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Sample records for temperature proton exchange

  1. Durable Catalysts for High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    the selectivity for platinum loading. Fuel cell durability tests in term of performance degradation were performed with acid doped polybenzimidazole membrane fuel cells at temperatures of up to 160°C. The tests were focused on catalyst degradation by means of a potential cycling protocol. The electrochemical......Durability of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is recognized as one of the most important issues to be addressed before the commercialization. The failure mechanisms are not well understood, however, degradation of carbon supported noble metal catalysts is identified as a major failure...... mode of PEMFCs. Under idle, load-cycling or start-up/shutdown modes of operation, which are prerequisite for automobile applications, the cathode will experience significantly higher potentials and therefore suffer from serious carbon corrosion, especially at the presence of platinum. The carbon...

  2. Dynamic Model of the High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Stack Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2009-01-01

    The present work involves the development of a model for predicting the dynamic temperature of a high temperature proton exchange membrane (HTPEM) fuel cell stack. The model is developed to test different thermal control strategies before implementing them in the actual system. The test system...... is managed by running the stack at a high stoichiometric air flow. This is possible because of the polybenzimidazole (PBI) fuel cell membranes used and the very low pressure drop in the stack. The model consists of a discrete thermal model dividing the stack into three parts: inlet, middle, and end....... The temperature is predicted in these three parts, where they also are measured. The heat balance of the system involves a fuel cell model to describe the heat added by the fuel cells when a current is drawn. Furthermore the model also predicts the temperatures when heating the stack with external heating...

  3. Phosphoric acid doped imidazolium polysulfone membranes for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Jingshuai; Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2012-01-01

    A novel acid–base polymer membrane is prepared by doping of imidazolium polysulfone with phosphoric acid for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Polysulfone is first chloromethylated, followed by functionalization of the chloromethylated polysulfone with alkyl imidazoles i...... group is achieved in 85wt% H3PO4 at room temperature. The membranes exhibit a proton conductivity of 0.015–0.022Scm−1 at 130–150°C under 15mol% water vapor in air, and a tensile strength of 5–6MPa at 130°C under ambient humidity. Fuel cell tests show an open circuit voltage as high as 0.96V and a peak...

  4. New High-Temperature Membranes Developed for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinder, James D.

    2004-01-01

    Fuel cells are receiving a considerable amount of attention for potential use in a variety of areas, including the automotive industry, commercial power generation, and personal electronics. Research at the NASA Glenn Research Center has focused on the development of fuel cells for use in aerospace power systems for aircraft, unmanned air vehicles, and space transportation systems. These applications require fuel cells with higher power densities and better durability than what is required for nonaerospace uses. In addition, membrane cost is a concern for any fuel cell application. The most widely used membrane materials for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells are based on sulfonated perfluorinated polyethers, typically Nafion 117, Flemion, or Aciplex. However, these polymers are costly and do not function well at temperatures above 80 C. At higher temperatures, conventional membrane materials dry out and lose their ability to conduct protons, essential for the operation of the fuel cell. Increasing the operating temperature of PEM fuel cells from 80 to 120 C would significantly increase their power densities and enhance their durability by reducing the susceptibility of the electrode catalysts to carbon monoxide poisoning. Glenn's Polymers Branch has focused on developing new, low-cost membranes that can operate at these higher temperatures. A new series of organically modified siloxane (ORMOSIL) polymers were synthesized for use as membrane materials in a high-temperature PEM fuel cell. These polymers have an organic portion that can allow protons to transport through the polymer film and a cross-linked silica network that gives the polymers dimensional stability. These flexible xerogel polymer films are thermally stable, with decomposition onset as high as 380 C. Two types of proton-conducting ORMOSIL films have been produced: (1) NASA-A, which can coordinate many highly acid inorganic salts that facilitate proton conduction and (2) NASA-B, which has been

  5. In-situ Monitoring of Internal Local Temperature and Voltage of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Yuan Lee

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of temperature and voltage of a fuel cell are key factors that influence performance. Conventional sensors are normally large, and are also useful only for making external measurements of fuel cells. Centimeter-scale sensors for making invasive measurements are frequently unable to accurately measure the interior changes of a fuel cell. This work focuses mainly on fabricating flexible multi-functional microsensors (for temperature and voltage to measure variations in the local temperature and voltage of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC that are based on micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS. The power density at 0.5 V without a sensor is 450 mW/cm2, and that with a sensor is 426 mW/cm2. Since the reaction area of a fuel cell with a sensor is approximately 12% smaller than that without a sensor, but the performance of the former is only 5% worse.

  6. In-situ Monitoring of Internal Local Temperature and Voltage of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Fan, Wei-Yuan; Hsieh, Wei-Jung

    2010-01-01

    The distribution of temperature and voltage of a fuel cell are key factors that influence performance. Conventional sensors are normally large, and are also useful only for making external measurements of fuel cells. Centimeter-scale sensors for making invasive measurements are frequently unable to accurately measure the interior changes of a fuel cell. This work focuses mainly on fabricating flexible multi-functional microsensors (for temperature and voltage) to measure variations in the local temperature and voltage of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) that are based on micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). The power density at 0.5 V without a sensor is 450 mW/cm2, and that with a sensor is 426 mW/cm2. Since the reaction area of a fuel cell with a sensor is approximately 12% smaller than that without a sensor, but the performance of the former is only 5% worse. PMID:22163556

  7. Proton exchange membrane with hydrophilic capillaries for elevated temperature PEM fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Xue-Min; Mei, Ping; Mi, Yuanzhu; Gao, Lin; Qin, Shaoxiong [College of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Yangtze University, Jingzhou 434023 (China)

    2009-01-15

    Novel water-retention proton exchange membrane of Nafion-phosphotungstic acid/mesoporous silica with hydrophilic capillaries has been fabricated to improve the elevated temperature performance of the PEM fuel cells. Due to the hydrophilic capillarity of the HPW/meso-SiO{sub 2} mesoporous structure, the Nafion-HPW/meso-SiO{sub 2} composite membrane retained 23.7 wt% of water after being dried in 100 C for 2 h and then exposed in 25 RH% gas for 2 h. As a result, under the condition of elevated temperature of 120 C and low humidity of 25 RH%, the Nafion-HPW/meso-SiO{sub 2} composite membrane showed a steady performance. (author)

  8. Nonhumidified High-Temperature Membranes Developed for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinder, James D.

    2005-01-01

    Fuel cells are being considered for a wide variety of aerospace applications. One of the most versatile types of fuel cells is the proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cell. PEM fuel cells can be easily scaled to meet the power and space requirements of a specific application. For example, small 100-W PEM fuel cells are being considered for personal power for extravehicular activity suit applications, whereas larger PEM fuel cells are being designed for primary power in airplanes and in uninhabited air vehicles. Typically, PEM fuel cells operate at temperatures up to 80 C. To increase the efficiency and power density of the fuel cell system, researchers are pursuing methods to extend the operating temperature of the PEM fuel cell to 180 C. The most widely used membranes in PEM fuel cells are Nafion 112 and Nafion 117--sulfonated perfluorinated polyethers that were developed by DuPont. In addition to their relatively high cost, the properties of these membranes limit their use in a PEM fuel cell to around 80 C. The proton conductivity of Nafion membranes significantly decreases above 80 C because the membrane dehydrates. The useful operating range of Nafion-based PEM fuel cells can be extended to over 100 C if ancillary equipment, such as compressors and humidifiers, is added to maintain moisture levels within the membrane. However, the addition of these components reduces the power density and increases the complexity of the fuel cell system.

  9. High temperature proton exchange membranes based on polybenzimidazoles for fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Savinell, Robert F

    2009-01-01

    havebeenmadeincluding spectroscopy,wateruptake and acid doping, thermal and oxidative stability, conductivity, electro-osmoticwater drag, methanol crossover, solubility and permeability of gases, and oxygen reduction kinetics. Related fuel cell technologies such as electrode and MEA fabrication have been developed......To achieve high temperature operation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), preferably under ambient pressure, acid–base polymer membranes represent an effective approach. The phosphoric acid-doped polybenzimidazole membrane seems so far the most successful system in the field. It has...... in recent years motivated extensive research activities with great progress. This treatise is devoted to updating the development, covering polymer synthesis, membrane casting, physicochemical characterizations and fuel cell technologies. To optimize the membrane properties, high molecular weight polymers...

  10. New load cycling strategy for enhanced durability of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, Sobi; Jeppesen, Christian; Steenberg, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to develop a new operational strategy to increase the lifetime of a high temperature proton exchange membrane (HT-PEMFCs) fuel cell system by using load cycling patterns to reduce the phosphoric acid loss from the fuel cell. Four single cells were operated under...... different current cycling profile, while one cell was operated at constant current density for comparison. Polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements were recorded during the course of the tests and analysed. Two different current densities, 0.2 Acm-2 for the lower end and 0.......8 Acm-2 for the higher end, were selected for the load cycling operation. The relaxation time, which is the period of time spent at low current density operation, is varied to understand how the performance over prolonged period behaves. The duration of the high current density operation is selected...

