temporal gravity variations can thus......-induced temporal variations in gravity from any hydrological model, provided earth curvature effects can be neglected. The method allows for the routine assimilation of ground-based gravity data into hydrological models....... be used to determine the water storage change in the hydrological system. A numerical method for the calculation of temporal gravity changes from the output of hydrological models is developed. Gravity changes due to incremental prismatic mass storage in the hydrological model cells are determined to give...

  2. A comparison of GRACE-derived temporal gravity variations with observations of six European superconducting gravimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, M.; Kroner, C.; Förste, C.; Petrovic, S.; Barthelmes, F.; Weise, A.; Güntner, A.; Creutzfeldt, B.; Jahr, T.; Jentzsch, G.; Wilmes, H.; Wziontek, H.

    2012-09-01

    The GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellite mission provides global time-series of the Earth's gravity field. In view of limited resolution and noise from the GRACE data, various filtering techniques have been developed to extract an optimal signal. There is no conclusion on the best filter method so far, however. On the other hand, terrestrial gravity observations from superconducting gravimeters (SGs) provide variations of the gravity field with very high accuracy and time resolution, but only at single points. The aim of this study is to compare GRACE-derived temporal gravity variations with gravity time-series within a network of six Central European SG stations. Empirical orthogonal functions (EOF) analysis was applied to detect common signal characteristics over a 3 yr period (2004-2006). rms Differences between the time-series of several GRACE solutions amount to 60 per cent of the rms variability of the individual data sets. The rms differences between the SG and GRACE time-series are about 70 per cent of the rms value of the SG observations. The best agreement between SG and GRACE is obtained when using a Gaussian filter with filter lengths of 800-1250 km for the GRACE data. With the EOF analysis, a common regional signal can be deduced from all gravity data sets. Nevertheless, differences in the first EOF among the GRACE solutions were up to 40 per cent, and differences of up to 50 per cent were found between the SG-based terrestrial and the GRACE-based satellite observations.

  3. Temporal Gravity Variations near Shrinking Vatnajökull Ice Cap, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, Wolfgang R.; Hartmann, Oliver; Wallner, Herbert; Smilde, Peter L.; Bürger, Stefan; Sjöberg, Lars E.; Erlingsson, Sigurdur; Wolf, Detlef; Klemann, Volker; Sasgen, Ingo

    2009-09-01

    Repeated gravity measurements were carried out from 1991 until 1999 at sites SE of Vatnajökull, Iceland, to estimate the mass flow and deformation accompanying the shrinking of the ice cap. Published GPS data show an uplift of about 13 ± 5 mm/a near the ice margin. A gravity decrease of -2 ± 1 μGal/a relative to the Höfn base station, was observed for the same sites. Control measurements at the Höfn station showed a gravity decrease of -2 ± 0.5 µGal/a relative to the station RVIK 5473 at Reykjavík (about 250 km from Höfn). This is compatible, as a Bouguer effect, with a 10 ± 3 mm/a uplift rate of the IGS point at Höfn and an uplift rate of ~20 mm/a near the ice margin. Although the derived gravity change rates at individual sites have large uncertainties, the ensemble of the rates varies systematically and significantly with distance from the ice. The relationship between gravity and elevation changes and the shrinking ice mass is modelled as response to the loading history. The GPS data can be explained by 1-D modelling (i.e., an earth model with a 15-km thick elastic lithosphere and a 7·1017 Pa·s asthenosphere viscosity), but not the gravity data. Based on 2-D modelling, the gravity data favour a low-viscosity plume in the form of a cylinder of 80 km radius and 1017 to 1018 Pa·s viscosity below a 6 km-thick elastic lid, embedded in a layered PREM-type earth, although the elevation data are less well explained by this model. Strain-porosity-hydrology effects are likely to enhance the magnitude of the gravity changes, but need verification by drilling. More accurate data may resolve the discrepancies or suggest improved models.

  4. Magma Intrusion at Mount St. Helens, Washington, from Temporal Gravity Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Maurizio; Lisowski, Mike; Dzursin, Dan; Poland, Mike; Schilling, Steve; Diefenbach, Angie; Wynn, Jeff

    2017-04-01

    Mount St. Helens is a stratovolcano in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States, best known for its explosive eruption in May 1980 - deadliest and most economically destructive volcanic event in US history. Volcanic activity renewed in September 2004 with a dome forming eruption that lasted until 2008. This eruption was surprising because the preceding four years had seen the fewest earthquakes and no significant deformation since the 1980-86 eruption ended. After the dome forming eruption ended in July 2008, the volcano seismic activity and deformation went back to background values. Time-dependent gravimetric measurements can detect subsurface processes long before magma flow leads to earthquakes or other eruption precursors. A high-precision gravity monitoring network (referenced to a base station 36 km NW of the volcano) was set up at Mount St Helens in 2010. Measurements were made at 12 sites on the volcano (at altitudes between 1200 and 2350 m a.s.l.) and 4 sites far afield during the summers of 2010, 2012, and 2014. The repeated gravity measurements revealed an increase in gravity between 2010 and 2014. Positive residual gravity anomalies remained after accounting for changes in surface height, in the Crater Glacier, and in the shallow hydrothermal aquifer. The pattern of residual gravity changes, with a maximum of 57±12 μGal from 2010 to 2014, is radially symmetric and centered on the 2004-08 lava dome. Inversion of the residual gravity signal points to a source 2.5-4 km beneath the crater floor (i.e., in the magma conduit that fed eruptions in 1980-86 and 2004-08). We attribute the gravity increase to re-inflation of the magma plumbing system following the 2004-8 eruption. Recent seismic activity (e.g., the seismic swarm of March 2016) has been interpreted as a response to the slow recharging of the volcano magma chamber.

  5. Temporal variation of gravity field prior to the Ludian Ms6.5 and Kangding Ms6.3 earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Hao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Using mobile gravity data from the central area of Sichuan and Yunnan Provinces, the relationship between gravity variation and earthquakes was studied based on the Ludian Ms6.5 earthquake that occurred on August 3rd, 2014, and the Kangding Ms6.3 earthquake that occurred on November 22nd, 2014; the mechanism of gravity variation was also explored. The results are as follows: (1 Prior to both earthquakes, gravity variation exhibited similar characteristics as those observed before both the Tangshan and Wenchuan earthquakes, in which typical precursor anomalies were positive gravity variation near the epicenter and the occurrence of a high-gravity-gradient zone across the epicenter prior to the earthquake. (2 A relatively accurate prediction of the occurrence locations of the two earthquakes was made by the Gravity Network Center of China (GNCC based on these precursor anomalies. In the gravity study report on the 2014 earthquake trends submitted at the end of 2013, the Daofu-Shimian section at the junction of the Xianshuihe and Longmenshan fault zones was noted as an earthquake-risk region with a predicted magnitude of 6.5, which covered the epicenter of the Kangding Ms6.3 earthquake. In another report on earthquake trends in southwestern China submitted in mid-2014, the Lianfeng, Zhaotong fault zone was also classified as an earthquake-risk region with a magnitude of 6.0, and the central area of this region basically overlapped with the epicenter of the Ludian Ms6.5 earthquake. (3 The gravity variation characteristics are reasonably consistent with crustal movements, and deep material migration is likely the primary cause of gravity variation.

  6. Temporal gravity variations observed with the superconducting gravimeter at Metsähovi, Finland: interpreted by local hydrological sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, H.; Mäkinen, J.; Raja-Halli, A.; Hokkanen, T.; Mäkinen, R. P.

    2012-04-01

    Metsähovi is a fundamental geodetic station with multiple observation techniques, including a superconducting gravimeter (SG). The SG no. T020 has been operating continuously at Metsähovi since August 1994. After corrections for known time-variable gravity effects, such as tides, atmosphere and the Baltic Sea are made, the remaining gravity residual (8 microgals peak-to-peak) is mostly due to variation in terrestrial water storage. The detection threshold of the SG corresponds to the attraction a hypothetical Bouguer slab of water 1-2 mm thick that extends below the instrument as well. The local hydrological effects in gravity are generated by the attractions: local water storage in the fractures of the crystalline bedrock, local water storage in sediments, local snow on the ground and on the laboratory roof. In addition, by the loading and attraction by regional and global water storage. If we want to use record of the SG for discriminating between different regional/continental hydrological models, or for validating GRACE observations, physical modeling of the local effects is required. The station stands on bedrock and surrounding sediments are thin (0.2 - to 4 meters) but geologically quite complex. Since 1994 station is equipped with two borehole wells in the crystalline bedrock. In 2006 two arrays of Time Domain Reflectometer sensors of soil moisture were installed by the Finnish Environment Institute. In 2008-2009 several new instruments were installed within 100-150 m distance from the SG: Ten additional capacitive arrays for soil moisture, a 20 x 20 meter grid of 21 x 21=441 probes for soil resistivity. For observing groundwater level in the sediments, we lowered 11 tubes down to the bedrock surface. For radiometric measurements of soil moisture content and soil density we established 5 dry access tubes. We present results of 3D-hydrological model of observed local water mass changes together with gravity observations with SG.

  7. Gravity and Height Variations at Medicina, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, Sara; Zerbini, Susanna; Errico, Maddalena; Santi, Efisio; Wziontek, Hartmut

    2017-04-01

    Since 1996, at the Medicina station, height and gravity variations are monitored continuously by means of GPS, VLBI and superconducting gravimeter (SG) data. Additionally, absolute gravity observations are performed twice a year and environmental parameters, among others water table levels, are regularly acquired. Levelling between the different monuments at the site area is also carried out repeatedly to constrain local ties in the vertical position. Two GPS systems are located very close to each other, and both are in close proximity to the VLBI antenna. Twenty years of data are now available, which allow investigating both long- and short-period height and gravity signals together with their relevant correlations. Natural land subsidence, which is well known to occur in the area, is a major component of the observed long-term behavior; however, non-linear long-period signatures are also present in the time series. On a shorter time scale, fingerprints of the water table seasonal oscillations can be recognized in the data. The Medicina site is characterized by clayey soil subjected to consolidation effects when the water table lowers during summer periods. The pillar on which the SG is installed is especially affected because of its shallow foundation, causing height decreases in the order of 2.5-3 cm for water table lowering of 2 m. This study presents a comparative analysis of the different data sets with the aim of separating mass and deformation contributions in the SG gravity record.

  8. Temporal Variations in Jupiter's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Chanover, N. J.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.; Hammel, H. B.; dePater, I.; Noll, K.; Wong, M.; Clarke, J.; Sanchez-Levega, A.; Orton, G. S.; hide

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, Jupiter has undergone many atmospheric changes from storms turning red to global. cloud upheavals, and most recently, a cornet or asteroid impact. Yet, on top of these seemingly random changes events there are also periodic phenomena, analogous to observed Earth and Saturn atmospheric oscillations. We will present 15 years of Hubble data, from 1994 to 2009, to show how the equatorial tropospheric cloud deck and winds have varied over that time, focusing on the F953N, F41 ON and F255W filters. These filters give leverage on wind speeds plus cloud opacity, cloud height and tropospheric haze thickness, and stratospheric haze, respectively. The wind data consistently show a periodic oscillation near 7-8 S latitude. We will discuss the potential for variations with longitude and cloud height, within the calibration limits of those filters. Finally, we will discuss the role that large atmospheric events, such as the impacts in 1994 and 2009, and the global upheaval of 2007, have on temporal studies, This work was supported by a grant from the NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program. HST observational support was provided by NASA through grants from Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under contract NAS5-26555.

  9. Superalloy microstructural variations induced by gravity level during directional solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, M. H.; Curreri, P. A.; Parr, R. A.; Alter, W. S.

    1985-01-01

    The Ni-base superalloy MAR-M246 (Hf) was directionally solidified during low gravity maneuvers aboard a NASA KC-135 aircraft. Gravity force variations during this process yielded a concomitant variation in microstructure and microsegregation. Secondary dendrite arm spacings are noted to be larger in the low-g portion; this, in turn, decreases the extent of interdendritic segregation. The amount of Hf in both the carbides and interdendritic eutectic increases as the gravity force diminishes. Fewer carbides are present in the low-g regions.

  10. Monthly gravity field recovery from GRACE orbits and K-band measurements using variational equations approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changqing Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE mission can significantly improve our knowledge of the temporal variability of the Earth's gravity field. We obtained monthly gravity field solutions based on variational equations approach from GPS-derived positions of GRACE satellites and K-band range-rate measurements. The impact of different fixed data weighting ratios in temporal gravity field recovery while combining the two types of data was investigated for the purpose of deriving the best combined solution. The monthly gravity field solution obtained through above procedures was named as the Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics (IGG temporal gravity field models. IGG temporal gravity field models were compared with GRACE Release05 (RL05 products in following aspects: (i the trend of the mass anomaly in China and its nearby regions within 2005–2010; (ii the root mean squares of the global mass anomaly during 2005–2010; (iii time-series changes in the mean water storage in the region of the Amazon Basin and the Sahara Desert between 2005 and 2010. The results showed that IGG solutions were almost consistent with GRACE RL05 products in above aspects (i–(iii. Changes in the annual amplitude of mean water storage in the Amazon Basin were 14.7 ± 1.2 cm for IGG, 17.1 ± 1.3 cm for the Centre for Space Research (CSR, 16.4 ± 0.9 cm for the GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ and 16.9 ± 1.2 cm for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL in terms of equivalent water height (EWH, respectively. The root mean squares of the mean mass anomaly in Sahara were 1.2 cm, 0.9 cm, 0.9 cm and 1.2 cm for temporal gravity field models of IGG, CSR, GFZ and JPL, respectively. Comparison suggested that IGG temporal gravity field solutions were at the same accuracy level with the latest temporal gravity field solutions published by CSR, GFZ and JPL.

  11. Urban building recognition during significant temporal variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Phuong Giang; Andersen, Hans Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    features (Multi-scale Oriented Patches) in [2], which extract features of patches around interest points. To speed up the searching process, we employ the vocabulary tree based search technique in [12]. Our final system shows high performance in recognizing buildings under significant temporal variations...

  12. Temporal Mass Variations in Northern India as Observed by GRACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeimi, M.; Mueller, J.

    2009-05-01

    Since successful launch of GRACE twin satellites, up to 70 monthly gravity field solutions have been released by several data processing centers. With a signal containing some seventy samples and sampling rate of one month, it is possible to significantly detect the periodicities between 2 and 35 months. In this study we applied the least- squares spectral method to analyze geoid changes over northern India and Nepal in the frequency domain, in order to determine the main existing temporal variations in that region. Results show some significant periodicities where the largest amplitude is for the annual cycle, as expected. A semi-annual amplitude and a signal with 2.5-year period are also included in the total mass changes. The results are presented and compared to hydrological models and further possible explanations for the mass variations (i.e. geophysical impacts or man-made effects) are given as well.

  13. Re-analysis of temporal GRACE gravity solutions from CNES/GRGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancale, R.; Lemoine, J.-M.; Bruinsma, S.; Bourgogne, S.

    2009-04-01

    The GRACE mission, already more than 6 years in operation, has provided a large-scale vision of temporal gravity variations on the Earth surface. It is presently profitable to entirely reprocess the GRACE data thanks to more accurate a priori models as well as improved computation strategies. In this context the CNES/GRGS team has undertaken a full reiteration of the GRACE and LAGEOS data processing, based on upgraded models for generating: 1) a time-series of truly 10-day gravity field models from spherical harmonic degree 1 to 50 and 2) a static satellite-only gravity field model up to degree and order 160, but in which annual and semi-annual periodic components as well as drift are modelled up to degree 50. Particular attention has been given to the stability of the inversion process and therefore the solutions can be interpreted without additional filtering. Selected geographical areas of very low mass variability, or on the opposite very large water variations, have been analysed and results have been compared with other available solutions. "Release 2" CNES/GRGS solutions are available on the http://bgi.cnes.fr web site. Together with RL02, new additional products are now provided: dealiasing products, averaged over 10 days, in separate files for atmosphere and ocean ; grid of the reference atmospheric pressure.

  14. Temporal instability analysis of inviscid compound jets falling under gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsin, Muhammad; Uddin, Jamal; Decent, Stephen P.; Afzaal, Muhammad F.

    2013-01-01

    Compound liquid jets can be used in a variety of industrial applications ranging from capsule production in pharmaceutics to enhance printing methods in ink-jet printing. An appreciation of how instability along compound jets can lead to breakup and droplet formation is thus critical in many fields in science and engineering. In this paper, we perform a theoretical analysis to examine the instability of an axisymmetric inviscid compound liquid jet which falls vertically under the influence of gravity. We use a long-wavelength, slender-jet asymptotic expansion to reduce the governing equations of the problem into a set of one-dimensional partial differential equations, which describe the evolution of the leading-order axial velocity of the jet as well as the radii of both the inner and the outer interfaces. We first determine the steady-state solutions of the one-dimensional model equations and then we perform a linear temporal instability analysis to obtain a dispersion relation, which gives us useful information about the maximum growth rate and the maximum wavenumber of the imposed wave-like disturbance. We use our results to estimate the location and qualitative nature of breakup and then compare our results with numerical simulations.

  15. Variations of $\\alpha$ and $G$ from nonlinear multidimensional gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bronnikov, K A

    2013-01-01

    To explain the recently reported large-scale spatial variations of the fine structure constant $\\alpha$, we apply some models of curvature-nonlinear multidimensional gravity. Under the reasonable assumption of slow changes of all quantities as compared with the Planck scale, the original theory reduces to a multi-scalar field theory in four dimensions. On this basis, we consider different variants of isotropic cosmological models in both Einstein and Jordan conformal frames. One of the models turns out to be equally viable in both frames, but in the Jordan frame the model predicts simultaneous variations of $\\alpha$ and the gravitational constant $G$, equal in magnitude. Large-scale small inhomogeneous perturbations of these models allow for explaining the observed spatial distribution of $\\alpha$ values.

  16. Seasonal and nightly variations of gravity-wave energy density in the middle atmosphere measured by the Purple Crow Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Sica

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The Purple Crow Lidar (PCL is a large power-aperture product monostatic Rayleigh-Raman-Sodium-resonance-fluorescence lidar, which has been in operation at the Delaware Observatory (42.9° N, 81.4° W, 237 m elevation near the campus of The University of Western Ontario since 1992. Kinetic-energy density has been calculated from the Rayleigh-scatter system measurements of density fluctuations at temporal-spatial scales relevant for gravity waves, e.g. soundings at 288 m height resolution and 9 min temporal resolution in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere. The seasonal averages from 10 years of measurements show in all seasons some loss of gravity-wave energy in the upper stratosphere. During the equinox periods and summer the measurements are consistent with gravity waves growing in height with little saturation, in agreement with the classic picture of the variations in the height at which gravity waves break given by Lindzen (1981. The mean values compare favourably to previous measurements when computed as nightly averages, but the high temporal-spatial resolution measurements show considerable day-to-day variability. The variability over a night is often extremely large, with typical RMS fluctuations of 50 to 100% at all heights and seasons common. These measurements imply that using a daily or nightly-averaged gravity-wave energy density in numerical models may be highly unrealistic.

  17. The Impact of Temporal Geopotential Variations on GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melachroinos, Stavros; Lemoine, Frank G.; Zelensky, Nikita P.; Beckley, Brian D.; Chinn, Douglas S.; Nicholas, Joseph B.; McCarthy, John J.; Pennington, Teresa; Luthcke, Scott B.

    2012-01-01

    Lemoine et al. (2006) and Lemoine et al. (2010) showed that applying more detailed models of time-variable gravity (TVG) improved the quality of the altimeter satellite orbits (e.g. TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-1, Jason-2). This modeling include application of atmospheric gravity derived from 6-hrly pressure fields obtained from the ECMWF and annual gravity variations to degree & order 20x20 in spherical harmonics derived from GRACE data. This approach allowed the development of a consistent geophysical model for application to altimeter satellite orbit determination from 1993 to 2011. In addition, we have also evaluated the impact of TVG modeling on the POD of Jason-1 and Jason-2 by application of a weekly degree & order four gravity coefficient time series developed using data from ten SLR & DORIS-tracked satellites from 1993 to 2011 (Lemoine et al., 2011).

  18. Temporal variation of tidal parameters in superconducting gravimeter time-series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurers, Bruno; Van Camp, Michel; Francis, Olivier; Pálinkáš, Vojtech

    2016-04-01

    Analysing independent 1-yr data sets of 10 European superconducting gravimeters (SG) reveals statistically significant temporal variations of M2 tidal parameters. Both common short-term (2 yr) features are identified in all SG time-series but one. The averaged variations of the amplitude factor are about 0.2‰. The path of load vector variations equivalent to the temporal changes of tidal parameters suggests the presence of an 8.85 yr modulation (lunar perigee). The tidal waves having the potential to modulate M2 with this period belong to the 3rd degree constituents. Their amplitude factors turn out to be much closer to body tide model predictions than that of the main 2nd degree M2, which indicates ocean loading for 3rd degree waves to be less prominent than for 2nd degree waves within the M2 group. These two different responses to the loading suggest that the observed modulation is more due to insufficient frequency resolution of limited time-series rather than to time variable loading. Presently, SG gravity time-series are still too short to prove if time variable loading processes are involved too as in case of the annual M2 modulation known to appear for analysis intervals of less than 1 yr. Whatever the variations are caused by, they provide the upper accuracy limit for earth model validation and permit estimating the temporal stability of SG scale factors and assessing the quality of gravity time-series.

  19. Interannual Variations in Earth's Low-Degree Gravity Field and the Connections With Geophysical/Climatic Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Benjamin F.; Cox, Christopher M.

    2004-01-01

    Long-wavelength time-variable gravity recently derived from satellite laser ranging (SLR) analysis have focused to a large extent on the effects of the recent (since 1998) large anomalous change in J2, or the Earth's oblateness, and the potential causes. However, it is relatively more difficult to determine whether there are corresponding signals in the shorter wavelength zonal harmonics from the existing SLR-derived time variable gravity results, although it appears that geophysical fluid mass transport is being observed. For example, the recovered J3 time series shows remarkable agreement with NCEP-derived estimates of atmospheric gravity variations. Likewise, some of the non-zonal spherical harmonic components have significant interannual signal that appears to be related to mass transport. The non-zonal degree-2 components show reasonable temporal correlation with atmospheric signals, as well as climatic effects such as El Nino Southern Oscillation. We will present recent updates on the J2 evolution, as well as a look at other low-degree components of the interannual variations of gravity, complete through degree 4. We will examine the possible geophysical and climatic causes of these low-degree time-variable gravity related to oceanic and hydrological mass transports, for example some anomalous but prominent signals found in the extratropic Pacific ocean related to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation.

  20. Squeezing more information out of time variable gravity data with a temporal decomposition approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barletta, Valentina Roberta; Bordoni, A.; Aoudia, A.

    2012-01-01

    A measure of the Earth's gravity contains contributions from solid Earth as well as climate-related phenomena, that cannot be easily distinguished both in time and space. After more than 7years, the GRACE gravity data available now support more elaborate analysis on the time series. We propose...... to design a screening algorithm to identify regions where anomalous gravity variations deserve further investigations. It also allows to raise the amount of information one can obtain exclusively from gravity data, prior and preliminary to any subsequent specifically targeted study. This approach has been...... used to assess the possibility of finding evidence of meaningful geophysical signals different from hydrology over Africa in GRACE data. In this case we conclude that hydrological phenomena are dominant and so time variable gravity data in Africa can be directly used to calibrate hydrological models....

  1. Seasonal variation of gravity wave parameters using different filter methods with daylight lidar measurements at midlatitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, K.; Gerding, M.; Lübken, F.-J.

    2017-03-01

    The daylight-capable Rayleigh-Mie-Raman (RMR) lidar at the midlatitude station in Kühlungsborn (54°N, 12°E) is in operation since 2010. The RMR lidar system is used to investigate different fractions of atmospheric waves, like gravity waves (GW) and thermal tides (with diurnal, semidiurnal, and terdiurnal components) at day and night. About 6150 h of data have been acquired until 2015. The general challenge for GW observations is the separation of different wave contributions from the observed superposition of GW, tides, or even longer periodic waves. Unfiltered lidar data always include such a superposition. We applied a Butterworth filter to separate GW and tides by vertical wavelength with a cutoff wavelength of 15 km and by observed periods with a cutoff period of 8 h. GW activity and characteristics are derived in an altitude range between 30 and 70 km. The retrieved vertically filtered temperature deviations contain GW with small vertical wavelengths over a broad range of periods, while only a small range of periods is included in the temporally filtered temperature deviations. We observe an annual variation of the wave activity for unfiltered and vertically filtered data, which is caused from tides and inertia gravity waves. In contrast to that, filtering in time leads to a weak semiannual variation for gravity waves with periods of 4-8 h, especially in higher altitudes. During summer, these waves have the half of the total amount of the potential energy budget compared to the unfiltered data. This shows the importance of waves with periods smaller than 8 h.

  2. Lysimeter vs. superconducting gravimeter: Measuring the influence of local water storage changes on temporal gravity observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creutzfeldt, Benjamin; Güntner, Andreas; Wziontek, Hartmut

    2010-05-01

    Temporal gravimeter observations, which are used in geodesy and geophysics to study changes in the Earth's gravity field like tidal or mass transfer effects, are influenced by local water storage change (WSC). This study presents the first comparison of lysimeter measurements with temporal gravimeter observations made by a superconducting gravimeter (SG). Lysimeter measurements in combination with complementary hydrological observations and a rigid hydrological 1D model give the unique opportunity to estimate WSC from the snow down to the groundwater at the field scale. At the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell (Germany), water storage changes in the snow pack, top soil, unsaturated saprolite and fractured aquifer are all important terms for the local water budget. The hydrological influence on SG measurements is estimated by calculating the gravity response of local WSC. We find a high correlation of local WSC and SG residuals on the event and seasonal scale. Lysimeter measurements significantly improve the estimation of WSC on the field scale and consequently provide a better reduction of local hydrological influence on temporal gravimeter measurements. Hence, at temporal gravity observation sites a lysimeter installation is recommended in case that the gravity signal should be reduced from local WSC.

  3. Temporal variability of tidal and gravity waves during a record long 10-day continuous lidar sounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, Kathrin; Gerding, Michael; Baumgarten, Gerd; Lübken, Franz-Josef

    2018-01-01

    Gravity waves (GWs) as well as solar tides are a key driving mechanism for the circulation in the Earth's atmosphere. The propagation of gravity waves is strongly affected by tidal waves as they modulate the mean background wind field and vice versa, which is not yet fully understood and not adequately implemented in many circulation models. The daylight-capable Rayleigh-Mie-Raman (RMR) lidar at Kühlungsborn (54° N, 12° E) typically provides temperature data to investigate both wave phenomena during one full day or several consecutive days in the middle atmosphere between 30 and 75 km altitude. Outstanding weather conditions in May 2016 allowed for an unprecedented 10-day continuous lidar measurement, which shows a large variability of gravity waves and tides on timescales of days. Using a one-dimensional spectral filtering technique, gravity and tidal waves are separated according to their specific periods or vertical wavelengths, and their temporal evolution is studied. During the measurement period a strong 24 h wave occurs only between 40 and 60 km and vanishes after a few days. The disappearance is related to an enhancement of gravity waves with periods of 4-8 h. Wind data provided by ECMWF are used to analyze the meteorological situation at our site. The local wind structure changes during the observation period, which leads to different propagation conditions for gravity waves in the last days of the measurement period and therefore a strong GW activity. The analysis indicates a further change in wave-wave interaction resulting in a minimum of the 24 h tide. The observed variability of tides and gravity waves on timescales of a few days clearly demonstrates the importance of continuous measurements with high temporal and spatial resolution to detect interaction phenomena, which can help to improve parametrization schemes of GWs in general circulation models.

  4. Temporal super resolution using variational methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Sune Høgild; Lauze, Francois Bernard; Nielsen, Mads

    2010-01-01

    Temporal super resolution (TSR) is the ability to convert video from one frame rate to another and is as such a key functionality in modern video processing systems. A higher frame rate than what is recorded is desired for high frame rate displays, for super slow-motion, and for video/film format...... and intensities are calculated simultaneously in a multiresolution setting. A frame doubling version of our algorithm is implemented and in testing it, we focus on making the motion of high contrast edges to seem smooth and thus reestablish the illusion of motion pictures....

  5. Temporal Variation of Large Scale Flows in the Solar Interior

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We attempt to detect short-term temporal variations in the rotation rate and other large scale velocity fields in the outer part of the solar convection zone using the ring diagram technique applied to Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) data. The measured velocity field shows variations by about 10 m/s on the scale of few days.

  6. Temporal Variation of Large Scale Flows in the Solar Interior ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Abstract. We attempt to detect short term temporal variations in the rotation rate and other large scale velocity fields in the outer part of the solar convection zone using the ring diagram technique applied to. Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) data. The measured velocity field shows variations by about 10 m/s on the scale of ...

  7. Spatial and temporal variation in a mesic savanna fire regime ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Umfolozi Park, a mesic savanna area in South Africa. The study focuses at the landscape scale of tens of kilometres and at the medium term temporal scale of decades. Variation in fire regime was analysed in relation to variation in annual rainfall ...

  8. Gravity Variation in Siberia: GRACE Observation and Possible Causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Fong Chao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the finding, from the GRACE observation, of an increasing trend in the gravity anomaly in Siberia at the rate of up to 0.5 ugal yr-1 during 2003/1 - 2009/12, in the backdrop of a negative anomaly of magnitude on the order of ~-10 mgal. In consideration of the non-uniqueness of the gravitational inverse problem, we examine in some detail the various possible geophysical causes to explain the increasing gravity signal. We find two geophysical mechanisms being the most plausible, namely the melting of permafrost and the GIA post-glacial rebound. We conclude that these two mechanisms cannot be ruled out as causes for the regional gravity increase in Siberia, based on gravity data and in want of ancillary geophysical data in the region. More definitive identification of the contributions of the various causes awaits further studies.

  9. Variation of Specific Gravity in Plantation-Grown Trees of Bigleaf Mahogany

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. B. Briscoe; J. B. Harris; D. Wyckoff

    1963-01-01

    As a prelude to tree improvement work in the genus Swietenia, a study was made of specific gravity variation within the bole of six plantation-grown trees of bigleaf mahogany. Variation was appreciable, from 0.36 to 0.65 , and several patterns were determined. Specific gravity of the tree increased with growth rate, as expressed in diameter at breast height, but not...

  10. Gravity variation before the Akto Ms6.7 earthquake, Xinjiang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Hao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between gravity variation and the Akto Ms6.7 earthquake on November 11, 2016, was studied by use of mobile gravity observation data from the China continental structural environmental monitoring network. The result revealed that before the Akto earthquake, a high positive gravity variation was observed in the Pamir tectonic knots region (within a maximum magnitude of approximately +80 microgal, which was consistent with the existing knowledge of gravity abnormality and the locations of strong earthquakes. In view of the recent strong seismic activities in the Pamir tectonic knots region, as well as the strong upward crust movement and compressive strain, it is believed that gravity change in the Pamir tectonic knots region reflects the recent strong seismic activities and crust movement.

  11. Earthquake precursors: spatial-temporal gravity changes before the great earthquakes in the Sichuan-Yunnan area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yi-Qing; Liang, Wei-Feng; Zhang, Song

    2017-09-01

    Using multiple-scale mobile gravity data in the Sichuan-Yunnan area, we systematically analyzed the relationships between spatial-temporal gravity changes and the 2014 Ludian, Yunnan Province Ms6.5 earthquake and the 2014 Kangding Ms6.3, 2013 Lushan Ms7.0, and 2008 Wenchuan Ms8.0 earthquakes in Sichuan Province. Our main results are as follows. (1) Before the occurrence of large earthquakes, gravity anomalies occur in a large area around the epicenters. The directions of gravity change gradient belts usually agree roughly with the directions of the main fault zones of the study area. Such gravity changes might reflect the increase of crustal stress, as well as the significant active tectonic movements and surface deformations along fault zones, during the period of gestation of great earthquakes. (2) Continuous significant changes of the multiple-scale gravity fields, as well as greater gravity changes with larger time scales, can be regarded as medium-range precursors of large earthquakes. The subsequent large earthquakes always occur in the area where the gravity changes greatly. (3) The spatial-temporal gravity changes are very useful in determining the epicenter of coming large earthquakes. The large gravity networks are useful to determine the general areas of coming large earthquakes. However, the local gravity networks with high spatial-temporal resolution are suitable for determining the location of epicenters. Therefore, denser gravity observation networks are necessary for better forecasts of the epicenters of large earthquakes. (4) Using gravity changes from mobile observation data, we made medium-range forecasts of the Kangding, Ludian, Lushan, and Wenchuan earthquakes, with especially successful forecasts of the location of their epicenters. Based on the above discussions, we emphasize that medium-/long-term potential for large earthquakes might exist nowadays in some areas with significant gravity anomalies in the study region. Thus, the monitoring

  12. Variation of gravity before the Alxa Zuoqi M5.8 earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianlin Feng

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a classic survey adjustment computation method was used for data obtained in the Inner Mongolia and Ningxia gravimetric networks between September 2013 and April 2015 so as to investigate the variation of gravity before the Alxa Zuoqi M5.8 earthquake. The relationship between gravity variation and the Alxa Zuoqi M5.8 earthquake was analyzed. The results showed that: (1 the severe variation in gravity field at the test sites before the Alxa Zuoqi M5.8 earthquake, as well as the subsequent accelerated rising, might be an earthquake precursor; (2 the Alxa Zuoqi M5.8 earthquake occurred at the turning point where the high-gravity gradient zone changed from the NE direction to NW.

  13. Large trench-parallel gravity variations predict seismogenic behavior in subduction zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Teh-Ru Alex; Simons, Mark

    2003-08-01

    We demonstrate that great earthquakes occur predominantly in regions with a strongly negative trench-parallel gravity anomaly (TPGA), whereas regions with strongly positive TPGA are relatively aseismic. These observations suggest that, over time scales up to at least 1 million years, spatial variations of seismogenic behavior within a given subduction zone are stationary and linked to the geological structure of the fore-arc. The correlations we observe are consistent with a model in which spatial variations in frictional properties on the plate interface control trench-parellel variations in fore-arc topography, gravity, and seismogenic behavior.

  14. Monitoring Vertical Crustal Deformation and Gravity Variations during Water Level Changes at the Three Gorges Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Wei

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring vertical crustal deformation and gravity changes during water level changes at the Three Gorges reservoir is important for the safe operation of the Three Gorges Dam and for the monitoring and prevention of a regional geological disaster. In this study, we determined vertical crustal deformation and gravity changes during water level variations of the Three Gorges reservoir from direct calculations and actual measurements and a comprehensive solution. We used water areas extracted image data from the ZY-3 satellite and water level data to calculate gravity changes and vertical crustal deformation caused by every 5 m change in the water level due to storage and drainage of the Three Gorges reservoir from 145 m to 175 m. The vertical crustal deformation was up to 30 mm. The location of gravity change above 20 μ Gal(1 Gal=10-2 m/s2 was less than 2 km from the centerline of the Yangtze River. The CORS ES13 in Badong, near the reservoir, measured the vertical crustal deformation during water level changes. Because of the small number of CORS and gravity stations in the Three Gorges reservoir area, monitoring deformation and gravity related to changes in the Three Gorges reservoir water level cannot be closely followed. Using 26 CORS and some of the gravity stations in the Three Gorges area and based on loading deformation and the spherical harmonic analysis method, an integrated solution of vertical deformation and gravity variations during water level changes of the reservoir was determined, which is consistent with the actual CORS monitoring results. By comparison, we found that an integrated solution based on a CORS network can effectively enhance the capability of monitoring vertical crustal deformation and gravity changes during water level variations of the reservoir.

  15. Spatial and temporal variations in the occurrences of wet periods ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This study highlights the hydro-climatic features of the five wet periods contributing in different percentages to the annual rainfall total over major river basins in India. Spatial and temporal variations in the parameters such as starting date, duration and rainfall intensity of these wet periods throughout India have been ...

  16. Spatio-temporal Variations of Abundance, Biomass, Repproductive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    N'DOUA RAPHAEL

    2015-08-19

    Aug 19, 2015 ... of physical factors of the aquatic ecosystem controlling egg production (Uriarte and Villate, 2005) .... effects of environmental factors on P. hessei abundance, biomass and reproductive parameters (NEF, Gf, ..... have a fertilizing effect on phytoplankton and can control temporal variations in standing stocks of ...

  17. Temporal variation in the ecology of Kuramo water, Lagos Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temporal variation in the ecology of Kuramo water was studied in the Lagos lagoon complex. Physicochemical parameters and heavy metals concentration were analyzed. Eight sites were marked using the geographical positioning system (GPS model-12). Water chemistry was determined for 8 months and sampling was ...

  18. Spatio-temporal variations in phytoplankton community structure in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OMARI

    2013-09-06

    Sep 6, 2013 ... Spatio-temporal variations of phytoplankton, expressed in terms of species composition and diversity collected at various sampling sites in small water bodies (SWBs) within Lake Victoria basin, Kenya, were investigated monthly from November 2010 to June 2011, in relation to selected physical and.

  19. Spatio-temporal variations in phytoplankton community structure in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OMARI

    2013-09-06

    Sep 6, 2013 ... Spatio-temporal variations of phytoplankton, expressed in terms of species composition and diversity collected at various sampling ... chemical and biological properties of water most often lead to the production of .... Persulfate digestion methods, respectively in the laboratory (APHA,. 2000). Data analysis.

  20. Spatial and temporal variations in the occurrences of wet periods ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This study highlights the hydro-climatic features of the five wet periods contributing in different percentages to the annual rainfall total over major river basins in India.Spatial and temporal variations in the parameters such as starting date,duration and rainfall intensity of these wet periods throughout India have been ...

  1. temporal variation of malaria occurrence in kano municipal local

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    order to prevent the disease. Keywords: Malaria, Epidemiology, Seasons, Temporal Variation, Kano. ... effect of temperature on the outbreak of Malaria. Hay et al (2002) examined the role of climate change on the resurgence of ... up of 13 wards. The climate of the area is the tropical dry and wet climate. The average annual.

  2. Spatio-temporal variation in density of microphytoplankton genera in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spatial and temporal (seasonal and interannual) variation in microphytoplankton was investigated at two tropical coral reef sites off Mauritius (Belle Mare [BM] and Flic-en-Flac [FEF]), from 2010 to 2012. Each site was divided into three zones: coast, lagoon and reef. Microphytoplankton, nutrient and chlorophyll a samples ...

  3. Spatial and Temporal Price Variations of Sawn Wood Utilized for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The spatial and temporal price variations of sawn-wood used for furniture making in Lagos, Ibadan and Benin were studied and evaluated. Four wood species popularly used for furniture making in the cities were studied. They are: Mansonia altissima (Mansonia), Khaya ivorensis (Khaya), Cordia millenii (Cordia) and ...

  4. Geographic and temporal variations in pollen exposure across Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, M.; Jäger, S.; Berger, U.; Sikoparija, B.; Hallsdottir, M.; Sauliene, I.; Bergmann, K.-C.; Pashley, C. H.; de Weger, L.; Majkowska-Wojciechowska, B.; Rybníček, O.; Thibaudon, M.; Gehrig, R.; Bonini, M.; Yankova, R.; Damialis, A.; Vokou, D.; Gutiérrez Bustillo, A. M.; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, K.; van Ree, R.

    2014-01-01

    The EC-funded EuroPrevall project examined the prevalence of food allergy across Europe. A well-established factor in the occurrence of food allergy is primary sensitization to pollen. To analyse geographic and temporal variations in pollen exposure, allowing the investigation of how these

  5. Spatio-temporal variations in phytoplankton community structure in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spatio-temporal variations of phytoplankton, expressed in terms of species composition and diversity collected at various sampling sites in small water bodies (SWBs) within Lake Victoria basin, Kenya, were investigated monthly from November 2010 to June 2011, in relation to selected physical and chemical water quality ...

  6. The spatial and temporal variations of nematofauna of recovering ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The spatio-temporal variations in physical sediment characteristics and nematode community assemblages were investigated and compared between a natural, a 10-year reforested, and a degraded Rhizophora mucronata mangrove ecosystem in Gazi Bay, Kenya. PCA showed a clear separation of the degraded site from ...

  7. Spatial and temporal price variations of sawn wood utilized for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    O Y Ogunsanwo

    The spatial and temporal price variations of sawn-wood used for furniture making in. Lagos ... the wood species. This was followed by Lagos, while Benin had the highest mean price. The percentage annual price changes were inconsistent and tend to be in ..... project priorities that enhances socio economic development.

  8. temporal variation of malaria occurrence in kano municipal local

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    government should provide mosquito nets and drugs at an affordable price to the general public in order to prevent the disease. Keywords: Malaria, Epidemiology, Seasons, Temporal Variation, Kano. INTRODUCTION. Malaria is currently affecting more people in the World than any other disease. It is currently endemic in ...

  9. Spatio-temporal variation in trihalomethanes in New South Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerhayes, Richard J; Morgan, Geoffrey G; Lincoln, Douglas; Edwards, Howard P; Earnest, Arul; Rahman, Md Bayzidur; Byleveld, Paul; Cowie, Christine T; Beard, John R

    2011-11-01

    This paper describes the spatio-temporal variation of trihalomethanes in drinking water in New South Wales, Australia from 1997 to 2007 We obtained data on trihalomethanes (THMs) from two metropolitan and 13 rural water utilities and conducted a descriptive analysis of the spatial and temporal trends in THMs and the influence of season and drought. Concetrations of monthly THMs in the two metropolitan water utilities of Sydney/Illawarra (mean 66.8 μg/L) and Hunter (mean 62.7 μg/L) were similar compared to the considerable variation between rural water utilities (range in mean THMs: 14.5-330.7 μg/L). Chloroform was the predominate THM in two-thirds of the rural water utilities. Higher concentrations of THMs were found in chlorinated water distribution systems compared to chloraminated systems, and in distribution systems sourced from surface water compared to ground water or mixed surface and ground water. Ground water sourced supplies had a greater proportion of brominated THMs than surface water sourced supplies. There was substantial variation in concentration of THMs between seasons and between periods of drought or no drought. There was a moderate correlation between heavy rainfall and elevated concentrations of THMs. There is considerable spatial and temporal variation in THMs amongst New South Wales water utilities and these variations are likely related to water source, treatment processes, catchments, drought and seasonal factors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Gamow, George

    2003-01-01

    A distinguished physicist and teacher, George Gamow also possessed a special gift for making the intricacies of science accessible to a wide audience. In Gravity, he takes an enlightening look at three of the towering figures of science who unlocked many of the mysteries behind the laws of physics: Galileo, the first to take a close look at the process of free and restricted fall; Newton, originator of the concept of gravity as a universal force; and Einstein, who proposed that gravity is no more than the curvature of the four-dimensional space-time continuum.Graced with the author's own draw

  11. A Numerical Investigation on Tidal and Gravity Wave Contributions to the Summer Time Na Variations in the Midlatitude E Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xuguang; Yuan, Tao; Eccles, J. Vincent

    2017-10-01

    The Na density variations in the E region have been studied over the past few decades. Although considerable progress in understanding and in modeling the metal layer observations has been made, Na density features above 100 km have yet to be explained. Various studies have linked them to the Na+ variations, a major reservoir for Na in E region. But the lack of comprehensive modeling investigations and of wind and temperature observations prevents further understanding on this important ion-neutral coupling topic. In this study, we conduct a numerical simulation on the summer time Na density behavior in the midlatitude E region, where both the ion density and the neutral atmosphere are modulated by tidal and gravity waves. Simulation results show good agreement with Na lidar measurements and reveal that atmospheric waves can transport Na upward to generate Na layers and variations in E region considerably. The vertical wind component of the large amplitude tidal wave can extend the Na layer above 120 km into the thermosphere. The simulation also demonstrates that the modulation of large amplitude gravity (GW) wave can generate small-scale sporadic Na layers (Nas) in the E region. Finally, eddy diffusion enhancement in the GW saturation process can significantly alter the Nas spatial and temporal structures.

  12. Temporal variation in Sargassum Biomass, Hypnea epiphytism and associated fauna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leite Fosca Pedini Pereira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies were carried out to investigate the temporal variation in Sargassum biomass, Hypnea epiphytism and associated fauna. There was a marked variation in the biomass of Sargassum and Hypnea among various sampling periods. Low values for Sargassum were recorded in August and November, while the lower value for Hypnea biomass was recorded in August. An inverse relationship was found between Sargassum biomass and the intensity of Hypnea epiphytism. The density of the total fauna associated to Sargassum showed a marked reduction in May. This variation was influenced by the variation patterns of the dominant faunistic groups (Gastropoda, Gammaridea, Isopoda and Caridea. Significant positive relationships were found between the biomass of Sargassum and Sargassum+Hypnea with the total density of all faunistic groups (per macroalgae biomass unit. However, the influence of Hypnea epiphytism on the phytal organisms was not evidenced.

  13. Deriving daily and seasonal variations in meteorological gravity wave parameters from a tropical infrasound station and comparisons with lightning strike data form ATDnet and TRMM LIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlton, Graeme; Charlton-Perez, Andrew; Harrison, Giles

    2017-04-01

    A wealth of work has shown that meteorological gravity wave parameters can be derived from both satellite data and weather balloons. Satellite data has good temporal and spatial coverage but can only probe the lower stratosphere and mesosphere. Radiosonde wind and temperature profiles can also be used to infer gravity wave information in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Both methods have been used to investigate seasonal variations in gravity wave parameters at these heights. However, these methods cannot be used to infer gravity wave parameters near the surface. One method to detect atmospheric gravity waves at the surface is by using an infrasound array. Infrasound arrays consist of several microbarometers which are spaced kilometres apart. As the wave passes over the array subtle pressure perturbations are subsequently detected at each microbarometer. The temporal differences in each microbarometer's time series allow a gravity wave's velocity, back azimuth, ground based frequency and amplitude to be calculated using the progressive multichannel correlation method. In order to calculate further meteorological values such as wave number, velocity perturbations and hence find the momentum flux for each gravity wave, data from meteorological station in close proximity to the array need to be combined with the infrasound data, which is explored here. Gravity wave parameters calculated from infra sound data combined with meteorological data over several years will be shown for a station (IS17) in the Ivory Coast. Blanc et al 2010 showed an annual variation in gravity wave back azimuth due to the shifting of thunderstorms associated with the ITCZ. A spectral analysis of all gravity wave parameters has revealed daily and seasonal variations, which are further explored. To further understand the seasonal variations observed data from the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) rainfall estimate and TRMM LIS lightning data are used to relate how the

  14. Temporal and spatial variations in fly ash quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hower, J.C.; Trimble, A.S. [Center for Applied Energy Research, University of Kentucky, 2540 Research Park Drive, 40511 Lexington, KY (United States); Eble, C.F. [Kentucky Geological Survey, Mining and Mineral Resources Building, University of Kentucky, 40506 Lexington, KY (United States)

    2001-10-05

    Fly ash quality, both as the amount of petrographically distinguishable carbons and in chemistry, varies in both time and space. Temporal variations are a function of a number of variables. Variables can include variations in the coal blend organic petrography, mineralogy, and chemistry; variations in the pulverization of the coal, both as a function of the coal's Hardgrove grindability index and as a function of the maintenance and settings of the pulverizers; and variations in the operating conditions of the boiler, including changes in the pollution control system. Spatial variation, as an instantaneous measure of fly ash characteristics, should not involve changes in the first two sets of variables listed above. Spatial variations are a function of the gas flow within the boiler and ducts, certain flow conditions leading to a tendency for segregation of the less-dense carbons in one portion of the gas stream.Caution must be applied in sampling fly ash. Samples from a single bin, or series of bins, may not be representative of the whole fly ash, providing a biased view of the nature of the material. Further, it is generally not possible to be certain about variation until the analysis of the ash is complete.

  15. Temporal and spatial variations in fly ash quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hower, J.C.; Trimble, A.S.; Eble, C.F.

    2001-01-01

    Fly ash quality, both as the amount of petrographically distinguishable carbons and in chemistry, varies in both time and space. Temporal variations are a function of a number of variables. Variables can include variations in the coal blend organic petrography, mineralogy, and chemistry; variations in the pulverization of the coal, both as a function of the coal's Hardgrove grindability index and as a function of the maintenance and settings of the pulverizers; and variations in the operating conditions of the boiler, including changes in the pollution control system. Spatial variation, as an instantaneous measure of fly ash characteristics, should not involve changes in the first two sets of variables listed above. Spatial variations are a function of the gas flow within the boiler and ducts, certain flow conditions leading to a tendency for segregation of the less-dense carbons in one portion of the gas stream. Caution must be applied in sampling fly ash. Samples from a single bin, or series of bins, m ay not be representative of the whole fly ash, providing a biased view of the nature of the material. Further, it is generally not possible to be certain about variation until the analysis of the ash is complete. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Monitoring of the temporal and spatial variation of groundwater storage in the Three Gorges area based on the CORS network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Chuanyin; Liang, Shiming; Yang, Qiang; Hu, MinZhang; Feng, Wei

    2017-11-01

    The variation of groundwater storage is not well understood due to the complex hydrodynamic environment in the Three Gorges area. The variation of monthly groundwater storage from January 2011 to June 2015 was directly inverted in the Three Gorges area of China based on 26 Continuously Operating Reference Station (CORS) and eight gravity stations with a resolution of 2‧ × 2‧ using the Earth's gravity field and the load deformation theory. The results were then compared with the water level from groundwater monitoring wells. The comparison indicates that it is possible to calculate the temporal and spatial variation of groundwater with high precision based on the continuous observation data of CORS and a small amount of gravity stations. Our analysis shows that the groundwater storage was consistent in the Three Gorges area from 2011 to 2014. The Three Gorges Reservoir has a large impact on the variation of groundwater storage. The variation of the groundwater storage derived from CORS agrees well with that of the groundwater monitoring wells. The new data are important references for the research of hydrodynamic environmental change in the Three Gorges area and for the analysis of the impact of water impoundment and drainage in the Three Gorges Reservoir.

  17. Spatial and Temporal Variation of Wideband Indoor Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Ndzi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive studies of the impact of temporal variations induced by people on the characteristics of indoor wideband channels are reported. Singular Value Decomposition Prony algorithm has been used to compute the impulse response from measured channel transfer functions. The high multipath resolution of the algorithm has allowed a detailed assessment of the shapes of individual multipath clusters and their variation in time and space in indoor channels. Large- and small-scale analyses show that there is a significant dependency of the channel response on room size. The presence of people in the channel has been found to induce both signal enhancements and fading with short-term dynamic variations of up to 30 dB, depending on the number of people and their positions within the room. A joint amplitude and time of arrival model has been used to successfully model measured impulse response clusters.

  18. Volcanic signatures in time gravity variations during the volcanic unrest on El Hierro (Canary Islands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainz-Maza Aparicio, S.; Arnoso Sampedro, J.; Gonzalez Montesinos, F.; Martí Molist, J.

    2014-06-01

    Gravity changes occurring during the initial stage of the 2011-2012 El Hierro submarine eruption are interpreted in terms of the preeruptive signatures during the episode of unrest. Continuous gravity measurements were made at two sites on the island using the relative spring gravimeter LaCoste and Romberg gPhone-054. On 15 September 2011, an observed gravity decrease of 45 μGal, associated with the southward migration of seismic epicenters, is consistent with a lateral magma migration that occurred beneath the volcanic edifice, an apparently clear precursor of the eruption that took place 25 days later on 10 October 2011. High-frequency gravity signals also appeared on 6-11 October 2011, pointing to an occurring interaction between a magmatic intrusion and the ocean floor. These important gravity changes, with amplitudes varying from 10 to -90 μGal, during the first 3 days following the onset of the eruption are consistent with the northward migration of the eruptive focus along an active eruptive fissure. An apparent correlation of gravity variations with body tide vertical strain was also noted, which could indicate that concurrent tidal triggering occurred during the initial stage of the eruption.

  19. Seasonal variation and sources of atmospheric gravity waves in the Antarctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaoru Sato

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last recent ten years, our knowledge of gravity waves in the Antarctic has been significantly improved through numerous studies using balloon and satellite observations and high-resolution model simulations. In this report, we introduce results from two studies which were performed as a part of the NIPR project "Integrated analysis of the material circulation in the Antarctic atmosphere-cryosphere-ocean" (2004-2009, i.e., Yoshiki et al. (2004 and Sato and Yoshiki (2008. These two studies focused on the seasonal variation and sources of the gravity waves in the Antarctic, because horizontal wavelengths and phase velocities depend largely on the wave sources. The former study used original high-resolution data from operational radiosonde observations at Syowa Station. In the lowermost stratosphere, gravity waves do not exhibit characteristic seasonal variation; instead, the wave energy is intensified when lower latitude air intrudes into the area near Syowa Station in the upper troposphere. This intrusion is associated with blocking events or developed synoptic-scale waves. In the lower and middle stratosphere, the gravity wave energy is maximized in spring and particularly intensified when the axis of the polar night jet approaches Syowa Station. The latter study is based on intensive radiosonde observation campaigns that were performed in 2002 at Syowa Station as an activity of JARE-43. Gravity wave propagation was statistically examined using two dimensional (i.e., vertical wavenumber versus frequency spectra in each season. It was shown that the gravity waves are radiated upward and downward from an unbalanced region of the polar night jet. This feature is consistent with the gravity-wave resolving GCM simulation.

  20. Temporal variation of clear-water scour at compound Abutments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminuddin Ab. Ghani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Most of actual abutments in rivers are built on foundation, while there is limited number of study available on the effects of the foundation on the local scour. In this study, temporal variation of local scour around compound abutment was investigated experimentally under clear-water conditions. The results showed that a suitable level of foundation is able to decrease the scour depth and increase scour time during the flood events. The trend of temporal scour depth at compound pier and abutment is similar. The scour depth develops to top of foundation quickly, and then the foundation postpones the scour development (lag–time. Duration of lag–time depends on the foundation level, velocity ratio (U/Uc and foundation dimension. This study highlights that proper design of foundation level increases duration of scouring and provides enough time to treat bridge foundation after the flood events.

  1. Application of 3D variation-density interface inversion of gravity anomalies in South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuling; Meng, Xiaohong

    2017-04-01

    The South China Sea (SCS) is a marginal basin with extremely complicated crustal structure and whose evolutional history is associated with continental rifting and seafloor spreading. The gravity data are among the most important data sets for studying deep crustal structures and the tectonic evolution. Density interface inversion by gravity anomalies can effectively estimate the depth of Moho interface. However, the Moho interface inversion in SCS are facing challenges due to the density contract of crust-mantle vary in three dimensions, which are associated with the complicated crustal structure (co-existing oceanic crust, continental crust and transitional crust). The regular inversion methods always assume the density contract on both sides of the interface would be constant, which is quite unrealistic since actual strata densities vary both vertically and laterally. To meet the challenges of 3D variation of density in SCS, we present an improved 3D variation-density interface inversion of gravity anomalies based on Parker-Oldenburg method. We first construct two variation density models with exponential density-depth relationships, which expressed the variation of stratum density depending on the depth in oceanic and continental crust respectively. Meanwhile, to minimize multiple solutions for potential field inversion, we collect deep seismic sounding data and employ the gravity inversion by joint using seismic data to be constraint for depth of Moho. Finally, we have estimated the depth of Moho interface which infers the tectonic significance in SCS. The inversion results agree well with seismic data in SCS show this approach is more effective and precise to quantitative estimate the depth of interface. Keywords: South China Sea; Gravity anomalies; Density interface inversion;

  2. Forward modeling of gravity data using geostatistically generated subsurface density variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    Using geostatistical models of density variations in the subsurface, constrained by geologic data, forward models of gravity anomalies can be generated by discretizing the subsurface and calculating the cumulative effect of each cell (pixel). The results of such stochastically generated forward gravity anomalies can be compared with the observed gravity anomalies to find density models that match the observed data. These models have an advantage over forward gravity anomalies generated using polygonal bodies of homogeneous density because generating numerous realizations explores a larger region of the solution space. The stochastic modeling can be thought of as dividing the forward model into two components: that due to the shape of each geologic unit and that due to the heterogeneous distribution of density within each geologic unit. The modeling demonstrates that the internally heterogeneous distribution of density within each geologic unit can contribute significantly to the resulting calculated forward gravity anomaly. Furthermore, the stochastic models match observed statistical properties of geologic units, the solution space is more broadly explored by producing a suite of successful models, and the likelihood of a particular conceptual geologic model can be compared. The Vaca Fault near Travis Air Force Base, California, can be successfully modeled as a normal or strike-slip fault, with the normal fault model being slightly more probable. It can also be modeled as a reverse fault, although this structural geologic configuration is highly unlikely given the realizations we explored.

  3. Temporal Variation of Iodine Isotopes in the North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Peng; Aldahan, Ala; Possnert, Göran

    2014-01-01

    . These variations in total 129I and 127I and their species are related to coastal water offshore propagation and surface currents that are linked to long-term and seasonal climatic changes over the North Atlantic and North Sea. Inventory estimation shows that >90% of 129I resides in the Southern and German Bights...... and their species forms (iodide and iodate) are gained here through sampling of surface water in 2010. The results show generally large spatial and temporal (compared to data from 2005) fluctuations of total 129I and 127I, and iodide and iodate. In samples south of 53°N, the level of 127I− in 2010 was generally...

  4. Chemical studies of H chondrites. 5: Temporal variations of sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michlovich, Edward S.; Wolf, Stephen F.; Wang, Ming-Sheng; Vogt, Stephan; Elmore, David; Lipschutz, Michael E.

    1995-01-01

    We report Cl-36 (301-kyr half-life) data obtained by accelerator mass spectrometry allowing nominal terrestrial ages to be determined for 39 Antarctic H4-6 chondrites for which contents of volatile trace elements are known. The compositional difference between these Antarctic meteorites and 58 non-Antarctic falls increases with terrestrial age and, using multivariate statistical techniques, becomes highly significant for Antarctic samples with ages greater than 50 kyr. The compositional difference is inconsistent with trivial causes such as weathering and seems to reflect differences in thermal histories of parent sources. Temporal source variations for the H chondrite flux on Earth thus exist not only on a short-term, 40 years, basis (Dodd et al., 1993) but also on a long-term, greater than 50 kyr, basis.

  5. Seasonal gravity changes estimated from GRACE data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengbo Zou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 2002, the GRACE program has provided a large amount of high-precision data, which can be used to detect temporal gravity variations related to global mass re-distribution inside the fluid envelop of the surface of the Earth. In order to make use of the GRACE data to investigate earthquake-related gravity changes in China, we first studied the degree variances of the monthly GRACE gravity field models, and then applied decor-relation and Gaussian smoothing method to obtain seasonal gravity changes in China. By deducting the multi-year mean seasonal variations from the seasonal maps, we found some earthquake-related gravity anomalies.

  6. Normal-Mode and Free-Air Gravity Constraints on Lateral Variations in Velocity and Density of Earth's Mantle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miaki Ishii; Jeroen Tromp

    1999-01-01

    With the use of a large collection of free-oscillation data and additional constraints imposed by the free-air gravity anomaly, lateral variations in shear velocity, compressional velocity, and density within the mantle...

  7. Analyzing temporal variation in the lethality of ETA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez-Cuenca, Ignacio

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes time variation in the lethal violence of the terrorist organization ETA. Given the dynamic structure of the time series of fatalities, I look at the effect of a number of independent variables (the celebration of different types of elections, anti-ETA activity by extreme right-wing organizations and the GAL, police arrests, and other relevant events, such as the referendums on the Constitution and the Statute of Autonomy of Guernica. To do so, I have estimated several ARIMA models using the time series of fatalities between 1968 and 2007. Moreover, the results obtained are complemented by a historical-political analysis of the period of maximum violence, which took place during the Spanish transition to democracy.

    Este artículo analiza la variación temporal en la violencia letal de la organización terrorista ETA. Dada la estructura dinámica de la serie temporal de víctimas mortales, se estudia el efecto de una serie de variables independientes (celebración de distintos tipos de elecciones, actividad anti-ETA de la extrema derecha y del GAL, detenciones policiales y sucesos especiales como los referendos sobre la Constitución o el Estatuto de Autonomía de Guernica. Para ello, se estiman diversos modelos ARIMA con la serie trimestral de víctimas mortales entre 1968 y 2007. Además, se completan los resultados obtenidos con un análisis histórico-político del periodo de máxima violencia durante la transición a la democracia.

  8. Temporal variations analyses and predictive modeling of microbiological seawater quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lušić, Darija Vukić; Kranjčević, Lado; Maćešić, Senka; Lušić, Dražen; Jozić, Slaven; Linšak, Željko; Bilajac, Lovorka; Grbčić, Luka; Bilajac, Neiro

    2017-08-01

    Bathing water quality is a major public health issue, especially for tourism-oriented regions. Currently used methods within EU allow at least a 2.2 day period for obtaining the analytical results, making outdated the information forwarded to the public. Obtained results and beach assessment are influenced by the temporal and spatial characteristics of sample collection, and numerous environmental parameters, as well as by differences of official water standards. This paper examines the temporal variation of microbiological parameters during the day, as well as the influence of the sampling hour, on decision processes in the management of the beach. Apart from the fecal indicators stipulated by the EU Bathing Water Directive (E. coli and enterococci), additional fecal (C. perfringens) and non-fecal (S. aureus and P. aeriginosa) parameters were analyzed. Moreover, the effects of applying different evaluation criteria (national, EU and U.S. EPA) to beach ranking were studied, and the most common reasons for exceeding water-quality standards were investigated. In order to upgrade routine monitoring, a predictive statistical model was developed. The highest concentrations of fecal indicators were recorded early in the morning (6 AM) due to the lack of solar radiation during the night period. When compared to enterococci, E. coli criteria appears to be more stringent for the detection of fecal pollution. In comparison to EU and U.S. EPA criteria, Croatian national evaluation criteria provide stricter public health standards. Solar radiation and precipitation were the predominant environmental parameters affecting beach water quality, and these parameters were included in the predictive model setup. Predictive models revealed great potential for the monitoring of recreational water bodies, and with further development can become a useful tool for the improvement of public health protection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Persistent organic pollutants in the atmosphere - spatial and temporal variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backe, Cecilia

    2001-05-01

    In this thesis I have studied the spatial and temporal variations of PCBs in the atmosphere and in precipitation in southern Sweden. Further, soil-air exchange processes of PCBs were investigated. Finally, the long-range transport of PCBs and DDT was studied in the Baltic Sea region and in a tropical vs. a temporal region. On the regional scale there were significant differences in PCB concentration in the atmosphere, in precipitation and in soil between nearby sampling-areas. Differences in PCB concentrations between areas probably originated from varying geographical and meteorological conditions that affected exchange processes between air and soil/vegetation surfaces. Temporal variations in PCB concentration in atmosphere and precipitation were also found. For PCBs in the air, a systematic pattern in the deviation from the yearly median value for the region was observed. Wind direction played an important role for PCB concentration in precipitation in coastal areas, while at the inland sites this variable seemed to have a minor influence. To examine the intensity of precipitation scavenging, the total washout ratios were calculated and the highest ratios were observed at the two sites where PCB concentration in the air was high. Further, high concentrations of PCB in precipitation correlated with a composition of highly chlorinated PCB congeners, as shown by principal component analysis. For most of the sites there was a significant negative relationship between PCB concentration and rain volume. Soil type and soil organic matter content was found to be important for the variations in PCB concentration between nearby areas. Highest concentrations were found at two sites with sandy soils, one with an extremely high organic carbon content. Soils with similar soil textures (i.e. sandy silt moraine) did not show any significant differences in PCB concentrations. PCB congener composition was shown to differ between sites, with site-specific congener patterns. No

  10. Variational approach to gravity field theories from Newton to Einstein and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Vecchiato, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    This book offers a detailed and stimulating account of the Lagrangian, or variational, approach to general relativity and beyond. The approach more usually adopted when describing general relativity is to introduce the required concepts of differential geometry and derive the field and geodesic equations from purely geometrical properties. Demonstration of the physical meaning then requires the weak field approximation of these equations to recover their Newtonian counterparts. The potential downside of this approach is that it tends to suit the mathematical mind and requires the physicist to study and work in a completely unfamiliar environment. In contrast, the approach to general relativity described in this book will be especially suited to physics students. After an introduction to field theories and the variational approach, individual sections focus on the variational approach in relation to special relativity, general relativity, and alternative theories of gravity. Throughout the text, solved exercis...

  11. Temporal variations of Titan's surface with Cassini/VIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomonidou, Anezina; Coustenis, A.; Hirtzig, M.; Rodriguez, S.; Stephan, K.; Lopes, R. M. C.; Drossart, P.; Sotin, C.; Le Mouélic, S.; Lawrence, K.; Bratsolis, E.; Jaumann, R.; Brown, R. H.

    2016-05-01

    correspond to dune fields. During the time periods explored here we find that, as expected and contrary to Tui Regio and Sotra Patera, the test cases did not show any significant changes in surface albedo. We therefore suggest that temporal variations of surface albedo exist for some areas on Titan, but that their origin may differ from one region to the other. They could be due to diverse, past and/or ongoing formation processes (endogenic and/or exogenic, possibly cryovolcanic), as discussed here.

  12. Robust Estimation of Temporal Resistivity Variations from Magnetotelluric Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Arroyo, O. J.; Romo, J. M.; Gomez-Trevino, E.

    2016-12-01

    In recent years there has been a worldwide increase of projects related to fluid injection, such as enhanced geothermal systems, CO2 sequestration and/or fracture monitoring studies. For the success of such projects, a full knowledge of the fluid penetration and propagation is needed, making monitoring techniques sensible to the fluid displacement an essential tool. The magnetotelluric (MT) method is a widely used geophysical technique in tectonic and reservoir exploration studies, where its sensitivity to changes in the electrical resistivity of rocks makes it a very promising tool for monitoring application. Several authors have already reported experiments using the MT method to monitor the effects produced by the injection of fluids in the subsurface. Most of them analyze the changes registered in the variables measured at the surface, particularly the apparent resistivity and the impedance phase. However, few studies have tried to estimate the changes in the ground resistivity from the observable data at the surface. The main difficulty in this kind of problems is that a full control of the geo-electric structure is needed a priori, and distortion effects in the measured data can lead to estimate false temporal or spatial variations. In this work we remove distortion in the data by applying a combination of the phase tensor and the quadratic equation, and propose a new technique to estimate ground resistivity variations by applying a 1D inversion scheme, based on a relationship between changes in resistivity at depth to observed changes of rotation invariant MT responses, applying the Marquardt-Levenberg regularization technique. We test the method using synthetic data and then apply it to real MT data sets collected before and after the 2010, Mw 7.2 earthquake in the Mexicali Valley, Mexico. We also apply it to data sets registered continuously by permanent electromagnetic monitoring stations. Keywords: Magnetotellurics, continuous monitoring, regularized

  13. Geographic and temporal variations in pollen exposure across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M; Jäger, S; Berger, U; Sikoparija, B; Hallsdottir, M; Sauliene, I; Bergmann, K-C; Pashley, C H; de Weger, L; Majkowska-Wojciechowska, B; Rybníček, O; Thibaudon, M; Gehrig, R; Bonini, M; Yankova, R; Damialis, A; Vokou, D; Gutiérrez Bustillo, A M; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, K; van Ree, R

    2014-07-01

    The EC-funded EuroPrevall project examined the prevalence of food allergy across Europe. A well-established factor in the occurrence of food allergy is primary sensitization to pollen. To analyse geographic and temporal variations in pollen exposure, allowing the investigation of how these variations influence the prevalence and incidence of food allergies across Europe. Airborne pollen data for two decades (1990-2009) were obtained from 13 monitoring sites located as close as possible to the EuroPrevall survey centres. Start dates, intensity and duration of Betulaceae, Oleaceae, Poaceae and Asteraceae pollen seasons were examined. Mean, slope of the regression, probability level (P) and dominant taxa (%) were calculated. Trends were considered significant at P pollen exposure, two folds higher than to Poaceae, and greater than five folds higher than to Oleaceae and Asteraceae. Only in Reykjavik, Madrid and Derby was Poaceae the dominant pollen, as was Oleaceae in Thessaloniki. Weed pollen (Asteraceae) was never dominant, exposure accounted for >10% of total pollen exposure only in Siauliai (Artemisia) and Legnano (Ambrosia). Consistent trends towards changing intensity or duration of exposure were not observed, possibly with the exception of (not significant) decreased exposure to Artemisia and increased exposure to Ambrosia. This is the first comprehensive study quantifying exposure to the major allergenic pollen families Betulaceae, Oleaceae, Poaceae and Asteraceae across Europe. These data can now be used for studies into patterns of sensitization and allergy to pollen and foods. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Separating Mass and Height Contributions in Gravity Variations at Medicina, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbini, S.; Bruni, S.; Errico, M.; Santi, E.; Wziontek, H.

    2016-12-01

    During 1996, at the Medicina station, a GPS and a superconducting gravimeter (SG) were installed in the framework of an experiment focused on the comparison between height and gravity variations. Absolute gravity observations are also performed twice a year and environmental parameters, among others water table levels, are recorded continuously. The station is also equipped with a second GPS system, the two antennas are very close to each other, and both are located in close proximity to the VLBI dish. Two decades of continuous height and gravity observations are now available which allow investigating both long and short period signals and the relevant correlations between the two measured quantities. Long period signatures are observed, a principal component is due to subsidence which is well known to occur in the area; however, also non-linear long-period behaviors are observed. Seasonal effects are also clearly recognizable in the time series and are mainly associated with the water table seasonal behavior. The station is characterized by clayey soil which is subject to consolidation effects when the water table lowers during the summer period. This effect is particularly recognizable in the SG data since the instrument is installed on a shallow foundation pillar which may suffer for height decreases in the order of 2,5-3 cm for water table lowering of 2 m.

