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Sample records for temperature reactor materials

  1. High temperature brazing of reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlov, A.V.; Nechaev, V.A.; Rybkin, B.V.; Ponimash, I.D.

    1990-01-01

    Application of high-temperature brazing for joining products of such materials as molybdenum, tungsten, zirconium, beryllium, magnesium, nickel and aluminium alloys, graphite ceramics etc. is described. Brazing materials composition and brazed joints properties are presented. A satisfactory strength of brazed joints is detected under reactor operation temperatures and coolant and irradiation effect

  2. Materials for high temperature reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buenaventura Pouyfaucon, A.

    2004-01-01

    Within the 5th Euraton Framework Programme, a big effort is being made to promote and consolidate the development of the High Temperature Reactor (HTR). Empresarios Agrupados is participating in this project and among others, also forms part of the HTR-M project Materials for HTRs. This paper summarises the work carried out by Empresarios Agrupados regarding the material selection of the HTR Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). The possible candidate materials and the most promising ones are discussed. Design aspects such as the RPV sensitive zones and material damage mechanisms are considered. Finally, the applicability of the existing design Codes and Standards for the design of the HTR RPV is also discussed. (Author)

  3. Materials for advanced high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, L.W.

    1977-01-01

    Materials are studied in advanced applications of high temperature reactors: helium gas turbine and process heat. Long term creep behavior and corrosion tests are conducted in simulated HTR helium up to 1000 deg C with impurities additions in the furnace atmosphere. Corrosion studies on AISI 321 steels at 800-1000 deg C have shown that the O 2 partial pressure is as low as 10 -24+-3 atm, Ni and Fe cannot be oxidised above about 500 and 600 deg C, Cr cease to oxidise at 800 to 900 deg C and Ti at 900 to 1000 deg C depending on alloy composition γ' strengthened superalloys must depend on a protective corrosion mechanism assisted by the presence of Ti and possibly Cr. Carburisation has been identified metallographically in several high temperature materials: Hastelloy X and M21Z. Alloy TZM appears to be inert in HTR Helium at 900 and 1000 deg C. In alloy 800 and Inconel 625 surface cracks initiation is suppressed but crack propagation is accelerated but this was not apparent in AISI steels, Hastelloy X or fine grain Inconel at 750 deg C

  4. Materials for advanced high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, L.W.

    1976-01-01

    The results recently obtained from the Dragon program are presented to illustrate materials behavior: (a) effect of temperature on oxidation and carburisation in HTR helium (variation in oxide depth and in C content of AISI 321 after 5000 hours in HTR helium; effect of temperature on surface scale formation in the γ' strengthened alloys Nimonic 80A and 713LC); (b) effect of alloy composition on oxidation and carburisation behavior (influence of Nb and Ti on the corrosion of austenitic steels; influence of Ti and Al in IN-102; weight gain of cast high Ni alloys); (c) effect of environment on creep strength (results of tests for hastelloy X, grade I inconel 625, grade II inconel 625 and inconel 617 in He and air between 750 and 800 0 C)

  5. Creep behavior of materials for high-temperature reactor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, K.; Hartnagel, W.; Iischner, B.; Schepp, P.

    1984-01-01

    Materials for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) application are selected according to their creep behavior. For two alloys--Incoloy-800 used for the live steam tubing of the thorium high-temperature reactor and Inconel-617 evaluated for tubings in advanced HTGRs--creep curves are measured and described by equations. A microstructural interpretation is given. An essential result is that nonstable microstructures determine the creep behavior

  6. Generation IV Reactors Integrated Materials Technology Program Plan: Focus on Very High Temperature Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corwin, William R [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; McGreevy, Timothy E [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

    2008-08-01

    requirements. (4) Pressure Vessel Steels: (a) Qualification of short-term, high-temperature properties of light water reactor steels for anticipated VHTR off-normal conditions must be determined, as well as the effects of aging on tensile, creep, and toughness properties, and on thermal emissivity. (b) Large-scale fabrication process for higher temperature alloys, such as 9Cr-1MoV, including ensuring thick-section and weldment integrity must be developed, as well as improved definitions of creep-fatigue and negligible creep behavior. (5) High-Temperature Alloys: (a) Qualification and codification of materials for the intermediate heat exchanger, such as Alloys 617 or 230, for long-term very high-temperature creep, creep-fatigue, and environmental aging degradation must be done, especially in thin sections for compact designs, for both base metal and weldments. (b) Constitutive models and an improved methodology for high-temperature design must be developed.

  7. High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Fuels and Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-03-01

    At the third annual meeting of the technical working group on Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options and Spent Fuel Management (TWG-NFCO), held in Vienna, in 2004, it was suggested 'to develop manuals/handbooks and best practice documents for use in training and education in coated particle fuel technology' in the IAEA's Programme for the year 2006-2007. In the context of supporting interested Member States, the activity to develop a handbook for use in the 'education and training' of a new generation of scientists and engineers on coated particle fuel technology was undertaken. To make aware of the role of nuclear science education and training in all Member States to enhance their capacity to develop innovative technologies for sustainable nuclear energy is of paramount importance to the IAEA Significant efforts are underway in several Member States to develop high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR) based on either pebble bed or prismatic designs. All these reactors are primarily fuelled by TRISO (tri iso-structural) coated particles. The aim however is to build future nuclear fuel cycles in concert with the aim of the Generation IV International Forum and includes nuclear reactor applications for process heat, hydrogen production and electricity generation. Moreover, developmental work is ongoing and focuses on the burning of weapon-grade plutonium including civil plutonium and other transuranic elements using the 'deep-burn concept' or 'inert matrix fuels', especially in HTGR systems in the form of coated particle fuels. The document will serve as the primary resource materials for 'education and training' in the area of advanced fuels forming the building blocks for future development in the interested Member States. This document broadly covers several aspects of coated particle fuel technology, namely: manufacture of coated particles, compacts and elements; design-basis; quality assurance/quality control and characterization techniques; fuel irradiations; fuel

  8. Reactor physics and reactor strategy investigations into the fissionable material economy of the thorium and uranium cycle in fast breeder reactors and high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schikorr, W.M.

    In this work the properties governing the fissionable material economy of the uranium and thorium cycles are investigated for the advanced reactor types currently under development - the fast breeder reactor (FBR) and the high temperature reactor (HTR) - from the point of view of the optimum utilization of the available nuclear fuel reserves and the continuance of supply of these reserves. For this purpose, the two reactor types are first of all considered individually and are subsequently discussed as a complementary overall system

  9. Manufacturing and material properties of forgings for reactor pressure vessel of high temperature engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, I.; Suzuki, K.

    1994-01-01

    For the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) which has been developed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel is used first in the world. Material confirmation test has been carried out to demonstrate good applicability of forged low Si 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel to the RPV of HTTR. Recently, JSW has succeeded in the manufacturing of large size ring forgings and large size forged cover dome integrated with nozzles for stand pipe for the RPV. This paper describes the results of the material confirmation test as well as the manufacturing and material properties of the large forged cover dome integrated with nozzles for stand pipe. (orig.)

  10. High temperature metallic materials for gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    The Specialists' Meeting was organized in conjunction with an earlier meeting on this topic held in Vienna, Austria, 1981, which provided for a comprehensive review of the status of materials development and testing at that time and for a description of test facilities. This meeting provided an opportunity (1) to review and discuss the progress made since 1981 in the development, testing and qualification of high temperature metallic materials, (2) to critically assess results achieved, and (3) to give directions for future research and development programmes. In particular, the meeting provided a form for a close interaction between component designers and materials specialists. The meeting was attended by 48 participants from France, People's Republic of China, Federal Republic of Germany, Japan, Poland, Switzerland, United Kingdom, USSR and USA presenting 22 papers. The technical part of the meeting was subdivided into four technical sessions: Components Design and Testing - Implications for Materials (4 papers); Microstructure and Environmental Compatibility (4 papers); Mechanical Properties (9 papers); New Alloys and Developments (6 papers). At the end of the meeting a round table discussion was organized in order to summarize the meeting and to make recommendations for future activities. This volume contains all papers presented at the meeting. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  11. Composite Materials under Extreme Radiation and Temperature Environments of the Next Generation Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simos, N.

    2011-01-01

    In the nuclear energy renaissance, driven by fission reactor concepts utilizing very high temperatures and fast neutron spectra, materials with enhanced performance that exceeds are expected to play a central role. With the operating temperatures of the Generation III reactors bringing the classical reactor materials close to their performance limits there is an urgent need to develop and qualify new alloys and composites. Efforts have been focused on the intricate relations and the high demands placed on materials at the anticipated extreme states within the next generation fusion and fission reactors which combine high radiation fluxes, elevated temperatures and aggressive environments. While nuclear reactors have been in operation for several decades, the structural materials associated with the next generation options need to endure much higher temperatures (1200 C), higher neutron doses (tens of displacements per atom, dpa), and extremely corrosive environments, which are beyond the experience on materials accumulated to-date. The most important consideration is the performance and reliability of structural materials for both in-core and out-of-core functions. While there exists a great body of nuclear materials research and operating experience/performance from fission reactors where epithermal and thermal neutrons interact with materials and alter their physio-mechanical properties, a process that is well understood by now, there are no operating or even experimental facilities that will facilitate the extreme conditions of flux and temperature anticipated and thus provide insights into the behaviour of these well understood materials. Materials, however, still need to be developed and their interaction and damage potential or lifetime to be quantified for the next generation nuclear energy. Based on material development advances, composites, and in particular ceramic composites, seem to inherently possess properties suitable for key functions within the

  12. An integrated approach to selecting materials for fuel cladding in advanced high-temperature reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangacharyulu, C., E-mail: chary.r@usask.ca [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Guzonas, D.A.; Pencer, J.; Nava-Dominguez, A.; Leung, L.K.H. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    An integrated approach has been developed for selection of fuel cladding materials for advanced high-temperature reactors. Reactor physics, thermalhydraulic and material analyses are being integrated in a systematic study comparing various candidate fuel-cladding alloys. The analyses established the axial and radial neutron fluxes, power distributions, axial and radial temperature distributions, rates of defect formation and helium production using AECL analytical toolsets and experimentally measured corrosion rates to optimize the material composition for fuel cladding. The project has just been initiated at University of Saskatchewan. Some preliminary results of the analyses are presented together with the path forward for the project. (author)

  13. High temperature resistant materials and structural ceramics for use in high temperature gas cooled reactors and fusion plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel, H.

    1992-01-01

    Irrespective of the systems and the status of the nuclear reactor development lines, the availability, qualification and development of materials are crucial. This paper concentrates on the requirements and the status of development of high temperature metallic and ceramic materials for core and heat transferring components in advanced HTR supplying process heat and for plasma exposed, high heat flux components in Tokamak fusion reactor types. (J.P.N.)

  14. Temperature stabilisation in Fischer–Tropsch reactors using phase change material (PCM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odunsi, Ademola O.; O'Donovan, Tadhg S.; Reay, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The Fischer–Tropsch (FT) reaction is highly exothermic. The exothermicity combined with a high sensitivity of product selectivity to temperature constitute the main challenges in the design of FT reactors. Temperature control is particularly critical to the process in order to ensure longevity of the catalyst, optimise the product distribution, and to ensure thermo-mechanical reliability of the entire process. The use of encapsulated, Phase Change Material (PCM), in conjunction with a supervisory temperature control mechanism, could help mitigate these challenges and intensify the heat transport from the reactor. A 2D-axisymmetric, pseudo-homogeneous, steady-state model, with the dissipation of the enthalpy of reaction into an isothermal PCM sink, in a wall-cooled, single-tube fixed bed reactor is presented. Effective temperature control shows a shift in thermodynamic equilibrium, favouring the selectivity of longer chain hydrocarbons (C_5_+) to the disadvantage of CH_4 selectivity-a much desired outcome in the hydrocarbon Gas-to-Liquid (GTL) industry. - Highlights: • Phase change material is used to control temperature in a Fischer–Tropsch reactor. • Effective temperature control favours the production of C_5_+ over CH_4. • A 2D-axisymmetric, steady-state model is presented. • The model is verified against similar experimental work done in literature.

  15. Measuring technique of super high temperature thermal properties of reactor core materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Akira; Baba, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Hideo; Matsumoto, Tsuyoshi

    1998-01-01

    In this study, thermal properties of reactor core materials used for water cooled reactors and FBR were tried to develop a technique to measure their melt states at less than 3,000degC in order to contribute more correct evaluation of the reactor core behavior at severe accident. Then, a thermal property measuring method of high temperature melt by using floating method was investigated and its fundamental design was begun to investigate under a base of optimum judgement on the air flow floating throw-down method. And, in order to measure emissivity of melt specimen surface essential for correct temperature measurement using the throw down method, a spectroscopic emissivity measuring unit using an ellipsometer was prepared and induced. On the thermal properties measurement using the holding method, a specimen container to measure thermal diffusiveness of the high temperature melts by using laser flashing method was tried to prepare. (G.K.)

  16. Fission reactors and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, B.R.T.

    1981-12-01

    The American-designed boiling water reactor and pressurized water reactor dominate the designs currently in use and under construction worldwide. As in all energy systems, materials problems have appeared during service; these include stress-corrosion of stainless steel pipes and heat exchangers and questions regarding crack behavior in pressure vessels. To obtain the maximum potential energy from our limited uranium supplies is is essential to develop the fast breeder reactor. The materials in these reactors are subjected to higher temperatures and neutron fluxes but lower pressures than in the water reactors. The performance required of the fuel elements is more arduous in the breeder than in water reactors. Extensive materials programs are in progress in test reactors and in large test rigs to ensure that materials will be available to meet these conditions

  17. Temperature measurement of the reactor materials samples irradiated in the fuel channels of the RA reactor - Annex 16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolic, M.; Djalovic, M.

    1964-01-01

    Reactor materials as graphite, stainless steel, magnox, zirconium alloys, etc. were exposed to fast neutron flux inside the fuel elements specially adapted for this purpose. Samples in the form ampoules were placed in capsules inside the fuel channels and cooled by heavy water which cools the fuel elements. In order to monitor the samples temperature 42 thermocouples were placed in the samples. That was necessary for reactor safety reasons and for further interpretation of measured results. Temperature monitoring was done continuously by multichannel milivoltmeters. This paper describes the technique of introducing the thermocouples, compensation instruments, control of the cold ends and adaptation of the instruments for precision (0.5%) temperature measurement in the range 30 deg - 130 deg C; 30 deg - 280 deg C and 30 deg - 80 deg C [sr

  18. Development of a Low Temperature Irradiation Capsule for Research Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Kee Nam; Cho, Man Soon; Lee, Cheol Yong; Yang, Sung Woo; Shin, Yoon Taek; Park, Seng Jae; Kang, Suk Hoon; Kang, Young Hwan; Park, Sang Jun

    2013-01-01

    A new capsule design was prepared and tested at HANARO for a neutron irradiation of core materials of research reactors as a part of the research reactor development project. Irradiation testing of the materials including graphite, beryllium, and zircaloy-4 that are supposed to be used as core materials in research reactors was required for irradiation at up to 8 reactor operation cycles at low temperature (<100 .deg. C). Therefore, three instrumented capsules were designed and fabricated for an evaluation of the neutron irradiation properties of the core materials (Graphite, Be, Zircaloy-4) of research reactors. The capsules were first designed and fabricated to irradiate materials at low temperature (<100 .deg. C) for a long cycle of 8 irradiation cycles at HANARO. Therefore, the safety of the new designed capsule should be fully checked before irradiation testing. Out-pile performance and endurance testing before HANARO irradiation testing was performed using a capsule under a 110% condition of a reactor coolant flow amount. The structural integrity of the capsule was analyzed in terms of a vibration-induced fatigue cracking of a rod tip of the capsule that is suspected to be the most vulnerable part of a capsule. Another two capsules were irradiated at HANARO for 4 cycles, and one capsule was transferred to a hot cell to examine the integrity of the rod tip of the capsule. After confirming the soundness of the 4 cycle-irradiated capsule, the remaining capsule was irradiated at up to 8 cycles at HANARO. Based on the structural integrity analysis of the capsule, an improved capsule design will be suggested for a longer irradiation test at HANARO

  19. ARCHER Project: Progress on Material and component activities for the Advanced High Temperature Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckthorpe, D.E.

    2014-01-01

    The ARCHER (Advanced High-Temperature Reactors for Cogeneration of Heat and Electricity R&D) integrated project is a four year project which was started in 2011 as part of the European Commission 7th Framework Programme (FP7) to perform High Temperature Reactor technology R&D in support of reactor demonstration. The project consortium encompasses conventional and Nuclear Industry, Utilities, Technical Support Organizations, Research & Development Organizations and Academia. The activities involved contribute to the Generation IV (GIF) International Forum and collaborate with related projects in the US, China, Japan, and the Republic of Korea in cooperation with IAEA and ISTC. This paper addresses the progress of the work on ARCHER materials and component activities since the start of the project and underlines some of the main conclusions reached. (author)

  20. Material and component progress within ARCHER for advanced high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckthorpe, D.E.; Davies, M.; Pra, F.; Bonnamy, P.; Fokkens, J.; Heijna, M.; Bout, N. de; Vreeling, A.; Bourlier, F.; Lhachemi, D.; Woayehune, A.; Dubiez-le-Goff, S.; Hahner, P.; Futterer, M.; Berka, J.; Kalivodora, J.; Pouchon, M.A.; Schmitt, R.; Homerin, P.; Marsden, B.; Mummery, P.; Mutch, G.; Ponca, D.; Buhl, P.; Hoffmann, M.; Rondet, F.; Pecherty, A.; Baurand, F.; Alenda, F.; Esch, M.; Kohlz, N.; Reed, J.; Fachinger, J.; Klower, Dr.

    2014-01-01

    The ARCHER (Advanced High-Temperature Reactors for Cogeneration of Heat and Electricity R and D) integrated project started in 2011 as part of the European Commission 7. Framework Programme (FP7) for a period of four years to perform High Temperature Reactor technology R and D in support of reactor demonstration. The project consortium encompasses conventional and Nuclear Industry, Utilities, Technical Support Organizations, Research and Development Organizations and Academia. The activities involved contribute to the Generation IV (GIF) International Forum and collaborate with related projects in the US, China, Japan, and the Republic of Korea in cooperation with IAEA and ISTC. This paper addresses the progress of the work on materials and component technologies within ARCHER over the first two years of the project. (authors)

  1. Modelling and experimental study of low temperature energy storage reactor using cementitious material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ndiaye, Khadim; Ginestet, Stéphane; Cyr, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Numerical study of a thermochemical reactor using a cementitious material for TES. • Development and test of an original prototype based on this original material. • Comparison of the experimental and numerical results. • Energy balance of the experimental setup (charging and discharging phases). - Abstract: Renewable energy storage is now essential to enhance the energy performance of buildings and to reduce their environmental impact. Most adsorbent materials are capable of storing heat, in a large range of temperature. Ettringite, the main product of the hydration of sulfoaluminate binders, has the advantage of high energy storage density at low temperature, around 60 °C. The objective of this study is, first, to predict the behaviour of the ettringite based material in a thermochemical reactor during the heat storage process, by heat storage modelling, and then to perform experimental validation by tests on a prototype. A model based on the energy and mass balance in the cementitious material was developed and simulated in MatLab software, and was able to predict the spatiotemporal behaviour of the storage system. This helped to build a thermochemical reactor prototype for heat storage tests in both the charging and discharging phases. Thus experimental tests validated the numerical model and served as proof of concept.

  2. Fuel-Cycle and Nuclear Material Disposition Issues Associated with High-Temperature Gas Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shropshire, D.E.; Herring, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to facilitate a better understanding of the fuel-cycle and nuclear material disposition issues associated with high-temperature gas reactors (HTGRs). This paper reviews the nuclear fuel cycles supporting early and present day gas reactors, and identifies challenges for the advanced fuel cycles and waste management systems supporting the next generation of HTGRs, including the Very High Temperature Reactor, which is under development in the Generation IV Program. The earliest gas-cooled reactors were the carbon dioxide (CO2)-cooled reactors. Historical experience is available from over 1,000 reactor-years of operation from 52 electricity-generating, CO2-cooled reactor plants that were placed in operation worldwide. Following the CO2 reactor development, seven HTGR plants were built and operated. The HTGR came about from the combination of helium coolant and graphite moderator. Helium was used instead of air or CO2 as the coolant. The helium gas has a significant technical base due to the experience gained in the United States from the 40-MWe Peach Bottom and 330-MWe Fort St. Vrain reactors designed by General Atomics. Germany also built and operated the 15-MWe Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor (AVR) and the 300-MWe Thorium High-Temperature Reactor (THTR) power plants. The AVR, THTR, Peach Bottom and Fort St. Vrain all used fuel containing thorium in various forms (i.e., carbides, oxides, thorium particles) and mixtures with highly enriched uranium. The operational experience gained from these early gas reactors can be applied to the next generation of nuclear power systems. HTGR systems are being developed in South Africa, China, Japan, the United States, and Russia. Elements of the HTGR system evaluated included fuel demands on uranium ore mining and milling, conversion, enrichment services, and fuel fabrication; fuel management in-core; spent fuel characteristics affecting fuel recycling and refabrication, fuel handling, interim

  3. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components during and after irradiation. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; the detection of abrupt electrical degradation of insulating ceramics under high temperature and neutron irradiation; and the study of dismantling and waste disposal strategy for fusion reactors. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2000 are discussed

  4. Material development for gas-cooled high temperature reactors for the production of nuclear process heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel, H.

    1977-04-01

    In the framework of the material development for gas-cooled high temperature reactors, considerable investigations of the materials for the reactor core and the primary cicuit are being conducted. Concerning the core components, the current state-of-the-art and the objectives of the development work on the spherical fuel elements, coated particles and structural graphite are discussed. As an example of the structural graphite, the non-replaceable reflector of the process heat reactor is discussed. The primary circuit will be constructed mainly from metallic materials, although some ceramics are also being considered. Components of interest are hot gas ducts, liners, methane reformer tubes and helium-helium intermediate heat exchangers. The gaseous impurities present in the helium coolant may cause oxidation and carburization of the nickel-base and iron-base alloys envisaged for use in these components, with a possible associated adverse effect on the mechanical properties such as creep and fatigue. Test capacity has therefore been installed to investigate materials behaviour in simulated reactor helium under both constant and alternating stress conditions. The first results on the creep behaviour of several alloys in impure helium are presented and discussed. (orig./GSC) [de

  5. Material Control and Accounting Design Considerations for High-Temperature Gas Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjornard, Trond; Hockert, John

    2011-01-01

    The subject of this report is domestic safeguards and security by design (2SBD) for high-temperature gas reactors, focusing on material control and accountability (MC and A). The motivation for the report is to provide 2SBD support to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, which was launched by Congress in 2005. This introductory section will provide some background on the NGNP project and an overview of the 2SBD concept. The remaining chapters focus specifically on design aspects of the candidate high-temperature gas reactors (HTGRs) relevant to MC and A, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements, and proposed MC and A approaches for the two major HTGR reactor types: pebble bed and prismatic. Of the prismatic type, two candidates are under consideration: (1) GA's GT-MHR (Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor), and (2) the Modular High-Temperature Reactor (M-HTR), a derivative of Areva's Antares reactor. The future of the pebble-bed modular reactor (PBMR) for NGNP is uncertain, as the PBMR consortium partners (Westinghouse, PBMR (Pty) and The Shaw Group) were unable to agree on the path forward for NGNP during 2010. However, during the technology assessment of the conceptual design phase (Phase 1) of the NGNP project, AREVA provided design information and technology assessment of their pebble bed fueled plant design called the HTR-Module concept. AREVA does not intend to pursue this design for NGNP, preferring instead a modular reactor based on the prismatic Antares concept. Since MC and A relevant design information is available for both pebble concepts, the pebble-bed HTGRs considered in this report are: (1) Westinghouse PBMR; and (2) AREVA HTR-Module. The DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) sponsors the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program (FCR and D), which contains an element specifically focused on the domestic (or state) aspects of SBD. This Material Protection, Control and Accountancy Technology (MPACT) program supports the present

  6. Management of graphite material: a key issue for High Temperature Gas Reactor system (HTGR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourdeloie, C.; Marimbeau, P.; Robin, J.C.; Cellier, F.

    2005-01-01

    Graphite material is used in nuclear High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGR, Fig.1) as moderator, thermal absorber and also as structural components of the core (Fig.2). This type of reactor was selected by the Generation IV forum as a potential high temperature provider for supplying hydrogen production plants and is under development in France in the frame of the AREVA ANTARES program. In order to select graphite grades to be used in these future reactors, the requirements for mechanical, thermal, physical-chemical properties must match the internal environment of the nuclear core, especially with regard to irradiation effect. Another important aspect that must be addressed early in design is the waste issue. Indeed, it is necessary to reduce the amount of nuclear waste produced by operation of the reactor during its lifetime. Preliminary assessment of the nuclear waste output for an ANTARES type 280 MWe HTGR over 60 year-lifetime gives an estimated 6000 m 3 of activated graphite waste. Thus, reducing the graphite waste production is an important issue for any HTGR system. First, this paper presents a preliminary inventory of graphite waste fluxes coming from a HTGR, in mass and volume, with magnitudes of radiological activities based on activation calculations of graphite during its stay in the core of the reactor. Normalized data corresponding to an output of 1 GWe.year electricity allows comparison of the waste production with other nuclear reactor systems. Second, possible routes to manage irradiated graphite waste are addressed in both the context of French nuclear waste management rules and by comparison to other national regulations. Routes for graphite waste disposal studied in different countries (concerning existing irradiated graphite waste) will be discussed with regard to new issues of large graphite waste from HTGR. Alternative or complementary solutions aiming at lowering volume of graphite waste to be managed will be presented. For example

  7. Reactor pressure boundary materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jun Hwa; Chi, S. H.; Lee, B. S.

    2002-04-01

    With a long-term operation of nuclear power plants, the component materials are degraded under severe reactor conditions such as neutron irradiation, high temperature, high pressure and corrosive environment. It is necessary to establish the reliable and practical technologies for improving and developing the component materials and for evaluating the mechanical properties. Especially, it is very important to investigate the technologies for reactor pressure boundary materials such as reactor vessel and pipings in accordance with their critical roles. Therefore, this study was focused on developing and advancing the microstructural/micro-mechanical evaluation technologies, and on evaluating the neutron irradiation characteristics and radiation effects analysis technology of the reactor pressure boundary materials, and also on establishing a basis of nuclear material property database

  8. Chemical and physical analysis of core materials for advanced high temperature reactors with process heat applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel, H.

    1985-08-01

    Various chemical and physical methods for the analysis of structural materials have been developed in the research programmes for advanced high temperature reactors. These methods are discussed using as examples the structural materials of the reactor core - the fuel elements consisting of coated particles in a graphite matrix and the structural graphite. Emphasis is given to the methods of chemical analysis. The composition of fuel kernels is investigated using chemical analysis methods to determine the heavy metals content (uranium, plutonium, thorium and metallic impurity elements) and the amount of non-metallic constituents. The properties of the pyrocarbon and silicon carbide coatings of fuel elements are investigated using specially developed physiochemical methods. Regarding the irradiation behaviour of coated particles and fuel elements, methods have been developed for examining specimens in hot cells following exposures under reactor operating conditions, to supplement the measurements of in-reactor performance. For the structural graphite, the determination of impurities is important because certain impurities may cause pitting corrosion during irradiation. The localized analysis of very low impurity concentrations is carried out using spectrochemical d.c. arc excitation, local laser and inductively coupled plasma methods. (orig.)

  9. Spectral emissivity measurements of candidate materials for very high temperature reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, G.; Weber, S.J.; Martin, S.O.; Anderson, M.H. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI (United States); Sridharan, K., E-mail: kumars@cae.wisc.edu [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI (United States); Allen, T.R. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Heat dissipation by radiation is an important consideration in VHTR components, particularly the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), because of the fourth power temperature dependence of radiated heat. Since emissivity is the material property that dictates the ability to radiate heat, measurements of emissivities of materials that are being specifically considered for the construction of VHTR become important. Emissivity is a surface phenomenon and therefore compositional, structural, and topographical changes that occur at the surfaces of these materials as a result of their interactions with the environment at high temperatures will alter their emissivities. With this background, an experimental system for the measurement of spectral emissivity has been designed and constructed. The system has been calibrated in conformance with U.S. DoE quality assurance standards using inert ceramic materials, boron nitride, silicon carbide, and aluminum oxide. The results of high temperature emissivity measurements of potential VHTR materials such as ferritic steels SA 508, T22, T91 and austenitic alloys IN 800H, Haynes 230, IN 617, and 316 stainless steel have been presented.

  10. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2000-01-01

    SCK-CEN's research and development programme on fusion reactor materials includes: (1) the study of the mechanical behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation (including steels, inconel, molybdenum, chromium); (2) the determination and modelling of the characteristics of irradiated first wall materials such as beryllium; (3) the detection of abrupt electrical degradation of insulating ceramics under high temperature and neutron irradiation; (4) the study of the dismantling and waste disposal strategy for fusion reactors.; (5) a feasibility study for the testing of blanket modules under neutron radiation. Main achievements in these topical areas in the year 1999 are summarised

  11. Fusion Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2000-07-01

    SCK-CEN's research and development programme on fusion reactor materials includes: (1) the study of the mechanical behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation (including steels, inconel, molybdenum, chromium); (2) the determination and modelling of the characteristics of irradiated first wall materials such as beryllium; (3) the detection of abrupt electrical degradation of insulating ceramics under high temperature and neutron irradiation; (4) the study of the dismantling and waste disposal strategy for fusion reactors.; (5) a feasibility study for the testing of blanket modules under neutron radiation. Main achievements in these topical areas in the year 1999 are summarised.

  12. Graphite materials for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, Tatsuo

    1991-01-01

    Graphite materials have been used in the nuclear fission reactors from the beginning of the reactor development for the speed reduction and reflection of neutron. Graphite materials are used both as a moderator and as a reflector in the core of high temperature gas-cooled reactors, and both as a radiation shielding material and as a reflector in the surrounding of the core for the fast breeder reactor. On the other hand, graphite materials are being positively used as a first wall of plasma as it is known that low Z materials are useful for holding high temperature plasma in the nuclear fusion devices. In this paper the present status of the application of graphite materials to the nuclear fission reactors and fusion devices (reactors) is presented. In addition, a part of results on the related properties to the structural design and safety evaluation and results examined on the subjects that should be done in the future are also described. (author)

  13. Steam generator materials performance in high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chafey, J.E.; Roberts, D.I.

    1980-11-01

    This paper reviews the materials technology aspects of steam generators for HTGRs which feature a graphite-moderated, uranium-thorium, all-ceramic core and utilizes high-pressure helium as the primary coolant. The steam generators are exposed to gas-side temperatures approaching 760 0 C and produce superheated steam at 538 0 C and 16.5 MPa (2400 psi). The prototype Peach Bottom I 40-MW(e) HTGR was operated for 1349 EFPD over 7 years. Examination after decommissioning of the U-tube steam generators and other components showed the steam generators to be in very satisfactory condition. The 330-MW(e) Fort St. Vrain HTGR, now in the final stages of startup, has achieved 70% power and generated more than 1.5 x 10 6 MWh of electricity. The steam generators in this reactor are once-through units of helical configuration, requiring a number of new materials factors including creep-fatigue and water chemistry control. Current designs of larger HTGRs also feature steam generators of helical once-through design. Materials issues that are important in these designs include detailed consideration of time-dependent behavior of both base metals and welds, as required by current American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code rules, evaluation of bimetallic weld behavior, evaluation of the properties of large forgings, etc

  14. Effect of ultra high temperature ceramics as fuel cladding materials on the nuclear reactor performance by SERPENT Monte Carlo code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkut, Turgay; Kara, Ayhan; Korkut, Hatun [Sinop Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Nuclear Energy Engineering

    2016-12-15

    Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTCs) have low density and high melting point. So they are useful materials in the nuclear industry especially reactor core design. Three UHTCs (silicon carbide, vanadium carbide, and zirconium carbide) were evaluated as the nuclear fuel cladding materials. The SERPENT Monte Carlo code was used to model CANDU, PWR, and VVER type reactor core and to calculate burnup parameters. Some changes were observed at the same burnup and neutronic parameters (keff, neutron flux, absorption rate, and fission rate, depletion of U-238, U-238, Xe-135, Sm-149) with the use of these UHTCs. Results were compared to conventional cladding material zircalloy.

  15. Fabrication of Tungsten-Rhenium Cladding materials via Spark Plasma Sintering for Ultra High Temperature Reactor Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charit, Indrajit; Butt, Darryl; Frary, Megan; Carroll, Mark

    2012-11-05

    This research will develop an optimized, cost-effective method for producing high-purity tungsten-rhenium alloyed fuel clad forms that are crucial for the development of a very high-temperature nuclear reactor. The study will provide critical insight into the fundamental behavior (processing-microstructure- property correlations) of W-Re alloys made using this new fabrication process comprising high-energy ball milling (HEBM) and spark plasma sintering (SPS). A broader goal is to re-establish the U.S. lead in the research field of refractory alloys, such as W-Re systems, with potential applications in very high-temperature nuclear reactors. An essential long-term goal for nuclear power is to develop the capability of operating nuclear reactors at temperatures in excess of 1,000K. This capability has applications in space exploration and some special terrestrial uses where high temperatures are needed in certain chemical or reforming processes. Refractory alloys have been identified as being capable of withstanding temperatures in excess of 1,000K and are considered critical for the development of ultra hightemperature reactors. Tungsten alloys are known to possess extraordinary properties, such as excellent high-temperature capability, including the ability to resist leakage of fissile materials when used as a fuel clad. However, there are difficulties with the development of refractory alloys: 1) lack of basic experimental data on thermodynamics and mechanical and physical properties, and 2) challenges associated with processing these alloys.

  16. Standard Guide for Predicting Radiation-Induced Transition Temperature Shift in Reactor Vessel Materials, E706 (IIF)

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This guide presents a method for predicting reference transition temperature adjustments for irradiated light-water cooled power reactor pressure vessel materials based on Charpy V-notch 30-ftlbf (41-J) data. Radiation damage calculative procedures have been developed from a statistical analysis of an irradiated material database that was available as of May 2000. The embrittlement correlation used in this guide was developed using the following variables: copper and nickel contents, irradiation temperature, and neutron fluence. The form of the model was based on current understanding for two mechanisms of embrittlement: stable matrix damage (SMD) and copper-rich precipitation (CRP); saturation of copper effects (for different weld materials) was included. This guide is applicable for the following specific materials, copper, nickel, and phosphorus contents, range of irradiation temperature, and neutron fluence based on the overall database: 1.1.1 MaterialsA 533 Type B Class 1 and 2, A302 Grade B, A302 G...

  17. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the radiation-induced behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components as well as to help the international community in building the scientific and technical basis needed for the construction of the future reactor. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical and chemical (corrosion) behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation and water coolant environment; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; investigations on the management of materials resulting from the dismantling of fusion reactors including waste disposal. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are discussed

  18. Stability of test environments for performance evaluation of materials for the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edgemon, G.L.; Wilson, D.F.; Bell, G.E.C.

    1993-01-01

    Stability of the primary helium-based coolant test gas for use in performance ests of materials for the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) was determined. Results of tests of the initial gas chemistry from General Atomics (GA) at elevated temperatures, and the associated results predicted by the SOLGASMIX trademark modelling package are presented. Results indicated that for this gas composition and at flow rates obtainable in the test loop, 466 ± 24C is the highest temperature that can be maintained without significantly altering the specified gas chemistry. Four additional gas chemistries were modelled using SOLGASMIX trademark

  19. Specialists' meeting on high temperature metallic materials for application in gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the meeting overviews of current programmes for the development of high temperature materials in Japan, F.R. Germany and the United States of America were presented. Some papers were presented dealing with various aspects of microstructural studies, surface reactions and the changes of microstructure and dimensions due mainly to the associated interfacial material transports, protective surface coatings for HTGR and AGR applications. Other topics presented were mechanical properties of materials and also the influence of materials' properties data on design at temperatures in the creep region where time dependent behaviour must be considered

  20. Analyse of the potential of the high temperature reactor with respect to the use of fissile materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damian, F.

    2001-01-01

    The high temperature reactors fuel is made of micro-particles dispersed in a graphite matrix. This configuration makes it possible to reach high burnup, higher than 700 GWj/t. Thanks to the decoupling between the thermal and the neutronic behaviors in the core many types of fuels can be used. These characteristics give to HTR reactor very good capacities to burn fissile materials. This work was done in the frame of the evaluation of HTR capacities to enhance the value of the plutonium stocks. These stocks are currently composed of the irradiated fuels discharged from classical PWR or the dismantling of the nuclear weapons and represent a significant energy potential. These studies concluded that high cycles length can be reached whatever the plutonium quality is (from 50 % to 94 % of fissile plutonium). In addition, it was demonstrated that the moderator temperature coefficient becomes locally positive for highly burn fuel while the core global moderator temperature coefficient remained negative in the operation range of the reactor. A significant share of this work was first devoted to the setting of a modeling of the fuel element but also of the reactor's core with the codes of system SAPHYR. The whole of modeling was validated by reference calculations. This work of code assessment is justified by a preliminary work that showed that the classical calculation scheme used for PWR could not be transposed directly to HTR core. (author)

  1. Materials for passively safe reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simnad, T.

    1993-01-01

    Future nuclear power capacity will be based on reactor designs that include passive safety features if recent progress in advanced nuclear power developments is realized. There is a high potential for nuclear systems that are smaller and easier to operate than the current generation of reactors, especially when passive or intrinsic characteristics are applied to provide inherent stability of the chain reaction and to minimize the burden on equipment and operating personnel. Taylor, has listed the following common generic technical features as the most important goals for the principal reactor development systems: passive stability, simplification, ruggedness, case of operation, and modularity. Economic competitiveness also depends on standardization and assurance of licensing. The performance of passively safe reactors will be greatly influenced by the successful development of advanced fuels and materials that will provide lower fuel-cycle costs. A dozen new designs of advanced power reactors have been described recently, covering a wide spectrum of reactor types, including pressurized water reactors, boiling water reactors, heavy-water reactors, modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (MHTGRs), and fast breeder reactors. These new designs address the need for passive safety features as well as the requirement of economic competitiveness

  2. Fusion Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2002-04-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the radiation-induced behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components as well as to help the international community in building the scientific and technical basis needed for the construction of the future reactor. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical and chemical (corrosion) behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation and water coolant environment; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; investigations on the management of materials resulting from the dismantling of fusion reactors including waste disposal. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are discussed.

  3. Reactor Materials Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Walle, E.

    2001-01-01

    The activities of the Reactor Materials Research Department of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) fusion, in particular mechanical testing; (2) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (3) nuclear fuel; and (4) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel (RPVS)

  4. Reactor Materials Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Walle, E

    2001-04-01

    The activities of the Reactor Materials Research Department of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) fusion, in particular mechanical testing; (2) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (3) nuclear fuel; and (4) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel (RPVS)

  5. Fusion reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1989-01-01

    This paper discuses the following topics on fusion reactor materials: irradiation, facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; fundamental mechanical behavior; radiation effects; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials; and ceramics.

  6. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This paper discuses the following topics on fusion reactor materials: irradiation, facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; fundamental mechanical behavior; radiation effects; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials; and ceramics

  7. Polymer materials for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaoka, H.

    1993-01-01

    The radiation-resistant polymer materials have recently drawn much attention from the viewpoint of components for fusion reactors. These are mainly applied to electrical insulators, thermal insulators and structural supports of superconducting magnets in fusion reactors. The polymer materials used for these purposes are required to withstand the synergetic effects of high mechanical loads, cryogenic temperatures and intense nuclear radiation. The objective of this review is to summarize the anticipated performance of candidate materials including polymer composites for fusion magnets. The cryogenic properties and the radiation effects of polymer materials are separately reviewed, because there is only limited investigation on the above-mentioned synergetic effects. Additional information on advanced polymer materials for fusion reactors is also introduced with emphasis on recent developments. (orig.)

  8. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowcliffe, A.F.; Burn, G.L.; Knee', S.S.; Dowker, C.L.

    1994-02-01

    This is the fifteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; Special purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide

  9. Corrosion of reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1963-01-15

    Much operational experience and many experimental results have accumulated in recent years regarding corrosion of reactor materials, particularly since the 1958 Geneva Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy, where these problems were also discussed. It was, felt that a survey and critical appraisal of the results obtained during this period had become necessary and, in response to this need, IAEA organized a Conference on the Corrosion of Reactor Materials at Salzburg, Austria (4-9 June 1962). It covered many of the theoretical, experimental and engineering problems relating to the corrosion phenomena which occur in nuclear reactors as well as in the adjacent circuits

  10. High temperature materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this workshop is to share the needs of high temperature and nuclear fuel materials for future nuclear systems, to take stock of the status of researches in this domain and to propose some cooperation works between the different research organisations. The future nuclear systems are the very high temperature (850 to 1200 deg. C) gas cooled reactors (GCR) and the molten salt reactors (MSR). These systems include not only the reactor but also the fabrication and reprocessing of the spent fuel. This document brings together the transparencies of 13 communications among the 25 given at the workshop: 1) characteristics and needs of future systems: specifications, materials and fuel needs for fast spectrum GCR and very high temperature GCR; 2) high temperature materials out of neutron flux: thermal barriers: materials, resistance, lifetimes; nickel-base metal alloys: status of knowledge, mechanical behaviour, possible applications; corrosion linked with the gas coolant: knowledge and problems to be solved; super-alloys for turbines: alloys for blades and discs; corrosion linked with MSR: knowledge and problems to be solved; 3) materials for reactor core structure: nuclear graphite and carbon; fuel assembly structure materials of the GCR with fast neutron spectrum: status of knowledge and ceramics and cermets needs; silicon carbide as fuel confinement material, study of irradiation induced defects; migration of fission products, I and Cs in SiC; 4) materials for hydrogen production: status of the knowledge and needs for the thermochemical cycle; 5) technologies: GCR components and the associated material needs: compact exchangers, pumps, turbines; MSR components: valves, exchangers, pumps. (J.S.)

  11. Reactor Materials Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Walle, E

    2002-04-01

    The activities of SCK-CEN's Reactor Materials Research Department for 2001 are summarised. The objectives of the department are: (1) to evaluate the integrity and behaviour of structural materials used in nuclear power industry; (2) to conduct research to unravel and understand the parameters that determine the material behaviour under or after irradiation; (3) to contribute to the interpretation, the modelling of the material behaviour and to develop and assess strategies for optimum life management of nuclear power plant components. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (2) nuclear fuel; and (3) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel.

  12. Reactor Materials Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Walle, E.

    2002-01-01

    The activities of SCK-CEN's Reactor Materials Research Department for 2001 are summarised. The objectives of the department are: (1) to evaluate the integrity and behaviour of structural materials used in nuclear power industry; (2) to conduct research to unravel and understand the parameters that determine the material behaviour under or after irradiation; (3) to contribute to the interpretation, the modelling of the material behaviour and to develop and assess strategies for optimum life management of nuclear power plant components. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (2) nuclear fuel; and (3) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel

  13. Papers about coated particles, graphitic and metallic materials for progressive high-temperature reactors at the Reactor Meeting 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rottmann, J.

    1978-09-01

    In the contributions, questions on the development, the radiation and the high-temperature behaviour and the characterization of fuel element particles are treated. Furthermore the resistance and radiation behaviour of graphitic materials are discussed. Finally, questions on the choice of high-temperature alloys for nuclear process heat facilities are discussed and the testing-equipment of the Nuclear Research Centre as well as first results of the long-time experiments are presented. The work was performed within the frame of the projects 'HTR-Fuel Element Cycle' and 'Prototype Nuclear Process Heat', which are sponsored by the Federal Ministry of Research and Technology of the Federal Republic of Germany and of the state of North-Rhine-Westfalia. Partner firms, who participate in the two projects are Gelsenberg AG, Gesellschaft fuer Hochtemperaturreaktor-Technik mbH, Hochtemperaturreaktor-Brennelement GmbH, Hochtemperatur-Reaktorbau GmbH, Kernforschungsanlage Juelich GmbH, NUKEM GmbH, SIGRI Elektrographit GmbH/Ringsdorff-Werke GmbH, Bergbauforschung GmbH und Rheinische Braunkohlenwerke AG. (orig./UA) [de

  14. Reliability of reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toerroenen, K.; Aho-Mantila, I.

    1986-05-01

    This report is the final technical report of the fracture mechanics part of the Reliability of Reactor Materials Programme, which was carried out at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) through the years 1981 to 1983. Research and development work was carried out in five major areas, viz. statistical treatment and modelling of cleavage fracture, crack arrest, ductile fracture, instrumented impact testing as well as comparison of numerical and experimental elastic-plastic fracture mechanics. In the area of cleavage fracture the critical variables affecting the fracture of steels are considered in the frames of a statistical model, so called WST-model. Comparison of fracture toughness values predicted by the model and corresponding experimental values shows excellent agreement for a variety of microstructures. different posibilities for using the model are discussed. The development work in the area of crack arrest testing was concentrated in the crack starter properties, test arrangement and computer control. A computerized elastic-plastic fracture testing method with a variety of test specimen geometries in a large temperature range was developed for a routine stage. Ductile fracture characteristics of reactor pressure vessel steel A533B and comparable weld material are given. The features of a new, patented instrumented impact tester are described. Experimental and theoretical comparisons between the new and conventional testers indicated clearly the improvements achieved with the new tester. A comparison of numerical and experimental elastic-plastic fracture mechanics capabilities at VTT was carried out. The comparison consisted of two-dimensional linear elastic as well as elastic-plastic finite element analysis of four specimen geometries and equivalent experimental tests. (author)

  15. Materials for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlich, K.; Kaletta, D.

    1978-03-01

    The following report describes five papers which were given during the IMF seminar series summer 1977. The purpose of this series was to discuss especially the irradiation behaviour of materials intended for the first wall of future fusion reactors. The first paper deals with the basic understanding of plasma physics relating to the fusion reactor and presents the current state of art of fusion technology. The next two talks discuss the metals intended for the first wall and structural components of a fusion reactor. Since 14 MeV neutrons play an important part in the process of irradiation damage their role is discussed in detail. The question which machines are presently available to simulate irradiation damage under conditions similar to the ones found in a fusion reactor are investigated in the fourth talk which also presents the limitations of the different methods of simulation. In this context also discussed is the importance future intensive neutron sources and materials test reactors will have for this problem area. The closing paper has as a theme the review of the present status of research of metallic and non-metallic materials in view of the quite different requirements for different fusion systems; a closing topic is the world supply on rare materials required for fusion reactors. (orig) [de

  16. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethi, V.K.; Scholz, R.; Nolfi, F.V. Jr.; Turner, A.P.L.

    1980-01-01

    Data are given for each of the following areas: (1) effects of irradiation on fusion reactor materials, (2) hydrogen permeation and materials behavior in alloys, (3) carbon coatings for fusion applications, (4) surface damage of TiB 2 coatings under energetic D + and 4 He + irradiations, and (5) neutron dosimetry

  17. Materials for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, S.; Kamath, H.S.

    2005-01-01

    The improved performance of present generation nuclear reactors and the realization of advanced reactor concepts, both, require development of better materials. Physical metallurgy/materials science principles which have been exploited in meeting the exacting requirements of nuclear reactor materials (fuels and structural materials), are outlined citing a few specific examples. While the incentive for improvement of traditional fuels (e.g., UO 2 fuel) is primarily for increasing the average core burn up, the development of advanced fuels (e.g., MOX, mixed carbide, nitride, silicide and dispersion fuels) are directed towards better utilization of fissile and fertile inventories through adaptation of innovative fuel cycles. As the burn up of UO 2 fuel reaches higher levels, a more detailed and quantitative understanding of the phenomena such as fission gas release, fuel restructuring induced by radiation and thermal gradients and pellet-clad interaction is being achieved. Development of zirconium based alloys for both cladding and pressure tube applications is discussed with reference to their physical metallurgy, fabrication techniques and in-reactor degradation mechanisms. The issue of radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is covered drawing a comparison between the western and eastern specifications of RPV steels. The search for new materials which can stand higher rates of atomic displacement due to radiation has led to the development of swelling resistant austenitic and ferritic stainless steels for fast reactor applications as exemplified by the development of the D-9 steel for Indian fast breeder reactor. The presentation will conclude by listing various materials related phenomena, which have a strong bearing on the successful development of future nuclear energy systems. (author)

  18. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The following topics are briefly discussed: (1) surface blistering studies on fusion reactor materials, (2) TFTR design support activities, (3) analysis of samples bombarded in-situ in PLT, (4) chemical sputtering effects, (5) modeling of surface behavior, (6) ion migration in glow discharge tube cathodes, (7) alloy development for irradiation performance, (8) dosimetry and damage analysis, and (9) development of tritium migration in fusion devices and reactors

  19. Material for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abhishek, Anuj; Ranjan, Prem

    2011-01-01

    To make nuclear fusion power a reality, the scientists are working restlessly to find the materials which can confine the power generated by the fusion of two atomic nuclei. A little success in this field has been achieved, though there are still miles to go. Fusion reaction is a special kind of reaction which must occur at very high density and temperature to develop extremely large amount of energy, which is very hard to control and confine within using the present techniques. As a whole it requires the physical condition that rarely exists on the earth to carry out in an efficient manner. As per the growing demand and present scenario of the world energy, scientists are working round the clock to make effective fusion reactions to real. In this paper the work presently going on is considered in this regard. The progress of the Joint European Torus 2010, ITER 2005, HiPER and minor works have been studied to make the paper more object oriented. A detailed study of the technological and material requirement has been discussed in the paper and a possible suggestion is provided to make a contribution in the field of building first ever nuclear fusion reactor

  20. Materials for generation-IV nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, M. G.

    2009-01-01

    Materials science and materials development are key issues for the implementation of innovative reactor systems such as those defined in the framework of the Generation IV. Six systems have been selected for Generation IV consideration: gas-cooled fast reactor, lead-cooled fast reactor, molten salt-cooled reactor, sodium-cooled fast reactor, supercritical water-cooled reactor, and very high temperature reactor. The structural materials need to resist much higher temperatures, higher neutron doses and extremely corrosive environment, which are beyond the experience of the current nuclear power plants. For this reason, the first consideration in the development of Generation-IV concepts is selection and deployment of materials that operate successfully in the aggressive operating environments expected in the Gen-IV concepts. This paper summarizes the Gen-IV operating environments and describes the various candidate materials under consideration for use in different structural applications. (author)

  1. Calculated and experimental definition of neutron-physical and temperature conditions of material testing in the SM reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toporova, V.G.; Pimenov, V.V.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Reactor material science is one of the main scientific directions of the RIAR activities. Particularly, a wide range of materials and products testing under irradiation is performed in reactor facility SM (RF SM). To solve the tasks specified in the technical specification for an experiment, previously, the test conditions are chosen. At the minimum a space-energy distribution of neutrons and heating rate in the materials under test are important as well as temperature conditions of irradiation. The up-to-date software and libraries of nuclear data allow modeling of neutron-material interaction processes to a considerable degree of details and also obtaining a true neutron distribution by calculation methods. As a result of a great scope of work on verification, a calculation model, developed on the basis of a package of applied software MCU (option MCU-4/SM22) and analogue Monte-Carlo method, is widely used at RIAR. The MCU geometric module makes it possible to model the SM core and reflector in three-dimensional geometry with sufficient accuracy and to describe all elements of the channel structure and irradiation device with specimens. The calculation model of RF SM is tested using the results of activation experiments performed in its critical assembly, geometric parameters and structural materials of which correspond completely with the prototype. The difference in the calculated and experimental values is less than 2.5%. Possibilities of the calculated estimation of operating temperature conditions of absorbing elements under irradiation should be considered separately. As the conducted calculations and their analysis show, to define the fuel column temperature correctly, one needs reliable data on thermal-physical parameters of materials, especially ceramic ones, such as titanium, dysprosium or boron carbide. This is very important for boron carbide-absorbing elements for actually all their operation parameters (such as: gas release, swelling

  2. Thermochemical data for reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronchi, C.; Turrini, F.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes a computer database of thermochemical properties of nuclear reactor materials to be used for source term calculations in reactor accident codes. In the first part, the structure and the content of the computer file is described. In the second part a set of thermochemical data is presented pertaining to chemical reactions occurring during severe nuclear reactor accidents and involving fuel (uranium dioxide), fission products and structural materials. These data are complementary to those collected in the databook recently published by Cordfunke and Potter after a study supported by the Commission of the European Communities. The present data were collected from review articles and databanks and follow a discussion on the uncertainties and errors involved in the calculation of complex chemical equilibria in the extrapolated temperature range

  3. Survey report on high temperature irradiation experiment programs for new ceramic materials in the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor). 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    A survey research on status of research activities on new ceramic materials in Japan was carried out under contract between Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and Atomic Energy Society of Japan. The purpose of the survey is to provide information to prioritize prospective experiments and tests in the HTTR. The HTTR as a high temperature gas cooled reactor has a unique and superior capability to irradiate large-volumed specimen at high temperature up to approximately 800degC. The survey was focused on mainly the activities of functional ceramics and heat resisting ceramics as a kind of structural ceramics. As the result, the report recommends that the irradiation experiment of functional ceramics is feasible to date. (K. Itami)

  4. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moons, F.

    1998-01-01

    SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials includes studies (1) to investigate fracture mechanics of neutron-irradiated beryllium; (2) to describe the helium behaviour in irradiated beryllium at atomic scale; (3) to define the kinetics of beryllium reacting with air or steam; (3) to perform a feasibility study for the testing of integrated blanket modules under neutron irradiation. Progress and achievements in 1997 are reported

  5. Chemical interactions of reactor core materials up to very high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, P.; Hagen, S.; Schanz, G.; Skokan, A.

    1989-01-01

    The paper describes which chemical interactions may occur in a LWR fuel rod bundle containing (Ag, In, Cd) absorber rods or (Al 2 O 3 /B 4 C) burnable poison rods with increasing temperature up to the complete melting of the components and the formed reaction products. The kinetics of the most important chemical interactions has been investigated and the results are described. In most cases the reaction products have lower melting points or ranges than the original components. This results in a relocation of liquefied components often far below their melting points. There exist three distinct temperature regimes in which liquid phases can form in the core in differently large quantities. These temperature regimes are described in detail. The phase relations in the important ternary (U, Zr, O) system have been extensively studied. The effect of steel constituents on the phase relations is given in addition. All the considerations are focused on PWR conditions only. (orig.) [de

  6. Stress relaxation and creep of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core support ceramic materials: a literature search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selle, J.E.; Tennery, V.J.

