WorldWideScience

Sample records for temporal dose distributions

  1. Hourly temporal distribution of wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deligiannis, Ilias; Dimitriadis, Panayiotis; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

    2016-04-01

    The wind process is essential for hydrometeorology and additionally, is one of the basic renewable energy resources. Most stochastic forecast models are limited up to daily scales disregarding the hourly scale which is significant for renewable energy management. Here, we analyze hourly wind timeseries giving emphasis on the temporal distribution of wind within the day. We finally present a periodic model based on statistical as well as hydrometeorological reasoning that shows good agreement with data. Acknowledgement: This research is conducted within the frame of the undergraduate course "Stochastic Methods in Water Resources" of the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA). The School of Civil Engineering of NTUA provided moral support for the participation of the students in the Assembly.

  2. Impact of temporal probability in 4D dose calculation for lung tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouabhi, Ouided; Ma, Mingyu; Bayouth, John; Xia, Junyi

    2015-11-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric uncertainty in 4D dose calculation using three temporal probability distributions: uniform distribution, sinusoidal distribution, and patient-specific distribution derived from the patient respiratory trace. Temporal probability, defined as the fraction of time a patient spends in each respiratory amplitude, was evaluated in nine lung cancer patients. Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT), along with deformable image registration, was used to compute 4D dose incorporating the patient's respiratory motion. First, the dose of each of 10 phase CTs was computed using the same planning parameters as those used in 3D treatment planning based on the breath-hold CT. Next, deformable image registration was used to deform the dose of each phase CT to the breath-hold CT using the deformation map between the phase CT and the breath-hold CT. Finally, the 4D dose was computed by summing the deformed phase doses using their corresponding temporal probabilities. In this study, 4D dose calculated from the patient-specific temporal probability distribution was used as the ground truth. The dosimetric evaluation matrix included: 1) 3D gamma analysis, 2) mean tumor dose (MTD), 3) mean lung dose (MLD), and 4) lung V20. For seven out of nine patients, both uniform and sinusoidal temporal probability dose distributions were found to have an average gamma passing rate > 95% for both the lung and PTV regions. Compared with 4D dose calculated using the patient respiratory trace, doses using uniform and sinusoidal distribution showed a percentage difference on average of -0.1% ± 0.6% and -0.2% ± 0.4% in MTD, -0.2% ± 1.9% and -0.2% ± 1.3% in MLD, 0.09% ± 2.8% and -0.07% ± 1.8% in lung V20, -0.1% ± 2.0% and 0.08% ± 1.34% in lung V10, 0.47% ± 1.8% and 0.19% ± 1.3% in lung V5, respectively. We concluded that four-dimensional dose computed using either a uniform or sinusoidal temporal probability distribution can

  3. Multicriteria optimization of the spatial dose distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlaefer, Alexander [Medical Robotics Group, Universität zu Lübeck, Lübeck 23562, Germany and Institute of Medical Technology, Hamburg University of Technology, Hamburg 21073 (Germany); Viulet, Tiberiu [Medical Robotics Group, Universität zu Lübeck, Lübeck 23562 (Germany); Muacevic, Alexander; Fürweger, Christoph [European CyberKnife Center Munich, Munich 81377 (Germany)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Treatment planning for radiation therapy involves trade-offs with respect to different clinical goals. Typically, the dose distribution is evaluated based on few statistics and dose–volume histograms. Particularly for stereotactic treatments, the spatial dose distribution represents further criteria, e.g., when considering the gradient between subregions of volumes of interest. The authors have studied how to consider the spatial dose distribution using a multicriteria optimization approach.Methods: The authors have extended a stepwise multicriteria optimization approach to include criteria with respect to the local dose distribution. Based on a three-dimensional visualization of the dose the authors use a software tool allowing interaction with the dose distribution to map objectives with respect to its shape to a constrained optimization problem. Similarly, conflicting criteria are highlighted and the planner decides if and where to relax the shape of the dose distribution.Results: To demonstrate the potential of spatial multicriteria optimization, the tool was applied to a prostate and meningioma case. For the prostate case, local sparing of the rectal wall and shaping of a boost volume are achieved through local relaxations and while maintaining the remaining dose distribution. For the meningioma, target coverage is improved by compromising low dose conformality toward noncritical structures. A comparison of dose–volume histograms illustrates the importance of spatial information for achieving the trade-offs.Conclusions: The results show that it is possible to consider the location of conflicting criteria during treatment planning. Particularly, it is possible to conserve already achieved goals with respect to the dose distribution, to visualize potential trade-offs, and to relax constraints locally. Hence, the proposed approach facilitates a systematic exploration of the optimal shape of the dose distribution.

  4. Sesame allergy threshold dose distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dano, D; Remington, B C; Astier, C; Baumert, J L; Kruizinga, A G; Bihain, B E; Taylor, S L; Kanny, G

    2015-09-01

    Sesame is a relevant food allergen in France. Compared to other allergens there is a lack of food challenge data and more data could help sesame allergy risk management. The aim of this study is to collect more sesame challenge data and investigate the most efficient food challenge method for future studies. Records of patients at University Hospital in Nancy (France) with objective symptoms to sesame challenges were collected and combined with previously published data. An estimation of the sesame allergy population threshold was calculated based on individual NOAELs and LOAELs. Clinical dosing schemes at Nancy were investigated to see if the optimal protocol for sesame is currently used. Fourteen patients (10 M/4 F, 22 ± 14.85 years old) with objective symptoms were added to previously published data making a total of 35 sesame allergic patients. The most sensitive patient reacted to the first dose at challenge of 1.02 mg sesame protein. The ED05 ranges between 1.2 and 4.0 mg of sesame protein (Log-Normal, Log-Logistic, and Weibull models) and the ED10 between 4.2 and 6.2 mg. The optimal food challenge dosing scheme for sesame follows semi-log dose increases from 0.3 to 3000 mg protein. This article provides a valuable update to the existing clinical literature regarding sesame NOAELs and LOAELs. Establishment of a population threshold for sesame could help in increasing the credibility of precautionary labelling and decrease the costs associated with unexpected allergic reactions. Also, the use of an optimal dosing scheme would decrease time spent on diagnostic and thereafter on the economic burden of sesame allergy diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Spatial and temporal distribution of natural disasters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvetković Vladimir M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of quantitative research is determining the spatial and temporal distribution of natural disasters worldwide for the period 1900-2013. Considering that it is a mass phenomenon, which consists of multiple units, most preferred scientific method for making conclusions on natural disasters is the statistical method. Thereby, a statistical survey has been conducted in the way that raw data about all natural disasters in the first step were downloaded (25.552 in the form of Excel file from the international database on disasters (CRED in Brussels, and then analyzed in program for statistical analysis of data SPSS. Within the geospatial distribution the total number and consequences of natural disasters were analyzed by continents. According to the same principle, within temporal analysis we examined distribution of the total number and effects of natural disasters on annual, monthly and daily levels. Statistical results of analysis clearly indicate that the number of natural disasters has increased, with their recorded maximum in the period from 2000 to 2013. Certainly, one can not absolutely say this is true in view of starting to pay serious attention to quantitative indicators. Also, it can not be said that the international database (CRED included absolutely all natural disasters in the world, considering that it was created thanks to the submission of national reports on natural disasters. Such way of data collection can have serious shortcomings, given the diverse subjectivities. In addition, the question that arises is whether most underdeveloped countries submitted their reports. Bearing in mind the increasing trend in the number and severity of natural disasters in the global geographic space, the survey results represent a good argument for initiation of serious reforms of the system of protection and rescue against natural disasters in countries around the world. Results of research impact on raising awareness among citizens

  6. Isobio software: biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram from physical dose conversion using linear-quadratic-linear model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tanwiwat Jaikuna; Phatchareewan Khadsiri; Nisa Chawapun; Suwit Saekho; Ekkasit Tharavichitkul

    2017-01-01

      Purpose: To develop an in-house software program that is able to calculate and generate the biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram by physical dose conversion using the linear-quadratic-linear (LQL) model...

  7. Spatio-temporal distribution of the infestations of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spatio-temporal distribution of the infestations of Coelaenomenodera lameensis Berti and Mariau ( Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae ) an oil palm tree ( Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) pest in Toumanguié (Côte d'Ivoire)

  8. Dose-mapping distribution around MNSR

    CERN Document Server

    Jamal, M H

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study is to establish the dose-rate map through the determination of radiological dose-rate levels in reactor hall, adjacent rooms, and outside the MNSR facility. Controlling dose rate to reactor operating personnel , dose map was established. The map covers time and distances in the reactor hall, during reactor operation at nominal power. Different measurement of dose rates in other areas of the reactor buildings was established. The maximum dose rate, during normal operation of the MNSR was 40 and 21 Sv/hr on the top of the reactor and near the pool fence, respectively. Whereas, gamma and neutron doses have not exceeded natural background in all rooms adjacent to the reactor hall or nearly buildings. The relation between the dose rate for gamma rays and neutron flux at the top of cover of reactor pool was studied as well. It was found that this relation is linear.

  9. Threshold dose distributions for 5 major allergenic foods in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, W.M.; Vlieg-Boerstra, B.J.; Kruizinga, A.G.; Heide, S. van der; Houben, G.F.; Dubois, A.E.J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: For most allergenic foods, insufficient threshold dose information within the population restricts the advice on levels of unintended allergenic foods which should trigger precautionary labeling on prepackaged foods. Objective: We wanted to derive threshold dose distributions for major

  10. Threshold dose distributions for 5 major allergenic foods in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, W. Marty; Vlieg-Boerstra, Berber J.; Kruizinga, Astrid G.; van der Heide, Sicco; Houben, Geert F.; Dubois, Anthony E. J.

    Background: For most allergenic foods, insufficient threshold dose information within the population restricts the advice on levels of unintended allergenic foods which should trigger precautionary labeling on prepackaged foods. Objective: We wanted to derive threshold dose distributions for major

  11. Time and temporality: linguistic distribution in human life-games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowley, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    While clock-time can be used to clarify facts, all living systems construct their own temporalities. Having illustrated the claim for foxtail grasses, it is argued that, with motility and brains, organisms came to use temporalities that build flexibility into behavior. With the rise of human...... culture, individuals developed a knack of using linguistic distribution to link metabolism with collective ways of assessing and managing experience. Of human temporal management, the best known case is the mental time travel enabled by, among other functions, autobiographical memory. One contribution...... of this special issue is to show many ways in which temporality connects up circumstances, goals, perception, attention and modes of recall. It can be hypothesized that temporalities evolve because the relevant skills reduce uncertainties. Using cases from blogging, problem solving and doctor-patient interaction...

  12. Evaluation and temporal evolution of image quality and its dosimetric effect on the dose distributions calculated on megavoltage CT images from tomotherapy unit; Evaluacion y evolucion temporal de la calidad de imagen y su impacto dosimetrico en el calculo de distribuciones realizadas sobre imagenes de megavoltaje de la unidad de tomoterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez Rubio, P.; Castro Tejero, P.; Rodriguez Romero, R.

    2015-05-01

    Over a period of five years the temporal evolution of the image quality parameters and the linearity of the Hounsfield units (HU) of megavoltage studies (MVCT) were analyzed as well as the influence of the actions of the field service engineer. Furthermore the dosimetric impact of HU variation as a result of such actions was studied in three clinical cases (prostate, head and neck, and lung). MVCT images showed an appropriate image quality for image-guided radiotherapy and adaptive radiation therapy despite its lower contrast to noise ratio in comparison to the kilo voltage studies. Because of temporal stability of the linearity between HU and mass density, MVCT studies were appropriate for dose calculation especially to avoid artifacts due to high density metallic structures. Target changes had the largest effect on the imaging parameters analyzed. Variations around 30 and 50 HU for water and bone, respectively, led to a dosimetric error of 1% for the studied locations; while discrepancies about 6% were found as a result of higher HU changes. (Author)

  13. Auditory spectral versus spatial temporal order judgment: Threshold distribution analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fostick, Leah; Babkoff, Harvey

    2017-05-01

    Some researchers suggested that one central mechanism is responsible for temporal order judgments (TOJ), within and across sensory channels. This suggestion is supported by findings of similar TOJ thresholds in same modality and cross-modality TOJ tasks. In the present study, we challenge this idea by analyzing and comparing the threshold distributions of the spectral and spatial TOJ tasks. In spectral TOJ, the tones differ in their frequency ("high" and "low") and are delivered either binaurally or monaurally. In spatial (or dichotic) TOJ, the two tones are identical but are presented asynchronously to the two ears and thus differ with respect to which ear received the first tone and which ear received the second tone ("left"/"left"). Although both tasks are regarded as measures of auditory temporal processing, a review of data published in the literature suggests that they trigger different patterns of response. The aim of the current study was to systematically examine spectral and spatial TOJ threshold distributions across a large number of studies. Data are based on 388 participants in 13 spectral TOJ experiments, and 222 participants in 9 spatial TOJ experiments. None of the spatial TOJ distributions deviated significantly from the Gaussian; while all of the spectral TOJ threshold distributions were skewed to the right, with more than half of the participants accurately judging temporal order at very short interstimulus intervals (ISI). The data do not support the hypothesis that 1 central mechanism is responsible for all temporal order judgments. We suggest that different perceptual strategies are employed when performing spectral TOJ than when performing spatial TOJ. We posit that the spectral TOJ paradigm may provide the opportunity for two-tone masking or temporal integration, which is sensitive to the order of the tones and thus provides perceptual cues that may be used to judge temporal order. This possibility should be considered when interpreting

  14. Spatial and temporal distribution of cattle trypanosomosis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Increase in outbreaks and cases could be attributed to the inadequate resources for vector control from about the year 2002. Professional intervention and revision of current control methods and policies are therefore imperative. Keywords: African Animal Trypanosomosis, vector-borne disease, spatial - temporal distribution ...

  15. Spatio-temporal distribution of the infestations of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1 Entomology and soil fauna unity, UFR Biosciences, Cocody University, Abidjan (Côte d'Ivoire). 2 Pierre ... relative humidity). Larvae at stages 1, 2, 3 and 4 are mostly responsible of the damages observed in the fields. Key words: Coelaenomenodera lameensis; Elaeis guineensis; spatio-temporal distribution; Côte d'Ivoire.

  16. Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Reef Fish Spawning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many coral reef fish species aggregate at specific times and locations for the purpose of spawning. This study examined the spatial and temporal distribution of spawning aggregations in the Seychelles. An interview-based survey of the principal stakeholders, mainly artisanal fishers, yielded 89 reports of aggregation fishing ...

  17. Spatio-temporal modeling of nonlinear distributed parameter systems

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Han-Xiong

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this volume is to provide a brief review of the previous work on model reduction and identifi cation of distributed parameter systems (DPS), and develop new spatio-temporal models and their relevant identifi cation approaches. In this book, a systematic overview and classifi cation on the modeling of DPS is presented fi rst, which includes model reduction, parameter estimation and system identifi cation. Next, a class of block-oriented nonlinear systems in traditional lumped parameter systems (LPS) is extended to DPS, which results in the spatio-temporal Wiener and Hammerstein s

  18. Threshold Dose Distribution in Walnut Allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankestijn, Mark A; Remington, Benjamin C.; Houben, GF; Baumert, Joseph L.; Knulst, André C; Blom, W Marty; Klemans, Rob J B; Taylor, Steve L

    BACKGROUND: In food allergy, eliciting doses (EDs) of foods on a population level can improve risk management and labeling strategies for the food industry and regulatory authorities. Previously, data available for walnut were unsuitable to determine EDs. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was

  19. A new method for effective dose calculation based on the ambient dose height distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liebmann Mario

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The realistic determination of effective dose of the staff in diagnostic radiology has been a challenge both for personal dosimetry and ambient dose measurement. A model for dosimetry of occupational exposure is presented that allows direct determination of effective dose from measured or even manufacturer given ambient dose distribution in front of the personnel. This model considers a wide range of radiation energies, different radiation protection situations, and gender effects.

  20. Thyroid dose distribution in dental radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bristow, R.G.; Wood, R.E.; Clark, G.M. (Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto (Canada))

    1989-10-01

    The anatomic position and proven radiosensitivity of the thyroid gland make it an organ of concern in dental radiography. A calibrated thermoluminescent dosimetry system was used to investigate the absorbed dose (microGy) to the thyroid gland resultant from a minimum irradiated volume, intraoral full-mouth radiography technique with the use of rectangular collimation with a lead-backed image receptor, and conventional panoramic radiography performed with front and rear lead aprons. Use of the minimum irradiated volume technique resulted in a significantly decreased absorbed dose over the entire thyroid region ranging from 100% to 350% (p less than 0.05). Because this intraoral technique results in radiographs with greater image quality and also exposes the thyroid gland to less radiation than the panoramic, this technique may be an alternative to the panoramic procedure.

  1. [Homogeneous dose distribution in the moving-strip technic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiecchio, A; Torrengo, S; Barboni, G; Giordana, C; Malinverni, G

    1983-03-01

    The moving-strip technique employing a 60Co beam, is used in radiotherapy for whole abdominal irradiation in ovarian tumours and lymphomas. With this technique the spread of received dose from single strip, around an average value, is very high. Our paper suggest a computerized method for a more homogeneous dose distribution in central strips and a lower dose in out-side tissues.

  2. Dedicated breast CT: effect of adaptive filtration on dose distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the work was experimental investigations of the breast dose distributions with adaptive filtration. Adaptive filtration reduces detector dynamic range and improves image quality. The adaptive filter with predetermined shape is placed at the x-ray beam such that the x-ray intensity at the detector surface is flat. However, adaptive filter alters the mean dose to the breast, as well as volume distribution of the dose. Methods: The dose was measured using a 14 cm diameter cylindrical acrylic breast phantom. An acrylic adaptive filter was fabricated to match the 14 cm diameter of the phantom. The dose was measured using ion chamber inserted into holes distributed along the radius of the phantom from the center to the edge. The radial distribution of dose was measured and fitted by an analytical function and the volume distribution and mean value of dose was calculated. The measurements were performed at 40, 60, 90, and 120 kVp tube voltages and 6.6 mGy air kerma. Results: The adaptive filt...

  3. Estimation of percentage depth dose distributions for therapeutic machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Surajit; Muthukrishnan, G.; Ravishankar, R.; Sharma, R. P.; Ghose, A. M.

    2002-12-01

    A mathematical formulation has been carried out to predict megavoltage photon depth dose distributions for different field sizes inside a water phantom. From the studies it is found that it would be possible to predict depth dose distributions for different energies and different field sizes based on measurements carried out for single energy and single field size. The method has been successfully applied for 60Co γ-rays also.

  4. Temporal-difference reinforcement learning with distributed representations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeb Kurth-Nelson

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Temporal-difference (TD algorithms have been proposed as models of reinforcement learning (RL. We examine two issues of distributed representation in these TD algorithms: distributed representations of belief and distributed discounting factors. Distributed representation of belief allows the believed state of the world to distribute across sets of equivalent states. Distributed exponential discounting factors produce hyperbolic discounting in the behavior of the agent itself. We examine these issues in the context of a TD RL model in which state-belief is distributed over a set of exponentially-discounting "micro-Agents", each of which has a separate discounting factor (gamma. Each microAgent maintains an independent hypothesis about the state of the world, and a separate value-estimate of taking actions within that hypothesized state. The overall agent thus instantiates a flexible representation of an evolving world-state. As with other TD models, the value-error (delta signal within the model matches dopamine signals recorded from animals in standard conditioning reward-paradigms. The distributed representation of belief provides an explanation for the decrease in dopamine at the conditioned stimulus seen in overtrained animals, for the differences between trace and delay conditioning, and for transient bursts of dopamine seen at movement initiation. Because each microAgent also includes its own exponential discounting factor, the overall agent shows hyperbolic discounting, consistent with behavioral experiments.

  5. Threshold dose distributions for 5 major allergenic foods in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, W Marty; Vlieg-Boerstra, Berber J; Kruizinga, Astrid G; van der Heide, Sicco; Houben, Geert F; Dubois, Anthony E J

    2013-01-01

    For most allergenic foods, insufficient threshold dose information within the population restricts the advice on levels of unintended allergenic foods which should trigger precautionary labeling on prepackaged foods. We wanted to derive threshold dose distributions for major allergenic foods and to elaborate the protein doses at which a proportion of the allergic population is likely to respond. For 7 allergenic foods double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges (DBPCFCs) with a positive outcome for allergic reactions were selected from the clinical database of children routinely tested to diagnose food allergy at the University Medical Center Groningen. For each allergen 2 population threshold distributions were determined with the individual minimal eliciting dose and the preceding dose of each DBPCFC for objective symptoms and any symptom (either subjective or objective). Individual positive DBPCFCs were available for peanut (n = 135), cow's milk (n = 93), hen's egg (n = 53), hazelnut (n = 28), and cashew nut (n = 31). Fewer children were challenged with soy (n = 10) or walnut (n = 13). Threshold dose distributions showed a good statistical and visual fit. The protein dose at which 5% of the allergic population is likely to respond with objective reactions was 1.6 mg for peanut, 1.1 mg for cow's milk, 1.5 mg for hen's egg, 7.4 mg for cashew nut, and 0.29 mg for hazelnut. Thresholds for any symptom were on average 2 to 6 times lower than for objective symptoms. The 95% upper and lower confidence intervals of the threshold distributions were overlapping. The peanut threshold distribution on objective symptoms was similar to the distribution of another European center. Threshold distribution curves and eliciting doses are a powerful tool to compare different allergenic foods and for informing policy on precautionary labeling. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Imaging and Measuring Electron Beam Dose Distributions Using Holographic Interferometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; McLaughlin, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    Holographic interferometry was used to image and measure ionizing radiation depth-dose and isodose distributions in transparent liquids. Both broad and narrowly collimated electron beams from accelerators (2–10 MeV) provided short irradiation times of 30 ns to 0.6 s. Holographic images...... and measurements of absorbed dose distributions were achieved in liquids of various densities and thermal properties and in water layers thinner than the electron range and with backings of materials of various densities and atomic numbers. The lowest detectable dose in some liquids was of the order of a few k...

  7. Environmental DNA reflects spatial and temporal jellyfish distribution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshifumi Minamoto

    Full Text Available Recent development of environmental DNA (eDNA analysis allows us to survey underwater macro-organisms easily and cost effectively; however, there have been no reports on eDNA detection or quantification for jellyfish. Here we present the first report on an eDNA analysis of marine jellyfish using Japanese sea nettle (Chrysaora pacifica as a model species by combining a tank experiment with spatial and temporal distribution surveys. We performed a tank experiment monitoring eDNA concentrations over a range of time intervals after the introduction of jellyfish, and quantified the eDNA concentrations by quantitative real-time PCR. The eDNA concentrations peaked twice, at 1 and 8 h after the beginning of the experiment, and became stable within 48 h. The estimated release rates of the eDNA in jellyfish were higher than the rates previously reported in fishes. A spatial survey was conducted in June 2014 in Maizuru Bay, Kyoto, in which eDNA was collected from surface water and sea floor water samples at 47 sites while jellyfish near surface water were counted on board by eye. The distribution of eDNA in the bay corresponded with the distribution of jellyfish inferred by visual observation, and the eDNA concentration in the bay was ~13 times higher on the sea floor than on the surface. The temporal survey was conducted from March to November 2014, in which jellyfish were counted by eye every morning while eDNA was collected from surface and sea floor water at three sampling points along a pier once a month. The temporal fluctuation pattern of the eDNA concentrations and the numbers of observed individuals were well correlated. We conclude that an eDNA approach is applicable for jellyfish species in the ocean.

  8. Environmental DNA reflects spatial and temporal jellyfish distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamoto, Toshifumi; Fukuda, Miho; Katsuhara, Koki R; Fujiwara, Ayaka; Hidaka, Shunsuke; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Takahashi, Kohji; Masuda, Reiji

    2017-01-01

    Recent development of environmental DNA (eDNA) analysis allows us to survey underwater macro-organisms easily and cost effectively; however, there have been no reports on eDNA detection or quantification for jellyfish. Here we present the first report on an eDNA analysis of marine jellyfish using Japanese sea nettle (Chrysaora pacifica) as a model species by combining a tank experiment with spatial and temporal distribution surveys. We performed a tank experiment monitoring eDNA concentrations over a range of time intervals after the introduction of jellyfish, and quantified the eDNA concentrations by quantitative real-time PCR. The eDNA concentrations peaked twice, at 1 and 8 h after the beginning of the experiment, and became stable within 48 h. The estimated release rates of the eDNA in jellyfish were higher than the rates previously reported in fishes. A spatial survey was conducted in June 2014 in Maizuru Bay, Kyoto, in which eDNA was collected from surface water and sea floor water samples at 47 sites while jellyfish near surface water were counted on board by eye. The distribution of eDNA in the bay corresponded with the distribution of jellyfish inferred by visual observation, and the eDNA concentration in the bay was ~13 times higher on the sea floor than on the surface. The temporal survey was conducted from March to November 2014, in which jellyfish were counted by eye every morning while eDNA was collected from surface and sea floor water at three sampling points along a pier once a month. The temporal fluctuation pattern of the eDNA concentrations and the numbers of observed individuals were well correlated. We conclude that an eDNA approach is applicable for jellyfish species in the ocean.

  9. Distributed processing and temporal codes in neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Wolf

    2009-09-01

    The cerebral cortex presents itself as a distributed dynamical system with the characteristics of a small world network. The neuronal correlates of cognitive and executive processes often appear to consist of the coordinated activity of large assemblies of widely distributed neurons. These features require mechanisms for the selective routing of signals across densely interconnected networks, the flexible and context dependent binding of neuronal groups into functionally coherent assemblies and the task and attention dependent integration of subsystems. In order to implement these mechanisms, it is proposed that neuronal responses should convey two orthogonal messages in parallel. They should indicate (1) the presence of the feature to which they are tuned and (2) with which other neurons (specific target cells or members of a coherent assembly) they are communicating. The first message is encoded in the discharge frequency of the neurons (rate code) and it is proposed that the second message is contained in the precise timing relationships between individual spikes of distributed neurons (temporal code). It is further proposed that these precise timing relations are established either by the timing of external events (stimulus locking) or by internal timing mechanisms. The latter are assumed to consist of an oscillatory modulation of neuronal responses in different frequency bands that cover a broad frequency range from 40 Hz (gamma) and ripples. These oscillations limit the communication of cells to short temporal windows whereby the duration of these windows decreases with oscillation frequency. Thus, by varying the phase relationship between oscillating groups, networks of functionally cooperating neurons can be flexibly configurated within hard wired networks. Moreover, by synchronizing the spikes emitted by neuronal populations, the saliency of their responses can be enhanced due to the coincidence sensitivity of receiving neurons in very much the same way as

  10. Radiochromic Plastic Films for Accurate Measurement of Radiation Absorbed Dose and Dose Distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W. L.; Miller, Arne; Fidan, S.

    1977-01-01

    Thin radiochromic dye films are useful for measuring large radiation absorbed doses (105–108 rads) and for high-resolution imaging of dose patterns produced by penetrating radiation beams passing through non-homogeneous media. Certain types of amino-substituted triarylmethane cyanides dissolved...... in polymeric solutions can be cast into flexible free-standing thin films of uniform thickness and reproducible response to ultraviolet and ionizing radiation. The increase in optical density versus energy deposited by radiation is linear over a wide range of doses and is for practical purposes independent...... of dose rate (1–1014 rad s−1). Upon irradiation of the film, the profile of the radiation field is registered as a permanent colored image of the dose distribution. Unlike most other types of dyed plastic dose meters, the optical density produced by irradiation is in most cases stable for periods...

  11. Visualizing the temporal distribution of terminologies for biological ontology development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tak-eun; Lee, Hodong; Park, Jinah; Park, Jong C.

    2008-01-01

    Communities in biology have developed a number of ontologies that provide standard terminologies for the characteristics of various concepts and their relationships. However, it is difficult to construct and maintain such ontologies in biology, since it is a non-trivial task to identify commonly used potential member terms in a particular ontology, in the presence of constant changes of such terms over time as the research in the field advances. In this paper, we propose a visualization system, called BioTermViz, which presents the temporal distribution of ontological terms from the text of published journal abstracts. BioTermViz shows such a temporal distribution of terms for journal abstracts in the order of published time, occurrences of the annotated Gene Ontology concepts per abstract, and the ontological hierarchy of the terms. With a combination of these three types of information, we can capture the global tendency in the use of terms, and identify a particular term or terms to be created, modified, segmented, or removed, effectively developing biological ontologies in an interactive manner. In order to demonstrate the practical utility of BioTermViz, we describe several scenarios for the development of an ontology for a specific sub-class of proteins, or ubiquitin-protein ligases.

  12. Absorbed Dose Distribution in a Pulse Radiolysis Optical Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; McLaughlin, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    radiochromic dye film dosimeters placed at various depths in a quartz glass pulse radiolysis cell. The cell was irradiated with 30 ns pulses from a field-emission electron accelerator having a broad spectrum with a maximum energy of ≈MeV. The measured three-dimensional dose distributions showed sharp gradients...... in dose at the largest penetration depths in the cell and at the extreme lateral edges of the cell interior near the optical windows. This method of measurement was convenient because of the high spatial resolution capability of the detector and the linearity and absence of dose-rate dependence of its...

  13. Optical tomography for measuring dose distribution in radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kauppinen Matti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The dosimetry is used to verify the dose magnitude with artificial samples (phantoms before giving the planned radiation therapy to the patient. Typically, dose distribution is measured only in a single point or on a two-dimensional matrix plane. New techniques of radiation therapy ensure more detailed planning of radiation dose distribution which will lead to the need of measuring the radiation dose distribution three-dimensionally. The gel dosimetry is used to indicate and determine the ionizing radiation three-dimensionally. The radiation causes changes in chemical properties of the gel. The radiation dose distribution is defined by measuring the chemical changes. A conventional method is the magnetic resonance imaging and a new possibility is optical computed tomography (optical-CT. The optical-CT is much cheaper and more practical than magnetic resonance imaging. In this project, an optical-CT based method device was built by aiming at low material costs and a simple realization. The constructed device applies the charge coupled device camera and fluorescent lamp technologies. The test results show that the opacity level of the radiated gel can be measured accurately enough. The imaging accuracy is restricted by the optical distortion, e. g. vignetting, of the lenses, the distortion of a fluorescent lamp as the light source and a noisy measuring environment.

  14. Bacteriophage Distributions and Temporal Variability in the Ocean's Interior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Elaine; Aylward, Frank O; Mende, Daniel R; DeLong, Edward F

    2017-11-28

    Bacteriophages are numerically the most abundant DNA-containing entities in the oligotrophic ocean, yet how specific phage populations vary over time and space remains to be fully explored. Here, we conducted a metagenomic time-series survey of double-stranded DNA phages throughout the water column in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre, encompassing 1.5 years from depths of 25 to 1,000 m. Viral gene sequences were identified in assembled metagenomic samples, yielding an estimated 172,385 different viral gene families. Viral marker gene distributions suggested that lysogeny was more prevalent at mesopelagic depths than in surface waters, consistent with prior prophage induction studies using mitomycin C. A total of 129 ALOHA viral genomes and genome fragments from 20 to 108 kbp were selected for further study, which represented the most abundant phages in the water column. Phage genotypes displayed discrete population structures. Most phages persisted throughout the time-series and displayed a strong depth structure that mirrored the stratified depth distributions of co-occurring bacterial taxa in the water column. Mesopelagic phages were distinct from surface water phages with respect to diversity, gene content, putative life histories, and temporal persistence, reflecting depth-dependent differences in host genomic architectures and phage reproductive strategies. The spatiotemporal distributions of the most abundant open-ocean bacteriophages that we report here provide new insight into viral temporal persistence, life history, and virus-host-environment interactions throughout the open-ocean water column.IMPORTANCE The North Pacific Subtropical Gyre represents one of the largest biomes on the planet, where microbial communities are central mediators of ecosystem dynamics and global biogeochemical cycles. Critical members of these communities are the viruses of marine bacteria, which can alter microbial metabolism and significantly influence their survival and

  15. The dose dependency of the over-dispersion of quartz OSL single grain dose distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov; Murray, Andrew S.; Jain, Mayank

    2012-01-01

    The use of single grain quartz OSL dating has become widespread over the past decade, particularly with application to samples likely to have been incompletely bleached before burial. By reducing the aliquot size to a single grain the probability of identifying the grain population most likely...... to have been well-bleached at deposition is maximised and thus the accuracy with which the equivalent dose can be determined is – at least in principle – improved. However, analysis of single grain dose distributions requires knowledge of the dispersion of the well-bleached part of the dose distribution...... also show that the dim grains in the distributions have a greater over-dispersion than the bright grains, implying that insensitive samples will have greater values of over-dispersion than sensitive samples....

  16. Temporal Variations of Air Dose Rates in East Fukushima During Japanese Fiscal Years 2012 and 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Temporal variations of ambient air dose rates in eastern Fukushima prefecture during Japanese fiscal years 2012 and 2013 are analyzed. The average overall variation rate of air dose rates in east Fukushima during the examined period is found to be 0.49 (51% down) compared to the theoretically predicted value 0.65 (35% down) based on physical decay of radioactive cesium nuclides. On average, local dose rates declined almost linearly for the relatively short period. Temporal characteristics of air dose rates may be classified into variation rates, peaks, spikes, and oscillations. During the examined period, a typical dose-rate curve formed a long-term peak in summer that lasted one through a few months as well as a long-term spike in winter that lasted likewise. Otherwise, occasional short-term peaks and short-term spikes, in addition to long-term oscillations, were observed. Air dose rates may be effectively modulated at short timescales mainly by precipitation. Moreover, it is likely that winds may oscillate air dose rates due to resuspension of radio-dusts.

  17. Spatial and temporal distribution of urban heat islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Alexandre Rosa; de Oliveira, Felício Santos; da Silva, Aderbal Gomes; Gleriani, José Marinaldo; Gonçalves, Wantuelfer; Moreira, Giselle Lemos; Silva, Felipe Gimenes; Branco, Elvis Ricardo Figueira; Moura, Marks Melo; da Silva, Rosane Gomes; Juvanhol, Ronie Silva; de Souza, Kaíse Barbosa; Ribeiro, Carlos Antonio Alvares Soares; de Queiroz, Vagner Tebaldi; Costa, Adilson Vidal; Lorenzon, Alexandre Simões; Domingues, Getulio Fonseca; Marcatti, Gustavo Eduardo; de Castro, Nero Lemos Martins; Resende, Rafael Tassinari; Gonzales, Duberli Elera; de Almeida Telles, Lucas Arthur; Teixeira, Thaisa Ribeiro; Dos Santos, Gleissy Mary Amaral Dino Alves; Mota, Pedro Henrique Santos

    2017-12-15

    The formation of an urban heat island (UHI) is one of the most common impacts of the urbanization process. To mitigate the effects of UHI, the planning of urban forests (e.g., creation of parks, forests and afforestation streets) has been the major tool applied in this context. Thus, the aim of this study is to evaluate the spatial and temporal distribution of heat islands in Vila Velha, ES, Brazil using the mono-window algorithm. The study followed these methodological steps: 1) mapping of urban green areas through a photointerpretation screen; 2) application of the mono-window algorithm to obtain the spatial and temporal patterns of land surface temperature (LST); 3) correlation between LST and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and normalized difference build-up index (NDBI); 4) application of ecological evaluation index. The results showed that the mean values of LST in urban areas were at least 2.34 to 7.19°C higher than undeveloped areas. Moreover, the positive correlation between LST and NDBI showed an amplifying effect of the developed areas for UHI, while areas with a predominance of vegetation attenuated the effect of UHI. Urban centers, clustered in some parts of the city, received the worst ecological assessment index. Finally, the adoption of measures to guide the urban forest planning within urban centers is necessary to mitigate the effect of heat islands and provide thermal comfort in urban areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Tissue distribution of rat flavanol metabolites at different doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalef, Maria; Pons, Zara; Bravo, Francisca Isabel; Muguerza, Begoña; Arola-Arnal, Anna

    2015-10-01

    Flavanols are metabolized in the small intestine and the liver to produce their glucuronidated, sulfated or methylated conjugates that can be body distributed or excreted in the urine. However, the intake of large amounts of flavanols is not directly related to their bioavailability. This study aims to investigate the administered dose dependence of flavanols' conjugation and body distribution. In this study, different doses of a grape seed proanthocyanidin extract (GSPE; 125, 250, 375 and 1000 mg/kg) were orally administered to male Wistar rats. Tissues were collected 2h after GSPE administration. Flavanols were quantified by HPLC-MS/MS. Results show that the majority of GSPE metabolites are located in the kidney, followed by the liver. Lower concentrations were found in mesenteric white adipose tissue (MWAT) and the brain. Moreover, flavanol metabolites followed a tissue-specific distribution pattern independent of dosage. In the kidney, glucuronidated metabolites were the most abundant; however, in the liver, it was mainly methyl-glucuronidated metabolites. In MWAT, free flavanols were dominant, and methylated metabolites were dominant in the brain. Concentration within a tissue was dependent on the administered dose. In conclusion, flavanol metabolites follow a tissue-specific distribution pattern and only the tissue concentration of flavanol metabolites is dependent on the administered dose. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of Dose Rate Variation on Dose Distribution in IMRT with a Dynamic Multileaf Collimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Kyoung Dal; Jae, Young Wan; Yoon, Il Kyu; Lee, Jae Hee; Yoo, Suk Hyun [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    To evaluate dose distribution differences when the dose rates are randomly changed in intensity-modulated radiation therapy using a dynamic multileaf collimator. Two IMRT treatment plans including small-field and large-field plans were made using a commercial treatment planning system (Eclipse, Varian, Palo Alto, CA). Each plan had three sub-plans according to various dose rates of 100, 400, and 600 MU/min. A chamber array (2D-Array Seven729, PTW-Freiburg) was positioned between solid water phantom slabs to give measurement depth of 5 cm and backscattering depth of 5 cm. Beam deliveries were performed on the array detector using a 6 MV beam of a linear accelerator (Clinac 21EX, Varian, Palo Alto, CA) equipped with 120-leaf MLC (Millenium 120, Varian). At first, the beam was delivered with same dose rates as planned to obtain reference values. After the standard measurements, dose rates were then changed as follows: 1) for plans with 100 MU/min, dose rate was varied to 200, 300, 400, 500 and 600 MU/min, 2) for plans with 400 MU/min, dose rate was varied to 100, 200, 300, 500 and 600 MU/min, 3) for plans with 600 MU/min, dose rate was varied to 100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 MU/min. Finally, using an analysis software (Verisoft 3.1, PTW-Freiburg), the dose difference and distribution between the reference and dose-rate-varied measurements was evaluated. For the small field plan, the local dose differences were -0.8, -1.1, -1.3, -1.5, and -1.6% for the dose rate of 200, 300, 400, 500, 600 MU/min, respectively (for 100 MU/min reference), +0.9, +0.3, +0.1, -0.2, and -0.2% for the dose rate of 100, 200, 300, 500, 600 MU/min, respectively (for 400 MU/min reference) and +1.4, +0.8, +0.5, +0.3, and +0.2% for the dose rate of 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 MU/min, respectively (for 600 MU/min reference). On the other hand, for the large field plan, the pass-rate differences were -1.3, -1.6, -1.8, -2.0, and -2.4% for the dose rate of 200, 300, 400, 500, 600 MU/min, respectively (for 100

  20. Acquisition of multiple prior distributions in tactile temporal order judgment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhito eNagai

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The Bayesian estimation theory proposes that the brain acquires the prior distribution of a task and integrates it with sensory signals to minimize the effect of sensory noise. Psychophysical studies have demonstrated that our brain actually implements Bayesian estimation in a variety of sensory-motor tasks. However, these studies only imposed one prior distribution on participants within a task period. In this study, we investigated the conditions that enable the acquisition of multiple prior distributions in temporal order judgment (TOJ of two tactile stimuli across the hands. In Experiment 1, stimulation intervals were randomly selected from one of two prior distributions (biased to right hand earlier and biased to left hand earlier in association with color cues (green and red, respectively. Although the acquisition of the two priors was not enabled by the color cues alone, it was significant when participants shifted their gaze (above or below in response to the color cues. However, the acquisition of multiple priors was not significant when participants moved their mouths (opened or closed. In Experiment 2, the spatial cues (above and below were used to identify which eye position or retinal cue position was crucial for the eye-movement-dependent acquisition of multiple priors in Experiment 1. The acquisition of the two priors was significant when participants moved their gaze to the cues (i.e., the cue positions on the retina were constant across the priors, as well as when participants did not shift their gazes (i.e., the cue positions on the retina changed according to the priors. Thus, both eye and retinal cue positions were effective in acquiring multiple priors. Based on previous neurophysiological reports, we discuss possible neural correlates that contribute to the acquisition of multiple priors.

  1. Measurement of spatial dose distribution for evaluation operator dose during nero-interventional procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Su Chul [Division of Medical Radiation Equipment, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Dong Hee [Dept. of Radiology Science, Far East University, Eumseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The spatial dose distribution was measured with ionization chamber as preliminary study to evaluate operator dose and to study dose reduction during neuro-interventional procedures. The zone of operators was divided into four area (45, 135, 225, and 315 degree).We supposed that operator exist on the four area and indicated location of critical organs(eyes, breast, gonad). The spatial doses were measured depending on distance( 80, 100, 120, and 140 cm) and location of critical organs. The spatial doses of area of 225 degree were 114.5 mR/h (eyes location), 143.1 mR/h (breast location) and 147 mR/h (gonad location) in 80 cm. When changed location of x-ray generator, spatial dose increased in 18.1±10.5%, averagely. We certified spatial dose in the operator locations, Using the results of this study, It is feasible to protect operator from radiation in neuro-interventional procedures.

  2. Spatial and temporal distribution of snowmelt rate in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen Gupta, A.; Chowdhary, H.; Chinnayakanahalli, K.; Ashouri, H.

    2016-12-01

    Volume and timing of runoff due to snowmelt are major factors influencing the magnitude and timing of floods, reservoir operations, as well as the duration of the skiing season in the high-altitude northern regions of Japan. Snowmelt models are often used within rainfall-runoff models to estimate snowmelt runoff. In order to accurately model snowmelt runoff, these models need to account for the spatial and temporal variability of the snowmelt rate. Temperature index (TI) snowmelt models are commonly used for this purpose owing to their simplicity, parsimonious nature and computational efficiency. Traditional TI models assume a constant melt rate or degree day factor (DDF) over the entire melting season which usually overestimates the melt quantity during early season and underestimates during the latter part of the season. Moreover, available information on the spatial variability of the DDF is generally inadequate to develop spatially distributed snowmelt models. In this study, DDF has been estimated using Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) Noah Land Surface Model (LSM) outputs over Japan at 0.25° spatial resolution. 3-hourly temperature and snowmelt amount data have been used to estimate spatially varying daily melt rates resulting in time-varying seasonal melt factor curve similar to that proposed in SNOW-17. A distributed TI model was then applied to model snow water equivalent (SWE) and daily snowmelt over the entire Japan from 2000 to 2010. The modeled distributions of the onset and cessation of the snowpack buildup, and of the annual maximum SWE and its time of occurrence have been found to be in agreement with the patterns available from the GLDAS Noah data. The model performed better for Hokkaido, the northernmost of Japan's five main islands, where the annual maximum SWE is higher compared to the other parts of the country. The DDFs estimated in this study provide improved snowmelt driven flood estimates, especially for northern Japan.

  3. Influence of Geant4 parameters on proton dose distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asad Merouani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The proton therapy presents a great precision during the radiation dose delivery. It is useful when the tumor is located in a sensitive area like brain or eyes. The Monte Carlo (MC simulations are usually used in treatment planning system (TPS to estimate the radiation dose. In this paper we are interested in estimating the proton dose statistical uncertainty generated by the MC simulations. Methods: Geant4 was used in the simulation of the eye’s treatment room for 62 MeV protons therapy, installed in the Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS-INFN facility in Catania. This code is a Monte Carlo based on software dedicated to simulate the passage of particles through the matter. In this work, we are interested in optimizing the Geant4 parameters on energy deposit distribution by proton to achieve the spatial resolution of dose distribution required for cancer therapy. We propose various simulations and compare the corresponding dose distribution inside water to evaluate the statistical uncertainties. Results: The simulated Bragg peak, based on facility model is in agreement with the experimental data, The calculations show that the mean statistical uncertainty is less than 1% for a simulation set with 5 × 104 events, 10-3 mm production threshold and a 10-2 mm step limit. Conclusion: The set of Geant4 cut and step limit values can be chosen in combination with the number of events to reach precision recommended from International Commission on Radiation Units and measurements (ICRU in Monte Carlo codes for proton therapy treatment.

  4. The air dose rate around the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant: its spatial characteristics and temporal changes until December 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Satoshi; Maeyama, Takeshi; Hoshide, Yoshifumi; Sakamoto, Ryuichi; Sato, Shoji; Okuda, Naotoshi; Sato, Tetsuro; Takemiya, Hiroshi; Saito, Kimiaki

    2015-01-01

    Distribution maps of air dose rates around the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant were constructed using the results of measurement obtained from approximately 6500 locations (at most) per measurement period. The measurements were conducted 1 m above the ground using survey meters in flat and spatially open locations. Spatial distribution and temporal change of the air dose rate in the area were revealed by examining the resultant distribution maps. The observed reduction rate of the air dose rate over the 18 months between June 2011 and December 2012 was greater than that calculated from radioactive decay of radiocesium by 10% in relative percentage except decontaminated sites. This 10% difference in the reduction of the air dose rate can be explained by the mobility of radiocesium in the depth direction. In the region where the air dose rate was lower than 0.25 μSv h(-1) on June 2011, the reduction of the air dose rate was observed to be smaller than that of the other dose rate regions, and it was in fact smaller than the reduction rate caused by radioactive decay alone. In contrast, the reduction rate was larger in regions with higher air dose rates. In flat and spatially open locations, no significant difference in the reduction tendency of air dose rates was observed among different land use classifications (rice fields, farmland, forests, and building sites). Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. First trial of spatial and temporal fractionations of the delivered dose using synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serduc, Raphael [Toulouse Univ. (France). UPS Centre de Recherche Cerveau et Cognition; CNRS, CerCo, Toulouse (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38 - Grenoble (France); Braeuer-Krisch, Elke; Bouchet, Audrey; Brochard, Thierry; Bravin, Alberto; Le Duc, Geraldine [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38 - Grenoble (France); Renaud, Luc [Toulouse Univ. (France). UPS Centre de Recherche Cerveau et Cognition; CNRS, CerCo, Toulouse (France); Laissue, Jean Albert [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. of Pathology

    2009-07-15

    The technical feasibility of temporal and spatial fractionations of the radiation dose has been evaluated using synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy for brain tumors in rats. A significant increase in lifespan (216%, p<0.0001) resulted when three fractions of microbeam irradiation were applied to the tumor through three different ports, orthogonal to each other, at 24 h intervals. However, there were no long-term survivors, and immunohistological studies revealed that 9 L tumors were not entirely ablated. (orig.)

  6. Temporal distribution of tuberculosis in the State of Amazonas, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Marlucia da Silva; Bührer-Sékula, Samira; Souza, Alexandra Brito de; Ramasawmy, Rajendranath; Quincó, Patrícia de Lima; Monte, Rossicleia Lins; Santos, Lucilaide Oliveira; Perez-Porcuna, Tomás Maria; Martinez-Espínosa, Flor Ernestina; Saraceni, Valéria; Cordeiro-Santos, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the infectious diseases that contributes most to the morbidity and mortality of millions of people worldwide. Brazil is one of 22 countries that accounts for 80% of the tuberculosis global burden. The highest incidence rates in Brazil occur in the States of Amazonas and Rio de Janeiro. The aim of this study was to describe the temporal distribution of TB in the State of Amazonas. Between 2001 and 2011, 28,198 cases of tuberculosis were reported in Amazonas, distributed among 62 municipalities, with the capital Manaus reporting the highest (68.7%) concentration of cases. Tuberculosis was more prevalent among males (59.3%) aged 15 to 34 years old (45.5%), whose race/color was predominantly pardo (64.7%) and who had pulmonary TB (84.3%). During this period, 81 cases of multidrug-resistant TB were registered, of which the highest concentration was reported from 2008 onward (p = 0.002). The municipalities with the largest numbers of indigenous individuals affected were São Gabriel da Cachoeira (93%), Itamarati (78.1%), and Santa Isabel do Rio Negro (70.1%). The future outlook for this region includes strengthening the TB control at the primary care level, by expanding diagnostic capabilities, access to treatment, research projects developed in collaboration with the Dr. Heitor Vieira Dourado Tropical Medicine Foundation .;Fundação de Medicina Tropical Dr. Heitor Vieira Dourado (FMT-HVD).; and financing institutions, such as the project for the expansion of the Clinical Research Center and the creation of a hospital ward for individuals with transmissible respiratory diseases, including TB.

  7. Temporal distribution of tuberculosis in the State of Amazonas, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlucia da Silva Garrido

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is one of the infectious diseases that contributes most to the morbidity and mortality of millions of people worldwide. Brazil is one of 22 countries that accounts for 80% of the tuberculosis global burden. The highest incidence rates in Brazil occur in the States of Amazonas and Rio de Janeiro. The aim of this study was to describe the temporal distribution of TB in the State of Amazonas. Between 2001 and 2011, 28,198 cases of tuberculosis were reported in Amazonas, distributed among 62 municipalities, with the capital Manaus reporting the highest (68.7% concentration of cases. Tuberculosis was more prevalent among males (59.3% aged 15 to 34 years old (45.5%, whose race/color was predominantly pardo (64.7% and who had pulmonary TB (84.3%. During this period, 81 cases of multidrug-resistant TB were registered, of which the highest concentration was reported from 2008 onward (p = 0.002. The municipalities with the largest numbers of indigenous individuals affected were São Gabriel da Cachoeira (93%, Itamarati (78.1%, and Santa Isabel do Rio Negro (70.1%. The future outlook for this region includes strengthening the TB control at the primary care level, by expanding diagnostic capabilities, access to treatment, research projects developed in collaboration with the Dr. Heitor Vieira Dourado Tropical Medicine Foundation .;Fundação de Medicina Tropical Dr. Heitor Vieira Dourado (FMT-HVD.; and financing institutions, such as the project for the expansion of the Clinical Research Center and the creation of a hospital ward for individuals with transmissible respiratory diseases, including TB.

  8. Spatial and temporal distribution of falciparum malaria in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Hualiang

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Falciparum malaria is the most deadly among the four main types of human malaria. Although great success has been achieved since the launch of the National Malaria Control Programme in 1955, malaria remains a serious public health problem in China. This paper aimed to analyse the geographic distribution, demographic patterns and time trends of falciparum malaria in China. Methods The annual numbers of falciparum malaria cases during 1992–2003 and the individual case reports of each clinical falciparum malaria during 2004–2005 were extracted from communicable disease information systems in China Center for Diseases Control and Prevention. The annual number of cases and the annual incidence were mapped by matching them to corresponding province- and county-level administrative units in a geographic information system. The distribution of falciparum malaria by age, gender and origin of infection was analysed. Time-series analysis was conducted to investigate the relationship between the falciparum malaria in the endemic provinces and the imported falciparum malaria in non-endemic provinces. Results Falciparum malaria was endemic in two provinces of China during 2004–05. Imported malaria was reported in 26 non-endemic provinces. Annual incidence of falciparum malaria was mapped at county level in the two endemic provinces of China: Yunnan and Hainan. The sex ratio (male vs. female for the number of cases in Yunnan was 1.6 in the children of 0–15 years and it reached 5.7 in the adults over 15 years of age. The number of malaria cases in Yunnan was positively correlated with the imported malaria of concurrent months in the non-endemic provinces. Conclusion The endemic area of falciparum malaria in China has remained restricted to two provinces, Yunnan and Hainan. Stable transmission occurs in the bordering region of Yunnan and the hilly-forested south of Hainan. The age and gender distribution in the endemic area is

  9. A review of in vitro experimental evidence for the effect of spatial and temporal modulation of radiation dose on response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suchowerska, Natalka (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, New South Wales (Australia)), E-mail: Natalka@email.cs.nsw.gov.au; McKenzie, David R. (School of Physics, Univ. of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)); Ebert, Martin A. (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Western Australia (Australia)); Jackson, Michael (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, New South Wales (Australia))

    2010-11-15

    Background. Intensity modulated radiation therapy introduces strong spatial and temporal modulation of the dose delivery that may have therapeutic benefits, as yet unrealized. Material and methods. Experimental evidence for spatial and temporal modulation affecting the cell survival following in vitro irradiation has been derived using clonogenic assays. Results and discussion. The experimental results show that the survival status of a cell is strongly influenced by the spatial dose modulation. The classical bystander effect of decreased survival has now been supplemented by observations of increased survival, which may result from the same or different signaling mechanisms. Temporal dose modulation experiments show that dose protraction significantly increases cell survival. An appropriate choice of temporal dose modulation pattern enables cell death to be maximized or minimized for a constant dose and delivery time. Conclusion. Bystander effects challenge the assumption that outcome is solely dependent on local dose. Intra-fractional temporal modulation via protracted treatments and time varying dose delivery both affect the cell survival. The presence of bystander and temporal effects emphasize the need for a mathematical framework which incorporates their influence on cell survival

  10. Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm on a distributed system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvie, Stéphane; Dominoni, Matteo; Marini, Piergiorgio; Stasi, Michele; Pia, Maria Grazia; Scielzo, Giuseppe

    2003-09-01

    The main goal of modern radiotherapy, such as 3D conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy is to deliver a high dose to the target volume sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. The accuracy of dose calculation in a treatment planning system is therefore a critical issue. Among many algorithms developed over the last years, those based on Monte Carlo proven to be very promising in terms of accuracy. The most severe obstacle in application to clinical practice is the high time necessary for calculations. We have studied a high performance network of Personal Computer as a realistic alternative to a high-costs dedicated parallel hardware to be used routinely as instruments of evaluation of treatment plans. We set-up a Beowulf Cluster, configured with 4 nodes connected with low-cost network and installed MC code Geant4 to describe our irradiation facility. The MC, once parallelised, was run on the Beowulf Cluster. The first run of the full simulation showed that the time required for calculation decreased linearly increasing the number of distributed processes. The good scalability trend allows both statistically significant accuracy and good time performances. The scalability of the Beowulf Cluster system offers a new instrument for dose calculation that could be applied in clinical practice. These would be a good support particularly in high challenging prescription that needs good calculation accuracy in zones of high dose gradient and great dishomogeneities.

  11. Temporal Lobe Reactions After Carbon Ion Radiation Therapy: Comparison of Relative Biological Effectiveness–Weighted Tolerance Doses Predicted by Local Effect Models I and IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillmann, Clarissa, E-mail: clarissa.gillmann@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Jäkel, Oliver [Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Schlampp, Ingmar [Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Therapy, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Karger, Christian P. [Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To compare the relative biological effectiveness (RBE)–weighted tolerance doses for temporal lobe reactions after carbon ion radiation therapy using 2 different versions of the local effect model (LEM I vs LEM IV) for the same patient collective under identical conditions. Methods and Materials: In a previous study, 59 patients were investigated, of whom 10 experienced temporal lobe reactions (TLR) after carbon ion radiation therapy for low-grade skull-base chordoma and chondrosarcoma at Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany in 2002 and 2003. TLR were detected as visible contrast enhancements on T1-weighted MRI images within a median follow-up time of 2.5 years. Although the derived RBE-weighted temporal lobe doses were based on the clinically applied LEM I, we have now recalculated the RBE-weighted dose distributions using LEM IV and derived dose-response curves with Dmax,V-1 cm³ (the RBE-weighted maximum dose in the remaining temporal lobe volume, excluding the volume of 1 cm³ with the highest dose) as an independent dosimetric variable. The resulting RBE-weighted tolerance doses were compared with those of the previous study to assess the clinical impact of LEM IV relative to LEM I. Results: The dose-response curve of LEM IV is shifted toward higher values compared to that of LEM I. The RBE-weighted tolerance dose for a 5% complication probability (TD{sub 5}) increases from 68.8 ± 3.3 to 78.3 ± 4.3 Gy (RBE) for LEM IV as compared to LEM I. Conclusions: LEM IV predicts a clinically significant increase of the RBE-weighted tolerance doses for the temporal lobe as compared to the currently applied LEM I. The limited available photon data do not allow a final conclusion as to whether RBE predictions of LEM I or LEM IV better fit better clinical experience in photon therapy. The decision about a future clinical application of LEM IV therefore requires additional analysis of temporal lobe reactions in a

  12. GPU-based Low-dose 4DCT Reconstruction via Temporal Non-local Means

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Zhen; Jiang, Steve B

    2010-01-01

    Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) has been widely used in cancer radiotherapy for accurate target delineation and motion measurement for tumors in thorax and upper abdomen areas. However, 4DCT simulation is associated with much higher imaging dose than conventional CT simulation, which is a major concern in its clinical application. Conventionally, each phase of 4DCT is reconstructed independently using the filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm. The basic idea of our new algorithm is that, by utilizing the common information among different phases, the input information required to reconstruct image of high quality, and thus the imaging dose, can be reduced. We proposed a temporal non-local means (TNLM) method to explore the inter-phase similarity. All phases of the 4DCT images are reconstructed simultaneously by minimizing a cost function consisting of a data fidelity term and a TNLM regularization term. We utilized a forward-backward splitting algorithm and a Gauss-Jacobi iteration method to eff...

  13. Dose/volume-response relations for rectal morbidity using planned and simulated motion-inclusive dose distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thor, Maria; Apte, Aditya; Deasy, Joseph O; Karlsdóttir, Àsa; Moiseenko, Vitali; Liu, Mitchell; Muren, Ludvig Paul

    2013-12-01

    Many dose-limiting normal tissues in radiotherapy (RT) display considerable internal motion between fractions over a course of treatment, potentially reducing the appropriateness of using planned dose distributions to predict morbidity. Accounting explicitly for rectal motion could improve the predictive power of modelling rectal morbidity. To test this, we simulated the effect of motion in two cohorts. The included patients (232 and 159 cases) received RT for prostate cancer to 70 and 74 Gy. Motion-inclusive dose distributions were introduced as simulations of random or systematic motion to the planned dose distributions. Six rectal morbidity endpoints were analysed. A probit model using the QUANTEC recommended parameters was also applied to the cohorts. The differences in associations using the planned over the motion-inclusive dose distributions were modest. Statistically significant associations were obtained with four of the endpoints, mainly at high doses (55-70 Gy), using both the planned and the motion-inclusive dose distributions, primarily when simulating random motion. The strongest associations were observed for GI toxicity and rectal bleeding (Rs=0.12-0.21; Rs=0.11-0.20). Applying the probit model, significant associations were found for tenesmus and rectal bleeding (Rs=0.13, p=0.02). Equally strong associations with rectal morbidity were observed at high doses (>55 Gy), for the planned and the simulated dose distributions including in particular random rectal motion. Future studies should explore patient-specific descriptions of rectal motion to achieve improved predictive power. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  14. Spatio-temporal pattern of rainfall distribution over Ilorin metropolis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rainfall varies over time and space and the study of its variability cannot be over emphasized. This paper examines spatio-temporal patterns of rainfall in Ilorin metropolis, Nigeria. 30 years data were collected in 3 locations [Nigeria Meteorological Agency (NIMET), Lower Niger River Basin Development Authority (LNRBDA) ...

  15. Spatial and temporal distribution of ionospheric currents-4: altitude ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The rare opportunity given by the unprecedented spatial and temporal coverage of POGO satellites data is exploited to present all possible cross sections of equatorial electrojet (EEJ) current in the group of papers. Here the all-longitude means at 7 hours centred on local noon and the daytime means at 36 longitudes, of the ...

  16. Spatial and temporal distribution of methane in an extensive shallow ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Methane emission; spatial and temporal variation; macro-algal zone; estuaries; Pulicat lake. Abstract. Sedimentary methane (CH4) fluxes and oxidation rates were determined over the wet and dry seasons (four measurement campaigns)in Pulicat lake,an extensive shallow estuary in south India. Dissolved CH4 ...

  17. Spatio-temporal stability of pre-treatment 18F-Fludeoxyglucose uptake in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas sufficient for dose painting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jacob H; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Aznar, Marianne C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pre-treatment 18F-Fludeoxyglucose (FDG) avid subvolume of the tumor has shown promise as a potential target for dose painting in patients with in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). PURPOSE: The purposes of this study are: 1) to assess the pre-treatment spatio-temporal......BACKGROUND: The pre-treatment 18F-Fludeoxyglucose (FDG) avid subvolume of the tumor has shown promise as a potential target for dose painting in patients with in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). PURPOSE: The purposes of this study are: 1) to assess the pre-treatment spatio......-temporal variability of FDG PET/CT target volumes and 2) to assess the impact of this variability on dose distribution in dose painting plans in patients with HNSCC. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty patients were enrolled and scanned twice, three days apart, days prior to treatment. Delineation of the FDG avid subvolume...... of the tumor and lymph nodes on both scans was performed by a specialist in nuclear medicine yielding GTVPET1 and GTVPET2 and segmentation based on SUV iso-contours were constructed yielding two metabolic target volumes, MTV1 and MTV2. Images were co-registered rigidly and dose painting plans with dose...

  18. Spatial distribution and temporal trends of rainfall erosivity in mainland China for 1951-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei Qin; Qiankun Guo; Changqing Zuo; Zhijie Shan; Liang Ma; Ge Sun

    2016-01-01

    Rainfall erosivity is an important factor for estimating soil erosion rates. Understanding the spatial distributionand temporal trends of rainfall erosivity is especially critical for soil erosion risk assessment and soil conservationplanning in mainland China. However, reports on the spatial distribution and temporal trends of rainfall...

  19. SU-E-T-165: Characterization of Dose Distributions in High-Dose-Rate Surface Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzurovic, I; Hansen, J; Bhagwat, M; O’Farrell, D; Damato, A; Friesen, S; Devlin, P; Cormack, R [Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize dose distributions in high-dose-rate(HDR) surface brachytherapy using an Ir-125 source for different geometries, field sizes and topology of the clinical targets(CT). To investigate the depth doses at the central axis(CAX), edges of the treatment fields(E), and lateral dose distributions(L) present when using flap applicators in skin cancer treatments. Methods: When malignancies diagnosed on the skin are treated, various geometries of the CT require proper adaptation of the flap or custom-made applicators to the treatment site. Consequently, the dose at the depth on CAX and field edges changes with variation of the curvatures and size of the applicators. To assess the dose distributions, we created a total of 10 treatment plans(TP) for 10×10 and 20×20 field sizes(FS) with a step size of 1cm. The geometry of the applicators was: planar(PA), curved to 30(CA30) and 60(CA60) degrees with respect to the CAX, half-cylinder(HC), and cylindrical shape(CS). One additional TP was created in which the applicators were positioned to form a dome shape(DS) with a diameter of 16cm. This TP was used to emulate treatment of the average sized scalp. All TPs were optimized to deliver a prescription dose at 8mm equidistantly from the planes containing the dwell positions. This optimization is equivalent to the clinical arrangement since the SSD for the flap applicators is 5mm and the prescription depth is 3mm in the majority of clinical cases. Results: The depths (in mm) of the isodose lines were: FS(10×10):PA[90%(9.1CAX,8.0E,7.6L),50%(28.3CAX,20E,17.3L), 25%(51.1CAX,40E,27L)],CA30[90%(10.3CAX,8.2E,7.9L),50%(32.1CAX, 16.2E,15.8L),25%(61.3CAX,36.7E,31.8L)],CA60[90%(12.2CAX,6.1E,6.3L ),50%(47CAX,14E,16.6L),25%(70.8CAX,31.9E,35.4L)],HC[90%(11.1CA X,6.3E,7.3L),50%(38.3CAX,14.6E,16.1L),25%(66.2CAX,33.8E,34.2L)];FS (20×20):PA[90%(11.1CAX,9.0E,7.0L),50%(34.4CAX,21.9E,15.3L),25%(7 0.4CAX,50.9E,34.8L)],CA30[90%(10.9CAX,7.5E,7.1L),50%(38.8CAX,16. 7E,15.4L),25

  20. Analysis of dose distribution of Leipzig conical applicator; Analise da distribuicao de dose do aplicador conico tipo Leipzig

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takizawa, Ricardo H.; Flosi, Adriana A. [A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    The dose distribution of Leipzig conical metallic applicators compared to the dose distribution calculated through a planning system with calculation algorithm based on TG43 was analyzed, since this algorithm does not take into account the heterogeneities present. The dose distribution of the subject applicator associated with a GammaMed Plus iX®, used in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with Iridium 192 source was observed. The batch calibration of EBT2 films with a 6MV beam of a Clinac 600C® linear accelerator was performed for the dose range of 0.1Gy to 8.0Gy. The experiment was performed with each applicator of the available set, with different diameters, being used as a function of the size of the lesion to be treated, positioned on a solid water phantom with 10cm depth, offering scattering conditions.It was prescribed 4.0Gy at 3mm depth. The surface dose was observed at 3, 5 and 7mm depth, using solid water plates between the applicator and the film. Using an Epson scanner, images were obtained, which can be analyzed by Image J software, allowing the calibration of the batch of films and analysis of the dose distribution of the applicator. Afterwards, the simulation of the cited experiment was carried out in a commercial planning system. Dose superficiality was observed, being larger in experiment (27.8%), and absolute dose deviation in depth with that observed in the planning system, being smaller in experiment (7.5%)

  1. Classical Light Sources with Tunable Temporal Coherence and Tailored Photon Number Distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, Deepak; Satapathy, Nandan; Suryabrahmam, Buti; Ivan, J. Solomon; Ramachandran, Hema

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the generation of classical incoherent light with electronic control over its temporal characteristics and photon number distribution. The tunability of the temporal coherence is shown, under both classical and quantum detection, through second order correlation ($G^2(\\tau)$) measurements. The tailoring of desired classical photon number distributions is illustrated by creating two representative light sources - one thermal and the other a specific classical, non-Gaussian state...

  2. Changes in photon dose distributions due to breast prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, E.E. (Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)); Kuske, R.R. (Ochsner Clinic, New Orleans, LA (United States))

    1993-02-15

    Subcutaneous prosthetic implants have been routinely used for cosmetic augmentation and for tissue replacement following mastectomy over the last 15 years. The implants come in many forms as the gel filler material and surrounding shell material(s) vary significantly. This study uses a thin window parallel-plate chamber and thermoluminescent dosimeters to quantify any dosimetric changes to surrounding breast tissue due to the presence of the prosthesis. A mammographic phantom was compared to four commercial prostheses, namely two silicon gel fillers within two different shells (silicon or silicon/polyurethane), a tri-glyceride within silicon and a bio-oncotic gel within silicon and a bio-oncotic gel within silicon/polyurethane. The latter two implants were designed with a low-Z fill for diagnostic imaging benefits. Ion chamber results indicate no significant alteration of depth doses away from the implant with only minor canceling (parallel opposed) interface perturbations for all implants. In addition the physical changes to the irradiated prostheses were quantified by tonometry testing and qualified by color change. Each implant exhibited color change following 50 Gy, and the bio-oncotic gel became significantly less formable following irradiation, and even less formable 6 weeks postirradiation. The data indicates that prostheses do not affect the photon beam distribution, but radiation does affect the prosthesis. 9 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Forage potential, micro-spatial and temporal distribution of ground ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the critical roles played by arthropods in ecosystem functioning and nutrient cycling, a general lack of information about the ecology of many arthropods in West African coastal wetlands persists. An investigation into the abundance, distribution and forage potential of ground arthropods to waterbirds inaWest African ...

  4. Evaluation of heterogeneity dose distributions for Stereotactic Radiotherapy (SRT: comparison of commercially available Monte Carlo dose calculation with other algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi Wataru

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to compare dose distributions from three different algorithms with the x-ray Voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC calculations, in actual computed tomography (CT scans for use in stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT of small lung cancers. Methods Slow CT scan of 20 patients was performed and the internal target volume (ITV was delineated on Pinnacle3. All plans were first calculated with a scatter homogeneous mode (SHM which is compatible with Clarkson algorithm using Pinnacle3 treatment planning system (TPS. The planned dose was 48 Gy in 4 fractions. In a second step, the CT images, structures and beam data were exported to other treatment planning systems (TPSs. Collapsed cone convolution (CCC from Pinnacle3, superposition (SP from XiO, and XVMC from Monaco were used for recalculating. The dose distributions and the Dose Volume Histograms (DVHs were compared with each other. Results The phantom test revealed that all algorithms could reproduce the measured data within 1% except for the SHM with inhomogeneous phantom. For the patient study, the SHM greatly overestimated the isocenter (IC doses and the minimal dose received by 95% of the PTV (PTV95 compared to XVMC. The differences in mean doses were 2.96 Gy (6.17% for IC and 5.02 Gy (11.18% for PTV95. The DVH's and dose distributions with CCC and SP were in agreement with those obtained by XVMC. The average differences in IC doses between CCC and XVMC, and SP and XVMC were -1.14% (p = 0.17, and -2.67% (p = 0.0036, respectively. Conclusions Our work clearly confirms that the actual practice of relying solely on a Clarkson algorithm may be inappropriate for SRT planning. Meanwhile, CCC and SP were close to XVMC simulations and actual dose distributions obtained in lung SRT.

