WorldWideScience

Sample records for temperature vacuum microgravity

  1. Temperature control in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearnaley, G.

    1986-01-01

    The patent concerns a method for controlling the temperature of silicon wafers (or samples), during ion beam treatment of the wafers, in a vacuum. The apparatus and method are described for irradiation and temperature control of the samples. The wafers are mounted on a drum which is rotated through the ion beam, and are additionally heated by infra-red lamps to achieve the desired temperature. (U.K.)

  2. HIGH TEMPERATURE VACUUM MIXER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D. Chertov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The work is devoted to the creation of a new type of mixer to produce homogeneous mixtures of dissimilar materials applied to recycling of housing and communal services waste. The article describes the design of a dual-chamber device of the original high-temperature vacuum mixer, there investigated the processes occurring in the chambers of such devices. The results of theoretical and experimental research of the process of mixing recycled polyethylene with a mixture of "grinded food waste – Eco wool” are presented. The problem of the optimum choice of bending the curvilinear blades in the working volume of the seal, which is achieved by setting their profile in the form of involute arc of several circles of different radii, is examined . The dependences, allowing to define the limits of the changes of the main mode parameters the angular velocity of rotation of the working body of the mixer using two ways of setting the profile of the curvilinear blade mixer are obtained. Represented design of the mixer is proposed to use for a wide range of tasks associated with the mixing of the components with a strongly pronounced difference of physic al chemical properties and, in particular, in the production of composites out of housing and communal services waste.

  3. Flexible Transfer of Regolith in Micro-Gravity and Vacuum Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A novel, robust method of collection and transfer of NEO/Phobos material under micro-gravity conditions under vacuum/space environment with minimal loss of volatiles...

  4. The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Experiments Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Warren; Lai, Anthony; Croonquist, Arvid; Chui, Talso; Eraker, J. H.; Abbott, Randy; Mills, Gary; Mohl, James; Craig, James; Balachandra, Balu; hide

    2000-01-01

    The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility (LTMPF) is being developed by NASA to provide long duration low temperature and microgravity environment on the International Space Station (ISS) for performing fundamental physics investigations. Currently, six experiments have been selected for flight definition studies. More will be selected in a two-year cycle, through NASA Research Announcement. This program is managed under the Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Experiments Project Office at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The facility is being designed to launch and returned to earth on a variety of vehicles including the HII-A and the space shuttle. On orbit, the facility will be connected to the Exposed Facility on the Japanese Experiment Module, Kibo. Features of the facility include a cryostat capable of maintaining super-fluid helium at a temperature of 1.4 K for 5 months, resistance thermometer bridges, multi-stage thermal isolation system, thermometers capable of pico-Kelvin resolution, DC SQUID magnetometers, passive vibration isolation, and magnetic shields with a shielding factor of 80dB. The electronics and software architecture incorporates two VME buses run using the VxWorks operating system. Technically challenging areas in the design effort include the following: 1) A long cryogen life that survives several launch and test cycles without the need to replace support straps for the helium tank. 2) The minimization of heat generation in the sample stage caused by launch vibration 3) The design of compact and lightweight DC SQUID electronics. 4) The minimization of RF interference for the measurement of heat at pico-Watt level. 5) Light weighting of the magnetic shields. 6) Implementation of a modular and flexible electronics and software architecture. The first launch is scheduled for mid-2003, on an H-IIA Rocket Transfer Vehicle, out of the Tanegashima Space Center of Japan. Two identical facilities will be built. While one facility is onboard

  5. High temperature autoclave vacuum seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, J. R.; Simpson, W. G.; Walker, H. M.

    1971-01-01

    Aluminum sheet forms effective sealing film at temperatures up to 728 K. Soft aluminum wire rings provide positive seal between foil and platen. For applications at temperatures above aluminum's service temperature, stainless steel is used as film material and copper wire as sealant.

  6. Experimental Investigation of Pressure-volume-Temperature Mass Gauging Method Under Microgravity Condition by Parabolic Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Mansu; Park, Hana; Yoo, DonGyu; Jung, Youngsuk; Jeong, Sangkwon

    Gauging the volume or mass of liquid propellant of a rocket vehicle in space is an important issue for its economic feasibility and optimized design of loading mass. Pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) gauging method is one of the most suitable measuring techniques in space due to its simplicity and reliability. This paper presents unique experimental results and analyses of PVT gauging method using liquid nitrogen under microgravity condition by parabolic flight. A vacuum-insulated and cylindrical-shaped liquid nitrogen storage tank with 9.2 L volume is manufactured by observing regulation of parabolic flight. PVT gauging experiments are conducted under low liquid fraction condition from 26% to 32%. Pressure, temperature, and the injected helium mass into the storage tank are measured to obtain the ullage volume by gas state equation. Liquid volume is finally derived by the measured ullage volume and the known total tank volume. Two sets of parabolic flights are conducted and each set is composed of approximately 10 parabolic flights. In the first set of flights, the short initial waiting time (3 ∼ 5 seconds) cannot achieve sufficient thermal equilibrium condition at the beginning. It causes inaccurate gauging results due to insufficient information of the initial helium partial pressure in the tank. The helium injection after 12 second waiting time at microgravity condition with high mass flow rate in the second set of flights achieves successful initial thermal equilibrium states and accurate measurement results of initial helium partial pressure. Liquid volume measurement errors in the second set are within 11%.

  7. Ceramic material suitable for repair of a space vehicle component in a microgravity and vacuum environment, method of making same, and method of repairing a space vehicle component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedell, James A. (Inventor); Easler, Timothy E. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A precursor of a ceramic adhesive suitable for use in a vacuum, thermal, and microgravity environment. The precursor of the ceramic adhesive includes a silicon-based, preceramic polymer and at least one ceramic powder selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride, boron carbide, boron oxide, boron nitride, hafnium boride, hafnium carbide, hafnium oxide, lithium aluminate, molybdenum silicide, niobium carbide, niobium nitride, silicon boride, silicon carbide, silicon oxide, silicon nitride, tin oxide, tantalum boride, tantalum carbide, tantalum oxide, tantalum nitride, titanium boride, titanium carbide, titanium oxide, titanium nitride, yttrium oxide, zirconium diboride, zirconium carbide, zirconium oxide, and zirconium silicate. Methods of forming the ceramic adhesive and of repairing a substrate in a vacuum and microgravity environment are also disclosed, as is a substrate repaired with the ceramic adhesive.

  8. Temperature Distribution Pattern of Brassica chinensis during Vacuum Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-yan Song

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature distribution of leafy vegetables is often less uniform than that of other vegetables during the vacuum cooling process, a factor that can cause undesired effects such as frostbite. Brassica chinensis, a type of classical leafy vegetable, was used as a model in this paper to optimize vacuum cooling technology for the whole and fresh-cut leafy vegetables. We found that noticeable temperature differences between the leaf and the petiole occurred, which resulted from their structural difference. Temperature variations of different parts of the leaf were also observed, indicating that cooling rate of leaf margin was quicker than the other parts. Our experiments show that using a moderate volumetric displacement of the chamber (0.033 s−1 is beneficial for obtaining a relative uniform temperature distribution of the leaf part.

  9. Implementation of Temperature-Controlled Method of Protein Crystallization in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelov, V. I.; Zakharov, B. G.; Bezbakh, I. Zh.; Safronov, V. V.; Chernyshev, B. V.; Dutyshev, I. N.

    2018-01-01

    An experimental scientific equipment for implementing temperature-controlled protein crystallization in capillaries under microgravity has been developed, fabricated, and tested. This crystallization method, providing on-line separate control of crystal growth both in the stage of nucleation of crystals and during their further growth, requires small amounts of protein solution. The equipment has been tested on board of Foton-M4 spacecraft (growth of lysozyme protein crystals of high structural quality in microgravity) using a cyclogram developed in ground-based experiments. The results obtained have demonstrated efficiency and importance of the developed equipment and method for growing biomacromolecular crystals of high-structural quality.

  10. Pressure-volume-temperature gauging method experiment using liquid nitrogen under microgravity condition of parabolic flight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Man Su; Park, Hana; Yoo, Don Gyu; Jeong, Sang Kwon [Cryogenic Engineering Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Young Suk [Launcher Systems Development Team, Korea Aerospace Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    Measuring an exact amount of remaining cryogenic liquid propellant under microgravity condition is one of the important issues of rocket vehicle. A Pressure-Volume-Temperature (PVT) gauging method is attractive due to its minimal additional hardware and simple gauging process. In this paper, PVT gauging method using liquid nitrogen is investigated under microgravity condition with parabolic flight. A 9.2 litre metal cryogenic liquid storage tank containing approximately 30% of liquid nitrogen is pressurized by ambient temperature helium gas. During microgravity condition, the inside of the liquid tank becomes near-isothermal condition within 1 K difference indicated by 6 silicon diode sensors vertically distributed in the middle of the liquid tank. Helium injection with higher mass flow rate after 10 seconds of the waiting time results in successful measurements of helium partial pressure in the tank. Average liquid volume measurement error is within 11% of the whole liquid tank volume and standard deviation of errors is 11.9. As a result, the applicability of PVT gauging method to liquid.

  11. Simulation of the temperature field distribution in medium-voltage vacuum interrupter and experimental verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W.; Liu, H. L.; Cai, Y. G.; Li, Y. L.; Zhou, H. Y.; Zhou, Y.

    2018-01-01

    The temperature field distribution in the medium-voltage vacuum interrupter decides the thermal stability of it. In this paper, the simulation model of a kind of 12kV/3150A/40kA medium-voltage vacuum interrupter is constructed, and conductive bridge model is used. This paper simulates current contraction and Joule heating between contacts, and solves relevant problems using the function of the thermal-electrical coupling in the finite element software ANSYS. Steady-state temperature rise of vacuum interrupter at rated current and transient temperature rise of vacuum interrupter at short-time withstand current are calculated. Influence of the contact situation on vacuum interrupter temperature rise is analyzed. Steady-state temperature rise experiments for the interrupter are carried out, and experiment results verify the accuracy of simulation results. The results are useful in the designing and optimizing of medium-voltage vacuum interrupter.

  12. DIAGNOSTICS OF THE HIGH-TORQUE ELECTRICAL MOTOR UNDER OPERATING CONDITIONS AT LOW TEMPERATURES IN VACUUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Byeli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Parameters of high-moment electrical motor working at low-temperatures and high vacuum were investigated. It has been demonstrated that pressure in conspiracy with temperature does not influence starting current of the motor. Temperature reduction from 293 up to 143 K increases starting current at a factor of 3.5. 

  13. Temperature distributions in a Tokamak vacuum vessel of fusion reactor after the loss-of-vacuum-events occurred

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takase, K.; Kunugi, T.; Shibata, M.; Seki, Y.

    1998-01-01

    If a loss-of-vacuum-event (LOVA) occurred in a fusion reactor, buoyancy-driven exchange flows would occur at breaches of a vacuum vessel (VV) due to the temperature difference between the inside and outside of the VV. The exchange flows may bring mixtures of activated materials and tritium in the VV to the outside through the breaches, and remove decay heat from the plasma-facing components of the VV. Therefore, the LOVA experiments were carried out under the condition that one or two breaches was opened and that the VV was heated to a maximum 200 C, using a small-scaled LOVA experimental apparatus. Air and helium gas were provided as working fluids. Fluid and wall temperature distributions in the VV were measured and the flow patterns in the VV were estimated by using these temperature distributions. It was found that: (1) the exchange mass in the VV depended on the breach positions; (2) the exchange flow at the single breach case became a counter-current flow when the breach was at the roof of the VV and a stratified flow when it was at the side wall; (3) and that at the double breach case, a one-way flow between two breaches was formed. (orig.)

  14. Space simulation chambers for complete satellites: High vacuum and extreme temperatures challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galan, M.; Cazador, M.

    2010-01-01

    During any satellite development phase, many operational factors can only be experimentally determined by testing under the most extreme environmental conditions that will be encountered in its life. Simulating the different temperatures, thermal loads and vacuum conditions allows analyzing the suitability of new materials, components and systems for these extreme conditions. In a space project, thermal vacuum testing reaches 70% of the total testing costs. They are the most similar conditions to the real ones that will be encountered in the outer space.In this article, the function of both the thermal and vacuum subsystems are explained and analyzed.Thermal control units are the most fundamental part in a space simulation chamber; they must cover the required extreme temperature range with the required heating and cooling speed. The vacuum subsystem must allow reaching the required operating pressure within the specified time, handling significant degassing loads both from the satellite and the large exposed surfaces inside the chamber. (Author) 6 refs.

  15. Real-Time Temperature Measurement in a Vacuum Degasser Using Optical Pyrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel Bonin - Process Metrix; Peter Hues - Process Metrix; William Federoff - US Steel; Todd Smith - Berry Metals

    2007-02-14

    The objective of the research was the development of a fiber-coupled, optical pyrometer for continuous temperature measurement in a vacuum degasser that reduces process time, enhances process control, and eliminates manual or robot-operated thermocouples. Through the live testing performed at US Steel's Edgar Thompson Works, the challenges associated with making optical temperature measurements in a vacuum chamber were identified. As a result of these challenges it was determined that continuous temperature monitoring in RH-type degassers was not a viable alternative to standard immersion thermocouples. The project was not successful.

  16. Heat Transfer Mechanisms for Flow Boiling in Microgravity using Fluorescing Materials as Temperature Sensors

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — I propose an experiment to study two-phase flow boiling in microgravity. Obtaining a fundamental understanding of the nature of flow boiling fluid mechanics and heat...

  17. Vacuum encapsulated, high temperature diamond amplified cathode capsule and method for making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Triveni; Walsh, Josh; Gangone, Elizabeth

    2015-12-29

    A vacuum encapsulated, hermetically sealed cathode capsule for generating an electron beam of secondary electrons, which generally includes a cathode element having a primary emission surface adapted to emit primary electrons, an annular insulating spacer, a diamond window element comprising a diamond material and having a secondary emission surface adapted to emit secondary electrons in response to primary electrons impinging on the diamond window element, a first high-temperature solder weld disposed between the diamond window element and the annular insulating spacer and a second high-temperature solder weld disposed between the annular insulating spacer and the cathode element. The cathode capsule is formed by a high temperature weld process under vacuum such that the first solder weld forms a hermetical seal between the diamond window element and the annular insulating spacer and the second solder weld forms a hermetical seal between the annular spacer and the cathode element whereby a vacuum encapsulated chamber is formed within the capsule.

  18. Jets with ALICE: from vacuum to high-temperature QCD

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    ALICE measures jets in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions to study modifications of the jet fragmentation due to cold nuclear and hot QCD matter. In pp collisions ALICE has measured inclusive jet yields, the ratio of yields with different resolution R, a variety of jet shapes and the semi-inclusive rate of jets recoiling against a high transverse momentum hadron trigger. These measurements are compared to NLO calculations including hadronization corrections and to MC models. Jets in pp are primarily conceived as a vacuum reference for jet observables in p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions. In p-Pb collisions ALICE explores cold nuclear matter effects on jet yields, jet fragmentation and dijet acoplanarity. The hot and dense medium created in heavy-ion collisions is expected to modify the fragmentation of high energy partonic projectiles leading to changes in the energy and structure of the reconstructed jets with respect to pp jets. The study of modified jets aims at understanding the detailed mechanisms of in-medium energy...

  19. Thermophysical Properties Measurement of High-Temperature Liquids Under Microgravity Conditions in Controlled Atmospheric Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masahito; Ozawa, Shumpei; Mizuno, Akotoshi; Hibiya, Taketoshi; Kawauchi, Hiroya; Murai, Kentaro; Takahashi, Suguru

    2012-01-01

    Microgravity conditions have advantages of measurement of surface tension and viscosity of metallic liquids by the oscillating drop method with an electromagnetic levitation (EML) device. Thus, we are preparing the experiments of thermophysical properties measurements using the Materials-Science Laboratories ElectroMagnetic-Levitator (MSL-EML) facilities in the international Space station (ISS). Recently, it has been identified that dependence of surface tension on oxygen partial pressure (Po2) must be considered for industrial application of surface tension values. Effect of Po2 on surface tension would apparently change viscosity from the damping oscillation model. Therefore, surface tension and viscosity must be measured simultaneously in the same atmospheric conditions. Moreover, effect of the electromagnetic force (EMF) on the surface oscillations must be clarified to obtain the ideal surface oscillation because the EMF works as the external force on the oscillating liquid droplets, so extensive EMF makes apparently the viscosity values large. In our group, using the parabolic flight levitation experimental facilities (PFLEX) the effect of Po2 and external EMF on surface oscillation of levitated liquid droplets was systematically investigated for the precise measurements of surface tension and viscosity of high temperature liquids for future ISS experiments. We performed the observation of surface oscillations of levitated liquid alloys using PFLEX on board flight experiments by Gulfstream II (G-II) airplane operated by DAS. These observations were performed under the controlled Po2 and also under the suitable EMF conditions. In these experiments, we obtained the density, the viscosity and the surface tension values of liquid Cu. From these results, we discuss about as same as reported data, and also obtained the difference of surface oscillations with the change of the EMF conditions.

  20. Performance of solid lubricated ball bearings at high-temperatures in a vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Katsumi; Suzuki, Mineo; Nishimura, Makoto; Hasegawa, Masaji; Moriyama, Minoru

    1994-07-01

    Ball bearings which can operate at high temperatures in a vacuum will be required with advances in technology. Among the issues for the operation of ball bearings at high temperatures, solid lubricants and bearing materials are crucial. The aim of this study was to develop ball bearings for use at high temperatures in a vacuum. The tested bearings were 20-mm bore-sized angular contact ball bearings. Three combinations of bearing materials were tested: M-50 bearings, hybrid bearings with M-50 races and Si3N4 balls, and Si3N4 bearings. M-50 bearings were lubricated with a silver film. Hybrid and ceramic bearings were lubricated with a pre-coated sputtered MoS2 film and a self-lubricating hot-pressed composite retainer. Tests were carried out at temperatures up to 500 C and a rotational speed of 600 rpm under an axial load of 50 N in a vacuum. Excellent performance at 500 C in a vacuum was obtained for Si3N4 bearings. Frictional torque was low and stable for more than 5x10(exp 7) revolutions. After the tests, the bearings were in very good condition with a small amount of wear. Hybrid bearings also showed very good performance at 350 C in a vacuum. M-50 steel bearings were operated without failure at 350 C in a vacuum, although frictional torque was rather high and unstable. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation revealed the existence of a film on the ball surface transferred from the composite retainer for both hybrid and ceramic bearings.

  1. Influence of vacuum drying temperature on: physico-chemical composition and antioxidant properties of murta berries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murta (Ugni molinae T.) berries were vacuum dried at a constant pressure of 15 kPa. The effects of processing temperatures (50, 60, 70, 80 and 90 °C) on the physico-chemical characteristics, the phenolic and flavonoid compounds, the antioxidant activity (measured by DPPH and ORAC) and the sugar and ...

  2. Investigations of Heat Transfer in Vacuum between Room Temperature and 80 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooks, J.; Demko, J. A.; E Fesmire, J.; Matsumoto, T.

    2017-12-01

    The heat transfer between room temperature and 80 K is controlled using various insulating material combinations. The modes of heat transfer are well established to be conduction and thermal radiation when in a vacuum. Multi-Layer Insulation (MLI) in a vacuum has long been the best approach. Typically this layered system is applied to the cold surface. This paper investigates the application of MLI to both the cold and warm surface to see whether there is a significant difference. In addition if MLI is on the warm surface, the cold side of the MLI may be below the critical temperature of some high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials. It has been proposed that HTS materials can serve to block thermal radiation. An experiment is conducted to measure this effect. Boil-off calorimetry is the method of measuring the heat transfer.

  3. Accurate measuring temperature by infrared thermal imaging system in vacuum and cryogenic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yonghong; Tao, Dongxing; Hou, Yaqing; Wang, Jing; Pei, Yifei

    2018-01-01

    Infrared thermal imaging technology uses the detector to receive infrared radiation from the measured object, and the object temperature distribution will be changed into a visual image by signal processing system. The accuracy of measuring temperature will be affected by the surface emission rate, reflectivity, atmospheric attenuation, and background radiation and environmental effect under normal temperature and pressure conditions. In order to realize the accurate temperature measurement under the condition of ultra-high vacuum and cryogenic environment, the general formula of the theoretic temperature of measured object surface is deduced, which based on the principle of thermal radiation and temperature measurement by infrared thermal imager. In this paper, the impact factors of temperature measurement accuracy of long-wave infrared thermal imaging system under those conditions are analyzed, and various theoretical numerical value of factors are plotted on the curve of precious accuracy temperature measurement. The results of analysis for the thermal imaging system will improve temperature measurement precision in vacuum thermal test, which have active practical significance.

  4. Tribological properties of polymers PI, PTFE and PEEK at cryogenic temperature in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qihua; Zheng, Fei; Wang, Tingmei

    2016-04-01

    The effects of temperature, sliding speed and load on the tribological properties of polyimide (PI), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) at cryogenic temperature in vacuum were investigated using a ball-on-disk tribometer. At cryogenic temperature, polymers show higher hardness which results in decreasing contact area between the friction pairs. Moreover, the real surface area in contact between steel ball and polymer disk determines the friction coefficient instead of the formation and adhesion of the transfer film. Thus, the friction coefficients at cryogenic temperatures are lower than at room temperature. On the other hand, wear rates of the three polymers decrease as temperature decreases since molecular mobility and migration are limited at cryogenic temperatures. For the visco-elasticity of PI, PTFE and PEEK, the friction coefficients fall as the load increases.

  5. Temperature Stability and Control Requirements for Thermal Vacuum/Thermal Balance Testing of the Aquarius Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The paper describes the specific temperature stability and control requirements for the thermal vacuum and thermal balance testing of the Aquarius Instrument at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The testing was conducted in the 10' wide x 15' deep Facility 225 Thermal Vacuum chamber. The temperature control stability requirements were less than .14 C RMS thermal variation over a seven-day period. The thermal test specification also called for the ability to impose a high-resolution sinusoidal variation for all heater zones. The special requirements of the Aquarius radiometer test necessitated the construction of a multi-function test fixture and the modification of two existing heater controller racks.

  6. Densification control and analysis of outer shell of new high-temperature vacuum insulated composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Chen, Zhaofeng; Jiang, Yun; Yu, Shengjie; Xu, Tengzhou; Li, Binbin; Chen, Zhou

    2017-11-01

    A novel high temperature vacuum insulated composite with low thermal conductivity composed of SiC foam core material and sealing outer shell is discussed, which will have a great potential to be used as thermal protection system material. In this composite, the outer shell is the key to maintain its internal vacuum, which is consisted of 2.5D C/C and SiC coating. So the densification processes of outer shell, including 2.5D braiding process, chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) pyrolytic carbon (PyC) process, polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) glassy carbon (GC) process and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) SiC process, are focused in this paper. The measuring result of the gas transmission quantity of outer shell is only 0.14 cm3/m2 · d · Pa after 5 times CVD processes, which is two order of magnitude lower than that sample deposited one time. After 10 times thermal shock cycles, the gas transmission quantity increases to 1.2 cm3/m2 · d · Pa. The effective thermal conductivity of high temperature vacuum insulated composite ranged from 0.19 W m‑1 K‑1 to 0.747 W m‑1 K‑1 within the temperature from 20 °C to 900 °C. Even after 10 thermal shock cycles, the variation of the effective thermal conductivity is still consistent with that without treatments.

  7. Method and apparatus for scientific analysis under low temperature vacuum conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winefordner, James D.; Jones, Bradley T.

    1990-01-01

    A method and apparatus for scientific analysis of a sample under low temperature vacuum conditions uses a vacuum chamber with a conveyor belt disposed therein. One end of the conveyor belt is a cool end in thermal contact with the cold stage of a refrigerator, whereas the other end of the conveyor belt is a warm end spaced from the refrigerator. A septum allows injection of a sample into the vacuum chamber on top of the conveyor belt for spectroscopic or other analysis. The sample freezes on the conveyor belt at the cold end. One or more windows in the vacuum chamber housing allow spectroscopic analysis of the sample. Following the spectroscopic analysis, the conveyor belt may be moved such that the sample moves toward the warm end of the conveyor belt where upon it evaporates, thereby cleaning the conveyor belt. Instead of injecting the sample by way of a septum and use of a syringe and needle, the present device may be used in series with capillary-column gas chromatography or micro-bore high performance liquid chromatography.

  8. Quantum electrodynamics at a finite temperature with an external field destroying the stability of the vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilov, S.P.; Gitman, D.M.; Fradkin, E.S.

    1987-01-01

    A generating functional for expectation values is found for QED at a finite temperature with an external field which destroys the stability of the vacuum. The equations for connected Green functions and the effective action for the mean field are written out. Their representation is obtained in the form of an integral over the proper time for the Green function taking into account temperature effects in a constant uniform field. By means of this representation the polarization operator for the mean field in an external constant uniform field has been calculated

  9. Quantum electrodynamics at finite temperatures in presence of an external field violating the vacuum stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilov, S.P.; Gitman, D.M.; Fradkin, E.S.

    1987-01-01

    A functional generating expectation values is obtained for QED at a finite temperature in presence of an external field violating the vacuum stability. Equations for connected Green's functions and the effective action for the mean field are derived. The Green function is obtained as an integral with respect of the proper time; the representation takes into account temperature effects in a constant homogeneous field. The polarization operator for the mean field in an external constant homogeneous field is calculated by means of the integral representation

  10. Metal glass vacuum tube solar collectors are approaching lower-medium temperature heat application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xinian

    2010-04-26

    Solar thermal collectors are widely used worldwide mainly for hot water preparation at a low temperature (less than 80?C). Applications including many industrial processes and central air conditioning with absorption chillers, instead require lower-medium temperature heat (between 90 degrees C and 150 degrees C) to be driven when using solar thermal energy. The metal absorber glass vacuum tube collectors (MGVT) are developed for this type of applications. Current state-of-art and possible future technology development of MGVT are presented.

  11. Effect of vacuum packing and temperature on survival and hatching of strongyle eggs in faecal samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Mita E; Thapa, Sundar; Thamsborg, Stig M; Mejer, Helena

    2016-02-15

    Strongyle eggs of helminths of livestock usually hatch within a few hours or days after deposition with faeces. This poses a problem when faecal sampling is performed in the field. As oxygen is needed for embryonic development, it is recommended to reduce air supply during transport and refrigerate. The present study therefore investigated the combined effect of vacuum packing and temperature on survival of strongyle eggs and their subsequent ability to hatch and develop into L3. Fresh faecal samples were collected from calves infected with Cooperia oncophora, pigs infected with Oesophagostomum dentatum, and horses infected with Strongylus vulgaris and cyathostomins. The samples were allocated into four treatments: vacuum packing and storage at 5 °C or 20 °C (5 V and 20 V); normal packing in plastic gloves closed with a loose knot and storage at 5 °C or 20 °C (5 N and 20 N). The number of eggs per gram faeces (EPG) was estimated every fourth day until day 28 post set up (p.s.) by a concentration McMaster-method. Larval cultures were prepared on day 0, 12 and 28 p.s. and the larval yield determined. For C. oncophora, the EPG was significantly higher in vacuum packed samples after 28 days as compared to normal storage, regardless of temperature. However, O. dentatum EPG was significantly higher in samples kept at 5 °C as compared to 20 °C, irrespective of packing. For the horse strongyles, vacuum packed samples at 5 °C had a significantly higher EPG compared to the other treatments after 28 days. The highest larval yield of O. dentatum and horse strongyles were obtained from fresh faecal samples, however, if storage is necessary prior to setting up larval cultures O. dentatum should be kept at room temperature (aerobic or anaerobic). However, horse strongyle coprocultures should ideally be set up on the day of collection to ensure maximum yield. Eggs of C. oncophora should be kept vacuum packed at room temperature for the highest larval yield. Copyright

  12. Nonlinear vacuum gas flow through a short tube due to pressure and temperature gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantazis, Sarantis; Naris, Steryios; Tantos, Christos [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Thessaly, Pedion Areos, 38334 Volos (Greece); Valougeorgis, Dimitris, E-mail: diva@mie.uth.gr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Thessaly, Pedion Areos, 38334 Volos (Greece); André, Julien; Millet, Francois; Perin, Jean Paul [Service des Basses Températures, UMR-E CEA/UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, Grenoble, F-38054 (France)

    2013-10-15

    The flow of a rarefied gas through a tube due to both pressure and temperature gradients has been studied numerically. The main objective is to investigate the performance of a mechanical vacuum pump operating at low temperatures in order to increase the pumped mass flow rate. This type of pump is under development at CEA-Grenoble. The flow is modelled by the Shakhov kinetic model equation, which is solved by the discrete velocity method. Results are presented for certain geometry and flow parameters. Since according to the pump design the temperature driven flow is in the opposite direction than the main pressure driven flow, it has been found that for the operating pressure range studied here the net mass flow rate through the pump may be significantly reduced.

  13. Experimental and theoretical analyses of temperature polarization effect in vacuum membrane distillation

    KAUST Repository

    Alsaadi, Ahmad Salem

    2014-08-13

    This paper discusses the effect of temperature polarization in Vacuum Membrane Distillation (VMD). The main motivation for using VMD in this work is that this module configuration is much simpler and more suitable for this kind of investigation than the other MD configurations such as Direct Contact Membrane Distillation (DCMD). The coupling between heat and mass transfer mechanisms at the feed-membrane interface is presented from a theoretical point of view. In addition, a new simple graphical method and a mathematical model for determining VMD flux are presented. The two methods used in evaluating the extent of temperature polarization effect on water vapor flux (flux sensitivity factors and temperature polarization coefficient (TPC)) are also analyzed and compared. The effect of integrating a heat recovery system in a large scale module on the TPC coefficient has also been studied and presented in this paper. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Substrate temperature influence on W/WCN{sub x} bilayers grown by pulsed vacuum arc discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ospina, R.; Escobar, D. [Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 via al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia); Restrepo-Parra, E., E-mail: erestrepopa@unal.edu.co [Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 via al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia); Arango, P.J.; Jurado, J.F. [Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 via al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia)

    2012-04-01

    W/WCN{sub x} coatings were produced by using a repetitive pulsed vacuum arc discharge on stainless-steel 304 substrates, varying the substrate temperature from room temperature to 200 Degree-Sign C. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was used for determining W, C and N concentrations dependence on the substrate temperature. A competition between C and N can be observed. Atomic force microscopy was employed for obtaining the thickness and grain size that present similar tendencies as a function of the temperature. X-ray diffraction characterization showed phases of W and {alpha}-WCN (hexagonal). Raman spectra for all substrate temperatures were obtained, presenting two peaks corresponding to D (disorder) and G (graphite) bands in the region of 1100-1700 cm{sup -1} due to the amorphous carbon. As an important conclusion, it was stated that substrate temperature has strong influence on the structure, chemical composition and morphology of W/WCN{sub x} bilayers, caused by the competition between carbon and nitrogen.

  15. Short-term, daily exposure to cold temperature may be an efficient way to prevent muscle atrophy and bone loss in a microgravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Claudia; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ya

    2015-04-01

    Microgravity induces less pressure on muscle/bone, which is a major reason for muscle atrophy as well as bone loss. Currently, physical exercise is the only countermeasure used consistently in the U.S. human space program to counteract the microgravity-induced skeletal muscle atrophy and bone loss. However, the routinely almost daily time commitment is significant and represents a potential risk to the accomplishment of other mission operational tasks. Therefore, development of more efficient exercise programs (with less time) to prevent astronauts from muscle atrophy and bone loss are needed. Consider the two types of muscle contraction: exercising forces muscle contraction and prevents microgravity-induced muscle atrophy/bone loss, which is a voluntary response through the motor nervous system; and cold temperature exposure-induced muscle contraction is an involuntary response through the vegetative nervous system, we formed a new hypothesis. The main purpose of this pilot study was to test our hypothesis that exercise at 4 °C is more efficient than at room temperature to prevent microgravity-induced muscle atrophy/bone loss and, consequently reduces physical exercise time. Twenty mice were divided into two groups with or without daily short-term (10 min × 2, at 12 h interval) cold temperature (4 °C) exposure for 30 days. The whole bodyweight, muscle strength and bone density were measured after terminating the experiments. The results from the one-month pilot study support our hypothesis and suggest that it would be reasonable to use more mice, in a microgravity environment and observe for a longer period to obtain a conclusion. We believe that the results from such a study will help to develop efficient exercise, which will finally benefit astronauts' heath and NASA's missions.

  16. VACUUM TRAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, H.S.

    1959-09-15

    An improved adsorption vacuum trap for use in vacuum systems was designed. The distinguishing feature is the placement of a plurality of torsionally deformed metallic fins within a vacuum jacket extending from the walls to the central axis so that substantially all gas molecules pass through the jacket will impinge upon the fin surfaces. T fins are heated by direct metallic conduction, thereby ol taining a uniform temperature at the adeorbing surfaces so that essentially all of the condensible impurities from the evacuating gas are removed from the vacuum system.

  17. High temperature vacuum furnace for the preparation of graphite targets for 14C dating by tandem accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, D.C.; Bristow, P.; Judd, W.J.

    1985-02-01

    A simple and reliable furnace design capable of producing temperatures of up to 2800 deg. C is presented. The furnace has been specifically designed for the rapid and reliable production of graphite targets for 14 C dating purposes but may be used in a variety of applications requiring high temperatures under vacuum conditions

  18. Optimization of a near-field thermophotovoltaic system operating at low temperature and large vacuum gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Mikyung; Song, Jaeman; Kim, Jihoon; Lee, Seung S.; Lee, Ikjin; Lee, Bong Jae

    2018-05-01

    The present work successfully achieves a strong enhancement in performance of a near-field thermophotovoltaic (TPV) system operating at low temperature and large-vacuum-gap width by introducing a hyperbolic-metamaterial (HMM) emitter, multilayered graphene, and an Au-backside reflector. Design variables for the HMM emitter and the multilayered-graphene-covered TPV cell are optimized for maximizing the power output of the near-field TPV system with the genetic algorithm. The near-field TPV system with the optimized configuration results in 24.2 times of enhancement in power output compared with that of the system with a bulk emitter and a bare TPV cell. Through the analysis of the radiative heat transfer together with surface-plasmon-polariton (SPP) dispersion curves, it is found that coupling of SPPs generated from both the HMM emitter and the multilayered-graphene-covered TPV cell plays a key role in a substantial increase in the heat transfer even at a 200-nm vacuum gap. Further, the backside reflector at the bottom of the TPV cell significantly increases not only the conversion efficiency, but also the power output by generating additional polariton modes which can be readily coupled with the existing SPPs of the HMM emitter and the multilayered-graphene-covered TPV cell.

  19. Effects of Sulfurization Temperature on Properties of CZTS Films by Vacuum Evaporation and Sulfurization Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper zinc tin sulfur (CZTS thin films have been extensively studied in recent years for their advantages of low cost, high absorption coefficient (≥104 cm−1, appropriate band gap (~1.5 eV, and nontoxicity. CZTS thin films are promising materials of solar cells like copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS. In this work, CZTS thin films were prepared on glass substrates by vacuum evaporation and sulfurization method. Sn/Cu/ZnS (CZT precursors were deposited by thermal evaporation and then sulfurized in N2 + H2S atmosphere at temperatures of 360–560°C to produce polycrystalline CZTS thin films. It is found that there are some impurity phases in the thin films with the sulfurization temperature less than 500°C, and the crystallite size of CZTS is quite small. With the further increase of the sulfurization temperature, the obtained thin films exhibit preferred (112 orientation with larger crystallite size and higher density. When the sulfurization temperature is 500°C, the band gap energy, resistivity, carrier concentration, and mobility of the CZTS thin films are 1.49 eV, 9.37 Ω · cm, 1.714×1017 cm−3, and 3.89 cm2/(V · s, respectively. Therefore, the prepared CZTS thin films are suitable for absorbers of solar cells.

  20. High Temperature Vacuum Annealing and Hydrogenation Modification of Exfoliated Graphite Nanoplatelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobing Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Highly active defect sites on the edges of graphene automatically capture oxygen from air to form various oxygen groups. A two-step procedure to remove various oxygen functional groups from the defect sites of exfoliated graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs has been developed to reduce the atomic oxygen concentration from 9.5% to 4.8%. This two-step approach involves high temperature vacuum annealing followed by hydrogenation to protect the reduced edge carbon atoms from recombining with the atmospheric oxygen. The reduced GNPs exhibit decreased surface resistance and graphitic potential-dependent capacitance characteristics compared to the complex potential-dependent capacitance characteristics exhibited by the unreduced GNPs as a result of the removal of the oxygen functional groups present primarily at the edges. These reduced GNPs also exhibit high electrochemical cyclic stability for electrochemical energy storage applications.

  1. High-temperature deformation and rupture behavior of internally-pressurized Zircaloy-4 cladding in vacuum and steam enivronments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.; Garde, A.M.; Kassner, T.F.

    1977-01-01

    The high-temperature diametral expansion and rupture behavior of Zircaloy-4 fuel-cladding tubes have been investigated in vacuum and steam environments under transient-heating conditions that are of interest in hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident situations in light-water reactors. The effects of internal pressure, heating rate, axial constraint, and localized temperature nonuniformities in the cladding on the maximum circumferential strain have been determined for burst temperatures between approximately 650 and 1350 0 C

  2. Glass transition in thin supported polystyrene films probed by temperature-modulated ellipsometry in vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremov, Mikhail Yu; Kiyanova, Anna V; Last, Julie; Soofi, Shauheen S; Thode, Christopher; Nealey, Paul F

    2012-08-01

    Glass transition in thin (1-200 nm thick) spin-cast polystyrene films on silicon surfaces is probed by ellipsometry in a controlled vacuum environment. A temperature-modulated modification of the method is used alongside a traditional linear temperature scan. A clear glass transition is detected in films with thicknesses as low as 1-2 nm. The glass transition temperature (T(g)) shows no substantial dependence on thickness for coatings greater than 20 nm. Thinner films demonstrate moderate T(g) depression achieving 18 K for thicknesses 4-7 nm. Less than 4 nm thick samples are excluded from the T(g) comparison due to significant thickness nonuniformity (surface roughness). The transition in 10-20 nm thick films demonstrates excessive broadening. For some samples, the broadened transition is clearly resolved into two separate transitions. The thickness dependence of the glass transition can be well described by a simple 2-layer model. It is also shown that T(g) depression in 5 nm thick films is not sensitive to a wide range of experimental factors including molecular weight characteristics of the polymer, specifications of solvent used for spin casting, substrate composition, and pretreatment of the substrate surface.

  3. System to measure accurate temperature dependence of electric conductivity down to 20 K in ultrahigh vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, C; Takeda, S N; Daimon, H

    2013-07-01

    We have developed the new in situ electrical-conductivity measurement system which can be operated in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) with accurate temperature measurement down to 20 K. This system is mainly composed of a new sample-holder fixing mechanism, a new movable conductivity-measurement mechanism, a cryostat, and two receptors for sample- and four-probe holders. Sample-holder is pushed strongly against the receptor, which is connected to a cryostat, by using this new sample-holder fixing mechanism to obtain high thermal conductivity. Test pieces on the sample-holders have been cooled down to about 20 K using this fixing mechanism, although they were cooled down to only about 60 K without this mechanism. Four probes are able to be touched to a sample surface using this new movable conductivity-measurement mechanism for measuring electrical conductivity after making film on substrates or obtaining clean surfaces by cleavage, flashing, and so on. Accurate temperature measurement is possible since the sample can be transferred with a thermocouple and∕or diode being attached directly to the sample. A single crystal of Bi-based copper oxide high-Tc superconductor (HTSC) was cleaved in UHV to obtain clean surface, and its superconducting critical temperature has been successfully measured in situ. The importance of in situ measurement of resistance in UHV was demonstrated for this HTSC before and after cesium (Cs) adsorption on its surface. The Tc onset increase and the Tc offset decrease by Cs adsorption were observed.

  4. 3D thermography for improving temperature measurements in thermal vacuum testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, D. W.; Simpson, R.; Parian, J. A.; Cozzani, A.; Casarosa, G.; Sablerolle, S.; Ertel, H.

    2017-09-01

    The application of thermography to thermal vacuum (TV) testing of spacecrafts is becoming a vital additional tool in the mapping of structures during thermal cycles and thermal balance (TB) testing. Many of the customers at the European Space Agency (ESA) test centre, European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC), The Netherlands, now make use of a thermal camera during TB-TV campaigns. This complements the use of embedded thermocouples on the structure, providing the prospect of monitoring temperatures at high resolution and high frequency. For simple flat structures with a well-defined emissivity, it is possible to determine the surface temperatures with reasonable confidence. However, for most real spacecraft and sub-systems, the complexity of the structure's shape and its test environment creates inter-reflections from external structures. This and the additional complication of angular and spectral variations of the spacecraft surface emissivity make the interpretation of the radiation detected by a thermal camera more difficult in terms of determining a validated temperature with high confidence and well-defined uncertainty. One solution to this problem is: to map the geometry of the test specimen and thermal test environment; to model the surface temperatures and emissivity variations of the structures and materials; and to use this model to correct the apparent temperatures recorded by the thermal camera. This approach has been used by a team from NPL (National Physical Laboratory), Psi-tran, and PhotoCore, working with ESA, to develop a 3D thermography system to provide a means to validate thermal camera temperatures, based on a combination of thermal imaging photogrammetry and ray-tracing scene modeling. The system has been tested at ESTEC in ambient conditions with a dummy spacecraft structure containing a representative set of surface temperatures, shapes, and spacecraft materials, and with hot external sources and a high power lamp as a sun

  5. Chain length and temperature dependence of alkanedithiol molecular conductance under ultra high vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Ellis; Macdonald, J Emyr; Elliott, Martin

    2013-10-07

    We report scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) measurements of the single molecule conductance of α,ω-alkanedithiols for a large range of molecular chain lengths (N = 3-10) and temperatures (180-390 K) under ultra high vacuum. Two STM-based measurement techniques were employed on molecules trapped between tip and substrate: (i) the well established current-distance or I(z) technique and (ii) a new I(V,z) technique in which the current-voltage characteristics are determined as the tip-substrate distance z is varied. Low, medium, and high conductance groups were observed for each molecular length, which were temperature independent over the range examined, consistent with off-resonance tunnelling. For N > 4 the current-voltage characteristics and conductance trend with chain length is well described using a simple rectangular tunnel barrier model with parameters in excellent agreement with previously reported values. However, both 1,3-propanedithiol (N = 3) and 1,4-butanedithiol (N = 4) show an anomalous behaviour which is qualitatively similar to, but much less pronounced than, that reported by Haiss et al. (Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2009, 11, 10831) for measurements performed under air and nitrogen gas.

  6. Role of the vacuum pressure and temperature in the shape of metal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aggregation and surface irregularities at the edges of the hexagonal nanodisks were observed with further increases in the vacuum pressure. The nanoscale characteristics of the nanodisks were lost at a vacuum pressure of 10−6 Torr and heating the substrate at 100°C. The nanodisks were transformed into Zn wires at a ...

  7. The effect of vacuum packaging on histamine changes of milkfish sticks at various storage temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Hsien-Feng; Lee, Yi-Chen; Lin, Chiang-Wei; Huang, Yu-Ru; Cheng, Chao-An; Lin, Chia-Min; Tsai, Yung-Hsiang

    2017-10-01

    The effects of polyethylene packaging (PEP) (in air) and vacuum packaging (VP) on the histamine related quality of milkfish sticks stored at different temperatures (-20°C, 4°C, 15°C, and 25°C) were studied. The results showed that the aerobic plate count (APC), pH, total volatile basic nitrogen (TVBN), and histamine contents increased as storage time increased when the PEP and VP samples were stored at 25°C. At below 15°C, the APC, TVBN, pH, and histamine levels in PEP and VP samples were retarded, but the VP samples had considerably lower levels of APC, TVBN, and histamine than PEP samples. Once the frozen fish samples stored at -20°C for 2 months were thawed and stored at 25°C, VP retarded the increase of histamine in milkfish sticks as compared to PEP. In summary, this result suggested the milkfish sticks packed with VP and stored below 4°C could prevent deterioration of product quality and extend shelf-life. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. ITER articulated inspection arm (AIA): R and D progress on vacuum and temperature technology for remote handling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrot, Y.; Friconneau, J.P. [Robotics and Interactive Systems Unit - CEA/LIST, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France); Cordier, J.J.; Gargiulo, L. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d' Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Palmer, J.D. [EFDA CSU Garching (Germany); Martin, E. [ITER International Team, Garching (Germany); Tesini, A. [ITER International Team, ITER Naka Joint Work Site, Iberaki-ken (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    To perform an intervention a short time after plasma shutdown, the operation of the robot will have to be under ITER conditions which means: under high vacuum, pollution avoidance and a temperature ambience around 120 C. The feasibility studies have led to the design of a robot in the shape of a 8.2 meter long articulated arm made up of 5 modules with 11 articulated joints. A single module prototype has been manufactured to be tested. The prototype was set up in a specific vacuum vessel at Tore-Supra facility that can be baked up to 230 C under high-vacuum conditions. The first tests have shown that: -) the efficiency of the actuators at 120 C was the same than in air at room temperature, the speed was slightly lower, -) the monitoring of the temperature of the motor and of the power electronics components showed an increasing of only 40 C during 3 full pitch movements, and -) most of the greases was degassed during the 1 week long baking at 200 C except one which comes from an organic material in a component that has to be identified.

  9. Temperature-dependent electrical characterization of nitrogen-doped ZnO thin film: vacuum annealing effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guer, Emre; Tuezemen, S; Dogan, S [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Atatuerk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey)], E-mail: emregur@atauni.edu.tr

    2009-03-15

    Temperature-dependent Hall effect measurements were carried out at an N-doped ZnO thin film grown by the reactive sputtering method onto (001) Si substrate before and after being vacuum annealed at 900 deg. 403{sup 1} C. p-Type ZnO thin film was obtained with a relatively high mobility of {approx}60 cm{sup 2} V {sup -} {sup 1} s {sup -} {sup 1}, a high carrier concentration of 2.5x10{sup 17} cm {sup -} {sup 3} and a low resistivity of 0.4 ohm cm. After vacuum annealing, the temperature dependence of electrical parameters such as mobility and carrier concentration showed highly different characteristics. Time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL), PL and x-ray diffraction measurements (XRD) were performed after the annealing process to check whether the high-temperature annealing can remove the ZnO film on Si or not. The PL measurement shows band-to-band recombination at 360 nm and TRPL shows the exciton recombination lifetime to be 571.7 ps. The XRD measurement reveals highly preferred c-axis (0002) orientation. Activation energies were calculated using the ln {sigma} versus 1000 T {sup -} {sup 1} plot to be 20 meV for the as-grown and 24 and 6.8 meV after the vacuum annealing process.

  10. Influence of Crucible Materials on High-temperature Properties of Vacuum-melted Nickel-chromium-cobalt Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, R F; Rowe, John P; Freeman, J W

    1957-01-01

    A study of the effect of induction-vacuum-melting procedure on the high-temperature properties of a titanium-and-aluminum-hardened nickel-base alloy revealed that a major variable was the type of ceramic used as a crucible. Reactions between the melt and magnesia or zirconia crucibles apparently increased high-temperature properties by introducing small amounts of boron or zirconium into the melts. Heats melted in alumina crucibles had relatively low rupture life and ductility at 1,600 F and cracked during hot-working as a result of deriving no boron or zirconium from the crucible.

  11. In-Situ Microprobe Observations of Dispersed Oil with Low-Temperature Low-Vacuum Scanning Electron Microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohsen, H.T.

    2010-01-01

    A low cost cryostat stage from high heat capacity material is designed and constructed, in attempt to apply size distribution techniques for examination of oil dispersions. Different materials were tested according to their heat capacity to keep the liquid under investigation in frozen state as long as possible during the introduction of the cryostat stage to the low-vacuum scanning electron microscope. Different concentrations of non ionic surfactant were added to artificially contaminated with 10000 ppm Balayeam base oil in 3.5 % saline water, where oil and dispersing liquid have been added and shacked well to be investigated under the microscope as fine frozen droplets. The efficiency of dispersion was examined using low temperature low-vacuum scanning electron microscope. The shape and size distributions of freeze oil droplets were studied by digital imaging processing technique in conjunction with scanning electron microscope counting method. Also elemental concentration of oil droplets was analyzed.

  12. Role of the vacuum pressure and temperature in the shape of metal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    that the initial stages of the growth of the Zn wires are governed by the agglomeration of the Zn nanodisks since the structure of the wires was observed to be composed by stacked nanodisks. Keywords. Zn; nanodisk; nanowire; vacuum pressure; evapouration. 1. Introduction. Historically, zinc (Zn) has been successfully ...

  13. Identification of new chemical structures in poly(tetrafluoroethylene-co-perfluoropropyl vinyl ether) irradiated in vacuum at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lappan, U.; Geissler, U.; Scheler, U.; Lunkwitz, K.

    2003-01-01

    Electron beam irradiation of perfluorinated copolymer poly(tetrafluoroethylene-co-perfluoropropyl vinyl ether) (PFA) was carried out in vacuum at different temperatures between room temperature and temperature above the melting point of PFA. Changes of chemical structure were studied by 19 F solid-state NMR and IR spectroscopy. Chain scissions and branching reactions occur simultaneously, which are indicated by formation of CF 3 , COF and COOH end groups, CF branching points and CF 3 side groups. Branching density based on concentration of CF groups increases with increasing temperature. Formation of cross-links is concluded for PFA irradiated in molten state. Perfluoropropyl vinyl ether (PPVE) units are found to be more sensitive to radiation than tetrafluoroethylene units. COF and COOH groups are assumed to result from PPVE degradation

  14. Identification of new chemical structures in poly(tetrafluoroethylene-co-perfluoropropyl vinyl ether) irradiated in vacuum at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lappan, U. E-mail: lappan@ipfdd.de; Geissler, U.; Scheler, U.; Lunkwitz, K

    2003-06-01

    Electron beam irradiation of perfluorinated copolymer poly(tetrafluoroethylene-co-perfluoropropyl vinyl ether) (PFA) was carried out in vacuum at different temperatures between room temperature and temperature above the melting point of PFA. Changes of chemical structure were studied by {sup 19}F solid-state NMR and IR spectroscopy. Chain scissions and branching reactions occur simultaneously, which are indicated by formation of CF{sub 3}, COF and COOH end groups, CF branching points and CF{sub 3} side groups. Branching density based on concentration of CF groups increases with increasing temperature. Formation of cross-links is concluded for PFA irradiated in molten state. Perfluoropropyl vinyl ether (PPVE) units are found to be more sensitive to radiation than tetrafluoroethylene units. COF and COOH groups are assumed to result from PPVE degradation.

  15. Effect of vacuum packing and temperature on survival and hatching of strongyle eggs in faecal samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sengupta, Mita Eva; Thapa, Sundar; Thamsborg, Stig Milan

    2016-01-01

    , and horses infected with Strongylus vulgaris and cyathostomins. The samples were allocated into four treatments: vacuum packing and storage at 5 °C or 20 °C (5 V and 20 V); normal packing in plastic gloves closed with a loose knot and storage at 5 °C or 20 °C (5 N and 20 N). The number of eggs per gram...

  16. Quantitative Infrared Image Analysis Of Thermally-Thin Cellulose Surface Temperatures During Upstream and Downstream Microgravity Flame Spread from A Central Ignition Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Sandra L.; Lee, J. R.; Fujita, O.; Kikuchi, M.; Kashiwagi, T.

    2012-01-01

    Surface view calibrated infrared images of ignition and flame spread over a thin cellulose fuel were obtained at 30 Hz during microgravity flame spread tests in the 10 second Japan Microgravity Center (JAMIC). The tests also used a color video of the surface view and color images of the edge view using 35 millimeter 1600 Kodak Ektapress film at 2 Hz. The cellulose fuel samples (50% long fibers from lumi pine and 50% short fibers from birch) were made with an area density of 60 grams per square meters. The samples were mounted in the center of a 12 centimeter wide by 16 centimeter tall flow duct that uses a downstream fan to draw the air through the flow duct. Samples were ignited after the experiment package was released using a straight hot wire across the center of the 7.5 centimeter wide by 14 centimeter long samples. One case, at 1 atmosphere 35%O2 in N2, at a forced flow of 10 centimeters per second, is presented here. In this case, as the test progresses, the single flame begins to separate into simultaneous upstream and downstream flames. Surface temperature profiles are evaluated as a function of time, and temperature gradients for upstream and downstream flame spread are measured. Flame spread rates from IR image data are compared to visible image spread rate data. IR blackbody temperatures are compared to surface thermocouple readings to evaluate the effective emissivity of the pyrolyzing surface. Preheat lengths are evaluated both upstream and downstream of the central ignition point. A surface energy balance estimates the net heat flux from the flame to the fuel surface along the length of the fuel.

  17. High temperature low vacuum synthesis of a freestanding three-dimensional graphene nano-ribbon foam electrode

    OpenAIRE

    Brownson, Dale A.C.; Figueiredo-Filho, Luiz C.S.; Riehl, Bill L.; Riehl, Bonnie D.; Gomez-Mingot, Maria; Iniesta, Jesus; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando; Banks, Craig E.

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication of a freestanding three-dimensional (3D) graphene nano-ribbon open cell foam electrode is reported based upon a facile high temperature (1700 °C) low vacuum (50 Torr) process. The graphene nano-ribbon (GNR) foam comprises on average 4 graphene layers and has an O/C ratio of 0.14; a quasi-graphene structure. This unique material is demonstrated to be electrochemically useful, with the electrochemical properties and resultant electroanalytical performance of the novel freestandi...

  18. A diamond-based scanning probe spin sensor operating at low temperature in ultra-high vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer-Nolte, E; Reinhard, F; Ternes, M; Wrachtrup, J; Kern, K

    2014-01-01

    We present the design and performance of an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) low temperature scanning probe microscope employing the nitrogen-vacancy color center in diamond as an ultrasensitive magnetic field sensor. Using this center as an atomic-size scanning probe has enabled imaging of nanoscale magnetic fields and single spins under ambient conditions. In this article we describe an experimental setup to operate this sensor in a cryogenic UHV environment. This will extend the applicability to a variety of molecular systems due to the enhanced target spin lifetimes at low temperature and the controlled sample preparation under UHV conditions. The instrument combines a tuning-fork based atomic force microscope (AFM) with a high numeric aperture confocal microscope and the facilities for application of radio-frequency (RF) fields for spin manipulation. We verify a sample temperature of <50 K even for strong laser and RF excitation and demonstrate magnetic resonance imaging with a magnetic AFM tip.

  19. Smoldering Combustion Experiments in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, David C.; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; Urban, David L.