    1980-05-01

    Creep and stress relaxation in structural ceramics are important properties to the high-temperature design and safety analysis of the core support structure of the HTGR. The ability of the support structure to function for the lifetime of the reactor is directly related to the allowable creep strain and the ability of the structure to withstand thermal transients. The thermal-mechanical response of the core support pads to steady-state stresses and potential thermal transients depends on variables, including the ability of the ceramics to undergo some stress relaxation in relatively short times. Creep and stress relaxation phenomena in structural ceramics of interest were examined. Of the materials considered (fused silica, alumina, silicon nitride, and silicon carbide), alumina has been more extensively investigated in creep. Activation energies reported varied between 482 and 837 kJ/mole, and consequently, variations in the assigned mechanisms were noted. Nabarro-Herring creep is considered as the primary creep mechanism and no definite grain size dependence has been identified. Results for silicon nitride are in better agreement with reported activation energies. No creep data were found for fused silica or silicon carbide and no stress relaxation data were found for any of the candidate materials. While creep and stress relaxation are similar and it is theoretically possible to derive the value of one property when the other is known, no explicit demonstrated relationship exists between the two. For a given structural ceramic material, both properties must be experimentally determined to obtain the information necessary for use in high-temperature design and safety analyses

  7. Fundamental Understanding of Ambient and High-Temperature Plasticity Phenomena in Structural Materials in Advanced Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deo, Chaitanya; Zhu, Ting; McDowell, David

    2013-11-17

    The goal of this research project is to develop the methods and tools necessary to link unit processes analyzed using atomistic simulations involving interaction of vacancies and interstitials with dislocations, as well as dislocation mediation at sessile junctions and interfaces as affected by radiation, with cooperative influence on higher-length scale behavior of polycrystals. These tools and methods are necessary to design and enhance radiation-induced damage-tolerant alloys. The project will achieve this goal by applying atomistic simulations to characterize unit processes of: 1. Dislocation nucleation, absorption, and desorption at interfaces 2. Vacancy production, radiation-induced segregation of substitutional Cr at defect clusters (point defect sinks) in BCC Fe-Cr ferritic/martensitic steels 3. Investigation of interaction of interstitials and vacancies with impurities (V, Nb, Ta, Mo, W, Al, Si, P, S) 4. Time evolution of swelling (cluster growth) phenomena of irradiated materials 5. Energetics and kinetics of dislocation bypass of defects formed by interstitial clustering and formation of prismatic loops, informing statistical models of continuum character with regard to processes of dislocation glide, vacancy agglomeration and swelling, climb and cross slip This project will consider the Fe, Fe-C, and Fe-Cr ferritic/martensitic material system, accounting for magnetism by choosing appropriate interatomic potentials and validating with first principles calculations. For these alloys, the rate of swelling and creep enhancement is considerably lower than that of face-centered cubic (FCC) alloys and of austenitic Fe-Cr-Mo alloys. The team will confirm mechanisms, validate simulations at various time and length scales, and improve the veracity of computational models. The proposed research?s feasibility is supported by recent modeling of radiation effects in metals and alloys, interfacial dislocation transfer reactions in nano-twinned copper, and dislocation

  8. The materials programme for the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor in the Federal Republic of Germany: Status of the development of high-temperature materials, integrity concept, and design codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel, H.; Bodmann, E.; Seehafer, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    During the last 15 years, the research and development of materials for high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) applications in the Federal Republic of Germany have been concentrated on the qualification of high-temperature structural alloys. Such materials are required for heat exchanger components of advanced HTGRs supplying nuclear process heat in the temperature range between 750 deg. and 950 deg. C. The suitability of the candidate alloys for service in the HTGR has been established, and continuing research is aimed at verification of the integrity of components over the envisaged service lifetimes. The special features of the HTGR which provide a high degree of safety are the use of ceramics for the core construction and the low power density of the core. The reactor integrity concept which has been developed is based on these two characteristics. Previously, technical guidelines and design codes for nuclear plants were tailored exclusively to light water reactor systems. An extensive research project was therefore initiated which led to the formulation of the basic principles on which a high temperature design code can be based. (author)

  9. The problems of material pairs under the specific conditions of high-temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoening, J.

    1981-01-01

    This dissertation gives a detailed descirption of the problems of friction and solid lubrication of slide and ball bearings under HTR conditions. The first part is concerned with an analysis of established approaches for determining the friction factor and the development of a mathematical model on this basis, taking particular account of the following parameters. (1) Surface characteristics (peak-to-valley height, pressure angles of roughness elevations) and, (2) material properties of the friction partner (ductility, brittleness, crystal structure). The formula for friction factor thus arrived at incorporates the microscopic and sub-microscopic influence of the surface grain structure. In addition, the effects of elastic and plastic properties at the region of contact was studied. The derived equation is used to characterise frictional properties and enables a suitable and economic friction pair to be selected. The second part deals with the application of solid lubrication and the effect of the solid lubricant film on the mechanicsm and kinematics of ball bearings. In the final part of this investigation an evaluation of experimental results is carried out on the basis of the preceding theoretical studies in order to confirm the theoretical approach and to provide information of practical use on limits of application, cost details and aids to construction. (orig./IHOE) [de

  10. High temperature materials; Materiaux a hautes temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this workshop is to share the needs of high temperature and nuclear fuel materials for future nuclear systems, to take stock of the status of researches in this domain and to propose some cooperation works between the different research organisations. The future nuclear systems are the very high temperature (850 to 1200 deg. C) gas cooled reactors (GCR) and the molten salt reactors (MSR). These systems include not only the reactor but also the fabrication and reprocessing of the spent fuel. This document brings together the transparencies of 13 communications among the 25 given at the workshop: 1) characteristics and needs of future systems: specifications, materials and fuel needs for fast spectrum GCR and very high temperature GCR; 2) high temperature materials out of neutron flux: thermal barriers: materials, resistance, lifetimes; nickel-base metal alloys: status of knowledge, mechanical behaviour, possible applications; corrosion linked with the gas coolant: knowledge and problems to be solved; super-alloys for turbines: alloys for blades and discs; corrosion linked with MSR: knowledge and problems to be solved; 3) materials for reactor core structure: nuclear graphite and carbon; fuel assembly structure materials of the GCR with fast neutron spectrum: status of knowledge and ceramics and cermets needs; silicon carbide as fuel confinement material, study of irradiation induced defects; migration of fission products, I and Cs in SiC; 4) materials for hydrogen production: status of the knowledge and needs for the thermochemical cycle; 5) technologies: GCR components and the associated material needs: compact exchangers, pumps, turbines; MSR components: valves, exchangers, pumps. (J.S.)

  11. Nuclear reactors: physics and materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadigaroglu, G

    2005-07-01

    In the form of a tutorial addressed to non-specialists, the article provides an introduction to nuclear reactor technology and more specifically to Light Water Reactors (LWR); it also shows where materials and chemistry problems are encountered in reactor technology. The basics of reactor physics are reviewed, as well as the various strategies in reactor design and the corresponding choices of materials (fuel, coolant, structural materials, etc.). A brief description of the various types of commercial power reactors follows. The design of LWRs is discussed in greater detail; the properties of light water as coolant and moderator are put in perspective. The physicochemical and metallurgical properties of the materials impose thermal limits that determine the performance and the maximum power a reactor can deliver. (author)

  12. Research and materials irradiation reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballagny, A.; Guigon, B.

    2004-01-01

    Devoted to the fundamental and applied research on materials irradiation, research reactors are nuclear installations where high neutrons flux are maintained. After a general presentation of the research reactors in the world and more specifically in France, this document presents the heavy water cooled reactors and the water cooled reactors. The third part explains the technical characteristics, thermal power, neutron flux, operating and details the Osiris, the RHF (high flux reactor), the Orphee and the Jules Horowitz reactors. The last part deals with the possible utilizations. (A.L.B.)

  13. Research reactors and materials testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, H.

    1986-01-01

    Research reactors can be classified in three main groups according to the moderator which is used. Their technical characteristics are given and the three most recent research and materials testing reactors are described: OSIRIS, ORPHEE and the high-flux reactor of Grenoble. The utilization of research reactors is reviewed in four fields of activity: training, fundamental or applied research and production (eg. radioisotopes) [fr

  14. Temperature measurement of the reactor materials samples irradiated in the fuel channels of the RA reactor - Annex 16; Prilog 16 - Merenje temperature uzoraka reaktorskih materijala ozracivanih u gorivnim kanalima reaktora RA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolic, M; Djalovic, M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Reaktor RA, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1964-12-15

    Reactor materials as graphite, stainless steel, magnox, zirconium alloys, etc. were exposed to fast neutron flux inside the fuel elements specially adapted for this purpose. Samples in the form ampoules were placed in capsules inside the fuel channels and cooled by heavy water which cools the fuel elements. In order to monitor the samples temperature 42 thermocouples were placed in the samples. That was necessary for reactor safety reasons and for further interpretation of measured results. Temperature monitoring was done continuously by multichannel milivoltmeters. This paper describes the technique of introducing the thermocouples, compensation instruments, control of the cold ends and adaptation of the instruments for precision (0.5%) temperature measurement in the range 30 deg - 130 deg C; 30 deg - 280 deg C and 30 deg - 80 deg C. Ozracivanje uzoraka materijala za izgradnju reaktora kao sto su grafit, nerdjajuci celik, magnox, legure cirkonijuma, aluminijuma itd. vrseno je u fluksu brzih neutrona unutar samih gorivnih elemenata koji su specijalno adaptirani za ovu svrhu. Uzorci u vidu ampula smesteni su u kapsulu od aluminijuma i postavljeni unutar kanala gde su hladjeni cirkulacijom teske vode koja hladi same gorivne elemente. U cilju kontrole temperature uzoraka radi bezbednosti samog reaktora, kao i radi kasnije interpretacije rezultata ispitivanja radijacionog ostecenja materijala, ugradjeno je 42 termopara u uzorke. Kontrola temperature je vrsena kontinualno visekanalnim registratorima. U radu je prikazana tehnika izvodjenja termoparova, kompenzacionih vodova, kontrola hladnih krajeva i prilagodjenje instrumentacije za merenje i registraciju temperature sa tacnoscu 0,5% u opsezima 30 deg - 130 deg C; 30 deg - 280 deg C i 30 deg - 80 deg C (author)

  15. The high-temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, U.

    1991-01-01

    The book deals with the development of the German high-temperature reactor (pebble-bed), the design of a prototype plant and its (at least provisional) shut-down in 1989. While there is a lot of material on the HTR's competitor, the fast breeder, literature is very incomplete on HTRs. The author describes HTR's history as a development which was characterised by structural divergencies but not effectively steered and monitored. There was no project-oriented 'community' such as there was for the fast breeder. Also, the new technology was difficult to control there were situations where no one quite knew what was going on. The technical conditions however were not taken as facts but as a basis for interpretation, wishes and reservations. The HTR gives an opportunity to consider the conditions under which large technical projects can be carried out today. (orig.) [de

  16. Reactor simulator development. Workshop material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established a programme in nuclear reactor simulation computer programs to assist its Member States in education and training. The objective is to provide, for a variety of advanced reactor types, insight and practice in reactor operational characteristics and their response to perturbations and accident situations. To achieve this, the IAEA arranges for the supply or development of simulation programs and training material, sponsors training courses and workshops, and distributes documentation and computer programs. This publication consists of course material for workshops on development of such reactor simulators. Participants in the workshops are provided with instruction and practice in the development of reactor simulation computer codes using a model development system that assembles integrated codes from a selection of pre-programmed and tested sub-components. This provides insight and understanding into the construction and assumptions of the codes that model the design and operational characteristics of various power reactor systems. The main objective is to demonstrate simple nuclear reactor dynamics with hands-on simulation experience. Using one of the modular development systems, CASSIM tm , a simple point kinetic reactor model is developed, followed by a model that simulates the Xenon/Iodine concentration on changes in reactor power. Lastly, an absorber and adjuster control rod, and a liquid zone model are developed to control reactivity. The built model is used to demonstrate reactor behavior in sub-critical, critical and supercritical states, and to observe the impact of malfunctions of various reactivity control mechanisms on reactor dynamics. Using a PHWR simulator, participants practice typical procedures for a reactor startup and approach to criticality. This workshop material consists of an introduction to systems used for developing reactor simulators, an overview of the dynamic simulation

  17. Very-high-temperature reactors for future use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasten, P.R.

    1988-08-01

    Very-high-temperature reactors (VHTRs) show promise for economic generation of electricity and of high-temperature process heat. The key is the development of high-temperature materials which permit gas turbine VHTRs to generate electricity economically, at reactor coolant temperatures which can be used for fossil fuel conversion processes. 7 refs., 5 figs

  18. Medium temperature carbon dioxide gas turbine reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Yasuyoshi; Nitawaki, Takeshi; Muto, Yasushi

    2004-01-01

    A carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) gas turbine reactor with a partial pre-cooling cycle attains comparable cycle efficiencies of 45.8% at medium temperature of 650 deg. C and pressure of 7 MPa with a typical helium (He) gas turbine reactor of GT-MHR (47.7%) at high temperature of 850 deg. C. This higher efficiency is ascribed to: reduced compression work around the critical point of CO 2 ; and consideration of variation in CO 2 specific heat at constant pressure, C p , with pressure and temperature into cycle configuration. Lowering temperature to 650 deg. C provides flexibility in choosing materials and eases maintenance through the lower diffusion leak rate of fission products from coated particle fuel by about two orders of magnitude. At medium temperature of 650 deg. C, less expensive corrosion resistant materials such as type 316 stainless steel are applicable and their performance in CO 2 have been proven during extensive operation in AGRs. In the previous study, the CO 2 cycle gas turbomachinery weight was estimated to be about one-fifth compared with He cycles. The proposed medium temperature CO 2 gas turbine reactor is expected to be an alternative solution to current high-temperature He gas turbine reactors

  19. Simulator for materials testing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemoto, Noriyuki; Sugaya, Naoto; Ohtsuka, Kaoru; Hanakawa, Hiroki; Onuma, Yuichi; Hosokawa, Jinsaku; Hori, Naohiko; Kaminaga, Masanori; Tamura, Kazuo; Hotta, Kohji; Ishitsuka, Tatsuo

    2013-06-01

    A real-time simulator for both reactor and irradiation facilities of a materials testing reactor, “Simulator of Materials Testing Reactors”, was developed for understanding reactor behavior and operational training in order to utilize it for nuclear human resource development and to promote partnership with developing countries which have a plan to introduce nuclear power plant. The simulator is designed based on the JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor), and it simulates operation, irradiation tests and various kinds of anticipated operational transients and accident conditions caused by the reactor and irradiation facilities. The development of the simulator was sponsored by the Japanese government as one of the specialized projects of advanced research infrastructure in order to promote basic as well as applied researches. This report summarizes the simulation components, hardware specification and operation procedure of the simulator. (author)

  20. Selection of nuclear reactor coolant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Lisheng; Wang Bairong

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear material is nuclear material or materials used in nuclear industry, the general term, it is the material basis for the construction of nuclear power, but also a leader in nuclear energy development, the two interdependent and mutually reinforcing. At the same time, nuclear materials research, development and application of the depth and breadth of science and technology reflects a nation and the level of the nuclear power industry. Coolant also known as heat-carrier agent, is an important part of the heart nuclear reactor, its role is to secure as much as possible to the economic output in the form fission energy to heat the reactor to be used: the same time cooling the core, is controlled by the various structural components allowable temperature. This paper described the definition of nuclear reactor coolant and characteristics, and then addressed the requirements of the coolant material, and finally were introduced several useful properties of the coolant and chemical control. (authors)

  1. Selection of support structure materials for irradiation experiments in the HFIR [High Flux Isotope Reactor] at temperatures up to 500 degrees C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrell, K.; Longest, A.W.

    1990-01-01

    The key factor in the design of capsules for irradiation of test specimens in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at preselected temperatures up to 500 degree C utilizing nuclear heating is a narrow gas-filled gap which surrounds the specimens and controls the transfer of heat from the specimens through the wall of a containment tube to the reactor cooling water. Maintenance of this gap to close tolerances is dependent on the characteristics of the materials used to support the specimens and isolate them from the water. These support structure materials must have low nuclear heating rates, high thermal conductivities, and good dimensional stabilities under irradiation. These conditions are satisfied by certain aluminum alloys. One of these alloys, a powder metallurgy product containing a fine dispersion of aluminum oxide, is no longer manufactured. A new alloys of this type, with the trade name DISPAL, is determined to be a suitable substitute. 23 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Fundamental Processes of Coupled Radiation Damage and Mechanical Behavior in Nuclear Fuel Materials for High Temperature Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillpot, Simon; Tulenko, James

    2011-09-08

    The objective of this work has been to elucidate the relationship among microstructure, radiation damage and mechanical properties for nuclear fuel materials. As representative nuclear materials, we have taken an hcp metal (Mg as a generic metal, and Ti alloys for fast reactors) and UO2 (representing fuel). The degradation of the thermo-mechanical behavior of nuclear fuels under irradiation, both the fissionable material itself and its cladding, is a longstanding issue of critical importance to the nuclear industry. There are experimental indications that nanocrystalline metals and ceramics may be more resistant to radiation damage than their coarse-grained counterparts. The objective of this project look at the effect of microstructure on radiation damage and mechanical behavior in these materials. The approach to be taken was state-of-the-art, large-scale atomic-level simulation. This systematic simulation program of the effects of irradiation on the structure and mechanical properties of polycrystalline Ti and UO2 identified radiation damage mechanisms. Moreover, it will provided important insights into behavior that can be expected in nanocrystalline microstructures and, by extension, nanocomposites. The fundamental insights from this work can be expected to help in the design microstructures that are less susceptible to radiation damage and thermomechanical degradation.

  3. Fundamental Processes of Coupled Radiation Damage and Mechanical Behavior in Nuclear Fuel Materials for High Temperature Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillpot, Simon; Tulenko, James

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work has been to elucidate the relationship among microstructure, radiation damage and mechanical properties for nuclear fuel materials. As representative nuclear materials, we have taken an hcp metal (Mg as a generic metal, and Ti alloys for fast reactors) and UO2 (representing fuel). The degradation of the thermo-mechanical behavior of nuclear fuels under irradiation, both the fissionable material itself and its cladding, is a longstanding issue of critical importance to the nuclear industry. There are experimental indications that nanocrystalline metals and ceramics may be more resistant to radiation damage than their coarse-grained counterparts. The objective of this project look at the effect of microstructure on radiation damage and mechanical behavior in these materials. The approach to be taken was state-of-the-art, large-scale atomic-level simulation. This systematic simulation program of the effects of irradiation on the structure and mechanical properties of polycrystalline Ti and UO2 identified radiation damage mechanisms. Moreover, it will provided important insights into behavior that can be expected in nanocrystalline microstructures and, by extension, nanocomposites. The fundamental insights from this work can be expected to help in the design microstructures that are less susceptible to radiation damage and thermomechanical degradation.

  4. Mechanical characterization of metallic materials for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors in air and in helium environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sainfort, G.; Cappelaere, M.; Gregoire, J.; Sannier, J.

    1984-01-01

    In the French R and D program for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs), three metallic alloys were studied: steel Chromesco-3 with 2.25% chromium, alloy 800H, and Hastelloy-X. The Chromesco-3 and alloy 800H creep behavior is the same in air and in HTGR atmosphere (helium). The tensile tests of Hastelloy-X specimens reveal that aging has embrittlement and hardening effects up to 700 0 C, but the creep tests at 800 0 C show opposite effects. This particular behavior could be due to induced precipitation by aging and the depletion of hardening elements from the matrix. Tests show a low influence of cobalt content on mechanical properties of Hastelloy-X

  5. Present status of fusion reactor materials, 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasaki, Ryukichi; Shiraishi, Kensuke; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Murakami, Yoshio; Takamura, Saburo

    1982-01-01

    Recently, the design of fusion reactors such as Intor has been carried out, and various properties that fusion reactor materials should have been clarified. In the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the research and development of materials aiming at a tokamak type experimental fusion reactor are in progress. In this paper, the problems, the present status of research and development and the future plan about the surface materials and structural materials for the first wall, blanket materials and magnet materials are explained. The construction of the critical plasma testing facility JT-60 developed by JAERI has progressed smoothly, and the operation is expected in 1985. The research changes from that of plasma physics to that of reactor technology. In tokamak type fusion reactors, high temperature D-T plasma is contained with strong magnetic field in vacuum vessels, and the neutrons produced by nuclear reaction, charged particles diffusing from plasma and neutral particles by charge exchange strike the first wall. The PCA by improving 316 stainless steel is used as the structural material, and TiC coating techniques are developed. As the blanket material, Li 2 O is studied, and superconducting magnets are developed. (Koko, I.)

  6. Design and construction of an irradiation apparatus with controlled atmosphere and temperature for radiation damage evaluation of nuclear materials in the IEA-R1 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucki, Georgi; Silva, Jose Eduardo Rosa da; Castanheira, Myrthes; Terremoto, Luis Antonio Albiac; Teodoro, Celso Antonio; Silva, Antonio Teixeira e; Damy, Margaret de Almeida

    2005-01-01

    A material irradiation apparatus CIMAT (Capsula de Irradiacao de Materiais) with controlled temperature and atmosphere is described. The device was specifically designed to perform experiments inside the core of the IEA-R1 swimming pool reactor and allows fast neutron (E=1 MeV) irradiations of multiple miniature metallic samples at temperature between 100 deg C and 500 deg C, in Argon or Helium atmosphere to inhibit corrosion. The aim of CIMAT is to make a comparative assessment of Radiation Embrittlement (RE) on the AS 508 cl.3 steel, of different origins (ELETROMETAL-Brazil and VITCOVICE-Chekia) used in Pressure Vessels (PV) of PWR, for fluence of 10 exp 19 nvt at 300 C, by means of mechanical post irradiation evaluation. Previous characterization of non-irradiated samples of these materials is presented. In situ electrical and magnetic measurements, at high temperatures, are foreseen to be made with this apparatus. Extensive temperature stability and leak-tightness tests performed in the reactor swimming pool have proven the CIMAT to be intrinsically safe and operational. (author)

  7. Composites as structural materials in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megusar, J.

    1989-01-01

    In fusion reactors, materials are used under extreme conditions of temperature, stress, irradiation, and chemical environment. The absence of adequate materials will seriously impede the development of fusion reactors and might ultimately be one of the major difficulties. Some of the current materials problems can be solved by proper design features. For others, the solution will have to rely on materials development. A parallel and balanced effort between the research in plasma physics and fusion-related technology and in materials research is, therefore, the best strategy to ultimately achieve economic, safe, and environmentally acceptable fusion. The essential steps in developing composites for structural components of fusion reactors include optimization of mechanical properties followed by testing under fusion-reactor-relevant conditions. In optimizing the mechanical behavior of composite materials, a wealth of experience can be drawn from the research on ceramic matrix and metal matrix composite materials sponsored by the Department of Defense. The particular aspects of this research relevant to fusion materials development are methodology of the composite materials design and studies of new processing routes to develop composite materials with specific properties. Most notable examples are the synthesis of fibers, coatings, and ceramic materials in their final shapes form polymeric precursors and the infiltration of fibrous preforms by molten metals

  8. The proposals on cooperation to foreign centers of science on thermophysical properties of reactor materials in a broad band of pressure and temperatures realized at normal transient and emergency operation activity of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortov, V.E.

    1996-01-01

    The proposals on cooperation in the area of thermophysical properties of reactor materials in a broad band of pressure and temperature realized at normal transient and emergency operation activity of nuclear power plants are discussed. 1 fig

  9. OECD high temperature reactor project Dragon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Information is presented concerning the Dragon reactor support studies and fuel irradiation programs, HTGR and fuel graphite studies, primary circuit materials, reactor safety evaluation, and administration

  10. Potentialities of high temperature reactors (HTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hittner, D.

    2001-01-01

    This articles reviews the assets of high temperature reactors concerning the amount of radioactive wastes produced. 2 factors favors HTR-type reactors: high thermal efficiency and high burn-ups. The high thermal efficiency is due to the high temperature of the coolant, in the case of the GT-MHR project (a cooperation between General Atomic, Minatom, Framatome, and Fuji Electric) designed to burn Russian military plutonium, the expected yield will be 47% with an outlet helium temperature of 850 Celsius degrees. The high temperature of the coolant favors a lot of uses of the heat generated by the reactor: urban heating, chemical processes, or desalination of sea water.The use of a HTR-type reactor in a co-generating way can value up to 90% of the energy produced. The high burn-up is due to the technology of HTR-type fuel that is based on encapsulation of fuel balls with heat-resisting materials. The nuclear fuel of Fort-Saint-Vrain unit (Usa) has reached values of burn-ups from 100.000 to 120.000 MWj/t. It is shown that the quantity of unloaded spent fuel can be divided by 4 for the same amount of electricity produced, in the case of the GT-MHR project in comparison with a light water reactor. (A.C.)

  11. Analysis and fabrication of tungsten CERMET materials for ultra-high temperature reactor applications via pulsed electric current sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Jonathan A.

    order to reduce the porosity in the initial green compact. Particle mixing techniques were also shown to be capable of producing consolidated CERMETs, but with a less than desirable microstructure. The work presented herin will help in the development of very high temperature reactors for terrestrial and space missions in the future.

  12. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Data are given for each of the following areas: (1) depth distribution of bubbles in 20-keV 4 He + irradiated nickel, (2) surface damage of Al irradiated with 4 He + to high doses, (3) secondary photon emission from ion bombarded surfaces, (4) dosimetry and damage analysis work in support of the MFE materials program, (5) hydrogen permeation and materials behavior in alloys, (6) radiation damage of diagnostic windows in TFTR, and (7) fast neutron irradiations of superconducting Nb 3 Sn

  13. Diffusion in reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorov, G.B.; Smirnov, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    The monograph contains a brief description of the principles underlying the theory of diffusion, as well as modern methods of studying diffusion. Data on self-diffusion and diffusion of impurities in a nuclear fuel and fissionable materials (uranium, plutonium, thorium, zirconium, titanium, hafnium, niobium, molybdenum, tungsten, beryllium, etc.) is presented. Anomalous diffusion, diffusion of components, and interdiffusion in binary and ternary alloys were examined. The monograph presents the most recent reference material on diffusion. It is intended for a wide range of researchers working in the field of diffusion in metals and alloys and attempting to discover new materials for application in nuclear engineering. It will also be useful for teachers, research scholars and students of physical metallurgy

  14. Structural materials for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Victoria, M.; Baluc, N.; Spaetig, P.

    2001-01-01

    In order to preserve the condition of an environmentally safe machine, present selection of materials for structural components of a fusion reactor is made not only on the basis of adequate mechanical properties, behavior under irradiation and compatibility with other materials and cooling media, but also on their radiological properties, i.e. activity, decay heat, radiotoxicity. These conditions strongly limit the number of materials available to a few families of alloys, generically known as low activation materials. We discuss the criteria for deciding on such materials, the alloys resulting from the application of the concept and the main issues and problems of their use in a fusion environment. (author)

  15. Temperature etalon of WWER-440 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanc, S.; Slanina, M.

    2001-01-01

    The presentation deals with the description, parameters and advantages of use of the temperature etalon. The system ensures temperature measurement of reactor outlet and inlet temperatures with high accuracy. Accuracy of temperature measurement is 0.18 deg C, accuracy of temperature difference measurement is 0.14 deg C, both with probability 0.95. Using the temperature etalon it is possible to increase accuracy of the standard temperature reactor measurements and to check their accuracy in the course of power reactor statuses in every measurement cycle. Temperature reactor etalon was installed in 12 WWER-440 units in Slovakia, Bohemia and Bulgaria. (Authors)

  16. Phase instability and toughness change during high temperature exposure of various steels for the first wall structural materials of a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, K.; Shimoide, Y.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the present research is to clarify the phase instability, particularly, the precipitation behavior of carbide and nitride during the long term aging in the non-irradiation state of the materials proposed for the first wall structural component of fusion reactors, such as a type 316 austenitic steel, its modified steels, ferritic heat resisting steels and reduced radio-activation materials. The effect of the precipitation behavior on the toughness is also investigated. It is noticed that the toughness was much deteriorated by the formation of large amounts of coarse carbides within grains and on grain boundaries during 2.88x10 4 ks (8000 h) aging at 873 K and that intergranular fracture occurred by the impact test at room temperature even in the type 316 steel. (orig.)

  17. Analyse of the potential of the high temperature reactor with respect to the use of fissile materials; Analyse des capacites des reacteurs a haute temperature sous l'aspect de l'utilisation des matieres fissiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damian, F

    2001-07-01

    The high temperature reactors fuel is made of micro-particles dispersed in a graphite matrix. This configuration makes it possible to reach high burnup, higher than 700 GWj/t. Thanks to the decoupling between the thermal and the neutronic behaviors in the core many types of fuels can be used. These characteristics give to HTR reactor very good capacities to burn fissile materials. This work was done in the frame of the evaluation of HTR capacities to enhance the value of the plutonium stocks. These stocks are currently composed of the irradiated fuels discharged from classical PWR or the dismantling of the nuclear weapons and represent a significant energy potential. These studies concluded that high cycles length can be reached whatever the plutonium quality is (from 50 % to 94 % of fissile plutonium). In addition, it was demonstrated that the moderator temperature coefficient becomes locally positive for highly burn fuel while the core global moderator temperature coefficient remained negative in the operation range of the reactor. A significant share of this work was first devoted to the setting of a modeling of the fuel element but also of the reactor's core with the codes of system SAPHYR. The whole of modeling was validated by reference calculations. This work of code assessment is justified by a preliminary work that showed that the classical calculation scheme used for PWR could not be transposed directly to HTR core. (author)

  18. Analyse of the potential of the high temperature reactor with respect to the use of fissile materials; Analyse des capacites des reacteurs a haute temperature sous l'aspect de l'utilisation des matieres fissiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damian, F

    2001-07-01

    The high temperature reactors fuel is made of micro-particles dispersed in a graphite matrix. This configuration makes it possible to reach high burnup, higher than 700 GWj/t. Thanks to the decoupling between the thermal and the neutronic behaviors in the core many types of fuels can be used. These characteristics give to HTR reactor very good capacities to burn fissile materials. This work was done in the frame of the evaluation of HTR capacities to enhance the value of the plutonium stocks. These stocks are currently composed of the irradiated fuels discharged from classical PWR or the dismantling of the nuclear weapons and represent a significant energy potential. These studies concluded that high cycles length can be reached whatever the plutonium quality is (from 50 % to 94 % of fissile plutonium). In addition, it was demonstrated that the moderator temperature coefficient becomes locally positive for highly burn fuel while the core global moderator temperature coefficient remained negative in the operation range of the reactor. A significant share of this work was first devoted to the setting of a modeling of the fuel element but also of the reactor's core with the codes of system SAPHYR. The whole of modeling was validated by reference calculations. This work of code assessment is justified by a preliminary work that showed that the classical calculation scheme used for PWR could not be transposed directly to HTR core. (author)

  19. Selection and challenges for LFR reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisenburger, A.; Jianu, A.; Del Giacco, M.; Fetzer, R.; Heinzel, A.; Mueller, G. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear energy using Fast GenIV reactors can fulfil future demands concerning CO2 free, base load capability and sustainability. One of the most promising coolants especially due to its high thermal inertia is liquid lead (Pb). Since several years researches all over the world investigate this coolant and its impact on the reactor design and by that on the materials to be selected. The LEADER project, a follow up of ELSY, aims to design a prototypical demonstrator ALFRED and to continue with several design related aspects of the ELFR reactor. For a demonstrator the criteria of material selection are somewhat different to a commercial type like the ELFR. Material selection for ELFR of course considers all the aspects relevant for ALFRED plus the targeted burn up and the expected total dpa related damage especially of the fuel pins. In the past compatibility of structural material (steels like 316L, T91 and 15-15Ti (1.4970)) that can be employed for Pb cooled fast nuclear reactors were investigated in several EU projects like EUROTRANS and worldwide. Solubility of steel alloying elements like Ni, Fe, Cr is the driving force for the reduced corrosion resistance in contact with Pb. In-situ oxidation is the acknowledged measure to protect steels in Pb up to certain temperatures that are material dependent. Based on experiments and the derived temperature limits the average core outlet temperatures of ALFRED and the ELFR are set to 480 C. The most challenging conditions with respect to temperature are at the fuel assembly and the heat exchangers. For both, thin stable oxide scales with negligible reduction in heat transfer are the requested protection method. This presentation will give an overview on the selected materials for ALFRED and ELFR considering, beside pure compatibility, the influence of mechanical interaction like creep and fretting. (orig.)

  20. Organic materials for fusion-reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurley, G.F.; Coltman, R.R. Jr.

    1983-09-01

    Organic materials requirements for fusion-reactor magnets are described with reference to the temperature, radiation, and electrical and mechanical stress environment expected in these magnets. A review is presented of the response to gamma-ray and neutron irradiation at low temperatures of candidate organic materials; i.e. laminates, thin films, and potting compounds. Lifetime-limiting features of this response as well as needed testing under magnet operating conditions not yet adequately investigated are identified and recomendations for future work are made

  1. Very-high-temperature reactors for future use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasten, P.R.

    1988-01-01

    Very-High-Temperature Reactors (VHTRs) show promise for economic generation of electricity and of high-temperature process heat. The key is the development of high-temperature materials which permit gas turbine VHTRs to generate electricity economically, at helium temperatures which can be used for fossil fuel conversion processes. 7 refs., 5 figs

  2. the JHR Material Testing Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roure, C.; Cornu, B.; Berthet, B.; Simon, E.; Estre, N.; Guimbal, P.; Kinnunen, P.; Kotiluoto, P.

    2013-06-01

    The Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) is a European experimental reactor under construction in CEA Cadarache. It will be dedicated to material and fuel irradiation tests, and to medical isotopes production. Non-Destructive nuclear Examinations systems (NDE) will be implemented in pools to analyse the irradiated fuel or tested material in their supporting experimental irradiation devices extracted from the core or its immediate periphery. The Nuclear Measurement Laboratory (NML) of CEA Cadarache is working in collaboration with VTT (Technical Research Centre in Finland) in designing and developing NDE systems implementing gamma-ray spectroscopy and high energy X-ray imaging of the sample and irradiation device. CEA is also designing a neutron radiography system for which NML is working on the detection system. Design studies are performed with Monte Carlo transport codes and specific simulation tools developed by the NML for Xray and neutron imaging. (authors)

  3. High temperature fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkness, S.D.; dePaz, J.F.; Gohar, M.Y.; Stevens, H.C.

    1979-01-01

    Fusion energy may have unique advantages over other systems as a source for high temperature process heat. A conceptual design of a blanket for a 7 m tokamak reactor has been developed that is capable of producing 1100 0 C process heat at a pressure of approximately 10 atmospheres. The design is based on the use of a falling bed of MgO spheres as the high temperature heat transfer system. By preheating the spheres with energy taken from the low temperature tritium breeding part of the blanket, 1086 MW of energy can be generated at 1100 0 C from a system that produces 3000 MW of total energy while sustaining a tritium breeding ratio of 1.07. The tritium breeding is accomplished using Li 2 O modules both in front of (6 cm thick) and behind (50 cm thick) the high temperature ducts. Steam is used as the first wall and front tritium breeding module coolant while helium is used in the rear tritium breeding region. The system produces 600 MW of net electricity for use on the grid

  4. Liquid metal reactor core material HT9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. H.; Kuk, I. H.; Ryu, W. S. and others

    1998-03-01

    A state-of-the art is surveyed on the liquid metal reactor core materials HT9. The purpose of this report is to give an insight for choosing and developing the materials to be applied to the KAERI prototype liquid metal reactor which is planned for the year of 2010. In-core stability of cladding materials is important to the extension of fuel burnup. Austenitic stainless steel (AISI 316) has been used as core material in the early LMR due to the good mechanical properties at high temperatures, but it has been found to show a poor swelling resistance. So many efforts have been made to solve this problem that HT9 have been developed. HT9 is 12Cr-1MoVW steel. The microstructure of HT9 consisted of tempered martensite with dispersed carbide. HT9 has superior irradiation swelling resistance as other BCC metals, and good sodium compatibility. HT9 has also a good irradiation creep properties below 500 dg C, but irradiation creep properties are degraded above 500 dg C. Researches are currently in progress to modify the HT9 in order to improve the irradiation creep properties above 500 dg C. New design studies for decreasing the core temperature below 500 dg C are needed to use HT9 as a core material. On the contrary, decrease of the thermal efficiency may occur due to lower-down of the operation temperature. (author). 51 refs., 6 tabs., 19 figs

  5. HTR-2002: Proceedings of the conference on high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    High temperature reactors are considered as future inherently safe and efficient energy sources. The presentations covered all the relevant aspects of the existing HTGRs and/or helium cooled pebble bed reactors. They were sorted into 7 sessions: HTR Projects and Programmes; Fuel and Fuel Cycle; Physics and Neutronics; Thermohydraulic Calculation; Engineering, Design and Applications; Materials and Components; Safety and Licensing

  6. Temperature and humidity effects on the corrosion of aluminium-base reactor fuel cladding materials during dry storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peacock, H.B.; Sindelar, R.L.; Lam, P.S.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of temperature and relative humidity on the high temperature (up to 200 deg. C) corrosion of aluminum cladding alloys was investigated for dry storage of spent nuclear fuels. A dependency on alloy type and temperature was determined for saturated water vapor conditions. Models were developed to allow prediction of cladding behaviour of 1100, 5052, and 6061 aluminum alloys for up to 50+ years at 100% relative humidity. Calculations show that for a closed system, corrosion stops after all moisture and oxygen is used up during corrosion reactions with aluminum alloys. (author)

  7. Corrosion of graphitic high temperature reactor materials in steam/helium mixtures at total pessures of 3-55 bar and temperatures of 900-1150 C (1173-1423K)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinssen, H.K.; Loenissen, K.J.; Katscher, W.; Moormann, R.

    1993-03-01

    In course of accident examination for (HTR), experiments on the corrosion behavior of graphitic reactor materials in steam have been performed a total pressures of 3-55bar and temperatures of 900-1150 C (1173-1423K); these experiments and their evaluation are documented here. Reactor materials examined are the structure graphite V483T2 and the fuel element matrices A3-27 and A3-3. In all experiments, the steam partial pressure was 474mbar (inert gas helium). The dependence of reaction rates and density profiles on burn-off, total pressure and temperature has been examined. Experimental reaction rates depending on burn-off are fitted by theoretical curves, a procedure, which allows rate comparison for a well defined burn-off. Comparing rates as a function of total pressure, V483T2 shows a linear dependence on 1√p total , whereas for matrix materials a pressure independent rate was found for p total 4mm for A3-3. (orig.) [de

  8. Fusion-reactor blanket and coolant material compatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeppson, D.W.; Keough, R.F.

    1981-01-01

    Fusion reactor blanket and coolant compatibility tests are being conducted to aid in the selection and design of safe blanket and coolant systems for future fusion reactors. Results of scoping compatibility tests to date are reported for blanket material and water interactions at near operating temperatures. These tests indicate the quantitative hydrogen release, the maximum temperature and pressures produced and the rates of interactions for selected blanket materials

  9. The primary circuit of the dragon high temperature reactor experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, R.

    2005-01-01

    The 20 MWth Dragon Reactor Experiment was the first HTGR (High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor) with coated particle fuel. Its purpose was to test fuel and materials for the High Temperature Reactor programmes pursued in Europe 40 years ago. This paper describes the design and construction of the primary (helium) circuit. It summarizes the main design objectives, lists the performance data and explains the flow paths of the heat removal and helium purification systems. The principal circuit accidents postulated are discussed and the choice of the main construction materials is given. (author)

  10. Space Fission Reactor Structural Materials: Choices Past, Present and Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busby, Jeremy T.; Leonard, Keith J.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear powered spacecraft will enable missions well beyond the capabilities of current chemical, radioisotope thermal generator and solar technologies. The use of fission reactors for space applications has been considered for over 50 years, although, structural material performance has often limited the potential performance of space reactors. Space fission reactors are an extremely harsh environment for structural materials with high temperatures, high neutron fields, potential contact with liquid metals, and the need for up to 15-20 year reliability with no inspection or preventative maintenance. Many different materials have been proposed as structural materials. While all materials meet many of the requirements for space reactor service, none satisfy all of them. However, continued development and testing may resolve these issues and provide qualified materials for space fission reactors.

  11. Resonance integral calculations for high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, J.P.H.

    1960-02-01

    Methods of calculation of resonance integrals of finite dilution and temperature are given for both, homogeneous and heterogeneous geometries, together with results obtained from these methods as applied to the design of high temperature reactors. (author)

  12. Real time simulator for material testing reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takemoto, Noriyuki; Imaizumi, Tomomi; Izumo, Hironobu; Hori, Naohiko; Suzuki, Masahide [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai Research and Development Center, Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan); Ishitsuka, Tatsuo; Tamura, Kazuo [ITOCHU Techno-Solutions Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is now developing a real time simulator for a material testing reactor based on Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). The simulator treats reactor core system, primary and secondary cooling system, electricity system and irradiation facility systems. Possible simulations are normal reactor operation, unusual transient operation and accidental operation. The developed simulator also contains tool to revise/add facility in it for the future development. (author)

  13. Real time simulator for material testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemoto, Noriyuki; Imaizumi, Tomomi; Izumo, Hironobu; Hori, Naohiko; Suzuki, Masahide; Ishitsuka, Tatsuo; Tamura, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is now developing a real time simulator for a material testing reactor based on Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). The simulator treats reactor core system, primary and secondary cooling system, electricity system and irradiation facility systems. Possible simulations are normal reactor operation, unusual transient operation and accidental operation. The developed simulator also contains tool to revise/add facility in it for the future development. (author)

  14. High temperature materials characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    A lab facility for measuring elastic moduli up to 1700 C was constructed and delivered. It was shown that the ultrasonic method can be used to determine elastic constants of materials from room temperature to their melting points. The ease in coupling high frequency acoustic energy is still a difficult task. Even now, new coupling materials and higher power ultrasonic pulsers are being suggested. The surface was only scratched in terms of showing the full capabilities of either technique used, especially since there is such a large learning curve in developing proper methodologies to take measurements into the high temperature region. The laser acoustic system does not seem to have sufficient precision at this time to replace the normal buffer rod methodology.

  15. Characterization of liquid metal reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuk, I. H.; Ryu, W. S.; Kim, H. H. and others

    1999-03-01

    The objectives of this report were to assess the material requirements for LMR environment, to select the optimum candidates for KALIMER components, to characterize the performance for establishing a database of the structural materials for KALIMER, and to develop the basic material technologies for the localization of the advanced materials. Stainless steel ingots were melted by VIM and hot-rolled to plate with the thickness of 15mm. The plate was solution-treated for 1 hr at 1100 deg C and then water-quenched. Specimens were taken parallel to the rolling direction of the plate. The effects of nitrogen and phosphorus were analyzed on the high temperature mechanical properties of 316MRP (Liquid Metal Reactor, Primary candidate material) stainless steels with the different nitrogen content from 0.04 to 0.15% and with the different phosphorus content from 0.002 to 0.02%. Heat treatment was performed to investigate the changes in microstructure and mechanical properties of Cr-Mo steels for LMR heat transfer tube materials and core materials. The Cr-Mo steels were normalized at the temperatures between 900 deg C and 1200 deg C for 1hrs and tempered at the temperatures between 500 deg C and 800 deg C for 2hrs. Conventional optical and electron micrographic studies were carried out to investigate the martensite lath structure, carbide indentification and carbide shape. Vickers microhardness was measured at room temperature using 10g load. Tensile properties were tested at high temperature. Charpy V-notch impact tests were also carried out at temperature between -120 deg C and +180 deg C. (author). 72 refs., 28 tabs., 244 figs

  16. High temperature materials and mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    The use of high-temperature materials in current and future applications, including silicone materials for handling hot foods and metal alloys for developing high-speed aircraft and spacecraft systems, has generated a growing interest in high-temperature technologies. High Temperature Materials and Mechanisms explores a broad range of issues related to high-temperature materials and mechanisms that operate in harsh conditions. While some applications involve the use of materials at high temperatures, others require materials processed at high temperatures for use at room temperature. High-temperature materials must also be resistant to related causes of damage, such as oxidation and corrosion, which are accelerated with increased temperatures. This book examines high-temperature materials and mechanisms from many angles. It covers the topics of processes, materials characterization methods, and the nondestructive evaluation and health monitoring of high-temperature materials and structures. It describes the ...

  17. Plasma induced material defects and threshold values for thermal loads in high temperature resistant alloys and in refractory metals for first wall application in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolt, H.; Hoven, H.; Kny, E.; Koizlik, K.; Linke, J.; Nickel, H.; Wallura, E.

    1986-10-01

    Materials for the application in the first wall of fusion reactors of the tokamak type are subjected to pulsed heat fluxes which range from some 0.5 MW m -2 to 10 MW m -2 during normal plasma operation, and which can exceed 1000 MW m -2 during total plasma disruptions. The structural defects and material fatigue caused by this types of plasma wall interaction are investigated and the results are plotted in threshold loading curves. Additionally, the results are, as far as possible, compared with quantitative, theoretical calculations. These procedures allow a semiquantitative evaluation of the applicability of the mentioned metals in the first wall of fusion reactors. (orig.) [de

  18. Design and development of gas turbine high temperature reactor 300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Katanishi, Shoji; Takada, Shoji; Yan, Xing; Takizuka, Takakazu

    2003-01-01

    JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute) has been designing a Japan's original gas turbine high temperature reactor, GTHTR300 (Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor 300). The greatly simplified design based on salient features of the HTGR (High Temperature Gas-cooled reactor) with a closed helium gas turbine enables the GTHTR300 a high efficient and economically competitive reactor to be deployed in early 2010s. Also, the GTHTR300 fully taking advantage of various experiences accumulated in design, construction and operation of the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) and fossil gas turbine systems reduces technological development concerning a reactor system and electric generation system. Original features of this system are core design with two-year refueling interval, conventional steel material usage for a reactor pressure vessel, innovative plant flow scheme and horizontally installed gas turbine unit. Due to these salient features, the capital cost of the GTHTR300 is less than a target cost of 200 thousands Yen/kWe, and the electric generation cost is close to a target cost of 4 Yen/kWh. This paper describes the original design features focusing on reactor core design, fuel design, in-core structure design and reactor pressure vessel design except PCU design. Also, R and D for developing the power conversion unit is briefly described. The present study is entrusted from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. (author)

  19. Raw materials for reflector graphite (for reactors)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelmi, G.; Mindermann, D.

    1992-01-01

    The manufacturing concept for the core components of German high temperature reactor (HTR) types of graphite was previously entirely directed to the use of German tar coke (St coke). As the plants for producing this material no longer complied technically with the current environmental protection requirements, one had to assume that they would soon be shut down. To prevent bottlenecks in the erection of future HTR plants, alternative cokes produced by modern processes by Japanese manufacturers were checked for their suitability for the manufacture of reactor graphite. This report describes the investigations carried out on these materials from the safe delayed coking process. The project work, apart from analysis of the main data of the candidate coke considered, included the processing of the raw materials into directly and secondarily extruded graphite rods on the laboratory scale, including characterisation. As the results show, the material data achieved with the previous raw material can be reproduced with Japanese St coke. The tar coke LPC-A from the Nippon Steel Chemical Co., Ltd was decided on as the new standard coke for manufacturing reflector graphite. (orig.) With 15 tabs., 2 figs [de

  20. Materials requirements for liquid metal fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, J.W.; Horton, K.E.

    1978-01-01

    Materials requirements for Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs) are quite varied with requisite applications ranging from ex-reactor components such as piping, pumps, steam generators and heat exchangers to in-reactor components such as heavy section reactor vessels, core structurals, fuel pin cladding and subassembly flow ducts. Requirements for ex-reactor component materials include: good high temperature tensile, creep and fatigue properties; compatibility with high temperature flowing sodium; resistance to wear, stress corrosion cracking, and crack propagation; and good weldability. Requirements for in-reactor components include most of those cited above for ex-reactor components as supplemented by the following: resistance to radiation embrittlement, swelling and radiation enhanced creep; good neutronics; compatibility with fuel and fission product materials; and resistance to mass transfer via flowing sodium. Extensive programs are currently in place in a number of national laboratories and industrial contractors to address the materials requirements for LMFBRs. These programs are focused on meeting the near term requirements of early LMFBRs such as the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor as well as the longer term requirements of larger near-commercial and fully-commercial reactors

  1. Reactor Structural Materials: Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaouadi, R.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's R and D programme on Rector Pressure Vessel (RPV) Steels are:(1) to complete the fracture toughness data bank of various reactor pressure vessel steels by using precracked Charpy specimens that were tested statically as well as dynamically; (2) to implement the enhanced surveillance approach in a user-friendly software; (3) to improve the existing reconstitution technology by reducing the input energy (short cycle welding) and modifying the stud geometry. Progress and achievements in 1999 are reported

  2. Pressurized water reactor simulator. Workshop material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established an activity in nuclear reactor simulation computer programs to assist its Member States in education. The objective is to provide, for a variety of advanced reactor types, insight and practice in their operational characteristics and their response to perturbations and accident situations. To achieve this, the IAEA arranges for the development and distribution of simulation programs and educational material and sponsors courses and workshops. The workshops are in two parts: techniques and tools for reactor simulator development; and the use of reactor simulators in education. Workshop material for the first part is covered in the IAEA Training Course Series No. 12, 'Reactor Simulator Development' (2001). Course material for workshops using a WWER- 1000 reactor department simulator from the Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, the Russian Federation is presented in the IAEA Training Course Series No. 21 'WWER-1000 Reactor Simulator' (2002). Course material for workshops using a boiling water reactor simulator developed for the IAEA by Cassiopeia Technologies Incorporated of Canada (CTI) is presented in the IAEA publication: Training Course Series No.23 'Boiling Water Reactor Simulator' (2003). This report consists of course material for workshops using a pressurized water reactor simulator

  3. Computerized reactor pressure vessel materials information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strosnider, J.; Monserrate, C.; Kenworthy, L.D.; Tether, C.D.

    1980-10-01

    A computerized information system for storage and retrieval of reactor pressure vessel materials data was established, as part of Task Action Plan A-11, Reactor Vessel Materials Toughness. Data stored in the system are necessary for evaluating the resistance of reactor pressure vessels to flaw-induced fracture. This report includes (1) a description of the information system; (2) guidance on accessing the system; and (3) a user's manual for the system

  4. Temperature monitoring of gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, G.E.

    1977-01-01

    The present paper deals with questions like : a) Why temperature monitoring in high-temperature reactors at all. b) How are the measuring positions arranged and how are the measurements designed. c) What technique of temperature measurement is applied. (RW) [de

  5. Lower activation materials and magnetic fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; Bloom, E.E.; Davis, J.W.; Gold, R.E.; Little, R.; Schultz, K.R.; Smith, D.L.; Wiffen, F.W.

    1984-01-01

    Radioactivity in fusion reactors can be effectively controlled by materials selection. The detailed relationship between the use of a material for construction of a magnetic fusion reactor and the material's characteristics important to waste disposal, safety, and system maintainability has been studied. The quantitative levels of radioactivation are presented for many materials and alloys, including the role of impurities, and for various design alternatives. A major outcome has been the development of quantitative definitions to characterize materials based on their radioactivation properties. Another key result is a four-level classification scheme to categorize fusion reactors based on quantitative criteria for waste management, system maintenance, and safety. A recommended minimum goal for fusion reactor development is a reference reactor that (a) meets the requirements for Class C shallow land burial of waste materials, (b) permits limited hands-on maintenance outside the magnet's shield within 2 days of a shutdown, and (c) meets all requirements for engineered safety. The achievement of a fusion reactor with at least the characteristics of the reference reactor is a realistic goal. Therefore, in making design choices or in developing particular materials or alloys for fusion reactor applications, consideration must be given to both the activation characteristics of a material and its engineering practicality for a given application

  6. Structural materials issues for the next generation fission reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chant, I.; Murty, K. L.

    2010-09-01

    Generation-IV reactor design concepts envisioned thus far cater to a common goal of providing safer, longer lasting, proliferation-resistant, and economically viable nuclear power plants. The foremost consideration in the successful development and deployment of Gen-W reactor systems is the performance and reliability issues involving structural materials for both in-core and out-of-core applications. The structural materials need to endure much higher temperatures, higher neutron doses, and extremely corrosive environments, which are beyond the experience of the current nuclear power plants. Materials under active consideration for use in different reactor components include various ferritic/martensitic steels, austenitic stainless steels, nickel-base superalloys, ceramics, composites, etc. This article addresses the material requirements for these advanced fission reactor types, specifically addressing structural materials issues depending on the specific application areas.

  7. Research reactors for power reactor fuel and materials testing - Studsvik's experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grounes, M.

    1998-01-01

    Presently Studsvik's R2 test reactor is used for BWR and PWR fuel irradiations at constant power and under transient power conditions. Furthermore tests are performed with defective LWR fuel rods. Tests are also performed on different types of LWR cladding materials and structural materials including post-irradiation testing of materials irradiated at different temperatures and, in some cases, in different water chemistries and on fusion reactor materials. In the past, tests have also been performed on HTGR fuel and FBR fuel and materials under appropriate coolant, temperature and pressure conditions. Fuel tests under development include extremely fast power ramps simulating some reactivity initiated accidents and stored energy (enthalpy) measurements. Materials tests under development include different types of in-pile tests including tests in the INCA (In-Core Autoclave) facility .The present and future demands on the test reactor fuel in all these cases are discussed. (author)

  8. Nuclear materials for fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzke, H.; Schumacher, G.

    1992-01-01

    This volume brings together 47 papers from scientists involved in the fabrication of new nuclear fuels, in basic research of nuclear materials, their application and technology as well as in computer codes and modelling of fuel behaviour. The main emphasis is on progress in the development of non -oxide fuels besides reporting advances in the more conventional oxide fuels. The two currently performed large reactor safety programmes CORA and PHEBUS-FP are described in invited lectures. The contributions review basic property measurements, as well as the present state of fuel performance modelling. The performance of today's nuclear fuel, hence UO 2 , at high burnup is also reviewed with particular emphasis on the recently observed phenomenon of grain subdivision in the cold part of the oxide fuel at high burnup, the so-called 'rim' effect. Similar phenomena can be simulated by ion implantation in order to better elucidate the underlying mechanism and reviews on high resolution electron microscopy provide further information. The papers will provide a useful treatise of views, ideas and new results for all those scientists and engineers involved in the specific questions of current nuclear waste management

  9. Boiling water reactor simulator. Workshop material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established an activity in nuclear reactor simulation computer programs to assist its Member States in education. The objective is to provide, for a variety of advanced reactor types, insight and practice in their operational characteristics and their response to perturbations and accident situations. To achieve this, the IAEA arranges for the development and distribution of simulation programs and workshop material and sponsors workshops. The workshops are in two parts: techniques and tools for reactor simulator development; and the use of reactor simulators in education. Workshop material for the first part is covered in the IAEA publication: Training Course Series No. 12, 'Reactor Simulator Development' (2001). Course material for workshops using a WWER- 1000 simulator from the Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, Russian Federation is presented in the IAEA publication: Training Course Series No. 21 'WWER-1000 Reactor Simulator' (2002). Course material for workshops using a pressurized water reactor (PWR) simulator developed by Cassiopeia Technologies Incorporated, Canada, is presented in the IAEA publication: Training Course Series No. 22 'Pressurized Water Reactor Simulator' (2003). This report consists of course material for workshops using a boiling water reactor (BWR) simulator. Cassiopeia Technologies Incorporated, developed the simulator and prepared this report for the IAEA

  10. Technological improvements to high temperature thermocouples for nuclear reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schley, R.; Leveque, J.P.

    1980-07-01

    The specific operating conditions of thermocouples in nuclear reactors have provided an incentive for further advances in high temperature thermocouple applications and performance. This work covers the manufacture and improvement of existing alloys, the technology of clad thermocouples, calibration drift during heat treatment, resistance to thermal shock and the compatibility of insulating materials with thermo-electric alloys. The results lead to specifying improved operating conditions for thermocouples in nuclear reactor media (pressurized water, sodium, uranium oxide) [fr

  11. Developments in reactor materials science methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsykanov, V.A.; Ivanov, V.B.

    1987-01-01

    Problems related to organization of investigations into reactor materials science are considered. Currently the efficiency and reliability of nuclear power units are largely determined by the fact, how correctly and quickly conclusions concerning the parameters of designs and materials worked out for a long time in reactor cores, are made. To increase information value of materials science investigations it is necessary to create a uniform system, providing for solving methodical, technical and organizational problems. Peculiarities of the current state of reactor material science are analysed and recommendations on constructing an optimal scheme of investigations and data flow interconnection are given

  12. Material design data of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel and hastelloy-x for the experimental multi-purpose very-high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodaira, Tsuneo; Suzuki, Michiaki; Uga, Takeo

    1975-08-01

    The preliminary structural design guidelines for the experimental multi-purpose very-high temperature gas-cooled reactor have recently been prepared. The components of the primary system operating at temperatures of creep dominant range are grouped in those of pressure and temperature boundaries respectively. In the material selection, 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel is chosen for the former and Hastelloy-X for the latter taking into account of material properties at operating temperature. Deriving from the literature in the field, material design data of the alloys are established in design forms such as Sy, So, Sm, St, 100% of minimum stress to rupture, design fatigue curves, isochronous stress-strain curves, creep-fatigue interaction damage factor and so on, which are defined in ASME Code Section III, Code Case 1592. (auth.)

