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Sample records for temperature rate coefficients

  1. The HD+ dissociative recombination rate coefficient at low temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the rotational temperature of the ions is considered for low-energy dissociative recombination (DR of HD+. Merged beams measurements with HD+ ions of a rotational temperature near 300 K are compared to multichannel quantum defect theory calculations. The thermal DR rate coefficient for a Maxwellian electron velocity distribution is derived from the merged-beams data and compared to theoretical results for a range of rotational temperatures. Good agreement is found for the theory with 300 K rotational temperature. For a low-temperature plasma environment where also the rotational temperature assumes 10 K, theory predicts a considerably higher thermal DR rate coefficient. The origin of this is traced to predicted resonant structures of the collision-energy dependent DR cross section at few-meV collision energies for the particular case of HD+ ions in the rotational ground state.

  2. On the use temperature parameterized rate coefficients in the estimation of non-equilibrium reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shizgal, Bernie D.; Chikhaoui, Aziz

    2006-06-01

    The present paper considers a detailed analysis of the nonequilibrium effects for a model reactive system with the Chapman-Eskog (CE) solution of the Boltzmann equation as well as an explicit time dependent solution. The elastic cross sections employed are a hard sphere cross section and the Maxwell molecule cross section. Reactive cross sections which model reactions with and without activation energy are used. A detailed comparison is carried out with these solutions of the Boltzmann equation and the approximation introduced by Cukrowski and coworkers [J. Chem. Phys. 97 (1992) 9086; Chem. Phys. 89 (1992) 159; Physica A 188 (1992) 344; Chem. Phys. Lett. A 297 (1998) 402; Physica A 275 (2000) 134; Chem. Phys. Lett. 341 (2001) 585; Acta Phys. Polonica B 334 (2003) 3607.] based on the temperature of the reactive particles. We show that the Cukrowski approximation has limited applicability for the large class of reactive systems studied in this paper. The explicit time dependent solutions of the Boltzmann equation demonstrate that the CE approach is valid only for very slow reactions for which the corrections to the equilibrium rate coefficient are very small.

  3. Laboratory Studies of Low Temperature Rate Coefficients: The Atmospheric Chemistry of the Outer Planets and Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogan, Denis

    1999-01-01

    Laboratory measurements have been carried out to determine low temperature chemical rate coefficients of ethynyl radical (C2H) for the atmospheres of the outer planets and their satellites. This effort is directly related to the Cassini mission which will explore Saturn and Titan. A laser-based photolysis/infrared laser probe setup was used to measure the temperature dependence of kinetic rate coefficients from approx. equal to 150 to 350 K for C2H radicals with H2, C2H2, CH4, CD4, C2H4, C2H6, C3H8, n-C4H10, i-C4H10, neo-C5H12, C3H4 (methylacetylene and allene), HCN, and CH3CN. The results revealed discrepancies of an order of magnitude or more compared with the low temperature rate coefficients used in present models. A new Laval nozzle, low Mach number supersonic expansion kinetics apparatus has been constructed, resulting in the first measurements of neutral C2H radical kinetics at 90 K and permitting studies on condensable gases with insufficient vapor pressure at low temperatures. New studies of C 2H with acetylene have been completed.

  4. Temperature-Dependent Rate Coefficients for the Reaction of CH2OO with Hydrogen Sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mica C; Chao, Wen; Kumar, Manoj; Francisco, Joseph S; Takahashi, Kaito; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2017-02-09

    The reaction of the simplest Criegee intermediate CH 2 OO with hydrogen sulfide was measured with transient UV absorption spectroscopy in a temperature-controlled flow reactor, and bimolecular rate coefficients were obtained from 278 to 318 K and from 100 to 500 Torr. The average rate coefficient at 298 K and 100 Torr was (1.7 ± 0.2) × 10 -13 cm 3 s -1 . The reaction was found to be independent of pressure and exhibited a weak negative temperature dependence. Ab initio quantum chemistry calculations of the temperature-dependent reaction rate coefficient at the QCISD(T)/CBS level are in reasonable agreement with the experiment. The reaction of CH 2 OO with H 2 S is 2-3 orders of magnitude faster than the reaction with H 2 O monomer. Though rates of CH 2 OO scavenging by water vapor under atmospheric conditions are primarily controlled by the reaction with water dimer, the H 2 S loss pathway will be dominated by the reaction with monomer. The agreement between experiment and theory for the CH 2 OO + H 2 S reaction lends credence to theoretical descriptions of other Criegee intermediate reactions that cannot easily be probed experimentally.

  5. Laboratory studies of low temperature rate coefficients: The atmospheric chemistry of the outer planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Stephen R.

    1995-01-01

    The objectives of the research are to measure low temperature laboratory rate coefficients for key reactions relevant to the atmospheres of Titan and Saturn. These reactions are, for example, C2H + H2, CH4, C2H2, and other hydrocarbons which need to be measured at low temperatures, down to approximately 150 K. The results of this work are provided to NASA specialists who study modeling of the hydrocarbon chemistry of the outer planets. The apparatus for this work consists of a pulsed laser photolysis system and a tunable F-center probe laser to monitor the disappearance of C2H. A low temperature cell with a cryogenic circulating fluid in the outer jacket provides the gas handling system for this work. These elements have been described in detail in previous reports. Several new results are completed and the publications are just being prepared. The reaction of C2H with C2H2 has been measured with an improved apparatus down to 154 K. An Arrhenius plot indicates a clear increase in the rate coefficient at the lowest temperatures, most likely because of the long-lived (C4H3) intermediate. The capability to achieve the lowest temperatures in this work was made possible by construction of a new cell and addition of a multipass arrangement for the probe laser, as well as improvements to the laser system.

  6. Disalignment rate coefficient of neon excited atoms due to helium atom collisions at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, M; Shimamura, T; Furutani, T; Hasuo, M; Bahrim, C; Fujimoto, T

    2003-01-01

    Disalignment of neon excited atoms in the fine-structure 2p i levels (in Paschen notation) of the 2p 5 3p configuration is investigated in a helium-neon glow discharge at temperatures between 15 and 77 K. At several temperatures, we plot the disalignment rate as a function of the helium atom density for Ne* (2p 2 or 2p 7 ) + He(1s 2 ) collisions. The slope of this dependence gives the disalignment rate coefficient. For both collisions, the experimental data for the disalignment rate coefficient show a more rapid decrease with the decrease in temperature below 40 K than our quantum close-coupling calculations based on the model potential of Hennecart and Masnou-Seeuws (1985 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Phys. 18 657). This finding suggests that the disalignment cross section rapidly decreases below a few millielectronvolts, in disagreement with our theoretical quantum calculations which predict a strong increase below 1 meV. The disagreement suggests that the long-range electrostatic potentials are significantly more repulsive than in the aforementioned model

  7. Rate coefficients for the reactions of ions with polar molecules at interstellar temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, N.G.; Smith, D.; Clary, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    A theory has been developed recently which predicts that the rate coefficients, k, for the reactions of ions with polar molecules at low temperatures will be much greater than the canonical value of 10 -9 cm 3 s -1 . The new theory indicates that k is greatest for low-lying rotational sates and increases rapidly with decreasing temperature. We refer to recent laboratory measurements which validate the theory, present calculated values of k for the reactions of H + 3 ions with several polar molecules, and discuss their significance to interstellar chemistry. For the reactions of ions with molecules having large dipole moments, we recommend that k values as large as 10 -7 cm 3 s -1 should be used in ion-chemical models of low-temperature interstellar clouds

  8. Rate Coefficients of the Reaction of OH with Allene and Propyne at High Temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Es-sebbar, Et-touhami

    2016-09-28

    Allene (H2C═C═CH2; a-C3H4) and propyne (CH3C≡CH; p-C3H4) are important species in various chemical environments. In combustion processes, the reactions of hydroxyl radicals with a-C3H4 and p-C3H4 are critical in the overall fuel oxidation system. In this work, rate coefficients of OH radicals with allene (OH + H2C═C═CH2 → products) and propyne (OH + CH3C≡CH → products) were measured behind reflected shock waves over the temperature range of 843–1352 K and pressures near 1.5 atm. Hydroxyl radicals were generated by rapid thermal decomposition of tert-butyl hydroperoxide ((CH3)3–CO–OH), and monitored by narrow line width laser absorption of the well-characterized R1(5) electronic transition of the OH A–X (0,0) electronic system near 306.7 nm. Results show that allene reacts faster with OH radicals than propyne over the temperature range of this study. Measured rate coefficients can be expressed in Arrhenius form as follows: kallene+OH(T) = 8.51(±0.03) × 10–22T3.05 exp(2215(±3)/T), T = 843–1352 K; kpropyne+OH(T) = 1.30(±0.07) × 10–21T3.01 exp(1140(±6)/T), T = 846–1335 K.

  9. Determination of equilibrium electron temperature and times using an electron swarm model with BOLSIG+ calculated collision frequencies and rate coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusateri, Elise N.; Morris, Heidi E.; Nelson, Eric M.; Ji, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) events produce low-energy conduction electrons from Compton electron or photoelectron ionizations with air. It is important to understand how conduction electrons interact with air in order to accurately predict EMP evolution and propagation. An electron swarm model can be used to monitor the time evolution of conduction electrons in an environment characterized by electric field and pressure. Here a swarm model is developed that is based on the coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) described by Higgins et al. (1973), hereinafter HLO. The ODEs characterize the swarm electric field, electron temperature, electron number density, and drift velocity. Important swarm parameters, the momentum transfer collision frequency, energy transfer collision frequency, and ionization rate, are calculated and compared to the previously reported fitted functions given in HLO. These swarm parameters are found using BOLSIG+, a two term Boltzmann solver developed by Hagelaar and Pitchford (2005), which utilizes updated cross sections from the LXcat website created by Pancheshnyi et al. (2012). We validate the swarm model by comparing to experimental effective ionization coefficient data in Dutton (1975) and drift velocity data in Ruiz-Vargas et al. (2010). In addition, we report on electron equilibrium temperatures and times for a uniform electric field of 1 StatV/cm for atmospheric heights from 0 to 40 km. We show that the equilibrium temperature and time are sensitive to the modifications in the collision frequencies and ionization rate based on the updated electron interaction cross sections

  10. Temperature dependent electron transport and rate coefficient studies for e-beam-sustained diffuse gas discharge switching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, J.G.; Hunter, S.R.; Christophorou, L.G.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of the electron drift velocity, w, attachment coefficient, eta/N/sub a/, and ionization coefficient, α/N, have been made in C 2 F 6 /Ar and C 2 F 6 /CH 4 gas mixtures at gas temperatures, T, of 300 and 500 0 K over the concentration range of 0.1 to 100% of the C 2 F 6 . These measurements are useful for modeling the expected behavior of repetitively operated electron-beam sustained diffuse gas discharge opening switches where gas temperatures within the switch are anticipated to rise several hundred degrees during switch operation

  11. Fuel Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewe, W.E.

    2001-07-31

    A method for measuring the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity in a heterogeneous nuclear reactor is presented. The method, which is used during normal operation, requires that calibrated control rods be oscillated in a special way at a high reactor power level. The value of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity is found from the measured flux responses to these oscillations. Application of the method in a Savannah River reactor charged with natural uranium is discussed.

  12. Rate coefficient for the reaction N + NO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence has been advanced that the rate coefficient for the reaction N + NO right arrow N2 + O has a small positive temperature dependence at the high temperatures (900 to 1500 K) that prevail in the terrestrial middle and upper thermosphere by Siskind and Rusch (1992), and at the low temperatures (100 to 200 K) of the Martian lower thermosphere by Fox (1993). Assuming that the rate coefficient recommended by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory evaluation (DeMore et al., 1992) is accurate at 300 K, we derive here the low temperature value of the activation energy for this reaction and thus the rate coefficient that best fits the Viking 1 measured NO densities. We find that the fit is acceptable for a rate coefficient of about 1.3 x 10(exp -10)(T/300)(exp 0.5)exp(-400/T) and better for a value of about 2.5 x 10(exp -10)(T/300)(exp 0.5)exp(-600/T)cu cm/s.

  13. Low temperature rate coefficients of the H + CH(+) → C(+) + H2 reaction: New potential energy surface and time-independent quantum scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werfelli, Ghofran; Halvick, Philippe; Honvault, Pascal; Kerkeni, Boutheïna; Stoecklin, Thierry

    2015-09-21

    The observed abundances of the methylidyne cation, CH(+), in diffuse molecular clouds can be two orders of magnitude higher than the prediction of the standard gas-phase models which, in turn, predict rather well the abundances of neutral CH. It is therefore necessary to investigate all the possible formation and destruction processes of CH(+) in the interstellar medium with the most abundant species H, H2, and e(-). In this work, we address the destruction process of CH(+) by hydrogen abstraction. We report a new calculation of the low temperature rate coefficients for the abstraction reaction, using accurate time-independent quantum scattering and a new high-level ab initio global potential energy surface including a realistic model of the long-range interaction between the reactants H and CH(+). The calculated thermal rate coefficient is in good agreement with the experimental data in the range 50 K-800 K. However, at lower temperatures, the experimental rate coefficient takes exceedingly small values which are not reproduced by the calculated rate coefficient. Instead, the latter rate coefficient is close to the one given by the Langevin capture model, as expected for a reaction involving an ion and a neutral species. Several recent theoretical works have reported a seemingly good agreement with the experiment below 50 K, but an analysis of these works show that they are based on potential energy surfaces with incorrect long-range behavior. The experimental results were explained by a loss of reactivity of the lowest rotational states of the reactant; however, the quantum scattering calculations show the opposite, namely, a reactivity enhancement with rotational excitation.

  14. State-to-state quantum mechanical calculations of rate coefficients for the D+ + H2 → HD + H+ reaction at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honvault, P; Scribano, Y

    2013-10-03

    The dynamics of the D(+) + H2 → HD + H(+) reaction on a recent ab initio potential energy surface (Velilla, L.; Lepetit, B.; Aguado, A.; Beswick, J. A.; Paniagua, M. J. Chem. Phys. 2008, 129, 084307) has been investigated by means of a time-independent quantum mechanical approach. Cross-sections and rate coefficients are calculated, respectively, for collision energies below 0.1 eV and temperatures up to 100 K for astrophysical application. An excellent accord is found for collision energy above 5 meV, while a disagreement between theory and experiment is observed below this energy. We show that the rate coefficients reveal a slightly temperature-dependent behavior in the upper part of the temperature range considered here. This is in agreement with the experimental data above 80 K, which give a temperature independent value. However, a significant decrease is found at temperatures below 20 K. This decrease can be related to quantum effects and the decay back to the reactant channel, which are not considered by simple statistical approaches, such as the Langevin model. Our results have been fitted to appropriate analytical expressions in order to be used in astrochemical and cosmological models.

  15. Moderator temperature coefficient in BWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Yoshitaka

    1977-01-01

    Temperature dependences of infinite multiplication factor k sub(infinity) and neutron leakage from the core must be examined for estimation of moderator temperature coefficient. Temperature dependence on k sub(infinity) has been investigated by many researchers, however, the dependence on neutron leakage of a BWR with cruciformed control rods has hardly been done. Because there are difficulties and necessity on calculations of three space dimensional and multi-energy groups neutron distribution in a BWR core. In this study, moderator temperature coefficients of JPDR-II (BWR) core were obtained by calculation with DIFFUSION-ACE, which is newly developed three-dimensional multi-group computer code. The results were compared with experimental data measured from 20 to 275 0 C of the moderator temperature and the good agreement was obtained between calculation and measurement. In order to evaluate neutron leakage from the core, the other two calculations were carried out, adjusting criticality by uniform absorption rate and by material buckling. The former underestimated neutron leakage and the latter overestimated it. Discussion on the results shows that in order to estimate the temperature coefficient of BWR, neutron leakage must be evaluated precisely, therefore the calculation at actual pattern of control rods is necessary. (auth.)

  16. Estimating temperature reactivity coefficients by experimental procedures combined with isothermal temperature coefficient measurements and dynamic identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Masashi; Aoki, Yukinori; Shimazu, Yoichiro; Yamasaki, Masatoshi; Hanayama, Yasushi

    2006-01-01

    A method to evaluate the moderator coefficient (MTC) and the Doppler coefficient through experimental procedures performed during reactor physics tests of PWR power plants is proposed. This method combines isothermal temperature coefficient (ITC) measurement experiments and reactor power transient experiments at low power conditions for dynamic identification. In the dynamic identification, either one of temperature coefficients can be determined in such a way that frequency response characteristics of the reactivity change observed by a digital reactivity meter is reproduced from measured data of neutron count rate and the average coolant temperature. The other unknown coefficient can also be determined by subtracting the coefficient obtained from the dynamic identification from ITC. As the proposed method can directly estimate the Doppler coefficient, the applicability of the conventional core design codes to predict the Doppler coefficient can be verified for new types of fuels such as mixed oxide fuels. The digital simulation study was carried out to show the feasibility of the proposed method. The numerical analysis showed that the MTC and the Doppler coefficient can be estimated accurately and even if there are uncertainties in the parameters of the reactor kinetics model, the accuracies of the estimated values are not seriously impaired. (author)

  17. Temperature Dependent Rate Coefficients for the Gas-Phase Reaction of the OH Radical with Linear (L2, L3) and Cyclic (D3, D4) Permethylsiloxanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, François; Papanastasiou, Dimitrios K; Papadimitriou, Vassileios C; Burkholder, James B

    2018-04-19

    Permethylsiloxanes are emitted into the atmosphere during production and use as personal care products, lubricants, and cleaning agents. The predominate atmospheric loss process for permethylsiloxanes is expected to be via gas-phase reaction with the OH radical. In this study, rate coefficients, k(T), for the OH radical gas-phase reaction with the two simplest linear and cyclic permethylsiloxanes were measured using a pulsed laser photolysis-laser induced fluorescence technique over the temperature range of 240-370 K and a relative rate method at 294 K: hexamethyldisiloxane ((CH 3 ) 3 SiOSi(CH 3 ) 3 , L 2 ), k 1 ; octamethyltrisiloxane ([(CH 3 ) 3 SiO] 2 Si(CH 3 ) 2 , L 3 ), k 2 ; hexamethylcyclotrisiloxane ([-Si(CH 3 ) 2 O-] 3 , D 3 ), k 3 ; and octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane ([-Si(CH 3 ) 2 O-] 4 , D 4 ), k 4 . The obtained k(294 K) values and temperature-dependence expressions for the 240-370 K temperature range are (cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 , 2σ absolute uncertainties): k 1 (294 K) = (1.28 ± 0.08) × 10 -12 , k 1 ( T) = (1.87 ± 0.18) × 10 -11 exp(-(791 ± 27)/ T); k 2 (294 K) = (1.72 ± 0.10) × 10 -12 , k 2 ( T) = 1.96 × 10 -13 (T/298) 4.34 exp(657/ T); k 3 (294 K) = (0.82 ± 0.05) × 10 -12 , k 3 ( T) = (1.29 ± 0.19) × 10 -11 exp(-(805 ± 43)/ T); and k 4 (294 K) = (1.12 ± 0.10) × 10 -12 , k 4 ( T) = (1.80 ± 0.26) × 10 -11 exp(-(816 ± 43)/ T). The cyclic molecules were found to be less reactive than the analogous linear molecule with the same number of -CH 3 groups, while the linear and cyclic permethylsiloxane reactivity both increase with the increasing number of CH 3 - groups. The present results are compared with previous rate coefficient determinations where available. The permethylsiloxanes included in this study are atmospherically short-lived compounds with estimated atmospheric lifetimes of 11, 8, 17, and 13 days, respectively.

  18. Revised Mark 22 coolant temperature coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    Coolant temperature coefficients for the Mark 22 charge published previously are non-conservative because of the neglect of a significant mechanism which has a positive contribution to reactivity. Even after correcting for this effect, dynamic tests made on a Mark VIB charge in the early 60's suggest the results are still non-conservative. This memorandum takes both of these sources of information into account in making a best estimate of the prompt (coolant plus metal) temperature coefficient. Although no safety issues arise from this work (the overall temperature coefficient still strongly contributes to reactor stability), it is obviously desirable to use best estimates for prompt coefficients in limits and other calculations

  19. Research of fuel temperature control in fuel pipeline of diesel engine using positive temperature coefficient material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolu Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As fuel temperature increases, both its viscosity and surface tension decrease, and this is helpful to improve fuel atomization and then better combustion and emission performances of engine. Based on the self-regulated temperature property of positive temperature coefficient material, this article used a positive temperature coefficient material as electric heating element to heat diesel fuel in fuel pipeline of diesel engine. A kind of BaTiO3-based positive temperature coefficient material, with the Curie temperature of 230°C and rated voltage of 24 V, was developed, and its micrograph and element compositions were also analyzed. By the fuel pipeline wrapped in six positive temperature coefficient ceramics, its resistivity–temperature and heating characteristics were tested on a fuel pump bench. The experiments showed that in this installation, the surface temperature of six positive temperature coefficient ceramics rose to the equilibrium temperature only for 100 s at rated voltage. In rated power supply for six positive temperature coefficient ceramics, the temperature of injection fuel improved for 21°C–27°C within 100 s, and then could keep constant. Using positive temperature coefficient material to heat diesel in fuel pipeline of diesel engine, the injection mass per cycle had little change, approximately 0.3%/°C. This study provides a beneficial reference for improving atomization of high-viscosity liquids by employing positive temperature coefficient material without any control methods.

  20. Reaction rate calculations via transmission coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feit, M.D.; Alder, B.J.

    1985-01-01

    The transmission coefficient of a wavepacket traversing a potential barrier can be determined by steady state calculations carried out in imaginary time instead of by real time dynamical calculations. The general argument is verified for the Eckart barrier potential by a comparison of transmission coefficients calculated from real and imaginary time solutions of the Schroedinger equation. The correspondence demonstrated here allows a formulation for the reaction rate that avoids difficulties due to both rare events and explicitly time dependent calculations. 5 refs., 2 figs

  1. Atomic rate coefficients in a degenerate plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanyan, Valentin; Tallents, Greg

    2015-11-01

    The electrons in a dense, degenerate plasma follow Fermi-Dirac statistics, which deviate significantly in this regime from the usual Maxwell-Boltzmann approach used by many models. We present methods to calculate the atomic rate coefficients for the Fermi-Dirac distribution and present a comparison of the ionization fraction of carbon calculated using both models. We have found that for densities close to solid, although the discrepancy is small for LTE conditions, there is a large divergence from the ionization fraction by using classical rate coefficients in the presence of strong photoionizing radiation. We have found that using these modified rates and the degenerate heat capacity may affect the time evolution of a plasma subject to extreme ultraviolet and x-ray radiation such as produced in free electron laser irradiation of solid targets.

  2. Rotational cross sections and rate coefficients of aluminium monoxide AlO(X2Σ+) induced by its collision with He(1 S) at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchakoua, Théophile; Nkot Nkot, Pierre René; Fifen, Jean Jules; Nsangou, Mama; Motapon, Ousmanou

    2018-06-01

    We present the first potential energy surface (PES) for the AlO(X2Σ+)-He(1 S) van der Waals complex. This PES has been calculated at the RCCSD(T) level of theory. The mixed Gaussian/Exponential Extrapolation Scheme of complete basis set [CBS(D,T,Q)] was employed. The PES was fitted using global analytical method. This fitted PES was used subsequently in the close-coupling approach for the computation of the state-to-state collisional excitation cross sections of the fine-structure levels of the AlO-He complex. Collision energies were taken up to 2500 cm-1 and they yield after thermal averaging, state-to-state rate coefficients up to 300 K. The propensity rules between the lowest fine-structure levels were studied. These rules show, on one hand, a strong propensity in favour of odd ΔN transitions, and on the other hand, that cross sections and collisional rate coefficients for Δj = ΔN transitions are larger than those for Δj ≠ ΔN transitions.

  3. Dielectronic recombination rate coefficients of initially rubidium-like tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Z.; Zhang, Y.; Fu, Y.; Dong, C.; Surzhykov, A.; Fritzsche, S.

    2015-01-01

    Dielectric recombination (DR) is a dominant electron recombination process in plasmas. Tungsten ions are expected to be prominent impurities in fusion plasmas so the knowledge of DR rate coefficient of tungsten ions is important to model fusion plasmas. Ab initio calculations of DR rate coefficients of initially rubidium-like W 37+ ions have been performed for the electron temperatures from 1 eV to 5*10 4 eV, by using the Flexible Atomic Code based on the relativistic configuration-interaction method. Special attention has been paid to the partial contributions to total DR rate coefficients as associated with the excitation of individual subshells. A detailed comparison of the calculations shows that the excitation from 4p subshell dominates total DR rate coefficients followed by the excitations from 4s and 4d subshells, while the contribution of excitations from 3l (l = s, p, d) subshells becomes important only at high temperatures. Besides, it is found that the electron excitations associated with Δn = 0, 1 dominate at low-temperature plasmas, however, the excitations associated with Δn ≥ 2 become non-negligible at high-temperature ones

  4. Rate coefficients of the CF3CHFCF3 + H → CF3CFCF3 + H2 reaction at different temperatures calculated by transition state theory with ab initio and DFT reaction paths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Maggie; Mok, Daniel K W; Lee, Edmond P F; Dyke, John M

    2013-03-15

    The minimum energy path (MEP) of the reaction, CF(3)CHFCF(3) + H → transition state (TS) → CF(3)CFCF(3) + H(2), has been computed at different ab initio levels and with density functional theory (DFT) using different functionals. The computed B3LYP/6-31++G**, BH&HLYP/cc-pVDZ, BMK/6-31++G**, M05/6-31+G**, M05-2X/6-31+G**, UMP2/6-31++G**, PUMP2/6-31++G**//UMP2/6-31++G**, RCCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ//UMP2/6-31++G**, RCCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ(spd,sp)//UMP2//6-31++G**, RCCSD(T)/CBS//M05/6-31+G**, and RCCSD(T)/CBS//UMP2/6-31++G** MEPs, and associated gradients and Hessians, were used in reaction rate coefficient calculations based on the transition state theory (TST). Reaction rate coefficients were computed between 300 and 1500 K at various levels of TST, which include conventional TST, canonical variational TST (CVT) and improved CVT (ICVT), and with different tunneling corrections, namely, Wigner, zero-curvature, and small-curvature (SCT). The computed rate coefficients obtained at different ab initio, DFT and TST levels are compared with experimental values available in the 1000-1200 K temperature range. Based on the rate coefficients computed at the ICVT/SCT level, the highest TST level used in this study, the BH&HLYP functional performs best among all the functionals used, while the RCCSD(T)/CBS//MP2/6-31++G** level is the best among all the ab initio levels used. Comparing computed reaction rate coefficients obtained at different levels of theory shows that, the computed barrier height has the strongest effect on the computed reaction rate coefficients as expected. Variational effects on the computed rate coefficients are found to be negligibly small. Although tunneling effects are relatively small at high temperatures (~1500 K), SCT corrections are significant at low temperatures (~300 K), and both barrier heights and the magnitudes of the imaginary frequencies affect SCT corrections. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Critically evaluated rate coefficients for free-radical polymerization, 5. Propagation rate coefficient for butyl acrylate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asua, J.M.; Beuermann, S.; Buback, M.; Castignolles, P.; Charleux, B.; Gilbert, R.G.; Hutchinson, R.A.; Leiza, J.R.; Nikitin, A.N.; Vairon, J.P.; Herk, van A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Propagation rate coefficients, kp, for free-radical polymerization of butyl acrylate (BA) previously reported by several groups are critically evaluated. All data were determined by the combination of pulsed-laser polymerization (PLP) and subsequent polymer analysis by size exclusion (SEC)

  6. Communication: Equilibrium rate coefficients from atomistic simulations: The O(3P) + NO(2Π) → O2(X3Σg−) + N(4S) reaction at temperatures relevant to the hypersonic flight regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro-Palacio, Juan Carlos; Bemish, Raymond J.; Meuwly, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The O( 3 P) + NO( 2 Π) → O 2 (X 3 Σ g − ) + N( 4 S) reaction is among the N- and O- involving reactions that dominate the energetics of the reactive air flow around spacecraft during hypersonic atmospheric re-entry. In this regime, the temperature in the bow shock typically ranges from 1000 to 20 000 K. The forward and reverse rate coefficients for this reaction derived directly from trajectory calculations over this range of temperature are reported in this letter. Results compare well with the established equilibrium constants for the same reaction from thermodynamic quantities derived from spectroscopy in the gas phase which paves the way for large-scale in silico investigations of equilibrium rates under extreme conditions

  7. Communication: Equilibrium rate coefficients from atomistic simulations: The O((3)P) + NO((2)Π) → O2(X(3)Σg(-)) + N((4)S) reaction at temperatures relevant to the hypersonic flight regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Palacio, Juan Carlos; Bemish, Raymond J; Meuwly, Markus

    2015-03-07

    The O((3)P) + NO((2)Π) → O2(X(3)Σg(-)) + N((4)S) reaction is among the N- and O- involving reactions that dominate the energetics of the reactive air flow around spacecraft during hypersonic atmospheric re-entry. In this regime, the temperature in the bow shock typically ranges from 1000 to 20,000 K. The forward and reverse rate coefficients for this reaction derived directly from trajectory calculations over this range of temperature are reported in this letter. Results compare well with the established equilibrium constants for the same reaction from thermodynamic quantities derived from spectroscopy in the gas phase which paves the way for large-scale in silico investigations of equilibrium rates under extreme conditions.

  8. Measuring device for the temperature coefficient of reactor moderators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Yuzo.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To rapidly determine by automatic calculation the temperature coefficient for moderators which has been determined so far by a log of manual processings. Constitution: Each of signals from a control rod position indicator, a reactor reactivity, instrument and moderator temperature meter are inputted, and each of the signals and designed valued for the doppler temperature coefficients are stored. Recurling calculation is conducted based on the reactivity and the moderator temperature at an interval where the temperature changes of the moderators are equalized at an identical control rod position, to determine isothermic coefficient. Then, the temperature coefficient for moderator are calculated from the isothermic coefficient and the doppler temperature coefficient. The relationship between the reactivity and the moderator temperature is plotted on a X-Y recorder. The stored signals and the calculated temperature coefficient for moderators are sequentially displayed and the results are printed out when the measurement is completed. According to the present device, since the real time processing is conducted, the processing time can be shortened remarkably. Accordingly, it is possible to save the man power for the test of the nuclear reactor and improve the reactor operation performance. (Kamimura, M.)

  9. Modelling of tandem cell temperature coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, D.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-05-01

    This paper discusses the temperature dependence of the basic solar-cell operating parameters for a GaInP/GaAs series-connected two-terminal tandem cell. The effects of series resistance and of different incident solar spectra are also discussed.

  10. Compilation report of VHTRC temperature coefficient benchmark calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, Hideshi; Yamane, Tsuyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1995-11-01

    A calculational benchmark problem has been proposed by JAERI to an IAEA Coordinated Research Program, `Verification of Safety Related Neutronic Calculation for Low-enriched Gas-cooled Reactors` to investigate the accuracy of calculation results obtained by using codes of the participating countries. This benchmark is made on the basis of assembly heating experiments at a pin-in block type critical assembly, VHTRC. Requested calculation items are the cell parameters, effective multiplication factor, temperature coefficient of reactivity, reaction rates, fission rate distribution, etc. Seven institutions from five countries have joined the benchmark works. Calculation results are summarized in this report with some remarks by the authors. Each institute analyzed the problem by applying the calculation code system which was prepared for the HTGR development of individual country. The values of the most important parameter, k{sub eff}, by all institutes showed good agreement with each other and with the experimental ones within 1%. The temperature coefficient agreed within 13%. The values of several cell parameters calculated by several institutes did not agree with the other`s ones. It will be necessary to check the calculation conditions again for getting better agreement. (J.P.N.).

  11. Amide temperature coefficients in the protein G B1 domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomlinson, Jennifer H.; Williamson, Mike P.

    2012-01-01

    Temperature coefficients have been measured for backbone amide 1 H and 15 N nuclei in the B1 domain of protein G (GB1), using temperatures in the range 283–313 K, and pH values from 2.0 to 9.0. Many nuclei display pH-dependent coefficients, which were fitted to one or two pK a values. 1 H coefficients showed the expected behaviour, in that hydrogen-bonded amides have less negative values, but for those amides involved in strong hydrogen bonds in regular secondary structure there is a negative correlation between strength of hydrogen bond and size of temperature coefficient. The best correlation to temperature coefficient is with secondary shift, indicative of a very approximately uniform thermal expansion. The largest pH-dependent changes in coefficient are for amides in loops adjacent to sidechain hydrogen bonds rather than the amides involved directly in hydrogen bonds, indicating that the biggest determinant of the temperature coefficient is temperature-dependent loss of structure, not hydrogen bonding. Amide 15 N coefficients have no clear relationship with structure.

  12. Improved cryo-resistors with low temperature coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warnecke, P.; Braun, E.

    1989-01-01

    A new type of 10- and 12.9κΩ cryo-resistors operating in a liquid helium bath with small temperature coefficient of resistivity have been built. Details for the fabrication of these improved cryo-resistors are reported. Experimental evidence of their drift rates are on the order of a few parts in 10 9 per day. A reduction of the mean pressure of 98.7 kPa in the helium dewar to 86.1 kPa, corresponding to a temperature decrease from 4.19 to 4.07 Κ, did not change the resistance value by more than the experimental resolution of 4 parts in 10 8

  13. Isothermal temperature reactivity coefficient measurement in TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagar, T.; Ravnik, M.; Trkov, A.

    2002-01-01

    Direct measurement of an isothermal temperature reactivity coefficient at room temperatures in TRIGA Mark II research reactor at Jozef Stefan Institute in Ljubljana is presented. Temperature reactivity coefficient was measured in the temperature range between 15 o C and 25 o C. All reactivity measurements were performed at almost zero reactor power to reduce or completely eliminate nuclear heating. Slow and steady temperature decrease was controlled using the reactor tank cooling system. In this way the temperatures of fuel, of moderator and of coolant were kept in equilibrium throughout the measurements. It was found out that TRIGA reactor core loaded with standard fuel elements with stainless steel cladding has small positive isothermal temperature reactivity coefficient in this temperature range.(author)

  14. The application of dual-electrode through vial impedance spectroscopy for the determination of ice interface temperatures, primary drying rate and vial heat transfer coefficient in lyophilization process development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Geoff; Jeeraruangrattana, Yowwares; Ermolina, Irina

    2018-06-22

    Through vial impedance spectroscopy (TVIS) is a product non-invasive process analytical technology which exploits the frequency dependence of the complex impedance spectrum of a composite object (i.e. the freeze-drying vial and its contents) in order to track the progression of the freeze-drying cycle. This work demonstrates the use of a dual electrode system, attached to the external surface of a type I glass tubing vial (nominal capacity 10 mL) in the prediction of (i) the ice interface temperatures at the sublimation front and at the base of the vial, and (ii) the primary drying rate. A value for the heat transfer coefficient (for a chamber pressure of 270 µbar) was then calculated from these parameters and shown to be comparable to that published by Tchessalov[1]. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Collisional excitation rate coefficients for lithium-like ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochrane, D.M.; McWhirter, R.W.P.

    1982-11-01

    This report takes all the available good quality quantal calculations of excitation cross-sections by electron collision for lithium-like ions and intercompares them. There is a comparison also with the small amount of experimental data of 2s 2 S - 2p 2 P cross-sections. On the basis of all of these data, a choice is made of the best cross-sections and these are integrated over Maxwellians to give excitation rate coefficients. In general data are available for up to seven transitions in five or six ions. When the results are compared along the iso-electronic sequence, trends are established which allow estimates to be made of the rate coefficients for these seven transitions for any lithium-like ion of nuclear charge greater than boron. The results are presented graphically and as simple formulae. The formulae reproduce the source data at various levels of accuracy from about +-1% for individual ions to universal formulae of accuracy better than +-15% in the relevant temperature ranges. (author)

  16. A theoretical study of the mechanism of the atmospherically relevant reaction of chlorine atoms with methyl nitrate, and calculation of the reaction rate coefficients at temperatures relevant to the troposphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Maggie; Mok, Daniel K W; Lee, Edmond P F; Dyke, John M

    2015-03-21

    The reaction between atomic chlorine (Cl) and methyl nitrate (CH3ONO2) is significant in the atmosphere, as Cl is a key oxidant, especially in the marine boundary layer, and alkyl nitrates are important nitrogen-containing organic compounds, which are temporary reservoirs of the reactive nitrogen oxides NO, NO2 and NO3 (NOx). Four reaction channels HCl + CH2ONO2, CH3OCl + NO2, CH3Cl + NO3 and CH3O + ClNO2 were considered. The major channel is found to be the H abstraction channel, to give the products HCl + CH2ONO2. For all channels, geometry optimization and frequency calculations were carried out at the M06-2X/6-31+G** level, while relative electronic energies were improved to the UCCSD(T*)-F12/CBS level. The reaction barrier (ΔE(‡)0K) and reaction enthalpy (ΔH(RX)298K) of the H abstraction channel were computed to be 0.61 and -2.30 kcal mol(-1), respectively, at the UCCSD(T*)-F12/CBS//M06-2X/6-31+G** level. Reaction barriers (ΔE(‡)0K) for the other channels are more positive and these pathways do not contribute to the overall reaction rate coefficient in the temperature range considered (200-400 K). Rate coefficients were calculated for the H-abstraction channel at various levels of variational transition state theory (VTST) including tunnelling. Recommended ICVT/SCT rate coefficients in the temperature range 200-400 K are presented for the first time for this reaction. The values obtained in the 200-300 K region are particularly important as they will be valuable for atmospheric modelling calculations involving reactions with methyl nitrate. The implications of the results to atmospheric chemistry are discussed. Also, the enthalpies of formation, ΔHf,298K, of CH3ONO2 and CH2ONO2 were computed to be -29.7 and 19.3 kcal mol(-1), respectively, at the UCCSD(T*)-F12/CBS level.

  17. The rate coefficients of unimolecular reactions in the systems with power-law distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Cangtao; Guo, Ran; Du, Jiulin

    2014-08-01

    The rate coefficient formulae of unimolecular reactions are generalized to the systems with the power-law distributions based on nonextensive statistics, and the power-law rate coefficients are derived in the high and low pressure limits, respectively. The numerical analyses are made of the rate coefficients as functions of the ν-parameter, the threshold energy, the temperature and the number of degrees of freedom. We show that the new rate coefficients depend strongly on the ν-parameter different from one (thus from a Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution). Two unimolecular reactions, CH3CO→CH3+CO and CH3NC→CH3CN, are taken as application examples to calculate their power-law rate coefficients, which obtained with the ν-parameters slightly different from one can be exactly in agreement with all the experimental studies on these two reactions in the given temperature ranges.

  18. Measurement and analysis of reactivity temperature coefficient of CEFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yiyu; Hu Yun; Yang Xiaoyan; Fan Zhendong; Zhang Qiang; Zhao Jinkun; Li Zehua

    2013-01-01

    The reactivity temperature coefficient of CEFR was calculated by CITATION program and compared with the results calculated by correlative programs and measured from experiments for temperature effects. It is indicated that the calculation results from CITATION agree well with measured values. The reactivity temperature coefficient of CEFR is about -4 pcm/℃. The deviation of the measured values between the temperature increasing and decreasing processes is about 11%, which satisfies the experiment acceptance criteria. The measured results can validate the calculation ones by program and can provide important reference data for the safety operation of CEFR and the analysis of the reactivity balance in the reactor refueling situation. (authors)

  19. Temperature and current coefficients of lasing wavelength in tunable diode laser spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, M; Mishima, T; Nakayama, N; Masuda, T

    2010-08-01

    The factors determining temperature and current coefficients of lasing wavelength are investigated and discussed under monitoring CO(2)-gas absorption spectra. The diffusion rate of Joule heating at the active layer to the surrounding region is observed by monitoring the change in the junction voltage, which is a function of temperature and the wavelength (frequency) deviation under sinusoidal current modulation. Based on the experimental results, the time interval of monitoring the wavelength after changing the ambient temperature or injected current (scanning rate) has to be constant at least to eliminate the monitoring error induced by the deviation of lasing wavelength, though the temperature and current coefficients of lasing wavelength differ with the rate.

  20. Amide proton temperature coefficients as hydrogen bond indicators in proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cierpicki, Tomasz; Otlewski, Jacek

    2001-01-01

    Correlations between amide proton temperature coefficients (Δσ HN /ΔT) and hydrogen bonds were investigated for a data set of 793 amides derived from 14 proteins. For amide protons showing temperature gradients more positive than -4.6 ppb/K there is a hydrogen bond predictivity value exceeding 85%. It increases to over 93% for amides within the range between -4 and -1 ppb/K. Detailed analysis shows an inverse proportionality between amide proton temperature coefficients and hydrogen bond lengths. Furthermore, for hydrogen bonds of similar bond lengths, values of temperature gradients in α-helices are on average 1 ppb/K more negative than in β-sheets. In consequence, a number of amide protons in α-helices involved in hydrogen bonds shorter than 2 A show Δσ HN /ΔT 10 helices and 98% in β-turns have temperature coefficients more positive than -4.6ppb/K. Ring current effect also significantly influences temperature coefficients of amide protons. In seven out of eight cases non-hydrogen bonded amides strongly deshielded by neighboring aromatic rings show temperature coefficients more positive than -2 ppb/K. In general, amide proton temperature gradients do not change with pH unless they correspond to conformational changes. Three examples of pH dependent equilibrium showing hydrogen bond formation at higher pH were found. In conclusion, amide proton temperature coefficients offer an attractive and simple way to confirm existence of hydrogen bonds in NMR determined structures

  1. Study of Temperature Coefficients for Parameters of Photovoltaic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Tudor Cotfas

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature is one of the most important factors which affect the performance of the photovoltaic cells and panels along with the irradiance. The current voltage characteristics, I-V, are measured at different temperatures from 25°C to 87°C and at different illumination levels from 400 to 1000 W/m2, because there are locations where the upper limit of the photovoltaic cells working temperature exceeds 80°C. This study reports the influence of the temperature and the irradiance on the important parameters of four commercial photovoltaic cell types: monocrystalline silicon—mSi, polycrystalline silicon—pSi, amorphous silicon—aSi, and multijunction InGaP/InGaAs/Ge (Emcore. The absolute and normalized temperature coefficients are determined and compared with their values from the related literature. The variation of the absolute temperature coefficient function of the irradiance and its significance to accurately determine the important parameters of the photovoltaic cells are also presented. The analysis is made on different types of photovoltaics cells in order to understand the effects of technology on temperature coefficients. The comparison between the open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current was also performed, calculated using the temperature coefficients, determined, and measured, in various conditions. The measurements are realized using the SolarLab system, and the photovoltaic cell parameters are determined and compared using the LabVIEW software created for SolarLab system.

  2. Dielectronic recombination rate coefficients to excited states of Be-like oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Izumi; Safronova, Ulyana I.; Kato, Takako

    2001-05-01

    We have calculated energy levels, radiative transition probabilities, and autoionization rates for Be-like oxygen (O{sup 4+}) including ls{sup 2}2lnl' (n=2 - 8, l {<=} n - 1) and 1s{sup 2}3l'nl (n=3 - 6, l {<=} n - l) states by multi-configurational Hartree-Fock method (Cowan code) and perturbation theory Z-expansion method (MZ code). The state selective dielectronic recombination rate coefficients to excited states of Be-like O ions are obtained. Configuration mixing plays an important role for the principal quantum number n distribution of the dielectronic recombination rate coefficients for 2snl (n {<=} 5) levels at low electron temperature. The orbital angular momentum quantum number l distribution of the rate coefficients shows a peak at l = 4. The total dielectronic recombination rate coefficient is derived as a function of electron temperature. (author)

  3. Static pressure and temperature coefficients of laboratory standard microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Knud

    1996-01-01

    of the microphone. The static pressure and temperature coefficients were determined experimentally for about twenty samples of type BK 4160 and BK 4180 microphones. The results agree almost perfectly with the predictions for BK 4160, while some modifications of the lumped parameter values are called for to make......-order approximation of resonances in the back cavity. It was found that each of the coefficients, for a given type of microphone, can be expressed by a single function when the coefficients are normalized by their low-frequency value and the frequency axis normalized by the individual resonance frequency...

  4. Rate Coefficients for the OH + (CHO)2 (Glyoxal) Reaction Between 240 and 400 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feierabend, K. J.; Talukdar, R. K.; Zhu, L.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Burkholder, J. B.

    2006-12-01

    Glyoxal (CHO)2, the simplest dialdehyde, is an end product formed in the atmospheric oxidation of biogenic hydrocarbons, for example, isoprene. As such, glyoxal plays a role in regional air quality and ozone production in certain locations. Glyoxal is lost in the atmosphere via UV photolysis and reaction with OH. However, the currently available rate coefficient data for the OH + glyoxal reaction is limited to a single room- temperature measurement made using the relative rate method. A determination of the rate coefficient temperature dependence is therefore needed for a more complete interpretation of the atmospheric processing of glyoxal. This study reports the rate coefficient for the OH + (CHO)2 reaction measured under pseudo- first-order conditions in OH ([(CHO)2] > 1000 [OH]0). OH radicals were produced using 248 nm pulsed laser photolysis of H2O2 or HNO3 and detected by pulsed laser induced fluorescence. The concentration of glyoxal in the reactor was determined using three independent techniques; gas flow rates as well as in situ UV and IR absorption. The total pressure in the reactor was varied from 40 to 300 Torr (He), and the rate coefficient was found to be independent of pressure over the temperature range studied. The rate coefficient exhibits a negative temperature dependence between 240 and 400 K consistent with the dependence previously observed for many other aldehydes. Our room-temperature rate coefficient is smaller than the relative rate value that is currently recommended for use in atmospheric model calculations. Our measured rate coefficients are discussed with respect to those for other aldehydes. The atmospheric implications of our work will also be discussed.

  5. Distribution of temperature coefficient density for muons in the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuzmenko V.S.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available To date, several dozens of new muon detectors have been built. When studying cosmic-ray intensity variations with these detectors, located deep in the atmosphere, it is necessary to calculate all characteristics, including the distribution of temperature coefficient density for muons in the atmosphere, taking into account their specific geometry. For this purpose, we calculate the density of temperature coefficients of muon intensity in the atmosphere at various zenith angles of detection at sea level and at various depths underground for different absorption ranges of primary protons and pions in the atmosphere.

  6. The Influence of Particle Charge on Heterogeneous Reaction Rate Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikin, A. C.; Pesnell, W. D.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of particle charge on heterogeneous reaction rates are presented. Many atmospheric particles, whether liquid or solid are charged. This surface charge causes a redistribution of charge within a liquid particle and as a consequence a perturbation in the gaseous uptake coefficient. The amount of perturbation is proportional to the external potential and the square of the ratio of debye length in the liquid to the particle radius. Previous modeling has shown how surface charge affects the uptake coefficient of charged aerosols. This effect is now included in the heterogeneous reaction rate of an aerosol ensemble. Extension of this analysis to ice particles will be discussed and examples presented.

  7. Efficient calculation of atomic rate coefficients in dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanyan, Valentin; Tallents, Greg J.

    2017-03-01

    Modelling electron statistics in a cold, dense plasma by the Fermi-Dirac distribution leads to complications in the calculations of atomic rate coefficients. The Pauli exclusion principle slows down the rate of collisions as electrons must find unoccupied quantum states and adds a further computational cost. Methods to calculate these coefficients by direct numerical integration with a high degree of parallelism are presented. This degree of optimization allows the effects of degeneracy to be incorporated into a time-dependent collisional-radiative model. Example results from such a model are presented.

  8. Effective dose rate coefficients for exposure to contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veinot, K.G. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States); Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eckerman, K.F.; Easterly, C.E. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States); Bellamy, M.B.; Hiller, M.M.; Dewji, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hertel, N.E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Manger, R. [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge has undertaken calculations related to various environmental exposure scenarios. A previous paper reported the results for submersion in radioactive air and immersion in water using age-specific mathematical phantoms. This paper presents age-specific effective dose rate coefficients derived using stylized mathematical phantoms for exposure to contaminated soils. Dose rate coefficients for photon, electron, and positrons of discrete energies were calculated and folded with emissions of 1252 radionuclides addressed in ICRP Publication 107 to determine equivalent and effective dose rate coefficients. The MCNP6 radiation transport code was used for organ dose rate calculations for photons and the contribution of electrons to skin dose rate was derived using point-kernels. Bremsstrahlung and annihilation photons of positron emission were evaluated as discrete photons. The coefficients calculated in this work compare favorably to those reported in the US Federal Guidance Report 12 as well as by other authors who employed voxel phantoms for similar exposure scenarios. (orig.)

  9. ROVIBRATIONAL QUENCHING RATE COEFFICIENTS OF HD IN COLLISIONS WITH He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolte, J. L.; Stancil, P. C.; Lee, T.-G.; Balakrishnan, N.; Forrey, R. C.

    2012-01-01

    Along with H 2 , HD has been found to play an important role in the cooling of the primordial gas for the formation of the first stars and galaxies. It has also been observed in a variety of cool molecular astrophysical environments. The rate of cooling by HD molecules requires knowledge of collisional rate coefficients with the primary impactors, H, He, and H 2 . To improve knowledge of the collisional properties of HD, we present rate coefficients for the He-HD collision system over a range of collision energies from 10 –5 to 5 × 10 3 cm –1 . Fully quantum mechanical scattering calculations were performed for initial HD rovibrational states of j = 0 and 1 for v = 0-17 which utilized accurate diatom rovibrational wave functions. Rate coefficients of all Δv = 0, –1, and –2 transitions are reported. Significant discrepancies with previous calculations, which adopted a small basis and harmonic HD wave functions for excited vibrational levels, were found for the highest previously considered vibrational state of v = 3. Applications of the He-HD rate coefficients in various astrophysical environments are briefly discussed.

  10. Temperature coefficients in the Dragon low-enriched power reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, U

    1972-05-15

    The temperature coefficient of the fuel and of the moderator have been evaluated for the Dragon HTR design for different stages in reactor life, initial core, end of no-refuelling period and equilibrium conditions. The investigation has shown the low-enriched HTR to have a strong, positive moderator coefficient. In some cases and for special operating conditions, even leading to a positive total temperature coefficient. This does not imply, however, that the HTR is an unsafe reactor system. By adequate design of the control system, safe and reliable operating characteristics can be achieved. This has already been proved satisfactory through many years of operation of other graphite moderated systems, such as the Magnox stations.

  11. Temperature coefficients of reactivity in the fourth loading of ZENITH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caro Manso, R.; Freemantle, R.G.; Rogers, J.D.

    1962-10-01

    Measurements have been made of the temperature coefficients of reactivity associated with the core plus end reflectors and the side reflector of the fourth core loading of ZENITH, which had a carbon/U235 atomic ratio of 7788 and no other absorber. (author)

  12. Temperature coefficients of reactivity in the fourth loading of ZENITH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caro Manso, R; Freemantle, R G; Rogers, J D [Graphite Reactor Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1962-10-15

    Measurements have been made of the temperature coefficients of reactivity associated with the core plus end reflectors and the side reflector of the fourth core loading of ZENITH, which had a carbon/U235 atomic ratio of 7788 and no other absorber. (author)

  13. Determination of sedimentation rates and absorption coefficient of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. MIKE HORSFALL

    particles have pores that can absorb radiation. Gamma rays have been used to study the absorption coefficients of cobalt(II) insoluble compounds (Essien and Ekpe, 1998), densities of marine sediments. (Gerland and Villinger, 1995) and soil particle-size distribution (Vaz et al., 1992). In this study, sedimentation rates of ...

  14. Rate coefficients for hydrogen abstraction reaction of pinonaldehyde

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The H abstraction reaction from the –CHO group was found to be the most dominant reaction channelamong all the possible reaction pathways and its corresponding rate coefficient at 300 K is kEckart's unsymmetrical= 3.86 ×10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. Whereas the channel with immediate lower activation energy is the ...

  15. Collisional Dissociation of CO: ab initio Potential Energy Surfaces and Quasiclassical Trajectory Rate Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenke, David W.; Jaffe, Richard L.; Chaban, Galina M.

    2016-01-01

    We have generated accurate global potential energy surfaces for CO+Ar and CO+O that correlate with atom-diatom pairs in their ground electronic states based on extensive ab initio electronic structure calculations and used these potentials in quasi-classical trajectory nuclear dynamics calculations to predict the thermal dissociation rate coefficients over 5000- 35000 K. Our results are not compatible with the 20-45 year old experimental results. For CO + Ar we obtain fairly good agreement with the experimental rate coefficients of Appleton et al. (1970) and Mick and Roth (1993), but our computed rate coefficients exhibit a stronger temperature dependence. For CO + O our dissociation rate coefficient is in close agreement with the value from the Park model, which is an empirical adjustment of older experimental results. However, we find the rate coefficient for CO + O is only 1.5 to 3.3 times larger than CO + Ar over the temperature range of the shock tube experiments (8000-15,000 K). The previously accepted value for this rate coefficient ratio is 15, independent of temperature. We also computed the rate coefficient for the CO + O ex- change reaction which forms C + O2. We find this reaction is much faster than previously believed and is the dominant process in the removal of CO at temperatures up to 16,000 K. As a result, the dissociation of CO is accomplished in two steps (react to form C+O2 and then O2 dissociates) that are endothermic by 6.1 and 5.1 eV, instead of one step that requires 11.2 eV to break the CO bond.

  16. Determination of the rate coefficients of the CH{sub 4} + O{sub 2} → HO{sub 2}+CH{sub 3} and HCO+O{sub 2} → HO{sub 2} + CO reactions at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Si Ok [School of Chemical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kuan Soo [Dept. of Chemistry, Soongsil University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Soon Muk [Science Applications International Corp oration, 3000 Aerospace Park way, Brook Park, Ohio (United States)

    2017-02-15

    Rate coefficients of the title reactions, R1 (CH{sub 4} + O{sub 2} → HO{sub 2}+CH{sub 3}) and R{sub 2} (HCO+O{sub 2} → HO{sub 2} + CO) were obtained over T = 1610 ⁓ 1810 K and T = 200 ⁓ 1760 K, respectively, and at ρ = 7.1 μmol/cm{sup 3}. A lean CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2}/Ar mixture (0.1% CH{sub 4}, ϕ = 0.02) was heated behind reflected shock waves and the temporal OH absorption profiles were measured using a laser absorption spectroscopy. Reaction rate coefficients were elucidated by matching the experimental profiles via optimization of k1 and k2 values in the reaction simulation. The rate coefficient expressions derived are k{sub 1} = 1.46 × 10{sup 14} exp (−26 210 K/T) cm{sup 3}/mol/s, T = 1610 ⁓ 1810 K and k{sub 2} = 1.9 × 10{sup 12} T{sup 0.1{sup 6}} exp (−245 K/T) cm{sup 3}/mol/s, T = 200 ⁓ 1760 K.

  17. Rate Coefficient Measurements of the Reaction CH3 + O2 = CH3O + O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, S. M.; Ryu, Si-Ok; DeWitt, K. J.; Rabinowitz, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Rate coefficients for the reaction CH3 + O2 = CH3O + O were measured behind reflected shock waves in a series of lean CH4-O2-Ar mixtures using hydroxyl and methyl radical diagnostics. The rate coefficients are well represented by an Arrhenius expression given as k = (1.60(sup +0.67, sub -0.47 ) x 10(exp 13) e(-15813 +/- 587 K/T)/cubic cm.mol.s. This expression, which is valid in the temperature range 1575-1822 K, supports the downward trend in the rate coefficients that has been reported in recent determinations. All measurements to date, including the present study, have been to some extent affected by secondary reactions. The complications due to secondary reactions, choice of thermochemical data, and shock-boundary layer interactions that affect the determination of the rate coefficients are examined.

  18. Rate Coefficient Measurements of the Reaction CH3+O2+CH3O+O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, S. M.; Ryu, Si-Ok; DeWitt, K. J.; Rabinowitz, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Rate coefficients for the reaction CH3 + O2 = CH3O + O were measured behind reflected shock waves in a series of lean CH4-O2-Ar mixtures using hydroxyl and methyl radical diagnostics. The rate coefficients are well represented by an Arrhenius expression given as k = (1.60(sup +0.67, -0.47)) X 10(exp 13) exp(- 15813 +/- 587 K/T)cc/mol s. This expression, which is valid in the temperature range 1575-1822 K, supports the downward trend in the rate coefficients that has been reported in recent determinations. All measurements to date, including the present study, have been to some extent affected by secondary reactions. The complications due to secondary reactions, choice of thermochemical data, and shock-boundary layer interactions that affect the determination of the rate coefficients are examined.

  19. Temperature reactivity coefficient of the RA reactor; Temperaturni koeficijenat reaktivnosti reaktora RA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raisic, N; Strugar, P; Dobrosavljevic, N [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    Temperature reactivity coefficient of the RA reactor was determined as follows. Stabilization of moderator temperature and graphite reflector was achieved in the reactor operated at power levels of 20, 100, 500, 1000, 3000 and 5000 kW. Temperature change of the moderator was achieved by changing the water flow rate in the secondary cooling system. The fuel temperature was changed simultaneously. During the measurement at each power level the temperature change was between 30 - 50 deg C. Changing the position of the automated regulator is registered during moderator temperature change, and these changes were used for determining the total reactivity change by using the calibration curves for the automated regulator. In the measured temperature range the the reactivity change was linear and it was possible to determine the total temperature coefficient.

  20. The 95% confidence intervals of error rates and discriminant coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuichi Shinmura

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fisher proposed a linear discriminant function (Fisher’s LDF. From 1971, we analysed electrocardiogram (ECG data in order to develop the diagnostic logic between normal and abnormal symptoms by Fisher’s LDF and a quadratic discriminant function (QDF. Our four years research was inferior to the decision tree logic developed by the medical doctor. After this experience, we discriminated many data and found four problems of the discriminant analysis. A revised Optimal LDF by Integer Programming (Revised IP-OLDF based on the minimum number of misclassification (minimum NM criterion resolves three problems entirely [13, 18]. In this research, we discuss fourth problem of the discriminant analysis. There are no standard errors (SEs of the error rate and discriminant coefficient. We propose a k-fold crossvalidation method. This method offers a model selection technique and a 95% confidence intervals (C.I. of error rates and discriminant coefficients.

  1. Accurate Determination of Tunneling-Affected Rate Coefficients: Theory Assessing Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Junxiang; Xie, Changjian; Guo, Hua; Xie, Daiqian

    2017-07-20

    The thermal rate coefficients of a prototypical bimolecular reaction are determined on an accurate ab initio potential energy surface (PES) using ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD). It is shown that quantum effects such as tunneling and zero-point energy (ZPE) are of critical importance for the HCl + OH reaction at low temperatures, while the heavier deuterium substitution renders tunneling less facile in the DCl + OH reaction. The calculated RPMD rate coefficients are in excellent agreement with experimental data for the HCl + OH reaction in the entire temperature range of 200-1000 K, confirming the accuracy of the PES. On the other hand, the RPMD rate coefficients for the DCl + OH reaction agree with some, but not all, experimental values. The self-consistency of the theoretical results thus allows a quality assessment of the experimental data.

  2. Temperature dependence of the dispersion of single crystals SrCl/sub 2/. [Temperature coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzin, M P [L' vovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (Ukrainian SSR)

    1976-01-01

    The dispersion of the refractive index of SrCl/sub 2/ monocrystals in the spectral range 300-700 nm at temperatures of 223, 295 adn 373 K has been studied. The temperature coefficient of the refractive index as a function of the wave length has been determined for the room temperature. The function resembles the corresponding dependence for alkali-halide crystals.

  3. Measurement of the temperature coefficient of ratio transformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Matthew E.; Gammon, Robert W.; Shaumeyer, J. N.

    1993-01-01

    We have measured the temperature coefficient of the output of several ratio transformers at ratios near 0.500,000 using an ac bridge and a dual-phase, lock-in amplifier. The two orthogonal output components were each resolved to +/- ppb of the bridge drive signal. The results for three commercial ratio transformers between 20 and 50 C range from 0.5 to 100 ppb/K for the signal component in phase with the bridge drive, and from 4 to 300 ppb/K for the quadrature component.

  4. Automatic estimation of pressure-dependent rate coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Joshua W; Goldsmith, C Franklin; Green, William H

    2012-01-21

    A general framework is presented for accurately and efficiently estimating the phenomenological pressure-dependent rate coefficients for reaction networks of arbitrary size and complexity using only high-pressure-limit information. Two aspects of this framework are discussed in detail. First, two methods of estimating the density of states of the species in the network are presented, including a new method based on characteristic functional group frequencies. Second, three methods of simplifying the full master equation model of the network to a single set of phenomenological rates are discussed, including a new method based on the reservoir state and pseudo-steady state approximations. Both sets of methods are evaluated in the context of the chemically-activated reaction of acetyl with oxygen. All three simplifications of the master equation are usually accurate, but each fails in certain situations, which are discussed. The new methods usually provide good accuracy at a computational cost appropriate for automated reaction mechanism generation.

  5. The accommodation coefficient of the liquid at temperatures below the boiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulba Elena E.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Are carried out experimental investigation of the laws of vaporization at temperatures below the boiling point. Is determined the mass rate of evaporation of distilled water in large intervals of time at different temperatures in order to sound conclusions about the stationarity of the process of evaporation of the liquid in the conditions of the experiments performed, and also studied the effect of temperature on the rate of evaporation. Accommodation coefficient is defined in the mathematical expression of the law of Hertz-Knudsen for standart substance used in the experiments.

  6. Dielectronic and Trielectronic Recombination Rate Coefficients of Be-like Ar14+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Z. K.; Wen, W. Q.; Xu, X.; Mahmood, S.; Wang, S. X.; Wang, H. B.; Dou, L. J.; Khan, N.; Badnell, N. R.; Preval, S. P.; Schippers, S.; Xu, T. H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, K.; Xu, W. Q.; Chuai, X. Y.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhao, D. M.; Mao, L. J.; Ma, X. M.; Li, J.; Mao, R. S.; Yuan, Y. J.; Wu, B.; Sheng, L. N.; Yang, J. C.; Xu, H. S.; Zhu, L. F.; Ma, X.

    2018-03-01

    Electron–ion recombination of Be-like 40Ar14+ has been measured by employing the electron–ion merged-beams method at the cooler storage ring CSRm. The measured absolute recombination rate coefficients for collision energies from 0 to 60 eV are presented, covering all dielectronic recombination (DR) resonances associated with 2s 2 → 2s2p core transitions. In addition, strong trielectronic recombination (TR) resonances associated with 2s 2 → 2p 2 core transitions were observed. Both DR and TR processes lead to series of peaks in the measured recombination spectrum, which have been identified by the Rydberg formula. Theoretical calculations of recombination rate coefficients were performed using the state-of-the-art multi-configuration Breit–Pauli atomic structure code AUTOSTRUCTURE to compare with the experimental results. The plasma rate coefficients for DR+TR of Ar14+ were deduced from the measured electron–ion recombination rate coefficients in the temperature range from 103 to 107 K, and compared with calculated data from the literature. The experimentally derived plasma rate coefficients are 60% larger and 30% lower than the previously recommended atomic data for the temperature ranges of photoionized plasmas and collisionally ionized plasmas, respectively. However, good agreement was found between experimental results and the calculations by Gu and Colgan et al. The plasma rate coefficients deduced from experiment and calculated by the current AUTOSTRUCTURE code show agreement that is better than 30% from 104 to 107 K. The present results constitute a set of benchmark data for use in astrophysical modeling.

  7. Thermodynamically based constraints for rate coefficients of large biochemical networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlad, Marcel O; Ross, John

    2009-01-01

    Wegscheider cyclicity conditions are relationships among the rate coefficients of a complex reaction network, which ensure the compatibility of kinetic equations with the conditions for thermodynamic equilibrium. The detailed balance at equilibrium, that is the equilibration of forward and backward rates for each elementary reaction, leads to compatibility between the conditions of kinetic and thermodynamic equilibrium. Therefore, Wegscheider cyclicity conditions can be derived by eliminating the equilibrium concentrations from the conditions of detailed balance. We develop matrix algebra tools needed to carry out this elimination, reexamine an old derivation of the general form of Wegscheider cyclicity condition, and develop new derivations which lead to more compact and easier-to-use formulas. We derive scaling laws for the nonequilibrium rates of a complex reaction network, which include Wegscheider conditions as a particular case. The scaling laws for the rates are used for clarifying the kinetic and thermodynamic meaning of Wegscheider cyclicity conditions. Finally, we discuss different ways of using Wegscheider cyclicity conditions for kinetic computations in systems biology.

  8. A review of reaction rates in high temperature air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chul

    1989-01-01

    The existing experimental data on the rate coefficients for the chemical reactions in nonequilibrium high temperature air are reviewed and collated, and a selected set of such values is recommended for use in hypersonic flow calculations. For the reactions of neutral species, the recommended values are chosen from the experimental data that existed mostly prior to 1970, and are slightly different from those used previously. For the reactions involving ions, the recommended rate coefficients are newly chosen from the experimental data obtained more recently. The reacting environment is assumed to lack thermal equilibrium, and the rate coefficients are expressed as a function of the controlling temperature, incorporating the recent multitemperature reaction concept.

  9. Automatic estimation of pressure-dependent rate coefficients

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Joshua W.; Goldsmith, C. Franklin; Green, William H.

    2012-01-01

    A general framework is presented for accurately and efficiently estimating the phenomenological pressure-dependent rate coefficients for reaction networks of arbitrary size and complexity using only high-pressure-limit information. Two aspects of this framework are discussed in detail. First, two methods of estimating the density of states of the species in the network are presented, including a new method based on characteristic functional group frequencies. Second, three methods of simplifying the full master equation model of the network to a single set of phenomenological rates are discussed, including a new method based on the reservoir state and pseudo-steady state approximations. Both sets of methods are evaluated in the context of the chemically-activated reaction of acetyl with oxygen. All three simplifications of the master equation are usually accurate, but each fails in certain situations, which are discussed. The new methods usually provide good accuracy at a computational cost appropriate for automated reaction mechanism generation. This journal is © the Owner Societies.