  5. Proton dose distribution measurements using a MOSFET detector with a simple dose-weighted correction method for LET effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Ryosuke; Hotta, Kenji; Matsuura, Taeko; Matsubara, Kana; Nishioka, Shie; Nishio, Teiji; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Ogino, Takashi

    2011-04-04

    We experimentally evaluated the proton beam dose reproducibility, sensitivity, angular dependence and depth-dose relationships for a new Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) detector. The detector was fabricated with a thinner oxide layer and was operated at high-bias voltages. In order to accurately measure dose distributions, we developed a practical method for correcting the MOSFET response to proton beams. The detector was tested by examining lateral dose profiles formed by protons passing through an L-shaped bolus. The dose reproducibility, angular dependence and depth-dose response were evaluated using a 190 MeV proton beam. Depth-output curves produced using the MOSFET detectors were compared with results obtained using an ionization chamber (IC). Since accurate measurements of proton dose distribution require correction for LET effects, we developed a simple dose-weighted correction method. The correction factors were determined as a function of proton penetration depth, or residual range. The residual proton range at each measurement point was calculated using the pencil beam algorithm. Lateral measurements in a phantom were obtained for pristine and SOBP beams. The reproducibility of the MOSFET detector was within 2%, and the angular dependence was less than 9%. The detector exhibited a good response at the Bragg peak (0.74 relative to the IC detector). For dose distributions resulting from protons passing through an L-shaped bolus, the corrected MOSFET dose agreed well with the IC results. Absolute proton dosimetry can be performed using MOSFET detectors to a precision of about 3% (1 sigma). A thinner oxide layer thickness improved the LET in proton dosimetry. By employing correction methods for LET dependence, it is possible to measure absolute proton dose using MOSFET detectors.

  6. Dose Distribution According to the Tissue Composition Using Wedge Filter by Radiochromic Film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yon Lae [Dept. of Radiologic Technology, Choonhae College of Health Sciences, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Woo; Park, Byung Moon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Konku University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jae Yong; Park, Ji Yeon; Suh, Tae Suk [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Catholic University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the dose distribution when wedge filter is used in the various tissue electron density materials. The dose distribution was assessed that the enhanced dynamic wedge filter and physical wedge filter were used in the solid water phantom, cork phantom, and air cavity. The film dosimetry was suitable simple to measure 2D dose distribution. Therefore, the radiochromic films (Gafchromic EBT2, ISP, NJ, USA) were selected to measure and to analyze the dose distributions. A linear accelerator using 6 MV photon were irradiated to field size of 10 x10 cm{sup 2} with 400 MUs. The dose distributions of EBT2 films were analyzed the in-field area and penumbra regions by using dose analysis program. In the dose distributions of wedge field, the dose from a physical wedge was higher than that from a dynamic wedge at the same electron density materials. A dose distributions of wedge type in the solid water phantom and the cork phantom were in agreements with 2%. However, the dose distribution in air cavity showed the large difference with those in the solid water phantom or cork phantom dose distributions. Dose distribution of wedge field in air cavity was not shown the wedge effect. The penumbra width, out of the field of thick and thin, was observed larger from 1 cm to 2 cm at the thick end. The penumbra of physical wedge filter was much larger average 6% than the dynamic wedge filter. If the physical wedge filter is used, the dose was increased to effect the scatter that interacted with photon and physical wedge. In the case of difference in electron like the soft tissue, lung, and air, the transmission, absorption, and scattering were changed in the medium at high energy photon. Therefore, the treatment at the difference electron density should be inhomogeneity correction in treatment planning system.

  7. The temporal-spatial distribution of seriously maltreated children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, Holly; Freisthler, Bridget; Bell, Janice; Tancredi, Daniel; Romano, Patrick S; Miyamoto, Sheridan; Joseph, Jill G

    2017-02-01

    This descriptive study utilized Bernoulli and Poisson spatial scan statistical models in SatScan v.9.4 to examine the distribution in space and time of residence of maltreatment cases-operationalized as families with serious maltreatment (resulting in death or hospitalization) of children under 6 years-for the presence of clusters ("hot spots"). In the Poisson model, a population dataset of serious maltreatment cases were non-randomly dispersed in four major areas, with these "hot spots" moving over time and space. Most cases were outside these clusters. In the Bernoulli model, the geographic distribution of a case-control dataset of families with serious maltreatment who were previously investigated by child welfare did not differ compared to controls previously investigated by child welfare with no serious maltreatment. Findings suggest that child fatality prevention efforts such as Back to Sleep and Never Shake a Baby campaigns should continue to be universal efforts, targeted to all parents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Donders revisited: Discrete or continuous temporal processing underlying reaction time distributions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yan; Yang, Taoxi; Lin, Xiaoxiong; Pöppel, Ernst

    2016-09-01

    Differences of reaction times to specific stimulus configurations are used as indicators of cognitive processing stages. In this classical experimental paradigm, continuous temporal processing is implicitly assumed. Multimodal response distributions indicate, however, discrete time sampling, which is often masked by experimental conditions. Differences in reaction times reflect discrete temporal mechanisms that are pre-semantically implemented and suggested to be based on entrained neural oscillations. © 2016 The Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Nonfeedback Distributed Beamforming Using Spatial-Temporal Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pongnarin Sriploy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available So far, major phase synchronization techniques for distributed beamforming suffer from the problem related to the feedback procedure as a base station has to send the feedback reference signal back to the transmitting nodes. This requires stability of communication channel or a number of retransmissions, introducing a complicated system to both transmitter and receiver. Therefore, this paper proposes an alternative technique, so-called nonfeedback beamforming, employing an operation in both space and time domains. The proposed technique is to extract a combined signal at the base station. The concept of extraction is based on solving a simultaneous linear equation without the requirement of feedback or reference signals from base station. Also, the number of retransmissions is less compared with the ones available in literatures. As a result, the transmitting nodes are of low complexity and also low power consumption. The simulation and experimental results reveal that the proposed technique provides the optimum beamforming gain. Furthermore, it can reduce Bit Error Rate to the systems.

  10. The Impact of Spatial and Temporal Resolutions in Tropical Summer Rainfall Distribution: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q.; Chiu, L. S.; Hao, X.

    2017-10-01

    The abundance or lack of rainfall affects peoples' life and activities. As a major component of the global hydrological cycle (Chokngamwong & Chiu, 2007), accurate representations at various spatial and temporal scales are crucial for a lot of decision making processes. Climate models show a warmer and wetter climate due to increases of Greenhouse Gases (GHG). However, the models' resolutions are often too coarse to be directly applicable to local scales that are useful for mitigation purposes. Hence disaggregation (downscaling) procedures are needed to transfer the coarse scale products to higher spatial and temporal resolutions. The aim of this paper is to examine the changes in the statistical parameters of rainfall at various spatial and temporal resolutions. The TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) at 0.25 degree, 3 hourly grid rainfall data for a summer is aggregated to 0.5,1.0, 2.0 and 2.5 degree and at 6, 12, 24 hourly, pentad (five days) and monthly resolutions. The probability distributions (PDF) and cumulative distribution functions(CDF) of rain amount at these resolutions are computed and modeled as a mixed distribution. Parameters of the PDFs are compared using the Kolmogrov-Smironov (KS) test, both for the mixed and the marginal distribution. These distributions are shown to be distinct. The marginal distributions are fitted with Lognormal and Gamma distributions and it is found that the Gamma distributions fit much better than the Lognormal.

  11. Spatial and temporal distribution of fungicides applied to creeping bentgrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockemeyer, Kurt R; Latin, Richard

    2015-05-01

    Turf managers often rely on fungicides to limit damage caused by root diseases. Because fungicides are applied to aboveground surfaces and do not move basipetally, they are effective against root pathogens only when fungitoxic concentrations migrate to the rhizosphere. This research focused on the distribution of modern fungicides in verdure, thatch, sand, and roots of creeping bentgrass [ L. var. (Huds.) Farw.] maintained as a putting green. The fungicides azoxystrobin (methyl (E)-2-[2-[6-(2-cyanophenoxy)pyrimidin-4-yloxy]phenyl]-3-methoxyacrylate), propiconazole (1,2,4-triazole, 1-((2-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-propyl-1,3-dioxolan-2-yl)methyl), pyraclostrobin (carbamic acid, [2-[[[1-(4-chlorophenyl)-1H-pyrazol-3-yl]oxy]methyl]phenyl]methoxy-,methyl ester), and thiophanate-methyl (dimethyl 4,'4-o-phenylenebis[3-thioallophanate]) were applied to replicate field plots in a water volume of 815 L ha. Plots were sampled at 0, 3, 7, 10, 14, 17, and 21 d after application by extracting cores measuring 1.9 cm in diameter by 3.8 cm deep. Cores were separated into verdure/thatch, sand, and roots before quantitative determination (liquid chromatography, triple quadrupole mass spectrometry) of fungicide residues. Fungicide residues in verdure/thatch declined steadily with time and support previously reported results describing fungicide depletion. Fungicides were detected in roots and sand within 5 h of application at very low (1-15 mg kg) concentrations and remained at low levels throughout the sampling period. Fungicides differed with respect to amounts recovered per turfgrass component. Azoxystrobin and propiconazole were associated with roots for the duration of the experiment, but pyraclostrobin was nearly undetectable. Near-zero levels of all fungicides were detected in the sand component. Half-life values in the verdure/thatch component ranged from 2.3 to 18.9 d. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of

  12. Temporal evolution of DNAPL source and contaminant flux distribution: impacts of source mass depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Nandita B; Rao, P S C; Falta, Ronald W; Annable, Michael D; Jawitz, James W; Hatfield, K

    2008-01-28

    We investigated, using model simulations, the changes occurring in the distribution of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) mass (Sn) within the source zone during depletion through dissolution, and the resulting changes in the contaminant flux distribution (J) at the source control plane (CP). Two numerical codes (ISCO3D and T2VOC) were used to simulate selected scenarios of DNAPL dissolution and transport in three-dimensional, heterogeneous, spatially correlated, random permeability fields with emplaced sources. Data from the model simulations were interpreted based on population statistics (mean, standard deviation, coefficient of variation) and spatial statistics (centroid, second moments, variograms). The mean and standard deviation of the Sn and J distributions decreased with source mass depletion by dissolution. The decrease in mean and standard deviation was proportional for the J distribution resulting in a constant coefficient of variation (CV), while for the Sn distribution, the mean decreased faster than the standard deviation. The spatial distributions exhibited similar behavior as the population distribution, i.e., the CP flux distribution was more stable (defined by temporally constant second moments and range of variograms) than the Sn distribution. These observations appeared to be independent of the heterogeneity of the permeability (k) field (variance of the log permeability field=1 and 2.45), correlation structure (positive vs. negative correlation between the k and Sn domains) and the DNAPL dissolution model (equilibrium vs. rate-limited), for the cases studied. Analysis of data from a flux monitoring field study (Hill Air Force Base, Utah) at a DNAPL source CP before and after source remediation also revealed temporal invariance of the contaminant flux distribution. These modeling and field observations suggest that the temporal evolution of the contaminant flux distribution can be estimated if the initial distribution is known. However, the

  13. Spatial and temporal distribution of trunk-injected imidacloprid in apple tree canopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aćimović, Srđan G; VanWoerkom, Anthony H; Reeb, Pablo D; Vandervoort, Christine; Garavaglia, Thomas; Cregg, Bert M; Wise, John C

    2014-11-01

    Pesticide use in orchards creates drift-driven pesticide losses which contaminate the environment. Trunk injection of pesticides as a target-precise delivery system could greatly reduce pesticide losses. However, pesticide efficiency after trunk injection is associated with the underinvestigated spatial and temporal distribution of the pesticide within the tree crown. This study quantified the spatial and temporal distribution of trunk-injected imidacloprid within apple crowns after trunk injection using one, two, four or eight injection ports per tree. The spatial uniformity of imidacloprid distribution in apple crowns significantly increased with more injection ports. Four ports allowed uniform spatial distribution of imidacloprid in the crown. Uniform and non-uniform spatial distributions were established early and lasted throughout the experiment. The temporal distribution of imidacloprid was significantly non-uniform. Upper and lower crown positions did not significantly differ in compound concentration. Crown concentration patterns indicated that imidacloprid transport in the trunk occurred through radial diffusion and vertical uptake with a spiral pattern. By showing where and when a trunk-injected compound is distributed in the apple tree canopy, this study addresses a key knowledge gap in terms of explaining the efficiency of the compound in the crown. These findings allow the improvement of target-precise pesticide delivery for more sustainable tree-based agriculture. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Tomotherapy dose distribution verification using MAGIC-f polymer gel dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavoni, J. F.; Pike, T. L.; Snow, J.; DeWerd, L.; Baffa, O. [Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto-Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes, 3900 - CEP 14040-901 - Bairro Monte Alegre - Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Medical Radiation Research Center, Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1111 Highland Avenue, B1002 WIMR, Madison, Wisconsin 53705-2275 (United States); Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto-Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes, 3900 - CEP 14040-901 - Bairro Monte Alegre - Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: This paper presents the application of MAGIC-f gel in a three-dimensional dose distribution measurement and its ability to accurately measure the dose distribution from a tomotherapy unit. Methods: A prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) irradiation was simulated in the gel phantom and the treatment was delivered by a TomoTherapy equipment. Dose distribution was evaluated by the R2 distribution measured in magnetic resonance imaging. Results: A high similarity was found by overlapping of isodoses of the dose distribution measured with the gel and expected by the treatment planning system (TPS). Another analysis was done by comparing the relative absorbed dose profiles in the measured and in the expected dose distributions extracted along indicated lines of the volume and the results were also in agreement. The gamma index analysis was also applied to the data and a high pass rate was achieved (88.4% for analysis using 3%/3 mm and of 96.5% using 4%/4 mm). The real three-dimensional analysis compared the dose-volume histograms measured for the planning volumes and expected by the treatment planning, being the results also in good agreement by the overlapping of the curves. Conclusions: These results show that MAGIC-f gel is a promise for tridimensional dose distribution measurements.

  15. Spatial distributions of dose enhancement around a gold nanoparticle at several depths of proton Bragg peak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Jihun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University (Japan); Sutherland, Kenneth [Department of Medical Physics, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University (Japan); Hashimoto, Takayuki [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Shirato, Hiroki [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine and Global Station for Quantum Medical Science and Engineering, Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education (GI-CoRE), Hokkaido University (Japan); Date, Hiroyuki, E-mail: date@hs.hokudai.ac.jp [Faculty of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University (Japan)

    2016-10-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have been recognized as a promising candidate for a radiation sensitizer. A proton beam incident on a GNP can produce secondary electrons, resulting in an enhancement of the dose around the GNP. However, little is known about the spatial distribution of dose enhancement around the GNP, especially in the direction along the incident proton. The purpose of this study is to determine the spatial distribution of dose enhancement by taking the incident direction into account. Two steps of calculation were conducted using the Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit. First, the energy spectra of 100 and 195 MeV protons colliding with a GNP were calculated at the Bragg peak and three other depths around the peak in liquid water. Second, the GNP was bombarded by protons with the obtained energy spectra. Radial dose distributions were computed along the incident beam direction. The spatial distributions of the dose enhancement factor (DEF) and subtracted dose (D{sub sub}) were then evaluated. The spatial DEF distributions showed hot spots in the distal radial region from the proton beam axis. The spatial D{sub sub} distribution isotropically spread out around the GNP. Low energy protons caused higher and wider dose enhancement. The macroscopic dose enhancement in clinical applications was also evaluated. The results suggest that the consideration of the spatial distribution of GNPs in treatment planning will maximize the potential of GNPs.

  16. Calculation of dose distribution on Rhizophora spp soy protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some of the commercial solid phantoms were unable to provide a good simulation to water at low and high energy ranges. A potential phantom from Malaysian mangrove wood family, Rhizophoraspp was fabricated with addition of Soy Protein. An Electron Gamma Sho (EGSnrc) code was used to evaluate the dose ...

  17. Evaluation of dose equivalent rate distribution in JCO critical accident by radiation transport calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, Y

    2002-01-01

    In the prevention of nuclear disaster, there needs the information on the dose equivalent rate distribution inside and outside the site, and energy spectra. The three dimensional radiation transport calculation code is a useful tool for the site specific detailed analysis with the consideration of facility structures. It is important in the prediction of individual doses in the future countermeasure that the reliability of the evaluation methods of dose equivalent rate distribution and energy spectra by using of Monte Carlo radiation transport calculation code, and the factors which influence the dose equivalent rate distribution outside the site are confirmed. The reliability of radiation transport calculation code and the influence factors of dose equivalent rate distribution were examined through the analyses of critical accident at JCO's uranium processing plant occurred on September 30, 1999. The radiation transport calculations including the burn-up calculations were done by using of the structural info...

  18. Electron Beam Dose Distribution in the Presence of Non-Uniform Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Javad Tahmasebi-Birgani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Magnetic fields are capable of altering the trajectory of electron beams andcan be used in radiation therapy.Theaim of this study was to produce regions with dose enhancement and reduction in the medium. Materials and Methods The NdFeB permanent magnets were arranged on the electron applicator in several configurations. Then, after the passage of the electron beams (9 and 15 MeV Varian 2100C/D through the non-uniform magnetic field, the Percentage Depth Dose(PDDs on central axis and dose profiles in three depths for each energy were measured in a 3D water phantom. Results For all magnet arrangements and for two different energies, the surface dose increment and shift in depth of maximum dose (dmax were observed. In addition, the pattern of dose distribution in buildup region was changed. Measurement of dose profile showed dose localization and spreading in some other regions. Conclusion The results of this study confirms that using magnetic field can alter the dose deposition patterns and as a result can produce dose enhancement as well as dose reduction in the medium using high-energy electron beams. These effects provide dose distribution with arbitrary shapes for use in radiation therapy.

  19. Longitudinal dose distribution and energy absorption in PMMA and water cylinders undergoing CT scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob

    2014-10-01

    The knowledge of longitudinal dose distribution provides the most direct view of the accumulated dose in computed tomography (CT) scanning. The purpose of this work was to perform a comprehensive study of dose distribution width and energy absorption with a wide range of subject sizes and beam irradiated lengths. Cumulative dose distribution along the z-axis was calculated based on the previously published CT dose equilibration data by Li, Zhang, and Liu [Med. Phys. 40, 031903 (10pp.) (2013)] and a mechanism for computing dose on axial lines by Li, Zhang, and Liu [Med. Phys. 39, 5347-5352 (2012)]. Full width at half maximum (FWHM), full width at tenth maximum (FWTM), the total energy (E) absorbed in a small cylinder of unit mass per centimeter square about the central or peripheral axis, and the energy (Ein) absorbed inside irradiated length (L) were subsequently extracted from the dose distribution. Extensive results of FWHM, FWTM, and Ein/E were presented on the central and peripheral axes of infinitely long PMMA (diameters 6-50 cm) and water (diameters 6-55 cm) cylinders with L explanation of dose distribution width results was presented. This study enables the reader to gain a comprehensive view of dose distribution width and energy absorption and provides useful data for estimating doses to organs inside or beyond the irradiated region. The dose length product (DLP) presented by CT scanners is equal to neither E nor Ein. Both E and Ein can be evaluated using the equations and results presented in this paper and are robust with both constant and variable tube current scanning techniques.

  20. Assessmet of temporal distribution of pesticide residues in vineyard soils of La Rioja (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pose Juan, Eva; Herrero Hernandez, Eliseo; Soledad Andrades, Maria; Rodriguez Cruz, Maria Sonia; Sanchez Martin, Maria Jesus

    2013-04-01

    The use and application of pesticides in vineyard is a common practice, which is important to prevent pest and diseases and improve the crop health and production, but on the other hand it could involve a potential risk for humans and the environment. For this reason, it is important to develop and validate a simple and fast multiresidue method to determine the presence of these compounds in soils. La Rioja region (Spain) is one of the most important wine-growing regions in Spain, which also entails that could be an important area of pesticide pollution. The objective of this work is to assess the temporal distribution of the possible pesticide pollution in soils from different areas of La Rioja (Spain). The pesticides selected in this study included fungicides (metalaxyl, and its metabolite CGA62826, pyrimethanil, tebuconazole, myclobutanil, kresoxim-methyl, triadimenol and flutriafol); herbicides (fluometuron, terbuthylazine and its metabolites desethylterbuthylazine and hydroxyterbuthylazine, lenacil, ethofumesate and acetochlor) and insecticides (methoxyfenozide and pirimicarb). The pesticide residues were evaluated by two analytical techniques, gas chromatography and liquid chromatography (GC-MS and LC-MS). The extraction procedure of pesticides from soils was optimized using two soil samples (blank soils) with different texture and characteristics collected from areas without pesticide application. Recoveries were studied in soil samples fortified with all pesticides at two levels of concentrations (the agronomic dose, 0.1 mg kg-1, and ten times this dose, 1 mg kg-1). Different extraction solvents were tested. The best results were obtained with methanol:acetone (50:50) mixture or methanol:CaCl2 0.01 M (50:50) mixture for hydroxyterbuthylazine and CGA62826. The accuracy (average recovery) and precision (reproducibility and repeatability) of the method were assessed using six replicates and the limits of detection (LODs) and quantification (LOQs) were

  1. Seasonal influenza vaccine dose distribution in 157 countries (2004-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palache, Abraham; Oriol-Mathieu, Valerie; Abelin, Atika; Music, Tamara

    2014-11-12

    Globally there are an estimated 3-5 million cases of severe influenza illness every year, resulting in 250,000-500,000 deaths. At the World Health Assembly in 2003, World Health Organization (WHO) resolved to increase influenza vaccine coverage rates (VCR) for high-risk groups, particularly focusing on at least 75% of the elderly by 2010. But systematic worldwide data have not been available to assist public health authorities to monitor vaccine uptake and review progress toward vaccination coverage targets. In 2008, the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Associations Influenza Vaccine Supply task force (IFPMA IVS) developed a survey methodology to assess global influenza vaccine dose distribution. The current survey results represent 2011 data and demonstrate the evolution of the absolute number distributed between 2004 and 2011 inclusive, and the evolution in the per capita doses distributed in 2008-2011. Global distribution of IFPMA IVS member doses increased approximately 86.9% between 2004 and 2011, but only approximately 12.1% between 2008 and 2011. The WHO's regions in Eastern Mediterranean (EMRO), Southeast Asian (SEARO) and Africa (AFRO) together account for about 47% of the global population, but only 3.7% of all IFPMA IVS doses distributed. While distributed doses have globally increased, they have decreased in EURO and EMRO since 2009. Dose distribution can provide a reasonable proxy of vaccine utilization. Based on the dose distribution, we conclude that seasonal influenza VCR in many countries remains well below the WHA's VCR targets and below the recommendations of the Council of the European Union in EURO. Inter- and intra-regional disparities in dose distribution trends call into question the impact of current vaccine recommendations at achieving coverage targets. Additional policy measures, particularly those that influence patients adherence to vaccination programs, such as reimbursement, healthcare provider knowledge

  2. The temporal distribution of directional gradients under selection for an optimum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevin, Luis-Miguel; Haller, Benjamin C

    2014-12-01

    Temporal variation in phenotypic selection is often attributed to environmental change causing movements of the adaptive surface relating traits to fitness, but this connection is rarely established empirically. Fluctuating phenotypic selection can be measured by the variance and autocorrelation of directional selection gradients through time. However, the dynamics of these gradients depend not only on environmental changes altering the fitness surface, but also on evolution of the phenotypic distribution. Therefore, it is unclear to what extent variability in selection gradients can inform us about the underlying drivers of their fluctuations. To investigate this question, we derive the temporal distribution of directional gradients under selection for a phenotypic optimum that is either constant or fluctuates randomly in various ways in a finite population. Our analytical results, combined with population- and individual-based simulations, show that although some characteristic patterns can be distinguished, very different types of change in the optimum (including a constant optimum) can generate similar temporal distributions of selection gradients, making it difficult to infer the processes underlying apparent fluctuating selection. Analyzing changes in phenotype distributions together with changes in selection gradients should prove more useful for inferring the mechanisms underlying estimated fluctuating selection. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  3. Depth-Dose and LET Distributions of Antiproton Beams in Various Target Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Rochus; Olsen, Sune; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.

    therapy is unlikely to yield any clinical enhancement  since unrealistic high concentrations are required in order to observe a beneficial effect. Substituting a water target with the aforementioned ICRP tissues has only minor effect on the depth-dose distribution and the LET-distribution. However......-dose distributions and an increased biological effect in the target region from the production of secondary nuclear fragments with increased LET. Earlier it has been speculated how the target material will affect the depth-dose curve of antiprotons and secondary particle production. Intuitively, the presence...... unrestricted LET is calculated for all configurations. Finally, we investigate which concentrations of gadolinium and boron are needed in a water target in order to observe a significant change in the antiproton depth-dose distribution.  Results Results indicate, that there is no significant change...

  4. Modelling dose distribution in tubing and cable using CYLTRAN and ACCEPT Monte Carlo simulation code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, D.E. [Minnesota Mining and Mfg. Co., St. Paul, MN (United States). Corporate Research Process Technologies Laboratory; Kensek, R.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-12-31

    One of the difficulties in the irradiation of non-slab geometries, such as a tube, is the uneven penetration of the electrons. A simple model of the distribution of dose in a tube or cable in relationship to voltage, composition, wall thickness and diameter can be mapped using the cylinder geometry provided for in the ITS/CYLTRAN code, complete with automatic subzoning. The reality of more complex 3D geometry to include effects of window foil, backscattering fixtures and beam scanning angles can be more completely accounted for by using the ITS/ACCEPT code with a line source update and a system of intersecting wedges to define input zones for mapping dose distributions in a tube. Thus, all of the variables that affect dose distribution can be modelled without the need to run time consuming and costly factory experiments. The effects of composition changes on dose distribution can also be anticipated.

  5. Estimation of dose distribution in occupationally exposed individuals to FDG-{sup 18}F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, Isabelle V. Batista de; Cabral, Manuela O. Monteiro; Vieira, Jose Wilson, E-mail: ilacerda.bolsista@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: manuela.omc@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Oliveira, Mercia Liane de; Andrade Lima, Fernando R. de, E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The use of unsealed radiation sources in nuclear medicine can lead to important incorporation of radionuclides, especially for occupationally exposed individuals (OEIs) during production and handling of radiopharmaceuticals. In this study, computer simulation was proposed as an alternative methodology for evaluation of the absorbed dose distribution and for the effective dose value in OEIs. For this purpose, the Exposure Computational Model (ECM) which is named as FSUP (Female Adult Mesh - supine) were used. This ECM is composed of: voxel phantom FASH (Female Adult MeSH) in the supine position, the MC code EGSnrc and an algorithm simulator of general internal source. This algorithm was modified to adapt to specific needs of the positron emission from FDG-{sup 18}F. The obtained results are presented as absorbed dose/accumulated activity. To obtain the absorbed dose distribution it was necessary to use accumulative activity data from the in vivo bioassay. The absorbed dose distribution and the value of estimated effective dose in this study did not exceed the limits for occupational exposure. Therefore, the creation of a database with the distribution of accumulated activity is suggested in order to estimate the absorbed dose in radiosensitive organs and the effective dose for OEI in similar environment. (author)

  6. Spatio-Temporal Distribution Characteristics and Trajectory Similarity Analysis of Tuberculosis in Beijing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is an infectious disease with one of the highest reported incidences in China. The detection of the spatio-temporal distribution characteristics of TB is indicative of its prevention and control conditions. Trajectory similarity analysis detects variations and loopholes in prevention and provides urban public health officials and related decision makers more information for the allocation of public health resources and the formulation of prioritized health-related policies. This study analysed the spatio-temporal distribution characteristics of TB from 2009 to 2014 by utilizing spatial statistics, spatial autocorrelation analysis, and space-time scan statistics. Spatial statistics measured the TB incidence rate (TB patients per 100,000 residents at the district level to determine its spatio-temporal distribution and to identify characteristics of change. Spatial autocorrelation analysis was used to detect global and local spatial autocorrelations across the study area. Purely spatial, purely temporal and space-time scan statistics were used to identify purely spatial, purely temporal and spatio-temporal clusters of TB at the district level. The other objective of this study was to compare the trajectory similarities between the incidence rates of TB and new smear-positive (NSP TB patients in the resident population (NSPRP/new smear-positive TB patients in the TB patient population (NSPTBP/retreated smear-positive (RSP TB patients in the resident population (RSPRP/retreated smear-positive TB patients in the TB patient population (RSPTBP to detect variations and loopholes in TB prevention and control among the districts in Beijing. The incidence rates in Beijing exhibited a gradual decrease from 2009 to 2014. Although global spatial autocorrelation was not detected overall across all of the districts of Beijing, individual districts did show evidence of local spatial autocorrelation: Chaoyang and Daxing were Low-Low districts over

  7. Measurements of superficial dose distributions in radiation therapy using translucent cryogel dosimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyadeh, M. M.; Wierzbicki, M.; Diamond, K. R.

    2017-05-01

    Superficial dose distributions were measured using radiochromic translucent poly(vinyl alcohol) cryogels. The relationship between dose to the skin surface and dose measured with the bolus (cryogel) was established using a series of oblique irradiations. Gafchromic film was placed under the bolus, and the ratio of bolus-film dose was determined for angle ranging from 0o to 90o. The average ratio over 0-67.5 degrees (0.800 ± 0.064) was used as the single correction factor to convert dose in bolus to dose to the skin surface, and applied to bolus measurements of skin dose from head and neck intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments delivered to a RANDO phantom. The resulting dose distributions were compared to film measurements using gamma analysis with a 3%/3mm tolerance and a 10% threshold. The minimum gamma pass rate was 95.2%. This study is the first report on the use of a poly(vinyl alcohol) cryogels based dosimeter to provide an accurate estimation of superficial dose distributions in megavoltage photon beams.

  8. Tracking the dose distribution in radiation therapy by accounting for variable anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaly, B [Radiation Treatment Program, London Regional Cancer Centre, 790 Commissioners Rd E, London, ON, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Kempe, J A [Department of Medical Biophysics, Medical Science Building, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 5C1 (Canada); Bauman, G S [Radiation Treatment Program, London Regional Cancer Centre, 790 Commissioners Rd E, London, ON, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Battista, J J [Radiation Treatment Program, London Regional Cancer Centre, 790 Commissioners Rd E, London, ON, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Van Dyk, J [Radiation Treatment Program, London Regional Cancer Centre, 790 Commissioners Rd E, London, ON, N6A 4L6 (Canada)

    2004-03-07

    The goal of this research is to calculate the daily and cumulative dose distribution received by the radiotherapy patient while accounting for variable anatomy, by tracking the dose distribution delivered to tissue elements (voxels) that move within the patient. Non-linear image registration techniques (i.e., thin-plate splines) are used along with a conventional treatment planning system to combine the dose distributions computed for each 3D computed tomography (CT) study taken during treatment. For a clinical prostate case, we demonstrate that there are significant localized dose differences due to systematic voxel motion in a single fraction as well as in 15 cumulative fractions. The largest positive dose differences in rectum, bladder and seminal vesicles were 29%, 2% and 24%, respectively, after the first fraction of radiation treatment compared to the planned dose. After 15 cumulative fractions, the largest positive dose differences in rectum, bladder and seminal vesicles were 23%, 32% and 18%, respectively, compared to the planned dose. A sensitivity analysis of control point placement is also presented. This method provides an important understanding of actual delivered doses and has the potential to provide quantitative information to use as a guide for adaptive radiation treatments.

  9. Non-contact assessment of melanin distribution via multispectral temporal illumination coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amelard, Robert; Scharfenberger, Christian; Wong, Alexander; Clausi, David A.

    2015-03-01

    Melanin is a pigment that is highly absorptive in the UV and visible electromagnetic spectra. It is responsible for perceived skin tone, and protects against harmful UV effects. Abnormal melanin distribution is often an indicator for melanoma. We propose a novel approach for non-contact melanin distribution via multispectral temporal illumination coding to estimate the two-dimensional melanin distribution based on its absorptive characteristics. In the proposed system, a novel multispectral, cross-polarized, temporally-coded illumination sequence is synchronized with a camera to measure reflectance under both multispectral and ambient illumination. This allows us to eliminate the ambient illumination contribution from the acquired reflectance measurements, and also to determine the melanin distribution in an observed region based on the spectral properties of melanin using the Beer-Lambert law. Using this information, melanin distribution maps can be generated for objective, quantitative assessment of skin type of individuals. We show that the melanin distribution map correctly identifies areas with high melanin densities (e.g., nevi).

  10. TOPOLOGICALLY CONSISTENT MODELS FOR EFFICIENT BIG GEO-SPATIO-TEMPORAL DATA DISTRIBUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. Jahn

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Geo-spatio-temporal topology models are likely to become a key concept to check the consistency of 3D (spatial space and 4D (spatial + temporal space models for emerging GIS applications such as subsurface reservoir modelling or the simulation of energy and water supply of mega or smart cities. Furthermore, the data management for complex models consisting of big geo-spatial data is a challenge for GIS and geo-database research. General challenges, concepts, and techniques of big geo-spatial data management are presented. In this paper we introduce a sound mathematical approach for a topologically consistent geo-spatio-temporal model based on the concept of the incidence graph. We redesign DB4GeO, our service-based geo-spatio-temporal database architecture, on the way to the parallel management of massive geo-spatial data. Approaches for a new geo-spatio-temporal and object model of DB4GeO meeting the requirements of big geo-spatial data are discussed in detail. Finally, a conclusion and outlook on our future research are given on the way to support the processing of geo-analytics and -simulations in a parallel and distributed system environment.

  11. Improved Side Information Generation for Distributed Video Coding by Exploiting Spatial and Temporal Correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Shuiming

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Distributed video coding (DVC is a video coding paradigm allowing low complexity encoding for emerging applications such as wireless video surveillance. Side information (SI generation is a key function in the DVC decoder, and plays a key-role in determining the performance of the codec. This paper proposes an improved SI generation for DVC, which exploits both spatial and temporal correlations in the sequences. Partially decoded Wyner-Ziv (WZ frames, based on initial SI by motion compensated temporal interpolation, are exploited to improve the performance of the whole SI generation. More specifically, an enhanced temporal frame interpolation is proposed, including motion vector refinement and smoothing, optimal compensation mode selection, and a new matching criterion for motion estimation. The improved SI technique is also applied to a new hybrid spatial and temporal error concealment scheme to conceal errors in WZ frames. Simulation results show that the proposed scheme can achieve up to 1.0 dB improvement in rate distortion performance in WZ frames for video with high motion, when compared to state-of-the-art DVC. In addition, both the objective and perceptual qualities of the corrupted sequences are significantly improved by the proposed hybrid error concealment scheme, outperforming both spatial and temporal concealments alone.

  12. Verification of Dose Distribution in Carbon Ion Radiation Therapy for Stage I Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irie, Daisuke; Saitoh, Jun-ichi, E-mail: junsaito@gunma-u.ac.jp; Shirai, Katsuyuki; Abe, Takanori; Kubota, Yoshiki; Sakai, Makoto; Noda, Shin-ei; Ohno, Tatsuya; Nakano, Takashi

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate robustness of dose distribution of carbon-ion radiation therapy (C-ion RT) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to identify factors affecting the dose distribution by simulated dose distribution. Methods and Materials: Eighty irradiation fields for delivery of C-ion RT were analyzed in 20 patients with stage I NSCLC. Computed tomography images were obtained twice before treatment initiation. Simulated dose distribution was reconstructed on computed tomography for confirmation under the same settings as actual treatment with respiratory gating and bony structure matching. Dose-volume histogram parameters, such as %D95 (percentage of D95 relative to the prescribed dose), were calculated. Patients with any field for which the %D95 of gross tumor volume (GTV) was below 90% were classified as unacceptable for treatment, and the optimal target margin for such cases was examined. Results: Five patients with a total of 8 fields (10% of total number of fields analyzed) were classified as unacceptable according to %D95 of GTV, although most patients showed no remarkable change in the dose-volume histogram parameters. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that tumor displacement and change in water-equivalent pathlength were significant predictive factors of unacceptable cases (P<.001 and P=.002, respectively). The main cause of degradation of the dose distribution was tumor displacement in 7 of the 8 unacceptable fields. A 6-mm planning target volume margin ensured a GTV %D95 of >90%, except in 1 extremely unacceptable field. Conclusions: According to this simulation analysis of C-ion RT for stage I NSCLC, a few fields were reported as unacceptable and required resetting of body position and reconfirmation. In addition, tumor displacement and change in water-equivalent pathlength (bone shift and/or chest wall thickness) were identified as factors influencing the robustness of dose distribution. Such uncertainties should be regarded

  13. Temporal and spatial distribution of human cryptosporidiosis in the west of Ireland 2004-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cloughley Richard

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cryptosporidiosis is increasingly recognised as a cause of gastrointestinal infection in Ireland and has been implicated in several outbreaks. This study aimed to investigate the spatial and temporal distribution of human cryptosporidiosis in the west of Ireland in order to identify high risk seasons and areas and to compare Classically Calculated (CC and Empirical Bayesian (EB incidence rates. Two spatial scales of analysis were used with a view to identifying the best one in assessing geographical patterns of infection. Global Moran's I and Local Moran's I tests of autocorrelation were used to test for evidence of global and local spatial clustering. Results There were statistically significant seasonal patterns of cryptosporidiosis with peaks in spring and an increasing temporal trend. Significant (p Conclusion This study identified spatial and temporal patterns in cryptosporidiosis distribution. The study also showed benefit in performing spatial analyses at more than one spatial scale to assess geographical patterns in disease distribution and that smoothing of disease rates for mapping in small areas enhances visualisation of spatial patterns. These findings are relevant in guiding policy decisions on disease control strategies.

  14. Small-Scale Spatio-Temporal Distribution of Bactrocera minax (Enderlein) (Diptera: Tephritidae) Using Probability Kriging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S Q; Zhang, H Y; Li, Z L

    2016-10-01

    Understanding spatio-temporal distribution of pest in orchards can provide important information that could be used to design monitoring schemes and establish better means for pest control. In this study, the spatial and temporal distribution of Bactrocera minax (Enderlein) (Diptera: Tephritidae) was assessed, and activity trends were evaluated by using probability kriging. Adults of B. minax were captured in two successive occurrences in a small-scale citrus orchard by using food bait traps, which were placed both inside and outside the orchard. The weekly spatial distribution of B. minax within the orchard and adjacent woods was examined using semivariogram parameters. The edge concentration was discovered during the most weeks in adult occurrence, and the population of the adults aggregated with high probability within a less-than-100-m-wide band on both of the sides of the orchard and the woods. The sequential probability kriged maps showed that the adults were estimated in the marginal zone with higher probability, especially in the early and peak stages. The feeding, ovipositing, and mating behaviors of B. minax are possible explanations for these spatio-temporal patterns. Therefore, spatial arrangement and distance to the forest edge of traps or spraying spot should be considered to enhance pest control on B. minax in small-scale orchards.

  15. Dose distribution response in HDRB measured with EBT2 and compared with PLATO SYSTEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ruiz, L; Hernández-Oviedo, J O; Ruesga-Vazquez, D; Rivera-Montalvo, T

    2014-01-01

    Dose distribution of a High Dose Rate Brachytherapy (BHDR) oncological treatment with (192)Ir was measured using a Gafchromic EBT2 film. The film calibration was performed with a (60)Co unit and a LINAC of 6 mV and 18 mV. Gafchromic behavior of a dosimeter varies in respect of energy. Experimental results of dose distribution match with those planned in the PLATO commercial system, they also show that there is a difference of 2.11% between the planning system and isodoses measured. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. EVALUATION OF SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL DISTRIBUTION CHANGES OF LST USING LANDSAT IMAGES (CASE STUDY:TEHRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kachar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In traditional approach, the land surface temperature (LST is estimated by the permanent or portable ground-based weather stations. Due to the lack of adequate distribution of weather stations, a uniform LST could not be achieved. Todays, With the development of remote sensing from space, satellite data offer the only possibility for measuring LST over the entire globe with sufficiently high temporal resolution and with complete spatially averaged rather than point values. the remote sensing imageries with relatively high spatial and temporal resolution are used as suitable tools to uniformly LST estimation. Time series, generated by remote sensed LST, provide a rich spatial-temporal infrastructure for heat island’s analysis. in this paper, a time series was generated by Landsat8 and Landsat7 satellite images to analysis the changes in the spatial and temporal distribution of the Tehran’s LST. In this process, The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI threshold method was applied to extract the LST; then the changes in spatial and temporal distribution of LST over the period 1999 to 2014 were evaluated by the statistical analysis. Finally, the achieved results show the very low temperature regions and the middle temperature regions were reduced by the rate of 0.54% and 5.67% respectively. On the other hand, the high temperature and the very high temperature regions were increased by 3.68% and 0.38% respectively. These results indicate an incremental procedure on the distribution of the hot regions in Tehran in this period. To quantitatively compare urban heat islands (UHI, an index called Urban Heat Island Ratio Index(URI was calculated. It can reveal the intensity of the UHI within the urban area. The calculation of the index was based on the ratio of UHI area to urban area. The greater the index, the more intense the UHI was. Eventually, Considering URI between 1999 and 2014, an increasing about 0.03 was shown. The reasons

  17. Temporal Distinctiveness in Task Switching: Assessing the Mixture-Distribution Assumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A Grange

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In task switching, increasing the response--cue interval has been shown to reduce the switch cost. This has been attributed to a time-based decay process influencing the activation of memory representations of tasks (task-sets. Recently, an alternative account based on interference rather than decay has been successfully applied to this data (Horoufchin et al., 2011. In this account, variation of the RCI is thought to influence the temporal distinctiveness (TD of episodic traces in memory, thus affecting their retrieval probability. This can affect performance as retrieval probability influences response time: If retrieval succeeds, responding is fast due to positive priming; if retrieval fails, responding is slow, due to having to perform the task via a slow algorithmic process. This account---and a recent formal model (Grange & Cross, 2015---makes the strong prediction that all RTs are a mixture of one of two processes: a fast process when retrieval succeeds, and a slow process when retrieval fails. The present paper assesses the evidence for this mixture-distribution assumption in TD data. In a first section, statistical evidence for mixture-distributions is found using the fixed-point property test. In a second section, a mathematical process model with mixture-distributions at its core is fitted to the response time distribution data. Both approaches provide good evidence in support of the mixture-distribution assumption, and thus support temporal distinctiveness accounts of the data.

  18. Spatially and temporally resolved gas distributions around heterogeneous catalysts using infrared planar laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetterberg, Johan; Blomberg, Sara; Gustafson, Johan; Evertsson, Jonas; Zhou, Jianfeng; Adams, Emma C.; Carlsson, Per-Anders; Aldén, Marcus; Lundgren, Edvin

    2015-01-01

    Visualizing and measuring the gas distribution in close proximity to a working catalyst is crucial for understanding how the catalytic activity depends on the structure of the catalyst. However, existing methods are not able to fully determine the gas distribution during a catalytic process. Here we report on how the distribution of a gas during a catalytic reaction can be imaged in situ with high spatial (400 μm) and temporal (15 μs) resolution using infrared planar laser-induced fluorescence. The technique is demonstrated by monitoring, in real-time, the distribution of carbon dioxide during catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide above powder catalysts. Furthermore, we demonstrate the versatility and potential of the technique in catalysis research by providing a proof-of-principle demonstration of how the activity of several catalysts can be measured simultaneously, either in the same reactor chamber, or in parallel, in different reactor tubes. PMID:25953006

  19. Temporal distribution characteristics of GNSS ionospheric occultation data and its effects in earthquake-ionosphere anomaly detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Ying

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The temporal distribution characteristics of COSMIC occultation data are analyzed in detail, and the limitations in earthquake-ionosphere anomaly detection caused by the temporal distribution characteristics of COSMIC occultation data are discussed using the example of the Wenchuan earthquake. The results demonstrate that there is no fixed temporal resolution for COSMIC occultation data when compared with other ionospheric observation techniques. Therefore, occultation data cannot currently be independently utilized in research studies but can only be used as a complement to other ionospheric observation techniques for applications with high temporal resolution demands, such as earthquake-ionosphere anomaly detection.

  20. Detection of lung nodules in chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT): effects of the different angular dose distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Byungdu; Lee, Youngjin; Kim, Dohyeon; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Jin, Seong-Soo; Mu, Shou-Chih; Kim, Hye-Mi; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2015-03-01

    Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) is a recently introduced new imaging modality for better detection of high- and smallcontrast lung nodules compared to conventional X-ray radiography. In CDT system, several projection views need to be acquired with limited angular range. The acquisition of insufficient number of projection data can degrade the reconstructed image quality. This image degradation easily affected by acquisition parameters such as angular dose distribution, number of projection views and reconstruction algorithm. To investigate the imaging characteristics, we evaluated the impact of the angular dose distribution on image quality by simulation studies with Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE). We designed the different angular dose distribution conditions. The results showed that the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) improves when exposed the higher dose at central projection views than peripheral views. While it was found that increasing angular dose distribution at central views improved lung nodule detectability, although both peripheral regions slightly suffer from image noise due to low dose distribution. The improvements of CNR by using proposed image acquisition technique suggest possible directions for further improvement of CDT system for lung nodule detection with high quality imaging capabilities.

  1. Effect of various dental restorations on dose distribution of 6 MV photon beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Mona; Mowlavi, Ali Asghar; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Davenport, David

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of various dental restoration materials on dose distribution in radiotherapy of head and neck cancer with 6 MV photon beam of a medical linac. The dental restorations include tooth, tooth with amalgam, tooth with Ni-Cr alloy, and tooth with Ceramco. Dose perturbation due to the dental restorations on 6 MV beam of Siemens Primus linac was calculated by MCNPX Monte Carlo code. These dental materials were separately simulated in a cubic water phantom. Photon percentage dose change in the presence of tooth, tooth with amalgam, tooth with Ni-Cr alloy, and tooth with Ceramco was calculated at various depths on the central axis of the beam relative to the dose in water. In another evaluation, the absolute dose (cGy) for water, tooth, tooth with amalgam, tooth with Ni-Cr alloy, and tooth with Ceramco was obtained by calculating 100 cGy dose at 0.75 cm depth in the water phantom. Based on the calculations performed, maximum percentage dose change due to backscattering was 11%, 8%, 6%, and 4% for amalgam, Ni-Cr alloy, Ceramco and tooth at depth of 0.75 cm, respectively. The maximum dose perturbation by amalgam is due to its higher mass density and atomic number. Ignoring the effect of dental restoration compositions on dose distribution causes discrepancy in clinical treatment planning system calculations.

  2. Temporal and spatial variations of water qualities and fish fauna distributions in the Kaname river, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, K.; Kitano, T.; Kutsumi, M.; Shimizu, K.

    2011-12-01

    Fish fauna distributions had been studied at many places and they indicated that the fish distributions were dramatically different depending on fish species and local environment such as water temperature, current, sediment parameters. But the relationships between water qualities and fish fauna distribution have not been understood well. In order to find physical and chemical environment factors which relate to the fish fauna distribution, we investigated the temporal and spatial change of water qualities and fish distributions in Kaname river, Japan. We measured both of physical (temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, Chl-a and turbidity) and chemical (nitrate, nitrite, ammonia, orthophosphoric and suspended solids) water parameters and surveyed the fish distribution. The field observations were conducted seasonally and check the season differences. Observation results showed that Gobiidae and Cyprinidae fishes live in the Kaname river and the distribution was clearly classified with the species. And also chemical water qualities were dramatically different by location. Especially the effects of sewage farms on water qualities were detected. This study will be contributory to reveal the relationships between fish fauna distribution and environmental parameters and it will lead to the ecological preservation.

  3. Temporal Statistical Analysis of Degree Distributions in an Undirected Landline Phone Call Network Graph Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orgeta Gjermëni

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to provide new results about the intraday degree sequence distribution considering phone call network graph evolution in time. More specifically, it tackles the following problem. Given a large amount of landline phone call data records, what is the best way to summarize the distinct number of calling partners per client per day? In order to answer this question, a series of undirected phone call network graphs is constructed based on data from a local telecommunication source in Albania. All network graphs of the series are simplified. Further, a longitudinal temporal study is made on this network graphs series related to the degree distributions. Power law and log-normal distribution fittings on the degree sequence are compared on each of the network graphs of the series. The maximum likelihood method is used to estimate the parameters of the distributions, and a Kolmogorov–Smirnov test associated with a p-value is used to define the plausible models. A direct distribution comparison is made through a Vuong test in the case that both distributions are plausible. Another goal was to describe the parameters’ distributions’ shape. A Shapiro-Wilk test is used to test the normality of the data, and measures of shape are used to define the distributions’ shape. Study findings suggested that log-normal distribution models better the intraday degree sequence data of the network graphs. It is not possible to say that the distributions of log-normal parameters are normal.

  4. DISTRIBUTION OF A 2ND DOSE OF EXOGENOUS SURFACTANT IN RABBITS WITH SEVERE RESPIRATORY-FAILURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PLOTZ, FB; STEVENS, H; HEIKAMP, A; OETOMO, SB

    Newborn infants with respiratory distress who fail to respond to surfactant treatment receive a second dose of surfactant. The effect of this strategy on the distribution of surfactant to the lung is unknown. We therefore investigated the distribution of the first (100 mg/kg body weight) and second

  5. Effects of physics change in Monte Carlo code on electron pencil beam dose distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toutaoui, Abdelkader, E-mail: toutaoui.aek@gmail.com [Departement de Physique Medicale, Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, 2 Bd Frantz Fanon BP399 Alger RP, Algiers (Algeria); Khelassi-Toutaoui, Nadia, E-mail: nadiakhelassi@yahoo.fr [Departement de Physique Medicale, Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, 2 Bd Frantz Fanon BP399 Alger RP, Algiers (Algeria); Brahimi, Zakia, E-mail: zsbrahimi@yahoo.fr [Departement de Physique Medicale, Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, 2 Bd Frantz Fanon BP399 Alger RP, Algiers (Algeria); Chami, Ahmed Chafik, E-mail: chafik_chami@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Sciences Nucleaires, Faculte de Physique, Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumedienne, BP 32 El Alia, Bab Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria)

    2012-01-15

    Pencil beam algorithms used in computerized electron beam dose planning are usually described using the small angle multiple scattering theory. Alternatively, the pencil beams can be generated by Monte Carlo simulation of electron transport. In a previous work, the 4th version of the Electron Gamma Shower (EGS) Monte Carlo code was used to obtain dose distributions from monoenergetic electron pencil beam, with incident energy between 1 MeV and 50 MeV, interacting at the surface of a large cylindrical homogeneous water phantom. In 2000, a new version of this Monte Carlo code has been made available by the National Research Council of Canada (NRC), which includes various improvements in its electron-transport algorithms. In the present work, we were interested to see if the new physics in this version produces pencil beam dose distributions very different from those calculated with oldest one. The purpose of this study is to quantify as well as to understand these differences. We have compared a series of pencil beam dose distributions scored in cylindrical geometry, for electron energies between 1 MeV and 50 MeV calculated with two versions of the Electron Gamma Shower Monte Carlo Code. Data calculated and compared include isodose distributions, radial dose distributions and fractions of energy deposition. Our results for radial dose distributions show agreement within 10% between doses calculated by the two codes for voxels closer to the pencil beam central axis, while the differences are up to 30% for longer distances. For fractions of energy deposition, the results of the EGS4 are in good agreement (within 2%) with those calculated by EGSnrc at shallow depths for all energies, whereas a slightly worse agreement (15%) is observed at deeper distances. These differences may be mainly attributed to the different multiple scattering for electron transport adopted in these two codes and the inclusion of spin effect, which produces an increase of the effective range of

  6. Dose-Specific Adverse Drug Reaction Identification in Electronic Patient Records: Temporal Data Mining in an Inpatient Psychiatric Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Robert; Werge, Thomas; Jensen, Lars Juhl

    2014-01-01

    all indication areas.The aim of this study was to take advantage of techniques for temporal data mining of EPRs in order to detect ADRs in a patient- and dose-specific manner.We used a psychiatric hospital’s EPR system to investigate undesired drug effects. Within one workflow the method identified...... patient-specific adverse events (AEs) and links these to specific drugs and dosages in a temporal manner, based on integration of text mining results and structured data. The structured data contained precise information on drug identity, dosage and strength.When applying the method to the 3,394 patients......Data collected for medical, filing and administrative purposes in electronic patient records (EPRs) represent a rich source of individualised clinical data, which has great potential for improved detection of patients experiencing adverse drug reactions (ADRs), across all approved drugs and across...

  7. GeoMesa: a distributed architecture for spatio-temporal fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, James N.; Annex, Andrew; Eichelberger, Christopher N.; Fox, Anthony; Hulbert, Andrew; Ronquest, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Recent advances in distributed databases and computing have transformed the landscape of spatio-temporal machine learning. This paper presents GeoMesa, a distributed spatio-temporal database built on top of Hadoop and column-family databases such as Accumulo and HBase, that includes a suite of tools for indexing, managing and analyzing both vector and raster data. The indexing techniques use space filling curves to map multi-dimensional data to the single lexicographic list managed by the underlying distributed database. In contrast to traditional non-distributed RDBMS, GeoMesa is capable of scaling horizontally by adding more resources at runtime; the index rebalances across the additional resources. In the raster domain, GeoMesa leverages Accumulo's server-side iterators and aggregators to perform raster interpolation and associative map algebra operations in parallel at query time. The paper concludes with two geo-time data fusion examples: using GeoMesa to aggregate Twitter data by keywords; and georegistration to drape full-motion video (FMV) over terrain.

  8. Impact of Mobile Dose-Tracking Technology on Medication Distribution at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelm, Matthew; Campbell, Udobi

    2016-05-01

    Medication dose-tracking technologies have the potential to improve efficiency and reduce costs associated with re-dispensing doses reported as missing. Data describing this technology and its impact on the medication use process are limited. The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of dose-tracking technology on pharmacy workload and drug expense at an academic, acute care medical center. Dose-tracking technology was implemented in June 2014. Pre-implementation data were collected from February to April 2014. Post-implementation data were collected from July to September 2014. The primary endpoint was the percent of re-dispensed oral syringe and compounded sterile product (CSP) doses within the pre- and post-implementation periods per 1,000 discharges. Secondary endpoints included pharmaceutical expense generated from re-dispensing doses, labor costs, and staff satisfaction with the medication distribution process. We observed an average 6% decrease in re-dispensing of oral syringe and CSP doses from pre- to post-implementation (15,440 vs 14,547 doses; p = .047). However, when values were adjusted per 1,000 discharges, this trend did not reach statistical significance (p = .074). Pharmaceutical expense generated from re-dispensing doses was significantly reduced from pre- to post-implementation ($834,830 vs $746,466 [savings of $88,364]; p = .047). We estimated that $2,563 worth of technician labor was avoided in re-dispensing missing doses. We also saw significant improvement in staff perception of technology assisting in reducing missing doses (p = .0003), as well as improvement in effectiveness of resolving or minimizing missing doses (p = .01). The use of mobile dose-tracking technology demonstrated meaningful reductions in both the number of doses re-dispensed and cost of pharmaceuticals dispensed.

  9. Temporal processes that contribute to nonlinearity in vegetation responses to ozone exposure and dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert L. Heath; Allen S. Lefohn; Robert C. Musselman

    2009-01-01

    Ozone interacts with plant tissue through distinct temporal processes. Sequentially, plants are exposed to ambient O3 hat (1) moves through the leaf boundary layer, (2) is taken up into plant tissue primarily through stomata, and (3) undergoes chemical interaction within plant tissue, first by initiating alterations and then as part of plant...

  10. Temporal and spatial distribution of human cryptosporidiosis in the west of Ireland 2004-2007.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Callaghan, Mary

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cryptosporidiosis is increasingly recognised as a cause of gastrointestinal infection in Ireland and has been implicated in several outbreaks. This study aimed to investigate the spatial and temporal distribution of human cryptosporidiosis in the west of Ireland in order to identify high risk seasons and areas and to compare Classically Calculated (CC) and Empirical Bayesian (EB) incidence rates. Two spatial scales of analysis were used with a view to identifying the best one in assessing geographical patterns of infection. Global Moran\\'s I and Local Moran\\'s I tests of autocorrelation were used to test for evidence of global and local spatial clustering. RESULTS: There were statistically significant seasonal patterns of cryptosporidiosis with peaks in spring and an increasing temporal trend. Significant (p < 0.05) global spatial clustering was observed in CC rates at the Electoral Division (ED) level but not in EB rates at the same level. Despite variations in disease, ED level was found to provide the most accurate account of distribution of cryptosporidiosis in the West of Ireland but required spatial EB smoothing of cases. There were a number of areas identified with significant local clustering of cryptosporidiosis rates. CONCLUSION: This study identified spatial and temporal patterns in cryptosporidiosis distribution. The study also showed benefit in performing spatial analyses at more than one spatial scale to assess geographical patterns in disease distribution and that smoothing of disease rates for mapping in small areas enhances visualisation of spatial patterns. These findings are relevant in guiding policy decisions on disease control strategies.

  11. SU-E-T-609: Perturbation Effects of Pedicle Screws On Radiotherapy Dose Distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bar-Deroma, R; Borzov, E; Nevelsky, A [Rambam Medical Center, Haifa (Israel)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Radiation therapy in conjunction with surgical implant fixation is a common combined treatment in case of bone metastases. However, metal implants generally used in orthopedic implants perturb radiation dose distributions. Carbon-Fiber Reinforced (CFR) PEEK material has been recently introduced for production of intramedullary screws and plates. Gold powder can be added to the CFR-PEEK material in order to enhance visibility of the screws during intraoperative imaging procedures. In this work, we investigated the perturbation effects of the pedicle screws made of CFR-PEEK, CFR-PEEK with added gold powder (CFR-PEEK-AU) and Titanium (Ti) on radiotherapy dose distributions. Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed using the EGSnrc code package for 6MV beams with 10×10 fields at SSD=100cm. By means of MC simulations, dose distributions around titanium, CFR- PEEK and CFR-PEEK-AU screws (manufactured by Carbo-Fix Orthopedics LTD, Israel) placed in a water phantom were calculated. The screw axis was either parallel or perpendicular to the beam axis. Dose perturbation (relative to dose in homogeneous water phantom) was assessed. Results: Maximum overdose due to backscatter was 10% for the Ti screws, 5% for the CFR-PEEK-AU screws and effectively zero for the CFR-PEEK screws. Maximum underdose due to attenuation was 25% for the Ti screws, 15% for the CFR-PEEK-AU screws and 5% for the CFR-PEEK screws. Conclusion: Titanium screws introduce the largest distortion on the radiation dose distribution. The gold powder added to the CFR-PEEK material improves visibility at the cost of increased dose perturbation. CFR-PEEK screws caused minimal alteration on the dose distribution. This can decrease possible over and underdose of adjacent tissue and thus favorably influence treatment efficiency. The use of such implants has potential clinical advantage in the treatment of neoplastic bone disease.

  12. A study on the dose distributions in various materials from an Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy source.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Ming Hsu

    Full Text Available Dose distributions of (192Ir HDR brachytherapy in phantoms simulating water, bone, lung tissue, water-lung and bone-lung interfaces using the Monte Carlo codes EGS4, FLUKA and MCNP4C are reported. Experiments were designed to gather point dose measurements to verify the Monte Carlo results using Gafchromic film, radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter, solid water, bone, and lung phantom. The results for radial dose functions and anisotropy functions in solid water phantom were consistent with previously reported data (Williamson and Li. The radial dose functions in bone were affected more by depth than those in water. Dose differences between homogeneous solid water phantoms and solid water-lung interfaces ranged from 0.6% to 14.4%. The range between homogeneous bone phantoms and bone-lung interfaces was 4.1% to 15.7%. These results support the understanding in dose distribution differences in water, bone, lung, and their interfaces. Our conclusion is that clinical parameters did not provide dose calculation accuracy for different materials, thus suggesting that dose calculation of HDR treatment planning systems should take into account material density to improve overall treatment quality.

  13. Cost comparison of unit dose and traditional drug distribution in a long-term-care facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepinski, P W; Thielke, T S; Collins, D M; Hanson, A

    1986-11-01

    Unit dose and traditional drug distribution systems were compared in a 352-bed long-term-care facility by analyzing nursing time, medication-error rate, medication costs, and waste. Time spent by nurses in preparing, administering, charting, and other tasks associated with medications was measured with a stop-watch on four different nursing units during six-week periods before and after the nursing home began using unit dose drug distribution. Medication-error rate before and after implementation of the unit dose system was determined by patient profile audits and medication inventories. Medication costs consisted of patient billing costs (acquisition cost plus fee) and cost of medications destroyed. The unit dose system required a projected 1507.2 hours less nursing time per year. Mean medication-error rates were 8.53% and 0.97% for the traditional and unit dose systems, respectively. Potential annual savings because of decreased medication waste with the unit dose system were $2238.72. The net increase in cost for the unit dose system was estimated at $615.05 per year, or approximately $1.75 per patient. The unit dose system appears safer and more time-efficient than the traditional system, although its costs are higher.

  14. Temporal distribution of favourite books, movies, and records: differential encoding and re-sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Steve M J; Chessa, Antonio G; Murre, Jaap M J

    2007-10-01

    The reminiscence bump is the effect that people recall more personal events from early adulthood than from childhood or adulthood. The bump has been examined extensively. However, the question of whether the bump is caused by differential encoding or re-sampling is still unanswered. To examine this issue, participants were asked to name their three favourite books, movies, and records. Furthermore,they were asked when they first encountered them. We compared the temporal distributions and found that they all showed recency effects and reminiscence bumps. The distribution of favourite books had the largest recency effect and the distribution of favourite records had the largest reminiscence bump. We can explain these results by the difference in rehearsal. Books are read two or three times, movies are watched more frequently, whereas records are listened to numerous times. The results suggest that differential encoding initially causes the reminiscence bump and that re-sampling increases the bump further.

  15. Dose distribution calculation for in-vivo X-ray fluorescence scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, R. G. [Universidad de la Frontera, Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Av. Francisco Salazar 1145, Temuco 4811230, Araucania (Chile); Lozano, E. [Instituto Nacional del Cancer, Unidad de Fisica Medica, Av. Profesor Zanartu 1010, Santiago (Chile); Valente, M., E-mail: figueror@ufro.cl [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Av. Ravadavia 1917, C1033AAJ, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2013-08-01

    In-vivo X-ray fluorescence constitutes a useful and accurate technique, worldwide established for constituent elementary distribution assessment. Actually, concentration distributions of arbitrary user-selected elements can be achieved along sample surface with the aim of identifying and simultaneously quantifying every constituent element. The method is based on the use of a collimated X-ray beam reaching the sample. However, one common drawback for considering the application of this technique for routine clinical examinations was the lack of information about associated dose delivery. This work presents a complete study of the dose distribution resulting from an in-vivo X-ray fluorescence scanning for quantifying biohazard materials on human hands. Absorbed dose has been estimated by means of dosimetric models specifically developed to this aim. In addition, complete dose distributions have been obtained by means of full radiation transport calculations in based on stochastic Monte Carlo techniques. A dedicated subroutine has been developed using the Penelope 2008 main code also integrated with dedicated programs -Mat Lab supported- for 3 dimensional dose distribution visualization. The obtained results show very good agreement between approximate analytical models and full descriptions by means of Monte Carlo simulations. (Author)

  16. Re-distribution of brachytherapy dose using a differential dose prescription adapted to risk of local failure in low-risk prostate cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rylander, Susanne; Polders, Daniel; Steggerda, Marcel J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We investigated the application of a differential target- and dose prescription concept for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR-BT), involving a re-distribution of dose according to risk of local failure and treatment-related morbidity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Our stud...

  17. Effect of silicone gel breast prosthesis on electron and photon dose distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, L.; St. George, F.J.; Mansfield, C.M.; Krishnan, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of a silicone gel breast prosthesis on the absorbed dose distribution of 9--20 MeV electron beams and 1.25--15 MV photon beams was studied. Compared to water measurements, at depths smaller than the practical range of the electron beams, the central axis depth dose values below the prothesis were lower for all energies by as much as 3.5%. However, at depths near the practical range, the central axis depth dose values for the prosthesis were greater than that of water by as much as 33%. Since this occurs near the end of the electron range, the resultant difference may not be clinically significant. Results of the effect of breast prosthesis on photon depth dose distributions reveal that no clinically significant perturbation is produced by the breast prosthesis using Co-60, 6- and 15-MV radiations.

  18. Influence of pedestrian age and gender on spatial and temporal distribution of pedestrian crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toran Pour, Alireza; Moridpour, Sara; Tay, Richard; Rajabifard, Abbas

    2018-01-02

    Every year, about 1.24 million people are killed in traffic crashes worldwide and more than 22% of these deaths are pedestrians. Therefore, pedestrian safety has become a significant traffic safety issue worldwide. In order to develop effective and targeted safety programs, the location- and time-specific influences on vehicle-pedestrian crashes must be assessed. The main purpose of this research is to explore the influence of pedestrian age and gender on the temporal and spatial distribution of vehicle-pedestrian crashes to identify the hotspots and hot times. Data for all vehicle-pedestrian crashes on public roadways in the Melbourne metropolitan area from 2004 to 2013 are used in this research. Spatial autocorrelation is applied in examining the vehicle-pedestrian crashes in geographic information systems (GIS) to identify any dependency between time and location of these crashes. Spider plots and kernel density estimation (KDE) are then used to determine the temporal and spatial patterns of vehicle-pedestrian crashes for different age groups and genders. Temporal analysis shows that pedestrian age has a significant influence on the temporal distribution of vehicle-pedestrian crashes. Furthermore, men and women have different crash patterns. In addition, results of the spatial analysis shows that areas with high risk of vehicle-pedestrian crashes can vary during different times of the day for different age groups and genders. For example, for those between ages 18 and 65, most vehicle-pedestrian crashes occur in the central business district (CBD) during the day, but between 7:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m., crashes among this age group occur mostly around hotels, clubs, and bars. This research reveals that temporal and spatial distributions of vehicle-pedestrian crashes vary for different pedestrian age groups and genders. Therefore, specific safety measures should be in place during high crash times at different locations for different age groups and genders to

  19. Onset of leptin resistance shows temporal differences related to dose or pulsed treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strehler, Kevin Y.E.; Matheny, Michael; Kirichenko, Nataliya; Sakarya, Yasemin; Bruce, Erin; Toklu, Hale Zerrin; Carter, Christy S.; Morgan, Drake; Tümer, Nihal; Scarpace, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    Leptin administration results in leptin resistance presenting a significant barrier to therapeutic use of leptin. Consequently, we examined two hypotheses. The first examined the relationship between leptin dose and development of physiological and biochemical signs of leptin resistance. We hypothesized lower doses of leptin would produce proportional reductions in body weight without the adverse leptin-induced leptin resistance. The second compared pulsed central leptin infusion to continuous leptin infusion. We hypothesized that pulsed infusion at specific times of the day would evoke favorable body weight reductions while tempering the development of leptin-induced leptin resistance. The first experiment examined leptin responsiveness, including food intake, body weight and hypothalamic STAT3 phosphorylation to increasing doses of viral gene delivery of leptin. Varying the dose proved inconsequential with respect to long-term therapy and demonstrated proportional development of leptin resistance. The second experiment examined leptin responsiveness to pulsed central leptin infusion, comparing pulsed versus constant infusion of 3 ug/day leptin or a 2 h morning versus a 2 h evening pulsed leptin infusion. Pulsed delivery of the supramaximal dose of 3 ug/day was not different than constant delivery. Morning pulsed infusion of the submaximal dose of 0.25 ug reduces food intake only over subsequent immediate meal period and was associated with body weight reductions, but results in cellular leptin resistance. Evening pulsed infusion did not decrease food intake but reduces body weight and maintains full leptin signaling. The positive benefit for pulsed delivery remains speculative, yet potentially may provide an alternative mode of leptin therapy. PMID:27012992

  20. Spatial and temporal distribution of onroad CO2 emissions at the Urban spatial scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y.; Gurney, K. R.; Zhou, Y.; Mendoza, D. L.

    2011-12-01

    The Hestia Project is a multi-disciplinary effort to help better understand the spatial and temporal distribution of fossil fuel carbon dioxide (CO2) emission at urban scale. Onroad transportation is an essential source of CO2 emissions. This study examines two urban domains: Marion County (Indianapolis) and Los Angeles County and explores the methods and results associated with the spatial and temporal distribution of local urban onroad CO2 emissions. We utilize a bottom-up approach and spatially distribute county emissions based on the Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT) counts provided by local Department of Transportation. The total amount of CO2 emissions is calculated by the National Mobile Inventory Model (NMIM) for Marion County and the EMission FACtors (EMFAC) model for Los Angeles County. The NMIM model provides CO2 emissions based on vehicle miles traveled (VMT) data at the county-level from the national county database (NCD). The EMFAC model provides CO2 emissions for California State based on vehicle activities, including VMT, vehicle population and fuel types. A GIS road atlas is retrieved from the US Census Bureau. Further spatial analysis and integration are performed by GIS software to distribute onroad CO2 emission according to the traffic volume. The temporal allocation of onroad CO2 emission is based on the hourly traffic data obtained from the Metropolitan Planning Orgnizations (MPO) for Marion County and Department of Transportation for Los Angeles County. The annual CO2 emissions are distributed according to each hourly fraction of traffic counts. Due to the fact that ATR stations are unevenly distributed in space, we create Thiessen polygons such that each road segment is linked to the nearest neighboring ATR station. The hourly profile for each individual station is then combined to create a "climatology" of CO2 emissions in time on each road segment. We find that for Marion County in the year 2002, urban interstate and arterial roads have

  1. Effect of various dental restorations on dose distribution of 6 MV photon beam

    OpenAIRE

    Mona Azizi; Ali Asghar Mowlavi; Mahdi Ghorbani; David Davenport

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of various dental restoration materials on dose distribution in radiotherapy of head and neck cancer with 6 MV photon beam of a medical linac. Setting and Design: The dental restorations include tooth, tooth with amalgam, tooth with Ni-Cr alloy, and tooth with Ceramco. Dose perturbation due to the dental restorations on 6 MV beam of Siemens Primus linac was calculated by MCNPX Monte Carlo code. These dental materials were separately ...

  2. Imaging of gamma and neutron dose distributions at LVR-15 epithermal beam by means of FGLDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambarini, G., E-mail: grazia.gambarini@mi.infn.it [Department of Physics, Universita degli Studi, Milan (Italy)] [INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Milan, Milan (Italy); Bartesaghi, G. [Department of Physics, Universita degli Studi, Milan (Italy)] [INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Milan, Milan (Italy); Carrara, M. [The Fondazione IRCCS ' Istituto Nazionale Tumori' , Milan (Italy); Negri, A. [INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Milan, Milan (Italy); Paganini, L. [Department of Physics, Universita degli Studi, Milan (Italy); Vanossi, E. [INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Milan, Milan (Italy); Burian, J.; Marek, M.; Viererbl, L.; Klupak, V.; Rejchrt, J. [Department of Reactor Physics, NRI Rez, plc (Czech Republic)

    2011-12-15

    Gamma and fast neutron dose spatial distributions have been measured at the collimator exit of the epithermal neutron beam of LVR-15 reactor (Rez). Measurements were performed by means of optically analyzed Fricke-gel-layer detectors. The separation of the two dose contributions has been achieved by suitable pixel-to-pixel elaboration of the light transmittance images of Fricke-gel-layer detectors prepared with water and heavy water.