    1997-01-01

    The Microgravity Smoldering Combustion (MSC) experiment is part of a study of the smolder characteristics of porous combustible materials in a microgravity environment. Smoldering is a non-flaming form of combustion that takes place in the interior of porous materials and takes place in a number of processes ranging from smoldering of porous insulation materials to high temperature synthesis of metals. The objective of the study is to provide a better understanding of the controlling mechanisms of smolder, both in microgravity and normal-gravity. As with many forms of combustion, gravity affects the availability of oxidizer and transport of heat, and therefore the rate of combustion. Microgravity smolder experiments, in both a quiescent oxidizing environment, and in a forced oxidizing flow have been conducted aboard the NASA Space Shuttle (STS-69 and STS-77 missions) to determine the effect of the ambient oxygen concentration and oxidizer forced flow velocity on smolder combustion in microgravity. The experimental apparatus is contained within the NASA Get Away Special Canister (GAS-CAN) Payload. These two sets of experiments investigate the propagation of smolder along the polyurethane foam sample under both diffusion driven and forced flow driven smoldering. The results of the microgravity experiments are compared with identical ones carried out in normal gravity, and are used to verify present theories of smolder combustion. The results of this study will provide new insights into the smoldering combustion process. Thermocouple histories show that the microgravity smolder reaction temperatures (Ts) and propagation velocities (Us) lie between those of identical normal-gravity upward and downward tests. These observations indicate the effect of buoyancy on the transport of oxidizer to the reaction front.

  20. Thermal vacuum state for the two-coupled-oscillator model at finite temperature: Derivation and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xue-Xiang; Hu Li-Yun; Guo Qin; Fan Hong-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Following the spirit of thermo field dynamics initiated by Takahashi and Umezawa, we employ the technique of integration within an ordered product of operators to derive the thermal vacuum state (TVS) for the Hamiltonian H of the two-coupled-oscillator model. The ensemble averages of the system are derived conveniently by using the TVS. In addition, the entropy for this system is discussed based on the relation between the generalized Hellmann—Feynman theorem and the entroy variation in the context of the TVS. (general)

  1. Space simulation chambers for complete satellites: High vacuum and extreme temperatures challenges; Camaras de simulacion espacial para satelites completos: los retos de alto vacio y temperaturas extremas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galan, M.; Cazador, M.

    2010-07-01

    During any satellite development phase, many operational factors can only be experimentally determined by testing under the most extreme environmental conditions that will be encountered in its life. Simulating the different temperatures, thermal loads and vacuum conditions allows analyzing the suitability of new materials, components and systems for these extreme conditions. In a space project, thermal vacuum testing reaches 70% of the total testing costs. They are the most similar conditions to the real ones that will be encountered in the outer space.In this article, the function of both the thermal and vacuum subsystems are explained and analyzed.Thermal control units are the most fundamental part in a space simulation chamber; they must cover the required extreme temperature range with the required heating and cooling speed. The vacuum subsystem must allow reaching the required operating pressure within the specified time, handling significant degassing loads both from the satellite and the large exposed surfaces inside the chamber. (Author) 6 refs.

  2. Containerless experiments in fluid physics in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, E. H.

    1990-01-01

    The physical phenomena associated with the behavior of liquid samples freely suspended in low gravity must be thoroughly understood prior to undertaking detailed scientific studies of the materials under scrutiny. The characteristics of molten specimens under the action of containerless positioning stresses must be identified and separated from the specific phenomena relating to the absence of an overwhelming gravitational field. The strategy designed to optimize the scientific return of reliable experimental data from infrequent microgravity investigations should include the gradual and logical phasing of more sophisticated studies building on the accumulated results from previous flight experiments. Lower temperature fluid physics experiments using model materials can provide a great deal of information that can be useful in analyzing the behavior of high temperature melts. The phasing of the experimental capabilities should, therefore, also include a gradual build-up of more intricate and specialized diagnostic instrumentation and environmental control and monitoring capabilities. Basic physical investigations should also be distinguished from specific materials technology issues. The latter investigations require very specific high temperature (and high vacuum) devices that must be thoroughly mastered on the ground prior to implementing them in space.

  3. Stability of the lamellar structure in Mo-TiC eutectic composite under a low vacuum at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Shoji; Nishijima, Yuzo; Yoshinaga, Hideo

    1986-01-01

    Thermal stability of the lamellar structure in a Mo-TiC eutectic composite has been investigated through the heat-treatment at 1523 - 2223 K for 5.76 x 10 4 - 3.6 x 10 5 s under a low vacuum pressure of 13 mPa. It was found that the TiC phase in the eutectic lamellar disappeared above the critical temperature of about 1750 K, but below the critical temperature the disappearance of TiC phase was hardly observed and TiO film was formed on the surface. The Mo matrix phase was not oxidized and was stable at all test temperatures, since its affinity for oxygen is lower than that for carbon and titanium. It is presumed that at higer temperatures the disappearance process of TiC phase is controlled by the diffusion of carbon atoms through the matrix to the surface, and carbon and titanium atoms on the surface are removed by CO gas formation and TiO evaporation, respectively, but at lower temperatures the evaporation of TiO is so slow that the TiO film is formed on the surface. (author)

  4. Laser remote heating in vacuum environment to study temperature dependence of optical properties for bulk materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minissale, Marco; Bisson, Regis; Gallais, Laurent

    2016-12-01

    The knowledge of optical and thermal properties of materials at high temperatures is of crucial importance in the field of high power laser/material interactions. We report in this contribution on the development of a spectroscopic ellipsometry system dedicated to the measurement of optical properties of solid materials from the ambient to high temperatures (optic spectrometer to measure reflected light and optical pyrometers for temperature monitoring.

  5. Surface Effects and Challenges for Application of Piezoelectric Langasite Substrates in Surface Acoustic Wave Devices Caused by High Temperature Annealing under High Vacuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marietta Seifert

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Substrate materials that are high-temperature stable are essential for sensor devices which are applied at high temperatures. Although langasite is suggested as such a material, severe O and Ga diffusion into an O-affine deposited film was observed during annealing at high temperatures under vacuum conditions, leading to a damage of the metallization as well as a change of the properties of the substrate and finally to a failure of the device. Therefore, annealing of bare LGS (La 3 Ga 5 SiO 14 substrates at 800 ∘ C under high vacuum conditions is performed to analyze whether this pretreatment improves the suitability and stability of this material for high temperature applications in vacuum. To reveal the influence of the pretreatment on the subsequently deposited metallization, RuAl thin films are used as they are known to oxidize on LGS at high temperatures. A local study of the pretreated and metallized substrates using transmission electron microscopy reveals strong modification of the substrate surface. Micro cracks are visible. The composition of the substrate is strongly altered at those regions. Severe challenges for the application of LGS substrates under high-temperature vacuum conditions arise from these substrate damages, revealing that the pretreatment does not improve the applicability.

  6. Surface Effects and Challenges for Application of Piezoelectric Langasite Substrates in Surface Acoustic Wave Devices Caused by High Temperature Annealing under High Vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Marietta; Rane, Gayatri K; Kirbus, Benjamin; Menzel, Siegfried B; Gemming, Thomas

    2015-12-19

    Substrate materials that are high-temperature stable are essential for sensor devices which are applied at high temperatures. Although langasite is suggested as such a material, severe O and Ga diffusion into an O-affine deposited film was observed during annealing at high temperatures under vacuum conditions, leading to a damage of the metallization as well as a change of the properties of the substrate and finally to a failure of the device. Therefore, annealing of bare LGS (La 3 Ga 5 SiO 14 ) substrates at 800 ∘ C under high vacuum conditions is performed to analyze whether this pretreatment improves the suitability and stability of this material for high temperature applications in vacuum. To reveal the influence of the pretreatment on the subsequently deposited metallization, RuAl thin films are used as they are known to oxidize on LGS at high temperatures. A local study of the pretreated and metallized substrates using transmission electron microscopy reveals strong modification of the substrate surface. Micro cracks are visible. The composition of the substrate is strongly altered at those regions. Severe challenges for the application of LGS substrates under high-temperature vacuum conditions arise from these substrate damages, revealing that the pretreatment does not improve the applicability.

  7. Vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy and photochemistry of zinc dihydride and related molecules in low-temperature matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henchy, Chris; Kilmartin, Una; McCaffrey, John G

    2013-09-26

    Optical absorption spectra of thin film samples, formed by the codeposition of zinc vapor with D2 and CH4, have been recorded with synchrotron radiation. With sufficiently low metal vapor flux, samples deposited at 4 K were found to consist exclusively of isolated zinc atoms for both solids. The atomic absorption bands in the quantum solids D2 and CH4 were found to exhibit large bandwidths, behavior related to the high lattice frequencies of these low mass solids. The reactivity of atomic zinc was promoted with (1)P state photolysis leading to the first recording of electronic absorption spectra for the molecules ZnD2 and CH3ZnH in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region. (3)P state luminescence of atomic zinc observed in the Zn/CH4 system points to the involvement of the spin triplet state in the relaxation of CH3ZnH system as it evolves into the C3v ground state. This state is not involved in the relaxation of the higher symmetry molecule ZnD2. Time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations were conducted to predict the electronic transitions of the inserted molecular species. Comparisons with experimental data indicate the predicted transition energies are approximately 0.5 eV less than the recorded values. Possible reasons for the discrepancy are discussed. The molecular photochemistry of ZnD2 and CH3ZnH observed in the VUV was modeled successfully with a simple four-valence electron AH2 Walsh-type diagram.

  8. [Study on the vacuum ultraviolet transmittance of barium fluoride crystals at different temperature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ru-Yi; Fu, Li-Ping; Tao, Ye

    2014-03-01

    Two VUV-grade BaF2 windows with 0.5 mm-thick and 1 mm-thick respectively were selected to study the transmittance variety with the temperature. The results show that the cutoff wavelength of BaF2 crystals will shift towards the long wave with the increase in temperature. In a certain temperature range, BaF2 crystals can depress 130.4 nm radiation well, and also has a high transmittance at 135.6 nm. Compared with the reported method in which SrF2 crystals can be applied to suppress 130.4 nm stray light by heating, BaF2 crystal can inhibit the 130. 4 nm emission line completely, and thus reduce the power consumption of the device at the same time. This indicates that BaF2 crystals can play an important role in the ionosphere optical remote sensing detection.

  9. Hamiltonian approach to QCD in Coulomb gauge: From the vacuum to finite temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhardt H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The variational Hamiltonian approach to QCD in Coulomb gauge is reviewedand the essential results obtained in recent years are summarized. First the results for thevacuum sector are discussed, with a special emphasis on the mechansim of confinementand chiral symmetry breaking. Then the deconfinement phase transition is described byintroducing temperature in the Hamiltonian approach via compactification of one spatialdimension. The effective action for the Polyakov loop is calculated and the order of thephase transition as well as the critical temperatures are obtained for the color group SU(2 and SU(3. In both cases, our predictions are in good agreement with lattice calculations.

  10. A simple, ultrahigh vacuum compatible scanning tunneling microscope for use at variable temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugele, Friedrich Gunther; Kloos, Ch.; Leiderer, P.; Moller, R.

    1996-01-01

    We present the construction of a very compact scanning tunneling microscope (STM) which can be operated at temperatures between 4 and 350 K. The tip and a tiny tip holder are the only movable parts, whereas the sample and the piezoscanner are rigidly attached to the body of the STM. This leads to an

  11. Physisorption of ammonia on AISI 304L stainless steel at different surface temperature under high vacuum conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. de Castro

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The physisorption of ammonia molecules (sticking on the walls of a stainless steel pipe (AISI 304L has been studied at different wall temperatures (323-473K. The total amount of ammonia that is retained on the walls, once equilibrium is reached, has been measured by differentially-pumped mass spectrometry in gas exposure laboratory experiments. The results show ammonia retentions in the range of μg/cm2 resulting in a multilayer adsorption with lower amounts of stuck ammonia at higher temperatures of the stainless steel surface. The sticking coefficient follows an exponential decay evolution with time. The activation energy of the process has been estimated by an Arrhenius fit, assuming that the characteristic time for this decay is inversely proportional to the kinetic adsorption constant. A value of 0.15eV per ammonia molecule has been obtained, being in agreement with nominal values for the physisorption of small molecules or atoms (CO, N2, Ar… that can be found in the specialized literature. The implication of these results in the possible extrapolation to the ITER vacuum system under nitrogen seeded plasma operation is also addressed.

  12. Effects of vacuum-ultraviolet irradiation on copper penetration into low-k dielectrics under bias-temperature stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, X.; Zheng, H.; Xue, P.; Shohet, J. L. [Plasma Processing and Technology Laboratory and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); King, S. W. [Logic Technology Development, Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, Oregon 97124 (United States); Nishi, Y. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2015-01-05

    The effects of vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) irradiation on copper penetration into non-porous low-k dielectrics under bias-temperature stress (BTS) were investigated. By employing x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy depth-profile measurements on both as-deposited and VUV-irradiated SiCOH/Cu stacks, it was found that under the same BTS conditions, the diffusion depth of Cu into the VUV-irradiated SiCOH is higher than that of as-deposited SiCOH. On the other hand, under the same temperature-annealing stress (TS) without electric bias, the Cu distribution profiles in the VUV-irradiated SiCOH were same with that for the as-deposited SiCOH. The experiments suggest that in as-deposited SiCOH, the diffused Cu exists primarily in the atomic state, while in VUV-irradiated SiCOH, the diffused Cu is oxidized by the hydroxyl ions (OH{sup −}) generated from VUV irradiation and exists in the ionic state. The mechanisms for metal diffusion and ion injection in VUV irradiated low-k dielectrics are discussed.

  13. Vacuum electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Eichmeier, Joseph A

    2008-01-01

    Nineteen experts from the electronics industry, research institutes and universities have joined forces to prepare this book. ""Vacuum Electronics"" covers the electrophysical fundamentals, the present state of the art and applications, as well as the future prospects of microwave tubes and systems, optoelectronics vacuum devices, electron and ion beam devices, light and X-ray emitters, particle accelerators and vacuum interrupters. These topics are supplemented by useful information about the materials and technologies of vacuum electronics and vacuum technology.

  14. Assessment of New Components to be integrated in the LHC Room Temperature Vacuum System

    CERN Document Server

    Bregliozzi, G; Chiggiato, P

    2014-01-01

    Integration of new equipment in the long straight sections (LSS) of the LHC must be compatible with the TiZrV non-evaporable getter thin film that coats most of the 6-km-long room-temperature beam pipes. This paper focus on two innovative accelerator devices to be installed in the LSS during the long shutdown 1 (LS1): the beam gas vertex (BGV) and a beam bending experiment using a crystal collimator (LUA9). The BGV necessitates a dedicated pressure bump, generated by local gas injection, in order to create the required rate of inelastic beam-gas interactions. The LAU9 experiments aims at improving beam cleaning efficiency with the use of a crystal collimator. New materials like fibre optics, piezoelectric components, and glues are proposed in the original design of the two devices. The integration feasibility of these set-ups in the LSS is presented. In particular outgassing tests of special components, X-rays photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of NEG coating behaviour in presence of glues during bake-out, a...

  15. Low-temperature melt growth of YBa 2Cu 3O 7- x/silver composites in partial vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Nae-Lih; Zern, H. H.; Chen, Chi-Liang

    1995-02-01

    A new version of the YBa 2Cu 3O 7- x (the 123 oxide) melt-growth (MG) process, which is carried out under greatly reduced oxygen pressures (in partial vacuum) at temperatures not higher than 950°C, is described. Some salient aspects of this process are demonstrated with examples of processing 123/Ag composites in bulk and 123-on-Ag tape forms under the conditions of 0.01⩽ P(O 2)⩽10 Torr and 920⩽ T⩽950°C. In addition to the 123 domain structure, Y 2BaCuO 5 inclusions and strong pinning typical of MG-123, the bulk composites thus synthesized contain uniformly dispersed Ag inclusions, which are effective in suppressing cracking within the 123 domains, while the 123-on-Ag tapes show c-axis preferential orientation of the 123 film normal to the Ag substrate, good oxide-substrate adhesion, and particularly negligible Ag melting. On the basis of microstructural observations, the mechanisms for the engulfment of Ag inclusions during solidification and for the enhancement in resistance to crack growth by the Ag inclusions are revealed.

  16. Vacuum extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mathilde Maagaard; Oestergaard, Jeanett; Johansen, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To develop and validate an Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) scale for vacuum extraction. Design. Two part study design: Primarily, development of a procedure-specific checklist for vacuum extraction. Hereafter, validationof the developed OSATS scale for vacuum...... with daily work in the obstetric field were tested. Methods. The Delphi method was used for development of the scale. In a simulated vacuum extraction scenario first-year residents and obstetric chief physicians were rated using the developed OSATS scale for vacuum extraction to test construct validity...... scale for vacuum extraction is a reliable test for differentiating between competence levels in a simulated setting....

  17. Assessing the feasibility of a high-temperature, helium-cooled vacuum vessel and first wall for the Vulcan tokamak conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnard, H.S.; Hartwig, Z.S.; Olynyk, G.M.; Payne, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    The Vulcan conceptual design (R = 1.2 m, a = 0.3 m, B 0 = 7 T), a compact, steady-state tokamak for plasma–material interaction (PMI) science, must incorporate a vacuum vessel capable of operating at 1000 K in order to replicate the temperature-dependent physical chemistry that will govern PMI in a reactor. In addition, the Vulcan divertor must be capable of handling steady-state heat fluxes up to 10 MW m −2 so that integrated materials testing can be performed under reactor-relevant conditions. A conceptual design scoping study has been performed to assess the challenges involved in achieving such a configuration. The Vulcan vacuum system comprises an inner, primary vacuum vessel that is thermally and mechanically isolated from the outer, secondary vacuum vessel by a 10 cm vacuum gap. The thermal isolation minimizes heat conduction between the high-temperature helium-cooled primary vessel and the water-cooled secondary vessel. The mechanical isolation allows for thermal expansion and enables vertical removal of the primary vessel for maintenance or replacement. Access to the primary vessel for diagnostics, lower hybrid waveguides, and helium coolant is achieved through ∼1 m long intra-vessel pipes to minimize temperature gradients and is shown to be commensurate with the available port space in Vulcan. The isolated primary vacuum vessel is shown to be mechanically feasible and robust to plasma disruptions with analytic calculations and finite element analyses. Heat removal in the first wall and divertor, coupled with the ability to perform in situ maintenance and replacement of divertor components for scientific purposes, is achieved by combining existing helium-cooled techniques with innovative mechanical attachments of plasma facing components, either in plate-type helium-cooled modules or independently bolted, helium-jet impingement-cooled tiles. The vacuum vessel and first wall design enables a wide range of potential PFC materials and configurations to

  18. Fundamental studies on the switching in liquid nitrogen environment using vacuum switches for application in future high-temperature superconducting medium-voltage power grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golde, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    By means of superconducting equipment it is possible to reduce the transmission losses in distribution networks while increasing the transmission capacity. As a result even saving a superimposed voltage level would be possible, which can put higher investment costs compared to conventional equipment into perspective. For operation of superconducting systems it is necessary to integrate all equipment in the cooling circuit. This also includes switchgears. Due to cooling with liquid nitrogen, however, only vacuum switching technology comes into question. Thus, the suitability of vacuum switches is investigated in this work. For this purpose the mechanics of the interrupters is considered first. Material investigations and switching experiments at ambient temperature and in liquid nitrogen supply information on potential issues. For this purpose, a special pneumatic construction is designed, which allows tens of thousands of switching cycles. Furthermore, the electrical resistance of the interrupters is considered. Since the contact system consists almost exclusively of copper, a remaining residual resistance and appropriate thermal losses must be considered. Since they have to be cooled back, an appropriate evaluation is given taking environmental parameters into account. The dielectric strength of vacuum interrupters is considered both at ambient temperature as well as directly in liquid nitrogen. For this purpose different contact distances are set at different interrupter types. A distinction is made between internal and external dielectric strength. Conditioning and deconditioning effects are minimized by an appropriate choice of the test circuit. The current chopping and resulting overvoltages are considered to be one of the few drawbacks of vacuum switching technology. Using a practical test circuit the height of chopping current is determined and compared for different temperatures. Due to strong scattering the evaluation is done using statistical methods. At

  19. Vacuum system

    OpenAIRE

    Gröbner, Oswald

    2006-01-01

    The vacuum system of a particle accelerator must provide the necessary conditions for the high energy beam to avoid loss of particles and deterioration of the beam quality. In this talk we will review basic design concepts, vacuum components and procedures required for an accelerator vacuum system.

  20. Actin dynamics in microgravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moes, M.J.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30483128X

    2013-01-01

    Organisms on earth develop in the presence of gravity. A good opportunity to study the effects of gravity on organisms is to expose organisms or cells to conditions of altered gravity, such as microgravity in space. Microgravity has been described to affect numerous processes that take place in

  1. Quantum and classical vacuum forces at zero and finite temperature; Quantentheoretische und klassische Vakuum-Kraefte bei Temperatur Null und bei endlicher Temperatur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niekerken, Ole

    2009-06-15

    In this diploma thesis the Casimir-Polder force at zero temperature and at finite temperatures is calculated by using a well-defined quantum field theory (formulated in position space) and the method of image charges. For the calculations at finite temperature KMS-states are used. The so defined temperature describes the temperature of the electromagnetic background. A one oscillator model for inhomogeneous dispersive absorbing dielectric material is introduced and canonically quantized to calculate the Casimir-Polder force at a dielectric interface at finite temperature. The model fulfils causal commutation relations and the dielectric function of the model fulfils the Kramer-Kronig relations. We then use the same methods to calculate the van der Waals force between two neutral atoms at zero temperature and at finite temperatures. It is shown that the high temperature behaviour of the Casimir-Polder force and the van der Waals force are independent of {Dirac_h}. This means that they have to be understood classically, what is then shown in an algebraic statistical theory by using classical KMS states. (orig.)

  2. Microfabricated triggered vacuum switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesler, Alexander W [Tijeras, NM; Schare, Joshua M [Albuquerque, NM; Bunch, Kyle [Albuquerque, NM

    2010-05-11

    A microfabricated vacuum switch is disclosed which includes a substrate upon which an anode, cathode and trigger electrode are located. A cover is sealed over the substrate under vacuum to complete the vacuum switch. In some embodiments of the present invention, a metal cover can be used in place of the trigger electrode on the substrate. Materials used for the vacuum switch are compatible with high vacuum, relatively high temperature processing. These materials include molybdenum, niobium, copper, tungsten, aluminum and alloys thereof for the anode and cathode. Carbon in the form of graphitic carbon, a diamond-like material, or carbon nanotubes can be used in the trigger electrode. Channels can be optionally formed in the substrate to mitigate against surface breakdown.

  3. Evaporation under vacuum condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuta, Satoshi; Shibata, Yuki; Yuki, Kazuhisa; Hashizume, Hidetoshi; Toda, Saburo; Takase, Kazuyuki; Akimoto, Hajime

    2000-01-01

    In nuclear fusion reactor design, an event of water coolant ingress into its vacuum vessel is now being considered as one of the most probable accidents. In this report, the evaporation under vacuum condition is evaluated by using the evaporation model we have developed. The results show that shock-wave by the evaporation occurs whose behavior strongly depends on the initial conditions of vacuum. And in the case of lower initial pressure and temperature, the surface temp finally becomes higher than other conditions. (author)

  4. Vacuum system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathewson, A.G.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper the basic terms used by the vacuum engineer are presented and some useful formulae are also given. The concept of bakeout is introduced and the physics behind it explained. We concentrate on the effects in electron and proton storage rings which are due to energetic particle bombardment of the vacuum system walls and the ensuing gas desorption which may detrimentally affect the running of the machine. In addition, the problems associated with proton storage rings where the vacuum chamber is at cryogenic temperature are described

  5. Influence of vacuum impregnation and pulsed electric field on the freezing temperature and ice propagation rates of spinach leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efforts are currently directed towards improving the quality of sensitive tissues of fruits and vegetables after freezing and thawing. One of the methods under investigation is the combination of vacuum impregnation (VI) with cryoprotectants and pulsed electric field (PEF) applied to the plant tiss...

  6. Improvement of devolatilization and control of low-temperature oxidation by vacuum drying and tar coating treatments of low-rank coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahidin; Ogaki, Y.; Nakata, Y.; Usui, H. [Kobe University, Kobe (Japan). Graduate School for Science & Technology

    2003-07-01

    Upgrading of low-rank coal by means of a combined process of vacuum drying and tar coating has been conducted in order to suppress low-temperature oxidation and spontaneous combustion of coal. Some advantages on improvement of devolatilization and control of low-temperature oxidation have been observed. This upgrading technique was able to produce the upgraded coals comparable to bituminous coal particularly in moisture, volatile matter and carbon contents. Total weight loss and devolatilization significantly increased with an increase of the upgrading temperature, from 29.5 and 10.5%, respectively at 200{sup o}C to 36.5 and 21.9%, respectively, at 300{sup o}C. Moreover, upgraded coals showed a lower propensity to oxygen attack and low-temperature oxidation.

  7. Vacuum mechatronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackwood, Susan; Belinski, Steven E.; Beni, Gerardo

    1989-01-01

    The discipline of vacuum mechatronics is defined as the design and development of vacuum-compatible computer-controlled mechanisms for manipulating, sensing and testing in a vacuum environment. The importance of vacuum mechatronics is growing with an increased application of vacuum in space studies and in manufacturing for material processing, medicine, microelectronics, emission studies, lyophylisation, freeze drying and packaging. The quickly developing field of vacuum mechatronics will also be the driving force for the realization of an advanced era of totally enclosed clean manufacturing cells. High technology manufacturing has increasingly demanding requirements for precision manipulation, in situ process monitoring and contamination-free environments. To remove the contamination problems associated with human workers, the tendency in many manufacturing processes is to move towards total automation. This will become a requirement in the near future for e.g., microelectronics manufacturing. Automation in ultra-clean manufacturing environments is evolving into the concept of self-contained and fully enclosed manufacturing. A Self Contained Automated Robotic Factory (SCARF) is being developed as a flexible research facility for totally enclosed manufacturing. The construction and successful operation of a SCARF will provide a novel, flexible, self-contained, clean, vacuum manufacturing environment. SCARF also requires very high reliability and intelligent control. The trends in vacuum mechatronics and some of the key research issues are reviewed.

  8. Effect of vacuum packaging on the shelf-life and quality of Hypophthalmichthys molitrix fillets during storage in refrigerator temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Javaheri Baboli

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Vacuum packaging is one of the appropriate methods in packaging and storage of fish products. In this study, chemical changes including pH, thiobarbituric acid (TBA, total volatile basic nitrogen (TVN and microbial counts such as coliform bacteria, fecal coliform, salmonella and Escherichia coli in vacuum packed fillet of silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix was performed during 30 days storage at 4 ± 1 °C. Fresh silver carp fish samples (ranged 900 to 1200 g were obtained and transported to the laboratory. Data were analyzed using SPSS 18 software. Results showed that the highest levels of TVN and pH were determined as 63.33 ± 1.82 mg/100 g and 6.81 ± 0.04 in the day 30, respectively. According to the results, TBA, TVN and pH values were increased during 30 days storage. Moreover, total bacterial count increased during the 30 days of storage. Results revealed that coliform counts were less than 2 log cfu/g during the 30 days of storage. Increasing trend of faecal coliform at the end of storage period was estimated as 2.38±0.01 log cfu/g. Considering the microbial populations and the chemical spoilage indicators (TBA and TVN, the shelf life of 15 days was established for the vacuum packaged fillet stored at 4±1°C.

  9. Helical type vacuum container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owada, Kimio.

    1989-01-01

    Helical type vacuum containers in the prior art lack in considerations for thermal expansion stresses to helical coils, and there is a possibility of coil ruptures. The object of the present invention is to avoid the rupture of helical coils wound around the outer surface of a vacuum container against heat expansion if any. That is, bellows or heat expansion absorbing means are disposed to a cross section of a helical type vacuum container. With such a constitution, thermal expansion of helical coils per se due to temperature elevation of the coils during electric supply can be absorbed by expansion of the bellows or absorption of the heat expansion absorbing means. Further, this can be attained by arranging shear pins in the direction perpendicular to the bellows axis so that the bellows are not distorted when the helical coils are wound around the helical type vacuum container. (I.S.)

  10. Actin dynamics in mouse fibroblasts in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moes, Maarten J. A.; Bijvelt, Jose J.; Boonstra, Johannes

    2007-09-01

    After stimulating with the growth factor PDGF, cells exhibit abundant membrane ruffling and other morphological changes under normal gravity conditions. These morphological changes are largely determined by the actin microfilament system. Now these actin dynamics were studied under microgravity conditions in mouse fibroblasts during the DELTA mission. The aim of the present study was to describe the actin morphology in detail, to establish the effect of PDGF on actin morphology and to study the role of several actin-interacting proteins involved in introduced actin dynamics in microgravity. Identical experiments were conducted at 1G on earth as a reference. No results in microgravity were obtained due to a combination of malfunctioning hardware and unfulfilled temperature requirements.

  11. Next Generation Non-Vacuum, Maskless, Low Temperature Nanoparticle Ink Laser Digital Direct Metal Patterning for a Large Area Flexible Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Junyeob; Hong, Sukjoon; Lee, Daehoo; Hotz, Nico; Lee, Ming-Tsang; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Ko, Seung Hwan

    2012-01-01

    Flexible electronics opened a new class of future electronics. The foldable, light and durable nature of flexible electronics allows vast flexibility in applications such as display, energy devices and mobile electronics. Even though conventional electronics fabrication methods are well developed for rigid substrates, direct application or slight modification of conventional processes for flexible electronics fabrication cannot work. The future flexible electronics fabrication requires totally new low-temperature process development optimized for flexible substrate and it should be based on new material too. Here we present a simple approach to developing a flexible electronics fabrication without using conventional vacuum deposition and photolithography. We found that direct metal patterning based on laser-induced local melting of metal nanoparticle ink is a promising low-temperature alternative to vacuum deposition– and photolithography-based conventional metal patterning processes. The “digital” nature of the proposed direct metal patterning process removes the need for expensive photomask and allows easy design modification and short turnaround time. This new process can be extremely useful for current small-volume, large-variety manufacturing paradigms. Besides, simple, scalable, fast and low-temperature processes can lead to cost-effective fabrication methods on a large-area polymer substrate. The developed process was successfully applied to demonstrate high-quality Ag patterning (2.1 µΩ·cm) and high-performance flexible organic field effect transistor arrays. PMID:22900011

  12. Review: Physical, physical chemistries, chemical and sensorial characteristics of the several fruits and vegetables chips by low-temperature vacuum frying machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AHMAD DWI SETYAWAN

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Setyawan AD, Sugiyarto, Solichatun, Susilowati A. 2013. Review: Physical, physical chemistries, chemical and sensorial characteristics of the several fruits and vegetables chips by low-temperature vacuum frying machine. Nusantara Bioscience 5: 84-100. Frying process is one of the oldest cooking methods and most widely practiced in the world. Frying process is considered as a dry cooking method because the process does not involve water. In frying process, oil conduction occurs at high temperature pressing water out of food in the form of bubbles. Fried foods last longer due to reduced water levels lead less decomposition by microbes, even fried foods can be enhanced nutritional value and quality of appearance. Food frying technology can extend the shelf life of fruits and vegetables and frying oil enhances the flavors of the products, however, improper frying oil can have harmful effects on human health. Vacuum frying is a promising technology that may be an option for the production of novel snacks such as fruit and vegetable crisps that present the desired quality and respond to new health trends. This technique fry food at a low temperature and pressure so that the nutritional quality of the food is maintained and the quality of the used oil does not quickly declined and became saturated oils that are harmful to human health. This technique produces chips that have physical, physico-chemical, chemical, and sensory generally better than conventional deep-fat frying methods.

  13. Next generation non-vacuum, maskless, low temperature nanoparticle ink laser digital direct metal patterning for a large area flexible electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Junyeob; Hong, Sukjoon; Lee, Daehoo; Hotz, Nico; Lee, Ming-Tsang; Grigoropoulos, Costas P; Ko, Seung Hwan

    2012-01-01

    Flexible electronics opened a new class of future electronics. The foldable, light and durable nature of flexible electronics allows vast flexibility in applications such as display, energy devices and mobile electronics. Even though conventional electronics fabrication methods are well developed for rigid substrates, direct application or slight modification of conventional processes for flexible electronics fabrication cannot work. The future flexible electronics fabrication requires totally new low-temperature process development optimized for flexible substrate and it should be based on new material too. Here we present a simple approach to developing a flexible electronics fabrication without using conventional vacuum deposition and photolithography. We found that direct metal patterning based on laser-induced local melting of metal nanoparticle ink is a promising low-temperature alternative to vacuum deposition- and photolithography-based conventional metal patterning processes. The "digital" nature of the proposed direct metal patterning process removes the need for expensive photomask and allows easy design modification and short turnaround time. This new process can be extremely useful for current small-volume, large-variety manufacturing paradigms. Besides, simple, scalable, fast and low-temperature processes can lead to cost-effective fabrication methods on a large-area polymer substrate. The developed process was successfully applied to demonstrate high-quality Ag patterning (2.1 µΩ·cm) and high-performance flexible organic field effect transistor arrays.

  14. Next generation non-vacuum, maskless, low temperature nanoparticle ink laser digital direct metal patterning for a large area flexible electronics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyeob Yeo

    Full Text Available Flexible electronics opened a new class of future electronics. The foldable, light and durable nature of flexible electronics allows vast flexibility in applications such as display, energy devices and mobile electronics. Even though conventional electronics fabrication methods are well developed for rigid substrates, direct application or slight modification of conventional processes for flexible electronics fabrication cannot work. The future flexible electronics fabrication requires totally new low-temperature process development optimized for flexible substrate and it should be based on new material too. Here we present a simple approach to developing a flexible electronics fabrication without using conventional vacuum deposition and photolithography. We found that direct metal patterning based on laser-induced local melting of metal nanoparticle ink is a promising low-temperature alternative to vacuum deposition- and photolithography-based conventional metal patterning processes. The "digital" nature of the proposed direct metal patterning process removes the need for expensive photomask and allows easy design modification and short turnaround time. This new process can be extremely useful for current small-volume, large-variety manufacturing paradigms. Besides, simple, scalable, fast and low-temperature processes can lead to cost-effective fabrication methods on a large-area polymer substrate. The developed process was successfully applied to demonstrate high-quality Ag patterning (2.1 µΩ·cm and high-performance flexible organic field effect transistor arrays.

  15. Functional foods enriched in Aloe vera. Effects of vacuum impregnation and temperature on the respiration rate and the respiratory quotient of some vegetables

    OpenAIRE

    Sanzana, Sigrid; Gras, María Luisa; Vidal-Brotóns, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    [EN] This work is part of a study on the process of production of vegetables enriched in Aloe vera using the vacuum impregnation (VI) technique. The objectives of this work were: (i) to analyze the effects of VI with Aloe vera on some quality parameters of vegetables: water activity, water content, soluble solids content, real and apparent densities, and pH; (ii) to analyze the effects of the presence of Aloe vera in VI solutions and temperature on the respiration rates (carbon di...

  16. Influence of growth temperature on formation of continuous Ag thin film on ZnO surface by ultra-high vacuum deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, T C; Mei, Z X; Guo, Y; Xue, Q K; Du, X L

    2009-01-01

    Growth of an Ag film on a ZnO (0 0 0 1) surface by ultra-high vacuum deposition has been investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy. It is revealed that the growth temperature has a considerable effect on the formation of a continuous Ag thin film on a ZnO surface. At room temperature or above, the formation of continuous Ag films with small thickness was found to be difficult due to an upstepping mechanism, whereas a continuous Ag film as thin as 30 nm was achieved at 140 K, resulting from the reduced migration length of silver atoms and the increased saturated island density at low temperature. Coalescence between the islands occurred and predominated over upstepping during subsequent deposition, which is favourable for the formation of a continuous Ag film with a smaller thickness.

  17. Vacuum II

    CERN Document Server

    Franchetti, G

    2013-01-01

    This paper continues the presentation of pumps begun in ‘Vacuum I’. The main topic here is gauges and partial-pressure measurements. Starting from the kinetics of gases, the various strategies for measuring vacuum pressures are presented at an introductory level, with some reference to hardware devices. Partial-pressure measurement techniques are introduced, showing that the principles of ion selection have a direct similarity to particle dynamics in accelerators.

  18. Vacuum properties of high quality value tuning fork in high magnetic field up to 8 Tesla and at mK temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Človečko, M.; Kupka, M.; Skyba, P.; Vavrek, F.

    2014-12-01

    Tuning forks are very popular experimental tools widely applied in low and ultra low temperature physics as mechanical resonators and cantilevers in the study of quantum liquids, STM and AFM techniques, etc. As an added benefit, these forks being cooled, have very high Q-value, typically 106 and their properties seems to be magnetic field independent. We present preliminary vacuum measurements of a commercial tuning fork oscillating at frequency 32 kHz conducted in magnetic fields up to 8 T and at temperature ~ 10 mK. We found an additional weak damping of the tuning fork motion depending on magnetic field magnitude and we discuss physical nature of the observed phenomena.

  19. Macromolecular Crystallization in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Edward H.; Helliwell, John R.

    2004-01-01

    The key concepts that attracted crystal growers, macromolecular or solid state, to microgravity research is that density difference fluid flows and sedimentation of the growing crystals are greatly reduced. Thus, defects and flaws in the crystals can be reduced, even eliminated, and crystal volume can be increased. Macromolecular crystallography differs from the field of crystalline semiconductors. For the latter, crystals are harnessed for their electrical behaviors. A crystal of a biological macromolecule is used instead for diffraction experiments (X-ray or neutron) to determine the three-dimensional structure of the macromolecule. The better the internal order of the crystal of a biological macromolecule then the more molecular structure detail that can be extracted. This structural information that enables an understanding of how the molecule functions. This knowledge is changing the biological and chemical sciences with major potential in understanding disease pathologies. Macromolecular structural crystallography in general is a remarkable field where physics, biology, chemistry, and mathematics meet to enable insight to the basic fundamentals of life. In this review, we examine the use of microgravity as an environment to grow macromolecular crystals. We describe the crystallization procedures used on the ground, how the resulting crystals are studied and the knowledge obtained from those crystals. We address the features desired in an ordered crystal and the techniques used to evaluate those features in detail. We then introduce the microgravity environment, the techniques to access that environment, and the theory and evidence behind the use of microgravity for crystallization experiments. We describe how ground-based laboratory techniques have been adapted to microgravity flights and look at some of the methods used to analyze the resulting data. Several case studies illustrate the physical crystal quality improvements and the macromolecular structural

  20. Macromolecular crystallization in microgravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snell, Edward H; Helliwell, John R

    2005-01-01

    Density difference fluid flows and sedimentation of growing crystals are greatly reduced when crystallization takes place in a reduced gravity environment. In the case of macromolecular crystallography a crystal of a biological macromolecule is used for diffraction experiments (x-ray or neutron) so as to determine the three-dimensional structure of the macromolecule. The better the internal order of the crystal then the greater the molecular structure detail that can be extracted. It is this structural information that enables an understanding of how the molecule functions. This knowledge is changing the biological and chemical sciences, with major potential in understanding disease pathologies. In this review, we examine the use of microgravity as an environment to grow macromolecular crystals. We describe the crystallization procedures used on the ground, how the resulting crystals are studied and the knowledge obtained from those crystals. We address the features desired in an ordered crystal and the techniques used to evaluate those features in detail. We then introduce the microgravity environment, the techniques to access that environment and the theory and evidence behind the use of microgravity for crystallization experiments. We describe how ground-based laboratory techniques have been adapted to microgravity flights and look at some of the methods used to analyse the resulting data. Several case studies illustrate the physical crystal quality improvements and the macromolecular structural advances. Finally, limitations and alternatives to microgravity and future directions for this research are covered. Macromolecular structural crystallography in general is a remarkable field where physics, biology, chemistry and mathematics meet to enable insight to the fundamentals of life. As the reader will see, there is a great deal of physics involved when the microgravity environment is applied to crystallization, some of it known, and undoubtedly much yet to

  1. Solidification under microgravity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The paper outlines the broad areas where studies are being conducted under microgravity conditions worldwide viz., biotechnology, combustion science, materials science and fluid physics. The paper presents in particular a review on the various areas of research being pursued in materials science. These include studies ...

  2. Unit Operations in Microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, David T.; Pettit, Donald R.

    1987-01-01

    Presents some of the work currently under way in the development of microgravity chemical processes. Highlights some of the opportunities for materials processing in outer space. Emphasizes some of the contributions that chemical engineers can make in this emerging set of technologies. (TW)

  3. Solidification under microgravity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    However, in order to assess the models, experiments able to separate convection from the other mechanisms are still needed. This has led to conducting experiments in microgravity environment on inoculated Al–Cu alloys to minimise convection so that diffusive transport mechanism is dominant and in which density of the.

  4. Design and performance of an ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscope operating at dilution refrigerator temperatures and high magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, S; Zhou, B B; Drozdov, I K; Seo, J; Urban, L; Gyenis, A; Kingsley, S C J; Jones, H; Yazdani, A

    2013-10-01

    We describe the construction and performance of a scanning tunneling microscope capable of taking maps of the tunneling density of states with sub-atomic spatial resolution at dilution refrigerator temperatures and high (14 T) magnetic fields. The fully ultra-high vacuum system features visual access to a two-sample microscope stage at the end of a bottom-loading dilution refrigerator, which facilitates the transfer of in situ prepared tips and samples. The two-sample stage enables location of the best area of the sample under study and extends the experiment lifetime. The successful thermal anchoring of the microscope, described in detail, is confirmed through a base temperature reading of 20 mK, along with a measured electron temperature of 250 mK. Atomically resolved images, along with complementary vibration measurements, are presented to confirm the effectiveness of the vibration isolation scheme in this instrument. Finally, we demonstrate that the microscope is capable of the same level of performance as typical machines with more modest refrigeration by measuring spectroscopic maps at base temperature both at zero field and in an applied magnetic field.

  5. Design and performance of an ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscope operating at dilution refrigerator temperatures and high magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, S.; Zhou, B. B.; Drozdov, I. K.; Seo, J.; Urban, L.; Gyenis, A.; Kingsley, S. C. J.; Jones, H.; Yazdani, A.

    2013-10-01

    We describe the construction and performance of a scanning tunneling microscope capable of taking maps of the tunneling density of states with sub-atomic spatial resolution at dilution refrigerator temperatures and high (14 T) magnetic fields. The fully ultra-high vacuum system features visual access to a two-sample microscope stage at the end of a bottom-loading dilution refrigerator, which facilitates the transfer of in situ prepared tips and samples. The two-sample stage enables location of the best area of the sample under study and extends the experiment lifetime. The successful thermal anchoring of the microscope, described in detail, is confirmed through a base temperature reading of 20 mK, along with a measured electron temperature of 250 mK. Atomically resolved images, along with complementary vibration measurements, are presented to confirm the effectiveness of the vibration isolation scheme in this instrument. Finally, we demonstrate that the microscope is capable of the same level of performance as typical machines with more modest refrigeration by measuring spectroscopic maps at base temperature both at zero field and in an applied magnetic field.

  6. Vacuum Valve

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    This valve was used in the Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) to protect against the shock waves that would be caused if air were to enter the vacuum tube. Some of the ISR chambers were very fragile, with very thin walls - a design required by physicists on the lookout for new particles.

  7. Measurement of H and H2 populations in-situ in a low-temperature plasma by vacuum-ultraviolet laser-absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlachter, A.S.; Young, A.T.; Stutzin, G.C.; Stearns, J.W.; Doebele, H.G.; Leung, K.N.; Kunkel, W.B.

    1988-12-01

    A new technique, vacuum-ultraviolet laser-absorption spectroscopy, has been developed to quantitatively determine the absolute density of H and H 2 within a plasma. The technique is particularly well suited to measurement in a plasma, where high charged particle and photon background complicate other methods of detection. The high selectivity and sensitivity of the technique allows for the measurement of the rotational-vibrational state distribution of H 2 as well as the translational temperature of the atoms and molecules. The technique has been used to study both pulsed and continuous H/sup /minus// ion-source plasma discharges. H 2 state distributions in a multicusp ''volume'' H/sup /minus// ion- source plasma show a high degree of internal excitation, with levels up to v = 5 and J = 8 being observed. The method is applicable for a very wide range of plasma conditions. Emission measurements from excited states of H are also reported. 17 refs., 9 figs

  8. 14 CFR 25.1433 - Vacuum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Vacuum systems. 25.1433 Section 25.1433... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 25.1433 Vacuum systems. There... discharge lines from the vacuum air pump when the delivery temperature of the air becomes unsafe. ...

  9. 14 CFR 29.1433 - Vacuum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Vacuum systems. 29.1433 Section 29.1433... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 29.1433 Vacuum systems. (a... the discharge lines from the vacuum air pump when the delivery temperature of the air becomes unsafe...

  10. A HIGH VACUUM GAUGE CALIBRATION SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    An ultra- high vacuum type metal and glass system was constructed for the purpose of calibrating vacuum gauges in the pressure region from 760 to 10...to the -7th power torr. The high vacuum portion of the system is bakeable at temperatures up to 450 C. A mercury manometer serves as a pressure

  11. R&D ERL: Vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mapes, M.; Smart, L.; Weiss, D.; Steszyn, A.; Todd, R.

    2010-01-01

    The ERL Vacuum systems are depicted in a figure. ERL has eight vacuum volumes with various sets of requirements. A summary of vacuum related requirements is provided in a table. Five of the eight volumes comprise the electron beamline. They are the 5-cell Superconducting RF Cavity, Superconducting e-gun, injection, loop and beam dump. Two vacuum regions are the individual cryostats insulating the 5-cell Superconducting RF Cavity and the Superconducting e-gun structures. The last ERL vacuum volume not shown in the schematic is the laser transport line. The beamline vacuum regions are separated by electropneumatic gate valves. The beam dump is common with loop beamline but is considered a separate volume due to geometry and requirements. Vacuum in the 5-cell SRF cavity is maintained in the {approx}10{sup -9} torr range at room temperature by two 20 l/s ion pumps and in the e-gun SRF cavity by one 60 l/s ion pump. Vacuum in the SRF cavities operated at 2{sup o}K is reduced to low 10{sup -11} torr via cryopumping of the cavity walls. The cathode of the e-gun must be protected from poisoning, which can occur if vacuum adjacent to the e-gun in the injection line exceeds 10-11 torr range in the injection warm beamline near the e-gun exit. The vacuum requirements for beam operation in the loop and beam dump are 10-9 torr range. The beamlines are evacuated from atmospheric pressure to high vacuum level with a particulate free, oil free turbomolecular pumping cart. 25 l/s shielded ion pumps distributed throughout the beamlines maintain the vacuum requirement. Due to the more demanding vacuum requirement of the injection beamline proximate to the e-gun, a vacuum bakeout of the injection beamline is required. In addition, two 200 l/s diode ion pumps and supplemental pumping provided by titanium sublimation pumps are installed in the injection line just beyond the exit of the e-gun. Due to expected gas load a similar pumping arrangement is planned for the beam dump. The

  12. Qualitative and quantitative imaging in microgravity combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Karen J.

    1995-01-01

    An overview of the imaging techniques implemented by researchers in the microgravity combustion program shows that for almost any system, imaging of the flame may be accomplished in a variety of ways. Standard and intensified video, high speed, and infrared cameras and fluorescence, laser schlieren, rainbow schlieren, soot volume fraction, and soot temperature imaging have all been used in the laboratory and many in reduced gravity to make the necessary experimental measurements.

  13. Microgravity particle reduction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Vanessa; Joslin, Michelle; Mateo, Lili; Tubbs, Tracey

    1988-01-01

    The Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) project, sponsored by NASA, is assembling the knowledge required to design, construct, and operate a system which will grow and process higher plants in space for the consumption by crew members of a space station on a long term space mission. The problem of processing dry granular organic materials in microgravity is discussed. For the purpose of research and testing, wheat was chosen as the granular material to be ground into flour. Possible systems which were devised to transport wheat grains into the food processor, mill the wheat into flour, and transport the flour to the food preparation system are described. The systems were analyzed and compared and two satisfactory systems were chosen. Prototypes of the two preferred systems are to be fabricated next semester. They will be tested under simulated microgravity conditions and revised for maximum effectiveness.

  14. Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, William

    2009-01-01

    Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System (MAMS) is an ongoing study of the small forces (vibrations and accelerations) on the ISS that result from the operation of hardware, crew activities, as well as dockings and maneuvering. Results will be used to generalize the types of vibrations affecting vibration-sensitive experiments. Investigators seek to better understand the vibration environment on the space station to enable future research.

  15. Plant Cell Adaptive Responses to Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordyum, Elizabeth; Kozeko, Liudmyla; Talalaev, Alexandr

    Microgravity is an abnormal environmental condition that plays no role in the functioning of biosphere. Nevertheless, the chronic effect of microgravity in space flight as an unfamiliar factor does not prevent the development of adaptive reactions at the cellular level. In real microgravity in space flight under the more or less optimal conditions for plant growing, namely temperature, humidity, CO2, light intensity and directivity in the hardware angiosperm plants perform an “reproductive imperative”, i.e. they flower, fruit and yield viable seeds. It is known that cells of a multicellular organism not only take part on reactions of the organism but also carry out processes that maintain their integrity. In light of these principles, the problem of the identification of biochemical, physiological and structural patterns that can have adaptive significance at the cellular and subcellular level in real and simulated microgravity is considered. Cytological studies of plants developing in real and simulated microgravity made it possible to establish that the processes of mitosis, cytokinesis, and tissue differentiation of vegetative and generative organs are largely normal. At the same time, under microgravity, essential reconstruction in the structural and functional organization of cell organelles and cytoskeleton, as well as changes in cell metabolism and homeostasis have been described. In addition, new interesting data concerning the influence of altered gravity on lipid peroxidation intensity, the level of reactive oxygen species, and antioxidant system activity, just like on the level of gene expression and synthesis of low-molecular and high-molecular heat shock proteins were recently obtained. So, altered gravity caused time-dependent increasing of the HSP70 and HSP90 levels in cells, that may indicate temporary strengthening of their functional loads that is necessary for re-establish a new cellular homeostasis. Relative qPCR results showed that

  16. The influence of pH, temperature and hydrolyzate concentration on the removal of volatile and nonvolatile compounds from sugarcane bagasse hemicellulosic hydrolyzate treated with activated charcoal before or after vacuum evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C.L.B. Rodrigues

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the influence of pH, temperature and degree of hydrolyzate concentration on the removal of volatile and nonvolatile compounds from sugarcane bagasse hemicellulosic hydrolyzate treated with activated charcoal before or after the vacuum evaporation process. Furfural and 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural were almost totally removed in all the experiments, irrespective of pH and temperature and whether the charcoal was added before or after the vacuum evaporation process. Adding activated charcoal before the vacuum evaporation process favored the removal of phenolic compounds for all values of pH. Acetic acid, on the contrary, was most effectively removed when the activated charcoal was added after the vacuum evaporation process at an acid pH (0.92 and at the highest degree of hydrolyzate concentration (f=4. However, addition of activated charcoal before or after vacuum evaporation at an acid pH (0.92 and at the highest degree of hydrolyzate concentration (f=4 favored the removal of both acetic acid and phenolic compounds.

  17. Dynamic Models of Vacuum-Evaporator Plants for Dairy Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Airapetiants

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies problems of linearized dynamic models intended for synthesis of automatic temperature control systems and vacuum depth in vacuum evaporators. А single-casing vacuum evaporator plant is considered as an object of automatic control. Disturbance input channels are discerned and transfer functions permitting to determine laws of temperature and vacuum regulation and optimum parameters for setting automatic regulators used for various operational modes of vacuum-evaporator plants are obtained on the basis of the executed analysis.

  18. Advanced Microgravity Compatible, Integrated Laundry System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Advanced Microgravity Compatible, Integrated Laundry (AMCIL) is a microgravity compatible liquid / liquid vapor, two-phase laundry system with water jet...

  19. High-temperature two-dimensional gas chromatography of hydrocarbons up to nC60 for analysis of vacuum gas oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutriez, Thomas; Courtiade, Marion; Thiébaut, Didier; Dulot, Hugues; Bertoncini, Fabrice; Vial, Jérôme; Hennion, Marie-Claire

    2009-04-03

    In a tense energetic context, the characterization of heavy petroleum fractions becomes essential. Conventional comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (2D-GC or GCxGC) is widely used for middle distillates analysis, but only a few applications are devoted to these heavier fractions. In this paper, it is shown how the optimization of GCxGC separation allowed the determination of suitable high-temperature (HT) conditions, adjusting column properties and operating conditions. 2D separations were evaluated using 2D separation criteria and a new concept of 2D asymmetry (As(2D)). New HT conditions allowed the extension of GCxGC range of applications to heavier hydrocarbons, up to nC(60). A first application of high-temperature two-dimensional gas chromatography (HT-2D-GC) to a full vacuum gas oil (VGO) feed stock is described. Comparisons with other standardized methods illustrate the high potential of HT-2D-GC for heavy fractions analysis.

  20. Airfoil sampling of a pulsed Laval beam with tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry: Application to low--temperature kinetics and product detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soorkia, Satchin; Liu, Chen-Lin; Savee, John D; Ferrell, Sarah J; Leone, Stephen R; Wilson, Kevin R

    2011-10-12

    A new pulsed Laval nozzle apparatus with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron photoionization quadrupole mass spectrometry is constructed to study low-temperature radicalneutralchemical reactions of importance for modeling the atmosphere of Titan and the outer planets. A design for the sampling geometry of a pulsed Laval nozzle expansion has beendeveloped that operates successfully for the determination of rate coefficients by time-resolved mass spectrometry. The new concept employs airfoil sampling of the collimated expansion withexcellent sampling throughput. Time-resolved profiles of the high Mach number gas flow obtained by photoionization signals show that perturbation of the collimated expansion by theairfoil is negligible. The reaction of C2H with C2H2 is studied at 70 K as a proof-of-principle result for both low-temperature rate coefficient measurements and product identification basedon the photoionization spectrum of the reaction product versus VUV photon energy. This approach can be used to provide new insights into reaction mechanisms occurring at kinetic ratesclose to the collision-determined limit.

  1. Design of an optical fibre based angular position sensor for wire scanners complying with ultra-high vacuum, high temperature and radiation conditions of the CERN´s accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Sirvent Blasco, Jose Luis; Azorin Poveda, Jose Maria

    The main objective of this thesis is to design and implement the relative optical position sensor based on optical fibre, related to the new design of wire scanner, also taking into account the general specifications of the whole design of the Vacuum Wire Scanner (VWS from here in advanced). According to the limitations of the environment this sensor must work under very hard conditions and provide as much accuracy as possible, this means that all the components must be carefully selected and also rated to high temperature, ultra high vacuum and radiation environment to provide the longest life time as possible.