  10. Temperature dependence of Kerr coefficient and quadratic polarized optical coefficient of a paraelectric Mn:Fe:KTN crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qieni Lu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We measure temperature dependence on Kerr coefficient and quadratic polarized optical coefficient of a paraelectric Mn:Fe:KTN crystal simultaneously in this work, based on digital holographic interferometry (DHI. And the spatial distribution of the field-induced refractive index change can also be visualized and estimated by numerically retrieving sequential phase maps of Mn:Fe:KTN crystal from recording digital holograms in different states. The refractive indices decrease with increasing temperature and quadratic polarized optical coefficient is insensitive to temperature. The experimental results suggest that the DHI method presented here is highly applicable in both visualizing the temporal and spatial behavior of the internal electric field and accurately measuring electro-optic coefficient for electrooptical media.

  11. Static pressure and temperature coefficients of working standard microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Torras Rosell, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    be a significant contribution to the uncertainty of the measurement. Determining the environmental coefficients of individual specimens of measurement microphones can be a straightforward though time-consuming procedure provided the appropriate facilities are available. An alternative is to determine them using...... coefficients. For this purpose, the environmental coefficients of some commercially available microphones have been determined experimentally, and whenever possible, compared with the coefficients determined numerically using the Boundary Element Method....... for these coefficients which are used for calibration purposes. Working standard microphones are not exempt of these influences. However, manufacturers usually provide a low frequency value of the environmental coefficient. While in some applications the influence of this coefficient may be negligible, in others it may...

  12. Direct access to dithiobenzoate RAFT agent fragmentation rate coefficients by ESR spin-trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Kayte; Delaittre, Guillaume; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher; Junkers, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    The β-scission rate coefficient of tert-butyl radicals fragmenting off the intermediate resulting from their addition to tert-butyl dithiobenzoate-a reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) agent-is estimated via the recently introduced electron spin resonance (ESR)-trapping methodology as a function of temperature. The newly introduced ESR-trapping methodology is critically evaluated and found to be reliable. At 20 °C, a fragmentation rate coefficient of close to 0.042 s(-1) is observed, whereas the activation parameters for the fragmentation reaction-determined for the first time-read EA = 82 ± 13.3 kJ mol(-1) and A = (1.4 ± 0.25) × 10(13) s(-1) . The ESR spin-trapping methodology thus efficiently probes the stability of the RAFT adduct radical under conditions relevant for the pre-equilibrium of the RAFT process. It particularly indicates that stable RAFT adduct radicals are indeed formed in early stages of the RAFT poly-merization, at least when dithiobenzoates are employed as controlling agents as stipulated by the so-called slow fragmentation theory. By design of the methodology, the obtained fragmentation rate coefficients represent an upper limit. The ESR spin-trapping methodology is thus seen as a suitable tool for evaluating the fragmentation rate coefficients of a wide range of RAFT adduct radicals. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Cross-section and rate coefficient calculation for electron impact excitation, ionisation and dissociation of H2 and OH molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riahi, R.; Ben Lakhdar, Z.; Teulet, Ph.; Gleizes, A.

    2006-01-01

    The weighted total cross-sections (WTCS) theory is used to calculate electron impact excitation, ionization and dissociation cross-sections and rate coefficients of OH, H 2 , OH + , H 2 + , OH - and H 2 - diatomic molecules in the temperature range 1500-15000 K. Calculations are performed for H 2 (X, B, C), OH(X, A, B), H 2 + (X), OH + (X, a, A, b, c), H 2 - (X) and OH - (X) electronic states for which Dunham coefficients are available. Rate coefficients are calculated from WTCS assuming Maxwellian energy distribution functions for electrons and heavy particles. One and 2 temperatures (θ e and θ g respectively for electron and heavy particles kinetic temperatures) results are presented and fitting parameters (a, b and c) are given for each reaction rate coefficient: k(θ) a(θ b )exp(-c/θ). (authors)

  14. Simultaneous interferometric measurement of linear coefficient of thermal expansion and temperature-dependent refractive index coefficient of optical materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsetti, James A; Green, William E; Ellis, Jonathan D; Schmidt, Greg R; Moore, Duncan T

    2016-10-10

    Characterizing the thermal properties of optical materials is necessary for understanding how to design an optical system for changing environmental conditions. A method is presented for simultaneously measuring both the linear coefficient of thermal expansion and the temperature-dependent refractive index coefficient of a sample interferometrically in air. Both the design and fabrication of the interferometer is presented as well as a discussion of the results of measuring both a steel and a CaF2 sample.

  15. The functional correlation between rainfall rate and extinction coefficient for frequencies from 3 to 10 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, A. R.

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between the rainfall rate (R) obtained from radiometric brightness temperatures and the extinction coefficient (k sub e) is investigated by computing the values of k sub e over a wide range of rainfall rates, for frequencies from 3 to 25 GHz. The results show that the strength of the relation between the R and the k sub e values exhibits considerable variation for frequencies at this range. Practical suggestions are made concerning the selection of particular frequencies for rain measurements to minimize the error in R determinations.

  16. Recommended data on proton-ion collision rate coefficients for Fe X-Fe XV ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skobelev, I.; Murakami, I.; Kato, T.

    2006-01-01

    The proton-ion collisions are important for excitation of some ion levels in a high-temperature low density plasma. In the present work evaluation of data obtained for proton-induced transitions in Fe X - Fe XV ions with the help of different theoretical methods is carried out. It is suggested a simple analytical formula with 7 parameters allowing to describe dependency of proton rate coefficient on proton temperature in an enough wide temperature range. The values of free parameters have been determined by fitting of approximation formula to numerical data and are presented for recommended data together with fitting accuracies. By comparing of proton collision rates with electron ones it is shown that proton impact excitation processes may be important for Fe X, XI, XIII-XV ions. The results obtained can be used for plasma kinetics calculations and for development of spectroscopy methods of plasma diagnostics. (author)

  17. Cross sections and rate coefficients for charge exchange reactions of protons with hydrocarbon molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janev, R.K.; Kato, T.; Wang, J.G.

    2001-05-01

    The available experimental and theoretical cross section data on charge exchange processes in collisions of protons with hydrocarbon molecules have been collected and critically assessed. Using well established scaling relationships for the charge exchange cross sections at low and high collision energies, as well as the known rate coefficients for these reactions in the thermal energy region, a complete cross section database is constructed for proton-C x H y charge exchange reactions from thermal energies up to several hundreds keV for all C x H y molecules with x=1, 2, 3 and 1 ≤ y ≤ 2x + 2. Rate coefficients for these charge exchange reactions have also been calculated in the temperature range from 0.1 eV to 20 keV. (author)

  18. Cross sections and rate coefficients for charge exchange reactions of protons with hydrocarbon molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janev, R.K.; Kato, T. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Wang, J.G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens (United States)

    2001-05-01

    The available experimental and theoretical cross section data on charge exchange processes in collisions of protons with hydrocarbon molecules have been collected and critically assessed. Using well established scaling relationships for the charge exchange cross sections at low and high collision energies, as well as the known rate coefficients for these reactions in the thermal energy region, a complete cross section database is constructed for proton-C{sub x}H{sub y} charge exchange reactions from thermal energies up to several hundreds keV for all C{sub x}H{sub y} molecules with x=1, 2, 3 and 1 {<=} y {<=} 2x + 2. Rate coefficients for these charge exchange reactions have also been calculated in the temperature range from 0.1 eV to 20 keV. (author)

  19. The static pressure and temperature coefficients of laboratory standard microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Knud

    1999-01-01

    , for a given type of microphone, can be described by a single function when the coefficients are normalized by their low-frequency value and the frequency is normalized with respect to the individual resonance frequency of the microphone. The theoretical results are supported by experimentally determined...... on an extended lumped parameter representation of the mechanical and acoustic elements of the microphone. The extension involves the frequency dependency of the dynamic diaphragm mass and stiffness as well as a first-order approximation of resonances in the back cavity. It was found that each coefficient...... coefficients for about twenty samples of microphone types B&K 4160 and B&K 4180....

  20. A study of temperature coefficients of reactivity for a Savannah River Site tritium-producing charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, D.L.; Frost, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    Temperature coefficients of reactivity have been calculated for the Mark 22 assembly in the K-14 charge at the Savannah River Site. Temperature coefficients are the most important reactivity feedback mechanism in SRS reactors; they are used in all safety analyses performed in support of the Safety Analysis Report, and in operations to predict reactivity changes with control rod moves. The effects of the radial location of the assembly in the reactor, isotope depletion, and thermal expansion of the metal components on the temperature coefficients have also been investigated. With the exception of the dead space coefficient, all of the regional temperature coefficients were found to be negative or zero. All of the temperature coefficients become more negative with isotopic depletion over the fuel cycle. Coefficients also become more negative with increasing radial distance of the assembly from the center of the core; this is proven from first principles and confirmed by calculations. It was found that axial and radial thermal expansion effects on the metal fuel and target tubes counteract one another, indicating these effects do not need to be considered in future temperature coefficient calculations for the Mark 22 assembly. The moderator coefficient was found to be nonlinear with temperature; thus, the values derived for accidents involving increases in moderator temperature are significantly different than those for decreases in moderator temperature, although the moderator coefficient is always negative

  1. Improvement of calculation method for temperature coefficient of HTTR by neutronics calculation code based on diffusion theory. Analysis for temperature coefficient by SRAC code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Minoru; Takamatsu, Kuniyoshi

    2007-03-01

    The HTTR temperature coefficients required for the core dynamics calculations had been calculated from the HTTR core calculation results by the diffusion code with which the corrections had been performed using the core calculation results by the Monte-Carlo code MVP. This calculation method for the temperature coefficients was considered to have some issues to be improved. Then, the calculation method was improved to obtain the temperature coefficients in which the corrections by the Monte-Carlo code were not required. Specifically, from the point of view of neutron spectrum calculated by lattice calculations, the lattice model was revised which had been used for the calculations of the temperature coefficients. The HTTR core calculations were performed by the diffusion code with the group constants which were generated by the lattice calculations with the improved lattice model. The core calculations and the lattice calculations were performed by the SRAC code system. The HTTR core dynamics calculation was performed with the temperature coefficient obtained from the core calculation results. In consequence, the core dynamics calculation result showed good agreement with the experimental data and the valid temperature coefficient could be calculated only by the diffusion code without the corrections by Monte-Carlo code. (author)

  2. Heat transfer coefficient: Medivance Arctic Sun Temperature Management System vs. water immersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, M J; Hemmerling, T M

    2008-07-01

    To improve heat transfer, the Medivance Arctic Sun Temperature Management System (Medivance, Inc., Louisville, CO, USA) features an adhesive, water-conditioned, highly conductive hydrogel pad for intimate skin contact. This study measured and compared the heat transfer coefficient (h), i.e. heat transfer efficiency, of this pad (hPAD), in a heated model and in nine volunteers' thighs; and of 10 degrees C water (hWATER) in 33 head-out immersions by 11 volunteers. Volunteer studies had ethical approval and written informed consent. Calibrated heat flux transducers measured heat flux (W m-2). Temperature gradient (DeltaT) was measured between skin and pad or water temperatures. Temperature gradient was changed through the pad's water temperature controller or by skin cooling on immersion. The heat transfer coefficient is the slope of W m-2/DeltaT: its unit is W m-2 degrees C-1. Average with (95% CI) was: model, hPAD = 110.4 (107.8-113.1), R2 = 0.99, n = 45; volunteers, hPAD = 109.8 (95.5-124.1), R2 = 0.83, n = 51; and water immersion, hWATER = 107.1 (98.1-116), R2 = 0.86, n = 94. The heat transfer coefficient for the pad was the same in the model and volunteers, and equivalent to hWATER. Therefore, for the same DeltaT and heat transfer area, the Arctic Sun's heat transfer rate would equal water immersion. This has important implications for body cooling/rewarming rates.

  3. Electron-impact excitation rate-coefficients and polarization of subsequent emission for Ar"+ ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dipti; Srivastava, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Electron impact excitation in Ar"+ ions has been studied by using fully relativistic distorted wave theory. Calculations are performed to obtain the excitation cross-sections and rate-coefficients for the transitions from the ground state 3p"5 (J=3/2) to fine-structure levels of excited states 3p"44s, 3p"44p, 3p"45s, 3p"45p, 3p"43d and 3p"44d. Polarization of the radiation following the excitation has been calculated using the obtained magnetic sub-level cross-sections. Comparison of the present rate-coefficients is also done with the previously reported theoretical results for some unresolved fine structure transitions. - Highlights: • Fully relativistic distorted wave theory has been used to study the excitation of fine-structure states of Ar"+. • We have calculated electron-impact excitation cross-sections for the wide range of incident electron energies. • Electron impact excitation rate-coefficients are calculated as a function of electron temperature. • Polarization of photons emitted following the decay of the excited fine-structure states are also reported.

  4. Modeling maximum daily temperature using a varying coefficient regression model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han Li; Xinwei Deng; Dong-Yum Kim; Eric P. Smith

    2014-01-01

    Relationships between stream water and air temperatures are often modeled using linear or nonlinear regression methods. Despite a strong relationship between water and air temperatures and a variety of models that are effective for data summarized on a weekly basis, such models did not yield consistently good predictions for summaries such as daily maximum temperature...

  5. Determination of sedimentation rates and absorption coefficient of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2+ has a higher sedimentation rate of 5.10x10-2 s-1 while Ni2+ has the lowest sedimentation rates of 1.10 x10-3. The rate of sedimentation of the metal carbonates decreased in the order: Zn2+ > Cd2+ > Cu2+ > Co2+ > Ni2+. The order ...

  6. Relative measurement of the excitation rate coefficients of the FeXI ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marotta, A.

    1982-01-01

    The collision rate coefficients for the iron atoms are measured through the hot plasma obtainment. The physical model used in this determination is the crown stationary model which consider that the excitation by electronic collisions is balanced by the spontaneous emission. This work was realized in a 15Kj theta pinch device, of high pulse reproductibility. The iron-pentacarbonyl [Fe(Co) 5 ] was used as the impurity source of a hydrogen gas. The temperature and density were determined by the scattering light analysis of a rubi laser using the Thomson scattering. (L.C.) [pt

  7. Temperature dependences of the electrical conductivity and Hall coefficient of indium telluride single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    Conductivity type, carrier concentration and carrier mobility of InTe samples grown by Bridgman technique were determined by the Hall effect and electrical conductivity measurements. The study was performed in the temperature range 150-480 K. Two samples with different growth rate were used in the investigation. The samples under test were P-type conducting, in accordance with previous measurements of undoped material. The Hall coefficient was found to be isotropic yielding room temperature hole concentration in the range 10 15 -10 16 cm -3 . The hole mobilities of InTe samples were in the range 1.17 x 10 3 -2.06 x 10 3 cm 2 /V · sec at room temperature. The band-gap of InTe determined from Hall coefficient studies has been obtained equal to 0.34 eV. The scattering mechanism was checked, and the electrical properties were found to be sensitive to the crystal growth rate. (author)

  8. Dielectronic recombination rate coefficients to the excited states of CI from CII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubau, J.; Kato, T.; Safronova, U.I.

    1998-01-01

    The dielectronic recombination rate coefficients to the excited states for n=2-6 are calculated including 1s 2 2l 1 2l 2 2l 3 nl (n=2-6, l≤(n-1)) states. The values for the excited states higher than n=6 are extrapolated and the total dielectronic recombination rate coefficients are derived. The rate coefficients to the excited states are fitted to an analytical formula and the fit parameters are given. (author)

  9. On the second-order temperature jump coefficient of a dilute gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Gregg A.; Hadjiconstantinou, N. G.; Takata, S.; Aoki, K.

    2012-09-01

    We use LVDSMC simulations to calculate the second-order temperature jump coefficient for a dilute gas whose temperature is governed by the Poisson equation with a constant forcing term. Both the hard sphere gas and the BGK model of the Boltzmann equation are considered. Our results show that the temperature jump coefficient is different from the well known linear and steady case where the temperature is governed by the homogeneous heat conduction (Laplace) equation.

  10. Studies on preparation and adaptive thermal control performance of novel PTC (positive temperature coefficient) materials with controllable Curie temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Wen-long; Yuan, Shuai; Song, Jia-liang

    2014-01-01

    PTC (positive temperature coefficient) material is a kind of thermo-sensitive material. In this study, a series of novel PTC materials adapted to thermal control of electron devices are prepared. By adding different low-melting-point blend matrixes into GP (graphite powder)/LDPE (low density polyethylene) composite, the Curie temperatures are adjusted to 9 °C, 25 °C, 34 °C and 41 °C, and the resistance–temperature coefficients are enhanced to 1.57/°C–2.15/°C. These PTC materials remain solid in the temperature region of PTC effect, which makes it possible to be used as heating element to achieve adaptive temperature control. In addition, the adaptive thermal control performances of this kind of materials are investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The result shows that the adaptive effect becomes more significant while the resistance–temperature coefficient increases. A critical heating power defined as the initial heating power which makes the equilibrium temperature reach terminal temperature is presented. The adaptive temperature control will be effective only if the initial power is below this value. The critical heating power is determined by the Curie temperature and resistance–temperature coefficient of PTC materials, and a higher Curie temperature or resistance–temperature coefficient will lead to a larger critical heating power. - Highlights: • A series of novel PTC (positive temperature coefficient) materials were prepared. • The Curie point of PTC material can be adjusted by choosing different blend matrixes. • The resistance–temperature coefficient of PTC materials is enhanced to 2.15/°C. • The material has good adaptive temperature control ability with no auxiliary method. • A mathematical model is established to analyze the performance and applicability

  11. Calculation of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity considering non-uniform radial temperature distribution in the fuel rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazirandeh, Ali [Islamic Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Science and Research Branch; Hooshyar Mobaraki, Almas

    2017-07-15

    The safe operation of a reactor is based on feedback models. In this paper we attempted to discuss the influence of a non-uniform radial temperature distribution on the fuel rod temperature coefficient of reactivity. The paper demonstrates that the neutron properties of a reactor core is based on effective temperature of the fuel to obtain the correct fuel temperature feedback. The value of volume-averaged temperature being used in the calculations of neutron physics with feedbacks would result in underestimating the probable event. In the calculation it is necessary to use the effective temperature of the fuel in order to provide correct accounting of the fuel temperature feedback. Fuel temperature changes in different zones of the core and consequently reactivity coefficient change are an important parameter for analysis of transient conditions. The restricting factor that compensates the inserted reactivity is the temperature reactivity coefficient and effective delayed neutron fraction.

  12. Rate Coefficient Determinations for H + NO2 → OH + NO from High Pressure Flow Reactor Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Francis M; Dryer, Frederick L

    2015-07-16

    Rate coefficients for the reaction H + NO2 → OH + NO (R1) have been determined over the nominal temperature and pressure ranges of 737-882 K and 10-20 atm, respectively, from measurements in two different flow reactor facilities: one laminar and one turbulent. Considering the existing database of experimental k1 measurements, the present conditions add measurements of k1 at previously unconsidered temperatures between ∼820-880 K, as well as at pressures that exceed existing measurements by over an order of magnitude. Experimental measurements of NOx-perturbed H2 oxidation have been interpreted by a quasi-steady state NOx plateau (QSSP) method. At the QSSP conditions considered here, overall reactivity is sensitive only to the rates of R1 and H + O2 + M → HO2 + M (R2.M). Consequently, the ratio of k1 to k2.M may be extracted as a simple algebraic function of measured NO2, O2, and total gas concentrations with only minimal complication (within measurement uncertainty) due to treatment of overall gas composition M that differs slightly from pure bath gas B. Absolute values of k1 have been determined with reference to the relatively well-known, pressure-dependent rate coefficients of R2.B for B = Ar and N2. Rate coefficients for the title reaction determined from present experimental interpretation of both laminar and turbulent flow reactor results appear to be in very good agreement around a representative value of 1.05 × 10(14) cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1) (1.74 × 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)). Further, the results of this study agree both with existing low pressure flash photolysis k1 determinations of Ko and Fontijn (J. Phys. Chem. 95 3984) near 760 K as well as a present fit to the theoretical expression of Su et al. (J. Phys. Chem. A 106 8261). These results indicate that, over the temperature range considered in this study and up to at least 20 atm, net chemistry due to stabilization of the H-NO2 reaction intermediate to form isomers of HNO2 may proceed at

  13. Temperature dependence of transport coefficients of 'simple liquid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... has been investigated. The study carried out at two densities, r* = 0.60 and r* = 0.95. Result shows erratic variations of the shear viscosity in the two lattices structures. KeyWords: Temperature effect, face centred, simple cubic, transport properties, simple liquid. [Global Jnl Pure & Appl. Sci. Vol.9(3) 2003: 403-406] ...

  14. Rate coefficients of exchange reactions accounting for vibrational excitation of reagents and products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustova, E. V.; Savelev, A. S.; Kunova, O. V.

    2018-05-01

    Theoretical models for the vibrational state-resolved Zeldovich reaction are assessed by comparison with the results of quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations. An error in the model of Aliat is corrected; the model is generalized taking into account NO vibrational states. The proposed model is fairly simple and can be easily implemented to the software for non-equilibrium flow modeling. It provides a good agreement with the QCT rate coefficients in the whole range of temperatures and reagent/product vibrational states. The developed models are tested in simulations of vibrational and chemical relaxation of air mixture behind a shock wave. The importance of accounting for excitated NO vibrational states and accurate prediction of Zeldovich reactions rates is shown.

  15. Evaluation of temperature coefficients of reactivity for 233U--thorium fueled HTGR lattices. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, D.F.; Leonard, B.R. Jr.; Trapp, T.J.; Gore, B.F.; Kottwitz, D.A.; Thompson, J.K.; Purcell, W.L.; Stewart, K.B.

    1977-05-01

    A comparison of calculated and measured neutron multiplication factors as a function of temperature was made for three graphite-moderated lattices in the High Temperature Lattice Test Reactor (HTLTR) using 233 UO 2 --ThO 2 fuels in varying amounts and configurations. Correlation of neutronic analysis methods and cross section data with the experimental measurements forms the basis for assessing the accuracy of the methods and data and developing confidence in the ability to predict the temperature coefficient of reactivity for various High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) conditions in which 233 U and thorium are present in the fuel. The calculated values of k/sub infinity/(T) were correlated with measured values using two least-squares-fitted correlation coefficients: (1) a normalization factor, and (2) a temperature coefficient bias factor. These correlations indicate the existence of a negative (nonconservative) bias in temperature coefficients of reactivity calculated using ENDF/B-IV cross section data

  16. Temperature and Doppler coefficients of various space nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mughabghab, S.F.; Ludewig, H. Schmidt, E.

    1993-01-01

    Temperature and Doppler feedback effects for a Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) designed to operate as a propulsion reactor are investigated. Several moderator types and compositions fuel enrichments and reactor sizes are considered in this study. From this study it could be concluded that a PBR can be configured which has a negative prompt feedback, zero coolant worth, and a small positive to zero moderator worth. This reactor would put the lowest demands on the control system

  17. Temperature and Doppler Coefficients of Various Space Nuclear Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mughabghab, Said F.; Ludewig, Hans; Schmidt, Eldon

    1994-07-01

    Temperature and Doppler feedback effects for a Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) designed to operate as a propulsion reactor are investigated. Several moderator types and compositions fuel enrichments and reactor sizes are considered in this study. From this study it could be concluded that a PBR can be configured which has a negative prompt feedback, zero coolant worth, and a small positive to zero moderator worth. This reactor would put the lowest demands on the control system.

  18. Direct Determination of the Rate Coefficient for the Reaction of OH Radicals with Monoethanol Amine (MEA) from 296 to 510 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onel, L; Blitz, M A; Seakins, P W

    2012-04-05

    Monoethanol amine (H2NCH2CH2OH, MEA) has been proposed for large-scale use in carbon capture and storage. We present the first absolute, temperature-dependent determination of the rate coefficient for the reaction of OH with MEA using laser flash photolysis for OH generation, monitoring OH removal by laser-induced fluorescence. The room-temperature rate coefficient is determined to be (7.61 ± 0.76) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), and the rate coefficient decreases by about 40% by 510 K. The temperature dependence of the rate coefficient is given by k1= (7.73 ± 0.24) × 10(-11)(T/295)(-(0.79±0.11)) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). The high rate coefficient shows that gas-phase processing in the atmosphere will be competitive with uptake onto aerosols.

  19. Comparison of recombination rate coefficients given by empirical formulas for ions from hydrogen through nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, T.; Asano, E. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1999-06-01

    Recombination rate coefficients based on several empirical formulae are compared for ions of H, He, C, N, O, Ne, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, P, Cl, Ar, Ca, Fe and Ni. The total rate coefficients including radiative recombination and dielectronic recombination are shown in graphs. (author)

  20. Monitoring of the temperature reactivity coefficient at the PWR nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostic, Lj.

    1996-01-01

    For monitoring temperature coefficient of reactivity of pressurized water reactor a method based on the correction of fluctuation in signals of i-core neutron detectors and core-exit thermocouples and neural network paradigm is used it is shown that the moderator temperature coefficient of relativity can be predicted with the aid of the back propagation neural network technique by measuring the frequency response function between the in-core neutron flux and the core-exit coolant temperature

  1. Cold collisions of SH- with He: Potential energy surface and rate coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bop, C. T.; Trabelsi, T.; Hammami, K.; Mogren Al Mogren, M.; Lique, F.; Hochlaf, M.

    2017-09-01

    Collisional energy transfer under cold conditions is of great importance from the fundamental and applicative point of view. Here, we investigate low temperature collisions of the SH- anion with He. We have generated a three-dimensional potential energy surface (PES) for the SH-(X1Σ+)-He(1S) van der Waals complex. The ab initio multi-dimensional interaction PES was computed using the explicitly correlated coupled cluster approach with simple, double, and perturbative triple excitation in conjunction with the augmented-correlation consistent-polarized valence triple zeta Gaussian basis set. The PES presents two minima located at linear geometries. Then, the PES was averaged over the ground vibrational wave function of the SH- molecule and the resulting two-dimensional PES was incorporated into exact quantum mechanical close coupling calculations to study the collisional excitation of SH- by He. We have computed inelastic cross sections among the 11 first rotational levels of SH- for energies up to 2500 cm-1. (De-)excitation rate coefficients were deduced for temperatures ranging from 1 to 300 K by thermally averaging the cross sections. We also performed calculations using the new PES for a fixed internuclear SH- distance. Both sets of results were found to be in reasonable agreement despite differences existing at low temperatures confirming that accurate predictions require the consideration of all internal degrees of freedom in the case of molecular hydrides. The rate coefficients presented here may be useful in interpreting future experimental work on the SH- negative ion colliding with He as those recently done for the OH--He collisional system as well as for possible astrophysical applications in case SH- would be detected in the interstellar medium.

  2. Determination of the temperature coefficients and the kinetic parameters for the HTTR safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuhara, K.; Nakata, T.; Murata, I.; Yamashita, K.; Shindo, R.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the calculational methods which were employed to determine the temperature coefficients and the kinetic parameters for the safety analysis in the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor). The temperature coefficients (doppler, moderator temperature) and the kinetic parameters (prompt neutron life time; l, effective delayed neutron fraction; β eff) are important for the point model core dynamic analysis and should be evaluated properly. The temperature coefficients were calculated by the whole core model. Doppler coefficient was evaluated under the conditions of all control rods withdrawn and the uniform change of fuel temperature. The minimum and the maximum value of the evaluated doppler coefficients in a burnup cycle are -4.6x10 -5 and -1.5x10 -5 ΔK/K/deg. C respectively. The moderator temperature coefficient was evaluated under the conditions of all control rods withdrawn and the uniform change of moderator temperature. The minimum and the maximum value of the evaluated moderator temperature coefficients in a burnup cycle are -17.1x10 -5 and 0.99x10 -5 ΔK/K/deg. C respectively. In spite of positive moderator temperature coefficient, the power coefficient is always negative. Therefore the HTTR possesses inherent power-suppressing feed back characteristic in all operating condition. We surveyed the effects of the Xe existence, the control rods existence, the fuel temperature and the region in which the temperature was changed on the moderator temperature coefficients. The kinetic parameters were calculated by the perturbation method with the whole core model. The minimum and the maximum value of the evaluated effective delayed neutron fraction (β eff) are 0.0047 and 0.0065 respectively. These of the evaluated prompt neutron life time (l) are 0.67 and 0.78 ms respectively. We have surveyed the effects of the fuel depletion and the core power level on these parameters, and considered these effects on the kinetic parameters. From

  3. The significance level and repeatability for isotope-temperature coefficient of precipitation in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dongsheng; Wang Jinglan

    2003-01-01

    The good linear relationship with significance level α = 0.01 exists between isotope in precipitation and surface air temperature with multi-year average in 32 stations of China, and the yearly δD-temperature coefficient = 3.1‰/1℃ and the yearly δ 18 O-temperature coefficient = 0.36‰/1℃, and its determination coefficient R 2 = 0.67 and 0.64 respectively. So the isotope-temperature coefficient with yearly average can serve as the temperature yearly measure. But the monthly average isotope-temperature coefficient in each station is variable according to both of space and time, and its repeatability is determined by the meteorological regimes. According to the monthly isotope-temperature coefficient (B) and the coefficient of determination (R 2 ) and its α, all of China can be zoned the following three belts: (1) In the North Belt, B>O, R 2 ≈ 0.3-0.65, α = 0.01, the relation between monthly isotope in precipitation and surface air temperature (RMIT) belongs to a direct correlation and is closer in 99% probability; (2) In the South Belt, Btemperature coefficient with both of yearly average and monthly average and its statistical attribution is site-specific, it may be used to reconstruct past surface air temperatures or to diagnose regional climate models. (authors)

  4. Transport coefficients in high-temperature ionized air flows with electronic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istomin, V. A.; Oblapenko, G. P.

    2018-01-01

    Transport coefficients are studied in high-temperature ionized air mixtures using the modified Chapman-Enskog method. The 11-component mixture N2/N2+/N /N+/O2/O2+/O /O+/N O /N O+/e- , taking into account the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom of molecules and electronic degrees of freedom of both atomic and molecular species, is considered. Using the PAINeT software package, developed by the authors of the paper, in wide temperature range calculations of the thermal conductivity, thermal diffusion, diffusion, and shear viscosity coefficients for an equilibrium ionized air mixture and non-equilibrium flow conditions for mixture compositions, characteristic of those in shock tube experiments and re-entry conditions, are performed. For the equilibrium air case, the computed transport coefficients are compared to those obtained using simplified kinetic theory algorithms. It is shown that neglecting electronic excitation leads to a significant underestimation of the thermal conductivity coefficient at temperatures higher than 25 000 K. For non-equilibrium test cases, it is shown that the thermal diffusion coefficients of neutral species and the self-diffusion coefficients of all species are strongly affected by the mixture composition, while the thermal conductivity coefficient is most strongly influenced by the degree of ionization of the flow. Neglecting electronic excitation causes noticeable underestimation of the thermal conductivity coefficient at temperatures higher than 20 000 K.

  5. Viscous slip coefficients for binary gas mixtures measured from mass flow rates through a single microtube

    OpenAIRE

    Yamaguchi, H.; Takamori, K.; Perrier, P.; Graur, I.; Matsuda, Y.; Niimi, T.

    2016-01-01

    The viscous slip coefficient for helium-argon binary gas mixture is extracted from the experimental values of the mass flow rate through a microtube. The mass flow rate is measured by the constant-volume method. The viscous slip coefficient was obtained by identifying the measured mass flow rate through a microtube with the corresponding analytical expression, which is a function of the Knudsen number. The measurements were carried out in the slip flow regime where the first-order slip bounda...

  6. Measurement of Linear Coefficient of Thermal Expansion and Temperature-Dependent Refractive Index Using Interferometric System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsetti, James A.; Green, William E.; Ellis, Jonathan D.; Schmidt, Greg R.; Moore, Duncan T.

    2017-01-01

    A system combining an interferometer with an environmental chamber for measuring both coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and temperature-dependent refractive index (dn/dT) simultaneously is presented. The operation and measurement results of this instrument are discussed.

  7. Positive Temperature Coefficient of Breakdown Voltage in 4H-SiC PN Junction Rectifiers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Neudeck, Philip

    1998-01-01

    ...-suited SiC polytype for power device implementation. This paper reports the first experimental measurements of stable positive temperature coefficient behavior observed in 4H-SiC pn junction rectifiers...

  8. Chapter 10: Calculation of the temperature coefficient of reactivity of a graphite-moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.; Richmond, R.; Stace, R.H.W.

    1963-01-01

    The temperature coefficients of reactivity of the BEPO, Windscale and Calder reactors are calculated, using the revised methods given by Lockey et al. (1956) and by Campbell and Symonds (1962). The results are compared with experimental values. (author)

  9. Invar hardening under keeping of low values of temperature coefficient of linear expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashnin, Yu.A.; Shiryaeva, A.N.; Omel'chenko, A.V.

    1982-01-01

    Complex invar alloying with chromium, zirconium and nitrogen is conducted for increasing hardness and assuring low values of the temperature coefficient of linear expansion. It is shown that alloying with nitride-forming elements-chromium, zirconium and the following high-temperature saturation under high pressure with nitrogen provides the invar hardening at assuring a low temperature coefficient of linear expansion. Saturation with nitrogen under 100 MPa pressure at 1050 deg C during 3 hours permits to prepare an invar containing up to 0.2% N 2 uniformly distributed over the whole cross section of samples with 4 mm diameter. Nitrogen in invar alloys alloyed with chromium and zirconium affects the Curie point similarly to carbon and nickel shifting it towards higher temperatures, it slightly changes the value of the temperature coefficient of linear expansion and provides linear character of thermal expansion dependence on temperature in the +100 deg C - -180 deg C range

  10. Estimation of Temperature Conductivity Coefficient Impact upon Fatigue Damage of Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibik, V; Galeeva, A

    2015-01-01

    In the paper we consider the peculiarities of adhesive wear of cutting tools. Simulation of heat flows in the cutting zone showed that, as thermal conduction and heat conductivity of tool material grow, the heat flows from the front and back surfaces to tool holder will increase and so, the temperature of the contact areas of the tool will lower. When estimating the adhesive wear rate of cemented-carbide tool under the cutting rates corresponding to the cutting temperature of up to 900 °C, it is necessary to take the fatigue character of adhesive wear into consideration. The process of accumulation and development of fatigue damage is associated with micro- and macroplastic flowing of material, which is determined by the processes of initiation, motion, generation, and elimination of line defects - dislocations. Density of dislocations grows with increase of the loading cycles amount and increase of load amplitude. Growth of dislocations density leads to loosening of material, formation of micro- and macrocracks. The heat capacity of material grows as the loosening continues. In the given paper the authors prove theoretically that temperature conductivity coefficient which is associated with heat capacity of material, decreases as fatigue wear grows. (paper)

  11. Relationship between thermal expansion coefficient and glass transition temperature in metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, H.; Chen, H.-S.; Inoue, A.

    2008-01-01

    The thermal expansion coefficients of 13 metallic glasses were measured using a thermo-mechanical analyser. A unique correlation was found between the linear thermal expansion coefficient and the glass transition temperature-their product is nearly constant ∼8.24 x 10 -3 . If one assumes the Debye expression for thermal activation, the total linear thermal expansion up to glass transition temperature (T g ) is reduced to 6 x 10 -3 , nearly 25% of that at the fusion of pure metals

  12. Contribution to the study of the temperature reactivity coefficient for light water reactors; Contribution a l`etude du coefficient de temperature des reacteurs a eau legere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mounier, C.

    1994-05-01

    In this work, we looked for the error sources in the calculation of the isothermal temperature coefficient for light water lattices. We studied three fields implied: the nuclear data, the calculation methods and the temperature coefficient measurement. About the measurement, we pointed out the difficulties of he interpretation. So we used an indirect approach by the mean of critical states at various temperatures. In that way, we can say that if the errors in the effective multiplication factor are constants with temperature then the temperature coefficient is correctly calculated. We studied the neutronic influence of light water models which are used in the thermal scattering cross-section computation. This cross-section determines the thermalization process of neutrons. We showed that the actual model (JEF2) is satisfactory of the needs of the reactors physics. Concerning the majors isotopes ({sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 239}Pu), the uncertainties on the nuclear data do not seem as a preponderant cause of errors, without to be totally negligible. We also studied, with the neutron transport code Apollo-2, the influence of difference approximations for cell calculation . The new possibilities of the code has been used to represent the critical experiments, particularly the improvement of the resonance self-shielding formalism. The calculation scheme adopted permits to remove partially the fundamental mode approximation by the mean of a two-dimensional transport calculation with the SN method, the axial leakage being treated as an absorption in DB{sup 2}{sub Z}. The agreement between theory and experiment is good both for the reactivity and the temperature coefficient. (author). 114 refs., 40 figs., 163 tabs., 1 append.

  13. Dielectronic recombination rate coefficients to the excited states of CI from CII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubau, J. [Observatoire of Paris, 92 MEUDON (France); Kato, T.; Safronova, U.I.

    1998-01-01

    The dielectronic recombination rate coefficients to the excited states for n=2-6 are calculated including 1s{sup 2}2l{sub 1}2l{sub 2}2l{sub 3}nl (n=2-6, l{<=}(n-1)) states. The values for the excited states higher than n=6 are extrapolated and the total dielectronic recombination rate coefficients are derived. The rate coefficients to the excited states are fitted to an analytical formula and the fit parameters are given. (author)

  14. Dielectronic recombination rate coefficients to the excited states of CII from CIII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Takako; Safronova, U.; Ohira, Mituhiko.

    1996-02-01

    Energy levels, radiative transition probabilities and autoionization rates for CII including 1s 2 2l2l'nl'' (n=2-6, l'≤(n-1)) states were calculated by using multi-configurational Hartree-Fock (Cowan code) method. Autoionizing levels above three thresholds: 1s 2 2s 2 ( 1 S), 1s 2 2s2p( 3 P), 1s 2 2s2p( 1 P) were considered. Branching ratios related to the first threshold and the intensity factor were calculated for satellite lines of CII ion. The dielectronic recombination rate coefficients to the excited states for n=2-6 are calculated with these atomic data. The rate coefficients are fitted to an analytical formula and the fit parameters are given. The values for higher excited states than n=6 are extrapolated and the total dielectronic recombination rate coefficients are derived. The effective recombination rate coefficient for different electron densities are also derived. (author)

  15. Simultaneous determination of reference free-stream temperature and convective heat transfer coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Gi Ho; Song, Ki Bum; Kim, Kui Soon

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with the development of a new method that can obtain heat transfer coefficient and reference free stream temperature simultaneously. The method is based on transient heat transfer experiments using two narrow-band TLCs. The method is validated through error analysis in terms of the random uncertainties in the measured temperatures. It is shown how the uncertainties in heat transfer coefficient and free stream temperature can be reduced. The general method described in this paper is applicable to many heat transfer models with unknown free stream temperature

  16. Analysis of the reactivity coefficients of the advanced high-temperature reactor for plutonium and uranium fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakova, Jitka; Talamo, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    The conceptual design of the advanced high-temperature reactor (AHTR) has recently been proposed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with the intention to provide and alternative energy source for very high temperature applications. In the present study, we focused on the analyses of the reactivity coefficients of the AHTR core fueled with two types of fuel: enriched uranium and plutonium from the reprocessing of light water reactors irradiated fuel. More precisely, we investigated the influence of the outer graphite reflectors on the multiplication factor of the core, the fuel and moderator temperature reactivity coefficients and the void reactivity coefficient for five different molten salts: NaF, BeF 2 , LiF, ZrF 4 and Li 2 BeF 4 eutectic. In order to better illustrate the behavior of the previous parameters for different core configurations, we evaluated the moderating ratio of the molten salts and the absorption rate of the key fuel nuclides, which, of course, are driven by the neutron spectrum. The results show that the fuel and moderator temperature reactivity coefficients are always negative, whereas the void reactivity coefficient can be set negative provided that the fuel to moderator ratio is optimized (the core is undermoderated) and the moderating ratio of the coolant is large

  17. Analysis of the reactivity coefficients of the advanced high-temperature reactor for plutonium and uranium fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakova, Jitka [Department of Nuclear and Reactor Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, KTH, Roslagstullsbacken 21, S-10691, Stockholm (Sweden)], E-mail: jitka.zakova@neutron.kth.se; Talamo, Alberto [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, ANL, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: alby@anl.gov

    2008-05-15

    The conceptual design of the advanced high-temperature reactor (AHTR) has recently been proposed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with the intention to provide and alternative energy source for very high temperature applications. In the present study, we focused on the analyses of the reactivity coefficients of the AHTR core fueled with two types of fuel: enriched uranium and plutonium from the reprocessing of light water reactors irradiated fuel. More precisely, we investigated the influence of the outer graphite reflectors on the multiplication factor of the core, the fuel and moderator temperature reactivity coefficients and the void reactivity coefficient for five different molten salts: NaF, BeF{sub 2}, LiF, ZrF{sub 4} and Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} eutectic. In order to better illustrate the behavior of the previous parameters for different core configurations, we evaluated the moderating ratio of the molten salts and the absorption rate of the key fuel nuclides, which, of course, are driven by the neutron spectrum. The results show that the fuel and moderator temperature reactivity coefficients are always negative, whereas the void reactivity coefficient can be set negative provided that the fuel to moderator ratio is optimized (the core is undermoderated) and the moderating ratio of the coolant is large.

  18. Spin fluctuations and low temperature features of thermal coefficient of linear expansion of iron monosilicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, A.G.; Kortov, S.V.; Povzner, A.A.

    1996-01-01

    The low temperature measurements of thermal coefficient of linear expansion of strong paramagnet FeSi are carried out. The results obtained are discussed with in the framework of spin-fluctuation theory. It is shown that electronic part of the thermal coefficient of linear expansion is negative in the range of temperatures lower that of the semiconductor-metal phase transition. In metal phase it becomes positive. This specific features of the thermal coefficient is explained by the spin-fluctuation renormalization of d-electronic states density

  19. NdFeB magnets with zero temperature coefficient of induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, B.M.; Narasimhan, K.S.V.L.; Hurt, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    Temperature compensation for the induction of NdFeB type magnets has been investigated. A computer assisted alloy selection method was adopted to identify composition of zero temperature coefficient of induction over -50 to 200 0 C. Selected alloys were processed into magnet by the conventional powder metallurgy method. The experimental temperature coefficient on the sintered magnet correlated with the prediction satisfactory. Holmium is an essential ingredient required for temperature compensation of NdFeB magnets. A magnet, (Nd/sub 0.23/Ho/sub 0.64/Dy/sub 0.13/)/sub 15/Fe/sub 79/B/sub 6/ with B/sub r/ of 7,700 Gauss, H/sub c/ of 7,700 Oe, H/sub ci/ of 20,600 Oe, Bh/sub max/ of 14.8 MGOe and temperature coefficient of -0.029% per 0 C over -50 to +150 was obtained

  20. Influence of the Previous Preheating Temperature on the Static Coefficient of Friction with Lubrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Živković

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Experimental investigations static coefficient of friction in lubricated conditions and pre-heating of the sample pin at high temperatures is discussed in this paper. The static coefficient of friction was measured in the sliding steel copper pins per cylinder of polyvinylchloride. Pins are previously heated in a special chamber from room temperature to a temperature of 800 oC with a step of 50 °C. Tribological changes in the surface layer of the pins caused by pre-heating the pins at high temperatures and cooling systems have very significantly influenced the increase in the coefficient of static friction. The results indicate the possibility of improving the friction characteristics of metal materials based on their thermal treatment at elevated temperatures.

  1. The Merkel coefficient and its dependence on the temperature position of the cooling tower process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klenke, W.

    1977-01-01

    The Merkel coefficient, or evaporation coefficient, is still being used as a characteristic factor for the cooling tower process. Its dependence on the cooling range or on the warm water temperature of the process is often considered a disadvantage of the theory of evaporation cooling. This is also the reason for the suggestion to change the theory in such a way that the Merkel coefficient becomes independent of the temperature. The present investigation, however, leads to the result that the dependence of the Merkel coefficient on the temperature must be considered as a remarkable confirmation for the evidence of the theory of heat and mass transfer, as the experimental statements agree fully with the results of the theoretical considerations. (orig.) [de

  2. A study of the irradiation temperature coefficient for L-alanine and DL-alanine dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desrosiers, M. F.; Lin, M.; Cooper, S. L.; Cui, Y.; Chen, K.

    2006-01-01

    Alanine dosimetry is now well established both as a reference and routine dosemeter for industrial irradiation processing. Accurate dosimetry under the relatively harsh conditions of industrial processing requires a characterisation of the parameters that influence the dosemeter response. The temperature of the dosemeter during irradiation is a difficult quantity to measure so that the accuracy of the temperature coefficient that governs the dosemeter response becomes a critical factor. Numerous publications have reported temperature coefficients for several types of alanine dosemeters. The observed differences in the measured values were commonly attributed to the differences in the polymer binder or the experimental design of the measurement. However, the data demonstrated a consistent difference in the temperature coefficients between L-alanine and DL-alanine. Since there were no commonalities in the dosemeter composition or the measurement methods applied, a clear conclusion is not possible. To resolve this issue, the two isomeric forms of alanine dosemeters were prepared and irradiated in an identical manner. The results indicated that the DL-alanine temperature coefficient is more than 50% higher than the L-alanine temperature coefficient. (authors)

  3. Organ and effective dose rate coefficients for submersion exposure in occupational settings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veinot, K.G.; Dewji, S.A.; Hiller, M.M.; Eckerman, K.F.; Easterly, C.E.

    2017-01-01

    External dose coefficients for environmental exposure scenarios are often computed using assumption on infinite or semi-infinite radiation sources. For example, in the case of a person standing on contaminated ground, the source is assumed to be distributed at a given depth (or between various depths) and extending outwards to an essentially infinite distance. In the case of exposure to contaminated air, the person is modeled as standing within a cloud of infinite, or semi-infinite, source distribution. However, these scenarios do not mimic common workplace environments where scatter off walls and ceilings may significantly alter the energy spectrum and dose coefficients. In this paper, dose rate coefficients were calculated using the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference voxel phantoms positioned in rooms of three sizes representing an office, laboratory, and warehouse. For each room size calculations using the reference phantoms were performed for photons, electrons, and positrons as the source particles to derive mono-energetic dose rate coefficients. Since the voxel phantoms lack the resolution to perform dose calculations at the sensitive depth for the skin, a mathematical phantom was developed and calculations were performed in each room size with the three source particle types. Coefficients for the noble gas radionuclides of ICRP Publication 107 (e.g., Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, and Rn) were generated by folding the corresponding photon, electron, and positron emissions over the mono-energetic dose rate coefficients. Results indicate that the smaller room sizes have a significant impact on the dose rate per unit air concentration compared to the semi-infinite cloud case. For example, for Kr-85 the warehouse dose rate coefficient is 7% higher than the office dose rate coefficient while it is 71% higher for Xe-133. (orig.)

  4. Organ and effective dose rate coefficients for submersion exposure in occupational settings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veinot, K.G. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States); Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dewji, S.A.; Hiller, M.M. [Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eckerman, K.F.; Easterly, C.E. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2017-11-15

    External dose coefficients for environmental exposure scenarios are often computed using assumption on infinite or semi-infinite radiation sources. For example, in the case of a person standing on contaminated ground, the source is assumed to be distributed at a given depth (or between various depths) and extending outwards to an essentially infinite distance. In the case of exposure to contaminated air, the person is modeled as standing within a cloud of infinite, or semi-infinite, source distribution. However, these scenarios do not mimic common workplace environments where scatter off walls and ceilings may significantly alter the energy spectrum and dose coefficients. In this paper, dose rate coefficients were calculated using the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference voxel phantoms positioned in rooms of three sizes representing an office, laboratory, and warehouse. For each room size calculations using the reference phantoms were performed for photons, electrons, and positrons as the source particles to derive mono-energetic dose rate coefficients. Since the voxel phantoms lack the resolution to perform dose calculations at the sensitive depth for the skin, a mathematical phantom was developed and calculations were performed in each room size with the three source particle types. Coefficients for the noble gas radionuclides of ICRP Publication 107 (e.g., Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, and Rn) were generated by folding the corresponding photon, electron, and positron emissions over the mono-energetic dose rate coefficients. Results indicate that the smaller room sizes have a significant impact on the dose rate per unit air concentration compared to the semi-infinite cloud case. For example, for Kr-85 the warehouse dose rate coefficient is 7% higher than the office dose rate coefficient while it is 71% higher for Xe-133. (orig.)

  5. CH3Cl self-broadening coefficients and their temperature dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudaryonok, A.S.; Lavrentieva, N.N.; Buldyreva, J.V.

    2013-01-01

    CH 3 35 Cl self-broadening coefficients at various temperatures of atmospheric interest are computed by a semi-empirical method particularly suitable for molecular systems with strong dipole–dipole interactions. In order to probe the dependence on the rotational number K, the model parameters are adjusted on extensive room-temperature measurements for K≤7 and allow reproducing fine features of J-dependences observed for K≤3; for higher K up to 20, the fitting is performed on specially calculated semi-classical values. The temperature exponents for the standard power law are extracted and validated by calculation of low-temperature self-broadening coefficients comparing very favorably with available experimental data. An extensive line-list of self-broadening coefficients at the reference temperature 296 K and associated temperature exponents for 0≤J≤70, 0≤K≤20 is provided as Supplementary material for their use in atmospheric applications and spectroscopic databases. -- Highlights: • We calculated methyl chloride self-broadening coefficients using two methods. • Rotational quantum numbers were J from 0 till 70 and K from 0 till 20. • The temperature exponents were calculated for every mentioned line

  6. Temperature effects on diffusion coefficient for 6-gingerol and 6-shogaol in subcritical water extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilia Anisa, Nor; Azian, Noor; Sharizan, Mohd; Iwai, Yoshio

    2014-04-01

    6-gingerol and 6-shogaol are the main constituents as anti-inflammatory or bioactive compounds from zingiber officinale Roscoe. These bioactive compounds have been proven for inflammatory disease, antioxidatives and anticancer. The effect of temperature on diffusion coefficient for 6-gingerol and 6-shogaol were studied in subcritical water extraction. The diffusion coefficient was determined by Fick's second law. By neglecting external mass transfer and solid particle in spherical form, a linear portion of Ln (1-(Ct/Co)) versus time was plotted in determining the diffusion coefficient. 6-gingerol obtained the higher yield at 130°C with diffusion coefficient of 8.582x10-11 m2/s whilst for 6-shogaol, the higher yield and diffusion coefficient at 170°C and 19.417 × 10-11 m2/s.

  7. Temperature effects on diffusion coefficient for 6-gingerol and 6-shogaol in subcritical water extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisa, Nor Ilia; Azian, Noor; Sharizan, Mohd; Iwai, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    6-gingerol and 6-shogaol are the main constituents as anti-inflammatory or bioactive compounds from zingiber officinale Roscoe. These bioactive compounds have been proven for inflammatory disease, antioxidatives and anticancer. The effect of temperature on diffusion coefficient for 6-gingerol and 6-shogaol were studied in subcritical water extraction. The diffusion coefficient was determined by Fick's second law. By neglecting external mass transfer and solid particle in spherical form, a linear portion of Ln (1-(Ct/Co)) versus time was plotted in determining the diffusion coefficient. 6-gingerol obtained the higher yield at 130°C with diffusion coefficient of 8.582x10 −11 m 2 /s whilst for 6-shogaol, the higher yield and diffusion coefficient at 170°C and 19.417 × 10 −11 m 2 /s.

  8. Positive temperature coefficient of magnetic anisotropy in polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF)-based magnetic composites

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yiwei; Wang, Baomin; Zhan, Qingfeng; Tang, Zhenhua; Yang, Huali; Liu, Gang; Zuo, Zhenghu; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Xie, Yali; Zhu, Xiaojian; Chen, Bin; Wang, Junling; Li, Run-Wei

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic anisotropy is decreased with increasing temperature in normal magnetic materials, which is harmful to the thermal stability of magnetic devices. Here, we report the realization of positive temperature coefficient of magnetic anisotropy in a novel composite combining β-phase polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) with magnetostrictive materials (magnetostrictive film/PVDF bilayer structure). We ascribe the enhanced magnetic anisotropy of the magnetic film at elevated temperature to the st...

  9. Temperature dependence of the hydrogen-broadening coefficient for the nu 9 fundamental of ethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, G. W.; Hillman, J. J.; Nadler, Shacher; Jennings, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental results for the temperature dependence of the H2-broadening coefficient for the nu 9 fundamental of ethane are reported. Measurements were made over the temperature range 95-300 K using a novel low-temperature absorption cell. These spectra were recorded with the Doppler-limited diode laser spectrometer at NASA Goddard. The results are compared with recent measurements and model predictions.

  10. Experimental measurement of variation of heat transfer coefficient and temperature gradients in 16'' deep fluidised beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blacker, P.T.; McLain, D.R.

    1962-04-01

    The object of the experiments was to choose suitable particulate materials for a fluidised bed cooler, to test a deep fluidised bed for uniformity of heat transfer coefficient, and to explore the temperature distribution in a centrally heated annular fluidised bed. This memorandum records the techniques used and some of the practical aspects involved, together with the performance results obtained, for the assistance of other experimenters who may wish to use fluidised beds as a laboratory technique. Mathematical correlation of the results has not been attempted since some of the properties of the bed material were not known and to determine them was beyond the scope of the work programme. Rather, we have compared our results with those of other experimenters. Graphite tubes, for use in steady state thermal stress experiments, are to be heated by a graphite radiant heater situated in the bore and cooled on the outer surface. The tubes are 2 cm. bore, 8 cm. outside diameter and 48 cm. long. The outside temperature of the tubes is to be between 500 deg. C. and 1500 deg. C. It is estimated that the heat transfer rate required for fracture at the outer surface is 30 watts/cm 2 . This could readily be achieved by cooling with liquid metals, water or high velocity gas. However, serious problems of either materials compatibility or mechanical complexity make these undesirable. A water-cooled fluidised bed of compatible solids fluidised with nitrogen gas can overcome most of these problems and give heat transfer coefficients close to that required, vis. about 0.1 w/cm C . A coolant bed about 20'' long would be required and an annulus of about 2'' radial width round the specimen was considered to be practicable

  11. Experimental measurement of variation of heat transfer coefficient and temperature gradients in 16'' deep fluidised beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blacker, P T; McLain, D R [Reactor Development Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1962-04-15

    The object of the experiments was to choose suitable particulate materials for a fluidised bed cooler, to test a deep fluidised bed for uniformity of heat transfer coefficient, and to explore the temperature distribution in a centrally heated annular fluidised bed. This memorandum records the techniques used and some of the practical aspects involved, together with the performance results obtained, for the assistance of other experimenters who may wish to use fluidised beds as a laboratory technique. Mathematical correlation of the results has not been attempted since some of the properties of the bed material were not known and to determine them was beyond the scope of the work programme. Rather, we have compared our results with those of other experimenters. Graphite tubes, for use in steady state thermal stress experiments, are to be heated by a graphite radiant heater situated in the bore and cooled on the outer surface. The tubes are 2 cm. bore, 8 cm. outside diameter and 48 cm. long. The outside temperature of the tubes is to be between 500 deg. C. and 1500 deg. C. It is estimated that the heat transfer rate required for fracture at the outer surface is 30 watts/cm{sup 2}. This could readily be achieved by cooling with liquid metals, water or high velocity gas. However, serious problems of either materials compatibility or mechanical complexity make these undesirable. A water-cooled fluidised bed of compatible solids fluidised with nitrogen gas can overcome most of these problems and give heat transfer coefficients close to that required, vis. about 0.1 w/cm C . A coolant bed about 20'' long would be required and an annulus of about 2'' radial width round the specimen was considered to be practicable.

  12. Viscous slip coefficients for binary gas mixtures measured from mass flow rates through a single microtube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Takamori, K.; Perrier, P.; Graur, I.; Matsuda, Y.; Niimi, T.

    2016-09-01

    The viscous slip coefficient for helium-argon binary gas mixture is extracted from the experimental values of the mass flow rate through a microtube. The mass flow rate is measured by the constant-volume method. The viscous slip coefficient was obtained by identifying the measured mass flow rate through a microtube with the corresponding analytical expression, which is a function of the Knudsen number. The measurements were carried out in the slip flow regime where the first-order slip boundary condition can be applied. The measured viscous slip coefficients of binary gas mixtures exhibit a concave function of the molar ratio of the mixture, showing a similar profile with numerical results. However, from the detailed comparison between the measured and numerical values with the complete and incomplete accommodation at a surface, it is inappropriate to estimate the viscous slip coefficient for the mixture numerically by employing separately measured tangential momentum accommodation coefficient for each component. The time variation of the molar ratio in the downstream chamber was measured by sampling the gas from the chamber using the quadrupole mass spectrometer. In our measurements, it is indicated that the volume flow rate of argon is larger than that of helium because of the difference in the tangential momentum accommodation coefficient.

  13. Monitoring temperature reactivity coefficient by noise method in a NPP at full power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar, O.; Por, G.

    1987-04-01

    A new method based on noise measurement was used to estimate the temperature reactivity coefficient of the PAKS-2 reactor during the entire fuel cycle. Based on the measurements it is possible to measure the dependence of reactivity coefficient on boron concentration. Good agreement was found between the results obtained by the new method and by the conventional ones. Based on this method a new equipment can be develop which assures permanent measurements during operation. (author)

  14. THERMODYNAMICS OF ELECTROLYTES. X. ENTHALPY AND THE EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE ON THE ACTIVITY COEFFICIENTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvester, Leonard F.; Pitzer, Kenneth S.

    1977-11-01

    Heat of dilution and of solution data are fitted to the form of equation corresponding to that used successfully for activity and osmotic coefficients over a wide range of concentration. The resulting parameters give the change with temperature of the activity and osmotic coefficients. Results are reported for 84 electrolytes of 1-1, 2-1, 3-1, and 2-2 valence types.

  15. Measurement of reactivity temperature coefficient by noise method in a power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar, O.

    1986-07-01

    The temperature reactivity coefficient was estimated on the basis of noise measurements performed in a PWR. The magnitude of the coefficient was evaluated by relating the values of the APSD and CPSD between ex-core neutron detector signals and fuel assembly outlet thermocouple in the low frequency range. Comparison with δρ/δT measurements performed in PWR by standard methods supports the validity of the results. (author)

  16. Atmospheric chemistry of (Z)-CF3CH═CHCF3: OH radical reaction rate coefficient and global warming potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baasandorj, Munkhbayar; Ravishankara, A R; Burkholder, James B

    2011-09-29

    Rate coefficients, k, for the gas-phase reaction of the OH radical with (Z)-CF(3)CH═CHCF(3) (cis-1,1,1,4,4,4-hexafluoro-2-butene) were measured under pseudo-first-order conditions in OH using pulsed laser photolysis (PLP) to produce OH and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) to detect it. Rate coefficients were measured over a range of temperatures (212-374 K) and bath gas pressures (20-200 Torr; He, N(2)) and found to be independent of pressure over this range of conditions. The rate coefficient has a non-Arrhenius behavior that is well-described by the expression k(1)(T) = (5.73 ± 0.60) × 10(-19) × T(2) × exp[(678 ± 10)/T] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) where k(1)(296 K) was measured to be (4.91 ± 0.50) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) and the uncertainties are at the 2σ level and include estimated systematic errors. Rate coefficients for the analogous OD radical reaction were determined over a range of temperatures (262-374 K) at 100 Torr (He) to be k(2)(T) = (4.81 ± 0.20) × 10(-19) × T(2) × exp[(776 ± 15)/T], with k(2)(296 K) = (5.73 ± 0.50) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). OH radical rate coefficients were also measured at 296, 345, and 375 K using a relative rate technique and found to be in good agreement with the PLP-LIF results. A room-temperature rate coefficient for the O(3) + (Z)-CF(3)CH═CHCF(3) reaction was measured using an absolute method with O(3) in excess to be reaction was estimated to be ~20 days. Infrared absorption spectra of (Z)-CF(3)CH═CHCF(3) measured in this work were used to determine a (Z)-CF(3)CH═CHCF(3) global warming potential (GWP) of ~9 for the 100 year time horizon. A comparison of the OH reactivity of (Z)-CF(3)CH═CHCF(3) with other unsaturated fluorinated compounds is presented.

  17. Influence on Heat Transfer Coefficient of Heat Exchanger by Velocity and Heat Transfer Temperature Difference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Fang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aimed to insufficient heat transfer of heat exchanger, research the influence on the heat transfer coefficient impacted by velocity and heat transfer temperature difference of tube heat exchanger. According to the different heat transfer temperature difference and gas velocity,the experimental data were divided into group. Using the control variable method,the above two factors were analyzed separately. K一△T and k一:fitting curve were clone to obtain empirical function. The entire heat exchanger is as the study object,using numerical simulation methods,porous media,k一£model,second order upwind mode,and pressure一velocity coupling with SIMPLE algorithm,the entire heat exchanger temperature field and the heat transfer coefficient distribution were given. Finally the trend of the heat transfer coefficient effected by the above two factors was gotten.

  18. Temperature dependence of diffusion coefficients of trivalent uranium ions in chloride and chloride-fluoride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarov, V.E.; Borodina, N.P.

    1981-01-01

    Diffusion coefficients of U 3+ ions are measured by chronopotentiometric method in chloride 3LiCl-2KCl and in mixed chloride fluoride 3LiCl(LiF)-2KCl melts in the temperature range 633-1235 K. It is shown It is shown that experimental values of diffusion-coefficients are approximated in a direct line in lg D-1/T coordinate in chloride melt in the whole temperature range and in chloride-fluoride melt in the range of 644-1040 K. Experimental values of diffusion coefficients diviate from Arrhenius equation in the direction of large values in chloride-fluoride melt at further increase of temperature up to 1235 K. Possible causes of such a diviation are considered [ru

  19. Estimation of moderator temperature coefficient of actual PWRs using wavelet transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsumata, Ryosuke; Shimazu, Yoichiro

    2001-01-01

    Recently, an applicability of wavelet transform for estimation of moderator temperature coefficient was shown in numerical simulations. The basic concept of the wavelet transform is to eliminate noise in the measured signals. The concept is similar to that of Fourier transform method in which the analyzed reactivity component is divided by the analyzed component of relevant parameter. In order to apply the method to analyze measured data in actual PWRs, we carried out numerical simulations on the data that were more similar to actual data and proposed a method for estimation of moderator temperature coefficient using the wavelet transform. In the numerical simulations we obtained moderator temperature coefficients with the relative error of less than 4%. Based on this result we applied this method to analyze measured data in actual PWRs and the results have proved that the method is applicable for estimation of moderator temperature coefficients in the actual PWRs. It is expected that this method can reduce the required data length during the measurement. We expect to expand the applicability of this method to estimate the other reactivity coefficients with the data of short transient. (author)

  20. Rate coefficients for the reaction of OH radicals with cis-3-hexene: an experimental and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Thaís da Silva; Peirone, Silvina; Barrera, Javier A; Abrate, Juan P A; Lane, Silvia I; Arbilla, Graciela; Bauerfeldt, Glauco Favilla

    2015-04-14

    The kinetics of the cis-3-hexene + OH reaction were investigated by an experimental relative rate method and at the density functional theory level. The experimental set-up consisted of a 200 L Teflon bag, operated at atmospheric pressure and 298 K. OH radicals were produced by the photolysis of H2O2 at 254 nm. Relative rate coefficients were determined by comparing the decays of the cis-3-hexene and reference compounds (cyclohexene, 2-buten-1-ol and allyl ether). The mean second-order rate coefficient value found was (6.27 ± 0.66) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), the uncertainty being estimated by propagation of errors. Theoretical calculations for the addition reaction of OH to cis-3-hexene have also been performed, at the BHandHLYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level, in order to investigate the reaction mechanism, to clarify the experimental observations and to model the reaction kinetics. Different conformations of the reactants, pre-barrier complexes and saddle points were considered in our calculations. The individual rate coefficients, calculated for each conformer of the reactant, at 298 K, using a microcanonical variational transition state method, are 4.19 × 10(-11) and 1.23 × 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). The global rate coefficient was estimated from the Boltzmann distribution of the conformers to be 8.10 × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), which is in agreement with the experimental value. Rate coefficients calculated over the temperature range from 200-500 K are also given. Our results suggest that the complex mechanism, explicitly considering different conformations for the stationary points, must be taken into account for a proper description of the reaction kinetics.

  1. Comparison of rotational temperature derived from ground-based OH airglow observations with TIMED/SABER to evaluate the Einstein Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W.; Xu, J.; Smith, A. K.; Yuan, W.

    2017-12-01

    Ground-based observations of the OH(9-4, 8-3, 6-2, 5-1, 3-0) band airglows over Xinglong, China (40°24'N, 117°35'E) from December 2011 to 2014 are used to calculate rotational temperatures. The temperatures are calculated using five commonly used Einstein coefficient datasets. The kinetic temperature from TIMED/SABER is completely independent of the OH rotational temperature. SABER temperatures are weighted vertically by weighting functions calculated for each emitting vibrational state from two SABER OH volume emission rate profiles. By comparing the ground-based OH rotational temperature with SABER's, five Einstein coefficient datasets are evaluated. The results show that temporal variations of the rotational temperatures are well correlated with SABER's; the linear correlation coefficients are higher than 0.72, but the slopes of the fit between the SABER and rotational temperatures are not equal to 1. The rotational temperatures calculated using each set of Einstein coefficients produce a different bias with respect to SABER; these are evaluated over each of vibrational levels to assess the best match. It is concluded that rotational temperatures determined using any of the available Einstein coefficient datasets have systematic errors. However, of the five sets of coefficients, the rotational temperature derived with the Langhoff et al.'s (1986) set is most consistent with SABER. In order to get a set of optimal Einstein coefficients for rotational temperature derivation, we derive the relative values from ground-based OH spectra and SABER temperatures statistically using three year data. The use of a standard set of Einstein coefficients will be beneficial for comparing rotational temperatures observed at different sites.