  3. Spatio-temporal Distribution of North African Dust Sources: Controling Mechanism and Interannual Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepanski, K.; Feuerstein, S.

    2016-12-01

    Mineral dust aerosol emitted from arid and semi-arid areas impacts on the weather and climate system by e.g. altering the atmospheric radiation budget and affecting nutrient cycles which ultimately changes the carbon cycle. To estimate the effect of dust in the Earth system, detailed knowledge on the spatio-temporal distribution of active dust sources is necessary. Furthermore, the understanding on the natural variablity of dust source activity has to be improved for a better representation of dust-related processes in numerical models and climate change projections. We discuss the atmospheric dust life-cycle over North Africa with regard to mechanisms both controlling dust uplift and transport pathways. Results from a four-year satellite-based study analysing the spatio-temporal distribution of dust source activations inferred from 15-minute Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) SEVIRI infra-red observations are linked to atmospheric conditions and dust source characteristics. The predominance of dust sources located in desert valleys illustrates the importance of alluvial sediments for the atmospheric dust life-cycle. With focus on alluvial dust sources, Landsat and Sentinel-2 data are analysed to identify changes in surface sediments caused by flash floodings which possibly generate fresh layers of sediments that are prone to wind erosion. Classification algorithms applied to the remote sensing data highlight an increase of alluvial sediments downstream of ephemeral channels and in mountain foothill regions subsequent to events of strong precipitation and a decrease in sediment coverage for long periods of rain absence and the occurrence of wind erosion (dust emission). Altogether, the presented and discussed results (1) illustrate the spatio-temporal distribution of dust sources over North Africa, (2) identify atmospheric controlling mechanism on dust source activation, and (3) investigate alluvial sediments as dust source. In summary, the outcomes contribute to the

  4. Asymptotic distributions of coalescence times and ancestral lineage numbers for populations with temporally varying size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua; Chen, Kun

    2013-07-01

    The distributions of coalescence times and ancestral lineage numbers play an essential role in coalescent modeling and ancestral inference. Both exact distributions of coalescence times and ancestral lineage numbers are expressed as the sum of alternating series, and the terms in the series become numerically intractable for large samples. More computationally attractive are their asymptotic distributions, which were derived in Griffiths (1984) for populations with constant size. In this article, we derive the asymptotic distributions of coalescence times and ancestral lineage numbers for populations with temporally varying size. For a sample of size n, denote by Tm the mth coalescent time, when m + 1 lineages coalesce into m lineages, and An(t) the number of ancestral lineages at time t back from the current generation. Similar to the results in Griffiths (1984), the number of ancestral lineages, An(t), and the coalescence times, Tm, are asymptotically normal, with the mean and variance of these distributions depending on the population size function, N(t). At the very early stage of the coalescent, when t → 0, the number of coalesced lineages n - An(t) follows a Poisson distribution, and as m → n, $$n\\left(n-1\\right){T}_{m}/2N\\left(0\\right)$$ follows a gamma distribution. We demonstrate the accuracy of the asymptotic approximations by comparing to both exact distributions and coalescent simulations. Several applications of the theoretical results are also shown: deriving statistics related to the properties of gene genealogies, such as the time to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) and the total branch length (TBL) of the genealogy, and deriving the allele frequency spectrum for large genealogies. With the advent of genomic-level sequencing data for large samples, the asymptotic distributions are expected to have wide applications in theoretical and methodological development for population genetic inference.

  5. Model of distribution of dose for intravascular brachytherapy; Modelo de distribucion de dosis para braquiterapia intravascular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirchio, Rosana; Signoretta, Catalina [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Buenos Aires (Argentina). Dosimetria de Radioaciones Ionizantes; Martin, Gabriela; Rivera, Elena; Bergoc, Rosa [Univeridad de Buenos Aires (Argentina). Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquimica. Lab. de Radioisotopos; Guzman, Luis [Instituto Cardiovascular de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2001-07-01

    In this work we present the radiation dose distributions for a theoretical model with Monte Carlo simulation, which was based on an experimental model developed for the study of the prevention of restenosis post-angioplasty employing intravascular brachytherapy. In the experimental model, the atherosclerotic plaques were induced in femoral arteries of male New Zealand rabbits through surgical intervention and later administration of cholesterol enriched diet. For the intravascular irradiation we employed a {sup 32} P source contained within the balloon used for the angioplasty. The radiation dose distributions were calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP4B according to a segment of a simulated artery. We studied the radiation dose distribution in the axial and radial directions for different thickness of the atherosclerotic plaques. The results will be correlated with the biologic effects observed by means of histological analysis of the irradiated arteries. (author)

  6. Efficient calculation of local dose distributions for response modeling in proton and heavier ion beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greilich, Steffen; Hahn, Ute; Kiderlen, Markus

    2014-01-01

    We present an algorithm for fast and accurate computation of the local dose distribution in MeV beams of protons, carbon ions or other heavy charged particles. It uses compound Poisson modeling of track interaction and successive convolutions for fast computation. It can handle arbitrary complex ...... mixed particle fields over a wide range of fluences. Since the local dose distribution is the essential part of several approaches to model detector efficiency and cellular response it has potential use in ion-beam dosimetry, radiotherapy, and radiobiology.......We present an algorithm for fast and accurate computation of the local dose distribution in MeV beams of protons, carbon ions or other heavy charged particles. It uses compound Poisson modeling of track interaction and successive convolutions for fast computation. It can handle arbitrary complex...

  7. Stereotactic radiosurgery of prostate cancer - dose distribution for VMAT and CyberKnife techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ślosarek, Krzysztof; Osewski, Wojciech; Grządziel, Aleksandra; Stąpór-Fudzińska, Małgorzata; Szlag, Marta

    2016-06-01

    New capabilities of biomedical accelerators allow for very precise depositing of the radiation dose and imaging verification during the therapy. In addition, computer algorithms calculating dose distributions are taking into account the increasing number of physical effects. Therefore, administration of high dose fractionation, which is consistent with radiobiology used in oncology, becomes safer and safer. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), which is very precise irradiation with high dose fractionation is increasingly widespread use in radiotherapy of prostate cancer. For this purpose different biomedical accelerators are used. The aim of this study is to compare dose distributions for two techniques: VMAT and CyberKnife. Statistical analysis was performed for the two groups of patients treated by VMAT technique (25 patients), and CyberKnife technique (15 patients). The analysis shows that the dose distributions are comparable, both in the treated area (prostate) and in the critical organs (rectum, urinary bladder, femoral heads). The results show that stereotactic radiosurgery of prostate cancer can be carried out on CyberKnife accelerator as well as on the classical accelerator with the use of VMAT technique.

  8. Temporal distribution of linear densities of the plasma column in a plasma focus discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cikhardtova Balzhima

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were carried out on the PF-1000 plasma focus device, with a deuterium filling and with deuterium puffing from a gas-puff nozzle placed on the axis of the anode face. The current was reaching 2 MA. 15 interferometric frames from one shot were recorded with a Nd:YLF laser and a Mach–Zehnder interferometer, with 10–20 ns delay between the frames. As a result, the temporal and spatial distribution of the linear densities and the radial and axial velocities of the moving of plasma in the dense plasma column could be estimated.

  9. Three-dimensional dose distribution in contrast-enhanced digital mammography using Gafchromic XR-QA2 films: Feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Yi-Shuan; Lin, Yu-Ying; Cheung, Yun-Chung; Tsai, Hui-Yu

    2014-11-01

    This study was aimed to establish three-dimensional dose distributions for contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) using self-developed Gafchromic XR-QA2 films. Dose calibration and distribution evaluations were performed on a full-field digital mammography unit with dual energy (DE) contrast-enhanced option. Strategy for dose calibration of films in the DE mode was based on the data obtained from common target/filter/kVp combinations used clinically and the dose response model modified from Rampado's model. Dose derived from films were also verified by measured data from an ionization chamber. The average difference of dose was 8.9% in the dose range for clinical uses. Three-dimensional dose distributions were estimated using triangular acrylic phantom equipped with the mammography system. Five pieces of film sheets were separately placed between the acrylic slabs to evaluate the dose distribution at different depths. After normalizing the dose in each pixel to the maximum dose at the top-center position of the acrylic, normalized dose distribution for transverse, coronal and sagittal planes, could thus be obtained. The depth dose distribution evaluated in this study may further serve as a reference for evaluating the patient glandular dose at different depths based on the entrance exposure information.

  10. Spatio-temporal distribution of malaria vectors (Diptera: Culicidae) across different climatic zones of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanafi-Bojd, Ahmad Ali; Azari-Hamidian, Shahyad; Vatandoost, Hassan; Charrahy, Zabihollah

    2011-06-01

    Malaria is a main vector-borne public health problem in Iran. The last studies on Iranian mosquitoes show 31 Anopheles species including different sibling species and genotypes, eight of them are reported to play role in malaria transmission. The objective of this study is to provide a reference for malaria vectors of Iran and to map their spatial and temporal distribution in different climatic zones. Shape files of administrative boundaries and climates of Iran were provided by National Cartographic Center. Data on distribution and seasonal activity of malaria vectors were obtained from different sources and a databank in district level was created in Excel 2003, inserted to the shape files and analyzed by ArcGIS 9.2 to provide the maps. Anopheles culicifacies Giles s.l., Anopheles dthali Patton, Anopheles fluviatilis James s.l., Anopheles maculipennis Meigen s.l., Anopheles sacharovi Favre, Anopheles stephensi Liston, and Anopheles superpictus Grassi have been introduced as primary and secondary malaria vectors and Anopheles pulcherrimus Theobald as a suspected vector in Iran. Temporal distribution of anopheline mosquitoes is restricted to April-December in northern Iran, however mosquitoes can be found during the year in southern region. Spatial distribution of malaria vectors is different based on species, thus six of them (except for Anopheles maculipennis s.l. and Anopheles sacharovi) are reported from endemic malarious area in southern and southeastern areas of Iran. The climate of this part is usually warm and humid, which makes it favorable for mosquito rearing and malaria transmission. Correlation between climate conditions and vector distribution can help to predict the potential range of activity for each species and preparedness for malaria epidemics. Copyright © 2011 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Temporal Evolution and Dose-Volume Histogram Predictors of Visual Acuity After Proton Beam Radiation Therapy of Uveal Melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polishchuk, Alexei L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Mishra, Kavita K., E-mail: Kavita.Mishra@ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Weinberg, Vivian; Daftari, Inder K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Nguyen, Jacqueline M.; Cole, Tia B. [Tumori Foundation, San Francisco, California (United States); Quivey, Jeanne M.; Phillips, Theodore L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Char, Devron H. [Tumori Foundation, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To perform an in-depth temporal analysis of visual acuity (VA) outcomes after proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT) in a large, uniformly treated cohort of uveal melanoma (UM) patients, to determine trends in VA evolution depending on pretreatment and temporally defined posttreatment VA measurements; and to investigate the relevance of specific patient, tumor and dose-volume parameters to posttreatment vision loss. Methods and Materials: Uveal melanoma patients receiving PBRT were identified from a prospectively maintained database. Included patients (n=645) received 56 GyE in 4 fractions, had pretreatment best corrected VA (BCVA) in the affected eye of count fingers (CF) or better, with posttreatment VA assessment at specified post-PBRT time point(s). Patients were grouped according to the pretreatment BCVA into favorable (≥20/40) or unfavorable (20/50-20/400) and poor (CF) strata. Temporal analysis of BCVA changes was described, and univariate and forward stepwise multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify predictors for VA loss. Results: Median VA follow-up was 53 months (range, 3-213 months). At 60-month follow up, among evaluable treated eyes with favorable pretreatment BCVA, 45% retained BCVA ≥20/40, whereas among evaluable treated eyes with initially unfavorable/poor BCVA, 21% had vision ≥20/100. Among those with a favorable initial BCVA, attaining BCVA of ≥20/40 at any posttreatment time point was associated with subsequent maintenance of excellent BCVA. Multivariate analysis identified volume of the macula receiving 28GyE (P<.0001) and optic nerve (P=.0004) as independent dose-volume histogram predictors of 48-month post-PBRT vision loss among initially favorable treated eyes. Conclusions: Approximately half of PBRT-treated UM eyes with excellent pretreatment BCVA assessed at 5 years after treatment will retain excellent long-term vision. 28GyE macula and optic nerve dose-volume histogram parameters allow for

  12. SU-E-T-224: Dose Distribution of Oesophagus Stents Measured by EBT2 Film Dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppinga, D; Schoenfeld, A; Chofor, N; Poppe, B

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the dose enhancement at oesophagus stents made of nitinol. The material is a nickel titan alloy with an effective atomic number of 26. Because of the increased atomic number in comparison to the human body, dose enhancement in surrounding tissue is expected. The relative dose distribution around the stent was measured in a water phantom. To simulate the air cavity within the oesophagus, a styrodur cylinder was placed inside the stent. The stent was held with a circular PMMA holder. An EBT2 film was wrapped around the stent to measure the relative radial dose distribution.The setup was irradiated with a 6MV photon beam (Siemens Primus) and a field size of 5cmx5cm. The distance between source and centre of the stent was 100cm.The EBT2 films were digitized at a scanning resolution of 72dpi using an Epson 10000XL flatbed scanner with a transparency unit. Furthermore, the films were fixed in a frame to prevent Newton rings in the scanned image. The dose increases in all directions around the stent. With approximately 18%, the highest increase is caused on the proximal side of the stent. On the backside the dose enhancement is approximately 10%. Dose enhancements around a stent are detectable and one should be aware of it's occurence in the radiotherapeutical treatment of oesophageal cancer. Because of the enhancement in all directions healthy tissue may be affected. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  13. Spatio-temporal patterns in acoustic presence and distribution of Antarctic blue whales Balaenoptera musculus intermedia in the Weddell Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Thomisch, Karolin; Boebel, Olaf; Clark, CW; Hagen, W.; Spiesecke, Stefanie; Zitterbart, Daniel; Van Opzeeland, Ilse

    2016-01-01

    Distribution and movement patterns of Antarctic blue whales Balaenoptera musculus intermedia at large temporal and spatial scales are still poorly understood. The objective of this study was to explore spatio-temporal distribution patterns of Antarctic blue whales in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean, using passive acoustic monitoring data. Multi-year data were collected between 2008 and 2013 by 11 recorders deployed in the Weddell Sea and along the Greenwich meridian. Antarctic blue ...

  14. The roles of convective entrainment in spatial distributions and temporal variations of precipitation over tropical oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, N.; Takayabu, Y. N.; Watanabe, M.; Kimoto, M.; Chikira, M.

    2013-12-01

    This study shows that a proper treatment of convective entrainment is essential in determining spatial distributions and temporal variations of precipitation by numerical experiments. They have performed and compared four experiments with different entrainment characteristics: a control (Ctl), no entrainment (NoEnt), original Arakawa Schubert (AS), and AS with simple empirical suppression of convection (ASRH). The fractional entrainment rate of AS and ASRH are constant for each cloud type and are very small near cloud base compared to Ctl, in which half of buoyancy-generated energy is consumed by the entrainment. Ctl well reproduces the spatial and temporal variations, whereas NoEnt and AS, which are very similar to each other, significantly underestimated the variations with the so-called the double ITCZ problem. The enhanced variations in Ctl are due to the larger entrainment that strengthens the coupling of convection and free tropospheric humidity. Time variations are also more realistic in Ctl; mid-height convection moistens mid-troposphere and large precipitation events occur after sufficient moisture is available. In contrast, deep convection is more frequent but with smaller precipitation amount in NoEnt and AS. ASRH shows smaller spatial but excessive temporal variations suggesting that its empirical suppression condition is too simple and a more sophisticated formulation is required for more realistic precipitation variations. This study was supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (GRENE), and by the Ministry of the Environment (2A-1201), Japan.

  15. Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Tuberculosis in the State of Mexico, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragoza Bastida, Adrian; Hernández Tellez, Marivel; Bustamante Montes, Lilia P.; Medina Torres, Imelda; Jaramillo Paniagua, Jaime Nicolás; Mendoza Martínez, Germán David; Ramírez Durán, Ninfa

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the oldest human diseases that still affects large population groups. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), there were approximately 9.4 million new cases worldwide in the year 2010. In Mexico, there were 18,848 new cases of TB of all clinical variants in 2010. The identification of clusters in space-time is of great interest in epidemiological studies. The objective of this research was to identify the spatial and temporal distribution of TB during the period 2006–2010 in the State of Mexico, using geographic information system (GIS) and SCAN statistics program. Nine significant clusters (P Mexico is not randomly distributed but is concentrated in areas close to Mexico City. PMID:22919337

  16. [Temporal and spatial distribution of red tide in Yangtze River Estuary and adjacent waters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lu-San; Li, Zi-Cheng; Zhou, Juan; Zheng, Bing-Hui; Tang, Jing-Liang

    2011-09-01

    The events of red tide were collected in Yangtze River Estuary and adjacent waters from 1972 to 2009. Based on geographic information system (GIS) analysis on the temporal and spatial distribution of red tide, the distribution map was generated accordingly. The results show: (1) There are three red tide-prone areas, which are outside the Yangtze River estuary and the eastern of Sheshan, Huaniaoshan-Shengshan-Gouqi, Zhoushan and the eastern of Zhujiajian. The red tide occurred 174 times in total, in which there were 25 times covered the area was larger than 1 000 km2. After 2000, the frequency of red tide were significantly increasing; (2) The frequent occurrence of red tide was in May (51% of total occurrence) and June (20% of total occurrence); (3) In all of the red tide plankton, the dominant species were Prorocentrum danghaiense, Skeletonema costatum, Prorocentrum dantatum, Nactiluca scientillans. The red tides caused by these species were 38, 35, 15, 10 times separately.

  17. Potential dose distributions at proposed surface radioactvity clearance levels resulting from occupational scenarios.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamboj, S.; Yu, C.; Rabovsky, J. (Environmental Science Division); (USDOE)

    2011-08-02

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the potential dose distribution resulting from surface radioactivity, using occupational radiation exposure scenarios. The surface radioactivity clearance values considered in this analysis may ultimately replace those currently specified in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements and guidance for radiological protection of workers, the public and the environment. The surface contamination values apply to radioactive contamination deposited on a surface (i.e., not incorporated into the interior of the material). For these calculations, the dose coefficients for intake of radionuclides were taken from ICRP Publication 68 (ICRP 1994), and external exposure dose coefficients were taken from the compact disc (CD) that accompanied Federal Guidance Report (FGR) 13 (Eckerman et al. 1999). The ICRP Publication 68 dose coefficients were based on ICRP Publication 60 (ICRP 1990) and were used specifically for worker dose calculations. The calculated dose in this analysis is the 'effective dose' (ED), rather than the 'effective dose equivalent' (EDE).

  18. Spatio-temporal distribution of localized aerosol loading in China: A satellite view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kun; Chen, Xiaoling

    2017-08-01

    In recent years, haze pollution and high concentrations of particulate matter frequently occur in many mega cities of China, which has seriously impacted the regional air quality, and further caused harm to human health. Although satellite observation provides a convenient way to evaluate air quality in space and time, satellite measurements do not separate between natural and anthropogenic aerosols. To discriminate anthropogenic aerosol contribution from satellite observations, we proposed the concept of Local Aerosol Optical Depth (LAOD) to describe the localized aerosol loading. A comparative analysis was performed between seasonal/monthly Mean AOD (MAOD), LAOD and ground measured PM2.5/PM10. The comparison results show that LAOD has better linear relationship with PM2.5/PM10 than MAOD in central and eastern China with persistent localized aerosol emissions. Based on the MODIS Deep Blue AOD dataset from 2001 to 2015, we analyzed the spatio-temporal distribution of LAOD over China. Spatially, high LAODs are mainly distributed in Sichuan basin, North China Plain, and central China; temporally, LAOD over China presents an upward trend (+0.003 year-1) during 2001-2007 and a weak downward (-0.002 year-1) trend from 2008 to 2015. LAOD was also found to be highly correlated with haze frequency over most areas of central and eastern China, especially in North China Plain with a correlation coefficient of 0.87 (P pollution in China.

  19. [Interdependence of plankton spatial distribution and plancton biomass temporal oscillations: mathematical simulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedinskiĭ, A B; Tikhonova, I A; Li, B L; Malchow, H

    2003-01-01

    The dynamics of aquatic biological communities in a patchy environment is of great interest in respect to interrelations between phenomena at various spatial and time scales. To study the complex plankton dynamics in relation to variations of such a biologically essential parameter as the fish predation rate, we use a simple reaction-diffusion model of trophic interactions between phytoplankton, zooplankton, and fish. We suggest that plankton is distributed between two habitats one of which is fish-free due to hydrological inhomogeneity, while the other is fish-populated. We show that temporal variations in the fish predation rate do not violate the strong correspondence between the character of spatial distribution of plankton and changes of plankton biomass in time: regular temporal oscillations of plankton biomass correspond to large-scale plankton patches, while chaotic oscillations correspond to small-scale plankton patterns. As in the case of the constant fish predation rate, the chaotic plankton dynamics is characterized by coexistence of the chaotic attractor and limit cycle.

  20. Spatio-Temporal Distribution and Hotspots of Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease (HFMD in Northern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratchaphon Samphutthanon

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease (HFMD is an emerging viral disease, and at present, there are no antiviral drugs or vaccines available to control it. Outbreaks have persisted for the past 10 years, particularly in northern Thailand. This study aimed to elucidate the phenomenon of HFMD outbreaks from 2003 to 2012 using general statistics and spatial-temporal analysis employing a GIS-based method. The spatial analysis examined data at the village level to create a map representing the distribution pattern, mean center, standard deviation ellipse and hotspots for each outbreak. A temporal analysis was used to analyze the correlation between monthly case data and meteorological factors. The results indicate that the disease can occur at any time of the year, but appears to peak in the rainy and cold seasons. The distribution of outbreaks exhibited a clustered pattern. Most mean centers and standard deviation ellipses occurred in similar areas. The linear directional mean values of the outbreaks were oriented toward the south. When separated by season, it was found that there was a significant correlation with the direction of the southwest monsoon at the same time. An autocorrelation analysis revealed that hotspots tended to increase even when patient cases subsided. In particular, a new hotspot was found in the recent year in Mae Hong Son province.

  1. Reproducibility of spatial and temporal distribution of aseismic slips in Hyuga-nada of southwest Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Ryoko; Miyazaki, Shin'ichi; Hyodo, Mamoru; Hori, Takane

    2014-09-01

    The Hyuga-nada region of southwest Japan, which is located off the east coast of Kyushu Island, may have the potential to generate great interplate earthquakes along the Nankai trough in the future. In this area, thrust earthquakes of M = 6.7-7.2 have occurred with recurrence intervals of approximately 30 years. In association with these earthquakes, possible local heterogeneities of plate coupling may be expected within 100 km from the coast in the Hyuga-nada region. We investigate numerical experiments to determine the spatial and temporal resolution of slip on the plate interface beneath the Hyuga-nada offshore region. For this purpose, we calculated synthetic displacement data from the result of numerical simulation conducted for the afterslip following an Mw 6.8 earthquake, for existing global positioning system stations on land and planned ocean floor seismic network stations. The spatial and temporal distribution of fault slip is then estimated using a Kalman filter-based inversion. The slip distribution estimated by using ocean floor stations demonstrates that the heterogeneity of plate coupling is resolved approximately within 50 km from the coastal area. This heterogeneity corresponds to the coseismic area of an Mw 6.8 earthquake with a radius of 10 km. Our study quantitatively evaluates the spatial resolution of aseismic slip in the Hyuga-nada region. Analysis based on continuous ocean floor data is useful for resolving the spatial variations of heterogeneities in plate couplings.

  2. Spatial and Temporal Distributions of Air Pollutants and Size Distribution of Aerosols over Central and Eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Honglei; Shen, Lijuan; Zhu, Bin; Kang, Hanqing; Hou, Xuewei; Miao, Qing; Yang, Yang; Shi, Shuangshuang

    2017-05-01

    The origins and spatial and temporal distributions of air pollutants (PM 2.5 , PM 10 , CO, SO 2 , NO 2 and O 3 ) during May to June of 2015 were investigated using data from 1490 monitoring sites in China. Aerosol number concentrations and meteorological data from Shijiazhuang, Nanjing, and Suzhou were combined with the MIX Asian emission data and the HYSPLIT model. Furthermore, the diurnal variation, size distribution, and main sources of air pollutants and aerosols were selectively characterized in the North China Plain (NCP) and the Yangtze River Delta (YRD). High values of particulate matter concentrations (PM), including PM 2.5 and PM 10 , occurred in the northwestern and central regions of eastern China. Elevated PM 2.5 and PM 10 concentrations represented natural dust sources and anthropogenic resident, power plant, industry, and traffic emissions sources, respectively. The concentrated distributions of SO 2 were similar to those of PM. The CO concentrations were distributed uniformly in China. High O 3 values occurred above the Qinghai province. During the observation period, the air masses mainly originated from the northwest NCP and from the southwest or northeastern ocean in the YRD, resulting in high concentrations of PM 2.5 , PM 10 , SO 2 , and CO in the NCP, the average values of which were 61.8 ± 40.0, 118.8 ± 66.4, 24.1 ± 24.6 μg m -3 , and 1.2 ± 0.9 mg m -3 , respectively, and were 1.2, 1.4, 1.5, and 1.3 times larger than those in the YRD. NO 2 had higher concentrations in the YRD with an average of 43.7 ± 24.8 μg m -3 , which was 1.2 times larger than that in the NCP. The diurnal variations of PM, NO 2 and CO had bimodal distributions and SO 2 and O 3 had unimodal distributions in the NCP and YRD. The aerosol number concentrations had average values of 12,661 ± 5266, 11,189 ± 5905, and 12,797 ± 5931 cm -3 in Shijiazhuang, Nanjing, and Suzhou. Their diurnal variations displayed trimodal peaks at 18:00-21:00, 11

  3. Development of a phantom for dose distribution verification in Stereotactic Radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Nilseia Aparecida; da Rosa, Luiz Antonio Ribeiro; Batista, Delano Valdivino Santos; Carvalho, Arnaldo Rangel

    2013-09-01

    A geometric acrylic phantom was designed and built for dose distribution verification in Stereotactic Radiosurgery. Acrylic objects representing the tumor tissue, (target volume (TV)), and the organ at risk (OAR), the brainstem, were inserted inside this phantom. The TV is represented by two semi-spheres of acrylic with a diameter of 13.0 mm, both having a central cavity for accommodation of a TLD-100 detector and a small radiochromic Gafchromic EBT film. The OAR is represented by the two parts of a 38.0 mm length acrylic cylinder with a diameter 18.0 mm and cavities along the cylinder central axis able to accommodate 5 TLD - 100 detectors and another of EBT film between the two cylinder parts. This experimental setup was submitted to a radiosurgical treatment, after which the TL dosimeters were evaluated and their responses were compared with the planned dose values. The radiochromic EBT films showed the dose distributions. The linear accelerator used was a Varian 2300 C/D, generating a 6 MV photon beam. The investigated phantom system was able to check the accuracy of dose delivery to predetermined points and the dose distribution due to stereotactic radiosurgery treatments and proved to be a good tool for quality control in these situations. Copyright © 2013 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of dosimeter type for commissioning small photon beams on calculated dose distribution in stereotactic radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Garduño, O A; Rodríguez-Ponce, M; Gamboa-deBuen, I; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M; Galván de la Cruz, O O; Rivera-Montalvo, T

    2014-09-01

    To assess the impact of the detector used to commission small photon beams on the calculated dose distribution in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). In this study, six types of detectors were used to characterize small photon beams: three diodes [a silicon stereotactic field diode SFD, a silicon diode SRS, and a silicon diode E], an ionization chamber CC01, and two types of radiochromic film models EBT and EBT2. These detectors were used to characterize circular collimated beams that were generated by a Novalis linear accelerator. This study was conducted in two parts. First, the following dosimetric data, which are of particular interest in SRS, were compared for the different detectors: the total scatter factor (TSF), the tissue phantom ratios (TPRs), and the off-axis ratios (OARs). Second, the commissioned data sets were incorporated into the treatment planning system (TPS) to compare the calculated dose distributions and the dose volume histograms (DVHs) that were obtained using the different detectors. The TSFs data measured by all of the detectors were in good agreement with each other within the respective statistical uncertainties: two exceptions, where the data were systematically below those obtained for the other detectors, were the CC01 results for all of the circular collimators and the EBT2 film results for circular collimators with diameters below 10.0 mm. The OAR results obtained for all of the detectors were in excellent agreement for all of the circular collimators. This observation was supported by the gamma-index test. The largest difference in the TPR data was found for the 4.0 mm circular collimator, followed by the 10.0 and 20.0 mm circular collimators. The results for the calculated dose distributions showed that all of the detectors passed the gamma-index test at 100% for the 3 mm/3% criteria. The aforementioned observation was true regardless of the size of the calculation grid for all of the circular collimators. Finally, the dose volume

  5. Effect of dosimeter type for commissioning small photon beams on calculated dose distribution in stereotactic radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Garduño, O. A., E-mail: oagarciag@innn.edu.mx, E-mail: amanda.garcia.g@gmail.com [Laboratorio de Física Médica, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía, Mexico City 14269, México and Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Legaria 694, México City 11500, México (Mexico); Rodríguez-Ponce, M. [Departamento de Biofísica, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, Mexico City 14080, México (Mexico); Gamboa-deBuen, I. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico City 04510 (Mexico); Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico City 04510 (Mexico); Galván de la Cruz, O. O. [Laboratorio de Física Médica, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía, Mexico City 14269, México (Mexico); and others

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: To assess the impact of the detector used to commission small photon beams on the calculated dose distribution in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: In this study, six types of detectors were used to characterize small photon beams: three diodes [a silicon stereotactic field diode SFD, a silicon diode SRS, and a silicon diode E], an ionization chamber CC01, and two types of radiochromic film models EBT and EBT2. These detectors were used to characterize circular collimated beams that were generated by a Novalis linear accelerator. This study was conducted in two parts. First, the following dosimetric data, which are of particular interest in SRS, were compared for the different detectors: the total scatter factor (TSF), the tissue phantom ratios (TPRs), and the off-axis ratios (OARs). Second, the commissioned data sets were incorporated into the treatment planning system (TPS) to compare the calculated dose distributions and the dose volume histograms (DVHs) that were obtained using the different detectors. Results: The TSFs data measured by all of the detectors were in good agreement with each other within the respective statistical uncertainties: two exceptions, where the data were systematically below those obtained for the other detectors, were the CC01 results for all of the circular collimators and the EBT2 film results for circular collimators with diameters below 10.0 mm. The OAR results obtained for all of the detectors were in excellent agreement for all of the circular collimators. This observation was supported by the gamma-index test. The largest difference in the TPR data was found for the 4.0 mm circular collimator, followed by the 10.0 and 20.0 mm circular collimators. The results for the calculated dose distributions showed that all of the detectors passed the gamma-index test at 100% for the 3 mm/3% criteria. The aforementioned observation was true regardless of the size of the calculation grid for all of the circular collimators

  6. Temporal distribution of earthquakes using renewal process in the Dasht-e-Bayaz region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Mehdi; Salehi, Masoud

    2017-09-01

    Temporal distribution of earthquakes with M w > 6 in the Dasht-e-Bayaz region, eastern Iran has been investigated using time-dependent models. Based on these types of models, it is assumed that the times between consecutive large earthquakes follow a certain statistical distribution. For this purpose, four time-dependent inter-event distributions including the Weibull, Gamma, Lognormal, and the Brownian Passage Time (BPT) are used in this study and the associated parameters are estimated using the method of maximum likelihood estimation. The suitable distribution is selected based on logarithm likelihood function and Bayesian Information Criterion. The probability of the occurrence of the next large earthquake during a specified interval of time was calculated for each model. Then, the concept of conditional probability has been applied to forecast the next major (M w > 6) earthquake in the site of our interest. The emphasis is on statistical methods which attempt to quantify the probability of an earthquake occurring within a specified time, space, and magnitude windows. According to obtained results, the probability of occurrence of an earthquake with M w > 6 in the near future is significantly high.

  7. Nuclear reaction secondary particle dose distributions and dose enhancement by boron neutron capture in proton beam therapy evaluated using the LAHET code system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laky, Peter Gyula

    The objective of this study was to use the LAHET Code System (LCS), which has recently been used in shielding calculations for proton therapy, to model the proton, neutron and photon dose and equivalent dose distributions created in tissue during proton beam cancer therapy. Proton beams used for therapy have shown distinct advantages over other therapeutic radiation treatments due to the rapid distal dose falloff in the region of the Bragg Peak. Nuclear reactions caused by the primary proton beam in beam modifying devices and patient tissues create secondary particles which contribute to the dose received by the patient inside and outside of the targeted region. The spatial distribution of the dose created by these secondary particles is an important consideration in the choice of beam modification methods and treatment volume planning, since a goal of radiation therapy is to minimize dose to normal tissue while maximizing dose to the tumor. The photon dose was found to be negligible in all target regions. The neutron dose and dose equivalent were found to be negligible in the tissue volume targeted for proton beam therapy, but contributed a majority of the dose outside of the treatment volume. Finally, LAHET was used to evaluate the utility of exploiting the secondary neutrons for supplemental boron neutron capture therapy during proton beam therapy. These results indicate that the additional useful dose due to BNCT is negligible.

  8. Study on dose distribution of therapeutic proton beams with prompt gamma measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. W. [National Cancer Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Min, C. H.; Kim, C. H.; Kim, D. K.; Yoon, M. Y. [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    The proton beam has an advantage of the sharp dose falloff in dose distribution called Bragg peak while conventional radiation therapy modalities such as photons exhibit considerable amount of exit dose. To take advantage of this property it is important to know the exact location of the distal dose falloff. An error can cause overdose to the normal tissue or underdose to the tumor volume. The only way of finding out the dose distribution in-situ in particle therapy is to measure the gammas produced by nuclear reactions with tissue materials. Two kinds of gammas can be used: one is prompt gamma and the other is coincident gamma from the positron-emission isotopes. We chose to detect prompt gammas, and developed a prompt gamma scanning system (PGS). The proton beams of the proton therapy facility at National Cancer Center were used. The gamma distribution was compared to the dose distribution measured by an ionization chamber at three different energies of 100, 150, 200 MeV's. The two distributions were well correlated within 1-2 mm. The effect of high-energy neutron appeared as blurred distribution near the distal dose falloff at the energy of 200 MeV. We then tested the PGS shielding design by adding additional layer of paraffin plates outside of the PGS, and found that fast neutrons significantly affect the background level. But the location of the dose fall-off was nearly coincident. The analysis of gamma energy spectrum showed that cut-off energy in gamma counting can be adjusted to enhance the signal to noise ratio. Further the ATOM phantom, which has similar tissue structure to human, was used to investigate the gamma distribution for the case of inhomogeneous matter. The location of dose falloff region was found to be well defined as for water phantom. Next an actual therapy beam, which was produced by the double scattering method, was used, for which the dose falloff by the gamma distribution was completely wiped out by background neutrons. It is not

  9. A practical tool to evaluate dose distributions using radiochromic film in radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamponi, M; Bona, R; Poggiu, A; Marini, P

    2015-02-01

    Triple channel algorithm and specific procedures make more reliable radiochromic dosimetry for treatment planning verification and quality assurance in radiation therapy. A tool to obtain radiochromic dose distributions and compare them with the ones resulting from a treatment planning system was developed and applied. The tool was developed as Microsoft Excel macro; it builds dose calibration curves against net optical density of Gafchromic EBT3 film, produces axial, coronal and sagittal dose maps and allows to evaluate them against dose distributions calculated by the Varian treatment planning system Eclipse using gamma index and gamma angle. The net optical density standard errors of estimate of calibration curves at 6 MV Varian DBX600 linac energy were 0.2%, 0.4% and 0.2% for the red, green and blue channels. Tests of these curves by means of three independent eight dose points measurement series, at 15 MV and 6 MV Varian 2100C linac and at 6 MV DBX600 linac energies, showed less than 2% of dose errors for the red channel and less than 3% for the green channel in the range 100-450 cGy. The comparisons between dose distributions from Gafchromic EBT3 triple channel algorithm and the ones from Eclipse analytic anisotropic algorithm (AAA) showed values of gamma index 95th percentile between 0.6 and 1.0. The obtained results encourage the application of this tool in radiation therapy quality assurance. Copyright © 2014 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of the distribution of absorbed dose in child phantoms exposed to diagnostic medical x rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, W. L.; Poston, J. W.; Warner, G. G.

    1978-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine, by theoretical calculation and experimental measurement, the absorbed dose distributions in two heterogeneous phantoms representing one-year- and five-year-old children from typical radiographic examinations for those ages. Theoretical work included the modification of an existing internal dose code which uses Monte Carlo methods to determine doses within the Snyder-Fisher mathematical phantom. A Ge(Li) detector and a pinhole collimator were used to measure x-ray spectra which served as input to the modified Monte Carlo codes which were used to calculate organ doses in children. The calculated and measured tissue-air values were compared for a number of organs. For most organs, the results of the calculated absorbed doses agreed with the measured absorbed doses within twice the coefficient of variation of the calculated value. The absorbed dose to specific organs for several selected radiological examinations are given for one-year-old, five-year-old, and adult phantoms.

  11. Dosimetric verification of stereotactic radiosurgery/stereotactic radiotherapy dose distributions using Gafchromic EBT3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cusumano, Davide, E-mail: davide.cusumano@unimi.it [School of Medical Physics, University of Milan, Milan (Italy); Fumagalli, Maria L. [Health Department, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Milan (Italy); Marchetti, Marcello; Fariselli, Laura [Department of Neurosurgery, Radiotherapy Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Milan (Italy); De Martin, Elena [Health Department, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Milan (Italy)

    2015-10-01

    Aim of this study is to examine the feasibility of using the new Gafchromic EBT3 film in a high-dose stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy quality assurance procedure. Owing to the reduced dimensions of the involved lesions, the feasibility of scanning plan verification films on the scanner plate area with the best uniformity rather than using a correction mask was evaluated. For this purpose, signal values dispersion and reproducibility of film scans were investigated. Uniformity was then quantified in the selected area and was found to be within 1.5% for doses up to 8 Gy. A high-dose threshold level for analyses using this procedure was established evaluating the sensitivity of the irradiated films. Sensitivity was found to be of the order of centiGray for doses up to 6.2 Gy and decreasing for higher doses. The obtained results were used to implement a procedure comparing dose distributions delivered with a CyberKnife system to planned ones. The procedure was validated through single beam irradiation on a Gafchromic film. The agreement between dose distributions was then evaluated for 13 patients (brain lesions, 5 Gy/die prescription isodose ~80%) using gamma analysis. Results obtained using Gamma test criteria of 5%/1 mm show a pass rate of 94.3%. Gamma frequency parameters calculation for EBT3 films showed to strongly depend on subtraction of unexposed film pixel values from irradiated ones. In the framework of the described dosimetric procedure, EBT3 films proved to be effective in the verification of high doses delivered to lesions with complex shapes and adjacent to organs at risk.

  12. Dosimetric and Clinical Analysis of Spatial Distribution of the Radiation Dose in Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Vestibular Schwannoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massager, Nicolas, E-mail: nmassage@ulb.ac.be [Gamma Knife Center, Hospital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium); Neurosurgery-Department, Hospital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium); Lonneville, Sarah [Gamma Knife Center, Hospital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium); Neurosurgery-Department, Hospital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium); Delbrouck, Carine [Gamma Knife Center, Hospital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium); ENT-Department, Hospital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium); Benmebarek, Nadir [Gamma Knife Center, Hospital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium); Neurosurgery-Department, Hospital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium); Desmedt, Francoise [Gamma Knife Center, Hospital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium); Radiophysics, Bordet Institute, Brussels (Belgium); Devriendt, Daniel [Gamma Knife Center, Hospital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium); Radiotherapy, Bordet Institute, Brussels (Belgium)

    2011-11-15

    Objectives: We investigated variations in the distribution of radiation dose inside (dose inhomogeneity) and outside (dose falloff) the target volume during Gamma Knife (GK) irradiation of vestibular schwannoma (VS). We analyzed the relationship between some parameters of dose distribution and the clinical and radiological outcome of patients. Methods and Materials: Data from dose plans of 203 patients treated for a vestibular schwannoma by GK C using same prescription dose (12 Gy at the 50% isodose) were collected. Four different dosimetric indexes were defined and calculated retrospectively in all plannings on the basis of dose-volume histograms: Paddick conformity index (PI), gradient index (GI), homogeneity index (HI), and unit isocenter (UI). The different measures related to distribution of the radiation dose were compared with hearing and tumor outcome of 203 patients with clinical and radiological follow-up of minimum 2 years. Results: Mean, median, SD, and ranges of the four indexes of dose distribution analyzed were calculated; large variations were found between dose plans. We found a high correlation between the target volume and PI, GI, and UI. No significant association was found between the indexes of dose distribution calculated in this study and tumor control, tumor volume shrinkage, hearing worsening, loss of functional hearing, or complete hearing loss at last follow-up. Conclusions: Parameters of distribution of the radiation dose during GK radiosurgery for VS can be highly variable between dose plans. The tumor and hearing outcome of patients treated is not significantly related to these global indexes of dose distribution inside and around target volume. In GK radiosurgery for VS, the outcome seems more to be influenced by local radiation dose delivered to specific structures or volumes than by global dose gradients.

  13. Spatio-temporal distribution of energy radiation from low frequency tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, T.; Obara, K.

    2007-12-01

    iteratively. As a first application of our method, we estimated the spatio-temporal distribution of energy radiation for 2006 May episodic tremor and slip event occurred in western Shikoku, Japan, region. Tremor location and their radiated energy are estimated for every 1 minute. We counted the number of located LFTs and summed up their total energy at each grid having 0.05-degree spacing at each day to figure out the spatio-temporal distribution of energy release of tremors. The resultant spatial distribution of radiated energy is concentrated at a specific region. Additionally, we see the daily change of released energy, both of location and amount, which corresponds to the migration of tremor activity. The spatio-temporal distribution of energy radiation of tremors is in good agreement with a spatio-temporal slip distribution of slow slip event estimated from Hi-net tiltmeter record (Hirose et al. 2007). This suggests that small continuous tremors occur associated with a rupture process of slow slip.

  14. Image quality and dose distributions of three linac-based imaging modalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzierma, Yvonne; Ames, Evemarie; Nuesken, Frank; Palm, Jan; Licht, Norbert; Ruebe, Christian [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    Linac-based patient imaging is possible with a variety of techniques using different photon energies. The purpose of this work is to compare three imaging systems operating at 6 MV, flattening free filter (FFF) 1 MV, and 121 kV. The dose distributions of all pretreatment set-up images (over 1,000) were retrospectively calculated on the planning computed tomography (CT) images for all patients with prostate and head-and-neck cancer treated at our institution in 2013. We analyzed the dose distribution and the dose to organs at risk. For head-and-neck cancer patients, the imaging dose from 6-MV cone beam CT (CBCT) reached maximum values at around 8 cGy. The 1-MV CBCT dose was about 63-79 % of the 6-MV CBCT dose for all organs at risk. Planar imaging reduced the imaging dose from CBCT to 30-40 % for both megavoltage modalities. The dose from the kilovoltage CBCT was 4-10 % of the 6-MV CBCT dose. For prostate cancer patients, the maximum dose from 6-MV CBCT reached 13-15 cGy, and was reduced to 66-73 % for 1 MV. Planar imaging reduces the MV CBCT dose to 10-20 %. The kV CBCT dose is 15-20 % of the 6-MV CBCT dose, slightly higher than the dose from MV axes. The dose distributions differ markedly in response to the different beam profiles and dose-depth characteristics. (orig.) [German] Linac-basierte Bildgebung zur Patientenlagerung ist mit einer Vielzahl von Techniken unterschiedlicher Photonenenergien moeglich. Ziel dieser Arbeit ist der Vergleich dreier Bildgebungssysteme mit 6 MV (Megavolt), FFF 1 MV, und 121 kV (Kilovolt). Fuer alle im Jahr 2013 an unserer Klinik behandelten Prostata- und HNO-Patienten wurden retrospektiv die Dosisverteilungen aller Verifikationsaufnahmen (ueber 1000 insgesamt) auf der Planungs-Computertomographie (CT) berechnet. Wir analysierten die Dosisverteilung und die Dosis an den Risikoorganen. Bei HNO-Patienten erreichte die Dosis von 6 MV ''Cone-beam''-CT (CBCT)Maximalwerte um 8 cGy. Mit 1 MV wird die Dosis auf 63

  15. Imaging the distribution of photoswitchable probes with temporally-unmixed multispectral optoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deán-Ben, X. Luís.; Stiel, Andre C.; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Westmeyer, Gil G.; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Synthetic and genetically encoded chromo- and fluorophores have become indispensable tools for biomedical research enabling a myriad of applications in imaging modalities based on biomedical optics. The versatility offered by the optoacoustic (photoacoustic) contrast mechanism enables to detect signals from any substance absorbing light, and hence these probes can be used as optoacoustic contrast agents. While contrast versatility generally represents an advantage of optoacoustics, the strong background signal generated by light absorption in endogeneous chromophores hampers the optoacoustic capacity to detect a photo-absorbing agent of interest. Increasing the optoacoustic sensitivity is then determined by the capability to differentiate specific features of such agent. For example, multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT) exploits illuminating the tissue at multiple optical wavelengths to spectrally resolve (unmix) the contribution of different chromophores. Herein, we present an alternative approach to enhance the sensitivity and specificity in the detection of optoacoustic contrast agents. This is achieved with photoswitchable probes that change optical absorption upon illumination with specific optical wavelengths. Thereby, temporally unmixed MSOT (tuMSOT) is based on photoswitching the compounds according to defined schedules to elicit specific time-varying optoacoustic signals, and then use temporal unmixing algorithms to locate the contrast agent based on their particular temporal profile. The photoswitching kinetics is further affected by light intensity, so that tuMSOT can be employed to estimate the light fluence distribution in a biological sample. The performance of the method is demonstrated herein with the reversibly switchable fluorescent protein Dronpa and its fast-switching fatigue resistant variant Dronpa-M159T.

  16. Dose distribution in the thyroid gland following radiation therapy of breast cancer--a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, S; Reinertsen, K V; Knutstad, K; Olsen, D R; Fosså, S D

    2011-06-09

    To relate the development of post-treatment hypothyroidism with the dose distribution within the thyroid gland in breast cancer (BC) patients treated with loco-regional radiotherapy (RT). In two groups of BC patients postoperatively irradiated by computer tomography (CT)-based RT, the individual dose distributions in the thyroid gland were compared with each other; Cases developed post-treatment hypothyroidism after multimodal treatment including 4-field RT technique. Matched patients in Controls remained free for hypothyroidism. Based on each patient's dose volume histogram (DVH) the volume percentages of the thyroid absorbing respectively 20, 30, 40 and 50 Gy were then estimated (V20, V30, V40 and V50) together with the individual mean thyroid dose over the whole gland (MeanTotGy). The mean and median thyroid dose for the included patients was about 30 Gy, subsequently the total volume of the thyroid gland (VolTotGy) and the absolute volumes (cm3) receiving respectively thyroid gland receivingthyroid glands after loco-radiotherapy of BC, the risk of post-treatment hypothyroidism depends on the volume of the thyroid gland.

  17. Temporal variations in supraglacial debris distribution on Baltoro Glacier, Karakoram between 2001 and 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Morgan J.; Glasser, Neil F.; Quincey, Duncan J.; Mayer, Christoph; Rowan, Ann V.; Irvine-Fynn, Tristram D. L.

    2017-10-01

    Distribution of supraglacial debris in a glacier system varies spatially and temporally due to differing rates of debris input, transport and deposition. Supraglacial debris distribution governs the thickness of a supraglacial debris layer, an important control on the amount of ablation that occurs under such a debris layer. Characterising supraglacial debris layer thickness on a glacier is therefore key to calculating ablation across a glacier surface. The spatial pattern of debris thickness on Baltoro Glacier has previously been calculated for one discrete point in time (2004) using satellite thermal data and an empirically based relationship between supraglacial debris layer thickness and debris surface temperature identified in the field. Here, the same empirically based relationship was applied to two further datasets (2001, 2012) to calculate debris layer thickness across Baltoro Glacier for three discrete points over an 11-year period (2001, 2004, 2012). Surface velocity and sediment flux were also calculated, as well as debris thickness change between periods. Using these outputs, alongside geomorphological maps of Baltoro Glacier produced for 2001, 2004 and 2012, spatiotemporal changes in debris distribution for a sub-decadal timescale were investigated. Sediment flux remained constant throughout the 11-year period. The greatest changes in debris thickness occurred along medial moraines, the locations of mass movement deposition and areas of interaction between tributary glaciers and the main glacier tongue. The study confirms the occurrence of spatiotemporal changes in supraglacial debris layer thickness on sub-decadal timescales, independent of variation in surface velocity. Instead, variation in rates of debris distribution are primarily attributed to frequency and magnitude of mass movement events over decadal timescales, with climate, regional uplift and erosion rates expected to control debris inputs over centurial to millennial timescales. Inclusion

  18. Spatio-temporal distribution of dengue fever under scenarios of climate change in the southern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chieh-Han; Yu, Hwa-Lung

    2014-05-01

    Dengue fever has been recognized as the most important widespread vector-borne infectious disease in recent decades. Over 40% of the world's population is risk from dengue and about 50-100 million people are infected world wide annually. Previous studies have found that dengue fever is highly correlated with climate covariates. Thus, the potential effects of global climate change on dengue fever are crucial to epidemic concern, in particular, the transmission of the disease. This present study investigated the nonlinearity of time-delayed impact of climate on spatio-temporal variations of dengue fever in the southern Taiwan during 1998 to 2011. A distributed lag nonlinear model (DLNM) is used to assess the nonlinear lagged effects of meteorology. The statistically significant meteorological factors are considered, including weekly minimum temperature and maximum 24-hour rainfall. The relative risk and the distribution of dengue fever then predict under various climate change scenarios. The result shows that the relative risk is similar for different scenarios. In addition, the impact of rainfall on the incidence risk is higher than temperature. Moreover, the incidence risk is associated to spatially population distribution. The results can be served as practical reference for environmental regulators for the epidemic prevention under climate change scenarios.

  19. Spatial and temporal distribution of carbon dioxide gas using GOSAT data over IRAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falahatkar, Samereh; Mousavi, Seyed Mohsen; Farajzadeh, Manochehr

    2017-11-09

    CO2 concentration (XCO2) shows the spatial and temporal variation in Iran. The major purpose of this investigation is the assessment of the spatial distribution of carbon dioxide concentration in the different seasons of 2013 based on the Thermal And Near Infrared Sensor for Carbon Observation-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS) level 2 GOSAT data by implementing the ordinary kriging (OK) method. In this study, the Land Surface Temperature (LST), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and metrological parameters (temperature and precipitation) were used for the analysis of the spatial distribution of CO2 over Iran in 2013. The spatial distribution maps of XCO2 show the highest concentration of this gas in the south and south-east and the lowest concentration in the north and north-west. These results indicate that the concentration of carbon dioxide decreased with the increase of LST and temperature and a decrease of NDVI and humidity in the study area. Therefore, the existence of vegetation has an effective role in capturing carbon from the atmosphere by photosynthesis phenomena, and sustainable land management can be effective for carbon absorption from the atmosphere and mitigation of climate change in arid and semi-arid regions.

  20. Spatio-temporal distribution and emergence of beetles in arable fields in relation to soil moisture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, J M; Thomas, C F G; Birkett, T; Southway, S

    2007-02-01

    Predatory beetles contribute to the control of crop pests and are an important food resource for farmland birds. Many of these beetle species overwinter as larvae within agricultural soils, however, their spatio-temporal emergence patterns are poorly understood, even though such knowledge can assist with their management for biocontrol. Soil moisture is considered to be a key factor influencing oviposition site selection and larval survival. The time, density and spatial pattern of Carabidae and Staphylidae emergence was therefore measured across two fields and compared to soil moisture levels in the previous winter and adult distribution in the previous July. The mean density of Carabidae and Staphylidae that emerged between April and harvest within each field was 157 and 86 m-2, indicating that soils are an important over-wintering habitat for beneficial invertebrates and should be managed sympathetically if numbers are to be increased. Of the species that were sufficiently numerous to allow their spatial pattern to be analysed, all showed a heterogeneous emergence pattern, although patches with high emergence were stable over the sampling period. The distribution of eight species was influenced by soil moisture levels in the previous winter and eight species, although not the same, were spatially associated with the distribution of adults in the previous summer suggesting that the females selected oviposition areas with the appropriate soil wetness.

  1. Spatial and temporal distributions of the sponge fauna insouthern Italian lagoon systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. LONGO

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The present work focused on the taxonomic composition, spatial distributions, and temporal distributions of the sponge fauna from the main lagoon systems of southern Italy: Lesina, Varano, Taranto, Alimini, Faro, Ganzirri, Tindari and Marsala. Overall, 62 sponge species were recorded, belonging to the classes Demospongiae (52 species, Calcarea (8 and Homoscleromorpha (2. All the lagoon systems studied hosted sponges, even if with marked differences. Species richness varied from one (Lesina to 45 (Marsala. A large number of the species recorded during this study (52% was found only at a single site, whereas a species only (Halichondria (H. panicea was present in all the environments studied. Sponges colonised all available substrates. Salinity was the ecological factort hat best explained the spatial distribution of sponges, even though the wide heterogeneity of sponge assemblages, strongly suggests an important role of stochastic factors acting on pre- and post-settlement phases. Comparison of the present data with lists available from the literature shows that sponge assemblages from most of the studied lagoons were quite persistent. However, in some of the lagoons remarkable extinction processes, probably related to massive and prolonged anthropogenic pressures, have contributed to large changes in the sponge patterns.

  2. Human influence on the temporal dynamics and spatial distribution of forest biomass carbon in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiwei; Lu, Fei; Luo, Yunjian; Bo, Wenjing; Kong, Lingqiao; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Bojie; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Wang, Xiaoke

    2017-08-01

    Global carbon cycles are impacted by human activity primarily via fossil fuel combustion and forest carbon budget alterations. In this study, the temporal dynamics and spatial distribution of forest biomass carbon (FBC) stock and density in China were analyzed to assess the large-scale effects of humans on FBC. The results indicated that from 1977 to 2013, the FBC stock increased by 62.9%, from 4,335 to 7,064 Tg C, owing to human-driven forestation and ecological restoration programs. Because of intensive human impacts, 44.2%-54.6% of the FBC stock was concentrated in four provinces (Heilongjiang, Yunnan, Inner Mongolia, and Sichuan) and the FBC density increased from the densely populated southeastern provinces to the sparsely populated northeastern and western provinces. On a spatial scale, the FBC density was significantly negatively related to population density, and the degree of the dependence of the FBC density on population density has been declining since 1998. This improvement in human-forest relations is related to economic development and programs in China that have promoted forestation and reduced deforestation. These results suggest that human impacts, including forestation, deforestation, population density, and economic development, have played significant roles in determining the temporal and spatial variations of FBC in the anthropogenic era. Moreover, our findings have implications for forest management and improvement of the forest carbon sink in China.

  3. Spatial and temporal distribution of fish larvae in marginal lagoons of Pantanal, Mato Grosso State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Keyla Tondato

    Full Text Available An analysis was made of the spatial and temporal distribution of the abundance and composition of fish larvae assemblies, aiming to ascertain correlations with biotic and abiotic factors in marginal lagoons of the Cuiabá River floodplain in Brazil's Pantanal wetlands. Samples were collected bimonthly in the pelagic region of the marginal lagoons (fourteen lagoons close to the littoral zone covered by aquatic macrophytes from December 2006 to April 2007. The captured individuals consisted of 2,739 larvae, represented predominantly by Triportheus spp. (Characidae, Parodontidae, Anostomidae, Characidae and Serrasalmidae. Larval density varied among the sample lagoons in December, but the biotic (zooplankton density and abiotic (water temperature, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen, pH, water transparency and lagoon depth factors did not significantly affect larval composition and abundance. Larvae were captured throughout the sample period, with the highest densities occurring in December and early January. Temporally, lagoon depth, water transparency and fluviometric level showed a negative correlation with larval density. Both the zooplankton and the larval density vary positively, responding likewise to the environmental conditions imposed by flooding. The highest larval density was also found to coincide with the first rains (early December, when the rainfall has not yet reached its peak.

  4. Exploiting temporal correlation of speech for error robust and bandwidth flexible distributed speech recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Zheng-Hua; Dalsgaard, Paul; Lindberg, Børge

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the temporal correlation of speech is exploited in front-end feature extraction, client based error recovery and server based error concealment (EC) for distributed speech recognition. First, the paper investigates a half frame rate (HFR) front-end that uses double frame shifting...... and concealment is conducted at the sub-vector level as opposed to conventional techniques where an entire vector is replaced even though only a single bit error occurs. The sub-vector EC is further combined with weighted Viterbi decoding. Encouraging recognition results are observed for the proposed techniques....... Lastly, to understand the effects of applying various EC techniques, this paper introduces three approaches consisting of speech feature, dynamic programming distance and hidden Markov model state duration comparison....

  5. The Impact of the Temporal Distribution of Communicating Civilizations on Their Detectability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbi, Amedeo

    2018-01-01

    We used a statistical model to investigate the detectability (defined by the requirement that causal contact has been initiated with us) of communicating civilizations within a volume of the Universe surrounding our location. If the civilizations are located in our galaxy, the detectability requirement imposes a strict constraint on their epoch of appearance and their communicating life span. This, in turn, implies that our ability to gather empirical evidence of the fraction of civilizations within range of detection strongly depends on the specific features of their temporal distribution. Our approach illuminates aspects of the problem that can escape the standard treatment based on the Drake equation. Therefore, it might provide the appropriate framework for future studies dealing with the evolutionary aspects of the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI).

  6. Identification of the heart wall and chamber based on temporal change of ultrasonic scatterer distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kohei; Taki, Hirofumi; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2017-07-01

    In most current methods for evaluating the cardiac function by ultrasound, the heart wall area is identified manually by an examiner. To eliminate examiner dependence and to improve usability, an automatic heart wall identification method is desirable. Identification based on only echogenicity often fails because of low echogenicity of some areas of the heart wall. In the present study, to determine more essential features, we focused on the relative temporal change of ultrasonic scatterer distribution and proposed three features for identification of the heart wall and the chamber: cross-correlation of RF signals, that of envelopes, and spatial dispersion of movement vectors in small regions. In an in vivo experiment, using echogenicity and the three features, we identified the heart wall and the chamber in the left ventricular long-axis view, resulting in criteria of separability J of 1.69, 1.40, and 3.02 using these features compared with the result of 0.979 using echogenicity.

  7. Temperature distribution in side- and end-pumped laser crystal rods - Temporal and spatial variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrukh, Usamah O.; Brockman, Philip

    1993-01-01

    Knowledge of the temperature distribution of laser rods end pumped by laser diodes or other laser systems is relevant when thermal stress and crystal damage are expected. The temperature of a multipulsed or continuously pumped laser rod is given as a double-series expression and as a function of time. The mathematical model considers all surface cooling rates, the spatial and temporal variations of the pump beam, and the specific heat and thermal conductivity of the rod material. This eigenfunction expansion representation was employed to predict the spatial and time-dependent quasi-steady-state temperature in Ti:sapphire, Nd:YAG, and Cr:LiSAF laser rods of specific dimensions.

  8. Temperature distribution in side- and end-pumped laser crystal rods: temporal and spatial variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrukh, U O; Brockman, P

    1993-04-20

    Knowledge of the temperature distribution of laser rods end pumped by laser diodes or other laser systems is relevant when thermal stress and crystal damage are expected. The temperature of a multipulsed or continuously pumped laser rod is given as a double-series expression and as a function of time. The mathematical model considers all surface cooling rates, the spatial and temporal variations of the pump beam, and the specific heat and thermal conductivity of the rod material. This eigenfunction expansion representation was employed to predict the spatial and time-dependent quasi-steady-state temperature in Ti:sapphire, Nd:YAG, and Cr:LiSAF laser rods of specific dimensions.

  9. Isodose distributions and dose uniformity in the Portuguese gamma irradiation facility calculated using the MCNP code

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, C

    2001-01-01

    A systematic study of isodose distributions and dose uniformity in sample carriers of the Portuguese Gamma Irradiation Facility was carried out using the MCNP code. The absorbed dose rate, gamma flux per energy interval and average gamma energy were calculated. For comparison purposes, boxes filled with air and 'dummy' boxes loaded with layers of folded and crumpled newspapers to achieve a given value of density were used. The magnitude of various contributions to the total photon spectra, including source-dependent factors, irradiator structures, sample material and other origins were also calculated.

  10. Benchmark Experiment of Dose Rate Distributions Around the Gamma Knife Medical Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, K.; Kosako, K.; Kobayashi, Y.; Sonoki, I.

    2014-06-01

    Dose rate measurements around a gamma knife apparatus were performed by using an ionization chamber. Analyses have been performed by using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-5. The nuclear library used for the dose rate distribution of 60Co was MCPLIB04. The calculation model was prepared with a high degree of fidelity, such as the position of each Cobalt source and shielding materials. Comparisons between measured results and calculated ones were performed, and a very good agreement was observed. It is concluded that the Monte Carlo calculation method with its related nuclear data library is very effective for such a complicated radiation oncology apparatus.

  11. Perturbation effects of the carbon fiber-PEEK screws on radiotherapy dose distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevelsky, Alexander; Borzov, Egor; Daniel, Shahar; Bar-Deroma, Raquel

    2017-03-01

    Radiation therapy, in conjunction with surgical implant fixation, is a common combined treatment in cases of bone metastases. However, metal implants generally used in orthopedic implants perturb radiation dose distributions. Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Polyetheretherketone (CFR-PEEK) material has been recently introduced for production of intramedullary nails and plates. The purpose of this work was to investigate the perturbation effects of the new CFR-PEEK screws on radiotherapy dose distributions and to evaluate these effects in comparison with traditional titanium screws. The investigation was performed by means of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for a 6 MV photon beam. The project consisted of two main stages. First, a comparison of measured and MC calculated doses was performed to verify the validity of the MC simulation results for different materials. For this purpose, stainless steel, titanium, and CFR-PEEK plates of various thicknesses were used for attenuation and backscatter measurements in a solid water phantom. For the same setup, MC dose calculations were performed. Next, MC dose calculations for titanium, CFR-PEEK screws, and CFR-PEEK screws with ultrathin titanium coating were performed. For the plates, the results of our MC calculations for all materials were found to be in good agreement with the measurements. This indicates that the MC model can be used for calculation of dose perturbation effects caused by the screws. For the CFR-PEEK screws, the maximum dose perturbation was less than 5%, compared to more than 30% perturbation for the titanium screws. Ultrathin titanium coating had a negligible effect on the dose distribution. CFR-PEEK implants have good prospects for use in radiotherapy because of minimal dose alteration and the potential for more accurate treatment planning. This could favorably influence treatment efficiency and decrease possible over- and underdose of adjacent tissues. The use of such implants has potential clinical advantages

  12. An approach to using conventional brachytherapy software for clinical treatment planning of complex, Monte Carlo-based brachytherapy dose distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, Mark J.; Melhus, Christopher S.; Granero, Domingo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Radiation Oncology Department, Physics Section, ' ' La Fe' ' University Hospital, Avenida Campanar 21, E-46009 Valencia (Spain); Department of Atomic, Molecular, and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, C/Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot, Spain and IFIC (University of Valencia-CSIC), C/Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain)

    2009-06-15

    Certain brachytherapy dose distributions, such as those for LDR prostate implants, are readily modeled by treatment planning systems (TPS) that use the superposition principle of individual seed dose distributions to calculate the total dose distribution. However, dose distributions for brachytherapy treatments using high-Z shields or having significant material heterogeneities are not currently well modeled using conventional TPS. The purpose of this study is to establish a new treatment planning technique (Tufts technique) that could be applied in some clinical situations where the conventional approach is not acceptable and dose distributions present cylindrical symmetry. Dose distributions from complex brachytherapy source configurations determined with Monte Carlo methods were used as input data. These source distributions included the 2 and 3 cm diameter Valencia skin applicators from Nucletron, 4-8 cm diameter AccuBoost peripheral breast brachytherapy applicators from Advanced Radiation Therapy, and a 16 mm COMS-based eye plaque using {sup 103}Pd, {sup 125}I, and {sup 131}Cs seeds. Radial dose functions and 2D anisotropy functions were obtained by positioning the coordinate system origin along the dose distribution cylindrical axis of symmetry. Origin:tissue distance and active length were chosen to minimize TPS interpolation errors. Dosimetry parameters were entered into the PINNACLE TPS, and dose distributions were subsequently calculated and compared to the original Monte Carlo-derived dose distributions. The new planning technique was able to reproduce brachytherapy dose distributions for all three applicator types, producing dosimetric agreement typically within 2% when compared with Monte Carlo-derived dose distributions. Agreement between Monte Carlo-derived and planned dose distributions improved as the spatial resolution of the fitted dosimetry parameters improved. For agreement within 5% throughout the clinical volume, spatial resolution of

  13. Spatial distribution and temporal variability of solar radiant over southern Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waewsak, J.; Chancham, C. [Thaksin Univ., Phatthalung (Thailand). Dept. of Physics, Renewable Energy System Research and Demonstration Center, Solar and Wind Energy Research Lab

    2009-07-01

    The potential for solar energy in Thailand has been estimated at over 50,000 MW for power generation. However, existing power plants in the country produce only 32 MW. Most the the systems have been installed in rural areas, islands and other off-grid sites. The availability and variability of global solar radiant intensity and its spatial distribution are key parameters for designing and testing outdoor solar energy systems. These parameters must be well understood in order to evaluate system efficiency at specific locations. Therefore, this study examined the spatial distribution and temporal variability of solar radiant over southern Thailand using the Surfer computer program. The incident of solar radiation on a horizontal plane was estimated at 14 synoptic stations using the Angstrom's correlation which was obtained from meteorological data. Rainfall quantity at 3 main meteorological stations was used to correlate the hours of sunshine and to predict them in meteorological stations where sunshine recorders were absent but where rainfall data were present. The 3 stations were at the Surat Thani, Phuket and Hat Yai airports. Angstrom's correlation coefficients were obtained using the correlation between the hours of sunshine and day length. The solar radiant was obtained once the extraterrestrial solar radiation was known. The study showed that the solar radiant over southern Thailand varies between 12.51 to 24.54 MJ per m{sup 2} per day. It was concluded that the temporal variation of solar radiant over southern Thailand is highly influenced by the North-East and South-West monsoons. 16 refs., 1 tab., 17 figs.

  14. Independent calculation of dose distributions for helical tomotherapy using a conventional treatment planning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klüter, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.klueter@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Schubert, Kai; Lissner, Steffen; Sterzing, Florian; Oetzel, Dieter; Debus, Jürgen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany, and Heidelberg Institute for Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany, and German Consortium for Translational Cancer Research (DKTK), Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Schlegel, Wolfgang [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Oelfke, Uwe [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany and Joint Department of Physics at The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London SM2 5NG (United Kingdom); Nill, Simeon [Joint Department of Physics at The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London SM2 5NG (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric verification of treatment plans in helical tomotherapy usually is carried out via verification measurements. In this study, a method for independent dose calculation of tomotherapy treatment plans is presented, that uses a conventional treatment planning system with a pencil kernel dose calculation algorithm for generation of verification dose distributions based on patient CT data. Methods: A pencil beam algorithm that directly uses measured beam data was configured for dose calculation for a tomotherapy machine. Tomotherapy treatment plans were converted into a format readable by an in-house treatment planning system by assigning each projection to one static treatment field and shifting the calculation isocenter for each field in order to account for the couch movement. The modulation of the fluence for each projection is read out of the delivery sinogram, and with the kernel-based dose calculation, this information can directly be used for dose calculation without the need for decomposition of the sinogram. The sinogram values are only corrected for leaf output and leaf latency. Using the converted treatment plans, dose was recalculated with the independent treatment planning system. Multiple treatment plans ranging from simple static fields to real patient treatment plans were calculated using the new approach and either compared to actual measurements or the 3D dose distribution calculated by the tomotherapy treatment planning system. In addition, dose–volume histograms were calculated for the patient plans. Results: Except for minor deviations at the maximum field size, the pencil beam dose calculation for static beams agreed with measurements in a water tank within 2%/2 mm. A mean deviation to point dose measurements in the cheese phantom of 0.89% ± 0.81% was found for unmodulated helical plans. A mean voxel-based deviation of −0.67% ± 1.11% for all voxels in the respective high dose region (dose values >80%), and a mean local

  15. Unbiased Stereologic Estimation of the Spatial Distribution of Paget’s Disease in the Human Temporal Bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, Sune Land; Sørensen, Mads Sølvsten

    2014-01-01

    remodeling around the inner ear space and to compare it with that of otosclerosis in a contemporary context of temporal bone dynamics. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From the temporal bone collection of Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, 15 of 29 temporal bones with Paget's disease were selected to obtain......BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that Paget's disease of bone and otosclerosis may share a myxoviral etiology. However, the association between virus infection and pathologic bone remodeling is still controversial. The aim of this study was to estimate the spatial distribution of pagetic bone...... is similar to the normal distribution of perilabyrinthine bone remodeling but entirely different from the spatial location of otosclerosis, which are focal and centripetally distributed around the inner ear space. CONCLUSION: In Paget's disease, the antiresorptive barrier around the inner ear space becomes...