  2. Countermeasures to microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttges, Marvin W.

    1989-01-01

    Biological systems ranging from the most simple to the most complex generally survive exposure to microgravity. Changes in many characteristics of biological systems are well documented as a consequence of space flight. Attempts to devise countermeasures to microgravity may have direct pragmatic consequences for crew protection and may provide additional insights into the nature of microgravity influences on biological systems. Some of the most well documented changes occur in humans who have experienced space flight. Changes appear to be transient. Space adaption syndrome occurs relatively briefly whereas bone deterioration may require months of postflight time for restoration. It seems critical to recognize that these changes and others may derive from rather passive, active or even reactive changes in the biological systems that are hosts to them. For example, hydrostatic fluid redistributions may be quite passive occurrences that are realized through extensive fluid channels. Changes occur in cell metabolism because of fluid, nutrient and gas redistributions. Equally important are the misconstrued messages likely to be carried by fluid redistributions. These reactive events can trigger, for example, loss of fluids and electrolytes through altered kidney function. Each of these considerations must be evaluated in regard to the biological site affected. Countermeasures to the vast range of biological changes and sites are difficult to envision. The most obvious countermeasure is the restoration of gravity-like influences. Some options are discussed. Recent work has focussed on the use of magnetic fields. Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) are shown to alleviate bone deterioration produced in rodents exposed to tail suspension. Methods of PEMF exposure are consistent with human use in space. Related methods may provide muscular and neural benefits.

  3. Microgravity and Macromolecular Crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundrot, Craig E.; Judge, Russell A.; Pusey, Marc L.; Snell, Edward H.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Macromolecular crystal growth has been seen as an ideal experiment to make use of the reduced acceleration environment provided by an orbiting spacecraft. The experiments are small, simply operated and have a high potential scientific and economic impact. In this review we examine the theoretical reasons why microgravity should be a beneficial environment for crystal growth and survey the history of experiments on the Space Shuttle Orbiter, on unmanned spacecraft, and on the Mir space station. Finally we outline the direction for optimizing the future use of orbiting platforms.

  4. Ultra high vacuum high precision low background setup with temperature control for thermal desorption mass spectroscopy (TDA-MS) of hydrogen in metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merzlikin, Sergiy V; Borodin, S; Vogel, D; Rohwerder, M

    2015-05-01

    In this work, a newly developed UHV-based high precision low background setup for hydrogen thermal desorption analysis (TDA) of metallic samples is presented. Using an infrared heating with a low thermal capacity enables a precise control of the temperature and rapid cool down of the measurement chamber. This novel TDA-set up is superior in sensitivity to almost every standard hydrogen analyzer available commercially due to the special design of the measurement chamber, resulting in a very low hydrogen background. No effects of background drift characteristic as for carrier gas based TDA instruments were observed, ensuring linearity and reproducibility of the analysis. This setup will prove to be valuable for detailed investigations of hydrogen trapping sites in steels and other alloys. With a determined limit of detection of 5.9×10(-3)µg g(-1) hydrogen the developed instrument is able to determine extremely low hydrogen amounts even at very low hydrogen desorption rates. This work clearly demonstrates the great potential of ultra-high vacuum thermal desorption mass spectroscopy instrumentation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Properties of low-temperature deposited ZnO thin films prepared by cathodic vacuum arc technology on different flexible substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Cheng-Tang [Department of Mechanical and Electron-Mechanical Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung City 804, Taiwan (China); Yang, Ru-Yuan, E-mail: ryyang@mail.npust.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Materials Engineering, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Pingtung County 912, Taiwan (China); Weng, Min-Hang [Medical Devices and Opto-Electronics Equipment Department, Metal Industries Research and Development Center, Kaohsiung City 821, Taiwan (China); Huang, Chien-Wei [Department of Mechanical and Electron-Mechanical Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung City 804, Taiwan (China)

    2013-07-31

    Un-doped zinc oxide (ZnO) films were deposited on three different substrates (polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyvinyl butyral (PVB) and polyimide (PI)) at a low temperature (< 75 °C) by cathode vacuum arc deposition. The microstructure, optical and electrical properties of the deposited films were investigated and discussed. All the deposited films reveal a preferred orientation with the c-axis perpendicular to the substrate, and an average transmittance of over 85% in the visible region. The calculated optical band gaps are around 2.6, 3.14 and 3.18 eV, respectively, for the ZnO films deposited on the PI, PVB and PET substrates. The lowest resistivity and the highest Hall mobility are 5.31 × 10{sup −3} Ω-cm and 15.16 cm{sup 2}/V-s for the ZnO film deposited on the PET substrate. - Highlights: • Polyethylene terephthalate, polyvinyl butyral and polyimide were used as substrates. • ZnO films were prepared by cathodic arc plasma deposition. • ZnO films have different properties due to different substrates. • The microstructure control of ZnO film on polymer substrate is important.

  6. Vacuum microelectronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grayer, G.H.

    1990-10-01

    The last few years have seen references in scientific and economic literature to research and development taking place on ''vacuum microelectronics'', but few in the particle physics community seem to know more than these brief, second hand reports, mostly written for a non-scientific readership. The interest of these devices for the particle physics community is obvious when it is realised that one of the driving forces for this research and development is the military need for electronic components which can withstand very high doses of radiation. The author therefore arranged to visit one of the centres of research on these components, and the information obtained there formed the principle source material for this summary. (author)

  7. Straight Ahead in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, G.; Wood, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The subjective straight-ahead direction is a very basic perceptual reference for spatial orientation and locomotion. The perceived straight-ahead along the horizontal and vertical meridian is largely determined by both otolith and somatosensory inputs which are altered in microgravity. The Straight Ahead in Microgravity (SAM) experiment will be conducted on the International Space Station (ISS) to examine how this spatial processing changes as a function of spaceflight. METHODS Data will be collected before the flight, at one-month intervals during long-duration stay (180 days) on board ISS, and after return to Earth. Control studies will also be performed during parabolic flights. Three different protocols will be used in each test session: (1) Fixation: The subject will be asked to look at actual targets (normal vision) and then to imagine these same targets (occluded vision) in the straight-ahead direction. Targets will be located at near distance (arm s length, 0.5m), medium distance (1 m), and far distance (beyond 2 m). This task will be successively performed with subject s body aligned with the spacecraft interior, and with subject s body tilted forward and backward by an operator. (2) Saccades: The subject will be asked to make horizontal and vertical saccades, first relative to the spacecraft interior reference system, and then relative to the subject s head reference system. This task will be successively performed with subject s body aligned with the spacecraft interior, and with subject s body tilted in roll or in pitch by an operator. (3) Linear Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (VOR): The subject will be asked to stare at actual visual targets (normal vision) at various distances (near, medium, far) in the straight-ahead direction. Vision will then be occluded, and the subject will be asked to continue staring at the same imagined targets while he/she is passively translated forward-backward, up-down, or side-to-side. The subject's body motion will

  8. Laser diagnostics for microgravity droplet studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Michael

    1993-01-01

    Rapid advances have recently been made in numerical simulation of droplet combustion under microgravity conditions, while experimental capabilities remain relatively primitive. Calculations can now provide detailed information on mass and energy transport, complex gas-phase chemistry, multi-component molecular diffusion, surface evaporation and heterogeneous reaction, which provides a clearer picture of both quasi-steady as well as dynamic behavior of droplet combustion. Experiments concerning these phenomena typically result in pictures of the burning droplets, and the data therefrom describe droplet surface regression along with flame and soot shell position. With much more precise, detailed, experimental diagnostics, significant gains could be made on the dynamics and flame structural changes which occur during droplet combustion. Since microgravity experiments become increasingly more expensive as they progress from drop towers and flights to spaceborne experiments, there is a great need to maximize the information content from these experiments. Sophisticated measurements using laser diagnostics on individual droplets and combustion phenomena are now possible. These include measuring flow patterns and temperature fields within droplets, vaporization rates and vaporization enhancement, radical species profiling in flames and gas-phase flow-tagging velocimetry. Although these measurements are sophisticated, they have undergone maturation to the degree where with some development, they are applicable to studies of microgravity droplet combustion. This program beginning in September of 1992, will include a series of measurements in the NASA Learjet, KC-135 and Drop Tower facilities for investigating the range of applicability of these diagnostics while generating and providing fundamental data to ongoing NASA research programs in this area. This program is being conducted in collaboration with other microgravity investigators and is aimed toward supplementing

  9. Sleep and Respiration in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, John B.; Elliott, Ann R.; Prisk, G. Kim; Paiva, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    Sleep is often reported to be of poor quality in microgravity, and studies on the ground have shown a strong relationship between sleep-disordered breathing and sleep disruption. During the 16-day Neurolab mission, we studied the influence of possible changes in respiratory function on sleep by performing comprehensive sleep recordings on the payload crew on four nights during the mission. In addition, we measured the changes in the ventilatory response to low oxygen and high carbon dioxide in the same subjects during the day, hypothesizing that changes in ventilatory control might affect respiration during sleep. Microgravity caused a large reduction in the ventilatory response to reduced oxygen. This is likely the result of an increase in blood pressure at the peripheral chemoreceptors in the neck that occurs when the normally present hydrostatic pressure gradient between the heart and upper body is abolished. This reduction was similar to that seen when the subjects were placed acutely in the supine position in one-G. In sharp contrast to low oxygen, the ventilatory response to elevated carbon dioxide was unaltered by microgravity or the supine position. Because of the similarities of the findings in microgravity and the supine position, it is unlikely that changes in ventilatory control alter respiration during sleep in microgravity. During sleep on the ground, there were a small number of apneas (cessation of breathing) and hypopneas (reduced breathing) in these normal subjects. During sleep in microgravity, there was a reduction in the number of apneas and hypopneas per hour compared to preflight. Obstructive apneas virtually disappeared in microgravity, suggesting that the removal of gravity prevents the collapse of upper airways during sleep. Arousals from sleep were reduced in microgravity compared to preflight, and virtually all of this reduction was as a result of a reduction in the number of arousals from apneas and hypopneas. We conclude that any sleep

  10. Analysis of biological effects in human endothelial cells after stimulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Zhang; Sun, Yeqing; Xu, Dan

    Space environment is characterized by strong radiation, ultra-high vacuum, weak magnetic field and microgravity. Among them, microgravity (10-4-10-6g) in space is different from gravity (1g) on earth, possibly causing visual disorders, muscle alterations, bone loss and dysfunction of cardiovascular systems. To study about microgravity environment, the most advanced rotary cell culture system (RCCS-1) was used to do stimulated microgravity (SMG) experiments in the ground. Up to now, most of studies focus on the biological effects under stimulated microgravity, but it is less known about the cellular response after stimulated microgravity. In the present study, we explored the subsequent effects of stimulated microgravity on human endothelial cells (HUVEC-C) after these cells were cultured on RCCS-1 for 48 hours. We co-cultured HUVEC-C cells with Hillex-microcarriers in 60-mm culture dishes for 24h, followed by transferring them to RCCS-1 so that cells remain to be the state of SMG. In parallel, HUVEC-C cells were co-cultured with microcarriers in the ground condition. We found that stimulated microgravity induced cytoskeleton remodeling, cell cycle G2/M arrest and cellular senescence, consistent with previous reports. To study the subsequent effects of stimulated microgravity, we make cells detach from microcarriers and observed various effects including cell growth, cell adhesion, cytoskeleton, cell cycle, apoptosis and senescence. The results showed that those cells undergoing stimulated microgravity appeared obvious growth inhibition, a transition from the decrease in cell adhesion ability and cytoskeleton remodeling within 24h to induction of apoptosis and senescence-like phenotype in the later time with slight changes in cell cycle. Analysis of protein expression in western blot demonstrated that apoptosis-related protein PTEN was up-regulated on the time-dependent pattern after stimulated microgravity, indicating that PTEN-PI3K-Akt pathway might play an

  11. Straight Ahead in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, S. J.; Vanya, R. D.; Clement, G.

    2014-01-01

    This joint ESA-NASA study will address adaptive changes in spatial orientation related to the subjective straight ahead, and the use of a vibrotactile sensory aid to reduce perceptual errors. The study will be conducted before and after long-duration expeditions to the International Space Station (ISS) to examine how spatial processing of target location is altered following exposure to microgravity. This project specifically addresses the sensorimotor research gap "What are the changes in sensorimotor function over the course of a mission?" Six ISS crewmembers will be requested to participate in three preflight sessions (between 120 and 60 days prior to launch) and then three postflight sessions on R+0/1 day, R+4 +/-2 days, and R+8 +/-2 days. The three specific aims include: (a) fixation of actual and imagined target locations at different distances; (b) directed eye and arm movements along different spatial reference frames; and (c) the vestibulo-ocular reflex during translation motion with fixation targets at different distances. These measures will be compared between upright and tilted conditions. Measures will then be compared with and without a vibrotactile sensory aid that indicates how far one has tilted relative to the straight-ahead direction. The flight study was been approved by the medical review boards and will be implemented in the upcoming Informed Crew Briefings to solicit flight subject participation. Preliminary data has been recorded on 6 subjects during parabolic flight to examine the spatial coding of eye movements during roll tilt relative to perceived orientations while free-floating during the microgravity phase of parabolic flight or during head tilt in normal gravity. Binocular videographic recordings obtained in darkness allowed us to quantify the mean deviations in gaze trajectories along both horizontal and vertical coordinates relative to the aircraft and head orientations. During some parabolas, a vibrotactile sensory aid provided

  12. Liposome formation in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claassen, D. E.; Spooner, B. S.

    Liposomes are artificial vesicles with a phospholipid bilayer membrane. The formation of liposomes is a self-assembly process that is driven by the amphipathic nature of phospholipid molecules and can be observed during the removal of detergent from phospholipids dissolved in detergent micelles. As detergent concentration in the mixed micelles decreases, the non-polar tail regions of phospholipids produce a hydrophobic effect that drives the micelles to fuse and form planar bilayers in which phospholipids orient with tail regions to the center of the bilayer and polar head regions to the external surface. Remaining detergent molecules shield exposed edges of the bilayer sheet from the aqueous environment. Further removal of detergent leads to intramembrane folding and membrane vesiculation, forming liposomes. We have observed that the formation of liposomes is altered in microgravity. Liposomes that were formed at 1-g did not exceed 150 nm in diameter, whereas liposomes that were formed during spaceflight exhibited diameters up to 2000 nm. Using detergent-stabilized planar bilayers, we determined that the stage of liposome formation most influenced by gravity is membrane vesiculation. In addition, we found that small, equipment-induced fluid disturbances increased vesiculation and negated the size-enhancing effects of microgravity. However, these small disturbances had no effect on liposome size at 1-g, likely due to the presence of gravity-induced buoyancy-driven fluid flows (e.g., convection currents). Our results indicate that fluid disturbances, induced by gravity, influence the vesiculation of membranes and limit the diameter of forming liposomes.

  13. Ceramic vacuum tubes for geothermal well logging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, R.D.

    1977-01-01

    Useful design data acquired in the evaluation of ceramic vacuum tubes for the development of a 500/sup 0/C instrumentation amplifier are presented. The general requirements for ceramic vacuum tubes are discussed for application to the development of high temperature well logs. Commercially available tubes are described and future contract activities that specifically relate to ceramic vacuum tubes are detailed. Supplemental data are presented in the appendix.

  14. Uji Suhu Penggorengan Keripik Nangka Pada Alat Penggorengan Vakum (Vacuum Frying) Tipe Vacuum Pump

    OpenAIRE

    Hutabarat, Lamhot

    2016-01-01

    Vacuum frying is a food processing technology that can produce healthy food without much changing it’s original nature like the taste, aroma, color and nutrients. This research was aimed at testing the frying temperature of jackfruit chips in vacuum frying (vacuum pump type). Therefore, a research had been conducted at Agricultural Engineering Laboratory, Faculty of Agriculture USU in January - February 2014 using factorial randomized block design with one factor i.e. frying temperature (75°C...

  15. Proteomic analysis of zebrafish embryos exposed to simulated-microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Xiaoming; Ma, Wenwen; Wang, Wei; Liu, Cong; Sun, Yeqing

    Microgravity can induce a serial of physiological and pathological changes in human body, such as cardiovascular functional disorder, bone loss, muscular atrophy and impaired immune system function, etc. In this research, we focus on the influence of microgravity to vertebrate embryo development. As a powerful model for studying vertebrate development, zebrafish embryos at 8 hpf (hour past fertilization) and 24 hpf were placed into a NASA developed bioreac-tor (RCCS) to simulate microgravity for 64 and 48 hours, respectively. The same number of control embryos from the same parents were placed in a tissue culture dish at the same temper-ature of 28° C. Each experiment was repeated 3 times and analyzed by two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis. Image analysis of silver stained 2-D gels revealed that 64 from total 292 protein spots showed quantitative and qualitative variations that were significantly (Pmuscle B. Other protein spots showed significant expression alteration will be identified successively and the corresponding genes expression will also be measured by Q-PCR method at different development stages. The data presented in this study illustrate that zebrafish embryo can be significantly induced by microgravity on the expression of proteins involved in bone and muscle formation. Key Words: Danio rerio; Simulated-microgravity; Proteomics

  16. Microgravity influence on the instability of phase separation in protein solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Weichun; Zhang, Rui; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Li, Ang

    2015-09-01

    The influence of cooling and heating rates on the spinodal temperature of lysozyme liquid-liquid phase separation was assessed under microgravity and normal gravity. During both heating and cooling, the mean spinodal temperature was independent of gravity conditions and the rate of temperature change. However, during the cooling process, the spinodal temperature was always lower under microgravity than under normal gravity, whereas the opposite effect was observed under heating. We attribute this phenomenon to the hydrodynamic effect. Under normal gravity, mass transfer occurs by universal convection, but under microgravity it can occur only by diffusion. Because of the relatively small diffusivity of lysozyme molecules, the size evolution of the dense liquid domain was slower under microgravity than under normal gravity.

  17. Vacuum system for ISABELLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobson, J.P.

    1975-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the proposed vacuum system for the planned ISABELLE storage rings with respect to acceptability and practicality from the vacuum viewport. A comparison is made between the proposed vacuum system and the vacuum system at the CERN ISR, and some comments on various design and operational parameters are made

  18. Modern vacuum practice

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, Nigel

    2007-01-01

    Modern Vacuum Practice is an easy-to-understand introduction to high vacuum technology suitable for anyone using high vacuum as a tool. The author provides a fundamentally non-mathematical treatment of the subject, assuming little or no prior vacuum knowledge throughout. With its emphasis always on providing practical information, the book gives the reader the knowledge to set up, use, maintain and troubleshoot a vacuum system.

  19. Blood flow and microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau, Lionel; Coupier, Gwennou; Dubois, Frank; Duperray, Alain; Farutin, Alexander; Minetti, Christophe; Misbah, Chaouqi; Podgorski, Thomas; Tsvirkun, Daria; Vysokikh, Mikhail

    2017-01-01

    The absence of gravity during space flight can alter cardio-vascular functions partially due to reduced physical activity. This affects the overall hemodynamics, and in particular the level of shear stresses to which blood vessels are submitted. Long-term exposure to space environment is thus susceptible to induce vascular remodeling through a mechanotransduction cascade that couples vessel shape and function with the mechanical cues exerted by the circulating cells on the vessel walls. Central to such processes, the glycocalyx - i.e. the micron-thick layer of biomacromolecules that lines the lumen of blood vessels and is directly exposed to blood flow - is a major actor in the regulation of biochemical and mechanical interactions. We discuss in this article several experiments performed under microgravity, such as the determination of lift force and collective motion in blood flow, and some preliminary results obtained in artificial microfluidic circuits functionalized with endothelium that offer interesting perspectives for the study of the interactions between blood and endothelium in healthy condition as well as by mimicking the degradation of glycocalyx caused by long space missions. A direct comparison between experiments and simulations is discussed. xml:lang="fr"

  20. Vacuum systems for the ILC helical undulator

    CERN Document Server

    Malyshev, O B; Clarke, J A; Bailey, I R; Dainton, J B; Malysheva, L I; Barber, D P; Cooke, P; Baynham, E; Bradshaw, T; Brummitt, A; Carr, S; Ivanyushenkov, Y; Rochford, J; Moortgat-Pick, G A

    2007-01-01

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) positron source uses a helical undulator to generate polarized photons of ∼10MeV∼10MeV at the first harmonic. Unlike many undulators used in synchrotron radiation sources, the ILC helical undulator vacuum chamber will be bombarded by photons, generated by the undulator, with energies mostly below that of the first harmonic. Achieving the vacuum specification of ∼100nTorr∼100nTorr in a narrow chamber of 4–6mm4–6mm inner diameter, with a long length of 100–200m100–200m, makes the design of the vacuum system challenging. This article describes the vacuum specifications and calculations of the flux and energy of photons irradiating the undulator vacuum chamber and considers possible vacuum system design solutions for two cases: cryogenic and room temperature.

  1. OPTIMASI DENGAN ALGORITMA RSM-CCD PADA EVAPORATOR VAKUM WATERJET DENGAN PENGENDALI SUHU FUZZY PADA PEMBUATAN PERMEN SUSU (RSM-CCD Algorithm for Optimizing Waterjet Vacuum Evaporator Using Fuzzy Temperature Control in The Milk Candy Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Hendrawan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Milk candy is a product which has to be produced under a high temperature to achieve the caramelization process. The use of vacuum system during a food processing is one of the alternatives to engineer the value of a material’s boiling point. The temperature control system and the mixing speed in machine that produce the milk candy were expected to be able to prevent the formation of off-flavour in the final product. A smart control system based on fuzzy logic was applied in the temperature control within the double jacket vacuum evaporator machine that needs stable temperature in the cooking process. The objective of this research is developing vacuum evaporator for milk candy production using fuzzy temperature control. The result in machine and system planning showed that the process of milk candy production was going on well. The parameter optimization of water content and ash content purposed to acquire the temperature point parameter and mixing speed in milk candy production. The optimization method was response surface methodology (RSM, by using the model of central composite design (CCD. The optimization resulted 90.18oC for the temperature parameter and 512 RPM for the mixing speed, with the prediction about 4.69% of water content and 1.57% of ash content. Keywords: Optimization, vacuum evaporator, fuzzy, milk candy, response surface methodology ABSTRAK Permen susu merupakan salah satu produk yang diolah dengan suhu tinggi untuk mencapai proses karamelisasi. Pengolahan pangan dengan sistem vakum merupakan salah satu alternatif untuk merekayasa nilai titik didih suatu bahan. Sistem pengendalian suhu serta kecepatan pengadukan pada mesin produksi permen susu diharapkan dapat mencegah terbentuknya partikel hitam (off-flavour pada produk akhir. Sistem kontrol cerdas logika fuzzy diaplikasikan dalam pengendalian suhu pada mesin evaporator vakum double jacket yang membutuhkan tingkat stabilitas suhu pemasakan permen susu. Tujuan dari

  2. Overview of NASA's Microgravity Materials Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, James Patton; Grugel, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The NASA microgravity materials program is dedicated to conducting microgravity experiments and related modeling efforts that will help us understand the processes associated with the formation of materials. This knowledge will help improve ground based industrial production of such materials. The currently funded investigations include research on the distribution of dopants and formation of defects in semiconductors, transitions between columnar and dendritic grain morphology, coarsening of phase boundaries, competition between thermally and kinetically favored phases, and the formation of glassy vs. crystalline material. NASA microgravity materials science investigators are selected for funding either through a proposal in response to a NASA Research Announcement or by participation in a team proposing to a foreign agency research announcement. In the latter case, a US investigator participating in a successful proposal to a foreign agency can then apply to NASA for funding of an unsolicited proposal. The program relies on cooperation with other aerospace partners from around the world. The ISS facilities used for these investigations are provided primarily by partnering with foreign agencies and in most cases the US investigators are working as a part of a larger team studying a specific area of materials science. The following facilities are to be utilized for the initial investigations. The ESA provided Low Gradient Facility and the Solidification and Quench Inserts to the Materials Research Rack/Materials Science Laboratory are to be used primarily for creating bulk samples that are directionally solidified or quenched from a high temperature melt. The CNES provided DECLIC facility is used to observe morphological development in transparent materials. The ESA provided Electro-Magnetic Levitator (EML) is designed to levitate, melt and then cool samples in order to study nucleation behavior. The facility provides conditions in which nucleation of the solid is

  3. Method for producing evaporation inhibiting coating for protection of silicon--germanium and silicon--molybdenum alloys at high temperatures in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, P.J.

    1974-01-01

    A method is given for protecting Si--Ge and Si-- Mo alloys for use in thermocouples. The alloys are coated with silicon to inhibit the evaporation of the alloys at high tempenatures in a vacuum. Specific means and methods are provided. (5 fig) (Official Gazette)

  4. Room-Temperature and High-Temperature Tensile Mechanical Properties of TA15 Titanium Alloy and TiB Whisker-Reinforced TA15 Matrix Composites Fabricated by Vacuum Hot-Pressing Sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangju Feng

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the microstructure, the room-temperature and high-temperature tensile mechanical properties of monolithic TA15 alloy and TiB whisker-reinforced TA15 titanium matrix composites (TiBw/TA15 fabricated by vacuum hot-pressing sintering were investigated. The microstructure results showed that there were no obvious differences in the microstructure between monolithic TA15 alloy and TiBw/TA15 composites, except whether or not the grain boundaries contained TiBw. After sintering, the matrix microstructure presented a typical Widmanstätten structure and the size of primary β grain was consistent with the size of spherical TA15 titanium metallic powders. This result demonstrated that TiBw was not the only factor limiting grain coarsening of the primary β grain. Moreover, the grain coarsening of α colonies was obvious, and high-angle grain boundaries (HAGBs were distributed within the primary β grain. In addition, TiBw played an important role in the microstructure evolution. In the composites, TiBw were randomly distributed in the matrix and surrounded by a large number of low-angle grain boundaries (LAGBs. Globularization of α phase occurred prior, near the TiBw region, because TiBw provided the nucleation site for the equiaxed α phase. The room-temperature and high-temperature tensile results showed that TiBw distributed at the primary β grain boundaries can strengthen the grain boundary, but reduce the connectivity of the matrix. Therefore, compared to the monolithic TA15 alloy fabricated by the same process, the tensile strength of the composites increased, and the tensile elongation decreased. Moreover, with the addition of TiBw, the fracture mechanism was changed to a mixture of brittle fracture and ductile failure (composites from ductile failure (monolithic TA15 alloy. The fracture surfaces of TiBw/TA15 composites were the grain boundaries of the primary β grain where the majority of TiB whiskers distributed, i.e., the

  5. Simulations and Vacuum Tests of a CLIC Accelerating Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Garion, C

    2011-01-01

    The Compact LInear Collider, under study, is based on room temperature high gradient structures. The vacuum specificities of these cavities are low conductance, large surface areas and a non-baked system. The main issue is to reach UHV conditions (typically 10-7 Pa) in a system where the residual vacuum is driven by water outgassing. A finite element model based on an analogy thermal/vacuum has been built to estimate the vacuum profile in an accelerating structure. Vacuum tests are carried out in a dedicated set-up, the vacuum performances of different configurations are presented and compared with the predictions.

  6. Progress in vacuum metal extraction, refining and consolidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundaram, C.V.; Mukherjee, T.K.; Sharma, B.P.

    1973-01-01

    The unique achievements in the process metallurgy of rare metals in the past quarter century should largely be attributed to advances in vacuum technology. New standards for high purity, increasing demand for pure metals and alloys for established applications, and steady improvement in sophistication and capacity of vacuum furnaces have provided the stimulus for developing and expanding vacuum metal extraction processes, and also exploring totally new processes. The paper discusses the thermochemistry of vacuum metallurgy, carbothermic and metallothermic reduction reactions, consolidation and refining by vacuum arc melting, electron beam melting and high temperature high vacuum sintering, and ultrapurification, with special reference to the reactive and refractory metals of Group IV to VI. (author)

  7. Technology base for microgravity horticulture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, R. L.; Magnuson, J. W.; Scruby, R. R.; Scheld, H. W.

    1987-01-01

    Advanced microgravity plant biology research and life support system development for the spacecraft environment are critically hampered by the lack of a technology base. This inadequacy stems primarily from the fact that microgravity results in a lack of convective currents and phase separation as compared to the one gravity environment. A program plan is being initiated to develop this technology base. This program will provide an iterative flight development effort that will be closely integrated with both basic science investigations and advanced life support system development efforts incorporating biological processes. The critical considerations include optimum illumination methods, root aeration, root and shoot support, and heat rejection and gas exchange in the plant canopy.

  8. Surfactant-based critical phenomena in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaler, Eric W.; Paulaitis, Michael E.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this research project is to characterize by experiment and theoretically both the kinetics of phase separation and the metastable structures produced during phase separation in a microgravity environment. The particular systems we are currently studying are mixtures of water, nonionic surfactants, and compressible supercritical fluids at temperatures and pressures where the coexisting liquid phases have equal densities (isopycnic phases). In this report, we describe experiments to locate equilibrium isopycnic phases and to determine the 'local' phase behavior and critical phenomena at nearby conditions of temperature, pressure, and composition. In addition, we report the results of preliminary small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments to characterize microstructures that exist in these mixtures at different fluid densities.

  9. Vacuum-assisted delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000514.htm Vacuum-assisted delivery To use the sharing features on this page, ... through the birth canal. When is Vacuum-assisted Delivery Needed? Even after your cervix is fully dilated ( ...

  10. The economics of microgravity research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiFrancesco, Jeanne M; Olson, John M

    2015-01-01

    In this introduction to the economics of microgravity research, DiFrancesco and Olson explore the existing landscape and begin to define the requirements for a robust, well-funded microgravity research environment. This work chronicles the history, the opportunities, and how the decisions made today will shape the future. The past 60 years have seen tremendous growth in the capabilities and resources available to conduct microgravity science. However, we are now at an inflection point for the future of humanity in space. A confluence of factors including the rise of commercialization, a shifting funding landscape, and a growing international presence in space exploration, and terrestrial research platforms are shaping the conditions for full-scale microgravity research programs. In this first discussion, the authors focus on the concepts of markets, tangible and intangible value, research pathways and their implications for investments in research projects, and the collateral platforms needed. The opportunities and implications for adopting new approaches to funding and market-making illuminate how decisions made today will affect the speed of advances the community will be able to achieve in the future.

  11. Burning in Outer Space: Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matkowsky, Bernard; Aldushin, Anatoly

    2000-01-01

    A better understanding of combustion can lead to significant technological advances, such as less polluting, more fuel-efficient vehicles. Unfortunately, gravity can interfere with the study of combustion. Gravity drags down gases that are cooler- and, therefore, denser-than heated gases. This movement mixes the fuel and the oxidizer substance that promotes burning. Because of this mixing, an observer cannot necessarily distinguish what is happening as a result of the natural combustion process and what is caused, by the pull of gravity. To remove this uncertainty, scientists can conduct experiments that simulate the negation of gravity through freefall. This condition is known as a microgravity environment. A micro-gravity experiment may take place in a chamber that is dropped down a hole or from a high-speed drop tower. The experiment also be conducted in an airplane or a rocket during freefall in a parabolic flight path. This method provides less than a minute of microgravity at most. An experiment that requires the prolonged absence of gravity may necessitate the use of an orbiting spacecraft as a venue. However, access to an orbital laboratory is difficult to acquire. High-end computing centers such as the NCCS can provide a practical alternative to operating in microgravity. Scientists can model phenomena such as combustion without gravitys observational interference. The study of microgravity combustion produces important benefits beyond increased observational accuracy. Certain valuable materials that are produced through combustion can be formed with a more uniform crystal structure-and, therefore, improved structural quality-when the pull of gravity is removed. Furthermore, understanding how fires propagate in the absence of gravity can improve fire safety aboard spacecraft.

  12. Nanoscale Vacuum Channel Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jin-Woo; Moon, Dong-Il; Meyyappan, M

    2017-04-12

    Vacuum tubes that sparked the electronics era had given way to semiconductor transistors. Despite their faster operation and better immunity to noise and radiation compared to the transistors, the vacuum device technology became extinct due to the high power consumption, integration difficulties, and short lifetime of the vacuum tubes. We combine the best of vacuum tubes and modern silicon nanofabrication technology here. The surround gate nanoscale vacuum channel transistor consists of sharp source and drain electrodes separated by sub-50 nm vacuum channel with a source to gate distance of 10 nm. This transistor performs at a low voltage (3 microamperes). The nanoscale vacuum channel transistor can be a possible alternative to semiconductor transistors beyond Moore's law.

  13. Vacuum and ultravacuum physics and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Bello, Igor

    2018-01-01

    Vacuum technology has enormous impact on human life in many aspects and fields, such as metallurgy, material development and production, food and electronic industry, microelectronics, device fabrication, physics, materials science, space science, engineering, chemistry, technology of low temperature, pharmaceutical industry, and biology. All decorative coatings used in jewelries and various daily products—including shiny decorative papers, the surface finish of watches, and light fixtures—are made using vacuum technological processes. Vacuum analytical techniques and vacuum technologies are pillars of the technological processes, material synthesis, deposition, and material analyses—all of which are used in the development of novel materials, increasing the value of industrial products, controlling the technological processes, and ensuring the high product quality. Based on physical models and calculated examples, the book provides a deeper look inside the vacuum physics and technology.

  14. Indian Vacuum Society: The Indian Vacuum Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, T. K.

    2008-03-01

    The Indian Vacuum Society (IVS) was established in 1970. It has over 800 members including many from Industry and R & D Institutions spread throughout India. The society has an active chapter at Kolkata. The society was formed with the main aim to promote, encourage and develop the growth of Vacuum Science, Techniques and Applications in India. In order to achieve this aim it has conducted a number of short term courses at graduate and technician levels on vacuum science and technology on topics ranging from low vacuum to ultrahigh vacuum So far it has conducted 39 such courses at different parts of the country and imparted training to more than 1200 persons in the field. Some of these courses were in-plant training courses conducted on the premises of the establishment and designed to take care of the special needs of the establishment. IVS also regularly conducts national and international seminars and symposia on vacuum science and technology with special emphasis on some theme related to applications of vacuum. A large number of delegates from all over India take part in the deliberations of such seminars and symposia and present their work. IVS also arranges technical visits to different industries and research institutes. The society also helped in the UNESCO sponsored post-graduate level courses in vacuum science, technology and applications conducted by Mumbai University. The society has also designed a certificate and diploma course for graduate level students studying vacuum science and technology and has submitted a syllabus to the academic council of the University of Mumbai for their approval, we hope that some colleges affiliated to the university will start this course from the coming academic year. IVS extended its support in standardizing many of the vacuum instruments and played a vital role in helping to set up a Regional Testing Centre along with BARC. As part of the development of vacuum education, the society arranges the participation of

  15. Baking results of KSTAR vacuum vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. T.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, K. M.; Im, D. S.; Joung, N. Y.; Yang, H. L.; Kim, Y. S.; Kwon, M.

    2009-01-01

    The Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) is an advanced superconducting tokamak designed to establish a scientific and technological basis for an attractive fusion reactor. The fusion energy in the tokamak device is released through fusion reactions of light atoms such as deuterium or helium in hot plasma state, of which temperature reaches several hundreds of millions Celsius. The high temperature plasma is created in the vacuum vessel that provides ultra high vacuum status. Accordingly, it is most important for the vacuum condition to keep clean not only inner space but also surface of the vacuum vessel to make high quality plasma. There are two methods planned to clean the wall surface of the KSTAR vacuum vessel. One is surface baking and the other is glow discharge cleaning (GDC). To bake the vacuum vessel, De-Ionized (DI) water is heated to 130 .deg. C and circulated in the passage between double walls of the vacuum vessel (VV) in order to bake the surface. The GDC operation uses hydrogen and inert gas discharges. In this paper, general configuration and brief introduction of the baking result will be reported

  16. Microgravity Fluids for Biology, Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, DeVon; Kohl, Fred; Massa, Gioia D.; Motil, Brian; Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia; Quincy, Charles; Sato, Kevin; Singh, Bhim; Smith, Jeffrey D.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2013-01-01

    Microgravity Fluids for Biology represents an intersection of biology and fluid physics that present exciting research challenges to the Space Life and Physical Sciences Division. Solving and managing the transport processes and fluid mechanics in physiological and biological systems and processes are essential for future space exploration and colonization of space by humans. Adequate understanding of the underlying fluid physics and transport mechanisms will provide new, necessary insights and technologies for analyzing and designing biological systems critical to NASAs mission. To enable this mission, the fluid physics discipline needs to work to enhance the understanding of the influence of gravity on the scales and types of fluids (i.e., non-Newtonian) important to biology and life sciences. In turn, biomimetic, bio-inspired and synthetic biology applications based on physiology and biology can enrich the fluid mechanics and transport phenomena capabilities of the microgravity fluid physics community.

  17. Fifth International Microgravity Combustion Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacksteder, Kurt (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    This conference proceedings document is a compilation of 120 papers presented orally or as poster displays to the Fifth International Microgravity Combustion Workshop held in Cleveland, Ohio on May 18-20, 1999. The purpose of the workshop is to present and exchange research results from theoretical and experimental work in combustion science using the reduced-gravity environment as a research tool. The results are contributed by researchers funded by NASA throughout the United States at universities, industry and government research agencies, and by researchers from at least eight international partner countries that are also participating in the microgravity combustion science research discipline. These research results are intended for use by public and private sector organizations for academic purposes, for the development of technologies needed for the Human Exploration and Development of Space, and to improve Earth-bound combustion and fire-safety related technologies.

  18. Stabilization flyuorytopodibnoyi structure in oxide vacuum condensate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О.М. Заславський

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available  The influence of the oxide-stabilizer content, M'-cation radius and film deposition temperature on the stabilization of the fluorite-like solid solutions in the zirconium and hafnium oxides-based vacuum condensates, obtained by Laser-evaporating method, was investigated. The optimum parameters of the coatication of the isotropic thermostable coverings was determined. This results were explained by using of the high-speed condensation in vacuum theory.

  19. Candle Flames in Microgravity Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This video of a candle flame burning in space was taken by the Candle Flames in Microgravity (CFM) experiment on the Russian Mir space station. It is actually a composite of still photos from a 35mm camera since the video images were too dim. The images show a hemispherically shaped flame, primarily blue in color, with some yellow early int the flame lifetime. The actual flame is quite dim and difficult to see with the naked eye. Nearly 80 candles were burned in this experiment aboard Mir. NASA scientists have also studied how flames spread in space and how to detect fire in microgravity. Researchers hope that what they learn about fire and combustion from the flame ball experiments will help out here on Earth. Their research could help create things such as better engines for cars and airplanes. Since they use very weak flames, flame balls require little fuel. By studying how this works, engineers may be able to design engines that use far less fuel. In addition, microgravity flame research is an important step in creating new safety precautions for astronauts living in space. By understanding how fire works in space, the astronauts can be better prepared to fight it.

  20. Creating Simulated Microgravity Patient Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Victor; Doerr, Harold K.; Bacal, Kira

    2004-01-01

    The Medical Operational Support Team (MOST) has been tasked by the Space and Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) to integrate medical simulation into 1) medical training for ground and flight crews and into 2) evaluations of medical procedures and equipment for the International Space Station (ISS). To do this, the MOST requires patient models that represent the physiological changes observed during spaceflight. Despite the presence of physiological data collected during spaceflight, there is no defined set of parameters that illustrate or mimic a 'space normal' patient. Methods: The MOST culled space-relevant medical literature and data from clinical studies performed in microgravity environments. The areas of focus for data collection were in the fields of cardiovascular, respiratory and renal physiology. Results: The MOST developed evidence-based patient models that mimic the physiology believed to be induced by human exposure to a microgravity environment. These models have been integrated into space-relevant scenarios using a human patient simulator and ISS medical resources. Discussion: Despite the lack of a set of physiological parameters representing 'space normal,' the MOST developed space-relevant patient models that mimic microgravity-induced changes in terrestrial physiology. These models are used in clinical scenarios that will medically train flight surgeons, biomedical flight controllers (biomedical engineers; BME) and, eventually, astronaut-crew medical officers (CMO).

  1. Magnetic hysterysis evolution of Ni-Al alloy with Fe and Mn substitution by vacuum arc melting to produce the room temperature magnetocaloric effect material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Notonegoro, Hamdan Akbar [PPS Materials Science, FMIPA-Universitas Indonesia, Depok 16424 (Indonesia); Mechanical Engineering Dept., FT-Universitas Sultan Ageng Tirtayasa, Cilegon 42435 (Indonesia); Kurniawan, Budhy; Manaf, Azwar, E-mail: azwar@sci.ui.ac.id [PPS Materials Science, FMIPA-Universitas Indonesia, Depok 16424 (Indonesia); Setiawan, Jan [Center for Nuclear Fuel Tecnology-Badan Tenaga Atom Nasional, Tangerang Selatan 15310 (Indonesia)

    2016-06-17

    The development of magnetocaloric effect (MCE) material is done in order to reduce the damage of the ozone layer caused by the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) emitted into the air. The research dealing with synthesis of magnetocaloric materials based of Ni-Al Heusler Alloy structure and by varying substitution some atoms of Ni with Fe and Al with Mn on Ni-Al Heusler Alloy structure to become Ni{sub 44}Fe{sub 6}Mn{sub 32}Al{sub 18}. Vacuum Arc Melting (VAM) equipment is used to form the alloys on vacuum condition and by flowing argon gas atmosphere and then followed by annealing process for 72 hours. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) reveals that crystallite structure of material is observed. We define that Ni{sub 44}Fe{sub 6} as X{sub 2}, Mn{sub 25} as Y, and Al{sub 18}Mn{sub 7} as Z. Based on the XRD result, we observed that the general formula X{sub 2}YZ is not changed. The PERMAGRAF measurement revealed that there exists of magnetic hysterysis. The hysterysis show that the magnetic structures of the system undego evolution from diamagnetic to soft ferromagnetic material which all of the compound have the same crystallite structure. This evolution indicated that the change in the composition has led to changes the magnetic composition. Mn is the major element that gives strong magnetic properties to the sample. When Mn partially replaced position of Al, the sample became dominant to be influenced to improve their magnetic properties. In addition, substitution a part of Ni by Fe in the composition reveals a pinning of the domain walls in the sample.

  2. Gravitation and vacuum field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tevikyan, R.V.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents equations that describe particles with spins s = 0, 1/2, 1 completely and which also describe 2s + 2 limiting fields as E → ∞. It is shown that the ordinary Hilbert-Einstein action for the gravitation field must be augmented by the action for the Bose vacuum field. This means that one must introduce in the gravitational equations a cosmological term proportional to the square of the strength of the Bose vacuum field. It is shown that the theory of gravitation describes three realities: matter, field, and vacuum field. A new form of matter--the vacuum field--is introduced into field theory

  3. Materials for high vacuum technology, an overview

    CERN Document Server

    Sgobba, Stefano

    2007-01-01

    In modern accelerators stringent requirements are placed on materials of vacuum systems. Their physical and mechanical properties, machinability, weldability or brazeability are key parameters. Adequate strength, ductility, magnetic properties at room as well as low temperatures are important factors for vacuum systems of accelerators working at cryogenic temperatures, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) under construction at CERN. In addition, baking or activation of Non-Evaporable Getters (NEG) at high temperatures impose specific choices of material grades of suitable tensile and creep properties in a large temperature range. Today, stainless steels are the dominant materials of vacuum constructions. Their metallurgy is extensively treated. The reasons for specific requirements in terms of metallurgical processes are detailed, in view of obtaining adequate purity, inclusion cleanliness, and fineness of the microstructure. In many cases these requirements are crucial to guarantee the final leak tightnes...

  4. Ultra high vacuum seal arrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Robert

    1981-01-01

    Arrangement for demountably sealing two concentric metallic tubes in an ultra high vacuum system which facilitates remote actuation. A tubular seal includes integral spaced lips which circumferentially engage the metallic tubes. The lips plastically deform the metallic tubes by mechanical forces resulting from a martensite to austenite transformation of the tubular seal upon application of a predetermined temperature. The sealing force is released upon application of another temperature which causes a transformation from the stronger austenite to the weaker martensite. Use of a dual acting sealing ring and driving ring circumferentially contacting the sealing ring is particularly applicable to sealing larger diameter concentric metallic members.

  5. "Flat-Fish" Vacuum Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1978-01-01

    The picture shows a "Flat-Fish" vacuum chamber being prepared in the ISR workshop for testing prior to installation in the Split Field Magnet (SFM) at intersection I4. The two shells of each part were hydroformed from 0.15 mm thick inconel 718 sheet (with end parts in inconel 600 for easier manual welding to the arms) and welded toghether with two strips which were attached by means of thin stainless steel sheets to the Split Field Magnet poles in order to take the vertical component of the atmospheric pressure force. This was the thinnest vacuum chamber ever made for the ISR. Inconel material was chosen for its high elastic modulus and strenght at chamber bake-out temperature. In this picture the thin sheets transferring the vertical component of the atmosferic pressure force are attached to a support frame for testing. See also 7712182, 7712179.

  6. International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1) Onboard Photograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1) was the first in a series of Shuttle flights dedicated to fundamental materials and life sciences research with the international partners. The participating space agencies included: NASA, the 14-nation European Space Agency (ESA), the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), the French National Center of Space Studies (CNES), the German Space Agency and the German Aerospace Research Establishment (DAR/DLR), and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA). Dedicated to the study of life and materials sciences in microgravity, the IML missions explored how life forms adapt to weightlessness and investigated how materials behave when processed in space. Both life and materials sciences benefited from the extended periods of microgravity available inside the Spacelab science module in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Orbiter. In this photograph, Astronauts Stephen S. Oswald and Norman E. Thagard handle ampoules used in the Mercuric Iodide Crystal Growth (MICG) experiment. Mercury Iodide crystals have practical uses as sensitive x-ray and gamma-ray detectors. In addition to their exceptional electronic properties, these crystals can operate at room temperature rather than at the extremely low temperatures usually required by other materials. Because a bulky cooling system is urnecessary, these crystals could be useful in portable detector devices for nuclear power plant monitoring, natural resource prospecting, biomedical applications in diagnosis and therapy, and astronomical observation. Managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center, IML-1 was launched on January 22, 1992 aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery (STS-42 mission).

  7. Performance evaluation on vacuum pumps using nanolubricants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lue, Yeou Feng; Hsu, Yu Chun; Teng, Tun Ping [Dept. of Industrial EducationNational Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan (China)

    2016-09-15

    This study produced alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanovacuum-pump lubricants (NVALs) by involving the dispersion of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles in a vacuum-pump lubricant (VAL) with oleic as a dispersant. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the suspension performance, thermal conductivity, viscosity, specific heat, tribological performance and vacuum-pump performance of the NVALs. The experimental results obtained from the vacuum-pump performance tests show that the NVALs with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration of 0.2 wt.% and oleic concentration of 0.025 wt.% yielded the lowest electricity consumption, conserving 2.39% of electricity compared with the VAL. No marked difference was observed between the temperatures of the vacuum pump using VAL and NVAL. Furthermore, evacuation (i.e., the minimal pressure of -99.5 kPa) was reached faster by the vacuum pump with the NVALs, and the evacuation time could be reduced by 4.91% under optimal conditions. In addition, the vacuum pump with the NVALs exhibited superior overall effectiveness under relatively lower ambient temperatures.

  8. Turning toys into microgravity machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumners, C.; Reiff, P.

    The Toys in Space program communicates the experience of being in space and ultimately living in space. In space, what would happen to a yo-yo's speed, a top's wobble, or your skill in playing soccer, throwing a boomerang or jumping rope? Discover how these toys and others have performed in microgravity and how these demonstrations can link children to the space program. On April 12, 1985 astronauts carried the first experiment package of miniature mechanical systems called toys into space. Since that time 54 toys have been demonstrated in microgravity. This summer, NASA and the Houston Museum of Natural Science have sponsored the first International Toys in Space project with sixteen toys chosen for their popularity and relevance around the world. This set of toys takes advantage of the larger Space Station by providing toys that take up more room - from two-person games of soccer, lacrosse, marbles, and hockey to a jump rope and several kinds of yoyos. Three earlier Toys in Space missions have shown that toys are ideal machines to demonstrate how gravity affects moving objects on the Earth's surface and how the motions of these objects change in microgravity. In this presentation, participants actually experiment with miniature versions of toys, predict their behavior on orbit, and watch the surprising results. Participants receive toy patterns to share with young people at home, around the world. The Toys in Space program scales for all ages. Young learners can use their observation and comparison skills while older students apply physics concepts to toy behaviors. Concepts demonstrated include all of Newton's Laws of Motion, gyroscopic stability, centripetal force, density, as well as conservation of linear and angular momentum.

  9. Low temperature Si processing integrating surface preparation, homoepitaxial growth, and SiO2 deposition into an untrahigh vacuum compatible chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountain, G. G.; Rudder, R. A.; Hattangady, S. V.; Vitkavage, D. J.; Markunas, R. J.

    1988-09-01

    Integration of low temperature Si processing steps using interconnected ultra-high (UHV) systems addresses two concerns of the semiconductor industry, low temperature processing and control of wafer environment between processing steps. We report results from a single remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RPECVD) reactor with UHV capability. In situ surface preparations using a 300°C hydrogen plasma treatment have been successful in reconstructing Si(100) surfaces. SiO2 layers deposited on these surfaces at 250°C have resulted in MOS capacitors with minimum interface state densities of 1.8×1010 cm-2 eV-1. Homoepitaxial Si epitaxy originally nucleated at 520°C renucleated for growth temperatures as low at 235°C. This work clearly demonstrates the versatility and potential for the RPECVD process to become a member of a low temperature, integrated silicon processing facility.

  10. A Geology Sampling System for Microgravity Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Anthony; Naids, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Human exploration of microgravity bodies is being investigated as a precursor to a Mars surface mission. Asteroids, comets, dwarf planets, and the moons of Mars all fall into this microgravity category and some are been discussed as potential mission targets. Obtaining geological samples for return to Earth will be a major objective for any mission to a microgravity body. Currently the knowledge base for geology sampling in microgravity is in its infancy. Humans interacting with non-engineered surfaces in microgravity environment pose unique challenges. In preparation for such missions a team at the NASA Johnson Space Center has been working to gain experience on how to safely obtain numerous sample types in such an environment. This paper describes the type of samples the science community is interested in, highlights notable prototype work, and discusses an integrated geology sampling solution.

  11. Effect of simulated microgravity on Aspergillus niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratap, Jeffrey J.

    2005-08-01

    A rotating bioreactor was developed to simulate microgravity and its influence was studied on fungal growth. The reactor was designed to simulate microgravity using 'free fall' principle, which creates an apparent weightlessness for a brief period of time. In this experiment, a sealed vertically rotating tube is the reactor in which the cells are grown. For the first time vertically rotating tubes were used to obtain 'free fall' thereby simulating microgravity. Simulated microgravity served significant in the alteration of growth and productivity of Aspergillus niger, a common soil fungi. Two other sets of similar cultures were maintained as still and shake control cultures to compare with the growth and productivity of cells in rotating culture. It was found increased growth and productivity occurred in simulated microgravity. Since this experiment involves growth of cells in a liquid medium, the fluidic effects must also be studied which is a limitation.

  12. Embryogenic plant cells in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krikorian, Abraham D.

    1991-01-01

    In view of circumstantial evidence for the role of gravity (g) in shaping the embryo environment, normal embryo development may not occur reliably and efficiently in the microgravity environment of space. Attention must accordingly be given to those aspects of higher plant reproductive biology in space environments required for the production of viable embryos in a 'seed to seed to seed' experiment. It is suggested that cultured cells can be grown to be morphogenetically competent, and can be evaluated as to their ability to simulate embryogenic events usually associated with fertilized eggs in the embryo sac of the ovule in the ovary.

  13. A comparative study of TiN and TiC: Oxidation resistance and retention of xenon at high temperature and under degraded vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavarini, S.; Bes, R.; Millard-Pinard, N.; Peaucelle, C.; Perrat-Mabilon, A.; Gaillard, C.; Cardinal, S.; Garnier, V.

    2011-01-01

    Dense TiN and TiC samples were prepared by hot pressing using micrometric powders. Xenon species (simulating rare gas fission products) were then implanted into the ceramics. The samples were annealed for 1 h at 1500 deg. C under several degraded vacuums with P O 2 varying from 10 -6 to 2x10 -4 mbars. The oxidation resistance of the samples and their retention properties with respect to preimplanted xenon species were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, and nuclear backscattering spectrometry. Results indicate that TiC is resistant to oxidation and does not release xenon for P O 2 ≤6x10 -6 mbars. When P O 2 increases, geometric oxide crystallites appear at the surface depending on the orientation and size of TiC grains. These oxide phases are Ti 2 O 3 , Ti 3 O 5 , and TiO 2 . Apparition of oxide crystallites is associated with the beginning of xenon release. TiC surface is completely covered by the oxide phases at P O 2 =2x10 -4 mbars up to a depth of 3 μm and the xenon is then completely released. For TiN samples, the results show a progressive apparition of oxide crystallites (Ti 3 O 5 mainly) at the surface when P O 2 increases. The presence of the oxide crystallites is also directly correlated with xenon release, the more oxide crystallites are growing the more xenon is released. TiN surface is completely covered by an oxide layer at P O 2 =2x10 -4 mbars up to 1 μm. A correlation between the initial fine microstructure of TiN and the properties of the growing layer is suggested.

  14. Vacuum vessel and first wall thermocouple instrumentation on TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrara, A.A.; Sredniawski, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    The temperature instrumentation of TFTR is designed to monitor critical vacuum vessel surface temperatures resulting from pulsed operation, discharge cleaning, bakeout and the gobal thermal effects of first wall components, primarily during the period between pulses. The vacuum vessel instrumentation consists of 231 Type ''E'' thermocouples while the first wall instrumentation consists of 193 Type ''E'' thermocouples. Temperature responses are processed and are used to limit the operation of the machine to avoid over-stressing critical vacuum vessel structural areas and first wall components. This paper describes the complete thermocouple system including thermocouple assemblies, voltage isolation and temperature processing equipment as presently installed and operating in the TFTR complex

  15. Evaluating performances of vacuum dedicated blackbodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrat, Catherine; Leboucher, Vincent

    2014-10-01

    Vacuum blackbodies have to combine performance of traditional infrared reference sources with specific features in order to operate in vacuum chamber. As their usual applications are calibration and tests of IR sensors to be loaded on satellites, earth or space radiation simulation and test of IR sensors for scientific applications, their usual features are emission over an ultra extended temperature range, knowledge of the radiated temperature with a high accuracy, extremely high uniformity of the emissive surface and extremely high emissivity. HGH developed tools to demonstrate such performances since they surpass the accuracy of usual tools.