  2. Estimation of water diffusion coefficient into polycarbonate at different temperatures using numerical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasirabadi, P. Shojaee; Jabbari, M.; Hattel, J. H. [Process Modelling Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Nils Koppels Allé, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2016-06-08

    Nowadays, many electronic systems are exposed to harsh conditions of relative humidity and temperature. Mass transport properties of electronic packaging materials are needed in order to investigate the influence of moisture and temperature on reliability of electronic devices. Polycarbonate (PC) is widely used in the electronics industry. Thus, in this work the water diffusion coefficient into PC is investigated. Furthermore, numerical methods used for estimation of the diffusion coefficient and their assumptions are discussed. 1D and 3D numerical solutions are compared and based on this, it is shown how the estimated value can be different depending on the choice of dimensionality in the model.

  3. Effect of oxyfluorinated multi-walled carbon nanotube additives on positive temperature coefficient/negative temperature coefficient behavior in high-density polyethylene polymeric switches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Byong Chol; Kang, Seok Chang; Im, Ji Sun; Lee, Se Hyun; Lee, Young-Seak

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The electrical properties of MWCNT-filled HDPE polymeric switches and their effect on oxyfluorination. Highlights: → Oxyfluorinated MWCNTs were used to reduce the PTC/NTC phenomenon in MWCNT-filled HDPE polymeric switches. → Electron mobility is difficult in MWCNT particles when the number of oxygen functional groups (C-O, C=O) increases by oxyfluorination. → A mechanism of improved electrical properties of oxyfluorinated MWCNT-filled HDPE polymeric switches was suggested. -- Abstract: Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were embedded into high-density polyethylene (HDPE) to improve the electrical properties of HDPE polymeric switches. The MWCNT surfaces were modified by oxyfluorination to improve their positive temperature coefficient (PTC) and negative temperature coefficient (NTC) behaviors in HDPE polymeric switches. HDPE polymeric switches exhibit poor electron mobility between MWCNT particles when the number of oxygen functional groups is increased by oxyfluorination. Thus, the PTC intensity of HDPE polymeric switches was increased by the destruction of the electrical conductivity network. The oxyfluorination of MWCNTs also leads to weak NTC behavior in the MWCNT-filled HDPE polymeric switches. This result is attributed to the reduction of the mutual attraction between the MWCNT particles at the melting temperature of HDPE, which results from a decrease in the surface free energy of the C-F bond in MWCNT particles.

  4. Atmospheric chemistry of HFE-7000 (CF(3)CF (2)CF (2)OCH (3)) and 2,2,3,3,4,4,4-heptafluoro-1-butanol (CF (3)CF (2)CF (2)CH (2)OH): kinetic rate coefficients and temperature dependence of reactions with chlorine atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-de-Mera, Yolanda; Aranda, Alfonso; Bravo, Iván; Rodríguez, Diana; Rodríguez, Ana; Moreno, Elena

    2008-10-01

    The adverse environmental impacts of chlorinated hydrocarbons on the Earth's ozone layer have focused attention on the effort to replace these compounds by nonchlorinated substitutes with environmental acceptability. Hydrofluoroethers (HFEs) and fluorinated alcohols are currently being introduced in many applications for this purpose. Nevertheless, the presence of a great number of C-F bonds drives to atmospheric long-lived compounds with infrared absorption features. Thus, it is necessary to improve our knowledge about lifetimes and global warming potentials (GWP) for these compounds in order to get a complete evaluation of their environmental impact. Tropospheric degradation is expected to be initiated mainly by OH reactions in the gas phase. Nevertheless, Cl atoms reaction may also be important since rate constants are generally larger than those of OH. In the present work, we report the results obtained in the study of the reactions of Cl radicals with HFE-7000 (CF(3)CF(2)CF(2)OCH(3)) (1) and its isomer CF(3)CF(2)CF(2)CH(2)OH (2). Kinetic rate coefficients with Cl atoms have been measured using the discharge flow tube-mass spectrometric technique at 1 Torr of total pressure. The reactions of these chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) substitutes have been studied under pseudo-first-order kinetic conditions in excess of the fluorinated compounds over Cl atoms. The temperature ranges were 266-333 and 298-353 K for reactions of HFE-7000 and CF(3)CF(2)CF(2)CH(2)OH, respectively. The measured room temperature rate constants were k(Cl+CF(3)CF(2)CF(2)OCH(3)) = (1.24 +/- 0.28) x 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)and k(Cl+CF(3)CF(2)CF(2)CH(2)OH) = (8.35 +/- 1.63) x 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) (errors are 2sigma + 10% to cover systematic errors). The Arrhenius expression for reaction 1 was k (1)(266-333 K) = (6.1 +/- 3.8) x 10(-13)exp[-(445 +/- 186)/T] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) and k (2)(298-353 K) = (1.9 +/- 0.7) x 10(-12)exp[-(244 +/- 125)/T] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) (errors

  5. Control rod position and temperature coefficients in HTTR power-rise tests. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Nozomu; Nojiri, Naoki; Takada, Eiji; Saito, Kenji; Kobayashi, Shoichi; Sawahata, Hiroaki; Kokusen, Sigeru

    2001-03-01

    Power-rise tests of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) have been carried out aiming to achieve 100% power. So far, 50% of power operation and many tests have been carried out. In the HTTR, temperature change in core is so large to achieve the outlet coolant temperature of 950degC. To improve the calculation accuracy of the HTTR reactor physics characteristics, control rod positions at criticality and temperature coefficients were measured at each step to achieve 50% power level. The calculations were carried out using Monte Carlo code and diffusion theory with temperature distributions in the core obtained by reciprocal calculation of thermo-hydraulic code and diffusion theory. Control rod positions and temperature coefficients were calculated by diffusion theory and Monte Carlo method. The test results were compared to calculation results. The control rod positions at criticality showed good agreement with calculation results by Monte Carlo method with error of 50 mm. The control position at criticality at 100% was predicted around 2900mm. Temperature coefficients showed good agreement with calculation results by diffusion theory. The improvement of calculation will be carried out comparing the measured results up to 100% power level. (author)

  6. Coefficient of friction and wear rate effects of different composite nanolubricant concentrations on Aluminium 2024 plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawawi, N. N. M.; Azmi, W. H.; Redhwan, A. A. M.; Sharif, M. Z.

    2017-10-01

    Wear of sliding parts and operational machine consistency enhancement can be avoided with good lubrication. Lubrication reduce wear between two contacting and sliding surfaces and decrease the frictional power losses in compressor. The coefficient of friction and wear rate effects study were carried out to measure the friction and anti-wear abilities of Al2O3-SiO2 composite nanolubricants a new type of compressor lubricant to enhanced the compressor performances. The tribology test rig employing reciprocating test conditions to replicate a piston ring contact in the compressor was used to measure the coefficient of friction and wear rate. Coefficient of friction and wear rate effects of different Al2O3-SiO2/PAG composite nanolubricants of Aluminium 2024 plate for 10-kg load at different speed were investigated. Al2O3 and SiO2 nanoparticles were dispersed in the Polyalkylene Glycol (PAG 46) lubricant using two-steps method of preparation. The result shows that the coefficient friction and wear rate of composite nanolubricants decreased compared to pure lubricant. The maximum reduction achievement for friction of coefficient and wear rate by Al2O3-SiO2 composite nanolubricants by 4.78% and 12.96% with 0.06% volume concentration. Therefore, 0.06% volume concentration is selected as the most enhanced composite nanolubricants with effective coefficient of friction and wear rate reduction compared to other volume concentrations. Thus, it is recommended to be used as the compressor lubrication to enhanced compressor performances.

  7. The influence of thorium on the temperature reactivity coefficient in a 400 MWth pebble bed high temperature plutonium incinerating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, Guy A.; Serfontein, Dawid E.

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates advanced fuel cycles containing thorium and reactor grade plutonium (Pu(PWR)) in a 400 MW th Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) Demonstration Power Plant. Results presented were determined from coupled neutronics and thermo-hydraulic simulations of the VSOP 99/05 diffusion codes. In a previous study impressive burn-ups (601 MWd/kg heavy metal (HM)) and thus plutonium destruction rates (69.2 %) were obtained with pure plutonium fuel with mass loadings of 3 g Pu(PWR)/fuel sphere or less. However the safety performance was poor in that the limit on the maximum fuel temperature during equilibrium operation was exceeded and positive Uniform Temperature Reactivity Coefficients (UTCs) were obtained. In the present study fuel cycles containing mixtures of thorium and plutonium achieved negative maximum UTCs. Plutonium only fuel cycles also achieved negative maximum UTCs, provided that much higher mass loadings are used. It is proposed that the lower thermal neutron flux was responsible for this effect. The plutonium only fuel cycle with 12 g Pu(PWR)/fuel sphere also achieved the adopted safety limits for the PBMR DPP-400 in that the maximum fuel temperature and the maximum power density did not exceed 1130°C or 4.5 kW/sphere respectively. This design would thus be licensable and could potentially be economically feasible. However the burn-up was much lower at 181 MWd/kgHM and thus the plutonium destruction fraction was also much lower at 24.5%, which may be sub-optimal with respect to proliferation and waste disposal objectives and therefore further optimisation studies are proposed. (author)

  8. Measurements of fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity on a commercial AGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telford, A.; Bridge, M.J.

    1978-01-01

    Tests have been carried out on the commercial AGR at Hikley Point to determine the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity, an important safety related parameter. Reactor neutron flux was measured during transients induced by movement of a bank of control rods from one steady position to another. An inverse kinetics analysis was applied to the measured flux to determine the change which occured in core reactivity as the fuel temperature changed. The variation of mean fuel temperature was deduced from the flux transient by means of a nine-plane thermal hydraulics representation of the AGR fuel channel. Results so far obtained confirm the predicted variation of fuel temperature coefficient with butn-up. (author)

  9. Temperature coefficients for GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAsSb solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aho, Arto; Isoaho, Riku; Tukiainen, Antti; Polojärvi, Ville; Aho, Timo; Raappana, Marianna; Guina, Mircea [Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 692, FIN-33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2015-09-28

    We report the temperature coefficients for MBE-grown GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAsSb multijunction solar cells and the corresponding single junction sub-cells. Temperature-dependent current-voltage measurements were carried out using a solar simulator equipped with a 1000 W Xenon lamp and a three-band AM1.5D simulator. The triple-junction cell exhibited an efficiency of 31% at AM1.5G illumination and an efficiency of 37–39% at 70x real sun concentration. The external quantum efficiency was also measured at different temperatures. The temperature coefficients up to 80°C, for the open circuit voltage, the short circuit current density, and the conversion efficiency were determined to be −7.5 mV/°C, 0.040 mA/cm{sup 2}/°C, and −0.09%/°C, respectively.

  10. Self-consistent transport coefficients for average collective motion at moderately high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaji, Shuhei; Hofmann, H.; Samhammer, R.

    1987-01-01

    Linear response theory is applied to compute the coefficients for inertia, friction and local stiffness for slow, large scale nuclear collective motion. It is shown how these coefficients can be defined within a locally harmonic approximation. The latter allows to study the implications arising from a finite local collective frequency. It is only for temperatures around 2 MeV that the zero frequency limit becomes a fair approximation. Friction is found to have a marked temperature dependence. The numerical computations are performed on the basis of a two-center shell model, but allowing the particles and holes to become dressed through effects of the medium. The dependence of the transport coefficients on the parameters of these self-energies is studied. It is argued that the uncertainties are smaller than a factor of 2. (orig.)

  11. Current Sharing inside a High Power IGBT Module at the Negative Temperature Coefficient Operating Region

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084596; Papastergiou, Konstantinos; Bongiorno, M; Thiringer, T

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates the current sharing effect of a high power Soft Punch Through IGBT module in the Negative Temperature Coefficient region. The unbalanced current sharing between two of the substrates is demonstrated for different current and temperature levels and its impact on the thermal stressing of the device is evaluated. The results indicate that the current asymmetry does not lead to a significant thermal stressing unbalance between the substrates.

  12. Anomalous temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient for the substitutionally-disordered hopping conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raffaelle, R.P.; Parris, P.E.; Anderson, H.U.; Sparlin, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    Thermoelectric power measurements are presented for the (La,Sr)(Cr,Mn)O 3 series. The nonlinear temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient is analyzed in terms of a random distribution of energetically equivalent hopping sites. The limitations of Heikes' formula, which has been traditionally used to calculate small polaron carrier densities in these systems, are discussed. Recent theoretical developments in the interpretation of Seebeck measurements in substitutionally-disordered high-temperature hopping conductors are reviewed

  13. Determination of the N2 recombination rate coefficient in the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsini, N.; Torr, D. G.; Brinton, H. C.; Brace, L. H.; Hanson, W. B.; Hoffman, J. H.; Nier, A. O.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of aeronomic parameters made by the Atmosphere Explorer-C satellite are used to determine the recombination rate coefficient of N2(+) in the ionosphere. The rate is found to increase significantly with decreasing electron density. Values obtained range from approximately 1.4 x 10 to the -7th to 3.8 x 10 to the -7th cu cm/sec. This variation is explained in a preliminary way in terms of an increase in the rate coefficient with vibrational excitation. Thus, high electron densities depopulate high vibrational levels reducing the effective recombination rate, whereas, low electron densities result in an enhancement in the population of high vibrational levels, thus, increasing the effective recombination rate.

  14. Measuring temperature coefficient of TRIGA MARK I reactor by noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, P.A.

    1975-01-01

    The transfer function of TRIGA MARK I Reactor is measured at power zero (5w) and power 118Kw, in the frequency range of 0.02 to 0.5 rd/s. The method of intercorrelation between a pseudostochasticbinary signal is used. A simple dynamic model of the reactor is developed and the coefficient of temperature is estimated [pt

  15. Temperature dependence of the absorption coefficient of water for midinfrared laser radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, E. D.; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Motamedi, M.; Borst, C.; Welch, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    The dynamics of the water absorption peak around 1.94 microns was examined. This peak is important for the absorption of holmium and thulium laser radiation. To examine the effect of temperature on the absorption coefficient, the transmission of pulsed Ho:YAG, Ho:YAG, Ho:YSGG, and Tm:YAG laser

  16. Investigations of the reactivity temperature coefficient of the Dresden Technical University training and research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, E.; Knorr, J.

    1982-01-01

    Approximate formulas are derived for determining the temperature coefficient of reactivity of the training and research reactor (AKR) of the Dresden Technical University. Values calculated on the basis of these approximations show good agreement with experimentally obtained results, thus confirming the applicability of the formulas to simple systems

  17. Monte Carlo calculation of the nuclear temperature coefficient in fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthes, W.

    1974-04-15

    A Monte Carlo program for the calculation of the nuclear temperature coefficient for fast reactors is described. The special difficulties for this problem are the energy and space dependence of the cross sections and the calculation of differential eifects. These difficulties are discussed in detail and the way for their solution chosen in this program is described. (auth)

  18. Experimental estimation of moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity of the IPEN/MB-01 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Rubens C. da; Bitelli, Ulysses D.; Mura, Luiz Ernesto C.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present the procedure for the experimental estimation of the Moderator Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity of the IPEN/MB-01 Research Reactor, a parameter that has an important role in the physics and the control operations of any reactor facility. At the experiment, the IPEN/MB-01 reactor went critical at the power of 1W (1% of its total power), and whose core configuration was 28 x 26 rectangular array of UO_2 fuel rods, inside a light water (moderator) tank. In addition, there was a heavy water (D_2O) reflector installed in the West side of the core to obtain an adequate neutron reflection along the experiment. The moderator temperature was increased in steps of 4 °C, and the measurement of the mean moderator temperature was acquired using twelve calibrated thermocouples, placed around the reactor core. As a result, the mean value of -4.81 pcm/°C was obtained for such coefficient. The curves of ρ(T) (Reactivity x Temperature) and α"M_T(T)(Moderator Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity x Temperature) were developed using data from an experimental measurement of the integral reactivity curves through the Stable Period and Inverse Kinetics Methods, that was carried out at the reactor with the same core configuration. Such curves were compared and showed a very similar behavior between them. (author)

  19. Experimental estimation of moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity of the IPEN/MB-01 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Rubens C. da; Bitelli, Ulysses D.; Mura, Luiz Ernesto C., E-mail: rubensrcs@usp.br, E-mail: ubitelli@ipen.br, E-mail: credidiomura@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (PNV/POLI/USP), SP (Brazil). Arquitetura Naval e Departamento de Engenharia Oceanica; Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this article is to present the procedure for the experimental estimation of the Moderator Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity of the IPEN/MB-01 Research Reactor, a parameter that has an important role in the physics and the control operations of any reactor facility. At the experiment, the IPEN/MB-01 reactor went critical at the power of 1W (1% of its total power), and whose core configuration was 28 x 26 rectangular array of UO{sub 2} fuel rods, inside a light water (moderator) tank. In addition, there was a heavy water (D{sub 2}O) reflector installed in the West side of the core to obtain an adequate neutron reflection along the experiment. The moderator temperature was increased in steps of 4 °C, and the measurement of the mean moderator temperature was acquired using twelve calibrated thermocouples, placed around the reactor core. As a result, the mean value of -4.81 pcm/°C was obtained for such coefficient. The curves of ρ(T) (Reactivity x Temperature) and α{sup M}{sub T}(T)(Moderator Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity x Temperature) were developed using data from an experimental measurement of the integral reactivity curves through the Stable Period and Inverse Kinetics Methods, that was carried out at the reactor with the same core configuration. Such curves were compared and showed a very similar behavior between them. (author)

  20. Semiempirical method of determining flow coefficients for pitot rake mass flow rate measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trefny, C. J.

    1985-01-01

    Flow coefficients applicable to area-weighted pitot rake mass flow rate measurements are presented for fully developed, turbulent flow in an annulus. A turbulent velocity profile is generated semiempirically for a given annulus hub-to-tip radius ratio and integrated numerically to determine the ideal mass flow rate. The calculated velocities at each probe location are then summed, and the flow rate as indicated by the rake is obtained. The flow coefficient to be used with the particular rake geometry is subsequently obtained by dividing the ideal flow rate by the rake-indicated flow rate. Flow coefficients ranged from 0.903 for one probe placed at a radius dividing two equal areas to 0.984 for a 10-probe area-weighted rake. Flow coefficients were not a strong function of annulus hub-to-tip radius ratio for rakes with three or more probes. The semiempirical method used to generate the turbulent velocity profiles is described in detail.

  1. Rate Coefficient Measurements and Theoretical Analysis of the OH + ( E) CF3CH=CHCF3 Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baasandorj, Munkhbayar; Marshall, Paul; Waterland, Robert L; Ravishankara, Akkihebbal R; Burkholder, James B

    2018-04-25

    Rate coefficients, k, for the gas-phase reaction of the OH radical with (E) CF3CH=CHCF3 ((E)-1,1,14,4,4-hexafluoro-2-butene, HFO-1336mzz(E)) were measured over a range of temperature (211-374 K) and bath gas pressure (20-300 Torr; He, N2) using a pulsed laser photolysis-laser induced fluorescence (PLP-LIF) technique. k1(T) was independent of pressure over this range of conditions with k1(296 K) = (1.31 ± 0.15) × 10 13 cm3 molecule 1 s 1 and k1(T) = (6.94 ± 0.80) × 10 13 exp[ (496 ± 10)/T] cm3 molecule 1 s 1, where the uncertainties are 2 and the pre-exponential term includes estimated systematic error. Rate coefficients for the OD reaction were also determined over a range of temperature (262-374 K) at 100 Torr (He). The OD rate coefficients were ~15% greater than the OH values and showed similar temperature dependent behavior with k2(T) = (7.52 ± 0.44) × 10 13 exp[ (476 ± 20)/T] and k2(296 K) = (1.53 ± 0.15) × 10 13 cm3 molecule 1 s 1. The rate coefficients for reaction 1 were also measured using a relative rate technique between 296 and 375 K with k1(296 K) measured to be (1.22 ± 0.1) × 10 13 cm3 molecule 1 s 1 in agreement with the PLP-LIF results. In addition, the 296 K rate coefficient for the O3 + (E) CF3CH=CHCF3 reaction was determined to be reaction and the significant decrease in OH reactivity compared to the (Z) CF3CH=CHCF3 stereoisomer reaction. The estimated atmospheric lifetime of (E) CF3CH=CHCF3, due to loss by reaction with OH, is estimated to be ~90 days, while the actual lifetime will depend on the location and season of its emission. Infrared absorption spectra of (E) CF3CH=CHCF3 were measured and used to estimate the 100-year time horizon global warming potentials (GWP) of 32 (atmospherically well-mixed) and 14 (lifetime-adjusted).

  2. Simplified method of ''push-pull'' test data analysis for determining in situ reaction rate coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haggerty, R.; Schroth, M.H.; Istok, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    The single-well, ''''push-pull'''' test method is useful for obtaining information on a wide variety of aquifer physical, chemical, and microbiological characteristics. A push-pull test consists of the pulse-type injection of a prepared test solution into a single monitoring well followed by the extraction of the test solution/ground water mixture from the same well. The test solution contains a conservative tracer and one or more reactants selected to investigate a particular process. During the extraction phase, the concentrations of tracer, reactants, and possible reaction products are measured to obtain breakthrough curves for all solutes. This paper presents a simplified method of data analysis that can be used to estimate a first-order reaction rate coefficient from these breakthrough curves. Rate coefficients are obtained by fitting a regression line to a plot of normalized concentrations versus elapsed time, requiring no knowledge of aquifer porosity, dispersivity, or hydraulic conductivity. A semi-analytical solution to the advective-dispersion equation is derived and used in a sensitivity analysis to evaluate the ability of the simplified method to estimate reaction rate coefficients in simulated push-pull tests in a homogeneous, confined aquifer with a fully-penetrating injection/extraction well and varying porosity, dispersivity, test duration, and reaction rate. A numerical flow and transport code (SUTRA) is used to evaluate the ability of the simplified method to estimate reaction rate coefficients in simulated push-pull tests in a heterogeneous, unconfined aquifer with a partially penetrating well. In all cases the simplified method provides accurate estimates of reaction rate coefficients; estimation errors ranged from 0.1 to 8.9% with most errors less than 5%

  3. Vibrationally resolved rate coefficients and branching fractions in the dissociative recombination of O2+

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrignani, A.; Zande, W.J. van der; Cosby, P.C.; Hellberg, F.; Thomas, R.; Larsson, M.

    2005-01-01

    We have studied the dissociative recombination of the first three vibrational levels of O-2(+) in its electronic ground X (2)Pi(g) state. Absolute rate coefficients, cross sections, quantum yields and branching fractions have been determined in a merged-beam experiment in the heavy-ion storage ring,

  4. Rate coefficients of open shell molecules and radicals: R-matrix ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-04-07

    Apr 7, 2017 ... Rate coefficients of open shell molecules and radicals: R-matrix method. JASMEET SINGH1 ... lasers, study of structure of DNA and astrophysics which require a ..... [6] CCPForge, http://ccpforge.cse.rl.ac.uk/projects/ukrmol-in/.

  5. Nickel group cluster anion reactions with carbon monoxide: Rate coefficients and chemisorption efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintz, Paul A.; Ervin, Kent M.

    1994-04-01

    Reactions of Ni-n(n=3-10), Pd-n(n=3-8), and Pt-n(n=3-7) with CO are studied in a flow tube reactor. Bimolecular rate coefficients are measured for the association reaction of CO adsorbing on the cluster surface. The rate coefficients range from about 10% of the collision rate for the trimer anions to near the collision rate for clusters larger than four atoms. The maximum number of CO molecules that bind to each cluster is determined. Whereas the saturation limits for nickel are typical for an 18 electron transition metal, the limits for platinum are lower, reflecting the electron deficient structures observed in condensed phase chemistry. The CO saturated palladium clusters represent the first examples of saturated binary palladium carbonyl compounds. Comparisons are made to similar studies on metal cation and neutral clusters and also to surface scattering studies of nickel group metals.

  6. Elasticity moduli, thermal expansion coefficients and Debye temperature of titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beletskij, V.M.; Glej, V.A.; Maksimyuk, P.A.; Tabachnik, V.I.; Opanasenko, V.F.

    1979-01-01

    Studied are the characteristics of titanium alloys which reflect best the bonding forces for atoms in a crystal lattice: elastic modules, their temperature dependences, thermal expansion coefficient and Debye temperatures. For the increase of the accuracy of measuring modules and especially their changes with temperature an ultrasonic echo-impulse method of superposition has been used. The temperature dependences of Young modulus of the VT1-0, VT16 and VT22 titanium alloys are plotted. The Young module and its change with temperature depend on the content of alloying elements. The Young module decrease with temperature may be explained within the framework of the inharmonic effect theory. The analysis of the results obtained permits to suppose that alloying of titanium alloys with aluminium results in an interatomic interaction increase that may be one of the reasons of their strength increase

  7. Measurement of the Thermal Expansion Coefficient for Ultra-High Temperatures up to 3000 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kompan, T. A.; Kondratiev, S. V.; Korenev, A. S.; Puhov, N. F.; Inochkin, F. M.; Kruglov, S. K.; Bronshtein, I. G.

    2018-03-01

    The paper is devoted to a new high-temperature dilatometer, a part of the State Primary Standard of the thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) unit. The dilatometer is designed for investigation and certification of materials for TEC standards in the range of extremely high temperatures. The critical review of existing methods of TEC measurements is given. Also, the design, principles of operation and metrological parameters of the new device are described. The main attention is paid to the system of machine vision that allows accurate measurement of elongation at high temperatures. The results of TEC measurements for graphite GIP-4, single crystal Al2O3, and some other materials are also presented.

  8. A numerical evaluation of prediction accuracy of CO2 absorber model for various reaction rate coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shim S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of the CO2 absorber column using mono-ethanolamine (MEA solution as chemical solvent are predicted by a One-Dimensional (1-D rate based model in the present study. 1-D Mass and heat balance equations of vapor and liquid phase are coupled with interfacial mass transfer model and vapor-liquid equilibrium model. The two-film theory is used to estimate the mass transfer between the vapor and liquid film. Chemical reactions in MEA-CO2-H2O system are considered to predict the equilibrium pressure of CO2 in the MEA solution. The mathematical and reaction kinetics models used in this work are calculated by using in-house code. The numerical results are validated in the comparison of simulation results with experimental and simulation data given in the literature. The performance of CO2 absorber column is evaluated by the 1-D rate based model using various reaction rate coefficients suggested by various researchers. When the rate of liquid to gas mass flow rate is about 8.3, 6.6, 4.5 and 3.1, the error of CO2 loading and the CO2 removal efficiency using the reaction rate coefficients of Aboudheir et al. is within about 4.9 % and 5.2 %, respectively. Therefore, the reaction rate coefficient suggested by Aboudheir et al. among the various reaction rate coefficients used in this study is appropriate to predict the performance of CO2 absorber column using MEA solution. [Acknowledgement. This research was supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF, funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2011-0017220].

  9. Electrical resistivity, Hall coefficient and electronic mobility in indium antimonide at different magnetic fields and temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jee, Madan; Prasad, Vijay; Singh, Amita

    1995-01-01

    The electrical resistivity, Hall coefficient and electronic mobility of n-type and p-type crystals of indium antimonide have been measured from 25 degC-100 degC temperature range. It has been found by this measurement that indium antimonide is a compound semiconductor with a high mobility 10 6 cm 2 /V.S. The Hall coefficient R H was measured as a function of magnetic field strength H for a number of samples of both p and n-type using fields up to 12 kilo gauss. The Hall coefficient R h decreases with increasing magnetic fields as well as with increase in temperature of the sample. The electric field is more effective on samples with high mobilities and consequently the deviations from linearity are manifested at comparatively low values of the electric field. The measurement of R H in weak and strong magnetic fields makes it possible to determine the separate concentration of heavy and light holes. Measured values of Hall coefficient and electrical resistivity show that there is a little variation of ρ and R h with temperatures as well as with magnetic fields. (author). 12 refs., 5 tabs

  10. A new kind of shape-stabilized PCMs with positive temperature coefficient (PTC) effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Wen-long; Wu, Wan-fan; Song, Jia-liang; Liu, Yi; Yuan, Shuai; Liu, Na

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A new kind of shape-stabilized PCMs with PTC effect is first prepared. • It provides a potential means for the thermal control of the electronic devices. • The switching temperature of the materials is about 25 °C. • The most appropriate component of the material is found out by experimental study. • The NTC effect of the new PCMs is eliminated effectively by heat treatment. - Abstract: A new kind of shape-stabilized phase change materials (PCMs) with positive temperature coefficient (PTC) effect was prepared in this paper. The materials were prepared by adding graphite powder (GP) to the paraffin/low density polyethylene (LDPE) composite and the PTC characteristic was found by adjusting the component ratio of the material. Then the physical structures and thermal properties of the materials were investigated and the effect of various GP mass fractions and paraffin/LDPE mass proportions on the PTC behavior of the materials was studied experimentally. The results showed that the switching temperature of the materials was about 25 °C (room temperature) which approached to the first phase change temperature of paraffin dispersed in the materials. The PTC behavior of the materials was the best when the GP mass fraction and the mass proportion of LDPE/paraffin were 40 wt% and 30:70, respectively. Furthermore, the negative temperature coefficient (NTC) effect of the materials could be eliminated effectively with heat treatment. This new kind of materials is different from the former PTC materials which the switching temperatures focus on high temperature ranges. It makes up for the defect of previous materials that the switching temperatures only range in high temperature rather than room temperature and provides a potential means for the thermal control of the electronic devices or other room temperature thermal control applications

  11. Study on Characteristic of Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity for Plutonium Core of Pebbled Bed Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuhair; Suwoto; Setiadipura, T.; Bakhri, S.; Sunaryo, G. R.

    2018-02-01

    As a part of the solution searching for possibility to control the plutonium, a current effort is focused on mechanisms to maximize consumption of plutonium. Plutonium core solution is a unique case in the high temperature reactor which is intended to reduce the accumulation of plutonium. However, the safety performance of the plutonium core which tends to produce a positive temperature coefficient of reactivity should be examined. The pebble bed inherent safety features which are characterized by a negative temperature coefficient of reactivity must be maintained under any circumstances. The purpose of this study is to investigate the characteristic of temperature coefficient of reactivity for plutonium core of pebble bed reactor. A series of calculations with plutonium loading varied from 0.5 g to 1.5 g per fuel pebble were performed by the MCNPX code and ENDF/B-VII library. The calculation results show that the k eff curve of 0.5 g Pu/pebble declines sharply with the increase in fuel burnup while the greater Pu loading per pebble yields k eff curve declines slighter. The fuel with high Pu content per pebble may reach long burnup cycle. From the temperature coefficient point of view, it is concluded that the reactor containing 0.5 g-1.25 g Pu/pebble at high burnup has less favorable safety features if it is operated at high temperature. The use of fuel with Pu content of 1.5 g/pebble at high burnup should be considered carefully from core safety aspect because it could affect transient behavior into a fatal accident situation.

  12. Estimation of Water Diffusion Coefficient into Polycarbonate at Different Temperatures Using Numerical Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shojaee Nasirabadi, Parizad; Jabbaribehnam, Mirmasoud; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    ) is widely used in the electronics industry. Thus, in this work the water diffusion coefficient into PC is investigated. Furthermore, numerical methods used for estimation of the diffusion coefficient and their assumptions are discussed. 1D and 3D numerical solutions are compared and based on this, itis......Nowadays, many electronic systems are exposed to harsh conditions of relative humidity and temperature. Masstransport properties of electronic packaging materials are needed in order to investigate the influence of moisture andtemperature on reliability of electronic devices. Polycarbonate (PC...... shown how the estimated value can be different depending on the choice of dimensionality in the model....

  13. High temperature electrical resistivity and Seebeck coefficient of Ge2Sb2Te5 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnane, L.; Dirisaglik, F.; Cywar, A.; Cil, K.; Zhu, Y.; Lam, C.; Anwar, A. F. M.; Gokirmak, A.; Silva, H.

    2017-09-01

    High-temperature characterization of the thermoelectric properties of chalcogenide Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) is critical for phase change memory devices, which utilize self-heating to quickly switch between amorphous and crystalline states and experience significant thermoelectric effects. In this work, the electrical resistivity and Seebeck coefficient are measured simultaneously as a function of temperature, from room temperature to 600 °C, on 50 nm and 200 nm GST thin films deposited on silicon dioxide. Multiple heating and cooling cycles with increasingly maximum temperature allow temperature-dependent characterization of the material at each crystalline state; this is in contrast to continuous measurements which return the combined effects of the temperature dependence and changes in the material. The results show p-type conduction (S > 0), linear S(T), and a positive Thomson coefficient (dS/dT) up to melting temperature. The results also reveal an interesting linearity between dS/dT and the conduction activation energy for mixed amorphous-fcc GST, which can be used to estimate one parameter from the other. A percolation model, together with effective medium theory, is adopted to correlate the conductivity of the material with average grain sizes obtained from XRD measurements. XRD diffraction measurements show plane-dependent thermal expansion for the cubic and hexagonal phases.

  14. Variable temperature effects on release rates of readily soluble nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, C.-L.; Light, W.B.; Lee, W.W.-L.; Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H.

    1988-09-01

    In this paper we study the effect of temperature on the release rate of readily soluble nuclides, as affected by a time-temperature dependent diffusion coefficient. In this analysis ground water fills the voids in the waste package at t = 0 and one percent of the inventories of cesium and iodine are immediately dissolved into the void water. Mass transfer resistance of partly failed container and cladding is conservatively neglected. The nuclides move through the void space into the surrounding rock under a concentration gradient. We use an analytic solution to compute the nuclide concentration in the gap or void, and the mass flux rate into the porous rock. 8 refs., 4 figs

  15. Dielectronic recombination rate coefficients to the excited states of CIII from CIV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronova, U.; Kato, Takako; Ohira, Mituhiko

    1996-07-01

    Energy levels, radiative transition probabilities and autoionization rates for CIII including 1s{sup 2}2pnl` (n=2/6, l`{<=}(n-1)) and 1s{sup 2}3lnl` (n=3/6, l`{<=}(n-1)) states were calculated by using multi-configurational Hartree-Fock (Cowan code) method. Autoionizing levels above the 1s{sup 2}2s and 1s{sup 2}2p thresholds were considered and their contributions were computed. Branching ratios on the autoionization rate to the first threshold and intensity factor were calculated for satellite lines of CIII ion. The dielectronic recombination rate coefficients to the excited states for n=2-6 were calculated. The values for the excited states higher than n=6 were extrapolated and the total dielectronic recombination rate coefficients were also derived. The rate coefficients to the excited states were fitted to an analytical formula and the fitting parameters are given. (author)

  16. Communication: Rate coefficients from quasiclassical trajectory calculations from the reverse reaction: The Mu + H2 reaction re-visited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homayoon, Zahra; Jambrina, Pablo G.; Aoiz, F. Javier; Bowman, Joel M.

    2012-07-01

    In a previous paper [P. G. Jambrina et al., J. Chem. Phys. 135, 034310 (2011), 10.1063/1.3611400] various calculations of the rate coefficient for the Mu + H2 → MuH + H reaction were presented and compared to experiment. The widely used standard quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) method was shown to overestimate the rate coefficients by several orders of magnitude over the temperature range 200-1000 K. This was attributed to a major failure of that method to describe the correct threshold for the reaction owing to the large difference in zero-point energies (ZPE) of the reactant H2 and product MuH (˜0.32 eV). In this Communication we show that by performing standard QCT calculations for the reverse reaction and then applying detailed balance, the resulting rate coefficient is in very good agreement with the other computational results that respect the ZPE, (as well as with the experiment) but which are more demanding computationally.

  17. Temperature modulation of the visible and near infrared absorption and scattering coefficients of human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Omar S; Yeh, Shu-Jen; Lowery, Michael G; Wu, Xiaomao; Hanna, Charles F; Kantor, Stanislaw; Jeng, Tzyy-Wen; Kanger, Johannes S; Bolt, Rene A; de Mul, Frits F

    2003-04-01

    We determine temperature effect on the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients (mu(a) and mu(s)(')) of human forearm skin. Optical and thermal simulation data suggest that mu( a) and mu(s)(') are determined within a temperature-controlled depth of approximately 2 mm. Cutaneous mu(s)(') change linearly with temperature. Change in mu(a) was complex and irreversible above body normal temperatures. Light penetration depth (delta) in skin increased on cooling, with considerable person-to-person variations. We attribute the effect of temperature on mu(s)(') to change in refractive index mismatch, and its effect on mu(a) to perfusion changes. The reversible temperature effect on mu (s)(' ) was maintained during more than 90 min. contact between skin and the measuring probe, where temperature was modulated between 38 and 22 degrees C for multiple cycles While temperature modulated mu(s)(' ) instantaneously and reversibly, mu(a) exhibited slower response time and consistent drift. There was a statistically significant upward drift in mu(a) and a mostly downward drift in mu( s)(') over the contact period. The drift in temperature-induced fractional change in mu(s)(') was less statistically significant than the drift in mu(s)('). Deltamu( s)(') values determined under temperature modulation conditions may have less nonspecific drift than mu(s)(') which may have significance for noninvasive determination of analytes in human tissue.

  18. Assessment of the crossflow loss coefficient in Very High Temperature Reactor core - 15338

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.N.; Tak, N.I.; Kim, M.H.; Noh, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is a helium gas cooled and graphite moderated reactor. It was chosen as one of the Gen-4 reactors owing to its inherent safety. Various researches for prismatic gas-cooled reactors have been conducted for efficient and safe use. The prismatic VHTR consists of vertically stacked fuel blocks. Between the vertical fuel blocks, there is cross gap because of manufacturing tolerance or graphite change during the operation. This cross gap changes the coolant flow path, called a crossflow, which may affect the fuel temperature. Various tests and numerical studies have been conducted to predict the crossflow and loss coefficient. In the present study, the CFD calculation is conducted to draw the loss coefficient, and compared with Groehn, Kaburaki and General Atomics (GA) correlations. The results of the Groehn and Kaburaki correlations tend to decrease as the gap size increases, whereas the data of GA show the opposite. The loss coefficient given by the CFD calculation tends to maintain the regular value without regard to the gap size for the standard fuel block, like the Groehn correlation. However, the loss coefficient of the control fuel block increases as the gap size widens, like the GA results

  19. Optimization of temperature coefficient and breeding ratio for a graphite-moderated molten salt reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, C.Y.; Cai, X.Z.; Jiang, D.Z.; Yu, C.G.; Li, X.X.; Ma, Y.W.; Han, J.L. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); CAS Center for Excellence in TMSR Energy System, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Key Laboratory of Nuclear Radiation and Nuclear Energy Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Chen, J.G., E-mail: chenjg@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); CAS Center for Excellence in TMSR Energy System, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Key Laboratory of Nuclear Radiation and Nuclear Energy Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • The temperature feedback coefficient with different moderation ratios for TMSR in thermal neutron region is optimized. • The breeding ratio and doubling time of a thermal TMSR with three different reprocessing schemes are analyzed. • The smaller hexagon size and larger salt fraction with more negative feedback coefficient can better satisfy the safety demands. • A shorter reprocessing time can achieve a better breeding ratio in a thermal TMSR. • The graphite moderator lifespan is compared with other MSRs and discussed. - Abstract: Molten salt reactor (MSR) has fascinating features: inherent safety, no fuel fabrication, online fuel reprocessing, etc. However, the graphite moderated MSR may present positive feedback coefficient which has severe implications for the transient behavior during operation. In this paper, the feedback coefficient and the breeding ratio are optimized based on the fuel-to-graphite ratio variation for a thorium based MSR (TMSR). A certain thermal core with negative feedback coefficient and relative high initial breeding ratio is chosen for the reprocessing scheme analysis. The breeding performances for the TMSR under different online fuel reprocessing efficiencies and frequencies are evaluated and compared with other MSR concepts. The results indicate that the thermal TMSR can get a breeding ratio greater than 1.0 with appropriate reprocessing scheme. The low fissile inventory in thermal TMSR leads to a short doubling time and low transuranic (TRU) inventory. The lifetime of graphite used for the TMSR is also discussed.

  20. Transitions in genetic toggle switches driven by dynamic disorder in rate coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Hang; Thill, Peter; Cao, Jianshu

    2016-01-01

    In biochemical systems, intrinsic noise may drive the system switch from one stable state to another. We investigate how kinetic switching between stable states in a bistable network is influenced by dynamic disorder, i.e., fluctuations in the rate coefficients. Using the geometric minimum action method, we first investigate the optimal transition paths and the corresponding minimum actions based on a genetic toggle switch model in which reaction coefficients draw from a discrete probability distribution. For the continuous probability distribution of the rate coefficient, we then consider two models of dynamic disorder in which reaction coefficients undergo different stochastic processes with the same stationary distribution. In one, the kinetic parameters follow a discrete Markov process and in the other they follow continuous Langevin dynamics. We find that regulation of the parameters modulating the dynamic disorder, as has been demonstrated to occur through allosteric control in bistable networks in the immune system, can be crucial in shaping the statistics of optimal transition paths, transition probabilities, and the stationary probability distribution of the network.

  1. Transitions in genetic toggle switches driven by dynamic disorder in rate coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hang, E-mail: hangchen@mit.edu; Thill, Peter; Cao, Jianshu [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2016-05-07

    In biochemical systems, intrinsic noise may drive the system switch from one stable state to another. We investigate how kinetic switching between stable states in a bistable network is influenced by dynamic disorder, i.e., fluctuations in the rate coefficients. Using the geometric minimum action method, we first investigate the optimal transition paths and the corresponding minimum actions based on a genetic toggle switch model in which reaction coefficients draw from a discrete probability distribution. For the continuous probability distribution of the rate coefficient, we then consider two models of dynamic disorder in which reaction coefficients undergo different stochastic processes with the same stationary distribution. In one, the kinetic parameters follow a discrete Markov process and in the other they follow continuous Langevin dynamics. We find that regulation of the parameters modulating the dynamic disorder, as has been demonstrated to occur through allosteric control in bistable networks in the immune system, can be crucial in shaping the statistics of optimal transition paths, transition probabilities, and the stationary probability distribution of the network.

  2. Calculation of fuel and moderator temperature coefficients in APR1400 nuclear reactor by MVP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham Tuan Nam; Le Thi Thu; Nguyen Huu Tiep; Tran Viet Phu

    2014-01-01

    In this project, these fuel and moderator temperature coefficients were calculated in APR1400 nuclear reactor by MVP code. APR1400 is an advanced water pressurized reactor, that was researched and developed by Korea Experts, its electric power is 1400 MW. The neutronics calculations of full core is very important to analysis and assess a reactor. Results of these calculation is input data for thermal-hydraulics calculations, such as fuel and moderator temperature coefficients. These factors describe the self-safety characteristics of nuclear reactor. After obtaining these reactivity parameters, they were used to re-run the thermal hydraulics calculations in LOCA and RIA accidents. These thermal-hydraulics results were used to analysis effects of reactor physics parameters to thermal hydraulics situation in nuclear reactors. (author)

  3. RADIAL FORCE IMPACT ON THE FRICTION COEFFICIENT AND TEMPERATURE OF A SELF-LUBRICATING PLAIN BEARING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Bojić

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Self-lubricating bearings are available in spherical, plain, flanged journal, and rod end bearing configurations. They were originally developed to eliminate the need for re-lubrication, to provide lower torque and to solve application problems where the conventional metal-to-metal bearings would not perform satisfactorily, for instance, in the presence of high frequency vibrations. Among the dominant tribological parameters of the self-lubricating bearing, two could be singled out: the coefficient of friction and temperature. To determine these parameters, an experimental method was applied in this paper. By using this method, the coefficient of friction and temperature were identified and their correlation was established. The aim of this research was to determine the effect of radial force on tribological parameters in order to predict the behavior of sliding bearings with graphite in real operating conditions.

  4. Thermal Rate Coefficients and Kinetic Isotope Effects for the Reaction OH + CH4 → H2O + CH3 on an ab Initio-Based Potential Energy Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Guo, Hua

    2018-03-15

    Thermal rate coefficients for the title reaction and its various isotopologues are computed using a tunneling-corrected transition-state theory on a global potential energy surface recently developed by fitting a large number of high-level ab initio points. The calculated rate coefficients are found to agree well with the measured ones in a wide temperature range, validating the accuracy of the potential energy surface. Strong non-Arrhenius effects are found at low temperatures. In addition, the calculations reproduced the primary and secondary kinetic isotope effects. These results confirm the strong influence of tunneling to this heavy-light-heavy hydrogen abstraction reaction.

  5. Noise analysis method for monitoring the moderator temperature coefficient of pressurized water reactors: Neural network calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.R. Jr.; Adams, J.T.

    1994-01-01

    A neural network was trained with data for the frequency response function between in-core neutron noise and core-exit thermocouple noise in a pressurized water reactor, with the moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) as target. The trained network was subsequently used to predict the MTC at other points in the same fuel cycle. Results support use of the method for operating pressurized water reactors provided noise data can be accumulated for several fuel cycles to provide a training base

  6. Temperature and void reactivity coefficient calculations for the high flux isotope reactor safety analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engle, W.W. Jr.; Williams, L.R.

    1994-07-01

    This report provides documentation of a series of calculations performed in 1991 in order to provide input for the High Flux Isotope Reactor Safety Analysis Report. In particular, temperature and void reactivity coefficients were calculated for beginning-of-life, end-of-life, and xenon equilibrium (29 h) conditions. Much of the data used to prepare the computer models for these calculations was derived from the original HFIR nuclear design study

  7. Evaluation of heat transfer coefficient of tungsten filaments at low pressures and high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chondrakis, N.G.; Topalis, F.V.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents an experimental method for the evaluation of the heat transfer coefficient of tungsten filaments at low pressures and high temperatures. For this purpose an electrode of a T5 fluorescent lamp was tested under low pressures with simultaneous heating in order to simulate the starting conditions in the lamp. It was placed in a sealed vessel in which the pressure was varied from 1 kM (kilo micron) to 760 kM. The voltage applied to the electrode was in the order of the filament's voltage of the lamp at the normal operation with the ballast during the preheating process. The operating frequency ranged from DC to 50 kHz. The experiment targeted on estimating the temperature of the electrode at the end of the first and the ninth second after initiating the heating process. Next, the heat transfer coefficient was calculated at the specific experimental conditions. A mathematical model based on the results was developed that estimates the heat transfer coefficient. The experiments under different pressures confirm that the filament's temperature strongly depends on the pressure.

  8. Method for producing ceramic composition having low friction coefficient at high operating temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankford, Jr., James

    1988-01-01

    A method for producing a stable ceramic composition having a surface with a low friction coefficient and high wear resistance at high operating temperatures. A first deposition of a thin film of a metal ion is made upon the surface of the ceramic composition and then a first ion implantation of at least a portion of the metal ion is made into the near surface region of the composition. The implantation mixes the metal ion and the ceramic composition to form a near surface composite. The near surface composite is then oxidized sufficiently at high oxidizing temperatures to form an oxide gradient layer in the surface of the ceramic composition.

  9. The temperature coefficient of the resonance integral for uranium metal and oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomberg, P; Hellstrand, E; Homer, S

    1960-06-15

    The temperature coefficient of the resonance integral in uranium metal and oxide has been measured over a wide temperature range for rods with three different diameters. The results for metal agree with most earlier results from activation measurements but differ as much as a factor of two from results obtained with reactivity methods. For oxide only one measurement has been reported recently. Our value is considerably lower than the result of that measurement. The experiments will continue in order to find the reason for the large discrepancy mentioned above.

  10. The temperature coefficient of the resonance integral for uranium metal and oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomberg, P.; Hellstrand, E.; Homer, S.

    1960-06-01

    The temperature coefficient of the resonance integral in uranium metal and oxide has been measured over a wide temperature range for rods with three different diameters. The results for metal agree with most earlier results from activation measurements but differ as much as a factor of two from results obtained with reactivity methods. For oxide only one measurement has been reported recently. Our value is considerably lower than the result of that measurement. The experiments will continue in order to find the reason for the large discrepancy mentioned above

  11. The effect of core configuration on temperature coefficient of reactivity in IRR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettan, M.; Silverman, I.; Shapira, M.; Nagler, A. [Soreq Nuclear Research Center, Yavne (Israel)

    1997-08-01

    Experiments designed to measure the effect of coolant moderator temperature on core reactivity in an HEU swimming pool type reactor were performed. The moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity ({alpha}{sub {omega}}) was obtained and found to be different in two core loadings. The measured {alpha}{sub {omega}} of one core loading was {minus}13 pcm/{degrees}C at the temperature range of 23-30{degrees}C. This value of {alpha}{sub {omega}} is comparable to the data published by the IAEA. The {alpha}{sub {omega}} measured in the second core loading was found to be {minus}8 pcm/{degrees}C at the same temperature range. Another phenomenon considered in this study is core behavior during reactivity insertion transient. The results were compared to a core simulation using the Dynamic Simulator for Nuclear Power Plants. It was found that in the second core loading factors other than the moderator temperature influence the core reactivity more than expected. These effects proved to be extremely dependent on core configuration and may in certain core loadings render the reactor`s reactivity coefficient undesirable.

  12. Inverse method for determining radon diffusion coefficient and free radon production rate of fragmented uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Yong-jun; Wang, Li-heng; Ding, De-xin; Zhao, Ya-li; Fan, Nan-bin

    2014-01-01

    The radon diffusion coefficient and the free radon production rate are important parameters for describing radon migration in the fragmented uranium ore. In order to determine the two parameters, the pure diffusion migration equation for radon was firstly established and its analytic solution with the two parameters to be determined was derived. Then, a self manufactured experimental column was used to simulate the pure diffusion of the radon, the improved scintillation cell method was used to measure the pore radon concentrations at different depths of the column loaded with the fragmented uranium ore, and the nonlinear least square algorithm was used to inversely determine the radon diffusion coefficient and the free radon production rate. Finally, the solution with the two inversely determined parameters was used to predict the pore radon concentrations at some depths of the column, and the predicted results were compared with the measured results. The results show that the predicted results are in good agreement with the measured results and the numerical inverse method is applicable to the determination of the radon diffusion coefficient and the free radon production rate for the fragmented uranium ore. - Highlights: • Inverse method for determining two transport parameters of radon is proposed. • A self-made experimental apparatus is used to simulate radon diffusion process. • Sampling volume and position for measuring radon concentration are optimized. • The inverse results of an experimental sample are verified

  13. Re-evaluation of SiC permeation coefficients at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Yasushi, E-mail: yama3707@kansai-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Engineering Science, Kansai Univ., Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Murakami, Yuichiro; Yamaguchi, Hirosato; Yamamoto, Takehiro; Yonetsu, Daigo [Faculty of Engineering Science, Kansai Univ., Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Noborio, Kazuyuki [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, Univ. of Toyama, Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Konishi, Satoshi [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto Univ., Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The deuterium permeation coefficients of CVD-SiC at 600–950 °C were evaluated. • The wraparound flow was reduced to less than 1/100th of the permeation flow. • CVD-SiC materials are very effective as hydrogen isotope permeation barriers. - Abstract: Since 2007, our group has studied the deuterium permeation and diffusion coefficients for SiC materials at temperatures above 600 °C as a means of evaluating the tritium inventory and permeation in fusion blankets. During such measurements, control and evaluation of the wraparound flow through the sample holder are important, and so the heated sample holder is enclosed by a glass tube and kept under vacuum during experimental trials. However, detailed studies regarding the required degree of vacuum based on model calculations have shown that the wraparound flow is much larger than expected, and so can affect measurements at high temperatures. We therefore modified the measurement apparatus based on calculations involving reduced pressure in the glass tube, and are now confident that the measurement error is only several percent, even at 950 °C. In this paper, recent experimental results obtained with a chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiC sample over the temperature range of 600–950 °C are presented, showing that the permeation coefficient for CVD-SiC is more than three orders of magnitude smaller than that for stainless steel (SS316) at 600 °C, and that at 950 °C, the coefficient for CVD-SiC is almost equal to that for SUS316 at 550 °C.

  14. Experimental and Numerical Study on Effects of Airflow and Aqueous Ammonium Temperature on Ammonia Mass Transfer Coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rong, Li; Nielsen, Peter V.; Zhang, Guoqiang

    2010-01-01

    greatly along the airflow direction on the emission surface. The average mass transfer coefficient increases with higher velocity and turbulence intensity. However, the mass transfer coefficient estimated by CFD simulation is consistently larger than the calculated one by the method using dissociation...... constant and Henry's constant models. In addition, the results show that the liquid-air temperature difference has little impact on the simulated mass transfer coefficient by CFD modeling, whereas the mass transfer coefficient increases with higher liquid temperature using the other method under...... the conditions that the liquid temperature is lower than the air temperature. Although there are differences of mass transfer coefficients between these two methods, the mass transfer coefficients determined by these two methods are significantly related....

  15. Interpretation of biological-rate coefficients derived from radionuclide content, radionuclide concentration and specific activity experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanderploeg, H.A.; Booth, R.S.

    1976-01-01

    Rigorous expressions are derived for the biological-rate coefficients (BRCs) determined from time-dependent measurements of three different dependent variables of radionuclide tracer experiments. These variables, which apply to a single organism, are radionuclide content, radionuclide concentration and specific activity. The BRCs derived from these variables have different mathematical expressions and, for high growth rates, their numerical values can be quite different. The precise mathematical expressions for the BRCs are presented here to aid modelers in selecting the correct parameters for their models and to aid experiments in interpreting their results. The usefulness of these three variables in quantifying elemental uptakes and losses by organisms is discussed. (U.K.)

  16. Derivation of the chemical-equilibrium rate coefficient using scattering theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickens, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    Scattering theory is applied to derive the equilibrium rate coefficient for a general homogeneous chemical reaction involving ideal gases. The reaction rate is expressed in terms of the product of a number of normalized momentum distribution functions, the product of the number of molecules with a given internal energy state, and the spin-averaged T-matrix elements. An expression for momentum distribution at equilibrium for an arbitrary molecule is presented, and the number of molecules with a given internal-energy state is represented by an expression which includes the partition function.

  17. Influence of variable heat transfer coefficient of fireworks and crackers on thermal explosion critical ambient temperature and time to ignition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Zerong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the effect of variable heat transfer coefficient of fireworks and crackers on thermal explosion critical ambient temperature and time to ignition, considering the heat transfer coefficient as the power function of temperature, mathematical thermal explosion steady state and unsteady-state model of finite cylindrical fireworks and crackers with complex shell structures are established based on two-dimensional steady state thermal explosion theory. The influence of variable heat transfer coefficient on thermal explosion critical ambient temperature and time to ignition are analyzed. When heat transfer coefficient is changing with temperature and in the condition of natural convection heat transfer, critical ambient temperature lessen, thermal explosion time to ignition shorten. If ambient temperature is close to critical ambient temperature, the influence of variable heat transfer coefficient on time to ignition become large. For firework with inner barrel in example analysis, the critical ambient temperature of propellant is 463.88 K and the time to ignition is 4054.9s at 466 K, 0.26 K and 450.8s less than without considering the change of heat transfer coefficient respectively. The calculation results show that the influence of variable heat transfer coefficient on thermal explosion time to ignition is greater in this example. Therefore, the effect of variable heat transfer coefficient should be considered into thermal safety evaluation of fireworks to reduce potential safety hazard.

  18. Two-temperature transport coefficients of SF6–N2 plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Fei; Chen, Zhexin; Wu, Yi; Rong, Mingzhe; Wang, Chunlin; Guo, Anxiang; Liu, Zirui

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF 6 ) is widely adopted in electric power industry, especially in high-voltage circuit breakers and gas-insulated switchgear. However, the use of SF 6 is limited by its high liquidation temperature and high global warming potential. Recently, research shows SF 6 –N 2 mixture, which shows environmental friendliness and good electrical properties, may be a feasible substitute for pure SF 6 . This paper is devoted to the calculation of and transport coefficients of SF 6 –N 2 mixture under both LTE (local thermodynamic equilibrium) and non-LTE condition. The two–temperature mass action law was used to determine the composition. The transport coefficients were calculated by classical Chapman–Enskog method simplified by Devoto. The thermophysical properties are presented for electron temperatures of 300–40 000 K, ratios of electron to heavy species temperature of 1–10 and N 2 mole fraction of 0%–100% at atmospheric pressure. The ionization processes under both LTE and non-LTE have been discussed. The results show that deviations from local thermodynamic equilibrium significantly affect the properties of SF 6 –N 2 plasma, especially before the plasma is fully ionized. The different influence of N 2 on properties for SF 6 –N 2 plasma in and out of LTE has been found. The results will serve as reliable reference data for computational simulation of the behavior of SF 6 –N 2 plasmas

  19. A methodology for the parametric modelling of the flow coefficients and flow rate in hydraulic valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdés, José R.; Rodríguez, José M.; Saumell, Javier; Pütz, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We develop a methodology for the parametric modelling of flow in hydraulic valves. • We characterize the flow coefficients with a generic function with two parameters. • The parameters are derived from CFD simulations of the generic geometry. • We apply the methodology to two cases from the automotive brake industry. • We validate by comparing with CFD results varying the original dimensions. - Abstract: The main objective of this work is to develop a methodology for the parametric modelling of the flow rate in hydraulic valve systems. This methodology is based on the derivation, from CFD simulations, of the flow coefficient of the critical restrictions as a function of the Reynolds number, using a generalized square root function with two parameters. The methodology is then demonstrated by applying it to two completely different hydraulic systems: a brake master cylinder and an ABS valve. This type of parametric valve models facilitates their implementation in dynamic simulation models of complex hydraulic systems

  20. On determination of enthalpies of complex formation reactions by means of temperature coefficient of complexing degree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povar, I.G.

    1995-01-01

    Equations describing the relation between temperature coefficient of ∂lnα/∂T complexing degree and the sum of changes in the enthalpy of complex formation of the composition M m L n δH mn multiplied by the weight coefficients k mm , are presented. A method to determine changes in the enthalpy of certain ΔH mm reactions from ∂lnα/∂T derivatives has been suggested. The best approximating equation from lnα/(T) dependence has been found. Errors of thus determined δH mm values are estimated and the results of calculation experiment for the system In 3+ -F - are provided. 10 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  1. The negative temperature coefficient resistivities of Ag2S-Ag core–shell structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Mingming; Liu, Dongzhi; Li, Wei; Zhou, Xueqin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the conductivity of silver nanoparticle films protected by 3-mercaptopropionic acid (Ag/MPA) has been investigated. When the nanoparticles were annealed in air at 200 °C, they converted to stable Ag 2 S-Ag core–shell structures. The mechanism for the formation of the Ag 2 S-Ag core–shell structures along with the compositional changes and the microstructural evolution of the Ag/MPA nanoparticles during the annealing process are discussed. It is proposed that the Ag 2 S-Ag core–shell structure was formed through a solid-state reduction reaction, in which the Ag + ions coming from Ag 2 S were reduced by sulfonate species and sulfur ions. The final Ag 2 S-Ag films display an exponentially decreased resistivity with increasing temperature from 25 to 170 °C. The negative temperature coefficient resistivity of Ag 2 S-Ag films can be adjusted by changing the S/Ag molar ratio used for the synthesis of the Ag/MPA nanoparticles, paving the way for the preparation of negative temperature-coefficient thermistors via printing technology for use in the electronics.

  2. Nitroxide-mediated living radical polymerization: determination of the rate coefficient for alkoxyamine C-O bond homolysis by quantitative ESR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bon, S.A.F.; Chambard, G.; German, A.L.

    1999-01-01

    The rate coefficient for alkoxyamine C-O bond homolysis has been determined over a range of temperatures for both 2-tert-butoxy-1-phenyl-1-(1-oxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl)ethane (1) and a polystyrene-TEMPO (approximately 75 units) adduct using quantitative ESR. In a thermostated solution of

  3. Determination of the rate coefficient for the N2/+/ + O reaction in the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torr, D. G.; Torr, M. R.; Orsini, N.; Hanson, W. B.; Hoffman, J. H.; Walker, J. C. G.

    1977-01-01

    Using approximately 400 simultaneous measurements of ion and neutral densities and temperatures, and the spectrum of the solar flux measured by the Atmosphere Explorer C satellite, we have determined the rate constant k1 for the reaction between N2(+) and O in the ionosphere for ion temperatures between 600 and 700 K. We find that k1 = 1.1 x 10 to the minus 10th power cu cm per sec, with a standard deviation of + or - 15%. If we use the temperature dependence for this reaction determined in the laboratory then at 300 K we find excellent agreement with the recommended laboratory value.

  4. Dose Rate and Mass Attenuation Coefficients of Gamma Ray for Concretes

    CERN Document Server

    Abdel-Latif, A A; Kansouh, W A; El-Sayed, F H

    2003-01-01

    This work is concerned with the study of the leakage gamma ray dose and mass attenuation coefficients for ordinary, basalt and dolomite concretes made from local ores. Concretes under investigation were constructed from gravel, basalt and dolomite ores, and then reconstructed with the addition of 3% steel fibers by weight. Measurements were carried out using a collimated beam from sup 6 sup 0 Co gamma ray source and sodium iodide (3x3) crystal with the genie 2000 gamma spectrometer. The obtained fluxes were transformed to gamma ray doses and displayed in the form of gamma ray dose rates distribution. The displayed curves were used to estimate the linear attenuation coefficients (mu), the relaxation lengths (lambda), half value layer (t sub 1 /2) and tenth value layer (t sub 1 /10). Also, The total mass attenuation coefficients of gamma ray have been calculated to the concerned concretes using XCOM (version 3.1) program and database elements cross sections from Z=1 to 100 at energies from 10 keV to 100 MeV. In...

  5. A method for estimating the diffuse attenuation coefficient (KdPAR)from paired temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Jordan S.; Rose, Kevin C.; Winslow, Luke A.; Read, Emily K.

    2015-01-01

    A new method for estimating the diffuse attenuation coefficient for photosynthetically active radiation (KdPAR) from paired temperature sensors was derived. We show that during cases where the attenuation of penetrating shortwave solar radiation is the dominant source of temperature changes, time series measurements of water temperatures at multiple depths (z1 and z2) are related to one another by a linear scaling factor (a). KdPAR can then be estimated by the simple equation KdPAR ln(a)/(z2/z1). A suggested workflow is presented that outlines procedures for calculating KdPAR according to this paired temperature sensor (PTS) method. This method is best suited for conditions when radiative temperature gains are large relative to physical noise. These conditions occur frequently on water bodies with low wind and/or high KdPARs but can be used for other types of lakes during time periods of low wind and/or where spatially redundant measurements of temperatures are available. The optimal vertical placement of temperature sensors according to a priori knowledge of KdPAR is also described. This information can be used to inform the design of future sensor deployments using the PTS method or for campaigns where characterizing sub-daily changes in temperatures is important. The PTS method provides a novel method to characterize light attenuation in aquatic ecosystems without expensive radiometric equipment or the user subjectivity inherent in Secchi depth measurements. This method also can enable the estimation of KdPAR at higher frequencies than many manual monitoring programs allow.

  6. Determination and importance of temperature dependence of retention coefficient (RPHPLC) in QSAR model of nitrazepams' partition coefficient in bile acid micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posa, Mihalj; Pilipović, Ana; Lalić, Mladena; Popović, Jovan

    2011-02-15

    Linear dependence between temperature (t) and retention coefficient (k, reversed phase HPLC) of bile acids is obtained. Parameters (a, intercept and b, slope) of the linear function k=f(t) highly correlate with bile acids' structures. Investigated bile acids form linear congeneric groups on a principal component (calculated from k=f(t)) score plot that are in accordance with conformations of the hydroxyl and oxo groups in a bile acid steroid skeleton. Partition coefficient (K(p)) of nitrazepam in bile acids' micelles is investigated. Nitrazepam molecules incorporated in micelles show modified bioavailability (depo effect, higher permeability, etc.). Using multiple linear regression method QSAR models of nitrazepams' partition coefficient, K(p) are derived on the temperatures of 25°C and 37°C. For deriving linear regression models on both temperatures experimentally obtained lipophilicity parameters are included (PC1 from data k=f(t)) and in silico descriptors of the shape of a molecule while on the higher temperature molecular polarisation is introduced. This indicates the fact that the incorporation mechanism of nitrazepam in BA micelles changes on the higher temperatures. QSAR models are derived using partial least squares method as well. Experimental parameters k=f(t) are shown to be significant predictive variables. Both QSAR models are validated using cross validation and internal validation method. PLS models have slightly higher predictive capability than MLR models. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Rate coefficients for low-energy electron dissociative attachment to molecular hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horacek, J.; Houfek, K.; Cizek, M.; Murakami, I.; Kato, T.

    2003-02-01

    Calculation of rate constants for dissociative electron attachment to molecular hydrogen is reported. The calculation is based on an improved nonlocal resonance model of Cizek, Horacek and Domcke which takes fully into account the nonlocality of the resonance dynamics and uses potentials with correct asymptotic forms. The rate constants are calculated for all quantum numbers v and J of the target molecules and for electron temperature in the range 0-30000 K. (author)

  8. Equivalent network for resistance and temperature coefficient of resistance versus temperature and composition of thick resistive films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusy, A.