  16. Effect of VERO pan-tilt motion on the dose distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetio, Heru; Yohannes, Indra; Bert, Christoph

    2017-07-01

    Tumor tracking is an option for intra-fractional motion management in radiotherapy. The VERO gimbal tracking system creates a unique beam geometry and understanding the effect of the gimbal motion in terms of dose distribution is important to assess the dose deviation from the reference conditions. Beam profiles, output factors (OF) and percentage depth doses (PDD) were measured and evaluated to investigate this effect. In order to find regions affected by the pan-tilt motion, synthesized 2D dose distributions were generated. An evaluation of the 2D dose distribution with the reference position was done using dose difference criteria 1%-4%. The OF and point dose at central axis were measured and compared with the reference position. Furthermore, the PDDs were measured using a special monitoring approach to filtering inaccurate points during the acquisition. Beam profiles evaluation showed that the effect of pan-tilt at inline direction was stronger than at the crossline direction. The maximum average deviation of the full width half maximum (FWHM), flatness, symmetry, penumbra left and right were 0.39 ± 0.25 mm, 0.62 ± 0.50%, 0.76 ± 0.59%, 0.22 ± 0.16 mm, and 0.19 ± 0.15 mm respectively. The ÔF and the measured dose average deviation were pan and tilt and pan or tilt position. The PDD average deviations were 0.58 ± 0.26 % and 0.54 ± 0.25 % for pan-or-tilt and pan-and-tilt position respectively. All the results showed that the deviation at pan and tilt position are higher than pan or tilt. The most influences were observed for the penumbra region and the shift of radiation beam path. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  17. Statistical distributions of ultra-low dose CT sinograms and their fundamental limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tzu-Cheng; Zhang, Ruoqiao; Alessio, Adam M.; Fu, Lin; De Man, Bruno; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2017-03-01

    Low dose CT imaging is typically constrained to be diagnostic. However, there are applications for even lowerdose CT imaging, including image registration across multi-frame CT images and attenuation correction for PET/CT imaging. We define this as the ultra-low-dose (ULD) CT regime where the exposure level is a factor of 10 lower than current low-dose CT technique levels. In the ULD regime it is possible to use statistically-principled image reconstruction methods that make full use of the raw data information. Since most statistical based iterative reconstruction methods are based on the assumption of that post-log noise distribution is close to Poisson or Gaussian, our goal is to understand the statistical distribution of ULD CT data with different non-positivity correction methods, and to understand when iterative reconstruction methods may be effective in producing images that are useful for image registration or attenuation correction in PET/CT imaging. We first used phantom measurement and calibrated simulation to reveal how the noise distribution deviate from normal assumption under the ULD CT flux environment. In summary, our results indicate that there are three general regimes: (1) Diagnostic CT, where post-log data are well modeled by normal distribution. (2) Lowdose CT, where normal distribution remains a reasonable approximation and statistically-principled (post-log) methods that assume a normal distribution have an advantage. (3) An ULD regime that is photon-starved and the quadratic approximation is no longer effective. For instance, a total integral density of 4.8 (ideal pi for 24 cm of water) for 120kVp, 0.5mAs of radiation source is the maximum pi value where a definitive maximum likelihood value could be found. This leads to fundamental limits in the estimation of ULD CT data when using a standard data processing stream

  18. The use of Monte Carlo technique to optimize the dose distribution in total skin irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, M. E. R.; Pereira, S. A.; Yoriyaz, H.

    2001-06-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (mycosis fungoides) is an indolent disease with a low percentage of cure. Total skin irradiation using an electron beam has become an efficient treatment of mycosis fungoides with curative intention, with success in almost 40% of the patients. In this work, we propose the use of a Monte Carlo technique to simulate the dose distribution in the patients during total skin irradiation treatments. Use was made of MCNP-4B, a well known and established code used to simulate transport of electrons, photons and neutrons through matter, especially in the area of reactor physics, and also finding increasing utility in medical physics. The goal of our work is to simulate different angles between each beam with a fixed treatment distance in order to obtain a uniform dose distribution in the patient.

  19. Monte Carlo calculations of the depth-dose distribution in skin contaminated by hot particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patau, J.-P. (Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France))

    1991-01-01

    Accurate computer programs were developed in order to calculate the spatial distribution of absorbed radiation doses in the skin, near high activity particles (''hot particles''). With a view to ascertaining the reliability of the codes the transport of beta particles was simulated in a complex configuration used for dosimetric measurements: spherical {sup 60}Co sources of 10-1000 {mu}m fastened to an aluminium support with a tissue-equivalent adhesive overlaid with 10 {mu}m thick aluminium foil. Behind it an infinite polystyrene medium including an extrapolation chamber was assumed. The exact energy spectrum of beta emission was sampled. Production and transport of secondary knock-on electrons were also simulated. Energy depositions in polystyrene were calculated with a high spatial resolution. Finally, depth-dose distributions were calculated for hot particles placed on the skin. The calculations will be continued for other radionuclides and for a configuration suited to TLD measurements. (author).

  20. Estimating rainfall distributions at high temporal resolutions using a multifractal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pathirana

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Rainfall data from 18 stations in the vicinity of Tokyo city, measured to a precision of 1 mm, were analysed for multifractal properties. A multifractal model based on the scaling properties of temporal distribution of rainfall intensities was formulated to investigate the intensity distribution relationships in the available scaling regime. Although conventional analysis did not provide encouraging results with these measurements, an alternative approach that could be applied to rainfall data of widely variable quality and duration was used to establish a scaling relationship between daily and hourly rainfall intensities. Using a discrete cascade algorithm based on the log-Lèvy generator, synthetic hourly rainfall series were generated from the multifractal statistics of daily-accumulated rainfall. Several properties of rainfall time series that are relevant to the use of rainfall data in surface hydrological studies were used to determine, statistically, the degree of agreement between the synthetic hourly series and observed hourly rainfall. Keywords: rainfall modelling, cascades, multifractal, downscaling

  1. Spatial and temporal distribution of mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet since AD 1900

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Kristian Kjellerup; Korsgaard, Niels J.; Bjørk, Anders A

    2015-01-01

    The response of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) to changes in temperature during the twentieth century remains contentious, largely owing to difficulties in estimating the spatial and temporal distribution of ice mass changes before 1992, when Greenland-wide observations first became available....... The only previous estimates of change during the twentieth century are based on empirical modelling and energy balance modelling. Consequently, no observation-based estimates of the contribution from the GIS to the global-mean sea level budget before 1990 are included in the Fifth Assessment Report...... of the nineteenth century. We estimate the total ice mass loss and its spatial distribution for three periods: 1900-1983 (75.1 ± 29.4 gigatonnes per year), 1983-2003 (73.8 ± 40.5 gigatonnes per year), and 2003-2010 (186.4 ± 18.9 gigatonnes per year). Furthermore, using two surface mass balance models we partition...

  2. We'll meet again: revealing distributional and temporal patterns of social contact.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Pachur

    Full Text Available What are the dynamics and regularities underlying social contact, and how can contact with the people in one's social network be predicted? In order to characterize distributional and temporal patterns underlying contact probability, we asked 40 participants to keep a diary of their social contacts for 100 consecutive days. Using a memory framework previously used to study environmental regularities, we predicted that the probability of future contact would follow in systematic ways from the frequency, recency, and spacing of previous contact. The distribution of contact probability across the members of a person's social network was highly skewed, following an exponential function. As predicted, it emerged that future contact scaled linearly with frequency of past contact, proportionally to a power function with recency of past contact, and differentially according to the spacing of past contact. These relations emerged across different contact media and irrespective of whether the participant initiated or received contact. We discuss how the identification of these regularities might inspire more realistic analyses of behavior in social networks (e.g., attitude formation, cooperation.

  3. Population ecology of Paepalanthus polyanthus (Bong. Kunth: temporal variation in the pattern of spatial distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Tarabini Castellani

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The temporal variation in density and pattern of spatial distribution of Paepalanthus polyanthus (BONG. Kunth (Eriocaulaceae were evaluated at a determinate sand dune. This study was carried out over a period of five years, at three permanent plots of 25m2 in a sand dune slack at Joaquina Beach, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil. There were strong density fluctuations throughout these years. In areas 1, 2 and 3, the densities changed from 10.4, 2.2 and 1.8 plants/m2 in December 1986 to 75.8, 11.4 and 45.6 plants/m2 in December 1991. Area 3, situated on an elevated site, presented greater variation in density, with no live plants in December 1989 and 102.2 plants/m2 at the recruitment observed in May 1990. Despite these density fluctuations, the pattern of spatial distribution was always aggregated (Id>1, P<0.05. The greatest Id values occurred in periods of low density and not in those of high density, associated with seedling recruitment. Factors such as high seed production with low dispersal, massive germination in moit years and a comparatively high death rate of seedlings at sites more subject to flooding or more distant from the water table proved themselves able to promote this aggregate pattern and increase it during plant development.

  4. Semicircular canal dehiscence: Frequency and distribution on temporal bone CT and its relationship with the clinical outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmali, Muzaffer, E-mail: muzafel@yahoo.com.tr [Department of Radiology, Ondokuz Mayis University, Faculty of Medicine, Samsun (Turkey); Polat, Ahmet Veysel, E-mail: veyselp@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Ondokuz Mayis University, Faculty of Medicine, Samsun (Turkey); Kucuk, Harun, E-mail: hardrmd@yahoo.com [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Ondokuz Mayis University, Faculty of Medicine, Samsun (Turkey); Atmaca, Sinan, E-mail: sinanatmaca@yahoo.com [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Ondokuz Mayis University, Faculty of Medicine, Samsun (Turkey); Aksoy, Ahmet, E-mail: toxocara47@hotmail.com [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Ondokuz Mayis University, Faculty of Medicine, Samsun (Turkey)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: In this study, we aimed to investigate the frequency of SCD and its distribution and relationship with clinical outcomes on thin-section CT of the temporal bone. Materials and methods: Digital temporal bone CT images of 850 consecutive patients (1700 temporal bone CTs, 5100 SCs) who presented with a range of complaints such as vertigo, deafness, ear pain, fullness, and discharge between January 2008 and December 2011 were re-evaluated. Axial and oblique coronal reconstruction images of the temporal bone were made with a reconstruction thickness of 0.5 mm. Additionally, superior SC was evaluated in two perpendicular planes. Results: Out of 850 patients, 70 had completely normal temporal bone CT. Ninety-three patients had at least one SCD. In the temporal bone-based evaluation, 119 (26 bilateral, 67 unilateral) of 1700 temporal bones (7%) showed dehiscence. The SC-based evaluation revealed 125 SCD (2.5%) in 5100 SCs. The total number and rates of SCD were as follows: superior 103 (82.4%), posterior 13 (10.4%), and lateral nine (7.2%). Twenty of the 93 patients with SCD (21.5%) revealed no other findings on their temporal bone CTs. We determined a significant correlation between vestibular complaints, conductive hearing loss and SCD but there was no correlation between mixed, sensorineural hearing loss and SCD. Conclusion: We determined the frequency of SCD in 11% of patients and 7% of temporal bones. With regards to the distribution, the superior SC showed the highest dehiscence rate (82.4%). We found a significant correlation between vestibular symptoms, conductive hearing loss and SCD.

  5. Pet imaging of dose distribution in proton-beam cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beebe-Wang Joanne

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Proton therapy is a treatment modality of increasing utility in clinical radiation oncology mostly because its dose distribution conforms more tightly to the target volume than X-ray radiation therapy. One important feature of proton therapy is that it produces a small amount of positron-emitting isotopes along the beam-path through the non-elastic nuclear interaction of protons with target nuclei such as 12C, 14N, and 16O. These radio isotopes, mainly 11C, 13N, and 15O, al low imaging the therapy dose distribution using positron emission tomography. The resulting positron emission tomography images provide a powerful tool for quality assurance of the treatment, especially when treating inhomogeneous organs such as the lungs or the head-and-neck, where the calculation of the dose distribution for treatment planning is more difficult. This pa per uses Monte Carlo simulations to predict the yield of positron emitters produced by a 250 MeV proton beam, and to simulate the productions of the image in a clinical PET scanner.

  6. Commercial milk distribution profiles and production locations. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deonigi, D.E.; Anderson, D.M.; Wilfert, G.L.

    1994-04-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project was established to estimate radiation doses that people could have received from nuclear operations at the Hanford Site since 1944. For this period iodine-131 is the most important offsite contributor to radiation doses from Hanford operations. Consumption of milk from cows that ate vegetation contaminated by iodine-131 is the dominant radiation pathway for individuals who drank milk (Napier 1992). Information has been developed on commercial milk cow locations and commercial milk distribution during 1945 and 1951. The year 1945 was selected because during 1945 the largest amount of iodine-131 was released from Hanford facilities in a calendar year (Heeb 1993); therefore, 1945 was the year in which an individual was likely to have received the highest dose. The year 1951 was selected to provide data for comparing the changes that occurred in commercial milk flows (i.e., sources, processing locations, and market areas) between World War II and the post-war period. To estimate the doses people could have received from this milk flow, it is necessary to estimate the amount of milk people consumed, the source of the milk, the specific feeding regime used for milk cows, and the amount of iodine-131 contamination deposited on feed.

  7. Dose distribution and mapping with 3D imaging presentation in intraoral and panoramic examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hsiu-Ling [Department of Dental Medicine, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, Yung-Hui [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Science, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Wu, Tung-Hsin, E-mail: tung@ym.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, No. 155, Sec. 2, Linong Street, Taipei 112 Taiwan (China); Wang, Shih-Yuan [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, No. 155, Sec. 2, Linong Street, Taipei 112 Taiwan (China); Lee, Jason J.S., E-mail: jslee@ym.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, No. 155, Sec. 2, Linong Street, Taipei 112 Taiwan (China)

    2011-10-01

    In current medical imaging applications, high quality images not only provide more diagnostic value for anatomic delineation but also offer functional information for treatment direction. However, this approach would potentially subscribe higher radiation dose in dental radiographies, which has been putatively associated with low-birth-weight during pregnancy, which affects the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis or thereby directly affects the reproductive organs. The aim of this study was to apply the high resolution 3-D image mapping technique to evaluate radiation doses from the following aspects: (1) verifying operating parameters of dental X-ray units, (2) measuring the leakage radiations and (3) mapping dose with 3-D radiographic imaging to evaluate dose distribution in head and neck regions. From the study results, we found that (1) leakage radiation from X-ray units was about 21.31{+-}15.24 mR/h (<100 mR/h), (2) error of actual tube voltage for 60 kVp setting was from 0.2% to 6.5%, with an average of 2.5% (<7%) and (3) the error of exposure time for a 0.5-1.5 s setting was within 0.7-8.5%, with an average of 7.3% (<10%) error as well. Our 3-D dose mapping demonstrated that dose values were relatively lower in soft tissues and higher in bone surfaces compared with other investigations. Multiple causes could contribute to these variations, including irradiation geometry, image equipment and type of technique applied, etc. From the results, we also observed that larger accumulated doses were presented in certain critical organs, such as salivary gland, thyroid gland and bone marrow. Potential biological affects associated with these findings warrant further investigation.

  8. Dose distribution and mapping with 3D imaging presentation in intraoral and panoramic examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Huang, Yung-Hui; Wu, Tung-Hsin; Wang, Shih-Yuan; Lee, Jason J. S.

    2011-10-01

    In current medical imaging applications, high quality images not only provide more diagnostic value for anatomic delineation but also offer functional information for treatment direction. However, this approach would potentially subscribe higher radiation dose in dental radiographies, which has been putatively associated with low-birth-weight during pregnancy, which affects the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis or thereby directly affects the reproductive organs. The aim of this study was to apply the high resolution 3-D image mapping technique to evaluate radiation doses from the following aspects: (1) verifying operating parameters of dental X-ray units, (2) measuring the leakage radiations and (3) mapping dose with 3-D radiographic imaging to evaluate dose distribution in head and neck regions. From the study results, we found that (1) leakage radiation from X-ray units was about 21.31±15.24 mR/h (<100 mR/h), (2) error of actual tube voltage for 60 kVp setting was from 0.2% to 6.5%, with an average of 2.5% (<7%) and (3) the error of exposure time for a 0.5-1.5 s setting was within 0.7-8.5%, with an average of 7.3% (<10%) error as well. Our 3-D dose mapping demonstrated that dose values were relatively lower in soft tissues and higher in bone surfaces compared with other investigations. Multiple causes could contribute to these variations, including irradiation geometry, image equipment and type of technique applied, etc. From the results, we also observed that larger accumulated doses were presented in certain critical organs, such as salivary gland, thyroid gland and bone marrow. Potential biological affects associated with these findings warrant further investigation.

  9. The Spatial and Temporal Distributions of Absorbing Aerosols over East Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Litai Kang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Absorbing aerosols can strongly absorb solar radiation and have a profound impact on the global and regional climate. Black carbon (BC, organic carbon (OC and dust are three major types of absorbing aerosols. In order to deepen the overall understanding of absorbing aerosols over East Asia and provide a basis for further investigation of its role in enhanced warming in drylands, the spatial-temporal distribution of absorbing aerosols over East Asia for the period of 2005–2016 was investigated based on the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI satellite retrievals. Overall, high values of Aerosol Absorption Optical Depth (AAOD mainly distribute near dust sources as well as BC and OC sources. AAOD reaches its maximum during spring over East Asia as a result of dust activity and biomass burning. Single-scattering albedo (SSA is comparatively high (>0.96 in the most part of East Asia in the summer, indicating the dominance of aerosol scattering. Hyper-arid regions have the highest Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD and AAOD among the five climatic regions, with springtime values up to 0.72 and 0.04, respectively. Humid and sub-humid regions have relatively high AOD and AAOD during the spring and winter and the highest SSA during the summer. AAOD in some areas shows significant upward trends, which is likely due to the increase of BC and OC emission. SSA shows overall downward trends, indicating the enhancement of the aerosol absorption. Analysis of emission inventory and dust index data shows that BC and OC emissions mainly come from the humid regions, while dust sources mainly distribute in drylands.

  10. Identifying the optimal spatially and temporally invariant root distribution for a semiarid environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivandran, Gajan; Bras, Rafael L.

    2012-12-01

    In semiarid regions, the rooting strategies employed by vegetation can be critical to its survival. Arid regions are characterized by high variability in the arrival of rainfall, and species found in these areas have adapted mechanisms to ensure the capture of this scarce resource. Vegetation roots have strong control over this partitioning, and assuming a static root profile, predetermine the manner in which this partitioning is undertaken.A coupled, dynamic vegetation and hydrologic model, tRIBS + VEGGIE, was used to explore the role of vertical root distribution on hydrologic fluxes. Point-scale simulations were carried out using two spatially and temporally invariant rooting schemes: uniform: a one-parameter model and logistic: a two-parameter model. The simulations were forced with a stochastic climate generator calibrated to weather stations and rain gauges in the semiarid Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW) in Arizona. A series of simulations were undertaken exploring the parameter space of both rooting schemes and the optimal root distribution for the simulation, which was defined as the root distribution with the maximum mean transpiration over a 100-yr period, and this was identified. This optimal root profile was determined for five generic soil textures and two plant-functional types (PFTs) to illustrate the role of soil texture on the partitioning of moisture at the land surface. The simulation results illustrate the strong control soil texture has on the partitioning of rainfall and consequently the depth of the optimal rooting profile. High-conductivity soils resulted in the deepest optimal rooting profile with land surface moisture fluxes dominated by transpiration. As we move toward the lower conductivity end of the soil spectrum, a shallowing of the optimal rooting profile is observed and evaporation gradually becomes the dominate flux from the land surface. This study offers a methodology through which local plant, soil, and climate can be

  11. Temporal and spatial distributions of δ18O and δ2H in precipitation in Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagavciuc, Viorica; Bădăluță, Carmen-Andreea; Perșoiu, Aurel

    2015-04-01

    Stable isotope ratios of meteoric water have an important role in climatic, paleoclimatic, hydrological and meteorological studies. While such data are available from most of Europe, so far, in Romania (East Central Europe), no systematic study of the stable isotopic composition of precipitation exists. In this context, the aim of this study is to analyze the isotopic composition of rainwater, its temporal and spatial distribution, the identification of the main factors influencing these variations and the creation of the first map of spatial distribution of stable isotopes in precipitation in Romania. Between March 2012 and March 2014 we have collected monthly samples from 22 stations in Romania, which were subsequently analyzed for their δ18O and δ2H at the Stable Isotopes Laboratory, Stefan cel Mare University, Suceava, Romania. Precipitation in W and NW Romania plot along the GMWL, while those in the East are slightly below it, on an evaporative trend. The LMWL for Romania is defined as δ2H=7,27*δ18O + 6,92. The W-E gradient in the distribution of δ18O and δ2H are less marked than the N-S ones, with local influences dominating in areas of strong evaporation (intramountain basins, rain-shadow areas etc). In SW, and especially in autumn and winter, Meditteranean cyclones carry moisture from the Eastern Mediterranean, the δ18O and δ2H values in precipitation in the area plotting between the GMWL and the Eastern Mediterranean Meteoric Water Line. The isotopic composition of rainwater in Romania correlates well with air temperature, and is influenced to a lesser extent by other factors such as the amount of precipitation, topography configuration, the effect of continentalism and season of the year.

  12. [Characteristic of spatial-temporal distribution of hepatitis E in Hunan province, 2006-2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Liang, Weijun; Li, Junhua; Liu, Fuqiang; Zhou, Guifeng; Zha, Wenting; Zheng, Jian; Zhang, Guochao

    2016-04-01

    To analyze the spatial-temporal distribution of Hepatitis E (HEV) in Hunan province from 2006 to 2014. Data related to HEV cases in Hunan province from 2006 to 2014 were collected from the Infectious Diseases Reporting Information System in the formation System of Disease Prevention and Control of China. Based on ArcGIS (10.2) and SaTScan(version 9.1), spatial autocorrelation analysis and space-time clustering analysis were used to study the prevalence on HEV. A total of 7 124 HEV cases were reported with 3 deaths during this period. The average annual incidence rate was 1.22/10(5). Most of the cases were over 55 years old and the majority of them (54.15%) were farmers. The distribution of HEV showed differences on locations and the regions with high incidence seen in northern and western areas of Hunan. However the regions with low incidence appeared in central or southern parts of Hunan. Data from the global spatial autocorrelation analysis showed that there was space autocorrelation on the HEV incidence rates in counties (cities, districts) (Moran'I was positive,Panalysis, 31 countries in high-high region all showed statistically significant differences (P<0.05). RESULTS from the space-time scan showed 7 space-time clustering areas, including those most likely in the western Hunan area (2012-2014); the secondary clusters in northern Hunan areas (2011-2014). Significant cluster pattern was found in the distribution of HEV in Hunan province. Clusters found in northern and western of Hunan province were seen more than in other regions.

  13. Spatial-temporal distribution of genotyped tuberculosis cases in a county with active transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Saroochi; Nguyen, Duc T; Teeter, Larry D; Graviss, Edward A

    2017-05-31

    Harris County, Texas is the third most populous county in the United States and consistently has tuberculosis rates above the national average. Understanding jurisdictional epidemiologic characteristics for the most common Mycobacterium tuberculosis genotyped clusters is needed for tuberculosis prevention programs. Our objective is to describe the demographic, laboratory, clinical, temporal and geospatial characteristics for the most common Mycobacterium tuberculosis GENType clusters in Harris County from 2009 to 2015. We analyzed data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Tuberculosis Genotyping Information Management System (TB GIMS). Chi-square analyses were used to determine associations between selected clusters and specific characteristics of interest. Geographical Information System (GIS) point density and hot spot maps were generated and analyzed with ArcGIS 10.4. In Harris County from 2009 to 2015, 1655 of 1705 (97.1%) culture positive tuberculosis cases were genotyped and assigned a GENType, and 1058 different GENTypes were identified. The analyzed genotype clusters represent 14.1% (233/1655) of all genotyped cases: G00010 (n = 118), G00014 (n = 38), G00769 (n = 33), G01521 (n = 26), and G08964 (n = 18). Male gender (p = 0.002), ethnicity (p tuberculosis GENType clusters seen from 2009 to 2015. The common genotypes were observed primarily in U.S.-born populations despite the large foreign-born population residing in Harris County. GENType was significant distributed spatially and temporally in Harris County in the analyzed time period indicating that there may be outbreaks caused by transmission.

  14. Particulate air pollution in six Asian cities: Spatial and temporal distributions, and associated sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim Oanh, N. T.; Upadhyay, N.; Zhuang, Y.-H.; Hao, Z.-P.; Murthy, D. V. S.; Lestari, P.; Villarin, J. T.; Chengchua, K.; Co, H. X.; Dung, N. T.; Lindgren, E. S.

    A monitoring program for particulate matter pollution was designed and implemented in six Asian cities/metropolitan regions including Bandung, Bangkok, Beijing, Chennai, Manila, and Hanoi, within the framework of the Asian regional air pollution research network (AIRPET), coordinated by the Asian Institute of Technology. As uniform the methodologies as possible were intended with an established QA/QC procedure in order to produce reliable and comparable data by the network. The monsoon effects and seasonal changes in the sources/activities require long-term monitoring to understand the nature of air pollution in the cities. During phase 1 (2001-2004) of the AIRPET around 3000 fine and coarse particulate matter samples were collected from characteristic urban sites, which provide insight into temporal and spatial variations of PM in the cities. In all six cities, the levels of PM 10 and PM 2.5 were found high, especially during the dry season, which frequently exceeded the corresponding 24 h US EPA standards at a number of sites. The average concentrations of PM 2.5 and PM 10 in the cities ranged, respectively, 44-168 and 54-262 μg m -3 in the dry season, and 18-104 and 33-180 μg m -3 in the wet season. Spatial and temporal distribution of PM in each city, the ratios of PM 2.5 to PM 10, and the reconstructed mass were presented which provide useful information on possible PM sources in the cities. The findings help to understand the nature of particulate matter air pollution problems in the selected cities/metropolitan regions.

  15. Pattern of Spatial Distribution and Temporal Variation of Atmospheric Pollutants during 2013 in Shenzhen, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Xia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution caused by atmospheric particulate and gaseous pollutants has drawn broad public concern globally. In this paper, the spatial-temporal distributions of major air pollutants in Shenzhen from March 2013 to February 2014 are discussed. In this study, ground-site monitoring data from 19 monitoring sites was used and spatial interpolation and spatial autocorrelation methods were applied to analyze both spatial and temporal characteristics of air pollutants in Shenzhen City. During the study period, the daily average concentrations of Particulate Matter (PM10 and PM2.5 ranged from 16–189 μg/m3 and 10–136 μg/m3, respectively, with 13 and 44 over-limit days, indicating that particulate matter was the primary air pollutant in Shenzhen. The highest PM occupation in the polluted air was observed in winter, indicating that fine particulate pollution was most serious in winter. Meanwhile, seasonal agglomeration patterns for six kinds of air pollutants showed that Guangming, Baoan, Nanshan, and the northern part of Longgang were the most polluted areas and PMs were their primary air pollutants. In addition, wind scale and rainfall played an important role in dissipating air pollutant in Shenzhen. The wind direction impacted the air pollution level in Shenzhen in multiple ways: the highest concentrations for all air pollutants all occurred on days with a northeast wind; the second highest ones appeared on the days with no wind. The concentrations on days with north-related winds are higher on average than those of days with south-related winds.

  16. Estimation of ambient dose equivalent distribution in the 18F-FDG administration room using Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamine, Shuji; Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Umezu, Yoshiyuki; Himuro, Kazuhiko; Awamoto, Shinichi; Tsutsui, Yuji; Nakamura, Yasuhiko

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we estimated the ambient dose equivalent rate (hereafter "dose rate") in the fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) administration room in our hospital using Monte Carlo simulations, and examined the appropriate medical-personnel locations and a shielding method to reduce the dose rate during FDG injection using a lead glass shield. The line source was assumed to be the FDG feed tube and the patient a cube source. The dose rate distribution was calculated with a composite source that combines the line and cube sources. The dose rate distribution was also calculated when a lead glass shield was placed in the rear section of the lead-acrylic shield. The dose rate behind the automatic administration device decreased by 87 % with respect to that behind the lead-acrylic shield. Upon positioning a 2.8-cm-thick lead glass shield, the dose rate behind the lead-acrylic shield decreased by 67 %.

  17. Evaluation of ambient dose equivalent rates influenced by vertical and horizontal distribution of radioactive cesium in soil in Fukushima Prefecture

    CERN Document Server

    Malins, Alex; Nakama, Shigeo; Saito, Tatsuo; Okumura, Masahiko; Machida, Masahiko; Kitamura, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    The air dose rate in an environment contaminated with 134Cs and 137Cs depends on the amount, depth profile and horizontal distribution of these contaminants within the ground. This paper introduces and verifies a tool that models these variables and calculates ambient dose equivalent rates at 1 m above the ground. Good correlation is found between predicted dose rates and dose rates measured with survey meters in Fukushima Prefecture in areas contaminated with radiocesium from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. This finding is insensitive to the choice for modelling the activity depth distribution in the ground using activity measurements of collected soil layers, or by using exponential and hyperbolic secant fits to the measurement data. Better predictions are obtained by modelling the horizontal distribution of radioactive cesium across an area if multiple soil samples are available, as opposed to assuming a spatially homogeneous contamination distribution. Reductions seen in air dose rate...

  18. Low LET proton microbeam to understand high-LET RBE by shaping spatial dose distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greubel, Christoph; Ilicic, Katarina; Rösch, Thomas; Reindl, Judith; Siebenwirth, Christian; Moser, Marcus; Girst, Stefanie; Walsh, Dietrich W. M.; Schmid, Thomas E.; Dollinger, Günther

    2017-08-01

    High LET radiation, like heavy ions, are known to have a higher biological effectiveness (RBE) compared to low LET radiation, like X- or γ -rays. Theories and models attribute these higher effectiveness mostly to their extremely inhomogeneous dose deposition, which is concentrated in only a few micron sized spots. At the ion microprobe SNAKE, low LET 20 MeV protons (LET in water of 2.6 keV/μm) can be applied to cells either randomly distributed or focused to submicron spots, approximating heavy ion dose deposition. Thus, the transition between low and high LET energy deposition is experimentally accessible and the effect of different spatial dose distributions can be analysed. Here, we report on the technical setup to cultivate and irradiate 104 cells with submicron spots of low LET protons to measure cell survival in unstained cells. In addition we have taken special care to characterise the beam spot of the 20 MeV proton microbeam with fluorescent nuclear track detectors.

  19. Mycosis Fungoides electron beam absorbed dose distribution using Fricke xylenol gel dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silveira, Michely C.; Sampaio, Francisco G. A.; Petchevist, Paulo C. D.; de Oliveira, André L.; Almeida, Adelaide de

    2011-12-01

    Radiotherapy uses ionizing radiation to destroy tumor cells. The absorbed dose control in the target volume is realized through radiation sensors, such as Fricke dosimeters and radiochromic film, which permit to realize bi-dimensional evaluations at once and because of that, they will be used in this study as well. Among the several types of cancer suitable for ionizing radiation treatment, the Mycosis Fungoides, a lymphoma that spreads on the skin surface and depth, requires for its treatment total body irradiation by high-energy electrons. In this work the Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) was used in order to obtain information about the absorbed dose distribution induced by the electron interactions with the irradiated tissues and to control this type of treatment. FXG can be considered as an alternative dosimeter, since up to now only films have been used. FXG sample cuvettes, simulating two selected tomos (cranium and abdomen) of the Rando anthropomorphic phantom, were positioned along with radiochromic films for comparison. The phantom was subjected to Stanford total body irradiation using 6 MeV electrons. Tomographic images were acquired for both dosimeters and evaluated through horizontal and vertical profiles along the tomographic centers. These profiles were obtained through a Matlab routine developed for this purpose. From the obtained results, one could infer that, for a superficial and internal patient irradiation, the FXG dosimeter showed an absorbed dose distribution similar to the one of the film. These results can validate the FXG dosimeter as an alternative dosimeter for the Mycosis Fungoides treatment planning.

  20. Temporal, geographic, and host distribution of avian paramyxovirus 1 (Newcastle disease virus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Kiril M.; Ramey, Andy M.; Qiu, Xueting; Bahl, Justin; Afonso, Claudio L.

    2016-01-01

    Newcastle disease is caused by virulent forms of avian paramyxovirus of serotype 1 (APMV-1) and has global economic importance. The disease reached panzootic proportions within two decades after first being identified in 1926 in the United Kingdom and Indonesia and still remains endemic in many countries across the world. Here we review information on the host, temporal, and geographic distribution of APMV-1 genetic diversity based on the evolutionary systematics of the complete coding region of the fusion gene. Strains of APMV-1 are phylogenetically separated into two classes (class I and class II) and further classified into genotypes based on genetic differences. Class I viruses are genetically less diverse, generally present in wild waterfowl, and are of low virulence. Class II viruses are genetically and phenotypically more diverse, frequently isolated from poultry with occasional spillovers into wild birds, and exhibit a wider range of virulence. Waterfowl, cormorants, and pigeons are natural reservoirs of all APMV-1 pathotypes, except viscerotropic velogenic viruses for which natural reservoirs have not been identified. Genotypes I and II within class II include isolates of high and low virulence, the latter often being used as vaccines. Viruses of genotypes III and IX that emerged decades ago are now isolated rarely, but may be found in domestic and wild birds in China. Containing only virulent viruses and responsible for the majority of recent outbreaks in poultry and wild birds, viruses from genotypes V, VI, and VII, are highly mobile and have been isolated on different continents. Conversely, virulent viruses of genotypes XI (Madagascar), XIII (mainly Southwest Asia), XVI (North America) and XIV, XVII and XVIII (Africa) appear to have a more limited geographic distribution and have been isolated predominantly from poultry.

  1. Estimating the spatial and temporal distribution of species richness within Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wathen, Steve; Thorne, James H; Holguin, Andrew; Schwartz, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    Evidence for significant losses of species richness or biodiversity, even within protected natural areas, is mounting. Managers are increasingly being asked to monitor biodiversity, yet estimating biodiversity is often prohibitively expensive. As a cost-effective option, we estimated the spatial and temporal distribution of species richness for four taxonomic groups (birds, mammals, herpetofauna (reptiles and amphibians), and plants) within Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks using only existing biological studies undertaken within the Parks and the Parks' long-term wildlife observation database. We used a rarefaction approach to model species richness for the four taxonomic groups and analyzed those groups by habitat type, elevation zone, and time period. We then mapped the spatial distributions of species richness values for the four taxonomic groups, as well as total species richness, for the Parks. We also estimated changes in species richness for birds, mammals, and herpetofauna since 1980. The modeled patterns of species richness either peaked at mid elevations (mammals, plants, and total species richness) or declined consistently with increasing elevation (herpetofauna and birds). Plants reached maximum species richness values at much higher elevations than did vertebrate taxa, and non-flying mammals reached maximum species richness values at higher elevations than did birds. Alpine plant communities, including sagebrush, had higher species richness values than did subalpine plant communities located below them in elevation. These results are supported by other papers published in the scientific literature. Perhaps reflecting climate change: birds and herpetofauna displayed declines in species richness since 1980 at low and middle elevations and mammals displayed declines in species richness since 1980 at all elevations.

  2. Estimating the spatial and temporal distribution of species richness within Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Wathen

    Full Text Available Evidence for significant losses of species richness or biodiversity, even within protected natural areas, is mounting. Managers are increasingly being asked to monitor biodiversity, yet estimating biodiversity is often prohibitively expensive. As a cost-effective option, we estimated the spatial and temporal distribution of species richness for four taxonomic groups (birds, mammals, herpetofauna (reptiles and amphibians, and plants within Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks using only existing biological studies undertaken within the Parks and the Parks' long-term wildlife observation database. We used a rarefaction approach to model species richness for the four taxonomic groups and analyzed those groups by habitat type, elevation zone, and time period. We then mapped the spatial distributions of species richness values for the four taxonomic groups, as well as total species richness, for the Parks. We also estimated changes in species richness for birds, mammals, and herpetofauna since 1980. The modeled patterns of species richness either peaked at mid elevations (mammals, plants, and total species richness or declined consistently with increasing elevation (herpetofauna and birds. Plants reached maximum species richness values at much higher elevations than did vertebrate taxa, and non-flying mammals reached maximum species richness values at higher elevations than did birds. Alpine plant communities, including sagebrush, had higher species richness values than did subalpine plant communities located below them in elevation. These results are supported by other papers published in the scientific literature. Perhaps reflecting climate change: birds and herpetofauna displayed declines in species richness since 1980 at low and middle elevations and mammals displayed declines in species richness since 1980 at all elevations.

  3. The Spatio-Temporal Distribution and Development Modes of Border Ports in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaoe Wang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Border ports play a substantial role in socio-economic exchanges, which reflect the diplomatic relations between neighboring countries. This paper maps and analyzes the evolution process of border ports in China since the 1930s, in terms of the spatial distribution, transport modes, cargo and flows of people. Four development modes of border ports and cities are summarized based on the functions and development level of border ports and their proximity to urban core areas. The four modes include: (1 Port-Port mode; (2 City-Port-Port-City mode; (3 City (Port-Port-City mode; (4 City (Port-City (Port mode, which also reflect the spatio-temporal evolution process of certain border ports and cities. The results show that the development of border ports is closely related to the bilateral relations with neighboring countries and their complementarities of natural resources and economic development, national foreign policies, as well as the physical, historical and cultural context. The findings of this study are helpful to promote the sustainable development of the border port system which is crucial for win-win reciprocity between China and its neighboring countries.

  4. Analysis and Assessment of the Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Burned Areas in the Amazon Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francielle da Silva Cardozo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze the spatial and temporal distribution of burned areas in Rondônia State, Brazil during the years 2000 to 2011 and evaluate the burned area maps. A Linear Spectral Mixture Model (LSMM was applied to MODIS surface reflectance images to originate the burned areas maps, which were validated with TM/Landsat 5 and ETM+/Landsat 7 images and field data acquired in August 2013. The validation presented a correlation ranging from 67% to 96% with an average value of 86%. The lower correlation values are related to the distinct spatial resolutions of the MODIS and TM/ETM+ sensors because small burn scars are not detected in MODIS images and higher spatial correlations are related to the presence of large fires, which are better identified in MODIS, increasing the accuracy of the mapping methodology. In addition, the 12-year burned area maps of Rondônia indicate that fires, as a general pattern, occur in areas that have already been converted to some land use, such as vegetal extraction, large animal livestock areas or diversified permanent crops. Furthermore, during the analyzed period, land use conversion associated with climatic events significantly influenced the occurrence of fire in Rondônia and amplified its impacts.

  5. Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Imidacloprid Within the Crown of Eastern Hemlock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, Richard M.; Lagalante, Anthony; Jones, Jonathan; Cook, Frank; Elliott, Thomas; Billings, Anthony A.

    2017-01-01

    Systemic imidacloprid is the most widely used insecticide to control the hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), an exotic pest of eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carriére in the United States. This study was conducted to 1) determine the effect of treatment timing (spring vs. fall) and application method (trunk injection vs. soil injection) on the spatial and temporal distribution of imidacloprid within the crown of A. tsugae-free eastern hemlock using a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), 2) compare ELISA to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for the detection of imidacloprid in xylem fluid, and 3) determine the concentration of imidacloprid in leaf tissue using high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric (LC/MS/MS) detection methods. Xylem fluid concentrations of imidacloprid were found to be significantly higher for spring applications than for fall applications and for trunk injections than soil injections in the first year posttreatment. A total of 69% of samples analyzed by ELISA gave 1.8 times higher concentrations of imidacloprid than those found by GC/MS, leading to evidence of a matrix effect and overestimation of imidacloprid in xylem fluid by ELISA. A comparison of the presence of imidacloprid with xylem fluid and in leaf tissue on the same branch showed significant differences, suggesting that imidacloprid moved intermittently within the crown of eastern hemlock. PMID:28130463

  6. Distribution, teratogenicity, and embryonic delivered dose of retinoid Ro 23-9223.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willhite, C C; Lovey, A; Eckhoff, C

    2000-04-15

    Ro 23-9223 is a highly lipophilic aromatic retinoid with antiproliferative and sebum supressive effects in preclinical disease models of acne. To investigate the relation between Ro 23-9223 developmental toxicity, drug distribution, and transplacental transfer, groups of pregnant hamsters were given oral doses of 50-500 mg/kg Ro 23-9223 on days 8 and 9 of gestation. The teratogenic phenotype induced at doses greater than 125 mg/kg per day was similar to that found after exposure to doses of 13-cis-retinoic acid (isotretinoin, Accutane) greater than 37.5 mg/kg per day. Oral bioavailability of Ro 23-9223 was very low compared to 13-cis-retinoic acid. The highest concentrations of Ro 23-9223 were found in maternal liver, lung, adipose tissue, cardiac muscle, and placenta, whereas only little of the compound crossed the blood-brain barrier. Based on embryo AUC, Ro 23-9223 had a 30- to 50-fold greater embryo:maternal concentration ratio than 13-cis-retinoic acid plus its bioactive metabolites following similar doses of the two retinoids. In preclinical pharmacology studies, oral doses of Ro 23-9223 (5 mg/kg per day) and 13-cis-retinoic acid (10 mg/kg per day) produced comparable gland size reductions in the hamster ear sebaceous gland reduction assay. Under these conditions, Ro 23-9223 plasma AUC was 40 times smaller than that of 13-cis-retinoic acid plus its bioactive metabolites. Assuming that the near linear dose-exposure relationship of Ro 23-9223 extends beyond the dose range of this study, embryo AUCs of Ro 23-9223 and 13-cis-retinoic acid (plus metabolites) would be near identical following pharmacologically equivalent doses. A comparison of embryo retinoid AUCs suggests a 4-fold lower teratogenic potency of Ro 23-9223 compared to with 13-cis-retinoic acid. Despite high embryo levels in hamsters, the data suggest an improved therapeutic index for Ro 23-9223 compared with 13-cis-retinoic acid in a preclinical acne disease model. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  7. Evaluation of induced activity, decay heat and dose rate distribution after shutdown in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maki, Koichi [Hitachi Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan). Hitachi Research Lab.; Satoh, Satoshi; Hayashi, Katsumi; Yamada, Koubun; Takatsu, Hideyuki; Iida, Hiromasa

    1997-03-01

    Induced activity, decay heat and dose rate distributions after shutdown were estimated for 1MWa/m{sup 2} operation in ITER. The activity in the inboard blanket one day after shutdown is 1.5x10{sup 11}Bq/cm{sup 3}, and the average decay heating rate 0.01w/cm{sup 3}. The dose rate outside the 120cm thick concrete biological shield is two order higher than the design criterion of 5{mu}Sv/h. This indicates that the biological shield thickness should be enhanced by 50cm in concrete, that is, total thickness 170cm for workers to enter the reactor room and to perform maintenance. (author)

  8. Effects of CT based Voxel Phantoms on Dose Distribution Calculated with Monte Carlo Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chaobin; Huang, Qunying; Wu, Yican

    2005-04-01

    A few CT-based voxel phantoms were produced to investigate the sensitivity of Monte Carlo simulations of x-ray beam and electron beam to the proportions of elements and the mass densities of the materials used to express the patient's anatomical structure. The human body can be well outlined by air, lung, adipose, muscle, soft bone and hard bone to calculate the dose distribution with Monte Carlo method. The effects of the calibration curves established by using various CT scanners are not clinically significant based on our investigation. The deviation from the values of cumulative dose volume histogram derived from CT-based voxel phantoms is less than 1% for the given target.

  9. Spatial and temporal distribution of ore deposits, in relation with thermal anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harcouet, V.; Bonneville, A.; Guillou-Frottier, L.

    2003-04-01

    Ore deposits have formed over billion years of Earth's history with a discontinuous distribution in time and space.In time, their formation is episodical, and the data concerning the main deposit types show an alternation of periods with mineralisation followed by time gaps, with no large amount of ore generation. The "Snowball Earth" theory suggests that Banded Iron formations (BIF) are in relation with periods of intense global glaciations of Paleoproterozoic (2500-1600 Ma) and Neoproterozoic (1000-540 Ma) ages. During global glaciations, surface temperatures were of the order of -50°C and an ice layer of about 1km covered almost the entire Earth. We have performed analytical and numerical modelling of such events that shows the development of high thermal anomalies in the crust. These anomalies can reach several tens of degrees for a time lapse that depends on the duration of the glaciation. If the thermal impact is clear, the mechanical impact of the glaciations on the crustal rocks still needs to be evaluated to precisely assess the role of glaciations as a possible cause to some of the gaps in the temporal distribution of ore deposits.Ore deposits have also a heterogeneous spatial distribution: they are located in specific places of the Earth's crust, where thermo-mechanical and hydrothermal conditions have triggered their formation. The temperature pattern corresponding to these cases can prove to be particularly favourable to ore deposits. A good example of such deposits, is the Ashanti belt in Ghana of which we present a detailed study. It is the key district of gold mineralisation in the Paleoproterozoic terrane of West Africa. This is the second giant concentration of gold deposits after South Africa with a potential of about 2500 tons of gold. The Eburnean orogeny operated between 2.13 and 1.98 Ga. Two tectonic phases affected the area, a period of thrusting and a second one corresponding to transcurrent tectonism. A numerical modelling was performed

  10. Spatial distribution and temporal variability of Harmattan dust haze in sub-Sahel West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuforom, Anthony C.

    The distributions of frequency of occurrence (FOO) of 'thick dust haze' (TDH) and of 'light dust haze' (LDH) with respect to latitude, longitude, elevation and distance from source during Harmattan season (from November to February) are investigated, using 30-year visibility data collected from 27 synoptic stations located in Nigeria between the West African Sahel and the coasts of Gulf of Guinea. This region lies along the Harmattan season trajectory of Saharan dust. Also investigated is the temporal variability of TDH and LDH on intra-seasonal and inter-annual timescales spanning three decades from 1971 to 2000. Dust haze distribution over the region is found to correlate with the four geographical variables to different extents, with latitude, distance from source and elevation showing strong correlations with both TDH and LDH. The investigation also shows that while FOO of TDH days increases with latitude (correlation coefficient, rlat,FOO_TDH=0.88), FOO of LDH days decreases with latitude over the region (correlation coefficient, rlat,FOO_LDH=-0.74). The correlation coefficients with longitude over the region are rlon,FOO_TDH=0.44 and rlon,FOO_LDH=-0.25, respectively, indicating weaker dependence of TDH and LDH on longitude. The average number of TDH days per month during the Harmattan season in the region ranges from about 0.5 in the humid coastal zone near the Gulf of Guinea in the south, to approximately 6 in the dry semi-arid zone near the West African Sahel. An empirical equation which shows that FOO of TDH increases exponentially with latitude over the region is derived. The FOO of TDH is found to be most variable in or near the Sahel zone and decreases southwards towards the Gulf of Guinea. The average of the standard deviations is 1.13 for the six northernmost synoptic stations and decreases to 0.51 over the six coastal and southernmost locations. In contrast, the FOO of LDH is most variable in the south (with standard deviation of 2.11 (over the six

  11. Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Clouds Observed by MODIS Onboard the Terra and Aqua Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michael D.; Platnick, Steven; Menzel, W. Paul; Ackerman, Steven A.; Hubanks, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) was developed by NASA and launched aboard the Terra spacecraft on December 18, 1999 and Aqua spacecraft on May 4, 2002. A comprehensive set of remote sensing algorithms for the retrieval of cloud physical and optical properties have enabled over twelve years of continuous observations of cloud properties from Terra and over nine years from Aqua. The archived products from these algorithms include 1 km pixel-level (Level-2) and global gridded Level-3 products. In addition to an extensive cloud mask, products include cloud-top properties (temperature, pressure, effective emissivity), cloud thermodynamic phase, cloud optical and microphysical parameters (optical thickness, effective particle radius, water path), as well as derived statistics. Results include the latitudinal distribution of cloud optical and radiative properties for both liquid water and ice clouds, as well as latitudinal distributions of cloud top pressure and cloud top temperature. MODIS finds the cloud fraction, as derived by the cloud mask, is nearly identical during the day and night, with only modest diurnal variation. Globally, the cloud fraction derived by the MODIS cloud mask is approx.67%, with somewhat more clouds over land during the afternoon and less clouds over ocean in the afternoon, with very little difference in global cloud cover between Terra and Aqua. Overall, cloud fraction over land is approx.55%, with a distinctive seasonal cycle, whereas the ocean cloudiness is much higher, around 72%, with much reduced seasonal variation. Cloud top pressure and temperature have distinct spatial and temporal patterns, and clearly reflect our understanding of the global cloud distribution. High clouds are especially prevalent over the northern hemisphere continents between 30 and 50 . Aqua and Terra have comparable zonal cloud top pressures, with Aqua having somewhat higher clouds (cloud top pressures lower by 100 hPa) over land due to

  12. Temporal distribution of floods and landslides in Portugal (1865-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Monica; Bateira, Carlos; Hermenegildo, Carlos; Soares, Laura; Pereira, Susana; Quaresma, Ivânia; Santos, Pedro

    2013-04-01

    Hydro-geomorphological events are the natural hazards that most affect Portugal. Under the DISASTER research project, was created a GIS database (DB) about floods and landslides that occurred in this country, from 1865 to 2010. The inventory of these processes was based on a systematic compilation of national and regional newspapers articles, focusing occurrences with direct consequences on the population, i.e., those that implied killed, injured, missing, evacuated or displaced people, independently of the number of affected and the economic value of damage. The main objective of this DB is to support the development of risk studies related with these events, analysing their spatial and temporal distribution, the susceptibility of the territories and the vulnerability of the exposed elements. It is essential for risk management, providing a decision support for spatial and emergency planning. This study aims to analyse the temporal rhythm of floods and landslides that occurred in the above mentioned period, as well as its evolutionary trend and the relationship between these processes and the precipitation, the main triggering factor of hydro-geomorphological events in Portugal mainland. The trends are analysed using the nonparametric Mann-Kendall (M-K) and Theil-Sen statistical tests (B), in order to estimate its magnitude. The results show that from the 1903 records integrated in the Disaster DB (in the 145 years under analysis), 85.2% of occurrences correspond to floods and 14.8% to landslides. Until 1935 the number of occurrences per year is less than 10 (except 1909), but after this date there was a significant increase of this value, mainly in the years of 1936, 1966/67, 1979, 1996 and 2001, with more than 50 occurrences/year. In the period between 1935 and 1975, the mean number of occurrences is 22.5/year, but between 1975-2010 it changes to 16.5. The results suggest the absence of a statistically significant increasing trend of occurrences, during all the

  13. Distribution of Boreal Toad Populations in Relation to Estimated UV-B Dose in Glacier National Park, Montana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    This work provides information on amphibian distributions as well as the range of UV-B exposure in mountain habitats, and will be of use to scientists interested in tracking changes in amphibian distributions and abundance, and spatial and temporal patterns of UV-B exposure

  14. Development of a 3D optical scanner for evaluating patient-specific dose distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Suk; Jung, Hong; Choo, Yeon-Wook; Cao, Yuan Jie; Shim, Jang Bo; Kim, Kwang Hyeon; Lee, Nam Kwon; Park, Young Je; Kim, Chul Yong; Cho, Sam Ju; Lee, Sang Hoon; Min, Chul Kee; Kim, Woo Chul; Cho, Kwang Hwan; Huh, Hyun Do; Lim, Sangwook

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the hardware and software characteristics of a 3D optical scanner (P3DS) developed in-house. The P3DS consists of an LED light source, diffuse screen, step motor, CCD camera, and scanner management software with 3D reconstructed software. We performed optical simulation, 2D and 3D reconstruction image testing, and pre-clinical testing for the P3DS. We developed the optical scanner with three key characteristics in mind. First, we developed a continuous scanning method to expand possible clinical applications. Second, we manufactured a collimator to improve image quality by reducing scattering from the light source. Third, we developed an optical scanner with changeable camera positioning to enable acquisition of optimal images according to the size of the gel dosimeter. We confirmed ray-tracing in P3DS with optic simulation and found that 2D projection and 3D reconstructed images were qualitatively similar to the phantom images. For pre-clinical tests, the dose distribution and profile showed good agreement among RTP, optical CT, and external beam radiotherapy film data for the axial and coronal views. The P3DS has shown that it can scan and reconstruct for evaluation of the gel dosimeter within 1 min. We confirmed that the P3DS system is a useful tool for the measurement of 3D dose distributions for 3D radiation therapy QA. Further experiments are needed to investigate quantitative analysis for 3D dose distribution. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Spatial distributions of radionuclides deposited onto ground soil around the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant and their temporal change until December 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Satoshi; Maeyama, Takeshi; Hoshide, Yoshifumi; Sakamoto, Ryuichi; Sato, Shoji; Okuda, Naotoshi; Demongeot, Stéphanie; Gurriaran, Rodolfo; Uwamino, Yoshitomo; Kato, Hiroaki; Fujiwara, Mamoru; Sato, Tetsuro; Takemiya, Hiroshi; Saito, Kimiaki

    2015-01-01

    Spatial distributions and temporal changes of radioactive fallout released by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident have been investigated by two campaigns with three measurement schedules. The inventories (activities per unit area) of the radionuclides deposited onto ground soil were measured using portable gamma-ray spectrometers at nearly 1000 locations (at most) per measurement campaign. Distribution maps of the inventories of (134)Cs, (137)Cs, and (110m)Ag as of March, September, and December 2012 were constructed. No apparent temporal change of the radionuclide inventories was observed from March to December 2012. Weathering effects (e.g., horizontal mobility) were not noticeable during this period. Spatial dependence in the ratios of (134)Cs/(137)Cs and (110m)Ag/(137)Cs were observed in the Tohoku and Kanto regions. The detailed maps of (134)Cs and (137)Cs as of September 2012 and December 2012 were constructed using the relationship between the air dose rate and the inventory. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. A luminescence imaging system for the routine measurement of single-grain OSL dose distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kook, Myung Ho; Lapp, Torben; Murray, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating and other retrospective dosimetry studies there is considerable demand for the ability to measure luminescence from individual dosimeters in the size range 50e500 mm diameter, either as separate grains or as part of a matrix. This work tests...... the potential of an electron multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD), providing extremely low level light detection. We characterize the performance of the device by discussing reproducibility and evaluating uncertainties in OSL signals. Finally we derive a typical single grain natural dose distribution...

  17. Room model with three modal distributions of attached 220Rn progeny and dose conversion factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikezić, D; Stevanović, N

    2007-01-01

    Jacobi parametric room model was extended to the three modal distribution of aerosols, and applied to (220)Rn progeny. The computer program was developed to calculate ratios of progeny activity concentrations in different modes to (220)Rn concentration. The ratios are relatively small and they are given as functions on ventilation rate. Dose conversion factor (DCF) for (220)Rn progeny was calculated as 4.5 mSv WLM(-1), which is smaller by over three times than that for (222)Rn progeny.

  18. Calculated and measured dose distribution in electron and X-ray irradiated water phantom

    CERN Document Server

    Ziaie, F; Bulka, S; Afarideh, H; Hadji-Saeid, S M

    2002-01-01

    The Bremsstrahlung yields produced by incident electrons on a tantalum converter have been calculated by using a Monte-Carlo computer code. The tantalum thickness as an X-ray converter was optimized for 2, 2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10 MeV electron beams. The dose distribution in scanning and conveyor direction for both 2 MeV electron and X-ray converted from 2 MeV electron beam have been calculated and compared with experimental results. The economical aspects of low energy electron conversion were discussed as well.

  19. [Study on the spatial and temporal distribution of animal plague in Junggar Basin plague focus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rong; Dai, Xiang; Cao, Hanli; Xia, Lianxu; Abuli, Miti; Abuli, Kemu; Wang, Xinhui; Aza, Ti; Jiang, Wei; Li, Bing; Zhang, Xiaobing; Lei, Gang; Wang, Qiguo; Luo, Tao; Meng, Weiwei; Buren, Mingde; Re, Na; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Yujiang

    2014-02-01

    To explore the spatial and temporal distributions of animal plague in Junggar Basin natural plague focus. Data regarding plague antibody (F1) in serum of Great Gerbil (Rhombomys opimus, R. opimus) which were collected from 2005 to 2012 in Junggar Basin and analyzed. The changing rates on the positivity of F1 that appeared spatially and temporally were also analyzed. A total of 4 825 R. opimus serum samples were collected in 13 administrative regions in Junggar Basin. showed that plague R. opimus existed in two areas-Gurbantonggut desert in the eastern-center and the clay desert of western Junggar Basin. However, in these two areas, the intensity of animal plague prevalence was different. In the former region where Yesinia pestis positive serum was detected from R. opimus, the detected rate of R. opimus was 8.39%. However, in the latter areas, the average positive rate was 1.56%. The changing trends of R. opimus plague prevalence were also varied annually. In the western Junggar Basin, the trend showed a slowly downward profile. The serum positive rate of R. opimus for Yesinia pestis decreased, from 7.59% in 2005 to 0.61% in 2008, and appeared as a resting state that none of the positive sample could be found since then. However, in the eastern-center Junggar Basin area-also named as Gurbantonggut desert which had been divided into 3 segments(western, central and eastern, according to related geographical characteristics), the changing trends of animal plague seemed quite complex. In the western segment, the animal plague had two epidemic peaks-in 2006 and 2010, with the interval of 4 years, with the higher peak of all the three geographic segments as 45.65% in 2010 and the positive serum of R. opimus for plague could be detected each year from 2006 to 2012. However, there were 3 epidemic peaks in the same period in the central and eastern segments. In the central segment, the peaks appeared in 2006, 2009 and 2011, with the intervals as 2.5 years and the average

  20. Knowledge-based prediction of three-dimensional dose distributions for external beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Satomi; Moore, Kevin L

    2016-01-01

    To demonstrate knowledge-based 3D dose prediction for external beam radiotherapy. Using previously treated plans as training data, an artificial neural network (ANN) was trained to predict a dose matrix based on patient-specific geometric and planning parameters, such as the closest distance (r) to planning target volume (PTV) and organ-at-risks (OARs). Twenty-three prostate and 43 stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) cases with at least one nearby OAR were studied. All were planned with volumetric-modulated arc therapy to prescription doses of 81 Gy for prostate and 12-30 Gy for SRS. Using these clinically approved plans, ANNs were trained to predict dose matrix and the predictive accuracy was evaluated using the dose difference between the clinical plan and prediction, δD = Dclin - Dpred. The mean (〈δDr〉), standard deviation (σδDr ), and their interquartile range (IQR) for the training plans were evaluated at a 2-3 mm interval from the PTV boundary (rPTV) to assess prediction bias and precision. Initially, unfiltered models which were trained using all plans in the cohorts were created for each treatment site. The models predict approximately the average quality of OAR sparing. Emphasizing a subset of plans that exhibited superior to the average OAR sparing during training, refined models were created to predict high-quality rectum sparing for prostate and brainstem sparing for SRS. Using the refined model, potentially suboptimal plans were identified where the model predicted further sparing of the OARs was achievable. Replans were performed to test if the OAR sparing could be improved as predicted by the model. The refined models demonstrated highly accurate dose distribution prediction. For prostate cases, the average prediction bias for all voxels irrespective of organ delineation ranged from -1% to 0% with maximum IQR of 3% over rPTV ∈ [ - 6, 30] mm. The average prediction error was less than 10% for the same rPTV range. For SRS cases

  1. Knowledge-based prediction of three-dimensional dose distributions for external beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiraishi, Satomi; Moore, Kevin L., E-mail: kevinmoore@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate knowledge-based 3D dose prediction for external beam radiotherapy. Methods: Using previously treated plans as training data, an artificial neural network (ANN) was trained to predict a dose matrix based on patient-specific geometric and planning parameters, such as the closest distance (r) to planning target volume (PTV) and organ-at-risks (OARs). Twenty-three prostate and 43 stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) cases with at least one nearby OAR were studied. All were planned with volumetric-modulated arc therapy to prescription doses of 81 Gy for prostate and 12–30 Gy for SRS. Using these clinically approved plans, ANNs were trained to predict dose matrix and the predictive accuracy was evaluated using the dose difference between the clinical plan and prediction, δD = D{sub clin} − D{sub pred}. The mean (〈δD{sub r}〉), standard deviation (σ{sub δD{sub r}}), and their interquartile range (IQR) for the training plans were evaluated at a 2–3 mm interval from the PTV boundary (r{sub PTV}) to assess prediction bias and precision. Initially, unfiltered models which were trained using all plans in the cohorts were created for each treatment site. The models predict approximately the average quality of OAR sparing. Emphasizing a subset of plans that exhibited superior to the average OAR sparing during training, refined models were created to predict high-quality rectum sparing for prostate and brainstem sparing for SRS. Using the refined model, potentially suboptimal plans were identified where the model predicted further sparing of the OARs was achievable. Replans were performed to test if the OAR sparing could be improved as predicted by the model. Results: The refined models demonstrated highly accurate dose distribution prediction. For prostate cases, the average prediction bias for all voxels irrespective of organ delineation ranged from −1% to 0% with maximum IQR of 3% over r{sub PTV} ∈ [ − 6, 30] mm. The

  2. Practical dose point-based methods to characterize dose distribution in a stationary elliptical body phantom for a cone-beam C-arm CT system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jang-Hwan, E-mail: jhchoi21@stanford.edu [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Constantin, Dragos [Microwave Physics R& E, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Ganguly, Arundhuti; Girard, Erin; Fahrig, Rebecca [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Morin, Richard L. [Mayo Clinic Jacksonville, Jacksonville, Florida 32224 (United States); Dixon, Robert L. [Department of Radiology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27157 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: To propose new dose point measurement-based metrics to characterize the dose distributions and the mean dose from a single partial rotation of an automatic exposure control-enabled, C-arm-based, wide cone angle computed tomography system over a stationary, large, body-shaped phantom. Methods: A small 0.6 cm{sup 3} ion chamber (IC) was used to measure the radiation dose in an elliptical body-shaped phantom made of tissue-equivalent material. The IC was placed at 23 well-distributed holes in the central and peripheral regions of the phantom and dose was recorded for six acquisition protocols with different combinations of minimum kVp (109 and 125 kVp) and z-collimator aperture (full: 22.2 cm; medium: 14.0 cm; small: 8.4 cm). Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were carried out to generate complete 2D dose distributions in the central plane (z = 0). The MC model was validated at the 23 dose points against IC experimental data. The planar dose distributions were then estimated using subsets of the point dose measurements using two proposed methods: (1) the proximity-based weighting method (method 1) and (2) the dose point surface fitting method (method 2). Twenty-eight different dose point distributions with six different point number cases (4, 5, 6, 7, 14, and 23 dose points) were evaluated to determine the optimal number of dose points and their placement in the phantom. The performances of the methods were determined by comparing their results with those of the validated MC simulations. The performances of the methods in the presence of measurement uncertainties were evaluated. Results: The 5-, 6-, and 7-point cases had differences below 2%, ranging from 1.0% to 1.7% for both methods, which is a performance comparable to that of the methods with a relatively large number of points, i.e., the 14- and 23-point cases. However, with the 4-point case, the performances of the two methods decreased sharply. Among the 4-, 5-, 6-, and 7-point cases, the 7-point case (1

  3. Vertebral lesion distribution in multiple myeloma - assessed by reduced-dose whole-body MDCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bier, Georg; Kloth, Christopher; Schabel, Christoph; Bongers, Malte; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Horger, Marius [Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    To observe the distribution and potential distribution patterns of osteolytic and sclerotic vertebral involvement in a representative collective of multiple myeloma patients. A total of 66 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of multiple myeloma at initial diagnosis or during follow-up were examined by multidetector reduced-dose computed tomography to evaluate the distribution of bone lesions along the spine with focus on size, location, and lesion character. Confirmation of diagnosis was performed by comparison to follow-up computed tomography or magnetic resonance tomography. If >50 % of all detected malignant lesions occurred in one spinal segment, the distribution pattern was called cervical, thoracic, lumbar, or sacral, otherwise a ''mixed'' pattern was classified. Of a total number of 933 osseous spine lesions, 632 (67.7 %) were classified as malignant (98.9 % of them osteolytic) and 293 (31.5 %) as benign. The distribution pattern analysis yielded two patients (3.8 %) with a cervical, 26 (50 %) with a thoracic, 4 (7.7 %) with a lumbar, one (1.9 %) with a sacral pattern, and 19 cases (36.6 %) showed a mixed distribution pattern. Segment-wise, the mean lesion size was 6.52 ± 2.76 mm (cervical), 8.97 ± 5.43 mm (thoracic), 11.97 ± 7.11 mm (lumbar), and 17.5 ± 16.465 (sacral), whilst, related to the vertebra size, the lesion/vertebra size ratio is decreasing through the whole spine beginning from the top. Multiple myeloma bone lesions occur preferably and are larger in the thoracic and lumbar spine. Moreover, a specific distribution pattern is present in about 60 %. (orig.)

  4. [Temporal-spatial distribution of agricultural diffuse nitrogen pollution and relationship with soil respiration and nitrification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ouyang; Cai, Guan-Qing; Huang, Hao-Bo; Geng, Xiao-Jun

    2014-06-01

    The soil respiration, nitrification and denitrification processes play an important role on soil nitrogen transformation and diffuse nitrogen loading. These processes are also the chains for soil circle. In this study, the Zhegao watershed located north of Chaohu Lake was selected to explore the interactions of these processes with diffuse nitrogen pollution. The BaPS (Barometric Process Separation) was applied to analyze the soil respiration, nitrification and denitrification processes in farmland and forest. The SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) simulated the temporal and spatial pattern of diffuse nitrogen loading. As the expanding of farmland and higher level of fertilization, the yearly mean loading of diffuse nitrogen increased sustainably from 1980-1995 to 1996-2012. The monthly loading in 1996-2012 was also higher than that in the period of 1980-1995, which closely related to the precipitation. The statistical analysis indicated that there was a significant difference between two periods. The yearly averaged loading of the whole watershed in 1996-2012 was 10.40 kg x hm(-2), which was 8.10 kg x hm(-2) in 1980-1995. The variance analysis demonstrated that there was also a big difference between the spatial distributions of two periods. The forest soil had much higher soil respiration than the farmland soil. But the farmland had higher nitrification and denitrification rates. The more intensive nitrogen transformation in the farmland contributed to the less diffuse nitrogen loading. As the nitrification rate of farmland was higher than denitrification rate, agricultural diffuse nitrate nitrogen loading would increase and organic nitrogen loading would reduce. The analysis of soil respiration, nitrification and denitrification is helpful for the study of soil nitrogen circle form the aspect of soil biology, which also benefits the control of agricultural diffuse nitrogen pollution.

  5. Spatial and temporal distribution of coloured dissolved organic matter in a hypertrophic freshwater lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Vaičiūtė

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A dataset of 224 Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS full resolution satellite images were processed to retrieve the concentration of coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM in a hypertrophic estuary (Curonian Lagoon, Lithuania and Russia. Images covered a period of 7 months, spanning from the ice melting (March to the late summer (September of 7 consecutive years (2005-2011. The aim of the study was to analyse the spatial and temporal variations of CDOM, by focusing on the main regulating factors (riverine discharge, sea-lagoon water exchange, water temperature, chlorophyll a, wind in a large estuary. The working hypothesis is that CDOM distribution may reveal distinct, site specific seasonal patterns. Our results demonstrated that CDOM concentrations at the whole lagoon level were elevated (1.5-4 m-1 and slightly but significantly higher in spring (1.50 m-1 on average compared to the summer (1.45 m-1 on average. This is due to very different flow of CDOM-rich freshwater from the main lagoon tributary in spring compared to summer. They also highlight macroscopic differences among areas within the lagoon, depending on season, suggesting a complex regulation of CDOM in this system. Significant factors explaining observed differences are the dilution of lagoon water with CDOM-poor brackish water, regeneration of large amounts of dissolved organic matter from sediments and combinations of uptake/release from phytoplankton. CDOM and its variations are understudied due to inherent methodological and analytical difficulties. However, this pool has a demonstrated relevant role in the biogeochemistry of aquatic environments. We speculate that the dissolved organic pool in the Curonian Lagoon has a mainly allochthonous origin in the high discharge period and an autochthonous origin in the summer, algal bloom period. Both positive and negative relationships between CDOM and phytoplankton suggest that pelagic microalgae may act as a source or as

  6. Measurements of spatial distribution of absorbed dose in proton therapy with Gafchromic EBT3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambarini, G.; Regazzoni, V.; Grisotto, S.; Artuso, E.; Giove, D. [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Department of Physics, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Borroni, M.; Carrara, M.; Pignoli, E. [Fondazione IRCCS, Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano, Medical Physics Unit, via Giacomo Venezian 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Mirandola, A.; Ciocca, M., E-mail: grazia.gambarini@mi.infn.it [Centro Nazionale Adroterapia Oncologica, Medical Physics Unit, Strada Campeggi 53, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2014-08-15

    A study of the response of EBT3 films has been carried out. Light transmittance images (around 630 nm) were acquired by means of a Ccd camera. The difference of optical density was assumed as dosimeter response. Calibration was performed by means of {sup 60}Co photons, at a radiotherapy facility. A study of the response variation during the time after exposure has been carried out. EBT3 films were exposed, in a solid-water phantom, to proton beams of various energies and the obtained depth-dose profiles were compared with those measured with a ionization chamber. As expected, in the Bragg peak region the values obtained with EBT3 films were lower than those obtained with the ionization chamber. The ratio of such values was evaluated, along dose profiles, for each utilized energy. A method for correcting the data measured with EBT3 has been proposed and tested. The results confirm that the method can be advantageously applied for obtaining spatial distribution of the absorbed dose in proton therapy. (author)

  7. The Effect of Breast Reconstruction Prosthesis on Photon Dose Distribution in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    fatemeh sari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Siliconeprosthetic implants are commonlyutilizedfor tissue replacement and breast augmentation after mastectomy. On the other hand, some patients require adjuvant radiotherapy in order to preventlocal-regional recurrence and increment ofthe overall survival. In case of recurrence, the radiation oncologist might have to irradiate the prosthesis.The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of silicone prosthesis on photon dose distribution in breast radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: The experimental dosimetry was performed using theprosthetic breast phantom and the female-equivalent mathematical chest phantom. A Computerized Tomographybased treatment planning was performedusing a phantom and by CorePlan Treatment Planning System (TPS. For measuring the absorbed dose, thermoluminescent dosimeter(TLD chips (GR-207A were used. Multiple irradiations were completed for all the TLD positions, and the dose absorbed by the TLDs was read by a lighttelemetry (LTM reader. Results: Statistical comparisons were performed between the absorbed dosesassessed by the TLDs and the TPS calculations forthe same sites. Our initial resultsdemonstratedanacceptable agreement (P=0.064 between the treatment planning data and the measurements. The mean difference between the TPS and TLD resultswas 1.99%.The obtained findings showed that radiotherapy is compatible withsilicone gel prosthesis. Conclusion: It could be concludedthat the siliconbreast prosthesis has no clinicallysignificant effectondistribution of a 6 MV photon beam for reconstructed breasts.

