WorldWideScience

Sample records for temperature sensitive solutions

  1. Corrosion behaviour of sensitized and unsensitized Alloy 900 (UNS 1.4462) in concentrated aqueous lithium bromide solutions at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leiva-Garcia, R.; Munoz-Portero, M.J.; Garcia-Anton, J.

    2010-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels can undergo microstructural changes if they are heated improperly. When that happens, duplex stainless steels are sensitized and intermetallic phases appear. The high Chromium and Molybdenum content promotes the formation of secondary phases as a consequence of the heat treatment. These secondary phases, which are rich in alloying elements, such as Cr and Mo, deplete these elements from the neighbouring phases, leading to a reduction in corrosion resistance. In order to study the influence of the secondary phases on the corrosion parameters, samples of duplex stainless steel, Alloy 900 (UNS 1.4462), have been heated in argon atmosphere at 825 deg. C for 1 h. The corrosion behaviour of sensitized and unsensitized Alloy 900 has been analyzed in a concentrated aqueous lithium bromide (LiBr) solution of 992 g/L by means of cyclic potentiodynamic curves. Secondary phase presence reduces the pitting potential value of Alloy 900. Besides, the pitting potential decreases with temperature. On the other hand, the corrosion potential and open circuit potential values increase with temperature and sensitization.

  2. Effects of flow rate on crack growth in sensitized type 304 stainless steel in high-temperature aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, H.S.; Wuensche, A.; Macdonald, D.D.

    2000-01-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in weld-sensitized, Type 304 (UNS S30400) (1) stainless steel (SS) remains a major threat to the integrity of heat transport circuits (HTC) in boiling water reactors (BWR), in spite of extensive research over the last 30 years. Effects of flow rate on intergranular crack growth in sensitized Type 304 stainless steel (UNS S30400) in distilled water containing 15 ppm or 25 ppm (2.59 x 10 -4 or 4.31 x 10 -4 m) sodium chloride (NaCl) at 250 C were examined using compact tension (CT) specimens under constant loading conditions. On increasing the flow rate, the crack growth rate (CGR) drastically increased, but later decreased to a level that was lower than the initial value. The initial increase in CGR was attributed to an enhanced rate of mass transfer of oxygen to the external surface, where it consumed the current emanating from the crack mouth. However, the subsequent decrease in CGR was attributed to crack flushing, which is a delayed process because of the time required to destroy the aggressive conditions that exist within the crack. Once flushing destroyed the aggressive crack environment, CGR decreased with increasing flow rate. The time over which CGR increased after an increase in the flow rate depended on how fast crack flushing occurred by fluid flow; the higher the flow rate and the greater the crack opening, the faster the crack flushing and the shorter the transition time. Finally, intergranular cracks propagated faster in regions nearer both sides of the Ct specimens, where the oxygen supply to the external surface was enhanced under stirring conditions and where minimal resistance existed to current flow from the crack tip to the external surfaces. This observation provided evidence that the crack's internal and external environments were coupled electrochemically

  3. Effect of Temperature-Sensitive Poloxamer Solution/Gel Material on Pericardial Adhesion Prevention: Supine Rabbit Model Study Mimicking Cardiac Surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Kang

    Full Text Available We investigated the mobility of a temperature-sensitive poloxamer/Alginate/CaCl2 mixture (PACM in relation to gravity and cardiac motion and the efficacy of PACM on the prevention of pericardial adhesion in a supine rabbit model.A total of 50 rabbits were randomly divided into two groups according to materials applied after epicardial abrasion: PACM and dye mixture (group PD; n = 25 and saline as the control group (group CO; n = 25. In group PD, rabbits were maintained in a supine position with appropriate sedation, and location of mixture of PACM and dye was assessed by CT scan at the immediate postoperative period and 12 hours after surgery. The grade of adhesions was evaluated macroscopically and microscopically two weeks after surgery.In group PD, enhancement was localized in the anterior pericardial space, where PACM and dye mixture was applied, on immediate post-surgical CT scans. However, the volume of the enhancement was significantly decreased at the anterior pericardial space 12 hours later (P < .001. Two weeks after surgery, group PD had significantly lower macroscopic adhesion score (P = .002 and fibrosis score (P = .018 than did group CO. Inflammation score and expression of anti-macrophage antibody in group PD were lower than those in group CO, although the differences were not significant.In a supine rabbit model study, the anti-adhesion effect was maintained at the area of PACM application, although PACM shifted with gravity and heart motion. For more potent pericardial adhesion prevention, further research and development on the maintenance of anti-adhesion material position are required.

  4. Electrocutaneous sensitivity: effects of skin temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, W D; Reilly, J P

    1986-01-01

    The effect of human skin temperature on electrocutaneous sensitivity was examined using brief capacitive discharges. Stimuli were designed to ensure that sensory effects would be independent of skin resistance and would reflect underlying neural excitability as closely as possible. Skin temperature was manipulated by immersing the forearm in circulating hot or cold air. Detection thresholds on the arm and fingertip were raised by cooling, but were not altered by heating. Temperature-related sensitivity shifts were described by the same multiplicative factors for both threshold and suprathreshold levels. The temperature coefficient (Q10) for cutaneous sensitivity under these conditions was approximately 1.3.

  5. The Krafft temperature of surfactant solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Manojlović Jelena Ž.

    2012-01-01

    Our main motivation to revisit the solution properties of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide is related to the clear requirement for better control of the adsorption parameters to form uniform self-assembled monolayers on muscovite mica substrates. To readily monitor the temporal evolution of structural details in cetyltrimethylammonium bromide solutions, we realized a rather simple conductivity experiment. Conductivity measurements were carried out as a function of temperature, to look clo...

  6. Crystal growth from low-temperature solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangwal, K.

    1994-01-01

    The state of the art in crystal growth from solutions at low-temperatures has been done. The thermodynamic and kinetic parameters have been discussed in respect to different systems. The methods of crystal growth from water and organic solutions and different variants of their technical realizations have been reviewed. Also the growth by chemical reactions and gel growth have been described. The large number of examples have been shown. 21 refs, 30 figs, 3 tabs

  7. Sensitivity analysis of numerical solutions for environmental fluid problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Nobuatsu; Motoyama, Yasunori

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we present a new numerical method to quantitatively analyze the error of numerical solutions by using the sensitivity analysis. If a reference case of typical parameters is one calculated with the method, no additional calculation is required to estimate the results of the other numerical parameters such as more detailed solutions. Furthermore, we can estimate the strict solution from the sensitivity analysis results and can quantitatively evaluate the reliability of the numerical solution by calculating the numerical error. (author)

  8. Tyrosine-sensitized photodimerization of thymine in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, M.; Matsuyama, A.; Nagata, C.

    1978-01-01

    Photodimerization of thymine in aqueous solution in the presence of tyrosine was studied with monochromatic UV irradiation. The total dimer formation was sensitized in the presence of tyrosine. The action spectrum of sensitized total dimer formation has a peak near 280 nm corresponding to the absorption maximum of tyrosine. Triplet quenchers reduced the sensitization substantially. It seems probable that tyrosine-sensitized photodimerization of thymine occurred via triplet-triplet energy transfer from tyrosine to thymine. (author)

  9. Time-temperature-sensitization and time-temperature-precipitation behavior of alloy 625

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, M.; Heubner, U.

    1996-01-01

    Time-Temperature-Sensitization diagrams have been established for a low-carbon version of alloy 625 (UNS N06625). Sensitization in terms of a 50 microm (2 mils) intergranular penetration criterion starts after about 3 h aging time at 750 C (soft annealed condition) or after less than 1 h aging time at 800 C (solution annealed condition) when tested according to ASTM-G 28 method A. Grain boundary precipitation of carbides occurs during aging of both the soft annealed and the solution annealed material, but the soft annealed material exhibits a more pronounced general precipitation of Ni 3 (Nb,Mo) phase giving rise to more distinct loss of ductility. Sensitization of alloy 625 may be retarded by lowering its iron content

  10. Temperature sheets and aspect sensitive radar echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Luce

    Full Text Available here have been years of discussion and controversy about the existence of very thin and stable temperature sheets and their relationship to the VHF radar aspect sensitivity. It is only recently that very high-resolution in situ temperature observations have brought credence to the reality and ubiquity of these structures in the free atmosphere and to their contribution to radar echo enhancements along the vertical. Indeed, measurements with very high-resolution sensors are still extremely rare and rather difficult to obtain outside of the planetary boundary layer. They have only been carried out up to the lower stratosphere by Service d’A´ eronomie (CNRS, France for about 10 years. The controversy also persisted due to the volume resolution of the (Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere VHF radars which is coarse with respect to sheet thickness, although widely sufficient for meteorological or mesoscale investigations. The contribution within the range gate of many of these structures, which are advected by the wind, and decay and grow at different instants and could be distorted either by internal gravity waves or turbulence fields, could lead to radar echoes with statistical properties similar to those produced by anisotropic turbulence. Some questions thus remain regarding the manner in which temperature sheets contribute to VHF radar echoes. In particular, the zenithal and azimuthal angular dependence of the echo power may not only be produced by diffuse reflection on stable distorted or corrugated sheets, but also by extra contributions from anisotropic turbulence occurring in the stratified atmosphere. Thus, for several years, efforts have been put forth to improve the radar height resolution in order to better describe thin structures. Frequency interferometric techniques are widely used and have been recently further developed with the implementation of high-resolution data processings. We begin by reviewing briefly some characteristics

  11. Temperature sheets and aspect sensitive radar echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Luce

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available here have been years of discussion and controversy about the existence of very thin and stable temperature sheets and their relationship to the VHF radar aspect sensitivity. It is only recently that very high-resolution in situ temperature observations have brought credence to the reality and ubiquity of these structures in the free atmosphere and to their contribution to radar echo enhancements along the vertical. Indeed, measurements with very high-resolution sensors are still extremely rare and rather difficult to obtain outside of the planetary boundary layer. They have only been carried out up to the lower stratosphere by Service d’A´ eronomie (CNRS, France for about 10 years. The controversy also persisted due to the volume resolution of the (Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere VHF radars which is coarse with respect to sheet thickness, although widely sufficient for meteorological or mesoscale investigations. The contribution within the range gate of many of these structures, which are advected by the wind, and decay and grow at different instants and could be distorted either by internal gravity waves or turbulence fields, could lead to radar echoes with statistical properties similar to those produced by anisotropic turbulence. Some questions thus remain regarding the manner in which temperature sheets contribute to VHF radar echoes. In particular, the zenithal and azimuthal angular dependence of the echo power may not only be produced by diffuse reflection on stable distorted or corrugated sheets, but also by extra contributions from anisotropic turbulence occurring in the stratified atmosphere. Thus, for several years, efforts have been put forth to improve the radar height resolution in order to better describe thin structures. Frequency interferometric techniques are widely used and have been recently further developed with the implementation of high-resolution data processings. We begin by reviewing briefly some characteristics

  12. Weak Solution and Weakly Uniformly Bounded Solution of Impulsive Heat Equations Containing “Maximum” Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyelami, Benjamin Oyediran

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, criteria for the existence of weak solutions and uniformly weak bounded solution of impulsive heat equation containing maximum temperature are investigated and results obtained. An example is given for heat flow system with impulsive temperature using maximum temperature simulator and criteria for the uniformly weak bounded of solutions of the system are obtained.

  13. Temperature sensitive surfaces and methods of making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Liang [Richland, WA; Rieke, Peter C [Pasco, WA; Alford, Kentin L [Pasco, WA

    2002-09-10

    Poly-n-isopropylacrylamide surface coatings demonstrate the useful property of being able to switch charateristics depending upon temperature. More specifically, these coatings switch from being hydrophilic at low temperature to hydrophobic at high temperature. Research has been conducted for many years to better characterize and control the properties of temperature sensitive coatings. The present invention provides novel temperature sensitive coatings on articles and novel methods of making temperature sensitive coatings that are disposed on the surfaces of various articles. These novel coatings contain the reaction products of n-isopropylacrylamide and are characterized by their properties such as advancing contact angles. Numerous other characteristics such as coating thickness, surface roughness, and hydrophilic-to-hydrophobic transition temperatures are also described. The present invention includes articles having temperature-sensitve coatings with improved properties as well as improved methods for forming temperature sensitive coatings.

  14. Membrane distillation with porous metal hollow fibers for the concentration of thermo-sensitive solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shukla, Sushumna

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents an original approach for the concentration of thermo-sensitive solutions: the Sweep Gas Membrane Distillation (SGMD) process. A new membrane contactor with metallic hollow fibers has been designed and allows the distillation process to be operational at low temperature. Heat is

  15. Sensitivity to temperature of nuclear energy generation by hydrogen burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitalas, R.

    1981-01-01

    The sensitivity to temperature of nuclear energy generation by hydrogen burning is discussed. The complexity of the sensitivity is due to the different equilibration time-scales of the constituents of the p-p chain and CN cycle and the dependence of their abundances and time-scales on temperature. The time-scale of the temperature perturbation, compared to the equilibrium time-scale of a constituent, determines whether the constituent is in equilibrium and affects the sensitivity. The temperature sensitivity of the p-p chain for different values of hydrogen abundance, when different constituents come into equilibrium is presented, as well as its variation with 3 He abundance. The temperature sensitivity is drastically different from n 11 , the temperature sensitivity of the proton-proton reaction, unless the time-scale of temperature perturbation is long enough for 3 He to remain in equilibrium. Even in this case the sensitivity of the p-p chain differs significantly from n 11 , unless the temperature is so low that PP II and PP III chains can be neglected. The variation of the sensitivity of CN energy generation is small for different time-scales of temperature variation, because the temperature sensitivities of individual reactions are so similar. The combined sensitivity to temperature of energy generation by hydrogen burning is presented and shown to have a maximum of 16.4 at T 6 = 24.5. For T 6 > 25 the temperature sensitivity is given by the sensitivity of 14 N + p reaction. (author)

  16. A Solution-Based Temperature Sensor Using the Organic Compound CuTsPc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahino Mah Abdullah

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An electrochemical cell using an organic compound, copper (II phthalocyanine-tetrasulfonic acid tetrasodium salt (CuTsPc, has been fabricated and investigated as a solution-based temperature sensor. The capacitance and resistance of the ITO/CuTsPc solution/ITO chemical cell has been characterized as a function of temperature in the temperature range of 25–80 °C. A linear response with minimal hysteresis is observed. The fabricated temperature sensor has shown high consistency and sensitive response towards a specific range of temperature values.

  17. Integrated Computational Solution for Predicting Skin Sensitization Potential of Molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konda Leela Sarath Kumar

    Full Text Available Skin sensitization forms a major toxicological endpoint for dermatology and cosmetic products. Recent ban on animal testing for cosmetics demands for alternative methods. We developed an integrated computational solution (SkinSense that offers a robust solution and addresses the limitations of existing computational tools i.e. high false positive rate and/or limited coverage.The key components of our solution include: QSAR models selected from a combinatorial set, similarity information and literature-derived sub-structure patterns of known skin protein reactive groups. Its prediction performance on a challenge set of molecules showed accuracy = 75.32%, CCR = 74.36%, sensitivity = 70.00% and specificity = 78.72%, which is better than several existing tools including VEGA (accuracy = 45.00% and CCR = 54.17% with 'High' reliability scoring, DEREK (accuracy = 72.73% and CCR = 71.44% and TOPKAT (accuracy = 60.00% and CCR = 61.67%. Although, TIMES-SS showed higher predictive power (accuracy = 90.00% and CCR = 92.86%, the coverage was very low (only 10 out of 77 molecules were predicted reliably.Owing to improved prediction performance and coverage, our solution can serve as a useful expert system towards Integrated Approaches to Testing and Assessment for skin sensitization. It would be invaluable to cosmetic/ dermatology industry for pre-screening their molecules, and reducing time, cost and animal testing.

  18. Temperature sensitive self-actuated scram mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The apparatus, described in detail, accurately infers the average coolant temperature exiting from the reactor core in a liquid metal cooled reactor and rapidly and reliably actuates a safety rod release mechanism on the occurrence of a critical temperature. The output temperature is inferred from the cooperative effect of the flow rate through a coolant flow path within the safety assembly and the heat generated by sensor fuel pins. The inferred temperature is sensed by a confined fluid having a high expansion coefficient; the expansion is transferred to a linear force used to actuate the release mechanism. The system may be contained within the safety assembly and does not interfere with the operation of the plant protection system scram mode. It is resetable after a scram. The time interval between the overtemperature and the insertion of the safety rods is short enough to preclude fuel damage. (U.K.)

  19. Study on temperature sensitivity of topological insulators based on long-period fiber grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jianhua; Zhao, Chenghai; Li, Jianbo; He, Mengdong

    2017-06-01

    Based on a long-period fiber grating, we conducted experimental research on the temperature sensitivity of topological insulators. The long-period fiber grating and topological insulators solution were encapsulated in a capillary tube using UV glue, and the temperature response was measured. Within a range of 35 to 75 centigrade, one resonance dip of a long-period fiber grating exhibits a redshift of 1.536 nm. The temperature sensitivity is about 7.7 times of an ordinary long-period fiber grating's sensitivity (0.005 nm/°C). A numerical simulation is also performed on the basis of the experiments.

  20. Divergent apparent temperature sensitivity of terrestrial ecosystem respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing Song; Shuli Niu; Ruise Luo; Yiqi Luo; Jiquan Chen; Guirui Yu; Janusz Olejnik; Georg Wohlfahrt; Gerard Kiely; Ako Noormets; Leonardo Montagnani; Alessandro Cescatti; Vincenzo Magliulo; Beverly Elizabeth Law; Magnus Lund; Andrej Varlagin; Antonio Raschi; Matthias Peichl; Mats B. Nilsson; Lutz Merbold

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies revealed convergent temperature sensitivity of ecosystem respiration (Re) within aquatic ecosystems and between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. We do not know yet whether various terrestrial ecosystems have consistent or divergent temperature sensitivity. Here, we synthesized 163 eddy covariance flux sites across the world and...

  1. Ultrahigh temperature-sensitive silicon MZI with titania cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Moo eLee

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a possibility of intensifying temperature sensitivity of a silicon Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI by using a highly negative thermo-optic property of titania (TiO2. Temperature sensitivity of an asymmetric silicon MZI with a titania cladding is experimentally measured from +18pm/C to -340 pm/C depending on design parameters of MZI.

  2. Temperature sensitive self-actuated scram mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giuggio, N.; Noyes, R.C.; Zaman, S.U.

    1982-01-01

    This invention provides a mechanism for rapidly dropping a neutron absorbing poison material into the core of an LMFBR type reactor, and in particular a mechanism that is self-actuated when the reactor coolant temperature reaches a critical value. A safety duct located in the reactor core and extending above the core contains an inner column that provides a vertical coolant flow path through the duct. One or more fuel pins are located in the duct, with a temperature-responsive actuator near their upper ends. A poison bundle surrounds the inner column within the duct, held in position by a release mechanism connected to the actuator. The inferred core temperature is sensed by a fluid confined within the actuator, and the expansion of the fluid is translated into a linear force used to activate the release mechanism

  3. Temperature sensitive self-actuated scram mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giuggio, N.; Noyes, R.C.; Zaman, S.U.

    1980-01-01

    A self-actuated mechanism within a safety assembly in a liquid metal nuclear reactor comprising sensor fuel pins located in a reactor coolant flow path, a sensor bulb containing NaK located near the upper end of the sensor fuel pins and in the reactor coolant flow path, and a sensor tube connecting the sensor bulb to a metal bellows and push rod. The motion of the push rod resulting from the temperature dependent change in the NaK volume actuates a safety rod release mechanism when a predetermined coolant temperature is reached

  4. High sensitivity pyrogen testing in water and dialysis solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshian, Mardas; Wendel, Albrecht; Hartung, Thomas; von Aulock, Sonja

    2008-07-20

    The dialysis patient is confronted with hundreds of litres of dialysis solution per week, which pass the natural protective barriers of the body and are brought into contact with the tissue directly in the case of peritoneal dialysis or indirectly in the case of renal dialysis (hemodialysis). The components can be tested for living specimens or dead pyrogenic (fever-inducing) contaminations. The former is usually detected by cultivation and the latter by the endotoxin-specific Limulus Amoebocyte Lysate Assay (LAL). However, the LAL assay does not reflect the response of the human immune system to the wide variety of possible pyrogenic contaminations in dialysis fluids. Furthermore, the test is limited in its sensitivity to detect extremely low concentrations of pyrogens, which in their sum result in chronic pathologies in dialysis patients. The In vitro Pyrogen Test (IPT) employs human whole blood to detect the spectrum of pyrogens to which humans respond by measuring the release of the endogenous fever mediator interleukin-1beta. Spike recovery checks exclude interference. The test has been validated in an international study for pyrogen detection in injectable solutions. In this study we adapted the IPT to the testing of dialysis solutions. Preincubation of 50 ml spiked samples with albumin-coated microspheres enhanced the sensitivity of the assay to detect contaminations down to 0.1 pg/ml LPS or 0.001 EU/ml in water or saline and allowed pyrogen detection in dialysis concentrates or final working solutions. This method offers high sensitivity detection of human-relevant pyrogens in dialysis solutions and components.

  5. Greater temperature sensitivity of plant phenology at colder sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prevey, Janet; Vellend, Mark; Ruger, Nadja

    2017-01-01

    Warmer temperatures are accelerating the phenology of organisms around the world. Temperature sensitivity of phenology might be greater in colder, higher latitude sites than in warmer regions, in part because small changes in temperature constitute greater relative changes in thermal balance...

  6. Dopamine modulates metabolic rate and temperature sensitivity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Ueno

    Full Text Available Homeothermal animals, such as mammals, maintain their body temperature by heat generation and heat dissipation, while poikilothermal animals, such as insects, accomplish it by relocating to an environment of their favored temperature. Catecholamines are known to regulate thermogenesis and metabolic rate in mammals, but their roles in other animals are poorly understood. The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has been used as a model system for the genetic studies of temperature preference behavior. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic rate and temperature sensitivity of some temperature sensitive behaviors are regulated by dopamine in Drosophila. Temperature-sensitive molecules like dTrpA1 and shi(ts induce temperature-dependent behavioral changes, and the temperature at which the changes are induced were lowered in the dopamine transporter-defective mutant, fumin. The mutant also displays a preference for lower temperatures. This thermophobic phenotype was rescued by the genetic recovery of the dopamine transporter in dopamine neurons. Flies fed with a dopamine biosynthesis inhibitor (3-iodo-L-tyrosine, which diminishes dopamine signaling, exhibited preference for a higher temperature. Furthermore, we found that the metabolic rate is up-regulated in the fumin mutant. Taken together, dopamine has functions in the temperature sensitivity of behavioral changes and metabolic rate regulation in Drosophila, as well as its previously reported functions in arousal/sleep regulation.

  7. Electrochemical polarization behavior of sensitized SUS 304 stainless steel in high temperature water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushiya, K [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan); Sugimoto, K; Ejima, T

    1978-11-01

    Anodic polarization curves for a solution-treated or sensitized SUS 304 stainless steel and solution-treated Fe-Ni-Cr ternary alloys containing 10%Ni and 6 to 14%Cr have been measured in deaerated 0.5 mol/l Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solutions of pH 2.0 to 5.9 at 298, 523 and 553 K. Corrosion potentials for U-bend SCC test specimens of sensitized SUS 304 stainless steel have also been monitored for a long time in the same solutions as those used for the polarization measurements except that they were aerated. It was found that the differences in the current densities in the passive state, i sub(pass), between the solution treated steel and the sensitized one and also between the ternary alloy with higher Cr content and the one with lower Cr content become large with increasing temperature and decreasing pH. This means that the difference in the values of i sub(pass) between grain bodies and Cr-depleted zones along grain boundaries of sensitized steel becomes larger and susceptibility to intergranular corrosion of the sensitized steel in the passivation region becomes higher with increasing temperature and decreasing pH. Since corrosion potentials for the U-bend SCC test specimens in air-satulated solutions lie in the passive region of anodic polarization curves for the sensitized steel in deaerated solutions, the intergranular stress-corrosion cracking of the sensitized steel in high temperature water with dissolved oxygen is considered to be caused by the preferential corrosion in the Cr-depleted zone.

  8. Temperature sensitivity of respiration scales with organic matter recalcitrance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craine, J. M.; Fierer, N.; McLauchlan, K. K.

    2010-12-01

    Microbial decomposition of soil organic matter is a key process in determining the carbon sequestration potential of ecosystems and carbon fluxes to the atmosphere. Since microbial decomposition is highly sensitive to short-term changes in temperature, predicting the temperature sensitivity of microbial decomposition is critical to predicting future atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and feedbacks to anthropogenic warming. Fundamental principles of enzyme kinetics, embodied in the carbon-quality temperature hypothesis, predict that the temperature sensitivity of microbial decomposition should increase with increasing biochemical recalcitrance of a substrate. To test the generality of this principle, we measured the temperature sensitivity of microbial respiration of soil organic matter with serial short-term temperature manipulations over 365 days for 28 North American soils. When joined with data from similar studies that represent a wide variety of contrasts, we show that the temperature sensitivity of organic matter decomposition scales with biochemical recalcitrance. With physico-chemical protection likely an important covariate for relating plant and soil organic matter decomposition scalars, biochemically recalcitrant organic matter is highly susceptible to short-term increases in temperature, a key link in predicting the effects of warming on carbon cycling.

  9. Fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer with controllable temperature sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinpu; Peng, Wei; Zhang, Yang

    2015-12-01

    We proposed a fiber taper based on the Fabry-Perot (FP) interferometer structure with controllable temperature sensitivity. The FP interferometer is formed by inserting a segment of tapered fiber tip into the capillary and subsequently splicing the other end of the capillary to a single-mode fiber (SMF), the tapered fiber endface, and the spliced face form the FP cavity. Through controlling the inserted tapered fiber length, a series of FP interferometers were made. Because the inserted taper tip has the degree of freedom along the fiber axial, when the FP interferometer is subjected to temperature variation, the thermal expansion of the fiber taper tip will resist the FP cavity length change caused by the evolution of capillary length, and we can control the temperature sensitivity by adjusting the inserted taper length. In this structure, the equivalent thermal expansion coefficient of the FP interferometer can be defined; it was used to evaluate the temperature sensitivity of the FP interferometer, which provides an effective method to eliminate the temperature effect and to enhance other measurement accuracy. We fabricated the FP interferometers and calibrated their temperature characters by measuring the wavelength shift of the resonance dips in the reflection spectrum. In a temperature range of 50°C to 150°C, the corresponding temperature sensitivities can be controlled between 0 and 1.97 pm/°C when the inserted taper is between 75 and 160 μm. Because of its controllable temperature sensitivity, ease of fabrication, and low cost, this FP interferometer can meet different temperature sensitivity requirements in various application areas, especially in the fields which need temperature insensitivity.

  10. Solution hardening and strain hardening at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocks, U.F.

    1982-10-01

    Solutes can significantly increase the rate of strain hardening; as a consequence, the saturation stress, at which strain hardening tends to cease for a given temperature and strain rate, is increased more than the yield stress: this is the major effect of solutes on strength at elevated temperatures, especially in the regime where dynamic strain-aging occurs. It is shown that local solute mobility can affect both the rate of dynamic recovery and the dislocation/dislocation interaction strength. The latter effect leads to multiplicative solution strengthening. It is explained by a new model based on repeated dislocation unlocking, in a high-temperature limit, which also rationalizes the stress dependence of static and dynamic strain-aging, and may help explain the plateau of the yield stress at elevated temperatures. 15 figures

  11. High-Sensitivity Temperature-Independent Silicon Photonic Microfluidic Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kangbaek

    Optical biosensors that can precisely quantify the presence of specific molecular species in real time without the need for labeling have seen increased use in the drug discovery industry and molecular biology in general. Of the many possible optical biosensors, the TM mode Si biosensor is shown to be very attractive in the sensing application because of large field amplitude on the surface and cost effective CMOS VLSI fabrication. Noise is the most fundamental factor that limits the performance of sensors in development of high-sensitivity biosensors, and noise reduction techniques require precise studies and analysis. One such example stems from thermal fluctuations. Generally SOI biosensors are vulnerable to ambient temperature fluctuations because of large thermo-optic coefficient of silicon (˜2x10 -4 RIU/K), typically requiring another reference ring and readout sequence to compensate temperature induced noise. To address this problem, we designed sensors with a novel TM-mode shallow-ridge waveguide that provides both large surface amplitude for bulk and surface sensing. With proper design, this also provides large optical confinement in the aqueous cladding that renders the device athermal using the negative thermo-optic coefficient of water (~ --1x10-4RIU/K), demonstrating cancellation of thermo-optic effects for aqueous solution operation near 300K. Additional limitations resulting from mechanical actuator fluctuations, stability of tunable lasers, and large 1/f noise of lasers and sensor electronics can limit biosensor performance. Here we also present a simple harmonic feedback readout technique that obviates the need for spectrometers and tunable lasers. This feedback technique reduces the impact of 1/f noise to enable high-sensitivity, and a DSP lock-in with 256 kHz sampling rate can provide down to micros time scale monitoring for fast transitions in biomolecular concentration with potential for small volume and low cost. In this dissertation, a novel

  12. Osmotic potential calculations of inorganic and organic aqueous solutions over wide solute concentration levels and temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochrane, T. T., E-mail: agteca@hotmail.com [AGTECA S.A., 230 Oceanbeach Road, Mount Maunganui, Tauranga 3116 (New Zealand); Cochrane, T. A., E-mail: tom.cochrane@canterbury.ac.nz [Department of Civil and Natural Resources Engineering, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140 (New Zealand)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate that the authors’ new “aqueous solution vs pure water” equation to calculate osmotic potential may be used to calculate the osmotic potentials of inorganic and organic aqueous solutions over wide ranges of solute concentrations and temperatures. Currently, the osmotic potentials of solutions used for medical purposes are calculated from equations based on the thermodynamics of the gas laws which are only accurate at low temperature and solute concentration levels. Some solutions used in medicine may need their osmotic potentials calculated more accurately to take into account solute concentrations and temperatures. Methods: The authors experimented with their new equation for calculating the osmotic potentials of inorganic and organic aqueous solutions up to and beyond body temperatures by adjusting three of its factors; (a) the volume property of pure water, (b) the number of “free” water molecules per unit volume of solution, “N{sub f},” and (c) the “t” factor expressing the cooperative structural relaxation time of pure water at given temperatures. Adequate information on the volume property of pure water at different temperatures is available in the literature. However, as little information on the relative densities of inorganic and organic solutions, respectively, at varying temperatures needed to calculate N{sub f} was available, provisional equations were formulated to approximate values. Those values together with tentative t values for different temperatures chosen from values calculated by different workers were substituted into the authors’ equation to demonstrate how osmotic potentials could be estimated over temperatures up to and beyond bodily temperatures. Results: The provisional equations formulated to calculate N{sub f}, the number of free water molecules per unit volume of inorganic and organic solute solutions, respectively, over wide concentration ranges compared well with the calculations of N{sub f

  13. Osmotic potential calculations of inorganic and organic aqueous solutions over wide solute concentration levels and temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochrane, T. T.; Cochrane, T. A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate that the authors’ new “aqueous solution vs pure water” equation to calculate osmotic potential may be used to calculate the osmotic potentials of inorganic and organic aqueous solutions over wide ranges of solute concentrations and temperatures. Currently, the osmotic potentials of solutions used for medical purposes are calculated from equations based on the thermodynamics of the gas laws which are only accurate at low temperature and solute concentration levels. Some solutions used in medicine may need their osmotic potentials calculated more accurately to take into account solute concentrations and temperatures. Methods: The authors experimented with their new equation for calculating the osmotic potentials of inorganic and organic aqueous solutions up to and beyond body temperatures by adjusting three of its factors; (a) the volume property of pure water, (b) the number of “free” water molecules per unit volume of solution, “N f ,” and (c) the “t” factor expressing the cooperative structural relaxation time of pure water at given temperatures. Adequate information on the volume property of pure water at different temperatures is available in the literature. However, as little information on the relative densities of inorganic and organic solutions, respectively, at varying temperatures needed to calculate N f was available, provisional equations were formulated to approximate values. Those values together with tentative t values for different temperatures chosen from values calculated by different workers were substituted into the authors’ equation to demonstrate how osmotic potentials could be estimated over temperatures up to and beyond bodily temperatures. Results: The provisional equations formulated to calculate N f , the number of free water molecules per unit volume of inorganic and organic solute solutions, respectively, over wide concentration ranges compared well with the calculations of N f using recorded

  14. Targeted drug delivery using temperature-sensitive liposomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magin, R.L.; Niesman, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    Liposomes are receiving considerable attention as vehicles for selective drug delivery. One method of targeting liposomal contents involves the combination of local hyperthermia with temperature-sensitive liposomes. Such liposomes have been used to increase the uptake of methotrexate and cis-platinum into locally heated mouse tumors. However, additional information is needed on the mechanism of liposome drug release and the physiologic deposition of liposomes in vivo before clinical trails are begun. Current research is directed at studying the encapsulation and release of water soluble drugs from temperature-sensitive liposomes. The influence of liposome size, structure, and composition on the rapid release in plasma of cytosine arabinoside, cis-platinum, and the radiation sensitizer SR-2508 are described. These results demonstrate potential applications for temperature-sensitive liposomes in selective drug delivery

  15. Sensitivity calculation of the coolant temperature regarding the thermohydraulic parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade Lima, F.R. de; Silva, F.C. da; Thome Filho, Z.D.; Alvim, A.C.M.; Oliveira Barroso, A.C. de.

    1985-01-01

    It's studied the application of the Generalized Perturbation Theory (GPT) in the sensitivity calculation of thermalhydraulic problems, aiming at verifying the viability of the extension of the method. For this, the axial distribution, transient, of the coolant temperature in a PWR channel are considered. Perturbation expressions are developed using the GPT formalism, and a computer code (Tempera) is written, to calculate the channel temperature distribution and the associated importance function, as well as the effect of the thermalhydraulic parameters variations in the coolant temperature (sensitivity calculation). The results are compared with those from the direct calculation. (E.G.) [pt

  16. The effects of injected solution temperature on intravenous regional anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, D L; Logan, M R; Wildsmith, J A

    1988-05-01

    Ten healthy volunteers received three standard Bier's blocks. Prilocaine 0.5%, 40 ml was injected at a solution temperature of 0 degrees C, 22 degrees C or 37 degrees C. Recordings were made of sensory block, motor block, intravenous pressure, limb temperature and pain on injection. There were no differences between the three treatments in the rate of development or in the quality of block but there was a significant difference in the comfort of injection. Cold solutions caused most, and warm solutions least discomfort.

  17. Effect of solvent and temperature on solution-crystallized terfenadine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitao, M. Luisa P.; Canotilho, Joao; Ferreira, Simone C.R.; Sousa, Adriano T.; Simoes Redinha, J.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this work was to understand the crystallization process of terfenadine in solution. Cooling of saturated solutions prepared at 50 deg. C at different temperatures, evaporating the solvent from nearly saturated solutions at a certain temperature, and exposing ethanol solutions of terfenadine to water vapour atmosphere were the techniques used for obtaining terfenadine specimens. The characterization of these specimens was carried out by thermal microscopy, differential thermal analysis, thermogravimetry and powder X-ray diffraction. Crystalline phases, amorphous solids, and solvates were identified. For the solvents used in the present study, the crystallinity degree of terfenadine decreases from ethanol-water to ethanol and from this to methanol. Decreasing the temperature promotes the formation of amorphous solid material; at low temperatures, methanol and ethanol solvates are also formed. Desolvation, following the terfenadine aggregation process in solution accounts for the different behaviour found for the solvents and for the effect of temperature on the structure. The role of the solvent as structure-mediator is explained on the grounds of the values previously published for the enthalpy of solution of terfenadine in the solvents under study

  18. Room temperature electrodeposition of actinides from ionic solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatchett, David W.; Czerwinski, Kenneth R.; Droessler, Janelle; Kinyanjui, John

    2017-04-25

    Uranic and transuranic metals and metal oxides are first dissolved in ozone compositions. The resulting solution in ozone can be further dissolved in ionic liquids to form a second solution. The metals in the second solution are then electrochemically deposited from the second solutions as room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL), tri-methyl-n-butyl ammonium n-bis(trifluoromethansulfonylimide) [Me.sub.3N.sup.nBu][TFSI] providing an alternative non-aqueous system for the extraction and reclamation of actinides from reprocessed fuel materials. Deposition of U metal is achieved using TFSI complexes of U(III) and U(IV) containing the anion common to the RTIL. TFSI complexes of uranium were produced to ensure solubility of the species in the ionic liquid. The methods provide a first measure of the thermodynamic properties of U metal deposition using Uranium complexes with different oxidation states from RTIL solution at room temperature.

  19. Low-temperature Fabrication of Highly-Efficient, Optically-Transparent (FTO-free) Graphene Cathode for Co-Mediated Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells with Acetonitrile-free Electrolyte Solution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kavan, Ladislav; Liska, P.; Zakeeruddin, S. M.; Grätzel, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 195, MAR 2016 (2016), s. 34-42 ISSN 0013-4686 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-07724S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : dye sensitized solar cell * electrochemical impedance spectroscopy * stainless-steel Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 4.798, year: 2016

  20. Solution Processed Silver Nanoparticles in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Berginc

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A plasmonic effect of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs is studied. The solutions of silver nitrate in isopropanol, ethylene glycol, or in TiO2 sol were examined as possible precursors for Ag NPs formation. The solutions were dip-coated on the top of the porous TiO2 layer. The results of optical measurements confirmed the formation of Ag NPs throughout the porous TiO2 layer after the heat treatment of the layers above 100°C. Heat treatment at 220°C was found to be optimal regarding the formation of the Ag NPs. The porous TiO2 layers with Ag NPs have been evaluated also in DSSC by measuring current-voltage characteristics and the external quantum efficiency of the cells. In addition, the amount of adsorbed dye has been determined to prove the plasmonic effect in the cells. The I-V characterization of the DSSCs revealed an increase of the short circuit current in the presence of Ag NPs although the amount of the attached dye molecules decreased. These results confirm that the performance enhancement is related to the plasmonic effect. However, neither a thin sol-gel TiO2 layer nor poly(4-vinylpyridine shells provide effective protection for the long term stability of the Ag NPs against the corrosion of I3-/I- based electrolyte.

  1. Temperature Crosstalk Sensitivity of the Kummerow Rainfall Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Roy W.; Petrenko, Boris

    1999-01-01

    Even though the signal source for passive microwave retrievals is thermal emission, retrievals of non-temperature geophysical parameters typically do not explicitly take into account the effects of temperature change on the retrievals. For global change research, changes in geophysical parameters (e.g. water vapor, rainfall, etc.) are referenced to the accompanying changes in temperature. If the retrieval of a certain parameter has a cross-talk response from temperature change alone, the retrievals might not be very useful for climate research. We investigated the sensitivity of the Kummerow rainfall retrieval algorithm to changes in air temperature. It was found that there was little net change in total rainfall with air temperature change. However, there were non-negligible changes within individual rain rate categories.

  2. Calculation of coolant temperature sensitivity related to thermohydraulic parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, F.C. da; Andrade Lima, F.R. de

    1985-01-01

    It is verified the viability to apply the generalized Perturbation Theory (GPT) in the calculation of sensitivity for thermal-hydraulic problems. It was developed the TEMPERA code in FORTRAN-IV to transient calculations in the axial temperature distribution in a channel of PWR reactor and the associated importance function, as well as effects of variations of thermalhydraulic parameters in the coolant temperature. The results are compared with one which were obtained by direct calculation. (M.C.K.) [pt

  3. The relationship between virtual body ownership and temperature sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llobera, Joan; Sanchez-Vives, M. V.; Slater, Mel

    2013-01-01

    In the rubber hand illusion, tactile stimulation seen on a rubber hand, that is synchronous with tactile stimulation felt on the hidden real hand, can lead to an illusion of ownership over the rubber hand. This illusion has been shown to produce a temperature decrease in the hidden hand, suggesting that such illusory ownership produces disownership of the real hand. Here, we apply immersive virtual reality (VR) to experimentally investigate this with respect to sensitivity to temperature change. Forty participants experienced immersion in a VR with a virtual body (VB) seen from a first-person perspective. For half the participants, the VB was consistent in posture and movement with their own body, and in the other half, there was inconsistency. Temperature sensitivity on the palm of the hand was measured before and during the virtual experience. The results show that temperature sensitivity decreased in the consistent compared with the inconsistent condition. Moreover, the change in sensitivity was significantly correlated with the subjective illusion of virtual arm ownership but modulated by the illusion of ownership over the full VB. This suggests that a full body ownership illusion results in a unification of the virtual and real bodies into one overall entity—with proprioception and tactile sensations on the real body integrated with the visual presence of the VB. The results are interpreted in the framework of a ‘body matrix’ recently introduced into the literature. PMID:23720537

  4. Sensitivities and uncertainties of modeled ground temperatures in mountain environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gubler

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Model evaluation is often performed at few locations due to the lack of spatially distributed data. Since the quantification of model sensitivities and uncertainties can be performed independently from ground truth measurements, these analyses are suitable to test the influence of environmental variability on model evaluation. In this study, the sensitivities and uncertainties of a physically based mountain permafrost model are quantified within an artificial topography. The setting consists of different elevations and exposures combined with six ground types characterized by porosity and hydraulic properties. The analyses are performed for a combination of all factors, that allows for quantification of the variability of model sensitivities and uncertainties within a whole modeling domain. We found that model sensitivities and uncertainties vary strongly depending on different input factors such as topography or different soil types. The analysis shows that model evaluation performed at single locations may not be representative for the whole modeling domain. For example, the sensitivity of modeled mean annual ground temperature to ground albedo ranges between 0.5 and 4 °C depending on elevation, aspect and the ground type. South-exposed inclined locations are more sensitive to changes in ground albedo than north-exposed slopes since they receive more solar radiation. The sensitivity to ground albedo increases with decreasing elevation due to shorter duration of the snow cover. The sensitivity in the hydraulic properties changes considerably for different ground types: rock or clay, for instance, are not sensitive to uncertainties in the hydraulic properties, while for gravel or peat, accurate estimates of the hydraulic properties significantly improve modeled ground temperatures. The discretization of ground, snow and time have an impact on modeled mean annual ground temperature (MAGT that cannot be neglected (more than 1 °C for several

  5. Low temperature kinetics of In-Cd solid solution decomposition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pal-Val, P.P.; Pal-Val, L.N.; Ostapovets, A.A.; Vaněk, Přemysl

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 137, - (2008), s. 35-42 ISSN 1012-0394 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : low temperatures * In-based alloys * solid solutions * isothermal structure instability * Young's modulus * electrical resistivity * phase diagrams Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://www.scientific.net/3-908451-53-1/35/

  6. Transitions in aqueous solutions of sucrose at subzero temperatures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sikora, Antonín; Dupanov, V. O.; Kratochvíl, Jaroslav; Zámečník, J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 1 (2007), s. 71-85 ISSN 0022-2348 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA522/04/0384 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : aqueous sucrose solutions * subzero temperature * glass transitions Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 0.809, year: 2007

  7. Temperature sensitive riboflavin mutants of Penicillium vermiculatum Dangeard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, J.; Chaudhari, K.L.

    1974-01-01

    Two temperature sensitive UV induced riboflavin mutants rib 1 and rib 6 have been physiologically and genetically characterized. The two mutants behave differently with regard to their temperature sensitivity. The rib 1 mutant exhibits a leaky growth in minimal medium between 15 0 C and 30 0 C but grows well when the medium is supplemented with riboflavin. At 35 0 C the growth response of the mutant is at its max. and at 40 0 C and below 15 0 C it ceases to grow. The rib 6 mutant which is red brown in colour shows wild type character at temp. below 25 0 C in minimal medium but requires riboflavin at 30 0 C and above. Heterokaryotic analysis revealed the nonallelic nature of the two temperature mutants. Genetic tests of allelic relationship between riboflavin markers by crossing were also done. (author)

  8. Environmental issues and solutions for exploratory drilling in sensitive areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.M.

    1995-01-01

    Chevron USA Production Company (CPDN), the National Forest Service (FS) and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) successfully utilized a multi-disciplinary team approach to design and implement innovative environmental solutions to drill the 8,000 foot deep, Hunter Creek exploratory well. The project was located in the Bridger-Teton National Forest, less than 20 miles from Grand Teton National Park. Acquiring permission from the FS, the BLM, and ultimately, the public to drill the Hunter Creek well involved substantial teamwork in identifying many potential, environmental pitfalls. Creative, workable and cost-effective mitigation measures employed at Hunter Creek included: utilizing a helicopter and limiting vehicle use of an existing road, conducting environmental and safety training, an erosion control and reclamation plan, designing an environmentally friendly, near-zero-discharge drilling location, initiating a water quality monitoring program to establish baseline data and to ensure protection of surface and ground water, designing a waste minimization plan, identifying threatened and endangered and special status species possibly affected by project activities, and ensuring compliance with all mitigation measures and Federal and State regulations. The Hunter Creek project successfully demonstrates that oil and gas exploration can be conducted with a soft footprint in environmentally sensitive areas if mitigation measures are front-end loaded in the project and honored by all personnel involved. Teamwork, training and communication were found to be indispensable components of achieving success at Hunter Creek

  9. Corrosion of silicon nitride in high temperature alkaline solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Liyan, E-mail: liyan.qiu@cnl.ca; Guzonas, Dave A.; Qian, Jing

    2016-08-01

    The corrosion of silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) in alkaline solutions was studied at temperatures from 60 to 300 °C. Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} experienced significant corrosion above 100 °C. The release rates of silicon and nitrogen follow zero order reaction kinetics and increase with increasing temperature. The molar ratio of dissolved silicon and nitrogen species in the high temperature solutions is the same as that in the solid phase (congruent dissolution). The activation energy for silicon and nitrogen release rates is 75 kJ/mol which agrees well with that of silica dissolution. At 300 °C, the release of aluminum is observed and follows first order reaction kinetics while other minor constituents including Ti and Y are highly enriched on the corrosion films due to the low solubility of their oxides.

  10. On the sensitivity of annual streamflow to air temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milly, Paul C.D.; Kam, Jonghun; Dunne, Krista A.

    2018-01-01

    Although interannual streamflow variability is primarily a result of precipitation variability, temperature also plays a role. The relative weakness of the temperature effect at the annual time scale hinders understanding, but may belie substantial importance on climatic time scales. Here we develop and evaluate a simple theory relating variations of streamflow and evapotranspiration (E) to those of precipitation (P) and temperature. The theory is based on extensions of the Budyko water‐balance hypothesis, the Priestley‐Taylor theory for potential evapotranspiration ( ), and a linear model of interannual basin storage. The theory implies that the temperature affects streamflow by modifying evapotranspiration through a Clausius‐Clapeyron‐like relation and through the sensitivity of net radiation to temperature. We apply and test (1) a previously introduced “strong” extension of the Budyko hypothesis, which requires that the function linking temporal variations of the evapotranspiration ratio (E/P) and the index of dryness ( /P) at an annual time scale is identical to that linking interbasin variations of the corresponding long‐term means, and (2) a “weak” extension, which requires only that the annual evapotranspiration ratio depends uniquely on the annual index of dryness, and that the form of that dependence need not be known a priori nor be identical across basins. In application of the weak extension, the readily observed sensitivity of streamflow to precipitation contains crucial information about the sensitivity to potential evapotranspiration and, thence, to temperature. Implementation of the strong extension is problematic, whereas the weak extension appears to capture essential controls of the temperature effect efficiently.

  11. Two mutations which confer temperature-sensitive radiation sensitivity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, K.S.Y.; Mortimer, R.K.

    1975-01-01

    X-ray survival curves for two mutations, rad54 and rad55, in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are presented. These mutations confer temperature sensitive X-ray sensitivity; that is, rad54 and rad55 strains display a wild type X-ray survival response at permissive temperatures and a radiosensitive X-ray survival response at restrictive temperatures. The survival response of cells which were shifted from a permissive to a restrictive temperature or vice versa at various post-irradiation times indicates that repair and fixation of X-ray induced lesions is largely complete three hours after X-irradiation. Experiments to determine the utilization sequence of the rad54 and rad55 gene products in the repair of X-ray induced damage suggest that the two products are required in an interdependent manner

  12. Validation of temperature-sensitive radio transmitters for measurement of body temperature in small animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, Joseph B.; Tieleman, B. I.; Shobrak, Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    As part of a study on the core body temperature (T(b)) of desert birds, we purposed to use temperature-sensitive implantable radio transmitters. Because of the difficulty in recapturing these birds, we needed to know if these electronic devices held their calibration over the duration of normal

  13. Sensitivity of LUCC on the Surface Temperature of Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, W.; Deng, X.; Wu, F.

    2016-12-01

    The Tibetan Plateau has an important effect on the ecological security in China, even in Asia, which makes the region become the hot spot in recently research. Under the joint influence of global change and human activities, ecosystem destabilizing and the increasing pressure on resources and environment emerge on the Tibetan Plateau, but the potential spatial sensitivity of land use and land cover changes(LUCC) on surface temperature has not been quantitatively analyzed. This study analyzed the mainly types of LUCC, urbanization, grassland degradation, deforestation on Tibetan Plateau along with Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The LUCC in recent decades was first quantitatively analyzed in this study to give the basic fact with a significant increase in temperatures, reduced precipitation and increased evaporation. This study focused on the future spatio-temporal heterogeneity of the temperature and precipitation. Finally, the influencing factors with LUCC on Tibetan Plateau were simulated with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, and the sensitivity of different land use types was spatially analyzed with Singular Value Decomposition (SVD). The results indicate that the large-area alpine grassland plays a more important role in alleviating global warming than other vegetation types do. The changes of the landscape structure resulting from the urban expansion play a significant role in intensifying regional temperature increase. In addition, the effects of LUCC on monthly average temperature change would vary from month to month with obviously spatial heterogeneity.

  14. Water Recycling removal using temperature-sensitive hydronen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rana B. Gupta

    2002-10-30

    The overall objective of this project was to study the proposed Water Recycling/Removal Using Temperature-Sensitive Hydrogels. The main element of this technology is the design of a suitable hydrogel that can perform needed water separation for pulp and paper industry. The specific topics studied are to answer following questions: (a) Can water be removed using hydrogel from large molecules such as lignin? (b) Can the rate of separation be made faster? (c) What are the molecular interactions with hydrogel surface? (d) Can a hydrogel be designed for a high ionic strength and high temperature? Summary of the specific results are given.

  15. Effect of solution treatment conditions on the sensitization of austenitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XIAOFEI YU

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the impact of the conditions of solution treatment on the degree of sensitization (DOS of austenitic stainless steel (AISI 304 was investigated in detail. The results derived from the electrochemical potentiodynamic reactivation (EPR test indicated that the DOS decreased as the solution treatment temperature and time increased. The reason for this was studied via the SEM morphologies and EDS results, which indicated that the grain size influenced the DOS. Furthermore, cellular automaton (CA was utilized to simulate grain growth, the precipitation of Cr-rich carbides and the three dimensional distribution of the chromium concentration, which vividly illuminated the effect of the grain size on the DOS and was in accordance with the experiment results.

  16. Solute strengthening effects for 316 stainless steel at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Nam Ju; Lee, Sang Mae

    1986-01-01

    The inelastic behavior of 316 stainless steel is studied in order to investigate the solute strengthening effects. The Arrhenius-type rate equation with inclusion of the Voce-type evolution phenomenon is extended by addition of solute strengthening term to the isotropic work hardening effect. Changing of strain rate and temperature during the tension tests, we found that the strong work hardening for the inelastic of 316 stainless steel resulted from the vacancy-interstitial pair mechanism. Thus, the calculated results using the extended constitutive equations including solute effect due to the vacancy-interstitial pair mechanism were found to be in good agreement with the stress-strain curves obtained from the tension tests. (Author)

  17. Temperature dependence of heat sensitization and thermotolerance induction with ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henle, K.J.; Nagle, W.A.; Moss, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    Cytoxicity of 1 M ethanol was strongly temperature dependent; survival curves between 34 0 and 39 0 C were similar to heat survival curves between 40 and 45 0 without ethanol. Ethanol was non-toxic at 22 0 ; at 34.5 0 and 35.5 0 ethanol survival curves were biphasic. The major effect of 1 M ethanol was an effective temperature shift of 6.4 Celsius degrees, although temperatures between 34 0 and 36 0 caused additional sensitization reminiscent of the stepdown heating phenomenon. Induction of thermotolerance with equitoxic ethanol exposures at 35.5 0 and 37 0 or with heat alone (10 min, 45 0 ) resulted in tolerance development with similar kinetics; in contrast, ethanol exposures at 22 0 did not induce any tolerance development with similar kinetics; in contrast, ethanol exposures at 22 0 did not induce any tolerance to hyperthermia. These data provide a rationale for conflicting reports in the literature regarding thermotolerance induction by ethanol and suggest that ethanol causes ''heat'' stress at temperatures that are generally considered to be physiological. This interpretation predicts that the use of ethanol and other organic solvents in high concentrations will cause effects at 37 0 that normally occur only at hyperthermic temperatures, including membrane perturbations and HSP synthesis, and that ''physiological'' temperatures must be precisely controlled under those conditions

  18. Influence of pH, temperature and thermal treatment on site corrosion of SAE 304 steel in chlorinated solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konrad, I.B.

    1982-01-01

    The electrochemical behaviour and fracture morphology of homogenized and sensitized type SAE 304 stainless steel U bent specimens, in 3% NaCl solution, at pH=2.0 and pH=7.0 both at room temperature and 100 0 C was studied. Polarization curves, galvanostatic and potentiostatic experiments were run. It could be observed that high temperature and low pH favour transgranular cracking and longer sensitization times lower fracture time and tend to give rise to intergranular fracture. Light sensitization can produce transgranular cracking even at room temperature, when the homogenized alloy does not present stress-corrosion cracking for the same condition. (Author) [pt

  19. Effect of cold work on low-temperature sensitization behaviour of austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kain, V. E-mail: vivkain@apsara.barc.ernet.in; Chandra, K.; Adhe, K.N.; De, P.K

    2004-09-01

    The effects of cold work and low-temperature sensitization heat treatment of non-sensitized austenitic stainless steels have been investigated and related to the cracking in nuclear power reactors. Types 304, 304L and 304LN developed martensite after 15% cold working. Heat treatment of these cold worked steels at 500 deg. C led to sensitization of grain boundaries and the matrix and a desensitization effect was seen in 11 days due to fast diffusion rate of chromium in martensite. Types 316L and 316LN did not develop martensite upon cold rolling due to its chemical composition suppressing the martensite transformation (due to deformation) temperature, hence these were not sensitized at 500 deg. C. The sensitization of the martensite phase was always accompanied by a hump in the reactivation current peak in the double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation test, thus providing a test to detect such sensitization. It was shown that bending does not produce martensite and therefore, is a better method to simulate weld heat affected zone. Bending and heating at 500 deg. C for 11 days led to fresh precipitation due to increased retained strain and desensitization of 304LN due to faster diffusion rate of chromium along dislocations. The as received or solution annealed 304 and 304LN with 0.15% nitrogen showed increased sensitization after heat treatment at 500 deg. C, indicating the presence of carbides/nitrides.

  20. Excitation temperature of a solution plasma during nanoparticle synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Genki, E-mail: genki@eng.hokudai.ac.jp; Nakasugi, Yuki; Akiyama, Tomohiro [Center for Advanced Research of Energy and Materials, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2014-08-28

    Excitation temperature of a solution plasma was investigated by spectroscopic measurements to control the nanoparticle synthesis. In the experiments, the effects of edge shielding, applied voltage, and electrode material on the plasma were investigated. When the edge of the Ni electrode wire was shielded by a quartz glass tube, the plasma was uniformly generated together with metallic Ni nanoparticles. The emission spectrum of this electrode contained OH, H{sub α}, H{sub β}, Na, O, and Ni lines. Without an edge-shielded electrode, the continuous infrared radiation emitted at the edge created a high temperature on the electrode surface, producing oxidized coarse particles as a result. The excitation temperature was estimated from the Boltzmann plot. When the voltages were varied at the edge-shielded electrode with low average surface temperature by using different electrolyte concentrations, the excitation temperature of current-concentration spots increased with an increase in the voltage. The size of the Ni nanoparticles decreased at high excitation temperatures. Although the formation of nanoparticles via melting and solidification of the electrode surface has been considered in the past, vaporization of the electrode surface could occur at a high excitation temperature to produce small particles. Moreover, we studied the effects of electrodes of Ti, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Pd, Ag, W, Pt, Au, and various alloys of stainless steel and Cu–Ni alloys. With the exception of Ti, the excitation temperatures ranged from 3500 to 5500 K and the particle size depended on both the excitation temperature and electrode-material properties.

  1. Solution-phase synthesis of nanomaterials at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yongchun; Qian, Yitai

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the solution-phase synthesis of nanoparticles via some routes at low temperatures, such as room temperature route, wave-assisted synthesis (γ-irradiation route and sonochemical route), directly heating at low temperatures, and hydrothermal/solvothermal methods. A number of strategies were developed to control the shape, the size, as well as the dispersion of nanostructures. Using diethylamine or n-butylamine as solvent, semiconductor nanorods were yielded. By the hydrothermal treatment of amorphous colloids, Bi2S3 nanorods and Se nanowires were obtained. CdS nanowires were prepared in the presence of polyacrylamide. ZnS nanowires were obtained using liquid crystal. The polymer poly (vinyl acetate) tubule acted as both nanoreactor and template for the CdSe nanowire growth. Assisted by the surfactant of sodium dodecyl benzenesulfonate (SDBS), nickel nanobelts were synthesized. In addition, Ag nanowires, Te nanotubes and ZnO nanorod arrays could be prepared without adding any additives or templates.

  2. Radiation chemistry of aqueous solutions of hydrazine at elevated temperatures: Pt. 2. Solutions containing oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buxton, G.V.; Stuart, C.R.

    1997-01-01

    Here, we investigate the effects of oxygen on the radiation chemistry of hydrazine at elevated temperatures. The chemistry of this system is important to reactor coolant chemistry, particularly under start-up conditions when hydrazine is added to suppress corrosion which would otherwise be caused by the ingress of oxygen. The radiation chemistry of aqueous solutions of hydrazine has been investigated previously in the presence of oxygen by Ershov et al., but only at room temperature. In those experiments, both steady-state γ-radiolysis and pulse radiolysis were used to deduce the mechanism of decomposition of hydrazine in the presence of oxygen. (author)

  3. Radiolysis of phenol in aqueous solution at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Toyoaki; Katsumura, Yosuke; Lin Mingzhang; Muroya, Yusa; Kudo, Hisaaki; Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Asano, Masaharu; Yoshida, Masaru

    2006-01-01

    γ-Radiolysis and pulse radiolysis of phenol in aqueous solution up to supercritical condition have been carried out. G-values of phenol consumption and product formation have been determined. While dihydroxybenzenes were major products at room temperature, multi-ring compounds and benzene were formed above 300 deg. C. This indicates reaction mechanism was changed above 300 deg. C, where phenoxyl radical plays a predominant role. This is supported by the observation of phenoxyl radical in pulse radiolysis. In supercritical water, the G-values increased with decrease of density

  4. Temperature uniformity mapping in a high pressure high temperature reactor using a temperature sensitive indicator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grauwet, T.; Plancken, van der I.; Vervoort, L.; Matser, A.M.; Hendrickx, M.; Loey, van A.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the first prototype ovomucoid-based pressure–temperature–time indicator (pTTI) for high pressure high temperature (HPHT) processing was described. However, for temperature uniformity mapping of high pressure (HP) vessels under HPHT sterilization conditions, this prototype needs to be

  5. Radiolysis of Aqueous Benzene Solutions at higher temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, H.

    1964-07-01

    Aqueous solutions of benzene have been irradiated with Co γ-rays with doses of up to 2.3 Mrad in the temperature region 100 - 200 C. At 100 C a linear relationship between the phenol concentration and the absorbed dose was obtained, but at 150 C and at higher temperatures the rate of the phenol formation increased significantly after an initial constant period. With higher doses the rate decreased again, falling almost to zero at 200 C after a dose of 2.2 Mrad. The G value of phenol in the initial linear period increased from 2.8 at 100 C to 8.0 at 200 C. The reaction mechanism is discussed and reactions constituting a chain reaction are suggested. The result of the addition of iron ions and of a few inorganic oxides to the system is presented and briefly discussed

  6. Radiolysis of Aqueous Benzene Solutions at higher temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, H

    1964-07-15

    Aqueous solutions of benzene have been irradiated with Co {gamma}-rays with doses of up to 2.3 Mrad in the temperature region 100 - 200 C. At 100 C a linear relationship between the phenol concentration and the absorbed dose was obtained, but at 150 C and at higher temperatures the rate of the phenol formation increased significantly after an initial constant period. With higher doses the rate decreased again, falling almost to zero at 200 C after a dose of 2.2 Mrad. The G value of phenol in the initial linear period increased from 2.8 at 100 C to 8.0 at 200 C. The reaction mechanism is discussed and reactions constituting a chain reaction are suggested. The result of the addition of iron ions and of a few inorganic oxides to the system is presented and briefly discussed.

  7. On the Sensitivity Matrix of the Nash Bargaining Solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engwerda, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    In this note we provide a characterization of a subclass of bargaining problems for which the Nash solution has the property of disagreement point monotonicity.While the original d-monotonicity axiom and its stronger notion, strong d-monotonicity, were introduced and discussed by Thomson [15], this

  8. Sensitivity of regional climate to global temperature and forcing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tebaldi, Claudia; O’Neill, Brian; Lamarque, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    The sensitivity of regional climate to global average radiative forcing and temperature change is important for setting global climate policy targets and designing scenarios. Setting effective policy targets requires an understanding of the consequences exceeding them, even by small amounts, and the effective design of sets of scenarios requires the knowledge of how different emissions, concentrations, or forcing need to be in order to produce substantial differences in climate outcomes. Using an extensive database of climate model simulations, we quantify how differences in global average quantities relate to differences in both the spatial extent and magnitude of climate outcomes at regional (250–1250 km) scales. We show that differences of about 0.3 °C in global average temperature are required to generate statistically significant changes in regional annual average temperature over more than half of the Earth’s land surface. A global difference of 0.8 °C is necessary to produce regional warming over half the land surface that is not only significant but reaches at least 1 °C. As much as 2.5 to 3 °C is required for a statistically significant change in regional annual average precipitation that is equally pervasive. Global average temperature change provides a better metric than radiative forcing for indicating differences in regional climate outcomes due to the path dependency of the effects of radiative forcing. For example, a difference in radiative forcing of 0.5 W m −2 can produce statistically significant differences in regional temperature over an area that ranges between 30% and 85% of the land surface, depending on the forcing pathway. (letter)

  9. Isotopic equilibria between sulphur solute species at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, B.W.

    1978-01-01

    Sulphur solute species in ore solutions and geothermal discharges include HSO 4 - , SO 4 2- , H 2 S, and HS - , as well as the ion-paired species, NaHS 0 , NaHSO 4 - and Na 2 SO 4 0 . Observed sulphate-sulphide fractionation factors and the rates of attainment of isotopic equilibrium are likely to depend on the nature of the sulphur species actually taking part in these isotopic equilibria. Preliminary experiments in alkaline solution (pH 10.1 at 20 0 C) were carried out in a gold cell. No significant isotope fractionation was observed between the SO 4 2- and HS - in 29 days at 200 0 C, 63days at 300 0 C, or 90 days at 250 0 C. However, similar experiments at 350 0 C in sealed gold capsules at room temperature pH 8.5 showed slow exchange(t( 1 / 2 ) was calculated to be 510 days for the SO 4 2- -HS - exchange reaction using the theoretical fractionation of 20.2 0 / 00 ). The addition of NaCl appeared to have no affect on the exchange. However, pH strongly controls the reaction rate, and exchange probably involves H 2 S and the HSO 4 - ion. Additional preliminary experiments were conducted with a fivefold increase in the sulphur concentration; a decrease in t( 1 / 2 ) to 142 days resulted. Some inter-relationship between sulphur concentration and exchange rate thus exists. The important controlling parameters of isotope exchange (temperature, pH, and ΣS) can be seen to have influenced exchange in natural systems.(auth.)

  10. Understanding dynamics using sensitivity analysis: caveat and solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Parametric sensitivity analysis (PSA) has become one of the most commonly used tools in computational systems biology, in which the sensitivity coefficients are used to study the parametric dependence of biological models. As many of these models describe dynamical behaviour of biological systems, the PSA has subsequently been used to elucidate important cellular processes that regulate this dynamics. However, in this paper, we show that the PSA coefficients are not suitable in inferring the mechanisms by which dynamical behaviour arises and in fact it can even lead to incorrect conclusions. Results A careful interpretation of parametric perturbations used in the PSA is presented here to explain the issue of using this analysis in inferring dynamics. In short, the PSA coefficients quantify the integrated change in the system behaviour due to persistent parametric perturbations, and thus the dynamical information of when a parameter perturbation matters is lost. To get around this issue, we present a new sensitivity analysis based on impulse perturbations on system parameters, which is named impulse parametric sensitivity analysis (iPSA). The inability of PSA and the efficacy of iPSA in revealing mechanistic information of a dynamical system are illustrated using two examples involving switch activation. Conclusions The interpretation of the PSA coefficients of dynamical systems should take into account the persistent nature of parametric perturbations involved in the derivation of this analysis. The application of PSA to identify the controlling mechanism of dynamical behaviour can be misleading. By using impulse perturbations, introduced at different times, the iPSA provides the necessary information to understand how dynamics is achieved, i.e. which parameters are essential and when they become important. PMID:21406095

  11. Neighborhood properties are important determinants of temperature sensitive mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Lockwood

    Full Text Available Temperature-sensitive (TS mutants are powerful tools to study gene function in vivo. These mutants exhibit wild-type activity at permissive temperatures and reduced activity at restrictive temperatures. Although random mutagenesis can be used to generate TS mutants, the procedure is laborious and unfeasible in multicellular organisms. Further, the underlying molecular mechanisms of the TS phenotype are poorly understood. To elucidate TS mechanisms, we used a machine learning method-logistic regression-to investigate a large number of sequence and structure features. We developed and tested 133 features, describing properties of either the mutation site or the mutation site neighborhood. We defined three types of neighborhood using sequence distance, Euclidean distance, and topological distance. We discovered that neighborhood features outperformed mutation site features in predicting TS mutations. The most predictive features suggest that TS mutations tend to occur at buried and rigid residues, and are located at conserved protein domains. The environment of a buried residue often determines the overall structural stability of a protein, thus may lead to reversible activity change upon temperature switch. We developed TS prediction models based on logistic regression and the Lasso regularized procedure. Through a ten-fold cross-validation, we obtained the area under the curve of 0.91 for the model using both sequence and structure features. Testing on independent datasets suggested that the model predicted TS mutations with a 50% precision. In summary, our study elucidated the molecular basis of TS mutants and suggested the importance of neighborhood properties in determining TS mutations. We further developed models to predict TS mutations derived from single amino acid substitutions. In this way, TS mutants can be efficiently obtained through experimentally introducing the predicted mutations.

  12. Western Arctic Temperature Sensitivity Varies under Different Mean States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, W.; Russell, J. M.; Morrill, C.; Longo, W. M.; Giblin, A. E.; Holland-Stergar, P.; Hu, A.; Huang, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The Arctic is warming faster than anywhere on earth. Predictions of future change, however, are hindered by uncertainty in the mechanisms that underpin Arctic amplification. Data from Beringia (Alaska and Eastern Siberia) are particularly inconclusive with regards to both glacial-interglacial climate change as well as the presence or absence of abrupt climate change events such as the Younger Dryas. Here we investigate temperature change in Beringia from the last glacial maximum (LGM) to present using a unique 30 kyr lacustrine record of leaf wax hydrogen isotope ratios (δDwax) from Northern Alaska. We evaluate our results in the context of PMIP3 climate simulations as well as sensitivity tests of the effects of sea level and Bering Strait closure on Arctic Alaskan climate. The amplitude of LGM cooling in Alaska (-3.2 °C relative to pre-industrial) is smaller than other parts of North America and areas proximal to LGM ice sheets, but similar to Arctic Asia and Europe. This suggests that the local feedbacks (vegetation, etc.) had limited impacts on regional temperatures during the last ice-age, and suggests most of the Arctic exhibited similar responses to global climate boundary conditions. Deglacial warming was superimposed by a series of rapid warming events that encompass most of the temperature increase. These events are largely synchronous with abrupt events in the North Atlantic, but are amplified, muted, or even reversed in comparison depending on the mean climate state. For example, we observe warming during Heinrich 1 and during the submergence of the Bering Land Bridge, which are associated with cooling in the North Atlantic. Climate modeling suggests that opening of the Bering Strait controlled the amplitude and sign of millennial-scale temperature changes across the glacial termination.