  13. TESTING OF GAS REACTOR MATERIALS AND FUEL IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, S.B.

    2004-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has long been involved in testing gas reactor materials, and has developed facilities well suited for providing the right conditions and environment for gas reactor tests. This paper discusses the different types of irradiation hardware that have been utilized in past ATR irradiation tests of gas reactor materials. The new Gas Test Loop facility currently being developed for the ATR is discussed and the different approaches being considered in the design of the facility. The different options for an irradiation experiment such as active versus passive temperature control, neutron spectrum tailoring, and different types of lead experiment sweep gas monitors are also discussed. The paper is then concluded with examples of different past and present gas reactor material and fuel irradiations

  14. Testing of Gas Reactor Materials and Fuel in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2004-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has long been involved in testing gas reactor materials, and has developed facilities well suited for providing the right conditions and environment for gas reactor tests. This paper discusses the different types of irradiation hardware that have been utilized in past ATR irradiation tests of gas reactor materials. The new Gas Test Loop facility currently being developed for the ATR is discussed and the different approaches being considered in the design of the facility. The different options for an irradiation experiment such as active versus passive temperature control, neutron spectrum tailoring, and different types of lead experiment sweep gas monitors are also discussed. The paper is then concluded with examples of different past and present gas reactor material and fuel irradiations

  15. WWER-1000 reactor simulator. Workshop material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established an activity in nuclear reactor simulation computer programs to assist its Member States in education. The objective is to provide, for a variety of advanced reactor types, insight and practice in their operational characteristics and their response to perturbations and accident situations. To achieve this, the IAEA arranges for the development and distribution of simulation programs and educational material and sponsors courses and workshops. The workshops are in two parts: techniques and tools for reactor simulator development; and the use of reactor simulators in education. Workshop material for the first part is covered in the IAEA publication: Training Course Series 12, 'Reactor Simulator Development' (2001). Course material for workshops using a pressurized water reactor (PWR) Simulator developed for the IAEA by Cassiopeia Technologies Inc. of Canada is presented in the IAEA publication: Training Course Series No. 22 'Pressurized Water Reactor Simulator' (2003) and Training Course Series No. 23 'Boiling Water Reactor Simulator' (2003). This report consists of course material for workshops using the WWER-1000 Reactor Department Simulator from the Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, Russian Federation. N. V. Tikhonov and S. B. Vygovsky of the Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute prepared this report for the IAEA

  16. Graphite for high-temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, W.; Leushacke, D.F.; Nickel, H.; Theymann, W.

    1976-01-01

    The different graphites necessary for HTRs are being developed, produced and tested within the Federal German ''Development Programme Nuclear Graphite''. Up to now, batches of the following graphite grades have been manufactured and fully characterized by the SIGRI Company to demonstrate reproducibility: pitch coke graphite AS2-500 for the hexagonal fuel elements and exchangeable reflector blocks; special pitch coke graphite ASI2-500 for reflector blocks of the pebble-bed reactor and as back-up material for the hexagonal fuel elements; graphite for core support columns. The material data obtained fulfill most of the requirements under present specifications. Production of large-size blocks for the permanent side reflector and the core support blocks is under way. The test programme covers all areas important for characterizing and judging HTR-graphites. In-pile testing comprises evaluation of the material for irradiation-induced changes of dimensions, mechanical and thermal properties - including behaviour under temperature cycling and creep behaviour - as well as irradiating fuel element segments and blocks. Testing out-of-pile includes: evaluation of corrosion rates and influence of corrosion on strength; strength measurements; including failure criteria. The test programme has been carried out extensively on the AS2-graphite, and the results obtained show that this graphite is suitable as HTGR fuel element graphite. (author)

  17. High-temperature materials and structural ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report gives a survey of research work in the area of high-temperature materials and structural ceramics of the KFA (Juelich Nuclear Research Center). The following topics are treated: (1) For energy facilities: ODS materials for gas turbine blades and heat exchangers; assessment of the remaining life of main steam pipes, material characterization and material stress limits for First-Wall components; metallic and graphitic materials for high-temperature reactors. (2) For process engineering plants: composites for reformer tubes and cracking tubes; ceramic/ceramic joints and metal/ceramic and metal/metal joints; Composites and alloys for rolling bearing and sliding systems up to application temperatures of 1000deg C; high-temperature corrosion of metal and ceramic material; porous ceramic high-temperature filters and moulding coat-mix techniques; electrically conducting ceramic material (superconductors, fuel cells, solid electrolytes); high-temperature light sources (high-temperature chemistry); oil vapor engines with caramic components; ODS materials for components in diesel engines and vehicle gas turbines. (MM) [de

  18. Tritium Formation and Mitigation in High Temperature Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Carl Stoots

    2012-08-01

    Tritium is a radiologically active isotope of hydrogen. It is formed in nuclear reactors by neutron absorption and ternary fission events and can subsequently escape into the environment. In order to prevent the tritium contamination of proposed reactor buildings and surrounding sites, this paper examines the root causes and potential solutions for the production of this radionuclide, including materials selection and inert gas sparging. A model is presented that can be used to predict permeation rates of hydrogen through metallic alloys at temperatures from 450–750°C. Results of the diffusion model are presented for one steadystate value of tritium production in the reactor.

  19. Estimation of temperature distribution in a reactor shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, R.A.; Goverdhan, P.; Gupta, S.K.

    1989-01-01

    Shielding is provided in a nuclear reactor to absorb the radiations emanating from the core. The energy of these radiations appear in the form of heat. Concrete which is commonly used as a shielding material in nuclear power plants must be able to withstand the temperatures and temperature gradients appearing in the shield due to this heat. High temperatures lead to dehydration of the concrete and in turn reduce the shielding effectiveness of the material. Adequate cooling needs to be provided in these shields in order to limit the maximum temperature. This paper describes a method to estimate steady state and transient temperature distribution in reactor shields. The results due to loss of coolant in the coolant tubes have been studied and presented in the paper. (author). 5 figs

  20. Advanced gas cooled nuclear reactor materials evaluation and development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Results of work performed from January 1, 1977 through March 31, 1977 on the Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program are presented. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Process Heat and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (impure Helium), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Work covered in this report includes progress to date on alloy selection for VHTR Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) applications and for DCHT applications. The present status on the simulated reactor helium loop design and on designs for the testing and analysis facilities and equipment is discussed

  1. High temperature gas cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosegood, S.B.; Lockett, G.E.

    1975-01-01

    For high-temperature gas cooled reactors it is considered advantageous to design the core so that the moderator blocks can be removed and replaced by some means of standpipes normally situated in the top of the reactor vessel. An arrangement is here described to facilitate these operations. The blocks have end faces shaped as irregular hexagons with three long sides of equal length and three short sides also of equal length, one short side being located between each pair of adjacent long sides, and the long sides being inclined towards one another at 60 0 . The block defines a number of coolant channels located parallel to its sides. Application of the arrangement to a high temperature gas-cooled reactor with refuelling standpipes is described. The standpipes are located in the top of the reactor vessel above the tops of the columns and are disposed coaxially above the hexagonal channels, with diameters that allow the passage of the blocks. (U.K.)

  2. High temperature reactor safety and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brisbois, J.; Charles, J.

    1975-01-01

    High-temperature reactors are endowed with favorable safety and environmental factors resulting from inherent design, main-component safety margins, and conventional safety systems. The combination of such characteristics, along with high yields, prove in addition, that such reactors are plagued with few problems, can be installed near users, and broaden the recourse to specific power, therefore fitting well within a natural environment [fr

  3. Physics of high-temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massimo, L.

    1976-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters entitled: general description of the HTR core; general considerations about reactor physics; neutron cross-sections; basic aspects of transport and diffusion theory; methods for the solution of the diffusion equation; slowing-down and thermalization in graphite; resonance absorption; spectrum calculations and cross-section averaging; burn-up; core design; fuel management and cost calculations; temperature coefficient; core dynamics and accident analysis; reactor control; peculiarities of HTR physics; analysis of calculational accuracy; sequence of reactor design calculations. (U.K.)

  4. High-temperature reactor in modular construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, F.U.; Reutler, H.; Ullrich, M.

    1981-01-01

    Together with other reactors of the same type a gas-cooled, small-sized high-temperature reactor is to be assembled into a plant with modular design. The reactor vessel can be withdrawn as a whole after shutdown, removal of the fuel element charge, disassembly of the control rods, and opening of the closure of the safety containment. All apertures for the inlet and outlet of the cooling gas are located in the ground plate of the reactor. The lower part of the reactor cavern serves as inlet space for the cool gas, while the heated gas is let in through a line of a heat sink, e.g. a heat exchanger. The ground plate is connected with the hot gas line or with an inserted hot gas collecting room by means of a simple plug connection which is released automatically when the reactor vessel is withdrawn. The cooling gas, which is put into circulation by a blower and led through special conducting systems, is also used for cooling the outer metal jacket of the hot gas line. A second design is described according to which the reactor and heat exchanger are superposed in a safety containment, such as applied for pressurized water-cooled nuclear reactors. (orig.) [de

  5. Design of High Temperature Reactor Vessel Using ANSYS Software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandriyana; Kasmudin

    2003-01-01

    Design calculation and evaluation of material strength for high temperature reactor vessel based on the design of HTR-10 high temperature reactor vessel were carried out by using the ANSYS 5.4 software. ANSYS software was applied to calculate the combined load from thermal and pressure load. Evaluation of material strength was performed by calculate and determine the distribution of temperature, stress and strain in the thickness direction of vessel, and compared with its material strength for designed. The calculation was based on the inner wall temperature of vessel of 600 o C and the outer temperature of 500 and 600 o C. Result of calculation gave the maximum stress for outer temperature of 600 o C was 288 N/ mm 2 and strain of 0.000187. For outer temperature of 500 o C the maximum stress was 576 N/ mm 2 and strain of 0.003. Based on the analysis result, the material of steel SA 516-70 with limited stress for design of 308 N/ mm 2 can be used for vessel material with outer wall temperature of 600 o C

  6. Detection method for nuclear reactor material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isobe, Yusuke; Hashimoto, Motoyuki.

    1995-01-01

    A fine state of a test piece taken out of a reactor core is analyzed upon periodical inspection, and a new test piece previously reproducing the state described above at the outside of the reactor is disposed to the reactor core upon completion of the periodical inspection. Further, a fine state of the material at a time preceding to the operation time at a certain periodical inspection is forecast, and a test piece reproducing the state at the outside of the reactor is disposed to the reactor core upon the completion of the periodical inspection. Since a test piece previously reproducing the change of the state up to a certain periodical inspection by a method other than irradiation of neutrons is newly disposed, radiation of the test piece is not extremely increased even after an extremely long period of summed up reactor operation time, to provide substantially constant radiation level on every test piece. (T.M.)

  7. High Temperature reactors status 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekholm, R.; Bosaeus, J.; Carleson, G.; Gelin, R.; Jirlow, K.; Linder, S.; Menon, S.; Runfors, U.; Vieider, G.

    1978-03-01

    The objective of this report is to summarize the current state-of-the-art of HTR technology as part of follow-up studies of the development of advanced fission reactor systems. These studies have been performed at AB Atomenergi since fiscal year 1975/76 and are financed by governmental funds for energy R and D. In this report emphasis is given to the following main aspects of the HTR development: - a survey of the major HTR - R and D programmes; - the description of HTR technology including remaining development problems and uncertainties; - the analysis of the safety and environmental characteristics of the HTR systems; - the analysis of the incentives for the introduction of various HTR types. The report contains also information kindly provided directly by experts from several organisations developing the HTR-systems

  8. Maintenance and material aspects of DREAM reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, S.; Nishio, S.; Yamada, R.; Seki, Y.; Kurihara, R.; Adachi, J.; Yamazaki, S.

    2000-01-01

    A concept of a commercial fusion power reactors (Fusion Power: 5.5 GW, electric output: 2.7 GW) having high environmental safety, high thermal efficiency and high availability has been studied in JAERI. The gross reactor configuration was designed to achieve good maintainability, high performance breeding blanket, high efficient power generation system and little radwastes. Design was based on the use of low activation structural material (SiC/SiC composites) and helium as a coolant. In this paper, maintenance and material aspects of DREAM reactor design is discussed. The concluding remarks are as follows. (1) The difficulty of development of maintenance tool is alleviated by sector replacement and the radiation dose environment less than 10 Gy/h in a reactor chamber. (2) Design requirement and present status of SiC/SiC composites was investigated. (3) The SiC/SiC composite development program is planned to satisfy the requirements of DREAM reactor

  9. Nuclear reactor structural material forming less radioactive corrosion product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazawa, Hiroshi.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To provide nuclear reactor structural materials forming less radioactive corrosion products. Constitution: Ni-based alloys such as inconel alloy 718, 600 or inconel alloy 750 and 690 having excellent corrosion resistance and mechanical property even in coolants at high temperature and high pressure have generally been used as nuclear reactor structural materials. However, even such materials yield corrosion products being attacked by coolants circulating in the nuclear reactor, which produce by neutron irradiation radioactive corrosion products, that are deposited in primary circuit pipeways to constitute exposure sources. The present invention dissolves dissolves this problems by providing less activating nuclear reactor structural materials. That is, taking notice on the fact that Ni-58 contained generally by 68 % in Ni changes into Co-58 under irradiation of neutron thereby causing activation, the surface of nuclear reactor structural materials is applied with Ni plating by using Ni with a reduced content of Ni-58 isotopes. Accordingly, increase in the radiation level of the nuclear reactor structural materials can be inhibited. (K.M.)

  10. Irradiation capsule for testing magnetic fusion reactor first-wall materials at 60 and 2000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conlin, J.A.

    1985-08-01

    A new type of irradiation capsule has been designed, and a prototype has been tested in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) for low-temperature irradiation of Magnetic Fusion Reactor first-wall materials. The capsule meets the requirements of the joint US/Japanese collaborative fusion reactor materials irradiation program for the irradiation of first-wall fusion reactor materials at 60 and 200 0 C. The design description and results of the prototype capsule performance are presented

  11. Overview moderator material for nuclear reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mairing Manutu Pongtuluran; Hendra Prihatnadi

    2009-01-01

    In order for a reactor design is considered acceptable absolute technical requirement is fulfilled because the most important part of a reactor design. Safety considerations emphasis on the handling of radioactive substances emitted during the operation of a reactor and radioactive waste handling. Moderator material is a layer that interacts directly with neutrons split the nuclear fuel that will lead to changes in physical properties, nuclear properties, mechanical properties and chemical properties. Reviews moderator of this time is of the types of moderator is often used to meet the requirements as nuclear material. (author)

  12. Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Reactor Materials: News for the Reactor Materials Crosscut, May 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloy, Stuart Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science in Radiation and Dynamics Extremes

    2016-09-26

    In this newsletter for Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Reactor Materials, pages 1-3 cover highlights from the DOE-NE (Nuclear Energy) programs, pages 4-6 cover determining the stress-strain response of ion-irradiated metallic materials via spherical nanoindentation, and pages 7-8 cover theoretical approaches to understanding long-term materials behavior in light water reactors.

  13. High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The six user centers in the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML), a DOE User Facility, are dedicated to solving materials problems that limit the efficiency...

  14. High-temperature reactors: a recent past, a near future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballot, B.

    2007-01-01

    While high-temperature reactors did experience major developments in the past, in Europe in particular, significant R and D efforts are required, if a major innovation deployment is to be made possible, of modular reactors having the capability of being coupled, in reliable, economic fashion, to an industrial process. The aim: the construction, before the next decade is out more swiftly than is feasible for other fourth-generation systems of an industrial prototype, coupled to such a process. The Areva Group takes up this approach, with its ANTARES project. For the purposes of characterizing the thermal properties of heterogeneous, multi-scale materials, as a function of temperature, experimental and numerical instruments have been developed at the Microstructure and Behavior Laboratory (Laboratoire microstructure et comportement), at CEA Le Ripault Center. They have been applied to the thermal characterization of the various layers in a high temperature reactor (HTR) fuel ball. (authors)

  15. A high temperature reactor for ship propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobet, P.; Seigel, R.; Thompson, A.C.; Beadnell, R.M.; Beeley, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    The initial thermal hydraulic and physics design of a high temperature gas cooled reactor for ship propulsion is described. The choice of thermodynamic cycle and thermal power is made to suit the marine application. Several configurations of a Helium cooled, Graphite moderated reactor are then analysed using the WIMS and MONK codes from AEA Technology. Two geometries of fuel elements formed using micro spheres in prismatic blocks, and various arrangements of control rods and poison rods are examined. Reactivity calculations through life are made and a pattern of rod insertion to flatten the flux is proposed and analysed. Thermal hydraulic calculations are made to find maximum fuel temperature under high power with optimized flow distribution. Maximum temperature after loss of flow and temperatures in the reactor vessel are also computed. The temperatures are significantly below the known limits for the type of fuel proposed. It is concluded that the reactor can provide the required power and lifetime between refueling within likely space and weight constraints. (author)

  16. The Application of Non-Metallic Core Materials in a High-Temperature Reactor Experiment; Utilisation de materes non metalliques dans le coeur d'un reacteur experimental a haute temperature; Ispol'zovanie nemetallicheskikh materialov dlya aktivnoj zony vysokotemperaturnogo opytnogo reaktora; Empleo de materiales no metalicos en el nucleo de un reactor experimental de alta temperatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huddle, R. A.U.; Shepherd, L. R. [Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development, Dragon Project, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1963-11-15

    The OECD High-Temperature Reactor Project (DRAGON) was set up to develop the technology of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors and, as part of this development, to construct and operate a 20-MW(t) reactor experiment. The reactor, which is now nearing completion, is a helium-cooled system with a coreoutlet temperature of 750{sup o}C; it employs U{sup 235} fuel with thorium as a fertile material. A particular feature of this system is the absence of any metals in the core. Because of the high temperatures involved, namely, up to 1050{sup o}C at fuel element surfaces and above, 1500{sup o}C in-the hottest regions of the fuel, refractory nonmetallic materials are employed. All the core material is incorporated within the fuel element which leads to a high ratio of heat transfer surface area to core volume and hence permits a high average power density leading to a relatively compact system. Each fuel element consists of a cluster of graphite tubes, containing the fissile and fertile materials as carbides incorporated in graphite pellets. A purge flow of the helium coolant passing through the centre of each fuel rod is extracted from the base whence it passes into a helium processing plant to remove fission products and other impurities before being returned to the reactor. This procedure reduces the escape of fission products from the very hot ceramic fuel into the primary coolant stream. Problems associated with the development and production of ceramic fuel bodies and graphite for this reactor, and the behaviour of these materials under operating conditions are outlined. Some experience from irradiation and in-pile loop investigations are reported. The main emphasis in this programme is on the development of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor for application as an economic power producing system. (author) [French] Les objectifs du Projet DRAGON de l'OCDE (reacteur a haute temperature) sont les suivants: ameliorer la technologie des reacteurs a haute temperature

  17. IAEA high temperature gas cooled reactor activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    IAEA activities on high temperature gas cooled reactors are conducted with the review and support of Member States, primarily through the International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors (IWGGCR). This paper summarises the results of the IAEA gas cooled reactor project activities in recent years along with ongoing current activities through a review of Co-ordinated Research Projects (CRPs), meetings and other international efforts. A series of three recently completed CRPs have addressed the key areas of reactor physics for LEU fuel, retention of fission products, and removal of post shutdown decay heat through passive heat transport mechanisms. These activities along with other completed and ongoing supporting CRPs and meetings are summarised with reference to detailed documentation of the results. (author)

  18. High temperature reactor development in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heek, A.I. van

    1996-01-01

    This year, some clear design choices have been made in the WHITE Reactor development programme. The activities will be concentrated at the development of a small size pebble bed HTR for combined heat and power production with a closed cycle gas turbine. Objective of the development is threefold: 1. restoring social support; 2. establishing commercial viability after market introduction; and 3. making the market introduction itself feasible, i.e. limited development and first-of-a-kind costs. This design is based on the peu-a-peu design of KFA Juelich and will be optimized. The computer codes necessary for this are being prepared for this work. The dynamic neutronics code PANTHER is being coupled to the thermal hydraulics code THERMIX-DIREKT. For this reactor type, fuel temperatures are maximal in the scenario of depressurization with recriticality. Even for this scenario, fuel temperatures of the 20MWth PAP-GT do not exceed 1300 deg. C, so there should be room for upscaling for economic reasons. On the other hand, it would be convenient to fuel the reactor batchwise instead of continuously, and the use of thorium could be required. These two features may lead to a larger temperature margin. The optimal design must unite these features in the best acceptable way. To gain expertise in calculations on gas cooled graphite moderate reactors, benchmark calculations are being performed in parallel with international partners. Parallel to this, special expertise is being built up on HTR fuel and HTR reactor vessels. (author). 3 refs

  19. New materials in nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Shuichi

    1988-01-01

    In the autumn of 1987, the critical condition was attained in the JET in Europe and Japanese JT-60, thus the first subject in the physical verification of nuclear fusion reactors was resolved, and the challenge to the next attainment of self ignition condition started. As the development process of nuclear fusion reactors, there are the steps of engineering, economical and social verifications after this physical verification, and in respective steps, there are the critical problems related to materials, therefore the development of new materials must be advanced. The condition of using nuclear fusion reactors is characterized by high fluence, high thermal flux and strong magnetic field, and under such extreme condition, the microscopic structures of materials change, and they behave much differently from usual case. The subjects of material development for nuclear fusion reactors, the material data base being built up, the materials for facing plasma and high thermal flux, first walls, blanket structures, electric insulators and others are described. The serious effect of irradiation and the rate of defect inducement must be taken in consideration in the structural materials for nuclear fusion reactors. (Kako, I.)

  20. Use of stainless steel as structural materials in reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teodoro, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are used as structural materials in reactor cores, due to their good mechanical properties at working temperatures and high generalized corrosion resistance in aqueous medium. The objective of this paper is to compare several 300 series austenitic stainless steels related to mechanical properties, localized corrosion resistance (SCC and intergranular) and content of delta ferrite. (author)

  1. Introduction to reactor internal materials for pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Woo Suk; Hong, Joon Hwa; Jee, Se Hwan; Lee, Bong Sang; Kuk, Il Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-06-01

    This report reviewed the R and D states of reactor internal materials in order to be a reference for researches and engineers who are concerning on localization of the materials in the field or laboratory. General structure of PWR internals and material specification for YGN 3 and 4 were reviewed. States-of-arts on R and D of stainless steel and Alloy X-750 were reviewed, and degradation mechanisms of the components were analyzed. In order to develop the good domestic materials for reactor internal, following studies would be carried out: microstructure, sensitization behavior, fatigue property, irradiation-induced stress corrosion cracking/radiation-induced segregation, radiation embrittlement. (Author) 7 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.,.

  2. Introduction to reactor internal materials for pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Woo Suk; Hong, Joon Hwa; Jee, Se Hwan; Lee, Bong Sang; Kuk, Il Hyun

    1994-06-01

    This report reviewed the R and D states of reactor internal materials in order to be a reference for researches and engineers who are concerning on localization of the materials in the field or laboratory. General structure of PWR internals and material specification for YGN 3 and 4 were reviewed. States-of-arts on R and D of stainless steel and Alloy X-750 were reviewed, and degradation mechanisms of the components were analyzed. In order to develop the good domestic materials for reactor internal, following studies would be carried out: microstructure, sensitization behavior, fatigue property, irradiation-induced stress corrosion cracking/radiation-induced segregation, radiation embrittlement. (Author) 7 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.,

  3. Temperature measurements inside nuclear reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarassenko, Serge

    1969-11-01

    Non negligible errors may happen in nuclear reactor temperature measurements using magnesium oxide insulated and stainless steel sheathed micro-wire thermocouples, when these thermometric lines are placed under operational conditions typical of electrical power stations. The present work shows that this error is principally due to electrical hysteresis and polarization phenomena in the insulator subjected to the strong fields generated by common-mode voltages. These phenomena favour the unsymmetrical common-mode current flow and thus lead to the differential-mode voltage generation which is superposing on the thermoelectric hot junction potential. A calculation and an experimental approach make possible the importance of the magnesium oxide insulating characteristics, the hot junction insulation, the choice of the main circuits in the data processing equipment as well as the galvanic isolation performances and the common-mode rejection features of all the measurement circuits. A justification is thereby given for the severe conditions imposed for the acceptance of thermoelectric materials; some particular precautions to be taken are described, as well as the high performance characteristics which have to be taken into account in choosing measurement systems linked to thermometric circuits with sheathed micro-wire thermocouples. (author) [fr

  4. Materials design data for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavassoli, A.A.F.

    1998-01-01

    Design data needed for fusion reactors are characterized by the diversity of materials and the complexity of loading situations found in these reactors. In addition, advanced fabrication techniques, such as hot isostatic pressing, envisaged for fabrication of single and multilayered in-vessel components, could significantly change the original materials properties for which the current design rules are written. As a result, additional materials properties have had to be generated for fusion reactors and new structural design rules formulated. This paper recalls some of the materials properties data generated for ITER and DEMO, and gives examples of how these are converted into design criteria. In particular, it gives specific examples for the properties of 316LN-IG and modified 9Cr-1Mo steels, and CuCrZr alloy. These include, determination of tension, creep, isochronous, fatigue, and creep-fatigue curves and their analysis and conversion into design limits. (orig.)

  5. Materials design data for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavassoli, A.A.F. [CEA Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, Gif sur Yvette (France). CEREM

    1998-10-01

    Design data needed for fusion reactors are characterized by the diversity of materials and the complexity of loading situations found in these reactors. In addition, advanced fabrication techniques, such as hot isostatic pressing, envisaged for fabrication of single and multilayered in-vessel components, could significantly change the original materials properties for which the current design rules are written. As a result, additional materials properties have had to be generated for fusion reactors and new structural design rules formulated. This paper recalls some of the materials properties data generated for ITER and DEMO, and gives examples of how these are converted into design criteria. In particular, it gives specific examples for the properties of 316LN-IG and modified 9Cr-1Mo steels, and CuCrZr alloy. These include, determination of tension, creep, isochronous, fatigue, and creep-fatigue curves and their analysis and conversion into design limits. (orig.) 19 refs.

  6. Metallic materials corrosion problems in molten salt reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauvin, G.; Dixmier, J.; Jarny, P.

    1977-01-01

    The USA forecastings concerning the molten salt reactors are reviewed (mixtures of fluorides containing the fuel, operating between 560 and 700 0 C). Corrosion problems are important in these reactors. The effects of certain characteristic factors on corrosion are analyzed: humidity and metallic impurities in the salts, temperature gradients, speed of circulation of salts, tellurium from fission products, coupling. In the molten fluorides and experimental conditions, the materials with high Ni content are particularly corrosion resistant alloys (hastelloy N). The corrosion of this material is about 2.6 mg.cm -2 at 700 0 C [fr

  7. Materials degradation in fission reactors: Lessons learned of relevance to fusion reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Was, Gary S.

    2007-01-01

    The management of materials in power reactor systems has become a critically important activity in assuring the safe, reliable and economical operation of these facilities. Over the years, the commercial nuclear power reactor industry has faced numerous 'surprises' and unexpected occurrences in materials. Mitigation strategies have sometimes solved one problem at the expense of creating another. Other problems have been solved successfully and have motivated the development of techniques to foresee problems before they occur. This paper focuses on three aspects of fission reactor experience that may benefit future fusion systems. The first is identification of parameters and processes that have had a large impact on the behavior of materials in fission systems such as temperature, dose rate, surface condition, gradients, metallurgical variability and effects of the environment. The second is the development of materials performance and failure models to provide a basis for assuring component integrity. Last is the development of proactive materials management programs that identify and pre-empt degradation processes before they can become problems. These aspects of LWR experience along with the growing experience with materials in the more demanding advanced fission reactor systems form the basis for a set of 'lessons learned' to aid in the successful management of materials in fusion reactor systems

  8. Summary of ORNL high-temperature gas-cooled reactor program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasten, P.R.

    1981-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) efforts on the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Program have been on HTGR fuel development, fission product and coolant chemistry, prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) studies, materials studies, graphite development, reactor physics and shielding studies, application assessments and evaluations and selected component testing

  9. Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60,

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busby, Jeremy T; Nanstad, Randy K; Stoller, Roger E; Feng, Zhili; Naus, Dan J

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear reactors present a very harsh environment for components service. Components within a reactor core must tolerate high temperature water, stress, vibration, and an intense neutron field. Degradation of materials in this environment can lead to reduced performance, and in some cases, sudden failure. A recent EPRI-led study interviewed 47 US nuclear utility executives to gauge perspectives on long-term operation of nuclear reactors. Nearly 90% indicated that extensions of reactor lifetimes to beyond 60 years were likely. When polled on the most challenging issues facing further life extension, two-thirds cited plant reliability as the key issue with materials aging and cable/piping as the top concerns for plant reliability. Materials degradation within a nuclear power plant is very complex. There are many different types of materials within the reactor itself: over 25 different metal alloys can be found with can be found within the primary and secondary systems, not to mention the concrete containment vessel, instrumentation and control, and other support facilities. When this diverse set of materials is placed in the complex and harsh environment coupled with load, degradation over an extended life is indeed quite complicated. To address this issue, the USNRC has developed a Progressive Materials Degradation Approach (NUREG/CR-6923). This approach is intended to develop a foundation for appropriate actions to keep materials degradation from adversely impacting component integrity and safety and identify materials and locations where degradation can reasonably be expected in the future. Clearly, materials degradation will impact reactor reliability, availability, and potentially, safe operation. Routine surveillance and component replacement can mitigate these factors, although failures still occur. With reactor life extensions to 60 years or beyond or power uprates, many components must tolerate the reactor environment for even longer times. This may increase

  10. Materials for advanced water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    The current IAEA programme in advanced nuclear power technology promotes technical information exchange between Member States with major development programmes. The International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors recommended to organize a Technical Committee Meeting for the purpose of providing an international forum for technical specialists to review and discuss aspects regarding development trends in material application for advanced water cooled reactors. The experience gained from the operation of current water cooled reactors, and results from related research and development programmes, should be the basis for future improvements of material properties and applications. This meeting enabled specialists to exchange knowledge about structural materials application in the nuclear island for the next generation of nuclear power plants. Refs, figs, tabs

  11. Material test reactor fuel research at the BR2 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyck, Steven Van; Koonen, Edgar; Berghe, Sven van den [Institute for Nuclear Materials Science, SCK-CEN, Boeretang, Mol (Belgium)

    2012-03-15

    The construction of new, high performance material test reactor or the conversion of such reactors' core from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) based fuel requires several fuel qualification steps. For the conversion of high performance reactors, high density dispersion or monolithic fuel types are being developed. The Uranium-Molybdenum fuel system has been selected as reference system for the qualification of LEU fuels. For reactors with lower performance characteristics, or as medium enriched fuel for high performance reactors, uranium silicide dispersion fuel is applied. However, on the longer term, the U-Mo based fuel types may offer a more efficient fuel alternative and-or an easier back-end solution with respect to the silicide based fuels. At the BR2 reactor of the Belgian nuclear research center, SCK-CEN in Mol, several types of fuel testing opportunities are present to contribute to such qualification process. A generic validation test for a selected fuel system is the irradiation of flat plates with representative dimensions for a fuel element. By flexible positioning and core loading, bounding irradiation conditions for fuel elements can be performed in a standard device in the BR2. For fuel element designs with curved plates, the element fabrication method compatibility of the fuel type can be addressed by incorporating a set of prototype fuel plates in a mixed driver fuel element of the BR2 reactor. These generic types of tests are performed directly in the primary coolant flow conditions of the BR2 reactor. The experiment control and interpretation is supported by detailed neutronic and thermal-hydraulic modeling of the experiments. Finally, the BR2 reactor offers the flexibility for irradiation of full size prototype fuel elements, as 200mm diameter irradiation channels are available. These channels allow the accommodation of various types of prototype fuel elements, eventually using a dedicated cooling loop to provide the

  12. Material options for a commercial fusion reactor first wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabiri, A.E.

    1986-05-01

    A study has been conducted to evaluate the potential of various materials for use as first walls in high-power-density commercial fusion reactors. Operating limits for each material were obtained based on a number of criteria, including maximum allowable structural temperatures, critical heat flux, ultimate tensile strength, and design-allowable stress. The results with water as a coolant indicate that a modified alloy similar to HT-9 may be a suitable candidate for low- and medium-power-density reactor first walls with neutron loads of up to 6 MW/m 2 . A vanadium or copper alloy must be used for high-power-density reactors. The neutron wall load limit for vanadium alloys is about 14 MW 2 , provided a suitable coating material is chosen. The extremely limited data base for radiation effects hinders any quantitative assessment of the limits for copper alloys

  13. Design and evaluation of materials for space reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavassoli, A.A.; Vrillon, B.; Robert, G.

    1990-01-01

    The French programme envisages a 20 kWe reactor, project ERATO, with three technological options. The first option is a sodium cooled reactor, derived from the fast breeder reactor technology, (upper core outlet temperature of 700 0 C). The second option is based on the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor technology (outlet temperature range 700 0 C-900 0 C). The third option is the reference solution, lithium cooled and UN fuelled fast spectrum reactor, (outlet temperature as high as 1200 0 C). The choice is essentially dominated by material considerations, and more specifically by the problems related to the compatibility with the cooling medium and to the high temperature creep resistance. For the first system limited work will be needed as the technology used is well experimented and there is a wealth of information on the austenitic stainless steel Type 316L-SPH. For the second system, most of the work has been concentrated on characterization of existing commercial alloys. This has included the preselection and the testing of a number of superalloys irradiated or not. The results obtained from high temperature tensile and creep tests have allowed selection of Haynes 230 as the primary candidate material and have also permitted calculation of allowable design stresses for this alloy. For the very high temperature system the French R and D programme has focused on Mo-Re alloys. The results obtained to this date from microstructural examinations and mechanical tests performed on different alloy compositions have allowed selection of Mo-25%Re for future optimization work. They have also shown the need for evaluation of creep properties at low stresses where microstructural instabilities are likely to occur as a result of long exposure to high temperature

  14. Temperature measuring element in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Takashi.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To easily measure the partial maximum temperature at a portion within the nuclear reactor where the connection with the external portion is difficult. Constitution: Sodium, potassium or the alloy thereof with high heat expansion coefficient is packed into an elastic vessel having elastic walls contained in a capsule. A piercing member formed into an acute triangle is attached to one end in the direction of expansion and contraction of the elastic container. The two sides of the triangle form an acute knife edge. A diaphragm is disposed within a capsule at a position opposed to the sharpened direction of the piercing member. Such a capsule is placed in a predetermined position of the nuclear reactor. The elastic vessel causes thermal expansion displacement depending on the temperature at a certain position, by which the top end of the pierce member penetrates through the diaphragm. A pierced scar of a penetration length depending on the temperature is resulted to the diaphragm. The length of the piercing damage is electroscopically observed and compared with the calibration curve to recognize the maximum temperature in the predetermined portion of the nuclear reactor. (Kamimura, M.)

  15. Materials for High-Temperature Catalytic Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ersson, Anders

    2003-04-01

    Catalytic combustion is an environmentally friendly technique to combust fuels in e.g. gas turbines. Introducing a catalyst into the combustion chamber of a gas turbine allows combustion outside the normal flammability limits. Hence, the adiabatic flame temperature may be lowered below the threshold temperature for thermal NO{sub X} formation while maintaining a stable combustion. However, several challenges are connected to the application of catalytic combustion in gas turbines. The first part of this thesis reviews the use of catalytic combustion in gas turbines. The influence of the fuel has been studied and compared over different catalyst materials. The material section is divided into two parts. The first concerns bimetallic palladium catalysts. These catalysts showed a more stable activity compared to their pure palladium counterparts for methane combustion. This was verified both by using an annular reactor at ambient pressure and a pilot-scale reactor at elevated pressures and flows closely resembling the ones found in a gas turbine combustor. The second part concerns high-temperature materials, which may be used either as active or washcoat materials. A novel group of materials for catalysis, i.e. garnets, has been synthesised and tested in combustion of methane, a low-heating value gas and diesel fuel. The garnets showed some interesting abilities especially for combustion of low-heating value, LHV, gas. Two other materials were also studied, i.e. spinels and hexa aluminates, both showed very promising thermal stability and the substituted hexa aluminates also showed a good catalytic activity. Finally, deactivation of the catalyst materials was studied. In this part the sulphur poisoning of palladium, platinum and the above-mentioned complex metal oxides has been studied for combustion of a LHV gas. Platinum and surprisingly the garnet were least deactivated. Palladium was severely affected for methane combustion while the other washcoat materials were

  16. Blankets for fusion reactors : materials and neutronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, S.H. de.

    1980-03-01

    The studies about Fusion Reactors have lead to several problems for which there is no general agreement about the best solution. Nevertheless, several points seem to be well defined, at least for the first generation of reactors. The fuel, for example, should be a mixture of deuterium and tritium. Therefore, the reactor should be able to generate the tritium to be burned and also to transform kinetic energy of the fusion neutrons into heat in a process similar to the fission reactors. The best materials for the composition of the blanket were first selected and then the neutronics for the proposed system was developed. The neutron flux in the blanket was calculated using the discrete ordinates transport code, ANISN. All the nuclides cross sections came from the DLC-28/CTR library, that processed the ENDF/B data, using the SUPERTOG Program. (Author) [pt

  17. Overview of materials research for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muroga, T.; Gasparotto, M.; Zinkle, S.J.

    2002-01-01

    Materials research for fusion reactors is overviewed from Japanese, EU and US perspectives. Emphasis is placed on programs and strategies for developing blanket structural materials, and recent highlights in research and development for reduced activation ferritic martensitic steels, vanadium alloys and SiC/SiC composites, and in mechanistic experimental and modeling studies. The common critical issue for the candidate materials is the effect of irradiation with helium production. For the qualification of materials up to the full lifetime of a DEMO and Power Plant reactors, an intense neutron source with relevant fusion neutron spectra is crucial. Elaborate use of the presently available irradiation devices will facilitate efficient and sound materials development within the required time scale

  18. The modular high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, D.E.; Lipps, A.J.

    1984-01-01

    Due to relatively high operating temperatures, the gas-cooled reactor has the potential to serve a wide variety of energy applications. This paper discusses the energy applications which can be served by the modular HTGR, the magnitude of the potential markets, and the HTGR product cost incentives relative to fossil fuel competition. Advantages of the HTGR modular systems are presented along with a description of the design features and performance characteristics of the current reference HTGR modular systems

  19. Material Properties at Low Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duthil, P

    2014-01-01

    From ambient down to cryogenic temperatures, the behaviour of materials changes greatly. Mechanisms leading to variations in electrical, thermal, mechanical, and magnetic properties in pure metals, alloys, and insulators are briefly introduced from a general engineering standpoint. Data sets are provided for materials commonly used in cryogenic systems for design purposes

  20. Material Properties at Low Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Duthil, P

    2014-07-17

    From ambient down to cryogenic temperatures, the behaviour of materials changes greatly. Mechanisms leading to variations in electrical, thermal, mechanical, and magnetic properties in pure metals, alloys, and insulators are briefly introduced from a general engineering standpoint. Data sets are provided for materials commonly used in cryogenic systems for design purposes.

  1. Material Properties at Low Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duthil, P [Orsay, IPN (France)

    2014-07-01

    From ambient down to cryogenic temperatures, the behaviour of materials changes greatly. Mechanisms leading to variations in electrical, thermal, mechanical, and magnetic properties in pure metals, alloys, and insulators are briefly introduced from a general engineering standpoint. Data sets are provided for materials commonly used in cryogenic systems for design purposes.

  2. Proliferation resistance assessment of high temperature gas reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikamatsu N, M. A. [Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Campus Santa Fe, Av. Carlos Lazo No. 100, Santa Fe, 01389 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Puente E, F., E-mail: midori.chika@gmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The Generation IV International Forum has established different objectives for the new generation of reactors to accomplish. These objectives are focused on sustain ability, safety, economics and proliferation resistance. This paper is focused on how the proliferation resistance of the High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGR) is assessed and the advantages that these reactors present currently. In this paper, the focus will be on explaining why such reactors, HTGR, can achieve the goals established by the GIF and can present a viable option in terms of proliferation resistance, which is an issue of great importance in the field of nuclear energy generation. The reason why the HTGR are being targeted in this writing is that these reactors are versatile, and present different options from modular reactors to reactors with the same size as the ones that are being operated today. Besides their versatility, the HTGR has designed features that might improve on the overall sustain ability of the nuclear reactors. This is because the type of safety features and materials that are used open up options for industrial processes to be carried out; cogeneration for instance. There is a small section that mentions how HTGR s are being developed in the international sector in order to present the current world view in this type of technology and the further developments that are being sought. For the proliferation resistance section, the focus is on both the intrinsic and the extrinsic features of the nuclear systems. The paper presents a comparison between the features of Light Water Reactors (LWR) and the HTGR in order to be able to properly compare the most used technology today and one that is gaining international interest. (Author)

  3. Proliferation resistance assessment of high temperature gas reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chikamatsu N, M. A.; Puente E, F.

    2014-10-01

    The Generation IV International Forum has established different objectives for the new generation of reactors to accomplish. These objectives are focused on sustain ability, safety, economics and proliferation resistance. This paper is focused on how the proliferation resistance of the High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGR) is assessed and the advantages that these reactors present currently. In this paper, the focus will be on explaining why such reactors, HTGR, can achieve the goals established by the GIF and can present a viable option in terms of proliferation resistance, which is an issue of great importance in the field of nuclear energy generation. The reason why the HTGR are being targeted in this writing is that these reactors are versatile, and present different options from modular reactors to reactors with the same size as the ones that are being operated today. Besides their versatility, the HTGR has designed features that might improve on the overall sustain ability of the nuclear reactors. This is because the type of safety features and materials that are used open up options for industrial processes to be carried out; cogeneration for instance. There is a small section that mentions how HTGR s are being developed in the international sector in order to present the current world view in this type of technology and the further developments that are being sought. For the proliferation resistance section, the focus is on both the intrinsic and the extrinsic features of the nuclear systems. The paper presents a comparison between the features of Light Water Reactors (LWR) and the HTGR in order to be able to properly compare the most used technology today and one that is gaining international interest. (Author)

  4. Materials challenges for the supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baindur, S.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the materials requirements of the Supercritical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR) which arise from its severe expected operating conditions: (i) Outlet Temperature (to 650 C); (ii) Pressure of 25 MPa for the coolant containment, (iii) Thermochemical stress in the presence of supercritical water, and (iv) Radiative damage (up to 150 dpa for the fast spectrum variant). These operating conditions are reviewed; the phenomenology of materials in the supercritical water environment that create the materials challenges is discussed; knowledge gaps are identified, and efforts to understand material behaviour under the operating conditions expected in the SCWR are described. (author)

  5. Assessment of very high-temperature reactors in process applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiewak, I.; Jones, J.E. Jr.; Gambill, W.R.; Fox, E.C.

    1976-11-01

    An overview is presented of the technical and economic feasibility for the development of a very high-temperature reactor (VHTR) and associated processes. A critical evaluation of VHTR technology for process temperatures of 1400 and 2000 0 F is made. Additionally, an assessment of potential market impact is made to determine the commercial viability of the reactor system. It is concluded that VHTR process heat in the range of 1400 to 1500 0 F is attainable with near-term technology. However, process heat in excess of 1600 0 F would require considerably more materials development. The potential for the VHTR could include a major contribution to synthetic fuel, hydrogen, steel, and fertilizer production and to systems for transport and storage of high-temperature heat. A recommended development program including projected costs is presented

  6. Materials surveillance program for C-E NSSS reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koziol, J.J.

    1977-01-01

    Irradiation surveillance programs for light water NSSS reactor vessels provide the means by which the utility can assess the extent of neutron-induced changes in the reactor vessel materials. These programs are conducted to verify, by direct measurement, the conservatism in the predicted radiation-induced changes and hence the operational parameters (i.e., heat-up, cooldown, and pressurization rates). In addition, such programs provide assurance that the scheduled adjustments in the operational parameters are made with ample margin for safe operation of the plant. During the past 3 years, several documents have been promulgated establishing the criteria for determining both the initial properties of the reactor vessel materials as well as measurement of changes in these initial properties as a result of irradiation. These documents, ASTM E-185-73, ''Recommended Practice for Surveillance Tests for Nuclear Reactor Vessels,'' and Appendix H to 10 CFR 50, ''Reactor Vessel Material Surveillance Program Requirements,'' are complementary to each other. They are the result of a change in the basic philosophy regarding the design and analysis of reactor vessels. In effect, the empirical ''transition temperature approach,'' which was used for design, was replaced by the ''analytical fracture mechanics approach.'' The implementation of this technique was described in Welding Research Council Bulletin 1975 and Appendix G to ASME Code Section III. Further definition of requirements appears in Appendix G to 10 CFR 50 published in July 1973. It is the intent of this paper to describe (1) a typical materials surveillance program for the reactor vessel of a Combustion Engineering NSSS, and (2) how the results of such programs, as well as experimental programs provide feed-back for improvement of materials to enhance their radiation resistance and thereby further improve the safety and reliability of future plants. (author)

  7. Materials technologies of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begley, R.

    1984-01-01

    Satisfactory materials performance is a key element in achieving reliable operation of light water reactors. Outstanding performance under rigorous operational conditions has been exhibited by pressure boundary components, core internals, fuel cladding, and other critical components of these systems. Corrosion and stress corrosion phenomena have, however, had an impact on plant availability, most notably relating to pipe cracking in BWR systems and steam generator corrosion in PWR systems. These experiences have stimulated extensive development activities by the nuclear industry in improved NDE techniques, investigation of corrosion phenomena, as well as improved materials and repair processes. This paper reviews key materials performance aspects of light water reactors with particular emphasis on the progress which has been made in modeling of corrosion phenomena, control of the plant operating environment, advanced material development, and application of sophisticated repair procedures. Implementation of this technology provides the basis for improved plant availability

  8. High Flux Materials Testing Reactor (HFR), Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-09-01

    After conversion to burnable poison fuel elements, the High Flux Materials Testing Reactor (HFR) Petten (Netherlands), operated through 1974 for 280 days at 45 MW. Equipment for irradiation experiments has been replaced and extended. The average annual occupation by experiments was 55% as compared to 38% in 1973. Work continued on thirty irradiation projects and ten development activities

  9. Materials problems associated with fusion reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutton, R.

    This paper outlines the principles of design and operation of conceptual fusion reactors, indicates the level of research funding and activity being proposed at major centres and reviews the major materials problems which have been identified, together with an outline of the experimental techniques which have been suggested for investigating these problems. (author)

  10. The future of the low temperature district heating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yingzhong; Wang Dazhong; Ma Changwen; Dong Duo; Tian Jiafu.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper, the role, development and situation of the low temperature district heating reactor (LTDHR) are briefly summarized. There are four types of LTDHR. They are PWR, reactor with boiling in the chimney, organic reactor and swimming pool reactor. The features of these reactors are introduced. The situation and role of the LTDHR in the future of the energy system are also discussed. The experiment on nuclear district heating with the swimming pool reactor in Qinghua Univ. is described briefly. (Author)

  11. High Temperature Materials Interim Data Qualification Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lybeck, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Projects for the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office provide data in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing of the VHTR. Fuel and materials to be used in the reactor are tested and characterized to quantify performance in high temperature and high fluence environments. The VHTR program has established the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) to ensure that VHTR data are qualified for use, stored in a readily accessible electronic form, and analyzed to extract useful results. This document focuses on the first NDMAS objective. It describes the High Temperature Materials characterization data stream, the processing of these data within NDMAS, and reports the interim FY2010 qualification status of the data. Data qualification activities within NDMAS for specific types of data are determined by the data qualification category assigned by the data generator. The High Temperature Materials data are being collected under NQA-1 guidelines, and will be qualified data. For NQA-1 qualified data, the qualification activities include: (1) capture testing, to confirm that the data stored within NDMAS are identical to the raw data supplied, (2) accuracy testing to confirm that the data are an accurate representation of the system or object being measured, and (3) documenting that the data were collected under an NQA-1 or equivalent Quality Assurance program. Currently, data from two test series within the High Temperature Materials data stream have been entered into the NDMAS vault: (1) Tensile Tests for Sm (i.e., Allowable Stress) Confirmatory Testing - 1,403,994 records have been inserted into the NDMAS database. Capture testing is in process. (2) Creep-Fatigue Testing to Support Determination of Creep-Fatigue Interaction Diagram - 918,854 records have been processed and inserted into the NDMAS database. Capture testing is in process.

  12. Materials corrosion and protection at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balbaud, F.; Desgranges, Clara; Martinelli, Laure; Rouillard, Fabien; Duhamel, Cecile; Marchetti, Loic; Perrin, Stephane; Molins, Regine; Chevalier, S.; Heintz, O.; David, N.; Fiorani, J.M.; Vilasi, M.; Wouters, Y.; Galerie, A.; Mangelinck, D.; Viguier, B.; Monceau, D.; Soustelle, M.; Pijolat, M.; Favergeon, J.; Brancherie, D.; Moulin, G.; Dawi, K.; Wolski, K.; Barnier, V.; Rebillat, F.; Lavigne, O.; Brossard, J.M.; Ropital, F.; Mougin, J.

    2011-01-01

    This book was made from the lectures given in 2010 at the thematic school on 'materials corrosion and protection at high temperatures'. It gathers the contributions from scientists and engineers coming from various communities and presents a state-of-the-art of the scientific and technological developments concerning the behaviour of materials at high temperature, in aggressive environments and in various domains (aerospace, nuclear, energy valorization, and chemical industries). It supplies pedagogical tools to grasp high temperature corrosion thanks to the understanding of oxidation mechanisms. It proposes some protection solutions for materials and structures. Content: 1 - corrosion costs; macro-economical and metallurgical approach; 2 - basic concepts of thermo-chemistry; 3 - introduction to the Calphad (calculation of phase diagrams) method; 4 - use of the thermodynamic tool: application to pack-cementation; 5 - elements of crystallography and of real solids description; 6 - diffusion in solids; 7 - notions of mechanics inside crystals; 8 - high temperature corrosion: phenomena, models, simulations; 9 - pseudo-stationary regime in heterogeneous kinetics; 10 - nucleation, growth and kinetic models; 11 - test experiments in heterogeneous kinetics; 12 - mechanical aspects of metal/oxide systems; 13 - coupling phenomena in high temperature oxidation; 14 - other corrosion types; 15 - methods of oxidized surfaces analysis at micro- and nano-scales; 16 - use of SIMS in the study of high temperature corrosion of metals and alloys; 17 - oxidation of ceramics and of ceramic matrix composite materials; 18 - protective coatings against corrosion and oxidation; 19 - high temperature corrosion in the 4. generation of nuclear reactor systems; 20 - heat exchangers corrosion in municipal waste energy valorization facilities; 21 - high temperature corrosion in oil refining and petrochemistry; 22 - high temperature corrosion in new energies industry. (J.S.)

  13. Investigation of materials for fusion power reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhaddane, A.; Slugeň, V.; Sojak, S.; Veterníková, J.; Petriska, M.; Bartošová, I.

    2014-06-01

    The possibility of application of nuclear-physical methods to observe radiation damage to structural materials of nuclear facilities is nowadays a very actual topic. The radiation damage to materials of advanced nuclear facilities, caused by extreme radiation stress, is a process, which significantly limits their operational life as well as their safety. In the centre of our interest is the study of the radiation degradation and activation of the metals and alloys for the new nuclear facilities (Generation IV fission reactors, fusion reactors ITER and DEMO). The observation of the microstructure changes in the reactor steels is based on experimental investigation using the method of positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). The experimental part of the work contains measurements focused on model reactor alloys and ODS steels. There were 12 model reactor steels and 3 ODS steels. We were investigating the influence of chemical composition on the production of defects in crystal lattice. With application of the LT 9 program, the spectra of specimen have been evaluated and the most convenient samples have been determined.

  14. Baseline Concept Description of a Small Modular High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gougar, Hans D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a description of generic small modular high temperature reactors (herein denoted as an smHTR), summarize their distinguishing attributes, and lay out the research and development (R&D) required for commercialization. The generic concepts rely heavily on the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor designs developed in the 1980s which were never built but for which pre-licensing or certification activities were conducted. The concept matured more recently under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, specifically in the areas of fuel and material qualification, methods development, and licensing. As all vendor-specific designs proposed under NGNP were all both ‘small’ or medium-sized and ‘modular’ by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Department of Energy (DOE) standards, the technical attributes, challenges, and R&D needs identified, addressed, and documented under NGNP are valid and appropriate in the context of Small Modular Reactor (SMR) applications. Although the term High Temperature Reactor (HTR) is commonly used to denote graphite-moderated, thermal spectrum reactors with coolant temperatures in excess of 650oC at the core outlet, in this report the historical term High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) will be used to distinguish the gas-cooled technology described herein from its liquid salt-cooled cousin. Moreover, in this report it is to be understood that the outlet temperature of the helium in an HTGR has an upper limit of 950 degrees C which corresponds to the temperature to which certain alloys are currently being qualified under DOE’s ARC program. Although similar to the HTGR in just about every respect, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) may have an outlet temperature in excess of 950 degrees C and is therefore farther from commercialization because of the challenges posed to materials exposed to these temperatures. The VHTR is the focus of R&D under the

  15. Baseline Concept Description of a Small Modular High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans Gougar

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a description of generic small modular high temperature reactors (herein denoted as an smHTR), summarize their distinguishing attributes, and lay out the research and development (R&D) required for commercialization. The generic concepts rely heavily on the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor designs developed in the 1980s which were never built but for which pre-licensing or certification activities were conducted. The concept matured more recently under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, specifically in the areas of fuel and material qualification, methods development, and licensing. As all vendor-specific designs proposed under NGNP were all both ‘small’ or medium-sized and ‘modular’ by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Department of Energy (DOE) standards, the technical attributes, challenges, and R&D needs identified, addressed, and documented under NGNP are valid and appropriate in the context of Small Modular Reactor (SMR) applications. Although the term High Temperature Reactor (HTR) is commonly used to denote graphite-moderated, thermal spectrum reactors with coolant temperatures in excess of 650oC at the core outlet, in this report the historical term High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) will be used to distinguish the gas-cooled technology described herein from its liquid salt-cooled cousin. Moreover, in this report it is to be understood that the outlet temperature of the helium in an HTGR has an upper limit of 950 degrees C which corresponds to the temperature to which certain alloys are currently being qualified under DOE’s ARC program. Although similar to the HTGR in just about every respect, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) may have an outlet temperature in excess of 950 degrees C and is therefore farther from commercialization because of the challenges posed to materials exposed to these temperatures. The VHTR is the focus of R&D under the

  16. Reactor Coolant Temperature Measurement using Ultrasonic Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, JaeCheon [KEPCO International Nuclear graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Seo, YongSun; Bechue, Nicholas [Krohne Messtechnik GmbH, Duisburg (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    In NPP, the primary piping temperature is detected by four redundant RTDs (Resistance Temperature Detectors) installed 90 degrees apart on the RCS (Reactor Coolant System) piping circumferentially. Such outputs however, if applied to I and C systems would not give balanced results. The discrepancy can be explained by either thermal stratification or improper arrangement of thermo-wells and RTDs. This phenomenon has become more pronounced in the hot-leg piping than in the cold-leg. Normally, the temperature difference among channels is in the range of 1°F in Korean nuclear power Plants. Consequently, a more accurate pipe average temperate measurement technique is required. Ultrasonic methods can be used to measure average temperatures with relatively higher accuracy than RTDs because the sound wave propagation in the RCS pipe is proportional to the average temperature around pipe area. The inaccuracy of RCS temperature measurement worsens the safety margin for both DNBR and LPD. The possibility of this discrepancy has been reported with thermal stratification effect. Proposed RCS temperature measurement system based on ultrasonic technology offers a countermeasure to cope with thermal stratification effect on hot-leg piping that has been an unresolved issue in NPPs. By introducing ultrasonic technology, the average internal piping temperature can be measured with high accuracy. The inaccuracy can be decreased less than ±1℉ by this method.