  16. Vacuum mechatronics first international workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belinski, S.E.; Shirazi, M.; Hackwood, S.; Beni, G. (eds.) (California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (USA))

    1989-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: proposed epitaxial thin film growth in the ultra-vacuum of space; particle monitoring and control in vacuum processing equipment; electrostatic dust collector for use in vacuum systems; materials evaluation of an electrically noisy vacuum slip ring assembly; an overview of lubrication and associated materials for vacuum service; the usage of lubricants in a vacuum environment; guidelines and practical applications for lubrication in vacuum; recent development in leak detector and calibrator designs; the durability of ballscrews for ultrahigh vacuum; vacuum-compatible robot for self-contained manufacturing systems; the design, fabrication, and assembly of an advanced vacuum robotics system for space payload calibration; design criteria for mechanisms used in space; and concepts and requirements for semiconductor multiprocess integration in vacuum. These papers are indexed separately elsewhere.

  17. Handbook of vacuum technology

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This comprehensive, standard work has been updated to remain an important resource for all those needing detailed knowledge of the theory and applications of vacuum technology. With many numerical examples and illustrations to visualize the theoretical issues.

  18. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located near the K-Basins (see K-Basins link) in Hanford's 100 Area is a facility called the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF).Between 2000 and 2004, workers at the...

  19. Ultra high vacuum technology

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2001-01-01

    A short introduction for some basic facts and equations. Subsquently, discussion about: Building blocks of an ultrahigh vacuum system - Various types of pumps required to reach uhv and methods to reduce these effects - Outgassing phenomena induced by the presence of a particle beam and the most common methods to reduce these effects It will be given some practical examples from existing CERN accelerators and discuss the novel features of the future LHC vacuum system.

  20. Power vacuum tubes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Whitaker, Jerry

    2012-01-01

    Providing examples of applications, Power Vacuum Tubes Handbook, Third Edition examines the underlying technology of each type of power vacuum tube device in common use today. The author presents basic principles, reports on new development efforts, and discusses implementation and maintenance considerations. Supporting mathematical equations and extensive technical illustrations and schematic diagrams help readers understand the material. Translate Principles into Specific Applications This one-stop reference is a hands-on guide for engineering personnel involved in the design, specification,

  1. A Planck Vacuum Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daywitt W. C.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Both the big-bang and the quasi-steady-state cosmologies originate in some type of Planck state. This paper presents a new cosmological theory based on the Planck- vacuum negative-energy state, a state consisting of a degenerate collection of negative- energy Planck particles. A heuristic look at the Einstein field equation provides a con- vincing argument that such a vacuum state could provide a theoretical explanation for the visible universe.

  2. Effect of Oxygen Enrichment in Propane Laminar Diffusion Flames under Microgravity and Earth Gravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Pramod; Singh, Ravinder

    2017-06-01

    Diffusion flames are the most common type of flame which we see in our daily life such as candle flame and match-stick flame. Also, they are the most used flames in practical combustion system such as industrial burner (coal fired, gas fired or oil fired), diesel engines, gas turbines, and solid fuel rockets. In the present study, steady-state global chemistry calculations for 24 different flames were performed using an axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics code (UNICORN). Computation involved simulations of inverse and normal diffusion flames of propane in earth and microgravity condition with varying oxidizer compositions (21, 30, 50, 100 % O2, by mole, in N2). 2 cases were compared with the experimental result for validating the computational model. These flames were stabilized on a 5.5 mm diameter burner with 10 mm of burner length. The effect of oxygen enrichment and variation in gravity (earth gravity and microgravity) on shape and size of diffusion flames, flame temperature, flame velocity have been studied from the computational result obtained. Oxygen enrichment resulted in significant increase in flame temperature for both types of diffusion flames. Also, oxygen enrichment and gravity variation have significant effect on the flame configuration of normal diffusion flames in comparison with inverse diffusion flames. Microgravity normal diffusion flames are spherical in shape and much wider in comparison to earth gravity normal diffusion flames. In inverse diffusion flames, microgravity flames were wider than earth gravity flames. However, microgravity inverse flames were not spherical in shape.

  3. Survival of Salmonella typhimurium ATCC 14028 on the surface of chicken legs or in mechanically deboned chicken meat gamma irradiated in air or vacuum at temperatures of -20 to +20 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thayer, D.W.; Boyd, G.

    1991-01-01

    Response-surface methodology was used to develop predictive equations for the response of Salmonella typhimurium ATCC 14028 on the surface of chicken legs or within mechanically deboned chicken meat (MDCM) to the effects of γ radiation doses of 0 to 3.60 kGy (100 krad = 1 kGy) at temperatures of -20 to +20 C in air or vacuum. A streptomycin-resistant mutant was used in these studies to allow accurate estimations of the surviving salmonellae in the presence of residual normal flora. This strain has been demonstrated to have no significant shift in its biological properties nor in its resistance to ionizing radiation. The response of S. typhimurium to gamma radiation was similar on both chicken legs and MDCM. The radiation was significantly more lethal to the bacterial cells at temperatures above freezing. The response-surface equations developed from the studies predict that the number of viable cells per gram of MDCM or per square centimeter of the surface of chicken legs would be reduced approximately 2.8 to 5.1 log units at 0 C by radiation doses within the range of 1.5 to 3.0 kGy. The results of the present studies are similar to those obtained previously with sterile mechanically deboned chicken meat

  4. NONCHEMICAL DEHYDRATION OF FIXED TISSUE COMBINING MICROWAVES AND VACUUM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KOK, LP; BOON, ME

    A novel histoprocessing method for paraffin and plastic sections is presented in which dehydration of fixed tissue blocks is achieved within 5 minutes by microwaving under vacuum. Exploiting the decrease in boiling temperature under vacuum, we succeed in evaporating liquid molecules in the tissues

  5. Vacuum pumping for controlled thermonuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, J.S.; Fisher, P.W.

    1976-01-01

    Thermonuclear reactors impose unique vacuum pumping problems involving very high pumping speeds, handling of hazardous materials (tritium), extreme cleanliness requirements, and quantitative recovery of pumped materials. Two principal pumping systems are required for a fusion reactor, a main vacuum system for evacuating the torus and a vacuum system for removing unaccelerated deuterium from neutral beam injectors. The first system must pump hydrogen isotopes and helium while the neutral beam system can operate by pumping only hydrogen isotopes (perhaps only deuterium). The most promising pumping techniques for both systems appear to be cryopumps, but different cryopumping techniques can be considered for each system. The main vacuum system will have to include cryosorption pumps cooled to 4.2 0 K to pump helium, but the unburned deuterium-tritium and other impurities could be pumped with cryocondensation panels (4.2 0 K) or cryosorption panels at higher temperatures. Since pumping speeds will be limited by conductance through the ducts and thermal shields, the pumping performance for both systems will be similar, and other factors such as refrigeration costs are likely to determine the choice. The vacuum pumping system for neutral beam injectors probably will not need to pump helium, and either condensation or higher temperature sorption pumps can be used

  6. Vacuum Baking To Remove Volatile Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscari, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Outgassing reduced in some but not all nonmetallic materials. Eleven polymeric materials tested by determining outgassing species as temperature of conditioned and unconditioned materials raised to 300 degrees C. Conditioning process consisted of vacuum bake for 24 hours at 80 degrees C in addition to usual cure. Baking did not change residual gas percentage of water molecules.

  7. Action of microgravity on root development

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Arabidopsis were grown on horizontal or vertical clinostat for 4 8 or 12 days. Seedlings on horizontal clinostat were in simulated microgravity and seedlings on...

  8. Microgravity Effects on Yersinia Pestis Virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawal, A.; Abogunde, O.; Jejelowo, O.; Rosenzweig, J.-A.

    2010-04-01

    Microgravity effects on Yersinia pestis proliferation, cold growth, and type three secretion system function were evaluated in macrophage cell infections, HeLa cell infections, and cold growth plate assays.

  9. Spacelab J: Microgravity and life sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spacelab J is a joint venture between NASA and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA). Using a Spacelab pressurized long module, 43 experiments will be performed in the areas of microgravity and life sciences. These experiments benefit from the microgravity environment available on an orbiting Shuttle. Removed from the effects of gravity, scientists will seek to observe processes and phenomena impossible to study on Earth, to develop new and more uniform mixtures, to study the effects of microgravity and the space environment on living organisms, and to explore the suitability of microgravity for certain types of research. Mission planning and an overview of the experiments to be performed are presented. Orbital research appears to hold many advantages for microgravity science investigations, which on this mission include electronic materials, metals and alloys, glasses and ceramics, fluid dynamics and transport phenomena, and biotechnology. Gravity-induced effects are eliminated in microgravity. This allows the investigations on Spacelab J to help scientists develop a better understanding of how these gravity-induced phenomena affect both processing and products on Earth and to observe subtle phenomena that are masked in gravity. The data and samples from these investigations will not only allow scientists to better understand the materials but also will lead to improvements in the methods used in future experiments. Life sciences research will collect data on human adaptation to the microgravity environment, investigate ways of assisting astronauts to readapt to normal gravity, explore the effects of microgravity and radiation on living organisms, and gather data on the fertilization and development of organisms in the absence of gravity. This research will improve crew comfort and safety on future missions while helping scientists to further understand the human body.

  10. Acoustic Experiment to Measure the Bulk Viscosity of Near-Critical Xenon in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, K. A.; Shinder, I.; Moldover, M. R.; Zimmerli, G. A.

    2002-01-01

    We plan a rigorous test of the theory of dynamic scaling by accurately measuring the bulk viscosity of xenon in microgravity 50 times closer to the critical temperature T(sub c) than previous experiments. The bulk viscosity zeta (or "second viscosity" or "dilational viscosity") will be determined by measuring the attenuation length of sound alpha lambda and also measuring the frequency-dependence of the speed of sound. For these measurements, we developed a unique Helmholtz resonator and specialized electro-acoustic transducers. We describe the resonator, the transducers, their performance on Earth, and their expected performance in microgravity.

  11. Structural Analysis of the NCSX Vacuum Vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fred Dahlgren; Art Brooks; Paul Goranson; Mike Cole; Peter Titus

    2004-01-01

    The NCSX (National Compact Stellarator Experiment) vacuum vessel has a rather unique shape being very closely coupled topologically to the three-fold stellarator symmetry of the plasma it contains. This shape does not permit the use of the common forms of pressure vessel analysis and necessitates the reliance on finite element analysis. The current paper describes the NCSX vacuum vessel stress analysis including external pressure, thermal, and electro-magnetic loading from internal plasma disruptions and bakeout temperatures of up to 400 degrees centigrade. Buckling and dynamic loading conditions are also considered

  12. Rheological Properties of Quasi-2D Fluids in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trittel, Torsten; Stannarius, Ralf; Eremin, Alexey; Harth, Kirsten; Clark, Noel A.; Maclennan, Joseph; Glaser, Matthew; Park, Cheol; Hall, Nancy; Tin, Padetha

    2016-01-01

    Freely suspended smectic films of sub-micrometer thickness and lateral extensions of several millimeters are used to study thermally driven convection and diffusion in the film plane. The experiments were performed during a six minute microgravity phase of a TEXUS suborbital rocket flight (Texus 52, launched April 27, 2015). The project served as a preliminary test for a planned ISS Experiment with liquid crystal films (OASIS), and in addition it provided new experimental data on smectic films exposed to in-plane thermal gradients.We find an attraction of the smectic material towards the cold edge of the film in a temperature gradient, similar to a Soret effect. This process is reversed when this edge is heated up again. Thermal convection driven by two thermocontacts in the film is practically absent, even at temperature gradients up to 10 Kmm, thermally driven convection sets in when the hot post reaches the transition temperature to the nematic phase.An additional experiment was performed under microgravity conditions to test the stability of liquid crystal bridges in different smectic phases.

  13. Vacuum decay in a soluble model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo Filho, A.F. de; Shellard, R.C.; Marques, G.C.

    1983-03-01

    A field-theoretical model is studied, where the decay rate of the false vacuum can be computed up to the first quantum corrections in both the high-temperature and zero-temperature limits. It is found that the dependence of the decay rate on the height and width of the potential barrier does not follow the same simple area rule as in the quantum-mechanical case. Furthermore, its behaviour is strongly model-dependent. (Author) [pt

  14. Baryogenesis in false vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Yuta [KEK Theory Center, IPNS, KEK, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Yamada, Masatoshi [Kanazawa University, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kanazawa (Japan)

    2017-09-15

    The null result in the LHC may indicate that the standard model is not drastically modified up to very high scales, such as the GUT/string scale. Having this in the mind, we suggest a novel leptogenesis scenario realized in the false vacuum of the Higgs field. If the Higgs field develops a large vacuum expectation value in the early universe, a lepton number violating process is enhanced, which we use for baryogenesis. To demonstrate the scenario, several models are discussed. For example, we show that the observed baryon asymmetry is successfully generated in the standard model with higher-dimensional operators. (orig.)

  15. Handbook of vacuum physics

    CERN Document Server

    1964-01-01

    Handbook of Vacuum Physics, Volume 3: Technology is a handbook of vacuum physics, with emphasis on the properties of miscellaneous materials such as mica, oils, greases, waxes, and rubber. Accurate modern tables of physical constants, properties of materials, laboratory techniques, and properties of commercial pumps, gauges, and leak detectors are presented. This volume is comprised of 12 chapters and begins with a discussion on pump oils, divided into rotary pump oils and vapor pump oils. The next chapter deals with the properties and applications of greases, including outgassing and vapor pr

  16. Vacuum fusion of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stohr, J.A.

    1957-01-01

    After having outlined that vacuum fusion and moulding of uranium and of its alloys have some technical and economic benefits (vacuum operations avoid uranium oxidation and result in some purification; precision moulding avoids machining, chip production and chemical reprocessing of these chips; direct production of the desired shape is possible by precision moulding), this report presents the uranium fusion unit (its low pressure enclosure and pumping device, the crucible-mould assembly, and the MF supply device). The author describes the different steps of cast production, and briefly comments the obtained results

  17. Killing the Copenhagen vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flyvbjerg, H.

    1981-04-01

    One-loop corrections to the equation expressing the instability of the Nielsen-Olesen unstable mode are considered. These corrections radically change the equation, and introduce a critical field strength Bsub(c) upon which instability, and consequently the life or death of the Copenhagen Vacuum, depends. These results are obtained by consideration of renormalizability and dimensions alone. The evaluation of Bsub(c) requires a long and technical calculation to be published in a subsequent paper. A preliminary result indicates that the Copenhagen Vacuum survives. (Auth.)

  18. Evading death by vacuum

    OpenAIRE

    Barroso, A.; Ferreira, P. M.; Ivanov, I. P.; Santos, Rui; Silva, João P.

    2012-01-01

    In the Standard Model, the Higgs potential allows only one minimum at tree-level. But the open possibility that there might be two scalar doublets enriches the vacuum structure, allowing for the risk that we might now be in a metastable state, which we dub the panic vacuum. Current experiments at the LHC are probing the Higgs particle predicted as a result of the spontaneous symmetry breaking. Remarkably, in the two Higgs model with a softly broken U(1) symmetry, the LHC experiments already p...

  19. A rotating quantum vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenci, V.A. de; Svaiter, N.F. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1996-11-01

    It was investigated which mapping has to be used to compare measurements made in a rotating frame to those made in an inertial frame. Using a non-Galilean coordinate transformation, the creation-annihilation operators of a massive scalar field in the rotating frame are not the same as those of an inertial observer. This leads to a new vacuum state(a rotating vacuum) which is a superposition of positive and negative frequency Minkowski particles. Polarization effects in circular accelerators in the proper frame of the electron making a connection with the inertial frame point of view were analysed. 65 refs.

  20. FMIT accelerator vacuum system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machalek, M.D.; Meyer, E.A.; Price, L.S.

    1979-01-01

    The Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility accelerator is being designed to continuously accelerate 100-mA deuterons to 25 MeV. High vacuum pumping of the accelerator structure and beam lines will be done by ion pumps and titanium sublimation pumps. The design of the roughing system includes a Roots blower/mechanical pump package. For economy the size of the system has been designed to operate at 10 -6 torr, where beam particle scattering on residual gases is negligible. For minimum maintenance in this neutron factory, the FMIT vacuum system is designed from the point of view of simplicity and reliability

  1. Vacuum Arc Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, I.

    2013-12-16

    The vacuum arc ion source has evolved into a more or less standard laboratory tool for the production of high-current beams of metal ions, and is now used in a number of different embodiments at many laboratories around the world. Applications include primarily ion implantation for material surface modification research, and good performance has been obtained for the injection of high-current beams of heavy-metal ions, in particular uranium, into particle accelerators. As the use of the source has grown, so also have the operational characteristics been improved in a variety of different ways. Here we review the principles, design, and performance of vacuum arc ion sources.

  2. Novel active driven drop tower facility for microgravity experiments investigating production technologies on the example of substrate-free additive manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotz, Christoph; Wessarges, Yvonne; Hermsdorf, Jörg; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Overmeyer, Ludger

    2018-04-01

    Through the striving of humanity into space, new production processes and technologies for the use under microgravity will be essential in the future. Production of objects in space demands for new processes, like additive manufacturing. This paper presents the concept and the realization for a new machine to investigate microgravity production processes on earth. The machine is based on linear long stator drives and a vacuum chamber carrying up to 1000 kg. For the first time high repetition rate and associated low experimental costs can provide basic research. The paper also introduces the substrate-free additive manufacturing as a future research topic and one of our primary application.

  3. Technology handbook of vacuum physics

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, A H

    2013-01-01

    Handbook of Vacuum Physics, Volume 3: Technology is part of a series of publications that presents articles featuring the whole spectrum of vacuum physics. This particular volume presents materials that deal with technology concerns in vacuum mechanics. The first material talks about the utilization of ceramic materials in the construction of vacuum devices. The next paper details the application of vacuum physics in soldering and brazing process. The last article deals with the utilization of vacuum technology in high frequency heating. The book will be of great use to professionals involved

  4. The influence of oxygen, partial vacuum, temperature, relative humidity combined with gamma radiation on the mosquito, Culex pipiens complex l. I. Effect of exposure to temperature and relative humidity alone.

    OpenAIRE

    Hafez, Mahmood [محمود حافظ; Abdel-Rahmen, A. M.; Osman, A. Z.; Wakid, A. M.; Hafez, M. K.

    1993-01-01

    The results revealed that a temperature of 10°C was the most effective temperature on pupal mortality of Culex pipiens complex L. followed by 32°C then 20 and 26°C. There was a gradual increase in pupal mortality with increasing the time of exposure to temperatures. The pupal mortality increased with decreasing the relative humidity levels at the same time of exposure. Exposure for short time periods did not affect significantly the pupal mortality. Increasing the exposure time increased m...

  5. Design of the ITER vacuum vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioki, K.; Johnson, G.; Shimizu, K.; Williamson, D.

    1995-01-01

    The ITER vacuum vessel is a major safety barrier and must support electromagnetic loads during plasma disruptions and vertical displacement events (VDE) and withstand plausible accidents without losing confinement.The vacuum vessel has a double wall structure to provide structural and electrical continuity in the toroidal direction. The inner and outer shells and poloidal stiffening ribs between them are joined by welding, which gives the vessel the required mechanical strength. The space between the shells will be filled with steel balls and plate inserts to provide additional nuclear shielding. Water flowing in this space is required to remove nuclear heat deposition, which is 0.2-2.5% of the total fusion power. The minor and major radii of the tokamak are 3.9 m and 13 m respectively, and the overall height is 15 m. The total thickness of the vessel wall structure is 0.4-0.7 m.The inboard and outboard blanket segments are supported from the vacuum vessel. The support structure is required to withstand a large total vertical force of 200-300 MN due to VDE and to allow for differential thermal expansion.The first candidate for the vacuum vessel material is Inconel 625, due to its higher electric resistivity and higher yield strength, even at high temperatures. Type 316 stainless steel is also considered a vacuum vessel material candidate, owing to its large database and because it is supported by more conventional fabrication technology. (orig.)

  6. LEP vacuum chamber, prototype

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1983-01-01

    Final prototype for the LEP vacuum chamber, see 8305170 for more details. Here we see the strips of the NEG pump, providing "distributed pumping". The strips are made from a Zr-Ti-Fe alloy. By passing an electrical current, they were heated to 700 deg C.

  7. LEP Vacuum Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This is a cut-out of a LEP vacuum chamber for dipole magnets showing the beam channel and the pumping channel with the getter (NEG) strip and its insulating supports. A water pipe connected to the cooling channel can also be seen at the back.The lead radiation shield lining is also shown. See also 8305563X.

  8. Inexpensive high vacuum feedthroughs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, S.; Post, D.

    1973-01-01

    Description of the use of rigid coaxial cable in the construction of high vacuum coaxial and coaxial push-pull rotary motion feedthroughs. This type of feedthroughs is shown to be extremely cheap and simple to make and modify. It can be used for moderately high voltages and provides a continuous, well shielded, low-noise feedthrough cable in any desired configuration.

  9. ISR vacuum system

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1970-01-01

    A pressure of 5 x 10-11 Torr has been obtained repreatedly in this pilot section of the ISR vacuum system. The pilot section is 45 m long is pumped by 9 sputter-ion pumps pf 350 l/s pumping speed, and is baked out at 200 degrees C before each pump down.

  10. ISR vacuum system

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1971-01-01

    Some of the most important components of the vacuum system are shown. At the left, the rectangular box is a sputter-ion pump inside its bake-out oven. The assembly in the centre includes a sector valve, three roughing valves, a turbomolecular pump, a rotary backing pump and auxiliary equipment. At the right, the small elbow houses a Bayard-

  11. Vacuum System at IUAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, A.

    2012-11-01

    Vacuum technology is an integral part of any accelerator system. At IUAC we have a 15UD PELLETRON, superconduting LINAC, Low Energy Ion beam Facility and a 1.7MV pelletron. Vacuum requirement in these accelerators is ~10-8 torr. Various types of Vacuum pump are used in different zones of the accelerators depending on load. Since the whole accelerator is quite long, distributed pumps are placed in different sections as per load. In ion sources displacement type pump viz turbo-pumps are usually used as the gas load is quite high. In other parts of the accelerator combination of getter and ion pumps are used. It is very much necessary to isolate different sections for maintenance purpose. Proper valves are used to isolate the sections and to avoid vacuum accidents proper interlock system is introduced. If air goes in some sections accidentally, valves will close automatically to protect other sections. The talk will cover different types of pumps and interlock used in accelerators at IUAC.

  12. Thermodynamical aspects of running vacuum models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, J.A.S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Departamento de Astronomia, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Basilakos, Spyros [Academy of Athens, Research Center for Astronomy and Applied Mathematics, Athens (Greece); Sola, Joan [Univ. de Barcelona, High Energy Physics Group, Dept. d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia, Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos (ICC), Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2016-04-15

    The thermal history of a large class of running vacuum models in which the effective cosmological term is described by a truncated power series of the Hubble rate, whose dominant term is Λ(H) ∝ H{sup n+2}, is discussed in detail. Specifically, by assuming that the ultrarelativistic particles produced by the vacuum decay emerge into space-time in such a way that its energy density ρ{sub r} ∝ T{sup 4}, the temperature evolution law and the increasing entropy function are analytically calculated. For the whole class of vacuum models explored here we find that the primeval value of the comoving radiation entropy density (associated to effectively massless particles) starts from zero and evolves extremely fast until reaching a maximum near the end of the vacuum decay phase, where it saturates. The late-time conservation of the radiation entropy during the adiabatic FRW phase also guarantees that the whole class of running vacuum models predicts the same correct value of the present day entropy, S{sub 0} ∝ 10{sup 87}-10{sup 88} (in natural units), independently of the initial conditions. In addition, by assuming Gibbons¨CHawking temperature as an initial condition, we find that the ratio between the late-time and primordial vacuum energy densities is in agreement with naive estimates from quantum field theory, namely, ρ{sub Λ0}/ρ{sub ΛI} 10{sup -123}. Such results are independent on the power n and suggests that the observed Universe may evolve smoothly between two extreme, unstable, non-singular de Sitter phases. (orig.)

  13. Microgravity and the respiratory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisk, G Kim

    2014-05-01

    The structure of the lung, with its delicate network of airspaces and capillaries, means that gravity has a profound influence on its function. Studies of lung function in the absence of gravity provide valuable insight into how, for we Earth-bound individuals, its unavoidable effects shape our lung function. Gravity causes uneven ventilation in the lung through the deformation of lung tissue (the so-called Slinky effect), and uneven perfusion through a combination of the Slinky effect and the zone model of pulmonary perfusion. Both ventilation and perfusion exhibit persisting heterogeneity in microgravity, indicating important other mechanisms. However, gravity serves to maintain a degree of matching of these two processes, so that the ventilation/perfusion ratio, and thus gas exchange, remains efficient. Therefore, while both ventilation and perfusion are more uniform in spaceflight, gas exchange is seemingly no more efficient than on Earth. Despite the changes in lung function when gravity is removed, the lung continues to function well in weightlessness. Unlike many other organ systems, the lung does not appear to undergo structural adaptive changes when gravity is removed, and so there is no apparent degradation in lung function upon return to earth, even after 6 months in space.

  14. Vacuum in thermo field dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, H.

    1987-01-01

    The framework for thermo field dynamics is presented in the axiomatic form. It consists of the conditions for the quantum algebra and the conditions for the vacuum. Choices of nonequilibrium vacuums correspond to nonequilibrium phenomena. (orig.)

  15. Tritium handling in vacuum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, J.T. [Monsanto Research Corp., Miamisburg, OH (United States). Mound Facility; Coffin, D.O. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1986-10-01

    This report provides a course in Tritium handling in vacuum systems. Topics presented are: Properties of Tritium; Tritium compatibility of materials; Tritium-compatible vacuum equipment; and Tritium waste treatment.

  16. Association and dissociation of Feshbach molecules in a microgravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Incao, Jose P.; Willians, Jason R.

    2016-05-01

    NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL) is a multi-user facility scheduled for launch to the ISS in 2017. Our flight experiments with CAL will characterize and mitigate leading-order systematics in dual-atomic-species atom interferometers in microgravity relevant for future fundamental physics missions in space. Here, we study the RF association and dissociation of weakly bound heteronuclear Feshbach molecules for expected parameters relevant for the microgravity environment of CAL. This includes temperatures on the pico-Kelvin range and atomic densities as low as 108/ cm3. We show that under such conditions, thermal and loss effects can be greatly suppressed, resulting in high efficiency in both association and dissociation of extremely weakly bound Feshbach molecules and allowing for high accuracy determination coherent properties of such processes. Our theoretical model for 41 K-87 Rb mixture includes thermal, loss, and density effects in a simple and conceptually clear manner. We derive several conditions in terms of the temperature, density and scattering lengths, determining the regime in which one can achieve efficient association and dissociation. This research is supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  17. Synergistic effects of microgravity and space radiation (Nimblegen)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space radiations and microgravity both could cause DNA damage in cells but the effects of microgravity on DNA damage response to space radiations are still...

  18. A radiation hard vacuum switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1988-07-19

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction. 3 figs.

  19. LHC : The World's Largest Vacuum Systems being commissioned at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Jiménez, J M

    2008-01-01

    When it switches on in 2008, the 26.7 km Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, will have the world's largest vacuum system operating over a wide range of pressures and employing an impressive array of vacuum technologies. This system is composed by 54 km of UHV vacuum for the circulating beams and 50 km of insulation vacuum around the cryogenic magnets and the liquid helium transfer lines. Over the 54 km of UHV beam vacuum, 48 km of this are at cryogenic temperature (1.9 K). The remaining 6 km of beam vacuum containing the insertions for "cleaning" the proton beams, radiofrequency cavities for accelerating the protons as well as beam-monitoring equipment is at ambient temperature and uses non-evaporable getter (NEG) coatings - a vacuum technology that was born and industrialized at CERN. The pumping scheme is completed using 780 ion pumps to remove noble gases and to provide pressure interlocks to the 303 vacuum safety valves. Pressure readings are provided by 170 Bayard-Alpert gauges and 1084 gauges (Pirani a...

  20. Optimal conditions of vacuum distillation process for obtaining the high grade pure magnesium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matković Vladislav Lj.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the procedure of obtaining of high purity magnesium by using the vacuum distillation process has been shown. Vacuum distillation process has been conducted under low and high vacuum at different operating temperatures and times. Also, the condenser structure in vacuum equipment is set up in such a way to get the optimal conditions for obtaining of high purity magnesium. Based on experimental results, optimal process parameters were determined which justify the economy and technology of the process.

  1. The symmetries of the vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, H.

    1985-01-01

    The vacuum equation of state required by cosmological inflation is taken seriously as a general property of the cosmological vacuum. This correctly restricts the class of theories which admit inflation. A model of such a vacuum is presented that leads naturally to the cosmological principle. (Author) [pt

  2. Remotely handled vacuum flange connections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andelfinger, C.; Ulrich, M.; Weber, G.

    1982-04-01

    During the design of ZEPHYR, a fusion experiment for ignition and burn control, remotely handled high vacuum flanges were developed. The main features are: The tightening forces are transmitted via conically shaped flanges by a clamping chain, specially formed for small friction; the clamping forces are produced by one or two screws to minimize the positioning of remotely controlled manipulators; The arrangement is such that the flanges become completely free for axial removal, combined with exact axial alignment; the sealing areas are deepened so that scratching is avoided; the flange connection is suitable for elastomer and aluminium seals in a temperature range of 80 to 430 K. Up to now flanges with inner diameter of 100 to 650 mm have been successfully tested, larger flanges are under preparation. (orig.)

  3. Fundamental studies on the switching in liquid nitrogen environment using vacuum switches for application in future high-temperature superconducting medium-voltage power grids; Grundsatzuntersuchungen zum Schalten in Fluessigstickstoff-Umgebung mit Vakuumschaltern zur Anwendung in zukuenftigen Hochtemperatur-Supraleitungs-Mittelspannungsnetzen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golde, Karsten

    2016-06-24

    By means of superconducting equipment it is possible to reduce the transmission losses in distribution networks while increasing the transmission capacity. As a result even saving a superimposed voltage level would be possible, which can put higher investment costs compared to conventional equipment into perspective. For operation of superconducting systems it is necessary to integrate all equipment in the cooling circuit. This also includes switchgears. Due to cooling with liquid nitrogen, however, only vacuum switching technology comes into question. Thus, the suitability of vacuum switches is investigated in this work. For this purpose the mechanics of the interrupters is considered first. Material investigations and switching experiments at ambient temperature and in liquid nitrogen supply information on potential issues. For this purpose, a special pneumatic construction is designed, which allows tens of thousands of switching cycles. Furthermore, the electrical resistance of the interrupters is considered. Since the contact system consists almost exclusively of copper, a remaining residual resistance and appropriate thermal losses must be considered. Since they have to be cooled back, an appropriate evaluation is given taking environmental parameters into account. The dielectric strength of vacuum interrupters is considered both at ambient temperature as well as directly in liquid nitrogen. For this purpose different contact distances are set at different interrupter types. A distinction is made between internal and external dielectric strength. Conditioning and deconditioning effects are minimized by an appropriate choice of the test circuit. The current chopping and resulting overvoltages are considered to be one of the few drawbacks of vacuum switching technology. Using a practical test circuit the height of chopping current is determined and compared for different temperatures. Due to strong scattering the evaluation is done using statistical methods. At

  4. Evaporation of binary mixtures in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girgis, Morris; Matta, Nabil; Kolli, Kiran; Brown, Leon; Chubb, Kevin

    1995-01-01

    The motivation of this research is to obtain a better understanding of phase-change heat transfer within single and binary liquid meniscii, both in 1-g and 0-g environments. During phase 1 and part of phase 2, in a glass test cell with an inclined heated plate, 1-6 experiments on pentane with additions of decane up to 3% were conducted to determine the optimum concentration that will exhibit the maximum heat transfer and stability. During phase 2 emphasis was given to explore fundamental research issues and to ultimately develop a reliable capillary pumped loop (CPL) device for low gravity. In related experimental work, it was found that thermocapillary stresses near the contract line could result in a degraded wettability which ultimately could explain the observed failure of CPL devices in zero-gravity environment. Therefore, the current experimental effort investigates the effect of adding binary constituents in improving the thermocapillary characteristics near the contact line within the loop configuration. Achievements during second phase include: (1) Further enhancement of Central State University's Microgravity Laboratory by adding or improving upon capabilities of photography, video imaging, fluid visualization, and general experimental testing capabilities; (2) Experimental results for the inclined plate cell; (3) Modeling effort with a detailed scaling analysis; (4) Additional testing with a tube loop configuration to extend experimental work by Dickens, et al.; (5) Fabrication of a capillary loop to be tested using binary fluid (pentane/decane). The device that has been recently completed will be set up horizontally so that the effect of gravity on the performance is negligible. Testing will cover a wide range of parameters such as decane/pentane concentration, heat input value, heat input location (below or above meniscus), and loop temperature.

  5. Emulsion Droplet Combustion in Microgravity: Water/Heptane Emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avedisian, C. Thomas

    1997-01-01

    This presentation reviews a series of experiments to further examine parametric effects on sooting processes of droplet flames in microgravity. The particular focus is on a fuel droplet emulsified with water, specifically emulsions of n-heptane as the fuel-phase and water as the dispersed phase. Water was selected as the additive because of its anticipated effect on soot formation, and the heptane fuel phase was chosen to theoretically reduce the likelihood of microexplosions because its boiling point is nearly the same as that of water: 100 C for water and 98 C for heptane. The water content was varied while the initial droplet diameter was kept within a small range. The experiments were carried out in microgravity to reduce the effects of buoyancy and to promote spherical symmetry in the burning process. Spherically symmetric droplet burning is a convenient starting point for analysis, but experimental data are difficult to obtain for this situation as evidenced by the fact that no quantitative data have been reported on unsupported emulsion droplet combustion in a convection-free environment. The present study improves upon past work carried out on emulsion droplet combustion in microgravity which employed emulsion droplets suspended from a fiber. The fiber can be instrusive to the emulsion droplet burning process as it can promote coalescence of the dispersed water phase and heterogeneous nucleation on the fiber. Prior work has shown that the presence of water in liquid hydrocarbons can have both beneficial and detrimental effects on the combustion process. Water is known to reduce soot formation and radiation heat transfer to combustor walls Gollahalli (1979) reduce flame temperatures and thereby NOx emissions, and encourage secondary droplet atomization or microexplosion. Water also tends to retard ignition and and promote early extinction. The former effect restricted the range of water volume fractions as discussed below.

  6. Kennedy Educate to Innovate (KETI) Microgravity Powerpoint Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to define and explain microgravity and show how microgravity can help students learn about the phenomena of the world. The presentation is designed to provide teachers of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics at many levels with a foundation in microgravity science and applications.

  7. Neurology of microgravity and space travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, M. D.; Patten, B. M.

    1992-01-01

    Exposure to microgravity and space travel produce several neurologic changes, including SAS, ataxia, postural disturbances, perceptual illusions, neuromuscular weakness, and fatigue. Inflight SAS, perceptual illusions, and ocular changes are of more importance. After landing, however, ataxia, perceptual illusions, neuromuscular weakness, and fatigue play greater roles in astronaut health and readaptation to a terrestrial environment. Cardiovascular adjustments to microgravity, bone demineralization, and possible decompression sickness and excessive radiation exposure contribute further to medical problems of astronauts in space. A better understanding of the mechanisms by which microgravity adversely affects the nervous system and more effective treatments will provide healthier, happier, and longer stays in space on the space station Freedom and during the mission to Mars.

  8. How cells (might) sense microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, D.

    1999-01-01

    This article is a summary of a lecture presented at an ESA/NASA Workshop on Cell and Molecular Biology Research in Space that convened in Leuven, Belgium, in June 1998. Recent studies are reviewed which suggest that cells may sense mechanical stresses, including those due to gravity, through changes in the balance of forces that are transmitted across transmembrane adhesion receptors that link the cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix and to other cells (e.g., integrins, cadherins, selectins). The mechanism by which these mechanical signals are transduced and converted into a biochemical response appears to be based, in part, on the finding that living cells use a tension-dependent form of architecture, known as tensegrity, to organize and stabilize their cytoskeleton. Because of tensegrity, the cellular response to stress differs depending on the level of pre-stress (pre-existing tension) in the cytoskeleton and it involves all three cytoskeletal filament systems as well as nuclear scaffolds. Recent studies confirm that alterations in the cellular force balance can influence intracellular biochemistry within focal adhesion complexes that form at the site of integrin binding as well as gene expression in the nucleus. These results suggest that gravity sensation may not result from direct activation of any single gravioreceptor molecule. Instead, gravitational forces may be experienced by individual cells in the living organism as a result of stress-dependent changes in cell, tissue, or organ structure that, in turn, alter extracellular matrix mechanics, cell shape, cytoskeletal organization, or internal pre-stress in the cell-tissue matrix.--Ingber, D. How cells (might) sense microgravity.

  9. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-04-28

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point' or line' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included. 26 figs.

  10. Compact vacuum insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1993-01-05

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point'' or line'' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line'' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point'' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  11. Vacuum inhomogeneous cosmological models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanquin, J.-L.

    1984-01-01

    The author presents some results concerning the vacuum cosmological models which admit a 2-dimensional Abelian group of isometries: classifications of these space-times based on the topological nature of their space-like hypersurfaces and on their time evolution, analysis of the asymptotical behaviours at spatial infinity for hyperbolical models as well as in the neighbourhood of the singularity for the models possessing a time singularity during their evolution. (Auth.)

  12. Vacuum pumping concepts for ETF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homeyer, W.G.

    1980-09-01

    The Engineering Test Facility (ETF) poses unique vacuum pumping requirements due to its large size and long burn characteristics. These requirements include torus vacuum pumping initially and between burns and pumping of neutralized gas from divertor collector chambers. It was found that the requirements could be met by compound cryopumps in which molecular sieve 5A is used as the cryosorbent. The pumps, ducts, and vacuum valves required are large but fit with other ETF components and do not require major advances in vacuum pumping technology. Several additional design, analytical, and experimental studies were identified as needed to optimize designs and provide better design definition for the ETF vacuum pumping systems

  13. The Influence of Microgravity on Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Howard G.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the studies and the use of plants in various space exploration scenarios. The current state of research on plant growth in microgravity is reviewed, with several questions that require research for answers to assist in our fundamental understanding of the influence of microgravity and the space environment on plant growth. These questions are posed to future Principal Investigators and Payload Developers, attending the meeting, in part, to inform them of NASA's interest in proposals for research on the International Space Station.

  14. Technology Thresholds for Microgravity: Status and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noever, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    The technological and economic thresholds for microgravity space research are estimated in materials science and biotechnology. In the 1990s, the improvement of materials processing has been identified as a national scientific priority, particularly for stimulating entrepreneurship. The substantial US investment at stake in these critical technologies includes six broad categories: aerospace, transportation, health care, information, energy, and the environment. Microgravity space research addresses key technologies in each area. The viability of selected space-related industries is critically evaluated and a market share philosophy is developed, namely that incremental improvements in a large markets efficiency is a tangible reward from space-based research.

  15. Accelerator tube vacuum conditions in the NSF tandem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groome, A.E.

    1979-08-01

    The Nuclear Structure Facility currently under construction at the Daresbury Laboratory contains a 30 MV tandem Van de Graaff accelerator with a modular design of accelerator tube. The vacuum system requirements are specified to limit beam loss due to charge-state-changing collisions in the residual gas. This report gives an assessment of some of the parameters affecting the vacuum pressure in an operational machine. Measurements are made of the vacuum conductance and outgassing rate of accelerator tube modules. An assessment is made of the effects of temperature rise, beam mis-steering and the presence of suppression magnets on the ultimate vacuum obtainable. Predictions are made of the pressure profile throughout the machine and consideration is given to operational problems such as tube conditioning and temporary loss of pumping. A schematic diagram of the tandem and its vacuum system is shown. (author)

  16. Vacuum sealing and cooling as methods to preserve surgical specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielsgaard Kristensen, Thomas; Engvad, Birte; Nielsen, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Recently, vacuum-based preservation of surgical specimens has been proposed as a safe alternative to formalin fixation at the surgical theater. The method seems feasible from a practical point of view, but no systematic study has examined the effect of vacuum sealing alone with respect to tissue...... preservation. In this study, we therefore subjected tissue samples from 5 different organs to treatments with and without vacuum sealing and cooling at 4°C to study the effect of vacuum sealing of surgical specimens with respect to tissue preservation and compare it with the effect of cooling. No preserving...... effect of vacuum sealing was observed with respect to cellular morphology, detection of immunohistochemical epitopes, or RNA integrity. In contrast, storage at 4°C was shown to preserve tissue to a higher degree than storage at room temperature for all included endpoints, independently of whether...

  17. Prediction of Water Loss During Potato Vacuum Frying Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Dani Supardan

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Vacuum frying may be a good alternative for the production of dehydrated fruit and vegetable slices. In this study, a relationship between water losses with frying time during vacuum frying process of potato chips has been developed. A first order kinetic model was used, in which drying rate constant is a function of the main process variables, i.e. oil temperature, sample thickness and vacuum pressure. The experimental data of Garayo and Moreira (2000 have been used to validate the model. Generally there was a good agreement between the calculated results and the experimental data. Then, the effect of initial water content and vacuum pressure has been studied. Keywords: kinetic model, potato, vacuum frying, water loss

  18. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Set Point Determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PHILIPP, B.L.

    2000-01-12

    This document provides the calculations used to determine the error of safety class signals used for the CVD process These errors are used with the Parameter limits to arrive at the initial set point. The Safety Class Instrumentation and Control (SCIC) system provides active detection and response to process anomalies that, if unmitigated would result in a safety event. Specifically actuation of the SCIC system includes two portions. The portion which isolates the MCO and initiates the safety-class helium (SCHe) purge, and the portion which detects and stops excessive heat input to the MCO on high tempered water MCO inlet temperature. For the MCO isolation and purge the SCIC receives signals from MCO pressure (both positive pressure and vacuum) helium flow rate, bay high temperature switches, seismic trips and time under vacuum trips.

  19. Model of ASTM Flammability Test in Microgravity: Iron Rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Theodore A; Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Fries, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    There is extensive qualitative results from burning metallic materials in a NASA/ASTM flammability test system in normal gravity. However, this data was shown to be inconclusive for applications involving oxygen-enriched atmospheres under microgravity conditions by conducting tests using the 2.2-second Lewis Research Center (LeRC) Drop Tower. Data from neither type of test has been reduced to fundamental kinetic and dynamic systems parameters. This paper reports the initial model analysis for burning iron rods under microgravity conditions using data obtained at the LERC tower and modeling the burning system after ignition. Under the conditions of the test the burning mass regresses up the rod to be detached upon deceleration at the end of the drop. The model describes the burning system as a semi-batch, well-mixed reactor with product accumulation only. This model is consistent with the 2.0-second duration of the test. Transient temperature and pressure measurements are made on the chamber volume. The rod solid-liquid interface melting rate is obtained from film records. The model consists of a set of 17 non-linear, first-order differential equations which are solved using MATLAB. This analysis confirms that a first-order rate, in oxygen concentration, is consistent for the iron-oxygen kinetic reaction. An apparent activation energy of 246.8 kJ/mol is consistent for this model.

  20. High vacuum tribology of polycrystalline diamond coatings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The morphology of the grown coatings has been varied from cauliflower morphology to faceted morphology by manipulation of the growth temperature from 700°C to 900°C and methane gas concentration from 3% to 1·5%. It is found that the coefficient of friction of the coatings under high vacuum of 133·32 × 10-7 Pa (10-7 ...

  1. An Experimental and Computational Study on Soot Formation in a Coflow Jet Flame Under Microgravity and Normal Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Bin; Cao, Su; Giassi, Davide; Stocker, Dennis P.; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Bennett, Beth Anne V.; Smooke, Mitchell D.; Long, Marshall B.

    2014-01-01

    Upon the completion of the Structure and Liftoff in Combustion Experiment (SLICE) in March 2012, a comprehensive and unique set of microgravity coflow diffusion flame data was obtained. This data covers a range of conditions from weak flames near extinction to strong, highly sooting flames, and enabled the study of gravitational effects on phenomena such as liftoff, blowout and soot formation. The microgravity experiment was carried out in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) on board the International Space Station (ISS), while the normal gravity experiment was performed at Yale utilizing a copy of the flight hardware. Computational simulations of microgravity and normal gravity flames were also carried out to facilitate understanding of the experimental observations. This paper focuses on the different sooting behaviors of CH4 coflow jet flames in microgravity and normal gravity. The unique set of data serves as an excellent test case for developing more accurate computational models.Experimentally, the flame shape and size, lift-off height, and soot temperature were determined from line-of-sight flame emission images taken with a color digital camera. Soot volume fraction was determined by performing an absolute light calibration using the incandescence from a flame-heated thermocouple. Computationally, the MC-Smooth vorticity-velocity formulation was employed to describe the chemically reacting flow, and the soot evolution was modeled by the sectional aerosol equations. The governing equations and boundary conditions were discretized on an axisymmetric computational domain by finite differences, and the resulting system of fully coupled, highly nonlinear equations was solved by a damped, modified Newtons method. The microgravity sooting flames were found to have lower soot temperatures and higher volume fraction than their normal gravity counterparts. The soot distribution tends to shift from the centerline of the flame to the wings from normal gravity to

  2. HOM Effects in Vacuum System with Short Bunches

    CERN Document Server

    Novokhatski, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    High luminosity in electron-positron factories requires high beam currents of very short bunches. SLAC PEP-II and KEKB B-factories are progressively increasing currents and gaining more and more luminosity. Because of this the interaction of high currents and vacuum chamber elements becomes more important for the operation of the rings. High Order Modes (HOM) excited by short intense bunches propagate along the vacuum chamber, penetrating and dissipating inside vital vacuum elements like shielded bellows, vacuum valves and vacuum pumps. As a result these elements can heat up or have temperature oscillations. Often HOM heating has a resonance character. HOM heating of vacuum pumps can lead to vacuum pressure increases. High frequency modes excited by short bunches “check” the quality of the vacuum chamber by detecting small gaps, weak RF screens or weak feed-through. At these high currents even smooth tapers and smooth collimators become a source of HOM production. We will discuss the physi...

  3. Baking of SST-1 vacuum vessel modules and sectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathan, Firozkhan S; Khan, Ziauddin; Yuvakiran, Paravastu; George, Siju; Ramesh, Gattu; Manthena, Himabindu; Shah, Virendrakumar; Raval, Dilip C; Thankey, Prashant L; Dhanani, Kalpesh R; Pradhan, Subrata

    2012-01-01

    SST-1 Tokamak is a steady state super-conducting tokamak for plasma discharge of 1000 sec duration. The plasma discharge of such long time duration can be obtained by reducing the impurities level, which will be possible only when SST-1 vacuum chamber is pumped to ultra high vacuum. In order to achieve UHV inside the chamber, the baking of complete vacuum chamber has to be carried out during pumping. For this purpose the C-channels are welded inside the vacuum vessel. During baking of vacuum vessel, these welded channels should be helium leak tight. Further, these U-channels will be in accessible under operational condition of SST-1. So, it will not possible to repair if any leak is developed during experiment. To avoid such circumstances, a dedicated high vacuum chamber is used for baking of the individual vacuum modules and sectors before assembly so that any fault during welding of the channels will be obtained and repaired. This paper represents the baking of vacuum vessel modules and sectors and their temperature distribution along the entire surface before assembly.

  4. PI Microgravity Services Role for International Space Station Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLombard, Richard

    1998-01-01

    During the ISS era, the NASA Lewis Research Center's Principal Investigator Microgravity Services (PIMS) project will provide to principal investigators (PIs) microgravity environment information and characterization of the accelerations to which their experiments were exposed during on orbit operations. PIMS supports PIs by providing them with microgravity environment information for experiment vehicles, carriers, and locations within the vehicle. This is done to assist the PI with their effort to evaluate the effect of acceleration on their experiments. Furthermore, PIMS responsibilities are to support the investigators in the area of acceleration data analysis and interpretation, and provide the Microgravity science community with a microgravity environment characterization of selected experiment carriers and vehicles. Also, PIMS provides expertise in the areas of microgravity experiment requirements, vibration isolation, and the implementation of requirements for different spacecraft to the microgravity community and other NASA programs.

  5. Design of the ZTH vacuum liner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, P.P.; Dike, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    The current status of the ZTH vacuum liner design is covered by this report. ZTH will be the first experiment to be installed in the CPRF (Confinement Physics Research Facility) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and is scheduled to be operational at the rated current of 4 MA in 1992. The vacuum vessel has a 2.4 m major radius and a 40 cm minor radius. Operating parameters which drive the vacuum vessel mechanical design include a 300 C bakeout temperature, an armour support system capable of withstanding 25 kV, a high toroidal resistance, 1250 kPa magnetic loading, a 10 minute cycle time, and high positional accuracy with respect to the conducting shell. The vacuum vessel design features which satisfy the operating parameters are defined. The liner is constructed of Inconel 625 and has a geometry which alternates sections of thin walled bellows with rigid ribs. These composite sections span between pairs of the 16 diagnostic stations to complete the torus. The thin bellows sections maximize the liner toroidal resistance and the ribs provide support and positional accuracy for the armour in relation to the conducting shell. Heat transfer from the vessel is controlled by a blanket wrap of ceramic fiber insulation and the heat flux is dissipated to a water cooling jacket in the conducting shell

  6. Microgravity Two-Phase Flow Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parang, M.; Chao, D.

    1999-01-01

    Two-phase flows under microgravity condition find a large number of important applications in fluid handling and storage, and spacecraft thermal management. Specifically, under microgravity condition heat transfer between heat exchanger surfaces and fluids depend critically on the distribution and interaction between different fluid phases which are often qualitatively different from the gravity-based systems. Heat transfer and flow analysis in two-phase flows under these conditions require a clear understanding of the flow pattern transition and development of appropriate dimensionless scales for its modeling and prediction. The physics of this flow is however very complex and remains poorly understood. This has led to various inadequacies in flow and heat transfer modeling and has made prediction of flow transition difficult in engineering design of efficient thermal and flow systems. In the present study the available published data for flow transition under microgravity condition are considered for mapping. The transition from slug to annular flow and from bubbly to slug flow are mapped using dimensionless variable combination developed in a previous study by the authors. The result indicate that the new maps describe the flow transitions reasonably well over the range of the data available. The transition maps are examined and the results are discussed in relation to the presumed balance of forces and flow dynamics. It is suggested that further evaluation of the proposed flow and transition mapping will require a wider range of microgravity data expected to be made available in future studies.

  7. Imaging of premixed flames in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostiuk, L. W.; Cheng, R. K.

    1994-12-01

    A laser schlieren system which uses video recording and digital images analysis has been developed and applied successfully to microgravity combustion experiments performed in a drop-tower. The optical system and the experiment are installed within a small package which is subjected to free-fall. The images are recorded on video tape and are digitized and analyzed by a computer-controlled image processor. The experimental results include laminar and turbulent premixed conical flames in microgravity, normal positive gravity (upward), and reverse gravity (downward). The procedures to extract frequency information from the digitized images are described. Many gross features of the effects of gravity on premixed conical flames are found. Flames that ignite easily in normal gravity fail to ignite in microgravity. Buoyancy driven instabilities associated with an interface formed between the hot products and the cold surrounding air is the mechanism through which gravity influences premixed laminar and turbulent flames. In normal gravity, this causes the flame to flicker. In reverse gravity, - g, and microgravity, μg, the interface is stable and flame flickering ceases. The flickering frequencies of + g flames vary with changing upstream boundary conditions. The absence of flame flickering in μg suggest that μg flames would be less sensitive to these changes.

  8. Validity of microgravity simulation models on earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regnard, J; Heer, M; Drummer, C

    2001-01-01

    Many studies have used water immersion and head-down bed rest as experimental models to simulate responses to microgravity. However, some data collected during space missions are at variance or in contrast with observations collected from experimental models. These discrepancies could reflect inc...

  9. Microgravity Flammability Experiments for Spacecraft Fire Safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legros, Guillaume; Minster, Olivier; Tóth, Balazs

    2012-01-01

    As fire behaviour in manned spacecraft still remains poorly understood, an international topical team has been created to design a validation experiment that has an unprecedented large scale for a microgravity flammability experiment. While the validation experiment is being designed for a re...

  10. The vacuum platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNab, A.

    2017-10-01

    This paper describes GridPP’s Vacuum Platform for managing virtual machines (VMs), which has been used to run production workloads for WLCG and other HEP experiments. The platform provides a uniform interface between VMs and the sites they run at, whether the site is organised as an Infrastructure-as-a-Service cloud system such as OpenStack, or an Infrastructure-as-a-Client system such as Vac. The paper describes our experience in using this platform, in developing and operating VM lifecycle managers Vac and Vcycle, and in interacting with VMs provided by LHCb, ATLAS, ALICE, CMS, and the GridPP DIRAC service to run production workloads.

  11. Evaluation of supercapacitors for space applications under thermal vacuum conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Keith C.; Green, Nelson W.; Brandon, Erik J.

    2018-03-01

    Commercially available supercapacitor cells from three separate vendors were evaluated for use in a space environment using thermal vacuum (Tvac) testing. Standard commercial cells are not hermetically sealed, but feature crimp or double seam seals between the header and the can, which may not maintain an adequate seal under vacuum. Cells were placed in a small vacuum chamber, and cycled between three separate temperature set points. Charging and discharging of cells was executed following each temperature soak, to confirm there was no significant impact on performance. A final electrical performance check, visual inspection and mass check following testing were also performed, to confirm the integrity of the cells had not been compromised during exposure to thermal cycling under vacuum. All cells tested were found to survive this testing protocol and exhibited no significant impact on electrical performance.

  12. Vacuum radiation induced by time dependent electric field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Many predictions of new phenomena given by strong field quantum electrodynamics (SFQED will be tested on next generation multi-petawatt laser facilities in the near future. These new phenomena are basis to understand physics in extremely strong electromagnetic fields therefore have attracted wide research interest. Here we discuss a new SFQED phenomenon that is named as vacuum radiation. In vacuum radiation, a virtual electron loop obtain energy from time dependent external electric field and radiate an entangled photon pair. Features of vacuum radiation in a locally time dependent electric field including spectrum, characteristic temperature, production rate and power are given.