  13. Sensitivity of Sump Water Temperature to Containment Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Misuk; Kim, Seoung Rae [Nuclear Engineering Service and Solution, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    This paper is focused on the containment behavior analysis in the above described cases using GOTHIC-IST (generation of thermal-hydraulic information for containments, industry standard toolset). GOTHIC-IST version 7.2a is an integrated, general purpose thermal-hydraulics software package for design, licensing, safety and operating analysis of nuclear power plant containments and other confinement buildings. In this study, we perform the sensitivity the sump water temperature to containment integrity. For 35% RIH break accident with the malfunction of spray system, local air coolers, ECC(emergency core cooling) pump and heat exchanger, the peak pressure at boiler room do not exceed the design pressure 124kPa(g) of the containment and containment integrity is secured. If accompanied the malfunction of heat exchanger or pump in the time of low pressure safety injection, of ECCS, it will be one of the aggravating factors to the integrity of core and containment.

  14. In vivo non-invasive optical imaging of temperature-sensitive co-polymeric nanohydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiyan; Zhang, Jian; Qian, Zhiyu; Liu, Fei; Chen, Xinyang; Hu, Yuzhu; Gu, Yueqing

    2008-05-01

    Assessment of hyperthermia in pathological tissue is a promising strategy for earlier diagnosis of malignant tumors. In this study, temperature-sensitive co-polymeric nanohydrogel poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) (PNIPA-co-AA) was successfully synthesized by the precipitation polymerization method. The diameters of nanohydrogels were controlled to be less than 100 nm. Also the lower critical solution temperature (LCST, 40 °C) was manipulated above physiological temperature after integration of near-infrared (NIR) organic dye (heptamethine cyanine dye, HMCD) within its interior cores. NIR laser light (765 nm), together with sensitive charge coupled device (CCD) cameras, were designed to construct an NIR imaging system. The dynamic behaviors of PNIPA-co-AA-HMCD composites in denuded mice with or without local hyperthermia treatment were real-time monitored by an NIR imager. The results showed that the PNIPA-co-AA-HMCD composites accumulated in the leg treated with local heating and diffused much slower than that in the other leg without heating. The results demonstrated that the temperature-responsive PNIPA-co-AA-HMCD composites combining with an NIR imaging system could be an effective temperature mapping technique, which provides a promising prospect for earlier tumor diagnosis and thermally related therapeutic assessment.

  15. In vivo non-invasive optical imaging of temperature-sensitive co-polymeric nanohydrogel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Haiyan; Hu Yuzhu; Zhang Jian; Liu Fei; Chen Xinyang; Gu Yueqing; Qian Zhiyu

    2008-01-01

    Assessment of hyperthermia in pathological tissue is a promising strategy for earlier diagnosis of malignant tumors. In this study, temperature-sensitive co-polymeric nanohydrogel poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) (PNIPA-co-AA) was successfully synthesized by the precipitation polymerization method. The diameters of nanohydrogels were controlled to be less than 100 nm. Also the lower critical solution temperature (LCST, 40 deg. C) was manipulated above physiological temperature after integration of near-infrared (NIR) organic dye (heptamethine cyanine dye, HMCD) within its interior cores. NIR laser light (765 nm), together with sensitive charge coupled device (CCD) cameras, were designed to construct an NIR imaging system. The dynamic behaviors of PNIPA-co-AA-HMCD composites in denuded mice with or without local hyperthermia treatment were real-time monitored by an NIR imager. The results showed that the PNIPA-co-AA-HMCD composites accumulated in the leg treated with local heating and diffused much slower than that in the other leg without heating. The results demonstrated that the temperature-responsive PNIPA-co-AA-HMCD composites combining with an NIR imaging system could be an effective temperature mapping technique, which provides a promising prospect for earlier tumor diagnosis and thermally related therapeutic assessment

  16. Temperature-sensitive elastin-mimetic dendrimers: Effect of peptide length and dendrimer generation to temperature sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Chie; Irie, Kotaro; Tada, Tomoko; Tanaka, Naoki

    2014-06-01

    Dendrimers are synthetic macromolecules with unique structure, which are a potential scaffold for peptides. Elastin is one of the main components of extracellular matrix and a temperature-sensitive biomacromolecule. Previously, Val-Pro-Gly-Val-Gly peptides have been conjugated to a dendrimer for designing an elastin-mimetic dendrimer. In this study, various elastin-mimetic dendrimers using different length peptides and different dendrimer generations were synthesized to control the temperature dependency. The elastin-mimetic dendrimers formed β-turn structure by heating, which was similar to the elastin-like peptides. The elastin-mimetic dendrimers exhibited an inverse phase transition, largely depending on the peptide length and slightly depending on the dendrimer generation. The elastin-mimetic dendrimers formed aggregates after the phase transition. The endothermal peak was observed in elastin-mimetic dendrimers with long peptides, but not with short ones. The peptide length and the dendrimer generation are important factors to tune the temperature dependency on the elastin-mimetic dendrimer. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Low-Temperature Solution Processable Electrodes for Piezoelectric Sensors Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuukkanen, Sampo; Julin, Tuomas; Rantanen, Ville; Zakrzewski, Mari; Moilanen, Pasi; Lupo, Donald

    2013-05-01

    Piezoelectric thin-film sensors are suitable for a wide range of applications from physiological measurements to industrial monitoring systems. The use of flexible materials in combination with high-throughput printing technologies enables cost-effective manufacturing of custom-designed, highly integratable piezoelectric sensors. This type of sensor can, for instance, improve industrial process control or enable the embedding of ubiquitous sensors in our living environment to improve quality of life. Here, we discuss the benefits, challenges and potential applications of piezoelectric thin-film sensors. The piezoelectric sensor elements are fabricated by printing electrodes on both sides of unmetallized poly(vinylidene fluoride) film. We show that materials which are solution processable in low temperatures, biocompatible and environmental friendly are suitable for use as electrode materials in piezoelectric sensors.

  18. Trends and Variability in Temperature Sensitivity of Lilac Flowering Phenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huanjiong; Dai, Junhu; Rutishauser, This; Gonsamo, Alemu; Wu, Chaoyang; Ge, Quansheng

    2018-03-01

    The responses of plant phenology to temperature variability have many consequences for ecological processes, agriculture, forestry, and human health. Temperature sensitivity (ST) of phenology could measure how and to what degree plant could phenologically track climate change. The long-term trends and spatial patterns in ST have been well studied for vegetative phenology such as leaf unfolding, but trends to be expected for reproductive phenology in the future remain unknown. Here we investigate trends and factors driving the temporal variation of ST of first bloom date (FBD). Using the long-term FBD records during 1963-2013 for common lilac (Syringa vulgaris) from 613 stations in Europe, we compared changes in ST from the beginning to the end of the study period. The Spearman partial correlations were used to assess the importance of four influencing factors. The results showed that the temporal changes in ST of FBD varied considerably among time scales. Mean ST decreased significantly by 0.92 days °C-1 from 1963-1972 to 2004-2013 (P plant species in other climates and environments using similar methods to our study.

  19. Temperature effects on solute diffusion and adsorption in differently compacted kaolin clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mon, Ei Ei; Hamamoto, Shoichiro; Kawamoto, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Effects of soil temperature on the solute diffusion process in soils are important since subsurface temperature variation affects solute transport such as a fertilizer movement, leaching of salt, and pollutant movement to groundwater aquifers. However, the temperature dependency on the solute dif...

  20. Isopiestic studies of aqueous solutions at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, H.F.; Mesmer, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    Isopiestic measurements have been made on SrCl 2 (aq) and BaCl 2 (aq) over the temperature range 382.96 to 473.61 K with NaCl(aq) as the reference solution for the calculation of osmotic coefficients. The molalities corresponded to NaCl(aq) molalities ranging from 0.6 to 6.5 mol kg -1 . An ion-interaction model was fitted to the osmotic coefficients of SrCl 2 (aq) and BaCl 2 (aq) with a standard deviation of fit (in the osmotic coefficient) ranging from 0.0007 to 0.0048. Parameters derived from the fit were used to calculate the activity coefficients. The osmotic and activity coefficients decrease with increasing temperature and become less dependent on molality. Previous isopiestic results between 318 and 394 K agree with the present study. Activity coefficients from electrochemical measurements between 283.15 and 343.15 K are not consistent with the isopiestic results. (author)

  1. Temperature-sensitive leaf color mutation in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu Qingyao; Liu Guifu; Xia Yingwu

    1996-01-01

    Studies on the leaf color appearance of 4 chlorophyll-deficient mutation lines both in field and in phytotron were carried out. The mutation lines were induced by 60 Co gamma rays, and showed that white or yellow leaves at seedling stage were quite different from their-parent 2177 S, a thermal sensitive genie male sterile line and any other rice materials. The temperature had great influence on the expression of leaf color at seedling stage in the mutation lines. the leaf color was white at 30∼35 degree C for the lines W 4 and W 11 . The chlorophyll content of 1.5-leaf-age seedlings was 0.0219 and 0.0536 mg/g FW respectively for W 4 and W 11 at 35 degree C. When the temperature dropped to 20∼25 degree C, the seedlings showed yellow or yellowish and the chlorophyll content reached to 0.2410 and 0.3431 mg/g FW at 25 degree C, respectively. However, the responses to temperature for W 17 and W 25 were just the opposite. They were white at 20∼25 degree C, but appeared greenish at 30∼35 degree C. The chlorophyll content increased from 0.0813 and 0.0172 mg/g FW at 25 degree C to 1.0570 and 1.1367 mg/g FW at 35 degree C for the lines W 1 -7 and W 25 , respectively. The parent line 2177 S showed normal green and the chlorophyll content was between 2.108 and 2.118 mg/g FW. The W 11 is exception, which showed yellow to light green in lifetime, and all the mutation lines could convert to normal green after the extension of the fourth leaf. The chlorophyll content of 3.5-leaf-age W 4 and W 17 seedlings grown under 25 degree C reached to 2.2190 and 1.993 mg/g FW, which was about 86. 6% and 81.1% of that of 2177 S at the same stage. When grown at the temperature bellow 20 degree C, W 25 maintained white and could not changed into green after the 4th leaf extension, and showed a conditional lethal status

  2. Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel in glycerol solution and chloride solution at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haftirman; Maruhum Tua Lubis

    2009-01-01

    Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) is an environmentally assisted failure caused by exposure to a corrodant while under a sustained tensile stress. SCC is most often rapid, unpredictable and catastrophic. Failure can occur in as little as a few hours or take years to happen. Most alloys are susceptible to SCC in one or more environments requiring careful consideration of alloy type in component design. In aqueous chloride environments austenitic stainless steels and many nickel based alloys are known to perform poorly. One of products Oleo chemical is glycerol solution. Glycerol solution contains chloride with concentration 50 ppm - 150 ppm. Austenitic stainless steel is usually used in distillation construction tank and pipe line of glycerol. Material AISI 304 will be failure in this glycerol solution with this concentration in 5 years. In production process, concentration of chloride in glycerol becomes more than 150 ppm at temperature 150 degree Celsius. The reason is that the experiment I conducted in high chloride with concentration such as 6000 ppm, 9000 ppm, and 12000 ppm. The stress corrosion cracking of the austenitic stainless steels of types AISI 304, 316 and 316L in glycerol solution at elevated temperature 150 degree Celsius is investigated as a function variation of chloride concentration, namely 50, 6000, 9000 and 12000 ppm using a constant load method with two kinds of initial tensile stress as 50 % and 70 % yield strength. The experiment uses a spring loaded fixture type and is based on ASTM G49 for experiment method, and E292 for geometry of specimen. Pitting corrosion occurs on the surface specimen until the stress level reaches the ultimate strength. Pitting corrosion attack and depletion occur on the surface as initiation of SCC failure as the stress reaches the ultimate strength. Failure has occurred in catastrophic brittle fracture type of transgranular. AISI 304 was more susceptible for all conditions. In chloride solution with concentration of

  3. Emergent constraint on equilibrium climate sensitivity from global temperature variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Peter M; Huntingford, Chris; Williamson, Mark S

    2018-01-17

    Equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS) remains one of the most important unknowns in climate change science. ECS is defined as the global mean warming that would occur if the atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) concentration were instantly doubled and the climate were then brought to equilibrium with that new level of CO 2 . Despite its rather idealized definition, ECS has continuing relevance for international climate change agreements, which are often framed in terms of stabilization of global warming relative to the pre-industrial climate. However, the 'likely' range of ECS as stated by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has remained at 1.5-4.5 degrees Celsius for more than 25 years. The possibility of a value of ECS towards the upper end of this range reduces the feasibility of avoiding 2 degrees Celsius of global warming, as required by the Paris Agreement. Here we present a new emergent constraint on ECS that yields a central estimate of 2.8 degrees Celsius with 66 per cent confidence limits (equivalent to the IPCC 'likely' range) of 2.2-3.4 degrees Celsius. Our approach is to focus on the variability of temperature about long-term historical warming, rather than on the warming trend itself. We use an ensemble of climate models to define an emergent relationship between ECS and a theoretically informed metric of global temperature variability. This metric of variability can also be calculated from observational records of global warming, which enables tighter constraints to be placed on ECS, reducing the probability of ECS being less than 1.5 degrees Celsius to less than 3 per cent, and the probability of ECS exceeding 4.5 degrees Celsius to less than 1 per cent.

  4. Emergent constraint on equilibrium climate sensitivity from global temperature variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Peter M.; Huntingford, Chris; Williamson, Mark S.

    2018-01-01

    Equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS) remains one of the most important unknowns in climate change science. ECS is defined as the global mean warming that would occur if the atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration were instantly doubled and the climate were then brought to equilibrium with that new level of CO2. Despite its rather idealized definition, ECS has continuing relevance for international climate change agreements, which are often framed in terms of stabilization of global warming relative to the pre-industrial climate. However, the ‘likely’ range of ECS as stated by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has remained at 1.5-4.5 degrees Celsius for more than 25 years. The possibility of a value of ECS towards the upper end of this range reduces the feasibility of avoiding 2 degrees Celsius of global warming, as required by the Paris Agreement. Here we present a new emergent constraint on ECS that yields a central estimate of 2.8 degrees Celsius with 66 per cent confidence limits (equivalent to the IPCC ‘likely’ range) of 2.2-3.4 degrees Celsius. Our approach is to focus on the variability of temperature about long-term historical warming, rather than on the warming trend itself. We use an ensemble of climate models to define an emergent relationship between ECS and a theoretically informed metric of global temperature variability. This metric of variability can also be calculated from observational records of global warming, which enables tighter constraints to be placed on ECS, reducing the probability of ECS being less than 1.5 degrees Celsius to less than 3 per cent, and the probability of ECS exceeding 4.5 degrees Celsius to less than 1 per cent.

  5. Hypomorphic temperature-sensitive alleles of NSDHL cause CK syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLarren, Keith W; Severson, Tesa M; du Souich, Christèle; Stockton, David W; Kratz, Lisa E; Cunningham, David; Hendson, Glenda; Morin, Ryan D; Wu, Diane; Paul, Jessica E; An, Jianghong; Nelson, Tanya N; Chou, Athena; DeBarber, Andrea E; Merkens, Louise S; Michaud, Jacques L; Waters, Paula J; Yin, Jingyi; McGillivray, Barbara; Demos, Michelle; Rouleau, Guy A; Grzeschik, Karl-Heinz; Smith, Raffaella; Tarpey, Patrick S; Shears, Debbie; Schwartz, Charles E; Gecz, Jozef; Stratton, Michael R; Arbour, Laura; Hurlburt, Jane; Van Allen, Margot I; Herman, Gail E; Zhao, Yongjun; Moore, Richard; Kelley, Richard I; Jones, Steven J M; Steiner, Robert D; Raymond, F Lucy; Marra, Marco A; Boerkoel, Cornelius F

    2010-12-10

    CK syndrome (CKS) is an X-linked recessive intellectual disability syndrome characterized by dysmorphism, cortical brain malformations, and an asthenic build. Through an X chromosome single-nucleotide variant scan in the first reported family, we identified linkage to a 5 Mb region on Xq28. Sequencing of this region detected a segregating 3 bp deletion (c.696_698del [p.Lys232del]) in exon 7 of NAD(P) dependent steroid dehydrogenase-like (NSDHL), a gene that encodes an enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. We also found that males with intellectual disability in another reported family with an NSDHL mutation (c.1098 dup [p.Arg367SerfsX33]) have CKS. These two mutations, which alter protein folding, show temperature-sensitive protein stability and complementation in Erg26-deficient yeast. As described for the allelic disorder CHILD syndrome, cells and cerebrospinal fluid from CKS patients have increased methyl sterol levels. We hypothesize that methyl sterol accumulation, not only cholesterol deficiency, causes CKS, given that cerebrospinal fluid cholesterol, plasma cholesterol, and plasma 24S-hydroxycholesterol levels are normal in males with CKS. In summary, CKS expands the spectrum of cholesterol-related disorders and insight into the role of cholesterol in human development. Copyright © 2010 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of peritoneal lavage solution temperature on body temperature in anaesthetised cats and small dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, D C; Leece, E A; Trimble, T A; Demetriou, J L

    2017-05-20

    A prospective, randomised, non-blinded, clinical study to assess the effect of peritoneal lavage using warmed fluid on body temperature in anesthetised cats and dogs of less than 10 kg body mass undergoing coeliotomy. A standardised anaesthetic protocol was used. Oesophageal and rectal temperatures were measured at various time points. At the end of surgery, group 1 patients (n=10) were lavaged with 200 ml/kg sterile isotonic saline at 34±1°C and group 2 (n=10) at 40±1°C. Groups were similar with respect to age, mass, body condition and surgical incision length. Duration of anaesthesia, surgical procedures and peritoneal lavage was similar between groups. Linear regression showed no significant change in oesophageal temperature during the lavage period for group 1 (P=0.64), but a significant increase for group 2 patients (Ptemperature changes of -0.5°C (from (36.3°C to 35.9°C) and +0.9°C (from 35.4°C to 36.3°C), respectively. Similar results were found for rectal temperature, with mean changes of -0.5°C and +0.8°C (P=0.922 and 0.045), respectively. The use of isotonic crystalloid solution for peritoneal lavage at a temperature of 40±1°C significantly warms small animal patients, when applied in a clinical setting, compared with lavage solution at 34±1°C. British Veterinary Association.

  7. EXACT SOLUTION TO FINITE TEMPERATURE SFDM: NATURAL CORES WITHOUT FEEDBACK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles, Victor H.; Matos, T.

    2013-01-01

    Recent high-quality observations of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies have shown that their dark matter (DM) halos prefer flat central density profiles. However, the standard cold dark matter model simulations predict a more cuspy behavior. One mechanism used to reconcile the simulations with the observed data is the feedback from star formation. While this mechanism may be successful in isolated dwarf galaxies, its success in LSB galaxies remains unclear. Additionally, the inclusion of too much feedback in the simulations is a double-edged sword—in order to obtain a cored DM distribution from an initially cuspy one, the feedback recipes usually require one to remove a large quantity of baryons from the center of the galaxies; however, some feedback recipes produce twice the number of satellite galaxies of a given luminosity and with much smaller mass-to-light ratios from those that are observed. Therefore, one DM profile that produces cores naturally and that does not require large amounts of feedback would be preferable. We find both requirements to be satisfied in the scalar field dark matter model. Here, we consider that DM is an auto-interacting real scalar field in a thermal bath at temperature T with an initial Z 2 symmetric potential. As the universe expands, the temperature drops so that the Z 2 symmetry is spontaneously broken and the field rolls down to a new minimum. We give an exact analytic solution to the Newtonian limit of this system, showing that it can satisfy the two desired requirements and that the rotation curve profile is no longer universal.

  8. Toward Analytic Solution of Nonlinear Differential Difference Equations via Extended Sensitivity Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darmani, G.; Setayeshi, S.; Ramezanpour, H.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper an efficient computational method based on extending the sensitivity approach (SA) is proposed to find an analytic exact solution of nonlinear differential difference equations. In this manner we avoid solving the nonlinear problem directly. By extension of sensitivity approach for differential difference equations (DDEs), the nonlinear original problem is transformed into infinite linear differential difference equations, which should be solved in a recursive manner. Then the exact solution is determined in the form of infinite terms series and by intercepting series an approximate solution is obtained. Numerical examples are employed to show the effectiveness of the proposed approach. (general)

  9. Radiation synthesis of the water-soluble, temperature sensitive polymer, copolymer and study on their properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai Maolin; Yin Min; Ha Hongfei

    1994-01-01

    In order to obtain the water-soluble, temperature sensitive polymer and activated copolymer, the radiation polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm), radiation copolymerization of NIPAAm and N-acryloxysuccide (NASI) in aqueous solution or in buffer solution (PBS pH = 7.4) have been carried out by γ-rays from 60 Co source at room temperature. The optimum dose range (1-7 kGy), dose rate (>40 Gy/min) and monomer concentration (1%) were chosen through determining the monomer conversion yield and molecular weight (M w = 6.8 x 10 5 ) of product. Synthesis of the reversible linear polymer was performed in tetrahydrofuran (THF) as well. In this way a white powder product could be obtained which possesses of thermally reversible property too, when it was dissolved in water or PBS. The only disadvantages of this method is that the molecular weight of the polymer produced in THF was much lower than that in aqueous solution

  10. Human body temperature and new approaches to constructing temperature-sensitive bacterial vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Matthew D; Bosio, Catharine M; Duplantis, Barry N; Nano, Francis E

    2011-09-01

    Many of the live human and animal vaccines that are currently in use are attenuated by virtue of their temperature-sensitive (TS) replication. These vaccines are able to function because they can take advantage of sites in mammalian bodies that are cooler than the core temperature, where TS vaccines fail to replicate. In this article, we discuss the distribution of temperature in the human body, and relate how the temperature differential can be exploited for designing and using TS vaccines. We also examine how one of the coolest organs of the body, the skin, contains antigen-processing cells that can be targeted to provoke the desired immune response from a TS vaccine. We describe traditional approaches to making TS vaccines, and highlight new information and technologies that are being used to create a new generation of engineered TS vaccines. We pay particular attention to the recently described technology of substituting essential genes from Arctic bacteria for their homologues in mammalian pathogens as a way of creating TS vaccines.

  11. Temperature sensitivity of the penicillin-induced autolysis mechanism in nongrowing cultures of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Kusser, W; Ishiguro, E E

    1987-01-01

    The effect of incubation temperature on the ampicillin-induced autolysis of nongrowing Escherichia coli was determined. The autolysis mechanisms in amino acid-deprived relA mutant cells treated with chloramphenicol were temperature sensitive. This temperature-sensitive autolysis was demonstrated in three independent ways: turbidimetric determinations, viable cell counts, and solubilization of radiolabeled peptidoglycan.

  12. Influence of temperature on the formation and encapsulation of gold nanoparticles using a temperature-sensitive template

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel Peter Bengzon Tan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This data article describes the synthesis of temperature-sensitive and amine-rich microgel particle as a dual reductant and template to generate smart gold/polymer nanocomposite particle. TEM images illustrate the influence of reaction temperature on the formation and in-site encapsulation of gold nanoparticles using the temperature-sensitive microgel template. Thermal stability of the resultant gold/polymer composite particles was also examined.

  13. Temperature-sensitive porous membrane production through radiation co-grafting of NIPAAm on/in PVDF porous membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qi; Zhu Zhiyong; Yang Xiaomin; Chen Xiliang; Song Yufeng

    2007-01-01

    N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) monomer was grafted on and in poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) micro-pore membrane by γ-irradiation. The influence of irradiation and reaction conditions on the grafting yield was investigated in detail. The chemical structure of NIPAAm-grafted PVDF (NIPAAm-g-PVDF) membrane was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectra measurements. The morphology of the sample surface as well as the cross-section before and after grafting was characterized by scanning electron microscope. The temperature sensitive properties of the membrane were monitored by measuring the conductance as well as the water flux through the sample thickness. The results show that the membrane exhibits clearly temperature-sensitive permeability to water as expected, i.e. the permeability of water changes dramatically as the temperature goes over the lower critical solution temperature of NIPAAm

  14. Low temperature sensitization behavior in the weld metal of austenitic stainless steel. Study on low temperature sensitization in weldments of austenitic stainless steels and its improvement by laser surface melting treatment. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Hiroaki; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi; Nakao, Yoshikuni

    1996-01-01

    Low temperature sensitization (LTS) behavior in the weld metal of Type308 stainless steel was investigated in this study. Three kinds of Type308 stainless steels, of which carbon contents were 0.04%, 0.06% and 0.08%, were used for this study. TIG welding method was adopted to make the weld metals. Weld metals were subjected to the sensitizing heat treatment in the temperature range between 773 K and 1073 K. The degree of sensitization were examined by the EPR method and the Strauss test. Chromium carbide was absorbed to precipitate at δ/γ grain boundaries in the as-welded weld metals Corrosion test results have shown that the higher carbon content in the weld metal is, the earlier sensitization yields in it. Sensitization in weld metals is found to occur faster than in those solution heat-treated at 1273 K prior to sensitizing heat-treatment. This fact suggests that preexisted chromium carbides have an effect to accelerate sensitization. That is, it is apparent that LTS phenomenon occur even in the weld metal. Moreover, sensitization in the weld metal has occurred in much shorter time than in HAZ, which is attributed to the preferential precipitation of chromium carbide at δ/γ grain boundaries in the weld metals. (author)

  15. Effect of solution saturation state and temperature on diopside dissolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carroll Susan A

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Steady-state dissolution rates of diopside are measured as a function of solution saturation state using a titanium flow-through reactor at pH 7.5 and temperature ranging from 125 to 175°C. Diopside dissolved stoichiometrically under all experimental conditions and rates were not dependent on sample history. At each temperature, rates continuously decreased by two orders of magnitude as equilibrium was approached and did not exhibit a dissolution plateau of constant rates at high degrees of undersaturation. The variation of diopside dissolution rates with solution saturation can be described equally well with a ion exchange model based on transition state theory or pit nucleation model based on crystal growth/dissolution theory from 125 to 175°C. At 175°C, both models over predict dissolution rates by two orders of magnitude indicating that a secondary phase precipitated in the experiments. The ion exchange model assumes the formation of a Si-rich, Mg-deficient precursor complex. Lack of dependence of rates on steady-state aqueous calcium concentration supports the formation of such a complex, which is formed by exchange of protons for magnesium ions at the surface. Fit to the experimental data yields Rate (moldiopsidecm−2s−1=k×10−Ea/2.303RT(aH+2aMg2+n MathType@MTEF@5@5@+=feaafiart1ev1aaatCvAUfKttLearuWrP9MDH5MBPbIqV92AaeXatLxBI9gBaebbnrfifHhDYfgasaacH8akY=wiFfYdH8Gipec8Eeeu0xXdbba9frFj0=OqFfea0dXdd9vqai=hGuQ8kuc9pgc9s8qqaq=dirpe0xb9q8qiLsFr0=vr0=vr0dc8meaabaqaciaacaGaaeqabaqabeGadaaakeaaieaacqWFsbGucqWFHbqycqWF0baDcqWFLbqzcqqGGaaicqGGOaakcqWFTbqBcqWFVbWBcqWFSbaBcqWFGaaicqWFKbazcqWFPbqAcqWFVbWBcqWFWbaCcqWFZbWCcqWFPbqAcqWFKbazcqWFLbqzcqWFGaaicqWFJbWycqWFTbqBdaahaaWcbeqaaiabgkHiTiabikdaYaaakiab=bcaGiab=nhaZnaaCaaaleqabaGaeyOeI0IaeGymaedaaOGaeiykaKIaeyypa0Jaem4AaSMaey41aqRaeeymaeJaeeimaaZaaWbaaSqabeaacqGHsislcqWGfbqrdaWgaaadbaGaemyyaegabeaaliabc+caViabikdaYiabc6caUiabioda

  16. Passive Wireless Temperature Sensors with Enhanced Sensitivity and Range, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) temperature sensors with enhanced sensitivity and detection range for NASA application...

  17. Sensitivity of technetium-99m-d,1-HMPAO to radiolysis in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubergen, K.; Corlija, M.; Volkert, W.A.; Holmes, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    The sensitivity of technetium-99m- (99mTc) d,l-HMPAO to radiolytically induced dissociation in aqueous solutions was investigated. It was found that cobalt-60 (60Co) gamma irradiation of solutions containing 99mTc-d,l-HMPAO with only 1600 cGy reduced the lipophilic chelates' radiochemical purity (RCP) to 50%-60%. The radiolytic sensitivity of 99mTc-meso-HMPAO is significantly lower. The results indicate that radiolytically produced intermediates limit the in vitro stability of 99mTc-d,l-HMPAO

  18. Temperature effects on geotechnical and hydraulic properties of bentonite hydrated with inorganic salt solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rashid, H. M. A.; Kawamoto, K.; Saito, T.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015, International Journal of GEOMATE. This study investigated the combined effect of temperature and single-species salt solutions on geotechnical properties (swell index and liquid limit) and hydraulic conductivity of bentonite applying different cation types, concentrations, and temperatures...

  19. l-Tryptophan-capped carbon quantum dots for the sensitive and selective fluorescence detection of mercury ion in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Xuejuan; Li, Shifeng; Zhuang, Lulu; Tang, Jiaoning, E-mail: tjn@szu.edu.cn [Shenzhen University, Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Special Functional Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering (China)

    2016-07-15

    l-Tryptophan-capped carbon quantum dots (l-CQDs) were facilely synthesized through “green” methodology, and the obtained material was utilized as a sensitive and selective fluorescence sensor for mercury ion (Hg{sup 2+}) in pure aqueous solutions. Carboxyl-functionalized CQDs were first green synthesized by a one-step hydrothermal route, and l-tryptophan was then attached to CQDs via direct surface condensation reaction in aqueous solution at room temperature. The as-synthesized l-CQDs had an average size of ca. 5 nm with a good dispersity in water, and exhibited a favorable selectivity for Hg{sup 2+} ions over a range of other common metal cations in aqueous solution (10 mM PBS buffer, pH 6.0). Upon the addition of Hg{sup 2+}, a complete fluorescence quenching (ON–OFF switching) of l-CQDs was evident from the fluorescence titration experiment, and the fluorescence detection limit of Hg{sup 2+} was calculated to be 11 nM, which indicated that the obtained environmentally friendly l-CQDs had sensitive detection capacity for Hg{sup 2+} in aqueous solution.

  20. Dynamic microscale temperature gradient in a gold nanorod solution measured by diffraction-limited nanothermometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chengmingyue; Gan, Xiaosong; Li, Xiangping; Gu, Min, E-mail: mgu@swin.edu.au [Centre for Micro-Photonics, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia)

    2015-09-21

    We quantify the dynamic microscale temperature gradient in a gold nanorod solution using quantum-dot-based microscopic fluorescence nanothermometry. By incorporating CdSe quantum dots into the solution as a nanothermometer, precise temperature mapping with diffraction-limited spatial resolution and sub-degree temperature resolution is achieved. The acquired data on heat generation and dissipation show an excellent agreement with theoretical simulations. This work reveals an effective approach for noninvasive temperature regulation with localized nanoheaters in microfluidic environment.

  1. Sensitivity analysis and thermoeconomic comparison of ORCs (organic Rankine cycles) for low temperature waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Yongqiang; Zhang, Yaning; Li, Bingxi; Yang, Jinfu; Shi, Yang

    2015-01-01

    The sensitivity analysis for low temperature ORCs (organic Rankine cycles), as well as the thermoeconomic comparison between the basic ORC and regenerative ORC using Non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm-II (NSGA-II), are conducted in this paper. The derivatives of five system parameters on system performance are used to evaluate the parametric sensitiveness. The exergy efficiency and the APR (heat exchanger area per unit net power output) are selected as the objective functions for multi-objective optimization using R123 under the low temperature heat source of 423 K. The Pareto frontier solution with bi-objective for maximizing exergy efficiency and minimizing APR is obtained and compared with the corresponding single-objective solutions. The results indicate that the prior consideration of improving thermal efficiency and exergy efficiency is to increase the evaporator outlet temperature. A fitting curve can be yielded from the Pareto frontier between the thermodynamic performance and economic factor. The optimum exergy efficiency and APR of the regenerative ORC obtained from the Pareto-optimal solution are 59.93% and 3.07 m 2 /kW, which are 8.10% higher and 15.89% lower than that of the basic ORC, respectively. The Pareto optimization compromises the thermodynamic performance and economic factor, therefore being more suitable for decision making. - Highlights: • The sensitivity analysis of the basic ORC is conducted. • The Pareto-optimal solution is compared with the single-objective solutions. • Evaporator outlet temperature should be preferentially considered. • 8.10% higher exergy efficiency and 15.89% lower APR for the regenerative ORC

  2. Single molecule dynamics at a mechanically controllable break junction in solution at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Tatsuya; Kiguchi, Manabu; Takase, Mai; Nagasawa, Fumika; Nabika, Hideki; Ikeda, Katsuyoshi; Uosaki, Kohei; Ueno, Kosei; Misawa, Hiroaki; Murakoshi, Kei

    2013-01-23

    The in situ observation of geometrical and electronic structural dynamics of a single molecule junction is critically important in order to further progress in molecular electronics. Observations of single molecular junctions are difficult, however, because of sensitivity limits. Here, we report surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of a single 4,4'-bipyridine molecule under conditions of in situ current flow in a nanogap, by using nano-fabricated, mechanically controllable break junction (MCBJ) electrodes. When adsorbed at room temperature on metal nanoelectrodes in solution to form a single molecule junction, statistical analysis showed that nontotally symmetric b(1) and b(2) modes of 4,4'-bipyridine were strongly enhanced relative to observations of the same modes in solid or aqueous solutions. Significant changes in SERS intensity, energy (wavenumber), and selectivity of Raman vibrational bands that are coincident with current fluctuations provide information on distinct states of electronic and geometrical structure of the single molecule junction, even under large thermal fluctuations occurring at room temperature. We observed the dynamics of 4,4'-bipyridine motion between vertical and tilting configurations in the Au nanogap via b(1) and b(2) mode switching. A slight increase in the tilting angle of the molecule was also observed by noting the increase in the energies of Raman modes and the decrease in conductance of the molecular junction.

  3. Semianalytical Solution and Parameters Sensitivity Analysis of Shallow Shield Tunneling-Induced Ground Settlement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jifeng Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of boundary soil properties on tunneling-induced ground settlement is generally not considered in current analytic solutions, and the hypothesis of equal initial stress in vertical and horizontal makes the application of the above solutions limited. Based on the homogeneous half-plane hypothesis, by defining the boundary condition according to the ground loss pattern in shallow tunnel, and with the use of Mohr-Coulomb plastic yielding criteria and classic Lame and Kiersch elastic equations by separating the nonuniform stress field to uniform and single-direction stress field, a semiempirical solution for ground settlement induced by single shallow circular tunnel is presented and sensitivity to the ground parameters is analyzed. The methods of settlement control are offered by influence factors analysis of semiempirical solution. A case study in Beijing Metro tunnel shows that the semiempirical solution agrees well with the in situ measured results.

  4. Evaluation of SCC test methods for Inconel 600 in low temperature aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, R.C.; Roberge, R.; Bandy, R.

    1982-04-01

    In late 1981, widespread leakage was encountered in Alloy 600 steam-generator tubing at the Three Mile Island Unit 1 nuclear power plant. The phenomenon was identified as low-temperature intergranular stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) initiated from the inner surfaces of the tubes exposed to the primary coolant. A testing program was initiated to examine the material and environmental factors relevant to these failures, which were found to be associated with sensitization of the material and contamination of the coolant by air and sodium thiosulfate. The test solutions contained 1.3% boric acid with various additions of sulfur compounds and lithium hydroxide. Constant extension rate testing was used as the primary tool to examine environmental effects such as the inhibition of cracking by lithium hydroxide. Important effects of crack-initiation frequency on the specimen potential (and therefore crack velocity) are demonstrated

  5. A highly sensitive fluorescent probe based on BODIPY for Hg2+ in aqueous solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHAO Junwei

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A highly sensitive fluorescent probe based on BODIPY and hydrazine for Hg2+ was designed and synthesized.This probe could detect mercury ions in aqueous solutions within 5 min.With the increase of Hg2+ mole concentration,an obvious red shift of UV-Vis absorption wavelength was observed and the fluorescence intensity significantly enhanced.It was found that the fluorescence intensity of an aqueous solution containing 0.1 μmol/L Hg2+ is much stronger than that of blank solution,which indicats that the fluorescent probe has high sensitivity.In addition,other metal ions could not cause the change of fluorescent spectra,which means this probe has good selectivity,as well.

  6. Temperature field conduction solution by incomplete boundary condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novakovic, M; Petrasinovic, Lj; Djuric, M [Tehnoloski fakultet, Novi Sad (Yugoslavia); Perovic, N [Institut za Nuklearne Nauke Boris Kidric, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1977-01-01

    The problem of determination of one part boundary conditions temperatures for Fourier partial differential equation when the other part of boundary condition and derivates (heat fluxes) are known is a practical interest as it enables one to determine and accessible temperature by measuring temperatures on other side, of the wall. Method developed and applied here consist of transforming the Fourier partial differential equation by time discretisation in sets of pairs of ordinary differential equations for temperature and heat flux. Such pair of differential equations of first order was solved by Runge-Kutta method. The integration proceeds along space interval simultaneosly for all time intervals. It is interesting to note that this procedure does not require the initial condition.

  7. Solution properties and taste behavior of lactose monohydrate in aqueous ascorbic acid solutions at different temperatures: Volumetric and rheological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Abhijit; Sinha, Biswajit

    2016-11-15

    The densities and viscosities of lactose monohydrate in aqueous ascorbic acid solutions with several molal concentrations m=(0.00-0.08)molkg(-1) of ascorbic acid were determined at T=(298.15-318.15)K and pressure p=101kPa. Using experimental data apparent molar volume (ϕV), standard partial molar volume (ϕV(0)), the slope (SV(∗)), apparent specific volumes (ϕVsp), standard isobaric partial molar expansibility (ϕE(0)) and its temperature dependence [Formula: see text] the viscosity B-coefficient and solvation number (Sn) were determined. Viscosity B-coefficients were further employed to obtain the free energies of activation of viscous flow per mole of the solvents (Δμ1(0≠)) and of the solute (Δμ2(0≠)). Effects of molality, solute structure and temperature and taste behavior were analyzed in terms of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions; results revealed that the solutions are characterized predominantly by solute-solvent interactions and lactose monohydrate behaves as a long-range structure maker. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of Solution Annealing Temperature on the Galvanic Corrosion Behavior of the Super Duplex Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun-Seob; Jeon, Soon-Hyeok; Park, Yong-Soo

    2013-02-01

    This study investigated the active dissolution of super duplex stainless steel (SDSS) at various solution annealing temperatures. The active dissolutions of the α-phase and γ-phase were compared, and the effects of the surface area ratio on the active dissolutions of both phases were investigated. There were two peaks in the active-passive transition region in the potentiodynamic test in the modified green-death solution. The two peaks changed as the solution annealing temperature was increased from 1050 to 1150 °C. The solution annealing temperature difference affected the critical anodic current densities. This provides useful information for determining the appropriate solution annealing temperature in the modified green-death solution for SDSS.

  9. Sensitive Constrained Optimal PMU Allocation with Complete Observability for State Estimation Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Manam

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a sensitive constrained integer linear programming approach is formulated for the optimal allocation of Phasor Measurement Units (PMUs in a power system network to obtain state estimation. In this approach, sensitive buses along with zero injection buses (ZIB are considered for optimal allocation of PMUs in the network to generate state estimation solutions. Sensitive buses are evolved from the mean of bus voltages subjected to increase of load consistently up to 50%. Sensitive buses are ranked in order to place PMUs. Sensitive constrained optimal PMU allocation in case of single line and no line contingency are considered in observability analysis to ensure protection and control of power system from abnormal conditions. Modeling of ZIB constraints is included to minimize the number of PMU network allocations. This paper presents optimal allocation of PMU at sensitive buses with zero injection modeling, considering cost criteria and redundancy to increase the accuracy of state estimation solution without losing observability of the whole system. Simulations are carried out on IEEE 14, 30 and 57 bus systems and results obtained are compared with traditional and other state estimation methods available in the literature, to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  10. Immobilization of plutonium from solutions on porous matrices by the method of high temperature sorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nardova, A.K.; Filippov, E.A. [All Research Institute of Chemical Technologies, Moscow (Russian Federation); Glagolenko, Y.B. [and others

    1996-05-01

    This report presents the results of investigations of plutonium immobilization from solutions on inorganic matrices with the purpose of producing a solid waste form. High-temperature sorption is described which entails the adsorption of radionuclides from solutions on porous, inorganic matrices, as for example silica gel. The solution is brought to a boil with additional thermal process (calcination) of the saturated granules.

  11. Sensitivity of a soil-plant-atmosphere model to changes in air temperature, dew point temperature, and solar radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luxmoore, R.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab.,TN); Stolzy, J.L.; Holdeman, J.T.

    1981-01-01

    Air temperature, dew point temperature and solar radiation were independently varied in an hourly soil-plant-atmosphere model in a sensitivity analysis of these parameters. Results suggested that evapotranspiration in eastern Tennessee is limited more by meteorological conditions that determine the vapor-pressure gradient than by the necessary energy to vaporize water within foliage. Transpiration and soil water drainage were very sensitive to changes in air and dew point temperature and to solar radiation under low atmospheric vapor-pressure deficit conditions associated with reduced air temperature. Leaf water potential and stomatal conductance were reduced under conditions having high evapotranspiration. Representative air and dew point temperature input data for a particular application are necessary for satisfactory results, whereas irradiation may be less well characterized for applications with high atmospheric vapor-pressure deficit. The effects of a general rise in atmospheric temperature on forest water budgets are discussed.

  12. Cell membrane temperature rate sensitivity predicted from the Nernst equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, F S

    1984-01-01

    A hyperpolarized current is predicted from the Nernst equation for conditions of positive temperature derivatives with respect to time. This ion current, coupled with changes in membrane channel conductivities, is expected to contribute to a transient potential shift across the cell membrane for silent cells and to a change in firing rate for pacemaker cells.

  13. Temperature sensitivity of the oxygenation reaction of stripped ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -operativity (n) at all three experimental temperatures compared to L. capensis. The heat of oxygenation (",H) between 8"C (pH 7,63) and. 23"C (pH 7,49) calculated for L capensis haemoglobin (-56,3 kJ.mol ') exceeded that of C. gariepinus ...

  14. Low-temperature magnetic modification of sensitive biological materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospišková, K.; Šafařík, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 142, mar (2015), s. 184-188 ISSN 0167-577X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13021 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : magnetic iron oxides particles * microwave-assisted synthesis * low-temperature magnetic modification * immobilized enzymes Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.437, year: 2015

  15. Snapshot of methanogen sensitivity to temperature in Zoige wetland from Tibetan plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li eFu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Zoige wetland in Tibetan plateau represents a cold environment at high altitude where significant methane emission has been observed. However, it remains unknown how the production and emission of CH4 from Zoige wetland will respond to a warming climate. Here we investigated the temperature sensitivity of methanogen community in a Zoige wetland soil under the laboratory incubation conditions. One soil sample was collected and the temperature sensitivity of the methanogenic activity, the structure of methanogen community and the methanogenic pathways were determined. We found that the response of methanogenesis to temperature could be separated into two phases, a high sensitivity in the low temperature range and a modest sensitivity under mesophilic conditions, respectively. The aceticlastic methanogens Methanosarcinaceae were the main methanogens at low temperatures, while hydrogenotrophic Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales and Methanocellales were more abundant at higher temperatures. The total abundance of mcrA genes increased with temperature indicating that the growth of methanogens was stimulated. The growth of hydrogenotrophic methanogens, however, was faster than aceticlastic ones resulting in the shift of methanogen community. Determination of carbon isotopic signatures indicated that methanogenic pathway was also shifted from mainly aceticlastic methanogenesis to a mixture of hydrogenotrophic and aceticlastic methanogenesis with the increase of temperature. Collectively, the shift of temperature responses of methanogenesis was in accordance with the changes in methanogen composition and methanogenic pathway in this Zoige wetland sample. It appears that the aceticlastic methanogenesis dominated at low temperatures is more sensitive than the hydrogenotrophic one at higher temperatures.

  16. γ-Radiolysis of benzophenone aqueous solution at elevated temperatures up to supercritical condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Toyoaki; Katsumura, Yosuke; Lin Mingzhang; Muroya, Yusa; Kudo, Hisaaki; Asano, Masaharu; Yoshida, Masaru

    2006-01-01

    A product analysis study of γ-irradiated benzophenone aqueous solutions from room temperature to 400 deg. C has been carried out by the combination of a flow irradiation system and a liquid chromatographic method. At room temperature, the main decomposition products are phenol and hydroxybenzophenone isomers. In high temperature and supercritical water solutions, 9-fluorenone appears as an important product and the G-value of benzophenone consumption depends significantly on the water density under supercritical conditions

  17. Modelling firn thickness evolution during the last deglaciation: constraints on sensitivity to temperature and impurities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bréant

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The transformation of snow into ice is a complex phenomenon that is difficult to model. Depending on surface temperature and accumulation rate, it may take several decades to millennia for air to be entrapped in ice. The air is thus always younger than the surrounding ice. The resulting gas–ice age difference is essential to documenting the phasing between CO2 and temperature changes, especially during deglaciations. The air trapping depth can be inferred in the past using a firn densification model, or using δ15N of air measured in ice cores. All firn densification models applied to deglaciations show a large disagreement with δ15N measurements at several sites in East Antarctica, predicting larger firn thickness during the Last Glacial Maximum, whereas δ15N suggests a reduced firn thickness compared to the Holocene. Here we present modifications of the LGGE firn densification model, which significantly reduce the model–data mismatch for the gas trapping depth evolution over the last deglaciation at the coldest sites in East Antarctica (Vostok, Dome C, while preserving the good agreement between measured and modelled modern firn density profiles. In particular, we introduce a dependency of the creep factor on temperature and impurities in the firn densification rate calculation. The temperature influence intends to reflect the dominance of different mechanisms for firn compaction at different temperatures. We show that both the new temperature parameterization and the influence of impurities contribute to the increased agreement between modelled and measured δ15N evolution during the last deglaciation at sites with low temperature and low accumulation rate, such as Dome C or Vostok. We find that a very low sensitivity of the densification rate to temperature has to be used in the coldest conditions. The inclusion of impurity effects improves the agreement between modelled and measured δ15N at cold East Antarctic sites during the last

  18. A Methodology for Modeling Confined, Temperature Sensitive Cushioning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    thickness of cushion T, and®- s temperature 0, and as a dependent variable, G, the peak acceleration. The initial model, Equation (IV-11), proved deficient ...k9) = TR * TCTH ALV(60) = Tk * TCTH AL2 V6)= Tk2 * FCTH V2 =TRk * TCrFH *AL V(6~3) =THZ * TC.TH AU! V(,34) =TRa * TCTH 141 Yj)=Tks * T(-Th * AL V(.4b

  19. Isopiestic studies of aqueous solutions at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, H.F.; Mesmer, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    Isopiestic measurements have been made for LiCl(aq) and CsCl(aq) over the temperature range 382.96 to 473.61 K. NcCl(aq) served as the reference electrolyte for the calculation of osmotic coefficients and the molalities ranged from about 0.6 to 6 mol kg -1 , for NaCl(aq). An ion-interaction model gave an excellent fit to the experimental osmotic coefficients with a standard error of fit ranging from 0.0004 to 0.0016 in the osmotic coefficient. Parameters obtained from the fit were used to calculate the activity coefficients. The osmotic and activity coefficients both decreased with increasing temperature over this temperature range. LiCl(aq) is somewhat unusual among the alkali-metal chlorides in that the osmotic (and activity) coefficient is much more dependent on molality at the higher molalities and there is no maximum between 273.15 and 373.15 K in the osmotic coefficient as a function of temperature. For both LiCl(aq) and CsCl(aq) there is an excellent correlation between the isopiestic results and the vapor pressures of Lindsay and Liu. Existing electrochemical results between 283.15 and 343.15 K are consistent with the calculated activity coefficients for CsCl(aq). (author)

  20. Low-temperature solution processing of palladium/palladium oxide films and their pH sensing performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yiheng; Alam, Arif U; Pan, Si; Howlader, Matiar M R; Ghosh, Raja; Selvaganapathy, P Ravi; Wu, Yiliang; Deen, M Jamal

    2016-01-01

    Highly sensitive, easy-to-fabricate, and low-cost pH sensors with small dimensions are required to monitor human bodily fluids, drinking water quality and chemical/biological processes. In this study, a low-temperature, solution-based process is developed to prepare palladium/palladium oxide (Pd/PdO) thin films for pH sensing. A precursor solution for Pd is spin coated onto pre-cleaned glass substrates and annealed at low temperature to generate Pd and PdO. The percentages of PdO at the surface and in the bulk of the electrodes are correlated to their sensing performance, which was studied by using the X-ray photoelectron spectroscope. Large amounts of PdO introduced by prolonged annealing improve the electrode's sensitivity and long-term stability. Atomic force microscopy study showed that the low-temperature annealing results in a smooth electrode surface, which contributes to a fast response. Nano-voids at the electrode surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscope, indicating a reason for the long-term degradation of the pH sensitivity. Using the optimized annealing parameters of 200°C for 48 h, a linear pH response with sensitivity of 64.71±0.56 mV/pH is obtained for pH between 2 and 12. These electrodes show a response time shorter than 18 s, hysteresis less than 8 mV and stability over 60 days. High reproducibility in the sensing performance is achieved. This low-temperature solution-processed sensing electrode shows the potential for the development of pH sensing systems on flexible substrates over a large area at low cost without using vacuum equipment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Cross Validation Through Two-Dimensional Solution Surface for Cost-Sensitive SVM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Bin; Sheng, Victor S; Tay, Keng Yeow; Romano, Walter; Li, Shuo

    2017-06-01

    Model selection plays an important role in cost-sensitive SVM (CS-SVM). It has been proven that the global minimum cross validation (CV) error can be efficiently computed based on the solution path for one parameter learning problems. However, it is a challenge to obtain the global minimum CV error for CS-SVM based on one-dimensional solution path and traditional grid search, because CS-SVM is with two regularization parameters. In this paper, we propose a solution and error surfaces based CV approach (CV-SES). More specifically, we first compute a two-dimensional solution surface for CS-SVM based on a bi-parameter space partition algorithm, which can fit solutions of CS-SVM for all values of both regularization parameters. Then, we compute a two-dimensional validation error surface for each CV fold, which can fit validation errors of CS-SVM for all values of both regularization parameters. Finally, we obtain the CV error surface by superposing K validation error surfaces, which can find the global minimum CV error of CS-SVM. Experiments are conducted on seven datasets for cost sensitive learning and on four datasets for imbalanced learning. Experimental results not only show that our proposed CV-SES has a better generalization ability than CS-SVM with various hybrids between grid search and solution path methods, and than recent proposed cost-sensitive hinge loss SVM with three-dimensional grid search, but also show that CV-SES uses less running time.

  2. Approximate solution of the Saha equation - temperature as an explicit function of particle densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, M.

    1991-01-01

    The Saha equation for a plasma in thermodynamic equilibrium (TE) is approximately solved to give the temperature as an explicit function of population densities. It is shown that the derived expressions for the Saha temperature are valid approximations to the exact solution. An application of the approximate temperature to the calculation of TE plasma parameters is also described. (orig.)

  3. Sensitivity of Optimal Solutions to Control Problems for Second Order Evolution Subdifferential Inclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartosz, Krzysztof; Denkowski, Zdzisław; Kalita, Piotr

    In this paper the sensitivity of optimal solutions to control problems described by second order evolution subdifferential inclusions under perturbations of state relations and of cost functionals is investigated. First we establish a new existence result for a class of such inclusions. Then, based on the theory of sequential [Formula: see text]-convergence we recall the abstract scheme concerning convergence of minimal values and minimizers. The abstract scheme works provided we can establish two properties: the Kuratowski convergence of solution sets for the state relations and some complementary [Formula: see text]-convergence of the cost functionals. Then these two properties are implemented in the considered case.

  4. Influence of anoxic sensitizers on the radiation damage in biologically active DNA in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafleur, M.V.M.; Loman, H.

    1982-01-01

    The competition between biologically active single-stranded phiX174 DNA and the anoxic radiosensitizers metronidazole, misonidazole, paranitroacetophenone or nifuroxime for OH radicals is studied. The results are compared with experiments in which the protection of the DNA by t-butanol is determined. Also the effects of the sensitizers on the chemical nature of the damage (immediate and potential break, immediate and potential base damage) is studied. It is found that in diluted aqueous solutions of DNA these radiosensitizers do not sensitize with respect to the biological inactivation. The only effect observed is a shift from potential to immediate breaks with misonidazole and also nifuroxime. (author)

  5. Further studies on a temperature-sensitive mutant of Escherichia coli with defective repair capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morfiadakis, I.; Geissler, E.; Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Berlin. Zentralinstitut fuer Molekularbiologie)

    1981-01-01

    A temperature-sensitive mutant of E. coli, WG24, was studied with respect to its sensitivity to photodynamic action, its capacity to perform host controlled reactivation, and its sensitivity to transduction at elevated temperatures. Mutant cells are much more sensitive than wild type cells to photodynamic action by thiopyronine and visible light at elevated temperatures. As well defined rec mutants, WG24 cells are less able to reactivate UV irradiated lambdac phages at elevated temperatures, while their ability to repair T1 phages is less impaired. Mutant cells cannot be transduced to T6 resistance at a detectable rate at elevated temperature. It is concluded, therefore, that some rec gene carries a ts mutation in this mutant. (author)

  6. Identification of a novel temperature sensitive promoter in cho cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesse Friedemann

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO expression system is the leading production platform for manufacturing biopharmaceuticals for the treatment of numerous human diseases. Efforts to optimize the production process also include the genetic construct encoding the therapeutic gene. Here we report about the successful identification of an endogenous highly active gene promoter obtained from CHO cells which shows conditionally inducible gene expression at reduced temperature. Results Based on CHO microarray expression data abundantly transcribed genes were selected as potential promoter candidates. The S100a6 (calcyclin and its flanking regions were identified from a genomic CHO-K1 lambda-phage library. Computational analyses showed a predicted TSS, a TATA-box and several TFBSs within the 1.5 kb region upstream the ATG start signal. Various constructs were investigated for promoter activity at 37°C and 33°C in transient luciferase reporter gene assays. Most constructs showed expression levels even higher than the SV40 control and on average a more than two-fold increase at lower temperature. We identified the core promoter sequence (222 bp comprising two SP1 sites and could show a further increase in activity by duplication of this minimal sequence. Conclusions This novel CHO promoter permits conditionally high-level gene expression. Upon a shift to 33°C, a two to three-fold increase of basal productivity (already higher than SV40 promoter is achieved. This property is of particular advantage for a process with reduced expression during initial cell growth followed by the production phase at low temperature with a boost in expression. Additionally, production of toxic proteins becomes feasible, since cell metabolism and gene expression do not directly interfere. The CHO S100a6 promoter can be characterized as cold-shock responsive with the potential for improving process performance of mammalian expression systems.

  7. Corrosion behaviour of Alloy 800 in high temperature aqueous solutions: Electrochemical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmedo, A.M.; Villegas, M.; Alvarez, M.G.

    1996-01-01

    The anodic behaviour and passivity breakdown of Alloy 800 in aqueous solutions of sodium chloride, sodium sulphate and sodium bicarbonate were studied by electrochemical techniques in the temperature range from 60 C to 280 C. The pitting resistance and pitting morphology of the alloy in chloride plus sulphate and chloride plus bicarbonate mixtures, at 60 C and 280 C, were also examined. Increasing bicarbonate or sulphate additions to chloride solutions shift the characteristic pitting potential of Alloy 800 to higher values, both at low and high temperatures. Changes in pitting morphology were observed in sulphate containing solutions while the morphology of the attack found in bicarbonate containing solutions was similar to that in pure chloride solutions. Finally, no localized or substantial generalized corrosion was detected in pure sulphate or bicarbonate solutions at any temperature. (orig.)

  8. Effects of Temperature on Solute Transport Parameters in Differently-Textured Soils at Saturated Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, S.; Arihara, M.; Kawamoto, K.; Nishimura, T.; Komatsu, T.; Moldrup, P.

    2014-12-01

    Subsurface warming driven by global warming, urban heat islands, and increasing use of shallow geothermal heating and cooling systems such as the ground source heat pump, potentially causes changes in subsurface mass transport. Therefore, understanding temperature dependency of the solute transport characteristics is essential to accurately assess environmental risks due to increased subsurface temperature. In this study, one-dimensional solute transport experiments were conducted in soil columns under temperature control to investigate effects of temperature on solute transport parameters, such as solute dispersion and diffusion coefficients, hydraulic conductivity, and retardation factor. Toyoura sand, Kaolin clay, and intact loamy soils were used in the experiments. Intact loamy soils were taken during a deep well boring at the Arakawa Lowland in Saitama Prefecture, Japan. In the transport experiments, the core sample with 5-cm diameter and 4-cm height was first isotropically consolidated, whereafter 0.01M KCl solution was injected to the sample from the bottom. The concentrations of K+ and Cl- in the effluents were analyzed by an ion chromatograph to obtain solute breakthrough curves. The solute transport parameters were calculated from the breakthrough curves. The experiments were conducted under different temperature conditions (15, 25, and 40 oC). The retardation factor for the intact loamy soils decreased with increasing temperature, while water permeability increased due to reduced viscosity of water at higher temperature. Opposite, the effect of temperature on solute dispersivity for the intact loamy soils was insignificant. The effects of soil texture on the temperature dependency of the solute transport characteristics will be further investigated from comparison of results from differently-textured samples.

  9. Temperature sensitivity of soil respiration is dependent on readily decomposable C substrate concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larionova, A. A.; Yevdokimov, I. V.; Bykhovets, S. S.

    2007-06-01

    Temperature acclimation of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition is one of the major uncertainties in predicting soil CO2 efflux by the increase in global mean temperature. A reasonable explanation for an apparent acclimation proposed by Davidson and colleagues (2006) based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics suggests that temperature sensitivity decreases when both maximal activity of respiratory enzymes (Vmax) and half- saturation constant (Ks) cancel each other upon temperature increase. We tested the hypothesis of the canceling effect by the mathematical simulation of the data obtained in the incubation experiments with forest and arable soils. Our data confirm the hypothesis and suggest that concentration of readily decomposable C substrate as glucose equivalent is an important factor controlling temperature sensitivity. The highest temperature sensitivity was observed when C substrate concentration was much lower than Ks. Increase of substrate content to the half-saturation constant resulted in temperature acclimation associated with the canceling effect. Addition of the substrate to the level providing respiration at a maximal rate Vmax leads to the acclimation of the whole microbial community as such. However, growing microbial biomass was more sensitive to the temperature alterations. This study improves our understanding of the instability of temperature sensitivity of soil respiration under field conditions, explaining this phenomenon by changes in concentration of readily decomposable C substrate. It is worth noting that this pattern works regardless of the origin of C substrate: production by SOM decomposition, release into the soil by rhizodeposition, litter fall or drying-rewetting events.

  10. Quantitative analysis of the calorimetric parameters associated with the temperature induced aggregation of aqueous solutions of polyoxypropylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, Jonathan K.; Chowdhry, Babur Z.; Snowden, Martin J.; Dong, Jingfeng; Leharne, Stephen A.

    2003-01-01

    High sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry (HSDSC)--coupled with the application of a previously outlined thermodynamic model [Patterson et al., Langmuir 13 (1997) 2219]--has been used to the obtain thermodynamic parameters that characterise thermal aggregation in aqueous solutions of polyoxypropylene (POP) of molecular mass 1000 g mol -1 over a range of concentrations (2.5-51.5 g dm -3 ). An important aspect of the derived thermodynamic values, which complements previously reported HSDSC data [Armstrong et al., J. Phys. Chem. 99 (1995) 4590], is the elaboration of heat capacity changes which accompany the aggregation transition. The concentration dependence of the POP thermodynamic data, obtained in this investigation, has been established. These observations provide the means for establishing functional relationships between enthalpy and temperature as well as heat capacity and temperature. The parameters describing the quadratic relationship between enthalpy change associated with aggregation and temperature are in close agreement with those describing the linear relationship between heat capacity change and temperature

  11. Field Effect Devices Sensitive to CO at Room Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo ARAG?N

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available [5,10,15-Tris(2,6-dichlorophenylcorrolate] cobalt(III was used to chemisorb CO selectively, on the gap-gate of MOS capacitors and the state of charge monitored by voltage shifts of the photocurrent induced by pulsed illumination under constant D. C. bias, proportionally to CO concentration in air. Negative chemically induced charges at room temperature induce positive responses above and negative shifts below the threshold voltage, conforming to acceptor behavior, and the dynamic range (125 ppm is limited by the silicon doping concentration. The linear proportionality between CO concentration and surface charge (6.46[ppm.m2.µC-1] corresponds to the low concentration limit of the Langmuir isotherm. Sluggish CO desorption can be compensated by photo stimulation at 395 nm.

  12. Data on the experiments of temperature-sensitive hydrogels for pH-sensitive drug release and the characterizations of materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This article contains experimental data on the strain sweep, the calibration curve of drug (doxorubicin, DOX and the characterizations of materials. Data included are related to the research article “Injectable and body temperature sensitive hydrogels based on chitosan and hyaluronic acid for pH sensitive drug release” (Zhang et al., 2017 [1]. The strain sweep experiments were performed on a rotational rheometer. The calibration curves were obtained by analyzing the absorbance of DOX solutions on a UV–vis-NIR spectrometer. Molecular weight (Mw of the hyaluronic acid (HA and chitosan (CS were determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC. The deacetylation degree of CS was measured by acid base titration.

  13. The effects of heated and room-temperature abdominal lavage solutions on core body temperature in dogs undergoing celiotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrocki, Michael A; McLaughlin, Ron; Hendrix, P K

    2005-01-01

    To document the magnitude of temperature elevation obtained with heated lavage solutions during abdominal lavage, 18 dogs were lavaged with sterile isotonic saline intraoperatively (i.e., during a celiotomy). In nine dogs, room-temperature saline was used. In the remaining nine dogs, saline heated to 43+/-2 degrees C (110+/-4 degrees F) was used. Esophageal, rectal, and tympanic temperatures were recorded every 60 seconds for 15 minutes after initiation of the lavage. Temperature levels decreased in dogs lavaged with room-temperature saline. Temperature levels increased significantly in dogs lavaged with heated saline after 2 to 6 minutes of lavage, and temperatures continued to increase throughout the 15-minute lavage period.

  14. Modeling FBG sensors sensitivity from cryogenic temperatures to room temperature as a function of metal coating thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendittozzi, Cristian; Felli, Ferdinando; Lupi, Carla

    2018-05-01

    Fiber optics with photo-imprinted Bragg grating have been studied in order to be used as temperature sensors in cryogenic applications. The main disadvantage presented by Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors is the significant drop in sensitivity as temperature decreases, mainly due to the critical lowering of the thermo-optic coefficient of the fiber and the very low thermal expansion coefficient (CTE) of fused silica at cryogenic temperatures. Thus, especially for the latter, it is important to enhance sensitivity to temperature by depositing a metal coating presenting higher CTE. In this work the thermal sensitivity of metal-coated FBG sensors has been evaluated by considering their elongation within temperature variations in the cryogenic range, as compared to bare fiber sensors. To this purpose, a theoretical model simulating elongation of metal-coated sensors has been developed. The model has been used to evaluate the behaviour of different metals which can be used as coating (Ni, Cu, Al, Zn, Pb and In). The optimal coating thickness has been calculated at different fixed temperature (from 5 K to 100 K) for each metal. It has been found that the metal coating effectiveness depends on thickness and operating temperature in accordance to our previous experimental work and theory suggest.

  15. Temperature Profile of the Solution Vessel of an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fissile Solution System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Steven Karl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Determan, John C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-14

    Dynamic System Simulation (DSS) models of fissile solution systems have been developed and verified against a variety of historical configurations. DSS techniques have been applied specifically to subcritical accelerator-driven systems using fissile solution fuels of uranium. Initial DSS models were developed in DESIRE, a specialized simulation scripting language. In order to tailor the DSS models to specifically meet needs of system designers they were converted to a Visual Studio implementation, and one of these subsequently to National Instrument’s LabVIEW for human factors engineering and operator training. Specific operational characteristics of subcritical accelerator-driven systems have been examined using a DSS model tailored to this particular class using fissile fuel.

  16. Temperature Profile of the Solution Vessel of an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fissile Solution System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Steven Karl; Determan, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic System Simulation (DSS) models of fissile solution systems have been developed and verified against a variety of historical configurations. DSS techniques have been applied specifically to subcritical accelerator-driven systems using fissile solution fuels of uranium. Initial DSS models were developed in DESIRE, a specialized simulation scripting language. In order to tailor the DSS models to specifically meet needs of system designers they were converted to a Visual Studio implementation, and one of these subsequently to National Instrument's LabVIEW for human factors engineering and operator training. Specific operational characteristics of subcritical accelerator-driven systems have been examined using a DSS model tailored to this particular class using fissile fuel.

  17. Sensitivity of photonic crystal fiber grating sensors: biosensing, refractive index, strain, and temperature sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindorf, Lars Henning; Bang, Ole

    2008-01-01

    We study the sensitivity of fiber grating sensors in the applications of strain, temperature, internal label-free biosensing, and internal refractive index sensing. New analytical expressions for the sensitivities, valid for photonic crystal fibers are rigorously derived. These are generally vali...

  18. Volumetric and viscometric studies of some drugs in aqueous solutions at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhondge, Sudhakar S.; Zodape, Sangesh P.; Parwate, Dilip V.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Study of aqueous solutions of biologically important compounds has been reported. ► MH is used for treating type II diabetes, RH is in treatment of peptic ulcer and TH is used to treat severe pain. ► All the compounds act as structure makers by volumetric studies. ► MH and RH act as weak structure breakers and TH acts as a weak structure maker by viscometric studies. - Abstract: Density and viscosity measurements are reported for aqueous solutions of the drugs like Metformin hydrochloride (MH), Ranitidine hydrochloride (RH) and Tramadol hydrochloride (TH) at different temperatures T = (288.15, 298.15, and 308.15) K within the concentration range (0 to 0.15) mol · kg −1 . The density and viscosity data are used to obtain apparent molar volume of solute (φ V ) and relative viscosity (η r ) of aqueous solutions at different temperatures. The limiting apparent molar volume of solute (φ V 0 ), limiting apparent molar expansivity (φ E 0 ), thermal expansion coefficient (α ∗ ), hydration number (n h ), Jones–Dole equation viscosity A and B coefficients, experimental slope (S V ) at different temperatures, and temperature coefficient of Bi.e.(dB/dT) at T = 298.15 K were also obtained. The results obtained have been interpreted in terms of solute–solvent and solute–solute interactions and structure making/breaking ability of solute in the aqueous solution.