  11. Catalyst Degradation in High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Based on Acid Doped Polybenzimidazole Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cleemann, Lars Nilausen; Buazar, F.; Li, Qingfeng

    2013-01-01

    contribution of the membrane degradation to the performance losses during the potential cycling tests. As the major mechanism of the fuel cell performance degradation, the electrochemical active area of the cathodic catalysts showed a steady decrease in the cyclic voltammetric measurements, which was also...... and multi‐walled carbon nanotubes were used as supports for electrode catalysts and evaluated in accelerated durability tests under potential cycling at 150 °C. Measurements of open circuit voltage, area specific resistance and hydrogen permeation through the membrane were carried out, indicating little......Degradation of carbon supported platinum catalysts is a major failure mode for the long term durability of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells based on phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole membranes. With Vulcan carbon black as a reference, thermally treated carbon black...

  12. Durability Issues of High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Based on Acid Doped Polybenzimidazole Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    observed under continuous operation with hydrogen and air at 150-160oC, with a fuel cell performance degradation rate of 5-10 µV/h. Improvement of the membrane performance such as mechanical strength, swelling and oxidative stability has achieved by exploring the polymer chemistry, i.e. covalently......To achieve high temperature operation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), preferably under ambient pressure, phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole (PBI) membrane represents an effective approach, which in recent years has motivated extensive research activities with great progress....... As a critical concern, issues of long term durability of PBI based fuel cells are addressed in this talk, including oxidative degradation of the polymer, mechanical failures of the membrane, acid leaching out, corrosion of carbon support and sintering of catalysts particles. Excellent polymer durability has...

  13. Investigation of high temperature operation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjemian, Kevork Tro

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) have garnered much attention in the media over the past years as they can provide a clean, environmentally friendly alternative to internal combustion engines. PEMFCs also have the flexibility to operate on many different types of fuels, thereby diminishing our reliance on foreign oil. PEMFCs, however, suffer from many drawbacks which need to be overcome before mass production becomes viable. One drawback is the expense of the fuel cell system, costing several times more than existing technologies. Another problem is that if the fuel cell is running on reformed fuels, trace amounts of carbon monoxide (10 ppm) in the hydrogen gas stream will completely poison the anode electrocatalyst, killing the PEMFC. Also, as a lot of waste heat is generated, a very elaborate cooling system needs to be used, making the overall system more expensive and complex. A possible solution to both the carbon monoxide poisoning and thermal management of a PEMFC is to elevate its operating temperature above 100°C. Unfortunately, current state-of-the-art electrolytes used in PEMFCs, i.e. Nafion 115, rely on water for the conduction of protons and by elevating the temperature, water loss occurs due to evaporation resulting in inadequate PEMFC performance. This thesis delves into the modification of Nafion and similar electrolytes to permit PEMFC operation above 100°C. This was accomplished by impregnating the pores of the Nafion with hydrophilic inorganic materials-silicon oxide via sol-gel processing and various inorganic particles. By performing these modifications to the various electrolytes, several composite membranes performed exceptionally well at an operating temperature of 130°C and demonstrated carbon monoxide tolerance of up to 500 ppm. In addition, a theory on how these materials help improve the water management characteristics of Nafion was developed, laying the foundation for the development of a completely novel membrane to

  14. On active disturbance rejection in temperature regulation of the proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dazi; Li, Chong; Gao, Zhiqiang; Jin, Qibing

    2015-06-01

    Operating a Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) system to maintain the stack temperature stable is one of the key issues in PEMFC's normal electrochemical reaction process. Its temperature characteristic is easily affected by inlet gas humidity, external disturbances, and electrical load changes and so on. Because of the complexity and nonlinearity of the reaction process, it is hard to build a model totally consistent with the real characteristic of the process. If model uncertainty, external disturbances, parameters changes can be regarded as "total disturbance", which is then estimated and compensated, the accurate model is no longer required and the control design can be greatly simplified to meet the practical needs. Based on this idea, an active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) with a switching law is proposed for the problem of precise temperature regulation in PEMFC. Results of the work show that the proposed control system allows the PEMFC to operate successfully at the temperature of 343 K point in the presence of two different disturbances.

  15. Free air breathing proton exchange membrane fuel cell: Thermal behavior characterization near freezing temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuita Cano, Mauricio; Kelouwani, Sousso; Agbossou, Kodjo; Dubé, Yves

    2014-01-01

    A free air breathing fuel cell thermal model is developed. This proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) has been selected as the basis for the study due to its use in automotive applications. The blowers integrated to the stack provide the required air flow for hydrogen oxidation as well as the fluid for the stack thermal regulation. Hence, their controls are a key point for keeping the system to maximum efficiency. Using well-known fuel cell electrochemistry, a dynamic thermal model near freezing temperature, which includes the stack physical parameters, is developed and validated. In addition to these parameters, only the inlet and outlet air temperatures are used to derive the model. Experimental validation with a real 1 kW free air breathing PEMFC has demonstrated that the model can reasonably track the stack internal temperature with a maximum deviation between the observed and the estimated temperatures of 5%. Therefore, the proposed method will allow the development of efficient blower management systems for PEMFC efficiency improvement.

  16. Numerical simulation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells at high operating temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jie; Lee, Seung Jae

    A three-dimensional, single-phase, non-isothermal numerical model for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell at high operating temperature (T ≥ 393 K) was developed and implemented into a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code. The model accounts for convective and diffusive transport and allows predicting the concentration of species. The heat generated from electrochemical reactions, entropic heat and ohmic heat arising from the electrolyte ionic resistance were considered. The heat transport model was coupled with the electrochemical and mass transport models. The product water was assumed to be vaporous and treated as ideal gas. Water transportation across the membrane was ignored because of its low water electro-osmosis drag force in the polymer polybenzimidazole (PBI) membrane. The results show that the thermal effects strongly affect the fuel cell performance. The current density increases with the increasing of operating temperature. In addition, numerical prediction reveals that the width and distribution of gas channel and current collector land area are key optimization parameters for the cell performance improvement.

  17. Nafion®/ODF-silica composite membranes for medium temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Treekamol, Yaowapa

    2014-01-01

    A series of composite membranes were prepared by dispersing fluorinated polyoxadiazole oligomer (ODF)-functionalized silica nanoparticles in a Nafion matrix. Both melt-extrusion and solvent casting processes were explored. Ion exchange capacity, conductivity, water uptake and dimensional stability, thermal stability and morphology were characterized. The inclusion of functionalized nanoparticles proved advantageous, mainly due to a physical crosslinking effect and better water retention, with functionalized nanoparticles performing better than the pristine silica particles. For the same filler loading, better nanoparticle dispersion was achieved for solvent-cast membranes, resulting in higher proton conductivity. Filler agglomeration, however,was more severe for solvent-castmembranes at loadings beyond 5wt.%. The composite membranes showed excellent thermal stability, allowing for operation in medium temperature PEM fuel cells. Fuel cell performance of the compositemembranesdecreaseswithdecreasing relativehumidity, but goodperformance values are still obtained at 34% RHand 90 °C,with the best results obtained for solvent castmembranes loaded with 10 wt.% ODF-functionalized silica. Hydrogen crossover of the composite membranes is higher than that forpureNafion membranes,possiblydue toporosityresulting fromsuboptimalparticle- matrixcompatibility. © 2013 Crown Copyright and Elsevier BV. All rights reserved.

  18. Fabrication BaZrO3/PBI-based nanocomposite as a new proton conducting membrane for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshyari, Khadijeh; Javanbakht, Mehran; Shabanikia, Akbar; Enhessari, Morteza

    2015-02-01

    Novel PBI (polybenzimidazole)-BaZrO3 (PBZ) nanocomposite membranes have been prepared for the high temperature proton exchange membrane (HT-PEM) fuel cells. The results showed that the water uptake, acid doping level and proton conductivity of the PBZ nanocomposite membranes were higher than that of virgin PBI membrane due to the presence of perovskite structure BaZrO3 nanoparticles, which as protonic conductor can perform as a special pathway for hydrogen transport. The proton conductivity of the PBZ nanocomposite membranes with 13 mol phosphoric acid per PBI repeat unit was obtained 125 mS/cm at 180 °C and 5% relative humidity. It was found that the performance of the fuel cells increases by increasing temperature; this was explained by faster reaction kinetic and higher proton conductivity. The power density and current density at 0.5 V 180 °C with 5% relative humidity were observed 0.56 W/cm2 and 1.12 A/cm2, respectively for PBZ nanocomposite membranes containing 4 wt% of the nanofillers. The results suggested that PBZ nanocomposite membranes are promising electrolytes for HT-PEM fuel cells with improved proton conductivity.

  19. The dew point temperature as a criterion for optimizing the operating conditions of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    In this article an analytical method to calculate the dew point temperatures of the anode and cathode exit gas streams of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell is developed. The results of these calculations are used to create diagrams that show the dew point temperatures as function...... of the operating pressure, the stoichiometric flow ratios and the net drag coefficient of water through the membrane. Then, computational modeling results obtained with a previously published model are analyzed and compared with the dew point charts, and it is demonstrated how cell flooding or membrane dry-out can...... be predicted a priori with the aid of these diagrams. Finally, guidelines for the desired cell operating temperature based on the expected dew point temperatures are developed. In the current work these guidelines are limited to the interdigitated flow field design, and they are likely to be different...