  15. Temporal variation of decomposition gases from baled municipal solid wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbay, Ismail; Durmusoglu, Ertan

    2012-05-01

    In this study, after nine cylindrical bales containing a mix of different waste materials were constructed, they were stored in the open air and temporal variations of CO(2), CH(4), O(2), and N(2) were monitored over 10 months. In each bale, different waste fractions were considered in order to represent different moisture contents. The results showed that CO(2) increased within very few days to approximately 80% and stabilized later in the range of between 10% and 35% in a month. The O(2) levels dropped from approximately 15% to significantly less than 1%. There was no significant anaerobic decomposition since CH(4) did not exceed 5% during the whole test period. N(2) exhibited an opposite pattern with CO(2). In addition, relationships between waste species in the bales and gas formations were determined by a bivariate correlation analysis. An empirical prediction model for the maximum CO(2) production was also developed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Temporal redox variation in basaltic tephra from Surtsey volcano (Iceland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, C. Ian; Moussallam, Yves

    2017-10-01

    The oxidation state of magma controls and/or tracks myriad petrologic phenomena, and new insights into oxidation are now made possible by high-resolution measurements of Fe3+/∑Fe in volcanic glasses. We present new μ-XANES measurements of Fe3+/∑Fe in a time series of basaltic tephra from the 1963-1967 eruption of Surtsey (Iceland), to examine if the magma mixing between alkalic and tholeiitic basalts that is apparent in the major and trace elements of these glasses is also represented in their oxidation states. Raw Fe3+/∑Fe data show a temporal trend from oxidized to reduced glasses, and this is accompanied by decreasing indices of mantle enrichment (e.g., La/Yb, Zr/Y). When expressed as composition- and temperature-corrected fO2, the trend has a similar magnitude ( 0.3 log units) to the variation in fO2 due to ridge-plume interaction along the Reykjanes Ridge. These data indicate that the oxidation state of mixed magmas can be retained through fractionation and degassing processes, and that matrix glass Fe3+/∑Fe in tephras can be used to make inferences about the relative oxidation states of parental magmas during nuanced magma mixing.

  17. Temporal and spatial variation of nitrogen transformations in a coniferous forest soils.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laverman, A.M.; Zoomer, H.R.; van Verseveld, H.W.; Verhoef, H.A.

    2000-01-01

    Forest soils show a great degree of temporal and spatial variation of nitrogen mineralization. The aim of the present study was to explain temporal variation in nitrate leaching from a nitrogen-saturated coniferous forest soil by potential nitrification, mineralization rates and nitrate uptake by

  18. Temporal and spatial variation of nitrogen transformations in a coniferous soil.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laverman, A.M.; Zoomer, H.R.; van Verseveld, H.W.; Verhoef, H.A.

    2000-01-01

    Forest soils show a great degree of temporal and spatial variation of nitrogen mineralization. The aim of the present study was to explain temporal variation in nitrate leaching from a nitrogen-saturated coniferous forest soil by potential nitrification, mineralization rates and nitrate uptake by

  19. Temporal variations in the food habits of some fish species in Lake ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temporal variations in the food habits of some fish species in Lake Nokoué, Benin. P Gnohossou, P Lalèyè, P Atachi, G Magali, MC Villanueva, J Moreau. Abstract. Stomach contents of the 12 most abundant fish species in Lake Nokoué, Benin, collected between 2003 and 2005, were analysed for temporal variations in ...

  20. Spatial and temporal variations of thunderstorm activities over Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnadara, Upul

    2016-05-01

    Spatial and temporal variation of frequencies of thunderstorms over Sri Lanka using thunder day data is presented. A thunder day is simply a calendar day in which thunder is heard at least once at a given location. Two sets of data were collected and analyzed: annual totals for 10 climatological stations for a period of 50 years and monthly totals for 20 climatological stations for a period of 20 years. The average annual thunder days over Sri Lanka was found to be 76. Among the climatological stations considered, a high number of annual thunder days was recorded in Ratnapura (150 days/year), followed by Colombo (108 days/year) and Bandarawela (106 days/year). It appears that there are no widespread long-term increasing or decreasing trends in thunderstorm frequencies. However, Colombo, the capital of Sri Lanka which has over two million people shows an increasing trend of 0.8 thunder days per year. Although there is a high variability between stations reporting the number of thunder days, the overall pattern within a year is clear. Thunderstorm frequencies are high during two periods: March-May and September-November, which coincide with the first inter-monsoon and second inter-monsoon periods. Compared to the dry zone, the wet zone, especially the southwestern region, has high thunderstorm activity. There is a clear spatial difference in thunderstorm activities during the southwest and northeast monsoon seasons. During both these seasons, enhanced thunderstorm activities are reported on the leeward side of the mountain range. A slight reduction in the thunderstorm activities was found in the high elevation areas of the hill country compared to the surrounding areas. A lightning ground flash density map derived using annual thunder days is also presented.

  1. Zika in Twitter: Temporal Variations of Locations, Actors, and Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanidis, Anthony; Vraga, Emily; Lamprianidis, Georgios; Radzikowski, Jacek; Delamater, Paul L; Jacobsen, Kathryn H; Pfoser, Dieter; Croitoru, Arie; Crooks, Andrew

    2017-04-20

    The recent Zika outbreak witnessed the disease evolving from a regional health concern to a global epidemic. During this process, different communities across the globe became involved in Twitter, discussing the disease and key issues associated with it. This paper presents a study of this discussion in Twitter, at the nexus of location, actors, and concepts. Our objective in this study was to demonstrate the significance of 3 types of events: location related, actor related, and concept related, for understanding how a public health emergency of international concern plays out in social media, and Twitter in particular. Accordingly, the study contributes to research efforts toward gaining insights on the mechanisms that drive participation, contributions, and interaction in this social media platform during a disease outbreak. We collected 6,249,626 tweets referring to the Zika outbreak over a period of 12 weeks early in the outbreak (December 2015 through March 2016). We analyzed this data corpus in terms of its geographical footprint, the actors participating in the discourse, and emerging concepts associated with the issue. Data were visualized and evaluated with spatiotemporal and network analysis tools to capture the evolution of interest on the topic and to reveal connections between locations, actors, and concepts in the form of interaction networks. The spatiotemporal analysis of Twitter contributions reflects the spread of interest in Zika from its original hotspot in South America to North America and then across the globe. The Centers for Disease Control and World Health Organization had a prominent presence in social media discussions. Tweets about pregnancy and abortion increased as more information about this emerging infectious disease was presented to the public and public figures became involved in this. The results of this study show the utility of analyzing temporal variations in the analytic triad of locations, actors, and concepts. This

  2. Spatial and temporal variations in airborne Ambrosia pollen in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikoparija, B; Skjøth, C A; Celenk, S; Testoni, C; Abramidze, T; Alm Kübler, K; Belmonte, J; Berger, U; Bonini, M; Charalampopoulos, A; Damialis, A; Clot, B; Dahl, Å; de Weger, L A; Gehrig, R; Hendrickx, M; Hoebeke, L; Ianovici, N; Kofol Seliger, A; Magyar, D; Mányoki, G; Milkovska, S; Myszkowska, D; Páldy, A; Pashley, C H; Rasmussen, K; Ritenberga, O; Rodinkova, V; Rybníček, O; Shalaboda, V; Šaulienė, I; Ščevková, J; Stjepanović, B; Thibaudon, M; Verstraeten, C; Vokou, D; Yankova, R; Smith, M

    2017-01-01

    The European Commission Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) Action FA1203 "SMARTER" aims to make recommendations for the sustainable management of Ambrosia across Europe and for monitoring its efficiency and cost-effectiveness. The goal of the present study is to provide a baseline for spatial and temporal variations in airborne Ambrosia pollen in Europe that can be used for the management and evaluation of this noxious plant. The study covers the full range of Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. distribution over Europe (39°N-60°N; 2°W-45°E). Airborne Ambrosia pollen data for the principal flowering period of Ambrosia (August-September) recorded during a 10-year period (2004-2013) were obtained from 242 monitoring sites. The mean sum of daily average airborne Ambrosia pollen and the number of days that Ambrosia pollen was recorded in the air were analysed. The mean and standard deviation (SD) were calculated regardless of the number of years included in the study period, while trends are based on those time series with 8 or more years of data. Trends were considered significant at p Ambrosia pollen (only 8% for the mean sum of daily average Ambrosia pollen concentrations and 14% for the mean number of days Ambrosia pollen were recorded in the air). The direction of any trends varied locally and reflected changes in sources of the pollen, either in size or in distance from the monitoring station. Pollen monitoring is important for providing an early warning of the expansion of this invasive and noxious plant.

  3. Temporal delays and individual variation in antidiuretic response to desmopressin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juul, Kristian Vinter; Erichsen, Lars; Robertson, Gary L

    2013-02-01

    This study aimed to estimate the relationship between pharmacokinetics and the antidiuretic effect of desmopressin. In the investigator-blind, randomized, parallel group study, 5 dose groups and 1 placebo group, each consisting of 12 healthy, overhydrated, nonsmoking male subjects 18-55 yr of age were infused intravenously over 2 h with placebo or 30, 60, 125, 250, and 500 ng desmopressin in 50 ml of normal saline. Plasma desmopressin and urine osmolality rose by variable amounts during the infusions of 60, 125, 250, and 500 ng desmopressin. Plotting mean urine osmolality against the concurrent mean plasma desmopressin yielded a temporal delay between pharmacokinetic (PK) and -dynamic (PD) responses in all dose groups. Using simulation from the indirect-response model, assuming a constant (4 ng/ml) desmopressin concentration, this delay between PK and PD was estimated at 4 h (10th-90th percentile: 1.8-8.1). Within each group, however, there were large individual variations (2- to 10-fold) in the magnitude and duration of the antidiuretic effect. The antidiuretic effect of intravenous desmopressin in water-loaded healthy adults varies considerably due largely to factors other than individual differences in pharmacokinetics. The antidiuretic effect is time as well as dose dependent and may be self-amplifying. The most likely explanation for these findings is that the time required for a given level of plasma desmopressin to exert its maximum antidiuretic effect varies markedly from person to person due to individual differences in the kinetics of one or more of the intracellular mechanisms that promote the reabsorption of solute-free water by principal cells in renal collecting tubules.

  4. Temporal variation in fish assemblage composition on a tidal flat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry L. Spach

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Annual variation in the fish assemblage characteristics on a tidal flat was studied in coastal Paraná, in southern Brazil. Fish were collected between August 1998 and July 1999, during the diurnal high tide and diurnal and nocturnal low tide of the syzygial (full moon and quadrature (waning moon tides, to characterize temporal change in assemblage composition. A total of 64,265 fish in 133 species were collected. The average number of species and individuals, biomass, species richness, diversity (mass and equitability varied significantly over time . The dissimilarity of the assemblage was greatest in August, September and October in contrast with the period from November to January, with the lowest dissimilarity. The combined action of water temperature, salinity and wind intensity had a great influence over the structure of the fish assemblage.Os peixes de uma planície de maré da praia Balneário de Pontal do Sul, Paraná, foram coletados, na preamar diurna e na baixa-mar diurna e noturna das marés de sizígia e de quadratura, visando caracterizar as mudanças temporais entre agosto de 1998 e julho de 1999. As coletas totalizaram 64.265 peixes de 133 espécies. Foram observadas diferenças significativas na captura média em número de espécies e de peixes, peso total e nos índices de riqueza, diversidade (H' peso e eqüitatividade entre os meses de coleta. A dissimilaridade da ictiofauna foi maior entre os meses de agosto, setembro e outubro em comparação com o período de novembro a janeiro. A ação combinada da temperatura da água, salinidade e intensidade do vento, influenciaram mais sobre a estrutura da assembléia de peixes.

  5. Wood Specific Gravity Variations and Biomass of Central African Tree Species: The Simple Choice of the Outer Wood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Bastin

    Full Text Available Wood specific gravity is a key element in tropical forest ecology. It integrates many aspects of tree mechanical properties and functioning and is an important predictor of tree biomass. Wood specific gravity varies widely among and within species and also within individual trees. Notably, contrasted patterns of radial variation of wood specific gravity have been demonstrated and related to regeneration guilds (light demanding vs. shade-bearing. However, although being repeatedly invoked as a potential source of error when estimating the biomass of trees, both intraspecific and radial variations remain little studied. In this study we characterized detailed pith-to-bark wood specific gravity profiles among contrasted species prominently contributing to the biomass of the forest, i.e., the dominant species, and we quantified the consequences of such variations on the biomass.Radial profiles of wood density at 8% moisture content were compiled for 14 dominant species in the Democratic Republic of Congo, adapting a unique 3D X-ray scanning technique at very high spatial resolution on core samples. Mean wood density estimates were validated by water displacement measurements. Wood density profiles were converted to wood specific gravity and linear mixed models were used to decompose the radial variance. Potential errors in biomass estimation were assessed by comparing the biomass estimated from the wood specific gravity measured from pith-to-bark profiles, from global repositories, and from partial information (outer wood or inner wood.Wood specific gravity profiles from pith-to-bark presented positive, neutral and negative trends. Positive trends mainly characterized light-demanding species, increasing up to 1.8 g.cm-3 per meter for Piptadeniastrum africanum, and negative trends characterized shade-bearing species, decreasing up to 1 g.cm-3 per meter for Strombosia pustulata. The linear mixed model showed the greater part of wood specific gravity

  6. Wood Specific Gravity Variations and Biomass of Central African Tree Species: The Simple Choice of the Outer Wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastin, Jean-François; Fayolle, Adeline; Tarelkin, Yegor; Van den Bulcke, Jan; de Haulleville, Thales; Mortier, Frederic; Beeckman, Hans; Van Acker, Joris; Serckx, Adeline; Bogaert, Jan; De Cannière, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Wood specific gravity is a key element in tropical forest ecology. It integrates many aspects of tree mechanical properties and functioning and is an important predictor of tree biomass. Wood specific gravity varies widely among and within species and also within individual trees. Notably, contrasted patterns of radial variation of wood specific gravity have been demonstrated and related to regeneration guilds (light demanding vs. shade-bearing). However, although being repeatedly invoked as a potential source of error when estimating the biomass of trees, both intraspecific and radial variations remain little studied. In this study we characterized detailed pith-to-bark wood specific gravity profiles among contrasted species prominently contributing to the biomass of the forest, i.e., the dominant species, and we quantified the consequences of such variations on the biomass. Radial profiles of wood density at 8% moisture content were compiled for 14 dominant species in the Democratic Republic of Congo, adapting a unique 3D X-ray scanning technique at very high spatial resolution on core samples. Mean wood density estimates were validated by water displacement measurements. Wood density profiles were converted to wood specific gravity and linear mixed models were used to decompose the radial variance. Potential errors in biomass estimation were assessed by comparing the biomass estimated from the wood specific gravity measured from pith-to-bark profiles, from global repositories, and from partial information (outer wood or inner wood). Wood specific gravity profiles from pith-to-bark presented positive, neutral and negative trends. Positive trends mainly characterized light-demanding species, increasing up to 1.8 g.cm-3 per meter for Piptadeniastrum africanum, and negative trends characterized shade-bearing species, decreasing up to 1 g.cm-3 per meter for Strombosia pustulata. The linear mixed model showed the greater part of wood specific gravity variance was

  7. The expanding Earth at present: evidence from temporal gravity field and space-geodetic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiancheng Han

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available

    The Earth expansion problem has attracted great interest, and the present study demonstrates that the Earth has been expanding, at least over the recent several decades. Space-geodetic data recorded at stations distributed globally were used (including global positioning system data, very-long-baseline interferometry, satellite laser ranging stations, and stations for Doppler orbitography and radiopositioning integrated by satellite, which covered a period of more than 10 years in the International Terrestrial Reference Frame 2008. A triangular network covering the surface of the Earth was thus constructed based on the spherical Delaunay approach, and average-weighted vertical variations in the Earth surface were estimated. Calculations show that the Earth is expanding at present at a rate of 0.24 ± 0.04 mm/yr. Furthermore, based on the Earth Gravitational Model 2008 and the secular variation rates of the second-degree coefficients estimated by satellite laser ranging and Earth mean-pole data, the principal inertia moments of the Earth (A, B, C and in particular their temporal variations, were determined: the simple mean value of the three principal inertia moments (i.e., [A+B+C]/3 is gradually increasing. This clearly demonstrates that the Earth has been expanding, at least over the recent decades, and the data show that the Earth is expanding at a rate ranging from 0.17 ± 0.02 mm/yr to 0.21 ± 0.02 mm/yr, which coincides with the space geodetic evidence. Hence, based on both space geodetic observations and gravimetric data, we conclude that the Earth has been expanding at a rate of about 0.2 mm/yr over recent decades.

  8. How Fast Do Objects Fall in Visual Memory? Uncovering the Temporal and Spatial Features of Representational Gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sá Teixeira, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    Visual memory for the spatial location where a moving target vanishes has been found to be systematically displaced downward in the direction of gravity. Moreover, it was recently reported that the magnitude of the downward error increases steadily with increasing retention intervals imposed after object's offset and before observers are allowed to perform the spatial localization task, in a pattern where the remembered vanishing location drifts downward as if following a falling trajectory. This outcome was taken to reflect the dynamics of a representational model of earth's gravity. The present study aims to establish the spatial and temporal features of this downward drift by taking into account the dynamics of the motor response. The obtained results show that the memory for the last location of the target drifts downward with time, thus replicating previous results. Moreover, the time taken for completion of the behavioural localization movements seems to add to the imposed retention intervals in determining the temporal frame during which the visual memory is updated. Overall, it is reported that the representation of spatial location drifts downward by about 3 pixels for each two-fold increase of time until response. The outcomes are discussed in relation to a predictive internal model of gravity which outputs an on-line spatial update of remembered objects' location.

  9. How Fast Do Objects Fall in Visual Memory? Uncovering the Temporal and Spatial Features of Representational Gravity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno De Sá Teixeira

    Full Text Available Visual memory for the spatial location where a moving target vanishes has been found to be systematically displaced downward in the direction of gravity. Moreover, it was recently reported that the magnitude of the downward error increases steadily with increasing retention intervals imposed after object's offset and before observers are allowed to perform the spatial localization task, in a pattern where the remembered vanishing location drifts downward as if following a falling trajectory. This outcome was taken to reflect the dynamics of a representational model of earth's gravity. The present study aims to establish the spatial and temporal features of this downward drift by taking into account the dynamics of the motor response. The obtained results show that the memory for the last location of the target drifts downward with time, thus replicating previous results. Moreover, the time taken for completion of the behavioural localization movements seems to add to the imposed retention intervals in determining the temporal frame during which the visual memory is updated. Overall, it is reported that the representation of spatial location drifts downward by about 3 pixels for each two-fold increase of time until response. The outcomes are discussed in relation to a predictive internal model of gravity which outputs an on-line spatial update of remembered objects' location.

  10. Seasonal and interannual variations of mesospheric gravity waves and background winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, P.; Rapp, M.; Becker, E.; Placke, M.

    2011-12-01

    The seasonal variation of the activity of gravity waves (GW) in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere is investigated using wind measurements with meteor and MF radars at Juliusruh (55°N, 13°E) and Andenes (69°N, 16°E), as well as on the basis of the simulated annual cycle using a gravity-wave resolving mechanistic general circulation model. Observational and computational results show the strongest GW energy during winter and a secondary maximum during summer. Additional observational analysis of short-period GWs yields a more pronounced summer maximum. The semi-annual variation is consistent with the selective filtering of westward and eastward GWs by the mean zonal wind. The latitudinal dependence during summer is characterized by stronger GW energy between 65 and 85 km at middle latitudes than at polar latitudes, and a corresponding upward shift of the wind reversal towards the pole which is also reflected by the simulated GW drag. Based on long term measurements of mesospheric winds at mid and polar altitudes, the interannual variations of the activity of GW with different periods and their dependence from the background winds are investigated. First results indicate that the observed zonal wind trend at about 75 km during summer at mid latitudes goes along with an enhanced activity of GW with periods between 3 - 6 hours at altitudes between 80 and 88 km. We will continue our studies of GW trends for other seasons at both latitudes to illuminate the contribution of the selective GW filtering by the background winds.

  11. Diurnal variation in gravity wave activity at low and middle latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Andrioli

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We employ a modified composite day extension of the Hocking (2005 analysis method to study gravity wave (GW activity in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere using 4 meteor radars spanning latitudes from 7° S to 53.6° S. Diurnal and semidiurnal modulations were observed in GW variances over all sites. Semidiurnal modulation with downward phase propagation was observed at lower latitudes mainly near the equinoxes. Diurnal modulations occur mainly near solstice and, except for the zonal component at Cariri (7° S, do not exhibit downward phase propagation. At a higher latitude (SAAMER, 53.6° S these modulations are only observed in the meridional component where we can observe diurnal variation from March to May, and semidiurnal, during January, February, October (above 88 km and November. Some of these modulations with downward phase progression correlate well with wind shear. When the wind shear is well correlated with the maximum of the variances the diurnal tide has its largest amplitudes, i.e., near equinox. Correlations exhibiting variations with tidal phases suggest significant GW-tidal interactions that have different characters depending on the tidal components and possible mean wind shears. Modulations that do not exhibit phase variations could be indicative of diurnal variations in GW sources.

  12. Spatio-temporal variation of methane over Indian region: Seasonal and inter-annual variation .

    Science.gov (United States)

    M, K.; Nair, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    Methane (CH4) has an important role in the radiation budget and chemistry in the lower and middle atmosphere as a greenhouse and reactive trace gas. The rapid developments in the agriculture and industry over India have lead to the emission of many pollutants like CO, O3, CH4, CO2, SO2 etc into the atmosphere. However, their sources, sinks and concentration levels are poorly understood because of the lack of systematic sampling and monitoring. The advent of satellite remote sensing has helped to analyze the chemical composition of atmosphere with good spatial coverage especially over tropical region which was poorly sampled with the existing surface network. This work attempts an analysis of spatial distribution, seasonal cycle and inter annual variation of CH4 over Indian region during 2003-2009 using SCIAMACHY data onboard ENVISAT. Column CH4 varies from 1740-1890 ppbv over Indian region with distinct spatial and temporal features. We observed a dependence of seasonal CH4 variation on rice cultivation, convective activities and changes in boundary layer characteristics. The comparative study using satellite, aircraft and surface measurement shown CH4 has non-homogeneity in its distribution and seasonal variation in different layers of atmosphere. A comparative study of CH4 at different hot spot regions over the globe was carried out which showed prominent hemispherical variations. Large spread in column CH4 was observed at India and Chinese region compared to other regions with a significant seasonal variability. This study points to the blending of satellite, aircraft and surface measurements for the realization of regional distribution of CH4.

  13. Spatio-temporal variation of urban ultrafine particle number concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragettli, Martina S.; Ducret-Stich, Regina E.; Foraster, Maria; Morelli, Xavier; Aguilera, Inmaculada; Basagaña, Xavier; Corradi, Elisabetta; Ineichen, Alex; Tsai, Ming-Yi; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Rivera, Marcela; Slama, Rémy; Künzli, Nino; Phuleria, Harish C.

    2014-10-01

    Methods are needed to characterize short-term exposure to ultrafine particle number concentrations (UFP) for epidemiological studies on the health effects of traffic-related UFP. Our aims were to assess season-specific spatial variation of short-term (20-min) UFP within the city of Basel, Switzerland, and to develop hybrid models for predicting short-term median and mean UFP levels on sidewalks. We collected measurements of UFP for periods of 20 min (MiniDiSC particle counter) and determined traffic volume along sidewalks at 60 locations across the city, during non-rush hours in three seasons. For each monitoring location, detailed spatial characteristics were locally recorded and potential predictor variables were derived from geographic information systems (GIS). We built multivariate regression models to predict local UFP, using concurrent UFP levels measured at a suburban background station, and combinations of meteorological, temporal, GIS and observed site characteristic variables. For a subset of sites, we assessed the relationship between UFP measured on the sidewalk and at the nearby residence (i.e., home outdoor exposure on e.g. balconies). The average median 20-min UFP levels at street and urban background sites were 14,700 ± 9100 particles cm-3 and 9900 ± 8600 particles cm-3, respectively, with the highest levels occurring in winter and the lowest in summer. The most important predictor for all models was the suburban background UFP concentration, explaining 50% and 38% of the variability of the median and mean, respectively. While the models with GIS-derived variables (R2 = 0.61) or observed site characteristics (R2 = 0.63) predicted median UFP levels equally well, mean UFP predictions using only site characteristic variables (R2 = 0.62) showed a better fit than models using only GIS variables (R2 = 0.55). The best model performance was obtained by using a combination of GIS-derived variables and locally observed site characteristics (median: R2 = 0

  14. Excitation of Earth Rotation Variations "Observed" by Time-Variable Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ben F.; Cox, C. M.

    2005-01-01

    Time variable gravity measurements have been made over the past two decades using the space geodetic technique of satellite laser ranging, and more recently by the GRACE satellite mission with improved spatial resolutions. The degree-2 harmonic components of the time-variable gravity contain important information about the Earth s length-of-day and polar motion excitation functions, in a way independent to the traditional "direct" Earth rotation measurements made by, for example, the very-long-baseline interferometry and GPS. In particular, the (degree=2, order= 1) components give the mass term of the polar motion excitation; the (2,O) component, under certain mass conservation conditions, gives the mass term of the length-of-day excitation. Combining these with yet another independent source of angular momentum estimation calculated from global geophysical fluid models (for example the atmospheric angular momentum, in both mass and motion terms), in principle can lead to new insights into the dynamics, particularly the role or the lack thereof of the cores, in the excitation processes of the Earth rotation variations.

  15. Temporal Variation in Single-Cell Power-Law Rheology Spans the Ensemble Variation of Cell Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, PingGen; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Kuribayashi-Shigetomi, Kaori; Subagyo, Agus; Sueoka, Kazuhisa; Maloney, John M; Van Vliet, Krystyn J; Okajima, Takaharu

    2017-08-08

    Changes in the cytoskeletal organization within cells can be characterized by large spatial and temporal variations in rheological properties of the cell (e.g., the complex shear modulus G(∗)). Although the ensemble variation in G(∗) of single cells has been elucidated, the detailed temporal variation of G(∗) remains unknown. In this study, we investigated how the rheological properties of individual fibroblast cells change under a spatially confined environment in which the cell translational motion is highly restricted and the whole cell shape remains unchanged. The temporal evolution of single-cell rheology was probed at the same measurement location within the cell, using atomic force microscopy-based oscillatory deformation. The measurements reveal that the temporal variation in the power-law rheology of cells is quantitatively consistent with the ensemble variation, indicating that the cell system satisfies an ergodic hypothesis in which the temporal statistics are identical to the ensemble statistics. The autocorrelation of G(∗) implies that the cell mechanical state evolves in the ensemble of possible states with a characteristic timescale. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Passive-ocean radial basis function approach to improve temporal gravity recovery from GRACE observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Kusche, Jürgen; Forootan, Ehsan; Rietbroek, Roelof

    2017-08-01

    We present a state-of-the-art approach of passive-ocean modified radial basis functions (MRBFs) that improves the recovery of time-variable gravity fields from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE). As is well known, spherical harmonics (SHs), which are commonly used to recover gravity fields, are orthogonal basis functions with global coverage. However, the chosen SH truncation involves a global compromise between data coverage and obtainable resolution, and strong localized signals may not be fully captured. Radial basis functions (RBFs) provide another representation, which has been proposed in earlier works to be better suited to retrieve regional gravity signals. In this paper, we propose a MRBF approach by embedding the known coastal geometries in the RBF parameterization and imposing global mass conservation and equilibrium behavior of the oceans. Our hypothesis is that with this physically justified constraint, the GRACE-derived gravity signals can be more realistically partitioned into the land and ocean contributions along the coastlines. We test this new technique to invert monthly gravity fields from GRACE level-1b observations covering 2005-2010, for which the numerical results indicate that (1) MRBF-based solutions reduce the number of parameters by approximately 10% and allow for more flexible regularization when compared to ordinary RBF solutions and (2) the MRBF-derived mass flux is better confined along coastal areas. The latter is particularly tested in the southern Greenland, and our results indicate that the trend of mass loss from the MRBF solutions is approximately 11% larger than that from the SH solutions and approximately 4%-6% larger than that of RBF solutions.

  17. Incorporating NDVI in a gravity model setting to describe spatio-temporal patterns of Lyme borreliosis incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, J. M.; Verstraeten, W. W.; Farifteh, J.; Maes, P.; Aerts, J. M.; Coppin, P.

    2012-04-01

    Lyme borreliosis (LB) is the most common tick-borne disease in Europe and incidence growth has been reported in several European countries during the last decade. LB is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and the main vector of this pathogen in Europe is the tick Ixodes ricinus. LB incidence and spatial spread is greatly dependent on environmental conditions impacting habitat, demography and trophic interactions of ticks and the wide range of organisms ticks parasite. The landscape configuration is also a major determinant of tick habitat conditions and -very important- of the fashion and intensity of human interaction with vegetated areas, i.e. human exposure to the pathogen. Hence, spatial notions as distance and adjacency between urban and vegetated environments are related to human exposure to tick bites and, thus, to risk. This work tested the adequacy of a gravity model setting to model the observed spatio-temporal pattern of LB as a function of location and size of urban and vegetated areas and the seasonal and annual change in the vegetation dynamics as expressed by MODIS NDVI. Opting for this approach implies an analogy with Newton's law of universal gravitation in which the attraction forces between two bodies are directly proportional to the bodies mass and inversely proportional to distance. Similar implementations have proven useful in fields like trade modeling, health care service planning, disease mapping among other. In our implementation, the size of human settlements and vegetated systems and the distance separating these landscape elements are considered the 'bodies'; and the 'attraction' between them is an indicator of exposure to pathogen. A novel element of this implementation is the incorporation of NDVI to account for the seasonal and annual variation in risk. The importance of incorporating this indicator of vegetation activity resides in the fact that alterations of LB incidence pattern observed the last decade have been ascribed

  18. Latitudinal and seasonal variations of lower atmospheric inertial gravity wave energy revealed by US radiosonde data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Zhang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The latitudinal and seasonal variations of gravity wave (GW potential energy density (EP, kinetic energy density (EK, and total energy density (ET, i.e, the sum of potential and kinetic energy densities in the tropospheric (typically 2–10 km and lower stratospheric (typically 18–25 km segments have been derived from 10 years (1998–2007 of radiosonde observations over 92 United States stations in the Northern Hemisphere. The latitudinal variation of EP in the lower stratosphere is in good agreement with satellite observations. However, EK and ET in the lower stratosphere are different from satellite observations and the difference is believed to be linked with the latitudinal dependence of GW sources. Our analysis reveals that GW energy properties exhibit distinctive latitudinal and seasonal variations. The upward-propagating GW energy in the troposphere is larger than that in the lower stratosphere at low latitudes but the opposite holds true at high latitudes. The transition latitude, where the upward- propagating energies in the two altitude regions are the same, occurs at 35° N throughout the year. So striking differences between GW activity in the troposphere and lower stratosphere are not likely explained only by the background wind Doppler shifting due to strong tropospheric jets. Our analysis indicates that the region around tropopause, roughly from 10 km to 18 km, is an important source region, especially at latitudes below 35° N. Our studies strongly suggest that in order to fully understand the global GW activity in the lower atmosphere, the GW kinetic energy and its geographical and seasonal variations should be included, and more attention should be given to GWs in the troposphere and GW sources within the intermediate region, especially the upper troposphere.

  19. Spatial and temporal price variations of sawn wood utilized for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    O Y Ogunsanwo

    recommended that suitable policies that will ensure market integration through proper fixing of forest tariff and ... temporal and spatial transfer; the extent to which prices generated through the market process reflect the ..... Production, Trade and Prices: Global Forest Products model projections to 2010. FAO Forest Paper No.

  20. Temporal variations of atmospheric aerosol in four European urban areas.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lianou, M.; Chalbot, M.C.; Kavouras, I.G.; Kotronarou, A.; Karakatsani, A.; Analytis, A.; Katsouyanni, K.; Puustinen, A.; Hameri, K.; Vallius, M.; Pekkanen, J.; Meddings, C.; Harrison, R.M.; Ayres, J.G.; Brick, H. ten; Kos, G.; Meliefste, K.; Hartog, J.J. de; Hoek, G.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The concentrations of PM(10) mass, PM(2.5) mass and particle number were continuously measured for 18 months in urban background locations across Europe to determine the spatial and temporal variability of particulate matter. METHODS: Daily PM(10) and PM(2.5) samples were continuously

  1. On the Assessment of Global Terrestrial Reference Frame Temporal Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampatzidis, Dimitrios; Koenig, Rolf; Zhu, Shengyuan

    2015-04-01

    Global Terrestrial Reference Frames (GTRFs) as the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) provide reliable 4-D position information (3-D coordinates and their evolution through time). The given 3-D velocities play a significant role in precise position acquisition and are estimated from long term coordinate time series from the space-geodetic techniques DORIS, GNSS, SLR, and VLBI. GTRFs temporal evolution is directly connected with their internal stability: The more intense and inhomogeneous velocity field, the less stable TRF is derived. The assessment of the quality of the GTRF is mainly realized by comparing it to each individual technique's reference frame. E.g the comparison of GTRFs to SLR-only based TRF gives the sense of the ITRF stability with respect to the Geocenter and scale and their associated rates respectively. In addition, the comparison of ITRF to the VLBI-only based TRF can be used for the scale validation. However, till now there is not any specified methodology for the total assessment (in terms of origin, orientation and scale respectively) of the temporal evolution and GTRFs associated accuracy. We present a new alternative diagnostic tool for the assessment of GTRFs temporal evolution based on the well-known time-dependent Helmert type transformation formula (three shifts, three rotations and scale rates respectively). The advantage of the new methodology relies on the fact that it uses the full velocity field of the TRF and therefore all points not just the ones common to different techniques. It also examines simultaneously rates of origin, orientation and scale. The methodology is presented and implemented to the two existing GTRFs on the market (ITRF and DTRF which is computed from DGFI) , the results are discussed. The results also allow to compare directly each GTRF dynamic behavior. Furthermore, the correlations of the estimated parameters can also provide useful information to the proposed GTRFs assessment scheme.

  2. Spatio-temporal Variations of Abundance, Biomass, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The spatio-seasonal variations of Pseudodiaptomus hessei abundance, biomass and reproductive parameters were investigated in the Grand-Lahou lagoon at five stations during the dry and wet (or rainy) seasons from September 2005 to August 2006. In all sampling stations, abundance and biomass of P. hessei in the dry ...

  3. Spatio-temporal variations of phytoplankton community composition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-05

    Oct 5, 2009 ... (2003), who concluded that short-term phyto- plankton variations were controlled by temperature, wind and turbidity, while long-term abundance dynamics were influenced by nutrients. However, these findings are insufficient to understand phytoplankton dynamics since only pelagic data were considered.

  4. GRACE, time-varying gravity, Earth system dynamics and climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, B.; Bonin, J.A.; Chambers, D.P.; Riva, R.E.M.; Sasgen, I.; Wahr, J.

    2014-01-01

    Continuous observations of temporal variations in the Earth's gravity field have recently become available at an unprecedented resolution of a few hundreds of kilometers. The gravity field is a product of the Earth's mass distribution, and these data—provided by the satellites of the Gravity

  5. Colour based fire detection method with temporal intensity variation filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trambitckii, K.; Anding, K.; Musalimov, V.; Linß, G.

    2015-02-01

    Development of video, computing technologies and computer vision gives a possibility of automatic fire detection on video information. Under that project different algorithms was implemented to find more efficient way of fire detection. In that article colour based fire detection algorithm is described. But it is not enough to use only colour information to detect fire properly. The main reason of this is that in the shooting conditions may be a lot of things having colour similar to fire. A temporary intensity variation of pixels is used to separate them from the fire. These variations are averaged over the series of several frames. This algorithm shows robust work and was realised as a computer program by using of the OpenCV library.

  6. Frequency variations of gravity waves interacting with a time-varying tide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Huang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Using a nonlinear, 2-D time-dependent numerical model, we simulate the propagation of gravity waves (GWs in a time-varying tide. Our simulations show that when a GW packet propagates in a time-varying tidal-wind environment, not only its intrinsic frequency but also its ground-based frequency would change significantly. The tidal horizontal-wind acceleration dominates the GW frequency variation. Positive (negative accelerations induce frequency increases (decreases with time. More interestingly, tidal-wind acceleration near the critical layers always causes the GW frequency to increase, which may partially explain the observations that high-frequency GW components are more dominant in the middle and upper atmosphere than in the lower atmosphere. The combination of the increased ground-based frequency of propagating GWs in a time-varying tidal-wind field and the transient nature of the critical layer induced by a time-varying tidal zonal wind creates favorable conditions for GWs to penetrate their originally expected critical layers. Consequently, GWs have an impact on the background atmosphere at much higher altitudes than expected, which indicates that the dynamical effects of tidal–GW interactions are more complicated than usually taken into account by GW parameterizations in global models.

  7. Influence of soil consolidation and thermal expansion effects on height and gravity variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romagnoli, C.; Zerbini, S.; Lago, L.; Richter, B.; Simon, D.; Domenichini, F.; Elmi, C.; Ghirotti, M.

    2003-07-01

    The daily GPS height series of the Medicina station were analyzed for the period July 1996-September 2001. The station is located in the middle Po Plain on fine-grained alluvial deposits. A seasonal oscillation in the order of 18 mm (peak-to-peak amplitude) is present in the data. This crustal deformation has been modeled by including variations in the atmospheric, oceanic and hydrologic mass. The vertical positions can also be affected significantly by soil consolidation. Geotechnical parameters derived by in situ tests and laboratory analyses of the clayey soil collected at Medicina allowed the estimate of the soil settlement relevant to the seasonal oscillation of the surficial water table. Thermal expansion of the geodetic monument has to be taken into account in the case of high-precision vertical positioning. In this work models both for the soil consolidation and the thermal expansion effects are provided. The continuous gravity observations collected at Medicina by means of a superconducting gravimeter also exhibit a marked seasonal oscillation, which has been interpreted as the sum of loading and Newtonian attraction effects, as well as of the contribution due to soil consolidation. Especially the study concerning the soil consolidation effect has allowed a better insight on the seasonal vertical movements occurring at the Medicina station by providing quantitative information on soil behavior due to change of effective pressures. The results can be applied to those stations characterized by similar fine-grained soils and surficial hydrogeology.

  8. Frequency variations of gravity waves interacting with a time-varying tide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, C.M.; Zhang, S.D.; Yi, F.; Huang, K.M.; Gan, Q.; Gong, Y. [Wuhan Univ., Hubei (China). School of Electronic Information; Ministry of Education, Wuhan, Hubei (China). Key Lab. of Geospace Environment and Geodesy; State Observatory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Zhang, Y.H. [Nanjing Univ. of Information Science and Technology (China). College of Hydrometeorolgy

    2013-11-01

    Using a nonlinear, 2-D time-dependent numerical model, we simulate the propagation of gravity waves (GWs) in a time-varying tide. Our simulations show that when aGW packet propagates in a time-varying tidal-wind environment, not only its intrinsic frequency but also its ground-based frequency would change significantly. The tidal horizontal-wind acceleration dominates the GW frequency variation. Positive (negative) accelerations induce frequency increases (decreases) with time. More interestingly, tidal-wind acceleration near the critical layers always causes the GW frequency to increase, which may partially explain the observations that high-frequency GW components are more dominant in the middle and upper atmosphere than in the lower atmosphere. The combination of the increased ground-based frequency of propagating GWs in a time-varying tidal-wind field and the transient nature of the critical layer induced by a time-varying tidal zonal wind creates favorable conditions for GWs to penetrate their originally expected critical layers. Consequently, GWs have an impact on the background atmosphere at much higher altitudes than expected, which indicates that the dynamical effects of tidal-GW interactions are more complicated than usually taken into account by GW parameterizations in global models.

  9. Monitoring temporal variations in water resources across the Arabian Peninsula and identification of their controlling factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, M.; Sultan, M.; Othman, A.

    2015-12-01

    Assessment, monitoring, and development of the fresh water resources in the Arabian Peninsula (AP) are critical for the sustenance of the AP's growing population and water consumption. Monthly (01/2003-12/2013) Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data along with other relevant climatic, geologic, hydrogeologic, and remote sensing datasets were used to monitor the spatiotemporal variability in the AP's water resources and to investigate the causes of those variations. Four regions were selected; in our selection, we tried to cover major aquifers, follow political boundaries, and exceed GRACE footprint (~0.20×106 km2) to minimize uncertainties. The selected regions are: (1) Northern Saudi Arabia and Jordan (area: 0.53×106 km2), (2) Southern Saudi Arabia, Qatar and United Arab Emiratis (area: 0.97×106 km2), (3) Yemen (area: 0.45×106 km2), and (4) Oman (area: 0.32×106 km2). Results indicate: (1) Northern Saudi Arabia and Jordan area is experiencing large depletions (-8.76±0.94 mm/yr; -4.68±0.50 km3/yr) in GRACE-derived terrestrial water storage (TWS) that is largely related to groundwater extraction as well as decrease in rainfall rates throughout the investigated period compared to the preceding period (average annual rainfall [AAR]: 2003-2013: 58 mm; 1979-2002: 103 mm), (2) Southern Saudi Arabia, Qatar and United Arab Emiratis area is experiencing a moderate depletion (-2.73±1.0 mm/yr; -2.63±0.96 km3/yr) in TWS that might be related to groundwater/oil extraction as well as a moderate decrease in rainfall rates (AAR: 2003-2013: 61 mm; 1979-2002: 82 mm), (3) Yemen is experiencing a slight depletion (-0.82±0.30 mm/yr; -0.36±0.13 km3/yr) in TWS that might be related groundwater extraction, and (4) Oman is experiencing slight increase (+0.78±0.30 mm/yr; +0.25±0.09 km3/yr) in TWS that might be related an increase in rainfall rates. Our preliminary results are being further examined by: (1) extracting temporal variations in groundwater storage by

  10. Temporal aliasing effects on future gravity satellite missions and their assessment – Lessons from the ESA-SC4MGV project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daras, Ilias; Pail, Roland; Visser, Pieter; Weigelt, Matthias; Iran-Pour, Siavash; Murböck, Michael; Gruber, Thomas; Texeira da Encarnação, Joao; Sneeuw, Nico; Tonetti, Stefania; Christian, Siemes; van den IJssel, Jose; Cornara, Stefania; van Dam, Tonie; Cesare, Stefano; Haagmans, Roger

    2015-04-01

    Temporal aliasing is expected to add up to the error budget of future gravity satellite missions of low-low satellite-to-satellite tracking (LL-SST) type in such a way, that it could act as a constraining factor on their way to achieve the expected accuracy that new generation sensors could provide. Within the scope of the ESA-SC4MGV project, we investigate the impact of temporal aliasing on future gravity satellite missions as well as methods for its minimization. This is achieved on the one hand by optimizing the choice for the orbital configuration, and on the other by optimizing the gravity field retrieval techniques accordingly. In this study we investigate the contribution of all error sources to the error budget and prove that temporal aliasing errors are one of the biggest contributors. We explore the advantages of using two in-line pairs in reducing temporal aliasing errors. For this purpose, the optimized orbit constellation consisting of two in-line pairs of a Bender type configuration is used as our "baseline" scenario. Using the "baseline" scenario, we investigate gravity field processing methods that lead in a reduction of the temporal aliasing errors. As a first step we apply the so-called "Wiese" approach, which suggests co-estimating low resolution gravity fields at short time intervals in order to directly estimate the short-term signals that alias into the combined solution. We demonstrate the ability of the "Wiese" approach to minimize temporal aliasing errors for our "baseline" scenario. Moreover, we fine-tune the "Wiese" parameterization options such as the duration and the resolution of the gravity field solutions estimated at high frequency, in order to maximize the effectiveness of the method at reducing the temporal aliasing effects with respect to our chosen Bender constellation. As a step forward, we experiment with alternative parameterizations that combine low and medium spatial resolution gravity fields at different time intervals

  11. Age versus size determination of radial variation in wood specific gravity : lessons from eccentrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. Bruce Williamson; Michael C. Wiemann

    2011-01-01

    Radial increases in wood specific gravity have been shown to characterize early successional trees from tropical forests. Here, we develop and apply a novel method to test whether radial increases are determined by tree age or tree size. The method compares the slopes of specific gravity changes across a short radius and a long radius of trees with eccentric trunks. If...

  12. Temporal Variation and Scaling of Hydrological Variables in a Typical Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C.; Zhang, Y. K.; Liang, X.; Liu, J.

    2016-12-01

    Temporal variations of the main hydrological variables over 16 years were systematically investigated based on the results from an integrated hydrological modeling at the Sagehen Creek Watershed in northern Sierra Nevada. Temporal scaling of these variables and damping effects of the hydrological system as well as its subsystems, i.e., the land surface, unsaturated zone, and saturated zone, were analyzed with spectral analyses. It was found that the hydrological system may act as a cascade of hierarchical fractal filters which sequentially transfer a non-fractal or less correlated fractal hydrological signal to a more correlated fractal signal. Temporal scaling of infiltration (I), actual evapotraspiration (ET), recharge (R), baseflow (BF), streamflow (SF) exist and the temporal autocorrelation of these variables increase as water moves through the system. The degree of the damping effect of the subsystems is different and is strongest in the unsaturated zone compared with that of the land surface and saturated zone. The temporal scaling of the groundwater levels (h) also exists and is strongly affected by the river: the temporal autocorrelation of h near the river is similar to that of the river stage fluctuations and increases away from the river. There is a break in the temporal scaling of h near the river at low frequencies due to the effect of the river. Temporal variations of the soil moisture (θ) is more complicated: the value of the scaling exponent (β) for θ increases with depth as water moves downwards and its high-frequency fluctuations are damped by the unsaturated zone. The temporal fluctuations of precipitation (P) and I are fractional Gauss noise (fGn), those of ET, R, BF, and SF are fractional Brownian motion (fBm), and those of h away from the river are 2nd-order fBm based on the values of β obtained in this study. Keywords: Temporal variations, Scaling, Damping effect, Hydrological system.

  13. Temporal and spatial variation of the human microbiota during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiulio, Daniel B; Callahan, Benjamin J; McMurdie, Paul J; Costello, Elizabeth K; Lyell, Deirdre J; Robaczewska, Anna; Sun, Christine L; Goltsman, Daniela S A; Wong, Ronald J; Shaw, Gary; Stevenson, David K; Holmes, Susan P; Relman, David A

    2015-09-01

    Despite the critical role of the human microbiota in health, our understanding of microbiota compositional dynamics during and after pregnancy is incomplete. We conducted a case-control study of 49 pregnant women, 15 of whom delivered preterm. From 40 of these women, we analyzed bacterial taxonomic composition of 3,767 specimens collected prospectively and weekly during gestation and monthly after delivery from the vagina, distal gut, saliva, and tooth/gum. Linear mixed-effects modeling, medoid-based clustering, and Markov chain modeling were used to analyze community temporal trends, community structure, and vaginal community state transitions. Microbiota community taxonomic composition and diversity remained remarkably stable at all four body sites during pregnancy (P > 0.05 for trends over time). Prevalence of a Lactobacillus-poor vaginal community state type (CST 4) was inversely correlated with gestational age at delivery (P = 0.0039). Risk for preterm birth was more pronounced for subjects with CST 4 accompanied by elevated Gardnerella or Ureaplasma abundances. This finding was validated with a set of 246 vaginal specimens from nine women (four of whom delivered preterm). Most women experienced a postdelivery disturbance in the vaginal community characterized by a decrease in Lactobacillus species and an increase in diverse anaerobes such as Peptoniphilus, Prevotella, and Anaerococcus species. This disturbance was unrelated to gestational age at delivery and persisted for up to 1 y. These findings have important implications for predicting premature labor, a major global health problem, and for understanding the potential impact of a persistent, altered postpartum microbiota on maternal health, including outcomes of pregnancies following short interpregnancy intervals.

  14. Temporal variations of Cs-137 in Sots Pine; Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nylen, T.; Plamboeck, A.H.; Boson, J.

    2008-07-01

    In this study the temporal changes in 137Cs distribution in a Scots pine (Pinus Sylvestris L.) stand was studied during 1986 to 2006 in Northern Sweden. The Chernobyl fallout provided an excellent possibility to study the uptake and retention in conifer trees of 137Cs, since the deposition lasted for only a few days. The average deposition of 137Cs in the region that originates from the Chernobyl accident in 1986 was 20 +-9 kBq M-2 . Also 137Cs from the atmospheric nuclear weapons tests was present in the area and was only 3 +-2 kBq m-2. Studies show that the redistribution of radioactive caesium still contribute to high activity concentrations in some compartments of the ecosystem. It has been known that certain fungi continue to produce fruit bodies with high amounts of 137Cs. The current study adds another aspect to consider: The high activity concentration in branches and current needles during 2006 indicates an uptake of 137Cs from the soil which could lead to concentrations in Scots Pine that has to be considered in forestry and other kind of utilization of forest products. There are for instance a few game birds such as the capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus) that feed on pine shoots. Another possible effect is on the use of pine branches in the bio fuel industry. Given an activity concentration of 1200 Bq/kg (d.w.) and a concentration factor of 10 during combustion the concentration in ashes would be 12000 bq/kg. According to the recommendations from SSI (the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority) ashes that have concentrations higher than 10 kBq/kg must be stored in special deposits. It would be of interest to investigate the uptake in stands of different ages since the pine stand that was studied was about 30 years old in 1986 and do not represent neither a mature nor a newly established stand (tk)

  15. Temporal variation in atmospheric ammonia concentrations above seabird colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackall, T. D.; Wilson, L. J.; Bull, J.; Theobald, M. R.; Bacon, P. J.; Hamer, K. C.; Wanless, S.; Sutton, M. A.

    Recent studies have shown that seabirds are an important source of ammonia (NH 3) emissions in remote coastal ecosystems. Nesting behaviour, which varies between seabird species, is likely to be a major factor in determining the proportion of excreted nitrogen (N) volatilised to the atmosphere as NH 3. A long-term NH 3 monitoring programme was implemented at a Scottish seabird colony with a range of species and associated nesting behaviours. The average monthly NH 3 concentration was measured at 12 locations over a 14-month period, to infer spatial (i.e. species-specific) and temporal (seasonal) changes in NH 3 emissions from different seabird species. An emissions model of seabird NH 3, based on species-specific bioenergetics and behaviour, was applied to produce spatial estimates for input to a dispersion model. Atmospheric NH 3 concentrations demonstrated spatial variability as a result of differing local populations of breeding seabirds, with the highest concentrations measured above cliff nesting species such as Common guillemot Uria aalge, Razorbill Alca torda and Black-legged kittiwake Rissa tridactyla. NH 3 concentrations above a colony of burrow nesting Atlantic puffin Fratercula arctica were low, considering the high number of birds. Emission of NH 3 from excreted N exhibits a time lag of approximately a month. It is likely that all excreted N is lost from the colony by volatilisation as NH 3 or surface run-off between breeding seasons. Modelled NH 3 emissions and concentrations correlated with measured concentrations, but were much higher, reflecting uncertainties in the local turbulent characteristics. The results allow multi-species seabird population data to be used for the calculation of regional and global NH 3 emission inventories, whilst improving understanding of N budgets of remote coastal ecosystems.

  16. Spatial and temporal variations in glacier hydrology on Storglaciaeren, Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Peter (Dept. of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden)); Naeslund, Jens-Ove (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-06-15

    The aim of the current research project was to provide a framework of real conditions within which to interpret theory and extrapolate likely conditions beneath a future ice sheet over Fennoscandia. The purpose of this report is to summarize the experimental work on glacier hydrology and basal hydraulic conditions performed on Storglaciaeren, northern Sweden, during the years 1990-2006. Surface fed subglacial hydrological systems are extremely dynamic because the input rates of rain and temperature-controlled surface melt fluctuate, and the geometry of flow paths is constantly changing due to ice deformation which tends to open and close the flow paths. The hydrological system of a glacier is quite unusual because since liquid water flows through conduits made of its solid phase (ice). Understanding the expected dynamic range of a glacier's hydrological system is best studied by in situ measurements. The processes studied on Storglaciaeren can be expected to apply to ice sheet scale, albeit on different spatial scales. Since Storglaciaeren is a polythermal glacier with a large fraction of ice below freezing and at the melting point and with a surface-fed hydrological system of conduits and tunnels, results apply to the lower elevation regions where the surface is composed of ice (ablation zone) rather than composed of snow (accumulation zone) found at higher elevations of the glaciers and ice sheets, Therefore, our results apply to the ablation zone of the past Fennoscandian Ice Sheet. In this report we discuss the measurements made to assess the subglacial conditions that provide a potential analogue for conditions under the Fennoscandian Ice Sheet. For this purpose field work was performed on from 2003 to 2006 yielding subglacial water pressure measurements. We have included a large quantity of unpublished data from Storglaciaeren from different research projects conducted since 1990. Together these data provide a picture of the temporal and spatial water

  17. SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIATION OF NITROGEN IN THE MEDELLIN RIVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LINA CLAUDIA GIRALDO

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available El nitrógeno es un elemento biogénico constituyente de moléculas orgánicas que desempeñan funciones vitales para toda célula [1]. Su origen proviene de la mineralización de la materia orgánica, de la disolución de rocas sedimentarias y del intercambio con el nitrógeno gaseoso¿ es por ello que un incremento de materia orgánica proveniente de fuentes domésticas, agrícolas e industriales, eleva las concentraciones de nitrógeno, que aunque es un nutriente esencial, en concentraciones elevadas genera efectos nocivos a la biota acuática, y por tanto se desequilibra un ecosistema. En este artículo se hace un análisis de la variación espacial de las formas de nitrógeno: amoniacal, nitritos y nitratos en el perfil del río Medellín, buscando entender los fenómenos asociados a sus transformaciones. Así mismo, un análisis temporal a partir de información recolectada desde el año 1973 de diferentes estudios fisicoquímicos realizados en el río. Finalmente, se correlaciona el crecimiento de población y los usos del suelo con las concentraciones de nitrógeno, tratando de explicar estas últimas como un producto de la interacción del hombre con la naturaleza y los procesos de ocupación.

  18. Temporal variations of atmospheric aerosol in four European urban areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lianou, Maria; Chalbot, Marie-Cecile; Kavouras, Ilias G; Kotronarou, Anastasia; Karakatsani, Anna; Analytis, Antonis; Katsouyanni, Klea; Puustinen, Arto; Hameri, Kaarle; Vallius, Marko; Pekkanen, Juha; Meddings, Claire; Harrison, Roy M; Ayres, Jon G; ten Brick, Harry; Kos, Gerard; Meliefste, Kees; de Hartog, Jeroen; Hoek, Gerard

    2011-08-01

    The concentrations of PM(10) mass, PM(2.5) mass and particle number were continuously measured for 18 months in urban background locations across Europe to determine the spatial and temporal variability of particulate matter. Daily PM(10) and PM(2.5) samples were continuously collected from October 2002 to April 2004 in background areas in Helsinki, Athens, Amsterdam and Birmingham. Particle mass was determined using analytical microbalances with precision of 1 μg. Pre- and post-reflectance measurements were taken using smoke-stain reflectometers. One-minute measurements of particle number were obtained using condensation particle counters. The 18-month mean PM(10) and PM(2.5) mass concentrations ranged from 15.4 μg/m(3) in Helsinki to 56.7 μg/m(3) in Athens and from 9.0 μg/m(3) in Helsinki to 25.0 μg/m(3) in Athens, respectively. Particle number concentrations ranged from 10,091 part/cm(3) in Helsinki to 24,180 part/cm(3) in Athens with highest levels being measured in winter. Fine particles accounted for more than 60% of PM(10) with the exception of Athens where PM(2.5) comprised 43% of PM(10). Higher PM mass and number concentrations were measured in winter as compared to summer in all urban areas at a significance level p urban areas in Europe were observed. These were due to strong local and regional characteristics of particulate pollution sources which contribute to the heterogeneity of health responses. In addition, these findings also bear on the ability of different countries to comply with existing directives and the effectiveness of mitigation policies.

  19. Modeling the hydrological effect on local gravity at Moxa, Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hasan, S.; Troch, P.A.A.; Boll, J.; Kroner, C.

    2006-01-01

    A superconducting gravimeter has observed with high accuracy (to within a few nm s¿2) and high frequency (1 Hz) the temporal variations in the earth¿s gravity field near Moxa, Germany, since 1999. Hourly gravity residuals are obtained by time averaging and correcting for earth tides, polar motion,

  20. Temporal variations of airborne particle concentration in an arid region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offer, Z Y; Zangvil, A; Klepach, D

    2008-11-01

    Airborne particle concentration (APC) measurements were carried out at the Sede Boker experimental station located in the northern Negev Desert, about 50 km south of Beer Sheva, during the years 1987--1997. The basic sampling period used in 1987--1993 was 12 h (day and night) and in 1994--1997 the sampling period was 24 h. For the entire study period, the average airborne particle concentration (APC) was 123.8 microg/m3, the highest value was 4204.2 microg/m3; and the lowest, near 5 microg/m3. For the 24 h average, about 90% of the cases were defined as normal situations (APC between 0-200 microg/m3) about, 8.5%, hazy periods (APC between 200-500 microg/m3), 1.4% dusty periods (APC between 500-1000 microg/m3) and about 0.7% were intense dusty periods (APC above 1000 microg/m3). Statistical analysis of the data showed significant seasonal and monthly fluctuations. The seasonal variation of the APC was further examined using different definitions of the seasons (astronomical, meteorological, and synoptic).

  1. Inferring lateral density variations in Great Geneva Basin, western Switzerland from wells and gravity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Aurore; Lupi, Matteo; Clerc, Nicolas; Rusillon, Elme; Do Couto, Damien

    2017-04-01

    In the framework of sustainable energy development Switzerland supports the growth of renewable energies. SIG (Services Industriels de Genève) and the Canton of Geneva intend to develop the use of hydrothermal energy in western Switzerland. As a Mesozoïc-formed sedimentary basin, the Great Geneva Basin (GGB) shares geological and petrophysical similarities with the Munich area (Baviera, Germany) and Paris Basin (France). The latter already provide significant amounts of geothermal energy for district heating. The prospection phase has been launched in 2014 by SIG and aims at identifying relevant geological units and defining their geometries. Lower Cretaceous and Tertiary geological units have first been targeted as potential layers. At the depth we find these units (and according to the normal geothermal gradient), low enthalpy geothermal resources are rather expected. In this framework, our study aims at constraining and refining lateral and vertical heterogeneities of Quaternary to Cretaceous sedimentary layers in GGB. Linear velocity law is inverted at wells and then interpolated to the whole basin for each geological layer. Using time pickings from available data and Quaternary information from previous studies time to depth conversion is performed. Thickness map of every geological unit is then produced. Tertiary thickness ranges from 0 m at the NW border of the GGB at the foothill of the Jura Mountains to 3000 m in the SE of the GGB at the border with the French Alps. These observations are consistent with field and well observations. The produced thickness map will be used as a geometry support for gravity data inversion and then density lateral variations estimation. Unconstrained, and a priori constrained inversion has been performed in GGB using Gauss-Newton algorithms. Velocity versus density relationships will then enable to refine velocity law interpolation. Our procedure allowed us to reduce the uncertainty of key target formation and represents an

  2. The roles of convective entrainment in spatial distributions and temporal variations of precipitation over tropical oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, N.; Takayabu, Y. N.; Watanabe, M.; Kimoto, M.; Chikira, M.

    2013-12-01

    This study shows that a proper treatment of convective entrainment is essential in determining spatial distributions and temporal variations of precipitation by numerical experiments. They have performed and compared four experiments with different entrainment characteristics: a control (Ctl), no entrainment (NoEnt), original Arakawa Schubert (AS), and AS with simple empirical suppression of convection (ASRH). The fractional entrainment rate of AS and ASRH are constant for each cloud type and are very small near cloud base compared to Ctl, in which half of buoyancy-generated energy is consumed by the entrainment. Ctl well reproduces the spatial and temporal variations, whereas NoEnt and AS, which are very similar to each other, significantly underestimated the variations with the so-called the double ITCZ problem. The enhanced variations in Ctl are due to the larger entrainment that strengthens the coupling of convection and free tropospheric humidity. Time variations are also more realistic in Ctl; mid-height convection moistens mid-troposphere and large precipitation events occur after sufficient moisture is available. In contrast, deep convection is more frequent but with smaller precipitation amount in NoEnt and AS. ASRH shows smaller spatial but excessive temporal variations suggesting that its empirical suppression condition is too simple and a more sophisticated formulation is required for more realistic precipitation variations. This study was supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (GRENE), and by the Ministry of the Environment (2A-1201), Japan.

  3. Temporal variations in PAH concentrations in Quercus ilex L. (holm oak) leaves in an urban area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nicola, Flavia; Maisto, Giulia; Prati, Maria Vittoria; Alfani, Anna

    2005-10-01

    Temporal variations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations in leaves of a Mediterranean evergreen oak, Quercus ilex L., were investigated in order to assess the suitability of this species to biomonitor PAH air contamination. Leaf samples were collected at six sites of the urban area of Naples (Italy) and at a control site in the Vesuvius National Park, in May and September 2001, and in January and May 2002. PAH extraction was conducted by sonication in dichloromethane-acetone and quantification by GC-MS. In winter, leaf total PAH concentrations showed, at all the urban sites, values 2-fold higher than in all the other samplings, reflecting the temporal trend reported for PAH air contamination in the Naples urban area. Moreover, leaf PAH concentrations showed, at all the urban sites, a decrease in May 2002 after the winter accumulation. At the control site leaf PAH concentrations showed lower values and smaller temporal variations than at the urban sites. The findings support the suitability of Q. ilex leaves to monitor temporal variations in PAH contamination. The highest winter concentrations of total PAHs were due to the medium molecular weight PAHs that increased with respect to both low and high molecular weight PAHs. The medium molecular weight PAHs showed the same temporal trend both at the urban and remote sites.

  4. Temporal variation of trace metal geochemistry in floodplain lake sediment subject to dynamic hydrological conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griethuysen, van C.; Luitwieler, M.; Joziasse, J.; Koelmans, A.A.

    2005-01-01

    Climate change and land use may significantly influence metal cycling in dynamic river systems. We studied temporal variation of sediment characteristics in a floodplain lake, including concentrations of dissolved organic carbon, acid volatile sulfide and trace metals. The sampling period included a

  5. Monitoring scale-specific and temporal variation in electromagnetic conductivity images

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the semi-arid and arid landscapes of southwest USA, irrigation sustains agricultural activity; however, there are increasing demands on water resources. As such spatial temporal variation of soil moisture needs to be monitored. One way to do this is to use electromagnetic (EM) induction instrumen...

  6. Spatial and temporal variation of surface waves in shallow waters along the eastern Arabian Sea.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anoop, T.R.; SanilKumar, V.; Shanas, P.R.

    We studied the spatial and temporal variation of surface waves along the eastern Arabian Sea during 2011 and 2012. Measured directional wave data at two shallow water locations and re-analysis datasets (ERA-Interim) at 0.751 intervals at four...

  7. Spatio-Temporal Variation in Water Quality of Orle River Basin, S.W. ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Magnesium (Mg++) and Hydrogen-ion concentration (pH) showed no definite pattern of variation. This paper focuses on this aspect of Orle River, thus giving baseline information on the temporal and spatial dynamics in the chemical attributes of the basin. This is necessary since the rivers form a major source of drinking ...

  8. Impact of spatial-temporal variations of climatic variables onsummer maize yield in North China Plain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, D.; Yu, Q.; Wang, E.; Hengsdijk, H.

    2008-01-01

    Summer maize (Zea mays L.) is one of the dominant crops in the North China Plain (NCP). Itsgrowth is greatly influenced by the spatial-temporal variation of climatic variables, especially solar radiation, temperature and rainfall. The WOFOST (version 7.1) model was applied to evaluate the impact of

  9. Temporal and spatial variation of canopy spectral characteristics in apple orchard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaolei; Li, Minzan; Zheng, Lihua; Zhang, Yao; An, Xiaofei

    2012-11-01

    Plant nutritional status can be evaluated with remote sensing. In order to detect the temporal and spatial variation of spectral characteristics in apple orchard, the experiments were carried out. Firstly the flower/ leaf samples from 15 year-on trees and 5 year-off t rees were collected. The real time reflectance spectra of flowers/leaves from three parts (base, middle, top) of each main branch were measured by using the ASD spectrometer. And then the temporal and spatial variations of spectral characteristics were analyzed. The results showed that leaves from the top of the branch had higher reflectance than the other parts of the branch at the same time. The reflectance spectra of apple trees changed significantly at different stages. Furthermore, the reflectance spectra varied in different parts of the apple trees as well as in different trees. Accordingly the temporal curve and spatial figure were obtained and the growing informat ion can be analyzed from them.

  10. Influence of Gravity Compensation on Muscle Activation Patterns During Different Temporal Phases of Arm Movements of Stroke Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prange, Grada Berendina; Jannink, M.J.A.; Stienen, Arno; van der Kooij, Herman; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Arm support to help compensate for the effects of gravity may improve functional use of the shoulder and elbow during therapy after stroke, but gravity compensation may alter motor control. Objective. To obtain quantitative information on how gravity compensation influences muscle

  11. Temporal variations of geyser water chemistry in the Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Shaul; Hunt, Andrew G.; Evans, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Geysers are rare features that reflect a delicate balance between an abundant supply of water and heat and a unique geometry of fractures and porous rocks. Between April 2007 and September 2008, we sampled Old Faithful, Daisy, Grand, Oblong, and Aurum geysers in Yellowstone National Park's Upper Geyser Basin and characterized temporal variations in major element chemistry and water isotopes (δ18O, δD, 3H). We compare these temporal variations with temporal trends of Geyser Eruption Intervals (GEI). SiO2 concentrations and geothermometry indicate that the geysers are fed by waters ascending from a reservoir with temperatures of ∼190 to 210°C. The studied geysers display small and complex chemical and isotopic seasonal variations, and geysers with smaller volume display larger seasonal variations than geysers with larger volumes. Aurum and Oblong Geysers contain detectable tritium concentrations, suggesting that erupted water contains some modern meteoric water. We propose that seasonal GEI variations result from varying degrees of evaporation, meteoric water recharge, water table fluctuations, and possible hydraulic interaction with the adjacent Firehole River. We demonstrate that the concentrations of major dissolved species in Old Faithful Geyser have remained nearly constant since 1884 despite large changes in Old Faithful's eruption intervals, suggesting that no major changes have occurred in the hydrothermal system of the Upper Geyser Basin for >120 years. Our data set provides a baseline for monitoring future changes in geyser activity that might result from varying climate, earthquakes, and changes in heat flow from the underlying magmatic system.

  12. Spatial and temporal variations of the chromosomal inversion polymorphism of Anopheles funestus in senegal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dia I.

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The polymorphism of paracentric inversions of An. funestus polytene chromosomes was studied along a transect in Senegal in order to assess their variations at the spatial and temporal level. There was an increase in the degree of chromosomal polymorphism from the West to South-East. At the geographical level the variations in inversion frequencies were highly significant whatever the chromosomal arm considered. However, the variations in the chromosomal inversion frequencies did not change significantly over either seasons or years, except for inversion 3b in the village of Dielmo. Such geographical variability within a relatively limited area, associated to temporal stability, suggest a restricted gene flow between the populations studied, probably due to discontinuities in the An. funestus distribution and to its bioecology.

  13. Measuring gravity change caused by water storage variations: Performance assessment under controlled conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lars; Lund, Sanne; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2011-01-01

    Subsurface water content is an important state variable in hydrological systems. Established methods to measure subsurface water content have a small support scale which causes scaling problems in many applications. Time-lapse relative gravimetry can give an integrated measure of soil water storage...... a sensitivity of 1μGal, corresponding to a layer of 0.024 m of water in an infinitely extended horizontal sheet. For gravity surveys using relative gravity meters, the precision is highly dependent on the methods used to operate the gravimeter in the field. Systematic errors, which are difficult to detect, can...

  14. Spatial and temporal variation of fish assemblages in a subtropical small stream of the Huangshan Mountain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunzhi YAN,Shan HE, Ling CHU, Xiuying XIANG, Yanju JIA, Juan TAO, Yifeng CHEN

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Spatial and temporal variation of fish assemblages were investigated seasonally from May 2007 to February 2008 across 11 study sites in a subtropical small stream, the Puxi Stream, of the Huangshan Mountain. Along the longitudinal gradient from headwater to downstream, fish species richness and abundance increased gradually, but then decreased significantly at the lower reaches. The highest species richness and abundance were observed in August and the lowest in February. Based on analysis of similarities (ANOSIM, fish assemblages were significantly different in spatial variation but not in temporal variation. Although differences were observed both among sites and among stream orders, the lower R value in order-variation suggested stream order was not the optimal factor explaining the spatial variation of fish assemblages. In addition, dam construction did not significantly alter fish assemblages in the sites adjacent to and immediately downstream to dams. Using cluster analysis and non-metric Multi Dimensional Scaling analysis (NMS, assemblages were separated into three groups at a Bray-Curtis similarity value of 42%: the upper, middle and lower groups. Following analysis of similarity percentages of species contributions (SIMPER, shifts in occurrence or abundance of S. curriculus, Z. platypus, R. bitterling and A. fasciatus contributed most to the differences amongst the three groups. Standard Deviation Redundancy Analysis (RDA suggested that habitat structure (such as elevation, substrate, and flow velocity contributed to the spatial and temporal pattern of fish assemblages in the Puxi Stream. In conclusion, the fish assemblages in Puxi Stream presented significant spatial but not temporal variation. Human disturbance has perhaps induced the decrease in species diversity in the lower reaches. However, no significant change was observed for fish assemblages in sites far from and immediately downstream from low-head dams [Current Zoology 56 (6

  15. Dissecting dynamic genetic variation that controls temporal gene response in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avital Brodt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Inter-individual variation in regulatory circuits controlling gene expression is a powerful source of functional information. The study of associations among genetic variants and gene expression provides important insights about cell circuitry but cannot specify whether and when potential variants dynamically alter their genetic effect during the course of response. Here we develop a computational procedure that captures temporal changes in genetic effects, and apply it to analyze transcription during inhibition of the TOR signaling pathway in segregating yeast cells. We found a high-order coordination of gene modules: sets of genes co-associated with the same genetic variant and sharing a common temporal genetic effect pattern. The temporal genetic effects of some modules represented a single state-transitioning pattern; for example, at 10-30 minutes following stimulation, genetic effects in the phosphate utilization module attained a characteristic transition to a new steady state. In contrast, another module showed an impulse pattern of genetic effects; for example, in the poor nitrogen sources utilization module, a spike up of a genetic effect at 10-20 minutes following stimulation reflected inter-individual variation in the timing (rather than magnitude of response. Our analysis suggests that the same mechanism typically leads to both inter-individual variation and the temporal genetic effect pattern in a module. Our methodology provides a quantitative genetic approach to studying the molecular mechanisms that shape dynamic changes in transcriptional responses.