  19. Surface properties of magnetite in high temperature aqueous electrolyte solutions: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidojkovic, Sonja M; Rakin, Marko P

    2017-07-01

    Deposits and scales formed on heat transfer surfaces in power plant water/steam circuits have a significant negative impact on plant reliability, availability and performance, causing tremendous economic consequences and subsequent increases in electricity cost. Consequently, the improvement of the understanding of deposition mechanisms on power generating surfaces is defined as a high priority in the power industry. The deposits consist principally of iron oxides, which are steel corrosion products and usually present in colloidal form. Magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) is the predominant and most abundant compound found in water/steam cycles of all types of power plants. The crucial factor that governs the deposition process and influences the deposition rate of magnetite is the electrostatic interaction between the metal wall surfaces and the suspended colloidal particles. However, there is scarcity of data on magnetite surface properties at elevated temperatures due to difficulties in their experimental measurement. In this paper a generalized overview of existing experimental data on surface characteristics of magnetite at high temperatures is presented with particular emphasis on possible application in the power industry. A thorough analysis of experimental techniques, mathematical models and results has been performed and directions for future investigations have been considered. The state-of-the-art assessment showed that for the characterization of magnetite/aqueous electrolyte solution interface at high temperatures acid-base potentiometric titrations and electrophoresis were the most beneficial and dependable techniques which yielded results up to 290 and 200°C, respectively. Mass titrations provided data on magnetite surface charge up to 320°C, however, this technique is highly sensitive to the minor concentrations of impurities present on the surface of particle. Generally, fairly good correlation between the isoelectric point (pH iep ) and point of zero charge

  20. CO and C_3H_8 Sensitivity Behavior of Zinc Antimonate Prepared by a Microwave-Assisted Solution Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillen-Bonilla, H.; Rodiguez Betancourtt, V. M.; Flores-Martinez, M.; Guillen-Bonilla, J. T.; Reyes-Gomez, J.; Gildo-Ortiz, L.; Olvera-Amador, M. L.; Santoyo-Salazar, J.

    2015-01-01

    ZnSb_2O_6 has been synthesized by a microwave-assisted solution method in order to test its possible application as a gas sensor. Zinc nitrate, antimony trichloride, and ethylenediamine were used as precursors and deionized water as solvent. Microwave radiation, with a power of "approx"350 W, was applied for solvent evaporation. The thermal decomposition of the precursors leads to the formation of ZnSb_2O_6 at 600 degree. This oxide crystallized in a tetragonal structure with cell parameters a=4.66 angstrom sign, c=9.26 angstrom sign and space group P4_2/ mnm. Micro wires and micro rods formed by nano crystals were observed by means of scanning and transmission electron micros copies (SEM and TEM, resp.). Pellets of the oxide were tested as gas sensors in flowing atmospheres of carbon monoxide (CO) and propane (C_3H_8). Sensitivity increased with the gas concentration (0-300 ppm) and working temperatures (ambient, 150 and 250 degree) increase. The results indicate high sensitivity of ZnSb_2O_6 in both gases at different concentrations and operating temperatures.

  1. CO and C3H8 Sensitivity Behavior of Zinc Antimonate Prepared by a Microwave-Assisted Solution Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Guillen-Bonilla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ZnSb2O6 has been synthesized by a microwave-assisted solution method in order to test its possible application as a gas sensor. Zinc nitrate, antimony trichloride, and ethylenediamine were used as precursors and deionized water as solvent. Microwave radiation, with a power of ~350 W, was applied for solvent evaporation. The thermal decomposition of the precursors leads to the formation of ZnSb2O6 at 600°C. This oxide crystallized in a tetragonal structure with cell parameters a=4.66 Å, c=9.26 Å and space group P42/mnm. Microwires and microrods formed by nanocrystals were observed by means of scanning and transmission electron microscopies (SEM and TEM, resp.. Pellets of the oxide were tested as gas sensors in flowing atmospheres of carbon monoxide (CO and propane (C3H8. Sensitivity increased with the gas concentration (0–300 ppm and working temperatures (ambient, 150 and 250°C increase. The results indicate high sensitivity of ZnSb2O6 in both gases at different concentrations and operating temperatures.

  2. Temperature sensitivity analysis of polarity controlled electrostatically doped tunnel field-effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Kaushal; Pandey, Sunil; Kondekar, P. N.; Sharma, Dheeraj

    2016-09-01

    The conventional tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs) have shown potential to scale down in sub-22 nm regime due to its lower sub-threshold slope and robustness against short-channel effects (SCEs), however, sensitivity towards temperature variation is a major concern. Therefore, for the first time, we investigate temperature sensitivity analysis of a polarity controlled electrostatically doped tunnel field-effect transistor (ED-TFET). Different performance metrics and analog/RF figure-of-merits were considered and compared for both devices, and simulations were performed using Silvaco ATLAS device tool. We found that the variation in ON-state current in ED-TFET is almost temperature independent due to electrostatically doped mechanism, while, it increases in conventional TFET at higher temperature. Above room temperature, the variation in ION, IOFF, and SS sensitivity in ED-TFET are only 0.11%/K, 2.21%/K, and 0.63%/K, while, in conventional TFET the variations are 0.43%/K, 2.99%/K, and 0.71%/K, respectively. However, below room temperature, the variation in ED-TFET ION is 0.195%/K compared to 0.27%/K of conventional TFET. Moreover, it is analysed that the incomplete ionization effect in conventional TFET severely affects the drive current and the threshold voltage, while, ED-TFET remains unaffected. Hence, the proposed ED-TFET is less sensitive towards temperature variation and can be used for cryogenics as well as for high temperature applications.

  3. The dependence of thermoluminescence sensitivity upon the temperature of irradiation in meteorites and in terrestrial apatites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durrani, S.A.; Al-Khalifa, I.J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements are reported on the TL sensitivity (i.e. TL glow output per unit γ ray test dose) of meteoritic specimens as well as terrestrial fluor- and chlor-apatites, as a function of irradiation temperature (T irr ). The irradiation temperatures ranged from liquid nitrogen to room temperature (77 - 293 K). A kilocurie 60 Co γ ray source was used to deliver test doses of 400 Gy (40 krad) and 40 (4 krad) to the various samples. A strong dependence of the TL sensitivity upon the temperature of irradiation was noted in the case of Kirin meteorite: its TL sensitivity (for the 493 K readout peak) decreased by a factor of ∼ 2 when T irr rose from liquid nitrogen (77 K) to dry ice in acetone (197 K) temperature, in the case of both 400 Gy and 40 Gy γ ray doses. In the case of the Antarctic meteorite specimen (ALHA 77182.13), there was a smaller effect, viz. a fall of ∼ 14% in the TL output corresponding to dry ice and higher irradiating temperatures as compared to the 77 K irradiation. For chlorapatite, the TL sensitivity decreased monotonically with increasing temperature for both the 563 K and the 448 K glow peaks. For the fluorapatite, the effect of reduced response was observed only between -17 0 C (256 K) and room temperature (293 K). Both the theoretical and the practical implications of these observations are discussed. (author)

  4. Temperature-Sensitive Mutants of Mouse Hepatitis Virus Strain A59: Isolation, Characterization and Neuropathogenic Properties.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.M. Koolen (Marck); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G. van Steenis (Bert); M.C. Horzinek; B.A.M. van der Zeijst (Ben)

    1983-01-01

    textabstractTwenty 5-fluorouracil-induced temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants of mouse hepatitis virus strain A59 were isolated from 1284 virus clones. Mutants were preselected on the basis of their inability to induce syncytia in infected cells at the restrictive temperature (40 degrees) vs the

  5. Sensitivity of summer stream temperatures to climate variability in the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles Luce; Brian Staab; Marc Kramer; Seth Wenger; Dan Isaak; Callie McConnell

    2014-01-01

    Estimating the thermal response of streams to a warming climate is important for prioritizing native fish conservation efforts. While there are plentiful estimates of air temperature responses to climate change, the sensitivity of streams, particularly small headwater streams, to warming temperatures is less well understood. A substantial body of literature correlates...

  6. Effects of Temperature on Aggregation Kinetics of Graphene Oxide in Aqueous Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M.; Gao, B.; Tang, D.; Sun, H.; Yin, X.; Yu, C.

    2017-12-01

    Temperature may play an important role in controlling graphene oxide (GO) stability in aqueous solutions, but it has been overlooked in the literature. In this work, laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the effects of temperature (6, 25, and 40 °C) on GO aggregation kinetics under different combinations of ionic strength, cation type, humic acid (HA) concentration by monitoring GO hydrodynamic radii and attachment efficiencies. The results showed that, without HA, temperature increase promoted GO aggregation in both monovalent (Na+ and K+) and divalent (Ca2+) solutions. This phenomenon might be caused by multiple processes including enhanced collision frequency, enhanced cation dehydration, and reduced electrostatic repulsion. The presence of HA introduced steric repulsion forces that enhanced GO stability and temperature showed different effects GO aggregation kinetics in monovalent and divalent electrolytes. In monovalent electrolytes, cold temperature diminished the steric repulsion of HA-coated GO. As a result, the fastest increasing rate of GO hydrodynamic radius and the smallest critical coagulation concentration value appeared at the lowest temperature (6 °C). Conversely, in divalent electrolyte solutions with HA, high temperate favored GO aggregation, probably because the interactions between Ca2+ and HA increased with temperature resulting in lower HA coating on GO. Findings of this work emphasized the importance of temperature as well as solution chemistry on the stability and fate of GO nanoparticles in aquatic environment.

  7. Twin solution calorimeter determines heats of formation of alloys at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby, J. B., Jr.; Kleb, R.; Kleppa, O. J.

    1968-01-01

    Calvert-type, twin liquid metal solution calorimeter determines the heats of formation of transition metal alloys at high temperatures. The twin differential calorimeter measures the small heat effects generated over extended periods of time, has maximum operating temperature of 1073 degrees K and an automatic data recording system.

  8. Effect of temperature on hydration kinetics and polymerization of tricalcium silicate in stirred suspensions of CaO-saturated solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, Steven A.; Boitnott, Ginger E.; Korhonen, Charles J.; Sletten, Ronald S.

    2006-01-01

    Tricalcium silicate was hydrated at 274, 278, 283, 298, and 313 K in stirred suspensions of saturated CaO solutions under a nitrogen-gas atmosphere until the end of deceleratory period. The suspension conductivities and energy flows were measured continuously. The individual reaction rates for tricalcium silicate dissolution, calcium silicate hydrate precipitation, and calcium hydroxide precipitation were calculated from these measurements. The results suggest that the proportion of tricalcium silicate dissolved was determined by the rate of tricalcium silicate dissolution and the time to very rapid calcium hydroxide precipitation. The time to very rapid calcium hydroxide precipitation was more sensitive to changes in temperature than was the rate of tricalcium silicate dissolution, so that the proportion of tricalcium silicate hydration dissolved by the deceleratory period increased with decreasing temperature. The average chain length of the calcium silicate hydrate ascertained by magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy increased with increasing temperature

  9. Development of an ozone high sensitive sensor working at ambient temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, F; Ghaddab, B; Sanchez, J B; Mavon, C

    2011-01-01

    Hybrid SnO 2 /SWNTs thin layer were deposited by using sol-gel process. Such sensitive layers showed very high performances for O 3 flow detection at ambient temperature. Limit sensitivity, lower than 21,5 ppb of O 3 in air has been reached by using these hybrid layers. Compared to usefull metal oxide sensors, the main advantage of the use of such hybrid layers, is that these devices enable the detection of O 3 traces at room temperature. The influence of sensor's working temperature is discussed and finally a reactional mechanism for the detection of O 3 is proposed.

  10. Sensitizing effect of Z,Z-bilirubin IXα and its photoproducts on enzymes in model solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plavskii, V. Yu.; Mostovnikov, V. A.; Tret'yakova, A. I.; Mostovnikova, G. R.

    2008-05-01

    In model systems, we have studied side effects which may be induced by light during phototherapy of hyperbilirubinemia (jaundice) in newborn infants, with the aim of reducing the Z,Z-bilirubin IXα (Z,Z-BR IXα) level. We have shown that the sensitizing effect of Z,Z-BR IXα, localized at strong binding sites of the human serum albumin (HSA) macromolecule, is primarily directed at the amino acid residues of the carrier protein and does not involve the molecules of the enzyme (lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)) present in the buffer solution. The detected photodynamic damage to LDH is due to sensitization by bilirubin photoisomers, characterized by lower HSA association constants and located (in contrast to native Z,Z-BR IXα) on the surface of the HSA protein globule. Based on study of the spectral characteristics of the photoproducts of Z,Z-BR IXα and comparison of their accumulation kinetics in solution and the enzyme photo-inactivation kinetics, we concluded that the determining role in sensitized damage to LDH is played by lumirubin. The photosensitization effect depends on the wavelength of the radiation used for photoconversion of bilirubin. When (at the beginning of exposure) we make sure that identical numbers of photons are absorbed by the pigment in the different spectral ranges, the side effect is minimal for radiation corresponding to the long-wavelength edge of the bilirubin absorption band. We have shown that for a bilirubin/HSA concentration ratio >2 (when some of the pigment molecules are sorbed on the surface of the protein globule), the bilirubin can act as a photosensitizing agent for the enzyme present in solution. We discuss methods for reducing unfavorable side effects of light on the body of newborn infants during phototherapy of hyperbilirubinemia.

  11. Development and application of a species sensitivity distribution for temperature-induced mortality in the aquatic environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de P.; Tamis, J.E.; Murk, A.J.; Smit, M.G.D.

    2008-01-01

    Current European legislation has static water quality objectives for temperature effects, based on the most sensitive species. In the present study a species sensitivity distribution (SSD) for elevated temperatures is developed on the basis of temperature sensitivity data (mortality) of 50 aquatic

  12. The effect of temperature on the sensitivity of Daphnia magna to cyanobacteria is genus dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochmuth, Jennifer D; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C

    2014-10-01

    In the present study, the authors investigated the effects of 6 different genera of cyanobacteria on multiple endpoints of Daphnia magna in a 21-d life table experiment conducted at 3 different temperatures (15 °C, 19 °C, and 23 °C). The specific aims were to test if the effect of temperature on Daphnia's sensitivity to cyanobacteria differed among different cyanobacteria and if the rank order from most to least harmful cyanobacteria to Daphnia reproduction changed or remained the same across the studied temperature range. Overall, the authors observed a decrease in harmful effects on reproduction with increasing temperature for Microcystis, Nodularia, and Aphanizomenon, and an increase in harmful effects with increasing temperature for Anabaena and Oscillatoria. No effect of temperature was observed on Daphnia sensitivity to Cylindrospermopsis. Harmful effects of Microcystis and Nodularia on reproduction appear to be mirrored by a decrease in length. On the other hand, harmful effects of Anabaena, Aphanizomenon, and Oscillatoria on reproduction were correlated with a decrease in intrinsic rate of natural increase, which was matched by a later onset of reproduction in exposures to Oscillatoria. In addition, the results suggest that the cyanobacteria rank order of harmfulness may change with temperature. Higher temperatures may increase the sensitivity of D. magna to the presence of some cyanobacteria (Anabaena and Oscillatoria) in their diet, whereas the harmful effects of others (Microcystis, Nodularia, and Aphanizomenon) may be reduced by higher temperatures. © 2014 SETAC.

  13. Sensitive element of multifunctional sensor for measuring temperature, strain and magnetic field induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Druzhinin A. A.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sensitive element of multifunctional sensor for measuring temperature, strain and magnetic field induction has been developed based on the studies of electrical conductivity and magnetoresistance of silicon and germanium microcrystals in the temperature range 4.2—70 K, strain ±1.5*10–3 rel.un. and magnetic fields of 0—14 T. The feature of the sensitive element is the using of the p- and n-type conductivity germanium microcrystals as mechanical and magnetic field sensors, respectively, and the p-type silicon microcrystal — as temperature sensor. That allows providing the compensation of temperature influence on piezoresistance and on sensitivity to the magnetic field.

  14. Billion-Fold Enhancement in Sensitivity of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Magnesium Ions in Solution

    CERN Document Server

    Gottberg, Alexander; Kowalska, Magdalena; Bissell, Mark L; Arcisauskaite, Vaida; Blaum, Klaus; Helmke, Alexander; Johnston, Karl; Kreim, Kim; Larsen, Flemming H; Neugart, Rainer; Neyens, Gerda; Garcia Ruiz, Ronald F; Szunyogh, Daniel; Thulstrup, Peter W; Yordanov, Deyan T; Hemmingsen, Lars

    2014-01-01

    β-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is highly sensitive compared to conventional NMR spectroscopy, and may be applied for several elements across the periodic table. β-NMR has previously been successfully applied in the fields of nuclear and solid-state physics. In this work, β-NMR is applied, for the first time, to record an NMR spectrum for a species in solution. 31Mg β-NMR spectra are measured for as few as 107 magnesium ions in ionic liquid (EMIM-Ac) within minutes, as a prototypical test case. Resonances are observed at 3882.9 and 3887.2 kHz in an external field of 0.3 T. The key achievement of the current work is to demonstrate that β-NMR is applicable for the analysis of species in solution, and thus represents a novel spectroscopic technique for use in general chemistry and potentially in biochemistry.

  15. Effect of temperature on the behavior of surface properties of alcohols in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, Carmen M. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia)], E-mail: cmromeroi@unal.edu.co; Jimenez, Eulogio [Facultade de Ciencias, Universidade da Coruna (Spain); Suarez, Felipe [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia)

    2009-04-15

    The influence of temperature on the behavior of surface properties of aqueous solutions has often been used to obtain information about solute structural effects on water. In this work, we present experimental results for surface tension of aqueous solutions of n-pentanol, n-hexanol, n-heptanol, and n-octanol at T = (283.15, 288.15, 293.15, 298.15, 303.15, and 308.15) K at several concentrations. The results were used to evaluate the limiting experimental slopes of surface tension with respect to mole fraction and the hydrophobicity constant of the Connors model at each temperature. The thermodynamic behavior of aqueous alcohol solutions is discussed in terms of the effect of the hydrocarbon chain on water structure. The temperature dependence of the limiting slopes of surface tension with respect to mole fraction, as well as the hydrophobicity constant derived from surface measurements, is interpreted in terms of alcohol hydration.

  16. Effect of temperature on the behavior of surface properties of alcohols in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, Carmen M.; Jimenez, Eulogio; Suarez, Felipe

    2009-01-01

    The influence of temperature on the behavior of surface properties of aqueous solutions has often been used to obtain information about solute structural effects on water. In this work, we present experimental results for surface tension of aqueous solutions of n-pentanol, n-hexanol, n-heptanol, and n-octanol at T = (283.15, 288.15, 293.15, 298.15, 303.15, and 308.15) K at several concentrations. The results were used to evaluate the limiting experimental slopes of surface tension with respect to mole fraction and the hydrophobicity constant of the Connors model at each temperature. The thermodynamic behavior of aqueous alcohol solutions is discussed in terms of the effect of the hydrocarbon chain on water structure. The temperature dependence of the limiting slopes of surface tension with respect to mole fraction, as well as the hydrophobicity constant derived from surface measurements, is interpreted in terms of alcohol hydration

  17. Sensitivity of the solution of the Elder problem to density, velocity and numerical perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan-Hee; Aral, Mustafa M.

    2007-06-01

    In this paper the Elder problem is studied with the purpose of evaluating the inherent instabilities associated with the numerical solution of this problem. Our focus is first on the question of the existence of a unique numerical solution for this problem, and second on the grid density and fluid density requirements necessary for a unique numerical solution. In particular we have investigated the instability issues associated with the numerical solution of the Elder problem from the following perspectives: (i) physical instability issues associated with density differences; (ii) sensitivity of the numerical solution to idealization irregularities; and, (iii) the importance of a precise velocity field calculation and the association of this process with the grid density levels that is necessary to solve the Elder problem accurately. In the study discussed here we have used a finite element Galerkin model we have developed for solving density-dependent flow and transport problems, which will be identified as TechFlow. In our study, the numerical results of Frolkovič and de Schepper [Frolkovič, P. and H. de Schepper, 2001. Numerical modeling of convection dominated transport coupled with density-driven flow in porous media, Adv. Water Resour., 24, 63-72.] were replicated using the grid density employed in their work. We were also successful in duplicating the same result with a less dense grid but with more computational effort based on a global velocity estimation process we have adopted. Our results indicate that the global velocity estimation approach recommended by Yeh [Yeh, G.-T., 1981. On the computation of Darcian velocity and mass balance in finite element modelling of groundwater flow, Water Resour. Res., 17(5), 1529-1534.] allows the use of less dense grids while obtaining the same accuracy that can be achieved with denser grids. We have also observed that the regularity of the elements in the discretization of the solution domain does make a difference

  18. Highly sensitive methanol chemical sensor based on undoped silver oxide nanoparticles prepared by a solution method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, M.M.; Khan, S.B.; Asiri, A.M.; Jamal, A.; Faisal, M.

    2012-01-01

    We have prepared silver oxide nanoparticles (NPs) by a simple solution method using reducing agents in alkaline medium. The resulting NPs were characterized by UV-vis and FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, and field-emission scanning electron microscopy. They were deposited on a glassy carbon electrode to give a sensor with a fast response towards methanol in liquid phase. The sensor also displays good sensitivity and long-term stability, and enhanced electrochemical response. The calibration plot is linear (r 2 = 0.8294) over the 0.12 mM to 0.12 M methanol concentration range. The sensitivity is ∼ 2.65 μAcm -2 mM -1 , and the detection limit is 36.0 μM (at a SNR of 3). We also discuss possible future prospective uses of this metal oxide semiconductor nanomaterial in terms of chemical sensing. (author)

  19. Temperature duality on Riemann surface and cosmological solutions for genus g = 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Jun; Wang Shunjin

    1999-01-01

    A bosonic string model at finite temperature on the gravitation g μν and the dilaton φ background field is examined. Moreover, the duality relation of energy momentum tensor on high genus Riemann surface is derived. At the same time, the temperature duality invariance for the action of string gas matter is proved in 4-D Robertson-Walker metric, the string cosmological solutions and temperature duality of the equations of motion for genus g = 1 and 2 are also investigated

  20. Effects of sorption and temperature on solute transport in unsaturated steady flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes, H.R.; Polzer, W.L.; Essington, E.H.

    1986-01-01

    It is known that temperature affects physical and chemical processes and that these processes may alter the transport of solutes in the environment. Laboratory column studies were performed in unsaturated flow conditions with a composite pulse containing iodide, cobalt, cesium and strontium each at 10 -3 M. The experiments were performed with Bandelier Tuff and produced breakthrough curves that indicate significant changes in transport due to a temperature change from 25 0 C to 5 0 C for nonconservative solutes. Also, the interpretation of the temperature and sorption data suggest that the differences in transport between 5 0 C and 25 0 C for nonconservative solutes may be predicted in a qualitative manner from batch equilibrium and nonequilibrium sorption data and the theory of sorption used in deriving the modified Freundlich isotherm equation. These effects should be of concern in modeling and management of spills and waste disposal within this range of environmental temperatures

  1. High-temperature extraction of rhenium from sulfuric acid solutions with trialkylamines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladyhev, V.P.; Andreeva, N.N.; Kim, E.M.; Kovaleva, S.V.

    1985-01-01

    This paper attempts to determine the possibility of conducting high-temperature extraction of rhenium from sulfuric acid solutions with trialkylamines (TAA) using higher hydrocarbon-paraffin mixtures as the diluent of the extraction system. Substitution of kerosene by paraffin in the extraction system would permit decreasing the danger of fire and explosions during he extraction process. In extracting rhenium from industrial solutions with a melt of higher paraffins containing TAA and alcohols, the extraction system can be continously heated in heat exchangers through which washing sulfuric acid passes and then goes to the extractor. This permits utilizing the heat and decreases the temperature of the solutions for extraction to the optimum temperatures. Extraction of rhenium with a melt of trioctylamine in paraffin obeys the same mechanisms as high-temperature extraction of ruthenium (IV) by amines in kerosene and aromatic hydrocarbons

  2. Probing Ionic Liquid Aqueous Solutions Using Temperature of Maximum Density Isotope Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Tariq

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This work is a new development of an extensive research program that is investigating for the first time shifts in the temperature of maximum density (TMD of aqueous solutions caused by ionic liquid solutes. In the present case we have compared the shifts caused by three ionic liquid solutes with a common cation—1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium coupled with acetate, ethylsulfate and tetracyanoborate anions—in normal and deuterated water solutions. The observed differences are discussed in terms of the nature of the corresponding anion-water interactions.

  3. Etching characteristics of a CR-39 track detector at room temperature in different etching solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dajko, G.

    1991-01-01

    Investigations were carried out to discover how the etching characteristics of CR-39 detectors change with varying conditions of the etching process. Measurements were made at room temperature in pure NaOH and KOH solutions; in different alcoholic KOH solutions (PEW solution, i.e. potassium hydroxide, ethyl alcohol, water); and in NaOH and KOH solutions containing different additives. The bulk etching rate of the detector (V B ) and the V (= V T /V B ) function, i.e. track to bulk etch rates ratio, for 6.1 MeV α-particles, were measured systematically. (author)

  4. Association and Structure of Thermo Sensitive Comblike Block Copolymers in Aqueous Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Gang

    2008-01-01

    The structures and association properties of thermo sensitive poly(methoxyoligo(ethylene glycol) norbornenyl esters) block copolymers in D2O were investigated by Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS). Each block is a comb-like polymer with a polynorbornene (PNB) backbone and oligo ethylene glycol (OEG) side chains (one side chain per NB monomer). The chemical formula of the block copolymer is (OEG3NB)79-(OEG6.6NB)67, where subscripts represent the degree of polymerization (DP) of OEG and NB in each block The polymer concentration was fixed at 2.0 wt % and the structural changes were investigated over a temperature range between 25 C and 68 C. It was found that at room temperature polymers associate to form micelles with a spherical core formed by the block (OEG3NB)79 and corona formed by the block (OEG6.6NB)67 and that the shape of the polymer in the corona could be described by the form factor of rigid cylinders. At elevated temperatures, the aggregation number increases and the micelles become more compact. At temperatures round the cloud point temperature (CPT) T = 60 C a correlation peak started to appear and became pronounced at 68 C due to the formation of a partially ordered structure with a correlation length ∼ 349

  5. A temperature monitor circuit with small voltage sensitivity using a topology-reconfigurable ring oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Tadashi; Ishihara, Tohru; Onodera, Hidetoshi

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a temperature monitor circuit that exhibits a small supply voltage sensitivity adopting a circuit topology of a reconfigurable ring oscillator. The circuit topology of the monitor is crafted such that the oscillation frequency is determined by the amount of subthreshold leakage current, which has an exponential dependence on temperature. Another important characteristic of the monitor is its small supply voltage sensitivity. The measured oscillation frequency of a test chip fabricated in a 65 nm CMOS process varies only 2.6% under a wide range of supply voltages from 0.4 to 1.0 V at room temperature. The temperature estimation error ranges from -0.3 to 0.4 °C over a temperature range of 10 to 100 °C.

  6. SENSITIVITY TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE RESEARCH OF TV-CAMERAS BASED ON SILICON MATRIXES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey N. Starchenko

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. The research is dedicated to the analysis of sensitivity change patterns of the cameras based on silicon CMOS-matrixes in various ambient temperatures. This information is necessary for the correct camera application for photometric measurements in-situ. The paper deals with studies of sensitivity variations of two digital cameras with different silicon CMOS matrixes in visible and near IR regions of the spectrum at temperature change. Method. Due to practical restrictions the temperature changes were recorded in separate spectral intervals important for practical use of the cameras. The experiments were carried out with the use of a climatic chamber, providing change and keeping the temperature range from minus 40 to plus 50 °C at a pitch of 10 о С. Two cameras were chosen for research: VAC-135-IP with OmniVision OV9121 matrix and VAC-248-IP with OnSemiconductor VITA2000 matrix. The two tested devices were placed in a climatic chamber at the same time and illuminated by one radiation source with a color temperature about 3000 K in order to eliminate a number of methodological errors. Main Results. The temperature dependence of the signals was shown to be linear and the matrixes sensitivities were determined. The results obtained are consistent with theoretical views, in general. The coefficients of thermal sensitivity were computed by these dependencies. It is shown that the greatest affect of temperature on the sensitivity occurs in the area (0.7–1.1 mkm. Temperature coefficients of sensitivity increase with the downward radiation wavelength increase. The experiments carried out have shown that it is necessary to take into account the changes in temperature sensitivity of silicon matrixes in the red and near in IR regions of the spectrum. The effect reveals itself in a clearly negative way in cameras with an amplitude resolution of 10-12 bits used for aerospace and space spectrozonal photography. Practical Relevance

  7. Effect of Propellant Composition to the Temperature Sensitivity of Composite Propellant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, Amir; Mamat, Rizalman; Amin, Makeen; Wan Ali, Wan Khairuddin

    2012-01-01

    The propellant composition is one of several parameter that influencing the temperature sensitivity of composite propellant. In this paper, experimental investigation of temperature sensitivity in burning rate of composite propellant was conducted. Four sets of different propellant compositions had been prepared with the combination of ammonium perchlorate (AP) as an oxidizer, aluminum (Al) as fuel and hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) as fuel and binder. For each mixture, HTPB binder was fixed at 15% and cured with isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI). By varying AP and Al, the effect of oxidizer- fuel mixture ratio (O/F) on the whole propellant can be determined. The propellant strands were manufactured using compression molded method and burnt in a strand burner using wire technique over a range of pressure from 1 atm to 31 atm. The results obtained shows that the temperature sensitivity, a, increases with increasing O/F. Propellant p80 which has O/F ratio of 80/20 gives the highest value of temperature sensitivity which is 1.687. The results shows that the propellant composition has significant effect on the temperature sensitivity of composite propellant

  8. The elastic solid solution model for minerals at high pressures and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhill, R.

    2018-02-01

    Non-ideality in mineral solid solutions affects their elastic and thermodynamic properties, their thermobaric stability, and the equilibrium phase relations in multiphase assemblages. At a given composition and state of order, non-ideality in minerals is typically modelled via excesses in Gibbs free energy which are either constant or linear with respect to pressure and temperature. This approach has been extremely successful when modelling near-ideal solutions. However, when the lattice parameters of the solution endmembers differ significantly, extrapolations of thermodynamic properties to high pressures using these models may result in significant errors. In this paper, I investigate the effect of parameterising solution models in terms of the Helmholtz free energy, treating volume (or lattice parameters) rather than pressure as an independent variable. This approach has been previously applied to models of order-disorder, but the implications for the thermodynamics and elasticity of solid solutions have not been fully explored. Solid solution models based on the Helmholtz free energy are intuitive at a microscopic level, as they automatically include the energetic contribution from elastic deformation of the endmember lattices. A chemical contribution must also be included in such models, which arises from atomic exchange within the solution. Derivations are provided for the thermodynamic properties of n-endmember solutions. Examples of the use of the elastic model are presented for the alkali halides, pyroxene, garnet, and bridgmanite solid solutions. Elastic theory provides insights into the microscopic origins of non-ideality in a range of solutions, and can make accurate predictions of excess enthalpies, entropies, and volumes as a function of volume and temperature. In solutions where experimental data are sparse or contradictory, the Helmholtz free energy approach can be used to assess the magnitude of excess properties and their variation as a function

  9. The chemistry of high temperature phosphate solutions in relation to steam generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadbent, D.; Lewis, G.G.; Wetton, E.A.M.

    1978-01-01

    The problems associated with the use of phosphate for chemical treatment of the P.W.R. secondary circuit have prompted renewed interest in the physical chemistry of these solutions. Solubility and phase studies have been carried out at 250, 300 and 350 0 C with solutions having sodium to phosphate ratios from 1.0 to above 3.0. A solid phase of ratio about 2.8 exists in equilibrium with a wide range of saturated solution compositions at each temperature. Invariant points at which three phases are in equilibrium have been identified and at the two higher temperatures a region of liquid-liquid immiscibility occurs. Phase diagrams have been constructed for each temperature from which it is possible to predict the compositional changes occurring during the isothermal evaporation process. The corrosivity of these phosphate solutions to a range of steel alloys is being studied, the results reported in the present work, however, are confined to mild steel in the temperature and phosphate composition ranges of the phase studies. The corrosion of mild steel is generally considerably less than in sodium hydroxide solutions of equivalent concentration. The dependence of corrosion rate on sodium and phosphate concentrations in not readily explicable in terms of the solubility and phase studies and it is thought that the solubility of iron in the phosphate solutions is an important rate-determining factor since several complex compounds containing sodium, phosphorus and ferrous iron are present in the corrosion films. (author)

  10. Lower critical solution temperature (LCST) phase separation of glycol ethers for forward osmotic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Daichi; Mok, Yeongbong; Noh, Minwoo; Park, Jeongseon; Kang, Sunyoung; Lee, Yan

    2014-03-21

    Lower critical solution temperature (LCST) phase transition of glycol ether (GE)-water mixtures induces an abrupt change in osmotic pressure driven by a mild temperature change. The temperature-controlled osmotic change was applied for the forward osmosis (FO) desalination. Among three GEs evaluated, di(ethylene glycol) n-hexyl ether (DEH) was selected as a potential FO draw solute. A DEH-water mixture with a high osmotic pressure could draw fresh water from a high-salt feed solution such as seawater through a semipermeable membrane at around 10 °C. The water-drawn DEH-water mixture was phase-separated into a water-rich phase and a DEH-rich phase at around 30 °C. The water-rich phase with a much reduced osmotic pressure released water into a low-salt solution, and the DEH-rich phase was recovered into the initial DEH-water mixture. The phase separation behaviour, the residual GE concentration in the water-rich phase, the osmotic pressure of the DEH-water mixture, and the osmotic flux between the DEH-water mixture and salt solutions were carefully analysed for FO desalination. The liquid-liquid phase separation of the GE-water mixture driven by the mild temperature change between 10 °C and 30 °C is very attractive for the development of an ideal draw solute for future practical FO desalination.

  11. Corrosion studies of austenitic and duplex stainless steels in aqueous lithium bromide solution at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igual Munoz, A.; Garcia Anton, J.; Lopez Nuevalos, S.; Guinon, J.L.; Perez Herranz, V.

    2004-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of three stainless steels EN 14311, EN 14429 (austenitic stainless steels) and EN 14462 (duplex stainless steel) was studied in a commercial LiBr solution (850 g/l LiBr solution containing chromate as inhibitor) at different temperatures (25, 50, 75 and 85 deg C) by electrochemical methods. Open circuit potentials shifted towards more active values as temperature increased, while corrosion potentials presented the opposite tendency. The most resistant alloys to general corrosion were EN 14429 and EN 14462 because they had the lowest corrosion current for all temperatures. In all the cases corrosion current increases with temperature. Pitting corrosion resistance is improved by the EN 14462, which presented the highest pitting potential, and the lowest passivation current for the whole range of temperatures studied. The duplex alloy also presents the worst repassivation behavior (in terms of the narrowest difference between corrosion potential and pitting potential); it does not repassivate from 50 deg C

  12. Boundary integral method to calculate the sensitivity temperature error of microstructured fibre plasmonic sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esmaeilzadeh, Hamid; Arzi, Ezatollah; Légaré, François; Hassani, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, using the boundary integral method (BIM), we simulate the effect of temperature fluctuation on the sensitivity of microstructured optical fibre (MOF) surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors. The final results indicate that, as the temperature increases, the refractometry sensitivity of our sensor decreases from 1300 nm/RIU at 0 °C to 1200 nm/RIU at 50 °C, leading to ∼7.7% sensitivity reduction and the sensitivity temperature error of 0.15% °C −1 for this case. These results can be used for biosensing temperature-error adjustment in MOF SPR sensors, since biomaterials detection usually happens in this temperature range. Moreover, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of our sensor decreases from 0.265 at 0 °C to 0.154 at 100 °C with the average reduction rate of ∼0.42% °C −1 . The results suggest that at lower temperatures the sensor has a higher SNR. (paper)

  13. Temperature sensitivity of differential absorption lidar measurements of water vapor in the 720-nm region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browell, Edward V.; Ismail, Syed; Grossmann, Benoist E.

    1991-01-01

    Recently measured properties of water vapor (H2O) absorption lines have been used in calculations to evalute the temperature sensitivity of differential absorption lidar (Dial) H2O measurements. This paper estimates the temperature sensitivity of H2O lines in the 717-733-nm region for both H2O mixing ratio and number density measurements, and discusses the influence of the H2O line ground state energies E-double-prime, the H2O absorption linewidths, the linewidth temperature dependence parameter, and the atmospheric temperature and pressure variations with altitude and location on the temperature sensitivity calculations. Line parameters and temperature sensitivity calculations for 67 H2O lines in the 720-nm band are given which can be directly used in field experiments. Water vapor lines with E-double-prime values in the 100-300/cm range were found to be optimum for Dial measurements of H2O number densities, while E-double-prime values in the 250-500/cm range were found to be optimum for H2O mixing ratio measurements.

  14. Radiation synthesis of a water-soluble temperature sensitive polymer, activated copolymer and applications in immobilization of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai Maolin; Ha Hongfei; Wu Jilan

    1993-01-01

    In this work the radiation polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAM) in aqueous solutions has been carried out and a water-soluble, temperature sensitive polymer and copolymer were obtained by using γ-rays from Co-60 source at room temperature. We have gained the optimum dose and dose-rate of radiation synthesis of linear polyNIPAAM through determining conversion yield and viscosity. In order to immobilize protein (BSA) and enzyme (HRP) into this water-soluble polymer, we prepared an activated copolymer, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-N-acryloxysuccinimide). The BSA and HRP has been immobilized onto the activated copolymer. The BSA (HRP)/copolymer conjugates still kept the original thermally sensitive properties of the linear polyNIPAAM. The conjugation yield of BSA to the activated copolymer decreased with increasing dose. Immobilized HRP was stable at 0 o C for a long time and has, at least, 4 days stability at room temperature. Immobilized HRP activity was lowered when the temperature was raised. This phenomenon was reversible and the immobilized HRP regained activity. The optimum pH of the immobilized HRP shifted from ca.5 upward to ca. 7. (author)

  15. Critical pitting temperature for Type 254 SMO stainless steel in chloride solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El Meguid, E.A.; Abd El Latif, A.A.

    2007-01-01

    The variation with time of the open circuit potential of high molybdenum containing stainless steel (Type 254 SMO) was measured in 4% sodium chloride solution in the temperatures range 30-100 deg. C. The plot of steady state potentials as function of temperature showed an inflection at 50 deg. C, attributed to the decrease of oxygen solubility in test solution above 50 deg. C. Potentiodynamic cycling anodic polarization technique was used to determine the critical pitting potential (E pit ) and the critical protection potential (E prot ) of the steel in 4-30% NaCl solutions at temperatures between 30 and 100 deg. C. By plotting the two values versus solution temperature, the corresponding critical pitting (CPT) and the critical protection (CPrT) temperatures were determined. Both parameters decreased with increasing chloride content. Above the CPT, E pit and E prot decreased linearly with log[Cl - ]. The addition of bromide ions to the solution shifted both E pit and E prot towards positive values. In 4% NaCl, E pit increased linearly with pH in the range 1-10. The combined effect of chloride ion concentration and pH on the morphology of the pits was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) following potentiodynamic cycling anodic polarization

  16. Volumetric and viscometric studies of glucose in binary aqueous solutions of urea at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samanta, T.; Saharay, S.K.

    2010-01-01

    Densities and viscosities of glucose in (1.0, 2.5, and 5.0) mass% aqueous urea solutions have been measured at T = (298.15, 303.15, 308.15, and 313.15) K, respectively. Apparent molar volumes, limiting partial molar volume, and relative viscosity have been obtained from the density and viscosity results. Limiting partial molar expansibilities have also been calculated from the temperature dependence of limiting partial molar volumes. The viscosity data have been analyzed by using the modified Jones-Dole equation. The results are used to establish the nature of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions. Transition state treatment of the relative viscosity was also used for the calculation of activation parameters of viscous flow. Pour findings show that the solute acts as a water structure former and provides strong solute-solvent interaction.

  17. Volumetric and viscometric studies of urea in binary aqueous solutions of glucose at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samanta, T.; Ray, A.

    2010-01-01

    Densities and viscosities of urea in (1.0, 2.5, and 5.0) mass% of aqueous glucose solutions have been measured at T = (298.15, 303.15, 308.15, and 313.15) K, respectively. Apparent molar volumes, limiting partial molar volume, and relative viscosity have been obtained from the density and viscosity data. Limiting partial molar expansibilities have also been calculated from the temperature dependence of limiting partial molar volumes. The viscosity data has been analyzed using the Jones-Dole equation. The results are used to establish the nature of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions. The activation parameters of viscous flow have also been calculated on the basis of transition state treatment of the relative viscosity. Result shows that the solute acts as water structure breaker and posses' weak solute-solvent interaction.

  18. Glass Transition Temperature of Saccharide Aqueous Solutions Estimated with the Free Volume/Percolation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin, Julian Gelman; Schneider, Matthias; Corti, Horacio R

    2016-06-09

    The glass transition temperature of trehalose, sucrose, glucose, and fructose aqueous solutions has been predicted as a function of the water content by using the free volume/percolation model (FVPM). This model only requires the molar volume of water in the liquid and supercooled regimes, the molar volumes of the hypothetical pure liquid sugars at temperatures below their pure glass transition temperatures, and the molar volumes of the mixtures at the glass transition temperature. The model is simplified by assuming that the excess thermal expansion coefficient is negligible for saccharide-water mixtures, and this ideal FVPM becomes identical to the Gordon-Taylor model. It was found that the behavior of the water molar volume in trehalose-water mixtures at low temperatures can be obtained by assuming that the FVPM holds for this mixture. The temperature dependence of the water molar volume in the supercooled region of interest seems to be compatible with the recent hypothesis on the existence of two structure of liquid water, being the high density liquid water the state of water in the sugar solutions. The idealized FVPM describes the measured glass transition temperature of sucrose, glucose, and fructose aqueous solutions, with much better accuracy than both the Gordon-Taylor model based on an empirical kGT constant dependent on the saccharide glass transition temperature and the Couchman-Karasz model using experimental heat capacity changes of the components at the glass transition temperature. Thus, FVPM seems to be an excellent tool to predict the glass transition temperature of other aqueous saccharides and polyols solutions by resorting to volumetric information easily available.

  19. Zirconium-cerin solid solutions: thermodynamic model and thermal stability at high temperature; Solutions solides de zirconium dans la cerine: modele thermodynamique et stabilite thermique a haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janvier, C.

    1998-04-02

    The oxides-gaseous dioxygen equilibria and the textural thermal stability of six zirconium-cerin solutions Ce{sub 1-x}Zr{sub x}O{sub 2} (0solutions and the gaseous oxygen by thermal gravimetric analysis at 600 degrees Celsius has shown that these solutions have not a ideal behaviour. A thermodynamic model where the point defects of solutions are included describe them the best. It becomes then possible to know the variations of the concentrations of the point defects in terms of temperature, oxygen pressure and zirconium concentration. A kinetic study (by calcination at 950 degrees Celsius of the solid solutions) of the specific surface area decrease has revealed a minima (0

  20. Solutions to mitigate heat loads due to electrons on sensitive components of ITER HNB beamlines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartori, Emanuele, E-mail: emanuele.sartori@gmail.com [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), C.so Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Veltri, Pierluigi; Dalla Palma, Mauro; Agostinetti, Piero [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), C.so Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Hemsworth, Ronald; Singh, Mahendrajit [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Serianni, Gianluigi [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), C.so Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Energetic electrons leaking out of the ITER HNB accelerator are simulated. • Electrons generated along the ITER HNB beamline are simulated. • Heat loads and heat load maps on cryopumps are calculated for ITER HNB and test facility. • Protection solutions that will be installed are presented and their effect discussed. - Abstract: The operation of neutral beam injectors for plasma heating and current drive in a fusion device provides challenges in the thermal management of beamline components. Sensitive components such as the cryogenic pumps at beamline periphery shall be protected from the heat flux due to stray electrons. These are emitted by the negative ion accelerator or generated along the beamline by interaction of fast electrons, ions or atoms with background gas and surfaces. In this article the case of the ITER Heating Neutral Beam (HNB) and its test facility MITICA is discussed, for which the beam parameters and the required pulse length of one hour is a major leap forward with respect to the present experience with neutral beam systems. The engineering solutions adopted for effective cryopump protection against the heat load from electrons are described. The use of three-dimensional numerical simulations of particle trajectories in the complex geometry of the beamline was needed for the quantitative estimations of the heat loads. The presented solutions were optimized to minimize the impact on gas pumping and on the functionality of other components.

  1. Isolation of temperature-sensitive mutants of 16 S rRNA in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triman, K; Becker, E; Dammel, C

    1989-01-01

    Temperature-sensitive mutants have been isolated following hydroxylamine mutagenesis of a plasmid containing Escherichia coli rRNA genes carrying selectable markers for spectinomycin resistance (U1192 in 16 S rRNA) and erythromycin resistance (G2058 in 23 S rRNA). These antibiotic resistance....... The mutations were localized by in vitro restriction fragment replacement followed by in vivo marker rescue and were identified by DNA sequence analysis. We report here seven single-base alterations in 16 S rRNA (A146, U153, A350, A359, A538, A1292 and U1293), five of which produce temperature......-sensitive spectinomycin resistance and two that produce unconditional loss of resistance. In each case, loss of ribosomal function can be accounted for by disruption of base-pairing in the secondary structure of 16 S rRNA. For the temperature-sensitive mutants, there is a lag period of about two generations between...

  2. Effect of the temperature in the sensitivity of CaSO4: Dy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, P.R.; Alcantara, B.C.; Azorin, J.; Furetta, C.

    2003-01-01

    Sensitivity of a Tl material is one of the most important properties for dosimetry. This property is optimized by means of various processes such as the incorporation of different dopants into the matrix material, the application of certain doses of ionizing radiation and carefully controlled thermal treatments among others. Results obtained of studying the sensitivity of diverse preparations of CaSO 4 : Dy submitted different thermal treatments are presented. The material, which presented the highest sensitivity, was that one it was heated to 800 C during one hour. When the temperature was raised over this value it was observed that sensitivity drops again. In other hand, as the heating rate in lowing down, during the readout, the height of the glow curve decreases proportionally. The temperature of the maximum of the main peak also decreases. (Author)

  3. Phenotypic characterization of adenovirus type 12 temperature-sensitive mutants in productive infection and transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hama, S; Kimura, G

    1980-01-01

    Eleven temperature-sensitive mutants of adenovirus type 12, capable of forming plaques in human cells at 33 C but not at 39.5 C, were isolated from a stock of a wild-type strain after treatment with either nitrous acid or hydroxylamine. Complementation tests in doubly infected human cells permitted a tentative assignment of eight of these mutants to six complementation groups. Temperature-shift experiments revealed that one mutant is affected early and most of the other mutants are affected late. Only the early mutant, H12ts505, was temperature sensitive in viral DNA replication. Infectious virions of all the mutants except H12ts505 and two of the late mutants produced at 33 C, appeared to be more heat labile than those of the wild type. Only H12ts505 was temperature sensitive for the establishment of transformation of rat 3Y1 cells. One of the late mutants (H12ts504) had an increased transforming ability at the permissive temperature. Results of temperature-shift transformation experiments suggest that a viral function affected in H12ts505 is required for "initiation" of transformation. Some of the growth properties of H12ts505-transformed cells were also temperature dependent, suggesting that a functional expression of a gene mutation in H12ts505 is required to maintain at least some aspects of the transformed state.

  4. Calcitonin gene-related peptide alters the firing rates of hypothalamic temperature sensitive and insensitive neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grimm Eleanor R

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transient hyperthermic shifts in body temperature have been linked to the endogenous hormone calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, which can increase sympathetic activation and metabolic heat production. Recent studies have demonstrated that these centrally mediated responses may result from CGRP dependent changes in the activity of thermoregulatory neurons in the preoptic and anterior regions of the hypothalamus (POAH. Results Using a tissue slice preparation, we recorded the single-unit activity of POAH neurons from the adult male rat, in response to temperature and CGRP (10 μM. Based on the slope of firing rate as a function of temperature, neurons were classified as either warm sensitive or temperature insensitive. All warm sensitive neurons responded to CGRP with a significant decrease in firing rate. While CGRP did not alter the firing rates of some temperature insensitive neurons, responsive neurons showed an increase in firing rate. Conclusion With respect to current models of thermoregulatory control, these CGRP dependent changes in firing rate would result in hyperthermia. This suggests that both warm sensitive and temperature insensitive neurons in the POAH may play a role in producing this hyperthermic shift in temperature.

  5. Resonance analysis of a high temperature piezoelectric disc for sensitivity characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgunde, Prathamesh N; Bond, Leonard J

    2018-07-01

    Ultrasonic transducers for high temperature (200 °C+) applications are a key enabling technology for advanced nuclear power systems and in a range of chemical and petro-chemical industries. Design, fabrication and optimization of such transducers using piezoelectric materials remains a challenge. In this work, experimental data-based analysis is performed to investigate the fundamental causal factors for the resonance characteristics of a piezoelectric disc at elevated temperatures. The effect of all ten temperature-dependent piezoelectric constants (ε 33 , ε 11 , d 33 , d 31 , d 15 , s 11 , s 12 , s 13 , s 33 , s 44 ) is studied numerically on both the radial and thickness mode resonances of a piezoelectric disc. A sensitivity index is defined to quantify the effect of each of the temperature-dependent coefficients on the resonance modes of the modified lead zirconium titanate disc. The temperature dependence of s 33 showed highest sensitivity towards the thickness resonance mode followed by ε 33 , s 11 , s 13 , s 12 , d 31 , d 33 , s 44 , ε 11 , and d 15 in the decreasing order of the sensitivity index. For radial resonance modes, the temperature dependence of ε 33 showed highest sensitivity index followed by s 11 , s 12 and d 31 coefficient. This numerical study demonstrates that the magnitude of d 33 is not the sole factor that affects the resonance characteristics of the piezoelectric disc at high temperatures. It appears that there exists a complex interplay between various temperature dependent piezoelectric coefficients that causes reduction in the thickness mode resonance frequencies which is found to be agreement in with the experimental data at an elevated temperature. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of temperature and humidity on electrical properties of organic semiconductor orange dye films deposited from solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karimov, K.S.; Babadzhanov, A.; Turaeva, M.A.; Marupov, R.; Ahmed, M.M.; Khalid, F.A.; Khan, M.N.; Zakaullah, Kh.; Moiz, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    In this study the effect of temperature and humidity on electrical properties of organic semiconductor orange dye (OD) have been examined. Thin films of OD (C/sub 17/H/sub 17/N/sub 5/O/sub 2/) were deposited from 10 wt. % aqueous solution on gold and conductive glass (SnO/sub 2/) substrates. The films were grown at room temperature under normal gravity conditions, i.e., 1 g and in a spin coater up to an angular speed of 1000 RPM. Two different types of structures: surface Ga/OD/Au and sandwich AVOD/SnO/sub 2/ were fabricated and their DC and low frequency AC characteristics were evaluated for the temperature range 30-70 deg. C at ambient humidity of 50-80 %. It was observed that the sandwich structure of OD films show rectification behavior whilst the conductivity of all devices are temperature and humidity dependent. Observed room temperature activation energy for OD films was 0.30 eV which showed an increase up to 0.51 eV as a function of temperature. It was found that certain sandwich structures are more sensitive to humidity than others and the observed resistance to humidity ratio for Au/OD/Au was 5.4 whereas for Au/OD/Ga samples it was 5.0. (author)

  7. Sensitive Indicators of Zonal Stipa Species to Changing Temperature and Precipitation in Inner Mongolia Grassland, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xiaomin; Zhou, Guangsheng; Wang, Yuhui; Song, Xiliang

    2016-01-01

    Climate change often induces shifts in plant functional traits. However, knowledge related to sensitivity of different functional traits and sensitive indicator representing plant growth under hydrothermal change remains unclear. Inner Mongolia grassland is predicted to be one of the terrestrial ecosystems which are most vulnerable to climate change. In this study, we analyzed the response of four zonal Stipa species (S. baicalensis, S. grandis, S. breviflora, and S. bungeana) from Inner Mongolia grassland to changing temperature (control, increased 1.5, 2, 4, and 6°C), precipitation (decreased 30 and 15%, control, increased 15 and 30%) and their combined effects via climate control chambers. The relative change of functional traits in the unit of temperature and precipitation change was regarded as sensitivity coefficient and sensitive indicators were examined by pathway analysis. We found that sensitivity of the four Stipa species to changing temperature and precipitation could be ranked as follows: S. bungeana > S. grandis > S. breviflora > S. baicalensis. In particular, changes in leaf area, specific leaf area and root/shoot ratio could account for 86% of the changes in plant biomass in the four Stipa species. Also these three measurements were more sensitive to hydrothermal changes than the other functional traits. These three functional indicators reflected the combination of plant production capacity (leaf area), adaptive strategy (root/shoot ratio), instantaneous environmental effects (specific leaf area), and cumulative environmental effects (leaf area and root/shoot ratio). Thus, leaf area, specific leaf area and root/shoot ratio were chosen as sensitive indicators in response to changing temperature and precipitation for Stipa species. These results could provide the basis for predicting the influence of climate change on Inner Mongolia grassland based on the magnitude of changes in sensitive indicators. PMID:26904048

  8. Spectroscopic investigation of solutions temperature effect on structure of americium(3) complexes with ethylenediaminetetraacetate and hydroxyethylethylenediaminetriacetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitenko, S.I.; Martynenko, L.I.; Pechurova, N.I.

    1985-01-01

    Temperature dependence of absorption band intensity in spectra of solutions AmA - and AmX, where A 4- - ethylenediaminetetraacetate, X 3- - hydroxyethyl ethylenediaminetriacetate, has been studied spectrophotometrically. It is detected, that with the increase in solution temperature in the range 25-86 deg C a redistribution of absorption band intensities in AmA - X and AmX spectra is observed. Spectrum of Am 3+ never varies in the studied temperature range. It is assumed, that the observed phenomenon is explained by the change in the structure of Am 3+ complexonates during solution heating. Values of ΔH of the processes of internal coordination sphere rebuilding are calculated: 3.3+-0.9 (AmA - ), 2.2+-0.8 (AmX) kJ/mol

  9. High performance solution processed zirconium oxide gate dielectric appropriate for low temperature device application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasan, Musarrat; Nguyen, Manh-Cuong; Kim, Hyojin; You, Seung-Won; Jeon, Yoon-Seok; Tong, Duc-Tai; Lee, Dong-Hwi; Jeong, Jae Kyeong; Choi, Rino, E-mail: rino.choi@inha.ac.kr

    2015-08-31

    This paper reports a solution processed electrical device with zirconium oxide gate dielectric that was fabricated at a low enough temperature appropriate for flexible electronics. Both inorganic dielectric and channel materials were synthesized in the same organic solvent. The dielectric constant achieved was 13 at 250 °C with a reasonably low leakage current. The bottom gate transistor devices showed the highest mobility of 75 cm{sup 2}/V s. The device is operated at low voltage with high-k dielectric with excellent transconductance and low threshold voltage. Overall, the results highlight the potential of low temperature solution based deposition in fabricating more complicated circuits for a range of applications. - Highlights: • We develop a low temperature inorganic dielectric deposition process. • We fabricate oxide semiconductor channel devices using all-solution processes. • Same solvent is used for dielectric and oxide semiconductor deposition.

  10. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Zircaloy-4 in Halide Solutions: Effect of Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farina S.B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Zircaloy-4 was found to be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in 1 M NaCl, 1 M KBr and 1 M KI aqueous solutions at potentials above the pitting potential. In all the solutions tested crack propagation was initially intergranular and then changed to transgranular. The effect of strain rate and temperature on the SCC propagation was investigated. An increase in the strain rate was found to lead to an increase in the crack propagation rate. The crack propagation rate increases in the three solutions tested as the temperatures increases between 20 and 90 °C. The Surface-Mobility SCC mechanism accounts for the observation made in the present work, and the activation energy predicted in iodide solutions is similar to that found in the literature.

  11. Aroma volatility from aqueous sucrose solutions at low and subzero temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covarrubias-Cervantes, Marco; Champion, Dominique; Debeaufort, Frédéric; Voilley, Andrée

    2004-11-17

    The gas-liquid partition coefficients of ethyl acetate and ethyl hexanoate have been measured in water and aqueous sucrose solutions from 25 to -10 degrees C by dynamic headspace. Experiments were carried out on sucrose solutions at temperatures where no ice formation was possible. Results showed that when sucrose concentration increased, aroma volatility increased except for ethyl hexanoate and in the highest sucrose concentration solution (57.5%). A quasi-linear temperature decrease on aroma volatility was observed in sucrose solutions from 25 to around 4 and 0 degrees C. Then, from 0 to -10 degrees C, aroma volatility did not decrease: ethyl acetate volatility remained constant but that of ethyl hexanoate increased. Enthalpy of vaporization and activity coefficients of the aroma compounds were calculated.

  12. The observed sensitivity of the global hydrological cycle to changes in surface temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkin, Phillip A; Janowiak, John; Smith, Thomas M; Sapiano, Mathew R P

    2010-01-01

    Climate models project large changes in global surface temperature in coming decades that are expected to be accompanied by significant changes in the global hydrological cycle. Validation of model simulations is essential to support their use in decision making, but observing the elements of the hydrological cycle is challenging, and model-independent global data sets exist only for precipitation. We compute the sensitivity of the global hydrological cycle to changes in surface temperature using available global precipitation data sets and compare the results against the sensitivities derived from model simulations of 20th century climate. The implications of the results for the global climate observing system are discussed.

  13. Effect of solution treatment temperature and cooling rate on the mechanical properties of tungsten heavy alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumari, Anjali, E-mail: anjalikumari1261@gmail.com; Prabhu, G.; Sankaranarayana, M.; Nandy, T.K.

    2017-03-14

    The present study investigates the effect of solution treatment temperature and cooling rate on mechanical properties of a tungsten heavy alloy (89.6W-6.2Ni-1.8Fe-2.4Co). In addition to water quenching, rapid argon quenching has been attempted in this study since it is a relatively cleaner process and it can be used in conjunction with vacuum treatment. Since in these alloys, there is a possibility of incomplete dissolution of intermetallics or segregation of impurities during heat treatment, which results in scatter in the mechanical properties, it was decided that the solution treatment temperature for both water and argon quenching would be varied from 1100 to 1250 °C in order to see its effect on the microstructure and mechanical properties. Solution treatment at varying temperatures followed by water quenching resulted in tensile strength ranging from 908 to 921 MPa and % elongation varied from 19% to 26%. On the other hand, the argon quenching heat treatment resulted in tensile strength in the range of 871–955 MPa and % elongation from 9% to 25%. No significant trend with respect to solution treatment temperature on tensile properties was seen in both argon and water quenched samples. % elongation to failure and impact values of water quenched specimens were better than those of argon quenched specimens for a given solution treatment temperature. The impact values appeared to improve with increasing solution treatment temperature in water quenched condition. The properties were correlated with underlying microstructure and fractographs of the failed specimens. The study showed the argon quenching may not be appropriate for the heat treatment of heavy alloys since it results in inferior mechanical properties as compared to water quenching.

  14. Global weak solutions for coupled transport processes in concrete walls at high temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Beneš, Michal; Štefan, Radek

    2012-01-01

    We consider an initial-boundary value problem for a fully nonlinear coupled parabolic system with nonlinear boundary conditions modelling hygro-thermal behavior of concrete at high temperatures. We prove a global existence of a weak solution to this system on an arbitrary time interval. The main result is proved by an approximation procedure. This consists in proving the existence of solutions to mollified problems using the Leray-Schauder theorem, for which a priori estimates are obtained. T...

  15. A new sensitive method of dissociation constants determination based on the isohydric solutions principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michałowski, Tadeusz; Pilarski, Bogusław; Asuero, Agustin G; Dobkowska, Agnieszka

    2010-10-15

    The paper provides a new formulation and analytical proposals based on the isohydric solutions concept. It is particularly stated that a mixture formed, according to titrimetric mode, from a weak acid (HX, C(0)mol/L) and a strong acid (HB, Cmol/L) solutions, assumes constant pH, independently on the volumes of the solutions mixed, provided that the relation C(0)=C+C(2)·10(pK(1)) is valid, where pK(1)=-log K(1), K(1) the dissociation constant for HX. The generalized formulation, referred to the isohydric solutions thus obtained, was extended also to more complex acid-base systems. Particularly in the (HX, HB) system, the titration occurs at constant ionic strength (I) value, not resulting from presence of a basal electrolyte. This very advantageous conjunction of the properties provides, among others, a new, very sensitive method for verification of pK(1) value. The new method is particularly useful for weak acids HX characterized by low pK(1) values. The method was tested experimentally on four acid-base systems (HX, HB), in aqueous and mixed-solvent media and compared with the literature data. Some useful (linear and hyperbolic) correlations were stated and applied for validation of pK(1) values. Finally, some practical applications of analytical interest of the isohydricity (pH constancy) principle as one formulated in this paper were enumerated, proving the usefulness of such a property which has its remote roots in the Arrhenius concept. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Spectral and Concentration Sensitivity of Multijunction Solar Cells at High Temperature: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, Daniel J.; Steiner, Myles A.; Perl, Emmett E.; Simon, John

    2017-06-14

    We model the performance of two-junction solar cells at very high temperatures of ~400 degrees C and beyond for applications such as hybrid PV/solar-thermal power production, and identify areas in which the design and performance characteristics behave significantly differently than at more conventional near-room-temperature operating conditions. We show that high-temperature operation reduces the sensitivity of the cell efficiency to spectral content, but increases the sensitivity to concentration, both of which have implications for energy yield in terrestrial PV applications. For other high-temperature applications such as near-sun space missions, our findings indicate that concentration may be a useful tool to enhance cell efficiency.

  17. Influence of Temperature Variation on Optical Receiver Sensitivity and its Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Prokes

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, the influence of temperature variation on the sensitivity of an avalanche-photodiode-based optical receiver applied in the free space optical communication link is discussed. Communication systems of this type are exposed to a wide range of operating temperatures, which markedly affect many photodiode and preamplifier parameters. The paper presents a receiver sensitivity calculation, taking into consideration the temperature dependence of avalanche photodiode gain, excess noise factor, dark current and thermal noise of preamplifier resistances, and describes the compensation of temperature effects on photodiode gain based on a corresponding change in the reverse voltage applied to the diode. The calculations are demonstrated on the connection of a small-area silicon APD operating in the wavelength range from 820 to 1150 nm with a transimpedance preamplifier using a bipolar junction transistor.

  18. Species composition and forest structure explain the temperature sensitivity patterns of productivity in temperate forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. J. Bohn

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Rising temperatures due to climate change influence the wood production of forests. Observations show that some temperate forests increase their productivity, whereas others reduce their productivity. This study focuses on how species composition and forest structure properties influence the temperature sensitivity of aboveground wood production (AWP. It further investigates which forests will increase their productivity the most with rising temperatures. We described forest structure by leaf area index, forest height and tree height heterogeneity. Species composition was described by a functional diversity index (Rao's Q and a species distribution index (ΩAWP. ΩAWP quantified how well species are distributed over the different forest layers with regard to AWP. We analysed 370 170 forest stands generated with a forest gap model. These forest stands covered a wide range of possible forest types. For each stand, we estimated annual aboveground wood production and performed a climate sensitivity analysis based on 320 different climate time series (of 1-year length. The scenarios differed in mean annual temperature and annual temperature amplitude. Temperature sensitivity of wood production was quantified as the relative change in productivity resulting from a 1 °C rise in mean annual temperature or annual temperature amplitude. Increasing ΩAWP positively influenced both temperature sensitivity indices of forest, whereas forest height showed a bell-shaped relationship with both indices. Further, we found forests in each successional stage that are positively affected by temperature rise. For such forests, large ΩAWP values were important. In the case of young forests, low functional diversity and small tree height heterogeneity were associated with a positive effect of temperature on wood production. During later successional stages, higher species diversity and larger tree height heterogeneity were an advantage. To achieve such a

  19. Species composition and forest structure explain the temperature sensitivity patterns of productivity in temperate forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Friedrich J.; May, Felix; Huth, Andreas

    2018-03-01

    Rising temperatures due to climate change influence the wood production of forests. Observations show that some temperate forests increase their productivity, whereas others reduce their productivity. This study focuses on how species composition and forest structure properties influence the temperature sensitivity of aboveground wood production (AWP). It further investigates which forests will increase their productivity the most with rising temperatures. We described forest structure by leaf area index, forest height and tree height heterogeneity. Species composition was described by a functional diversity index (Rao's Q) and a species distribution index (ΩAWP). ΩAWP quantified how well species are distributed over the different forest layers with regard to AWP. We analysed 370 170 forest stands generated with a forest gap model. These forest stands covered a wide range of possible forest types. For each stand, we estimated annual aboveground wood production and performed a climate sensitivity analysis based on 320 different climate time series (of 1-year length). The scenarios differed in mean annual temperature and annual temperature amplitude. Temperature sensitivity of wood production was quantified as the relative change in productivity resulting from a 1 °C rise in mean annual temperature or annual temperature amplitude. Increasing ΩAWP positively influenced both temperature sensitivity indices of forest, whereas forest height showed a bell-shaped relationship with both indices. Further, we found forests in each successional stage that are positively affected by temperature rise. For such forests, large ΩAWP values were important. In the case of young forests, low functional diversity and small tree height heterogeneity were associated with a positive effect of temperature on wood production. During later successional stages, higher species diversity and larger tree height heterogeneity were an advantage. To achieve such a development, one could plant

  20. Solution processable titanium dioxide precursor and nanoparticulated ink: application in Dye Sensitized Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch-Jimenez, Pau; Yu, Youhai; Lira-Cantu, Mónica; Domingo, Concepción; Ayllón, José A

    2014-02-15

    Colloidal TiO2 anatase nanoparticles of 4-8 nm diameter capped with 3,6,9-trioxadecanoic acid (TODA) were synthesized at low temperature using water and ethanol as the solvents. ATR-FTIR and (1)H NMR characterization showed the capping acid capability of stabilizing the TiO2 nanoparticles through labile hydrogen bonds. The presence of the capping ligand permitted the further preparation of homogeneous and stable colloidal dispersions of the TiO2 powder in aqueous media. Moreover, after solvent evaporation, the ligand could be easily eliminated by soft treatments, such as UV irradiation or low-temperature thermal annealing. These properties have been used in this work to fabricate mesoporous TiO2 electrodes, which can be applied as photoanodes in Dye Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSCs). For the preparation of the electrodes, the as-synthesized mesoporous TiO2 nanoparticles were mixed with commercial TiO2 (Degussa P25) and deposited on FTO substrates by using the doctor blade technique. A mixture of water and ethanol was used as the solvent. A soft thermal treatment at 140 °C for 2h eliminated the organic compound and produced a sintered mesoporous layer of 6 μm thickness. The photovoltaic performance of the DSSCs applying these electrodes sensitized with the N3 dye resulted in 5.6% power conversion efficiency. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Incoloy 800 anodic behavior in sulfate and chloride solutions at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafont, C.; Alvarez, M.G.

    1992-01-01

    The anodic behavior and pitting corrosion resistance of Incoloy 800 in concentrated aqueous chloride and sulphate solutions has been studied by means of electrochemical techniques. The effect of different environmental variables, such as temperature (in the 100 0 C to 280 0 C range) and sulphate ion concentration (0.02 M to 2 M), was evaluated. In another set of experiments, the influence of sulphate ions additions on the pitting resistance and pitting morphology of Incoloy 800 in chloride solutions at high temperature was also examined. (author)

  2. Temperature sensitivity of soil respiration rates enhanced by microbial community response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karhu, Kristiina; Auffret, Marc D; Dungait, Jennifer A J; Hopkins, David W; Prosser, James I; Singh, Brajesh K; Subke, Jens-Arne; Wookey, Philip A; Agren, Göran I; Sebastià, Maria-Teresa; Gouriveau, Fabrice; Bergkvist, Göran; Meir, Patrick; Nottingham, Andrew T; Salinas, Norma; Hartley, Iain P

    2014-09-04

    Soils store about four times as much carbon as plant biomass, and soil microbial respiration releases about 60 petagrams of carbon per year to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide. Short-term experiments have shown that soil microbial respiration increases exponentially with temperature. This information has been incorporated into soil carbon and Earth-system models, which suggest that warming-induced increases in carbon dioxide release from soils represent an important positive feedback loop that could influence twenty-first-century climate change. The magnitude of this feedback remains uncertain, however, not least because the response of soil microbial communities to changing temperatures has the potential to either decrease or increase warming-induced carbon losses substantially. Here we collect soils from different ecosystems along a climate gradient from the Arctic to the Amazon and investigate how microbial community-level responses control the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration. We find that the microbial community-level response more often enhances than reduces the mid- to long-term (90 days) temperature sensitivity of respiration. Furthermore, the strongest enhancing responses were observed in soils with high carbon-to-nitrogen ratios and in soils from cold climatic regions. After 90 days, microbial community responses increased the temperature sensitivity of respiration in high-latitude soils by a factor of 1.4 compared to the instantaneous temperature response. This suggests that the substantial carbon stores in Arctic and boreal soils could be more vulnerable to climate warming than currently predicted.