  13. Vacuum radiation induced by time dependent electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Bo, E-mail: zhangbolfrc@caep.cn [Department of High Energy Density Physics, Research Center of Laser Fusion, 621900, Mianyang, Sichuan (China); Laboratory of Science and Technology on Plasma Physics, Research Center of Laser Fusion, 621900, Mianyang, Sichuan (China); Zhang, Zhi-meng; Hong, Wei; He, Shu-Kai; Teng, Jian [Department of High Energy Density Physics, Research Center of Laser Fusion, 621900, Mianyang, Sichuan (China); Laboratory of Science and Technology on Plasma Physics, Research Center of Laser Fusion, 621900, Mianyang, Sichuan (China); Gu, Yu-qiu, E-mail: yqgu@caep.cn [Department of High Energy Density Physics, Research Center of Laser Fusion, 621900, Mianyang, Sichuan (China); Laboratory of Science and Technology on Plasma Physics, Research Center of Laser Fusion, 621900, Mianyang, Sichuan (China)

    2017-04-10

    Many predictions of new phenomena given by strong field quantum electrodynamics (SFQED) will be tested on next generation multi-petawatt laser facilities in the near future. These new phenomena are basis to understand physics in extremely strong electromagnetic fields therefore have attracted wide research interest. Here we discuss a new SFQED phenomenon that is named as vacuum radiation. In vacuum radiation, a virtual electron loop obtain energy from time dependent external electric field and radiate an entangled photon pair. Features of vacuum radiation in a locally time dependent electric field including spectrum, characteristic temperature, production rate and power are given.

  14. Combustion in microgravity: The French contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'homme, Roger; Legros, Guillaume; Torero, José L.

    2017-01-01

    Microgravity (drop towers, parabolic flights, sounding rockets and space stations) are particularly relevant to combustion problems given that they show high-density gradients and in many cases weak forced convection. For some configurations where buoyancy forces result in complex flow fields, microgravity leads to ideal conditions that correspond closely to canonical problems, e.g., combustion of a spherical droplet in a far-field still atmosphere, Emmons' problem for flame spreading over a solid flat plate, deflagration waves, etc. A comprehensive chronological review on the many combustion studies in microgravity was written first by Law and Faeth (1994) and then by F.A. Williams (1995). Later on, new recommendations for research directions have been delivered. In France, research has been managed and supported by CNES and CNRS since the creation of the microgravity research group in 1992. At this time, microgravity research and future activities contemplated the following: Droplets: the "D2 law" has been well verified and high-pressure behavior of droplet combustion has been assessed. The studies must be extended in two main directions: vaporization in mixtures near the critical line and collective effects in dense sprays. Flame spread: experiments observed blue flames governed by diffusion that are in accordance with Emmons' theory. Convection-dominated flames showed significant departures from the theory. Some theoretical assumptions appeared controversial and it was noted that radiation effects must be considered, especially when regarding the role of soot production in quenching. Heterogeneous flames: two studies are in progress, one in Poitiers and the other in Marseilles, about flame/suspension interactions. Premixed and triple flames: the knowledge still needs to be complemented. Triple flames must continue to be studied and understanding of "flame balls" still needs to be addressed.

  15. Vacuum-tight joints and seals usina glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanskaya, A.V.; Zagajnyj, V.K.; Pevzner, B.Z.; Peregud, V.I.

    1982-01-01

    Results of studying for a possible utilization of new types of vacuum-tight designs made using glass ceramics are given. Constructional features of diffrent joints are considered and their vacuum and electric characteristics are given. Optimum range of application of these designs in electrophysical equipment is shown. Under operating conditions these designs provide a 1.5x10 - 5 Pa pressure and withstand a 2 kV voltage at a 400 deg C temperature

  16. Evaluation by an Aeronautic Dentist on the Adverse Effects of a Six-Week Period of Microgravity on the Oral Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balwant Rai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. HDT bed rest condition is a simulated microgravity condition in which subject lies on bed inclined −6 degree feet up. To determine the influence of a simulated microgravity (HDT bed rest on oral cavity, 10 healthy male volunteers were studied before, during, just after, and after 6 weeks of the simulated microgravity condition of −6° head-down-tilt (HDT bed rest. Materials and Methods. Facial nerve function, facial sensation, chemosensory system, salivary biomarkers were measured. Results. Lactate dehydrogenase, MIP 1 alpha, malonaldehyde, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, and thiocyanate were found to increase significantly, while flow rate, sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphate, protein, amylase activity, vitamin E and C, and mouth opening were decreased in simulation environments in contradiction to normal. The threshold for monosodium glutamate (MSG and capsaicin increased during microgravity as compared to normal conditions. Moderate pain of teeth, facial oedema, mild pain, loss of sensation of pain and temperature, decreased tongue, and mandibular movement in simulation microgravity environments were observed. Conclusions. These results suggest that reversible effect of microgravity is oedema of face, change in taste, abnormal expression of face, teeth pain, and xerostomia. Further study will be required on large scale on long-term effects of microgravity on oral cavity to prevent the adverse effects.

  17. A Characterization Of Alcohol Fuel Vapor For Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy Applied To Microgravity Flame Spread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulis, Michael J.; Perry, David S.; Miller, Fletcher; Piltch, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    A diode laser diagnostic is being developed for use in an ongoing investigation of flame spread in microgravity at NASA Glenn Research Center. Flame spread rates through non-homogenous gas mixtures are significantly different in a microgravity environment because of buoyancy and possibly hydrostatic pressure effects. These effects contribute to the fuel vapor concentration ahead of the flame being altered so that flame spread is more rapid in microgravity. This paper describes spectral transmission measurements made through mixtures of alcohol, water vapor, and nitrogen in a gas cell that was designed and built to allow measurements at temperatures up to 500 C. The alcohols considered are methanol, ethanol, and n-propanol. The basic technique of wavelength modulation spectroscopy for gas species measurements in microgravity was developed by Silver et al. For this technique to be applicable, one must carefully choose the spectral features over which the diode laser is modulated to provide good sensitivity and minimize interference from other molecular lines such as those in water. Because the methanol spectrum was not known with sufficient resolution in the wavelength region of interest, our first task was to perform high-resolution transmission measurements with an FTIR spectrometer for methanol vapor in nitrogen, followed recently by ethanol and n-propanol. A computer program was written to generate synthesized data to mimic that expected from the experiment using the laser diode, and results from that simulation are also presented.

  18. Particle contamination in vacuum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martignac, J.; Bonin, B.; Henriot, C.; Poupeau, J.P.; Koltchakian, I.; Kocic, D.; Herbeaux, Ch.; Marx, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    Many vacuum devices, like RF cavities, are sensitive to particle contamination. This fact has motivated a considerable effort of cleanliness from the SRF community. The first results of a general study trying to identify the most contaminating steps during assembly and vacuum operation of the cavity is reported. The steps investigated here are gasket assembly, evacuation and venting of the vacuum system, and operation of sputter ion pumps. (author)

  19. Ultra High Vacuum Sputtering System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-25

    NO. NO. Washington, D.C. 20332-6448 E.. 1,1. T IT LE (Incirot Securi ty Ciassificalion) (U L t ra High Vacuum Spattering System _1__ 12. PERSONAL...ABSTRACT (Continue on reuerse it necessary and identify by bioc, number) This grant provided for the purchase of an ultra high vacuum sputtering system, for...FOR GRANT FROM DEFENSE UNIVERSITY RESEARCH INSTRUMENTATION PROGRAM Grant no. AFOSR-89-0138 Date Submitted: 27 July, 1991 Title: Ultra High Vacuum Sputtering

  20. Big Bang or vacuum fluctuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zel'dovich, Ya.B.

    1980-01-01

    Some general properties of vacuum fluctuations in quantum field theory are described. The connection between the ''energy dominance'' of the energy density of vacuum fluctuations in curved space-time and the presence of singularity is discussed. It is pointed out that a de-Sitter space-time (with the energy density of the vacuum fluctuations in the Einstein equations) that matches the expanding Friedman solution may describe the history of the Universe before the Big Bang. (P.L.)

  1. Of vacuum and gas

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2015-01-01

    A new LHCb programme is delving into uncharted waters for the LHC: exploring how protons interact with noble gases inside the machine pipe. While, at first glance, it may sound risky for the overall quality of the vacuum in the machine, the procedure is safe and potentially very rich in rewards. The results could uncover the high-energy helium-proton cross-section (with all the implications thereof), explore new boundaries of the quark-gluon plasma and much more.   As the beam passes through LHCb, interactions with neon gas allow the experiment to measure the full beam profile. In this diagram, beam 1 (blue) and beam 2 (red) are measured by the surrounding VELO detector. It all begins with luminosity. In 2011, LHCb set out to further improve its notoriously precise measurements of the beam profile, using the so-called Beam-Gas Imaging (BGI) method. BGI does exactly what it says on the tin: a small amount of gas is inserted into the vacuum, increasing the rate of collisions around the interaction ...

  2. Development of Apparatus for Microgravity Experiments on Evaporation and Combustion of Palm Methyl Ester Droplet in High-Pressure Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masato; Nomura, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Nozomu

    New apparatus for microgravity experiments was developed in order to obtain fundamental data of single droplet evaporation and combustion of palm methyl ester (PME) for understanding PME spray combustion in internal combustion engines. n-hexadecane droplet combustion and evaporation experiments were also performed to obtain single-component fuel data. Combustion experiments were performed at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. For droplet evaporation experiments, ambient temperature and pressure were varied from 473 to 873 K and 0.10 to 4.0 MPa, respectively. Microgravity conditions were employed for evaporation experiments to prevent natural convection. Droplet diameter history of a burning PME droplet is similar to that of n-hexadecane. Droplet diameter history of an evaporating PME droplet is different from that of n-hexadecane at low ambient temperatures. In the latest stage of PME droplet evaporation, temporal evaporation constant decreases remarkably. At ambient temperatures sufficiently above the boiling temperature of PME components, droplet diameter history of PME and n-hexadecane are similar to each other. Corrected evaporation lifetime τ of PME at 873 K as a function of ambient pressure was obtained at normal and microgravity. At normal gravity, τ monotonically decreases with ambient pressure. On the other hand, at microgravity, τ increases with ambient pressure, and then decreases.

  3. Vacuum leak detector and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jr., David

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus and method for detecting leakage in a vacuum system involves a moisture trap chamber connected to the vacuum system and to a pressure gauge. Moisture in the trap chamber is captured by freezing or by a moisture adsorbent to reduce the residual water vapor pressure therein to a negligible amount. The pressure gauge is then read to determine whether the vacuum system is leaky. By directing a stream of carbon dioxide or helium at potentially leaky parts of the vacuum system, the apparatus can be used with supplemental means to locate leaks.

  4. Vacuum science, technology, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Naik, Pramod K

    2018-01-01

    Vacuum plays an important role in science and technology. The study of interaction of charged particles, neutrals and radiation with each other and with solid surfaces requires a vacuum environment for reliable investigations. Vacuum has contributed immensely to advancements made in nuclear science, space, metallurgy, electrical/electronic technology, chemical engineering, transportation, robotics and many other fields. This book is intended to assist students, scientists, technicians and engineers to understand the basics of vacuum science and technology for application in their projects. The fundamental theories, concepts, devices, applications, and key inventions are discussed.

  5. PDX vacuum vessel stress analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikodem, Z.D.

    1975-01-01

    A stress analysis of PDX vacuum vessel is described and the summary of results is presented. The vacuum vessel is treated as a toroidal shell of revolution subjected to an internal vacuum. The critical buckling pressure is calculated. The effects of the geometrical discontinuity at the juncture of toroidal shell head and cylindrical outside wall, and the concavity of the cylindrical wall are examined. An effect of the poloidal field coil supports and the vessel outside supports on the stress distribution in the vacuum vessel is determined. A method evaluating the influence of circular ports in the vessel wall on the stress level in the vessel is outlined

  6. Vacuum metastability with black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burda, Philipp; Gregory, Ruth; Moss, Ian G. annd

    2015-01-01

    We consider the possibility that small black holes can act as nucleation seeds for the decay of a metastable vacuum, focussing particularly on the Higgs potential. Using a thin-wall bubble approximation for the nucleation process, which is possible when generic quantum gravity corrections are added to the Higgs potential, we show that primordial black holes can stimulate vacuum decay. We demonstrate that for suitable parameter ranges, the vacuum decay process dominates over the Hawking evaporation process. Finally, we comment on the application of these results to vacuum decay seeded by black holes produced in particle collisions.

  7. temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Polt

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In-situ X-ray diffraction was applied to isotactic polypropylene with a high volume fraction of α-phase (α-iPP while it has been compressed at temperatures below and above its glass transition temperature Tg. The diffraction patterns were evaluated by the Multi-reflection X-ray Profile Analysis (MXPA method, revealing microstructural parameters such as the density of dislocations and the size of coherently scattering domains (CSD-size. A significant difference in the development of the dislocation density was found compared to compression at temperatures above Tg, pointing at a different plastic deformation mechanism at these temperatures. Based on the individual evolutions of the dislocation density and CSD-size observed as a function of compressive strain, suggestions for the deformation mechanisms occurring below and above Tg are made.

  8. Mineralization and growth of cultured embryonic skeletal tissue in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klement, B. J.; Spooner, B. S.

    1999-01-01

    Microgravity provides a unique environment in which to study normal and pathological phenomenon. Very few studies have been done to examine the effects of microgravity on developing skeletal tissue such as growth plate formation and maintenance, elongation of bone primordia, or the mineralization of growth plate cartilage. Embryonic mouse premetatarsal triads were cultured on three space shuttle flights to study cartilage growth, differentiation, and mineralization, in a microgravity environment. The premetatarsal triads that were cultured in microgravity all formed cartilage rods and grew in length. However, the premetatarsal cartilage rods cultured in microgravity grew less in length than the ground control cartilage rods. Terminal chondrocyte differentiation also occurred during culture in microgravity, as well as in the ground controls, and the matrix around the hypertrophied chondrocytes was capable of mineralizing in both groups. The same percentage of premetatarsals mineralized in the microgravity cultures as mineralized in the ground control cultures. In addition, the sizes of the mineralized areas between the two groups were very similar. However, the amount of 45Ca incorporated into the mineralized areas was significantly lower in the microgravity cultures, suggesting that the composition or density of the mineralized regions was compromised in microgravity. There was no significant difference in the amount of 45Ca liberated from prelabeled explants in microgravity or in the ground controls.

  9. Electrostatic Levitation: A Tool to Support Materials Research in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jan; SanSoucie, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Containerless processing represents an important topic for materials research in microgravity. Levitated specimens are free from contact with a container, which permits studies of deeply undercooled melts, and high-temperature, highly reactive materials. Containerless processing provides data for studies of thermophysical properties, phase equilibria, metastable state formation, microstructure formation, undercooling, and nucleation. The European Space Agency (ESA) and the German Aerospace Center (DLR) jointly developed an electromagnetic levitator facility (MSL-EML) for containerless materials processing in space. The electrostatic levitator (ESL) facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center provides support for the development of containerless processing studies for the ISS. Apparatus and techniques have been developed to use the ESL to provide data for phase diagram determination, creep resistance, emissivity, specific heat, density/thermal expansion, viscosity, surface tension and triggered nucleation of melts. The capabilities and results from selected ESL-based characterization studies performed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center will be presented.

  10. Innovative Vacuum Distillation for Magnesium Recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tianbai; Li, Naiyi; Mei, Xiaoming; Yu, Alfred; Shang, Shixiang

    Magnesium recycling now becomes a very important subject as magnesium consumption increases fast around the world. All commonly used magnesium die-casting alloys can be recycled and recovered to the primary metal quality. The recycled materials may be comprised of biscuits, sprues, runners, flash, overflows, dross, sludge, scrap parts, and old parts that are returned from service, An innovative magnesium recycle method, vacuum distillation, is developed and proved out to be able to recycle magnesium scraps, especially machining chips, oily magnesium, smelting sludge, dross or the mixture. With this process at a specific temperature and environment condition, magnesium in scraps can be gasified and then solidified to become crystal magnesium crown. This `recycled' magnesium crown is collected and used as the raw material of magnesium alloys. The experimental results show the vacuum distillation is a feasible and plausible method to recycle magnesium. Further, the cost analysis will be addressed in this paper.

  11. LIGO vacuum system study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.; Moore, Boude C.

    1988-01-01

    A laser interferometer gravitational wave observatory (LIGO) is being developed with sensitivities which will have a high probability of detecting gravitational waves from astrophysical sources. A major component of LIGO is a total of 16 km of 1.2 m (48 inch) diameter tube at a pressure of less than 10 to the minus 8th power torr. It will be of 304L stainless steel procured directly from the steel mills with the initial hydrogen content specially reduced. Projections of the outgassing rates of hydrogen and of water vapor as a function of time are given and the uncertainties discussed. Based on these, a preliminary analysis of the vacuum system is presented.

  12. ULTRA HIGH VACUUM VALVE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, W.A.

    1962-05-29

    A valve for high vacuum applications such as the CStellarator where chamber pressures as low as 2 x 10/sup -10/ mm Hg are necessary is designed with a line-of-sight path through the valve for visual inspection of the contents of reactants in such chambers. The valve comprises a turnable resilient metal ball having an aperture therethrough, means for selectively turning the ball to rotate the axis of its line-of-sight path, and soft, deformable opposing orifices that are movable relatively toward said ball to seal with opposite ball surfaces upon said movement of said axis of said line-of-sight path. The valve also includes a bellows seal connected between said orifices and internal actuating means that eliminates the requirement for gasketed turnable valve closing stems. (AEC)

  13. Heterotic vacuum structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimmrigk, R.

    1989-01-01

    The vacuum structure of the Heterotic String is investigated. Methods from fleld theory and critical systems are being used to map out part of the moduli space of the (2,2)-configuration space of the Heterotic String. This configuration space breaks up into different Multidimensional spaces, each leading to a different physical particle spectrum. After explicitly constructing parts of the subspace of all (2,2)-vacua corresponding to complete intersection Calabi-Yau manifolds and tensor models of the N = 2 superconformal discrete minimal series, the spectrum of these models is computed and a search for phenomenological viable models is conducted. It turns out that there are only very few such models. In the second part of the thesis the construction of a new threegeneration model is explained and a detailed phenomenological analysis is presented

  14. Accelerator vacuum system elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivokon', V.V.; Kobets, A.F.; Shvetsov, V.A.; Sivokon', L.V.

    1980-01-01

    Some elements of vacuum systems are investigated. Considerable attention has been given to the investigation into peculiarities in pumping out of a ionoguide for transportation of an accelerated charged particles beam the spread of which often attains a considerable length. The number of pumps over the ionoguide length is experimentally determined. It is shown that as a result of ionoguide warm-up the pumping out time is considerably reduced maximum permissible pressure is decreased by two orders and lesser rate of pump pumping out is required. The investigations have shown that when operating the ionoguide there is no necessity in setting up seals between the ionoguide and magnetodischarged pump. The causes of the phenomenon in which the pressure near the pump is greater than in the end of the ionoguide, are impurities carried in by the pump into the ionoguide volume and the pumping out capacity of the pressure converter

  15. Vacuum Technology for Superconducting Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Chiggiato, P

    2014-01-01

    The basic notions of vacuum technology for superconducting applications are presented, with an emphasis on mass and heat transport in free molecular regimes. The working principles and practical details of turbomolecular pumps and cryopumps are introduced. The specific case of the Large Hadron Collider’s cryogenic vacuum system is briefly reviewed.

  16. Vacuum Alignment with more Flavors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryttov, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We study the alignment of the vacuum in gauge theories with $N_f$ Dirac fermions transforming according to a complex representation of the gauge group. The alignment of the vacuum is produced by adding a small mass perturbation to the theory. We study in detail the $N_f=2,3$ and $4$ case. For $N_...

  17. Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, J. L.; Todd, D. T.; Wooten, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program investigated vacuum gas tungsten arc welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. After a vacuum chamber and GTAW power supply were modified, several difficult-to-weld materials were studied and key parameters developed. Finally, Incoloy 903 weld overlays were produced without microfissures.

  18. Detecting leaks in vacuum bags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlstrom, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    Small leaks in vacuum bag can be readily detected by eye, using simple chemical reaction: combination of ammonia and acetic acid vapors to produce cloudy white smoke. Technique has been successfully used to test seam integrity and to identify minute pinholes in vacuum bag used in assembly of ceramic-tile heat shield for Space Shuttle Orbiter.

  19. Fish Inner Ear Otolith Growth Under Real Microgravity (Spaceflight) and Clinorotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anken, Ralf; Brungs, Sonja; Grimm, Dennis; Knie, Miriam; Hilbig, Reinhard

    2016-06-01

    Using late larval stages of cichlid fish ( Oreochromis mossambicus) we have shown earlier that the biomineralization of otoliths is adjusted towards gravity by means of a neurally guided feedback loop. Centrifuge experiments, e.g., revealed that increased gravity slows down otolith growth. Microgravity thus should yield an opposite effect, i.e., larger than normal otoliths. Consequently, late larval cichlids (stage 14, vestibular system operational) were subjected to real microgravity during the 12 days FOTON-M3 spaceflight mission (OMEGAHAB-hardware). Controls were kept at 1 g on ground within an identical hardware. Animals of another batch were subsequently clinorotated within a submersed fast-rotating clinostat with one axis of rotation (2d-clinostat), a device regarded to simulate microgravity. Temperature and light conditions were provided in analogy to the spaceflight experiment. Controls were maintained at 1 g within the same aquarium. After all experiments, animals had reached late stage 21 (fish can swim freely). Maintenance under real microgravity during spaceflight resulted in significantly larger than normal otoliths (both lapilli and sagittae, involved in sensing gravity and the hearing process, respectively). This result is fully in line with an earlier spaceflight study in the course of which otoliths from late-staged swordtails Xiphophorus helleri were analyzed. Clinorotation resulted in larger than 1 g sagittae. However, no effect on lapilli was obtained. Possibly, an effect was present but too light to be measurable. Overall, spaceflight obviously induces an adaptation of otolith growth, whereas clinorotation does not fully mimic conditions of microgravity regarding late larval cichlids.

  20. Glucocorticoid: A potential role in microgravity-induced bone loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiancheng; Yang, Zhouqi; Li, Wenbin; Xue, Yanru; Xu, Huiyun; Li, Jingbao; Shang, Peng

    2017-11-01

    Exposure of animals and humans to conditions of microgravity, including actual spaceflight and simulated microgravity, results in numerous negative alterations to bone structure and mechanical properties. Although there are abundant researches on bone loss in microgravity, the explicit mechanism is not completely understood. At present, it is widely accepted that the absence of mechanical stimulus plays a predominant role in bone homeostasis disorders in conditions of weightlessness. However, aside from mechanical unloading, nonmechanical factors such as various hormones, cytokines, dietary nutrition, etc. are important as well in microgravity induced bone loss. The stress-induced increase in endogenous glucocorticoid (GC) levels is inevitable in microgravity environments. Moreover, it is well known that GCs have a detrimental effect to bone health at excess concentrations. Therefore, GC plays a potential role in microgravity-induced bone loss. This review summarizeds several studies and their prospective solutions to this hypothesis.

  1. Cosmology with decaying vacuum energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freese, K.; Adams, F.; Frieman, J.; Mottola, E.

    1987-09-01

    Motivated by recent attempts to solve the cosmological constant problem, we examine the observational consequences of a vacuum energy density which decays in time. For all times later than t ∼ 1 sec, the ratio of the vacuum to the total energy density of the universe must be small. Although the vacuum cannot provide the ''missing mass'' required to close the universe today, its presence earlier in the history of the universe could have important consequences. We discuss restrictions on the vacuum energy arising from primordial nucleosynthesis, the microwave and gamma ray background spectra, and galaxy formation. A small vacuum component at the era of nucleosynthesis, 0.01 5, but in some cases would severely distort the microwave spectrum. 9 refs., 3 figs

  2. Hadron Contribution to Vacuum Polarisation

    CERN Document Server

    Davier, M; Malaescu, B; Zhang, Z

    2016-01-01

    Precision tests of the Standard Theory require theoretical predictions taking into account higher-order quantum corrections. Among these vacuum polarisation plays a predominant role. Vacuum polarisation originates from creation and annihilation of virtual particle–antiparticle states. Leptonic vacuum polarisation can be computed from quantum electrodynamics. Hadronic vacuum polarisation cannot because of the non-perturbative nature of QCD at low energy. The problem is remedied by establishing dispersion relations involving experimental data on the cross section for e+ e− annihilation into hadrons. This chapter sets the theoretical and experimental scene and reviews the progress achieved in the last decades thanks to more precise and complete data sets. Among the various applications of hadronic vacuum polarisation calculations, two are emphasised: the contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, and the running of the fine structure constant α to the Z mass scale. They are fundamental ingre...

  3. Vacuum transitions in dual models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashnev, A.I.; Volkov, D.V.; Zheltukhin, A.A.

    1976-01-01

    The investigation is continued of the spontaneous vacuum transition problem in the Neview-Schwartz dual model (NSDM). It is shown that vacuum transitions allow disclosing of supplementary degeneration in the resonance state spectrum. The dual amplitudes possess an internal structure corresponding to the presence of an infinite number of quarks with increasing masses and retained charges. The Adler principle holds. Analytic continuation on the constant of induced vacuum transitions makes it possible to establish the existence of spontaneous vacuum transitions in the NSDM. The consequence of this fact is the exact SU(2) symmetry of π, rho meson trajectories and the Higgs mechanism in the model. In this case the ratios of masses of particles leading trajectories are analogous to those obtained in the current algebra. It is shown that in the NSDM there arises chiral SU(2) x SU(2) x U(1) x U(1) x ... symmetry resulting from spontaneous vacuum transitions

  4. Effects of microgravity on osteoblast growth activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Lewis, M. L.

    1996-01-01

    Space flight is an environmental condition where astronauts can lose up to 19% of weight-bearing bone during long duration missions. We used the MC3T3-E1 osteoblast to investigate bone cell growth in microgravity (10(-6) to 10(-9)g). Osteoblasts were launched on the STS-56 shuttle flight in a quiescent state with 0.5% fetal calf serum (FCS) medium and growth activation was initiated by adding fresh medium with 10% FCS during microgravity exposure. Four days after serum activation, the cells were fixed before return to normal Earth gravity. Ground controls were treated in parallel with the flight samples in identical equipment. On landing, cell number, cell cytoskeleton, glucose utilization, and prostaglandin synthesis in flight (n = 4) and ground controls (n = 4) were examined. The flown osteoblasts grew slowly in microgravity with total cell number significantly reduced (55 +/- 6 vs 141 +/- 8 cells per microscopic field). The cytoskeleton of the flight osteoblasts had a reduced number of stress fibers and a unique abnormal morphology. Nuclei in the ground controls were large and round with punctate Hoechst staining of the DNA nucleosomes. The flight nuclei were 30% smaller than the controls (P prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis when compared to controls (57.3 +/- 17 vs 138.3 +/- 41 pmol/ml). Cell viability was normal since, on a per-cell basis, glucose use and prostaglandin synthesis were comparable for flight and ground samples. Taken together, these data suggest that growth activation in microgravity results in reduced growth, causing reduced glucose utilization and reduced prostaglandin synthesis, with significantly altered actin cytoskeleton in osteoblasts.

  5. Bacillus thuringiensis Conjugation in Simulated Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuls, Elise; van Houdt, Rob; Leys, Natalie; Dijkstra, Camelia; Larkin, Oliver; Mahillon, Jacques

    2009-10-01

    Spaceflight experiments have suggested a possible effect of microgravity on the plasmid transfer among strains of the Gram-positive Bacillus thuringiensis, as opposed to no effect recorded for Gram-negative conjugation. To investigate these potential effects in a more affordable experimental setup, three ground-based microgravity simulators were tested: the Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV), the Random Positioning Machine (RPM), and a superconducting magnet. The bacterial conjugative system consisted in biparental matings between two B. thuringiensis strains, where the transfer frequencies of the conjugative plasmid pAW63 and its ability to mobilize the nonconjugative plasmid pUB110 were assessed. Specifically, potential plasmid transfers in a 0-g position (simulated microgravity) were compared to those obtained under 1-g (normal gravity) condition in each device. Statistical analyses revealed no significant difference in the conjugative and mobilizable transfer frequencies between the three different simulated microgravitational conditions and our standard laboratory condition. These important ground-based observations emphasize the fact that, though no stimulation of plasmid transfer was observed, no inhibition was observed either. In the case of Gram-positive bacteria, this ability to exchange plasmids in weightlessness, as occurs under Earth's conditions, should be seen as particularly relevant in the scope of spread of antibiotic resistances and bacterial virulence.

  6. Simulation of the synergistic low Earth orbit effects of vacuum thermal cycling, vacuum UV radiation, and atomic oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Degroh, Kim K.; Stidham, Curtis R.; Stueber, Thomas J.; Dever, Therese M.; Rodriguez, Elvin; Terlep, Judith A.

    1992-01-01

    In order to assess the low Earth orbit (LEO) durability of candidate space materials, it is necessary to use ground laboratory facilities which provide LEO environmental effects. A facility combining vacuum thermal cycling and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation has been designed and constructed at NASA Lewis Research Center for this purpose. This facility can also be operated without the VUV lamps. An additional facility can be used to provide VUV exposure only. By utilizing these facilities, followed by atomic oxygen exposure in an RF plasma asher, the effects of the individual vacuum thermal cycling and VUV environments can be compared to the effect of the combined vacuum thermal cycling/VUV environment on the atomic oxygen durability of materials. The synergistic effects of simulated LEO environmental conditions on materials were evaluated by first exposing materials to vacuum thermal cycling, VUV, and vacuum thermal cycling/VUV environments followed by exposure to atomic oxygen in an RP plasma asher. Candidate space power materials such as atomic oxygen protected polyimides and solar concentrator mirrors were evaluated using these facilities. Characteristics of the Vacuum Thermal Cycling/VUV Exposure Facility which simulates the temperature sequences and solar ultraviolet radiation exposure that would be experienced by a spacecraft surface in LEO are discussed. Results of durability evaluations of some candidate space power materials to the simulated LEO environmental conditions will also be discussed. Such results have indicated that for some materials, atomic oxygen durability is affected by previous exposure to thermal cycling and/or VUV exposure.

  7. 49 CFR 570.56 - Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system... Vehicles With GVWR of More Than 10,000 Pounds § 570.56 Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system. The following requirements apply to vehicles with vacuum brake assist units and vacuum brake systems...

  8. Automatic electromagnetic valve for previous vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granados, C. E.; Martin, F.

    1959-01-01

    A valve which permits the maintenance of an installation vacuum when electric current fails is described. It also lets the air in the previous vacuum bomb to prevent the oil ascending in the vacuum tubes. (Author)

  9. Effect of microgravity on an animal-bacteria symbiosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spaceflight imposes numerous adaptive challenges for terrestrial life. The reduction in gravity or microgravity represents a novel environment that can disrupt...

  10. Single Electron Transistor Platform for Microgravity Proteomics, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Proteomic studies in microgravity are crucial to understanding the health effects of spaceflight on astronauts. Unfortunately, existing tools for measuring protein,...

  11. Large high-vacuum systems for CERN accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strubin, P.

    2008-05-01

    CERN operated over the more than 50 years of its existence particle accelerators and storage rings ranging from a few tens of metre to 27 km, the size of its latest project, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which is under construction and will be started in 2008. The challenges began with the Intersection Storage Rings (ISR) in the seventies. With a beam pipe length of 2 × 1 km, this accelerator required innovative solutions like bake-out and glow discharge to achieve the required static vacuum level, fight against beam-induced pressure increases and cancel beam neutralisation by trapped electrons. The vacuum system of the Large Electron Positron (LEP) storage ring (in operation between 1989 and 2001) of a total length of 27 km had to cope with very high levels of synchrotron power. The beam vacuum system of LHC (2 × 27 km) integrates some parts at 1.9 K and others at room temperature and will also have to cope with dynamic effects. In addition to the beam vacuum system, LHC requires insulation vacuum for the superconducting magnets and the helium distribution line. Whereas the required pressure is not very low, the leak detection and localisation is significantly more demanding for the insulation vacuum than for the beam vacuum because of the large volumes and the thermal insulation. When the size of an accelerator grows, the difficulties are not only to get a clean and leak tight vacuum system, but also to be able to measure reliably pressure or gas composition over long distances. Furthermore, in the case of LHC the integration of the beam vacuum system was particularly difficult because of the complexity induced by a superconducting magnet scheme and the reduced space available for the beam pipes. Planning and logistics aspects during installation, including the usage of mobile pumping and diagnostic means, were much more difficult to manage in LHC than in previous projects.

  12. Vacuum type D initial data

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Parrado Gómez-Lobo, Alfonso

    2016-09-01

    A vacuum type D initial data set is a vacuum initial data set of the Einstein field equations whose data development contains a region where the space–time is of Petrov type D. In this paper we give a systematic characterisation of a vacuum type D initial data set. By systematic we mean that the only quantities involved are those appearing in the vacuum constraints, namely the first fundamental form (Riemannian metric) and the second fundamental form. Our characterisation is a set of conditions consisting of the vacuum constraints and some additional differential equations for the first and second fundamental forms These conditions can be regarded as a system of partial differential equations on a Riemannian manifold and the solutions of the system contain all possible regular vacuum type D initial data sets. As an application we particularise our conditions for the case of vacuum data whose data development is a subset of the Kerr solution. This has applications in the formulation of the nonlinear stability problem of the Kerr black hole.

  13. Microgravity Spray Cooling Research for High Powered Laser Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivich, Chad P.

    2004-01-01

    An extremely powerful laser is being developed at Goddard Space Flight Center for use on a satellite. This laser has several potential applications. One application is to use it for upper atmosphere weather research. In this case, the laser would reflect off aerosols in the upper atmosphere and bounce back to the satellite, where the aerosol velocities could be calculated and thus the upper atmosphere weather patterns could be monitored. A second application would be for the US. Air Force, which wants to use the laser strategically as a weapon for satellite defense. The Air Force fears that in the coming years as more and more nations gain limited space capabilities that American satellites may become targets, and the laser could protect the satellites. Regardless of the ultimate application, however, a critical step along the way to putting the laser in space is finding a way to efficiently cool it. While operating the laser becomes very hot and must be cooled to prevent overheating. On earth, this is accomplished by simply running cool tap water over the laser to keep it cool. But on a satellite, this is too inefficient. This would require too much water mass to be practical. Instead, we are investigating spray cooling as a means to cool the laser in microgravity. Spray cooling requires much less volume of fluid, and thus could be suitable for use on a satellite. We have inherited a 2.2 second Drop Tower rig to conduct our research with. In our experiments, water is pressurized with a compressed air tank and sprayed through a nozzle onto our test plate. We can vary the pressure applied to the water and the temperature of the plate before an experiment trial. The whole process takes place in simulated microgravity in the 2.2 second Drop Tower, and a high speed video camera records the spray as it hits the plate. We have made much progress in the past few weeks on these experiments. The rig originally did not have the capability to heat the test plate, but I did

  14. Changing MFTF vacuum environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margolies, D.; Valby, L.

    1982-01-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) vaccum vessel will be about 60m long and 10m in diameter at the widest point. The allowable operating densities range from 2 x 10 9 to 5 x 10 10 particles per cc. The maximum leak rate of 10 -6 tl/sec is dominated during operation by the deliberately injected cold gas of 250 tl/sec. This gas is pumped by over 1000 square meters of cryopanels, external sorbtion pumps and getters. The design and requirements have changed radically over the past several years, and they are still not in final form. The vacuum system design has also changed, but more slowly and less radically. This paper discusses the engineering effort necessary to meet these stringent and changing requirements. Much of the analysis of the internal systems has been carried out using a 3-D Monte Carlo computer code, which can estimate time dependent operational pressures. This code and its use will also be described

  15. Compact vacuum insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-10-27

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases there between are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and various laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels. 35 figs.

  16. Vacuum system for Advanced Test Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denhoy, B.S.

    1981-01-01

    The Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) is a pulsed linear electron beam accelerator designed to study charged particle beam propagation. ATA is designed to produce a 10,000 amp 50 MeV, 70 ns electron beam. The electron beam acceleration is accomplished in ferrite loaded cells. Each cell is capable of maintaining a 70 ns 250 kV voltage pulse across a 1 inch gap. The electron beam is contained in a 5 inch diameter, 300 foot long tube. Cryopumps turbomolecular pumps, and mechanical pumps are used to maintain a base pressure of 2 x 10 -6 torr in the beam tube. The accelerator will be installed in an underground tunnel. Due to the radiation environment in the tunnel, the controlling and monitoring of the vacuum equipment, pressures and temperatures will be done from the control room through a computer interface. This paper describes the vacuum system design, the type of vacuum pumps specified, the reasons behind the selection of the pumps and the techniques used for computer interfacing

  17. Vacuum system for Advanced Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denhoy, B.S.

    1981-09-03

    The Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) is a pulsed linear electron beam accelerator designed to study charged particle beam propagation. ATA is designed to produce a 10,000 amp 50 MeV, 70 ns electron beam. The electron beam acceleration is accomplished in ferrite loaded cells. Each cell is capable of maintaining a 70 ns 250 kV voltage pulse across a 1 inch gap. The electron beam is contained in a 5 inch diameter, 300 foot long tube. Cryopumps turbomolecular pumps, and mechanical pumps are used to maintain a base pressure of 2 x 10/sup -6/ torr in the beam tube. The accelerator will be installed in an underground tunnel. Due to the radiation environment in the tunnel, the controlling and monitoring of the vacuum equipment, pressures and temperatures will be done from the control room through a computer interface. This paper describes the vacuum system design, the type of vacuum pumps specified, the reasons behind the selection of the pumps and the techniques used for computer interfacing.

  18. The LHC Vacuum Pilot Sectors Project

    CERN Document Server

    Henrist, B; Bregliozzi, G; Chiggiato, P

    2014-01-01

    The operation of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at nominal beam parameters is expected for the next years. Increased synchrotron-radiation stimulated-desorption and electron-cloud build-up are expected. A deep understanding of the interactions between the proton beams and the beam pipe wall is mandatory to control the anticipated beam-induced pressure rise. A Vacuum Pilot Sector (VPS) has been designed to monitor the performance of the vacuum system with time. The VPS is installed along a double LHC room temperature vacuum sector (18 m long, 80 mm inner diameter beam pipes) and includes 8 standard modules, 1.4 m long each. Such modules are equipped with residual gas analysers, Bayard-Alpert gauges, photon and electron flux monitors etc. The chosen modular approach opens the possibility of studying different configurations and implementing future modifications. This contribution will describe the apparatus, the control system designed to drive measurements and possible applications during the LHC Run 2.

  19. Vacuum system for HIMAC synchrotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, M.; Sudou, M.; Sato, K.

    1994-01-01

    HIMAC synchrotrons are now under construction, which require vacuum chambers of large aperture and high vacuum of about 10 -9 torr. Wide thin wall vacuum chamber of 0.3 mm thickness reinforced with ribs has been developed as the chamber at dipole magnet. We have just now started to evacuate the lower ring. The obtained average value was about 5x10 -8 torr with turbo-molecular and sputter ion pumps, and 1.1x10 -9 torr after baking. (author)

  20. Resistor cooling in a vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crittenden, R.; Krider, J.

    1987-01-01

    This note describes thermal measurements which were done on a resistor operating both in air at one atmosphere pressure and in a vacuum of a few milliTorr. The motivation for this measurement was our interest in operating a BGO crystal-photomultiplier tube-base assembly in a vacuum, as a synchrotron radiation detector to tag electrons in the MT beam. We wished to determine what fraction of the total resistor power was dissipated by convection in air, in order to know whether there would be excessive heating of the detector assembly in a vacuum. 3 figs

  1. Experimental tests of vacuum energy

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    While the current vacuum energy of the Universe is very small, in our standard cosmological picture it has been much larger at earlier epochs. We try to address the question of what are possible ways to try to experimentally verify this. One direction is to look for systems where vacuum energy constitutes a non-negligible fraction of the total energy, and study the properties of those. Another possibility is to focus on the epochs around cosmic phase transitions, when the vacuum energy is of the same order as the total energy. Along these lines we investigate properties of neutron stars and the imprint of phase transitions on primordial gravitational waves.

  2. Vacuum vessel for thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagiwara, Koji; Imura, Yasuya.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To provide constituted method for easily performing baking of vacuum vessel, using short-circuiting segments. Constitution: At the time of baking, one turn circuit is formed by the vacuum vessel and short-circuiting segments, and current transformer converting the one turn circuit into a secondary circuit by the primary coil and iron core is formed, and the vacuum vessel is Joule heated by an induction current from the primary coil. After completion of baking, the short-circuiting segments are removed. (Kamimura, M.)

  3. Design and Performance of an Automated Bioreactor for Cell Culture Experiments in a Microgravity Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youn-Kyu Kim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe the development of a bioreactor for a cell-culture experiment on the International Space Station (ISS. The bioreactor is an experimental device for culturing mouse muscle cells in a microgravity environment. The purpose of the experiment was to assess the impact of microgravity on the muscles to address the possibility of longterm human residence in space. After investigation of previously developed bioreactors, and analysis of the requirements for microgravity cell culture experiments, a bioreactor design is herein proposed that is able to automatically culture 32 samples simultaneously. This reactor design is capable of automatic control of temperature, humidity, and culture-medium injection rate; and satisfies the interface requirements of the ISS. Since bioreactors are vulnerable to cell contamination, the medium-circulation modules were designed to be a completely replaceable, in order to reuse the bioreactor after each experiment. The bioreactor control system is designed to circulate culture media to 32 culture chambers at a maximum speed of 1 ml/min, to maintain the temperature of the reactor at 36±1°C, and to keep the relative humidity of the reactor above 70%. Because bubbles in the culture media negatively affect cell culture, a de-bubbler unit was provided to eliminate such bubbles. A working model of the reactor was built according to the new design, to verify its performance, and was used to perform a cell culture experiment that confirmed the feasibility of this device.

  4. Design and Performance of an Automated Bioreactor for Cell Culture Experiments in a Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youn-Kyu; Park, Seul-Hyun; Lee, Joo-Hee; Choi, Gi-Hyuk

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of a bioreactor for a cell-culture experiment on the International Space Station (ISS). The bioreactor is an experimental device for culturing mouse muscle cells in a microgravity environment. The purpose of the experiment was to assess the impact of microgravity on the muscles to address the possibility of longterm human residence in space. After investigation of previously developed bioreactors, and analysis of the requirements for microgravity cell culture experiments, a bioreactor design is herein proposed that is able to automatically culture 32 samples simultaneously. This reactor design is capable of automatic control of temperature, humidity, and culture-medium injection rate; and satisfies the interface requirements of the ISS. Since bioreactors are vulnerable to cell contamination, the medium-circulation modules were designed to be a completely replaceable, in order to reuse the bioreactor after each experiment. The bioreactor control system is designed to circulate culture media to 32 culture chambers at a maximum speed of 1 ml/min, to maintain the temperature of the reactor at 36°C, and to keep the relative humidity of the reactor above 70%. Because bubbles in the culture media negatively affect cell culture, a de-bubbler unit was provided to eliminate such bubbles. A working model of the reactor was built according to the new design, to verify its performance, and was used to perform a cell culture experiment that confirmed the feasibility of this device.

  5. Coarsening Dynamics and Marangoni Effects in Thin Liquid Crystal Bubbles in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Noel; Glaser, Matthew; Maclennan, Joseph; Park, Cheol; Tin, Padetha; Hall, Nancy R.; Sheehan, Christopher; Storck, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The Observation and Analysis of Smectic Islands in Space (OASIS) flight hardware was successfully launched on SpaceX-6 on April 15, 2015 and was operated in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) on board the International Space Station (ISS). The OASIS project comprises a series of experiments that probe the interfacial and hydrodynamic behavior of spherical-bubble freely suspended liquid crystal (FSLC) membranes in space. These are the thinnest known stable condensed phase structures, making them ideal for studies of two-dimensional (2D) coarsening dynamics and thermocapillary phenomena in microgravity. The OASIS experimental investigation was carried out using four different smectic A and C liquid crystal materials in four separate sample chambers housed inside the MSG. In this report, we present the behavior of collective dynamics on 2D bubble surface, including the equilibrium spatial organization and interaction of islands in electric fields and temperature gradients, and the diffusion and coalescence-driven coarsening dynamics of island emulsions in microgravity. We have observed spontaneous bubble thickening behavior caused by gradients between the bubble-blowing needle and ambient air temperatures. A uniform, thicker band forms during coarsening as a result of non-uniform heating by the LED illumination panels. These are proposed to be a result of Marangoni convection on the bubble surface.

  6. Proposal of a Simple Plant Growth System under Microgravity Conditions in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Hiroaki; Kitaya, Yoshiaki; Hirai, Takehiro; Tsukamoto, Koya; Yamashita, Youichirou

    2012-07-01

    Plant culture in space has multiple functions for human life support such as providing food and purifying air and water. It is also suggested that crew can relieve their stress by watching growing plants and by enjoying fresh vegetable food during staying for several months in the International Space Station. Under such circumstances, it is an utmost importance to develop plant culture equipment that can be handled more easily by crew. This study aims to develop an easy-to-use plant growth system with modification of commercial household plant culture equipment. The item is equipped with a peltier device for cooling air and collecting water vapor in the growth room. The study was conducted to examine the performance of the equipment under microgravity conditions that were created by the parabolic airplane flights. As a result, the temperature of the peltier device was affected under the microgravity conditions due to the absence of heat convection. When an air flow was made with an air circulation fan, the temperature of the peltier device was stable to gravity changes. The water recycling method for an automatic nutrient solution supply system in the closed plant culture equipment under microgravity is proposed. In addition, a high output white LEDs showing a good performance for growing leafy vegetables will be introduced.

  7. Vacuum membrane distillation of liquid desiccants Utilizing Hollow Fiber Membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Lefers, Ryan

    2018-01-31

    This paper documents the testing of a vacuum membrane distillation system intended for use with liquid desiccants. Liquid desiccants offer the possibility for low-energy, ambient temperature dehumidification. Effective desalination and purification of diluted desiccants outputs two important products: a concentrated desiccant for reuse in dehumidification and fresh water. In this study, vacuum membrane distillation was used in the laboratory to purify diluted liquid desiccants. Calcium chloride and magnesium chloride were the desiccants selected for testing. Desiccant solutions were pumped through the lumens of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) hollow fiber membranes at varying feed inlet temperatures, solution velocity rates and vacuum set points during membrane distillation. An average flux of 8 kg m-2 h-1 was obtained using 30 wt% magnesium chloride solution at a temperature of 50 °C while applying vacuum to achieve 25 mbar absolute pressure on the air side of the membrane. The results are promising for the development of a full-scale vacuum membrane distillation process for desiccant solution regeneration and fresh water recovery. In addition, the recovered condensate was of sufficient quality for use in agricultural irrigation or drinking water.

  8. Fluid Flow and Solidification Under Combined Action of Magnetic Fields and Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B. Q.; Shu, Y.; Li, K.; deGroh, H. C.

    2002-01-01

    Mathematical models, both 2-D and 3-D, are developed to represent g-jitter induced fluid flows and their effects on solidification under combined action of magnetic fields and microgravity. The numerical model development is based on the finite element solution of governing equations describing the transient g-jitter driven fluid flows, heat transfer and solutal transport during crystal growth with and without an applied magnetic field in space vehicles. To validate the model predictions, a ground-based g-jitter simulator is developed using the oscillating wall temperatures where timely oscillating fluid flows are measured using a laser PIV system. The measurements are compared well with numerical results obtained from the numerical models. Results show that a combined action derived from magnetic damping and microgravity can be an effective means to control the melt flow and solutal transport in space single crystal growth systems.

  9. A review of the strategies for obtaining high-quality crystals utilizing nanotechnologies and microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechkova, Eugenia; Bragazzi, Nicola; Bozdaganyan, Marine; Belmonte, Luca; Nicolini, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Crystallization is a highly demanding and time-consuming task that causes a real bottle-neck in basic research. Great effort has been made to understand the factors and parameters that influence this process and to finely tune them to facilitate crystal growth. Different crystallization techniques have been proposed over the past decades, such as the classical vapor hanging drop method, its variant the sitting drop method, dialysis, cryo-temperature, gel, batch, and the innovative microgravity (space) techniques like free interface diffusion (FID) and counter-ion diffusion (CID). Here, we present a review of the strategies utilizing Langmuir-Blodgett (LB)-based nanotechnologies, and microgravity techniques for obtaining optimal high-quality crystals, as proven by molecular dynamics (MD) and bioinformatics approaches, namely using a clustering algorithm and protein alignment.

  10. Vacuum in intensive gauge fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matinian, S.G.

    1977-12-01

    The behaviour of vacuum in a covariantly constant Yang-Mills field is considered. The expressions for the effective Lagrangian in an intensive field representing the asymptotic freedom of the theory are found

  11. Vacuum production; Produccion de vacio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segovia, J. L. de

    2010-07-01

    Since the advent of ultra high vacuum in 1958 has been a great demand for new as means of production and to meet the process needs to be done: industry heavy, high technology and space research areas, large accelerator systems particles or nuclear fusion. In this paper we explore the modern media production: dry vacuum pumps, turbo pumps, pump status diffusion ion pumps and cryopumps. (Author)

  12. ITER diagnostic system: Vacuum interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, K.M.; Udintsev, V.S.; Hughes, S.; Walker, C.I.; Andrew, P.; Barnsley, R.; Bertalot, L.; Drevon, J.M.; Encheva, A.; Kashchuk, Y.; Maquet, Ph.; Pearce, R.; Taylor, N.; Vayakis, G.; Walsh, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Diagnostics play an essential role for the successful operation of the ITER tokamak. They provide the means to observe control and to measure plasma during the operation of ITER tokamak. The components of the diagnostic system in the ITER tokamak will be installed in the vacuum vessel, in the cryostat, in the upper, equatorial and divertor ports, in the divertor cassettes and racks, as well as in various buildings. Diagnostic components that are placed in a high radiation environment are expected to operate for the life of ITER. There are approx. 45 diagnostic systems located on ITER. Some diagnostics incorporate direct or independently pumped extensions to maintain their necessary vacuum conditions. They require a base pressure less than 10 −7 Pa, irrespective of plasma operation, and a leak rate of less than 10 −10 Pa m 3 s −1 . In all the cases it is essential to maintain the ITER closed fuel cycle. These directly coupled diagnostic systems are an integral part of the ITER vacuum containment and are therefore subject to the same design requirements for tritium and active gas confinement, for all normal and accidental conditions. All the diagnostics, whether or not pumped, incorporate penetration of the vacuum boundary (i.e. window assembly, vacuum feedthrough etc.) and demountable joints. Monitored guard volumes are provided for all elements of the vacuum boundary that are judged to be vulnerable by virtue of their construction, material, load specification etc. Standard arrangements are made for their construction and for the monitoring, evacuating and leak testing of these volumes. Diagnostic systems are incorporated at more than 20 ports on ITER. This paper will describe typical and particular arrangements of pumped diagnostic and monitored guard volume. The status of the diagnostic vacuum systems, which are at the start of their detailed design, will be outlined and the specific features of the vacuum systems in ports and extensions will be described

  13. Technical specification for vacuum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaw, J.

    1987-01-01

    The vacuum systems at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) are primarily of all-metal construction and operate at pressures from 10 -5 to 10 -11 Torr. The primary gas loads during operation result from thermal desorption and beam-induced desorption from the vacuum chamber walls. These desorption rates can be extremely high in the case of hydrocarbons and other contaminants. These specifications place a major emphasis on eliminating contamination sources. The specifications and procedures have been written to insure the cleanliness and vacuum integrity of all SLAC vacuum systems, and to assist personnel involved with SLAC vacuum systems in choosing and designing components that are compatible with existing systems and meet the quality and reliability of SLAC vacuum standards. The specification includes requirements on design, procurement, fabrication, chemical cleaning, clean room practices, welding and brazing, helium leak testing, residual gas analyzer testing, bakeout, venting, and pumpdown. Also appended are specifications regarding acceptable vendors, isopropyl alcohol, bakeable valve cleaning procedure, mechanical engineering safety inspection, notes on synchrotron radiation, and specifications of numerous individual components

  14. Vacuum-assisted cesarean section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McQuivey RW

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Ross W McQuivey,1 Jon E Block2 1Clinical Innovations, Salt Lake City, UT, 2Independent consultant, San Francisco, CA, USA Abstract: There has been a dramatic rise in the frequency of cesarean sections, surpassing 30% of all deliveries in the US. This upsurge, coupled with a decreasing willingness to allow vaginal birth after cesarean section, has resulted in an expansion of the use of vacuum assistance to safely extract the fetal head. By avoiding the use of a delivering hand or forceps blade, the volume being delivered through the uterine incision can be decreased when the vacuum is used properly. Reducing uterine extensions with their associated complications (eg, excessive blood loss in difficult cases is also a theoretical advantage of vacuum delivery. Maternal discomfort related to excessive fundal pressure may also be lessened. To minimize the risk of neonatal morbidity, proper cup placement over the “flexion point” remains essential to maintain vacuum integrity and reduce the chance of inadvertent detachment and uterine extensions. Based on the published literature and pragmatic clinical experience, utilization of the vacuum device is a safe and effective technique to assist delivery during cesarean section. Keywords: cesarean section, vacuum, forceps, birth, delivery

  15. Technical specification for vacuum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaw, J. (ed.)

    1987-01-01

    The vacuum systems at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) are primarily of all-metal construction and operate at pressures from 10/sup -5/ to 10/sup -11/ Torr. The primary gas loads during operation result from thermal desorption and beam-induced desorption from the vacuum chamber walls. These desorption rates can be extremely high in the case of hydrocarbons and other contaminants. These specifications place a major emphasis on eliminating contamination sources. The specifications and procedures have been written to insure the cleanliness and vacuum integrity of all SLAC vacuum systems, and to assist personnel involved with SLAC vacuum systems in choosing and designing components that are compatible with existing systems and meet the quality and reliability of SLAC vacuum standards. The specification includes requirements on design, procurement, fabrication, chemical cleaning, clean room practices, welding and brazing, helium leak testing, residual gas analyzer testing, bakeout, venting, and pumpdown. Also appended are specifications regarding acceptable vendors, isopropyl alcohol, bakeable valve cleaning procedure, mechanical engineering safety inspection, notes on synchrotron radiation, and specifications of numerous individual components. (LEW)

  16. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) OCRWM Loop Error Determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PHILIPP, B.L.