  16. Lithospheric Thickness Variations from Gravity and Topography in Areas of High Crustal Remanent Magnetization on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smrekar, S. E.; Raymond, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Large regions of intense crustal re- manent magnetization were fortuitously discovered on Mars by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft. Gravity and topography admittance studies are used to examine lithospheric structure in the areas of intense magnetization. Areas with positively magnetized crust appear to have thinner crust and elastic lithosphere than negatively magnetized crust. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  17. Wood Specific Gravity Variation with Height and Its Implications for Biomass Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael C. Wiemann; G. Bruce Williamson

    2014-01-01

    Wood specific gravity (SG) is widely employed by ecologists as a key variable in estimates of biomass. When it is important to have nondestructive methods for sampling wood for SG measurements, cores are extracted with an increment borer. While boring is a relatively difficult task even at breast height sampling, it is impossible at ground level and arduous at heights...

  18. Temporal variations of concentrations of currently used pesticides in the atmosphere of Strasbourg, France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schummer, Claude [Laboratoire des Materiaux, Surfaces et Procedes pour la Catalyse, Equipe de Physico-Chimie de l' Atmosphere (UMR 7515 CNRS-Universite de Strasbourg), 1, rue Blessig, F-67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Laboratoire de Toxicologie, Centre de Recherche Public, Sante/Laboratoire National de Sante, Universite du Luxembourg, Campus Limpertsberg, 162A, avenue de la Faiencerie, L-1511 Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Mothiron, Elodie [Laboratoire des Materiaux, Surfaces et Procedes pour la Catalyse, Equipe de Physico-Chimie de l' Atmosphere (UMR 7515 CNRS-Universite de Strasbourg), 1, rue Blessig, F-67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Appenzeller, Brice M.R. [Laboratoire de Toxicologie, Centre de Recherche Public, Sante/Laboratoire National de Sante, Universite du Luxembourg, Campus Limpertsberg, 162A, avenue de la Faiencerie, L-1511 Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Rizet, Anne-Laure [Laboratoire des Materiaux, Surfaces et Procedes pour la Catalyse, Equipe de Physico-Chimie de l' Atmosphere (UMR 7515 CNRS-Universite de Strasbourg), 1, rue Blessig, F-67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Wennig, Robert [Laboratoire de Toxicologie, Centre de Recherche Public, Sante/Laboratoire National de Sante, Universite du Luxembourg, Campus Limpertsberg, 162A, avenue de la Faiencerie, L-1511 Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Millet, Maurice, E-mail: millet@illite.u-strasbg.f [Laboratoire des Materiaux, Surfaces et Procedes pour la Catalyse, Equipe de Physico-Chimie de l' Atmosphere (UMR 7515 CNRS-Universite de Strasbourg), 1, rue Blessig, F-67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France)

    2010-02-15

    Atmospheric samples have been collected in Strasbourg between April 18 and May 29, 2007 and were analyzed for 71 current-use pesticides, of which 38 were detected. Average concentrations ranged from 0.09 ng m{sup -3} for Fenarimol to 110.42 ng m{sup -3} for Dimethachlor, which was slightly higher than the concentrations reported from other, comparable agricultural regions. Significant temporal variations were observed for 30 pesticides, and for most of them it could be shown that these were linked to time, temperature or atmospheric pressure. In several cases this helped to identify pesticide application just before or at the beginning of the sampling period, or ongoing treatment. Humidity, in contrast to previous reports, could not be linked to these variations. For the other 8 pesticides, only very little temporal variations were observed. Generally, these concentrations were low (less than 1 ng m{sup -3}), and it was assumed that they are not in use in Alsace at present. - The paper describes the temporal variations of current-use pesticides in the atmosphere of Strasbourg during pesticide application.

  19. Identifying significant temporal variation in time course microarray data without replicates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porter Weston

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important component of time course microarray studies is the identification of genes that demonstrate significant time-dependent variation in their expression levels. Until recently, available methods for performing such significance tests required replicates of individual time points. This paper describes a replicate-free method that was developed as part of a study of the estrous cycle in the rat mammary gland in which no replicate data was collected. Results A temporal test statistic is proposed that is based on the degree to which data are smoothed when fit by a spline function. An algorithm is presented that uses this test statistic together with a false discovery rate method to identify genes whose expression profiles exhibit significant temporal variation. The algorithm is tested on simulated data, and is compared with another recently published replicate-free method. The simulated data consists both of genes with known temporal dependencies, and genes from a null distribution. The proposed algorithm identifies a larger percentage of the time-dependent genes for a given false discovery rate. Use of the algorithm in a study of the estrous cycle in the rat mammary gland resulted in the identification of genes exhibiting distinct circadian variation. These results were confirmed in follow-up laboratory experiments. Conclusion The proposed algorithm provides a new approach for identifying expression profiles with significant temporal variation without relying on replicates. When compared with a recently published algorithm on simulated data, the proposed algorithm appears to identify a larger percentage of time-dependent genes for a given false discovery rate. The development of the algorithm was instrumental in revealing the presence of circadian variation in the virgin rat mammary gland during the estrous cycle.

  20. Geographical and temporal variation of regional development and innovation in Finland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makkonen, Teemu; Inkinen, Tommi

    2015-01-01

    . Analysis was conducted using principal component indices from the years 1995–2007 to provide a temporal trend perspective of the most successful locations in innovation activity and regional development. Availability of an extensive workforce, income and higher education have steadily been the most...... “distinct” variables corresponding to regional development in Finland, whereas innovation occupies a stable middling position among explanative variables. Regional development and innovation activity is still concentrated in the core urban regions, but this tendency has lost at least some of its importance.......Variations in regional development are basically carried forward by technological development together with spatial concentrations of production and finance. The main argument behind this paper is that innovation and regional development variables have temporal variations in a spatial context...

  1. Species Composition and Spatio-Temporal Variations of Phytoplankton of Lake Uluabat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhayat DALKIRAN

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out at three stations of Lake Uluabat between March 2006 and January 2007. Composition, density and spatio-temporal variations of phytoplankton of Lake Uluabat were investigated. During the study period, a total of 169 taxa were identified. 56 taxa belong to Bacillariophyta, 51 to Chlorophyta, 25 to Cyanobacteria, 19 to Euglenophyta, 7 to Miozoa, 6 to Charophyta and 5 to Ochrophyta. The results of this study were compared with the previous studies, indicated that the phytoplankton taxa richness were approximately reduced by half in Lake Uluabat. According to RDA analysis, water temperature and nitrate nitrogen were the most important physicochemical parameters that affect species composition, density and spatio-temporal variations of phytoplankton of Lake Uluabat. The phytoplankton composition of Lake Uluabat indicated that the trophic state of lake was eutrophic.

  2. Spatial and temporal variations of wave height in shelf seas around India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Anoop, T.R.

    Version: Nat. Hazards, vol.78(3); 2015; 1693-1706. Spatial and temporal variations of wave height in shelf seas around India V. Sanil Kumar, T.R.Anoop CSIR-National Institute of Oceanography (Council of Scientific & Industrial Research), Dona Paula... on measured data covering one-year period (Nayak et al. 1992; Kumar and Anand, 2004; Glejin et al. 2013a; Gowthaman et al. 2013; Kumar et al. 2014). Inter-annual variations in wave characteristics during 3-yr period at a shallow water location in eastern...

  3. Temporal and spatial variation in harbor seal (Phoca vitulina L.) roar calls from southern Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabinsky, Puk Faxe; Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Wahlberg, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    Male harbor seals gather around breeding sites for competitive mating displays. Here, they produce underwater vocalizations possibly to attract females and/or scare off other males. These calls offer prospects for passive acoustic monitoring. Acoustic monitoring requires a good understanding...... of natural variation in calling behavior both temporally and among geographically separate sites. Such variation in call structure and calling patterns were studied in harbor seal vocalizations recorded at three locations in Danish and Swedish waters. There was a strong seasonality in the calls from end...... biological differences when comparing harbor seal roars among recording sites and between years....

  4. Temporal variation in bat-fruit interactions: Foraging strategies influence network structure over time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata-Mesa, Natalya; Montoya-Bustamante, Sebastián; Murillo-García, Oscar E.

    2017-11-01

    Mutualistic interactions, such as seed dispersal, are important for the maintenance of structure and stability of tropical communities. However, there is a lack of information about spatial and temporal variation in plant-animal interaction networks. Thus, our goal was to assess the effect of bat's foraging strategies on temporal variation in the structure and robustness of bat-fruit networks in both a dry and a rain tropical forest. We evaluated monthly variation in bat-fruit networks by using seven structure metrics: network size, average path length, nestedness, modularity, complementary specialization, normalized degree and betweenness centrality. Seed dispersal networks showed variations in size, species composition and modularity; did not present nested structures and their complementary specialization was high compared to other studies. Both networks presented short path lengths, and a constantly high robustness, despite their monthly variations. Sedentary bat species were recorded during all the study periods and occupied more central positions than nomadic species. We conclude that foraging strategies are important structuring factors that affect the dynamic of networks by determining the functional roles of frugivorous bats over time; thus sedentary bats are more important than nomadic species for the maintenance of the network structure, and their conservation is a must.

  5. Age-specific fitness components and their temporal variation in the barn owl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altwegg, Res; Schaub, Michael; Roulin, Alexandre

    2007-01-01

    Theory predicts that temporal variability plays an important role in the evolution of life histories, but empirical studies evaluating this prediction are rare. In constant environments, fitness can be measured by the population growth rate lambda, and the sensitivity of lambda to changes in fitness components estimates selection on these traits. In variable environments, fitness is measured by the stochastic growth rate lambda(S), and stochastic sensitivities estimate selection pressure. Here we examine age-specific schedules for reproduction and survival in a barn owl population (Tyto alba). We estimated how temporal variability affected fitness and selection, accounting for sampling variance. Despite large sample sizes of old individuals, we found no strong evidence for senescence. The most variable fitness components were associated with reproduction. Survival was less variable. Stochastic simulations showed that the observed variation decreased fitness by about 30%, but the sensitivities of lambda and lambda(S) to changes in all fitness components were almost equal, suggesting that temporal variation had negligible effects on selection. We obtained these results despite high observed variability in the fitness components and relatively short generation time of the study organism, a situation in which temporal variability should be particularly important for natural selection and early senescence is expected.

  6. Variation of gravity waves on different time scales and the differences between day and nighttime lidar soundings at mid-latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, Kathrin; Gerding, Michael; Luebken, Franz-Josef

    2017-04-01

    A daylight capable Rayleigh-Mie-Raman (RMR) lidar is in operation since summer 2010 at the mid-latitude station at Kühlungsborn (54° N, 12° E). The RMR lidar system is used for measuring wave structures at day and night to investigate short and long periodic atmospheric waves, like gravity waves (GW) and thermal tides (with diurnal, semidiurnal and terdiurnal components) between 30 and 70 km altitude. An extensive data set with over 7500 measurements hours allows deriving the seasonal variation of, e.g., gravity wave potential energy density (GWPED), while several multi-day observations show the variability of gravity waves and tides on shorter time scales. To separate gravity waves, tides and other long periodic waves a 1-dimensional spectral filtering technique is used. The seasonal variation of the potential energy per unit volume shows a clear summer minimum for inertia gravity waves as well as for tides. Contrary to this, short periodic gravity waves with periods between 4 and 8 h show no clear seasonal variation. Especially for altitudes above 55 km an additional semiannual component with a second summer maximum is observed, which shows the increasing relevance of these waves. Because of the availability of whole day data, we have the possibility to distinguish between day and nighttime data. By using only data between 20 UT and 4 UT ("nighttime") we found a summer minimum in GWPED that is hidden in the whole day data. We relate these differences in the seasonal behavior to a diurnal variation of propagation conditions for the particular gravity waves. Beside the monthly averaged data, we will present a 10-day continuous lidar sounding to show the variability of gravity waves and tides on short time scales.

  7. Regional variations of mesospheric gravity-wave momentum flux over Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Espy

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Images of mesospheric airglow and radar-wind measurements have been combined to estimate the difference in the vertical flux of horizontal momentum carried by high-frequency gravity waves over two dissimilar Antarctic stations. Rothera (67° S, 68° W is situated in the mountains of the Peninsula near the edge of the wintertime polar vortex. In contrast, Halley (76° S, 27° W, some 1658 km to the southeast, is located on an ice sheet at the edge of the Antarctic Plateau and deep within the polar vortex during winter. The cross-correlation coefficients between the vertical and horizontal wind perturbations were calculated from sodium (Na airglow imager data collected during the austral winter seasons of 2002 and 2003 at Rothera for comparison with the 2000 and 2001 results from Halley reported previously (Espy et al., 2004. These cross-correlation coefficients were combined with wind-velocity variances from coincident radar measurements to estimate the daily averaged upper-limit of the vertical flux of horizontal momentum due to gravity waves near the peak emission altitude of the Na nightglow layer, 90km. The resulting momentum flux at both stations displayed a large day-to-day variability and showed a marked seasonal rotation from the northwest to the southwest throughout the winter. However, the magnitude of the flux at Rothera was about 4 times larger than that at Halley, suggesting that the differences in the gravity-wave source functions and filtering by the underlying winds at the two stations create significant regional differences in wave forcing on the scale of the station separation.

  8. Equations of motion for a rotor blade, including gravity, pitch action and rotor speed variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallesøe, Bjarne Skovmose

    2007-01-01

    This paper extends Hodges-Dowell's partial differential equations of blade motion, by including the effects from gravity, pitch action and varying rotor speed. New equations describing the pitch action and rotor speeds are also derived. The physical interpretation of the individual terms...... in the equations is discussed. The partial differential equations of motion are approximated by ordinary differential equations of motion using an assumed mode method. The ordinary differential equations are used to simulate a sudden pitch change of a rotating blade. This work is a part of a project on pitch blade...

  9. Spatio-Temporal Variation in Landscape Composition May Speed Resistance Evolution of Pests to Bt Crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, Anthony R; Paull, Cate; Hulthen, Andrew; Downes, Sharon; Andow, David A; Haygood, Ralph; Zalucki, Myron P; Schellhorn, Nancy A

    2017-01-01

    Transgenic crops that express insecticide genes from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are used worldwide against moth and beetle pests. Because these engineered plants can kill over 95% of susceptible larvae, they can rapidly select for resistance. Here, we use a model for a pyramid two-toxin Bt crop to explore the consequences of spatio-temporal variation in the area of Bt crop and non-Bt refuge habitat. We show that variability over time in the proportion of suitable non-Bt breeding habitat, Q, or in the total area of Bt and suitable non-Bt habitat, K, can increase the overall rate of resistance evolution by causing short-term surges of intense selection. These surges can be exacerbated when temporal variation in Q and/or K cause high larval densities in refuges that increase density-dependent mortality; this will give resistant larvae in Bt fields a relative advantage over susceptible larvae that largely depend on refuges. We address the effects of spatio-temporal variation in a management setting for two bollworm pests of cotton, Helicoverpa armigera and H. punctigera, and field data on landscape crop distributions from Australia. Even a small proportion of Bt fields available to egg-laying females when refuges are sparse may result in high exposure to Bt for just a single generation per year and cause a surge in selection. Therefore, rapid resistance evolution can occur when Bt crops are rare rather than common in the landscape. These results highlight the need to understand spatio-temporal fluctuations in the landscape composition of Bt crops and non-Bt habitats in order to design effective resistance management strategies.

  10. Intraindividual variation and short-term temporal trend in DNA methylation of human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvetsov, Yurii B; Song, Min-Ae; Cai, Qiuyin; Tiirikainen, Maarit; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Yu, Herbert

    2015-03-01

    Between- and within-person variation in DNA methylation levels are important parameters to be considered in epigenome-wide association studies. Temporal change is one source of within-person variation in DNA methylation that has been linked to aging and disease. We analyzed CpG-site-specific intraindividual variation and short-term temporal trend in leukocyte DNA methylation among 24 healthy Chinese women, with blood samples drawn at study entry and after 9 months. Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip was used to measure methylation. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and trend estimates were summarized by genomic location and probe type. The median ICC was 0.36 across nonsex chromosomes and 0.80 on the X chromosome. There was little difference in ICC profiles by genomic region and probe type. Among CpG loci with high variability between participants, more than 99% had ICC > 0.8. Statistically significant trend was observed in 10.9% CpG loci before adjustment for cell-type composition and in 3.4% loci after adjustment. For CpG loci differentially methylated across subjects, methylation levels can be reliably assessed with one blood sample. More samples per subject are needed for low-variability and unmethylated loci. Temporal changes are largely driven by changes in cell-type composition of blood samples, but temporal trend unrelated to cell types is detected in a small percentage of CpG sites. This study shows that one measurement can reliably assess methylation of differentially methylated CpG loci. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 24(3); 490-7. ©2014 AACR. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Evaluation of spatial and temporal variations in marine sediments quality using multivariate statistical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Odalys Quevedo; Tagle, Margarita Edelia Villanueva; Pascual, Jorge L Gómez; Marín, Ma Teresa Larrea; Clemente, Ana Catalina Nuñez; Medina, Miriam Odette Cora; Palau, Raiza Rey; Alfonso, Mario Simeón Pomares

    2014-10-01

    Spatial and temporal variations of sediment quality in Matanzas Bay (Cuba) were studied by determining a total of 12 variables (Zn, Cu, Pb, As, Ni, Co, Al, Fe, Mn, V, CO₃²⁻, and total hydrocarbons (THC). Surface sediments were collected, annually, at eight stations during 2005-2008. Multivariate statistical techniques, such as principal component (PCA), cluster (CA), and lineal discriminant (LDA) analyses were applied for identification of the most significant variables influencing the environmental quality of sediments. Heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Pb, V, and As) and THC were the most significant species contributing to sediment quality variations during the sampling period. Concentrations of V and As were determined in sediments of this ecosystem for the first time. The variation of sediment environmental quality with the sampling period and the differentiation of samples in three groups along the bay were obtained. The usefulness of the multivariate statistical techniques employed for the environmental interpretation of a limited dataset was confirmed.

  12. Temporal and spatial variation in landscape connectivity for a freshwater turtle in a temporally dynamic wetland system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, John H; Brinton, Alicia C; Georges, Arthur

    2009-07-01

    Inter-wetland connectivity, defined here as the movement of biota among discrete water bodies, can have important population- and community-level consequences in aquatic systems. We examined inter-wetland connectivity in a southeastern Australian national park by intensively monitoring the movements of freshwater turtles (Chelodina longicollis) via capture-mark-recapture over a three-year period, and more sporadically for 25 years. A high percentage (33%) of turtles moved between wetlands, suggesting that single wetlands should not represent the minimum habitat unit harboring a C. longicollis population. Distance was the only structural landscape metric correlated with inter-patch transition probability, with probability declining as inter-wetland distance increased. Movements also appear to be strongly influenced by shifting resource quality gradients between temporary wetlands and permanent lakes according to drought and flood cycles, a pattern more consistent with migration between critical resource patches than occasional interpopulational dispersal. Rare dispersal events of up to 5.2 km were known to occur. Captures at a terrestrial drift fence suggest that small and immature turtles moved between wetlands more frequently than our aquatic sampling indicated. We caution that measures of actual (or functional) connectivity can be biased by sampling methods and the temporal scale of sampling and must also be interpreted in the context of factors that motivate animal movements. This requires some understanding of spatial and temporal variation in intra-patch processes (e.g., quality and extent) and the expected movement responses of animals (e.g., habitat selection) over extended time frames, information that can potentially yield more important insight on connectivity than measures of landscape structural features alone.

  13. Variation in the macrofaunal community over large temporal and spatial scales in the southern Yellow Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yong; Sui, Jixing; Yang, Mei; Sun, Yue; Li, Xinzheng; Wang, Hongfa; Zhang, Baolin

    2017-09-01

    To detect large, temporal- and spatial-scale variations in the macrofaunal community in the southern Yellow Sea, data collected along the western, middle and eastern regions of the southern Yellow Sea from 1958 to 2014 were organized and analyzed. Statistical methods such as cluster analysis, non-metric multidimensional scaling ordination (nMDS), permutational multivariate analysis of variance (PERMANOVA), redundancy analysis (RDA) and canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) were applied. The abundance of polychaetes increased in the western region but decreased in the eastern region from 1958 to 2014, whereas the abundance of echinoderms showed an opposite trend. For the entire macrofaunal community, Margalef's richness (d), the Shannon-Wiener index (H‧) and Pielou's evenness (J‧) were significantly lower in the eastern region when compared with the other two regions. No significant temporal differences were found for d and H‧, but there were significantly lower values of J‧ in 2014. Considerable variation in the macrofaunal community structure over the past several decades and among the geographical regions at the species, genus and family levels were observed. The species, genera and families that contributed to the temporal variation in each region were also identified. The most conspicuous pattern was the increase in the species Ophiura sarsii vadicola in the eastern region. In the western region, five polychaetes (Ninoe palmata, Notomastus latericeus, Paralacydonia paradoxa, Paraprionospio pinnata and Sternaspis scutata) increased consistently from 1958 to 2014. The dominance curves showed that both the species diversity and the dominance patterns were relatively stable in the western and middle regions. Environmental parameters such as depth, temperature and salinity could only partially explain the observed biological variation in the southern Yellow Sea. Anthropogenic activities such as demersal fishing and other unmeasured environmental variables

  14. Temporal and spatial variations in phytoplankton: correlations with environmental factors in Shengjin Lake, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lan; Wang, Chao; Deng, Daogui; Zhao, Xiuxia; Zhou, Zhongze

    2015-09-01

    Temporal and spatial variations in the phytoplankton community and environmental variables were investigated from February to July 2014, in the upper lake of Shengjin Lake, China. We identified 192 species of phytoplankton belonging to 8 phyla and 84 genera, of which 46.4% of Chlorophyta, 29.2% of Bacillariophyta, and 12.5% of Cyanophyta. There were 14 predominant species. Marked temporal and spatial variations were observed in the phytoplankton community. The total abundance of phytoplankton ranged from 3.66 × 10(5) to 867.93 × 10(5) cells/L and total biomass ranging from 0.40 to 20.89 mg/L. The Shannon-Wiener diversity index varied from 3.50 to 8.35 with an average of 5.58, revealing high biodiversity in the phytoplankton community. There were substantial temporal changes in the dominant species, from Bacillariophyta and Cryptophyta to Cyanophyta and Chlorophyta. Phytoplankton biomass and abundance showed a similar increasing trend from February to July. Pearson correlations and Redundancy analysis revealed that the most significant environmental factors influencing phytoplankton community were water temperature (T), transparency (SD), and nutrient concentration. The positive correlation between the key water bird areas and phytoplankton biomass indicated that the droppings of wintering water birds had an important influence on the phytoplankton community in the upper lake of Shengjin Lake.

  15. Temporal sea-surface gravity changes observed near the source area prior to the 2011 Tohoku earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, T.; Tsuboi, S.

    2013-12-01

    Recent seismological studies suggested subsurface activities preceding the 2011 Tohoku earthquake; the occurrence of migration of seismicity (Kato et al., 2012) and slow slip events (Ito et al., 2013) in and around the source area one month before the mainshock. In this study, we investigated sea-surface gravity changes observed by the shipboard gravimeter mounted on research vessels before the mainshock. The vessels incidentally passed through the source area along almost the same cruise track twice, four months before and one month before the mainshock. Comparing the sea surface gravity in the former track with that in the latter after Bouguer correction, we find the gravity changes of approximately 7 mGal in coseismic slip areas near the trench axis during the three months. We find these gravity changes even in the crossing areas of the cruise tracks where seafloor topographies have no differences between the tracks. We also find that the topographic differences show positive changes but the gravity changes negative ones in other areas, which is a negative correlation inconsistent with the theoretical relationship between the topographic difference and the gravity change. These mean that the differences of seafloor topographies due to differences between the two cruise tracks are not main causes of the observed gravity changes there. The changes cannot also be explained by drifts of the gravimeter and geostrophic currents. Although we have not had any clear evidences, we speculate that the possible cause may be density increases around the seismogenic zone or uplifts of seafloor in order to explain the changes of this size. We estimate the density increases of 1.0 g/cm**3 in a disk with a radius of 40 km and a width of 200 m or the uplifts of several tens of meters in seafloor areas for the observed gravity changes. Our results indicate that sea-surface gravity observations may be one of valid approaches to monitor the approximate location of a possible great

  16. Measuring sparse temporal-variation for accurate registration of dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MR images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yuanjie; Wei, Benzheng; Liu, Hui; Xiao, Rui; Gee, James C

    2015-12-01

    Accurate registration of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MR breast images is challenging due to the temporal variations of image intensity and the non-rigidity of breast motion. The former can cause the well-known tumor shrinking/expanding problem in registration process while the latter complicates the task by requiring an estimation of non-rigid deformation. In this paper, we treat the intensity's temporal variations as "corruptions" which spatially distribute in a sparse pattern and model them with a L1 norm and a Lorentzian norm. We show that these new image similarity measurements can characterize the non-Gaussian property of the difference between the pre-contrast and post-contrast images and help to resolve the shrinking/expanding problem by forgiving significant image variations. Furthermore, we propose an iteratively re-weighted least squares based method and a linear programming based technique for optimizing the objective functions obtained using these two novel norms. We show that these optimization techniques outperform the traditional gradient-descent approach. Experimental results with sequential DCE-MR images from 28 patients show the superior performances of our algorithms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Spatial-temporal variation of groundwater and land subsidence evolution in Beijing area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Lei

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Precipitation is the main recharge source of groundwater in the plain of Beijing, China. Rapid expansion of urbanization has resulted in increased built-up area and decreased amount of effective recharge of precipitation to groundwater, indirectly leading to the long-term over-exploitation of groundwater, and induced regional land subsidence. Based on the combination of meteorological data, groundwater level data, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR; specifically persistent scatterer interferometry, PSI, geographic information system (GIS spatial analysis method and rainfall recharge theory, this paper presents a systematic analysis of spatial-temporal variation of groundwater level and land subsidence evolution. Results show that rainfall has been decreasing annually, while the exploitation of groundwater is increasing and the groundwater level is declining, which is has caused the formation and evolution of land subsidence. Seasonal and interannual variations exist in the evolution of land subsidence; the subsidence is uneven in both spatial and temporal distribution. In 2011, at the center of mapped subsidence the subsidence rate was greater than 120 mm a−1. The results revealed good correlation between the spatial distribution of groundwater level declines and subsidence. The research results show that it is beneficial to measure the evolution of land subsidence to dynamic variations of groundwater levels by combining InSAR or PSI, groundwater-level data, and GIS. This apprpach provides improved information for environmental and hydrogeologic research and a scientific basis for regional land subsidence control.

  18. Temporal Variations of Air Dose Rates in East Fukushima During Japanese Fiscal Years 2012 and 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Temporal variations of ambient air dose rates in eastern Fukushima prefecture during Japanese fiscal years 2012 and 2013 are analyzed. The average overall variation rate of air dose rates in east Fukushima during the examined period is found to be 0.49 (51% down) compared to the theoretically predicted value 0.65 (35% down) based on physical decay of radioactive cesium nuclides. On average, local dose rates declined almost linearly for the relatively short period. Temporal characteristics of air dose rates may be classified into variation rates, peaks, spikes, and oscillations. During the examined period, a typical dose-rate curve formed a long-term peak in summer that lasted one through a few months as well as a long-term spike in winter that lasted likewise. Otherwise, occasional short-term peaks and short-term spikes, in addition to long-term oscillations, were observed. Air dose rates may be effectively modulated at short timescales mainly by precipitation. Moreover, it is likely that winds may oscillate air dose rates due to resuspension of radio-dusts.

  19. Strong Temporal Variation Over One Saturnian Year: From Voyager to Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liming; Achterberg, Richard K.; Conrath, Barney J.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Smith, Mark A.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Nixon, Conor A.; Orton, Glenn S.; Flasar, F. Michael; Jiang, Xun; hide

    2013-01-01

    Here we report the combined spacecraft observations of Saturn acquired over one Saturnian year (approximately 29.5 Earth years), from the Voyager encounters (1980-81) to the new Cassini reconnaissance (2009-10). The combined observations reveal a strong temporal increase of tropic temperature (approximately 10 Kelvins) around the tropopause of Saturn (i.e., 50 mbar), which is stronger than the seasonal variability (approximately a few Kelvins). We also provide the first estimate of the zonal winds at 750 mbar, which is close to the zonal winds at 2000 mbar. The quasi-consistency of zonal winds between these two levels provides observational support to a numerical suggestion inferring that the zonal winds at pressures greater than 500 mbar do not vary significantly with depth. Furthermore, the temporal variation of zonal winds decreases its magnitude with depth, implying that the relatively deep zonal winds are stable with time.

  20. Spatial-Temporal Variation and Prediction of Rainfall in Northeastern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umar M. Bibi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In Northeastern Nigeria seasonal rainfall is critical for the availability of water for domestic use through surface and sub-surface recharge and agricultural production, which is mostly rain fed. Variability in rainfall over the last 60 years is the main cause for crop failure and water scarcity in the region, particularly, due to late onset of rainfall, short dry spells and multi-annual droughts. In this study, we analyze 27 years (1980–2006 of gridded daily rainfall data obtained from a merged dataset by the National Centre for Environmental Prediction and Climate Research Unit reanalysis data (NCEP-CRU for spatial-temporal variability of monthly amounts and frequency in rainfall and rainfall trends. Temporal variability was assessed using the percentage coefficient of variation and temporal trends in rainfall were assessed using maps of linear regression slopes for the months of May through October. These six months cover the period of the onset and cessation of the wet season throughout the region. Monthly rainfall amount and frequency were then predicted over a 24-month period using the Auto Regressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA Model. The predictions were evaluated using NCEP-CRU data for the same period. Kolmogorov Smirnov test results suggest that despite there are some months during the wet season (May–October when there is no significant agreement (p < 0.05 between the monthly distribution of the values of the model and the corresponding 24-month NCEP-CRU data, the model did better than simply replicating the long term mean of the data used for the prediction. Overall, the model does well in areas and months with lower temporal rainfall variability. Maps of the coefficient of variation and regression slopes are presented to indicate areas of high rainfall variability and water deficit over the period under study. The implications of these results for future policies on Agriculture and Water Management in the region are

  1. Geomagnetic imprinting predicts spatio-temporal variation in homing migration of pink and sockeye salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, Nathan F; Jenkins, Erica S; Michielsens, Catherine G J; Noakes, David L G

    2014-10-06

    Animals navigate using a variety of sensory cues, but how each is weighted during different phases of movement (e.g. dispersal, foraging, homing) is controversial. Here, we examine the geomagnetic and olfactory imprinting hypotheses of natal homing with datasets that recorded variation in the migratory routes of sockeye (Oncorhynchus nerka) and pink (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) salmon returning from the Pacific Ocean to the Fraser River, British Columbia. Drift of the magnetic field (i.e. geomagnetic imprinting) uniquely accounted for 23.2% and 44.0% of the variation in migration routes for sockeye and pink salmon, respectively. Ocean circulation (i.e. olfactory imprinting) predicted 6.1% and 0.1% of the variation in sockeye and pink migration routes, respectively. Sea surface temperature (a variable influencing salmon distribution but not navigation, directly) accounted for 13.0% of the variation in sockeye migration but was unrelated to pink migration. These findings suggest that geomagnetic navigation plays an important role in long-distance homing in salmon and that consideration of navigation mechanisms can aid in the management of migratory fishes by better predicting movement patterns. Finally, given the diversity of animals that use the Earth's magnetic field for navigation, geomagnetic drift may provide a unifying explanation for spatio-temporal variation in the movement patterns of many species. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Total variation regularization of the 3-D gravity inverse problem using a randomized generalized singular value decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatankhah, Saeed; Renaut, Rosemary A.; Ardestani, Vahid E.

    2018-01-01

    We present a fast algorithm for the total variation regularization of the 3-D gravity inverse problem. Through imposition of the total variation regularization, subsurface structures presenting with sharp discontinuities are preserved better than when using a conventional minimum-structure inversion. The associated problem formulation for the regularization is non linear but can be solved using an iteratively reweighted least squares algorithm. For small scale problems the regularized least squares problem at each iteration can be solved using the generalized singular value decomposition. This is not feasible for large, or even moderate, scale problems. Instead we introduce the use of a randomized generalized singular value decomposition in order to reduce the dimensions of the problem and provide an effective and efficient solution technique. For further efficiency an alternating direction algorithm is used to implement the total variation weighting operator within the iteratively reweighted least squares algorithm. Presented results for synthetic examples demonstrate that the novel randomized decomposition provides good accuracy for reduced computational and memory demands as compared to use of classical approaches.

  3. Gravity-dependent signal path variation in a large VLBI telescope modelled with a combination of surveying methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarti, Pierguido; Abbondanza, C.; Vittuari, L.

    2009-11-01

    The very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) antenna in Medicina (Italy) is a 32-m AZ-EL mount that was surveyed several times, adopting an indirect method, for the purpose of estimating the eccentricity vector between the co-located VLBI and Global Positioning System instruments. In order to fulfill this task, targets were located in different parts of the telescope’s structure. Triangulation and trilateration on the targets highlight a consistent amount of deformation that biases the estimate of the instrument’s reference point up to 1 cm, depending on the targets’ locations. Therefore, whenever the estimation of accurate local ties is needed, it is critical to take into consideration the action of gravity on the structure. Furthermore, deformations induced by gravity on VLBI telescopes may modify the length of the path travelled by the incoming radio signal to a non-negligible extent. As a consequence, differently from what it is usually assumed, the relative distance of the feed horn’s phase centre with respect to the elevation axis may vary, depending on the telescope’s pointing elevation. The Medicina telescope’s signal path variation Δ L increases by a magnitude of approximately 2 cm, as the pointing elevation changes from horizon to zenith; it is described by an elevation-dependent second-order polynomial function computed as, according to Clark and Thomsen (Techical report, 100696, NASA, Greenbelt, 1988), a linear combination of three terms: receiver displacement Δ R, primary reflector’s vertex displacement Δ V and focal length variations Δ F. Δ L was investigated with a combination of terrestrial triangulation and trilateration, laser scanning and a finite element model of the antenna. The antenna gain (or auto-focus curve) Δ G is routinely determined through astronomical observations. A surprisingly accurate reproduction of Δ G can be obtained with a combination of Δ V, Δ F and Δ R.

  4. Temporal variation of Trypanosoma cruzi discrete typing units in asymptomatic Chagas disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Laura V; Bautista, Diana C; Corredor, Andrés F; Herrera, Victor M; Martinez, Luz X; Villar, Juan Carlos; Ramírez, Juan David

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi is a public health problem in Latin America. This parasite displays a high genetic diversity evidenced in six Discrete Typing Units (DTUs) namely TcI-TcVI. The aim of this study was to observe the temporal variation of the DTUs in asymptomatic patients at three different times (10 days interval). The results showed that intermittence is the rule in the bloodstream of Chagas disease patients. The patients showed different detectable DTUs with short time intervals, which favors the clonal histiotropic model and the multiclonality structure of this parasite. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  5. Temporal variation in temperature determines disease spread and maintenance in Paramecium microcosm populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Alison B; Fellous, Simon; Kaltz, Oliver

    2011-11-22

    The environment is rarely constant and organisms are exposed to temporal and spatial variations that impact their life histories and inter-species interactions. It is important to understand how such variations affect epidemiological dynamics in host-parasite systems. We explored effects of temporal variation in temperature on experimental microcosm populations of the ciliate Paramecium caudatum and its bacterial parasite Holospora undulata. Infected and uninfected populations of two P. caudatum genotypes were created and four constant temperature treatments (26°C, 28°C, 30°C and 32°C) compared with four variable treatments with the same mean temperatures. Variable temperature treatments were achieved by alternating populations between permissive (23°C) and restrictive (35°C) conditions daily over 30 days. Variable conditions and high temperatures caused greater declines in Paramecium populations, greater fluctuations in population size and higher incidence of extinction. The additional effect of parasite infection was additive and enhanced the negative effects of the variable environment and higher temperatures by up to 50 per cent. The variable environment and high temperatures also caused a decrease in parasite prevalence (up to 40%) and an increase in extinction (absence of detection) (up to 30%). The host genotypes responded similarly to the different environmental stresses and their effect on parasite traits were generally in the same direction. This work provides, to our knowledge, the first experimental demonstration that epidemiological dynamics are influenced by environmental variation. We also emphasize the need to consider environmental variance, as well as means, when trying to understand, or predict population dynamics or range.

  6. Subsurface temporal variation of radon at the Conrad Geophysical Observatory, Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Roman; Steinitz, Gideon; Piatibratova, Oksana

    2015-04-01

    The Conrad Observatory (COBS) housed the national geophysical observatory of Austria and is located 50 km south west of Vienna within the carbonate sequence of the "Wettersteinkalk". Parameters monitored at the facility comprise environmental data, seismic signals, gravity, geomagnetic components and also natural gamma rays. A subsurface tunnel, 150 meters long and oriented E-W is driven into the calcareous sequence at a depth of 50 meters. The tunnel is lined with a concrete carapace, ~20 cm thick. The tunnel observatory is separated from the external atmosphere by 3 tight doors, resulting in a stable temperature of 6.85±0.04°C. A gamma detector (3×3", NaI, SCA) is used measure the variation of the gamma radiation from radon in the air of the tunnel, at a resolution of 1 minute, which is accumulated to form a 15-minute count rate. The sensor is placed on a concrete block at 135 meters. Several SSNTD measurements in the tunnel indicated radon level in the level of 1.5 kBq/m^3. The background gamma radiation, due probably mainly to sources in the concrete is in the order to 2×105 counts (per 15-minutes). A long term variation of radon is reflected as an annual radon signal with large amplitude (2×105 counts) and a maximum in summer. Small to large (2×105 counts) non periodic multi-day signals lasting from two to several tens of days are superimposed. Daily periodic signals of much lower amplitude are observed, with amplitudes generally up to 4×104 counts. The amplitude of the non-periodic multi-day is coupled to amplitude of the annual signal, and the amplitude of the periodic daily signal is modulated by the multi-day variation. The source of the radon in the air of the tunnel is from the concrete lining the floor and walls of the tunnel. The variation patterns and their systematic characteristics cannot be ascribed to local variations of pressure and temperature (stable). These limitations indicate that other driver(s), external to the tunnel, are forcing

  7. Improved daily GRACE gravity field solutions using a Kalman smoother

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtenbach, E.; Eicker, A.; Mayer-Gürr, T.; Holschneider, M.; Hayn, M.; Fuhrmann, M.; Kusche, J.

    2012-09-01

    Different GRACE data analysis centers provide temporal variations of the Earth's gravity field as monthly, 10-daily or weekly solutions. These temporal mean fields cannot model the variations occurring during the respective time span. The aim of our approach is to extract as much temporal information as possible out of the given GRACE data. Therefore the temporal resolution shall be increased with the goal to derive daily snapshots. Yet, such an increase in temporal resolution is accompanied by a loss of redundancy and therefore in a reduced accuracy if the daily solutions are calculated individually. The approach presented here therefore introduces spatial and temporal correlations of the expected gravity field signal derived from geophysical models in addition to the daily observations, thus effectively constraining the spatial and temporal evolution of the GRACE solution. The GRACE data processing is then performed within the framework of a Kalman filter and smoother estimation procedure. The approach is at first investigated in a closed-loop simulation scenario and then applied to the original GRACE observations (level-1B data) to calculate daily solutions as part of the gravity field model ITG-Grace2010. Finally, the daily models are compared to vertical GPS station displacements and ocean bottom pressure observations. From these comparisons it can be concluded that particular in higher latitudes the daily solutions contain high-frequent temporal gravity field information and represent an improvement to existing geophysical models.

  8. Geodynamics implication of GPS and satellite altimeter and gravity observations to the Eastern Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled H. Zahran

    2012-06-01

    Results show important zones of mass discontinuity in this region correlated with the seismological activities and temporal gravity variations agree with the crustal deformation obtained from GPS observations. The current study indicates that satellite gravity data is a valuable source of data in understanding the geodynamical behavior of the studied region and that satellite gravity data is an important contemporary source of data in the geodynamical studies.

  9. Temporal variations of Escherichia coli concentrations in a large Midwestern river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, K.E.; Zhang, Y.-K.; Hill, D.R.; Jones, C.S.; Wolter, C.F.

    2009-01-01

    The Raccoon River used by the Des Moines Water Works to serve more than 400,000 people in central Iowa is threatened by contamination from Escherichia coli bacteria from point and nonpoint sources. The 9389 km2 watershed is highly agricultural, with 73% of the land in row crop production and widespread animal production. Results from 2155 grab samples from 1997 to 2005 for E. coli analysis were examined for temporal variations. E. coli concentrations were found to vary across years, seasons, and flow conditions, with a 9-year mean value of 1156 most probable number (MPN)/100 ml. Monthly concentrations exhibited clear seasonality with highest values in May through July. Although E. coli concentrations were higher during periods of greater discharge, the relation of log E. coli to log discharge was not particularly strong (r2 = 0.35). The variogram of E. coli concentrations showed temporal correlation within a span of 4 days suggesting that concentrations measured on 1 day may be related in time to concentrations measured up to 3 days later and beyond 4 days the concentrations vary randomly. The spectral analysis of the time series of E. coli was also carried out and was fitted well with the spectrum of an exponential covariance function. Deciphering temporal patterns and correlation of E. coli bacteria in streams may be useful for developing future monitoring strategies to track concentration patterns and loads. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Spatial and Temporal Variations of Atmospheric Aerosol in Osaka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonoyo Mukai

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the aerosol distribution in Asia is complex due to both the increasing emissions of the anthropogenic aerosols associated with economic growth and the behavior of natural dusts. Therefore, detailed observations of atmospheric particles in Asian urban cities are important. In this work, we focus on the spatial and temporal variations of atmospheric particles around Higashi-Osaka in Japan. Higashi-Osaka is located in the eastern part of Osaka, the second-largest city in Japan, and is famous for small- and medium-sized manufacturing enterprises. For this study, we placed various ground measurement devices around the Higashi-Osaka campus of Kinki University including a Cimel sunphotometer supported by NASA/AERONET (Aerosol robotics network, suspended particulate matter (SPM sampler and LIDAR (light detection and ranging. Individual particle analyses with a SEM (scanning electron microscope/EDX (energy-dispersive X-ray analyzer show the temporal variations of particle properties, such as size, shape and components, during a dust event on 21 March 2010. The simultaneous measurement using a portable sun photometer with AERONET was conducted from April to November 2011. A comparison of the data at each site and the combination of the observed LIDAR data and model simulations indicate the difference in the transportation processes between dust and anthropogenic particles. We suppose this difference is attributed to the differences in the vertical aerosol profiles, where one aerosol is transported over Mount Ikoma and the other is blocked by it.

  11. Environmental drivers of spatial and temporal variation in infaunal communities at methane hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanyà i Llovet, N.; Snelgrove, P. V.

    2016-02-01

    Methane hydrates support unique infauna that varies from one hydrate area to another, therefore chemosynthetic environments could increase beta diversity in deep-sea environments. Our results show that oligochaetes, rather than dorvilleid polychaetes or Capitella spp. that characterize other cold seeps, dominate Barkley hydrates infauna off British Columbia (Canada). Most studies of faunal distribution of chemosynthetic environments focus on toxic effects of sulfur or limited oxygen, however, our study demonstrates that the contrasting food quality in hydrate patch mosaics also influences faunal distribution patterns. Food quality in the methane outcrop differs from adjacent sediments in a higher chl/phaeo ratio, lower lipid class diversity, high hydrocarbons (HC) and the presence of wax esters/steryl esters (WE/SE). Mean grain size, chl/phaeo ration, HC, WE/SE, triacylglycerides (TAG) and phospholipids (PL) appear primarily responsible for infaunal distribution patterns. The spatial extent of methane influence on food quality and community structure extends at least 20 m beyond the actual outcrop. The absence of temporal variation in infaunal community structure suggests a strong dependence on methane as a food source, even in relatively shallow hydrates ( 900 m depth). Our data on environmental drivers of community structure, spatial extent, and temporal variation may prove valuable to managers interested in extraction of methane from hydrate sites as a potential source of energy.

  12. Temporal patterns of genetic and phenotypic variation in the epidemiologically important drone fly, Eristalis tenax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francuski, Lj; Matić, I; Ludoški, J; Milankov, V

    2011-06-01

    Eristalis tenax L. (Diptera: Syrphidae) is commonly known as the drone fly (adult) or rat-tailed maggot (immature). Both adults and immature stages are identified as potential mechanical vectors of mycobacterial pathogens, and early-stage maggots cause accidental myiasis. We compared four samples from Mount Fruška Gora, Serbia, with the aim of obtaining insights into the temporal variations and sexual dimorphism in the species. This integrative approach was based on allozyme loci, morphometric wing parameters (shape and size) and abdominal colour patterns. Consistent sexual dimorphism was observed, indicating that male specimens had lighter abdomens and smaller and narrower wings than females. The distribution of genetic diversity at polymorphic loci indicated genetic divergence among collection dates. Landmark-based geometric morphometrics revealed, contrary to the lack of divergence in wing size, significant wing shape variation throughout the year. In addition, temporal changes in the frequencies of the abdominal patterns observed are likely to relate to the biology of the species and ecological factors in the locality. Hence, the present study expands our knowledge of the genetic diversity and phenotypic plasticity of E. tenax. The quantification of such variability represents a step towards the evaluation of the adaptive potential of this species of medical and epidemiological importance.

  13. Temporal variation of intertidal seagrass in southern China (2008-2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Guanglong; Short, Frederick T.; Fan, Hangqing; Liu, Guohua

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the temporal dynamics of seagrasses and the major influences on seagrass growth is critical for seagrass habitat conservation and administration. However, little work has been done regarding these issues in southern China. To examine inter-annual and seasonal variations of the intertidal Halophila ovalis community in southern China, we conducted quarterly sampling using the SeagrassNet methodology and assessed environmental conditions as well as direct anthropogenic impacts on the seagrass meadow from July 2008 to October 2014. Our study demonstrated strong inter-annual and seasonal dynamics of the intertidal seagrass meadow in the study area. Generally, the community performed best (highest seagrass cover, leaf area, shoot density, total biomass) in summer and worst in spring among the 4 seasons. The temporal variations in the seagrass community attributes (e.g. above-ground biomass) were significantly affected by precipitation, atmospheric visibility, and salinity, while leaf width was significantly negatively correlated with temperature, atmospheric visibility and salinity. Temperature was a major factor influencing the seagrass community (both macroalgae and seagrass), with temperature data showing an inverse relationship between seagrass and macroalgae. The above-ground: below-ground biomass ratio and leaf width of H. ovalis were the most sensitive plant parameters monitored when assessing environmental interactions. Human physical disturbances did not have a significant effect on seagrass dynamics in the study area. We concluded that long-term monitoring (like SeagrassNet) is valuable in understanding the relationship between environmental variables and seagrasses.

  14. Spatio-Temporal Variations and Source Apportionment of Water Pollution in Danjiangkou Reservoir Basin, Central China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Chen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the spatio-temporal variation and the potential source of water pollution could greatly improve our knowledge of human impacts on the environment. In this work, data of 11 water quality indices were collected during 2012–2014 at 10 monitoring sites in the mainstream and major tributaries of the Danjiangkou Reservoir Basin, Central China. The fuzzy comprehensive assessment (FCA, the cluster analysis (CA and the discriminant analysis (DA were used to assess the water pollution status and analyze its spatio-temporal variation. Ten sites were classified by the high pollution (HP region and the low pollution (LP region, while 12 months were divided into the wet season and the dry season. It was found that the HP region was mainly in the small tributaries with small drainage areas and low average annual discharges, and it was also found that most of these rivers went through urban areas with industrial and domestic sewages input into the water body. Principal component analysis/factor analysis (PCA/FA was applied to reveal potential pollution sources, whereas absolute principal component score-multiple linear regression (APCS-MLR was used to identify their contributions to each water quality variable. The study area was found as being generally affected by industrial and domestic sewage. Furthermore, the HP region was polluted by chemical industries, and the LP region was influenced by agricultural and livestock sewage.

  15. The trophic state of lake water regulates spatial-temporal variations of bloom-forming Microcystis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinxia; Liu, Bibo; Liu, Shuaixia; Li, Dunhai

    2017-03-01

    Although biomass variations in Microcystis and microcystin have been widely reported, few studies have addressed whether different trophic states of natural lake water affect the spatial-temporal variations in abundances of microcystin-producing Microcystis in a given bloom. In this study, we used a harmful algal bloom in Chaohu Lake, eastern China, as an example to investigate the mutual relationship between different nutrient states and environmental factors, and the impact on Microcystis. Overall, cyanobacteria and Microcystis were more abundant in the middle and western parts of the lake under high nutrients levels, while in the eastern part, nutrient concentrations were low enough to limit biomass, and their fluctuations affected the contents of toxic Microcystis. Moreover, microcystin concentration was correlated positively to nutrient levels and Microcystis biomass during bloom developing in 2013 from June to August. Temporally, the cellular content of total microcystin was lowest when the bloom peaked in intensity. Our results suggest that lake eutrophication not only results in cyanobacterial blooms, but may also increase the proportion of toxic Microcystis species and their cell-bound MCs contents (i.e. microcystin cell quotas) under mild eutrophication. The present investigation provided molecular evidence for the selection of MC-producing and non-MC-producing genotypes. The current study provides new evidence advocating the monitoring of partitions of large lakes when studying cyanobacteria and toxin-contaminated freshwaters, which will be beneficial for both water agencies and water researchers.

  16. Spatial and temporal variations of the callus mechanical properties during bone transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora-Macias, J.; Reina-Romo, E.; Pajares, A.; Miranda, P.; Dominguez, J.

    2016-07-01

    Nanoindentation allows obtaining the elastic modulus and the hardness of materials point by point. This technique has been used to assess the mechanical propeties of the callus during fracture healing. However, as fas as the authors know, the evaluation of mechanical properties by this technique of the distraction and the docking-site calluses generated during bone transport have not been reported yet. Therefore, the aim of this work is using nanoindentation to assess the spatial and temporal variation of the elastic modulus of the woven bone generated during bone transport. Nanoindentation measurements were carried out using 6 samples from sheep sacrificed at different stages of the bone transport experiments. The results obtained show an important heterogeneity of the elastic modulus of the woven bone without spatial trends. In the case of temporal variation, a clear increase of the mean elastic modulus with time after surgery was observed (from 7±2GPa 35 days after surgery to 14±2GPa 525 days after surgery in the distraction callus and a similar increase in the docking site callus). Comparison with the evolution of the elastic modulus in the woven bone generated during fracture healing shows that mechanical properties increase slower in the case of the woven bone generated during bone transport. (Author)

  17. Challenges for modelling spatio-temporal variations of malaria risk in Malawi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, R.; Chirombo, J.; Tompkins, A. M.

    2012-04-01

    Malaria is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Malawi with more than 6 million episodes reported each year. Malaria poses a huge economic burden to Malawi in terms of the direct cost of treating malaria patients and also indirect costs resulting from workdays lost in agriculture and industry and absenteeism from school. Malawi implements malaria control activities within the Roll Back Malaria framework, with the objective to provide those most at risk (i.e. children under five years, pregnant woman and individuals with suppressed immune systems) access to personal and community protective measures. However, at present there is no mechanism by which to target the most 'at risk' populations ahead of an impending epidemic. Malaria transmission is influenced by variations in meteorological conditions, which impact the biology of the mosquito and the availability of breeding sites, but also socio-economic conditions such as levels of urbanisation, poverty and education, which influence human vulnerability and vector habitat. The many potential drivers of malaria, both extrinsic, such as climate, and intrinsic, such as population immunity are often difficult to disentangle. This presents a challenge for modelling of malaria risk in space and time. Using an age-stratified spatio-temporal dataset of malaria cases at the district level from July 2004 - June 2011, we use a spatio-temporal modelling framework to model variations in malaria risk in Malawi. Climatic and topographic variations are accounted for using an interpolation method to relate gridded products to administrative districts. District level data is tested in the model to account for confounding factors, including the proportion of the population living in urban areas; residing in traditional housing; with no toilet facilities; who do not attend school, etc, the number of health facilities per population and yearly estimates of insecticide-treated mosquito net distribution. In order to account for

  18. Spatial variation buffers temporal fluctuations in early juvenile survival for an endangered Pacific salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorson, James T; Scheuerell, Mark D; Buhle, Eric R; Copeland, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Spatial, phenotypic and genetic diversity at relatively small scales can buffer species against large-scale processes such as climate change that tend to synchronize populations and increase temporal variability in overall abundance or production. This portfolio effect generally results in improved biological and economic outcomes for managed species. Previous evidence for the portfolio effect in salmonids has arisen from examinations of time series of adult abundance, but we lack evidence of spatial buffering of temporal variability in demographic rates such as survival of juveniles during their first year of life. We therefore use density-dependent population models with multiple random effects to represent synchronous (similar among populations) and asynchronous (different among populations) temporal variability as well as spatial variability in survival. These are fitted to 25 years of survey data for breeding adults and surviving juveniles from 15 demographically distinct populations of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) within a single metapopulation in the Snake River in Idaho, USA. Model selection identifies the most support for the model that included both synchronous and asynchronous temporal variability, in addition to spatial variability. Asynchronous variability (log-SD = 0·55) is approximately equal in magnitude to synchronous temporal variability (log-SD = 0·67), but much lower than spatial variability (log-SD = 1·11). We also show that the pairwise correlation coefficient, a common measure of population synchrony, is approximated by the estimated ratio of shared and total variance, where both approaches yield a synchrony estimate of 0·59. We therefore find evidence for spatial buffering of temporal variability in early juvenile survival, although between-population variability that persists over time is also large. We conclude that spatial variation decreases interannual changes in overall juvenile production, which suggests that

  19. Temporal variation of phytoplankton in a small tropical crater lake, Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Umaña-Villalobos

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The temporal variation in lake’s phytoplankton is important to understand its general biodiversity. For tropical lakes, it has been hypothesized that they follow a similar pattern as temperate ones, on a much accelerated pace; nevertheless, few case studies have tried to elucidate this. Most studies in Costa Rica have used a monthly sampling scheme and failed in showing the expected changes. In this study, the phytoplankton of the small Barvas’s crater lake was followed for more than three years, first with monthly and later with weekly samplings, that covered almost two years. Additional information on temperature and oxygen vertical profiles was obtained on a monthly basis, and surface temperature was measured during weekly samplings around noon. Results showed that in spite of its shallow condition (max. depth: 7m and low surface temperature (11 to 19°C, the lake stratifies at least for brief periods. The phytoplankton showed both, rapid change periods, and prolonged ones of relative stasis. The plankton composition fluctuated between three main phases, one characterized by the abundance of small sized desmids (Staurastrum paradoxum, Cosmarium asphaerosporum, a second phase dominated by equally small cryptomonads (Chryptochrysis minor, Chroomonas sp. and a third phase dominated by the green alga Eutetramorus tetrasporus. Although data evidenced that monthly sampling could miss short term events, the temporal variation did not follow the typical dry and rainy seasons of the region, or any particular annual pattern. Year to year variation was high. As this small lake is located at the summit of Barva Volcano and receives the influence from both the Caribbean and the Pacific weather, seasonality at the lake is not clearly defined as in the rest of the country and short term variations in the local weather might have a stronger effect than broad seasonal trends. The occurrence of this short term changes in the phytoplankton of small tropical

  20. Monitoring temporal microstructural variations of skeletal muscle tissues by multispectral Mueller matrix polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yang; He, Honghui; He, Chao; Ma, Hui

    2017-02-01

    Mueller matrix polarimetry is a powerful tool for detecting microscopic structures, therefore can be used to monitor physiological changes of tissue samples. Meanwhile, spectral features of scattered light can also provide abundant microstructural information of tissues. In this paper, we take the 2D multispectral backscattering Mueller matrix images of bovine skeletal muscle tissues, and analyze their temporal variation behavior using multispectral Mueller matrix parameters. The 2D images of the Mueller matrix elements are reduced to the multispectral frequency distribution histograms (mFDHs) to reveal the dominant structural features of the muscle samples more clearly. For quantitative analysis, the multispectral Mueller matrix transformation (MMT) parameters are calculated to characterize the microstructural variations during the rigor mortis and proteolysis processes of the skeletal muscle tissue samples. The experimental results indicate that the multispectral MMT parameters can be used to judge different physiological stages for bovine skeletal muscle tissues in 24 hours, and combining with the multispectral technique, the Mueller matrix polarimetry and FDH analysis can monitor the microstructural variation features of skeletal muscle samples. The techniques may be used for quick assessment and quantitative monitoring of meat qualities in food industry.

  1. Spatial and temporal variation of total electron content as revealed by principal component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaat, Elsayed R.; Zhu, Xun

    2016-11-01

    Eleven years of global total electron content (TEC) data derived from the assimilated thermosphere-ionosphere electrodynamics general circulation model are analyzed using empirical orthogonal function (EOF) decomposition and the corresponding principal component analysis (PCA) technique. For the daily averaged TEC field, the first EOF explains more than 89 % and the first four EOFs explain more than 98 % of the total variance of the TEC field, indicating an effective data compression and clear separation of different physical processes. The effectiveness of the PCA technique for TEC is nearly insensitive to the horizontal resolution and the length of the data records. When the PCA is applied to global TEC including local-time variations, the rich spatial and temporal variations of field can be represented by the first three EOFs that explain 88 % of the total variance. The spectral analysis of the time series of the EOF coefficients reveals how different mechanisms such as solar flux variation, change in the orbital declination, nonlinear mode coupling and geomagnetic activity are separated and expressed in different EOFs. This work demonstrates the usefulness of using the PCA technique to assimilate and monitor the global TEC field.

  2. Temperature distribution in side- and end-pumped laser crystal rods - Temporal and spatial variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrukh, Usamah O.; Brockman, Philip

    1993-01-01

    Knowledge of the temperature distribution of laser rods end pumped by laser diodes or other laser systems is relevant when thermal stress and crystal damage are expected. The temperature of a multipulsed or continuously pumped laser rod is given as a double-series expression and as a function of time. The mathematical model considers all surface cooling rates, the spatial and temporal variations of the pump beam, and the specific heat and thermal conductivity of the rod material. This eigenfunction expansion representation was employed to predict the spatial and time-dependent quasi-steady-state temperature in Ti:sapphire, Nd:YAG, and Cr:LiSAF laser rods of specific dimensions.

  3. Temperature distribution in side- and end-pumped laser crystal rods: temporal and spatial variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrukh, U O; Brockman, P

    1993-04-20

    Knowledge of the temperature distribution of laser rods end pumped by laser diodes or other laser systems is relevant when thermal stress and crystal damage are expected. The temperature of a multipulsed or continuously pumped laser rod is given as a double-series expression and as a function of time. The mathematical model considers all surface cooling rates, the spatial and temporal variations of the pump beam, and the specific heat and thermal conductivity of the rod material. This eigenfunction expansion representation was employed to predict the spatial and time-dependent quasi-steady-state temperature in Ti:sapphire, Nd:YAG, and Cr:LiSAF laser rods of specific dimensions.

  4. Evaluation of low viscosity variations in fluids using temporal and spatial analysis of the speckle pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nader, Christelle Abou; Pellen, Fabrice; Roquefort, Philippe; Aubry, Thierry; Le Jeune, Bernard; Le Brun, Guy; Abboud, Marie

    2016-06-01

    The noninvasive detection of a material's viscoelasticity is of great importance in the medical field. In fact, certain diseases cause changes in tissue structure and biological fluid viscosity; tracking those changes allows for detection of these diseases. Rheological measurements are also imperative in the industrial field, where it is necessary to characterize a material's viscoelasticity for manufacturing purposes. In this Letter, we present a noncontact, noninvasive, and low cost method for determining low viscosity values and variations in fluids. Laser speckle and viscometric measurements are performed on test samples having low scattering coefficients and low viscosities. The speckle spatial analysis proved to be as accurate as the speckle temporal correlation method reported in previous studies. Very low viscosities of the order of 1 mPa.s were retrieved for the first time using speckle images with either a frame rate of 1950 fps or a single acquired image.

  5. Analysis of spatial and temporal variations of PM 10 concentrations in the Netherlands using Kalman filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wal, J. T.; Janssen, L. H. J. M.

    The spatial and temporal variations of PM10 concentrations in the Netherlands as measured by the National Air Quality Monitoring Network in the period of 1993-1994 have been analysed using descriptive statistics, principal component analysis (PCA) and Kalman filtering. Spatial differences in PM10 concentrations in the Netherlands are rather small. PM10 concentrations may be elevated by about 10-20% with respect to the yearly average, which is about 40 μg/m 3, in areas with local sources such as traffic or other urban, industrial or agricultural sources. Actual PM10 concentrations vary between 20 and 50 μg/m 3 throughout the year. During episodes, PM10 concentrations may increase to 4 to 5 times the annual average (>200 μg/m 3). The large amount of variance explained by the first component of PCA, i.e. 85%, shows that all measuring stations observe the same pattern of daily variations which is mainly governed by large-scale weather systems.The daily variations are analysed using multiple-linear regression and Kalman filtering; the latter employed as a time-varying linear regression technique. The results of the both methods are compared and show that using wind direction, temperature and duration of precipitation as variables, ordinary linear regression explains about 25% of the variance of PM10 concentrations, while the application of the Kalman filter explains about 45% of the variance. The improvement using the Kalman filter is primarily obtained by making the explaining variables time dependent. This shows a significant effect of seasonal variation on temperature and wind direction at PM10 levels.

  6. Temporal Variations in 234U/238U Activity Ratios in Four Mississippi River Tributaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzymko, T. J.; Marcantonio, F.

    2005-05-01

    In 2004 we sampled the four tributaries that are the major contributors to the Mississippi River in terms of water discharge, i.e., the Arkansas, Missouri, Upper Mississippi, and Ohio rivers. Each river was sampled four times over the course of the year at variable levels of discharge in an attempt to constrain the causes of the temporal variations of 234U/238U activity ratios in the lower Mississippi River at New Orleans. The tributary uranium data support the idea that lower river uranium isotope and elemental systematics are controlled by a simple mass balance of the source tributary discharges. Furthermore, the uranium isotope ratios of the individual tributaries show coherent patterns of variability. Specifically, the data obtained from the four sampling trips yielded similar patterns of temporal variation in the 234U/238U activity ratios of all of the rivers, although the absolute values of these ratios were distinctly different from one river to the next. The pattern was such that the highest 234U/238U activity ratios were observed during the highest flow associated with the spring freshet while the lowest ratios occurred during the summer. For example, in the Missouri River, the 234U/238U activity ratios varied from 1.51 (February 12) to 1.37 (April 14) to 1.34 (July 16) to 1.37 (November 12), while in the Ohio River the same ratios varied from 1.36 (February 12) to 1.29 (April 14) to 1.21 (July 16) to 1.23 (November 12). The apparent seasonal pattern of these ratios in each tributary has led to several ideas as to the causes of the observed trends. The first, and most obvious, is that in each individual drainage basin there are various source tributaries that contribute to the uranium isotope systematics of the main stem of the tributary of interest. It follows that the variations in the uranium activity ratios may be caused by spatial variations in the source rock chemistry of the drainage basin. Other more complex scenarios can also be envisioned and

  7. Attribution of spatial and temporal variations in terrestrial methane flux over North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X. F.; Tian, H. Q.; Zhang, C.; Liu, M. L.; Ren, W.; Chen, G. S.; Lu, C. Q.; Bruhwiler, L.

    2010-11-01

    The attribution of spatial and temporal variations in terrestrial methane (CH4) flux is essential for assessing and mitigating CH4 emission from terrestrial ecosystems. In this study, we used a process-based model, the Dynamic Land Ecosystem Model (DLEM), in conjunction with spatial data of six major environmental factors to attribute the spatial and temporal variations in the terrestrial methane (CH4) flux over North America from 1979 to 2008 to six individual driving factors and their interaction. Over the past three decades, our simulations indicate that global change factors accumulatively contributed 23.51 ± 9.61 T g CH4-C (1 Tg = 1012 g) emission over North America, among which ozone (O3) pollution led to a reduced CH4 emission by 2.30 ± 0.49 T g CH4-C. All other factors including climate variability, nitrogen (N) deposition, elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), N fertilizer application, and land conversion enhanced terrestrial CH4 emissions by 19.80 ± 12.42 T g CH4-C, 0.09 ± 0.02 T g CH4-C, 6.80 ± 0.86 T g CH4-C, 0.01 ± 0.001 T g CH4-C, and 3.95 ± 0.38 T g CH4-C, respectively, and interaction between/among these global change factors led to a decline of CH4 emission by 4.84 ± 7.74 T g CH4-C. Climate variability and O3 pollution suppressed, while other factors stimulated CH4 emission over the USA; climate variability significantly enhanced, while all the other factors exerted minor effects, positive or negative, on CH4 emission in Canada; Mexico functioned as a sink for atmospheric CH4 with a major contribution from climate change. Climatic variability dominated the inter-annual variations in terrestrial CH4 flux at both continental and country levels. Precipitation played an important role in the climate-induced changes in terrestrial CH4 flux at both continental and country-levels. The relative importance of each environmental factor in determining the magnitude of CH4 flux showed substantially spatial variation across North America. This

  8. Sediment carbon and oxygen cycling and its temporal variations at the continent-ocean interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabouille, Christophe; Lansard, Bruno; Rassmann, Jens; Pozzato, Lara; Taillefert, Martial; Eytel, Erin; Abchiche, Abdel; Moriarty, Julia; Harris, Courtney

    2017-04-01

    River deltas are among the most biogeochemically active areas on Earth. They receive large amounts of organic matter from the continent, which, added to nutrient inputs, stimulate primary production of coastal waters. They also contribute significantly to the global ocean carbon burial (> 80%) and are, at the same time, considered as net sources of CO2 to the atmosphere due to their heterotrophic nature. This occurs in a context of large temporal variability linked to hydrological variations in river discharge, interaction with seasonal variability of the ocean, and extreme events characterized by floods and storms. It is thus of prime importance to decipher the processes controlling the transformation of carbon leading to recycling and burial, and to disentangle the different frequencies of temporal variability in order to understand its influence on the deltaic systems and the coastal ocean in river-dominated areas. We present a case study on the Rhône River delta, the largest river in the Western Mediterranean Sea, and dig into the processes that lead to the recycling of organic carbon and the alkalinity production which is a strong counteracting mechanism to the air-sea CO2 exchange. This involves anoxic diagenesis processes including recombination of reduced species as a key-process in alkalinity generation and fluxes from the deltaic sediments to the seawater. We examine the temporal variability of oxygen consumption as an indicator of carbon recycling over different time scales (from hours to decades). This variability is observed using a combination of in situ techniques: a novel observatory, the LSCE benthic station, which performs in situ oxygen profiles at the sediment-water interface at a fixed station and conventional in situ profilers which allow spatial investigations during sea expeditions. The results display large inter-annual modulations linked to the organic matter discharge from the river, large variability linked to floods and storms and

  9. Spatial-temporal gait variability poststroke: variations in measurement and implications for measuring change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Amanda E; Makepeace, Shelley; Inness, Elizabeth L; Perry, Stephen D; McIlroy, William E; Mansfield, Avril

    2014-07-01

    To determine the responsiveness to change of spatial-temporal gait parameters among stroke survivors for 3 different variability measures: SD, coefficient of variation (CV), and median absolute deviation (MAD). Retrospective chart review. Clinical laboratory in a Canadian hospital. Stroke survivors (N=74) receiving inpatient rehabilitation. Not applicable. Spatial-temporal gait variability was calculated for step length, step width, stance time, swing time, and double support time. Responsiveness to change was determined by comparing (1) trials without versus trials with a concurrent cognitive task and (2) admission to discharge from rehabilitation. Variability estimators (SD, CV, and MAD) increased with the addition of a cognitive task and decreased from admission to discharge of rehabilitation. However, these changes were not statistically significant when change in gait velocity was included as a covariate. The effect size values were similar for all variability estimators with a trend toward a greater SD response to temporal parameters. The CV displayed a larger response to change for step length than did the SD and MAD. Although gait variability decreased between admission and discharge, the effect size was larger for the condition without the cognitive task than for the condition with the cognitive task. Our results show that gait variability estimators demonstrate a similar responsiveness to a concurrent cognitive task and improved walking ability with recovery from stroke. Future work may focus on evaluating the clinical utility of these measures in relation to informing therapy and response to gait-specific training protocols. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Temporal variations of potential fecundity of southern blue whiting (Micromesistius australis australis) in the Southeast Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Andrés; Wiff, Rodrigo; Díaz, Eduardo; Carvajal, Bernardita

    2017-08-01

    Fecundity is a key aspect of fish species reproductive biology because it relates directly to total egg production. Yet, despite such importance, fecundity estimates are lacking or scarce for several fish species. The gravimetric method is the most-used one to estimate fecundity by essentially scaling up the oocyte density to the ovary weight. It is a relatively simple and precise technique, but also time consuming because it requires counting all oocytes in an ovary subsample. The auto-diametric method, on the other hand, is relatively new for estimating fecundity, representing a rapid alternative, because it requires only an estimation of mean oocyte density from mean oocyte diameter. Using the extensive database available from commercial fishery and design surveys for southern blue whiting Micromesistius australis australis in the Southeast Pacific, we compared estimates of fecundity using both gravimetric and auto-diametric methods. Temporal variations in potential fecundity from the auto-diametric method were evaluated using generalised linear models considering predictors from maternal characteristics such as female size, condition factor, oocyte size, and gonadosomatic index. A global and time-invariant auto-diametric equation was evaluated using a simulation procedure based on non-parametric bootstrap. Results indicated there were not significant differences regarding fecundity estimates between the gravimetric and auto-diametric method (p > 0.05). Simulation showed the application of a global equation is unbiased and sufficiently precise to estimate time-invariant fecundity of this species. Temporal variations on fecundity were explained by maternal characteristic, revealing signals of fecundity down-regulation. We discuss how oocyte size and nutritional condition (measured as condition factor) are one of the important factors determining fecundity. We highlighted also the relevance of choosing the appropriate sampling period to conduct maturity studies

  11. Temporal variation of PM10 concentration and properties in Istanbul 2007-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Rosa M.; Kaya, Nefel; Eşer, Övgü; Saltan, Şehnaz

    2017-04-01

    The study of temporal variation of atmospheric aerosols is essential for a better understanding of sources, transport, and accumulation in the atmosphere. In addition, the study of aerosol properties is important for the understanding of their formation and potential impacts on ecosystems and climate change. Istanbul is a Megacity that often shows exceedance in particulate matter (PM) standard values, especially during the winter season. In this work, temporal variations of hourly ground-level PM10 concentrations, aerosol optical depth (AOD), aerosol index (AI), vertical distribution, and mineral dust loadings were investigated according to air mass trajectory clusters in Istanbul during 2007-2015. Aerosol properties (i.e., AOD, AI, and vertical distribution) and mineral dust loadings were retrieved from satellite observations and the BSC-DREAM8b model, respectively. Air mass backward trajectories and clustering were supplied by NOAA-HYSPLIT model. Mineral dust transport events were characterized according to the exceedance of a dust loading threshold value. The total number of mineral dust transport events ranged from 115 to 183 during the study period. The largest number of mineral dust transport events were observed in 2008 and 2014. However, the highest ground-level PM10 measurements were observed in 2012-2013 with approximately 70% of the daily average concentrations exceeding the air quality standard of 50 µg m-3. Overall, 5-6 air mass trajectory clusters were able to resolve over 85% of the total spatial variance. These trajectories vary in frequency and direction throughout the years, however, the main trajectories favor aerosol transport from N, NE, NNE, and S, and SE. Evaluation of mineral dust loading and PM10 concentrations is helpful for successful development and implementation of air quality management strategies on local levels.