  3. A Novel High-Sensitivity, Low-Power, Liquid Crystal Temperature Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Francisco Algorri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A novel temperature sensor based on nematic liquid crystal permittivity as a sensing magnitude, is presented. This sensor consists of a specific micrometric structure that gives considerable advantages from other previous related liquid crystal (LC sensors. The analytical study reveals that permittivity change with temperature is introduced in a hyperbolic cosine function, increasing the sensitivity term considerably. The experimental data has been obtained for ranges from −6 °C to 100 °C. Despite this, following the LC datasheet, theoretical ranges from −40 °C to 109 °C could be achieved. These results have revealed maximum sensitivities of 33 mVrms/°C for certain temperature ranges; three times more than of most silicon temperature sensors. As it was predicted by the analytical study, the micrometric size of the proposed structure produces a high output voltage. Moreover the voltage’s sensitivity to temperature response can be controlled by the applied voltage. This response allows temperature measurements to be carried out without any amplification or conditioning circuitry, with very low power consumption.

  4. Bio-inspired intelligent evaporation modulation in a thermo-sensitive nanogel colloid solution for self-thermoregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhi; Liu, Kang; Feng, Yanhui; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Xinxin

    2017-06-28

    Intelligent evaporation and temperature modulation plays an important role in self-regulation of living organisms and many industrial applications. Here we demonstrate that a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) nanogel colloid solution can spontaneously and intelligently modulate its evaporation rate with temperature variation, which has a larger evaporation rate than distilled water at a temperature higher than its lower critical solution temperature (LCST) and a smaller evaporation rate at a temperature lower than its LCST. It performs just like human skin. Theoretical analysis based on the thermodynamic derivation reveals that the evaporation rate transition around the LCST may originate from the saturated vapor pressure transition caused by the status transformation of the PNIPAM additives. An intelligent thermoregulation system based on the PNIPAM colloid solution is also demonstrated, illustrating its potential for intelligent temperature control and acting as an artificial skin.

  5. Post-deposition annealing temperature dependence TiO_2-based EGFET pH sensor sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zulkefle, M. A.; Rahman, R. A.; Yusoff, K. A.; Abdullah, W. F. H.; Rusop, M.; Herman, S. H.

    2016-01-01

    EGFET pH sensor is one type of pH sensor that is used to measure and determine pH of a solution. The sensing membrane of EGFET pH sensor plays vital role in the overall performance of the sensor. This paper studies the effects of different annealing temperature of the TiO_2 sensing membranes towards sensitivity of EGFET pH sensor. Sol-gel spin coating was chosen as TiO_2 deposition techniques since it is cost-effective and produces thin film with uniform thickness. Deposited TiO_2 thin films were then annealed at different annealing temperatures and then were connected to the gate of MOSFET as a part of the EGFET pH sensor structure. The thin films now act as sensing membranes of the EGFET pH sensor and sensitivity of each sensing membrane towards pH was measured. From the results it was determined that sensing membrane annealed at 300 °C gave the highest sensitivity followed by sample annealed at 400 °C and 500 °C.

  6. Post-deposition annealing temperature dependence TiO{sub 2}-based EGFET pH sensor sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zulkefle, M. A., E-mail: alhadizulkefle@gmail.com; Rahman, R. A., E-mail: rohanieza.abdrahman@gmail.com; Yusoff, K. A., E-mail: khairul.aimi.yusof@gmail.com [NANO-ElecTronic Centre (NET), Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Abdullah, W. F. H., E-mail: wanfaz@salam.uitm.edu.my [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Rusop, M., E-mail: rusop@salam.uitm.edu.my [NANO-Science Technology (NST), Institute of Science (IOS), Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA - UiTM, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Herman, S. H., E-mail: hana1617@salam.uitm.edu.my [Core of Frontier Materials & Industry Applications, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-07-06

    EGFET pH sensor is one type of pH sensor that is used to measure and determine pH of a solution. The sensing membrane of EGFET pH sensor plays vital role in the overall performance of the sensor. This paper studies the effects of different annealing temperature of the TiO{sub 2} sensing membranes towards sensitivity of EGFET pH sensor. Sol-gel spin coating was chosen as TiO{sub 2} deposition techniques since it is cost-effective and produces thin film with uniform thickness. Deposited TiO{sub 2} thin films were then annealed at different annealing temperatures and then were connected to the gate of MOSFET as a part of the EGFET pH sensor structure. The thin films now act as sensing membranes of the EGFET pH sensor and sensitivity of each sensing membrane towards pH was measured. From the results it was determined that sensing membrane annealed at 300 °C gave the highest sensitivity followed by sample annealed at 400 °C and 500 °C.

  7. Storage Duration and Temperature Effects of Strychnos potatorum Stock Solutions on its Coagulation Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha R Warrier

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the effects of storage duration and temperature of Strychnos potatorum stock solution on its coagulation efficiency. Coagulation efficiency of the seed extracts on water samples depended on the initial turbidity of the water sample. The stock solutions could clarify only highly turbid solutions. The optimum dosage of the stock solutions was 5% and optimal time required was 50 minutes. S. potatorum stock solutions, which were kept at room temperature (28 °C, had a shelf life of only five days and were able to remove turbidity from high and low turbidity water samples and no coagulation activity was observed for medium turbidity. The highest turbidity removals were observed for stock solutions, which were kept for three days. For stock solutions which were stored in refrigerator, shelf life was extended upto seven days, and the turbidity removal efficiencies improved from 45.9 to 63.8 for low and 43.7 to 64.9 % for high turbidity water samples, respectively.

  8. A new variable temperature solution-solid interface scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanbekam, Abdolreza; Mazur, Ursula; Hipps, K W

    2014-10-01

    We present a new solution-solid (SS) interface scanning tunneling microscope design that enables imaging at high temperatures with low thermal drift and with volatile solvents. In this new design, distinct from the conventional designs, the entire microscope is surrounded in a controlled-temperature and controlled-atmosphere chamber. This allows users to take measurements at high temperatures while minimizing thermal drift. By incorporating an open solution reservoir in the chamber, solvent evaporation from the sample is minimized; allowing users to use volatile solvents for temperature dependent studies at high temperatures. The new design enables the user to image at the SS interface with some volatile solvents for long periods of time (>24 h). An increase in the nonlinearity of the piezoelectric scanner in the lateral direction as a function of temperature is addressed. A temperature dependent study of cobalt(II) octaethylporphyrin (CoOEP) at the toluene/Au(111) interface has been performed with this instrument. It is demonstrated that the lattice parameters remain constant within experimental error from 24 °C to 75 °C. Similar quality images were obtained over the entire temperature range. We report the unit cell of CoOEP at the toluene/Au(111) interface (based on two molecules per unit cell) to be A = (1.36 ± 0.04) nm, B = (2.51 ± 0.04) nm, and α = 97° ± 2°.

  9. Investigating the sensitivity of PMMA optical fibres for use as an evanescent field absorption sensor in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lye, P G; Boerkamp, M; Ernest, A; Lamb, D W

    2005-01-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) optical fibres are low-cost polymer fibres that are generally more physically robust than silica fibres, are more flexible, yet like silica fibres have the potential to be used for practical evanescent field absorption sensors in aqueous solutions. However, evanescent field absorption in aqueous solutions is influenced by more than just the specific absorptivity of the solution in question. The physical configuration of the optical fibre itself, as well as surface charge interactions between the fibre and the chromophore in the solution also significantly affects the sensitivity of the fibre to evanescent field absorption. This paper reports on an investigation of numerous physical phenomena that influence evanescent field absorption for PMMA fibres using an aqueous solution of the dye Amidoblack. Parameters investigated included fibre coiling configuration and bend radius, fibre interaction length, and effect of solution pH. Coiled fibres were found to be more sensitive to evanescent field absorption than straight (uncoiled) lengths, and sensitivity was found to increase with a further reduction in bend radius. At high solution pH, the absorption versus solution concentration proved to be linear whereas at low pH the absorption versus concentration relationship exhibited a clear deviation from linearity. The observed nonlinearity at low pH points to the importance of accounting for electrostatic interactions between chromophore and fibre surface when designing a PMMA sensor for evanescent field absorption measurements in aqueous solutions

  10. Design of cross-sensitive temperature and strain sensor based on sampled fiber grating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xiaohang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper,a cross-sensitive temperature and strain sensor based on sampled fiber grating is designed.Its temperature measurement range is -50-200℃,and the strain measurement rangeis 0-2 000 με.The characteristics of the sensor are obtained using simulation method.Utilizing SPSS software,we found the dual-parameter matrix equations of measurement of temperature and strain,and calibrated the four sensing coefficients of the matrix equations.

  11. Characterization of the temperature-sensitive mutations un-7 and png-1 in Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieterle, Michael G; Wiest, Aric E; Plamann, Mike; McCluskey, Kevin

    2010-05-18

    The model filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa has been studied for over fifty years and many temperature-sensitive mutants have been generated. While most of these have been mapped genetically, many remain anonymous. The mutation in the N. crassa temperature-sensitive lethal mutant un-7 was identified by a complementation based approach as being in the open reading frame designated NCU00651 on linkage group I. Other mutations in this gene have been identified that lead to a temperature-sensitive morphological phenotype called png-1. The mutations underlying un-7 result in a serine to phenylalanine change at position 273 and an isoleucine to valine change at position 390, while the mutation in png-1 was found to result in a serine to leucine change at position 279 although there were other conservative changes in this allele. The overall morphology of the strain carrying the un-7 mutation is compared to strains carrying the png-1 mutation and these mutations are evaluated in the context of other temperature-sensitive mutants in Neurospora.

  12. Low temperature sensitization of austenitic stainless steel: an ageing effect during BWR service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, B.K.; Sinha, A.K.; Rastogi, P.K.; Kulkarni, P.G.

    1994-01-01

    Sensitization in austenitic stainless steel refers to chromium carbide precipitation at the grain boundaries with concomitant depletion of chromium below 12% near grain boundaries. This makes the material susceptible to either intergranular corrosion (IGC) or intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). This effect is predominant whenever austenitic stainless steel is subjected to thermal exposure in the temperature range 723-1073K either during welding or during heat treatment. Low temperature sensitization (LTS) refers to sensitization at temperature below the typical range of sensitization i.e. 723-1073K. A prerequisite for LTS phenomenon is reported to be the presence of chromium carbide nuclei at the grain boundaries which can grow during boiling water reactor service even at a relatively lower temperature of around 560K. LTS can lead to failure of BWR pipe due to IGSCC. The paper reviews the phenomenological and mechanistic aspects of LTS. Studies carried out regarding effect of prior cold work on LTS are reported. Summary of the studies reported in literature to examine the occurrence of LTS during BWR service has also been included. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs

  13. Alginate microgels loaded with temperature sensitive liposomes for magnetic resonance imageable drug release and microgel visualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Elk, Merel; Lorenzato, Cyril; Ozbakir, Burcin; Oerlemans, Chris; Storm, Gert; Nijsen, Frank; Deckers, Roel; Vermonden, Tina; Hennink, Wim E.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to prepare and characterize alginate microgels loaded with temperature sensitive liposomes, which release their payload after mild hyperthermia. It is further aimed that by using these microgels both the drug release and the microgel deposition can be visualized by

  14. Shrub encroachment alters sensitivity of soil respiration to temperature and moisture 2115

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrub encroachment into grasslands creates a mosaic of different soil microsites ranging from open spaces to well-developed shrub canopies, and it is unclear how this affects the spatial variability in soil respiration characteristics, such as the sensitivity to soil temperature and moisture. This i...

  15. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Study of Structural Changes in Temperature-Sensitive Microgel Colloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stieger, M.A.; Richtering, W.; Pedersen, J.S.; Lindner, P.

    2004-01-01

    The structure of temperature-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) microgels in dilute suspension was investigated by means of small-angle neutron scattering. A direct modeling expression for the scattering intensity distribution was derived which describes very well the experimental data at all

  16. Highly Sensitive Liquid Core Temperature Sensor Based on Multimode Interference Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Fuentes-Fuentes

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel fiber optic temperature sensor based on a liquid-core multimode interference device is demonstrated. The advantage of such structure is that the thermo-optic coefficient (TOC of the liquid is at least one order of magnitude larger than that of silica and this, combined with the fact that the TOC of silica and the liquid have opposite signs, provides a liquid-core multimode fiber (MMF highly sensitive to temperature. Since the refractive index of the liquid can be easily modified, this allows us to control the modal properties of the liquid-core MMF at will and the sensor sensitivity can be easily tuned by selecting the refractive index of the liquid in the core of the device. The maximum sensitivity measured in our experiments is 20 nm/°C in the low-temperature regime up to 60 °C. To the best of our knowledge, to date, this is the largest sensitivity reported for fiber-based MMI temperature sensors.

  17. The effect of temperature on radiolysis of iodide ion diluted aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorbovitskaya, T; Tiliks, J [Latvia Univ., Lab. of Radiation Chemistry, Riga (Latvia)

    1996-12-01

    To investigate the radiolysis of iodine containing aqueous solutions a flow type facility (ITF) has a possibility to irradiate aqueous solutions in the steel vessel with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays and continuously (on line) to analyze the products of radiolysis both in liquid and in gaseous phases. By means of ITF the formation of I{sub ox} (I{sub 2} + I{sub 3}{sup -} + HOI), IO{sub 3}{sup -}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was studied in 10{sup -5} - 10{sup -3} mol/dm{sup 3} CsI aqueous solutions by their radiolysis at dose rate 4.5 kGv/h for six hours in region of temperatures from 313 to 404 K. Some experiments in glass ampoules were also performed. The steady-state concentrations of I{sub ox} and IO{sub 3}{sup -} decreased with increasing temperature as linear function of inverted temperature. The effect decreased with decreasing concentration of iodide ion. As the result, at high temperatures (T{>=}380 K) the steady-state concentration of I{sub ox} does not depend essentially on the iodide ion initial concentration. Molecular iodine (I{sub 2}) released from the solution was the main radiolysis product in gaseous phase. Its steady-state concentration increased with increasing temperature because of iodine solubility in the water and decreased at the same time because the radiolytic iodine concentrations decreased. Therefore the most volatility of irradiated 10{sup -3} and 10{sup -4}M CsI solutions was observed at the temperature about 350 K. The volatility of 10{sup -5}M solutions gradually decreased with increasing temperature. The experimental data were explained on the base of the hypothesis that the reaction between I{sub 2} and radiolytic H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was the limit one determining the temperature dependence of I{sub ox} and IO{sub 3}{sup -}steady-state concentrations. Its activation energy was estimated to be 27,5 kcal.mol{sup -1}. The temperature dependence for reaction (IO{sup -} + H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) was also estimated. (author) 8 figs., 1 tab., 17 refs.

  18. The effect of temperature on radiolysis of iodide ion diluted aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbovitskaya, T.; Tiliks, J.

    1996-01-01

    In order to investigate the radiolysis of iodine containing aqueous solutions a flow type facility - Iodine Thermoradiation Facility (ITF) has been designed. It has a possibility to irradiate aqueous solutions in the steel vessel with 60 Co γ-rays and continuously (on line) to analyze the products of radiolysis both in liquid and in gaseous phases. By means of ITF the formation of I ox (I 2 + I 3 - + HOI), IO 3 - , H 2 O 2 was studied in 10 -5 - 10 -3 mol/dm 3 CsI aqueous solutions by their radiolysis at dose rate 4.5 kGv/h for six hours in region of temperatures from 313 to 404 K. Under similar conditions, some experiments in glass ampoules were also performed. The steady-state concentrations of I ox and IO 3 - decreased with increasing temperature as linear function of inverted temperature. The effect decreased with decreasing concentration of iodide ion. As the result, at high temperatures (T≥380 K) the steady-state concentration of I ox does not depend essentially on the iodide ion initial concentration. Molecular iodine (I 2 ) released from the solution was the main radiolysis product in gaseous phase. Its steady-state concentration increased with increasing temperature because of iodine solubility in the water and decreased at the same time because the radiolytic iodine concentrations decreased. Therefore the most volatility of irradiated 10 -3 and 10 -4 M CsI solutions was observed at the temperature about 350 K. The volatility of 10 -5 M solutions gradually decreased with increasing temperature. The experimental data were explained on the base of the hypothesis that the reaction between I 2 and radiolytic H 2 O 2 was the limit one determining the temperature dependence of I ox and IO 3 - steady-state concentrations. Its activation energy was estimated to be 27,5 kcal.mol -1 . The temperature dependence for reaction (IO - + H 2 O 2 ) was also estimated. (author) 8 figs., 1 tab., 17 refs

  19. Linear Analytical Solutions of Mechanical Sensitivity in Large Deflection of Unsymmetrically Layered Piezoelectric Plate under Pretension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Fu Chen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Linear analytical study on the mechanical sensitivity in large deflection of unsymmetrically layered and laterally loaded piezoelectric plate under pretension is conducted. von Karman plate theory for large deflection is utilized but extended to the case of an unsymmetrically layered plate embedded with a piezoelectric layer. The governing equations thus obtained are simplified by omitting the arising nonlinear terms, yielding a Bessel or modified Bessel equation for the lateral slope. Depending on the relative magnitude of the piezoelectric effect, for both cases, analytical solutions of various geometrical responses are developed and formulated via Bessel and modified Bessel functions. The associated ultimate radial stresses are further derived following lamina constitutive law to evaluate the mechanical sensitivity of the considered plate. For a nearly monolithic plate under a very low applied voltage, the results are in good agreement with those for a single-layered case due to pure mechanical load available in literature, and thus the present approach is checked. For a two-layered unsymmetric plate made of typical silicon-based materials, a sound piezoelectric effect is illustrated particularly in a low pretension condition.

  20. Effect of soil moisture on the temperature sensitivity of Northern soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minions, C.; Natali, S.; Ludwig, S.; Risk, D.; Macintyre, C. M.

    2017-12-01

    Arctic and boreal ecosystems are vast reservoirs of carbon and are particularly sensitive to climate warming. Changes in the temperature and precipitation regimes of these regions could significantly alter soil respiration rates, impacting atmospheric concentrations and affecting climate change feedbacks. Many incubation studies have shown that both temperature and soil moisture are important environmental drivers of soil respiration; this relationship, however, has rarely been demonstrated with in situ data. Here we present the results of a study at six field sites in Alaska from 2016 to 2017. Low-power automated soil gas systems were used to measure soil surface CO2 flux from three forced diffusion chambers and soil profile concentrations from three soil depth chambers at hourly intervals at each site. HOBO Onset dataloggers were used to monitor soil moisture and temperature profiles. Temperature sensitivity (Q10) was determined at each site using inversion analysis applied over different time periods. With highly resolved data sets, we were able to observe the changes in soil respiration in response to changes in temperature and soil moisture. Through regression analysis we confirmed that temperature is the primary driver in soil respiration, but soil moisture becomes dominant beyond a certain threshold, suppressing CO2 flux in soils with high moisture content. This field study supports the conclusions made from previous soil incubation studies and provides valuable insights into the impact of both temperature and soil moisture changes on soil respiration.

  1. Temperature influence on corrosion rate of armco iron in acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perboni, G.; Rocchini, G.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study of the behaviour of Armco iron and several steels in acid solutions (HCl, H 2 SO 4 , H 3 PO 4 ) has been undertaken to determine the temperature effect on dissolution rate. The test temperatures were 30, 45, 60, 75 and 90 deg C. The activation heat was determined by application of the Arrhenius law from colorimetric and electrochemical data. Investigation results obtained by both methods were represented diagrammatically and showed a good agreement, though the discrepancy in the data increased with test temperature

  2. The relation between temperature and concentration gradients in superfluid sup 3 He- sup 4 He solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Zadorozhko, A A; Rudavskij, E Y; Chagovets, V K; Sheshin, G A

    2003-01-01

    The temperature and concentration gradients nabla T and nabla x in a superfluid sup 3 He- sup 4 He mixture with an initial concentration 9,8 % of sup 3 He are measured in a temperature range 70-500 mK. The gradients are produced by a steady thermal flow with heating from below. It is shown that the value of nabla x/nabla T observed in the experiment is in good agreement with the theoretical model derived from the temperature and concentration dependences of osmotic pressure. The experimental data permitted us to obtain a thermal diffusion ratio of the solution responsible for the thermal diffusion coefficient.

  3. Enhanced field emission of ZnO nanoneedle arrays via solution etching at room temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Huanming; Qin, Zhiwei; Wang, Zaide

    2017-01-01

    ZnO nanoneedle arrays (ZnO nns) were synthesized by a facile two-step solution-phase method based on the etching of pre-synthesized ZnO nanowire arrays (ZnO nws) with flat ends at room temperature. Field emission measurement results showed that the turn-on electronic fields of ZnO nns and nws wer...

  4. Estimating the Soil Temperature Profile from a single Depth Observation: A simple Empirical Heatflow Solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holmes, T.R.H.; Owe, M.; de Jeu, R.A.M.; Kooi, H.

    2008-01-01

    Two field data sets are used to model near-surface soil temperature profiles in a bare soil. It is shown that the commonly used solutions to the heat flow equations by Van Wijk perform well when applied at deeper soil layers, but result in large errors when applied to near surface layers, where more

  5. Effect of temperature and salting-out agents on the sorption of nitrophenols from aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Churilina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sorption of nitrophenols from aqueous media by сrosslinked N-vinylpyrrolidone-based polymer in static conditions are studied depending on the pH of the solution and the nature of the nitrophenols. It has been established that a temperature and the introduction of salting-out agents influence on the sorption of nitrophenols.

  6. Room temperature synthesis of protonated layered titanate sheets using peroxo titanium carbonate complex solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutradhar, Narottam; Sinhamahapatra, Apurba; Pahari, Sandip Kumar; Bajaj, Hari C; Panda, Asit Baran

    2011-07-21

    We report the synthesis of peroxo titanium carbonate complex solution as a novel water-soluble precursor for the direct synthesis of layered protonated titanate at room temperature. The synthesized titanates showed excellent removal capacity for Pb(2+) and methylene blue. Based on experimental observations, a probable mechanism for the formation of protonated layered dititanate sheets is also discussed.

  7. Temperature and hydration effects on absorbance spectra and radiation sensitivity of a radiochromic medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rink, Alexandra; Lewis, David F.; Varma, Sangya; Vitkin, I. Alex; Jaffray, David A. [Princess Margaret Hospital/Ontario Cancer Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics and Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Advanced Materials Group, International Specialty Products, Inc., Wayne, New Jersey 07470 (United States); Princess Margaret Hospital/Ontario Cancer Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics and Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    The effects of temperature on real time changes in optical density ({Delta}OD) of GAFCHROMIC EBT film were investigated. The spectral peak of maximum change in absorbance ({lambda}{sub max}) was shown to downshift linearly when the temperature of the film was increased from 22 to 38 degree sign C. The {Delta}OD values were also shown to decrease linearly with temperature, and this decrease could not be attributed to the shift in {lambda}{sub max}. A compensation scheme using {lambda}{sub max} and a temperature-dependent correction factor was investigated, but provided limited improvement. Part of the reason may be the fluctuations in hydration of the active component, which were found to affect both position of absorbance peaks and the sensitivity of the film. To test the effect of hydration, laminated and unlaminated films were desiccated. This shifted both the major and minor absorbance peaks in the opposite direction to the change observed with temperature. The desiccated film also exhibited reduced sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Rehydration of the desiccated films did not reverse the effects, but rather gave rise to another form of the polymer with absorbance maxima upshifted further 20 nm. Hence, the spectral characteristics and sensitivity of the film can be dependent on its history, potentially complicating both real-time and conventional radiation dosimetry.

  8. Temperature Sensitivity of an Atomic Vapor Cell-Based Dispersion-Enhanced Optical Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, K.; Smith, D. D.; Chang, H.; Luckay, H. A.

    2015-01-01

    Enhancement of the response of an optical cavity to a change in optical path length, through the use of an intracavity fast-light medium, has previously been demonstrated experimentally and described theoretically for an atomic vapor cell as the intracavity resonant absorber. This phenomenon may be used to enhance both the scale factor and sensitivity of an optical cavity mode to the change in path length, e.g. in gyroscopic applications. We study the temperature sensitivity of the on-resonant scale factor enhancement, S(sub o), due to the thermal sensitivity of the lower-level atom density in an atomic vapor cell, specifically for the case of the Rb-87 D(sub 2) transition. A semi-empirical model of the temperature-dependence of the absorption profile, characterized by two parameters, a(sub o)(T) and gamma(sub a)(T) allows the temperature-dependence of the cavity response, S(sub o)(T) and dS(sub o)/dT to be predicted over a range of temperature. We compare the predictions to experiment. Our model will be useful in determining the useful range for S(sub o), given the practical constraints on temperature stability for an atomic vapor cell.

  9. OSMOTIC COEFFICIENTS, SOLUBILITIES, AND DELIQUESCENCE RELATIONS IN MIXED AQUEOUS SALT SOLUTIONS AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M.S. Gruszkiewicz; D.A. Palmer

    2006-01-01

    While thermodynamic properties of pure aqueous electrolytes are relatively well known at ambient temperature, there are far fewer data for binary systems extending to elevated temperatures and high concentrations. There is no general theoretically sound basis for prediction of the temperature dependence of ionic activities, and consequently temperature extrapolations based on ambient temperature data and empirical equations are uncertain and require empirical verification. Thermodynamic properties of mixed brines in a wide range of concentrations would enhance the understanding and precise modeling of the effects of deliquescence of initially dry solids in humid air in geological environments and in modeling the composition of waters during heating, cooling, evaporation or condensation processes. These conditions are of interest in the analysis of waters on metal surfaces at the proposed radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The results obtained in this project will be useful for modeling the long-term evolution of the chemical environment, and this in turn is useful for the analysis of the corrosion of waste packages. In particular, there are few reliable experimental data available on the relationship between relative humidity and composition that reveals the eutonic points of the mixtures and the mixture deliquescence RH. The deliquescence RH for multicomponent mixtures is lower than that of pure component or binary solutions, but is not easy to predict quantitatively since the solutions are highly nonideal. In this work we used the ORNL low-temperature and high-temperature isopiestic facilities, capable of precise measurements of vapor pressure between ambient temperature and 250 C for determination of not only osmotic coefficients, but also solubilities and deliquescence points of aqueous mixed solutions in a range of temperatures. In addition to standard solutions of CaCl 2 , LiCl, and NaCl used as references, precise direct

  10. Global sensitivity analysis of water age and temperature for informing salmonid disease management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaheri, Amir; Babbar-Sebens, Meghna; Alexander, Julie; Bartholomew, Jerri; Hallett, Sascha

    2018-06-01

    Many rivers in the Pacific Northwest region of North America are anthropogenically manipulated via dam operations, leading to system-wide impacts on hydrodynamic conditions and aquatic communities. Understanding how dam operations alter abiotic and biotic variables is important for designing management actions. For example, in the Klamath River, dam outflows could be manipulated to alter water age and temperature to reduce risk of parasite infections in salmon by diluting or altering viability of parasite spores. However, sensitivity of water age and temperature to the riverine conditions such as bathymetry can affect outcomes from dam operations. To examine this issue in detail, we conducted a global sensitivity analysis of water age and temperature to a comprehensive set of hydraulics and meteorological parameters in the Klamath River, California, where management of salmonid disease is a high priority. We applied an analysis technique, which combined Latin-hypercube and one-at-a-time sampling methods, and included simulation runs with the hydrodynamic numerical model of the Lower Klamath. We found that flow rate and bottom roughness were the two most important parameters that influence water age. Water temperature was more sensitive to inflow temperature, air temperature, solar radiation, wind speed, flow rate, and wet bulb temperature respectively. Our results are relevant for managers because they provide a framework for predicting how water within 'high infection risk' sections of the river will respond to dam water (low infection risk) input. Moreover, these data will be useful for prioritizing the use of water age (dilution) versus temperature (spore viability) under certain contexts when considering flow manipulation as a method to reduce risk of infection and disease in Klamath River salmon.

  11. Correction of MHS Viscosimetric Constants upon Numerical Simulation of Temperature Induced Degradation Kinetic of Chitosan Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Maria De Benedictis

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Mark–Houwink–Sakurada (MHS equation allows for estimation of rheological properties, if the molecular weight is known along with good understanding of the polymer conformation. The intrinsic viscosity of a polymer solution is related to the polymer molecular weight according to the MHS equation, where the value of the constants is related to the specific solvent and its concentration. However, MHS constants do not account for other characteristics of the polymeric solutions, i.e., Deacetilation Degree (DD when the solute is chitosan. In this paper, the degradation of chitosan in different acidic environments by thermal treatment is addressed. In particular, two different solutions are investigated (used as solvent acetic or hydrochloric acid with different concentrations used for the preparation of chitosan solutions. The samples were treated at different temperatures (4, 30, and 80 °C and time points (3, 6 and 24 h. Rheological, Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC and Thermal Gravimetric Analyses (TGA were performed in order to assess the degradation rate of the polymer backbones. Measured values of molecular weight have been integrated in the simulation of the batch degradation of chitosan solutions for evaluating MHS coefficients to be compared with their corresponding experimental values. Evaluating the relationship between the different parameters used in the preparation of chitosan solutions (e.g., temperature, time, acid type and concentration, and their contribution to the degradation of chitosan backbone, it is important to have a mathematical frame that could account for phenomena involved in polymer degradation that go beyond the solvent-solute combination. Therefore, the goal of the present work is to propose an integration of MHS coefficients for chitosan solutions that contemplate a deacetylation degree for chitosan systems or a more

  12. Effect of different ions on the anodic behaviour of alloy 800 chloride solutions at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafont, C.J.; Alvarez, M.G.

    1993-01-01

    The anodic behaviour and passivity breakdown of alloy 800 in sodium bicarbonate and sodium phosphate aqueous solutions were studied in the temperature range from 100 degrees C to 280 degrees C by means of electrochemical techniques. The effect of phosphate or bicarbonate additions on the pitting susceptibility and pitting morphology of the alloy in chloride solutions was also examined. Experiments were performed in the following solutions: 0.1M NaHCO 3 , at 100 degrees C, 200 degrees C, 280 degrees C; 0.06M NaH 2 PO 4 + 0.04M Na 2 HPO 4 , at 100 degrees C, 200 degrees C and 280 degrees C, and 0.1M NaCl with different additions of bicarbonate ion (0.02M, 0.05M and 0.1M) and phosphate ion (0.01M, 0.05M and 0.1M) at 100 degrees C and 280 degrees C. The anodic polarization curves of alloy 800 in deaerated 0.1M NaHCO 3 and 0.06M NaH 2 PO 4 + 0.04M Na 2 HPO 4 solutions exhibited a similar shape at all the tested temperatures. No localized or generalized corrosion was detected on the metallic surface after polarization. The results obtained in chloride plus bicarbonate and chloride plus phosphate mixtures showed that the pitting potential of alloy 800 in chloride solutions was increased by the presence of bicarbonate or phosphate ions. In those solutions where the inhibitor concentration in the mixture is equal or higher than the chloride concentration , the behaviour of the alloy is similar to the one observed in the absence of chlorides. Changes in pitting morphology were found in phosphate containing solutions, while the pits found in bicarbonate containing solutions were similar to those formed in pure chloride solutions. (author). 3 refs., 4 figs

  13. Required developments towards ultra high pressure and temperature subsea tree system solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queseth, Per-Olaf

    2010-07-01

    For the subsea High Pressure High Temperature oil and gas production systems, the primary challenge is to provide good, reliable solutions for HPHT reservoir exploitation based on an overview of parameters for already discovered potential fields. The paper will present a resume of Aker Solutions' previous development in this area exemplified with experiences from testing and operator observations during production start of HPHT fields in the North Sea. Further improvements are required to comply with the extreme pressures and temperatures sought to overcome. 'The Devil is in the details' is a very relevant proverb. A program to qualify subsea production X-mas trees for Ultra HPHT use will be presented with highlight on sealing systems, feed-through solutions and materials as well as impact on interfacing systems. Preliminary and intermediate analytical and test results will be presented and remaining activities summarised. (Author)

  14. Surgical implantation of temperature-sensitive transmitters and data-loggers to record body temperature in koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, D; Johnston, S D; Beard, L; Nicholson, V; Lisle, A; Gaughan, J; Larkin, R; Theilemann, P; Mckinnon, A; Ellis, W

    2016-01-01

    Under predicted climate change scenarios, koala distribution in Australia is expected to be adversely affected. Recent studies have attempted to identify suitable habitat, based on models of bioclimatic regions, but to more accurately reflect the thermal tolerance and behavioural adaptations of the various regional populations, the koala's response to periods of heat stress will need to be investigated at the individual animal level. To explore the safety and suitability of temperature-sensitive intra-abdominal implants for monitoring core body temperature in the koala. A temperature-sensitive radio transmitter and thermal iButton data-logger, waxed together as a package, were surgically implanted into the abdominal cavity of four captive koalas. In one animal the implant was tethered and in the other three, it was left free-floating. After 3 months, the implants were removed and all four koalas recovered without complications. The tethering of the package in the one koala resulted in minor inflammation and adhesion, so this practice was subsequently abandoned. The free-floating deployments were complication-free and revealed a diurnal body temperature rhythm, with daily ranges of 0.4-2.8°C. The minimum recorded body temperature was 34.2°C and the maximum was 37.7°C. The difference in the readings obtained from the transmitters and iButtons never exceeded 0.3°C. The suitability of the surgical approach was confirmed, from both the animal welfare and data collection points of view. © 2016 Australian Veterinary Association.

  15. A technique for accurate measurements of temperature variations in solution calorimetry and osmometry of actinide complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponkshe, M.R.; Samuel, J.K.

    1982-01-01

    The temperature variations of the order of 10 3- to 10 -4 C are measured by means of matched pair of thermistors and constant current techniques. The factors deciding the sensitivity and accuracy are fully discussed. Also the factors which put restrictions on the practical detection limits are also described. (author)

  16. Passivation behavior of SUS 304 stainless steel in neutral solutions at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanno, Kazuo; Kato, Koji; Ohnaka, Noriyuki; Okajima, Yoshiaki; Minato, Akira.

    1981-01-01

    Cyclic voltammograms of SUS 304 stainless steel in various neutral solutions such as Na 2 SO 4 at high temperature were measured, as a successive study to previous report in which effects of temperature and pH on polarization behavior of stainless steel were studied. In this measurement Ag/AgCl reference electrode and platinum counter electrode were used in a static autoclave lined with inconel. Passive films formed in various conditions were analysed by electron diffraction and Auger spectroscopy. Results obtained were compared with anodic behavior of iron, chromium and nickel and with thermodynamical stabilities of their compounds. The main results are summarized as follows. (1) Stainless steel shows such electrochemical behavior as active dissolution, passivation and transpassivation in a deaerated neutral solution at 250 0 C after fully reductive treatment of the specimen. In air-saturated solution, the peak of active dissolution is not observed. In the passive range there are intermediate oxidation and reduction peaks, and it is assumed that dissolved ionic species are oxidized to form oxide of spinel type and higher oxidized state successively at these peaks. (2) Electrochemical behavior of specimens in 0.1 M sulfate, -phosphate and -carbonate solutions are almost the same and rather thick films form in these solutions. On the other hand, specimens are easy to passivate in borate and -nitrate solution, and their passive films are thin. (author)

  17. Fatigue behavior of alloy 600 in sodium chloride solution at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, J.-T.; Yu, G.-P.

    2004-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth (FCG) rates of mill annealed Alloy 600 in NaCI solution were studied by a fracture mechanics test method. Compact tension (CT) specimens were tested under load control with a sinusoidal wave form, in accordance with ASTM specification E647-83, to investigate the effects of environment, load frequency (f), load ratio (R=Pmin/Pmax). The FCG rates of Alloy 600, R=0.1, f=1Hz, were quite similar in air, distilled water, and NaCI (0.6 M, 0.1 M, and 0.001 M) solution at room temperature. Environmental enhancement effect on the FCG rate of Alloy 600 was not significant in NaCI solution. Variations of the load frequency (0.03Hz-3Hz) did not influence the FCG rates of Alloy 600 significantly in air and 0.1 M NaCI solution. The FCG rates of Alloy 600 in air and 0.1 M NaCI solution increased with increasing the load ratio. Compared with the corrosion effects, test results showed that the mechanical effects dominated on the FCG rates of Alloy 600 in chloride solution at room temperature. The SEM fractographs showed that significant striations and transgranular fracture modes were observed on tested specimens. (author)

  18. Thermal sterilization of heat-sensitive products using high-temperature short-time sterilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, A; Kiefer, M; Leuenberger, H

    2001-03-01

    High-temperature short-time (HTST) sterilization with a continuous-flow sterilizer, developed for this study, was evaluated. The evaluation was performed with respect to (a) the chemical degradation of two heat-sensitive drugs in HTST range (140-160 degrees C) and (b) the microbiological effect of HTST sterilization. Degradation kinetics of two heat-sensitive drugs showed that a high peak temperature sterilization process resulted in less chemical degradation for the same microbiological effect than a low peak temperature process. Both drugs investigated could be sterilized with acceptable degradation at HTST conditions. For the evaluation of the microbiological effect, Bacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 7953 spores were used as indicator bacteria. Indicator spore kinetics (D(T), z value, k, and E(a)), were determined in the HTST range. A comparison between the Bigelow model (z value concept) and the Arrhenius model, used to describe the temperature coefficient of the microbial inactivation, demonstrated that the Bigelow model is more accurate in prediction of D(T) values in the HTST range. The temperature coefficient decreased with increasing temperature. The influence of Ca(2+) ions and pH value on the heat resistance of the indicator spores, which is known under typical sterilization conditions, did not change under HTST conditions.

  19. [Emission spectrum temperature sensitivity of Mg4FGeO6 : mn induced by laser].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Liu, Jing-Ru; Shao, Jun; Hu, Zhi-Yun; Tao, Bo; Huang, Mei-Sheng

    2013-08-01

    In order to develop a new sort of thermally sensitive phosphor coating, the emission spectrum thermally sensitivity of Mg4FGeO6 : Mn induced by laser was studied. The spectrum measurement system with heating function was set up, and the emission spectrum of Mg4FGeO6 : Mn at various temperatures were measured. Absorption spectrum was measured, and the mechanism of formation of the structure of double peak was analyzed with the perturbation theory of crystal lattice. The group of peaks around 630 nm is represented by the transitions 4F"2 to 4A2, whereas the group of peaks around 660 nm is due to the transitions 4F'2 to 4A2. The occupancy of both excited states 4F'2 and 4F"2 is in thermal equilibrium. Thus increasing temperature causes the intensity of the emission in the group around 630 nm to increase at the expense of the emission intensity of the group around 660 nm. The various spectral regions in emission differ with temperature, which could be used to support the intensity-ratio measurement method. The intensity-ratio change curve as a function of temperature was fitted, which shows that the range of temperature measurement is between room temperature and 800 K.

  20. A luminescent Lanthanide-free MOF nanohybrid for highly sensitive ratiometric temperature sensing in physiological range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, You; Zhang, Denan; Zeng, Jin; Gan, Ning; Cuan, Jing

    2018-05-01

    Luminescent MOF materials with tunable emissions and energy/charge transfer processes have been extensively explored as ratiometric temperature sensors. However, most of the ratiometric MOF thermometers reported thus far are based on the MOFs containing photoactive lanthanides, which are potentially facing cost issue and serious supply shortage. Here, we present a ratiometric luminescent thermometer based on a dual-emitting lanthanide-free MOF hybrid, which is developed by encapsulation of a fluorescent dye into a robust nanocrystalline zirconium-based MOF through a one-pot synthesis approach. The structure and morphology of the hybrid product was characterized by Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), N 2 adsorption-desorption measurement and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The pore confinement effect well isolates the guest dye molecules and therefore suppresses the nonradiative energy transfer process between dye molecules. The incorporated dye emission is mainly sensitized by the organic linkers within MOF through fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The ratiometric luminescence of the MOF hybrid shows a significant response to temperature due to the thermal-related back energy transfer process from dye molecules and organic linkers, thus can be exploited for self-calibrated temperature sensing. The maximum thermometric sensitivity is 1.19% °C -1 in the physiological temperature range, which is among the highest for the ratiomtric MOF thermometers that operating in 25-45°C. The temperature resolution is better than 0.1°C over the entire operative range (20-60°C). By integrating the advantages of excellent stability, nanoscale nature, and high sensitivity and precision in the physiological temperature range, this dye@MOF hybrid might have potential application in biomedical diagnosis. What' more, this work has expanded the possibility of non-lanthanide luminescent MOF materials for the development of ratiometric temperature sensors. Copyright © 2018

  1. Seasonal variation in the temperature sensitivity of proteolytic enzyme activity in temperate forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzostek, Edward R.; Finzi, Adrien C.

    2012-03-01

    Increasing soil temperature has the potential to alter the activity of the extracellular enzymes that mobilize nitrogen (N) from soil organic matter (SOM) and ultimately the availability of N for primary production. Proteolytic enzymes depolymerize N from proteinaceous components of SOM into amino acids, and their activity is a principal driver of the within-system cycle of soil N. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the soils of temperate forest tree species differ in the temperature sensitivity of proteolytic enzyme activity over the growing season and the role of substrate limitation in regulating temperature sensitivity. Across species and sampling dates, proteolytic enzyme activity had relatively low sensitivity to temperature with a mean activation energy (Ea) of 33.5 kJ mol-1. Ea declined in white ash, American beech, and eastern hemlock soils across the growing season as soils warmed. By contrast, Eain sugar maple soil increased across the growing season. We used these data to develop a species-specific empirical model of proteolytic enzyme activity for the 2009 calendar year and studied the interactive effects of soil temperature (ambient or +5°C) and substrate limitation (ambient or elevated protein) on enzyme activity. Declines in substrate limitation had a larger single-factor effect on proteolytic enzyme activity than temperature, particularly in the spring. There was, however, a large synergistic effect of increasing temperature and substrate supply on proteolytic enzyme activity. Our results suggest limited increases in N availability with climate warming unless there is a parallel increase in the availability of protein substrates.

  2. Fabrication of a microfluidic chip by UV bonding at room temperature for integration of temperature-sensitive layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlautmann, S.; Besselink, G. A. J.; Radhakrishna Prabhu, G.; Schasfoort, R. B. M.

    2003-07-01

    A method for the bonding of a microfluidic device at room temperature is presented. The wafer with the fluidic structures was bonded to a sensor wafer with gold pads by means of adhesive bonding, utilizing an UV-curable glue layer. To avoid filling the fluidic channels with the glue, a stamping process was developed which allows the selective application of a thin glue layer. In this way a microfluidic glass chip was fabricated that could be used for performing surface plasmon resonance measurements without signs of leakage. The advantage of this method is the possibility of integration of organic layers as well as other temperature-sensitive layers into a microfluidic glass device.

  3. Modification of thermal sensitivity of Chinese hamster cells by exposure to solutions of monovalent and divalent cationic salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raaphorst, G.P.; Azzam, E.I.; Vadasz, J.

    1984-06-01

    Chinese hamster V79 cells were heated in culture medium or in 0.155-mol.dm -3 solutions of LiCl, NaCl, KCl, MgCl 2 , CaCl 2 and BaCl 2 . The presence of any one of these ionic solutions during heating increased the thermal sensitivity of the cells. The order of increased thermal sensitivity was KCl > LiCl > NaCl for the monovalent salts and BaCl 2 > MgCl 2 > CaCl 2 for the divalent cation salts. The addition of glucose to LiCl or NaCl solutions did not reduce the thermal sensitization caused by these solutions. When cells were sensitized by LiCl or NaCl treatment, a change in pH from 7.2 to 6.6 did not further increase thermal sensitivity. These data show that nutrient and ionic factors and their interplay are involved in cellular thermal sensitivity

  4. Change in the sensitivity of CR-39 for alpha-tracks after the storage at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enomoto, Hiroko; Ishigure, Nobuhito

    2000-01-01

    The effect of storage on track registration property of CR-39 has been investigated. Pieces of CR-39 plate were irradiated with normally incident α-particles and fission fragments using a 252 Cf source prior and posterior to the storage of them in air for one year at different temperatures of -80degC, -23degC, 4degC, 23degC and 35degC. Periodical etching was performed for the pieces stored at different temperatures using the solution of NaOH with 7 mol+l -1 at 70degC for 4 hours. Bulk etch rate (V b ) was obtained from the etch pit diameter (D f ) of fission tracks using the equation: V b =D f /(2t), where t is etching time (h). The sensitivity for α-tracks (S) was obtained from the ratio of the etch pit diameters between α-tracks (D a ) and fission-tracks using the equation: S={1+(D a /D f ) 2 }/{1-(D a /D f ) 2 }-1. The present results show that both the bulk etch rate and α-track sensitivity are not constant, which tend to decrease with storage times and storage temperatures. At -80degC, -23degC and 4degC the change in the sensitivity was negligible. On the other hand, the storage at 23degC for 1 year decreased the sensitivity down to 74%. The most significant effect was observed on the α-track sensitivity at 35degC, which was reduced to 80% for one month, 61% for three months, 42% for six months and 32% for one year. By the comparison of experiments between fading and ageing it is shown that such storage effect is attributed not to fading of latent tracks but mainly to some changes in the detector itself. When CR-39 is used of radon monitoring or neutron monitoring, the following points should be paid attention to: (1) the detector should be stored in a refrigerator before exposure and until etching after the exposure, (2) the change in the sensitivity between the time of calibration and the time of use should be evaluated and the counting efficiency at the measurement should be corrected and (3) for comparison or for interpretation of experimental results

  5. Sensitivity of glaciation in the arid subtropical Andes to changes in temperature, precipitation, and solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargo, L. J.; Galewsky, J.; Rupper, S.; Ward, D. J.

    2018-04-01

    The subtropical Andes (18.5-27 °S) have been glaciated in the past, but are presently glacier-free. We use idealized model experiments to quantify glacier sensitivity to changes in climate in order to investigate the climatic drivers of past glaciations. We quantify the equilibrium line altitude (ELA) sensitivity (the change in ELA per change in climate) to temperature, precipitation, and shortwave radiation for three distinct climatic regions in the subtropical Andes. We find that in the western cordillera, where conditions are hyper-arid with the highest solar radiation on Earth, ELA sensitivity is as high as 34 m per % increase in precipitation, and 70 m per % decrease in shortwave radiation. This is compared with the eastern cordillera, where precipitation is the highest of the three regions, and ELA sensitivity is only 10 m per % increase in precipitation, and 25 m per % decrease in shortwave radiation. The high ELA sensitivity to shortwave radiation highlights the influence of radiation on mass balance of high elevation and low-latitude glaciers. We also consider these quantified ELA sensitivities in context of previously dated glacial deposits from the regions. Our results suggest that glaciation of the humid eastern cordillera was driven primarily by lower temperatures, while glaciations of the arid Altiplano and western cordillera were also influenced by increases in precipitation and decreases in shortwave radiation. Using paleoclimate records from the timing of glaciation, we find that glaciation of the hyper-arid western cordillera can be explained by precipitation increases of 90-160% (1.9-2.6× higher than modern), in conjunction with associated decreases in shortwave radiation of 7-12% and in temperature of 3.5 °C.

  6. Differences in SOM decomposition and temperature sensitivity among soil aggregate size classes in a temperate grasslands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Wang, Dan; Wen, Xuefa; Yu, Guirui; He, Nianpeng; Wang, Rongfu

    2015-01-01

    The principle of enzyme kinetics suggests that the temperature sensitivity (Q10) of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition is inversely related to organic carbon (C) quality, i.e., the C quality-temperature (CQT) hypothesis. We tested this hypothesis by performing laboratory incubation experiments with bulk soil, macroaggregates (MA, 250-2000 μm), microaggregates (MI, 53-250 μm), and mineral fractions (MF, temperature and aggregate size significantly affected on SOM decomposition, with notable interactive effects (Ptemperature in the following order: MA>MF>bulk soil >MI(P classes (P temperature is closely associated withsoil aggregation and highlights the complex responses of ecosystem C budgets to future warming scenarios.

  7. Solution of the neutron point kinetics equations with temperature feedback effects applying the polynomial approach method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumelero, Fernanda, E-mail: fernanda.tumelero@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica; Petersen, Claudio Z.; Goncalves, Glenio A.; Lazzari, Luana, E-mail: claudiopeteren@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: gleniogoncalves@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: luana-lazzari@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pelotas (DME/UFPEL), Capao do Leao, RS (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica e Matematica

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we present a solution of the Neutron Point Kinetics Equations with temperature feedback effects applying the Polynomial Approach Method. For the solution, we consider one and six groups of delayed neutrons precursors with temperature feedback effects and constant reactivity. The main idea is to expand the neutron density, delayed neutron precursors and temperature as a power series considering the reactivity as an arbitrary function of the time in a relatively short time interval around an ordinary point. In the first interval one applies the initial conditions of the problem and the analytical continuation is used to determine the solutions of the next intervals. With the application of the Polynomial Approximation Method it is possible to overcome the stiffness problem of the equations. In such a way, one varies the time step size of the Polynomial Approach Method and performs an analysis about the precision and computational time. Moreover, we compare the method with different types of approaches (linear, quadratic and cubic) of the power series. The answer of neutron density and temperature obtained by numerical simulations with linear approximation are compared with results in the literature. (author)

  8. Solution of the neutron point kinetics equations with temperature feedback effects applying the polynomial approach method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumelero, Fernanda; Petersen, Claudio Z.; Goncalves, Glenio A.; Lazzari, Luana

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we present a solution of the Neutron Point Kinetics Equations with temperature feedback effects applying the Polynomial Approach Method. For the solution, we consider one and six groups of delayed neutrons precursors with temperature feedback effects and constant reactivity. The main idea is to expand the neutron density, delayed neutron precursors and temperature as a power series considering the reactivity as an arbitrary function of the time in a relatively short time interval around an ordinary point. In the first interval one applies the initial conditions of the problem and the analytical continuation is used to determine the solutions of the next intervals. With the application of the Polynomial Approximation Method it is possible to overcome the stiffness problem of the equations. In such a way, one varies the time step size of the Polynomial Approach Method and performs an analysis about the precision and computational time. Moreover, we compare the method with different types of approaches (linear, quadratic and cubic) of the power series. The answer of neutron density and temperature obtained by numerical simulations with linear approximation are compared with results in the literature. (author)

  9. Effect of dope solution temperature on the membrane structure and membrane distillation performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawi, N. I. M.; Bilad, M. R.; Nordin, N. A. H. M.

    2018-04-01

    Membrane distillation (MD) is a non-isothermal process applicable to purify water using hydrophobic membrane. Membrane in MD is hydrophobic, permeable to water vapor but repels liquid water. MD membrane is expected to pose high flux, high fouling and scaling resistances and most importantly high wetting resistance. This study develops flat-sheet polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane by exploring both liquid-liquid and liquid-solid phase inversion technique largely to improve its wetting resistance and flux performance. We hypothesize that temperature of dope solution play roles in solid-liquid separation during membrane formation and an optimum balance between liquid-liquid and liquid-solid (crystallization) separation leads to highly performance PVDF membrane. Findings obtained from differential scanning calorimeter test show that increasing dope solution temperature reduces degree of PVDF crystallinity and suppresses formation of crystalline structure. The morphological images of the resulting membranes show that at elevated dope solution temperature (40, 60, 80 and 100°C), the spherulite-like structures are formed across the thickness of membranes ascribed from due to different type of crystals. The performance of direct-contact MD shows that the obtained flux of the optimum dope temperature (60°C) of 10.8 L/m2h is comparable to commercial PTFE-based MD membrane.

  10. The effect of nodalization and temperature of reactor upper region: Sensitivity analysis for APR-1400 LBLOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Dong Gu

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The nodalization of APR-1400 was modified to reflect the characteristic of upper region temperature. • The effect of nodalization and temperature of reactor upper region on LBLOCA consequence was evaluated. • The modification of nodalization is an essential prerequisite in APR-1400 LBLOCA analysis. - Abstract: In best estimate (BE) calculation, the definition of system nodalization is important step influencing the prediction accuracy for specific thermal-hydraulic phenomena. The upper region of reactor is defined as the region of the upper guide structure (UGS) and upper dome. It has been assumed that the temperature of upper region is close to average temperature in most large break loss of coolant accident (LBLOCA) analysis cases. However, it was recently found that the temperature of upper region of APR-1400 reactor might be little lower than or similar to hot leg temperature through the review of detailed design data. In this study, the nodalization of APR-1400 was modified to reflect the characteristic of upper region temperature, and the effect of nodalization and temperature of reactor upper region on LBLOCA consequence was evaluated by sensitivity analysis including best estimate plus uncertainty (BEPU) calculation. In basecase calculation, in case of modified version, the peak cladding temperature (PCT) in blowdown phase became higher and the blowdown quenching (or cooling) was significantly deteriorated as compared to original case, and as a result, the cladding temperature in reflood phase became higher and the final quenching was also delayed. In addition, thermal-hydraulic parameters were compared and analyzed to investigate the effect of change of upper region on cladding temperature. In BEPU analysis, the 95 percentile PCT used in current regulatory practice was increased due to the modification of upper region nodalization, and it occurred in the reflood phase unlike original case.

  11. Sea-ice cover in the Nordic Seas and the sensitivity to Atlantic water temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mari F.; Nisancioglu, Kerim H.; Spall, Michael A.

    2017-04-01

    Changes in the sea-ice cover of the Nordic Seas have been proposed to play a key role for the dramatic temperature excursions associated with the Dansgaard-Oeschger events during the last glacial. However, with its proximity to the warm Atlantic water, how a sea-ice cover can persist in the Nordic Seas is not well understood. In this study, we apply an eddy-resolving configuration of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model with an idealized topography to study the presence of sea ice in a Nordic Seas-like domain. We assume an infinite amount of warm Atlantic water present in the south by restoring the southern area to constant temperatures. The sea-surface temperatures are restored toward cold, atmospheric temperatures, and as a result, sea ice is present in the interior of the domain. However, the sea-ice cover in the margins of the Nordic Seas, an area with a warm, cyclonic boundary current, is sensitive to the amount of heat entering the domain, i.e., the restoring temperature in the south. When the temperature of the warm, cyclonic boundary current is high, the margins are free of sea ice and heat is released to the atmosphere. We show that with a small reduction in the temperature of the incoming Atlantic water, the Nordic Seas-like domain is fully covered in sea ice. Warm water is still entering the Nordic Seas, however, this happens at depths below a cold, fresh surface layer produced by melted sea ice. Consequently, the heat release to the atmosphere is reduced along with the eddy heat fluxes. Results suggest a threshold value in the amount of heat entering the Nordic Seas before the sea-ice cover disappears in the margins. We study the sensitivity of this threshold to changes in atmospheric temperatures and vertical diffusivity.

  12. High-temperature sensitivity and its acclimation for photosynthetic electron reactions of desert succulents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chetti, M.B.; Nobel, P.S. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (USA))

    1987-08-01

    Photosynthetic electron reactions of succulent plants from hot deserts are able to tolerate extremely high temperatures and to acclimate to seasonal increase in temperature. In this study, we report the influence of relatively long, in vivo, high-temperature treatments on electron transport reactions for two desert succulents, Agave deserti and Opuntia ficus-indica, species which can tolerate 60{degree}C. Whole chain electron transport averaged 3{degree}C more sensitive to a 1-hour high-temperature treatment than did PSII (Photosystem II) which in turn averaged 3{degree}C more sensitive than did PSI. For plants maintained at day/night air temperatures of 30{degree}C/20{degree}C, treatment at 50{degree}C cause these reactions to be inhibited an average of 39% during the first hour, an additional 31% during the next 4 hours, and 100% by 12 hours. Upon shifting the plants from 30{degree}C/20{degree}C to 45{degree}C/35{degree}C, the high temperatures where activity was inhibited 50% increased 3{degree}C to 8{degree}C for the three electron transport reactions, the half-times for acclimation averaging 5 days for A. deserti and 4 days for O. ficus-indica. For the 45{degree}C/35{degree}C plants treated at 60{degree}C for 1 hour, PSI activity was reduced by 54% for A. deserti and 36% for O. ficus-indica. Acclimation leads to a toleration of very high temperatures without substantial disruption of electron transport for these desert succulents, facilitating their survival in hot deserts. Indeed, the electron transport reactions of these species tolerate longer periods at higher temperatures than any other vascular plants so far reported.

  13. Soil warming increases metabolic quotients of soil microorganisms without changes in temperature sensitivity of soil respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marañón-Jiménez, Sara; Soong, Jenniffer L.; Leblans, Niki I. W.; Sigurdsson, Bjarni D.; Dauwe, Steven; Fransen, Erik; Janssens, Ivan A.

    2017-04-01

    Increasing temperatures can accelerate soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and release large amounts of CO2 to the atmosphere, potentially inducing climate change feedbacks. Alterations to the temperature sensitivity and metabolic pathways of soil microorganisms in response to soil warming can play a key role in these soil carbon (C) losses. Here, we present results of an incubation experiment using soils from a geothermal gradient in Iceland that have been subjected to different intensities of soil warming (+0, +1, +3, +5, +10 and +20 °C above ambient) over seven years. We hypothesized that 7 years of soil warming would led to a depletion of labile organic substrates, with a subsequent decrease of the "apparent" temperature sensitivity of soil respiration. Associated to this C limitation and more sub-optimal conditions for microbial growth, we also hypothesized increased microbial metabolic quotients (soil respiration per unit of microbial biomass), which is associated with increases in the relative amount of C invested into catabolic pathways along the warming gradient. Soil respiration and basal respiration rates decreased with soil warming intensity, in parallel with a decline in soil C availability. Contrasting to our first hypothesis, we did not detect changes in the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration with soil warming or on the availability of nutrients and of labile C substrates at the time of incubation. However, in agreement to our second hypothesis, microbial metabolic quotients (soil respiration per unit of microbial biomass) increased at warmer temperatures, while the C retained in biomass decreased as substrate became limiting. Long-term (7 years) temperature increases thus triggered a change in the metabolic functioning of the soil microbial communities towards increasing energy costs for maintenance or resource acquisition, thereby lowering the capacity of C retention and stabilization of warmed soils. These results highlight the need

  14. High temperature thermodynamics of solutions of oxygen in zirconium and hafnium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boureau, G.; Gerdanian, P.

    1984-01-01

    The Tian-Calvet microcalorimetric method has been applied to the determination at 1323 Kelvin of ΔH(O 2 ), the partial molar enthalpy of mixing of oxygen in zirconium and in hafnium. No measurable departure from Henry's law has been found for dilute solutions (ratio oxygen over metal smaller than 0.1). For concentrated solutions repulsive interactions are found in agreement with the existence of ordered structures at lower temperatures. The domain of homogeneity of zirconium has been found larger than previously assumed. (author)

  15. Evaluation of stress-corrosion cracking of sensitized 304SS in low-temperature borated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.H.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Bruemmer, S.M.

    1981-05-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking has been observed in constant extension rate tests, CERT and constant load tests of 304SS tested at 32 0 C in borated water plus 15 ppM C1 - . Evidence of IGSCC was obtained in CERT tests of welded pipe samples only when the original inner diameter surface was intact and with 15 ppM C1 - added to the borated water while IGSCC occurred in a furnace sensitized pipe sample after 500 h at a constant stress of 340 MPa in borated water containing 15 ppM C1 - . These results indicate that surface features associated with weld preparation grinding contributed to the susceptibility of sensitized 304SS to IGSCC in low temperature borated water; however, the constant load test indicates that such surface defects are not necessary for IGSCC in low temperature borated water

  16. Modeling programmable deformation of self-folding all-polymer structures with temperature-sensitive hydrogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Wei; Zhou, Jinxiong; Li, Meie

    2013-01-01

    Combination of soft active hydrogels with hard passive polymers gives rise to all-polymer composites. The hydrogel is sensitive to external stimuli while the passive polymer is inert. Utilizing the different behaviors of two materials subject to environmental variation, for example temperature, results in self-folding soft machines. We report our efforts to model the programmable deformation of self-folding structures with temperature-sensitive hydrogels. The self-folding structures are realized either by constructing a bilayer structure or by incorporating hydrogels as hinges. The methodology and the results may aid the design, control and fabrication of 3D complex structures from 2D simple configurations through self-assembly. (paper)

  17. Novel pH-sensitive photopolymer hydrogel and its holographic sensing response for solution characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongpeng; Yu, Dan; Zhou, Ke; Wang, Shichan; Luo, Suhua; Li, Li; Wang, Weibo; Song, Qinggong

    2018-05-01

    Optical sensor based on pH-sensitive hydrogel has important practical applications in medical diagnosis and bio-sensor areas. This report details the experimental and theoretical results from a novel photosensitive polymer hydrogel holographic sensor, which formed by thermal polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, for the detection of pH in buffer. Volume grating recorded in the polymer hydrogel was employed in response to the performance of solution. Methacrylic acid with carboxyl groups was selected as the primary co-monomer to functionalize the matrix. Peak diffraction spectrum of holographic grating determined as a primary sensing parameter was characterized to reflect the change in pH. The extracted linear relation between peak wavelength and pH value provided a probability for the practical application of holographic sensor. To explore the sensing mechanism deeply, a theoretical model was used to describe the relevant holographic processes, including grating formation, dark diffusional enhancement, and final fringe swelling. Numerical result further showed all of the dynamic processes and internal sensing physical mechanism. These experimental and numerical results provided a significant foundation for the development of novel holographic sensor based on polymer hydrogel and improvement of its practical applicability.

  18. Behaviour of aqueous sulfamethizole solution and temperature effects in cold plasma oxidation treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Alexander; Louhi-Kultanen, Marjatta

    2018-06-07

    The increase in volume and variety of pharmaceuticals found in natural water bodies has become an increasingly serious environmental problem. The implementation of cold plasma technology, specifically gas-phase pulsed corona discharge (PCD), for sulfamethizole abatement was studied in the present work. It was observed that sulfamethizole is easily oxidized by PCD. The flow rate and pH of the solution have no significant effect on the oxidation. Treatment at low pulse repetition frequency is preferable from the energy efficiency point of view but is more time-consuming. The maximum energy efficiency was around 120 g/kWh at half-life and around 50 g/kWh at the end of the treatment. Increasing the solution temperature from room temperature to 50 °C led to a significant reaction retardation of the process and decrease in energy efficiency. The pseudo-first order reaction rate constant (k 1 ) grows with increase in pulse repetition frequency and does not depend on pH. By contrast, decreasing frequency leads to a reduction of the second order reaction rate constant (k 2 ). At elevated temperature of 50 °C, the k 1 , k 2 values decrease 2 and 2.9 times at 50 pps and 500 pps respectively. Lower temperature of 10 °C had no effect on oxidation efficiency compared with room temperature.

  19. Temperature and concentration calibration of aqueous polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP solutions for isotropic diffusion MRI phantoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrich Wagner

    Full Text Available To use the "apparent diffusion coefficient" (Dapp as a quantitative imaging parameter, well-suited test fluids are essential. In this study, the previously proposed aqueous solutions of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP were examined and temperature calibrations were obtained. For example, at a temperature of 20°C, Dapp ranged from 1.594 (95% CI: 1.593, 1.595 μm2/ms to 0.3326 (95% CI: 0. 3304, 0.3348 μm2/ms for PVP-concentrations ranging from 10% (w/w to 50% (w/w using K30 polymer lengths. The temperature dependence of Dapp was found to be so strong that a negligence seems not advisable. The temperature dependence is descriptively modelled by an exponential function exp(c2 (T - 20°C and the determined c2 values are reported, which can be used for temperature calibration. For example, we find the value 0.02952 K-1 for 30% (w/w PVP-concentration and K30 polymer length. In general, aqueous PVP solutions were found to be suitable to produce easily applicable and reliable Dapp-phantoms.

  20. Temperature modulates coccolithophorid sensitivity of growth, photosynthesis and calcification to increasing seawater pCO₂.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scarlett Sett

    Full Text Available Increasing atmospheric CO₂ concentrations are expected to impact pelagic ecosystem functioning in the near future by driving ocean warming and acidification. While numerous studies have investigated impacts of rising temperature and seawater acidification on planktonic organisms separately, little is presently known on their combined effects. To test for possible synergistic effects we exposed two coccolithophore species, Emiliania huxleyi and Gephyrocapsa oceanica, to a CO₂ gradient ranging from ∼0.5-250 µmol kg⁻¹ (i.e. ∼20-6000 µatm pCO₂ at three different temperatures (i.e. 10, 15, 20°C for E. huxleyi and 15, 20, 25°C for G. oceanica. Both species showed CO₂-dependent optimum-curve responses for growth, photosynthesis and calcification rates at all temperatures. Increased temperature generally enhanced growth and production rates and modified sensitivities of metabolic processes to increasing CO₂. CO₂ optimum concentrations for growth, calcification, and organic carbon fixation rates were only marginally influenced from low to intermediate temperatures. However, there was a clear optimum shift towards higher CO₂ concentrations from intermediate to high temperatures in both species. Our results demonstrate that the CO₂ concentration where optimum growth, calcification and carbon fixation rates occur is modulated by temperature. Thus, the response of a coccolithophore strain to ocean acidification at a given temperature can be negative, neutral or positive depending on that strain's temperature optimum. This emphasizes that the cellular responses of coccolithophores to ocean acidification can only be judged accurately when interpreted in the proper eco-physiological context of a given strain or species. Addressing the synergistic effects of changing carbonate chemistry and temperature is an essential step when assessing the success of coccolithophores in the future ocean.

  1. Transposition of Tn5096 from a temperature-sensitive transducible plasmid in Streptomyces spp.

    OpenAIRE

    McHenney, M A; Baltz, R H

    1991-01-01

    Transposon Tn5096 was inserted into a derivative of the temperature-sensitive plasmid pMT660 containing the bacteriophage FP43 pac site. The resulting plasmid, pRHB126, was transduced by FP43 into several Streptomyces species. Tn5096 transposed from pRHB126 into different sites in the genomes of Streptomyces ambofaciens, Streptomyces cinnamonensis, Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2), Streptomyces fradiae, Streptomyces griseofuscus, and Streptomyces thermotolerans.

  2. Shrub encroachment alters sensitivity of soil respiration to temperature and moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable, Jessica M.; Barron-Gafford, Greg A.; Ogle, Kiona; Pavao-Zuckerman, Mitchell; Scott, Russell L.; Williams, David G.; Huxman, Travis E.

    2012-03-01

    A greater abundance of shrubs in semiarid grasslands affects the spatial patterns of soil temperature, moisture, and litter, resulting in fertile islands with potentially enhanced soil metabolic activity. The goal of this study was to quantify the microsite specificity of soil respiration in a semiarid riparian ecosystem experiencing shrub encroachment. We quantified the response of soil respiration to different microsite conditions created by big mesquite shrubs (near the trunk and the canopy edge), medium-sized mesquite, sacaton bunchgrasses, and open spaces. We hypothesized that soil respiration would be more temperature sensitive and less moisture sensitive and have a greater magnitude in shrub microsites compared with grass and open microsites. Field and incubation soil respiration data were simultaneously analyzed in a Bayesian framework to quantify the microsite-specific temperature and moisture sensitivities and magnitude of respiration. The analysis showed that shrub expansion increases the heterogeneity of respiration. Respiration has greater temperature sensitivity near the shrub canopy edge, and respiration rates are higher overall under big mesquite compared with those of the other microsites. Respiration in the microsites beneath medium-sized mesquites does not behave like a downscaled version of big mesquite microsites. The grass microsites show more similarity to big mesquite microsites than medium-sized shrubs. This study shows there can be a great deal of fine-scale spatial heterogeneity that accompanies shifts in vegetation structure. Such complexity presents a challenge in scaling soil respiration fluxes to the landscape for systems experiencing shrub encroachment, but quantifying this complexity is significantly important in determining overall ecosystem metabolic behavior.