    2000-01-01

    Characterization is specifically identified by the Richland Operations Office (RL) for the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) of the US Department of Energy (DOE), as requiring application of the requirements in the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) (RW-0333P DOE 1997a). Those analyses that provide information that is necessary for repository acceptance require application of the QARD. The cold vacuum drying (CVD) project identified the loops that measure, display, and record multi-canister overpack (MCO) vacuum pressure and Tempered Water (TW) temperature data as providing OCRWM data per Application of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Quality Assurance Requirements to the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project HNF-SD-SNF-RPT-007. Vacuum pressure transmitters (PT 1*08, 1*10) and TW temperature transmitters (TIT-3*05, 3*12) are used to verify drying and to determine the water content within the MCO after CVD

  17. Water cooling thermal power measurement in a vacuum diffusion pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Henrique Cardozo Amorin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion vacuum pumps are used both in industry and in laboratory science for high vacuum production. For its operation they must be refrigerated, and it is done by circulating water in open circuit. Considering that, vacuum systems stays operating by hours, the water consumption may be avoided if the diffusion vacuum pumps refrigeration were done in closed circuit. However, it is necessary to know the diffusion vacuum pump thermal power (the heat transferred to circulate water by time units to implement one of these and get in the refrigeration system dimension. In this paper the diffusion vacuum pump thermal power was obtained by measuring water flow and temperature variation and was calculated through the heat quantity variation equation time function. The thermal power value was 935,6 W, that is 397 W smaller and 35 W bigger than, respectively, the maximum and minimum diffusion pump thermal power suggested by its operation manual. This procedure have been shown useful to precisely determine the diffusion pump thermal power or of any other system that needs to be refrigerated in water closed circuit.

  18. ISS Microgravity Research Payload Training Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlagheck, Ronald; Geveden, Rex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Microgravity Research Discipline has multiple categories of science payloads that are being planned and currently under development to operate on various ISS on-orbit increments. The current program includes six subdisciplines; Materials Science, Fluids Physics, Combustion Science, Fundamental Physics, Cellular Biology and Macromolecular Biotechnology. All of these experiment payloads will require the astronaut various degrees of crew interaction and science observation. With the current programs planning to build various facility class science racks, the crew will need to be trained on basic core operations as well as science background. In addition, many disciplines will use the Express Rack and the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) to utilize the accommodations provided by these facilities for smaller and less complex type hardware. The Microgravity disciplines will be responsible to have a training program designed to maximize the experiment and hardware throughput as well as being prepared for various contingencies both with anomalies as well as unexpected experiment observations. The crewmembers will need various levels of training from simple tasks as power on and activate to extensive training on hardware mode change out to observing the cell growth of various types of tissue cultures. Sample replacement will be required for furnaces and combustion type modules. The Fundamental Physics program will need crew EVA support to provide module change out of experiment. Training will take place various research centers and hardware development locations. It is expected that onboard training through various methods and video/digital technology as well as limited telecommunication interaction. Since hardware will be designed to operate from a few weeks to multiple research increments, flexibility must be planned in the training approach and procedure skills to optimize the output as well as the equipment maintainability. Early increment lessons learned

  19. Subjective Straight Ahead Orientation in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, G.; Reschke, M. F.; Wood, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    This joint ESA NASA study will address adaptive changes in spatial orientation related to the subjective straight ahead and the use of a vibrotactile sensory aid to reduce perceptual errors. The study will be conducted before and after long-duration expeditions to the International Space Station (ISS) to examine how spatial processing of target location is altered following exposure to microgravity. This study addresses the sensorimotor research gap to "determine the changes in sensorimotor function over the course of a mission and during recovery after landing."

  20. Deposition of CdTe films under microgravity: Foton M3 mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benz, K.W.; Croell, A. [Freiburger Materialforschungszentrum FMF, Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg (Germany); Zappettini, A.; Calestani, D. [CNR Parma, Instituto Materiali Speciali per Elettronica e Magnetismo IMEM, Fontani Parma (Italy); Dieguez, E. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Departamento de Fisica de Materiales; Carotenuto, L.; Bassano, E. [Telespazio Napoli, Via Gianturco 31, 80146 Napoli (Italy); Fiederle, M.

    2009-10-15

    Experiments of deposition of CdTe films have been carried out under microgravity in the Russian Foton M3 mission. The influence of gravity has been studied with these experiments and compared to the results of simulations. The measured deposition rate could be confirmed by the theoretical results for lower temperatures. For higher temperatures the measured thickness of the deposited films was larger compared to the theoretical data. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. process controller for induction vacuum brazing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldea, A.

    2016-01-01

    A brazing operation involves joining two parts made of different materials, using a filler material that has a melting temperature lower than the base materials used. The temperature of the process must be carefully controlled, sometimes with an accuracy of about 1°C, because overshooting the prescribed temperature results in detrimental metallurgic phenomena and joints of poor quality. The brazing system is composed of an operating cabinet, a mid-frequency generator, a vacuum chamber with an induction coil inside and the parts that have to be brazed. Until now, to operate this system two operators were required: one to continuously read the temperature with an optical pyrometer and another to manually adjust the current in the induction coil according to his intuition and prediction gained only by experience. The improvement that we made to the system involved creating an automatic temperature control unit, using a PID closed loop controller that reads the temperature of the parts and adjusts automatically the current in the coil. Using the PID controller, the brazing engineer can implement a certain temperature slope for the current brazing process. (authors)

  2. Numerical research of the swirling supersonic gas flows in the self-vacuuming vortex tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volov, V. T.; Lyaskin, A. S.

    2018-03-01

    This article presents the results of simulation for a special type of vortex tubes – self-vacuuming vortex tube (SVVT), for which extreme values of temperature separation and vacuum are realized. The main results of this study are the flow structure in the SVVT and energy loss estimations on oblique shock waves, gas friction, instant expansion and organization of vortex bundles in SVVT.

  3. Accelerator Technology: Ultra-High Vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Baglin, V

    2013-01-01

    This document is part of Subvolume C 'Accelerators and Colliders' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the the Section '8.5 Ultra-High Vacuum' of the Chapter '8 Accelerator Technology' with the content: 8.5 Ultra-High Vacuum 8.5.1 Introduction 8.5.2 Vacuum Fundamentals 8.5.3 Vacuum Dynamics 8.5.4 Vacuum Engineering

  4. Investigating steam penetration using thermometric methods in dental handpieces with narrow internal lumens during sterilizing processes with non-vacuum or vacuum processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, S; Smith, A; Lappin, D; McDonagh, G; Kirk, B

    2017-12-01

    Dental handpieces are required to be sterilized between patient use. Vacuum steam sterilization processes with fractionated pre/post-vacuum phases or unique cycles for specified medical devices are required for hollow instruments with internal lumens to assure successful air removal. Entrapped air will compromise achievement of required sterilization conditions. Many countries and professional organizations still advocate non-vacuum sterilization processes for these devices. To investigate non-vacuum downward/gravity displacement, type-N steam sterilization of dental handpieces, using thermometric methods to measure time to achieve sterilization temperature at different handpiece locations. Measurements at different positions within air turbines were undertaken with thermocouples and data loggers. Two examples of widely used UK benchtop steam sterilizers were tested: a non-vacuum benchtop sterilizer (Little Sister 3; Eschmann, Lancing, UK) and a vacuum benchtop sterilizer (Lisa; W&H, Bürmoos, Austria). Each sterilizer cycle was completed with three handpieces and each cycle in triplicate. A total of 140 measurements inside dental handpiece lumens were recorded. The non-vacuum process failed (time range: 0-150 s) to reliably achieve sterilization temperatures within the time limit specified by the international standard (15 s equilibration time). The measurement point at the base of the handpiece failed in all test runs (N = 9) to meet the standard. No failures were detected with the vacuum steam sterilization type B process with fractionated pre-vacuum and post-vacuum phases. Non-vacuum downward/gravity displacement, type-N steam sterilization processes are unreliable in achieving sterilization conditions inside dental handpieces, and the base of the handpiece is the site most likely to fail. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Media Compositions for Three Dimensional Mammalian Tissue Growth Under Microgravity Culture Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Normal mammalian tissue and the culturing process has been developed for the three groups of organ, structural and blood tissue. The cells are grown in vitro under microgravity culture conditions and form three dimensional cells aggregates with normal cell function. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel.

  6. Media Compositions for Three-Dimensional Mammalian Tissue Growth under Microgravity Culture Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Normal mammalian tissue and the culturing process has been developed for the three groups of organ, structural and blood tissue.The cells are grown in vitro under microgravity culture conditions and form three dimensional cells aggregates with normal cell function. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel.

  7. The two-step vacuum-microwave method for histoprocessing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon, ME; WalsPaap, CH; Visinoni, FA; Kok, LP

    1995-01-01

    When microwaving and vacuum is combined, decrease of boiling temperature can be exploited in the histoprocessing procedures allowing a completely novel approach for impregnating tissue with paraffin. We found that, if the pressure is sufficiently low in the paraffin step, no ethyl-alcohol step is

  8. Vacuum stability and residual gas density estimation for the vacuum chamber upgrade of the ATLAS interaction region of the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bregliozzi, G; Baglin, V; Jimenez, J M

    2012-01-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has 54 km of ultra-high vacuum (UHV) beam chambers out of which about 90% are at cryogenic temperature (1.9 K) and the rest at room temperature. During operation, the residual gas density in the beam pipes is dominated by beam induced effect such ion, electron and photon-stimulated gas desorption. Therefore, the computation of gas density profile is of great importance to confirm the vacuum stability, and to estimate the beam lifetime. Moreover, the gas density profiles are essential to determine the machine induced background in the experimental areas, and to define the pressure profile in the cryogenic sectors where there is no vacuum instrumentation available. In this paper, the vacuum stability is studied for a newly proposed upgrade of the vacuum chamber at the ATLAS interaction point, using the vacuum stability code called VASCO. The residual gas density profile along the ATLAS vacuum chambers and the effects of photon and electron flux hitting the vacuum chamber wal...

  9. Planarians sense simulated microgravity and hypergravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adell, Teresa; Saló, Emili; van Loon, Jack J W A; Auletta, Gennaro

    2014-01-01

    Planarians are flatworms, which belong to the phylum Platyhelminthes. They have been a classical subject of study due to their amazing regenerative ability, which relies on the existence of adult totipotent stem cells. Nowadays they are an emerging model system in the field of developmental, regenerative, and stem cell biology. In this study we analyze the effect of a simulated microgravity and a hypergravity environment during the process of planarian regeneration and embryogenesis. We demonstrate that simulated microgravity by means of the random positioning machine (RPM) set at a speed of 60 °/s but not at 10 °/s produces the dead of planarians. Under hypergravity of 3 g and 4 g in a large diameter centrifuge (LDC) planarians can regenerate missing tissues, although a decrease in the proliferation rate is observed. Under 8 g hypergravity small planarian fragments are not able to regenerate. Moreover, we found an effect of gravity alterations in the rate of planarian scission, which is its asexual mode of reproduction. No apparent effects of altered gravity were found during the embryonic development.

  10. Planarians Sense Simulated Microgravity and Hypergravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Adell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Planarians are flatworms, which belong to the phylum Platyhelminthes. They have been a classical subject of study due to their amazing regenerative ability, which relies on the existence of adult totipotent stem cells. Nowadays they are an emerging model system in the field of developmental, regenerative, and stem cell biology. In this study we analyze the effect of a simulated microgravity and a hypergravity environment during the process of planarian regeneration and embryogenesis. We demonstrate that simulated microgravity by means of the random positioning machine (RPM set at a speed of 60 °/s but not at 10 °/s produces the dead of planarians. Under hypergravity of 3 g and 4 g in a large diameter centrifuge (LDC planarians can regenerate missing tissues, although a decrease in the proliferation rate is observed. Under 8 g hypergravity small planarian fragments are not able to regenerate. Moreover, we found an effect of gravity alterations in the rate of planarian scission, which is its asexual mode of reproduction. No apparent effects of altered gravity were found during the embryonic development.

  11. Resource Management in the Microgravity Science Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casselle, Justine

    2004-01-01

    In the Microgravity Science Division, the primary responsibilities of the Business Management Office are resource management and data collection. Resource management involves working with a budget to do a number of specific projects, while data collection involves collecting information such as the status of projects and workforce hours. This summer in the Business Management Office I assisted Margie Allen with resource planning and the implementation of specific microgravity projects. One of the main duties of a Project Control Specialists, such as my mentor, is to monitor and analyze project manager s financial plans. Project managers work from the bottom up to determine how much money their project will cost. They then set up a twelve month operating plan which shows when money will be spent. I assisted my mentor in checking for variances in her data against those of the project managers. In order to successfully check for those variances, we had to understand: where the project is including plans vs. actual performance, why it is in its present condition, and what the future impact will be based on known budgetary parameters. Our objective was to make sure that the plan, or estimated resources input, are a valid reflection of the actual cost. To help with my understanding of the process, over the course of my tenure I had to obtain skills in Microsoft Excel and Microsoft Access.

  12. Microgravity Flammability Experiments for Spacecraft Fire Safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legros, Guillaume; Minster, Olivier; Tóth, Balazs

    2012-01-01

    As fire behaviour in manned spacecraft still remains poorly understood, an international topical team has been created to design a validation experiment that has an unprecedented large scale for a microgravity flammability experiment. While the validation experiment is being designed for a re-sup...... validation experiment are crucial to the ultimate goal of the project, which is the development of predictive tools that should be capable of selecting an adaptive response to fire spread in any manned spacecraft.......As fire behaviour in manned spacecraft still remains poorly understood, an international topical team has been created to design a validation experiment that has an unprecedented large scale for a microgravity flammability experiment. While the validation experiment is being designed for a re...... spread, and thus also the modeling thereof, in realistic conditions is described. Some of the parameters governing the flame spread are also identified and their scaling against the dimensions of the test specimen is briefly questioned. Then several of the current and scheduled efforts are presented...

  13. Baroreflex Function in Rats after Simulated Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasser, Eileen M.

    1997-01-01

    Prolonged exposure of humans to decreased gravitational forces during spaceflight results in a number of adverse cardiovascular consequences, often referred to as cardiovascular deconditioning. Prominent among these negative cardiovascular effects are orthostatic intolerance and decreased exercise capacity. Rat hindlimb unweighting is an animal model which simulates weightlessness, and results in similar cardiovascular consequences. Cardiovascular reflexes, including arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflexes, are required for normal adjustment to both orthostatic challenges and exercise. Therefore, the orthostatic intolerance and decreased exercise capacity associated with exposure to microgravity may be due to cardiovascular reflex dysfunction. The proposed studies will test the general hypothesis that hindlimb unweighting in rats results in impaired autonomic reflex control of the sympathetic nervous system. Specifically, we hypothesize that the ability to reflexly increase sympathetic nerve activity in response to decreases in arterial pressure or blood volume will be blunted due to hindlimb unweighting. There are 3 specific aims: (1) To evaluate arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of renal and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity in conscious rats subjected to 14 days of hindlimb unweighting; (2) To examine the interaction between arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of sympathetic nerve activity in conscious hindlimb unweighted rats; (3) to evaluate changes in afferent and/or central nervous system mechanisms in baroreflex regulation of the sympathetic nervous system. These experiments will provide information related to potential mechanisms for orthostatic and exercise intolerance due to microgravity.

  14. Collective search by ants in microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie M. Countryman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The problem of collective search is a tradeoff between searching thoroughly and covering as much area as possible. This tradeoff depends on the density of searchers. Solutions to the problem of collective search are currently of much interest in robotics and in the study of distributed algorithms, for example to design ways that without central control robots can use local information to perform search and rescue operations. Ant colonies operate without central control. Because they can perceive only local, mostly chemical and tactile cues, they must search collectively to find resources and to monitor the colony's environment. Examining how ants in diverse environments solve the problem of collective search can elucidate how evolution has led to diverse forms of collective behavior. An experiment on the International Space Station in January 2014 examined how ants (Tetramorium caespitum perform collective search in microgravity. In the ISS experiment, the ants explored a small arena in which a barrier was lowered to increase the area and thus lower ant density. In microgravity, relative to ground controls, ants explored the area less thoroughly and took more convoluted paths. It appears that the difficulty of holding on to the surface interfered with the ants’ ability to search collectively. Ants frequently lost contact with the surface, but showed a remarkable ability to regain contact with the surface.

  15. Microgravity-Enhanced Stem Cell Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudio, Pier Paolo; Valluri, Jagan

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells, both embryonic and adult, promise to revolutionize the practice of medicine in the future. In order to realize this potential, a number of hurdles must be overcome. Most importantly, the signaling mechanisms necessary to control the differentiation of stem cells into tissues of interest remain to be elucidated, and much of the present research on stem cells is focused on this goal. Nevertheless, it will also be essential to achieve large-scale expansion and, in many cases, assemble cells in 3D as transplantable tissues. To this end, microgravity analog bioreactors can play a significant role. Microgravity bioreactors were originally conceived as a tool to study the cellular responses to microgravity. However, the technology can address some of the shortcomings of conventional cell culture systems; namely, the deficiency of mass transport in static culture and high mechanical shear forces in stirred systems. Unexpectedly, the conditions created in the vessel were ideal for 3D cell culture. Recently, investigators have demonstrated the capability of the microgravity bioreactors to expand hematopoietic stem cells compared to static culture, and facilitate the differentiation of umbilical cord stem cells into 3D liver aggregates. Stem cells are capable of differentiating into functional cells. However, there are no reliable methods to induce the stem cells to form specific cells or to gain enough cells for transplantation, which limits their application in clinical therapy. The aim of this study is to select the best experimental setup to reach high proliferation levels by culturing these cells in a microgravity-based bioreactor. In typical cell culture, the cells sediment to the bottom surface of their container and propagate as a one-cell-layer sheet. Prevention of such sedimentation affords the freedom for self-assembly and the propagation of 3D tissue arrays. Suspension of cells is easily achievable using stirred technologies. Unfortunately, in

  16. Free fall plasma-arc reactor for synthesis of carbon nanotubes in microgravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alford, J. M.; Mason, G. R.; Feikema, D. A.

    2006-01-01

    High temperatures inside the plasma of a carbon arc generate strong buoyancy driven convection which has an effect on the growth and morphology of the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). To study the effect of buoyancy on the arc process, a miniature carbon arc apparatus was designed and developed to synthesize SWNTs in a microgravity environment substantially free from buoyant convective flows. An arc reactor was operated in the 2.2 and 5.18 s drop towers at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The apparatus employed a 4 mm diameter anode and was powered by a portable battery pack capable of providing in excess of 300 A at 30 V to the arc for the duration of a 5 s drop. However, the principal result is that no dramatic difference in sample yield or composition was noted between normal gravity and 2.2 and 5 s long microgravity runs. Much longer duration microgravity time is required for SWNT's growth such as the zero-G aircraft, but more likely will need to be performed on the international space station or an orbiting spacecraft

  17. Vacuum vessel for thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Nagashima, Keisuke; Suzuki, Masaru; Onozuka, Masaki.

    1997-01-01

    A vacuum vessel main body and structural members at the inside and the outside of the vacuum vessel main body are constituted by structural materials activated by irradiation of neutrons from plasmas such as stainless steels. Shielding members comprising tungsten or molybdenum are disposed on the surface of the vacuum vessel main body and the structural members of the inside and the outside of the main body. The shielding members have a function also as first walls or a seat member for the first walls. Armor tiles may be disposed to the shielding members. The shielding members and the armor tiles are secured to a securing seat member disposed, for example, to an inner plate of the vacuum vessel main body by bolts. Since the shielding members are disposed, it is not necessary to constitute the vacuum vessel main body and the structural members at the inside and the outside thereof by using a low activation material which is less activated, such as a titanium alloy. (I.N.)

  18. Carbon nanotubes based vacuum gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudyk, N. N.; Il’in, O. I.; Il’ina, M. V.; Fedotov, A. A.; Klimin, V. S.; Ageev, O. A.

    2017-11-01

    We have created an ionization type Vacuum gauge with sensor element based on an array of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. Obtained asymmetrical current-voltage characteristics at different voltage polarity on the electrode with the CNTs. It was found that when applying a negative potential on an electrode with the CNTs, the current in the gap is higher than at a positive potential. In the pressure range of 1 ÷ 103 Torr vacuum gauge sensitivity was 6 mV/Torr (at a current of 4.5·10-5 A) and in the range of 10-5 ÷ 1 Torr was 10 mV/Torr (at a current of 1.3·10-5 A). It is shown that the energy efficiency of vacuum gauge can be increased in the case where electrode with CNT operates as an emitter of electrons.

  19. Vacuum Frying: A nutritional approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Coronel

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available (Received: 2014/08/07 - Accepted: 2014/09/22One of the largest areas of the food industry is the production of snacks, but these have generally an inadequate nutritional profile in healthy eating. The vacuum frying technology is presented as a clear option processing for the development of new products and existing ones. This review article presents the advantages of using technology in Vacuum frying different types of food, especially in relation to the contents of some micronutrients and fat. They also mention the work done in Ecuador, especially in local products.

  20. The performance test of a modified miniature rotary compressor in upright and inverted modes subjected to microgravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Rui; Wu, Yu-ting; Du, Chun-xu; Chen, Xia; Zhang, De-lou; Ma, Chong-fang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A miniature rotary compressor by ASPEN company was modified. • The modified compressor can be employed in microgravity. • Performance of upright compressor is superior to inverted mode in most cases. • Performance curves of system with inverted compressor are obtained. • Experimental results of compressor inverted and upright are compared. - Abstract: Vapor compression heat pump is a new concept of thermal control system and refrigerator for future space use. Compressor is a key component in the vapor compression heat pump. Development of compressor capable of operating in both microgravity (10 E-6 g) and lunar (1/6 g) environments is urgently needed for space thermal control systems based on heat pump technique. In this paper, a miniature rotary compressor by ASPEN company was modified to realize acceptable compressor lubrication and oil circulation in microgravity environments. An experimental system was built up to check the performance of the modified compressor subjected to microgravity. A performances comparison of inverted compressor with upright one was made. The influences of operating parameters such as refrigerant charge, cooling water temperature as well as compressor speed on the performances of vapor compression heat pump were investigated. The results show that the modified miniature rotary compressor in inverted mode can operate stably in a long period, which indicates that the modified compressor can be employed in microgravity environments. Compressor discharge temperature increased or decreased while COP changed more obviously with cooling water temperature and speed in microgravity. In most cases, performance of the upright compressor is superior to that of the inverted one. But when the compressor speed is from 1500 rpm to 2500 rpm or the coolant temperature is between 20 and 25 degrees, the performance of inverted compressor is better. The highest discharge temperature of the inverted compressor can be as high

  1. Design and performance of multi-purpose vacuum solar collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balotaki, H. Kavoosi; Saidi, M. H.

    2017-09-01

    Design and fabrication of solar collectors with high performance of energy efficiency to convert solar energy to utility energy is vitally important. This article reports the results obtained from design, construction and investigation of the performance of a Combined Multi-Purpose Vacuum Solar Collector (CMPVSC). This collector consists of three sections: the vacuum section, the liquid section and the air section. In the present collector, it is capable of transferring heat to two flows (liquid and air) simultaneously and separate with the possibility of multipurpose applications. The CMPVSC is compared with the existing individual collectors and the effects of different parameters on the efficiency of this collector are examined. Experimental data indicate that high temperature and high performance with a 43% reduction in cost can be obtained using CMPVSC compared to two individual collectors. To increase the efficiency of the collector, triangular and rectangular channels in the air section have been used. The vacuum part is implemented to reduce heat losses. The effect of water inlet temperature, air flow rate, shape of air channel and vacuum part on the heat delivery by air and water have been investigated. Furthermore, as a matter of comparison of CMPVSC with the individual collector, there is a chance of obtaining highest temperature and efficiency with minimum cost and space requirements.

  2. Biological Rhythms and Temperature Regulation in Rhesus Monkeys During Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Charles A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    This program examined the influence of microgravity on temperature regulation and circadian timekeeping systems in Rhesus monkeys. Animals flown on the Soviet Biosatellite COSMOS 2229 were exposed to 11 2/3 days of microgravity. The circadian patterns temperature regulation, heart rate and activity were monitored constantly. This experiment has extended previous observations from COSMOS 1514 and 2044, as well as provided insights into the physiological mechanisms that produce these changes.

  3. Gases and vacua handbook of vacuum physics

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, A H

    2013-01-01

    Handbook of Vacuum Physics, Volume 1: Gases and Vacua provides information on the many aspects of vacuum technology, from material on the quantum theoretical aspects of the complex semi-conductors used for thermionic and photo-electric emission to data on the performance of commercially available pumps, gauges, and high-vacuum materials. The handbook satisfies the need of workers using vacuum apparatuses or works on the diverse applications of high-vacuum technology in research and industry. The book is a compilation of long articles prepared by experts in vacuum technology. Sufficient theoret

  4. On Vacuum Polarization and Schwinger Pair Production in Intense Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Pyo

    2015-03-01

    We review and elaborate the complex effective action at one-loop and at zero or finite temperature in the in-out formalism for scalar QED and the vacuum persistence in time-dependent electric fields. Using the gamma-function regularization, we find the effective action in the proper-time integral and the pair-production rate in an exponentially increasing electric field. We apply the quantum invariant theory to the scalar field in time-dependent electric fields and clarify the meaning of multi-pair states. And pair-production rates are derived when the initial state is the Minkowski vacuum or the adiabatic vacuum and are compared with two representations for the Vlasov equation. Finally, the contour integral method gives the pair-production rate in the exponentially increasing electric field.

  5. Living beyond the edge: Higgs inflation and vacuum metastability

    CERN Document Server

    Bezrukov, Fedor; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    The measurements of the Higgs mass and top Yukawa coupling indicate that we live in a very special Universe, at the edge of the absolute stability of the electroweak vacuum. If fully stable, the Standard Model (SM) can be extended all the way up to the inflationary scale and the Higgs field, non-minimally coupled to gravity with strength $\\xi$, can be responsible for inflation. We show that the successful Higgs inflation scenario can also take place if the SM vacuum is not absolutely stable. This conclusion is based on two effects that were overlooked previously. The first one is associated with the effective renormalization of the SM couplings at the energy scale $M_P/\\xi$, where $M_P$ is the Planck scale. The second one is a symmetry restoration after inflation due to high temperature effects that leads to the (temporary) disappearance of the vacuum at Planck values of the Higgs field.

  6. Development of Vacuum Chambers in Low Z Material

    CERN Document Server

    Garion, C; Gallilee, M; Perez Espinos, J

    2013-01-01

    Highly transparent vacuum chambers are increasingly required in high energy particle physics. In particular, vacuum chambers in the experiments should be as transparent as possible to minimize the background to the detectors, whilst also reducing the material activation. Beryllium is, so far, the most performant material for this application, but it presents some drawbacks such as brittleness, manufacturing issues, toxic if broken, high cost and low availability. A development work to obtain an alternative material to beryllium with similar performance is being carried out at CERN. Three categories have been defined and considered: raw bulk material, material composites and structural composites. The main functional requirements are: vacuum compatibility (leak tightness, low outgassing rate), temperature resistance (in the range 200-230 °C), transparency, and mechanical stiffness and strength. After beryllium, carbon is the element with the lowest atomic number that is practical for this application; therefo...

  7. DEEP IMPACT PREFLIGHT THERMAL-VACUUM 4 HRII/HRIV/MRI DATA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains image and temperature data acquired during the preflight thermal-vacuum test (TV4) of the High Resolution Instrument's Infrared Spectrometer...

  8. Under Pressure: Activities with a Vacuum Pump (and Some Marshmallows) Help Students Learn about Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galus, Pamela

    2002-01-01

    Introduces a science demonstration that illustrates the effects of pressure and gravity on humans using a marshmallow man and a vacuum pump. Demonstrates the same concept with shaving cream, balloons, and boiling water without raising temperature. (YDS)

  9. DEEP IMPACT PREFLIGHT THERMAL-VACUUM 2 HRII/HRIV DATA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains image and temperature data acquired during the preflight thermal-vacuum test (TV2) of the High Resolution Instrument's Infrared Spectrometer...

  10. Microgravity sciences application visiting scientist program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicksman, Martin; Vanalstine, James

    1995-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center pursues scientific research in the area of low-gravity effects on materials and processes. To facilitate these Government performed research responsibilities, a number of supplementary research tasks were accomplished by a group of specialized visiting scientists. They participated in work on contemporary research problems with specific objectives related to current or future space flight experiments and defined and established independent programs of research which were based on scientific peer review and the relevance of the defined research to NASA microgravity for implementing a portion of the national program. The programs included research in the following areas: protein crystal growth, X-ray crystallography and computer analysis of protein crystal structure, optimization and analysis of protein crystal growth techniques, and design and testing of flight hardware.

  11. The Fastrack Suborbital Platform for Microgravity Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, H. G.; Ball, J. E.; Shultz, D.; Odyssey, A.; Wells, H. W.; Soler, R. R.; Albino, S.; Meshberger, R. J.; Murdoch, T.

    2009-01-01

    The FASTRACK suborbital experiment platform has been developed to provide a capability for utilizing 2.5-5 minute microgravity flight opportunities anticipated from the commercial suborbital fleet (currently in development) for science investigations, technology development and hardware testing. It also provides "express rack" functionality to deliver payloads to ISS. FASTRACK fits within a 24" x 24" x 36" (61 cm x 61 cm x 91.4 cm) envelope and is capable of supporting either two single Middeck Locker Equivalents (MLE) or one double MLE configuration. Its overall mass is 300 lbs (136 kg), of which 160 lbs (72 kg) is reserved for experiments. FASTRACK operates using 28 VDC power or batteries. A support drawer located at the bottom of the structure contains all ancillary electrical equipment (including batteries, a conditioned power system and a data collection system) as well as a front panel that contains all switches (including remote cut-off), breakers and warning LEDs.

  12. Powder agglomeration in a microgravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, James D.

    1994-01-01

    This is the final report for NASA Grant NAG3-755 entitled 'Powder Agglomeration in a Microgravity Environment.' The research program included both two types of numerical models and two types of experiments. The numerical modeling included the use of Monte Carlo type simulations of agglomerate growth including hydrodynamic screening and molecular dynamics type simulations of the rearrangement of particles within an agglomerate under a gravitational field. Experiments included direct observation of the agglomeration of submicron alumina and indirect observation, using small angle light scattering, of the agglomeration of colloidal silica and aluminum monohydroxide. In the former class of experiments, the powders were constrained to move on a two-dimensional surface oriented to minimize the effect of gravity. In the latter, some experiments involved mixture of suspensions containing particles of opposite charge which resulted in agglomeration on a very short time scale relative to settling under gravity.

  13. Meniscus effect in microgravity materials processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    While the microgravity environment of orbit eliminates a number of effects that impede the formation of materials on Earth, the change can also cause new, unwanted effects. A mysterious phenomenon, known as detached solidification, apparently stems from a small hydrostatic force that turns out to be pervasive. The contact of the solid with the ampoule transfers stress to the growing crystal and causing unwanted dislocations and twins. William Wilcox and Liya Regel of Clarkson University theorize that the melt is in contact with the ampoule wall, while the solid is not, and the melt and solid are cornected by a meniscus. Their work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Researcxh, and builds on earlier work by Dr. David Larson of the State University of New York at Stony Brook.

  14. Cytoplasm-to-myonucleus ratios following microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, C E; Xun, L

    1996-10-01

    The cytoplasmic volume-to-myonucleus ratio in the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscles of juvenile rats after 5.4 days of microgravity was studied. Three groups of rats (n = 8 each) were used. The experimental group (space rats) was flown aboard the space shuttle Discovery (NASA, STS-48), while two ground-based groups, one hindlimb suspended (suspended rats), one non-suspended (control), served as controls. Single fibre analysis revealed a significant decrease in cross-sectional area (microns2) in the gastrocnemius for both the space and the suspended rats; in the tibialis anterior only the suspended rats showed a significant decrease. Myonuclei counts (myonuclei per mm) in both the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius were significantly increased in the space rats but not in the suspended rats. The mean myonuclear volume (individual nuclei: microns3) in tibialis anterior fibres from the space rats, and in gastrocnemius fibres from both the space and the suspended rats, was significantly lower than that in the respective control group. Estimation of the total myonuclear volume (microns3 per.mm), however, revealed no significant differences between the three groups in either the tibialis anterior or gastrocnemius. The described changes in the cross-sectional area and myonuclei numbers resulted in significant decreases in the cytoplasmic volume-to-myonucleus ratio (microns3 x 10(3)) in both muscles and for both space and suspended rats (tibialis anterior; 15.6 +/- 0.6 (space), 17.2 +/- 1.0 (suspended), 20.8 +/- 0.9 (control): gastrocnemius; 13.4 +/- 0.4 (space) and 14.9 +/- 1.1 (suspended) versus 18.1 +/- 1.1 (control)). These results indicate that even short periods of unweighting due to microgravity or limb suspension result in changes in skeletal muscle fibres which lead to significant decreases in the cytoplasmic volume-to-myonucleus ratio.

  15. Locomotion in simulated microgravity: gravity replacement loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrory, Jean L.; Baron, Heidi A.; Balkin, Sandy; Cavanagh, Peter R.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: When an astronaut walks or runs on a treadmill in microgravity, a subject load device (SLD) is used to return him or her back to the treadmill belt. The gravity replacement load (GRL) in the SLD is transferred, via a harness, to the pelvis and/or the shoulders. This research compared comfort and ground reaction forces during treadmill running in a microgravity locomotion simulator at GRLs of 60%, 80%, and 100% of body weight (BW). Two harness designs (shoulder springs only (SSO) and waist and shoulder springs (WSS)) were used. HYPOTHESES: 1) The 100% BW gravity replacement load conditions would be comfortably tolerated and would result in larger ground reaction forces and loading rates than the lower load conditions, and 2) the WSS harness would be more comfortable than the SSO harness. METHODS: Using the Penn State Zero Gravity Locomotion Simulator (ZLS), 8 subjects ran at 2.0 m x s(-1) (4.5 mph) for 3 min at each GRL setting in each harness. Subjective ratings of harness comfort, ground reaction forces, and GRL data were collected during the final minute of exercise. RESULTS: The 100% BW loading conditions were comfortably tolerated (2.3 on a scale of 0-10), although discomfort increased as the GRL increased. There were no overall differences in perceived comfort between the two harnesses. The loading rates (27.1, 33.8, 39.1 BW x s(-1)) and the magnitudes of the first (1.0, 1.4, 1.6 BW) and second (1.3, 1.7, 1.9 BW) peaks of the ground reaction force increased with increasing levels (60, 80, 100% BW respectively) of GRL. CONCLUSIONS: Subjects were able to tolerate a GRL of 100% BW well. The magnitude of the ground reaction force peaks and the loading rate is directly related to the magnitude of the GRL.

  16. Microgravity Turbulent Gas-Jet Diffusion Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    A gas-jet diffusion flame is similar to the flame on a Bunsen burner, where a gaseous fuel (e.g., propane) flows from a nozzle into an oxygen-containing atmosphere (e.g., air). The difference is that a Bunsen burner allows for (partial) premixing of the fuel and the air, whereas a diffusion flame is not premixed and gets its oxygen (principally) by diffusion from the atmosphere around the flame. Simple gas-jet diffusion flames are often used for combustion studies because they embody the mechanisms operating in accidental fires and in practical combustion systems. However, most practical combustion is turbulent (i.e., with random flow vortices), which enhances the fuel/air mixing. These turbulent flames are not well understood because their random and transient nature complicates analysis. Normal gravity studies of turbulence in gas-jet diffusion flames can be impeded by buoyancy-induced instabilities. These gravitycaused instabilities, which are evident in the flickering of a candle flame in normal gravity, interfere with the study of turbulent gas-jet diffusion flames. By conducting experiments in microgravity, where buoyant instabilities are avoided, we at the NASA Lewis Research Center hope to improve our understanding of turbulent combustion. Ultimately, this could lead to improvements in combustor design, yielding higher efficiency and lower pollutant emissions. Gas-jet diffusion flames are often researched as model flames, because they embody mechanisms operating in both accidental fires and practical combustion systems (see the first figure). In normal gravity laboratory research, buoyant air flows, which are often negligible in practical situations, dominate the heat and mass transfer processes. Microgravity research studies, however, are not constrained by buoyant air flows, and new, unique information on the behavior of gas-jet diffusion flames has been obtained.

  17. Large high-vacuum systems for CERN accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Strubin, P

    2008-01-01

    CERN operated over the more than 50 years of its existence particle accelerators and storage rings ranging from a few tens of metre to 27 km, the size of its latest project, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which is under construction and will be started in 2008. The challenges began with the Intersection Storage Rings (ISR) in the seventies. With a beam pipe length of 2 × 1 km, this accelerator required innovative solutions like bake-out and glow discharge to achieve the required static vacuum level, fight against beam-induced pressure increases and cancel beam neutralisation by trapped electrons. The vacuum system of the Large Electron Positron (LEP) storage ring (in operation between 1989 and 2001) of a total length of 27 km had to cope with very high levels of synchrotron power. The beam vacuum system of LHC (2 × 27 km) integrates some parts at 1.9 K and others at room temperature and will also have to cope with dynamic effects. In addition to the beam vacuum system, LHC requires insulation vacuum for th...

  18. Vacuum assisted closure in coloproctology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemelman, W. A.

    2009-01-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure has earned its indications in coloproctology. It has been described with variable results in the treatment of large perineal defects after abdominoperineal excision, in the treatment of stoma dehiscence and perirectal abscesses. The most promising indication for

  19. Brine Distribution after Vacuum Saturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Kathrine; Andersen, Bertel Lohmann

    1999-01-01

    Experiments with the vacuum saturation method for brine in plugs of chalk showed that a homogeneous distribution of brine cannot be ensured at saturations below 20% volume. Instead of a homogeneous volume distribution the brine becomes concentrated close to the surfaces of the plugs...

  20. High productivity vacuum blasting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebadian, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the project is to increase the productivity and economics of existing vacuum blasting technology. This technology is used to remove radioactive contamination, PCB's and lead-base paint and provides worker and environmental protection by continuously recycling the blast media and the full containment of the dust generated in the process

  1. Vacuum Stability of Standard Model^{++}

    CERN Document Server

    Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Goldberg, Haim; Huang, Xing; Lust, Dieter; Taylor, Tomasz R.; Vlcek, Brian

    2013-01-01

    The latest results of the ATLAS and CMS experiments point to a preferred narrow Higgs mass range (m_h \\simeq 124 - 126 GeV) in which the effective potential of the Standard Model (SM) develops a vacuum instability at a scale 10^{9} -10^{11} GeV, with the precise scale depending on the precise value of the top quark mass and the strong coupling constant. Motivated by this experimental situation, we present here a detailed investigation about the stability of the SM^{++} vacuum, which is characterized by a simple extension of the SM obtained by adding to the scalar sector a complex SU(2) singlet that has the quantum numbers of the right-handed neutrino, H", and to the gauge sector an U(1) that is broken by the vacuum expectation value of H". We derive the complete set of renormalization group equations at one loop. We then pursue a numerical study of the system to determine the triviality and vacuum stability bounds, using a scan of 10^4 random set of points to fix the initial conditions. We show that, if there...

  2. PC driven integrated vacuum system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curuia, M.; Culcer, M.; Brandea, I.; Anghel, M.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents a integrated vacuum system which was designed and manufactured in our institute. The main parts of this system are the power supply unit for turbo-melecular pumps and the vacuummeter. Both parts of the system are driven by means of a personal computer using a serial communication, according to the RS 232 hardware standard.(author)

  3. Filling the vacuum at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Last month, the Vacuum, Surfaces and Coatings (VSC) group was tasked with an unusually delicate operation in the LHCb experiment cavern: removing the LHC beam pipe while keeping the sensitive Vertex Locator vacuum vessel (VELO) completely isolated from the action.   The VSC group seal off the VELO beam pipe with a flange. Image: Gloria Corti. LHCb’s VELO detector is one of the crown jewels of the experiment. With detector elements surrounded by a vacuum, it gets as close as 5 cm from the beam. Fantastic for physics, but difficult for all-important access. “Because of the sensitivity of the VELO detector and its proximity to the beam, the collaboration decided not to bake (see box) its portion of the beam pipe,” says Giulia Lanza (TE-VSC-LBV), the expert in charge of the beam vacuum operation. “Our group was therefore asked to remove the rest of the LHC beam pipe while keeping the VELO portion of the pipe completely isolated. This work...

  4. The Training Employment Vacuum Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Carl E.

    1970-01-01

    This program suggests: (1) take the underemployed, nonskilled worker, who has a feel for upward job mobility, and offer him opportunities of current job training programs; (2) fill the vacuum he creates by filling his job with hard core unemployed individual; (3) after he has worked for a period of time the cycle will probably start over. (Author)

  5. HIGH PRODUCTIVITY VACUUM BLASTING SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McPhee, William S.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this project is to improve the productivity and lower the expense of existing vacuum blasting technology. This technology is used to remove radioactive contamination, PCBs, and lead-based paint and provides worker protection by continuously recycling the material and dust for the decontamination tasks. The proposed work would increase the cleaning rate and provide safe and cost-effective decontamination of the DOE sites. This work focuses on redesigning and improving existing vacuum blasting technology including blast head nozzles, ergonomic handling of the blast head by reducing its weight; brush-ring design, vacuum level regulator, efficiency of the dust separator, and operational control sensors. The redesign is expected to enhance the productivity and economy of the vacuum blasting system by at least 50% over current vacuum blasting systems. There are three phases in the project. Phase I consists of developing and testing mathematical models. Phase II consists of pre-prototype design and fabrication and pre-prototype unit testing. Phase III consists of prototype design and field verification testing. In phase I, mathematical models are developed and analyzed for the nozzle, blast head, wind curtain, and dust separator, first as individual devices and then combined as an integrated model. This allows study of respective airflow and design parameters. The Contractor shall, based on the results of the mathematical modeling studies, design experimental models of the components and test these models. In addition, the Contractor shall develop sensors to detect the relationship of the blast head to the blast surfaces and controls to minimize the dependency on an operator's skill and judgment to obtain optimum positioning, as well as real-time characterization sensors to determine as the blast head is moving the depth to which coatings must be removed, thereby improving production and minimizing waste. In phase II, the Contractor shall design and

  6. Growth and division of Escherichia coli under microgravity conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasset, G; Tixador, R; Eche, B; Lapchine, L; Moatti, N; Toorop, P; Woldringh, C

    1994-02-01

    The growth rate in glucose minimal medium and time of entry into the stationary phase in pepton cultures were determined during the STS 42 mission of the space shuttle Discovery. Cells were cultured in plastic bags and growth was stopped at six different time points by lowering the temperature to 5 degrees C, and at a single time point, by formaldehyde fixation. Based on cell number determination, the doubling time calculated for the flight samples of glucose cells was shorter (46 min) than for the ground samples (59 min). However, a larger cell size expected for more rapidly growing cells was not observed by volume measurements with the electronic particle counter, nor by electron microscopic measurement of cell dimensions. Only for cells fixed in flight was a larger cell length and percentage of constricted cells found. An optical density increase in the peptone cultures showed an earlier entry into the stationary phase in flight samples, but this could not be confirmed by viability counts. The single sample with cells fixed in flight showed properties indicative of growth stimulation. However, taking all observations together, we conclude that microgravity has no effect on the growth rate of exponentially growing Escherichia coli cells.

  7. Microgravity Production of Nanoparticles of Novel Materials Using Plasma Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenklach, Michael; Fernandez-Pello, Carlos

    2001-01-01

    The research goal is to study the formation in reduced gravity of high quality nanoparticulate of novel materials using plasma synthesis. Particular emphasis will be placed on the production of powders of non-oxide materials like diamond, SiC, SiN, c-BN, etc. The objective of the study is to investigate the effect of gravity on plasma synthesis of these materials, and to determine how the microgravity synthesis can improve the quality and yield of the nanoparticles. It is expected that the reduced gravity will aid in the understanding of the controlling mechanisms of plasma synthesis, and will increase the yield, and quality of the synthesized powder. These materials have properties of interest in several industrial applications, such as high temperature load bearings or high speed metal machining. Furthermore, because of the nano-meter size of the particulate produced in this process, they have specific application in the fabrication of MEMS based combustion systems, and in the development and growth of nano-systems and nano-structures of these materials. These are rapidly advancing research areas, and there is a great need for high quality nanoparticles of different materials. One of the primary systems of interest in the project will be gas-phase synthesis of nanopowder of non-oxide materials.

  8. Dielectrophoretic Rayleigh-Bénard convection under microgravity conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, H N; Tadie Fogaing, M; Crumeyrolle, O; Mutabazi, I

    2013-04-01

    Thermal convection in a dielectric fluid layer between two parallel plates subjected to an alternating electric field and a temperature gradient is investigated under microgravity conditions. A thermoelectric coupling resulting from the thermal variation of the electric permittivity of the fluid produces the dielectrophoretic (DEP) body force, which can be regarded as thermal buoyancy due to an effective gravity. This electric gravity can destabilize a stationary conductive state of the fluid to develop convection. The similarity of the DEP thermal convection with the Rayleigh-Bénard (RB) convection is examined by considering its behavior in detail by a linear stability theory and a two-dimensional direct numerical simulation. The results are analyzed from an energetic viewpoint and in the framework of the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) equation. The stabilizing effects of a thermoelectric feedback make the critical parameters different from those in the RB instability. The nonuniformity of the electric gravity arising from the finite variation of permittivity also affects the critical parameters. The characteristic constants of the GL equation are comparable with those for the RB convection. The heat transfer in the DEP convection is weaker than in the RB convection as a consequence of the feedback that impedes the convection.

  9. Heat and Mass Transfer of Vacuum Cooling for Porous Foods-Parameter Sensitivity Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the theory of heat and mass transfer, a coupled model for the porous food vacuum cooling process is constructed. Sensitivity analyses of the process to food density, thermal conductivity, specific heat, latent heat of evaporation, diameter of pores, mass transfer coefficient, viscosity of gas, and porosity were examined. The simulation results show that the food density would affect the vacuum cooling process but not the vacuum cooling end temperature. The surface temperature of food was slightly affected and the core temperature is not affected by the changed thermal conductivity. The core temperature and surface temperature are affected by the changed specific heat. The core temperature and surface temperature are affected by the changed latent heat of evaporation. The core temperature is affected by the diameter of pores. But the surface temperature is not affected obviously. The core temperature and surface temperature are not affected by the changed gas viscosity. The parameter sensitivity of mass transfer coefficient is obvious. The core temperature and surface temperature are affected by the changed mass transfer coefficient. In all the simulations, the end temperature of core and surface is not affected. The vacuum cooling process of porous medium is a process controlled by outside process.

  10. A Study on the Development of Nonglass Solar Vacuum Tube Collector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Seung Jin

    2008-02-01

    Nature has been providing us energy from the beginning of the world. However human has hardly used it wisely. Solar energy is a kind of renewable energy from the nature. This study has been carried out to study the use of solar energy as it is harnessed in the form of thermal energy. Solar energy is one of the most promising energy resources such as hydrogen, biomass, wind and geothermal energy, because it is clean and inexhaustible. Space heating in buildings can be provided from solar energy by systems that are similar in many respects to water heater systems. By tapping into solar energy, we can not only solve the problem of energy shortage, but also can protect the environment and benefit the human beings. There are currently two types of evacuated tube; a single glass tube and a double glass tube. The former consists of a single glass tube which contains a flat or curved aluminium plate attached to a copper heat pipe or water flow pipe. The latter consists of rows of parallel transparent glass tubes, each of which contains an absorber tube. Evacuated tube collectors introduced above, however, pose some problems as they break rather easily under mechanical stresses. This paper introduces some preliminary results in design and fabrication of a non-glass solar vacuum tube collector in which the thermosyphon(heat pipe)made of copper is used as a heat transfer device. A series of tests have been performed to assess the ability of a non-glass solar vacuum tube collector. The series of experiments are as follows: 1)Vacuum level inside a vacuum tube. 2)Effects of the air remaining inside a vacuum tube on the temperature on the absorber plate. 3)Comparison of a non-glass vacuum solar collector with a single glass evacuated tube(SEIDO 5). Different vacuum levels inside non-glass vacuum tubes were applied to check any leakage or unexpected physical or chemical developments with time. The vacuum level changed from 10 -2 torr to 5torr in 5 days due to air infiltration from

  11. Musing over Microbes in Microgravity: Microbial Physiology Flight Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweickart, Randolph; McGinnis, Michael; Bloomberg, Jacob; Lee, Angie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    New York City, the most populated city in the United States, is home to over 8 million humans. This means over 26,000 people per square mile! Imagine, though, what the view would be if you peeked into the world of microscopic organisms. Scientists estimate that a gram of soil may contain up to 1 billion of these microbes, which is as much as the entire human population of China! Scientists also know that the world of microbes is incredibly diverse-possibly 10,000 different species in one gram of soil - more than all the different types of mammals in the world. Microbes fill every niche in the world - from 20 miles below the Earth's surface to 20 miles above, and at temperatures from less than -20 C to hotter than water's boiling point. These organisms are ubiquitous because they can adapt quickly to changing environments, an effective strategy for survival. Although we may not realize it, microbes impact every aspect of our lives. Bacteria and fungi help us break down the food in our bodies, and they help clean the air and water around us. They can also cause the dark, filmy buildup on the shower curtain as well as, more seriously, illness and disease. Since humans and microbes share space on Earth, we can benefit tremendously from a better understanding of the workings and physiology of the microbes. This insight can help prevent any harmful effects on humans, on Earth and in space, as well as reap the benefits they provide. Space flight is a unique environment to study how microbes adapt to changing environmental conditions. To advance ground-based research in the field of microbiology, this STS-107 experiment will investigate how microgravity affects bacteria and fungi. Of particular interest are the growth rates and how they respond to certain antimicrobial substances that will be tested; the same tests will be conducted on Earth at the same times. Comparing the results obtained in flight to those on Earth, we will be able to examine how microgravity induces

  12. Electrical Microgravity Research in Colloidal Development Platform, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a platform upon which to perform high voltage Electrical microGravity Research In colloidal Development (E-GRID). This platform will...

  13. Genechip analysis of bone marrow osteoprogenitors exposed to microgravity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In March 2006 murine Bone Marrow Stromal Cells (BMSC) were flown in the Soyuz 12S to the International Space Station to investigate the effects of microgravity on...

  14. Measured Success: The Microgravity Measurement and Analysis Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLombard, Richard; Sedlak, Deborah A.

    1997-01-01

    In microgravity, even minute forces can affect experiments: therefore, investigators need to know the precise strength of the gravitational levels and vibrations affecting their experiments to interpret results correctly and to develop an understanding of the effects caused by these forces. The Microgravity Measurement and Analysis Project (MMAP) at the NASA Lewis Research Center was established to provide a single source for measuring the microgravity environment on various orbiting spacecraft, providing support for scientists, and microgravity environment data. As part of this project, the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) and the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) have supported 15 shuttle missions. In addition, one SAMS unit has been operated on Russia's Mir Space Station since September 1994.

  15. Hemodynamic effects of microgravity and their ground-based simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobachik, V. I.; Abrosimov, S. V.; Zhidkov, V. V.; Endeka, D. K.

    Hemodynamic effects of simulated microgravity were investigated, in various experiments, using radioactive isotopes, in which 40 healthy men, aged 35 to 42 years, took part. Blood shifts were evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively. Simulation studies included bedrest, head-down tilt (-5° and -15°), and vertical water immersion, it was found that none of the methods could entirely simulate hemodynamic effects of microgravity. Subjective sensations varied in a wide range. They cannot be used to identify reliably the effects of real and simulated microgravity. Renal fluid excretion in real and simulated microgravity was different in terms of volume and time. The experiments yielded data about the general pattern of circulation with blood displaced to the upper body.

  16. Zero-Energy Ultrafast Water Nanofiltration System in Microgravity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this program is to develop a water nanofiltration system that functions in microgravity for use during a long-duration human space exploration. The...

  17. The Influence of Microgravity on Invasive Growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Mulders, Sebastiaan E.; Stassen, Catherine; Daenen, Luk; Devreese, Bart; Siewers, Verena; van Eijsden, Rudy G. E.; Nielsen, Jens; Delvaux, Freddy R.; Willaert, Ronnie

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of microgravity on colony growth and the morphological transition from single cells to short invasive filaments in the model eukaryotic organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two-dimensional spreading of the yeast colonies grown on semi-solid agar medium was reduced under microgravity in the Σ1278b laboratory strain but not in the CMBSESA1 industrial strain. This was supported by the Σ1278b proteome map under microgravity conditions, which revealed upregulation of proteins linked to anaerobic conditions. The Σ1278b strain showed a reduced invasive growth in the center of the yeast colony. Bud scar distribution was slightly affected, with a switch toward more random budding. Together, microgravity conditions disturb spatially programmed budding patterns and generate strain-dependent growth differences in yeast colonies on semi-solid medium.

  18. Visualization of Thin Liquid Crystal Bubbles in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, C. S.; Clark, N. A.; Maclennan, J. E.; Glaser, M. A.; Tin, P.; Stannarius, R.; Hall, N.; Storck, J.; Sheehan, C.

    2015-01-01

    The Observation and Analysis of Smectic Islands in Space (OASIS) experiment exploits the unique characteristics of freely suspended liquid crystals in a microgravity environment to advance the understanding of fluid state physics.

  19. Macromolecule Crystal Quality Improvement in Microgravity: The Role of Impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Russell A.; Snell, Edward H.; Pusey, Marc L.; Sportiello, Michael G.; Todd, Paul; Bellamy, Henry; Borgstahl, Gloria E.; Pokros, Matt; Cassanto, John M.

    2000-01-01

    While macromolecule impurities may affect crystal size and morphology the over-riding question is; "How do macromolecule impurities effect crystal X-ray quality and diffraction resolution?" In the case of chicken egg white lysozyme, crystals can be grown in the presence of a number of impurities without affecting diffraction resolution. One impurity however, the lysozyme dimer, does negatively impact the X-ray crystal properties. Crystal quality improvement as a result of better partitioning of this impurity during crystallization in microgravity has been reported'. In our recent experimental work dimer partitioning was found to be not significantly different between the two environments. Mosaicity analysis of pure crystals showed a reduced mosaicity and increased signal to noise for the microgravity grown crystals. Dimer incorporation however, did greatly reduce the resolution limit in both ground and microgravity grown crystals. These results indicate that impurity effects in microgravity are complex and may rely on the conditions or techniques employed.

  20. RNA-seq analysis of mycobacteria stress response to microgravity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The aim of this work is to determine whether mycobacteria have enhanced virulence during space travel and what mechanisms they use to adapt to microgravity. M....

  1. The potential impact of microgravity science and technology on education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wargo, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    The development of educational support materials by NASA's Microgravity Science and Applications Division is discussed in the light of two programs. Descriptions of the inception and application possibilities are given for the Microgravity-Science Teacher's Guide and the program of Undergraduate Research Opportunities in Microgravity Science and Technology. The guide is intended to introduce students to the principles and research efforts related to microgravity, and the undergraduate program is intended to reinforce interest in the space program. The use of computers and electronic communications is shown to be an important catalyst for the educational efforts. It is suggested that student and teacher access to these programs be enhanced so that they can have a broader impact on the educational development of space-related knowledge.