    1987-01-01

    Two types of elementary resistances in thick resistive films have been considered: (i) constriction resistance R/sub C/ determined by the bulk properties of conducting material and by the geometry of constriction, and (ii) barrier resistance R/sub B/ determined by the parameters of a thermally activated type of tunneling process and by the geometry of the metal-insulator-metal unit. On this basis a resistance network composed of a large number of the two types of resistances has been defined. The network has been considered as being equivalent to thick resistive film (TRF) from the point of view of the resistance and temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR). The parameters of this network have been evaluated by the computer-aided approximation of the experimental data found for RuO 2 -based TRFs. On the basis of the equations derived for the network as well as the results of the approximation process, it can be concluded that the small values of the network TCR result from the superposition of the TCR of the conducting component β/sub C/ and of the temperature coefficient of barrier resistance α/sub B/. In this superposition β/sub C/ is attenuated (by 1--2 orders of magnitude), while α/sub B/ is attenuated by only few percentages. The network has been found to be strongly barrier dominated

  9. Two-temperature transport coefficients of SF{sub 6}–N{sub 2} plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Fei; Chen, Zhexin; Wu, Yi, E-mail: wuyic51@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Rong, Mingzhe; Wang, Chunlin [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, School of Electrical Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Guo, Anxiang; Liu, Zirui [Electric Power Research Institute of State Grid Shaanxi Electric Power Company, Xian (China)

    2015-10-15

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is widely adopted in electric power industry, especially in high-voltage circuit breakers and gas-insulated switchgear. However, the use of SF{sub 6} is limited by its high liquidation temperature and high global warming potential. Recently, research shows SF{sub 6}–N{sub 2} mixture, which shows environmental friendliness and good electrical properties, may be a feasible substitute for pure SF{sub 6}. This paper is devoted to the calculation of and transport coefficients of SF{sub 6}–N{sub 2} mixture under both LTE (local thermodynamic equilibrium) and non-LTE condition. The two–temperature mass action law was used to determine the composition. The transport coefficients were calculated by classical Chapman–Enskog method simplified by Devoto. The thermophysical properties are presented for electron temperatures of 300–40 000 K, ratios of electron to heavy species temperature of 1–10 and N{sub 2} mole fraction of 0%–100% at atmospheric pressure. The ionization processes under both LTE and non-LTE have been discussed. The results show that deviations from local thermodynamic equilibrium significantly affect the properties of SF{sub 6}–N{sub 2} plasma, especially before the plasma is fully ionized. The different influence of N{sub 2} on properties for SF{sub 6}–N{sub 2} plasma in and out of LTE has been found. The results will serve as reliable reference data for computational simulation of the behavior of SF{sub 6}–N{sub 2} plasmas.

  10. Replacement of unsteady heat transfer coefficient by equivalent steady-state one when calculating temperature oscillations in a thermal layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supel'nyak, M. I.

    2017-11-01

    Features of calculation of temperature oscillations which are damped in a surface layer of a solid and which are having a small range in comparison with range of temperature of the fluid medium surrounding the solid at heat transfer coefficient changing in time under the periodic law are considered. For the specified case the equations for approximate definition of constant and oscillating components of temperature field of a solid are received. The possibility of use of appropriately chosen steady-state coefficient when calculating the temperature oscillations instead of unsteady heat-transfer coefficient is investigated. Dependence for definition of such equivalent constant heat-transfer coefficient is determined. With its help the research of temperature oscillations of solids with canonical form for some specific conditions of heat transfer is undertaken. Comparison of the obtained data with results of exact solutions of a problem of heat conductivity by which the limits to applicability of the offered approach are defined is carried out.

  11. Application of noise analysis technique for monitoring the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shieh, D.J.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Sweeney, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    A new technique, based on the noise analysis of neutron detector and core-exit coolant temperature signals, is developed for monitoring the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). A detailed multinodal model is developed and evaluated for the reactor core subsystem of the loss-of-fluid test (LOFT) reactor. This model is used to study the effect of changing the sign of the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity on the low-frequency phase angle relationship between the neutron detector and the core-exit temperature noise signals. Results show that the phase angle near zero frequency approaches - 180 deg for negative coefficients and 0 deg for positive coefficients when the perturbation source for the noise signals is core coolant flow, inlet coolant temperature, or random heat transfer

  12. Design and fabrication of sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets with a low temperature coefficient of intrinsic coercivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui X.G.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To decrease the temperature coefficients of sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets, the influencing factors on temperature coefficients, especially the reversible temperature coefficient β of intrinsic coercivity Hcj, were analyzed. The results showed that the absolute value of β decreased with increasing Hcj and also the ratio of microstructure parameter c to Neff, indicating that the increase of magnetocrystalline anisotropy field HA and c/Neff can effectively decrease the absolute value of β. On the basis of this analysis, a sintered Nd-Fe-B magnet with a low temperature coefficient of Hcj was fabricated through composition design, and the value of β was only -0.385%/ºC in the temperature interval of 20-150ºC.

  13. Analysis of Moderator Temperature Reactivity Coefficient of the PWR Core Using WIMS-ANL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tukiran; Rokhmadi

    2007-01-01

    The Moderator Temperature Reactivity Coefficient (MTRC) is an important parameter in design, control and safety, particularly in PWR reactor. It is then very important to validate any new processed library for an accurate prediction of this parameter. The objective of this work is to validate the newly WIMS library based on ENDF/B-VI nuclear data files, especially for the prediction of the MTRC parameter. For this purpose, it is used a set of light water moderated lattice experiments as the NORA experiment and R1-100H critical reactors, both of reactors using UO 2 fuel pellet. Analysis is used with WIMSD/4 lattice code with original cross section libraries and WIMS-ANL with ENDF/B-VI cross section libraries. The results showed that the moderator temperatures reactivity coefficients for the NORA reactor using original libraries is - 5.039E-04 %Δk/k/℃ but for ENDF/B-VI libraries is - 2.925E-03 %Δk/k/℃. Compared to the designed value of the reactor core, the difference is in the range of 1.8 - 3.8 % for ENDF/B-IV libraries. It can be concluded that for reactor safety and control analysis, it has to be used ENDF/B- VI libraries because the original libraries is not accurate any more. (author)

  14. Experimental verification of temperature coefficients of resistance for uniformly doped P-type resistors in SOI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszacki, M.; Maj, C.; Bahri, M. Al; Marrot, J.-C.; Boukabache, A.; Pons, P.; Napieralski, A.

    2010-06-01

    Many today's microsystems like strain-gauge-based piezoresistive pressure sensors contain doped resistors. If one wants to predict correctly the temperature impact on the performance of such devices, the accurate data about the temperature coefficients of resistance (TCR) are essential. Although such data may be calculated using one of the existing mobility models, our experiments showed that we can observe the huge mismatch between the calculated and measured values. Thus, in order to investigate the TCR values, a set of the test structures that contained doped P-type resistors was fabricated. As the TCR value also depends on the doping profile shape, we decided to use the very thin, 340 nm thick SOI wafers in order to fabricate the quasi-uniformly doped silicon layers ranging from 2 × 1017 at cm-3 to 1.6 × 1019 at cm-3. The results showed that the experimental data for the first-order TCR are quite far from the calculated ones especially over the doping range of 1018-1019 at cm-3 and quite close to the experimental ones obtained by Bullis about 50 years ago for bulk silicon. Moreover, for the first time, second-order coefficients that were not very consistent with the calculations were obtained.

  15. Experimental verification of temperature coefficients of resistance for uniformly doped P-type resistors in SOI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olszacki, M; Maj, C; Al Bahri, M; Marrot, J-C; Boukabache, A; Pons, P; Napieralski, A

    2010-01-01

    Many today's microsystems like strain-gauge-based piezoresistive pressure sensors contain doped resistors. If one wants to predict correctly the temperature impact on the performance of such devices, the accurate data about the temperature coefficients of resistance (TCR) are essential. Although such data may be calculated using one of the existing mobility models, our experiments showed that we can observe the huge mismatch between the calculated and measured values. Thus, in order to investigate the TCR values, a set of the test structures that contained doped P-type resistors was fabricated. As the TCR value also depends on the doping profile shape, we decided to use the very thin, 340 nm thick SOI wafers in order to fabricate the quasi-uniformly doped silicon layers ranging from 2 × 10 17 at cm −3 to 1.6 × 10 19 at cm −3 . The results showed that the experimental data for the first-order TCR are quite far from the calculated ones especially over the doping range of 10 18 –10 19 at cm −3 and quite close to the experimental ones obtained by Bullis about 50 years ago for bulk silicon. Moreover, for the first time, second-order coefficients that were not very consistent with the calculations were obtained.

  16. Measurements of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity at Hinkley Point 'B': 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, T.A.

    1982-03-01

    Measurements of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity made at Hinkley Point 'B' AGR in 1981 are described. These measurements follow earlier tests reported in e.g. RD/B/N4846 and are part of a series of measurements designed to support theoretical estimates of the change of fuel temperature coefficient as a function of core irradiation. Low and high power measurements were made at a mean core irradiation of 1170GWD. As previously, the measurements at both power levels show agreement with theoretical predictions to within the estimated experimental errors. Recent measurements (mean core irradiation >500GWD) show evidence of a small systematic difference between measured and theoretical values with the experimental values being approximately equal to 0.1mN/ 0 C more positive than the theoretical ones. The measured value of αsub(U) at high power was -0.64+-0.10mN/ 0 C and the low power value, corrected theoretically to normal operating conditions, was also -0.64+-0.10mN/ 0 C. (author)

  17. Analytical method for estimating the thermal expansion coefficient of metals at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamoto, S; Izumi, S; Nakata, T; Sakai, S; Oinuma, S; Nakatani, Y

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an analytical method for estimating the thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of metals at high-temperature ranges. Although the conventional method based on quasiharmonic approximation (QHA) shows good results at low temperatures, anharmonic effects caused by large-amplitude thermal vibrations reduces its accuracy at high temperatures. Molecular dynamics (MD) naturally includes the anharmonic effect. However, since the computational cost of MD is relatively high, in order to make an interatomic potential capable of reproducing TEC, an analytical method is essential. In our method, analytical formulation of the radial distribution function (RDF) at finite temperature realizes the estimation of the TEC. Each peak of the RDF is approximated by the Gaussian distribution. The average and variance of the Gaussian distribution are formulated by decomposing the fluctuation of interatomic distance into independent elastic waves. We incorporated two significant anharmonic effects into the method. One is the increase in the averaged interatomic distance caused by large amplitude vibration. The second is the variation in the frequency of elastic waves. As a result, the TECs of fcc and bcc crystals estimated by our method show good agreement with those of MD. Our method enables us to make an interatomic potential that reproduces the TEC at high temperature. We developed the GEAM potential for nickel. The TEC of the fitted potential showed good agreement with experimental data from room temperature to 1000 K. As compared with the original potential, it was found that the third derivative of the wide-range curve was modified, while the zeroth, first and second derivatives were unchanged. This result supports the conventional theory of solid state physics. We believe our analytical method and developed interatomic potential will contribute to future high-temperature material development. (paper)

  18. Determination of temperature dependence of piezoelectric coefficients matrix of lead zirconate titanate ceramics by quasi-static and resonance method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fei; Xu Zhuo; Wei Xiaoyong; Yao Xi

    2009-01-01

    The piezoelectric coefficients (d 33 , -d 31 , d 15 , g 33 , -g 31 , g 15 ) of soft and hard lead zirconate titanate ceramics were measured by the quasi-static and resonance methods, at temperatures from 20 to 300 0 C. The results showed that the piezoelectric coefficients d 33 , -d 31 and d 15 obtained by these two methods increased with increasing temperature for both hard and soft PZT ceramics, while the piezoelectric coefficients g 33 , -g 31 and g 15 decreased with increasing temperature for both hard and soft PZT ceramics. In this paper, the observed results were also discussed in terms of intrinsic and extrinsic contributions to piezoelectric response.

  19. Estimating Reaction Rate Coefficients Within a Travel-Time Modeling Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, R [Georgia Institute of Technology; Lu, C [Georgia Institute of Technology; Luo, Jian [Georgia Institute of Technology; Wu, Wei-min [Stanford University; Cheng, H. [Stanford University; Criddle, Craig [Stanford University; Kitanidis, Peter K. [Stanford University; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL

    2011-03-01

    A generalized, efficient, and practical approach based on the travel-time modeling framework is developed to estimate in situ reaction rate coefficients for groundwater remediation in heterogeneous aquifers. The required information for this approach can be obtained by conducting tracer tests with injection of a mixture of conservative and reactive tracers and measurements of both breakthrough curves (BTCs). The conservative BTC is used to infer the travel-time distribution from the injection point to the observation point. For advection-dominant reactive transport with well-mixed reactive species and a constant travel-time distribution, the reactive BTC is obtained by integrating the solutions to advective-reactive transport over the entire travel-time distribution, and then is used in optimization to determine the in situ reaction rate coefficients. By directly working on the conservative and reactive BTCs, this approach avoids costly aquifer characterization and improves the estimation for transport in heterogeneous aquifers which may not be sufficiently described by traditional mechanistic transport models with constant transport parameters. Simplified schemes are proposed for reactive transport with zero-, first-, nth-order, and Michaelis-Menten reactions. The proposed approach is validated by a reactive transport case in a two-dimensional synthetic heterogeneous aquifer and a field-scale bioremediation experiment conducted at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The field application indicates that ethanol degradation for U(VI)-bioremediation is better approximated by zero-order reaction kinetics than first-order reaction kinetics.

  20. A self-consistent, multivariate method for the determination of gas-phase rate coefficients, applied to reactions of atmospheric VOCs and the hydroxyl radical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jacob T.; Lidster, Richard T.; Cryer, Danny R.; Ramirez, Noelia; Whiting, Fiona C.; Boustead, Graham A.; Whalley, Lisa K.; Ingham, Trevor; Rickard, Andrew R.; Dunmore, Rachel E.; Heard, Dwayne E.; Lewis, Ally C.; Carpenter, Lucy J.; Hamilton, Jacqui F.; Dillon, Terry J.

    2018-03-01

    Gas-phase rate coefficients are fundamental to understanding atmospheric chemistry, yet experimental data are not available for the oxidation reactions of many of the thousands of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) observed in the troposphere. Here, a new experimental method is reported for the simultaneous study of reactions between multiple different VOCs and OH, the most important daytime atmospheric radical oxidant. This technique is based upon established relative rate concepts but has the advantage of a much higher throughput of target VOCs. By evaluating multiple VOCs in each experiment, and through measurement of the depletion in each VOC after reaction with OH, the OH + VOC reaction rate coefficients can be derived. Results from experiments conducted under controlled laboratory conditions were in good agreement with the available literature for the reaction of 19 VOCs, prepared in synthetic gas mixtures, with OH. This approach was used to determine a rate coefficient for the reaction of OH with 2,3-dimethylpent-1-ene for the first time; k = 5.7 (±0.3) × 10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. In addition, a further seven VOCs had only two, or fewer, individual OH rate coefficient measurements available in the literature. The results from this work were in good agreement with those measurements. A similar dataset, at an elevated temperature of 323 (±10) K, was used to determine new OH rate coefficients for 12 aromatic, 5 alkane, 5 alkene and 3 monoterpene VOC + OH reactions. In OH relative reactivity experiments that used ambient air at the University of York, a large number of different VOCs were observed, of which 23 were positively identified. Due to difficulties with detection limits and fully resolving peaks, only 19 OH rate coefficients were derived from these ambient air samples, including 10 reactions for which data were previously unavailable at the elevated reaction temperature of T = 323 (±10) K.

  1. The rate of the reaction between CN and C2H2 at interstellar temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woon, D. E.; Herbst, E.

    1997-01-01

    The rate coefficient for the important interstellar reaction between CN and C2H2 has been calculated as a function of temperature between 10 and 300 K. The potential surface for this reaction has been determined through ab initio quantum chemical techniques; the potential exhibits no barrier in the entrance channel but does show a small exit channel barrier, which lies below the energy of reactants. Phase-space calculations for the reaction dynamics, which take the exit channel barrier into account, show the same unusual temperature dependence as determined by experiment, in which the rate coefficient at first increases as the temperature is reduced below room temperature and then starts to decrease as the temperature drops below 50-100 K. The agreement between theory and experiment provides strong confirmation that the reaction occurs appreciably at cool interstellar temperatures.

  2. OSMOTIC COEFFICIENTS, SOLUBILITIES, AND DELIQUESCENCE RELATIONS IN MIXED AQUEOUS SALT SOLUTIONS AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M.S. Gruszkiewicz; D.A. Palmer

    2006-01-01

    While thermodynamic properties of pure aqueous electrolytes are relatively well known at ambient temperature, there are far fewer data for binary systems extending to elevated temperatures and high concentrations. There is no general theoretically sound basis for prediction of the temperature dependence of ionic activities, and consequently temperature extrapolations based on ambient temperature data and empirical equations are uncertain and require empirical verification. Thermodynamic properties of mixed brines in a wide range of concentrations would enhance the understanding and precise modeling of the effects of deliquescence of initially dry solids in humid air in geological environments and in modeling the composition of waters during heating, cooling, evaporation or condensation processes. These conditions are of interest in the analysis of waters on metal surfaces at the proposed radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The results obtained in this project will be useful for modeling the long-term evolution of the chemical environment, and this in turn is useful for the analysis of the corrosion of waste packages. In particular, there are few reliable experimental data available on the relationship between relative humidity and composition that reveals the eutonic points of the mixtures and the mixture deliquescence RH. The deliquescence RH for multicomponent mixtures is lower than that of pure component or binary solutions, but is not easy to predict quantitatively since the solutions are highly nonideal. In this work we used the ORNL low-temperature and high-temperature isopiestic facilities, capable of precise measurements of vapor pressure between ambient temperature and 250 C for determination of not only osmotic coefficients, but also solubilities and deliquescence points of aqueous mixed solutions in a range of temperatures. In addition to standard solutions of CaCl 2 , LiCl, and NaCl used as references, precise direct

  3. Absolute and relative-rate measurement of the rate coefficient for reaction of perfluoro ethyl vinyl ether (C2F5OCF[double bond, length as m-dash]CF2) with OH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasulu, G; Bunkan, A J C; Amedro, D; Crowley, J N

    2018-01-31

    The rate coefficient (k 1 ) for the reaction of OH radicals with perfluoro ethyl vinyl ether (PEVE, C 2 F 5 OCF[double bond, length as m-dash]CF 2 ) has been measured as a function of temperature (T = 207-300 K) using the technique of pulsed laser photolysis with detection of OH by laser-induced fluorescence (PLP-LIF) at pressures of 50 or 100 Torr N 2 bath gas. In addition, the rate coefficient was measured at 298 K and in one atmosphere of air by the relative-rate technique with loss of PEVE and reference reactant monitored in situ by IR absorption spectroscopy. The rate coefficient has a negative temperature dependence which can be parameterized as: k 1 (T) = 6.0 × 10 -13  exp[(480 ± 38/T)] cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 and a room temperature value of k 1 (298 K) = (3.0 ± 0.3) × 10 -12 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 . Highly accurate rate coefficients from the PLP-LIF experiments were achieved by optical on-line measurements of PEVE and by performing the measurements at two different apparatuses. The large rate coefficient and the temperature dependence indicate that the reaction proceeds via OH addition to the C[double bond, length as m-dash]C double bond, the high pressure limit already being reached at 50 Torr N 2 . Based on the rate coefficient and average OH levels, the atmospheric lifetime of PEVE was estimated to be a few days.

  4. Effect of variable heat transfer coefficient on tissue temperature next to a large vessel during radiofrequency tumor ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinheiro Cleber

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the current shortcomings of radiofrequency (RF tumor ablation is its limited performance in regions close to large blood vessels, resulting in high recurrence rates at these locations. Computer models have been used to determine tissue temperatures during tumor ablation procedures. To simulate large vessels, either constant wall temperature or constant convective heat transfer coefficient (h have been assumed at the vessel surface to simulate convection. However, the actual distribution of the temperature on the vessel wall is non-uniform and time-varying, and this feature makes the convective coefficient variable. Methods This paper presents a realistic time-varying model in which h is a function of the temperature distribution at the vessel wall. The finite-element method (FEM was employed in order to model RF hepatic ablation. Two geometrical configurations were investigated. The RF electrode was placed at distances of 1 and 5 mm from a large vessel (10 mm diameter. Results When the ablation procedure takes longer than 1–2 min, the attained coagulation zone obtained with both time-varying h and constant h does not differ significantly. However, for short duration ablation (5–10 s and when the electrode is 1 mm away from the vessel, the use of constant h can lead to errors as high as 20% in the estimation of the coagulation zone. Conclusion For tumor ablation procedures typically lasting at least 5 min, this study shows that modeling the heat sink effect of large vessels by applying constant h as a boundary condition will yield precise results while reducing computational complexity. However, for other thermal therapies with shorter treatment using a time-varying h may be necessary.

  5. Mass-transport limitation to in-cloud reaction rates: Implications of new accommodation coefficient measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, S.E.

    1988-10-01

    Although it has been recognized for some time that the rate of reactive uptake of gases in cloudwater can depend on the value of the mass-accommodation coefficient (α) describing interfacial mass transport (MT), definitive evaluation of such rates is only now becoming possible with the availability of measurements of α for gases of atmospheric interest at air-water interfaces. Examination of MT limitation to the rate of in-cloud aqueous-phase oxidation of SO 2 by O 3 and H 2 O 2 shows that despite the low value of α/sub O3/ (5 /times/ 10/sup /minus/4/), interfacial MT of this species is not limiting under essentially all conditions of interest; the high values of α for SO 2 (≥ 0.2) and H 2 O 2 (≥ 0.08) indicate no interfacial MT limitation for these species also. Although gas- and aqueous-phase MT can be limiting under certain extremes of conditions, treating the system as under chemical kinetic control is generally an excellent approximation. Interfacial MT limitation also is found not to hinder the rate of H 2 O 2 formation by aqueous-phase disproportionation of HO 2 . Finally, the rapid uptake of N 2 O 5 by cloud droplets implies that the yield of aqueous HNO 3 from in-cloud gas-phase oxidation of NO 2 by O 3 can be substantial even under daytime conditions. This report consists of copies of viewgraphs prepared for this presentation

  6. Evaluating the coefficient of thermal expansion using time periods of minimal thermal gradient for a temperature driven structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, J.; Abdel-Jaber, H.; Yarnold, M.; Glisic, B.

    2017-04-01

    Structural Health Monitoring aims to characterize the performance of a structure from a combination of recorded sensor data and analytic techniques. Many methods are concerned with quantifying the elastic response of the structure, treating temperature changes as noise in the analysis. While these elastic profiles do demonstrate a portion of structural behavior, thermal loads on a structure can induce comparable strains to elastic loads. Understanding this relationship between the temperature of the structure and the resultant strain and displacement can provide in depth knowledge of the structural condition. A necessary parameter for this form of analysis is the Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE). The CTE of a material relates the amount of expansion or contraction a material undergoes per degree change in temperature, and can be determined from temperature-strain relationship given that the thermal strain can be isolated. Many times with concrete, the actual amount of expansion with temperature in situ varies from the given values for the CTE due to thermally generated elastic strain, which complicates evaluation of the CTE. To accurately characterize the relationship between temperature and strain on a structure, the actual thermal behavior of the structure needs to be analyzed. This rate can vary for different parts of a structure, depending on boundary conditions. In a case of unrestrained structures, the strain in the structure should be linearly related to the temperature change. Thermal gradients in a structure can affect this relationship, as they induce curvature and deplanations in the cross section. This paper proposes a method that addresses these challenges in evaluating the CTE.

  7. Thermodynamics of aqueous electrolytes at various temperatures, pressures, and compositions. [Virial coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitzer, K.S.

    1979-09-01

    It is shown that the properties of fully ionized aqueous electrolyte systems can be represented by relatively simple equations over wide ranges of composition. There are only a few systems for which data are available over the full range to fused salt. A simple equation commonly used for nonelectrolytes fits the measured vapor pressure of water reasonably well and further refinements are clearly possible. Over the somewhat more limited composition range up to saturation of typical salts such as NaCl, the equations representing thermodynamic properties with a Debye-Hueckel term plus second and third virial coefficients are very successful and these coefficients are known for nearly 300 electrolytes at room temperature. These same equations effectively predict the properties of mixed electrolytes. A stringent test is offered by the calculation of all of the solubility relationships of the system Na-K-Mg-Ca-Cl-So{sub 4}-H{sub 2}0 and the calculated results of Harvie and Weare show excellent agreement with

  8. New proposal of moderator temperature coefficient estimation method using gray-box model in NPP, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Michitsugu; Kagami, Yuichi; Kanemoto, Shigeru; Enomoto, Mitsuhiro; Tamaoki, Tetsuo; Kawamura, Shinichiro

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to establish a new void reactivity coefficient (VRC) estimation method based on gray box modeling concept. The gray box model consists of a point kinetics model as the first principle model and a fitting model of moderator temperature kinetics. Applying Kalman filter and maximum likehood estimation algorithms to the gray box model, MTC can be estimated. The verification test is done by Monte Carlo simulation, and, it is shown that the present method gives the best estimation results comparing with the conventional methods from the viewpoints of non-biased and smallest scattering estimation performance. Furthermore, the method is verified via real plant data analysis. The reason of good performance of the present method is explained by proper definition of likelihood function based on explicit expression of observation and system noise in the gray box model. (author)

  9. Spatial variation in deposition rate coefficients of an adhesion-deficient bacterial strain in quartz sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Meiping; Camesano, Terri A; Johnson, William P

    2005-05-15

    The transport of bacterial strain DA001 was examined in packed quartz sand under a variety of environmentally relevant ionic strength and flow conditions. Under all conditions, the retained bacterial concentrations decreased with distance from the column inlet at a rate that was faster than loglinear, indicating that the deposition rate coefficient decreased with increasing transport distance. The hyperexponential retained profile contrasted againstthe nonmonotonic retained profiles that had been previously observed for this same bacterial strain in glass bead porous media, demonstrating that the form of deviation from log-linear behavior is highly sensitive to system conditions. The deposition rate constants in quartz sand were orders of magnitude below those expected from filtration theory, even in the absence of electrostatic energy barriers. The degree of hyperexponential deviation of the retained profiles from loglinear behavior did not decrease with increasing ionic strength in quartz sand. These observations demonstrate thatthe observed low adhesion and deviation from log-linear behavior was not driven by electrostatic repulsion. Measurements of the interaction forces between DA001 cells and the silicon nitride tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) showed that the bacterium possesses surface polymers with an average equilibrium length of 59.8 nm. AFM adhesion force measurements revealed low adhesion affinities between silicon nitride and DA001 polymers with approximately 95% of adhesion forces having magnitudes responsible for the low adhesion to silicon nitride, indicating that steric interactions from extracellular polymers controlled DA001 adhesion deficiency and deviation from log-linear behavior on quartz sand.

  10. The Atmospherically Important Reaction of Hydroxyl Radicals with Methyl Nitrate: A Theoretical Study Involving the Calculation of Reaction Mechanisms, Enthalpies, Activation Energies, and Rate Coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Maggie; Mok, Daniel K W; Lee, Edmond P F; Dyke, John M

    2017-09-07

    A theoretical study, involving the calculation of reaction enthalpies, activation energies, mechanisms, and rate coefficients, was made of the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with methyl nitrate, an important process for methyl nitrate removal in the earth's atmosphere. Four reaction channels were considered: formation of H 2 O + CH 2 ONO 2 , CH 3 OOH + NO 2 , CH 3 OH + NO 3 , and CH 3 O + HNO 3 . For all channels, geometry optimization and frequency calculations were performed at the M06-2X/6-31+G** level, while relative energies were improved at the UCCSD(T*)-F12/CBS level. The major channel is found to be the H abstraction channel, to give the products H 2 O + CH 2 ONO 2 . The reaction enthalpy (ΔH 298 K RX ) of this channel is computed as -17.90 kcal mol -1 . Although the other reaction channels are also exothermic, their reaction barriers are high (>24 kcal mol -1 ), and therefore these reactions do not contribute to the overall rate coefficient in the temperature range considered (200-400 K). Pathways via three transition states were identified for the H abstraction channel. Rate coefficients were calculated for these pathways at various levels of variational transition state theory including tunneling. The results obtained are used to distinguish between two sets of experimental rate coefficients, measured in the temperature range of 200-400 K, one of which is approximately an order of magnitude greater than the other. This comparison, as well as the temperature dependence of the computed rate coefficients, shows that the lower experimental values are favored. The implications of the results to atmospheric chemistry are discussed.

  11. Population decay time and distribution of exciton states analyzed by rate equations based on theoretical phononic and electron-collisional rate coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, Kensuke; Ma, Bei; Ishitani, Yoshihiro

    2017-11-01

    Population distributions and transition fluxes of the A exciton in bulk GaN are theoretically analyzed using rate equations of states of the principal quantum number n up to 5 and the continuum. These rate equations consist of the terms of radiative, electron-collisional, and phononic processes. The dependence of the rate coefficients on temperature is revealed on the basis of the collisional-radiative model of hydrogen plasma for the electron-collisional processes and theoretical formulation using Fermi's "golden rule" for the phononic processes. The respective effects of the variations in electron, exciton, and lattice temperatures are exhibited. This analysis is a base of the discussion on nonthermal equilibrium states of carrier-exciton-phonon dynamics. It is found that the exciton dissociation is enhanced even below 150 K mainly by the increase in the lattice temperature. When the thermal-equilibrium temperature increases, the population fluxes between the states of n >1 and the continuum become more dominant. Below 20 K, the severe deviation from the Saha-Boltzmann distribution occurs owing to the interband excitation flux being higher than the excitation flux from the 1 S state. The population decay time of the 1 S state at 300 K is more than ten times longer than the recombination lifetime of excitons with kinetic energy but without the upper levels (n >1 and the continuum). This phenomenon is caused by a shift of population distribution to the upper levels. This phonon-exciton-radiation model gives insights into the limitations of conventional analyses such as the ABC model, the Arrhenius plot, the two-level model (n =1 and the continuum), and the neglect of the upper levels.

  12. Rate coefficients for dissociative attachment and resonant electron-impact dissociation involving vibrationally excited O{sub 2} molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laporta, V. [Istituto di Metodologie Inorganiche e dei Plasmi, CNR, Bari, Italy and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Celiberto, R. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale, del Territorio, Edile e di Chimica, Politecnico di Bari, Italy and Istituto di Metodologie Inorganiche e dei Plasmi, CNR, Bari (Italy); Tennyson, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-09

    Rate coefficients for dissociative electron attachment and electron-impact dissociation processes, involving vibrationally excited molecular oxygen, are presented. Analytical fits of the calculated numerical data, useful in the applications, are also provided.

  13. Graphene-based mid-infrared room-temperature pyroelectric bolometers with ultrahigh temperature coefficient of resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassi, U; Parret, R; Nanot, S; Bruna, M; Borini, S; De Fazio, D; Zhao, Z; Lidorikis, E; Koppens, F H L; Ferrari, A C; Colli, A

    2017-01-31

    There is a growing number of applications demanding highly sensitive photodetectors in the mid-infrared. Thermal photodetectors, such as bolometers, have emerged as the technology of choice, because they do not need cooling. The performance of a bolometer is linked to its temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR, ∼2-4% K -1 for state-of-the-art materials). Graphene is ideally suited for optoelectronic applications, with a variety of reported photodetectors ranging from visible to THz frequencies. For the mid-infrared, graphene-based detectors with TCRs ∼4-11% K -1 have been demonstrated. Here we present an uncooled, mid-infrared photodetector, where the pyroelectric response of a LiNbO 3 crystal is transduced with high gain (up to 200) into resistivity modulation for graphene. This is achieved by fabricating a floating metallic structure that concentrates the pyroelectric charge on the top-gate capacitor of the graphene channel, leading to TCRs up to 900% K -1 , and the ability to resolve temperature variations down to 15 μK.

  14. Comparative evaluation of fuel temperature coefficient of standard and CANFLEX fuels in CANDU 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woosong; Hartant, Donny; Kim, Yonghee

    2012-01-01

    The fuel temperature reactivity coefficient (FTC) of CANDU 6 has become a concerning issue. The FTC was found to be slightly positive for the operating condition of CANDU 6. Since CANDU 6 has unique fuel arrangement and very soft neutron spectrum, its Doppler reactivity feedback of U 238 is rather weak. The upscattering by oxygen in fuel and Pu 239 buildup with fuel depletion are responsible for the positive FTC value at high temperature. In this study, FTC of both standard CANDU and CANFLEX fuel lattice are re evaluated. A Monte Carlo code Serpent2 was chosen as the analysis tool because of its high calculational speed and it can account for the thermal motion of heavy nuclides in fuel by using the Doppler Broadening Rejection Correction (DBRC) method. It was reported that the fuel Doppler effect is noticeably enhanced by accounting the target thermal motion. Recently, it was found that the FTC of the CANDU 6 standard fuel is noticeably enhanced by the DBRC

  15. Temperature Dependence of the Seebeck Coefficient in Zinc Oxide Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noori, Amirreza; Masoumi, Saeed; Hashemi, Najmeh

    2017-12-01

    Thermoelectric devices are reliable tools for converting waste heat into electricity as they last long, produce no noise or vibration, have no moving elements, and their light weight makes them suitable for the outer space usage. Materials with high thermoelectric figure of merit (zT) have the most important role in the fabrication of efficient thermoelectric devices. Metal oxide semiconductors, specially zinc oxide has recently received attention as a material suitable for sensor, optoelectronic and thermoelectric device applications because of their wide direct bandgap, chemical stability, high-energy radiation endurance, transparency and acceptable zT. Understanding the thermoelectric properties of the undoped ZnO thin films can help design better ZnO-based devices. Here, we report the results of our experimental work on the thermoelectric properties of the undoped polycrystalline ZnO thin films. These films are deposited on alumina substrates by thermal evaporation of zinc in vacuum followed by a controlled oxidation process in air carried out at the 350-500 °C temperature range. The experimental setup including gradient heaters, thermometry system and Seebeck voltage measurement equipment for high resistance samples is described. Seebeck voltage and electrical resistivity of the samples are measured at different conditions. The observed temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient is discussed.

  16. Mapping grain boundary heterogeneity at the nanoscale in a positive temperature coefficient of resistivity ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsgrove, Kristina M.; Kepaptsoglou, Demie M.; Douglas, Alan M.; Ramasse, Quentin M.; Prestat, Eric; Haigh, Sarah J.; Ward, Michael B.; Kumar, Amit; Gregg, J. Marty; Arredondo, Miryam

    2017-06-01

    Despite being of wide commercial use in devices, the orders of magnitude increase in resistance that can be seen in some semiconducting BaTiO3-based ceramics, on heating through the Curie temperature (TC), is far from well understood. Current understanding of the behavior hinges on the role of grain boundary resistance that can be modified by polarization discontinuities which develop in the ferroelectric state. However, direct nanoscale resistance mapping to verify this model has rarely been attempted, and the potential approach to engineer polarization states at the grain boundaries, that could lead to optimized positive temperature coefficient (PTC) behavior, is strongly underdeveloped. Here we present direct visualization and nanoscale mapping in a commercially optimized BaTiO3-PbTiO3-CaTiO3 PTC ceramic using Kelvin probe force microscopy, which shows that, even in the low resistance ferroelectric state, the potential drop at grain boundaries is significantly greater than in grain interiors. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy reveal new evidence of Pb-rich grain boundaries symptomatic of a higher net polarization normal to the grain boundaries compared to the purer grain interiors. These results validate the critical link between optimized PTC performance and higher local polarization at grain boundaries in this specific ceramic system and suggest a novel route towards engineering devices where an interface layer of higher spontaneous polarization could lead to enhanced PTC functionality.

  17. Mapping grain boundary heterogeneity at the nanoscale in a positive temperature coefficient of resistivity ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina M. Holsgrove

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite being of wide commercial use in devices, the orders of magnitude increase in resistance that can be seen in some semiconducting BaTiO3-based ceramics, on heating through the Curie temperature (TC, is far from well understood. Current understanding of the behavior hinges on the role of grain boundary resistance that can be modified by polarization discontinuities which develop in the ferroelectric state. However, direct nanoscale resistance mapping to verify this model has rarely been attempted, and the potential approach to engineer polarization states at the grain boundaries, that could lead to optimized positive temperature coefficient (PTC behavior, is strongly underdeveloped. Here we present direct visualization and nanoscale mapping in a commercially optimized BaTiO3–PbTiO3–CaTiO3 PTC ceramic using Kelvin probe force microscopy, which shows that, even in the low resistance ferroelectric state, the potential drop at grain boundaries is significantly greater than in grain interiors. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy reveal new evidence of Pb-rich grain boundaries symptomatic of a higher net polarization normal to the grain boundaries compared to the purer grain interiors. These results validate the critical link between optimized PTC performance and higher local polarization at grain boundaries in this specific ceramic system and suggest a novel route towards engineering devices where an interface layer of higher spontaneous polarization could lead to enhanced PTC functionality.

  18. Adjustment of activity coefficients as a function of changes in temperature, using the SIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giffaut, E.; Vitorge, P.; Capdevila, H.

    1993-11-01

    The aim of this work is to propose and to check approximations to calculate from only a few experimental measurements, ionic strength, I, and temperature, T, influences on Gibbs energy, G, redox formal potential, E, and standard equilibrium constant, K. Series expansions versus T are first used: S and Cp/2T a are typically the -G first and second order terms. In the same way, -ΔH and T 2 ΔCp/2 are the first and second order terms of R in K expansions versus 1/T. This type of approximation is discussed for the E of the M 4+ /M 3+ , MO 2 2+ /MO 2 + and MO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 4- /MO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 5- couples (M = U or Pu) measured from 5 to 70 deg C, for the standard ΔG of some solid U compounds, calculated from 17 to 117 deg C, and for ΔCp, ΔG and Ig K of the CO 2 (aq)/HCO 3 - equilibrium from 0 to 150 deg C. Excess functions, X ex , are then calculated from activity coefficients, γ: enthalpy, H, or heat capacity, Cp, adjustment as a function of I changes is needed only when the γ adjustment as a function of T changes is needed. The SIT coefficient, ε, variations with T, are small and roughly linear for the above redox equilibria and for chloride electrolytes mean γ: first order expansion seems enough to deduce ε, and then the excess functions G ex , S ex and H ex , in this T range; but second order expansion is more consistent to estimate Cp ex . (authors). 25 refs., 3 tabs., 1 fig

  19. Determination of the Rate Coefficients of the SO2 plus O plus M yields SO3 plus M Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, S. M.; Cooke, J. A.; De Witt, K. J.; Rabinowitz, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    Rate coefficients of the title reaction R(sub 31) (SO2 +O+M yields SO3 +M) and R(sub 56) (SO2 + HO2 yields SO3 +OH), important in the conversion of S(IV) to S(VI),were obtained at T =970-1150 K and rho (sub ave) = 16.2 micro mol/cubic cm behind reflected shock waves by a perturbation method. Shock-heated H2/ O2/Ar mixtures were perturbed by adding small amounts of SO2 (1%, 2%, and 3%) and the OH temporal profiles were then measured using laser absorption spectroscopy. Reaction rate coefficients were elucidated by matching the characteristic reaction times acquired from the individual experimental absorption profiles via simultaneous optimization of k(sub 31) and k(sub 56) values in the reaction modeling (for satisfactory matches to the observed characteristic times, it was necessary to take into account R(sub 56)). In the experimental conditions of this study, R(sub 31) is in the low-pressure limit. The rate coefficient expressions fitted using the combined data of this study and the previous experimental results are k(sub 31,0)/[Ar] = 2.9 10(exp 35) T(exp ?6.0) exp(?4780 K/T ) + 6.1 10(exp 24) T(exp ?3.0) exp(?1980 K/T ) cm(sup 6) mol(exp ?2)/ s at T = 300-2500 K; k(sub 56) = 1.36 10(exp 11) exp(?3420 K/T ) cm(exp 3)/mol/s at T = 970-1150 K. Computer simulations of typical aircraft engine environments, using the reaction mechanism with the above k(sub 31,0) and k(sub 56) expressions, gave the maximum S(IV) to S(VI) conversion yield of ca. 3.5% and 2.5% for the constant density and constant pressure flow condition, respectively. Moreover, maximum conversions occur at rather higher temperatures (?1200 K) than that where the maximum k(sub 31,0) value is located (approximately 800 K). This is because the conversion yield is dependent upon not only the k(sup 31,0) and k(sup 56) values (production flux) but also the availability of H, O, and HO2 in the system (consumption flux).

  20. Technical characterization of dialysis fluid flow and mass transfer rate in dialyzers with various filtration coefficients using dimensionless correlation equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Makoto; Yoshimura, Kengo; Namekawa, Koki; Sakai, Kiyotaka

    2017-06-01

    The objective of the present study is to evaluate the effect of filtration coefficient and internal filtration on dialysis fluid flow and mass transfer coefficient in dialyzers using dimensionless mass transfer correlation equations. Aqueous solution of vitamin B 12 clearances were obtained for REXEED-15L as a low flux dialyzer, and APS-15EA and APS-15UA as high flux dialyzers. All the other design specifications were identical for these dialyzers except for filtration coefficient. The overall mass transfer coefficient was calculated, moreover, the exponents of Reynolds number (Re) and film mass transfer coefficient of the dialysis-side fluid (k D ) for each flow rate were derived from the Wilson plot and dimensionless correlation equation. The exponents of Re were 0.4 for the low flux dialyzer whereas 0.5 for the high flux dialyzers. Dialysis fluid of the low flux dialyzer was close to laminar flow because of its low filtration coefficient. On the other hand, dialysis fluid of the high flux dialyzers was assumed to be orthogonal flow. Higher filtration coefficient was associated with higher k D influenced by mass transfer rate through diffusion and internal filtration. Higher filtration coefficient of dialyzers and internal filtration affect orthogonal flow of dialysis fluid.

  1. Determination of the reaction rate coefficient of sulphide mine tailings deposited under water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awoh, Akué Sylvette; Mbonimpa, Mamert; Bussière, Bruno

    2013-10-15

    The efficiency of a water cover to limit dissolved oxygen (DO) availability to underlying acid-generating mine tailings can be assessed by calculating the DO flux at the tailings-water interface. Fick's equations, which are generally used to calculate this flux, require knowing the effective DO diffusion coefficient (Dw) and the reaction (consumption) rate coefficient (Kr) of the tailings, or the DO concentration profile. Whereas Dw can be accurately estimated, few studies have measured the parameter Kr for submerged sulphide tailings. The objective of this study was to determine Kr for underwater sulphide tailings in a laboratory experiment. Samples of sulphide mine tailings (an approximately 6 cm layer) were placed in a cell under a water cover (approximately 2 cm) maintained at constant DO concentration. Two tailings were studied: TA1 with high sulphide content (83% pyrite) and TA2 with low sulphide content (2.8% pyrite). DO concentration was measured with a microelectrode at various depths above and below the tailings-water interface at 1 mm intervals. Results indicate that steady-state condition was rapidly attained. As expected, a diffusive boundary layer (DBL) was observed in all cases. An iterative back-calculation process using the numerical code POLLUTEv6 and taking the DBL into account provided the Kr values used to match calculated and experimental concentration profiles. Kr obtained for tailings TA1 and TA2 was about 80 d(-1) and 6.5 d(-1), respectively. For comparison purposes, Kr obtained from cell tests on tailings TA1 was lower than Kr calculated from the sulphate production rate obtained from shake-flask tests. Steady-state DO flux at the water-tailings interface was then calculated with POLLUTEv6 using tailings characteristics Dw and Kr. For the tested conditions, DO flux ranged from 608 to 758 mg O2/m(2)/d for tailings TA1 and from 177 to 221 mg O2/m(2)/d for tailings TA2. The impact of placing a protective layer of inert material over

  2. Effect of flow rate on the adsorption coefficient of radioactive krypton on activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, L.S.C.; Underhill, D.W.

    1981-01-01

    For some time, there have been questions relative to the effect of carrier gas velocity on the adsorption coefficient for radioactive noble gases on activated charcoal. Resolution of these questions is particularly important in terms of developing standard procedures for determining such coefficients under laboratory conditions. Studies at the Harvard Air Cleaning Laboratory appear to confirm that the adsorption coefficient for radioactive krypton on activated charcoal is independent of the velocity of the carrier gas

  3. Experimental Investigation of Friction Coefficient and Wear Rate of Composite Materials Sliding Against Smooth and Rough Mild Steel Counterfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Chowdhury

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, friction coefficient and wear rate of gear fiber reinforced plastic (gear fiber and glass fiber reinforced plastic (glass fiber sliding against mild steel are investigated experimentally. In order to do so, a pin on disc apparatus is designed and fabricated. Experiments are carried out when smooth or rough mild steel pin slides on gear fiber and glass fiber disc. Experiments are conducted at normal load 10, 15 and 20 N, sliding velocity 1, 1.5 and 2 m/s and relative humidity 70%. Variations of friction coefficient with the duration of rubbing at different normal loads and sliding velocities are investigated. Results show that friction coefficient is influenced by duration of rubbing, normal load and sliding velocity. In general, friction coefficient increases for a certain duration of rubbing and after that it remains constant for the rest of the experimental time. The obtained results reveal that friction coefficient decreases with the increase in normal load for gear fiber and glass fiber mating with smooth or rough mild steel counterface. On the other hand, it is also found that friction coefficient increases with the increase in sliding velocity for both of the tested materials. Moreover, wear rate increases with the increase in normal load and sliding velocity. The magnitudes of friction coefficient and wear rate are different depending on sliding velocity and normal load for both smooth and rough counterface pin materials.

  4. Study of oxygen mass transfer coefficient and oxygen uptake rate in a stirred tank reactor for uranium ore bioleaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zokaei-Kadijani, S.; Safdari, J.; Mousavian, M.A.; Rashidi, A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Mass transfer coefficient does not depend on biomass concentration. ► The pulp density has a negative effect on mass transfer coefficient. ► The pulp density is the unique factor that affects maximum OUR. ► In this work, Neale’s correlation is corrected for prediction of mass transfer coefficient. ► Biochemical reaction is a limiting factor in the uranium bioleaching process. - Abstract: In this work, the volumetric oxygen mass transfer coefficient and the oxygen uptake rate (OUR) were studied for uranium ore bioleaching process by Acidthiobacillus ferrooxidans in a stirred tank reactor. The Box-Bohnken design method was used to study the effect of operating parameters on the oxygen mass transfer coefficient. The investigated factors were agitation speed (rpm), aeration rate (vvm) and pulp density (% weight/volume) of the stirred tank reactor. Analysis of experimental results showed that the oxygen mass transfer coefficient had low dependence on biomass concentration but had higher dependence on the agitation speed, aeration rate and pulp density. The obtained biological enhancement factors were equal to ones in experiments. On the other hand, the obtained values for Damkohler number (Da < 0.468) indicated that the process was limited by the biochemical reaction rate. Experimental results obtained for oxygen mass transfer coefficient were correlated with the empirical relations proposed by Garcia-Ochoa and Gomez (2009) and Neale and Pinches (1994). Due to the high relative error in the correlation of Neale and Pinches, that correlation was corrected and the coefficient of determination was calculated to be 89%. The modified correlation has been obtained based on a wide range of operating conditions, which can be used to determine the mass transfer coefficient in a bioreactor

  5. Uptake rate constants and partition coefficients for vapor phase organic chemicals using semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranor, W.L.; Alvarez, D.A.; Huckins, J.N.; Petty, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    To fully utilize semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) as passive samplers in air monitoring, data are required to accurately estimate airborne concentrations of environmental contaminants. Limited uptake rate constants (kua) and no SPMD air partitioning coefficient (Ksa) existed for vapor-phase contaminants. This research was conducted to expand the existing body of kinetic data for SPMD air sampling by determining kua and Ksa for a number of airborne contaminants including the chemical classes: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, organochlorine pesticides, brominated diphenyl ethers, phthalate esters, synthetic pyrethroids, and organophosphate/organosulfur pesticides. The kuas were obtained for 48 of 50 chemicals investigated and ranged from 0.03 to 3.07??m3??g-1??d-1. In cases where uptake was approaching equilibrium, Ksas were approximated. Ksa values (no units) were determined or estimated for 48 of the chemicals investigated and ranging from 3.84E+5 to 7.34E+7. This research utilized a test system (United States Patent 6,877,724 B1) which afforded the capability to generate and maintain constant concentrations of vapor-phase chemical mixtures. The test system and experimental design employed gave reproducible results during experimental runs spanning more than two years. This reproducibility was shown by obtaining mean kua values (n??=??3) of anthracene and p,p???-DDE at 0.96 and 1.57??m3??g-1??d-1 with relative standard deviations of 8.4% and 8.6% respectively.

  6. Population densities and rate coefficients for electron impact excitation in singly ionized oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awakowicz, P.; Behringer, K.

    1995-01-01

    In non-LTE arc plasmas, O II excited state number densities were measured relative to the O II ground and metastable states. The results were compared with collisional-radiative code calculations on the basis of the JET ADAS programs. Stationary He plasmas with small oxygen admixtures, generated in a 5 mm diameter cascade arc chamber (pressures 13-70 hPa, arc current 150 A), were investigated spectroscopically in the visible and the VUV spectral range. The continuum of a 2 mm diameter pure He arc (atmospheric pressure, current 100 A) served for calibration of the VUV system response. Plasma diagnostics on the basis of Hβ Stark broadening yielded electron densities between 2.4 x 10 14 and 2.0 x 10 15 cm -3 for the low-pressure O II mixture plasmas. The agreement of measured and calculated excited state populations is generally very satisfactory, thus confirming the rate coefficients in the code. This is of particular interest in this intermediate region between corona balance and LTE, where many atomic data are required in the simulation. Clear indications were found for the diffusion of metastables lowering their number densities significantly below their statistical values. (author)

  7. Analysis of the Lankford coefficient evolution at different strain rates for AA6016-T4, DP800 and DC06

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzen, Matthias; Merklein, Marion

    2017-10-01

    In the automotive sector, a major challenge is the deep-drawing of modern lightweight sheet metals with limited formability. Thus, conventional material models lack in accuracy due to the complex material behavior. A current field of research takes into account the evolution of the Lankford coefficient. Today, changes in anisotropy under increasing degree of deformation are not considered. Only a consolidated average value of the Lankford coefficient is included in conventional material models. This leads to an increasing error in prediction of the flow behavior and therefore to an inaccurate prognosis of the forming behavior. To increase the accuracy of the prediction quality, the strain dependent Lankford coefficient should be respected, because the R-value has a direct effect on the contour of the associated flow rule. Further, the investigated materials show a more or less extinct rate dependency of the yield stress. For this reason, the rate dependency of the Lankford coefficient during uniaxial tension is focused within this contribution. To quantify the influence of strain rate on the Lankford coefficient, tensile tests are performed for three commonly used materials, the aluminum alloy AA6016-T4, the advanced high strength steel DP800 and the deep drawing steel DC06 at three different strain rates. The strain measurement is carried out by an optical strain measurement system. An evolution of the Lankford coefficient was observed for all investigated materials. Also, an influence of the deformation velocity on the anisotropy could be detected.

  8. Positron annihilation lifetime study of positive temperature coefficient BaTiO3 samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling Chen; Mingkang Teng; Guanghou Wang; Xiaoyun Li; Tianchang Lu

    1989-01-01

    In order to investigate the doped vacancies in BaTiO 3 samples as well as their influence on the positive temperature coefficient (PTC) the positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy was applied. Two groups of BaTiO 3 samples with BaO excess were prepared by doping different concentrations of La 2 O 3 and Nb 2 O 5 , respectively in the range from 0.1 to 3 at%. A third group of samples of two Sb-doped PTC BaTiO 3 semiconductors with excess BaO or TiO 2 were studied by the aid of positron technique before and after being reduced. It is shown that the positron lifetime parameters are sensitive to changes in the vacancy concentration in BaTiO 3 ceramics near the 0.1 mol% region. But they are almost unchanged during reduction processing; the resistivity of samples changed by one to two orders of magnitude through the reduction. It can be concluded that the PTC effect is due to oxygen on the grain boundary rather than vacancies, and that the Heywang-Jonker model is more reasonable

  9. Rational design and synthesis of an orally bioavailable peptide guided by NMR amide temperature coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Conan K.; Northfield, Susan E.; Colless, Barbara; Chaousis, Stephanie; Hamernig, Ingrid; Lohman, Rink-Jan; Nielsen, Daniel S.; Schroeder, Christina I.; Liras, Spiros; Price, David A.; Fairlie, David P.; Craik, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Enhancing the oral bioavailability of peptide drug leads is a major challenge in drug design. As such, methods to address this challenge are highly sought after by the pharmaceutical industry. Here, we propose a strategy to identify appropriate amides for N-methylation using temperature coefficients measured by NMR to identify exposed amides in cyclic peptides. N-methylation effectively caps these amides, modifying the overall solvation properties of the peptides and making them more membrane permeable. The approach for identifying sites for N-methylation is a rapid alternative to the elucidation of 3D structures of peptide drug leads, which has been a commonly used structure-guided approach in the past. Five leucine-rich peptide scaffolds are reported with selectively designed N-methylated derivatives. In vitro membrane permeability was assessed by parallel artificial membrane permeability assay and Caco-2 assay. The most promising N-methylated peptide was then tested in vivo. Here we report a novel peptide (15), which displayed an oral bioavailability of 33% in a rat model, thus validating the design approach. We show that this approach can also be used to explain the notable increase in oral bioavailability of a somatostatin analog. PMID:25416591

  10. Artificial Neural Networks-Based Software for Measuring Heat Collection Rate and Heat Loss Coefficient of Water-in-Glass Evacuated Tube Solar Water Heaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhijian; Liu, Kejun; Li, Hao; Zhang, Xinyu; Jin, Guangya; Cheng, Kewei

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient are crucial for the evaluation of in service water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. However, conventional measurement requires expensive detection devices and undergoes a series of complicated procedures. To simplify the measurement and reduce the cost, software based on artificial neural networks for measuring heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters was developed. Using multilayer feed-forward neural networks with back-propagation algorithm, we developed and tested our program on the basis of 915 measured samples of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. This artificial neural networks-based software program automatically obtained accurate heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient using simply "portable test instruments" acquired parameters, including tube length, number of tubes, tube center distance, heat water mass in tank, collector area, angle between tubes and ground and final temperature. Our results show that this software (on both personal computer and Android platforms) is efficient and convenient to predict the heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient due to it slow root mean square errors in prediction. The software now can be downloaded from http://t.cn/RLPKF08.

  11. Measurement of the high-temperature Seebeck coefficient of thin films by means of an epitaxially regrown thermometric reference material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramu, Ashok T; Mages, Phillip; Zhang, Chong; Imamura, Jeffrey T; Bowers, John E

    2012-09-01

    The Seebeck coefficient of a typical thermoelectric material, silicon-doped InGaAs lattice-matched to InP, is measured over a temperature range from 300 K to 550 K. By depositing and patterning a thermometric reference bar of silicon-doped InP adjacent to a bar of the material under test, temperature differences are measured directly. This is in contrast to conventional two-thermocouple techniques that subtract two large temperatures to yield a small temperature difference, a procedure prone to errors. The proposed technique retains the simple instrumentation of two-thermocouple techniques while eliminating the critical dependence of the latter on good thermal contact. The repeatability of the proposed technique is demonstrated to be ±2.6% over three temperature sweeps, while the repeatability of two-thermocouple measurements is about ±5%. The improved repeatability is significant for reliable reporting of the ZT figure of merit, which is proportional to the square of the Seebeck coefficient. The accuracy of the proposed technique depends on the accuracy with which the high-temperature Seebeck coefficient of the reference material may be computed or measured. In this work, the Seebeck coefficient of the reference material, n+ InP, is computed by rigorous solution of the Boltzmann transport equation. The accuracy and repeatability of the proposed technique can be systematically improved by scaling, and the method is easily extensible to other material systems currently being investigated for high thermoelectric energy conversion efficiency.

  12. Determination of temperature dependence of piezoelectric coefficients matrix of lead zirconate titanate ceramics by quasi-static and resonance method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Fei; Xu Zhuo; Wei Xiaoyong; Yao Xi, E-mail: lifei1216@gmail.co [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2009-05-07

    The piezoelectric coefficients (d{sub 33}, -d{sub 31}, d{sub 15}, g{sub 33}, -g{sub 31}, g{sub 15}) of soft and hard lead zirconate titanate ceramics were measured by the quasi-static and resonance methods, at temperatures from 20 to 300 {sup 0}C. The results showed that the piezoelectric coefficients d{sub 33}, -d{sub 31} and d{sub 15} obtained by these two methods increased with increasing temperature for both hard and soft PZT ceramics, while the piezoelectric coefficients g{sub 33}, -g{sub 31} and g{sub 15} decreased with increasing temperature for both hard and soft PZT ceramics. In this paper, the observed results were also discussed in terms of intrinsic and extrinsic contributions to piezoelectric response.

  13. Atmospheric reactions of methylcyclohexanes with Cl atoms and OH radicals: determination of rate coefficients and degradation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros, Bernabé; Ceacero-Vega, Antonio A; Jiménez, Elena; Albaladejo, José

    2015-04-01

    As the result of biogenic and anthropogenic activities, large quantities of chemical compounds are emitted into the troposphere. Alkanes, in general, and cycloalkanes are an important chemical class of hydrocarbons found in diesel, jet and gasoline, vehicle exhaust emissions, and ambient air in urban areas. In general, the primary atmospheric fate of organic compounds in the gas phase is the reaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH). The oxidation by Cl atoms has gained importance in the study of atmospheric reactions because they may exert some influence in the boundary layer, particularly in marine and coastal environments, and in the Arctic troposphere. The aim of this paper is to study of the atmospheric reactivity of methylcylohexanes with Cl atoms and OH radicals under atmospheric conditions (in air at room temperature and pressure). Relative kinetic techniques have been used to determine the rate coefficients for the reaction of Cl atoms and OH radicals with methylcyclohexane, cis-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane, trans-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane, and 1,3,5-trimethylcyclohexane at 298 ± 2 K and 720 ± 5 Torr of air by Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in two atmospheric simulation chambers. The products formed in the reaction under atmospheric conditions were investigated using a 200-L Teflon bag and employing the technique of solid-phase microextraction coupled to a GC-MS. The rate coefficients obtained for the reaction of Cl atoms with the studied compounds are the following ones (in units of 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): (3.11 ± 0.16), (2.89 ± 0.16), (2.89 ± 0.26), and (2.61 ± 0.42), respectively. For the reactions with OH radicals the determined rate coefficients are (in units of 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): (1.18 ± 0.12), (1.49 ± 0.16), (1.41 ± 0.15), and (1.77 ± 0.23), respectively. The reported error is twice the standard deviation. A detailed

  14. Creep-Fatigue Life Design with Various Stress and Temperature Conditions on the Basis of Lethargy Coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jung Eun; Yang, Sung Mo; Han, Jae Hee; Yu, Hyo Sun

    2011-01-01

    High temperature and stress are encounted in power plants and vehicle engines. Therefore, determination of the creep-fatigue life of a material is necessary prior to fabricating equipment. In this study, life design was determined on the basis of the lethargy coefficient for different temperatures, stress and rupture times. SP-Creep test data was compared with computed data. The SP-Creep test was performed to obtain the rupture time for X20CrMoV121 steel. The integration life equation was considered for three cases with various load, temperature and load-temperature. First, the lethargy coefficient was calculated by using the obtained rupture stress and the rupture time that were determined by carrying out the SP-Creep test. Next, life was predicted on the basis of the temperature condition. Finally, it was observed that life decreases considerably due to the coupling effect that results when fatigue and creep occur simultaneously

  15. The relationship between temperature and standard rate of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    teleost) fishes, while largely unknown, is essential to an understanding of the effects of temperature on fish energetics. This study quantifies the effect of temperature on the standard rate of metabolism in the African lungfish, Protopterus aethiopicus.

  16. Significance and influence of the ambient temperature as a rate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    , undoubtedly is dependent even on the level of the ambient temperature. Therefore, the ambient temperature seems to be an important factor of the corrosion rate and the durability of the reinforced concrete structures in aggressive ...

  17. Constant displacement rate testing at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepe, J.J.; Gonyea, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    A short time test has been developed which is capable of determining the long time notch sensitivity tendencies of CrMoV rotor forging materials. This test is based on Constant Displacement Rate (CDR) testing of a specific notch bar specimen at 1200 0 F at 2 mils/in/hour displacement rate. These data were correlated to conventional smooth and notch bar rupture behavior for a series of CrMoV materials with varying long time ductility tendencies. The purpose of this paper is to describe the details of this new test procedure and some of the relevant mechanics of material information generated during its development

  18. EFFECTS OF TIN ON HARDNESS, WEAR RATE AND COEFFICIENT OF FRICTION OF CAST CU-NI-SN ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. ILANGOVAN

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available An investigation was carried out to understand the effects of Sn on hardness, wear rate and the coefficient of friction of spinodal Cu-Ni-Sn alloys. Alloys of appropriate compositions were melted in a crucible furnace under argon atmosphere and cast into sand moulds. Solution heat treated and aged specimens were tested for hardness, wear rate and the coefficient of friction. It was found that the hardness increases when the Sn content increases from 4% to 8% in the solution heat treated conditions. The peak aging time is found to decrease with an increase in the Sn content. Further, the coefficient of friction is independent of hardness whereas the wear rate decreases linearly with hardness irrespective of Sn content.

  19. Artificial Neural Networks-Based Software for Measuring Heat Collection Rate and Heat Loss Coefficient of Water-in-Glass Evacuated Tube Solar Water Heaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhijian; Liu, Kejun; Li, Hao; Zhang, Xinyu; Jin, Guangya; Cheng, Kewei

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient are crucial for the evaluation of in service water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. However, conventional measurement requires expensive detection devices and undergoes a series of complicated procedures. To simplify the measurement and reduce the cost, software based on artificial neural networks for measuring heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters was developed. Using multilayer feed-forward neural networks with back-propagation algorithm, we developed and tested our program on the basis of 915measuredsamples of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. This artificial neural networks-based software program automatically obtained accurate heat collection rateand heat loss coefficient using simply "portable test instruments" acquired parameters, including tube length, number of tubes, tube center distance, heat water mass in tank, collector area, angle between tubes and ground and final temperature. Our results show that this software (on both personal computer and Android platforms) is efficient and convenient to predict the heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient due to it slow root mean square errors in prediction. The software now can be downloaded from http://t.cn/RLPKF08. PMID:26624613

  20. A self-consistent, multivariate method for the determination of gas-phase rate coefficients, applied to reactions of atmospheric VOCs and the hydroxyl radical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. T. Shaw

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Gas-phase rate coefficients are fundamental to understanding atmospheric chemistry, yet experimental data are not available for the oxidation reactions of many of the thousands of volatile organic compounds (VOCs observed in the troposphere. Here, a new experimental method is reported for the simultaneous study of reactions between multiple different VOCs and OH, the most important daytime atmospheric radical oxidant. This technique is based upon established relative rate concepts but has the advantage of a much higher throughput of target VOCs. By evaluating multiple VOCs in each experiment, and through measurement of the depletion in each VOC after reaction with OH, the OH + VOC reaction rate coefficients can be derived. Results from experiments conducted under controlled laboratory conditions were in good agreement with the available literature for the reaction of 19 VOCs, prepared in synthetic gas mixtures, with OH. This approach was used to determine a rate coefficient for the reaction of OH with 2,3-dimethylpent-1-ene for the first time; k =  5.7 (±0.3  ×  10−11 cm3 molecule−1 s−1. In addition, a further seven VOCs had only two, or fewer, individual OH rate coefficient measurements available in the literature. The results from this work were in good agreement with those measurements. A similar dataset, at an elevated temperature of 323 (±10 K, was used to determine new OH rate coefficients for 12 aromatic, 5 alkane, 5 alkene and 3 monoterpene VOC + OH reactions. In OH relative reactivity experiments that used ambient air at the University of York, a large number of different VOCs were observed, of which 23 were positively identified. Due to difficulties with detection limits and fully resolving peaks, only 19 OH rate coefficients were derived from these ambient air samples, including 10 reactions for which data were previously unavailable at the elevated reaction temperature of T =  323 (±10 K.

  1. Rate Coefficients for Reactions of Ethynyl Radical (C2H) With HCN and CH3CN: Implications for the Formation of Comples Nitriles on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoobler, Ray J.; Leone, Stephen R.

    1997-01-01

    Rate coefficients for the reactions of C2H + HCN yields products and C2H + CH3CN yields products have been measured over the temperature range 262-360 K. These experiments represent an ongoing effort to accurately measure reaction rate coefficients of the ethynyl radical, C2H, relevant to planetary atmospheres such as those of Jupiter and Saturn and its satellite Titan. Laser photolysis of C2H2 is used to produce C2H, and transient infrared laser absorption is employed to measure the decay of C2H to obtain the subsequent reaction rates in a transverse flow cell. Rate constants for the reaction C2H + HCN yields products are found to increase significantly with increasing temperature and are measured to be (3.9-6.2) x 10(exp 13) cm(exp 3) molecules(exp -1) s(exp -1) over the temperature range of 297-360 K. The rate constants for the reaction C2H + CH3CN yields products are also found to increase substantially with increasing temperature and are measured to be (1.0-2.1) x 10(exp -12) cm(exp 3) molecules(exp -1) s(exp -1) over the temperature range of 262-360 K. For the reaction C2H + HCN yields products, ab initio calculations of transition state structures are used to infer that the major products form via an addition/elimination pathway. The measured rate constants for the reaction of C2H + HCN yields products are significantly smaller than values currently employed in photochemical models of Titan, which will affect the HC3N distribution.

  2. Effects of large rate coefficients for ion-polar neutral reactions on chemical models of dense interstellar clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, E.; Leung, C.M.; Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY)

    1986-01-01

    Pseudo-time-dependent models of the gas phase chemistry of dense interstellar clouds have been run with large rate coefficients for reactions between ions and polar neutral species, as advocated by Adams, Smith, and Clary. The higher rate coefficients normally lead to a reduction in both the peak and steady state abundances of polar neutrals, which can be as large as an order of magnitude but is more often smaller. Other differences between the results of these models and previous results are also discussed. 38 references

  3. Non-linear dynamo waves in an incompressible medium when the turbulence dissipative coefficients depend on temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Pataraya

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-linear α-ω; dynamo waves existing in an incompressible medium with the turbulence dissipative coefficients depending on temperature are studied in this paper. We investigate of α-ω solar non-linear dynamo waves when only the first harmonics of magnetic induction components are included. If we ignore the second harmonics in the non-linear equation, the turbulent magnetic diffusion coefficient increases together with the temperature, the coefficient of turbulent viscosity decreases, and for an interval of time the value of dynamo number is greater than 1. In these conditions a stationary solution of the non-linear equation for the dynamo wave's amplitude exists; meaning that the magnetic field is sufficiently excited. The amplitude of the dynamo waves oscillates and becomes stationary. Using these results we can explain the existence of Maunder's minimum.