  20. Effect of chloride impurities on the performance and durability of polybenzimidazole-based high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Syed Talat; Li, Qingfeng; Pan, Chao

    2011-01-01

    . The performance loss was recovered when switching from the HCl solution back to pure water in the air humidifier. Under an accelerated aging performance test conducted through potential cycling between 0.9 V and 1.2 V, the PBI-based fuel cell initially containing 0.5 NaCl mg cm−2 on the cathode catalyst layer......The effect of chloride as an air impurity and as a catalyst contaminant on the performance and durability of polybenzimidazole (PBI)-based high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell (HT-PEMFC) was studied. The ion chromatographic analysis reveals the existence of chloride contaminations...... temperatures in 85% phosphoric acid containing chloride ions showed both increase in oxidation and reduction current densities. The fuel cell performance, i.e. the current density at a constant voltage of 0.4 V and 0.5 V was found to be degraded as soon as HCl was introduced in the air humidifier...

  1. Thin film thermocouples for in situ membrane electrode assembly temperature measurements in a polybenzimidazole-based high temperature proton exchange membrane unit cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Syed Talat; Lebæk, Jesper; Nielsen, Lars Pleth

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents Type-T thin film thermocouples (TFTCs) fabricated on Kapton (polyimide) substrate for measuring the internal temperature of PBI(polybenzimidazole)-based high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell (HT-PEMFC). Magnetron sputtering technique was employed to deposit a 2 mu...... m thick layer of TFTCs on 75 mu m thick Kapton foil. The Kapton foil was treated with in situ argon plasma etching to improve the adhesion between TFTCs and the Kapton substrate. The TFTCs were covered with a 7 mu m liquid Kapton layer using spin coating technique to protect them from environmental...

  2. Thermal and water management of low temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell in fork-lift truck power system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseinzadeh, Elham; Rokni, Masoud; Rabbani, Raja Abid

    2013-01-01

    A general zero-dimensional Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) model has been developed for forklift truck application. The balance of plant (BOP) comprises of a compressor, an air humidifier, a set of heat exchangers and a recirculation pump. Water and thermal management of the fuel cell...

  3. Impedance characterization of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell stack under the influence of carbon monoxide and methanol vapor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Christian; Polverino, Pierpaolo; Andreasen, Søren Juhl

    2017-01-01

    This work presents a comprehensive mapping of electrochemical impedance measurements under the influence of CO and methanol vapor contamination of the anode gas in a high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell, at varying load current. Electrical equivalent circuit model parameters based...... in an increase in the high frequency and intermediate frequency impedances. When adding CO and methanol to the anode gas, the low frequency part of the impedance spectrum is especially affected at high load currents, which is clearly seen as a result of the high load current resolution used in this work....... The negative effects of methanol vapor are found to be more pronounced on the series resistance. When CO and methanol vapor are both present in anode gas, the entire frequency spectrum and thereby all the equivalent circuit model parameters are affected. It is also shown that the trends of contamination...

  4. Performance comparison between high temperature and traditional proton exchange membrane fuel cell stacks using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Zhu, Wenhua H.; Tatarchuk, Bruce J.

    2014-06-01

    A temperature above 100 °C is always desired for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell operation. It not only improves kinetic and mass transport processes, but also facilitates thermal and water management in fuel cell systems. Increased carbon monoxide (CO) tolerance at higher operating temperature also simplifies the pretreatment of fuel supplement. The novel phosphoric acid (PA) doped polybenzimidazole (PBI) membranes achieve PEM fuel cell operations above 100 °C. The performance of a commercial high temperature (HT) PEM fuel cell stack module is studied by measuring its impedance under various current loads when the operating temperature is set at 160 °C. The contributions of kinetic and mass transport processes to stack impedance are analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively by equivalent circuit (EC) simulation. The performance of a traditional PEM fuel cell stack module operated is also studied by impedance measurement and EC simulation. The operating temperature is self-stabilized between 40 °C and 65 °C. An enhancement of the HT-PEM fuel cell stack in polarization impedance is evaluated by comparing to the traditional PEM fuel cell stack. The impedance study on two commercial fuel cell stacks reveals the real situation of current fuel cell development.

  5. Effects of Straight and Serpentine Flow Field Designs on Temperature Distribution in Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaman Izzuddin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Proton exchange membrane fuel cells or sometimes called as polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM fuel cells is a device for energy transformation in a changing process from one form of energy to another form of energy. It became as an alternative especially for future use in stationary and vehicular applications. PEM fuel cells provide high efficiency and power density with null emission, low operating temperature, quickly start and long life. One of the aspects that are crucial in optimizing the PEM fuel cells performance is a flow field geometry. In this paper, a simulation case of PEM fuel cells was simulated to determine effects of a straight and serpentine flow field on temperature distribution in PEM fuel cells. ANSYS Fluent software was used to simulate 3-dimensional models of single PEM fuel cells in order to determine the effects of changes in the geometry flow field on temperature distributions. Results showed that the serpentine flow field design produces a better temperature distribution along the membrane. The simulation result shows a good agreement with the experiment, thus boost a higher confidence in the results to determine the effectiveness of the flow field design in PEM fuel cells.

  6. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Preface Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsFuel CellsTypes of Fuel CellsAdvantages of Fuel CellsProton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsMembraneCatalystCatalyst LayerGas Diffusion MediumMicroporous LayerMembrane Electrode AssemblyPlateSingle CellStackSystemCell Voltage Monitoring Module (CVM)Fuel Supply Module (FSM)Air Supply Module (ASM)Exhaust Management Module (EMM)Heat Management Module (HMM)Water Management Module (WMM)Internal Power Supply Module (IPM)Power Conditioning Module (PCM)Communications Module (COM)Controls Module (CM)SummaryThermodynamics and KineticsTheoretical EfficiencyVoltagePo

  7. Low platinum loading for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell developed by ultrasonic spray coating technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Huaneng; Jao, Ting-Chu; Barron, Olivia; Pollet, Bruno G.; Pasupathi, Sivakumar

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports use of an ultrasonic-spray for producing low Pt loadings membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) with the catalyst coated substrate (CCS) fabrication technique. The main MEA sub-components (catalyst, membrane and gas diffusion layer (GDL)) are supplied from commercial manufacturers. In this study, high temperature (HT) MEAs with phosphoric acid (PA)-doped poly(2,5-benzimidazole) (AB-PBI) membrane are fabricated and tested under 160 °C, hydrogen and air feed 100 and 250 cc min-1 and ambient pressure conditions. Four different Pt loadings (from 0.138 to 1.208 mg cm-2) are investigated in this study. The experiment data are determined by in-situ electrochemical methods such as polarization curve, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The high Pt loading MEA exhibits higher performance at high voltage operating conditions but lower performances at peak power due to the poor mass transfer. The Pt loading 0.350 mg cm-2 GDE performs the peak power density and peak cathode mass power to 0.339 W cm-2 and 0.967 W mgPt-1, respectively. This work presents impressive cathode mass power and high fuel cell performance for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells (HT-PEMFCs) with low Pt loadings.

  8. High temperature proton exchange membranes based on polybenzimidazole and clay composites for fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plackett, David; Siu, Ana; Li, Qingfeng

    2011-01-01

    dispersion of modified laponite clay was achieved in polybenzimidazole (PBI) solutions which, when cast and allowed to dry, resulted in homogeneous and transparent composite membranes containing up to 20 wt% clay in the polymer. The clay was organically modified using a series of ammonium......, acid doping and swelling, tensile strength, conductivity and hydrogen permeability as well as by fuel cell tests. For the composite membranes, high acid doping levels were achieved with sufficient mechanical strength and improved dimensional stability or reduced membrane swelling. At an acid doping...... level of 12 mol H3PO4 per monomer unit, proton conductivity as high as 0.12 S cm−1 was obtained at 150 °C and 12% relative humidity. The composite membranes exhibited hydrogen permeability ranging from 0.6 to 1.2 × 10−10 mol cm−1 s−1 bar−1 from 100 to 200 °C, which was five times lower than that of acid...

  9. Develpment of Higher Temperature Membrane and Electrode Assembly (MEA) for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan Agro, Anthony DeCarmine, Shari Williams

    2005-12-30

    Our work will fucus on developing higher temperature MEAs based on SPEKK polymer blends. Thse MEAs will be designed to operatre at 120 degrees C Higher temperatures, up to 200 degrees C will also be explored. This project will develop Nafion-free MEAs using only SPEKK blends in both membrane and catalytic layers.