  2. Exercise training - Blood pressure responses in subjects adapted to microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, Victor A.

    1991-01-01

    Conventional endurance exercise training that involves daily workouts of 1-2 hr duration during exposure to microgravity has not proven completely effective in ameliorating postexposure orthostatic hypotension. Single bouts of intense exercise have been shown to increase plasma volume and baroreflex sensitivity in ambulatory subjects through 24 hr postexercise and to reverse decrements in maximal oxygen uptake and syncopal episodes following exposure to simulated microgravity. These physiological adaptations to acute intense exercise were opposite to those observed following exposure to microgravity. These results suggest that the 'exercise training' stimulus used to prevent orthostatic hypotension induced by microgravity may be specific and should be redefined to include single bouts of maximal exercise which may provide an acute effective countermeasure against postflight hypotension.

  3. Advanced Microgravity Compatible, Integrated Laundry System, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An Advanced Microgravity Compatible, Integrated laundry System (AMCILS) is proposed that uses a two phase water / water vapor system to allow good agitation of...

  4. Evidence for Increased Cardiac Compliance During Exposure to Simulated Microgravity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koenig, Steven

    1998-01-01

    We measured specific hemodynamic responses during 4 days (96 hours) of head-down tilt (HDT) in invasively- instrumented rhesus monkeys to test the hypothesis that exposure to simulated microgravity causes increased cardiac compliance...

  5. Determining Weight of Stockpiled Ore Using Microgravity Measurements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sjostrom, Keith

    1997-01-01

    ...; and Large, PA. Microgravity measurements were performed over selected ore piles to provide high-resolution surveys of the gravitational field with which to determine the average bulk density of the ore material...

  6. COLDDIAG: A Cold Vacuum Chamber for Diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Casalbuoni, S; Gerstl, S; Grau, A W; Hagelstein, M; Saez de Jauregui, D; Boffo, C; Sikler, G; Baglin, V; Cox, M P; Schouten, J C; Cimino, R; Commisso, M; Spataro, B; Mostacci, A; Wallen, E J; Weigel, R; Clarke, J; Scott, D; Bradshaw, T; Jones, R; Shinton, I

    2011-01-01

    One of the still open issues for the development of superconducting insertion devices is the understanding of the beam heat load. With the aim of measuring the beam heat load to a cold bore and the hope to gain a deeper understanding in the beam heat load mechanisms, a cold vacuum chamber for diagnostics is under construction. The following diagnostics will be implemented: i) retarding field analyzers to measure the electron energy and flux, ii) temperature sensors to measure the total heat load, iii) pressure gauges, iv) and mass spectrometers to measure the gas content. The inner vacuum chamber will be removable in order to test different geometries and materials. This will allow the installation of the cryostat in different synchrotron light sources. COLDDIAG will be built to fit in a short straight section at ANKA. A first installation at the synchrotron light source Diamond is foreseen in June 2011. Here we describe the technical design report of this device and the planned measurements with beam.

  7. Novel vacuum conditions in inflationary collapse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel R. Bengochea

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of inflationary models that incorporate a spontaneous reduction of the wave function for the emergence of the seeds of cosmic structure, we study the effects on the primordial scalar power spectrum by choosing a novel initial quantum state that characterizes the perturbations of the inflaton. Specifically, we investigate under which conditions one can recover an essentially scale free spectrum of primordial inhomogeneities when the standard Bunch–Davies vacuum is replaced by another one that minimizes the renormalized stress–energy tensor via a Hadamard procedure. We think that this new prescription for selecting the vacuum state is better suited for the self-induced collapse proposal than the traditional one in the semiclassical gravity picture. We show that the parametrization for the time of collapse, considered in previous works, is maintained. Also, we obtain an angular spectrum for the CMB temperature anisotropies consistent with the one that best fits the observational data. Therefore, we conclude that the collapse mechanism might be of a more fundamental character than previously suspected.

  8. Vacuum polarization and Hawking radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmati, Shohreh

    Quantum gravity is one of the interesting fields in contemporary physics which is still in progress. The purpose of quantum gravity is to present a quantum description for spacetime at 10-33cm or find the 'quanta' of gravitational interaction.. At present, the most viable theory to describe gravitational interaction is general relativity which is a classical theory. Semi-classical quantum gravity or quantum field theory in curved spacetime is an approximation to a full quantum theory of gravity. This approximation considers gravity as a classical field and matter fields are quantized. One interesting phenomena in semi-classical quantum gravity is Hawking radiation. Hawking radiation was derived by Stephen Hawking as a thermal emission of particles from the black hole horizon. In this thesis we obtain the spectrum of Hawking radiation using a new method. Vacuum is defined as the possible lowest energy state which is filled with pairs of virtual particle-antiparticle. Vacuum polarization is a consequence of pair creation in the presence of an external field such as an electromagnetic or gravitational field. Vacuum polarization in the vicinity of a black hole horizon can be interpreted as the cause of the emission from black holes known as Hawking radiation. In this thesis we try to obtain the Hawking spectrum using this approach. We re-examine vacuum polarization of a scalar field in a quasi-local volume that includes the horizon. We study the interaction of a scalar field with the background gravitational field of the black hole in the desired quasi-local region. The quasi-local volume is a hollow cylinder enclosed by two membranes, one inside the horizon and one outside the horizon. The net rate of particle emission can be obtained as the difference of the vacuum polarization from the outer boundary and inner boundary of the cylinder. Thus we found a new method to derive Hawking emission which is unitary and well defined in quantum field theory.

  9. Fluid Physics and Macromolecular Crystal Growth in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helliwell, John R.; Snell, Edward H.; Chayen, Naomi E.; Judge, Russell A.; Boggon, Titus J.; Pusey, M. L.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The first protein crystallization experiment in microgravity was launched in April, 1981 and used Germany's Technologische Experimente unter Schwerelosigkeit (TEXUS 3) sounding rocket. The protein P-galactosidase (molecular weight 465Kda) was chosen as the sample with a liquid-liquid diffusion growth method. A sliding device brought the protein, buffer and salt solution into contact when microgravity was reached. The sounding rocket gave six minutes of microgravity time with a cine camera and schlieren optics used to monitor the experiment, a single growth cell. In microgravity a strictly laminar diffusion process was observed in contrast to the turbulent convection seen on the ground. Several single crystals, approx 100micron in length, were formed in the flight which were of inferior but of comparable visual quality to those grown on the ground over several days. A second experiment using the same protocol but with solutions cooled to -8C (kept liquid with glycerol antifreeze) again showed laminar diffusion. The science of macromolecular structural crystallography involves crystallization of the macromolecule followed by use of the crystal for X-ray diffraction experiments to determine the three dimensional structure of the macromolecule. Neutron protein crystallography is employed for elucidation of H/D exchange and for improved definition of the bound solvent (D20). The structural information enables an understanding of how the molecule functions with important potential for rational drug design, improved efficiency of industrial enzymes and agricultural chemical development. The removal of turbulent convection and sedimentation in microgravity, and the assumption that higher quality crystals will be produced, has given rise to the growing number of crystallization experiments now flown. Many experiments can be flown in a small volume with simple, largely automated, equipment - an ideal combination for a microgravity experiment. The term "protein crystal growth

  10. Consort and Joust sounding rockets for microgravity research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessling, F. C.; Maybee, G. W.

    1992-08-01

    Descriptions are given of the hardware and techniques used for five launches of the Consort and Joust sounding rockets with payloads for short periods of microgravity payload research. The Consort rockets can provide about seven minutes of microgravity conditions for about 300 kg of payload, and the Joust rocket can yield over 14 minutes for 240 kg. These rockets provide effective means for experiments involving foam formation, bioprocessing, polymer processing, and accelerometers.

  11. Microgravity metal processing: from undercooled liquids to bulk metallic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Douglas C; Roberts, Scott N

    2015-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are a novel class of metal alloys that are poised for widespread commercialization. Over 30 years of NASA and ESA (as well as other space agency) funding for both ground-based and microgravity experiments has resulted in fundamental science data that have enabled commercial production. This review focuses on the history of microgravity BMG research, which includes experiments on the space shuttle, the ISS, ground-based experiments, commercial fabrication and currently funded efforts. PMID:28725709

  12. Investigations of field instability of ferrofluid in hypergravity and microgravity

    OpenAIRE

    Theng Yee Chong; Kent Loong Ho; Boon Hoong Ong

    2012-01-01

    The field instability of the free surface of ferrofluid was investigated under microgravity and hypergravity environments conducted by parabolic flight. It is observed that the perturbation was suppressed under hypergravity, whereas at the microgravity condition, it appeared to have only slight increase in the amplitude of the perturbation peaks compared to the case of ground condition. Besides, an observation of peak-trough distance showed that not only the peak, but the trough was also very...

  13. A hydroponic design for microgravity and gravity installations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielder, Judith; Leggett, Nickolaus

    1990-01-01

    A hydroponic system is presented that is designed for use in microgravity or gravity experiments. The system uses a sponge-like growing medium installed in tubular modules. The modules contain the plant roots and manage the flow of the nutrient solution. The physical design and materials considerations are discussed, as are modifications of the basic design for use in microgravity or gravity experiments. The major external environmental requirements are also presented.

  14. Effect of microgravity on forearm subcutaneous vascular resistance in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabrielsen, A; Norsk, P; Videbæk, R

    1995-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that the subcutaneous vascular constrictor response to an orthostatic stress in humans is augmented after exposure to microgravity, the following experiment was performed. Four male astronauts underwent a standardized stepwise lower body negative pressure (LBNP) profile 5 mo...... after 1-2 days after exposure to 10 days of microgravity and could act as a defense mechanism to alleviate decreased orthostatic tolerance...

  15. Extreme Adiabatic Expansion in Micro-gravity: Modeling for the Cold Atomic Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackett, C. A.; Lam, T. C.; Stickney, J. C.; Burke, J. H.

    2017-12-01

    The upcoming Cold Atom Laboratory mission for the International Space Station will allow the investigation of ultracold gases in a microgravity environment. Cold atomic samples will be produced using evaporative cooling in a magnetic chip trap. We investigate here the possibility to release atoms from the trap via adiabatic expansion. We discuss both general considerations and a detailed model of the planned apparatus. We find that it should be possible to reduce the mean trap confinement frequency to about 0.2 Hz, which will correspond to a three-dimensional sample temperature of about 150 pK and a mean atom velocity of 0.1 mm/s.

  16. Ultrathin gate valve for high vacuum operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugiansky, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    Thin, compact, high-vacuum gate valve used to join two vacuum systems together demonstrates multiple operation reliability. Valve measurements and non-protruding handle make valve usable in confined areas.

  17. Gauge field vacuum structure in geometrical aspect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konopleva, N.P.

    2003-01-01

    Vacuum conception is one of the main conceptions of quantum field theory. Its meaning in classical field theory is also very profound. In this case the vacuum conception is closely connected with ideas of the space-time geometry. The global and local geometrical space-time conceptions lead to different vacuum definitions and therefore to different ways of physical theory construction. Some aspects of the gauge field vacuum structure are analyzed. It is shown that in the gauge field theory the vacuum Einstein equation solutions describe the relativistic vacuum as common vacuum of all gauge fields and its sources. Instantons (both usual and hyperbolical) are regarded as nongravitating matter, because they have zero energy-momentum tensors and correspond to vacuum Einstein equations

  18. Nanoscale Vacuum Electronics: Back to the Future?

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This CIF project developed nanoscale vacuum devices for potential radiation-immune electronics ideal for space applications. Vacuum is superior to any semiconductor...

  19. Proteomic Analysis of Rat Hippocampus under Simulated Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Li, Yujuan; Zhang, Yongqian; Liu, Yahui; Deng, Yulin

    It has been found that microgravity may lead to impairments in cognitive functions performed by CNS. However, the exact mechanism of effects of microgravity on the learning and memory function in animal nervous system is not elucidated yet. Brain function is mainly mediated by membrane proteins and their dysfunction causes degeneration of the learning and memory. To induce simulated microgravity, the rat tail suspension model was established. Comparative O (18) labeling quantitative proteomic strategy was applied to detect the differentially expressed proteins in rat brain hippocampus. The proteins in membrane fraction from rat hippocampus were digested by trypsin and then the peptides were separated by off-gel for the first dimension with 24 wells device encompassing the pH range of 3 - 10. An off-gel fraction was subjected into LC-ESI-QTOF in triplicate. Preliminary results showed that nearly 77% of the peptides identified were specific to one fraction. 676 proteins were identified among which 108 proteins were found differentially expressed under simulated microgravity. Using the KOBAS server, many enriched pathways, such as metabolic pathway, synaptic vesicle cycle, endocytosis, calcium signaling pathway, and SNAREs pathway were identified. Furthermore, it has been found that neurotransmitter released by Ca (2+) -triggered synaptic vesicles fusion may play key role in neural function. Rab 3A might inhibit the membrane fusion and neurotransmitter release. The protein alteration of the synaptic vesicle cycle may further explain the effects of microgravity on learning and memory function in rats. Key words: Microgravity; proteomics; synaptic vesicle; O (18) ({}) -labeling

  20. Research on vacuum insulation for cryocables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graneau, P.

    1974-01-01

    Vacuum insulation, as compared with solid insulation, simplifies the construction of both resistive or superconducting cryogenic cables. The common vacuum space in the cable can furnish thermal insulation between the environment and the cryogenic coolant, provide electrical insulation between conductors, and establish thermal isolation between go- and return-coolant streams. The differences between solid and vacuum high voltage insulation are discussed, and research on the design, materials selection, and testing of vacuum insulated cryogenic cables is described

  1. Robot Vacuum Cleaner Personality and Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Hendriks, A.F.M.; Meerbeek, B.W.; Boess, S.; Pauws, S.C; Sonneveld, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we report our study on the user experience of robot vacuum cleaner behavior. How do people want to experience this new type of cleaning appliance? Interviews were conducted to elicit a desired robot vacuum cleaner personality. With this knowledge in mind, behavior was designed for a future robot vacuum cleaner. A video prototype was used to evaluate how people experienced the behavior of this robot vacuum cleaner. The results indicate that people recognizedthe intended personali...

  2. Utilize Vacuum Forming to Make Interdisciplinary Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Tyler S.; Valenza, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The concept of vacuum forming has been around since the 19th century, despite not being fully utilized in industry until the 1950s. In the past, industrial arts classes have used vacuum-forming projects to concentrate solely on the manufacturing process and the final product. However, vacuum forming is not just an old industrial arts activity; it…

  3. Observational study: microgravity testing of a phase-change reference on the International Space Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topham, T Shane; Bingham, Gail E; Latvakoski, Harri; Podolski, Igor; Sychev, Vladimir S; Burdakin, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Orbital sensors to monitor global climate change during the next decade require low-drift rates for onboard thermometry, which is currently unattainable without on-orbit recalibration. Phase-change materials (PCMs), such as those that make up the ITS-90 standard, are seen as the most reliable references on the ground and could be good candidates for orbital recalibration. Space Dynamics Lab (SDL) has been developing miniaturized phase-change references capable of deployment on an orbital blackbody for nearly a decade. Improvement of orbital temperature measurements for long duration earth observing and remote sensing. To determine whether and how microgravity will affect the phase transitions, SDL conducted experiments with ITS-90 standard material (gallium, Ga) on the International Space Station (ISS) and compared the phase-change temperature with earth-based measurements. The miniature on-orbit thermal reference (MOTR) experiment launched to the ISS in November 2013 on Soyuz TMA-11M with the Expedition 38 crew and returned to Kazakhstan in March 2014 on the Soyuz TMA-10 spacecraft. MOTR tested melts and freezes of Ga using repeated 6-h cycles. Melt cycles obtained on the ground before and after launch were compared with those obtained on the ISS. To within a few mK uncertainty, no significant difference between the melt temperature of Ga at 1 g and in microgravity was observed.

  4. Vacuum tribological behaviour of self lubricant quasicrystalline composite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcí de Blas, F. J.; Román, A.; de Miguel, C.; Longo, F.; Muelas, R.; Agüero, A.

    2003-09-01

    High temperature resistant self-lubricant coatings are needed in space vehicles for components that operate at high temperatures and/or under vacuum. Thick composite lubricant coatings containing quasicrystalline alloys (QC) as the hard phase for wear resistance, have been deposited by thermal spray. The coatings also comprise lubricating materials (silver and BaF2-CaF2 eutectic) and NiCr as the tough component. This paper describes the vacuum tribological properties of TH103, a coating belonging to this family, with excellent microstructural quality. The coating was deposited by HVOF and tested under vacuum on a pin-on-disc tribometer. Different loads, linear speeds and pin materials were studied. The pin scars and disc wear tracks were characterized by EDS-SEM. A minimum mean steady friction coefficient of 0.32 was obtained employing a X-750 Ni superalloy pin in vacuum conditions under 10 N load and 15 cm/s linear speed, showing moderate wear of the disc and low wear of the pin.

  5. The cosmological Higgstory of the vacuum instability

    CERN Document Server

    Espinosa, Jose R.; Morgante, Enrico; Riotto, Antonio; Senatore, Leonardo; Strumia, Alessandro; Tetradis, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    The Standard Model Higgs potential becomes unstable at large field values. After clarifying the issue of gauge dependence of the effective potential, we study the cosmological evolution of the Higgs field in presence of this instability throughout inflation, reheating and the present epoch. We conclude that anti-de Sitter patches in which the Higgs field lies at its true vacuum are lethal for our universe. From this result, we derive upper bounds on the Hubble constant during inflation, which depend on the reheating temperature and on the Higgs coupling to the scalar curvature or to the inflaton. Finally we study how a speculative link between Higgs meta-stability and consistence of quantum gravity leads to a sharp prediction for the Higgs and top masses, which is consistent with measured values.

  6. Metalclad switchgear with vacuum circuit breaker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pihler, J.; Vorsic, J. [Maribor Univ. (Slovenia); Kos, D. [TSN - Eling d.o.o., Maribor, (Slovenia)

    1997-12-31

    The development and testing of a medium voltage metalclad switchgear with a vacuum circuit breaker limited to European use was described. Laboratory tests were conducted, with special attention given to the calculation of pressure and temperature conditions in the switchgear of an open electric arc. The construction of individual compartments and the driving mechanisms of removable parts of the switchgear were also examined. Because of the metal partition walls between individual compartments of the switchgear, it was more difficult to achieve prescribed dielectric strengths between current conducting and grounded parts. Maxwells`s equations were used to determine the electromagnetic fields. The metal partition walls prevented the propagation of electric arcs in the switchgear. This, along with the removable circuit breaker, increased the reliability of the device. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  7. The cosmological Higgstory of the vacuum instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa, José R. [IFAE, Universitat Autónoma de Barcelona,08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); ICREA, Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats,Barcelona (Spain); Giudice, Gian F. [CERN, Theory Division,CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Morgante, Enrico; Riotto, Antonio [Département de Physique Théorique and Centre for Astroparticle Physics (CAP),Université de Genève, 24 quai Ernest-Ansermet, CH-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Senatore, Leonardo [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physicsand Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology,Physics Department and SLAC, Stanford, CA 94025 (United States); Strumia, Alessandro [Dipartimento di Fisica dell’Università di Pisa and INFN, Polo Fibonacci,Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, Pisa (Italy); National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics,Ravala 10, Tallinn (Estonia); Tetradis, Nikolaos [Department of Physics, University of Athens,Zographou 157 84 (Greece)

    2015-09-24

    The Standard Model Higgs potential becomes unstable at large field values. After clarifying the issue of gauge dependence of the effective potential, we study the cosmological evolution of the Higgs field in presence of this instability throughout inflation, reheating and the present epoch. We conclude that anti-de Sitter patches in which the Higgs field lies at its true vacuum are lethal for our universe. From this result, we derive upper bounds on the Hubble constant during inflation, which depend on the reheating temperature and on the Higgs coupling to the scalar curvature or to the inflaton. Finally we study how a speculative link between Higgs meta-stability and consistence of quantum gravity leads to a sharp prediction for the Higgs and top masses, which is consistent with measured values.

  8. Conditioning of vacuum chamber by RF plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elizondo, J.I.; Nascimento, I.C. do

    1985-01-01

    A new conditioning vaccum chamber system is presented. It consists in hydrogen plasm generation by microwaves with low electronic temperature (Te approx. 5eV) and low ionization degree. The ions and neutral atoms generated in the reaction: e + H 2 -> H+ H+ e, bomb the chamber walls combinig themselves to impurities of surface and generating several compounds: H 2 O, CO, CH 4 , CO 2 etc. The vacuum system operates continuosly and remove these compounds. A microwave system using magnetron valve (f=2,45 GHz, P=800W) was constructed for TBR (Brazilian tokamak). The gas partial pressures were monitored before, during and after conditioning showing the efficiency of the process. (M.C.K.) [pt

  9. Growth of a Si0.50Ge0.50 crystal by the traveling liquidus-zone (TLZ) method in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, K.; Arai, Y.; Inatomi, Y.; Tsukada, T.; Adachi, S.; Miyata, H.; Tanaka, R.; Yoshikawa, J.; Kihara, T.; Tomioka, H.; Shibayama, H.; Kubota, Y.; Warashina, Y.; Sasaki, Y.; Ishizuka, Y.; Harada, Y.; Wada, S.; Harada, C.; Ito, T.; Takayanagi, M.; Yoda, S.

    2014-02-01

    An alloy semiconductor Si1-xGex (x~0.5) crystal was grown by the TLZ method in microgravity. Ge concentration was 48.5±1.5 at% for the whole region of 10 mm diameter and 17.2 mm long crystal. Compositional uniformity was established but the average concentration was a little deviated from the expected 50 at%. For further improving compositional uniformity and for obtaining Si0.5Ge0.5 crystals in microgravity, growth conditions were refined based on the measured axial compositional profile. In determining new growth conditions, difference in temperature gradient in a melt, difference in freezing interface curvature, and difference in melt back length of a seed between microgravity and terrestrial growth were taken into consideration.

  10. Sensorimotor adaptations to microgravity in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgerton, V. R.; McCall, G. E.; Hodgson, J. A.; Gotto, J.; Goulet, C.; Fleischmann, K.; Roy, R. R.

    2001-01-01

    Motor function is altered by microgravity, but little detail is available as to what these changes are and how changes in the individual components of the sensorimotor system affect the control of movement. Further, there is little information on whether the changes in motor performance reflect immediate or chronic adaptations to changing gravitational environments. To determine the effects of microgravity on the neural control properties of selected motor pools, four male astronauts from the NASA STS-78 mission performed motor tasks requiring the maintenance of either ankle dorsiflexor or plantarflexor torque. Torques of 10 or 50% of a maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) were requested of the subjects during 10 degrees peak-to-peak sinusoidal movements at 0.5 Hz. When 10% MVC of the plantarflexors was requested, the actual torques generated in-flight were similar to pre-flight values. Post-flight torques were higher than pre- and in-flight torques. The actual torques when 50% MVC was requested were higher in- and post-flight than pre-flight. Soleus (Sol) electromyographic (EMG) amplitudes during plantarflexion were higher in-flight than pre- or post-flight for both the 10 and 50% MVC tasks. No differences in medial gastrocnemius (MG) EMG amplitudes were observed for either the 10 or 50% MVC tasks. The EMG amplitudes of the tibialis anterior (TA), an antagonist to plantarflexion, were higher in- and post-flight than pre-flight for the 50% MVC task. During the dorsiflexion tasks, the torques generated in both the 10 and 50% MVC tasks did not differ pre-, in- and post-flight. TA EMG amplitudes were significantly higher in- than pre-flight for both the 10 or 50% MVC tasks, and remained elevated post-flight for the 50% MVC test. Both the Sol and MG EMG amplitudes were significantly higher in-flight than either pre- or post-flight for both the 10 and 50% MVC tests. These data suggest that the most consistent response to space flight was an elevation in the level of

  11. Quantum vacuum and dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Hajdukovic, Dragan Slavkov

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the gravitational polarization of the quantum vacuum was proposed as alternative to the dark matter paradigm. In the present paper we consider four benchmark measurements: the universality of the central surface density of galaxy dark matter haloes, the cored dark matter haloes in dwarf spheroidal galaxies, the non-existence of dark disks in spiral galaxies and distribution of dark matter after collision of clusters of galaxies (the Bullet cluster is a famous example). Only some of these phenomena (but not all of them) can (in principle) be explained by the dark matter and the theories of modified gravity. However, we argue that the framework of the gravitational polarization of the quantum vacuum allows the understanding of the totality of these phenomena.

  12. Mirror fusion vacuum technology developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batzer, T.H.; Call, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    Magnetic Mirror Fusion experiments, such as MFTF-B+T (Mirror Fusion Test Facility-B, Tritium Upgrade) and foreseeable follow-on devices, have operational and maintenance requirements that have not yet been fully demonstrated. Among those associated with vacuum technology are the very-high continuous-pumping speeds, 10 7 to 10 8 l/s for D 2 , T 2 and, to a lesser extent, He; the early detection of water leaks from the very-high heat-flux neutral-beam dumps and the detection and location of leaks in the superconducting magnets not protected by guard vacuums. Possible solutions to these problems have been identified and considerable progress has been made toward successfully demonstrating their feasibility

  13. LEP vacuum chamber, early prototype

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1978-01-01

    The structure of LEP, with long bending magnets and little access to the vacuum chamber between them, required distributed pumping. This is an early prototype for the LEP vacuum chamber, made from extruded aluminium. The main opening is for the beam. The small channel to the right is for cooling water, to carry away the heat deposited by the synchroton radiation from the beam. The 4 slots in the channel to the left house the strip-shaped ion-getter pumps (see 7810255). The ion-getter pumps depended on the magnetic field of the bending magnets, too low at injection energy for the pumps to function well. Also, a different design was required outside the bending magnets. This design was therefore abandoned, in favour of a thermal getter pump (see 8301153 and 8305170).

  14. HIGH PRODUCTIVITY VACUUM BLASTING SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McPhee, William S.

    2001-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) needs improved technologies to decontaminate large areas of both concrete and steel surfaces. The technology should have high operational efficiency, minimize exposures to workers, and produce low levels of secondary waste. In order to meet the DOE's needs, an applied research and development project for the improvement of a current decontamination technology, Vacuum Blasting, is proposed. The objective of this project is to improve the productivity and lower the expense of the existing vacuum blasting technology which has been widely used in DOE sites for removing radioactive contamination, PCBs, and lead-based paint. The proposed work would increase the productivity rate and provide safe and cost-effective decontamination of the DOE sites

  15. Vacuum mammotomy under ultrasound guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luczynska, E.; Kocurek, A.; Pawlik, T.; Aniol, J.; Herman, K.; Skotnicki, P.

    2007-01-01

    Breast ultrasound is a non-invasive method of breast examination. You can use it also for fine needle biopsy, core needle biopsy, vacuum mammotomy and for placing the '' wire '' before open surgical biopsy. 106 patients (105 women and 1 man) aged 20-71 years (mean age 46.9) were treated in Cancer Institute in Cracow by vacuum mammotomy under ultrasound guidance. The lesions found in ultrasonography were divided into three groups: benign lesions (BI RADS II), ambiguous lesions (BI RADS 0, III and IVa), and suspicious lesions (BI RADS IV B, IV C and V). Then lesions were qualified to vacuum mammotomy. According to USG, fibroadenoma or '' fibroadenoma-like '' lesions were found in 75 women, in 6 women complicated cysts, in 6 women cyst with dense fluid (to differentiate with FA), and in 19 patients undefined lesions. Fibroadenoma was confirmed in histopathology in 74% patients among patients with fibroadenoma or '' fibroadenoma-like '' lesions in ultrasound (in others also benign lesions were found). Among lesions undefined after ultrasound examination (total 27 patients) cancer was confirmed in 6 % (DCIS and IDC). In 6 patients with complicated cysts in ultrasound examination, histopathology confirmed fibroadenoma in 4 women, an intraductal lesion in 1 woman and inflamatory process in 1 woman. Also in 6 women with a dense cyst or fibroadenoma seen in ultrasound, histopathology confirmed fibroadenoma in 3 women and fibrosclerosis in 3 women. Any breast lesions undefined or suspicious after ultrasound examination should be verified. The method of verification or kind of operation of the whole lesion (vacuum mammotomy or '' wire '') depends on many factors, for example: lesion localization; lesion size; BI RADS category. (author)

  16. Field Emission in Vacuum Microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Fursey, George; Schwoebel, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Field emission is a phenomenon described by quantum mechanics. Its emission capability is millions times higher than that of any other known types of electron emission. Nowadays this phenomenon is experiencing a new life due to wonderful applications in the atomic resolution microscopy, in electronic holography, and in the vacuum micro- and nanoelectronics in general. The main field emission properties, and some most remarkable experimental facts and applications, are described in this book.

  17. Vacuum evaporation of pure metals

    OpenAIRE

    Safarian, Jafar; Engh, Thorvald Abel

    2013-01-01

    Theories on the evaporation of pure substances are reviewed and applied to study vacuum evaporation of pure metals. It is shown that there is good agreement between different theories for weak evaporation, whereas there are differences under intensive evaporation conditions. For weak evaporation, the evaporation coefficient in Hertz-Knudsen equation is 1.66. Vapor velocity as a function of the pressure is calculated applying several theories. If a condensing surface is less than one collision...

  18. Entanglement in the Bogoliubov vacuum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Uffe Vestergaard; Meyer, T.; Lewenstein, M.

    2005-01-01

    We analyze the entanglement properties of the Bogoliubov vacuum, which is obtained as a second-order approximation to the ground state of an interacting Bose-Einstein condensate. We work in one- and two-dimensional lattices and study the entanglement between two groups of sites as a function...... and to be favoured by strong interactions. Conversely, long-range entanglement is favoured by relatively weak interactions. No examples of bound entanglement are found....

  19. Random numbers from vacuum fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Yicheng; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Chng, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    We implement a quantum random number generator based on a balanced homodyne measurement of vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. The digitized signal is directly processed with a fast randomness extraction scheme based on a linear feedback shift register. The random bit stream is continuously read in a computer at a rate of about 480 Mbit/s and passes an extended test suite for random numbers.

  20. Vacuum electronics applications at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, E

    2009-01-01

    CERN operates a large number of vacuum electronics based RF power amplifiers covering a wide frequency range – over 300 sockets with 24 different grid tubes and klystrons are in use and require constant care to insure reliable operation of the accelerators. This is in particular true for the LHC and its injector chain, for which a program of improvement and stepwise upgrade has started. These include IOT’s for the SPS and klystrons and modulators for Linac4 and SPL. The CLIC study and the CTF3 facility are relevant to vacuum electronics in many ways: The CLIC primary RF power, to be provided at 1 GHz, requires highest possible efficiency and phase stability, MBK’s are likely candidates. The CLIC RF power source and CTF3 are themselves large vacuum electronics applications, consequently there are areas of common interest and concern, including fabrication techniques, pulse compression techniques, breakdown and multipactor theory and simulation, material fatigue, numerical analysis of slow-wave structures...

  1. PC driven integrated vacuum system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curuia, Marian; Culcer, Mihai; Brandea, Iulian; Anghel, Mihai

    2001-01-01

    The monitoring of industrial plants by virtual instrumentation represents the most modern trend in the domain of electronic equipment. The integrated vacuum system presented here has several facilities, including the automated data storing of measurement results on hard disk and providing warning messages for operators when the measured parameters are lower or higher upper than the fixed values. The system can also work stand-alone, receiving the commands from the keyboards placed on his front panel but, when it is included in a automation complex system, a remote control from PC is necessary . Both parts of the system, power supply unit for turbo-molecular pump and the vacuum gage, are controlled by an 80C31 microcontroller. Because this microcontroller has a built-in circuitry for a serial communication, we established a serial communication between the PC and the power supply unit for turbo-molecular pump and the vacuum gage, according to the RS-232 hardware standard. As software, after careful evaluation of several options, we chose to develop a hybrid software packing using two different software development tools: LabVIEW, and assembly language. We chose LabVIEW because it is dedicated to data acquisition and communications, containing libraries for data collection, analysis, display and storage. (authors)

  2. Magnetic and electrical properties of ITER vacuum vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mergia, K.; Apostolopoulos, G.; Gjoka, M.; Niarchos, D.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Ferritic steel AISI 430 is a candidate material for the lTER vacuum vessel which will be used to limit the ripple in the toroidal magnetic field. The magnetic and electrical properties and their temperature dependence in the temperature range 300 - 900 K of AISI 430 ferritic stainless steels are presented. The temperature variation of the coercive field, remanence and saturation magnetization as well as electrical resistivity and the effect of annealing on these properties is discussed. (authors)

  3. Kinetics of scrap tyre pyrolysis under vacuum conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Gartzen; Aguado, Roberto; Olazar, Martín; Arabiourrutia, Miriam; Bilbao, Javier

    2009-10-01

    Scrap tyre pyrolysis under vacuum is attractive because it allows easier product condensation and control of composition (gas, liquid and solid). With the aim of determining the effect of vacuum on the pyrolysis kinetics, a study has been carried out in thermobalance. Two data analysis methods have been used in the kinetic study: (i) the treatment of experimental data of weight loss and (ii) the deconvolution of DTG (differential thermogravimetry) curve. The former allows for distinguishing the pyrolysis of the three main components (volatile components, natural rubber and styrene-butadiene rubber) according to three successive steps. The latter method identifies the kinetics for the pyrolysis of individual components by means of DTG curve deconvolution. The effect of vacuum in the process is significant. The values of activation energy for the pyrolysis of individual components of easier devolatilization (volatiles and NR) are lower for pyrolysis under vacuum with a reduction of 12K in the reaction starting temperature. The kinetic constant at 503K for devolatilization of volatile additives at 0.25atm is 1.7 times higher than that at 1atm, and that corresponding to styrene-butadiene rubber at 723K is 2.8 times higher. Vacuum enhances the volatilization and internal diffusion of products in the pyrolysis process, which contributes to attenuating the secondary reactions of the repolymerization and carbonization of these products on the surface of the char (carbon black). The higher quality of carbon black is interesting for process viability. The large-scale implementation of this process in continuous mode requires a comparison to be made between the economic advantages of using a vacuum and the energy costs, which will be lower when the technologies used for pyrolysis require a lower ratio between reactor volume and scrap tyre flow rate.

  4. Kinetics of scrap tyre pyrolysis under vacuum conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Gartzen; Aguado, Roberto; Olazar, Martin; Arabiourrutia, Miriam; Bilbao, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Scrap tyre pyrolysis under vacuum is attractive because it allows easier product condensation and control of composition (gas, liquid and solid). With the aim of determining the effect of vacuum on the pyrolysis kinetics, a study has been carried out in thermobalance. Two data analysis methods have been used in the kinetic study: (i) the treatment of experimental data of weight loss and (ii) the deconvolution of DTG (differential thermogravimetry) curve. The former allows for distinguishing the pyrolysis of the three main components (volatile components, natural rubber and styrene-butadiene rubber) according to three successive steps. The latter method identifies the kinetics for the pyrolysis of individual components by means of DTG curve deconvolution. The effect of vacuum in the process is significant. The values of activation energy for the pyrolysis of individual components of easier devolatilization (volatiles and NR) are lower for pyrolysis under vacuum with a reduction of 12 K in the reaction starting temperature. The kinetic constant at 503 K for devolatilization of volatile additives at 0.25 atm is 1.7 times higher than that at 1 atm, and that corresponding to styrene-butadiene rubber at 723 K is 2.8 times higher. Vacuum enhances the volatilization and internal diffusion of products in the pyrolysis process, which contributes to attenuating the secondary reactions of the repolymerization and carbonization of these products on the surface of the char (carbon black). The higher quality of carbon black is interesting for process viability. The large-scale implementation of this process in continuous mode requires a comparison to be made between the economic advantages of using a vacuum and the energy costs, which will be lower when the technologies used for pyrolysis require a lower ratio between reactor volume and scrap tyre flow rate.

  5. Modelling of nectarine drying under near infrared - Vacuum conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaei, Behnam; Chayjan, Reza Amiri

    2015-01-01

    Drying of nectarine slices was performed to determine the thermal and physical properties in order to reduce product deterioration due to chemical reactions, facilitate storage and lower transportation costs. Because nectarine slices are sensitive to heat with long drying period, the selection of a suitable drying approach is a challenging task. Infrared-vacuum drying can be used as an appropriate method for susceptible materials with high moisture content such as nectarine slices. Modelling of nectarine slices drying was carried out in a thin layer near infraredvacuum conditions. Drying of the samples was implemented at the absolute pressures of 20, 40 and 60 kPa and drying temperatures of 50, 60 and 70°C. Drying behaviour of nectarine slices, as well as the effect of drying conditions on moisture loss trend, drying rate, effective diffusion coefficient, activation energy, shrinkage, colour and energy consumption of nectarine slices, dried in near infrared-vacuum dryer are discussed in this study. Six mathematical models were used to predict the moisture ratio of the samples in thin layer drying. The Midilli model had supremacy in prediction of nectarine slices drying behaviour. The maximum drying rates of the samples were between 0.014-0.047 gwater/gdry material·min. Effective moisture diffusivity of the samples was estimated in the ranges of 2.46·10-10 to 6.48·10-10 m2/s. Activation energy were computed between 31.28 and 35.23 kJ/mol. Minimum shrinkage (48.4%) and total colour difference (15.1) were achieved at temperature of 50°C and absolute pressure of 20 kPa. Energy consumption of the tests was estimated in the ranges of 0.129 to 0.247 kWh. Effective moisture diffusivity was increased with decrease of vacuum pressure and increase of drying temperature but effect of drying temperature on effective moisture diffusivity of nectarine slices was more than vacuum pressure. Activation energy was decreased with decrease in absolute pressure. Total colour

  6. CAS CERN Accelerator School vacuum technology. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, S.

    1999-01-01

    These proceedings present the lectures given at the twelfth specialized course organized by the CERN Accelerator School (CAS), the topic this time being 'Vacuum Technology'. Despite the importance of vacuum technology in the design and operation of particle accelerators at CERN and at the many other accelerators already installed around the world, this was the first time that CAS has organized a course devoted entirely to this topic. Perhaps this reflects the facts that vacuum has become one of the more critical aspects of future accelerators, and that many of the pioneers in the accelerator field are being replaced by new, younger personnel. The lectures start with the basic concepts of the physics and technology of vacuum followed by detailed descriptions of the many different types of gas-pumping devices and methods to measure the pressures achieved. The outgassing characteristics of the different materials used in the construction of vacuum systems and the optimisation of cleaning methods to reduce this outgassing are then explained together with the effects of the residual gases on the particle beams. Then follow chapters on leak detection, materials and vacuum system engineering. Finally, seminars are presented on designing vacuum systems, the history of vacuum devices, the LHC (large hadron collider) vacuum system, vacuum systems for electron storage rings, and quality assurance for vacuum. (orig.)

  7. The Distinctive Sensitivity to Microgravity of Immune Cell Subpopulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Luo, Haiying; Liu, Jing; Wang, Peng; Dong, Dandan; Shang, Peng; Zhao, Yong

    2015-11-01

    Immune dysfunction in astronauts is well documented after spaceflights. Microgravity is one of the key factors directly suppressing the function of immune system. However, it is unclear which subpopulations of immune cells including innate and adaptive immune cells are more sensitive to microgravity We herein investigated the direct effects of modeled microgravity (MMg) on different immune cells in vitro. Mouse splenocytes, thymocytes and bone marrow cells were exposed to MMg for 16 hrs. The survival and the phenotypes of different subsets of immune cells including CD4+T cells, CD8+T cells, CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg), B cells, monocytes/macrophages, dendritic cells (DCs), natural killer cells (NK) were determined by flow cytometry. After splenocytes were cultured under MMg for 16h, the cell frequency and total numbers of monocytes, macrophages and CD4+Foxp3+T cells were significantly decreased more than 70 %. MMg significantly decreased the cell numbers of CD8+ T cells, B cells and neutrophils in splenocytes. The cell numbers of CD4+T cells and NK cells were unchanged significantly when splenocytes were cultured under MMg compared with controls. However, MMg significantly increased the ratio of mature neutrophils to immature neutrophils in bone marrow and the cell number of DCs in splenocytes. Based on the cell survival ability, monocytes, macrophages and CD4+Foxp3+Treg cells are most sensitive to microgravity; CD4+T cells and NK cells are resistant to microgravity; CD8+T cells and neutrophils are impacted by short term microgravity exposure. Microgravity promoted the maturation of neutrophils and development of DCs in vitro. The present studies offered new insights on the direct effects of MMg on the survival and homeostasis of immune cell subsets.

  8. How to Make a Microgravity Drop Tower for Your Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLombard, Richard; Hall, Nancy R.

    2014-01-01

    Microgravity is quite often seen as exotic and special as astronauts float around in the International Space Station, eating MM's in mid-air, and performing science experiments, all done seemingly without gravity being present. Surprisingly enough, up on the ISS there is about 90 of the same gravity that holds you to the floor in your classroom or museum exhibit hall. Participate in this session and you will understand that and more. You can use simple devices to demonstrate microgravity conditions in your classroom or museum exhibit hall. This will be the same microgravity condition that astronauts experience on the ISS, just for a much shorter period of time. Contrary to popular opinion of some people, microgravity is NOT caused by zero gravity up there. Microgravity on the ISS is due to free fall within the Earth's gravitational field. That means you can drop an item in free fall in your classroom and museum exhibit hall and that item will experience microgravity. In this session, a short theory segment will explain and reinforce these concepts so that you may explain to others. The session will concentrate on showing the session participants how to make an effective, but inexpensive, drop tower for use in the classroom. Such a drop tower may be used to reinforce classroom instruction in physics and forces motion as well as serve as a platform for student investigations, classroom competitions, and student science or technology fair entries. Session participants will build their own simple microgravity experiment and operate them in a drop tower, compare results, and modify their experiment based on results. This material is also useful for public demonstrations at school open houses, travelling museum exhibits, fixed museum exhibits, and independent student projects or experiments. These free fall concepts also connect terrestrial demonstrations with planetary moon motion, comet trajectory, and more.

  9. Rotary bayonets for cryogenic and vacuum service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucinski, R.A.; Dixon, K.D.; Krasa, R.; Krempetz, K.J.; Mulholland, G.T.; Trotter, G.R.; Urbin, J.B.

    1993-07-01

    Rotary bayonets were designed, tested, and installed for liquid nitrogen, liquid argon, and vacuum service. This paper will present the design, testing, and service record for two sizes of vacuum jacketed cryogenic rotary bayonets and two sizes of vacuum service rotary bayonets. Materials used in construction provide electrical isolation across the bayonet joint. The joint permits 360 degrees of rotation between the male and female pipe sections while maintaining integrity of service. Assemblies using three such joints were built to allow end connection points to be translated through at least 1 meter of horizontal travel while kept in service. Vacuum jacketed sizes built in-house at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are 1-1/2 in. inner pipe size, 3 in. vacuum jacket, and 4 in. inner pipe size, 6 in. vacuum jacket The single wall vacuum service bayonets are in 4 in. and 6 in. pipe sizes. The bayonets have successfully been in active service for over one year

  10. Application of vacuum technology during nuclear fuel fabrication, inspection and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, S.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Vacuum technology plays very important role during various stages of fabrication, inspection and characterization of U, Pu based nuclear fuels. Controlled vacuum is needed for melting and casting of U, Pu based alloys, picture framing of the fuel meat for plate type fuel fabrication, carbothermic reduction for synthesis of (U-Pu) mixed carbide powder, dewaxing of green ceramic fuel pellets, degassing of sintered pellets and encapsulation of fuel pellets inside clad tube. Application of vacuum technology is also important during inspection and characterization of fuel materials and fuel pins by way of XRF and XRD analysis, Mass spectrometer Helium leak detection etc. A novel method of low temperature sintering of UO 2 developed at BARC using controlled vacuum as sintering atmosphere has undergone successful irradiation testing in Cirus. The paper will describe various fuel fabrication flow sheets highlighting the stages where vacuum applications are needed

  11. Effects of vacuum and controlled atmosphere treatments on insect mortality and lettuce quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong-Biao

    2003-08-01

    Laboratory studies were conducted to determine the effects of vacuum and controlled atmosphere on mortality of aphids, Nasonovia ribisnigri (Mosley) and Macrosiphum euphorbiae (Thomas), and leafminer, Liriomyza langei Frick, and on the visual quality of iceberg lettuce at three different temperatures. Vacuum at 50 mbar and controlled atmosphere with 6% CO2 were effective in controlling aphids and leafminer larvae. Complete control of N. ribisnigri and M. euphorbiae was achieved with vacuum treatments and 6% CO2 CA treatments at 5 degrees C in 4 d. Mortality was >96% when leafminer larvae were treated with vacuum and 6% CO2 CA treatments for 4 d. However, leafminer pupae were more tolerant to the treatments and highest mortality was close to 60% in 4 d with CO2 under vacuum. None of the treatments had negative effects on visual quality of iceberg lettuce. Results from this study are encouraging and warrant further and large-scale research.

  12. New trends in oil free vacuum generation equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliev Yu. K.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Main modern trends of vacuum technology and vacuum equipment market such as fore-vacuum and high-vacuum pumps, analytical devices and vacuum components are shown. Amount of different regional markets is also reviewed by main world vacuum equipment suppliers turnover.

  13. A microgravity boiling and convective condensation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachnik, Leo; Lee, Doojeong; Best, Frederick; Faget, Nanette

    1987-12-01

    A boiling and condensing test article consisting of two straight tube boilers, one quartz and one stainless steel, and two 1.5 m long glass-in-glass heat exchangers, on 6 mm ID and one 10 mm ID, was flown on the NASA KC-135 0-G aircraft. Using water as the working fluid, the 5 kw boiler produces two phase mixtures of varying quality for mass flow rates between 0.005 and 0.1 kg/sec. The test section is instrumented at eight locations with absolute and differential pressure transducers and thermocouples. A gamma densitometer is used to measure void fraction, and high speed photography records the flow regimes. A three axis accelerometer provides aircraft acceleration data (+ or - 0.01G). Data are collected via an analog-to-digital conversion and data acquisition system. Bubbly, annular, and slug flow regimes were observed in the test section under microgravity conditions. Flow oscillations were observed for some operating conditions and the effect of the 2-G pullout prior to the 0-G period was observed by continuously recording data throughout the parabolas. A total fo 300 parabolas was flown.

  14. NASA's Microgravity Fluid Physics Strategic Research Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motil, Brian J.; Singh, Bhim S.

    2004-01-01

    The Microgravity Fluid Physics Program at NASA has developed a substantial investigator base engaging a broad crosssection of the U.S. scientific community. As a result, it enjoys a rich history of many significant scientific achievements. The research supported by the program has produced many important findings that have been published in prestigious journals such as Science, Nature, Journal of Fluid Mechanics, Physics of Fluids, and many others. The focus of the program so far has primarily been on fundamental scientific studies. However, a recent shift in emphasis at NASA to develop advanced technologies to enable future exploration of space has provided motivation to add a strategic research component to the program. This has set into motion a year of intense planning within NASA including three workshops to solicit inputs from the external scientific community. The planning activities and the workshops have resulted in a prioritized list of strategic research issues along with a corresponding detailed roadmap specific to fluid physics. The results of these activities were provided to NASA s Office of Biological and Physical Research (OBPR) to support the development of the Enterprise Strategy document. This paper summarizes these results while showing how the planned research supports NASA s overall vision through OBPR s organizing questions.

  15. The Microgravity Research Experiments (MICREX) Data Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, C. A.; Jones, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    An electronic data base identifying over 800 fluids and materials processing experiments performed in a low-gravity environment has been created at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The compilation, called MICREX (MICrogravity Research Experiments) was designed to document all such experimental efforts performed (1) on U.S. manned space vehicles, (2) on payloads deployed from U.S. manned space vehicles, and (3) on all domestic and international sounding rockets (excluding those of China and the former U.S.S.R.). Data available on most experiments include (1) principal and co-investigator (2) low-gravity mission, (3) processing facility, (4) experimental objectives and results, (5) identifying key words, (6) sample materials, (7) applications of the processed materials/research area, (8) experiment descriptive publications, and (9) contacts for more information concerning the experiment. This technical memorandum (1) summarizes the historical interest in reduced-gravity fluid dynamics, (2) describes the importance of a low-gravity fluids and materials processing data base, (4) describes thE MICREX data base format and computational World Wide Web access procedures, and (5) documents (in hard-copy form) the descriptions of the first 600 fluids and materials processing experiments entered into MICREX.

  16. Mechanobiologic Research in a Microgravity Environment Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidi, A.; Dubini, G.; Tominetti, F.; Raimondi, M.

    mechanical forces. For example, cartilage constructs have been cultured in spinner flasks under mixed or unmixed conditions, in simulated and in real microgravity. In these mixing studies, however, it is difficult to definitively quantify the effects of mixing-induced mechanical forces from those of convection-enhanced transport of nutrients to and of catabolites away from the cells. At the state of the art, the presence of a more controlled mechanical environment may be the condition required in order to study the biochemical and mechanical response of these biological systems. Such a controlled environment could lead to an advanced fluid dynamic design of the culture chamber that could both enhance the local mass transfer phenomena and match the needs of specific macroscopic mechanical effects in tissue development. The bioreactor is an excellent example of how the skills and resources of two distinctly different fields can complement each other. Microgravity can be used to enhance the formation of tissue like aggregates in specially designed bioreactors. Theoretical and experimental projects are under way to improve cell culture techniques using microgravity conditions experienced during space flights. Bioreactors usable under space flight conditions impose constructional principles which are different from those intended solely for ground applications. The Columbus Laboratory as part of the International Space Station (ISS) will be an evolving facility in low Earth orbit. Its mission is to support scientific, technological, and commercial activities in space. A goal of this research is to design a unique bioreactor for use sequentially from ground research to space research. One of the particularities of the simulated microgravity obtained through time averaging of the weight vector is that by varying the rotational velocity the same results can be obtained with a different value of g. One of the first applications of this technique in space biology was in fact the

  17. A hydroponic system for microgravity plant experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, B. D.; Bausch, W. C.; Knott, W. M.

    1988-01-01

    The construction of a permanently manned space station will provide the opportunity to grow plants for weeks or months in orbit for experiments or food production. With this opportunity comes the need for a method to provide plants with a continuous supply of water and nutrients in microgravity. The Capillary Effect Root Environment System (CERES) uses capillary forces to maintain control of circulating plant nutrient solution in the weightless environment of an orbiting spacecraft. The nutrient solution is maintained at a pressure slightly less than the ambient air pressure while it flows on one side of a porous membrane. The root, on the other side of the membrane, is surrounded by a thin film of nutrient solution where it contacts the moist surface of the membrane. The root is provided with water, nutrients and air simultaneously. Air bubbles in the nutrient solution are removed using a hydrophobic/hydrophilic membrane system. A model scaled to the size necessary for flight hardware to test CERES in the space shuttle was constructed.

  18. Vacuum system for the test accumulation ring for the NUMATRON project (TARN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizobuchi, Akira

    1979-01-01

    The vacuum system for the test accumulation ring for the NUMATRON project (TARN) being constructed in the Institute for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, for the purpose of accumulating fundamental data on high energy, heavy ion acceleration is presented. The main specifications of TARN are as follows: repetition rate 1 Hz, average radius 5.06 m, the radius of curvature 1.333 m, circumference 31.795 m, the length of a unit cell 3.974 m, the length of a long straight section 1.8 m, the number of unit cells 8, superperiodicity 8, and the structure of a unit cell FODO. The vacuum level of TARN lower than 1 x 10 -10 Torr is necessary. The preliminary test apparatuses, number one and two, for obtaining the basic data on superhigh vacuum were constructed. The characteristics of a molecular vacuum pump and the high temperature baking effect were tested with the number one test apparatus. The glow discharge cleaning effect of the model vacuum chamber for deflecting magnets was tested, utilizing the number two test apparatus. The pressure curve in course of time during pump down, the residual gas components, the residual gas spectrum in vacuum state and the change of residual gas components before and after the glow discharge cleaning are shown as these testing results. The vacuum gauges, which are used for TARN for measuring both the total pressure and the partial pressure of gas, are explained. The vacuum system, the vacuum chamber, the vacuum pumps, the expected exhausting speed and the partial functional test results for the vacuum system are introduced. (Nakai, Y.)

  19. Physiology of a microgravity environment invited review: microgravity and skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitts, R. H.; Riley, D. R.; Widrick, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    Spaceflight (SF) has been shown to cause skeletal muscle atrophy; a loss in force and power; and, in the first few weeks, a preferential atrophy of extensors over flexors. The atrophy primarily results from a reduced protein synthesis that is likely triggered by the removal of the antigravity load. Contractile proteins are lost out of proportion to other cellular proteins, and the actin thin filament is lost disproportionately to the myosin thick filament. The decline in contractile protein explains the decrease in force per cross-sectional area, whereas the thin-filament loss may explain the observed postflight increase in the maximal velocity of shortening in the type I and IIa fiber types. Importantly, the microgravity-induced decline in peak power is partially offset by the increased fiber velocity. Muscle velocity is further increased by the microgravity-induced expression of fast-type myosin isozymes in slow fibers (hybrid I/II fibers) and by the increased expression of fast type II fiber types. SF increases the susceptibility of skeletal muscle to damage, with the actual damage elicited during postflight reloading. Evidence in rats indicates that SF increases fatigability and reduces the capacity for fat oxidation in skeletal muscles. Future studies will be required to establish the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the SF-induced muscle atrophy and functional loss and to develop effective exercise countermeasures.