  12. Study of spectro-temporal variation in paleo-climatic marine proxy records using wavelet transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Chhavi P.

    2017-10-01

    Wavelet analysis is a powerful mathematical and computational tool to study periodic phenomena in time series particu-larly in the presence of potential frequency changes in time. Continuous wavelet transformation (CWT) provides localised spectral information of the analysed dataset and in particular useful to study multiscale, nonstationary processes occurring over finite spatial and temporal domains. In the present work, oxygen-isotope ratio from the plantonic foraminifera species (viz. Globigerina bul-loides and Globigerinoides ruber) acquired from the broad central plateau of the Maldives ridge situated in south-eastern Arabian sea have been used as climate proxy. CWT of the time series generated using both the biofacies indicate spectro-temporal varia-tion of the natural climatic cycles. The dominant period resembles to the period of Milankovitch glacial-interglacial cycle. Apart from that, various other cycles are present in the time series. The results are in good agreement with the astronomical theory of paleoclimates and can provide better visualisation of Indian summer monsoon in the context of climate change.

  13. Spatial variation in the temporal change of male and female melanic ornamentation in the barn owl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roulin, A; Antoniazza, S; Burri, R

    2011-07-01

    Because the magnitude of selection can vary between sexes and in space and time, sexually antagonistic selection is difficult to demonstrate. In a Swiss population of barn owls (Tyto alba), a heritable eumelanic colour trait (size of black spots on ventral feathers) was positively selected with respect to yearling survival only in females. It remains unclear whether the absence of negative selection in males is typical in this species. To tackle this issue indirectly, we measured the size of black spots in 1733 skin specimens collected by museums from 1816 to 2001 in seven European countries and in the Middle-East. The temporal change in spot size was sex- and country-specific. In males, spots became smaller particularly in three countries (Middle-East, Italy and Switzerland). In females, the size of spots increased significantly in two countries (UK and Spain) and decreased in two others (Germany and Switzerland). Because migration and phenotypic plasticity cannot explain these results, selection is the most likely cause. The weaker temporal change in spot size in females than males may be because of the combined effect of strong genetic correlation between the sexes and stronger negative selection in males than positive selection in females. We thus suggest that in the barn owl, spot size (or genetically correlated traits) is sexually antagonistically selected and that its pattern of selection may account for the maintenance of its variation and sexual dimorphism. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2011 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  14. Spatial and temporal variation in the range-wide cyclic dynamics of greater sage-grouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Row, Jeffrey R; Fedy, Bradley C

    2017-10-19

    Periodic changes in abundance, or population cycles, are common in a variety of species and is one of the most widely studied ecological phenomena. The strength of, and synchrony between population cycles can vary across time and space and understanding these patterns can provide insight into the mechanisms generating population cycles and their variability within and among species. Here, we used wavelet and spectral analysis on a range-wide dataset of abundance for the greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) to test for regional differences in temporal cyclicity. Overall, we found that most populations (11 of 15) were cyclic at some point in a 50-year time series (1965-2015), but the patterns varied over both time and space. Several peripheral populations demonstrated amplitude dampening or loss of cyclicity following population lows in the mid-1990s. Populations through the core of the range in the Great and Wyoming Basins had more consistent cyclic dynamics, but period length appeared to shorten from 10-12 to 6-8 years. In one time period, where cyclicity was greatest overall, increased pairwise population synchrony was correlated with cycle intensity. Our work represents a comprehensive range-wide assessment of cyclic dynamics and revealed substantial variation in temporal and spatial trends of cyclic dynamics across populations.

  15. Temporal variation of β-diversity and assembly mechanisms in a bacterial metacommunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenheder, Silke; Berga, Mercè; Östman, Örjan; Székely, Anna J

    2012-06-01

    The turnover of community composition across space, β-diversity, is influenced by different assembly mechanisms, which place varying weight on local habitat factors, such as environmental conditions and species interactions, and regional factors such as dispersal and history. Several assembly mechanisms may function simultaneously; however, little is known about how their importance changes over time and why. Here, we implemented a field survey where we sampled a bacterial metacommunity consisting of 17 rock pools located at the Swedish Baltic Sea coast at 11 occasions during 1 year. We determined to which extent communities were structured by different assembly mechanisms using variation partitioning and studied changes in β-diversity across environmental gradients over time. β-Diversity was highest at times of high overall productivity and environmental heterogeneity in the metacommunity, at least partly due to species sorting, that is, selection of taxa by the prevailing environmental conditions. In contrast, dispersal-driven assembly mechanisms were primarily detected at times when β-diversity was relatively low. There were no indications for strong and persistent differences in community composition or β-diversity between permanent and temporary pools, indicating that the physical disturbance regime is of relatively minor importance. In summary, our study clearly suggests that there are temporal differences in the relative importance of different assembly mechanisms related to abiotic factors and shows that the temporal variability of those factors is important for a more complete understanding of bacterial metacommunity dynamics.

  16. Spatio-temporal variation of fish taxonomic composition in a South-East Asian flood-pulse system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Kong

    Full Text Available The Tonle Sap Lake (TSL is a flood-pulse system. It is the largest natural lake in South-East Asia and constitutes one of the largest fisheries over the world, supporting the livelihood of million peoples. Nonetheless, the Mekong River Basin is changing rapidly due to accelerating water infrastructure development (hydropower, irrigation, flood control, and water supply and climate change, bringing considerable modifications to the annual flood-pulse of the TSL. Such modifications are expected to have strong impacts on fish biodiversity and abundance. This paper aims to characterize the spatio-temporal variations of fish taxonomic composition and to highlights the underlying determinants of these variations. For this purpose, we used data collected from a community catch monitoring program conducted at six sites during 141 weeks, covering two full hydrological cycles. For each week, we estimated beta diversity as the total variance of the site-by-species community matrix and partitioned it into Local Contribution to Beta Diversity (LCBD and Species Contribution to Beta Diversity (SCBD. We then performed multiple linear regressions to determine whether species richness, species abundances and water level explained the temporal variation in the contribution of site and species to beta diversity. Our results indicate strong temporal variation of beta diversity due to differential contributions of sites and species to the spatial variation of fish taxonomic composition. We further found that the direction, the shape and the relative effect of species richness, abundances and water level on temporal variation in LCBD and SCBD values greatly varied among sites, thus suggesting spatial variation in the processes leading to temporal variation in community composition. Overall, our results suggest that fish taxonomic composition is not homogeneously distributed over space and time and is likely to be impacted in the future if the flood-pulse dynamic of

  17. Spatio-temporal variation of fish taxonomic composition in a South-East Asian flood-pulse system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Heng; Chevalier, Mathieu; Laffaille, Pascal; Lek, Sovan

    2017-01-01

    The Tonle Sap Lake (TSL) is a flood-pulse system. It is the largest natural lake in South-East Asia and constitutes one of the largest fisheries over the world, supporting the livelihood of million peoples. Nonetheless, the Mekong River Basin is changing rapidly due to accelerating water infrastructure development (hydropower, irrigation, flood control, and water supply) and climate change, bringing considerable modifications to the annual flood-pulse of the TSL. Such modifications are expected to have strong impacts on fish biodiversity and abundance. This paper aims to characterize the spatio-temporal variations of fish taxonomic composition and to highlights the underlying determinants of these variations. For this purpose, we used data collected from a community catch monitoring program conducted at six sites during 141 weeks, covering two full hydrological cycles. For each week, we estimated beta diversity as the total variance of the site-by-species community matrix and partitioned it into Local Contribution to Beta Diversity (LCBD) and Species Contribution to Beta Diversity (SCBD). We then performed multiple linear regressions to determine whether species richness, species abundances and water level explained the temporal variation in the contribution of site and species to beta diversity. Our results indicate strong temporal variation of beta diversity due to differential contributions of sites and species to the spatial variation of fish taxonomic composition. We further found that the direction, the shape and the relative effect of species richness, abundances and water level on temporal variation in LCBD and SCBD values greatly varied among sites, thus suggesting spatial variation in the processes leading to temporal variation in community composition. Overall, our results suggest that fish taxonomic composition is not homogeneously distributed over space and time and is likely to be impacted in the future if the flood-pulse dynamic of the system is

  18. Modelling the spatial and temporal variations of the water balance for the Weser catchment 1965 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Ulrich; Mauser, Wolfram

    2001-12-01

    This study describes the application of the physically based SVAT model PROMET (PRocess Oriented Model for EvapoTranspiration) in the mesoscale catchment of the Weser (Northern Germany, approx. 37,500 km 2) utilizing a 30 years time series of meteorological input data. To enable a representative analysis of the spatial and temporal variations of the water balance components, the modelization is performed continuously without re-initialization of the state variables or specific calibration. Therefore, PROMET is expanded with the one-layer snow model ESCIMO (Energy balance Snow Cover Integrated MOdel) to provide an integrated model structure for continuous simulations of the water cycle. All necessary input data fields are integrated in a four-dimensional GIS data structure with a raster grid spacing of 1 km: a DEM, soil texture information derived from digitized maps, landuse distribution computed by unmixing a time series of NOAA/AVHRR satellite images and meteorological input data fields which are spatially and temporally interpolated using data provided by the standard measurement network of the German Weather Service (DWD). Spatially non-distributed physical soil and plant parameters are either derived from measurements or taken from literature. The study presents the structure of ESCIMO and its validation at the point and the catchment scale. Then, the modelled mean annual evapotranspiration, aET, as obtained by application of the linked models PROMET/ESCIMO is compared with the corresponding term ET calculated by inserting the measured precipitation and gauged runoff into the water balance equation. It is started from the assumption that for the 30 years period, the overall underground storage change Δ S is negligible. The mean annual deviation aET-ET over the 30 years period is 10.9 mm, indicating that the results represent a valid long-term description of the water balance. The patterns of the simulated water balance components are discussed with respect to

  19. Key Edaphic Properties Largely Explain Temporal and Geographic Variation in Soil Microbial Communities across Four Biomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn M Docherty

    Full Text Available Soil microbial communities play a critical role in nutrient transformation and storage in all ecosystems. Quantifying the seasonal and long-term temporal extent of genetic and functional variation of soil microorganisms in response to biotic and abiotic changes within and across ecosystems will inform our understanding of the effect of climate change on these processes. We examined spatial and seasonal variation in microbial communities based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA composition across four biomes: a tropical broadleaf forest (Hawaii, taiga (Alaska, semiarid grassland-shrubland (Utah, and a subtropical coniferous forest (Florida. In this study, we used a team-based instructional approach leveraging the iPlant Collaborative to examine publicly available National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON 16S gene and PLFA measurements that quantify microbial diversity, composition, and growth. Both profiling techniques revealed that microbial communities grouped strongly by ecosystem and were predominately influenced by three edaphic factors: pH, soil water content, and cation exchange capacity. Temporal variability of microbial communities differed by profiling technique; 16S-based community measurements showed significant temporal variability only in the subtropical coniferous forest communities, specifically through changes within subgroups of Acidobacteria. Conversely, PLFA-based community measurements showed seasonal shifts in taiga and tropical broadleaf forest systems. These differences may be due to the premise that 16S-based measurements are predominantly influenced by large shifts in the abiotic soil environment, while PLFA-based analyses reflect the metabolically active fraction of the microbial community, which is more sensitive to local disturbances and biotic interactions. To address the technical issue of the response of soil microbial communities to sample storage temperature, we compared 16S

  20. Spatial and temporal variations of water balance components due to a bottomland hedgerow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Z.; Ghazavi, G.; Merot, P.

    2009-04-01

    -water content is not limited and can exceed the potential evapotranspiration. Spatial and temporal variations of water balance components is highly related to climatic conditions Such research suggests that the impact of the destruction of the wooded linear structures on the water cycle and water resources had been underestimated. Moreover, these results support the urgent need to improve hydrological models to predict the impact of climatic changes on water cycle by including the impact of land use and land cover. Keywords: spatial and temporal variations, climatic context, hedgerow, water balance, transpiration, drainage, capillary rise.

  1. Influence of a variation in the position of the arms on the sagittal connection of the gravity line with the spinal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legaye, Jean; Duval-Beaupere, Ginette

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the influence of the position of the arms on the location of the body's gravity line. The sagittal balance of the pelvi-spinal unit is organized so that the gravity line is localized in a way that limits the mechanical loads and the muscle efforts. This position of the gravity line was analyzed in vivo, in standing position, the arms dangling, by the barycentremeter, a gamma rays scanner. Then, several teams had the same purpose but using a force platform combined with radiographies. Their results differed significantly among themselves and with the data of the barycentremetry. However, in these studies, the positions of the arms varied noticeably, either slightly bent forwards on a support, or the fingers on the clavicles or on the cheeks. We estimated, for each varied posture of the arms, the sagittal coordinates of the masses of the upper limbs and their influence on the anatomical position of the gravity line of the whole body. Using a simple equation and the data of the barycentremeter, we observed that the variations in the location of the gravity line were proportionally connected to the changes of the sagittal position of the mass of the upper limbs induced by the various positions of the arms. We conclude in a validation of the data of the barycentremeter, as well as of the data obtained by the force platforms as long as the artifact of the position of the arms is taken into account.

  2. Spatial and temporal variation in isotopic composition of atmospheric lead in Norwegian moss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosman, K.J.R.; Ly, C. [Curtin Univ. of Technology, Perth, Western Australia (Australia). Dept. of Applied Physics; Steinnes, E. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway). Dept. of Chemistry

    1998-09-01

    Earlier studies using moss as a biomonitor of pollution have shown that long-range transport is a major source of pollution in Norway. Until now, the origin of these pollutants has been inferred from concentration measurements of various elements in moss and the climatology at each sampling site. Lead isotopes provide an opportunity to identify the sources and to quantify the contribution of each. This preliminary study reports measurements of lead isotopes in moss from selected sites along the full extent of Norway that reveal significant spatial and temporal variations. There are significant north-south trends that differ at coastal and inland sites and differ between sampling periods (1974--1994). These variations reflect the changing contributions from the different source regions as the regulation of pollution from automobiles and industry takes effect. Identifiable sources are the U.K. and possibly France, which is noticeable at coastal sites; western Europe at the southern end; and eastern Europe and Russia influencing the inland and northernmost sites.

  3. Temporal variation and regional transfer of heavy metals in the Pearl (Zhujiang) River, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Gengchong; Li, Ying; Tong, Yindong; Yang, Lei; Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Heavy metals are highly persistent in water and have a particular significance in ecotoxicology. Heavy metals loading from the Pearl River are likely to cause significant impacts on the environment in the South China Sea and the West Pacific. In this study, using monthly monitoring data from a water quality monitoring campaign during 2006-2012, the temporal variation and spatial transfer of six heavy metals (lead (Pb), copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd), zinc (Zn), arsenic (As), and mercury (Hg)) in the Pearl River were analyzed, and the heavy metal fluxes into the sea were calculated. During this period, the annual heavy metal loads discharged from the Pearl River into the South China Sea were 5.8 (Hg), 471.7 (Pb), 1524.6 (Cu), 3819.6 (Zn), 43.9 (Cd), and 621.9 (As) tons, respectively. The metal fluxes showed a seasonal variation with the maximum fluxes occurring from June to July. There is a close association between metal fluxes and runoff. The analysis of the heavy metal transfer from the upstream to the downstream revealed that the transfer from the upstream accounted for a major portion of the heavy metals in the Pearl River Delta. Therefore, earlier industry relocation efforts in the Pearl River watershed may have limited effect on the water quality improvement in surrounding areas. It is suggested that watershed-based pollution control measures focusing on wastewater discharge in both upstream and downstream areas should be developed and implemented in the future.

  4. Spatial and temporal variations in extracellular matrix of periocular and corneal regions during corneal stromal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doane, K J; Ting, W H; McLaughlin, J S; Birk, D E

    1996-03-01

    The development of the avian corneal stroma occurs in discrete developmental stages. During this sequence of events, the neural crest-derived corneal fibroblast precursor cells are surrounded by distinct extracellular matrices which change both spatially and temporally. To elucidate the role of these matrices, extracellular matrix components in the periocular mesenchyme and cornea were analysed prior to and during migration and differentiation of corneal fibroblasts using antibodies against collagens, proteoglycans and glycoproteins. Previous work has concentrated on the matrix of the corneal stroma rather than the matrix of the periocular mesenchyme. Since the precursors of the corneal fibroblasts are present within the must migrate through the periocular mesenchyme prior to entry into the cornea proper, this environment was fully evaluated. The present study documents the matrix composition of both the cornea and periocular mesenchyme at developmental stages that are prior to and after initiation of corneal invasion by the corneal fibroblast precursors. Variations in matrix molecules comprising both the periocular mesenchyme and cornea were demonstrated. These include changes in the distribution of collagen types I, II, III, IV and VI; the proteoglycans decorin and lumican; as well as the adhesive glycoproteins tenascin, fibronectin and laminin. It is hypothesized that the variations in matrix localization are important in the regulation of cell migration and differentiation during normal corneal development. Any regulation is likely to involve a combination of components found in the extracellular matrices and therefore, a consideration of the matrix rather than isolated components is required.

  5. Geographical and Temporal Variations in Female Breast Cancer Mortality in the Municipalities of Andalusia (Southern Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaña-Riola, Ricardo; Montaño-Remacha, Carmen; Mayoral-Cortés, José María

    2016-11-22

    The last published figures have shown geographical variations in mortality with respect to female breast cancer in European countries. However, national health policies need a dynamic image of the geographical variations within the country. The aim of this paper was to describe the spatial distribution of age-specific mortality rates from female breast cancer in the municipalities of Andalusia (southern Spain) and to analyze its evolution over time from 1981 to 2012. An ecological study was devised. Two spatio-temporal hierarchical Bayesian models were estimated. One of these was used to estimate the age-specific mortality rate for each municipality, together with its time trends, and the other was used to estimate the age-specific rate ratio compared with Spain as a whole. The results showed that 98% of the municipalities exhibited a decreasing or a flat mortality trend for all the age groups. In 2012, the geographical variability of the age-specific mortality rates was small, especially for population groups below 65. In addition, more than 96.6% of the municipalities showed an age-specific mortality rate similar to the corresponding rate for Spain, and there were no identified significant clusters. This information will contribute towards a reflection on the past, present and future of breast cancer outcomes in Andalusia.

  6. Temporal and spatial variation of rocky shores intertidal benthic communities in Southeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela C. Zamprogno

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The relationships between environmental factors and temporal and spatial variations of benthic communities of three rocky shores of the state of Espírito Santo, Southeast Brazil, were studied. Sampling was conducted every three months, from August 2006 to May 2007, using intersection points. Chthamalus bisinuatus (Pilsbry, 1916 (Crustacea and Brachidontes spp. (Mollusca were the most abundant taxa, occupying the upper level of the intertidal zone of the rocky shore. The species richness was higher at the lower levels. The invasive species Isognomon bicolor (C. B. Adams, 1845 (Mollusca occurred at low densities in the studied areas. The clustering analysis dendrogram indicated a separation of communities based on exposed and sheltered areas. According to the variance analyses, the communities were significantly different among the studied areas and seasons. The extent of wave exposure and shore slope influenced the species variability. The Setibão site showed the highest diversity and richness, most likely due to greater wave exposure. The communities showed greater variation in the lower levels where environmental conditions were less severe, relative to the other levels.

  7. Population ecology of Paepalanthus polyanthus (Bong. Kunth: temporal variation in the pattern of spatial distribution

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    Tânia Tarabini Castellani

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The temporal variation in density and pattern of spatial distribution of Paepalanthus polyanthus (BONG. Kunth (Eriocaulaceae were evaluated at a determinate sand dune. This study was carried out over a period of five years, at three permanent plots of 25m2 in a sand dune slack at Joaquina Beach, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil. There were strong density fluctuations throughout these years. In areas 1, 2 and 3, the densities changed from 10.4, 2.2 and 1.8 plants/m2 in December 1986 to 75.8, 11.4 and 45.6 plants/m2 in December 1991. Area 3, situated on an elevated site, presented greater variation in density, with no live plants in December 1989 and 102.2 plants/m2 at the recruitment observed in May 1990. Despite these density fluctuations, the pattern of spatial distribution was always aggregated (Id>1, P<0.05. The greatest Id values occurred in periods of low density and not in those of high density, associated with seedling recruitment. Factors such as high seed production with low dispersal, massive germination in moit years and a comparatively high death rate of seedlings at sites more subject to flooding or more distant from the water table proved themselves able to promote this aggregate pattern and increase it during plant development.

  8. Hidden diversity in diatoms of Kenyan Lake Naivasha: a genetic approach detects temporal variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoof-Leichsenring, Kathleen R; Epp, Laura S; Trauth, Martin H; Tiedemann, Ralph

    2012-04-01

    This study provides insights into the morphological and genetic diversity in diatoms occurring in core sediments from tropical lakes in Kenya. We developed a genetic survey technique specific for diatoms utilizing a short region (76-67 bp) of the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit (rbcL) gene as genetic barcode. Our analyses (i) validated the use of rbcL as a barcoding marker for diatoms, applied to sediment samples, (ii) showed a significant correlation between the results obtained by morphological and molecular data and (iii) indicated temporal variation in diatom assemblages on the inter- and intra-specific level. Diatom assemblages from a short core from Lake Naivasha show a drastic shift over the last 200 years, as littoral species (e.g. Navicula) are replaced by more planktonic ones (e.g. Aulacoseira). Within that same period, we detected periodic changes in the respective frequencies of distinct haplotype groups of Navicula, which coincide with wet and dry periods of Lake Naivasha between 1820 and 1938 AD. Our genetic analyses on historical lake sediments revealed inter- and intra-specific variation in diatoms, which is partially hidden behind single morphotypes. The occurrence of particular genetic lineages is probably correlated with environmental factors. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Geographical and Temporal Variations in Female Breast Cancer Mortality in the Municipalities of Andalusia (Southern Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaña-Riola, Ricardo; Montaño-Remacha, Carmen; Mayoral-Cortés, José María

    2016-01-01

    The last published figures have shown geographical variations in mortality with respect to female breast cancer in European countries. However, national health policies need a dynamic image of the geographical variations within the country. The aim of this paper was to describe the spatial distribution of age-specific mortality rates from female breast cancer in the municipalities of Andalusia (southern Spain) and to analyze its evolution over time from 1981 to 2012. An ecological study was devised. Two spatio-temporal hierarchical Bayesian models were estimated. One of these was used to estimate the age-specific mortality rate for each municipality, together with its time trends, and the other was used to estimate the age-specific rate ratio compared with Spain as a whole. The results showed that 98% of the municipalities exhibited a decreasing or a flat mortality trend for all the age groups. In 2012, the geographical variability of the age-specific mortality rates was small, especially for population groups below 65. In addition, more than 96.6% of the municipalities showed an age-specific mortality rate similar to the corresponding rate for Spain, and there were no identified significant clusters. This information will contribute towards a reflection on the past, present and future of breast cancer outcomes in Andalusia. PMID:27879690

  10. Field source characteristic of gravity variation in Hexi region before Menyuan Ms6.4 earthquake based on the Euler deconvolution

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    Fang Liu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study adopted the Euler deconvolution method to conduct an inversion and interpretation of the depth and spatial distribution pattern of field source that lead to gravity variation. For this purpose, mobile gravity data from four periods in the Hexi region between 2011 and 2015 were obtained from an observation network. With a newly established theoretical model, we acquired the optimum inversion parameters and conducted calculation and analysis with the actual data. The results indicate that one is the appropriate value of the structure index for the inversion of the mobile gravity data. The inversion results of the actual data showed a comparable spatial distribution of the field source and a consistent structural trend with observations from the Qilian-Haiyuan Fault zone between 2011 and 2015. The distribution was in a blocking state at the epicenter of the Menyuan earthquake in 2016. Our quantitative study of the field source provides new insights into the inversion and interpretation of signals of mobile gravity variation.

  11. Long-term temporal variation in the organization of an ant-plant network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Castelazo, Cecilia; Sánchez-Galván, Ingrid R; Guimarães, Paulo R; Raimundo, Rafael L Galdini; Rico-Gray, Víctor

    2013-06-01

    Functional groups of species interact and coevolve in space and time, forming complex networks of interacting species. A long-term study of temporal variation of an ant-plant network is presented with the aims of: (1) depicting its structural changes over a 20-year period; (2) detailing temporal variation in network topology, as revealed by nestedness and modularity analysis and other parameters (i.e. connectance, niche overlap); and (3) identifying long-term turnover in taxonomic structure (i.e. switches in ant resource use or plant visitor assemblages according to taxa). Fieldwork was carried out at La Mancha, Mexico, and ant-plant interactions were observed between 1989 and 1991, between 1998 and 2000, and between May 2010 and 2011. Occurrences of ants on extrafloral nectaries (EFNs) were recorded. The resulting ant-plant networks were constructed from qualitative presence-absence data determined by a species-species matrix defined by the frequency of occurrence of each pairwise ant-plant interaction. Network variation across time was stable and a persistent nested structure may have contributed to the maintenance of resilient and species-rich communities. Modularity was lower than expected, especially in the most recent networks, indicating that the community exhibited high overlap among interacting species (e.g. few species were hubs in the more recent network, being partly responsible for the nested pattern). Structurally, the connections created among modules by super-generalists gave cohesion to subsets of species that otherwise would remain unconnected. This may have allowed an increasing cascade-effect of evolutionary events among modules. Mutualistic ant-plant interactions were structured 20 years ago mainly by the subdominant nectarivorous ant species Camponotus planatus and Crematogaster brevispinosa, which monopolized the best extrafloral nectar resources and out-competed other species with broader feeding habits. Through time, these ants, which are

  12. Long-term temporal variation in the organization of an ant–plant network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Castelazo, Cecilia; Sánchez-Galván, Ingrid R.; Guimarães, Paulo R.; Raimundo, Rafael L. Galdini; Rico-Gray, Víctor

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Functional groups of species interact and coevolve in space and time, forming complex networks of interacting species. A long-term study of temporal variation of an ant–plant network is presented with the aims of: (1) depicting its structural changes over a 20-year period; (2) detailing temporal variation in network topology, as revealed by nestedness and modularity analysis and other parameters (i.e. connectance, niche overlap); and (3) identifying long-term turnover in taxonomic structure (i.e. switches in ant resource use or plant visitor assemblages according to taxa). Methods Fieldwork was carried out at La Mancha, Mexico, and ant–plant interactions were observed between 1989 and 1991, between 1998 and 2000, and between May 2010 and 2011. Occurrences of ants on extrafloral nectaries (EFNs) were recorded. The resulting ant–plant networks were constructed from qualitative presence–absence data determined by a species–species matrix defined by the frequency of occurrence of each pairwise ant–plant interaction. Key Results Network variation across time was stable and a persistent nested structure may have contributed to the maintenance of resilient and species-rich communities. Modularity was lower than expected, especially in the most recent networks, indicating that the community exhibited high overlap among interacting species (e.g. few species were hubs in the more recent network, being partly responsible for the nested pattern). Structurally, the connections created among modules by super-generalists gave cohesion to subsets of species that otherwise would remain unconnected. This may have allowed an increasing cascade-effect of evolutionary events among modules. Mutualistic ant–plant interactions were structured 20 years ago mainly by the subdominant nectarivorous ant species Camponotus planatus and Crematogaster brevispinosa, which monopolized the best extrafloral nectar resources and out-competed other species with broader

  13. Temporal and spatial variations of water quality in the Jinshui River of the South Qinling Mts., China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Hongmei; Tan, Xiang; Li, Siyue; Zhang, Quanfa

    2010-07-01

    Water pollution has become a growing threat to human society and natural ecosystems in recent decades, increasing the need to better understand the spatial and temporal variabilities of pollutants within aquatic systems. This study sampled water quality at 12 sampling sites from October 2006 to August 2008 in the Jinshui River of the South Qinling Mts., China. Multivariate statistical techniques and gridding methods were used to investigate the temporal and spatial variations of water quality and identify the main pollution factors and sources. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that 25 studied water quality variables had significant temporal differences (pMts., China. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Annual spatio-temporal variation of the euphotic depth in the SW-Finnish archipelago, Baltic Sea

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    Hanna Luhtala

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We measured depth profiles of underwater PAR (photosynthetically active radiation together with optically derived turbidity and chlorophyll fluorescence values at 11 sampling stations in the South-West Finnish archipelago of the Baltic Sea. The data were collected eight times during the spring, summer and early autumn of 2010. The results illustrate complex and multidimensional variations in the euphotic depth, which was subject to fourfold and twofold differences in the geographical and seasonal dimensions respectively. The spatio-temporal inconsistency and non-linearity of the seasonal euphotic depth variation calls for further studies at different spatial and temporal scales.

  15. Temporal variations in supraglacial debris distribution on Baltoro Glacier, Karakoram between 2001 and 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Morgan J.; Glasser, Neil F.; Quincey, Duncan J.; Mayer, Christoph; Rowan, Ann V.; Irvine-Fynn, Tristram D. L.

    2017-10-01

    Distribution of supraglacial debris in a glacier system varies spatially and temporally due to differing rates of debris input, transport and deposition. Supraglacial debris distribution governs the thickness of a supraglacial debris layer, an important control on the amount of ablation that occurs under such a debris layer. Characterising supraglacial debris layer thickness on a glacier is therefore key to calculating ablation across a glacier surface. The spatial pattern of debris thickness on Baltoro Glacier has previously been calculated for one discrete point in time (2004) using satellite thermal data and an empirically based relationship between supraglacial debris layer thickness and debris surface temperature identified in the field. Here, the same empirically based relationship was applied to two further datasets (2001, 2012) to calculate debris layer thickness across Baltoro Glacier for three discrete points over an 11-year period (2001, 2004, 2012). Surface velocity and sediment flux were also calculated, as well as debris thickness change between periods. Using these outputs, alongside geomorphological maps of Baltoro Glacier produced for 2001, 2004 and 2012, spatiotemporal changes in debris distribution for a sub-decadal timescale were investigated. Sediment flux remained constant throughout the 11-year period. The greatest changes in debris thickness occurred along medial moraines, the locations of mass movement deposition and areas of interaction between tributary glaciers and the main glacier tongue. The study confirms the occurrence of spatiotemporal changes in supraglacial debris layer thickness on sub-decadal timescales, independent of variation in surface velocity. Instead, variation in rates of debris distribution are primarily attributed to frequency and magnitude of mass movement events over decadal timescales, with climate, regional uplift and erosion rates expected to control debris inputs over centurial to millennial timescales. Inclusion

  16. Endozoochorous seed dispersal by Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata): Effects of temporal variation in ranging and seed characteristics on seed shadows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Yamato; Morimoto, Mayumi

    2016-02-01

    Variation in seed shadows generated by frugivores is caused by daily, seasonal, and inter-annual variation in ranging, as well as inter-specific variability in gut passage times according to seed characteristics. We studied the extent to which seed weight, specific gravity, and daily (morning, afternoon, and evening) and inter-annual (2004 vs. 2005) variation in ranging affected seed shadows generated by wild Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) in northern Japan. The macaques ingested fleshy fruits of 11 species during the two year study period; Viburnum dilatatum (Caprifoliaceae: heavier seeds with higher specific gravity) and Rosa multiflora (Rosaceae: lighter seeds with lower specific gravity) were eaten frequently in both years. The travel distances of macaques after feeding on V. dilatatum and R. multiflora fruits were estimated by combining feeding locations and ranging patterns measured in the field with gut passage times of model seeds in captive animals. Median travel distances after fruit feeding were 431 (quantile range: 277-654) and 478 m (265-646), respectively, with a maximum of 1,261 m. Neither year nor time of day affected travel distances. The gut passage time of model V. dilatatum seeds was longer than that of model R. multiflora seed, but this did not affect dispersal distances. Seed shadows for both species over 2 years showed unimodal distribution (peak: 101-500 m) and more than 90%, 20%, and 3% of ingested seeds were estimated to be dispersed >100, >500, and >1000 m, respectively, the longest known distances among macaque species. R. multiflora seeds tended to be dispersed further in 2004 than 2005, but V. dilatatum seeds were not, implying that inter-annual variations in ranging pattern due to the distribution and abundance of nut fruiting could affect dispersal distance. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Spatio-temporal variations in deep-sea demersal communities off the Balearic Islands (western Mediterranean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moranta, Joan; Quetglas, Antoni; Massutí, Enric; Guijarro, Beatriz; Hidalgo, Manuel; Diaz, Paz

    2008-06-01

    The spatial and temporal variations of deep-sea megafaunal assemblages from the western Mediterranean are analysed in the present paper. The assemblages from two locations of the Balearic Islands situated 120 km apart were compared using data collected seasonally on a bathymetric stratum covering the 150-750 m depth range during six bottom-trawl surveys. The assemblage structure, in terms of species composition, species dominance and population sizes, was differentially affected by the spatio-temporal variables analysed (depth, location and fishing period). Although depth was the main factor determining the assemblage composition, the differences obtained between the two locations were also relevant. On the upper slope these between-location differences in the dynamics of megafaunal assemblages were found to be related to the effect of fishing exploitation. Population size-based metrics and biomass spectra were good predictors of meso-scale fishing effects, and were mainly reflected by elasmobranchs and demersal teleosts. Nevertheless, the effects of fishing depended on the species considered. Two dominant large-sized fish species found on the upper slope in both localities, Galeus melastomus and Phycis blennoides, had higher biomass values associated with lower fishing effort. Although the mean body weight (MBW) of both species and also the mean maximum body weight (MMBW) of G. melastomus agreed with this pattern, the P. blennoides MMBW did not. This last case could be indicative of natural size-trends such as the bigger-deeper phenomenon which refers to the displacement of large individuals towards the deeper limit of their bathymetric distribution, beyond the maximum depth sampled in this study for this species. By contrast, the target species of the upper slope fishery, the red shrimp Aristeus antennatus, was not negatively affected by the direct impact of fishing activity and other environmental factors, such as the presence of specific water masses could also

  18. Fish habitat selection in a large hydropeaking river: Strong individual and temporal variations revealed by telemetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capra, Hervé; Plichard, Laura; Bergé, Julien; Pella, Hervé; Ovidio, Michaël; McNeil, Eric; Lamouroux, Nicolas

    2017-02-01

    Modeling individual fish habitat selection in highly variable environments such as hydropeaking rivers is required for guiding efficient management decisions. We analyzed fish microhabitat selection in the heterogeneous hydraulic and thermal conditions (modeled in two-dimensions) of a reach of the large hydropeaking Rhône River locally warmed by the cooling system of a nuclear power plant. We used modern fixed acoustic telemetry techniques to survey 18 fish individuals (five barbels, six catfishes, seven chubs) signaling their position every 3s over a three-month period. Fish habitat selection depended on combinations of current microhabitat hydraulics (e.g. velocity, depth), past microhabitat hydraulics (e.g. dewatering risk or maximum velocities during the past 15days) and to a lesser extent substrate and temperature. Mixed-effects habitat selection models indicated that individual effects were often stronger than specific effects. In the Rhône, fish individuals appear to memorize spatial and temporal environmental changes and to adopt a "least constraining" habitat selection. Avoiding fast-flowing midstream habitats, fish generally live along the banks in areas where the dewatering risk is high. When discharge decreases, however, they select higher velocities but avoid both dewatering areas and very fast-flowing midstream habitats. Although consistent with the available knowledge on static fish habitat selection, our quantitative results demonstrate temporal variations in habitat selection, depending on individual behavior and environmental history. Their generality could be further tested using comparative experiments in different environmental configurations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Spatial and temporal patterns of sea ice variations in Vilkitsky strait, Russian High Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ci, T.; Cheng, X.; Hui, F.

    2013-12-01

    The Arctic Ocean has been greatly affected by climate change. Future predications show an even more drastic reduction of the ice cap which will open new areas for the exploration of natural resources and maritime transportation.Shipping through the Arctic Ocean via the Northern Sea Route (NSR) could save about 40% of the sailing distance from Asia (Yokohama) to Europe (Rotterdam) compared to the traditional route via the Suez Canal. Vilkitsky strait is the narrowest and northest portion of the Northern Sea Route with heaviest traffic between the Taimyr Peninsular and the Severnaya Zemlya archipelago. The preliminary results of sea ice variations are presented by using moderate-resolution imaging spectro radiometer(MODIS) data with 250-m resolution in the Vilkitsky strait during 2009-2012. Temporally, the first rupture on sea ice in Vilkitsky strait usually comes up in April and sea ice completely break into pieces in early June. The strait would be ice-free between August and late September. The frequency of ice floes grows while temperature falls down in October. There are always one or two months suitable for transport. Spatially, Sea ice on Laptev sea side breaks earlier than that of Kara sea side while sea ice in central of strait breaks earlier than in shoreside. The phenomena are directly related with the direction of sea wind and ocean current. In summmary, study on Spatial and temporal patterns in this area is significant for the NSR. An additional research issue to be tackled is to seeking the trends of ice-free duration in the context of global warming. Envisat ASAR data will also be used in this study.

  20. [Spatial and temporal variation in diet composition of invertivore fishes in a tropical stream, Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortaz, Mario; Martín, Ricardo; López-Ordaz, Adriana

    2011-09-01

    Invertivores fishes are an important component of neotropical streams and they represent a link between aquatic invertebrates and piscivorous species. This study evaluated the breadth diet and interspecific food overlap of nine invertivores fish species during three consecutive hydrological phases: falling (December/07, January/08, February/08 and March/08), low (April/08) and rising waters (June/08), in two sections of a Venezuelan neotropical stream, which were located at different elevation, high watershed (HW) and low watershed (LW). The fishes were collected with a beach seine (5mm mesh) between 8:00 and 11:00 hours. The diet of each species was evaluated using an index of relative importance (IRI), which includes as variables the number, weight and occurrence frequency of food items consumed. The Levin' index (B ) and Morisita (IM) were used to estimate the breadth diet and interspecific food overlap, respectively. All estimations were made using the numeric proportion of preys. Nine fish species were captured, eight Characiformes, of which three were captured in HW (Knodus deuteronoides, Creagrutus bolivari and C. melasma) and five in LW (Thoracocharax stellatus, Moenkhausia lepidura, Cheirodon pulcher, Ctenobrycon spilurus and Aphyocharax alburnus), and one Cyprinodontiformes (Poecilia reticulata), which was also found in HW. In HW aquatic insects were the main resource consumed by fishes while plant material and terrestrial arthropods were secondary resources. In LW the fishes ingested all of these items in addition to zooplankton (Copepoda, Cladocera and larval stages of Decapoda). However, there was a temporal replacement with a predominance of zooplankton in falling and low water. In general, the breadth diet decreased during the falling water in both sections and increased in rising water. However, the average breadth diet was higher in HW. The interspecific food overlap was high in HW while low values were more frequent in LW and its temporal

  1. The Spatio-Temporal Variation of Hydrochemical Characteristics in Yamzhog Yumco Basin, South Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhe, M.; Zhang, X.

    2015-12-01

    From 2009 to 2014, more than 300 water samples of 52 sites from the five lakes and seven inflow rivers of Yumzhog Yumco Basin, South Tibet have been collected, and the hydrochemical types, sources of ions, and the spatial-temporal variation in waters analyzed annually. The basin waters are slightly saline or fresh because of the different sources of water replenishment, and are hardest water with weak alkalinity. The hydrochemical types of Yamzhog Yum Co, Puma Yum Co, Bajiu Co, Kongmu Co, and Chen Co are SO42--HCO3--Mg2+-Na+, HCO3--SO42--Mg2+, SO42--Mg2+-Na+, SO42--HCO3--Ca2+, and SO42--Na+-Mg2+-Ca2+, respectively. As for rivers, HCO3- together with SO42- is the major anion, and Ca2+ is the dominant cation. The weathering of evaporites and carbonatites, along with the evaporation-crystallization plays a significant role in the difference of hydrochemical compositions. In addition, anthropogenic impacts, such as the rapid tourism development and the utilization of Yamzhog Yumco hydropower should not be ignored. Compared with the salinity in 1984, Puma Yum Co has been desalinated obviously during 2009-2014 as a result of the accelerated glacier melt caused by the global warming. Furthermore, the Cl- concentration has decreased consequently with the increased evaporation from 2009 to 2014. Yamzhog Yum Co, the largest lake in this basin with a complex zigzag bank and a different inflow river system, exhibits remarkable spatial variation for its surface waters. The mineralization degree, and the concentration of Mg2+ and (Na++K+) are low with high concentration of Ca2+ in the river mouth entering into Yamzhog Yum Co. Moreover, the irregular changes in vertical direction can be attributed to the strong wind and comparatively abundant rainfall during the sampling period. To sum up, the combined impacts of environmental changes and human activities can account for the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of hydrochemical characteristics in Yamzhog Yumco Basin.

  2. Spatial and temporal variation of particulate matter and gaseous pollutants in China during 2014-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Cui, Lulu; Li, Junlin; Zhao, An; Fu, Hongbo; Wu, Yu; Zhang, Liwu; Kong, Lingdong; Chen, Jianmin

    2017-07-01

    China is experiencing severe air pollution due to rapid economic development and accelerated urbanization. High-resolution temporal and spatial air pollution data are imperative to understand the physical and chemical processes affecting air quality of China. The data of PM2.5, PM10, SO2, CO, NO2, and O3 in 187 Chinese cities during January 2014 and November 2016 were collected to uncover the spatial and temporal variation of the pollutants in China. The annual mean concentrations of PM2.5 exceeded the Grade I standard of Chinese Ambient Air Quality (CAAQS) for all of the cities except several cities in Hainan, and more than 100 cities exceeded the CAAQS Grade II standard. The concentrations of PM2.5, PM10, SO2, CO, and NO2 decreased from 2014 to 2016, whereas the O3 level increased dramatically during this period. The concentrations of PM2.5, PM10, SO2, CO and NO2 exhibited the highest levels in winter and the lowest in summer, and evidently decreased from 2014 to 2016, whereas the O3 concentration peaked in spring and summer, and dramatically increased from 2014 to 2016. The non-attainment ratios were highest in winters, while high pollution days were also frequently observed in the Southeast region in autumn and in the Northwest region in spring. Pearson correlation analysis indicated that all of the pollutants exhibited significant correlation one another. PM10 was a major pollutant affecting the air quality of China in all of the seasons. Both SO2 and NO2 exerted significantly adverse effects on the air quality in spring and autumn, but CO played an important role on the air quality in winter. O3 was found to be the dominant species among the pollutants affecting the air quality in summer, suggesting that photochemical O3 formation should be paid more attention to improve the air quality in summer. The results of geographical weight regression (GWR) showed that more significant correlations among the pollutants and the highest air quality index (AQI) appeared

  3. Temporal variation of phytoplankton in a small tropical crater lake, Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Umaña-Villalobos

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The temporal variation in lake’s phytoplankton is important to understand its general biodiversity. For tropical lakes, it has been hypothesized that they follow a similar pattern as temperate ones, on a much accelerated pace; nevertheless, few case studies have tried to elucidate this. Most studies in Costa Rica have used a monthly sampling scheme and failed in showing the expected changes. In this study, the phytoplankton of the small Barvas’s crater lake was followed for more than three years, first with monthly and later with weekly samplings, that covered almost two years. Additional information on temperature and oxygen vertical profiles was obtained on a monthly basis, and surface temperature was measured during weekly samplings around noon. Results showed that in spite of its shallow condition (max. depth: 7m and low surface temperature (11 to 19°C, the lake stratifies at least for brief periods. The phytoplankton showed both, rapid change periods, and prolonged ones of relative stasis. The plankton composition fluctuated between three main phases, one characterized by the abundance of small sized desmids (Staurastrum paradoxum, Cosmarium asphaerosporum, a second phase dominated by equally small cryptomonads (Chryptochrysis minor, Chroomonas sp. and a third phase dominated by the green alga Eutetramorus tetrasporus. Although data evidenced that monthly sampling could miss short term events, the temporal variation did not follow the typical dry and rainy seasons of the region, or any particular annual pattern. Year to year variation was high. As this small lake is located at the summit of Barva Volcano and receives the influence from both the Caribbean and the Pacific weather, seasonality at the lake is not clearly defined as in the rest of the country and short term variations in the local weather might have a stronger effect than broad seasonal trends. The occurrence of this short term changes in the phytoplankton of small tropical

  4. Attribution of spatial and temporal variations in terrestrial methane flux over North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. F. Xu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The attribution of spatial and temporal variations in terrestrial methane (CH4 flux is essential for assessing and mitigating CH4 emission from terrestrial ecosystems. In this study, we used a process-based model, the Dynamic Land Ecosystem Model (DLEM, in conjunction with spatial data of six major environmental factors to attribute the spatial and temporal variations in the terrestrial methane (CH4 flux over North America from 1979 to 2008 to six individual driving factors and their interaction. Over the past three decades, our simulations indicate that global change factors accumulatively contributed 23.51 ± 9.61 T g CH4-C (1 Tg = 1012 g emission over North America, among which ozone (O3 pollution led to a reduced CH4 emission by 2.30 ± 0.49 T g CH4-C. All other factors including climate variability, nitrogen (N deposition, elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2, N fertilizer application, and land conversion enhanced terrestrial CH4 emissions by 19.80 ± 12.42 T g CH4-C, 0.09 ± 0.02 T g CH4-C, 6.80 ± 0.86 T g CH4-C, 0.01 ± 0.001 T g CH4-C, and 3.95 ± 0.38 T g CH4-C, respectively, and interaction between/among these global change factors led to a decline of CH4 emission by 4.84 ± 7.74 T g CH4-C. Climate variability and O3 pollution suppressed, while other factors stimulated CH4 emission over the USA; climate variability significantly enhanced, while all the other factors exerted minor effects, positive or negative, on CH4 emission in Canada; Mexico functioned as a sink for atmospheric CH4 with a major contribution from climate change. Climatic variability dominated the inter-annual variations in terrestrial CH4 flux at both continental and country levels. Precipitation played an important role in

  5. Fine-scale temporal variation in marine extracellular enzymes of coastal southern California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven D Allison

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular enzymes are functional components of marine microbial communities that contribute to nutrient remineralization by catalyzing the degradation of organic substrates. Particularly in coastal environments, the magnitude of variation in enzyme activities across timescales is not well characterized. Therefore, we established the MICRO time series at Newport Pier, California, to assess enzyme activities and other ocean parameters at high temporal resolution in a coastal environment. We hypothesized that enzyme activities would vary most on daily to weekly timescales, but would also show repeatable seasonal patterns. In addition, we expected that activities would correlate with nutrient and chlorophyll concentrations, and that most enzyme activity would be bound to particles. We found that 34-48% of the variation in enzyme activity occurred at timescales <30 days. 28-56% of the variance in seawater nutrient concentrations, chlorophyll concentrations, and ocean currents also occurred on this timescale. Only the enzyme β-glucosidase showed evidence of a repeatable seasonal pattern, with elevated activities in the spring months that correlated with spring phytoplankton blooms in the Southern California Bight. Most enzyme activities were weakly but positively correlated with nutrient concentrations (r = 0.24-0.31 and upwelling (r = 0.29-0.35. For the enzymes β-glucosidase and leucine aminopeptidase, most activity was bound to particles. However, 81.2% of alkaline phosphatase and 42.8% of N-acetyl-glucosaminidase activity was freely dissolved. These results suggest that enzyme-producing bacterial communities and nutrient dynamics in coastal environments vary substantially on short timescales (<30 days. Furthermore, the enzymes that degrade carbohydrates and proteins likely depend on microbial communities attached to particles, whereas phosphorus release may occur throughout the water column.

  6. Temporal Variations of Telluric Water Vapor Absorption at Apache Point Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Blake, Cullen H.; Nidever, David; Halverson, Samuel P.

    2018-01-01

    Time-variable absorption by water vapor in Earth’s atmosphere presents an important source of systematic error for a wide range of ground-based astronomical measurements, particularly at near-infrared wavelengths. We present results from the first study on the temporal and spatial variability of water vapor absorption at Apache Point Observatory (APO). We analyze ∼400,000 high-resolution, near-infrared (H-band) spectra of hot stars collected as calibration data for the APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) survey. We fit for the optical depths of telluric water vapor absorption features in APOGEE spectra and convert these optical depths to Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) using contemporaneous data from a GPS-based PWV monitoring station at APO. Based on simultaneous measurements obtained over a 3° field of view, we estimate that our PWV measurement precision is ±0.11 mm. We explore the statistics of PWV variations over a range of timescales from less than an hour to days. We find that the amplitude of PWV variations within an hour is less than 1 mm for most (96.5%) APOGEE field visits. By considering APOGEE observations that are close in time but separated by large distances on the sky, we find that PWV is homogeneous across the sky at a given epoch, with 90% of measurements taken up to 70° apart within 1.5 hr having ΔPWV < 1.0 mm. Our results can be used to help simulate the impact of water vapor absorption on upcoming surveys at continental observing sites like APO, and also to help plan for simultaneous water vapor metrology that may be carried out in support of upcoming photometric and spectroscopic surveys.

  7. Spatial-temporal variation of ecosystem water use efficiency in Beijing’s suburban region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, F.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, X. C.; Yuan, S. B.; Lu, N.; Yan, N. Na

    2017-08-01

    Suburban ecosystem has multiple functions such as soil conservation and water regulation, which are critical for the welfare of human beings in the city. Water use efficiency (WUE) is an important indicator of ecosystem function that represents the amount of productivity per unit mass of evapotranspiration (ET). Improving WUE of suburban ecosystem is significant to climate regulation by carbon sequestration and water consumption, especially for cities with severe water shortage like Beijing, the capital of China. Based on remote sensing data, this paper examined the spatial and temporal variations in WUE in Beijing’s suburban region from 2002 to 2010. The results showed that the average annual WUE was 0.868 g C mm-1 m-2. It has large spatial variation with the minimum of 0.500 g C mm-1 m-2 in the Miyun District. During the study periods, the area with significant increasing trend of WUE was 63.2% of the total suburban region. In terms of ecosystem type, the value of WUE was following the sequence, deciduous coniferous forest (0.921g C mm-1 m-2) > mixed forest (0.887g C mm-1 m-2) > deciduous broadleaf forest (0.884 g C mm-1 m-2) > shrubland (0.860 g C mm-1 m-2) > evergreen coniferous forest (0.836 g C mm-1 m-2) > grassland (0.830 g C mm-1 m-2). As ET was similar among the ecosystems, the difference in WUE was mainly due to the discrepancy of NPP. We found that NPP significantly correlated with the diversity of ecosystem type (represented by Shannon-Wiener index). Our results suggest that ecological engineering construction, scientific ecosystem type selection, ecosystem diversity improvement and drought-resistant species cultivation are conductive to improve ecosystem WUE in Beijing’s suburban region.

  8. [Temporal variation and geographical distribution: congenital heart defects in the Comunitat Valenciana].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavero Carbonell, C; Zurriaga, O; Pérez Panadés, J; Barona Vilar, C; Martos Jiménez, C

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study is to estimate the prevalence of congenital heart defects (CHD) in the Comunitat Valenciana (CV) in children less than one year old and identify whether there are temporal and geographic variations within this prevalence. The minimum basic data set from hospital discharge reports was used to select patients, who were born between 1999-2008, were less than one year old, and who lived in the CV with at least one hospital admission in which the primary diagnosis and/or any of the events were coded as CHD (codes 745-747 of the International Classification of Diseases 9th Revision Clinical Modification). The first hospital discharge report with CHD was selected, using the health card number to detect duplication. The prevalence and 95% confidence intervals were calculated, and the prevalence ratio (PR) and smoothed PR was obtained for each municipality to identify geographic patterns. In the period 1999-2008 there were 6.377 patients younger than one year with some CHD, representing the 43.2% of cases of congenital anomalies. The prevalence was 134.3 per 10.000 live births (95% CI: 131.1-137.6). There was a significant increase in the prevalence, from 115.8 in the 1999-2003 period to 149.5 in the 2004-2008 period. A higher risk was identified in the north of the CV, and in some municipalities of the province of Alicante, in the south. The observed increase in CHD agrees with the findings in other countries and it can be explained, at least in part, by improved diagnostic techniques. The geographic pattern identified requires a more detailed analysis that could explain the geographic variations found. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Temporal variation in photosynthetically active radiation (par) in mesic southern Appalachian hardwood forests with and without Rhododendron understories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton D. Clinton

    1995-01-01

    Understanding spatial and temporal variation in the understory light regime of southern Appalachian forests is central to understanding regeneration patterns of overstory species. One of the important contributors to this variability is the distribution of evergreen shrub species, primarily Rhododendron maximum L. We measured photosynthetically...

  10. Monitoring temporal development of spatial soil water content variation: comparison of ground penetrating radar and time domain reflectometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, J.A.; Snepvangers, J.J.J.C.; Bouten, W.; Heuvelink, G.B.M.

    2003-01-01

    We compare the capability of ground penetrating radar (GPR) and time domain reflectometry (TDR) to assess the temporal development of spatial variation of surface volumetric water content. In the case of GPR, we measured surface water content with the ground wave, which is a direct wave between the

  11. Temporal and spatial variation of terpenoids in eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) in relation to feeding by Adelges tsugae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony F. Lagalante; Nyssa Lewis; Michael E. Montgomery; Kathleen S. Shields

    2006-01-01

    The terpenoid content of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) foliage was measured over an annual cycle of development from bud opening, shoot elongation, shoot maturation, to bud-break at the start of the next growing season. The objective was to determine if variation in terpenoid composition is linked with spatial and temporal feeding preferences of...

  12. Temporal variations in microbial biomass C and cellulolytic enzyme activity in arable soils: effects of organic matter input

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debosz, K.; Rasmussen, Peter Have; Pedersen, A. R.

    1999-01-01

    -OM). The cultivation systems differed in whether their source of fertiliser was mainly mineral or organic, in whether a winter cover crop was grown, and whether straw was mulched or removed. Sampling occurred at approximately monthly intervals, over a period of two years. Distinct temporal variations in microbial...

  13. Low temporal variation in the intact polar lipid composition of North Sea coastal marine water reveals limited chemotaxonomic value

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandsma, J.; Hopmans, E.C.; Philippart, C.J.M.; Veldhuis, M.J.W.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.S.

    2012-01-01

    Temporal variations in the abundance and composition of intact polar lipids (IPLs) in North Sea coastal marine water were assessed over a one-year seasonal cycle, and compared with environmental parameters and the microbial community composition. Sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG) was the most

  14. Spatial/Temporal Variations of Crime: A Routine Activity Theory Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo, Silas Nogueira; Pereira, Débora V S; Andresen, Martin A; Matias, Lindon Fonseca

    2017-04-01

    Temporal and spatial patterns of crime in Campinas, Brazil, are analyzed considering the relevance of routine activity theory in a Latin American context. We use geo-referenced criminal event data, 2010-2013, analyzing spatial patterns using census tracts and temporal patterns considering seasons, months, days, and hours. Our analyses include difference in means tests, count-based regression models, and Kulldorff's scan test. We find that crime in Campinas, Brazil, exhibits both temporal and spatial-temporal patterns. However, the presence of these patterns at the different temporal scales varies by crime type. Specifically, not all crime types have statistically significant temporal patterns at all scales of analysis. As such, routine activity theory works well to explain temporal and spatial-temporal patterns of crime in Campinas, Brazil. However, local knowledge of Brazilian culture is necessary for understanding a portion of these crime patterns.

  15. Spatial and temporal variations and mobile source emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Quito, Ecuador

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brachtl, Megan V. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Tufts University, Medford, MA (United States)], E-mail: megan.brachtl@gmail.com; Durant, John L. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Tufts University, Medford, MA (United States)], E-mail: john.durant@tufts.edu; Perez, Carlos Paez [Corporacion para el Mejoramiento del Aire de Quito (CORPAIRE), Av. Amazonas 29-25 e Inglaterra. 4th floor. Quito (Ecuador); Oviedo, Jorge [Corporacion para el Mejoramiento del Aire de Quito (CORPAIRE), Av. Amazonas 29-25 e Inglaterra. 4th floor. Quito (Ecuador)], E-mail: joviedo@corpaire.org; Sempertegui, Fernando [Corporacion Ecuatoriana de Biotecnologia, Av. Colon 1468 y nueve de Octubre. Of. 508 Quito (Ecuador)], E-mail: fersempert@andinanet.net; Naumova, Elena N. [School of Medicine, Tufts University, Boston, MA (United States)], E-mail: elena.naumova@tufts.edu; Griffiths, Jeffrey K. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Tufts University, Medford, MA (United States); School of Medicine, Tufts University, Boston, MA (United States)], E-mail: jeff.griffiths@tufts.edu

    2009-02-15

    Motor vehicles are a major source of air pollution in Quito, Ecuador; however, little work has been done to characterize spatial and temporal variations in traffic-related pollutants, or to measure pollutants in vehicle emissions. We measured PAH continuously for one year at two residential sites in Quito, and PAH and traffic patterns for one week near a busy roadway. Morning rush-hour traffic and temperature inversions caused daily PAH maxima between 06:00 and 08:00. SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, CO, and PM{sub 2.5} behaved similarly. At the residential sites PAH levels during inversions were 2-3-fold higher than during the afternoon, and 10-16-fold higher than 02:00-03:00 when levels were lowest. In contrast, at the near-roadway site, PAH concentrations were 3-6-fold higher than at the residential sites, and the effects of inversions were less pronounced. Cars and buses accounted for >95% of PAH at the near-roadway site. Near-roadway PAH concentrations were comparable to other polluted cities. - Atmospheric temperature inversions and proximity to roadways strongly influence potential human exposure to ambient airborne PAH in Quito, Ecuador.

  16. Analyzing the Temporal and Spatial Variation of Fog Days in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Mohammad

    2012-05-01

    In order to study the temporal and spatial variation of fog days in Iran, the data of 115 synoptic meteorological stations have been analyzed for years 1960-2005. The results revealed that different types of fogs form all over the country, apart from central areas of Iran that are located in the big dessert of Iran. Advection fogs are common in the south coast (Persian Gulf) and north coastal (Caspian Sea) regions. Upslope fogs form in the mountainous areas of the northwest and north parts of Iran. This study shows no height dependence relationship on fog days for all types of fogs in overall. The trend analysis of fog days during the last 20 years shows some significant negative and positive trends. The frequency of advection fogs shows positive trends and most upslope fogs show negative trends. The results show that there are suitable places for fog collection projects in the north and south coastal regions during the year, especially in cold months.

  17. Spatio-temporal variations of PM2.5 emission in China from 2005 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Qiang; Fang, Xinyue; Wen, Bo; Shan, Aidang

    2017-09-01

    With the rapid development of economy, air pollution has become increasingly serious nowadays in China, especially for the PM2.5. In this paper, the Spatio-temporal variations of PM2.5 emission over the past decade, from 2005 to 2014, were researched by cartograms. Meanwhile, a complex network technology was adopted to study the spatial auto-correlation of PM2.5 emission. The results showed that every province in China suffered a disparate increment in PM2.5 emission during the past ten years and also indicated that provinces in the same region had a huge influence on each other. There were three sectors including the thermal power, biomass burning and building materials that constituted the major sources of PM2.5 emission and they had different changing trends. There existed a dramatic difference in the east and west of China considering that the amount of PM2.5 was closely related to gross domestic product (GDP) and population. With higher GDP and population, eastern provinces emitted the most amount of PM2.5. Normalization results proposed that most of the provinces were PM2.5 exporting provinces in the southeast of China while most in the northwest were importing provinces. This study can help the policy-makers understand the distribution characteristics of PM2.5 emission and propose the effective strategy to mitigate the pollution of haze. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Structure and temporal variation of the phytoplankton of a macrotidal beach from the Amazon coastal zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JISLENE B. MATOS

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The present study aimed to analyze the structure and the temporal variation of the phytoplankton of Ajuruteua beach (Bragança, Pará and to investigate the influence of environmental variables on the dynamics of this community to provide a basis about the trophic state of this environment. Biological, hydrological and hydrodynamic samplings were performed during a nyctemeral cycle in the months of November/08, March/09, June/09 and September/09. We identified 110 taxa, which were distributed among the diatoms (87.3%, dinoflagellates (11.8% and cyanobacteria (0.9%, with the predominance of neritic species, followed by the tychoplankton species. Chlorophyll-a concentrations were the highest during the rainy period (24.5 mg m-3, whereas total phytoplankton density was higher in the dry period (1,255 x 103 cell L-1. However, phytoflagellates density was significantly higher during the rainy period. Cluster Analysis revealed the formation of four groups, which were influenced by the monthly differences in the environmental variables. The Principal Component Analysis indicated salinity and chlorophyll-a as the main variables that explained the components. Spearman correlation analysis supported the influence of these variables on the local phytoplankton community. Overall, the results obtained suggest that rainfall and strong local hydrodynamics play an important role in the dynamic of the phytoplankton of Ajuruteua beach, by influencing both environmental and biological variables.

  19. Contribution of benthic microalgae to the temporal variation in phytoplankton assemblages in a macrotidal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Fariñas, Tania; Ribeiro, Lourenço; Soudant, Dominique; Belin, Catherine; Bacher, Cédric; Lampert, Luis; Barillé, Laurent

    2017-10-01

    Suspended marine benthic microalgae in the water column reflect the close relationship between the benthic and pelagic components of coastal ecosystems. In this study, a 12-year phytoplankton time-series was used to investigate the contribution of benthic microalgae to the pelagic system at a site along the French-Atlantic coast. Furthermore, all taxa identified were allocated into different growth forms in order to study their seasonal patterns. The highest contribution of benthic microalgae was observed during the winter period, reaching up to 60% of the carbon biomass in the water column. The haptobenthic growth form showed the highest contribution in terms of biomass, dominant in the fall-winter period when the turbidity and the river flow were high. The epipelic growth form did not follow any seasonal pattern. The epiphytic diatom Licmophora was most commonly found during summer. As benthic microalgae were found in the water column throughout the year, the temporal variation detected in the structure of pelagic assemblages in a macrotidal ecosystem was partly derived from the differentiated contribution of several benthic growth forms. © 2017 Phycological Society of America.

  20. Recent temporal variations of trace metal content in an Italian white wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Silvia; Annibaldi, Anna; Truzzi, Cristina; Scarponi, Giuseppe

    2014-09-15

    For the first time in Italy, the temporal variations of Cd, Pb and Cu content in an Italian white wine were studied over the period 1995-2010. A previously set up and optimized Square-Wave Anodic Stripping Voltammetric technique was used. Cd showed a first decrease (∼30%) due to the use of pesticides with progressively low Cd residues. Since 2000 Cd had constant and extremely low values (0.17±0.07 μg L(-1)). A significant decrease (∼74%) from 1995 to 2010 was observed for Pb (mean concentration, 18±10 μg L(-1)) probably due to the recent decrease in Pb emissions in the atmosphere following the phasing out of metal from gasoline (in Italy since 2002). The Cu reduction (mean value, 32±15 μg L(-1)) of ∼74% from 1995 to 2010 was related to the use of phytoiatric products with a progressively low Cu content. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of the temporal variation of air quality in Rome, Italy from 1999 to 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Cattani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to asses the temporal variation (1999 trough 2008 of air quality in Rome, focusing on airborn concentration of selected pollutants (PM10 and PM2.5 mass concentration and particle number concentration, PNC, carbon monoxide, CO, nitrogen oxides, NO and NO2 used for health effects assessment in epidemiological analyses. Time series analysis using Seasonal Kendall test has been applied. A statistically significant decreasing trend was found for primary gaseous pollutants and total particle number concentrations. Moreover a decreasing trend was assessed for PM10, PM2.5 and NO2 measured at traffic oriented sites even if the estimated reduction was lower compared with NO, CO and PNC. The urban background PM10 and NO2 concentrations seem to be practically unchanged since 1999 as no statistically significant trends were found. All the pollutants show higher slope of the estimated trend line at traffic oriented sites compared with those observed at the urban background. Thus a reduction of the intra-city concentration variability throughout the years occurred.

  2. Temporal Aspects of Surface Water Quality Variation Using Robust Statistical Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamu Mustapha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Robust statistical tools were applied on the water quality datasets with the aim of determining the most significance parameters and their contribution towards temporal water quality variation. Surface water samples were collected from four different sampling points during dry and wet seasons and analyzed for their physicochemical constituents. Discriminant analysis (DA provided better results with great discriminatory ability by using five parameters with (P<0.05 for dry season affording more than 96% correct assignation and used five and six parameters for forward and backward stepwise in wet season data with P-value (P<0.05 affording 68.20% and 82%, respectively. Partial correlation results revealed that there are strong (rp=0.829 and moderate (rp=0.614 relationships between five-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5 and chemical oxygen demand (COD, total solids (TS and dissolved solids (DS controlling for the linear effect of nitrogen in the form of ammonia (NH3 and conductivity for dry and wet seasons, respectively. Multiple linear regression identified the contribution of each variable with significant values r = 0.988, R2 = 0.976 and r = 0.970, R2 = 0.942 (P<0.05 for dry and wet seasons, respectively. Repeated measure t-test confirmed that the surface water quality varies significantly between the seasons with significant value P<0.05.

  3. Spatial and temporal variation of freely dissolved PAHs in an urban river undergoing Superfund remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sower, GJ; Anderson, K.A.

    2014-01-01

    Urban rivers with a history of industrial use can exhibit spatial and temporal variations in contaminant concentrations that may significantly affect risk evaluations and even the assessment of remediation efforts. Concentrations of 15 biologically available priority pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured over five years along 18.5 miles of the lower Willamette River using passive sampling devices and HPLC. The study area includes the Portland Harbor Superfund megasite with several PAH sources including remediation operations for coal tar at RM 6.3 west and an additional Superfund site, McCormick and Baxter, at RM 7 east consisting largely of creosote contamination. Study results show that organoclay capping at the McCormick and Baxter Superfund Site reduced PAHs from a pre-cap average of 440 ± 422 ng/L to 8 ± 3 ng/L post-capping. Results also reveal that dredging of submerged coal tar nearly tripled nearby freely dissolved PAH concentrations. For apportioning sources, fluoranthene/ pyrene and phenanthrene/anthracene diagnostic ratios from passive sampling devices were established for creosote and coal tar contamination and compared to published sediment values. PMID:19174872

  4. Temporal variations and scaling of streamflow and baseflow and their nitrate-nitrogen concentrations and loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.-K.; Schilling, K.

    2005-01-01

    The patterns of temporal variations of precipitation (P), streamflow (SF) and baseflow (BF) as well as their nitrate-nitrogen (nitrate) concentrations (C) and loads (L) from a long-term record (28 years) in the Raccoon River, Iowa, were analyzed using variogram and spectral analyses. The daily P is random but scaling may exist in the daily SF and BF with a possible break point in the scaling at about 18 days and 45 days, respectively. The nitrate concentrations and loads are shown to have a half-year cycle while daily P, SF, and BF have a one-year cycle. Furthermore, there may be a low-frequency cycle of 6-8 years in C. The power spectra of C and L in both SF and BF exhibit fractal 1/f scaling with two characteristic frequencies of half-year and one-year, and are fitted well with the spectrum of the gamma distribution. The nitrate input to SF and BF at the Raccoon watershed seems likely to be a white noise process superimposed on another process with a half-year and one-year cycle. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Temporal variation of soil entomofauna from an urban forest fragment in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Custodio Lopes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Insects are important environmental bioindicators, due to the species diversity and wide range of habitats occupied. The present study evaluated the temporal variation in composition and abundance of soil insects in an urban forest fragment in the municipality of Toledo, in the state of Paraná, by analyzing their abundance and seasonality. Monthly samplings were conducted between August 2011 and July 2012 at four sampling sites within the fragment. At each site, three pitfall traps remained exposed for 48 hours. Captured insects were fixed in alcohol, sorted and identified. Throughout the study period, we captured 11,568 insects from 11 orders and 35 families. Coleoptera was the richest order (12 families, followed by Diptera and Hemiptera (5, Hymenoptera and Orthoptera (3. The order Hymenoptera was the most abundant (4,789 individuals, followed by Coleoptera (4,630 and Diptera (1,985. Coleoptera was represented mainly by the families Staphylinidae and Silphidae. Formicidae (Hymenoptera was the least abundant in colder months. Collembola was positively correlated with soil moisture. In general, the insect fauna in the forest fragment exhibited characteristics of the fauna from impacted habitats, that is, low diversity of families and dominance of generalist groups.