  3. Refractive index and temperature sensitivity characteristics of a micro-slot fiber Bragg grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffari, Pouneh; Yan, Zhijun; Zhou, Kaiming; Zhang, Lin

    2012-07-10

    Fabrication and characterization of a UV inscribed fiber Bragg grating (FBG) with a micro-slot liquid core is presented. Femtosecond (fs) laser patterning/chemical etching technique was employed to engrave a micro-slot with dimensions of 5.74 μm(h)×125 μm(w)×1388.72 μm(l) across the whole grating. The device has been evaluated for refractive index (RI) and temperature sensitivities and exhibited distinctive thermal response and RI sensitivity beyond the detection limit of reported fiber gratings. This structure has not just been RI sensitive, but also maintained the robustness comparing with the bare core FBGs and long-period gratings with the partial cladding etched off.

  4. Solution of Point Reactor Neutron Kinetics Equations with Temperature Feedback by Singularly Perturbed Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzhen Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The singularly perturbed method (SPM is proposed to obtain the analytical solution for the delayed supercritical process of nuclear reactor with temperature feedback and small step reactivity inserted. The relation between the reactivity and time is derived. Also, the neutron density (or power and the average density of delayed neutron precursors as the function of reactivity are presented. The variations of neutron density (or power and temperature with time are calculated and plotted and compared with those by accurate solution and other analytical methods. It is shown that the results by the SPM are valid and accurate in the large range and the SPM is simpler than those in the previous literature.

  5. Solution-Mediated Annealing of Polymer Optical Fiber Bragg Gratings at Room Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fasano, Andrea; Woyessa, Getinet; Janting, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    In this letter, we investigate the response of poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) microstructured polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings (POFBGs) after immersion inmethanol/water solutions at room temperature. As the glass transition temperature of solution-equilibrated PMMA differs from the one...... of solvent-free PMMA, different concentrations of methanol and water lead to various degrees of frozen-in stress relaxation in the fiber. After solvent evaporation, we observe a permanent blue-shift in the grating resonance wavelength. The main contribution in the resonance wavelength shift arises from...... a permanent change in the size of the fiber. The results are compared with conventional annealing. The proposed methodology is cost-effective as it does not require a climate chamber. Furthermore, it enables an easy-to-control tuning of the resonance wavelength of POFBGs....

  6. Effect of Mn Content and Solution Annealing Temperature on the Corrosion Resistance of Stainless Steel Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihsan-ul-Haq Toor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of two specially designed austenitic stainless steels (SSs having different Nickel (Ni and Manganese (Mn contents was investigated. Prior to electrochemical tests, SS alloys were solution-annealed at two different temperatures, that is, at 1030°C for 2 h and 1050°C for 0.5 h. Potentiodynamic polarization (PD tests were carried out in chloride and acidic chloride, whereas linear polarization resistance (LPR and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS was performed in 0.5 M NaCl solution at room temperature. SEM/EDS investigations were carried out to study the microstructure and types of inclusions present in these alloys. Experimental results suggested that the alloy with highest Ni content and annealed at 1050°C/0.5 hr has the highest corrosion resistance.

  7. Polarization-sensitive and broadband germanium sulfide photodetectors with excellent high-temperature performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Dezhi; Zhang, Wenjin; Wang, Xiaofan; Koirala, Sandhaya; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2017-08-31

    Layered materials, such as graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorene, have been established rapidly as intriguing building blocks for optoelectronic devices. Here, we introduce highly polarization sensitive, broadband, and high-temperature-operation photodetectors based on multilayer germanium sulfide (GeS). The GeS photodetector shows a high photoresponsivity of about 6.8 × 10 3 A W -1 , an extremely high specific detectivity of 5.6 × 10 14 Jones, and broad spectral response in the wavelength range of 300-800 nm. More importantly, the GeS photodetector has high polarization sensitivity to incident linearly polarized light, which provides another degree of freedom for photodetectors. Tremendously enhanced photoresponsivity is observed with a temperature increase, and high responsivity is achievable at least up to 423 K. The establishment of larger photoinduced reduction of the Schottky barrier height will be significant for the investigation of the photoresponse mechanism of 2D layered material-based photodetectors. These attributes of high photocurrent generation in a wide temperature range, broad spectral response, and polarization sensitivity coupled with environmental stability indicate that the proposed GeS photodetector is very suitable for optoelectronic applications.

  8. Temperature-sensitive host range mutants of herpes simplex virus type 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koment, R.W.; Rapp, F.

    1975-01-01

    Herpesviruses are capable of several types of infection of a host cell. To investigate the early events which ultimately determine the nature of the virus-host cell interaction, a system was established utilizing temperature-sensitive mutants of herpes simplex virus type 2. Four mutants have been isolated which fail to induce cytopathic effects and do not replicate at 39 C in hamster embryo fibroblast cells. At least one mutant is virus DNA negative. Since intracellular complementation is detectable between pairs of mutants, a virus function is known to be temperature sensitive. However, all four mutants induce cytopathic effects and replicate to parental virus levels in rabbit kidney cells at 39 C. This suggests that a host cell function, lacking or nonfunctional in HEF cells but present in rabbit kidney cells at 39 C, is required for the replication of these mutants in hamster embryo fibroblast cells at 39 C. Therefore, we conclude that these mutants are both temperature sensitive and exhibit host range properties

  9. Martensitic transformation behaviour in sensitized SUS304 austenitic stainless steel during isothermal holding at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae-hwa; Fukuda, Takashi; Kakeshita, Tomoyuki

    2009-01-01

    We investigated martensitic transformation behaviour in sensitized SUS304 austenitic stainless steel to determine the stability of the austenitic phase at low temperatures. We found that a specimen that was sensitized at 973 K for 100 h exhibits an isothermal martensitic transformation when the specimen is held in the temperature range between 60 and 260 K. We constructed a time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagram corresponding to the formation of 0.5 vol. % α'-martensite. A magnetization measurement was used to evaluate the volume fraction of a'-martensite. The TTT diagram shows a double-C curve with two noses located at about 100 and 200 K. In-situ optical microscope observations reveal that the double C-curve is due to two different transformation sequences. That is, the upper part of the C-curve is due to a direct γ → α' martensitic transformation and the lower part of the C-curve is due to a successive γ → ψ → α' martensitic transformation. The direct γ → α' transformation occurs in the vicinity of grain boundaries while the successive γ → ψ' → α' transformation occurs near the centre of grains. A scanning electron microscope observation reveals that carbide particles of M 23 C 6 are formed in the grain boundaries. The concentration difference between the centre of the grains and regions near grain boundaries is the reason for the difference in the isothermal transformation sequence for the sensitized SUS304 stainless steel.

  10. On-line monitoring of resistance of aqueous solutions at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Shilin; Zhang Pingzhu; Shang Weiguo

    1999-01-01

    The coulostatic measurement is a fast speed electrochemical test method. By this technology, analyzing Δ E(t)- T curves recorded under coulostatic perturbation, the solution resistance R l , resistance of coated film R f , capacity of coated film C f , Polarization resistance R p and double layer capacity C d are obtained. The resistance variety of 0.05N KCl is measured from room temperature up to 255 deg. C under saturation steam pressure. (author)

  11. LOW TEMPERATURE PROCESS FOR THE REMOVAL AND RECOVERY OF CHLORIDES AND NITRATES FROM AQUEOUS NITRATE SOLUTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savolainen, J.E.

    1963-01-29

    A method is described for reducing the chloride content of a solution derived from the dissolution of a stainless steel clad nuclear fuel element with an aqua regia dissolution medium. The solutlon is adjusted to a nitric acid concentration in the range 5 to 10 M and is countercurrently contacted at room temperature with a gaseous oxide of nitrogen selected from NO, NO/sub 2/, N/sub 2/ O/sub 3/, and N/sub 2/O/sub 4/. Chlo ride is recovered from the contacted solution as nitrosyl chloride. After reduction of the chloride content, the solution is then contacted with gaseous NO to reduce the nitric acid molarity to a desired level. (AEC)

  12. Development of Temperature Control Solutions for Non-Instrumented Nucleic Acid Amplification Tests (NINAAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Pardy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-instrumented nucleic acid amplification tests (NINAAT are a novel paradigm in portable molecular diagnostics. They offer the high detection accuracy characteristic of nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT in a self-contained device, without the need for any external instrumentation. These Point-of-Care tests typically employ a Lab-on-a-Chip for liquid handling functionality, and perform isothermal nucleic acid amplification protocols that require low power but high accuracy temperature control in a single well-defined temperature range. We propose temperature control solutions based on commercially available heating elements capable of meeting these challenges, as well as demonstrate the process by which such elements can be fitted to a NINAAT system. Self-regulated and thermostat-controlled resistive heating elements were evaluated through experimental characterization as well as thermal analysis using the finite element method (FEM. We demonstrate that the proposed solutions can support various NAAT protocols, as well as demonstrate an optimal solution for the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP protocol. Furthermore, we present an Arduino-compatible open-source thermostat developed for NINAAT applications.

  13. Low-Temperature Solution-Processed Gate Dielectrics for High-Performance Organic Thin Film Transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaekyun Kim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A low-temperature solution-processed high-k gate dielectric layer for use in a high-performance solution-processed semiconducting polymer organic thin-film transistor (OTFT was demonstrated. Photochemical activation of sol-gel-derived AlOx films under 150 °C permitted the formation of a dense film with low leakage and relatively high dielectric-permittivity characteristics, which are almost comparable to the results yielded by the conventionally used vacuum deposition and high temperature annealing method. Octadecylphosphonic acid (ODPA self-assembled monolayer (SAM treatment of the AlOx was employed in order to realize high-performance (>0.4 cm2/Vs saturation mobility and low-operation-voltage (<5 V diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP-based OTFTs on an ultra-thin polyimide film (3-μm thick. Thus, low-temperature photochemically-annealed solution-processed AlOx film with SAM layer is an attractive candidate as a dielectric-layer for use in high-performance organic TFTs operated at low voltages.

  14. Chemistry in high temperature aqueous solutions application to the power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, P.

    1990-01-01

    The power industry utilizes water (aqueous solutions) for two main functions: as a medium for heat transfer and transport and as a thermodynamic working fluid. These functions are performed in systems fabricated from a wide variety of materials, over a wide range of thermal and hydraulic conditions, and at medium temperatures and densities which determine the significant chemical properties. The major chemical interest is in the concentrated solutions derived from the dilute working fluid at selected sites defined by the physical arrangement and temperature and in their consequential effects on heat transfer and corrosion. Examples of these sites for typical fossil fired and nuclear steam generating equipment are described, as well as the extent and limit of the concentration process. The history of steam power plant water chemistry is discussed from the point of view of the chemical processes involved. The period covered is from the 1920s to the present state of the art, which is a major application of the subject of this symposium--chemistry in high temperature aqueous solution

  15. Can slow-diffusing solute atoms reduce vacancy diffusion in advanced high-temperature alloys?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goswami, Kamal Nayan; Mottura, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The high-temperature mechanical properties of precipitate-strengthened advanced alloys can be heavily influenced by adjusting chemical composition. The widely-accepted argument within the community is that, under certain temperature and loading conditions, plasticity occurs only in the matrix, and dislocations have to rely on thermally-activated climb mechanisms to overcome the barriers to glide posed by the hard precipitates. This is the case for γ′-strengthened Ni-based superalloys. The presence of dilute amounts of slow-diffusing solute atoms, such as Re and W, in the softer matrix phase is thought to reduce plasticity by retarding the climb of dislocations at the interface with the hard precipitate phase. One hypothesis is that the presence of these solutes must hinder the flow of vacancies, which are essential to the climb process. In this work, density functional theory calculations are used to inform two analytical models to describe the effect of solute atoms on the diffusion of vacancies. Results suggest that slow-diffusing solute atoms are not effective at reducing the diffusion of vacancies in these systems

  16. Sensitivities of dry season runoff to precipitation and temperature in southern Sierra Nevada streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safeeq, M.; Hunsaker, C. T.; Bales, R. C.

    2016-12-01

    In a mediterranean climate, dry season runoff sustains water supply and supports aquatic habitat and other ecosystems. Precipitation and temperature directly, by regulating recharge and evapotranspiration (ET), and indirectly, by regulating amount and timing of snowmelt, control the dry season runoff in the Sierra Nevada. Here, we explored relative impacts of precipitation and temperature variability on dry season runoff using path analysis. Specific objectives include: (i) to quantify the direct and indirect impacts of precipitation and temperature on 7-day average minimum flow (Qmin) and (ii) to explore the role of preceding year Qmin on fall season runoff (QF). We used daily runoff, air temperature, precipitation, and snow water equivalent (SWE) over 2004-2015 for the ten catchments in the Kings River Experimental Watersheds. For path analysis model of Qmin, we defined annual precipitation and temperature as exogenous variables and peak SWE, day of snow disappearance, and Qmin as endogenous variables. For QF, we defined current year fall precipitation and preceding year Qmin as exogenous variables and current year QF as an endogenous variable. Path analysis results for Qmin show precipitation as a dominant driver when compared to temperature, peak SWE, and day of snow disappearance. However, in half of the catchments that are mostly located at higher elevations the impact of temperature on Qmin was either comparable or exceeded that of precipitation. This relatively high sensitivity of Qmin to air temperature in high elevation catchments is consistent with the earlier findings of increased ET in proportion to warming. The direct effects of peak SWE and day of snow disappearance on Qmin were limited, and indirect effects of temperature and precipitation via peak SWE and day of snow disappearance were not significant. The preceding year Qmin and fall precipitation showed comparable impacts on QF, indicating that the storage in the preceding year modulates current

  17. Identification of ribonucleotide reductase mutation causing temperature-sensitivity of herpes simplex virus isolates from whitlow by deep sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daikoku, Tohru; Oyama, Yukari; Yajima, Misako; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Kuroda, Makoto; Shimada, Yuka; Takehara, Kazuhiko; Miwa, Naoko; Okuda, Tomoko; Sata, Tetsutaro; Shiraki, Kimiyasu

    2015-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus 2 caused a genital ulcer, and a secondary herpetic whitlow appeared during acyclovir therapy. The secondary and recurrent whitlow isolates were acyclovir-resistant and temperature-sensitive in contrast to a genital isolate. We identified the ribonucleotide reductase mutation responsible for temperature-sensitivity by deep-sequencing analysis.

  18. Effect of growth temperature on lipid composition and ultraviolet sensitivity of human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAleer, M.A.; Moore, S.P.; Moss, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    Human skin fibroblasts were incubated at either 25 or 37 0 C before UV irradiation. Cells incubated at 25 0 C were more resistant to near UV radiation than cells grown at 37 0 C, but cells grown at the lower temperature were more sensitive to 254 nm radiation. Fatty acid analysis of membranes of cells showed that cells incubated at the lower temperature contained significantly higher amounts of linoleic acid (18:2) and linolenic acid (18:3) than cells incubated at 37 0 C. To determine if this difference in fatty acid content of the membranes was responsible for the UV survival characteristics of cells incubated at different temperatures, cells were enriched with either linoleate or linolenate during a 37 0 C incubation period. Gas chromatography revealed that cells incorporated the supplied fatty acid. Fatty acid enriched cells were then irradiated with near UV, and survival characteristics were compared to those obtained with cells grown at the lower incubation temperature. The results suggest that the different proportion of fatty acid content of the cells is not the cause of different UV sensitivities of cells grown at 25 0 C compared to cells grown at 37 0 C. (author)

  19. Development of High Temperature/High Sensitivity Novel Chemical Resistive Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Chunrui [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Enriquez, Erik [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Wang, Haibing [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Xu, Xing [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Bao, Shangyong [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Collins, Gregory [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2013-08-13

    The research has been focused to design, fabricate, and develop high temperature/high sensitivity novel multifunctional chemical sensors for the selective detection of fossil energy gases used in power and fuel systems. By systematically studying the physical properties of the LnBaCo2O5+d (LBCO) [Ln=Pr or La] thin-films, a new concept chemical sensor based high temperature chemical resistant change has been developed for the application for the next generation highly efficient and near zero emission power generation technologies. We also discovered that the superfast chemical dynamic behavior and an ultrafast surface exchange kinetics in the highly epitaxial LBCO thin films. Furthermore, our research indicates that hydrogen can superfast diffuse in the ordered oxygen vacancy structures in the highly epitaxial LBCO thin films, which suggest that the LBCO thin film not only can be an excellent candidate for the fabrication of high temperature ultra sensitive chemical sensors and control systems for power and fuel monitoring systems, but also can be an excellent candidate for the low temperature solid oxide fuel cell anode and cathode materials.

  20. Increase of ozone concentrations, its temperature sensitivity and the precursor factor in South China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. C. Lee

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Concerns have been raised about the possible connections between the local and regional photochemical problem and global warming. The current study assesses the trend of ozone in Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta (PRD in South China and investigates the interannual changes of sensitivity of ozone to air temperature, as well as the trends in regional precursors. Results reveal, at the three monitoring sites from the mid-1990s to 2010, an increase in the mean ozone concentrations from 1.0 to 1.6 µg m−3 per year. The increase occurred in all seasons, with the highest rate in autumn. This is consistent with trends and temperature anomalies in the region. The increase in the sensitivity of ozone to temperature is clearly evident from the correlation between ozone (OMI [Ozone Monitoring Instrument] column amount and surface air temperature (from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder displayed in the correlation maps for the PRD during the prominently high ozone period of July–September. It is observed to have increased from 2005 to 2010, the latter being the hottest year on record globally. To verify this temporal change in sensitivity, the ground-level trends of correlation coefficients/regression slopes are analysed. As expected, results reveal a statistically significant upward trend over a 14-year period (1997–2010. While the correlation revealed in the correlation maps is in agreement with the corresponding OMI ozone maps when juxtaposed, temperature sensitivity of surface ozone also shows an association with ozone concentration, with R=0.5. These characteristics of ozone sensitivity are believed to have adverse implications for the region. As shown by ground measurements and/or satellite analyses, the decrease in nitrogen oxides (NO2 and NOx in Hong Kong is not statistically significant while NO2 of the PRD has only very slightly changed. However, carbon dioxide has remarkably declined in the whole region. While these observations concerning

  1. Uncertainty of Wheat Water Use: Simulated Patterns and Sensitivity to Temperature and CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammarano, Davide; Roetter, Reimund P.; Asseng, Senthold; Ewert, Frank; Wallach, Daniel; Martre, Pierre; Hatfield, Jerry L.; Jones, James W.; Rosenzweig, Cynthia E.; Ruane, Alex C.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Projected global warming and population growth will reduce future water availability for agriculture. Thus, it is essential to increase the efficiency in using water to ensure crop productivity. Quantifying crop water use (WU; i.e. actual evapotranspiration) is a critical step towards this goal. Here, sixteen wheat simulation models were used to quantify sources of model uncertainty and to estimate the relative changes and variability between models for simulated WU, water use efficiency (WUE, WU per unit of grain dry mass produced), transpiration efficiency (Teff, transpiration per kg of unit of grain yield dry mass produced), grain yield, crop transpiration and soil evaporation at increased temperatures and elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations ([CO2]). The greatest uncertainty in simulating water use, potential evapotranspiration, crop transpiration and soil evaporation was due to differences in how crop transpiration was modelled and accounted for 50 of the total variability among models. The simulation results for the sensitivity to temperature indicated that crop WU will decline with increasing temperature due to reduced growing seasons. The uncertainties in simulated crop WU, and in particularly due to uncertainties in simulating crop transpiration, were greater under conditions of increased temperatures and with high temperatures in combination with elevated atmospheric [CO2] concentrations. Hence the simulation of crop WU, and in particularly crop transpiration under higher temperature, needs to be improved and evaluated with field measurements before models can be used to simulate climate change impacts on future crop water demand.

  2. Temperature dependence of energy-transducing functions and inhibitor sensitivity in chloroplasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuurmans, J.J.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Francke, J.A.; Torres-Pereira, J.M.G.; Kraayenhof, R.

    1984-01-01

    A comparative analysis of the temperature dependence of energy-transducing reactions in spinach (Spinacia oleracea) chloroplasts and their sensitivity for uncouplers and energy-transfer inhibitors at different temperatures is presented. Arrhenius plots reveal two groups of transitions, around 19/sup 0/C and around 12/sup 0/C. Activities that show transitions around 19/sup 0/C include linear electron flow from water to ferricyanide, its coupled photophosphorylation, the dark-release of the fluorescent probe atebrin, and the slow component of the 515 nm (carotenoid) absorbance decay after a flash. The transitions around 12/sup 0/C are observed with pyocyanine-mediated cyclic photophosphorylation, light- and dithioerythritol-activated ATP hydrolysis, the dark-release of protons, and the fast 515 nm decay component. It is suggested that both groups of temperature transitions are determined by proton displacements in different domains of the exposed thylakoid membranes. The effects of various uncouplers and an energy-transfer inhibitor are temperature dependent. Some uncouplers also show a different relative inhibition of proton uptake and ATP synthesis at lower temperatures. The efficiency of energy transduction (ATP/e/sub 3/) varied with temperature and was optimal around 10/sup 0/C.

  3. Sensitivity Studies of Advanced Reactors Coupled to High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) Hydrogen Production Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwin A. Harvego; Michael G. McKellar; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring

    2007-01-01

    High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE), when coupled to an advanced nuclear reactor capable of operating at reactor outlet temperatures of 800 C to 950 C, has the potential to efficiently produce the large quantities of hydrogen needed to meet future energy and transportation needs. To evaluate the potential benefits of nuclear-driven hydrogen production, the UniSim process analysis software was used to evaluate different reactor concepts coupled to a reference HTE process design concept. The reference HTE concept included an Intermediate Heat Exchanger and intermediate helium loop to separate the reactor primary system from the HTE process loops and additional heat exchangers to transfer reactor heat from the intermediate loop to the HTE process loops. The two process loops consisted of the water/steam loop feeding the cathode side of a HTE electrolysis stack, and the steam or air sweep loop used to remove oxygen from the anode side. The UniSim model of the process loops included pumps to circulate the working fluids and heat exchangers to recover heat from the oxygen and hydrogen product streams to improve the overall hydrogen production efficiencies. The reference HTE process loop model was coupled to separate UniSim models developed for three different advanced reactor concepts (a high-temperature helium cooled reactor concept and two different supercritical CO2 reactor concepts). Sensitivity studies were then performed to evaluate the affect of reactor outlet temperature on the power cycle efficiency and overall hydrogen production efficiency for each of the reactor power cycles. The results of these sensitivity studies showed that overall power cycle and hydrogen production efficiencies increased with reactor outlet temperature, but the power cycle producing the highest efficiencies varied depending on the temperature range considered

  4. Optical temperature sensor with enhanced sensitivity by employing hybrid waveguides in a silicon Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guan, Xiaowei; Wang, Xiaoyan; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    2016-01-01

    We report on a novel design of an on-chip optical temperature sensor based on a Mach-Zehnder interferometer configuration where the two arms consist of hybrid waveguides providing opposite temperature-dependent phase changes to enhance the temperature sensitivity of the sensor. The sensitivity...... of the fabricated sensor with silicon/polymer hybrid waveguides is measured to be 172 pm/°C, which is two times larger than a conventional all-silicon optical temperature sensor (∼80 pm/°C). Moreover, a design with silicon/titanium dioxide hybrid waveguides is by calculation expected to have a sensitivity as high...

  5. Hydration, phase separation and nonlinear rheology of temperature-sensitive water-soluble polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Fumihiko; Koga, Tsuyoshi [Department of Polymer Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Kaneda, Isamu [Department of Food Science, Rakuno Gakuen University, Ebetsu, Hokkaido 069-8501 (Japan); Winnik, Francoise M, E-mail: ftanaka@phys.polym.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry and Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Montreal, Montreal, H3C 3J7 (Canada)

    2011-07-20

    The collapse of a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) chain upon heating and the phase diagrams of aqueous PNIPAM solutions with a very flat lower critical solution temperature (LCST) phase separation line are theoretically studied on the basis of cooperative dehydration (simultaneous dissociation of bound water molecules in a group of correlated sequence), and compared with the experimental observation of temperature-induced coil-globule transition by light scattering methods. The transition becomes sharper with the cooperativity parameter {sigma} of hydration. The reentrant coil-globule-coil transition and cononsolvency in a mixed solvent of water and methanol are also studied from the viewpoint of competitive hydrogen bonds between polymer-water and polymer-methanol. The downward shift of the cloud-point curves (LCST cononsolvency) with the mol fraction of methanol due to the competition is calculated and compared with the experimental data. Aqueous solutions of hydrophobically modified PNIPAM carrying short alkyl chains at both chain ends (telechelic PNIPAM) are theoretically and experimentally studied. The LCST of these solutions is found to shift downward along the sol-gel transition curve as a result of end-chain association (association-induced phase separation), and separate from the coil-globule transition line. Associated structures in the solution, such as flower micelles, mesoglobules, and higher fractal assembly, are studied by ultra small-angle neutron scattering with theoretical modeling of the scattering function. Dynamic-mechanical modulus, nonlinear stationary viscosity, and stress build-up in start-up shear flows of the associated networks are studied on the basis of the affine and non-affine transient network theory. The molecular conditions for thickening, strain hardening, and stress overshoot are found in terms of the nonlinear amplitude A of the chain tension and the tension-dissociation coupling constant g.

  6. Empirically Derived and Simulated Sensitivity of Vegetation to Climate Across Global Gradients of Temperature and Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quetin, G. R.; Swann, A. L. S.

    2017-12-01

    Successfully predicting the state of vegetation in a novel environment is dependent on our process level understanding of the ecosystem and its interactions with the environment. We derive a global empirical map of the sensitivity of vegetation to climate using the response of satellite-observed greenness and leaf area to interannual variations in temperature and precipitation. Our analysis provides observations of ecosystem functioning; the vegetation interactions with the physical environment, across a wide range of climates and provide a functional constraint for hypotheses engendered in process-based models. We infer mechanisms constraining ecosystem functioning by contrasting how the observed and simulated sensitivity of vegetation to climate varies across climate space. Our analysis yields empirical evidence for multiple physical and biological mediators of the sensitivity of vegetation to climate as a systematic change across climate space. Our comparison of remote sensing-based vegetation sensitivity with modeled estimates provides evidence for which physiological mechanisms - photosynthetic efficiency, respiration, water supply, atmospheric water demand, and sunlight availability - dominate the ecosystem functioning in places with different climates. Earth system models are generally successful in reproducing the broad sign and shape of ecosystem functioning across climate space. However, this general agreement breaks down in hot wet climates where models simulate less leaf area during a warmer year, while observations show a mixed response but overall more leaf area during warmer years. In addition, simulated ecosystem interaction with temperature is generally larger and changes more rapidly across a gradient of temperature than is observed. We hypothesize that the amplified interaction and change are both due to a lack of adaptation and acclimation in simulations. This discrepancy with observations suggests that simulated responses of vegetation to

  7. Temperature dependent absorption spectra of Br(-), Br2(•-), and Br3(-) in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mingzhang; Archirel, Pierre; Van-Oanh, Nguyen Thi; Muroya, Yusa; Fu, Haiying; Yan, Yu; Nagaishi, Ryuji; Kumagai, Yuta; Katsumura, Yosuke; Mostafavi, Mehran

    2011-05-05

    The absorption spectra of Br(2)(•-) and Br(3)(-) in aqueous solutions are investigated by pulse radiolysis techniques from room temperature to 380 and 350 °C, respectively. Br(2)(•-) can be observed even in supercritical conditions, showing that this species could be used as a probe in pulse radiolysis at high temperature and even under supercritical conditions. The weak temperature effect on the absorption spectra of Br(2)(•-) and Br(3)(-) is because, in these two systems, the transition occurs between two valence states; for example, for Br(2)(-) we have (2)Σ(u) → (2)Σ(g) transition. These valence transitions involve no diffuse final state. However, the absorption band of Br(-) undergoes an important red shift to longer wavelengths. We performed classical dynamics of hydrated Br(-) system at 20 and 300 °C under pressure of 25 MPa. The radial distribution functions (rdf's) show that the strong temperature increase (from 20 to 300 °C) does not change the radius of the solvent first shell. On the other hand, it shifts dramatically (by 1 Å) the second maximum of the Br-O rdf and introduces much disorder. This shows that the first water shell is strongly bound to the anion whatever the temperature. The first two water shells form a cavity of a roughly spherical shape around the anion. By TDDFT method, we calculated the absorption spectra of hydrated Br(-) at two temperatures and we compared the results with the experimental data.

  8. Regional Variation in the Temperature Sensitivity of Soil Organic Matter Decomposition in China's Forests and Grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; He, N.; Zhu, J.; Yu, G.; Xu, L.; Niu, S.; Sun, X.; Wen, X.

    2017-12-01

    How to assess the temperature sensitivity (Q10) of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and its regional variation with high accuracy is one of the largest uncertainties in determining the intensity and direction of the global carbon (C) cycle in response to climate change. In this study, we collected a series of soils from 22 forest sites and 30 grassland sites across China to explore regional variation in Q10 and its underlying mechanisms. We conducted a novel incubation experiment with periodically changing temperature (5-30 °C), while continuously measuring soil microbial respiration rates. The results showed that Q10 varied significantly across different ecosystems, ranging from 1.16 to 3.19 (mean 1.63). Q10 was ordered as follows: alpine grasslands (2.01) > temperate grasslands (1.81) > tropical forests (1.59) > temperate forests (1.55) > subtropical forests (1.52). The Q10 of grasslands (1.90) was significantly higher than that of forests (1.54). Furthermore, Q10 significantly increased with increasing altitude and decreased with increasing longitude. Environmental variables and substrate properties together explained 52% of total variation in Q10 across all sites. Overall, pH and soil electrical conductivity primarily explained spatial variation in Q10. The general negative relationships between Q10 and substrate quality among all ecosystem types supported the C quality temperature (CQT) hypothesis at a large scale, which indicated that soils with low quality should have higher temperature sensitivity. Furthermore, alpine grasslands, which had the highest Q10, were predicted to be more sensitive to climate change under the scenario of global warming.

  9. What is the Right Temperature Sensitivity for Foraminiferal Mg/ca Paleothermometry in Ancient Oceans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggins, S.; Holland, K.; Hoenisch, B.; Spero, H. J.; Allen, K. A.

    2013-12-01

    Mg/Ca seawater thermometry has become a cornerstone of modern paleoceanography. Laboratory experiments, seafloor core-top samples, plankton trap and tow collected materials all indicate consistent temperature sensitivity (9-10% increase in Mg/Ca per °C) for a full range of modern planktic foraminifer species. While these results demonstrate the overall robustness of Mg/Ca paleothermometry for the modern ocean, it is an empirical tool for which there is limited understanding of its bio-physio-chemical basis and its applicability to ancient oceans. We have undertaken experimental cultures of Orbulina universa, Globigerinoides sacculifer and Globigerinoides ruber (pink) across a range of seawater compositions (temperature, carbonate chemistry and Mg/Casw) that encompass modern and ancient Paleogene and Cretaceous ocean compositions (Mg/Casw 0.25x to 2x modern and pCO2 = 200 to 1500 ppmv). Our results reveal that the sensitivity of the Mg/Ca-thermometer for planktic foraminifers reduces significantly with Mg/Casw, rather than remaining constant as has been widely assumed or, increasing at lower Mg/Casw as proposed recently by Evans and Müller (2012). These results indicate that the modern sensitivity of 9-10% increase in Mg/Ca per °C cannot yet be applied to obtain reliable relative temperature change estimates to ancient oceans. These results further suggest that variations in foraminiferal Mg/Ca compositions in ancient oceans with lower Mg/Casw may correspond to larger temperature variations than in the modern ocean. Evans D. and Müller W., Paleoceanography, vol. 27, PA4205, doi:10.1029/2012PA002315, 2012

  10. Laminating solution-processed silver nanowire mesh electrodes onto solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Hardin, Brian E.; Gaynor, Whitney; Ding, I-Kang; Rim, Seung-Bum; Peumans, Peter; McGehee, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Solution processed silver nanowire meshes (Ag NWs) were laminated on top of solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (ss-DSCs) as a reflective counter electrode. Ag NWs were deposited in <1 min and were less reflective compared to evaporated Ag

  11. The influence of precipitation temperature on the properties of ceria–zirconia solid solution composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Yajuan; Fang, Ruimei; Shang, Hongyan; Shi, Zhonghua; Gong, Maochu; Chen, Yaoqiang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The crystallite size of precipitate increases as the precipitation temperature rises. • The stack of large crystallite can form nanoparticles with big pore size. • Big pore sizes are advantageous to improve the thermal stability. • Phase segregation is restricted in CZ solid solution precipitated at 70 °C. • The reducibility and OSC of the solid solution precipitated at 70 °C are improved. - Abstract: The ceria–zirconia composites (CZ) with a Ce/Zr mass ratio of 1/1 were synthesized by a back-titration method, in which the influence of precipitation temperature on the properties of ceria–zirconia precipitates was investigated. The resulting precipitation and mixed oxides at different precipitation temperatures were then characterized by a range of techniques, including textural properties, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), H 2 -temperature programmed reduction (H 2 -TPR) as well as oxygen storage capacity (OSC) measurement. The results revealed that ceria–zirconia composites were formed as solid solution and such structure is favored of thermostability and texture properties. In particular, the composite CZ-70 synthesized at 70 °C exhibited prominent thermostability with a surface area of 32 m 2 /g as well as a pore volume of 0.15 cc/g after aging treatment at 1000 °C for 5 h. And this was found to be associated with the wider pore size distribution which maybe owed to the formation of large crystal at the primary stage of precipitation. Additionally, the composite CZ-70 showed excellent reduction property and OSC benefiting from stable texture and structure

  12. Numerical simulation of temperature's sensitivity of chamfer hole's resistance on hydraulic step cylinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinhua, Wang; Hanliang, Bo; Wenxiang, Zheng; Jinnong, Yang

    2003-01-01

    The control rod drive is a very important device for controlling nuclear reactor startup, operation, shut down, and power change. The ability of the control rod drive to move safely and reliably directly relates to reactor safety. The Hydraulic Control Rod Drive System (HCRDS) is a new type of control rod drive system developed by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET) of Tsinghua University for Nuclear Heating Reactors. The HCRDS, designed using the hydrodynamic principle, has many advantages, including having the structure complete in the vessel, no possible ejection accident, short drive line, simple movable parts structure and safe shutdown during accidents. The hydraulic step cylinder is the key part for the HCRDS. In the process of reactor startup, the variation of temperature could make the water's density and viscosity change, and the force from the water flow would change accordingly. These factors could influence the performance of the hydraulic step cylinder. In this paper, the temperature sensitivity of the chamfer hole's resistance in the hydraulic step cylinder was studied with the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) program CFX5.5. The results were satisfactory: the discipline of variation of the chamfer hole's resistance with the outer tube's position was the same at different temperatures, the discrepancy of the chamfer hole's resistance was small for the same position at different temperatures, the chamfer hole's resistance decreased gradually with the increase of temperature, and the decrease extent was relatively small

  13. Temperature sensitivity study of eddy current and digital gauge probes for nuclear fuel rod oxide measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Faith R.; Lind, R. Paul; Smith, James A.

    2018-04-01

    Novel fuels are part of the nationwide effort to reduce the enrichment of Uranium for energy production. Performance of such fuels is determined by irradiating their surfaces. To test irradiated samples, the instrumentation must operate remotely. The plate checker used in this experiment at Idaho National Lab (INL) performs non-destructive testing on fuel rod and plate geometries with two different types of sensors: eddy current and digital thickness gauges. The sensors measure oxide growth and total sample thickness on research fuels, respectively. Sensor measurement accuracy is crucial because even 10 microns of error is significant when determining the viability of an experimental fuel. One parameter known to affect the eddy current and thickness gauge sensors is temperature. Since both sensor accuracies depend on the ambient temperature of the system, the plate checker has been characterized for these sensitivities. The manufacturer of the digital gauge probes has noted a rather large coefficient of thermal expansion for their linear scale. It should also be noted that the accuracy of the digital gauge probes are specified at 20°C, which is approximately 7°C cooler than the average hot-cell temperature. In this work, the effect of temperature on the eddy current and digital gauge probes is studied, and thickness measurements are given as empirical functions of temperature.

  14. Continuous cooling and low temperature sensitization of AISI types 316 SS and 304 SS with different degrees of cold work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parvathavarthini, N.; Dayal, R.K.; Gnanamoorthy, J.B. (Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Metallurgy and Materials Programme); Seshadri, S.K. (Indian Inst. of Tech., Madras (India). Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering)

    This paper presents the results of investigations carried out to study the sensitization behaviour of AISI Types 316 SS and 304 SS with various degrees of cold work ranging from 0 to 25%. Initially Time-Temperature-Sensitization (TTS) diagrams were established using ASTM standard A262 Practice A and E tests. From these diagrams it was found that the rate of sensitization and overall susceptibility to intergranular corrosion increases up to 15% cold work and above that starts decreasing. Desensitization was observed to be faster for higher levels of cold work, especially in the higher sensitization temperature range. From the TTS diagrams, the critical linear cooling rate below which sensitization occurs was calculated. From these data, Continuous Cooling Sensitization (CCS) diagrams were established. The results show that as the degree of cold work increases up to 15%, time needed for sensitization decreases and hence faster cooling rates must be used in order to avoid sensitization. At temperatures sufficiently below the nose temperature of the TTS diagram, log t versus 1/T plots follow a linear relationship where t is the time needed for the onset of sensitization at temperature T. From the slope, the apparent activation energy for sensitization was estimated. The validity of extrapolating these linear plots to lower temperatures (725 to 775 K) (which lie in the operating temperature regime of fast reactors) has been verified by experiment. The effect of heat treatment and microstructure on the Low Temperature Sensitization (LTS) behaviour was investigated. The results indicate that carbides of optimum size and distribution are the essential pre-requisites for LTS and cold work enhances susceptibility of stainless steels to LTS. (orig.).

  15. Applicability of low-melting-point microcrystalline wax to develop temperature-sensitive formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Kohei; Kimura, Shin-Ichiro; Iwao, Yasunori; Itai, Shigeru

    2017-10-30

    Low-melting-point substances are widely used to develop temperature-sensitive formulations. In this study, we focused on microcrystalline wax (MCW) as a low-melting-point substance. We evaluated the drug release behavior of wax matrix (WM) particles using various MCW under various temperature conditions. WM particles containing acetaminophen were prepared using a spray congealing technique. In the dissolution test at 37°C, WM particles containing low-melting-point MCWs whose melting was starting at approx. 40°C (Hi-Mic-1045 or 1070) released the drug initially followed by the release of only a small amount. On the other hand, in the dissolution test at 20 and 25°C for WM particles containing Hi-Mic-1045 and at 20, 25, and 30°C for that containing Hi-Mic-1070, both WM particles showed faster drug release than at 37°C. The characteristic drug release suppression of WM particles containing low-melting-point MCWs at 37°C was thought attributable to MCW melting, as evidenced by differential scanning calorimetry analysis and powder X-ray diffraction analysis. Taken together, low-melting-point MCWs may be applicable to develop implantable temperature-sensitive formulations that drug release is accelerated by cooling at administered site. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Low-Temperature Crystalline Titanium Dioxide by Atomic Layer Deposition for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Chandiran, Aravind Kumar

    2013-04-24

    Low-temperature processing of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) is crucial to enable commercialization with low-cost, plastic substrates. Prior studies have focused on mechanical compression of premade particles on plastic or glass substrates; however, this did not yield sufficient interconnections for good carrier transport. Furthermore, such compression can lead to more heterogeneous porosity. To circumvent these problems, we have developed a low-temperature processing route for photoanodes where crystalline TiO2 is deposited onto well-defined, mesoporous templates. The TiO2 is grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD), and the crystalline films are achieved at a growth temperature of 200 C. The ALD TiO2 thickness was systematically studied in terms of charge transport and performance to lead to optimized photovoltaic performance. We found that a 15 nm TiO2 overlayer on an 8 μm thick SiO2 film leads to a high power conversion efficiency of 7.1% with the state-of-the-art zinc porphyrin sensitizer and cobalt bipyridine redox mediator. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  17. Temperature and pH driven association in uranyl aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Druchok

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An association behavior of uranyl ions in aqueous solutions is explored. For this purpose a set of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations is performed. During the simulation, the fractions of uranyl ions involved in dimer and trimer formations were monitored. To accompany the fraction statistics one also collected distributions characterizing average times of the dimer and trimer associates. Two factors effecting the uranyl association were considered: temperature and pH. As one can expect, an increase of the temperature decreases an uranyl capability of forming the associates, thus lowering bound fractions/times and vice versa. The effect of pH was modeled by adding H+ or OH- ions to a "neutral" solution. The addition of hydroxide ions OH- favors the formation of the associates, thus increasing bound times and fractions. The extra H+ ions in a solution produce an opposite effect, thus lowering the uranyl association capability. We also made a structural analysis for all the observed associates to reveal the mutual orientation of the uranyl ions.

  18. Straining electrode behavior and corrosion resistance of nickel base alloys in high temperature acidic solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Kazuo

    1992-01-01

    Repassivation behavior and IGA resistance of nickel base alloys containing 0∼30 wt% chromium was investigated in high temperature acid sulfate solution. (1) The repassivation rate was increased with increasing chromium content. And so the amounts of charge caused by the metal dissolution were decreased with increasing chromium content. (2) Mill-annealed Alloy 600 suffered IGA at low pH environment below about 3.5 at the fixed potentials above the corrosion potential in 10%Na 2 SO 4 +H 2 SO 4 solution at 598K. On the other hand, thermally-treated Alloy 690 was hard to occur IGA at low pH environments which mill-annealed Alloy 600 occurred IGA. (3) It was considered that the reason, why nickel base alloys containing high chromium content such as Alloy 690 (60%Ni-30%Cr-10%Fe) had high IGA/SCC resistance in high temperature acidic solution containing sulfate ion, is due to both the promotion of the repassivation and the suppression of the film dissolution by the formation of the dense chromium oxide film

  19. Effects of Soil Moisture on the Temperature Sensitivity of Soil Heterotrophic Respiration: A Laboratory Incubation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weiping; Hui, Dafeng; Shen, Weijun

    2014-01-01

    The temperature sensitivity (Q10) of soil heterotrophic respiration (Rh) is an important ecological model parameter and may vary with temperature and moisture. While Q10 generally decreases with increasing temperature, the moisture effects on Q10 have been controversial. To address this, we conducted a 90-day laboratory incubation experiment using a subtropical forest soil with a full factorial combination of five moisture levels (20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, and 100% water holding capacity - WHC) and five temperature levels (10, 17, 24, 31, and 38°C). Under each moisture treatment, Rh was measured several times for each temperature treatment to derive Q10 based on the exponential relationships between Rh and temperature. Microbial biomass carbon (MBC), microbial community structure and soil nutrients were also measured several times to detect their potential contributions to the moisture-induced Q10 variation. We found that Q10 was significantly lower at lower moisture levels (60%, 40% and 20% WHC) than at higher moisture level (80% WHC) during the early stage of the incubation, but became significantly higher at 20%WHC than at 60% WHC and not significantly different from the other three moisture levels during the late stage of incubation. In contrast, soil Rh had the highest value at 60% WHC and the lowest at 20% WHC throughout the whole incubation period. Variations of Q10 were significantly associated with MBC during the early stages of incubation, but with the fungi-to-bacteria ratio during the later stages, suggesting that changes in microbial biomass and community structure are related to the moisture-induced Q10 changes. This study implies that global warming’s impacts on soil CO2 emission may depend upon soil moisture conditions. With the same temperature rise, wetter soils may emit more CO2 into the atmosphere via heterotrophic respiration. PMID:24647610

  20. Sensitivity analysis of recovery efficiency in high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage with single well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Jun-Seo; Lee, Seung-Rae; Pasquinelli, Lisa; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2015-01-01

    High-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage system usually shows higher performance than other borehole thermal energy storage systems. Although there is a limitation in the widespread use of the HT-ATES system because of several technical problems such as clogging, corrosion, etc., it is getting more attention as these issues are gradually alleviated. In this study, a sensitivity analysis of recovery efficiency in two cases of HT-ATES system with a single well is conducted to select key parameters. For a fractional factorial design used to choose input parameters with uniformity, the optimal Latin hypercube sampling with an enhanced stochastic evolutionary algorithm is considered. Then, the recovery efficiency is obtained using a computer model developed by COMSOL Multiphysics. With input and output variables, the surrogate modeling technique, namely the Gaussian-Kriging method with Smoothly Clopped Absolute Deviation Penalty, is utilized. Finally, the sensitivity analysis is performed based on the variation decomposition. According to the result of sensitivity analysis, the most important input variables are selected and confirmed to consider the interaction effects for each case and it is confirmed that key parameters vary with the experiment domain of hydraulic and thermal properties as well as the number of input variables. - Highlights: • Main and interaction effects on recovery efficiency in HT-ATES was investigated. • Reliability depended on fractional factorial design and interaction effects. • Hydraulic permeability of aquifer had an important impact on recovery efficiency. • Site-specific sensitivity analysis of HT-ATES was recommended.

  1. Sensitivity study and functionalization of cross section to fuel and moderator temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zee, Sung Quun; Song, Jae Seung; Cho, Young Chul

    1995-11-01

    A reactor core neutronics code MASTER is under development as a part of Korean Core Design System ADONIS. MASTER solves two-group three-dimensional; neutron diffusion equation which requires fuel assembly-wise group constants, to calculate the neutron flux distribution in the core. The group constants are obtained from the fuel assembly multi-group neutron transport calculation, and inputted as functions of the core operating condition. The functionalization of the group constant requires sensitivity analysis to various core operating conditions. In this report, the sensitivity of group constant to fuel and moderator temperature were analyzed. Lumped higher order macroscopic cross section derivative method was developed to reduce the computer memory and the number of floating point operations to treat group constants in MASTER. 1 fig., 6 tabs., 2 refs. (Author) .new

  2. Evolution of microstructures in nickel solid solution fatigued at high temperature: occurence of an intragranular cavitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnaud, B.

    1986-06-01

    We studied by T.E.M. the microstructures appearing in Nickel solid solution fatigued in push-pull between 0.4 Tm and 0.6 Tm (Tm=melting temperature), the maximum amplitude of stress was imposed: +- 100 MPa, three frequencies were used: 1.25 Hz, 2.5 Hz and 10 Hz. In Ni 6% at Ge the structure of dislocations evolves continuously with the number of cycles: homogeneous distribution of dislocations, cell structure, then development of sub-grains 5 times as big as the cell; these sub-grains are not stable, they break up into cells. This succession of structures suggests a cyclic evolution. The cavities appear for number of cycles greater than a threshold number depending on the temperature and the frequency. The cavities are not distributed uniformly, they are located in zone. According to the conditions of sollicitation, the shape (equiaxe of small stick) and the distribution (uniform, in band, in crown) of the cavities fluctuate. This cavitation exists equally in other materials (Ni 4% at Si, Ni). This intra-granular cavitation has been observed in the same domain of temperatures as the domain of swelling in the same material under bombardment with ions Ni + . Due to this similitude we searched for a segregation of solute (like the induced precipitation by irradiation) but this phenomenon did not occur with our experimental conditions [fr

  3. Asymptotic solutions of glass temperature profiles during steady optical fibre drawing

    KAUST Repository

    Taroni, M.

    2013-03-12

    In this paper we derive realistic simplified models for the high-speed drawing of glass optical fibres via the downdraw method that capture the fluid dynamics and heat transport in the fibre via conduction, convection and radiative heating. We exploit the small aspect ratio of the fibre and the relative orders of magnitude of the dimensionless parameters that characterize the heat transfer to reduce the problem to one- or two-dimensional systems via asymptotic analysis. The resulting equations may be readily solved numerically and in many cases admit exact analytic solutions. The systematic asymptotic breakdown presented is used to elucidate the relative importance of furnace temperature profile, convection, surface radiation and conduction in each portion of the furnace and the role of each in controlling the glass temperature. The models derived predict many of the qualitative features observed in real industrial processes, such as the glass temperature profile within the furnace and the sharp transition in fibre thickness. The models thus offer a desirable route to quick scenario testing, providing valuable practical information about the dependencies of the solution on the parameters and the dominant heat-transport mechanism. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  4. Practical Considerations for Determination of Glass Transition Temperature of a Maximally Freeze Concentrated Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pansare, Swapnil K; Patel, Sajal Manubhai

    2016-08-01

    Glass transition temperature is a unique thermal characteristic of amorphous systems and is associated with changes in physical properties such as heat capacity, viscosity, electrical resistance, and molecular mobility. Glass transition temperature for amorphous solids is referred as (T g), whereas for maximally freeze concentrated solution, the notation is (T g'). This article is focused on the factors affecting determination of T g' for application to lyophilization process design and frozen storage stability. Also, this review provides a perspective on use of various types of solutes in protein formulation and their effect on T g'. Although various analytical techniques are used for determination of T g' based on the changes in physical properties associated with glass transition, the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is the most commonly used technique. In this article, an overview of DSC technique is provided along with brief discussion on the alternate analytical techniques for T g' determination. Additionally, challenges associated with T g' determination, using DSC for protein formulations, are discussed. The purpose of this review is to provide a practical industry perspective on determination of T g' for protein formulations as it relates to design and development of lyophilization process and/or for frozen storage; however, a comprehensive review of glass transition temperature (T g, T g'), in general, is outside the scope of this work.

  5. Room temperature synthesis of 2D CuO nanoleaves in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yan; Li Yunling; Wang Zichen; Zhao Jingzhe; Ma Dechong; Hou Shengnan; Li Linzhi; Hao Xinli

    2011-01-01

    A simple room temperature method was reported for the synthesis of CuO nanocrystals in aqueous solution through the sequence of Cu 2+ → Cu(OA) 2 → Cu(OH) 2 → Cu(OH) 4 2- → CuO. Sodium oleate (SOA) was used as the surfactant and shape controller. The as-prepared samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV-visible absorption spectroscopy (UV-vis) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). It can be seen that 1D Cu(OH) 2 nanowires were first obtained from Cu(OA) 2 and, at room temperature, converted into 2D CuO nanoleaves (CuO NLs) in a short time under a weakly basic environment. On prolonging the reaction time, the top part of these 2D nanoleaves branched and separated along the long axis to form 1D rod-like nano-CuO because of the assistance of SOA. A possible transformation mechanism of Cu(OH) 2 to CuO nanostructures at room temperature in aqueous solution is discussed. The transformation velocity can be controlled by changing the pH value of the system. The prepared CuO NLs were used to construct an enzyme-free glucose sensor. The detecting results showed that the designed sensor exhibited good amperometric responses towards glucose with good anti-interferent ability.

  6. Extremophiles in Mineral Sulphide Heaps: Some Bacterial Responses to Variable Temperature, Acidity and Solution Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen R. Watling

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In heap bioleaching, acidophilic extremophiles contribute to enhanced metal extraction from mineral sulphides through the oxidation of Fe(II and/or reduced inorganic sulphur compounds (RISC, such as elemental sulphur or mineral sulphides, or the degradation of organic compounds derived from the ore, biota or reagents used during mineral processing. The impacts of variable solution acidity and composition, as well as temperature on the three microbiological functions have been examined for up to four bacterial species found in mineral sulphide heaps. The results indicate that bacteria adapt to sufficiently high metal concentrations (Cu, Ni, Co, Zn, As to allow them to function in mineral sulphide heaps and, by engaging alternative metabolic pathways, to extend the solution pH range over which growth is sustained. Fluctuating temperatures during start up in sulphide heaps pose the greatest threat to efficient bacterial colonisation. The large masses of ores in bioleaching heaps mean that high temperatures arising from sulphide oxidation are hard to control initially, when the sulphide content of the ore is greatest. During that period, mesophilic and moderately thermophilic bacteria are markedly reduced in both numbers and activity.

  7. Effect of solution annealing temperature on precipitation in 2205 duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashiwar, A.; Vennela, N. Phani; Kamath, S.L.; Khatirkar, R.K.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, effect of solution annealing temperature (1050 °C and 1100 °C) and isothermal ageing (700 °C: 15 min to 6 h) on the microstructural changes in 2205 duplex stainless steel has been investigated systematically. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were adopted to follow the microstructural evolution, while an energy dispersive spectrometer attached to scanning electron microscope was used to obtain localised chemical information of various phases. The ferritic matrix of the two phase 2205 duplex stainless steel (∼ 45% ferrite and ∼ 55% austenite) undergoes a series of metallurgical transformations during ageing—formation of secondary austenite (γ 2 ) and precipitation of Cr and Mo rich intermetallic (chi-χ and sigma-σ) phases. For solution annealing at 1050 °C, significant amount of carbides were observed in the ferrite grains after 1 h of ageing at 700 °C. χ Phase precipitated after the precipitation of carbides—preferentially at the ferrite–ferrite and also at the ferrite–austenite boundaries. σ Phase was not observed in significant quantity even after 6 h of ageing. The sequence of precipitation in samples solution annealed at 1050 °C was found to be carbides → χ → σ. On the contrary, for samples solution annealed at 1100 °C, the precipitation of χ phase was negligible. χ Phase precipitated before σ phase, preferentially along the ferrite–ferrite grain boundaries and was later consumed in the σ phase precipitation. The σ phase precipitated via the eutectoid transformation of ferrite to yield secondary austenite γ 2 and σ phase in the ferrite and along the ferrite–austenite grain boundaries. An increase in the volume fraction of γ 2 and σ phase with simultaneous decrease in the ferrite was evidenced with ageing. - Highlights: ► Effect of solution annealing temperature on microstructural evolution is studied. ► χ Phase precipitated preferentially in the samples solution annealed at

  8. Effect of solution annealing temperature on precipitation in 2205 duplex stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashiwar, A., E-mail: akashiwar@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur-440010, Maharashtra (India); Vennela, N. Phani, E-mail: phanivennela@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur-440010, Maharashtra (India); Kamath, S.L., E-mail: kamath@iitb.ac.in [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay (IITB), Powai, Mumbai-400076, Maharashtra (India); Khatirkar, R.K., E-mail: rajesh.khatirkar@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur-440010, Maharashtra (India)

    2012-12-15

    In the present study, effect of solution annealing temperature (1050 Degree-Sign C and 1100 Degree-Sign C) and isothermal ageing (700 Degree-Sign C: 15 min to 6 h) on the microstructural changes in 2205 duplex stainless steel has been investigated systematically. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were adopted to follow the microstructural evolution, while an energy dispersive spectrometer attached to scanning electron microscope was used to obtain localised chemical information of various phases. The ferritic matrix of the two phase 2205 duplex stainless steel ({approx} 45% ferrite and {approx} 55% austenite) undergoes a series of metallurgical transformations during ageing-formation of secondary austenite ({gamma}{sub 2}) and precipitation of Cr and Mo rich intermetallic (chi-{chi} and sigma-{sigma}) phases. For solution annealing at 1050 Degree-Sign C, significant amount of carbides were observed in the ferrite grains after 1 h of ageing at 700 Degree-Sign C. {chi} Phase precipitated after the precipitation of carbides-preferentially at the ferrite-ferrite and also at the ferrite-austenite boundaries. {sigma} Phase was not observed in significant quantity even after 6 h of ageing. The sequence of precipitation in samples solution annealed at 1050 Degree-Sign C was found to be carbides {yields} {chi} {yields} {sigma}. On the contrary, for samples solution annealed at 1100 Degree-Sign C, the precipitation of {chi} phase was negligible. {chi} Phase precipitated before {sigma} phase, preferentially along the ferrite-ferrite grain boundaries and was later consumed in the {sigma} phase precipitation. The {sigma} phase precipitated via the eutectoid transformation of ferrite to yield secondary austenite {gamma}{sub 2} and {sigma} phase in the ferrite and along the ferrite-austenite grain boundaries. An increase in the volume fraction of {gamma}{sub 2} and {sigma} phase with simultaneous decrease in the ferrite was evidenced with ageing. - Highlights

  9. Fabrication of ultra-high sensitive and selective CH4 room temperature gas sensing of TiO2nanorods: Detailed study on the annealing temperature

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tshabalala, Zamaswazi P

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Applications of ultra-highly sensitive and selective methane (CH(sub4)) room temperature gas sensors are important for various operations especially in underground mining environment. Therefore, this study is set out to investigate the effect...

  10. Sensitivity of encapsulated diamond-protein transistor renewed by low temperature hydrogen plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krátká, Marie; Neykova, Neda; Ukraintsev, Egor; Kromka, Alexander; Rezek, Bohuslav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 2 (2013), s. 1598-1608 ISSN 1452-3981 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA ČR GAP108/12/0996; GA ČR GD202/09/H041 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : nanocrystalline diamond * solution-gated field-effect transistor * low temperature hydrogen termination * proteins * encapsulation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.956, year: 2013 http://www.electrochemsci.org/list13.htm#current

  11. Sensitivity of surface temperature to radiative forcing by contrail cirrus in a radiative-mixing model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Schumann

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Earth's surface temperature sensitivity to radiative forcing (RF by contrail cirrus and the related RF efficacy relative to CO2 are investigated in a one-dimensional idealized model of the atmosphere. The model includes energy transport by shortwave (SW and longwave (LW radiation and by mixing in an otherwise fixed reference atmosphere (no other feedbacks. Mixing includes convective adjustment and turbulent diffusion, where the latter is related to the vertical component of mixing by large-scale eddies. The conceptual study shows that the surface temperature sensitivity to given contrail RF depends strongly on the timescales of energy transport by mixing and radiation. The timescales are derived for steady layered heating (ghost forcing and for a transient contrail cirrus case. The radiative timescales are shortest at the surface and shorter in the troposphere than in the mid-stratosphere. Without mixing, a large part of the energy induced into the upper troposphere by radiation due to contrails or similar disturbances gets lost to space before it can contribute to surface warming. Because of the different radiative forcing at the surface and at top of atmosphere (TOA and different radiative heating rate profiles in the troposphere, the local surface temperature sensitivity to stratosphere-adjusted RF is larger for SW than for LW contrail forcing. Without mixing, the surface energy budget is more important for surface warming than the TOA budget. Hence, surface warming by contrails is smaller than suggested by the net RF at TOA. For zero mixing, cooling by contrails cannot be excluded. This may in part explain low efficacy values for contrails found in previous global circulation model studies. Possible implications of this study are discussed. Since the results of this study are model dependent, they should be tested with a comprehensive climate model in the future.

  12. Low temperature carving of ZnO nanorods into nanotubes for dye-sensitized solar cell application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehghan Nayeri, Fatemeh, E-mail: F.d.nayeri@ut.ac.ir; Kolahdouz, Mohammadreza; Asl-Soleimani, Ebrahim; Mohajerzadeh, S.

    2015-06-05

    Highlights: • Large scale arrays of highly oriented ZnO NTs have been fabricated and investigated. • The DSSCs made of these 2.5 μm NRs and NTs resulted in conversion efficiencies of 0.34% and 0.9%, respectively. • EIS measurements have demonstrated that the NTs could acquire a higher electron lifetime compared to NRs. • Twofold electron lifetime electron accompanied by half electron transport time for ZnO NTs compared to NRs. - Abstract: High aspect ratio zinc oxide (ZnO) nanotubes (NT) were synthesized based on a two-steps approach. In the first step, ZnO nanorod (NR) arrays were prepared by chemical bath deposition from an aqueous of zinc nitrate. In the second step, the cores of ZnO NRs were carved selectively in a KCl solution, resulting in the formation of a tubular structure. The influence of KCL concentration, temperature, and immersion time on the ZnO NT formation process was completely characterized and investigated. 12.5 μm NRs and NTs have been utilized to manufacture dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) and as a result, conversion efficiencies of 1.06% and 2.87% were obtained, respectively. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements have demonstrated that the NTs could acquire a higher electron lifetime compared to NRs which causes a faster electron collection. The overall improvement in NT-based DSSC performance demonstrates a new approach to enhance the efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells.

  13. Solvation behaviour of biologically active compounds in aqueous solutions of antibacterial drug amoxicillin at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singla, Meenu; Kumar, Harsh; Jindal, Rajeev

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Densities and speeds of sound of amino acids in aqueous amoxicillin solutions. • Partial molar volumes and compressibility of transfer. • Group contribution have been calculated. • (Ion + hydrophilic) and (hydrophilic + hydrophilic) interactions are present. • Pair-wise interactions are dominant in the mixtures. - Abstract: The interactions of glycine (Gly), L-alanine (Ala), L-valine (Val) and L-Leucine (Leu) with drug amoxicillin (AMX) as a function of temperature have been investigated by combination of volumetric and acoustic measurements. Densities and speeds of sound of amino acids in aqueous solutions of amoxicillin have been measured at T = (305.15, 310.15 and 315.15) K and atmospheric pressure. The apparent molar volume (V ϕ ), the partial molar volume (V ϕ 0 ) and standard partial molar volumes of transfer (ΔV ϕ 0 ) for amino acids from water to aqueous amoxicillin solutions have been calculated from density data. Group contributions of amino acids to partial molar volume were determined. Partial molar isentropic compression (κ ϕ,s ) and partial molar isentropic compression of transfer (Δκ ϕ,S 0 ) have been calculated from speed of sound data. The pair and triplet interaction coefficient have been calculated from both the properties. The results have been explained based on competing patterns of interactions of co-solvents and the solute

  14. A new sensor for ammonia based on cyanidin-sensitized titanium dioxide film operating at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao-wei, Huang [School of Food and Biological Engineering, Jiangsu University, 301 Xuefu Road, 212013 Zhenjiang, Jiangsu (China); Xiao-bo, Zou, E-mail: zou_xiaobo@ujs.edu.cn [School of Food and Biological Engineering, Jiangsu University, 301 Xuefu Road, 212013 Zhenjiang, Jiangsu (China); Key Laboratory of Modern Agricultural Equipment and Technology, 301 Xuefu Road, 212013 Zhenjiang, Jiangsu (China); Ji-yong, Shi; Jie-wen, Zhao; Yanxiao, Li [School of Food and Biological Engineering, Jiangsu University, 301 Xuefu Road, 212013 Zhenjiang, Jiangsu (China); Limin, Hao; Jianchun, Zhang [The Research Center of China Hemp Materials, Beijing (China)

    2013-07-17

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •TiO{sub 2} was prepared by sol–gel method film and then functionalized with the cyanidin dye. •The morphology and the absorption spectra of films were examined. •The hybrid organic–inorganic formed film here can detect ammonia reversibly at room temperature. •The low humidity could promote the sensitivity of the sensors. -- Abstract: Design and fabrication of an ammonia sensor operating at room temperature based on pigment-sensitized TiO{sub 2} films was described. TiO{sub 2} was prepared by sol–gel method and deposited on glass slides containing gold electrodes. Then, the film immersed in a 2.5 × 10{sup −4} M ethanol solution of cyanidin to absorb the pigment. The hybrid organic–inorganic formed film here can detect ammonia reversibly at room temperature. The relative change resistance of the films at a potential difference of 1.5 V is determined when the films are exposed to atmospheres containing ammonia vapors with concentrations over the range 10–50 ppm. The relative change resistance, S, of the films increased almost linearly with increasing concentrations of ammonia (r = 0.92). The response time to increasing concentrations of the ammonia is about 180–220 s, and the corresponding values for decreasing concentrations 240–270 s. At low humidity, ammonia could be ionized by the cyanidin on the TiO{sub 2} film and thereby decrease in the proton concentration at the surface. Consequently, more positively charged holes at the surface of the TiO{sub 2} have to be extracted to neutralize the adsorbed cyanidin and water film. The resistance response to ammonia of the sensors was nearly independent on temperature from 10 to 50 °C. These results are not actually as good as those reported in the literature, but this preliminary work proposes simpler and cheaper processes to realize NH{sub 3} sensor for room temperature applications.

  15. Fracture analysis of a transversely isotropic high temperature superconductor strip based on real fundamental solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Zhiwen; Zhou, Youhe

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We studied fracture problem in HTS based on real fundamental solutions. • When the thickness of HTS strip increases the SIF decrease. • A higher applied field leads to a larger stress intensity factor. • The greater the critical current density is, the smaller values of the SIF is. - Abstract: Real fundamental solution for fracture problem of transversely isotropic high temperature superconductor (HTS) strip is obtained. The superconductor E–J constitutive law is characterized by the Bean model where the critical current density is independent of the flux density. Fracture analysis is performed by the methods of singular integral equations which are solved numerically by Gauss–Lobatto–Chybeshev (GSL) collocation method. To guarantee a satisfactory accuracy, the convergence behavior of the kernel function is investigated. Numerical results of fracture parameters are obtained and the effects of the geometric characteristics, applied magnetic field and critical current density on the stress intensity factors (SIF) are discussed

  16. The influence of temperature on the decomposition kinetics of peracetic acid in solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunigk L.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Peracetic acid is a powerful sanitizer that has only recently been introduced in the Brazilian food industry. The main disadvantage of this sanitizer is its decomposition rate. The main purpose of this paper is to present results obtained in experiments carried out to study the decomposition kinetics of peracetic acid in aqueous solutions at 25, 35, 40 and 45 °C. The decompositon of peracetic acid is a first-order reaction. The decomposition rate constants are between 1.71x10-3 h -1 for 25 °C and 9.64x10-3 h-1 for 45 °C. The decomposition rate constant is affected by temperature according to the Arrhenius equation, and the activation energy for the decomposition of peracetic acid in aqueous solutions prepared from the commercial formulation used in this work is 66.20 kJ/mol.

  17. Simultaneous determination of nitric acid and uranium concentrations in aqueous solution from measurements of electrical conductivity, density, and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, B.B.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear fuel reprocessing plants handle aqueous solutions of nitric acid and uranium in large quantities. Automatic control of process operations requires reliable measurements of these solutes concentration, but this is difficult to directly measure. Physical properties such as solution density and electrical conductivity vary with solute concentration and temperature. Conductivity, density and temperature can be measured accurately with relatively simple and inexpensive devices. These properties can be used to determine solute concentrations will good correlations. This paper provides the appropriate correlations for solutions containing 2 to 6 Molar (M) nitric acid and 0 to 300 g/L uranium metal at temperatures from 25--90 degrees C. The equations are most accurate below 5 M nitric acid, due to a broad maximum in the conductivity curve at 6 M. 12 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs

  18. Steel billet reheat simulation with growth of oxide layer and investigation on zone temperature sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubey, Satish Kumar; Srinivasan, P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional heat conduction numerical model and simulation of steel billet reheating in a reheat furnace. The model considers the growth of oxide scale on the billet surfaces. Control-volume approach and implicit scheme of finite difference method are used to discretize the transient heat conduction equation. The model is validated with analytical results subject to limited conditions. Simulations are carried out for predictions of three-dimensional temperature filed in the billet and oxide scale growth on the billet surfaces. The model predictions are in agreement with expected trends. It was found that the effect of oxide scale on billet heating is considerable. In order to investigate the effect of zone temperatures on the responses, a parametric sensitivity subject to six responses of interest are carried out using analysis of mean approach. The simulation approach and parametric study presented will be useful and applicable to the steel industry.