  4. Determination of Scattering and Absorption Coefficients for Plasma-Sprayed Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Spuckler, Charles M.; Markham, James R.

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the scattering and absorption coefficients for a set of freestanding plasma-sprayed 8 wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was determined at temperatures up to 1360 C in a wavelength range from 1.2 micrometers up to the 8YSZ absorption edge. The scattering and absorption coefficients were determined by fitting the directional-hemispherical reflectance and transmittance values calculated by a four-flux Kubelka Munk method to the experimentally measured hemispherical-directional reflectance and transmittance values obtained for five 8YSZ thicknesses. The scattering coefficient exhibited a continuous decrease with increasing wavelength and showed no significant temperature dependence. The scattering is primarily attributed to the relatively temperature-insensitive refractive index mismatch between the 8YSZ and its internal voids. The absorption coefficient was very low (less than 1 per centimeter) at wavelengths between 2 micrometers and the absorption edge and showed a definite temperature dependence that consisted of a shift of the absorption edge to shorter wavelengths and an increase in the weak absorption below the absorption edge with increasing temperature. The shift in the absorption edge with temperature is attributed to strongly temperature-dependent multiphonon absorption. While TBC hemispherical transmittance beyond the absorption edge can be predicted by a simple exponential decrease with thickness, below the absorption edge, typical TBC thicknesses are well below the thickness range where a simple exponential decrease in hemispherical transmittance with TBC thickness is expected. [Correction added after online publication August 11, 2009: "edge to a shorter wavelengths" has been updated as edge to shorter wavelengths."

  5. Flow boiling heat transfer coefficients at cryogenic temperatures for multi-component refrigerant mixtures of nitrogen-hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardhapurkar, P. M.; Sridharan, Arunkumar; Atrey, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    The recuperative heat exchanger governs the overall performance of the mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson cryocooler. In these heat exchangers, the non-azeotropic refrigerant mixture of nitrogen-hydrocarbons undergoes boiling and condensation simultaneously at cryogenic temperature. Hence, the design of such heat exchanger is crucial. However, due to lack of empirical correlations to predict two-phase heat transfer coefficients of multi-component mixtures at low temperature, the design of such heat exchanger is difficult.

  6. C02(nu2)-0 Quenching Rate Coefficient Derived from Coincidental Fort Collins Lidar and SABER Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feofilov, A. G.; Kutepov, A. A.; She, C. Y.; Smith, A. K.; Pesnell, W. D.; Goldberg, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    Among the processes governing the energy balance in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT), the quenching of CO2(V2) vibrational levels in collisions with oxygen atoms plays an important role. However, neither the rate coefficient of this process (k(CO2O)) nor the atomic oxygen concentrations ([O]) in the MLT are well known. The discrepancy between k(CO2O) measured in the lab and retrieved from atmospheric measurements is of about factor of 2.5. At the same time, the discrepancy between [O] in the MLT measured by different instruments is of the same order of magnitude. In this work we used a synergy of a ground based lidar and satellite infrared radiometer to make a further step in understanding of the physics of the region. In this study we apply the night- and daytime temperatures between 80 and 110 km measured by the Colorado State University narrow-band sodium (Na) lidar located at Fort Collins, Colorado for retrieving the product of k(CO2-O) x [O] from the limb radiances in the 15 micron channel measured by the SABER/TIMED instrument for nearly simultaneous common volume measurements of both instruments within +/-1 degree in latitude, +/-2 degrees in longitude and +/-10 minutes in time. We derive k(CO2-O) and its possible variation range from the retrieved product by utilizing the [O] values measured by the SABER and other instruments.

  7. Bivariate functional data clustering: grouping streams based on a varying coefficient model of the stream water and air temperature relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Li; X. Deng; Andy Dolloff; E. P. Smith

    2015-01-01

    A novel clustering method for bivariate functional data is proposed to group streams based on their water–air temperature relationship. A distance measure is developed for bivariate curves by using a time-varying coefficient model and a weighting scheme. This distance is also adjusted by spatial correlation of streams via the variogram. Therefore, the proposed...

  8. The rate coefficients for the processes of (n - n')-mixing in collisions of Rydberg atoms H*(n) with H(1s) atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihajlov, A A [Institute of Physics, PO Box 57, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Ignjatovic, Lj M [Institute of Physics, PO Box 57, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Djuric, Z [Silvaco Data Systems, Compass Point, St Ives PE27 5JL (United Kingdom); Ljepojevic, N N [Silvaco Data Systems, Compass Point, St Ives PE27 5JL (United Kingdom)

    2004-11-28

    This paper presents the results of semi-classical calculations of rate coefficients of (n - n')-mixing processes in collisions of Rydberg atoms H*(n) with H(1s) atoms. These processes have been modelled by the mechanism of the resonant energy exchange within the electron component of the H*(n) + H collisional system. The calculations of the rate coefficients, based on this model, were performed for the series of principal quantum numbers, n and n', and atomic, T{sub a}, and electronic, T{sub e}, temperatures. It was shown that these processes can be of significant influence on the populations of Rydberg atoms in weakly ionized plasmas (ionization degree {approx}<10{sup -4}), and therefore have to be included in appropriate models of such plasmas.

  9. The rate coefficients for the processes of (n - n')-mixing in collisions of Rydberg atoms H*(n) with H(1s) atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihajlov, A A; Ignjatovic, Lj M; Djuric, Z; Ljepojevic, N N

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the results of semi-classical calculations of rate coefficients of (n - n')-mixing processes in collisions of Rydberg atoms H*(n) with H(1s) atoms. These processes have been modelled by the mechanism of the resonant energy exchange within the electron component of the H*(n) + H collisional system. The calculations of the rate coefficients, based on this model, were performed for the series of principal quantum numbers, n and n', and atomic, T a , and electronic, T e , temperatures. It was shown that these processes can be of significant influence on the populations of Rydberg atoms in weakly ionized plasmas (ionization degree ∼ -4 ), and therefore have to be included in appropriate models of such plasmas

  10. Global minimum profile error (GMPE) - a least-squares-based approach for extracting macroscopic rate coefficients for complex gas-phase chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Minh V; Nguyen, Hieu T; Mai, Tam V-T; Huynh, Lam K

    2018-01-03

    Master equation/Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (ME/RRKM) has shown to be a powerful framework for modeling kinetic and dynamic behaviors of a complex gas-phase chemical system on a complicated multiple-species and multiple-channel potential energy surface (PES) for a wide range of temperatures and pressures. Derived from the ME time-resolved species profiles, the macroscopic or phenomenological rate coefficients are essential for many reaction engineering applications including those in combustion and atmospheric chemistry. Therefore, in this study, a least-squares-based approach named Global Minimum Profile Error (GMPE) was proposed and implemented in the MultiSpecies-MultiChannel (MSMC) code (Int. J. Chem. Kinet., 2015, 47, 564) to extract macroscopic rate coefficients for such a complicated system. The capability and limitations of the new approach were discussed in several well-defined test cases.

  11. Temperature-related changes in respiration and Q10 coefficient of Guava

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bron Ilana Urbano

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Guava (Psidium guajava L. is a tropical fruit that presents fast post-harvest ripening; therefore it is a very perishable product. Inappropriate storage temperature and retail practices can accelerate fruit quality loss. The objective of this study was to evaluate the respiratory activity (RA, the ethylene production (EP and Q10 of guava fruit at different storage temperatures. 'Paluma' guava fruits were harvested at maturity stage 1 (dark-green skin and stored at either 1, 11, 21, 31 or 41ºC; RA and EP were determined after 12, 36, 84 and 156 h of storage. RA and EP rates at 1 and 11ºC were the lowest - 0.16 and 0.43 mmol CO2 kg-1 h-1 and 0.003 and 0.019 µmol C2H4 kg-1 h-1, respectively. When guavas were stored at 21ºC, a gradual increase occurred in RA and EP, reaching 2.24 mmol CO2 kg-1 h-1 and 0.20 µmol C2H4 kg-1 h-1, after 156 h of storage. The highest RA and EP were recorded for guavas stored at 31ºC. In spite of high RA, guavas stored at 41ºC presented EP similar to guavas stored at 11ºC, an indicator of heat-stress injury. Considering the 1-11ºC range, the mean Q10 value was around 3.0; the Q10 value almost duplicated at 11-21ºC range (5.9. At 21-31ºC and 31-41ºC, Q10 was 1.5 and 0.8, respectively. Knowing Q10, respiratory variation and ripening behavior in response to different temperatures, fruit storage and retail conditions can be optimized to reduce quality losses.

  12. Doppler Temperature Coefficient Calculations Using Adjoint-Weighted Tallies and Continuous Energy Cross Sections in MCNP6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Matthew Alejandro

    The calculation of the thermal neutron Doppler temperature reactivity feedback co-efficient, a key parameter in the design and safe operation of advanced reactors, using first order perturbation theory in continuous energy Monte Carlo codes is challenging as the continuous energy adjoint flux is not readily available. Traditional approaches of obtaining the adjoint flux attempt to invert the random walk process as well as require data corresponding to all temperatures and their respective temperature derivatives within the system in order to accurately calculate the Doppler temperature feedback. A new method has been developed using adjoint-weighted tallies and On-The-Fly (OTF) generated continuous energy cross sections within the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP6) transport code. The adjoint-weighted tallies are generated during the continuous energy k-eigenvalue Monte Carlo calculation. The weighting is based upon the iterated fission probability interpretation of the adjoint flux, which is the steady state population in a critical nuclear reactor caused by a neutron introduced at that point in phase space. The adjoint-weighted tallies are produced in a forward calculation and do not require an inversion of the random walk. The OTF cross section database uses a high order functional expansion between points on a user-defined energy-temperature mesh in which the coefficients with respect to a polynomial fitting in temperature are stored. The coefficients of the fits are generated before run- time and called upon during the simulation to produce cross sections at any given energy and temperature. The polynomial form of the OTF cross sections allows the possibility of obtaining temperature derivatives of the cross sections on-the-fly. The use of Monte Carlo sampling of adjoint-weighted tallies and the capability of computing derivatives of continuous energy cross sections with respect to temperature are used to calculate the Doppler temperature coefficient in a research

  13. Gas-phase rate coefficients of the reaction of ozone with four sesquiterpenes at 295 ± 2 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richters, Stefanie; Herrmann, Hartmut; Berndt, Torsten

    2015-05-07

    The rate coefficients of the reaction of ozone with the four atmospherically relevant sesquiterpenes β-caryophyllene, α-humulene, α-cedrene and isolongifolene were investigated at 295 ± 2 K and atmospheric pressure by at least two independent experimental investigations for each reaction. Relative rate experiments were carried out in a flow tube using two different experimental approaches with GC-MS detection (RR 1) and PTR-MS analysis (RR 2) as the analytical techniques. Absolute rate coefficients were determined in a stopped-flow experiment following the ozone depletion by means of UV spectroscopy. The average rate coefficients from the combined investigations representing the mean values of the different experimental methods are (unit: cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): k(O3+β-caryophyllene) = (1.1 ± 0.3) × 10(-14) (methods: RR 1, RR 2, absolute), k(O3+α-humulene) = (1.2 ± 0.3) × 10(-14) (RR 1, RR 2), k(O3+α-cedrene) = (1.7 ± 0.5) × 10(-16) (RR 2, absolute) and k(O3+isolongifolene) = (1.1 ± 0.5) × 10(-17) (RR 2, absolute). The high ozonolysis rate coefficients for β-caryophyllene and α-humulene agree well with the results by Shu and Atkinson (Int. J. Chem. Kinet., 1994, 26) and lead to short atmospheric lifetimes of about two minutes with respect to the ozone reaction. The relatively small rate coefficients for α-cedrene and isolongifolene differ from the available literature values by a factor of about 2.5-6. Possible reasons for the deviations are discussed. Finally, calibrated sesquiterpene FT-IR spectra were recorded for the first time.

  14. Dopamine modulates metabolic rate and temperature sensitivity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Ueno

    Full Text Available Homeothermal animals, such as mammals, maintain their body temperature by heat generation and heat dissipation, while poikilothermal animals, such as insects, accomplish it by relocating to an environment of their favored temperature. Catecholamines are known to regulate thermogenesis and metabolic rate in mammals, but their roles in other animals are poorly understood. The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has been used as a model system for the genetic studies of temperature preference behavior. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic rate and temperature sensitivity of some temperature sensitive behaviors are regulated by dopamine in Drosophila. Temperature-sensitive molecules like dTrpA1 and shi(ts induce temperature-dependent behavioral changes, and the temperature at which the changes are induced were lowered in the dopamine transporter-defective mutant, fumin. The mutant also displays a preference for lower temperatures. This thermophobic phenotype was rescued by the genetic recovery of the dopamine transporter in dopamine neurons. Flies fed with a dopamine biosynthesis inhibitor (3-iodo-L-tyrosine, which diminishes dopamine signaling, exhibited preference for a higher temperature. Furthermore, we found that the metabolic rate is up-regulated in the fumin mutant. Taken together, dopamine has functions in the temperature sensitivity of behavioral changes and metabolic rate regulation in Drosophila, as well as its previously reported functions in arousal/sleep regulation.

  15. H2 line-mixing coefficients in the ν2 and ν4 bands of PH3 at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salem, Jamel; Blanquet, Ghislain; Lepère, Muriel; Aroui, Hassen

    2016-01-01

    Using a tunable diode-laser spectrometer adapted with a low temperature cell, we have measured the H 2 line-mixing coefficients for 21 lines in the Q R branch of the ν 2 band and in the P P and R P branches of the ν 4 band of phosphine (PH 3 ) at low temperature. These coefficients were determined using a multi-pressure fitting procedure that accounts for the apparatus function, the Doppler and the collisional effects. These lines with J values ranging from 2 to 11 and K from 0 to 9 are located in the spectral range from 1016 to 1093 cm −1 . The variations of these parameters with the temperature, and the ro-vibrational quantum numbers are discussed. - Graphical abstract: Comparisons of the determined line-mixing coefficients (in atm −1 ) obtained in this study in the ν 2 and ν 4 bands of PH 3 at T=173.2 K with those measured at T=298 K for different values of the J quantum number. - Highlights: • The spectra have been recorded with a tunable diode-laser spectrometer at 173.2 K. • The line-mixing coefficients are determined by a multi-pressure fitting procedure. • The effect of the line-mixing in the spectra, appear to be important.

  16. Investigation on low room-temperature resistivity Cr/(Ba0.85Pb0.15)TiO3 positive temperature coefficient composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Zeming; Ma, J.; Qu, Yuanfang

    2009-01-01

    discussed. Using these special processes, the prepared composite with 20 wt% Cr possessed low room-temperature resistivity (2.96 Ω cm at 25 °C) and exhibited PTC effect (resistivity jump of 10), which is considered as a promising candidate for over-current protector when working at low voltage. The grain......Low room-temperature resistivity positive temperature coefficient (PTC) Cr/(Ba0.85Pb0.15)TiO3 composites were produced via a reducing sintering and a subsequent oxidation treatment. The effects of metallic content and processing conditions on materials resistivity–temperature properties were...

  17. Shear piezoelectric coefficients of PZT, LiNbO3 and PMN-PT at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukhari, Syed; Islam, Md; Haziot, Ariel; Beamish, John

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric transducers are used to detect stress and to generate nanometer scale displacements but their piezoelectric coefficients decrease with temperature, limiting their performance in cryogenic applications. We have developed a capacitive technique and directly measured the temperature dependence of the shear coefficient d 15 for ceramic lead zirconium titanate (PZT), 41° X-cut lithium niobate (LiNbO 3 ) and single crystal lead magnesium niobium-lead titanate (PMN-PT). In PZT, d 15 decreases nearly linearly with temperature, dropping by factor of about 4 by 1.3 K. LiNbO3 has the smallest room temperature d15, but its value decreased by only 6% at the lowest temperatures. PMN-PT had the largest value of d15 at room temperature (2.9 × 10 −9 m/V, about 45 times larger than for LiNbO 3 ) but it decreased rapidly below 75 K; at 1.3 K, d 15 was only about 8% of its room temperature value

  18. Analyses of Spring Barley Evapotranspiration Rates Based on Gradient Measurements and Dual Crop Coefficient Model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pozníková, Gabriela; Fischer, Milan; Pohanková, Eva; Trnka, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 5 (2014), s. 1079-1086 ISSN 1211-8516 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12037; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0248 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : evapotranspiration * dual crop coefficient model * Bowen ratio/energy balance method * transpiration * soil evaporation * spring barley Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7)

  19. Temperature coefficient of elastic constants of SiO2 over-layer on LiNbO3 for a temperature stable SAW device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomar, Monika; Gupta, Vinay; Sreenivas, K

    2003-01-01

    The influence of sputtered SiO 2 over-layer on the SAW propagation characteristics of a 128 deg. rotated Y-cut X-propagating lithium niobate SAW filter has been studied. Experimentally measured SAW phase velocity and temperature coefficient of delay (TCD), with varying SiO 2 over-layer thickness, show a significant deviation from the theoretically calculated values using the bulk material parameters of SiO 2 . The observed deviation is attributed to the differences in the material parameters (density, elastic and dielectric constants and their temperature coefficient) of the deposited SiO 2 over-layer. The density and the dielectric constant of the deposited SiO 2 layer were determined separately, and the elastic constants and their temperature coefficients were estimated by fitting the experimental velocity and TCD data, respectively. The deviation in the dielectric constant and the density in comparison to the bulk was insignificant, and the estimated values of the elastic constants (C 11 = 0.75x10 11 N m -2 and C 44 0.225x10 11 N m -2 ) were found to be lower, and the respective temperature coefficients (5.0x10 -4 deg C -1 and 2.0x10 -4 deg C -1 ) were high in comparison to the bulk material parameters

  20. Temperature coefficient of elastic constants of SiO{sub 2} over-layer on LiNbO{sub 3} for a temperature stable SAW device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomar, Monika; Gupta, Vinay; Sreenivas, K [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India)

    2003-08-07

    The influence of sputtered SiO{sub 2} over-layer on the SAW propagation characteristics of a 128 deg. rotated Y-cut X-propagating lithium niobate SAW filter has been studied. Experimentally measured SAW phase velocity and temperature coefficient of delay (TCD), with varying SiO{sub 2} over-layer thickness, show a significant deviation from the theoretically calculated values using the bulk material parameters of SiO{sub 2}. The observed deviation is attributed to the differences in the material parameters (density, elastic and dielectric constants and their temperature coefficient) of the deposited SiO{sub 2} over-layer. The density and the dielectric constant of the deposited SiO{sub 2} layer were determined separately, and the elastic constants and their temperature coefficients were estimated by fitting the experimental velocity and TCD data, respectively. The deviation in the dielectric constant and the density in comparison to the bulk was insignificant, and the estimated values of the elastic constants (C{sub 11} = 0.75x10{sup 11} N m{sup -2} and C{sub 44} 0.225x10{sup 11} N m{sup -2}) were found to be lower, and the respective temperature coefficients (5.0x10{sup -4} deg C{sup -1} and 2.0x10{sup -4} deg C{sup -1}) were high in comparison to the bulk material parameters.

  1. Development of the loss coefficient correlation for cross flow between graphite fuel blocks in the core of prismatic very high temperature reactor-PMR200

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong-Hun; Cho, Hyoung-Kyu; Park, Goon-Cherl

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Cross flow experimental data are produced with wedge-shaped and parallel gaps. • The results of a CFD analysis and experimental data are in good agreement. • Pressure loss coefficient for the cross gap between fuel blocks in PMR200 is found. • A new correlation of the cross flow loss coefficient for PMR200 is proposed. - Abstract: The core of the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) PMR200 (a prismatic modular reactor rated at 200 MW of thermal power) consists of hexagonal prismatic fuel blocks and reflector blocks made of graphite. If the core bypass flow ratio increases, the coolant channel flow is decreased and can then lower the heat removal efficiency, resulting in a locally increased fuel block temperature. The coolant channels in the fuel blocks are connected to bypass gaps by the cross gap, complicating flow distribution in the VHTR core. Therefore, reliable estimation of the bypass flow is highly important for the design and safety analysis of the VHTR core. Because of the complexity of the core geometry and gap configuration, it is challenging to predict the flow distribution in the VHTR core. To analyze this flow distribution accurately, it is necessary to determine the cross flow phenomena, and the loss coefficient across the cross gap has to be evaluated to determine the flow distribution in the VHTR core when a lumped parameter code or a flow network analysis code that uses the correlation of the loss coefficient is employed. The purpose of this paper is to develop a loss coefficient correlation applicable to the cross gap in the PMR200 core. The cross flow was evaluated experimentally using the difference between the measured inlet and outlet mass flow rates. Next, the applicability of a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, CFX 15, was confirmed by comparing the experimental data and CFD analysis results. To understand the cross flow phenomena, the loss coefficient was evaluated; in the high Reynolds number region

  2. Development of the loss coefficient correlation for cross flow between graphite fuel blocks in the core of prismatic very high temperature reactor-PMR200

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong-Hun, E-mail: huny12@snu.ac.kr; Cho, Hyoung-Kyu, E-mail: chohk@snu.ac.kr; Park, Goon-Cherl, E-mail: parkgc@snu.ac.kr

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Cross flow experimental data are produced with wedge-shaped and parallel gaps. • The results of a CFD analysis and experimental data are in good agreement. • Pressure loss coefficient for the cross gap between fuel blocks in PMR200 is found. • A new correlation of the cross flow loss coefficient for PMR200 is proposed. - Abstract: The core of the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) PMR200 (a prismatic modular reactor rated at 200 MW of thermal power) consists of hexagonal prismatic fuel blocks and reflector blocks made of graphite. If the core bypass flow ratio increases, the coolant channel flow is decreased and can then lower the heat removal efficiency, resulting in a locally increased fuel block temperature. The coolant channels in the fuel blocks are connected to bypass gaps by the cross gap, complicating flow distribution in the VHTR core. Therefore, reliable estimation of the bypass flow is highly important for the design and safety analysis of the VHTR core. Because of the complexity of the core geometry and gap configuration, it is challenging to predict the flow distribution in the VHTR core. To analyze this flow distribution accurately, it is necessary to determine the cross flow phenomena, and the loss coefficient across the cross gap has to be evaluated to determine the flow distribution in the VHTR core when a lumped parameter code or a flow network analysis code that uses the correlation of the loss coefficient is employed. The purpose of this paper is to develop a loss coefficient correlation applicable to the cross gap in the PMR200 core. The cross flow was evaluated experimentally using the difference between the measured inlet and outlet mass flow rates. Next, the applicability of a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, CFX 15, was confirmed by comparing the experimental data and CFD analysis results. To understand the cross flow phenomena, the loss coefficient was evaluated; in the high Reynolds number region

  3. Assessment of external heat transfer coefficient during oocyte vitrification in liquid and slush nitrogen using numerical simulations to determine cooling rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M V; Sansinena, M; Zaritzky, N; Chirife, J

    2012-01-01

    In oocyte vitrification, plunging directly into liquid nitrogen favor film boiling and strong nitrogen vaporization. A survey of literature values of heat transfer coefficients (h) for film boiling of small metal objects with different geometries plunged in liquid nitrogen revealed values between 125 to 1000 W per per square m per K. These h values were used in a numerical simulation of cooling rates of two oocyte vitrification devices (open-pulled straw and Cryotop), plunged in liquid and slush nitrogen conditions. Heat conduction equation with convective boundary condition was considered a linear mathematical problem and was solved using the finite element method applying the variational formulation. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to simulate the cooling process of the systems. Predicted cooling rates for OPS and Cryotop when cooled at -196 degree C (liquid nitrogen) or -207 degree C (average for slush nitrogen) for heat transfer coefficients estimated to be representative of film boiling, indicated lowering the cooling temperature produces only a maximum 10 percent increase in cooling rates; confirming the main benefit of plunging in slush over liquid nitrogen does not arise from their temperature difference. Numerical simulations also demonstrated that a hypothetical four-fold increase in the cooling rate of vitrification devices when plunging in slush nitrogen would be explained by an increase in heat transfer coefficient. This improvement in heat transfer (i.e., high cooling rates) in slush nitrogen is attributed to less or null film boiling when a sample is placed in slush (mixture of liquid and solid nitrogen) because it first melts the solid nitrogen before causing the liquid to boil and form a film.

  4. The effect of different solar simulators on the measurement of short-circuit current temperature coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, H. B.; Hart, R. E., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Gallium arsenide solar cells are considered for several high temperature missions in space. Both near-Sun and concentrator missions could involve cell temperatures on the order of 200 C. Performance measurements of cells at elevated temperatures are usually made using simulated sunlight and a matched reference cell. Due to the change in bandgap with increasing temperature at portions of the spectrum where considerable simulated irradiance is present, there are significant differences in measured short circuit current at elevated temperatures among different simulators. To illustrate this, both experimental and theoretical data are presented for gallium arsenide cells.

  5. Extracting rate coefficients from single-molecule photon trajectories and FRET efficiency histograms for a fast-folding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hoi Sung; Gopich, Irina V; McHale, Kevin; Cellmer, Troy; Louis, John M; Eaton, William A

    2011-04-28

    Recently developed statistical methods by Gopich and Szabo were used to extract folding and unfolding rate coefficients from single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) data for proteins with kinetics too fast to measure waiting time distributions. Two types of experiments and two different analyses were performed. In one experiment bursts of photons were collected from donor and acceptor fluorophores attached to a 73-residue protein, α(3)D, freely diffusing through the illuminated volume of a confocal microscope system. In the second, the protein was immobilized by linkage to a surface, and photons were collected until one of the fluorophores bleached. Folding and unfolding rate coefficients and mean FRET efficiencies for the folded and unfolded subpopulations were obtained from a photon by photon analysis of the trajectories using a maximum likelihood method. The ability of the method to describe the data in terms of a two-state model was checked by recoloring the photon trajectories with the extracted parameters and comparing the calculated FRET efficiency histograms with the measured histograms. The sum of the rate coefficients for the two-state model agreed to within 30% with the relaxation rate obtained from the decay of the donor-acceptor cross-correlation function, confirming the high accuracy of the method. Interestingly, apparently reliable rate coefficients could be extracted using the maximum likelihood method, even at low (rate coefficients and mean FRET efficiencies were also obtained in an approximate procedure by simply fitting the FRET efficiency histograms, calculated by binning the donor and acceptor photons, with a sum of three-Gaussian functions. The kinetics are exposed in these histograms by the growth of a FRET efficiency peak at values intermediate between the folded and unfolded peaks as the bin size increases, a phenomenon with similarities to NMR exchange broadening. When comparable populations of folded and unfolded

  6. Partition coefficient n-octanol/water of propranolol and atenolol at different temperatures: Experimental and theoretical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohsen-Nia, M.; Ebrahimabadi, A.H.; Niknahad, B.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► n-Octanol/water partition coefficients of propranolol and atenolol were measured. ► The effect of temperature on the partition coefficient was studied. ► The equilibrium data were correlated using the NRTL and UNIQUAC activity models. ► The binary interaction parameters of the activity models were reported. ► It is concluded that propranolol is more hydrophobic than the atenolol at 298.15 K. - Abstract: The n-octanol/water partition coefficients of propranolol and atenolol were experimentally determined by ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy at T = (298.15, 310.15 and 314.15) K. All measurements were made at the maximum wavelength corresponding to maximum absorption. The results showed that the n-octanol/water partition coefficients of propranolol and atenolol increase with the increase of temperature. The experimental data of this work were also used to examine the phase equilibrium correlating capability of some liquid-phase models. The equilibrium experimental data were correlated using the NRTL and UNIQUAC activity coefficient models and the binary interaction parameters were reported. The average root-mea n-square deviations (RMSD) between the experimental and calculated mass fractions of the (n-octanol + propranolol + water) and (n-octanol + atenolol + water) systems were determined. From the partition coefficients obtained, it is concluded that propranolol (log P ow = 3.12 ± 0.14) is more hydrophobic than the atenolol (log P ow = 0.16 ± 0.01) at T = 298.15 K.

  7. Upper limits to the reaction rate coefficients of C(n)(-) and C(n)H(-) (n = 2, 4, 6) with molecular hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endres, Eric S; Lakhmanskaya, Olga; Hauser, Daniel; Huber, Stefan E; Best, Thorsten; Kumar, Sunil S; Probst, Michael; Wester, Roland

    2014-08-21

    In the interstellar medium (ISM) ion–molecule reactions play a key role in forming complex molecules. Since 2006, after the radioastronomical discovery of the first of by now six interstellar anions, interest has grown in understanding the formation and destruction pathways of negative ions in the ISM. Experiments have focused on reactions and photodetachment of the identified negatively charged ions. Hints were found that the reactions of CnH(–) with H2 may proceed with a low (rate [Eichelberger, B.; et al. Astrophys. J. 2007, 667, 1283]. Because of the high abundance of molecular hydrogen in the ISM, a precise knowledge of the reaction rate is needed for a better understanding of the low-temperature chemistry in the ISM. A suitable tool to analyze rare reactions is the 22-pole radiofrequency ion trap. Here, we report on reaction rates for Cn(–) and CnH(–) (n = 2, 4, 6) with buffer gas temperatures of H2 at 12 and 300 K. Our experiments show the absence of these reactions with an upper limit to the rate coefficients between 4 × 10(–16) and 5 × 10(–15) cm(3) s(–1), except for the case of C2(–), which does react with a finite rate with H2 at low temperatures. For the cases of C2H(–) and C4H(–), the experimental results were confirmed with quantum chemical calculations. In addition, the possible influence of a residual reactivity on the abundance of C4H(–) and C6H(–) in the ISM were estimated on the basis of a gas-phase chemical model based on the KIDA database. We found that the simulated ion abundances are already unaffected if reaction rate coefficients with H2 were below 10(–14) cm(3) s(–1).

  8. Electron energy distribution functions and transport coefficients relevant for air plasmas in the troposphere: impact of humidity and gas temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordillo-Vazquez, F J [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (IAA), CSIC, PO Box 3004, 18080 Granada (Spain); Donko, Z [Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, H-1525 Budapest, PO Box, 49 (Hungary)

    2009-08-15

    A Boltzmann and Monte Carlo analysis of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) and transport coefficients for air plasmas is presented for the conditions of the Earth troposphere where some transient luminous events (TLEs) such as blue jets, blue starters and gigantic jets have been observed. According to recent model results (Minschwaner et al 2004 J. Climate 17 1272) supported by the halogen occultation experiment, the relative humidity of the atmospheric air between 0 and 15 km can change between 15% and 100% depending on the altitude investigated and the ground temperature. The latter results cover a region of latitudes between -25 deg. S and +25 deg. N, that is, the Earth tropical region where lightning and TLE activity is quite high. The calculations shown here suggest that the relative humidity has a clear impact on the behaviour of the EEDF and magnitude of the transport coefficients of air plasmas at ground (0 km) and room temperature conditions (293 K). At higher altitudes (11 and 15 km), the influence of the relative humidity is negligible when the values of the gas temperature are assumed to be the 'natural' ones corresponding to those altitudes, that is, {approx}215 K (at 11 km) and {approx}198 K (at 15 km). However, it is found that a small enhancement (of maximum 100 K) in the background gas temperature (that could be reasonably associated with the TLE activity) would lead to a remarkable impact of the relative humidity on the EEDF and transport coefficients of air plasmas under the conditions of blue jets, blue starters and gigantic jets at 11 and 15 km. The latter effects are visible for relatively low reduced electric fields (E/N {<=} 25 Td) that could be controlling the afterglow kinetics of the air plasmas generated by TLEs. However, for much higher fields such as, for instance, 400 Td (representative of the fields in the streamer coronas and lightning leaders), the impact of increasing the relative humidity and gas

  9. Electron energy distribution functions and transport coefficients relevant for air plasmas in the troposphere: impact of humidity and gas temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordillo-Vazquez, F J; Donko, Z

    2009-01-01

    A Boltzmann and Monte Carlo analysis of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) and transport coefficients for air plasmas is presented for the conditions of the Earth troposphere where some transient luminous events (TLEs) such as blue jets, blue starters and gigantic jets have been observed. According to recent model results (Minschwaner et al 2004 J. Climate 17 1272) supported by the halogen occultation experiment, the relative humidity of the atmospheric air between 0 and 15 km can change between 15% and 100% depending on the altitude investigated and the ground temperature. The latter results cover a region of latitudes between -25 deg. S and +25 deg. N, that is, the Earth tropical region where lightning and TLE activity is quite high. The calculations shown here suggest that the relative humidity has a clear impact on the behaviour of the EEDF and magnitude of the transport coefficients of air plasmas at ground (0 km) and room temperature conditions (293 K). At higher altitudes (11 and 15 km), the influence of the relative humidity is negligible when the values of the gas temperature are assumed to be the 'natural' ones corresponding to those altitudes, that is, ∼215 K (at 11 km) and ∼198 K (at 15 km). However, it is found that a small enhancement (of maximum 100 K) in the background gas temperature (that could be reasonably associated with the TLE activity) would lead to a remarkable impact of the relative humidity on the EEDF and transport coefficients of air plasmas under the conditions of blue jets, blue starters and gigantic jets at 11 and 15 km. The latter effects are visible for relatively low reduced electric fields (E/N ≤ 25 Td) that could be controlling the afterglow kinetics of the air plasmas generated by TLEs. However, for much higher fields such as, for instance, 400 Td (representative of the fields in the streamer coronas and lightning leaders), the impact of increasing the relative humidity and gas temperature is only slightly

  10. The effect of the intermolecular potential formulation on the state-selected energy exchange rate coefficients in N2-N2 collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnosov, Alexander; Cacciatore, Mario; Laganà, Antonio; Pirani, Fernando; Bartolomei, Massimiliano; Garcia, Ernesto

    2014-04-05

    The rate coefficients for N2-N2 collision-induced vibrational energy exchange (important for the enhancement of several modern innovative technologies) have been computed over a wide range of temperature. Potential energy surfaces based on different formulations of the intramolecular and intermolecular components of the interaction have been used to compute quasiclassically and semiclassically some vibrational to vibrational energy transfer rate coefficients. Related outcomes have been rationalized in terms of state-to-state probabilities and cross sections for quasi-resonant transitions and deexcitations from the first excited vibrational level (for which experimental information are available). On this ground, it has been possible to spot critical differences on the vibrational energy exchange mechanisms supported by the different surfaces (mainly by their intermolecular components) in the low collision energy regime, though still effective for temperatures as high as 10,000 K. It was found, in particular, that the most recently proposed intermolecular potential becomes the most effective in promoting vibrational energy exchange near threshold temperatures and has a behavior opposite to the previously proposed one when varying the coupling of vibration with the other degrees of freedom. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Relations between temperature coefficients of permittivity and elastic compliances in PZT ceramics near the morphotropic phase boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudys, M

    1991-01-01

    Variations of temperature coefficients of permittivity epsilon(33)(T), elastic compliances at constant electric fields s(11)(E), and constant polarization s(11)(P) with a Zr/Ti ratio of Pb(Zr(x)Ti(1-x))O(3) and Pb[(Sb(1/3)Mn(2/3))(0.05)Zr(x)Ti (0.95-x)]O(3) solid solutions, were investigated. Relations between temperature coefficients of epsilon(33)(T ), S(11)(E), and S(11) (P) were theoretically derived; a discrepancy was found between theoretical relations and experimental results. On the basis of the observed discrepancy, it is proposed that some extrinsic effects arising from the motion of interphase boundaries between the tetragonal and the rhombohedral phases which exist in grains contribute to values of both elastic compliances.

  12. Rating of Dynamic Coefficient for Simple Beam Bridge Design on High-Speed Railways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diachenko, Leonid; Benin, Andrey; Smirnov, Vladimir; Diachenko, Anastasia

    2018-06-01

    The aim of the work is to improve the methodology for the dynamic computation of simple beam spans during the impact of high-speed trains. Mathematical simulation utilizing numerical and analytical methods of structural mechanics is used in the research. The article analyses parameters of the effect of high-speed trains on simple beam spanning bridge structures and suggests a technique of determining of the dynamic index to the live load. Reliability of the proposed methodology is confirmed by results of numerical simulation of high-speed train passage over spans with different speeds. The proposed algorithm of dynamic computation is based on a connection between maximum acceleration of the span in the resonance mode of vibrations and the main factors of stress-strain state. The methodology allows determining maximum and also minimum values of the main efforts in the construction that makes possible to perform endurance tests. It is noted that dynamic additions for the components of the stress-strain state (bending moments, transverse force and vertical deflections) are different. This condition determines the necessity for differentiated approach to evaluation of dynamic coefficients performing design verification of I and II groups of limiting state. The practical importance: the methodology of determining the dynamic coefficients allows making dynamic calculation and determining the main efforts in split beam spans without numerical simulation and direct dynamic analysis that significantly reduces the labour costs for design.

  13. Effective neutron temperature measurements in well moderated reactor by the reactivity coefficient method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisic, N.; Klinc, T.

    1968-11-01

    The ratio of the reactivity changes of a nuclear reactor produced by successive introduction of two different neutron absorbers in the reactor core, has been measured and information on effective neutron temperature at a particular point obtained. Boron was used as a l/v absorber and cadmium as an absorber sensiti ve to neutron temperature. Effective neutron temperature distribution has been deduced by moving absorbers across the reactor core and observing the corresponding reactivity changes. (author)

  14. Temperature dependencies of Henry's law constants and octanol/water partition coefficients for key plant volatile monoterpenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copolovici, Lucian O; Niinemets, Ulo

    2005-12-01

    To model the emission dynamics and changes in fractional composition of monoterpenoids from plant leaves, temperature dependencies of equilibrium coefficients must be known. Henry's law constants (H(pc), Pa m3 mol(-1) and octanol/water partition coefficients (K(OW), mol mol(-1)) were determined for 10 important plant monoterpenes at physiological temperature ranges (25-50 degrees C for H(pc) and 20-50 degrees C for K(OW)). A standard EPICS procedure was established to determine H(pc) and a shake flask method was used for the measurements of K(OW). The enthalpy of volatilization (deltaH(vol)) varied from 18.0 to 44.3 kJ mol(-1) among the monoterpenes, corresponding to a range of temperature-dependent increase in H(pc) between 1.3- and 1.8-fold per 10 degrees C rise in temperature. The enthalpy of water-octanol phase change varied from -11.0 to -23.8 kJ mol(-1), corresponding to a decrease of K(OW) between 1.15- and 1.32-fold per 10 degrees C increase in temperature. Correlations among physico-chemical characteristics of a wide range of monoterpenes were analyzed to seek the ways of derivation of H(pc) and K(OW) values from other monoterpene physico-chemical characteristics. H(pc) was strongly correlated with monoterpene saturated vapor pressure (P(v)), and for lipophilic monoterpenes, deltaH(vol) scaled positively with the enthalpy of vaporization that characterizes the temperature dependence of P(v) Thus, P(v) versus temperature relations may be employed to derive the temperature relations of H(pc) for these monoterpenes. These data collectively indicate that monoterpene differences in H(pc) and K(OW) temperature relations can importantly modify monoterpene emissions from and deposition on plant leaves.

  15. Measurement of the fuel temperature and the fuel-to-coolant heat transfer coefficient of Super Phenix 1 fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelmann, M.

    1995-12-01

    A new measurement method for measuring the mean fuel temperature as well as the fuel-to-coolant heat transfer coefficient of fast breeder reactor subassemblies (SA) is reported. The method is based on the individual heat balance of fuel SA's after fast reactor shut-downs and uses only the plants normal SA outlet temperature and neutron power signals. The method was used successfully at the french breeder prototype Super Phenix 1. The mean SA fuel temperature as well as the heat transfer coefficient of all SPX SA's have been determined at power levels between 15 and 90% of nominal power and increasing fuel burn-up from 3 to 83 EFPD (Equivalent of Full Power-Days). The measurements also provided fuel and whole SA time constants. The estimated accuracy of measured fuel parameters is in the order of 10%. Fuel temperatures and SA outlet temperature transients were also calculated with the SPX1 systems code DYN2 for exactly the same fuel and reactor operating parameters as in the experiments. Measured fuel temperatures were higher than calculated ones in all cases. The difference between measured and calculated core mean values increases from 50 K at low power to 180 K at 90% n.p. This is about the double of the experimental error margins. Measured SA heat transfer coefficients are by nearly 20% lower than corresponding heat transfer parameters used in the calculations. Discrepancies found between measured and calculated results also indicate that either the transient heat transfer in the gap between fuel and cladding (gap conductance) might not be exactly reproduced in the computer code or that the gap in the fresh fuel was larger than assumed in the calculations. (orig.) [de

  16. BETTER FINGERPRINT IMAGE COMPRESSION AT LOWER BIT-RATES: AN APPROACH USING MULTIWAVELETS WITH OPTIMISED PREFILTER COEFFICIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N R Rema

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a multiwavelet based fingerprint compression technique using set partitioning in hierarchical trees (SPIHT algorithm with optimised prefilter coefficients is proposed. While wavelet based progressive compression techniques give a blurred image at lower bit rates due to lack of high frequency information, multiwavelets can be used efficiently to represent high frequency information. SA4 (Symmetric Antisymmetric multiwavelet when combined with SPIHT reduces the number of nodes during initialization to 1/4th compared to SPIHT with wavelet. This reduction in nodes leads to improvement in PSNR at lower bit rates. The PSNR can be further improved by optimizing the prefilter coefficients. In this work genetic algorithm (GA is used for optimizing prefilter coefficients. Using the proposed technique, there is a considerable improvement in PSNR at lower bit rates, compared to existing techniques in literature. An overall average improvement of 4.23dB and 2.52dB for bit rates in between 0.01 to 1 has been achieved for the images in the databases FVC 2000 DB1 and FVC 2002 DB3 respectively. The quality of the reconstructed image is better even at higher compression ratios like 80:1 and 100:1. The level of decomposition required for a multiwavelet is lesser compared to a wavelet.

  17. Decay rate of the false vacuum at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eboli, O.J.P.; Marques, G.C.

    1986-01-01

    We investigate, within the semiclassical approach, the high temperature behaviour of the decay rate (Γ) of the metastable vacuum in Field Theory. We exhibit some exactly soluble (1+1) and (3+1) dimensional examples and develop a formal expression for γ in the high temperature limit. (Author) [pt

  18. Temperature dependence of dose rate laser simulation adequacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skorobogatov, P.K.; Nikiforov, A.Y.; Demidov, A.A.

    1999-01-01

    2-D numerical modeling was carried out to analyze the temperature dependence of dose rate laser simulation adequacy in application to p-n junction ionising current. Experimental validation was performed using test structure in the temperature range of 0 to 100 deg.C. (authors)

  19. Grinding temperature and energy ratio coefficient in MQL grinding of high-temperature nickel-base alloy by using different vegetable oils as base oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Benkai

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Vegetable oil can be used as a base oil in minimal quantity of lubrication (MQL. This study compared the performances of MQL grinding by using castor oil, soybean oil, rapeseed oil, corn oil, sunflower oil, peanut oil, and palm oil as base oils. A K-P36 numerical-control precision surface grinder was used to perform plain grinding on a workpiece material with a high-temperature nickel base alloy. A YDM–III 99 three-dimensional dynamometer was used to measure grinding force, and a clip-type thermocouple was used to determine grinding temperature. The grinding force, grinding temperature, and energy ratio coefficient of MQL grinding were compared among the seven vegetable oil types. Results revealed that (1 castor oil-based MQL grinding yields the lowest grinding force but exhibits the highest grinding temperature and energy ratio coefficient; (2 palm oil-based MQL grinding generates the second lowest grinding force but shows the lowest grinding temperature and energy ratio coefficient; (3 MQL grinding based on the five other vegetable oils produces similar grinding forces, grinding temperatures, and energy ratio coefficients, with values ranging between those of castor oil and palm oil; (4 viscosity significantly influences grinding force and grinding temperature to a greater extent than fatty acid varieties and contents in vegetable oils; (5 although more viscous vegetable oil exhibits greater lubrication and significantly lower grinding force than less viscous vegetable oil, high viscosity reduces the heat exchange capability of vegetable oil and thus yields a high grinding temperature; (6 saturated fatty acid is a more efficient lubricant than unsaturated fatty acid; and (7 a short carbon chain transfers heat more effectively than a long carbon chain. Palm oil is the optimum base oil of MQL grinding, and this base oil yields 26.98 N tangential grinding force, 87.10 N normal grinding force, 119.6 °C grinding temperature, and 42.7% energy

  20. Does runoff or temperature control chemical weathering rates?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eiriksdottir, Eydis Salome; Gislason, Sigurdur Reynir; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The rate chemical weathering is affected by both temperature and runoff. Separating out these two factors is challenging because runoff tends to increase with increasing temperature. → In this study, natural river water samples collected on basaltic catchments over a five year period are used together with experimentally derived dissolution rate model for basaltic glass to pull apart the effects of runoff and temperature. → This study shows that the rate of chemical denudation is controlled by both temperature and runoff, but is dominated by runoff. - Abstract: The rate of chemical denudation is controlled by both temperature and runoff. The relative role of these two factors in the rivers of NE Iceland is determined through the rigorous analysis of their water chemistry over a 5-a period. River catchments are taken to be analogous to laboratory flow reactors; like the fluid in flow reactors, the loss of each dissolved element in river water is the sum of that of the original rainwater plus that added from kinetically controlled dissolution and precipitation reactions. Consideration of the laboratory determined dissolution rate behaviour of basalts and measured water chemistry indicates that the maximum effect of changing temperature on chemical denudation in the NE Icelandic rivers was 5-25% of the total change, whereas that of runoff was 75-95%. The bulk of the increased denudation rates with runoff appear to stem from an increase in reactive surface area for chemical weathering of catchment solids.

  1. Negative temperature coefficient of the action of DDT in a sense organ

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bercken, J. van den; Akkermans, L.M.A.

    1972-01-01

    DDT induced repetitive spontaneuos activity inthe afferent nerve fibers of the lateral-line organ of the clawed toad, Xenopus laevis. The action of DDT increased markedly with lowered temperature. This temperature-effect was easily reversible. The results demonstrate that DDT has a definite negative

  2. The effect of transition metals additions on the temperature coefficient of linear expansion of titanium and vanadium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesnaya, M.I.; Volokitin, G.G.; Kashchuk, V.A.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported of an experimental research into the influence of small additions of α-transition metals on the temperature coefficient of linear expansion of titanium and vanadium. Using the configuration model of substance as the basis, expeained are the lowering of the critical liquefaction temperature or the melting point of vanadium and the raising of it, as caused by the addition of metals of the 6 group of the periodic chart and by the addition of metals of the 8 group, respectively, and also a shift in the temperature of the polymorphic α-β-transformation of titanium. Suggested as the best alloying metal for vanadium are tungsten and tantalum; for titaniums is vanadium whose admixtures lower the melting point and shift the polymorphic transformation temperature by as much as 100 to 120 degrees

  3. Analytical calculation of the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient for pebble bed and prismatic high temperature reactors for plutonium and uranium-thorium fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talamo, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    We analytically evaluated the fuel coefficient of temperature both for pebble bed and prismatic high temperature reactors when they utilize as fuel plutonium and minor actinides from light water reactors spent fuel or a mixture of 50% uranium, enriched 20% in 235 U, and 50% thorium. In both cores the calculation involves the evaluation of the resonances integrals of the high absorbers fuel nuclides 240 Pu, 238 U and 232 Th and it requires the esteem of the Dancoff-Ginsburg factor for a pebble bed or prismatic core. The Dancoff-Ginsburg factor represents the only discriminating parameter in the results for the two different reactors types; in fact, both the pebble bed and the prismatic reactors share the same the pseudo-cross-section describing an infinite medium made of graphite filled by TRISO particles. We considered only the resolved resonances with a statistical spin factor equal to one and we took into account 267, 72, 212 resonances in the range 1.057-5692, 6.674-14485, 21.78-3472 eV for 240 Pu, 238 U and 232 Th, respectively, for investigating the influence on the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient of the variation of the TRISO kernel radius and TRISO particles packing fraction from 100, 200 to 300 μm and from 10% to 50%, respectively. Finally, in the pebble bed core, we varied the radius of the pebble for setting a fuel temperature reactivity coefficient similar to the one of a prismatic core

  4. From boiling point to glass transition temperature: transport coefficients in molecular liquids follow three-parameter scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtke, B; Petzold, N; Kahlau, R; Hofmann, M; Rössler, E A

    2012-10-01

    The phenomenon of the glass transition is an unresolved problem in condensed matter physics. Its prominent feature, the super-Arrhenius temperature dependence of the transport coefficients, remains a challenge to be described over the full temperature range. For a series of molecular glass formers, we combined τ(T) collected from dielectric spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering covering a range 10(-12) s < τ(T) < 10(2) s. Describing the dynamics in terms of an activation energy E(T), we distinguish a high-temperature regime characterized by an Arrhenius law with a constant activation energy E(∞) and a low-temperature regime for which E(coop)(T) ≡ E(T)-E(∞) increases exponentially while cooling. A scaling is introduced, specifically E(coop)(T)/E(∞) [proportionality] exp[-λ(T/T(A)-1)], where λ is a fragility parameter and T(A) a reference temperature proportional to E(∞). In order to describe τ(T) still the attempt time τ(∞) has to be specified. Thus, a single interaction parameter E(∞) describing the high-temperature regime together with λ controls the temperature dependence of low-temperature cooperative dynamics.

  5. Reevaluation of the O+(2P) reaction rate coefficients derived from atmosphere explorer C observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, T.; Torr, D.G.; Richards, P.G.; Solomon, S.C.

    1993-01-01

    O + ( 2 P) is an important species for studies of the ionosphere and thermosphere: its emission at 7320 angstrom can be used as a diagnostic of the thermospheric atomic oxygen density. Unfortunately, there are no laboratory measurements of the O and N 2 reaction rates which are needed to determine the major sinks of O + ( 2 P). The reaction rates that are generally used were determined from aeronomic data by Rusch et al. but there is evidence that several important inputs that they used should be changed. The authors have recalculated the O and N 2 reaction rates for O + ( 2 P) using recent improvements in the solar EUV flux, cross sections, and photoelectron fluxes. For the standard solar EUV flux, the new N 2 reaction rate of 3.4 ± 1.5 x 10 -10 cm 3 s -1 is close to the value obtained by Rusch et al., but the new O reaction rate of 4.0 ± 1.9 x 10 -10 cm 3 s -1 is about 8 times larger. These new reaction rates are derived using neutral densities, electron density, and solar EUV fluxes measured by Atmosphere Explorer C in 1974 during solar minimum. The new theoretical emission rates are in good agreement with the data for the two orbits studied by Rusch et al. and they are in reasonable agreement with data from five additional orbits that are used in this study. The authors have also examined the effect of uncertainties in the solar EUV flux on the derived reaction rates and found that 15% uncertainties in the solar flux could cause additional uncertainties of up to a factor of 1.5 in the O quenching rate. 19 refs., 4 figs., 8 tabs

  6. Reevaluation of the O(+)(2P) reaction rate coefficients derived from Atmosphere Explorer C observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, T.; Torr, D. G.; Richards, P. G.; Solomon, S. C.

    1993-01-01

    O(+)(2P) is an important species for studies of the ionosphere and thermosphere: its emission at 7320 A can be used as a diagnostic of the thermospheric atomic oxygen density. Unfortunately, there are no laboratory measurements of the O and N2 reaction rates which are needed to determine the major sinks of (O+)(2p). We have recalculated the O and N2 reaction rates for O(+) (2P) using recent improvements in the solar EUV flux, cross sections, and photoelectron fluxes. For the standard solar EUV flux, the new N2 reaction rate of 3.4 +/- 1.5 x 10 exp -10 cu cm/s is close to the value obtained by Rusch et al. (1977), but the new O reaction rate of 4.0 +/- 1.9 x 10 exp -10 cu cm/sec is about 8 times larger. These new reaction rates are derived using neutral densities, electron density, and solar EUV fluxes measured by Atmosphere Explorer C in 1974 during solar minimum. The new theoretical emission rates are in good agreement with the data for the two orbits studied by Rusch et al.

  7. Calculation of rate coefficients of some proton-transfer ion-molecule reactions in weakly ionized gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiller, W.

    1985-01-01

    A classical collision theory is used to describe thermal bimolecular rate coefficeints for reaction between positive and negative ions and polar molecules in a carrier gas. Special attention is paid to ion-molecule reaction in which proton transfer occurs. These reactions play an important role in terrestrial plasma devices, in ionosphere, in planetary atmospheres and in interstellar matter. The equilibrium rate coefficients of the reactions are calculated based on a microscopic reactive cross section derived from a long distance polar molecule-ion potential. The results are compared with experimental values of afterglow measurements. (D.Gy.)

  8. Measurements of Drag Coefficients and Rotation Rates of Free-Falling Helixes

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Omari, Abdulrhaman A.

    2016-05-01

    The motion of bacteria in the environment is relevant to several fields. At very small scales and with simple helical shapes, we are able to describe experimentally and mathematically the motion of solid spirals falling freely within a liquid pool. Using these shapes we intend to mimic the motion of bacteria called Spirochetes. We seek to experimentally investigate the linear and the rotational motion of such shapes. A better understanding of the dynamics of this process will be practical not only on engineering and physics, but the bioscience and environmental as well. In the following pages, we explore the role of the shape on the motion of passive solid helixes in different liquids. We fabricate three solid helical shapes and drop them under gravity in water, glycerol and a mixture of 30% glycerol in water. That generated rotation due to helical angle in water. However, we observe the rotation disappear in glycerol. The movement of the solid helical shapes is imaged using a high-speed video camera. Then, the images are analyzed using the supplied software and a computer. Using these simultaneous measurements, we examine the terminal velocity of solid helical shapes. Using this information we computed the drag coefficient and the drag force. We obtain the helical angular velocity and the torque applied to the solid. The results of this study will allow us to more accurately predict the motion of solid helical shape. This analysis will also shed light onto biological questions of bacteria movement.

  9. A low temperature drift coefficient crystal-less frequency reference clock compensated by temperature sensor for microsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhiqiang; Wu, Ruixuan; Wang, Yuteng; Gao, Yuan; Liu, Xiaowei; Zhu, Jiaqi

    2018-05-01

    Quartz oscillator has been widely used as reference clock source in the microsystems due to its good performance. But a good crystal oscillator costs too much and its bulky size is not desired. This paper aims at designing an alternative integrated oscillator to replace the external quartz oscillator. The proposed circuit used maneatis delay cell to construct a ring oscillator for its superior linear I-V characteristic. As for a frequency reference clock, its frequency stability over temperature is required at first. After detailed mathematical deducing and careful analysis, a formula is proposed to describe the relationship between desired control voltage and temperature by assuming the frequency as constant. This paper utilized bipolar transistor as the temperature sensor, combining it with CTAT current source and resistor to create a first-order temperature compensation control voltage. The chip with typical frequency of 10 MHz was fabricated in a 0.35 μm CMOS technology and occupied 0.45 mm2. The measured results show that the frequency variation is ±0.2% for supply changes from 4.8 V to 5 V, and frequency variation is 48 ppm when the temperature change is from ‑40∘C to 85∘C, while the average current of the tested chip consumes 50 μA from 5 V.

  10. A variational centroid density procedure for the calculation of transmission coefficients for asymmetric barriers at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messina, M.; Schenter, G.K.; Garrett, B.C.

    1995-01-01

    The low temperature behavior of the centroid density method of Voth, Chandler, and Miller (VCM) [J. Chem. Phys. 91, 7749 (1989)] is investigated for tunneling through a one-dimensional barrier. We find that the bottleneck for a quantum activated process as defined by VCM does not correspond to the classical bottleneck for the case of an asymmetric barrier. If the centroid density is constrained to be at the classical bottleneck for an asymmetric barrier, the centroid density method can give transmission coefficients that are too large by as much as five orders of magnitude. We follow a variational procedure, as suggested by VCM, whereby the best transmission coefficient is found by varying the position of the centroid until the minimum value for this transmission coefficient is obtained. This is a procedure that is readily generalizable to multidimensional systems. We present calculations on several test systems which show that this variational procedure greatly enhances the accuracy of the centroid density method compared to when the centroid is constrained to be at the barrier top. Furthermore, the relation of this procedure to the low temperature periodic orbit or ''instanton'' approach is discussed. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  11. Mid-infrared response of reduced graphene oxide and its high-temperature coefficient of resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Liang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Much effort has been made to study the formation mechanisms of photocurrents in graphene and reduced graphene oxide films under visible and near-infrared light irradiation. A built-in field and photo-thermal electrons have been applied to explain the experiments. However, much less attention has been paid to clarifying the mid-infrared response of reduced graphene oxide films at room temperature. Thus, mid-infrared photoresponse and annealing temperature-dependent resistance experiments were carried out on reduced graphene oxide films. A maximum photocurrent of 75 μA was observed at room temperature, which was dominated by the bolometer effect, where the resistance of the films decreased as the temperature increased after they had absorbed light. The electrons localized in the defect states and the residual oxygen groups were thermally excited into the conduction band, forming a photocurrent. In addition, a temperature increase of 2 °C for the films after light irradiation for 2 minutes was observed using absorption power calculations. This work details a way to use reduced graphene oxide films that contain appropriate defects and residual oxygen groups as bolometer-sensitive materials in the mid-infrared range.

  12. A Review of Rate Coefficients in the D2-F2 Chemical Laser System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-08-05

    analyzed by subjecting the mixture to a high-frequency dis- charge, then using EPR to assay the relative H and D atom concentrations. The rate...856 ( 1935 ). Anlauf, K. G. , P. E. Charters, D. S. Home, R. G. MacDonald, D. II. Maylotte, J. C. Polanyi, W. J

  13. Effects of temperature and sliding rate on frictional strength of granite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockner, D.A.; Summers, R.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Layers of artificial granite gouge have been deformed on saw-cut granite surfaces inclined 30?? to the sample axes. Samples were deformed at a constant confining pressure of 250 MPa and temperatures of 22 to 845??C. The velocity dependence of the steady-state coefficient of friction (??ss) was determined by comparing sliding strengths at different sliding rates. The results of these measurements are consistent with those reported by Solberg and Byerlee (1984) at room temperature and Stesky (1975) between 300 and 400??C. Stesky found that the slip-rate dependence of (??ss) increased above 400??C. In the present study, however, the velocity dependence of (??ss) was nearly independent of temperature. ?? 1986 Birkha??user Verlag.

  14. Constant temperatures and the rate of seed germination in maize ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The rate of germination of the NEM cultivar was faster than that of the QPM cultivar at all temperatures. The thermal times for median germination were 46 for QPM and 40.7 oCd for the NEM cultivar. The cardinal temperatures (base, Tb, optimum, To and ceiling, Tc) for the NEM cultivar were Tb: 7, To: 30 and Tc: 48.2 oC.

  15. Exploring the negative temperature coefficient behavior of acetaldehyde based on detailed intermediate measurements in a jet-stirred reactor

    KAUST Repository

    Tao, Tao

    2018-03-20

    Acetaldehyde is an observed emission species and a key intermediate produced during the combustion and low-temperature oxidation of fossil and bio-derived fuels. Investigations into the low-temperature oxidation chemistry of acetaldehyde are essential to develop a better core mechanism and to better understand auto-ignition and cool flame phenomena. Here, the oxidation of acetaldehyde was studied at low-temperatures (528–946 K) in a jet-stirred reactor (JSR) with the corrected residence time of 2.7 s at 700 Torr. This work describes a detailed set of experimental results that capture the negative temperature coefficient (NTC) behavior in the low-temperature oxidation of acetaldehyde. The mole fractions of 28 species were measured as functions of the temperature by employing a vacuum ultra-violet photoionization molecular-beam mass spectrometer. To explain the observed NTC behavior, an updated mechanism was proposed, which well reproduces the concentration profiles of many observed peroxide intermediates. The kinetic analysis based on the updated mechanism reveals that the NTC behavior of acetaldehyde oxidation is caused by the competition between the O-addition to and the decomposition of the CHCO radical.

  16. Exploring the negative temperature coefficient behavior of acetaldehyde based on detailed intermediate measurements in a jet-stirred reactor

    KAUST Repository

    Tao, Tao; Sun, Wenyu; Hansen, Nils; Jasper, Ahren W.; Moshammer, Kai; Chen, Bingjie; Wang, Zhandong; Huang, Can; Dagaut, Philippe; Yang, Bin

    2018-01-01

    Acetaldehyde is an observed emission species and a key intermediate produced during the combustion and low-temperature oxidation of fossil and bio-derived fuels. Investigations into the low-temperature oxidation chemistry of acetaldehyde are essential to develop a better core mechanism and to better understand auto-ignition and cool flame phenomena. Here, the oxidation of acetaldehyde was studied at low-temperatures (528–946 K) in a jet-stirred reactor (JSR) with the corrected residence time of 2.7 s at 700 Torr. This work describes a detailed set of experimental results that capture the negative temperature coefficient (NTC) behavior in the low-temperature oxidation of acetaldehyde. The mole fractions of 28 species were measured as functions of the temperature by employing a vacuum ultra-violet photoionization molecular-beam mass spectrometer. To explain the observed NTC behavior, an updated mechanism was proposed, which well reproduces the concentration profiles of many observed peroxide intermediates. The kinetic analysis based on the updated mechanism reveals that the NTC behavior of acetaldehyde oxidation is caused by the competition between the O-addition to and the decomposition of the CHCO radical.

  17. Distinct positive temperature coefficient effect of polymer-carbon fiber composites evaluated in terms of polymer absorption on fiber surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Zheng, Shaodi; Zheng, Xiaofang; Liu, Zhengying; Yang, Wei; Yang, Mingbo

    2016-03-21

    In this article, the positive temperature coefficient (PTC) effect was studied for high-density polyethylene (HDPE)/carbon fiber (CF) composites. All of the samples showed a significant PTC effect during the heating processes without a negative temperature coefficient (NTC) effect, even at a temperature much higher than the melting point of the polymer matrix. An ever-increasing PTC intensity with increasing thermal cycles was observed in our study that had never been reported in previous research. The absence of a NTC effect resulted from the increased binding force between the matrix and fillers that contributed to the very special structure of CF surface. We incorporated thermal expansion theory and quantum tunneling effects to explain PTC effect. From the SEM micrographs for the HDPE/CF composites before and after the different thermal cycles, we found that the surface of CF was covered with a layer of polymer which resulted in a change in the gap length between CF and HDPE and its distribution. We believed that the gap change induced by polymer absorption on the fiber surface had a great effect on the PTC effect.

  18. Attributing Changing Rates of Temperature Record Breaking to Anthropogenic Influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Andrew D.

    2017-11-01

    Record-breaking temperatures attract attention from the media, so understanding how and why the rate of record breaking is changing may be useful in communicating the effects of climate change. A simple methodology designed for estimating the anthropogenic influence on rates of record breaking in a given time series is proposed here. The frequency of hot and cold record-breaking temperature occurrences is shown to be changing due to the anthropogenic influence on the climate. Using ensembles of model simulations with and without human-induced forcings, it is demonstrated that the effect of climate change on global record-breaking temperatures can be detected as far back as the 1930s. On local scales, a climate change signal is detected more recently at most locations. The anthropogenic influence on the increased occurrence of hot record-breaking temperatures is clearer than it is for the decreased occurrence of cold records. The approach proposed here could be applied in rapid attribution studies of record extremes to quantify the influence of climate change on the rate of record breaking in addition to the climate anomaly being studied. This application is demonstrated for the global temperature record of 2016 and the Central England temperature record in 2014.

  19. Synchronous temperature rate control for refrigeration with reduced energy consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Alberto Regio; Keres, Stephen L.; Kuehl, Steven J.; Litch, Andrew D.; Richmond, Peter J.; Wu, Guolian

    2015-09-22

    Methods of operation for refrigerator appliance configurations with a controller, a condenser, at least one evaporator, a compressor, and two refrigeration compartments. The configuration may be equipped with a variable-speed or variable-capacity compressor, variable speed evaporator or compartment fans, a damper, and/or a dual-temperature evaporator with a valve system to control flow of refrigerant through one or more pressure reduction devices. The methods may include synchronizing alternating cycles of cooling each compartment to a temperature approximately equal to the compartment set point temperature by operation of the compressor, fans, damper and/or valve system. The methods may also include controlling the cooling rate in one or both compartments. Refrigeration compartment cooling may begin at an interval before or after when the freezer compartment reaches its lower threshold temperature. Freezer compartment cooling may begin at an interval before or after when the freezer compartment reaches its upper threshold temperature.

  20. Synchronous temperature rate control for refrigeration with reduced energy consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Alberto Regio; Keres, Stephen L.; Kuehl, Steven J.; Litch, Andrew D.; Richmond, Peter J.; Wu, Guolian

    2017-11-07

    Methods of operation for refrigerator appliance configurations with a controller, a condenser, at least one evaporator, a compressor, and two refrigeration compartments. The configuration may be equipped with a variable-speed or variable-capacity compressor, variable speed evaporator or compartment fans, a damper, and/or a dual-temperature evaporator with a valve system to control flow of refrigerant through one or more pressure reduction devices. The methods may include synchronizing alternating cycles of cooling each compartment to a temperature approximately equal to the compartment set point temperature by operation of the compressor, fans, damper and/or valve system. The methods may also include controlling the cooling rate in one or both compartments. Refrigeration compartment cooling may begin at an interval before or after when the freezer compartment reaches its lower threshold temperature. Freezer compartment cooling may begin at an interval before or after when the freezer compartment reaches its upper threshold temperature.