  17. Cladding and Duct Materials for Advanced Nuclear Recycle Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, Todd R.; Busby, J. T.; Klueh, R. L.; Maloy, Stuart A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

    2008-01-01

    This is a review article that provides an overview of the reactor core structural materials and clad and duct needs for the GNEP advanced burner reactor design. A short history of previous research on structural materials for irradiation environments is provided. There is also a section describing some advanced materials that may be candidate materials for various reactor core structures

  18. Fuel element for high-temperature nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schloesser, J.

    1974-01-01

    The fuel element of the HTGR consists of a spherical graphite body with a spherical cavity. A deposit of fissile material, e.g. coated particles of uranium carbide, is fixed to the inner wall using binders. In addition to the fissile material, there are concentric deposits of fertile material, e.g. coated thorium carbide particles. The remaining cavity is filled with a graphite mass, preferably graphite powder, and the filling opening with a graphite stopper. At the beginning of the reactor operation, the fissile material layer provides the whole power. With progressing burn-up, the energy production is taken over by the fertile layer, which provides the heat production until the end of burn-up. Due to the relatively small temperature difference between the outer wall of the outer graphite body and the maximum fuel temperature, the power of the fuel element can be increased. (DG) [de

  19. Manufacturing Demonstration Facility: Low Temperature Materials Synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, David E.; Moon, Ji-Won; Armstrong, Beth L.; Datskos, Panos G.; Duty, Chad E.; Gresback, Ryan; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Jacobs, Christopher B.; Jellison, Gerald Earle; Jang, Gyoung Gug; Joshi, Pooran C.; Jung, Hyunsung; Meyer, Harry M.; Phelps, Tommy

    2015-01-01

    The Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) low temperature materials synthesis project was established to demonstrate a scalable and sustainable process to produce nanoparticles (NPs) for advanced manufacturing. Previous methods to chemically synthesize NPs typically required expensive, high-purity inorganic chemical reagents, organic solvents and high temperatures. These processes were typically applied at small laboratory scales at yields sufficient for NP characterization, but insufficient to support roll-to-roll processing efforts or device fabrication. The new NanoFermentation processes described here operated at a low temperature (~60 C) in low-cost, aqueous media using bacteria that produce extracellular NPs with controlled size and elemental stoichiometry. Up-scaling activities successfully demonstrated high NP yields and quality in a 900-L pilot-scale reactor, establishing this NanoFermentation process as a competitive biomanufacturing strategy to produce NPs for advanced manufacturing of power electronics, solid-state lighting and sensors.

  20. Manufacturing Demonstration Facility: Low Temperature Materials Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, David E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Moon, Ji-Won [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Armstrong, Beth L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Datskos, Panos G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Duty, Chad E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gresback, Ryan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ivanov, Ilia N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jacobs, Christopher B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jellison, Gerald Earle [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jang, Gyoung Gug [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Joshi, Pooran C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jung, Hyunsung [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Meyer, III, Harry M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Phelps, Tommy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-06-30

    The Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) low temperature materials synthesis project was established to demonstrate a scalable and sustainable process to produce nanoparticles (NPs) for advanced manufacturing. Previous methods to chemically synthesize NPs typically required expensive, high-purity inorganic chemical reagents, organic solvents and high temperatures. These processes were typically applied at small laboratory scales at yields sufficient for NP characterization, but insufficient to support roll-to-roll processing efforts or device fabrication. The new NanoFermentation processes described here operated at a low temperature (~60 C) in low-cost, aqueous media using bacteria that produce extracellular NPs with controlled size and elemental stoichiometry. Up-scaling activities successfully demonstrated high NP yields and quality in a 900-L pilot-scale reactor, establishing this NanoFermentation process as a competitive biomanufacturing strategy to produce NPs for advanced manufacturing of power electronics, solid-state lighting and sensors.

  1. Present status of Japan materials testing reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hori, Naohiko; Kaminaga, Masanori; Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Ishihara, Masahiro; Niimi, Motoji; Komori, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Masahide; Kawamura, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai Research and Development Center, Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    The Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is a light water cooled tank type reactor with first criticality in March 1968. Owing to the connection between the JMTR and hot laboratory by a canal, easy re-irradiation tests can be conducted with safe and quick transportation of irradiated samples. The JMTR has been applied to fuel/material irradiation examinations for LWRs, HTGR, fusion reactor and RI production. However, the JMTR operation was once stopped in August 2006, and check and review on the reoperation had been conducted by internal as well as external committees. As a result of the discussion, the JMTR reoperation was determined, and refurbishment works started from the beginning of JFY 2007. The refurbishment works have finished in March 2011 taking four years from JFY 2007. Unfortunately, at the end of the JFY 2010 on March 11, the Great-Eastern-Japan-Earthquake occurred, and functional tests before the JMTR restart, such as cooling system, reactor control system and so on, were delayed by the earthquake. Moreover, a detail inspection found some damages such as slight deformation of the truss structure at the roof of the JMTR reactor building. Consequently, the restart of the JMTR will be delayed from June to next October, 2012. Now, the safety evaluation after the earthquake disaster is being carried out aiming at the restart of the JMTR. The renewed JMTR will be started from JFY 2012 and operated for a period of about 20 years until around JFY 2030. The usability improvement of the JMTR, e.g. higher reactor availability, shortening turnaround time to get irradiation results, attractive irradiation cost, business confidence, is also discussed with users as the preparations for re-operation. (author)

  2. Present status of Japan materials testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, Naohiko; Kaminaga, Masanori; Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Ishihara, Masahiro; Niimi, Motoji; Komori, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Masahide; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    The Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is a light water cooled tank type reactor with first criticality in March 1968. Owing to the connection between the JMTR and hot laboratory by a canal, easy re-irradiation tests can be conducted with safe and quick transportation of irradiated samples. The JMTR has been applied to fuel/material irradiation examinations for LWRs, HTGR, fusion reactor and RI production. However, the JMTR operation was once stopped in August 2006, and check and review on the reoperation had been conducted by internal as well as external committees. As a result of the discussion, the JMTR reoperation was determined, and refurbishment works started from the beginning of JFY 2007. The refurbishment works have finished in March 2011 taking four years from JFY 2007. Unfortunately, at the end of the JFY 2010 on March 11, the Great-Eastern-Japan-Earthquake occurred, and functional tests before the JMTR restart, such as cooling system, reactor control system and so on, were delayed by the earthquake. Moreover, a detail inspection found some damages such as slight deformation of the truss structure at the roof of the JMTR reactor building. Consequently, the restart of the JMTR will be delayed from June to next October, 2012. Now, the safety evaluation after the earthquake disaster is being carried out aiming at the restart of the JMTR. The renewed JMTR will be started from JFY 2012 and operated for a period of about 20 years until around JFY 2030. The usability improvement of the JMTR, e.g. higher reactor availability, shortening turnaround time to get irradiation results, attractive irradiation cost, business confidence, is also discussed with users as the preparations for re-operation. (author)

  3. Assessment of materials needs for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, G.S.

    1976-07-01

    This report has the goal of presenting for the CTR designer and material supplier potentially significant problem areas in materials manufacturing and in structural material resources projected for potential application in fusion power reactor construction. The projected material requirements are based on presently available bills-of-materials for conceptual CTR designs used for constructing a hypothetical fusion power generating capacity of 10 6 MW(e) maturing exponentially over a 20-year period. The projected elemental requirements, the ratio of these requirements to the projected total U.S. demand, and the salient problems currently identified with the CTR use of these elements are summarized. The projected requirements are based upon a ''model'' industry, which is described, and the estimated potential use of molybdenum, niobium, vanadium, and tantalum as blanket structural materials

  4. Assessment of materials needs for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, G.S. (comp.)

    1976-07-01

    This report has the goal of presenting for the CTR designer and material supplier potentially significant problem areas in materials manufacturing and in structural material resources projected for potential application in fusion power reactor construction. The projected material requirements are based on presently available bills-of-materials for conceptual CTR designs used for constructing a hypothetical fusion power generating capacity of 10/sup 6/ MW(e) maturing exponentially over a 20-year period. The projected elemental requirements, the ratio of these requirements to the projected total U.S. demand, and the salient problems currently identified with the CTR use of these elements are summarized. The projected requirements are based upon a ''model'' industry, which is described, and the estimated potential use of molybdenum, niobium, vanadium, and tantalum as blanket structural materials.

  5. Estimation of radioactivity in structural materials of ETRR-1 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imam, M [National Center for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1997-12-31

    Precise knowledge of the thermal neutron flux in the different structural materials of a reactor is necessary to estimate the radioactive inventory in these materials that are needed in any decommissioning study of the reactor. ETRR-1 is a research reactor that went critical on 2/1691. In spite of this long age of the reactor, the effective operation time of this reactor is very short since the reactor was shutdown for long periods. Because of this long age one may think of reactor decommissioning. For this purpose, the radioactivity of the reactor structural materials was estimated. Apart from the reactor core, the important structural materials in the ETRR-1 are the reactor tank, shielding concrete, and the graphite thermal column. The thermal neutron flux was determined by the monte Carlo method in these materials and the isotope inventory and the radioactivity were calculated by the international code ORIGEN-JR. 1 fig.

  6. The problem of helium in structural materials for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikiforov, A.S.; Zakharov, A.P.; Chuev, V.I.

    1982-01-01

    The processes of helium buildup in some metals and alloys at different energy neutron flux irradiation under thermonuclear reactor conditions are considered. The data on high temperature helium embrittlement of a number of stainless steels, titanium and aluminium alloys etc. are given A review of experiments concerning the implanted helium behaviour is presented. Possible reactions between helium atoms and point defects or their clusters are discussed. Analysed are material structure variations upon buildup in them up to 1 at % of helium

  7. Reactivity control system of the high temperature engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Yukio; Sawahata, Hiroaki; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Nakazawa, Toshio

    2004-01-01

    The reactivity control system of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) consists of a control rod system and a reserve shutdown system. During normal operation, reactivity is controlled by the control rod system, which consists of 32 control rods (16 pairs) and 16 control rod drive mechanisms except for the case when the center control rods are removed to perform an irradiation test. In an unlikely event that the control rods fail to be inserted, reserve shutdown system is provided to insert pellets of neutron-absorbing material into the core. Alloy 800H is chosen for the metallic parts of the control rods. Because the maximum temperature of the control rods reaches about 900 deg. C at reactor scrams, structural design guideline and design material data on Alloy 800H are needed for the high temperature design. The design guideline for the HTTR control rod is based on ASME Code Case N-47-21. Design material data is also determined and shown in this paper. Observing the guideline, temperature and stress analysis were conducted; it can be confirmed that the target life of the control rods of 5 years can be achieved. Various tests conducted for the control rod system and the reserve shutdown system are also described

  8. Nuclear graphite for high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.

    2001-01-01

    The cores and reflectors in modern High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTRs) are constructed from graphite components. There are two main designs; the Pebble Bed design and the Prism design. In both of these designs the graphite not only acts as a moderator, but is also a major structural component that may provide channels for the fuel and coolant gas, channels for control and safety shut off devices and provide thermal and neutron shielding. In addition, graphite components may act as a heat sink or conduction path during reactor trips and transients. During reactor operation, many of the graphite component physical properties are significantly changed by irradiation. These changes lead to the generation of significant internal shrinkage stresses and thermal shut down stresses that could lead to component failure. In addition, if the graphite is irradiated to a very high irradiation dose, irradiation swelling can lead to a rapid reduction in modulus and strength, making the component friable.The irradiation behaviour of graphite is strongly dependent on its virgin microstructure, which is determined by the manufacturing route. Nevertheless, there are available, irradiation data on many obsolete graphites of known microstructures. There is also a well-developed physical understanding of the process of irradiation damage in graphite. This paper proposes a specification for graphite suitable for modern HTRs. (author)

  9. Interatomic potentials for fusion reactor material simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoerkas, C.

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, the behaviour of a material situated in a fusion reactor was studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Simulations of processes in the next generation fusion reactor ITER include the reactor materials beryllium, carbon and tungsten as well as the plasma hydrogen isotopes. This means that interaction models, i.e. interatomic potentials, for this complicated quaternary system are needed. The task of finding such potentials is nonetheless nearly at its end, since models for the beryllium-carbon-hydrogen interactions were constructed in this thesis and as a continuation of that work, a beryllium-tungsten model is under development. These potentials are combinable with the earlier tungsten-carbon-hydrogen ones. The potentials were used to explain the chemical sputtering of beryllium due to deuterium plasma exposure. During experiments, a large fraction of the sputtered beryllium atoms were observed to be released as BeD molecules, and the simulations identified the swift chemical sputtering mechanism, previously not believed to be important in metals, as the underlying mechanism. Radiation damage in the reactor structural materials vanadium, iron and iron chromium, as well as in the wall material tungsten and the mixed alloy tungsten carbide, was also studied in this thesis. Interatomic potentials for vanadium, tungsten and iron were modified to be better suited for simulating collision cascades that are formed during particle irradiation, and the potential features affecting the resulting primary damage were identified. Including the often neglected electronic effects in the simulations was also shown to have an impact on the damage. With proper tuning of the electronphonon interaction strength, experimentally measured quantities related to ion-beam mixing in iron could be reproduced. The damage in tungsten carbide alloys showed elemental asymmetry, as the major part of the damage consisted of carbon defects. On the other hand, modelling the damage

  10. Reactor core materials research and integrated material database establishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Woo Seog; Jang, J. S.; Kim, D. W.

    2002-03-01

    Mainly two research areas were covered in this project. One is to establish the integrated database of nuclear materials, and the other is to study the behavior of reactor core materials, which are usually under the most severe condition in the operating plants. During the stage I of the project (for three years since 1999) in- and out of reactor properties of stainless steel, the major structural material for the core structures of PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor), were evaluated and specification of nuclear grade material was established. And the damaged core components from domestic power plants, e.g. orifice of CVCS, support pin of CRGT, etc. were investigated and the causes were revealed. To acquire more resistant materials to the nuclear environments, development of the alternative alloys was also conducted. For the integrated DB establishment, a task force team was set up including director of nuclear materials technology team, and projector leaders and relevant members from each project. The DB is now opened in public through the Internet

  11. Coolant radiolysis studies in the high temperature, fuelled U-2 loop in the NRU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliot, A.J.; Stuart, C.R.

    2008-06-01

    An understanding of the radiolysis-induced chemistry in the coolant water of nuclear reactors is an important key to the understanding of materials integrity issues in reactor coolant systems. Significant materials and chemistry issues have emerged in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR), Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) and CANDU reactors that have required a detailed understanding of the radiation chemistry of the coolant. For each reactor type, specific computer radiolysis models have been developed to gain insight into radiolysis processes and to make chemistry control adjustments to address the particular issue. In this respect, modelling the radiolysis chemistry has been successful enough to allow progress to be made. This report contains a description of the water radiolysis tests performed in the U-2 loop, NRU reactor in 1995, which measured the CHC under different physical conditions of the loop such as temperature, reactor power and steam quality. (author)

  12. Design of high temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Shinzo; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Sudo, Yukio

    1994-09-01

    Construction of High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) is now underway to establish and upgrade basic technologies for HTGRs and to conduct innovative basic research at high temperatures. The HTTR is a graphite-moderated and helium gas-cooled reactor with 30 MW in thermal output and outlet coolant temperature of 850degC for rated operation and 950degC for high temperature test operation. It is planned to conduct various irradiation tests for fuels and materials, safety demonstration tests and nuclear heat application tests. JAERI received construction permit of HTTR reactor facility in February 1990 after 22 months of safety review. This report summarizes evaluation of nuclear and thermal-hydraulic characteristics, design outline of major systems and components, and also includes relating R and D result and safety evaluation. Criteria for judgment, selection of postulated events, major analytical conditions for anticipated operational occurrences and accidents, computer codes used in safety analysis and evaluation of each event are presented in the safety evaluation. (author)

  13. Characterizing the tribological behaviour of fast breeder reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depierre, J.; Raffailhac, J.

    1984-04-01

    The object of these tests is to define the behaviour of material couples working in conditions as representative as possible of reactor operation. For this purpose a certain number of test installations have been developed to simulate the most typical cases of friction encountered: plane to plane geometry, rotational bearings, guiding bearings. Endurance tests have also been carried out on ball bearings and ballscrews samples. As said before, the test conditions attempt to reproduce as faithfully as possible the environment of the materials used in fast breeder reactors, particularly in: - using purified liquid sodium, and maintaining it isotherm, respectively at three temperature levels: 180, 400 and 550 0 C; - or using argon containing sodium aerosol particles. Some typical values of friction coefficients and rates of wear obtained during the tests with certain couples of materials are given here as examples. The aims which are currently guiding the direction of the tests are also briefly described

  14. Fusion-reactor blanket-material safety-compatibility studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeppson, D.W.; Muhlestein, L.D.; Keough, R.F.; Cohen, S.

    1982-11-01

    Blanket material selection for fusion reactors is strongly influenced by the desire to minimize safety and environmental concerns. Blanket material safety compatibility studies are being conducted to identify and characterize blanket-coolant-material interactions under postulated reactor accident conditions. Recently completed scoping compatibility tests indicate that : (1) ternary oxides (LiAlO 2 , Li 2 ZrO 3 , Li 2 SiO 3 , Li 4 SiO 4 and LiTiO 3 ) at postulated blanket operating temperatures are compatible with water coolant, while liquid lithium and Li 7 Pb 2 alloy reactions with water generate heat, aerosol and hydrogen; (2) lithium oxide and Li 17 Pb 83 alloy react mildly with water requiring special precautions to control hydrogen release; (3) liquid lithium reacts substantially, while Li 17 Pb 83 alloy reacts mildly with concrete to produce hydrogen; and (4) liquid lithium-air reactions present some major safety concerns

  15. Accelerated irradiation test of gundremmingen reactor vessel trepan material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, J.R.

    1992-08-01

    Initial mechanical properties tests of beltline trepanned from the decommissioned KRB-A pressure vessel and archive material irradiated in the UBR test reactor revealed a major anomaly in relative radiation embrittlement sensitivity. Poor correspondence of material behavior in test vs. power reactor environments was observed for the weak test orientation (ASTL C-L) whereas correspondence was good for the strong orientation (ASTM C-L). To resolve the anomaly directly, Charpy-V specimens from a low (essentially-nil) fluence region of the vessel were irradiated together with archive material at 279 degrees C in the UBR test reactor. Properties tests before UBR irradiation revealed a significant difference in 41-J transition temperature and upper shelf energy level between the materials. However, the materials exhibited essentially the same radiation embrittlement sensitivity (both orientations), proving that the anomaly is not due to a basic difference in material irradiation resistances. Possible causes of the original anomaly and the significance to NRC Regulatory Guide 1.99 are discussed

  16. Material challenges for the next generation of fission reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckthorpe, Derek

    2010-01-01

    The new generation of fission reactor systems wil require the deployment and construction of a series of advanced water cooled reactors as part of a package of measures to meet UK and European energy needs and to provide a near term non-fossil fuel power solution that addresses CO 2 emission limits. In addition new longer term Generation IV reactor tye systems are being developed and evaluated to enhance safety, reliability, sustainability economics and proliferation resistance requirements and to meet alternative energy applications (outside of electricity generation) such as process heat and large scale hydrogen generation. New fission systems will impose significant challenges on materials supply and development. In the near term, because of the need to 'gear up' to large scale construction after decades of industrial hibernation/contraction and, in the longer term, because of the need for materials to operate under more challenging environments requiring the deployment and development of new alternative materials not yet established to an industrial stage. This paper investigates the materials challenges imposed by the new Generation III+ and Generation IV systems. These include supply and fabrication issues, development of new high temperature alloys and non-metallic materials, the use of new methods of manufacture and the best use of currently available resources and minerals. Recommendations are made as to how these materials challenges might be met and how governments, industry, manufacturers and researchers can all play their part. (orig.)

  17. Accelerated irradiation test of Gundremmingen reactor vessel trepan material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawthorne, J.R. [Materials Engineering Associates, Inc., Lanham, MD (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Initial mechanical properties tests of beltline trepanned from the decommissioned KRB-A pressure vessel and archive material irradiated in the UBR test reactor revealed a major anomaly in relative radiation embrittlement sensitivity. Poor correspondence of material behavior in test vs. power reactor environments was observed for the weak test orientation (ASTL C-L) whereas correspondence was good for the strong orientation (ASTM C-L). To resolve the anomaly directly, Charpy-V specimens from a low (essentially-nil) fluence region of the vessel were irradiated together with archive material at 279{degrees}C in the UBR test reactor. Properties tests before UBR irradiation revealed a significant difference in 41-J transition temperature and upper shelf energy level between the materials. However, the materials exhibited essentially the same radiation embrittlement sensitivity (both orientations), proving that the anomaly is not due to a basic difference in material irradiation resistances. Possible causes of the original anomaly and the significance to NRC Regulatory Guide 1.99 are discussed.

  18. Material challenges for the next generation of fission reactor systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckthorpe, Derek [AMEC, Knutsford, Cheshire (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    The new generation of fission reactor systems wil require the deployment and construction of a series of advanced water cooled reactors as part of a package of measures to meet UK and European energy needs and to provide a near term non-fossil fuel power solution that addresses CO{sub 2} emission limits. In addition new longer term Generation IV reactor tye systems are being developed and evaluated to enhance safety, reliability, sustainability economics and proliferation resistance requirements and to meet alternative energy applications (outside of electricity generation) such as process heat and large scale hydrogen generation. New fission systems will impose significant challenges on materials supply and development. In the near term, because of the need to 'gear up' to large scale construction after decades of industrial hibernation/contraction and, in the longer term, because of the need for materials to operate under more challenging environments requiring the deployment and development of new alternative materials not yet established to an industrial stage. This paper investigates the materials challenges imposed by the new Generation III+ and Generation IV systems. These include supply and fabrication issues, development of new high temperature alloys and non-metallic materials, the use of new methods of manufacture and the best use of currently available resources and minerals. Recommendations are made as to how these materials challenges might be met and how governments, industry, manufacturers and researchers can all play their part. (orig.)

  19. Structural materials for fusion reactor blanket systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.E.; Smith, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    Consideration of the required functions of the blanket and the general chemical, mechanical, and physical properties of candidate tritium breeding materials, coolants, structural materials, etc., leads to acceptable or compatible combinations of materials. The presently favored candidate structural materials are the austenitic stainless steels, martensitic steels, and vanadium alloys. The characteristics of these alloy systems which limit their application and potential performance as well as approaches to alloy development aimed at improving performance (temperature capability and lifetime) will be described. Progress towards understanding and improving the performance of structural materials has been substantial. It is possible to develop materials with acceptable properties for fusion applications

  20. Structural materials for the next generation nuclear reactors - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charit, I.; Murty, K.L.

    2007-01-01

    The Generation-IV reactors need to withstand much higher temperatures, greater neutron doses, severe corrosive environment and above all, a substantially higher life time (60 years or more). Hence for their successful deployment, a significant research in structural materials is needed. Various potential candidate materials, such as austenitic stainless steels, oxide-dispersion strengthened steels, nickel-base superalloys, refractory alloys etc. are considered. Both baseline and irradiated mechanical, thermophysical and chemical properties are important. However, due to the longer high temperature exposure involved in most designs, creep and corrosion/oxidation will become the major performance limiting factors. In this study we did not cover fabricability and weldability of the candidate materials. Pros and cons of each candidate can be summarized as following: -) for austenitic stainless steel: lower thermal creep resistance at higher temperatures but poor swelling resistance at high temperatures; -) for ferritic-martensitic steels: excellent swelling resistance at higher burnups but thermal creep strength is limited at higher temperatures and radiation embrittlement at low temperature; -) for Ni-base alloys: excellent thermal creep resistance at higher temperatures but radiation embrittlement even at moderate doses and helium embrittlement at higher temperatures; and -) for refractory alloys: adequate swelling resistance up to high burnups but fabrication difficulties, low temperature radiation hardening and poor oxidation resistance

  1. Ultrahigh temperature vapor core reactor-MHD system for space nuclear electric power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya, Isaac; Anghaie, Samim; Diaz, Nils J.; Dugan, Edward T.

    1991-01-01

    The conceptual design of a nuclear space power system based on the ultrahigh temperature vapor core reactor with MHD energy conversion is presented. This UF4 fueled gas core cavity reactor operates at 4000 K maximum core temperature and 40 atm. Materials experiments, conducted with UF4 up to 2200 K, demonstrate acceptable compatibility with tungsten-molybdenum-, and carbon-based materials. The supporting nuclear, heat transfer, fluid flow and MHD analysis, and fissioning plasma physics experiments are also discussed.

  2. Environmentally assisted cracking of light-water reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Kassner, T.F.; Shack, W.J.

    1996-02-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of lightwater reactor (LWR) materials has affected nuclear reactors from the very introduction of the technology. Corrosion problems have afflicted steam generators from the very introduction of pressurized water reactor (PWR) technology. Shippingport, the first commercial PWR operated in the United States, developed leaking cracks in two Type 304 stainless steel (SS) steam generator tubes as early as 1957, after only 150 h of operation. Stress corrosion cracks were observed in the heat-affected zones of welds in austenitic SS piping and associated components in boiling-water reactors (BRWs) as early as 1965. The degradation of steam generator tubing in PWRs and the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic SS piping in BWRs have been the most visible and most expensive examples of EAC in LWRs, and the repair and replacement of steam generators and recirculation piping has cost hundreds of millions of dollars. However, other problems associated with the effects of the environment on reactor structures and components am important concerns in operating plants and for extended reactor lifetimes. Cast duplex austenitic-ferritic SSs are used extensively in the nuclear industry to fabricate pump casings and valve bodies for LWRs and primary coolant piping in many PWRs. Embrittlement of the ferrite phase in cast duplex SS may occur after 10 to 20 years at reactor operating temperatures, which could influence the mechanical response and integrity of pressure boundary components during high strain-rate loading (e.g., seismic events). The problem is of most concern in PWRs where slightly higher temperatures are typical and cast SS piping is widely used

  3. Materials development for fast reactor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, T.; Mathew, M.D.; Laha, K.; Sandhya, R., E-mail: san@igcar.gov.in

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • A modified version of alloy D9 designated as IFAC-1 has been developed. • Oxide dispersion strengthened Grade 91 steel with good creep strength developed. • 0.14 wt% nitrogen in 316LN stainless steel leads to improved mechanical properties. • Type IV cracking resistant Grade 91 steel with boron addition developed. • Mechanical properties of SFR materials evaluated in sodium environment. -- Abstract: Materials play a crucial role in the economic competitiveness of electricity produced from fast reactors. It is necessary to increase the fuel burn-up and design life in order to realize this objective. The burnup is largely limited by the void swelling and creep resistance of the fuel cladding and wrapping materials. India's 500 MWe Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) is in advanced stage of construction. The major structural materials chosen for PFBR with MOX fuel are D9 austenitic stainless steel as fuel clad and wrapper material, 316LN austenitic stainless steel for reactor components and piping and modified 9Cr-1Mo steel for steam generator. In order to improve the burnup, titanium, phosphorous and silicon contents in alloy D9 have been optimized for decreased void swelling and increased creep strength and this has led to the development of a modified version of alloy D9 as IFAC-1. Ferritic steels are inherently resistant to void swelling. The disadvantage is their poor creep strength. Creep resistance of 9Cr-ferritic steel has been improved with the dispersion of nano-size yttria to develop oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel clad tube with long-term creep strength, comparable to alloy D9 so as to achieve higher fuel burnup. Improved versions of 316LN stainless steel with nitrogen content of about 0.14 wt% having higher creep strength to increase the life of fast reactors and modified 9Cr-1Mo steel with reduced nitrogen content and controlled addition of boron to improve type IV cracking resistance for steam generator

  4. Thermophysical properties of materials for water cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) to establish a thermophysical properties data base for light and heavy water reactor materials was organized within the framework of the IAEA`s International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors. The work within the CRP started in 1990. The objective of the CRP was to collect and systemaize a thermophysical properties data base for light and heavy water reactor materials under normal operating, transient and accident conditions. The important thermophysical properties include thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, specific heat capacity, enthalpy, thermal expansion and others. These properties as well as the oxidation of zirconium-based alloys, the thermophysical characteristics of high temperature concrete-core melt interaction and the mechanical properties of construction materials are presented in this report. It is hoped that this report will serve as a useful source of thermophysical properties data for water cooled reactor analyses. The properties data are maintained on the THERSYST system at the University of Stuttgart, Germany and are internationally available. Refs, figs, tabs.

  5. Thermophysical properties of materials for water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-06-01

    The IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) to establish a thermophysical properties data base for light and heavy water reactor materials was organized within the framework of the IAEA's International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors. The work within the CRP started in 1990. The objective of the CRP was to collect and systemaize a thermophysical properties data base for light and heavy water reactor materials under normal operating, transient and accident conditions. The important thermophysical properties include thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, specific heat capacity, enthalpy, thermal expansion and others. These properties as well as the oxidation of zirconium-based alloys, the thermophysical characteristics of high temperature concrete-core melt interaction and the mechanical properties of construction materials are presented in this report. It is hoped that this report will serve as a useful source of thermophysical properties data for water cooled reactor analyses. The properties data are maintained on the THERSYST system at the University of Stuttgart, Germany and are internationally available. Refs, figs, tabs

  6. Assessment of very high temperature reactors in process applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.E. Jr.; Spiewak, I.; Gambill, W.R.

    1976-01-01

    In April 1974, the United States Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) authorized General Atomic Company, General Electric Company, and Westinghouse Astronuclear Laboratory to assess the available technology for producing process heat utilizing a very high temperature nuclear reactor (VHTR). The VHTR is defined as a gas-cooled graphite-moderated reactor. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been given a lead role in evaluating the VHTR reactor studies and potential applications of the VHTR. Process temperatures up to the 760 to 871 0 C range appear to be achievable with near-term technology. The major development considerations are high temperature materials, the safety questions (especially regarding the need for an intermediate heat exchanger) and the process heat exchanger. The potential advantages of the VHTR over competing fossil energy sources are conservation of fossil fuels and reduced atmospheric impacts. Costs are developed for nuclear process heat supplied from a 3000-MW(th) VHTR. The range of cost in process applications is competitive with current fossil fuel alternatives

  7. Design and selection of materials for sodium cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chetal, S.C.

    2011-01-01

    Sodium cooled fast reactors are currently in operation, under construction or under design by a number of countries. The design of sodium cooled fast reactor is covered by French RCC - MR code and ASME code NH. The codes cover rules as regards to materials, design and construction. These codes do not cover the effect of irradiation and environment. Elevated temperature design criteria in nuclear codes are much stringent in comparison to non nuclear codes. Sodium corrosion is not an issue in selection of materials provided oxygen impurity in sodium is controlled for which excellent reactor operating experience is available. Austenitic stainless steels have remained the choice for the permanent structures of primary sodium system. Stabilized austenitic stainless steel are rejected because of poor operating experience and non inclusion in the design codes. Route for improved creep behaviour lies in compositional modifications in 316 class steel. However, the weldability needs to be ensured. For cold leg component is non creep regime, SS 304 class steel is favoured from overall economics. Enhanced fuel burn up can be realized by the use of 9-12%Cr 1%Mo class steel for the wrapper of MOX fuel design, and cladding and wrapper for metal fuel reactors. Minor compositional modifications of 20% cold worked 15Cr-15Ni class austenitic stainless steel will be a strong candidate for the cladding of MOX fuel design in the short term. Long term objective for the cladding will be to develop oxide dispersion strengthened steel. 9%Cr 1%Mo class steel (Gr 91) is an ideal choice for integrated once through sodium heated steam generators. One needs to incorporate operating experience from reactors and thermal power stations, industrial capability and R and D feedback in preparing the technical specifications for procurement of wrought products and welding consumables to ensure reliable operation of the components and systems over the design life. The paper highlights the design approach

  8. Characterization of Decommissioned PWR Vessel Internals Materials Samples: Material Certification, Fluence, and Temperature (Nonproprietary Version)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krug, M.; Shogan, R.; Fero, A.; Snyder, M.

    2004-01-01

    Pressurized water reactor (PWR) cores, operate under extreme environmental conditions due to coolant chemistry, operating temperature, and neutron exposure. Extending the life of PWRs require detailed knowledge of the changes in mechanical and corrosion properties of the structural austenitic stainless steel components adjacent to the fuel. This report contains basic material characterization information of the as-installed samples of reactor internals material which were harvested from a decommissioned PWR

  9. Developing the MAPLE materials test reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.G.; Lidstone, R.F.; Donnelly, J.V.

    1992-05-01

    MAPLE-MTR is a new multipurpose research facility being planned by AECL Research as a possible replacement for the 35-year-old NRU reactor. In developing the MAPLE-MTR concept, AECL is starting from the recent design and licensing experience with the MAPLE-X10 reactor. By starting from technology developed to support the MAPLE-X10 design and adapting it to produce a concept that satisfies the requirements of fuel channel materials testing and fuel irradiation programs, AECL expects to minimize the need for major advances in nuclear technology (e.g., fuel, heat transfer). Formulation of the MAPLE-MTR concept is at an early stage. This report describes the irradiation requirements of the research areas, how these needs are translated into design criteria for the project and elements of the preliminary design concept

  10. Development of radiation resistant structural materials utilizing fission research reactors in Japan (Role of research reactors)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikama, T.; Tanigawa, H.; Nozawa, T.; Muroga, T.; Aoyama, T.; Kawamura, H.; Ishihara, M.; Ito, C.; Kaneda, S.; Mimura, S.

    2009-01-01

    there. Recently, a new irradiation rig is under development for the high temperature and high fluence irradiation in JOYO. Vanadium based alloys are studied by university groups led by the NIFS, for their unique and excellent nuclear and radiation resistant properties. The paper will review the present activity for developing radiation resistant structural materials in Japan, in conjunction with effective utilization of test reactors in Japan as well as abroad. (author)

  11. Joining and fabrication techniques for high temperature structures including the first wall in fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ho Jin; Lee, B. S.; Kim, K. B.

    2003-09-01

    The materials for PFC's (Plasma Facing Components) in a fusion reactor are severely irradiated with fusion products in facing the high temperature plasma during the operation. The refractory materials can be maintained their excellent properties in severe operating condition by lowering surface temperature by bonding them to the high thermal conducting materials of heat sink. Hence, the joining and bonding techniques between dissimilar materials is considered to be important in case of the fusion reactor or nuclear reactor which is operated at high temperature. The first wall in the fusion reactor is heated to approximately 1000 .deg. C and irradiated severely by the plasma. In ITER, beryllium is expected as the primary armour candidate for the PFC's; other candidates including W, Mo, SiC, B4C, C/C and Si 3 N 4 . Since the heat affected zones in the PFC's processed by conventional welding are reported to have embrittlement and degradation in the sever operation condition, both brazing and diffusion bonding are being considered as prime candidates for the joining technique. In this report, both the materials including ceramics and the fabrication techniques including joining technique between dissimilar materials for PFC's are described. The described joining technique between the refractory materials and the dissimilar materials may be applicable for the fusion reactor and Generation-4 future nuclear reactor which are operated at high temperature and high irradiation

  12. Joining and fabrication techniques for high temperature structures including the first wall in fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Jin; Lee, B. S.; Kim, K. B

    2003-09-01

    The materials for PFC's (Plasma Facing Components) in a fusion reactor are severely irradiated with fusion products in facing the high temperature plasma during the operation. The refractory materials can be maintained their excellent properties in severe operating condition by lowering surface temperature by bonding them to the high thermal conducting materials of heat sink. Hence, the joining and bonding techniques between dissimilar materials is considered to be important in case of the fusion reactor or nuclear reactor which is operated at high temperature. The first wall in the fusion reactor is heated to approximately 1000 .deg. C and irradiated severely by the plasma. In ITER, beryllium is expected as the primary armour candidate for the PFC's; other candidates including W, Mo, SiC, B4C, C/C and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. Since the heat affected zones in the PFC's processed by conventional welding are reported to have embrittlement and degradation in the sever operation condition, both brazing and diffusion bonding are being considered as prime candidates for the joining technique. In this report, both the materials including ceramics and the fabrication techniques including joining technique between dissimilar materials for PFC's are described. The described joining technique between the refractory materials and the dissimilar materials may be applicable for the fusion reactor and Generation-4 future nuclear reactor which are operated at high temperature and high irradiation.

  13. High-temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, Sajad

    2011-05-01

    General Atomics (GA) has over 35 years experience in prismatic block High-temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) technology design. During this period, the design has recently involved into a modular have been performed to demonstrate its versatility. This versatility is directly related to refractory TRISO coated - particle fuel that can contain any type of fuel. This paper summarized GA's fuel cycle studies individually and compares each based upon its cycle sustainability, proliferation-resistance capabilities, and other performance data against pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel cycle data. Fuel cycle studies LEU-NV;commercial HEU-Th;commercial LEU-Th;weapons-grade plutonium consumption; and burning of LWR waste including plutonium and minor actinides in the MHR. results show that all commercial MHR options, with the exception of HEU-TH, are more sustainable than a PWR fuel cycle. With LEU-NV being the most sustainable commercial options. In addition, all commercial MHR options out perform the PWR with regards to its proliferation-resistance, with thorium fuel cycle having the best proliferation-resistance characteristics.

  14. Imitation and reactor studies of irradiation effect on material mechanic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozhigov, L.S.

    1999-01-01

    Processes of low- and high-temperature radiation embrittlement, radiation creeping and their influence on reactor material properties are considered. Role of imitation experiments in these processes is analysed

  15. Development of Very High Temperature Reactor Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Won Jae; Noh, J. M.; Kim, Y. H.

    2009-04-01

    For an efficient production of nuclear hydrogen, the VHTR (Very High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor) of 950 .deg. C outlet temperature and the interfacing system for the hydrogen production are required. We have developed various evaluation technologies for the performance and safety of VHTR through the accomplishment of this project. First, to evaluate the performance of VHTR, a series of analyses has been performed such as core characteristics at 950 .deg. C, applicability of cooled-vessel, intermediate loop system and high temperature structural integrity. Through the analyses of major accidents such as HPCC and LPCC and the analysis of the risk/performance-informed method, VHTR safety evaluation has been also performed. In addition, various design analysis codes have been developed for a nuclear design, system loop design, system performance analysis, air-ingress accident analysis, fission product/tritium transport analysis, graphite structure seismic analysis and hydrogen explosion analysis, and they are being verified and validated through a lot of international collaborations

  16. Blanket materials for DT fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the critical materials issues that must be considered in the development of a tritium breeding blanket for a tokamak fusion reactor that operates on the D-T-Li fuel cycle. The primary requirements of the blanket system are identified and the important criteria that must be considered in the development of blanket technology are summarized. The candidate materials are listed for the different blanket components, e.g., breeder, coolant, structure and neutron multiplier. Three blanket concepts that appear to offer the most potential are: (1) liquid-metal breeder/coolant, (2) liquid-metal breeder/separate coolant, and (3) solid breeder/separate coolant. The major uncertainties associated with each of the design concepts are discussed and the key materials R and D requirements for each concept are identified

  17. Thermonuclear reactor materials composed of glassy carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazumata, Yukio.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the durability to plasma radiation by the use of glassy carbon as the structural materials for the first wall and the blanket in thermonuclear devices. Constitution: The glassy carbon (glass-like carbon) is obtained by forming specific organic substances into a predetermined configuration and carbonizing them by heat decomposition under special conditions. They are impermeable carbon material of 1.40 - 1.70 specific gravity, less graphitizable and being almost in isotropic crystal forms in which isotropic structure such as in graphite is scarcely observed. They have an extremely high hardness, are less likely to be damaged when exposed to radiation and have great strength and corrosion resistance. Accordingly, the service life of the reactor walls and the likes can remarkably be increased by using the materials. (Horiuchi, T.)

  18. High temperature humidity sensing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, P.P.; Tanase, S.; Greenblatt, M.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on new proton conducting materials prepared and characterized for potential applications in humidity sensing at temperatures higher than 100 degrees C by complex impedance or galvanic cell type techniques. Calcium metaphosphate, β-Ca(PO 3 ) 2 as a galvanic cell type sensor material yields reproducible signals in the range from 5 to 200 mm Hg water vapor pressure at 578 degrees C, with short response time (∼ 30 sec). Polycrystalline samples of α-Zr(HPO 4 ) 2 and KMo 3 P 5.8 Si 2 O 25 , and the gel converted ceramic, 0.10Li 2 O-0.25P 2 O 5 -0.65SiO 2 as impedance sensor materials show decreases in impedance with increasing humidity in the range from 9 mm Hg to 1 atm water vapor pressure at 179 degrees C

  19. Anaerobic horizontal flow reactor with polyethylene terephthalate as support material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Muñoz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A pilot anaerobic reactor was installed to remove the organic load of wastewater from dairy industry. It uses a bacterial inoculum previously acclimated to the substrate. It was disposed horizontally and filled with pieces of polyethylene terephthalate (PET, from plastic bottles. The reactor was operated at room temperature, during 100 days, in three phases: 1 the reactor was stabilized with volumetric organic load from 0.013 to 0.500 kg/day.m³; 2 the hydraulic retention time was of 1 day and the volumetric organic load of 3 kg/day.m³; 3 the volumetric organic load was incremented from 4 to 6.6 kg/day.m³ and the hydraulic retention time was 1 day. Organic material removal efficiencies was of 85%, and approximately 75% were obtained in the second and third phase, respectively. The Y value was 0.15, indicating that 0.15 kg of biomass were generated by kg of QDO supplied to the reactor. Finally, the biomass generated inside the reactor was analyzed, obtaining a value of 18868 mg/L, which is a higher value than those of conventional systems.

  20. High-temperature reactor developments in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schram, R.P.C.; Cordfunke, E.H.P.; Heek, A.I. van

    1996-01-01

    The high-temperature reactor development in the Netherlands is embedded in the WHITE reactor program, in which several Dutch research institutes and engineering companies participate. The activities within the WHITE program are focused on the development of a small scale HTR for combined heat and power generation. In 1995, design choices for a pebble bed reactor were made at ECN. The first concept HTR will have a closed cycle helium turbine and a power level of 40 MWth. It is intended to make the market introduction of a commercially competitive HTR feasible. As a part of the HTR program at ECN, chemical aspects of HTR fuel and coated particles are studied. Experimental work on the oxidation resistance of coating materials and fission product attack on coating materials as well as thermochemical calculations of the fuel particles are done at ECN. The concept-HTR of ECN is fuelled with UO 2 , but the use of thorium is considered. The composition of the fuel determines the oxygen potential, which plays a key role in chemical safety of the fuel. Thermochemical calculations of the chemical form of cesium inside the HTR fuel particles were performed for a wide oxygen potential range. The chemical form of cesium determines the cesium pressure inside the fuel particle, which in turn determines the release behavior of Cs from defective particles. At normal operating temperatures and low oxygen potentials, the chemical form of cesium is C 60 Cs. It is known that cesium carbon compounds decompose above 650degC in vacuum. The stability of these compounds in the fuel particles at high temperatures(1000-1600degC) is questioned. Decomposition of these compounds may result in high cesium pressures even at normal operating conditions. Experimental work on the thermodynamic properties of cesium compounds at high temperatures is currently performed. (J.P.N.)

  1. A new materials irradiation facility at the Kyoto university reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshiie, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Yanagita, S.; Xu, Q.; Satoh, Y.; Tsujimoto, H.; Kozuka, T.; Kamae, K.; Mishima, K.; Shiroya, S.; Kobayashi, K.; Utsuro, M.; Fujita, Y.

    2003-01-01

    A new materials irradiation facility with improved control capabilities has been installed at the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR). Several deficiencies of conventional fission neutron material irradiation systems have been corrected. The specimen temperature is controlled both by an electric heater and by the helium pressure in the irradiation tube without exposure to neutrons at temperatures different from the design test conditions. The neutron spectrum is varied by the irradiation position. Irradiation dose is changed by pulling the irradiation capsule up and down during irradiation. Several characteristics of the irradiation field were measured. The typical irradiation intensity is 9.4x10 12 n/cm 2 s (>0.1 MeV) and the irradiation temperature of specimens is controllable from 363 to 773 K with a precision of ±2 K

  2. Material for shutting down gas cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, F.

    1977-01-01

    Some disadvantage of conventional emergency shutdown means for nuclear reactors employing a supply of B steel shot or B powder are mentioned. With regard to B powder it is stated that there is some uncertainty as to whether the powder once dispersed into the core will settle in the active part of the core in sufficient quantities to ensure shutdown. The system described aims to avoid these disadvantages. Pellets are provided comprising a solid neutron poison material and a solid organic substance that remains solid at the relatively low temperature normally expected to prevail in the reactor coolant channel away from the reactor core. The organic substance melts at a higher temperature expected to prevail in the coolant channel within the core., and is adherent on melting to the coolant channel wall and to the solid neutron poison, being thus capable of causing adherence of the latter to the coolant channel wall in the reactor core. The pellets are preferably given a moisture resistant coating to prevent them sticking together and to impart free flowing characteristics. The neutron poison may consist of B, Cd, Gd, or their compounds, and for the coating a suitable polymer may be used. Steel filings may be incorporated in the pellets to aid easy flowing under gravity. Examples of manufacture of the pellets are given. (U.K.)

  3. Microwave reactor for utilizing waste materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pigiel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a designed and manufactured, semi-industrial microwave reactor for thermal utilization of asbestos-bearing wastes. Presented are also semi-industrial tests of utilizing such wastes. It was found that microwave heating can be applied for utilizing asbestos with use of suitable wetting agents. The wetting agents should ensure continuous heating process above 600 °C, as well as uniform heat distribution in the whole volume of the utilized material. Analysis of the neutralization process indicates a possibility of presenting specific, efficient and effective process parameters of utilizing some asbestos-bearing industrial wastes.

  4. Irradiation-Accelerated Corrosion of Reactor Core Materials. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Zhujie [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Was, Gary [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bartels, David [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2015-04-02

    This project aims to understand how radiation accelerates corrosion of reactor core materials. The combination of high temperature, chemically aggressive coolants, a high radiation flux and mechanical stress poses a major challenge for the life extension of current light water reactors, as well as the success of most all GenIV concepts. Of these four drivers, the combination of radiation and corrosion places the most severe demands on materials, for which an understanding of the fundamental science is simply absent. Only a few experiments have been conducted to understand how corrosion occurs under irradiation, yet the limited data indicates that the effect is large; irradiation causes order of magnitude increases in corrosion rates. Without a firm understanding of the mechanisms by which radiation and corrosion interact in film formation, growth, breakdown and repair, the extension of the current LWR fleet beyond 60 years and the success of advanced nuclear energy systems are questionable. The proposed work will address the process of irradiation-accelerated corrosion that is important to all current and advanced reactor designs, but remains very poorly understood. An improved understanding of the role of irradiation in the corrosion process will provide the community with the tools to develop predictive models for in-reactor corrosion, and to address specific, important forms of corrosion such as irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking.

  5. Code qualification of structural materials for AFCI advanced recycling reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Li, M.; Majumdar, S.; Nanstad, R.K.; Sham, T.-L. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (ORNL)

    2012-05-31

    This report summarizes the further findings from the assessments of current status and future needs in code qualification and licensing of reference structural materials and new advanced alloys for advanced recycling reactors (ARRs) in support of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The work is a combined effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with ANL as the technical lead, as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for AFCI Reactor Campaign. The report is the second deliverable in FY08 (M505011401) under the work package 'Advanced Materials Code Qualification'. The overall objective of the Advanced Materials Code Qualification project is to evaluate key requirements for the ASME Code qualification and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval of structural materials in support of the design and licensing of the ARR. Advanced materials are a critical element in the development of sodium reactor technologies. Enhanced materials performance not only improves safety margins and provides design flexibility, but also is essential for the economics of future advanced sodium reactors. Code qualification and licensing of advanced materials are prominent needs for developing and implementing advanced sodium reactor technologies. Nuclear structural component design in the U.S. must comply with the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III (Rules for Construction of Nuclear Facility Components) and the NRC grants the operational license. As the ARR will operate at higher temperatures than the current light water reactors (LWRs), the design of elevated-temperature components must comply with ASME Subsection NH (Class 1 Components in Elevated Temperature Service). However, the NRC has not approved the use of Subsection NH for reactor components, and this puts additional burdens on materials qualification of the ARR. In the past licensing review for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project (CRBRP

  6. Platform for high temperature materials (PHiTEM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baluc, N.; Hoffelner, W.; Michler, J.

    2007-01-01

    Advanced energy power systems like Generation IV fission reactors, thermonuclear fusion reactors, solar thermal/solar chemical reactors, gas turbines and coal gasification systems require materials that can operate at high temperatures in extreme environments: irradiation, corrosion, unidirectional and cyclic loads. On the path to development of new and adequate high temperature materials, understanding of damage formation and evolution and of damage effects is indispensable. Damage of materials in components takes place on different time and length scales. Component failure is usually a macroscopic event. Macroscopic material properties and their changes with time (e.g., hardening, creep embrittlement, corrosion) are determined by the micro- to nano-properties of the material. The multi scale is an ambitious and challenging attempt to take these facts into consideration by developing an unified model of the material behaviour. This requires, however, dedicated tools to test and analyse materials on different scales. The platform for high temperatures materials is being set up within the framework of collaboration between the EPFL, the PSI and the EMPA. It has three main goals: 1) Establish a platform that allows the multi scale characterization of relationships between microstructure and mechanical properties of advanced, high temperature materials, with a focus on irradiated, i.e. radioactive, materials, by combining the use of a focused ion beam and a nano indentation device with multi scale modelling and simulations. 2) Use the methods developed and the results gained for existing materials for developing improved high temperature materials to be used in advanced and sustainable future energy power plants. 3) Become an attractive partner for industry by providing a wide knowledge base, flexibility in answering technical questions and skills to better understand damage in already existing plants and to support development of new products at the industrial scale

  7. Temperature and Doppler coefficients of various space nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mughabghab, S.F.; Ludewig, H. Schmidt, E.

    1993-01-01

    Temperature and Doppler feedback effects for a Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) designed to operate as a propulsion reactor are investigated. Several moderator types and compositions fuel enrichments and reactor sizes are considered in this study. From this study it could be concluded that a PBR can be configured which has a negative prompt feedback, zero coolant worth, and a small positive to zero moderator worth. This reactor would put the lowest demands on the control system

  8. Temperature and Doppler Coefficients of Various Space Nuclear Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mughabghab, Said F.; Ludewig, Hans; Schmidt, Eldon

    1994-07-01

    Temperature and Doppler feedback effects for a Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) designed to operate as a propulsion reactor are investigated. Several moderator types and compositions fuel enrichments and reactor sizes are considered in this study. From this study it could be concluded that a PBR can be configured which has a negative prompt feedback, zero coolant worth, and a small positive to zero moderator worth. This reactor would put the lowest demands on the control system.

  9. Thermal Energetic Reactor with High Reproduction of Fission Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir M. Kotov

    2012-01-01

    On the base of thermal reactors with high fission materials reproduction world atomic power engineering development supplying higher power and requiring smaller speed of raw uranium mining, than in the variant with fast reactors, is possible.

  10. Design and safety consideration in the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Shinzo; Tanaka, Toshiuki; Sudo, Yukio; Baba, Osamu; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Okubo, Minoru

    1990-01-01

    The budget for construction of the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) was recently committed by the Government in Japan. The HTTR is a test reactor with thermal output of 30 MW and reactor outlet coolant temperature of 950 deg. C at high temperature test operation. The HTTR plant uses a pin-in-block design core and will be used as an experience leading to high temperature applications. Several major important safety considerations are adopted in the design of the HTTR. These are as follows: 1) A coated particle fuel must not be failed during a normal reactor operation and an anticipated operational occurrence; 2) Two independent and diverse reactor shut-down systems are provided in order to shut down the reactor safely and reliably in any condition; 3) Back-up reactor cooling systems which are safety ones are provided in order to remove residual heat of reactor in any condition; 4) Multiple barriers and countermeasures are provided to contain fission products such as a containment, pressure gradient between the primary and secondary cooling circuit and so on, though coated particle fuels contain fission products with high reliability; 5) The functions of materials used in the primary cooling circuit are separated to be pressure-resisting and heat-resisting in order to resolve material problems and maintain high reliability. The detailed design of the HTTR was completed with extensive accumulation of material data and component tests. (author)

  11. CFD Analysis of the Fuel Temperature in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In, W. K.; Chun, T. H.; Lee, W. J.; Chang, J. H.

    2005-01-01

    High temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) have received a renewed interest as potential sources for future energy needs, particularly for a hydrogen production. Among the HTGRs, the pebble bed reactor (PBR) and a prismatic modular reactor (PMR) are considered as the nuclear heat source in Korea's nuclear hydrogen development and demonstration project. PBR uses coated fuel particles embedded in spherical graphite fuel pebbles. The fuel pebbles flow down through the core during an operation. PMR uses graphite fuel blocks which contain cylindrical fuel compacts consisting of the fuel particles. The fuel blocks also contain coolant passages and locations for absorber and control material. The maximum fuel temperature in the core hot spot is one of the important design parameters for both PBR and PMR. The objective of this study is to predict the fuel temperature distributions in PBR and PMR using a computational fluid dynamics(CFD) code, CFX-5. The reference reactor designs used in this analysis are PBMR400 and GT-MHR600

  12. Materials needs for compact fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    The economic prospects for magnetic fusion energy can be dramatically improved if for the same total power output the fusion neutron first-wall (FW) loading and the system power density can be increased by factors of 3 to 5 and 10 to 30, respectively. A number of compact fusion reactor embodiments have been proposed, all of which would operate with increased FW loadings, would use thin (0.5 to 0.6 m) blankets, and would confine quasi-steady-state plasma with resistive, water-cooled copper or aluminum coils. Increased system power density (5 to 15 MWt/m 3 versus 0.3 to 0.5 MW/m 3 ), considerably reduced physical size of the fusion power core (FPC), and appreciably reduced economic leverage exerted by the FPC and associated physics result. The unique materials requirements anticipated for these compact reactors are outlined against the well documented backdrop provided by similar needs for the mainline approaches. Surprisingly, no single materials need that is unique to the compact systems is identified; crucial uncertainties for the compact approaches must also be addressed by the mainline approaches, particularly for in-vacuum components (FWs, limiters, divertors, etc.)

  13. Isothermal temperature reactivity coefficient measurement in TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagar, T.; Ravnik, M.; Trkov, A.