  19. Cohort Removal Induces Changes in Body Temperature, Pain Sensitivity, and Anxiety-Like Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Keizo; Shoji, Hirotaka; Hattori, Satoko; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Mouse behavior is analyzed to elucidate the effects of various experimental manipulations, including gene mutation and drug administration. When the effect of a factor of interest is assessed, other factors, such as age, sex, temperature, apparatus, and housing, are controlled in experiments by matching, counterbalancing, and/or randomizing. One such factor that has not attracted much attention is the effect of sequential removal of animals from a common cage (cohort removal). Here we evaluated the effects of cohort removal on rectal temperature, pain sensitivity, and anxiety-like behavior by analyzing the combined data of a large number of C57BL/6J mice that we collected using a comprehensive behavioral test battery. Rectal temperature increased in a stepwise manner according to the position of sequential removal from the cage, consistent with previous reports. In the hot plate test, the mice that were removed first from the cage had a significantly longer latency to show the first paw response than the mice removed later. In the elevated plus maze, the mice removed first spent significantly less time on the open arms compared to the mice removed later. The results of the present study demonstrated that cohort removal induces changes in body temperature, pain sensitivity, and anxiety-like behavior in mice. Cohort removal also increased the plasma corticosterone concentration in mice. Thus, the ordinal position in the sequence of removal from the cage should be carefully counterbalanced between groups when the effect of experimental manipulations, including gene manipulation and drug administration, are examined using behavioral tests. PMID:27375443

  20. Cohort removal induces changes in body temperature, pain sensitivity, and anxiety-like behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keizo eTakao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mouse behavior is analyzed to elucidate the effects of various experimental manipulations, including gene mutation and drug administration. When the effect of a factor of interest is assessed, other factors, such as age, sex, temperature, apparatus, and housing, are controlled in experiments by matching, counterbalancing, and/or randomizing. One such factor that has not attracted much attention is the effect of sequential removal of animals from a common cage (cohort removal. Here we evaluated the effects of cohort removal on rectal temperature, pain sensitivity, and anxiety-like behavior by analyzing the combined data of a large number of C57BL/6J mice that we collected using a comprehensive behavioral test battery. Rectal temperature increased in a stepwise manner according to the position of sequential removal from the cage, consistent with previous reports. In the hot plate test, the mice that were removed first from the cage had a significantly longer latency to show the first paw response than the mice removed later. In the elevated plus maze, the mice removed first spent significantly less time on the open arms compared to the mice removed later. The results of the present study demonstrated that cohort removal induces changes in body temperature, pain sensitivity, and anxiety-like behavior in mice. Cohort removal also increased the plasma corticosterone concentration in mice. Thus, the ordinal position in the sequence of removal from the cage should be carefully counterbalanced between groups when the effect of experimental manipulations, including gene manipulation and drug administration, are examined using behavioral tests.

  1. Temperature- and pH-sensitive wearable materials for monitoring foot ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvo P

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pietro Salvo,1,2 Nicola Calisi,1 Bernardo Melai,1 Valentina Dini,3 Clara Paoletti,1 Tommaso Lomonaco,1 Andrea Pucci,1 Fabio Di Francesco,1 Alberto Piaggesi,4 Marco Romanelli3 1Department of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry, University of Pisa, 2Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Council of Research, 3Wound Healing Research Unit, Department of Dermatology, University of Pisa, 4Diabetic Foot Section, Department of Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy Abstract: Foot ulcers account for 15% of comorbidities associated with diabetes. Presently, no device allows the status of foot ulcers to be continuously monitored when patients are not hospitalized. In this study, we describe a temperature and a pH sensor capable of monitoring diabetic foot and venous leg ulcers developed in the frame of the seventh framework program European Union project SWAN-iCare (smart wearable and autonomous negative pressure device for wound monitoring and therapy. Temperature is measured by exploiting the variations in the electrical resistance of a nanocomposite consisting of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and poly(styrene-b-(ethylene-co-butylene-b-styrene. The pH sensor used a graphene oxide (GO layer that changes its electrical potential when pH changes. The temperature sensor has a sensitivity of ~85 Ω/°C in the range 25°C–50°C and a high repeatability (maximum standard deviation of 0.1% over seven repeated measurements. For a GO concentration of 4 mg/mL, the pH sensor has a sensitivity of ~42 mV/pH and high linearity (R2=0.99. Keywords: diabetic foot ulcer, wearable sensors, wound temperature, wound pH

  2. On the sensitivity of a helicopter combustor wall temperature to convective and radiative thermal loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, S.; Richard, S.; Duchaine, F.; Staffelbach, G.; Gicquel, L.Y.M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Coupling of LES, DOM and conduction is applied to an industrial combustor. • Thermal sensitivity of the combustor to convection and radiation is investigated. • CHT based on LES is feasible in an industrial context with acceptable CPU costs. • Radiation heat fluxes are of the same order of magnitude that the convective ones. • CHT with radiation are globally in good agreement with thermocolor test. - Abstract: The design of aeronautical engines is subject to many constraints that cover performance gain as well as increasingly sensitive environmental issues. These often contradicting objectives are currently being answered through an increase in the local and global temperature in the hot stages of the engine. As a result, hot spots could appear causing a premature aging of the combustion chamber. Today, the characterization of wall temperatures is performed experimentally by complex thermocolor tests in advanced phases of the design process. To limit such expensive experiments and integrate the knowledge of the thermal environment earlier in the design process, efforts are currently performed to provide high fidelity numerical tools able to predict the combustion chamber wall temperature including the main physical phenomena: combustion, convection and mixing of hot products and cold flows, radiative transfers as well as conduction in the solid parts. In this paper, partitioned coupling approaches based on a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) solver, a Discrete Ordinate Method radiation solver and an unsteady conduction code are used to investigate the sensitivity of an industrial combustor thermal environment to convection and radiation. Four computations including a reference adiabatic fluid only simulation, Conjugate Heat Transfer, Radiation-Fluid Thermal Interaction and fully coupled simulations are performed and compared with thermocolor experimental data. From the authors knowledge, such comparative study with LES has never been published. It

  3. Application of TAM III to study sensitivity of soil organic matter degradation to temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikegard, Peter; Barros, Nieves; Piñeiro, Verónica

    2014-05-01

    Traditionally, studies of soil biodegradation are based on CO2 dissipation rates. CO2 is a product of aerobic degradation of labile organic substrates like carbohydrates. That limits the biodegradation concept to just one of the soil organic matter fractions. This feature is responsible for some problems to settle the concept of soil organic matter (SOM) recalcitrance and for controversial results defining sensitivity of SOM to temperature. SOM consists of highly complex macromolecules constituted by fractions with different chemical nature and redox state affecting the chemical nature of biodegradation processes. Biodegradation of fractions more reduced than carbohydrates take place through metabolic pathways that dissipate less CO2 than carbohydrate respiration, that may not dissipate CO2, or that even may uptake CO2. These compounds can be considered more recalcitrant and with lower turnover times than labile SOM just because they are degraded at lower CO2 rates that may be just a consequence of the metabolic path. Nevertheless, decomposition of every kind of organic substrate always releases heat. For this reason, the measurement of the heat rate by calorimetry yields a more realistic measurement of the biodegradation of the SOM continuum. TAM III is one of the most recent calorimeters designed for directly measuring in real time the heat rate associated with any degradation process. It is designed as a multichannel system allowing the concomitant measurement of to up 24 samples at isothermal conditions or through a temperature scanning mode from 18 to 100ºC, allowing the continous measure of any sample at controlled non-isothermal conditions. The temperature scanning mode was tested in several soil samples collected at different depths to study their sensitivity to temperature changes from 18 to 35 ºC calculating the Q10 and the activation energy (EA) by the Arrhenius equation. It was attempted to associate the obtained EA values with the soil thermal

  4. Temperature sensitivity of void nucleation and growth parameters for single crystal copper: a molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawat, S; Chavan, V M; Warrier, M; Chaturvedi, S

    2011-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the void nucleation and growth is studied using the molecular dynamics (MD) code LAMMPS (Large-Scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator). Single crystal copper is triaxially expanded at 5 × 10 9  s −1 strain rate keeping the temperature constant. It is shown that the nucleation and growth of voids at these atomistic scales follows a macroscopic nucleation and growth (NAG) model. As the temperature increases there is a steady decrease in the nucleation and growth thresholds. As the melting point of copper is approached, a double-dip in the pressure–time profile is observed. Analysis of this double-dip shows that the first minimum corresponds to the disappearance of the long-range order due to the creation of stacking faults and the system no longer has a FCC structure. There is no nucleation of voids at this juncture. The second minimum corresponds to the nucleation and incipient growth of voids. We present the sensitivity of NAG parameters to temperature and the analysis of double-dip in the pressure–time profile for single crystal copper at 1250 K

  5. Fracture analysis of a transversely isotropic high temperature superconductor strip based on real fundamental solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhiwen; Zhou, Youhe

    2015-04-01

    Real fundamental solution for fracture problem of transversely isotropic high temperature superconductor (HTS) strip is obtained. The superconductor E-J constitutive law is characterized by the Bean model where the critical current density is independent of the flux density. Fracture analysis is performed by the methods of singular integral equations which are solved numerically by Gauss-Lobatto-Chybeshev (GSL) collocation method. To guarantee a satisfactory accuracy, the convergence behavior of the kernel function is investigated. Numerical results of fracture parameters are obtained and the effects of the geometric characteristics, applied magnetic field and critical current density on the stress intensity factors (SIF) are discussed.

  6. A new cell for temperature-dependent X-ray absorption spectroscopy of liquid solutions: application to PbBr2 solutions in diethylene glycol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D; Oldag, T; Keil, P; Keller, H L; Frahm, R

    2005-03-01

    An in situ cell has been constructed for temperature-dependent X-ray absorption experiments (EXAFS and XANES) of lead bromine (PbBr2) solutions in diethylene glycol in the temperature range from room temperature up to about 433 K. The solution is kept in a thermostated container made of carbon-reinforced teflon between two thin chemically inert quartz glass windows with a high transmission for hard X-rays. The construction of the cell ensures that these X-ray windows are thermalized so that any possible precipitation of solid products from the solution is inhibited. The cell consists mainly of two hermetically sealed teflon containers for the thermostating fluid (silicon oil) that were fitted together in such a way that a small and variable volume (approximately 2-4 cm3) for the liquid under investigation was achieved. A small thermocouple in a glass enclosure was placed in the solution to maintain temperature control and feedback to the thermostat. The cell design and its performance for temperature-dependent in situ investigations with X-rays are reported. Some preliminary results obtained for PbBr2 solutions in diethylene glycol are given.

  7. Highly conductive p-type amorphous oxides from low-temperature solution processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jinwang; Tokumitsu, Eisuke; Koyano, Mikio; Mitani, Tadaoki; Shimoda, Tatsuya

    2012-01-01

    We report solution-processed, highly conductive (resistivity 1.3-3.8 mΩ cm), p-type amorphous A-B-O (A = Bi, Pb; B = Ru, Ir), processable at temperatures (down to 240 °C) that are compatible with plastic substrates. The film surfaces are smooth on the atomic scale. Bi-Ru-O was analyzed in detail. A small optical bandgap (0.2 eV) with a valence band maximum (VBM) below but very close to the Fermi level (binding energy E VBM = 0.04 eV) explains the high conductivity and suggests that they are degenerated semiconductors. The conductivity changes from three-dimensional to two-dimensional with decreasing temperature across 25 K.

  8. Solution for laminar natural convection flows in a square cavity with temperature dependent viscosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, J.G. [Parsons Brinckerhoff, New York, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents an examination of numerical results for the buoyancy-driven convection heat transfer problem, in a two-dimensional enclosure under steady-state, laminar, incompressible, and temperature dependent viscosity fluid flow conditions. The vertical walls are exposed to different temperatures and the top and bottom are insulated. Rayleigh numbers of 10{sup 4}, 10{sup 5}, and 10{sup 6} are considered. Specific heat, thermal conductivity, and the thermal expansion coefficient are assumed constant. Density variation is included using the Oberbeck-Boussinesq approximation. The results are obtained using the SIMPLEC solution technique based on a power-law, finite-volume discretization scheme. The hydrodynamic and thermal fields are presented at various locations in the enclosures.

  9. On a closed form solution of the point kinetics equations with reactivity feedback of temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Jeronimo J.A.; Vilhena, Marco T.M.B.; Petersen, Claudio Z.; Bodmann, Bardo E.J.; Alvim, Antonio C.M.

    2011-01-01

    An analytical solution of the point kinetics equations to calculate reactivity as a function of time by the Decomposition method has recently appeared in the literature. In this paper, we go one step forward, by considering the neutron point kinetics equations together with temperature feedback effects. To accomplish that, we extended the point kinetics by a temperature perturbation, obtaining a second order nonlinear ordinary differential equation. This equation is then solved by the Decomposition Method, that is, by expanding the neutron density in a series and the nonlinear terms into Adomian Polynomials. Substituting these expansions into the nonlinear ordinary equation, we construct a recursive set of linear problems that can be solved by the methodology previously mentioned for the point kinetics equation. We also report on numerical simulations and comparisons against literature results. (author)

  10. Body temperature and cold sensation during and following exercise under temperate room conditions in cold‐sensitive young trained females

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, Naoto; Aoki‐Murakami, Erii; Tsuji, Bun; Kenny, Glen P.; Nagashima, Kei; Kondo, Narihiko; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated cold sensation at rest and in response to exercise‐induced changes in core and skin temperatures in cold‐sensitive exercise trained females. Fifty‐eight trained young females were screened by a questionnaire, selecting cold‐sensitive (Cold‐sensitive, n = 7) and non‐cold‐sensitive (Control, n = 7) individuals. Participants rested in a room at 29.5°C for ~100 min after which ambient temperature was reduced to 23.5°C where they remained resting for 60 min. Participants then...

  11. Simple and accurate solution for convective-radiative fin with temperature dependent thermal conductivity using double optimal linearization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouaziz, M.N.; Aziz, Abdul

    2010-01-01

    A novel concept of double optimal linearization is introduced and used to obtain a simple and accurate solution for the temperature distribution in a straight rectangular convective-radiative fin with temperature dependent thermal conductivity. The solution is built from the classical solution for a pure convection fin of constant thermal conductivity which appears in terms of hyperbolic functions. When compared with the direct numerical solution, the double optimally linearized solution is found to be accurate within 4% for a range of radiation-conduction and thermal conductivity parameters that are likely to be encountered in practice. The present solution is simple and offers superior accuracy compared with the fairly complex approximate solutions based on the homotopy perturbation method, variational iteration method, and the double series regular perturbation method. The fin efficiency expression resembles the classical result for the constant thermal conductivity convecting fin. The present results are easily usable by the practicing engineers in their thermal design and analysis work involving fins.

  12. LSENS: A General Chemical Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis Code for homogeneous gas-phase reactions. Part 1: Theory and numerical solution procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan

    1994-01-01

    LSENS, the Lewis General Chemical Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis Code, has been developed for solving complex, homogeneous, gas-phase chemical kinetics problems and contains sensitivity analysis for a variety of problems, including nonisothermal situations. This report is part 1 of a series of three reference publications that describe LENS, provide a detailed guide to its usage, and present many example problems. Part 1 derives the governing equations and describes the numerical solution procedures for the types of problems that can be solved. The accuracy and efficiency of LSENS are examined by means of various test problems, and comparisons with other methods and codes are presented. LSENS is a flexible, convenient, accurate, and efficient solver for chemical reaction problems such as static system; steady, one-dimensional, inviscid flow; reaction behind incident shock wave, including boundary layer correction; and perfectly stirred (highly backmixed) reactor. In addition, the chemical equilibrium state can be computed for the following assigned states: temperature and pressure, enthalpy and pressure, temperature and volume, and internal energy and volume. For static problems the code computes the sensitivity coefficients of the dependent variables and their temporal derivatives with respect to the initial values of the dependent variables and/or the three rate coefficient parameters of the chemical reactions.

  13. Thermodynamics of protonation of amines in aqueous solutions at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Inna, E-mail: inna.kim@sintef.no [SINTEF Materials and Chemistry, N-7465 Trondheim (Norway); Jens, Christian M., E-mail: chrijens@stud.ntnu.no [Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Grimstvedt, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.grimstvedt@sintef.no [SINTEF Materials and Chemistry, N-7465 Trondheim (Norway); Svendsen, Hallvard F., E-mail: hallvard.svendsen@chemeng.ntnu.no [Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), N-7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > Effect of ionic strength and temperature on dissociation constants of amines. > Effect of ionic strength of temperature on enthalpies of protonation of amines. > Measured dissociation constants and enthalpies of protonation used for fitting. > Coefficients for thermodynamically consistent correlations given for 5 amines. - Abstract: The dissociation constants, pK{sub a}, of monoethanolamine (MEA), N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP), 2(2-aminoethyl)etanolamine (AEEA), and piperazine (Pz) were measured by potentiometric titration over the temperature range (298.15 to 363.15) K. Enthalpies of protonation, {Delta}H{sub p}, were measured calorimetrically at temperatures from (298.15 to 393.15) K for MEA, MDEA, and AMP, and from (298.15 to 353.15) K for AEEA and Pz. In addition, the effect of the ionic strength of the solutions on the protonation of MDEA was studied using NaCl as background salt {l_brace}(0 to 5.5) mol/kg-H{sub 2}O){r_brace}. Correlations for the reaction equilibrium constants for proton dissociation are proposed for the studied amines based on the experimental data from literature and from this work. Both experimental enthalpy data and dissociation constants were used for fitting. The results from this work may be used for thermodynamic modeling of CO{sub 2} capture processes using amines.

  14. Measurement of bovine body and scrotal temperature using implanted temperature sensitive radio transmitters, data loggers and infrared thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallage, A. L.; Gaughan, J. B.; Lisle, A. T.; Beard, L.; Collins, C. W.; Johnston, S. D.

    2017-07-01

    Synchronous and continuous measurement of body (BT) and scrotal temperature (ST) without adverse welfare or behavioural interference is essential for understanding thermoregulation of the bull testis. This study compared three technologies for their efficacy for long-term measurement of the relationship between BT and ST by means of (1) temperature sensitive radio transmitters (RT), (2) data loggers (DL) and (3) infrared imaging (IRI). After an initial pilot study on two bulls to establish a surgical protocol, RTs and DLs were implanted into the flank and mid-scrotum of six Wagyu bulls for between 29 and 49 days. RT frequencies were scanned every 15 min, whilst DLs logged every 30 min. Infrared imaging of the body (flank) and scrotum of each bull was recorded hourly for one 24-h period and compared to RT and DL data. After a series of subsequent heat stress studies, bulls were castrated and testicular tissue samples processed for evidence of histopathology. Radio transmitters were less reliable than DLs; RTs lost >11 % of data, whilst 11 of the 12 DLs had 0 % data loss. IRI was only interpretable in 35.8 % of images recorded. Pearson correlations between DL and RT were strong for both BT ( r > 0.94, P 0.80, P animals post-surgery. Whilst scar tissue was observed at all surgical sutured sites when bulls were castrated, there was no evidence of testicular adhesion and normal active spermatogenesis was observed in six of the eight implanted testicles. There was no significant correlation of IRI with either DL or RT. We conclude that DLs provided to be a reliable continuous source of data for synchronous measurement of BT and ST.

  15. Effect of temperature on the dilution enthalpies of α,ω-amino acids in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, C.M.; Cadena, J.C.; Lamprecht, I.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The dilution of 3-amino propanoic acid, 4-amino butanoic acid, 5-amino pentanoic acid, and 6-amino hexanoic acid in water is an exothermic process at T = (293.15, 298.15, 303.15, and 308.15) K. → The limiting experimental slopes of the enthalpies of dilution with respect to the molality change Δm, are negative suggesting that the solutes interact with water primarily through their alkyl groups. → The value of the pairwise coefficient is positive at the temperatures considered, and the magnitude increases linearly with the number of methylene groups. → The comparison between the pairwise interaction coefficients for α,ω-amino acids and α-amino acids shows that the change in the enthalpic interaction coefficient is related to the relative position of the polar groups. - Abstract: Dilution enthalpies of aqueous solutions of 3-amino propanoic acid, 4-amino butanoic acid, 5-amino pentanoic acid, and 6-amino hexanoic acid were determined at T = (293.15, 298.15, 303.15, and 308.15) K using an LKB flow microcalorimeter. The homotactic interaction coefficients were obtained according to the McMillan-Mayer theory from the experimental data. For all the systems studied, the dilution of α,ω-amino acids in water is an exothermic process; the pair coefficients have positive values which increases with chain length. The obtained values of the interaction coefficients are interpreted in terms of solute-solvent and solute-solute interactions and are used as indicative of hydrophobic behavior of the amino acid studied.

  16. Differential chromosomal and mitochondrial DNA synthesis in temperature-sensitive mutants of Ustilago maydis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unrau, P.

    1977-01-01

    The amount and type of residual DNA synthesis was determined in eight temperature-sensitive mutants of the smut fungus Ustilago maydis after incubation at the restrictive temperature (32/sup 0/C) for eight hours. Mutants ts-220, ts-207, ts-432 and ts-346 were found to have an overall reduction in the synthesis of both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA in comparison to the wild-type. In mutants ts-20, tsd 1-1, ts-84 and pol 1-1 nuclear DNA synthesis was depressed relative to mitochondrial synthesis. The DNA-polymerase mutant pol 1-1 had persistent nuclear synthesis at about 50% of the rate of synthesis of mitochondrial DNA and similar behavior was observed in a diploid homozygous strain. Mutant ts-84 had an initial burst of DNA synthesis which was reduced for nuclear but not mitochondrial synthesis after three hours preincubation at 32/sup 0/C. tsd 1-1 and ts-20 had nuclear residual synthesis amounting to about 25% of the relative rate of mitochondrial synthesis which correlates to increasing UV sensitivity of these strains on incubation at 32/sup 0/C. A pol 1-1 ts-84 double mutant had an additive loss of nuclear DNA synthesis which indicates that the steps of replication involved may be sequential.

  17. Microarray study of temperature-dependent sensitivity and selectivity of metal/oxide sensing interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiffany, Jason; Cavicchi, Richard E.; Semancik, Stephen

    2001-02-01

    Conductometric gas microsensors offer the benefits of ppm-level sensitivity, real-time data, simple interfacing to electronics hardware, and low power consumption. The type of device we have been exploring consists of a sensor film deposited on a "microhotplate"- a 100 micron platform with built-in heating (to activate reactions on the sensing surface) and thermometry. We have been using combinatorial studies of 36-element arrays to characterize the relationship between sensor film composition, operating temperature, and response, as measured by the device's sensitivity and selectivity. Gases that have been tested on these arrays include methanol, ethanol, dichloromethane, propane, methane, acetone, benzene, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide, and are of interest in the management of environmental waste sites. These experiments compare tin oxide films modified by catalyst overlayers, and ultrathin metal seed layers. The seed layers are used as part of a chemical vapor deposition process that uses each array element's microheater to activate the deposition of SnO2, and control its microstructure. Low coverage (20 Ê) catalytic metals (Pd, Cu, Cr, In, Au) are deposited on the oxides by masked evaporation or sputtering. This presentation demonstrates the value of an array-based approach for developing film processing methods, measuring performance characteristics, and establishing reproducibility. It also illustrates how temperature-dependent response data for varied metal/oxide compositions can be used to tailor a microsensor array for a given application.

  18. The clear-sky greenhouse effect sensitivity to a sea surface temperature change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvel, J. PH.; Breon, F. M.

    1991-01-01

    The clear-sky greenhouse effect response to a sea surface temperature (SST or Ts) change is studied using outgoing clear-sky longwave radiation measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment. Considering geographical distributions for July 1987, the relation between the SST, the greenhouse effect (defined as the outgoing infrared flux trapped by atmospheric gases), and the precipitable water vapor content (W), estimated by the Special Sensor Microwave Imager, is analyzed first. A fairly linear relation between W and the normalized greenhouse effect g, is found. On the contrary, the SST dependence of both W and g exhibits nonlinearities with, especially, a large increase for SST above 25 C. This enhanced sensitivity of g and W can be interpreted in part by a corresponding large increase of atmospheric water vapor content related to the transition from subtropical dry regions to equatorial moist regions. Using two years of data (1985 and 1986), the normalized greenhouse effect sensitivity to the sea surface temperature is computed from the interannual variation of monthly mean values.

  19. Computational design and characterization of a temperature-sensitive plasmid replicon for gram positive thermophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olson Daniel G

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temperature-sensitive (Ts plasmids are useful tools for genetic engineering, but there are currently none compatible with the gram positive, thermophilic, obligate anaerobe, Clostridium thermocellum. Traditional mutagenesis techniques yield Ts mutants at a low frequency, and therefore requires the development of high-throughput screening protocols, which are also not available for this organism. Recently there has been progress in the development of computer algorithms which can predict Ts mutations. Most plasmids currently used for genetic modification of C. thermocellum are based on the replicon of plasmid pNW33N, which replicates using the RepB replication protein. To address this problem, we set out to create a Ts plasmid by mutating the gene coding for the RepB replication protein using an algorithm designed by Varadarajan et al. (1996 for predicting Ts mutants based on the amino-acid sequence of the protein. Results A library of 34 mutant plasmids was designed, synthesized and screened, resulting in 6 mutants which exhibited a Ts phenotype. Of these 6, the one with the most temperature-sensitive phenotype (M166A was compared with the original plasmid. It exhibited lower stability at 48°C and was completely unable to replicate at 55°C. Conclusions The plasmid described in this work could be useful in future efforts to genetically engineer C. thermocellum, and the method used to generate this plasmid may be useful for others trying to make Ts plasmids.

  20. Influence of pre-deformation, sensitization and oxidation in high temperature water on corrosion resistance of AISI 304 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Jinlong, E-mail: ljltsinghua@126.com [Beijing Key Laboratory of Fine Ceramics, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Zhongguancun Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); State Key Lab of New Ceramic and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liang, Tongxiang [Beijing Key Laboratory of Fine Ceramics, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Zhongguancun Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); State Key Lab of New Ceramic and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Luo, Hongyun [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Xueyuan Road 37, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • The pre-strain accelerated desensitization and sensitization for austenitic stainless steels. • Low temperature sensitization (carbide precipitation) induced α′-martensite. • The sensitization level could affect directly corrosion resistance of the oxide film. - Abstract: The effects of pre-deformation on sensitization of AISI 304 stainless steel were investigated by the double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation test. The effects of pre-deformation and sensitization on high temperature oxidized film formed in high temperature water were analyzed by a XRD and SEM. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy at room temperature was used to study corrosion resistance of oxidized film. The point defect density of oxidized film was calculated by Mott–Schottky plots. The results showed that the value of the degree of sensitization first decreased and then slight increased with the increasing of engineering strain. Moreover, low temperature promoted to form sensitization induced “secondary” α′-martensite. The sample with 20% engineering strain had higher impedance value than other samples. The result was supported by further Mott–Schottky experiments. Considering increased α′-martensite with the increasing of strain, the results of the impedance were more consistent with values of the degree of sensitization.

  1. Correlation of high-temperature stability of alpha-chymotrypsin with 'salting-in' properties of solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitsky VYu; Panova, A A; Mozhaev, V V

    1994-01-15

    A correlation between the stability of alpha-chymotrypsin against irreversible thermal inactivation at high temperatures (long-term stability) and the coefficient of Setchenov equation as a measure of salting-in/out efficiency of solutes in the Hofmeister series has been found. An increase in the concentration of salting-in solutes (KSCN, urea, guanidinium chloride, formamide) leads to a many-fold decrease of the inactivation rate of the enzyme. In contrast, addition of salting-out solutes has a small effect on the long-term stability of alpha-chymotrypsin at high temperatures. The effects of solutes are additive with respect to their salting-in/out capacities; the stabilizing action of the solutes is determined by the calculated Setchenov coefficient of solution. The correlation is explained by a solute-driven shift of the conformational equilibrium between the 'low-temperature' native and the 'high-temperature' denatured forms of the enzyme within the range of the kinetic scheme put forward in the preceding paper in this journal: irreversible inactivation of the high-temperature form proceeds much more slowly compared with the low-temperature form.

  2. Sensitivity of Distributions of Climate System Properties to Surface Temperature Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libardoni, A. G.; Forest, C. E.

    2011-12-01

    Predictions of climate change from models depend strongly on the representation of climate system properties emerging from the processes and feedbacks in the models. The quality of any model prediction can be evaluated by determining how well its output reproduces the observed climate system. With this evaluation, the reliability of climate projections derived from the model and provided for policy makers is assessed and quantified. In this study, surface temperature, upper-air temperature, and ocean heat content data are used to constrain the distributions of the parameters that define three climate system properties in the MIT Integrated Global Systems Model: climate sensitivity, the rate of ocean heat uptake into the deep ocean, and net anthropogenic aerosol forcing. In particular, we explore the sensitivity of the distributions to the surface temperature dataset used to estimate the likelihood of model output given the observed climate records. In total, five different reconstructions of past surface temperatures are used and the resulting parameter distribution functions differ from each other. Differences in estimates of climate sensitivity mode and mean are as great as 1 K between the datasets, with an overall range of 1.2 to 5.3 K using the 5-95 confidence intervals. Ocean effective diffusivity is poorly constrained regardless of which dataset is used. All distributions show broad distributions and only three show signs of a distribution mode. When a mode is present, they tend to be for low diffusivity values. Distributions for the net aerosol forcing show similar shapes and cluster into two groups that are shifted by approximately 0.1 watts per square meter. However, the overall spread of forcing values from the 5-95 confidence interval, -0.19 to -0.83 watts per square meter, is small compared to other uncertainties in climate forcings. Transient climate response estimates derived from these distributions range between 0.87 and 2.41 K. Similar to the

  3. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses applied to one-dimensional radionuclide transport in a layered fractured rock: MULTFRAC --Analytic solutions and local sensitivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gureghian, A.B.; Wu, Y.T.; Sagar, B.

    1992-12-01

    Exact analytical solutions based on the Laplace transforms are derived for describing the one-dimensional space-time-dependent, advective transport of a decaying species in a layered, saturated rock system intersected by a planar fracture of varying aperture. These solutions, which account for advection in fracture, molecular diffusion into the rock matrix, adsorption in both fracture and matrix, and radioactive decay, predict the concentrations in both fracture and rock matrix and the cumulative mass in the fracture. The solute migration domain in both fracture and rock is assumed to be semi-infinite with non-zero initial conditions. The concentration of each nuclide at the source is allowed to decay either continuously or according to some periodical fluctuations where both are subjected to either a step or band release mode. Two numerical examples related to the transport of Np-237 and Cm-245 in a five-layered system of fractured rock were used to verify these solutions with several well established evaluation methods of Laplace inversion integrals in the real and complex domain. In addition, with respect to the model parameters, a comparison of the analytically derived local sensitivities for the concentration and cumulative mass of Np-237 in the fracture with the ones obtained through a finite-difference method of approximation is also reported

  4. Perovskite Nanoparticle-Sensitized Ga2O3 Nanorod Arrays for CO Detection at High Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui-Jan; Baltrus, John P; Gao, Haiyong; Ding, Yong; Nam, Chang-Yong; Ohodnicki, Paul; Gao, Pu-Xian

    2016-04-13

    Noble metal nanoparticles are extensively used for sensitizing metal oxide chemical sensors through the catalytic spillover mechanism. However, due to earth-scarcity and high cost of noble metals, finding replacements presents a great economic benefit. Besides, high temperature and harsh environment sensor applications demand material stability under conditions approaching thermal and chemical stability limits of noble metals. In this study, we employed thermally stable perovskite-type La(0.8)Sr(0.2)FeO3 (LSFO) nanoparticle surface decoration on Ga2O3 nanorod array gas sensors and discovered an order of magnitude enhanced sensitivity to carbon monoxide at 500 °C. The LSFO nanoparticle catalysts was of comparable performance to that achieved by Pt nanoparticles, with a much lower weight loading than Pt. Detailed electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies suggested the LSFO nanoparticle sensitization effect is attributed to a spillover-like effect associated with the gas-LSFO-Ga2O3 triple-interfaces that spread the negatively charged surface oxygen ions from LSFO nanoparticles surfaces over to β-Ga2O3 nanorod surfaces with faster surface CO oxidation reactions.

  5. Effect of temperature on chlorproguanil and proguanil hydrochloride solutions: a chemical stability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolawole, J A; Mustapha, A; Abdul-Aguye, I; Ochekpe, N

    1996-04-01

    Chlorproguanil and proguanil hydrochloride solutions in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid, water and 1 M ammonium hydroxide were subjected to different temperatures (22-80 degrees C) for 68 h. The decomposition rate constants for chlorproguanil ranged from 1.60 to 47.6 x 10(3) h-1 in acid, 3.5 to 18 x 10(3) h-1 in water and 3.87 to 32.5 x 10(3) h-1 in base, between 50 degrees C and 80 degrees C. The activation energy Ea was 96.5, 52.12 and 62.1 kJ mol-1 in acid, water and base respectively. The proguanil decomposition rate constant ranged from 1.72 to 18.5 x 10(3) h-1 in acid, 1.58 to 9.67 x 10(3) h-1 in water and 2.34 to 15.77 x 10(3) h-1 in base, between 50 degrees C and 80 degrees C, with Ea values of 54.7, 73.3 and 62.5 kJ mol-1. Three unidentified degradation products were separated in the acid solution for each of the compounds. Chlorproguanil and proguanil are stable (t1/2 values over 30 days and up to 287 days respectively) in acid, water and base at temperatures below 22 degrees C.

  6. Pitting corrosion of Inconel 600 in chloride and sulfate solutions at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Mingyu; Yu Geping

    1993-01-01

    Pitting corrosion of Inconel 600 was examined in chloride and sulfate solutions through usage of potentiodynamic polarization techniques. The effects of chloride and sulfate concentration were investigated in the range of 0.0001 to 0.1 M. Increasing chloride concentrations resulted in active shifts of the pit nucleation potential. Immunity to pitting corrosion was evident at a chloride level below 0.005 M. Increasing sulfate concentrations resulted in improved pitting resistance of Inconel 600 in chloride solutions. Detrimental effects associated with pitting were evident with low-level sulfate being added to dilute chloride media. The density of pits increased with increasing chloride concentrations or temperature between room temperature and 70 C. Systematic trends for the depth of pits were not evident. The observations of pitting corrosion in open immersion were consistent with those in polarization methods. Corrosion products contained in the pits were enriched in nickel, chromium and iron with a small amount of titanium and silicon. The enrichment of chlorine or sulfur was still, however, not found. (orig.)

  7. Sensitivity analysis of efficient solution in vector MINMAX boolean programming problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A. Emelichev

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available We consider a multiple criterion Boolean programming problem with MINMAX partial criteria. The extreme level of independent perturbations of partial criteria parameters such that efficient (Pareto optimal solution preserves optimality was obtained.

  8. Differences in SOM decomposition and temperature sensitivity among soil aggregate size classes in a temperate grasslands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Wang

    Full Text Available The principle of enzyme kinetics suggests that the temperature sensitivity (Q10 of soil organic matter (SOM decomposition is inversely related to organic carbon (C quality, i.e., the C quality-temperature (CQT hypothesis. We tested this hypothesis by performing laboratory incubation experiments with bulk soil, macroaggregates (MA, 250-2000 μm, microaggregates (MI, 53-250 μm, and mineral fractions (MF, MF>bulk soil >MI(P <0.05. The Q10 values were highest for MA, followed (in decreasing order by bulk soil, MF, and MI. Similarly, the activation energies (Ea for MA, bulk soil, MF, and MI were 48.47, 33.26, 27.01, and 23.18 KJ mol-1, respectively. The observed significant negative correlations between Q10 and C quality index in bulk soil and soil aggregates (P<0.05 suggested that the CQT hypothesis is applicable to soil aggregates. Cumulative C emission differed significantly among aggregate size classes (P <0.0001, with the largest values occurring in MA (1101 μg g-1, followed by MF (976 μg g-1 and MI (879 μg g-1. These findings suggest that feedback from SOM decomposition in response to changing temperature is closely associated withsoil aggregation and highlights the complex responses of ecosystem C budgets to future warming scenarios.

  9. Effect of oxyanions on the IGSCC inhibition of sensitized 304 stainless steel in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuge, Hiroyuki; Murayama, Junichiro; Nagano, Hiroo.

    1983-01-01

    Effect of oxyanions such as MoO 4 2- , WO 4 2- , and CrO 4 2- on the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of Type 304 stainless steel in high temperature water was studied. The results obtained are as follows: 1) Addition of such oxyanion as MoO 4 2- , WO 4 2- , and CrO 4 2- suppresses IGSCC of sensitized Type 304 stainless steel in high temperature nondeaerated water. The effectiveness of the inhibitive action by the oxyanion is ranked in the order of MoO 4 2- >WO 4 2- >CrO 4 2- . 2) The mechanism of IGSCC inhibition by MoO 4 2- ion for sentized Type 304 stainless steel in high temperature water is considered as follows, i.e., the presence MoO 4 2- ion decreases the dissolution rate of Cr depleted zone at grain boundaries to the level of matrix by helping the formation of the Cr rich film containing MoO 3 or adsorbed MoO 4 2- ion on the surface of Type 304 stainless steel. (author)

  10. Temperature sensitive lethal factors and puparial colour sex separation mechanisms in the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wied.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch-Petersen, E.

    1990-01-01

    A programme to develop genetic sexing mechanisms in the Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly), Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), was initiated at the IAEA Laboratories, Seibersdorf, in 1983. Because of the potential benefits arising from the elimination of females early in the developmental cycle, combined with the anticipated relative ease of inducing temperature sensitive lethal (tsl) factors, it was decided to attempt to induce and isolate tsl factors active in the egg or early larval stages. Initially, five recombination suppressor (RS) strains were isolated. The degree of recombination suppression ranged from 77.6% to 99.1%. The viability of each of the five RS strains was assessed and RS 30/55 was selected as the most suitable strain. Ethyl methanesulphonate (EMS) was used to induce the tsl factors, by feeding two-day old adult males with a suspension of EMS in a 10% solution of sugar in the drinking water supply. Temperature tolerance tests indicated a discriminating temperature of 32 deg. C when isolating tsl factors active in the egg stage and 35 deg. C when isolating such factors in the early larval stage. A total of 39 and 22 tsl factors have been isolated in the two stages, respectively. However, none has yet proved stable. Induction of tsl factors with a reduced dose of EMS is now being attempted. An alternative genetic sexing programme was initiated in 1985, based on the use of pupal colour dimorphisms. Previously, a genetic sexing strain, T:Y(wp + )101, based on a white female/brown male puparial colour dimorphism, had twice been assessed for stability under mass rearing conditions. In both cases the sexual colour dimorphism disintegrated immediately. Another similarly dimorphic strain, T:Y(wp + )30C, was developed. This strain remained stable for seven generations of mass rearing, after which it started to disintegrate. Disintegration of this strain was probably caused by accidental contamination by wild type medflies. 34 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  11. Ultra-sensitive quasi-distributed temperature sensor based on an apodized fiber Bragg grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Nazmi A; El Serafy, Hatem O

    2018-01-10

    This work targets a remarkable quasi-distributed temperature sensor based on an apodized fiber Bragg grating. To achieve this, the mathematical formula for a proposed apodization function is carried out and tested. Then, an optimization parametric process required to achieve the remarkable accuracy that is based on coupled mode theory (CMT) is done. A detailed investigation for the side lobe analysis, which is a primary judgment factor, especially in quasi-distributed configuration, is investigated. A comparison between elite selection of apodization profiles (extracted from related literatures) and the proposed modified-Nuttal profile is carried out covering reflectivity peak, full width half maximum (FWHM), and side lobe analysis. The optimization process concludes that the proposed modified-Nuttal profile with a length (L) of 15 mm and refractive index modulation amplitude (Δn) of 1.4×10 -4 is the optimum choice for single-stage and quasi-distributed temperature sensor networks. At previous values, the proposed profile achieves an acceptable reflectivity peak of 10 -0.426   dB, acceptable FWHM of 0.0808 nm, lowest side lobe maximum (SL max) of 7.037×10 -12   dB, lowest side lobe average (SL avg) of 3.883×10 -12   dB, and lowest side lobe suppression ratio (SLSR) of 1.875×10 -11   dB. These optimized characteristics lead to an accurate single-stage sensor with a temperature sensitivity of 0.0136 nm/°C. For the quasi-distributed scenario, a noteworthy total isolation of 91 dB is achieved without temperature, and an isolation of 4.83 dB is achieved while applying temperature of 110°C for a five-stage temperature-sensing network. Further investigation is made proving that consistency in choosing the apodization profile in the quasi-distributed network is mandatory. If the consistency condition is violated, the proposed profile still survives with a casualty of side lobe level rise of -73.2070  dB when adding uniform apodization and

  12. Solution equilibrium behind the room-temperature synthesis of nanocrystalline titanium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seisenbaeva, Gulaim A.; Daniel, Geoffrey; Nedelec, Jean-Marie; Kessler, Vadim G.

    2013-03-01

    Formation of nanocrystalline and monodisperse TiO2 from a water soluble and stable precursor, ammonium oxo-lactato-titanate, (NH4)8Ti4O4(Lactate)8.4H2O, often referred to as TiBALDH or TALH, is demonstrated to be due to a coordination equilibrium. This compound, individual in the solid state, exists in solution in equilibrium with ammonium tris-lactato-titanate, (NH4)2Ti(Lactate)3 and uniform crystalline TiO2 nanoparticles (anatase) stabilized by surface-capping with lactate ligands. This equilibrium can be shifted towards nano-TiO2via application of a less polar solvent like methanol or ethanol, dilution of the solution, introduction of salts or raising the temperature, and reverted on addition of polar and strongly solvating media such as dimethyl sulfoxide, according to NMR. Aggregation and precipitation of the particles were followed by DLS and could be achieved by a decrease in their surface charge by adsorption of strongly hydrogen-bonding cations, e.g. in solutions of ammonia, ethanolamine or amino acid arginine or by addition of ethanol. The observed equilibrium may be involved in formation of nano-titania on the surface of plant roots exerting chelating organic carboxylate ligands and thus potentially influencing plant interactions.Formation of nanocrystalline and monodisperse TiO2 from a water soluble and stable precursor, ammonium oxo-lactato-titanate, (NH4)8Ti4O4(Lactate)8.4H2O, often referred to as TiBALDH or TALH, is demonstrated to be due to a coordination equilibrium. This compound, individual in the solid state, exists in solution in equilibrium with ammonium tris-lactato-titanate, (NH4)2Ti(Lactate)3 and uniform crystalline TiO2 nanoparticles (anatase) stabilized by surface-capping with lactate ligands. This equilibrium can be shifted towards nano-TiO2via application of a less polar solvent like methanol or ethanol, dilution of the solution, introduction of salts or raising the temperature, and reverted on addition of polar and strongly solvating

  13. Estimation of influence of a solution of a boric acid and temperatures on a isolation material from basalt fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyshnova, V.V.; Skobelkina, T.N.; Yurchenko, V.G.; Knot'ko, A.V.; Putlyaev, V.I.

    2006-01-01

    Paper presents the results of investigation into long-term simultaneous effect of a medium (boric acid solution) and temperature on a thermal-insulating basalt fiber material. The basalt fiber clothes used at the NPP were tested. When evaluating simultaneous effect of boric acid solution and temperature one kept watch on density, compressibility, elasticity and diameter of fiber. According to the results of 30 day tests, the basic technical parameters of the thermal-insulating material have changed insignificantly [ru

  14. Effects of temperature, genetic variation and species competition on the sensitivity of algae populations to the antibiotic enrofloxacin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rico, Andreu; Zhao, Wenkai; Gillissen, Frits; Lürling, Miquel; Brink, van den Paul J.

    2018-01-01

    Primary producers are amongst the most sensitive organisms to antibiotic pollution in aquatic ecosystems. To date, there is little information on how different environmental conditions may affect their sensitivity to antibiotics. In this study we assessed how temperature, genetic variation and

  15. Designing Metallic and Insulating Nanocrystal Heterostructures to Fabricate Highly Sensitive and Solution Processed Strain Gauges for Wearable Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woo Seok; Lee, Seung-Wook; Joh, Hyungmok; Seong, Mingi; Kim, Haneun; Kang, Min Su; Cho, Ki-Hyun; Sung, Yun-Mo; Oh, Soong Ju

    2017-12-01

    All-solution processed, high-performance wearable strain sensors are demonstrated using heterostructure nanocrystal (NC) solids. By incorporating insulating artificial atoms of CdSe quantum dot NCs into metallic artificial atoms of Au NC thin film matrix, metal-insulator heterostructures are designed. This hybrid structure results in a shift close to the percolation threshold, modifying the charge transport mechanism and enhancing sensitivity in accordance with the site percolation theory. The number of electrical pathways is also manipulated by creating nanocracks to further increase its sensitivity, inspired from the bond percolation theory. The combination of the two strategies achieves gauge factor up to 5045, the highest sensitivity recorded among NC-based strain gauges. These strain sensors show high reliability, durability, frequency stability, and negligible hysteresis. The fundamental charge transport behavior of these NC solids is investigated and the combined site and bond percolation theory is developed to illuminate the origin of their enhanced sensitivity. Finally, all NC-based and solution-processed strain gauge sensor arrays are fabricated, which effectively measure the motion of each finger joint, the pulse of heart rate, and the movement of vocal cords of human. This work provides a pathway for designing low-cost and high-performance electronic skin or wearable devices. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Analytical solution and numerical simulation of the liquid nitrogen freezing-temperature field of a single pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Haibing; Xu, Liuxun; Yang, Yugui; Li, Longqi

    2018-05-01

    Artificial liquid nitrogen freezing technology is widely used in urban underground engineering due to its technical advantages, such as simple freezing system, high freezing speed, low freezing temperature, high strength of frozen soil, and absence of pollution. However, technical difficulties such as undefined range of liquid nitrogen freezing and thickness of frozen wall gradually emerge during the application process. Thus, the analytical solution of the freezing-temperature field of a single pipe is established considering the freezing temperature of soil and the constant temperature of freezing pipe wall. This solution is then applied in a liquid nitrogen freezing project. Calculation results show that the radius of freezing front of liquid nitrogen is proportional to the square root of freezing time. The radius of the freezing front also decreases with decreased the freezing temperature, and the temperature gradient of soil decreases with increased distance from the freezing pipe. The radius of cooling zone in the unfrozen area is approximately four times the radius of the freezing front. Meanwhile, the numerical simulation of the liquid nitrogen freezing-temperature field of a single pipe is conducted using the Abaqus finite-element program. Results show that the numerical simulation of soil temperature distribution law well agrees with the analytical solution, further verifies the reliability of the established analytical solution of the liquid nitrogen freezing-temperature field of a single pipe.

  17. Material degradation due to moisture and temperature. Part 1: mathematical model, analysis, and analytical solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C.; Mudunuru, M. K.; Nakshatrala, K. B.

    2016-11-01

    The mechanical response, serviceability, and load-bearing capacity of materials and structural components can be adversely affected due to external stimuli, which include exposure to a corrosive chemical species, high temperatures, temperature fluctuations (i.e., freezing-thawing), cyclic mechanical loading, just to name a few. It is, therefore, of paramount importance in several branches of engineering—ranging from aerospace engineering, civil engineering to biomedical engineering—to have a fundamental understanding of degradation of materials, as the materials in these applications are often subjected to adverse environments. As a result of recent advancements in material science, new materials such as fiber-reinforced polymers and multi-functional materials that exhibit high ductility have been developed and widely used, for example, as infrastructural materials or in medical devices (e.g., stents). The traditional small-strain approaches of modeling these materials will not be adequate. In this paper, we study degradation of materials due to an exposure to chemical species and temperature under large strain and large deformations. In the first part of our research work, we present a consistent mathematical model with firm thermodynamic underpinning. We then obtain semi-analytical solutions of several canonical problems to illustrate the nature of the quasi-static and unsteady behaviors of degrading hyperelastic solids.

  18. Copper(II) oxide solubility behavior in aqueous sodium phosphate solutions at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziemniak, S.E.; Jones, M.E.; Combs, K.E.S.

    1990-02-01

    A platinum-lined, flowing autoclave facility is used to investigate the solubility behavior of copper(II) oxide (CuO) in aqueous sodium phosphate solutions at temperatures between 292 and 535 K. Copper solubilities are observed to increase continuously with temperature and phosphate concentration. The measured solubility is examined via a Cu(II) ion hydrolysis/complexing model and thermodynamic functions for the hydrolysis/complexing reactions are obtained from a least- squares analysis of the data. Altogether, thermochemical properties are established for five anionic complexes: Cu(OH) 3 - , Cu(OH) 4 = , Cu(OH) 2 (HPO 4 ) = , Cu(OH) 3 (H 2 PO 4 ) = , and Cu(OH) 2 (PO 4 ) ≡ . Precise thermochemical parameters are also derived for the Cu(OH) + hydroxocomplex based on CuO solubility behavior previously observed in pure water (*) at elevated temperatures. The relative ease of Cu(II) ion hydrolysis is such that Cu(OH) 3 - species become the preferred hydroxocomplex for pH ≥ 9.4. 20 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs

  19. Room-temperature solution synthesis of Ag nanoparticle functionalized molybdenum oxide nanowires and their catalytic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Wenjun; Huang Huandi; Zhu Yanjun; Li Xiaoyun; Wang Xuebin; Li Chaorong; Chen Benyong; Wang Ge; Shi Zhan

    2012-01-01

    A simple chemical solution route for the synthesis of large-scale high-quality Ag nanoparticle functionalized molybdenum oxide nanowire at room temperature has been developed. In the synthesis, the protonated amine was intercalated into the molybdenum bronze layers to reduce the electrostatic force of the lamellar structures, and then the Ag nanoparticle functionalized long nanowires could be easily induced by a redox reaction between a molybdenum oxide–amine intermediate and Ag + at room temperature. The intercalation lamellar structures improved the nucleation and growth of the Ag nanoparticles, with the result that uniform Ag nanoparticles occurred on the surface of the MoO 3 nanowire. In this way Ag nanoparticles with average sizes of around 6 nm, and high-purity nanowires with mean diameter of around 50 nm and with typical lengths of several tens to hundreds of micrometers were produced. The heteronanostructured nanowires were intricately and inseparably connected to each other with hydrogen bonds and/or bridge oxygen atoms and packed together, forming a paper-like porous network film. The Ag–MoO 3 nanowire film performs a promoted catalytic property for the epoxidation of cis-cyclooctene, and the heteronanostructured nanowire film sensor shows excellent sensing performance to hydrogen and oxygen at room temperature. (paper)

  20. Cathodic deposition of CdSe films from dimethyl formamide solution at optimized temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, J. [Department of Chemistry, Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711 103, West Bengal (India)]. E-mail: jayati_datta@rediffmail.com; Bhattacharya, C. [Department of Chemistry, Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711 103, West Bengal (India); Visiting Research Associate, School of Materials Science and Engineering, UNSW (Australia); Bandyopadhyay, S. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, UNSW, Sydney 2052 (Australia)

    2006-12-15

    In the present paper, thin film CdSe compound semiconductors have been electroplated on transparent conducting oxide coated glass substrates from nonaqueous dimethyl formamide bath containing CdCl{sub 2}, KI and Se under controlled temperature ranging from 100 to 140 deg. C. Thickness of the deposited films as obtained through focussed ion beam technique as well as their microstructural and photoelectrochemical properties have been found to depend on temperature. The film growth was therefore optimized at a bath temperature {approx}125 deg. C. The formation of crystallites in the range of 100-150 nm size has been ascertained through atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Energy dispersive analysis of X-rays for the as deposited film confirmed the 1:1 composition of CdSe compound in the matrix exhibiting band-gap energy of 1.74 eV. Microstructural properties of the deposited films have been determined through X-ray diffraction studies, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction pattern analysis. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and current-potential measurements have been performed to characterize the electrochemical behavior of the semiconductor-electrolyte interface. The photo-activity of the films have been recorded in polysulphide solution under illumination and solar conversion efficiency {>=}1% was achieved.

  1. Characterization of Modified Tapioca Starch Solutions and Their Sprays for High Temperature Coating Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, M. Y.; Sulaiman, S. A.; Ariwahjoedi, B.; Shaari, Ku Zilati Ku

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the research was to understand and improve the unusual physical and atomization properties of the complexes/adhesives derived from the tapioca starch by addition of borate and urea. The characterization of physical properties of the synthesized adhesives was carried out by determining the effect of temperature, shear rate, and mass concentration of thickener/stabilizer on the complex viscosity, density, and surface tension. In later stage, phenomenological analyses of spray jet breakup of heated complexes were performed in still air. Using a high speed digital camera, the jet breakup dynamics were visualized as a function of the system input parameters. The further analysis of the grabbed images confirmed the strong influence of the input processing parameters on full cone spray patternation. It was also predicted that the heated starch adhesive solutions generate a dispersed spray pattern by utilizing the partial evaporation of the spraying medium. Below 40°C of heating temperature, the radial spray cone width and angle did not vary significantly with increasing Reynolds and Weber numbers at early injection phases leading to increased macroscopic spray propagation. The discharge coefficient, mean flow rate, and mean flow velocity were significantly influenced by the load pressure but less affected by the temperature. PMID:24592165

  2. Room-temperature solution synthesis of Ag nanoparticle functionalized molybdenum oxide nanowires and their catalytic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wenjun; Huang, Huandi; Zhu, Yanjun; Li, Xiaoyun; Wang, Xuebin; Li, Chaorong; Chen, Benyong; Wang, Ge; Shi, Zhan

    2012-10-26

    A simple chemical solution route for the synthesis of large-scale high-quality Ag nanoparticle functionalized molybdenum oxide nanowire at room temperature has been developed. In the synthesis, the protonated amine was intercalated into the molybdenum bronze layers to reduce the electrostatic force of the lamellar structures, and then the Ag nanoparticle functionalized long nanowires could be easily induced by a redox reaction between a molybdenum oxide-amine intermediate and Ag(+) at room temperature. The intercalation lamellar structures improved the nucleation and growth of the Ag nanoparticles, with the result that uniform Ag nanoparticles occurred on the surface of the MoO(3) nanowire. In this way Ag nanoparticles with average sizes of around 6 nm, and high-purity nanowires with mean diameter of around 50 nm and with typical lengths of several tens to hundreds of micrometers were produced. The heteronanostructured nanowires were intricately and inseparably connected to each other with hydrogen bonds and/or bridge oxygen atoms and packed together, forming a paper-like porous network film. The Ag-MoO(3) nanowire film performs a promoted catalytic property for the epoxidation of cis-cyclooctene, and the heteronanostructured nanowire film sensor shows excellent sensing performance to hydrogen and oxygen at room temperature.

  3. High-Pressure-High-Temperature Processing Reduces Maillard Reaction and Viscosity in Whey Protein-Sugar Solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avila Ruiz, Geraldine; Xi, Bingyan; Minor, Marcel; Sala, Guido; Boekel, van Tiny; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Stieger, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the influence of pressure in high-pressure-high-temperature (HPHT) processing on Maillard reactions and protein aggregation of whey protein-sugar solutions. Solutions of whey protein isolate containing either glucose or trehalose at pH 6, 7, and 9 were

  4. Structural studies of aqueous solutions at high temperatures. Critical opalescence and hydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, D.M.

    2000-09-01

    Neutron scattering techniques were used to study aspects of the static, or equilibrium, structure at microscopic scales in a number of aqueous solutions at non ambient conditions (Temperature, T > 300 K, and pressure, P > 1 bar). Critical opalescence was observed in both pure D 2 O and a NaCI-D 2 O mixture by means of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), as described in Part I. The dependence of the correlation length, ξ, and the long wavelength limit, S(0), was measured at a number of state points on the critical isochore. The results are interpreted in terms of theories of critical phenomena; in particular the expected power law behaviour of ξ and S(0) with respect to reduced temperature, t, on the critical isochore. In the case of D 2 O, we observe the expected 3d-Ising behaviour with exponents (ν = 0.623 ± 0.030, γ = 1.14 ± 0.05) and amplitudes in agreement with theoretical and semi-empirical predictions. We performed measurements on aqueous sodium chloride, equivalent to those on pure 020, with the intention of classifying the critical behaviour. Although strong power-law divergence of the quantities ξ and S(0) was not observed, we find that the value of S(0) for a given ξ is strongly reduced in the ionic solution with respect to the pure solvent. Such behaviour is inconsistent with a thermodynamic model of aqueous sodium chloride, based on experimental thermodynamic data and the expected asymptotic 3d-Ising behaviour. Short-range structural correlations between solute and solvent atoms in aqueous solutions were studied by the technique of neutron diffraction and isotopic substitution (NDIS), as described in Part II. The anion hydration structure in 1.5 molal aqueous NaCl, was investigated at (T = 580 K, P = 800 bar) and (T = 380 K, P = 200 bar). Isotopic substitution was performed on the chloride ion, enabling the difference between scattering functions to be interpreted in terms of CI-H and CI-O correlation functions. The results show the chloride

  5. Structural studies of aqueous solutions at high temperatures. Critical opalescence and hydration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, D.M

    2000-09-01

    Neutron scattering techniques were used to study aspects of the static, or equilibrium, structure at microscopic scales in a number of aqueous solutions at non ambient conditions (Temperature, T > 300 K, and pressure, P > 1 bar). Critical opalescence was observed in both pure D{sub 2}O and a NaCI-D{sub 2}O mixture by means of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), as described in Part I. The dependence of the correlation length, {xi}, and the long wavelength limit, S(0), was measured at a number of state points on the critical isochore. The results are interpreted in terms of theories of critical phenomena; in particular the expected power law behaviour of {xi} and S(0) with respect to reduced temperature, t, on the critical isochore. In the case of D{sub 2}O, we observe the expected 3d-Ising behaviour with exponents ({nu} = 0.623 {+-} 0.030, {gamma} = 1.14 {+-} 0.05) and amplitudes in agreement with theoretical and semi-empirical predictions. We performed measurements on aqueous sodium chloride, equivalent to those on pure 020, with the intention of classifying the critical behaviour. Although strong power-law divergence of the quantities {xi} and S(0) was not observed, we find that the value of S(0) for a given {xi} is strongly reduced in the ionic solution with respect to the pure solvent. Such behaviour is inconsistent with a thermodynamic model of aqueous sodium chloride, based on experimental thermodynamic data and the expected asymptotic 3d-Ising behaviour. Short-range structural correlations between solute and solvent atoms in aqueous solutions were studied by the technique of neutron diffraction and isotopic substitution (NDIS), as described in Part II. The anion hydration structure in 1.5 molal aqueous NaCl, was investigated at (T = 580 K, P = 800 bar) and (T = 380 K, P = 200 bar). Isotopic substitution was performed on the chloride ion, enabling the difference between scattering functions to be interpreted in terms of CI-H and CI-O correlation functions

  6. Photo-sensitive Ge nanocrystal based films controlled by substrate deposition temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Stavarache, Ionel

    2017-07-21

    Lowering the temperature of crystallization by deposition of thin films on a heated substrate represents the easiest way to find new means to develop and improve new working devices based on nanocrystals embedded in thin films. The improvements are strongly related with the increasing of operation speed, substantially decreasing the energy consumption and reducing unit fabrication costs of the respective semiconductor devices. This approach avoids major problems, such as those related to diffusion or difficulties in controlling of nanocrystallites size, which appear during thermal treatments at high temperatures after deposition. It is reported here the significant progress introduced by synthesis procedure to the in-situ structuring of Ge nanocrystallites in SiO2 thin films by heating the substrate at low temperature, 400 °C during co-deposition of Ge and SiO2 by magnetron sputtering. As a proof-of-concept, a Si/Ge-NCs:SiO2 photo-sensitive structure was fabricated thereof and characterized. The structure shows superior performance on broad operation bandwidth from visible to near-infrared, as strong rectification properties in dark, significant current rise in the inversion mode when illuminated, high responsivity, high photo-detectivity of 1014 Jones, quick response and significant conversion efficiency of 850 %. This simple preparation approach brings an important contribution to the efort of structuring Ge nanocrystallites in SiO2 thin films at a lower temperature for the purpose of using these materials for devices in optoelectronics, solar cells and electronics on flexible substrates.

  7. Activation of temperature-sensitive TRPV1-like receptors in ARC POMC neurons reduces food intake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Hoon Jeong

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Proopiomelanocortin (POMC neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC respond to numerous hormonal and neural signals, resulting in changes in food intake. Here, we demonstrate that ARC POMC neurons express capsaicin-sensitive transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptor (TRPV1-like receptors. To show expression of TRPV1-like receptors in ARC POMC neurons, we use single-cell reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, electrophysiology, TRPV1 knock-out (KO, and TRPV1-Cre knock-in mice. A small elevation of temperature in the physiological range is enough to depolarize ARC POMC neurons. This depolarization is blocked by the TRPV1 receptor antagonist and by Trpv1 gene knockdown. Capsaicin-induced activation reduces food intake that is abolished by a melanocortin receptor antagonist. To selectively stimulate TRPV1-like receptor-expressing ARC POMC neurons in the ARC, we generate an adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV5 carrying a Cre-dependent channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2-enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP expression cassette under the control of the two neuronal POMC enhancers (nPEs. Optogenetic stimulation of TRPV1-like receptor-expressing POMC neurons decreases food intake. Hypothalamic temperature is rapidly elevated and reaches to approximately 39 °C during treadmill running. This elevation is associated with a reduction in food intake. Knockdown of the Trpv1 gene exclusively in ARC POMC neurons blocks the feeding inhibition produced by increased hypothalamic temperature. Taken together, our findings identify a melanocortinergic circuit that links acute elevations in hypothalamic temperature with acute reductions in food intake.

  8. Temperature-sensitive mutants of fowl plague virus: isolation and genetic characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almond, J.W.; McGeoch, D.; Barry, R.D.

    1979-01-01

    Forty-nine temperature-sensitive mutants of fowl plague virus (FPV) strain Rostock and four ts mutants of FPV-strain Dobson were isolated by utilizing two methods of plaque screening, after either spontaneous or chemically induced mutagenesis. Twenty-nine of the FPV-Rostock mutants were further characterized by genetic recombination studies and were found to fall into six high frequency recombination groups. The genome segment carrying the ts mutation in each group was identified by analyzing the gene composition of ts + recombinants generated from crosses between representatives of each group and ts mutants of FPV-Dobson. It was concluded that the six groups correspond to mutations in six different genome segments, namely, those coding for the P 1 , P 2 , P 3 , HA, NP, and NS proteins

  9. 9% Cr steel high temperature oxidation. Solutions investigated for improving corrosion resistance of the steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evin, Harold Nicolas; Heintz, Olivier; Chevalier, Sebastien [UMR 5209 CNRS-Bourgogne Univ. (France). Lab. Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne; Foejer, Cecilia; Jakani, Saad; Dhont, Annick; Claessens, Serge [OCAS N.V. ArcelorMittal Global R and D, Gent (Belgium)

    2010-07-01

    The improvement of high temperature oxidation resistance of low chromium content steels, such as T/P91, is of great interest in regards with their application in thermal power generating plants. Indeed, they possess good creep properties, but are facing their limits of use at temperature higher than 600 C, due to accelerated corrosion phenomena. Good knowledge of the mechanisms involved during their oxidation process is needed to prevent the degradation of the materials and to extend life time of the power plants components. Oxide layers thermally grown, on 9% Cr steels (provided by OCAS N.V), during isothermal tests between 600 C and 750 C in laboratory air under atmospheric pressure were investigated, by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The oxidation behaviour appeared very limited at 750 C, due to the presence of a breakaway, which can be linked to iron porous oxide grown over the surface of the samples. ''In situ'' X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses were performed in air at 600 C after short exposures (between 5 min and 25 h). A complex mixture of iron oxide, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Cr (VI) species were characterized in the scales. The in-situ analyses were compared and related to XPS analyses performed on thick oxide scales formed on samples oxidized in air at 600 C for 100h. An oxidation mechanism is then proposed to understand the oxide scale growth in the temperature range 600 - 750 C. The second step of this study consists in improving the high temperature corrosion resistance of these steels without modifying their mechanical properties. Thus several solutions were investigated such as MOCVD coatings, pack cementation coatings, and tested in cycle conditions prior. (orig.)

  10. Immunolocalization and distribution of functional temperature-sensitive TRP channels in salivary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhan, Ubaidus; Sato, Masaki; Shinomiya, Takashi; Okubo, Migiwa; Tsumura, Maki; Muramatsu, Takashi; Kawaguchi, Mitsuru; Tazaki, Masakazu; Shibukawa, Yoshiyuki

    2013-11-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels are unique cellular sensors involved in multiple cellular functions. Their role in salivary secretion remains to be elucidated. The expression and localization of temperature-sensitive TRP channels in salivary (submandibular, sublingual and parotid) glands were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time reverse transcription plus the polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The effects of various TRP channel agonists on carbachol (CCh)-induced salivary secretion in the submandibular gland and on the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in a submandibular epithelial cell line were also investigated. Immunohistochemistry revealed the expression of TRP-melastatin subfamily member 8 (TRPM8) and TRP-ankyrin subfamily member 1 (TRPA1) in myoepithelial, acinar and ductal cells in the sublingual, submandibular and parotid glands. In addition, TRP-vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1), TRPV3 and TRPV4 were also expressed in myoepithelial, acinar and ductal cells in all three types of gland. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR results demonstrated the mRNA expression of TRPV1, TRPV3, TRPV4, TRPM8 and TRPA1 in acinar and ductal cells in these salivary glands. Perfusion of the entire submandibular gland with the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin (1 μM) via the submandibular artery significantly increased CCh-induced salivation, whereas perfusion with TRPM8 and TRPA1 agonists (0.5 μM WS12 and 100 μM allyl isothiocyanate) decreased it. Application of agonists for each of the thermosensitive TRP channels increased [Ca(2+)]i in a submandibular epithelial cell line. These results indicate that temperature-sensitive TRP channels are localized and distributed in acinar, ductal and myoepithelial cells in salivary glands and that they play a functional role in the regulation and/or modulation of salivary secretion.

  11. Risk Sensitivity, Independence of Irrelevant Alternatives and Continuity of Bargaining Solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.B.M. de Koster (René); H.J.M. Peters (Hans); S.H. Tijs; P.P. Wakker (Peter)

    1983-01-01

    textabstractBargaining solutions are considered which have the following four properties: individual rationality, Pareto optimality, independence of equivalent utility representations, and independence of irrelevant alternatives. A main result of this paper is a simple proof of the fact that all

  12. Dye-sensitized solar cells with ZnO nanoparticles fabricated at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sungjae; Moon, Byungjoon; Son, Dongick [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Wanju (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Byoungwook; Choi, Wonkook [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    The authors investigated the microstructural and the electrical properties of ZnO based dyesensitized solar cells (DSSCs) fabricated using a low-temperature-processed(200 .deg. C) dye-sensitized ZnO-nanoparticle thin film and a Pt catalyst deposited on ITO/glass by using RF magnetron sputtering. A hydropolymer containing PEG (poly(ethylene glycol)) and PEO (poly ethylene oxide) was used to make uniformly-distributed ZnO nanoparticle layer that form a nano-porous ZnO network after heat treatment and was then dye sensitized and sandwiched between two electrodes in an electrolyte to make a DSSC device. The highest measured parameters, the short circuit current density (J{sub sc}), the open circuit potential(V{sub oc}), the fill factor(FF), and the power conversion efficiency (η), of the DSSC fabricated under optimized conditions were observed to be 4.93 mA/cm{sup 2}, 0.56 V, 0.40, and 1.12%, respectively.

  13. Land surface temperature downscaling using random forest regression: primary result and sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xin; Cao, Chen; Yang, Yingbao; Li, Xiaolong; Shan, Liangliang; Zhu, Xi

    2018-04-01

    The land surface temperature (LST) derived from thermal infrared satellite images is a meaningful variable in many remote sensing applications. However, at present, the spatial resolution of the satellite thermal infrared remote sensing sensor is coarser, which cannot meet the needs. In this study, LST image was downscaled by a random forest model between LST and multiple predictors in an arid region with an oasis-desert ecotone. The proposed downscaling approach was evaluated using LST derived from the MODIS LST product of Zhangye City in Heihe Basin. The primary result of LST downscaling has been shown that the distribution of downscaled LST matched with that of the ecosystem of oasis and desert. By the way of sensitivity analysis, the most sensitive factors to LST downscaling were modified normalized difference water index (MNDWI)/normalized multi-band drought index (NMDI), soil adjusted vegetation index (SAVI)/ shortwave infrared reflectance (SWIR)/normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), normalized difference building index (NDBI)/SAVI and SWIR/NDBI/MNDWI/NDWI for the region of water, vegetation, building and desert, with LST variation (at most) of 0.20/-0.22 K, 0.92/0.62/0.46 K, 0.28/-0.29 K and 3.87/-1.53/-0.64/-0.25 K in the situation of +/-0.02 predictor perturbances, respectively.