  1. Experimental determination of the Koo fuel temperature coefficient for an HTGR lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostini, P.; Benedetti, F.; Brighenti, G.; Chiodi, P. L.; Dell' Oro, P.; Giuliani, C.; Tassan, S.

    1974-10-15

    This paper describes temperature-dependent k-infinity measurements conducted using an assembly of loose HTGR coated particles in the BR-2 reactor by means of null reactivity oscillating method comparing the effect of poisoned and unpoisoned lattices like tests performed in the Physical Constants Test Reactor (PCTR) at Hanford. The RB-2 reactor was the property of the Italian firm AGIP NUCLEARE and operated at the Montecuccolino Center in Bologna.

  2. Lithium bromide high-temperature absorption heat pump: coefficient of performance and exergetic efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izquierdo, M [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid (ES). Inst. de Optica; Aroca, S [Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Valladolid (ES). Catedratico de Ingenieria Termica

    1990-04-01

    A theoretical study of a lithium bromide absorption heat pump, used as a machine type I and aimed to produce heat at 120{sup 0}C via waste heat sources at 60{sup 0}C, is given. Real performance conditions are stated for each component of the machine. By means of thermodynamic diagrams (p, t, x) and (h, x), the required data are obtained for calculation of the heat recovered in the evaporator Q{sub e}, the heat delivered to the absorber Q{sub a} and to the condenser Q{sub c}, and the heat supplied to the generator Q{sub g}. The heat delivered by the hot solution to the cold solution in the heat recovered Q{sub r}, and the work W{sub p} done by the solution pump are calculated. The probable COP is calculated as close to 1.4 and the working temperature in the generator ranges from 178 to 200{sup 0}C. The heat produced by the heat pump is 22% cheaper than that obtained from a cogeneration system comprising a natural gas internal combustion engine and high temperature heat pump with mechanical compression. Compared with a high temperature heat pump with mechanical compression, the heat produced by the absorption heat pump is 31% cheaper. From (h, x) and (s, x) diagrams, exergy losses for each component can be determined leading to an exergetic efficiency of 75% which provides the quality index of the absorption cycle. (author).

  3. Evaluating new methods for direct measurement of the moderator temperature coefficient in nuclear power plants during normal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makai, M.; Kalya, Z.; Nemes, I.; Pos, I.; Por, G.

    2007-01-01

    Moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity is not monitored during fuel cycles in WWER reactors, because it is not very easy or impossible to measure it without disturbing the normal operation. Two new methods were tested in our WWER type nuclear power plant to try methodologies, which enable to measure that important to safety parameter during the fuel cycle. One is based on small perturbances, and only small changes are requested in operation, the other is based on noise methods, which means it is without interference with reactor operation. Both method is new that aspects that they uses the plant computer data(VERONA) based signals calculated by C P ORCA diffusion code (Authors)

  4. Monte Carlo analysis of experiments on the reactivity temperature coefficient for UO2 and MOX light water moderated lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erradi, L.; Chetaine, A.; Chakir, E.; Kharchaf, A.; Elbardouni, T.; Elkhoukhi, T.

    2005-01-01

    In a previous work, we have analysed the main French experiments available on the reactivity temperature coefficient (RTC): CREOLE and MISTRAL experiments. In these experiments, the RTC has been measured in both UO 2 and UO 2 -PuO 2 PWR type lattices. Our calculations, using APOLLO2 code with CEA93 library based on JEF2.2 evaluation, have shown that the calculation error in UO 2 lattices is less than 1 pcm/C degrees which is considered as the target accuracy. On the other hand the calculation error in the MOX lattices is more significant in both low and high temperature ranges: an average error of -2 ± 0.5 pcm/C degrees is observed in low temperatures and an error of +3 ± 2 pcm/C degrees is obtained for temperatures higher than 250 C degrees. In the present work, we analysed additional experimental benchmarks on the RTC of UO 2 and MOX light water moderated lattices. To analyze these benchmarks and with the aim of minimizing uncertainties related to modelling of the experimental set up, we chose the Monte Carlo method which has the advantage of taking into account in the most exact manner the geometry of the experimental configurations. This analysis shows for the UO 2 lattices, a maximum experiment-calculation deviation of about 0,7 pcm/C degrees, which is below the target accuracy for this type of lattices. For the KAMINI experiment, which relates to the measurement of the RTC in a light water moderated lattice using U-233 as fuel our analysis shows that the ENDF/B6 library gives the best result, with an experiment-calculation deviation of the order of -0,16 pcm/C degrees. The analysis of the benchmarks using MOX fuel made it possible to highlight a discrepancy between experiment and calculation on the RTC of about -0.7 pcm/C degrees (for a range of temperatures going from 20 to 248 C degrees) and -1,2 pcm/C degrees (for a range of temperatures going from 20 to 80 C degrees). This result, in particular the tendency which has the error to decrease when the

  5. Investigation on powder metallurgy Cr-Si-Ta-Al alloy target for high-resistance thin film resistors with low temperature coefficient of resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.Y.; Zhang, Z.S.; Bai, T.

    2010-01-01

    The sputtering target for high-resistance thin film resistors plays a decisive role in temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR). Silicon-rich chromium (Cr)-silicon (Si) target was designed and smelted for high-resistance thin film resistors with low TCR. Valve metal tantalum (Ta) and aluminum (Al) were introduced to the Cr-Si target to improve the performance of the target prepared. The measures for grain refining in smelting Cr-Si-Ta-Al target were taken to improve the performance of the prepared target. The mechanism and role of grain refinement were discussed in the paper. The phase structure of the prepared target was detected by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Rate of temperature drop was studied to reduce the internal stress of alloy target and conquer the easy cracking disadvantage of silicon-rich target. The electrical properties of sputtered thin film resistors were tested to evaluate the performance of the prepared target indirectly.

  6. On the Temperature Dependence of Enzyme-Catalyzed Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcus, Vickery L; Prentice, Erica J; Hobbs, Joanne K; Mulholland, Adrian J; Van der Kamp, Marc W; Pudney, Christopher R; Parker, Emily J; Schipper, Louis A

    2016-03-29

    One of the critical variables that determine the rate of any reaction is temperature. For biological systems, the effects of temperature are convoluted with myriad (and often opposing) contributions from enzyme catalysis, protein stability, and temperature-dependent regulation, for example. We have coined the phrase "macromolecular rate theory (MMRT)" to describe the temperature dependence of enzyme-catalyzed rates independent of stability or regulatory processes. Central to MMRT is the observation that enzyme-catalyzed reactions occur with significant values of ΔCp(‡) that are in general negative. That is, the heat capacity (Cp) for the enzyme-substrate complex is generally larger than the Cp for the enzyme-transition state complex. Consistent with a classical description of enzyme catalysis, a negative value for ΔCp(‡) is the result of the enzyme binding relatively weakly to the substrate and very tightly to the transition state. This observation of negative ΔCp(‡) has important implications for the temperature dependence of enzyme-catalyzed rates. Here, we lay out the fundamentals of MMRT. We present a number of hypotheses that arise directly from MMRT including a theoretical justification for the large size of enzymes and the basis for their optimum temperatures. We rationalize the behavior of psychrophilic enzymes and describe a "psychrophilic trap" which places limits on the evolution of enzymes in low temperature environments. One of the defining characteristics of biology is catalysis of chemical reactions by enzymes, and enzymes drive much of metabolism. Therefore, we also expect to see characteristics of MMRT at the level of cells, whole organisms, and even ecosystems.

  7. Experimental Investigation of Friction Coefficient and Wear Rate of Composite Materials Sliding Against Smooth and Rough Mild Steel Counterfaces

    OpenAIRE

    M.A. Chowdhury; D.M. Nuruzzaman; B.K. Roy; S. Samad; R. Sarker; A.H.M. Rezwan

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, friction coefficient and wear rate of gear fiber reinforced plastic (gear fiber) and glass fiber reinforced plastic (glass fiber) sliding against mild steel are investigated experimentally. In order to do so, a pin on disc apparatus is designed and fabricated. Experiments are carried out when smooth or rough mild steel pin slides on gear fiber and glass fiber disc. Experiments are conducted at normal load 10, 15 and 20 N, sliding velocity 1, 1.5 and 2 m/s and relative h...

  8. Estimation of internal heat transfer coefficients and detection of rib positions in gas turbine blades from transient surface temperature measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidrich, P; Wolfersdorf, J v; Schmidt, S; Schnieder, M

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a non-invasive, non-destructive, transient inverse measurement technique that allows one to determine internal heat transfer coefficients and rib positions of real gas turbine blades from outer surface temperature measurements after a sudden flow heating. The determination of internal heat transfer coefficients is important during the design process to adjust local heat transfer to spatial thermal load. The detection of rib positions is important during production to fulfill design and quality requirements. For the analysis the one-dimensional transient heat transfer problem inside of the turbine blade's wall was solved. This solution was combined with the Levenberg-Marquardt method to estimate the unknown boundary condition by an inverse technique. The method was tested with artificial data to determine uncertainties with positive results. Then experimental testing with a reference model was carried out. Based on the results, it is concluded that the presented inverse technique could be used to determine internal heat transfer coefficients and to detect rib positions of real turbine blades.

  9. Thermodynamic properties and transport coefficients of a two-temperature polytetrafluoroethylene vapor plasma for ablation-controlled discharge applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiyan; Wang, Weizong; Yan, Joseph D.; Qi, Haiyang; Geng, Jinyue; Wu, Yaowu

    2017-10-01

    Ablation-controlled plasmas have been used in a range of technical applications where local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) is often violated near the wall due to the strong cooling effect caused by the ablation of wall materials. The thermodynamic and transport properties of ablated polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) vapor, which determine the flowing plasma behavior in such applications, are calculated based on a two-temperature model at atmospheric pressure. To our knowledge, no data for PTFE have been reported in the literature. The species composition and thermodynamic properties are numerically determined using the two-temperature Saha equation and the Guldberg-Waage equation according to van de Sanden et al’s derivation. The transport coefficients, including viscosity, thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity, are calculated with the most recent collision interaction potentials using Devoto’s electron and heavy-particle decoupling approach but expanded to the third-order approximation (second-order for viscosity) in the frame of the Chapman-Enskog method. Results are computed for different degrees of thermal non-equilibrium, i.e. the ratio of electron to heavy-particle temperatures, from 1 to 10, with electron temperature ranging from 300 to 40 000 K. Plasma transport properties in the LTE state obtained from the present work are compared with existing published results and the causes for the discrepancy analyzed. The two-temperature plasma properties calculated in the present work enable the modeling of wall ablation-controlled plasma processes.

  10. Thermodynamic properties and transport coefficients of a two-temperature polytetrafluoroethylene vapor plasma for ablation-controlled discharge applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Haiyan; Qi, Haiyang; Wang, Weizong; Yan, Joseph D; Geng, Jinyue; Wu, Yaowu

    2017-01-01

    Ablation-controlled plasmas have been used in a range of technical applications where local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) is often violated near the wall due to the strong cooling effect caused by the ablation of wall materials. The thermodynamic and transport properties of ablated polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) vapor, which determine the flowing plasma behavior in such applications, are calculated based on a two-temperature model at atmospheric pressure. To our knowledge, no data for PTFE have been reported in the literature. The species composition and thermodynamic properties are numerically determined using the two-temperature Saha equation and the Guldberg–Waage equation according to van de Sanden et al ’s derivation. The transport coefficients, including viscosity, thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity, are calculated with the most recent collision interaction potentials using Devoto’s electron and heavy-particle decoupling approach but expanded to the third-order approximation (second-order for viscosity) in the frame of the Chapman–Enskog method. Results are computed for different degrees of thermal non-equilibrium, i.e. the ratio of electron to heavy-particle temperatures, from 1 to 10, with electron temperature ranging from 300 to 40 000 K. Plasma transport properties in the LTE state obtained from the present work are compared with existing published results and the causes for the discrepancy analyzed. The two-temperature plasma properties calculated in the present work enable the modeling of wall ablation-controlled plasma processes. (paper)

  11. Analytical calculation of the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient for pebble bed and prismatic high temperature reactors for plutonium and uranium-thorium fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, Alberto [Department of Nuclear and Reactor Physics, Royal Institute of Technology - KTH, Roslagstullsbacken 21, S-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)]. E-mail: alby@anl.gov

    2007-01-15

    We analytically evaluated the fuel coefficient of temperature both for pebble bed and prismatic high temperature reactors when they utilize as fuel plutonium and minor actinides from light water reactors spent fuel or a mixture of 50% uranium, enriched 20% in {sup 235}U, and 50% thorium. In both cores the calculation involves the evaluation of the resonances integrals of the high absorbers fuel nuclides {sup 240}Pu, {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th and it requires the esteem of the Dancoff-Ginsburg factor for a pebble bed or prismatic core. The Dancoff-Ginsburg factor represents the only discriminating parameter in the results for the two different reactors types; in fact, both the pebble bed and the prismatic reactors share the same the pseudo-cross-section describing an infinite medium made of graphite filled by TRISO particles. We considered only the resolved resonances with a statistical spin factor equal to one and we took into account 267, 72, 212 resonances in the range 1.057-5692, 6.674-14485, 21.78-3472 eV for {sup 240}Pu, {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th, respectively, for investigating the influence on the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient of the variation of the TRISO kernel radius and TRISO particles packing fraction from 100, 200 to 300 {mu}m and from 10% to 50%, respectively. Finally, in the pebble bed core, we varied the radius of the pebble for setting a fuel temperature reactivity coefficient similar to the one of a prismatic core.

  12. Temperature effects on lithium-nitrogen reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijams, W.J.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1985-08-01

    A series of experiments have been run with the aim of measuring the reaction rate of lithium and nitrogen over a wide spectrum of lithium pool temperatures. In these experiments, pure nitrogen was blown at a controlled flow rate over a preheated lithium pool. The pool had a surface area of approximately 4 cm 2 and a total volume of approximately 6 cm 3 . The system pressure varied from 0 to 4 psig. The reaction rate was very small - approximately 0.002 to 0.003 g Li min cm 2 for lithium temperatures below 500 0 C. Above 500 0 C the reaction rate began to increase sharply, and reached a maximum of approximately 0.80 g Li min cm 2 above 700 0 C. It dropped off beyond 1000 0 C and seemed to approach zero at 1150 0 C. The maximum reaction rate observed in these forced convection experiments was higher by 60% than those previously observed in experiments where the nitrogen flowed to the reaction site by means of natural convection. During a reaction, a hard nitride layer built up on the surface of the lithium pool - its effect on the reaction rate was observed. The effect of the nitrogen flow rate on the reaction rate was also observed

  13. Cell membrane temperature rate sensitivity predicted from the Nernst equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, F S

    1984-01-01

    A hyperpolarized current is predicted from the Nernst equation for conditions of positive temperature derivatives with respect to time. This ion current, coupled with changes in membrane channel conductivities, is expected to contribute to a transient potential shift across the cell membrane for silent cells and to a change in firing rate for pacemaker cells.

  14. Sphaleron rate at high temperature in 1+1 dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smit, Jan; Tang, W.H.

    1999-01-01

    We resolve the controversy in the high temperature behavior of the sphaleron rate in the abelian Higgs model in 1+1 dimensions. The T 2 behavior at intermediate lattice spacings is found to change into T ((2)/(3)) behavior in the continuum limit. The results are supported by analytic arguments that the classical approximation is good for this model

  15. Relationship between tolerance factor and temperature coefficient of permittivity of temperature-stable high permittivity BaTiO3–Bi(MeO3 compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natthaphon Raengthon

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The temperature coefficient of permittivity (TCε of BaTiO3–Bi(MeO3 solid solutions were investigated. It was determined that as the tolerance factor was decreased with the addition of Bi(MeO3, the TCε shifted from large negative values to TCε values approaching zero. It is proposed that the different bonding nature of the dopant cation affects the magnitude and temperature stability of the permittivity. This study suggests that the relationship between tolerance factor and TCε can be used as a guide to design new dielectric compounds exhibiting temperature-stable high permittivity characteristics, which is similar to past research on perovskite and pyrochlore-based microwave dielectrics.

  16. Collisional rate coefficients of C3H2 and the determination of physical conditions in molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, L. W.; Green, Sheldon

    1989-01-01

    Collisional excitation rates for C3H2, calculated using the coupled states approximation at temperatures of 10-30 K, are presented. C3H2 produces a number of spectral line pairs whose members are close together in frequency but arise from levels with different excitation energies. The rates are used in statistical equilibrium calculations to illustrate the excitation properties and density-dependent behavior of various C3H2 line ratios.

  17. Elastic scattering and transport coefficients for a quark plasma in SUf(3) at finite temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehberg, P.; Klevansky, S. P.; Hüfner, J.

    1996-02-01

    The temperature dependence of the elastic-scattering processes qq' → qq' and q overlineq' → q overlineq' , with q, q' = u, d, s is studied as a function of the scattering angle and the center-of-mass energy of the collision within the framework of the SUf(3) Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. Critical scattering at threshold is observed in the q overlineq' → q overlineq' process, leading to an enhancement of the cross section as occurs in the phenomenon of critical opalescence. Transport properties such as viscosity, mean free paths and thermal relaxation times are calculated. Strangeness enhancement is investigated via the chemical relaxation times, which are found to be considerably higher than those calculated via perturbative QCD. A comparison with the experimental values for the strangeness enhancement in S + S collisions leads to an upper limit of 4 fm/ c for the lifetime of the plasma.

  18. Temperature dependence of muonium reaction rates in the gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, D.G.; Garner, D.M.; Mikula, R.J.; British Columbia Univ., Vancouver

    1981-01-01

    A study of the temperature dependence of reaction rates has long been an important tool in establishing reaction pathways in chemical reactions. This is particularly true for the reactions of muonium (in comparison with those of hydrogen) since a measurement of the activation energy for chemical reaction is sensitive to both the height and the position of the potential barrier in the reaction plane. For collision controlled reactions, on the other hand, the reaction rate is expected to exhibit a weak T 1 sup(/) 2 dependence characteristic of the mean collision velocity. These concepts are discussed and their effects illustrated in a comparison of the chemical and spin exchange reaction rates of muonium and hydrogen in the temperature range approx.300-approx.500 K. (orig.)

  19. The impact of fuel temperature reactivity coefficient on loss of reactivity control accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. H.; Ryu, E. H.; Song, Y. M.; Jung, J. Y.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear reactors experience small power fluctuations or anticipated operational transients during even normal power operation. During normal operation, the reactivity is mainly controlled by liquid zone controllers, adjuster rods, mechanical control absorbers, and moderator poison. Even when the reactor power is increased abruptly and largely from an accident and when reactor control systems cannot be actuated quickly due to a fast transient, the reactor should be controlled and stabilized by its inherent safety parameter, such as a negative PCR (Power Coefficient of Reactivity) feedback. A PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor), it is well designed for the reactor to have a negative PCR so that the reactor can be safely shut down or stabilized whenever an abrupt reactivity insertion into the reactor core occurs or the reactor power is abruptly increased. However, it is known that a CANDU reactor has a small amount of PCR, as either negative or positive, because of the different design basis and safety concepts from a PWR. CNSC's regulatory and safety regime has stated that; The PCR of CANDU reactors does not pose a significant risk. Consistent with Canadian nuclear safety requirements, nuclear power plants must have an appropriate combination of inherent and engineered safety features incorporated into the design of the reactor safety and control systems. A reactor design that has a PCR is quite acceptable provided that the reactor is stable against power fluctuations, and that the probability and consequences of any potential accidents that would be aggravated by a positive reactivity feedback are maintained within CNSCprescribed limits. Recently, it was issued licensing the refurbished Wolsong unit 1 in Korea to be operated continuously after its design lifetime in which the calculated PCR was shown to have a small positive value by applying the recent physics code systems, which are composed of WIMS IST, DRAGON IST, and RFSP IST. These code systems were transferred

  20. Correlation between Mechanical Properties with Specific Wear Rate and the Coefficient of Friction of Graphite/Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Alajmi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The correlation between the mechanical properties of Fillers/Epoxy composites and their tribological behavior was investigated. Tensile, hardness, wear, and friction tests were conducted for Neat Epoxy (NE, Graphite/Epoxy composites (GE, and Data Palm Fiber/Epoxy with or without Graphite composites (GFE and FE. The correlation was made between the tensile strength, the modulus of elasticity, elongation at the break, and the hardness, as an individual or a combined factor, with the specific wear rate (SWR and coefficient of friction (COF of composites. In general, graphite as an additive to polymeric composite has had an eclectic effect on mechanical properties, whereas it has led to a positive effect on tribological properties, whilst date palm fibers (DPFs, as reinforcement for polymeric composite, promoted a mechanical performance with a slight improvement to the tribological performance. Statistically, this study reveals that there is no strong confirmation of any marked correlation between the mechanical and the specific wear rate of filler/Epoxy composites. There is, however, a remarkable correlation between the mechanical properties and the friction coefficient of filler/Epoxy composites.

  1. Gas-Phase Reaction Pathways and Rate Coefficients for the Dichlorosilane-Hydrogen and Trichlorosilane-Hydrogen Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dateo, Christopher E.; Walch, Stephen P.

    2002-01-01

    As part of NASA Ames Research Center's Integrated Process Team on Device/Process Modeling and Nanotechnology our goal is to create/contribute to a gas-phase chemical database for use in modeling microelectronics devices. In particular, we use ab initio methods to determine chemical reaction pathways and to evaluate reaction rate coefficients. Our initial studies concern reactions involved in the dichlorosilane-hydrogen (SiCl2H2--H2) and trichlorosilane-hydrogen (SiCl2H-H2) systems. Reactant, saddle point (transition state), and product geometries and their vibrational harmonic frequencies are determined using the complete-active-space self-consistent-field (CASSCF) electronic structure method with the correlation consistent polarized valence double-zeta basis set (cc-pVDZ). Reaction pathways are constructed by following the imaginary frequency mode of the saddle point to both the reactant and product. Accurate energetics are determined using the singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations (CCSD(T)) extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Using the data from the electronic structure calculations, reaction rate coefficients are obtained using conventional and variational transition state and RRKM theories.

  2. Correlation between Mechanical Properties with Specific Wear Rate and the Coefficient of Friction of Graphite/Epoxy Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alajmi, Mahdi; Shalwan, Abdullah

    2015-07-08

    The correlation between the mechanical properties of Fillers/Epoxy composites and their tribological behavior was investigated. Tensile, hardness, wear, and friction tests were conducted for Neat Epoxy (NE), Graphite/Epoxy composites (GE), and Data Palm Fiber/Epoxy with or without Graphite composites (GFE and FE). The correlation was made between the tensile strength, the modulus of elasticity, elongation at the break, and the hardness, as an individual or a combined factor, with the specific wear rate (SWR) and coefficient of friction (COF) of composites. In general, graphite as an additive to polymeric composite has had an eclectic effect on mechanical properties, whereas it has led to a positive effect on tribological properties, whilst date palm fibers (DPFs), as reinforcement for polymeric composite, promoted a mechanical performance with a slight improvement to the tribological performance. Statistically, this study reveals that there is no strong confirmation of any marked correlation between the mechanical and the specific wear rate of filler/Epoxy composites. There is, however, a remarkable correlation between the mechanical properties and the friction coefficient of filler/Epoxy composites.

  3. Laboratory Study of the OH + Permethylsiloxane (L2, L3, D3, and D4) Reaction Rate Coefficients Between 240 and 370 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, J. B.; Bernard, F.; Papadimitriou, V. C.

    2016-12-01

    The atmospheric chemistry of organosiloxanes has recently been implicated in the formation of new particles as well as regional and indoor air quality. Methylsiloxanes with Sitextiles, health care and household products and in industrial applications as solvents and lubricants. They are released into the atmosphere during manufacturing, use, and disposal and have been observed in the atmosphere in ppb levels in certain locations. However, the fundamental chemical properties of this class of compounds, particularly their reactivity with the OH radical, are presently not fully characterized. In this work, the temperature dependence of the rate coefficients for the OH radical reaction with the simplest linear (L2 and L3) and cyclic (D3 and D4) siloxanes were measured: OH + (CH3)3SiOSi(CH3)3 = Products L2OH + [(CH3)3SiO]2Si(CH3)2 = Products L3OH + [-Si(CH3)2O-]3 = Products D3OH + [-Si(CH3)2O-]4 = Products D4OH rate coefficients were measured under pseudo-first conditions in OH over the temperature range 240-370 K using a pulsed laser photolysis-laser induced fluorescence (PLP-LIF) technique and at 296 K using a relative rate method. The present results are compared with available literature data where possible and discrepancies are discussed. The results from this work will be discussed in terms of the atmospheric lifetimes of these methylsiloxanes and the reactivity trends for this class of compound.

  4. New rate coefficients of CS in collision with para- and ortho-H2 and astrophysical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis-Alpizar, Otoniel; Stoecklin, Thierry; Guilloteau, Stéphane; Dutrey, Anne

    2018-05-01

    Astronomers use the CS molecule as a gas mass tracer in dense regions of the interstellar medium, either to measure the gas density through multi-line observations or the level of turbulence. This necessarily requires the knowledge of the rates coefficients with the most common colliders in the interstellar medium, He and H2. In the present work, the close coupling collisional rates are computed for the first thirty rotational states of CS in collision with para- and ortho-H2 using a recent rigid rotor potential energy surface. Some radiative transfer calculations, using typical astrophysical conditions, are also performed to test this new set of data and to compare with the existing ones.

  5. Transport of temperature-velocity covariance in gas-solid flow and its relation to the axial dispersion coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Shankar; Sun, Bo

    2015-11-01

    The presence of solid particles in a steady laminar flow generates velocity fluctuations with respect to the mean fluid velocity that are termed pseudo-turbulence. The level of these pseudo-turbulent velocity fluctuations has been characterized in statistically homogeneous fixed particle assemblies and freely evolving suspensions using particle-resolved direct numerical simulation (PR-DNS) by Mehrabadi et al. (JFM, 2015), and it is found to be a significant contribution to the total kinetic energy associated with the flow. The correlation of these velocity fluctuations with temperature (or a passive scalar) generates a flux term that appears in the transport equation for the average fluid temperature (or average scalar concentration). The magnitude of this transport of temperature-velocity covariance is quantified using PR-DNS of thermally fully developed flow past a statistically homogeneous fixed assembly of particles, and the budget of the average fluid temperature equation is presented. The relation of this transport term to the axial dispersion coefficient (Brenner, Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. A, 1980) is established. The simulation results are then interpreted in the context of our understanding of axial dispersion in gas-solid flow. NSF CBET 1336941.

  6. Influence of LMFBR fuel pin temperature profiles on corrosion rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiels, S.A.; Bagnall, C.; Schrock, S.L.; Orbon, S.J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes the sodium corrosion behavior of 20 percent cold worked Type 316 stainless steel fuel pin cladding under a simulated reactor thermal environment. A temperature gradient, typical of a fuel pin, was generated in a 0.9 m long heater section by direct resistance heating. Specimens were located in an isothermal test section immediately downstream of the heater. A comparison of the measured corrosion rates with available data showed an enhancement factor of between 1.5 and 2 which was attributed to the severe axial temperature gradient through the heater. Differences in structure and surface chemistry were also noted

  7. Development of a standard for calculation and measurement of the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity in water-moderated power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosteller, R.D.; Hall, R.A.; Lancaster, D.B.; Young, E.H.; Gavin, P.H.; Robertson, S.T.

    1998-01-01

    The contents of ANS 19.11, the standard for ''Calculation and Measurement of the Moderator Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity in Water-Moderated Power Reactors,'' are described. The standard addresses the calculation of the moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) both at standby conditions and at power. In addition, it describes several methods for the measurement of the at-power MTC and assesses their relative advantages and disadvantages. Finally, it specifies a minimum set of documentation requirements for compliance with the standard

  8. Predicting temperature drop rate of mass concrete during an initial cooling period using genetic programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Santosh; Zhou, Yihong; Zhao, Chunju; Zhou, Huawei

    2018-02-01

    Thermal cracking on concrete dams depends upon the rate at which the concrete is cooled (temperature drop rate per day) within an initial cooling period during the construction phase. Thus, in order to control the thermal cracking of such structure, temperature development due to heat of hydration of cement should be dropped at suitable rate. In this study, an attempt have been made to formulate the relation between cooling rate of mass concrete with passage of time (age of concrete) and water cooling parameters: flow rate and inlet temperature of cooling water. Data measured at summer season (April-August from 2009 to 2012) from recently constructed high concrete dam were used to derive a prediction model with the help of Genetic Programming (GP) software “Eureqa”. Coefficient of Determination (R) and Mean Square Error (MSE) were used to evaluate the performance of the model. The value of R and MSE is 0.8855 and 0.002961 respectively. Sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate the relative impact on the target parameter due to input parameters. Further, testing the proposed model with an independent dataset those not included during analysis, results obtained from the proposed GP model are close enough to the real field data.

  9. Thermal stability and temperature coefficients of four rare-earth-cobalt matrix magnets heated in dry air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strnat, R. M. W.; Liu, S.; Strnat, K. J.

    1982-03-01

    Flux-loss characteristics during long-term air aging of four rare-earth-cobalt matrix magnet types were measured. Irreversible losses and reversible temperature coefficients on heating above room temperature are reported. Purely magnetic and permanent microstructure-related changes during aging were differentiated by measuring hysteresis curves before and after long-term exposure. Three commercial polymer-bonded magnets using different rare-earth-cobalt-transition metal alloys and a solder-matrix magnet with Sm(Co, Cu, Fe, Zr)7.4 were studied. They were cycled between 25 °C and maximum temperatures to 150 °C (25 ° intervals) as applicable. Aging data at 50 and 125 °C for an exposure time of 3300 h are reported. The 2-17 samples have a stability far superior to bonded 1-5. The soft metal binder imparts significantly better aging behavior on precipitation-hardened 2-17 magnet alloys above 100 °C than an epoxy resin matrix.

  10. Pressure loss coefficient and flow rate of side hole in a lower end plug for dual-cooled annular nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Chang-Hwan, E-mail: shinch@kaeri.re.kr; Park, Ju-Yong, E-mail: juyong@kaeri.re.kr; In, Wang-Kee, E-mail: wkin@kaeri.re.kr

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • A lower end plug with side flow holes is suggested to provide alternative flow paths of the inner channel. • The inlet loss coefficient of the lower end plug is estimated from the experiment. • The flow rate through the side holes is estimated in a complete entrance blockage of inner channel. • The consequence in the reactor core condition is evaluated with a subchannel analysis code. - Abstract: Dual-cooled annular nuclear fuel for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) has been introduced for a significant increase in reactor power. KAERI has been developing a dual-cooled annular fuel for a power uprate of 20% in an optimized PWR in Korea, the OPR1000. This annular fuel can help decrease the fuel temperature substantially relative to conventional cylindrical fuel at a power uprate. Annular fuel has dual flow channels around itself; however, the inner flow channel has a weakness in that it is isolated unlike the outer flow channel, which is open to other neighbouring outer channels for a coolant exchange in the reactor core. If the entrance of the inner channel is, as a hypothetical event, completely blocked by debris, the inner channel will then experience a rapid increase in coolant temperature such that a departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) may occur. Therefore, a remedy to avoid such a postulated accident is indispensable for the safety of annular fuel. A lower end plug with side flow holes was suggested to provide alternative flow paths in addition to the central entrance of the inner channel. In this paper, the inlet loss coefficient of the lower end plug and the flow rate through the side holes were estimated from the experimental results even in a complete entrance blockage of the inner channel. An optimization for the side hole was also performed, and the results are applied to a subchannel analysis to evaluate the consequence in the reactor core condition.

  11. Diffusion-controlled reaction. V. Effect of concentration-dependent diffusion coefficient on reaction rate in graft polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imre, K.; Odian, G.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of diffusion on radiation-initiated graft polymerization has been studied with emphasis on the single- and two-penetrant cases. When the physical properties of the penetrants are similar, the two-penetrant problems can be reduced to the single-penetrant problem by redefining the characteristic parameters of the system. The diffusion-free graft polymerization rate is assumed to be proportional to the upsilon power of the monomer concentration respectively, and, in which the proportionality constant a = k/sub p/R/sub i//sup w//k/sub t//sup z/, where k/sub p/ and k/sub t/ are the propagation and termination rate constants, respectively, and R/sub i/ is the initiation rate. The values of upsilon, w, and z depend on the particular reaction system. The results of earlier work were generalized by allowing a non-Fickian diffusion rate which predicts an essentially exponential dependence on the monomer concentration of the diffusion coefficient, D = D 0 [exp(deltaC/M)], where M is the saturation concentration. A reaction system is characterized by the three dimensionless parameters, upsilon, delta, and A = (L/2)[aM/sup (upsilon--1)//D 0 ]/sup 1/2/, where L is the polymer film thickness. Graft polymerization tends to become diffusion controlled as A increases. Larger values of delta and ν cause a reaction system to behave closer to the diffusion-free regime. Transition from diffusion-free to diffusion-controlled reaction involves changes in the dependence of the reaction rate on film thickness, initiation rate, and monomer concentration. Although the diffusion-free rate is w order in initiation rate, upsilon order in monomer, and independent of film thickness, the diffusion-controlled rate is w/2 order in initiator rate and inverse first-order in film thickness. Dependence of the diffusion-controlled rate on monomer is dependent in a complex manner on the diffusional characteristics of the reaction system. 11 figures, 4 tables

  12. The Effect of Temperature on Kinetics and Diffusion Coefficients of Metallocene Derivatives in Polyol-Based Deep Eutectic Solvents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laleh Bahadori

    Full Text Available The temperature dependence of the density, dynamic viscosity and ionic conductivity of several deep eutectic solvents (DESs containing ammonium-based salts and hydrogen bond donvnors (polyol type are investigated. The temperature-dependent electrolyte viscosity as a function of molar conductivity is correlated by means of Walden's rule. The oxidation of ferrocene (Fc/Fc+ and reduction of cobaltocenium (Cc+/Cc at different temperatures are studied by cyclic voltammetry and potential-step chronoamperometry in DESs. For most DESs, chronoamperometric transients are demonstrated to fit an Arrhenius-type relation to give activation energies for the diffusion of redox couples at different temperatures. The temperature dependence of the measured conductivities of DES1 and DES2 are better correlated with the Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher equation. The kinetics of the Fc/Fc+ and Cc+/Cc electrochemical systems have been investigated over a temperature range from 298 to 338 K. The heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant is then calculated at different temperatures by means of a logarithmic analysis. The glycerol-based DES (DES5 appears suitable for further testing in electrochemical energy storage devices.

  13. Monte Carlo analysis of experiments on the reactivity temperature coefficient for UO2 and MOX light water moderated lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakir, E.; Erradi, L.; Bardouni, T El.; Khoukhi, T El.; Boukhal, H.; Meroun, O.; Bakkari, B El

    2007-01-01

    Full text: In a previous work, we have analysed the main french experiments available on the reactivity temperature coefficient (RTC) : CREAOLE and Mistral experiments. In these experiments, the RTC has been measured in both UO2 and UO2-PuO2 PWR type lattices. Our calculations, using APPOLO2 code with CEA93 library based on JEF2.2 evaluation, have shown that the calculation error in UO2 lattices is less than 1 pcm/Deg C which is considered as the target accuracy. On the other hand the calculation error in the MOX lattices is more significant in both low and high temperature ranges : an average error of -2 ± 0.5 pcm/Deg C is observed in low temperatures and an error of +3±2 pcm/Deg C is obtained for temperature higher than 250Deg C. In the present work, we analysed additional experimental benchmarks on the RTC of UO2 and MOX light water moderated lattices. To analyze these benchmarks and with the aim of minimizing uncertainties related to modelling of the experimental set up, we chose the Monte Carlo Method which has the advantage of taking into account in the most exact manner the geometry of the experimental configurations. Thus we have used the code MCNP5, for its recognized power and its availability. This analysis shows for the UO2 lattices, an average experiment-calculation deviation of about 0,5 pcm/Deg C, which is largely below the target accuracy for this type of lattices, that we estimate at approximately 1 pcm/Deg C. For the KAMINI experiment, which relates to the measurement of the RTC in light water moderated lattice using U-233 as fuel our analysis shows that the Endf/B6 library gives the best result, with an experiment -calculation deviation of the order of -0,16 pcm/Deg C. The analysis of the benchmarks using MOX fuel made it possible to highlight a discrepancy between experiment and calculation on the RTC of about -0.7pcm/Deg C ( for a range of temperature going from 20 to 248 Deg C) and -1.2 pcm/Deg C ( for a range of temperature going from 20 to

  14. Heart rates in hospitalized children by age and body temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daymont, Carrie; Bonafide, Christopher P; Brady, Patrick W

    2015-05-01

    Heart rate (HR) is frequently used by clinicians in the hospital to assess a patient's severity of illness and make treatment decisions. We sought to develop percentiles that characterize the relationship of expected HR by age and body temperature in hospitalized children and to compare these percentiles with published references in both primary care and emergency department (ED) settings. Vital sign data were extracted from electronic health records of inpatients temperature measurement pairs from each admission. Measurements from 60% of patients were used to derive the percentile curves, with the remainder used for validation. We compared our upper percentiles with published references in primary care and ED settings. We used 60,863 observations to derive the percentiles. Overall, an increase in body temperature of 1°C was associated with an increase of ∼ 10 beats per minute in HR, although there were variations across age and temperature ranges. For infants and young children, our upper percentiles were lower than in primary care and ED settings. For school-age children, our upper percentiles were higher. We characterized expected HR by age and body temperature in hospitalized children. These percentiles differed from references in primary care and ED settings. Additional research is needed to evaluate the performance of these percentiles for the identification of children who would benefit from further evaluation or intervention for tachycardia. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  15. Temperature dependence of the particle/gas partition coefficient: An application to predict indoor gas-phase concentrations of semi-volatile organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Wenjuan, E-mail: Wenjuan.Wei@cstb.fr [University of Paris-Est, Scientific and Technical Center for Building (CSTB), Health and Comfort Department, French Indoor Air Quality Observatory (OQAI), 84 Avenue Jean Jaurès, Champs sur Marne, 77447 Marne la Vallée Cedex 2 (France); Mandin, Corinne [University of Paris-Est, Scientific and Technical Center for Building (CSTB), Health and Comfort Department, French Indoor Air Quality Observatory (OQAI), 84 Avenue Jean Jaurès, Champs sur Marne, 77447 Marne la Vallée Cedex 2 (France); INSERM-U1085, Irset-Research Institute for Environmental and Occupational Health, Rennes (France); LERES-Environment and Health Research Laboratory (Irset and EHESP Technologic Platform), Rennes (France); Blanchard, Olivier [EHESP-School of Public Health, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Rennes (France); INSERM-U1085, Irset-Research Institute for Environmental and Occupational Health, Rennes (France); Mercier, Fabien [EHESP-School of Public Health, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Rennes (France); LERES-Environment and Health Research Laboratory (Irset and EHESP Technologic Platform), Rennes (France); INSERM-U1085, Irset-Research Institute for Environmental and Occupational Health, Rennes (France); Pelletier, Maud [EHESP-School of Public Health, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Rennes (France); INSERM-U1085, Irset-Research Institute for Environmental and Occupational Health, Rennes (France); Le Bot, Barbara [EHESP-School of Public Health, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Rennes (France); LERES-Environment and Health Research Laboratory (Irset and EHESP Technologic Platform), Rennes (France); INSERM-U1085, Irset-Research Institute for Environmental and Occupational Health, Rennes (France); and others

    2016-09-01

    The indoor gas-phase concentrations of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) can be predicted from their respective concentrations in airborne particles by applying the particle/gas partitioning equilibrium. The temperature used for partitioning is often set to 25 °C. However, indoor temperatures frequently differ from this reference value. This assumption may result in errors in the predicted equilibrium gas-phase SVOC concentrations. To improve the prediction model, the temperature dependence of the particle/gas partition coefficient must be addressed. In this paper, a theoretical relationship between the particle/gas partition coefficient and temperature was developed based on the SVOC absorptive mechanism. The SVOC particle/gas partition coefficients predicted by employing the derived theoretical relationship agree well with the experimental data retrieved from the literature (R > 0.93). The influence of temperature on the equilibrium gas-phase SVOC concentration was quantified by a dimensionless analysis of the derived relationship between the SVOC particle/gas partition coefficient and temperature. The predicted equilibrium gas-phase SVOC concentration decreased by between 31% and 53% when the temperature was lowered by 6 °C, while it increased by up to 750% when the indoor temperature increased from 15 °C to 30 °C. - Highlights: • A theoretical relationship between K{sub p} and temperature was developed. • The relationship was based on the SVOC absorptive mechanism. • The temperature impact was quantified by a dimensionless analysis.

  16. Determination of the thermal rate coefficient, products, and branching ratios for the reaction of O/+/ /D-2/ with N2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torr, D. G.; Torr, M. R.

    1980-01-01

    Atmosphere Explorer-C satellite measurements are used to determine rate coefficients (RCs) for the following reactions: O(+)(D-2) + N2 yields N2(+) + O (reaction 1), O(+)(D-2) + N2 yields O(+)(S-4) + N2 (reaction 2), and O(+)(D-2) + N2 yields NO(+) + N (reaction 3). Results show the RC for reaction 1 to be 1 (plus 1 or minus 0.5) x 10 to the -10th cu cm per sec, for reaction 2 to be 3 (plus 1 or minus 2) x 10 to the -11th cu cm per sec, and 3 to be less than 5.5 x 10 to the -11th cu cm per sec. It is also found that the reaction of O(+)(D-2) with N2 does not constitute a detectable source of NO(+) ions in the thermosphere.

  17. Thermal rate coefficients in collinear versus bent transition state reactions: the N+N{sub 2} case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagana, Antonio; Faginas Lago, Noelia; Rampino, Sergio [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Huarte-Larranaga, FermIn [Computer Simulation and Modeling Lab (CoSMoLab), Parc CientIfic de Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); GarcIa, Ernesto [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Universidad del PaIs Vasco, 01006 Vitoria (Spain)], E-mail: lagana05@gmail.com, E-mail: fhuarte@pcb.ub.es, E-mail: e.garcia@ehu.es

    2008-10-15

    Zero total angular momentum exact quantum calculations of the probabilities of the N+N{sub 2} reaction have been performed on the L3 potential energy surface having a bent transition state. This has allowed us to work out J-shifting estimates of the thermal rate coefficient based on the calculation of either detailed (state-to-state) or cumulative (multiconfiguration) probabilities. The results obtained are used to compare the numerical outcomes and the concurrent computational machineries of both quantum and semiclassical approaches as well as to exploit the potentialities of the J-shifting model. The implications of moving the barrier to reaction from the previously proposed collinear geometry of the LEPS to the bent one of L3 are also investigated by comparing the related detailed reactive probabilities.

  18. Direct measurements of rate coefficients for thermal decomposition of CF3I using shock—tube ARAS technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystrov, N. S.; Emelianov, A. V.; Eremin, A. V.; Yatsenko, P. I.

    2018-05-01

    The kinetics of the dissociation of CF3I behind shock waves was experimentally investigated. The reaction CF3I  +  Ar  →  CF3  +  I  +  Ar was studied at temperatures between 900 and 1250 K and pressures of 2–3 bar. For this purpose, the time profiles of the concentration of atomic iodine were measured using a highly sensitive atomic resonance absorption spectroscopy method at a wavelength of 183.04 nm. From these data, the experimental value of the dissociation rate constant of CF3I was obtained: . We found that the investigated range of pressures and temperatures for the CF3I dissociation lies in the pressure transition region. Based on the Rice-Ramsperger–Kassel–Marcus theory, the threshold high and low-pressure rate constants ( and k 0) and falloff curves are calculated for the temperatures of 950–1200 K. As a result of this calculation, the threshold rate constants could be evaluated in the forms: and , and the center broadening factor, which takes into account the contribution of strong and weak collisions in the transition region, is .

  19. Development of a non-intrusive method for the determination of the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity (MTC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaziere, C.

    2000-01-01

    The Moderator Temperature Coefficient of reactivity (MTC) plays an important role in the feedback mechanism and thus in the inherent stability of Pressurised Water Reactors (PWRs). Due to the inaccuracy of the traditional at-power MTC measurement techniques, many power utilities nowadays only measure the zero-power MTC since its determination is relatively straightforward and accurate. For the at-power MTC determination during the remaining fuel cycle, core calculations are assumed to be reliable enough. Nevertheless, these calculations were never benchmarked and most importantly, the use of high burnup fuel might induce a slightly positive MTC at Beginning Of Cycle (BOC) due to the high initial boron concentration. Even if in such a case the Doppler effect would still insure a negative reactivity feedback, monitoring the MTC throughout the cycle could become crucial. In this respect, not only the sign of the MTC is of importance, but also its magnitude. Consequently, developing a method that would permit monitoring the MTC during the fuel cycle is of great interest. One of the main disadvantages of the traditional at-power MTC measurement techniques is that the reactor has to be perturbed in order to induce a change of the moderator temperature. The modification of other parameters that can only be estimated by core calculation represents also a severe drawback of these methods, both for their precision and their reliability. A measurement performed at Ringhals-4 by using the so-called boron dilution method revealed that the uncertainty associated to the MTC estimation could even be much larger than previously expected due to the calculated reactivity corrections. These corrections are very sensitive to the input parameters chosen for the core simulation, and slight mis-estimations of these have large reactivity effects. It is known that if the reactivity noise and the moderator temperature noise could be measured, the MTC could be determined without disturbing

  20. Development of a non-intrusive method for the determination of the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity (MTC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaziere, C

    2000-07-01

    The Moderator Temperature Coefficient of reactivity (MTC) plays an important role in the feedback mechanism and thus in the inherent stability of Pressurised Water Reactors (PWRs). Due to the inaccuracy of the traditional at-power MTC measurement techniques, many power utilities nowadays only measure the zero-power MTC since its determination is relatively straightforward and accurate. For the at-power MTC determination during the remaining fuel cycle, core calculations are assumed to be reliable enough. Nevertheless, these calculations were never benchmarked and most importantly, the use of high burnup fuel might induce a slightly positive MTC at Beginning Of Cycle (BOC) due to the high initial boron concentration. Even if in such a case the Doppler effect would still insure a negative reactivity feedback, monitoring the MTC throughout the cycle could become crucial. In this respect, not only the sign of the MTC is of importance, but also its magnitude. Consequently, developing a method that would permit monitoring the MTC during the fuel cycle is of great interest. One of the main disadvantages of the traditional at-power MTC measurement techniques is that the reactor has to be perturbed in order to induce a change of the moderator temperature. The modification of other parameters that can only be estimated by core calculation represents also a severe drawback of these methods, both for their precision and their reliability. A measurement performed at Ringhals-4 by using the so-called boron dilution method revealed that the uncertainty associated to the MTC estimation could even be much larger than previously expected due to the calculated reactivity corrections. These corrections are very sensitive to the input parameters chosen for the core simulation, and slight mis-estimations of these have large reactivity effects. It is known that if the reactivity noise and the moderator temperature noise could be measured, the MTC could be determined without disturbing

  1. Phenomenon of quantum low temperature limit of chemical reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gol'danskij, V.I.

    1975-01-01

    The influence of quantum-mechanical effects on one of the fundamental laws of chemical kinetics - the Arrhenius law - is considered. Criteria characterising the limits of the low-temperature region where the extent of quantum-mechanical tunnelling transitions exceeds exponentially the transitions over the barrier are quoted. Studies of the low-temperature tunnelling of electrons and hydrogen atoms are briefly mentioned and the history of research on low-temperature radiation-induced solid-phase polymerisation, the development of which led to the discovery of the phenomenon of the low-temperature quantum-mechanical limit for the rates of chemical reactions in relation to the formaldehyde polymerisation reaction, is briefly considered. The results of experiments using low-inertia calorimeters, whereby it is possible to determine directly the average time (tau 0 ) required to add one new link to the polymer chain of formaldehyde during its polymerisation by radiation and during postpolymerisation and to establish that below 80K the increase of tau 0 slows down and that at T approximately equal to 10-4K the time tau 0 reaches a plateau (tau 0 approximately equals 0.01s), are described. Possible explanations of the observed low-temperature limit for the rate of a chemical reaction are critically examined and a semiquantitative explanation is given for this phenomenon, which may be particularly common in combined electronic-confirmational transitions in complex biological molecules and may play a definite role in chemical and biological evolution (cold prehistory of life)

  2. Phenomenon of quantum low temperature limit of chemical reaction rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gol' danskii, V I [AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Khimicheskoj Fiziki

    1975-12-01

    The influence of quantum-mechanical effects on one of the fundamental laws of chemical kinetics - the Arrhenius Law - is considered. Criteria characterising the limits of the low-temperature region where the extent of quantum-mechanical tunnelling transitions exceeds exponentially the transitions over the barrier are quoted. Studies of the low-temperature tunnelling of electrons and hydrogen atoms are briefly mentioned and the history of research on low-temperature radiation-induced solid-phase polymerization, the development of which led to the discovery of the phenomenon of the low-temperature quantum-mechanical limit for the rates of chemical reactions in relation to the formaldehyde polymerization reaction, is briefly considered. The results of experiments using low-inertia calorimeters, whereby it is possible to determine directly the average time (tau/sub 0/) required to add one new link to the polymer chain of formaldehyde during its polymerization by radiation and during postpolymerization and to establish that below 80K the increase of tau/sub 0/ slows down and that at T approximately equal to 10-4K the time tau/sub 0/ reaches a plateau (tau/sub 0/ approximately equals 0.01s), are described. Possible explanations of the observed low-temperature limit for the rate of a chemical reaction are critically examined and a semiquantitative explanation is given for this phenomenon, which may be particularly common in combined electronic-confirmational transitions in complex biological molecules and may play a definite role in chemical and biological evolution (cold prehistory of life).

  3. Comparison of inter-diffusion coefficients for Ni/Cu thin films determined from classical heating analysis and linear temperature ramping analysis by means of profile reconstruction and a numerical solution of Fick's law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joubert, H.D.; Terblans, J.J.; Swart, H.C.

    2009-01-01

    Classical inter-diffusion studies assume a constant time of annealing when samples are annealed in a furnace. It is assumed that the sample temperature reaches the annealing temperature immediately after insertion, while the sample temperature immediately drops to room temperature after removal, the annealing time being taken as the time between insertion and removal. Using the above assumption, the diffusion coefficient can be calculated in a number of ways. In reality, the sample temperature does not immediately reach the annealing temperature; instead it rises at a rate governed by several heat transfer mechanisms, depending on the annealing procedure. For short annealing times, the sample temperature may not attain the annealing temperature, while for extended annealing times the sample temperature may reach the annealing temperature only for a fraction of the annealing time. To eliminate the effect of heat transfer mechanisms, a linear temperature ramping regime is proposed. Used in conjunction with a suitable profile reconstructing technique and a numerical solution of Fick's second law, the inter-diffusion parameters obtained from a linear ramping of Ni/Cu thin film samples can be compared to those obtained from calculations performed with the so-called Mixing-Roughness-Information model or any other suitable method used to determine classical diffusion coefficients.

  4. High-temperature rate constant measurements for OH+xylenes

    KAUST Repository

    Elwardani, Ahmed Elsaid

    2015-06-01

    The overall rate constants for the reactions of hydroxyl (OH) radicals with o-xylene (k 1), m-xylene (k 2), and p-xylene (k 3) were measured behind reflected shock waves over 890-1406K at pressures of 1.3-1.8atm using OH laser absorption near 306.7nm. Measurements were performed under pseudo-first-order conditions. The measured rate constants, inferred using a mechanism-fitting approach, can be expressed in Arrhenius form as:k1=2.93×1013exp(-1350.3/T)cm3mol-1s-1(890-1406K)k2=3.49×1013exp(-1449.3/T)cm3mol-1s-1(906-1391K)k3=3.5×1013exp(-1407.5/T)cm3mol-1s-1(908-1383K)This paper presents, to our knowledge, first high-temperature measurements of the rate constants of the reactions of xylene isomers with OH radicals. Low-temperature rate-constant measurements by Nicovich et al. (1981) were combined with the measurements in this study to obtain the following Arrhenius expressions, which are applicable over a wider temperature range:k1=2.64×1013exp(-1181.5/T)cm3mol-1s-1(508-1406K)k2=3.05×109exp(-400/T)cm3mol-1s-1(508-1391K)k3=3.0×109exp(-440/T)cm3mol-1s-1(526-1383K) © 2015 The Combustion Institute.

  5. The potential effect of differential ambient and deployment chamber temperatures on PRC derived sampling rates with polyurethane foam (PUF) passive air samplers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, Karen, E-mail: k.kennedy@uq.edu.a [University of Queensland, EnTox (National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology), 39 Kessels Rd., Coopers Plains QLD 4108 (Australia); Hawker, Darryl W. [Griffith University, School of Environment, Nathan QLD 4111 (Australia); Bartkow, Michael E. [University of Queensland, EnTox (National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology), 39 Kessels Rd., Coopers Plains QLD 4108 (Australia); Carter, Steve [Queensland Health Forensic and Scientific Services, Coopers Plains QLD 4108 (Australia); Ishikawa, Yukari; Mueller, Jochen F. [University of Queensland, EnTox (National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology), 39 Kessels Rd., Coopers Plains QLD 4108 (Australia)

    2010-01-15

    Performance reference compound (PRC) derived sampling rates were determined for polyurethane foam (PUF) passive air samplers in both sub-tropical and temperate locations across Australia. These estimates were on average a factor of 2.7 times higher in summer than winter. The known effects of wind speed and temperature on mass transfer coefficients could not account for this observation. Sampling rates are often derived using ambient temperatures, not the actual temperatures within deployment chambers. If deployment chamber temperatures are in fact higher than ambient temperatures, estimated sampler-air partition coefficients would be greater than actual partition coefficients resulting in an overestimation of PRC derived sampling rates. Sampling rates determined under measured ambient temperatures and estimated deployment chamber temperatures in summer ranged from 7.1 to 10 m{sup 3} day{sup -1} and 2.2-6.8 m{sup 3} day{sup -1} respectively. These results suggest that potential differences between ambient and deployment chamber temperatures should be considered when deriving PRC-based sampling rates. - Internal deployment chamber temperatures rather than ambient temperatures may be required to accurately estimate PRC-based sampling rates.

  6. Rate coefficients from quantum and quasi-classical cumulative reaction probabilities for the S(1D) + H2 reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambrina, P. G.; Lara, Manuel; Menéndez, M.; Launay, J.-M.; Aoiz, F. J.

    2012-10-01

    Cumulative reaction probabilities (CRPs) at various total angular momenta have been calculated for the barrierless reaction S(1D) + H2 → SH + H at total energies up to 1.2 eV using three different theoretical approaches: time-independent quantum mechanics (QM), quasiclassical trajectories (QCT), and statistical quasiclassical trajectories (SQCT). The calculations have been carried out on the widely used potential energy surface (PES) by Ho et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 116, 4124 (2002), 10.1063/1.1431280] as well as on the recent PES developed by Song et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 9213 (2009), 10.1021/jp903790h]. The results show that the differences between these two PES are relatively minor and mostly related to the different topologies of the well. In addition, the agreement between the three theoretical methodologies is good, even for the highest total angular momenta and energies. In particular, the good accordance between the CRPs obtained with dynamical methods (QM and QCT) and the statistical model (SQCT) indicates that the reaction can be considered statistical in the whole range of energies in contrast with the findings for other prototypical barrierless reactions. In addition, total CRPs and rate coefficients in the range of 20-1000 K have been calculated using the QCT and SQCT methods and have been found somewhat smaller than the experimental total removal rates of S(1D).

  7. Measurements of Heat-Transfer and Friction Coefficients for Helium Flowing in a Tube at Surface Temperatures up to 5900 Deg R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Maynard F.; Kirchgessner, Thomas A.

    1959-01-01

    Measurements of average heat transfer and friction coefficients and local heat transfer coefficients were made with helium flowing through electrically heated smooth tubes with length-diameter ratios of 60 and 92 for the following range of conditions: Average surface temperature from 1457 to 4533 R, Reynolds numbe r from 3230 to 60,000, heat flux up to 583,200 Btu per hr per ft2 of heat transfer area, and exit Mach numbe r up to 1.0. The results indicate that, in the turbulent range of Reynolds number, good correlation of the local heat transfer coefficients is obtained when the physical properties and density of helium are evaluated at the surface temperature. The average heat transfer coefficients are best correlated on the basis that the coefficient varies with [1 + (L/D))(sup -0,7)] and that the physical properties and density are evaluated at the surface temperature. The average friction coefficients for the tests with no heat addition are in complete agreement with the Karman-Nikuradse line. The average friction coefficients for heat addition are in poor agreement with the accepted line.

  8. Effects of temperature and anion species on CO2 permeability and CO2/N2 separation coefficient through ionic liquid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jindaratsamee, Pinyarat; Shimoyama, Yusuke; Morizaki, Hironobu; Ito, Akira

    2011-01-01

    The permeability of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) through imidazolium-based ionic liquid membranes was measured by a sweep gas method. Six species of ionic liquids were studied in this work as follows: [emim][BF 4 ], [bmim][BF 4 ], [bmim][PF 6 ], [bmim][Tf 2 N], [bmim][OTf], and [bmim][dca]. The ionic liquids were supported with a polyvinylidene fluoride porous membrane. The measurements were performed at T = (303.15 to 343.15) K. The partial pressure difference between feed and permeate sides was 0.121 MPa. The permeability of the CO 2 increases with temperature for the all ionic liquid species. Base on solution diffusion theory, it can be explained that the diffusion coefficient of CO 2 in an ionic liquid affects the temperature dependence more strongly than the solubility coefficient. The greatest permeability was obtained with the [bmim][Tf 2 N] membrane. The membrane of [bmim][PF 6 ] presents the lowest permeability. The separation coefficient between CO 2 and N 2 through the ionic liquid membranes was also investigated at the volume fraction of CO 2 at feed side 0.10. The separation coefficient decreases with the increase of temperature for the all ionic liquid species. The membrane of [emim][BF 4 ] and [bmim][BF 4 ] gives the highest separation coefficient at constant temperature. The lowest separation coefficient was obtained from [bmim][Tf 2 N] membrane which presents the highest permeability of CO 2 .

  9. Influence of bearing pre-load coefficient on shaft vibration and pad temperature in a hydroturbine generator unit. A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng Fuzhou; Chu Fulei; Guo Dan; Lu Wenxiu [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing, BJ (China). Dept. of Precision Instruments

    2001-07-01

    From data collected by an online condition monitoring and fault diagnosis system, a higher pad temperature at the upper guide bearing in a pumped storage power generator unit installed in Guangdong province(GPSPS), China, was found. And also a relatively intensive shaft vibration occurred at the lower guide bearing. By calculating the Reynolds equation and viscosity-temperature equation of the lubricant, a curve between the pre-load coefficient and the increment of pad temperature is obtained, which shows that the larger, the pre-load coefficient, the bigger, the increment of pad temperature. For a practical unit in GPSPS, by employing Transfer matrix method and Wilson-{theta} method to analyze shaft vibration at different pre-load coefficients of the whole bearing or ''pad pair'' bearings, the results show that the larger the pre-load coefficient is, the smaller the vibration amplitude is, the shorter the time for vibration to become steady is. And an uneven pre-load coefficient of the ''pad pair'' bearings will cause shaft orbit from a circle to an ellipse whose long axes is at the direction of the ''pad pair'' with the lowest pre-load coefficient. Finally, reasons of higher pad temperature of the upper guide bearing and larger shaft vibration at the lower guide bearing are due to the inconsistent relation of bearing assembling clearance or pre-load coefficient of the upper and lower guide bearing, and also due to the too small, uneven pre-load coefficient of ''pad pair'' bearings. After a scheme for adjusting the bearing clearance is given, data measured show that the analysis and simulation methods are correct and the adjustment scheme to the assembling clearance of the upper and lower guide bearings is feasible and can be used to guide the field maintenance conveniently. (orig.)

  10. Dynamic Stability of the Rate, State, Temperature, and Pore Pressure Friction Model at a Rock Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Nitish; Singh, Arun K.; Singh, Trilok N.

    2018-05-01

    In this article, we study numerically the dynamic stability of the rate, state, temperature, and pore pressure friction (RSTPF) model at a rock interface using standard spring-mass sliding system. This particular friction model is a basically modified form of the previously studied friction model namely the rate, state, and temperature friction (RSTF). The RSTPF takes into account the role of thermal pressurization including dilatancy and permeability of the pore fluid due to shear heating at the slip interface. The linear stability analysis shows that the critical stiffness, at which the sliding becomes stable to unstable or vice versa, increases with the coefficient of thermal pressurization. Critical stiffness, on the other hand, remains constant for small values of either dilatancy factor or hydraulic diffusivity, but the same decreases as their values are increased further from dilatancy factor (˜ 10^{ - 4} ) and hydraulic diffusivity (˜ 10^{ - 9} {m}2 {s}^{ - 1} ) . Moreover, steady-state friction is independent of the coefficient of thermal pressurization, hydraulic diffusivity, and dilatancy factor. The proposed model is also used for predicting time of failure of a creeping interface of a rock slope under the constant gravitational force. It is observed that time of failure decreases with increase in coefficient of thermal pressurization and hydraulic diffusivity, but the dilatancy factor delays the failure of the rock fault under the condition of heat accumulation at the creeping interface. Moreover, stiffness of the rock-mass also stabilizes the failure process of the interface as the strain energy due to the gravitational force accumulates in the rock-mass before it transfers to the sliding interface. Practical implications of the present study are also discussed.

  11. Estimation of human core temperature from sequential heart rate observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buller, Mark J; Tharion, William J; Cheuvront, Samuel N; Montain, Scott J; Kenefick, Robert W; Castellani, John; Latzka, William A; Hoyt, Reed W; Roberts, Warren S; Richter, Mark; Jenkins, Odest Chadwicke

    2013-01-01

    Core temperature (CT) in combination with heart rate (HR) can be a good indicator of impending heat exhaustion for occupations involving exposure to heat, heavy workloads, and wearing protective clothing. However, continuously measuring CT in an ambulatory environment is difficult. To address this problem we developed a model to estimate the time course of CT using a series of HR measurements as a leading indicator using a Kalman filter. The model was trained using data from 17 volunteers engaged in a 24 h military field exercise (air temperatures 24–36 °C, and 42%–97% relative humidity and CTs ranging from 36.0–40.0 °C). Validation data from laboratory and field studies (N = 83) encompassing various combinations of temperature, hydration, clothing, and acclimation state were examined using the Bland–Altman limits of agreement (LoA) method. We found our model had an overall bias of −0.03 ± 0.32 °C and that 95% of all CT estimates fall within ±0.63 °C (>52 000 total observations). While the model for estimating CT is not a replacement for direct measurement of CT (literature comparisons of esophageal and rectal methods average LoAs of ±0.58 °C) our results suggest it is accurate enough to provide practical indication of thermal work strain for use in the work place. (paper)

  12. Estimation of human core temperature from sequential heart rate observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, Mark J; Tharion, William J; Cheuvront, Samuel N; Montain, Scott J; Kenefick, Robert W; Castellani, John; Latzka, William A; Roberts, Warren S; Richter, Mark; Jenkins, Odest Chadwicke; Hoyt, Reed W

    2013-07-01

    Core temperature (CT) in combination with heart rate (HR) can be a good indicator of impending heat exhaustion for occupations involving exposure to heat, heavy workloads, and wearing protective clothing. However, continuously measuring CT in an ambulatory environment is difficult. To address this problem we developed a model to estimate the time course of CT using a series of HR measurements as a leading indicator using a Kalman filter. The model was trained using data from 17 volunteers engaged in a 24 h military field exercise (air temperatures 24-36 °C, and 42%-97% relative humidity and CTs ranging from 36.0-40.0 °C). Validation data from laboratory and field studies (N = 83) encompassing various combinations of temperature, hydration, clothing, and acclimation state were examined using the Bland-Altman limits of agreement (LoA) method. We found our model had an overall bias of -0.03 ± 0.32 °C and that 95% of all CT estimates fall within ±0.63 °C (>52 000 total observations). While the model for estimating CT is not a replacement for direct measurement of CT (literature comparisons of esophageal and rectal methods average LoAs of ±0.58 °C) our results suggest it is accurate enough to provide practical indication of thermal work strain for use in the work place.