  10. Real Time Monitoring of Temperature of a Micro Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Shuo-Jen; Hu, Yuh-Chung; Shih, Wen-Pin; Fan, Wei-Yuan; Chuang, Chih-Wei

    2009-01-01

    Silicon micro-hole arrays (Si-MHA) were fabricated as a gas diffusion layer (GDL) in a micro fuel cell using the micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) fabrication technique. The resistance temperature detector (RTD) sensor was integrated with the GDL on a bipolar plate to measure the temperature inside the fuel cell. Experimental results demonstrate that temperature was generally linearly related to resistance and that accuracy and sensitivity were within 0.5 °C and 1.68×10−3/°C, respectively. The best experimental performance was 9.37 mW/cm2 at an H2/O2 dry gas flow rate of 30/30 SCCM. Fuel cell temperature during operation was 27 °C, as measured using thermocouples in contact with the backside of the electrode. Fuel cell operating temperature measured in situ was 30.5 °C. PMID:22573963

  11. Real Time Monitoring of Temperature of a Micro Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Wei Chuang

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Silicon micro-hole arrays (Si-MHA were fabricated as a gas diffusion layer (GDL in a micro fuel cell using the micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS fabrication technique. The resistance temperature detector (RTD sensor was integrated with the GDL on a bipolar plate to measure the temperature inside the fuel cell. Experimental results demonstrate that temperature was generally linearly related to resistance and that accuracy and sensitivity were within 0.5 °C and 1.68×10-3/°C, respectively. The best experimental performance was 9.37 mW/cm2 at an H2/O2 dry gas flow rate of 30/30 SCCM. Fuel cell temperature during operation was 27 °C, as measured using thermocouples in contact with the backside of the electrode. Fuel cell operating temperature measured in situ was 30.5 °C.

  12. Electrochemical characterization of a polybenzimidazole-based high temperature proton exchange membrane unit cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Jesper Lebæk; Schaltz, Erik; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2009-01-01

    This work constitutes detailed EIS (Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy) measurements on a PBIbased HT-PEM unit cell. By means of EIS the fuel cell is characterized in several modes of operation by varying the current density, temperature and the stoichiometry of the reactant gases. Using...

  13. Doping phosphoric acid in polybenzimidazole membranes for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Ronghuan; Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2007-01-01

    Polybenzimidazole (PBI) membranes were doped in phosphoric acid solutions of different concentrations at room temperature. The doping chemistry was studied using the Scatchard method. The energy distribution of the acid complexation in polymer membranes is heterogeneous, that is, there are two...

  14. Electrochemical characterization of a polybenzimidazole-based high temperature proton exchange membrane unit cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersen, Jesper Lebæk; Schaltz, Erik; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    This work constitutes detailed EIS (Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy) measurements on a PBI-based HT-PEM unit cell. By means of EIS the fuel cell is characterized in several modes of operation by varying the current density, temperature and the stoichiometry of the reactant gases. Using Equivalent Circuit (EC) modeling key parameters, such as the membrane resistance, charge transfer resistance and gas transfer resistance are identified, however the physical interpretation of the parameters derived from EC's are doubtful as discussed in this paper. The EC model proposed, which is a modified Randles circuit, provides a reasonably good fit at all the conditions tested. The measurements reveal that the cell temperature is an important parameter, which influences the cell performance significantly, especially the charge transfer resistance proved to be very temperature dependent. The transport of oxygen to the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) likewise has a substantial effect on the impedance spectra, results showed that the gas transfer resistance has an exponential-like dependency on the air stoichiometry. Based on the present results and results found in recent publications it is still not clear what exactly causes the distinctive low frequency loop occurring at oxygen starvation. Contrary to the oxygen transport, the transport of hydrogen to the Hydrogen Oxidation Reaction (HOR), in the stoichiometry range investigated in this study, shows no measurable change in the impedance data. Generally, this work is expected to provide a basis for future development of impedance-based fuel cell diagnostic systems for HT-PEM fuel cell.

  15. Epoxy-crosslinked sulfonated poly (phenylene) copolymer proton exchange membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbs, Michael; Fujimoto, Cy H.; Norman, Kirsten; Hickner, Michael A.

    2010-10-19

    An epoxy-crosslinked sulfonated poly(phenylene) copolymer composition used as proton exchange membranes, methods of making the same, and their use as proton exchange membranes (PEM) in hydrogen fuel cells, direct methanol fuel cell, in electrode casting solutions and electrodes, and in sulfur dioxide electrolyzers. These improved membranes are tougher, have higher temperature capability, and lower SO.sub.2 crossover rates.

  16. Oxidative degradation of polybenzimidazole membranes as electrolytes for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, J.H.; Li, Qingfeng; Rudbeck, H.C.

    2011-01-01

    Polybenzimidazole membranes imbibed with acid are emerging as a suitable electrolyte material for high-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells. The oxidative stability of polybenzimidazole has been identified as an important issue for the long-term durability of such cells. In this paper...... the oxidative degradation of the polymer membrane was studied under the Fenton test conditions by the weight loss, intrinsic viscosity, size exclusion chromatography, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. During the Fenton test, significant weight losses depending...... on the initial molecular weight of the polymer were observed. At the same time, viscosity and SEC measurements revealed a steady decrease in molecular weight. The degradation of acid doped PBI membranes under Fenton test conditions is proposed to start by the attack of hydroxyl radicals at the carbon atom...

  17. Use of Multi-Functional Flexible Micro-Sensors for in situ Measurement of Temperature, Voltage and Fuel Flow in a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Chan, Pin-Cheng; Lee, Chung-Ju

    2010-01-01

    Temperature, voltage and fuel flow distribution all contribute considerably to fuel cell performance. Conventional methods cannot accurately determine parameter changes inside a fuel cell. This investigation developed flexible and multi-functional micro sensors on a 40 μm-thick stainless steel foil substrate by using micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) and embedded them in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) to measure the temperature, voltage and flow. Users can monitor and control in situ the temperature, voltage and fuel flow distribution in the cell. Thereby, both fuel cell performance and lifetime can be increased. PMID:22163545

  18. Development of next generation micro-CHP system: Based on high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsalis, A.

    2012-01-15

    Novel proposals for the modeling and operation of a micro-CHP (combined-heat-and-power) residential system based on HT-PEMFC (High Temperature-Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell) technology are described and analyzed to investigate the technical feasibility of such systems. The proposed systems must provide electricity, hot water, and space heating for an average single-family household in Denmark. A complete fuel processing subsystem, with all necessary BOP (balance-of-plant) components, is modeled and coupled to the fuel cell stack subsystem. The research project is divided into five main study topics: (a) Modeling, simulation and validation of the system in LabVIEW environment to provide the ability of Data Acquisition of actual components, and thereby more realistic design in the future; (b) Modeling, parametric study, and sensitivity analysis of the system in EES (Engineering Equation Solver). The parametric study is conducted to determine the most viable system/component design based on maximizing total system efficiency; (c) An improved operational strategy is formulated and applied in an attempt to minimize operational implications, experienced when using conventional operational strategies; (d) Application of a GA (Genetic Algorithm) optimization strategy. The objective function of the single-objective optimization strategy is the net electrical efficiency of the micro-CHP system. The implemented optimization procedure attempts to maximize the objective function by variation of nine decision variables; (e) The micro-CHP system is optimized by formulating and applying a process integration methodology. The methodology involves system optimization targeting in net electrical efficiency maximization. Subsequently a MINLP (Mixed Integer Non-Linear Programming) problem optimization strategy is applied to minimize the annual cost of the HEN (Heat Exchanger Network). The results obtained throughout this research work indicate the high potential of the proposed

  19. Methods for measuring exchangeable protons in glycosaminoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beecher, Consuelo N; Larive, Cynthia K

    2015-01-01

    Recent NMR studies of the exchangeable protons of GAGs in aqueous solution, including those of the amide, sulfamate, and hydroxyl moieties, have demonstrated potential for the detection of intramolecular hydrogen bonds, providing insights into secondary structure preferences. GAG amide protons are observable by NMR over wide pH and temperature ranges; however, specific solution conditions are required to reduce the exchange rate of the sulfamate and hydroxyl protons and allow their detection by NMR. Building on the vast body of knowledge on detection of hydrogen bonds in peptides and proteins, a variety of methods can be used to identify hydrogen bonds in GAGs including temperature coefficient measurements, evaluation of chemical shift differences between oligo- and monosaccharides, and relative exchange rates measured through line shape analysis and EXSY spectra. Emerging strategies to allow direct detection of hydrogen bonds through heteronuclear couplings offer promise for the future. Molecular dynamic simulations are important in this effort both to predict and confirm hydrogen bond donors and acceptors.

  20. The 3rd CARISMA international conference on medium and high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells: Three approaches to better platinum catalysts at biannual conference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf; Cleemann, Lars Nilausen; Li, Qingfeng

    2013-01-01

    The 3rd CARISMA International Conference was held at the Axelborg venue in Copenhagen, Denmark, from September 3-5, 2012. The CARISMA conference series was specifically devoted to challenges in the development and testing of fuel cell materials and membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) for proton...... exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) to be operated at intermediate and high temperatures. The conference series was initiated by the European CARISMA Coordination Action for Research on Intermediate and High Temperature Specialized Membrane Electrode Assemblies. The 2012 event in Copenhagen had around...

  1. Crosslinking of polybenzimidazolemembranes by divinylsulfone post-treatment for high-temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aili, David; Li, Qingfeng; Christensen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    Phosphoric acid-doped polybenzimidazole (PBI) has been suggested as a promising electrolyte for proton exchangemembrane fuel cells operating at temperatures up to 200 ◦C. This paper describes the development of a crosslinking procedure for PBI membranes by post-treatment with divinylsulfone....... The crosslinking chemistry was studied and optimized on a low-molecularweight model system and the results were used to optimize the crosslinking conditions of PBI membranes. The crosslinked membraneswere characterized with respect to chemical and physiochemical properties, showing improved mechanical strength...