  8. Distribution, elimination, and renal effects of single oral doses of europium in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Keiko; Usuda, Kan; Nakayama, Shin; Sugiura, Yumiko; Kitamura, Yasuhiro; Kurita, Akihiro; Tsuda, Yuko; Kimura, Motoshi; Kono, Koichi

    2011-11-01

    Single doses of europium (III) chloride hexahydrate were orally administered to several groups of rats. Cumulative urine samples were taken at 0-24 h, and blood samples were drawn after 24-h administration. The europium concentration was determined in these samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. The volume, creatinine, ß-2-microglobulin, and N-acetyl-ß-D-glucosaminidase were measured in the urine samples to evaluate possible europium-induced renal effects. The blood samples showed low europium distribution, with an average of 77.5 μg/L for all groups. Although the urinary concentration and excretion showed dose-dependent increases, the percentage of europium excreted showed a dose-dependent decrease, with an average of 0.31% in all groups. The administration of europium resulted in a significant decrease of creatinine and a significant increase of urinary volume, N-acetyl-ß-D-glucosaminidase, and ß-2-microglobulin. Rare earth elements, including europium, are believed to form colloidal conjugates that deposit in the reticuloendothelial system and glomeruli. This specific reaction may contribute to low europium bioavailability and renal function disturbances. Despite low bioavailability, the high performance of the analytical method for determination of europium makes the blood and urine sampling suitable tools for monitoring of exposure to this element. The results presented in this study will be of great importance in future studies on the health impacts of rare earth elements.

  9. Integral T-shaped phantom-dosimeter system to measure transverse and longitudinal dose distributions simultaneously for stereotactic radiosurgery dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Wook Jae; Moon, Jinsoo; Jang, Kyoung Won; Han, Ki-Tek; Shin, Sang Hun; Jeon, Dayeong; Park, Jang-Yeon; Park, Byung Gi; Lee, Bongsoo

    2012-01-01

    A T-shaped fiber-optic phantom-dosimeter system was developed using square scintillating optical fibers, a lens system, and a CMOS image camera. Images of scintillating light were used to simultaneously measure the transverse and longitudinal distributions of absorbed dose of a 6 MV photon beam with field sizes of 1 × 1 and 3 × 3 cm(2). Each optical fiber has a very small sensitive volume and the sensitive material is water equivalent. This allows the measurements of cross-beam profile as well as the percentage depth dose of small field sizes. In the case of transverse dose distribution, the measured beam profiles were gradually become uneven and the beam edge had a gentle slope with increasing depth of the PMMA phantom. In addition, the maximum dose values of longitudinal dose distribution for 6 MV photon beam with field sizes of 1 × 1 and 3 × 3 cm(2) were found to be at a depth of approximately 15 mm and the percentage depth dose of both field sizes were nearly in agreement at the skin dose level. Based on the results of this study, it is anticipated that an all-in-one phantom-dosimeter can be developed to accurately measure beam profiles and dose distribution in a small irradiation fields prior to carrying out stereotactic radiosurgery.

  10. Integral T-Shaped Phantom-Dosimeter System to Measure Transverse and Longitudinal Dose Distributions Simultaneously for Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bongsoo Lee

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A T-shaped fiber-optic phantom-dosimeter system was developed using square scintillating optical fibers, a lens system, and a CMOS image camera. Images of scintillating light were used to simultaneously measure the transverse and longitudinal distributions of absorbed dose of a 6 MV photon beam with field sizes of 1 × 1 and 3 × 3 cm2. Each optical fiber has a very small sensitive volume and the sensitive material is water equivalent. This allows the measurements of cross-beam profile as well as the percentage depth dose of small field sizes. In the case of transverse dose distribution, the measured beam profiles were gradually become uneven and the beam edge had a gentle slope with increasing depth of the PMMA phantom. In addition, the maximum dose values of longitudinal dose distribution for 6 MV photon beam with field sizes of 1 × 1 and 3 × 3 cm2 were found to be at a depth of approximately 15 mm and the percentage depth dose of both field sizes were nearly in agreement at the skin dose level. Based on the results of this study, it is anticipated that an all-in-one phantom-dosimeter can be developed to accurately measure beam profiles and dose distribution in a small irradiation fields prior to carrying out stereotactic radiosurgery.

  11. Integral T-Shaped Phantom-Dosimeter System to Measure Transverse and Longitudinal Dose Distributions Simultaneously for Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Wook Jae; Moon, Jinsoo; Jang, Kyoung Won; Han, Ki-Tek; Shin, Sang Hun; Jeon, Dayeong; Park, Jang-Yeon; Park, Byung Gi; Lee, Bongsoo

    2012-01-01

    A T-shaped fiber-optic phantom-dosimeter system was developed using square scintillating optical fibers, a lens system, and a CMOS image camera. Images of scintillating light were used to simultaneously measure the transverse and longitudinal distributions of absorbed dose of a 6 MV photon beam with field sizes of 1 × 1 and 3 × 3 cm2. Each optical fiber has a very small sensitive volume and the sensitive material is water equivalent. This allows the measurements of cross-beam profile as well as the percentage depth dose of small field sizes. In the case of transverse dose distribution, the measured beam profiles were gradually become uneven and the beam edge had a gentle slope with increasing depth of the PMMA phantom. In addition, the maximum dose values of longitudinal dose distribution for 6 MV photon beam with field sizes of 1 × 1 and 3 × 3 cm2 were found to be at a depth of approximately 15 mm and the percentage depth dose of both field sizes were nearly in agreement at the skin dose level. Based on the results of this study, it is anticipated that an all-in-one phantom-dosimeter can be developed to accurately measure beam profiles and dose distribution in a small irradiation fields prior to carrying out stereotactic radiosurgery. PMID:22778649

  12. Entrance surface dose distribution and organ dose assessment for cone-beam computed tomography using measurements and Monte Carlo simulations with voxel phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, M.; Di Maria, S.; Vieira, S.; Vaz, P.

    2017-11-01

    Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) enables high-resolution volumetric scanning of the bone and soft tissue anatomy under investigation at the treatment accelerator. This technique is extensively used in Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) for pre-treatment verification of patient position and target volume localization. When employed daily and several times per patient, CBCT imaging may lead to high cumulative imaging doses to the healthy tissues surrounding the exposed organs. This work aims at (1) evaluating the dose distribution during a CBCT scan and (2) calculating the organ doses involved in this image guiding procedure for clinically available scanning protocols. Both Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and measurements were performed. To model and simulate the kV imaging system mounted on a linear accelerator (Edge™, Varian Medical Systems) the state-of-the-art MC radiation transport program MCNPX 2.7.0 was used. In order to validate the simulation results, measurements of the Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) were performed, using standard PMMA head and body phantoms, with 150 mm length and a standard pencil ionizing chamber (IC) 100 mm long. Measurements for head and pelvis scanning protocols, usually adopted in clinical environment were acquired, using two acquisition modes (full-fan and half fan). To calculate the organ doses, the implemented MC model of the CBCT scanner together with a male voxel phantom ("Golem") was used. The good agreement between the MCNPX simulations and the CTDIw measurements (differences up to 17%) presented in this work reveals that the CBCT MC model was successfully validated, taking into account the several uncertainties. The adequacy of the computational model to map dose distributions during a CBCT scan is discussed in order to identify ways to reduce the total CBCT imaging dose. The organ dose assessment highlights the need to evaluate the therapeutic and the CBCT imaging doses, in a more balanced approach, and the

  13. Tissue distribution and elimination of BDE 47 in mice following a single oral dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staskal, D. [Curriculum in Toxicology, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Diliberto, J.; DeVito, M.; Birnbaum, L. [US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, ETD, RTP (United States)

    2004-09-15

    2,2',4,4'-Tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE 47) is a polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congener which is part of a class of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) commonly used in a variety of highly flammable consumer goods. Concern for the effects of PBDEs has increased significantly in recent years as their presence has been detected in environmental samples and in human tissues at steadily increasing concentrations. Despite its small contribution to the PBDE global production and usage, BDE 47 is the major congener found in environmental samples and human tissue. Limited toxicology studies suggest that BDE 47 is a developmental neurotoxicant and an endocrine disruptor however, several data gaps exist and must be investigated in order to evaluate the human health risk of BDE 47. This study investigated basic toxicokinetic properties of BDE 47 in female C57BL/6J mice. Here we report the effect of time on the absorption, distribution, and excretion following a single, oral dose of 14C-labeled BDE 47. Animals were administered 1.0mg BDE 47/kg bw, a dose chosen based on previous studies. Distribution and elimination were monitored at several time points ranging from 1 hour to 21 days following exposure. Data from these basic toxicokinetic studies will be applied to studies investigating the toxicokinetics of BDE 47 in a developmental model as well as in the development of a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model.

  14. Dedicated high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy radiation fields for in vitro cell exposures at variable source-target cell distances: killing of mammalian cells depends on temporal dose rate fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veigel, Cornelia; Hartmann, Günther H.; Fritz, Peter; Debus, Jürgen; Weber, Klaus-Josef

    2017-02-01

    Afterloading brachytherapy is conducted by the stepwise movement of a radioactive source through surgically implanted applicator tubes where at predefined dwell positions calculated dwell times optimize spatial dose delivery with respect to a planned dose level. The temporal exposure pattern exhibits drastic fluctuations in dose rate at a given coordinate and within a single treatment session because of the discontinuous and repeated source movement into the target volume. This could potentially affect biological response. Therefore, mammalian cells were exposed as monolayers to a high dose rate 192Ir source by utilizing a dedicated irradiation device where the distance between a planar array of radioactive source positions and the plane of the cell monolayer could be varied from 2.5 mm to 40 mm, thus varying dose rate pattern for any chosen total dose. The Gammamed IIi afterloading system equipped with a nominal 370 GBq (10 Ci) 192-Ir source was used to irradiate V79 Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts from both confluent and from exponential growth phase with dose up to 12 Gy (at room temperature, total exposure not exceeding 1 h). For comparison, V79 cells were also exposed to 6 MV x-rays from a clinical linear accelerator (dose rate of 2.5 Gy min-1). As biological endpoint, cell survival was determined by standard colony forming assay. Dose measurements were conducted with a diamond detector (sensitive area 7.3 mm2), calibrated by means of 60Co radiation. Additionally, dose delivery was simulated by Monte Carlo calculations using the EGSnrc code system. The calculated secondary electron fluence spectra at the cell location did not indicate a significant change of radiation quality (i.e. higher linear energy transfer) at the lower distances. Clonogenic cell survival curves obtained after brachytherapy exhibited an altered biological response compared to x-rays which was characterized by a significant reduction of the survival curve shoulder when dose rate

  15. Measurement of two-dimensional thermal neutron flux in a water phantom and evaluation of dose distribution characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Kazuyoshi; Kumada, Hiroaki; Kishi, Toshiaki; Torii, Yoshiya; Horiguchi, Yoji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    To evaluate nitrogen dose, boron dose and gamma-ray dose occurred by neutron capture reaction of the hydrogen at the medical irradiation, two-dimensional distribution of the thermal neutron flux is very important because these doses are proportional to the thermal neutron distribution. This report describes the measurement of the two-dimensional thermal neutron distribution in a head water phantom by neutron beams of the JRR-4 and evaluation of the dose distribution characteristic. Thermal neutron flux in the phantom was measured by gold wire placed in the spokewise of every 30 degrees in order to avoid the interaction. Distribution of the thermal neutron flux was also calculated using two-dimensional Lagrange's interpolation program (radius, angle direction) developed this time. As a result of the analysis, it was confirmed to become distorted distribution which has annular peak at outside of the void, though improved dose profile of the deep direction was confirmed in the case which the radiation field in the phantom contains void. (author)

  16. Microbial Distributions Across pH, Temperature, and Temporal Conditions in Hot Springs of Tengchong, Yunnan Providence, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, B. R.; Brodie, E. L.; Tom, L. M.; Dong, H.; Jiang, H.; Huang, Q.; Wang, S.; Hou, W.; Wu, G.; Peacock, J. P.; Huang, L.; Zhi, X.; Li, W.; Dodsworth, J. A.; Hedlund, B. P.; Zhang, C.

    2012-12-01

    Terrestrial geothermal springs contain a rich microbial diversity that has gained attention because of their potential analogue to early Earth habitats and biotechnological applications. Despite this attention, the distribution of thermophiles and the mechanisms that underlie those distributions have not been fully elucidated. The objective of this study was to identify microorganisms in hot springs in Tengchong, China, and to compare microbial composition across temperature, pH, and temporal gradients. The PhyloChip microarray detected 79 bacterial and 20 archaeal phyla. Canonical correspondence analysis was used to link the detected taxa to their distributions across temperature and pH conditions. The distributions of phyla (e.g. Aquificae, Crenarchaeota) identified by this analysis were consistent with previous culture-dependent and independent methods and provides new knowledge on the distributions of phyla that do not contain cultured representatives (e.g. candidate phyla OP11, GoM161, etc.). For example, low pH (85o C). Furthermore, temporal changes in the community composition were detected, with the rainy season containing higher diversity but lower relative abundance of archaea. These results expand our understanding of the distributions of hot spring microorganisms seasonally, and across environmental gradients such as temperature and pH.

  17. Spatial-temporal distribution of dengue and climate characteristics for two clusters in Sri Lanka from 2012 to 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Xue, Ling; Xie, Xiaoxue

    2017-10-10

    Dengue is a vector-borne disease causing high morbidity and mortality in tropical and subtropical countries. Urbanization, globalization, and lack of effective mosquito control have lead to dramatically increased frequency and magnitude of dengue epidemic in the past 40 years. The virus and the mosquito vectors keep expanding geographically in the tropical regions of the world. Using the hot spot analysis and the spatial-temporal clustering method, we investigated the spatial-temporal distribution of dengue in Sri Lanka from 2012 to 2016 to identify spatial-temporal clusters and elucidate the association of climatic factors with dengue incidence. We detected two important spatial-temporal clusters in Sri Lanka. Dengue incidences were predicted by combining historical dengue incidence data with climate data, and hot and cold spots were forecasted using the predicted dengue incidences to identify areas at high risks. Targeting the hot spots during outbreaks instead of all the regions can save resources and time for public health authorities. Our study helps better understand how climatic factors impact spatial and temporal spread of dengue virus. Hot spot prediction helps public health authorities forecast future high risk areas and direct control measures to minimize cost on health, time, and economy.

  18. Commercial production and distribution of fresh fruits and vegetables: A scoping study on the importance of produce pathways to dose. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, T.L.; Anderson, D.M.; Farris, W.T.; Ikenberry, T.A.; Napier, B.A.; Wilfert, G.L.

    1992-09-01

    This letter report summarizes a scoping study that examined the potential importance of fresh fruit and vegetable pathways to dose. A simple production index was constructed with data collected from the Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA), the United States Bureau of the Census, and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project staff from Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, in cooperation with members of the Technical Steering Panel (TSP), selected lettuce and spinach as the produce pathways most likely to impact dose. County agricultural reports published in 1956 provided historical descriptions of the predominant distribution patterns of fresh lettuce and spinach from production regions to local population centers. Pathway rankings and screening dose estimates were calculated for specific populations living in selected locations within the HEDR study area.

  19. [Influence of inaccuracy of certain parameters on dose distribution in telecobalt therapy (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regis, H; Bru, A; Bousquet, L; Barral, J C; Daly, N

    1975-05-01

    Progress in dosimetry and in radiobiology together with the evolution of radiation generators led to adopt very elaborated radiotherapy protocols. However, the therapist should have confidence in these protocols on condition that irradiation parameters are strictly respected. For obvious reasons, this is impossible despite the meticulous rules. In this, paper, we therefore intend to study the role of the angle of incidence on the actual distribution of doses; we also study the inaccuracy of certain parameters recorded during preparation for the therapy or shown during successive irradiation courses. In this paper we retain only errors which can be easily quantified. These are errors concerning the irradiation apparatus (source to skin distance, angle of the rays, field dimension) and those due to factors related to the patient treated: contour measurement, entrance point of rays and positional changes of the patient. The different errors can be associated in various ways for a given therapy protocol. For the same reason, an isodose of a given nominal value will have several curves. All these tracings are lined by two curves which we call "superior and inferior envelops": these border the "incertitude area". It can be said that at the end of the treatment, the given isodose lies in this area; it is however impossible to define its form or exact position. A few examples in the text illustrate these results and show the possible practical angles of incidence. If we assume that errors during successive irradiations are distributed at random, a certain compensation is noted and the "areas of incertitude" decrease. But if the errors are constantly on the same side, as is sometimes the case, the dose distribution can be very different from that predicted in the dosimetric protocol.

  20. Temporal Bone CT: Improved Image Quality and Potential for Decreased Radiation Dose Using an Ultra-High-Resolution Scan Mode with an Iterative Reconstruction Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, S; Diehn, F E; Lane, J I; Koeller, K K; Witte, R J; Carter, R E; McCollough, C H

    2015-09-01

    Radiation dose in temporal bone CT imaging can be high due to the requirement of high spatial resolution. In this study, we assessed whether CT imaging of the temporal bone by using an ultra-high-resolution scan mode combined with iterative reconstruction provides higher spatial resolution and lower image noise than a z-axis ultra-high-resolution mode. Patients with baseline temporal bone CT scans acquired by using a z-axis ultra-high-resolution protocol and a follow-up scan by using the ultra-high-resolution-iterative reconstruction technique were identified. Images of left and right temporal bones were reconstructed in the axial, coronal, and Poschl planes. Three neuroradiologists assessed the spatial resolution of the following structures: round and oval windows, incudomallear and incudostapedial joints, basal turn spiral lamina, and scutum. The paired z-axis ultra-high-resolution and ultra-high-resolution-iterative reconstruction images were displayed side by side in random order, with readers blinded to the imaging protocol. Image noise was compared in ROIs over the posterior fossa. We identified 8 patients, yielding 16 sets of temporal bone images (left and right). Three sets were excluded because the patient underwent surgery between the 2 examinations. Spatial resolution was comparable (Poschl) or slightly better (axial and coronal planes) with ultra-high-resolution-iterative reconstruction than with z-axis ultra-high-resolution. A paired t test indicated that noise was significantly lower with ultra-high-resolution-iterative reconstruction than with z-axis ultra-high-resolution (P iterative reconstruction scan mode has similar or slightly better resolution relative to the z-axis ultra-high-resolution mode for CT of the temporal bone but significantly (P < .01) lower image noise, which may enable the dose to be reduced by approximately 50%. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  1. Estimation of the temporal and spatial distribution of dust concentration over China by combining PM10 and conventional meteorological observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fengsheng; Li, Xiaoqing; Gai, Changsong; Gao, Wenhua

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, we will present a simple algorithm to estimate the temporal and spatial distribution of dust mass concentration by combining PM10 and conventional meteorological observations. The efficiency of the algorithm has been demonstrated by applying it to analyze the dust source, transport, and dissipation of the dust storm which occurred in the west region of Pa-tan-chi-lin Desert at 0200 BST 27 March, 2004.

  2. Tuning aerosol particle size distribution of metered dose inhalers using cosolvents and surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Imran Y; Smyth, Hugh D C

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of these studies was to understand the influence of cosolvent and surfactant contributions to particle size distributions emitted from solution metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) based on the propellant HFA 227. Two sets of formulations were prepared: (a) pMDIs-HFA 227 containing cosolvent (5-15% w/w ethanol) with constant surfactant (pluronic) concentration and (b) pMDIs-HFA 227 containing surfactant (0-5.45% w/w pluronic) with constant cosolvent concentration. Particle size distributions emitted from these pMDIs were analyzed using aerodynamic characterization (inertial impaction) and laser diffraction methods. Both cosolvent and surfactant concentrations were positively correlated with median particle sizes; that is, drug particle size increased with increasing ethanol and pluronic concentrations. However, evaluation of particle size distributions showed that cosolvent caused reduction in the fine particle mode magnitude while the surfactant caused a shift in the mode position. These findings highlight the different mechanisms by which these components influence droplet formation and demonstrate the ability to utilize the different effects in formulations of pMDI-HFA 227 for independently modulating particle sizes in the respirable region. Potentially, the formulation design window generated using these excipients in combination could be used to match the particle size output of reformulated products to preexisting pMDI products.

  3. Temporal variation and size class distribution in a hepertological assemblage from Córdoba, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martori, Ricardo

    2005-05-01

    grupos etarios de cada especie cambió temporalmente debido al reclutamiento y el período de reclutamiento varió en y entre especies. Durante el primer período el índice de diversidad mayor se registró en abril 1999 (5.46, durante el segundo período de estudio el mayor índice de diversidad se registró en enero 2000. Este estudio muestra la importancia de los estudios temporalmente extensos y enfatiza la importancia de comprender la variación temporal de la fenología, diversidad y patrones de actividad de los ensambles herpetológicos. From a conservationist perspective, knowledge of the abundance, diversity, and activity patterns of a herpetological assemblage is essential to understand community dynamics and habitat utilization. We proposed four null hypotheses regarding the dynamics of an assemblage of amphibians and reptiles from Argentina: 1 The capture frequency of each species studied is similar during the two years; 2 The capture frequency of each species is similar in every month of each period; 3 The activity of each species is similar to that of every other species and 4 The proportion of each size class for each species is similar throughout the year. During the study, nineteen species were collected: ten species of Amphibia belonging to four families, and nine species of Squamata, distributed among seven families. In relatively complex habitats, with dense vegetation and very irregular herpetological activity, the pitfall method is one of the few efficient ways to evaluate terrestrial animal activity. Pitfall traps are an effective method to perform herpetological inventories, but results must be reported with caution because traps capture some species more easily than others. The main results of this study were: Hypothesis 1 was rejected for all species except Mabuya dosivittata, which showed similar frequencies during both years. Hypothesis 2 was rejected, as all species showed significant seasonal differences. The most variable species were Bufo

  4. SU-E-T-463: Impact to Total Scatter Factors On the Calculated Dose Distribution in Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, O; Larraga-Gutierrez, J [National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the impact of relative measurements: off axis ratios (OAR), tissue phantom ratios (TPR) and especially total scatter factor (TSF) on the calculated dose distribution in stereotactic radiosurgery with circular cones. Methods: Six detectors were employed to characterize circular collimated photon beams of 6 MV: three diodes (SFD, E, SRS), one ionization chamber (CC01) and two radiochromic films (EBT, EBT2). The relative measurements were incorporated in the treatment planning system (TPS) in order to compare and analyze the calculated dose distributions (DD). Each dose distribution was re-scaled by the TSF to observe its effect in the final dose distribution. The comparison was performed by using the gamma index. A Monte Carlo generated dosimetry was used as reference. Results: The results showed that in terms of relative dosimetry all the detectors have a good agreement within 2%, with the exception of the CC01 and EBT2 film. However, the analysis performed with the dose distributions re-scaled relative to the TSF for each detector showed that the impact it was not only to the isocenter dose. The dose to the PTV and normal tissue showed differences up to 13% depending of the dosimeter used for TSF measurements. Conclusion: With the exception of the CC01 ionization chamber and EBT2 radiochromic film, all the studied dosimeters were adequate for the measurement of OAR and TPR. However, attention must be put in the measurement of TSF. The use of the wrong detector does not only affect the isocenter dose, it may have an impact in the PTV and normal tissue dose.

  5. Optimal temporal windows and dose-reducing strategy for coronary artery bypass graft imaging with 256-slice CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Kun-Mu [Department of Radiology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, 95 Wen Chang Road, Shih Lin District, Taipei 111, Taiwan. (China); Lee, Yi-Wei [Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Guan, Yu-Xiang [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Liang-Kuang [Department of Radiology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, 95 Wen Chang Road, Shih Lin District, Taipei 111, Taiwan. (China); School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Law, Wei-Yip, E-mail: m002325@ms.skh.org.tw [Department of Radiology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, 95 Wen Chang Road, Shih Lin District, Taipei 111, Taiwan. (China); Su, Chen-Tau, E-mail: m005531@ms.skh.org.tw [Department of Radiology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, 95 Wen Chang Road, Shih Lin District, Taipei 111, Taiwan. (China); School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2013-12-11

    Objective: To determine the optimal image reconstruction windows in the assessment of coronary artery bypass grafts (CABGs) with 256-slice computed tomography (CT), and to assess their associated optimal pulsing windows for electrocardiogram-triggered tube current modulation (ETCM). Methods: We recruited 18 patients (three female; mean age 68.9 years) having mean heart rate (HR) of 66.3 beats per minute (bpm) and a heart rate variability of 1.3 bpm for this study. A total of 36 CABGs with 168 segments were evaluated, including 12 internal mammary artery (33.3%) and 24 saphenous vein grafts (66.7%). We reconstructed 20 data sets in 5%-step through 0–95% of the R–R interval. The image quality of CABGs was assessed by a 5-point scale (1=excellent to 5=non-diagnostic) for each segment (proximal anastomosis, proximal, middle, distal course of graft body, and distal anastomosis). Two reviewers discriminated optimal reconstruction intervals for each CABG segment in each temporal window. Optimal windows for ETCM were also evaluated. Results: The determined optimal systolic and diastolic reconstruction intervals could be divided into 2 groups with threshold HR=68. The determined best reconstruction intervals for low heart rate (HR<68) and high heart rate (HR>68) were 76.0±2.5% and 45.0±0% respectively. Average image quality scores were 1.7±0.6 with good inter-observer agreement (Kappa=0.79). Image quality was significantly better for saphenous vein grafts versus arterial grafts (P<0.001). The recommended windows of ETCM for low HR, high HR and all HR groups were 40–50%, 71–81% and 40–96% of R-R interval, respectively. The corresponding dose savings were about 60.8%, 58.7% and 22.7% in that order. Conclusions: We determined optimal reconstruction intervals and ETCM windows representing a good compromise between radiation and image quality for following bypass surgery using a 256-slice CT.

  6. Effects of Strain and Species on the Septo-Temporal Distribution of Adult Neurogenesis in Rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Wiget

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The functional septo-temporal (dorso-ventral differentiation of the hippocampus is accompanied by gradients of adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN in laboratory rodents. An extensive septal AHN in laboratory mice suggests an emphasis on a relation of AHN to tasks that also depend on the septal hippocampus. Domestication experiments indicate that AHN dynamics along the longitudinal axis are subject to selective pressure, questioning if the septal emphasis of AHN in laboratory mice is a rule applying to rodents in general. In this study, we used C57BL/6 and DBA2/Crl mice, wild-derived F1 house mice and wild-captured wood mice and bank voles to look for evidence of strain and species specific septo-temporal differences in AHN. We confirmed the septal > temporal gradient in C57BL/6 mice, but in the wild species, AHN was low septally and high temporally. Emphasis on the temporal hippocampus was particularly strong for doublecortin positive (DCX+ young neurons and more pronounced in bank voles than in wood mice. The temporal shift was stronger in female wood mice than in males, while we did not see sex differences in bank voles. AHN was overall low in DBA and F1 house mice, but they exhibited the same inversed gradient as wood mice and bank voles. DCX+ young neurons were usually confined to the subgranular zone and deep granule cell layer. This pattern was seen in all animals in the septal and intermediate dentate gyrus. In bank voles and wood mice however, the majority of temporal DCX+ cells were radially dispersed throughout the granule cell layer. Some but not all of the septo-temporal differences were accompanied by changes in the DCX+/Ki67+ cell ratios, suggesting that new neuron numbers can be regulated by both proliferation or the time course of maturation and survival of young neurons. Some of the septo-temporal differences we observe have also been found in laboratory rodents after the experimental manipulation of the molecular mechanisms

  7. Re-distribution of brachytherapy dose using a differential dose prescription adapted to risk of local failure in low-risk prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylander, Susanne; Polders, Daniel; Steggerda, Marcel J; Moonen, Luc M; Tanderup, Kari; Van der Heide, Uulke A

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the application of a differential target- and dose prescription concept for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR-BT), involving a re-distribution of dose according to risk of local failure and treatment-related morbidity. Our study included 15 patients. Multi-parametric MRI was acquired prior to LDR-BT for gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation. Trans-rectal ultrasound (US) images were acquired during LDR-BT for prostate gland- (CTV(Prostate)) and organs at risk delineation. The GTV contour was transferred to US images after US/MRI registration. An intermediate-risk target volume (CTV(Prostate)) and a high-risk target volume (CTV(HR)=GTV+5 mm margin) were defined. Two virtual dose plans were made: Plan(risk-adapt) consisted of a de-escalated dose of minimum 125 Gy to the CTV(Prostate) and an escalated dose to 145-250 Gy to the CTV(HR); Plan(ref) included the standard clinical dose of minimum 145 Gy to the CTV(Prostate). Dose-volume-histogram (DVH) parameters were expressed in equivalent 2 Gy fractionation doses. The median D(90%) to the GTV and CTV(HR) significantly increased by 44 Gy and 17 Gy, respectively when comparing Plan(risk-adapt) to Plan(ref). The median D(10%) and D(30%) to the urethra significantly decreased by 9 Gy and 11 Gy, respectively and for bladder neck by 18 Gy and 15 Gy, respectively. The median rectal D(2.0cm(3)) had a significant decrease of 4 Gy, while the median rectal D(0.1cm(3)) showed an increase of 1 Gy. Our risk adaptive target- and dose prescription concept of prescribing a lower dose to the whole gland and an escalated dose to the GTV using LDR-BT seed planning was technically feasible and resulted in a significant dose-reduction to urethra and bladder neck. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Distributed optical fibre temperature measurements in a low dose rate radiation environment based on Rayleigh backscattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustov, A.; Gussarov, A.; Wuilpart, M.; Fotiadi, A. A.; Liokumovich, L. B.; Kotov, O. I.; Zolotovskiy, I. O.; Tomashuk, A. L.; Deschoutheete, T.; Mégret, P.

    2012-04-01

    On-line monitoring of environmental conditions in nuclear facilities is becoming a more and more important problem. Standard electronic sensors are not the ideal solution due to radiation sensitivity and difficulties in installation of multiple sensors. In contrast, radiation-hard optical fibres can sustain very high radiation doses and also naturally offer multi-point or distributed monitoring of external perturbations. Multiple local electro-mechanical sensors can be replaced by just one measuring fibre. At present, there are over four hundred operational nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the world 1. Operating experience has shown that ineffective control of the ageing degradation of major NPP components can threaten plant safety and also plant life. Among those elements, cables are vital components of I&C systems in NPPs. To ensure their safe operation and predict remaining life, environmental monitoring is necessary. In particular, temperature and radiation dose are considered to be the two most important parameters. The aim of this paper is to assess experimentally the feasibility of optical fibre temperature measurements in a low doserate radiation environment, using a commercially available reflectometer based on Rayleigh backscattering. Four different fibres were installed in the Sub-Pile Room of the BR2 Material testing nuclear reactor in Mol, Belgium. This place is man-accessible during the reactor shut-down, allowing easy fibre installation. When the reactor operates, the dose-rates in the room are in a range 0.005-5 Gy/h with temperatures of 40-60 °C, depending on the location. Such a surrounding is not much different to some "hot" environments in NPPs, where I&C cables are located.

  9. Temporal and spatial distribution characteristics in the natural plague foci of Chinese Mongolian gerbils based on spatial autocorrelation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hai-Wen; Wang, Yong; Zhuang, Da-Fang; Jiang, Xiao-San

    2017-08-07

    The nest flea index of Meriones unguiculatus is a critical indicator for the prevention and control of plague, which can be used not only to detect the spatial and temporal distributions of Meriones unguiculatus, but also to reveal its cluster rule. This research detected the temporal and spatial distribution characteristics of the plague natural foci of Mongolian gerbils by body flea index from 2005 to 2014, in order to predict plague outbreaks. Global spatial autocorrelation was used to describe the entire spatial distribution pattern of the body flea index in the natural plague foci of typical Chinese Mongolian gerbils. Cluster and outlier analysis and hot spot analysis were also used to detect the intensity of clusters based on geographic information system methods. The quantity of M. unguiculatus nest fleas in the sentinel surveillance sites from 2005 to 2014 and host density data of the study area from 2005 to 2010 used in this study were provided by Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention. The epidemic focus regions of the Mongolian gerbils remain the same as the hot spot regions relating to the body flea index. High clustering areas possess a similar pattern as the distribution pattern of the body flea index indicating that the transmission risk of plague is relatively high. In terms of time series, the area of the epidemic focus gradually increased from 2005 to 2007, declined rapidly in 2008 and 2009, and then decreased slowly and began trending towards stability from 2009 to 2014. For the spatial change, the epidemic focus regions began moving northward from the southwest epidemic focus of the Mongolian gerbils from 2005 to 2007, and then moved from north to south in 2007 and 2008. The body flea index of Chinese gerbil foci reveals significant spatial and temporal aggregation characteristics through the employing of spatial autocorrelation. The diversity of temporary and spatial distribution is mainly affected by seasonal variation, the human

  10. MCNPX calculations of dose rate distribution inside samples treated in the research gamma irradiating facility at CTEx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusin, Tiago; Rebello, Wilson F.; Vellozo, Sergio O.; Gomes, Renato G., E-mail: tiagorusin@ime.eb.b, E-mail: rebello@ime.eb.b, E-mail: vellozo@cbpf.b, E-mail: renatoguedes@ime.eb.b [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Vital, Helio C., E-mail: vital@ctex.eb.b [Centro Tecnologico do Exercito (CTEx), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Ademir X., E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    A cavity-type cesium-137 research irradiating facility at CTEx has been modeled by using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. The irradiator has been daily used in experiments to optimize the use of ionizing radiation for conservation of many kinds of food and to improve materials properties. In order to correlate the effects of the treatment, average doses have been calculated for each irradiated sample, accounting for the measured dose rate distribution in the irradiating chambers. However that approach is only approximate, being subject to significant systematic errors due to the heterogeneous internal structure of most samples that can lead to large anisotropy in attenuation and Compton scattering properties across the media. Thus this work is aimed at further investigating such uncertainties by calculating the dose rate distribution inside the items treated such that a more accurate and representative estimate of the total absorbed dose can be determined for later use in the effects-versus-dose correlation curves. Samples of different simplified geometries and densities (spheres, cylinders, and parallelepipeds), have been modeled to evaluate internal dose rate distributions within the volume of the samples and the overall effect on the average dose. (author)

  11. Using electron beam radiation to simulate the dose distribution for whole body solar particle event proton exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengel, Keith A; Diffenderfer, Eric S; Avery, Stephen; Kennedy, Ann R; McDonough, James

    2010-11-01

    As a part of the near solar system exploration program, astronauts may receive significant total body proton radiation exposures during a solar particle event (SPE). In the Center for Acute Radiation Research (CARR), symptoms of the acute radiation sickness syndrome induced by conventional radiation are being compared to those induced by SPE-like proton radiation, to determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of SPE protons. In an SPE, the astronaut's whole body will be exposed to radiation consisting mainly of protons with energies below 50 MeV. In addition to providing for a potentially higher RBE than conventional radiation, the energy distribution for an SPE will produce a relatively inhomogeneous total body dose distribution, with a significantly higher dose delivered to the skin and subcutaneous tissues than to the internal organs. These factors make it difficult to use a (60)Co standard for RBE comparisons in our experiments. Here, the novel concept of using megavoltage electron beam radiation to more accurately reproduce both the total dose and the dose distribution of SPE protons and make meaningful RBE comparisons between protons and conventional radiation is described. In these studies, Monte Carlo simulation was used to determine the dose distribution of electron beam radiation in small mammals such as mice and ferrets as well as large mammals such as pigs. These studies will help to better define the topography of the time-dose-fractionation versus biological response landscape for astronaut exposure to an SPE.

  12. Preliminary calculation of RBE-weighted dose distribution for cerebral radionecrosis in carbon-ion treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kase, Yuki; Himukai, Takeshi; Nagano, Ai; Tameshige, Yuji; Minohara, Shinichi; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Mizoe, Junetsu; Fossati, Piero; Hasegawa, Azusa; Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral radionecrosis is a significant side effect in radiotherapy for brain cancer. The purpose of this study is to calculate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of carbon-ion beams on brain cells and to show RBE-weighted dose distributions for cerebral radionecrosis speculation in a carbon-ion treatment planning system. The RBE value of the radionecrosis for the carbon-ion beam is calculated by the modified microdosimetric kinetic model on the assumption of a typical clinical α/β ratio of 2 Gy for cerebral radionecrosis in X-rays. This calculation method for the RBE-weighted dose is built into the treatment planning system for the carbon-ion radiotherapy. The RBE-weighted dose distributions are calculated on computed tomography (CT) images of four patients who had been treated by carbon-ion radiotherapy for astrocytoma (WHO grade 2) and who suffered from necrosis around the target areas. The necrotic areas were detected by brain scans via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after the treatment irradiation. The detected necrotic areas are easily found near high RBE-weighted dose regions. The visual comparison between the RBE-weighted dose distribution and the necrosis region indicates that the RBE-weighted dose distribution will be helpful information for the prediction of radionecrosis areas after carbon-ion radiotherapy.

  13. Hyper-temporal SPOT-NDVI dataset parameterization captures species distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girma Gebrekidan, A.; de Bie, C.A.J.M.; Skidmore, A.K.; Venus, V.; Bongers, Frans

    2016-01-01

    Hyper-temporal SPOT NDVI images contain useful information about the environment in which a species occurs, including information such as the beginning, end, peak, and curvature of photosynthetically active vegetation (PAV) greenness signatures. This raises the question: can parameterization of

  14. Hyper-temporal SPOT-NDVI dataset parameterization captures species distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girma, Atkilt; Bie, de C.A.J.M.; Skidmore, Andrew K.; Venus, Valentijn; Bongers, Frans

    2016-01-01

    Hyper-temporal SPOT NDVI images contain useful information about the environment in which a species occurs, including information such as the beginning, end, peak, and curvature of photosynthetically active vegetation (PAV) greenness signatures. This raises the question: can parameterization of

  15. Hippocampal GABA transporter distribution in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijns, O.; Karaca, U.; Andrade, P.; Nijs, L. de; Kusters, B.; Peeters, A.; Dings, J.; Pannek, H.; Ebner, A.; Rijkers, K.; Hoogland, G.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine hippocampal expression of neuronal GABA-transporter (GAT-1) and glial GABA-transporter (GAT-3) in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and hippocampal sclerosis (HS). METHODS: Hippocampal sections were immunohistochemically stained for GABA-transporter 1 and

  16. Climate change, fisheries management and fishing aptitude affecting spatial and temporal distributions of the Barents Sea cod fishery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, Arne

    2017-12-01

    Climate change is expected to influence spatial and temporal distributions of fish stocks. The aim of this paper is to compare climate change impact on a fishery with other factors impacting the performance of fishing fleets. The fishery in question is the Northeast Arctic cod fishery, a well-documented fishery where data on spatial and temporal distributions are available. A cellular automata model is developed for the purpose of mimicking possible distributional patterns and different management alternatives are studied under varying assumptions on the fleets' fishing aptitude. Fisheries management and fishing aptitude, also including technological development and local knowledge, turn out to have the greatest impact on the spatial distribution of the fishing effort, when comparing the IPCC's SRES A1B scenario with repeated sequences of the current environmental situation over a period of 45 years. In both cases, the highest profits in the simulation period of 45 years are obtained at low exploitation levels and moderate fishing aptitude.

  17. Variations in spatial and temporal distribution of Archaea in the North Sea in relation to environmental variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herfort, Lydie; Schouten, Stefan; Abbas, Ben; Veldhuis, Marcel J W; Coolen, Marco J L; Wuchter, Cornelia; Boon, Jan P; Herndl, Gerhard J; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S

    2007-12-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of pelagic Archaea was studied in the southern North Sea by rRNA hybridization, sequencing and quantification of 16S rRNA gene and membrane lipid analyses and related to physical, chemical and biological parameters to determine the factors influencing archaeal biogeography. A clear temporal variability was observed, with marine Crenarchaeota (Group I.1a) being relatively more abundant in winter and Euryarchaeota dominating the archaeal assemblage in spring and summer. Spatial differences in the lateral distribution of Crenarchaeota were also evident. In fact, their abundance was positively correlated with the copy number of the gene encoding the alpha subunit of crenarchaeotal ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) and with concentrations of ammonia, nitrate, nitrite and phosphorus. This suggests that most Crenarchaeota in the North Sea are nitrifiers and that their distribution is determined by nutrient concentrations. However, Crenarchaeota were not abundant when larger phytoplankton (>3 microm) dominated the algal population. It is hypothesized that together with nutrient concentration, phytoplankton biomass and community structure can predict crenarchaeotal abundance in the southern North Sea. Euryarchaeotal abundance was positively correlated with chlorophyll a concentrations, but not with phytoplankton community structure. Whether this is related to the potential of Euryarchaeota to perform aerobic anoxygenic phototrophy remains to be shown, but the conspicuous seasonal distribution pattern of Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota suggests that they occupy a different ecological niche.

  18. In-situ optical and acoustical measurements of the buoyant cyanobacterium p. Rubescens: spatial and temporal distribution patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilmar Hofmann

    Full Text Available Optical (fluorescence and acoustic in-situ techniques were tested in their ability to measure the spatial and temporal distribution of plankton in freshwater ecosystems with special emphasis on the harmful and buoyant cyanobacterium P. rubescens. Fluorescence was measured with the multi-spectral FluoroProbe (Moldaenke FluoroProbe, MFP and a Seapoint Chlorophyll Fluorometer (SCF. In-situ measurements of the acoustic backscatter strength (ABS were conducted with three different acoustic devices covering multiple acoustic frequencies (614 kHz ADCP, 2 MHz ADP, and 6 MHz ADV. The MFP provides a fast and reliable technique to measure fluorescence at different wavelengths in situ, which allows discriminating between P. rubescens and other phytoplankton species. All three acoustic devices are sensitive to P. rubescens even if other scatterers, e.g., zooplankton or suspended sediment, are present in the water column, because P. rubescens containing gas vesicles has a strong density difference and hence acoustic contrast to the ambient water and other scatterers. After calibration, the combination of optical and acoustical measurements not only allows qualitative and quantitative observation of P. rubescens, but also distinction between P. rubescens, other phytoplankton, and zooplankton. As the measuring devices can sample in situ at high rates they enable assessment of plankton distributions at high temporal (minutes and spatial (decimeters resolution or covering large temporal (seasonal and spatial (basin scale scales.

  19. Comparison of dose distribution for proton beams and electrons: advantages and disadvantages; Comparacao de distribuicao de dose para feixes de protons e eletrons: vantagens e desvantagens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neto, Joao T.M.; Ferreira, Maira B.; Braga, Victor B. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    This study consists of a simulation of cancer therapy using a beam of protons and electrons. By comparing dose distribution curves for both beams we have showed the advantages and disadvantages of both therapies. The study was performed with Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4 code for a brain tumor, and it was found that the presence of the Bragg peak in proton beam allows a higher dose deposition in tumor and protection of adjacent tissues, while the electron beam has an entry dose in the tissue higher than the proton, yielding to the tissue neighbors of the tumor, unnecessary radiation. Moreover, it was also found significant production of neutrons from the proton beam, showing its main disadvantage. The continuation of this work will add the comparison with clinical beams of photons. (author)

  20. Spatial and temporal distribution patterns of the silver mojarra Eucinostomus argenteus (Perciformes: Gerreidae) in a tropical semi-enclosed bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, B; Vianna, M

    2016-07-01

    This study determined the spatial and temporal distributions of the silver mojarra Eucinostomus argenteus (Perciformes: Gerreidae), one of the most abundant teleost species in bays and estuaries. Sampling was conducted from July 2005 to June 2007. The species was captured on all sampling dates and at six of the seven sampling stations. Approximately 80% of the individuals were below the size of first sexual maturity (12·0 cm total length, LT ). Although the spatial distribution of juveniles and adults differed throughout the study period, the environmental variables measured explained only a small part of their distribution. The recruitment period occurred during the first part of each year. Despite the high pollution levels in Guanabara Bay, this coastal system plays an important role as a nursery ground and for the growth of E. argenteus. © 2015 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  1. Assessment of the spatio-temporal distribution of soil properties in East Kolkata wetland ecosystem (A Ramsar site: 1208)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, S.; Manna, S.; Aich, A.; Chattopadhyay, B.; Mukhopadhyay, S. K.

    2014-06-01

    The present investigation was made to characterize spatial and temporal variations in soil properties and to evaluate possible differences that could be dependent on the tannery effluent discharges, municipal sewage discharges, vegetation cover, soil settlement rate, crop rotation, etc. Soil total organic matter (TOM), cations like, Sodium (Na), Ammonium (NH4), Potassium (K), Calcium (Ca) and Magnesium (Mg) contents in the bank soils and bottom sediments were recorded from seven different characteristic sites in East Kolkata wetland ecosystem, a Ramsar site (Ramsar site No. 1208). The profile maps were constructed by geostatistical methods to describe the spatial distribution as well as temporal variations of all the factors to identify the influences of composite wastewaters. The work was initiated to identify causes and consequences of the waste dumping in the concerned region for the past hundred years and thereby to suggest necessary precautionary measures to prevent further loss of soil quality.

  2. fMR-adaptation indicates selectivity to audiovisual content congruency in distributed clusters in human superior temporal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blomert Leo

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efficient multisensory integration is of vital importance for adequate interaction with the environment. In addition to basic binding cues like temporal and spatial coherence, meaningful multisensory information is also bound together by content-based associations. Many functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI studies propose the (posterior superior temporal cortex (STC as the key structure for integrating meaningful multisensory information. However, a still unanswered question is how superior temporal cortex encodes content-based associations, especially in light of inconsistent results from studies comparing brain activation to semantically matching (congruent versus nonmatching (incongruent multisensory inputs. Here, we used fMR-adaptation (fMR-A in order to circumvent potential problems with standard fMRI approaches, including spatial averaging and amplitude saturation confounds. We presented repetitions of audiovisual stimuli (letter-speech sound pairs and manipulated the associative relation between the auditory and visual inputs (congruent/incongruent pairs. We predicted that if multisensory neuronal populations exist in STC and encode audiovisual content relatedness, adaptation should be affected by the manipulated audiovisual relation. Results The results revealed an occipital-temporal network that adapted independently of the audiovisual relation. Interestingly, several smaller clusters distributed over superior temporal cortex within that network, adapted stronger to congruent than to incongruent audiovisual repetitions, indicating sensitivity to content congruency. Conclusions These results suggest that the revealed clusters contain multisensory neuronal populations that encode content relatedness by selectively responding to congruent audiovisual inputs, since unisensory neuronal populations are assumed to be insensitive to the audiovisual relation. These findings extend our previously revealed mechanism for

  3. [Spatial-temporal distribution of smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis in Liangshan Yi autonomous prefecture, Sichuan province, 2011-2016].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, T; Yang, C H; He, J G; Li, Y K; Xiao, Y; Li, J; Wang, D X; Chen, C; Wu, J L

    2017-11-10

    Objective: To analyze the spatial and temporal distribution of smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in Liangshan Yi autonomous prefecture in Sichuan province from 2011 to 2016. Methods: The registration data of PTB in 618 townships of Liangshan from 2011 to 2016 were collected from "Tuberculosis Management Information System of National Disease Prevention and Control Information System" . Software ArcGIS 10.2 was used to establish the geographic information database and realize the visualization of the analysis results. Software OpenGeoda 1.2.0 was used to conduct the analyses on global indication of spatial autocorrelation (GISA) and local indication of spatial autocorrelation (LISA). Software SaTScan 9.4.1 was used for spatio-temporal scanning analysis. Results: From 2011 to 2016, the registration rate of smear positive PTB in Liangshan declined from 56.97/100 000 (2 666 cases) to 21.11/100 000 (1 038 cases). The global spatial autocorrelation coefficient Moran's I ranged from 0.25 to 0.45 and the difference was significant (all P=0.000). Local autocorrelation analysis showed that "high-high" area covered 43, 34, 37, 34, 42 and 61 townships from 2011 to 2016, respectively, mainly in Leibo county. Spatial temporal clustering analysis found one class Ⅰ clustering in the area around Bagu township of Meigu county and two class Ⅱ clustering in the areas around Liumin and Hekou township of Huili county, respectively (all P=0.000). Conclusion: Obvious spatial temporal clustering of smear positive PTB distribution was found in Liangshan from 2011-2016. Hot spot areas with serious smear positive PTB epidemic and high spread risk were mainly found in northeastern Liangshan, including townships in Leibo and Meigu counties. Targeted TB prevention and control should be conducted in these areas.

  4. Optimal angular dose distribution to acquire 3D and extra 2D images for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye-Suk; Kim, Ye-Seul; Lee, Haeng-Hwa; Gang, Won-Suk; Kim, Hee-Joung; Choi, Young-Wook; Choi, JaeGu

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the optimal non-uniform angular dose distribution to improve the quality of the 3D reconstructed images and to acquire extra 2D projection images. In this analysis, 7 acquisition sets were generated by using four different values for the number of projections (11, 15, 21, and 29) and total angular range (±14°, ±17.5°, ±21°, and ±24.5° ). For all acquisition sets, the zero-degree projection was used as the 2D image that was close to that of standard conventional mammography (CM). Exposures used were 50, 100, 150, and 200 mR for the zero-degree projection, and the remaining dose was distributed over the remaining projection angles. To quantitatively evaluate image quality, we computed the CNR (contrast-to-noise ratio) and the ASF (artifact spread function) for the same radiation dose. The results indicate that, for microcalcifications, acquisition sets with approximately 4 times higher exposure on the zero-degree projection than the average exposure for the remaining projection angles yielded higher CNR values and were 3% higher than the uniform distribution. However, very high dose concentrations toward the zero-degree projection may reduce the quality of the reconstructed images due to increasing noise in the peripheral views. The zero-degree projection of the non-uniform dose distribution offers a 2D image similar to that of standard CM, but with a significantly lower radiation dose. Therefore, we need to evaluate the diagnostic potential of extra 2D projection image when diagnose breast cancer by using 3D images with non-uniform angular dose distributions.

  5. Investigation of dose distribution in mixed neutron-gamma field of boron neutron capture therapy using N isopropylacrylamide gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bavarmegin, Elham; Sadremomtaz, Alireza [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khalafi, Hossein; Kasesaz, Yaser [Dept. of Physics, University of Guilan, Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khajeali, Azim [Medical Education Research Center, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Gel dosimeters have unique advantages in comparison with other dosimeters. Until now, these gels have been used in different radiotherapy techniques as a reliable dosimetric tool. Because dose distribution measurement is an important factor for appropriate treatment planning in different radiotherapy techniques, in this study, we evaluated the ability of the N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) polymer gel to record the dose distribution resulting from the mixed neutron-gamma field of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In this regard, a head phantom containing NIPAM gel was irradiated using the Tehran Research Reactor BNCT beam line, and then by a magnetic resonance scanner. Eventually, the R2 maps were obtained in different slices of the phantom by analyzing T2-weighted images. The results show that NIPAM gel has a suitable potential for recording three-dimensional dose distribution in mixed neutron-gamma field dosimetry.

  6. Investigation of Dose Distribution in Mixed Neutron-Gamma Field of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy using N-Isopropylacrylamide Gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Bavarnegin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Gel dosimeters have unique advantages in comparison with other dosimeters. Until now, these gels have been used in different radiotherapy techniques as a reliable dosimetric tool. Because dose distribution measurement is an important factor for appropriate treatment planning in different radiotherapy techniques, in this study, we evaluated the ability of the N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM polymer gel to record the dose distribution resulting from the mixed neutron-gamma field of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT. In this regard, a head phantom containing NIPAM gel was irradiated using the Tehran Research Reactor BNCT beam line, and then by a magnetic resonance scanner. Eventually, the R2 maps were obtained in different slices of the phantom by analyzing T2-weighted images. The results show that NIPAM gel has a suitable potential for recording three-dimensional dose distribution in mixed neutron-gamma field dosimetry.

  7. Neotropical tadpoles: spatial and temporal distribution and habitat use at a seasonal lake in Veracruz, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto E. Torres-Orozco

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available We studied a tadpole assemblage in a seasonal neotropical lake where 14 species of anurans reproduce. Tadpoles were collected monthly at nine sampling stations at depth intervals of 1 m from the surface to the bottom (13 m. Sufficient numbers of tadpoles of three species were collected to compare habitat use. This three species assemblage breed in the following order (first to last Smilisca baudinii, Gastrophryne ustra and Rana berlandieri. R. berlandieri had the greatest microhabitat breadth followed by S. baudinii. S. baudinii and G. usta had high mycrohabitat overlap, but significant differences in microhabitats use were found. S. baudinii tended to occur near the bottom, while G. usta was near the surface. This study shows that temporal and habitat partitioning both occur and depend on the species of tadpole. Dynamic interactions occur between habitat and temporal dimensions. Phenology and habitat selection depend both on the species and on biotic and abiotic factors.

  8. Assessment of ocular beta radiation dose distribution due to 106Ru/106Rh brachytherapy applicators using MCNPX Monte Carlo code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilseia Aparecida Barbosa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Melanoma at the choroid region is the most common primary cancer that affects the eye in adult patients. Concave ophthalmic applicators with 106Ru/106Rh beta sources are the more used for treatment of these eye lesions, mainly lesions with small and medium dimensions. The available treatment planning system for 106Ru applicators is based on dose distributions on a homogeneous water sphere eye model, resulting in a lack of data in the literature of dose distributions in the eye radiosensitive structures, information that may be crucial to improve the treatment planning process, aiming the maintenance of visual acuity. Methods: The Monte Carlo code MCNPX was used to calculate the dose distribution in a complete mathematical model of the human eye containing a choroid melanoma; considering the eye actual dimensions and its various component structures, due to an ophthalmic brachytherapy treatment, using 106Ru/106Rh beta-ray sources. Two possibilities were analyzed; a simple water eye and a heterogeneous eye considering all its structures. Two concave applicators, CCA and CCB manufactured by BEBIG and a complete mathematical model of the human eye were modeled using the MCNPX code. Results and Conclusion: For both eye models, namely water model and heterogeneous model, mean dose values simulated for the same eye regions are, in general, very similar, excepting for regions very distant from the applicator, where mean dose values are very low, uncertainties are higher and relative differences may reach 20.4%. For the tumor base and the eye structures closest to the applicator, such as sclera, choroid and retina, the maximum difference observed was 4%, presenting the heterogeneous model higher mean dose values. For the other eye regions, the higher doses were obtained when the homogeneous water eye model is taken into consideration. Mean dose distributions determined for the homogeneous water eye model are similar to those obtained for the

  9. GATE Monte Carlo simulation of dose distribution using MapReduce in a cloud computing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yangchuan; Tang, Yuguo; Gao, Xin

    2017-12-01

    The GATE Monte Carlo simulation platform has good application prospects of treatment planning and quality assurance. However, accurate dose calculation using GATE is time consuming. The purpose of this study is to implement a novel cloud computing method for accurate GATE Monte Carlo simulation of dose distribution using MapReduce. An Amazon Machine Image installed with Hadoop and GATE is created to set up Hadoop clusters on Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2). Macros, the input files for GATE, are split into a number of self-contained sub-macros. Through Hadoop Streaming, the sub-macros are executed by GATE in Map tasks and the sub-results are aggregated into final outputs in Reduce tasks. As an evaluation, GATE simulations were performed in a cubical water phantom for X-ray photons of 6 and 18 MeV. The parallel simulation on the cloud computing platform is as accurate as the single-threaded simulation on a local server and the simulation correctness is not affected by the failure of some worker nodes. The cloud-based simulation time is approximately inversely proportional to the number of worker nodes. For the simulation of 10 million photons on a cluster with 64 worker nodes, time decreases of 41× and 32× were achieved compared to the single worker node case and the single-threaded case, respectively. The test of Hadoop's fault tolerance showed that the simulation correctness was not affected by the failure of some worker nodes. The results verify that the proposed method provides a feasible cloud computing solution for GATE.

  10. Spatial and temporal distribution of drainage and solute leaching in heterogeneous urban vegetation environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, H.; Beecham, S.; Hassanli, A. M.; Ingleton, G.

    2013-05-01

    Deep percolation enhancement from recycled wastewater irrigation may contribute to salt accumulation and water table elevation that can ultimately cause soil and ground water degradation. The spatial and temporal variation of drainage rate and solute leaching were investigated in an urban park containing heterogeneous landscape plants that were irrigated with recycled wastewater. Field monitoring was undertaken at Veale Gardens in the Adelaide Parklands, Australia. Based on the landscape variation in Veale Gardens, two landscape zones were defined: one being largely covered with turf grasses with few trees and shrubs (MG) with the second zone being mostly trees and shrubs with intermittent turf grasses (MT). Experiments were performed using two zero-tension lysimeters placed horizontally 100 cm below ground to monitor the spatio-temporal behaviour of drained water and nutrient loadings for four seasons. The outcomes showed a large spatial and temporal variation of drainage quantity and quality in the MT and MG zones. The low vegetation cover in the MG zone resulted in more drained water than in the high vegetation cover (MT zone). In both zones, more drainage water was collected in winter than in other seasons. This is in spite of the input water showing a maximum rate in summer. The seasonal salinities measured in the two lysimeters showed very similar trends with the lowest salinity rate in autumn with the levels increasing through winter and spring. Chemical analyses of the leachate solute indicated no detrimental impact from using recycled wastewater during the study period.

  11. [Epidemiological characteristics on temporal-spatial distribution of varicella in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, 2014-2016].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y Q; Fu, Z Z; Zhou, J Y; Deng, G H; Gong, C; Cai, F W; Han, S S

    2017-10-10

    Objective: To analyze the epidemiological characteristics of temporal-spatial distribution on varicella in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region (Guangxi) during 2014 to 2016. Methods: Incidence data on varicella was collected from the National Notifiable Infectious Disease Reporting Information System (NNIDRIS) of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) while geographic information data was from the national CDC. ArcGIS 10.2 software was used to analyze global and local spatial auto correlation on spatial clusters. SaTScan v9.1.1 was used to conduct temporal-spatial scan for exploring the areas of temporal-spatial clusters. Results: The overall incidence rates of varicella during 2014 to 2016 were 32.48/100 000, 43.56/100 000 and 61.56/100 000 respectively. Incidence of varicella showed a positive spatial auto correlation at the county level (the value of Moran's I was between 0.24 to 0.35, P<0.01), with consistent high morbidity. High-high cluster areas were seen and mainly concentrated in the north-western areas of Guangxi. Result from the temporal-spatial scan showed that temporal cluster of varicella occurred mainly between October and next January while the type Ⅰ cluster area was mainly distributed in all of the counties in Hechi city and most counties of Baise city, with most counties being covered in the north-western areas of Guangxi, during 2014-2016. When comparing to data from the last two years, two type Ⅱ cluster areas with larger scales were formed in the north-eastern area of Guanyang county and Haicheng county of southern area in Guangxi, in 2016. Conclusions: Incidence on Varicella seemed on the rise, and the distribution of cases showed clustered features, both on time and space. Strategies regarding control and prevention on Varicella should focus on high-high clustered areas, namely north-western areas of the province, including surrounding areas during the high onset season.

  12. Concentration rather than dose defines the local brain toxicity of agents that are effectively distributed by convection-enhanced delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong; Saito, Ryuta; Mano, Yui; Kanamori, Masayuki; Sonoda, Yukihiko; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Tominaga, Teiji

    2014-01-30

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) has been developed as a potentially effective drug-delivery strategy into the central nervous system. In contrast to systemic intravenous administration, local delivery achieves high concentration and prolonged retention in the local tissue, with increased chance of local toxicity, especially with toxic agents such as chemotherapeutic agents. Therefore, the factors that affect local toxicity should be extensively studied. With the assumption that concentration-oriented evaluation of toxicity is important for local CED, we evaluated the appearance of local toxicity among different agents after delivery with CED and studied if it is dose dependent or concentration dependent. Local toxicity profile of chemotherapeutic agents delivered via CED indicates BCNU was dose-dependent, whereas that of ACNU was concentration-dependent. On the other hand, local toxicity for doxorubicin, which is not distributed effectively by CED, was dose-dependent. Local toxicity for PLD, which is extensively distributed by CED, was concentration-dependent. Traditional evaluation of drug induced toxicity was dose-oriented. This is true for systemic intravascular delivery. However, with local CED, toxicity of several drugs exacerbated in concentration-dependent manner. From our study, local toxicity of drugs that are likely to distribute effectively tended to be concentration-dependent. Concentration rather than dose may be more important for the toxicity of agents that are effectively distributed by CED. Concentration-oriented evaluation of toxicity is more important for CED. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Setting the sterilization dose for a cotton-based product family using a knowledge of the distribution of radiation resistances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Aoshuang; Wang, Ailian; Zhai, Ying; Chen, Ben; Lim, Boon

    2002-03-01

    In setting a sterilization dose for a cotton-based product family that has failed the verification experiment of Method 1 given in ISO 11137, a study has been carried out to gain a knowledge of the distribution of radiation resistances of contaminating microorganisms. Overall, 155 organisms were isolated from a total of 11,000 organisms present on 100 g of products. D10 values of the isolates fall within 0.8-3.8 kGy. The derived distribution of radiation resistances can be considered as an evidence to support the use of sterilization doses given in Table B1 of ISO 11137 for different bioburden levels.

  14. SU-D-BRB-06: Treating Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) as a Chronic Disease: Implication of Temporal-Spatial Dose Fractionation Optimization Including Cancer Stem Cell Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, V; Nguyen, D; Pajonk, F; Kaprealian, T; Kupelian, P; Steinberg, M; Low, D; Sheng, K [Department of Radiation Oncology, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the feasibility of improving GBM treatment outcome with temporal-spatial dose optimization of an ordinary differential equation (ODE) that models the differentiation and distinct radiosensitivity between cancer stem cells (CSC) and differentiated cancer cells (DCC). Methods: The ODE was formulated into a non-convex optimization problem with the objective to minimize remaining total cancer cells 500 days from the onset of radiotherapy when the total cancer cell number was 3.5×10{sup 7}, while maintaining normal tissue biological effective dose (BED) of 100Gy resulted from standard prescription of 2Gyx30. Assuming spatially separated CSC and DCC, optimization was also performed to explore the potential benefit from dose-painting the two compartments. Dose escalation to a sub-cell-population in the GTV was also examined assuming that a 2 cm margin around the GTV allows sufficient dose drop-off to 100Gy BED. The recurrence time was determined as the time at which the total cancer cell number regrows to 10{sup 9} cells. Results: The recurrence time with variable fractional doses administered once per week, bi-week and month for one year were found to be 615, 593 and 570 days, superior to the standard-prescription recurrence time of 418 days. The optimal dose-fraction size progression for both uniform and dose-painting to the tumor is low and relatively constant in the beginning and gradually increases to more aggressive fractions at end of the treatment course. Dose escalation to BED of 200Gy to the whole tumor alongside with protracted weekly treatment was found to further delay recurrence to 733 days. Dose-painting of 200 and 500Gy BED to CSC on a year-long weekly schedule further extended recurrence to 736 and 1076 days, respectively. Conclusion: GBM treatment outcome can possibly be improved with a chronic treatment approach. Further dose escalation to the entire tumor or CSC targeted killing is needed to achieve total tumor control. This work

  15. Climate-driven changes to the spatio-temporal distribution of the parasitic nematode, Haemonchus contortus, in sheep in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Hannah; Caminade, Cyril; Bolajoko, Muhammad Bashir; Phelan, Paul; van Dijk, Jan; Baylis, Matthew; Williams, Diana; Morgan, Eric R

    2016-03-01

    Recent climate change has resulted in changes to the phenology and distribution of invertebrates worldwide. Where invertebrates are associated with disease, climate variability and changes in climate may also affect the spatio-temporal dynamics of disease. Due to its significant impact on sheep production and welfare, the recent increase in diagnoses of ovine haemonchosis caused by the nematode Haemonchus contortus in some temperate regions is particularly concerning. This study is the first to evaluate the impact of climate change on H. contortus at a continental scale. A model of the basic reproductive quotient of macroparasites, Q0 , adapted to H. contortus and extended to incorporate environmental stochasticity and parasite behaviour, was used to simulate Pan-European spatio-temporal changes in H. contortus infection pressure under scenarios of climate change. Baseline Q0 simulations, using historic climate observations, reflected the current distribution of H. contortus in Europe. In northern Europe, the distribution of H. contortus is currently limited by temperatures falling below the development threshold during the winter months and within-host arrested development is necessary for population persistence over winter. In southern Europe, H. contortus infection pressure is limited during the summer months by increased temperature and decreased moisture. Compared with this baseline, Q0 simulations driven by a climate model ensemble predicted an increase in H. contortus infection pressure by the 2080s. In northern Europe, a temporal range expansion was predicted as the mean period of transmission increased by 2-3 months. A bimodal seasonal pattern of infection pressure, similar to that currently observed in southern Europe, emerges in northern Europe due to increasing summer temperatures and decreasing moisture. The predicted patterns of change could alter the epidemiology of H. contortus in Europe, affect the future sustainability of contemporary

  16. Temporal and spatial patterns in the distribution of squid Loligo spp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Geographic Information System (GIS) was used to test hypotheses regarding the spatial distribution of the squid Loligo forbesi and Loligo vulgaris vulgaris in the northern North-East Atlantic during the years 1989-1994. Loligo spp. were present throughout coastal waters of the United Kingdom, but distribution was patchy ...

  17. Impact of respiratory motion on variable relative biological effectiveness in 4D-dose distributions of proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Silke; Wieser, Hans-Peter; Cao, Wenhua; Mohan, Radhe; Bangert, Mark

    2017-11-01

    Organ motion during radiation therapy with scanned protons leads to deviations between the planned and the delivered physical dose. Using a constant relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1 linearly maps these deviations into RBE-weighted dose. However, a constant value cannot account for potential nonlinear variations in RBE suggested by variable RBE models. Here, we study the impact of motion on recalculations of RBE-weighted dose distributions using a phenomenological variable RBE model. 4D-dose calculation including variable RBE was implemented in the open source treatment planning toolkit matRad. Four scenarios were compared for one field and two field proton treatments for a liver cancer patient assuming (α∕β)x = 2 Gy and (α∕β)x = 10 Gy: (A) the optimized static dose distribution with constant RBE, (B) a static recalculation with variable RBE, (C) a 4D-dose recalculation with constant RBE and (D) a 4D-dose recalculation with variable RBE. For (B) and (D), the variable RBE was calculated by the model proposed by McNamara. For (C), the physical dose was accumulated with direct dose mapping; for (D), dose-weighted radio-sensitivity parameters of the linear quadratic model were accumulated to model synergistic irradiation effects on RBE. Dose recalculation with variable RBE led to an elevated biological dose at the end of the proton field, while 4D-dose recalculation exhibited random deviations everywhere in the radiation field depending on the interplay of beam delivery and organ motion. For a single beam treatment assuming (α∕β)x = 2 Gy, D95% was 1.98 Gy (RBE) (A), 2.15 Gy (RBE) (B), 1.81 Gy (RBE) (C) and 1.98 Gy (RBE) (D). The homogeneity index was 1.04 (A), 1.08 (B), 1.23 (C) and 1.25 (D). For the studied liver case, intrafractional motion did not reduce the modulation of the RBE-weighted dose postulated by variable RBE models for proton treatments.