    2002-01-01

    Direct measurement of an isothermal temperature reactivity coefficient at room temperatures in TRIGA Mark II research reactor at Jozef Stefan Institute in Ljubljana is presented. Temperature reactivity coefficient was measured in the temperature range between 15 o C and 25 o C. All reactivity measurements were performed at almost zero reactor power to reduce or completely eliminate nuclear heating. Slow and steady temperature decrease was controlled using the reactor tank cooling system. In this way the temperatures of fuel, of moderator and of coolant were kept in equilibrium throughout the measurements. It was found out that TRIGA reactor core loaded with standard fuel elements with stainless steel cladding has small positive isothermal temperature reactivity coefficient in this temperature range.(author)

  14. High-temperature-structural design and research and development for reactor system components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Makoto; Hada, Mikio

    1985-01-01

    The design of reactor system components requires high-temperature-structural design guide with the consideration of the creep effect of materials related to research and development on structural design. The high-temperature-structural design guideline for the fast prototype reactor MONJU has been developed under the active leadership by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation and Toshiba has actively participated to this work with responsibility on in-vessel components, performing research and development programs. This paper reports the current status of high-temperature-structural-design-oriented research and development programs and development of analytical system including stress-evaluation program. (author)

  15. Mechanical properties of concrete for power reactor at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawase, Kiyotaka; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Nakano, Masayuki

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the mechanical properties of concrete for power reactor at high temperature. This paper presents the creep behavior of concrete at high temperature and the cause by which a specified aggregate is broken at a specified high temperature. The creep coefficient at high temperature is smaller than that at ordinary temperature. (author)

  16. Fusion reactors-high temperature electrolysis (HTE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    Results of a study to identify and develop a reference design for synfuel production based on fusion reactors are given. The most promising option for hydrogen production was high-temperature electrolysis (HTE). The main findings of this study are: 1. HTE has the highest potential efficiency for production of synfuels from fusion; a fusion to hydrogen energy efficiency of about 70% appears possible with 1800 0 C HTE units and 60% power cycle efficiency; an efficiency of about 50% possible with 1400 0 C HTE units and 40% power cycle efficiency. 2. Relative to thermochemical or direct decomposition methods HTE technology is in a more advanced state of development, 3. Thermochemical or direct decomposition methods must have lower unit process or capital costs if they are to be more attractive than HTE. 4. While design efforts are required, HTE units offer the potential to be quickly run in reverse as fuel cells to produce electricity for restart of Tokamaks and/or provide spinning reserve for a grid system. 5. Because of the short timescale of the study, no detailed economic evaluation could be carried out.A comparison of costs could be made by employing certain assumptions. For example, if the fusion reactor-electrolyzer capital installation is $400/(KW(T) [$1000/KW(E) equivalent], the H 2 energy production cost for a high efficiency (about 70 %) fusion-HTE system is on the same order of magnitude as a coal based SNG plant based on 1976 dollars. 6. The present reference design indicates that a 2000 MW(th) fusion reactor could produce as much at 364 x 10 6 scf/day of hydrogen which is equivalent in heating value to 20,000 barrels/day of gasoline. This would fuel about 500,000 autos based on average driving patterns. 7. A factor of three reduction in coal feed (tons/day) could be achieved for syngas production if hydrogen from a fusion-HTE system were used to gasify coal, as compared to a conventional syngas plant using coal-derived hydrogen

  17. Hydrogen production from high temperature electrolysis and fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, V.D.; Steinberg, J.F.; Issacs, H.S.; Lazareth, O.; Powell, J.R.; Salzano, F.J.

    1978-01-01

    Production of hydrogen from high temperature electrolysis of steam coupled with a fusion reactor is studied. The process includes three major components: the fusion reactor, the high temperature electrolyzer and the power conversion cycle each of which is discussed in the paper. Detailed process design and analysis of the system is examined. A parametric study on the effect of process efficiency is presented

  18. Ultrasonic level and temperature sensor for power reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dress, W.B.; Miller, G.N.

    1983-01-01

    An ultrasonic waveguide employing torsional and extensional acoustic waves has been developed for use as a level and temperature sensor in pressurized and boiling water nuclear power reactors. Features of the device include continuous measurement of level, density, and temperature producing a real-time profile of these parameters along a chosen path through the reactor vessel

  19. Flow inversion and natural convection in a MTR (Materials Testing Reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimenez, M.O.; Clausse, A.

    1990-01-01

    The thermohydraulic evolution of a refrigerating channel of the MTR (Materials Testing Reactors) RA-6 reactor's core, at the Bariloche Atomic Center, has been studied during the transient caused by the primary system's pump decommissioning. This transient constitutes one of the reactor's operating power boundaries due to the maximum temperature permissible in fuel plates. The problem regarding the thermohydraulic code altered for the rectangular geometry calculation characteristic of the MTR design is analyzed. (Author) [es

  20. Materials compatibility considerations for a fusion-fission hybrid reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVan, J.H.; Tortorelli, P.F.

    1983-01-01

    The Tandem Mirror Hybrid Reactor is a fusion reactor concept that incorporates a fission-suppressed breeding blanket for the production of 233 U to be used in conventional fission power reactors. The present paper reports on compatibility considerations related to the blanket design. These considerations include solid-solid interactions and liquid metal corrosion. Potential problems are discussed relative to the reference blanket operating temperature (490 0 C) and the recycling time of breeding materials (<1 year)

  1. Modelling of temperature distribution and pulsations in fast reactor units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushakov, P.A.; Sorokin, A.P.

    1994-01-01

    Reasons for the occurrence of thermal stresses in reactor units have been analyzed. The main reasons for this analysis are: temperature non-uniformity at the output of reactor core and breeder and the ensuing temperature pulsation; temperature pulsations due to mixing of sodium jets of a different temperature; temperature nonuniformity and pulsations resulting from the part of loops (circuits) un-plug; temperature nonuniformity and fluctuations in transient and accidental shut down of reactor or transfer to cooling by natural circulation. The results of investigating the thermal hydraulic characteristics are obtained by modelling the processes mentioned above. Analysis carried out allows the main lines of investigation to be defined and conclusions can be drawn regarding the problem of temperature distribution and fluctuation in fast reactor units

  2. Programmes and projects for high-temperature reactor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogusch, Edgar; Hittner, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    An increasing attention has to be recognised worldwide on the development of High-Temperature Reactors (HTR) which has started in Germany and other countries in the 1970ies. While pebble bed reactors with spherical fuel elements have been developed and constructed in Germany, countries such as France, the US and Russia investigated HTR concepts with prismatic block-type fuel elements. The concept of a modular HTR formerly developed by Areva NP was an essential basis for the HTR-10 in China. A pebble bed HTR for electricity production is developed in South Africa. The construction is planned after the completion of the licensing procedure. Also the US is planning an HTR under the NGNP (Next Generation Nuclear Plant) Project. Due to the high temperature level of the helium coolant, the HTR can be used not only for electricity production but also for supply of process heat. Including its inherent safety features the HTR is an attractive candidate for heat supply to various types of plants e.g. for hydrogen production or coal liquefactions. The conceptual design of an HTR with prismatic fuel elements for the cogeneration of electricity and process heat has been developed by Areva NP. On the European scale the HTR development is promoted by the RAPHAEL (ReActor for Process heat, Hydrogen And ELectricity generation) project. RAPHAEL is an Integrated Project of the Euratom 6th Framework Programme for the development of technologies towards a Very High-Temperature Reactor (VHTR) for the production of electricity and heat. It is financed jointly by the European Commission and the partners of the HTR Technology Network (HTR-TN) and coordinated by Areva NP. The RAPHAEL project not only promotes HTR development but also the cooperation with other European projects such as the material programme EXTREMAT. Furthermore HTR technology is investigated in the frame of Generation IV International Forum (GIF). The development of a VHTR with helium temperatures above 900 C for the

  3. Advanced High Temperature Reactor Systems and Economic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL

    2011-09-01

    The Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a design concept for a large-output [3400 MW(t)] fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR). FHRs, by definition, feature low-pressure liquid fluoride salt cooling, coated-particle fuel, a high-temperature power cycle, and fully passive decay heat rejection. The AHTR's large thermal output enables direct comparison of its performance and requirements with other high output reactor concepts. As high-temperature plants, FHRs can support either high-efficiency electricity generation or industrial process heat production. The AHTR analysis presented in this report is limited to the electricity generation mission. FHRs, in principle, have the potential to be low-cost electricity producers while maintaining full passive safety. However, no FHR has been built, and no FHR design has reached the stage of maturity where realistic economic analysis can be performed. The system design effort described in this report represents early steps along the design path toward being able to predict the cost and performance characteristics of the AHTR as well as toward being able to identify the technology developments necessary to build an FHR power plant. While FHRs represent a distinct reactor class, they inherit desirable attributes from other thermal power plants whose characteristics can be studied to provide general guidance on plant configuration, anticipated performance, and costs. Molten salt reactors provide experience on the materials, procedures, and components necessary to use liquid fluoride salts. Liquid metal reactors provide design experience on using low-pressure liquid coolants, passive decay heat removal, and hot refueling. High temperature gas-cooled reactors provide experience with coated particle fuel and graphite components. Light water reactors (LWRs) show the potentials of transparent, high-heat capacity coolants with low chemical reactivity. Modern coal-fired power plants provide design experience

  4. Containment for low temperature district nuclear-heating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Shuyan; Dong Duo

    1992-03-01

    Integral arrangement is adopted for Low Temperature District Nuclear-heating Reactor. Primary heat exchangers, control rod drives and spent fuel elements are put in the reactor pressure vessel together with reactor core. Primary coolant flows through reactor core and primary heat exchangers in natural circulation. Primary coolant pipes penetrating the wall of reactor pressure vessel are all of small diameters. The reactor vessel constitutes the main part of pressure boundary of primary coolant. Therefore the small sized metallic containment closed to the wall of reactor vessel can be used for the reactor. Design principles and functions of the containment are as same as the containment for PWR. But the adoption of small sized containment brings about some benefits such as short period of manufacturing, relatively low cost, and easy for sealing. Loss of primary coolant accident would not be happened during the rupture accident of primary coolant pressure boundary inside the containment owing to its intrinsic safety

  5. Swelling of structural materials in fast neutron reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seran, J.L.

    1983-06-01

    The physical origin of swelling in irradiated materials and the main parameters acting on swelling of SS 316 are examined: temperature, neutron dose, dose rate, chemical composition, strain hardening. Results obtained, in Rapsodie and Phenix reactors, with fuel cans and with the hexagonal tube containing the fuel pins are analyzed and compared with results found in litterature. In conclusion hot swelling of SS 316 is too important at high doses and is will be replaced by austenitic steels stabilized by Ti and ferritic steels or high nickel steels with structural hardening [fr

  6. Positron annihilation studies on structural materials for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajaraman, R.; Amarendra, G.; Sundar, C.S.

    2012-01-01

    Structural steels for nuclear reactors have renewed interest owing to the future advanced fission reactor design with increased burn-up goals as well as for fusion reactor applications. While modified austenitic steels continue to be the main cladding materials for fast breeder reactors, Ferritic/martensitic steels and oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels are the candidate materials for future reactors applications in India. Sensitivity and selectivity of positron annihilation spectroscopy to open volume type defects and nano clusters have been extensively utilized in studying reactor materials. We have recently reviewed the application of positron techniques to reactor structural steels. In this talk, we will present successful application of positron annihilation spectroscopy to probe various structural materials such as D9, ferritic/martensitic, oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels and related model alloys, highlighting our recent studies. (author)

  7. The temperature distribution in a gas core fission reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoogenboom, J.E.; Dam, H. van; Kuijper, J.C. (Interuniversitair Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands)); Kistemaker, J.; Boersma-Klein, W.; Vitalis, F. (FOM-Instituut voor Atoom-en Molecuulfysica, Amsterdam (Netherlands))

    1991-01-01

    A model is proposed for the heat transport in a nuclear reactor with gaseous fuel at high temperatures taking into account radiative and kinetic heat transfer. A derivation is given of the equation determining the temperature distribution in a gas core reactor and different numerical solution methods are discussed in detail. Results are presented of the temperature distribution. The influence of the kinetic heat transport and of dissociation of the gas molecules is shown. Also discussed is the importance of the temperature gradient at the reactor wall and its dependence on system parameters. (author).

  8. The temperature distribution in a gas core fission reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogenboom, J.E.; Dam, H. van; Kuijper, J.C.; Kistemaker, J.; Boersma-Klein, W.; Vitalis, F.

    1991-01-01

    A model is proposed for the heat transport in a nuclear reactor with gaseous fuel at high temperatures taking into account radiative and kinetic heat transfer. A derivation is given of the equation determining the temperature distribution in a gas core reactor and different numerical solution methods are discussed in detail. Results are presented of the temperature distribution. The influence of the kinetic heat transport and of dissociation of the gas molecules is shown. Also discussed is the importance of the temperature gradient at the reactor wall and its dependence on system parameters. (author)

  9. Preliminary Demonstration Reactor Point Design for the Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qualls, A. L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Betzler, Benjamin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brown, Nicholas R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Carbajo, Juan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Greenwood, Michael Scott [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hale, Richard Edward [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Harrison, Thomas J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrell, Jerry W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Development of the Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor (FHR) Demonstration Reactor (DR) is a necessary intermediate step to enable commercial FHR deployment through disruptive and rapid technology development and demonstration. The FHR DR will utilize known, mature technology to close remaining gaps to commercial viability. Lower risk technologies are included in the initial FHR DR design to ensure that the reactor can be built, licensed, and operated within an acceptable budget and schedule. These technologies include tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel, replaceable core structural material, the use of that same material for the primary and intermediate loops, and tube-and-shell heat exchangers. This report provides an update on the development of the FHR DR. At this writing, the core neutronics and thermal hydraulics have been developed and analyzed. The mechanical design details are still under development and are described to their current level of fidelity. It is anticipated that the FHR DR can be operational within 10 years because of the use of low-risk, near-term technology options.

  10. Preliminary Demonstration Reactor Point Design for the Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qualls, A. L.; Betzler, Benjamin R.; Brown, Nicholas R.; Carbajo, Juan; Greenwood, Michael Scott; Hale, Richard Edward; Harrison, Thomas J.; Powers, Jeffrey J.; Robb, Kevin R.; Terrell, Jerry W.

    2015-01-01

    Development of the Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor (FHR) Demonstration Reactor (DR) is a necessary intermediate step to enable commercial FHR deployment through disruptive and rapid technology development and demonstration. The FHR DR will utilize known, mature technology to close remaining gaps to commercial viability. Lower risk technologies are included in the initial FHR DR design to ensure that the reactor can be built, licensed, and operated within an acceptable budget and schedule. These technologies include tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel, replaceable core structural material, the use of that same material for the primary and intermediate loops, and tube-and-shell heat exchangers. This report provides an update on the development of the FHR DR. At this writing, the core neutronics and thermal hydraulics have been developed and analyzed. The mechanical design details are still under development and are described to their current level of fidelity. It is anticipated that the FHR DR can be operational within 10 years because of the use of low-risk, near-term technology options.

  11. Very high temperature measurements: Applications to nuclear reactor safety tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parga, Clemente-Jose

    2013-01-01

    This PhD dissertation focuses on the improvement of very high temperature thermometry (1100 deg. C to 2480 deg. C), with special emphasis on the application to the field of nuclear reactor safety and severe accident research. Two main projects were undertaken to achieve this objective: - The development, testing and transposition of high-temperature fixed point (HTFP) metal-carbon eutectic cells, from metrology laboratory precision (±0.001 deg. C) to applied research with a reasonable degradation of uncertainties (±3-5 deg. C). - The corrosion study and metallurgical characterization of Type-C thermocouple (service temp. 2300 deg. C) prospective sheath material was undertaken to extend the survivability of TCs used for molten metallic/oxide corium thermometry (below 2000 deg. C)

  12. Low Temperature Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The embrittlement trend curve development project for HFIR reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels was carried out with three major tasks. Which are (1) data collection to match that used in HFIR steel embrittlement trend published in 1994 Journal Nuclear Material by Remec et. al, (2) new embrittlement data of A212B steel that are not included in earlier HFIR RPV trend curve, and (3) the adjustment of nil-ductility-transition temperature (NDTT) shift data with the consideration of the irradiation temperature effect. An updated HFIR RPV steel embrittlement trend curve was developed, as described below. NDTT( C) = 23.85 log(x) + 203.3 log (x) + 434.7, with 2- uncertainty of 34.6 C, where parameter x is referred to total dpa. The developed update HFIR RPV embrittlement trend curve has higher embrittlement rate compared to that of the trend curve developed in 1994.

  13. Correlation of electrical reactor cable failure with materials degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuetzer, O.M.

    1986-03-01

    Complete circuit failure (shortout) of electrical cables typically used in nuclear power plant containments is investigated. Failure modes are correlated with the mechanical deterioration of the elastomeric cable materials. It is found that for normal reactor operation, electrical cables are reliable and safe over very long periods. During high temperature excursions, however, cables pulled across corners under high stress may short out due to conductor creep. Severe cracking will occur in short times during high temperatures (>150/sup 0/C) and in times of the order of years at elevated temperatures (100/sup 0/C to 140/sup 0/C). A theoretical treatment of stress distribution responsible for creep and for cracking by J.E. Reaugh of Science Applications, Inc. is contained in the Appendix. 29 refs., 32 figs.

  14. Correlation of electrical reactor cable failure with materials degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuetzer, O.M.

    1986-03-01

    Complete circuit failure (shortout) of electrical cables typically used in nuclear power plant containments is investigated. Failure modes are correlated with the mechanical deterioration of the elastomeric cable materials. It is found that for normal reactor operation, electrical cables are reliable and safe over very long periods. During high temperature excursions, however, cables pulled across corners under high stress may short out due to conductor creep. Severe cracking will occur in short times during high temperatures (>150 0 C) and in times of the order of years at elevated temperatures (100 0 C to 140 0 C). A theoretical treatment of stress distribution responsible for creep and for cracking by J.E. Reaugh of Science Applications, Inc. is contained in the Appendix. 29 refs., 32 figs

  15. Blanket materials for fusion reactors: comparisons of thermochemical performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.E.; Fischer, A.K.; Tetenbaum, M.

    1984-01-01

    Thermodynamic calculations have been made to predict the thermochemical performance of the fusion reactor breeder materials, Li 2 O, LiAlO 2 , and Li 4 SiO 4 in the temperature range 900 to 1300 0 K and in the oxygen activity range 10 -25 to 10 -5 . Except for a portion of these ranges, the performance of LiAlO 2 is predicted to be better than that of Li 2 O and Li 4 SiO 4 . The protium purge technique for enhancing tritium release is explored for the Li 2 O system; it appears advantageous at higher temperatures but should be used cautiously at lower temperatures. Oxygen activity is an important variable in these systems and must be considered in executing and interpreting measurements on rates of tritium release, the form of released tritium, diffusion of tritiated species and their identities, retention of tritium in the condensed phase, and solubility of hydrogen isotope gases

  16. Material choices for the commercial fast reactor steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willby, C.; Walters, J.

    1978-01-01

    Experience with fast reactor steam generators has shown them to be critical components in achieving a high availability. This paper presents the designers views on the use of ferritic materials for steam generators and describes the proposed design of the steam generators for the Commercial Fast Reactor (CFR), prototype of which are to be inserted in the Prototype Fast Reactor at Dounreay. (author)

  17. Material Science Activities for Fusion Reactors in Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tazhibayeva, I.; Kenzhin, E.; Kulsartov, T.; Shestakov, V.; Chikhray, Y.; Azizov, E.; Filatov, O.; Chernov, V.M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Paper contains results of fusion material testing national program and results of activities on creation of material testing spherical tokamak. Hydrogen isotope behavior (diffusion, permeation, and accumulation) in the components of the first wall and divertor was studied taking into account temperature, pressure, and reactor irradiation. There were carried out out-of-pile and in-pile (reactors IVG-IM, WWRK, RA) studies of beryllium of various grades (TV-56, TShG-56, DV-56, TGP-56, TIP-56), graphites (RG-T, MPG-8, FP 479, R 4340), molybdenum, tungsten, steels (Cr18Ni10Ti, Cr16Ni15, MANET, F82H), alloys V-(4-6)Cr-( 4-5)Ti, Cu+1%Cr+0.1%Zr, and double Be/Cu and triple Be/Cu/steel structures. Tritium permeability from eutectic Pb+17%Li through steels Cr18Ni10Ti, Cr16Ni15, MANET, and F82H were studied taking into account protective coating effects. The tritium production rate was experimentally assessed during in-pile and post-reactor experiments. There were carried out radiation tests of ceramic Li 2 TiO 3 (96% enrichment by Li-6) with in-situ registration of released tritium and following post-irradiation material tests of irradiated samples. Verification of computer codes for simulation of accidents related to LOCA in ITER reactor was carried out. Codes' verification was carried out for a mockup of first wall in a form of three-layer cylinder of beryllium, bronze (Cu-Cr-Zr) and stainless steel. At present Kazakhstan Tokamak for Material testing (tokamak KTM) is created in National Nuclear Center of Republic of Kazakhstan in cooperation with Russian Federation organizations (start-up is scheduled on 2008). Tokamak KTM allows for expansion and specification of the studies and tests of materials, protection options of first wall, receiving divertor tiles and divertor components, methods for load reduction at divertor, and various options of heat/power removal, fast evacuation of divertor volume and development of the techniques for

  18. The analysis for inventory of experimental reactor high temperature gas reactor type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sri Kuntjoro; Pande Made Udiyani

    2016-01-01

    Relating to the plan of the National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN) to operate an experimental reactor of High Temperature Gas Reactors type (RGTT), it is necessary to reactor safety analysis, especially with regard to environmental issues. Analysis of the distribution of radionuclides from the reactor into the environment in normal or abnormal operating conditions starting with the estimated reactor inventory based on the type, power, and operation of the reactor. The purpose of research is to analyze inventory terrace for Experimental Power Reactor design (RDE) high temperature gas reactor type power 10 MWt, 20 MWt and 30 MWt. Analyses were performed using ORIGEN2 computer code with high temperatures cross-section library. Calculation begins with making modifications to some parameter of cross-section library based on the core average temperature of 570 °C and continued with calculations of reactor inventory due to RDE 10 MWt reactor power. The main parameters of the reactor 10 MWt RDE used in the calculation of the main parameters of the reactor similar to the HTR-10 reactor. After the reactor inventory 10 MWt RDE obtained, a comparison with the results of previous researchers. Based upon the suitability of the results, it make the design for the reactor RDE 20MWEt and 30 MWt to obtain the main parameters of the reactor in the form of the amount of fuel in the pebble bed reactor core, height and diameter of the terrace. Based on the main parameter or reactor obtained perform of calculation to get reactor inventory for RDE 20 MWT and 30 MWT with the same methods as the method of the RDE 10 MWt calculation. The results obtained are the largest inventory of reactor RDE 10 MWt, 20 MWt and 30 MWt sequentially are to Kr group are about 1,00E+15 Bq, 1,20E+16 Bq, 1,70E+16 Bq, for group I are 6,50E+16 Bq, 1,20E+17 Bq, 1,60E+17 Bq and for groups Cs are 2,20E+16 Bq, 2,40E+16 Bq, 2,60E+16 Bq. Reactor inventory will then be used to calculate the reactor source term and it

  19. Investigation of high temperature phase stability, thermal properties and evaluation of metallurgical compatibility with 304L stainless steel, of indigenously developed ferroboron alternate shielding material for fast reactor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Arun Kumar [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Raju, S., E-mail: sraju@igcar.gov.in [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Jeya Ganesh, B. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Panneerselvam, G. [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Vijayalakshmi, M.; Jayakumar, T. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Raj, Baldev [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > High temperature phase stability and metallurgical compatibility of indigenous Ferro boron alloy (17 wt.%) with 304L SS have been evaluated using calorimetry, metallography and X-ray diffraction. > Fe-B is stable upto 1227 deg. C without any phase transformation. > In combination with SS 304L, it develops an eutectic reaction at 1198 deg. C. > High temperature metallurgical interaction between Ferroboron and 304L SS clad has been simulated for temperatures 550-800 deg. C for reaction times up to 5000 h, using diffusion couple. > Clad penetration depth with time follows a paraobolic rate law. - Abstract: Towards the cause of serving economic power production through fast reactors, it is necessary to bring in functionally more efficient and innovative design options, which also includes exploration of cheaper material alternatives, wherever possible. In this regard, the feasibility of using a commercial grade ferroboron alloy as potential alternate shielding material in the outer subassemblies of future Indian fast reactors has been recently investigated from shielding physics point of view. The present study explores in detail the high temperature thermal stability and the metallurgical compatibility of Fe-15.4B-0.3C-0.89Si-0.17Al-0.006S-0.004P-0.003O (wt.%) alloy with SS 304L material. In addition, the high temperature specific heat and lattice thermal expansion characteristics of this alloy have also been investigated as a part of the present comprehensive characterisation program. The Fe-15 wt.%B alloy is constituted of principally of two boride phases, namely tetragonal Fe{sub 2}B and orthorhombic FeB phases, which in addition to boron also contains some amount of C and Si dissolved in solid solution form. This Fe-B alloy undergoes a series of phase transformation as a function of increasing temperature; the major ones among them are the dissolution of Fe{sub 2}B-lower boride in the matrix through a eutectic type reaction, which results in the

  20. Operating experience with the DRAGON High Temperature Reactor experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, R.A.; Capp, P.D.

    2002-01-01

    The Dragon Reactor Experiment in Winfrith/UK was a materials test facility for a number of HTR projects pursued in the sixties and seventies of the last century. It was built and managed as an OECD/NEA international joint undertaking. The reactor operated successfully between 1964 and 1975 to satisfy the growing demand for irradiation testing of fuels and fuel elements as well as for technological tests of components and materials. The paper describes the reactor's main experimental features and presents results of 11 years of reactor operation relevant for future HTRs. (author)

  1. Irradiation creep experiments on fusion reactor candidate structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausen, H.; Cundy, M.R.; Schuele, W.

    1991-01-01

    Irradiation creep rates were determined for annealed and cold-worked AMCR- and 316-type steel alloys in the high flux reactor at Petten, for various irradiation temperatures, stresses and for neutron doses up to 4 dpa. Primary creep elongations were found in all annealed materials. A negative creep elongation was found in cold-worked materials for stresses equal to or below about 100 MPa. An increase of the negative creep elongation is found for decreasing irradiation temperatures and decreasing applied stresses. The stress exponent of the irradiation creep rate in annealed and cold-worked AMCR alloys is n = 1.85 and n = 1.1, respectively. The creep rates of cold-worked AMCR alloys are almost temperature independent over the range investigated (573-693 K). The results obtained in the HFR at Petten are compared with those obtained in ORR and EBR II. The smallest creep rates are found for cold-worked materials of AMCR- and US-PCA-type at Petten which are about a factor two smaller than the creep rates obtained of US-316 at Petten or for US-PCA at ORR or for 316L at EBR II. The scatter band factor for US-PCA, 316L, US-316 irradiated in ORR and EBR II is about 1.5 after a temperature and damage rate normalization

  2. Optimization of the Neutronics of the Advanced High Temperature Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakova, Jitka; Talamo, Alberto

    2006-01-01

    In these studies, we have investigated the neutronic and safety performance of the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) for plutonium and uranium fuels and we extended the analysis to five different coolants. The AHTR is a graphite-moderated and molten salt-cooled high temperature reactor, which takes advantage of the TRISO particles technology for the fuel utilization. The conceptual design of the core, proposed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, aims to provide an alternative to helium as coolant of high-temperature reactors for industrial applications like hydrogen production. We evaluated the influence of the radial reflector on the criticality of the core for the uranium and plutonium fuels and we focused on the void coefficient of 5 different molten salts; since the safety of the reactor is enhanced also by the large and negative coefficient of temperature, we completed our investigation by observing the keff changes when the graphite temperature varies from 300 to 1800 K. (authors)

  3. Reactor Structure Materials: Corrosion of Reactor Core Internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dyck, S.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's R and D programme on the corrosion of reactor core internals are: (1) to gain mechanistic insight into the Irradition Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) phenomenon by studying the influence of separate parameters in well controlled experiments; (2) to develop and validate a predictive capability on IASCC by model description and (3) to define and validate countermeasures and monitoring techniques for application in reactors. Progress and achievements in 1999 are described

  4. Conceptual designs for advanced, high-temperature CANDU reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bushby, S.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Corrosion and Surface Science Branch, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Dimmick, G.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Fuel Channel Thermmalhydraulics Branch, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Duffey, R.B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Principal Scientist, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, On (Canada); Spinks, N.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Researcher Emeritus, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Burrill, K.A. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Chan, P.S.W. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Reactor Core Physics Branch, Mississauga, ON (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    AECL is studying advanced reactor concepts with the aim of significant cost reduction through improved thermodynamic efficiency and plant simplification. The program, generically called CANDU-X, also incorporates enhanced safety features, and flexible, proliferation-resistant fuel cycles, whilst retaining the fundamental design characteristics of CANDU: neutron economy, horizontal fuel channels, and a separate D{sub 2}O moderator that provides a passive heat sink. Where possible, proven, existing components and materials would be adopted, so that 'first-of-a-kind' costs and uncertainties are avoided. Three reactor concepts ranging in output from {approx}375 MW(e) to 1150 MW(e) are described. The modular design of a pressure tube reactor allows the plant size for each concept to be tailored to a given market through the addition or removal of fuel channels. Each concept uses supercritical water as the coolant at a nominal pressure of 25 MPa. Core outlet temperatures range from {approx}400degC to 625degC, resulting in substantial improvements in thermodynamic efficiencies compared to current nuclear stations. The CANDU-X Mark 1 concept is an extension of the present CANDU design. An indirect cycle is employed, but efficiency is increased due to higher coolant temperature, and changes to the secondary side; as well, the size and number of pumps and steam generators are reduced. Safety is enhanced through facilitation of thermo-siphoning of decay heat by increasing the temperature of the moderator. The CANDU-X NC concept is also based on an indirect cycle, but natural convection is used to circulate the primary coolant. This approach enhances cycle efficiency and safety, and is viable for reactors operating near the pseudo-critical temperature of water because of large changes in heat capacity and thermal expansion in that region. In the third concept (CANDUal-X), a dual cycle is employed. Supercritical water exits the core and feeds directly into a very high

  5. Secret high-temperature reactor concept for inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monsler, M.J.; Meier, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    The goal of our SCEPTRE project was to create an advanced second-generation inertial fusion reactor that offers the potential for either of the following: (1) generating electricity at 50% efficiency, (2) providing high temperature heat (850 0 C) for hydrogen production, or (3) producing fissile fuel for light-water reactors. We have found that these applications are conceptually feasible with a reactor that is intrinsically free of the hazards of catastrophic fire or tritium release

  6. Reactor materials research as an effective instrument of nuclear reactor perfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baryshnikov, M.

    2006-01-01

    The work is devoted to reactor materiology, as to the practical tool of nuclear reactor development. The work is illustrated with concrete examples from activity experience of the appropriate division of the Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute - Institute of Reactor Materials Research and Radiation Nanotechnologies. Besides the description of some modern potentials of the mentioned institute is given. (author)

  7. Development of high temperature gas cooled reactor in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Wentao [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland). Dept. of Nuclear Energy and Safety; Schorer, Michael [Swiss Nuclear Forum, Olten (Switzerland)

    2018-02-15

    High temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) is one of the six Generation IV reactor types put forward by Generation IV International Forum (GIF) in 2002. This type of reactor has high outlet temperature. It uses Helium as coolant and graphite as moderator. Pebble fuel and ceramic reactor core are adopted. Inherit safety, good economy, high generating efficiency are the advantages of HTGR. According to the comprehensive evaluation from the international nuclear community, HTGR has already been given the priority to the research and development for commercial use. A demonstration project of the High Temperature Reactor-Pebble-�bed Modules (HTR-PM) in Shidao Bay nuclear power plant in China is under construction. In this paper, the development history of HTGR in China and the current situation of HTR-PM will be introduced. The experiences from China may be taken as a reference by the international nuclear community.

  8. Structural instabilities of high temperature alloys and their use in advanced high temperature gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, H.; Ennis, P.J.; Nickel, H.; Czyrska-Filemonowicz, A.

    1989-01-01

    High-temperature, iron-nickel and nickel based alloys are the candidate heat exchanger materials for advanced high temperature gas-cooled reactors supplying process heat for coal gasification, where operation temperatures can reach 850-950 deg. C and service lives of more than 100,000 h are necessary. In the present paper, typical examples of structural changes which occur in two representative alloys (Alloy 800 H, Fe-32Ni-20Cr and Alloy 617, Ni-22Cr-12Co-9Mo-1Al) during high temperature exposure will be given and the effects on the creep rupture properties discussed. At service temperatures, precipitation of carbides occurs which has a significant effect on the creep behaviour, especially in the early stages of creep when the precipitate particles are very fine. During coarsening of the carbides, carbides at grain boundaries restrict grain boundary sliding which retards the development of creep damage. In the service environments, enhanced carbide precipitation may occur due to the ingress of carbon from the environment (carburization). Although the creep rate is not adversely affected, the ductility of the carburized material at low and intermediate temperatures is very low. During simulated service exposures, the formation of surface corrosion scales, the precipitation of carbides and the formation of internal oxides below the surface leads to depletion of the matrix in the alloying elements involved in the corrosion processes. In thin-walled tubes the depletion of Cr due to Cr 2 O 3 formation on the surface can lead to a loss of creep strength. An additional depletion effect resulting from environmental-metal reactions is the loss of carbon (decarburization) which may occur in specific environments. The compositions of the cooling gases which decarburize the material have been determined; they are to be avoided during reactor operation

  9. Proposal of world network on material testing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemoto, Noriyuki; Izumo, Hironobu; Hori, Naohiko; Ishitsuka, Etsuo; Ishihara, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    Establishment of an international cooperation system of worldwide testing reactor network (world network) is proposed in order to achieve efficient facility utilization and provide high quality irradiation data by role sharing of irradiation tests with materials testing reactors in the world. As for the first step, mutual understanding among materials testing reactors is thought to be necessary. From this point, an international symposium on materials testing reactors (ISMTR) was held to construct the world network from 2008, and a common understanding of world network has begun to be shared. (author)

  10. Thermal Energetic Reactor with High Reproduction of Fission Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotov, V.M.

    2012-01-01

    Existing thermal reactors are energy production scale limited because of low portion of raw uranium usage. Fast reactors are limited by reprocessing need of huge mass of raw uranium at the initial stage of development. The possibility of development of thermal reactors with high fission materials reproduction, which solves the problem, is discussed here. Neutron losses are decreased, uranium-thorium fuel with artificial fission materials equilibrium regime is used, additional in-core and out-core neutron sources are used for supplying of high fission materials reproduction. Liquid salt reactors can use dynamic loading regime for this purpose. Preferable construction is channel type reactor with heavy water moderator. Good materials for fuel element shells and channel walls are zirconium alloys enriched by 90Zr. Water cooled reactors with usage 12% of raw uranium and liquid metal cooled reactors with usage 25% of raw uranium are discussed. Reactors with additional neutron sources obtain full usage of raw uranium with small additional energy expenses. On the base of thermal reactors with high fission materials reproduction world atomic power engineering development supplying higher power and requiring smaller speed of raw uranium mining, than in the variant with fast reactors, is possible.

  11. Pressurized water reactor simulator. Workshop material. 2. ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established an activity in nuclear reactor simulation computer programs to assist its Member States in education. The objective is to provide, for a variety of advanced reactor types, insight and practice in their operational characteristics and their response to perturbations and accident situations. To achieve this, the IAEA arranges for the development and distribution of simulation programs and educational material and sponsors courses and workshops. The workshops are in two parts: techniques and tools for reactor simulator development. And the use of reactor simulators in education. Workshop material for the first part is covered in the IAEA Training Course Series No. 12, 'Reactor Simulator Development' (2001). Course material for workshops using a WWER- 1000 reactor department simulator from the Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, the Russian Federation is presented in the IAEA Training Course Series No. 21, 2nd edition, 'WWER-1000 Reactor Simulator' (2005). Course material for workshops using a boiling water reactor simulator developed for the IAEA by Cassiopeia Technologies Incorporated of Canada (CTI) is presented in the IAEA publication: Training Course Series No.23, 2nd edition, 'Boiling Water Reactor Simulator' (2005). This report consists of course material for workshops using a pressurized water reactor simulator

  12. Production of energy in a high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The cooling gas having left the reactor core is fed to a generator for direct production of current from the kinetic energy. Afterwards the gas is fed to a heat exchanger for cooling, then compressed and refed to the reactor core. The method further comprises that one part of the energy of the fission material is directly converted to electric energy in the reactor core, whereas the other part of the energy of the fission material is impressed upon the cooling gas. According to the invention the cooling gas when entering the reactor is first fed to that part of the reactor core which serves as a thermoionic or thermoelectric transducer. Afterwards the cooling gas is fed to the remaining part of the reactor gas. (P.K.)

  13. Potential market and characteristics of low-temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerouge, B.

    1975-01-01

    The low-temperature (100 to 200 deg C) heat market for industrial applications and district heating is very important. Two main studies have been developed: a swimming pool reactor delivering water at 110 deg C and a prestressed concrete vessel reactor delivering water at 200 deg C [fr

  14. The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) for Producing Hydrogen to Manufacture Liquid Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Peterson, P.F.; Ott, L.

    2004-01-01

    Conventional world oil production is expected to peak within a decade. Shortfalls in production of liquid fuels (gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) from conventional oil sources are expected to be offset by increased production of fuels from heavy oils and tar sands that are primarily located in the Western Hemisphere (Canada, Venezuela, the United States, and Mexico). Simultaneously, there is a renewed interest in liquid fuels from biomass, such as alcohol; but, biomass production requires fertilizer. Massive quantities of hydrogen (H2) are required (1) to convert heavy oils and tar sands to liquid fuels and (2) to produce fertilizer for production of biomass that can be converted to liquid fuels. If these liquid fuels are to be used while simultaneously minimizing greenhouse emissions, nonfossil methods for the production of H2 are required. Nuclear energy can be used to produce H2. The most efficient methods to produce H2 from nuclear energy involve thermochemical cycles in which high-temperature heat (700 to 850 C) and water are converted to H2 and oxygen. The peak nuclear reactor fuel and coolant temperatures must be significantly higher than the chemical process temperatures to transport heat from the reactor core to an intermediate heat transfer loop and from the intermediate heat transfer loop to the chemical plant. The reactor temperatures required for H2 production are at the limits of practical engineering materials. A new high-temperature reactor concept is being developed for H2 and electricity production: the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR). The fuel is a graphite-matrix, coated-particle fuel, the same type that is used in modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (MHTGRs). The coolant is a clean molten fluoride salt with a boiling point near 1400 C. The use of a liquid coolant, rather than helium, reduces peak reactor fuel and coolant temperatures 100 to 200 C relative to those of a MHTGR. Liquids are better heat transfer fluids than gases

  15. Temperature variation of criticality of thermal reactor lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velner, S.; Rothenstein, W.

    1975-01-01

    Departures from the asymptotic mode in the experimental setup have been examined in detail for two assemblies, one exponential, the other critical. It was found that the flux shape differed noticeably from the asymptotic mode in the core region especially for the exponential assemblies. On the other hand the departure from the fundamental mode has very little effect on the change of material buckling with temperature. Results of the calculations and their comparison with experiment are presented. The variation of material buckling with temperature is the same for ENDF/B-II and for ENDF/B-IV data, both for asymptotic reactor theory and for the buckling values derived from the flux calculated with the SN code. The results obtained with ENDF/B-IV data for both lattices are shown. In the small exponential assembly the results derived from S-4 calculations are compared with experiment. In the critical assembly the ratio of U-238 to U-235 fissions delta 28 and the relative conversion ratio - the ratio of U-238 captures to U-235 fissions in the lattice compared with the same quantity in a thermal column - are also shown. In both cases the experimental change of buckling with temperature is smaller than the calculated change. (B.G.)

  16. Overview of environmental materials degradation in light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaaban, H.I.; Wu, P.

    1986-08-01

    This report provides a brief overview of analyses and conclusions reported in published literature regarding environmentally induced degradation of materials in operating light-water reactors. It is intended to provide a synopsis of subjects of concern rather than to address a licensing basis for any newly discovered problems related to reactor materials

  17. Mechanical Property and Its Comparison of Superalloys for High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo Gon; Kim, D. W.; Ryu, W. S.; Han, C. H.; Yoon, J. H.; Chang, J.

    2005-01-01

    Since structural materials for high temperature gas cooled reactor are used during long period in nuclear environment up to 1000 .deg. C, it is important to have good properties at elevated temperature such as mechanical properties (tensile, creep, fatigue, creep-fatigue), microstructural stability, interaction between metal and gas, friction and wear, hydrogen and tritium permeation, irradiation behavior, corrosion by impurity in He. Thus, in order to select excellent materials for the high temperature gas cooled reactor, it is necessary to understand the material properties and to gather the data for them. In this report, the items related to material properties which are needed for designing the high temperature gas cooled reactor were presented. Mechanical properties; tensile, creep, and fatigue etc. were investigated for Haynes 230, Hastelloy-X, In 617 and Alloy 800H, which can be used as the major structural components, such as intermediate heat exchanger (IHX), hot duct and piping and internals. Effect of He and irradiation on these structural materials was investigated. Also, mechanical properties; physical properties, tensile properties, creep and creep crack growth rate were compared for them, respectively. These results of this report can be used as important data to select superior materials for high temperature gas reactor

  18. Corrosion degradation of materials in nuclear reactors and its control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kain, Vivekanand

    2016-01-01

    As in every industry, nuclear industry also faces the challenge of corrosion degradation due to the exposure of the materials to the working environment. The aggressiveness of the environment is enhanced by the presence of radiation and high temperature and high-pressure environment. Radiation has influence on both the materials (changes in microstructure and microchemistry) and the aqueous environment (radiolysis producing oxidizing conditions). A survey of all the light water reactors in the world showed that stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) account for more than two third of all the corrosion degradation cases. This paper visits these two forms of corrosion in nuclear power plants and illustrates cases from Indian nuclear power plants. Remedial measures against these two forms of corrosion that are possible to be employed and the actual measures employed in Indian nuclear power plants are discussed. Key features of SCC in different types of nuclear power plants are discussed. Main reasons for irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) are presented and discussed. The signature patterns of single and dual phase FAC captured from components replaced from Indian nuclear power plants are presented. The development of a correlation between the scallop size and rate of single phase FAC - based on the database developed in Indian nuclear power plants is presented. Based on these two forms of degradation in nuclear reactors, design of materials that would resist these forms of degradation is presented. (author)

  19. Study on Material Selection of Reactor Pressure Vessel of SCWR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shuli; Luo, Ying; Yin, Qinwei; Li, Changxiang; Xie, Guofu

    This paper first analyzes the feasibility of SA-508 Grade 3 Class 1 Steel as an alternative material for Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR) Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). This kind of steel is limited to be applied in SCWR RPV due to its quenching property, though large forging could be accomplished by domestic manufacturers in forging aspect. Therefore, steels with higher strength and better quenching property are needed for SWCR RPV. The chemical component of SA-508 Gr.3 Cl.2 steel is similar to that of SA-508 Gr.3 Cl.1 steel, and more appropriate matching of strength and toughness could be achieved by the adjusting the elements contents, as well as proper control of tempering temperature and time. In light of the fact that Cl.2 steel has been successfully applied to steam generator, it could be an alternative material for SWCR RPV. SA-508 Gr.4N steel with high strength and good toughness is another alternative material for SCWR RPV. But large amount of research work before application is still needed for the lack of data on welding and irradiation etc.

  20. Fuel arrangement for high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobin, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    Disclosed is a fuel arrangement for a high temperature gas cooled reactor including fuel assemblies with separate directly cooled fissile and fertile fuel elements removably inserted in an elongated moderator block also having a passageway for control elements

  1. Modular high-temperature reactor launched (and wallchart)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinwarz, W.

    1987-01-01

    In view of the need for a technically unsophisticated, safe and economic reactor system, the KWU group has integrated the experience gained from German light-water reactor engineering and from successful operation of the German AVR experimental high-temperature reactor into the development of the High-Temperature Reactor (HTR)-module. The main components are illustrated and explained and technical data for the HTR-module is given. Safety is also considered. This includes graphs of core heat-up temperature for pebble-bed HTR and a graph of the temperature load of the fuel elements. The operation, control and applications are considered. The latter includes use in combined heat and power generation and community heating. Feasibility studies have shown that the HTR-module is cheaper, comparatively, than coal-fired power stations. (U.K.)

  2. Study and development of a pyrometric in-core measurement technique to follow the temperature of the fuel rod cladding; applied to the study of Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) during trial simulations in the Jules Horowitz Reactor (Material Testing Reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramiandrisoa, Liana

    2014-01-01

    In both research and industry, temperature is a key parameter for understanding and characterizing the behavior of materials. To study the thermomechanical behavior of a fuel rod, a test device is designed for the Jules Horowitz Material Testing Reactor (currently under construction in the CEA Cadarache). The device will be placed under accidental conditions (Loss Of Coolant Accident, LOCA) causing rapid overheating. The temperature tracking, between 700 and 1200 C, will be measured by a fiber optic sensor. The aim of the project is to optimize temperature measurement by comparing different pyrometry techniques. This study covers the management of the main difficulties inherent to the design of the sensor.The first challenge consists of predicting optical fiber behavior in such complex environments where irradiation and high temperature are combined. The fiber will be exposed to a neutron dose rate about 10 12 nfast/cm 2 /s and a dose rate of about 1 kGy/s. Moreover its extremity is heated to approximately 800 C. It is shown that under these conditions, light interferences, absorption bands and fluctuating attenuation are obstacles to overcome or to mitigate.The second challenge, concerning pyrometric measurement, comes from spectral variations expected for the rod emissivity. The material of study is chosen for its widespread use in France: Zircaloy-4. Under oxidizing conditions the spectral emissivity of this Zirconium alloy evolves. This thesis proves that between 700 and 800 C pyrometric measurement is possible from experimental point of view in laboratory without irradiation.In conclusion rod temperature tracking in JHR conditions may be possible providing that interferences are mastered and wavelengths are chosen. This work makes the use of optical pyrometry under civil nuclear extreme conditions more promising. (author) [fr

  3. Corrosion behaviour of high temperature alloys in the cooling gas of high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadakkers, W.J.; Schuster, H.

    1989-01-01

    The reactive impurities in the primary cooling helium of advanced high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR) can cause oxidation, carburization or decarburization of the heat exchanging metallic components. By studies of the fundamental aspects of the corrosion mechanisms it became possible to define operating conditions under which the metallic construction materials show, from the viewpoint of technical application, acceptable corrosion behaviour. By extensive test programmes with exposure times of up to 30,000 hours, a data base has been obtained which allows a reliable extrapolation of the corrosion effects up to the envisaged service lives of the heat exchanging components. (author). 6 refs, 7 figs

  4. RHTF 2, a 1200 MWe high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brisbois, Jacques

    1978-01-01

    After having adapted to French conditions the 1160 MWe G.A.C. reactor, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique and French Industry have decided to design an High Temperature Reactor 1200 MWe based on the G.A.C. technology and taking into account the point of view of Electricite de France and the experience of C.E.A. and industry on the gas cooled reactor technology. The main objective of this work is to produce a reactor design having a low technical risk, good operability, with an emphasis on the safety aspects easing the licensing problems

  5. Assessment of the Capability of Molten Salt Reactors as a Next Generation High Temperature Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsheikh, B.M.

    2017-01-01

    Molten Salt Reactor according to Aircraft Reactor Experiment (ARE) and the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) programs, was designed to be the first full-scale, commercial nuclear power plant utilizing molten salt liquid fuels that can be used for producing electricity, and producing fissile fuels (breeding)burning actinides. The high temperature in the primary cycle enables the realization of efficient thermal conversion cycles with net thermal efficiencies reach in some of the designs of nuclear reactors greater than 45%. Molten salts and liquid salt because of their low vapor pressure are excellent candidates for meeting most of the requirements of these high temperature reactors. There is renewed interest in MSRs because of changing goals and new technologies in the use of high-temperature reactors. Molten Salt Reactors for high temperature create substantial technical challenges to have high effectiveness intermediate heat transfer loop components. This paper will discuss and investigate the capability and compatibility of molten salt reactors, toward next generation high temperature energy system and its technical challenges

  6. In-core materials testing under LWR conditions in the Halden reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, P.J.; Hauso, E.; Hoegberg, N.W.; Karlsen, T.M.; McGrath, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    The Halden boiling water reactor (HBWR) has been in operation since 1958. It is a test reactor with a maximum power of 18 MW and is cooled and moderated by boiling heavy water, with a normal operating temperature of 230 C and a pressure of 34 bar. In the past 15 years increasing emphasis has been placed on materials testing, both of in-core structural materials and fuel claddings. These tests require representative light water reactor (LWR) conditions, which are achieved by housing the test rigs in pressure flasks that are positioned in fuel channels in the reactor and connected to dedicated water loops, in which boiling water reactor (BWR) or pressurised water reactor (PWR) conditions are simulated. Understanding of the in-core behaviour of fuel or reactor materials can be greatly improved by on-line measurements during power operation. The Halden Project has performed in-pile measurements for a period of over 35 years, beginning with fuel temperature measurements using thermocouples and use of differential transformers for measurement of fuel pellet or cladding dimensional changes and internal rod pressure. Experience gained over this period has been applied to on-line instrumentation for use in materials tests. This paper gives details of the systems used at Halden for materials testing under LWR conditions. The techniques used to provide on-line data are described and illustrative results are presented. (authors)

  7. In-core materials testing under LWR conditions in the Halden reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, P.J.; Hauso, E.; Hoegberg, N.W.; Karlsen, T.M.; McGrath, M.A. [OECD Halden Reactor Project (Norway)

    2002-07-01

    The Halden boiling water reactor (HBWR) has been in operation since 1958. It is a test reactor with a maximum power of 18 MW and is cooled and moderated by boiling heavy water, with a normal operating temperature of 230 C and a pressure of 34 bar. In the past 15 years increasing emphasis has been placed on materials testing, both of in-core structural materials and fuel claddings. These tests require representative light water reactor (LWR) conditions, which are achieved by housing the test rigs in pressure flasks that are positioned in fuel channels in the reactor and connected to dedicated water loops, in which boiling water reactor (BWR) or pressurised water reactor (PWR) conditions are simulated. Understanding of the in-core behaviour of fuel or reactor materials can be greatly improved by on-line measurements during power operation. The Halden Project has performed in-pile measurements for a period of over 35 years, beginning with fuel temperature measurements using thermocouples and use of differential transformers for measurement of fuel pellet or cladding dimensional changes and internal rod pressure. Experience gained over this period has been applied to on-line instrumentation for use in materials tests. This paper gives details of the systems used at Halden for materials testing under LWR conditions. The techniques used to provide on-line data are described and illustrative results are presented. (authors)

  8. High-temperature and breeder reactors - economic nuclear reactors of the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djalilzadeh, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    The thesis begins with a review of the theory of nuclear fission and sections on the basic technology of nuclear reactors and the development of the first generation of gas-cooled reactors applied to electricity generation. It then deals in some detail with currently available and suggested types of high temperature reactor and with some related subsidiary issues such as the coupling of different reactor systems and various schemes for combining nuclear reactors with chemical processes (hydrogenation, hydrogen production, etc.), going on to discuss breeder reactors and their application. Further sections deal with questions of cost, comparison of nuclear with coal- and oil-fired stations, system analysis of reactor systems and the effect of nuclear generation on electricity supply. (C.J.O.G.)

  9. Lifetime embrittlement of reactor core materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreyns, P.H..; Bourgeois, W.F.; Charpentier, P.L.; Kammenzind, B.F.; Franklin, D.G.; White, C.J.

    1994-08-01

    Over a core lifetime, the reactor materials Zircaloy-2, Zircaloy-4, and hafnium may become embrittled due to the absorption of corrosion- generated hydrogen and to neutron irradiation damage. Results are presented on the effects of fast fluence on the fracture toughness of wrought Zircaloy-2, Zircaloy-4, and hafnium; Zircaloy-4 to hafnium butt welds; and hydrogen precharged beta treated and weld metal Zircaloy-4 for fluences up to a maximum of approximately 150 x 10 24 n/M 2 (> 1 Mev). While Zircaloy-4 did not exhibit a decrement in K IC due to irradiation, hafnium and butt welds between hafnium and Zircaloy-4 are susceptible to embrittlement with irradiation. The embrittlement can be attributed to irradiation strengthening, which promotes cleavage fracture in hafnium and hafnium-Zircaloy welds, and, in part, to the lower chemical potential of hydrogen in Zircaloy-4 compared to hafnium, which causes hydrogen, over time, to drift from the hafnium end toward the Zircaloy-4 end and to precipitate at the interface between the weld and base-metal interface. Neutron radiation apparently affects the fracture toughness of Zircaloy-2, Zircaloy-4, and hafnium in different ways. Possible explanations for these differences are suggested. It was found that Zircaloy-4 is preferred over Zircaloy-2 in hafnium-to- Zircaloy butt-weld applications due to its absence of a radiation- induced reduction in K IC plus its lower hydrogen absorption characteristics compared with Zircaloy-2

  10. High temperature reactor and application to nuclear process heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulten, R; Kugeler, K [Kernforschungsanlage Juelich G.m.b.H. (Germany, F.R.)

    1976-01-01

    The principle of high temperature nuclear process heat is explained and the main applications (hydrogasification of coal, nuclear chemical heat pipe, direct reduction of iron ore, coal gasification by steam and water splitting) are described in more detail. The motivation for the introduction of nuclear process heat to the market, questions of cost, of raw material resources and environmental aspects are the next point of discussion. The new technological questions of the nuclear reactor and the status of development are described, especially information about the fuel elements, the hot gas ducts, the contamination and some design considerations are added. Furthermore the status of development of helium heated steam reformers, the main results of the work until now and the further activities in this field are explained.

  11. Effects of molten material temperatures and coolant temperatures on vapor explosion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Tianshu; YANG Yanhua; YUAN Minghao; HU Zhihua

    2007-01-01

    An observable experiment facility for low-temperature molten materials to be dropped into water was set up in this study to investigate the mechanism of the vapor explosion. The effect of the fuel and coolant interaction(FCI) on the vapor explosion during the severe accidents of a fission nuclear reactor has been studied. The experiment results showed that the molten material temperature has an important effect on the vapor explosion behavior and pressure. The increase of the coolant temperature would decrease the pressure of the vapor explosion.

  12. Fuel, structural material and coolant for an advanced fast micro-reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, Jamil A. do; Guimaraes, Lamartine N.F.; Ono, Shizuca

    2011-01-01

    The use of nuclear reactors in space, seabed or other Earth hostile environment in the future is a vision that some Brazilian nuclear researchers share. Currently, the USA, a leader in space exploration, has as long-term objectives the establishment of a permanent Moon base and to launch a manned mission to Mars. A nuclear micro-reactor is the power source chosen to provide energy for life support, electricity for systems, in these missions. A strategy to develop an advanced micro-reactor technologies may consider the current fast reactor technologies as back-up and the development of advanced fuel, structural and coolant materials. The next generation reactors (GEN-IV) for terrestrial applications will operate with high output temperature to allow advanced conversion cycle, such as Brayton, and hydrogen production, among others. The development of an advanced fast micro-reactor may create a synergy between the GEN-IV and space reactor technologies. Considering a set of basic requirements and materials properties this paper discusses the choice of advanced fuel, structural and coolant materials for a fast micro-reactor. The chosen candidate materials are: nitride, oxide as back-up, for fuel, lead, tin and gallium for coolant, ferritic MA-ODS and Mo alloys for core structures. The next step will be the neutronic and burnup evaluation of core concepts with this set of materials. (author)

  13. HIGH TEMPERATURE, HIGH POWER HETEROGENEOUS NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, R.P.; Wykoff, W.R.; Busey, H.M.

    1960-06-14

    A heterogeneous nuclear reactor is designed comprising a stationary housing and a rotatable annular core being supported for rotation about a vertical axis in the housing, the core containing a plurality of radial fuel- element supporting channels, the cylindrical empty space along the axis of the core providing a central plenum for the disposal of spent fuel elements, the core cross section outer periphery being vertically gradated in radius one end from the other to provide a coolant duct between the core and the housing, and means for inserting fresh fuel elements in the supporting channels under pressure and while the reactor is in operation.