  2. Effect of different surface treatments on the stability of stainless steels for use as bipolar plates in low and high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, J.; Schmidt, K. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Chemische Technologie (ICT), Wolfsburg (Germany); Tuebke, J.; Cremers, C. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Chemische Technologie (ICT), Pfinztal (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The stability of different stainless steels against corrosion under simulated low and high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) operating conditions was studied. These investigations showed a moderate corrosion resistance for a couple of steels under LT-PEMFC conditions. However, for the HT-PEMFC conditions all specimens except one exhibit visible corrosion traces. With regards to their corrosion resistance after different surface treatments results show a minor improvement in corrosion resistance after the electro polishing process for most of the tested stainless steel samples. (orig.)

  3. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Fengge; Miraoui, Abdellatif

    2013-01-01

    The fuel cell is a potential candidate for energy storage and conversion in our future energy mix. It is able to directly convert the chemical energy stored in fuel (e.g. hydrogen) into electricity, without undergoing different intermediary conversion steps. In the field of mobile and stationary applications, it is considered to be one of the future energy solutions.Among the different fuel cell types, the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell has shown great potential in mobile applications, due to its low operating temperature, solid-state electrolyte and compactness.This book pre

  4. Long-term testing of a high-temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell short stack operated with improved polybenzimidazole-based composite membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinar, F. Javier; Cañizares, Pablo; Rodrigo, Manuel A.; Úbeda, Diego; Lobato, Justo

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the feasibility of a 150 cm2 high-temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell (HT-PEMFC) stack operated with modified proton exchange membranes is demonstrated. The short fuel cell stack was manufactured using a total of three 50 cm2 membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs). The PEM technology is based on a polybenzimidazole (PBI) membrane. The obtained results were compared with those obtained using a HT-PEMFC stack with unmodified membranes. The membranes were cast from a PBI polymer synthesized in the laboratory, and the modified membranes contained 2 wt.% micro-sized TiO2 as a filler. Long-term tests were performed in both constant and dynamic loading modes. The fuel cell stack with 2 wt.% TiO2 composite PBI membranes exhibited an irreversible voltage loss of less than 2% after 1100 h of operation. In addition, the acid loss was reduced from 2% for the fuel cell stack with unmodified membranes to 0.6% for the fuel cell stack with modified membranes. The results demonstrate that introducing filler into the membranes enhances the durability and stability of this type of fuel cell technology. Moreover, the fuel cell stack system also exhibits very rapid and stable power and voltage output responses under dynamic load regimes.

  5. The influence of humidification and temperature differences between inlet gases on water transport through the membrane of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuan-Jen; Hwang, Sheng-Jye; Lai, Wei-Hsiang

    2015-06-01

    This paper discusses the effects of humidification and temperature differences of the anode and cathode on water transport in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell. Heaters are used to cause a difference in gas temperature between two electrodes before the gases enter the fuel cell. The results show that when the temperature of the cathode is higher than that of the anode, the electro-osmotic drag is suppressed. In contrast, when the temperature of the anode is higher than that of cathode, it is enhanced. These effects are more significant when the temperature difference between the anode and cathode is greater. The same trends are seen with back diffusion. Three cases are tested, and the results show that the suppression due to the temperature difference occurs even when the relative humidity is low at the hotter side. The water transport tendencies of electro-osmotic drag and back diffusion in different situations can be expressed as dominant percentages calculated by the water masses collected at the anode and cathode. The suppression effect due to the temperature difference is relatively insignificant with regard to back diffusion compared to electro-osmosis, so water tends to accumulate on the anode rather than the cathode side.

  6. Enhanced performance and stability of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell by incorporating zirconium hydrogen phosphate in catalyst layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Olivia; Su, Huaneng; Linkov, Vladimir; Pollet, Bruno G.; Pasupathi, Sivakumar

    2015-03-01

    Zirconium hydrogen phosphate (ZHP) together with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) polymer binder is incorporated into the catalyst layers (CLs) of ABPBI (poly(2,5-benzimidazole))-based high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (HT-PEMFCs) to improve its performance and durability. The influence of ZHP content (normalised with respect to dry PTFE) on the CL properties are structurally characterised by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and mercury intrusion porosimetry. Electrochemical analyses of the resultant membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) are performed by recording polarisation curves and impedance spectra at 160 °C, ambient pressure and humidity. The result show that a 30 wt.% ZHP/PTFE content in the CL is optimum for improving fuel cell performance, the resultant MEA delivers a peak power of 592 mW cm-2 at a cell voltage of 380 mV. Electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) indicate that 30% ZHP in the CL can increase the proton conductivity compared to the pristine PTFE-gas diffusion electrode (GDE). A short term stability test (∼500 h) on the 30 wt.% ZHP/PTFE-GDE shows a remarkable high durability with a degradation rate as low as ∼19 μV h-1 at 0.2 A cm-2, while 195 μV h-1 was obtained for the pristine GDE.

  7. Membrane electrode assembly with enhanced platinum utilization for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell prepared by catalyst coating membrane method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Huagen; Su, Huaneng; Pollet, Bruno G.; Linkov, Vladimir; Pasupathi, Sivakumar

    2014-11-01

    In this work, membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) prepared by catalyst coating membrane (CCM) method are investigated for reduced platinum (Pt) loading and improved Pt utilization of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) based on phosphoric acid (PA)-doped poly(2,5-benzimidazole) (AB-PBI) membrane. The results show that CCM method exhibits significantly higher cell performance and Pt-specific power density than that of MEAs prepared with conventional gas diffusion electrode (GDE) under a low Pt loading level. In-suit cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) show that the MEAs prepared by the CCM method have a higher electrochemical surface area (ECSA), low cell ohmic resistance and low charge transfer resistance as compared to those prepared with GDEs at the same Pt loading.

  8. SSH2S: Hydrogen storage in complex hydrides for an auxiliary power unit based on high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baricco, Marcello; Bang, Mads; Fichtner, Maximilian; Hauback, Bjorn; Linder, Marc; Luetto, Carlo; Moretto, Pietro; Sgroi, Mauro

    2017-02-01

    The main objective of the SSH2S (Fuel Cell Coupled Solid State Hydrogen Storage Tank) project was to develop a solid state hydrogen storage tank based on complex hydrides and to fully integrate it with a High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane (HT-PEM) fuel cell stack. A mixed lithium amide/magnesium hydride system was used as the main storage material for the tank, due to its high gravimetric storage capacity and relatively low hydrogen desorption temperature. The mixed lithium amide/magnesium hydride system was coupled with a standard intermetallic compound to take advantage of its capability to release hydrogen at ambient temperature and to ensure a fast start-up of the system. The hydrogen storage tank was designed to feed a 1 kW HT-PEM stack for 2 h to be used for an Auxiliary Power Unit (APU). A full thermal integration was possible thanks to the high operation temperature of the fuel cell and to the relative low temperature (170 °C) for hydrogen release from the mixed lithium amide/magnesium hydride system.

  9. Proton channels and exchangers in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spugnini, Enrico Pierluigi; Sonveaux, Pierre; Stock, Christian; Perez-Sayans, Mario; De Milito, Angelo; Avnet, Sofia; Garcìa, Abel Garcìa; Harguindey, Salvador; Fais, Stefano

    2015-10-01

    Although cancer is characterized by an intratumoral genetic heterogeneity, a totally deranged pH control is a common feature of most cancer histotypes. Major determinants of aberrant pH gradient in cancer are proton exchangers and transporters, including V-ATPase, Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE), monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) and carbonic anhydrases (CAs). Thanks to the activity of these proton transporters and exchangers, cancer becomes isolated and/or protected not only from the body reaction against the growing tumor, but also from the vast majority of drugs that when protonated into the acidic tumor microenvironment do not enter into cancer cells. Proton transporters and exchangers represent a key feature tumor cells use to survive in the very hostile microenvironmental conditions that they create and maintain. Detoxifying mechanisms may thus represent both a key survival option and a selection outcome for cells that behave as unicellular microorganisms rather than belonging to an organ, compartment or body. It is, in fact, typical of malignant tumors that, after a clinically measurable yet transient initial response to a therapy, resistant tumor clones emerge and proliferate, thus bursting a more malignant behavior and rapid tumor progression. This review critically presents the background of a novel and efficient approach that aims to fight cancer through blocking or inhibiting well characterized proton exchangers and transporters active in human cancer cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Protonic conductors for proton exchange membrane fuel cells: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurado Ramon Jose

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, Nation, which is a perfluorinated polymer, is one of the few materials that deliver the set of chemical and mechanical properties required to perform as a good electrolyte in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs. However, Nation presents some disadvantages, such as limiting the operational temperature of the fuel system (So°C, because of its inability to retain water at higher temperatures and also suffers chemical crossover. In addition to these restrictions, Nation membranes are very expensive. Reducing costs and using environmentally friendly materials are good reasons to make a research effort in this field in order to achieve similar or even better fuel-cell performances. Glass materials of the ternary system SiO2-ZrO2-P2O5, hybrid materials based on Nation, and nanopore ceramic membranes based on SiO2 TiO2, Al2O3, etc. are considered at present, as promising candidates to replace Nation as the electrolyte in PEMFCs. These types of materials are generally prepared by sol-gel processes in order to tailor their channel-porous structure and pore size. In this communication, the possible candidates in the near future as electrolytes (including other polymers different than Nation in PEMFCs are briefly reviewed. Their preparation methods, their electrical transport properties and conduction mechanisms are considered. The advantages and disadvantages of these materials with respect to Nation are also discussed.