  13. Tantalum strength model incorporating temperature, strain rate and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hojun; Battaile, Corbett; Brown, Justin; Lane, Matt

    Tantalum is a body-centered-cubic (BCC) refractory metal that is widely used in many applications in high temperature, strain rate and pressure environments. In this work, we propose a physically-based strength model for tantalum that incorporates effects of temperature, strain rate and pressure. A constitutive model for single crystal tantalum is developed based on dislocation kink-pair theory, and calibrated to measurements on single crystal specimens. The model is then used to predict deformations of single- and polycrystalline tantalum. In addition, the proposed strength model is implemented into Sandia's ALEGRA solid dynamics code to predict plastic deformations of tantalum in engineering-scale applications at extreme conditions, e.g. Taylor impact tests and Z machine's high pressure ramp compression tests, and the results are compared with available experimental data. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  14. Homogeneous ice nucleation from aqueous inorganic/organic particles representative of biomass burning: water activity, freezing temperatures, nucleation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopf, Daniel A; Rigg, Yannick J

    2011-02-10

    Homogeneous ice nucleation plays an important role in the formation of cirrus clouds with subsequent effects on the global radiative budget. Here we report on homogeneous ice nucleation temperatures and corresponding nucleation rate coefficients of aqueous droplets serving as surrogates of biomass burning aerosol. Micrometer-sized (NH(4))(2)SO(4)/levoglucosan droplets with mass ratios of 10:1, 1:1, 1:5, and 1:10 and aqueous multicomponent organic droplets with and without (NH(4))(2)SO(4) under typical tropospheric temperatures and relative humidities are investigated experimentally using a droplet conditioning and ice nucleation apparatus coupled to an optical microscope with image analysis. Homogeneous freezing was determined as a function of temperature and water activity, a(w), which was set at droplet preparation conditions. The ice nucleation data indicate that minor addition of (NH(4))(2)SO(4) to the aqueous organic droplets renders the temperature dependency of water activity negligible in contrast to the case of aqueous organic solution droplets. The mean homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient derived from 8 different aqueous droplet compositions with average diameters of ∼60 μm for temperatures as low as 195 K and a(w) of 0.82-1 is 2.18 × 10(6) cm(-3) s(-1). The experimentally derived freezing temperatures and homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients are in agreement with predictions of the water activity-based homogeneous ice nucleation theory when taking predictive uncertainties into account. However, the presented ice nucleation data indicate that the water activity-based homogeneous ice nucleation theory overpredicts the freezing temperatures by up to 3 K and corresponding ice nucleation rate coefficients by up to ∼2 orders of magnitude. A shift of 0.01 in a(w), which is well within the uncertainty of typical field and laboratory relative humidity measurements, brings experimental and predicted freezing temperatures and homogeneous ice

  15. Elementary reaction rate measurements at high temperatures by tunable-laser flash-absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hessler, J.P. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The major objective of this program is to measure thermal rate coefficients and branching ratios of elementary reactions. To perform these measurements, the authors constructed an ultrahigh-purity shock tube to generate temperatures between 1000 and 5500 K. The tunable-laser flash-absorption technique is used to measure the rate of change of the concentration of species which absorb below 50,000 cm{sup {minus}1} e.g.: OH, CH, and CH{sub 3}. This technique is being extended into the vacuum-ultraviolet spectral region where one can measure atomic species e.g.: H, D, C, O, and N; and diatomic species e.g.: O{sub 2}, CO, and OH.

  16. Linear thermal expansion coefficient (at temperatures from 130 to 800 K) of borosilicate glasses applicable for coupling with silicon in microelectronics

    OpenAIRE

    Sinev, Leonid S.; Petrov, Ivan D.

    2017-01-01

    Processing results of measurements of linear thermal expansion coefficients and linear thermal expansion of two brands of borosilicate glasses --- LK5 and Borofloat 33 --- are presented. The linear thermal expansion of glass samples have been determined in the temperature range 130 to 800 K (minus 143 to 526 $\\deg$C) using thermomechanical analyzer TMA7100. Relative imprecision of indirectly measured linear thermal expansion coefficients and linear thermal expansion of both glass brands is le...

  17. Rate coefficients for collisional population transfer between 3p54p argon levels at 300 0K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, T.D.; Sadeghi, N.

    1978-01-01

    The population transfer between excited 3p 5 4p argon levels induced by the collisional process Ar* (3p 5 4p)/sub i/ + Ar( 1 S 0 ) arrow-right-left Ar* (3p 5 4p)/sub j/ + Ar( 1 S 0 ) + ΔE was studied in the afterglow of an argon pulsed discharge, at the pressure range of 0.2--1 Torr. Selective population of one particular argon 3p 5 4p level was achieved by laser excitation from one metastable state by use of a tunable cw dye laser. The populations of the laser-excited level and of the collisional excited levels were determined by intensity measurements of the fluorescence line and of the sensitized fluorescence lines. The time-dependence study of the populations of the metastable state, of the laser-excited state, and of the collisional excited states was carried out to ascertain the product channel and to determine the collisional transfer rate coefficients

  18. A paradox: The thermal rate coefficient for the H+DCl → HCl+D exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, D.L.; Suzukawa, H.H. Jr.; Raff, L.M.

    1975-01-01

    Previously reported photolysis experiments indicate that the frequency factors associated with the hydrogen-exchange reactions H+DCl → HCl+D and D+HCl → DCl+H are on the order of 10 10 cm 3 /molcenter-dotsec. A series of unadjusted, quasiclassical trajectory calculations were been carried out to compute the thermal rate coefficients and activation parameters for a series of 13 thermal processes of the type A+BC → AB+C, where A=H, D, or Cl and BC=H 2 , D 2 , HCl, DCl, or Cl 2 . In addition, hot-atom yield ratios have been computed from the IRP equation for the reactions D*+DCl → D 2 +Cl, D*+Cl 2 → DCl + Cl as a function of the initial D* laboratory energy. The computations yield (1) hot-atom DCl/D 2 yield ratios within a factor of 2 of the experimental values; (2) thermal activation energies in satisfactory agreement with experiment for all processes investigated; and (3) frequency factors in reasonable accord with experiment for all the reactions except the hydrogen exchange reactions

  19. Measurements of the isothermal temperature reactivity coefficient of KUCA C-Core with a D{sub 2}O tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyeon, Cheol Ho [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto Univ., Osaka (Japan); Shim, Hyung Jin; Choi, Sung Hoon; Jeon, Byoung Kyu [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Eun Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    The Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA) is a multi-core type critical assembly consisting of three independent cores in the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute. The light-water-moderated core (Ccore) is a tank type reactor, and the experiments of the isothermal temperature reactivity coefficient (ITRC) of C-core with a D{sub 2}O tank were carried out with the use of six 10 kW heaters and a radiator system in a dump tank, one 10 kW heater in a core tank, and one 5 kW heater in the D{sub 2}O tank. The ITRCs of the C-core with the D{sub 2}O tank immersed in the core tank are considered important to investigate the mechanism of moderation and reflection effects of H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O in the core on the evaluation by numerical simulations. The objectives of this paper are to report the ITRC measurements for C-core with D{sub 2}O tank ranging between 26.7 .deg. C and 58.5 .deg. C, and to examine the accuracy of the numerical simulations by the Seoul National University Monte Carlo code, McCARD, through the comparison between measured and calculated results.

  20. Novel Method for Measuring the Heat Collection Rate and Heat Loss Coefficient of Water-in-Glass Evacuated Tube Solar Water Heaters Based on Artificial Neural Networks and Support Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijian Liu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The determinations of heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient are crucial for the evaluation of in service water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. However, the direct determination requires complex detection devices and a series of standard experiments, which also wastes too much time and manpower. To address this problem, we propose machine learning models including artificial neural networks (ANNs and support vector machines (SVM to predict the heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient without a direct determination. Parameters that can be easily obtained by “portable test instruments” were set as independent variables, including tube length, number of tubes, tube center distance, heat water mass in tank, collector area, final temperature and angle between tubes and ground, while the heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient determined by the detection device were set as dependent variables respectively. Nine hundred fifteen samples from in-service water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters were used for training and testing the models. Results show that the multilayer feed-forward neural network (MLFN with 3 nodes is the best model for the prediction of heat collection rate and the general regression neural network (GRNN is the best model for the prediction of heat loss coefficient due to their low root mean square (RMS errors, short training times, and high prediction accuracies (under the tolerances of 30%, 20%, and 10%, respectively.

  1. Effects of strain rate and temperature on deformation behaviour of IN 718 during high temperature deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, L X [Dept. of Metallurgy and Engineering Materials, Univ. of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Baker, T N [Dept. of Metallurgy and Engineering Materials, Univ. of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    1994-04-15

    The hot deformation characteristics of a wrought IN 718 alloy were investigated by compression testing at constant strain rates in the range of 0.1 to 5 x 10[sup -3] s[sup -1], and testing temperatures in the range of 950 to 1100 C using a 200 ton capacity microprocessor controlled Fielding hydraulic press. Examination of the microstructures was carried out by optical microscopy and TEM. The flow stress of the compression tests showed a single peak in the flow stress-strain curves, and indicated that a dynamic recrystallization transition took place during the hot compression. The relationship between the peak stresses ([sigma][sub p]) and the Zener-Hollomon parameter (z) can be expressed by [sigma][sub p] = 0.5 Z[sup 0.17]. Necklace'' microstructures were observed at testing temperatures below 1050 C, for strain of 0.7. The fraction of recrystallized grains increased with the increasing temperature and strain, and decreasing strain rate. Fully recrystallized microstructures were observed at temperatures 1050 C or greater, with a strain of 0.7. (orig.)

  2. Temperature and orientation dependence of the short-term strength characteristics, Young's modulus, and linear expansion coefficient of ZhS6F alloy single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svetlov, I L; Sukhanov, N N; Krivko, A I; Roshchina, I N; Khatsinskaia, I M

    1987-01-01

    Experimental data are presented on the temperature dependence of the short- term strength characteristics, Young's modulus, and linear expansion coefficients of single crystals of a nickel alloy, ZhS6F, with crystallographic orientations along the 001, 111, 011, and 112 lines. It is found that the mechanical properties and Young's modulus of the alloy crystals exibit anisotropy in the temperature range 20-900 C. The linear thermal expansion coefficient is isotropic up to 900 C and equal to that of the equiaxed alloy. 10 references.

  3. Functional evaluation of hydronephrosis by diffusion-weighted MR imaging: Relationship between apparent diffusion coefficient and split glomerular filtration rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyoshima, S.; Noguchi, K.; Seto, H.; Shimizu, M.; Watanabe, N.

    2000-01-01

    To determine the relationship between apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values measured by diffusion-weighted MR imaging and split renal function determined by renal scintigraphy in patients with hydronephrosis. Material and Methods: Diffusion-weighted imaging on a 1.5 T MR unit and renal scintigraphy were performed in 36 patients with hydronephrosis (45 hydronephrotic kidneys, 21 non-hydronephrotic kidneys). ADC values of the individual kidneys were measured by diffusion-weighted MR imaging. Split renal function (glomerular filtration rate (GFR)) was determined by renal scintigraphy using 99m Tc-DTPA. The relationship between ADC values and split GFR was examined in 66 kidneys. The hydronephrotic kidneys were further classified into three groups (severe renal dysfunction, GFR 25 ml/min, n=28), and mean values for ADCs were calculated. Results: In hydronephrotic kidneys, there was a moderate positive correlation between ADC values and split GFR (R2=0.56). On the other hand, in non-hydronephrotic kidneys, poor correlation between ADC values and split GFR was observed (R2=0.08). The mean values for ADCs of the dysfunctioning hydronephrotic kidneys (severe renal dysfunction, 1.32x10 -3 ±0.18x10 -3 mm 2 /s; moderate renal dysfunction, 1.38x10 -3 ±0.10x10 -3 mm2/s) were significantly lower than that of the normal functioning hydronephrotic kidneys (1.63x10 -3 ±0.12±10 -3 mm 2 /s). Conclusion: These results indicated that measurement of ADC values by diffusion-weighted MR imaging has a potential value in the evaluation of the functional status of hydronephrotic kidneys

  4. Determination of the Optimum Heat Transfer Coefficient and Temperature Rise Analysis for a Lithium-Ion Battery under the Conditions of Harbin City Bus Driving Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaogang Wu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the heat problems that occur during the operation of power batteries, especially thermal runaway, which usually take place in high temperature environments. The study was conducted on a ternary polymer lithium-ion battery. In addition, a lumped parameter thermal model was established to analyze the thermal behavior of the electric bus battery system under the operation conditions of the driving cycles of the Harbin city electric buses. Moreover, the quantitative relationship between the optimum heat transfer coefficient of the battery and the ambient temperature was investigated. The relationship between the temperature rise (Tr, the number of cycles (c, and the heat transfer coefficient (h under three Harbin bus cycles have been investigated at 30 °C, because it can provide a basis for the design of the battery thermal management system. The results indicated that the heat transfer coefficient that meets the requirements of the battery thermal management system is the cubic power function of the ambient temperature. Therefore, if the ambient temperature is 30 °C, the heat transfer coefficient should be at least 12 W/m2K in the regular bus lines, 22 W/m2K in the bus rapid transit lines, and 32 W/m2K in the suburban lines.

  5. Application of Mathematical Models for Determination of Microorganisms Growth Rate Kinetic Coefficients for Wastewater Treatment Plant Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Delnavaz

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: Evaluation of Y, kd, k0 and Ks parameters in operation of Ekbatan wastewater treatment plant showed that ASM1 model could well determine the coefficients and therefore the conditions of biological treatment is appropriate.

  6. Temperature dependence of looping rates in a short peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roccatano, Danilo; Sahoo, Harekrushna; Zacharias, Martin; Nau, Werner M

    2007-03-15

    Knowledge of the influence of chain length and amino acid sequence on the structural and dynamic properties of small peptides in solution provides essential information on protein folding pathways. The combination of time-resolved optical spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation methods has become a powerful tool to investigate the kinetics of end-to-end collisions (looping rates) in short peptides, which are relevant in early protein folding events. We applied the combination of both techniques to study temperature-dependent (280-340 K) looping rates of the Dbo-AlaGlyGln-Trp-NH2 peptide, where Dbo represents a 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-ene-labeled asparagine, which served as a fluorescent probe in the time-resolved spectroscopic experiments. The experimental looping rates increased from 4.8 x 10(7) s(-1) at 283 K to 2.0 x 10(8) s(-1) at 338 K in H2O. The corresponding Arrhenius plot provided as activation parameters Ea = 21.5 +/- 1.0 kJ mol(-1) and ln(A/s-1) = 26.8 +/- 0.2 in H2O. The results in D2O were consistent with a slight solvent viscosity effect, i.e., the looping rates were 10-20% slower. MD simulations were performed with the GROMOS96 force field in a water solvent model, which required first a parametrization of the synthetic amino acid Dbo. After corrections for solvent viscosity effects, the calculated looping rates varied from 1.5 x 10(8) s(-1) at 280 K to 8.2 x 10(8) s(-1) at 340 K in H2O, which was about four times larger than the experimental data. The calculated activation parameters were Ea = 24.7 +/- 1.5 kJ mol(-1) and ln(A/s(-1)) = 29.4 +/- 0.1 in H2O.

  7. Effects of Agitation, Aeration and Temperature on Production of a Novel Glycoprotein GP-1 by Streptomyces kanasenisi ZX01 and Scale-Up Based on Volumetric Oxygen Transfer Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of temperature, agitation and aeration on glycoprotein GP-1 production by Streptomyces kanasenisi ZX01 in bench-scale fermentors were systematically investigated. The maximum final GP-1 production was achieved at an agitation speed of 200 rpm, aeration rate of 2.0 vvm and temperature of 30 °C. By using a dynamic gassing out method, the effects of agitation and aeration on volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient (kLa were also studied. The values of volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient in the logarithmic phase increased with increase of agitation speed (from 14.53 to 32.82 h−1 and aeration rate (from 13.21 to 22.43 h−1. In addition, a successful scale-up from bench-scale to pilot-scale was performed based on volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient, resulting in final GP-1 production of 3.92, 4.03, 3.82 and 4.20 mg/L in 5 L, 15 L, 70 L and 500 L fermentors, respectively. These results indicated that constant volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient was appropriate for the scale-up of batch fermentation of glycoprotein GP-1 by Streptomyces kanasenisi ZX01, and this scale-up strategy successfully achieved 100-fold scale-up from bench-scale to pilot-scale fermentor.

  8. Key physical parameters and temperature reactivity coefficients of the deep burn modular helium reactor fueled with LWRs waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, Alberto E-mail: alby@neutron.kth.se; Gudowski, Waclaw E-mail: wacek@neutron.kth.se; Cetnar, Jerzy E-mail: jerzy@neutron.kth.se; Venneri, Francesco E-mail: venneri@lanl.gov

    2004-11-01

    We investigated some important neutronic features of the deep burn modular helium reactor (DB-MHR) using the MCNP/MCB codes. Our attention was focused on the neutron flux and its spectrum, capture to fission ratio of {sup 239}Pu and the temperature coefficient of fuel and moderator. The DB-MHR is a graphite-moderated helium-cooled reactor proposed by General Atomic to address the need for a fast and efficient incineration of plutonium for non-proliferation purposes as well as the management of light water reactors (LWRs) waste. In fact, recent studies have shown that the use of the DB-MHR coupled to ordinary LWRs would keep constant the world inventory of plutonium for a reactor fleet producing 400 TW{sub e}/y. In the present studies, the DB-MHR is loaded with Np-Pu driver fuel (DF) with an isotopic composition corresponding to LWRs spent fuel waste. DF uses fissile isotopes (e.g. {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu), previously generated in the LWRs, and maintains criticality conditions in the DB-MHR. After an irradiation of three years, the spent DF is reprocessed and its remaining actinides are manufactured into fresh transmutation fuel (TF). TF mainly contains non-fissile actinides which undergo neutron capture and transmutation during the subsequent three-year irradiation in the DB-MHR. At the same time, TF provides control and negative reactivity feedback to the reactor. After extraction of the spent TF, irradiated for three years, over 94% of {sup 239}Pu and 53% of all actinides coming from LWRs waste will have been destroyed in the DB-MHR. In this paper we look at the operation conditions at equilibrium for the DB-MHR and evaluate fluxes and reactivity responses using state of the art 3-D Monte Carlo simulations.

  9. Leaf litter decomposition rates increase with rising mean annual temperature in Hawaiian tropical montane wet forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori D. Bothwell

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Decomposing litter in forest ecosystems supplies nutrients to plants, carbon to heterotrophic soil microorganisms and is a large source of CO2 to the atmosphere. Despite its essential role in carbon and nutrient cycling, the temperature sensitivity of leaf litter decay in tropical forest ecosystems remains poorly resolved, especially in tropical montane wet forests where the warming trend may be amplified compared to tropical wet forests at lower elevations. We quantified leaf litter decomposition rates along a highly constrained 5.2 °C mean annual temperature (MAT gradient in tropical montane wet forests on the Island of Hawaii. Dominant vegetation, substrate type and age, soil moisture, and disturbance history are all nearly constant across this gradient, allowing us to isolate the effect of rising MAT on leaf litter decomposition and nutrient release. Leaf litter decomposition rates were a positive linear function of MAT, causing the residence time of leaf litter on the forest floor to decline by ∼31 days for each 1 °C increase in MAT. Our estimate of the Q10 temperature coefficient for leaf litter decomposition was 2.17, within the commonly reported range for heterotrophic organic matter decomposition (1.5–2.5 across a broad range of ecosystems. The percentage of leaf litter nitrogen (N remaining after six months declined linearly with increasing MAT from ∼88% of initial N at the coolest site to ∼74% at the warmest site. The lack of net N immobilization during all three litter collection periods at all MAT plots indicates that N was not limiting to leaf litter decomposition, regardless of temperature. These results suggest that leaf litter decay in tropical montane wet forests may be more sensitive to rising MAT than in tropical lowland wet forests, and that increased rates of N release from decomposing litter could delay or prevent progressive N limitation to net primary productivity with climate warming.

  10. Vapor pressures, osmotic and activity coefficients for (LiBr + acetonitrile) between the temperatures (298.15 and 343.15) K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasirzadeh, Karamat E-mail: karamat.nasirzadeh@chemie.uni-regensburg.de; Neueder, Roland; Kunz, Werner

    2004-06-01

    Precise vapor pressure data for pure acetonitrile and (LiBr + acetonitrile) are given for temperatures ranging from T=(298.15 to 343.15) K. The molality range is from m=(0.0579 to 0.8298) mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1}. The osmotic coefficients are calculated by taking into account the second virial coefficient of acetonitrile. The parameters of the extended Pitzer ion interaction model of Archer and the mole fraction-based thermodynamic model of Clegg-Pitzer are evaluated. These models accurately reproduce the available osmotic coefficients. The parameters of the extended Pitzer ion interaction model of Archer are used to calculate the mean molal activity coefficients.

  11. Temperature equilibration rate with Fermi-Dirac statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Lowell S.; Singleton, Robert L. Jr.

    2007-01-01

    We calculate analytically the electron-ion temperature equilibration rate in a fully ionized, weakly to moderately coupled plasma, using an exact treatment of the Fermi-Dirac electrons. The temperature is sufficiently high so that the quantum-mechanical Born approximation to the scattering is valid. It should be emphasized that we do not build a model of the energy exchange mechanism, but rather, we perform a systematic first principles calculation of the energy exchange. At the heart of this calculation lies the method of dimensional continuation, a technique that we borrow from quantum field theory and use in a different fashion to regulate the kinetic equations in a consistent manner. We can then perform a systematic perturbation expansion and thereby obtain a finite first-principles result to leading and next-to-leading order. Unlike model building, this systematic calculation yields an estimate of its own error and thus prescribes its domain of applicability. The calculational error is small for a weakly to moderately coupled plasma, for which our result is nearly exact. It should also be emphasized that our calculation becomes unreliable for a strongly coupled plasma, where the perturbative expansion that we employ breaks down, and one must then utilize model building and computer simulations. Besides providing different and potentially useful results, we use this calculation as an opportunity to explain the method of dimensional continuation in a pedagogical fashion. Interestingly, in the regime of relevance for many inertial confinement fusion experiments, the degeneracy corrections are comparable in size to the subleading quantum correction below the Born approximation. For consistency, we therefore present this subleading quantum-to-classical transition correction in addition to the degeneracy correction

  12. Experimental particle formation rates spanning tropospheric sulfuric acid and ammonia abundances, ion production rates, and temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Kürten, Andreas; Almeida, Joao; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Dunne, Eimear M.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Williamson, Christina; Barmet, Peter; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Gordon, Hamish; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Ickes, Luisa; Jokinen, Tuija; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Onnela, Antti; Ortega, Ismael K.; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P.; Rondo, Linda; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Smith, James N.; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Wagner, Paul E.; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Ken; Kulmala, Markku; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Binary nucleation of sulfuric acid and water as well as ternary nucleation involving ammonia arethought to be the dominant processes responsible for new particle formation (NPF) in the cold temperaturesof the middle and upper troposphere. Ions are also thought to be important for particle nucleation inthese regions. However, global models presently lack experimentally measured NPF rates under controlledlaboratory conditions and so at present must rely on theoretical or empirical parameterizations. Here withdata obtained in the European Organization for Nuclear Research CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets)chamber, we present the first experimental survey of NPF rates spanning free tropospheric conditions. Theconditions during nucleation cover a temperature range from 208 to 298 K, sulfuric acid concentrationsbet ween 5 × 105and 1 × 109cm3, and ammonia mixing ratios from zero added ammonia, i.e., nominally purebinary, to a maximum of ~1400 parts per trillion by volume (pptv). We performed nucleation s...

  13. Estimation of Temperature Influence on Creep Rate of High-Temperature Elements in Steam Turbines and Steam Pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Gerasimova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a high temperature influence on strength characteristics of steam pipelines and steam turbine parts of high and medium pressure. The charts showing a decisive temperature importance in diffuse creep have been presented in the paper. The paper contains a calculation of steel self-diffusion coefficient. Dependence Dsd = f(t for more accurate assessment of  resource characteristics of the applied steel has been proposed in the paper.

  14. The effect of N2/+/ recombination on the aeronomic determination of the charge exchange rate coefficient of O/+//2D/ with N2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torr, D. G.; Orsini, N.

    1978-01-01

    The Atmosphere Explorer (AE) data are reexamined in the light of new laboratory measurements of the N2(+) recombination rate coefficient alpha. The new measurements support earlier measurements which yielded values of alpha significantly lower than the AE values. It is found that the values for alpha determined from the satellite data can be reconciled with the laboratory measurements, if the charge exchange rate coefficient for O(+)(2D) with N2 is less than one-quarter of that derived in the laboratory by Rutherford and Vroom (1971).

  15. Electron Excitation Rate Coefficients for Transitions from the IS21S Ground State to the 1S2S1,3S and 1S2P1,3P0 Excited States of Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, K. M.; Kingston, A. E.; McDowell, M. R. C.

    1984-03-01

    The available experimental and theoretical electron impact excitation cross section data for the transitions from the 1s2 1S ground state to the 1s2s 1,3S and 1s2p 1,3P0 excited states of helium are assessed. Based on this assessed data, excitation rate coefficients are calculated over a wide electron temperature range below 3.0×106K. A comparison with other published results suggests that the rates used should be lower by a factor of 2 or more.

  16. The effects of temperature and strain rate on the dynamic flow behaviour of different steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.-S.; Liu, C.-Y.

    2006-01-01

    A compressive type split-Hopkinson pressure bar is utilized to compare the impact plastic behaviour of three steels with different levels of carbon content. S15C low carbon steel, S50C medium alloy heat treatable steel (abbreviated hereafter to medium carbon steel) and SKS93 tool steel with a high carbon and low alloy content (abbreviated hereafter to high carbon steel) are tested under strain rates ranging from 1.1 x 10 3 s -1 to 5.5 x 10 3 s -1 and temperatures ranging from 25 to 800 deg. C. The effects of the carbon content, strain rate and temperature on the mechanical responses of the three steels are evaluated. The microstructures of the impacted specimens are studied using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). It is found that an increased carbon content enhances the dynamic flow resistance of the three steels. Additionally, the flow stress increases with strain and strain rate in every case. A thermal softening effect is identified in the plastic behaviour of the three steels. The activation energy, ΔG * , varies as a function of the strain rate and temperature, but is apparently insensitive to the carbon content level. The present study identifies maximum ΔG * values of 58 kJ/mol for the S15C low carbon steel, 54.9 kJ/mol for the S50C medium carbon steel, and 56.4 kJ/mol for the SKS93 high carbon steel. A Zerilli-Armstrong BCC constitutive model with appropriate coefficients is applied to describe the high strain rate plastic behaviours of the S15C, S50C and SKS93 steels. The errors between the calculated stress and the measured stress are found to be less than 5%. The microstructural observations reveal that the dislocation density and the degree of dislocation tangling increase with increasing strain rate in all three steels. Additionally, the TEM observations indicate that a higher strain rate reduces the size of the dislocation cells. The annihilation of dislocations occurs more readily at elevated temperatures. The square root of the dislocation

  17. Coherent quantum transport in disordered systems: II. Temperature dependence of carrier diffusion coefficients from the time-dependent wavepacket diffusion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Xinxin; Zhao, Yi; Cao, Jianshu

    2014-01-01

    The time-dependent wavepacket diffusion method for carrier quantum dynamics (Zhong and Zhao 2013 J. Chem. Phys. 138 014111), a truncated version of the stochastic Schrödinger equation/wavefunction approach that approximately satisfies the detailed balance principle and scales well with the size of the system, is applied to investigate the carrier transport in one-dimensional systems including both the static and dynamic disorders on site energies. The predicted diffusion coefficients with respect to temperature successfully bridge from band-like to hopping-type transport. As demonstrated in paper I (Moix et al 2013 New J. Phys. 15 085010), the static disorder tends to localize the carrier, whereas the dynamic disorder induces carrier dynamics. For the weak dynamic disorder, the diffusion coefficients are temperature-independent (band-like property) at low temperatures, which is consistent with the prediction from the Redfield equation, and a linear dependence of the coefficient on temperature (hopping-type property) only appears at high temperatures. In the intermediate regime of dynamic disorder, the transition from band-like to hopping-type transport can be easily observed at relatively low temperatures as the static disorder increases. When the dynamic disorder becomes strong, the carrier motion can follow the hopping-type mechanism even without static disorder. Furthermore, it is found that the memory time of dynamic disorder is an important factor in controlling the transition from the band-like to hopping-type motions. (paper)

  18. Altitude Variation of the CO2 (V2)-O Quenching Rate Coefficient in Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feofilovi, Artem; Kutepov, Alexander; She, Chiao-Yao; Smith, Anne K.; Pesnell, William Dean; Goldberg, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Among the processes governing the energy balance in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (mlt), the quenching of CO2(N2) vibrational levels by collisions with oxygen atoms plays an important role. However, the k(CO2-O) values measured in the lab and retrieved from atmospheric measurements vary from 1.5 x 10(exp -12) cubic centimeters per second through 9.0 x 10(exp -12) cubic centimeters per second that requires further studying. In this work we used synergistic data from a ground based lidar and a satellite infrared radiometer to estimate K(CO2-O). We used the night- and daytime temperatures between 80 and 110 km measured by the colorado state university narrow-band sodium (Na) lidar located at fort collins, colorado (41N, 255E) as ground truth of the saber/timed nearly simultaneous (plus or minus 10 minutes) and common volume (within plus or minus 1 degree in latitude, plus or minus 2 degrees in longitude) observations. For each altitude in 80-110 km interval we estimate an "optimal" value of K(CO2-O) needed to minimize the discrepancy between the simulated 15 mm CO2 radiance and that measured by the saber/timed instrument. The K(CO2-O) obtained in this way varies in altitude from 3.5 x 10(exp -12) cubic centimeters per second at 80 km to 5.2 x 10(exp -12) cubic centimeters pers second for altitudes above 95 km. We discuss this variation of the rate constant and its impact on temperature retrievals from 15 mm radiance measurements and on the energy budget of mlt.

  19. Room-temperature and temperature-dependent QSRR modelling for predicting the nitrate radical reaction rate constants of organic chemicals using ensemble learning methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S; Basant, N; Mohan, D; Singh, K P

    2016-07-01

    Experimental determinations of the rate constants of the reaction of NO3 with a large number of organic chemicals are tedious, and time and resource intensive; and the development of computational methods has widely been advocated. In this study, we have developed room-temperature (298 K) and temperature-dependent quantitative structure-reactivity relationship (QSRR) models based on the ensemble learning approaches (decision tree forest (DTF) and decision treeboost (DTB)) for predicting the rate constant of the reaction of NO3 radicals with diverse organic chemicals, under OECD guidelines. Predictive powers of the developed models were established in terms of statistical coefficients. In the test phase, the QSRR models yielded a correlation (r(2)) of >0.94 between experimental and predicted rate constants. The applicability domains of the constructed models were determined. An attempt has been made to provide the mechanistic interpretation of the selected features for QSRR development. The proposed QSRR models outperformed the previous reports, and the temperature-dependent models offered a much wider applicability domain. This is the first report presenting a temperature-dependent QSRR model for predicting the nitrate radical reaction rate constant at different temperatures. The proposed models can be useful tools in predicting the reactivities of chemicals towards NO3 radicals in the atmosphere, hence, their persistence and exposure risk assessment.

  20. High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Critical Experiment and its Application to Thorium Absorption Rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardes, R.G.; Brown, J.R.; Drake, M.K.; Fischer, P.U.; Pound, D.C.; Sampson, J.B.; Stewart, H.B.

    1964-01-01

    In developing the concept of the HTGR and its first prototype at Peach Bottom, General Atomic made the decision that a critical experiment was required to provide adequately certain necessary input data for the nuclear analysis. The specific needs of the nuclear design theory for input data relating to thorium absorptions led to an experimental design consisting of a central lattice-type critical assembly with surrounding buffer and driver regions. This type of assembly, in which the spectrum of interest can be established in the relatively small central lattice having a desired geometry, provides a useful tool for obtaining a variety of input data for nuclear analysis surveys of new concepts. The particular advantages of this approach over that of constructing a mock-up assembly will be discussed, as well as the role of the theory in determining what experiments are most useful and how these experiments are then used in verifying design techniques. Two relatively new techniques were developed for use in the lattice assembly. These were a reactivity oscillation technique for determining the thorium Doppler coefficient, and an activation technique for determining both the resonance integral of thorium dispersed in graphite and its temperature dependence (activation Doppler coefficient). The Doppler coefficient measurement by reactivity oscillation utilized the entire central fuel element in a technique which permitted heating this fuel element to 800°F and accurately subtracting experimentally the thermal-base effects, that is, those effects not contributing to the thorium resonance capture. Comparison of results with theory for a range of conditions shows excellent agreement. The measurement of the thorium resonance integral and its temperature dependence will be described. The technique developed for measuring resonance capture makes use of gold as the standard and vanadium as die material giving the 1/v absorption rate. This technique is dictated by the fact

  1. Absorption coefficient and refractive index changes of a quantum ring in the presence of spin-orbit couplings: Temperature and Zeeman effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A.; Azargoshasb, T.; Niknam, E.

    2017-10-01

    Effects of applied magnetic field, temperature and dimensions on the optical absorption coefficients (AC) and refractive index (RI) changes of a GaAs quantum ring are investigated in the presence of both Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions (SOI). To this end, the finite difference method (FDM) is used in order to numerically calculate the energy eigenvalues and eigenstates of the system while the compact density matrix approach is hired to calculate the optical properties. It is shown that application of magnetic field, temperature as well as the geometrical size in the presence of spin-orbit interactions, alter the electronic structure and consequently influence the linear and third-order nonlinear optical absorption coefficients as well as the refractive index changes of the system. Results show an obvious blue shift in optical curves with enhancing external magnetic field and temperature while the increment of dimensions result in red shift.

  2. The Heat Resistance of Microbial Cells Represented by D Values Can be Estimated by the Transition Temperature and the Coefficient of Linear Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Koichi; Kogure, Akinori; Deuchi, Keiji; Kuwana, Ritsuko; Takamatsu, Hiromu; Ito, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    We previously developed a method for evaluating the heat resistance of microorganisms by measuring the transition temperature at which the coefficient of linear expansion of a cell changes. Here, we performed heat resistance measurements using a scanning probe microscope with a nano thermal analysis system. The microorganisms studied included six strains of the genus Bacillus or related genera, one strain each of the thermophilic obligate anaerobic bacterial genera Thermoanaerobacter and Moorella, two strains of heat-resistant mold, two strains of non-sporulating bacteria, and one strain of yeast. Both vegetative cells and spores were evaluated. The transition temperature at which the coefficient of linear expansion due to heating changed from a positive value to a negative value correlated strongly with the heat resistance of the microorganism as estimated from the D value. The microorganisms with greater heat resistance exhibited higher transition temperatures. There was also a strong negative correlation between the coefficient of linear expansion and heat resistance in bacteria and yeast, such that microorganisms with greater heat resistance showed lower coefficients of linear expansion. These findings suggest that our method could be useful for evaluating the heat resistance of microorganisms.

  3. Calculation of the Ionization Coefficient in the Townsend Discharge in the Mixture of Argon and Mercury Vapors with Temperature-Dependent Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, G. G.; Dubinina, M. S.; Fisher, M. R.; Kristya, V. I.

    2018-04-01

    For a hybrid model of the low-current discharge considering, along with direct ionization of the mixture components by electrons, the Penning ionization of mercury atoms by metastable argon atoms, the ionization coefficient in the argon-mercury mixture used in illuminating lamps is calculated. The analytical approximation formula describing the dependence of the ionization coefficient of the mixture on the reduced electric field strength and temperature is obtained for sufficiently wide ranges of their variations, and its accuracy is estimated. It is demonstrated that the discharge ignition voltage calculated using this formula is in agreement with the results of simulation and the available experimental data.

  4. Thermal expansion and cooling rate dependence of transition temperature in ZrTiO4 single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal expansion in ZrTiO 4 single crystal was investigated in the temperature range covering the normal, incommensurate, and commensurate phases. Remarkable change was found at the normal-incommensurate phase transition (T I ) in all thermal expansion coefficients a, b, and c. The spontaneous strains χ as and χ bs along the a and b axes show linear temperature dependence, while the spontaneous strain χ cs along the c axis shows a nonlinear temperature dependence. Small discontinuity along the c direction was observed at the incommensurate-commensurate transition temperature, T c = 845 C. dT I /dP and dT c /dP depend on the cooling rate

  5. Characterization and prediction of rate-dependent flexibility in lumbar spine biomechanics at room and body temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolworthy, Dean K; Zirbel, Shannon A; Howell, Larry L; Samuels, Marina; Bowden, Anton E

    2014-05-01

    temperature, and a scaling parameter. A Bland-Altman analysis showed high coefficients of determination for the predictive model. The present work demonstrates significant changes in spine segment flexibility as a result of loading rate and testing temperature. Loading rate effects can be accounted for using the predictive model, which accurately estimated ROM, neutral zone, stiffness, and hysteresis within the range of voluntary motion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Disorder effect on heat capacity, self-diffusion coefficient, and choosing best potential model for melting temperature, in gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster with 55 atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taherkhani, Farid; Akbarzadeh, Hamed; Feyzi, Mostafa; Rafiee, Hamid Reza

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation has been implemented for doping effect on melting temperature, heat capacity, self-diffusion coefficient of gold–copper bimetallic nanostructure with 55 total gold and copper atom numbers and its bulk alloy. Trend of melting temperature for gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster is not same as melting temperature copper–gold bulk alloy. Molecular dynamics simulation of our result regarding bulk melting temperature is consistence with available experimental data. Molecular dynamics simulation shows that melting temperature of gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster increases with copper atom fraction. Semi-empirical potential model and quantum Sutton–Chen potential models do not change melting temperature trend with copper doping of gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster. Self-diffusion coefficient of copper atom is greater than gold atom in gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster. Semi-empirical potential within the tight-binding second moment approximation as new application potential model for melting temperature of gold–copper bulk structure shows better result in comparison with EAM, Sutton–Chen potential, and quantum Sutton–Chen potential models

  7. Disorder effect on heat capacity, self-diffusion coefficient, and choosing best potential model for melting temperature, in gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster with 55 atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taherkhani, Farid, E-mail: faridtaherkhani@gmail.com, E-mail: f.taherkhani@razi.ac.ir [Razi University, Department of Physical Chemistry (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akbarzadeh, Hamed [Hakim Sabzevari University, Department of Chemistry (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Feyzi, Mostafa; Rafiee, Hamid Reza [Razi University, Department of Physical Chemistry (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Molecular dynamics simulation has been implemented for doping effect on melting temperature, heat capacity, self-diffusion coefficient of gold–copper bimetallic nanostructure with 55 total gold and copper atom numbers and its bulk alloy. Trend of melting temperature for gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster is not same as melting temperature copper–gold bulk alloy. Molecular dynamics simulation of our result regarding bulk melting temperature is consistence with available experimental data. Molecular dynamics simulation shows that melting temperature of gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster increases with copper atom fraction. Semi-empirical potential model and quantum Sutton–Chen potential models do not change melting temperature trend with copper doping of gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster. Self-diffusion coefficient of copper atom is greater than gold atom in gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster. Semi-empirical potential within the tight-binding second moment approximation as new application potential model for melting temperature of gold–copper bulk structure shows better result in comparison with EAM, Sutton–Chen potential, and quantum Sutton–Chen potential models.

  8. CREOLE experiment study on the reactivity temperature coefficient with sensitivity and uncertainty analysis using the MCNP5 code and different neutron cross section evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulaich, Y.; El Bardouni, T.; Erradi, L.; Chakir, E.; Boukhal, H.; Nacir, B.; El Younoussi, C.; El Bakkari, B.; Merroun, O.; Zoubair, M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → In the present work, we have analyzed the CREOLE experiment on the reactivity temperature coefficient (RTC) by using the three-dimensional continuous energy code (MCNP5) and the last updated nuclear data evaluations. → Calculation-experiment discrepancies of the RTC were analyzed and the results have shown that the JENDL3.3 and JEFF3.1 evaluations give the most consistent values. → In order to specify the source of the relatively large discrepancy in the case of ENDF-BVII nuclear data evaluation, the k eff discrepancy between ENDF-BVII and JENDL3.3 was decomposed by using sensitivity and uncertainty analysis technique. - Abstract: In the present work, we analyze the CREOLE experiment on the reactivity temperature coefficient (RTC) by using the three-dimensional continuous energy code (MCNP5) and the last updated nuclear data evaluations. This experiment performed in the EOLE critical facility located at CEA/Cadarache, was mainly dedicated to the RTC studies for both UO 2 and UO 2 -PuO 2 PWR type lattices covering the whole temperature range from 20 deg. C to 300 deg. C. We have developed an accurate 3D model of the EOLE reactor by using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code which guarantees a high level of fidelity in the description of different configurations at various temperatures taking into account their consequence on neutron cross section data and all thermal expansion effects. In this case, the remaining error between calculation and experiment will be awarded mainly to uncertainties on nuclear data. Our own cross section library was constructed by using NJOY99.259 code with point-wise nuclear data based on ENDF-BVII, JEFF3.1 and JENDL3.3 evaluation files. The MCNP model was validated through the axial and radial fission rate measurements at room and hot temperatures. Calculation-experiment discrepancies of the RTC were analyzed and the results have shown that the JENDL3.3 and JEFF3.1 evaluations give the most consistent values; the discrepancy is

  9. CH3CO + O2 + M (M = He, N2) Reaction Rate Coefficient Measurements and Implications for the OH Radical Product Yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Vassileios C; Karafas, Emmanuel S; Gierczak, Tomasz; Burkholder, James B

    2015-07-16

    The gas-phase CH3CO + O2 reaction is known to proceed via a chemical activation mechanism leading to the formation of OH and CH3C(O)OO radicals via bimolecular and termolecular reactive channels, respectively. In this work, rate coefficients, k, for the CH3CO + O2 reaction were measured over a range of temperature (241-373 K) and pressure (0.009-600 Torr) with He and N2 as the bath gas and used to characterize the bi- and ter-molecular reaction channels. Three independent experimental methods (pulsed laser photolysis-laser-induced fluorescence (PLP-LIF), pulsed laser photolysis-cavity ring-down spectroscopy (PLP-CRDS), and a very low-pressure reactor (VLPR)) were used to characterize k(T,M). PLP-LIF was the primary method used to measure k(T,M) in the high-pressure regime under pseudo-first-order conditions. CH3CO was produced by PLP, and LIF was used to monitor the OH radical bimolecular channel reaction product. CRDS, a complementary high-pressure method, measured k(295 K,M) over the pressure range 25-600 Torr (He) by monitoring the temporal CH3CO radical absorption following its production via PLP in the presence of excess O2. The VLPR technique was used in a relative rate mode to measure k(296 K,M) in the low-pressure regime (9-32 mTorr) with CH3CO + Cl2 used as the reference reaction. A kinetic mechanism analysis of the combined kinetic data set yielded a zero pressure limit rate coefficient, kint(T), of (6.4 ± 4) × 10(-14) exp((820 ± 150)/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) (with kint(296 K) measured to be (9.94 ± 1.3) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)), k0(T) = (7.39 ± 0.3) × 10(-30) (T/300)(-2.2±0.3) cm(6) molecule(-2) s(-1), and k∞(T) = (4.88 ± 0.05) × 10(-12) (T/300)(-0.85±0.07) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) with Fc = 0.8 and M = N2. A He/N2 collision efficiency ratio of 0.60 ± 0.05 was determined. The phenomenological kinetic results were used to define the pressure and temperature dependence of the OH radical yield in the CH3CO + O2 reaction. The

  10. Metabolic rate and body temperature of an African sun bird ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The oxygen consumption (VO2) of the lesser double-collared sunbird, Nectarinia chalybea, was measured at ambient temperatures (Ta) from 7 to 35°C. The diel variation in body temperature (Tb) and wet thermal conductance (C) was also determined. The sunbirds (mean mass 8.36 g ± S.E. 0.21 g) showed a pronounced ...

  11. Behavior of specific heat and self diffusion coefficient of sodium near transition temperature: a molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, N.; Khan, G.

    1990-09-01

    In this report the author used of a very useful technique of simulation and applied it to successfully for determining the various properties of sodium, both in liquid and solid phase near transition point. As a first step the determination of specific heat and diffusion coefficient have been carried out. In liquid state the molecular dynamics (MD) values calculated matched the experimental data. But in solid state the diffusion coefficient obtained were not consistent with the one expected for a solid, rather the values obtained suggested that sodium remained in liquid state even below the melting point. (A.B.)

  12. Critical heat flux analysis on change of plate temperature and cooling water flow rate for rectangular narrow gap with bilateral-heated cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M Hadi Kusuma; Mulya Juarsa; Anhar Riza Antariksawan

    2013-01-01

    Boiling heat transfer phenomena on rectangular narrow gap was related to the safety of nuclear reactors. Research done in order to study the safety of nuclear reactors in particular relating to boiling heat transfer and useful on the improvement of next-generation reactor designs. The research focused on calculation of the heat flux during the cooling process in rectangular narrow gap size 1.0 mm. with initial temperatures 200°C. 400°C, and 600°C, also the flow rates of cooling water 0,1 liters/second. 0,2 liters/second. and 0,3 liters/second. Experiments carried out by injecting water at a certain flow rate with the water temperature 85°C. Transient temperature measurement data recorded by the data acquisition system. Transient temperature measurement data is used to calculate the flux of heat gain is then used to obtain the heat transfer coefficient. This research aimed to obtain the correlation between critical heat flux and heat transfer coefficient to changes in temperatures and water flow rates for bilaterally-heated cases on rectangular narrow gap. The results obtained for a constant cooling water flow rate, critical heat flux will increase when hot plate temperature also increased. While on a constant hot plate temperature, coefficient heat transfer will increase when cooling water flow rate also increased. Thus it can be said that the cooling water flow rate and temperature of the hot plate has a significant effect on the critical heat flux and heat transfer coefficient resulted in quenching process of vertical rectangular narrow gap with double-heated cases. (author)

  13. Investigation of the Maximum Spin-Up Coefficients of Friction Obtained During Tests of a Landing Gear Having a Static-Load Rating of 20,000 Pounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batterson, Sidney A.

    1959-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made at the Langley landing loads track to obtain data on the maximum spin-up coefficients of friction developed by a landing gear having a static-load rating of 20,000 pounds. The forward speeds ranged from 0 to approximately 180 feet per second and the sinking speeds, from 2.7 feet per second to 9.4 feet per second. The results indicated the variation of the maximum spin-up coefficient of friction with forward speed and vertical load. Data obtained during this investigation are also compared with some results previously obtained for nonrolling tires to show the effect of forward speed.

  14. Extreme learning machine: a new alternative for measuring heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhijian; Li, Hao; Tang, Xindong; Zhang, Xinyu; Lin, Fan; Cheng, Kewei

    2016-01-01

    Heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient are crucial indicators for the evaluation of in service water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. However, the direct determination requires complex detection devices and a series of standard experiments, wasting too much time and manpower. To address this problem, we previously used artificial neural networks and support vector machine to develop precise knowledge-based models for predicting the heat collection rates and heat loss coefficients of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters, setting the properties measured by "portable test instruments" as the independent variables. A robust software for determination was also developed. However, in previous results, the prediction accuracy of heat loss coefficients can still be improved compared to those of heat collection rates. Also, in practical applications, even a small reduction in root mean square errors (RMSEs) can sometimes significantly improve the evaluation and business processes. As a further study, in this short report, we show that using a novel and fast machine learning algorithm-extreme learning machine can generate better predicted results for heat loss coefficient, which reduces the average RMSEs to 0.67 in testing.

  15. Measurement of the ferric diffusion coefficient in agarose and gelatine gels by utilization of the evolution of a radiation induced edge as reflected in relaxation rate images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, Torje V.; Olsen, Dag R.; Skretting, Arne

    1997-01-01

    A method has been developed to determine the diffusion coefficients of ferric ions in ferrous sulphate doped gels. A radiation induced edge was created in the gel, and two spin-echo sequences were used to acquire a pair of images of the gel at different points of time. For each of these image pairs, a longitudinal relaxation rate image was derived. From profiles through these images, the standard deviations of the Gaussian functions that characterize diffusion were determined. These data provided the basis for the determination of the ferric diffusion coefficients by two different methods. Simulations indicate that the use of single spin-echo images in this procedure may in some cases lead to a significant underestimation of the diffusion coefficient. The technique was applied to different agarose and gelatine gels that were prepared, irradiated and imaged simultaneously. The results indicate that the diffusion coefficient is lower in a gelatine gel than in an agarose gel. Addition of xylenol orange to a gelatine gel lowers the diffusion coefficient from 1.45 to 0.81 mm 2 h -1 , at the cost of significantly lower R 1 sensitivity. The addition of benzoic acid to the latter gel did not increase the R 1 sensitivity. (author) OK

  16. Reaction-rate coefficients, high-energy ions slowing-down, and power balance in a tokamak fusion reactor plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tone, Tatsuzo

    1978-07-01

    Described are the reactivity coefficient of D-T fusion reaction, slowing-down processes of deuterons injected with high energy and 3.52 MeV alpha particles generated in D-T reaction, and the power balance in a Tokamak reactor plasma. Most of the results were obtained in the first preliminary design of JAERI Experimental Fusion Reactor (JXFR) driven with stationary neutral beam injection. A manual of numerical computation program ''BALTOK'' developed for the calculations is given in the appendix. (auth.)

  17. Surface temperature measurement using infrared radiometer. 1st Report. ; Radiosity coefficient and radiation temperature. Sekigaisen eizo sochi wo riyoshita jitsuyoteki ondo keisoku ni kansuru kenkyu. 1. ; Shado keisu to hosha ondo no kankei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Y; Inagaki, T; Sekiya, M [Ibaraki University, Ibaraki (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1993-12-25

    As a part of the studies on practical surface temperature measurement by infrared radiometer, some basic characteristics of an infrared radiometer were studied by using three kinds of sensors with different detectable wave lengths. Specimens allowable for gray body approximation such as mortar, graphite and carbon fiber composite material were tested at a practical ambient temperature of 293 K. As a result, the difference between a radiation temperature in consideration of reflection and that derived from an emissivity increased with a decrease in emissivity, and the deviation of an emissivity derived from a radiosity coefficient increased at 20 K or less in difference between a specimen surface temperature and ambient one. Each radiosity coefficient measured by each sensor also fairly agreed with each other. The deviation of a radiosity coefficient was relatively small indicating a good agreement between theoretical and experimental data, while the difference between emissivity and radiosity coefficient deviations decreased with an increase in specimen surface temperature. 3 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Gas-phase rate coefficients for the OH + n-, i-, s-, and t-butanol reactions measured between 220 and 380 K: non-Arrhenius behavior and site-specific reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillen, Max R; Baasandorj, Munkhbayar; Burkholder, James B

    2013-06-06

    Butanol (C4H9OH) is a potential biofuel alternative in fossil fuel gasoline and diesel formulations. The usage of butanol would necessarily lead to direct emissions into the atmosphere; thus, an understanding of its atmospheric processing and environmental impact is desired. Reaction with the OH radical is expected to be the predominant atmospheric removal process for the four aliphatic isomers of butanol. In this work, rate coefficients, k, for the gas-phase reaction of the n-, i-, s-, and t-butanol isomers with the OH radical were measured under pseudo-first-order conditions in OH using pulsed laser photolysis to produce OH radicals and laser induced fluorescence to monitor its temporal profile. Rate coefficients were measured over the temperature range 221-381 K at total pressures between 50 and 200 Torr (He). The reactions exhibited non-Arrhenius behavior over this temperature range and no dependence on total pressure with k(296 K) values of (9.68 ± 0.75), (9.72 ± 0.72), (8.88 ± 0.69), and (1.04 ± 0.08) (in units of 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)) for n-, i-, s-, and t-butanol, respectively. The quoted uncertainties are at the 2σ level and include estimated systematic errors. The observed non-Arrhenius behavior is interpreted here to result from a competition between the available H-atom abstraction reactive sites, which have different activation energies and pre-exponential factors. The present results are compared with results from previous kinetic studies, structure-activity relationships (SARs), and theoretical calculations and the discrepancies are discussed. Results from this work were combined with available high temperature (1200-1800 K) rate coefficient data and room temperature reaction end-product yields, where available, to derive a self-consistent site-specific set of reaction rate coefficients of the form AT(n) exp(-E/RT) for use in atmospheric and combustion chemistry modeling.

  19. Neutronic study of nuclear reactors. Complete calculation of TRIGA MARKII reactor and calculations of fuel temperature coefficients. (Qualification of WIMS code)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benmansour, L.

    1992-01-01

    The present work shows a group of results, obtained by a neutronic study, concerning the TRIGA MARK II reactor and LIGHT WATER reactors. These studies aim to make cell and diffusion calculations. WIMS D-4 with extended library and DIXY programs are used and tested for those purposes. We also have proceeded to a qualification of WIMS code based on the fuel temperature coefficient calculations. 33 refs.; 23 figs.; 30 tabs. (author)

  20. Estimating Seebeck Coefficient of a p-Type High Temperature Thermoelectric Material Using Bee Algorithm Multi-layer Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Fatih; Kilinc, Enes; Kurt, Huseyin; Celik, Erdal; Dugenci, Muharrem; Sagiroglu, Selami

    2017-08-01

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) convert heat into electrical energy. These energy-conversion systems do not involve any moving parts and are made of thermoelectric (TE) elements connected electrically in a series and thermally in parallel; however, they are currently not suitable for use in regular operations due to their low efficiency levels. In order to produce high-efficiency TEGs, there is a need for highly heat-resistant thermoelectric materials (TEMs) with an improved figure of merit ( ZT). Production and test methods used for TEMs today are highly expensive. This study attempts to estimate the Seebeck coefficient of TEMs by using the values of existing materials in the literature. The estimation is made within an artificial neural network (ANN) based on the amount of doping and production methods. Results of the estimations show that the Seebeck coefficient can approximate the real values with an average accuracy of 94.4%. In addition, ANN has detected that any change in production methods is followed by a change in the Seebeck coefficient.

  1. Evaluation of the difference in the rate coefficients of F2 + NOx (x = 1 or 2) → F + FNOx by the stereochemical arrangement using the density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Satomi; Hayashi, Toshio; Hori, Masaru

    2015-02-26

    The rate coefficient of F2 + NO → F + FNO is 2 to 5 orders of magnitude higher than that of F2 + NO2 → F + FNO2 even though bond energies of FNO and FNO2 only differ by ∼0.2 eV. To understand the cause of having different rate coefficients of these two reactions, the change in total energies was calculated by varying the stereochemical arrangement of F2 with respect to NOx (x = 1 or 2) by the density functional theory (DFT), using CAM-B3LYP/6-311 G+(d) in the Gaussian program. The permitted approaching angle between the x-axis and the plane consisting of O, N, F, and ϕ plays a key role to restrict the reaction of NO2 and F2 compared to the reaction of NO and F2. This restriction in the reaction space is considered to be the main cause of different rate coefficients depending on the selection of x = 1 or 2 of the reaction of F2 + NOx → F + FNOx, which was also confirmed by the difference in Si etch rate using the F formed by those reactions.

  2. Temperature coefficient of piezoelectric constants in Pb(Mg1/3 Nb2/3O3 - PbTiO3 ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Henrique Lente

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the thermal stability of piezoelectric constants of PMN-PT ceramics in the tetragonal and rhombohedral phases were investigated in a wide range of temperatures. The results showed that the tetragonal PMN-PT presented higher thermal stability and, consequently, the temperature coefficients for the piezoelectric constants were approximately zero. This result revealed to be much better than that commonly found for PZT ceramics. Although the rhombohedral PMN-PT presented a slight lower thermal stability, the values found for the coupling factor were significantly higher than the tetragonal composition.

  3. Saturation and negative temperature coefficient of electrical resistivity in liquid iron-sulfur alloys at high densities from first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagle, Fabian; Steinle-Neumann, Gerd; de Koker, Nico

    2018-03-01

    We report results on electronic transport properties of liquid Fe-S alloys at conditions of planetary cores, computed using first-principle techniques in the Kubo-Greenwood formalism. We describe a combined effect of resistivity saturation due to temperature, compression, and chemistry by comparing the electron mean free path from the Drude response of optical conductivity to the mean interatomic distance. At high compression and high sulfur concentration the Ioffe-Regel condition is satisfied, and the temperature coefficient of resistivity changes sign from positive to negative. We show that this happens due to a decrease in the d density of states at the Fermi level in response to thermal broadening.

  4. Peanut canopy temperature and NDVI response to varying irrigation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Variable rate irrigation (VRI) systems have the potential to conserve water by spatially allocating limited water resources. In this study, peanut was grown under a VRI system to evaluate the impact of differential irrigation rates on peanut yield. Additionally, we evaluated the impact of differenti...

  5. Mechanical response of AA7075 aluminum alloy over a wide range of temperatures and strain rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Z.; Cassada, W.A. [Reynolds Metals Co., Chester, VA (United States). Corp. Res. and Dev.; Cady, C.M.; Gray, G.T. III

    2000-07-01

    The influence of temperature and strain rate on the flow stress and work hardening rate of a 7075 aluminum alloy was studied under compressive loading over the temperature range from 23 C to 470 C, and strain rates from 0.001 s{sup -1} and 2100 s{sup -1}. While the temperature dependence of the flow stress was found to be most significant at temperatures below 300 C, the strain rate dependence of the flow stress was found to be pronounced at temperatures above 23 C. Concurrently, the work hardening rate decreases significantly with increasing temperature between 23 C and 300 C and increases slightly at higher temperatures. The minimum work hardening rate is observed to occur at temperatures between 200 C and 300 C and shift to higher temperatures with increasing strain rate. A negative strain rate dependence of work hardening rate was observed at 23 C, although a positive strain rate dependence of work hardening rate occurs at higher temperatures. Analysis of the experimental data revealed three deformation regimes. (orig.)

  6. Magnetic field and temperature dependent measurements of hall coefficient in thermal evaporated Tin-Doped Cadmium Oxide Thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamadi, O.; Shakir, N.; Mohammed, F.

    2010-01-01

    CdO:Sn thin films are deposited onto glass substrates by thermal evaporation under vacuum. The studied films are polycrystalline and have an NaCl structure. The Hall effect is studied for films with different thickness as substrates are maintained at different temperatures. The temperature dependence of the Hall mobility is also investigated. (authors)

  7. MM98.04 Measurement of temperature and determination of heat transfer coefficient in backward can extrusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Poul; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Wanheim, Tarras

    1998-01-01

    Temperature is measured during backward can extrusion of steel. The process is characterised by large deformations and very high surface pressure. In the experiments, a can in low carbon steel with a lubrication layer of phosphate soap is formed. The temperature is measured by thermocouples...

  8. MM98.34 Experimental Measurements of Die temperatures and determination of heat transfer coefficient in backward can extrusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Poul; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Wanheim, Tarras

    1998-01-01

    The large deformations in backward can extrusion result in a rise of temperature of more than 200 degrees Centigrade. In the experiments cans in low carbon steel are formed, with a lubrication layer of phosphate soap. The temperature is measured by thermocouples in the die insert and the punch...

  9. Density, thermal expansion coefficient and viscosity of sodium tetraborate (borax)-UO2 and of sodium metaborate-UO2 solutions at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.; Dorner, S.; Roth, A.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements have been performed of the density, of the volumetric thermal expansion coefficient and of the viscosity of liquid sodium tetraborate (borax) and of sodium metaborate both pure and with two different amounts of UO 2 dissolved in each. The viscosity measurements have been performed for the solution of sodium tetraborate with UO 2 and CeO 2 , and with CeO 2 only as well. These data are required for the design of core-catchers based on sodium borates. The density measurements have been performed with the buoyancy method in the temperature range from 825 0 C to 1300 0 C, the viscosity measurements in the temperature range 700-1250 0 C with a modified Haake viscosity balance. The balance was previously calibrated at ambient temperature with a standard calibration liquid and at high temperatures, with data for pure borax available from the literature. (orig.)

  10. Shock temperature dependent rate law for plastic bonded explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Tariq D.

    2018-04-01

    A reactive flow model for the tri-amino-tri-nitro-benzene (TATB) based plastic bonded explosive PBX 9502 (95% TATB, 5% polymeric binder Kel-F 800) is presented. This newly devised model is based primarily on the shock temperature of the material, along with local pressure, and accurately models a broader range of detonation and initiation scenarios. Specifically, sensitivity changes to the initial explosive temperature are accounted for naturally and with a single set of parameters. The equation of state forms for the reactants and products, as well as the thermodynamic closure of pressure and temperature equilibration, are carried over from the Wescott-Stewart-Davis (WSD) model [Wescott et al., J. Appl. Phys. 98, 053514 (2005) and "Modeling detonation diffraction and dead zones in PBX-9502," in Proceedings of the Thirteenth International Detonation Symposium (2006)]. This newly devised model, with Arrhenius state dependence on the shock temperature, based on the WSD equation of states, is denoted by AWSD. Modifying an existing implementation of the WSD model to the AWSD model in a hydrocode is a rather straightforward procedure.

  11. Effect of Polypropylene Modification by Impregnation with Oil on Its Wear and Friction Coefficient at Variable Load and Various Friction Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Sędłak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Laboratorial two-body wear testing was carried out in order to assess effects of polypropylene modification by impregnating it with oils on friction coefficient and wear in comparison to those parameters of unmodified polypropylene, Teflon, and polyamide during operation under conditions of sliding friction without lubrication. Wear behaviour of the tested specimens was investigated using ASTM G77-98 standard wear test equipment. Recording program made it possible to visualise and record the following parameters: rotational speed and load, linear wear, friction coefficient, temperature of the specimen, and ambient temperature. In addition, wear mechanisms of the analysed materials were determined with use of scanning electron microscopy. In the case of the remaining tested polymers, the most important mechanism of wear was adhesion (PP, PTFE, PA 6.6, and PA MoS2, microcutting (PTFE, PA 6.6, and PA MoS2, fatigue wear (PTFE, forming “roll-shaped particles” combined with plastic deformation (PA 6.6 and PA MoS2, and thermal wear (PP. Impregnation of polypropylene with engine oil, gear oil, or RME results in significant reduction of friction coefficient and thus of friction torque, in relation to not only unmodified polypropylene but also the examined polyamide and Teflon.

  12. Interrelated temperature dependence of bulk etch rate and track length saturation time in CR-39 detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azooz, A.A.; Al-Jubbori, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • New empirical parameterization of CR-39 bulk etch rate. • Bulk etch rates measurements using two different methods give consistent results. • Temperature independence of track saturation length. • Two empirical relation between bulk etch rate and temperature are suggested. • Simple inverse relation between bulk etch rate and track saturation time. -- Abstract: Experimental measurements of the etching solution temperature dependence of bulk etch rate using two independent methods revealed a few interesting properties. It is found that while the track saturation length is independent of etching temperature, the etching time needed to reach saturation is strongly temperature-dependent. It is demonstrated that there is systematic simple inverse relation between track saturation time, and etching solution temperature. In addition, and although, the relation between the bulk etch rate and etching solution temperature can be reasonably described by a modified form of the Arrhenius equation, better fits can be obtained by another equation suggested in this work

  13. Simple Closed-Form Expression for Penning Reaction Rate Coefficients for Cold Molecular Collisions by Non-Hermitian Time-Independent Adiabatic Scattering Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Mariusz; Ben-Asher, Anael; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2018-01-09

    We present a simple expression and its derivation for reaction rate coefficients for cold anisotropic collision experiments based on adiabatic variational theory and time-independent non-Hermitian scattering theory. We demonstrate that only the eigenenergies of the resulting one-dimensional Schrödinger equation for different complex adiabats are required. The expression is applied to calculate the Penning ionization rate coefficients of an excited metastable helium atom with molecular hydrogen in an energy range spanning from hundreds of kelvins down to the millikelvin regime. Except for trivial quantities like the masses of the nuclei and the bond length of the diatomic molecule participating in the collision, one needs as input data only the complex potential energy surface (CPES). In calculations, we used recently obtained ab initio CPES by D. Bhattacharya et al. ( J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2017 , 13 , 1682 - 1690 ) without fitting parameters. The results show good accord with current measurements ( Nat. Phys. 2017 , 13 , 35 - 38 ).

  14. Metabolic rate and body temperature of an African sun bird ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1997-02-19

    Feb 19, 1997 ... has a wide distribution in southern Africa. ... sample the voltage output of the oxygen analyser every 2 min ... Bailey Bat thermocouple thermometer, and the system was .... A similar 50% drop in metabolic rate in finches at.

  15. Dynamic High-Temperature Characterization of an Iridium Alloy in Compression at High Strain Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Bo [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Experimental Environment Simulation Dept.; Nelson, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Mechanics of Materials Dept.; Lipinski, Ronald J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology Dept.; Bignell, John L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Structural and Thermal Analysis Dept.; Ulrich, G. B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Radioisotope Power Systems Program; George, E. P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Radioisotope Power Systems Program

    2014-06-01

    Iridium alloys have superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures, making them useful as structural materials for certain high-temperature applications. However, experimental data on their high-temperature high-strain-rate performance are needed for understanding high-speed impacts in severe elevated-temperature environments. Kolsky bars (also called split Hopkinson bars) have been extensively employed for high-strain-rate characterization of materials at room temperature, but it has been challenging to adapt them for the measurement of dynamic properties at high temperatures. Current high-temperature Kolsky compression bar techniques are not capable of obtaining satisfactory high-temperature high-strain-rate stress-strain response of thin iridium specimens investigated in this study. We analyzed the difficulties encountered in high-temperature Kolsky compression bar testing of thin iridium alloy specimens. Appropriate modifications were made to the current high-temperature Kolsky compression bar technique to obtain reliable compressive stress-strain response of an iridium alloy at high strain rates (300 – 10000 s-1) and temperatures (750°C and 1030°C). Uncertainties in such high-temperature high-strain-rate experiments on thin iridium specimens were also analyzed. The compressive stress-strain response of the iridium alloy showed significant sensitivity to strain rate and temperature.

  16. Characteristics of radiation temperature and radiosity coefficient by means of infrared radiometer. Sekigai hoshakei ni yoru zairyo hyomen no hosha tokusei ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Y; Kaminaga, F [Ibaraki University, Ibaraki (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Ishii, T; Sato, K [Ibaraki University, Ibaraki (Japan); Kurokawa, T [NEC San-ei Instrumentsu Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1991-12-25

    A radiation thermometer was applied to the measurement and analysis of radiation temperature of the material surface. In this paper, the characteristics of the radiation temperature and the radiosity coefficient of gray body materials are investigatied. An infrared radiometer was used, which detects radiation energy in the region between 8 and 13{mu}m of wavelength. This infared radiometer has a Hg-Cd-Te photon radiation sensor. The variation of emissivity was measured for the four kinds of non-metalic materials, i.e., graphite, carbon fiber composite, Si-SiC ceramic, and black paint spread on an aluminum plate. As a result, the relationship between material temperature and radiation energy was made clear. Furthermore, the space-dependent variation of the radiation temperature and the radiosity coefficient was derived from the two-dimensional CRT image of the infrared radiometer. Consequently, the emmisivity variation gave a maximum for the carbon fiber composite surface rich in irregularity, and decreased in the order of graphite, Si-SiC, and black paint. 7 refs., 15 figs.