  6. A review on palaeogeographic implications and temporal variation in glaucony composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santanu Banerjee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a review on palaeogeographic implications and temporal variations of glaucony covering both modern and ancient records. Phanerozoic glaucony preferably forms in a shelf depositional setting. Deep marine conditions and low seawater temperature discourage formation of glaucony. Around 75% of glaucony is recorded from the Cretaceous to the Holocene sediments, which are related to the abundance of the most common substrates, faecal pellets and bioclasts. TFe2O3 (total, Al2O3, K2O and MgO contents of glaucony vary appreciably through geological time. While TFe2O3 content of most Mesozoic and Cenozoic glaucony exceeds 20%, it is always less than 20% in Precambrian varieties. High K2O, Al2O3, MgO and low TFe2O3 distinguish the Precambrian glaucony from its Phanerozoic counterpart. Precambrian glaucony, preferably formed within a K-feldspar substrate, is always rich in potassium irrespective of its degree of evolution, while high K-content in Phanerozoic evolved glaucony indicates significant stratigraphic condensation. K2O vs. TFe2O3 relationship of glaucony exhibits three different evolutionary trends corresponding to three common modes of origin. Depositional conditions may influence the composition of glaucony as slightly reducing conditions favour Fe enrichment, whereas oxidising conditions cause Fe depletion in glaucony.

  7. Temporal Patterns of Shrub Vegetation and Variation with Precipitation in Gurbantunggut Desert, Central Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuguang Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between shrub vegetation and precipitation is one important component of desert vegetation responses to climate change, but it has not been understood completely because of its complexity and nonlinearity. In this study, we used MODIS NDVI data and precipitation data from 2004 to 2012 to evaluate the relationship between the shrub vegetation and precipitation within Gurbantunggut Desert, Central Asia. Correlation analysis was employed to explore the relationship between NDVI and precipitation within growing season, within cross growing season, and on interannual scale. The results showed that NDVI could be classified into three temporal changing patterns within growing season, and NDVI was significantly correlated with the precipitation integrated by time durations and time lags within growing season; NDVI was significantly correlated with precipitation in the early growing season, but this relationship was not so obvious in the middle or late growing season; and the NDVI variational patterns depended on mean annual precipitation and the distribution of precipitation throughout the year. Precipitation had significant influence on shrub vegetation within Gurbantunggut Desert. Our findings provide basic knowledge for the relationship between precipitation and shrub vegetation, and it is helpful to understand how the desert vegetation responds to climate change in the future.

  8. Impact of temporal variation on design and analysis of mouse knockout phenotyping studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha A Karp

    Full Text Available A significant challenge facing high-throughput phenotyping of in-vivo knockout mice is ensuring phenotype calls are robust and reliable. Central to this problem is selecting an appropriate statistical analysis that models both the experimental design (the workflow and the way control mice are selected for comparison with knockout animals and the sources of variation. Recently we proposed a mixed model suitable for small batch-oriented studies, where controls are not phenotyped concurrently with mutants. Here we evaluate this method both for its sensitivity to detect phenotypic effects and to control false positives, across a range of workflows used at mouse phenotyping centers. We found the sensitivity and control of false positives depend on the workflow. We show that the phenotypes in control mice fluctuate unexpectedly between batches and this can cause the false positive rate of phenotype calls to be inflated when only a small number of batches are tested, when the effect of knockout becomes confounded with temporal fluctuations in control mice. This effect was observed in both behavioural and physiological assays. Based on this analysis, we recommend two approaches (workflow and accompanying control strategy and associated analyses, which would be robust, for use in high-throughput phenotyping pipelines. Our results show the importance in modelling all sources of variability in high-throughput phenotyping studies.

  9. Utilizing temporal variations in chemotherapeutic response to improve breast cancer treatment efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. McGrail

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Though survival rates for women with stage I breast cancer have radically improved, treatment options remain poor for the 40% of women diagnosed with later-stage disease. For these patients, improved chemotherapeutic treatment strategies are critical to eradicate any disseminated tumor cells. Despite many promising new drugs in vitro, most ultimately fail in the clinic. One aspect often lost during testing is in vivo circulation half-lives rarely exceed 24 hours, whereas in vitro studies involve drug exposure for 2-3 days. Here, we show how mimicking these exposure times alters efficacy. Next, using this model we show how drug response is highly time-dependent by extending analysis of cell viability out to two weeks. Variations in response both with feeding and time were dependent on drug mechanism of action. Finally, we show that by implementing this temporal knowledge of drug effects to optimize scheduling of drug administration we are able to regain chemosensitivity in a Carboplatin-resistant cell line.

  10. Spatial and temporal variations of mercury levels in Okefenokee invertebrates: Southeast Georgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Bagie M. [Department of Entomology, University of Georgia, 413 Biological Sciences Building, Athens, GA 30602 (United States)], E-mail: bgeorge@ggc.usg.edu; Batzer, Darold [Department of Entomology, University of Georgia, 413 Biological Sciences Building, Athens, GA 30602 (United States)

    2008-03-15

    Accumulation of mercury in wetland ecosystems has raised concerns about impacts on wetland food webs. This study measured concentrations of mercury in invertebrates of the Okefenokee Swamp in Georgia, focusing on levels in amphipods, odonates, and crayfish. We collected and analyzed total mercury levels in these invertebrates from 32 sampling stations across commonly occurring sub-habitats. Sampling was conducted in December, May, and August over a two-year period. The highest levels of mercury were detected in amphipods, with total mercury levels often in excess of 20 ppm. Bioaccumulation pathways of mercury in invertebrates of the Okefenokee are probably complex; despite being larger and higher in the food chain, levels in odonates and crayfish were much lower than in amphipods. Mercury levels in invertebrates varied temporally with the highest levels detected in May. There was a lack of spatial variation in mercury levels which is consistent with aerial deposition of mercury. - This study measured mercury levels in invertebrates and found the highest levels in amphipods.

  11. Temporal variation of surface chlorophyll a in the Romanian near-shore waters

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    D. VASILIU

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Chlorophyll a (Chl a dynamics in the near-shore waters of the NW Black Sea was investigated between 2002 and 2010 in the Mamaia Bay (north of Constanta, Romania in relation to some physical-chemical parameters. Chl a ranged from values below detection limit (0.17 μg.l–1 to 76.13 μg.l–1, and showed large temporal variability (CV = 142.3%, strongly related to the Danube’s discharges, meteorological conditions, and anthropogenic pressures. Seasonally, Chl a showed a winter/early spring maximum, sometimes followed by a stronger one in April/early May, closely linked to the Danube’s higher discharges in spring. After significantly lower concentrations in late spring/early summer, Chl a exhibited its strongest maximum in summer (July-August, followed by another one in autumn (late September–October. Interannual variation of Chl a seems to be controlled by the hydrometeorological conditions in summer. Thus, the highest annual Chl a means were observed in 2006 (8.56 ± 8.35 μg.l–1 and 2010 (9.20 ± 11.72 μg.l -1, when, also, the summer Chl a concentrations were maximal due to the large riverine discharges. The lowest annual Chl a mean was observed in 2004 (4.57 ± 9.81μg.l–1, closely linked to minimal summer Chl a resulted from a strong P limitation during summertime.

  12. Spatio-temporal structure and cycle to cycle variations of an in-cylinder tumbling flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voisine, M. [RENAULT s.a.s., Fluid Engine Department, Lardy (France); Universite de Poitiers, Institut Pprime Department, FTC, CNRS, ENSMA, Teleport 2, 1 Avenue Clement Ader, BP 40109, Futuroscope Chasseneuil (France); Thomas, L.; Boree, J. [Universite de Poitiers, Institut Pprime Department, FTC, CNRS, ENSMA, Teleport 2, 1 Avenue Clement Ader, BP 40109, Futuroscope Chasseneuil (France); Rey, P. [RENAULT s.a.s., Fluid Engine Department, Lardy (France)

    2011-05-15

    The aim of this paper is to make use of PIV and high-speed PIV in a research engine of moderate tumbling ratio in order to analyze both the spatial structure of the flow and its temporal evolution during series of consecutive cycles. Appropriate analyzing tools are introduced, and four different points are addressed: (1) the chain of events driving the generation of the three-dimensional mean tumbling motion is investigated; (2) a Lagrangian analysis of the roll-up of the tumbling jet in individual cycles demonstrates a strong cycle to cycle variation during the compression phase (the rms of the position of the jet front being approximately 10% of the piston stroke); (3) focussing on the ''breakdown'' phase, phase invariant proper orthogonal decomposition enables us to distinguish cycles according to their structure near top dead center (TDC). We show that when the coherent energy of the flow is conserved, there is no increase in the fluctuating kinetic energy; (4) finally, the phase-averaged Reynolds stresses is decomposed into a contribution of the in-cycle coherence and the turbulence carried by the flow states. Approximately 30% of the fluctuating kinetic energy is due to cycle to cycle fluctuations in this chamber near TDC. (orig.)

  13. Spatial-temporal variations of surface ozone and ozone control strategy for Northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, G.; Wang, Y.; Li, X.; Ji, D.; Gao, X.

    2011-09-01

    The Project of Atmospheric Combined Pollution Monitoring over Beijing and its Surrounding Areas, was an intensive field campaign conducted over northern China between June 2009 and September 2011 to provide an in-depth understanding and a comprehensive record of ozone (O3), respirable suspended particulate (PM10), fine particle (PM2.5), nitrogen oxides (NOx), volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other air pollutants in this quickly developing region of China. In this campaign, 25 stations in an air-quality monitoring network provided regional-scale spatial coverage. In this study, we analyzed the data on O3 and NOx levels obtained at the 22 sites over northern China between 1 September 2009 and 31 August 2010. Our goal was to investigate the O3 spatial-temporal variations and control strategy in this area. Significant diurnal, and seasonal variations were noted, with the highest concentrations typically found at around 03:00 p.m. (LT) and in June. The lowest concentrations were generally found during early morning hours (around 06:00 a.m.) and in December. Compared with July and August, June has increased photochemical production due to decreasing cloudiness coupled with reduced O3 loss due to less dry deposition, inducing an O3 peak appearing in June. The averaged O3 concentrations were lower in the plains area compared with the mountainous area due to the titration effects of high NOx emissions in urban areas. When the characteristics of O3 pollution in different regions were distinguished by factor analysis, we found high levels of O3 that exceeded China's National Standard throughout the plains areas, especially over Beijing and the surrounding areas. An integrated analysis with emissions data, meteorological data, and topography over northern China found that the meteorological results were the main factors that dominated the spatial variations of O3, with the presence of abundant emissions of precursors in this area. The smog production algorithm and space

  14. Spatial and temporal variation of the ichthyoplankton in the Laguna El Quelele, Nayarit, Mexico

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    Navarro-Rodríguez, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Estuarine systems are the most important natural aquatic resources because, from the perspective of the fish community, they include a large number of individuals and biomass, where larvae and juveniles are especially abundant. Thanks to the implementation of Ichthyoplanktonic studies, the areas of concentration of adults in reproductive stage and potentially exploitable species are detected and evaluated, generating the basis for establishing measures for rational use and conservation. This paper analyzes the composition of fish larvae in the lagoon El Quelele in Bahia de Banderas, Nayarit. 20 daytime superficial zooplanktonic trawls were conducted by using a standard “Zeppelin” net seasonally from spring to winter 2002. From the 20 samples obtained, larvae density was 573.51 org/1000 m3. Its ichthyoplanktonic group was represented by 11 families with 12 genres and 10 species, where Engraulis mordax (40.21 %, Eucinostomus sp. (22.68 %, Trachurus sp. (15.46 % and Dormitator latifrons (13.14 % presented greater percentage of relative abundance, while in the rest of the organisms, relative abundance was represented between 7.47 to 0.25 %. Regarding temporal variation, the highest relative abundance was presented in fall with 44.74 and the lowest during the winter with 4.85 %, with moderate average temperature records of 29.1 and 30.8 °C respectively, and low salinity (24.2 psu. While spatial variation was better represented in site 3 with relative abundance 29.41 % and site 4 with the lower value during the study period (9.2 % at temperatures ranging from 22 °C to 35 °C and salinity of 24 psu to 34 psu. On the other hand, in spring and fall they showed greater diversity, greater richness and therefore these are the seasons with greatest equity in summer and winter. Cluster analysis applied to the species-variable sampling sites showed greater similarity or affinity between sites 3 and 5 (72.2 %, similarly, variables season – species along

  15. Temporal and Spatial Variation of Chemical Water Quality in a Contour Canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, L. A.; Lunn, R. J.

    2004-12-01

    variation and the canal's biological status were carried out. Velocity metering in the canal identified extremely low flow rates ~0.15m3s-1. A tracer testing procedure for the canal's low flow conditions was designed and implemented which identified a lack of rapid dispersion processes with D~0.133m3s-1. Water quality sampling consisted of a year-long programme of high frequency temporal and spatial sampling along the canal length. Observations demonstrate significant variability, with widely differing measurements of DO as little as 5m apart. In addition, spot samples of water quality taken from individual incoming field drains showed PO4-P concentrations up to 2mgl-1, with a predominance of nutrient bound clay and silt sediments that ultimately settle on the canal bed. Due to low dispersion rates, residence times for pollutants are long and field drains, in combination with navigational activity, may well be one of the primary causes of raised nutrient levels at some locations. This research has shown that canal water quality is highly spatially and temporally variable; far in excess of the variability normally found in river systems. This is mainly determined by a lack of hydraulic mixing and the presence of small quantities of incoming runoff water of very low quality. Whilst low in volume, incoming sediment from the drains appears to strongly influence the nearby canal water quality. These results have important consequences both for future monitoring strategies of canals and management of their gradual ecological improvement.

  16. Model-assisted analysis of spatial and temporal variations in fruit temperature and transpiration highlighting the role of fruit development.

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    Thibault Nordey

    Full Text Available Fruit physiology is strongly affected by both fruit temperature and water losses through transpiration. Fruit temperature and its transpiration vary with environmental factors and fruit characteristics. In line with previous studies, measurements of physical and thermal fruit properties were found to significantly vary between fruit tissues and maturity stages. To study the impact of these variations on fruit temperature and transpiration, a modelling approach was used. A physical model was developed to predict the spatial and temporal variations of fruit temperature and transpiration according to the spatial and temporal variations of environmental factors and thermal and physical fruit properties. Model predictions compared well to temperature measurements on mango fruits, making it possible to accurately simulate the daily temperature variations of the sunny and shaded sides of fruits. Model simulations indicated that fruit development induced an increase in both the temperature gradient within the fruit and fruit water losses, mainly due to fruit expansion. However, the evolution of fruit characteristics has only a very slight impact on the average temperature and the transpiration per surface unit. The importance of temperature and transpiration gradients highlighted in this study made it necessary to take spatial and temporal variations of environmental factors and fruit characteristics into account to model fruit physiology.

  17. Identifying temporal variation in reported births, deaths and movements of cattle in Britain

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    Christley Rob M

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The accuracy of predicting disease occurrence using epidemic models relies on an understanding of the system or population under investigation. At the time of the Foot and Mouth disease (FMD outbreak of 2001, there were limited reports in the literature as to the cattle population structure in Britain. In this paper we examine the temporal patterns of cattle births, deaths, imports and movements occurring within Britain, reported to the Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA through the British Cattle Movement service (BCMS during the period 1st January 2002 to 28th February 2005. Results In Britain, the number of reported cattle births exhibit strong seasonality characterised by a large spring peak followed by a smaller autumn peak. Other event types also exhibit strong seasonal trends; both the reported number of cattle slaughtered and "on-farm" cattle deaths increase during the final part of the year. After allowing for seasonal components by smoothing the data, we illustrate that there is very little remaining non-seasonal trend in the number of cattle births, "on-farm" deaths, slaughterhouse deaths, on- and off-movements. However after allowing for seasonal fluctuations the number of cattle imports has been decreasing since 2002. Reporting of movements, births and deaths was more frequent on certain days of the week. For instance, greater numbers of cattle were slaughtered on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Evidence for digit preference was found in the reporting of births and "on-farm" deaths with particular bias towards over reporting on the 1st, 10th and 20th of each month. Conclusion This study provides insight into the population and movement dynamics of the British cattle population. Although the population is in constant flux, seasonal and long term trends can be identified in the number of reported births, deaths and movements of cattle. Incorporating this temporal variation in epidemic

  18. Spatial and temporal variation in dissolved organic carbon composition in a peaty catchment draining a windfarm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ying; Waldron, Susan; Flowers, Hugh

    2015-04-01

    Peatlands are an important terrestrial carbon reserve and a principal source of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to the fluvial environment (Wallage et al. 2006). Recently it has been observed that DOC concentrations [DOC] in surface waters have increased in Europe and North America (Monteith et al. 2007). This has been attributed primarily to reduced acid deposition. However, land use change can also release C from peat soils. A significant land use change in Scotland is hosting windfarms. Whether windfarm construction causes such impacts has been a research focus, particularly considering fluvial losses, but usually assessing if there are changes in DOC concentration rather than composition. Our study area is a peaty catchment that hosts wind turbines, has peat restoration activities and forest felling and is drained by two streams. We are using UV-visible and fluorescence spectrophotometry to assess if there are differences between the two steams or temporal changes in DOC composition. We will present data from samples collected since February 2014. The parameters we are focusing on are SUVA254, E4/E6 and E2/E4 ratios as these are indicators of DOC aromaticity, humic acid (HA): fulvic acid (FA) ratio and the proportion of humic substances in DOC (Weishaar, 2003; Spencer et al. 2007; Graham et al. 2012). To assess these we have measured UV-visible absorbance spectra from 200 nm to 800 nm. Meanwhile sample fluorescence emission and excitation matrix (EEM) will be applied with the PARAFAC model to obtain more information about the variations in humic substances in this catchment. Our current analysis indicates spatial differences not only in DOC concentration but also in composition. For example, the mainstem draining the windfarm area had a smaller [DOC] but higher E4/E6 and lower E2/E4 ratio values than the tributary draining an area of felled forestry. This may be indicative of more HAs in the mainstem DOC. Seasonal variations have also been observed. Both streams

  19. Global Spatial and Temporal Variation of Cd:P in Euphotic Zone Particulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, H.; Bishop, J. K. B.; Wood, T.

    2014-12-01

    The merits of dissolved cadmium as a paleo-proxy for phosphorus has long been discussed. Dissolved ratios of Cd:P (nmol/µmol) have been shown in previous studies to be relatively constant in deep-water samples. Younger Atlantic waters typically have dissolved Cd:P of about 0.2 while older Pacific waters have a higher value of 0.36. The mid-water dissolved Cd:P differences between the Atlantic and Pacific represent an integrated signature of remineralized particulates over a span of hundreds to 1,000 years. The trends of upper ocean dissolved Cd:P suggest regional differences exist due to differences in phytoplankton uptake and particle export. Particles turn over quickly (week time scales in near surface waters - year time scales at 1000 m) and therefore direct analysis can be used to understand what causes variability in the Cd:P ratios in different phytoplankton communities under a variety of conditions. To address the drivers of inter-ocean variation, concentrations of elements, in particular Cd, Co, Zn and P were determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass-Spectrometry in size-fractionated particulates collected using the Multiple Unit Large Volume in-situ Filtration System (MULVFS) from the upper 1000 m at the 34 different locations throughout the Atlantic, Pacific and Southern Oceans since 1991. The MULVFS technique simultaneously collects samples in three size fractions from thousands of liters of water: 51 μm. The collection sites have wide spatial and temporal distribution, allowing us to study the effects of an El Nino, upwelling, large scale in-situ Fe fertilization, anoxic conditions, a phytoplankton bloom and subsequent decline, and seasonal variation of Cd:P in particulates. Overall, Cd:P tends to be higher (typically 1-2 pmol/nmol) in particulates gathered in biologically dynamic waters, especially in High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll (HNLC) areas such as the subarctic north Pacific, equatorial Pacific, and Southern Ocean, and in Upwelling areas, and

  20. Characterizing the spatial and temporal variation of malaria incidence in Bangladesh, 2007

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    Reid Heidi L

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria remains a significant health problem in Bangladesh affecting 13 of 64 districts. The risk of malaria is variable across the endemic areas and throughout the year. A better understanding of the spatial and temporal patterns in malaria risk and the determinants driving the variation are crucial for the appropriate targeting of interventions under the National Malaria Control and Prevention Programme. Methods Numbers of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax malaria cases reported by month in 2007, across the 70 endemic thanas (sub-districts in Bangladesh, were assembled from health centre surveillance reports. Bayesian Poisson regression models of incidence were constructed, with fixed effects for monthly rainfall, maximum temperature and elevation, and random effects for thanas, with a conditional autoregressive prior spatial structure. Results The annual incidence of reported cases was 34.0 and 9.6 cases/10,000 population for P. falciparum and P. vivax respectively and the population of the 70 malaria-endemic thanas was approximately 13.5 million in 2007. Incidence of reported cases for both types of malaria was highest in the mountainous south-east of the country (the Chittagong Hill Tracts. Models revealed statistically significant positive associations between the incidence of reported P. vivax and P. falciparum cases and rainfall and maximum temperature. Conclusions The risk of P. falciparum and P. vivax was spatially variable across the endemic thanas of Bangladesh and also highly seasonal, suggesting that interventions should be targeted and timed according to the risk profile of the endemic areas. Rainfall, temperature and elevation are major factors driving the spatiotemporal patterns of malaria in Bangladesh.

  1. Understanding spatio-temporal variation of vegetation phenology and rainfall seasonality in the monsoon Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suepa, Tanita; Qi, Jiaguo; Lawawirojwong, Siam; Messina, Joseph P

    2016-05-01

    The spatio-temporal characteristics of remote sensing are considered to be the primary advantage in environmental studies. With long-term and frequent satellite observations, it is possible to monitor changes in key biophysical attributes such as phenological characteristics, and relate them to climate change by examining their correlations. Although a number of remote sensing methods have been developed to quantify vegetation seasonal cycles using time-series of vegetation indices, there is limited effort to explore and monitor changes and trends of vegetation phenology in the Monsoon Southeast Asia, which is adversely affected by changes in the Asian monsoon climate. In this study, MODIS EVI and TRMM time series data, along with field survey data, were analyzed to quantify phenological patterns and trends in the Monsoon Southeast Asia during 2001-2010 period and assess their relationship with climate change in the region. The results revealed a great regional variability and inter-annual fluctuation in vegetation phenology. The phenological patterns varied spatially across the region and they were strongly correlated with climate variations and land use patterns. The overall phenological trends appeared to shift towards a later and slightly longer growing season up to 14 days from 2001 to 2010. Interestingly, the corresponding rainy season seemed to have started earlier and ended later, resulting in a slightly longer wet season extending up to 7 days, while the total amount of rainfall in the region decreased during the same time period. The phenological shifts and changes in vegetation growth appeared to be associated with climate events such as EL Niño in 2005. Furthermore, rainfall seemed to be the dominant force driving the phenological changes in naturally vegetated areas and rainfed croplands, whereas land use management was the key factor in irrigated agricultural areas. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Spatial and temporal variation in fish community of the Ria de Aveiro estuarine lagoon (Portugal.

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    Eva García-Seoane

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Fish assemblages of Ria de Aveiro coastal lagoon (Northwest Portugal were studied from February 2012 and January 2013. Sampling were monthly conducted with a traditional beach-seine net (“chincha” at 9 sites. Multivariate approach were used in order to analyse the spatial and temporal variation in fish community. A total of 58,201 fishes, weighting 249,540 g, were identified, representing 37 taxa and 21 families. Four taxa (Atherina spp., Dicentrarchus labrax, Liza spp., and Sardina pilchardus were responsible for 94.7% and 85.4% of the total abundance, in number and weight. There were significant differences in fish community, in terms of fish number and weight, between sites and between months (ANOSIM, p<0.01. A total of 12 species appeared as characteristics of one of more sampling sites either in terms of number and weight. In both cases, D. labrax, Liza spp. and Atherina spp. were typical throughout the study area. Other species, such as Spondyliosoma cantharus appeared as typical only in the part of the lagoon more influenced by marine waters, whereas Anguilla anguilla was typical of the inner area. A total of 11 (in number or 13 (in weight species appeared as typical of at least one month of the year. Liza spp. and Atherina spp. were typical all the year round for number and weight data. In both cases, D. labrax, Diplodus spp. and S. pilchardus, appeared as a typical from spring to autumn. The number of typical species varied with the season, being maximum in May and minimum in winter. Finally, results of this work were discussed in comparison to previous studies.

  3. Spatial and temporal variation of water quality in the coastal lagoons of Sinaloa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez-Osuna, F.; Lopez-Aguiar, L. K.; Del Río-Chuljak, A.; Ruiz-Fernandez, A. C.

    2007-05-01

    The Mexican state of Sinaloa has 656 km of coastline and 221,600 ha of coastal lagoons, and is characterized by a high fishing and agriculture activity. It is well known that agricultural activities constitute a major factor affecting the water quality in the coastal waters. The current study focused on the 6 more important coastal lagoons of Sinaloa (Topolobampo-Ohuira-Santa María, Navachiste-San Ignacio-Macapule, Santa María-La Reforma, Altata-Ensenada del Pabellón, Ceuta and Teacapán-Agua Brava) with the aim to evaluate the water quality spatial and temporal variation at the lagoons (physico-chemical parameters, nutrients (N, P and Si), dissolved oxygen, total suspended solids and chlorophyll a) and to assess its eutrophication status. The water samples were collected in several stations at each lagoon (between 9 and 23 stations depending on the lagoon area) at low and high tides, during three different weather periods (dry-warm, rainy and dry-cold seasons) between May 2004 and April 2005. Mean concentrations of nutrients (μM), dissolved oxygen (mg/L) and chlorophyll a (mg/m3) obtained for each variable were comparable between lagoons (total N=51±45; total P= 2.5±1.5; Si=23±31; DO=6.7±1.8; Chll=1.7±1.9) although seasonal and spatial differences were observed at each lagoon. The nutrient concentrations measured fell in the typical concentration intervals for coastal lagoons; however, critical sampling points were identified and related to direct discharges of untreated effluents from municipal wastes, aquaculture farms and agriculture drain ditches.

  4. Examining Spatio-Temporal Intensity-Frequency Variations in Extreme Monsoon Rainfall using High Resolution Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devak, M.; Rajendran, V.; C T, D.

    2015-12-01

    The study of extreme events has gained the attention of hydrologists in recent times. Though these events are rare, the effects are catastrophic. It is reported that the frequency of the occurrence of these events has increased in recent decades, and is attributed to the recent revelation of climate change. Numerous studies have pointed out significant changes in extremely heavy precipitation over India, using coarse resolution data. Though there are disagreements in the results and its spatial uniformity, all these studies emphasize the need of fine resolution analysis. Fine resolution analysis is necessary mainly due to the highly heterogeneous characteristics of Indian monsoon, and for the proper employment in flood hazard preparedness and water resources management. The present study aims to analyse the spatio-temporal variation and trends in the intensity and frequency of heavy precipitation during Indian monsoon using 0.25°×0.25° resolution gridded data for a period of 113 years (1901-2013). The exceedance threshold is fixed at 90th percentile of rainfall over 113 years and parameters are defined accordingly. The maximum intensity of each extreme rainfall episode of 30 year moving window has been modelled using Peak Over Threshold based Extreme Value Theory to compute return level (considered for intensity). In addition, the number of such episodes in a particular year has been termed as frequency. Non-parametric Mann-Kendall test has been carried out for both intensity and frequency, to compute the statistical trend. In addition, moving block bootstrap approach has been used to incorporate the serial correlation. The significance of the trend has been evaluated at different significance levels and finally, change in trend over last century has been examined.

  5. Temporal stability of epigenetic markers: sequence characteristics and predictors of short-term DNA methylation variations.

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    Hyang-Min Byun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism that has been increasingly investigated in observational human studies, particularly on blood leukocyte DNA. Characterizing the degree and determinants of DNA methylation stability can provide critical information for the design and conduction of human epigenetic studies. METHODS: We measured DNA methylation in 12 gene-promoter regions (APC, p16, p53, RASSF1A, CDH13, eNOS, ET-1, IFNγ, IL-6, TNFα, iNOS, and hTERT and 2 of non-long terminal repeat elements, i.e., L1 and Alu in blood samples obtained from 63 healthy individuals at baseline (Day 1 and after three days (Day 4. DNA methylation was measured by bisulfite-PCR-Pyrosequencing. We calculated intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs to measure the within-individual stability of DNA methylation between Day 1 and 4, subtracted of pyrosequencing error and adjusted for multiple covariates. RESULTS: Methylation markers showed different temporal behaviors ranging from high (IL-6, ICC = 0.89 to low stability (APC, ICC = 0.08 between Day 1 and 4. Multiple sequence and marker characteristics were associated with the degree of variation. Density of CpG dinucleotides nearby the sequence analyzed (measured as CpG(o/e or G+C content within ±200 bp was positively associated with DNA methylation stability. The 3' proximity to repeat elements and range of DNA methylation on Day 1 were also positively associated with methylation stability. An inverted U-shaped correlation was observed between mean DNA methylation on Day 1 and stability. CONCLUSIONS: The degree of short-term DNA methylation stability is marker-dependent and associated with sequence characteristics and methylation levels.

  6. Spatial and temporal variation in fungal endophyte communities isolated from cultivated cotton (Gossypium hirsutum.

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    María J Ek-Ramos

    Full Text Available Studies of fungi in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum cultivated in the United States have largely focused on monitoring and controlling plant pathogens. Given increasing interest in asymptomatic fungal endophytes as potential biological control agents, surveys are needed to better characterize their diversity, distribution patterns and possible applications in integrated pest management. We sampled multiple varieties of cotton in Texas, USA and tested for temporal and spatial variation in fungal endophyte diversity and community composition, as well as for differences associated with organic and conventional farming practices. Fungal isolates were identified by morphological and DNA identification methods. We found members of the genera Alternaria, Colletotrichum and Phomopsis, previously isolated as endophytes from other plant species. Other recovered species such as Drechslerella dactyloides (formerly Arthrobotrys dactyloides and Exserohilum rostratum have not, to our knowledge, been previously reported as endophytes in cotton. We also isolated many latent pathogens, but some species such as Alternaria tennuissima, Epicoccum nigrum, Acremonium alternatum, Cladosporium cladosporioides, Chaetomium globosum and Paecilomyces sp., are known to be antagonists against plant pathogens, insects and nematode pests. We found no differences in endophyte species richness or diversity among different cotton varieties, but did detect differences over time and in different plant tissues. No consistent patterns of community similarity associated with variety, region, farming practice, time of the season or tissue type were observed regardless of the ecological community similarity measurements used. Results indicated that local fungal endophyte communities may be affected by both time of the year and plant tissue, but the specific community composition varies across sites. In addition to providing insights into fungal endophyte community structure, our survey

  7. Temporal variations of mobile carbohydrates in Abies fargesii at the upper tree limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, H S; Zhang, K R; Zhang, Q F; Xu, Y M

    2015-01-01

    Low temperatures are associated high-altitude treelines, but the functional mechanism of treeline formation remains controversial. The relative contributions of carbon limitation (source activity) and growth limitation (sink activity) require more tests across taxa and regions. We examined temporal variations of mobile carbon supply in different tissues of Abies fargesii across treeline ecotones on north- and south-facing slopes of the Qinling Mountains, China. Non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) concentrations in tissues along the altitudinal gradient on both slopes changed significantly in the early and late growing season, but not in the mid-growing season, indicating the season-dependent carbon supply status. Late in the growing season on both slopes, trees at the upper limits had the highest NSC concentrations and total soluble sugars and lowest starch concentrations compared to trees at the lower elevations. NSC concentrations tended to increase in needles and branches throughout the growing season with increasing elevation on both slopes, but declined in roots and stems. NSC concentrations across sampling dates also indicated increases in needles and branches, and decreases in roots and stem with increasing elevation. Overall altitudinal trends of NSC in A. fargesii revealed no depletion of mobile carbon reserves at upper elevation limits, suggesting limitation of sink activity dominates tree life across treeline ecotones in both north- and south-facing slopes. Carbon reserves in storage tissues (especially roots) in the late growing season might also play an important role in winter survival and early growth in spring at upper elevations on both slopes, which define the uppermost limit of A. fargesii. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  8. Spatial and temporal variation in fungal endophyte communities isolated from cultivated cotton (Gossypium hirsutum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ek-Ramos, María J; Zhou, Wenqing; Valencia, César U; Antwi, Josephine B; Kalns, Lauren L; Morgan, Gaylon D; Kerns, David L; Sword, Gregory A

    2013-01-01

    Studies of fungi in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) cultivated in the United States have largely focused on monitoring and controlling plant pathogens. Given increasing interest in asymptomatic fungal endophytes as potential biological control agents, surveys are needed to better characterize their diversity, distribution patterns and possible applications in integrated pest management. We sampled multiple varieties of cotton in Texas, USA and tested for temporal and spatial variation in fungal endophyte diversity and community composition, as well as for differences associated with organic and conventional farming practices. Fungal isolates were identified by morphological and DNA identification methods. We found members of the genera Alternaria, Colletotrichum and Phomopsis, previously isolated as endophytes from other plant species. Other recovered species such as Drechslerella dactyloides (formerly Arthrobotrys dactyloides) and Exserohilum rostratum have not, to our knowledge, been previously reported as endophytes in cotton. We also isolated many latent pathogens, but some species such as Alternaria tennuissima, Epicoccum nigrum, Acremonium alternatum, Cladosporium cladosporioides, Chaetomium globosum and Paecilomyces sp., are known to be antagonists against plant pathogens, insects and nematode pests. We found no differences in endophyte species richness or diversity among different cotton varieties, but did detect differences over time and in different plant tissues. No consistent patterns of community similarity associated with variety, region, farming practice, time of the season or tissue type were observed regardless of the ecological community similarity measurements used. Results indicated that local fungal endophyte communities may be affected by both time of the year and plant tissue, but the specific community composition varies across sites. In addition to providing insights into fungal endophyte community structure, our survey provides

  9. Spatial and temporal variations in the occurrence of low flow events in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Young

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Information on the magnitude and variability of low river flows at the river reach scale is central to most aspects of water resource and water quality management. Within the UK, river stretches with permanent gauging stations represent less than one percent of the total number of river stretches mapped at a scale of 1:50,000 and fewer that 20% of gauged catchments can be regarded as having natural flow regimes. This has led to the development of simple, multivariate models for predicting average annual natural flow duration statistics through relationships with catchment characteristics. One assumption within these models is that low flows occur at the same time at all points within a catchment, irrespective of the hydrogeological nature and climatic condition of the catchment. This paper discusses the implications of spatial variations in the timing of low flow events for this type of model. Differences in the timing of the mean day of occurrence of the annual Q95 flow in UK catchments can be identified with low flows occurring earlier in the year within impermeable dry catchments and later in the year for wet permeable catchments. However, any differences in the mean day of occurrence between different catchments are generally masked by the magnitude of the inter-year variability in the day of occurrence. From analysis of linear combinations of flow statistics from nearest-neighbour gauged catchments, the paper demonstrates that the assumption of temporal coherence of low flows will generally result in an under-estimate of Q95; these underestimates are more significant for pairs of impermeable catchments than for combinations of permeable catchments and impermeable-permeable catchments.

  10. Spatio-Temporal Variations of Rain-Use Efficiency in the West of Songliao Plain, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Huang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Spatio-temporal patterns of rain-use efficiency (RUE can explicitly present the steady-state of ecosystem water use and thus ecosystem functioning. The west of Songliao Plain, located along the east fringe of the agro-pasture transitional zone in northern China, is highly sensitive to global change. In this study, satellite-based RUE was calculated using time series SPOT VEGETATION (SPOT-VGT Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI images and precipitation data for the study area from 1999 to 2011. Based on regression model by fitting simple linear regression through the pixel-based time series of RUE in the growing season and calculating the slopes, the change trend of RUE was determined. The grey relational analysis (GRA method was extended to the spatial scale, and used to select sensitive climate and socio-economic factors that affected RUE variations. The result demonstrated that vegetation RUE increased slightly with an undulating trend, implying the ecosystem function tended to improve between 1999 and 2011. In total, 4.23% of the total area had experienced a significant increase in RUE, whereas 1.29% of the total area presented a significant decrease. Areas showing increased RUE trends mostly coincided with areas of land cover conversions from grassland to forest, shrub to forest and cropland to forest, which suggested a positive linkage with ecological protection policy and projects at national and local levels. Based on the obtained spatial Grey Relation Grade (GRG values, the pattern of the impact factors clearly showed a spatial heterogeneity. Spatially, sunshine duration, temperature and population density were most closely related to RUE in the west of Songliao Plain between 1999 and 2011.

  11. [Temporal and spatial variation of water nutrient level after exogenous nutrient input].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ling; Zhao, Kai; Wang, Guo-Xiang; Ou, Yuan; Fan, Zhou; Mao, Li-Na; Zhang, Jia; Han, Rui-Ming

    2014-04-01

    In order to study the spatial and temporal variations of nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) nutrition in artificial wetlands after a single exogenous nutrient input, 6 mosaic communities of 7 plant species were set up in a cement channel in the greenhouse. After the addition of N and P nutritional solutions, the concentrations of dissolved total nitrogen (DTN), dissolved total phosphorous (DTP), ammonia nitrogen (NH4(+)-N), nitrate nitrogen (NO3(-) -N) and nitrite nitrogen (NO2(-) -N) in the surface, middle, and bottom layers of the bulk water were determined regularly within 22 days. The results show that: (1) the water depth and measuring date have significant effects on nutritional contents while the type of plant communities have no such an influence; (2) the diffusion of nutrient from surface to the middle water layers is relatively slow, which costs 6 days under the current experimental condition; (3) in the bottom water layer, nutritional concentrations had no significant changes except for NO2-N, thus the exogenous nutrient input mainly affects the nutrient contents of surface and middle-level bulk water; (4) DTP and NH4(+) -N contents gradually decline to similar levels that before the nutritional input event until the end of experimental period, though DTN and NO3(-) -N content decrease much more slowly; (5) the fact that NO2(-) -N contents rise in water layers of all depths demonstrates that nitrification and denitrification in the process of N circulation are enhanced. It is concluded that exogenous nutrient inputs not only harm aquatic ecosystems but also directly threat human health.

  12. Geographical and Temporal Body Size Variation in a Reptile: Roles of Sex, Ecology, Phylogeny and Ecology Structured in Phylogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragón, Pedro; Fitze, Patrick S.

    2014-01-01

    Geographical body size variation has long interested evolutionary biologists, and a range of mechanisms have been proposed to explain the observed patterns. It is considered to be more puzzling in ectotherms than in endotherms, and integrative approaches are necessary for testing non-exclusive alternative mechanisms. Using lacertid lizards as a model, we adopted an integrative approach, testing different hypotheses for both sexes while incorporating temporal, spatial, and phylogenetic autocorrelation at the individual level. We used data on the Spanish Sand Racer species group from a field survey to disentangle different sources of body size variation through environmental and individual genetic data, while accounting for temporal and spatial autocorrelation. A variation partitioning method was applied to separate independent and shared components of ecology and phylogeny, and estimated their significance. Then, we fed-back our models by controlling for relevant independent components. The pattern was consistent with the geographical Bergmann's cline and the experimental temperature-size rule: adults were larger at lower temperatures (and/or higher elevations). This result was confirmed with additional multi-year independent data-set derived from the literature. Variation partitioning showed no sex differences in phylogenetic inertia but showed sex differences in the independent component of ecology; primarily due to growth differences. Interestingly, only after controlling for independent components did primary productivity also emerge as an important predictor explaining size variation in both sexes. This study highlights the importance of integrating individual-based genetic information, relevant ecological parameters, and temporal and spatial autocorrelation in sex-specific models to detect potentially important hidden effects. Our individual-based approach devoted to extract and control for independent components was useful to reveal hidden effects linked with

  13. Spatial and temporal variation of correlation between the Arctic total ozone and atmospheric temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fuxiang; Ren, suling; Han, Shuangshuang; Zheng, xiangdong; Deng, xuejiao

    2017-04-01

    Daily total ozone and atmospheric temperature profile data in 2015 from the AIRS are used to investigate the spatial and temporal variation of the correlation between the Arctic atmospheric ozone and temperature. In the study, 11 lays atmospheric temperature profiles from the troposphere to the stratosphere are investigated. These layer heights are 20, 50, 70, 100, 200, 250, 300, 400, 500, 600 and 700 hPa respectively. The results show that a significant seasonal split exists in the correlation between the Arctic ozone and atmospheric temperature. Figure 1 shows the spatial and temporal variation of the coefficient between the atmospheric ozone and temperature at 50hPa. It can be seen from the figure that an obvious spatiotemporal difference exists in the correlation between the Arctic total ozone and atmospheric temperature in the lower stratosphere. First, the seasonal difference is very remarkable, which is shown as a significant positive correlation in most regions during winter and summer, while no correlation in the majority of regions occurs during spring and autumn, with a weak positive or negative correlation in a small number regions. Second, the spatial differences are also very obvious. The summer maximum correlation coefficient occurs in the Barents Sea and other locations at 0.8 and above, while the winter maximum occurs in the Baffin Bay area at 0.6 to 0.8. However, in a small number of regions, such as the land to the west of the Bering Strait in winter and the Arctic Ocean core area in summer, the correlation coefficients were unable to pass the significance test to show no correlation. At the same time, in spring and autumn, a positive correlation only occurs over a few low-latitude land areas, while over other Arctic areas, weak negative correlation exists. The differences in horizontal position are clearly related to the land-sea distribution, underlying surface characteristics, glacial melting, and other factors. In the troposphere, the ozone

  14. Temporal variation and size class distribution in a hepertological assemblage from Córdoba, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martori, Ricardo

    2005-05-01

    fernandezae and Odontophrynus americanus; the most constant was Pantodactylus schreibersi. Hypothesis 3 was rejected for all species; except Elachistochleis bicolor that showed a similar activity pattern as the assemblage. Hypothesis 4 was rejected, size groups of each species showed temporal variation due to recruitment and recruitment period varied in and between species. During the first period, the highest diversity index was registered in April 1999 (5.46. During the second year the highest diversity index recorded (6.85 was in January 2000. This study shows the importance of long-term studies for conservation purposes. It also emphasizes the importance of understanding variation of the phenologies of individual species and the variation of activity and diversity within assemblages between years.

  15. Towards understanding of the spatio-temporal composition of Terrestrial Water Storage variations in Northern Latitudes using a model-data fusion approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautmann, Tina; Koirala, Sujan; Carvalhais, Nuno; Niemann, Christoph; Fink, Manfred; Jung, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Understanding variations in the terrestrial water storage (TWS) and its components is essential to gain insights into the dynamics of the hydrological cycle, and to assess temporal and spatial variations of water availability under global changes. We investigated spatio-temporal patterns of TWS variations and their composition in the humid regions of northern mid-to-high latitudes during 2001-2014 by using a simple hydrological model with few effective parameters. Compared to traditional modelling studies, our simple model was informed and constrained by multiple state-of-the-art earth observation products including TWS from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites (Wiese 2015), Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) from GlobSnow project (Loujous et al. 2014), evapotranspiration fluxes from eddy covariance measurements (Tramontana et al. 2016), and gridded runoff estimates for Europe (Gudmundsson & Seneviratne 2016). Thorough evaluation of model demonstrates that the model reproduces the observed patterns of hydrological fluxes and states well. The validated model results are then used to assess the contributions of snow pack, soil moisture and groundwater on the integrated TWS across spatial (local grid scale, spatially integrated) and temporal (seasonal, inter-annual) scales. Interestingly, our results show that TWS variations on different scales are dominated by different components. On both, seasonal and inter-annual time scales, the spatially integrated TWS signal mainly originates from dynamics of snow pack. On the local grid scale, mean seasonal TWS variations are driven by snow dynamics as well, whereas inter-annual variations are found to originate from soil moisture availability. Thus, we show that the determinants of TWS variations are scale-dependent, while coincidently underline the potential of model-data fusion techniques to gain insights into the complex hydrological system. References: Gudmundsson, L. and S. I. Seneviratne (2016

  16. VO-ESD: a virtual observatory approach to describe the geomagnetic field temporal variations with application to Swarm data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saturnino, Diana; Langlais, Benoit; Amit, Hagay; Mandea, Mioara; Civet, François; Beucler, Éric

    2017-04-01

    A complete description of the main geomagnetic field temporal variation is crucial to understand dynamics in the core. This variation, termed secular variation (SV), is known with high accuracy at ground magnetic observatory locations. However the description of its spatial variability is hampered by the globally uneven distribution of the observatories. For the past two decades a global coverage of the field changes has been allowed by satellites. Their surveys of the geomagnetic field have been used to derive and improve global spherical harmonic (SH) models through some strict data selection schemes to minimise external field contributions. But discrepancies remain between ground measurements and field predictions by these models. Indeed, the global models do not reproduce small spatial scales of the field temporal variations. To overcome this problem we propose a modified Virtual Observatory (VO) approach by defining a globally homogeneous mesh of VOs at satellite altitude. With this approach we directly extract time series of the field and its temporal variation from satellite measurements as it is done at observatory locations. As satellite measurements are acquired at different altitudes a correction for the altitude is needed. Therefore, we apply an Equivalent Source Dipole (ESD) technique for each VO and each given time interval to reduce all measurements to a unique location, leading to time series similar to those available at ground magnetic observatories. Synthetic data is first used to validate the new VO-ESD approach. Then, we apply our scheme to measurements from the Swarm mission. For the first time, a 2.5 degrees resolution global mesh of VO times series is built. The VO-ESD derived time series are locally compared to ground observations as well as to satellite-based model predictions. The approach is able to describe detailed temporal variations of the field at local scales. The VO-ESD time series are also used to derive global SH models. Without

  17. Worldwide variation in within-canopy photosynthetic acclimation: differences in temporal and environmental controls among plant functional types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niinemets, Ülo; Keenan, Trevor

    2017-04-01

    Major light gradients, characteristically 10- to 50-fold, constitute the most prominent feature of plant canopies. These gradients drive within-canopy variation in foliage structural, chemical and physiological traits. As a key acclimation response to variation in light availability, foliage photosynthetic capacity per area (Aarea) increases with increasing light availability within the canopy, maximizing whole canopy photosynthesis. Recently, a worldwide database including 831 within-canopy gradients with standardized light estimates for 304 species belonging to major vascular plant functional types was constructed and within-canopy variation in photosynthetic acclimation was characterized (Niinemets Ü, Keenan TF, Hallik L (2015) Tansley review. A worldwide analysis of within-canopy variations in leaf structural, chemical and physiological traits across plant functional types. The New Phytologist 205: 973-993). However, the understanding of how within-canopy photosynthetic gradients vary during the growing season and in response to site and stand characteristics is still limited. Here we analyzed temporal, environmental and site (nutrient availability, stand density, ambient CO2 concentration, water availability) sources of variation in within-canopy photosynthetic acclimation in different plant functional types. Variation in key structural (leaf dry mass per unit area, MA), chemical (nitrogen content per dry mass, NM, and area, NA) and physiological (photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency, EN) photosynthetic capacity per dry mass, Amass and area, Aarea) was examined. The analysis demonstrates major, typically 1.5-2-fold, time-, environment and site-dependent modifications in within-canopy variation in foliage photosynthetic capacity. However, the magnitude and direction of temporal and environmental variations in plasticity significantly varied among functional types. Species with longer leaf life span and low rates of canopy expansion or flush-type canopy

  18. Temporal variation of the gammaridean fauna (Crustacea, Amphipoda associated with the sponge Mycale angulosa (Porifera, Demospongiae in southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Fernandes de Britto Costa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTMarine sponges are advantageous microhabitats because of their complex architecture. The system of internal canals provides circulation of water and deposition of particulate organic matter, ensuring availability of food and shelter. Diminutive amphipods have little difficulty penetrating the spaces of sponges and remain in their aquiferous systems as one of the most abundant taxa in this association. This study evaluated the temporal variation of the gammaridean amphipod species associated with the sponge Mycale angulosa. Sponge samples were collected every three months over one year at Pontal da Cruz Beach, São Sebastião Channel, southeastern Brazil. The amphipod assembly varied over time, while the amphipod density and sponge biomass remained approximately constant. Six species contributed to the temporal variation infaunal composition, highlighting the importance of the natural history of each species.

  19. Temporal variation in the spider assemblage (Arachnida, Araneae) in canopies of Callisthene fasciculata (Vochysiaceae) in the Brazilian Pantanal biome

    OpenAIRE

    Lúcia Yamazaki; Vindica,Vanessa F.; Antonio D. Brescovit; Marques, Marinez I.; Battirola,Leandro D.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Spiders are generalist predators and present a high diversity of capturing and foraging, as well as considerable species richness in tropical habitats. Although, generally, not presenting specific relations to the host plant, they can be influenced by its phenology, structure and resource availability. So, this study analyzed temporal variation on the structure and composition of Araneae assemblage in Callisthene fasciculata (Spr.) Mart. (Vochysiaceae) canopies, in an area of monodom...

  20. Using a "time machine" to test for local adaptation of aquatic microbes to temporal and spatial environmental variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jeremy W; Harder, Lawrence D

    2015-01-01

    Local adaptation occurs when different environments are dominated by different specialist genotypes, each of which is relatively fit in its local conditions and relatively unfit under other conditions. Analogously, ecological species sorting occurs when different environments are dominated by different competing species, each of which is relatively fit in its local conditions. The simplest theory predicts that spatial, but not temporal, environmental variation selects for local adaptation (or generates species sorting), but this prediction is difficult to test. Although organisms can be reciprocally transplanted among sites, doing so among times seems implausible. Here, we describe a reciprocal transplant experiment testing for local adaptation or species sorting of lake bacteria in response to both temporal and spatial variation in water chemistry. The experiment used a -80°C freezer as a "time machine." Bacterial isolates and water samples were frozen for later use, allowing transplantation of older isolates "forward in time" and newer isolates "backward in time." Surprisingly, local maladaptation predominated over local adaptation in both space and time. Such local maladaptation may indicate that adaptation, or the analogous species sorting process, fails to keep pace with temporal fluctuations in water chemistry. This hypothesis could be tested with more finely resolved temporal data. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  1. Feeling Gravity's Pull: Gravity Modeling. The Gravity Field of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemoine, Frank; Smith, David; Rowlands, David; Zuber, Maria; Neumann, G.; Chinn, Douglas; Pavlis, D.

    2000-01-01

    Most people take the constant presence of gravitys pull for granted. However, the Earth's gravitational strength actually varies from location to location. This variation occurs because mass, which influences an object's gravitational pull, is not evenly distributed within the planet. Changes in topography, such as glacial movement, an earthquake, or a rise in the ocean level, can subtly affect the gravity field. An accurate measurement of the Earth's gravity field helps us understand the distribution of mass beneath the surface. This insight can assist us in locating petroleum, mineral deposits, ground water, and other valuable substances. Gravity mapping can also help notice or verify changes in sea surface height and other ocean characteristics. Such changes may indicate climate change from polar ice melting and other phenomena. In addition, gravity mapping can indicate how land moves under the surface after earthquakes and other plate tectonic processes. Finally, changes in the Earth's gravity field might indicate a shift in water distribution that could affect agriculture, water supplies for population centers, and long-term weather prediction. Scientists can map out the Earth's gravity field by watching satellite orbits. When a satellite shifts in vertical position, it might be passing over an area where gravity changes in strength. Gravity is only one factor that may shape a satellite's orbital path. To derive a gravity measurement from satellite movement, scientists must remove other factors that might affect a satellite's position: 1. Drag from atmospheric friction. 2. Pressure from solar radiation as it heads toward Earth and. as it is reflected off the surface of the Earth 3. Gravitational pull from the Sun, the Moon, and other planets in the Solar System. 4. The effect of tides. 5. Relativistic effects. Scientists must also correct for the satellite tracking process. For example, the tracking signal must be corrected for refraction through the

  2. Temporal and spatial variation in temperature experienced by macrofauna at Main Endeavour hydrothermal vent field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Raymond W.; Robert, Katleen; Matabos, Marjolaine; Bates, Amanda E.; Juniper, S. Kim

    2015-12-01

    A significant focus of hydrothermal vent ecological studies has been to understand how species cope with various stressors through physiological tolerance and biochemical resistance. Yet, the environmental conditions experienced by vent species have not been well characterized. This objective requires continuous observations over time intervals that can capture environmental variability at scales that are relevant to animals. We used autonomous temperature logger arrays (four roughly parallel linear arrays of 12 loggers spaced every 10-12 cm) to study spatial and temporal variations in the thermal regime experienced by hydrothermal vent macrofauna at a diffuse flow vent. Hourly temperatures were recorded over eight months from 2010 to 2011 at Grotto vent in the Main Endeavour vent field on the Juan de Fuca Ridge, a focus area of the Ocean Networks Canada cabled observatory. The conspicuous animal assemblages in video footage contained Ridgeia piscesae tubeworms, gastropods (primarily Lepetodrilus fucensis), and polychaetes (polynoid scaleworms and the palm worm Paralvinella palmiformis). Two dimensional spatial gradients in temperature were generally stable over the deployment period. The average temperature recorded by all arrays, and in some individual loggers, revealed distinctive fluctuations in temperature that often corresponded with the tidal cycle. We postulate that this may be related to changes in bottom currents or fluctuations in vent discharge. A marked transient temperature increase lasting over a period of days was observed in April 2011. While the distributions and behavior of Juan de Fuca Ridge vent invertebrates may be partially constrained by environmental temperature and temperature tolerance, except for the one transient high-temperature event, observed fluid temperatures were generally similar to the thermal preferences for some species, and typically well below lethal temperatures for all species. Average temperatures of the four arrays

  3. Organic molecular compositions and temporal variations of summertime mountain aerosols over Mt. Tai, North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Pingqing; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Okuzawa, Kazuhiro; Aggarwal, Shankar Gopala; Wang, Gehui; Kanaya, Yugo; Wang, Zifa

    2008-10-01

    Total suspended particles (TSP) were collected at the summit of Mt. Tai (1534 m above sea level) on a daytime and nighttime basis during a summertime campaign (May-June 2006) and were characterized for organic molecular compositions using solvent extraction/derivatization and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry technique. The n-Alkanes, fatty acids, fatty alcohols, sugars, glycerol and polyacids, and phthalate esters were found as major organic compound classes, whereas lignin and resin products, sterols, aromatic acids, hopanes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were detected as minor classes. Sugars (49.8-2115 ng m-3, average 640 ng m-3 in daytime; 18.1-4348 ng m-3, 799 ng m-3 in nighttime) were found to be the dominant compound class. Levoglucosan, a specific cellulose pyrolysis product, was detected as the most abundant single compound, followed by C28 fatty alcohol, diisobutyl and di-n-butyl phthalates, C29n-alkane, C16 and C28 fatty acids, and malic acid. By grouping organic compounds based on their sources, we found that emission of terrestrial plant waxes was the most significant source (30-34%) of the TSP, followed by biomass burning products (25-27%) (e.g., levoglucosan and lignin and resin products), soil resuspension (15-18%) due to agricultural activities, secondary oxidation products (8-10%), plastic emission (3-10%), marine/microbial sources (6%), and urban/industrial emissions from fossil fuel use (4%). However, low molecular weight dicarboxylic acids (such as oxalic acid) of photochemical origin were not included in this study. Malic acid was found to be much higher than those reported in the ground level, suggesting an enhanced photochemical production in the free troposphere over mountain areas. Temporal variations of biomass burning tracers (e.g., levoglucosan, galactosan, mannosan) and some higher plant wax derived compound classes suggested that there were two major (E1 and E2) and one minor (E3) biomass-burning events during this

  4. Temporal and spatial variation in recent vehicular emission inventories in China based on dynamic emission factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hao; Xie, Shaodong

    2013-03-01

    emissions. This paper tracks the temporal and spatial variation characteristics in recent vehicular emission inventories in China based on dynamic emission factors. The fact that CO and NMVOC emissions kept growing at reduced rates and the NOx, PM10, and GHG emissions continued rising rapidly reveals that it was insufficient to bring down the rapid growth of NOx, PM10, and CO2 emissions by merely tightening emission standards and improving fuel quality of motor vehicles. The results will assist decision makers to formulate effective control policies for China's vehicular emissions. The improved methodologies are applicable for routine update of China's vehicular emission inventories.

  5. Spatial and Temporal Variations of EC and OC Aerosol Combustion Sources in a Polluted Metropolitan Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouteva, G.; Randerson, J. T.; Fahrni, S.; Santos, G.; Bush, S. E.; Ehleringer, J. R.; Czimczik, C. I.

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of carbonaceous aerosols are a major component of fine air particulate matter (PM2.5) in polluted metropolitan areas and in the global atmosphere. Elemental (EC) and organic carbon (OC) aerosols influence Earth's energy balance by means of direct and indirect pathways and EC has been suggested as a better indicator of public health impacts from combustion-related sources than PM mass. Quantifying the contribution of fossil fuel and biomass combustion to the EC and OC emissions and their temporal and spatial variations is critical for developing efficient legislative air pollution control measures and successful climate mitigation strategies. In this study, we used radiocarbon (14C) to separate and quantify fossil and biomass contributions to a time series of EC and OC collected at 3 locations in Salt Lake City (SLC). Aerosol samples were collected on quartz fiber filters and a modified OC/EC analyzer was used with the Swiss_4S protocol to isolate and trap the EC fraction. Together with the total carbon (TC) content of the samples, the EC was analyzed for its 14C content with accelerator mass spectrometry. The 14C of OC was derived as a mass balance difference between TC and EC. EC had an annual average fraction modern of 0.13±0.06 and did not vary significantly across seasons. OC had an annual average FM of 0.49±0.13, with the winter mean (0.43±0.11) lower than the summer mean (0.64±0.13) at the 5% significance level. While the 3 stations were chosen to represent a variety of environmental conditions within SLC, no major differences in this source partitioning were observed between stations. During winter, the major sources of air pollutants in SLC are motor vehicles and wood stove combustion and determining their relative contributions has been the subject of debate. Our results indicated that fossil fuels were the dominant source of carbonaceous aerosols during winter, contributing 87% or more of the total EC mass and 40-75% of the OC

  6. Whole-tree distribution and temporal variation of non-structural carbohydrates in broadleaf evergreen trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Merryn G; Miller, Rebecca E; Arndt, Stefan K; Kasel, Sabine; Bennett, Lauren T

    2017-11-03

    Non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs) form a fundamental yet poorly quantified carbon pool in trees. Studies of NSC seasonality in forest trees have seldom measured whole-tree NSC stocks and allocation among organs, and are not representative of all tree functional types. Non-structural carbohydrate research has primarily focussed on broadleaf deciduous and coniferous evergreen trees with distinct growing seasons, while broadleaf evergreen trees remain under-studied despite their different growth phenology. We measured whole-tree NSC allocation and temporal variation in Eucalyptus obliqua L'Hér., a broadleaf evergreen tree species typically occurring in mixed-age temperate forests, which has year-round growth and the capacity to resprout after fire. Our overarching objective was to improve the empirical basis for understanding the functional importance of NSC allocation and stock changes at the tree- and organ-level in this tree functional type. Starch was the principal storage carbohydrate and was primarily stored in the stem and roots of young (14-year-old) trees rather than the lignotuber, which did not appear to be a specialized starch storage organ. Whole-tree NSC stocks were depleted during spring and summer due to significant decreases in starch mass in the roots and stem, seemingly to support root and crown growth but potentially exacerbated by water stress in summer. Seasonality of stem NSCs differed between young and mature trees, and was not synchronized with stem basal area increments in mature trees. Our results suggest that the relative magnitude of seasonal NSC stock changes could vary with tree growth stage, and that the main drivers of NSC fluctuations in broadleaf evergreen trees in temperate biomes could be periodic disturbances such as summer drought and fire, rather than growth phenology. These results have implications for understanding post-fire tree recovery via resprouting, and for incorporating NSC pools into carbon models of mixed

  7. short-temporal variation of soil organic carbon in different land use ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    65

    The soil organic carbon (SOC) was determined in 40 sites at two depths .... temporal way to contribute on the application of tools as a conservation, an ...... retention barriers, agroforestry practices, to mention a few, favor the SOC increase up to.

  8. Estimating uncertainty and its temporal variation related to global climate models in quantifying climate change impacts on hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Mingxi; Chen, Jie; Zhuan, Meijia; Chen, Hua; Xu, Chong-Yu; Xiong, Lihua

    2018-01-01

    Uncertainty estimation of climate change impacts on hydrology has received much attention in the research community. The choice of a global climate model (GCM) is usually considered as the largest contributor to the uncertainty of climate change impacts. The temporal variation of GCM uncertainty needs to be investigated for making long-term decisions to deal with climate change. Accordingly, this study investigated the temporal variation (mainly long-term) of uncertainty related to the choice of a GCM in predicting climate change impacts on hydrology by using multi-GCMs over multiple continuous future periods. Specifically, twenty CMIP5 GCMs under RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 emission scenarios were adapted to adequately represent this uncertainty envelope, fifty-one 30-year future periods moving from 2021 to 2100 with 1-year interval were produced to express the temporal variation. Future climatic and hydrological regimes over all future periods were compared to those in the reference period (1971-2000) using a set of metrics, including mean and extremes. The periodicity of climatic and hydrological changes and their uncertainty were analyzed using wavelet analysis, while the trend was analyzed using Mann-Kendall trend test and regression analysis. The results showed that both future climate change (precipitation and temperature) and hydrological response predicted by the twenty GCMs were highly uncertain, and the uncertainty increased significantly over time. For example, the change of mean annual precipitation increased from 1.4% in 2021-2050 to 6.5% in 2071-2100 for RCP4.5 in terms of the median value of multi-models, but the projected uncertainty reached 21.7% in 2021-2050 and 25.1% in 2071-2100 for RCP4.5. The uncertainty under a high emission scenario (RCP8.5) was much larger than that under a relatively low emission scenario (RCP4.5). Almost all climatic and hydrological regimes and their uncertainty did not show significant periodicity at the P = .05 significance

  9. Characteristics of Antarctic gravity waves in the lower atmosphere and their long-term variations at McMurdo and the South Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Z.; Chu, X.; McDonald, A.; Yamashita, C.; Gardner, C. S.

    2010-12-01

    Gravity wave perturbations in vertical profiles of temperature and wind are extracted from meteorological balloon radiosonde measurements during 1997-2009 at McMurdo station and 1993-2009 at the South Pole. Based on these perturbations, the seasonal, long-term and vertical variability of potential energy density(E_p), and kinetic energy density(E_k), are investigated. The climatologies of potential energies from two stations are similar, with comparable magnitude ranging from 0.5 J/kg to 6 J/kg and varying with season and altitude. However, comparing the seasonal average, the E_k at McMurdo is much smaller than that at the South Pole except in March. Preliminary results also suggest that the ratio of E_k/E_p may change with geographical locations. Background temperature and wind effects on propagation conditions (e.g. critical level filtering) and, variations in the gravity wave source spectrum, are all potential factors that play roles in the observed climatology. We will also study the seasonal and long-term variations of the slope of the vertical wavenumber spectrum, derived from temperature perturbations and wind perturbations, and the probability of wave propagation directions using the Stokes parameter methodology.

  10. Multi-technique approach for deriving a VLBI signal extra-path variation model induced by gravity: the example of Medicina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarti, P.; Abbondanza, C.; Negusini, M.; Vittuari, L.

    2009-09-01

    During the measurement sessions gravity might induce significant deformations in large VLBI telescopes. If neglected or mismodelled, these deformations might bias the phase of the incoming signal thus corrupting the estimate of some crucial geodetic parameters (e.g. the height component of VLBI Reference Point). This paper describes a multi-technique approach implemented for measuring and quantifying the gravity-dependent deformations experienced by the 32-m diameter VLBI antenna of Medicina (Northern Italy). Such an approach integrates three different methods: Terrestrial Triangulations and Trilaterations (TTT), Laser Scanning (LS) and a Finite Element Model (FEM) of the antenna. The combination of the observations performed with these methods allows to accurately define an elevation-dependent model of the signal path variation which appears to be, for the Medicina telescope, non negligible. In the range [0,90] deg the signal path increases monotonically by almost 2 cm. The effect of such a variation has not been introduced in actual VLBI analysis yet; nevertheless this is the task we are going to pursue in the very next future.

  11. Spatio-temporal genetic variation in populations of wild emmer wheat, Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccoides, as revealed by AFLP analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbek, O; Millet, E; Anikster, Y; Arslan, O; Feldman, M

    2007-06-01

    Genetic structure of natural populations of wild crop relatives has been the subject of many studies. Yet, most of them focused on the assessment of spatial genetic diversity, while information on long-term variation, affected by yearly changes, has been considered only in few cases. The present study aimed therefore, to estimate the spatio-temporal genetic variation in populations of wild emmer wheat, the progenitor of domesticated wheat, and to assess the contribution of spatial versus temporal factors to the maintenance of genetic variation in a population. Single spikes were collected in the years 1988 and 2002 from plants that grew in the same sampling points, from six different habitats in the Ammiad conservation site, Eastern Galilee, Israel. Seeds were planted in a nursery and DNA was extracted from each plant and analyzed by the AFLP method. Fourteen primer combinations yielded 1,545 bands of which 50.0 and 48.8% were polymorphic in the years 1988 and 2002, respectively. Genetic diversity was much larger within populations than between populations and the temporal genetic diversity was considerably smaller than the spatial one. Nevertheless, population genetic structure may vary to some degree in different years, mainly due to fluctuations in population size because of yearly rainfall variations. This may lead to predominance of different genotypes in different years. Clustering the plants by their genetic distances grouped them according to their habitats, indicating the existence of genotype-environment affinities. The significance of the results in relation to factors affecting the maintenance of polymorphism in natural populations is discussed.

  12. [Temporal and spatial variations of soil NO(3-)-N in Orychophragmus violaceus/spring maize rotation system in North China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jing; Wang, Gai-Lan; Cao, Wei-Dong; Bai, Jin-Shun; Zeng, Nao-Hua; Yang, Lu; Gao, Song-Juan; Shimizu, Katsuyoshi

    2014-02-01

    The February orchid (Orychophragmus violaceus)-spring maize rotation system is established to resolve the problems caused by the expansion of fallow fields in North China. Based on a site-specific experiment, temporal and spatial variations of soil NO(3-)-N were investigated during the period from February orchid incorporation to maize harvest. The results showed that the nitrate content in soil profiles not only showed a temporal characteristic, i. e., increasing at the beginning of the maize season and decreasing then after, but also showed a spatial characteristic, i. e., the gradual occurrence of the peak of nitrate content from shallower to deeper layer with the growth season of maize. Meanwhile, incorporation of February orchid could affect temporal and spatial variations of soil NO(3-)-N. February orchid planting reduced the soil NO(3-)-N accumulation in the profile of 0180 cm. After incorporation of February orchid, similar characteristics were observed at the seedling and bell stages of maize, i. e., the soil NO(3-)-N mainly stayed in the profile of 0-20 cm, and NO(3-)-N concentrations in the treatments with February orchid were higher in 0-100 cm layer and lower in 100-180 cm layer than those of the treatments without February orchid. After tasseling stage, opposite phenomena were found, and the soil NO(3-)-N content was all relative low. Overall, incorporation of February orchid could increase the storage capacity of soil NO(3-)-N in the profile of 0-180 cm.

  13. Lateral, radial and temporal variations in upper mantle viscosity and rheology under Scandinavia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barnhoorn, A.; Wal, W. van der; Vermeersen, L.L.A.; Drury, M.R.

    2011-01-01

    The viscosity of the upper mantle has a large control on the dynamics of plate tectonic processes or the response of the Earth's crust after a period of glaciation. Temperature variations within the upper mantle, time-dependent stress changes due to glaciations, and/or variations in the

  14. Effects of temporal variation in temperature and density dependence on insect population dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding effects of environmental variation on insect populations is important in light of predictions about increasing future climatic variability. In order to understand the effects of changing environmental variation on population dynamics and life history evolution in insects one would need...

  15. Pollinators of the Rocky Mountain Columbine: Temporal Variation, Functional Groups and Association with Floral Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollinators together with other biotic and some abiotic factors can select for floral traits. However, variation in pollinator abundance over time and space can weaken such selection. In this study, we examined the variation in pollinator abundance over time and space in populations of the rocky mou...

  16. Spatial/Temporal Variations and Source Apportionment of VOCs Monitored at Community Scale in an Urban Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chang Ho; Zhu, Xianlei; Fan, Zhi-hua

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize spatial/temporal variations of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using a community-scale monitoring approach and identify the main sources of concern in Paterson, NJ, an urban area with mixed sources of VOCs. VOC samples were simultaneously collected from three local source-dominated (i.e., commercial, industrial, and mobile) sites in Paterson and one background site in Chester, NJ (located ∼58 km southwest of Paterson). Samples were collected using the EPA TO-15 method from midnight to midnight, one in every sixth day over one year. Among the 60 analyzed VOCs, ten VOCs (acetylene, benzene, dichloromethane, ethylbenzene, methyl ethyl ketone, styrene, toluene, m,p-xylene, o-xylene, and p-dichlorobenzene) were selected to examine their spatial/temporal variations. All of the 10 VOCs in Paterson were significantly higher than the background site (pindustrial emissions (16%), mobile+stationery sources (12%), small shop emissions (11%), and others (22%). Additional locational analysis confirmed the identified sources were well matched with point sources located upwind in Paterson. The study demonstrated the community-scale monitoring approach can capture spatial variation of VOCs in an urban community with mixed VOC sources. It also provided robust data to identify major sources of concern in the community. PMID:24755686

  17. Spatial and temporal variation of macro-, meso- and microplastic abundance on a remote coral island of the Maldives, Indian Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhof, Hannes K; Sigl, Robert; Brauer, Emilia; Feyl, Sabine; Giesemann, Philipp; Klink, Saskia; Leupolz, Kathrin; Löder, Martin G J; Löschel, Lena A; Missun, Jan; Muszynski, Sarah; Ramsperger, Anja F R M; Schrank, Isabella; Speck, Susan; Steibl, Sebastian; Trotter, Benjamin; Winter, Isabel; Laforsch, Christian

    2017-03-15

    Plastic debris is ubiquitous in the marine environment and the world's shores represent a major sink. However, knowledge about plastic abundance in remote areas is scarce. Therefore, plastic abundance was investigated on a small island of the Maldives. Plastic debris (>1mm) was sampled once in natural long-term accumulation zones at the north shore and at the high tide drift line of the south shore on seven consecutive days to quantify daily plastic accumulation. Reliable identification of plastic debris was ensured by FTIR spectroscopy. Despite the remoteness of the island a considerable amount of plastic debris was present. At both sites a high variability in plastic abundance on a spatial and temporal scale was observed, which may be best explained by environmental factors. In addition, our results show that snapshot sampling may deliver biased results and indicate that future monitoring programs should consider spatial and temporal variation of plastic deposition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Spatial and temporal variations of winter discharge under climate change: Case study of rivers in European Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Telegina

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An important problem in hydrology is the re-evaluation of the current resources of surface and underground waters in the context of ongoing climate changes. The main feature of the present-day changes in water regime in the major portion of European Russia (ER is the substantial increase in low-water runoff, especially in winter. In this context, some features of the spatial–temporal variations of runoff values during the winter low-water period are considered. Calculations showed that the winter runoff increased at more than 95% of hydrological gauges. Changes in the minimum and average values of runoff during winter low-water period and other characteristics are evaluated against the background of climate changes in the recent decades. The spatial and temporal variability of winter runoff in European Russia is evaluated for the first time.