  14. Present state and future prospect of development of high temperature gas-cooled reactors in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanokawa, Konomo

    1994-01-01

    High temperature gas-cooled reactors can supply the heat of about 1000degC, and the high efficiency and the high rate of heat utilization can be attained. Also they have the features of excellent inherent safety, the easiness of operation, the high burnup of fuel and so on. The heat utilization of atomic energy in addition to electric power generation is very important in view of the protection of global environment and the diversification of energy supply. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has advanced the construction of the high temperature engineering test and research reactor (HTTR) of 30 MW thermal output, aiming at attaining the criticality in 1998. The progress of the development of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor is described. For 18 years, the design study of the reactor was advanced together with the research and development of the reactor physics, fuel and materials, high temperature machinery and equipment and others, and the decision of the design standard and the development of computation codes. The main specification and the construction schedule are shown. The reactor building was almost completed, and the reactor containment vessel was installed. The plan of the research and development by using the HTTR is investigated. (K.I.)

  15. The research of establishing reactor materials thermophysical properties data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Danhui; Zhong Jianguo; Zhang Lili; Zhao Yongming

    1992-01-01

    In the process of nuclear reactor design and safety analysis, the reactor materials thermophysical properties parameters are very important as the main input data of reactor design and calculation. The goal of this work is to establish a practical, reliable data base of reactor materials thermophysical properties parameters with obvious function in reactor design, operation and safety analysis. At present phase, the focal point of this data base is to collect the materials thermophysical properties data based on the need of safety analysis in light water reactor and heavy water reactor. The materials to be chosen are as follows: Uranium, U-Al alloy, UO 2 , UO 2 -PuO 2 mixture, Zr-2, Zr-4, Zr-1% Ni alloy, Inconel-625, ZrO 2 (oxidic layer), boron carbide, cadmium in stainless steel, silver-indium-cadmium alloy, light water and heavy water, etc. The following thermophysical properties parameters are mainly included in the data base: thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, specific heat capacity, heat of melting, coefficient of thermal expansion, emittance, density, heat of vaporization, kinematic viscosity etc. The first phase of this work has been finished, which includes the method of establishing reactor materials thermophysical properties data base, the requirement of data collection, the requirement of establishing data base and the method of the data evaluation. This data base has been established and used on PC computer

  16. Survey on Cooled-Vessel Designs in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min-Hwan; Lee, Won-Jae

    2006-01-01

    The core outlet temperature of the coolant in the high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) has been increased to improve the overall efficiency of their electricity generation by using the Brayton cycle or their nuclear hydrogen production by using thermo-chemical processes. The increase of the outlet temperature accompanies an increase of the coolant inlet temperature. A high coolant inlet temperature results in an increase of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) operation temperature. The conventional steels, proven vessel material in light water reactors, cannot be used as materials for the RPV in the elevated temperatures which necessitate its design to account for the creep effects. Some ferritic or martensitic steels like 2 1/4Cr-1Mo and 9Cr-1Mo-V are very well established creep resistant materials for a temperature range of 400 to 550 C. Although these materials have been used in a chemical plant, there is limited experience with using these materials in nuclear reactors. Even though the 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel was used to manufacture the RPV for HTR-10 of Japan Atomic Energy Agency(JAEA), a large RPV has not been manufactured by using this material or 9Cr-1Mo-V steel. Due to not only its difficulties in manufacturing but also its high cost, the JAEA determined that they would exclude these materials from the GTHTR design. For the above reasons, KAERI has been considering a cooled-vessel design as an option for the RPV design of a NHDD plant (Nuclear Hydrogen Development and Demonstration). In this study, we surveyed several HTGRs, which adopt the cooled-vessel concept for their RPV design, and discussed their design characteristics. The survey results in design considerations for the NHDD cooled-vessel design

  17. Advanced materials: The key to attractive magnetic fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.E.

    1992-01-01

    Fusion is one of the most attractive central station power sources from the viewpoint of potential safety and environmental impact characteristics. Studies also indicate that fusion can be economically competitive with other options such as fission reactors and fossil-fired power stations. However, to achieve this triad of characteristics we must develop advanced materials with properties tailored for performance in the various fusion reactor systems. This paper discusses the desired characteristics of materials and the status of materials technology in four critical areas: (1) structural material for the first wail and blanket (FWB), (2) plasma-facing materials, (3) materials for superconducting magnets, and (4) ceramics for electrical and structural applications

  18. Advanced materials - the key to attractive magnetic fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.E.

    1992-01-01

    Fusion is one of the most attractive central station power sources from the viewpoint of potential safety and environmental impact characteristics. Studies also indicate that fusion can be economically competitive with other options such as fission reactors and fossil-fired power stations. However, to achieve this triad of characteristics we must develop advanced materials with properties tailored for performance in the various fusion reactor systems. This paper discusses the desired characteristics of materials and the status of materials technology in four critical areas: (1) structural materials for the first wall and blanket (FWB), (2) plasmafacing materials, (3) materials for superconducting magnets, and (4) ceramics for electrical and structural applications. (author)

  19. Different approaches to estimation of reactor pressure vessel material embrittlement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Revka

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The surveillance test data for the nuclear power plant which is under operation in Ukraine have been used to estimate WWER-1000 reactor pressure vessel (RPV material embrittlement. The beltline materials (base and weld metal were characterized using Charpy impact and fracture toughness test methods. The fracture toughness test data were analyzed according to the standard ASTM 1921-05. The pre-cracked Charpy specimens were tested to estimate a shift of reference temperature T0 due to neutron irradiation. The maximum shift of reference temperature T0 is 84 °C. A radiation embrittlement rate AF for the RPV material was estimated using fracture toughness test data. In addition the AF factor based on the Charpy curve shift (ΔTF has been evaluated. A comparison of the AF values estimated according to different approaches has shown there is a good agreement between the radiation shift of Charpy impact and fracture toughness curves for weld metal with high nickel content (1,88 % wt. Therefore Charpy impact test data can be successfully applied to estimate the fracture toughness curve shift and therefore embrittlement rate. Furthermore it was revealed that radiation embrittlement rate for weld metal is higher than predicted by a design relationship. The enhanced embrittlement is most probably related to simultaneously high nickel and high manganese content in weld metal.

  20. Critical plasma-materials issues for fusion reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, K.L.; Bauer, W.

    1983-01-01

    Plasma-materials interactions are a dominant driving force in the design of fusion power reactors. This paper presents a summary of plasma-materials interactions research. Emphasis is placed on critical aspects related to reactor design. Particular issues to be addressed are plasma edge characterization, hydrogen recycle, impurity introduction, and coating development. Typical wall fluxes in operating magnetically confined devices are summarized. Recent calculations of tritium inventory and first wall permeation, based on laboratory measurements of hydrogen recycling, are given for various reactor operating scenarios. Impurity introduction/wall erosion mechanisms considered include sputtering, chemical erosion, and evaporation (melting). Finally, the advanced material development for in-vessel components is discussed. (author)

  1. Gas reactor and associated nuclear experience in the UK relevant to high temperature reactor engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beech, D.J.; May, R.

    2000-01-01

    In the UK, the NNC played a leading role in the design and build of all of the UK's commercial magnox reactors and advanced gas-cooled reactors (AGRs). It was also involved in the DRAGON project and was responsible for producing designs for large scale HTRs and other gas reactor designs employing helium and carbon dioxide coolants. This paper addresses the gas reactor experience and its relevance to the current HTR designs under development which use helium as the coolant, through the consideration of a representative sample of the issues addressed in the UK by the NNC in support of the AGR and other reactor programmes. Modern HTR designs provide unique engineering challenges. The success of the AGR design, reflected in the extended lifetimes agreed upon by the licensing authorities at many stations, indicates that these challenges can be successfully overcome. The UK experience is unique and provides substantial support to future gas reactor and high temperature engineering studies. (authors)

  2. Experimental determination of neutron temperature distribution in reactor cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosevski, T.

    1965-12-01

    This paper describes theoretical preparation of the experiment for measuring neutron temperature distribution at the RB reactor by activation foils. Due to rather low neutron flux Cu and Lu foil were irradiated for 4 days. Special natural uranium fuel element was prepared to enable easy removal of foils after irradiation. Experimental device was placed in the reactor core at half height in order to measure directly the mean neutron density. Experimental data of neutron temperature distribution for square lattice pitch 16 cm are presented with mean values of neutron temperature in the moderator, in the fuel and on the fuel element surface

  3. Task 08/41, Low temperature loop at the RA reactor, Review I of materials planned for irradiation within the five-year plan of nuclear power development in Federal Peoples Republic of Yugoslavia; Zadatak 08/41, Niskotemperaturna petlja u reaktoru 'A', Pregled I materijala predvidjenih za ozracivanje petogodisnjim planom razvoja nuklearne energije FNRJ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milenkovic, S; Milasin, N [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    For the purpose of designing the low-temperature loop at the RA reactor, a list of materials that would be irradiated in the reactor was made. This review includes materials which should be irradiated in for isotope production and materials to be irradiated for research and testing purposes. The neutron flux needed for materials testing should be much higher than presently available neutron flux of 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} sec. [Serbo-Croat] Za potrebe projektovanja niskotemperaturne petlje na reaktoru RA nacinjen je pregled materijala za ozracivanje u reaktoru. Pregled sadrzi materijale za ozracivanje u cilju proizvodnje izotopa i materijale za specijalna ozracivanja u cilju ispitivanja materijala. Za ispitivanje materijala potreban bi bio fluks neutron koji je znatno veci od raspolozivog fluksa od 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} sec.

  4. Irradiation experiments and materials testing capabilities in High Flux Reactor in Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzginova, N.; Blagoeva, D.; Hegeman, H.; Van der Laan, J.

    2011-01-01

    The text of publication follows: The High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten is a powerful multi-purpose research and materials testing reactor operating for about 280 Full Power Days per year. In combination with hot cells facilities, HFR provides irradiation and post-irradiation examination services requested by nuclear energy research and development programs, as well as by industry and research organizations. Using a variety of the custom developed irradiation devices and a large experience in executing irradiation experiments, the HFR is suitable for fuel, materials and components testing for different reactor types. Irradiation experiments carried out at the HFR are mainly focused on the understanding of the irradiation effects on materials; and providing databases for irradiation behavior of materials to feed into safety cases. The irradiation experiments and materials testing at the HFR include the following issues. First, materials irradiation to support the nuclear plant life extensions, for instance, characterization of the reactor pressure vessel stainless steel claddings to insure structural integrity of the vessel, as well as irradiation of the weld material coupons to neutron fluence levels that are representative for Light Water Reactors (LWR) internals applications. Secondly, development and qualification of the structural materials for next generation nuclear fission reactors as well as thermo-nuclear fusion machines. The main areas of interest are in both conventional stainless steel and advanced reduced activation steels and special alloys such as Ni-base alloys. For instance safety-relevant aspects of High Temperature Reactors (HTR) such as the integrity of fuel and structural materials with increasing neutron fluence at typical HTR operating conditions has been recently assessed. Thirdly, support of the fuel safety through several fuel irradiation experiments including testing of pre-irradiated LWR fuel rods containing UO 2 or MOX fuel. Fourthly

  5. Materials science research for sodium cooled fast reactors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The paper gives an insight into basic as well as applied research being carried out at the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research for the development of advanced materials for sodium cooled fast reactors towards extending the life of reactors to nearly 100 years and the burnup of fuel to 2,00,000 MWd/t with an objective ...

  6. High-temperature levitated materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Price, David L

    2010-01-01

    .... This can be avoided by suspending the sample through levitation. This technique also makes metastable states of matter accessible, opening up new avenues of scientific enquiry, as well as possible new materials for technological applications...

  7. High-temperature reactor developments in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schram, R.P.C.; Cordfunke, E.H.P.; Heek, A.I. van.

    1996-01-01

    The high-temperature reactor development in the Netherland is embedded in the WHITE reactor program, in which several Dutch research institutes and engineering companies participate. The activities within the WHITE program are focused on the development of a small scale HTS for combined heat and power generation. In 1995, design choices for a pebble bed reactor were made at ECN. The first concept HTR will gave a closed cycle helium turbine and a power level of 40 MWth. It is intended to make the market introduction of a commercially competitive HTR feasible. The design will be an optimization of the Peu-a-Peu (PAP) concept of KFA Juelich. Computer codes necessary for the evaluation of reactor physics aspects of this reactor are developed in cooperation with international partners. An evaluation of a 20 MWth PAP concept showed that the maximum fuel termmperature after depressurization does not exceed 1300 C. (orig.)

  8. Irradiation devices for fusion reactor materials results obtained from irradiated lithium aluminate at the OSIRIS reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefevre, F.; Thevenot, G.; Rasneur, B.; Botter, F.

    1986-06-01

    Studies about controlled fusion reactor of the Tokamak type require the examination of the radiation effects on the behaviour of various potential materials. Thus, in the first part of this paper, are presented the devices adapted to these materials studies and used in the OSIRIS reactor. In a second part, is described an experiment of irradiation ceramics used as candidates for breeding material and are given the first results

  9. High Temperature Materials Characterization and Advanced Materials Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Woo Seog; Kim, D. H.; Kim, S. H.

    2007-06-01

    The project has been carried out for 2 years in stage III in order to achieve the final goals of performance verification of the developed materials, after successful development of the advanced high temperature material technologies for 3 years in Stage II. The mechanical and thermal properties of the advanced materials, which were developed during Stage II, were evaluated at high temperatures, and the modification of the advanced materials were performed. Moreover, a database management system was established using user-friendly knowledge-base scheme to complete the integrated-information material database in KAERI material division

  10. High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Laboratory; Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Laboratory; Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Laboratory; Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Laboratory; Kinsey, James Carl [Idaho National Laboratory; Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Laboratory; Kumar, Akansha [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-04-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200 MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched UCO fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technological readiness level, licensing approach and costs.

  11. Low temperature radiation embrittlement for reactor vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginding, I.A.; Chirkina, L.A.

    1978-01-01

    General conceptions of cold brittleness of bcc metals are in a review. Considered are experimental data and theoretical representations about the effect of irradiation conditions, chemical composition, phase and structural constitutions, grain size, mechanical and thermomechanical treatments on low-temperature irradiation embrittlement of reactor vessel steels. Presented are the methods for increasing radiation stability of metals (carbon and Cr-Mo steels) used in manufacturing reactor vessels

  12. Direct digital temperature control of the A-1 nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpeta, C.

    1975-01-01

    The application is described of one of the modern control methods for designing an experimental digital temperature control system for heavy water moderated gas cooled reactors. The synthesis of the optimal stochastic regulator for reactor control in the area of the rated steady state was carried out using the method of dynamic programming and the Kalman filter technique. The analysis of the feedback circuit was conducted using control simulation on a universal digital computer. Results and experience are summed up. (author)

  13. Sodium environment effects to structural materials for fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Masayoshi; Fujimura, Tadato; Kondo, Tatsuo; Okabayashi, Kunio; Matsumoto, Keishi.

    1976-03-01

    Among the material technology for liquid metal-cooling fast breeder reactors, the characteristic points are high temperature, liquid sodium as a heat medium, and high energy-high density neutron energy spectra, accordingly the secular change of materials due to these factors must be taken into the design. The project of material tests in sodium was started from the metallographical studies on corrosion and mass transfer phenomena in sodium environment, and was evolved to the tests and studies on short time strength, creep strength, fatigue strength, and embrittlement in sodium environment. Concerning the corrosion and mass transfer tests, low purity and medium purity material testing loops were employed, and the test of immersion in sodium was carried out. Domestically produced austenitic stainless steel and Cr-Mo steel were tested, and the measurement of weight change, surface inspection, and the observation of cross sectional structure were carried out before and after the immersion. The decrease of thickness due to the leaching of surface metal and the lowering of strength due to the change of composition or structure come into question only in case of very thin walled stainless tubes, and the lowering of heat transfer is negligible. Cr-Mo steel also showed good corrosion resistance in sodium, but the effect of decarbonization on the strength needs some investigation in the production specifications. (Kako, I.)

  14. New facilities in Japan materials testing reactor for irradiation test of fusion reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, H.; Sagawa, H.; Ishitsuka, E.; Sakamoto, N.; Niiho, T.

    1996-01-01

    The testing and evaluation of fusion reactor components, i.e. blanket, plasma facing components (divertor, etc.) and vacuum vessel with neutron irradiation is required for the design of fusion reactor components. Therefore, four new test facilities were developed in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor: an in-pile functional testing facility, a neutron multiplication test facility, an electron beam facility, and a re-weldability facility. The paper describes these facilities

  15. Proceedings of the international symposium on materials testing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Masahiro; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    This report is the Proceedings of the International Symposium on Materials Testing Reactors hosted by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). The symposium was held on July 16 to 17, 2008, at the Oarai Research and Development Center of JAEA. This symposium was also held for the 40th anniversary ceremony of Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) from achieving its first criticality. The objective of the symposium is to exchange the information on current status, future plan and so on among each testing reactors for the purpose of mutual understanding. There were 138 participants from Argentina, Belgium, France, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Korea, the Russian Federation, Sweden, the United State, Vietnam and Japan. The symposium was divided into four technical sessions and three topical sessions. Technical sessions addressed the general topics of 'status and future plan of materials testing reactors', 'material development for research and testing reactors', irradiation technology (including PIE technology)' and 'utilization with materials testing reactors', and 21 presentations were made. Also the topical sessions addressed 'establishment of strategic partnership', 'management on re-operation work at reactor trouble' and 'basic technology for neutron irradiation tests in MTRs', and panel discussion was made. The 21 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  16. Materials for room temperature magnetic refrigeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosendahl Hansen, B.

    2010-07-15

    Magnetic refrigeration is a cooling method, which holds the promise of being cleaner and more efficient than conventional vapor-compression cooling. Much research has been done during the last two decades on various magnetic materials for this purpose and today a number of materials are considered candidates as they fulfill many of the requirements for a magnetic refrigerant. However, no one material stands out and the field is still active with improving the known materials and in the search for a better one. Magnetic cooling is based on the magnetocaloric effect, which causes a magnetic material to change its temperature when a magnetic field is applied or removed. For room temperature cooling, one utilizes that the magnetocaloric effect peaks near magnetic phase transitions and so the materials of interest all have a critical temperature within the range of 250 - 310 K. A magnetic refrigerant should fulfill a number of criteria, among these a large magnetic entropy change, a large adiabatic temperature change, preferably little to no thermal or magnetic hysteresis and the material should have the stability required for long term use. As the temperature range required for room temperature cooling is some 40 - 50 K, the magnetic refrigerant should also be able to cover this temperature span either by exhibiting a very broad peak in magnetocaloric effect or by providing the opportunity for creating a materials series with varying transition temperatures. (Author)

  17. Material accountancy and control practice at a research reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, J.; Maurel, J.J.; Tromeur, Y.

    1982-01-01

    This session surveys the regulations, organization, and accountancy practice that compose the French State System of Accountancy and Control. Practical examples are discussed showing how inventories are verified at a critical assembly facility and at a materials testing reactor

  18. Nuclear data for structural materials of fission and fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulo, V.

    1989-06-01

    The document presents the status of nuclear reaction theory concerning optical model development, level density models and pre-equilibrium and direct processes used in calculation of neutron nuclear data for structural materials of fission and fusion reactors. 6 refs

  19. Neutronic analysis of absorbing materials for the control rod system in reactor ALLEGRO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cajko, Frantisek; Secansky, Michal; Chrebet, Tomas; Zajac, Radoslav; Darilek, Petr [VUJE, a.s., Trnava (Slovakia)

    2016-09-15

    Experimental reactor ALLEGRO is a gas cooled fast reactor in the design stage. The current design of its reactivity control system is based on control rods filled with boron carbide as the absorber. Because of disadvantages connected to high boron enrichment a possibility of using other absorbent materials was explored to lower the boron enrichment and increase the worth of the control rods. The results of neutronic Monte-Carlo analyses in a computational supercell are presented in this paper. Three absorbent materials most suitable for a use in reactor ALLEGRO (B{sub 4}C, EuB{sub 6} and ReB{sub 2}) have been analysed also in a full core model. A possible benefit of a neutron trap concept is explored as well but materials with satisfactory neutronic properties proved to be not suitable for expected high temperatures in the reactor.

  20. Nuclear reactor application for high temperature power industrial processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dollezhal', N.A.; Zaicho, N.D.; Alexeev, A.M.; Baturov, B.B.; Karyakin, Yu.I.; Nazarov, E.K.; Ponomarev-Stepnoj, N.N.; Protzenko, A.M.; Chernyaev, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    This report gives the results of considerations on industrial heat and technology processes (in chemistry, steelmaking, etc.) from the point of view of possible ways, technical conditions and nuclear safety requirements for the use of high temperature reactors in these processes. Possible variants of energy-technological diagrams of nuclear-steelmaking, methane steam-reforming reaction and other processes, taking into account the specific character of nuclear fuel are also given. Technical possibilities and economic conditions of the usage of different types of high temperature reactors (gas cooled reactors and reactors which have other means of transport of nuclear heat) in heat processes are examined. The report has an analysis of the problem, that arises with the application of nuclear reactors in energy-technological plants and an evaluation of solutions of this problem. There is a reason to suppose that we will benefit from the use of high temperature reactors in comparison with the production based on high quality fossil fuel [ru

  1. Modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, L.R.

    1988-01-01

    The high financial risk involved in building large nuclear power reactors has been a major factor in halting investment in new plant and in bringing further technical development to a standstill. Increased public concern about the safety of nuclear plant, particularly after Chernobyl, has contributed to this stagnation. Financial and technical risk could be reduced considerably by going to small modular units, which would make it possible to build up power station capacity in small steps. Such modular plant, based on the helium-cooled high temperature reactor (HTR), offers remarkable advantages in terms of inherent safety characteristics, partly because of the relatively small size of the individual modules but more on account of the enormous thermal capacity and high temperature margins of the graphitic reactor assemblies. Assessments indicate that, in the USA, the cost of power from the modular systems would be less than that from conventional single reactor plant, up to about 600 MW(e), and only marginally greater above that level, a margin that should be offset by the shorter time required in bringing the modular units on line to earn revenue. The modular HTR would be particularly appropriate in the UK, because of the considerable British industrial background in gas-cooled reactors, and could be a suitable replacement for Magnox. The modular reactor would be particularly suited to combined heat and power schemes and would offer great potential for the eventual development of gas turbine power conversion and the production of high-temperature process heat. (author)

  2. High temperature fast reactor for hydrogen production in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, Jamil A. do; Ono, Shizuca; Guimaraes, Lamartine N.F.

    2008-01-01

    The main nuclear reactors technology for the Generation IV, on development phase for utilization after 2030, is the fast reactor type with high temperature output to improve the efficiency of the thermo-electric conversion process and to enable applications of the generated heat in industrial process. Currently, water electrolysis and thermo chemical cycles using very high temperature are studied for large scale and long-term hydrogen production, in the future. With the possible oil scarcity and price rise, and the global warming, this application can play an important role in the changes of the world energy matrix. In this context, it is proposed a fast reactor with very high output temperature, ∼ 1000 deg C. This reactor will have a closed fuel cycle; it will be cooled by lead and loaded with nitride fuel. This reactor may be used for hydrogen, heat and electricity production in Brazil. It is discussed a development strategy of the necessary technologies and some important problems are commented. The proposed concept presents characteristics that meet the requirements of the Generation IV reactor class. (author)

  3. Compatibility of steels for fast breeder reactor in high temperature sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuhara, Shunichi

    1981-01-01

    In recent years, considerable progress has been made and experience has been obtained for material applicability in sodium-cooled fast breeder reactors. In this report, materials, principal dimensions and sodium conditions for the reactor system components, which include fuel pin cladding, intermediate heat exchangers, steam generators and pipings, are reviewed with emphasis on the thin-walled, high temperature and high strength components. The corrosion, mechanical and tribological behavior in sodium of important materials used for the reactor components, such as Types 304 and 316 stainless steel and 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel, are discussed on the basis of characteristic testing results. Furthermore, material requirements concerned with compatibility in sodium are summarized from this review and discussion. (author)

  4. Theoretical study of energetic interactions between high temperature molten materials and a low temperature fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.H.H.

    1984-01-01

    Analytical models are developed to predict the hydrodynamical transients resulting from the energetic interactions between a high temperature molten material and a low temperature liquid coolant. Initially, the molten material at high temperature and pressure is separated from the low temperature fluid by a solid metal barrier. Upon contact between the molten material and solid barrier, thermal attack occurs eventually resulting in a loss of barrier integrity. Subsequently, the molten material is injected into the liquid pool resulting in energetic interactions. The analytical models integrate a wide variety of potentially mutually-interacting transport phenomena which dominate the transient process into a deterministic scheme to predict the hydrodynamic transient process into a deterministic scheme to predict the hydrodynamic transient process. The model calculations are compared with the existing experimental results to show its engineering accuracy and adequacy in predicting such energetic interactions. Two models are formulated to bracket the transport of molten material to the rupture site for the reactor system. The stratified model minimized the rate of transport of material to the break location while the dispersed model maximized such transport. These two models are applied to a reference pressure tube reactor to evaluate the pressure transients and the potential structural damages as a result of a postulated severe primary coolant blockage in a power channel

  5. Materials for low-temperature fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Ladewig, Bradley; Yan, Yushan; Lu, Max

    2014-01-01

    There are a large number of books available on fuel cells; however, the majority are on specific types of fuel cells such as solid oxide fuel cells, proton exchange membrane fuel cells, or on specific technical aspects of fuel cells, e.g., the system or stack engineering. Thus, there is a need for a book focused on materials requirements in fuel cells. Key Materials in Low-Temperature Fuel Cells is a concise source of the most important and key materials and catalysts in low-temperature fuel cells. A related book will cover key materials in high-temperature fuel cells. The two books form part

  6. Symposium on high temperature and materials chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-10-01

    This volume contains the written proceedings of the Symposium on High Temperature and Materials Chemistry held in Berkeley, California on October 24--25, 1989. The Symposium was sponsored by the Materials and Chemical Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and by the College of Chemistry of the University of California at Berkeley to discuss directions, trends, and accomplishments in the field of high temperature and materials chemistry. Its purpose was to provide a snapshot of high temperature and materials chemistry and, in so doing, to define status and directions

  7. Symposium on high temperature and materials chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-10-01

    This volume contains the written proceedings of the Symposium on High Temperature and Materials Chemistry held in Berkeley, California on October 24--25, 1989. The Symposium was sponsored by the Materials and Chemical Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and by the College of Chemistry of the University of California at Berkeley to discuss directions, trends, and accomplishments in the field of high temperature and materials chemistry. Its purpose was to provide a snapshot of high temperature and materials chemistry and, in so doing, to define status and directions.

  8. Nuclear fuels for material test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanathan, L.V.; Durazzo, M.; Freitas, C.T. de

    1982-01-01

    Experimental results related do the development of nuclear fuels for reactors cooled and moderated by water have been presented cylindrical and plate type fuels have been described in which the core consists of U compouns dispersed in an Al matrix and is clad with aluminium. Fabrication details involving rollmilling, swaging or hot pressing have been described. Corrosion and irradiation test results are also discussed. The performance of the different types of fuels indicates that it is possible to locally fabricate fuel plates with U 3 O 8 +Al cores (20% enriched U) for use in operating Brazilian research reactors. (Author) [pt

  9. Temperature noise characteristics of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, F.J.; Upadhyaya, B.R.

    1984-01-01

    The core exit temperature noise RMS is linearly related to the core ΔT at a commercial PWR and LOFT. Test loop observations indicate that this linear behavior becomes nonlinear with blockages, boiling, or power skews. The linear neutron flux to temperature noise phase behavior is indicative of a pure time delay process, which has been shown to be related to coolant flow velocity in the core. Therefore, temperature noise could provide a valuable diagnostic tool for the detection of coolant blockages, boiling, and sensor malfunction under both normal and accident conditions in a PWR

  10. Calculations on neutron irradiation damage in reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sone, Kazuho; Shiraishi, Kensuke

    1976-01-01

    Neutron irradiation damage calculations were made for Mo, Nb, V, Fe, Ni and Cr. Firstly, damage functions were calculated as a function of neutron energy with neutron cross sections of elastic and inelastic scatterings, and (n,2n) and (n,γ) reactions filed in ENDF/B-III. Secondly, displacement damage expressed in displacements per atom (DPA) was estimated for neutron environments such as fission spectrum, thermal neutron reactor (JMTR), fast breeder reactor (MONJU) and two fusion reactors (The Conceptual Design of Fusion Reactor in JAERI and ORNL-Benchmark). then, damage cross section in units of dpa. barn was defined as a factor to convert a given neutron fluence to the DPA value, and was calculated for the materials in the above neutron environments. Finally, production rates of helium and hydrogen atoms were calculated with (n,α) and (n,p) cross sections in ENDF/B-III for the materials irradiated in the above reactors. (auth.)

  11. High temperature reactor for the production of low temperature heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehlensiep, J.

    1986-12-01

    In this report the conditions of nuclear working reactors for district heating are described for the use in suburban areas. The design of a HTR is analysed under the point of view of safety and costs for the components and for the arrangement possibilities. The size of system is chosen by analysing important parameters for construction. The layout is determined by the retention of fission products in the coated particles of the fuel under conditions of hypothetical accidents. Based on stated data a HTR reactor for district heating will be designed. The speciality is a square shaped core which has the advantage to conduct the afterheat fastly to the outside of the pressure vessel in case of hypothetical accidents. Caused by the shape of the core the heat exchangers may be installed next to the core, the shutdown rods are maintained into reflector borings where they have a high efficiency. The whole primary circuit is surrounded by the reactor pressure vessel and is adjusted in an underground concrete cell. (orig./GL) [de

  12. A Microwave Thermostatic Reactor for Processing Liquid Materials Based on a Heat-Exchanger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yongqiang; Zhang, Chun; Xie, Tian; Hong, Tao; Zhu, Huacheng; Yang, Yang; Liu, Changjun; Huang, Kama

    2017-10-08

    Microwaves have been widely used in the treatment of different materials. However, the existing adjustable power thermostatic reactors cannot be used to analyze materials characteristics under microwave effects. In this paper, a microwave thermostatic chemical reactor for processing liquid materials is proposed, by controlling the velocity of coolant based on PLC (programmable logic controller) in different liquid under different constant electric field intensity. A nonpolar coolant (Polydimethylsiloxane), which is completely microwave transparent, is employed to cool the liquid materials. Experiments are performed to measure the liquid temperature using optical fibers, the results show that the precision of temperature control is at the range of ±0.5 °C. Compared with the adjustable power thermostatic control system, the effect of electric field changes on material properties are avoided and it also can be used to detect the properties of liquid materials and special microwave effects.

  13. Measuring device for the temperature coefficient of reactor moderators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Yuzo.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To rapidly determine by automatic calculation the temperature coefficient for moderators which has been determined so far by a log of manual processings. Constitution: Each of signals from a control rod position indicator, a reactor reactivity, instrument and moderator temperature meter are inputted, and each of the signals and designed valued for the doppler temperature coefficients are stored. Recurling calculation is conducted based on the reactivity and the moderator temperature at an interval where the temperature changes of the moderators are equalized at an identical control rod position, to determine isothermic coefficient. Then, the temperature coefficient for moderator are calculated from the isothermic coefficient and the doppler temperature coefficient. The relationship between the reactivity and the moderator temperature is plotted on a X-Y recorder. The stored signals and the calculated temperature coefficient for moderators are sequentially displayed and the results are printed out when the measurement is completed. According to the present device, since the real time processing is conducted, the processing time can be shortened remarkably. Accordingly, it is possible to save the man power for the test of the nuclear reactor and improve the reactor operation performance. (Kamimura, M.)

  14. High temperature reactors for cogeneration applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verfondern, Karl [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). IEK-6; Allelein, Hans-Josef [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). IEK-6; RWTH Aachen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Reaktorsicherheit und -technik (LRST)

    2016-05-15

    There is a large potential for nuclear energy also in the non-electric heat market. Many industrial sectors have a high demand for process heat and steam at various levels of temperature and pressure to be provided for desalination of seawater, district heating, or chemical processes. The future generation of nuclear plants will be capable to enter the wide field of cogeneration of heat and power (CHP), to reduce waste heat and to increase efficiency. This requires an adjustment to multiple needs of the customers in terms of size and application. All Generation-IV concepts proposed are designed for coolant outlet temperatures above 500 C, which allow applications in the low and medium temperature range. A VHTR would even be able to cover the whole temperature range up to approx. 1 000 C.

  15. Chemical reactor for converting a first material into a second material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Peter C

    2012-10-16

    A chemical reactor and method for converting a first material into a second material is disclosed and wherein the chemical reactor is provided with a feed stream of a first material which is to be converted into a second material; and wherein the first material is combusted in the chemical reactor to produce a combustion flame, and a resulting gas; and an electrical arc is provided which is passed through or superimposed upon the combustion flame and the resulting gas to facilitate the production of the second material.

  16. Refurbishing the BR2 materials testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baugnet, J.M.; Dekeyser, J.; Gubel, P.

    1995-01-01

    SCK/CEN is refurbishing its BR2 reactor to allow its further operation during the next 15 years; in doing so, it chooses to keep BR2 available for future scientific and technological irradiation programs within an international context. (author) 2 figs

  17. Material Issues of Blanket Systems for Fusion Reactors - Compatibility with Cooling Water -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Yukio; Tsukada, Takashi; Jitsukawa, Shiro

    Environmental assisted cracking (EAC) is one of the material issues for the reactor core components of light water power reactors(LWRs). Much experience and knowledge have been obtained about the EAC in the LWR field. They will be useful to prevent the EAC of water-cooled blanket systems of fusion reactors. For the austenitic stainless steels and the reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels, they clarifies that the EAC in a water-cooled blanket does not seem to be acritical issue. However, some uncertainties about influences on water temperatures, water chemistries and stress conditions may affect on the EAC. Considerations and further investigations elucidating the uncertainties are discussed.

  18. Measured gas and particle temperatures in VTT's entrained flow reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Sønnik; Sørensen, L.H.

    2006-01-01

    Particle and gas temperature measurements were carried out in experiments on VTTs entrained flow reactor with 5% and 10% oxygen using Fourier transform infrared emission spectroscopy (FTIR). Particle temperature measurements were performed on polish coal,bark, wood, straw particles, and bark...... and wood particles treated with additive. A two-color technique with subtraction of the background light was used to estimate particle temperatures during experiments. A transmission-emission technique was used tomeasure the gas temperature in the reactor tube. Gas temperature measurements were in good...... agreement with thermocouple readings. Gas lines and bands from CO, CO2 and H2O can be observed in the spectra. CO was only observed at the first measuring port (100ms) with the strongest CO-signal seen during experiments with straw particles. Variations in gas concentration (CO2 and H2O) and the signal from...

  19. Towards a reduced activation structural materials database for fusion DEMO reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeslang, A.; Diegele, E.; Laesser, R.; Klimiankou, M.; Lindau, R.; Materna-Morris, E.; Rieth, M.; Lucon, E.; Petersen, C.; Schneider, H.-C.; Pippan, R.; Rensman, J.W.; Schaaf, B. van der; Tavassoli, F.

    2005-01-01

    The development of First Wall, Blanket and Divertor materials which are capable of withstanding many years the high neutron and heat fluxes, is a critical path to fusion power. Therefore, the timely availability of a sound materials database has become an indispensable element in international fusion road maps. In order to provide materials design data for short term needs of ITER Test Blanket Modules and for a DEMOnstration fusion reactor, a wealth of R and D results on the European reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel EUROFER, and on oxide dispersion strengthened variants are being characterized, mainly in the temperature window 250-650 deg. C. The characterisation includes irradiations up to 15 dpa in the mixed spectrum reactor HFR and up to 75 dpa in the fast breeder reactor BOR60. Industrial EUROFER-batches of 3.5 and 7.5 tons have been produced with a variety of semi-finished, quality-assured product forms. To increase thermal efficiency of blankets, high temperature resistant SiC f /SiC channel inserts for liquid metal coolant tubes are also developed. Regarding radiation damage resistance, a broad based reactor irradiation programs counts several steps from ≤5dpa (ITER TBMs) up to 75 dpa (DEMO). For the European divertor designers, a materials data base is presently being set up for pure W and W alloys, and related reactor irradiations are foreseen with temperatures from 650-1000 deg. C. (author)

  20. ITER at the international conference on fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinin, G.; Barabash, V.; Matera, R.

    1998-01-01

    The reports summarizes the topics of the eighth International Conference on Fusion Reactor Materials (ICFRM-8) which was held in Sendai, Japan, on 26-31 October 1997. The ICFRM is focused on the whole spectrum of materials and technologies to be applied in fusion reactors and related facilities. The total number of conference participants was over 500, representing 24 countries and about 600 oral and poster papers were presented at the conference. Three sessions were devoted to ITER materials: (i) Design-Materials Interface and ITER (oral session); (ii) ITER, Irradiation Facility and Technology, (poster session); (iii) ITER and Beyond (discussion session)

  1. Cast iron as structural material for hot-working reactor vessels (PCIV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostendorf, H.; Schmidt, G.; Pittack, W.

    1977-01-01

    Cast iron with lamellar graphite is best suited for prestressed structures, because its compressive strength is nearly 4 times its tensile strength. In comparison to room temperature, cast iron with lamellar graphite shows essentially no loss of strength up to temperatures of 400 0 C. Under the particular aspect to use cast iron for hot-working prestressed reactor pressure vessels (PCIV) (Prestressed cast iron vessel=PCIV) a materials testing program is carried out, which meets the strict certification requirements for materials in the construction of reactor pressure vessels and which completes the presently available knowledge of cast iron. Especially in the following fields an extension and supplement of the present level of knowledge is necessary: mechanical properties under compressive stresses; material properties at elevated temperatures; influence of irradiation on mechanical and physical properties; production standards and quality control. The state of the research and the available data of the material testing program are reported

  2. Cast iron as structural material for hot-working reactor vessels (PCIV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostendorf, H.; Schmidt, G.; Pittack, W.

    1977-01-01

    Cast iron with lamellar graphite is best suited for prestressed structures, because its compressive strength is nearly 4 times its tensile strength. In comparison to room temperature, cast iron with lamellar graphite shows essentially no loss of strength up to temperatures of 400 0 C. Under the particular aspect to use cast iron for hot-working prestressed reactor pressure vessels (PCIV) (Prestressed cast iron vessel=PCIV) a materials testing program is carried out, which meets the strict certification requirements for materials in the construction of reactor pressure vessels and which completes the presently available knowledge of cast iron. Especially in the following fields an extension and supplement of the present level of knowledge is necessary. - Mechanical properties under compressive stresses. - Material properties at elevated temperatures. - Influence of irradiation on mechanical and physical properties. - Production standards and quality control. The state of the research and the available data of the material testing program are reported. (Auth.)

  3. Modelling of temperature distribution and temperature pulsations in elements of fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorokin, A.P.; Bogoslovskaia, G.P.; Ushakov, P.A.; Zhukov, A.V.; Ivanov, Eu.F.; Matjukhin, N.M.

    2004-01-01

    From thermophysical point of view, integrated configuration of liquid metal cooled reactor has some limitations. Large volume of mixing chamber causes a complex behavior of thermal hydraulic characteristics in such facilities. Also, this volume is responsible for large-scale eddies in the coolant, existence of stagnant areas and flow stratification, occurrence of temperature non-uniformity and pulsation of coolant and structure temperatures. Temperature non-uniformities and temperature pulsations depend heavily even on small variations in reactor core design. The paper presents some results on modeling of thermal hydraulic processes occurring in liquid metal cooled reactor. The behavior of following parameters are discussed: temperature non-uniformities at the core output and related temperature pulsations; temperature pulsations due to mixing of sodium jets at different temperatures; temperature pulsations arising if a part of loop (circuit) is shut off; temperature non-uniformities and pulsation at the core output and related temperature pulsation; temperature pulsations due to mixing of sodium jets at different temperatures; temperature pulsations arising if a part of loop (circuit) is shut off; temperature non-uniformities and pulsation of temperature during transients and during transition to natural convection cooling. Also, the issue of modeling of temperature behavior in compact arrangement of fast reactor fuel pins using water as modeling liquid is considered in the paper. One more discussion is concerned with experimental method of modeling of liquid metal mixing with the use of air. The method is based on freon tracer technique. The results of simulation of the thermal hydraulic processes mentioned above have been analyzed, that will allow the main lines of the study to be determined and conclusion to be drawn regarding the temperature behavior in fast reactor units. (author)

  4. Results and recommendations from the reactor chemistry and corrosion tasks of the reactor materials program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, E.W.; Ondrejcin, R.S.

    1990-11-01

    Within the general context of extended service life, the Reactor Materials Program was initiated in 1984. This comprehensive program addressed material performance in SRS reactor tanks and the primary coolant or Process Water System (PWS) piping. Three of the eleven tasks concerned moderator quality and corrosion mitigation. Definition and control of the stainless steel aqueous environment is a key factor in corrosion mitigation. The Reactor Materials Program systematically investigated the SRS environment and its effect on crack initiation and propagation in stainless steel, with the objective of improving this environment. The purpose of this report is to summarize the contributions of Tasks 6, 7 and 10 of the Reactor Materials Program to the understanding and control of moderator quality and its relationship to mitigation of stress corrosion cracking

  5. Neutron irradiation facilities for fission and fusion reactor materials studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1985-01-01

    The successful development of energy-conversion machines based upon nuclear fission or fusion reactors is critically dependent upon the behavior of the engineering materials used to construct the full containment and primary heat extraction systems. The development of radiation damage-resistant materials requires irradiation testing facilities which reproduce, as closely as possible, the thermal and neutronic environment expected in a power-producing reactor. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reference core design for the Center for Neutron Research (CNR) reactor provides for instrumented facilities in regions of both hard and mixed neutron spectra, with substantially higher fluxes than are currently available. The benefits of these new facilities to the development of radiation damage resistant materials are discussed in terms of the major US fission and fusion reactor programs

  6. Candidate Materials Evaluation for Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, T.R.; Was, G.S.

    2008-01-01

    Final technical report on the corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and radiation response of candidate materials for the supercritical water-cooled reactor concept. The objective of the proposed research was to investigate degradation of materials in the supercritical water environment (SCW). First, representative alloys from the important classes of candidate materials were studied for their corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance in supercritical water. These included ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels, austenitic stainless steels, and Ni-base alloys. Corrosion and SCC tests were conducted at various temperatures and exposure times, as well as in various water chemistries. Second, emerging plasma surface modification and grain boundary engineering technologies were applied to modify the near surface chemistry, microstructure, and stress-state of the alloys prior to corrosion testing. Third, the effect of irradiation on corrosion and SCC of alloys in the as-received and modified/engineered conditions were examined by irradiating samples using high-energy protons and then exposing them to SCW

  7. Gas cooled thermal reactors with high temperatures (VHTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchter, J.C.; Dufour, P.; Guidez, J.; Latge, C.; Renault, C.; Rimpault, G.; Vasile, A.

    2014-01-01

    VHTR is one of the 6 concepts retained for the 4. generation of nuclear reactors, it is an upgraded version of the HTR-type reactor (High Temperature Reactors). 5 HTR reactors were operated in the world in the eighties, now 2 experimental HTR are working in China and Japan and 2 HTR with an output power of 100 MWe are being built in China. The purpose of the VHTR is to provide an helium at very high temperatures around 1000 Celsius degrees that could be used directly in a thermochemical way to produce hydrogen for instance. HTR reactors are interesting in terms of safety but it does not optimise the consumption of uranium and the production of wastes. This article presents a brief historical account of HTR-type reactors and their main design and safety features. The possibility of using HTR to burn plutonium is also presented as well as the possibility of closing the fuel cycle and of using thorium-uranium fuel. (A.C.)

  8. Thermal insulation of high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornille, Y.

    1975-01-01

    Operating conditions of HTR thermal insulation are given and heat insulators currently developed are described (fibers kept in position by metallic structures). For future applications and higher temperatures, research is directed towards solutions using ceramics or associating fibers and ceramics [fr

  9. Thermal hydraulics analysis of the Advanced High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dean, E-mail: Dean_Wang@uml.edu [University of Massachusetts Lowell, One University Avenue, Lowell, MA 01854 (United States); Yoder, Graydon L.; Pointer, David W.; Holcomb, David E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley RD #6167, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The TRACE AHTR model was developed and used to define and size the DRACS and the PHX. • A LOFF transient was simulated to evaluate the reactor performance during the transient. • Some recommendations for modifying FHR reactor system component designs are discussed. - Abstract: The Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a liquid salt-cooled nuclear reactor design concept, featuring low-pressure molten fluoride salt coolant, a carbon composite fuel form with embedded coated particle fuel, passively triggered negative reactivity insertion mechanisms, and fully passive decay heat rejection. This paper describes an AHTR system model developed using the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) thermal hydraulic transient code TRAC/RELAP Advanced Computational Engine (TRACE). The TRACE model includes all of the primary components: the core, downcomer, hot legs, cold legs, pumps, direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS), the primary heat exchangers (PHXs), etc. The TRACE model was used to help define and size systems such as the DRACS and the PHX. A loss of flow transient was also simulated to evaluate the performance of the reactor during an anticipated transient event. Some initial recommendations for modifying system component designs are also discussed. The TRACE model will be used as the basis for developing more detailed designs and ultimately will be used to perform transient safety analysis for the reactor.

  10. Grey water treatment in UASB reactor at ambient temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmitwalli, T A; Shalabi, M; Wendland, C; Otterpohl, R

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of grey water treatment in a UASB reactor was investigated. The batch recirculation experiments showed that a maximum total-COD removal of 79% can be obtained in grey-water treatment in the UASB reactor. The continuous operational results of a UASB reactor treating grey water at different hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 20, 12 and 8 hours at ambient temperature (14-24 degrees C) showed that 31-41% of total COD was removed. These results were significantly higher than that achieved by a septic tank (11-14%), the most common system for grey water pre-treatment, at HRT of 2-3 days. The relatively lower removal of total COD in the UASB reactor was mainly due to a higher amount of colloidal COD in the grey water, as compared to that reported in domestic wastewater. The grey water had a limited amount of nitrogen, which was mainly in particulate form (80-90%). The UASB reactor removed 24-36% and 10-24% of total nitrogen and total phosphorus, respectively, in the grey water, due to particulate nutrients removal by physical entrapment and sedimentation. The sludge characteristics of the UASB reactor showed that the system had stable performance and the recommended HRT for the reactor is 12 hours.

  11. Plasma-arc reactor for production possibility of powdered nano-size materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadzhiyski, V; Mihovsky, M; Gavrilova, R

    2011-01-01

    Nano-size materials of various chemical compositions find increasing application in life nowadays due to some of their unique properties. Plasma technologies are widely used in the production of a range of powdered nano-size materials (metals, alloys, oxides, nitrides, carbides, borides, carbonitrides, etc.), that have relatively high melting temperatures. Until recently, the so-called RF-plasma generated in induction plasma torches was most frequently applied. The subject of this paper is the developments of a new type of plasma-arc reactor, operated with transferred arc system for production of disperse nano-size materials. The new characteristics of the PLASMALAB reactor are the method of feeding the charge, plasma arc control and anode design. The disperse charge is fed by a charge feeding system operating on gravity principle through a hollow cathode of an arc plasma torch situated along the axis of a water-cooled wall vertical tubular reactor. The powdered material is brought into the zone of a plasma space generated by the DC rotating transferred plasma arc. The arc is subjected to Auto-Electro-Magnetic Rotation (AEMR) by an inductor serially connected to the anode circuit. The anode is in the form of a water-cooled copper ring. It is mounted concentrically within the cylindrical reactor, with its lower part electrically insulated from it. The electric parameters of the arc in the reactor and the quantity of processed charge are maintained at a level permitting generation of a volumetric plasma discharge. This mode enables one to attain high mean mass temperature while the processed disperse material flows along the reactor axis through the plasma zone where the main physico-chemical processes take place. The product obtained leaves the reactor through the annular anode, from where it enters a cooling chamber for fixing the produced nano-structure. Experiments for AlN synthesis from aluminium power and nitrogen were carried out using the plasma reactor

  12. IAEA high temperature gas-cooled reactor activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    The IAEA activities on high temperature gas-cooled reactors are conducted with the review and support of the Member states, primarily through the International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors (IWG-GCR). This paper summarises the results of the IAEA gas-cooled reactor project activities in recent years along with ongoing current activities through a review of Co-ordinated Research Projects (CRPs), meetings and other international efforts. A series of three recently completed CRPs have addressed the key areas of reactor physics for LEU fuel, retention of fission products and removal of post shutdown decay heat through passive heat transport mechanisms. These activities along with other completed and ongoing supporting CRPs and meetings are summarised with reference to detailed documentation of the results. (authors)

  13. The behaviour of materials in fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    Fast neutron damage in fast reactors can limit the life of structural components through the growth voids. The main features of the current theory of point defect production and condensation are surveyed. The role of metallurgical structures and radiation produced extended defects is outlined and used to demonstrate the development of volume swelling and radiation hardening. Mechanisms of radiation creep are described in the context of the preceding treatment of point defect behaviour. Finally, future trends in the field are briefly explored. (author)

  14. QUARTERLY PROGRESS REPORT JANUARY, FEBRUARY, MARCH, 1968 REACTOR FUELS AND MATERIALS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS FOR FUELS AND MATERIALS BRANCH OF USAEC DIVISION OF REACTOR DEVELOPMENT AND TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwell, J. J.; de Halas, D. R.; Nightingale, R. E.; Worlton, D. C.

    1968-06-01

    Progress is reported in these areas: nuclear graphite; fuel development for gas-cooled reactors; HTGR graphite studies; nuclear ceramics; fast-reactor nitrides research; non-destructive testing; metallic fuels; basic swelling studies; ATR gas and water loop operation and maintenance; reactor fuels and materials; fast reactor dosimetry and damage analysis; and irradiation damage to reactor metals.

  15. A probabilistic consequence assessment for a very high temperature reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joeun; Kim, Jintae; Jae, Moosung [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2017-02-15

    Currently, fossil fuel is globally running out. If current trends continue, crude oil will be depleted in 20 years and natural gas in 40 years. In addition, the use of fossil resource has increased emissions of green gas such as carbon dioxide. Therefore, there has been a strong demand in recent years for producing large amounts of hydrogen as an alternative energy [1]. To generate hydrogen energy, very high temperature more than 900 C is required but this level is not easy to reach. Because a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), one of next generation reactor, is able to make the temperature, it is regarded as a solution of the problem. Also, VHTR has an excellent safety in comparison with existing and other next generation reactors. Especially, a passive system, Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS), is adopted to get rid of radiant heat in case of accidents. To achieve variety requirements of new designed-reactors, however, it needs to develop new methodologies and definitions different with existing method. At the same time, an application of probability safety assessment (PSA) has been proposed to ensure the safety of next generation NPPs. For this, risk-informed designs of structures have to be developed and verified. Particularly, the passive system requires to be evaluated for its reliability. The objective of this study is to improve safety of VIITR by conducting risk profile.

  16. Materials for Room Temperature Magnetic Refrigeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Britt Rosendahl

    Magnetic refrigeration is a cooling method, which holds the promise of being cleaner and more efficient than conventional vapor-compression cooling. Much research has been done during the last two decades on various magnetic materials for this purpose and today a number of materials are considered...... candidates as they fulfill many of the requirements for a magnetic refrigerant. However, no one material stands out and the field is still active with improving the known materials and in the search for a better one. Magnetic cooling is based on the magnetocaloric effect, which causes a magnetic material...... to change its temperature when a magnetic field is applied or removed. For room temperature cooling, one utilizes that the magnetocaloric effect peaks near magnetic phase transitions and so the materials of interest all have a critical temperature within the range of 250 – 310 K. A magnetic refrigerant...

  17. Safety philosophy of gas turbine high temperature reactor (GTHTR300)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji Katanishi; Kazuhiko Kunitomi; Shusaku Shiozawa

    2002-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has undertaken the study of an original design concept of gas turbine high temperature reactor, the GTHTR300. The general concept of this study is development of a greatly simplified design that leads to substantially reduced technical and cost requirements. Newly proposed design features enable the GTHTR300 to be an efficient and economically competitive reactor in 2010's. Also, the GTHTR300 fully takes advantage of its inherent safety characteristics. The safety philosophy of the GTHTR300 is developed based on the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) of JAERI which is the first HTGR in Japan. Major features of the newly proposed safety philosophy for the GTHTR300 are described in this article. (authors)

  18. Assessment of effluent turbidity in mesophilic and thermophilic sludge reactors - origin of effluent colloidal material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogelaar, J.C.T.; Lier, van J.B.; Klapwijk, B.; Vries, M.C.; Lettinga, G.

    2002-01-01

    Two lab-scale plug flow activated sludge reactors were run in parallel for 4 months at 30 and 55°C. Research focussed on: (1) COD (chemical oxygen demand) removal, (2) effluent turbidity at both temperatures, (3) the origin of effluent colloidal material and (4) the possible role of protozoa on

  19. Structural materials for Gen-IV nuclear reactors: Challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murty, K. L.; Charit, I.

    2008-12-01

    Generation-IV reactor design concepts envisioned thus far cater toward a common goal of providing safer, longer lasting, proliferation-resistant and economically viable nuclear power plants. The foremost consideration in the successful development and deployment of Gen-IV reactor systems is the performance and reliability issues involving structural materials for both in-core and out-of-core applications. The structural materials need to endure much higher temperatures, higher neutron doses and extremely corrosive environment, which are beyond the experience of the current nuclear power plants. Materials under active consideration for use in different reactor components include various ferritic/martensitic steels, austenitic stainless steels, nickel-base superalloys, ceramics, composites, etc. This paper presents a summary of various Gen-IV reactor concepts, with emphasis on the structural materials issues depending on the specific application areas. This paper also discusses the challenges involved in using the existing materials under both service and off-normal conditions. Tasks become increasingly complex due to the operation of various fundamental phenomena like radiation-induced segregation, radiation-enhanced diffusion, precipitation, interactions between impurity elements and radiation-produced defects, swelling, helium generation and so forth. Further, high temperature capability (e.g. creep properties) of these materials is a critical, performance-limiting factor. It is demonstrated that novel alloy and microstructural design approaches coupled with new materials processing and fabrication techniques may mitigate the challenges, and the optimum system performance may be achieved under much demanding conditions.

  20. Radioactive material transport in sodium-cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brehm, W.F.; McGuire, J.C.; Colburn, R.P.; Maffei, H.P.; Olson, W.H.

    1980-03-01

    Trapping devices which remove nuclides from the sodium stream in pre-selected locations away from maintenance areas have been developed and proven successful in in-reactor testing. The release of corrosion product radionuclides as a function of system temperature and oxygen content has been quantitatively evaluated. Ongoing work concentrates on further in-reactor testing of radionuclide removal devices, and characterization of fission product release and deposition from fuel pins with breached-cladding

  1. Simulating the temperature noise in fast reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kebadze, B.V.; Pykhtina, T.V.; Tarasko, M.Z.

    1987-01-01

    Characteristics of temperature noise at various modes of coolant flow in fast reactor fuel assemblies (FA) and for different points of sensor installation are investigated. Stationary mode of coolant flow and mode with a partial overlapping of FA through cross section, resulting in local temperature increase and sodium boiling, are considered. Numerical simulation permits to evaluate time characteristicsof temperature noise and to formulate requirements for dynamic characteristics of the sensors, and also to clarify the dependence of coolant distribution parameters on the sensor location and peculiarities of stationary temperature profile

  2. Materials Science of High-Temperature Superconducting Coated Conductor Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beasley, M. R

    2007-01-01

    This program was broadly focused on the materials science of high temperature superconducting coated conductors, which are of potential interest for application in electric power systems of interest to the Air Force...

  3. Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Materials Program. Reducing helium impurity depletion in HTGR materials testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, D.H.