  11. Investigation of carbon supported PtW catalysts as CO tolerant anodes at high temperature in proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ayaz; Paganin, Valdecir A.; Ticianelli, Edson A.

    2016-09-01

    The CO tolerance mechanism and the stability of carbon supported PtW electrocatalysts are evaluated in the anode of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) at two different temperatures. The electrocatalysts are characterized by energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron spectroscopy. Employed electrochemical techniques include cyclic voltammetry, CO stripping, fuel cell polarization, and online mass spectrometry. At a cell temperature of 85 °C, the PtW/C catalyst shows higher CO tolerance compared to Pt/C due an electronic effect of WOx in the Pt 5d band, which reduces the CO adsorption. An increase in hydrogen oxidation activity in the presence of CO is observed for both the catalysts at a higher temperature, due to the decrease of the Pt-CO coverage. A reduction in the current densities occurs for the PtW/C catalyst in both polarization curves and cyclic voltammograms after 5000 cycles of the anode in the range of 0.1-0.7 V vs. RHE at 50 mVs-1. This decrease in performance is assigned to the dissolution of W, with a consequent increase in the membrane resistivity. However, the observed decline of performance is small either in the presence of pure H2 or in the presence of H2/CO.

  12. Renewable Electricity Generation via Solar-Powered Methanol Reforming: Hybrid Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems Based on Novel Non-Concentrating, Intermediate-Temperature Solar Collectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real, Daniel J.

    Tremendous research efforts have been conducted studying the capturing and conversion of solar energy. Solar thermal power systems offer a compelling opportunity for renewable energy utilization with high efficiencies and excellent cost-effectiveness. The goal of this work was to design a non-concentrating collector capable of reaching temperatures above 250 °C, use this collector to power methanol steam reforming, and operate a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell using the generated hydrogen. The study presents the construction and characterization of a non-concentrating, intermediate-temperature, fin-in-tube evacuated solar collector, made of copper and capable of reaching stagnation temperatures of 268.5 °C at 1000 W/m2 irradiance. The collector was used to power methanol steam reforming, including the initial heating and vaporization of liquid reactants and the final heating of the gaseous reactants. A preferential oxidation (PROX) catalyst was used to remove CO from simulated reformate gas, and this product gas was used to operate a PEM fuel cell. The results show 1) that the outlet temperature is not limited by heat transfer from the absorber coating to the heat transfer fluid, but by the amount of solar energy absorbed. This implicates a constant heat flux description of the heat transfer process and allows for the usage of materials with lower thermal conductivity than copper. 2) It is possible to operate a PEM fuel cell from reformate gas if a PROX catalyst is used to remove CO from the gas. 3) The performance of the fuel cell is only slightly decreased (~4%) by CO2 dilution present in the reformate and PROX gas. These results provide a foundation for the first renewable electricity generation via solar-powered methanol reforming through a hybrid PEM fuel cell system based on novel non-concentrating, intermediate-temperature solar collectors.

  13. Effect of sintering temperature on the morphology and mechanical properties of PTFE membranes as a base substrate for proton exchange membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Aida Zubir

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the development of PTFE membranes as the base substrates for producing proton exchange membrane by using radiation-grafting technique. An aqueous dispersion of PTFE, which includes sodium benzoate, is cast in order to form suitable membranes. The casting was done by usinga pneumatically controlled flat sheet membrane-casting machine. The membrane is then sintered to fuse the polymer particles and cooled. After cooling process, the salt crystals are leached from the membrane by dissolution in hot bath to leave a microporous structure, which is suitable for such uses as a filtration membrane or as a base substrate for radiation grafted membrane in PEMFC. The effects of sintering temperature on the membrane morphology and tensile strength were investigated at 350oC and 385oC by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and EX 20, respectively. The pore size and total void space are significantly smaller at higher sintering temperature employed with an average pore diameter of 11.78 nm. The tensile strength and tensile strain of sintered PTFE membrane at 385oC are approximately 19.02 + 1.46 MPa and 351.04 + 23.13 %, respectively. These results were indicated at 385oC, which represents significant improvements in tensile strength and tensile strain, which are nearly twice those at 350oC.

  14. Modelling of the vapour-liquid equilibrium of water and the in situ concentration of H3PO4 in a high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazdal, Timur J.; Lang, Sebastian; Kühl, Frank; Hampe, Manfred J.

    2014-03-01

    The fuel cell technology is a key element for the hydrogen energy economy and therefore crucial for sustainable development. High temperature proton exchange membrane (HT-PEM) fuel cells (FC) can be operated with reformate gas and thus represent an important bridging technology for the energy transition to a renewable energy based system. HT-PEM FCs based on phosphoric acid (PA) are still subject to intense research, investigating the electrolyte behaviour. By enhancing state of the art 2D FEM simulations of FCs with the vapour liquid equilibrium of water-phosphoric acid and evaporation kinetics, a model was created in which the local concentration of PA can be calculated. Knowledge of the concentration field yields the basis for calculating the locally varying ionic conductivity and other physical properties. By describing the volume expansion behaviour of PA it was possible to predict the catalyst particle deactivation due to the swelling of PA. The in situ concentration predicted by the simulation ranges from 96 to 111 wt%. The model was validated using measured data of a single cell design for different temperatures and pressures. By varying the PA content flooding of the simulated fuel cell could be observed and was linked to humidification effects.

  15. Fault detection and isolation of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell stack under the influence of degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Christian; Araya, Samuel Simon; Sahlin, Simon Lennart

    2017-01-01

    This study proposes a data-drive impedance-based methodology for fault detection and isolation of low and high cathode stoichiometry, high CO concentration in the anode gas, high methanol vapour concentrations in the anode gas and low anode stoichiometry, for high temperature PEM fuel cells...... methanol vapour concentration in the anode gas fault, which was found to be difficult to distinguish from a normal operational data. The achieved accuracy for faults related to CO pollution, anode- and cathode stoichiometry is 100% success rate. Overall global accuracy on the test data is 94.6%....

  16. Proton translocation in cytochrome c oxidase: insights from proton exchange kinetics and vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigami, Izumi; Hikita, Masahide; Egawa, Tsuyoshi; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Rousseau, Denis L

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is the terminal enzyme in the electron transfer chain. It reduces oxygen to water and harnesses the released energy to translocate protons across the inner mitochondrial membrane. The mechanism by which the oxygen chemistry is coupled to proton translocation is not yet resolved owing to the difficulty of monitoring dynamic proton transfer events. Here we summarize several postulated mechanisms for proton translocation, which have been supported by a variety of vibrational spectroscopic studies. We recently proposed a proton translocation model involving proton accessibility to the regions near the propionate groups of the heme a and heme a3 redox centers of the enzyme based by hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange Raman scattering studies (Egawa et al., PLoS ONE 2013). To advance our understanding of this model and to refine the proton accessibility to the hemes, the H/D exchange dependence of the heme propionate group vibrational modes on temperature and pH was measured. The H/D exchange detected at the propionate groups of heme a3 takes place within a few seconds under all conditions. In contrast, that detected at the heme a propionates occurs in the oxidized but not the reduced enzyme and the H/D exchange is pH-dependent with a pKa of ~8.0 (faster at high pH). Analysis of the thermodynamic parameters revealed that, as the pH is varied, entropy/enthalpy compensation held the free energy of activation in a narrow range. The redox dependence of the possible proton pathways to the heme groups is discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vibrational spectroscopies and bioenergetic systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Fault detection and isolation of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell stack under the influence of degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppesen, Christian; Araya, Samuel Simon; Sahlin, Simon Lennart; Thomas, Sobi; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2017-08-01

    This study proposes a data-drive impedance-based methodology for fault detection and isolation of low and high cathode stoichiometry, high CO concentration in the anode gas, high methanol vapour concentrations in the anode gas and low anode stoichiometry, for high temperature PEM fuel cells. The fault detection and isolation algorithm is based on an artificial neural network classifier, which uses three extracted features as input. Two of the proposed features are based on angles in the impedance spectrum, and are therefore relative to specific points, and shown to be independent of degradation, contrary to other available feature extraction methods in the literature. The experimental data is based on a 35 day experiment, where 2010 unique electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements were recorded. The test of the algorithm resulted in a good detectability of the faults, except for high methanol vapour concentration in the anode gas fault, which was found to be difficult to distinguish from a normal operational data. The achieved accuracy for faults related to CO pollution, anode- and cathode stoichiometry is 100% success rate. Overall global accuracy on the test data is 94.6%.