  19. Temporal and spatial variations in PAH concentrations in the sediment from the Nilufer Creek in Bursa, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Gizem; Tasdemir, Yücel

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the temporal variations in PAH concentrations in the sediment at different locations on the Nilufer Creek moving along an industrial city. The distribution of various PAH species and their possible sources were determined. Sediment samples were taken from at eight different locations on the Nilufer Creek for a one-year period. Temporal concentration profiles were in the range of 15-9600 ng g(-1) dry matter (dm). PAH concentrations reached their maximum values in the winter (9600 ng g(-1) dm). Molecular diagnostic ratios of PAHs showed that the pollution in the Nilufer Creek in the fall, winter and summer seasons was mostly pyrolytic. It was observed that 3-4 ring species predominated in all seasons in the Nilufer Creek sediment.

  20. Stochastic and deterministic processes regulate spatio-temporal variation in seed bank diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejandro A. Royo; Todd E. Ristau

    2013-01-01

    Seed banks often serve as reservoirs of taxonomic and genetic diversity that buffer plant populations and influence post-disturbance vegetation trajectories; yet evaluating their importance requires understanding how their composition varies within and across spatial and temporal scales (α- and β-diversity). Shifts in seed bank diversity are strongly...

  1. Short-temporal variation of soil organic carbon in different land use ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L C López-Teloxa

    2017-10-06

    Corresponding author. e-mail: .... Nacional de Estadıstica, Geografıa e Informática. 1976–2013). The maps for spatial and temporal dis- ..... point for the development of a management plan for Ramsar sites in general with low ...

  2. Near-surface remote sensing of spatial and temporal variation in canopy phenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew D. Richardson; Bobby H. Braswell; David Y. Hollinger; Julian P. Jenkins; Scott V. Ollinger

    2009-01-01

    There is a need to document how plant phenology is responding to global change factors, particularly warming trends. "Near-surface" remote sensing, using radiometric instruments or imaging sensors, has great potential to improve phenological monitoring because automated observations can be made at high temporal frequency. Here we build on previous work and...

  3. Spatial and temporal variation of water temperature regimes on the Snoqualmie River network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley E. Steel; Colin Sowder; Erin E. Peterson

    2016-01-01

    Although mean temperatures change annually and are highly correlated with elevation, the entire thermal regime on the Snoqualmie River, Washington, USA does not simply shift with elevation or season. Particular facets of the thermal regime have unique spatial patterns on the river network and at particular times of the year. We used a spatially and temporally dense...

  4. Modeling of spatio-temporal variation in plague incidence in Madagascar from 1980 to 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, Emanuele; Kreppel, Katharina; Diggle, Peter J; Caminade, Cyril; Ratsitorahina, Maherisoa; Rajerison, Minoarisoa; Baylis, Matthew

    2016-11-01

    Plague is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, which, during the fourteenth century, caused the deaths of an estimated 75-200 million people in Europe. Plague epidemics still occur in Africa, Asia and South America. Madagascar is today one of the most endemic countries, reporting nearly one third of the human cases worldwide from 2004 to 2009. The persistence of plague in Madagascar is associated with environmental and climatic conditions. In this paper we present a case study of the spatio-temporal analysis of plague incidence in Madagascar from 1980 to 2007. We study the relationship of plague with temperature and precipitation anomalies, and with elevation. A joint spatio-temporal analysis of the data proves to be computationally intractable. We therefore develop a spatio-temporal log-Gaussian Cox process model, but then carry out marginal temporal and spatial analyses. We also introduce a spatially discrete approximation for Gaussian processes, whose parameters retain a spatially continuous interpretation. We find evidence of a cumulative effect, over time, of temperature anomalies on plague incidence, and of a very high relative risk of plague occurrence for locations above 800 m in elevation. Our approach provides a useful modeling framework to assess the relationship between exposures and plague risk, irrespective of the spatial resolution at which the latter has been recorded. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Spatio-temporal variation in stream water chemistry in a tropical urban watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Ramirez; K.G. Rosas; A.E. Lugo; O.M. Ramos-Gonzalez

    2014-01-01

    Urban activities and related infrastructure alter the natural patterns of stream physical and chemical conditions. According to the Urban Stream Syndrome, streams draining urban landscapes are characterized by high concentrations of nutrients and ions, and might have elevated water temperatures and variable oxygen concentrations. Here, we report temporal and spatial...

  6. Explanation of observable secular variations of gravity and alternative methods of determination of drift of the center of mass of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkin, Yury

    2010-05-01

    The summary. On the basis of geodynamic model of the forced relative displacement of the centers of mass of the core and the mantle of the Earth the secular variations of a gravity and heights of some gravimetry stations on a surface of the Earth have ben studied. At the account of secular drift of the center of mass of the Earth which on our geodynamic model is caused by the unidirectional drift of the core of the Earth relatively to the mantle, the full explanation is given to observable secular variations of a gravity at stations Ny-Alesund (Norway), Churchill (Canada), Medicine (Italy), Sayowa (Antarctica), Strastburg (France), Membach (Belgium), Wuhan (China) and Metsahovi (Finland). Two new methods of determination of secular drift of the center of mass of the Earth, alternative to classical method of a space geodesy are offered: 1) on the basis of gravimetry data about secular trends of a gravity at the stations located on all basic regions of the Earth; 2) on the basis of the comparative analysis of altimetry and coastal data about secular changes of sea level also in basic regions of ocean. 1. Secular drift of the center of mass of the core and the center of mass of the Earth. A secular drift of the center of mass of the Earth to the North relatively to special center O on an axis of rotation of the Earth for which the coefficient of third zonal harmonic J3' = 0, has been predicted in the author work [1]. A drift in a direction to a geographical point (pole P) 70°0 N and 104°3 E has been established for the first time theoretically - as a result of the analysis of the global directed redistribution of masses of the Earth, explaining the observed secular drift of the pole of an axis of rotation of the Earth and not tidal acceleration of its axial rotation [2]. In [1] velocity of drift it has been estimated in 1-2 cm/yr. For specified center O the figure of a planet is as though deprived of pure-shaped form (J3' = 0). And in this sense the point O can be

  7. Spatial and Temporal Variations in the Occurrence and Foraging Activity of Coastal Dolphins in Menai Bay, Zanzibar, Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Temple

    Full Text Available Understanding temporal patterns in distribution, occurrence and behaviour is vital for the effective conservation of cetaceans. This study used cetacean click detectors (C-PODs to investigate spatial and temporal variation in occurrence and foraging activity of the Indo-Pacific bottlenose (Tursiops aduncus and Indian Ocean humpback (Sousa plumbea dolphins resident in the Menai Bay Conservation Area (MBCA, Zanzibar, Tanzania. Occurrence was measured using detection positive minutes. Inter-click intervals were used to identify terminal buzz vocalisations, allowing for analysis of foraging activity. Data were analysed in relation to spatial (location and temporal (monsoon season, diel phase and tidal phase variables. Results showed significantly increased occurrence and foraging activity of dolphins in southern areas and during hours of darkness. Higher occurrence at night was not explained by diel variation in echolocation rate and so were considered representative of occurrence patterns. Both tidal phase and monsoon season influenced occurrence but results varied among sites, with no general patterns found. Foraging activity was greatest during hours of darkness, High water and Flood tidal phases. Comparisons of echolocation data among sites suggested differences in the broadband click spectra of MBCA dolphins, possibly indicative of species differences. These dolphin populations are threatened by unsustainable fisheries bycatch and tourism activities. The spatial and temporal patterns identified in this study have implications for future conservation and management actions with regards to these two threats. Further, the results indicate future potential for using passive acoustics to identify and monitor the occurrence of these two species in areas where they co-exist.

  8. Spatial and Temporal Variations in the Occurrence and Foraging Activity of Coastal Dolphins in Menai Bay, Zanzibar, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Andrew J; Tregenza, Nick; Amir, Omar A; Jiddawi, Narriman; Berggren, Per

    2016-01-01

    Understanding temporal patterns in distribution, occurrence and behaviour is vital for the effective conservation of cetaceans. This study used cetacean click detectors (C-PODs) to investigate spatial and temporal variation in occurrence and foraging activity of the Indo-Pacific bottlenose (Tursiops aduncus) and Indian Ocean humpback (Sousa plumbea) dolphins resident in the Menai Bay Conservation Area (MBCA), Zanzibar, Tanzania. Occurrence was measured using detection positive minutes. Inter-click intervals were used to identify terminal buzz vocalisations, allowing for analysis of foraging activity. Data were analysed in relation to spatial (location) and temporal (monsoon season, diel phase and tidal phase) variables. Results showed significantly increased occurrence and foraging activity of dolphins in southern areas and during hours of darkness. Higher occurrence at night was not explained by diel variation in echolocation rate and so were considered representative of occurrence patterns. Both tidal phase and monsoon season influenced occurrence but results varied among sites, with no general patterns found. Foraging activity was greatest during hours of darkness, High water and Flood tidal phases. Comparisons of echolocation data among sites suggested differences in the broadband click spectra of MBCA dolphins, possibly indicative of species differences. These dolphin populations are threatened by unsustainable fisheries bycatch and tourism activities. The spatial and temporal patterns identified in this study have implications for future conservation and management actions with regards to these two threats. Further, the results indicate future potential for using passive acoustics to identify and monitor the occurrence of these two species in areas where they co-exist.

  9. Spatial-temporal variations in regional ambient sulfur dioxide concentration and source-contribution analysis: A dispersion modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Bin; Wilson, J. Gaines; Zhan, F. Benjamin; Zeng, Yongnian; Wu, Kongjiang

    2011-09-01

    An understanding of the complexity of spatial-temporal variations in regional air quality and its respective source contributors is one of the priority research areas due to the adverse effects of air pollution on human health and the environment. In this paper, we integrate air dispersion modeling and Geographic Information System (GIS) based spatial analysis methods to characterize regional ambient air quality at a relatively fine geographical scale (1 km × 1 km) while ascertaining source contributors. The temporal variation analysis shows that sulfur dioxide (SO 2) pollution in Dallas County, Texas did not consistently increase or decrease from 1996 to 2002. The lowest and highest mean levels of annual SO 2 concentrations at all the receptors ( n = 2000) were 0.39 μg m -3 and 2.32 μg m -3 in 2001 and 2002, respectively. Meanwhile, analysis results suggest that the annual SO 2 concentrations in a small part of Dallas County slightly declined with the highest value of -1.00 μg m -3 over the 1996-2002 period, while most of the county experienced increased SO 2 concentration levels from 0.00 to 0.25 μg m -3. In addition, the source apportionment analysis demonstrated that the variations in total annual SO 2 concentrations in Dallas County from 1996 to 2002 were significantly different from those by source classification. That is, compared to industrial emission sources, on-road vehicle emission sources caused variations in annual SO 2 concentrations with relatively larger extents (power of determinant = 0.42). However, extreme variations in concentrations were due to industrial emission sources (3.45% vs. 0.00%). Based on these observations, it can be concluded that the combination of air dispersion modeling and GIS-based spatial analysis shows promise to overcome the drawbacks of sparse intraurban air quality monitoring in characterizing the spatial-temporal micro-variations in regional ambient air quality and ascertaining roles of source contributors over

  10. Possible relationship between temporal electrical resistivity variation and occurrence of the earthquake of 30 September 1993 in Latur region, Maharashtra, India

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    A. B. Narayanpethkar; A. Vasanthi; K. Mallick

    2001-01-01

    ... and resistivity values. In intraplate stable continental regions like Latur where the possible location is broadly known, the temporal variations of electrical resistivity may zero down the period of occurrence of high magnitude earthquakes to a couple of months.

  11. Spatio-temporal variations in the technetium-99 content of Fucus serratus in the English Channel during 1982-1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmet, D.; Patti, F.; Charmasson, S.

    1987-01-01

    Spatio-temporal variations in the technetium-99 content of Fucus serratus samples from the French coast of the English Channel were studied between 1982 and 1984 using various sampling strategies. The lack of constancy in measurements from within the seaweed zone of the same station is revealed by a variation of 18% in the mean contents of samples collected from different sampling levels, a variation which reaches 41% if the extreme values of all results are taken into account. Regional variations over the Channel as a whole show an asymmetric diminution of the /sup 99/Tc content of the seaweed on the two sides of the liquid effluent discharge outlet from the reprocessing plant at La Hague and this confirms a predominant drift of Channel waters towards the North Sea. A periodic component observed at the Roscoff and Wimereux stations, where the /sup 99/Tc content of the seaweed varies by a factor of 2-3 between winter and summer periods, could be correlated with seasonal changes both in the metabolic state of F.serratus and in the currents to the south-west of Cap de La Hague. /sup 99/Tc, which here has no radiological impact on man, would thus appear to be a radioactive label for sea waters and one which is particularly sensitive to variations in environmental conditions.

  12. Temporal and spatial variations in ionospheric electron density profiles over South Africa during strong magnetic storms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yao, Y. B; Chen, P; Zhang, S; Chen, J. J

    2013-01-01

    ...) and vertical total electron content (VTEC) data from the Jason-1 satellite were used to analyze the variations in ionospheric electron density profiles over South Africa before and after the severe geomagnetic storms on 15 May 2005...

  13. Contributions of local and regional hydrology to gravity variation observed with the superconducting gravimeter at Metsähovi, Finland: sensors and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, H.; Makinen, J.; Raja-Halli, A.; Hokkanen, T.; Mäkinen, R. P.

    2011-12-01

    The superconducting gravimeter (SG) no. T020 has been operating continuously at Metsähovi since August 1994. After corrections for known time-variable gravity effects, such as tides, atmosphere and the Baltic Sea, the gravity residual (8 microgals peak-to-peak 1994-2010) mostly comes from variation in terrestrial water storage. The hydrological effects in gravity are generated (1) by the attraction of local water storage in the fractures of the crystalline bedrock, (2) by the attraction of local water storage in sediments, (3) by the attraction of local snow on the ground and on the laboratory roof, and (4) by the loading and attraction by regional and global water storage. If we want to use the record of the SG for discriminating between different regional/continental hydrological models, or for validating GRACE observations, physical modelling of the effects (1,2,3) is required. Since 1994 the station is equipped with two borehole wells in the crystalline bedrock. The station stands on bedrock and surrounding sediments are thin (0.2 to 4 meters) but geologically quite complex. In 2006 two arrays of Time Domain Reflectometer sensors of soil moisture were installed by the Finnish Environment Institute. In 2008-2009 we installed more sensors in the sediments: ten capacitive arrays for soil moisture, a 20 x 20 meter grid of 21 x 21=441 probes for soil resistivity, 5 access tubes for radiometric measurement of soil moisture and density, 11 tubes for groundwater. We assess the local hydrology using these sensors, and present preliminary joint modelling of the effects (1-4).

  14. Spatio-temporal variation of anthropogenic marine debris on Chilean beaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo-Ruz, Valeria; Honorato-Zimmer, Daniela; Gatta-Rosemary, Magdalena; Nuñez, Paloma; Hinojosa, Iván A; Thiel, Martin

    2018-01-01

    We examined the hypothesis that in an emerging economy such as Chile the abundances of Anthropogenic Marine Debris (AMD) on beaches are increasing over time. The citizen science program Científicos de la Basura ("Litter Scientists") conducted three national surveys (2008, 2012 and 2016) to determine AMD composition, abundance, spatial patterns and temporal trends. AMD was found on all beaches along the entire Chilean coast. Highest percentages of AMD in all surveys were plastics and cigarette butts, which can be attributed to local sources (i.e. beach users). The Antofagasta region in northern Chile had the highest abundance of AMD compared with all other zones. Higher abundances of AMD were found at the upper stations from almost all zones. No significant tendency of increasing or decreasing AMD densities was observed during the 8years covered by our study, which suggests that economic development alone cannot explain temporal trends in AMD densities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Gravity changes, soil moisture and data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, J.; Grayson, R.; Rodell, M.; Ellet, K.

    2003-04-01

    Remote sensing holds promise for near-surface soil moisture and snow mapping, but current techniques do not directly resolve the deeper soil moisture or groundwater. The benefits that would arise from improved monitoring of variations in terrestrial water storage are numerous. The year 2002 saw the launch of NASA's Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites, which are mapping the Earth's gravity field at such a high level of precision that we expect to be able to infer changes in terrestrial water storage (soil moisture, groundwater, snow, ice, lake, river and vegetation). The project described here has three distinct yet inter-linked components that all leverage off the same ground-based monitoring and land surface modelling framework. These components are: (i) field validation of a relationship between soil moisture and changes in the Earth's gravity field, from ground- and satellite-based measurements of changes in gravity; (ii) development of a modelling framework for the assimilation of gravity data to constrain land surface model predictions of soil moisture content (such a framework enables the downscaling and disaggregation of low spatial (500 km) and temporal (monthly) resolution measurements of gravity change to finer spatial and temporal resolutions); and (iii) further refining the downscaling and disaggregation of space-borne gravity measurements by making use of other remotely sensed information, such as the higher spatial (25 km) and temporal (daily) resolution remotely sensed near-surface soil moisture measurements from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR) instruments on Aqua and ADEOS II. The important field work required by this project will be in the Murrumbidgee Catchment, Australia, where an extensive soil moisture monitoring program by the University of Melbourne is already in place. We will further enhance the current monitoring network by the addition of groundwater wells and additional soil moisture sites. Ground

  16. Temporal and ontogenetic variation in the escape response of Ameiva festiva (Squamata, Teiidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Lattanzio

    2014-01-01

    Several factors have been shown to affect lizard escape behavior (flight initiation distance or FID, the distance between predator and prey when the prey initiates escape). Patterns of daily activity, such as foraging or movement behavior, vary with respect to time of day, supporting that escape responses may vary temporally as well. However, there remains scant information regarding the effects of time of day on FID. During peak activity, FID may decrease due to increased cost of giving up r...

  17. Spatial and temporal variations of the high-altitude cusp precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Němeček

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Structured dispersion patterns of the ion precipitation in low- and mid-altitude cusp regions have been reported by many authors. These patterns are interpreted either as temporal features in terms of the pulsed reconnection model or as spatial changes caused by a combination of the particle velocity with the convection of magnetic field lines. It is generally expected that the spatial dispersion is predominantly observed in lower altitudes where the spacecraft crosses a wide range of geomagnetic coordinates in a short time, whereas the high-altitude spacecraft observes temporal changes because it stays nearly on the same field line for a long time. We have analyzed one pass of the INTERBALL-1/MAGION-4 satellite pair through the high-altitude cusp and found that both temporal and spatial dispersion effects are important even in the magnetopause vicinity. The analysis of the present event shows a spatial nature of the observed dispersion in the LLBL and in the plasma mantle. We have identified two sources of a mantle precipitation operating simultaneously. Our investigations suggest that besides already reported latitudinal dispersion, the longitudinal dispersion can be observed during intervals of sufficiently high east-west interplanetary magnetic field component.

  18. SPATIO-TEMPORAL VARIATIONS IN MACROINVERTEBRATE ASSEMBLAGES OF NEW CALEDONIAN STREAMS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARY N. J.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Forty-one sites located on 14 New Caledonian streams were surveyed four times between October 1996 and October 1997 in order to examine the spatial and temporal changes in the structure of the benthic macroinvertebrate communities. About 250 000 invertebrates representing 167 taxa were collected in the streams. Seventy-five percent of identified taxa and 67% of individuals were insects. Major spatial and temporal changes in the composition of the fauna were detected by multivariate analyses (ordination and classification. Overall, the number of individuals was significantly higher in the dry season (October than in the wetter seasons (January and June. However, a low temporal variability was detected in the structure of benthic communities during the sampling period. A cluster analysis based on taxonomic composition separated five groups of sites in relation with rock type, land use, and geographic characteristics. Several metrics (total invertebrate density, taxon richness, relative abundance of major invertebrate groups, diversity indices were used to characterize each group of sites. Forested streams, where the highest specific diversity occurred, represented the most speciose habitat for benthic fauna. A less rich and abundant fauna occurred in streams draining ultramafic rocks probably because of their low content in food resources and organic matter.

  19. Spatial and Temporal Variation in the Acoustic Habitat of Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops aduncus within a Highly Urbanized Estuary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A. Marley

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available There is growing awareness of underwater noise in a variety of marine habitats, and how such noise may adversely affect marine species. This is of particular concern for acoustically-specialized species, such as dolphins. In order to ascertain the potential impacts of anthropogenic noise on these animals, baseline information is required for defining the soundscape of dolphin habitats. The Swan-Canning River system in Western Australia flows through the city of Perth, and experiences numerous anthropogenic activities. Despite this, the river system is home to a community of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus. To provide a baseline soundscape description of dolphin habitat, over 11,600 h of acoustic data were analyzed from five sites within the Swan River (from Fremantle Inner Harbor to 20 km upstream across an 8-year period. Multiple sound sources were recorded at these sites, including: snapping shrimp; fishes; dolphins; pile-driving; bridge and road traffic; and vessel traffic. The two most prevalent sound sources, vessel traffic and snapping shrimp, likely have very different effects on dolphin communication with the former expected to be more disruptive. Sites were characteristic in their prominent sound sources, showing clear among-site variations, with some sites being “noisier” than others based on broadband noise levels, octave-band noise levels, and power spectrum density percentiles. Perth Waters had the highest broadband noise (10–11 kHz; median 113 dB re 1 μPa rms, whilst Heirisson Island was quietest (median 100 dB re 1 μPa rms. Generalized estimating equations identified variation in broadband noise levels within sites at a fine temporal scale, although sites differed in the significance of temporal variables. At Mosman Bay, a long-term dataset spanning eight years highlighted inter-annual variation in broadband noise levels, but no overall upwards or downwards trend over time. Acoustic habitats of the Swan

  20. Annual Variations in Water Storage and Precipitation in the Amazon Basin: Bounding Sink Terms in the Terrestrial Hydrological Balance using GRACE Satellite Gravity Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, John W.; Mitrovica, Jerry X.; Bailey, Richard C.; Tamisiea, Mark E.; Davis, James L.

    2007-01-01

    We combine satellite gravity data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and precipitation measurements from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climate Prediction Center's (CPC) Merged Analysis of Precipitation (CMAP) and the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), over the period from mid-2002 to mid-2006, to investigate the relative importance of sink (runoff and evaporation) and source (precipitation) terms in the hydrological balance of the Amazon Basin. When linear and quadratic terms are removed, the time series of land water storage variations estimated from GRACE exhibits a dominant annual signal of 250 mm peak-to-peak, which is equivalent to a water volume change of approximately 1800 cubic kilometers. A comparison of this trend with accumulated (i.e., integrated) precipitation shows excellent agreement and no evidence of basin saturation. The agreement indicates that the net runoff and evaporation contributes significantly less than precipitation to the annual hydrological mass balance. Indeed, raw residuals between the detrended water storage and precipitation anomalies range from plus or minus 40 mm. This range is consistent with streamflow measurements from the region, although the latter are characterized by a stronger annual signal than ow residuals, suggesting that runoff and evaporation may act to partially cancel each other.

  1. Remote Sensing-Based Biomass Estimation and Its Spatio-Temporal Variations in Temperate Grassland, Northern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunxiang Jin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Grassland biomass is essential for maintaining grassland ecosystems. Moreover, biomass is an important characteristic of grassland. In this study, we combined field sampling with remote sensing data and calculated five vegetation indices (VIs. Using this combined information, we quantified a remote sensing estimation model and estimated biomass in a temperate grassland of northern China. We also explored the dynamic spatio-temporal variation of biomass from 2006 to 2012. Our results indicated that all VIs investigated in the study were strongly correlated with biomass (α < 0.01. The precision of the model for estimating biomass based on ground data and remote sensing was greater than 73%. Additionally, the results of our analysis indicated that the annual average biomass was 11.86 million tons and that the average yield was 604.5 kg/ha. The distribution of biomass exhibited substantial spatial heterogeneity, and the biomass decreased from the eastern portion of the study area to the western portion. The interannual biomass exhibited strong fluctuations during 2006–2012, with a coefficient of variation of 26.95%. The coefficient of variation of biomass differed among the grassland types. The highest coefficient of variation was found for the desert steppe, followed by the typical steppe and the meadow steppe.

  2. Temporal and Spatial Variation of Residual Current Induced Bydredging Construction in the Front Area of Incheon New Port, South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. S.; Woo, S. B.; Kim, J. W.; Song, J. I.; Yoon, B. I.; Kwon, H. K.; Kim, H. I.

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the temporal and spatial variation of current induced by depth variation due to artificial dredging construction conduct observation. The study area in front of Incheon New Port (INP) located in the west coast of Korea has drastic topography variation because of its recent construction and development. These depth variations cause the change of the current velocity and direction. Furthermore, these processes cause the environmental change of topography and sediment dynamics. The across-sectional observations was conducted 4 times for 13 hours in order to acquire the hydrodynamics data with sampling the sea water. The across-sectional observation line is 2 km long and the depth of north side (nearby INP) is about 20 m, south side (nearby the Sihwa Dike) is about 7 m. In this area, uncommon current is observed. On the south side (shallow depth) of the line, ebb current is observed during high tide. On the other hand, on the north side (deep depth) of the line, flood tide is observed during low tide. The residual current is shown that the ebb dominance flow is shown at surface layer and flood dominance flow is shown at bottom layer near INP .The overall current flow of north - south direction is shown into the south. These results and physical character with the operation of Sihwa Tidal Power Plant (STPP) seem to affect the sediment processes in the vicinity of the IN

  3. Is there temporal variation on solid waste stranding in mangroves? A case study in Ratones mangrove, Florianopolis, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Pinto Vieira

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Mangrove areas are decreasing around the world due to population increase. The most damaging activities include embankments, shrimp farming, and dumping of wastes. The temporal and spatial stranding patterns of solid waste are important to establish probable sources and understand their role in the dispersion of organisms through natural areas. In this study, we analyze temporal variation of solid waste stranding in Ratones mangrove, northwestern of Santa Catarina Island (Brazil. Samplings were carried out monthly during one year in four different areas. In each area, two 50 m2 random plots were sampled per month. All solid waste strands on the plots were removed, quantified, and qualified. Plastic and nylon items (both made of petroleum represented 80% of waste stranding. There were significant differences in temporal stranding with regard to plastic, but not to nylon. Wastes were found in all samples throughout the year, and some areas are more affected than others. Places with dense edges of Spartina alterniflora Loisel (Poaceae seem to have less solid waste inside mangrove forest, perhaps due to the effect of grass acting as a mesh barrier. The results reflected concerns with conservation, considering that these coastal ecosystems are impacted by waste dumping throughout the year, with highest concentration within important nursery points.

  4. Is there temporal variation on solid waste stranding in mangroves? A case study in Ratones mangrove, Florianopolis, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Pinto Vieira

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2013v26n1p79 Mangrove areas are decreasing around the world due to population increase. The most damaging activities include embankments, shrimp farming, and dumping of wastes. The temporal and spatial stranding patterns of solid waste are important to establish probable sources and understand their role in the dispersion of organisms through natural areas. In this study, we analyze temporal variation of solid waste stranding in Ratones mangrove, northwestern Santa Catarina Island (Brazil. Samplings were carried out monthly during one year in four different areas. In each area, two 50 m2 random plots were sampled per month. All solid waste strands on the plots were removed, quantified, and qualified. Plastic and nylon items (both made of petroleum represented 80% of waste stranding. There were significant differences in temporal stranding with regard to plastic, but not to nylon. Wastes were found in all samples throughout the year, and some areas are more affected than others. Places with dense edges of Spartina alterniflora Loisel (Poaceae seem to have less solid waste inside mangrove forest, perhaps due to the effect of grass acting as a mesh barrier. The results reflected concerns with conservation, considering that these coastal ecosystems are impacted by waste dumping throughout the year, with highest concentration within important nursery points.

  5. Effects of temporal density variation and convergent geometry on nonlinear bubble evolution in classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharov, V N; Li, D

    2005-04-01

    Effects of temporal density variation and spherical convergence on the nonlinear bubble evolution of single-mode, classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability are studied using an analytical model based on Layzer's theory [Astrophys. J. 122, 1 (1955)]. When the temporal density variation is included, the bubble amplitude in planar geometry is shown to asymptote to integral(t)U(L)(t')rho(t')dt'/rho(t), where U(L) = square root of (g/(C(g)k)) is the Layzer bubble velocity, rho is the fluid density, and C(g) = 3 and C(g) = 1 for the two- and three-dimensional geometries, respectively. The asymptotic bubble amplitude in a converging spherical shell is predicted to evolve as eta approximately etam(-/r0//(lU(L)sp-eta/r0), where r0 is the outer shell radius, eta(t) = integral(t)U(L)sp(t')rho(t') r(0)2(t')dt'/rho(t)r(0)2(t), U(L)(sp) = square root of (-r0(t)r0(t)/l), m(t) = rho(t)r(0)3(t), and l is the mode number.

  6. No Evidence for Temporal Variation in a Cryptic Species Community of Freshwater Amphipods of the Hyalella azteca Species Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Nozais

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The co-occurrence of cryptic species of Hyalella amphipods is a challenge to our traditional views of how species assemble. Since these species have similar morphologies, it is not evident that they have developed phenotypic differences that would allow them to occupy different ecological niches. We examined the structure of a community of Hyalella amphipods in the littoral zone of a boreal lake to verify if temporal variation was present in relative abundances. Morphological and molecular analyses using the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI gene enabled us to detect three cryptic species at the study site. No temporal variation was observed in the community, as one cryptic species was always more abundant than the two others. The relative abundances of each species in the community appeared constant at least for the open-water season, both for adult and juvenile amphipods. Niche differences are still to be found among these species, but it is suggested that migration from nearby sites may be an important factor explaining the species co-occurrence.

  7. Temporal variation and biomagnification of organohalogen compounds in finless porpoises (Neophocaena phocaenoides) from the South China Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramu, Karri [Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama, Ehime Prefecture 790-8577 (Japan); Kajiwara, Natsuko [Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama, Ehime Prefecture 790-8577 (Japan); Lam, Paul K.S. [Department of Biology and Chemistry, Center for Coastal Pollution and Conservation, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Jefferson, Thomas A. [Southwest Fisheries Science Center, NOAA, Fisheries, 8604 La Jolla Shores Drive, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Zhou Kaiya [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Bioresource Technology, College of Life Sciences, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210097 (China); Tanabe, Shinsuke [Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama, Ehime Prefecture 790-8577 (Japan)]. E-mail: shinsuke@agr.ehime-u.ac.jp

    2006-11-15

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and organochlorine compounds (OCs) were determined in the blubber of male finless porpoises (Neophocaena phocaenoides) collected in 1990 and 2000/01 from the South China Sea. Among the organohalogen compounds analyzed, DDTs and PCBs were the predominant contaminants in the porpoises, ranging from 26,000 to 260,000 and 1400 to 28,000 ng/g lipid wt., respectively. PBDEs ranged from a minimum of 84 ng/g lipid wt., in 1990 to a maximum of 980 ng/g lipid wt., in 2001, showing a significant increase during the time period investigated. Congener profiles in finless porpoises did not shift to higher BDE congeners during these years, implying a continuous discharge of lower BDE commercial mixtures, such as PentaBDE. For OCs, HCHs concentrations decreased significantly, while others did not exhibit any significant temporal variation. Biomagnification factors (BMFs) were found to be highest for CHLs and lowest for HCB. PBDEs and PCBs had comparable BMFs, indicating a similar potential for biomagnification through the food web. - Levels and temporal variations of organohalogen contaminants in the South China Sea.

  8. Temporal variation in mycorrhizal diversity and carbon and nitrogen stable isotope abundance in the wintergreen meadow orchid Anacamptis morio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercole, Enrico; Adamo, Martino; Rodda, Michele; Gebauer, Gerhard; Girlanda, Mariangela; Perotto, Silvia

    2015-02-01

    Many adult orchids, especially photoautotrophic species, associate with a diverse range of mycorrhizal fungi, but little is known about the temporal changes that might occur in the diversity and functioning of orchid mycorrhiza during vegetative and reproductive plant growth. Temporal variations in the spectrum of mycorrhizal fungi and in stable isotope natural abundance were investigated in adult plants of Anacamptis morio, a wintergreen meadow orchid. Anacamptis morio associated with mycorrhizal fungi belonging to Tulasnella, Ceratobasidium and a clade of Pezizaceae (Ascomycetes). When a complete growing season was investigated, multivariate analyses indicated significant differences in the mycorrhizal fungal community. Among fungi identified from manually isolated pelotons, Tulasnella was more common in autumn and winter, the pezizacean clade was very frequent in spring, and Ceratobasidium was more frequent in summer. By contrast, relatively small variations were found in carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stable isotope natural abundance, A. morio samples showing similar (15)N enrichment and (13)C depletion at the different sampling times. These observations suggest that, irrespective of differences in the seasonal environmental conditions, the plant phenological stages and the associated fungi, the isotopic content in mycorrhizal A. morio remains fairly constant over time. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  9. Orogenic mass changes detectable in satellite gravity missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braitenberg, Carla; Pivetta, Tommaso; Morsut, Federico

    2017-04-01

    Long term GNSS time series detect vertical crustal movement rates, which typically at orogens demonstrate uplift. The orogenic uplift can be ascribed to tectonic and post-glacial adjustments and crustal thickening. We investigate the sensitivity of satellite gravity change rate observations to detect the associated mass changes. Gravity change rate joint with uplift monitoring allows to distinguish the mechanism of uplift (Braitenberg and Shum, 2016). We use known vertical uplift rates over specific orogens to predict the gravity change for different geodynamic hypotheses of pure uplift and mantle inflow, or crustal thickening and isostatic Moho lowering. The sensitivity of gravity as a tool to distinguish the two mechanisms is investigated. The estimate of this tectonic signal is important, when the observed gravity change rates of GRACE and future missions are interpreted exclusively in terms of hydrologic changes tied to climatic variation. We find that in some areas, as the Tibetan plateau and the Himalayan- Alpine range, the tectonic signal is measurable by satellite gravity and contributes to a better understanding of the geodynamic processes leading to orogenesis. Braitenberg C. and Shum C. K. (2016). Geodynamic implications of temporal gravity changes over Tibetan Plateau. Italian Journal of Geosciences, in press.

  10. Incorporating temporal variation in seabird telemetry data: time variant kernel density models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Andrew; Adams, Evan M.; Anderson, Carl; Berlin, Alicia; Bowman, Timothy D.; Connelly, Emily; Gilliland, Scott; Gray, Carrie E.; Lepage, Christine; Meattey, Dustin; Montevecchi, William; Osenkowski, Jason; Savoy, Lucas; Stenhouse, Iain; Williams, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    A key component of the Mid-Atlantic Baseline Studies project was tracking the individual movements of focal marine bird species (Red-throated Loon [Gavia stellata], Northern Gannet [Morus bassanus], and Surf Scoter [Melanitta perspicillata]) through the use of satellite telemetry. This element of the project was a collaborative effort with the Department of Energy (DOE), Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Sea Duck Joint Venture (SDJV), among other organizations. Satellite telemetry is an effective and informative tool for understanding individual animal movement patterns, allowing researchers to mark an individual once, and thereafter follow the movements of the animal in space and time. Aggregating telemetry data from multiple individuals can provide information about the spatial use and temporal movements of populations. Tracking data is three dimensional, with the first two dimensions, X and Y, ordered along the third dimension, time. GIS software has many capabilities to store, analyze and visualize the location information, but little or no support for visualizing the temporal data, and tools for processing temporal data are lacking. We explored several ways of analyzing the movement patterns using the spatiotemporal data provided by satellite tags. Here, we present the results of one promising method: time-variant kernel density analysis (Keating and Cherry, 2009). The goal of this chapter is to demonstrate new methods in spatial analysis to visualize and interpret tracking data for a large number of individual birds across time in the mid-Atlantic study area and beyond. In this chapter, we placed greater emphasis on analytical methods than on the behavior and ecology of the animals tracked. For more detailed examinations of the ecology and wintering habitat use of the focal species in the midAtlantic, see Chapters 20-22.

  11. Spatio-temporal variation in foodscapes modifies deer browsing impact on vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejandro A. Royo; David W. Kramer; Karl V. Miller; Nathan P. Nibbelink; Susan L. Stout

    2017-01-01

    Context. Ungulate browsers often alter plant composition and reduce diversity in forests worldwide, yet our ability to predict browse impact on vegetation remains equivocal. Theory suggests, however, that ungulate distribution and foraging impacts are shaped by scale-dependent decisions based on variation in habitat composition and structure...

  12. spatial-temporal variation in sex ratio and group size of ostriches

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    ABSTRACT. A study was conducted on variation in sex ratio and group size of ostriches (Struthio camelus) in. Serengeti National Park and adjacent partially protected areas in northern Tanzania. Data were collected for two years (2005- 2006), along 388 km of roads. The two areas were compared with respect to ostrich sex ...

  13. Temporal Variation of Ca–K Line Profile of the Sun during the Solar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We obtained the Ca–K line profile of the Sun as a star since. 1969 at the Kodaikanal Observatory (KO) and analysis of the data showed the need to delineate the role of different chromospheric features to the variations of solar irradiance. We, therefore, initiated a new methodol- ogy to make observations of Ca–K ...

  14. Temporal Variation of Ca–K Line Profile of the Sun during the Solar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... We obtained the Ca–K line profile of the Sun as a star since 1969 at the Kodaikanal Observatory (KO) and analysis of the data showed the need to delineate the role of different chromospheric features to the variations of solar irradiance. We, therefore, initiated a new methodology to make observations of ...

  15. Variation in Working Memory Capacity and Temporal-Contextual Retrieval from Episodic Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spillers, Gregory J.; Unsworth, Nash

    2011-01-01

    Unsworth and Engle (2007) recently proposed a model of working memory capacity characterized by, among other things, the ability to conduct a strategic, cue-dependent search of long-term memory. Although this ability has been found to mediate individual variation in a number of higher order cognitive tasks, the component processes involved remain…

  16. Spatial and temporal small-scale variation in groundwater quality of a shallow sandy aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1992-01-01

    The groundwater quality of a shallow unconfined sandy aquifer has been characterized for pH, alkalinity, chloride, nitrate, sulfate, calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium in terms of vertical and horizontal variations (350 groundwater samples). The test area is located within a farmland lot...

  17. Variation of Antarctic circumpolar current and its intensification in relation to the southern annular mode detected in the time-variable gravity signals by GRACE satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liau, Jen-Ru; Chao, Benjamin F.

    2017-07-01

    The southern annular mode (SAM) in the atmosphere and the Antarctic circumpolar current (ACC) in the ocean play decisive roles in the climatic system of the mid- to high-latitude southern hemisphere. Using the time-variable gravity data from the GRACE satellite mission, we find the link between the space-time variabilities of the ACC and the SAM. We calculate the empirical orthogonal functions (EOF) of the non-seasonal ocean bottom pressure (OBP) field in the circum-Antarctic seas from the GRACE data for the period from 2003 to 2015. We find that the leading EOF mode of the non-seasonal OBP represents a unison OBP oscillation around Antarctica with time history closely in pace with that of the SAM Index with a high correlation of 0.77. This OBP variation gives rise to a variation in the geostrophic flow field; the result for the same EOF mode shows heightened variations in the zonal velocity that resides primarily in the eastern hemispheric portion of the ACC and coincided geographically with the southernmost boundary of the ACC's main stream. Confirming previous oceanographic studies, these geodetic satellite results provide independent information toward better understanding of the ACC-SAM process.

  18. TEMPORAL VARIATIONS OF X-RAY SOLAR FLARE LOOPS: LENGTH, CORPULENCE, POSITION, TEMPERATURE, PLASMA PRESSURE, AND SPECTRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey, Natasha L. S.; Kontar, Eduard P., E-mail: n.jeffrey@physics.gla.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-01

    The spatial and spectral properties of three solar flare coronal X-ray loops are studied before, during, and after the peak X-ray emission. Using observations from the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), we deduce the temporal changes in emitting X-ray length, corpulence, volume, position, number density, and thermal pressure. We observe a decrease in the loop length, width, and volume before the X-ray peak, and an increasing number density and thermal pressure. After the X-ray peak, volume increases and loop corpulence grows due to increasing width. The volume variations are more pronounced than the position variations, often known as magnetic field line contraction. We believe this is the first dedicated study examining the temporal evolution of X-ray loop lengths and widths. Collectively, the observations also show for the first time three temporal phases given by peaks in temperature, X-ray emission, and thermal pressure, with the minimum volume coinciding with the X-ray peak. Although the volume of the flaring plasma decreases before the peak in X-ray emission, the relationship between temperature and volume does not support simple compressive heating in a collapsing magnetic trap model. Within a low {beta} plasma, shrinking loop widths perpendicular to the guiding field can be explained by squeezing the magnetic field threading the region. Plasma heating leads to chromospheric evaporation and growing number density. This produces increasing thermal pressure and decreasing loop lengths as electrons interact at shorter distances and we believe after the X-ray peak, the increasing loop corpulence.

  19. Effects of illumination functions on the computation of gravity-dependent signal path variation models in primary focus and Cassegrainian VLBI telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbondanza, Claudio; Sarti, Pierguido

    2010-08-01

    This paper sets the rules for an optimal definition of precise signal path variation (SPV) models, revising and highlighting the deficiencies in the calculations adopted in previous studies and improving the computational approach. Hence, the linear coefficients that define the SPV model are rigorously determined. The equations that are presented depend on the dimensions and the focal lengths of the telescopes as well as on the feed illumination taper. They hold for any primary focus or Cassegrainian very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) telescope. Earlier investigations usually determined the SPV models assuming a uniform illumination of the telescope mirrors. We prove this hypothesis to be over-simplistic by comparing results derived adopting (a) uniform, (b) Gaussian and (c) binomial illumination functions. Numerical computations are developed for AZ-EL mount, 32 m Medicina and Noto (Italy) VLBI telescopes, these latter being the only telescopes which possess thorough information on gravity-dependent deformation patterns. Particularly, assuming a Gaussian illumination function, the SPV in primary focus over the elevation range [0°, 90°] is 10.1 and 7.2 mm, for Medicina and Noto, respectively. With uniform illumination function the maximal path variation for Medicina is 17.6 and 12.7 mm for Noto, thus highlighting the strong dependency on the choice of the illumination function. According to our findings, a revised SPV model is released for Medicina and a model for Noto is presented here for the first time. Currently, no other VLBI telescope possesses SPV models capable of correcting gravity-dependent observation biases.

  20. Effects of ENSO and temporal rainfall variation on the dynamics of successional communities in old-field succession of a seasonal tropical dry forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maza-Villalobos, S.; Poorter, L.; Martínez-Ramos, M.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of temporal variation of rainfall on secondary succession of tropical dry ecosystems are poorly understood. We studied effects of inter-seasonal and inter-year rainfall variation on the dynamics of regenerative successional communities of a tropical dry forest in Mexico. We emphasized

  1. Spatial and temporal variation in results of purple urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) toxicity tests with zinc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, B.M.; Anderson, B.S.; Hunt, J.W. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States). Inst. of Marine Sciences

    1998-03-01

    Purple urchins (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) were maintained in year-round spawning condition in the laboratory for use in fertilization and larval development experiments designed to assess temporal variability in response to zinc. Results of these tests were compared to those from tests using gametes obtained from a field-collected population. Fertilization and larval development tests were also conducted comparing field-collected purple urchins from three geographically distinct groups on the West Coast of the United States. Fertilization tests conducted to assess temporal variability produced variable median effects concentrations (EC50s) ranging from 4.1 to >100 {micro}g/L zinc. Larval development tests did not demonstrate significant differences in response to zinc between geographically distinct purple urchin populations. Fertilization test variability was examined in terms of sperm concentration and sperm collection method during two seasons. Reduced variability was found with dry sperm collection in tests conducted in March 1995 but increased again in tests conducted in June 1995, regardless of sperm collection method. Increased variability in response to zinc may be caused by seasonal temperature effects.

  2. Temporal variation and scale in movement-based resource selection functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooten, M.B.; Hanks, E.M.; Johnson, D.S.; Alldredge, M.W.

    2013-01-01

    A common population characteristic of interest in animal ecology studies pertains to the selection of resources. That is, given the resources available to animals, what do they ultimately choose to use? A variety of statistical approaches have been employed to examine this question and each has advantages and disadvantages with respect to the form of available data and the properties of estimators given model assumptions. A wealth of high resolution telemetry data are now being collected to study animal population movement and space use and these data present both challenges and opportunities for statistical inference. We summarize traditional methods for resource selection and then describe several extensions to deal with measurement uncertainty and an explicit movement process that exists in studies involving high-resolution telemetry data. Our approach uses a correlated random walk movement model to obtain temporally varying use and availability distributions that are employed in a weighted distribution context to estimate selection coefficients. The temporally varying coefficients are then weighted by their contribution to selection and combined to provide inference at the population level. The result is an intuitive and accessible statistical procedure that uses readily available software and is computationally feasible for large datasets. These methods are demonstrated using data collected as part of a large-scale mountain lion monitoring study in Colorado, USA.

  3. Temporal genetic population structure and interannual variation in migration behavior of Pacific Lamprey Entosphenus tridentatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Benjamin J.; Wyss, Lance A.; McCoun, Rebecca; Courter, Ian; Schwabe, Lawrence; Peery, Christopher; Schreck, Carl B.; Spice, Erin K.; Docker, Margaret F.

    2017-01-01

    Studies using neutral loci suggest that Pacific lamprey, Entosphenus tridentatus, lack strong spatial genetic population structure. However, it is unknown whether temporal genetic population structure exists. We tested whether adult Pacific lamprey: (1) show temporal genetic population structure; and (2) migrate different distances between years. We non-lethally sampled lamprey for DNA in 2009 and 2010 and used eight microsatellite loci to test for genetic population structure. We used telemetry to record the migration behaviors of these fish. Lamprey were assignable to three moderately differentiated genetic clusters (FST = 0.16–0.24 for all pairwise comparisons): one cluster was composed of individuals from 2009, and the other two contained individuals from 2010. The FST value between years was 0.13 and between genetic clusters within 2010 was 0.20. A total of 372 (72.5%) fish were detected multiple times during their migrations. Most fish (69.9%) remained in the mainstem Willamette River; the remaining 30.1% migrated into tributaries. Eighty-two lamprey exhibited multiple back-and-forth movements among tributaries and the mainstem, which may indicate searching behaviors. All migration distances were significantly greater in 2010, when the amplitude of river discharge was greater. Our data suggest genetic structuring between and within years that may reflect different cohorts.

  4. Spatio-temporal variations of black carbon concentrations in the Megacity Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, Nina; Norra, Stefan; Fricker, Mathieu; Kaminski, Uwe; Chen, Yizhen; Chai, Fahe; Wang, Shulan; Yu, Yang; Cen, Kuang

    2013-11-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution and the flux of black carbon (BC) concentration in Beijing were continuously investigated over a two-year period at five sites to highlight the relative influence of contributing sources. The results demonstrate firstly that there is significant spatio-temporal variability of BC in Beijing. Highest concentrations occurred during winter primarily due to stagnant meteorological conditions, and seasonal BC sources, such as coal combustion for heating purposes. Biomass burning was identified as a minor seasonal source during the summer months. BC also varied spatially with higher concentrations in the SE of Beijing and lower concentrations in the NW, due to the differing emission intensity of various local BC sources such as traffic and industry. Frequently, overnight BC concentrations were higher due to specific meteorological conditions, such as the lower urban mixing layer height and various anthropogenic activities, such as exclusive night-time heavy duty vehicle traffic in the inner-city. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Temporal variations in air-sea CO2 exchange near large kelp beds near San Diego, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikawa, Hiroki; Oechel, Walter C.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents nearly continuous air-sea CO2 flux for 7 years using the eddy covariance method for nearshore water near San Diego, California, as well as identifying environmental processes that appear to control temporal variations in air-sea CO2 flux at different time scales using time series decomposition. Monthly variations in CO2 uptake are shown to be positively influenced by photosynthetically active photon flux density (PPFD) and negatively related to wind speeds. In contrast to the monthly scale, wind speeds often influenced CO2 uptake positively on an hourly scale. Interannual variations in CO2 flux were not correlated with any independent variables, but did reflect surface area of the adjacent kelp bed in the following year. Different environmental influences on CO2 flux at different temporal scales suggest the importance of long-term flux monitoring for accurately identifying important environmental processes for the coastal carbon cycle. Overall, the study area was a strong CO2 sink into the sea (CO2 flux of ca. -260 g C m-2 yr-1). If all coastal areas inhabited by macrophytes had a similar CO2 uptake rate, the net CO2 uptake from these areas alone would roughly equal the net CO2 sink estimated for the entire global coastal ocean to date. A similar-strength CO2 flux, ranging between -0.09 and -0.01 g C m-2 h-1, was also observed over another kelp bed from a pilot study of boat-based eddy covariance measurements.

  6. The gravity field and GGOS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, René; Sideris, M.G.; Shum, C.K.

    2005-01-01

    The gravity field of the earth is a natural element of the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS). Gravity field quantities are like spatial geodetic observations of potential very high accuracy, with measurements, currently at part-per-billion (ppb) accuracy, but gravity field quantities are also...... unique as they can be globally represented by harmonic functions (long-wavelength geopotential model primarily from satellite gravity field missions), or based on point sampling (airborne and in situ absolute and superconducting gravimetry). From a GGOS global perspective, one of the main challenges...... is to ensure the consistency of the global and regional geopotential and geoid models, and the temporal changes of the gravity field at large spatial scales. The International Gravity Field Service, an umbrella "level-2" IAG service (incorporating the International Gravity Bureau, International Geoid Service...

  7. MODTOHAFSD — A GUI based JAVA code for gravity analysis of strike limited sedimentary basins by means of growing bodies with exponential density contrast-depth variation: A space domain approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthi, V.; Sastry, S. Rajeswara; Ramamma, B.

    2013-07-01

    Based on the principles of modeling and inversion, two interpretation methods are developed in the space domain along with a GUI based JAVA code, MODTOHAFSD, to analyze the gravity anomalies of strike limited sedimentary basins using a prescribed exponential density contrast-depth function. A stack of vertical prisms all having equal widths, but each one possesses its own limited strike length and thickness, describes the structure of a sedimentary basin above the basement complex. The thicknesses of prisms represent the depths to the basement and are the unknown parameters to be estimated from the observed gravity anomalies. Forward modeling is realized in the space domain using a combination of analytical and numerical approaches. The algorithm estimates the initial depths of a sedimentary basin and improves them, iteratively, based on the differences between the observed and modeled gravity anomalies within the specified convergence criteria. The present code, works on Model-View-Controller (MVC) pattern, reads the Bouguer gravity anomalies, constructs/modifies regional gravity background in an interactive approach, estimates residual gravity anomalies and performs automatic modeling or inversion based on user specification for basement topography. Besides generating output in both ASCII and graphical forms, the code displays (i) the changes in the depth structure, (ii) nature of fit between the observed and modeled gravity anomalies, (iii) changes in misfit, and (iv) variation of density contrast with iteration in animated forms. The code is used to analyze both synthetic and real field gravity anomalies. The proposed technique yielded information that is consistent with the assumed parameters in case of synthetic structure and with available drilling depths in case of field example. The advantage of the code is that it can be used to analyze the gravity anomalies of sedimentary basins even when the profile along which the interpretation is intended fails to

  8. Temporal variation of carbonyl compound concentrations at a semi-rural site in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, C.S.; Skov, H.; Nielsen, T.

    2000-01-01

    The atmospheric concentrations of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and acetone were measured by the DNPH-technique at the semi-rural site Lille Valby, Denmark (55 degrees N) between May-July 1995, The average concentrations were observed to be 1.2 ppbv for formaldehyde, 0.8 ppbv for acetaldehyde and 1.......9 ppbv for acetone, For the set of carbonyl compounds, concentrations were found to be highly correlated, though only during daytime, The weak correlations observed during nighttime are believed to be caused by the dry deposition of especially formaldehyde, During periods with low photochemical activity...... of hydrocarbons during long-range transport. Especially, the concentration levels of acetone showed a pronounced seasonal-variation with the highest levels observed during summertime and lowest in winter and spring. The seasonal variation in the concentration levels of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were small...

  9. Insights From Genomics Into Spatial and Temporal Variation in Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, A Q; Voyles, J; Rios-Sotelo, G; Rosenblum, E B

    2016-01-01

    Advances in genetics and genomics have provided new tools for the study of emerging infectious diseases. Researchers can now move quickly from simple hypotheses to complex explanations for pathogen origin, spread, and mechanisms of virulence. Here we focus on the application of genomics to understanding the biology of the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), a novel and deadly pathogen of amphibians. We provide a brief history of the system, then focus on key insights into Bd variation garnered from genomics approaches, and finally, highlight new frontiers for future discoveries. Genomic tools have revealed unexpected complexity and variation in the Bd system suggesting that the history and biology of emerging pathogens may not be as simple as they initially seem. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Variational principle for gravity with null and non-null boundaries: a unified boundary counter-term

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parattu, Krishnamohan; Chakraborty, Sumanta; Padmanabhan, T. [IUCAA, Post Bag 4, Pune (India)

    2016-03-15

    It is common knowledge that the Einstein-Hilbert action does not furnish a well-posed variational principle. The usual solution to this problem is to add an extra boundary term to the action, called a counter-term, so that the variational principle becomes well-posed. When the boundary is spacelike or timelike, the Gibbons-Hawking-York counter-term is the most widely used. For null boundaries, we had proposed a counter-term in a previous paper. In this paper, we extend the previous analysis and propose a counter-term that can be used to eliminate variations of the ''off-the-surface'' derivatives of the metric on any boundary, regardless of its spacelike, timelike or null nature. (orig.)

  11. Spatial and temporal variation in crop diversity in agroforestry homegardens of southern Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Abebe, T.; Wiersum, K.F.; Bongers, F.

    2010-01-01

    A key assumption in many homegarden studies is that homegardens are ecologically and socio-economically sustainable due to their species diversity. The precise relation between diversity and sustainability is still heavily debated, however. A basic question is how diversity in homegardens can best be characterized in view of the various dimensions of species diversity and their variation in time and space. This paper assesses different types of species diversity in the homegardens of Sidama r...

  12. On the structure and variation of 'hace' as a temporal expression

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. The goal of this article is to analyse a case of variation in Spanish. In most varieties, constructions of the form Hace dos días que (“it has been two days since”) reject nominal expressions like todo el día (“all the day”), hence *Hace todo el día que (lit. “it has been all the day that”). However, a particular variety of ...

  13. Regional and temporal variations in organ donation across the UK (secondary analyses of databases)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlade, Donal; Rae, Gordon; McClenahan, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To explore regional variations in donation of cadaveric solid organs and tissues across the four devolved health administrations of the UK (England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland). Design A secondary analysis of databases from NHS Blood & Transplant (1990–2009) and from the National Organ Procurement Service for the Republic of Ireland, Eurotransplant International Foundation and Scandiatransplant. Results After adjusting for time, statistically significant differences were found among the four regions (pdonations. The only exceptions were between England and Scotland and between Wales and Northern Ireland where the differences were not significant following a Bonferroni correction (p>0.008). England had significantly fewer heart donations than both Wales (pdonations. Regional variations in kidney and corneal donations were moderated by time. Northern Ireland, however, has had consistently lower corneal donation rates than the other three regions. Conclusion Organ donation rates over the last two decades vary in the four UK regions, and this variation depends on the type of organ donated. Further exploration of underlying factors, organisational issues, practices and attitudes to organ donation in the four regions of the UK, taking into account findings from EU countries with varying approaches to presumed consent, needs to be undertaken before such legislation is introduced across the UK. PMID:22021868

  14. Spatio-temporal variation in surf zone fish communities at Ilha do Cardoso State Park, São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Menegassi del Favero

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to analyze the time-space variation of the fish fauna in the surf zone fish communities at Ilha do Cardoso State Park, São Paulo, Brazil, four consecutive hauls were done over a year on three beaches with different degrees of exposure, at low and high tide. To evaluate the influence of each abiotic variable over the fish community, a Canonical Correspondence Analysis was conducted. We identified 7.286 individuals belonging to 20 families and 47 species, most specimens collected were juveniles. At low tide, the highest diversity and richness values were calculated while the highest dominance was obtained at high tide. As for the number of species collected at the three beaches, stood out for the lower values the cooler months, between June and September. Abiotic variables explained 41.3% of the variability of biological data, where 11.4% corresponds to the spatial variation. Meanwhile the temporal variables accounted for 31.9% of the variation in abundance, where 26.3% of the variance explained nycthemeral variation. Additionally two groups were clearly observed between months with low and high temperature. However in this variable, the tidal variation, excluding the seasonal effect, explained 6.2%, while seasonality, excluding tide effect, explained 26.3%. Although the main measurable seasonal changes were related to temperature, water temperature showed a low percentage of explanation in the fish fauna variability (2.7%. Finally, it is emphasized that the seasonal changes in surf zone fish community primarily reflect patterns of recruitment determined by the reproductive activity and coastal circulation.

  15. Temporal variations in water quality in a brackish tidal pond: Implications for governing processes and management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Wenhui; Chui, Ting Fong May

    2017-05-15

    Brackish tidal ponds have been constructed along coastal areas in many parts of the world for aquaculture, including some Ramsar Sites. Such ponds are considered a sustainable, wise use of wetlands if managed properly, but they can also pose serious environmental problems if mismanaged. To understand the governing processes and to promote sustainable management strategies, this study examines the different temporal variations in water quality parameters in a brackish tidal pond located within the wetland complex of the Mai Po Ramsar Site in Hong Kong, China. The variations are compared with those of the receiving bay, and the water channel that connects the pond and the bay. Equations are then developed to link the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations in the pond with the governing processes, and to analyze their relative contributions to DO levels. Field data show seasonal patterns in water temperature and salinity in response to the seasonal variations in solar radiation and rainfall. For the pond and the channel, DO, chlorophyll and pH exhibit fortnightly variations due to the bi-weekly water exchange between the pond and the bay. There were also diurnal variations in water temperature and DO in response to changes in solar radiation for both locations, and the tidal flushing for the water channel. Analysis of the findings indicates that water exchange influences the DO concentration more strongly than solar radiation. The DO equation links pond water quality with the time of day, and the time in a water exchange cycle, and thus provides some guidance for determining water exchange and water sampling schedules. The study sheds light on the governing processes and management strategies related to the sustainable management of a brackish tidal pond. The results are thus beneficial in elucidating and promoting the sustainable management and wise use of wetlands in other locations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Spatio-temporal variations in storm surges along the North Atlantic coasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, Marta; Woodworth, Philip

    2017-04-01

    Extreme sea levels along the coasts of the North Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico have been investigated using hourly tide gauge records compiled in the recently released GESLA-2 data set (www.gesla.org). These regions are among the most densely monitored coasts worldwide, with more than 300 high frequency quality-controlled tide gauge time series available. Here we estimate the storm surge component of extreme sea levels using both tidal residuals and skew surges, for which we explore the spatial and temporal coherency of their intensities, duration and frequency. We quantify the relationship of extremes with dominant large scale climate patterns and discuss the impact of mean sea level changes. Finally, we test the assumption of stationarity of the probability of extreme occurrence and to which extent it holds when mean sea level changes are considered in combination with storm surges.

  17. Vegetation as a driver of temporal variations in slope stability: The impact of hydrological processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, John H.; Fourcaud, Thierry; Jourdan, Christophe; Maeght, Jean-Luc; Mao, Zhun; Metayer, James; Meylan, Louise; Pierret, Alain; Rapidel, Bruno; Roupsard, Olivier; de Rouw, Anneke; Sanchez, Mario Villatoro; Wang, Yan; Stokes, Alexia

    2017-05-01

    Although vegetation is increasingly used to mitigate landslide risks, how vegetation affects the temporal variability of slope stability is poorly understood, especially in earthquake-prone regions. We combined 3-year long soil moisture monitoring, measurements of soil physical properties and plant functional traits, and numerical modeling to compare slope stability under paired land uses with and without trees in tropical, subtropical, and temperate landslide- and earthquake-prone regions. Trees improved stability for 5-12 months per year from drawdown of soil moisture and resulted in less interannual variability in the duration of high-stability periods compared to slopes without trees. Our meta-analysis of published data also showed that slopes with woody vegetation were more stable and less sensitive to climate and soil factors than slopes with herbaceous vegetation. However, estimates of earthquake magnitude necessary to destabilize slopes at our sites suggest that large additional stabilization from trees is necessary for meaningful protection against external triggers.

  18. Capturing temporal variation in phosphorus dynamics in groundwater dominated rivers using automated high-frequency sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieroza, M. Z.; Heathwaite, A. L.; Mullinger, N. J.; Keenan, P. O.

    2012-04-01

    High-frequency river water quality monitoring provides detailed hydrochemical information on the time scale of hydrologic response. Several studies (Kirchner et al., 2004; Johnes, 2007; Cassidy and Jordan, 2011) have shown previously that coarse sampling approaches fail to quantify nutrient and sediment loads and to capture the fine structure of water quality dynamics correctly. A robust analysis of high-frequency nutrient and water quality time series can present a complex conceptual, analytical and computational problem. High-frequency nutrient monitoring provides new evidence of processes and patterns that could not be observed previously using standard coarse resolution sampling schemes. However, to fully utilise the wealth of information contained in high-frequency nutrient data, we need to address the following questions: how to detect complex coupling patterns and processes in high-resolution flow-nutrients data, how do these patterns and processes change throughout the period of observation, and how to distinguish noise signals from an evidence of real processes (Harris and Heathwaite, 2005). Here, hourly measurements of total phosphorus (TP), soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) and turbidity were carried out using bank side analysers to study the biogeochemical response of a 54 km2 catchment of the River Leith, a tributary of the River Eden (Cumbria, UK). A remote automated mobile lab facilitates real-time high-frequency nutrient and water quality monitoring, with no time delay between collection and analysis of the reactive elements. The objectives of this study were two-fold: first to investigate the intrinsic complexity of the temporal relationship between phosphorus fractions (SRP, TP), turbidity and continuous hydrometric time series and secondly to investigate the possibilities of missing high-frequency phosphorus data infilling using continuous hydrometric time series. Complex non-linear relationships between flow, TP and SRP, turbidity were observed

  19. Spatio-temporal variation in stream water chemistry in a tropical urban watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alonso Ramírez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Urban activities and related infrastructure alter the natural patterns of stream physical and chemical conditions. According to the Urban Stream Syndrome, streams draining urban landscapes are characterized by high concentrations of nutrients and ions, and might have elevated water temperatures and variable oxygen concentrations. Here, we report temporal and spatial variability in stream physicochemistry in a highly urbanized watershed in Puerto Rico. The main objective of the study was to describe stream physicochemical characteristics and relate them to urban intensity, e.g., percent impervious surface cover, and watershed infrastructure, e.g., road and pipe densities. The Río Piedras Watershed in the San Juan Metropolitan Area, Puerto Rico, is one of the most urbanized regions on the island. The Río Piedras presented high solute concentrations that were related to watershed factors, such as percent impervious cover. Temporal variability in ion concentrations lacked seasonality, as did all other parameters measured except water temperature, which was lower during winter and highest during summer, as expected based on latitude. Spatially, stream physicochemistry was strongly related to watershed percent impervious cover and also to the density of urban infrastructure, e.g., roads, pipe, and building densities. Although the watershed is serviced by a sewage collection system, illegal discharges and leaky infrastructure are probably responsible for the elevated ion concentration found. Overall, the Río Piedras is an example of the response of a tropical urban watershed after major sewage inputs are removed, thus highlighting the importance of proper infrastructure maintenance and management of runoff to control ion concentrations in tropical streams.

  20. Pattern of Spatial Distribution and Temporal Variation of Atmospheric Pollutants during 2013 in Shenzhen, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Xia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution caused by atmospheric particulate and gaseous pollutants has drawn broad public concern globally. In this paper, the spatial-temporal distributions of major air pollutants in Shenzhen from March 2013 to February 2014 are discussed. In this study, ground-site monitoring data from 19 monitoring sites was used and spatial interpolation and spatial autocorrelation methods were applied to analyze both spatial and temporal characteristics of air pollutants in Shenzhen City. During the study period, the daily average concentrations of Particulate Matter (PM10 and PM2.5 ranged from 16–189 μg/m3 and 10–136 μg/m3, respectively, with 13 and 44 over-limit days, indicating that particulate matter was the primary air pollutant in Shenzhen. The highest PM occupation in the polluted air was observed in winter, indicating that fine particulate pollution was most serious in winter. Meanwhile, seasonal agglomeration patterns for six kinds of air pollutants showed that Guangming, Baoan, Nanshan, and the northern part of Longgang were the most polluted areas and PMs were their primary air pollutants. In addition, wind scale and rainfall played an important role in dissipating air pollutant in Shenzhen. The wind direction impacted the air pollution level in Shenzhen in multiple ways: the highest concentrations for all air pollutants all occurred on days with a northeast wind; the second highest ones appeared on the days with no wind. The concentrations on days with north-related winds are higher on average than those of days with south-related winds.