  14. High temperature thermodynamics of solutions of oxygen in vanadium, niobium and tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boureau, G.; Gerdanian, P.

    1981-01-01

    The Tian-Calvet microcalorimetric method has been applied to the determination at 1323 K of ΔH(O 2 ), the partial molar enthalpy of mixing of oxygen in vanadium, niobium and tantalum. The present results are in good agreement with earlier studies using e.m.f. techniques. Nevertheless in the first two solutions, ΔH(O 2 ) has been found somewhat more negative than previously reported. The partial molar entropies of mixing have been recalculated. The low values of the excess entropies are explained by a strong increase of the Debye temperature and a decrease of the electronic density of states at the Fermi level as the oxygen content increases. (author)

  15. The study on density change of carbon dioxide seawater solution at high pressure and low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Y.; Chen, B.; Nishio, M.; Akai, M.

    2005-01-01

    It has been widely considered that the global warming, induced by the increasing concentration of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, is an environmental task affecting the world economic development. In order to mitigate the concentration of CO 2 in the atmosphere, the sequestration of carbon dioxide into the ocean had been investigated theoretically and experimentally over the last 10 years. In addition to ocean dynamics, ocean geological, and biological information on large space and long time scales, the physical-chemistry properties of seawater-carbon dioxide system at high pressure (P>5.0 MPa) and lower temperature (274.15 K 3 , which is approximately same with that of carbon dioxide freshwater solution, the slope of which is 0.275 g/cm 3

  16. Effect of Solution Temperature for Al Alloy Anodizing on Cavitation Characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung-Jun [Kunsan National University, Kunsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Hyung; Kim, Seong Jong [Mokpo National Maritime University, Haeyangdaehak-ro 91, Mokpo (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    The commercialization of aluminum had been delayed than other metals because of its high oxygen affinity. Anodizing is a process in which oxide film is formed on the surface of a valve metal in an electrolyte solution by anodic oxidation reaction. Aluminum has thin oxide film on surface but the oxide film is inhomogeneous having a thickness only in the range of several nanometers. Anodizing process increases the thickness of the oxide film significantly. In this study, porous type oxide film was produced on the surface of aluminum in sulfuric acid as a function of electrolyte temperature, and the optimum condition were determined for anodizing film to exhibit excellent cavitation resistance in seawater environment. The result revealed that the oxide film formed at 10 ℃ represented the highest cavitation resistance, while the oxide film formed at 15 ℃ showed the lowest resistance to cavitation in spite of its high hardness.

  17. Surface tension anomalies in room temperature ionic liquids-acetone solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Hiroshi; Murata, Keisuke; Kiyokawa, Shota; Yoshimura, Yukihiro

    2018-05-01

    Surface tension anomalies were observed in room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL)-acetone solutions. The RTILs are 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazorium iodide with [Cnmim][I] in a [Cnmim][I]-x mol% acetone. The maximum value of the surface tension appeared at 40 mol% acetone, although density decreased monotonically with an increase in acetone concentration. A small alkyl chain length effect of the Cnmim+ cations was observed in the surface tension. By the Gibbs adsorption isotherm, it was found that I- anion-mediated surface structure became dominant above 40 mol%. In the different [Cnmim][TFSI]-acetone mixtures, normal decay of the surface tension was observed on the acetone concentration scale, where TFSI- is bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide.

  18. Temperature sensitivity of extreme precipitation events in the south-eastern Alpine forelands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeer, Katharina; Kirchengast, Gottfried

    2016-04-01

    factors leads to the urgent questions of what we might expect from future heavy precipitation, particularly summertime convective storms, and how the associated risks will change if the observed trends persist. Working on an event basis allows us to consider a robust diversity of indicators such as storm duration, total sums, and peak intensities of the individual rainfall events in our analysis. First results suggest that the temperature sensitivity of precipitation events in the study region generally rises in accordance with the CC rate, but rates diverge dependent on the spatio-temporal properties of the sampling. At high temperatures above about 25 °C, the heaviest events do not show increases beyond the CC rate, as have been reported in some other studies for temperatures below 25°C. This is likely due to limitations of moisture availability in hot summer conditions. Observations of relative humidity available for 77 out of the 188 stations used support this hypothesis. When events where humidity is well below saturation are excluded from the sample, quantile regression results show higher scaling rates. The preliminary findings underline the need for a more sophisticated analysis of the temperature-precipitation relationship especially in heterogeneous regions with complex terrain.

  19. Generation and thermally adjustable catalysis of silver nanoparticle immobilized temperature-sensitive nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Zhou, Tao; Jia, Lei; Shen, Xiaoke; Li, Xiaohui; Li, Huijun; Xu, Zhouqing; Cao, Jianliang

    2017-03-01

    The rise in environmental issues due to the catalytic degradation of pollutants in water has received much attention. In this report, a facile method was developed for the generation of a novel thermosensitive Ag-decorated catalyst, SiO2@PNIPAM@Ag (the average particle size is around 540 nm), through atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and mild reducing reactions. First, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) was used to create a shell around mercapto-silica spheres that allowed for enhanced catalyst support dispersion into water. Second, through a mild reducing reaction, these Ag nanoparticles (NPs) were then anchored to the surface of SiO2@PNIPAM spheres. The resulting catalyst revealed catalytic activity to degrade various nitrobenzenes and organic dyes in an aqueous solution with sodium borohydride (NaBH4) at ambient temperature. The catalytic activity can be adjusted in different temperatures through the aggregation or dispersion of Ag catalyst on the polymer supporters, which is due to the thermosensitive PNIPAM shell. The ease of preparation and efficient catalytic activity of the catalyst can make it a promising candidate for the use in degrading organic pollutants for environmental remediation.

  20. Generation and thermally adjustable catalysis of silver nanoparticle immobilized temperature-sensitive nanocomposite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jun; Zhou, Tao; Jia, Lei, E-mail: jlxj@hpu.edu.cn; Shen, Xiaoke; Li, Xiaohui; Li, Huijun; Xu, Zhouqing; Cao, Jianliang, E-mail: caojianliang@hpu.edu.cn [Henan Polytechnic University, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China)

    2017-03-15

    The rise in environmental issues due to the catalytic degradation of pollutants in water has received much attention. In this report, a facile method was developed for the generation of a novel thermosensitive Ag-decorated catalyst, SiO{sub 2}@PNIPAM@Ag (the average particle size is around 540 nm), through atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and mild reducing reactions. First, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) was used to create a shell around mercapto-silica spheres that allowed for enhanced catalyst support dispersion into water. Second, through a mild reducing reaction, these Ag nanoparticles (NPs) were then anchored to the surface of SiO{sub 2}@PNIPAM spheres. The resulting catalyst revealed catalytic activity to degrade various nitrobenzenes and organic dyes in an aqueous solution with sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) at ambient temperature. The catalytic activity can be adjusted in different temperatures through the aggregation or dispersion of Ag catalyst on the polymer supporters, which is due to the thermosensitive PNIPAM shell. The ease of preparation and efficient catalytic activity of the catalyst can make it a promising candidate for the use in degrading organic pollutants for environmental remediation.

  1. OPTIMIZATION OF THE TEMPERATURE CONTROL SCHEME FOR ROLLER COMPACTED CONCRETE DAMS BASED ON FINITE ELEMENT AND SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huawei Zhou

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Achieving an effective combination of various temperature control measures is critical for temperature control and crack prevention of concrete dams. This paper presents a procedure for optimizing the temperature control scheme of roller compacted concrete (RCC dams that couples the finite element method (FEM with a sensitivity analysis method. In this study, seven temperature control schemes are defined according to variations in three temperature control measures: concrete placement temperature, water-pipe cooling time, and thermal insulation layer thickness. FEM is employed to simulate the equivalent temperature field and temperature stress field obtained under each of the seven designed temperature control schemes for a typical overflow dam monolith based on the actual characteristics of a RCC dam located in southwestern China. A sensitivity analysis is subsequently conducted to investigate the degree of influence each of the three temperature control measures has on the temperature field and temperature tensile stress field of the dam. Results show that the placement temperature has a substantial influence on the maximum temperature and tensile stress of the dam, and that the placement temperature cannot exceed 15 °C. The water-pipe cooling time and thermal insulation layer thickness have little influence on the maximum temperature, but both demonstrate a substantial influence on the maximum tensile stress of the dam. The thermal insulation thickness is significant for reducing the probability of cracking as a result of high thermal stress, and the maximum tensile stress can be controlled under the specification limit with a thermal insulation layer thickness of 10 cm. Finally, an optimized temperature control scheme for crack prevention is obtained based on the analysis results.

  2. Flowering time of butterfly nectar food plants is more sensitive to temperature than the timing of butterfly adult flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharouba, Heather M; Vellend, Mark

    2015-09-01

    1. Variation among species in their phenological responses to temperature change suggests that shifts in the relative timing of key life cycle events between interacting species are likely to occur under climate warming. However, it remains difficult to predict the prevalence and magnitude of these shifts given that there have been few comparisons of phenological sensitivities to temperature across interacting species. 2. Here, we used a broad-scale approach utilizing collection records to compare the temperature sensitivity of the timing of adult flight in butterflies vs. flowering of their potential nectar food plants (days per °C) across space and time in British Columbia, Canada. 3. On average, the phenology of both butterflies and plants advanced in response to warmer temperatures. However, the two taxa were differentially sensitive to temperature across space vs. across time, indicating the additional importance of nontemperature cues and/or local adaptation for many species. 4. Across butterfly-plant associations, flowering time was significantly more sensitive to temperature than the timing of butterfly flight and these sensitivities were not correlated. 5. Our results indicate that warming-driven shifts in the relative timing of life cycle events between butterflies and plants are likely to be prevalent, but that predicting the magnitude and direction of such changes in particular cases is going to require detailed, fine-scale data. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2015 British Ecological Society.

  3. Weak Hydrological Sensitivity to Temperature Change over Land, Independent of Climate Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Forster, P. M.; Hodnebrog, O.; Andrews, T.; Boucher, O.; Faluvegi, G.; Flaeschner, D.; Kasoar, M.; Kharin, V.; hide

    2018-01-01

    We present the global and regional hydrological sensitivity (HS) to surface temperature changes, for perturbations to CO2, CH4, sulfate and black carbon concentrations, and solar irradiance. Based on results from ten climate models, we show how modeled global mean precipitation increases by 2-3% per kelvin of global mean surface warming, independent of driver, when the effects of rapid adjustments are removed. Previously reported differences in response between drivers are therefore mainly ascribable to rapid atmospheric adjustment processes. All models show a sharp contrast in behavior over land and over ocean, with a strong surface temperature-driven (slow) ocean HS of 3-5%/K, while the slow land HS is only 0-2%/K. Separating the response into convective and large-scale cloud processes, we find larger inter-model differences, in particular over land regions. Large-scale precipitation changes are most relevant at high latitudes, while the equatorial HS is dominated by convective precipitation changes. Black carbon stands out as the driver with the largest inter-model slow HS variability, and also the strongest contrast between a weak land and strong sea response. We identify a particular need for model investigations and observational constraints on convective precipitation in the Arctic, and large-scale precipitation around the Equator.

  4. On the sensitivities of idealized moist baroclinic waves to environmental temperature and moist convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshbaum, Daniel; Merlis, Timothy; Gyakum, John; McTaggart-Cowan, Ron

    2017-04-01

    The impact of cloud diabatic heating on baroclinic life cycles has been studied for decades, with the nearly universal finding that this heating enhances the system growth rate. However, few if any studies have systematically addressed the sensitivity of baroclinic waves to environmental temperature. For a given relative humidity, warmer atmospheres contain more moisture than colder atmospheres. They also are more prone to the development of deep moist convection, which is itself a major source of diabatic heating. Thus, it is reasonable to expect faster baroclinic wave growth in warmer systems. To address this question, this study performs idealized simulations of moist baroclinic waves in a periodic channel, using initial environments with identical relative humidities, dry stabilities, and dry available potential energies but varying environmental temperatures and moist instabilities. While the dry versions of these simulations exhibit virtually identical wave growth, the moist versions exhibit major differences in life cycle. Counter-intuitively, despite slightly faster initial wave growth, the warmer and moister waves ultimately develop into weaker baroclinic systems with an earlier onset of the decay phase. An energetics analysis reveals that the reduced wave amplitude in the warmer cases stems from a reduced transfer of available potential energy into eddy potential energy. This reduced energy transfer is associated with an unfavorable phasing of mid-to-upper-level thermal and vorticity anomalies, which limits the meridional heat flux.

  5. Isolation of temperature-sensitive mutations in murC of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Mihoko; Kurokawa, Kenji; Nishida, Satoshi; Ueno, Kohji; Matsuo, Miki; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2007-09-01

    Enzymes in the bacterial peptidoglycan biosynthesis pathway are important targets for novel antibiotics. Of 750 temperature-sensitive (TS) mutants of Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, six were complemented by the murC gene, which encodes the UDP-N-acetylmuramic acid:l-alanine ligase. Each mutation resulted in a single amino acid substitution and, in all cases, the TS phenotype was suppressed by high osmotic stress. In mutant strains with the G222E substitution, a decrease in the viable cell number immediately after shift to the restrictive temperature was observed. These results suggest that S. aureus MurC protein is essential for cell growth. The MurC H343Y mutation is located in the putative alanine recognition pocket. Consistent with this, allele-specific suppression was observed of the H343Y mutation by multiple copies of the aapA gene, which encodes an alanine transporter. The results suggest an in vivo role for the H343 residue of S. aureus MurC protein in high-affinity binding to L-alanine.

  6. Effects of minor Si on microstructures and room temperature fracture toughness of niobium solid solution alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Bin, E-mail: kongbin@buaa.edu.cn; Jia, Lina, E-mail: jialina@buaa.edu.cn; Su, Linfen, E-mail: sulinfen@mse.buaa.edu.cn; Guan, Kai, E-mail: guankai@mse.buaa.edu.cn; Weng, Junfei, E-mail: wengjf@mse.buaa.edu.cn; Zhang, Hu, E-mail: zhanghu@buaa.edu.cn

    2015-07-15

    Controlling the elements content in the niobium solid solution (Nb{sub SS}) is significant for the better comprehensive performance of Nb-silicide-based alloys. In this paper, the effects of minor Si on the microstructures and room temperature fracture toughness of Nb–(0/0.5/1/2)Si–27.63Ti–12.92Cr–2.07Al–1.12Hf (at%, unless stated otherwise) solid solution alloys were investigated. The alloys were processed by vacuum arc-casting (AC), and then heat treated (HT) at 1425 °C for 10 h. In HT alloys, Nb{sub SS} grains are refined gradually with the increase of Si content. Meanwhile, the volume fraction of Cr{sub 2}Nb and silicides phases precipitates increases. The fracture toughness of HT alloys decreases at first but then increases in the range of 0 to 2% Si, because it is a combinatorial process of positive and negative effects caused by the addition of Si. The refinement of Nb{sub SS} grains displays positive effect on fracture toughness, while the increase of solid solubility of Si in Nb{sub SS} and brittle Cr{sub 2}Nb and Nb-silicides precipitate phases display negative effect.

  7. Influence of seed layer treatment on low temperature grown ZnO nanotubes: Performances in dye sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ameen, Sadia [Energy Materials and Surface Science Laboratory, Solar Energy Research Center, School of Chemical Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Akhtar, M. Shaheer [School of Semiconductor and Chemical Engineering and Solar Energy Research Center, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); New and Renewable Energy Material Development Center (NewREC), Chonbuk National University, Buan-gun, Jeonbuk (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Soon [Energy Materials and Surface Science Laboratory, Solar Energy Research Center, School of Chemical Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, O-Bong [School of Semiconductor and Chemical Engineering and Solar Energy Research Center, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hyung-Shik, E-mail: hsshin@jbnu.ac.k [Energy Materials and Surface Science Laboratory, Solar Energy Research Center, School of Chemical Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-01

    Non-aligned and highly densely aligned ZnO nanotube (NTs), synthesized by low temperature solution method were applied as photoanode materials for the fabrication of efficient dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The crystalline and the morphological analysis revealed that the grown aligned ZnO NTs possessed a typical hexagonal crystal structure of outer and inner diameter {approx}250 nm and {approx}100 nm, respectively. ZnO seeding on FTO substrates is an essential step to achieve the aligned ZnO NTs. A DSSC fabricated with aligned ZnO NTs photoanode achieved high solar-to-electricity conversion efficiency of {approx}2.2% with short circuit current (J{sub SC}) of 5.5 mA/cm{sup 2}, open circuit voltage (V{sub OC}) of 0.65 V and fill factor (FF) of 0.61. Significantly, the aligned ZnO NTs photoanode showed three times improved solar-to-electricity conversion efficiency than DSSC fabricated with non-aligned ZnO NTs. The enhanced performances were credited to the aligned morphology of ZnO NTs which executed the high charge collection and the transfer of electrons at the interfaces of ZnO NTs and electrolyte layer.

  8. Temperature effect on the photoinduced reduction of methyl viologen with several sensitizers and the evolution of hydrogen from water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenadovic, M.T.; Micic, O.I.; Rajh, T.; Savic, D.

    1983-01-01

    Irradiation by visible light of an aqueous solution containing a photosensitizer, methyl viologen (MV/sup 2 +/) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid leads to the formation of the reduced form of methyl viologen (MV/sup +/). The quantum yield for the formation of MV/sup +/ depends strongly on the time during which the formation is observed owing to the reaction of MV/sup +/ with oxidative products and its reduction to MV/sup 0/. Proflavin, acridine yellow and ruthenium(II)tris(2,2-bipyridyl) were used as photosensitizers and showed the same ability to promote hydrogen evolution. When CdS was used as a sensitizer a factor of 10 less hydrogen was obtained than when the dyes were used. The redox catalysts platinum, Pt-TiO/sub 2/-RuO/sub 2/ and Pt-CdS in colloidal systems showed approximately the same activity towards the reduction of water. The reduction of MV/sup 2 +/ and the evolution of hydrogen were enhanced at higher temperatures (70/sup 0/C). The optimum conditions for water reduction on redox catalysts in colloidal system under continuous illumination are analysed.

  9. Moisture Sensitivity of Crumb Rubber Modified Modifier Warm Mix Asphalt Additive for Two Different Compaction Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilema, Munder A.; Aman, Mohamad Y.; Hassan, Norhidayah A.; Ahmad, Kabiru A.; Elghatas, Hamza M.; Radwan, Ashraf A.; Shyaa, Ahmed S.

    2018-04-01

    Crumb rubber obtained from scrap tires has been incorporated with asphalt binder to improve the performance of asphalt mixtures in the past decades. Pavements containing crumb-rubber modified (CRM) binders present one major drawback: larger amounts of greenhouse gas emissions are produced as there is rise in the energy consumption at the asphalt plant due to the higher viscosity of these type of binders compared with a conventional mixture. The objective of this paper is to calculate the optimum bitumen content for each percentage and evaluate the moisture sensitivity of crumb rubber modified asphalt at two different compacting temperatures. In this study, crumb rubber modified percentages was 0%, 5%, 10% and 15% from the binder weight, with adding 1.5% warm mix asphalt additive (Sasobit) and crush granite aggregate of 9.5mm Nominal maximum size was used after assessing its properties. Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) used by 2% from fine aggregate. The wet method was using to mix the CRM with bitumen, the CRM conducted at 177°C for 30 min with 700rpm and Sasobit conducted at 120°C for 10 min with 1000rpm. As a result, from this study the optimum bitumen content (OBC) was increased with increased crumb rubber content. For performance test, it was conducted using the AASHTO T283 (2007): Resistance of Compacted Bituminous Mixture to Moisture-Induced Damage. The result was as expected and it was within the specification of the test, the result show that the moisture damage increased with increased the crumb rubber content but it is not exceeding the limit of specification 80% for indirect tension strength ratio (ITSR). For the temperature was with lowing the temperature the moisture damage increased.

  10. Photo-sensitive Ge nanocrystal based films controlled by substrate deposition temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavarache, Ionel; Maraloiu, Valentin Adrian; Negrila, Catalin; Prepelita, Petronela; Gruia, Ion; Iordache, Gheorghe

    2017-10-01

    Lowering the temperature of crystallization by deposition of thin films on a heated substrate represents the easiest way to find new means to develop and improve new working devices based on nanocrystals embedded in thin films. The improvements are strongly related with the increasing of operation speed, substantially decreasing the energy consumption and reducing unit fabrication costs of the respective semiconductor devices. This approach avoids major problems, such as those related to diffusion or difficulties in controlling nanocrystallites size, which appear during thermal treatments at high temperatures after deposition. This article reports on a significant progress given by structuring Ge nanocrystals (Ge-NCs) embedded in silicon dioxide (SiO2) thin films by heating the substrate at 400 °C during co-deposition of Ge and SiO2 by magnetron sputtering. As a proof-of-concept, a Si/Ge-NCs:SiO2 photo-sensitive structure was fabricated thereof and characterized. The structure shows superior performance on broad operation bandwidth from visible to near-infrared, as strong rectification properties in dark, significant current rise in the inversion mode when illuminated, high responsivity, high photo-detectivity of 1014 Jones, quick response and significant conversion efficiency with peak value reaching 850% at -1 V and about 1000 nm. This simple preparation approach brings an important contribution to the effort of structuring Ge nanocrystallites in SiO2 thin films at a lower temperature for the purpose of using these materials for devices in optoelectronics, solar cells and electronics on flexible substrates.

  11. Late Quaternary glacier sensitivity to temperature and precipitation distribution in the Southern Alps of New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ann V. Rowan; Simon H. Brocklehurst; David M. Schultz; Mitchell A. Plummer; Leif S. Anderson; Neil F. Glasser

    2014-05-01

    Glaciers respond to climate variations and leave geomorphic evidence that represents an important terrestrial paleoclimate record. However, the accuracy of paleoclimate reconstructions from glacial geology is limited by the challenge of representing mountain meteorology in numerical models. Precipitation is usually treated in a simple manner and yet represents difficult-to-characterize variables such as amount, distribution, and phase. Furthermore, precipitation distributions during a glacial probably differed from present-day interglacial patterns. We applied two models to investigate glacier sensitivity to temperature and precipitation in the eastern Southern Alps of New Zealand. A 2-D model was used to quantify variations in the length of the reconstructed glaciers resulting from plausible precipitation distributions compared to variations in length resulting from change in mean annual air temperature and precipitation amount. A 1-D model was used to quantify variations in length resulting from interannual climate variability. Assuming that present-day interglacial values represent precipitation distributions during the last glacial, a range of plausible present-day precipitation distributions resulted in uncertainty in the Last Glacial Maximum length of the Pukaki Glacier of 17.1?km (24%) and the Rakaia Glacier of 9.3?km (25%), corresponding to a 0.5°C difference in temperature. Smaller changes in glacier length resulted from a 50% decrease in precipitation amount from present-day values (-14% and -18%) and from a 50% increase in precipitation amount (5% and 9%). Our results demonstrate that precipitation distribution can produce considerable variation in simulated glacier extents and that reconstructions of paleoglaciers should include this uncertainty.

  12. Linking temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition to its molecular structure, accessibility, and microbial physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagai, Rota; Kishimoto-Mo, Ayaka W; Yonemura, Seiichiro; Shirato, Yasuhito; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Yagasaki, Yasumi

    2013-04-01

    Temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition may have a significant impact on global warming. Enzyme-kinetic hypothesis suggests that decomposition of low-quality substrate (recalcitrant molecular structure) requires higher activation energy and thus has greater temperature sensitivity than that of high-quality, labile substrate. Supporting evidence, however, relies largely on indirect indices of substrate quality. Furthermore, the enzyme-substrate reactions that drive decomposition may be regulated by microbial physiology and/or constrained by protective effects of soil mineral matrix. We thus tested the kinetic hypothesis by directly assessing the carbon molecular structure of low-density fraction (LF) which represents readily accessible, mineral-free SOM pool. Using five mineral soil samples of contrasting SOM concentrations, we conducted 30-days incubations (15, 25, and 35 °C) to measure microbial respiration and quantified easily soluble C as well as microbial biomass C pools before and after the incubations. Carbon structure of LFs (soil was measured by solid-state (13) C-NMR. Decomposition Q10 was significantly correlated with the abundance of aromatic plus alkyl-C relative to O-alkyl-C groups in LFs but not in bulk soil fraction or with the indirect C quality indices based on microbial respiration or biomass. The warming did not significantly change the concentration of biomass C or the three types of soluble C despite two- to three-fold increase in respiration. Thus, enhanced microbial maintenance respiration (reduced C-use efficiency) especially in the soils rich in recalcitrant LF might lead to the apparent equilibrium between SOM solubilization and microbial C uptake. Our results showed physical fractionation coupled with direct assessment of molecular structure as an effective approach and supported the enzyme-kinetic interpretation of widely observed C quality-temperature relationship for short-term decomposition. Factors

  13. Temperature Dependence of Charge Localization in High-Mobility, Solution-Crystallized Small Molecule Semiconductors Studied by Charge Modulation Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meneau, Aurélie Y. B.; Olivier, Yoann; Backlund, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    In solution-processable small molecule semiconductors, the extent of charge carrier wavefunction localization induced by dynamic disorder can be probed spectroscopically as a function of temperature using charge modulation spectroscopy (CMS). Here, it is shown based on combined fi eld-effect tran......In solution-processable small molecule semiconductors, the extent of charge carrier wavefunction localization induced by dynamic disorder can be probed spectroscopically as a function of temperature using charge modulation spectroscopy (CMS). Here, it is shown based on combined fi eld......-effect transistor and CMS measurements as a function of temperature that in certain molecular semiconductors, such as solution-processible pentacene, charge carriers become trapped at low temperatures in environments in which the charges become highly localized on individual molecules, while in some other molecules...

  14. Contribution of solution pH and buffer capacity to suppress intergranular stress corrosion cracking of sensitized type 304 stainless steel at 95 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S.; Shibata, T.; Haruna, T.

    1999-01-01

    Controlling pH of high-temperature water to ∼pH 7 at 300 C by adding lithium hydroxide (LiOH) into the coolant system of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) successfully has been mitigating the corrosion of PWR component materials. The effects of solution pH and buffer capacity on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of sensitized type 304 stainless steel ([SS] UNS S30400) was examined at 95 C by slow strain rate technique (SSRT) with an in-situ cracking observation system. It was found that an increase in solution pH or buffer capacity increased crack initiation time and decreased mean crack initiation frequency, but exerted almost no effect on crack propagation. This inhibition effect on IGSCC initiation was explained as resulting from a retarding effect of solution pH and buffer capacity on the decrease in pH at crack nuclei caused by the hydrolysis of metal ions dissolved when the passive film was ruptured by strain in SSRT

  15. High-temperature superconductivity in solid solutions based on mixed yttrium and barium cuprate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazuev, G.V.; Kirsanov, N.A.; Makarova, O.V.; Zubkov, V.G.; Shveikin, G.P.

    1990-01-01

    The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity (T c = 30-40 K) in mixed lanthanum and alkaline earth cuprates La 2-x M x CuO 4 , where M = Ba and Ca (1-3) stimulated an extensive search for new superconducting phases based on mixed oxides of these elements. The superconducting transition temperature T c in LnBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-z phases is practically independent of the REE and lies between 90-96 K. The crystal structure of superconducting YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-z is similar to perovskite, has orthorhombic symmetry (4,5), and is related to the lanthanum barium cuprite tetragonal defect structure La 3 Ba 3 Cu 6 O 14.1 (8). A study of possible solid solutions (SS) based on YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-z through iso- or heterovalent substitution for Y 3+ and Ba 2+ and of their electrical properties seems warranted. In the present work, the authors report the synthesis, x-ray diffraction study, and specific electric resistivity of SS Y 1-x M x (Ba 1-y M y ') 2 Cu 3 O 7-z , where M = La, Lu, Sc, In, K, Zr, and Ce and M' = Ca, Sr, Mg, K, and La

  16. Porous aluminum room temperature anodizing process in a fluorinated-oxalic acid solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhahri, S.; Fazio, E.; Barreca, F.; Neri, F.; Ezzaouia, H.

    2016-08-01

    Anodizing of aluminum is used for producing porous insulating films suitable for different applications in electronics and microelectronics. Porous-type aluminum films are most simply realized by galvanostatic anodizing in aqueous acidic solutions. The improvement in application of anodizing technique is associated with a substantial reduction of the anodizing voltage at appropriate current densities as well as to the possibility to carry out the synthesis process at room temperature in order to obtain a self-planarizing dielectric material incorporated in array of super-narrow metal lines. In this work, the anodizing of aluminum to obtain porous oxide was carried out, at room temperature, on three different substrates (glass, stainless steel and aluminum), using an oxalic acid-based electrolyte with the addition of a relatively low amount of 0.4 % of HF. Different surface morphologies, from nearly spherical to larger porous nanostructures with smooth edges, were observed by means of scanning electron microscopy. These evidences are explained by considering the formation, transport and adsorption of the fluorine species which react with the Al3+ ions. The behavior is also influenced by the nature of the original substrate.

  17. Room temperature solution processed low dimensional CH3NH3PbI3 NIR detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besra, N.; Paul, T.; Sarkar, P. K.; Thakur, S.; Sarkar, S.; Das, A.; Chanda, K.; Sardar, K.; Chattopadhyay, K. K.

    2018-05-01

    Metal halide perovskites have recently drawn immense research interests among the worldwide scientific community due to their excellent light harvesting capabilities and above all, cost effectiveness. These new class of materials have already been used as efficient optoelectronic devices e.g. solar cells, photo detectors, etc. Here in this work, room temperature NIR (near infra red) response of organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 (Methylammonium lead tri iodide) nanorods has been studied. A very simple solution process technique has been adopted to synthesize CH3NH3PbI3 nanostructures at room temperature. The NIR exposure upon the sample resulted in a considerable hike in its dark current with very good responsivity (0.37 mA/W). Along with that, a good on-off ratio (41.8) was also obtained when the sample was treated under a pulsed NIR exposure with operating voltage of 2 V. The specific detectivity of the device came in the order of 1010 Jone.

  18. Effects of different oxyanions in solution on the precipitation of jarosite at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeongkyoo, Kim

    2018-04-09

    The effects of five different oxyanions, AsO 4 , SeO 3 , SeO 4 , MoO 4 , and CrO 4 , on the precipitation of jarosite at room temperature were investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and chemical analysis. Different amounts (2, 5, and 10 mol%) of oxyanions in the starting solution and different aging times (1 h-40 days) were used for the experiment. In the initial stage, only the amorphous phase appears for all samples. With increasing aging time, jarosite and jarosite with oxyanions start precipitating at room temperature with different precipitation rates and crystallinities. Jarosite with AsO 4 shows the lowest precipitation rate and lowest crystallinity. With increasing amounts of oxyanions, the crystallization rate decreases, especially for jarosite with AsO 4 . The jarosite samples with CrO 4 and SeO 4 show the fastest precipitation and highest crystallinities. For the jarosite samples with a low precipitation rate and low crystallinity, the amorphous phase contains high concentrations of oxyanions, probably because of the fast precipitation of the amorphous iron oxyanion phase; however, the phase with fast jarosite precipitation contains fewer oxyanions. The results show that coprecipitation of jarosite can play a more important role in controlling the behavior of CrO 4 than AsO 4 in acid mine drainage. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cyclic voltammetry of Monel 400 in lithium hydroxide solution at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, D.D.

    1976-01-01

    The electrochemistry of Monel 400 in 1 mole/kg -1 LiOH solution at 25, 125 and 250 0 C has been investigated using the technique of cyclic voltammetry. The general electrochemical behaviour is found to most closely approximate to that of the major component, nickel, although expansion of the current scale reveals anodic and cathodic peaks which probably arise from redox processes involving copper. The general similarity to nickel can be rationalized in terms of either the d electron theory for cupronickel alloys or phase separation, the latter being favoured in the present study. At 25 0 C the majority of charge consumed on sweeping the potential in the positive direction is involved in the formation of an oxide film at potentials close to oxygen evolution. This process is no longer observed at 2500C, due to a sharp reduction in the oxygen evolution overpotential with temperature. The majority of charge consumed on cyclic sweeping at this temperature is attributed to active dissolution of the nickel component of the alloy to form HNiO 2 - (or Ni(OH) 3 - ) at potentials slightly positive to the hydrogen evolution region. (author)

  20. Investigation of Sensitivities and Drift Effects of the Arrayed Flexible Chloride Sensor Based on RuO2/GO at Different Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Chang Tseng

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the temperature effect on sensing characteristics and drift effect of an arrayed flexible ruthenium dioxide (RuO2/graphene oxide (GO chloride sensor at different solution temperatures between 10 °C and 50 °C. The average sensor sensitivities according to our experimental results were 28.2 ± 1.4 mV/pCl (10 °C, 42.5 ± 2.0 mV/pCl (20 °C, 47.1 ± 1.8 mV/pCl (30 °C, 54.1 ± 2.01 mV/pCl (40 °C and 46.6 ± 2.1 mV/pCl (50 °C. We found the drift effects of an arrayed flexible RuO2/GO chloride sensor in a 1 M NaCl solution to be between 8.2 mV/h and 2.5 mV/h with solution temperatures from 10 °C to 50 °C.

  1. Investigation of Sensitivities and Drift Effects of the Arrayed Flexible Chloride Sensor Based on RuO2/GO at Different Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Shi-Chang; Wu, Tong-Yu; Liao, Yi-Hung; Lai, Chih-Hsien; Yan, Siao-Jie; Tseng, Ting-Wei

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the temperature effect on sensing characteristics and drift effect of an arrayed flexible ruthenium dioxide (RuO2)/graphene oxide (GO) chloride sensor at different solution temperatures between 10 °C and 50 °C. The average sensor sensitivities according to our experimental results were 28.2 ± 1.4 mV/pCl (10 °C), 42.5 ± 2.0 mV/pCl (20 °C), 47.1 ± 1.8 mV/pCl (30 °C), 54.1 ± 2.01 mV/pCl (40 °C) and 46.6 ± 2.1 mV/pCl (50 °C). We found the drift effects of an arrayed flexible RuO2/GO chloride sensor in a 1 M NaCl solution to be between 8.2 mV/h and 2.5 mV/h with solution temperatures from 10 °C to 50 °C. PMID:29461506

  2. High temperature creep of single crystals of gold, silver and solid solution gold silver 50-50

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorizzi, Paul

    1973-01-01

    We have studied in compression creep along a direction, single crystals of gold, silver and a 50-50 gold-silver solid solution. The experiments were made at temperatures above 0.7 Tf. We have shown that under these conditions and for these three metals a new slip system is operating: the deformation is due to the slip of dislocations having a 1/2 burgers vector on the {110} planes. For gold the activation energy for creep is equal to the self-diffusion energy. We found the same result for silver when the contribution of divacancies to the self-diffusion energy is taken into account. For the alloy the activation energy for creep is very close to the self-diffusion energy of gold in a 50-50 gold-silver alloy, gold being the slower diffusing species in the alloy. The curves giving the creep rate versus the stress can be fitted with the following laws: ε 0 = σ 5 for gold; ε 0 = σ 2,2 for silver and ε 0 = σ 2,5 for the alloy. The dislocation substructure was studied using the crystalline contrast given by the electron microprobe. This new method gives images which are very sensitive to the sub-grains misorientation. The substructure is made of parallelepipedic cells divided by tilt boundaries that are perpendicular to the {110} slip planes. (author) [fr

  3. Analytical solution of transient temperature in continuous wave end-pumped laser slab: Reduction of temperature distribution and time of thermal response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibib Khalid S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An analytical solution of transient 3-D heat equation based on integral transform method is derived. The result are compared with numerical solution, and good agreements are obtained. Minimization of response time and temperature distribution through a laser slab are tested. It is found that the increasing in the lateral convection heat transfer coefficient can significantly reduce the response time and the temperature distribution while no effect on response time is observed when changing pumping profile from Gaussian to top hat beam in spite of the latter reduce the temperature distribution, also it is found that dividing the pumping power between two slab ends might reduce the temperature distribution and it has no effect on thermal response time.

  4. Apparent molal volumes of HMT and TATD in aqueous solutions around the temperature of maximum density of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clavijo Penagos, J.A.; Blanco, L.H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ►V φ for HMT and TATD in aqueous solutions around the temperature of maximum density of water are reported. ► V φ is linear in m form m = 0.025 for all the aqueous solutions investigated. ► Variation of V ¯ 2 ∞ with T obeys a second grade polynomial trend. ► The solutes are classified as structure breakers according to Hepler’s criterion. - Abstract: Apparent molal volumes V φ have been determined from density measurements for several aqueous solutions of 1,3,5,7-tetraazatricyclo[3.3.1.1(3,7)]decane (HMT) and 1,3,6,8-tetraazatricyclo[4.4.1.1(3,8)]dodecane (TATD) at T = (275.15, 275.65, 276.15, 276.65, 277.15, 277.65 and 278.15) K as function of composition. The infinite dilution partial molar volumes of solutes in aqueous solution are evaluated through extrapolation. Interactions of the solutes with water are discussed in terms of the effect of the temperature on the volumetric properties and the structure of the solutes. The results are interpreted in terms of water structure-breaking or structure forming character of the solutes.

  5. Low temperature solution synthesis of zinc antimonide, manganese antimonide, and strontium ruthenate compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noblitt, Jennifer Lenkner

    2011-12-01

    Increasing energy demands are fueling research in the area of renewable energy and energy storage. In particular, Li-ion batteries and superconducting wires are attractive choices for energy storage. Improving safety, simplifying manufacturing processes, and advancing technology to increase energy storage capacity is necessary to compete with current marketed energy storage devices. These advancements are accomplished through the study of new materials and new morphologies. Increasing dependence on and rising demand for portable electronic devices has continued to drive research in the area of Li-ion batteries. In order to compete with existing batteries and be applicable to future energy needs such as powering hybrid vehicles, the drawbacks of Li-ion batteries must be addressed including (i) low power density, (ii) safety, and (iii) high manufacturing costs. These drawbacks can be addressed through new materials and morphologies for the anode, cathode, and electrolyte. New intermetallic anode materials such as ZnSb, MnSb, and Mn2Sb are attractive candidates to replace graphite, the current industry standard anode material, because they are safer while maintaining comparable theoretical capacity. Electrodeposition is an inexpensive method that could be used for the synthesis of these electrode materials. Direct electrodeposition allows for excellent electrical contact to the current collector without the use of a binder. To successfully electrodeposit zinc and manganese antimonides, metal precursors with excellent solubility in water were needed. To promote solubility, particularly for the antimony precursor, coordinating ligands were added to the deposition bath solutions. This work shows that the choice of coordinating ligand and metal-ligand speciation can alter both the electrochemistry and the film composition. This work focuses on the search for appropriate coordinating ligands, solution pH, and bath temperatures so that high quality films of ZnSb, MnSb, and

  6. Arabidopsis ZED1-related kinases mediate the temperature-sensitive intersection of immune response and growth homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhicai; Cui, Dayong; Liu, Jing; Zhao, Jingbo; Liu, Cheng; Xin, Wei; Li, Yuan; Liu, Na; Ren, Dongtao; Tang, Dingzhong; Hu, Yuxin

    2017-07-01

    Activation of the immune response in plants antagonizes growth and development in the absence of pathogens, and such an autoimmune phenotype is often suppressed by the elevation of ambient temperature. However, molecular regulation of the ambient temperature-sensitive intersection of immune response and growth is largely elusive. A genetic screen identified an Arabidopsis mutant, zed1-D, by its high temperature-dependent growth retardation. A combination of molecular, cytological and genetic approaches was used to investigate the molecular basis behind the temperature-sensitive growth and immune response in zed1-D. A dominant mutation in HOPZ-ETI-DEFICIENT 1 (ZED1) is responsible for a high temperature-dependent autoimmunity and growth retardation in zed1-D. The autoimmune phenotype in zed1-D is dependent on the HOPZ-ACTIVATED RESISTANCE 1 (ZAR1). ZED1 and some ZED1-related kinases (ZRKs) are induced by elevated temperature and function cooperatively to suppress the immune response by modulating the transcription of SUPPRESSOR OF NPR1-1 CONSTITUTIVE 1 (SNC1) in the absence of pathogens. Our data reveal a previously unidentified role of ZRKs in the ambient temperature-sensitive immune response in the absence of pathogens, and thus reveals a possible molecular mechanism underlying the temperature-mediated intersection of immune response and growth in plants. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. Effect of annealing temperature and dopant concentration on the thermoluminescence sensitivity in LiF:Mg,Cu,Ag material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahyaabadi, Akram; Torkzadeh, Falamarz; Rezaei Ochbelagh, Dariush; Hosseini Pooya, Seyed Mahdi

    2018-04-24

    LiF:Mg,Cu,Ag is a new dosimetry material that is similar to LiF:Mg,Cu,P in terms of dosimetric properties. The effect of the annealing temperature in the range of 200 to 350°C on the thermoluminescence (TL) sensitivity and the glow curve structure of this material at different concentrations of silver (Ag) was investigated. It has been demonstrated that the optimum values of the annealing temperature and the Ag concentration are 240°C and 0.1 mol% for better sensitivity, respectively. The TL intensity decreases at annealing temperatures lower than 240°C or higher than 240°C, reaching a minimum at 300°C and then again increases for various Ag concentrations. It was observed that the glow curve structure altered and the area under the low temperature peak as well as the area under the main dosimetric peak decreased with increasing annealing temperature. The position of the main dosimetric peak moved in the direction of higher temperatures, but at 320 and 350°C annealing temperatures, it shifted to lower temperatures. It was also observed that the TL sensitivity could partially be recovered by a combined annealing procedure. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Fast and Sensitive Solution-Processed Visible-Blind Perovskite UV Photodetectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adinolfi, Valerio; Ouellette, Olivier; Saidaminov, Makhsud I; Walters, Grant; Abdelhady, Ahmed L; Bakr, Osman M; Sargent, Edward H

    2016-09-01

    The first visible-blind UV photodetector based on MAPbCl3 integrated on a substrate exhibits excellent performance, with responsivities reaching 18 A W(-1) below 400 nm and imaging-compatible response times of 1 ms. This is achieved by using substrate-integrated single crystals, thus overcoming the severe limitations affecting thin films and offering a new application of efficient, solution-processed, visible-transparent perovskite optoelectronics. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Enhanced Performance of PbS-quantum-dot-sensitized Solar Cells via Optimizing Precursor Solution and Electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jianjun; Shen, Ting; Liu, Xiaoguang; Fei, Chengbin; Lv, Lili; Cao, Guozhong

    2016-03-01

    This work reports a PbS-quantum-dot-sensitized solar cell (QDSC) with power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 4%. PbS quantum dots (QDs) were grown on mesoporous TiO2 film using a successive ion layer absorption and reaction (SILAR) method. The growth of QDs was found to be profoundly affected by the concentration of the precursor solution. At low concentrations, the rate-limiting factor of the crystal growth was the adsorption of the precursor ions, and the surface growth of the crystal became the limiting factor in the high concentration solution. The optimal concentration of precursor solution with respect to the quantity and size of synthesized QDs was 0.06 M. To further increase the performance of QDSCs, the 30% deionized water of polysulfide electrolyte was replaced with methanol to improve the wettability and permeability of electrolytes in the TiO2 film, which accelerated the redox couple diffusion in the electrolyte solution and improved charge transfer at the interfaces between photoanodes and electrolytes. The stability of PbS QDs in the electrolyte was also improved by methanol to reduce the charge recombination and prolong the electron lifetime. As a result, the PCE of QDSC was increased to 4.01%.

  10. Sensitivity Analysis of RCW Temperature on the Moderator Subcooling Margin for the LBLOCA of Wolsong NPP Unit 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Si Won; Kim, Jong Hyun; Choi, Sung Soo [Atomic Creative Technology Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Min [Central Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Moderator subcooling margin has been analyzed using the MODTURC{sub C}LAS code in the Large LOCA FSAR PARTs C and F. Performance of moderator heat exchangers depends on RCW (Raw reCirculated Water) temperature. And also the temperature is affected by sea water temperature. Unfortunately, sea water temperature is gradually increasing by global warming. So it will cause increase of RCW temperature inevitably. There is no assessment result of moderator subcooling with increasing RCW temperature even if it is important problem. Therefore, sensitivity analysis is performed to give information about the relation between RCW temperature and moderator subcooling in the present study. The moderator subcooling margin has to be ensured to establish the moderator heat removal when Large LOCA with LOECI and Loss of Class IV Power occurs. However, sea water temperature is increasing gradually due to global warming. So it is necessary that sensitivity analysis of RCW temperature on the moderator subcooling margin to estimate the availability of the moderator heat removal. In the present paper, the moderator subcooling analysis is performed using the same methodology and assumptions except for RCW temperature used in FSAR Large LOCA PART F.

  11. Sensitivity Analysis of RCW Temperature on the Moderator Subcooling Margin for the LBLOCA of Wolsong NPP Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Si Won; Kim, Jong Hyun; Choi, Sung Soo; Kim, Sung Min

    2016-01-01

    Moderator subcooling margin has been analyzed using the MODTURC_CLAS code in the Large LOCA FSAR PARTs C and F. Performance of moderator heat exchangers depends on RCW (Raw reCirculated Water) temperature. And also the temperature is affected by sea water temperature. Unfortunately, sea water temperature is gradually increasing by global warming. So it will cause increase of RCW temperature inevitably. There is no assessment result of moderator subcooling with increasing RCW temperature even if it is important problem. Therefore, sensitivity analysis is performed to give information about the relation between RCW temperature and moderator subcooling in the present study. The moderator subcooling margin has to be ensured to establish the moderator heat removal when Large LOCA with LOECI and Loss of Class IV Power occurs. However, sea water temperature is increasing gradually due to global warming. So it is necessary that sensitivity analysis of RCW temperature on the moderator subcooling margin to estimate the availability of the moderator heat removal. In the present paper, the moderator subcooling analysis is performed using the same methodology and assumptions except for RCW temperature used in FSAR Large LOCA PART F.

  12. Laminating solution-processed silver nanowire mesh electrodes onto solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Hardin, Brian E.

    2011-06-01

    Solution processed silver nanowire meshes (Ag NWs) were laminated on top of solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (ss-DSCs) as a reflective counter electrode. Ag NWs were deposited in <1 min and were less reflective compared to evaporated Ag controls; however, AgNW ss-DSC devices consistently had higher fill factors (0.6 versus 0.69), resulting in comparable power conversion efficiencies (2.7%) compared to thermally evaporated Ag control (2.8%). Laminated Ag NW electrodes enable higher throughput manufacturing and near unity material usage, resulting in a cheaper alternative to thermally evaporated electrodes. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Mehar Methods for Fuzzy Optimal Solution and Sensitivity Analysis of Fuzzy Linear Programming with Symmetric Trapezoidal Fuzzy Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhpreet Kaur Sidhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The drawbacks of the existing methods to obtain the fuzzy optimal solution of such linear programming problems, in which coefficients of the constraints are represented by real numbers and all the other parameters as well as variables are represented by symmetric trapezoidal fuzzy numbers, are pointed out, and to resolve these drawbacks, a new method (named as Mehar method is proposed for the same linear programming problems. Also, with the help of proposed Mehar method, a new method, much easy as compared to the existing methods, is proposed to deal with the sensitivity analysis of the same type of linear programming problems.

  14. Highly sensitive analysis of boron and lithium in aqueous solution using dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Hyoung; Han, Sol-Chan; Kim, Tae-Hyeong; Yun, Jong-Il

    2011-12-15

    We have applied a dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS) to sensitively detect concentrations of boron and lithium in aqueous solution. Sequential laser pulses from two separate Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers at 532 nm wavelength have been employed to generate laser-induced plasma on a water jet. For achieving sensitive elemental detection, the optimal timing between two laser pulses was investigated. The optimum time delay between two laser pulses for the B atomic emission lines was found to be less than 3 μs and approximately 10 μs for the Li atomic emission line. Under these optimized conditions, the detection limit was attained in the range of 0.8 ppm for boron and 0.8 ppb for lithium. In particular, the sensitivity for detecting boron by excitation of laminar liquid jet was found to be excellent by nearly 2 orders of magnitude compared with 80 ppm reported in the literature. These sensitivities of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy are very practical for the online elemental analysis of boric acid and lithium hydroxide serving as neutron absorber and pH controller in the primary coolant water of pressurized water reactors, respectively.

  15. A High-Sensitivity Gas Sensor Toward Methanol Using ZnO Microrods: Effect of Operating Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, M.; Mahapatra, R.; Mondal, B.; Ghosh, R.

    2017-04-01

    In the present work, zinc oxide (ZnO) microrods with the average diameter of 350 nm have been synthesized on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) substrate using a hydrothermal reaction process at a low temperature of 90°C. The methanol gas sensing behaviour of as-synthesized ZnO microrods have been studied at different operating temperatures (100-300°C). The gas sensing results show that the ZnO microrods exhibit excellent sensitivity, selectivity, and stability toward methanol gas at 300°C. The as-grown ZnO microrods sensor also shows the good sensitivity for methanol even at a low operating temperature of 100°C. The ultra-high sensitivity of 4.41 × 104% [gas sensitivity, S g = ( I g - I a)/ I a × 100%] and 5.11 × 102% to 100 ppm methanol gas at a temperature of 300°C and 100°C, respectively, has been observed. A fast response time of 200 ms and 270 ms as well as a recovery time of 120 ms and 1330 ms to methanol gas have also been found at an operating temperature of 300°C and 100°C, respectively. The response and recovery time decreases with increasing operation temperature of the sensor.

  16. A Sensitive Detection of Actinide Species in Solutions Using a Capillary Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Hye Ryun; Park, Kyung Kyun; Jung, Euo Chang; Song, Kyu Seok

    2009-01-01

    Absorption spectra for a quantitative analysis of actinide elements such as U(VI) and Pu(V) were measured by using a liquid waveguide capillary cell (LWCC) which has an optical path length of 1.0 meter. In order to investigate radioactive elements, a LWCC is installed in a glove box and is coupled to a spectrophotometer with optical fibers. Limits of detection (LOD) for the system were determined as 0.74 and 0.35 μM with molar absorption coefficients of 8.14 ± 0.07 (414 nm) and 17.00 ± 0.16 (569 nm) M -1 cm -1 for U(VI) and Pu(V) ions, respectively. The measured LOD values are about 30 times more sensitive when compared to those achievable by using a conventional quartz cell with an optical path length of 1.0 cm. As an application with an enhanced sensitivity, a quantitative analysis for micromolar concentrations of Pu(V) has been performed to decrease the uncertainty in the formation constant of the Pu(VI)-OH complex.

  17. Improved Sterilization of Sensitive Biomaterials with Supercritical Carbon Dioxide at Low Temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Bernhardt

    Full Text Available The development of bio-resorbable implant materials is rapidly going on. Sterilization of those materials is inevitable to assure the hygienic requirements for critical medical devices according to the medical device directive (MDD, 93/42/EG. Biopolymer-containing biomaterials are often highly sensitive towards classical sterilization procedures like steam, ethylene oxide treatment or gamma irradiation. Supercritical CO₂ (scCO₂ treatment is a promising strategy for the terminal sterilization of sensitive biomaterials at low temperature. In combination with low amounts of additives scCO₂ treatment effectively inactivates microorganisms including bacterial spores. We established a scCO₂ sterilization procedure under addition of 0.25% water, 0.15% hydrogen peroxide and 0.5% acetic anhydride. The procedure was successfully tested for the inactivation of a wide panel of microorganisms including endospores of different bacterial species, vegetative cells of gram positive and negative bacteria including mycobacteria, fungi including yeast, and bacteriophages. For robust testing of the sterilization effect with regard to later application of implant materials sterilization all microorganisms were embedded in alginate/agarose cylinders that were used as Process Challenge Devices (PCD. These PCD served as surrogate models for bioresorbable 3D scaffolds. Furthermore, the impact of scCO₂ sterilization on mechanical properties of polysaccharide-based hydrogels and collagen-based scaffolds was analyzed. The procedure was shown to be less compromising on mechanical and rheological properties compared to established low-temperature sterilization methods like gamma irradiation and ethylene oxide exposure as well as conventional steam sterilization. Cytocompatibility of alginate gels and scaffolds from mineralized collagen was compared after sterilization with ethylene oxide, gamma irradiation, steam sterilization and scCO₂ treatment. Human

  18. Soil respiration sensitivities to water and temperature in a revegetated desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Shan; Dong, Xue-Jun; Xu, Bing-Xin; Chen, Yong-Le; Zhao, Yang; Gao, Yan-Hong; Hu, Yi-Gang; Huang, Lei

    2015-04-01

    Soil respiration in water-limited ecosystems is affected intricately by soil water content (SWC), temperature, and soil properties. Eight sites on sand-fixed dunes that revegetated in different years since 1950s, with several topographical positions and various biological soil crusts (BSCs) and soil properties, were selected, as well as a moving sand dune (MSD) and a reference steppe in the Tengger Desert of China. Intact soil samples of 20 cm in depth were taken and incubated randomly at 12 levels of SWC (0 to 0.4 m3 m-3) and at 9 levels of temperature (5 to 45°C) in a growth chamber; additionally, cryptogamic and microbial respirations (RM) were measured. Total soil respiration (RT, including cryptogamic, microbial, and root respiration) was measured for 2 years at the MSD and five sites of sand-fixed dunes. The relationship between RM and SWC under the optimal SWC condition (0.25 m3 m-3) is linear, as is the entire range of RT and SWC. The slope of linear function describes sensitivity of soil respiration to water (SRW) and reflects to soil water availability, which is related significantly to soil physical properties, BSCs, and soil chemical properties, in decreasing importance. Inversely, Q10 for RM is related significantly to abovementioned factors in increasing importance. However, Q10 for RT and respiration rate at 20°C are related significantly to soil texture and depth of BSCs and subsoil only. In conclusion, through affecting SRW, soil physical properties produce significant influences on soil respiration, especially for RT. This indicates that a definition of the biophysical meaning of SRW is necessary, considering the water-limited and coarse-textured soil in most desert ecosystems.

  19. Signal detection in global mean temperatures after "Paris": an uncertainty and sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Hans; Dangendorf, Sönke; van Vuuren, Detlef P.; Bregman, Bram; Petersen, Arthur C.

    2018-02-01

    In December 2015, 195 countries agreed in Paris to hold the increase in global mean surface temperature (GMST) well below 2.0 °C above pre-industrial levels and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5 °C. Since large financial flows will be needed to keep GMSTs below these targets, it is important to know how GMST has progressed since pre-industrial times. However, the Paris Agreement is not conclusive as regards methods to calculate it. Should trend progression be deduced from GCM simulations or from instrumental records by (statistical) trend methods? Which simulations or GMST datasets should be chosen, and which trend models? What is pre-industrial and, finally, are the Paris targets formulated for total warming, originating from both natural and anthropogenic forcing, or do they refer to anthropogenic warming only? To find answers to these questions we performed an uncertainty and sensitivity analysis where datasets and model choices have been varied. For all cases we evaluated trend progression along with uncertainty information. To do so, we analysed four trend approaches and applied these to the five leading observational GMST products. We find GMST progression to be largely independent of various trend model approaches. However, GMST progression is significantly influenced by the choice of GMST datasets. Uncertainties due to natural variability are largest in size. As a parallel path, we calculated GMST progression from an ensemble of 42 GCM simulations. Mean progression derived from GCM-based GMSTs appears to lie in the range of trend-dataset combinations. A difference between both approaches appears to be the width of uncertainty bands: GCM simulations show a much wider spread. Finally, we discuss various choices for pre-industrial baselines and the role of warming definitions. Based on these findings we propose an estimate for signal progression in GMSTs since pre-industrial.

  20. Signal detection in global mean temperatures after “Paris”: an uncertainty and sensitivity analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Visser

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In December 2015, 195 countries agreed in Paris to hold the increase in global mean surface temperature (GMST well below 2.0 °C above pre-industrial levels and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5 °C. Since large financial flows will be needed to keep GMSTs below these targets, it is important to know how GMST has progressed since pre-industrial times. However, the Paris Agreement is not conclusive as regards methods to calculate it. Should trend progression be deduced from GCM simulations or from instrumental records by (statistical trend methods? Which simulations or GMST datasets should be chosen, and which trend models? What is pre-industrial and, finally, are the Paris targets formulated for total warming, originating from both natural and anthropogenic forcing, or do they refer to anthropogenic warming only? To find answers to these questions we performed an uncertainty and sensitivity analysis where datasets and model choices have been varied. For all cases we evaluated trend progression along with uncertainty information. To do so, we analysed four trend approaches and applied these to the five leading observational GMST products. We find GMST progression to be largely independent of various trend model approaches. However, GMST progression is significantly influenced by the choice of GMST datasets. Uncertainties due to natural variability are largest in size. As a parallel path, we calculated GMST progression from an ensemble of 42 GCM simulations. Mean progression derived from GCM-based GMSTs appears to lie in the range of trend–dataset combinations. A difference between both approaches appears to be the width of uncertainty bands: GCM simulations show a much wider spread. Finally, we discuss various choices for pre-industrial baselines and the role of warming definitions. Based on these findings we propose an estimate for signal progression in GMSTs since pre-industrial.

  1. High night temperature strongly impacts TCA cycle, amino acid and polyamine biosynthetic pathways in rice in a sensitivity-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaubitz, Ulrike; Erban, Alexander; Kopka, Joachim; Hincha, Dirk K; Zuther, Ellen

    2015-10-01

    Global climate change combined with asymmetric warming can have detrimental effects on the yield of crop plants such as rice (Oryza sativa L.). Little is known about metabolic responses of rice to high night temperature (HNT) conditions. Twelve cultivars with different HNT sensitivity were used to investigate metabolic changes in the vegetative stage under HNT compared to control conditions. Central metabolism, especially TCA cycle and amino acid biosynthesis, were strongly affected particularly in sensitive cultivars. Levels of several metabolites were correlated with HNT sensitivity. Furthermore, pool sizes of some metabolites negatively correlated with HNT sensitivity under control conditions, indicating metabolic pre-adaptation in tolerant cultivars. The polyamines putrescine, spermidine and spermine showed increased abundance in sensitive cultivars under HNT conditions. Correlations between the content of polyamines and 75 other metabolites indicated metabolic shifts from correlations with sugar-phosphates and 1-kestose under control to correlations with sugars and amino and organic acids under HNT conditions. Increased expression levels of ADC2 and ODC1, genes encoding enzymes catalysing the first committed steps of putrescine biosynthesis, were restricted to sensitive cultivars under HNT. Additionally, transcript levels of eight polyamine biosynthesis genes were correlated with HNT sensitivity. Responses to HNT in the vegetative stage result in distinct differences between differently responding cultivars with a dysregulation of central metabolism and an increase of polyamine biosynthesis restricted to sensitive cultivars under HNT conditions and a pre-adaptation of tolerant cultivars already under control conditions with higher levels of potentially protective compatible solutes. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  2. Direct measurement of osmotic pressure of glycosaminoglycan solutions by membrane osmometry at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahine, Nadeen O; Chen, Faye H; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2005-09-01

    Articular cartilage is a hydrated soft tissue composed of negatively charged proteoglycans fixed within a collagen matrix. This charge gradient causes the tissue to imbibe water and swell, creating a net osmotic pressure that enhances the tissue's ability to bear load. In this study we designed and utilized an apparatus for directly measuring the osmotic pressure of chondroitin sulfate, the primary glycosaminoglycan found in articular cartilage, in solution with varying bathing ionic strength (0.015 M, 0.15 M, 0.5 M, 1 M, and 2 M NaCl) at room temperature. The osmotic pressure (pi) was found to increase nonlinearly with increasing chondroitin sulfate concentration and decreasing NaCl ionic bath environment. Above 1 M NaCl, pi changes negligibly with further increases in salt concentration, suggesting that Donnan osmotic pressure is negligible above this threshold, and the resulting pressure is attributed to configurational entropy. Results of the current study were also used to estimate the contribution of osmotic pressure to the stiffness of cartilage based on theoretical and experimental considerations. Our findings indicate that the osmotic pressure resulting from configurational entropy is much smaller in cartilage (based on an earlier study on bovine articular cartilage) than in free solution. The rate of change of osmotic pressure with compressive strain is found to contribute approximately one-third of the compressive modulus (H(A)(eff)) of cartilage (Pi approximately H(A)(eff)/3), with the balance contributed by the intrinsic structural modulus of the solid matrix (i.e., H(A) approximately 2H(A)(eff)/3). A strong dependence of this intrinsic modulus on salt concentration was found; therefore, it appears that proteoglycans contribute structurally to the magnitude of H(A), in a manner independent of osmotic pressure.

  3. Sensitivity Filters In Topology Optimisation As A Solution To Helmholtz Type Differential Equation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarov, Boyan Stefanov; Sigmund, Ole

    2009-01-01

    The focus of the study in this article is on the use of a Helmholtz type differential equation as a filter for topology optimisation problems. Until now various filtering schemes have been utilised in order to impose mesh independence in this type of problems. The usual techniques require topology...... information about the neighbour sub-domains is an expensive operation. The proposed filtering technique requires only mesh information necessary for the finite element discretisation of the problem. The main idea is to define the filtered variable implicitly as a solution of a Helmholtz type differential...... equation with homogeneous Neumann boundary conditions. The properties of the filter are demonstrated for various 2D and 3D topology optimisation problems in linear elasticity, solved on sequential and parallel computers....

  4. Investigations to explore interactions in (polyhydroxy solute + L-ascorbic acid + H2O) solutions at different temperatures: Calorimetric and viscometric approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banipal, Parampaul K.; Sharma, Mousmee; Aggarwal, Neha; Banipal, Tarlok S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The hydrophilic-hydrophilic interactions predominate at low temperatures. • Enthalpy change for polyol is less exothermic than its parent saccharide. • Δ dil C o p,2,m values suggest structural increase in presence of L-ascorbic acid. • Solutes act as kosmotropes in L-ascorbic acid (aq) solutions as indicated by dB/dT. - Abstract: Isothermal titration micro-calorimeter has been used to measure the enthalpy change (q) of polyhydroxy solutes [(+)-D-xylose, xylitol, (+)-D-glucose, 2-deoxy-D-glucose, (+)-methyl-α-D-glucopyranoside, and (+)-maltose monohydrate] in water and in (0.05, 0.15, and 0.25) mol·kg −1 L-ascorbic acid (aq) solutions at (288.15, 298.15, 308.15, and 318.15) K. Limiting enthalpies of dilution (Δ dil H°) of these solutes were calculated from heat evolved/absorbed during calorimetric experiments. Further thermodynamic quantities such as limiting enthalpies of dilution of transfer (Δ tr Δ dil H°), change in heat capacity (Δ dil C o p,2,m ), and pair (h AB ) and triplet (h ABB ) enthalpic interaction coefficients were also calculated and used to explore the nature of interactions of solutes with cosolute (L-ascorbic acid). The Jones-Dole viscosity B-coefficients for (+)-D-xylose, xylitol, (+)-D-galactose, galactitol, (+)-D-glucose, 2-deoxy-D-glucose, (+)-methyl-α-D-glucopyranoside, and (+)-maltose monohydrate in water and in (0.05, 0.15, 0.25, and 0.35) mol·kg −1 L-ascorbic acid (aq) solutions have been determined from viscosity (η) data measured over temperature range (288.15–318.15) K and at pressure, P = 101.3 kPa. The temperature dependence of B-coefficients (dB/dT), and viscosity B-coefficients of transfer (Δ tr B) of solutes from water to cosolute have also been estimated. These parameters have been discussed in terms of structure-making (kosmotropic) or -breaking (chaotropic) behavior of solutes.

  5. Temperature sensitivity of extracellular enzyme kinetics in subtropical wetland soils under different nutrient and water level conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, S.; Inglett, K.; Inglett, P.

    2012-12-01

    Microbial extracellular enzymes play an important role in the initial steps of soil organic matter decomposition and are involved in regulating nutrient cycle processes. Moreover, with the recent concern of climate change, microbial extracellular enzymes may affect the functioning (C losses, C sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions, vegetation changes) of different ecosystems. Hence, it is imperative to understand the biogeochemical processes that may be climate change sensitive. Here, we have measured the Michaelis Menten Kinetics [maximal rate of velocity (Vmax) and half-saturation constant (Km)] of 6 enzymes involved in soil organic matter decomposition (phosphatase, phosphodiesterase, β-D-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, leucine aminopeptidase, N-Acetyl-β-D glucosaminidase) in different nutrient(P) concentration both aerobically and anaerobically in Everglade water conservation area 2A (F1, F4-slough and U3-slough). Temperature sensitivity of different enzymes is assessed within soil of different P concentrations. We hypothesized that the temperature sensitivity of the enzyme changes with the biogeochemical conditions including water level and nutrient condition. Furthermore, we have tested specific hypothesis that higher P concentration will initiate more C demand for microbes leading to higher Vmax value for carbon processing enzymes in high P site. We found temperature sensitivity of all enzymes for Vmax and Km under both aerobic and anaerobic condition ranges from 0.6 to 3.2 for Vmax and 0.5 to 2.5 for Km. Q10 values of Km for glucosidase indicate more temperature sensitivity under anaerobic condition. Under aerobic condition higher temperature showed significant effect on Vmax for bisphosphatase between high P and low P site. Decreasing P concentration from F1 site to U3-S site had showed significant effect in all temperature on carbon processing enzyme. This suggests that in high P site, microbes will use more carbon-processing enzyme to get more carbon

  6. Highly Sensitive Temperature Sensors Based on Fiber-Optic PWM and Capacitance Variation Using Thermochromic Sensing Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Rajibur Rahaman Khan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a temperature/thermal sensor that contains a Rhodamine-B sensing membrane. We applied two different sensing methods, namely, fiber-optic pulse width modulation (PWM and an interdigitated capacitor (IDC-based temperature sensor to measure the temperature from 5 °C to 100 °C. To the best of our knowledge, the fiber-optic PWM-based temperature sensor is reported for the first time in this study. The proposed fiber-optic PWM temperature sensor has good sensing ability; its sensitivity is ~3.733 mV/°C. The designed temperature-sensing system offers stable sensing responses over a wide dynamic range, good reproducibility properties with a relative standard deviation (RSD of ~0.021, and the capacity for a linear sensing response with a correlation coefficient of R2 ≈ 0.992 over a wide sensing range. In our study, we also developed an IDC temperature sensor that is based on the capacitance variation principle as the IDC sensing element is heated. We compared the performance of the proposed temperature-sensing systems with different fiber-optic temperature sensors (which are based on the fiber-optic wavelength shift method, the long grating fiber-optic Sagnac loop, and probe type fiber-optics in terms of sensitivity, dynamic range, and linearity. We observed that the proposed sensing systems have better sensing performance than the above-mentioned sensing system.

  7. Effects of solution temperature on localized corrosion of high nickel content stainless steels and nickel in chromated LiBr solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, A. Igual; Anton, J. Garcia; Guinon, J.L.; Perez Herranz, V.