  18. Spatial and temporal distribution of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in a drinking water resource: Implications for monitoring and risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnet, Jean-Baptiste, E-mail: jeanbaptiste.burnet@gmail.com [Centre de Recherche Public - Gabriel Lippmann, Department of Environment and Agro-biotechnologies (EVA), 41, rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Université de Liège (ULg), Department of Environmental Sciences and Management, 165 avenue de Longwy, B-6700 Arlon (Belgium); Penny, Christian, E-mail: penny@lippmann.lu [Centre de Recherche Public - Gabriel Lippmann, Department of Environment and Agro-biotechnologies (EVA), 41, rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Ogorzaly, Leslie, E-mail: ogorzaly@lippmann.lu [Centre de Recherche Public - Gabriel Lippmann, Department of Environment and Agro-biotechnologies (EVA), 41, rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Cauchie, Henry-Michel, E-mail: cauchie@lippmann.lu [Centre de Recherche Public - Gabriel Lippmann, Department of Environment and Agro-biotechnologies (EVA), 41, rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg)

    2014-02-01

    Because of their significant public health impact, waterborne Cryptosporidium and Giardia have been monitored in surface water in order to assess microbial quality of water bodies used for drinking water production and/or for recreational purposes. In this context, sampling strategy is of key importance and should be representative enough to appropriately assess the related microbial risk. This, however, requires sound knowledge on the behaviour of both pathogens in water. In the present study, the spatial and temporal distribution of Cryptosporidium and Giardia was explored in the rural Upper-Sûre watershed used for drinking water production in Luxembourg. By subdividing it into three compartments including (i) sub-catchments, (ii) the Sûre River fed by the sub-catchments and (iii) the Upper-Sûre reservoir fed by the Sûre River, parasite distribution was assessed using sampling designs adapted to the hydro-dynamic characteristics of the respective compartments. Results highlighted the high spatial and temporal variability in parasite distribution at watershed scale, as well as the prevalence of Giardia over Cryptosporidium. Besides land use features and catchment characteristics, hydro-climatology appeared to be a major driver of parasite behaviour in the watershed. It introduced a seasonal trend in their occurrence, highest densities being detected during the wet season. Peaks of contamination triggered out by rainfall-induced runoff were further observed in the three compartments. In the Sûre River, Cryptosporidium and Giardia fluxes peaked at 10{sup 9} and 10{sup 10} (oo)cysts.d{sup −1}, respectively, and were discharged into the drinking water reservoir, where they underwent a 2 to 3 log{sub 10} removal rate. Despite this, parasite fluxes entering the drinking water treatment plant were still high (10{sup 6} to 10{sup 7} (oo)cysts.d{sup −1}) and stressed on the need for improved watershed management upstream the water treatment barrier. The catchment

  19. SU-F-BRA-06: Dose Distributions for the CivaSheet Pd-103 Directional Brachytherapy Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, MJ [Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A flexible polymer membrane (CivaSheet) has been developed by CivaTech Oncology, Inc. (Research Triangle Park, NC) for permanent brachytherapy. Distributed throughout the array are small plastic disks containing Pd-103 and gold foil shielding on one side to provide a directional dose distribution and facilitate imaging. This study evaluated dosimetry for the CivaSheet. Methods: Manufacturer-provided dimensional and compositional information for the device were compared to physical samples for validation of design information, then entered into the MCNP6 radiation transport code for dosimetry simulations. Three device sizes (6×6, 6×12, or 6×18 disk-arrays) were simulated as the membrane can be custom-sized preceding surgical placement. Dose to water was estimated with 0.01 cm resolution from the surface to 10 cm on both sides of the device. Because this is a novel device with calibration methods under development, results were normalized using DVHs to provide 90% prescription coverage to a plane positioned 0.5 cm from the front surfaces. This same normalization was used for creating isodose distributions. Results: Planar dose distributions of flat CivaSheets were relatively homogeneous with acceptable dose uniformity variations. Differences in the results between the differently sized CivaSheets were not significant. At 0.5 mm, 87% of the target volume was within the therapeutic dose range. Dose hotspots on the CivaSheet forward surfaces were directly above the disks. However, dose hotspots on the rear-facing surfaces were positioned between the disks. Doses in contact with the front surface were similar to those observed for currently available brachytherapy sources. Maximum doses that occurred on the rear surface were approximately 55 times lower than the dose on the front surface. Conclusion: Monte Carlo calculations validated the directional capabilities and advantageous dosimetry of the new Pd-103 brachytherapy device. It appears feasible to re

  20. Factors influencing aerodynamic particle size distribution of suspension pressurized metered dose inhalers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Poonam; Stein, Stephen W; Myrdal, Paul B

    2015-02-01

    Pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) are frequently used for the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The aerodynamic particle size distribution (APSD) of the residual particles delivered from a pMDI plays a key role in determining the amount and region of drug deposition in the lung and thereby the efficacy of the inhaler. In this study, a simulation model that predicts the APSD of residual particles from suspension pMDIs was utilized to identify the primary determinants for APSD. These findings were then applied to better understand the effect of changing drug concentration and micronized drug size on experimentally observed APSDs determined through Andersen Cascade Impactor testing. The experimental formulations evaluated had micronized drug mass median aerodynamic diameters (MMAD) between 1.2 and 2.6 μm and drug concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 1% (w/w) with 8.5% (w/w) ethanol in 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFA-134a). It was determined that the drug concentration, micronized drug size, and initially atomized droplet distribution have a significant impact in modulating the proportion of atomized droplets that contain multiple suspended drug particles, which in turn increases the residual APSD. These factors were found to be predictive of the residual particle MMAD for experimental suspension HFA-134a formulations containing ethanol. The empirical algebraic model allows predicting the residual particle size for a variety of suspension formulations with an average error of 0.096 μm (standard deviation of 0.1 μm).

  1. A dynamic model for ALA-PDT of skin: simulation of temporal and spatial distributions of ground-state oxygen, photosensitizer and singlet oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baochang; Farrell, Thomas J.; Patterson, Michael S.

    2010-10-01

    Singlet oxygen (\\rm {^{1}O_{2}}) direct dosimetry and photosensitizer fluorescence photobleaching are being investigated and applied as dosimetric tools during 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-induced protophorphyrin IX (PpIX) photodynamic therapy (PDT) of normal skin and skin cancers. The correlations of photosensitizer fluorescence and singlet oxygen luminescence (SOL) emission signals to \\rm {^{1}O_{2}} distribution and cumulative \\rm {^{1}O_{2}} dose are difficult to interpret because of the temporal and spatial variations of three essential components (light fluence rate, photosensitizer concentration and oxygen concentration) in PDT. A one-dimensional model is proposed in this paper to simulate the dynamic process of ALA-PDT of normal human skin in order to investigate the time-resolved evolution of PpIX, ground-state oxygen (\\rm {^{3}O_{2}}) and \\rm {^{1}O_{2}} distributions. The model incorporates a simplified three-layer semi-infinite skin tissue, Monte Carlo simulations of excitation light fluence and both PpIX fluorescence and SOL emission signals reaching the skin surface, \\rm {^{1}O_{2}} -mediated photobleaching mechanism for updating PpIX, \\rm {^{3}O_{2}} and \\rm {^{1}O_{2}} distributions after the delivery of each light dose increment, ground-state oxygen supply by diffusion from the atmosphere and perfusion from blood vessels, a cumulative \\rm {^{1}O_{2}} -dependent threshold vascular response, and the initial non-uniform distribution of PpIX. The PpIX fluorescence simulated using this model is compared with clinical data reported by Cottrell et al (2008 Clin. Cancer Res. 14 4475-83) for a range of irradiances (10-150 mW cm-2). Except for the vascular response, one set of parameters is used to fit data at all irradiances. The time-resolved depth-dependent distributions of PpIX, \\rm {^{3}O_{2}} and \\rm {^{1}O_{2}} at representative irradiances are presented and discussed in this paper, as well as the PDT-induced vascular response at different

  2. Mapping the spatio-temporal distribution of key vegetation cover properties in lowland river reaches, using digital photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschoren, Veerle; Schoelynck, Jonas; Buis, Kerst; Visser, Fleur; Meire, Patrick; Temmerman, Stijn

    2017-06-01

    The presence of vegetation in stream ecosystems is highly dynamic in both space and time. A digital photography technique is developed to map aquatic vegetation cover at species level, which has a very high spatial and a flexible temporal resolution. A digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) camera mounted on a handheld telescopic pole is used. The low-altitude (5 m) orthogonal aerial images have a low spectral resolution (red-green-blue), high spatial resolution (∼1.9 pixels cm-2, ∼1.3 cm length) and flexible temporal resolution (monthly). The method is successfully applied in two lowland rivers to quantify four key properties of vegetated rivers: vegetation cover, patch size distribution, biomass and hydraulic resistance. The main advantages are that the method is (i) suitable for continuous and discontinuous vegetation covers, (ii) of very high spatial and flexible temporal resolution, (iii) relatively fast compared to conventional ground survey methods, (iv) non-destructive and (v) relatively cheap and easy to use, and (vi) the software is widely available and similar open source alternatives exist. The study area should be less than 10 m wide, and the prevailing light conditions and water turbidity levels should be sufficient to look into the water. Further improvements of the image processing are expected in the automatic delineation and classification of the vegetation patches.

  3. Tissue distribution of residual antimony in rats treated with multiple doses of meglumine antimoniate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Deise Riba; Miranda, Elaine Silva; Saint’Pierre, Tatiana Dillenburg; Paumgartten, Francisco José Roma

    2014-01-01

    Meglumine antimoniate (MA) and sodium stibogluconate are pentavalent antimony (SbV) drugs used since the mid-1940s. Notwithstanding the fact that they are first-choice drugs for the treatment of leishmaniases, there are gaps in our knowledge of their toxicological profile, mode of action and kinetics. Little is known about the distribution of antimony in tissues after SbV administration. In this study, we evaluated the Sb content of tissues from male rats 24 h and three weeks after a 21-day course of treatment with MA (300 mg SbV/kg body wt/d, subcutaneous). Sb concentrations in the blood and organs were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. In rats, as with in humans, the Sb blood levels after MA dosing can be described by a two-compartment model with a fast (t1/2 = 0.6 h) and a slow (t1/2 >> 24 h) elimination phase. The spleen was the organ that accumulated the highest amount of Sb, while bone and thyroid ranked second in descending order of tissues according to Sb levels (spleen >> bone, thyroid, kidneys > liver, epididymis, lungs, adrenals > prostate > thymus, pancreas, heart, small intestines > skeletal muscle, testes, stomach > brain). The pathophysiological consequences of Sb accumulation in the thyroid and Sb speciation in the liver, thyroid, spleen and bone warrant further studies. PMID:25075781

  4. Tissue distribution of residual antimony in rats treated with multiple doses of meglumine antimoniate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deise Riba Coelho

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Meglumine antimoniate (MA and sodium stibogluconate are pentavalent antimony (SbV drugs used since the mid-1940s. Notwithstanding the fact that they are first-choice drugs for the treatment of leishmaniases, there are gaps in our knowledge of their toxicological profile, mode of action and kinetics. Little is known about the distribution of antimony in tissues after SbV administration. In this study, we evaluated the Sb content of tissues from male rats 24 h and three weeks after a 21-day course of treatment with MA (300 mg SbV/kg body wt/d, subcutaneous. Sb concentrations in the blood and organs were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. In rats, as with in humans, the Sb blood levels after MA dosing can be described by a two-compartment model with a fast (t1/2 = 0.6 h and a slow (t1/2 >> 24 h elimination phase. The spleen was the organ that accumulated the highest amount of Sb, while bone and thyroid ranked second in descending order of tissues according to Sb levels (spleen >> bone, thyroid, kidneys > liver, epididymis, lungs, adrenals > prostate > thymus, pancreas, heart, small intestines > skeletal muscle, testes, stomach > brain. The pathophysiological consequences of Sb accumulation in the thyroid and Sb speciation in the liver, thyroid, spleen and bone warrant further studies.

  5. Lateral spread of dose distribution by therapeutic proton beams in liquid water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abril, Isabel, E-mail: ias@ua.es [Departament de Física Aplicada, Universitat d’Alacant, E-03080 Alacant (Spain); Vera, Pablo de [Departament de Física Aplicada, Universitat d’Alacant, E-03080 Alacant (Spain); Garcia-Molina, Rafael [Departamento de Física – Centro de Investigación en Óptica y Nanofísica, Regional Campus of International Excellence “Campus Mare Nostrum”, Universidad de Murcia, E-30100 Murcia (Spain); Kyriakou, Ioanna; Emfietzoglou, Dimitris [Medical Physics Laboratory, University of Ioannina Medical School, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece)

    2015-06-01

    We have calculated the lateral spread of the dose distribution of protons in liquid water by means of the SEICS (Simulation of Energetic Ions and Clusters through Solids) code, which properly accounts for the electronic stopping force (including energy-loss straggling), multiple elastic scattering with the target nuclei, dynamical electron charge-exchange processes and nuclear fragmentation reactions between the projectile and the nuclei of the target. Due to the multiple elastic scattering processes part of the proton energy may be deposited at a given lateral distance from the initial beam direction, which is quantified by the root mean square radius (r{sub rms}). We find in our simulations that the r{sub rms} follows a parabolic dependence as a function of the depth in the target and the quotient between the r{sub rms} at the Bragg peak and the depth of the Bragg peak is around 3% independently of the proton energy. A rather good agreement is obtained when comparing our results of r{sub rms} with experimental data and with other models.

  6. Patterns of spatial and temporal distribution of humpback whales at the southern limit of the Southeast Pacific breeding area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidino, Chiara; Llapapasca, Miguel A; Silva, Sebastian; Alcorta, Belen; Pacheco, Aldo S

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the patterns of spatial and temporal distribution in threshold habitats of highly migratory and endangered species is important for understanding their habitat requirements and recovery trends. Herein, we present new data about the distribution of humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) in neritic waters off the northern coast of Peru: an area that constitutes a transitional path from cold, upwelling waters to warm equatorial waters where the breeding habitat is located. Data was collected during four consecutive austral winter/spring seasons from 2010 to 2013, using whale-watching boats as platforms for research. A total of 1048 whales distributed between 487 groups were sighted. The spatial distribution of humpbacks resembled the characteristic segregation of whale groups according to their size/age class and social context in breeding habitats; mother and calf pairs were present in very shallow waters close to the coast, while dyads, trios or more whales were widely distributed from shallow to moderate depths over the continental shelf break. Sea surface temperatures (range: 18.2-25.9°C) in coastal waters were slightly colder than those closer to the oceanic realm, likely due to the influence of cold upwelled waters from the Humboldt Current system. Our results provide new evidence of the southward extension of the breeding region of humpback whales in the Southeast Pacific. Integrating this information with the knowledge from the rest of the breeding region and foraging grounds would enhance our current understanding of population dynamics and recovery trends of this species.

  7. Patterns of spatial and temporal distribution of humpback whales at the southern limit of the Southeast Pacific breeding area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Guidino

    Full Text Available Understanding the patterns of spatial and temporal distribution in threshold habitats of highly migratory and endangered species is important for understanding their habitat requirements and recovery trends. Herein, we present new data about the distribution of humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae in neritic waters off the northern coast of Peru: an area that constitutes a transitional path from cold, upwelling waters to warm equatorial waters where the breeding habitat is located. Data was collected during four consecutive austral winter/spring seasons from 2010 to 2013, using whale-watching boats as platforms for research. A total of 1048 whales distributed between 487 groups were sighted. The spatial distribution of humpbacks resembled the characteristic segregation of whale groups according to their size/age class and social context in breeding habitats; mother and calf pairs were present in very shallow waters close to the coast, while dyads, trios or more whales were widely distributed from shallow to moderate depths over the continental shelf break. Sea surface temperatures (range: 18.2-25.9°C in coastal waters were slightly colder than those closer to the oceanic realm, likely due to the influence of cold upwelled waters from the Humboldt Current system. Our results provide new evidence of the southward extension of the breeding region of humpback whales in the Southeast Pacific. Integrating this information with the knowledge from the rest of the breeding region and foraging grounds would enhance our current understanding of population dynamics and recovery trends of this species.

  8. What can flux tracking teach us about water age distribution patterns and their temporal dynamics?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hrachowitz, M.; Savenije, H.; Bogaard, T.A.; Tetzlaff, D.; Soulsby, C.

    2013-01-01

    The complex interactions of runoff generation processes underlying the hydrological response of streams remain not entirely understood at the catchment scale. Extensive research has demonstrated the utility of tracers for both inferring flow path distributions and constraining model

  9. Modifying the planning target volume to optimize the dose distribution in dynamic conformal arc therapy for large metastatic brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Kengo; Kosaka, Yasuhiro; Imagumbai, Toshiyuki; Ueki, Kazuhito; Narukami, Ryo; Hattori, Takayuki; Kokubo, Masaki

    2017-06-01

    When treating large metastatic brain tumors with stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT), high dose conformity to target is difficult to achieve. Employing a modified planning target volume (mPTV) instead of the original PTV may be one way to improve the dose distribution in linear accelerator-based SRT using a dynamic conformal technique. In this study, we quantitatively analyzed the impact of a mPTV on dose distribution. Twenty-four tumors with a maximum diameter of >2 cm were collected. For each tumor, two plans were created: one used a mPTV and the other did not. The mPTV was produced by shrinking or enlarging the original PTV according to the dose distribution in the original plan. The dose conformity was evaluated and compared between the plans using a two-sided paired t test. The conformity index defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group was 1.34 ± 0.10 and 1.41 ± 0.13, and Paddick's conformity index was 0.75 ± 0.05 and 0.71 ± 0.06, for the plans with and without a mPTV, respectively. All of these improvements were statistically significant (P < 0.05). The use of a mPTV can improve target conformity when planning SRT for large metastatic brain tumors.

  10. Verification of the 3D dose distribution in spinal radiosurgery by using a BANG3 polymer gel dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae-Hong; Kim, Hee-Joung [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong-Joon [Inje University, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    In intensity-modulated radiosurgery (IMRS) treatment, radiation delivery techniques require the ability to accurately verify complex three-dimensional (3D) dose distributions. This study was designed to evaluate and verify dosimetry generated from gels, films, and treatment planning systems. In this study, commercially available BANG3 polymer gel was used to confirm the accuracy of the treatment plan and to assess the dosimetric uncertainty of the radiosurgery procedure. BANG3 gels that are read with R{sub 2} magnetic resonance (MR) imaging mapping are useful options. The gel is a tissue equivalent, and the relaxation ratio measured using MR imaging is proportional to the dose absorbed in the gel. A cylindrical container (5 inch deep, 7 inch high) filled with BANG3 gel was mounted in a cubic phantom (The EASY CUBE, Euromechanics, Schwarzenbruck, Germany). We then carried out the same process using the gel and gafchromic film as would be used for a patient with metastatic T-spine cancer by using a Novalis Radiosurgery system (Brain LAB Inc., Germany). Our experimental results provided the dose distribution and the radiation delivery precision. Comparisons of the measured and the calculated relative dose distributions showed good agreement in the high-dose region with differences of 2 mm. BANG3 polymer gel dosimetry can be useful for the verification of clinical treatment radiosurgery plans.

  11. Mercury concentrations in Atlantic bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) inhabiting the Indian River Lagoon, Florida: Patterns of spatial and temporal distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Adam M; Titcomb, Elizabeth Murdoch; Fair, Patricia A; Stavros, Hui-Chen W; Mazzoil, Marilyn; Bossart, Gregory D; Reif, John S

    2015-08-15

    Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) inhabiting the Indian River Lagoon, FL (IRL) have tissue mercury concentrations among the highest reported worldwide. Analysis of total mercury (THg) concentrations in blood collected between 2003 and 2012 showed a significant linear decrease over time (p=0.04). Significant differences in the spatial distribution of THg in resident IRL dolphins were also observed with a general gradient in concentration from north to south. Evaluation of local biogeochemistry and accumulation of mercury in prey species is needed to better understand factors influencing the distribution of Hg in the apex predator. Analyses of temporal and spatial patterns of exposure to THg in this sentinel species may have implications for both ecosystem and public health in the region. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Temporal and spatial distribution characteristics and indicator effects of Corbicula fluminea in coastal flat of Changjiang estuary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lina; Chen, Zhenlou; Xu, Shiyuan; Hou, Jing; Bi, Chunjuan; Shi, Guitao

    2006-05-01

    Corbicula fluminea is a kind of macrobenthos commonly seen in the coastal wetland ecosystem of Changjiang estuary. This paper studied the temporal and spatial distribution characteristics of its population density and biomass, and analyzed the heavy metals concentrations in its body and in suspended particles and sediments. The results showed that the distribution of C. fluminea was discrepant in different seasons, sampling sites, and even, sampling sections of same sampling site. The population density and biomass of C. fluminea were higher in spring and autumn but lower in summer, and higher in mid-tidal flat than in low and high flats of Chongming. Its annual average population density and biomass was the maximal in Xupu. C. fluminea had definite accumulation ability to copper and zinc, but not to lead and chromium. There was a significant negative correlation between the lead concentrations in C. fluminea and sediments.

  13. The brown lacewings (Neuroptera, Hemerobiidae of northwestern Turkey with new records, their spatio-temporal distribution and harbouring plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orkun Baris Kovanci

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The brown lacewings (Neuroptera, Hemerobiidae of northwestern Turkey with new records, their spatio-temporal distribution and harbouring plants. The occurrence and spatio-temporal distribution of brown lacewing species (Neuroptera, Hemerobiidae in Bursa province, northwestern Turkey, was investigated during 1999-2011. A total of 852 brown lacewing specimens of 20 species, including the genera of Hemerobius, Megalomus, Micromus, Sympherobius, and Wesmaelius were collected. Of these, 12 species were new records for northwestern Turkey while Sympherobius klapaleki is a new record for the Neuroptera fauna of Turkey. The most widespread species were Hemerobius handschini and Sympherobius pygmaeus with percent dominance values of 42.00 and 15.96%, respectively. Wesmaelius subnebulosus was the earliest emerging hemerobiid species and had the longest flight activity lasting from March to October. The species of southern origin characterized by the Mediterranean elements constituted 55% of the hemerobiid fauna and prevailed over the species of northern origin that belong to the Siberian centres. The total number of hemerobiid species reached a peak in July with captures of 15 species per month. There were 11, 13, 18 and 5 hemerobiid species occurring at altitudes between 1-500, 501-1000, 1001-1500 and 1500-2000 m, respectively. In addition, plant species harbouring hemerobiids are given for each species, and their association with the hemerobiid fauna is discussed.

  14. Distribution and Abundance of Phlebotominae, Vectors of Leishmaniasis, in Argentina: Spatial and Temporal Analysis at Different Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Gabriela Quintana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The spatial-temporal analysis of the abundance of insects, vectors of tegumentary leishmaniasis (TL and visceral leishmaniasis (VL, was performed in Argentina using spatial-temporal increasing scales. In the microscale (microfocal, the effect of the primary vegetation-crop interface in vector abundance was observed, and also how the shelters, food sources, and other environmental characteristics contribute to habitat microheterogeneity and so to a microheterogeneous vector distribution. In the mesoscale (locality or epidemic focus, the results from different foci of TL (rural and periurban and VL (urban suggested a metapopulation structure determined partially by quantifiable habitat variables that could explain the increase of risk associated to an increase of vector-human contact due to climatic or anthropogenic changes. In the macroscale (regional, captures of vectors and records of human cases allowed the construction of risk maps and predictive models of vector distribution. In conclusion, in order to obtain valid results transferrable to control programs from spatial studies, special attention should be paid in order to assure the consistency between the spatial scales of the hypotheses, data, and analytical tools of each experimental or descriptive design.

  15. Calculation of dose distribution in compressible breast tissues using finite element modeling, Monte Carlo simulation and thermoluminescence dosimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadyari, Parvin; Faghihi, Reza; Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Lotfi, Mehrzad; Rahim Hematiyan, Mohammad; Koontz, Craig; Meigooni, Ali S.

    2015-12-01

    Compression is a technique to immobilize the target or improve the dose distribution within the treatment volume during different irradiation techniques such as AccuBoost® brachytherapy. However, there is no systematic method for determination of dose distribution for uncompressed tissue after irradiation under compression. In this study, the mechanical behavior of breast tissue between compressed and uncompressed states was investigated. With that, a novel method was developed to determine the dose distribution in uncompressed tissue after irradiation of compressed breast tissue. Dosimetry was performed using two different methods, namely, Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNP5 code and measurements using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The displacement of the breast elements was simulated using a finite element model and calculated using ABAQUS software. From these results, the 3D dose distribution in uncompressed tissue was determined. The geometry of the model was constructed from magnetic resonance images of six different women volunteers. The mechanical properties were modeled by using the Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic material model. Experimental dosimetry was performed by placing the TLD chips into the polyvinyl alcohol breast equivalent phantom. The results determined that the nodal displacements, due to the gravitational force and the 60 Newton compression forces (with 43% contraction in the loading direction and 37% expansion in the orthogonal direction) were determined. Finally, a comparison of the experimental data and the simulated data showed agreement within 11.5%  ±  5.9%.

  16. Commercial production and distribution of fresh fruits and vegetables: A scoping study on the importance of produce pathways to dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, T.L.; Anderson, D.M.; Farris, W.T.; Ikenberry, T.A.; Napier, B.A.; Wilfert, G.L.

    1992-09-01

    This letter report summarizes a scoping study that examined the potential importance of fresh fruit and vegetable pathways to dose. A simple production index was constructed with data collected from the Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA), the United States Bureau of the Census, and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project staff from Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, in cooperation with members of the Technical Steering Panel (TSP), selected lettuce and spinach as the produce pathways most likely to impact dose. County agricultural reports published in 1956 provided historical descriptions of the predominant distribution patterns of fresh lettuce and spinach from production regions to local population centers. Pathway rankings and screening dose estimates were calculated for specific populations living in selected locations within the HEDR study area.

  17. SU-E-I-16: Scan Length Dependency of the Radial Dose Distribution in a Long Polyethylene Cylinder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakalyar, D; McKenney, S [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Feng, W [New York Presbyterian Hospital, Tenafly, NJ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The area-averaged dose in the central plane of a long cylinder following a CT scan depends upon the radial dose distribution and the length of the scan. The ICRU/TG200 phantom, a polyethylene cylinder 30 cm in diameter and 60 cm long, was the subject of this study. The purpose was to develop an analytic function that could determine the dose for a scan length L at any point in the central plane of this phantom. Methods: Monte Carlo calculations were performed on a simulated ICRU/TG200 phantom under conditions of cylindrically symmetric conditions of irradiation. Thus, the radial dose distribution function must be an even function that accounts for two competing effects: The direct beam makes its weakest contribution at the center while the scatter begins abruptly at the outer radius and grows as the center is approached. The scatter contribution also increases with scan length with the increase approaching its limiting value at the periphery faster than along the central axis. An analytic function was developed that fit the data and possessed these features. Results: Symmetry and continuity dictate a local extremum at the center which is a minimum for the ICRU/TG200 phantom. The relative depth of the minimum decreases as the scan length grows and an absolute maximum can occur between the center and outer edge of the cylinders. As the scan length grows, the relative dip in the center decreases so that for very long scan lengths, the dose profile is relatively flat. Conclusion: An analytic function characterizes the radial and scan length dependency of dose for long cylindrical phantoms. The function can be integrated with the results expressed in closed form. One use for this is to help determine average dose distribution over the central cylinder plane for any scan length.

  18. Analysis of the temporal-spatial distribution of ionosphere scale height based on COSMIC occultation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin-Xin; Lin, Zhan; Jin, Hong-Lin; Chen, Hua-Ran; Jiao, Li-Guo

    2017-11-01

    In this study, the distribution characteristics of scale height at various solar activity levels were statistically analyzed using the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) radio occultation data for 2007-2013. The results show that: (1) in the mid-high latitude region, the daytime (06-17LT) scale height exhibits annual variations in the form of a single peak structure with the crest appearing in summer. At the high latitude region, an annual variation is also observed for nighttime (18-05LT) scale height; (2) changes in the spatial distribution of the scale height occur. The crests are deflected towards the north during daytime (12-14LT) at a geomagnetic longitude of 60°W-180°W, and they are distributed roughly along the geomagnetic equator at 60°W-180°E. In the approximate region of 120°W-150°E and 50°S-80°S, the scale height values are significantly higher than those in other mid-latitude areas. This region enlarges with increased solar activity, and shows an approximately symmetric distribution about 0° geomagnetic longitude. Nighttime (00-02LT) scale height values in the high-latitude region are larger than those in the low-mid latitude region. These results could serve as reference for the study of ionosphere distribution and construction of the corresponding profile model.

  19. SU-F-T-24: Impact of Source Position and Dose Distribution Due to Curvature of HDR Transfer Tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, A; Yue, N [Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Brachytherapy is a highly targeted from of radiotherapy. While this may lead to ideal dose distributions on the treatment planning system, a small error in source location can lead to change in the dose distribution. The purpose of this study is to quantify the impact on source position error due to curvature of the transfer tubes and the impact this may have on the dose distribution. Methods: Since the source travels along the midline of the tube, an estimate of the positioning error for various angles of curvature was determined using geometric properties of the tube. Based on the range of values a specific shift was chosen to alter the treatment plans for a number of cervical cancer patients who had undergone HDR brachytherapy boost using tandem and ovoids. Impact of dose to target and organs at risk were determined and checked against guidelines outlined by radiation oncologist. Results: The estimate of the positioning error was 2mm short of the expected position (the curved tube can only cause the source to not reach as far as with a flat tube). Quantitative impact on the dose distribution is still in the process of being analyzed. Conclusion: The accepted positioning tolerance for the source position of a HDR brachytherapy unit is plus or minus 1mm. If there is an additional 2mm discrepancy due to tube curvature, this can result in a source being 1mm to 3mm short of the expected location. While we do always attempt to keep the tubes straight, in some cases such as with tandem and ovoids, the tandem connector does not extend as far out from the patient so the ovoid tubes always contain some degree of curvature. The dose impact of this may be significant.

  20. Electron Irradiation of Conjunctival Lymphoma-Monte Carlo Simulation of the Minute Dose Distribution and Technique Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brualla, Lorenzo, E-mail: lorenzo.brualla@uni-due.de [NCTeam, Strahlenklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Essen (Germany); Zaragoza, Francisco J.; Sempau, Josep [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Wittig, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Giessen and Marburg, Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg (Germany); Sauerwein, Wolfgang [NCTeam, Strahlenklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Essen (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy is the only conservative curative approach for Stage I non-Hodgkin lymphomas of the conjunctiva. The target volume is geometrically complex because it includes the eyeball and lid conjunctiva. Furthermore, the target volume is adjacent to radiosensitive structures, including the lens, lacrimal glands, cornea, retina, and papilla. The radiotherapy planning and optimization requires accurate calculation of the dose in these anatomical structures that are much smaller than the structures traditionally considered in radiotherapy. Neither conventional treatment planning systems nor dosimetric measurements can reliably determine the dose distribution in these small irradiated volumes. Methods and Materials: The Monte Carlo simulations of a Varian Clinac 2100 C/D and human eye were performed using the PENELOPE and PENEASYLINAC codes. Dose distributions and dose volume histograms were calculated for the bulbar conjunctiva, cornea, lens, retina, papilla, lacrimal gland, and anterior and posterior hemispheres. Results: The simulated results allow choosing the most adequate treatment setup configuration, which is an electron beam energy of 6 MeV with additional bolus and collimation by a cerrobend block with a central cylindrical hole of 3.0 cm diameter and central cylindrical rod of 1.0 cm diameter. Conclusions: Monte Carlo simulation is a useful method to calculate the minute dose distribution in ocular tissue and to optimize the electron irradiation technique in highly critical structures. Using a voxelized eye phantom based on patient computed tomography images, the dose distribution can be estimated with a standard statistical uncertainty of less than 2.4% in 3 min using a computing cluster with 30 cores, which makes this planning technique clinically relevant.

  1. Spatial and temporal distribution of mercury and methylmercury in bivalves from the French coastline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briant, N; Chouvelon, T; Martinez, L; Brach-Papa, C; Chiffoleau, J F; Savoye, N; Sonke, J; Knoery, J

    2017-01-30

    Marine mercury (Hg) concentrations have been monitored in the French coastline for the last half a century using bivalves. The analyses presented in this study concerned 192 samples of bivalves (mussels: Mytilus edulis and Mytilus galloprovincialis and oysters: Crassostrea gigas and Isognomon alatus) from 77 sampling stations along the French coast and in the French Antilles sea. The goals of this study were to assess MeHg levels in various common bivalves from French coastline, and to identify possible geographic, taxonomic or temporal variations of concentrations. We show that the evolution of methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations covary with total mercury (HgT) concentrations. Moreover, in most of the study sites, HgT concentrations have not decreased since 1987, despite regulations to decrease or ban mercury used for anthropic activities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Role of Diatoms in the Spatial-Temporal Distribution of Intracellular Nitrate in Intertidal Sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stief, P.; Kamp, A.; de Beer, D.

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular nitrate storage allows microorganisms to survive fluctuating nutrient availability and anoxic conditions in aquatic ecosystems. Here we show that diatoms, ubiquitous and highly abundant microalgae, represent major cellular reservoirs of nitrate in an intertidal flat of the German...... Wadden Sea and are potentially involved in anaerobic nitrate respiration. Intracellular nitrate (ICNO3) was present year-round in the sediment and was spatially and temporally correlated with fucoxanthin, the marker photopigment of diatoms. Pyrosequencing of SSU rRNA genes of all domains of life...... in anaerobic nitrate respiration. Due to the widespread dominance of diatoms in microphytobenthos, the total nitrate pool in coastal marine sediments may generally be at least two times larger than derived from porewater measurements and partially be recycled to ammonium....

  3. Temporal and Spatial Distribution Patterns of Echinoderm Larvae in La Parguera, Puerto Rico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey M Williams

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This study describes temporal and spatial abundance patterns of echinoderm larvae in La Parguera, Puerto Rico. For the temporal study, larvae were sampled by a series of monthly tows taken with a 64μm mesh net between the new and full moon from April 2005 to July 2006, September 2006 and August 2007. In order to measure spatial variation of echinoderm larval bundances, oblique tows were taken with 64 and 202μm mesh nets at seven different sites within the shelf, at the shelf-edge, and at a nearby oceanic stations during August 2007. Overall, Echinoidea (sea urchin exhibited the highest abundance with a total of 11 921 larvae, representing 52.5% of the total collection. Ophiuroidea (brittle star ranked second in abundance with 45.6% of the total larvae. Holothuroidea (sea cucumber and Asteroidea larvae (sea star accounted for less than 2% of the total echinoderm larval collection. Early larval stages (2-8 day old of Diadema antillarum represented 20% of the total Echinoidea larvae. There was no marked seasonal trend of echinoderm larval abundance; Echinoidea and Ophiuroidea larvae were present in all monthly samples indicating that reproduction occurs year-round. Peak abundances of later-stage Echinoidea larvae were observed during January, July and October and of later-stage Ophiuroidea larvae during June, August and October. The observed peaks of later-stage larval abundances may be indicative of higher recruitment activity during these months. There was a significant difference of echinoderm larval abundance between spatial stations, with higher abundances collected at the shelf-edge. Later-stage (~24 day old D. antillarum larvae were mostly collected at shelf-edge and oceanic locations. In addition, the 64mm mesh net was more efficient for collection of echinoderm larvae than the 202mm mesh net. Rev. Biol. Trop. 58 (Suppl. 3: 81-88. Epub 2010 October 01.

  4. A Novel Method to Incorporate the Spatial Location of the Lung Dose Distribution into Predictive Radiation Pneumonitis Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy, E-mail: yvinogra@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Martel, Mary K. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Studies have proposed that patients who receive radiation therapy to the base of the lung are more susceptible to radiation pneumonitis than patients who receive therapy to the apex of the lung. The primary purpose of the present study was to develop a novel method to incorporate the lung dose spatial information into a predictive radiation pneumonitis model. A secondary goal was to apply the method to a 547 lung cancer patient database to determine whether including the spatial information could improve the fit of our model. Methods and Materials: The three-dimensional dose distribution of each patient was mapped onto one common coordinate system. The boundaries of the coordinate system were defined by the extreme points of each individual patient lung. Once all dose distributions were mapped onto the common coordinate system, the spatial information was incorporated into a Lyman-Kutcher-Burman predictive radiation pneumonitis model. Specifically, the lung dose voxels were weighted using a user-defined spatial weighting matrix. We investigated spatial weighting matrices that linearly scaled each dose voxel according to the following orientations: superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, medial-lateral, left-right, and radial. The model parameters were fit to our patient cohort with the endpoint of severe radiation pneumonitis. The spatial dose model was compared against a conventional dose-volume model to determine whether adding a spatial component improved the fit of the model. Results: Of the 547 patients analyzed, 111 (20.3%) experienced severe radiation pneumonitis. Adding in a spatial parameter did not significantly increase the accuracy of the model for any of the weighting schemes. Conclusions: A novel method was developed to investigate the relationship between the location of the deposited lung dose and pneumonitis rate. The method was applied to a patient database, and we found that for our patient cohort, the spatial location does not influence

  5. A novel method to incorporate the spatial location of the lung dose distribution into predictive radiation pneumonitis modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Tucker, Susan L; Liao, Zhongxing; Martel, Mary K

    2012-03-15

    Studies have proposed that patients who receive radiation therapy to the base of the lung are more susceptible to radiation pneumonitis than patients who receive therapy to the apex of the lung. The primary purpose of the present study was to develop a novel method to incorporate the lung dose spatial information into a predictive radiation pneumonitis model. A secondary goal was to apply the method to a 547 lung cancer patient database to determine whether including the spatial information could improve the fit of our model. The three-dimensional dose distribution of each patient was mapped onto one common coordinate system. The boundaries of the coordinate system were defined by the extreme points of each individual patient lung. Once all dose distributions were mapped onto the common coordinate system, the spatial information was incorporated into a Lyman-Kutcher-Burman predictive radiation pneumonitis model. Specifically, the lung dose voxels were weighted using a user-defined spatial weighting matrix. We investigated spatial weighting matrices that linearly scaled each dose voxel according to the following orientations: superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, medial-lateral, left-right, and radial. The model parameters were fit to our patient cohort with the endpoint of severe radiation pneumonitis. The spatial dose model was compared against a conventional dose-volume model to determine whether adding a spatial component improved the fit of the model. Of the 547 patients analyzed, 111 (20.3%) experienced severe radiation pneumonitis. Adding in a spatial parameter did not significantly increase the accuracy of the model for any of the weighting schemes. A novel method was developed to investigate the relationship between the location of the deposited lung dose and pneumonitis rate. The method was applied to a patient database, and we found that for our patient cohort, the spatial location does not influence the risk of pneumonitis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier

  6. Spatial and temporal distributions of magnetisation in arrays of interacting bistable microwires

    CERN Document Server

    Velazquez, J

    2002-01-01

    The unbalanced distribution of magnetic poles at the ends of the bistable Fe-based magnetostrictive glass-coated amorphous microwires generates a magnetic stray field that interacts with magnetisation in neighbouring microwires. A theoretical model is developed to analyse the magnetisation process of a two-dimensional array of quasi-identical microwires, taking into account the symmetry of the distribution (hexagonal, cubic, random), the number of microwires, and the distance between them. The conditions are analysed for arrays which behave as a complex system, specifically a system with self-organised criticality where both distributions of microwires with parallel and antiparallel magnetisation follow a fractal patron, and also conditions when individual magnetisation reversals in the array extend to the neighbours, as well as the possibility of application of this effect in magnetic recording devices.

  7. Spatio-temporal assessment of food safety risks in Canadian food distribution systems using GIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi Beni, Leila; Villeneuve, Sébastien; LeBlanc, Denyse I; Côté, Kevin; Fazil, Aamir; Otten, Ainsley; McKellar, Robin; Delaquis, Pascal

    2012-09-01

    While the value of geographic information systems (GIS) is widely applied in public health there have been comparatively few examples of applications that extend to the assessment of risks in food distribution systems. GIS can provide decision makers with strong computing platforms for spatial data management, integration, analysis, querying and visualization. The present report addresses some spatio-analyses in a complex food distribution system and defines influence areas as travel time zones generated through road network analysis on a national scale rather than on a community scale. In addition, a dynamic risk index is defined to translate a contamination event into a public health risk as time progresses. More specifically, in this research, GIS is used to map the Canadian produce distribution system, analyze accessibility to contaminated product by consumers, and estimate the level of risk associated with a contamination event over time, as illustrated in a scenario. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Graveyards on the Move: The Spatio-Temporal Distribution of Dead Ophiocordyceps-Infected Ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Maj-Britt; Himaman, Winanda; Hywel-Jones, Nigel L.

    2009-01-01

    unilateralis, which is pan-tropical in distribution, causes infected worker ants to leave their nest and die under leaves in the understory of tropical rainforests. Working in a forest dynamic plot in Southern Thailand we mapped the occurrence of these dead ants by examining every leaf in 1,360 m2 of primary...... rainforest. We established that high density aggregations exist (up to 26 dead ants/m2), which we coined graveyards. We further established that graveyards are patchily distributed in a landscape with no or very few O. unilateralis-killed ants. At some, but not all, spatial scales of analysis the density...

  9. Spatial and temporal distribution of Pacific cod Gadus macrocephalus juveniles in Mutsu Bay, Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Takatsu, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Yasuyuki; Kooka, Kouji; Sugimoto, Kouichi; Takahashi, Toyomi

    2001-01-01

    The spatial distributions of Pacific cod (Gadus macrocephalus) juveniles and their food organisms were examined in Mutsu Bay from April to July during 1988-1997. In April, large larvae (≤25 mm in total length (TL)) and pelagic juveniles (>25 mm TL) were widely distributed in the bay, and were concentrated at the same depths as calanoid copepodites during daylight hours. Geographical changes in cod TLs might have been due to transport by the Tsugaru Warm Current. After mid- and late May, juven...

  10. Spatial and temporal variation of fault slip and distributed off-fault deformation, Santa Cruz Mountains, central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsman, E. M.; Graymer, R. W.

    2010-12-01

    The Santa Cruz Mountains of central California record a lengthy history of deformation, including slip on the dextral San Andreas Fault (SAF) system and off-fault deformation manifested by both slip on secondary faults as well as distributed strain. This complex history provides insight into regional deformation processes operating both before and after initiation of the SAF. We focus here on deformation SW of the SAF, where several distinct, fault-bounded crustal blocks record different histories. We evaluate the magnitude and significance of off-fault deformation SW of the SAF by considering spatial and temporal relationships between slip on secondary faults and distributed deformation. To conduct the analysis we combine a synthesis of the slip histories of five important regional faults with a new dataset constraining spatial and temporal variation of regional deformation magnitude. This new dataset is based on shortening measurements of several major unconformities compiled from more than 60 cross sections from the region. To estimate strain magnitude recorded by older surfaces, we progressively subtract shortening magnitude of young markers from older markers. Because uncertainties grow for older surfaces, this method is most reliable for younger surfaces. Results of the analysis demonstrate that strain magnitude recorded by several unconformity-bound sedimentary packages of different ages is largest within about 5 km of the SAF, providing evidence of long-term deformation partitioning near this major structure. This pattern of distributed deformation partitioning near faults is also apparent but less pronounced near the secondary faults SW of the SAF. When considering spatial and temporal ties between regional deformation and slip on secondary faults, no simple pattern emerges. Fault activity is highly variable in both space and time. Additionally, fault activity at any one time is highly localized; one fault may be active while a nearby structure is inactive

  11. Global migration and the changing distribution of sickle haemoglobin: a quantitative study of temporal trends between 1960 and 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Frédéric B; Tatem, Andrew J; Huang, Zhuojie; Gupta, Sunetra; Williams, Thomas N; Weatherall, David J

    2014-02-01

    Changes in the geographical distribution of genetic disorders are often thought to happen slowly, especially when compared with infectious diseases. Whereas mutations, genetic drift, and natural selection take place over many generations, epidemics can spread through large populations within a few days or weeks. Nevertheless, population movements can interfere with these processes, and few studies have been done of their eff ect on genetic disorders. We aimed to investigate the eff ect of global migration on the distribution of the sickle-cell gene-the most common and clinically significant haemoglobin structural variant. For each country, we extracted data from the World Bank’s Global Bilateral Migration Database about international human migrations between 1960 and 2000. We combined this information with evidence-based estimates of national HbS allele frequencies, generated within a Bayesian geostatistical framework, to analyse temporal changes in the net numbers of migrants, and classified countries with an index summarising these temporal trends. The number of international migrants increased from 92.6 million in 1960, to 165.2 million in 2000. The estimated global number of migrants with HbS increased from about 1.6 million in 1960, to 3.6 million in 2000. This increase was largely due to an increase in the number of migrants from countries with HbS allele frequencies higher than 10%, from 3.1 million in 1960, to 14.2 million in 2000. Additionally, the mean number of countries of origin for each destination country increased from 70 (SE 46) in 1960, to 98 (48) in 2000, showing an increasing diversity in the network of international migrations between countries. Our index of change map shows a patchy distribution of the magnitude of temporal changes, with the highest positive and negative values scattered across all continents. Global human population movements have had a substantial eff ect on the distribution of the HbS gene. Population movements can create

  12. Investigation of the HU-density conversion method and comparison of dose distribution for dose calculation on MV cone beam CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Joo; Lee, Seu Ran; Suh, Tae Suk [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Modern radiation therapy techniques, such as Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), Adaptive radiation therapy (ART) has become a routine clinical practice on linear accelerators for the increase the tumor dose conformity and improvement of normal tissue sparing at the same time. For these highly developed techniques, megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MVCBCT) system produce volumetric images at just one rotation of the x-ray beam source and detector on the bottom of conventional linear accelerator for real-time application of patient condition into treatment planning. MV CBCT image scan be directly registered to a reference CT data set which is usually kilo-voltage fan-beam computed tomography (kVFBCT) on treatment planning system and the registered image scan be used to adjust patient set-up error. However, to use MV CBCT images in radiotherapy, reliable electron density (ED) distribution are required. Patients scattering, beam hardening and softening effect caused by different energy application between kVCT, MV CBCT can cause cupping artifacts in MV CBCT images and distortion of Houns field Unit (HU) to ED conversion. The goal of this study, for reliable application of MV CBCT images into dose calculation, MV CBCT images was modified to correct distortion of HU to ED using the relationship of HU and ED from kV FBCT and MV CBCT images. The HU-density conversion was performed on MV CBCT image set using Dose difference map was showing in Figure 1. Finally, percentage differences above 3% were reduced depending on applying density calibration method. As a result, total error co uld be reduced to under 3%. The present study demonstrates that dose calculation accuracy using MV CBCT image set can be improved my applying HU-density conversion method. The dose calculation and comparison of dose distribution from MV CBCT image set with/without HU-density conversion method was performed. An advantage of this study compared to other approaches is that HU

  13. Spatial-temporal distribution and risk assessment of mercury in different fractions in surface sediments from the Yangtze River estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingrui; Liu, Ruimin; Men, Cong; Xu, Fei; Guo, Lijia; Shen, Zhenyao

    2017-11-15

    The temporal and spatial distributions of mercury in different fractions and its potential ecological risk were investigated in sediments from the Yangtze River estuary (YRE) by analyzing data collected from the study area. The results showed that mercury in the organic and residual fractions had dominant proportions, from 15.2% to 48.52% and from 45.96% to 81.59%, respectively. The fractions were more susceptible to seasonal changes than other fractions. Higher proportions of mercury in organic fraction were found in wet seasons; the opposite was true for mercury in residual fraction. With respect to the spatial distribution, the concentration mercury in exchangeable, carbonate and Fe-Mn oxide fractions showed a decreasing trend from the inner estuary to the outer estuary, but no obvious trends were found in the distributions of mercury in the organic and residual fractions. The risk assessment code (RAC) was used to evaluate the potential ecological risk in the study area based on the proportions of exchangeable and carbonate fractions. The average RAC values during the four periods were 6.00%, 2.20%, 2.83%, and 0.61%. Although these values show that the risk in the study area is generally low, the distribution of RAC values indicates that the inner estuary has a medium risk, with a value up to 10%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Direct intratumoral infusion of liposome encapsulated rhenium radionuclides for cancer therapy: Effects of nonuniform intratumoral dose distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrycushko, Brian A.; Li Shihong; Goins, Beth; Otto, Randal A.; Bao, Ande [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States); Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78229 and Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: Focused radiation therapy by direct intratumoral infusion of lipid nanoparticle (liposome)-carried beta-emitting radionuclides has shown promising results in animal model studies; however, little is known about the impact the intratumoral liposomal radionuclide distribution may have on tumor control. The primary objective of this work was to investigate the effects the intratumoral absorbed dose distributions from this cancer therapy modality have on tumor control and treatment planning by combining dosimetric and radiobiological modeling with in vivo imaging data. Methods: {sup 99m}Tc-encapsulated liposomes were intratumorally infused with a single injection location to human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma xenografts in nude rats. High resolution in vivo planar imaging was performed at various time points for quantifying intratumoral retention following infusion. The intratumoral liposomal radioactivity distribution was obtained from 1 mm resolution pinhole collimator SPECT imaging coregistered with CT imaging of excised tumors at 20 h postinfusion. Coregistered images were used for intratumoral dosimetric and radiobiological modeling at a voxel level following extrapolation to the therapeutic analogs, {sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re liposomes. Effective uniform dose (EUD) and tumor control probability (TCP) were used to assess therapy effectiveness and possible methods of improving upon tumor control with this radiation therapy modality. Results: Dosimetric analysis showed that average tumor absorbed doses of 8.6 Gy/MBq (318.2 Gy/mCi) and 5.7 Gy/MBq (209.1 Gy/mCi) could be delivered with this protocol of radiation delivery for {sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re liposomes, respectively, and 37-92 MBq (1-2.5 mCi)/g tumor administered activity; however, large intratumoral absorbed dose heterogeneity, as seen in dose-volume histograms, resulted in insignificant values of EUD and TCP for achieving tumor control. It is indicated that the use of liposomes encapsulating

  15. Spatial and temporal distribution of rabies in the northern zone of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A retrospective study was carried out to investigate the occurrence and distribution patterns of rabies cases in northern Tanzania. Data on laboratory confirmed brain samples and associated case reports submitted to the Arusha Veterinary Investigation Centre, for a period of ten years (1993-2002) was retrieved and ...

  16. Temporal scalability comparison of the H.264/SVC and distributed video codec

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Xin; Ukhanova, Ann; Belyaev, Evgeny

    2009-01-01

    The problem of the multimedia scalable video streaming is a current topic of interest. There exist many methods for scalable video coding. This paper is focused on the scalable extension of H.264/AVC (H.264/SVC) and distributed video coding (DVC). The paper presents an efficiency comparison of SVC...

  17. Temporal dynamics of light and nitrogen vertical distributions in canopies of sunflower, kenaf and cynara

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Archontoulis, S.V.; Vos, J.; Yin, X.; Bastiaans, L.; Danalatos, N.G.; Struik, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    To enhance eco-physiological and modelling studies, we quantified vertical distributions of light and nitrogen in canopies of three Mediterranean bio-energy crops: sunflower (Helianthus annuus), kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) and cynara (Cynara cardunculus). Field crops were grown with and without

  18. Spatio-temporal distribution and production of calanoid copepods in the central Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, F.C.; Möllmann, Christian; Schutz, U.

    2006-01-01

    April to August 1999. Vertical and horizontal distribution patterns appeared to be linked with each other and were primarily species-dependent. Both Acartia spp. and Temora longicornis preferentially inhabited the upper 30 m of the water column and the shallower marginal regions of the Bornholm Basin...

  19. Effect of Pressurized Metered Dose Inhaler Spray Characteristics and Particle Size Distribution on Drug Delivery Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Morteza; Inthavong, Kiao; Tu, Jiyuan

    2017-10-01

    A key issue in pulmonary drug delivery is improvement of the delivery device for effective and targeted treatment. Pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) are the most popular aerosol therapy device for treating lung diseases. This article studies the effect of spray characteristics: injection velocity, spray cone angle, particle size distribution (PSD), and its mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) on drug delivery. An idealized oral airway geometry, extending from mouth to the main bronchus, was connected to a pMDI device. Inhalation flow rates of 15, 30, and 60 L/min were used and drug particle tracking was a one-way coupled Lagrangian model. The results showed that most particles deposited in the pharynx, where the airway has a reduced cross-sectional area. Particle deposition generally decreased with initial spray velocity and with increased spray cone angle for 30 and 60 L/min flow rates. However, for 15 L/min flow rate, the deposition increased slightly with an increase in the spray velocity and cone angle. The effect of spray cone angle was more significant than the initial spray velocity on particle deposition. When the MMAD of a PSD was reduced, the deposition efficiency also reduces, suggesting greater rates of particle entry into the lung. The deposition rate showed negligible change when the MMAD was more than 8 μm. Spray injection angle and velocity change the drug delivery efficacy; however, the efficiency shows more sensitivity to the injection angle. The 30 L/min airflow rate delivers spray particles to the lung more efficiently than 15 and 60 L/min airflow rate, and reducing MMAD can help increase drug delivery to the lung.

  20. Predicting spatial and temporal distribution of Indo-Pacific lionfish (Pterois volitans) in Biscayne Bay through habitat suitability modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Nicholas A.; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Schofield, Pamela J.; Sullivan Sealey, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Invasive species may exhibit higher levels of growth and reproduction when environmental conditions are most suitable, and thus their effects on native fauna may be intensified. Understanding potential impacts of these species, especially in the nascent stages of a biological invasion, requires critical information concerning spatial and temporal distributions of habitat suitability. Using empirically supported environmental variables (e.g., temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, rugosity, and benthic substrate), our models predicted habitat suitability for the invasive lionfish (Pterois volitans) in Biscayne Bay, Florida. The use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) as a platform for the modeling process allowed us to quantify correlations between temporal (seasonal) fluctuations in the above variables and the spatial distribution of five discrete habitat quality classes, whose ranges are supported by statistical deviations from the apparent best conditions described in prior studies. Analysis of the resulting models revealed little fluctuation in spatial extent of the five habitat classes on a monthly basis. Class 5, which represented the area with environmental variables closest to the best conditions for lionfish, occupied approximately one-third of Biscayne Bay, with subsequent habitats declining in area. A key finding from this study was that habitat suitability increased eastward from the coastline, where higher quality habitats were adjacent to the Atlantic Ocean and displayed marine levels of ambient water quality. Corroboration of the models with sightings from the USGS-NAS database appeared to support our findings by nesting 79 % of values within habitat class 5; however, field testing (i.e., lionfish surveys) is necessary to confirm the relationship between habitat classes and lionfish distribution.

  1. New investigation of distribution imaging and content uniformity of very low dose drugs using hot-melt extrusion method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun-Bom; Kang, Chin-Yang; Kang, Wie-Soo; Choi, Han-Gon; Han, Hyo-Kyung; Lee, Beom-Jin

    2013-12-31

    The content uniformity of low dose drugs in dosage forms is very important for quality assurance. The aim of this study was to prepare uniformly and homogeneously distributed dosage forms of very low-dose drugs using twin screw hot-melt extrusion (HME) and to investigate the distribution of drugs using instrumental analyses. For the feasibility of HME method, a very low amount of coumarin-6, a fluorescent dye, was used to visualize distribution images using confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). Limaprost, tamsulosin and glimepiride were then used as low-dose model drugs to study the applicability of HME for content uniformity and distribution behaviors. Hydrophilic thermosensitive polymers with low melting point, such as Poloxamer188 and polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000, were chosen as carriers. The melt extrusion was carried out around 50°C, at which both carriers were easily dissolved but model drugs remained in solid form. The physicochemical properties of the hot-melt extrudates, including differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), were measured. Content uniformity of the drugs was also checked by HPLC. CLSM imaging showed that model drugs were well distributed throughout the hot-melt extrudate, giving better content uniformity with low batch-to-batch variations compared with simple physical mixtures. DSC, PXRD and FT-IR data showed that there was no interaction or interference between model drugs and thermosensitive polymers. The current HME methods could be used to prepare uniformly distributed and reproducible solid dosage forms containing very low dose drugs for further pharmaceutical applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of linear and nonlinear programming approaches for "worst case dose" and "minmax" robust optimization of intensity-modulated proton therapy dose distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghian, Maryam; Cao, Wenhua; Liu, Wei; Kardar, Laleh; Randeniya, Sharmalee; Mohan, Radhe; Lim, Gino

    2017-03-01

    Robust optimization of intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) takes uncertainties into account during spot weight optimization and leads to dose distributions that are resilient to uncertainties. Previous studies demonstrated benefits of linear programming (LP) for IMPT in terms of delivery efficiency by considerably reducing the number of spots required for the same quality of plans. However, a reduction in the number of spots may lead to loss of robustness. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the performance in terms of plan quality and robustness of two robust optimization approaches using LP and nonlinear programming (NLP) models. The so-called "worst case dose" and "minmax" robust optimization approaches and conventional planning target volume (PTV)-based optimization approach were applied to designing IMPT plans for five patients: two with prostate cancer, one with skull-based cancer, and two with head and neck cancer. For each approach, both LP and NLP models were used. Thus, for each case, six sets of IMPT plans were generated and assessed: LP-PTV-based, NLP-PTV-based, LP-worst case dose, NLP-worst case dose, LP-minmax, and NLP-minmax. The four robust optimization methods behaved differently from patient to patient, and no method emerged as superior to the others in terms of nominal plan quality and robustness against uncertainties. The plans generated using LP-based robust optimization were more robust regarding patient setup and range uncertainties than were those generated using NLP-based robust optimization for the prostate cancer patients. However, the robustness of plans generated using NLP-based methods was superior for the skull-based and head and neck cancer patients. Overall, LP-based methods were suitable for the less challenging cancer cases in which all uncertainty scenarios were able to satisfy tight dose constraints, while NLP performed better in more difficult cases in which most uncertainty scenarios were hard to meet

  3. An open-source genetic algorithm for determining optimal seed distributions for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeachy, P; Madamesila, J; Beauchamp, A; Khan, R

    2015-01-01

    An open source optimizer that generates seed distributions for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy was designed, tested, and validated. The optimizer was a simple genetic algorithm (SGA) that, given a set of prostate and urethra contours, determines the optimal seed distribution in terms of coverage of the prostate with the prescribed dose while avoiding hotspots within the urethra. The algorithm was validated in a retrospective study on 45 previously contoured low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy patients. Dosimetric indices were evaluated to ensure solutions adhered to clinical standards. The SGA performance was further benchmarked by comparing solutions obtained from a commercial optimizer (inverse planning simulated annealing [IPSA]) with the same cohort of 45 patients. Clinically acceptable target coverage by the prescribed dose (V100) was obtained for both SGA and IPSA, with a mean ± standard deviation of 98 ± 2% and 99.5 ± 0.5%, respectively. For the prostate D90, SGA and IPSA yielded 177 ± 8 Gy and 186 ± 7 Gy, respectively, which were both clinically acceptable. Both algorithms yielded reasonable dose to the rectum, with V100 open source SGA was validated that provides a research tool for the brachytherapy community. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. SPATIAL-TEMPORAL DISTRIBUTION OF WATERBORNE INFECTIOUS DISEASE RISK USING THE HYDRAULIC MODEL AND OUTPATIENT DATA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Ayako; Sakuma, Taisuke; Kazama, So

    This study evaluated waterborne infectious diseases risk and incidence rate around Phonm Penh in Cambodia. We use the hydraulic flood simulation, coliform bacterium diffusion model, dose-response model and outpatient data for quantitative analysis. The results obtained are as follows; 1. The incidence (incidence rate) of diarrhea as water borne diseases risk is 0.14 million people (9%) in the inundation area. 2. The residents in the inundation area are exposed up to 4 times as high risk as daily mean calculated by the integrated model combined in the regional scale. 3.The infectious disease risk due to floods and inundation indicated is effective as an element to explain the risk. The scenario explains 34% number of patient estimated by the outpatient data.

  5. Inter-comparison of Dose Distributions Calculated by FLUKA, GEANT4, MCNP, and PHITS for Proton Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zi-Yi; Tsai, Pi-En; Lee, Shao-Chun; Liu, Yen-Chiang; Chen, Chin-Cheng; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Sheu, Rong-Jiun

    2017-09-01

    The dose distributions from proton pencil beam scanning were calculated by FLUKA, GEANT4, MCNP, and PHITS, in order to investigate their applicability in proton radiotherapy. The first studied case was the integrated depth dose curves (IDDCs), respectively from a 100 and a 226-MeV proton pencil beam impinging a water phantom. The calculated IDDCs agree with each other as long as each code employs 75 eV for the ionization potential of water. The second case considered a similar condition of the first case but with proton energies in a Gaussian distribution. The comparison to the measurement indicates the inter-code differences might not only due to different stopping power but also the nuclear physics models. How the physics parameter setting affect the computation time was also discussed. In the third case, the applicability of each code for pencil beam scanning was confirmed by delivering a uniform volumetric dose distribution based on the treatment plan, and the results showed general agreement between each codes, the treatment plan, and the measurement, except that some deviations were found in the penumbra region. This study has demonstrated that the selected codes are all capable of performing dose calculations for therapeutic scanning proton beams with proper physics settings.

  6. Inter-comparison of Dose Distributions Calculated by FLUKA, GEANT4, MCNP, and PHITS for Proton Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zi-Yi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The dose distributions from proton pencil beam scanning were calculated by FLUKA, GEANT4, MCNP, and PHITS, in order to investigate their applicability in proton radiotherapy. The first studied case was the integrated depth dose curves (IDDCs, respectively from a 100 and a 226-MeV proton pencil beam impinging a water phantom. The calculated IDDCs agree with each other as long as each code employs 75 eV for the ionization potential of water. The second case considered a similar condition of the first case but with proton energies in a Gaussian distribution. The comparison to the measurement indicates the inter-code differences might not only due to different stopping power but also the nuclear physics models. How the physics parameter setting affect the computation time was also discussed. In the third case, the applicability of each code for pencil beam scanning was confirmed by delivering a uniform volumetric dose distribution based on the treatment plan, and the results showed general agreement between each codes, the treatment plan, and the measurement, except that some deviations were found in the penumbra region. This study has demonstrated that the selected codes are all capable of performing dose calculations for therapeutic scanning proton beams with proper physics settings.

  7. Temporal and Spatial Distribution Patterns of Echinoderm Larvae in La Parguera, Puerto Rico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey M Williams

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This study describes temporal and spatial abundance patterns of echinoderm larvae in La Parguera, Puerto Rico. For the temporal study, larvae were sampled by a series of monthly tows taken with a 64μm mesh net between the new and full moon from April 2005 to July 2006, September 2006 and August 2007. In order to measure spatial variation of echinoderm larval bundances, oblique tows were taken with 64 and 202μm mesh nets at seven different sites within the shelf, at the shelf-edge, and at a nearby oceanic stations during August 2007. Overall, Echinoidea (sea urchin exhibited the highest abundance with a total of 11 921 larvae, representing 52.5% of the total collection. Ophiuroidea (brittle star ranked second in abundance with 45.6% of the total larvae. Holothuroidea (sea cucumber and Asteroidea larvae (sea star accounted for less than 2% of the total echinoderm larval collection. Early larval stages (2-8 day old of Diadema antillarum represented 20% of the total Echinoidea larvae. There was no marked seasonal trend of echinoderm larval abundance; Echinoidea and Ophiuroidea larvae were present in all monthly samples indicating that reproduction occurs year-round. Peak abundances of later-stage Echinoidea larvae were observed during January, July and October and of later-stage Ophiuroidea larvae during June, August and October. The observed peaks of later-stage larval abundances may be indicative of higher recruitment activity during these months. There was a significant difference of echinoderm larval abundance between spatial stations, with higher abundances collected at the shelf-edge. Later-stage (~24 day old D. antillarum larvae were mostly collected at shelf-edge and oceanic locations. In addition, the 64mm mesh net was more efficient for collection of echinoderm larvae than the 202mm mesh net. Rev. Biol. Trop. 58 (Suppl. 3: 81-88. Epub 2010 October 01.Este estudio describe patrones de abundancia temporal y espacial de larvas de

  8. Spatio-temporal distribution patterns of the epibenthic community in the coastal waters of Suriname

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Tomas; De Backer, Annelies; Wan Tong You, Kenneth; Vincx, Magda; Hostens, Kris

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to characterize the spatio-temporal patterns of the epibenthic community in the coastal waters of Suriname. Data were collected on a (bi)monthly basis in 2012-2013 at 15 locations in the shallow (Ophioderma brevispina and Ophiolepis elegans) and a variety of crabs, sea stars and hermit crabs. In between both zones, a transition assemblage was noted, with epibenthic species typically found in either the coastal or offshore assemblages, but mainly characterized by the absence of X. kroyeri. Although the epibenthic community was primarily structured in an on-offshore gradient related to depth, sediment grain size and sediment total organic carbon content, a longitudinal (west-east) gradient was apparent as well. The zones in the eastern part of the Suriname coastal shelf seemed to be more widely stretched along the on-offshore gradient. Although clear seasonal differences were noted in the environmental characteristics (e.g. dry vs. rainy season), this was not reflected in the epibenthic community structure. X. kroyeri reached very high densities (up to 1383 ind 1000 m-²) in the shallow coastal waters of Suriname. As X. kroyeri is increasingly exploited throughout its range, the current study provides the ecological context for its presence and abundance, which is crucial for an ecosystem approach and the sustainable management of this commercially important species and its habitat.

  9. Deformation Along the Rio Grande Rift: Investigating the Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Strain Using GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, K. D.; Murray, M. H.; Sheehan, A. F.; Nerem, R. S.

    2014-12-01

    Low velocity (concentrated on the narrow surface expression of the rift. We expand on this previous work by using a denser network of GPS stations and analyzing longer time series, which reduce horizontal velocity uncertainties to approximately 0.15 mm/yr. We also improve the accuracy of the estimated velocity uncertainties by robustly characterizing time-correlated noise. The noise models indicate that both power-law and flicker noise are present in the time series along with white noise. On average, power law noise constitutes about 90% of the total noise in the vertical component and 60% in the horizontal components for the RGR sites. We use the time series, and velocity and strain-rate estimates to constrain spatial and temporal variations in the deformation field in order to locate possible regions of strain localization and detect transient deformation signals, and to address some of the kinematic and dynamic issues raised by the observation that a broad, low seismic velocity zone underlies the narrow geologic surface expression of the RGR defined by normal fault bounded basins.

  10. Spatial and temporal distribution of Pu in the Northwest Pacific Ocean using modern coral archives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Patric; Andersen, Morten B; Keith-Roach, Miranda; Worsfold, Paul; Hyeong, Kiseong; Choi, Min-Seok; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2012-04-01

    Historical (239)Pu activity concentrations and (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios were determined in skeletons of dated modern corals collected from three locations (Chuuk Lagoon, Ishigaki Island and Iki Island) to identify spatial and temporal variations in Pu inputs to the Northwest Pacific Ocean. The main Pu source in the Northwest Pacific is fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing which consists of global fallout and close-in fallout from the former US Pacific Proving Grounds (PPG) in the Marshall Islands. PPG close-in fallout dominated the Pu input in the 1950s, as was observed with higher (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios (>0.30) at the Ishigaki site. Specific fallout Pu contamination from the Nagasaki atomic bomb and the Ivy Mike thermonuclear detonation at the PPG were identified at Ishigaki Island from the (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios of 0.07 and 0.46, respectively. During the 1960s and 1970s, global fallout was the major Pu source to the Northwest Pacific with over 60% contribution to the total Pu. After the cessation of the atmospheric nuclear tests, the PPG again dominated the Pu input due to the continuous transport of remobilised Pu from the Marshall Islands along the North Equatorial Current and the subsequent Kuroshio Current. The Pu contributions from the PPG in recent coral bands (1984 onwards) varied over time with average estimated PPG contributions between 54% and 72% depending on location. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Hippocampal GABA transporter distribution in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schijns, Olaf; Karaca, Ümit; Andrade, Pablo; de Nijs, Laurence; Küsters, Benno; Peeters, Andrea; Dings, Jim; Pannek, Heinz; Ebner, Alois; Rijkers, Kim; Hoogland, Govert

    2015-10-01

    To determine hippocampal expression of neuronal GABA-transporter (GAT-1) and glial GABA-transporter (GAT-3) in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and hippocampal sclerosis (HS). Hippocampal sections were immunohistochemically stained for GABA-transporter 1 and GABA-transporter-3, followed by quantification of the immunoreactivity in the hilus by optical density measurements. GABA-transporter 3 positive hilar cells were counted and GABA-transporter protein expression in sections that included all hippocampal subfields was quantified by Western blot. The hilar GABA-transporter 1 expression of patients with severe hippocampal sclerosis was about 7% lower compared to that in the mild hippocampal sclerosis/control group (psclerosis group than in the mild hippocampal sclerosis/control group (non-significant). Also, severe hippocampal sclerosis samples contained 34% less (non-significant) GABA-transporter 3 positive cells compared to that of controls. Protein expression as assessed by Western blot showed that GABA-transporter 1 was equally expressed in mild and severe hippocampal sclerosis samples, whereas GABA-transporter 3 was reduced by about 62% in severe hippocampal sclerosis samples (psclerosis. Implications for the use of GABAergic antiepileptic therapies in hippocampal sclerosis vs non-hippocampal sclerosis patients remain to be studied. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Processes driving short-term temporal dynamics of small mammal distribution in human-disturbed environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martineau, Julie; Pothier, David; Fortin, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    As the impact of anthropogenic activities intensifies worldwide, an increasing proportion of landscape is converted to early successional stages every year. To understand and anticipate the global effects of the human footprint on wildlife, assessing short-term changes in animal populations in response to disturbance events is becoming increasingly important. We used isodar habitat selection theory to reveal the consequences of timber harvesting on the ecological processes that control the distribution dynamics of a small mammal, the red-backed vole (Myodes gapperi). The abundance of voles was estimated in pairs of cut and uncut forest stands, prior to logging and up to 2 years afterwards. A week after logging, voles did not display any preference between cut and uncut stands, and a non-significant isodar indicated that their distribution was not driven by density-dependent habitat selection. One month after harvesting, however, juvenile abundance increased in cut stands, whereas the highest proportions of reproductive females were observed in uncut stands. This distribution pattern appears to result from interference competition, with juveniles moving into cuts where there was weaker competition with adults. In fact, the emergence of source-sink dynamics between uncut and cut stands, driven by interference competition, could explain why the abundance of red-backed voles became lower in cut (the sink) than uncut (the source) stands 1-2 years after logging. Our study demonstrates that the influences of density-dependent habitat selection and interference competition in shaping animal distribution can vary frequently, and for several months, following anthropogenic disturbance.

  13. Coronary computed tomography angiography - Tolerability of β-blockers and contrast media, and temporal changes in radiation dose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Charlotte; Thomsen, Camilla F; Hosbond, Susanne Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To determine the risk of administration of β-blockers, contrast induced nephropathy (CIN) and trend in x-rays use, during coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). Methods: A total of 416 patients were referred for elective CCTA. To achieve a resting heart rate below 60.......0001. Conclusions: In terms of side effects to β-blockers and contrast media, there were no short term complications to CCTA. Furthermore the radiation dose was dramatically diminished over the last three years....

  14. Beyond word frequency: bursts, lulls, and scaling in the temporal distributions of words.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo G Altmann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Zipf's discovery that word frequency distributions obey a power law established parallels between biological and physical processes, and language, laying the groundwork for a complex systems perspective on human communication. More recent research has also identified scaling regularities in the dynamics underlying the successive occurrences of events, suggesting the possibility of similar findings for language as well. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By considering frequent words in USENET discussion groups and in disparate databases where the language has different levels of formality, here we show that the distributions of distances between successive occurrences of the same word display bursty deviations from a Poisson process and are well characterized by a stretched exponential (Weibull scaling. The extent of this deviation depends strongly on semantic type -- a measure of the logicality of each word -- and less strongly on frequency. We develop a generative model of this behavior that fully determines the dynamics of word usage. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Recurrence patterns of words are well described by a stretched exponential distribution of recurrence times, an empirical scaling that cannot be anticipated from Zipf's law. Because the use of words provides a uniquely precise and powerful lens on human thought and activity, our findings also have implications for other overt manifestations of collective human dynamics.