  18. Development of membrane electrode assembly for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell by catalyst coating membrane method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Huagen; Su, Huaneng; Pollet, Bruno G.; Pasupathi, Sivakumar

    2015-08-01

    Membrane electrode assembly (MEA), which contains cathode and anode catalytic layer, gas diffusion layers (GDL) and electrolyte membrane, is the key unit of a PEMFC. An attempt to develop MEA for ABPBI membrane based high temperature (HT) PEMFC is conducted in this work by catalyst coating membrane (CCM) method. The structure and performance of the MEA are examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and I-V curve. Effects of the CCM preparation method, Pt loading and binder type are investigated for the optimization of the single cell performance. Under 160 °C and atmospheric pressure, the peak power density of the MEA, with Pt loading of 0.5 mg cm-2 and 0.3 mg cm-2 for the cathode and the anode, can reach 277 mW cm-2, while a current density of 620 A cm-2 is delivered at the working voltage of 0.4 V. The MEA prepared by CCM method shows good stability operating in a short term durability test: the cell voltage maintained at ∼0.45 V without obvious drop when operated at a constant current density of 300 mA cm-2 and 160 °C under ambient pressure for 140 h.

  19. Proton-Exchange-Induced Configuration Rearrangement in a Poly(ionic liquid) Solution: A NMR Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haijin; Yang, Hengrui; Li, Jiaye; Barlow, Kristine J; Kong, Lingxue; Mecerreyes, David; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Forsyth, Maria

    2017-11-02

    Polymeric ionic liquids have emerged recently as a promising alternative to traditional polymers as the polymer electrolyte membrane materials of choice because of their strongly decoupled dynamics between the polymer backbone and the counterions. Knowledge of proton exchange and transport mechanism in such materials is critical to the design and development of new poly(ionic liquid) materials with improved electrochemical properties. Our NMR results show that the proton exchange between the labile proton of the diethylmethylammonium (NH122) cation and H2O molecules is accompanied by a concerted configuration rearrangement of the ammonium. Through a combination of PFG-NMR and proton relaxation (line width) analysis, we demonstrate that at lower temperatures the labile proton diffuses along with the NH122 ammonium cation as an integral unit, whereas at higher temperatures the NH/H2O proton exchange sets in gradually, and the PFG-NMR measured diffusion coefficient is a population-averaged value between the two exchanging sites.

  20. Estimation of Membrane Hydration Status for Standby Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems by Impedance Measurement: First Results on Variable Temperature Stack Characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bidoggia, Benoit; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2013-01-01

    Fuel cells are getting growing interest in both backup systems and electric vehicles. Although these systems are characterized by periods of standby, they must be able to start at any instant in the shortest possible time. However, the membranes of which proton exchange membrane fuel cells are made...... impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique has been used, allowing the performance of a fuel cell diagnostic when the fuel cell stack does not contain any hydrogen, which would otherwise not be possible. The results appeared to confirm that measuring the impedance of an entire fuel cell stack could be a viable...

  1. Proton Conductivity of Proton Exchange Membrane Synergistically Promoted by Different Functionalized Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Zhuang; Tang, Beibei; Wu, Peiyi

    2017-07-12

    In this study, two functionalized metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), UiO-66-SO3H and UiO-66-NH2, were synthesized. Then, different composite proton exchange membranes (PEMs) were prepared by single doping and codoping of these two MOFs, respectively. It was found that codoping of these two MOFs with suitable sizes was more conducive to the proton conductivity enhancement of the composite PEM. A synergistic effect between these two MOFs led to the the formation of more consecutive hydration channels in the composite PEM. It further greatly promoted the proton conductivity of the composite PEM. The proton conductivity of the codoped PEM reached up to 0.256 S/cm under 90 °C, 95% RH, which was ∼1.17 times higher than that of the recast Nafion (0.118 S/cm). Besides, the methanol permeability of the codoped PEM was prominently decreased owing to the methanol trapping effect of the pores of these two MOFs. Meanwhile, the high water and thermal stabilities of these two MOFs were beneficial to the high proton conductivity stability of the codoped PEM under high humidity and high temperature. The proton conductivity of the codoped PEM was almost unchanged throughout 3000 min of testing under 90 °C, 95% RH. This work provides a valuable reference for designing different functionalized MOFs to synergistically promote the proton conductivities of PEMs.

  2. Ionic Liquids and New Proton Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belieres, Jean-Philippe

    2004-01-01

    There is currently a great surge of activity in fuel cell research as laboratories across the world seek to take advantage of the high energy capacity provided by &el cells relative to those of other portable electrochemical power systems. Much of this activity is aimed at high temperature fie1 cells, and a vital component of such &el cells must be the availability of a high temperature stable proton-permeable membrane. NASA Glenn Research Center is greatly involved in developing this technology. Other approaches to the high temperature fuel cell involve the use of single- component or almost-single-component electrolytes that provide a path for protons through the cell. A heavily researched case is the phosphoric acid fuel cell, in which the electrolyte is almost pure phosphoric acid and the cathode reaction produces water directly. The phosphoric acid fie1 cell delivers an open circuit voltage of 0.9 V falling to about 0.7 V under operating conditions at 170 C. The proton transport mechanism is mainly vehicular in character according to the viscosity/conductance relation. Here we describe some Proton Transfer Ionic Liquids (PTILs) with low vapor pressure and high temperature stability that have conductivities of unprecedented magnitude for non-aqueous systems. The first requirement of an ionic liquid is that, contrary to experience with most liquids consisting of ions, it must have a melting point that is not much above room temperature. The limit commonly suggested is 100 C. PTILs constitute an interesting class of non-corrosive proton-exchange electrolyte, which can serve well in high temperature (T = 100 - 250 C) fuel cell applications. We will present cell performance data showing that the open circuit voltage output, and the performance of a simple H2(g)Pt/PTIL/Pt/O2(g) fuel cell may be superior to those of the equivalent phosphoric acid electrolyte fuel cell both at ambient temperature and temperatures up to and above 200 C. My work at NASA Glenn Research

  3. Preparation of Highly Sulfonated Ultra-Thin Proton-Exchange Polymer Membranes for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhongqing; Meng, Yuedong; Jiang, Zhong-Jie; Shi, Yicai

    Sulfonated ultra-thin proton-exchange polymer membrane carrying pyridine groups was made from a plasma polymerization of styrene, 2-vinylpyridine, and trifluoromethanesulfonic acid by after-glow capacitively coupled discharge technique. Pyridine groups tethered to the polymer backbone acts as a medium through the basic nitrogen for transfer of protons between the sulfonic acid groups of proton exchange membrane. It shows that the method using present technology could effectively depress the degradation of monomers during the plasma polymerization. Spectroscopic analyses reveal that the obtained membranes are highly functionalized with proton exchange groups and have higher proton conductivity. Thus, the membranes are expected to be used in direct methanol fuel cells.

  4. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Applied for Transport Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseinzadeh, Elham; Rokni, Masoud

    2010-01-01

    A thermodynamic analysis of a PEMFC (proton exchange membrane fuel cell) is investigated. PEMFC may be the most promising technology for fuel cell automotive systems, which is operating at quite low temperatures, (between 60 to 80℃). In this study the fuel cell motive power part of a lift truck has...... of the electricity will be consumed by pumps and compressors in the system. Generally the whole system can be separated in three parts, cathode circuit, anode circuit and cooling loops. In this paper the effect of operating conditions and anode recirculation on power production as well as system efficiency have been...

  5. Formation of the organic-inorganic proton exchange membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.O. Maizelis

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of electrolyzers for the low-temperature water electrolysis with the solid polymer membrane is perspective for production of hydrogen using renewable energy sources. However, the high cost of membrane materials obstructs the mass commissioning of such electrolyzers. Most of the researches devoted to the technologies of membranes formation, alternative to Nafion®, deal only with organic materials. Aim: The aim of this research is to develop the method for formation of the competitive proton exchange membrane based on polyvinyl alcohol (PVA and inorganic hydrates. Materials and Methods: The hydrated oxide of tin was added to the 2...10% PVA solution, mixed and applied to inert base layer by layer for formation of the membrane. Then the membrane was separated from the base. The reinforcing mesh was used to improve mechanical properties of the membrane. The hydrated tin oxide was prepared by reaction of tin chloride and ammonium hydroxide solutions. Results: The conditions of formation of proton-exchange membranes based on polyvinyl alcohol and hydrated oxide of tin were investigated. The series of membranes containing 30, 50, 70, 80 and 90% of hydrated tin oxide are obtained. It is shown that a solid membrane film with the thickness over 100 μm can be obtained if the content of PVA exceeds 30%. It is shown that it is necessary to crosslink the chains of PVA in the resulting film. The structure of the obtained proton exchange membrane consists of PVA chains crosslinked by aldehyde, between which the globules of hydrated tin oxide are situated. The membrane conductivity is provided by both proton mobility of hydroxyl group of PVA and H3O+/H2O and OH–/H2O groups that are formed due to the partial dissociation of hydrated oxide on the surface of the globules.