  17. Non-resonant triple alpha reaction rate at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, T.; Tamii, A.; Aoi, N.; Fujita, H.; Hashimoto, T.; Miki, K.; Ogata, K. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Carter, J.; Donaldson, L.; Sideras-Haddad, E. [Schools of Physics, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Furuno, T.; Kawabata, T. [Departments of Physics, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); Kamimura, M. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Nemulodi, F.; Neveling, R.; Smit, F. D.; Swarts, C. [iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences Somerset, West, 7129 (South Africa)

    2014-05-02

    Our experimental goal is to study the non-resonant triple alpha reaction rate at low temperture (T < 10{sup 8} K). The {sup 13}C(p,d) reaction at 66 MeV has been used to probe the alpha-unbound continuum state in {sup 12}C just below the 2{sup nd} 0{sup +} state at 7.65 MeV. The transition strength to the continuum state is predicted to be sensitive to the non-resonant triple alpha reaction rate. The experiment has been performed at iThemba LABS. We report the present status of the experiment.

  18. Effects of Drying Temperature on Flavonoids Extraction Rate from Young Stems and Leaves of Two Cassava Varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Ding-mei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve flavonoids resources utilization level of young cassava stems and leaves, using cassava varieties SC09 and SC205 as ob jects, investigated the effect of different drying temperatures(40~120℃on the flavonoids extraction rate(FERand their stability in 120 d storage period after drying, explored a right drying storage method for postharvest young cassava stems and leaves. The research showed that total FER rised first, and then fell and rised again with the increase of drying temperature. During 40~80℃, the total FER was obviously in fluenced by variety and temperature, but only temperature was main factor affecting total FER during 90~120℃. Extract degree of flavonoids include rutin, amentoflavone or catechin, kaempferol, hesperidin, quercetin minished in order; the effect of cassava variety on the extraction rate of catechin and hesperidin was greater than that of drying temperature, but that contrary to other 4 flavonoids. Variety and temperature had a maximum impact respectively on catechin and rutin extraction rates. Whereas both of variety and temperature had a minimum impact on kaempferol extraction rate. FER reached higher levels of 1.42%and 1.53% respectively in SC09 after 120℃drying and SC205 after 110℃drying, and had best stability during 120 d storage period. The extraction rate of hesperidin increased after drying storage, and that of other 5 ingredients were changing with different varieties and temperatures; the coefficient variation(CV=1.03%~6.86%of kaempferol was minimum and its stability was best; extraction rates of rutin and kaempferol in SC205 after 110℃drying were maximum, whose increasing rates were 44.89%and 7.27%respectively with a small separate degree(CV were 6.94%, 4.59%and good extraction stability. Maximum in creasing rates of catechin, amentoflavone, quercetin and hesperidin were 211.60%,17.60%,186.39% and 538.08% respectively. However,their stabilities of extraction efficiency were poor

  19. High-temperature rate constant measurements for OH+xylenes

    KAUST Repository

    Elwardani, Ahmed Elsaid; Badra, Jihad; Farooq, Aamir

    2015-01-01

    The overall rate constants for the reactions of hydroxyl (OH) radicals with o-xylene (k 1), m-xylene (k 2), and p-xylene (k 3) were measured behind reflected shock waves over 890-1406K at pressures of 1.3-1.8atm using OH laser absorption near 306

  20. Processing of high-temperature superconductors at high strain rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamalis, A.G.; Pantazsopoulos, G.; Manolakos, D.E.; Szalay, A.

    2000-01-01

    This new book provides, for the first time, a systematic, unified presentation of all steps in the processing of high-temperature superconductor materials, ranging from synthesis of various systems to fabrication and industrial applications. Also covered are characterization techniques and current directions in research and development. The authors are leading specialists who bring to this new book their many years of experience in research, education and industrial engineering work in superconductor materials. This book is primarily focused on the bulk-fabrication techniques of high-temperature ceramic superconducting components, especially on the combination of dynamic powder-consolidation and subsequent deformation processing. The properties of these ceramics, which are difficult-to-form materials by applying conventional techniques, are combined for the net-shape manufacturing of such components for the construction of HTS deviceshor e llipsis. However, very important topics such as superconducting structures, chemical synthesis, film fabrication and characterization techniques are also reviewedhor e llipsis to provide a complete, comprehensive view of superconductors engineering

  1. Telemetry pill versus rectal and esophageal temperature during extreme rates of exercise-induced core temperature change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teunissen, L P J; Daanen, H A M; De Haan, A; De Koning, J J

    2012-01-01

    Core temperature measurement with an ingestible telemetry pill has been scarcely investigated during extreme rates of temperature change, induced by short high-intensity exercise in the heat. Therefore, nine participants performed a protocol of rest, (sub)maximal cycling and recovery at 30 °C. The pill temperature (T pill ) was compared with the rectal temperature (T re ) and esophageal temperature (T es ). T pill corresponded well to T re during the entire trial, but deviated considerably from T es during the exercise and recovery periods. During maximal exercise, the average ΔT pill −T re and ΔT pill −T es were 0.13 ± 0.26 and −0.57 ± 0.53 °C, respectively. The response time from the start of exercise, the rate of change during exercise and the peak temperature were similar for T pill and T re. T es responded 5 min earlier, increased more than twice as fast and its peak value was 0.42 ± 0.46 °C higher than T pill . In conclusion, also during considerable temperature changes at a very high rate, T pill is still a representative of T re . The extent of the deviation in the pattern and peak values between T pill and T es (up to >1 °C) strengthens the assumption that T pill is unsuited to evaluate central blood temperature when body temperatures change rapidly. (paper)

  2. A IR-Femtosecond Laser Hybrid Sensor to Measure the Thermal Expansion and Thermo-Optical Coefficient of Silica-Based FBG at High Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Litong; Lv, Dajuan; Yang, Minghong; Xiong, Liangming; Luo, Jie

    2018-01-26

    In this paper, a hybrid sensor was fabricated using a IR-femtosecond laser to measure the thermal expansion and thermo-optical coefficient of silica-based fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). The hybrid sensor was composed of an inline fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (FFPI) cavity and a type-II FBG. Experiment results showed that the type-II FBG had three high reflectivity resonances in the wavelength ranging from 1100 to 1600 nm, showing the peaks in 1.1, 1.3 and 1.5 μm, respectively. The thermal expansion and thermo-optical coefficient (1.3 μm, 1.5 μm) of silica-based FBG, under temperatures ranging from 30 to 1100 °C, had been simultaneously calculated by measuring the wavelength of the type-II FBG and FFPI cavity length.

  3. Effect of strain rate and temperature at high strains on fatigue behavior of SAP alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blucher, J.T.; Knudsen, Per; Grant, N.J.

    1968-01-01

    Fatigue behavior of three SAP alloys of two nominal compositions (7 and 13% Al2O3) was studied in terms of strain rate and temperature at high strains; strain rate had no effect on life at 80 F, but had increasingly greater effect with increasing temperature above 500 F; life decreased with decre......Fatigue behavior of three SAP alloys of two nominal compositions (7 and 13% Al2O3) was studied in terms of strain rate and temperature at high strains; strain rate had no effect on life at 80 F, but had increasingly greater effect with increasing temperature above 500 F; life decreased...

  4. Monte Carlo analysis of KRITZ-2 critical benchmarks on the reactivity temperature coefficient using ENDF/B-VII.1 and JENDL-4.0 nuclear data libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Ouahdani, S.; Boukhal, H.; Erradi, L.; Chakir, E.; El Bardouni, T.; Hajjaji, O.; Boulaich, Y.; Benaalilou, K.; Kaddour, M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A set of KRITZ-2 experiments with UO 2 and MOX LWR lattices, at room and elevated temperatures, have been analysed using the MCNP6.1 code with the libraries: JENDL-4 and ENDF/B-VII.1. • The detailed comparisons of the calculations and measurements demonstrate a good agreement between calculations and measurements. • To investigate better the influence of cross sections differences on the reactivity temperature coefficient, we break it down into its components using a pin cell model. - Abstract: A set of KRITZ-2 experiments light water moderated lattices with uranium oxide and mixed-oxide fuel rods, at room and elevated temperatures, performed in the early 1970’s have been assessed. Using the MCNP6.1 code with the most recent cross section libraries: JENDL-4 and ENDF/B-VII.1, the critical experiments KRITZ: 2-1, KRITZ: 2-13, and KRITZ: 2-19 achieved in the Sweden reactor KRITZ were analyzed. We have used the ENDF/B-VII.1 data provided with the MCNP6.1.1 version in ACE format and the Makxsf utility to handle the data in the specific temperatures not available in the MCNP6.1.1 original data. The JENDL-4 evaluations were processed using NJOY99 (update 364) to the temperatures of interest. The detailed comparisons of the calculated and measured (Benchmark, 2005) effective multiplication factors and pin power distributions for UO2 and MOX fuelled cores presented in this work demonstrate a good agreement between calculation and measurements. The maximum deviation of the calculation from the experimental data for k eff , is 0.58% (absolute value) obtained for the KRITZ 2:1 at 248.5 °C using ENDF/B-VII.1 data. To investigate better the influence of cross sections differences on the reactivity and temperature coefficient, we break down the infinite multiplication factor into its components using a pin cell model. Using this simple model we evaluated the temperature effect on the infinite multiplication factor and the effect on its components. We have

  5. Effect of the temperature-humidity index on body temperature and conception rate of lactating dairy cows in southwestern Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabenishi, Hisashi; Ohta, Hiroshi; Nishimoto, Toshihumi; Morita, Tetsuo; Ashizawa, Koji; Tsuzuki, Yasuhiro

    2011-09-01

    In the present study, we investigated the relationship between the temperature-humidity index (THI) and the conception rate of lactating dairy cows in southwestern Japan, one of the hottest areas of the country. We also investigated the relationship between measurement of the vaginal temperature of lactating dairy cows as their core body temperature at one-hour intervals for 25 consecutive days in hot (August-September, n=6) and cool (January-February, n=5) periods and their THI. Furthermore, we discussed the above relationship using these vaginal temperatures, the conception rates and the THI. As a result, when the conception rates from day 2 to 0 before AI were classified into day 2, 1 and 0 groups by the six maximum THI values in each group (mTHI; 80), only the conception rate for the mTHI over 80 at 1 day before AI group was significantly lower (P80) was significantly lower (P80. There was a significant positive correlation (Ptemperature, but not during the cool period. When the mTHI reached 69, the vaginal temperature started to increase. As for the relationship between the conception rates and vaginal temperatures for all mTHI classes, in the mTHI>80 at 1 day before AI group, the vaginal temperature increased by 0.6 C from 38.7 C, resulting in a reduction of 11.6% in the conception rate from 40.5%. In conclusion, these results suggest that one of the causes of the fall in conception rate of lactating dairy cows during the summer season in southwestern Japan may be an increase in their core body temperature with a higher mTHI than the critical mTHI of 69 at 1 day before AI.

  6. Rate Coefficient for the (4)Heμ + CH4 Reaction at 500 K: Comparison between Theory and Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arseneau, Donald J; Fleming, Donald G; Li, Yongle; Li, Jun; Suleimanov, Yury V; Guo, Hua

    2016-03-03

    The rate constant for the H atom abstraction reaction from methane by the muonic helium atom, Heμ + CH4 → HeμH + CH3, is reported at 500 K and compared with theory, providing an important test of both the potential energy surface (PES) and reaction rate theory for the prototypical polyatomic CH5 reaction system. The theory used to characterize this reaction includes both variational transition-state (CVT/μOMT) theory (VTST) and ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) calculations on a recently developed PES, which are compared as well with earlier calculations on different PESs for the H, D, and Mu + CH4 reactions, the latter, in particular, providing for a variation in atomic mass by a factor of 36. Though rigorous quantum calculations have been carried out for the H + CH4 reaction, these have not yet been extended to the isotopologues of this reaction (in contrast to H3), so it is important to provide tests of less rigorous theories in comparison with kinetic isotope effects measured by experiment. In this regard, the agreement between the VTST and RPMD calculations and experiment for the rate constant of the Heμ + CH4 reaction at 500 K is excellent, within 10% in both cases, which overlaps with experimental error.

  7. Dependence of Pyrolysis Rate of Coal on Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slyusarskiy Konstantin V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis process of coal has been researched to define kinetic constants which can be used for design and optimization of different processes of fuel transformation. The article considers anthracite powders and bituminous coal of Krasnogorsky mine with the use of non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis with mass spectrometry. Spectroscanning microscopy and laser diffraction for definition of sizes and forms of particles distribution has been done. Other parameters – carbon content, ash and volatiles, density and moisture have been defined by standard methods. Energy of activation and pre-exponent with the use of models of Freedman, Starink and distributed activation energy model (DAEM, and also relative deviation of design data from experimental ones have been designed. The results of the analysis have shown the important influence of volatiles content and coal transformation degree on maximum reaction rate. Energy activation values received with the help of DAEM model are higher than with Freedman and Starink models. Process of pyrolysis of bituminous coal has a big rate in comparison with anthracite, and is better described by the above-mentioned models.

  8. Influence of Nitrogen Flow Rate on Friction Coefficient and Surface Roughness of TiN Coatings Deposited on Tool Steel Using Arc Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzah, Esah; Ourdjini, Ali; Ali, Mubarak; Akhter, Parvez; Hj. Mohd Toff, Mohd Radzi; Abdul Hamid, Mansor

    In the present study, the effect of various N2 gas flow rates on friction coefficient and surface roughness of TiN-coated D2 tool steel was examined by a commercially available cathodic arc physical vapor deposition (CAPVD) technique. A Pin-on-Disc test was carried out to study the Coefficient of friction (COF) versus sliding distance. A surface roughness tester measured the surface roughness parameters. The minimum values for the COF and surface roughness were recorded at a N2 gas flow rate of 200 sccm. The increase in the COF and surface roughness at a N2 gas flow rate of 100 sccm was mainly attributed to an increase in both size and number of titanium particles, whereas the increase at 300 sccm was attributed to a larger number of growth defects generated during the coating process. These ideas make it possible to optimize the coating properties as a function of N2 gas flow rate for specific applications, e.g. cutting tools for automobiles, aircraft, and various mechanical parts.

  9. Computer investigations on the asymptotic behavior of the rate coefficient for the annihilation reaction A + A → product and the trapping reaction in three dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litniewski, Marek; Gorecki, Jerzy

    2011-06-28

    We have performed intensive computer simulations of the irreversible annihilation reaction: A + A → C + C and of the trapping reaction: A + B → C + B for a variety of three-dimensional fluids composed of identical spherical particles. We have found a significant difference in the asymptotic behavior of the rate coefficients for these reactions. Both the rate coefficients converge to the same value with time t going to infinity but the convergence rate is different: the O(t(-1/2)) term for the annihilation reaction is higher than the corresponding term for the trapping reaction. The simulation results suggest that ratio of the terms is a universal quantity with the value equal to 2 or slightly above. A model for the annihilation reaction based on the superposition approximation predicts the difference in the O(t(-1/2)) terms, but overestimates the value for the annihilation reaction by about 30%. We have also performed simulations for the dimerization process: A + A → E, where E stands for a dimer. The dimerization decreases the reaction rate due to the decrease in the diffusion constant for A. The effect is successfully predicted by a simple model.

  10. COMPARISON OF GKS CALCULATED CRITICAL ION TEMPERATURE GRADIENTS AND ITG GROWTH RATES TO DIII-D MEASURED GRADIENTS AND DIFFUSIVITIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BAKER, DR; STAEBLER, GM; PETTY, CC; GREENFIELD, CM; LUCE, TC

    2003-01-01

    OAK-B135 The gyrokinetic equations predict that various drift type waves or modes can be unstable in a tokamak. For some of these modes, such as the ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode and the electron temperature gradient mode, there exists a critical gradient, above which the mode is unstable. Since the existence of unstable modes can cause increased transport, plasmas which are centrally heated tend to increase in temperature gradient until the modes become unstable. Under some conditions the increased transport can fix the gradient at the critical value. here they present a comparison between the measured ion temperature gradients and the critical gradient as calculated by a gyrokinetic linear stability (GKS) code. They also present the maximum linear growth rate as calculated by this code for comparison to experimentally derived transport coefficients. The results show that for low confinement mode (L-mode) discharges, the measured ion temperature gradient is significantly greater than the GKS calculated critical gradient over a large region of the plasma. This is the same region of the plasma where the ion thermal diffusivity is large. For high confinement mode (H-mode) discharges the ion temperature gradient is closer to the critical gradient, but often still greater than the critical gradient over some region. For the best H-mode discharges, the ion temperature is less than or equal to the critical gradient over the whole plasma. In general they find that the position in the plasma where the ion thermal diffusivity starts to increase rapidly is where the maximum linear growth rate is greater than the E x B shearing rate

  11. Heart rate reveals torpor at high body temperatures in lowland tropical free-tailed bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mara, M Teague; Rikker, Sebastian; Wikelski, Martin; Ter Maat, Andries; Pollock, Henry S; Dechmann, Dina K N

    2017-12-01

    Reduction in metabolic rate and body temperature is a common strategy for small endotherms to save energy. The daily reduction in metabolic rate and heterothermy, or torpor, is particularly pronounced in regions with a large variation in daily ambient temperature. This applies most strongly in temperate bat species (order Chiroptera), but it is less clear how tropical bats save energy if ambient temperatures remain high. However, many subtropical and tropical species use some daily heterothermy on cool days. We recorded the heart rate and the body temperature of free-ranging Pallas' mastiff bats ( Molossus molossus ) in Gamboa, Panamá, and showed that these individuals have low field metabolic rates across a wide range of body temperatures that conform to high ambient temperature. Importantly, low metabolic rates in controlled respirometry trials were best predicted by heart rate, and not body temperature . Molossus molossus enter torpor-like states characterized by low metabolic rate and heart rates at body temperatures of 32°C, and thermoconform across a range of temperatures. Flexible metabolic strategies may be far more common in tropical endotherms than currently known.

  12. Low-temperature phonoemissive tunneling rates in single molecule magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Garg, Anupam

    2016-03-01

    Tunneling between the two lowest energy levels of single molecule magnets with Ising type anisotropy, accompanied by the emission or absorption of phonons, is considered. Quantitatively accurate calculations of the rates for such tunneling are performed for a model Hamiltonian especially relevant to the best studied example, Fe8. Two different methods are used: high-order perturbation theory in the spin-phonon interaction and the non-Ising-symmetric parts of the spin Hamiltonian, and a novel semiclassical approach based on spin-coherent-state-path-integral instantons. The methods are found to be in good quantitative agreement with other, and consistent with previous approaches to the problem. The implications of these results for magnetization of molecular solids of these molecules are discussed briefly.

  13. A new predictive dynamic model describing the effect of the ambient temperature and the convective heat transfer coefficient on bacterial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Yaghlene, H; Leguerinel, I; Hamdi, M; Mafart, P

    2009-07-31

    In this study, predictive microbiology and food engineering were combined in order to develop a new analytical model predicting the bacterial growth under dynamic temperature conditions. The proposed model associates a simplified primary bacterial growth model without lag, the secondary Ratkowsky "square root" model and a simplified two-parameter heat transfer model regarding an infinite slab. The model takes into consideration the product thickness, its thermal properties, the ambient air temperature, the convective heat transfer coefficient and the growth parameters of the micro organism of concern. For the validation of the overall model, five different combinations of ambient air temperature (ranging from 8 degrees C to 12 degrees C), product thickness (ranging from 1 cm to 6 cm) and convective heat transfer coefficient (ranging from 8 W/(m(2) K) to 60 W/(m(2) K)) were tested during a cooling procedure. Moreover, three different ambient air temperature scenarios assuming alternated cooling and heating stages, drawn from real refrigerated food processes, were tested. General agreement between predicted and observed bacterial growth was obtained and less than 5% of the experimental data fell outside the 95% confidence bands estimated by the bootstrap percentile method, at all the tested conditions. Accordingly, the overall model was successfully validated for isothermal and dynamic refrigeration cycles allowing for temperature dynamic changes at the centre and at the surface of the product. The major impact of the convective heat transfer coefficient and the product thickness on bacterial growth during the product cooling was demonstrated. For instance, the time needed for the same level of bacterial growth to be reached at the product's half thickness was estimated to be 5 and 16.5 h at low and high convection level, respectively. Moreover, simulation results demonstrated that the predicted bacterial growth at the air ambient temperature cannot be assumed to be

  14. Impact of temperature on ammonium and nitrite removal rates in RAS moving bed biofilters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinyage, John Peter Hewa; Pedersen, Lars-Flemming

    2016-01-01

    The impact of temperature on bacterial processes is well known; however temperature related data on nitrification rates in aquaculture systems are fragmented and compiled from different studies. We sought to determine ammonium and nitrite removal kinetics over a temperature range from 6 to 36 °C...

  15. Rate enhancement in microfabricated chemical reactors under fast forced temperature oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Heine Anton; Olsen, Jakob L.; Jensen, Søren

    2006-01-01

    Oxidation of CO under fast forced temperature oscillations shows increased reaction rate compared to steady state. A maximum increase of 40% is observed relative to steady state. The reaction rate is investigated for varying mean temperature, amplitude and frequency. As function of mean temperatu...

  16. Complete sets of elastic constants and photoelastic coefficients of pure and MgO-doped lithium niobate crystals at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrushchak, A. S.; Laba, H. P.; Yurkevych, O. V.; Mytsyk, B. G.; Solskii, I. M.; Kityk, A. V.; Sahraoui, B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of ultrasonic measurements of LiNbO 3 and LiNbO 3 :MgO crystals. The tensors of piezoelectric coefficients, elastic stiffness constants, and elastic compliances are determined for both crystals at room temperature. Combining these data with the results of piezo-optical measurements, a complete set of photoelastic tensor coefficients is also calculated. Doping of LiNbO 3 crystals by MgO does not lead to a considerable modification of their elastic and photoelastic properties. However, LiNbO 3 :MgO is characterized by a considerably higher resistance with respect to powerful light radiation, making it promising for future application in acousto-optic devices that deal with superpowerful laser radiation. Presented here are the complete tensor sets of elastic constants and photoelastic coefficients of LiNbO 3 and LiNbO 3 :MgO crystals that may be used for a geometry optimization of acousto-optical interaction providing the best diffraction efficiency of acousto-optical cells made of these materials.

  17. Influence of temperature and rate of deformation on mechanical properties of a low alloyed niobium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisenko, V.A.; Krashchenko, V.P.; Statsenko, V.E.; Kharchenko, V.K.

    1979-01-01

    The technique for indirect temperature measurements of wire samples is suggested and justified. Temperature dependences are investigated of strength and plasticity characteristics of niobium alloy alloyed with zirconium in the range of 20-1100 deg C at two deformation rates: 1.1x10 -3 and 5.3x10 -3 sec -1 . Deformation aging at both deformation rates in the temperature range of 0.25-0.42 Tsub(m) takes place in the form of the increase of σsub(B) and σsub(0.2) strength characteristics and discontinuous yield. The σsub(B) and σsub(0.2) level in this interval is higher for a lesser deformation rate, than for a higher one. Maxima on temperature strength dependence curves move to the side of high temperatures. In the 20-900 deg C temperature range rate alterations slightly affect plasticity characteristics

  18. Annular convective-radiative fins with a step change in thickness, and temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and heat transfer coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barforoush, M. S. M.; Saedodin, S.

    2018-01-01

    This article investigates the thermal performance of convective-radiative annular fins with a step reduction in local cross section (SRC). The thermal conductivity of the fin's material is assumed to be a linear function of temperature, and heat transfer coefficient is assumed to be a power-law function of surface temperature. Moreover, nonzero convection and radiation sink temperatures are included in the mathematical model of the energy equation. The well-known differential transformation method (DTM) is used to derive the analytical solution. An exact analytical solution for a special case is derived to prove the validity of the obtained results from the DTM. The model provided here is a more realistic representation of SRC annular fins in actual engineering practices. Effects of many parameters such as conduction-convection parameters, conduction-radiation parameter and sink temperature, and also some parameters which deal with step fins such as thickness parameter and dimensionless parameter describing the position of junction in the fin on the temperature distribution of both thin and thick sections of the fin are investigated. It is believed that the obtained results will facilitate the design and performance evaluation of SRC annular fins.

  19. Near-zero temperature coefficient of resistivity associated with magnetic ordering in antiperovskite Mn{sub 3+x}Ni{sub 1−x}N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Sihao; Sun, Ying; Wang, Lei; Shi, Kewen; Hu, Pengwei; Wang, Cong, E-mail: congwang@buaa.edu.cn [Center for Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, Department of Physics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Wu, Hui; Huang, Qingzhen [NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-6102 (United States)

    2016-01-25

    The near-zero temperature coefficient of resistivity (NZ-TCR) behavior is reported in the antiperovskite compounds Mn{sub 3+x}Ni{sub 1−x}N (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.333). Our results indicate that the broad temperature range (above 275 K extending to above 220 K) of NZ-TCR is obtained by Mn doping at the Ni site. The short-range magnetic ordering is revealed by both neutron powder diffraction and inverse magnetic susceptibility. Further, we find a strong correlation between the anomalous resistivity change of Mn{sub 3+x}Ni{sub 1−x}N from the metal-like to the NZ-TCR behavior and the lack of the long-range magnetic ordering. The possible mechanism of NZ-TCR behavior is discussed using the spin-disorder scattering model.

  20. A study on the estimation method of internal stresses caused by the difference of thermal expansion coefficients between concrete and reinforcement at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazu, Tsutomu

    1998-01-01

    When a reinforced concrete member is exposed to high temperature conditions over 100degC, tensile strain occurs in the concrete and compressive strain occurs in reinforcements due to a difference of thermal expansion coefficients between concrete and reinforcement. Its mechanism is the same as that of restrained stress caused by drying shrinkage of concrete; tensile stress occurs in the concrete because drying shrinkage strain is restrained by reinforcements, but there is a different point that the phenomenon at a high temperature condition includes the change of mechanical properties of concrete and reinforcement. In the study, the phenomenon is measured in the experiments and is clarified quantitatively. Moreover, the estimation method, which is derived from expanding the equation of average strain of reinforcement in the CEB Design Manual, is suggested and is verified by the comparison with the experimental results. (author)

  1. Assessment of oxygen diffusion coefficients by studying high-temperature oxidation behaviour of Zr1Nb fuel cladding in the temperature range of 1100–1300 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Négyesi, M., E-mail: negy@seznam.cz [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Trojanova 13, 120 00 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); UJP PRAHA a.s., Nad Kamínkou 1345, 156 10 Praha – Zbraslav (Czech Republic); Chmela, T. [UJP PRAHA a.s., Nad Kamínkou 1345, 156 10 Praha – Zbraslav (Czech Republic); Veselský, T. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Trojanova 13, 120 00 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); Krejčí, J. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Trojanova 13, 120 00 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); CHEMCOMEX Praha a.s., Elišky Přemyslovny 379, 156 10 Praha – Zbraslav (Czech Republic); Novotný, L.; Přibyl, A. [UJP PRAHA a.s., Nad Kamínkou 1345, 156 10 Praha – Zbraslav (Czech Republic); Bláhová, O. [New Technologies Research Centre, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitní 8, 306 14 Plzeň (Czech Republic); Burda, J. [NRI Rez plc, Husinec-Řež 130, 250 68 Řež (Czech Republic); Siegl, J. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Trojanova 13, 120 00 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); Vrtílková, V. [UJP PRAHA a.s., Nad Kamínkou 1345, 156 10 Praha – Zbraslav (Czech Republic)

    2015-01-15

    The paper deals with high-temperature steam oxidation behaviour of Zr1Nb fuel cladding. First of all, comprehensive experimental program was conducted to provide sufficient experimental data, such as the thicknesses of evolved phase layers and the overall weight gain kinetics, as well as the oxygen concentration and nanohardness values at phase boundaries. Afterwards, oxygen diffusion coefficients in the oxide, in the α-Zr(O) layer, in the double-phase (α + β)-Zr region, and in the β-phase region have been estimated based on the experimental data employing analytical solution of the multiphase moving boundary problem, assuming the equilibrium conditions being fulfilled at the interface boundaries. Eventually, the determined oxygen diffusion coefficients served as input into the in-house numerical code, which was designed to predict the high-temperature oxidation behaviour of Zr1Nb fuel cladding. Very good agreement has been achieved between the numerical calculations and the experimental data.

  2. Eclosion rate, development and survivorship of Aedes albopictus (Skuse)(Diptera: Culicidae) under different water temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, Laura C.C.; Souza, Jose R.B. de; Albuquerque, Cleide M.R. de

    2007-01-01

    In tropical areas, where vector insects populations are particularly numerous, temperature usually range between 25 de C and 35 deg C. Considering the importance of such temperature variation in determining mosquitoes population dynamics, in this work the developmental, eclosion and survival rates of the immature stages of Aedes albopictus (Skuse) were compared under constant 25, 30 and 35 deg C (using acclimatized chambers) and environmental (25 deg C to 29 deg C) temperatures. The hatching rate was considered as total number of larvae recovered after 24h. The development period as well as larval and pupal survival rate were evaluated daily. Eclosion rate was significantly higher under environmental temperature than under the studied constant temperatures, suggesting that temperature variation may be an eclosion-stimulating factor. The mean eclosion time increased with the temperature, ranging from 2.8 h (25 deg C) to 5.2 h (35 deg C). The larval period was greatly variable inside each group, although it did not differ significantly amongst groups (11.0 +- 4.19 days), with individuals showing longer larval stages in water at 35 deg C (12.0 +- 4.95 days) and environmental temperature (13.6 +- 5.98 days). Oppositely, survival was strongly affected by the higher temperature, where only one individual lived through to adult phase. The results suggest that population of Ae. albopictus from Recife may be adapting to increasing of environmental temperatures and that the limiting temperature to larval development is around 35 deg C. (author)

  3. Matching of experimental and statistical-model thermonuclear reaction rates at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, J. R.; Longland, R.; Iliadis, C.

    2008-01-01

    We address the problem of extrapolating experimental thermonuclear reaction rates toward high stellar temperatures (T>1 GK) by using statistical model (Hauser-Feshbach) results. Reliable reaction rates at such temperatures are required for studies of advanced stellar burning stages, supernovae, and x-ray bursts. Generally accepted methods are based on the concept of a Gamow peak. We follow recent ideas that emphasized the fundamental shortcomings of the Gamow peak concept for narrow resonances at high stellar temperatures. Our new method defines the effective thermonuclear energy range (ETER) by using the 8th, 50th, and 92nd percentiles of the cumulative distribution of fractional resonant reaction rate contributions. This definition is unambiguous and has a straightforward probability interpretation. The ETER is used to define a temperature at which Hauser-Feshbach rates can be matched to experimental rates. This matching temperature is usually much higher compared to previous estimates that employed the Gamow peak concept. We suggest that an increased matching temperature provides more reliable extrapolated reaction rates since Hauser-Feshbach results are more trustwhorthy the higher the temperature. Our ideas are applied to 21 (p,γ), (p,α), and (α,γ) reactions on A=20-40 target nuclei. For many of the cases studied here, our extrapolated reaction rates at high temperatures differ significantly from those obtained using the Gamow peak concept

  4. Copepod community growth rates in relation to body size, temperature, and food availability in the East China Sea: a test of metabolic theory of ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Y. Lin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Zooplankton play an essential role in marine food webs, and understanding how community-level growth rates of zooplankton vary in the field is critical for predicting how marine ecosystem function may vary in the face of environmental changes. Here, we used the artificial cohort method to examine the effects of temperature, body size, and chlorophyll concentration (a proxy for food on weight-specific growth rates for copepod communities in the East China Sea. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that copepod community growth rates can be described by the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE, linking spatio-temporal variation of copepod growth rate with temperature and their body size. Our results generally agree with predictions made by the MTE and demonstrate that weight-specific growth rates of copepod communities in our study area are positively related with temperature and negatively related to body size. However, the regression coefficients of body size do not approach the theoretical predictions. Furthermore, we find that the deviation from the MTE predictions may be partly attributed to the effect of food availability (which is not explicitly accounted for by the MTE. In addition, significant difference in the coefficients of temperature and body size exists among taxonomic groups. Our results suggest that considering the effects of food limitation and taxonomy is necessary to better understand copepod growth rates under in situ conditions, and such effects on the MTE-based predictions need further investigation.

  5. The relationship between heart rate and rate of oxygen consumption in Galapagos marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) at two different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Patrick J; Frappell, Peter B; Wang, Tobias; Wikelski, Martin

    2002-07-01

    To enable the use of heart rate (fH) for estimating field metabolic rate (FMR) in free-ranging Galapagos marine iguanas Amblyrhynchus cristatus, we determined the relationships between fH and mass-specific rate of oxygen consumption (sVO2) in seven iguanas before and during exercise on a treadmill and during the post-exercise period. The experiments were conducted at 27 and 35 degrees C, which are the temperatures that represent the lowest and highest average body temperatures of these animals in the field during summer. There were linear and significant relationships between fH and sVO2 at both temperatures (r(2)=0.86 and 0.91 at 27 degrees C and 36 degrees C, respectively). The slopes of the two regression lines did not differ, but there were significant differences in their intercepts. Thus, while heart rate can be used to predict FMR, the effects of temperature on the intercept of the regression must be taken into account when converting fH to sVO2. On the basis of our data, this can be achieved by applying the following formula: sVO2=0.0113fH-0.2983Q(10)((T(b)-27)/10). The increase in sVO2 with elevated body temperature results from an increase in fH, with no significant change in mass-specific oxygen pulse (sO(2) pulse; cardiac stroke volume times the difference in oxygen content between arterial and mixed venous blood). However, during exercise at both temperatures, increases in fH are insufficient to provide all of the additional O(2) required and there are also significant increases in the sO(2) pulses. This creates the situation whereby the same fH at the two temperatures can represent different values of sVO2.

  6. The effect of temperature and body weight on the routine metabolic rate and postprandial metabolic response in mulloway, Argyrosomus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirozzi, Igor; Booth, Mark A

    2009-09-01

    Specific dynamic action (SDA) is the energy expended on the physiological processes associated with meal digestion and is strongly influenced by the characteristics of the meal and the body weight (BW) and temperature of the organism. This study assessed the effects of temperature and body weight on the routine metabolic rate (RMR) and postprandial metabolic response in mulloway, Argyrosomus japonicus. RMR and SDA were established at 3 temperatures (14, 20 and 26 degrees C). 5 size classes of mulloway ranging from 60 g to 1.14 kg were used to establish RMR with 3 of the 5 size classes (60, 120 and 240 g) used to establish SDA. The effect of body size on the mass-specific RMR (mg O(2) kg(-1) h(-1)) varied significantly depending on the temperature; there was a greater relative increase in the mass-specific RMR for smaller mulloway with increasing temperature. No statistical differences were found between the mass exponent (b) values at each temperature when tested against H(0): b=0.8. The gross RMR of mulloway (mg O(2) fish(-1) h(-1)) can be described as function of temperature (T; 14-26 degrees C) as: (0.0195T-0.0454)BW(g)(0.8) and the mass-specific RMR (mg O(2) kg(-1) h(-1)) can be described as: (21.042T-74.867)BW(g)(-0.2). Both SDA duration and time to peak SDA were influenced by temperature and body weight; SDA duration occurred within 41-89 h and peak time occurred within 17-38 h of feeding. The effect of body size on peak metabolic rate varied significantly depending on temperature, generally increasing with temperature and decreasing with increasing body size. Peak gross oxygen consumption (MO(2): mg O(2) fish(-1) h(-1)) scaled allometrically with BW. Temperature, but not body size, significantly affected SDA scope, although the difference was numerically small. There was a trend for MO(2) above RMR over the SDA period to increase with temperature; however, this was not statistically significant. The average proportion of energy expended over the SDA period

  7. Co2(nu2)-o Quenching Rate Coefficient Derived from Coincidental SABER-TIMED and Fort Collins Lidar Observations of the Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feofilov, A. G.; Kutepov, A. A.; She, C.-Y.; Smith, A. K.; Pesnell, W. D.; Goldberg, R. A.

    2012-01-01

    Among the processes governing the energy balance in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT), the quenching of CO2(nu2) vibrational levels by collisions with O atoms plays an important role. However, there is a factor of 3-4 discrepancy between the laboratory measurements of the CO2-O quenching rate coefficient, k(sub VT),and its value estimated from the atmospheric observations. In this study, we retrieve k(sub VT) in the altitude region85-105 km from the coincident SABER/TIMED and Fort Collins sodium lidar observations by minimizing the difference between measured and simulated broadband limb 15 micron radiation. The averaged k(sub VT) value obtained in this work is 6.5 +/- 1.5 X 10(exp -12) cubic cm/s that is close to other estimates of this coefficient from the atmospheric observations.However, the retrieved k(sub VT) also shows altitude dependence and varies from 5.5 1 +/-1 10(exp -12) cubic cm/s at 90 km to 7.9 +/- 1.2 10(exp -12) cubic cm/s at 105 km. Obtained results demonstrate the deficiency in current non-LTE modeling of the atmospheric 15 micron radiation, based on the application of the CO2-O quenching and excitation rates, which are linked by the detailed balance relation. We discuss the possible model improvements, among them accounting for the interaction of the non-thermal oxygen atoms with CO2 molecules.

  8. Estimation of Circadian Body Temperature Rhythm Based on Heart Rate in Healthy, Ambulatory Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Soo Young; Joo, Kwang Min; Kim, Han Byul; Jang, Seungjin; Kim, Beomoh; Hong, Seungbum; Kim, Sungwan; Park, Kwang Suk

    2017-03-01

    Core body temperature is a reliable marker for circadian rhythm. As characteristics of the circadian body temperature rhythm change during diverse health problems, such as sleep disorder and depression, body temperature monitoring is often used in clinical diagnosis and treatment. However, the use of current thermometers in circadian rhythm monitoring is impractical in daily life. As heart rate is a physiological signal relevant to thermoregulation, we investigated the feasibility of heart rate monitoring in estimating circadian body temperature rhythm. Various heart rate parameters and core body temperature were simultaneously acquired in 21 healthy, ambulatory subjects during their routine life. The performance of regression analysis and the extended Kalman filter on daily body temperature and circadian indicator (mesor, amplitude, and acrophase) estimation were evaluated. For daily body temperature estimation, mean R-R interval (RRI), mean heart rate (MHR), or normalized MHR provided a mean root mean square error of approximately 0.40 °C in both techniques. The mesor estimation regression analysis showed better performance than the extended Kalman filter. However, the extended Kalman filter, combined with RRI or MHR, provided better accuracy in terms of amplitude and acrophase estimation. We suggest that this noninvasive and convenient method for estimating the circadian body temperature rhythm could reduce discomfort during body temperature monitoring in daily life. This, in turn, could facilitate more clinical studies based on circadian body temperature rhythm.

  9. Kinetic parameters, collision rates, energy exchanges and transport coefficients of non-thermal electrons in premixed flames at sub-breakdown electric field strengths

    KAUST Repository

    Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2014-01-02

    The effects of an electric field on the collision rates, energy exchanges and transport properties of electrons in premixed flames are investigated via solutions to the Boltzmann kinetic equation. The case of high electric field strength, which results in high-energy, non-thermal electrons, is analysed in detail at sub-breakdown conditions. The rates of inelastic collisions and the energy exchange between electrons and neutrals in the reaction zone of the flame are characterised quantitatively. The analysis includes attachment, ionisation, impact dissociation, and vibrational and electronic excitation processes. Our results suggest that Townsend breakdown occurs for E/N = 140 Td. Vibrational excitation is the dominant process up to breakdown, despite important rates of electronic excitation of CO, CO2 and N2 as well as impact dissociation of O2 being apparent from 50 Td onwards. Ohmic heating in the reaction zone is found to be negligible (less than 2% of peak heat release rate) up to breakdown field strengths for realistic electron densities equal to 1010 cm-3. The observed trends are largely independent of equivalence ratio. In the non-thermal regime, electron transport coefficients are insensitive to mixture composition and approximately constant across the flame, but are highly dependent on the electric field strength. In the thermal limit, kinetic parameters and transport coefficients vary substantially across the flame due to the spatially inhomogeneous concentration of water vapour. A practical approach for identifying the plasma regime (thermal versus non-thermal) in studies of electric field effects on flames is proposed. © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

  10. Impact of the thermal scattering law of H in H_2O on the isothermal temperatures reactivity coefficients for UOX and MOX fuel lattices in cold operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scotta, J.P.; Noguere, G.; Bernard, D.; Santamarina, A.; Damian, J.I.M.

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of the thermal scattering law of hydrogen in light water to isothermal temperature reactivity coefficients for UOX and MOX lattices was studied in the frame of the MISTRAL critical experiments carried out in the zero power reactor EOLE of CEA Cadarache (France). The interpretation of the core residual reactivity measured between 6 to 80 C. degrees (by step of 5 C. degrees) was performed with the Monte-Carlo code TRIPOLI-4"R. The nuclear data from the JEFF-3.1.1 library were used in the calculations. 3 different thermal scattering laws of hydrogen in light water were tested in order to evaluate their impact on the MISTRAL calculations. The thermal scattering laws of interest were firstly those recommended in JEFF-3.1.1 and ENDF/BVII.1 and also that recently produced at the atomic center of Bariloche (CAB, Argentina) with molecular dynamic simulations. The present work indicates that the calculation-to-experimental bias is (0.4 ± 0.3) pcm/C. degree in the UOX core and (1.0 ± 0.3) pcm/C. degree in the MOX cores, when the JEFF-3.1.1 library is used. An improvement is observed over the whole temperature range with the CAB model. The calculation-to-experimental bias vanishes for the UOX core (0.02 pcm/C. degree) and becomes close to 0.7 pcm/C. degree for the MOX cores. The magnitude of these bias have to be connected to the typical value of the temperature reactivity coefficient that ranges from 5 pcm/C. degree at Beginning Of Cycle (BOC) up to 50 pcm/C. degrees at End Of Cycle (EOC), in PWR conditions. (authors)

  11. Temperature Dependences for Air-broadened Widths and Shift Coefficients in the 30013 - 00001 and 30012 - 00001 Bands of Carbon Dioxide near 1600 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, M.; Predoi-Cross, A.; McKellar, R.; Benner, C.; Miller, C. E.; Toth, R. A.; Brown, L. R.

    2008-12-01

    Nearly 40 high resolution spectra of air-broadened CO2 recorded at temperatures between 215 and 294 K were analyzed using a multispectrum nonlinear least squares technique to determine temperature dependences of air-broadened half width and air-induced pressure shift coefficients in the 30013-00001 and 30012-00001 bands of 12CO2. Data were recorded with two different Fourier transform spectrometers (Kitt Peak FTS at the National Solar Observatory in Arizona and the Bomem FTS at NRC, Ottawa) with optical path lengths ranging between 25 m and 121 m. The sample pressures varied between 11 torr (pure CO2) and 924 torr (CO2-air) with volume mixing ratios of CO2 in air between ~ 0.015 and 0.11. To minimize systematic errors and increase the accuracy of the retrieved parameters, we constrained the multispectrum nonlinear least squares fittings to use quantum mechanical expressions for the rovibrational energies and intensities rather than retrieving the individual positions and intensities line-by-line. The results suggest minimal vibrational dependence for the temperature dependence coefficients.1 1 A. Predoi-Cross and R. Mckellar are grateful for financial support from the National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. The research at the Jet Propulsion laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology, was performed under contract with National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The support received from the National Science Foundation under Grant No. ATM-0338475 to the College of William and Mary is greatly appreciated. The authors thank Mike Dulick of the National Solar Observatory for his assistance in obtaining the data recorded at Kitt Peak.

  12. Embryos in the fast lane: high-temperature heart rates of turtles decline after hatching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Guo Du

    Full Text Available In ectotherms such as turtles, the relationship between cardiovascular function and temperature may be subject to different selective pressures in different life-history stages. Because embryos benefit by developing as rapidly as possible, and can "afford" to expend energy to do so (because they have access to the yolk for nutrition, they benefit from rapid heart (and thus, developmental rates. In contrast, hatchlings do not have a guaranteed food supply, and maximal growth rates may not enhance fitness--and so, we might expect a lower heart rate, especially at high temperatures where metabolic costs are greatest. Our data on two species of emydid turtles, Chrysemys picta, and Graptemys pseudogeographica kohnii, support these predictions. Heart rates of embryos and hatchlings were similar at low temperatures, but heart rates at higher temperatures were much greater before than after hatching.

  13. Grinding temperature and energy ratio coefficient in MQL grinding of high-temperature nickel-base alloy by using different vegetable oils as base oil

    OpenAIRE

    Li Benkai; Li Changhe; Zhang Yanbin; Wang Yaogang; Jia Dongzhou; Yang Min

    2016-01-01

    Vegetable oil can be used as a base oil in minimal quantity of lubrication (MQL). This study compared the performances of MQL grinding by using castor oil, soybean oil, rapeseed oil, corn oil, sunflower oil, peanut oil, and palm oil as base oils. A K-P36 numerical-control precision surface grinder was used to perform plain grinding on a workpiece material with a high-temperature nickel base alloy. A YDM–III 99 three-dimensional dynamometer was used to measure grinding force, and a clip-type t...

  14. Frequency and Temperature Dependence of Anharmonic Phonon Relaxation Rate in Carbon Nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hepplestone, S P; Srivastava, G P

    2007-01-01

    The relaxation rate of phonon modes in the (10, 10) single wall carbon nanotube undergoing three-phonon interactions at various temperatures has been studied using both qualitative and quantitative approaches based upon Fermi's Golden Rule and a quasi-elastic continuum model for the anharmonic potential. For the quantitative calculations, dispersion relations for the phonon modes were obtained from analytic expressions developed by Zhang et al. The qualitative expressions were derived using simple linear phonon dispersions relations. We show that in the high temperature regime the relaxation rate varies linearly with temperature and with the square of the frequency. In the low temperature regime we show that the relaxation rate varies exponentially with the inverse of temperature. These results have some very interesting implifications for effects for mean free path and thermal conductivity calculations

  15. Development of a noise-based method for the determination of the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity (MTC) in pressurized water reactors (PWRs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaziere, C.

    2002-01-01

    The Moderator Temperature Coefficient of reactivity (MTC) is an important safety parameter of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). In most countries, the so-called at-power MTC has to be measured a few months before the reactor outage, in order to determine if the MTC will not become too negative. Usually, the at-power MTC is determined by inducing a change in the moderator temperature, which has to be compensated for by other means, such as a change in the boron concentration. An MTC measurement using the boron dilution method is analysed in this thesis. It is demonstrated that the uncertainty of such a measurement technique is so large, that the measured MTC could become more negative than what the Technical Specifications allow. Furthermore, this technique incurs a disturbance of the plant operation. For this reason, another technique relying on noise analysis was proposed a few years ago. In this technique, the MTC is inferred from the neutron noise measured inside the core and the moderator temperature noise measured at the core-exit, in the same or in a neighbouring fuel assembly. This technique does not require any perturbation of the reactor operation, but was nevertheless proven to underestimate the MTC by a factor of 2 to 5. In this thesis, it is shown, both theoretically and experimentally, that the reason of the MTC underestimation by noise analysis is the radially loosely coupled character of the moderator temperature noise throughout the core. A new MTC noise estimator, accounting for this radially non-homogeneous moderator temperature noise is proposed and demonstrated to give the correct MTC value. This new MTC noise estimator relies on the neutron noise measured in a single point of the reactor and the radially averaged moderator temperature noise measured inside the core. In the case of the Ringhals-2 PWR in Sweden, Gamma-Thermometers (GTs) offer such a possibility since in dynamic mode they measure the moderator temperature noise, whereas in static

  16. New England observed and predicted August stream/river temperature maximum daily rate of change points

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The shapefile contains points with associated observed and predicted August stream/river temperature maximum negative rate of change in New England based on a...

  17. Temperature dependences of growth rates and carrying capacities of marine bacteria depart from metabolic theoretical predictions

    KAUST Repository

    Huete-Stauffer, Tamara Megan; Arandia-Gorostidi, Nestor; Dí az-Pé rez, Laura; Moran, Xose Anxelu G.

    2015-01-01

    Using the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) framework, we evaluated over a whole annual cycle the monthly responses to temperature of the growth rates (μ) and carrying capacities (K) of heterotrophic bacterioplankton at a temperate coastal site. We

  18. Pressure and temperature dependencies of o-Ps annihilation rates in ethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, S.C.; Juengerman, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    The authors report new results on the behavior of the sharp enhancement seen recently in the pickoff annihilation rates of orthopositronium atoms as functions of pressure and temperature of ethane gas

  19. Dogs with macroadenomas have lower body temperature and heart rate than dogs with microadenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benchekroun, Ghita; Desquilbet, Loic; Herrtage, Michael E; Jeffery, Nick D; Rosenberg, Dan; Granger, Nicolas

    2017-09-01

    Pituitary macroadenomas compress the hypothalamus, which partly regulates heart rate and body temperature. The aim of this study was to investigate whether heart rate and/or body temperature could aid in clinically differentiating dogs with macroadenomas from dogs with microadenomas (i.e. small non-compressive pituitary mass). Two groups of dogs diagnosed with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (i.e. Cushing's disease) were included. Heart rate and body temperature were collected on initial presentation before any procedure. Dogs with macroadenoma had a significantly lower heart rate and body temperature (Pdogs with microadenoma. We suggest that the combined cut-off values of 84 beats per minutes and 38.3°C in dogs with Cushing's disease, especially with vague neurological signs (nine of 12 dogs=75%), might help to suspect the presence of a macroadenoma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. On the temperature effect of substrate and evaporation rate on condensate dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlov, Yu.F.; Belotserkovskaya, N.G.; Gustylev, V.K.

    1978-01-01

    On the basis of available and new experimental data an attempt has been made to generalize the results of studying the effect of the substrate temperature and evaporation rate on the dispersity of amorphous condensates of Sb 2 S 3 and on that of crystalline condensates of PbO and PbTe. The dispersity of the condensates is shown to decrease with a substrate temperature and evaporation rate. The specific surface decreases linearly with the 3-5-fold rise in the evaporation rate. A dispersity decrease is due to the temperature rise in the medium where condensation takes place. The pattern of dispersity dependence on the substrate temperature and evaporation rate does not depend on the mechanism of vapour condensation and is the same both for aerosol mechanism of the condensate formation and for vapour condensation directly on the substrate

  1. Plastic Flow Characteristics of Uranium-Niobium as a Function of Strain Rate and Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cady, C.M.; Gray, G.T. III; Hecker, S.S; Thoma, D.J.; Korzekwa, D.R.; Patterson, R.A.; Dunn, P.S.; Bingert, J.F.

    1999-01-01

    The stress-strain response of uranium-niobium alloys as a function of temperature, strain-rate and stress-state was investigated. The yield and flow stresses of the U-Nb alloys were found to exhibit a pronounced strain rate sensitivity, while the hardening rates were found to be insensitive to strain rate and temperature. The overall stress-strain response of the U-6Nb exhibits a sinusoidal hardening response, which is consistent with multiple deformation modes and is thought to be related to shape-memory behavior

  2. Transport Coefficients of Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Eu, Byung Chan

    2006-01-01

    Until recently the formal statistical mechanical approach offered no practicable method for computing the transport coefficients of liquids, and so most practitioners had to resort to empirical fitting formulas. This has now changed, as demonstrated in this innovative monograph. The author presents and applies new methods based on statistical mechanics for calculating the transport coefficients of simple and complex liquids over wide ranges of density and temperature. These molecular theories enable the transport coefficients to be calculated in terms of equilibrium thermodynamic properties, and the results are shown to account satisfactorily for experimental observations, including even the non-Newtonian behavior of fluids far from equilibrium.

  3. Plasma-catalytic reforming of ethanol: influence of air activation rate and reforming temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedybaliuk, O.A.; Chernyak, V.Ya.; Fedirchuk, I.I.; Demchina, V.P.; Bortyshevsky, V.A.; Korzh, R.V.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the study of the influence that air activation rate and reforming temperature have on the gaseous products composition and conversion efficiency during the plasma-catalytic reforming of ethanol. The analysis of product composition showed that the conversion efficiency of ethanol has a maximum in the studied range of reforming temperatures. Researched system provided high reforming efficiency and high hydrogen energy yield at the lower temperatures than traditional conversion technologies

  4. Adaptation of Lactococcus lactis to high growth temperature leads to a dramatic increase in acidification rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jun; Shen, Jing; Hellgren, Lars

    2015-01-01

    temperature. At the maximal permissive temperature for the wild-type, 38 °C, TM29 grows 33% faster and has a 12% higher specific lactate production rate than its parent MG1363, which results in fast lactate accumulation. Genome sequencing was used to reveal the mutations accumulated, most of which were shown...

  5. The compressive behaviour and constitutive equation of polyimide foam in wide strain rate and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimoto Akifumi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available These days, polymer foams, such as polyurethane foam and polystyrene foam, are used in various situations as a thermal insulator or shock absorber. In general, however, their strength is insufficient in high temperature environments because of their low glass transition temperature. Polyimide is a polymer which has a higher glass transition temperature and high strength. Its mechanical properties do not vary greatly, even in low temperature environments. Therefore, polyimide foam is expected to be used in the aerospace industry. Thus, the constitutive equation of polyimide foam that can be applied across a wide range of strain rates and ambient temperature is very useful. In this study, a series of compression tests at various strain rates, from 10−3 to 103 s−1 were carried out in order to examine the effect of strain rate on the compressive properties of polyimide foam. The flow stress of polyimide foam increased rapidly at dynamic strain rates. The effect of ambient temperature on the properties of polyimide foam was also investigated at temperature from − 190 °C to 270°∘C. The flow stress decreased with increasing temperature.

  6. Comparison of cyanobacterial and green algal growth rates at different temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lurling, M.; Faassen, E.J.; Kosten, S.; Eshetu, Z.; Huszar, V.M.

    2013-01-01

    1.The hypothesis that cyanobacteria have higher optimum growth temperatures and higher growth rates at the optimum as compared to chlorophytes was tested by running a controlled experiment with eight cyanobacteria species and eight chlorophyte species at six different temperatures (20-35°C) and by

  7. Reaction rate constants of HO2 + O3 in the temperature range 233-400 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiuyan; Suto, Masako; Lee, L. C.

    1988-01-01

    The reaction rate constants of HO2 + O3 were measured in the temperature range 233-400 K using a discharge flow system with photofragment emission detection. In the range 233-253 K, the constants are approximately a constant value, and then increase with increasing temperature. This result suggests that the reaction may have two different channels. An expression representing the reaction rate constants is presented.

  8. Maybe Next Month? Temperature Shocks, Climate Change, and Dynamic Adjustments in Birth Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Barreca, Alan I.; Deschenes, Olivier; Guldi, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic adjustments could be a useful strategy for mitigating the costs of acute environmental shocks when timing is not a strictly binding constraint. To investigate whether such adjustments could apply to fertility, we estimate the effects of temperature shocks on birth rates in the United States between 1931 and 2010. Our innovative approach allows for presumably random variation in the distribution of daily temperatures to affect birth rates up to 24 months into the future. We find that a...

  9. Calcitonin gene-related peptide alters the firing rates of hypothalamic temperature sensitive and insensitive neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grimm Eleanor R

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transient hyperthermic shifts in body temperature have been linked to the endogenous hormone calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, which can increase sympathetic activation and metabolic heat production. Recent studies have demonstrated that these centrally mediated responses may result from CGRP dependent changes in the activity of thermoregulatory neurons in the preoptic and anterior regions of the hypothalamus (POAH. Results Using a tissue slice preparation, we recorded the single-unit activity of POAH neurons from the adult male rat, in response to temperature and CGRP (10 μM. Based on the slope of firing rate as a function of temperature, neurons were classified as either warm sensitive or temperature insensitive. All warm sensitive neurons responded to CGRP with a significant decrease in firing rate. While CGRP did not alter the firing rates of some temperature insensitive neurons, responsive neurons showed an increase in firing rate. Conclusion With respect to current models of thermoregulatory control, these CGRP dependent changes in firing rate would result in hyperthermia. This suggests that both warm sensitive and temperature insensitive neurons in the POAH may play a role in producing this hyperthermic shift in temperature.

  10. Low-temperature MIR to submillimeter mass absorption coefficient of interstellar dust analogues. II. Mg and Fe-rich amorphous silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demyk, K.; Meny, C.; Leroux, H.; Depecker, C.; Brubach, J.-B.; Roy, P.; Nayral, C.; Ojo, W.-S.; Delpech, F.

    2017-10-01

    Context. To model the cold dust emission observed in the diffuse interstellar medium, in dense molecular clouds or in cold clumps that could eventually form new stars, it is mandatory to know the physical and spectroscopic properties of this dust and to understand its emission. Aims: This work is a continuation of previous studies aiming at providing astronomers with spectroscopic data of realistic cosmic dust analogues for the interpretation of observations. The aim of the present work is to extend the range of studied analogues to iron-rich silicate dust analogues. Methods: Ferromagnesium amorphous silicate dust analogues were produced by a sol-gel method with a mean composition close to Mg1-xFexSiO3 with x = 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4. Part of each sample was annealed at 500 °C for two hours in a reducing atmosphere to modify the oxidation state of iron. We have measured the mass absorption coefficient (MAC) of these eight ferromagnesium amorphous silicate dust analogues in the spectral domain 30-1000 μm for grain temperature in the range 10-300 K and at room temperature in the 5-40 μm range. Results: The MAC of ferromagnesium samples behaves in the same way as the MAC of pure Mg-rich amorphous silicate samples. In the 30-300 K range, the MAC increases with increasing grain temperature whereas in the range 10-30 K, we do not see any change of the MAC. The MAC cannot be described by a single power law in λ- β. The MAC of the samples does not show any clear trend with the iron content. However the annealing process has, on average, an effect on the MAC that we explain by the evolution of the structure of the samples induced by the processing. The MAC of all the samples is much higher than the MAC calculated by dust models. Conclusions: The complex behavior of the MAC of amorphous silicates with wavelength and temperature is observed whatever the exact silicate composition (Mg vs. Fe amount). It is a universal characteristic of amorphous materials, and therefore of

  11. Oxygen isotope exchange rate between dissolved sulfate and water at hydrothermal temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, H.; Sakai, H.

    1985-01-01

    Oxygen isotope exchange rate between dissolved sulfate and water was experimentally determined at 100, 200 and 300 deg C. The isotope exchange rate is strongly dependent on temperature and pH of the solution. Combining the temperature and pH dependence of the reaction rate, the exchange reaction was estimated to be first-order with respect to sulfate. The logarithm of apparent rate constant of exchange reaction at a given temperature is a function of the pH calculated at the experimental temperatures. From the pH dependence of the apparent rate constant, it was deduced that the isotope exchange reaction between dissolved sulfate and water proceeds through collision between H 2 SO 4 0 and H 2 O at low pH, and between HSO 4 - and H 2 O at intermediate pH. The isotope exchange rate obtained indicates that oxygen isotope geothermometry utilizing the studied isotope exchange is suitable for temperature estimation of geothermal reservoirs. The extrapolated half-life of this reaction to oceanic temperature is about 10 9 years, implying that exchange between oceanic sulfate and water cannot control the oxygen isotope ratio of oceanic sulfates. (author)

  12. Effect of gas temperature on flow rate characteristics of an averaging pitot tube type flow meter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeo, Seung Hwa; Lee, Su Ryong; Lee, Choong Hoon [Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    The flow rate characteristics passing through an averaging Pitot tube (APT) while constantly controlling the flow temperature were studied through experiments and CFD simulations. At controlled temperatures of 25, 50, 75, and 100 .deg .C, the flow characteristics, in this case the upstream, downstream and static pressure at the APT flow meter probe, were measured as the flow rate was increased. The flow rate through the APT flow meter was represented using the H-parameter (hydraulic height) obtained by a combination of the differential pressure and the air density measured at the APT flow meter probe. Four types of H-parameters were defined depending on the specific combination. The flow rate and the upstream, downstream and static pressures measured at the APT flow meter while changing the H-parameters were simulated by means of CFD. The flow rate curves showed different features depending on which type of H-parameter was used. When using the constant air density value in a standard state to calculate the H-parameters, the flow rate increased linearly with the H-parameter and the slope of the flow rate curve according to the H-parameter increased as the controlled target air temperature was increased. When using different air density levels corresponding to each target air temperature to calculate the H-parameter, the slope of the flow rate curve according to the H-parameter was constant and the flow rate curve could be represented by a single line. The CFD simulation results were in good agreement with the experimental results. The CFD simulations were performed while increasing the air temperature to 1200 K. The CFD simulation results for high air temperatures were similar to those at the low temperature ranging from 25 to 100 .deg. C.

  13. Effect of gas temperature on flow rate characteristics of an averaging pitot tube type flow meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, Seung Hwa; Lee, Su Ryong; Lee, Choong Hoon

    2015-01-01

    The flow rate characteristics passing through an averaging Pitot tube (APT) while constantly controlling the flow temperature were studied through experiments and CFD simulations. At controlled temperatures of 25, 50, 75, and 100 .deg .C, the flow characteristics, in this case the upstream, downstream and static pressure at the APT flow meter probe, were measured as the flow rate was increased. The flow rate through the APT flow meter was represented using the H-parameter (hydraulic height) obtained by a combination of the differential pressure and the air density measured at the APT flow meter probe. Four types of H-parameters were defined depending on the specific combination. The flow rate and the upstream, downstream and static pressures measured at the APT flow meter while changing the H-parameters were simulated by means of CFD. The flow rate curves showed different features depending on which type of H-parameter was used. When using the constant air density value in a standard state to calculate the H-parameters, the flow rate increased linearly with the H-parameter and the slope of the flow rate curve according to the H-parameter increased as the controlled target air temperature was increased. When using different air density levels corresponding to each target air temperature to calculate the H-parameter, the slope of the flow rate curve according to the H-parameter was constant and the flow rate curve could be represented by a single line. The CFD simulation results were in good agreement with the experimental results. The CFD simulations were performed while increasing the air temperature to 1200 K. The CFD simulation results for high air temperatures were similar to those at the low temperature ranging from 25 to 100 .deg. C.

  14. Inbreeding effects on standard metabolic rate investigated at cold, benign and hot temperatures in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Palle; Overgaard, Johannes; Loeschcke, Volker

    2014-01-01

    in replicated lines of inbred and outbred Drosophila melanogaster at stressful low, benign and stressful high temperatures. The lowest measurements of metabolic rate in our study are always associated with the low activity period of the diurnal cycle and these measurements therefore serve as good estimates...... of standard metabolic rate. Due to the potentially added costs of genetic stress in inbred lines we hypothesized that inbred individuals have increased metabolic rate compared to outbred controls and that this is more pronounced at stressful temperatures due to synergistic inbreeding by environment...... interactions. Contrary to our hypothesis we found no significant difference in metabolic rate between inbred and outbred lines and no interaction between inbreeding and temperature. Inbreeding however effected the variance; the variance in metabolic rate was higher between the inbred lines compared...

  15. Microstructure and temperature coefficient of resistance of thin cermet resistor films deposited from CrSi2-Cr-SiC targets by S-gun magnetron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felmetsger, Valery V.

    2010-01-01

    Technological solutions for producing nanoscale cermet resistor films with sheet resistances above 1000 Ω/□ and low temperature coefficients of resistance (TCR) have been investigated. 2-40 nm thick cermet films were sputter deposited from CrSi 2 -Cr-SiC targets by a dual cathode dc S-gun magnetron. In addition to studying film resistance versus temperature, the nanofilm structural features and composition were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. This study has revealed that all cermet resistor films deposited at ambient and elevated temperatures were amorphous. The atomic ratio of Si to Cr in these films was about 2 to 1. The film TCR displayed a significant increase when the deposited film thickness was reduced below 2.5 nm. An optimized sputter process consisting of wafer degassing, cermet film deposition at elevated temperature with rf substrate bias, and a double annealing in vacuum, consisting of in situ annealing following the film sputtering and an additional annealing following the exposure of the wafers to air, has been found to be very effective for the film thermal stabilization and for fine tuning the film TCR. Cermet films with thicknesses in the range of 2.5-4 nm deposited using this technique had sheet resistances ranging from 1800 to 1200 Ω/□ and TCR values from -50 ppm/ deg. C to near zero, respectively. A possible mechanism responsible for the high efficiency of annealing the cermet films in vacuum (after preliminary exposure to air), resulting in resistance stabilization and TCR reduction, is also discussed.

  16. Temperature modulates dengue virus epidemic growth rates through its effects on reproduction numbers and generation intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siraj, A. S.; Oidtman, R. J.; Huber, J. H.; Kraemer, M. U.; Brady, O. J.; Johansson, M. A.; Perkins, T. A.

    2017-12-01

    Epidemic growth rate, r, provides a more complete description of the potential for epidemics than the more commonly studied basic reproduction number, R0, yet the former has never been described as a function of temperature for dengue virus or other pathogens with temperature-sensitive transmission. The need to understand the drivers of epidemics of these pathogens is acute, with arthropod-borne virus epidemics becoming increasingly problematic. We addressed this need by developing temperature-dependent descriptions of the two components of r—R0 and the generation interval—to obtain a temperature-dependent description of r. Our results show that the generation interval is highly sensitive to temperature, decreasing twofold between 25 and 35 °C and suggesting that dengue virus epidemics may accelerate as temperatures increase, not only because of more infections per generation but also because of faster generations. Under the empirical temperature relationships that we considered, we found that r peaked at a temperature threshold that was robust to uncertainty in model parameters that do not depend on temperature. Although the precise value of this temperature threshold could be refined following future studies of empirical temperature relationships, the framework we present for identifying such temperature thresholds offers a new way to classify regions in which dengue virus epidemic intensity could either increase or decrease under future climate change.

  17. The dissolution rate constant of magnetite in water at different temperatures and pH conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohajery, Khatereh; Deydier de Pierrefeu, Laurent; Lister, Derek H.

    2012-09-01

    Under the nominal conditions of power system coolants, the corrosion of components made of carbon steel is limited by the magnetite films that develop on surfaces. In some situations, the magnetite film loses much of its protective ability and corrosion and loss of iron to the system are exacerbated. Common examples of such situati