  15. Percentage depth dose distributions in inhomogeneous phantoms with lung and bone equivalent media for small fields of CyberKnife

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Chung Il; Yoon, Sei-Chul; Suh, Tae Suk; Hong, Seung-Woo; Min, Kyung Joo; Lee, Sang Deok; Chung, Su Mi; Jung, Jae-Yong

    2014-01-01

    The percentage depth dose distributions in inhomogeneous phantoms with lung and bone equivalent media are studied. For lung equivalent media a Balsa wood is used, and for a soft bone equivalent media a compound material with epoxy resin, hardener and calcium carbonate is used. Polystyrene slabs put together with these materials are used as an inhomogeneous phantom. Dose measurements are performed with Gafchromic EBT film by using photon beams from 6MV CyberKnife at the Seoul Uridul Hospital. The cone sizes of the photon beams are varied from 5, 10 to 30 mm. As a simulation tool GEANT4 Monte Carlo code v9.4.p02 is used. When the Balsa wood is inserted in the phantom, the dose measured with EBT film is found to be significantly different from the dose without the EBT film in and beyond the Balsa wood region, particularly for small field sizes. On the other hand, when the soft bone equivalent material is inserted in the phantom, discrepancy between the dose measured with EBT film and the dose without EBT film ca...

  16. Spatial distribution and temporal development of high-mountain lakes in western Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkl, Sarah; Emmer, Adam; Mergili, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Glacierized high-mountain environments are characterized by active morphodynamics, favouring the rapid appearance and disappearance of lakes. On the one hand, such lakes indicate high-mountain environmental changes such as the retreat of glaciers. On the other hand, they are sometimes susceptible to sudden drainage, leading to glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs) putting the downstream population at risk. Whilst high-mountain lakes have been intensively studied in the Himalayas, the Pamir, the Andes or the Western Alps, this is not the case for the Eastern Alps. A particular research gap, which is attacked with the present work, concerns the western part of Austria. We consider a study area of approx. 6,140 km², covering the central Alps over most of the province of Tyrol and part of the province of Salzburg. All lakes ≥250 m² located higher than 2000 m asl are mapped from high-resolution Google Earth imagery and orthophotos. The lakes are organized into seven classes: (i) ice-dammed; near-glacial (ii) moraine-dammed and (iii) bedrock-dammed; (iv) moraine-dammed and (v) bedrock-dammed distant to the recent glaciers; (vi) landslide-dammed; (vii) anthropogenic. The temporal development of selected lakes is investigated in detail, using aerial photographs dating back to the 1950s. 1045 lakes are identified in the study area. Only eight lakes are ice-dammed (i). One third of all lakes is located in the immediate vicinity of recent glacier tongues, half of them impounded by moraine (ii), half of them by bedrock (iii). Two thirds of all lakes are impounded by features (either moraines or bedrock) shaped by LIA or Pleistocenic glaciers at some distance to the present glacier tongues (iv and v). Only one landslide-dammed lake (vi) is identified in the study area, whilst 21 lakes are of anthropogenic origin (vii). 72% of all lakes are found at 2250-2750 m asl whilst less than 2% are found above 3000 m asl. The ratio of rock-dammed lakes increases with increasing

  17. Role of Diatoms in the Spatial-Temporal Distribution of Intracellular Nitrate in Intertidal Sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stief, Peter; Kamp, Anja; de Beer, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular nitrate storage allows microorganisms to survive fluctuating nutrient availability and anoxic conditions in aquatic ecosystems. Here we show that diatoms, ubiquitous and highly abundant microalgae, represent major cellular reservoirs of nitrate in an intertidal flat of the German Wadden Sea and are potentially involved in anaerobic nitrate respiration. Intracellular nitrate (ICNO3) was present year-round in the sediment and was spatially and temporally correlated with fucoxanthin, the marker photopigment of diatoms. Pyrosequencing of SSU rRNA genes of all domains of life confirmed that ICNO3 storage was most likely due to diatoms rather than other known nitrate-storing microorganisms (i.e., large sulfur bacteria and the eukaryotic foraminifers and gromiids). Sedimentary ICNO3 concentrations reached up to 22.3 µmol dm-3 at the sediment surface and decreased with sediment depth to negligible concentrations below 5 cm. Similarly, the ICNO3/fucoxanthin ratio and porewater nitrate (PWNO3) concentrations decreased with sediment depth, suggesting that ICNO3 of diatoms is in equilibrium with PWNO3, but is enriched relative to PWNO3 by 2-3 orders of magnitude. Cell-volume-specific ICNO3 concentrations in a diatom mat covering the sediment surface during spring were estimated at 9.3-46.7 mmol L-1. Retrieval of 18S rRNA gene sequences related to known nitrate-storing and nitrate-ammonifying diatom species suggested that diatoms in dark and anoxic sediment layers might be involved in anaerobic nitrate respiration. Due to the widespread dominance of diatoms in microphytobenthos, the total nitrate pool in coastal marine sediments may generally be at least two times larger than derived from porewater measurements and partially be recycled to ammonium. PMID:24023845

  18. [Temporal variation and geographical distribution: congenital heart defects in the Comunitat Valenciana].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavero Carbonell, C; Zurriaga, O; Pérez Panadés, J; Barona Vilar, C; Martos Jiménez, C

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study is to estimate the prevalence of congenital heart defects (CHD) in the Comunitat Valenciana (CV) in children less than one year old and identify whether there are temporal and geographic variations within this prevalence. The minimum basic data set from hospital discharge reports was used to select patients, who were born between 1999-2008, were less than one year old, and who lived in the CV with at least one hospital admission in which the primary diagnosis and/or any of the events were coded as CHD (codes 745-747 of the International Classification of Diseases 9th Revision Clinical Modification). The first hospital discharge report with CHD was selected, using the health card number to detect duplication. The prevalence and 95% confidence intervals were calculated, and the prevalence ratio (PR) and smoothed PR was obtained for each municipality to identify geographic patterns. In the period 1999-2008 there were 6.377 patients younger than one year with some CHD, representing the 43.2% of cases of congenital anomalies. The prevalence was 134.3 per 10.000 live births (95% CI: 131.1-137.6). There was a significant increase in the prevalence, from 115.8 in the 1999-2003 period to 149.5 in the 2004-2008 period. A higher risk was identified in the north of the CV, and in some municipalities of the province of Alicante, in the south. The observed increase in CHD agrees with the findings in other countries and it can be explained, at least in part, by improved diagnostic techniques. The geographic pattern identified requires a more detailed analysis that could explain the geographic variations found. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Within-Crop Air Temperature and Humidity Outcomes on Spatio-Temporal Distribution of the Key Rose Pest Frankliniella occidentalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicham Fatnassi

    Full Text Available Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande is a key pest of various crops worldwide. In this study, we analyse the dependence of the infestation of this pest on spatially distributed micro climatic factors in a rose greenhouse. Despite the importance of this subject, the few existing studies have been realized in laboratory rather than in greenhouse conditions. However, recent progress on greenhouse microclimate characterisation has highlighted the strong indoor climate heterogeneity that may influence the within-crop pest distribution. In this study, both microclimate (air temperature and humidity and thrips distribution were simultaneously mapped in a rose greenhouse. The measurements were sensed in a horizontal plane situated at mid-height of the rose crop inside the greenhouse. Simultaneously, thrips population dynamics were assessed after an artificial and homogeneous infestation of the rose crop. The spatio-temporal distribution of climate and thrips within the greenhouse were compared, and links between thrips infestation and climatic conditions were investigated. A statistical model was used to define the favourable climate conditions for thrips adults and larvae. Our results showed that (i the air temperature and air humidity were very heterogeneously distributed within the crop, (ii pest populations aggregated in the most favourable climatic areas and (iii the highest population density of thrips adults and larvae were recorded at 27°C and 22°C for temperature and 63% and 86% for humidity, respectively. These findings confirm, in real rose cropping conditions, previous laboratory studies on the F. occidentalis climatic optimum and provide a solid scientific support for climatic-based control methods against this pest.

  20. Within-Crop Air Temperature and Humidity Outcomes on Spatio-Temporal Distribution of the Key Rose Pest Frankliniella occidentalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatnassi, Hicham; Pizzol, Jeannine; Senoussi, Rachid; Biondi, Antonio; Desneux, Nicolas; Poncet, Christine; Boulard, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) is a key pest of various crops worldwide. In this study, we analyse the dependence of the infestation of this pest on spatially distributed micro climatic factors in a rose greenhouse. Despite the importance of this subject, the few existing studies have been realized in laboratory rather than in greenhouse conditions. However, recent progress on greenhouse microclimate characterisation has highlighted the strong indoor climate heterogeneity that may influence the within-crop pest distribution. In this study, both microclimate (air temperature and humidity) and thrips distribution were simultaneously mapped in a rose greenhouse. The measurements were sensed in a horizontal plane situated at mid-height of the rose crop inside the greenhouse. Simultaneously, thrips population dynamics were assessed after an artificial and homogeneous infestation of the rose crop. The spatio-temporal distribution of climate and thrips within the greenhouse were compared, and links between thrips infestation and climatic conditions were investigated. A statistical model was used to define the favourable climate conditions for thrips adults and larvae. Our results showed that (i) the air temperature and air humidity were very heterogeneously distributed within the crop, (ii) pest populations aggregated in the most favourable climatic areas and (iii) the highest population density of thrips adults and larvae were recorded at 27°C and 22°C for temperature and 63% and 86% for humidity, respectively. These findings confirm, in real rose cropping conditions, previous laboratory studies on the F. occidentalis climatic optimum and provide a solid scientific support for climatic-based control methods against this pest.

  1. Validation of temporal and spatial consistency of facility- and speed-specific vehicle-specific power distributions for emission estimation: A case study in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Zhiqiang; Song, Guohua; Lu, Hongyu; He, Weinan; Yu, Lei

    2017-09-01

    Vehicle-specific power (VSP) has been found to be highly correlated with vehicle emissions. It is used in many studies on emission modeling such as the MOVES (Motor Vehicle Emissions Simulator) model. The existing studies develop specific VSP distributions (or OpMode distribution in MOVES) for different road types and various average speeds to represent the vehicle operating modes on road. However, it is still not clear if the facility- and speed-specific VSP distributions are consistent temporally and spatially. For instance, is it necessary to update periodically the database of the VSP distributions in the emission model? Are the VSP distributions developed in the city central business district (CBD) area applicable to its suburb area? In this context, this study examined the temporal and spatial consistency of the facility- and speed-specific VSP distributions in Beijing. The VSP distributions in different years and in different areas are developed, based on real-world vehicle activity data. The root mean square error (RMSE) is employed to quantify the difference between the VSP distributions. The maximum differences of the VSP distributions between different years and between different areas are approximately 20% of that between different road types. The analysis of the carbon dioxide (CO2) emission factor indicates that the temporal and spatial differences of the VSP distributions have no significant impact on vehicle emission estimation, with relative error of less than 3%. The temporal and spatial differences have no significant impact on the development of the facility- and speed-specific VSP distributions for the vehicle emission estimation. The database of the specific VSP distributions in the VSP-based emission models can maintain in terms of time. Thus, it is unnecessary to update the database regularly, and it is reliable to use the history vehicle activity data to forecast the emissions in the future. In one city, the areas with less data can still

  2. Visualizing and quantifying dose distribution in a UV reactor using three-dimensional laser-induced fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Varun N; Roberts, Philip J W; Kim, Jae-Hong

    2012-12-18

    Evaluating the performance of typical water treatment UV reactors is challenging due to the complexity in assessing spatial and temporal variation of UV fluence, resulting from highly unsteady, turbulent nature of flow and variation in UV intensity. In this study, three-dimensional laser-induced fluorescence (3DLIF) was applied to visualize and quantitatively analyze a lab-scale UV reactor consisting of one lamp sleeve placed perpendicular to flow. Mapping the spatial and temporal fluence delivery and MS2 inactivation revealed the highest local fluence in the wake zone due to longer residence time and higher UV exposure, while the lowest local fluence occurred in a region near the walls due to short-circuiting flow and lower UV fluence rate. Comparing the tracer based decomposition between hydrodynamics and IT revealed similar coherent structures showing the dependency of fluence delivery on the reactor flow. The location of tracer injection, varying the height and upstream distance from the lamp center, was found to significantly affect the UV fluence received by the tracer. A Lagrangian-based analysis was also employed to predict the fluence along specific paths of travel, which agreed with the experiments. The 3DLIF technique developed in this study provides new insight on dose delivery that fluctuates both spatially and temporally and is expected to aid design and optimization of UV reactors as well as validate computational fluid dynamics models that are widely used to simulate UV reactor performances.

  3. Spatial and temporal distribution of the neutral polymorphisms in the last ZFX intron: analysis of the haplotype structure and genealogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaruzelska, J; Zietkiewicz, E; Batzer, M; Cole, D E; Moisan, J P; Scozzari, R; Tavaré, S; Labuda, D

    1999-07-01

    With 10 segregating sites (simple nucleotide polymorphisms) in the last intron (1089 bp) of the ZFX gene we have observed 11 haplotypes in 336 chromosomes representing a worldwide array of 15 human populations. Two haplotypes representing 77% of all chromosomes were distributed almost evenly among four continents. Five of the remaining haplotypes were detected in Africa and 4 others were restricted to Eurasia and the Americas. Using the information about the ancestral state of the segregating positions (inferred from human-great ape comparisons), we applied coalescent analysis to estimate the age of the polymorphisms and the resulting haplotypes. The oldest haplotype, with the ancestral alleles at all the sites, was observed at low frequency only in two groups of African origin. Its estimated age of 740 to 1100 kyr corresponded to the time to the most recent common ancestor. The two most frequent worldwide distributed haplotypes were estimated at 550 to 840 and 260 to 400 kyr, respectively, while the age of the continentally restricted polymorphisms was 120 to 180 kyr and smaller. Comparison of spatial and temporal distribution of the ZFX haplotypes suggests that modern humans diverged from the common ancestral stock in the Middle Paleolithic era. Subsequent range expansion prevented substantial gene flow among continents, separating African groups from populations that colonized Eurasia and the New World.

  4. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in bivalves from the San Francisco estuary: Spatial distributions, temporal trends, and sources (1993-2001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oros, D.R.; Ross, J.R.M. [San Francisco Estuary Institute, Oakland, CA (US)

    2005-10-01

    Bivalve tissue samples were examined over a range of spatial and temporal scales (1993-2001) to determine PAH distributions, trends, and possible sources. Mussels (Mytilus californianus), oysters (Crassostrea gigas), and clams (Corbicula fluminea) were deployed for three months in the estuary at stations remote from known point source discharges. The range of {Sigma} PAH detected in bivalves was oysters 184-6899 mu g/kg dry wt (mean 678 {mu}g/kg dry wt), mussels 21-1093 {mu}g/kg dry wt (mean 175 {mu}g/kg dry wt), and clams 78-720 {mu}g/kg dry wt (mean 323 {mu}g/kg dry wt). Linear regression analysis showed no statistically significant (P {gt} 0.05) temporal trends in clam and mussel {Sigma}PAH at any of the deployment stations or estuary segments. On the other hand, a statistically significant (p {lt} 0.05) decreasing trend was found in {Sigma}PAH in oysters at the Petaluma River station, and in the North Estuary segment. PAH isomer pair ratios applied as diagnostic indicators suggested that the bioaccumulated PAH were derived primarily from petroleum combustion, with lesser amounts derived from biomass and coal combustion, and unburned petroleum.

  5. Spatial and Temporal Analysis on the Distribution of Active Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID Tracking Accuracy with the Kriging Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Liu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Radio frequency identification (RFID technology has already been applied in a number of areas to facilitate the tracking process. However, the insufficient tracking accuracy of RFID is one of the problems that impedes its wider application. Previous studies focus on examining the accuracy of discrete points RFID, thereby leaving the tracking accuracy of the areas between the observed points unpredictable. In this study, spatial and temporal analysis is applied to interpolate the continuous distribution of RFID tracking accuracy based on the Kriging method. An implementation trial has been conducted in the loading and docking area in front of a warehouse to validate this approach. The results show that the weak signal area can be easily identified by the approach developed in the study. The optimum distance between two RFID readers and the effect of the sudden removal of readers are also presented by analysing the spatial and temporal variation of RFID tracking accuracy. This study reveals the correlation between the testing time and the stability of RFID tracking accuracy. Experimental results show that the proposed approach can be used to assist the RFID system setup process to increase tracking accuracy.

  6. Epidemiological features and risk factors associated with the spatial and temporal distribution of human brucellosis in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Human brucellosis incidence in China has been increasing dramatically since 1999. However, epidemiological features and potential factors underlying the re-emergence of the disease remain less understood. Methods Data on human and animal brucellosis cases at the county scale were collected for the year 2004 to 2010. Also collected were environmental and socioeconomic variables. Epidemiological features including spatial and temporal patterns of the disease were characterized, and the potential factors related to the spatial heterogeneity and the temporal trend of were analysed using Poisson regression analysis, Granger causality analysis, and autoregressive distributed lag (ADL) models, respectively. Results The epidemic showed a significantly higher spatial correlation with the number of sheep and goats than swine and cattle. The disease was most prevalent in grassland areas with elevation between 800–1,600 meters. The ADL models revealed that local epidemics were correlated with comparatively lower temperatures and less sunshine in winter and spring, with a 1–7 month lag before the epidemic peak in May. Conclusions Our findings indicate that human brucellosis tended to occur most commonly in grasslands at moderate elevation where sheep and goats were the predominant livestock, and in years with cooler winter and spring or less sunshine. PMID:24238301

  7. Spatio-temporal Distribution of Epileptiform Potentials in the Hippocampal Slice: Recordings with Voltage-sensitive Dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albowitz, Birgit; Kuhnt, Ulrich

    1991-06-01

    Voltage-sensitive dyes and fast optical recording techniques were used to monitor the spatio-temporal activity pattern of epileptiform potentials in hippocampal slices from guinea pigs. Epileptiform potentials were induced by adding 4-aminopyridine to the bath solution and applying single pulse stimulation either to the stratum pyramidale of area CA3 or to the stratum radiatum of area CA1. Optical activity as well as intra- or extracellular electrical activity were recorded from area CA1. There was a good correlation between optical and intracellular records from the same site. The spatio-temporal activity pattern of control and epileptiform potentials elicited by stimulation of CA1 was similar for the initial part of the potential. Then, epileptiform changes became apparent throughout the vertical extent of pyramidal neurons. Qualitative changes occurred in the stratum moleculare, reflecting activity of apical dendrites, such changes occurred even more strongly in the stratum oriens, reflecting activity of basal dendrites. The activity in the stratum oriens occurred relatively late, so that it cannot account for the initiation of epileptic discharges. It might, however, play an important role in the synchronization and spread of epileptiform potentials. The investigation of the horizontal distribution of potentials throughout the entire area CA1 indicates that different mechanisms are involved in the spread of epileptiform activity elicited by stimulation of CA1 and stimulation of CA3.

  8. Accidental hazardous material releases with human impacts in the United States: exploration of geographical distribution and temporal trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengul, Hatice; Santella, Nicholas; Steinberg, Laura J; Chermak, Christina

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the circumstances and geographic and temporal distributions of hazardous material releases and resulting human impacts in the United States. Releases with fatalities, injuries, and evacuations were identified from reports to the National Response Center between 1990 and 2008, correcting for data quality issues identified in previous studies. From more than 550,000 reports, 861 deaths, 16,348 injuries and 741,427 evacuations were identified. Injuries from releases of chemicals at fixed facilities and natural gas from pipelines have decreased whereas evacuations from petroleum releases at fixed facilities have increased. Results confirm recent advances in chemical and pipeline safety and suggest directions for further improvement including targeted training and inspections and adoption of inherently safer design principles.

  9. Organohalogen contaminants in striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) from Japan: present contamination status, body distribution and temporal trends (1978-2003).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Tomohiko; Ochi, Yoko; Ramu, Karri; Yamamoto, Takahito; Tajima, Yuko; Yamada, Tadasu K; Amano, Masao; Miyazaki, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Shin; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2009-08-01

    Organohalogen contaminants including PCBs, DDTs, CHLs, HCHs, HCB, PBDEs and HBCDs were determined in striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) found stranded at Gogo-shima (n=6, 2003) and collected from Taiji (n=15, 1978-1992) in Japan. All target compounds were significantly detected in all the specimens, indicating ubiquitous contamination of oceanic cetaceans in northwest Pacific Ocean. Examination of body distribution of organohalogens in the six specimens from Gogo-shima showed no significant difference in concentrations among the analyzed tissues, except for brain, which had lower levels possibly due to the existence of blood-brain barrier. For evaluating temporal trends, archived blubber samples of adult male stripped dolphins collected in 1978, 1979, 1986 and 1992 were analyzed. Concentrations of PCBs, DDTs and HCHs did not change significantly during 1978-2003. In contrast, remarkable increasing trends of PBDEs and HBCDs were observed, suggesting growing consumption in Japan and surrounding countries in recent years.

  10. Temporal changes in the geographic distribution, elevation, and potential origin of the Martian outflow channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribe, S.; Clifford, S. M.

    1993-01-01

    Observational evidence of outflow channel activity on Mars suggests that water was abundant in the planet's early crust. However, with the decline in the planet's internal heat flow, a freezing front developed within the regolith that propagated downward with time and acted as a thermodynamic sink for crustal H2O. One result of this thermal evolution is that, if the initial inventory of water on Mars was small, the cryosphere may have grown to the point where all the available water was taken up as ground ice. Alternatively, if the inventory of H2O exceeds the current pore volume of the cryosphere, then Mars has always possessed extensive bodies of subpermafrost groundwater. We have investigated the relative age, geographic distribution, elevation, and geologic setting of the outflow channels in an effort to accomplish the following: (1) identify possible modes of origin and evolutionary trends in their formation; (2) gain evidence regarding the duration and spatial distribution of groundwater in the crust; and (3) better constraint estimates of the planetary inventory of H2O.

  11. California dragonfly and damselfly (Odonata) database: temporal and spatial distribution of species records collected over the past century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball-Damerow, Joan E.; Oboyski, Peter T.; Resh, Vincent H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The recently completed Odonata database for California consists of specimen records from the major entomology collections of the state, large Odonata collections outside of the state, previous literature, historical and recent field surveys, and from enthusiast group observations. The database includes 32,025 total records and 19,000 unique records for 106 species of dragonflies and damselflies, with records spanning 1879–2013. Records have been geographically referenced using the point-radius method to assign coordinates and an uncertainty radius to specimen locations. In addition to describing techniques used in data acquisition, georeferencing, and quality control, we present assessments of the temporal, spatial, and taxonomic distribution of records. We use this information to identify biases in the data, and to determine changes in species prevalence, latitudinal ranges, and elevation ranges when comparing records before 1976 and after 1979. The average latitude of where records occurred increased by 78 km over these time periods. While average elevation did not change significantly, the average minimum elevation across species declined by 108 m. Odonata distribution may be generally shifting northwards as temperature warms and to lower minimum elevations in response to increased summer water availability in low-elevation agricultural regions. The unexpected decline in elevation may also be partially the result of bias in recent collections towards centers of human population, which tend to occur at lower elevations. This study emphasizes the need to address temporal, spatial, and taxonomic biases in museum and observational records in order to produce reliable conclusions from such data. PMID:25709531

  12. Spatial and temporal distributions and some biological aspects of commercially important fish species of Lake Tana, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dereje Tewabe Kokebe

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To know spatial, temporal distributions and some biological aspects of commercially important fish species of Lake Tana. Methods: Distribution of fish species in Lake Tana was studied from November 2009 to October 2012 based on samples collected every other month using gillnets of 60, 80, 100, 120 and 140 mm stretched mesh sizes. Labeobarbus species, Clarias gariepinus, Oreochromis niloticus, and Varicorhinus beso are commercially important fish species and form 68%, 18%, 14% and 0.5% of the pooled experimental fish catch. There was significant variability among years and sampling sites of both temporal and spatial aspects; Mann-Whitney U tests were used for pair wise comparisons of sites and years. Results: The composition of Labeobarbus spp. and Varicorhinus beso shows significant decline. On the other hand, the composition of Oreochromis niloticus did not change, but Clarias gariepinus increased by 100% by catch composition. The most likely explanations for the total decline in abundance of fish species are the increase of the illegal commercial gillnet fishery targeting their spawning aggregations in the wetlands and river mouths, and the increasing trend of the degradation of spawning and nursery habitats both in the lake and major tributary rivers of the catchment area. Conclusions: There should be a need for urgent development of a management plan focusing on ensuring sustainable utilization of a resource by fishing effort, gear mesh size and gear type restrictions, and controlling the spawning grounds from different types of human encroachment and designing closing seasons and spawning grounds during the breeding seasons of different fish species of Lake Tana.

  13. Stratum Electricity Markets: Toward Multi-temporal Distributed Risk Management for Sustainable Electricity Provision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhiyong (Richard)

    values for the same amount of energy during different time and at different location can vary dramatically. Moreover, for the same hour, the values for the same amount of power at base load level or at peak load level are different due to the different generation technologies and other non-convex constraints like unit commitment. The multiple market products at zonal/nodal levels with different time horizon and time of use categories are designed to reflect more realistic demand and supply conditions at various temporal and spatial granularities. Detailed market rules, rights and regulations (3Rs) concerning the sub-markets interactions, product hierarchy and financial settlements are also examined.

  14. Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Particulate Organic Carbon in the Winisk River, Northern Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasauer, S.; Smith, P.; Smith, R. W.

    2016-12-01

    The Winisk River begins in the Precambrian rock of the Canadian Shield in Ontario and traverses the Hudson Bay Lowlands before terminating in Hudson Bay. It drains an area of 67,300 km2that is sparsely populated, with remote communities that depend on natural resources. Accelerated decomposition of organic carbon (OC) in the area due to climate change is supported by higher inputs of particulate and dissolved OC to surface waters (Amon et al, 2012). The Winisk River is a particularly important source of OC to Hudson Bay, shown by high rates of lignin accumulation near the mouth of the river (Kuzyk et al., 2008). Webequie First Nation (WFN) is a small community located on Eastwood Island in Winisk Lake. It is the closest community to the proposed massive development of the "Ring of Fire" chromite and other mineral deposits in the James Bay Lowlands. Mine-related developments can be expected to impact water flows, water chemistry, and carbon cycling in the region. We sampled water and sediment at the major inlets to the lake and at the northern outlet within the territorial boundaries to characterize water chemistry, relate lignin compositional patterns to C and N isotopic signatures, and interpret temporal patterns in advance of development and future climate change. Organic C in the sediments ranged from around 1% to around 30%. Samples were analyzed for lignin compounds using a CuO digestion method coupled to GC-MS to identify lignin-phenol monomers, benzoic acids, and p-hydroxy acid. Ratios of 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, P-hydroxy phenols and cinnamyl phenols to total vanillyl phenols indicate that gymnosperm wood and sphagnum peat dominate the OC pool, although the proportions of gymnosperm- and sphagnum-derived material vary between sites. Stable isotope analysis (δ13C, δ15N) suggests that other inputs of OC may be present that are consistent with OM derived from the erosion of older marine sediments. The results support that the proportion of sphagnum mosses

  15. Whole-tree distribution and temporal variation of non-structural carbohydrates in broadleaf evergreen trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Merryn G; Miller, Rebecca E; Arndt, Stefan K; Kasel, Sabine; Bennett, Lauren T

    2017-11-03

    Non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs) form a fundamental yet poorly quantified carbon pool in trees. Studies of NSC seasonality in forest trees have seldom measured whole-tree NSC stocks and allocation among organs, and are not representative of all tree functional types. Non-structural carbohydrate research has primarily focussed on broadleaf deciduous and coniferous evergreen trees with distinct growing seasons, while broadleaf evergreen trees remain under-studied despite their different growth phenology. We measured whole-tree NSC allocation and temporal variation in Eucalyptus obliqua L'Hér., a broadleaf evergreen tree species typically occurring in mixed-age temperate forests, which has year-round growth and the capacity to resprout after fire. Our overarching objective was to improve the empirical basis for understanding the functional importance of NSC allocation and stock changes at the tree- and organ-level in this tree functional type. Starch was the principal storage carbohydrate and was primarily stored in the stem and roots of young (14-year-old) trees rather than the lignotuber, which did not appear to be a specialized starch storage organ. Whole-tree NSC stocks were depleted during spring and summer due to significant decreases in starch mass in the roots and stem, seemingly to support root and crown growth but potentially exacerbated by water stress in summer. Seasonality of stem NSCs differed between young and mature trees, and was not synchronized with stem basal area increments in mature trees. Our results suggest that the relative magnitude of seasonal NSC stock changes could vary with tree growth stage, and that the main drivers of NSC fluctuations in broadleaf evergreen trees in temperate biomes could be periodic disturbances such as summer drought and fire, rather than growth phenology. These results have implications for understanding post-fire tree recovery via resprouting, and for incorporating NSC pools into carbon models of mixed

  16. Temporal variations in the abundance and composition of biofilm communities colonizing drinking water distribution pipes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J Kelly

    Full Text Available Pipes that transport drinking water through municipal drinking water distribution systems (DWDS are challenging habitats for microorganisms. Distribution networks are dark, oligotrophic and contain disinfectants; yet microbes frequently form biofilms attached to interior surfaces of DWDS pipes. Relatively little is known about the species composition and ecology of these biofilms due to challenges associated with sample acquisition from actual DWDS. We report the analysis of biofilms from five pipe samples collected from the same region of a DWDS in Florida, USA, over an 18 month period between February 2011 and August 2012. The bacterial abundance and composition of biofilm communities within the pipes were analyzed by heterotrophic plate counts and tag pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, respectively. Bacterial numbers varied significantly based on sampling date and were positively correlated with water temperature and the concentration of nitrate. However, there was no significant relationship between the concentration of disinfectant in the drinking water (monochloramine and the abundance of bacteria within the biofilms. Pyrosequencing analysis identified a total of 677 operational taxonomic units (OTUs (3% distance within the biofilms but indicated that community diversity was low and varied between sampling dates. Biofilms were dominated by a few taxa, specifically Methylomonas, Acinetobacter, Mycobacterium, and Xanthomonadaceae, and the dominant taxa within the biofilms varied dramatically between sampling times. The drinking water characteristics most strongly correlated with bacterial community composition were concentrations of nitrate, ammonium, total chlorine and monochloramine, as well as alkalinity and hardness. Biofilms from the sampling date with the highest nitrate concentration were the most abundant and diverse and were dominated by Acinetobacter.

  17. Temporal variations in the abundance and composition of biofilm communities colonizing drinking water distribution pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, John J; Minalt, Nicole; Culotti, Alessandro; Pryor, Marsha; Packman, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Pipes that transport drinking water through municipal drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) are challenging habitats for microorganisms. Distribution networks are dark, oligotrophic and contain disinfectants; yet microbes frequently form biofilms attached to interior surfaces of DWDS pipes. Relatively little is known about the species composition and ecology of these biofilms due to challenges associated with sample acquisition from actual DWDS. We report the analysis of biofilms from five pipe samples collected from the same region of a DWDS in Florida, USA, over an 18 month period between February 2011 and August 2012. The bacterial abundance and composition of biofilm communities within the pipes were analyzed by heterotrophic plate counts and tag pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, respectively. Bacterial numbers varied significantly based on sampling date and were positively correlated with water temperature and the concentration of nitrate. However, there was no significant relationship between the concentration of disinfectant in the drinking water (monochloramine) and the abundance of bacteria within the biofilms. Pyrosequencing analysis identified a total of 677 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) (3% distance) within the biofilms but indicated that community diversity was low and varied between sampling dates. Biofilms were dominated by a few taxa, specifically Methylomonas, Acinetobacter, Mycobacterium, and Xanthomonadaceae, and the dominant taxa within the biofilms varied dramatically between sampling times. The drinking water characteristics most strongly correlated with bacterial community composition were concentrations of nitrate, ammonium, total chlorine and monochloramine, as well as alkalinity and hardness. Biofilms from the sampling date with the highest nitrate concentration were the most abundant and diverse and were dominated by Acinetobacter.

  18. Worldwide distribution of non–native Amazon parrots and temporal trends of their global trade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mori, E.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Alien species are the second leading cause of the global biodiversity crisis, after habitat loss and fragmentation. Popular pet species, such as parrots and parakeets (Aves, Psittaciformes, are often introduced outside their native range as a result of the pet trade. On escape from captivity, some such species, such as the ring–necked parakeet and the monk parakeet, are highly invasive and successfully compete with native species. Populations of Amazon parrots (Amazona spp. can be found throughout the world, but data on their status, distribution and impact are incomplete. We gathered and reviewed the available information concerning global trade, distribution, abundance and ecology of Amazon parrots outside their native range. Our review shows that at least nine species of Amazon parrots have established populations outside their original range of occurrence throughout the world (in Europe, South Africa, the Caribbean islands, Hawaii, and North and South America. Their elusive behaviour and small population size suggest that the number of alien nuclei could be underestimated or at undetected. Despite international trade bans, the large trade of wild–caught Amazon parrots in past decades appears to have contributed to the establishment of alien populations worldwide. Establishment success seems to differ geographically. While European populations are still small and growing slowly, USA populations are large and expanding geographically. This difference is not related to large propagule pressure (trade but possibly to a better niche match between native and introduced ranges. Amazona aestiva is the most frequently encountered Amazona parrot, with at least eight alien populations reported to date. All these populations, with the exception of those in the USA where the climate is more suitable for their establishment, are composed of a low number of individuals even though they have been established for a long period of time. Further research

  19. SU-F-T-323: A Post-Mastectomy Radiation Therapy Dose Distribution Study Using Nanodots and Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, X; Vaidya, K; Puckett, L; Souri, S; Chen, Y; Cao, Y; Jamshidi, A; Lee, L; Klein, E; Diaz, F [Long Island Jewish Medical Center, Lake Success, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In post-mastectomy radiation therapy (RT), skin dose must be accurately estimated to assess skin reactions such as erythema, desquamation and necrosis. Planning systems cannot always provide accurate dosimetry for target volumes distal to skin. Therefore, in-vivo dosimetry is necessary. A female anthropomorphic phantom was used with optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (nanoDots) to measure dose to chest wall skin. In addition, EBT2 films was employed to measure dose to left lung and heart in post-mastectomy RT. Methods: Films and nanoDots were calibrated under full buildup conditions at 100cm SAD for 6MV photons. Five pieces of films were placed between slabs of Rando phantom to assess dose to left lung and heart. Two layers of 0.5cm thick bolus were used to cover the whole left chest. Six pairs of nanoDots were placed at medical and lateral aspects on the bolus surface, between the 0.5cm bolus layers, and under the bolus. Three control nanoDots were placed on chest wall to quantify imaging dose. The phantom was CT scanned with all dosimeters in place, and treatment planning was performed with tangential fields (200cGy). All dosimeters were contoured on CT and dose was extracted. NanoDots were read using nanoDot reader and films were scanned using film scanner. The measured and calculated doses were tabulated. Results: Dose to 12 nanoDots were evaluated. Dose variance for surface nanoDots were +3.8%, +2.7%, −5% and −9.8%. Those at lateral positions, with greater beam obliquity had larger variance than the medial positions. A similar trend was observed for other nanoDots (Table1). Point doses from films for heart and the left lung were 112.7cGy and 108.7cGy, with +10.2% and +9.04% deviation from calculated values, respectively. Conclusion: Dosimetry provided by the advanced planning system was verified using NanoDots and films. Both nanoDots and films provided good estimation of dose distribution in post-mastectomy RT.

  20. Contrast-enhanced radiotherapy: feasibility and characteristics of the physical absorbed dose distribution for deep-seated tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnica-Garza, H M [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional Unidad Monterrey, Via del Conocimiento 201 Parque de Investigacion e Innovacion Tecnologica, Apodaca NL C.P. 66600 (Mexico)], E-mail: hgarnica@cinvestav.mx

    2009-09-21

    Radiotherapy using kilovoltage x-rays in conjunction with contrast agents incorporated into the tumor, gold nanoparticles in particular, could represent a potential alternative to current techniques based on high-energy linear accelerators. In this paper, using the voxelized Zubal phantom in conjunction with the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE to model a prostate cancer treatment, it is shown that in combination with a 360 deg. arc delivery technique, tumoricidal doses of radiation can be delivered to deep-seated tumors while still providing acceptable doses to the skin and other organs at risk for gold concentrations in the tumor within the range of 7-10 mg-Au per gram of tissue. Under these conditions and using a x-ray beam with 90% of the fluence within the range of 80-200 keV, a 72 Gy physical absorbed dose to the prostate can be delivered, while keeping the rectal wall, bladder, skin and femoral heads below 65 Gy, 55 Gy, 40 Gy and 30 Gy, respectively. However, it is also shown that non-uniformities in the contrast agent concentration lead to a severe degradation of the dose distribution and that, therefore, techniques to locally quantify the presence of the contrast agent would be necessary in order to determine the incident x-ray fluence that best reproduces the dosimetry obtained under conditions of uniform contrast agent distribution.

  1. Contrast-enhanced radiotherapy: feasibility and characteristics of the physical absorbed dose distribution for deep-seated tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnica-Garza, H. M.

    2009-09-01

    Radiotherapy using kilovoltage x-rays in conjunction with contrast agents incorporated into the tumor, gold nanoparticles in particular, could represent a potential alternative to current techniques based on high-energy linear accelerators. In this paper, using the voxelized Zubal phantom in conjunction with the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE to model a prostate cancer treatment, it is shown that in combination with a 360° arc delivery technique, tumoricidal doses of radiation can be delivered to deep-seated tumors while still providing acceptable doses to the skin and other organs at risk for gold concentrations in the tumor within the range of 7-10 mg-Au per gram of tissue. Under these conditions and using a x-ray beam with 90% of the fluence within the range of 80-200 keV, a 72 Gy physical absorbed dose to the prostate can be delivered, while keeping the rectal wall, bladder, skin and femoral heads below 65 Gy, 55 Gy, 40 Gy and 30 Gy, respectively. However, it is also shown that non-uniformities in the contrast agent concentration lead to a severe degradation of the dose distribution and that, therefore, techniques to locally quantify the presence of the contrast agent would be necessary in order to determine the incident x-ray fluence that best reproduces the dosimetry obtained under conditions of uniform contrast agent distribution.

  2. Spatio-Temporal Distribution of Dengue and Lymphatic Filariasis Vectors along an Altitudinal Transect in Central Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhimal, Meghnath; Gautam, Ishan; Kreß, Aljoscha; Müller, Ruth; Kuch, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Background Rapidly increasing temperatures in the mountain region of Nepal and recent reports of dengue fever and lymphatic filariasis cases from mountainous areas of central Nepal prompted us to study the spatio-temporal distribution of the vectors of these two diseases along an altitudinal transect in central Nepal. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a longitudinal study in four distinct physiographical regions of central Nepal from September 2011 to February 2012. We used BG-Sentinel and CDC light traps to capture adult mosquitoes. We found the geographical distribution of the dengue virus vectors Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus along our study transect to extend up to 1,310 m altitude in the Middle Mountain region (Kathmandu). The distribution of the lymphatic filariasis vector Culex quinquefasciatus extended up to at least 2,100 m in the High Mountain region (Dhunche). Statistical analysis showed a significant effect of the physiographical region and month of collection on the abundance of A. aegypti and C. quinquefasciatus only. BG-Sentinel traps captured significantly higher numbers of A. aegypti than CDC light traps. The meteorological factors temperature, rainfall and relative humidity had significant effects on the mean number of A. aegypti per BG-Sentinel trap. Temperature and relative humidity were significant predictors of the number of C. quinquefasciatus per CDC light trap. Dengue fever and lymphatic filariasis cases had previously been reported from all vector positive areas except Dhunche which was free of known lymphatic filariasis cases. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that dengue virus vectors have already established stable populations up to the Middle Mountains of Nepal, supporting previous studies, and report for the first time the distribution of lymphatic filariasis vectors up to the High Mountain region of this country. The findings of our study should contribute to a better planning and scaling-up of mosquito

  3. Distribution of colour-selective activity in the monkey inferior temporal cortex revealed by functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Takuya; Goda, Naokazu; Ogawa, Tadashi; Ito, Minami; Toyoda, Hiroshi; Sadato, Norihiro; Komatsu, Hidehiko

    2009-11-01

    Previous electrophysiological, neuroimaging and lesion studies have suggested that the anterior part of the monkey inferior temporal (IT) cortex, or area TE, plays an important role in colour processing. However, little is known about how colour information is distributed in these cortical regions. Here, we explored the distribution of colour-selective activity in alert macaque monkeys using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with two types of stimuli: a multicoloured ('Mondrian') pattern and an isoluminant colour grating. These two types of stimuli are both commonly used in human fMRI studies, but Mondrian stimuli, which contain a richer variety of hues and hence might be more suitable for activating higher-order areas than grating stimuli, have not been used to examine colour-selectivity in higher-order areas in earlier monkey studies. With the Mondrian stimuli, we observed that areas along the ventral pathway, V1, V2/V3, V4 and the IT cortex, responded more strongly to colour stimuli than to luminance stimuli. In the IT cortex, we found that colour-selective activities are not distributed uniformly, but are localized in discrete regions, each extending several millimetres in the anterior or posterior part of the IT cortex. The colour-selective activation in the anterior IT was observed only with the Mondrian stimuli, whereas the colour-selective activation in the posterior IT was observed with both the Mondrian and grating stimuli, with little overlap. These findings suggest that there are multiple subregions with differing stimulus selectivities distributed in the IT cortex, and that colour information is processed in these discrete subregions.

  4. Temporal variability and spatial distribution of suspended matter and organic C pool in the Zambezi River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodoru, Cristian R.; Bouillon, Steven; Borges, Alberto V.; Darchambeau, François; Nyoni, Frank C.; Nyambe, Imasiku

    2014-05-01

    It is increasingly recognized that rivers are active components of global carbon (C) cycling, able of processing, emitting into atmosphere, and transporting to the oceans large quantities of both organic and inorganic carbon derived from the surrounding terrestrial landscape. Although tropical rivers contribute with more than half to the global freshwater discharge to the oceans, there is surprisingly little information on biogeochemistry and C cycling of those systems, especially for Africa. As part of a broader study on the biogeochemistry of large African river basins, we present here data on temporal and spatial variability of total suspended matter (TSM), particulate (POC) and dissolved organic C (DOC) in the Zambezi River (length = 2900 km, catchment area > 1.4 million km2, annual discharge ~ 4150 m3/s) in relation to physico-chemical proprieties (conductivity, oxygen, pH, total alkalinity), bacterial respiration, primary production and net aquatic metabolism. Data were collected along the entire river stretch during 2012 and 2013, and over 2 climatic (dry and wet) seasons to constrain the interannual variability, seasonality and spatial heterogeneity of the investigated parameters, and at two monitoring stations: one on the Zambezi mainstream, and one on the Kafue River (major tributary of the Zambezi; total length ~ 1900 km, catchment ~ 156, 000 km2, annual discharge = 350 m3/s), both located several km upstream their confluence. During the two sampled years, TSM concentrations varied from 1.6 mg/L to 110 mg/L (mean 17 in 2012 and 29 mg/L in 2013) and were systematically higher in the river mainstream (mean 21 mg/L and 36 mg/L in 2012 and 2013, respectively) compared to both reservoirs (the Kariba and the Cahora Bassa) where TSM concentrations average 2.5 mg/L. Despite the disturbance along the aquatic continuum caused by the presence of the two man-made reservoirs, a distinct longitudinal pattern was observed during both years, with TSM increasing

  5. Conventional and conformal technique of external beam radiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer: Dose distribution, tumor response, and side effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutrikah, N.; Winarno, H.; Amalia, T.; Djakaria, M.

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare conventional and conformal techniques of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in terms of the dose distribution, tumor response, and side effects in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer patients. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on cervical cancer patients who underwent EBRT before brachytherapy in the Radiotherapy Department of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital. The prescribed dose distribution, tumor response, and acute side effects of EBRT using conventional and conformal techniques were investigated. In total, 51 patients who underwent EBRT using conventional techniques (25 cases using Cobalt-60 and 26 cases using a linear accelerator (LINAC)) and 29 patients who underwent EBRT using conformal techniques were included in the study. The distribution of the prescribed dose in the target had an impact on the patient’s final response to EBRT. The complete response rate of patients to conformal techniques was significantly greater (58%) than that of patients to conventional techniques (42%). No severe acute local side effects were seen in any of the patients (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grades 3-4). The distribution of the dose and volume to the gastrointestinal tract affected the proportion of mild acute side effects (RTOG grades 1-2). The urinary bladder was significantly greater using conventional techniques (Cobalt-60/LINAC) than using conformal techniques at 72% and 78% compared to 28% and 22%, respectively. The use of conformal techniques in pelvic radiation therapy is suggested in radiotherapy centers with CT simulators and 3D Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Systems (RTPSs) to decrease some uncertainties in radiotherapy planning. The use of AP/PA pelvic radiation techniques with Cobalt-60 should be limited in body thicknesses equal to or less than 18 cm. When using conformal techniques, delineation should be applied in the small bowel, as it is considered a critical organ according to RTOG

  6. Evaluation of dose distribution for targets near inhomogeneities in photon beam radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirydovich, Siarhei

    Purpose. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the accuracy of the dose calculated in the presence of inhomogeneities by the top performing algorithms employed by some commercially available modern treatment planning systems for the external photon beam radiotherapy. Materials and methods. A new Fluence Map Monte Carlo (FMMC) method that can serve as a benchmark for such evaluation under certain conditions for a given linear accelerator was developed and tested. Dose perturbation on the inhomogeneities composed of high, low and very low density materials was measured with film dosimeters and calculated with various algorithms. The algorithms included general purpose Monte Carlo and FMMC methods as well as the treatment planning dose calculation algorithms such as pencil beam kernel convolution, point kernel convolution, and superposition, which is the most accurate of the three. Results. The dosimetric comparison results for high density materials obtained by FMMC, superposition, and measurement revealed that the superposition overestimates (up to 16%) of the dose downstream of the inhomogeneity. A very low density medium such as an air cavity was found to have an overestimation (up to 20%) of the dose by the superposition algorithm. The dose in a lung (low density medium) equivalent material was found to be significantly overestimated when calculated with either point kernel (up to 20%) or pencil beam kernel (up to 40%) convolution algorithms. Conclusion. Based on these findings it is recommended that a particular attention should be given to the verification of a dose calculated for the treatment of tumors located in anatomical sites where inhomogeneities are predominant. In many cases a verification process can be successfully performed with the proposed FMMC method which is shown to have a good match with the measurements.

  7. Spatial and temporal distributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediments from the Songhua River, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, D.; Guo, Z.; Liu, X.; Hua, X.; Liang, D.

    2013-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), a class of typical persistent organic pollutants, widely exist in the environment and are potentially harmful to human health. They can enter the waters through atmospheric deposition, soil leaching, shipping, sewage discharges and surface runoff. In recent years, many studies on the distributions of PAHs in major rivers, lakes and bays around the world have been carried out. In this study, 9 surface sediments (0-10cm) were sampled from the Songhua River in Jilin and Heilongjiang provinces. The contents of 16 PAHs in the US Environmental Protection Agency list of priority pollutants were determined and their spatial distributions were discussed. Sediment cores (50cm length) in three oxbow lakes in this area were also collected and cut into 2 cm thickness sub-samples. PAHs concentrations in these samples were determined and the cores were dated using a 210Pb geochronology technique. Finally, the sedimentary history of PAHs in the Songhua River since the 1920s was revealed. Results indicated that total concentration of the 16 PAHs analyzed in the surface sediments was 187-2079 ng/g (dry weight), and the mean was 1029 ng/g. Sediments collected from near urban areas (Jilin and Harbin City) contained higher PAHs content. Compared with the domestic and international rivers, the PAHs content in this river sediments is at a medium level. The PAHs profiles showed that 2-3 ring PAHs, especially naphthalene, were dominant in all of the samples. Sedimentary flux can reflect the accumulating history of pollutants better. The PAHs fluxes were low and varied little from the 1920s to 1970s, but higher PAH fluxes were found since the 1980s in each core (Fig. 1). The PAHs sedimentary flux near Harbin City (Shuangcheng) was found changed remarkably. We inferred that the PAHs might be influenced by hydrological conditions, population mobility and economic activity in this area. PAHs sedimentary record in the Songhua River revealed that the

  8. Concentrations, size distributions and temporal variations of fluorescent biological aerosol particles in southern tropical India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsan, Aswathy; Krishna R, Ravi; CV, Biju; Huffman, Alex; Poschl, Ulrich; Gunthe, Sachin

    2015-04-01

    Biological aerosols constitute a wide range of dead and alive biological materials and structures that are suspended in the atmosphere. They play an important role in the atmospheric physical, chemical and biological processes and health of living being by spread of diseases among humans, plants, and, animals. The atmospheric abundance, sources, physical properties of PBAPs as compared to non-biological aerosols, however, is poorly characterized. The Indian tropical region, where large fraction of the world's total population is residing, experiences a distinctive meteorological phenomenon by means of Indian Summer Monsoon (IMS). Thus, the properties and characteristics of biological aerosols are also expected to be very diverse over the Indian subcontinent depending upon the seasons. Here we characterize the number concentration and size distribution of Fluorescent Biological Aerosol Particles (FBAP) at a high altitude continental site, Munnar (10.09 N, 77.06 E; 1605 m asl) in South India during the South-West monsoon, which constitute around 80 percent of the annual rainfall in Munnar. Continuous three months measurements (from 01 June 2014 to 21 Aug 2104) FBAPs were carried out at Munnar using Ultra Violet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UVAPS) during IMS. The mean number and mass concentration of coarse FBAP averaged over the entire campaign was 1.7 x 10-2 cm-3 and 0.24 µg m-3 respectively, which corresponds to 2 percent and 6 percent of total aerosol particle number and mass concentration. In agreement to other previous measurements the number size distribution of FBAP also peaks at 3.2 micron indicating the strong presence of fungal spores. This was also supported by the Scanning Electron Microscopic analysis of bioaerosols on filter paper. They also displayed a strong diurnal cycle with maximum concentration occurring at early morning hours. During periods of heavy and continuous rain where the wind is consistently blowing from South-West direction it was

  9. Two Dimensional Verification of the Dose Distribution of Gamma Knife Model C using Monte Carlo Simulation with a Virtual Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae-Hoon; Kim, Yong-Kyun; Lee, Cheol Ho; Son, Jaebum; Lee, Sangmin; Kim, Dong Geon; Choi, Joonbum; Jang, Jae Yeong [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hyun-Tai [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Gamma Knife model C contains 201 {sup 60}Co sources located on a spherical surface, so that each beam is concentrated on the center of the sphere. In the last work, we simulated the Gamma Knife model C through Monte Carlo simulation code using Geant4. Instead of 201 multi-collimation system, we made one single collimation system that collects source parameter passing through the collimator helmet. Using the virtual source, we drastically reduced the simulation time to transport 201 gamma circle beams to the target. Gamma index has been widely used to compare two dose distributions in cancer radiotherapy. Gamma index pass rates were compared in two calculated results using the virtual source method and the original method and measured results obtained using radiocrhomic films. A virtual source method significantly reduces simulation time of a Gamma Knife Model C and provides equivalent absorbed dose distributions as that of the original method showing Gamma Index pass rate close to 100% under 1mm/3% criteria. On the other hand, it gives a little narrow dose distribution compared to the film measurement showing Gamma Index pass rate of 94%. More accurate and sophisticated examination on the accuracy of the simulation and film measurement is necessary.

  10. The Monte Carlo SRNA-VOX code for 3D proton dose distribution in voxelized geometry using CT data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilic, Radovan D [Laboratory of Physics (010), Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, PO Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Spasic-Jokic, Vesna [Laboratory of Physics (010), Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, PO Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Belicev, Petar [Laboratory of Physics (010), Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, PO Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Dragovic, Milos [Center for Nuclear Medicine MEDICA NUCLEARE, Bulevar Despota Stefana 69, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2005-03-07

    This paper describes the application of the SRNA Monte Carlo package for proton transport simulations in complex geometry and different material compositions. The SRNA package was developed for 3D dose distribution calculation in proton therapy and dosimetry and it was based on the theory of multiple scattering. The decay of proton induced compound nuclei was simulated by the Russian MSDM model and our own using ICRU 63 data. The developed package consists of two codes: the SRNA-2KG, which simulates proton transport in combinatorial geometry and the SRNA-VOX, which uses the voxelized geometry using the CT data and conversion of the Hounsfield's data to tissue elemental composition. Transition probabilities for both codes are prepared by the SRNADAT code. The simulation of the proton beam characterization by multi-layer Faraday cup, spatial distribution of positron emitters obtained by the SRNA-2KG code and intercomparison of computational codes in radiation dosimetry, indicate immediate application of the Monte Carlo techniques in clinical practice. In this paper, we briefly present the physical model implemented in the SRNA package, the ISTAR proton dose planning software, as well as the results of the numerical experiments with proton beams to obtain 3D dose distribution in the eye and breast tumour.

  11. A summary of light dose distribution using an IR navigation system for Photofrin-mediated Pleural PDT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Timothy C; Kim, Michele M; Ong, Yi-Hong; Penjweini, Rozhin; Dimofte, Andreea; Finlay, Jarod C; Rodriguez, Carmen; Cengel, Keith A

    2017-01-28

    Uniform delivery of light fluence is an important goal for photodynamic therapy. We present summary results for an infrared (IR) navigation system to deliver light dose uniformly during intracavitory PDT by tracking the movement of the light source and providing real-time feedback on the light fluence rate on the entire cavity surface area. In the current intrapleural PDT protocol, 8 detectors placed in selected locations in the pleural cavity monitor the light doses. To improve the delivery of light dose uniformity, an IR camera system is used to track the motion of the light source as well as the surface contour of the pleural cavity. A MATLAB-based GUI program is developed to display the light dose in real-time during PDT to guide the PDT treatment delivery to improve the uniformity of the light dose. A dualcorrection algorithm is used to improve the agreement between calculations and in-situ measurements. A comprehensive analysis of the distribution of light fluence during PDT is presented in both phantom conditions and in clinical cases.

  12. A summary of light dose distribution using an IR navigation system for Photofrin-mediated Pleural PDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Timothy C.; Kim, Michele M.; Ong, Yi-Hong; Penjweini, Rozhin; Dimofte, Andreea; Finlay, Jarod C.; Rodriguez, Carmen; Cengel, Keith A.

    2017-02-01

    Uniform delivery of light fluence is an important goal for photodynamic therapy. We present summary results for an infrared (IR) navigation system to deliver light dose uniformly during intracavitory PDT by tracking the movement of the light source and providing real-time feedback on the light fluence rate on the entire cavity surface area. In the current intrapleural PDT protocol, 8 detectors placed in selected locations in the pleural cavity monitor the light doses. To improve the delivery of light dose uniformity, an IR camera system is used to track the motion of the light source as well as the surface contour of the pleural cavity. A MATLAB-based GUI program is developed to display the light dose in real-time during PDT to guide the PDT treatment delivery to improve the uniformity of the light dose. A dualcorrection algorithm is used to improve the agreement between calculations and in-situ measurements. A comprehensive analysis of the distribution of light fluence during PDT is presented in both phantom conditions and in clinical cases.

  13. Temporal changes and sexual differences in spatial distribution of Burbot in Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapanian, Martin A.; Witzel, Larry D.; Cook, Andy

    2013-01-01

    We used GIS mapping techniques to examine capture data for Burbot Lota lota from annual gill-net surveys in Canadian waters of Lake Erie during late August and September 1994–2011. Adult males were captured over a larger area (3–17% for ≥20% maximum yearly catch [MYC]) than adult females. More males than females were caught in the gill nets in 14 of the 15 study years. Collectively, these results support a hypothesis of greater activity by adult males during summer, when Burbot are actively feeding. The area of capture contracted by more than 60% (for ≥20% MYC) for both sexes during the time period, which is consistent with the documented decrease of the Burbot population in the lake. The sex ratio (females: males) varied over the time series but declined steadily from 0.97 in 2001 to 0.59 in 2011. The overlap in the capture areas of adult males and females was scale dependent. The depth distribution at which adult Burbot were caught did not change over the time series, and there was no difference in the median depths (about 30 m) at which adult male and female Burbot were caught. The last results are consistent with the Burbot's reliance on coldwater habitats. Additional research is recommended, including telemetry to describe daily and seasonal movements and assessment of gender bias in active and passive capture gear.

  14. Temporal evolution of the distribution of hepatitis E virus genotypes in Southwestern France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhomme, Sebastien; Abravanel, Florence; Dubois, Martine; Chapuy-Regaud, Sabine; Sandres-Saune, Karine; Mansuy, Jean-Michel; Rostaing, Lionel; Kamar, Nassim; Izopet, Jacques

    2015-10-01

    Southwest France is a highly endemic region for hepatitis E virus (HEV). This study examined the circulation of HEV strains between 2003 and 2014 in the Midi-Pyrénées, and compared these data with those from the rest of France. The polyproline region (PPR) of the ORF1 region of the HEV genome was also analyzed. HEV genotype was determined by sequencing a 348-nt fragment within the ORF2 gene for 333 strains in the Midi-Pyrénées and for 571 strains from the rest of France. PPR region was characterized for 56 strains. The frequency of subgenotype 3f decreased over time, whereas subgenotype 3c increased in the Midi-Pyrénées. Repartition of strains did not differ in the Midi-Pyrénées compared to the rest of France. HEV3i and HEV4 have been recently detected throughout France. PPR lengths showed that two major groups of HEV3f exist. Our study shows that HEV3 distribution in the Midi-Pyrénées was similar to the whole of France. Local dietary habits could explain the higher seroprevalence in the Midi-Pyrénées rather the circulation of a particular variant in this region. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. EXTRACTING TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL DISTRIBUTIONS INFORMATION ABOUT ALGAL GLOOMS BASED ON MULTITEMPORAL MODIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Chunguang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on MODIS remote sensing data, method and technology to extraction the time and space distribution information of algae bloom is studied and established. The dynamic feature of time and space in Taihu Lake from 2009 to 2011 can be obtained by extracted method. Variation of cyanobacterial bloom in the Taihu Lake is analyzed and discussed. The algae bloom frequency index (AFI and algae bloom sustainability index (ASI is important criterion which can show the interannual and inter-monthly variation in the whole area or the subregion of Taihu Lake. Utilizing the AFI and ASI from 2009 to 2011, it found some phenomena that: the booming frequency decreased from the north and west to the East and South of Taihu Lake. The annual month algae bloom variation of AFI reflect the booming existing twin peaks in the high shock level and lag trend in general. In the subregion statistics, the IBD and ASI in 2011 show the abnormal condition in the border between the Gongshan Bay and Central Lake. The date is obvious earlier than that on the same subregion in previous years and that on others subregion in the same year.

  16. Long term temporal trends and spatial distribution of total ozone over Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubna Rafiq

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Considering the potential importance of the concentration of ozone in the atmosphere and threat to its depletion in Pakistan’s environment, AQUA-AIRS Level-3 Daily Global satellite data is used to monitor the Total Column Ozone (TCO over the entire region of the country. During 2003–2011 with spatial resolution of 1ox 1o lat/long grid, inter-annual analysis of TCO over the area (62°-76°E and 23°-37°N showed that overall average distribution of TCO alterations are dependent on latitude and varied from 275 to 278 DU in the regions of Sindh and Baluchistan province with 297–300 DU in the northern and KPK province regions. Seasonal variations have shown that in the region 23°-29°N, highest concentration of ozone is recorded in summer season (JJA and lowest in winter season (DJF with mixed trend in both spring (MAM and autumn (SON seasons whereas in the region between 30°-37°N, maximum is recorded in winter (DJF and spring (MAM seasons with minimum in summer (JJA and autumn (SON seasons respectively. Statistical analysis revealed that linear relationship exists between year to year TCO and solar activity.

  17. Temporal and Spatial Distribution ofEnterobius vermicularis(Nematoda: Oxyuridae) in the Prehistoric Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard, Karl J; Araújo, Adauto; Morrow, Johnica J

    2016-10-01

    Investigations of Enterobius sp. infection in prehistory have produced a body of data that can be used to evaluate the geographic distribution of infection through time in the Americas. Regional variations in prevalence are evident. In North America, 119 pinworm positive samples were found in 1,112 samples from 28 sites with a prevalence of 10.7%. Almost all of the positive samples came from agricultural sites. From Brazil, 0 pinworm positive samples were found in 325 samples from 7 sites. For the Andes region, 22 pinworm positive samples were found in 411 samples from 26 sites for a prevalence of 5.3%. Detailed analyses of these data defined several trends. First, preagricultural sites less frequently show evidence of infection compared to agricultural populations. This is especially clear in the data from North America, but is also evident in the data from South America. Second, there is an apparent relationship between the commonality of pinworms in coprolites and the manner of constructing villages. These analyses show that ancient parasitism has substantial value in documenting the range of human behaviors that influence parasitic infections.

  18. Temporal and Spatial Distribution of Enterobius vermicularis (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) in the Prehistoric Americas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard, Karl J.; Araújo, Adauto; Morrow, Johnica J.

    2016-01-01

    Investigations of Enterobius sp. infection in prehistory have produced a body of data that can be used to evaluate the geographic distribution of infection through time in the Americas. Regional variations in prevalence are evident. In North America, 119 pinworm positive samples were found in 1,112 samples from 28 sites with a prevalence of 10.7%. Almost all of the positive samples came from agricultural sites. From Brazil, 0 pinworm positive samples were found in 325 samples from 7 sites. For the Andes region, 22 pinworm positive samples were found in 411 samples from 26 sites for a prevalence of 5.3%. Detailed analyses of these data defined several trends. First, preagricultural sites less frequently show evidence of infection compared to agricultural populations. This is especially clear in the data from North America, but is also evident in the data from South America. Second, there is an apparent relationship between the commonality of pinworms in coprolites and the manner of constructing villages. These analyses show that ancient parasitism has substantial value in documenting the range of human behaviors that influence parasitic infections. PMID:27853116

  19. Improvement of dose distribution in breast radiotherapy using a reversible transverse magnetic field Linac-MR unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeeli, A D; Mahdavi, S R; Pouladian, M; Monfared, A S; Bagheri, S

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the improvement in dose distribution in tangential breast radiotherapy using a reversible transverse magnetic field that maintains the same direction of Lorentz force between two fields. The investigation has a potential application in future Linac-MR units. Computed tomography images of four patients and magnetic fields of 0.25-1.5 Tesla (T) were used for Monte Carlo simulation. Two patients had intact breast while the other two had mastectomy. Simulations of planning and chest wall irradiation were similar to the actual clinical process. The direction of superior-inferior magnetic field for the medial treatment beam was reversed for the lateral beam. For the ipsilateral lung and heart mean doses were reduced by a mean (range) of 45.8% (27.6%-58.6%) and 26.0% (20.2%-38.9%), respectively, depending on various treatment plan setups. The mean V20 for ipsilateral lung was reduced by 55.0% (43.6%-77.3%). In addition acceptable results were shown after simulation of 0.25 T magnetic field demonstrated in dose-volume reductions of the heart, ipsilateral lung, and noninvolved skin. Applying a reversible magnetic field during breast radiotherapy, not only reduces the dose to the lung and heart but also produces a sharp drop dose volume histogram for planning target volume, because of bending of the path of secondary charged particles toward the chest wall by the Lorentz force. The simulations have shown that use of the magnetic field at 1.5 T is not feasible for clinical applications due to the increase of ipsilateral chest wall skin dose in comparison to the conventional planning while 0.25 T is suitable for all patients due to dose reduction to the chest wall skin.

  20. Improvement of dose distribution in breast radiotherapy using a reversible transverse magnetic field Linac-MR unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esmaeeli, A. D., E-mail: ali-esmaeeli-d@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Rasht Branch, Islamic Azad University, Rasht, 41476-54919 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, S. R. [Department of Medical Physics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, 14174 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pouladian, M.; Bagheri, S. [Department of Medical Radiation Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, 14778-93855 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Monfared, A. S. [Department of Medical Physics, Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol, 47148-71167 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate the improvement in dose distribution in tangential breast radiotherapy using a reversible transverse magnetic field that maintains the same direction of Lorentz force between two fields. The investigation has a potential application in future Linac-MR units. Methods: Computed tomography images of four patients and magnetic fields of 0.25–1.5 Tesla (T) were used for Monte Carlo simulation. Two patients had intact breast while the other two had mastectomy. Simulations of planning and chest wall irradiation were similar to the actual clinical process. The direction of superior-inferior magnetic field for the medial treatment beam was reversed for the lateral beam. Results: For the ipsilateral lung and heart mean doses were reduced by a mean (range) of 45.8% (27.6%–58.6%) and 26.0% (20.2%–38.9%), respectively, depending on various treatment plan setups. The mean V{sub 20} for ipsilateral lung was reduced by 55.0% (43.6%–77.3%). In addition acceptable results were shown after simulation of 0.25 T magnetic field demonstrated in dose-volume reductions of the heart, ipsilateral lung, and noninvolved skin. Conclusions: Applying a reversible magnetic field during breast radiotherapy, not only reduces the dose to the lung and heart but also produces a sharp drop dose volume histogram for planning target volume, because of bending of the path of secondary charged particles toward the chest wall by the Lorentz force. The simulations have shown that use of the magnetic field at 1.5 T is not feasible for clinical applications due to the increase of ipsilateral chest wall skin dose in comparison to the conventional planning while 0.25 T is suitable for all patients due to dose reduction to the chest wall skin.

  1. Shielding for Critical Organs and Radiation Exposure Dose Distribution in Patients with High Energy Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Sung Sil; Suh, Chang Ok; Kim, Gwi Eon [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    High energy photon beams from medical linear accelerators produce large scattered radiation by various components of the treatment head, collimator and walls or objects in the treatment room including the patient. These scattered radiation do not provide therapeutic dose and are considered a hazard from the radiation safety perspective. Scattered dose of therapeutic high energy radiation beams are contributed significant unwanted dose to the patient. ICRP take the position that a dose of 500mGy may cause abortion at any stage of pregnancy and that radiation detriment to the fetus includes risk of mental retardation with a possible threshold in the dose response relationship around 100 mGy for the gestational period. The ICRP principle of As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) was recommended for protection of occupation upon the linear no-threshold dose response hypothesis for cancer induction. We suggest this ALARA principle be applied to the fetus and testicle in therapeutic treatment. Radiation dose outside a photon treatment filed is mostly due to scattered photons . This scattered dose is a function of the distance from the beam edge, treatment geometry, primary photon energy, and depth in the patient. The need for effective shielding of the fetus and testicle is reinforced when young patients are treated with external beam radiation therapy and then shielding designed to reduce the scattered photon dose to normal organs have to considered. Irradiation was performed in phantom using high energy photon beams produced by a Varian 2100C/D medical linear accelerator (Varian Oncology Systems, Polo Alto, CA) located at the Yonsei Cancer Center. The composite phantom used was comprised of a commercially available anthropomorphic Rando phantom (Phantom Laboratory Inc., Salem, YN) and a rectangular solid polystyrene phantom of dimensions 30cm x 30cm x 20cm. The anthropomorphic Rando phantom represents an average man made from tissue equivalent materials that is

  2. Acute biological effects of simulating the whole-body radiation dose distribution from a solar particle event using a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jolaine M; Sanzari, Jenine K; Diffenderfer, Eric S; Yee, Stephanie S; Seykora, John T; Maks, Casey; Ware, Jeffrey H; Litt, Harold I; Reetz, Jennifer A; McDonough, James; Weissman, Drew; Kennedy, Ann R; Cengel, Keith A

    2011-11-01

    In a solar particle event (SPE), an unshielded astronaut would receive proton radiation with an energy profile that produces a highly inhomogeneous dose distribution (skin receiving a greater dose than internal organs). The novel concept of using megavoltage electron-beam radiation to more accurately reproduce both the total dose and the dose distribution of SPE protons and make meaningful RBE comparisons between protons and conventional radiation has been described previously. Here, Yucatan minipigs were used to determine the effects of a superficial, SPE-like proton dose distribution using megavoltage electrons. In these experiments, dose-dependent increases in skin pigmentation, ulceration, keratinocyte necrosis and pigment incontinence were observed. Five of 18 animals (one each exposed to 7.5 Gy and 12.5 Gy radiation and three exposed to 25 Gy radiation) developed symptomatic, radiation-associated pneumonopathy approximately 90 days postirradiation. The three animals from the highest dose group showed evidence of mycoplasmal pneumonia along with radiation pneumonitis. Moreover, delayed-type hypersensitivity was found to be altered, suggesting that superficial irradiation of the skin with ionizing radiation might cause immune dysfunction or dysregulation. In conclusion, using total doses, patterns of dose distribution, and dose rates that are compatible with potential astronaut exposure to SPE radiation, animals experienced significant toxicities that were qualitatively different from toxicities previously reported in pigs for homogeneously delivered radiation at similar doses.

  3. Acute Biological Effects of Simulating the Whole-Body Radiation Dose Distribution from a Solar Particle Event Using a Porcine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jolaine M.; Sanzari, Jenine K.; Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Yee, Stephanie S.; Seykora, John T.; Maks, Casey; Ware, Jeffrey H.; Litt, Harold I.; Reetz, Jennifer A.; McDonough, James; Weissman, Drew; Kennedy, Ann R.; Cengel, Keith A.