  20. Finite Element Analysis of Osteocytes Mechanosensitivity Under Simulated Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Sun, Lian-Wen; Du, Cheng-Fei; Wu, Xin-Tong; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2018-04-01

    It was found that the mechanosensitivity of osteocytes could be altered under simulated microgravity. However, how the mechanical stimuli as the biomechanical origins cause the bioresponse in osteocytes under microgravity is unclear yet. Computational studies may help us to explore the mechanical deformation changes of osteocytes under microgravity. Here in this paper, we intend to use the computational simulation to investigate the mechanical behavior of osteocytes under simulated microgravity. In order to obtain the shape information of osteocytes, the biological experiment was conducted under simulated microgravity prior to the numerical simulation The cells were rotated by a clinostat for 6 hours or 5 days and fixed, the cytoskeleton and the nucleus were immunofluorescence stained and scanned, and the cell shape and the fluorescent intensity were measured from fluorescent images to get the dimension information of osteocytes The 3D finite element (FE) cell models were then established based on the scanned image stacks. Several components such as the actin cortex, the cytoplasm, the nucleus, the cytoskeleton of F-actin and microtubules were considered in the model. The cell models in both 6 hours and 5 days groups were then imposed by three magnitudes (0.5, 10 and 15 Pa) of simulating fluid shear stress, with cell total displacement and the internal discrete components deformation calculated. The results showed that under the simulated microgravity: (1) the nuclear area and height statistically significantly increased, which made the ratio of membrane-cortex height to nucleus height statistically significantly decreased; (2) the fluid shear stress-induced maximum displacements and average displacements in the whole cell decreased, with the deformation decreasing amplitude was largest when exposed to 1.5Pa of fluid shear stress; (3) the fluid shear stress-induced deformation of cell membrane-cortex and cytoskeleton decreased, while the fluid shear stress

  1. Influência da pressão, temperatura e pré-tratamentos na secagem a vácuo de cenoura e abóbora Influence of pressure and temperature and pre-treatments in the carrot and pumpkin vacuum drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aroldo Arévalo-Pinedo

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho visou estudar experimentalmente a cinética de secagem a vácuo de cenoura e abóbora "in natura" e pré-tratadas por branqueamento e congelamento. Os ensaios experimentais foram conduzidos em um secador a vácuo, nas pressões de 5, 15 e 25 kPa e temperaturas de 50, 60 e 70°C. Estudou-se a influência da pressão e temperatura assim como os pré-tratamentos adotados sobre a cinética de secagem. A análise do efeito dos pré-tratamentos e dos parâmetros pressão e temperatura sobre a velocidade de secagem revelou que os melhores valores foram obtidos com a temperatura de 70°C e pressão de 5 kPa para as amostras prétratadas por congelamento. Quanto ao tipo de matéria-prima utilizado, a abóbora apresentou maiores velocidades de secagem que a cenoura, independentemente do tratamento recebido e da condição de secagem utilizada. As curvas experimentais de secagem foram ajustadas ao modelo difusional de Fick para uma placa plana infinita.In this work it was studied experimentally the kinetics of drying of carrot and pumpkin under vacuum drying in nature and pre-treatment by freezing and bleaching. The experimental runs were driven in a dryer under vacuum, at pressures of 5, 15 and 25 kPa and temperatures of 50, 60 and 70°C. The influences on the drying kinetics of the pressures and temperature were studied, as well as the effect of adopting pre-treatment. It was observed that the best values were obtained at the temperature of 70°C and pressure of 5 kPa for the samples pretreatment by freezing. As concerns to the raw material employed, pumpkin presented higher drying speeds than the one shown by carrot, independently of the treatment received and of the operational condition of drying. The experimental curves of drying were adjusted to the difusional model of Fick for an infinite slab.

  2. Synergistic effects of space radiation and microgravity (miRNA WT and ced-1 mutant)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space radiations and microgravity both could cause DNA damage in cells but the effects of microgravity on DNA damage response to space radiations are still...

  3. Synergistic effects of space radiation and microgravity (miRNA WT and dys-mutant)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space radiations and microgravity both could cause DNA damage in cells but the effects of microgravity on DNA damage response to space radiations are still...

  4. Microgravity effect on C. elegans N2/VC (CERISE 4 days)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microgravity effect on C. elegans gene expression was analysed by whole genome microarray. The worms were cultivated under microgravity for 4 days in the Japanese...

  5. Diffuser/ejector system for a very high vacuum environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, K. E.; Wojciechowski, C. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Turbo jet engines are used to furnish the necessary high temperature, high volume, medium pressure gas to provide a high vacuum test environment at comparatively low cost for space engines at sea level. Moreover, the invention provides a unique way by use of the variable area ratio ejectors with a pair of meshing cones are used. The outer cone is arranged to translate fore and aft, and the inner cone is interchangeable with other cones having varying angles of taper.

  6. Entropy evolution in warm inflation from a 5 D vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, J.; Bellini, M.

    2009-01-01

    Using some ideas of Modern Kaluza-Klein theory, we examine the evolution of entropy on a 4 D Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) brane from a 5 D vacuum state, which is defined on a 5 D background Riemann-flat metric. We found that entropy production is sufficiently important during inflation: S > 10 90 ., for all the initial values of temperature T 0 GU .

  7. Transcriptome Analysis of Oryza sativa Calli Under Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jing; Chen, Haiying; Cai, Weiming

    2015-11-01

    The transcriptome of Oryza sativacalli was analyzed on board the Chinese spaceship "Shenzhou 8" to study the effects of microgravity on plant signal transduction and secondary metabolism (as one of the experiments with SIMBOX on Shenzhou 8). Calli of Oryza sativa were pre-cultured for 4 days on ground and then loaded into the stationary platform or the rotating platform of a biological incubator, called SIMBOX, to grow in space under microgravity conditions or 1g-conditions, respectively. The calli were fixed by RNAlater after grew 324 h under microgravity. After 17 days, Shenzhou 8 returned to Earth carrying SIMBOX. Oryza sativa calli were recovered, and the RNA was extracted for transcriptome analysis. After comparing 1 gspaceflight controls-inflight controls with 1 g-ground controls, 157 probe sets with different expression levels (fold change ≥2, p<0.05) were identified. When comparing spaceflight controls to 1 g-ground controls and to 1 g-inflight controls, 678 probe sets with different expression levels (fold change ≥2, p<0.05) were identified. The fact that the same 678 probe sets were identified in these two comparisons suggests that transcription was affected under microgravity conditions. MapMan analysis was used to classify 627 microgravity responsive (MR) transcripts. The MR transcripts were mainly involved in cell wall structure, the TCA cycle, primary metabolism, transcription, protein modification and degradation, hormone metabolism, calcium regulation, receptor like kinase activity and transport.

  8. Report of an exploratory study on vacuum drying of flower bulbs; Verslag orienterend onderzoek vacuumdrogen bloembollen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijkema, M.; Van der Klugt, J.W.

    2010-03-15

    In an exploratory practical study, several questions were answered with regard to vacuum drying. What are the effects on growing and flowering of flower bulbs: (1) of vacuum drying; (2) of half an hour of zero oxygen immediately after harvesting; and (3) of strong temperature shift immediately after harvesting? In addition, the following questions were answered: (4) do flower bulbs dry sufficiently in half an hour of vacuum?; (5) how do fungi and bacteria respond to half an hour in vacuum?; (6) how do animal pests (e.g. bulb mite)react to vacuum? [Dutch] In een orienterende praktijkproef is een aantal vragen beantwoord met betrekking tot vacuumdrogen. Wat zijn de effecten op de groei en de bloei van bloembollen: (1) van vacuumdrogen; (2)van een half uur zuurstofloosheid direct na de oogst?; en (3) van een sterke temperatuurwisseling direct na de oogst?. Daarnaast werden de volgende vragen beantwoord: (4) drogen bloembollen voldoende in een half uur vacuum?; (5) hoe reageren schimmels en bacterien op het vacuum?; (6) hoe reageren dierlijke aantasters (o.a. bollenmijt) op het vacuum?.

  9. Vacuum/gas handling systems for ZTH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downing, J.N.

    1987-01-01

    The proposed ZTH vacuum system consists of three (potentially four or more) high-vacuum-pumping-stations (HVPSs), a gas handling system, a roughing system, and a vacuum control system. Each high vacuum line consists of a turbomolecular pump (TMP) pumping stack connected to the torus through a right-angle valve, a duct, and a 2 kV insulating break/bellows combination. The HVPSs are designed to be bakeable to at least 150 C. The gate seals on the high-vacuum valves are vision O-rings. Throughout the vacuum liner and high-vacuum pumping system, metal sealed joints are used where possible. Any O-ring seals, other than the gate seals, are a double-pumped configuration where a roughing vacuum is maintained between the O-rings. The insulating break eliminates ground loop currents, and the bellows mechanically decouples the pumping from the vacuum liner. This bellows section will accommodate the dimensional changes caused by heating the liner and/or the high-vacuum system

  10. Running vacuum cosmological models: linear scalar perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perico, E.L.D. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão 1371, CEP 05508-090, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Tamayo, D.A., E-mail: elduartep@usp.br, E-mail: tamayo@if.usp.br [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão 1226, CEP 05508-900, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-08-01

    In cosmology, phenomenologically motivated expressions for running vacuum are commonly parameterized as linear functions typically denoted by Λ( H {sup 2}) or Λ( R ). Such models assume an equation of state for the vacuum given by P-bar {sub Λ} = - ρ-bar {sub Λ}, relating its background pressure P-bar {sub Λ} with its mean energy density ρ-bar {sub Λ} ≡ Λ/8π G . This equation of state suggests that the vacuum dynamics is due to an interaction with the matter content of the universe. Most of the approaches studying the observational impact of these models only consider the interaction between the vacuum and the transient dominant matter component of the universe. We extend such models by assuming that the running vacuum is the sum of independent contributions, namely ρ-bar {sub Λ} = Σ {sub i} ρ-bar {sub Λ} {sub i} . Each Λ i vacuum component is associated and interacting with one of the i matter components in both the background and perturbation levels. We derive the evolution equations for the linear scalar vacuum and matter perturbations in those two scenarios, and identify the running vacuum imprints on the cosmic microwave background anisotropies as well as on the matter power spectrum. In the Λ( H {sup 2}) scenario the vacuum is coupled with every matter component, whereas the Λ( R ) description only leads to a coupling between vacuum and non-relativistic matter, producing different effects on the matter power spectrum.

  11. Moduli vacuum bubbles produced by evaporating black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    We consider a model with a toroidally compactified extra dimension giving rise to a temperature-dependent 4D effective potential with one-loop contributions due to the Casimir effect, along with a 5D cosmological constant. The forms of the effective potential at low and high temperatures indicate a possibility for the formation of a domain wall bubble, formed by the modulus scalar field, surrounding an evaporating black hole. This is viewed as an example of a recently proposed black hole vacuum bubble arising from matter-sourced moduli fields in the vicinity of an evaporating black hole [D. Green, E. Silverstein, and D. Starr, Phys. Rev. D 74, 024004 (2006)]. The black hole bubble can be highly opaque to lower-energy particles and photons, and thereby entrap them within. For high-temperature black holes, there may also be a symmetry-breaking black hole bubble of false vacuum of the type previously conjectured by Moss [I. G. Moss, Phys. Rev. D 32, 1333 (1985)], tending to reflect low-energy particles from its wall. A double bubble composed of these two different types of bubble may form around the black hole, altering the hole's emission spectrum that reaches outside observers. Smaller mass black holes that have already evaporated away could have left vacuum bubbles behind that contribute to the dark matter

  12. Appropriate fabrication method for vacuum-formed mouthguards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuhashi, Fumi; Koide, Kaoru

    2017-04-01

    The aim was to examine the influence of the heating temperature on the fabrication of vacuum-formed mouthguards. Mouthguard sheets of 3.8 mm ethylene vinyl acetate were vacuum-formed on working models at three heating temperatures: 80, 100, and 120°C. The thickness of the mouthguard was measured at the labial surface of the central incisor, and the buccal and occlusal surfaces of the first molar. Differences in the thickness of the mouthguards were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance. The fit of the mouthguard was examined at the central incisor and the first molar by measuring the distance between the mouthguard and the cervical margin of the working model. Differences in the distance between the mouthguard and the cervical margin according to the heating temperatures were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance. Mouthguard thickness varied among the measured regions of the central incisors and first molars (P vacuum-formed mouthguards. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Reactivity study on thermal cracking of vacuum residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, A. Y.; Díaz, S. D.; Rodríguez, R. C.; Laverde, D.

    2016-02-01

    This study focused on the process reactivity of thermal cracking of vacuum residues from crude oils mixtures. The thermal cracking experiments were carried out under a nitrogen atmosphere at 120psi between 430 to 500°C for 20 minutes. Temperature conditions were established considering the maximum fractional conversion reported in tests of thermogravimetry performed in the temperature range of 25 to 600°C, with a constant heating rate of 5°C/min and a nitrogen flow rate of 50ml/min. The obtained products were separated in to gases, distillates and coke. The results indicate that the behaviour of thermal reactivity over the chemical composition is most prominent for the vacuum residues with higher content of asphaltenes, aromatics, and resins. Finally some correlations were obtained in order to predict the weight percentage of products from its physical and chemical properties such as CCR, SARA (saturates, aromatics, resins, asphaltenes) and density. The results provide new knowledge of the effect of temperature and the properties of vacuum residues in thermal conversion processes.

  14. Drying kinetics of RDX under atmospheric pressure and vacuum conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yaoxuan; Chen, Houhe; Chen, Teng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • In this study, RDX is dried in the ranges of 60–90 °C under atmospheric pressure and vacuum conditions. • Ten models are used to describe the drying of RDX. • The Midilli–Kucuk model is determined as the most suitable model. • Effective moisture diffusivity and activation energy for drying process are determined. - Abstract: The drying characteristics of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) are investigated in the ranges of 60–90 °C of drying temperature under atmospheric pressure and vacuum conditions in a laboratory scale dryer. The effect of drying temperature and absolute pressure on the drying characteristics is determined. In order to estimate and select the suitable form of RDX drying curves, the curves are fitted to ten different semi-theoretical and/or empirical thin-layer drying models and coefficients are evaluated by non-linear regression analysis. The models are compared based on their coefficient of determination, such as mean bias error, root mean square error, reduced chi-square and modeling efficiency between experimental and predicted moisture ratios. It is deduced that Midilli–Kucuk model has shown a better fit to the experimental drying data as compared to other models. A diffusion model is used to describe the moisture transfer and the effective diffusivity for RDX drying is also determined at each temperature. Beside, the activation energy is also expressed using Arrhenius-type relationship under atmospheric pressure and vacuum conditions

  15. Development of vacuum glazing with advanced thermal properties - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koebel, M.; Manz, H.

    2009-03-15

    Windows constitute a weak link in the building envelope and hence contribute significantly to the total heating energy demand in buildings. By evacuating the glazing cavity a vacuum glazing is created and heat transfer can be significantly reduced. This project was designed to build knowledge and technology necessary to fabricate vacuum glazing with advanced thermal properties. More specifically, various strategies for improvement of conventional technology were investigated. Of central importance was the development of a novel edge sealing approach which can in theory circumvent the main limitation of conventional glass soldering technology. This approach which is rapid, low temperature, low cost and completely vacuum compatible was filed for patenting in 2008. With regards to thermal insulation performance and glazing deflection, numerical studies were performed demonstrating the importance of nonlinear behavior with glazing size and the results published. A detailed service life prediction model was elaborated which defines a set of parameters necessary to keep the expected pressure increase below a threshold value of 0.1 Pa after 30 years. The model takes into account four possible sources of pressure increase and a getter material which acts as a sink. For the production of 0.5 m by 0.5 m glazing assembly prototypes, a high vacuum chamber was constructed and a first sealing prototype realized therein. The manufacture of improved prototypes and optimization of the anodic bonding edge sealing technology with emphasis on process relevant aspects is the goal of a follow-up project. (authors)

  16. Theoretical Investigation of a Hot Refractory Anode Vacuum Arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beilis, I.I.; Boxman, R.L.; Goldsmith, S.

    1999-01-01

    The two principal modes of the vacuum arc arc the multi-cathode spot and the anode spot vacuum arc discharges. In both cases the current is conducted in plasma that is generated on relatively small areas on the relevant electrode surface. The hot anode vacuum arc (HAVA) is another mode of the vacuum arc in which the plasma is produced by material evaporation over the whole surface of a high temperature anode heated by the arc itself. In the present work, a model of a new type of the HAVA, recently discovered in the Electrical Discharges and Plasma Laboratory of TAU, is considered. In this mode of the HAVA the anode is made of a thermally isolated refractory material (graphite), whereas the water cooled cathode is fabricated from a more volatile material (copper). The discharge starts in the multi-cathode spot mode and after a transition period, during which the anode is heated by the arc, re-evaporated cathode material is released from the hot anode surface and becomes the main source of the arc plasma. At steady state, anode temperature exceeds a certain critical value. No evaporation of anode refractory material occurs during arc operation. This arc mode is labeled Hot Refractory Anode Vacuum Arc (HRAVA). The theoretical description of the HRAVA is accomplished by a plasma model that includes equations of mass, momentum, energy, and electrical current conservation, and by an anode thermal model that describes the anode thermal balance. The plasma model also considers radial expansion of the plasma from the interelectrode region. A self-consistent solution of the plasma and anode models was obtained. Plasma electron temperature, plasma density, plasma energy flux to the anode, and anode temperature distribution were calculated for several arc currents in the range 175 - 500 A. In the steady-state arc operation, anode surface temperature was calculated to be in the range 1800 - 2600 degree K, electron temperature is about 1 eV, effective anode voltage is about 6 V

  17. Modeling of Slosh Dynamics in Cryogenic Propellant Tanks in Microgravity Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The slosh dynamics in cryogenic fuel tanks under microgravity is a pressing problem that severely affects the reliability of launching spacecraft. After reaching low Earth orbit, the propellant in a multistage rocket experiences large and cyclic changes in temperature as a result of solar heating. Tank wall heating can induce thermal stratification and propellant boiloff, particularly during slosh-inducing vehicle maneuvers. Precise understanding of the dynamic and thermodynamic effects of propellant slosh caused by these maneuvers is critical to mission performance and success. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis is used extensively within the space vehicle industry in an attempt to characterize the behavior of liquids in microgravity, yet experimental data to quantify these predictions is very limited and reduces confidence in the analytical predictions. A novel approach designed to produce high-fidelity data for correlation to CFD model predictions is being developed with the assistance of Florida Institute of Technology (FIT) and Sierra Lobo, Inc. With few exceptions, previous work in slosh dynamics was theoretical or treated the mass of fuel as a variable of inertia only; such models did not consider the viscosity, surface tension, or other important fluid effects. The challenges in this research are in the development of instrumentation able to measure the required parameters, the computational ability to quantify the fluid behaviors, and the means to assess both the measurements and predictions. The design of this experiment bridges the understanding of slosh dynamics in microgravity by a comprehensive approach that combines CFD tools, dynamic simulation tools, semianalytical models of the predominant fluid effects, and an experimental framework that includes measurement and characterization of liquid slosh in one-degree-of-freedom (DOF) and two-DOF experiments, and ultimately experiments in a NASA low-gravity aircraft.

  18. Entangled wavepackets in the vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattemölle, Joris; Freivogel, Ben

    2017-10-01

    Motivated by the black hole firewall problem, we find highly entangled pairs of spatially localized modes in quantum field theory. We demonstrate that appropriately chosen wavepackets localized outside the horizon are nearly purified by `mirror' modes behind the horizon. In addition, we calculate the entanglement entropy of a single localized wavepacket in the Minkowski vacuum. In all cases we study, the quantum state of the system becomes pure in the limit that the wavepackets delocalize; we quantify the trade-off between localization and purity.

  19. Vacuum Chambers for LEP sections

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    The picture shows sections of the LEP vacuum chambers to be installed in the dipole magnets (left) and in the quadrupoles (right). The dipole chamber has three channels: the beam chamber, the pumping duct where the NEG (non-evaporabe getter) is installed and the water channel for cooling (on top in the picture). The pumping duct is connected to the beam chamber through holes in the separating wall. The thick lead lining to shield radiation can also be seen. These chambers were manufactured as extruded aluminium alloy profiles.

  20. Laser-triggered vacuum switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannon, Paul J.; Cowgill, Donald F.

    1990-01-01

    A laser-triggered vacuum switch has a material such as a alkali metal halide on the cathode electrode for thermally activated field emission of electrons and ions upon interaction with a laser beam, the material being in contact with the cathode with a surface facing the discharge gap. The material is preferably a mixture of KCl and Ti powders. The laser may either shine directly on the material, preferably through a hole in the anode, or be directed to the material over a fiber optic cable.

  1. Vacuum Decay via Lorentzian Wormholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, J. L.

    We speculate about the space-time description due to the presence of Lorentzian worm-holes (handles in space-time joining two distant regions or other universes) in quantum gravity. The semiclassical rate of production of these Lorentzian wormholes in Reissner-Nordström space-times is calculated as a result of the spontaneous decay of vacuum due to a real tunneling configuration. In the magnetic case it only depends on the value of the field theoretical fine structure constant. We predict that the quantum probability corresponding to the nucleation of such geodesically complete space-times should be acutally negligible in our physical Universe.

  2. Transcritical phenomena of autoignited fuel droplet at high pressures under microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segawa, Daisuke; Kajikawa, Tomoki; Kadoka, Toshikazu

    2005-09-01

    An experimental study has been performed under microgravity to obtain the detailed information needed for the deep understanding of the combustion phenomena of single fuel droplets which autoignite in supercritical gaseous environment. The microgravity environments both in a capsule of a drop shaft and during the parabolic flight of an aircraft were utilized for the experiments. An octadecanol droplet suspended at the tip of a fine quartz fiber in the cold section of the high-pressure combustion chamber was transferred quickly to be subjected to a hot gaseous medium in an electric furnace, this followed by autoignition and combustion of the fuel droplet in supercritical gaseous environment. High-pressure gaseous mixture of oxygen and nitrogen was used as the ambient gas. Temporal variation of temperature of the fuel droplet in supercritical gaseous environment was examined using an embedded fine thermocouple. Sequential backlighted images of the autoignited fuel droplet or the lump of fuel were acquired in supercritical gaseous environment with reduced oxygen concentration. The observed pressure dependence of the ignition delay and that of the burning time of the droplet with the embedded thermocouple were consistent with the previous results. Simultaneous imaging with thermometry showed that the appearance of the fuel changed remarkably at measured fuel temperatures around the critical temperature of the pure fuel. The interface temperature of the fuel rose well beyond the critical temperature of the pure fuel in supercritical gaseous environment. The fuel was gasified long before the end of combustion in supercritical gaseous environment. The proportion of the gasification time to the burning time decreased monotonically with increasing the ambient pressure.

  3. Development and research of vacuum-plasma composite coatings for increase of operability of shearing dies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volosova Marina A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The technological principles of low-temperature deposition of multilayer vacuum-plasma coatings with the increased operational properties on various types of die steels with the assistance of accelerated argon molecules beam are offered in the article. Four standard architecture of vacuum-plasma coatings - Ti/(Ti,ZrN, Cr/CrN, TiN/TiCN/(Ti,CrN and Ti/(Ti,AlN are considered. It is shown that deposition of vacuum-plasma coatings of the listed structures at the optimum modes considerably reduces intensity of wear of shearing dies therefore quality of shaped products several times increases.

  4. Thermal-vacuum facility with in-situ mechanical loading. [for testing space construction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, R. C.; Hansen, J. S.; Holzer, R. P.; Uffen, B.; Mabson, G.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes a thermal-vacuum space simulator used to assess property changes of fiber-reinforced polymer composite systems. The facility can achieve a vacuum of approximately .0000001 torr with temperatures ranging from -200 to +300 F. Some preliminary experimental results are presented for materials subjected to thermal loading up to 200 F. The tests conducted include the evaluation of matrix modulus and strength, coefficients of thermal expansion, and fracture toughness. Though the experimental program is at an early stage, the data appear to indicate that these parameters are influenced by hard vacuum.

  5. Microgravity effect on endophytic bacteria communities of Triticum aestivum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Youcai; Fu, Yuming; Chen, Huiwen; Liu, Hong; Sun, Yi

    2018-02-01

    Under normal gravity conditions, endophytic bacteria, one of the key bacterial community that inhabit in plant tissues, are well-known in promoting the plant growth and health, which are essential for long-term and long-distance manned microgravity space exploration. Here, we report how the Triticum aestivum endophytic bacterial communities behave differently under the simulated microgravity conditions. We demonstrate that, under simulated microgravity conditions, the microbial diversity in wheat seedling leaf increases while that in root decreases, compared to that cultivated under normal gravity conditions. We found that the dominant bacteria genus such as Pseudomonas, Paenibacillus and Bacillus significantly changes with gravity. The findings of this study provide important insight for space research, especially in terms of the Triticum aestivum cultivation in space.

  6. Microgravity Experiment for Attitude Control of a Tethered Space Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohmi, Masahiro

    A tethered space robot, which is connected to a mother spacecraft through a peace of tether, is a new space system proposed in the previous work. The tethered subsystem is envisioned to be a multi-body system for a robot, whose attitude can be controlled under tether tension by its own link motion. This paper discusses about microgravity experiment for a tethered space robot. Design and mechanism of the experimental device, required for the proposed attitude control, were explained. Also, link motion control algorithm was designed for the experimental device. Characteristics of the proposed attitude control were confirmed by microgravity experiment using a drop shaft, which can provide high quality microgravity condition during 4.5s.

  7. The Impact of Microgravity and Hypergravity on Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette A. M. Maier

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The endothelial cells (ECs, which line the inner surface of vessels, play a fundamental role in maintaining vascular integrity and tissue homeostasis, since they regulate local blood flow and other physiological processes. ECs are highly sensitive to mechanical stress, including hypergravity and microgravity. Indeed, they undergo morphological and functional changes in response to alterations of gravity. In particular microgravity leads to changes in the production and expression of vasoactive and inflammatory mediators and adhesion molecules, which mainly result from changes in the remodelling of the cytoskeleton and the distribution of caveolae. These molecular modifications finely control cell survival, proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and angiogenesis. This review summarizes the state of the art on how microgravity and hypergravity affect cultured ECs functions and discusses some controversial issues reported in the literature.

  8. Viscosity of Xenon Examined in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.

    1999-01-01

    Why does water flow faster than honey? The short answer, that honey has a greater viscosity, merely rephrases the question. The fundamental answer is that viscosity originates in the interactions between a fluid s molecules. These interactions are so complicated that, except for low-density gases, the viscosity of a fluid cannot be accurately predicted. Progress in understanding viscosity has been made by studying moderately dense gases and, more recently, fluids near the critical point. Modern theories predict a universal behavior for all pure fluids near the liquid-vapor critical point, and they relate the increase in viscosity to spontaneous fluctuations in density near this point. The Critical Viscosity of Xenon (CVX) experiment tested these theories with unprecedented precision when it flew aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-85) in August 1997. Near the critical point, xenon is a billion times more compressible than water, yet it has about the same density. Because the fluid is so "soft," it collapses under its own weight when exposed to the force of Earth s gravity - much like a very soft spring. Because the CVX experiment is conducted in microgravity, it achieves a very uniform fluid density even very close to the critical point. At the heart of the CVX experiment is a novel viscometer built around a small nickel screen. An oscillating electric field forces the screen to oscillate between pairs of electrodes. Viscosity, which dampens the oscillations, can be calculated by measuring the screen motion and the force applied to the screen. So that the fluid s delicate state near the critical point will not be disrupted, the screen oscillations are set to be both slow and small.

  9. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Microgravity Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshibli, Khalid A.; Sture, Stein

    1998-01-01

    The second series of MGM experiment was conducted during the STS-89 mission in January 1998. The experiment was previously flow on Atlantis's STS-79 mission in September 1996. Six displacement-controlled, drained triaxial compression experiments were performed at very low effective confining stresses. The confining stresses were in the ranges 0.05, 0.52 and 1.30 kPa. Three experiments were subjected to monotonic loading and unloading cycles while the other three experiments were subjected to cyclic loading. The results show very high peak strength friction angles in the range of 47.6 to 70.0 degrees, which are mainly due to overconsolidation and grain interlocking effects. It was observed that the residual strength levels in the monotonic loading experiments were in the same range as that observed at higher confining stress levels. The dilatancy angles were unusually high in the range of 30 to 31 degrees. All specimens display substantial initial stiffnesses and elastic moduli during unloading and reloading events, which are nearly an order of magnitude higher than conventional theories predict. A periodic instability phenomenon which appears to result from buckling of multiple internal arches and columnar systems, augmented by stick-slips was observed in the experiments. Computed Tomography (CT) measurements revealed valuable data about the internal fabric and the specimens deformation patterns. Uniform diffuse bifurcation with multiple radial shear bands was observed in the specimens tested in a microgravity environment. In the axial direction, two major conical surfaces were developed. Spatial nonsymmetrical deformations were observed in specimens tested in terrestrial laboratory.

  10. Robot design for a vacuum environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belinski, S.; Trento, W.; Imani-Shikhabadi, R.; Hackwood, S.

    1987-01-01

    The cleanliness requirements for many processing and manufacturing tasks are becoming ever stricter, resulting in a greater interest in the vacuum environment. Researchers discuss the importance of this special environment, and the development of robots which are physically and functionally suited to vacuum processing tasks. Work is in progress at the Center for robotic Systems in Microelectronics (CRSM) to provide a robot for the manufacture of a revolutionary new gyroscope in high vacuum. The need for vacuum in this and other processes is discussed as well as the requirements for a vacuum-compatible robot. Finally, researchers present details on work done at the CRSM to modify an existing clean-room compatible robot for use at high vacuum.

  11. Baking system for vacuum components in INDUS-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhange, Nilesh J.; Bhatnagar, Prateek; Shukla, S.K.

    2005-01-01

    Optimized bake-out procedures are very important for the overall reliability of vacuum system. In this process the UHV components like Sputter ion pump (SIP), Titanium sublimation pump (TSP) are subjected to temperature rise for sufficiently long period of time. Baking is necessary for obtaining low out gassing rates. In order to provide controlled baking of UHV (Ultra High Vacuum) components for INDUS-II an intelligent ON/OFF control system was needed. For that purpose distributed control system was suitable. For fulfillment of this need modular baking system was developed. This system contains Temperature controller unit (TCU), Pressure Monitoring Unit (PMU), and Temperature control and pressure Monitoring Interface Software (TCPMIS). Each TCU is an eight channel temperature controlling unit. PMU is eight channel pressure monitoring unit to which analog data from gauges like Penning, BA Gauge controllers is given. TCPMIS is a user interface software developed for, controlling up to 5 TCU's. In this way 40 channel temperature control, data logging of 40 channel temperature and logging of eight channel pressures was realized. The present paper describes details about computer controlled baking system. (author)

  12. Numerical Investigation of Microgravity Tank Pressure Rise Due to Boiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylton, Sonya; Ibrahim, Mounir; Kartuzova, Olga; Kassemi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The ability to control self-pressurization in cryogenic storage tanks is essential for NASAs long-term space exploration missions. Predictions of the tank pressure rise in Space are needed in order to inform the microgravity design and optimization process. Due to the fact that natural convection is very weak in microgravity, heat leaks into the tank can create superheated regions in the liquid. The superheated regions can instigate microgravity boiling, giving rise to pressure spikes during self-pressurization. In this work, a CFD model is developed to predict the magnitude and duration of the microgravity pressure spikes. The model uses the Schrage equation to calculate the mass transfer, with a different accommodation coefficient for evaporation at the interface, condensation at the interface, and boiling in the bulk liquid. The implicit VOF model was used to account for the moving interface, with bounded second order time discretization. Validation of the models predictions was carried out using microgravity data from the Tank Pressure Control Experiment, which flew aboard the Space Shuttle Mission STS-52. Although this experiment was meant to study pressurization and pressure control, it underwent boiling during several tests. The pressure rise predicted by the CFD model compared well with the experimental data. The ZBOT microgravity experiment is scheduled to fly on February 2016 aboard the ISS. The CFD model was also used to perform simulations for setting parametric limits for the Zero-Boil-Off Tank (ZBOT) Experiments Test Matrix in an attempt to avoid boiling in the majority of the test runs that are aimed to study pressure increase rates during self-pressurization. *Supported in part by NASA ISS Physical Sciences Research Program, NASA HQ, USA

  13. Note: Simple leak sealing technique for ultra-high vacuum cryostat by using freezable liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Seong; Kim, Ji-Ho; Lyo, In-Whan

    2015-05-01

    Here we introduce a simple, low-cost, contamination-free, and highly reliable technique for sealing an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) cryostat by using cryogenically freezable liquid. We demonstrate it by sealing an UHV cryostat with dry leaks in the high vacuum range; ethanol was utilized to fill and block the leakage pathways through the subsequent in situ solidification by LN2. The seal is reversible and can be maintained as long as the cryostat is kept at cryogenic temperature.

  14. Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG), Space Science's Past, Present and Future Aboard the International Space Station (ISS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivey, Reggie; Spearing, Scott; Jordan, Lee

    2012-01-01

    The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) is a double rack facility aboard the International Space Station (ISS), which accommodates science and technology investigations in a "workbench' type environment. The MSG has been operating on the ISS since July 2002 and is currently located in the US Laboratory Module. In fact, the MSG has been used for over 10,000 hours of scientific payload operations and plans to continue for the life of ISS. The facility has an enclosed working volume that is held at a negative pressure with respect to the crew living area. This allows the facility to provide two levels of containment for small parts, particulates, fluids, and gases. This containment approach protects the crew from possible hazardous operations that take place inside the MSG work volume and allows researchers a controlled pristine environment for their needs. Research investigations operating inside the MSG are provided a large 255 liter enclosed work space, 1000 watts of dc power via a versatile supply interface (120, 28, + 12, and 5 Vdc), 1000 watts of cooling capability, video and data recording and real time downlink, ground commanding capabilities, access to ISS Vacuum Exhaust and Vacuum Resource Systems, and gaseous nitrogen supply. These capabilities make the MSG one of the most utilized facilities on ISS. MSG investigations have involved research in cryogenic fluid management, fluid physics, spacecraft fire safety, materials science, combustion, and plant growth technologies. Modifications to the MSG facility are currently under way to expand the capabilities and provide for investigations involving Life Science and Biological research. In addition, the MSG video system is being replaced with a state-of-the-art, digital video system with high definition/high speed capabilities, and with near real-time downlink capabilities. This paper will provide an overview of the MSG facility, a synopsis of the research that has already been accomplished in the MSG, and an

  15. Advanced Photon Source accelerator ultrahigh vacuum guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.; Noonan, J.

    1994-03-01

    In this document the authors summarize the following: (1) an overview of basic concepts of ultrahigh vacuum needed for the APS project, (2) a description of vacuum design and calculations for major parts of APS, including linac, linac waveguide, low energy undulator test line, positron accumulator ring (PAR), booster synchrotron ring, storage ring, and insertion devices, and (3) cleaning procedures of ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) components presently used at APS

  16. High-vacuum plasma pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorodnov, A.M.; Minajchev, V.E.; Miroshkin, S.I.

    1980-01-01

    The action of an electric-arc high-vacuum pump intended for evacuating the volumes in which the operation processes are followed by a high gas evolution is considered. The operation of the pump is based on the principle of controlling the getter feed according to the gas load and effect of plasma sorbtion pumping. The pump performances are given. The starting pressure is about 5 Pa, the limiting residual pressure is about 5x10 -6 Pa, the pumping out rate of nitrogen in the pressure range 5x10 -5 -5x10 -3 Pa accounts for about 4000 l/s, the power consumption comes to 6 kW. Analyzing the results of the test operation of the pump, it has been concluded that its principal advantages are the high starting pressure, controlled getter feed rate and possibility of pumping out the gases which are usually pumped out with difficulty. The operation reliability of the pump is defined mainly by reliable operation of the ignition system of the vacuum arc [ru

  17. Vacuum Attachment for XRF Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Harry F.; Kaiser, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    Vacuum apparatuses have been developed for increasing the range of elements that can be identified by use of x-ray fluorescent (XRF) scanners of the type mentioned in the two immediately preceding articles. As a consequence of the underlying physical principles, in the presence of air, such an XRF scanner is limited to analysis of chlorine and elements of greater atomic number. When the XRF scanner is operated in a vacuum, it extends the range of analysis to lower atomic numbers - even as far as aluminum and sodium. Hence, more elements will be available for use in XRF labeling of objects as discussed in the two preceding articles. The added benefits of the extended capabilities also have other uses for NASA. Detection of elements of low atomic number is of high interest to the aerospace community. High-strength aluminum alloys will be easily analyzed for composition. Silicon, a major contaminant in certain processes, will be detectable before the process is begun, possibly eliminating weld or adhesion problems. Exotic alloys will be evaluated for composition prior to being placed in service where lives depend on them. And in the less glamorous applications, such as bolts and fasteners, substandard products and counterfeit items will be evaluated at the receiving function and never allowed to enter the operation

  18. Gases vacuum dedusting and cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey А. Burov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Represented are the results of operating the ladle degassing vacuum plant (productivity: 120 tons of liquid steel with various dust collectors. The process gases’ cooling and dedusting, obtained in the closed loop buran study, provides opportunity to install a bag filter after that closed loop and its efficient use. Proven is the effectiveness of the cylindrical cyclone replacement with a multichannel (buran dust collector, based on a system of closed-loop (return coupling serially connected curved ducts, where the dusty gas flow rotation axis is vertically positioned. The system of closed-loop serially connected curvilinear channels creates preconditions for the emergence of a negative feedback at the curvilinear gas flow containing transit and circulating flows. These conditions are embodied with circulating flows connecting the in- and outputs of the whole system each channel. The transit flow multiple continuous filtration through the circulating dust layers leads to the formation and accumulation of particles aggregates in the collection chamber. The validity of such a dusty flow control mechanism is confirmed by experimental data obtained in a vacuum chamber. Therefore, replacing one of the two buran’s forevacuum pumps assemblies with the necessary number of curved channels (closed loop is estimated in a promising method.

  19. Straw detector: 1 - Vacuum: 0

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The NA62 straw tracker is using pioneering CERN technology to measure charged particles from very rare kaon decays. For the first time, a large straw tracker with a 4.4 m2 coverage will be placed directly into an experiment’s vacuum tank, allowing physicists to measure the direction and momentum of charged particles with extreme precision. NA62 measurements using this technique will help physicists take a clear look at the kaon decay rate, which might be influenced by particles and processes that are not included in the Standard Model.   Straw ends are glued to an aluminium frame, a crucial step in the assembly of a module. The ends are then visually inspected before a leak test is performed.  “Although straw detectors have been around since the 1980s, what makes the NA62 straw trackers different is that they can work under vacuum,” explains Hans Danielsson from the PH-DT group leading the NA62 straw project. Straw detectors are basically small drift cha...

  20. A numerical study of biofilm growth in a microgravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristotelous, A. C.; Papanicolaou, N. C.

    2017-10-01

    A mathematical model is proposed to investigate the effect of microgravity on biofilm growth. We examine the case of biofilm suspended in a quiescent aqueous nutrient solution contained in a rectangular tank. The bacterial colony is assumed to follow logistic growth whereas nutrient absorption is assumed to follow Monod kinetics. The problem is modeled by a coupled system of nonlinear partial differential equations in two spatial dimensions solved using the Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element method. Nutrient and biofilm concentrations are computed in microgravity and normal gravity conditions. A preliminary quantitative relationship between the biofilm concentration and the gravity field intensity is derived.

  1. Robots for manipulation in a micro-gravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, R. D.; Lawrence, C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of control strategies and mechanisms for robots operating in the micro-gravity environment of Space Station. These robots must be capable of conducting experiments and manufacturing processes without disturbing the micro-gravity environment through base reactions/motions. Approaches discussed for controlling the robot base reactions/motions include strategies making use of manipulators with redundant degrees of freedon, actuators at the robot base, and a redundant (balancing) arm. Two degree-of-freedom, traction-drive joints are discussed as well as the conceptual design for a traction-driven manipulator.

  2. Investigations of field instability of ferrofluid in hypergravity and microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theng Yee Chong

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The field instability of the free surface of ferrofluid was investigated under microgravity and hypergravity environments conducted by parabolic flight. It is observed that the perturbation was suppressed under hypergravity, whereas at the microgravity condition, it appeared to have only slight increase in the amplitude of the perturbation peaks compared to the case of ground condition. Besides, an observation of peak-trough distance showed that not only the peak, but the trough was also very much dependent on the applied magnetic field. The difference of magnetic pole (north and south had shown to be a factor to the perturbation as well.

  3. Investigations of field instability of ferrofluid in hypergravity and microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Theng Yee; Ho, Kent Loong; Ong, Boon Hoong

    2012-03-01

    The field instability of the free surface of ferrofluid was investigated under microgravity and hypergravity environments conducted by parabolic flight. It is observed that the perturbation was suppressed under hypergravity, whereas at the microgravity condition, it appeared to have only slight increase in the amplitude of the perturbation peaks compared to the case of ground condition. Besides, an observation of peak-trough distance showed that not only the peak, but the trough was also very much dependent on the applied magnetic field. The difference of magnetic pole (north and south) had shown to be a factor to the perturbation as well.

  4. Electronic states of germanium grown under micro-gravity condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugahara, A. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)]. E-mail: sugahara@tsurugi.phys.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp; Ogawa, T. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Fujii, K. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Ohyama, T. [Liberal Arts, Fukui University of Technology, 3-6-1 Gakuen, Fukui, Fukui 910-8505 (Japan); Nakata, J. [Kyoto Semiconductor Corp. 418-9 Yodo Saime-cho, Fushimi-ku, Kyoto 613-0915 (Japan)

    2006-04-01

    Magneto-optical absorption measurements of Sb-doped germaniums grown under micro-gravity condition were carried out to investigate the influence of the gravity on crystal growth, using far-infrared laser and microwave. For comparison, we prepared two germanium crystals grown in the same conditions except the gravity conditions. In spite of the quite short growth period, the germanium grown under micro-gravity has a quite good quality. The lineshape analysis of Zeeman absorption peaks due to donor electrons indicates the existence of residual thermal acceptors.

  5. Shape Evolution of Detached Bridgman Crystals Grown in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K.

    2015-01-01

    A theory describing the shape evolution of detached Bridgman crystals in microgravity has been developed. A starting crystal of initial radius r0 will evolve to one of the following states: Stable detached gap; Attachment to the crucible wall; Meniscus collapse. Only crystals where alpha plus omega is great than 180 degrees will achieve stable detached growth in microgravity. Results of the crystal shape evolution theory are consistent with predictions of the dynamic stability of crystallization (Tatarchenko, Shaped Crystal Growth, Kluwer, 1993). Tests of transient crystal evolution are planned for ICESAGE, a series of Ge and GeSi crystal growth experiments planned to be conducted on the International Space Station (ISS).

  6. Vacuum Compatible Percussive Dynamic Cone Penetrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Honeybee Robotics proposes to develop a vacuum compatible percussive dynamic cone penetrometer (PDCP), for establishing soil bin characteristics, with the ultimate...

  7. Vacuum technology in the chemical industry

    CERN Document Server

    Jorisch, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Based on the very successful German edition and a seminar held by the German Engineers` Association (VDI) on a regular basis for years now, this English edition has been thoroughly updated and revised to reflect the latest developments. It supplies in particular the special aspects of vacuum technology, applied vacuum pump types and vacuum engineering in the chemical, pharmaceutical and process industry application-segments. The text includes chapters dedicated to latest European regulations for operating in hazardous zones with vacuum systems, methods for process pressure control and regulati

  8. Vacuum Technology Considerations For Mass Metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Patrick J.; Jabour, Zeina J.

    2011-01-01

    Vacuum weighing of mass artifacts eliminates the necessity of air buoyancy correction and its contribution to the measurement uncertainty. Vacuum weighing is also an important process in the experiments currently underway for the redefinition of the SI mass unit, the kilogram. Creating the optimum vacuum environment for mass metrology requires careful design and selection of construction materials, plumbing components, pumping, and pressure gauging technologies. We review the vacuum technology1 required for mass metrology and suggest procedures and hardware for successful and reproducible operation. PMID:26989593

  9. Cold vacuum drying facility design requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1999-01-01

    This document provides the detailed design requirements for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. Process, safety, and quality assurance requirements and interfaces are specified

  10. APS Storage Ring vacuum chamber fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeppner, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    The 1104-m circumference Advanced Photon Source Storage Ring Vacuum System is composed of 240 individual sections, which are fabricated from a combination of aluminum extrusions and machined components. The vacuum chambers will have 3800 weld joints, each subject to strict vacuum requirements, as well as a variety of related design criteria. The vacuum criteria and chamber design are reviewed, including a discussion of the weld joint geometries. The critical fabrication process parameters for meeting the design requirements are discussed. The experiences of the prototype chamber fabrication program are presented. Finally, the required facilities preparation for construction activity is briefly described. 6 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  11. Cold vacuum drying facility design requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1999-07-01

    This document provides the detailed design requirements for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. Process, safety, and quality assurance requirements and interfaces are specified.

  12. [Neonatal consequences of vacuum-assisted delivery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maagaard, Mathilde; Sørensen, Jette Led; Lando, Ane; Ottesen, Bent

    2010-08-30

    About 5000 babies annually, or 1/12 of all births, are the result of vacuum-assisted delivery in Denmark. Towards the end of the 1990'ies, the US FDA published a national warning concerning increasing complications and mortality after vacuum-assisted delivery, and other countries followed. One explanation is that training is no longer given the needed focus. Recent introduction of new requirements on Danish specialist training and the fact that vacuum-assisted delivery is an important procedure in obstetrics provides the basis for this article which systematically reviews the neonate consequences for the termed baby following vacuum-assisted delivery.

  13. Effect of Vacuum Frying on Changes in Quality Attributes of Jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus) Bulb Slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Tanushree; Bawa, A S; Raju, P S

    2014-01-01

    The effect of frying temperatures and durations on the quality of vacuum fried jackfruit (JF) chips was evaluated. Moisture content and breaking force of JF chips decreased with increase in frying temperature and time during vacuum frying whereas the oil content increased. The frying time for JF chips was found to be 30, 25, and 20 minutes at 80, 90, and 100°C, respectively. JF chips fried at higher temperature resulted in maximum shrinkage (48%). The lightness in terms of hunter L (*) value decreased significantly (P frying. Sensory evaluation showed maximum acceptability for JF chips fried at 90°C for 25 min. Frying under vacuum at lower temperatures was found to retain bioactive compounds such as total phenolics, total flavonoids, and total carotenoids in JF chips. Almost 90% of carotenoids were lost from the samples after 30 min of frying at 100°C.

  14. Effect of Vacuum Frying on Changes in Quality Attributes of Jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus Bulb Slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanushree Maity

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of frying temperatures and durations on the quality of vacuum fried jackfruit (JF chips was evaluated. Moisture content and breaking force of JF chips decreased with increase in frying temperature and time during vacuum frying whereas the oil content increased. The frying time for JF chips was found to be 30, 25, and 20 minutes at 80, 90, and 100°C, respectively. JF chips fried at higher temperature resulted in maximum shrinkage (48%. The lightness in terms of hunter L* value decreased significantly (P<0.05 during frying. Sensory evaluation showed maximum acceptability for JF chips fried at 90°C for 25 min. Frying under vacuum at lower temperatures was found to retain bioactive compounds such as total phenolics, total flavonoids, and total carotenoids in JF chips. Almost 90% of carotenoids were lost from the samples after 30 min of frying at 100°C.

  15. Rrhizogenesis in vitro is a convenient model for studying the root graviperceptive apparatus formation in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordyum, Elizabeth; Sarnatska, Veresa; Ovcharenko, Yulia

    A root graviperceptive apparatus is known to form in microgravity but does not function in the absence of a gravitational vector, that has been shown in many spaceflight experiments with seedlings of different plant species. In statocytes, which are differentiated in microgravity, a nucleus is localized in the proximal part of a cell as at 1 g. Unlike control, amyloplastsstatoliths do not sedimented in the distal part of a cell in microgravity, they group in the cell center more often, sometimes they localized in the different part of a cell. In all these experiments, the objects of investigations were embryonal roots formed in seeds at 1 g. There is only single report that columella cells in roots, which developed de novo from callus in space flight, did not differentiate in statocytes. Therefore, we call to attention to rhizogenesis in vitro as a convenient model for studying the influence of microgravity on differentiation of a root graviperceptive apparatus. Two methods for obtaining of Arabidopsis thaliana roots in vitro are proposed: the first-from the primary callus of leaf origin and the second - from leaf fragments. Callus initiation and growth are successful on MS medium supplemented with vitamin B5, glycine, inositol, 2,4-D, kinetin, glucose and agar. For induction of rhizogenesis calli were transferred to medium without hormones or medium which contained one to ten of MS mineral salts and microelements, without vitamins and hormones. Rhyzogenesis was obtained without added growth substances, but considerably higher number of calli with roots and number of roots per callus are on MS medium diluted tenfold. Rhizogenesis in A. thaliana leaf segments should present no problem, but the most intensive root formation is obtained when culturing them for three day on diluted MS medium supplemented with salycilic acid and then on diluted MS medium only. The low temperature treatment for three days increases the number of roots formed. A role of both plasticity

  16. Vacuum processing and storage of spruce pollen. Forest research report No. 136

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hak, O.

    1996-11-01

    Reliable methods of pollen storage are valuable for tree breeding programs. Good pollen viability during storage can be maintained by reducing its moisture content and by regulating temperature, humidity, and atmosphere. This paper describes a study conducted to determine: The effects of vacuum processing on black spruce and white spruce pollen viability; the temperature requirements for one-year storage; the effects of different levels of pollen moisture content during storage; the effects of low oxygen pressure during storage; and the effects of temperature fluctuation on pollen viability during storage. Vacuum processing performance was also compared to the performance of processing using a calcium sulphate desiccator.

  17. Calculation of period processing solution syrup in vacuum apparatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Slavyanskii

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Important and crucial element in the management of the technological flow of production of sugar product standards is the period of time the enrichment of massecuite, since its neutralization in the process of crystal formation in vacuum apparatus, excess sugar solution. Although currently proposed and implemented in the industry, including as a front-end accompany the process, a number of ways in the real world sugar production in many cases have to resort to the services of an experienced operator. It is obvious that in any case it is necessary to have a surround-dependent glucose solution data on time for the excess sugar solution into the vacuum apparatus. With regard to the period of the enrichment of depleted sucrose solution are entered into this substance excess sucrose solution, it should be noted that this problem is theoretically still insufficiently developed. It is obvious that for practical purposes it is desirable to have a simple and convenient for engineering calculation of sugar processing time dependencies of the specified volume of water from the operating parameters of the process (the required concentration of sucrose, temperature of the solution stirring. The problem is the quantitative analysis of sucrose crystallization in vacuum apparatus, including the timing of enrichment solution to the excess syrup, period of time processing massecuite total this apparatus has been investigated in many works. However, due to its importance to the task of obtaining commercial sugar high standards this issue required further in-depth examination. In the article to support the enrichment process solution sucrose due to neutralize this solvent system in vacuum apparatus, from the standpoint of diffusion theory provides a more reasonable compared to known so far, quantitative analysis of this process. Where as sucrose crystals team are considering a system of balls, uniformly distributed in vacuum apparatus. On the basis of the solution

  18. Research on influence of different cover to the characteristic of FBG reflectance spectrum in vacuum thermal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Yifei; Zhang, Jingchuan; Zhang, Luosha; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Lina; Chen, Shiyu

    2018-01-01

    To satisfy the application of fiber grating sensor technology in high vacuum thermal environment, two different kinds of sleeve compactly single model fiber covered by acrylate and polyimide are researched. Influence of the cover to the characteristic of FBG reflectance spectrum in high vacuum thermal environment is analyzed and verified. First, transmission characteristic of single model fiber in high vacuum thermal environment is analyzed by solve the equation of heat conduction. Then, experimental program of influence on FBG reflection spectrum characteristics is designed and a hardware-in-the-loop detection platform is set up. Finally, the influence of temperature and vacuum on the reflection peak power of FBG in different coating single-mode transmission fiber under high vacuum thermal environment is studied and verified. Experimental results indicate that: when vacuum varied from normal pressure to 10-4Pa level and then return to normal pressure, temperature of two different coating single-mode transmission fiber dropped to -196 ° from room temperature and then returned to room temperature, after 224 hours, the peak power of the FBG reflectance spectrum did not change. It provided the theoretical and experimental basis for the application of optical fiber sensing technology in high vacuum (pressure about 10-4Pa level) and thermal environment (-196 ° 25 ° temperature cycle) .

  19. CATE: A Case Study of an Interdisciplinary Student-Led Microgravity Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, J. E.; Dove, A.; Lane, S. S.; Tiller, C.; Whitaker, A.; Lai, K.; Hoover, B.; Benjamin, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Collisional Accretion Experiment (CATE) was designed, built, and flown on NASA's C-9 parabolic flight airplane in less than a year by an interdisciplinary team of 6 undergraduate students under the supervision of two faculty. CATE was selected in the initial NASA Undergraduate Student Instrument Project (USIP) solicitation in the Fall of 2013, and the experiment flight campaign was in July 2014. The experiment studied collisions between different particle populations at low velocities (sub-m/s) in a vacuum and microgravity to gain insight into processes in the protoplanetary disk and planetary ring systems. Faculty provided the experiment concept and key experiment design parameters, and the student team developed the detailed hardware design for all components, manufactured and tested hardware, operated the experiment in flight, and analyzed data post-flight. Students also developed and led an active social media campaign and education and public outreach campaign to engage local high school students in the project. The ability to follow an experiment through from conception to flight was a key benefit for undergraduate students whose available time for projects such as this is frequently limited to their junior and senior years. Key factors for success of the program included having an existing laboratory infrastructure and experience in developing flight payloads and an intrinsically simple experiment concept. Students were highly motivated, in part, by their sense of technical and scientific ownership of the project, and this engagement was key to the project's success.

  20. Development of Low Surge Vacuum Contact with Te

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, B. S.; Lee, H. W.; Woo, B. C.; Kim, B. G. [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop of low surge Te contact for vacuum circuit breaker. The vacuum circuit breaker have various advantages such that it is free from maintenance, does not bring about public pollution, is excellent in its current breaking property, and so forth, on account of which the extent of its application has become broadened rapidly. For the characteristics of the contact material for the vacuum circuit breaker to satisfy, there may be enumerated: (1)large current breaking capacity; (2)high voltage withstand; (3)small contact resistance; (4)small melt-adhesive force; (5)low chopping current value; (6)good workability; (7)sufficient mechanical strength; and so forth. In this study we used cobalt for based refractory material having high melting temperature and intermetallic material between tellurium and silver to reduce chopping current. The contact materials were produced in accordance with the powder metallurgy using the method of infiltration. Production of the contact material was carried out in such a method that cobalt powder having average particle size of 50{mu}m, pre sintered in H{sub 2} atmosphere, 900 degree C , 2 hour. Ag ingot and Te(Se) were alloyed using high frequency furnaced in vacuum. And then Ag-Te(Se) alloy was infiltrated to Co skeleton in H{sub 2} atmosphere, 1000 degree C , 1 hour. The melting of the alloy to be infiltrated was carried out in a vacuum sealed quartz tube and be analysed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, optical microscope and energy dispersive energy spectrometer. In the alloying of silver and tellurium, tellurium does not exist in single element but Ag{sub 2}Te intermetallic compound. And In Ag and Se, Se does not exist in single element but Ag{sub 2}Se intermetallic compound. We also produced the test vacuum interruptor to evaluate the electrode properties in vacuum atmosphere. The electrical properties of Co-(Ag-Se) electrode have better value than that of Co-(Ag-Te) electrode