    2006-01-01

    The potentiodynamic technique has been used to study the general and localized corrosion resistance of high-alloyed stainless steels (UNS N02031 and UNS R20033) and nickel (UNS N02205) at different temperatures (from 25 deg. C to 80 deg. C) in a heavy brine Lithium Bromide solution. The engineering question of concern is the compatibility of the LiBr fluid with the structural materials of refrigeration systems which use absorption technology. The results of potentiodynamic polarization studies indicate excellent corrosion resistance for stainless steels in LiBr solution at room temperature and no big differences at temperatures above 50 deg. C. In the temperature range of 25-80 deg. C, a linear relationship exists between logarithmic of corrosion rate and reciprocal of absolute temperature (Arrhenius plot). The linear plots showed that the mechanism of the corresponding passivation process is the same for the three investigated alloys, essentially due to the presence of nickel. Tests indicated that stainless steels UNS N02031 and UNS R20033 were the most suitable for use to be used in the construction of absorption units for refrigeration purposes

  8. Classifying Multi-Model Wheat Yield Impact Response Surfaces Showing Sensitivity to Temperature and Precipitation Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronzek, Stefan; Pirttioja, Nina; Carter, Timothy R.; Bindi, Marco; Hoffmann, Holger; Palosuo, Taru; Ruiz-Ramos, Margarita; Tao, Fulu; Trnka, Miroslav; Acutis, Marco; hide

    2017-01-01

    Crop growth simulation models can differ greatly in their treatment of key processes and hence in their response to environmental conditions. Here, we used an ensemble of 26 process-based wheat models applied at sites across a European transect to compare their sensitivity to changes in temperature (minus 2 to plus 9 degrees Centigrade) and precipitation (minus 50 to plus 50 percent). Model results were analysed by plotting them as impact response surfaces (IRSs), classifying the IRS patterns of individual model simulations, describing these classes and analysing factors that may explain the major differences in model responses. The model ensemble was used to simulate yields of winter and spring wheat at four sites in Finland, Germany and Spain. Results were plotted as IRSs that show changes in yields relative to the baseline with respect to temperature and precipitation. IRSs of 30-year means and selected extreme years were classified using two approaches describing their pattern. The expert diagnostic approach (EDA) combines two aspects of IRS patterns: location of the maximum yield (nine classes) and strength of the yield response with respect to climate (four classes), resulting in a total of 36 combined classes defined using criteria pre-specified by experts. The statistical diagnostic approach (SDA) groups IRSs by comparing their pattern and magnitude, without attempting to interpret these features. It applies a hierarchical clustering method, grouping response patterns using a distance metric that combines the spatial correlation and Euclidian distance between IRS pairs. The two approaches were used to investigate whether different patterns of yield response could be related to different properties of the crop models, specifically their genealogy, calibration and process description. Although no single model property across a large model ensemble was found to explain the integrated yield response to temperature and precipitation perturbations, the

  9. Locally Targeted Delivery of a Micron-Size Radiation Therapy Source Using Temperature-Sensitive Hydrogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yusung, E-mail: yusung-kim@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Seol, Dong Rim [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Mohapatra, Sucheta [Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Sunderland, John J. [Department of Radiology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Schultz, Michael K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Department of Radiology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Domann, Frederick E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Department of Surgery, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Lim, Tae-Hong [Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To propose a novel radiation therapy (RT) delivery modality: locally targeted delivery of micron-size RT sources by using temperature-sensitive hydrogel (RT-GEL) as an injectable vehicle. Methods and Materials: Hydrogel is a water-like liquid at room temperature but gels at body temperature. Two US Food and Drug Administration-approved polymers were synthesized. Indium-111 (In-111) was used as the radioactive RT-GEL source. The release characteristics of In-111 from polymerized RT-GEL were evaluated. The injectability and efficacy of RT-GEL delivery to human breast tumor were tested using animal models with control datasets of RT-saline injection. As proof-of-concept studies, a total of 6 nude mice were tested by injecting 4 million tumor cells into their upper backs after a week of acclimatization. Three mice were injected with RT-GEL and 3 with RT-saline. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and CT scans were performed on each mouse at 0, 24, and 48 h after injection. The efficacy of RT-GEL was determined by comparison with that of the control datasets by measuring kidney In-111 accumulation (mean nCi/cc), representing the distant diffusion of In-111. Results: RT-GEL was successfully injected into the tumor by using a 30-gauge needle. No difficulties due to polymerization of hydrogel during injection and intratumoral pressure were observed during RT-GEL injection. No back flow occurred for either RT-GEL or RT-saline. The residual tumor activities of In-111 were 49% at 24 h (44% at 48 h, respectively) for RT-GEL and 29% (22%, respectively) for RT-saline. Fused SPECT-CT images of RT-saline showed considerable kidney accumulation of In-111 (2886%, 261%, and 262% of RT-GEL at 0, 24, and 48 h, respectively). Conclusions: RT-GEL was successfully injected and showed much higher residual tumor activity: 170% (200%, respectively), than that of RT-saline at 24 h (48 h, respectively) after injection with a minimal accumulation of In-111 to the

  10. Resistor capacitor, primitive variable solution of buoyant fluid flow within an enclosure with highly temperature dependent viscosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, S.P. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States); Gianoulakis, S.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-07-01

    A numerical solution for buoyant natural convection within a square enclosure containing a fluid with highly temperature dependent viscosity is presented. Although the fluid properties employed do not represent any real fluid, the large variation in the fluid viscosity with temperature is characteristic of turbulent flow modeling with eddy-viscosity concepts. Results are obtained using a primitive variable formulation and the resistor method. The results presented include velocity, temperature and pressure distributions within the enclosure as well as shear stress and heat flux distributions along the enclosure walls. Three mesh refinements were employed and uncertainty values are suggested for the final mesh refinement. These solutions are part of a contributed benchmark solution set for the subject problem.

  11. Temperature field due to time-dependent heat sources in a large rectangular grid - Derivation of analytical solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claesson, J.; Probert, T.

    1996-01-01

    The temperature field in rock due to a large rectangular grid of heat releasing canisters containing nuclear waste is studied. The solution is by superposition divided into different parts. There is a global temperature field due to the large rectangular canister area, while a local field accounts for the remaining heat source problem. The global field is reduced to a single integral. The local field is also solved analytically using solutions for a finite line heat source and for an infinite grid of point sources. The local solution is reduced to three parts, each of which depends on two spatial coordinates only. The temperatures at the envelope of a canister are given by a single thermal resistance, which is given by an explicit formula. The results are illustrated by a few numerical examples dealing with the KBS-3 concept for storage of nuclear waste. 8 refs

  12. UV-B-inducible and temperature-sensitive photoreactivation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, Qishen; Hays, J.B.

    1991-01-01

    Removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CBPDs) in vivo from the DNA of UV-irradiated eight-leaf seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana was rapid in the presence of visible light (half-life about 1 hour); removal of CBPDs in the dark, presumably via excision repair, was an order of magnitude slower. Extracts of plants contained significant photolyase in vitro, as assayed by restoration of transforming activity to UV-irradiated Escherichia coli plasmids; activity was maximal from four-leaf to 12-leaf stages. UV-B treatment of seedlings for 6 hours increased photolyase specific activity in extracts twofold. Arabidopsis photolyase was markedly temperature-sensitive, both in vitro (half-life at 30C about 12 minutes) and in vivo (half-life at 30C, 30 to 45 minutes). The wavelength dependency of the photoreactivation cross-section showed a broad peak at 375 to 400 nm, and is thus similar to that for maize pollen; it overlaps bacterial and yeast photolyase action spectra

  13. Effect of Low-Temperature Sensitization on Hydrogen Embrittlement of 301 Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieh Yu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of metastable austenite on the hydrogen embrittlement (HE of cold-rolled (30% reduction in thickness 301 stainless steel (SS was investigated. Cold-rolled (CR specimens were hydrogen-charged in an autoclave at 300 or 450 °C under a pressure of 10 MPa for 160 h before tensile tests. Both ordinary and notched tensile tests were performed in air to measure the tensile properties of the non-charged and charged specimens. The results indicated that cold rolling caused the transformation of austenite into α′ and ε-martensite in the 301 SS. Aging at 450 °C enhanced the precipitation of M23C6 carbides, G, and σ phases in the cold-rolled specimen. In addition, the formation of α′ martensite and M23C6 carbides along the grain boundaries increased the HE susceptibility and low-temperature sensitization of the 450 °C-aged 301 SS. In contrast, the grain boundary α′-martensite and M23C6 carbides were not observed in the as-rolled and 300 °C-aged specimens.

  14. An Updated Collection of Sequence Barcoded Temperature-Sensitive Alleles of Yeast Essential Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofoed, Megan; Milbury, Karissa L; Chiang, Jennifer H; Sinha, Sunita; Ben-Aroya, Shay; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Hieter, Philip; Stirling, Peter C

    2015-07-14

    Systematic analyses of essential gene function using mutant collections in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been conducted using collections of heterozygous diploids, promoter shut-off alleles, through alleles with destabilized mRNA, destabilized protein, or bearing mutations that lead to a temperature-sensitive (ts) phenotype. We previously described a method for construction of barcoded ts alleles in a systematic fashion. Here we report the completion of this collection of alleles covering 600 essential yeast genes. This resource covers a larger gene repertoire than previous collections and provides a complementary set of strains suitable for single gene and genomic analyses. We use deep sequencing to characterize the amino acid changes leading to the ts phenotype in half of the alleles. We also use high-throughput approaches to describe the relative ts behavior of the alleles. Finally, we demonstrate the experimental usefulness of the collection in a high-content, functional genomic screen for ts alleles that increase spontaneous P-body formation. By increasing the number of alleles and improving the annotation, this ts collection will serve as a community resource for probing new aspects of biology for essential yeast genes. Copyright © 2015 Kofoed et al.

  15. Radiation sensitivities of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from chicken meat and their growth at refrigeration temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harsojo; Banati, D.; Ito, H.

    1997-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes were isolated in 5 lots, more than one cell in each 25-g sample of 10 lots of chicken meat, which was obtained from several different areas in Japan. From taxonomic study, the psychrotrophic type of 3 isolates grew well at 4°C on Trypticase soy agar slant, whereas 2 isolates grew poorly. Cells of all isolates were sensitive to γ-irradiation in phosphate buffer, and the D 10 values obtained were 0.16 to 0.18 kGy under aerobic irradiation conditions similar to the values of salmonellae. In the chicken meat sample, the D 10 value obtained was 0.42 kGy the same value as in phosphate buffer under anaerobic irradiation conditions, and the necessary dose for inactivation of L. monocytogenes was estimated to be 2 kGy in raw chicken meat below 10 -4 CFU (colony forming unit) per gram. In the storage study of chicken meat which was inoculated with about 3×10 3 CFU per gram of L. monocytogenes, the psychrotrophic type of the isolates grew quickly at 7 to 10°C storage. However, a dose of 1 kGy was also effective to suppress the growth of L. monocytogenes at refrigeration temperatures below 10°C

  16. Highly sensitive room temperature ammonia gas sensor based on Ir-doped Pt porous ceramic electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wenlong [College of pharmacy and biological engineering, Chengdu University, Chengdu, 610106 (China); Department of chemical and materials engineering, National Chin-Yi University of Technology, Taichung 411, Taiwan (China); Liu, Yen-Yu [Department of chemical and materials engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Do, Jing-Shan, E-mail: jsdo@ncut.edu.tw [Department of chemical and materials engineering, National Chin-Yi University of Technology, Taichung 411, Taiwan (China); Li, Jing, E-mail: lijing@cdu.edu.cn [College of pharmacy and biological engineering, Chengdu University, Chengdu, 610106 (China)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Water vapors seem to hugely improve the electrochemical activity of the Pt and Pt-Ir porous ceramic electrodes. • The gas sensors based on the Pt and Pt-Ir alloy electrodes possess good sensing performances. • The reaction path of the ammonia on platinum has been discussed. - Abstract: Room temperature NH{sub 3} gas sensors based on Pt and Pt-Ir (Ir doping Pt) porous ceramic electrodes have been fabricated by both electroplating and sputtering methods. The properties of the gaseous ammonia sensors have been examined by polarization and chronoamperometry techniques. The influence of humidity on the features of the resulting sensors in the system has also been discussed, and the working potential was optimized. Water vapors seem to hugely improve the electrochemical activity of the electrode. With increasing the relative humidity, the response of the Pt-Ir(E)/Pt(S)/PCP sensor to NH{sub 3} gas could be enhanced remarkably, and the sensitivity increases from 1.14 to 12.06 μA ppm{sup −1} cm{sup −2} .Then we have also discussed the sensing mechanism of the Pt-Ir sensor and the result has been confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the electrode surface before and after reaction in the end.

  17. Expression of temperature-sensitive ion channel TRPM8 in sperm cells correlates with vertebrate evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar Majhi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Transient Receptor Potential cation channel, subfamily Melastatin, member 8 (TRPM8 is involved in detection of cold temperature, different noxious compounds and in execution of thermo- as well as chemo-sensitive responses at cellular levels. Here we explored the molecular evolution of TRPM8 by analyzing sequences from various species. We elucidate that several regions of TRPM8 had different levels of selection pressure but the 4th–5th transmembrane regions remain highly conserved. Analysis of synteny suggests that since vertebrate origin, TRPM8 gene is linked with SPP2, a bone morphogen. TRPM8, especially the N-terminal region of it, seems to be highly variable in human population. We found 16,656 TRPM8 variants in 1092 human genomes with top variations being SNPs, insertions and deletions. A total of 692 missense mutations are also mapped to human TRPM8 protein of which 509 seem to be delateroiours in nature as supported by Polyphen V2, SIFT and Grantham deviation score. Using a highly specific antibody, we demonstrate that TRPM8 is expressed endogenously in the testis of rat and sperm cells of different vertebrates ranging from fish to higher mammals. We hypothesize that TRPM8 had emerged during vertebrate evolution (ca 450 MYA. We propose that expression of TRPM8 in sperm cell and its role in regulating sperm function are important factors that have guided its molecular evolution, and that these understandings may have medical importance.

  18. Lattice Boltzmann simulation for temperature-sensitive magnetic fluids in a porous square cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Licong; Zhang Xinrong; Niu Xiaodong

    2012-01-01

    A lattice Boltzmann method is developed to simulate temperature-sensitive magnetic fluids in a porous cavity. In the simulation, the magnetic force, efficient gravity, viscous loss term and geometric loss term in porous medium are imported to the momentum equation. To test the reliability of the method, a validation with water in porous cavity is carried out. Good agreements with the previous results verify that the present lattice Boltzmann method is promising for simulation of magnetic fluids in porous medium. In this study, we investigate the change of magnetization with external magnetic field, and we present numerical results for the streamlines, isotherms, and magnetization at vertical or horizontal mid-profiles for different values of Ram. In addition, Nusselt numbers changing with magnetic Rayleigh numbers are also investigated. - Highlights: → Developed a lattice Boltzmann method for magnetic nano-fluids in porous cavity. → Clarified flow and heat transfer for different values of (magnetic) Rayleigh numbers. → Heat transfer enhancement for magnetic fluid in porous cavity.

  19. Flexural modeling of the elastic lithosphere at an ocean trench: A parameter sensitivity analysis using analytical solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Reyes, Eduardo; Garay, Jeremías

    2018-01-01

    The outer rise is a topographic bulge seaward of the trench at a subduction zone that is caused by bending and flexure of the oceanic lithosphere as subduction commences. The classic model of the flexure of oceanic lithosphere w (x) is a hydrostatic restoring force acting upon an elastic plate at the trench axis. The governing parameters are elastic thickness Te, shear force V0, and bending moment M0. V0 and M0 are unknown variables that are typically replaced by other quantities such as the height of the fore-bulge, wb, and the half-width of the fore-bulge, (xb - xo). However, this method is difficult to implement with the presence of excessive topographic noise around the bulge of the outer rise. Here, we present an alternative method to the classic model, in which lithospheric flexure w (x) is a function of the flexure at the trench axis w0, the initial dip angle of subduction β0, and the elastic thickness Te. In this investigation, we apply a sensitivity analysis to both methods in order to determine the impact of the differing parameters on the solution, w (x). The parametric sensitivity analysis suggests that stable solutions for the alternative approach requires relatively low β0 values (rise bulge. The alternative method is a more suitable approach, assuming that accurate geometric information at the trench axis (i.e., w0 and β0) is available.

  20. Temperature-assisted solute focusing with sequential trap/release zones in isocratic and gradient capillary liquid chromatography: Simulation and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groskreutz, Stephen R.; Weber, Stephen G.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we characterize the development of a method to enhance temperature-assisted on-column solute focusing (TASF) called two-stage TASF. A new instrument was built to implement two-stage TASF consisting of a linear array of three independent, electronically controlled Peltier devices (thermoelectric coolers, TECs). Samples are loaded onto the chromatographic column with the first two TECs, TEC A and TEC B, cold. In the two-stage TASF approach TECs A and B are cooled during injection. TEC A is heated following sample loading. At some time following TEC A’s temperature rise, TEC B’s temperature is increased from the focusing temperature to a temperature matching that of TEC A. Injection bands are focused twice on-column, first on the initial TEC, e.g. single-stage TASF, then refocused on the second, cold TEC. Our goal is to understand the two-stage TASF approach in detail. We have developed a simple yet powerful digital simulation procedure to model the effect of changing temperature in the two focusing zones on retention, band shape and band spreading. The simulation can predict experimental chromatograms resulting from spatial and temporal temperature programs in combination with isocratic and solvent gradient elution. To assess the two-stage TASF method and the accuracy of the simulation well characterized solutes are needed. Thus, retention factors were measured at six temperatures (25–75 °C) at each of twelve mobile phases compositions (0.05–0.60 acetonitrile/water) for homologs of n-alkyl hydroxylbenzoate esters and n-alkyl p-hydroxyphenones. Simulations accurately reflect experimental results in showing that the two-stage approach improves separation quality. For example, two-stage TASF increased sensitivity for a low retention solute by a factor of 2.2 relative to single-stage TASF and 8.8 relative to isothermal conditions using isocratic elution. Gradient elution results for two-stage TASF were more encouraging. Application of two-stage TASF

  1. Evolution of vertebrate transient receptor potential vanilloid 3 channels: opposite temperature sensitivity between mammals and western clawed frogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeru Saito

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Transient Receptor Potential (TRP channels serve as temperature receptors in a wide variety of animals and must have played crucial roles in thermal adaptation. The TRP vanilloid (TRPV subfamily contains several temperature receptors with different temperature sensitivities. The TRPV3 channel is known to be highly expressed in skin, where it is activated by warm temperatures and serves as a sensor to detect ambient temperatures near the body temperature of homeothermic animals such as mammals. Here we performed comprehensive comparative analyses of the TRPV subfamily in order to understand the evolutionary process; we identified novel TRPV genes and also characterized the evolutionary flexibility of TRPV3 during vertebrate evolution. We cloned the TRPV3 channel from the western clawed frog Xenopus tropicalis to understand the functional evolution of the TRPV3 channel. The amino acid sequences of the N- and C-terminal regions of the TRPV3 channel were highly diversified from those of other terrestrial vertebrate TRPV3 channels, although central portions were well conserved. In a heterologous expression system, several mammalian TRPV3 agonists did not activate the TRPV3 channel of the western clawed frog. Moreover, the frog TRPV3 channel did not respond to heat stimuli, instead it was activated by cold temperatures. Temperature thresholds for activation were about 16 °C, slightly below the lower temperature limit for the western clawed frog. Given that the TRPV3 channel is expressed in skin, its likely role is to detect noxious cold temperatures. Thus, the western clawed frog and mammals acquired opposite temperature sensitivity of the TRPV3 channel in order to detect environmental temperatures suitable for their respective species, indicating that temperature receptors can dynamically change properties to adapt to different thermal environments during evolution.

  2. Body temperature and cold sensation during and following exercise under temperate room conditions in cold-sensitive young trained females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Naoto; Aoki-Murakami, Erii; Tsuji, Bun; Kenny, Glen P; Nagashima, Kei; Kondo, Narihiko; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2017-11-01

    We evaluated cold sensation at rest and in response to exercise-induced changes in core and skin temperatures in cold-sensitive exercise trained females. Fifty-eight trained young females were screened by a questionnaire, selecting cold-sensitive (Cold-sensitive, n  = 7) and non-cold-sensitive (Control, n  = 7) individuals. Participants rested in a room at 29.5°C for ~100 min after which ambient temperature was reduced to 23.5°C where they remained resting for 60 min. Participants then performed 30-min of moderate intensity cycling (50% peak oxygen uptake) followed by a 60-min recovery. Core and mean skin temperatures and cold sensation over the whole-body and extremities (fingers and toes) were assessed throughout. Resting core temperature was lower in the Cold-sensitive relative to Control group (36.4 ± 0.3 vs. 36.7 ± 0.2°C). Core temperature increased to similar levels at end-exercise (~37.2°C) and gradually returned to near preexercise rest levels at the end of recovery (>36.6°C). Whole-body cold sensation was greater in the Cold-sensitive relative to Control group during resting at a room temperature of 23.5°C only without a difference in mean skin temperature between groups. In contrast, cold sensation of the extremities was greater in the Cold-sensitive group prior to, during and following exercise albeit this was not paralleled by differences in mean extremity skin temperature. We show that young trained females who are sensitive to cold exhibit augmented whole-body cold sensation during rest under temperate ambient conditions. However, this response is diminished during and following exercise. In contrast, cold sensation of extremities is augmented during resting that persists during and following exercise. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  3. Effects of Pregnant Leach Solution Temperature on the Permeability of Gravelly Drainage Layer of Heap Leaching Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mehdi amini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In copper heap leaching structures, the ore is leached by an acidic solution. After dissolving the ore mineral, the heap is drained off in the acidic solution using a drainage system (consisting of a network of perforated polyethylene pipes and gravelly drainage layers and is, then, transferred to the leaching plant for copper extraction where the copper is extracted and the remaining solution is dripped over the ore heap for re-leaching. In this process, the reaction between the acidic solution and copper oxide ore is exothermal and the pregnant leach solution (PLS, which is drained off the leaching heap, has a higher temperature than the dripped acidic solution. The PLS temperature variations cause some changes in the viscosity and density which affect the gravelly drainage layer's permeability. In this research, a special permeability measuring system was devised for determining the effects of the PLS temperature variations on the permeability coefficient of the gravelly drainage layer of heap leaching structures. The system, consisting of a thermal acid resistant element and a thermocouple, controls the PLS temperature, which helps measure the permeability coefficient of the gravelly drainage layer. The PLS and gravelly drainage layer of Sarcheshmeh copper mine heap leaching structure No. 1 were used in this study. The permeability coefficient of the gravelly soil was measured against the PLS and pure water at temperatures varying between 3°C to 60°C. Also, the viscosity and density of the PLS and pure water were measured at these temperatures and, using existing theoretical relations, the permeability coefficient of the gravel was computed. A comparison between the experimental and theoretical results revealed a good conformity between the two sets of results. Finally, a case (Taft heap leaching structure, Yazd, Iran was studied and its gravelly drainage layer was designed based on the results of the present research.

  4. Catalytic destruction of perchlorate in ferric chloride and hydrochloric acid solution with control of temperature, pressure and chemical reagents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Baohua; Cole, David R.; Brown, Gilbert M.

    2004-10-05

    A method is described to decompose perchlorate in a FeCl.sub.3 /HCl aqueous solution such as would be used to regenerate an anion exchange resin used to remove perchlorate. The solution is mixed with a reducing agent, preferably an organic alcohol and/or ferrous chloride, and can be heated to accelerate the decomposition of perchlorate. Lower temperatures may be employed if a catalyst is added.

  5. Influence of yeast strain, priming solution and temperature on beer bottle conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconi, Ombretta; Rossi, Serena; Galgano, Fernanda; Sileoni, Valeria; Perretti, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Recently, there has been a significant increase in the number of microbreweries. Usually, craft beers are bottle conditioned; however, few studies have investigated beer refermentation. One of the objectives of this study was to evaluate the impacts of different experimental conditions, specifically yeast strain, priming solution and temperature, on the standard quality attributes, the volatile compounds and the sensory profile of the bottle-conditioned beer. The other aim was to monitor the evolution of volatile compounds and amino acids consumption throughout the refermentation process to check if it is possible to reduce the time necessary for bottle conditioning. The results indicate that the volatile profile was mainly influenced by the strain of yeast, and this may have obscured the possible impacts of the other parameters. Our results also confirm that the two yeast strains showed different metabolic activity, particularly with respect to esters production. Moreover, we found the Safbrew S-33® strain when primed with Siromix® and refermented at 30 °C yielded the fastest formation of higher alcohols while maintaining low production of off-flavours. These results suggest a formulation that may reduce the time needed for bottle conditioning without affecting the quality of the final beer which may simultaneously improve efficiency and economic profits. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Characterization of highly crystalline lead iodide nanosheets prepared by room-temperature solution processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisenda, Riccardo; Island, Joshua O.; Lado, Jose L.; Giovanelli, Emerson; Gant, Patricia; Nagler, Philipp; Bange, Sebastian; Lupton, John M.; Schüller, Christian; Molina-Mendoza, Aday J.; Aballe, Lucia; Foerster, Michael; Korn, Tobias; Niño, Miguel Angel; Perez de Lara, David; Pérez, Emilio M.; Fernandéz-Rossier, Joaquín; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres

    2017-11-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) semiconducting materials are particularly appealing for many applications. Although theory predicts a large number of 2D materials, experimentally only a few of these materials have been identified and characterized comprehensively in the ultrathin limit. Lead iodide, which belongs to the transition metal halides family and has a direct bandgap in the visible spectrum, has been known for a long time and has been well characterized in its bulk form. Nevertheless, studies of this material in the nanometer thickness regime are rather scarce. In this article we demonstrate an easy way to synthesize ultrathin, highly crystalline flakes of PbI2 by precipitation from a solution in water. We thoroughly characterize the produced thin flakes with different techniques ranging from optical and Raman spectroscopy to temperature-dependent photoluminescence and electron microscopy. We compare the results to ab initio calculations of the band structure of the material. Finally, we fabricate photodetectors based on PbI2 and study their optoelectronic properties.

  7. Effects of Temperature on Sensitivity of Bacilus licheniformis RI 75-1 Vegetative Cells at Gamma Quantum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Larrea Vega, O.; Rios Brito, F.; Marquez Alvarez, M.; Padron Soler, E.

    1986-01-01

    It is known that strains of E. Coli with wild genotype for reparation, when are irradiated at temperature between 42 0 C and 45 0 C, shown an increase of radioresistance. At the given temperature the number of double strands breaks of DNA decrease. Some authors report that the radioresistance increased is due to the elevation of the irradiation temperature is related to the cell membrane status. The paper includes reports on the effects of increased temperature on the sensitivity - at gamma quantum - of Bacillus licheniformis RI 75-1 vegetative cells. Temperatures of 42 0 C and 60 0 C during irradiation were employed. An increase in radioresistance was found when the temperature of irradiation was increased to 42 0 C. However, a decrease in viability was observed. Heat treatment prior to irradiation showed an increase in the number of radioresistance colonies when compared. (author)

  8. Enhancement of NH3 gas sensitivity at room temperature by carbon nanotube-based sensor coated with Co nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Lich Quang; Phan, Pho Quoc; Duong, Huyen Ngoc; Nguyen, Chien Duc; Nguyen, Lam Huu

    2013-01-30

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) film has been fabricated onto Pt-patterned alumina substrates using the chemical vapor deposition method for NH(3) gas sensing applications. The MWCNT-based sensor is sensitive to NH(3) gas at room temperature. Nanoclusters of Co catalysts have been sputtered on the surface of the MWCNT film to enhance gas sensitivity with respect to unfunctionalized CNT films. The gas sensitivity of Co-functionalized MWCNT-based gas sensors is thus significantly improved. The sensor exhibits good repeatability and high selectivity towards NH(3), compared with alcohol and LPG.

  9. Enhancement of NH3 Gas Sensitivity at Room Temperature by Carbon Nanotube-Based Sensor Coated with Co Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lich Quang Nguyen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT film has been fabricated onto Pt-patterned alumina substrates using the chemical vapor deposition method for NH3 gas sensing applications. The MWCNT-based sensor is sensitive to NH3 gas at room temperature. Nanoclusters of Co catalysts have been sputtered on the surface of the MWCNT film to enhance gas sensitivity with respect to unfunctionalized CNT films. The gas sensitivity of Co-functionalized MWCNT-based gas sensors is thus significantly improved. The sensor exhibits good repeatability and high selectivity towards NH3, compared with alcohol and LPG.

  10. Enhancement of the sensitivity of a temperature sensor based on fiber Bragg gratings via weak value amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Serrano, L J; Barrera, D; Amaya, W; Sales, S; Pruneri, V; Capmany, J; Torres, J P

    2015-09-01

    We present a proof-of-concept experiment aimed at increasing the sensitivity of Fiber-Bragg-gratings temperature sensors by making use of a weak-value-amplification scheme. The technique requires only linear optics elements for its implementation and appears as a promising method for increasing the sensitivity than state-of the-art sensors can currently provide. The device implemented here is able to generate a shift of the centroid of the spectrum of a pulse of ∼0.035  nm/°C, a nearly fourfold increase in sensitivity over the same fiber-Bragg-grating system interrogated using standard methods.

  11. Skin Sensitive Difference of Human Body Sections under Clothing-Smirnov Test of Skin Surface Temperatures' Dynamic Changing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun; WU Hai-yan; WANG Yun-yi

    2004-01-01

    Skin sensitive difference of human body sections under clothing is the theoretic foundation of thermal insulation clothing design.By a new method of researching on clothing comfort perception,the skin temperature live changing procedure of human body sections affected by the same cold stimulation is inspected.Furthermore with the Smirnov test the skin temperatures dynamic changing patterns of main human body sections are obtained.

  12. Behavioural thermoregulation in a temperature-sensitive coral reef fish, the five-lined cardinalfish (Cheilodipterus quinquelineatus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nay, Tiffany J.; Johansen, Jacob L.; Habary, Adam

    2015-01-01

    provide a strategy to cope with changing conditions. A temperature-sensitive coral reef cardinalfish (Cheilodipterusquinquelineatus) was exposed to 28 °C (average at collection site) or 32 °C (predicted end-of-century) for 6 weeks. Tpref was determined using a shuttlebox system, which allowed fish...... than night-time movements. Understanding temperature-mediated movements is imperative for predicting how ocean warming will influence coral reef species and distribution patterns....

  13. Enthalpies of solution of methylcalix[4]resorcinarene in non-aqueous solvents as a function of concentration and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riveros, Diana C. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica de Soluciones, Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de los Andes, Bogota D.C. (Colombia); Martinez, Fleming [Grupo de Investigaciones Farmaceutico-Fisicoquimicas, Departamento de Farmacia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota D.C. (Colombia); Vargas, Edgar F., E-mail: edvargas@uniandes.edu.co [Laboratorio de Termodinamica de Soluciones, Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de los Andes, Bogota D.C. (Colombia)

    2012-11-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The solution enthalpies of methylcalix[4]resorcinarene in alcohols have been measured. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The solution enthalpies of methylcalix[4]resorcinarene in alcohols are endothermic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enthalpies of transference are interpreted in terms of proton donor capacity of alcohols. - Abstract: Enthalpies of solution of 2,8,14,20-tetramethyl-4,6,10,12,16,18,22,24-octahydroxyresorci[4]arene in methanol, ethanol and propanol as a function of molal concentration at (288.15, 298.15 and 308.15) K were measured calorimetrically. The enthalpies of solvation were estimated. Using propanol as the referent solvent, transfer properties to other alcohols were also calculated. In addition, temperature dependence of the enthalpy of solution at infinite dilution was also obtained. The data were interpreted in terms of solute-solvent interactions.

  14. Enzymatic- and temperature-sensitive controlled release of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxides (USPIOs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shann S; Scherer, Randy L; Ortega, Ryan A; Bell, Charleson S; O'Neil, Conlin P; Hubbell, Jeffrey A; Giorgio, Todd D

    2011-02-27

    Drug and contrast agent delivery systems that achieve controlled release in the presence of enzymatic activity are becoming increasingly important, as enzymatic activity is a hallmark of a wide array of diseases, including cancer and atherosclerosis. Here, we have synthesized clusters of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxides (USPIOs) that sense enzymatic activity for applications in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To achieve this goal, we utilize amphiphilic poly(propylene sulfide)-bl-poly(ethylene glycol) (PPS-b-PEG) copolymers, which are known to have excellent properties for smart delivery of drug and siRNA. Monodisperse PPS polymers were synthesized by anionic ring opening polymerization of propylene sulfide, and were sequentially reacted with commercially available heterobifunctional PEG reagents and then ssDNA sequences to fashion biofunctional PPS-bl-PEG copolymers. They were then combined with hydrophobic 12 nm USPIO cores in the thin-film hydration method to produce ssDNA-displaying USPIO micelles. Micelle populations displaying complementary ssDNA sequences were mixed to induce crosslinking of the USPIO micelles. By design, these crosslinking sequences contained an EcoRV cleavage site. Treatment of the clusters with EcoRV results in a loss of R2 negative contrast in the system. Further, the USPIO clusters demonstrate temperature sensitivity as evidenced by their reversible dispersion at ~75°C and re-clustering following return to room temperature. This work demonstrates proof of concept of an enzymatically-actuatable and thermoresponsive system for dynamic biosensing applications. The platform exhibits controlled release of nanoparticles leading to changes in magnetic relaxation, enabling detection of enzymatic activity. Further, the presented functionalization scheme extends the scope of potential applications for PPS-b-PEG. Combined with previous findings using this polymer platform that demonstrate controlled drug release in oxidative

  15. Enzymatic- and temperature-sensitive controlled release of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxides (USPIOs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortega Ryan A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug and contrast agent delivery systems that achieve controlled release in the presence of enzymatic activity are becoming increasingly important, as enzymatic activity is a hallmark of a wide array of diseases, including cancer and atherosclerosis. Here, we have synthesized clusters of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxides (USPIOs that sense enzymatic activity for applications in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. To achieve this goal, we utilize amphiphilic poly(propylene sulfide-bl-poly(ethylene glycol (PPS-b-PEG copolymers, which are known to have excellent properties for smart delivery of drug and siRNA. Results Monodisperse PPS polymers were synthesized by anionic ring opening polymerization of propylene sulfide, and were sequentially reacted with commercially available heterobifunctional PEG reagents and then ssDNA sequences to fashion biofunctional PPS-bl-PEG copolymers. They were then combined with hydrophobic 12 nm USPIO cores in the thin-film hydration method to produce ssDNA-displaying USPIO micelles. Micelle populations displaying complementary ssDNA sequences were mixed to induce crosslinking of the USPIO micelles. By design, these crosslinking sequences contained an EcoRV cleavage site. Treatment of the clusters with EcoRV results in a loss of R2 negative contrast in the system. Further, the USPIO clusters demonstrate temperature sensitivity as evidenced by their reversible dispersion at ~75°C and re-clustering following return to room temperature. Conclusions This work demonstrates proof of concept of an enzymatically-actuatable and thermoresponsive system for dynamic biosensing applications. The platform exhibits controlled release of nanoparticles leading to changes in magnetic relaxation, enabling detection of enzymatic activity. Further, the presented functionalization scheme extends the scope of potential applications for PPS-b-PEG. Combined with previous findings using this polymer platform that

  16. Solution Process Synthesis of High Aspect Ratio ZnO Nanorods on Electrode Surface for Sensitive Electrochemical Detection of Uric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Rafiq; Tripathy, Nirmalya; Ahn, Min-Sang; Hahn, Yoon-Bong

    2017-04-01

    This study demonstrates a highly stable, selective and sensitive uric acid (UA) biosensor based on high aspect ratio zinc oxide nanorods (ZNRs) vertical grown on electrode surface via a simple one-step low temperature solution route. Uricase enzyme was immobilized on the ZNRs followed by Nafion covering to fabricate UA sensing electrodes (Nafion/Uricase-ZNRs/Ag). The fabricated electrodes showed enhanced performance with attractive analytical response, such as a high sensitivity of 239.67 μA cm-2 mM-1 in wide-linear range (0.01-4.56 mM), rapid response time (~3 s), low detection limit (5 nM), and low value of apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (Kmapp, 0.025 mM). In addition, selectivity, reproducibility and long-term storage stability of biosensor was also demonstrated. These results can be attributed to the high aspect ratio of vertically grown ZNRs which provides high surface area leading to enhanced enzyme immobilization, high electrocatalytic activity, and direct electron transfer during electrochemical detection of UA. We expect that this biosensor platform will be advantageous to fabricate ultrasensitive, robust, low-cost sensing device for numerous analyte detection.

  17. Numerical solution of fully developed heat transfer problem with constant wall temperature and application to isosceles triangle and parabolic ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karabulut, Halit; Ipci, Duygu; Cinar, Can

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A numerical method has been developed for fully developed flows with constant wall temperature. • The governing equations were transformed to boundary fitted coordinates. • The Nusselt number of parabolic duct has been investigated. • Validation of the numerical method has been made by comparing published data. - Abstract: In motor-vehicles the use of more compact radiators have several advantages such as; improving the aerodynamic form of cars, reducing the weight and volume of the cars, reducing the material consumption and environmental pollutions, and enabling faster increase of the engine coolant temperature after starting to run and thereby improving the thermal efficiency. For the design of efficient and compact radiators, the robust determination of the heat transfer coefficient becomes imperative. In this study the external heat transfer coefficient of the radiator has been investigated for hydrodynamically and thermally fully developed flows in channels with constant wall temperature. In such situation the numerical treatment of the problem results in a trivial solution. To find a non-trivial solution the problem is treated either as an eigenvalue problem or as a thermally developing flow problem. In this study a numerical solution procedure has been developed and the heat transfer coefficients of the fully developed flow in triangular and parabolic air channels were investigated. The governing equations were transformed to boundary fitted coordinates and numerically solved. The non-trivial solution was obtained by means of guessing the temperature of any grid point within the solution domain. The correction of the guessed temperature was performed via smoothing the temperature profile on a line passing through the mentioned grid point. Results were compared with literature data and found to be consistent.

  18. Solubility and solution thermodynamics of 2-methyl-6-nitroaniline in ten organic solvents at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cong, Yang; Wang, Jian; Du, Cunbin; Han, Shuo; Zhao, Hongkun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Solubility of 2-methyl-6-nitroaniline in ten solvents were determined. • The solubility were correlated with four thermodynamic models. • Standard dissolution enthalpy and excess enthalpy of the solutions were computed. - Abstract: Knowledge of solubility for 2-methyl-6-nitroaniline in different solvents is essential for its purification and further theoretical studies. In this paper, the solid-liquid equilibrium for 2-methyl-6-nitroaniline in ten pure organic solvents (methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, isopropanol, toluene, ethyl acetate, acetonitrile, acetone, cyclohexane and 1,4-dioxane) was established using the isothermal saturation method at temperatures T = (278.15–313.15) K under pressure of 101.2 kPa, and the solubility of 2-methyl-6-nitroaniline in these solvents were determined by a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In general, the mole fraction solubility followed the following order from high to low in different solvents: 1,4-dioxane (0.1799–0.3390) > acetone (0.1128–0.3010) > ethyl acetate (0.08414–0.2654) > acetonitrile (0.04179–0.2027) > toluene (0.02367–0.1104) > n-propanol (0.01080–0.04514) > ethanol (0.01020–0.04202) > isopropanol (0.008595–0.03763) > methanol (0.007391–0.03198) > cyclohexane (0.001027–0.005617). The modified Apelblat equation, λh equation, Wilson model and NRTL model were employed to correlate the measured solubility data of 2-methyl-6-nitroaniline in the selected solvents. Results indicated that the largest values of RAD and RMSD acquired by the four models were less than 0.76% and 9.13 × 10"−"4, respectively. The modified Apelblat equation provided better results than the other three models. Furthermore, the standard dissolution enthalpy and excess enthalpy of the solutions were computed from the solubility values. The standard dissolution enthalpies vary within the range from (14.88 to 45.57) kJ·mol"−"1 and are all positive, the dissolution process of 2-methyl-6

  19. The Usher Syndrome Type IIIB Histidyl-tRNA Synthetase Mutation Confers Temperature Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Jamie A; Guth, Ethan; Kim, Cindy; Regan, Cathy; Siu, Victoria M; Rupar, C Anthony; Demeler, Borries; Francklyn, Christopher S; Robey-Bond, Susan M

    2017-07-18

    Histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HARS) is a highly conserved translation factor that plays an essential role in protein synthesis. HARS has been implicated in the human syndromes Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) Type 2W and Type IIIB Usher (USH3B). The USH3B mutation, which encodes a Y454S substitution in HARS, is inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion and associated with childhood deafness, blindness, and episodic hallucinations during acute illness. The biochemical basis of the pathophysiologies linked to USH3B is currently unknown. Here, we present a detailed functional comparison of wild-type (WT) and Y454S HARS enzymes. Kinetic parameters for enzymes and canonical substrates were determined using both steady state and rapid kinetics. Enzyme stability was examined using differential scanning fluorimetry. Finally, enzyme functionality in a primary cell culture was assessed. Our results demonstrate that the Y454S substitution leaves HARS amino acid activation, aminoacylation, and tRNA His binding functions largely intact compared with those of WT HARS, and the mutant enzyme dimerizes like the wild type does. Interestingly, during our investigation, it was revealed that the kinetics of amino acid activation differs from that of the previously characterized bacterial HisRS. Despite the similar kinetics, differential scanning fluorimetry revealed that Y454S is less thermally stable than WT HARS, and cells from Y454S patients grown at elevated temperatures demonstrate diminished levels of protein synthesis compared to those of WT cells. The thermal sensitivity associated with the Y454S mutation represents a biochemical basis for understanding USH3B.

  20. Weather/temperature-sensitive vasomotor rhinitis may be refractory to intranasal corticosteroid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Robert; Lieberman, Philip; Kent, Edward; Silvey, MaryJane; Locantore, Nicholas; Philpot, Edward E

    2009-01-01

    Vasomotor rhinitis (VMR) is a common but poorly understood disorder of which there are two major subgroups: VMR(w/t), triggered by weather/temperature and VMR(ir), triggered by airborne irritants. No specific biological pathways or specific treatments for VMR(w/t) or VMR(ir) have been identified. However, intranasal corticosteroids (INSs) are effective in treating many forms of nonallergic rhinitis that include these conditions. A recently introduced INS with established efficacy in allergic rhinitis and enhanced affinity, fluticasone furoate, may possess the potency and safety profile required to treat chronic VMR(w/t). Two replicate studies (FFR30006 and FFR30007) were conducted in six countries to evaluate the efficacy and safety of fluticasone furoate nasal spray in subjects with VMR(w/t). After a 7- to 14-day screening period, subjects (n = 699) with symptomatic VMR(w/t) received fluticasone furoate, 110 mug q.d. or placebo for 4 weeks in these two randomized, double-blind, parallel-group studies. Subjects rated their nasal symptoms (congestion, rhinorrhea, and postnasal drip) twice daily on a 4-point categorical scale and evaluated their overall response to treatment at study end. Fluticasone furoate did not significantly improve daily reflective total nasal symptom scores, the primary end point, versus placebo (p = 0.259) and there was no improvement in any other measure of efficacy. The active treatment was well tolerated. Fluticasone furoate was not effective in treating subjects with a newly defined condition, weather-sensitive VMR. These unexpected results suggest that VMR(w/t) is a distinct subgroup of VMR that is refractory to treatment with INSs. Additional study of other treatments for VMR(w/t) (including INSs) is warranted.

  1. Sensitivity of Support Vector Machine Predictions of Passive Microwave Brightness Temperature Over Snow-covered Terrain in High Mountain Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, J. A.; Forman, B. A.

    2017-12-01

    High Mountain Asia (HMA) serves as a water supply source for over 1.3 billion people, primarily in south-east Asia. Most of this water originates as snow (or ice) that melts during the summer months and contributes to the run-off downstream. In spite of its critical role, there is still considerable uncertainty regarding the total amount of snow in HMA and its spatial and temporal variation. In this study, the NASA Land Information Systems (LIS) is used to model the hydrologic cycle over the Indus basin. In addition, the ability of support vector machines (SVM), a machine learning technique, to predict passive microwave brightness temperatures at a specific frequency and polarization as a function of LIS-derived land surface model output is explored in a sensitivity analysis. Multi-frequency, multi-polarization passive microwave brightness temperatures as measured by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) over the Indus basin are used as training targets during the SVM training process. Normalized sensitivity coefficients (NSC) are then computed to assess the sensitivity of a well-trained SVM to each LIS-derived state variable. Preliminary results conform with the known first-order physics. For example, input states directly linked to physical temperature like snow temperature, air temperature, and vegetation temperature have positive NSC's whereas input states that increase volume scattering such as snow water equivalent or snow density yield negative NSC's. Air temperature exhibits the largest sensitivity coefficients due to its inherent, high-frequency variability. Adherence of this machine learning algorithm to the first-order physics bodes well for its potential use in LIS as the observation operator within a radiance data assimilation system aimed at improving regional- and continental-scale snow estimates.

  2. Temperature sensitivity of drought-induced tree mortality portends increased regional die-off under global-change-type drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Henry D.; Guardiola-Claramonte, Maite; Barron-Gafford, Greg A.; Villegas, Juan Camilo; Breshears, David D.; Zou, Chris B.; Troch, Peter A.; Huxman, Travis E.

    2009-01-01

    Large-scale biogeographical shifts in vegetation are predicted in response to the altered precipitation and temperature regimes associated with global climate change. Vegetation shifts have profound ecological impacts and are an important climate-ecosystem feedback through their alteration of carbon, water, and energy exchanges of the land surface. Of particular concern is the potential for warmer temperatures to compound the effects of increasingly severe droughts by triggering widespread vegetation shifts via woody plant mortality. The sensitivity of tree mortality to temperature is dependent on which of 2 non-mutually-exclusive mechanisms predominates—temperature-sensitive carbon starvation in response to a period of protracted water stress or temperature-insensitive sudden hydraulic failure under extreme water stress (cavitation). Here we show that experimentally induced warmer temperatures (≈4 °C) shortened the time to drought-induced mortality in Pinus edulis (piñon shortened pine) trees by nearly a third, with temperature-dependent differences in cumulative respiration costs implicating carbon starvation as the primary mechanism of mortality. Extrapolating this temperature effect to the historic frequency of water deficit in the southwestern United States predicts a 5-fold increase in the frequency of regional-scale tree die-off events for this species due to temperature alone. Projected increases in drought frequency due to changes in precipitation and increases in stress from biotic agents (e.g., bark beetles) would further exacerbate mortality. Our results demonstrate the mechanism by which warmer temperatures have exacerbated recent regional die-off events and background mortality rates. Because of pervasive projected increases in temperature, our results portend widespread increases in the extent and frequency of vegetation die-off. PMID:19365070

  3. Fluorescent metal-organic framework MIL-53(Al) for highly selective and sensitive detection of Fe3+ in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Xiong; Ren, Hu-Bo; Yan, Xiu-Ping

    2013-08-06

    Fluorescent metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have received great attention in sensing application. Here, we report the exploration of fluorescent MIL-53(Al) for highly selective and sensitive detection of Fe(3+) in aqueous solution. The cation exchange between Fe(3+) and the framework metal ion Al(3+) in MIL-53(Al) led to the quenching of the fluorescence of MIL-53(Al) due to the transformation of strong-fluorescent MIL-53(Al) to weak-fluorescent MIL-53(Fe), allowing highly selective and sensitive detection of Fe(3+) in aqueous solution with a linear range of 3-200 μM and a detection limit of 0.9 μM. No interferences from 0.8 M Na(+); 0.35 M K(+); 11 mM Cu(2+); 10 mM Ni(2+); 6 mM Ca(2+), Pb(2+), and Al(3+); 5.5 mM Mn(2+); 5 mM Co(2+) and Cr(3+); 4 mM Hg(2+), Cd(2+), Zn(2+), and Mg(2+); 3 mM Fe(2+); 0.8 M Cl(-); 60 mM NO2(-) and NO3(-); 10 mM HPO4(2-), H2PO4(-), SO3(2-), SO4(2-), and HCOO(-); 8 mM CO3(2-), HCO3(-), and C2O4(2-); and 5 mM CH3COO(-) were found for the detection of 150 μM Fe(3+). The possible mechanism for the quenching effect of Fe(3+) on the fluorescence of MIL-53(Al) was elucidated by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, X-ray diffraction spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. The specific cation exchange behavior between Fe(3+) and the framework Al(3+) along with the excellent stability of MIL-53(Al) allows highly selective and sensitive detection of Fe(3+) in aqueous solution. The developed method was applied to the determination of Fe(3+) in human urine samples with the quantitative spike recoveries from 98.2% to 106.2%.

  4. Influence of annealing temperature and organic dyes as sensitizers on sol–gel derived TiO{sub 2} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rani, Mamta; Abbas, Saeed J.; Tripathi, S.K., E-mail: surya@pu.ac.in

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Preparation of rice shaped TiO{sub 2} nanorods with anatase structure by sol–gel method. • Effect of post deposition annealing on structural properties of TiO{sub 2} is studied. • Unlike individual dye, absorption of Cocktail dye with TiO{sub 2} nanorods is broader. • Cocktail dye sensitized TiO{sub 2} film has more photosensitivity than EY, RB, AO. • Increase in photosensitivity up to optimum temperature is due to hole passivation. - Abstract: Five different organic dyes and reported cocktail dye composed of these dyes are used as sensitizer for titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}). Rice shaped (TiO{sub 2}) nanorods are prepared by using sol–gel method. The films annealed at 673 K and above are crystalline with anatase structure. The effect of post annealing temperature is studied on various structural parameters. Cocktail dye shows broader absorption with TiO{sub 2} nanorods in visible region compared with five dyes. Maximum photosensitivity is obtained with RhB dye, followed by FGF and cocktail dye sensitized TiO{sub 2} films. Increase in photosensitivity is due to passivating some hole traps on the surface up to some optimum temperature, above which photosensitivity decreases due to a higher photo activation energy compared to dark conductivity in low temperature region and also may be due to damage of the dye molecule. This work may prove its worth for understanding the electron transport in dye sensitized nanodevices.

  5. Determination of Optimal Temperature for Biosorption of Heavy Metal Mixture from Aqueous Solution by Pretreated Biomass of Aspergillus niger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Yousefi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biosorption is a novel technology that uses dead and inactive biomass for removal of heavy metals from aqueous solution. Some parameters such as temperature, contact time, solution pH, initial metal concentration, biosorbent dose and also agitating speed of solution and biosorbent mixing can affect the amount of metal sorption by biosorbent. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different treatments of temperatures (25, 35, 45 and 55oC on biosorption of metals mixture in order to determine optimal temperature for more metals removal from aqueous solution. This study uses dead and pretreated biomass of Aspergillus niger with 0.5N NaOH for removal of Zn(II, Co(II and Cd(II. In all temperature treatments and in the case of all of heavy metals, maximum amount of metal sorption and concentration decrease was occurred in first 5 minutes and achieved to equilibrium after 20 minute. The percent of metals sorption show growth trend with temperature increase. Between 4 experimental treatments, 55oC treatment was shown maximum sorption and 25oC was shown minimum sorption amount. The percent of Cr(II sorption was increase from 28.5% in 25oC to 44.7% in 55oC. Also, this increase was from 40% to 58% for Cd(II and from 37.7% to 65.6% for Zn(II. About 60% of increase in sorption by A. niger was due to increase in temperature. Therefore the amount of metals sorption can be increase, only with temperature increase and without any biomass addition.

  6. Effect of Low-Temperature Environment on Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of X80 Pipeline Steel in Simulated Alkaline Soil Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fei; Wang, Dan; Wu, Ming; Yu, Chengxiang; Sun, Dongxu; Yang, Xu; Xu, Changhao

    2018-04-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of X80 pipeline steel in simulated alkaline soil solution under different temperatures was investigated by slow-strain-rate testing, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. Results showed that the fracture was transgranular and brittle at 273 K to 278 K (0 °C to 5 °C), and the metal surface was dissolved by a large number of chloride ions. Furthermore, hydrogen embrittlement was caused by the hydrogen atom extended to the high-stress region. The fracture process was controlled by hydrogen-induced cracking, and SCC was highly sensitive at this stage. At 288 K to 298 K (15 °C to 25 °C), the fracture morphology was attributed to the mixed mode of ductile and brittle fractures, the fracture process was controlled by the mechanism of hydrogen-induced cracking and anodic dissolution, and the susceptibility to SCC decreased. When the temperature reached 308 K to 318 K (35 °C to 45 °C), the fracture was mainly intergranular and ductile, the fracture process was controlled by anodic dissolution, and SCC sensitivity was the smallest in this temperature range.

  7. PH-Sensitive Nanogels Synthesised by Radiation-Induced Cross-Linking of Hydrogen-Bonded Interpolymer Complexes in Aqueous Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulanski, P.; Kadłubowski, S.; Henke, A.; Olejnik, A.K.; Rokita, B.; Wach, R.; Rosiak, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Nanogels, i.e., internally cross-linked hydrophilic polymeric particles of sub-micron sizes, gained much interest over the last years due to their possible application as components of advanced type of medicines, like drug carriers. It is expected that they can facilitate distribution and delivery of different types of biologically active substances (including proteins, peptides and oligonucleotides) in a controlled way within the human body. Nanogels and their bigger analogues – microgels, are mainly synthesised through free-radical cross-linking polymerization of monomers. This synthetic routine can be carried out in solution but more often emulsion techniques are preferred (mini- or microemulsion) due to easier size control and exclusion of the macrogelation process. Additionally, surfactant-free emulsion polymerization (SFEP) is the method of choice for the preparation of temperature-sensitive particles, mainly based on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide).Nanogels were also successfully prepared by intramolecular cross-linking of single macromolecules. More recently, covalent stabilization was utilized to obtain the self-assembled structures like micelles of amphiphilic block copolymers, held by relatively weak physical interactions. Due to low stability of these polymolecular systems against dilution or temperature changes, different chemistry-based strategies to turn them into permanent nanopaticles were proposed in the literature (e.g., independent stabilization of a core or a shell of the micelles)

  8. PH-Sensitive Nanogels Synthesised by Radiation-Induced Cross-Linking of Hydrogen-Bonded Interpolymer Complexes in Aqueous Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulanski, P.; Kadłubowski, S.; Henke, A.; Olejnik, A. K.; Rokita, B.; Wach, R.; Rosiak, J.M., E-mail: slawekka@mitr.p.lodz.pl [Technical University of Lodz, Wroblewskiego 15, 93-590 Lodz (Poland)

    2010-07-01

    Nanogels, i.e., internally cross-linked hydrophilic polymeric particles of sub-micron sizes, gained much interest over the last years due to their possible application as components of advanced type of medicines, like drug carriers. It is expected that they can facilitate distribution and delivery of different types of biologically active substances (including proteins, peptides and oligonucleotides) in a controlled way within the human body. Nanogels and their bigger analogues – microgels, are mainly synthesised through free-radical cross-linking polymerization of monomers. This synthetic routine can be carried out in solution but more often emulsion techniques are preferred (mini- or microemulsion) due to easier size control and exclusion of the macrogelation process. Additionally, surfactant-free emulsion polymerization (SFEP) is the method of choice for the preparation of temperature-sensitive particles, mainly based on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide).Nanogels were also successfully prepared by intramolecular cross-linking of single macromolecules. More recently, covalent stabilization was utilized to obtain the self-assembled structures like micelles of amphiphilic block copolymers, held by relatively weak physical interactions. Due to low stability of these polymolecular systems against dilution or temperature changes, different chemistry-based strategies to turn them into permanent nanopaticles were proposed in the literature (e.g., independent stabilization of a core or a shell of the micelles)

  9. Sensitivity analysis of power depression and axial power factor effect on fuel pin to temperature and related properties distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suwardi, S.

    2001-01-01

    The presented paper is a preliminary step to evaluate the effect of radial and axial distribution of power generation on thermal analysis of whole fuel pin model with large L/D ratio. The model takes into account both radial and axial distribution of power generation due to power depression and core geometry, temperature and microstructure dependent on thermal conductivity. The microstructure distribution and the gap conductance for typical steady-state situation are given for the sensitivity analysis. The temperature and thermal conductivity distribution along the radial and axial directions obtained by different power distribution is used to indicate the sensitivity of power depression and power factor on thermal aspect. The evaluation is made for one step of incremental time and steady state approach is used. The analysis has been performed using a finite element-finite difference model. The result for typical reactor fuel shows that the sensitivity is too important to be omitted in thermal model

  10. Sensitivities of selenite, selenate, selenomethionine and trimethylselenonium ion in aqueous solution and in blood plasma - ETAAS compared with ICP-MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, B.; Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt

    1998-01-01

    coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Using ETAAS, the sensitivities for Se(IV), SeMet and TMSe in aqueous solution were similar, whereas the sensitivity of Se(VI) was 63% of that value. In blood plasma, the ETAAS sensitivities of Se(IV) and Se(VI) were equal, whereas the sensitivities of Se......Met and TMSe were 87 and 56%, respectively, of that value. In contrast, the ICP-MS sensitivities obtained for Se(VI), TMSe and SeMet were between 96 and 98% of that obtained for Se(IV) in aqueous solution and in blood plasma. It is concluded, that ICP-MS is superior to ETAAS as the problem of differences...... in sensitivity of the selenium species when using ETAAS are not prevalent when using the ICP-MS technique....

  11. High temperature solution-nitriding and low-temperature nitriding of AISI 316: Effect on pitting potential and crevice corrosion performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottoli, Federico; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2018-01-01

    in a 0.1M NaCl solution and crevice corrosion immersion tests in 3wt% FeCl3 solution were studied before and after the bulk and surface treatments.Nitrogen addition in the bulk proved to have a beneficial effect on the pitting resistance of the alloy. The formation of a zone of expanded austenite...... at the material surface through low-temperature nitriding resulted in a considerable improvement of the pitting potential and the crevice corrosion performance of the steels....

  12. The effect of temperature on nascent morphology of polyethylene polymerized over solution-phase flat model catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, S.D.; Kong, B.L.; Han, W.; Thune, P.C.; Yang, X.Z.; Loos, J.; Yan, S.K.

    2009-01-01

    The structure and morphology of polyethylene (PE) produced during solution polymerization using bis(imino)pyridyl metal catalysts supported by flat SiO2/Si(100) wafers were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electron diffraction. Depending on the polymerization temperature, ranging

  13. Facile room-temperature solution-phase synthesis of a spherical covalent organic framework for high-resolution chromatographic separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Xiong; Liu, Chang; Cao, Yi-Meng; Yan, Xiu-Ping

    2015-08-07

    A simple and facile room-temperature solution-phase synthesis was developed to fabricate a spherical covalent organic framework with large surface area, good solvent stability and high thermostability for high-resolution chromatographic separation of diverse important industrial analytes including alkanes, cyclohexane and benzene, α-pinene and β-pinene, and alcohols with high column efficiency and good precision.

  14. Structure and dynamics of POPC bilayers in water solutions of room temperature ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedetto, Antonio; Bingham, Richard J.; Ballone, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations in the NPT ensemble have been carried out to investigate the effect of two room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), on stacks of phospholipid bilayers in water. We consider RTIL compounds consisting of chloride ([bmim][Cl]) and hexafluorophosphate ([bmim][PF 6 ]) salts of the 1-buthyl-3-methylimidazolium ([bmim] + ) cation, while the phospholipid bilayer is made of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC). Our investigations focus on structural and dynamical properties of phospholipid and water molecules that could be probed by inelastic and quasi-elastic neutron scattering measurements. The results confirm the fast incorporation of [bmim] + into the lipid phase already observed in previous simulations, driven by the Coulomb attraction of the cation for the most electronegative oxygens in the POPC head group and by sizeable dispersion forces binding the neutral hydrocarbon tails of [bmim] + and of POPC. The [bmim] + absorption into the bilayer favours the penetration of water into POPC, causes a slight but systematic thinning of the bilayer, and further stabilises hydrogen bonds at the lipid/water interface that already in pure samples (no RTIL) display a lifetime much longer than in bulk water. On the other hand, the effect of RTILs on the diffusion constant of POPC (D POPC ) does not reveal a clearly identifiable trend, since D POPC increases upon addition of [bmim][Cl] and decreases in the [bmim][PF 6 ] case. Moreover, because of screening, the electrostatic signature of each bilayer is only moderately affected by the addition of RTIL ions in solution. The analysis of long wavelength fluctuations of the bilayers shows that RTIL sorption causes a general decrease of the lipid/water interfacial tension and bending rigidity, pointing to the destabilizing effect of RTILs on lipid bilayers

  15. Structure and dynamics of POPC bilayers in water solutions of room temperature ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedetto, Antonio [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Laboratory for Neutron Scattering and Imaging, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Bingham, Richard J. [York Centre for Complex Systems Analysis, University of York, York YO10 5GE (United Kingdom); Ballone, Pietro [Center for Life Nano Science @Sapienza, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), 00185 Roma (Italy); Department of Physics, Università di Roma “La Sapienza,” 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2015-03-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations in the NPT ensemble have been carried out to investigate the effect of two room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), on stacks of phospholipid bilayers in water. We consider RTIL compounds consisting of chloride ([bmim][Cl]) and hexafluorophosphate ([bmim][PF{sub 6}]) salts of the 1-buthyl-3-methylimidazolium ([bmim]{sup +}) cation, while the phospholipid bilayer is made of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC). Our investigations focus on structural and dynamical properties of phospholipid and water molecules that could be probed by inelastic and quasi-elastic neutron scattering measurements. The results confirm the fast incorporation of [bmim]{sup +} into the lipid phase already observed in previous simulations, driven by the Coulomb attraction of the cation for the most electronegative oxygens in the POPC head group and by sizeable dispersion forces binding the neutral hydrocarbon tails of [bmim]{sup +} and of POPC. The [bmim]{sup +} absorption into the bilayer favours the penetration of water into POPC, causes a slight but systematic thinning of the bilayer, and further stabilises hydrogen bonds at the lipid/water interface that already in pure samples (no RTIL) display a lifetime much longer than in bulk water. On the other hand, the effect of RTILs on the diffusion constant of POPC (D{sub POPC}) does not reveal a clearly identifiable trend, since D{sub POPC} increases upon addition of [bmim][Cl] and decreases in the [bmim][PF{sub 6}] case. Moreover, because of screening, the electrostatic signature of each bilayer is only moderately affected by the addition of RTIL ions in solution. The analysis of long wavelength fluctuations of the bilayers shows that RTIL sorption causes a general decrease of the lipid/water interfacial tension and bending rigidity, pointing to the destabilizing effect of RTILs on lipid bilayers.

  16. Highly Sensitive Reentrant Cavity-Microstrip Patch Antenna Integrated Wireless Passive Pressure Sensor for High Temperature Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Lu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel reentrant cavity-microstrip patch antenna integrated wireless passive pressure sensor was proposed in this paper for high temperature applications. The reentrant cavity was analyzed from aspects of distributed model and equivalent lumped circuit model, on the basis of which an optimal sensor structure integrated with a rectangular microstrip patch antenna was proposed to better transmit/receive wireless signals. In this paper, the proposed sensor was fabricated with high temperature resistant alumina ceramic and silver metalization with weld sealing, and it was measured in a hermetic metal tank with nitrogen pressure loading. It was verified that the sensor was highly sensitive, keeping stable performance up to 300 kPa with an average sensitivity of 981.8 kHz/kPa at temperature 25°C, while, for high temperature measurement, the sensor can operate properly under pressure of 60–120 kPa in the temperature range of 25–300°C with maximum pressure sensitivity of 179.2 kHz/kPa. In practical application, the proposed sensor is used in a method called table lookup with a maximum error of 5.78%.

  17. Sensitivity of decomposition rates of soil organic matter with respect to simultaneous changes in temperature and moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Carlos A.; Trumbore, Susan E.; Davidson, Eric A.; Vicca, Sara; Janssens, I.

    2015-03-01

    The sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition to global environmental change is a topic of prominent relevance for the global carbon cycle. Decomposition depends on multiple factors that are being altered simultaneously as a result of global environmental change; therefore, it is important to study the sensitivity of the rates of soil organic matter decomposition with respect to multiple and interacting drivers. In this manuscript, we present an analysis of the potential response of decomposition rates to simultaneous changes in temperature and moisture. To address this problem, we first present a theoretical framework to study the sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition when multiple driving factors change simultaneously. We then apply this framework to models and data at different levels of abstraction: (1) to a mechanistic model that addresses the limitation of enzyme activity by simultaneous effects of temperature and soil water content, the latter controlling substrate supply and oxygen concentration for microbial activity; (2) to different mathematical functions used to represent temperature and moisture effects on decomposition in biogeochemical models. To contrast model predictions at these two levels of organization, we compiled different data sets of observed responses in field and laboratory studies. Then we applied our conceptual framework to: (3) observations of heterotrophic respiration at the ecosystem level; (4) laboratory experiments looking at the response of heterotrophic respiration to independent changes in moisture and temperature; and (5) ecosystem-level experiments manipulating soil temperature and water content simultaneously.

  18. High-temperature x-ray diffraction study of HfTiO4-HfO2 solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, D.A.

    1975-01-01

    High-temperature x-ray diffraction techniques were used to determine the axial thermal expansion curves of HfTiO 4 -HfO 2 solid solutions as a function of composition. Data show increasing anisotropy with increasing HfO 2 content. An orthorhombic-to-monoclinic phase transformation was detected near room temperature for compositions near the high HfO 2 end of the orthorhombic phase field and for compositions within the two-phase region (HfTiO 4 solid solution plus HfO 2 solid solution). An orthorhombic-to-cubic phase transformation is indicated by data from oxygen-deficient materials at greater than 1873 0 K. (U.S.)

  19. High-Pressure-High-Temperature Processing Reduces Maillard Reaction and Viscosity in Whey Protein-Sugar Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila Ruiz, Geraldine; Xi, Bingyan; Minor, Marcel; Sala, Guido; van Boekel, Martinus; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Stieger, Markus

    2016-09-28

    The aim of the study was to determine the influence of pressure in high-pressure-high-temperature (HPHT) processing on Maillard reactions and protein aggregation of whey protein-sugar solutions. Solutions of whey protein isolate containing either glucose or trehalose at pH 6, 7, and 9 were treated by HPHT processing or conventional high-temperature (HT) treatments. Browning was reduced, and early and advanced Maillard reactions were retarded under HPHT processing at all pH values compared to HT treatment. HPHT induced a larger pH drop than HT treatments, especially at pH 9, which was not associated with Maillard reactions. After HPHT processing at pH 7, protein aggregation and viscosity of whey protein isolate-glucose/trehalose solutions remained unchanged. It was concluded that HPHT processing can potentially improve the quality of protein-sugar-containing foods, for which browning and high viscosities are undesired, such as high-protein beverages.

  20. Krokot (Portulaca oleracea L As a Natural Sensitizer for TiO2 Dye-sensitized Solar Cells: The Effect of Temperature Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyza Anni Mufidah

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The solar cell is formed by a sandwich structure, in which two electrodes flank the primary electrolyte that is containing redox I-/based on PEG (Polyethylene Glycol. The working-electrode which is TiO2 layer on an ITO glass substrate is sensitized with krokot dye as the electron donor. The counter electrode is a layer of carbon. The fabrication cell is immersed with the krokot dye with 40°C, 50°C, 60°C extract temperature. The result of the UV-Vis shows that the absorption of wave-length from dye extract of krokot is located in the visible region with the absorbance peak in 420,5 nm and 665,5 nm which are the peak of chlorophyll. For the UV-Vis solid system, there are the highest band gap  in  50°C extract temperature that make the capability of absorption toward UV spectrum is large. Furthermore, in the functional group analysed by FT-IR, there are shiften-carbonil and hydroxyl group after they are sensitized. From the current and voltage test with I-V meter keithley 2400 is resulted that on the 50°C extract temperature produces the highest efficiency of reaches which is 2.63 x 10-3 %.

  1. Dansyl-8-aminoquinoline as a sensitive pH fluorescent probe with dual-responsive ranges in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Zheng, Shuyu; Ma, Liguo; Zhao, Meili; Deng, Lengfang; Yang, Liting; Ma, Li-Jun

    2014-04-24

    A sensitive pH fluorescent probe based on dansyl group, dansyl-8-aminoquinoline (DAQ), has been synthesized. The probe showed dual-responsive ranges to pH changes, one range from 2.00 to 7.95 and another one from 7.95 to 10.87 in aqueous solution, as it showed pKa values of 5.73 and 8.56 under acid and basic conditions, respectively. Furthermore, the pH response mechanism of the probe was explored successfully by using NMR spectra. The results indicated that the responses of DAQ to pH changes should attribute to the protonation of the nitrogen atom in the dimethylamino