    1984-08-01

    Moisture depletion in HTGR materials testing rigs has been empirically studied in the GE High Temperature Reactor Materials Testing Laboratory (HTRMTL). Tests have shown that increased helium flow rates and reduction in reactive (oxidizable) surface area are effective means of reducing depletion. Further, a portion of the depletion has been shown to be due to the presence of free C released by the dissociation of CH 4 . This depletion component can be reduced by reducing the helium residence time (increasing the helium flow rate) or by reducing the CH 4 concentration in the test gas. Equipment modifications to reduce depletion have been developed, tested, and in most cases implemented in the HTRMTL to date. These include increasing the Helium Loop No. 1 pumping capacity, conversion of metallic retorts and radiation shields to alumina, isolation of thermocouple probes from the test gas by alumina thermowells, and substitution of non-reactive Mo-TZM for reactive metallic structural components

  4. Studies on high temperature research reactor in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Yuanhui; Zuo Kanfen [Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology, Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China)

    1999-08-01

    China recognises the advantages of Modular HTGRs and has chosen Modular HTGRs as one of advanced reactors to be developed for the further intensive utilisation of nuclear power in the next century. In energy supply systems of the next century, HTGR is supposed to serve: 1. as supplement to water-cooled reactors for electricity generation and 2. as environmentally friendly heat source providing process heat at different temperatures for various applications like heavy oil recovery, coal gasification and liquefaction, etc.. The 10 MW High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTR-10) is a major project in the energy sector of the Chinese National High Technology Programme as the first step of development of Modular HTGRs in China. Its main objectives are: 1. to acquire know-how in the design, construction and operation of HTGRs, 2. to establish an irradiation and experimental facility, 3. to demonstrate the inherent safety features of Modular HTGR, 4. to test electricity and heat co-generation and closed cycle gas turbine technology and 5. to do research and development work on the nuclear process heat application. Now the HTR-10 is being constructed at the site of Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET). The HTR-10 project is to be carried out in two phases. In the first phase, the reactor with an coolant outlet temperature of 700degC will be coupled with a steam generator providing steam for a steam turbine cycle which works on an electricity and heat co-generation basis. In the second phase, the reactor coolant outlet temperature is planned to be raised to 900degC. As gas turbine cycle and a steam reformer will be coupled to the reactor in addition to the steam turbine cycle. (author)

  5. Studies on high temperature research reactor in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yuanhui; Zuo Kanfen

    1999-01-01

    China recognises the advantages of Modular HTGRs and has chosen Modular HTGRs as one of advanced reactors to be developed for the further intensive utilisation of nuclear power in the next century. In energy supply systems of the next century, HTGR is supposed to serve: 1. as supplement to water-cooled reactors for electricity generation and 2. as environmentally friendly heat source providing process heat at different temperatures for various applications like heavy oil recovery, coal gasification and liquefaction, etc.. The 10 MW High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTR-10) is a major project in the energy sector of the Chinese National High Technology Programme as the first step of development of Modular HTGRs in China. Its main objectives are: 1. to acquire know-how in the design, construction and operation of HTGRs, 2. to establish an irradiation and experimental facility, 3. to demonstrate the inherent safety features of Modular HTGR, 4. to test electricity and heat co-generation and closed cycle gas turbine technology and 5. to do research and development work on the nuclear process heat application. Now the HTR-10 is being constructed at the site of Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET). The HTR-10 project is to be carried out in two phases. In the first phase, the reactor with an coolant outlet temperature of 700degC will be coupled with a steam generator providing steam for a steam turbine cycle which works on an electricity and heat co-generation basis. In the second phase, the reactor coolant outlet temperature is planned to be raised to 900degC. As gas turbine cycle and a steam reformer will be coupled to the reactor in addition to the steam turbine cycle. (author)

  6. High temperature electrochemistry related to light water reactor corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, Gabor; Kerner, Zsolt; Balog, Janos; Schiller, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The present work deals with corrosion problems related to conditions which prevail in a WWER primary circuit. We had a two-fold aim: (A) electrochemical methods were applied to characterise the hydrothermally produced oxides of the cladding material (Zr-1%Nb) of nuclear fuel elements used in Russian made power reactors of WWER type, and (B) a number of possible reference electrodes were investigated with a view to high temperature applications. (A) Test specimens made of the cladding material, Zr-1%Nb, were immersed into an autoclave, filled with an aqueous solution typical to a WWER primary circuit, and were treated for different periods of time up to 28 weeks. The electrode potentials were measured and electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) were taken regularly both as a function of oxidation time and temperature. This rendered information on the overall kinetics of oxide growth. By combining in situ and ex situ impedance measurements, with a particular view of the temperature dependence of EIS, we concluded that the high frequency region of impedance spectra is relevant to the presence of oxide layer on the alloy. This part of the spectra was treated in terms of a parallel CPE||R ox equivalent circuit (CPE denoting constant phase element, R ox ohmic resistor). The CPE element was understood as a dispersive resistance in terms of the continuous time random walk theory by Scher and Lax. This enabled us to tell apart electrical conductance and oxide growth with a model of charge transfer and recombination within the oxide layer as rate determining steps. (B) Three types of reference electrodes were tested within the framework of the LIRES EU5 project: (i) external Ag/AgCl, (ii) Pt/Ir alloy and (iii) Pd(Pt) double polarised active electrode. The most stable of the electrodes was found to be the Pt/Ir one. The Ag/AgCl electrode showed good stability after an initial period of some days, while substantial drifts were found for the Pd(Pt) electrode. EIS spectra of the

  7. Temperature fluctuation reducing device for FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ootsuka, Fumio; Shiratori, Fumihiro.

    1991-01-01

    In existent FBR type reactors, since temperature fluctuation in the reactor upper portion has been inevitable, thermal fatigue may be caused possibly in reactor core upper mechanisms. Then, a valve is disposed to a control rod lower guide tube contained in a reactor container for automatically controlling the amount of passing coolants in accordance with the temperature of the passing coolants, to mix and control coolants passing through a fuel assembly in adjacent with the guide tube and coolants passing through the guide tube. Further, a rectification cylinder is disposed, in which a portion of coolants passing through the fuel assembly is caused to flow. An orifice is disposed to the cylinder with an exit being disposed to the upstream thereof such that the coolants not flown into the rectification cylinder and the coolants passing through the guide tube are mixed to moderate the temperature fluctuation. That is, a portion of the coolants flown into the rectification cylinder can not pass through the orifice, but flow backwardly to the upstream and is discharged out of the rectification cylinder from the coolants exit and mixed sufficiently with coolants passing through the guide tube. In this way, temperature fluctuation can be moderated. (N.H.)

  8. Method to fabricate block fuel elements for high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrovat, M.; Rachor, L.

    1977-01-01

    The fabrication of block fuel elements for gas-cooled high temperature reactors can be improved upon by adding 0.2 to 2 wt.% of a hydrocarbon compound to the lubricating mixture prior to pressing. Hexanol or octanol are named as substances. The dimensional accuracy of the block is thus improved. 2 examples illustrate the method. (RW) [de

  9. Method to fabricate block fuel elements for high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrovat, M.; Rachor, L.

    1978-01-01

    The fabrication of block fuel elements for gas-cooled high temperature reactors can be improved upon by adding 0.2 to 2 wt.% of a hydrocarbon compound to the lubricating mixture prior to pressing. Hexanol or octanol are named as substances. The dimensional accuracy of the block is thus improved. 2 examples illustrate the method. (orig./PW)

  10. Millimeter-Wave Thermal Analysis Development and Application to GEN IV Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wosko, Paul; Sundram, S. K.

    2012-10-16

    New millimeter-wave thermal analysis instrumentation has been developed and studied for characterization of materials required for diverse fuel and structural needs in high temperature reactor environments such as the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). A two-receiver 137 GHz system with orthogonal polarizations for anisotropic resolution of material properties has been implemented at MIT. The system was tested with graphite and silicon carbide specimens at temperatures up to 1300 ºC inside an electric furnace. The analytic and hardware basis for active millimeter-wave radiometry of reactor materials at high temperature has been established. Real-time, non contact measurement sensitivity to anisotropic surface emissivity and submillimeter surface displacement was demonstrated. The 137 GHz emissivity of reactor grade graphite (NBG17) from SGL Group was found to be low, ~ 5 %, in the 500 – 1200 °C range and increases by a factor of 2 to 4 with small linear grooves simulating fracturing. The low graphite emissivity would make millimeter-wave active radiometry a sensitive diagnostic of graphite changes due to environmentally induced stress fracturing, swelling, or corrosion. The silicon carbide tested from Ortek, Inc. was found to have a much higher emissivity at 137 GHz of ~90% Thin coatings of silicon carbide on reactor grade graphite supplied by SGL Group were found to be mostly transparent to millimeter-waves, increasing the 137 GHz emissivity of the coated reactor grade graphite to about ~14% at 1250 ºC.

  11. Constitutive relations for nuclear reactor core materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaverl, F. Jr.; Lee, D.

    1978-01-01

    A strain rate dependent constitutive equation is proposed which is capable of describing inelastic deformation behavior of anisotropic metals, such as Zircaloys, under complex loading conditions. The salient features of the constitutive equations are that they describe history dependent inelastic deformation behaviour of anisotropic metals under three-dimensional stress states in the presence of fast neutron flux. It is shown that the general form of the constitutive relations is consistent with experimental observations made under both unirradiated and irradiated conditions. The utility of the model is demonstrated by examining the analytical results obtained for a segment of tubing undergoing different loading histories in a reactor. (Auth.)

  12. Irradiation effects on the ductility of fusion reactor structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudamous, F.

    1986-10-01

    Austenitic and ferritic-martensitic stainless steels have been proposed as first wall structural materials for the next generation of fusion devices. In order to study the effect of high temperature irradiation on their tensile properties, specimens of the steel AISI 316 L (CEC reference), of the martensitic steel W. Nr 1.4914 and of the duplex ferritic-martensitic steel EM12 have been irradiated in the BR2 reactor in Mol. The austenitic steel was irradiated at 470 0 C to about 1.1 10 22 n/cm 2 ( E>0.1 MeV) while the ferritic-martensitic steels were irradiated at 590 0 C to about 7.7 10 22 n/cm 2 (E>0.1 MeV). The tensile tests of the 316 L steel have been performed between 250 and 750 0 C. Below around 550 0 C, the yield stress after irradiation increased from about 160 to 270 MPa and the total elongation decreased from 42 to about 26%. At 750 0 C, the yield stress increase was small but the total elongation decreased from 60 to only 10%. At this temperature, the rupture of the irradiated specimen was intergranular while all the other specimens presented a transgranular rupture. At 650 0 C the variations were intermediate. The change of the ultimate tensile strength was small at all test temperatures. The EM12 and W. Nr 1.4914 steels tested only at 550 0 C, showed a decrease of the yield and tensile strength as well as an increase of the total elongation. The same tests performed on specimens which have been heat treated in parallel showed that the observed changes were due, in a large part, if not completely, to the maintenance of steels at high temperature

  13. Recovery of weapon plutonium as feed material for reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armantrout, G.A.; Bronson, M.A.; Choi, Jor-Shan

    1994-01-01

    This report presents preliminary considerations for recovering and converting weapon plutonium from various US weapon forms into feed material for fabrication of reactor fuel elements. An ongoing DOE study addresses the disposition of excess weapon plutonium through its use as fuel for nuclear power reactors and subsequent disposal as spent fuel. The spent fuel would have characteristics similar to those of commercial power spent fuel and could be similarly disposed of in a geologic repository

  14. Monitoring actual temperatures in Susquehanna SES reactor buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derkacs, A.P.

    1991-01-01

    PP and L has been monitoring temperatures in the Susquehanna SES reactor building with digital temperature recorders since 1986. In early 1990, data from four representative areas was analyzed to determine the temperature in each area which would produce the same rate of degradation as the distribution of actual temperatures recorded over about 40 months. From these effective average temperatures, qualified life multipliers were determined for activation energies in the range of 0.5 to 1.5 and those multipliers were used to estimate new qualified lives and the number of replacements which might be saved during the life of the plant. The results indicate that pursuing a program of determining EQ qualified lives from actual temperatures, rather than maximum design basis temperatures, will provide a substantial payback in reduced EQ driven maintenance

  15. Alcohol synthesis in a high-temperature slurry reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, G.W.; Marquez, M.A.; McCutchen, M.S. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The overall objective of this contract is to develop improved process and catalyst technology for producing higher alcohols from synthesis gas or its derivatives. Recent research has been focused on developing a slurry reactor that can operate at temperatures up to about 400{degrees}C and on evaluating the so-called {open_quotes}high pressure{close_quotes} methanol synthesis catalyst using this reactor. A laboratory stirred autoclave reactor has been developed that is capable of operating at temperatures up to 400{degrees}C and pressures of at least 170 atm. The overhead system on the reactor is designed so that the temperature of the gas leaving the system can be closely controlled. An external liquid-level detector is installed on the gas/liquid separator and a pump is used to return condensed slurry liquid from the separator to the reactor. In order to ensure that gas/liquid mass transfer does not influence the observed reaction rate, it was necessary to feed the synthesis gas below the level of the agitator. The performance of a commercial {open_quotes}high pressure {close_quotes} methanol synthesis catalyst, the so-called {open_quotes}zinc chromite{close_quotes} catalyst, has been characterized over a range of temperature from 275 to 400{degrees}C, a range of pressure from 70 to 170 atm., a range of H{sub 2}/CO ratios from 0.5 to 2.0 and a range of space velocities from 2500 to 10,000 sL/kg.(catalyst),hr. Towards the lower end of the temperature range, methanol was the only significant product.

  16. Catalytic effect of different reactor materials under subcritical water conditions: decarboxylation of cysteic acid into taurine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, M.

    2018-03-01

    In order to understand the influence of reactor materials on the catalytic effect for a particular reaction, the decomposition of cysteic acid from Ni/Fe-based alloy reactors under subcritical water conditions was examined. Experiments were carried out in three batch reactors made of Inconel 625, Hastelloy C-22 and SUS 316 over temperatures of 200 to 300 °C. The highest amount of eluted metals was found for SUS 316. The results demonstrated that reactor materials contribute to the resulting product. Under the tested conditions, cysteic acid decomposes readily with SUS 316. However, the Ni-based materials (Inconel 625 and Hastelloy C-22) show better resistance to metal elution. It was found that among the materials used in this work, SUS 316 gave the highest reaction rate constant of 0.1934 s‑1. The same results were obtained at temperatures of 260 and 300 °C. Investigation of the Arrhenius activation energy revealed that the highest activation energy was for Hastelloy C-22 (109 kJ/mol), followed by Inconel 625 (90 kJ/mol) and SUS 316 (70 kJ/mol). The decomposition rate of cysteic acid was found to follow the results for the trend of the eluted metals. Therefore, it can be concluded that the decomposition of cysteic acid was catalyzed by the elution of heavy metals from the surface of the reactor. The highest amount of taurine from the decarboxylation of cysteic acid was obtained from SUS 316.

  17. Fusion reactor materials research in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Jiapu

    1994-10-01

    The fusion materials research in China is introduced. Many kinds of structural materials (such as Ti-modified stainless steel, ferritic steel, HT-9, HT-7, oxide dispersion strengthening ferritic steel), tritium breeders (lithium, Li 2 O, γ-LiAlO 2 ) and plasma facing materials (PFMs) (graphite with TiC and SiC coatings) have been developed or being developed. A systematic research activities on irradiation effects, compatibility, plasma materials interaction, thermal shock during disruption, tritium production, release and permeation, neutron multiplication in Be and Pb, etc. have been performed. The research activities are summarized and some experimental results are also given

  18. Material Challenges For Plasma Facing Components in Future Fusion Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linke, J; Pintsuk, G.; Rödig, M.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing attention is directed towards thermonuclear fusion as a possible future energy source. Major advantages of this energy conversion technology are the almost inexhaustible resources and the option to produce energy without CO2-emissions. However, in the most advanced field of magnetic plasma confinement a number of technological challenges have to be met. In particular high-temperature resistant and plasma compatible materials have to be developed and qualified which are able to withstand the extreme environments in a commercial thermonuclear power reactor. The plasma facing materials (PFMs) and components (PFCs) in such fusion devices, i.e. the first wall (FW), the limiters and the divertor, are strongly affected by the plasma wall interaction processes and the applied intense thermal loads during plasma operation. On the one hand, these mechanisms have a strong influence on the plasma performance; on the other hand, they have major impact on the lifetime of the plasma facing armour. In present-day and next step devices the resulting thermal steady state heat loads to the first wall remain below 1 MWm-2; the limiters and the divertor are expected to be exposed to power densities being at least one order of magnitude above the FW-level, i.e. up to 20 MWm-2 for next step tokamaks such as ITER or DEMO. These requirements are responsible for high demands on the selection of qualified PFMs and heat sink materials as well as reliable fabrication processes for actively cooled plasma facing components. The technical solutions which are considered today are mainly based on the PFMs beryllium, carbon or tungsten joined to copper alloys or stainless steel heat sinks. In addition to the above mentioned quasi-stationary heat loads, short transient thermal pulses with deposited energy densities up to several tens of MJm-2 are a serious concern for next step tokamak devices. The most frequent events are so-called Edge Localized Modes (type I ELMs) and plasma disruptions

  19. Corrosion response of nuclear reactor materials to mixtures of decontamination reagents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speranzini, R.A.; Burchart, P.A.; Kanhai, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study of the corrosiveness of mixtures of citric acid, oxalic acid, and EDTA to nuclear reactor materials was undertaken. Specimens of type 304 stainless steel (SS), type 410 SS, carbon steel (CS) 1018 and A508, and heat-treated alloy 600 were suspended in recirculating mixtures of two or more combinations of citric acid, oxalic acid, and EDTA at temperatures of 90 C or 117 C for 22 hours. The results suggest that removal of oxalic acid from decontamination solutions should lower the corrosiveness of the solutions to nuclear reactor materials, particularly types 304 SS and 410 SS

  20. STATUS OF TRISO FUEL IRRADIATIONS IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR SUPPORTING HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR DESIGNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davenport, Michael; Petti, D. A.; Palmer, Joe

    2016-11-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is irradiating up to seven low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The experiments will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of several independent capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and completed in October 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated (AGR-3/4), which started its irradiation in December 2011 and completed in April 2014. Since the purpose of this experiment was to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment was significantly different from the first two experiments, though the control

  1. Critical evaluation of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors applicable to coal conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiewak, I.; Jones, J.E. Jr.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; DeStefano, J.R.; Delene, J.G.

    1975-12-01

    A critical review is presented of the technology and costs of very high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTRs) applicable to nuclear coal conversion. Coal conversion processes suitable for coupling to reactors are described. Vendor concepts of the VHTR are summarized. The materials requirements as a function of process temperature in the range 1400 to 2000 0 F are analyzed. Components, environmental and safety factors, economics and nuclear fuel cycles are reviewed. It is concluded that process heat supply in the range 1400 to 1500 0 F could be developed with a high degree of assurance. Process heat at 1600 0 F would require considerably more materials development. While temperatures up to 2000 0 F appear to be attainable, considerably more research and risk were involved. A demonstration plant would be required as a step in the commercialization of the VHTR

  2. Minimizing material damage using low temperature irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craven, E.; Hasanain, F.; Winters, M.

    2012-01-01

    Scientific advancements in healthcare driven both by technological breakthroughs and an aging and increasingly obese population have lead to a changing medical device market. Complex products and devices are being developed to meet the demands of leading edge medical procedures. Specialized materials in these medical devices, including pharmaceuticals and biologics as well as exotic polymers present a challenge for radiation sterilization as many of these components cannot withstand conventional irradiation methods. The irradiation of materials at dry ice temperatures has emerged as a technique that can be used to decrease the radiation sensitivity of materials. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of low temperature irradiation on a variety of polymer materials, and over a range of temperatures from 0 °C down to −80 °C. The effectiveness of microbial kill is also investigated under each of these conditions. The results of the study show that the effect of low temperature irradiation is material dependent and can alter the balance between crosslinking and chain scission of the polymer. Low temperatures also increase the dose required to achieve an equivalent microbiological kill, therefore dose setting exercises must be performed under the environmental conditions of use. - Highlights: ► A study is performed to quantify low temperature irradiation effects on polymer materials and BIs. ► Low temperature irradiation alters the balance of cross-linking and chain scissoning in polymers. ► Low temperatures provide radioprotection for BIs. ► Benefits of low temperatures are application specific and must be considered when dose setting.

  3. Erosion and mass transfer of Mo, W and Nb under neutron irradiation of high temperature materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berzhatyj, V.I.; Luk'yanov, A.N.; Zavalishin, A.A.; Tkach, V.N.; Fedorenko, A.I.

    1980-01-01

    Studies have been made of the medium composition in thermionic fuel elements of two types during reactor tests; erosion and mass transfer of electrode materials have been investigated in the after-reactor analysis of the tested fuel elements. The studies of electrode material evaporation at the conditions approaching (in environment temperature and composition) those of reactor tests of thermionic fuel elements have shown that the process proceeds in the form of metal oxides. Evaporation rates are determined, the mechanism of evaporation is discussed, and the analytical dependences are obtained for calculating the evaporation rates of Mo and W at certain temperature and gaseous medium composition. It is found that the main contribution to the material transfer off the Mo and Nb surfaces under a high-temperature reactor irradiation comes through the thermal evaporation; in the case of tungsten at the same experimental conditions the rates of mass transfer due to thermal evaporation and neutron sputtering are nearly the same [ru

  4. Concept of an inherently-safe high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Hirofumi; Sato, Hiroyuki; Tachibana, Yukio; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Masuro

    2012-01-01

    As the challenge to ensure no harmful release of radioactive materials at the accidents by deterministic approach instead to satisfy acceptance criteria or safety goal for risk by probabilistic approach, new concept of advanced reactor, an inherently-safe high temperature gas-cooled reactor, is proposed based on the experience of the operation of the actual High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) in Japan, High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), and the design of the commercial plant (GTHTR300), utilizing the inherent safety features of the HTGR (i.e., safety features based on physical phenomena). The safety design philosophy of the inherently-safe HTGR for the safety analysis of the radiological consequences is determined as the confinement of radioactive materials is assured by only inherent safety features without engineered safety features, AC power or prompt actions by plant personnel if the design extension conditions occur. Inherent safety features to prevent the loss or degradation of the confinement function are identified. It is proposed not to apply the probabilistic approach for the evaluation of the radiological consequences of the accidents in the safety analysis because no inherent safety features fail for the mitigation of the consequences of the accidents. Consequently, there are no event sequences to harmful release of radioactive materials if the design extension conditions occur in the inherently-safe HTGR concept. The concept and future R and D items for the inherently-safe HTGR are described in this paper.

  5. Mechanical properties of LMR structural materials at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, D. W.; Kuk, I. H.; Ryu, W. S. and others

    1999-03-01

    Austenitic stainless is used for the structural material of liquid metal reactor (LMR) because of good mechanical properties at high temperature. Stainless steel having more resistant to temperature by adding minor element has been developing for operating the LMR at higher temperature. Of many elements, nitrogen is a prospective element to modify type 316L(N) stainless steel because nitrogen is the most effective element for solid solution and because nitrogen retards the precipitation of carbide at grain boundary. Ti, Nb, and V are added to improve creep properties by stabilizing the carbides through forming MC carbide. Testing techniques of tensile, fatigue, creep, and creep-fatigue at high temperature are difficult. Moreover, testing times for creep and creep-fatigue tests are very long up to several tens of thousands hours because creep and creep-fatigue phenomena are time-dependent damage mechanism. So, it is hard to acquire the material data for designing LMR systems during a limited time. In addition, the integrity of LMR structural materials at the end of LMR life has to be predicted from the laboratory data tested during the short term because there is no data tested during 40 years. Therefore, the effect of elements on mechanical properties at high temperature was reviewed in this study and many methods to predict the long-term behaviors of structural materials by simulated modelling equation is shown in this report. (author). 32 refs., 9 tabs., 38 figs

  6. Phase change material for temperature control and material storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessling, Jr., Francis C. (Inventor); Blackwood, James M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A phase change material comprising a mixture of water and deuterium oxide is described, wherein the mole fraction of deuterium oxide is selected so that the mixture has a selected phase change temperature within a range between 0.degree. C. and 4.degree. C. The mixture is placed in a container and used for passive storage and transport of biomaterials and other temperature sensitive materials. Gels, nucleating agents, freezing point depression materials and colorants may be added to enhance the characteristics of the mixture.

  7. High temperature fracture of ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiederhorn, S.M.

    1979-01-01

    A review is presented of fracture mechanisms and methods of lifetime prediction in ceramic materials. Techniques of lifetime prediction are based on the science of fracture mechanics. Application of these techniques to structural ceramics is limited by our incomplete understanding of fracture mechanisms in these materials, and by the occurrence of flaw generation in these materials at elevated temperatures. Research on flaw generation and fracture mechanisms is recommended as a way of improving the reliability of structural ceramics

  8. Neutron analysis of the fuel of high temperature nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastida O, G. E.; Francois L, J. L.

    2014-10-01

    In this work a neutron analysis of the fuel of some high temperature nuclear reactors is presented, studying its main features, besides some alternatives of compound fuel by uranium and plutonium, and of coolant: sodium and helium. For this study was necessary the use of a code able to carry out a reliable calculation of the main parameters of the fuel. The use of the Monte Carlo method was convenient to simulate the neutrons transport in the reactor core, which is the base of the Serpent code, with which the calculations will be made for the analysis. (Author)

  9. Materials for high-temperature fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, San Ping; Lu, Max

    2013-01-01

    There are a large number of books available on fuel cells; however, the majority are on specific types of fuel cells such as solid oxide fuel cells, proton exchange membrane fuel cells, or on specific technical aspects of fuel cells, e.g., the system or stack engineering. Thus, there is a need for a book focused on materials requirements in fuel cells. Key Materials in High-Temperature Fuel Cells is a concise source of the most important and key materials and catalysts in high-temperature fuel cells with emphasis on the most important solid oxide fuel cells. A related book will cover key mater

  10. High Temperature Materials Interim Data Qualification Report FY 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lybeck, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    Projects for the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office provide data in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing of the VHTR. Fuel and materials to be used in the reactor are tested and characterized to quantify performance in high temperature and high fluence environments. The VHTR program has established the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) to ensure that VHTR data are qualified for use, stored in a readily accessible electronic form, and analyzed to extract useful results. This document focuses on the first NDMAS objective. It describes the High Temperature Materials characterization data stream, the processing of these data within NDMAS, and reports the interim fiscal year (FY) 2011 qualification status of the data. Data qualification activities within NDMAS for specific types of data are determined by the data qualification category assigned by the data generator. The High Temperature Materials data are being collected under the Nuclear Quality Assurance (NQA)-1 guidelines and will be qualified data. For NQA-1 qualified data, the qualification activities include: (1) capture testing to confirm that the data stored within NDMAS are identical to the raw data supplied, (2) accuracy testing to confirm that the data are an accurate representation of the system or object being measured, and (3) documenting that the data were collected under an NQA-1 or equivalent Quality Assurance program. Currently, data from seven test series within the High Temperature Materials data stream have been entered into the NDMAS vault, including tensile tests, creep tests, and cyclic tests. Of the 5,603,682 records currently in the vault, 4,480,444 have been capture passed, and capture testing is in process for the remaining 1,123,238.

  11. Damage analysis and fundamental studies for fusion reactor materials development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odette, G.R.; Lucas, G.E.

    1991-09-01

    The philosophy of the program at the University of California Santa Barbara has been to develop a fundamental understanding of both the basic damage processes and microstructural evolution that take place in a material during neutron irradiation and the consequent dimensional and mechanical property changes. This fundamental understanding can be used in conjunction with empirical data obtained from a variety of irradiation facilities to develop physically-based models of neutron irradiation effects in structural materials. The models in turn can be used to guide alloy development and to help extrapolate the irradiation data base (expected to be largely fission reactor based) to the fusion reactor regime. This philosophy is consistent with that of the national and international programs for developing structural materials for fusion reactors

  12. Hydrogen isotopes transport parameters in fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serra, E.; Ogorodnikova, O.V.

    1998-01-01

    This work presents a review of hydrogen isotopes-materials interactions in various materials of interest for fusion reactors. The relevant parameters cover mainly diffusivity, solubility, trap concentration and energy difference between trap and solution sites. The list of materials includes the martensitic steels (MANET, Batman and F82H-mod.), beryllium, aluminium, beryllium oxide, aluminium oxide, copper, tungsten and molybdenum. Some experimental work on the parameters that describe the surface effects is also mentioned. (orig.)

  13. Overview of European Community (Activity 3) work on materials properties of fast reactor structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, D.S.

    The Fast Reactor Coordinating Committee set up in 1974 the Working Group Codes and Standards, and organized its work into four main activities: Manufacturing standards, Structural analysis, Materials and Classification of components. The main purpose of materials activity is to compare and contrast existing national specifications and associated properties relevant to structural materials in fast reactors. Funds are available on a yearly basis for tasks to be carried out through Study Contracts. At present about four Study Contract Reports are prepared each year

  14. Monitoring system for accuracy and reliability characteristics of standard temperature measurements in WWER-440 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanc, S.; Repa, M.

    2001-01-01

    Description of a monitoring system for accuracy and reliability characteristics of standard temperature measurements in WWER-440 reactors and benefits obtained from its use are shown in the presentation. As standard reactor temperature measurement, coolant temperature measurement at fuel assembly outlets and in loops, entered into the In-Reactor Control System , are considered. Such systems have been implemented at two V-230 reactors and are under implementation at other four V-213 reactors. (Authors)

  15. Plasma flow reactor for steady state monitoring of physical and chemical processes at high temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroglu, Batikan; Mehl, Marco; Armstrong, Michael R; Crowhurst, Jonathan C; Weisz, David G; Zaug, Joseph M; Dai, Zurong; Radousky, Harry B; Chernov, Alex; Ramon, Erick; Stavrou, Elissaios; Knight, Kim; Fabris, Andrea L; Cappelli, Mark A; Rose, Timothy P

    2017-09-01

    We present the development of a steady state plasma flow reactor to investigate gas phase physical and chemical processes that occur at high temperature (1000 flow injector). We have modeled the system using computational fluid dynamics simulations that are bounded by measured temperatures. In situ line-of-sight optical emission and absorption spectroscopy have been used to determine the structures and concentrations of molecules formed during rapid cooling of reactants after they pass through the plasma. Emission spectroscopy also enables us to determine the temperatures at which these dynamic processes occur. A sample collection probe inserted from the open end of the reactor is used to collect condensed materials and analyze them ex situ using electron microscopy. The preliminary results of two separate investigations involving the condensation of metal oxides and chemical kinetics of high-temperature gas reactions are discussed.

  16. Integrated infrastructure initiatives for material testing reactor innovations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dekeyser, Jean; Vermeeren, Ludo; Iracane, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The EU FP7 MTR+I3 project has initiated a durable cooperation between MTR operators. → Improvements in irradiation test device technology and instrumentation were achieved. → Professional training efforts were streamlined and best practices were exchanged. → A framework has been set up to coordinate and optimize the use of MTRs in the EU. - Abstract: The key goal of the European FP6 project MTR+I3 was to build a durable cooperation between Material Testing Reactor (MTR) operators and relevant laboratories that can maintain European leadership with updated capabilities and competences regarding reactor performances and irradiation technology. The MTR+I3 consortium was composed of 18 partners with a high level of expertise in irradiation-related services for all types of nuclear plants. This project covered activities that foster integration of the MTR community involved in designing, fabricating and operating irradiation devices through information exchange, know-how cross-fertilization, exchanges of interdisciplinary personnel, structuring of key-technology suppliers and professional training. The network produced best practice guidelines for selected irradiation activities. This project allowed to launch or to improve technical studies in various domains dealing with irradiation test device technology, experimental loop designs and instrumentation. Major results are illustrated in this paper. These concern in particular: on-line fuel power determination, neutron screen optimization, simulation of transmutation process, power transient systems, water chemistry and stress corrosion cracking, fission gas measurement, irradiation behaviour of electronic modules, mechanical loading under irradiation, high temperature gas loop technology, heavy liquid metal loop development and safety test instrumentation. One of the major benefits of this project is that, starting from a situation of fragmented resources in a strongly competitive sector, it has

  17. First conceptual design of the experimental multi-purpose high temperature reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsunoda, T [Fuji Electric Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1976-02-01

    A part of the multi-purpose high temperature reactor (VHTR) was designed by the First Atomic Power Industry Group (FAPIG). Both Fuji Electric Co., Ltd. and Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd. of the FAPIG group took charge of the design of main parts of the reactor Kobe Steel, Ltd., Ebara Manufacturing Co., Ltd., Shimizu Construction Co., Ltd. and the Nuclear Fuel Corp. have associated with this group. The reactor system includes a nuclear reactor and two cooling loops provided through intermediate heat exchangers in order to utilize the heat of helium gas delivered from the reactor outlet at 1,000 deg C. One is a reformer loop to produce the reducing gas for steel manufacture. The other is a testing loop for a reducing gas heater and a gas turbine. These loops transfer heat of about 25 MW at 930 deg C at rated capacity. The reformer can supply the reducing gas equivalent to the production of 100 tons per day sponge iron. A housing of the reactor is composed of a primary steel container, internal concrete and a secondary container made of reinforced concrete. The construction is based on the following principles. (1) For the very high temperature portion at 1,000 deg C, a non-metallic material such as graphite should be used. (2) The metallic construction shall be cooled with return gas below 400 deg C. (3) The steel pressure vessel shall be employed. (4) The design shall be based on the existing gas furnace.

  18. The United States fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcomb, David E.

    2013-01-01

    The United States is pursuing the development of fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactors (FHRs) through the Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE). FHRs, by definition, feature low-pressure liquid fluoride salt cooling, coated-particle fuel, a high-temperature power cycle, and fully passive decay heat rejection. FHRs, in principle, have the potential to economically generate large amounts of electricity while maintaining full passive safety. FHRs, however, remain a longer-term power production option. A principal development focus is, thus, on shortening, to the extent possible, the overall development time by focusing initial efforts on the longest lead-time issues. While FHRs represent a distinct reactor class, they inherit desirable attributes from other thermal power plants whose characteristics can be studied to provide general guidance on plant configuration, anticipated performance, and costs. Molten salt reactors provide experience on the materials, procedures, and components necessary to use liquid fluoride salts. Liquid-metal reactors provide design experience on using low-pressure liquid coolants, passive decay heat removal, and hot refueling. High-temperature gas-cooled reactors provide experience with coated-particle fuel and graphite components. Light-water reactors show the potential of transparent, high-heat-capacity coolants with low chemical reactivity. The FHR development efforts include both reactor concept and technology developments and are being broadly pursued. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides technical leadership to the effort and is performing concept development on both a large base-load-type FHR as well as a small modular reactor (SMR) in addition to performing a broad scope of technology developments. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is providing coated-particle fuel irradiation testing as well as developing high-temperature steam generator technology. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT

  19. Medium-size high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peinado, C.O.; Koutz, S.L.

    1980-08-01

    This report summarizes high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) experience for the 40-MW(e) Peach Bottom Nuclear Generating Station of Philadelphia Electric Company and the 330-MW(e) Fort St. Vrain Nuclear Generating Station of the Public Service Company of Colorado. Both reactors are graphite moderated and helium cooled, operating at approx. 760 0 C (1400 0 F) and using the uranium/thorium fuel cycle. The plants have demonstrated the inherent safety characteristics, the low activation of components, and the high efficiency associated with the HTGR concept. This experience has been translated into the conceptual design of a medium-sized 1170-MW(t) HTGR for generation of 450 MW of electric power. The concept incorporates inherent HTGR safety characteristics [a multiply redundant prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV), a graphite core, and an inert single-phase coolant] and engineered safety features

  20. Neutron activation of building materials used in the reactor shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, A.T.; Perez, G.; D'Alessandro, K.

    1993-01-01

    Cuban concretes and their main components (mineral aggregates and cement) were investigated through long-lived activation products induced by neutrons from a reactor. The multielemental content in the materials studied was obtained by neutron activation analysis in an IBR-2 reactor and gamma activation analysis in an MT-25 microtron from Join Institute of Nuclear Research of Dubna. After irradiation of building materials for 30 years by a neutron flow of unitary density, induced radioactivity was calculated according to experimental data. The comparative evaluation of different concretes aggregates and two types of cement related to the activation properties is discussed

  1. Investigations into radiation damages of reactor materials by computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronnikov, V.A.

    2004-01-01

    Data on the state of works in European countries in the field of computerized simulation of radiation damages of reactor materials under the context of the international projects ITEM (European Database for Multiscale Modelling) and SIRENA (Simulation of Radiation Effects in Zr-Nb alloys) - computerized simulation of stress corrosion when contact of Zr-Nb alloys with iodine are presented. Computer codes for the simulation of radiation effects in reactor materials were developed. European Database for Multiscale Modelling (EDAM) was organized using the results of the investigations provided in the ITEM project [ru

  2. Development of a Fissile Materials Irradiation Capability for Advanced Fuel Testing at the MIT Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Linwen; Bernard, John A.; Hejzlar, Pavel; Kohse, Gordon

    2005-01-01

    A fissile materials irradiation capability has been developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Research Reactor (MITR) to support nuclear engineering studies in the area of advanced fuels. The focus of the expected research is to investigate the basic properties of advanced nuclear fuels using small aggregates of fissile material. As such, this program is intended to complement the ongoing fuel evaluation programs at test reactors. Candidates for study at the MITR include vibration-packed annular fuel for light water reactors and microparticle fuels for high-temperature gas reactors. Technical considerations that pertain to the design of the MITR facility are enumerated including those specified by 10 CFR 50 concerning the definition of a research reactor and those contained in a separate license amendment that was issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to MIT for these types of experiments. The former includes limits on the cross-sectional area of the experiment, the physical form of the irradiated material, and the removal of heat. The latter addresses experiment reactivity worth, thermal-hydraulic considerations, avoidance of fission product release, and experiment specific temperature scrams

  3. Minimizing material damage using low temperature irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, E.; Hasanain, F.; Winters, M.

    2012-08-01

    Scientific advancements in healthcare driven both by technological breakthroughs and an aging and increasingly obese population have lead to a changing medical device market. Complex products and devices are being developed to meet the demands of leading edge medical procedures. Specialized materials in these medical devices, including pharmaceuticals and biologics as well as exotic polymers present a challenge for radiation sterilization as many of these components cannot withstand conventional irradiation methods. The irradiation of materials at dry ice temperatures has emerged as a technique that can be used to decrease the radiation sensitivity of materials. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of low temperature irradiation on a variety of polymer materials, and over a range of temperatures from 0 °C down to -80 °C. The effectiveness of microbial kill is also investigated under each of these conditions. The results of the study show that the effect of low temperature irradiation is material dependent and can alter the balance between crosslinking and chain scission of the polymer. Low temperatures also increase the dose required to achieve an equivalent microbiological kill, therefore dose setting exercises must be performed under the environmental conditions of use.

  4. Continuous fluid bed reactor for fissionable material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, D.L.

    1975-01-01

    Plutonium (Pu) purification and plutonium hexafluoride (PuF 6 ) formation are achieved on a continuous basis by feeding particulate material into one end of an elongated and horizontally disposed vessel having an upper section with generally converging side walls and a lower section with generally vertical side walls, compartmented throughout its length by transversely disposed baffles, so that particulate material flows through the vessel in vertical generally zigzag fashion, being fluidized by dispersing gas that enters the compartment from a lower narrow compartment and discharges through an upper widened compartment. Vaporous PuF 6 formed from a reaction between the dispersing gas and the particulate material discharges through the upper widened compartment and solid impurities discharge for collection through a port at a far or distal end of the elongated vessel. (U.S.)

  5. Some metallic materials and fluoride salts for high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosnedl, P.; Hron, M.; Matal, O.

    2009-01-01

    There has been a special Ni base alloy MONICR for high temperature applications in fluoride salt environments developed in the framework of the complex R and D program for the Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) - SPHINX (SPent Hot fuel Incinerator by Neutron fluX) concept development in the Czech Republic. Selected results of MONICR alloy tests and results of semi products fabrication from this alloy are discussed in the paper. The results of the structural materials tests are applied on semi-products and for the design of the testing devices as the autoclave in loop arrangement for high temperature fluoride salts applications. Material properties other Ni base alloys are compared to those of MONICR. Corrosion test results of the alloy A686 in the LiF - NaF - ZrF 4 molten salt are provided and compared to the measured values of the polarizing resistance. (author)

  6. Status of control assembly materials in Indian water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Date, V.G.; Kulkarni, P.G.

    2000-01-01

    India's present operating water cooled power reactors comprise boiling water reactors of Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS) and pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs) at Kota (RAPS), Kalpakkam (MAPS), Narora (NAPS) and Kakrapara (KAPS). Boiling water reactors of TAPS use boron carbide control blades for control of power as well as for shut down (scram). PHWRs use boron steel and cobalt absorber rods for power control and Cd sandwiched shut off rods (primary shut down system) and liquid poison rods (secondary shut down system) for shut down. In TAPS, Gadolinium rods (burnable poison rods) are also incorporated in fuel assembly for flux flattening. Boron carbide control blades and Gadolinium rods for TAPS, cobalt absorber rods and shut down assemblies for PHWRs are fabricated indigenously. Considerable development work was carried out for evolving material specifications, component and assembly drawings, and fabrication processes. Details of various control and shut off assemblies being fabricated currently are highlighted in the paper. (author)

  7. Fuel elements for high temperature reactors having special suitability for reuse of the structural graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huschka, H.; Herrmann, F.J.

    1976-01-01

    There are prepared fuel elements for high temperature reactors from which the fuel zone can be removed from the structural graphite after the burnup of the fissile material has taken place so that the fuel element can be filled with new fuel and again placed in the reactor by having the strength of the matrix in the fuel zone sufficient for binding the embedded coated fuel particles but substantially less than the strength of the structural graphite whereby by the action of force it can be easily split up without destroying the particles

  8. Materials data base for fusion reactors-I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, S.; Nogami, A.; Ishino, S.; Mishima, Y.; Takao, Y.; Aruga, T.; Shiraishi, K.

    1982-01-01

    The materials data base is a set of experimental and/or calculated data being compiled to meet the broad needs for materials data by taking advantage of the data base management systems. In this paper the objective of such computerized data base is described and the characteristics of fusion reactor materials are discussed from the viewpoint of the data base development. The near-term emphasis of the development has been put on the irradiation data for 316 type stainless steels. Through the test of this small data base, it can be concluded that this approach is promising for materials data base management and for the establishment of the interface between fusion reactor designer and materials investigator. (orig.)

  9. Materials research with neutron beams from a research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Root, J.; Banks, D. [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    Because of the unique ways that neutrons interact with matter, neutron beams from a research reactor can reveal knowledge about materials that cannot be obtained as easily with other scientific methods. Neutron beams are suitable for imaging methods (radiography or tomography), for scattering methods (diffraction, spectroscopy, and reflectometry) and for other possibilities. Neutron-beam methods are applied by students and researchers from academia, industry and government to support their materials research programs in several disciplines: physics, chemistry, materials science and life science. The arising knowledge about materials has been applied to advance technologies that appear in everyday life: transportation, communication, energy, environment and health. This paper illustrates the broad spectrum of materials research with neutron beams, by presenting examples from the Canadian Neutron Beam Centre at the NRU research reactor in Chalk River. (author)

  10. Neutron irradiation experiments for fusion reactor materials through JUPITER program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, K.; Namba, C.; Wiffen, F.W.; Jones, R.H.

    1998-01-01

    A Japan-USA program of irradiation experiments for fusion research, ''JUPITER'', has been established as a 6 year program from 1995 to 2000. The goal is to study ''the dynamic behavior of fusion reactor materials and their response to variable and complex irradiation environment''. This is phase-three of the collaborative program, which follows RTNS-II program (phase-1: 1982-1986) and FFTF/MOTA program (phase-2: 1987-1994). This program is to provide a scientific basis for application of materials performance data, generated by fission reactor experiments, to anticipated fusion environments. Following the systematic study on cumulative irradiation effects, done through FFTF/MOTA program. JUPITER is emphasizing the importance of dynamic irradiation effects on materials performance in fusion systems. The irradiation experiments in this program include low activation structural materials, functional ceramics and other innovative materials. The experimental data are analyzed by theoretical modeling and computer simulation to integrate the above effects. (orig.)

  11. Molten core material holding device in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hisashi; Tanaka, Nobuo; Takahashi, Katsuro.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the function of cooling to hold molten core materials in a molten core material holding device. Constitution: Plenum structures are formed into a pan-like configuration, in which liners made of metal having high melting point and relatively high heat conductivity such as tantalum, tungsten, rhenium or alloys thereof are integrally appended to hold and directly cool the molten reactor core materials. Further, a plurality of heat pipes, passing through the plenum structures, facing the cooling portion thereof to the coolants at the outer side and immersing the heating portion into the molten core materials fallen to deposit in the inner liners are disposed radially. Furthermore, heat pipes embodded in the plenum structure are disposed in the same manner below the liners. Thus, the plenum structures and the molten reactor core materials can be cooled at a high efficiency. (Seki, T.)

  12. Tritium permeation behavior through pyrolytic carbon in tritium production using high-temperature gas-cooled reactor for fusion reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ushida

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Under tritium production method using a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor loaded Li compound, Li compound has to be coated by ceramic materials in order to suppress the spreading of tritium to the whole reactor. Pyrolytic carbon (PyC is a candidate of the coating material because of its high resistance for gas permeation. In this study, hydrogen permeation experiments using a PyC-coated isotropic graphite tube were conducted and hydrogen diffusivity, solubility and permeability were evaluated. Tritium permeation behavior through PyC-coated Li compound particles was simulated by using obtained data. Hydrogen permeation flux through PyC in a steady state is proportional to the hydrogen pressure and is larger than that through Al2O3 which is also candidate coating material. However, total tritium leak within the supposed reactor operation period through the PyC-coated Li compound particles is lower than that through the Al2O3-coated ones because the hydrogen absorption capacity in PyC is considerably larger than that in Al2O3.

  13. Structure optimization of CFB reactor for moderate temperature FGD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yuan; Zhang, Jie; Zheng, Kai; You, Changfu [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Thermal Engineering; Ministry of Education, Beijing (China). Key Lab. for Thermal Science and Power Engineering

    2013-07-01

    The gas velocity distribution, sorbent particle concentration distribution and particle residence time in circulating fluidized bed (CFB) reactors for moderate temperature flue gas desulfurization (FGD) have significant influence on the desulfurization efficiency and the sorbent calcium conversion ratio for sulfur reaction. Experimental and numerical methods were used to investigate the influence of the key reactor structures, including the reactor outlet structure, internal structure, feed port and circulating port, on the gas velocity distribution, sorbent particle concentration distribution and particle residence time. Experimental results showed that the desulfurization efficiency increased 5-10% when the internal structure was added in the CFB reactor. Numerical analysis results showed that the particle residence time of the feed particles with the average diameter of 89 and 9 {mu}m increased 40% and 17% respectively, and the particle residence time of the circulating particles with the average diameter of 116 {mu}m increased 28% after reactor structure optimization. The particle concentration distribution also improved significantly, which was good for improving the contact efficiency between the sorbent particles and SO{sub 2}. In addition, the optimization guidelines were proposed to further increase the desulfurization efficiency and the sorbent calcium conversion ratio.

  14. Use of thorium for high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimarães, Cláudio Q., E-mail: claudio_guimaraes@usp.br [Universidade de São Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Física; Stefani, Giovanni L. de, E-mail: giovanni.stefani@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Santos, Thiago A. dos, E-mail: thiago.santos@ufabc.edu.br [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Santo André, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The HTGR ( High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor) is a 4{sup th} generation nuclear reactor and is fuelled by a mixture of graphite and fuel-bearing microspheres. There are two competitive designs of this reactor type: The German “pebble bed” mode, which is a system that uses spherical fuel elements, containing a graphite-and-fuel mixture coated in a graphite shell; and the American version, whose fuel is loaded into precisely located graphite hexagonal prisms that interlock to create the core of the vessel. In both variants, the coolant consists of helium pressurised. The HTGR system operates most efficiently with the thorium fuel cycle, however, so relatively little development has been carried out in this country on that cycle for HTGRs. In the Nuclear Engineering Centre of IPEN (Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares), a study group is being formed linked to thorium reactors, whose proposal is to investigate reactors using thorium for {sup 233}U production and rejects burning. The present work intends to show the use of thorium in HTGRs, their advantages and disadvantages and its feasibility. (author)

  15. Overview of fast reactor structural materials programme in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, P.; Paranjpe, S.R.; Chetal, S.C.; Mannan, S.L.; Ray, S.K.; Seetharaman, V.; Srinivasan, G.

    The fast reactor structural materials activities in India comprise of the programme on the materials for the Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR), the construction of which is nearing completion, and the programme on the candidate materials for the Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) which is now in the design stage. For the materials in use in FBTR, the main thrust has been towards detailed evaluation and documentation of long term (creep) properties of type 316 stainless steel base material in air. For the PFBR the philosophy has been to identify the candidate materials and to evolve a wider scope for the testing and evaluation programmes. The major structural component is identified as variants of type 304 stainless steel and the programmes undertaken include study of low cycle fatigue properties and environmental effects on creep and stress rupture properties. Evaluations of aging embrittlement of type 316 stainless steel base material and weldments are also in progress. The paper lists the testing programmes identified for adoption in the near future. These include creep-fatigue damage studies and fracture mechanics studies on weldments for type 304 stainless steel and testing programme on 2.25 Cr-1 Mo and 9 Cr-1 Mo steels, the identified candidate materials for steam generators. The development efforts also include a comprehensive programme on inelastic analysis procedure. (author)

  16. Advance High Temperature Inspection Capabilities for Small Modular Reactors: Part 1 - Ultrasonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, Leonard J. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Bowler, John R. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2017-08-30

    The project objective was to investigate the development non-destructive evaluation techniques for advanced small modular reactors (aSMR), where the research sought to provide key enabling inspection technologies needed to support the design and maintenance of reactor component performance. The project tasks for the development of inspection techniques to be applied to small modular reactor are being addressed through two related activities. The first is focused on high temperature ultrasonic transducers development (this report Part 1) and the second is focused on an advanced eddy current inspection capability (Part 2). For both inspection techniques the primary aim is to develop in-service inspection techniques that can be carried out under standby condition in a fast reactor at a temperature of approximately 250°C in the presence of liquid sodium. The piezoelectric material and the bonding between layers have been recognized as key factors fundamental for development of robust ultrasonic transducers. Dielectric constant characterization of bismuth scantanate-lead titanate ((1-x)BiScO3-xPbTiO3) (BS-PT) has shown a high Curie temperature in excess of 450°C , suitable for hot stand-by inspection in liquid metal reactors. High temperature pulse-echo contact measurements have been performed with BS-PT bonded to 12.5 mm thick 1018-low carbon steel plate from 20C up to 260 C. High temperature air-backed immersion transducers have been developed with BS-PT, high temperature epoxy and quarter wavlength nickel plate, needed for wetting ability in liquid sodium. Ultrasonic immersion measurements have been performed in water up to 92C and in silicone oil up to 140C. Physics based models have been validated with room temperature experimental data with benchmark artifical defects.

  17. A New Class of Functionally Graded Cearamic-Metal Composites for Next Generation Very High Temperature Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Mohit; Skandan, Ganesh; Khose, Gordon E.; Maro, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Generation IV Very High Temperature power generating nuclear reactors will operate at temperatures greater than 900 C. At these temperatures, the components operating in these reactors need to be fabricated from materials with excellent thermo-mechanical properties. Conventional pure or composite materials have fallen short in delivering the desired performance. New materials, or conventional materials with new microstructures, and associated processing technologies are needed to meet these materials challenges. Using the concept of functionally graded materials, we have fabricated a composite material which has taken advantages of the mechanical and thermal properties of ceramic and metals. Functionally-graded composite samples with various microstructures were fabricated. It was demonstrated that the composition and spatial variation in the composition of the composite can be controlled. Some of the samples were tested for irradiation resistance to neutrons. The samples did not degrade during initial neutron irradiation testing.

  18. "A New Class od Functionally Graded Cearamic-Metal Composites for Next Generation Very High Temperature Reactors"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Mohit Jain; Dr. Ganesh Skandan; Dr. Gordon E. Khose; Mrs. Judith Maro, Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, MIT

    2008-05-01

    Generation IV Very High Temperature power generating nuclear reactors will operate at temperatures greater than 900 oC. At these temperatures, the components operating in these reactors need to be fabricated from materials with excellent thermo-mechanical properties. Conventional pure or composite materials have fallen short in delivering the desired performance. New materials, or conventional materials with new microstructures, and associated processing technologies are needed to meet these materials challenges. Using the concept of functionally graded materials, we have fabricated a composite material which has taken advantages of the mechanical and thermal properties of ceramic and metals. Functionally-graded composite samples with various microstructures were fabricated. It was demonstrated that the composition and spatial variation in the composition of the composite can be controlled. Some of the samples were tested for irradiation resistance to neutrons. The samples did not degrade during initial neutron irradiation testing.

  19. Electronic temperature control and measurements reactor fuel rig circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glowacki, S W

    1980-01-01

    The electronic circuits of two digital temperature meters developed for the thermocouple of Ni-NiCr type are described. The output thermocouple signal as converted by means of voltage-to-freguency converter. The frequency is measured by a digital scaler controled by quartz generator signals. One of the described meter is coupled with digital temperature controler which drives the power stage of the reactor rig heater. The internal rig temperature is measured by the thermocouple providing the input signal to the mentioned voltage-to-frequency converter, that means the circuits work in the negative feedback loop. The converter frequency-to-voltage ratio is automatically adjusted to match to thermocouple sensitivity changes in the course of the temperature variations. The accuracy of measuring system is of order of +- 1degC for thermocouple temperature changes from 523 K up to 973 K (50degC up to 700degC).

  20. The electronic temperature control and measurements reactor fuel rig circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glowacki, S.W.

    1980-01-01

    The electronic circuits of two digital temperature meters developed for the thermocouple of Ni-NiCr type are described. The output thermocouple signal as converted by means of voltage-to-freguency converter. The frequency is measured by a digital scaler controled by quartz generator signals. One of the described meter is coupled with digital temperature controler which drives the power stage of the reactor rig heater. The internal rig temperature is measured by the thermocouple providing the input signal to the mentioned voltage-to-frequency converter, that means the circuits work in the negative feedback loop. The converter frequency-to-voltage ratio is automatically adjusted to match to thermocouple sensitivity changes in the course of the temperature variations. The accuracy of measuring system is of order of +- 1degC for thermocouple temperature changes from 523 K up to 973 K (50degC up to 700degC). (author)

  1. Power Conversion Study for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Oh; Richard Moore; Robert Barner

    2005-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is investigating a Brayton cycle efficiency improvement on a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) as part of Generation-IV nuclear engineering research initiative. There are some technical issues to be resolved before the selection of the final design of the high temperature gas cooled reactor, called as a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), which is supposed to be built at the INEEL by year 2017. The technical issues are the selection of the working fluid, direct vs. indirect cycle, power cycle type, the optimized design in terms of a number of intercoolers, and others. In this paper, we investigated a number of working fluids for the power conversion loop, direct versus indirect cycle, the effect of intercoolers, and other thermal hydraulics issues. However, in this paper, we present part of the results we have obtained. HYSYS computer code was used along with a computer model developed using Visual Basic computer language

  2. Temperature coefficients in the Dragon low-enriched power reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, U

    1972-05-15

    The temperature coefficient of the fuel and of the moderator have been evaluated for the Dragon HTR design for different stages in reactor life, initial core, end of no-refuelling period and equilibrium conditions. The investigation has shown the low-enriched HTR to have a strong, positive moderator coefficient. In some cases and for special operating conditions, even leading to a positive total temperature coefficient. This does not imply, however, that the HTR is an unsafe reactor system. By adequate design of the control system, safe and reliable operating characteristics can be achieved. This has already been proved satisfactory through many years of operation of other graphite moderated systems, such as the Magnox stations.

  3. Results of radiation tests at cryogenic temperature on some selected organic materials for the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavlet, M.; Schoenbacher, H.