  1. Potential of electrical resistivity tomography and muon density imaging to study spatio-temporal variations in the sub-surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesparre, Nolwenn; Cabrera, Justo; Courbet, Christelle

    2015-04-01

    We explore the capacity of electrical resistivity tomography and muon density imaging to detect spatio-temporal variations of the medium surrounding a regional fault crossing the underground platform of Tournemire (Aveyron, France). The studied Cernon fault is sub-vertical and intersects perpendicularly the tunnel of Tournemire and extends to surface. The fault separates clay and limestones layers of the Dogger from limestones layers of the Lias. The Cernon fault presents a thickness of a ten of meters and drives water from an aquifer circulating at the top of the Dogger clay layer to the tunnel. An experiment combining electrical resistivity imaging and muon density imaging was setup taking advantage of the tunnel presence. A specific array of electrodes were set up, adapted for the characterization of the fault. Electrodes were placed along the tunnel as well as at the surface above the tunnel on both sides of the fault in order to acquire data in transmission across the massif to better cover the sounded medium. Electrical resistivity is particularly sensitive to water presence in the medium and thus carry information on the main water flow paths and on the pore space saturation. At the same time a muon sensor was placed in the tunnel under the fault region to detect muons coming from the sky after their crossing of the rock medium. Since the muon flux is attenuated as function of the quantity of matter crossed, muons flux measurements supply information on the medium average density along muons paths. The sensor presents 961 angles of view so measurements performed from one station allows a comparison of the muon flux temporal variations along the fault as well as in the medium surrounding the fault. As the water saturation of the porous medium fluctuates through time the medium density might indeed present sensible variations as shown by gravimetric studies. During the experiment important rainfalls occurred leading variations of the medium properties

  2. Temporal-spatial variation of DOC concentration, UV absorbance and the flux estimation in the Lower Dagu River, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Min; Kong, Fanlong; Li, Yue; Kong, Fanting

    2017-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is an important component for both carbon cycle and energy balance. The concentration, UV absorbance, and export flux of DOC in the natural environment dominate many important transport processes. To better understand the temporal and spatial variation of DOC, 7 sites along the Lower Dagu River were chosen to conduct a comprehensive measurement from March 2013 to February 2014. Specifically, water samples were collected from the Lower Dagu River between the 26th and 29th of every month during the experimental period. The DOC concentration (CDOC) and UV absorbance were analyzed using a total organic carbon analyzer and the ultraviolet-visible absorption spectrum, and the DOC export flux was estimated with a simple empirical model. The results showed that the CDOC of the Lower Dagu River varied from 1.32 to 12.56 mg/L, consistent with global rivers. The CDOC and UV absorbance showed significant spatial variation in the Dagu River during the experiential period because of the upstream natural processes and human activities in the watershed. The spatial variation is mainly due to dam or reservoir constructions, riverside ecological environment changes, and non-point source or wastewater discharge. The seasonal variation of CDOC was mainly related to the source of water DOC, river runoff, and temperature, and the UV absorbance and humification degree of DOC had no obvious differences among months ( Ptest the CDOC in Lower Dagu River using wave lengths of 254 and 280 nm. The results revealed that the annual DOC export flux varied from 1.6 to 3.76 × 105 g C/km2/yr in a complete hydrological year, significantly lower than the global average. It is worth mentioning that the DOC export flux was mainly concentrated in summer (˜90% of all-year flux in July and August), since the runoff in the Dagu River took place frequently in summer. These observations implied environment change could bring the temporal-spatial variation of DOC and the

  3. Temporal-spatial variation of DOC concentration, UV absorbance and the flux estimation in the Lower Dagu River, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Min; Kong, Fanlong; Li, Yue; Kong, Fanting

    2017-04-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is an important component for both carbon cycle and energy balance. The concentration, UV absorbance, and export flux of DOC in the natural environment dominate many important transport processes. To better understand the temporal and spatial variation of DOC, 7 sites along the Lower Dagu River were chosen to conduct a comprehensive measurement from March 2013 to February 2014. Specifically, water samples were collected from the Lower Dagu River between the 26th and 29th of every month during the experimental period. The DOC concentration (CDOC) and UVabsorbance were analyzed using a total organic carbon analyzer and the ultraviolet-visible absorption spectrum, and the DOC export flux was estimated with a simple empirical model. The results showed that the CDOC of the Lower Dagu River varied from 1.32 to 12.56 mg/L, consistent with global rivers. The CDOC and UV absorbance showed significant spatial variation in the Dagu River during the experiential period because of the upstream natural processes and human activities in the watershed. The spatial variation is mainly due to dam or reservoir constructions, riverside ecological environment changes, and non-point source or wastewater discharge. The seasonal variation of CDOC was mainly related to the source of water DOC, river runoff, and temperature, and the UV absorbance and humification degree of DOC had no obvious differences among months (P<0.05). UV absorbance was applied to test the CDOC in Lower Dagu River using wave lengths of 254 and 280 nm. The results revealed that the annual DOC export flux varied from 1.6 to 3.76 × 105 g C/km2/yr in a complete hydrological year, significantly lower than the global average. It is worth mentioning that the DOC export flux was mainly concentrated in summer ( 90% of all-year flux in July and August), since the runoff in the Dagu River took place frequently in summer. These observations implied environment change could bring the temporal

  4. Adaptation to Stochastic Temporal Variations in Intratumoral Blood Flow: The Warburg Effect as a Bet Hedging Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravenmier, Curtis A; Siddique, Miriam; Gatenby, Robert A

    2017-05-15

    While most cancers promote ingrowth of host blood vessels, the resulting vascular network usually fails to develop a mature organization, resulting in abnormal vascular dynamics with stochastic variations that include slowing, cessation, and even reversal of flow. Thus, substantial spatial and temporal variations in oxygen concentration are commonly observed in most cancers. Cancer cells, like all living systems, are subject to Darwinian dynamics such that their survival and proliferation are dependent on developing optimal phenotypic adaptations to local environmental conditions. Here, we consider the environmental stresses placed on tumors subject to profound, frequent, but stochastic variations in oxygen concentration as a result of temporal variations in blood flow. While vascular fluctuations will undoubtedly affect local concentrations of a wide range of molecules including growth factors (e.g., estrogen), substrate (oxygen, glucose, etc.), and metabolites ([Formula: see text], we focus on the selection forces that result solely from stochastic fluctuations in oxygen concentration. The glucose metabolism of cancer cells has been investigated for decades following observations that malignant cells ferment glucose regardless of oxygen concentration, a condition termed the Warburg effect. In contrast, normal cells cease fermentation under aerobic conditions and this physiological response is termed the Pasteur effect. Fermentation is markedly inefficient compared to cellular respiration in terms of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production, generating just 2 ATP/glucose, whereas respiration generates 38 ATP/glucose. This inefficiency requires cancer cells to increase glycolytic flux, which subsequently increases acid production and can significantly acidify local tissue. Hence, it initially appears that cancer cells adopt a disadvantageous metabolic phenotype. Indeed, this metabolic "hallmark" of cancer is termed "energy dysregulation." However, if cancers arise

  5. Spatial and temporal patterns of neutral and adaptive genetic variation in the endangered African wild dog (Lycaon pictus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Clare D; Woodroffe, Rosie; Mills, Michael G L; McNutt, J Weldon; Creel, Scott; Groom, Rosemary; Emmanuel, Masenga; Cleaveland, Sarah; Kat, Pieter; Rasmussen, Gregory S A; Ginsberg, Joshua; Lines, Robin; André, Jean-Marc; Begg, Colleen; Wayne, Robert K; Mable, Barbara K

    2012-03-01

    Deciphering patterns of genetic variation within a species is essential for understanding population structure, local adaptation and differences in diversity between populations. Whilst neutrally evolving genetic markers can be used to elucidate demographic processes and genetic structure, they are not subject to selection and therefore are not informative about patterns of adaptive variation. As such, assessments of pertinent adaptive loci, such as the immunity genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), are increasingly being incorporated into genetic studies. In this study, we combined neutral (microsatellite, mtDNA) and adaptive (MHC class II DLA-DRB1 locus) markers to elucidate the factors influencing patterns of genetic variation in the African wild dog (Lycaon pictus); an endangered canid that has suffered extensive declines in distribution and abundance. Our genetic analyses found all extant wild dog populations to be relatively small (N(e)  African mammals. We found strong structuring of wild dog populations, indicating the negative influence of extensive habitat fragmentation and loss of gene flow between habitat patches. Across populations, we found that the spatial and temporal structure of microsatellite diversity and MHC diversity were correlated and strongly influenced by demographic stability and population size, indicating the effects of genetic drift in these small populations. Despite this correlation, we detected signatures of selection at the MHC, implying that selection has not been completely overwhelmed by genetic drift. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Temporal and spatial variation of Stenoma cathosiota Meyrick (Lepidoptera: Elachistidae) caterpillar abundance in the cerrado of Brasilia, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morais, Helena C.; Mangabeira, Jacimary A. [Universidade Federal de Brasilia (UnB), DF (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biologicas. Dept. de Ecologia]. E-mail: morais@unb.br; Cabral, Berites C.; Diniz, Ivone R. [Universidade Federal de Brasilia (UnB), DF (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biologicas. Dept. de Zoologia]. E-mail: irdiniz@unb.br

    2007-11-15

    The caterpillars of Stenoma cathosiota Meyrick feed on Roupala montana Aubl. (Proteaceae) in the cerrado of the Distrito Federal, Brazil. They construct shelters by joining leaves of the plant where they feed and pupate. The caterpillars are parasitized by a wasp (Hymenoptera: Brachonidae), which emerges from the pupae. Caterpillar abundance and parasitism frequency were associated in an area of frequently burned cerrado (biennial fire) and in another area that burns sporadically (1987 and 1994). For S. cathosiota, the variation among years in a single area, with sporadic fires, was greater than the variation among areas with different fire regimes. Caterpillar abundance among years was significantly different in the area that burns sporadically (c{sup 2} = 24.06; df. = 1; P = 0.000). However, there were no significant differences on caterpillar abundance between areas for the same period (c{sup 2} 3.45; df. = 1; P = 0.063). Parasitism frequency was high, reaching 29% of the collected caterpillars, and did not differ among areas. The great temporal variation in abundance of lepidopteran caterpillars in the cerrado makes it difficult to determine the effects that fire exerts over this fauna. (author)

  7. Temporal variation of autotrophic picoplankton contribution to coastal phytoplankton communities over a seasonal cycle: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koçum, Esra

    2017-04-01

    Autotrophic pico-plankton form the smallest component of phytoplankton and refers to cells smaller than 2 µM. It is phylogenetically diverse and have both prokaryotic and eukaryotic components. Prokaryotic pico-autotrophs are unicellular cyanobacteria, represented mainly by Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus genera. Pico-eukaryotes are more diverse and include members of Chlorophyta, Cryptophyta, Haptophyta and Heterokontophyta. Owing to their higher nutrient acquisition capacity, relative share of pico-plankton in autotrophic production and biomass can be significant and even dominant in oligotrophic regions such as in warm tropical waters. They also fare better than larger members of phytoplankton communities under light limitation and under increasing temperature. Recent work has shown that autotrophic pico-plankton can be a significant component of coastal phytoplankton. In view of the global warming related increase in the sea surface temperature and nutrient enrichment of coastal waters, it is necessary to understand variation in the relative share of different sized groups in phytoplankton communities of coastal ecosystems including pico-plankton biomass as it shows the potential for development of microbial food web. Here, an interpretation of temporal patterns detected in the biomass and the relative contribution of pico-sized (< 2 µm) members of phytoplankton was made using data collected from two coastal sites over a year. The findings revealed the significant spatio-temporal variation in both actual pico-plankton biomass and its relative share in phytoplankton. The average biomass values of pico-plankton were 0.23 ± 0.02 µ g chl a L-1 and 0.15 ± 0.01 µg chl a L-1 at nutrient-poor and nutrient-rich sites; respectively. The temporal pattern of change displayed by picoplankton biomass was not seasonal at nutrient rich site while at nutrient poor site it was seasonal with low values measured over winter suggesting it was the seasonal changes leading to

  8. Temporal variation in plankton assemblages and physicochemistry of Devils Lake, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leland, H.V.; Berkas, W.R.

    1998-01-01

    Seasonal and annual variation in biomass and structure of algal assemblages of hyposaline Devils Lake were examined in relation to turbidity, ambient concentrations of major ions, trace elements and nutrients, and the standing crop of herbivores. Lake level declined during the early years of study, but rose markedly in subsequent years as historically large volumes of water flowed into this hydrologically-closed basin. Winter algal assemblages were dominated (in biomass) most years by small, non-motile chlorophytes (Choricystis minor, Kirchneriella lunaris or Dunaliella sp.), or Euglena sp. in the most saline sub-basin. Spring assemblages were dominated by diatoms (Stephanodiscus cf. minutulus, Surirella peisonis, Cyclotella meneghiniana and Entomoneis paludosa were especially prominent) or chlorophytes (C. minor) until the lake level rose. C. minor abundances then declined in spring assemblages and diatoms (Stephanodiscus cf. agassizensis and S. niagarae; E. paludosa in the more saline sub-basins) dominated. The potential for nitrogen-deficient conditions for phytoplankton growth was evidenced most summers and early autumns by consistently high concentrations of reactive-P relative to inorganic-N and blooms of the N-fixing cyanophyte Aphanizomenon flos-aquae; Microcystis aeruginosa typically was a co-dominant (> 30% of biomass) in these assemblages. Pulses of diatoms (S. cf. agassizensis and C. meneghiniana) occurred in summers following unusually prolonged periods of calm weather or large water inflows. Physical (irradiance, turbulence) and chemical (major nutrients) variables were the primary factors associated with phytoplankton growth. Transparency and major nutrient concentrations accounted for more of the annual variation in phytoplankton structure than did salinity. Seasonal abundance patterns of the dominant zooplankton (the copepod Diaptomus sicilis; the cladocerans Ceriodaphnia quadrangula, Chydorus sphaericus, Daphnia pulex and Diaphanosoma birgei; and

  9. Temporal variation in isotopic composition and diet of Weddell seals in the western Ross Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Kimberly T.; Burns, Jennifer M.; Hückstӓdt, Luis A.; Shero, Michelle R.; Costa, Daniel P.

    2017-06-01

    Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii) are important predators in the Antarctic marine ecosystem, yet little is known about their diet. Previous studies have used scat and stomach content analyses to examine Weddell seal diet, however, these methods are biased towards prey with indigestible hard parts. To provide a more complete picture of their diet, we analyzed the stable isotope composition (δ13C and δ15N values) of red blood cells (RBC, n=96, representing a time scale of weeks to months) and vibrissae (n=45, representing months to a year) collected over a three year period (2010-2012). Our objectives were to (1) examine isotopic variation in relation to Weddell seal mass, sex, season, location, percent lipid, and age, and (2) quantify the contribution of prey items to overall diet. Body mass was a significant predictor of δ13C and δ15N values for both tissues, though the strength and direction of the relationship varied by year. The prey group consisting of Pleurogramma antarcticum and Trematomus newnesi was found to be an important dietary component, but its proportional contribution to Weddell seal diet varied with the timeframe represented by each tissue type [median RBC (range): 59.2% (40.2-8 1.1%); median mean vibrissae (range): 69.3% (43.9-89.6%)]. Results from mixing models ran for each seal indicate individual variation in diet. Overall, this study presents novel information on the isotopic variation and diet of Weddell seals over two time scales and provides insight into the feeding ecology of an important Antarctic predator.

  10. Temporal variation of faecal indicator bacteria in tropical urban storm drains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekklesia, E; Shanahan, P; Chua, L H C; Eikaas, H S

    2015-01-01

    Human faecal contamination poses a widespread hazard for human health. In urban areas, sewer leakage may be an important cause of faecal pollution to surface water. Faecal indicator bacteria (FIB) are the most widely used indicators to monitor surface water quality. However, assessing whether a water body is meeting water quality criteria is made difficult by the high variability of FIB concentrations over time. In this study, the variation of FIB concentration in surface water from tropical urban catchments is investigated. Eleven urban sub-catchments were sampled hourly over 24-hr and samples analysed for FIB. It was found that FIB show a diurnal pattern that is characterised by daytime FIB concentrations that are significantly higher than nighttime FIB concentrations. This observed diurnal variation of FIB closely follows that of sewer flows and contrasts with observations in rural streams where FIB concentrations are known to be low in the daytime and high during the night. Field tracer tests provide qualitative evidence of sewage exfiltration and transport to drains via preferential flow paths. The diurnal FIB variation and field tracer tests indicate the likelihood of surface water contamination due to leaking sewers. The results further suggest that contamination of surface-water drains is likely a widespread problem in tropical urban areas due to extensive drainage networks and the persistence of FIB under tropical conditions. Because of FIB variation over time, the time at which samples are collected is important in being able to capture the daily maximum and minimum FIB concentrations. The Kruskal-Wallis test shows that hourly sampling from 04:00 to 07:00 and from 12:00 to 15:00 results in significantly different FIB concentration (minimum and maximum, respectively). Furthermore, the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test shows that sampling at 12:00 and 14:00 results in significantly higher FIB concentrations, while sampling at 05:00 and 04:00 or 05:00 and 06

  11. How Do Aerosol Properties Affect the Temporal Variation of MODIS AOD Bias in Eastern China?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghui Tao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The rapid changes of aerosol sources in eastern China during recent decades could bring considerable uncertainties for satellite retrieval algorithms that assume little spatiotemporal variation in aerosol single scattering properties (such as single scattering albedo (SSA and the size distribution for fine-mode and coarse mode aerosols in East Asia. Here, using ground-based observations in six AERONET sites, we characterize typical aerosol optical properties (including their spatiotemporal variation in eastern China, and evaluate their impacts on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS Collection 6 aerosol retrieval bias. Both the SSA and fine-mode particle sizes increase from northern to southern China in winter, reflecting the effect of relative humidity on particle size. The SSA is ~0.95 in summer regardless of the AEROENT stations in eastern China, but decreases to 0.85 in polluted winter in northern China. The dominance of larger and highly scattering fine-mode particles in summer also leads to the weakest phase function in the backscattering direction. By focusing on the analysis of high aerosol optical depth (AOD (>0.4 conditions, we find that the overestimation of the AOD in Dark Target (DT retrieval is prevalent throughout the whole year, with the bias decreasing from northern China, characterized by a mixture of fine and coarse (dust particles, to southern China, which is dominated by fine particles. In contrast, Deep Blue (DB retrieval tends to overestimate the AOD only in fall and winter, and underestimates it in spring and summer. While the retrievals from both the DT and DB algorithms show a reasonable estimation of the fine-mode fraction of AOD, the retrieval bias cannot be attributed to the bias in the prescribed SSA alone, and is more due to the bias in the prescribed scattering phase function (or aerosol size distribution in both algorithms. In addition, a large yearly change in aerosol single scattering properties

  12. Spatio-temporal Variations of Nitrogen Dioxide Pollution in China, 2005-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yuanzheng

    China has experienced rapid economic growth in recent decades, accompanied with intensive urbanization and industrialization. This economic growth has led to many significant environmental problems, including deteriorating nitrogen dioxide (NO2) pollution. NO2 is a key air pollutant, and it plays a major role in the tropospheric chemistry. This thesis investigates the extent to which the characteristics of NO2 pollution changes at different spatial and temporal scales reflects regional inequality in economic and environmental policies enforced by Chinese governments, which has important implications for future emission control. The objective of this thesis is to investigate the spatial and temporal variability and trends of tropospheric NO2 pollution over China, by analyzing the NO2 vertical column density (VCD) data over 2005 to 2015 retrieved from the space-borne Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). It is found that over most polluted regions in China, the NO2 columns increased rapidly since 2005, reached their peaks around 2011, and started to decline afterwards. Over parts of Eastern China, the NO2 levels in 2015 were close to the levels in 2005. Furthermore, severe pollution has extended from the traditional highly developed regions in Eastern China to newly emerged cities clusters in the west. Further comparisons with GEOS-Chem model simulations for 2005-2012 confirm that the OMI observed NO2 trends were driven mainly by changes in anthropogenic emissions. Then the long-term trends of NO2 over 2005-2013 from other scales of temporal variability over provincial-level regions of Western China were further distinguished, by using a wavelet decomposition analysis. The anthropogenic NO2 grew rapidly over Western China at a regional average rate of 8.6 +/- 0.9% yr-1 between 2005 and 2013. The rate of NO2 growth during 2005-2013 reached 11.3 +/- 1.0% yr-1 over Northwestern China, exceeding the rates over Southwestern China (5.9 +/- 0.6 % yr-1) and the three well

  13. Remarks to solve disagreement between Gravity anisotropy and constraints on the variation of Gravitational constant (big G) based on gravimetric data Reply to "Nano-constraints on the spatial anisotropy of the Gravitational Constant"

    CERN Document Server

    Gershteyn, M L; Gershteyn, A; Karagioz, O V

    2002-01-01

    Remarks to solve disagreement between Gravity anisotropy observed at decimeter distances and constraints on the spatial variation of Gravitational constant (big G) based on gravimetric data and Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) experiments. Disagreement disappears when we assume that Gravitational anisotropy may depend on the magnitudes of the interacting masses and the distance between them.

  14. Spatio-temporal variations in water quality of Muttukadu Backwaters, Tamilnadu, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Kalpana; Natesan, Usha

    2013-07-01

    Muttukadu Backwater, located on the east coast of Tamilnadu, is one of healthiest estuarine environments in the region. A study pertaining to seasonal variations in physico-chemical properties in water was conducted at nine sites of Muttukadu Backwater for a period of one year (January to December 2009). Multivariate statistical techniques, such as cluster analysis and principal component analysis (PCA), were applied to evaluate the variation in water quality of Muttukadu Backwater and to identify pollution sources. In order to analyze water quality, a geographic information systems (GIS) software package, Arc GIS version 9.3, was used (Esri, Redlands, California). An interpolation technique, inverse distance weighting, was used to produce the spatial distribution of water quality parameters over the backwater. The purpose of the technique was to aid in protection of the environment and ecology of the estuary and aid in effective management. In the present study, observed values of salinity, nitrite, nitrate, ammonia, total nitrogen, phosphate, and silicate were significantly high in the estuarine zone. PCA resulted in three factors explaining 75.9% of the total variance. Principal component 1 exhibited a high correlation with significant physico-chemical variables representing the influence of tidal action and sandbar formation. Principal component 2 represented natural pollution as a result of surface runoff. Principal component 3 represented natural pollution as a result of nutrient pollution.

  15. Estimating permeability from quasi-static deformation: Temporal variations and arrival time inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasco, D.W.; Ferretti, Alessandro; Novali, Fabrizio

    2008-05-01

    Transient pressure variations within a reservoir can be treated as a propagating front and analyzed using an asymptotic formulation. From this perspective one can define a pressure 'arrival time' and formulate solutions along trajectories, in the manner of ray theory. We combine this methodology and a technique for mapping overburden deformation into reservoir volume change as a means to estimate reservoir flow properties, such as permeability. Given the entire 'travel time' or phase field, obtained from the deformation data, we can construct the trajectories directly, there-by linearizing the inverse problem. A numerical study indicates that, using this approach, we can infer large-scale variations in flow properties. In an application to Interferometric Synthetic Aperture (InSAR) observations associated with a CO{sub 2} injection at the Krechba field, Algeria, we image pressure propagation to the northwest. An inversion for flow properties indicates a linear trend of high permeability. The high permeability correlates with a northwest trending fault on the flank of the anticline which defines the field.

  16. Spatial and temporal variation of natural toxicity in cnidarians, bryozoans and tunicates in Mediterranean caves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Martí

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The natural toxicity of cnidarians, bryozoans and tunicates in two caves was assessed using the Microtox® technique in spring and autumn. One cave was located in the Cabrera Archipelago (Balearic Islands and the other in the Medes Islands (Catalan littoral. The organisms analysed were good representatives of the coverage of each Phylum in the communities; however, these Phyla are less abundant than sponges which are the dominant group in these caves. Seventy-one percent of the species of cnidarians and bryozoans analysed were toxic in one of the caves, communities or seasons, which indicates the relevance of bioactive species in these groups. The tunicate Lissoclinum perforatum was the most toxic species. Although all three Phyla had some highly toxic species, a common pattern that related the caves, communities and seasons was not found. Seasonal variation of toxicity in cnidarians and bryozoans was higher in the Cabrera than in the Medes cave. Moreover, variation in toxicity either between communities or between seasons was a common trait for most cnidarians and bryozoans, whereas tunicates remained toxic throughout communities and seasons.

  17. Spatial and temporal variation in mercury contamination of seabirds in the North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furness, R. W.; Thompson, D. R.; Becker, P. H.

    1995-03-01

    Once the moult patterns have been taken into account, feather methylmercury levels can be used to accurately measure the mercury burdens of seabirds. We used body feathers from live seabirds and from museum collections to examine geographical and temporal patterns of mercury contamination in the North Sea. This approach identifies an increase in mercury concentrations in seabirds of the German North Sea coast during the last 100 years, especially high levels during the 1940s, and reduced contamination in the last few years. Comparisons among populations suggest that some increases in mercury levels are predominantly due to local pollution inputs, as on the German coast, while in other areas deposition from jet stream circulation of global contamination may be the major contributor. Mercury levels are far higher in seabirds from the German North Sea coast than in populations from the north and west North Sea or from most areas of the North Atlantic. We advocate the use of museum collections of birds for studies of long-term changes in levels of mercury contamination.

  18. Temporal and spatial variations of water qualities and fish fauna distributions in the Kaname river, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, K.; Kitano, T.; Kutsumi, M.; Shimizu, K.

    2011-12-01

    Fish fauna distributions had been studied at many places and they indicated that the fish distributions were dramatically different depending on fish species and local environment such as water temperature, current, sediment parameters. But the relationships between water qualities and fish fauna distribution have not been understood well. In order to find physical and chemical environment factors which relate to the fish fauna distribution, we investigated the temporal and spatial change of water qualities and fish distributions in Kaname river, Japan. We measured both of physical (temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, Chl-a and turbidity) and chemical (nitrate, nitrite, ammonia, orthophosphoric and suspended solids) water parameters and surveyed the fish distribution. The field observations were conducted seasonally and check the season differences. Observation results showed that Gobiidae and Cyprinidae fishes live in the Kaname river and the distribution was clearly classified with the species. And also chemical water qualities were dramatically different by location. Especially the effects of sewage farms on water qualities were detected. This study will be contributory to reveal the relationships between fish fauna distribution and environmental parameters and it will lead to the ecological preservation.

  19. Drivers and spatio-temporal extent of hyporheic patch variation: implications for sampling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Braun

    Full Text Available The hyporheic zone in stream ecosystems is a heterogeneous key habitat for species across many taxa. Consequently, it attracts high attention among freshwater scientists, but generally applicable guidelines on sampling strategies are lacking. Thus, the objective of this study was to develop and validate such sampling guidelines. Applying geostatistical analysis, we quantified the spatio-temporal variability of parameters, which characterize the physico-chemical substratum conditions in the hyporheic zone. We investigated eight stream reaches in six small streams that are typical for the majority of temperate areas. Data was collected on two occasions in six stream reaches (development data, and once in two additional reaches, after one year (validation data. In this study, the term spatial variability refers to patch contrast (patch to patch variance and patch size (spatial extent of a patch. Patch contrast of hyporheic parameters (specific conductance, pH and dissolved oxygen increased with macrophyte cover (r(2=0.95, p<0.001, while patch size of hyporheic parameters decreased from 6 to 2 m with increasing sinuosity of the stream course (r(2=0.91, p<0.001, irrespective of the time of year. Since the spatial variability of hyporheic parameters varied between stream reaches, our results suggest that sampling design should be adapted to suit specific stream reaches. The distance between sampling sites should be inversely related to the sinuosity, while the number of samples should be related to macrophyte cover.

  20. Drivers and spatio-temporal extent of hyporheic patch variation: implications for sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Alexander; Auerswald, Karl; Geist, Juergen

    2012-01-01

    The hyporheic zone in stream ecosystems is a heterogeneous key habitat for species across many taxa. Consequently, it attracts high attention among freshwater scientists, but generally applicable guidelines on sampling strategies are lacking. Thus, the objective of this study was to develop and validate such sampling guidelines. Applying geostatistical analysis, we quantified the spatio-temporal variability of parameters, which characterize the physico-chemical substratum conditions in the hyporheic zone. We investigated eight stream reaches in six small streams that are typical for the majority of temperate areas. Data was collected on two occasions in six stream reaches (development data), and once in two additional reaches, after one year (validation data). In this study, the term spatial variability refers to patch contrast (patch to patch variance) and patch size (spatial extent of a patch). Patch contrast of hyporheic parameters (specific conductance, pH and dissolved oxygen) increased with macrophyte cover (r(2)=0.95, psampling design should be adapted to suit specific stream reaches. The distance between sampling sites should be inversely related to the sinuosity, while the number of samples should be related to macrophyte cover.

  1. TEMPORAL VARIATION IN THE RED GROUPER, EPINEPHELUS MORIO, DEMOGRAPHIC STRUCTURE FROM SOUTHERN GULF OF MEXICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doralice Caballero-Arango

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the demographic structure of red grouper Epinephelus morio from the southern part of the Gulf of Mexico, were evaluated during periods when total catches, CPUE and annual yields of the specie decreased. Fishery-dependent samples (n = 1887 were obtained between August 1989 and February 2004 from the Campeche Bank, and size-frequency distributions by sex, sex ratios and sizes of sexual maturation and sex change were compared between three periods: P11989-1992 (n = 886; P21996-1998 (n = 413; and P32003-2004 (n = 588. The temporal stability of size-frequency distribution by sex, with males always being larger than females, and the sex ratios always biased towards females, were consistent with this species’ type of sexuality. Size for females and males, as well as sizes at first sexual maturity and at sex reversal all decreased from the oldest period to the more recent one and could be a consequence of the fishing intensity applied to this stock. The reductions in size of females and males associated with a relatively stable sex ratio and the lack of any drastic decrease in the number of males can be explained by this species’ reproductive ecology. Results are discussed regarding the capacity for reproductive resilience of red grouper in response to fishing pressure like that currently experienced by the Campeche Bank stock.

  2. TEMPORAL VARIATIONS OF MULTI-DAY PRECIPITATION EXTREMES IN SOUTHERN ROMANIA: 1961-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANA MICU

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The ECA dataset of daily precipitation observations was used to study the temporal variability of seasonal extreme precipitation amounts over a 54-year time period in the southern plain areas of Romania. Extreme events resulting in exceptional precipitation amounts cumulated over one to three consecutive days and the frequency of very heavy precipitation events (as defined by the ETCCDI were analyzed to reveal the changes in the seasonality of precipitation torrentiality and its frequency. The nonparametric Mann-Kendall test (MK and Sen's slope method were used to test the statistical significance, spatial robustness of the observed trends and their magnitude. A clear change signal was found for autumn, winter and autumn, with a high number of sites with statistically significant trends. The upward trends suggesting more intense precipitation events in these seasons were found at most sites as compared with summer, for which the MK statistics returned less consistent changes. There is a negative trend in the number of wet days associated with a dominantly upward in R20 frequency, for autumn and winter.

  3. Temporal and spatial variation of fish assemblages in Dianshan Lake, Shanghai, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhongjun; Wang, Siqing; Wu, Hao; Chen, Qingjiang; Ruan, Renliang; Chen, Liqiao; Liu, Qigen

    2014-07-01

    Using multi-mesh gillnets and trawls, the fish communities in Dianshan Lake at 6 stations from Oct. 2009 to Jul. 2010 were investigated seasonally to reveal the biodiversity and its spatial and temporal distribution patterns. The long-term changes in their structural characteristics were then analyzed to identify the main influencing factors and several measures for lake restoration were put forward. Thirty six species, belonging to 9 family and 30 genera, were collected, amongst which, the order Cypriniformes accounted for 61.1% of the total species number. In terms of importance value, Cypriniformes was the predominant group, Coilia nasus the dominant species, while Cyprinus carpio and Rhinogobius giurinus were the subdominant taxa. The community types did not differ among stations, but between seasons. There were no significant differences between seasons and among stations in species diversity, but richness differed both spatially and seasonally. Along with the process of eutrophication and the drastic reduction of the area colonized by macrophytes from 1959 to 2009-2010, the fish diversity declined markedly, and species numbers of herbivores and piscivores declined proportionately more than those of invertivores, omnivores, and planktivores. The decline of potamophilus and river-lake migratory fish was more marked than those of sedentary, river-sea migratory, and estuarine fishes. Eutrophication concomitant with sharp reduction of macrophyte area and overfishing may be the main reasons for the decline in fish diversity in Dianshan Lake.

  4. Spatial and temporal variation of diet within a presumed metapopulation of Adelie penguins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainley, D.G.; Ballard, G.; Barton, K.J.; Karl, B.J.; Rau, G.H.; Ribic, C.A.; Wilson, P.R.

    2003-01-01

    We investigated temporal and spatial variability in the diet of chick-provisioning Ade??lie Penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) breeding at all colonies within one isolated cluster in the southwestern Ross Sea, Antarctica, 1994-2000. We wished to determine if prey quality explained different population growth and emigration rates among colonies. Diet composition was described both by conventional means (stomach samples) and by analysis of stable isotopes in chick tissues (toenails of individuals killed by skuas [Stercorarius maccormicki]). Diets were similar among the four study colonies compared to the disparity apparent among 14 widely spaced sites around the continent. Calorimetry indicated that fish are more energetically valuable than krill, implying that if diet varied by colony, diet quality could attract recruits and help to explain differential rates of colony growth. However, a multiple-regression analysis indicated that diet varied as a function of year, time within the year, and percent of foraging area covered by sea ice, but not by colony location. Stable isotopes revealed similarity of diet at one colony where conventional sampling was not possible. We confirmed that sea ice importantly affects diet composition of this species in neritic waters, and found that (1) quality of summer diet cannot explain different population growth rates among colonies, and (2) stable isotope analysis of chick tissues (toenails) is a useful tool to synoptically describe diet in this species over a large area.

  5. Spatio-temporal variations of soil radon patterns around the Sea of Marmara

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passarelli, Luigi; Seyis, Cemil; Woith, Heiko

    2016-04-01

    Typically, the noble gas radon displays cyclic daily (S1), semidiurnal (S2) as well as seasonal variations in geological environments like soil air, groundwater, rock, caves, and tunnels. But there are also cases where theses cycles are absent. We present examples from a radon monitoring network of 21 sites around the Sea of Marmara. The works were carried out in the frame of MARsite, a project related to the EU supersite initiative (MARsite has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement No 308417). Alpha-meters from the Canadian company alpha-nuclear are used to measure the radon concentration in counts per 15 minutes at a depth of 80 cm. The long-term average radon concentrations at 21 sites vary between 35 and 1,000 counts per 15 minutes. Typical seasonal variations are absent at more than 6 sites. Sites with seasonal variations have radon minima usually during winter (December to April), radon maxima during summer months (June to October). We carefully investigated radon time series for all the monitoring stations. We find that at some sites the empirical distribution of radon counts is clearly bimodal and in other bimodality is absent. In those stations we analysed the time series in different time intervals in order to highlight seasonal periodicity in the radon emission. The empirical distributions obtained by time-windowing of the radon signals results to be statistically different one another after applying a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test at significance level of 0.1. Usually the maxima in radon emission occur in summer time but, interestingly enough, two sites are characterized by radon maxima in winter periods. We further investigate the radon signals seeking for smaller scale periodicity. We calculated Fourier spectra of all 21 sites. Daily cycles are absent at 6 sites which is an unusual phenomenon. Daily cycles may disappear, if the local system is heavily

  6. Natural spatial and temporal variations in groundwater chemistry in fractured, sedimentary rocks: scale and implications for solute transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoven, Stephen J. van der [Department of Geography-Geology, Illinois State University, Campus Box 4400, Normal, IL 61761 (United States)]. E-mail: vanderhoven@ilstu.edu; Kip Solomon, D. [Department of Geology and Geophyics, University of Utah, 135 S. 1460 E., Room 719, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Moline, Gerilynn R. [10 Victorian Heights, Thackeray Road, London SW8 3TD (United Kingdom)

    2005-05-15

    Natural tracers (major ions, {delta} {sup 18}O, and O{sub 2}) were monitored to evaluate groundwater flow and transport to a depth of 20 m below the surface in fractured sedimentary (primarily shale and limestone) rocks. Large temporal variations in these tracers were noted in the soil zone and the saprolite, and are driven primarily by individual storm events. During nonstorm periods, an upward flow brings water with high TDS, constant {delta} {sup 18}O, and low dissolved O{sub 2} to the water table. During storm events, low TDS, variable {delta} {sup 18}O, and high dissolved O{sub 2} water recharges through the unsaturated zone. These oscillating signals are rapidly transmitted along fracture pathways in the saprolite, with changes occurring on spatial scales of several meters and on a time scale of hours. The variations decreased markedly below the boundary between the saprolite and less weathered bedrock. Variations in the bedrock units occurred on time scales of days and spatial scales of at least 20 m. The oscillations of chemical conditions in the shallow groundwater are hypothesized to have significant implications for solute transport. Solutes and colloids that adsorb onto aquifer solids can be released into solution by decreases in ionic strength and pH. The decreases in ionic strength also cause thermodynamic undersaturation of the groundwater with respect to some mineral species and may result in mineral dissolution. Redox conditions are also changing and may result in mineral dissolution/precipitation. The net result of these chemical variations is episodic transport of a wide range of dissolved solutes or suspended particles, a phenomenon rarely considered in contaminant transport studies.

  7. The effect of large reservoirs impoundment to the spatial and temporal variations of regional crustal deformation in Hubei Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbin Shen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The total capacity of Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR and Danjiangkou Reservoir (DJR is large and has significant seasonal fluctuations, which give rise to crustal instability. In this research, we focus on studying the temporal and spatial variation of crustal deformation in Hubei Province caused by reservoir impoundment of TGR and DJR. The Digital Elevation Model, historical hydrological information, GPS monitoring data and load-induced deformation model are combined to monitor the crustal deformation. The modeled results indicate that in the trapezoidal area between the TGR and DJR, the average vertical deformations at different latitudes have different variation tendencies. The vertical deformation modulus and fluctuation amplitude are larger at the latitude of 33°N/32.5°N from 2003 to 2006 and at the latitude of 31°N/32.5°N from 2008 to 2014, while the latter are much larger than the former. Moreover, from 2008 to 2014, the frequency and the intensity of seismic activities are all enhanced significantly in this region. The modeled results at the GPS sites are consistent with the vertical displacement of GPS monitoring results in trends and the waveform. It can be inferred that the seasonal deformation is elastic. The horizontal deformation components have the same variation trends with that at each GPS monitoring station, which demonstrates that the whole region is moving toward the southeast. The spatial variation of crustal deformation demonstrates that the impoundment of TGR in 2003 causes significant vertical displacements, with the maximum modulus of 32 mm downward located in Xiangjiang River's estuary. When the water storage increases, the maximum value will become larger, and the location will move toward the upstream. Besides, the earthquakes occurred more frequently in the region with maximum deformation modulus.

  8. Monitoring and reactive-transport modeling of the spatial and temporal variations of the Strengbach spring hydrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerer, J.; Chabaux, F.; Lucas, Y.; Clément, A.; Fritz, B.; Beaulieu, E.; Viville, D.; Pierret, M. C.; Gangloff, S.; Négrel, Ph.

    2018-03-01

    This study focuses on 20 years of hydrochemical monitoring of the small springs that emerge in the experimental granitic catchment of Strengbach (OHGE, France) and the simulation of these data using the KIRMAT code. The data indicate that the Strengbach springs display chemostatic behavior; that is, limited temporal variations were noted in the concentrations of dissolved silica (H4SiO4) and most of the basic cations during the studied period (1987-2010), resulting in relative stability of the global weathering fluxes exported by the springs. Only the Ca2+ concentrations reflect a significant decrease in all the Strengbach springs since 1987, and the variations differ from one spring to another. The modeling results show that the decrease in Ca2+ in the Strengbach springs is due to the response of the water-rock interactions within the bedrock to the variations in the chemical composition of the soil solutions, which were characterized by a significant increase in pH and a decrease in Ca2+ concentrations between 1987 and 2010. The decrease in Ca2+ concentrations seen in the Strengbach springs is controlled by changes in the apatite dissolution rate and the compositions of clay minerals induced by the soil solution changes. The differences observed between the Ca2+ trends of the springs are related to changes in the residence time of the water supplying the different springs. The weak impact of the soil solution modifications on the dissolution rates of other primary minerals and on the bulk precipitation rates of the clay minerals explains the relative stability over time of the concentrations of the other cations and dissolved silica in the water derived from the Strengbach springs. Further, the hydrochemical simulations suggest that the chemostatic behavior of the Strengbach springs cannot be explained by the mobilization of waters that are close to chemical equilibrium, but rather by a hydrological control of the spring water residence times. Finally, a

  9. Massive Gravity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    de Rham, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    We review recent progress in massive gravity. We start by showing how different theories of massive gravity emerge from a higher-dimensional theory of general relativity, leading to the Dvali–Gabadadze–Porrati model (DGP...

  10. Seasonal and Temporal Variation in Release of Antibiotics in Hospital Wastewater: Estimation Using Continuous and Grab Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, Vishal; Stålsby Lundborg, Cecilia; Tamhankar, Ashok J.

    2013-01-01

    The presence of antibiotics in the environment and their subsequent impact on resistance development has raised concerns globally. Hospitals are a major source of antibiotics released into the environment. To reduce these residues, research to improve knowledge of the dynamics of antibiotic release from hospitals is essential. Therefore, we undertook a study to estimate seasonal and temporal variation in antibiotic release from two hospitals in India over a period of two years. For this, 6 sampling sessions of 24 hours each were conducted in the three prominent seasons of India, at all wastewater outlets of the two hospitals, using continuous and grab sampling methods. An in-house wastewater sampler was designed for continuous sampling. Eight antibiotics from four major antibiotic groups were selected for the study. To understand the temporal pattern of antibiotic release, each of the 24-hour sessions were divided in three sub-sampling sessions of 8 hours each. Solid phase extraction followed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to determine the antibiotic residues. Six of the eight antibiotics studied were detected in the wastewater samples. Both continuous and grab sampling methods indicated that the highest quantities of fluoroquinolones were released in winter followed by the rainy season and the summer. No temporal pattern in antibiotic release was detected. In general, in a common timeframe, continuous sampling showed less concentration of antibiotics in wastewater as compared to grab sampling. It is suggested that continuous sampling should be the method of choice as grab sampling gives erroneous results, it being indicative of the quantities of antibiotics present in wastewater only at the time of sampling. Based on our studies, calculations indicate that from hospitals in India, an estimated 89, 1 and 25 ng/L/day of fluroquinolones, metronidazole and sulfamethoxazole respectively, might be getting released into the

  11. Seasonal and temporal variation in release of antibiotics in hospital wastewater: estimation using continuous and grab sampling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Diwan

    Full Text Available The presence of antibiotics in the environment and their subsequent impact on resistance development has raised concerns globally. Hospitals are a major source of antibiotics released into the environment. To reduce these residues, research to improve knowledge of the dynamics of antibiotic release from hospitals is essential. Therefore, we undertook a study to estimate seasonal and temporal variation in antibiotic release from two hospitals in India over a period of two years. For this, 6 sampling sessions of 24 hours each were conducted in the three prominent seasons of India, at all wastewater outlets of the two hospitals, using continuous and grab sampling methods. An in-house wastewater sampler was designed for continuous sampling. Eight antibiotics from four major antibiotic groups were selected for the study. To understand the temporal pattern of antibiotic release, each of the 24-hour sessions were divided in three sub-sampling sessions of 8 hours each. Solid phase extraction followed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS was used to determine the antibiotic residues. Six of the eight antibiotics studied were detected in the wastewater samples. Both continuous and grab sampling methods indicated that the highest quantities of fluoroquinolones were released in winter followed by the rainy season and the summer. No temporal pattern in antibiotic release was detected. In general, in a common timeframe, continuous sampling showed less concentration of antibiotics in wastewater as compared to grab sampling. It is suggested that continuous sampling should be the method of choice as grab sampling gives erroneous results, it being indicative of the quantities of antibiotics present in wastewater only at the time of sampling. Based on our studies, calculations indicate that from hospitals in India, an estimated 89, 1 and 25 ng/L/day of fluroquinolones, metronidazole and sulfamethoxazole respectively, might be getting

  12. Temporal genetic variation as revealed by a microsatellite analysis of European sardine ( Sardina pilchardus) archived samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruggeri, Paolo; Splendiani, Andrea; Bonanomi, Sara

    2012-01-01

    ) that explain the genetic diversity variation, while the same parameters turned out to be more stable in the southern samples. In addition, we detected the presence of a genetic bottleneck and low effective population size ( Ne) values in several northern samples. Even if the northern and southern Adriatic...... of otoliths and scales from sampling locations of northern (Chioggia) and southern (Vieste) Adriatic Sea, with the aim to investigate the genetic effects of these stock biomass fluctuations. The northern samples showed significant reduction in observed heterozygosity ( HO) and mean number of alleles ( Na...... sardine samples belong to the same genetic stock, the more pronounced decrease in genetic variability recorded in the northern sample led us to speculate that a more intensive fishing pressure and a more pronounced oceanographic isolation of this area could have accentuated the effects of the genetic...

  13. Local hydrological information in gravity time series: reduction and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naujoks, M.; Kroner, C.; Weise, A.; Jahr, T.; Krause, P.

    2009-04-01

    Hydrological variations of up to some 10 nm•s2 represent significant, broadband, and integral information in temporal gravity observations. Thus, they can be considered as a valuable supplement to traditional hydrological point measurements. Of particular interest is to what extent such information can be used to improve the understanding of hydrological process dynamics and to evaluate distributed hydrological models. In this context, a new application of temporal gravity observations has been emerging: the study of natural hydrological mass changes and their underlying processes. Gravity data derived from GRACE satellite observations are affected by global and regional hydrological variations. Continuous recordings from superconducting gravimeters additionally contain information on local changes. Complementary to these data, repeated gravity observations on a local network contribute to gaining additional local information on spatial changes in hydrology and enabling a separation of the local hydrological influence from regional and global changes. To catch the local temporal hydrological influence on gravity of the hilly and geologically inhomogeneous surroundings of the superconducting gravimeter at the Geodynamic Observatory Moxa, Germany, interdisciplinary research has been carried out. For an area of approximately 1.5Ã-1.5 km2 a hydrological catchment model was combined with a well-constrained gravimetric 3D modell, which is made up of nearly 29.000 triangles and achieves a resolution of 5 metres in the close vicinity of the gravimeter. These combined modelling was used jointly with repeated gravity observations on a local network to develop a high accuracy reduction for the local hydrological signal in the continuous recordings of the superconducting gravimeter with uncertainties of ±1.5 nm•s2 for rain events and ±2.5 nm•s2 for seasonal variations. Applying this reduction, the data of the superconducting gravimeter become suitable to be interpreted

  14. High Spatial and Temporal Variations of Microbial Community along the Southern Catfish Gastrointestinal Tract: Insights into Dynamic Food Digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhimin; Li, Dapeng; Refaey, Mohamed M; Xu, Weitong

    2017-01-01

    The fish intestinal microbiota is affected by dietary shifts or diet-related seasonal fluctuations making it highly variable and dynamic. It assists with the digestion and absorption of food that is a common, yet dynamic process. However, fundamental dynamics of microbial ecology associated with food digestion in intestine and stomach are poorly understood in fish. We selected the southern catfish, Silurus meridionalis, as the targeted species, owing to its foraging behavior with a large meal that can assure clear periodic rhythms in food digestion, to study spatial variations of the microbial community along the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. We further evaluated temporal microbial dynamics by collecting GI tract samples at time intervals 03, 12, and 24h after feeding. High-throughput sequencing results showed higher microbial diversity in the stomach than in the intestine and distinguishable community structures between stomach and intestine. Firmicutes were dominated by both Clostridium and unclassified Clostridiaceae, which was the most abundant taxon in the stomach, whereas Fusobacteria were dominated by Cetobacterium, which prevailed in the intestine. Firmicutes was significantly increased and Fusobacteria was decreased after feeding. Furthermore, inter-stomach microbial variability was greater than inter-intestine microbial variability. These results demonstrate that GI microbial assemblies are specific per anatomical site and are highly dynamic during food digestion, indicating that digestive status and/or sampling time are factors potentially influencing the microbial compositions. Furthermore, the finding of high spatial and temporal variations of the microbial community along the GI tract suggests limitations of single sampling regime to study food-derived microbial ecology.

  15. High Spatial and Temporal Variations of Microbial Community along the Southern Catfish Gastrointestinal Tract: Insights into Dynamic Food Digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhimin Zhang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The fish intestinal microbiota is affected by dietary shifts or diet-related seasonal fluctuations making it highly variable and dynamic. It assists with the digestion and absorption of food that is a common, yet dynamic process. However, fundamental dynamics of microbial ecology associated with food digestion in intestine and stomach are poorly understood in fish. We selected the southern catfish, Silurus meridionalis, as the targeted species, owing to its foraging behavior with a large meal that can assure clear periodic rhythms in food digestion, to study spatial variations of the microbial community along the gastrointestinal (GI tract. We further evaluated temporal microbial dynamics by collecting GI tract samples at time intervals 03, 12, and 24h after feeding. High-throughput sequencing results showed higher microbial diversity in the stomach than in the intestine and distinguishable community structures between stomach and intestine. Firmicutes were dominated by both Clostridium and unclassified Clostridiaceae, which was the most abundant taxon in the stomach, whereas Fusobacteria were dominated by Cetobacterium, which prevailed in the intestine. Firmicutes was significantly increased and Fusobacteria was decreased after feeding. Furthermore, inter-stomach microbial variability was greater than inter-intestine microbial variability. These results demonstrate that GI microbial assemblies are specific per anatomical site and are highly dynamic during food digestion, indicating that digestive status and/or sampling time are factors potentially influencing the microbial compositions. Furthermore, the finding of high spatial and temporal variations of the microbial community along the GI tract suggests limitations of single sampling regime to study food-derived microbial ecology.

  16. High Spatial and Temporal Variations of Microbial Community along the Southern Catfish Gastrointestinal Tract: Insights into Dynamic Food Digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhimin; Li, Dapeng; Refaey, Mohamed M.; Xu, Weitong

    2017-01-01

    The fish intestinal microbiota is affected by dietary shifts or diet-related seasonal fluctuations making it highly variable and dynamic. It assists with the digestion and absorption of food that is a common, yet dynamic process. However, fundamental dynamics of microbial ecology associated with food digestion in intestine and stomach are poorly understood in fish. We selected the southern catfish, Silurus meridionalis, as the targeted species, owing to its foraging behavior with a large meal that can assure clear periodic rhythms in food digestion, to study spatial variations of the microbial community along the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. We further evaluated temporal microbial dynamics by collecting GI tract samples at time intervals 03, 12, and 24h after feeding. High-throughput sequencing results showed higher microbial diversity in the stomach than in the intestine and distinguishable community structures between stomach and intestine. Firmicutes were dominated by both Clostridium and unclassified Clostridiaceae, which was the most abundant taxon in the stomach, whereas Fusobacteria were dominated by Cetobacterium, which prevailed in the intestine. Firmicutes was significantly increased and Fusobacteria was decreased after feeding. Furthermore, inter-stomach microbial variability was greater than inter-intestine microbial variability. These results demonstrate that GI microbial assemblies are specific per anatomical site and are highly dynamic during food digestion, indicating that digestive status and/or sampling time are factors potentially influencing the microbial compositions. Furthermore, the finding of high spatial and temporal variations of the microbial community along the GI tract suggests limitations of single sampling regime to study food-derived microbial ecology. PMID:28848535

  17. Spatial and temporal variations of microbial community in a mixed plug-flow loop reactor fed with dairy manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yueh-Fen; Chen, Po-Hsu; Yu, Zhongtang

    2014-07-01

    Mixed plug-flow loop reactor (MPFLR) has been widely adopted by the US dairy farms to convert cattle manure to biogas. However, the microbiome in MPFLR digesters remains unexplored. In this study, the microbiome in a MPFLR digester operated on a mega-dairy farm was examined thrice over a 2 month period. Within 23 days of retention time, 55-70% of total manure solid was digested. Except for a few minor volatile fatty acids (VFAs), total VFA concentration and pH remained similar along the course of the digester and over time. Metagenomic analysis showed that although with some temporal variations, the bacterial community was rather stable spatially in the digester. The methanogenic community was also stable both spatially and temporally in the digester. Among methanogens, genus Methanosaeta dominated in the digester. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis and metagenomic analysis yielded different relative abundance of individual genera of methanogens, especially for Methanobacterium, which was predominant based on qPCR analysis but undetectable by metagenomics. Collectively, the results showed that only small microbial and chemical gradients existed within the digester, and the digestion process occurred similarly throughout the MPFLR digester. The findings of this study may help improve the operation and design of this type of manure digesters. © 2014 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. Temporal variations in parameters reflecting terminal-electron-accepting processes in an aquifer contaminated with waste fuel and chlorinated solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Jennifer T.; Smith, Erik W.; Long, David T.; Hyndman, David W.; Haack, Sheridan K.; Klug, Michael J.; Velbel, Michael A.

    2000-01-01

    A fundamental issue in aquifer biogeochemistry is the means by which solute transport, geochemical processes, and microbiological activity combine to produce spatial and temporal variations in redox zonation. In this paper, we describe the temporal variability of TEAP conditions in shallow groundwater contaminated with both waste fuel and chlorinated solvents. TEAP parameters (including methane, dissolved iron, and dissolved hydrogen) were measured to characterize the contaminant plume over a 3-year period. We observed that concentrations of TEAP parameters changed on different time scales and appear to be related, in part, to recharge events. Changes in all TEAP parameters were observed on short time scales (months), and over a longer 3-year period. The results indicate that (1) interpretations of TEAP conditions in aquifers contaminated with a variety of organic chemicals, such as those with petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents, must consider additional hydrogen-consuming reactions (e.g., dehalogenation); (2) interpretations must consider the roles of both in situ (at the sampling point) biogeochemical and solute transport processes; and (3) determinations of microbial communities are often necessary to confirm the interpretations made from geochemical and hydrogeological measurements on these processes.

  19. Atmospheric temporal variations in the pre-landfall environment of typhoon Nangka (2015) observed by the Himawari-8 AHI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Keun; Li, Jun; Li, Zhenglong; Schmit, Timothy

    2017-09-01

    The next generation Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R series (GOES-R) Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) legacy atmospheric profile (LAP) retrieval algorithm is applied to the Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI) radiance measurements from the Himawari-8 satellite. Derived products included atmospheric temperature/moisture profiles, total precipitable water (TPW), and atmospheric stability indices. Since both AHI and ABI have 9 similar infrared bands, the GOES-R ABI LAP retrieval algorithm can be applied to the AHI measurements with minimal modifications. With the capability of frequent (10-min interval) full disk observations over the East Asia and Western Pacific regions, the AHI measurements are used to investigate the atmospheric temporal variation in the pre-landfall environment for typhoon Nangka (2015). Before its landfall over Japan, heavy rainfalls from Nangka occurred over the southern region of Honshu Island. During the pre-landfall period, the trends of the AHI LAP products indicated the development of the atmospheric environment favorable for heavy rainfall. Even though, the AHI LAP products are generated only in the clear skies, the 10-minute interval AHI measurements provide detailed information on the pre-landfall environment for typhoon Nangka. This study shows the capability of the AHI radiance measurements, together with the derived products, for depicting the detailed temporal features of the pre-landfall environment of a typhoon, which may also be possible for hurricanes and storms with ABI on the GOES-R satellite.

  20. Spatio-temporal variations of NOy species in the northern latitudes stratosphere measured with the balloon-borne MIPAS instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Maucher

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the spatio-temporal distribution of NOy species at altitudes between 14 and 31 km as measured with the MIPAS-B instrument on the morning of 21 March 2003 in northern Scandinavia. At lower altitudes (below about 22 km, temperature variations, the distribution of ClONO2, and the tracer N2O reveal the dynamics through the edge of the late arctic polar vortex. At higher altitudes, continuous measurement before, during, and after sunrise provides information about photochemistry illustrating the evolution of the photochemically active gases NO2 and N2O5 around sunrise. The measured temporal evolution of NO2 and N2O5 is compared to box modelling that is run along backward calculated trajectories. While the comparison of measured and modelled N2O5 reveals significant differences, there is a good agreement between the model and observations for NO2 in terms of volume mixing ratios but the simulated decrease shortly after sunrise is underestimated compared to the measurements. The differences are attributed to the photolysis rates used in the box model calculations.

  1. Temporal variation in the prevalence of the crayfish plague pathogen, Aphanomyces astaci, in three Czech spiny-cheek crayfish populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matasová K.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available North American crayfish species are natural hosts of the crayfish plague pathogen Aphanomyces astaci. The spiny-cheek crayfish Orconectes limosus, widespread in Central Europe, is the main reservoir of A. astaci in Czech Republic. We tested if there are temporal changes in the prevalence of infected individuals (i.e., the proportion of individuals in which the pathogen is detected in spiny-cheek crayfish populations. Crayfish from three populations shown previously to be infected to different extents (high, intermediate and low, were repeatedly sampled in different years (2004–2010 and seasons. The presence of A. astaci in the soft abdominal crayfish cuticle was tested by specific amplification of the pathogen DNA. There was no substantial temporal variation in pathogen prevalence in the highly and very lowly infected populations. However, a significant long-term as well as seasonal decrease was found in the intermediately infected population. This decline could be related to a decrease in population density over the studied years, and to crayfish seasonal moulting, respectively. A reliable estimate of pathogen prevalence in American crayfish populations thus requires repeated monitoring over years, preferably during the same season before the main period of crayfish moulting.

  2. Temporal Dynamics of Phlebotomine Sand Flies Population in Response to Ambient Temperature Variation, Bam, Kerman Province of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halimi, Mansour; Cheghabaleki, Zahra Zarei; Modrek, Mohammad Jafari; Delavari, Mahdi

    Variations in climate condition may have changed the dynamic of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) and its agents such as sand flies and reservoir in the Bam Kerman the dry region of Iran. In this study we intend to examine the seasonal and interannual dynamics of the phlebotomine mosquito as a function of ambient temperature in Bam, Kerman one of the main leshmaniasis prevalence area in Iran. The MODIS land surface temperature product (LST; MODIS/Terra LST/E Monthly L3 Global 0.05Deg CMG [MOD11C3]) and land-based climatic data were used as explanatory variables. Monthly caught mosquitoes in Bam, Kerman, were used as a dependent variable. The temporal associations were first investigated by inspection of scatterplots and single-variable regression analysis. A multivariate linear regression model was developed to reveal the association between ambient temperature and the monthly mosquito abundance at a 95% confidence level (P 0.80 of temporal dynamics of phlebotomine mosquitos in Bam. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Species-specific temporal variation in photosynthesis as a moderator of peatland carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korrensalo, Aino; Alekseychik, Pavel; Hájek, Tomáš; Rinne, Janne; Vesala, Timo; Mehtätalo, Lauri; Mammarella, Ivan; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina

    2017-01-01

    In boreal bogs plant species are low in number, but they differ greatly in their growth forms and photosynthetic properties. We assessed how ecosystem carbon (C) sink dynamics were affected by seasonal variations in the photosynthetic rate and leaf area of different species. Photosynthetic properties (light response parameters), leaf area development and areal cover (abundance) of the species were used to quantify species-specific net and gross photosynthesis rates (PN and PG, respectively), which were summed to express ecosystem-level PN and PG. The ecosystem-level PG was compared with a gross primary production (GPP) estimate derived from eddy covariance (EC) measurements.Species areal cover, rather than differences in photosynthetic properties, determined the species with the highest PG of both vascular plants and Sphagna. Species-specific contributions to the ecosystem PG varied over the growing season, which, in turn, determined the seasonal variation in ecosystem PG. The upscaled growing season PG estimate, 230 g C m-2, agreed well with the GPP estimated by the EC (243 g C m-2).Sphagna were superior to vascular plants in ecosystem-level PG throughout the growing season but had a lower PN. PN results indicated that areal cover of the species, together with their differences in photosynthetic parameters, shape the ecosystem-level C balance. Species with low areal cover but high photosynthetic efficiency appear to be potentially important for the ecosystem C sink. Results imply that functional diversity, i.e., the presence of plant groups with different seasonal timing and efficiency of photosynthesis, may increase the stability of C sinks of boreal bogs.

  4. Temporal and spatial morphological variations along a cross-shore intertidal profile, Jiangsu, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zheng; Jin, Chuang; Zhang, Changkuan; Zhou, Zeng; Zhang, Qian; Li, Huan

    2017-07-01

    Fifteen monthly field surveys were conducted from September 2012 to November 2013 at ten representative stations along a cross-shore profile, covering the entire tidal flat. Results indicate that tidal currents significantly affect bed level variations over bare flats, while subsurface processes (e.g., soil subsidence and expansion) are likely to play an important role in changing the bed level of the upper intertidal flat where salt marshes are present. The cross-shore profile shows a clear double-convex shape, and different geomorphic zones display distinctive variation. Above the mean high water level (MHWL), the bed level is generally stable. The region around the MHWL, where the upper convex point is present, is a location of high sedimentation due to the weaker hydrodynamic conditions and the settling and scour lag effects, it keeps growing with the increase of inundation frequency. A concave point occurs in the middle part of the intertidal flat, showing considerable erosion. Near the mean low water level (MLWL), the lower convex point is elevated due to the long-shore tidal current and associated sediment transport (the flood dominated transport during summer exceeds the ebb dominated transport during winter, hence the net effect favors sedimentation). Further seawards, the area below the MLWL is strongly eroded. The cross-shore profile follows a ;stable-accretional-erosional-accretional-erosional; sequence. Overall, the measurements indicate that the interplay among vegetation, hydrodynamics and sediment transport is critical in shaping the cross-shore morphology of the intertidal flats along the Jiangsu coast of China.

  5. Massive gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia de Rham

    2016-01-01

    We review recent progress in massive gravity. We start by showing how different theories of massive gravity emerge from a higher-dimensional theory of general relativity, leading to the Dvali–Gabadadze–Porrati model (DGP), cascading gravity, and ghost-free massive gravity. We then explore their theoretical and phenomenological consistency, proving the absence of Boulware–Deser ghosts and reviewing the Vainshtein mechanism and the cosmological solutions in these models. Finally, we present alt...

  6. Coseismic gravity and displacement changes of Japan Tohoku earthquake (Mw 9.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinlin Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The greatest earthquake in the modern history of Japan and probably the fourth greatest in the last 100 years in the world occurred on March 11, 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku. Large tsunami and ground motions caused severe damage in wide areas, particularly many towns along the Pacific coast. So far, gravity change caused by such a great earthquake has been reported for the 1964 Alaska and the 2010 Maule events. However, the spatial-temporal resolution of the gravity data for these cases is insufficient to depict a co-seismic gravity field variation in a spatial scale of a plate subduction zone. Here, we report an unequivocal co-seismic gravity change over the Japanese Island, obtained from a hybrid gravity observation (combined absolute and relative gravity measurements. The time interval of the observation before and after the earthquake is within 1 year at almost all the observed sites, including 13 absolute and 16 relative measurement sites, which deduced tectonic and environmental contributions to the gravity change. The observed gravity agrees well with the result calculated by a dislocation theory based on a self-gravitating and layered spherical earth model. In this computation, a co-seismic slip distribution is determined by an inversion of Global Positioning System (GPS data. Of particular interest is that the observed gravity change in some area is negative where a remarkable subsidence is observed by GPS, which can not be explained by simple vertical movement of the crust. This indicated that the mass redistribution in the underground affects the gravity change. This result supports the result that Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE satellites detected a crustal dilatation due to the 2004 Sumatra earthquake by the terrestrial observation with a higher spatial and temporal resolution.

  7. Spatial, temporal, and source variations of hydrocarbons in marine sediments from Baffin Bay, Eastern Canadian Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Karen L; Stern, Gary A; Carrie, Jesse; Bailey, Joscelyn N-L; Outridge, Peter M; Sanei, Hamed; Macdonald, Robie W

    2015-02-15

    With declining sea ice conditions in Arctic regions owing to changing climate, the large prospective reservoirs of oil and gas in Baffin Bay and Davis Strait are increasingly accessible, and the interest in offshore exploration and shipping through these regions has increased. Both of these activities are associated with the risk of hydrocarbon releases into the marine ecosystem. However, hydrocarbons are also present naturally in marine environments, in some cases deriving from oil seeps. We have analyzed hydrocarbon concentrations in eleven sediment cores collected from northern Baffin Bay during 2008 and 2009 Amundsen expeditions and have examined the hydrocarbon compositions in both pre- and post-industrial periods (i.e., before and after 1900) to assess the sources of hydrocarbons, and their temporal and spatial variabilities. Concentrations of ΣPAHs ranged from 341 to 2693 ng g(-1) dw, with concentrations in cores from sites within the North Water (NOW) Polynya generally higher. Individual PAH concentrations did not exceed concentrations of concern for marine aquatic life, with one exception found in a core collected within the NOW (one of the seven sediment core samples). Hydrocarbon biomarkers, including alkane profiles, OEP (odd-to-even preference), and TAR (terrigenous/aquatic ratios) values indicated that organic carbon at all sites is derived from both terrigenous higher plants and marine algae, the former being of greater significance at coastal sites, and the latter at the deepest sites at the southern boundary of the NOW. Biomarker ratios and chemical profiles indicate that petrogenic sources dominate over combustion sources, and thus long-range atmospheric transport is less significant than inputs from weathering. Present-day and historic pre-1900 hydrocarbon concentrations exhibited less than an order of magnitude difference for most compounds at all sites. The dataset presented here provides a baseline record of hydrocarbon concentrations in

  8. Temporal and Seasonal Variations of the Hot Spring Basin Hydrothermal System, Yellowstone National Park, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Jaworowski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring Yellowstone National Park’s hydrothermal systems and establishing hydrothermal baselines are the main goals of an ongoing collaborative effort between Yellowstone National Park’s Geology program and Utah State University’s Remote Sensing Services Laboratory. During the first years of this research effort, improvements were made in image acquisition, processing and calibration. In 2007, a broad-band, forward looking infrared (FLIR camera (8–12 microns provided reliable airborne images for a hydrothermal baseline of the Hot Spring Basin hydrothermal system. From 2008 to 2011, night-time, airborne thermal infrared image acquisitions during September yielded temperature maps that established the temporal variability of the hydrothermal system. A March 2012 airborne image acquisition provided an initial assessment of seasonal variability. The consistent, high-spatial resolution imagery (~1 m demonstrates that the technique is robust and repeatable for generating corrected (atmosphere and emissivity and calibrated temperature maps of the Hot Spring Basin hydrothermal system. Atmospheric conditions before and at flight-time determine the usefulness of the thermal infrared imagery for geohydrologic applications, such as hydrothermal monitoring. Although these ground-surface temperature maps are easily understood, quantification of radiative heat from the Hot Spring Basin hydrothermal system is an estimate of the system’s total energy output. Area is a key parameter for calculating the hydrothermal system’s heat output. Preliminary heat calculations suggest a radiative heat output of ~56 MW to 62 MW for the central Hot Spring Basin hydrothermal system. Challenges still remain in removing the latent solar component within the calibrated, atmospherically adjusted, and emissivity corrected night-time imagery.

  9. Detection of embedded radiation sources using temporal variation of gamma spectral data.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokair, Isaac R.

    2011-09-01

    Conventional full spectrum gamma spectroscopic analysis has the objective of quantitative identification of all the isotopes present in a measurement. For low energy resolution detectors, when photopeaks alone are not sufficient for complete isotopic identification, such analysis requires template spectra for all the isotopes present in the measurement. When many isotopes are present it is difficult to make the correct identification and this process often requires many trial solutions by highly skilled spectroscopists. This report investigates the potential of a new analysis method which uses spatial/temporal information from multiple low energy resolution measurements to test the hypothesis of the presence of a target spectrum of interest in these measurements without the need to identify all the other isotopes present. This method is referred to as targeted principal component analysis (TPCA). For radiation portal monitor applications, multiple measurements of gamma spectra are taken at equally spaced time increments as a vehicle passes through the portal and the TPCA method is directly applicable to this type of measurement. In this report we describe the method and investigate its application to the problem of detection of a radioactive localized source that is embedded in a distributed source in the presence of an ambient background. Examples using simulated spectral measurements indicate that this method works very well and has the potential for automated analysis for RPM applications. This method is also expected to work well for isotopic detection in the presence of spectrally and spatially varying backgrounds as a result of vehicle-induced background suppression. Further work is needed to include effects of shielding, to understand detection limits, setting of thresholds, and to estimate false positive probability.

  10. Temporal and ontogenetic variation in the escape response of Ameiva festiva (Squamata, Teiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lattanzio

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Several factors have been shown to affect lizard escape behavior (flight initiation distance or FID, the distance between predator and prey when the prey initiates escape. Patterns of daily activity, such as foraging or movement behavior, vary with respect to time of day, supporting that escape responses may vary temporally as well. However, there remains scant information regarding the effects of time of day on FID. During peak activity, FID may decrease due to increased cost of giving up resources (e.g., prey or potential mates. An alternative hypothesis is that FID may increase because lizard activity in general may serve to alert a predator in advance of its approach. A lizard in this scenario may be favored to flee sooner rather than later. Moreover, juvenile and adult lizards of multiple species may differ in behavioral, ecological, and morphological traits that could influence escape decisions. I tested the effects of time of day (in 30-min intervals and age (juvenile or adult on the FID of a tropical whiptail lizard, Ameiva festiva in Costa Rica. I found that A. festiva escape responses varied with time of day such that in general, their FID decreased throughout the day. In addition, I observed a peak in FID from mid to late-morning that matches published estimates of peak activity times for A. festiva. Overall, juvenile A. festiva initiated an escape response sooner than adults, which may be related to differences in perceived risk associated with differences in size and predator experience between the two age groups. I conclude that escape responses may be contingent on both the activity level of the animal at the time of approach and its age.

  11. Spatial and temporal variation in microcystins occurrence in wadeable streams in the southeastern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftin, Keith A.; Clark, Jimmy M.; Journey, Celeste; Kolpin, Dana W.; Van Metre, Peter C.; Bradley, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite historical observations of potential microcystin-producing cyanobacteria (including Leptolyngbya,Phormidium, Pseudoanabaena, and Anabaena species) in 74% of headwater streams in Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina (USA) from 1993 to 2011, fluvial cyanotoxin occurrence has not been systematically assessed in the southeastern United States. To begin to address this data gap, a spatial reconnaissance of fluvial microcystin concentrations was conducted in 75 wadeable streams in the Piedmont region (southeastern USA) during June 2014. Microcystins were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (limit = 0.10 µg/L) in 39% of the streams with mean, median, and maximum detected concentrations of 0.29 µg/L, 0.11 µg/L, and 3.2 µg/L, respectively. Significant (α = 0.05) correlations were observed between June 2014 microcystin concentrations and stream flow, total nitrogen to total phosphorus ratio, and water temperature; but each of these factors explained 38% or less of the variability in fluvial microcystins across the region. Temporal microcystin variability was assessed monthly through October 2014 in 5 of the streams where microcystins were observed in June and in 1 reference location; microcystins were repeatedly detected in all but the reference stream. Although microcystin concentrations in the present study did not exceed World Health Organization recreational guidance thresholds, their widespread occurrence demonstrates the need for further investigation of possible in-stream environmental health effects as well as potential impacts on downstream lakes and reservoirs. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;9999:1–7. Published 2016 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US Government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  12. Spatial and temporal variation in microcystin occurrence in wadeable streams in the southeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftin, Keith A; Clark, Jimmy M; Journey, Celeste A; Kolpin, Dana W; Van Metre, Peter C; Carlisle, Daren; Bradley, Paul M

    2016-09-01

    Despite historical observations of potential microcystin-producing cyanobacteria (including Leptolyngbya, Phormidium, Pseudoanabaena, and Anabaena species) in 74% of headwater streams in Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina (USA) from 1993 to 2011, fluvial cyanotoxin occurrence has not been systematically assessed in the southeastern United States. To begin to address this data gap, a spatial reconnaissance of fluvial microcystin concentrations was conducted in 75 wadeable streams in the Piedmont region (southeastern USA) during June 2014. Microcystins were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (limit = 0.10 µg/L) in 39% of the streams with mean, median, and maximum detected concentrations of 0.29 µg/L, 0.11 µg/L, and 3.2 µg/L, respectively. Significant (α = 0.05) correlations were observed between June 2014 microcystin concentrations and stream flow, total nitrogen to total phosphorus ratio, and water temperature; but each of these factors explained 38% or less of the variability in fluvial microcystins across the region. Temporal microcystin variability was assessed monthly through October 2014 in 5 of the streams where microcystins were observed in June and in 1 reference location; microcystins were repeatedly detected in all but the reference stream. Although microcystin concentrations in the present study did not exceed World Health Organization recreational guidance thresholds, their widespread occurrence demonstrates the need for further investigation of possible in-stream environmental health effects as well as potential impacts on downstream lakes and reservoirs. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2281-2287. Published 2016 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US Government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America. Published 2016 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US Government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United

  13. Temporal and Spatial Variations of Bacterial and Faunal Communities Associated with Deep-Sea Wood Falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop Ristova, Petra; Bienhold, Christina; Wenzhöfer, Frank; Rossel, Pamela E; Boetius, Antje

    2017-01-01

    Sinking of large organic food falls i.e. kelp, wood and whale carcasses to the oligotrophic deep-sea floor promotes the establishment of locally highly productive and diverse ecosystems, often with specifically adapted benthic communities. However, the fragmented spatial distribution and small area poses challenges for the dispersal of their microbial and faunal communities. Our study focused on the temporal dynamics and spatial distributions of sunken wood bacterial communities, which were deployed in the vicinity of different cold seeps in the Eastern Mediterranean and the Norwegian deep-seas. By combining fingerprinting of bacterial communities by ARISA and 454 sequencing with in situ and ex situ biogeochemical measurements, we show that sunken wood logs have a locally confined long-term impact (> 3y) on the sediment geochemistry and community structure. We confirm previous hypotheses of different successional stages in wood degradation including a sulphophilic one, attracting chemosynthetic fauna from nearby seep systems. Wood experiments deployed at similar water depths (1100-1700 m), but in hydrographically different oceanic regions harbored different wood-boring bivalves, opportunistic faunal communities, and chemosynthetic species. Similarly, bacterial communities on sunken wood logs were more similar within one geographic region than between different seas. Diverse sulphate-reducing bacteria of the Deltaproteobacteria, the sulphide-oxidizing bacteria Sulfurovum as well as members of the Acidimicrobiia and Bacteroidia dominated the wood falls in the Eastern Mediterranean, while Alphaproteobacteria and Flavobacteriia colonized the Norwegian Sea wood logs. Fauna and bacterial wood-associated communities changed between 1 to 3 years of immersion, with sulphate-reducers and sulphide-oxidizers increasing in proportion, and putative cellulose degraders decreasing with time. Only 6% of all bacterial genera, comprising the core community, were found at any time on

  14. Temporal and spatial variation in CO2 exchange in a salt marsh dominated estuary (PIE LTER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbrich, I.; Giblin, A. E.; Morris, J. T.; Hopkinson, C.