    2011-01-01

    In a solar particle event (SPE), an unshielded astronaut would receive proton radiation with an energy profile that produces a highly inhomogeneous dose distribution (skin receiving a greater dose than internal organs). The novel concept of using megavoltage electron-beam radiation to more accurately reproduce both the total dose and the dose distribution of SPE protons and make meaningful RBE comparisons between protons and conventional radiation has been described previously. Here, Yucatan minipigs were used to determine the effects of a superficial, SPE-like proton dose distribution using megavoltage electrons. In these experiments, dose-dependent increases in skin pigmentation, ulceration, keratinocyte necrosis and pigment incontinence were observed. Five of 18 animals (one each exposed to 7.5 Gy and 12.5 Gy radiation and three exposed to 25 Gy radiation) developed symptomatic, radiation-associated pneumonopathy approximately 90 days postirradiation. The three animals from the highest dose group showed evidence of mycoplasmal pneumonia along with radiation pneumonitis. Moreover, delayed-type hypersensitivity was found to be altered, suggesting that superficial irradiation of the skin with ionizing radiation might cause immune dysfunction or dysregulation. In conclusion, using total doses, patterns of dose distribution, and dose rates that are compatible with potential astronaut exposure to SPE radiation, animals experienced significant toxicities that were qualitatively different from toxicities previously reported in pigs for homogeneously delivered radiation at similar doses. PMID:21859326

  4. Temporal and Spatial Distribution of Selected Species of Mercury, Carson River Superfund Site, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thodal, C.; Morway, E. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Carson River Mercury Site in western Nevada was added to the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) "Superfund" List in 1990 due to contamination from mercury used to amalgamate silver and gold from Comstock Lode ores milled during the late 1800s. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has monitored concentrations of suspended sediment (SS), total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) as well as streamflow upstream and downstream of Lahontan Reservoir since 1997 in support of USEPA Remedial Investigations. Differences between inflow and outflow concentrations indicate that nearly 90 percent of SS and unfiltered THg, and at least 50 percent of unfiltered MeHg and filtered (<0.45 μm) THg and MeHg is retained in the reservoir. However, outflow MeHg concentrations exceeded mean inflow concentration (2.9 nanograms per liter; ng/L) in 10 of 135 samples, indicating augmented mercury methylation. During August 2010 and June-September 2011, limnological profiles were measured and water samples collected from discrete depths in each of the reservoir's 3 sub-basins, the inflow delta and 2 shallow and rarely inundated overflow basins to investigate mercury distribution and methylation. In most samples, MeHg concentrations were less than 5 ng/L and increased by less than 1 ng/L in deeper samples. After temperature, oxygen, and Eh profiles indicated thermal stratification in the deep (~25 m) lower basin, samples from the top 1 m still had less than 2 ng/L MeHg but samples collected from 2 m above the sediment-water interface yielded concentrations as high as 220 ng/L in filtered water samples, accounting for 100 percent of filtered and 65 percent of unfiltered THg concentrations in concurrently-sampled water. We hypothesize that anoxic conditions and decomposition of mercury-contaminated plankton and sulfate-reduction in the hypolimnion provide carbon and mercury necessary for mercury methylation that exceeds diffusion from bottom sediment.

  5. Temporal analyses of the distribution and diversity of Salmonella in natural biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Qiong; Gunathilake, Anuradha; Forstner, Michael R J; Hahn, Dittmar

    2011-07-01

    The diversity and distribution of salmonellae in freshwater biofilms were analyzed at a fine scale (i.e. in 20 locations from a 324 cm(2) area) for two sites in San Marcos, TX. A concrete storm water overflow channel (City Park) was sampled 4 times and a concrete surface in the spring-fed headwaters of the San Marcos River (Spring Lake) 5 times between April and September 2009, and each biofilm sample analyzed by a combination of traditional enrichment methods and molecular techniques. PCR detection of the invA gene, that encodes a protein of a type III secretion system present in salmonellae, after semi-selective enrichment of salmonellae was achieved in biofilms from all 20 locations at the City Park site, with locations generally being positive 2-3 times out of 4 sampling times for a total of 59% positive samples. InvA gene fragment detection in biofilms was less frequent for the 5 sampling times and 20 locations from the Spring Lake site (18% of all samples), with 1 sampling time being entirely negative and 8 locations remaining negative throughout the study. Rep-PCR fingerprinting of 491 Salmonella isolates obtained from both sites resulted in 30 distinct profiles, with 26 and 7 profiles retrieved from City Park and Spring Lake samples, respectively, and thus with 3 profiles present at both sites, and multiple strains frequently obtained from single locations at both sites. The composition of Salmonella strains in the area analyzed changed in time with large differences between early (April, June) and late sampling times (September) within and among sites, except for one strain (S12) that was present at almost all sampling times at both sites, though often at different locations within the area analyzed. These results demonstrate the presence of salmonellae in natural biofilms and a significant micro-heterogeneity with differences in diversity and persistence of salmonellae. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Spatio-temporal patterns of distribution of West Nile virus vectors in eastern Piedmont Region, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bisanzio Donal

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background West Nile Virus (WNV transmission in Italy was first reported in 1998 as an equine outbreak near the swamps of Padule di Fucecchio, Tuscany. No other cases were identified during the following decade until 2008, when horse and human outbreaks were reported in Emilia Romagna, North Italy. Since then, WNV outbreaks have occurred annually, spreading from their initial northern foci throughout the country. Following the outbreak in 1998 the Italian public health authority defined a surveillance plan to detect WNV circulation in birds, horses and mosquitoes. By applying spatial statistical analysis (spatial point pattern analysis and models (Bayesian GLMM models to a longitudinal dataset on the abundance of the three putative WNV vectors [Ochlerotatus caspius (Pallas 1771, Culex pipiens (Linnaeus 1758 and Culex modestus (Ficalbi 1890] in eastern Piedmont, we quantified their abundance and distribution in space and time and generated prediction maps outlining the areas with the highest vector productivity and potential for WNV introduction and amplification. Results The highest abundance and significant spatial clusters of Oc. caspius and Cx. modestus were in proximity to rice fields, and for Cx. pipiens, in proximity to highly populated urban areas. The GLMM model showed the importance of weather conditions and environmental factors in predicting mosquito abundance. Distance from the preferential breeding sites and elevation were negatively associated with the number of collected mosquitoes. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI was positively correlated with mosquito abundance in rice fields (Oc. caspius and Cx. modestus. Based on the best models, we developed prediction maps for the year 2010 outlining the areas where high abundance of vectors could favour the introduction and amplification of WNV. Conclusions Our findings provide useful information for surveillance activities aiming to identify locations where the

  7. Taxonomical and ecological characteristics of the desmids placoderms in reservoir: analyzing the spatial and temporal distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirlene Aparecida Felisberto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: This study aimed to evaluate the influence of river-dam axis and abiotic factors on the composition of Closteriaceae, Gonatozygaceae, Mesotaeniaceae and Peniaceae in a tropical reservoir METHODS: Water samples for physical, chemical and periphyton analysis were collected in April and August 2002 in different regions along the axis of the river-dam of Rosana Reservoir, River Basin Paranapanema. The substrates collected, always in the litoranea region, were petioles of Eichhornia azurea (Swartz Kunth. To examine the relationship of abiotic variables with reservoir zones and between the floristic composition of desmids, we used principal component analysis (PCA and canonical correspondence analysis (CCA RESULTS: The results of the PCA explained 81.3% of the total variability in the first two axes. In the first axis, the variables of conductivity, water temperature and the pH were related to the sampling regions of April with higher values, while for the month of August, nitrate, total phosphorus and dissolved oxygen showed higher values. We identified 20 taxa, distributed in the genera Closterium (14, Gonatozygon (4, Netrium (1 and Penium (1. Spatially, the higher taxa were recorded in the lacustrine region for both collection periods. The canonical correspondence analysis (CCA summarized 62.2% of total data variability of taxa in the first two axes, and in August, Closterium incurvum Brébisson, C. cornu Ehrenberg ex Ralfs and Gonatozygon monotaenium De Bary, were related to higher values of turbidity and nitrate to the lacustrine and intermediate regions CONCLUSION: Thus, the formation of groups was due to the regions along the longitudinal axis, then the seasonal period, which must be related to the low current velocity, the higher values of temperature and the water transparency, especially in late summer

  8. On the use of computed radiography plates for quality assurance of intensity modulated radiation therapy dose distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, R. A.; Sankar, A. P.; Nailon, W. H.; MacLeod, A. S. [Department of Oncology Physics, Edinburgh Cancer Centre, Western General Hospital, Crewe Road South, Edinburgh EH4 2XU (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: As traditional film is phased out in most radiotherapy centers, computed radiography (CR) systems are increasingly being purchased as a replacement. CR plates can be used for patient imaging, but may also be used for a variety of quality assurance (QA) purposes and can be calibrated in terms of dose. This study looks at their suitability for verification of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose distributions. Methods: A CR plate was calibrated in terms of the relative dose and the stability of response over 1 year was studied. The effect of exposing the CR plate to ambient light and of using different time delays before scanning was quantified. The CR plate was used to verify the relative dose distributions for ten IMRT patients and the results were compared to those obtained using a two dimensional (2D) diode array. Results: Exposing the CR plate to 10 s of ambient light between irradiation (174 cGy) and scanning erased approximately 80% of the signal. Changes in delay time between irradiation and scanning also affected the measurement results. The signal on the plate was found to decay at a rate of approximately 3.6 cGy/min in the first 10 min after irradiation. The use of a CR plate for IMRT patient-specific QA resulted in a significantly lower distance to agreement (DTA) and gamma pass rate than when using a 2D diode array for the measurement. This was primarily due to the over-response of the CR phosphor to low energy scattered radiation. For the IMRT QA using the CR plate, the average gamma pass rate was 97.3%. For the same IMRT QA using a diode array, the average gamma pass rate was 99.7%. The gamma criteria used were 4% dose difference and 4 mm DTA for head and neck treatments and 3% dose difference and 3 mm DTA for prostate treatments. The gamma index tolerance was 1. The lowest 10% of the dose distribution was excluded from all gamma and DTA analyses. Conclusions: Although the authors showed that CR plates can be used for patient

  9. Spatial and temporal distribution of Alternaria spores in the Iberian Peninsula atmosphere, and meteorological relationships: 1993-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aira, María-Jesús; Rodríguez-Rajo, Francisco-Javier; Fernández-González, María; Seijo, Carmen; Elvira-Rendueles, Belén; Abreu, Ilda; Gutiérrez-Bustillo, Montserrat; Pérez-Sánchez, Elena; Oliveira, Manuela; Recio, Marta; Tormo, Rafael; Morales, Julia

    2013-03-01

    This paper provides an updated of airborne Alternaria spore spatial and temporal distribution patterns in the Iberian Peninsula, using a common non-viable volumetric sampling method. The highest mean annual spore counts were recorded in Sevilla (39,418 spores), Mérida (33,744) and Málaga (12,947), while other sampling stations never exceeded 5,000. The same cities also recorded the highest mean daily spore counts (Sevilla 109 spores m-3; Mérida 53 spores m-3 and Málaga 35 spores m-3) and the highest number of days on which counts exceeded the threshold levels required to trigger allergy symptoms (Sevilla 38 % and Mérida 30 % of days). Analysis of annual spore distribution patterns revealed either one or two peaks, depending on the location and prevailing climate of sampling stations. For all stations, average temperature was the weather parameter displaying the strongest positive correlation with airborne spore counts, whilst negative correlations were found for rainfall and relative humidity.

  10. Temporal and spatial distribution of red tide outbreaks in the Yangtze River Estuary and adjacent waters, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lusan; Zhou, Juan; Zheng, Binghui; Cai, Wenqian; Lin, Kuixuan; Tang, Jingliang

    2013-07-15

    Between 1972 and 2009, evidence of red tide outbreaks in the Yangtze River Estuary and adjacent waters was collected. A geographic information system (GIS) was used to analyze the temporal and spatial distribution of these red tides, and it was subsequently used to map the distribution of these events. The results show that the following findings. (1) There were three red tide-prone areas: outside the Yangtze River Estuary and the eastern coast of Sheshan, the Huaniaoshan-Shengshan-Gouqi waters, and the Zhoushan areas and eastern coast of Zhujiajian. In these areas, red tides occurred 174 total times, 25 of which were larger than 1000 km(2) in areal extent. After 2000, the frequency of red tide outbreaks increased significantly. (2) During the months of May and June, the red tide occurrence in these areas was 51% and 20%, respectively. (3) Outbreaks of the dominant red tide plankton species Prorocentrum dong-haiense, Skeletonema costatum, Prorocentrum dantatum, and Noctiluca scientillan occurred 38, 35, 15, and 10 times, respectively, during the study interval. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular analysis of the spatio-temporal distribution of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in Camargue (France) hypersaline microbial mat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourçans, Aude; Ranchou-Peyruse, Anthony; Caumette, Pierre; Duran, Robert

    2008-07-01

    The spatio-temporal distribution of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in the microbial mat of Camargue (Salins-de-Giraud, France) was investigated by molecular approaches at both microscale spatial resolution and different taxonomic organization levels. The vertical distribution of the SRB populations was correlated with oxygen and sulfide microgradient fluctuations. Comparisons of Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) fingerprints showed distinct locations of some operational taxonomic units at daytime and at night (4:00 or 15:00 hours) revealing important differences on the structures of the bacterial communities. When oxygen penetrates the mat, SRB migration was observed either downward to reach deeper anoxic zones to escape oxygen or upward to reach oxic surface zones. When no migration was observed, both metabolism switches and aggregate formations were suspected. These behaviors allowed the aerotolerant SRB to deal with oxygen. The analysis of the Desulfococcus-Desulfonema-Desulfosarcina T-RFLP profiles revealed up-migrating populations related to both Desulfonema sp. and Desulfosarcina variabilis. T-RFLP profiles combined with 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid gene library analysis of the Desulfobacter group revealed two distinct populations: a population related to the recently described Desulfotignum genus migrating upward during the night and a population of a new species of the Desulfobacter uniformly located throughout the mat independent of the period. Thus, the identification of the new oxygen-tolerant SRB will provide the basis for understanding the physiological adaptations to oxygen.

  12. Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Norovirus and E. coli in Sydney Rock Oysters Following a Sewage Overflow into an Estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brake, Felicity; Kiermeier, Andreas; Ross, Tom; Holds, Geoffrey; Landinez, Lina; McLeod, Catherine

    2017-07-06

    This paper reports a study of norovirus (NoV) GII distribution and persistence in Sydney rock oysters (SRO) (Saccostrea glomerata) located in an estuary after a pump station sewage overflow. SRO were strategically placed at six sites spanning the length of the estuary from the pump station to the sea. The spatial and temporal distribution of NoV, hepatitis A virus (HAV) and Escherichia coli (E. coli) in oysters was mapped after the contamination event. NoV GI and GII, HAV and E. coli were quantified for up to 48 days in oysters placed at six sites ranging from 0.05 to 8.20 km from the sewage overflow. NoV GII was detected up to 5.29 km downstream and persisted in oysters for 42 days at the site closest to the overflow. NoV GII concentrations decreased significantly over time; a reduction rate of 8.5% per day was observed in oysters (p oysters over time, as observed in this study and other published research, collectively suggest that GII reduction rates from oysters may be broadly similar, regardless of environmental conditions, oyster species and genotype.

  13. [Temporal and spatial distribution of ants in a light gradient, in a coffee agroforestry system, Turrialba, Costa Rica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varón, Edgar H; Hanson, Paul; Longino, John T; Borbón, Olger; Carballo, Manuel; Hilje, Luko

    2007-01-01

    Shade trees are frequently present in coffee (Coffea arabica L.) agroforestry systems of Mesoamerica. These systems can harbor a rich entomofauna, including ants, which could be predators of key pests in these systems. However, the role of shade on the distribution and abundance of these ants is unknown, yet such knowledge could suggest guidelines for manipulating certain environmental conditions of their habitat, thereby achieving their conservation and increase. Therefore, we studied the effect of shade on the spatial and temporal distribution of three ant species (Solenopsis geminata, Pheidole radoszkowskii and Crematogaster curvispinosa) that may prey on the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), and the mahogany shootborer, Hypsipyla grandella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae). To do this, abundance was evaluated across a sun-shade gradient in a coffee plantation with four alternate plots (from pure sun to total shade) in Turrialba, Costa Rica. In the community that was studied 28 species of ants were collected, of which S. geminata was the dominant species (79% of the total individuals), followed by P. radoszkowskii (16 %). S. geminata and C. curvispinosa preferred sunny areas, while P. radoszkowskii showed no defined preference. Likewise, with respect to location, S. geminata predominated in the soil, while P. radoszkowskii and C. curvispinosa predominated in coffee bushes.

  14. Abundance and spatial-temporal distribution of the shrimp Xiphopenaeus kroyeri (Decapoda: Penaeidae: an exploited species in southeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. R. Silva

    Full Text Available Abstract This study evaluated the abundance and spatial-temporal distribution of the shrimp Xiphopenaeus kroyeri in the coastal region of Macaé, state of Rio de Janeiro, southeastern Brazil. Monthly samples were obtained from March 2008 to February 2010 in six stations located in Inner (5, 10 and 15m depth and Outer (25, 35 and 45m depth areas. It was used a commercial fishery boat equipped with an otter-trawl net (3.5 m mouth width, mesh size 20mm and 15mm in the cod end. Water samples were taken for determination of temperature and salinity, and sediment samples for determination of texture and organic matter content. A total of 7146 shrimps were sampled. About 95% of all shrimps were caught in the shallow area, i.e., depths <20m. Greatest abundances were recorded in winter and spring. No significant correlation was observed between sediment (phi and abundance. The distribution of X. kroyeri in the studied area was closely related to seasonal cold waterfront of the South Atlantic Central Water (SACW and temperature was the main factor affecting the species abundance.

  15. Random Acts of Violence? Examining Probabilistic Independence of the Temporal Distribution of Mass Killing Events in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Douglas M; Jacobson, Sheldon H

    2017-12-01

    Recent mass killings, such as those in Newtown, Connecticut, and Aurora, Colorado, have brought new attention to mass killings in the United States. This article examines 323 mass killings taking place between January 1, 2006, and October 4, 2016, to assess how they are distributed over time. In particular, we find that they appear to be uniformly distributed over time, which suggests that their rate has remained stable over the past decade. Moreover, analysis of subsets of these mass killings sharing a common trait (e.g., family killings, public killings) suggests that they exhibit a memoryless property, suggesting that mass killing events within each category are random in the sense that the occurrence of a mass killing event does not signal whether another mass killing event is imminent. However, the same memoryless property is not found when combining all mass killings into a single analysis, consistent with earlier research that found evidence of a contagion effect among mass killing events. Because of the temporal randomness of public mass killings and the wide geographic area over which they can occur, these results imply that these events may be best addressed by systemic infrastructure-based interventions that deter such events, incorporate resiliency into the response system, or impede such events until law enforcement can respond when they do occur.

  16. Predicting the spatio-temporal distribution of Culicoides imicola in Sardinia using a discrete-time population model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rigot Thibaud

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Culicoides imicola KIEFFER, 1913 (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae is the principal vector of Bluetongue disease in the Mediterranean basin, Africa and Asia. Previous studies have identified a range of eco-climatic variables associated with the distribution of C. imicola, and these relationships have been used to predict the large-scale distribution of the vector. However, these studies are not temporally-explicit and can not be used to predict the seasonality in C. imicola abundances. Between 2001 and 2006, longitudinal entomological surveillance was carried out throughout Italy, and provided a comprehensive spatio-temporal dataset of C. imicola catches in Onderstepoort-type black-light traps, in particular in Sardinia where the species is considered endemic. Methods We built a dynamic model that allows describing the effect of eco-climatic indicators on the monthly abundances of C. imicola in Sardinia. Model precision and accuracy were evaluated according to the influence of process and observation errors. Results A first-order autoregressive cofactor, a digital elevation model and MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST/or temperatures acquired from weather stations explained ~77% of the variability encountered in the samplings carried out in 9 sites during 6 years. Incorporating Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI or rainfall did not increase the model's predictive capacity. On average, dynamics simulations showed good accuracy (predicted vs. observed r corr = 0.9. Although the model did not always reproduce the absolute levels of monthly abundances peaks, it succeeded in reproducing the seasonality in population level and allowed identifying the periods of low abundances and with no apparent activity. On that basis, we mapped C. imicola monthly distribution over the entire Sardinian region. Conclusions This study demonstrated prospects for modelling data arising from Culicoides longitudinal entomological surveillance

  17. Spatio-temporal variability and principal components of the particle number size distribution in an urban atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Costabile

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A correct description of fine (diameter <1 μm and ultrafine (<0.1 μm aerosol particles in urban areas is of interest for particle exposure assessment but also basic atmospheric research. We examined the spatio-temporal variability of atmospheric aerosol particles (size range 3–800 nm using concurrent number size distribution measurements at a maximum of eight observation sites in and around Leipzig, a city in Central Europe. Two main experiments were conducted with different time span and number of observation sites (2 years at 3 sites; 1 month at 8 sites. A general observation was that the particle number size distribution varied in time and space in a complex fashion as a result of interaction between local and far-range sources, and the meteorological conditions. To identify statistically independent factors in the urban aerosol, different runs of principal component (PC analysis were conducted encompassing aerosol, gas phase, and meteorological parameters from the multiple sites. Several of the resulting PCs, outstanding with respect to their temporal persistence and spatial coverage, could be associated with aerosol particle modes: a first accumulation mode ("droplet mode", 300–800 nm, considered to be the result of liquid phase processes and far-range transport; a second accumulation mode (centered around diameters 90–250 nm, considered to result from primary emissions as well as aging through condensation and coagulation; an Aitken mode (30–200 nm linked to urban traffic emissions in addition to an urban and a rural Aitken mode; a nucleation mode (5–20 nm linked to urban traffic emissions; nucleation modes (3–20 nm linked to photochemically induced particle formation; an aged nucleation mode (10–50 nm. Additional PCs represented only local sources at a single site, or infrequent phenomena. In summary, the analysis of size distributions of high time and size resolution yielded a surprising wealth of statistical aerosol

  18. Spatial and temporal distribution of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in a drinking water resource: implications for monitoring and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnet, Jean-Baptiste; Penny, Christian; Ogorzaly, Leslie; Cauchie, Henry-Michel

    2014-02-15

    Because of their significant public health impact, waterborne Cryptosporidium and Giardia have been monitored in surface water in order to assess microbial quality of water bodies used for drinking water production and/or for recreational purposes. In this context, sampling strategy is of key importance and should be representative enough to appropriately assess the related microbial risk. This, however, requires sound knowledge on the behaviour of both pathogens in water. In the present study, the spatial and temporal distribution of Cryptosporidium and Giardia was explored in the rural Upper-Sûre watershed used for drinking water production in Luxembourg. By subdividing it into three compartments including (i) sub-catchments, (ii) the Sûre River fed by the sub-catchments and (iii) the Upper-Sûre reservoir fed by the Sûre River, parasite distribution was assessed using sampling designs adapted to the hydro-dynamic characteristics of the respective compartments. Results highlighted the high spatial and temporal variability in parasite distribution at watershed scale, as well as the prevalence of Giardia over Cryptosporidium. Besides land use features and catchment characteristics, hydro-climatology appeared to be a major driver of parasite behaviour in the watershed. It introduced a seasonal trend in their occurrence, highest densities being detected during the wet season. Peaks of contamination triggered out by rainfall-induced runoff were further observed in the three compartments. In the Sûre River, Cryptosporidium and Giardia fluxes peaked at 10(9) and 10(10) (oo)cysts.d(-1), respectively, and were discharged into the drinking water reservoir, where they underwent a 2 to 3 log10 removal rate. Despite this, parasite fluxes entering the drinking water treatment plant were still high (10(6) to 10(7) (oo)cysts.d(-1)) and stressed on the need for improved watershed management upstream the water treatment barrier. The catchment-wide analysis described here

  19. Impact of photon cross section systematic uncertainties on Monte Carlo-determined depth-dose distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Aguirre, Eder; David, Mariano; deAlmeida, Carlos E

    2016-01-01

    This work studies the impact of systematic uncertainties associated to interaction cross sections on depth dose curves determined by Monte Carlo simulations. The corresponding sensitivity factors are quantified by changing cross sections in a given amount and determining the variation in the dose. The influence of total cross sections for all particles, photons and only for Compton scattering is addressed. The PENELOPE code was used in all simulations. It was found that photon cross section sensitivity factors depend on depth. In addition, they are positive and negative for depths below and above an equilibrium depth, respectively. At this depth, sensitivity factors are null. The equilibrium depths found in this work agree very well with the mean free path of the corresponding incident photon energy. Using the sensitivity factors reported here, it is possible to estimate the impact of photon cross section uncertainties on the uncertainty of Monte Carlo-determined depth dose curves.

  20. Electron Beam Dose Distribution in the Presence of Non-Uniform Magnetic Field

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamad Javad Tahmasebi-Birgani; Mohamad Reza Bayatiani; Fatemeh Seif; Mansur Zabihzadeh; Hojatolah Shahbazian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Magnetic fields are capable of altering the trajectory of electron beams andcan be used in radiation therapy.Theaim of this study was to produce regions with dose enhancement and reduction in the medium. Materials and Methods The NdFeB permanent magnets were arranged on the electron applicator in several configurations. Then, after the passage of the electron beams (9 and 15 MeV Varian 2100C/D) through the non-uniform magnetic field, the Percentage Depth Dose(PDDs) on central axi...

  1. Image quality of mean temporal arterial and mean temporal portal venous phase images calculated from low dose dynamic volume perfusion CT datasets in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X. [Radiology Department, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Henzler, T., E-mail: thomas.henzler@medma.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University (Germany); Gawlitza, J.; Diehl, S. [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University (Germany); Wilhelm, T. [Department of Surgery, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University (Germany); Schoenberg, S.O. [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University (Germany); Jin, Z.Y.; Xue, H.D. [Radiology Department, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Smakic, A. [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: Dynamic volume perfusion CT (dVPCT) provides valuable information on tissue perfusion in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and pancreatic cancer. However, currently dVPCT is often performed in addition to conventional CT acquisitions due to the limited morphologic image quality of dose optimized dVPCT protocols. The aim of this study was to prospectively compare objective and subjective image quality, lesion detectability and radiation dose between mean temporal arterial (mTA) and mean temporal portal venous (mTPV) images calculated from low dose dynamic volume perfusion CT (dVPCT) datasets with linearly blended 120-kVp arterial and portal venous datasets in patients with HCC and pancreatic cancer. Materials and methods: All patients gave written informed consent for this institutional review board–approved HIPAA compliant study. 27 consecutive patients (18 men, 9 women, mean age, 69.1 years ± 9.4) with histologically proven HCC or suspected pancreatic cancer were prospectively enrolled. The study CT protocol included a dVPCT protocol performed with 70 or 80 kVp tube voltage (18 spiral acquisitions, 71.2 s total acquisition times) and standard dual-energy (90/150 kVpSn) arterial and portal venous acquisition performed 25 min after the dVPCT. The mTA and mTPV images were manually reconstructed from the 3 to 5 best visually selected single arterial and 3 to 5 best single portal venous phases dVPCT dataset. The linearly blended 120-kVp images were calculated from dual-energy CT (DECT) raw data. Image noise, SNR, and CNR of the liver, abdominal aorta (AA) and main portal vein (PV) were compared between the mTA/mTPV and the linearly blended 120-kVp dual-energy arterial and portal venous datasets, respectively. Subjective image quality was evaluated by two radiologists regarding subjective image noise, sharpness and overall diagnostic image quality using a 5-point Likert Scale. In addition, liver lesion detectability was performed for each liver

  2. A first-principles model for prediction of product dose uniformity based on drug substance particle size distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilden, Jon; Schrad, Mark; Kuehne-Willmore, Jennifer; Sloan, Jessica

    2012-07-01

    The unit dose uniformity (UDU) of low-dose drug products can be affected by active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) particle size. UDU relative standard deviation increases as the fraction of large API particles increases and/or as the unit dose decreases. Control of API particle size has traditionally been based on the empirical relationship of d(90) and/or d(50) statistics to drug product uniformity. Several articles have been written that have identified a theoretical relationship between these particle size statistics, dose, and the probability of meeting US Pharmacopeial UDU testing criteria (Huang CY, Ku S. 2010. Int J Pharm 383:70-80; Rohrs B, Amidon G, Meury R, Secreast P, King H, Skoug C. 2006. J Pharm Sci 95(5):1049-1059; Huang CY, Ku S. 2010. J Pharm Sci 99:4351-4362; Yalkowsky SH, Bolton S. 1990. Pharm Res 7(9):962-966). However, these theoretical relationships assume a fixed shape for the API particle size distribution (PSD, i.e., lognormal) and do not account for changes in the distribution shape. A more rigorous method for predicting the effect of a given PSD on UDU is to evaluate the contribution of individual particle size bins on UDU variability. The latter approach is taken in this work, and the derivation reveals that the individual contribution of particles size bins can be expressed completely in terms of a single-particle-size statistic, D[6,3]. D[6,3] is therefore a valid predictor of UDU, regardless of the shape of the PSD (e.g., multimodal) and can form the basis of a particle size control strategy for low-dose drug products. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Coronary computed tomography angiography - tolerability of β-blockers and contrast media, and temporal changes in radiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Charlotte; Thomsen, Camilla F; Hosbond, Susanne E; Thomassen, Anders; Mickley, Hans; Diederichsen, Axel C P

    2014-10-01

    To determine the risk in administering β-blockers, contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) and the trend in X-ray use, during coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). A total of 416 patients were referred for elective CCTA. To achieve a resting heart rate below 60 beats per minute, oral and/or intravenous β-blockers were administered. Using questionnaires, information on the adverse effects of β-blockers was collected from the patients. The levels of s-creatinine and estimated GFR (eGFR) were measured before and after contrast enhanced CCTA. Radiation exposure was compared with the exposure 3 years earlier. There was no significant difference in the symptoms (dizziness, lipothymia and palpitations) between patients with and patients without β-blocker pretreatment. Compared to baseline values, the decrease in s-creatinine was not significant (75.2 vs. 74.6 μmol/L, p = 0.09), while the increase in eGFR was not significant (78 vs. 79 mL/min, p = 0.17). Also, subgroups of patients with hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes or pre-existing slight impairment in renal function did not develop CIN. The mean radiation exposure decreased from 17.5 to 6.7 mSv, p < 0.0001. In terms of the side effects of β-blockers and contrast media, there were no short term complications to CCTA. Furthermore, the radiation dose has been dramatically diminished over the last three years.

  4. Uniform pattern of normal faulting at the temporally distributed centers of eruption along the path of the Yellowstone hotspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davarpanah, Armita; Babaie, Hassan

    2016-04-01

    The northeasterly migration of the Yellowstone hotspot (YHS) has led both to the successive eruption of lava from a temporally ordered set of calderas, and related thermally-induced normal faulting along the Snake River Plain (SRP) over the past 16.6 Ma. We have applied a series of structural and statistical methods to analyze the spatial distribution and orientation of the normal faults to understand the kinematics of the mid-Tertiary-Quaternary faulting event along the SRP in the northern Rockies. The azimuths of the linear directional mean (LDM) and the directional (autocorrelation) anisotropy ellipses in the semivariograms, applying Ordinary Kriging, for different sets of normal fault traces give an estimate for the horizontal component of extension for normal faulting. The sub-parabolic spatial pattern of the normal fault LDMs, and their sub-parallel alignment with the minor axes of the Standard Deviation Ellipses (SDEs) in and around different caldera, suggest uniform normal faulting during thermally-induced extensions along the SRP. The asymmetric, sub-parabolic distribution of the spatial trajectories (form lines) of the LDMs and the major axes of the directional (anisotropy) ellipses of the traces of normal faults in the youngest three calderas are similar to the reported parabolic distribution of earthquake epicenters along active normal faults around the YHS. The parallelism of the axis of the sub-parabolic pattern with the trajectories of the LDMs, the major axes of the directional anisotropy ellipses, and the deduced extension directions for each caldera, suggest systematic and progressive normal faulting due to the thermal regime of the hotspot as it migrated to the northeast. This implies that the age of normal faulting progressively decreases to the northeast.

  5. Diversity and Spatial-Temporal Distribution of Soil Macrofauna Communities Along Elevation in the Changbai Mountain, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiuqin; Qiu, Lili; Jiang, Yunfeng; Wang, Yeqiao

    2017-06-01

    The understanding of patterns of vertical variation and diversity of flora and fauna along elevational change has been well established over the past century. However, it is unclear whether there is an elevational distribution pattern for soil fauna. This study revealed the diversity and spatial-temporal distribution of soil macrofauna communities in different vegetation zones from forest to alpine tundra along elevation of the Changbai Mountain, China. The abundance, richness, and Shannon-Wiener diversity index of soil macrofauna communities were compared in four distinguished vegetation zones including the coniferous and broadleaved mixed forest zone, the coniferous forest zone, the subalpine dwarf birch (Betula ermanii) forest zone, and the alpine tundra zone. Soil macrofauna were extracted in May, July, and September of 2009. In each season, the abundance and richness of the soil macrofauna decreased with the ascending elevation. The Shannon-Wiener diversity indices of the soil macrofauna were higher in the vegetation zones of lower elevation than of higher elevation. Significant differences were observed in the abundance, richness, and Shannon-Wiener diversity index for the studied vegetation zones. Soil macrofauna congregated mainly to the litter layer in the low-elevation areas and in the 0-5 cm soil layer of the higher elevation areas. The results emphasized that the diversity of soil macrofauna communities decreased as the elevation increased and possess the distinct characteristics of zonation in the mountain ecosystem. The diversity and distribution of soil macrofauna communities were influenced by mean annual precipitation, altitude, annual radiation quantity, and mean annual temperature. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Spatial-temporal distribution of fire-protected savanna physiognomies in Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo H.O. Pinheiro

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the influence of edaphic finer textures, as a facilitating factor for the expansion of forest formations in the absence of fire, was possible thanks to rare characteristics found in a savanna fragment located in the State of São Paulo, Brazil. The total suppression of fire for over four decades, and the occurrence of two savanna physiognomies, cerrado sensu stricto and cerradão, allowed the conduction of this study based on the hypothesis that cerradão, a physiognomy of forest aspect consisting of fire-sensitive tree and shrubs species, is favored by fire absence and higher soil hydric retention capacity. Edaphic samples were collected from a regular grid of 200 m² for the production of isopletic maps of the distribution of clay, fine sand, coarse sand and silt edaphic textures by the geostatistic method of ordinary kriging. Changes in the areas occupied by both savanna physiognomies, defined on the basis of aerial photographs taken over a period of 43 years, were assessed through mean variation rates. Besides corroborating the hypothesis of edaphic hydric retention as a facilitating factor for the expansion of forest physiognomies in savanna areas, we were able to infer the positive influence of higher precipitation on the increase in cerradão expansion rates.A influência de texturas edáficas finas, como fator de facilitação para a expansão de formações florestais sobre áreas savânicas, através da maior retenção hídrica edáfica, na ausência de incêndios, foi possível ser estudada graças às características encontradas em um fragmento savânico com 38,8 ha, situado em Corumbataí (SP. A supressão total do fogo por quatro décadas, e a ocorrência de duas fisionomias, cerrado sensu stricto e cerradão, permitiram a condução deste estudo. Amostras de solo foram coletadas em uma grade regular de 200 m², abrangendo toda a área do fragmento. Foram produzidos mapas iso-pléticos, com a distribuição das

  7. Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Soil Moisture at the Catchment Scale Using Remotely-Sensed Energy Fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas K. Alexandridis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite playing a critical role in the division of precipitation between runoff and infiltration, soil moisture (SM is difficult to estimate at the catchment scale and at frequent time steps, as is required by many hydrological, erosion and flood simulation models. In this work, an integrated methodology is described to estimate SM at the root zone, based on the remotely-sensed evaporative fraction (Λ and ancillary information on soil and meteorology. A time series of Terra MODIS satellite images was used to estimate SM maps with an eight-day time step at a 250-m spatial resolution for three diverse catchments in Europe. The study of the resulting SM maps shows that their spatial variability follows the pattern of land cover types and the main geomorphological features of the catchment, and their temporal pattern follows the distribution of rain events, with the exception of irrigated land. Field surveys provided in situ measurements to validate the SM maps’ accuracy, which proved to be variable according to site and season. In addition, several factors were analyzed in order to explain the variation in the accuracy, and it was shown that the land cover type, the soil texture class, the temporal difference between the datasets’ acquisition and the presence of rain events during the measurements played a significant role, rather than the often referred to scale difference between in situ and satellite observations. Therefore, the proposed methodology can be used operationally to estimate SM maps at the catchment scale, with a 250-m spatial resolution and an eight-day time step.

  8. Effects of fertilizer on inorganic soil N in East Africa maize systems: vertical distributions and temporal dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Katherine L; Hickman, Jonathan; McKenna, Madeline; Neill, Christopher; Palm, Cheryl A

    2016-09-01

    Fertilizer applications are poised to increase across sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), but the fate of added nitrogen (N) is largely unknown. We measured vertical distributions and temporal variations of soil inorganic N following fertilizer application in two maize (Zea mays L.)-growing regions of contrasting soil type. Fertilizer trials were established on a clayey soil in Yala, Kenya, and on a sandy soil in Tumbi, Tanzania, with application rates of 0-200 kg N/ha/yr. Soil profiles were collected (0-400 cm) annually (for three years in Yala and two years in Tumbi) to examine changes in inorganic N pools. Topsoils (0-15 cm) were collected every 3-6 weeks to determine how precipitation and fertilizer management influenced plant-available soil N. Fertilizer management altered soil inorganic N, and there were large differences between sites that were consistent with differences in soil texture. Initial soil N pools were larger in Yala than Tumbi (240 vs. 79 kg/ha). Inorganic N pools did not change in Yala (277 kg/ha), but increased fourfold after cultivation and fertilization in Tumbi (371 kg/ha). Intra-annual variability in NO - 3 -N concentrations (3-33 μg/g) in Tumbi topsoils strongly suggested that the sandier soils were prone to high leaching losses. Information on soil inorganic N pools and movement through soil profiles can h vulnerability of SSA croplands to N losses and determine best fertilizer management practices as N application rates increase. A better understanding of the vertical and temporal patterns of soil N pools improves our ability to predict the potential environmental effects of a dramatic increase in fertilizer application rates that will accompany the intensification of African croplands. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  9. Extended-range forecast for the temporal distribution of clustering tropical cyclogenesis over the western North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhiwei; Li, Tim; Bai, Long; Gao, Jianyun

    2017-11-01

    Based on outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), an index for clustering tropical cyclogenesis (CTC) over the western North Pacific (WNP) was defined. Around 76 % of total CTC events were generated during the active phase of the CTC index, and 38 % of the total active phase was concurrent with CTC events. For its continuous property, the CTC index was used as the representative predictand for extended-range forecasting the temporal distribution of CTC events. The predictability sources for CTC events were detected via correlation analyses of the previous 35-5-day lead atmospheric fields against the CTC index. The results showed that the geopotential height at different levels and the 200 hPa zonal wind over the global tropics possessed large predictability sources, whereas the predictability sources of other variables, e.g., OLR, zonal wind, and relatively vorticity at 850 hPa and relatively humility at 700 hPa, were mainly confined to the tropical Indian Ocean and western Pacific Ocean. Several spatial-temporal projection model (STPM) sets were constructed to carry out the extended-range forecast for the CTC index. By combining the output of STPMs separately conducted for the two dominant modes of intraseasonal variability, e.g., the 10-30 and the 30-80 day mode, useful forecast skill could be achieved for a 30-day lead time. The combined output successfully captured both the 10-30 and 30-80 day mode at least 10 days in advance. With a relatively low rate of false alarm, the STPM achieved hits for 80 % (69 %) of 54 CTC events during 2003-2014 at the 10-day (20-day) lead time, suggesting a practical value of the STPM for real-time forecasting WNP CTC events at an extended range.

  10. Identification of the Minimum Effective Dose for Normally Distributed Endpoints Using a Model Selection Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, Rebecca M.; Gerhard, Daniel; Hothorn, Ludwig A.

    2014-01-01

    When identifying the minimum effective dose (MED) or the lowest observed adverse event level (LOAEL), researchers usually employ multiple comparison procedures (MCPs). The ones preferred are the Dunnett-type difference-to-placebo and ratio-to-control test. In this article, we will use a model

  11. Comparison of 3-dimensional proton-photon dose distribution and evaluation of side effects after radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Poljanc, K

    2000-01-01

    The use of high precision radiation with particles (protons and ions) allows the radiation of tumors near risk organs and immedicable tumors. The aim of this work is the comparison between normal tissue complication probability for craniocerebral tumors of children and youth during simulation of photontherapy and proton therapy. The multivariate analysis gives the possibility to determine the tolerance dose for certain organs.

  12. Dose distribution in the thyroid and neighboring regions in therapy with {sup 131}I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, Rommel Barbosa; Bonifacio, Daniel Alexandre Baptista; Sa, Lidia Vasconcellos de [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    In this work, simulations were performed with two types of computer simulators: the MIRD phantom and voxel phantom MASH, both of type adult male and in the standing position, coupled to the computational tool GATE (Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission), to obtain the dose deposited in thyroid and neighboring regions.

  13. Spatial-Temporal Distribution of Hantavirus Rodent-Borne Infection by Oligoryzomys fulvescens in the Agua Buena Region--Panama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armién, Blas; Ortiz, Paulo Lazaro; Gonzalez, Publio; Cumbrera, Alberto; Rivero, Alina; Avila, Mario; Armién, Aníbal G; Koster, Frederick; Glass, Gregory

    2016-02-01

    Hotspot detection and characterization has played an increasing role in understanding the maintenance and transmission of zoonotic pathogens. Identifying the specific environmental factors (or their correlates) that influence reservoir host abundance help increase understanding of how pathogens are maintained in natural systems and are crucial to identifying disease risk. However, most recent studies are performed at macro-scale and describe broad temporal patterns of population abundances. Few have been conducted at a microscale over short time periods that better capture the dynamical patterns of key populations. These finer resolution studies may better define the likelihood of local pathogen persistence. This study characterizes the landscape distribution and spatio-temporal dynamics of Oligoryzomys fulvescens (O. fulvescens), an important mammalian reservoir in Central America. Information collected in a longitudinal study of rodent populations in the community of Agua Buena in Tonosí, Panama, between April 2006 and December 2009 was analyzed using non-spatial analyses (box plots) and explicit spatial statistical tests (correlograms, SADIE and LISA). A 90 node grid was built (raster format) to design a base map. The area between the nodes was 0.09 km(2) and the total study area was 6.43 km(2) (2.39 x 2.69 km). The temporal assessment dataset was divided into four periods for each year studied: the dry season, rainy season, and two months-long transitions between seasons (the months of April and December). There were heterogeneous patterns in the population densities and degrees of dispersion of O. fulvescens that varied across seasons and among years. The species typically was locally absent during the late transitional months of the season, and re-established locally in subsequent years. These populations re-occurred in the same area during the first three years but subsequently re-established further south in the final year of the study. Spatial

  14. Spatial-Temporal Distribution of Hantavirus Rodent-Borne Infection by Oligoryzomys fulvescens in the Agua Buena Region - Panama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Publio; Cumbrera, Alberto; Rivero, Alina; Avila, Mario; Armién, Aníbal G.; Koster, Frederick; Glass, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Background Hotspot detection and characterization has played an increasing role in understanding the maintenance and transmission of zoonotic pathogens. Identifying the specific environmental factors (or their correlates) that influence reservoir host abundance help increase understanding of how pathogens are maintained in natural systems and are crucial to identifying disease risk. However, most recent studies are performed at macro-scale and describe broad temporal patterns of population abundances. Few have been conducted at a microscale over short time periods that better capture the dynamical patterns of key populations. These finer resolution studies may better define the likelihood of local pathogen persistence. This study characterizes the landscape distribution and spatio-temporal dynamics of Oligoryzomys fulvescens (O. fulvescens), an important mammalian reservoir in Central America. Methods Information collected in a longitudinal study of rodent populations in the community of Agua Buena in Tonosí, Panama, between April 2006 and December 2009 was analyzed using non-spatial analyses (box plots) and explicit spatial statistical tests (correlograms, SADIE and LISA). A 90 node grid was built (raster format) to design a base map. The area between the nodes was 0.09 km2 and the total study area was 6.43 km2 (2.39 x 2.69 km). The temporal assessment dataset was divided into four periods for each year studied: the dry season, rainy season, and two months-long transitions between seasons (the months of April and December). Results There were heterogeneous patterns in the population densities and degrees of dispersion of O. fulvescens that varied across seasons and among years. The species typically was locally absent during the late transitional months of the season, and re-established locally in subsequent years. These populations re-occurred in the same area during the first three years but subsequently re-established further south in the final year of the

  15. Degradation of proton depth dose distributions attributable to microstructures in lung-equivalent material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titt, Uwe; Sell, Martin; Unkelbach, Jan; Bangert, Mark; Mirkovic, Dragan; Oelfke, Uwe; Mohan, Radhe

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of the work reported here was to investigate the influence of sub-millimeter size heterogeneities on the degradation of the distal edges of proton beams and to validate Monte Carlo (MC) methods' ability to correctly predict such degradation. A custom-designed high-resolution plastic phantom approximating highly heterogeneous, lung-like structures was employed in measurements and in Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate the degradation of proton Bragg curves penetrating heterogeneous media. Significant differences in distal falloff widths and in peak dose values were observed in the measured and the Monte Carlo simulated curves compared to pristine proton Bragg curves. Furthermore, differences between simulations of beams penetrating CT images of the phantom did not agree well with the corresponding experimental differences. The distal falloff widths in CT image-based geometries were underestimated by up to 0.2 cm in water (corresponding to 0.8-1.4 cm in lung tissue), and the peak dose values of pristine proton beams were overestimated by as much as ˜35% compared to measured curves or depth-dose curves simulated on the basis of true geometry. The authors demonstrate that these discrepancies were caused by the limited spatial resolution of CT images that served as a basis for dose calculations and lead to underestimation of the impact of the fine structure of tissue heterogeneities. A convolution model was successfully applied to mitigate the underestimation. The results of this study justify further development of models to better represent heterogeneity effects in soft-tissue geometries, such as lung, and to correct systematic underestimation of the degradation of the distal edge of proton doses.

  16. Comparison between the calculated and measured dose distributions for four beams of 6 MeV linac in a human-equivalent phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reda Sonia M.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation dose distributions in various parts of the body are of importance in radiotherapy. Also, the percent depth dose at different body depths is an important parameter in radiation therapy applications. Monte Carlo simulation techniques are the most accurate methods for such purposes. Monte Carlo computer calculations of photon spectra and the dose ratios at surfaces and in some internal organs of a human equivalent phantom were performed. In the present paper, dose distributions in different organs during bladder radiotherapy by 6 MeV X-rays were measured using thermoluminescence dosimetry placed at different points in the human-phantom. The phantom was irradiated in exactly the same manner as in actual bladder radiotherapy. Four treatment fields were considered to maximize the dose at the center of the target and minimize it at non-target healthy organs. All experimental setup information was fed to the MCNP-4b code to calculate dose distributions at selected points inside the proposed phantom. Percent depth dose distribution was performed. Also, the absorbed dose as ratios relative to the original beam in the surrounding organs was calculated by MCNP-4b and measured by thermoluminescence dosimetry. Both measured and calculated data were compared. Results indicate good agreement between calculated and measured data inside the phantom. Comparison between MCNP-4b calculations and measurements of depth dose distribution indicated good agreement between both.

  17. Reconnaissance dating: a new radiocarbon method applied to assessing the temporal distribution of Southern Ocean deep-sea corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Andrea; Robinson, Laura F.; McNichol, Ann P.; Jenkins, William J.; Scanlon, Kathryn M.; Gerlach, Dana S.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a rapid 'reconnaissance' method of preparing graphite for 14C/12C analysis. Carbonate (~15 mg) is combusted using an elemental analyzer and the resulting CO2 is converted to graphite using a sealed tube zinc reduction method. Over 85% (n=45 replicates on twenty-one individual corals) of reconnaissance ages measured on corals ranging in age from 500 to 33,000 radiocarbon years (Ryr) are within two standard deviations of ages generated using standard hydrolysis methods on the same corals, and all reconnaissance ages are within 300 Ryr of the standard hydrolysis ages. Replicate measurements on three individual aragonitic corals yielded ages of 1076±35 Ryr (standard deviation; n=5), 10,739±47 Ryr (n=8), and 40,146±3500 Ryr (n=9). No systematic biases were found using different cleaning methods or variable sample sizes. Analysis of 13C/12C was made concurrently with the 14C/12C measurement to correct for natural fractionation and for fractionation during sample processing and analysis. This technique provides a new, rapid method for making accurate, percent-level 14C/12C analyses that may be used to establish the rates and chronology of earth system processes where survey-type modes of age estimation are desirable. For example, applications may include creation of sediment core-top maps, preliminary age models for sediment cores, and growth rate studies of marine organisms such as corals or mollusks. We applied the reconnaissance method to more than 100 solitary deep-sea corals collected in the Drake Passage in the Southern Ocean to investigate their temporal and spatial distribution. The corals used in this study are part of a larger sample set, and the subset that was dated was chosen based on species as opposed to preservation state, so as to exclude obvious temporal biases. Similar to studies in other regions, the distribution of deep-sea corals is not constant through time across the Drake Passage. Most of the corals from the Burdwood Bank

  18. Spatial and temporal distribution of the dust deposition in Central Asia - results from a long term monitoring program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groll, M.; Opp, Chr.; Aslanov, I.

    2013-06-01

    The aeolian transport of dust is an important process in Central Asia. Anthropogenic desertification and the desiccation of the Aral Sea have increased the overall dust emission and transport from this region and the local dust storm frequency during the last decades. Reliable ground data, however, are collected only sporadically, so the knowledge about the spatial and temporal distribution and dynamics of the dust deposition in the Aral Sea basin is fragmented and inconsistent at best. A long-term monitoring program was installed and sustained by three research projects. The results included in this article cover the dust deposition between 2003 and 2010 from 21 stations in Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, and Turkmenistan. They confirm that the aeolian dust transport occurs mainly in the Southern direction. The highest average monthly deposition rate was registered in Uzbekistan (56.2 g m-2), while the percentage of months with a very intense (and potentially harmful) dust deposition flux was highest in Turkmenistan (36.4%). A majority of samples were collected during months with a dust deposition of less than 10.0 g m-2, while only 6% of all samples showed high monthly deposition intensities of more than 100 g m-2. The Kyzyl Kum, Kara Kum, and Aral Kum were identified as the main sources for aeolian dust in the Aral Sea basin. The impact of the Aral Kum as the dominant source of aeolian dust is limited to a region of approximately 500,000 km2 surrounding the former Aral Sea. The Kara Kum is characterized by a very high frequency of dust storms of a local and regional magnitude, and close to the Kyzyl Kum, monthly dust deposition rates of up to 9,600 g m-2 were registered. An analysis of the temporal distribution of the dust deposition showed a slight increase in the dust deposition activity and intensity between 2003 and 2010, with a strong inter-annual and seasonal dynamic. The highest average dust deposition was registered in June, and a second phase of intense dust

  19. Linking carbon and nitrogen metabolism to depth distribution of submersed macrophytes using high ammonium dosing tests and a lake survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Guixiang; Cao, Te; Fu, Hui; Ni, Leyi; Zhang, Xiaolin; Li, Wei; Song, Xin; Xie, Ping; Jeppesen, Erik

    2013-12-01

    Strategies of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) utilisation are among the factors determining plant distribution. It has been argued that submersed macrophytes adapted to lower light environments are more efficient in maintaining C metabolic homeostasis due to their conservative C strategy and ability to balance C shortage. We studied how depth distributions of 12 submersed macrophytes in Lake Erhai, China, were linked to their C-N metabolic strategies when facing acute [Formula: see text] dosing.[Formula: see text] dosing changed C-N metabolism significantly by decreasing the soluble carbohydrate (SC) content and increasing the [Formula: see text]-N and free amino acid (FAA) content of plant tissues.The proportional changes in SC contents in the leaves and FAA contents in the stems induced by [Formula: see text] dosing were closely correlated (positive for SC and negative for FAA) with the colonising water depths of the plants in Lake Erhai, the plants adapted to lower light regimes being more efficient in maintaining SC and FAA homeostasis.These results indicate that conservative carbohydrate metabolism of submersed macrophytes allowed the plants to colonise greater water depths in eutrophic lakes, where low light availability in the water column diminishes carbohydrate production by the plants.

  20. SU-F-T-380: Comparing the Effect of Respiration On Dose Distribution Between Conventional Tangent Pair and IMRT Techniques for Adjuvant Radiotherapy in Early Stage Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, M; Ramaseshan, R [BCCA Abbotsford Centre, Abbotsford, BC (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In this project, we compared the conventional tangent pair technique to IMRT technique by analyzing the dose distribution. We also investigated the effect of respiration on planning target volume (PTV) dose coverage in both techniques. Methods: In order to implement IMRT technique a template based planning protocol, dose constrains and treatment process was developed. Two open fields with optimized field weights were combined with two beamlet optimization fields in IMRT plans. We compared the dose distribution between standard tangential pair and IMRT. The improvement in dose distribution was measured by parameters such as conformity index, homogeneity index and coverage index. Another end point was the IMRT technique will reduce the planning time for staff. The effect of patient’s respiration on dose distribution was also estimated. The four dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) for different phase of breathing cycle was used to evaluate the effect of respiration on IMRT planned dose distribution. Results: We have accumulated 10 patients that acquired 4DCT and planned by both techniques. Based on the preliminary analysis, the dose distribution in IMRT technique was better than conventional tangent pair technique. Furthermore, the effect of respiration in IMRT plan was not significant as evident from the 95% isodose line coverage of PTV drawn on all phases of 4DCT. Conclusion: Based on the 4DCT images, the breathing effect on dose distribution was smaller than what we expected. We suspect that there are two reasons. First, the PTV movement due to respiration was not significant. It might be because we used a tilted breast board to setup patients. Second, the open fields with optimized field weights in IMRT technique might reduce the breathing effect on dose distribution. A further investigation is necessary.

  1. Absorbed dose distribution visualization for superficial treatments through the Fricke Xylenol Gel dosimeter (FXG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alva, M; Sampaio, F G A; Moreira, M V; Petchevist, P C D; De Almeida, A, E-mail: dalmeida@ffclrp.usp.b

    2010-11-01

    Electrons, orthovoltage X-rays and betas are used for superficial treatments. It has been shown that it is practical to measure these three types of radiation using gel dosimetry, which is an accurate dosimetric tool, from which one can infer the absorbed dose. The Fricke Xylenol Gel (FXG) dosimeter has presented adequate results due to its spatial resolution, effective atomic number and density that are near to those of soft tissue. The aim of this work is to compare three types of radiation for skin treatments like orthovoltage (X-rays), brachytherapy (beta rays) and megavoltage (electrons) using the FXG-CCD dosimetric system to determine the calibration curves (CC), beam profiles (BP) and percentage depth dose curves (PDD), evidencing why for clinical applications a specific type of radiation is selected for superficial treatment. From the results obtained we can infer that the FXG-CCD system is adequate for linear, area and volume measurements.

  2. Controlling the dose distribution with gEUD-type constraints within the convex radiotherapy optimization framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinchenko, Y; Craig, T; Keller, H; Terlaky, T; Sharpe, M

    2008-06-21

    Radiation therapy is an important modality in treating various cancers. Various treatment planning and delivery technologies have emerged to support intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), creating significant opportunities to advance this type of treatment. However, one of the fundamental questions in treatment planning and optimization, 'can we produce better treatment plans relying on the existing delivery technology?' still remains unanswered, in large part due to the underlying computational complexity of the problem, which, in turn, often stems from the optimization model being non-convex. We investigate the possibility of including the dose prescription, specified by the dose-volume histogram (DVH), within the convex optimization framework for inverse radiotherapy treatment planning. Specifically, we study the quality of approximating a given DVH with a superset of generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD)-based constraints, the so-called generalized moment constraints (GMCs). As a bi-product, we establish an analytic relationship between a DVH and a sequence of gEUD values. The newly proposed approach is promising as demonstrated by the computational study where the rectum DVH is considered. Unlike the precise partial-volume constraints formulation, which is commonly based on the mixed-integer model and necessitates the use of expensive computing resources to be solved to global optimality, our convex optimization approach is expected to be feasible for implementation on a conventional treatment planning station.

  3. Dose distribution calculation for in-vivo X-ray fluorescence scanning

    OpenAIRE

    Figueroa, Rodolfo; Lozano, Enrique; Valente, Mauro Andres

    2015-01-01

    In-vivo X-ray fluorescence constitutes a useful and accurate technique, worldwide established for constituent elementary distribution assessment. Actually, concentration distributions of arbitrary user-selected elements can be achieved along sample surface with the aim of identifying and simultaneously quantifying every constituent element. The method is based on the use of a collimated X-ray beam reaching the sample. However, one common drawback for considering the application of this techni...

  4. Network-scale spatial and temporal variation in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) redd distributions: patterns inferred from spatially continuous replicate surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Isaak; Russell F. Thurow

    2006-01-01

    Spatially continuous sampling designs, when temporally replicated, provide analytical flexibility and are unmatched in their ability to provide a dynamic system view. We have compiled such a data set by georeferencing the network-scale distribution of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) redds across a large wilderness basin (7330 km2) in...

  5. Spatio-temporal distributions of delta18O, delta D and salinity in the Arabian Sea: Identifying processes and controls

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Deshpande, R.D.; Muraleedharan, P.M.; Singh, R.L.; Kumar, B.; Rao, M.S.; Dave, M.; Sivakumar, K.U.; Gupta, S.K.

    Isotopic compositions ( delta18O and deltaD) and salinity (S) of 683 surface water samples from the Arabian Sea (AS) collected during 2008–2010, were measured to understand the factors controlling the spatio-temporal distribution...

  6. Spatio-temporal distribution of vegetation index and its influencing factors—a case study of the Jiaozhou Bay, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yang; Yu, Ge

    2017-11-01

    The coastal zone is an area characterized by intense interaction between land and sea, high sensitivity to regional environmental changes, and concentrated human activities. Little research has investigated vegetation cover changes in coastal zones resulting from climate change and land-use change, with a lack of knowledge about the driving mechanism. Normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) can be used as an indicator for change of the coastal environment. In this study, we analyzed the interannual changes and spatial distribution of NDVI in the coastal zone around Jiaozhou Bay in Qingdao, a coastal city undergoing rapid urbanization in northeast China. The underlying causes of NDVI variations were discussed in the context of climate change and land-use change. Results showed that the spatio-temporal distribution of NDVI displayed high spatial variability in the study area and showed a typical trend of gradually increasing from coastal to inland regions. The significant increase area of NDVI was mainly found in newly added construction land, extending along the coastline towards the inland. Land vegetation cover demonstrated a certain response relationship to sea-land climate change and land-based activities. The impact of land-based human activities was slightly greater than that of sea-land climate change for land vegetation cover. The results indicate that promoting ecological policies can build an ecological security framework of vegetation suitable for the resource characteristics of coastal cities. The framework will buffer the negative effects of sea-land climate change and land-based human activities on vegetation cover and thereby achieve the balance of regional development and ecological benefits in the coastal zone.

  7. Temporal and spatial distribution of phytoplankton functional groups and role of environment factors in a deep subtropical reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Li, Qiuhua; Chen, Jing'an; Wang, Jingfu; Jiao, Shulin; Chen, Fengfeng

    2017-09-01

    Phytoplankton and environment factors were investigated in 2015 and phytoplankton functional groups were used to understand their temporal and spatial distribution and their driving factors in Wanfeng Reservoir. Seventeen functional groups (B, D, E, F, G, J, Lo, MP, P, S1, T, W1, W2, X1, X2, Xph, Y) were identified based on 34 species. The dominant groups were: J/B/P/D in dry season, X1/J/Xph/G/T in normal season and J in flood season. Phytoplankton abundance ranged from 5.33×104 cells/L to 3.65×107 cells/L, with the highest value occurring in flood season and lowest in dry season. The vertical profile of dominant groups showed little differentiation except for P, which dominated surface layers over 20 m as a result of mixing water masses and higher transparency during dry season. However, the surface waters presented higher values of phytoplankton abundance than other layers, possibly because of greater irradiance. The significant explaining variables and their ability to describe the spatial distribution of the phytoplankton community in RDA differed seasonally as follows: dry season, NH4-N, NO3-N, NO2-N, TN:TP ratio and transparency (SD); normal season, temperature (WT), water depth, TN, NH4-N and NO3-N; flood season, WT, water depth, NO3-N and NO2-N. Furthermore, nitrogen, water temperature, SD and water depth were significant variables explaining the variance of phytoplankton communities when datasets included all samples. The results indicated that water physical conditions and hydrology were important in phytoplankton community dynamics, and nitrogen was more important than phosphorus in modifying phytoplankton communities. Seasonal differences in the relationship between the environment and phytoplankton community should be considered in water quality management.

  8. Temporal variability of chlorophyll distribution in the Gulf of Mexico: bio-optical data from profiling floats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqueron de Fommervault, Orens; Perez-Brunius, Paula; Damien, Pierre; Camacho-Ibar, Victor F.; Sheinbaum, Julio

    2017-12-01

    Chlorophyll concentration is a key oceanic biogeochemical variable. In the Gulf of Mexico (GOM), its distribution, which is mainly obtained from satellite surface observations and scarce in situ experiments, is still poorly understood. In 2011-2012, eight profiling floats equipped with biogeochemical sensors were deployed for the first time in the GOM and generated an unprecedented dataset that significantly increased the number of chlorophyll vertical distribution measurements in the region. The analysis of these data, once calibrated, permits us to reconsider the spatial and temporal variability of the chlorophyll concentration in the water column. At a seasonal scale, results confirm the surface signal seen by satellites, presenting maximum concentrations in winter and low values in summer. It is shown that the deepening of the mixed layer is the primary factor triggering the chlorophyll surface increase in winter. In the GOM, a possible interpretation is that this surface increase corresponds to a biomass increase. However, the present dataset suggests that the basin-scale climatological surface increase in chlorophyll content results from a vertical redistribution of subsurface chlorophyll and/or photoacclimation processes, rather than a net increase of biomass. One plausible explanation for this is the decoupling between the mixed-layer depth and the deep nutrient reservoir since mixed-layer depth only reaches the nitracline in sporadic events in the observations. Float measurements also provide evidence that the depth and the magnitude of the deep chlorophyll maximum is strongly controlled by the mesoscale variability, with higher chlorophyll biomass generally observed in cyclones rather than anticyclones.

  9. The temporal dynamics of object processing in visual cortex during the transition from distributed to focused spatial attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chien-Te; Libertus, Melissa E; Meyerhoff, Karen L; Woldorff, Marty G

    2011-12-01

    Several major cognitive neuroscience models have posited that focal spatial attention is required to integrate different features of an object to form a coherent perception of it within a complex visual scene. Although many behavioral studies have supported this view, some have suggested that complex perceptual discrimination can be performed even with substantially reduced focal spatial attention, calling into question the complexity of object representation that can be achieved without focused spatial attention. In the present study, we took a cognitive neuroscience approach to this problem by recording cognition-related brain activity both to help resolve the questions about the role of focal spatial attention in object categorization processes and to investigate the underlying neural mechanisms, focusing particularly on the temporal cascade of these attentional and perceptual processes in visual cortex. More specifically, we recorded electrical brain activity in humans engaged in a specially designed cued visual search paradigm to probe the object-related visual processing before and during the transition from distributed to focal spatial attention. The onset times of the color popout cueing information, indicating where within an object array the subject was to shift attention, was parametrically varied relative to the presentation of the array (i.e., either occurring simultaneously or being delayed by 50 or 100 msec). The electrophysiological results demonstrate that some levels of object-specific representation can be formed in parallel for multiple items across the visual field under spatially distributed attention, before focal spatial attention is allocated to any of them. The object discrimination process appears to be subsequently amplified as soon as focal spatial attention is directed to a specific location and object. This set of novel neurophysiological findings thus provides important new insights on fundamental issues that have been long

  10. Temporal distribution of Aedes aegypti Linnaeus (Diptera, Culicidae, in a Hospital in Cuiabá, State of Mato Grosso, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo de Carvalho-Leandro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at registering and monitoring the presence of Aedes aegypti in the University Hospital Júlio Muller, Cuiabá-MT, as well as investigating the influence of temperature and rainfall on its temporal distribution and egg densities in ovitraps. The study was performed from April/2007 to March/2008, utilizing ovitraps with 10% of hay infusion and a wood paddle as an oviposition substrate. For surveillance, one ovitrap was placed in each of the 12 points distributed throughout the hospital. Ovitraps were collected monthly at the end of a 5-day installation period. After egg counting, wood paddles were immersed in water to allow larval eclosion for species identification through optical microscopy. Egg Density Index (EDI, Positive Ovitraps Index (POI, and Mean Number of Eggs (MNE were used for data analysis. The presence of A. aegypti in the hospital was registered throughout the study period, except in July. The MNE was proportionally higher in the internal area (n= 8.47 eggs/paddle when compared to the external area (n= 5.46 eggs/paddle, and was higher in September/October 2007 and January/February 2008. A significant increase in EDI, POI and MNE was registered in periods where the average temperature was higher, and the increase in POI was also concomitant with an increase in rainfall. The continuous presence of A. aegypti in the hospital throughout the study period, points out the need of including this mosquito in the arthropod control list in this environment. This is particularly important, considering that A. aegypti is an important vector of several arboviroses.

  11. Abundance and spatial-temporal distribution of Macrobrachium surinamicum Holthuis, 1948 (Palaemonidae) in the Amazon estuary, north of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcante, D V; Bentes, B S; Martinelli-Lemos, J M

    2017-01-01

    Macrobrachium surinamicum is a small shrimp that inhabits rivers of low salinity. It is mainly caught as bycatch in Amazon shrimp Macrobrachium amazonicum fisheries, which is widely exploited by artisanal fisheries for food and economic needs of the riverside population. This study aimed to characterize the spatial and temporal distribution of the freshwater shrimp M. surinamicum in the Guajará Bay and on Mosqueiro Island, correlating the abundance of this species with abiotic factors (temperature and salinity). Samples were taken from May 2006 to April 2007 in six locations: Mosqueiro Island (Furo das Marinhas and Porto do Pelé); Icoaraci district; Arapiranga Island, edge of the city of Belém; and Combu Island, using traps named 'matapis'. A total of 361 shrimps were caught. The abundance was higher in December and lower in July 2006. The biggest catch occurred on Arapiranga Island and the lowest on Mosqueiro Island. The abundance differed significantly in December 2006 and no variable studied had significant influence on M. surinamicum abundance. In Guajará Bay, particularly the more sheltered places, as Arapiranga and Combu islands, favor the development of M. surinamicum, indicating that this species has preference for less disturbed areas.

  12. Study on Temporal and Spatial Distributions of Ba Atoms in Fluorescent Lamp Discharge Using Laser-Induced Florescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlyHendy, Ahmed Samir; Yamashita, Go; Yamagata, Yukihiko; Uchino, Kiichiro; Ueda, Takashi; Manabe, Yoshio

    2006-10-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique was applied to the measurements of the temporal and spatial distributions of Ba atoms in the vicinity of the electrode of a fluorescent lamp operated at 60 Hz. Ground-state (61S0) Ba atoms were excited to a 51P1 level (350.1 nm) by a frequency-doubled dye laser beam, and the subsequent fluorescence (51P1-51D2, 582.6 nm) was detected. Over a whole periodic time (16.67 ms), the density of the Ba atoms was found to have two peaks, and the number of Ba atoms emitted in the anode half-cycle was about twofold larger than that emitted in the cathode half-cycle. This difference between the Ba atoms emitted during the anode half-cycle and those emitted during the cathode half-cycle was studied for lamps with different gas pressures. Ba atoms were found to be emitted mainly from the hot spot of the filament electrode. It is suggested that the main factor for Ba atom emission from the electrode is not sputtering by ion bombardment but thermal evaporation.

  13. Indigenous knowledge and science unite to reveal spatial and temporal dimensions of distributional shift in wildlife of conservation concern.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina N Service

    Full Text Available Range shifts among wildlife can occur rapidly and impose cascading ecological, economic, and cultural consequences. However, occurrence data used to define distributional limits derived from scientific approaches are often outdated for wide ranging and elusive species, especially in remote environments. Accordingly, our aim was to amalgamate indigenous and western scientific evidence of grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis records and detail a potential range shift on the central coast of British Columbia, Canada. In addition, we test the hypothesis that data from each method yield similar results, as well as illustrate the complementary nature of this coupled approach. Combining information from traditional and local ecological knowledge (TEK/LEK interviews with remote camera, genetic, and hunting data revealed that grizzly bears are now present on 10 islands outside their current management boundary. LEK interview data suggested this expansion has accelerated over the last 10 years. Both approaches provided complementary details and primarily affirmed one another: all islands with scientific evidence for occupation had consistent TEK/LEK evidence. Moreover, our complementary methods approach enabled a more spatially and temporally detailed account than either method would have afforded alone. In many cases, knowledge already held by local indigenous people could provide timely and inexpensive data about changing ecological processes. However, verifying the accuracy of scientific and experiential knowledge by pairing sources at the same spatial scale allows for increased confidence and detail. A similarly coupled approach may be useful across taxa in many regions.

  14. The Temporal and Spatial Distribution of Aftershocks of The North Aegean Sea Earthquake on 24 May 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didem Tamtaş, Burçin

    2017-04-01

    An earthquake occured in the North Aegean Sea on 24 May 2014 12:25 local time (UTC+3) with Ml=6.5. It was a shallow earthquake with 21 km focal depth and felt in Aegean and Marmara regions of Turkey. 321 people were temporarily hospitalised as reported by Disaster and Emergency Management Presidency (AFAD). And also the earthquake caused damage to about 300 buildings. In this study, the spatial and temporal changes of the seismicity parameters of North Aegean Sea Earthquake were analyzed by using the aftershock data. Calculations are based on Gutenberg-Richter and Omori laws. It has been determined that the b value which is one of the seismicity parameters is changing in between 0.85 ≤ b ≤ 0.92 and increases by time. Based on the increasing value of b by time, it is reasonable to assume that the effective tension in the area is decreasing by time. It has been calculated that the p value which defines the declination of aftershocks by time changes in between 1.18 ≥ p ≥ 1.07 and decreases by time. The distributions of the main shock and the aftershocks locations and the focal mecanisms show that the region is the continution of the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ).

  15. Distinct temporal and anatomical distributions of amyloid-β and tau abnormalities following controlled cortical impact in transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hien T Tran

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a major environmental risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. Intracellular accumulations of amyloid-β and tau proteins have been observed within hours following severe TBI in humans. Similar abnormalities have been recapitulated in young 3xTg-AD mice subjected to the controlled cortical impact model (CCI of TBI and sacrificed at 24 h and 7 days post injury. This study investigated the temporal and anatomic