    1999-01-01

    In the near future, particle accelerators and detectors as well as fusion reactors will operate at cryogenic temperatures. At temperatures as low as 2 K, the organic materials used for the insulation of the superconducting magnets and cables will be exposed to high radiation levels. In this work, a representative selection of organic materials comprising insulating films, cable insulations and epoxy-type-impregnated resins were exposed to neutron and gamma radiation of nuclear reactors, both at ambient and cryogenic temperatures, and were subsequently mechanically tested. The results show that the radiation degradation is never worse in a cryogenic fluid than it is in usual ambient conditions. (author)

  4. Reactor neutron activation analysis of industrial materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niese, S.

    1983-01-01

    The specific application of neutron activation analysis (n.a.a.) for industrial materials is demonstrated by the determination of impurities in BeO, Al, Si, Cu, Ge, GaP, GaAs, steel, and irradiated uranium. A group scheme gives an orientation about the possibilities of n.a.a. The use of different standards, methods for the measurement of low radioactivities and errors caused by recoil reaction and radiation stimulated diffusion are discussed. (author)

  5. Thermocouple evaluation model and evaluation of chromel--alumel thermocouples for High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washburn, B.W.

    1977-03-01

    Factors affecting the performance and reliability of thermocouples for temperature measurements in High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors are investigated. A model of an inhomogeneous thermocouple, associated experimental technique, and a method of predicting measurement errors are described. Error drifts for Type K materials are predicted and compared with published stability measurements. 60 references

  6. Off-design temperature effects on nuclear fuel pins for an advanced space-power-reactor concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, K. J.

    1974-01-01

    An exploratory out-of-reactor investigation was made of the effects of short-time temperature excursions above the nominal operating temperature of 990 C on the compatibility of advanced nuclear space-power reactor fuel pin materials. This information is required for formulating a reliable reactor safety analysis and designing an emergency core cooling system. Simulated uranium mononitride (UN) fuel pins, clad with tungsten-lined T-111 (Ta-8W-2Hf) showed no compatibility problems after heating for 8 hours at 2400 C. At 2520 C and above, reactions occurred in 1 hour or less. Under these conditions free uranium formed, redistributed, and attacked the cladding.

  7. High-Temperature Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 617 in Helium Environment of Very High Temperature Gas Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gyeong-Geun; Jung, Sujin; Kim, Daejong; Jeong, Yong-Whan; Kim, Dong-Jin

    2012-01-01

    Alloy 617 is a Ni-base superalloy and a candidate material for the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) of a very high temperature gas reactor (VHTR) which is one of the next generation nuclear reactors under development. The high operating temperature of VHTR enables various applications such as mass production of hydrogen with high energy efficiency. Alloy 617 has good creep resistance and phase stability at high temperatures in an air environment. However, it was reported that the mechanical properties decreased at a high temperature in an impure helium environment. In this study, high-temperature corrosion tests were carried out at 850°C-950°C in a helium environment containing the impurity gases H_2, CO, and CH_4, in order to examine the corrosion behavior of Alloy 617. Until 250 h, Alloy 617 specimens showed a parabolic oxidation behavior at all temperatures. The activation energy for oxidation in helium environment was 154 kJ/mol. The SEM and EDS results elucidated a Cr-rich surface oxide layer, Al-rich internal oxides and depletion of grain boundary carbides. The thickness and depths of degraded layers also showed a parabolic relationship with time. A normal grain growth was observed in the Cr-rich surface oxide layer. When corrosion tests were conducted in a pure helium environment, the oxidation was suppressed drastically. It was elucidated that minor impurity gases in the helium would have detrimental effects on the high temperature corrosion behavior of Alloy 617 for the VHTR application.

  8. Low temperature irradiation facility at Kyoto University Reactor (KUR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atobe, Kozo; Okada, Moritami; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Kodaka, Hisao; Miyata, Kiyomi.

    1977-01-01

    A new refrigeration system has been substituted to the low temperature irradiation facility at KUR instead of the previous one, since April in 1975. The model 1204 CTi He liquifier was designed to be modified for the refrigerator with the capacity of 30 watts at 10 K. The refrigeration capacity of 38 watts at 10 K was defined using a special cryostat and transfer-tubes, and the lowest temperature of about 18 K was measured using the irradiation loop without reactor operation. The reconstructed facility enables us to hold the many specimens simultaneously in the sample chamber of the irradiation loop at about 25 K during reactor operation of 5 MW. The irradiation dose has been reached about 6.6 x 10 16 n sub(f)/cm 2 and 6.1 x 10 17 n sub(th)/cm 2 with the normal reactor operation cycle of up to 77 hours. The stable operation condition of the machine and the special safety system for the refrigeration system enable us to maintain easily the facility with a constant operation condition for such a long time irradiation. Many kinds of low temperature neutron irradiation experiments are carried out using the facility, which techniques are partially reported. (auth.)

  9. New deployment of high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Tsuchie, Yasuo; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Konuki, Kaoru; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Hayakawa, Hitoshi

    2002-01-01

    The high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) is now under a condition difficult to know it well, because of considering not only power generation, but also diverse applications of its nuclear heat, of having extremely different safe principle from that of conventional reactors, of having two types of pebble-bed and block which are extremely different types, of promoting its construction plan in South Africa, of including its application to disposition of Russian surplus weapons plutonium of less reporting HTTR in Japan in spite of its full operation, and so on. However, HTGR is expected for an extremely important nuclear reactor aiming at the next coming one of LWR. HTGR which is late started and developed under complete private leading, is strongly conscious at environmental problem since its beginning. Before 30 years when large scale HTGR was expected to operate, it advertised a merit to reduce wasted heat because of its high temperature. As ratio occupied by electricity expands among application of energies, ratio occupied by the other energies are larger. When considering applications except electric power, high temperature thermal energy from HTGR can be thought wider applications than that from LWR and so on. (G.K.)

  10. Graphite and carbonaceous materials in a molten salt nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousseau, Ginette; Lecocq, Alfred; Hery, Michel.

    1982-09-01

    A project for a molten salt 1000 MWe reactor is studied by EDF-CEA teams. The design provides for a chromesco 3 vessel housing graphite structures in which the salt circulates. The salt (Th, U, Be and Li fluorides) is cooled by direct contact with lead. The graphites and carbonated materials, inert with respect to lead and the fuel salt, are being considered not only as moderators, but as reflectors and in the construction of the sections where the heat exchange takes place. On the basis of the problems raised in the operation of the reactor, a study programme on French experimental materials (Le Carbone Lorraine, SERS, SEP) has been defined. Hence, depending on the function or functions that the material is to ensure in the structure, the criteria of choice which follow will have to be examined: behaviour under irradiation, insertion of a fluid in the material, thermal properties required, mechanical properties required, utilization [fr

  11. Cutting temperature measurement and material machinability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedić Bogdan P.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutting temperature is very important parameter of cutting process. Around 90% of heat generated during cutting process is then away by sawdust, and the rest is transferred to the tool and workpiece. In this research cutting temperature was measured with artificial thermocouples and question of investigation of metal machinability from aspect of cutting temperature was analyzed. For investigation of material machinability during turning artificial thermocouple was placed just below the cutting top of insert, and for drilling thermocouples were placed through screw holes on the face surface. In this way was obtained simple, reliable, economic and accurate method for investigation of cutting machinability.

  12. Tritium-related materials problems in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickman, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Pressing materials problems that must be solved before tritium can be used to produce energy economically in fusion reactors are discussed. The following topics are discussed: (1) breeding tritium, (2) recovering bred tritium, (3) containing tritium, (4) fuel recycling, and (5) laser-fusion fueling

  13. Compression device for feeding a waste material to a reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Paul M.; Faller, Kenneth M.; Bauer, Edward J.

    2001-08-21

    A compression device for feeding a waste material to a reactor includes a waste material feed assembly having a hopper, a supply tube and a compression tube. Each of the supply and compression tubes includes feed-inlet and feed-outlet ends. A feed-discharge valve assembly is located between the feed-outlet end of the compression tube and the reactor. A feed auger-screw extends axially in the supply tube between the feed-inlet and feed-outlet ends thereof. A compression auger-screw extends axially in the compression tube between the feed-inlet and feed-outlet ends thereof. The compression tube is sloped downwardly towards the reactor to drain fluid from the waste material to the reactor and is oriented at generally right angle to the supply tube such that the feed-outlet end of the supply tube is adjacent to the feed-inlet end of the compression tube. A programmable logic controller is provided for controlling the rotational speed of the feed and compression auger-screws for selectively varying the compression of the waste material and for overcoming jamming conditions within either the supply tube or the compression tube.

  14. Status of Preconceptual Design of the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingersoll, D.T.

    2004-07-29

    A new reactor plant concept is presented that combines the benefits of ceramic-coated, high-temperature particle fuel with those of clean, high-temperature, low-pressure molten salt coolant. The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) concept is a collaboration of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, and the University of California at Berkeley. The purpose of the concept is to provide an advanced design capable of satisfying the top-level functional requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), while also providing a technology base that is sufficiently robust to allow future development paths to higher temperatures and larger outputs with highly competitive economics. This report summarizes the status of the AHTR preconceptual design. It captures the results from an intense effort over a period of 3 months to (1) screen and examine potential feasibility concerns with the concept; (2) refine the conceptual design of major systems; and (3) identify research, development, and technology requirements to fully mature the AHTR design. Several analyses were performed and are presented to quantify the AHTR performance expectations and to assist in the selection of several design parameters. The AHTR, like other NGNP reactor concepts, uses coated particle fuel in a graphite matrix. But unlike the other NGNP concepts, the AHTR uses molten salt rather than helium as the primary system coolant. The considerable previous experience with molten salts in nuclear environments is discussed, and the status of high-temperature materials is reviewed. The large thermal inertia of the system, the excellent heat transfer and fission product retention characteristics of molten salt, and the low-pressure operation of the primary system provide significant safety attributes for the AHTR. Compared with helium coolant, a molten salt cooled reactor will have significantly lower fuel temperatures (150-200-C lower) for the

  15. Status of Preconceptual Design of the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingersoll, D.T.

    2004-01-01

    A new reactor plant concept is presented that combines the benefits of ceramic-coated, high-temperature particle fuel with those of clean, high-temperature, low-pressure molten salt coolant. The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) concept is a collaboration of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, and the University of California at Berkeley. The purpose of the concept is to provide an advanced design capable of satisfying the top-level functional requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), while also providing a technology base that is sufficiently robust to allow future development paths to higher temperatures and larger outputs with highly competitive economics. This report summarizes the status of the AHTR preconceptual design. It captures the results from an intense effort over a period of 3 months to (1) screen and examine potential feasibility concerns with the concept; (2) refine the conceptual design of major systems; and (3) identify research, development, and technology requirements to fully mature the AHTR design. Several analyses were performed and are presented to quantify the AHTR performance expectations and to assist in the selection of several design parameters. The AHTR, like other NGNP reactor concepts, uses coated particle fuel in a graphite matrix. But unlike the other NGNP concepts, the AHTR uses molten salt rather than helium as the primary system coolant. The considerable previous experience with molten salts in nuclear environments is discussed, and the status of high-temperature materials is reviewed. The large thermal inertia of the system, the excellent heat transfer and fission product retention characteristics of molten salt, and the low-pressure operation of the primary system provide significant safety attributes for the AHTR. Compared with helium coolant, a molten salt cooled reactor will have significantly lower fuel temperatures (150-200-C lower) for the

  16. Inelastic Cyclic Deformation Behaviors of Type 316H Stainless Steel for Reactor Pressure Vessel of Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor at Elevated Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Ji-Hyun; Hong, Seokmin; Koo, Gyeong-Hoi; Lee, Bong-Sang; Kim, Young-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Type 316H stainless steel is a primary candidate material for a reactor pressure vessel of a sodium-cooled fast (SFR) reactor which is under development in Korea. The reactor pressure vessel for a SFR is subjected to inelastic deformation induced by cyclic thermal stress. Fully reversed cyclic testing and ratcheting testing at elevated temperatures were performed to characterize the inelastic cyclic deformation behaviors of Type 316H stainless steel at the SFR operating temperature. It was found that cyclic hardening of Type 316H stainless steel was enhanced, and the accumulation of ratcheting deformation of Type 316H stainless steel was retarded at around the SFR operating temperature. The results of the tensile testing and the microstructural investigation for dislocated structures after the inelastic deformation testing showed that dynamic strain aging affected the inelastic cyclic deformation behavior of Type 316 stainless steel at around the SFR operating temperature.

  17. Development history of the gas turbine modular high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brey, H.L.

    2001-01-01

    The development of the high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) as an environmentally agreeable and efficient power source to support the generation of electricity and achieve a broad range of high temperature industrial applications has been an evolutionary process spanning over four decades. This process has included ongoing major development in both the HTGR as a nuclear energy source and associated power conversion systems from the steam cycle to the gas turbine. This paper follows the development process progressively through individual plant designs from early research of the 1950s to the present focus on the gas turbine modular HTGR. (author)

  18. Assessment of structural materials inside the reactor pool of the Dalat research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Nhi Dien; Luong Ba Vien; Nguyen Minh Tuan; Trang Cao Su

    2010-01-01

    Originally the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR) was a 250-kW TRIGA MARK II reactor, started building from early 1960s and achieved the first criticality on February 26, 1963. During the 1982-1984 period, the reactor was reconstructed and upgraded to 500kW, and restarted operation on March 20, 1984. From the original TRIGA reactor, only the pool liner, beam ports, thermal columns, and graphite reflector have been remained. The structural materials of pool liner and other components of TRIGA were made of aluminum alloy 6061 and aluminum cladding fuel assemblies. Some other parts, such as reactor core, irradiation rotary rack around the core, vertical irradiation facilities, etc. were replaced by the former Soviet Union's design with structural materials of aluminum alloy CAV-1. WWR-M2 fuel assemblies of U-Al alloy 36% and 19.75% 235 U enrichment and aluminum cladding have been used. In its original version, the reactor was setting upon an all-welded aluminum frame supported by four legs attached to the bottom of the pool. After the modification made, the new core is now suspended from the top of the pool liner by means of three aluminum concentric cylindrical shells. The upper one has a diameter of 1.9m, a length of 3.5m and a thickness of 10mm. This shell prevents from any visual access to the upper part of the pool liner, but is provided with some holes to facilitate water circulation in the 4cm gap between itself and the reactor pool liner. The lower cylindrical shells act as an extracting well for water circulation. As reactor has been operated at low power of 500 kW, it was no any problem with degradation of core structural materials due to neutron irradiation and thermal heat, but there are some ageing issues with aluminum liner and other structures (for example, corrosion of tightening-up steel bolt in the fourth beam port and flood of neutron detector housing) inside the reactor pool. In this report, the authors give an overview and assessment of

  19. Irradiation effects on material properties of steels used in nuclear reactors: a literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerceker, N.; Dara, I. H.

    2001-01-01

    The structural materials of a nuclear power plant are of vital importance as they provide mechanical strength, structural support and physical containment for the primary reactor components as well as the nuclear power plant itself. These structural materials comprise mainly of metals and their alloys, ceramics and cermets. However, metals and their alloys are the most widely used materials and the irradiation effects are more pronounced on metallic materials as of their high temperature properties are more sensitive (with respect to ceramics and cermets) to any kind of external effects. The wholesale creation of effects on material properties has been studied for over four decades and it is not realistic to attempt to represent even a small part of the field in single poster paper. In the present contribution, a literature review of the irradiation effects on the material properties of different types of steel alloys will be given because steels are widely used as structural materials in reactors and therefore the irradiation effects on steels may be of paramount importance for reactor design, operation and safety concepts which will be discussed about radiation effects on material properties of steels will provide highlights to better understanding of the origins and development of radiation effects in materials

  20. Computerized nuclear material database management system for power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Binghao; Zhu Rongbao; Liu Daming; Cao Bin; Liu Ling; Tan Yajun; Jiang Jincai

    1994-01-01

    The software packages for nuclear material database management for power reactors are described. The database structure, data flow and model for management of the database are analysed. Also mentioned are the main functions and characterizations of the software packages, which are successfully installed and used at both the Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant and the Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant for the purposed of handling nuclear material database automatically

  1. Contributions to the sixth international conference on fusion reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-11-15

    The ICFRM series has documented progress in the field of fusion reactor materials since the first conference held in Tokyo in 1984. The conference series has continually increased its coverage to the point where it now includes the comprehensive range of materials science and technology areas that enable systems designers to meet the needs of current experiments and to present innovative solutions for future energy systems. This publication contains five contributions to the sixth international conference which have each been indexed separately.

  2. Japanese program of materials research for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasiguti, R.R.

    1982-01-01

    The Japanese program of materials research for fusion reactors is described based on the report to the Nuclear Fusion Council, the project research program of the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture, and other official documents. The alloy development for the first wall and its radiation damage are the main topics discussed in this paper. Materials viewpoints for the Japanese Tokamak facilities and the problems of irradiation facilities are also discussed. (orig.)

  3. Irradiation can for the activation of materials in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, B.; Findeisen, A.; Katzmann, H.

    1985-01-01

    The invention is concerning with an irradiation can for the activation of materials in nuclear reactors in particular for materials with a high heat generation due to irradiation. A good heat transfer between the irradiated material and the irradiation can environment has been guaranteed by a special can design. The outside of the can consists of a tube or a tube bandle which has been formed as a water guide tube. One or more tubes containing the irradiated materials have been positioned at the inner areas of the irradiated can

  4. Standard Guide for Use of Melt Wire Temperature Monitors for Reactor Vessel Surveillance, E 706 (IIIE)

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This guide describes the application of melt wire temperature monitors and their use for reactor vessel surveillance of light-water power reactors as called for in Practice E 185. 1.2 The purpose of this guide is to recommend the selection and use of the common melt wire technique where the correspondence between melting temperature and composition of different alloys is used as a passive temperature monitor. Guidelines are provided for the selection and calibration of monitor materials; design, fabrication, and assembly of monitor and container; post-irradiation examinations; interpretation of the results; and estimation of uncertainties. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. (See Note 1.)

  5. Damage by radiation in structural materials of BWR reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles, E.; Balcazar, M.; Alpizar, A.M.; Calderon, B.E.

    2002-01-01

    The structural materials which are manufactured the pressure vessels of the BWR reactors undergo degradation in their mechanical properties mainly due to the damage produced by the fast neutrons (E> 1 MeV) coming from the reactor core. The mechanisms of neutron damage in this type of materials are experimentally studied, through the irradiation of vessel steel in experimental reactors for a quickly ageing. Alternately the neutron damage through steel irradiation with heavy ions is simulated. In this work the first results of the damage induced by irradiation of a similar steel to the vessel of a BWR reactor are shown. The irradiation was performed with fast neutrons (E> 1 MeV, fluence of 1.45 x 10 18 n/cm 2 ) in the TRIGA Mark III Salazar reactor and separately with Ni +3 ions in a Tandetrom accelerator (E= 4.8 MeV and an ion flux rank of 0.1 to 53 ions/A 2 ). (Author)

  6. Computer simulation of multi-elemental fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voertler, K.

    2011-01-01

    Thermonuclear fusion is a sustainable energy solution, in which energy is produced using similar processes as in the sun. In this technology hydrogen isotopes are fused to gain energy and consequently to produce electricity. In a fusion reactor hydrogen isotopes are confined by magnetic fields as ionized gas, the plasma. Since the core plasma is millions of degrees hot, there are special needs for the plasma-facing materials. Moreover, in the plasma the fusion of hydrogen isotopes leads to the production of high energetic neutrons which sets demanding abilities for the structural materials of the reactor. This thesis investigates the irradiation response of materials to be used in future fusion reactors. Interactions of the plasma with the reactor wall leads to the removal of surface atoms, migration of them, and formation of co-deposited layers such as tungsten carbide. Sputtering of tungsten carbide and deuterium trapping in tungsten carbide was investigated in this thesis. As the second topic the primary interaction of the neutrons in the structural material steel was examined. As model materials for steel iron chromium and iron nickel were used. This study was performed theoretically by the means of computer simulations on the atomic level. In contrast to previous studies in the field, in which simulations were limited to pure elements, in this work more complex materials were used, i.e. they were multi-elemental including two or more atom species. The results of this thesis are in the microscale. One of the results is a catalogue of atom species, which were removed from tungsten carbide by the plasma. Another result is e.g. the atomic distributions of defects in iron chromium caused by the energetic neutrons. These microscopic results are used in data bases for multiscale modelling of fusion reactor materials, which has the aim to explain the macroscopic degradation in the materials. This thesis is therefore a relevant contribution to investigate the

  7. Suitability of Co as an alloy material for components of the primary circuit of HTR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iniotakis, N.

    1977-02-01

    For high temperature reactors it is of interest if Co-alloys could be used for the different components of the primary cooling circuit. It has been investigated in detail to what amount the Co-60 created by neutron activation of Co-59 contained in the material of the components could possibly contribute to the contamination of the primary cooling circuit of the reactor. The result of these investigations is compared with the contamination of the cooling circuit by fission and activation products like Co-137, Cs-134, Ag-11om etc. For pebble bed reactors with an OTTO-type fuel management it could be shown that there is no limitation for the use of cobalt in alloys for materials of the components in the primary cooling circuit. The only boundary condition is that the local Thermal Flux at the position of the components should be less than phisub(th) 7 n/cm 2 . sec. (orig.) [de

  8. Mechanical degradation temperature of waste storage materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, M.C.; Meyer, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    Heat loading analysis of the Solid Waste Disposal Facility (SWDF) waste storage configurations show the containers may exceed 90 degrees C without any radioactive decay heat contribution. Contamination containment is primarily controlled in TRU waste packaging by using multiple bag layers of polyvinyl chloride and polyethylene. Since literature values indicate that these thermoplastic materials can begin mechanical degradation at 66 degrees C, there was concern that the containment layers could be breached by heating. To better define the mechanical degradation temperature limits for the materials, a series of heating tests were conducted over a fifteen and thirty minute time interval. Samples of a low-density polyethylene (LDPE) bag, a high-density polyethylene (HDPE) high efficiency particulate air filter (HEPA) container, PVC bag and sealing tape were heated in a convection oven to temperatures ranging from 90 to 185 degrees C. The following temperature limits are recommended for each of the tested materials: (1) low-density polyethylene -- 110 degrees C; (2) polyvinyl chloride -- 130 degrees C; (3) high-density polyethylene -- 140 degrees C; (4) sealing tape -- 140 degrees C. Testing with LDPE and PVC at temperatures ranging from 110 to 130 degrees C for 60 and 120 minutes also showed no observable differences between the samples exposed at 15 and 30 minute intervals. Although these observed temperature limits differ from the literature values, the trend of HDPE having a higher temperature than LDPE is consistent with the reference literature. Experimental observations indicate that the HDPE softens at elevated temperatures, but will retain its shape upon cooling. In SWDF storage practices, this might indicate some distortion of the waste container, but catastrophic failure of the liner due to elevated temperatures (<185 degrees C) is not anticipated

  9. Preliminary materials selection issues for the next generation nuclear plant reactor pressure vessel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Majumdar, S.; Shankar, P. S.; Shah, V. N.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-03-21

    In the coming decades, the United States and the entire world will need energy supplies to meet the growing demands due to population increase and increase in consumption due to global industrialization. One of the reactor system concepts, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), with helium as the coolant, has been identified as uniquely suited for producing hydrogen without consumption of fossil fuels or the emission of greenhouse gases [Generation IV 2002]. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected this system for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, to demonstrate emissions-free nuclear-assisted electricity and hydrogen production within the next 15 years. The NGNP reference concepts are helium-cooled, graphite-moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactors with a design goal outlet helium temperature of {approx}1000 C [MacDonald et al. 2004]. The reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. The use of molten salt coolant, especially for the transfer of heat to hydrogen production, is also being considered. The NGNP is expected to produce both electricity and hydrogen. The process heat for hydrogen production will be transferred to the hydrogen plant through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). The basic technology for the NGNP has been established in the former high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) and demonstration plants (DRAGON, Peach Bottom, AVR, Fort St. Vrain, and THTR). In addition, the technologies for the NGNP are being advanced in the Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) project, and the South African state utility ESKOM-sponsored project to develop the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR). Furthermore, the Japanese HTTR and Chinese HTR-10 test reactors are demonstrating the feasibility of some of the planned components and materials. The proposed high operating temperatures in the VHTR place significant constraints on the choice of material selected for the reactor pressure vessel for

  10. System and method for air temperature control in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sean M

    2016-09-27

    A system and method for air temperature control in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor is provided. The system and method involves introducing a specific quantity of cooling air or trim air in between stages in a multistage oxygen transport membrane based reactor or furnace to maintain generally consistent surface temperatures of the oxygen transport membrane elements and associated reactors. The associated reactors may include reforming reactors, boilers or process gas heaters.

  11. The law for the regulations of nuclear source materials, nuclear fuel materials and reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The law intends under the principles of the atomic energy act to regulate the refining, processing and reprocessing businesses of nuclear raw and fuel metarials and the installation and operation of reactors for the peaceful and systematic utilization of such materials and reactors and for securing public safety by preventing disasters, as well as to control internationally regulated things for effecting the international agreements on the research, development and utilization of atomic energy. Basic terms are defined, such as atomic energy; nuclear fuel material; nuclear raw material; nuclear reactor; refining; processing; reprocessing; internationally regulated thing. Any person who is going to engage in refining businesses other than the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation shall get the special designation by the Prime Minister and the Minister of International Trade Industry. Any person who is going to engage in processing businesses shall get the particular admission of the Prime Minister. Any person who is going to establish reactors shall get the particular admission of the Prime Minister, The Minister of International Trade and Industry or the Minister of Transportation according to the kinds of specified reactors, respectively. Any person who is going to engage in reprocessing businesses other than the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation and the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute shall get the special designation by the Prime Minister. The employment of nuclear fuel materials and internationally regulated things is defined in detail. (Okada, K.)

  12. High temperature material characterization and advanced materials development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Woo Seog; Kim, D. H.; Kim, S. H. and others

    2005-03-01

    The study is to characterize the structural materials under the high temperature, one of the most significant environmental factors in nuclear systems. And advanced materials are developed for high temperature and/or low activation in neutron irradiation. Tensile, fatigue and creep properties have been carried out at high temperature to evaluate the mechanical degradation. Irradiation tests were performed using the HANARO. The optimum chemical composition and heat treatment condition were determined for nuclear grade 316NG stainless steel. Nitrogen, aluminum, and tungsten were added for increasing the creep rupture strength of FMS steel. The new heat treatment method was developed to form more stable precipitates. By applying the novel whiskering process, high density SiC/SiC composites with relative density above 90% could be obtained even in a shorter processing time than the conventional CVI process. Material integrated databases are established using data sheets. The databases of 6 kinds of material properties are accessible through the home page of KAERI material division

  13. Experimental facility for development of high-temperature reactor technology: instrumentation needs and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabharwall Piyush

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A high-temperature, multi-fluid, multi-loop test facility is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory for support of thermal hydraulic materials, and system integration research for high-temperature reactors. The experimental facility includes a high-temperature helium loop, a liquid salt loop, and a hot water/steam loop. The three loops will be thermally coupled through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX and a secondary heat exchanger (SHX. Research topics to be addressed include the characterization and performance evaluation of candidate compact heat exchangers such as printed circuit heat exchangers (PCHEs at prototypical operating conditions. Each loop will also include an interchangeable high-temperature test section that can be customized to address specific research issues associated with each working fluid. This paper also discusses needs and challenges associated with advanced instrumentation for the multi-loop facility, which could be further applied to advanced high-temperature reactors. Based on its relevance to advanced reactor systems, the new facility has been named the Advanced Reactor Technology Integral System Test (ARTIST facility. A preliminary design configuration of the ARTIST facility will be presented with the required design and operating characteristics of the various components. The initial configuration will include a high-temperature (750 °C, high-pressure (7 MPa helium loop thermally integrated with a molten fluoride salt (KF-ZrF4 flow loop operating at low pressure (0.2 MPa, at a temperature of ∼450 °C. The salt loop will be thermally integrated with the steam/water loop operating at PWR conditions. Experiment design challenges include identifying suitable materials and components that will withstand the required loop operating conditions. The instrumentation needs to be highly accurate (negligible drift in measuring operational data for extended periods of times, as data collected will be

  14. Experimental facility for development of high-temperature reactor technology: instrumentation needs and challenges - 15066

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabharwall, P.; O'Brien, J.E.; Yoon, S.J.; Sun, X.

    2015-01-01

    A high-temperature, multi-fluid, multi-loop test facility is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory for support of thermal hydraulic, materials, and system integration research for high-temperature reactors. The experimental facility includes a high-temperature helium loop, a liquid salt loop, and a hot water/steam loop. The 3 loops will be thermally coupled through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and a secondary heat exchanger (SHX). Research topics to be addressed include the characterization and performance evaluation of candidate compact heat exchangers such as printed circuits heat exchangers (PCHEs) at prototypical operating conditions. Each loop will also include an interchangeable high-temperature test section that can be customized to address specific research issues associated with each working fluid. This paper also discusses needs and challenges associated with advanced instrumentation for the multi-loop facility, which could be further applied to advanced high-temperature reactors. Based on its relevance to advanced reactor systems, the new facility has been named the Advanced Reactor Technology Integrated System Test (ARTIST) facility. A preliminary design configuration of the ARTIST facility will be presented with the required design and operating characteristics of the various components. The initial configuration will include a high-temperature (750 C. degrees), high-pressure (7 MPa) helium loop thermally integrated with a molten fluoride salt (KF-ZrF 4 ) flow loop operating at low pressure (0.2 MPa), at a temperature of ∼ 450 C. degrees. The salt loop will be thermally integrated with the steam/water loop operating at PWR conditions. Experiment design challenges include identifying suitable materials and components that will withstand the required loop operating conditions. The instrumentation needs to be highly accurate (negligible drift) in measuring operational data for extended periods of times, as data collected will be

  15. Increase of efficiency of plant materials heat treatment in tubular reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Golubkovich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In agriculture products of pyrolysis of plant materials in the form of waste of the main production can be applied as a source of heat and electric power. Besides, their use prevents ecological pollution of the soil and the atmosphere. Pyrolysis plants can be used for work with tubular reactors anywhere. Due to them farmers can dry grain, using waste heat of diesel generators, heatgenerators, boiler plants and receiving thus gaseous products, liquid and firm fractions. A technology based on cyclic and continuous plant mass movement by a piston in a pipe from a loading site to a place of unloading of a firm phase consistently through cameras of drying, pyrolysis, condensation of gaseous products. Exhaust furnace gases with a temperature up to 600 degrees Celsius are given countercurrent material movement from a power equipment. The gaseous, liquid and firm products from the pyrolysis camera are used for heat and electric power generation. Calculation of parameters of subdrying and pyrolysis cameras is necessary for effective and steady operation of the tubular reactor. The authors determined the speed of raw materials movement, and also duration of drying and pyrolysis in working chambers. An analysis of a simplified mathematical model of process was confirmed with results of experiments. Models of heat treatment of wet plant materials in tubular reactors are worked out on a basis of equality of speeds of material movement in the reactor and distribution of a temperature front in material on radius. The authors defined estimated characteristic for determination of tubular reactor productivity and size of heat, required for drying and pyrolysis.

  16. Process heat cogeneration using a high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, Gustavo; Ramirez, Ramon; Valle, Edmundo del; Castillo, Rogelio

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • HTR feasibility for process heat cogeneration is assessed. • A cogeneration coupling for HTR is proposed and process heat cost is evaluated. • A CCGT process heat cogeneration set up is also assessed. • Technical comparison between both sources of cogeneration is performed. • Economical competitiveness of the HTR for process heat cogeneration is analyzed. - Abstract: High temperature nuclear reactors offer the possibility to generate process heat that could be used in the oil industry, particularly in refineries for gasoline production. These technologies are still under development and none of them has shown how this can be possible and what will be the penalty in electricity generation to have this additional product and if the cost of this subproduct will be competitive with other alternatives. The current study assesses the likeliness of generating process heat from Pebble Bed Modular Reactor to be used for a refinery showing different plant balances and alternatives to produce and use that process heat. An actual practical example is presented to demonstrate the cogeneration viability using the fact that the PBMR is a modular small reactor where the cycle configuration to transport the heat of the reactor to the process plant plays an important role in the cycle efficiency and in the plant economics. The results of this study show that the PBMR would be most competitive when capital discount rates are low (5%), carbon prices are high (>30 US$/ton), and competing natural gas prices are at least 8 US$/mmBTU

  17. High temperature helium-cooled fast reactor (HTHFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karam, R.A.; Blaylock, Dwayne; Burgett, Eric; Mostafa Ghiaasiaan, S.; Hertel, Nolan

    2006-01-01

    Scoping calculations have been performed for a very high temperature (1000 o C) helium-cooled fast reactor involving two distinct options: (1) using graphite foam into which UC (12% enrichment) is embedded into a matrix comprising UC and graphite foam molded into hexagonal building blocks and encapsulated with a SiC shell covering all surfaces, and (2) using UC only (also 12% enrichment) molded into the same shape and size as the foam-UC matrix in option 1. Both options use the same basic hexagonal fuel matrix blocks to form the core and reflector. The reflector contains natural uranium only. Both options use 50 μm SiC as a containment shell for fission product retention within each hexagonal block. The calculations show that the option using foam (option 1) would produce a reactor that can operate continuously for at least 25 years without ever adding or removing any fuel from the reactor. The calculations show further that the UC only option (option 2) can operate continually for 50 years without ever adding or removing fuel from the reactor. Doppler and loss of coolant reactivity coefficients were calculated. The Doppler coefficient is negative and much larger than the loss of coolant coefficient, which was very small and positive. Additional progress on and development of the two concepts are continuing

  18. Process heat cogeneration using a high temperature reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, Gustavo, E-mail: gustavoalonso3@gmail.com [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac, Edo. De Mexico 52750 (Mexico); Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Unidad Profesional Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Ed. 9, Lindavista, D.F. 07300 (Mexico); Ramirez, Ramon [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac, Edo. De Mexico 52750 (Mexico); Valle, Edmundo del [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Unidad Profesional Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Ed. 9, Lindavista, D.F. 07300 (Mexico); Castillo, Rogelio [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac, Edo. De Mexico 52750 (Mexico)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • HTR feasibility for process heat cogeneration is assessed. • A cogeneration coupling for HTR is proposed and process heat cost is evaluated. • A CCGT process heat cogeneration set up is also assessed. • Technical comparison between both sources of cogeneration is performed. • Economical competitiveness of the HTR for process heat cogeneration is analyzed. - Abstract: High temperature nuclear reactors offer the possibility to generate process heat that could be used in the oil industry, particularly in refineries for gasoline production. These technologies are still under development and none of them has shown how this can be possible and what will be the penalty in electricity generation to have this additional product and if the cost of this subproduct will be competitive with other alternatives. The current study assesses the likeliness of generating process heat from Pebble Bed Modular Reactor to be used for a refinery showing different plant balances and alternatives to produce and use that process heat. An actual practical example is presented to demonstrate the cogeneration viability using the fact that the PBMR is a modular small reactor where the cycle configuration to transport the heat of the reactor to the process plant plays an important role in the cycle efficiency and in the plant economics. The results of this study show that the PBMR would be most competitive when capital discount rates are low (5%), carbon prices are high (>30 US$/ton), and competing natural gas prices are at least 8 US$/mmBTU.

  19. Use of Master Curve technology for assessing shallow flaws in a reactor pressure vessel material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, Bennett Richard; Taylor, Nigel

    2006-01-01

    In the NESC-IV project an experimental/analytical program was performed to develop validated analysis methods for transferring fracture toughness data to shallow flaws in reactor pressure vessels subject to biaxial loading in the lower-transition temperature region. Within this scope an extensive range of fracture tests was performed on material removed from a production-quality reactor pressure vessel. The Master Curve analysis of this data is reported and its application to the assessment of the project feature tests on large beam test pieces.

  20. Extension of the reactor dynamics code MGT-3D for pebblebed and blocktype high-temperature-reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Dunfu

    2015-01-01

    The High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor (HTGR) is an improved, gas cooled nuclear reactor. It was chosen as one of the candidates of generation IV nuclear plants [1]. The reactor can be shut down automatically because of the negative reactivity feedback due to the temperature's increasing in designed accidents. It is graphite moderated and Helium cooled. The residual heat can be transferred out of the reactor core by inactive ways as conduction, convection, and thermal radiation during the accident. In such a way, a fuel temperature does not go beyond a limit at which major fission product release begins. In this thesis, the coupled neutronics and fluid mechanics code MGT-3D used for the steady state and time-dependent simulation of HTGRs, is enhanced and validated [2]. The fluid mechanics part is validated by SANA experiments in steady state cases as well as transient cases. The fuel temperature calculation is optimized by solving the heat conduction equation of the coated particles. It is applied in the steady state and transient simulation of PBMR, and the results are compared to the simulation with the old overheating model. New approaches to calculate the temperature profile of the fuel element of block-type HTGRs, and the calculation of the homogeneous conductivity of composite materials are introduced. With these new developments, MGT-3D is able to simulate block-type HTGRs as well. This extended MGT-3D is used to simulate a cuboid ceramic block heating experiment in the NACOK-II facility. The extended MGT-3D is also applied to LOFC and DLOFC simulation of GT-MHR. It is a fluid mechanics calculation with a given heat source. This calculation result of MGT-3D is verified with the calculation results of other codes. The design of the Japanese HTTR is introduced. The deterministic simulation of the LOFC experiment of HTTR is conducted with the Monte-Carlo code Serpent and MGT-3D, which is the LOFC Project organized by OECD/NEA [3]. With Serpent the burnup

  1. EMERIS: an advanced information system for a materials testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adorjan, F.; Buerger, L.; Lux, I.; Mesko, L.; Szabo, K.; Vegh, J.; Ivanov, V.V.; Mozhaev, A.A.; Yakovlev, V.V.

    1990-06-01

    The basic features of the Materials Testing Reactor of IAE, Moscow (MR) Information System (EMERIS) are outlined. The purpose of the system is to support reactor and experimental test loop operators by a flexible, fully computerized and user-friendly tool for the aquisition, analysis, archivation and presentation of data obtained during operation of the experimental facility. High availability of EMERIS services is ensured by redundant hardware and software components, and by automatic configuration procedure. A novel software feature of the system is the automatic Disturbance Analysis package, which is aimed to discover primary causes of irregularities occurred in the technology. (author) 2 refs.; 2 figs

  2. Flexible robotic entry device for a nuclear materials production reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckendorn, F.M. II.

    1988-01-01

    The Savannah River Laboratory has developed and is implementing a flexible robotic entry device (FRED) for the nuclear materials production reactors now operating at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). FRED is designed for rapid deployment into confinement areas of operating reactors to assess unknown conditions. A unique smart tether method has been incorporated into FRED for simultaneous bidirectional transmission of multiple video/audio/control/power signals over a single coaxial cable. This system makes it possible to use FRED under all operating and standby conditions, including those where radio/microwave transmissions are not possible or permitted, and increases the quantity of data available

  3. Gas-cooled reactor programs: high-temperature gas-cooled reactor technology development program. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-06-01

    Information is presented concerning HTGR chemistry; fueled graphite development; irradiation services for General Atomic Company; prestressed concrete pressure vessel development; HTGR structural materials; graphite development; high-temperature reactor physics studies; shielding studies; component flow test loop studies; core support performance test; and application and project assessments.

  4. Gas-cooled reactor programs: high-temperature gas-cooled reactor technology development program. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-06-01

    Information is presented concerning HTGR chemistry; fueled graphite development; irradiation services for General Atomic Company; prestressed concrete pressure vessel development; HTGR structural materials; graphite development; high-temperature reactor physics studies; shielding studies; component flow test loop studies; core support performance test; and application and project assessments

  5. Sustainability and Efficiency Improvements of Gas-Cooled High Temperature Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmier, Alain

    2012-01-01

    high temperature irradiation to high burn-ups with fission gas release measurements. To this end, the HFR-EU1 fuel irradiation in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) Petten (2006-2010) explored the potential for high performance and high burn-up of existing German fuel (3 pebbles produced for the AVR reactor at the German research centre Juelich) and newly produced Chinese fuel (2 pebbles produced by INET for use in the HTR-10 test reactor in China). These five pebbles were irradiated for 445 days in separately controlled capsules, while the fission gas release was monitored by gamma spectrometry thus enabling evaluation of the characteristic release over birth fraction, indicative for the health of the fuel. In none of the pebbles, abnormally increased fission gas release was observed indicating that all of the approx. 45,000 coated particles in the pebbles had remained intact. The results presented in this thesis cover the first 332 days of irradiation. While HFR-EU1 was dedicated to a particularly high burn-up, HFR-EU1bis, performed between 2004 and 2005, investigated extremely high temperature for steady-state conditions. The comparison of both experiments confirms that temperature plays a decisive part in fuel performance and integrity. The peak fuel temperature in pebbles can be lowered with the so-called w allpaper fuel , in which the coated fuel particles are arranged in a spherical shell within a pebble. This wallpaper concept also enhances neutronic performance through improved neutron economy, resulting in reduced fissile material and/or enrichment needs or providing the potential to achieve higher burn-up. To quantify these improvements, calculations were performed using the Monte Carlo neutron transport and depletion codes MCNP/MCB (to assess conversion ratio, temperature coefficient of reactivity and neutron multiplication) and PANTHERMIX (for fuel cycle in steady state conditions and loss of coolant accident calculations). Based on PANTHERMIX steady

  6. Overview of standards subcommittee 8, fissionable materials outside reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, T.P.

    1996-01-01

    The American Nuclear Society's Standards Subcommittee 8, titled open-quotes Fissionable Materials Outside Reactors,close quotes has worked for the past 35 yr to prepare and promote standards on nuclear criticality safety for the handling, processing, storing, and transportation of fissionable materials outside reactors. The reader is referred to the Transactions of the American Nuclear Society, Vols. 39 (1981) and 64 (1991), for previous papers associated with ANS-8 poster sessions. In addition to discussions on the then-current standards, the reader will find articles on working group efforts that never materialized into standards, such as proposed 8.13, open-quotes Use of the Solid-Angle Method in Nuclear Criticality Safety,close quotes and on applications and critiques of current standards. The paper by McLendon in Vol. 39 is particularly interesting as an overview of the early history of ANS-8 and its standards

  7. Very-high-temperature gas reactor environmental impacts assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, C.D.; Barton, C.J.; Compere, E.L.; Row, T.H.

    1977-08-01

    The operation of a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), a slightly modified General Atomic type High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) with 1600 F primary coolant, as a source of process heat for the 1400 0 F steam-methanation reformer step in a hydrogen producing plant (via hydrogasification of coal liquids) was examined. It was found that: (a) from the viewpoint of product contamination by fission and activation products, an Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) is probably not necessary; and (b) long term steam corrosion of the core support posts may require increasing their diameter (a relatively minor design adjustment). However, the hydrogen contaminant in the primary coolant which permeates the reformer may reduce steam corrosion but may produce other problems which have not as yet been resolved. An IHX in parallel with both the reformer and steam generator would solve these problems, but probably at greater cost than that of increasing the size of the core support posts. It is recommended that this corrosion problem be examined in more detail, especially by investigating the performance of current fossil fuel heated reformers in industry. Detailed safety analysis of the VHTR would be required to establish definitely whether the IHX can be eliminated. Water and hydrogen ingress into the reactor system are potential problems which can be alleviated by an IHX. These problems will require analysis, research and development within the program required for development of the VHTR

  8. Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor Technology Development and Demonstration Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Mays, Gary T [ORNL; Pointer, William David [ORNL; Robb, Kevin R [ORNL; Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL

    2013-11-01

    Fluoride salt-cooled High-temperature Reactors (FHRs) are an emerging reactor class with potentially advantageous performance characteristics, and fully passive safety. This roadmap describes the principal remaining FHR technology challenges and the development path needed to address the challenges. This roadmap also provides an integrated overview of the current status of the broad set of technologies necessary to design, evaluate, license, construct, operate, and maintain FHRs. First-generation FHRs will not require any technology breakthroughs, but do require significant concept development, system integration, and technology maturation. FHRs are currently entering early phase engineering development. As such, this roadmap is not as technically detailed or specific as would be the case for a more mature reactor class. The higher cost of fuel and coolant, the lack of an approved licensing framework, the lack of qualified, salt-compatible structural materials, and the potential for tritium release into the environment are the most obvious issues that remain to be resolved.

  9. Materials Inventory Database for the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazi Ahmed; Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton

    2013-08-01

    Scientific research involves the purchasing, processing, characterization, and fabrication of many sample materials. The history of such materials can become complicated over their lifetime – materials might be cut into pieces or moved to various storage locations, for example. A database with built-in functions to track these kinds of processes facilitates well-organized research. The Material Inventory Database Accounting System (MIDAS) is an easy-to-use tracking and reference system for such items. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program (LWRS), which seeks to advance the long-term reliability and productivity of existing nuclear reactors in the United States through multiple research pathways, proposed MIDAS as an efficient way to organize and track all items used in its research. The database software ensures traceability of all items used in research using built-in functions which can emulate actions on tracked items – fabrication, processing, splitting, and more – by performing operations on the data. MIDAS can recover and display the complete history of any item as a simple report. To ensure the database functions suitably for the organization of research, it was developed alongside a specific experiment to test accident tolerant nuclear fuel cladding under the LWRS Advanced Light Water Reactor Nuclear Fuels Pathway. MIDAS kept track of materials used in this experiment from receipt at the laboratory through all processes, test conduct and, ultimately, post-test analysis. By the end of this process, the database proved to be right tool for this program. The database software will help LWRS more efficiently conduct research experiments, from simple characterization tests to in-reactor experiments. Furthermore, MIDAS is a universal tool that any other research team could use to organize their material inventory.

  10. Control of tritium permeation through fusion reactor strucural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maroni, V.A.

    1978-01-01

    The intention of this paper is to provide a brief synopsis of the status of understanding and technology pertaining to the dissolution and permeation of tritium in fusion reactor materials. The following sections of this paper attempt to develop a simple perspective for understanding the consequences of these phenomena and the nature of the technical methodology being contemplated to control their impact on fusion reactor operation. Considered in order are: (1) the occurrence of tritium in the fusion fuel cycle, (2) a set of tentative criteria to guide the analysis of tritium containment and control strategies, (3) the basic mechanisms by which tritium may be released from a fusion plant, and (4) the methods currently under development to control the permeation-related release mechanisms. To provide background and support for these considerations, existing solubility and permeation data for the hydrogen isotopes are compared and correlated under conditions to be expected in fusion reactor systems

  11. Method of nuclear reactor control using a variable temperature load dependent set point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.J.; Rambo, G.E.

    1982-01-01

    A method and apparatus for controlling a nuclear reactor in response to a variable average reactor coolant temperature set point is disclosed. The set point is dependent upon percent of full power load demand. A manually-actuated ''droop mode'' of control is provided whereby the reactor coolant temperature is allowed to drop below the set point temperature a predetermined amount wherein the control is switched from reactor control rods exclusively to feedwater flow

  12. Materials considerations for UF6 gas-core reactor. Interim report for preliminary design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, P.

    1977-04-01

    The limiting materials problem in a high-temperature UF 6 core reactor is the corrosion of the core containment vessel. The UF 6 , the lower fluorides of uranium, and the fluorine that exist at the anticipated reactor operating conditions (1000 K and about one atmosphere UF 6 ) are all corrosive. Because of this, the materials evaluation effort for this reactor design study has concentrated on the identification of a viable system for the containment vessel that meets both the materials and neutronic requirements. A study of the literature has revealed that the most promising corrosion-resistant candidates are Ni or Ni-Al alloys. One of the conclusions of this work is that the containment vessel use a nickel liner or clad since the use of Ni as a structural member is precluded by its relative blackness to thermal neutrons. Estimates of corrosion rates of Ni and Ni-Al alloys, the effects of the pressure and temperature of F 2 on the corrosion rates, calculated equilibrium gas compositions at reactor core operating conditions, suggested methods of fabrication, and recommendations for future research and development are included

  13. Updated Generation IV Reactors Integrated Materials Technology Program Plan, Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corwin, William R [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Halsey, William [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Hayner, George [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Klett, James William [ORNL; McGreevy, Timothy E [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

    2005-12-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Program will address the research and development (R&D) necessary to support next-generation nuclear energy systems. Such R&D will be guided by the technology roadmap developed for the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) over two years with the participation of over 100 experts from the GIF countries. The roadmap evaluated over 100 future systems proposed by researchers around the world. The scope of the R&D described in the roadmap covers the six most promising Generation IV systems. The effort ended in December 2002 with the issue of the final Generation IV Technology Roadmap [1.1]. The six most promising systems identified for next generation nuclear energy are described within the roadmap. Two employ a thermal neutron spectrum with coolants and temperatures that enable hydrogen or electricity production with high efficiency (the Supercritical Water Reactor - SCWR and the Very High Temperature Reactor - VHTR). Three employ a fast neutron spectrum to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel (the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor - GFR, the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor - LFR, and the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor - SFR). The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) employs a circulating liquid fuel mixture that offers considerable flexibility for recycling actinides, and may provide an alternative to accelerator-driven systems. A few major technologies have been recognized by DOE as necessary to enable the deployment of the next generation of advanced nuclear reactors, including the development and qualification of the structural materials needed to ensure their safe and reliable operation. Accordingly, DOE has identified materials as one of the focus areas for Gen IV technology development.

  14. Present status of high-temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Baba, Osamu; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Okubo, Minoru; Tobioka, Toshiaki

    1994-01-01

    The 30MWt HTTR is a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), with a maximum helium coolant temperature of 950degC at the reactor outlet. The construction of the HTTR started in March 1991, with first criticality to be followed in 1998 after commissioning testing. At present the HTTR reactor building (underground part) and its containment vessel have been almost completed and its main components, such as a reactor pressure vessel (RPV), an intermediate heat exchanger, hot gas pipings and graphite core structures, are now manufacturing at their factories at the target of their installation starting in 1994. The project is intended to establish and upgrade the technology basis necessary for HTGR developments. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) also plans to conduct material and fuel irradiation tests as an innovative basic research after attaining rated power and coolant temperature. Innovative basic researches are now in great request. The paper describes major features of HTTR, present status of its construction and research and test using HTTR. (author)

  15. Present status of High-Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Baba, Osamu; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Okubo, Minoru; Tobioka, Toshiaki

    1993-01-01

    The 30MWt HTTR is a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), with a maximum helium coolant temperature of 950 deg C at the reactor outlet. The construction of the HTTR started in March 1991, with first criticality to be followed in 1998 after commissioning testing. At present the HTTR reactor building (underground part) and its containment vessel have been almost completed and its main components, such as a reactor pressure vessel (RPV), an intermediate heat exchanger, hot gas pipings and graphite core structures, are now manufacturing at their factories at the target of their installation starting in 1994. The project is intended to establish and upgrade the technology basis necessary for HTGR developments. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) also plans to conduct material and fuel irradiation tests as an innovative basic research after attaining rated power and coolant temperature. Innovative basic researches are now in great request. The paper describes major features of HTTR, present status of its construction and research and test plan using HTTR. (author)

  16. HYBRID SULFUR CYCLE FLOWSHEETS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION USING HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorensek, M.

    2011-07-06

    Two hybrid sulfur (HyS) cycle process flowsheets intended for use with high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) are presented. The flowsheets were developed for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program, and couple a proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzer for the SO2-depolarized electrolysis step with a silicon carbide bayonet reactor for the high-temperature decomposition step. One presumes an HTGR reactor outlet temperature (ROT) of 950 C, the other 750 C. Performance was improved (over earlier flowsheets) by assuming that use of a more acid-tolerant PEM, like acid-doped poly[2,2'-(m-phenylene)-5,5'-bibenzimidazole] (PBI), instead of Nafion{reg_sign}, would allow higher anolyte acid concentrations. Lower ROT was accommodated by adding a direct contact exchange/quench column upstream from the bayonet reactor and dropping the decomposition pressure. Aspen Plus was used to develop material and energy balances. A net thermal efficiency of 44.0% to 47.6%, higher heating value basis is projected for the 950 C case, dropping to 39.9% for the 750 C case.

  17. Fusion reactor materials program plan. Section III. Plasma material interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-07-01

    A discussion of materials-related problems and an analysis of such problems is given for each major topical area. The strategy that will be used to solve the materials problems is described. As part of this program strategy, a series of major milestones is identified that extends over the next 20 years. Detailed task descriptions for the next five years leading to the achievement of the major milestones are given. Each task is described on a separate page (or task sheet) which includes the task number, task title, objective, scope, and the major milestones addressed by the task. Secondary milestones within a given task or subtask are defined, together with a priority assignment and an estimate of man-years to accomplish the work. Each Plan is organized along major topics which parallel the Subtask organization of the Task Group responsible for the Plan

  18. Present status and prospects of high-temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Baba, Osamu; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Okubo, Minoru; Tobioka, Toshiaki

    1995-01-01

    It is essentially important in Japan, which has limited amount of natural resources, to make efforts to obtain more reliable and stable energy supply by extended use of nuclear energy including high temperature heat from nuclear reactors. Hence, efforts are to be continuously devoted to establish and upgrade High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) technologies and to make much of research resources accumulated so far. It is also expected that making basic researches at high temperature using HTGR will contribute to innovative basic research in future. Then, the construction of High Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), which is an HTGR with a maximum helium coolant temperature of 950degC at the reactor outlet, was decided by the Japanese Atomic Energy Commission (JAEC) in 1987 and is now under way by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The construction of the HTTR started in March 1991, with first criticality in 1998 to be followed after commissioning testing. At present the HTTR reactor building and its containment vessel have been nearly completed and its main components, such as a reactor pressure vessel, an intermediate heat exchanger, hot gas pipings and core support structures, have been manufactured at their factories and delivered to the Oarai Research Establishment of the JAERI for their installation in the middle of 1994. Fuel fabrication will be started as well. The project is intended to establish and upgrade the technology basis necessary for HTGR developments. The IAEA Coordinated Research Programme on Design and Evaluation of Heat Utilization Systems for the HTTR, such as steam reforming of methane and thermochemical water splitting for hydrogen production, was launched successfully in January 1994. Some heat utilization system is planned to be connected to the HTTR and demonstrated at the former stage of the second core. At present, steam-reforming of methane is the first candidate. The JAERI also plans to conduct material

  19. Nitrogen Removal by Anammox Biofilm Column Reactor at Moderately Low Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuty Emilia Agustina

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox as a new biological approach for nitrogen removal has been considered to be more cost-effective compared with the combination of nitrification and denitrification process. However, the anammox bioreactors are mostly explored at high temperature (>300C in which temperature controlling system is fully required. This research was intended to develop and to apply anammox process for high nitrogen concentration removal at ambient temperature used for treating wastewater in tropical countries. An up-flow biofilm column reactor, which the upper part constructed with a porous polyester non-woven fabric material as a carrier to attach the anammox bacteria was operated without heating system. A maximum nitrogen removal rate (NRR of 1.05 kg-N m3 d-1 was reached in the operation days of 178 with a Total Nitrogen (TN removal efficiency of 74%. This showed the biofilm column anammox reactor was successfully applied to moderate high nitrogen removal from synthetic wastewater at moderately low temperature. Keywords: Anammox, biofilm column reactor, ambient temperature, nitrogen removal

  20. Quality indexes for selecting control materials of the nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Val, J.M.; Pena, J.; Esteban Naudin, A.

    1981-01-01

    Quality indexes are established and valued for selecting control materials, The requirements for accomplishing such purposes are explained with detailed analysis: absortion cross section must be as high as possible, adequate reactivity evolution versus depletion, good resistance to radiation, appropiate thermal stability, mechanical resistance and ductility, chemical compatibility with the environment, good heat transfer properties, abundant in the nature and low costs. At present Westinghouse desire to commercialize hafnium as control material shows the exciting task of looking for new materials controlling nuclear reactors. (auth.)