    2016-12-01

    Salt marshes are important carbon sinks, but large uncertainties about current rates of carbon exchange with the atmosphere and the ocean remain. These need to be constrained for a better assessment of changes in long-term drivers such as sea level and climate. At the Plum Island Ecosystems LTER, we are expecting a transition from the current Spartina patens dominated high marsh to a more frequently flooded Spartina alterniflora dominated low marsh with increasing sea level. We have set up two eddy covariance sites, one in a high marsh (starting in 2013) and one in a low marsh (starting in 2015) to study net ecosystem CO2 exchange and evapotranspiration (ET). We use a broad-band NDVI to monitor phenology at both sites, which is tightly coupled to the CO2 fluxes. While the temporal dynamics do not vary much between the years, the magnitude in NDVI and CO2 fluxes does: For the high marsh site, we observe lower NDVI (and smaller overall net CO2 uptake) in years with low rainfall during the growing season, e.g. in 2014 and likely in 2016. In 2014, a low rainfall period occurred at the beginning of the growing season, during which ET was slightly higher than in other years, which likely increased soil salinity. In 2016, the period of low rainfall has extended much longer into the growing season (on-going) which seems to have an overall stronger effect (i.e. decrease) on low marsh net CO2 uptake than on the high marsh. We will discuss our findings in the context of salt marsh hydrology and carbon cycling in high and low marsh.

  15. Temporal Variation of Carbon Monoxide Concentration at Congested Urban Roadways Intersection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanshyam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The carbon monoxide (CO is dominant among major traffic emitted pollutants such as respirable suspended particulate matter (RSPM, oxides of nitrogen (NOx, volatile organic carbons(VOCs and ozone (O3 etc. It is generated by automobiles due to incomplete combustion of the fuel. The vehicles that queue up at an intersection spend more time in idle driving mode generating more pollutant leading to higher pollutant concentrations. Therefore, the trends of average hourly CO concentrations at various locations of congested roadways intersection have been investigated. The four approach roads making intersection have been selected for the present study. CO monitoring has been carried out at 2 selected locations of each approach road. The CO concentration has been monitored from 8:00 AM to 8:00 PM at each location using portable online CO monitor. The average hourly CO concentrations data have been analyzed using MS excel spread sheet for each approach road. The average hourly concentration of monitored CO concentration at all receptors locations shows two peak CO concentration values (i.e., the morning peak and evening peak throughout the monitoring programme (March to May, 2011. The comparison of monitored values of average 1 hourly CO concentration levels as well as 8 hourly average concentration levels of CO showed non compliance with the prescribed standards (4000 µg/m3 average hourly and 2000 µg/m3 average 8 hourly CO concentration. The temporal CO concentration at various approach roads making roadway intersection shows non-uniform. The highest CO concentration has been observed to be towards high rise building and vice-versa. The least CO concentration has been observed towards either low rise building or open area.

  16. Annual, semi-annual and ter-annual variations of gravity wave momentum flux in 13 years of SABER data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dan; Preusse, Peter; Ern, Manfred; Strube, Cornelia

    2017-04-01

    In this study, the variations at different time scales such as the annual cycle, the semiannual oscillation (SAO), the ter-annual cycle (about four monthly) and the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) in zonal mean GW amplitudes and GW momentum flux (GWMF) have been investigated using satellite observations from 2002-2014 and combining ECMWF high resolution data with the GORGRAT model. The global distribution (patterns) of spectral amplitudes of GW momentum flux in stratosphere and mesosphere (from 30 km to 90 km) show that the annual cycle is the most predominant variation, and then are SAO, ter-annual cycle and QBO. For annual components, two relatively isolated amplitude maxima appear in each hemisphere: a subtropical maximum is associated with convective sources in summer, a mid and high latitude maximum is associated with the polar vortex in winter. In the subtropics, GWs propagate upward obliquely to the higher latitudes. The winter maximum in the southern hemisphere has larger momentum flux than that one in the northern hemisphere. While on the SH the phase (i.e. time corresponding to the maximum GWMF) continuously descends with the maximum in July in the upper mesosphere and in September in the lower stratosphere, on the northern hemisphere, the phase has no visible altitude dependence with a maximum in December. For semiannual variations, in the MLT (70-80 km) region, there is an obvious enhancement of spectral amplitude at equatorial latitudes which relate to the dissipation of convectively forced GWs. The SAO in absolute momentum flux and the annual cycle in zonal momentum flux indicated that the variations at mid-latitudes (about from 30°-40°) are not a SAO signals but rather an annual cycle when the direction of GWMF is considered. The ter-annual cycle may be related to the duration of active convection in subtropical latitudes (from June to Sep. in north hemisphere) Indications for QBO are found latitude extension to mid-latitudes in stratosphere of

  17. Temporal variations of atmospheric CO2 and CO at Ahmedabad in western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Chandra

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available About 70 % of the anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2 is emitted from the megacities and urban areas of the world. In order to draw effective emission mitigation policies for combating future climate change as well as independently validating the emission inventories for constraining their large range of uncertainties, especially over major metropolitan areas of developing countries, there is an urgent need for greenhouse gas measurements over representative urban regions. India is a fast developing country, where fossil fuel emissions have increased dramatically in the last three decades and are predicted to continue to grow further by at least 6 % per year through to 2025. The CO2 measurements over urban regions in India are lacking. To overcome this limitation, simultaneous measurements of CO2 and carbon monoxide (CO have been made at Ahmedabad, a major urban site in western India, using a state-of-the-art laser-based cavity ring down spectroscopy technique from November 2013 to May 2015. These measurements enable us to understand the diurnal and seasonal variations in atmospheric CO2 with respect to its sources (both anthropogenic and biospheric and biospheric sinks. The observed annual average concentrations of CO2 and CO are 413.0 ± 13.7 and 0.50 ± 0.37 ppm respectively. Both CO2 and CO show strong seasonality with lower concentrations (400.3 ± 6.8 and 0.19 ± 0.13 ppm during the south-west monsoon and higher concentrations (419.6 ± 22.8 and 0.72 ± 0.68 ppm during the autumn (SON season. Strong diurnal variations are also observed for both the species. The common factors for the diurnal cycles of CO2 and CO are vertical mixing and rush hour traffic, while the influence of biospheric fluxes is also seen in the CO2 diurnal cycle. Using CO and CO2 covariation, we differentiate the anthropogenic and biospheric components of CO2 and found significant contributions of biospheric respiration and anthropogenic

  18. Spatial and temporal variation of fault slip and distributed off-fault deformation, Santa Cruz Mountains, central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsman, E. M.; Graymer, R. W.

    2010-12-01

    The Santa Cruz Mountains of central California record a lengthy history of deformation, including slip on the dextral San Andreas Fault (SAF) system and off-fault deformation manifested by both slip on secondary faults as well as distributed strain. This complex history provides insight into regional deformation processes operating both before and after initiation of the SAF. We focus here on deformation SW of the SAF, where several distinct, fault-bounded crustal blocks record different histories. We evaluate the magnitude and significance of off-fault deformation SW of the SAF by considering spatial and temporal relationships between slip on secondary faults and distributed deformation. To conduct the analysis we combine a synthesis of the slip histories of five important regional faults with a new dataset constraining spatial and temporal variation of regional deformation magnitude. This new dataset is based on shortening measurements of several major unconformities compiled from more than 60 cross sections from the region. To estimate strain magnitude recorded by older surfaces, we progressively subtract shortening magnitude of young markers from older markers. Because uncertainties grow for older surfaces, this method is most reliable for younger surfaces. Results of the analysis demonstrate that strain magnitude recorded by several unconformity-bound sedimentary packages of different ages is largest within about 5 km of the SAF, providing evidence of long-term deformation partitioning near this major structure. This pattern of distributed deformation partitioning near faults is also apparent but less pronounced near the secondary faults SW of the SAF. When considering spatial and temporal ties between regional deformation and slip on secondary faults, no simple pattern emerges. Fault activity is highly variable in both space and time. Additionally, fault activity at any one time is highly localized; one fault may be active while a nearby structure is inactive

  19. Modelling spatial and temporal variations in the water quality of an artificial water reservoir in the semiarid Midwest of Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cid, Fabricio D., E-mail: fabricio.cid@gmail.com [Laboratory of Biology ' Prof. E. Caviedes Codelia' , Facultad de Ciencias Humanas, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, San Luis (Argentina); Laboratory of Integrative Biology, Institute for Multidisciplinary Research in Biology (IMIBIO-SL), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, San Luis (Argentina); Department of Biochemistry and Biological Sciences, Facultad de Quimica, Bioquimica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, San Luis (Argentina); Anton, Rosa I. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Facultad de Quimica, Bioquimica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, San Luis (Argentina); Pardo, Rafael; Vega, Marisol [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid (Spain); Caviedes-Vidal, Enrique [Laboratory of Biology ' Prof. E. Caviedes Codelia' , Facultad de Ciencias Humanas, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, San Luis (Argentina); Laboratory of Integrative Biology, Institute for Multidisciplinary Research in Biology (IMIBIO-SL), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, San Luis (Argentina); Department of Biochemistry and Biological Sciences, Facultad de Quimica, Bioquimica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, San Luis (Argentina)

    2011-10-31

    Highlights: {yields} Water quality of an Argentinean reservoir has been investigated by N-way PCA. {yields} PARAFAC mode modelled spatial and seasonal variations of water composition. {yields} Two factors related with organic and lead pollution have been identified. {yields} The most polluted areas of the reservoir were located, and polluting sources identified. - Abstract: Temporal and spatial patterns of water quality of an important artificial water reservoir located in the semiarid Midwest of Argentina were investigated using chemometric techniques. Surface water samples were collected at 38 points of the water reservoir during eleven sampling campaigns between October 1998 and June 2000, covering the warm wet season and the cold dry season, and analyzed for dissolved oxygen (DO), conductivity, pH, ammonium, nitrate, nitrite, total dissolved solids (TDS), alkalinity, hardness, bicarbonate, chloride, sulfate, calcium, magnesium, fluoride, sodium, potassium, iron, aluminum, silica, phosphate, sulfide, arsenic, chromium, lead, cadmium, chemical oxygen demand (COD), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), viable aerobic bacteria (VAB) and total coliform bacteria (TC). Concentrations of lead, ammonium, nitrite and coliforms were higher than the maximum allowable limits for drinking water in a large proportion of the water samples. To obtain a general representation of the spatial and temporal trends of the water quality parameters at the reservoir, the three-dimensional dataset (sampling sites x parameters x sampling campaigns) has been analyzed by matrix augmentation principal component analysis (MA-PCA) and N-way principal component analysis (N-PCA) using Tucker3 and PARAFAC (Parallel Factor Analysis) models. MA-PCA produced a component accounting for the general behavior of parameters associated with organic pollution. The Tucker3 models were not appropriate for modelling the water quality dataset. The two-factor PARAFAC model provided the best picture to understand the

  20. Soil microbial responses to temporal variations of moisture and temperature in a chihuahuan desert grassland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Colin; McIntyre, Nancy; Cox, Stephen; Tissue, David; Zak, John

    2008-07-01

    Global climate change models indicate that storm magnitudes will increase in many areas throughout southwest North America, which could result in up to a 25% increase in seasonal precipitation in the Big Bend region of the Chihuahuan Desert over the next 50 years. Seasonal precipitation is a key limiting factor regulating primary productivity, soil microbial activity, and ecosystem dynamics in arid and semiarid regions. As decomposers, soil microbial communities mediate critical ecosystem processes that ultimately affect the success of all trophic levels, and the activity of these microbial communities is primarily regulated by moisture availability. This research is focused on elucidating soil microbial responses to seasonal and yearly changes in soil moisture, temperature, and selected soil nutrient and edaphic properties in a Sotol Grassland in the Chihuahuan Desert at Big Bend National Park. Soil samples were collected over a 3-year period in March and September (2004-2006) at 0-15 cm soil depth from 12 3 x 3 m community plots. Bacterial and fungal carbon usage (quantified using Biolog 96-well micro-plates) was related to soil moisture patterns (ranging between 3.0 and 14%). In addition to soil moisture, the seasonal and yearly variability of soil bacterial activity was most closely associated with levels of soil organic matter, extractable NH(4)-N, and soil pH. Variability in fungal activity was related to soil temperatures ranging between 13 and 26 degrees C. These findings indicate that changes in soil moisture, coupled with soil temperatures and resource availability, drive the functioning of soil-microbial dynamics in these desert grasslands. Temporal patterns in microbial activity may reflect the differences in the ability of bacteria and fungi to respond to seasonal patterns of moisture and temperature. Bacteria were more able to respond to moisture pulses regardless of temperature, while fungi only responded to moisture pulses during cooler seasons with

  1. Temporal and Spatial Variations of Bacterial and Faunal Communities Associated with Deep-Sea Wood Falls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Pop Ristova

    Full Text Available Sinking of large organic food falls i.e. kelp, wood and whale carcasses to the oligotrophic deep-sea floor promotes the establishment of locally highly productive and diverse ecosystems, often with specifically adapted benthic communities. However, the fragmented spatial distribution and small area poses challenges for the dispersal of their microbial and faunal communities. Our study focused on the temporal dynamics and spatial distributions of sunken wood bacterial communities, which were deployed in the vicinity of different cold seeps in the Eastern Mediterranean and the Norwegian deep-seas. By combining fingerprinting of bacterial communities by ARISA and 454 sequencing with in situ and ex situ biogeochemical measurements, we show that sunken wood logs have a locally confined long-term impact (> 3y on the sediment geochemistry and community structure. We confirm previous hypotheses of different successional stages in wood degradation including a sulphophilic one, attracting chemosynthetic fauna from nearby seep systems. Wood experiments deployed at similar water depths (1100-1700 m, but in hydrographically different oceanic regions harbored different wood-boring bivalves, opportunistic faunal communities, and chemosynthetic species. Similarly, bacterial communities on sunken wood logs were more similar within one geographic region than between different seas. Diverse sulphate-reducing bacteria of the Deltaproteobacteria, the sulphide-oxidizing bacteria Sulfurovum as well as members of the Acidimicrobiia and Bacteroidia dominated the wood falls in the Eastern Mediterranean, while Alphaproteobacteria and Flavobacteriia colonized the Norwegian Sea wood logs. Fauna and bacterial wood-associated communities changed between 1 to 3 years of immersion, with sulphate-reducers and sulphide-oxidizers increasing in proportion, and putative cellulose degraders decreasing with time. Only 6% of all bacterial genera, comprising the core community, were

  2. Temporal and Spatial Variations of Bacterial and Faunal Communities Associated with Deep-Sea Wood Falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienhold, Christina; Wenzhöfer, Frank; Rossel, Pamela E.; Boetius, Antje

    2017-01-01

    Sinking of large organic food falls i.e. kelp, wood and whale carcasses to the oligotrophic deep-sea floor promotes the establishment of locally highly productive and diverse ecosystems, often with specifically adapted benthic communities. However, the fragmented spatial distribution and small area poses challenges for the dispersal of their microbial and faunal communities. Our study focused on the temporal dynamics and spatial distributions of sunken wood bacterial communities, which were deployed in the vicinity of different cold seeps in the Eastern Mediterranean and the Norwegian deep-seas. By combining fingerprinting of bacterial communities by ARISA and 454 sequencing with in situ and ex situ biogeochemical measurements, we show that sunken wood logs have a locally confined long-term impact (> 3y) on the sediment geochemistry and community structure. We confirm previous hypotheses of different successional stages in wood degradation including a sulphophilic one, attracting chemosynthetic fauna from nearby seep systems. Wood experiments deployed at similar water depths (1100–1700 m), but in hydrographically different oceanic regions harbored different wood-boring bivalves, opportunistic faunal communities, and chemosynthetic species. Similarly, bacterial communities on sunken wood logs were more similar within one geographic region than between different seas. Diverse sulphate-reducing bacteria of the Deltaproteobacteria, the sulphide-oxidizing bacteria Sulfurovum as well as members of the Acidimicrobiia and Bacteroidia dominated the wood falls in the Eastern Mediterranean, while Alphaproteobacteria and Flavobacteriia colonized the Norwegian Sea wood logs. Fauna and bacterial wood-associated communities changed between 1 to 3 years of immersion, with sulphate-reducers and sulphide-oxidizers increasing in proportion, and putative cellulose degraders decreasing with time. Only 6% of all bacterial genera, comprising the core community, were found at any time

  3. Spatial and temporal variations in precipitation in the Upper Indus Basin, global teleconnections and hydrological implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.R. Archer

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the flow in the River Indus from its upper mountain basin is derived from melting snow and glaciers. Climatic variability and change of both precipitation and energy inputs will, therefore, affect rural livelihoods at both a local and a regional scale through effects on summer runoff in the River Indus. Spatial variation in precipitation has been investigated by correlation and regression analysis of long-period records. There is a strong positive correlation between winter precipitation at stations over the entire region, so that, for practical forecasting of summer runoff in some basins, a single valley-floor precipitation station can be used In contrast, spatial relationships in seasonal precipitation are weaker in summer and sometimes significantly negative between stations north and south of the Himalayan divide. Although analysis of long datasets of precipitation from 1895 shows no significant trend, from 1961–1999 there are statistically significant increases in winter, in summer and in the annual precipitation at several stations. Preliminary analysis has identified a significant positive correlation between the winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO and winter precipitation in the Karakoram and a negative correlation between NAO and summer rainfall at some stations. Keywords: upper Indus basin, climate change, time series analysis, spatial correlation, teleconnections

  4. Intermittency ratio: A metric reflecting short-term temporal variations of transportation noise exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderli, Jean Marc; Pieren, Reto; Habermacher, Manuel; Vienneau, Danielle; Cajochen, Christian; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Röösli, Martin; Brink, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Most environmental epidemiology studies model health effects of noise by regressing on acoustic exposure metrics that are based on the concept of average energetic dose over longer time periods (i.e. the Leq and related measures). Regarding noise effects on health and wellbeing, average measures often cannot satisfactorily predict annoyance and somatic health effects of noise, particularly sleep disturbances. It has been hypothesized that effects of noise can be better explained when also considering the variation of the level over time and the frequency distribution of event-related acoustic measures, such as for example, the maximum sound pressure level. However, it is unclear how this is best parametrized in a metric that is not correlated with the Leq, but takes into account the frequency distribution of events and their emergence from background. In this paper, a calculation method is presented that produces a metric which reflects the intermittency of road, rail and aircraft noise exposure situations. The metric termed intermittency ratio (IR) expresses the proportion of the acoustical energy contribution in the total energetic dose that is created by individual noise events above a certain threshold. To calculate the metric, it is shown how to estimate the distribution of maximum pass-by levels from information on geometry (distance and angle), traffic flow (number and speed) and single-event pass-by levels per vehicle category. On the basis of noise maps that simultaneously visualize Leq, as well as IR, the differences of both metrics are discussed. PMID:26350982

  5. Temporal and spatial variations of high-impact weather events in China during 1959-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jun; Wen, Kangmin; Cui, Linli

    2017-07-01

    The variation and trend in the frequency and duration of four types of high-impact weather (HIW) events were examined using daily surface climate data and linear regression method, and results show that for both the frequency and the duration, the trends of hot weather events were not significant in most parts of China, though for the China as a whole, they had increased with rates of 0.4 days and 0.1 spells of hot weather per decade respectively. The frequency of cold weather events had decreased significantly in most parts of China, particularly in northern, northeastern, and western China, where it increased at rates of 2-8 days per decade in most stations, but the duration of cold weather events were not significant in most parts of China. The frequency of gale weather events had decreased in almost all of China, with a rate of 3.7 days per decade for the China as a whole, and the duration of gale weather events had decreased mainly in northeastern and northern China, western Xinjiang, southwestern Sichuan, and some coastal areas of Liaoning, Shandong, Zhejiang, and Fujian. The frequency of rainstorm weather events was not significant in most parts of China, and the duration of rainstorm weather events was not significant in the whole of China. With global climate change, there would be an increase in the hot and rainstorm weather events, so mitigation/adaptation strategies for such weather events are essential for local government and social public.

  6. Temporal Variations of Different Solar Activity Indices Through the Solar Cycles 21-23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göker, Ü. D.; Singh, J.; Nutku, F.; Priyal, M.

    2017-12-01

    Here, we compare the sunspot counts and the number of sunspot groups (SGs) with variations of total solar irradiance (TSI), magnetic activity, Ca II K-flux, faculae and plage areas. We applied a time series method for extracting the data over the descending phases of solar activity cycles (SACs) 21, 22 and 23, and the ascending phases 22 and 23. Our results suggest that there is a strong correlation between solar activity indices and the changes in small (A, B, C and H-modified Zurich Classification) and large (D, E and F) SGs. This somewhat unexpected finding suggests that plage regions substantially decreased in spite of the higher number of large SGs in SAC 23 while the Ca II K-flux did not decrease by a large amount nor was it comparable with SAC 22 and relates with C and DEF type SGs. In addition to this, the increase of facular areas which are influenced by large SGs, caused a small percentage decrease in TSI while the decrement of plage areas triggered a higher decrease in the magnetic field flux. Our results thus reveal the potential of such a detailed comparison of the SG analysis with solar activity indices for better understanding and predicting future trends in the SACs.

  7. Spatial-temporal pattern recognition of groundwater head variations for recharge zone identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jui-Pin; Chang, Liang-Cheng; Chang, Ping-Yu; Lin, Yuan-Chien; Chen, You-Cheng; Wu, Meng-Ting; Yu, Hwa-Lung

    2017-06-01

    The delineation of groundwater recharge zones is crucial for the conservation of groundwater quality and quantity. To objectively estimate groundwater recharge zones, many field surveys are required that are costly in both time and money. To facilitate the assessment of recharge zones with high efficiency and low expense, this study proposes a 'fast-filter' approach based on empirical orthogonal function analysis and applies it in a synthetic case study and to Taiwan's Yilan Plain. In the synthetic case study, we demonstrate that the proposed method can effectively identify the recharge area by considering the head variations driven by rainfall recharge. For the case of Yilan Plain application, the field investigations (i.e., collected wellbore logs and electrical resistivity tomography [ERT] surveys) and a groundwater simulation model support the recharge zones estimated by the proposed method. The study results show that within the estimated recharge zone, all of the collected wellbore logs consist of coarse grains, and thick and continuous high resistivity zones were shown in the ERT profile images. Moreover, the groundwater model indicates that the recharge within the estimated recharge zone is 57.6% of the total recharge despite that the area of the estimated zone is only 26.8% of the study area. Therefore, the proposed method is shown to delineate recharge zones at low cost.

  8. Spatial and temporal variation of cultivable communities of co-occurring endophytes and pathogens in wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgane eComby

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate the diversity of endogenous microbes from wheat (Triticum aestivum and to study the structure of its microbial communities, with the ultimate goal to provide candidate strains for future evaluation as potential biological control agents against wheat diseases. We sampled plants from two wheat cultivars, Apache and Caphorn, showing different levels of susceptibility to Fusarium head blight, a major disease of wheat, and tested for variation in microbial diversity and assemblages depending on the host cultivar, host organ (aerial organs versus roots or host maturity. Fungi and bacteria were isolated using a culture dependent method. Isolates were identified using ribosomal DNA sequencing and we used diversity analysis to study the community composition of microorganisms over space and time. Results indicate great species diversity in wheat, with endophytes and pathogens co-occurring inside plant tissues. Significant differences in microbial communities were observed according to host maturity and host organs but we did not find clear differences between host cultivars. Some species isolated have not yet been reported as wheat endophytes and among all species recovered some might be good candidates as biological control agents, given their known effects towards plant pathogens.

  9. The community structure of macroscopic basidiomycetes (Fungi in Brazilian mangroves influenced by temporal and spatial variations

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    Georgea Santos Nogueira-Melo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mangroves are transitional ecosystems between terrestrial and marine environments, and are distinguished by a high abundance of animals, plants, and fungi. Although macrofungi occur in different types of habitat, including mangroves, little is known about their community structure and dynamic. Therefore the aim of this study was to analyze the diversity of macrofungi in a number of Brazilian mangroves, and the relationship between such diversity, precipitation and area of collection. A total of 32 field trips were undertaken from 2009 to 2010, and macrofungi were studied in four 250×40m transects: Timbó and Santa Cruz Channel on the Northern coast, and Maracaípe and Ariquindá on the Southern coast. All basidiomata found along the transects were placed in paper bags, air-dried and identified using existing literature. It was found that Northern areas predominantly featured Avicennia schaueriana mangroves, while Rhizophora mangle dominated in Southern transects. A total of 275 specimens were collected, and 33 species, 28 genera, 14 families and six orders were represented. Overall abundance and species richness did not vary significantly among areas, but varied according to time, being higher during the rainy season. Subtle differences in composition were observed over time and between areas, probably due to variations in plant species occurrence. Further studies with collections during months of greater precipitation in transects dominated by different mangrove species of the same ecosystem are suggested to assess the overall diversity of mycobiota in these ecosystems.

  10. Simulation for spatio-temporal variation of chemically active species in an atmospheric pressure streamer discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komuro, Atsushi; Takaahshi, Kazunori; Ando, Akira

    2016-09-01

    Spatiotemporal variation of radical density in an atmospheric pressure plasma discharge has been investigated by two-dimensional numerical simulation. Behaviors of radicals are characterized by four areas as ``Hot anode region'', ``Secondary streamer region'', ``Primary streamer region'', and ``Near-cathode region''. Although the reduced electric field in ``Hot anode region'' is relatively high, the gas temperature also increases and the ozone destruction process proceed. On the other hand, in ``Near-cathode region'', the high-energy radicals such as N(4S) is effectively produced because the instantaneous value of reduced electric field is high. Behaiviour of OH is also investigated. The results show that OH is effectively produced in ``Secondary streamer region'' and is not effective in ``Hot anode region''. This is because the reduced electric filed in ``Secondary streamer region'' is sufficiently high for the dissociation of H2O by O(D) and N2(a) and the gas temperature in ``Hot anode region'' is too high for the production of OH.

  11. Temporal and spatial variation of the limnological characteristics of a lotic ecosystem in the Cerrado of Mato Grosso.

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    Amintas Nazareth Rossete

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to characterize a stream in the area of Cerrado of Mato Grosso according to limnological characteristics during an annual cycle and to assess its relationship with the hydrological regime and anthropogenic changes of the adjacent land system. Two collection points in the stream were selected which passed through the Parque do Bacaba in addition to two other in areas of anthropogenic influence, mainly cattle-raising activity. Data collection was performed bimonthly in downstream order, from September 2001 to August 2002. At the sampling sites, the water temperature, depth, water transparency, dissolved oxygen, pH, electric conductivity, suspended material and total stream discharge were verified. The spatial variations were more obvious than the temporal changes. The values of water transparency, suspended material, electric conductivity and dissolved oxygen showed the greatest variations. The lowest concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the stream were recorded in the dry period. Among the sampling sites, only the pH did not present any significant differences, and the other variables differed significantly between at least two sampling sites. Between the dry and rainy periods, only the depth of the water column and total stream discharge differed significantly.

  12. Temporal and individual variation in offspring provisioning by tree swallows: a new method of automated nest attendance monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Alexandra P

    2009-01-01

    Studies of the ecology and evolution of avian nesting behavior have been limited by the difficulty and expense of sampling nest attendance behavior across entire days or throughout a substantial portion of the nestling period. Direct observation of nesting birds using human observers and most automated devices requires sub-sampling of the nestling period, which does not allow for the quantification of the duration of chick-feeding by parents within a day, and may also inadequately capture temporal variation in the rate at which chicks are fed. Here I describe an inexpensive device, the Automated Perch Recorder (APR) system, which collects accurate, long-term data on hourly rates of nest visitation, the duration of a pair's workday, and the total number of visits the pair makes to their nest across the entire period for which it is deployed. I also describe methods for verifying the accuracy of the system in the field, and several examples of how these data can be used to explore the causes of variation in and tradeoffs between the rate at which birds feed their chicks and the total length of time birds spend feeding chicks in a day.

  13. Temporal and individual variation in offspring provisioning by tree swallows: a new method of automated nest attendance monitoring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra P Rose

    Full Text Available Studies of the ecology and evolution of avian nesting behavior have been limited by the difficulty and expense of sampling nest attendance behavior across entire days or throughout a substantial portion of the nestling period. Direct observation of nesting birds using human observers and most automated devices requires sub-sampling of the nestling period, which does not allow for the quantification of the duration of chick-feeding by parents within a day, and may also inadequately capture temporal variation in the rate at which chicks are fed. Here I describe an inexpensive device, the Automated Perch Recorder (APR system, which collects accurate, long-term data on hourly rates of nest visitation, the duration of a pair's workday, and the total number of visits the pair makes to their nest across the entire period for which it is deployed. I also describe methods for verifying the accuracy of the system in the field, and several examples of how these data can be used to explore the causes of variation in and tradeoffs between the rate at which birds feed their chicks and the total length of time birds spend feeding chicks in a day.

  14. Spatial/temporal variations and source apportionment of VOCs monitored at community scale in an urban area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Ho Yu

    Full Text Available This study aimed to characterize spatial/temporal variations of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs using a community-scale monitoring approach and identify the main sources of concern in Paterson, NJ, an urban area with mixed sources of VOCs. VOC samples were simultaneously collected from three local source-dominated (i.e., commercial, industrial, and mobile sites in Paterson and one background site in Chester, NJ (located ∼58 km southwest of Paterson. Samples were collected using the EPA TO-15 method from midnight to midnight, one in every sixth day over one year. Among the 60 analyzed VOCs, ten VOCs (acetylene, benzene, dichloromethane, ethylbenzene, methyl ethyl ketone, styrene, toluene, m,p-xylene, o-xylene, and p-dichlorobenzene were selected to examine their spatial/temporal variations. All of the 10 VOCs in Paterson were significantly higher than the background site (p<0.01. Ethylbenzene, m,p-xylene, o-xylene, and p-dichlorobenzene measured at the commercial site were significantly higher than the industrial/mobile sites (p<0.01. Seven VOCs (acetylene, benzene, dichloromethane, methyl ethyl ketone, styrene, toluene, and p-dichlorobenzene were significantly different by season (p<0.05, that is, higher in cold seasons than in warm seasons. In addition, dichloromethane, methyl ethyl ketone, and toluene were significantly higher on weekdays than weekend days (p<0.05. These results are consistent with literature data, indicating the impact of anthropogenic VOC sources on air pollution in Paterson. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF analysis was applied for 24-hour integrated VOC measurements in Paterson over one year and identified six contributing factors, including motor vehicle exhausts (20%, solvents uses (19%, industrial emissions (16%, mobile+stationery sources (12%, small shop emissions (11%, and others (22%. Additional locational analysis confirmed the identified sources were well matched with point sources located upwind in

  15. Spatial and Temporal Variations in Titan's Surface Temperatures from Cassini CIRS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottini, V.; Nixon, C. A.; Jennings, D. E.; deKok, R.; Teanby, N. A.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Flasar, F. M.

    2012-01-01

    We report a wide-ranging study of Titan's surface temperatures by analysis of the Moon's outgoing radiance through a spectral window in the thermal infrared at 19 mm (530/cm) characterized by lower atmospheric opacity. We begin by modeling Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) far infrared spectra collected in the period 2004-2010, using a radiative transfer forward model combined with a non-linear optimal estimation inversion method. At low-latitudes, we agree with the HASI near-surface temperature of about 94 K at 101S (Fulchignoni et al., 2005). We find a systematic decrease from the equator toward the poles, hemispherically asymmetric, of approx. 1 K at 60 deg. south and approx. 3 K at 60 deg. north, in general agreement with a previous analysis of CIRS data and with Voyager results from the previous northern winter. Subdividing the available database, corresponding to about one Titan season, into 3 consecutive periods, small seasonal changes of up to 2 K at 60 deg N became noticeable in the results. In addition, clear evidence of diurnal variations of the surface temperatures near the equator are observed for the first time: we find a trend of slowly increasing temperature from the morning to the early afternoon and a faster decrease during the night. The diurnal change is approx. 1.5 K, in agreement with model predictions for a surface with a thermal inertia between 300 and 600 J/ sq. m s (exp -1/2) / K. These results provide important constraints on coupled surface-atmosphere models of Titan's meteorology and atmospheric dynamic.

  16. Reconstruction of temporal variations of evapotranspiration using instantaneous estimates at the time of satellite overpass

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    E. Delogu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Evapotranspiration estimates can be derived from remote sensing data and ancillary, mostly meterorological, information. For this purpose, two types of methods are classically used: the first type estimates a potential evapotranspiration rate from vegetation indices, and adjusts this rate according to water availability derived from either a surface temperature index or a first guess obtained from a rough estimate of the water budget, while the second family of methods relies on the link between the surface temperature and the latent heat flux through the surface energy budget. The latter provides an instantaneous estimate at the time of satellite overpass. In order to compute daily evapotranspiration, one needs an extrapolation algorithm. Since no image is acquired during cloudy conditions, these methods can only be applied during clear sky days. In order to derive seasonal evapotranspiration, one needs an interpolation method. Two combined interpolation/extrapolation methods based on the self preservation of evaporative fraction and the stress factor are compared to reconstruct seasonal evapotranspiration from instantaneous measurements acquired in clear sky conditions. Those measurements are taken from instantaneous latent heat flux from 11 datasets in Southern France and Morocco. Results show that both methods have comparable performances with a clear advantage for the evaporative fraction for datasets with several water stress events. Both interpolation algorithms tend to underestimate evapotranspiration due to the energy limiting conditions that prevail during cloudy days. Taking into account the diurnal variations of the evaporative fraction according to an empirical relationship derived from a previous study improved the performance of the extrapolation algorithm and therefore the retrieval of the seasonal evapotranspiration for all but one datasets.

  17. Spatial And Temporal Variation In The Dissolved Trace Element Chemistry Of Chesapeake Bay Surface Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorval, E.; Hannigan, R.; Jones, C.

    2001-12-01

    Surface waters were collected from sea grass beds around the Chesapeake Bay of Virginia as well as from the mouths of the York, James, Potomac and Rappahannock rivers and Tangier and Smith islands. These sea grass beds represent the nursery habitats for a variety of sport fish including Spotted Sea Trout and Weakfish. Trace element ratios of fish otoliths record the unique chemistries of bodies of water in which the fish live. The data presented here represent the initial results of a "ground-truthing" investigation of the relationships between the water and otolith chemistry. Waters were collected bi-monthly (July through September) from 30 sites around the western and eastern shore of Chesapeake Bay including major tributaries and Tangier and Smith islands. Water was collected using trace metal clean procedures including filtration through a 0.45 uM filter and acidification in the field to pH pH and dissolved oxygen likely related to a restricted flow regime between the islands and the eastern shore. Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios are unique for the sea grass beds along the western shore and allow the distinction of beds located between the York and Rappahannock rivers from those between the Rappahannock and Potomac rivers. Sr and Ba concentrations are variable between sites along the eastern shore. U, Th, Sr, and Ba fall along a mixing trajectory defined by variations in salinity from river mouth to open Bay. The preliminary results from this study indicate that the water chemistry of the sea grass beds is sufficiently variable, both in space and time. This variability in water chemistry further supports the use of otolith chemistry as a natural tag for water chemistry.

  18. Regional and temporal variations of Leptospira seropositivity in dogs in the United States, 2000-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H S; Levine, M; Guptill-Yoran, C; Johnson, A J; von Kamecke, P; Moore, G E

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have reported a seasonal increased risk for leptospirosis, but there is no consistent seasonality reported across regions in the United States. To evaluate and compare seasonal patterns in seropositivity for leptospirosis in dogs for 4 US regions (northeast [NE], midwest [MW], south-central [SC], and California-southern west coast [CS]). Forty four thousand nine hundred and sixteen canine serum samples submitted to a commercial laboratory for microscopic agglutination tests (MAT) from 2000 through 2010. In this retrospective study, positive cases were defined as MAT titers ≥1 : 3,200 for at least one of 7 tested serovars. Four geographic regions were defined, and MAT results were included in regional analyses based on hospital zipcode. A seasonal-trend decomposition method for times series was utilized for the analysis. Monthly variation in the seropositive rate was evaluated using a seasonal cycle subseries plot and logistic regression. Two thousand and twelve of 44,916 (4.48%) samples were seropositive. Compared to seropositive rates for February, significantly higher monthly rates occurred during the 2nd half of the year in the MW (OR 3.92-6.35) and NE (OR 2.03-4.80) regions, and only in January (OR 2.34) and December (OR 1.74) in the SC region. Monthly seropositive rates indicative of seasonality were observed earlier in the calendar year for both CS and SC regions. Seasonal patterns for seropositivity to leptospires differed by geographic region. Although risk of infection in dogs can occur year round, knowledge of seasonal trends can assist veterinarians in formulating differential diagnoses and evaluation of exposure risk. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  19. Temporal variation in the biochemical ecology of lower trophic levels in the Northern California Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. A.; Peterson, W. T.; Copeman, L. A.; Du, X.; Morgan, C. A.; Litz, M. N. C.

    2017-06-01

    There is strong correlative evidence that variation in the growth and survival of secondary consumers is related to the copepod species composition within the Northern California Current. Potential mechanisms driving these correlations include: (1) enhanced growth and survival of secondary consumers when lipid-rich, boreal copepod species are abundant, with cascading effects on higher trophic levels; (2) the regulation of growth and condition of primary and secondary consumers by the relative proportion of certain essential fatty acids (FAs) in primary producers; or (3) a combination of these factors. Disentangling the relative importance of taxonomic composition, lipid quantity, and FA composition on the nutritional quality of copepods requires detailed information on both the consumer and primary producers. Therefore, we collected phytoplankton and copepods at an oceanographic station for 19 months and completed species community analyses and generated detailed lipid profiles, including lipid classes and FAs, for both groups. There was strong covariation between species and biochemistry within and across trophic levels and distinct seasonal differences. The amount of total lipid within both the phytoplankton and copepod communities was twice as high in spring and summer than in fall and winter, and certain FAs, such as diatom indicators 20:5ω3 and 16:1ω7, comprised a greater proportion of the FA pool in spring and summer. Indicators of bacterial production within the copepod community were proportionally twice as high during fall and winter than spring and summer. Seasonal transitions in copepod FA composition were consistently offset from transitions in copepod species composition by approximately two weeks. The timing of the seasonal transition in copepod FAs reflected seasonal shifts in the species composition and/or biochemistry of primary producers more than seasonal shifts in the copepod species composition. These results emphasize the importance of

  20. Spatial and Temporal Variation in DeSoto Canyon Macrofaunal Community Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baco-Taylor, A.; Shantharam, A. K.

    2016-02-01

    Sediment-dwelling macrofauna (polychaetes, bivalves, and assorted crustaceans ≥ 300 µm) have long served as biological indicators of ecosystem stress. As part of evaluating the 2010 impact from the Deepwater Horizon blowout, we sampled 12 sites along and transverse to the DeSoto Canyon axis, Gulf of Mexico, as well as 2 control sites outside the Canyon. Sites ranged in depth from 479-2310 m. Three of the sites (PCB06, S36, and XC4) were sampled annually from 2012-2014. We provide an overview of the macrofauna community structure of canyon and non-canyon sites, as well as trends in community structure and diversity at the time-series sites. Compositionally, polychaetes dominated the communities, followed by tanaid crustaceans and bivalves. The total number of individuals was not significantly correlated with depth while the total number of taxa and species richness were. Rarefaction shows the deepest station, XC4 (2310 m) had the lowest diversity while NT800 (a non-canyon control at 800m) had the highest. Multivariate analysis shows the canyon assemblages fall into eight clusters with the non-canyon stations forming a separate ninth cluster, indicating a detectable difference in canyon and non-canyon communities. Time series stations show an increase in diversity from 2012-2014 with a strong overlap in community structure in 2013 and 2014 samples. Environmental analysis, via BEST, using data from 10 canyon sites and the controls, indicated depth in combination with latitude explain the most variation in macrofaunal community structure.

  1. Temporal and Spatial Variations in Fine and Coarse Particles in Seoul, Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghim, Young Sung

    2015-01-01

    Concentrations of fine (PM2.5) and coarse particles (PM10 -2.5), whose diameters are less 2.5 µm, and between 2.5 and 10 µm, respectively, at ambient air monitoring stations in Seoul between 2002 and 2008 were analyzed. Effects of Asian dust are mainly manifested as concentration spikes of PM10 - 2.5 but were considerable on PM2.5 levels in 2002 when Asian dust storms were the strongest. Excluding the effects of Asian dust, annual average PM2.5 showed a downward trend. Despite a similarity in year - to - year variations, PM10- 2.5, mostly affected by fugitive dust emissions, and CO and NO2, primarily affected by motor vehicle emissions, did not show a decrease. PM2.5 along with CO and NO2 had the highest values during the morning rush hour. PM10 - 2.5 peak lagged about one hour behind that of PM2.5 because of fugitive dust emissions despite an increasing mixing height. On high PM2.5 days, PM2. 5 peaks occurred two hours later than usual as the effects of secondary formation became more important. A test for the spatial variabilities shows that PM10 - 2.5, which is known to be greatly influenced by local effects, is lower in its correlation coeffic ient and higher in its coefficient of divergence (COD, which serves as an indicator for spatial variability) than PM2.5, albeit that the difference between the two is small. The average COD of PM2.5 among monitoring stations was about 0.2 but was lowered t o 0.13 when considering high PM2.5 days only, which signifies that spatial uniformity increases significantly.

  2. Spatial and temporal variation in snow accumulation in the Central Spanish Pyrenees

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Moreno, I.; Beguería, S.; García-Ruiz, J. M.

    2003-04-01

    Water stored in winter snowpack represents a valuable resource in mountainous regions. The distribution of the snow determines the availability of water resources during snowmelt period, as well as the development of the economy based on winter sports. This work analyses the main factors that explain the variation in snow accumulation in the Central Spanish Pyrenees. Data about evolution of snowpack is provided by the measurement of 106 sticks installed in the study area from 1985. The snow depth is measured in two moments of the year, at the beginning of March and at the end of April or beginning of May. Snow depth, of both measurements moments, has been mapped using linear regression between snow depth and different topographic and geographic variables derived from the digital terrain model. In order to improve the estimation interpolated residuals values have been subtracted. The variability of the interannual snow distribution has been analysed with a factorial analysis in order to obtain different annual patterns of snowpack distribution. Relation between the dominant winter weather-type and the different patterns, provided by the factorial analysis, has been studied. The weather-type classification has been obtained using the Jenkinson and Collison system based on daily series of sea level atmospheric pressure measured around the Iberian Peninsula with a 5º x 10º scale. Thus, it is possible to know the influence of the prevailing winter synoptic situations in the snowpack distribution. The results show that topographic and geographic variables have a high capacity to explain the spatial distribution of the average snow cover during the study period. Nevertheless, the annual snow accumulation is the result of the arrival of frontal disturbances that come from different directions. By that, it is complex to relate the different snow distribution patterns to the main winter synoptic conditions of each year.

  3. Temporal variation of sandy beach macrofauna at two sites with distinct environmental conditions on Cassino Beach, extreme southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro de Sá Rodrigues da Silva

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Temporal variations of the macrofauna of sandy beaches have been related to variations in the beach morphodynamics and also to the population dynamics of dominant species. The aim of this article is to describe the temporal variation of the intertidal macrofauna at two sites with distinct environmental condition on Cassino Beach, extreme southern Brazil. At each site three transect lines 50 m apart were defined perpendicular to the shore line, from which samples were collected monthly in triplicate at 4 intertidal levels (10 m apart from June 2004 to May 2005. During winter a generally low density was observed, due to the absence of recruitments and to the mud deposition, which occurred just before sampling (in April 2004, and to low intensity stranding events. Spring witnessed a population explosion of Scolelepis gaucha, a migration of Mesodesma mactroides adults from the subtidal zone, and a strong stranding event. In the summer, recruitment of M. mactroides, Donax hanleyanus and Emerita brasiliensis was observed. Fall was characterized by low densities, except for D. hanleyanus recruitment. The macrofauna at both sites showed a striking seasonal variation in density and diversity, perhaps attributable to the recruitment of numerically dominant species and physical disturbances (stranding and mud deposition.Variações sazonais da macrofauna bentônica de praias arenosas têm sido relacionadas com variações da morfodinâmica da praia e também aos recrutamentos das espécies dominantes. Este trabalho objetiva avaliar a variabilidade temporal da macrofauna da zona entremarés de dois locais com distintas características ambientais na praia do Cassino, extremo sul do Brasil. Em cada local foram demarcadas três transversais (separadas por 50m perpendiculares à linha de água, nas quais amostras foram coletadas em triplicata em 4 níveis entremarés (separados por 10 m, entre junho/2004 e maio/2005. Durante o inverno ocorreram baixas

  4. Nitrogen cycling in Ophiolite-hosted and Fault-associated Hydrothermal Systems; Spacial and Temporal Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Dombard, D. R.; Gulecal, Y.; Loiacono, S. T.; Cardace, D.; Uzunlar, N.; Temel, M.

    2011-12-01

    geochemical conditions. By sampling across this ecotone, changes in the genetic capacity for nitrogen fixation as a function of changing community structure become apparent. Fault-associated and ophiolite-hosted springs in Turkey were sampled over several seasons, and the presence and diversity of N-cycle related genes appears to shift temporally. Our results provide insight into shifts in genomic function in the context of niches within hot spring environments, and the effect of availability of fixed nitrogen on the growth habit of microbial communities in these ecosystems. [1]Havig et al., 2010. JGR-Biogeo (in press). [2]Raymond et al., 2008. EOS Trans AGU. Abstract B14A-03. [3]Swingley et al., submitted to PLoS One. [4]Loiacono et al., submitted. FEMS Microbiol Ecol [5]Hall et al., 2008. AEM 74:4910-4922. [6]Steunou et al., 2006. PNAS 103:2398-2403. [7]Hamilton et al., 2011. Env. Micro. DOI 10.1007/s00248-011-9824-9. [8]Zhang et al. 2008, AEM 74:6417-6426.

  5. Spatial and temporal variation in pH, alkalinity and conductivity in surface runoff and groundwater for the Upper River Severn catchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hill

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of pH, alkalinity and electrical conductivity are used to examine the extent of the spatial and temporal variation in stream and ground water chemistry for the Upper Severn catchment, Plynlimon. Wide temporal variations in stream waters broadly reflect flow conditions and complex soil and ground water interactions but not soil type, land usage or geology. The results have major implications for the use of critical load analysis and the development and application of models in upland catchments. They point to the value of field measurements for assessing the environmental management of upland catchments, rather than the present use of over simplistic or inappropriate models.

  6. Temporal variation in methane emissions in a shallow lake at a southern mid latitude during high and low rainfall periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusé, Victoria S; Priano, M Eugenia; Williams, Karen E; Gere, José I; Guzmán, Sergio A; Gratton, Roberto; Juliarena, M Paula

    2016-10-01

    The global methane (CH4) emission of lakes is estimated at between 6 and 16 % of total natural CH4 emissions. However, these values have a high uncertainty due to the wide variety of lakes with important differences in their morphological, biological, and physicochemical parameters and the relatively scarse data from southern mid-latitude lakes. For these reasons, we studied CH4 fluxes and CH4 dissolved in water in a typical shallow lake in the Pampean Wetland, Argentina, during four periods of consecutive years (April 2011-March 2015) preceded by different rainfall conditions. Other water physicochemical parameters were measured and meteorological data were reported. We identified three different states of the lake throughout the study as the result of the irregular alternation between high and low rainfall periods, with similar water temperature values but with important variations in dissolved oxygen, chemical oxygen demand, water turbidity, electric conductivity, and water level. As a consequence, marked seasonal and interannual variations occurred in CH4 dissolved in water and CH4 fluxes from the lake. These temporal variations were best reflected by water temperature and depth of the Secchi disk, as a water turbidity estimation, which had a significant double correlation with CH4 dissolved in water. The mean CH4 fluxes values were 0.22 and 4.09 mg/m2/h for periods with low and high water turbidity, respectively. This work suggests that water temperature and turbidity measurements could serve as indicator parameters of the state of the lake and, therefore, of its behavior as either a CH4 source or sink.

  7. Spatial distribution, temporal variation and risks of parabens and their chlorinated derivatives in urban surface water in Beijing, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wenhui; Gao, Lihong [School of Chemistry and Biological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Shi, Yali; Wang, Yuan [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Liu, Jiemin, E-mail: liujm@ustb.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Biological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Cai, Yaqi, E-mail: caiyaqi@rcees.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence and distribution of 13 target compounds, including eight parabens, four chlorinated parabens and p-hydroxybenzoic acid (PHBA), were detected in surface water samples at 35 sampling sites in the Beijing River system, China. The surface water samples were collected from the main rivers and lakes in the urban area monthly from July 2013 to June 2014 (except the frozen period). Laboratory analyses revealed that parabens were ubiquitous in the surface water of Beijing. PHBA was the predominant compound in the surface water samples, with the average concentration of 239 ng L{sup −1}, followed by the total amount of chlorinated parabens (average 50.1 ng/L) and parabens (average 44.3 ng/L). It is noteworthy that octylparaben with longer chain was firstly detected in the surface water. Significant difference was observed for paraben concentrations from different sampling sites, and the highest level of parabens was found in the Xiaotaihou River, which was mainly due to the untreated sewage discharge. Seasonal variation of target compounds in the urban surface water was also studied, and parabens exhibited a different temporal variation from chlorinated derivatives. A combination of factors including high residual chlorine level and water temperature as well as intense ultraviolet radiation might enhance the persistence of chlorinated parabens in chlorinated water during the wet season. Risk assessment showed that parabens and their chlorinated derivatives are not likely to produce biological effects on aquatic ecosystems at current levels in the surface water of Beijing. - Highlights: • Parabens and chlorinated parabens are ubiquitous in surface water in Beijing. • Octylparaben with longer chain was firstly detected in surface water. • Untreated sewage discharge was the main source of parabens in river. • Parabens exhibited a different seasonal variation from chlorinated derivatives. • The risks of target compounds are negligible at

  8. Spatial and temporal variation of CO2 efflux along a disturbance gradient in a miombo woodland in Western Zambia

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    M. M. Mukelabai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide efflux from the soil surface was measured over a period of several weeks within a heterogeneous Brachystegia spp. dominated miombo woodland in Western Zambia. The objectives were to examine spatial and temporal variation of soil respiration along a disturbance gradient from a protected forest reserve to a cut, burned, and grazed area outside, and to relate the flux to various abiotic and biotic drivers. The highest daily mean fluxes (around 12 μmol CO2 m−2 s−1 were measured in the protected forest in the wet season and lowest daily mean fluxes (around 1 μmol CO2 m−2 s−1 in the most disturbed area during the dry season. Diurnal variation of soil respiration was closely correlated with soil temperature. The combination of soil water content and soil temperature was found to be the main driving factor at seasonal time scale. There was a 75% decrease in soil CO2 efflux during the dry season and a 20% difference in peak soil respiratory flux measured in 2008 and 2009. Spatial variation of CO2 efflux was positively related to total soil carbon content in the undisturbed area but not at the disturbed site. Coefficients of variation of efflux rates between plots decreased towards the core zone of the protected forest reserve. Normalized soil respiration values did not vary significantly along the disturbance gradient. Spatial variation of respiration did not show a clear distinction between the disturbed and undisturbed sites and could not be explained by variables such as leaf area index. In contrast, within plot variability of soil respiration was explained by soil organic carbon content. Three different approaches to calculate total ecosystem respiration (Reco from eddy covariance measurements were compared to two bottom-up estimates of Reco obtained from chambers measurements of soil- and leaf respiration which differed in the consideration of spatial heterogeneity. The consideration of spatial variability resulted only in

  9. Temporal-spatial variation and controls of soil respiration in different primary succession stages on glacier forehead in Gongga Mountain, China.

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    Ji Luo

    Full Text Available Soil respiration (SR is an important process in the global carbon cycle. It is difficult to estimate SR emission accurately because of its temporal and spatial variability. Primary forest succession on Glacier forehead provides the ideal environment for examining the temporal-spatial variation and controlling factors of SR. However, relevant studies on SR are relatively scarce, and variations, as well as controlling factors, remain uncertain in this kind of region. In this study, we used a static chamber system to measure SR in six sites which represent different stages of forest succession on forehead of a temperate glacier in Gongga Mountain, China. Our results showed that there was substantial temporal (coefficient of variation (CV ranged from 39.3% to 73.9% and spatial (CV ranged from 12.3% to 88.6% variation in SR. Soil temperature (ST at 5 cm depth was the major controlling factor of temporal variation in all six sites. Spatial variation in SR was mainly caused by differences in plant biomass and Total N among the six sites. Moreover, soil moisture (SM, microbial biomass carbon (MBC, soil organic carbon (SOC, pH and bulk density could influence SR by directly or indirectly affecting plant biomass and Total N. Q(10 values (ranged from 2.1 to 4.7 increased along the forest succession, and the mean value (3.3 was larger than that of temperate ecosystems, which indicated a general tendency towards higher-Q(10 in colder ecosystems than in warmer ecosystems. Our findings provided valuable information for understanding temporal-spatial variation and controlling factors of SR.

  10. Temporal variations of black carbon in Guangzhou, China, in summer 2006

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    R. L. Verma

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In situ measurements of the mass concentration of black carbon (BC and mixing ratios of carbon monoxide (CO and carbon dioxide (CO2 were made at Guangzhou, an urban measurement site in the Pearl River Delta (PRD, China, in July 2006. The average ± standard deviation (SD concentrations of BC, CO, and CO2 were 4.7± 2.3 μgC m−3, 798± 459 ppbv, and 400± 13 ppmv, respectively. The trends of these species were mainly controlled by synoptic-scale changes in meteorology during the campaign. Based on back trajectories, data are analyzed separately for two different air mass types representing northerly and southerly flows. The northerly air masses, which constituted ~25% of the campaign, originated mostly in the PRD and hence represent observations on regional scales. On the other hand, during southerly flow (~75%, the measurements were influenced by dilution due to cleaner marine air. The diurnal patterns of BC, CO, and CO2 exhibited peak concentrations during the morning and evening hours coinciding with rush-hour traffic. The ratios of OC/BC were lower during the morning hour peaks in the concentrations of primary pollutants due to their fresh emissions mainly from vehicular traffic in Guangzhou. The diurnal variations of BC observed in southerly air masses tended to follow the traffic patterns of heavy-duty vehicles (HDV in Guangzhou, while the roles of other sources need to be investigated. The slopes of ΔBC/ΔCO, ΔBC/ΔCO2, and ΔCO/ΔCO2 observed during northerly flows were 0.0045 μgC m−3/ppbv, 0.13 μgC m−3/ppmv, and 49.4 ppbv/ppmv, respectively, agreeing reasonably with their respective emission ratios derived from regional emission inventories.

  11. Temporal and spatial variations of seismicity scaling behavior in Southern México

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    Alvarez-Ramirez, J.; Echeverria, J. C.; Ortiz-Cruz, A.; Hernandez, E.

    2012-03-01

    R/S analysis is used in this work to investigate the fractal correlations in terms of the Hurst exponent for the 1998-2011 seismicity data in Southern Mexico. This region is the most seismically active area in Mexico, where epicenters for severe earthquakes (e.g., September 19, 1985, Mw = 8.1) causing extensive damage in highly populated areas have been located. By only considering the seismic events that meet the Gutenberg-Ritcher law completeness requirement ( b = 0.97, MGR = 3.6), we found time clustering for scales of about 100 and 135 events. In both cases, a cyclic behavior with dominant spectral components at about one cycle per year is revealed. It is argued that such a one-year cycle could be related to tidal effects in the Pacific coast. Interestingly, it is also found that high-magnitude events ( Mw ≥ 6.0) are more likely to occur under increased interevent correlations with Hurst exponent values H > 0.65. This suggests that major earthquakes can occur when the tectonic stress accumulates in preferential directions. In contrast, the high-magnitude seismic risk is reduced when stresses are uniformly distributed in the tectonic shell. Such cointegration between correlations (i.e., Hurst exponent) and macroseismicity is confirmed for spatial variations of the Hurst exponent. In this way, we found that, using the Hurst exponent standpoint, the former presumed Michoacan and the Guerrero seismic gaps are the riskiest seismic zones. To test this empirical finding, two Southern Mexico local regions with large earthquakes were considered. These are the Atoyac de Alvarez, Guerrero ( Mw = 6.3), and Union Hidalgo, Oaxaca ( Mw = 6.6), events. In addition, we used the Loma Prieta, California, earthquake (October 17, 1989, Mw = 6.9) to show that the high-magnitude earthquakes in the San Andreas Fault region can also be linked to the increments of determinism (quantified in terms of the Hurst exponent) displayed by the stochastic dynamics of the interevent period time

  12. Reducing local hydrology from high-precision gravity measurements: a lysimeter-based approach

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    Creutzfeldt, Benjamin; Güntner, Andreas; Wziontek, Hartmut; Merz, Bruno

    2010-10-01

    Temporal gravimeter observations, used in geodesy and geophysics to study the Earth's gravity field variations, are influenced by local water storage changes (WSC). At the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell (Germany), WSC in the snow pack, top soil, unsaturated saprolite and fractured aquifer are all important terms of the local water budget. In this study, lysimeter measurements are used for the first time to estimate the hydrological influence on temporal gravimeter observations. Lysimeter data are used to estimate WSC at the field scale in combination with complementary observations and a hydrological 1-D model. From these estimated WSC, we calculate the hydrological gravity response. The results are compared to other methods used in the past to correct temporal gravity observations for the local hydrological influence. Lysimeter measurements significantly improve the independent estimation of WSC and thus provide a better way of reducing the local hydrological effect from gravimeter measurements. We find that the gravity residuals are caused to a larger extent by local WSC than previously stated. At sites where temporal gravity observations are used to study geophysical processes beyond local hydrology, the installation of a lysimeter is recommended.

  13. Seasonal Variations of Mesospheric Gravity Waves Observed with an Airglow All-sky Camera at Mt. Bohyun, Korea (36° N

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    Yong Ha Kim

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We have carried out all-sky imaging of OH Meinel, O2 atmospheric and OI 557.7 nm airglow layers in the period from July of 2001 through September of 2005 at Mt. Bohyun, Korea (36.2° N, 128.9° E, Alt = 1,124 m. We analyzed the images observed during a total of 153 clear moonless nights and found 97 events of band-type waves. The characteristics of the observed waves (wavelengths, periods, and phase speeds are consistent with internal gravity waves. The wave occurrence shows an approximately semi-annual variation, with maxima near solstices and minima near equinoxes, which is consistent with other studies of airglow wave observations, but not with those of mesospheric radar/lidar observations. The observed waves tended to propagate westward during fall and winter, and eastward during spring and summer. Our ray tracing study of the observed waves shows that majority of the observed waves seemed to originate from mesospheric altitudes. The preferential directions and the apparent source altitudes can be explained if the observed waves are secondary waves generated from primary waves that have been selected by the filtering process and break up at the mesospheric altitudes.

  14. Spatio-temporal variation in vegetation biomass and its relationships with climate factors in the Xilingol grasslands, Northern China.

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    Tian Gao

    Full Text Available Knowledge about grassland biomass and its dynamics is critical for studying regional carbon cycles and for the sustainable use of grassland resources. In this study, we investigated the spatio-temporal variation of biomass in the Xilingol grasslands of northern China. Field-based biomass samples and MODIS time series data sets were used to establish two empirical models based on the relationship of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI with above-ground biomass (AGB as well as that of AGB with below-ground biomass (BGB. We further explored the climatic controls of these variations. Our results showed that the biomass averaged 99.01 Tg (1 Tg=10(12 g over a total area of 19.6 × 10(4 km(2 and fluctuated with no significant trend from 2001 to 2012. The mean biomass density was 505.4 g/m(2, with 62.6 g/m(2 in AGB and 442.8 g/m(2 in BGB, which generally decreased from northeast to southwest and exhibited a large spatial heterogeneity. The year-to-year AGB pattern was generally consistent with the inter-annual variation in the growing season precipitation (GSP, showing a robust positive correlation (R(2=0.82, P<0.001, but an opposite coupled pattern was observed with the growing season temperature (GST (R(2=0.61, P=0.003. Climatic factors also affected the spatial distribution of AGB, which increased progressively with the GSP gradient (R(2=0.76, P<0.0001 but decreased with an increasing GST (R(2=0.70, P<0.0001. An improved moisture index that combined the effects of GST and GSP explained more variation in AGB than did precipitation alone (R(2=0.81, P<0.0001. The relationship between AGB and GSP could be fit by a power function. This increasing slope of the GSP-AGB relationships along the GSP gradient may be partly explained by the GST-GSP spatial pattern in Xilingol. Our findings suggest that the relationships between climatic factors and AGB may be scale-dependent and that multi-scale studies and sufficient long-term field data are needed

  15. Spatial and temporal variation of fish assemblages in a coastal lagoon of the Biosphere Reserve La Encrucijada, Chiapas, Mexico

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    Ernesto Velázquez-Velázquez

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Composition and abundance of the ichthyofauna in estuarine and coastal lagoon systems of the South Pacific in Mexico have been scarcely studied. In particular, there is a lack of information on how environmental variables determine the spatio-temporal structure of fish assemblages in those habitats. In this study, fishes were sampled by drop net during twelve months (May 2004 -April 2005 in 22 sites distributed along the Carretas-Pereyra lagoon, located in the Biosphere Reserve La Encrucijada, Chiapas, Mexico. We recorded 11 797 individuals (40 species, in 30 genera and 21 families. Dormitator latifrons was the most dominant species in terms of the Importance Value index, IV (23.05 %, followed by Lile gracilis (10.31 %, Poecilia sphenops (8.60 % and Poecilia butleri (7.30 %. D. latifrons also accounted for more than one half of the total biomass (50.14 %. Species richness and Shannon-Wiener’s diversity indexes showed similar temporal fluctuations, reaching their highest values during the dry season. The system evidenced temporal variations in salinity, having observed four different regimes: freshwater, oligohaline, mesohaline and polyhaline. Mean richness and diversity indexes achieved their highest values during the mesohaline period. On the other hand, mean abundances (CPUE were highest during the freshwater period. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA indicated that salinity and temperature were the most important environmental parameters affecting associations of fishes in terms of their abundances. Correlation analyses revealed that among the environmental variables measured in this study, transparency showed the most significant negative correlation with fish richness and Shannon-Wiener’s diversity index. At a local scale, results suggest that spatial and temporal distribution of fish assemblages are determined by differences in the regimes of salinity and transparency, primarily driven by freshwater input from rivers. Rev. Biol

  16. Mixing as a driver of temporal variations in river hydrochemistry: 1. Insights from conservative tracers in the Andes-Amazon transition

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    Torres, Mark A.; Baronas, J. Jotautas; Clark, Kathryn E.; Feakins, Sarah J.; West, A. Joshua

    2017-04-01

    The response of hillslope processes to changes in precipitation may drive the observed changes in the solute geochemistry of rivers with discharge. This conjecture is most robust when variations in the key environmental factors that affect hillslope processes (e.g., lithology, erosion rate, and climate) are minimal across a river's catchment area. For rivers with heterogenous catchments, temporal variations in the relative contributions of different tributary subcatchments may modulate variations in solute geochemistry with runoff. In the absence of a dense network of hydrologic gauging stations, alternative approaches are required to distinguish between the different drivers of temporal variability in river solute concentrations. In this contribution, we apportion the water and solute fluxes of a reach of the Madre de Dios River (Peru) between its four major tributary subcatchments during two sampling campaigns (wet and dry seasons) using spatial variations in conservative tracers. Guided by the results of a mixing model, we identify temporal variations in solute concentrations of the main stem Madre de Dios that are due to changes in the relative contributions of each tributary. Our results suggest that variations in tributary mixing are, in part, responsible for the observed concentration-discharge (C-Q) relationships. The implications of these results are further explored by reanalyzing previously published C-Q data from this region, developing a theoretical model of tributary mixing, and, in a companion paper, comparing the C-Q behavior of a suite of major and trace elements in the Madre de Dios River system.

  17. Spatial and Temporal Variations in Environmental Variables in Relation to Phytoplankton Community Structure in a Eutrophic River-Type Reservoir

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    Wenxi Zhao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study assesses spatial and temporal variation in environmental variables in relation to phytoplankton community size and composition in a typically eutrophic river reservoir (Hai River, northern China. The aim is to identify environmental parameters governing spatial and temporal differences in phytoplankton density and composition. Physicochemical parameters, including nutrient concentrations, were determined in monthly surface water samples from 2015. The average concentration of key eutrophication indexes (i.e., total phosphorous (TP: 0.24 ± 0.11 mg·L−1, total nitrogen (TN: 2.96 ± 1.60 mg·L−1, and Chlorophyll a (Chl a: 38.5 ± 11.5 mg·m−3 substantially exceeded threshold values for eutrophic streams. Moreover, the eutrophication increased significantly downstream along the river reservoir as a consequence of an increasing fraction of agricultural and industrial land-use in the watershed. 103 phytoplankton species were identified, of which Chlorophyta was the dominated phylum (47 species, followed by Bacillariophyta (23 species and Cyanophyta (18 species. No spatial difference in species distribution (ANOVA, p > 0.05 were found, while the temporal differences in species composition exhibited significant heterogeneity (ANOVA, p < 0.001. Phytoplankton abundance was highest in early summer (June and July, with maximum values increasing from 1.78 × 108 and 2.80 × 108 cells·L−1 in upstream and middle reaches, respectively, to 4.18 × 108 cells·L−1 furthest downstream. Cyanophyta, also known as Cyanobacteria and commonly referred to as blue-green algal, are known to constitute algae bloom in eutrophic systems. Common species are Microcystis marginata, Microcystis flos-aquae, and Oscillatoria sp. This was the dominant phyla during summer months, especially in the middle and lower reaches of the stream reservoir where it accounted for 88.9% of the phytoplankton community. Shannon weaver index (H’ and Pielous’s evenness

  18. Temporal Variation in Ankle Fractures and Orthopedic Resident Program Planning in an Urban Level 1 Trauma Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynkoop, Aaron; Ndubaku, Osy; Walter, Norman; Atkinson, Theresa

    Previous studies have described the mechanism of ankle fractures, their seasonal variation, and fracture patterns but never in conjunction. In addition, the cohorts previously studied were either not from trauma centers or were often dominated by low-energy mechanisms. The present study aimed to describe the epidemiology of ankle fractures presenting to an urban level 1 trauma center. The records from an urban level 1 trauma center located in the Midwestern United States were retrospectively reviewed, and the injury mechanism and energy, time of injury, day of week, month, and patient characteristics (age, gender, comorbidities, smoking status) were collected. The fractures were classified using the AO (Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen), Lauge-Hansen, and Danis-Weber systems. Of these systems, the Lauge-Hansen classification system resulted in the greatest number of "unclassifiable" cases. Most ankle fractures were due to high-energy mechanisms, with motor vehicle collisions the most common high-energy mechanism. The review found that most ankle fractures were malleolar fractures, regardless of the mechanism of injury. The ankle fracture patients had greater rates of obesity, diabetes, and smoking than present in the region where the hospital is located. The fractures were most likely to occur in the afternoon, with more fractures presenting on the weekend than earlier in the week and more fractures in the fall and winter than in the spring and summer. The temporal variation of these fractures should be considered for health services planning, in particular, in regard to resident physician staffing at urban level 1 trauma centers. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Temporal and spatial variation of potassium balance in agricultural land at national and regional levels in China.

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    Yingxia Liu

    Full Text Available Linking potassium (K balance to soil fertility creates a valuable indicator for sustainability assessment in agricultural land-use systems. It is crucial for the efficient use of K resources, food security and resource sustainability to realize soil K balance status in China. Therefore, temporal and spatial changes of K balance for farmland in China from 1980 to 2015 were analyzed at national and regional levels using statistical data and related parameters. At the national scale, K input increased from 6.78 Mt K2O in 1980 to 23.44 Mt K2O in 2015 with an average annual increment of 0.48 Mt K2O, and output changed from 8.10 Mt in 1980 to 21.31 Mt in 2015 with an average annual increment of 0.38 Mt K2O as well. On average, K balance was -24.17, -5.92, 21.31 and 19.50 kg K2O ha-1 in 1980s, 1990s, 2000s and 2010s, respectively. Moreover, the average balance of six regions was considerably different which were -21.37, 1.25, 13.70, -22.79, 99.22 and 7.18 kg K2O ha-1 from 1980 to 2015. The potassium use efficiency (KUE decreased with time which were 127.09, 104.35, 87.69 and 89.69% in 1980s, 1990s, 2000s and 2010s, respectively, and the decline of slope could also reflect the variation tendency of KUE. Great variation of K balance across different regions demonstrated that fertilizer application and management practices need to be adjusted to local conditions.

  20. Gender differences and temporal variation in the incidence of type 1 diabetes : results of 8012 cases in the nationwide Diabetes Incidence Study in Sweden 1983-2002

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ostman, J.; Lonnberg, G.; Arnqvist, H. J.; Blohme, G.; Bolinder, J.; Schnell, A. Ekbom; Eriksson, J. W.; Gudbjornsdottir, S.; Sundkvist, G.; Nystrom, L.

    Objectives. To establish the gender difference amongst newly diagnosed type 1 diabetic patients aged 15-34 years, considering age at diagnosis, temporal trend and seasonal