  6. Advanced proton-exchange materials for energy efficient fuel cells.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, Cy H.; Grest, Gary Stephen; Hickner, Michael A.; Cornelius, Christopher James; Staiger, Chad Lynn; Hibbs, Michael R.

    2005-12-01

    The ''Advanced Proton-Exchange Materials for Energy Efficient Fuel Cells'' Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project began in October 2002 and ended in September 2005. This LDRD was funded by the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy strategic business unit. The purpose of this LDRD was to initiate the fundamental research necessary for the development of a novel proton-exchange membranes (PEM) to overcome the material and performance limitations of the ''state of the art'' Nafion that is used in both hydrogen and methanol fuel cells. An atomistic modeling effort was added to this LDRD in order to establish a frame work between predicted morphology and observed PEM morphology in order to relate it to fuel cell performance. Significant progress was made in the area of PEM material design, development, and demonstration during this LDRD. A fundamental understanding involving the role of the structure of the PEM material as a function of sulfonic acid content, polymer topology, chemical composition, molecular weight, and electrode electrolyte ink development was demonstrated during this LDRD. PEM materials based upon random and block polyimides, polybenzimidazoles, and polyphenylenes were created and evaluated for improvements in proton conductivity, reduced swelling, reduced O{sub 2} and H{sub 2} permeability, and increased thermal stability. Results from this work reveal that the family of polyphenylenes potentially solves several technical challenges associated with obtaining a high temperature PEM membrane. Fuel cell relevant properties such as high proton conductivity (>120 mS/cm), good thermal stability, and mechanical robustness were demonstrated during this LDRD. This report summarizes the technical accomplishments and results of this LDRD.

  7. High Temperature Heat Exchanger Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony E. Hechanova, Ph.D.

    2008-09-30

    The UNLV Research Foundation assembled a research consortium for high temperature heat exchanger design and materials compatibility and performance comprised of university and private industry partners under the auspices of the US DOE-NE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative in October 2003. The objectives of the consortium were to conduct investigations of candidate materials for high temperature heat exchanger componets in hydrogen production processes and design and perform prototypical testing of heat exchangers. The initial research of the consortium focused on the intermediate heat exchanger (located between the nuclear reactor and hydrogen production plan) and the components for the hydrogen iodine decomposition process and sulfuric acid decomposition process. These heat exchanger components were deemed the most challenging from a materials performance and compatibility perspective

  8. Vanadium proton exchange membrane water electrolyser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noack, Jens; Roznyatovskaya, Nataliya; Pinkwart, Karsten; Tübke, Jens

    2017-05-01

    In order to reverse the reactions of vanadium oxygen fuel cells and to regenerate vanadium redox flow battery electrolytes that have been oxidised by atmospheric oxygen, a vanadium proton exchange membrane water electrolyser was set up and investigated. Using an existing cell with a commercial and iridium-based catalyst coated membrane, it was possible to fully reduce V3.5+ and V3+ solutions to V2+ with the formation of oxygen and with coulomb efficiencies of over 96%. The cell achieved a maximum current density of 75 mA/cm2 during this process and was limited by the proximity of the V(III) reduction to the hydrogen evolution reaction. Due to the specific reaction mechanisms of V(IV) and V(III) ions, V(III) solutions were reduced with an energy efficiency of 61%, making this process nearly twice as energy efficient as the reduction of V(IV) to V(III). Polarisation curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used to further investigate the losses of half-cell reactions and to find ways of further increasing efficiency and performance levels.

  9. Analysis performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubin, A. N. A.; Bahrom, M. H.; Azri, M.; Ibrahim, Z.; Rahim, N. A.; Raihan, S. R. S.

    2017-06-01

    Recently, the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) has gained much attention to the technology of renewable energy due to its mechanically ideal and zero emission power source. PEMFC performance reflects from the surroundings such as temperature and pressure. This paper presents an analysis of the performance of the PEMFC by developing the mathematical thermodynamic modelling using Matlab/Simulink. Apart from that, the differential equation of the thermodynamic model of the PEMFC is used to explain the contribution of heat to the performance of the output voltage of the PEMFC. On the other hand, the partial pressure equation of the hydrogen is included in the PEMFC mathematical modeling to study the PEMFC voltage behaviour related to the input variable input hydrogen pressure. The efficiency of the model is 33.8% which calculated by applying the energy conversion device equations on the thermal efficiency. PEMFC’s voltage output performance is increased by increasing the hydrogen input pressure and temperature.

  10. Stimulated-healing of proton exchange membrane fuel cell catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latsuzbaia, R.; Negro, E.; Koper, G.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Platinum nanoparticles, which are used as catalysts in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC), tend to degrade after long-term operation. We discriminate the following mechanisms of the degradation: poisoning, migration and coalescence, dissolution, and electrochemical Ostwald ripening. There

  11. Covalently cross-linked polyetheretherketone proton exchange membrane for DMFC

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Luo, H

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The proton exchange membrane was prepared by covalent cross-linking sulfonated-sulfinated polyetheretherketone. The cross-linked membrane showed high proton conductivity (0.04 S/cm) with suitable water uptake, low methanol permeability (2.21 × 10...

  12. Imade-imide cross-linked PEEK proton exchange membrane.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Luo, H

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available based membrane. Because of its high proton conductivity and good chemical stability, it has been widely used as the proton exchange membrane in PEMFC. However, the high cost of fluorinated polymers limits the large-scale commercialization of PEMFC...

  13. Hydroxyl pyridine containing polybenzimidazole membranes for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Jingshuai; Xu, Yixin; Zhou, Lu

    2013-01-01

    at 180°C without humidifying. In addition, an improved tensile modulus at elevated temperatures was observed for acid doped OHPyPBI membranes. Fuel cell tests demonstrated the technical feasibility of acid doped OHPyPBI membranes for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells. © 2013 Elsevier B.V....

  14. Study of coupled transport and its effect on different electrochemical systems: Implications in high temperature energy storage batteries and proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, Preethy

    Coupled transport is studied on two electrochemical systems: Na-ZnCl 2 batteries and Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC). The energy storage system of interest here is based on sodium β"-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE): Na/BASE/ZnCl2. BASE is an excellent Na+ conductor with a very high conductivity at 300°C. Its high Na+ ion conductivity and high stability are the principal reasons for its application in electrochemical storage systems. A novel vapor phase process was invented facilitating the fabrication of high strength and moisture/CO 2 resistant BASE. A two-phase composite of alumiNa+YSZ is formed by sintering and exposed to Na2O vapor, keeping the activity of Na2O lower than that in NaAlO2. This prevents the formation of hygroscopic NaAlO2 at the grain boundaries. A thin layer of β"-alumina is formed on the surface upon exposure. Further reaction occurs by transporting Na+ ions through the formed β"-alumina and a parallel transport of O2- ions through YSZ. This occurs by a coupled transport of Na+ through β"-alumina and O 2- ions through YSZ, thus expediting the process. The second electrochemical system of interest is PEMFC. The degradation mechanism of catalysts is studied using inexpensive copper particles. The mechanism of growth involves a coupled transport of Cu2+ through the aqueous medium and an electron transport through the direct particle-to-particle contact. Effect of applied stress on coarsening of platinum was also investigated. Two platinum wires/foils were immersed in a PtCl4+DMSO (Dimethyl sulfoxide) solution. A tensile load was applied to one wire/foil and the other one was left load-free. The wire/foil subjected to a tensile load became cathodic with respect to the unstressed wire/foil. Thus, under a tensile stress, the chemical potential of Pt decreases. This result suggests design strategies for core-shell catalysts used in PEMFCs: stable core-shell catalysts for PEMFC with Pt shell should be designed such that the shell is

  15. Platinum-cobalt catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction in high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells - Long term behavior under ex-situ and in-situ conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Alexander; Grimmer, Christoph; Perchthaler, Markus; Weinberger, Stephan; Pichler, Birgit; Heinzl, Christoph; Scheu, Christina; Mautner, Franz-Andreas; Bitschnau, Brigitte; Hacker, Viktor

    2014-11-01

    Platinum cobalt catalysts (Pt-Co) have attracted much interest as cathode catalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) due to their high activity toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Many of the reported catalysts show outstanding performance in ex-situ experiments. However, the laborious synthesis protocols of these Pt-Co catalysts disable an efficient and economic production of membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs). We present an economic, flexible and continuous Pt-M/C catalyst preparation method as part of a large scale membrane electrode assembly manufacturing. In comparison, the as-prepared Pt-Co/C based high temperature (HT)-PEM MEA showed an equal performance to a commercially available HT-PEM MEA during 600 h of operation under constant load, although the commercial one had a significantly higher Pt loading at the cathode.

  16. Reactivation System for Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel-Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Giral

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs have been the focus of very intensive researches. Manufacturers of these alternative power sources propose a rejuvenation sequence after the FC has been operating at high power for a certain period of time. These rejuvenation methods could be not appropriate for the reactivation of the FC when it has been out of operation for a long period of time or after it has been repaired. Since the developed reactivation system monitors temperature, current, and the cell voltages of the stack, it could be also useful for the diagnostic and repairing processes. The limited number of published contributions suggests that systems developing reactivation techniques are an open research field. In this paper, an automated system for reactivating PEMFCs and results of experimental testing are presented.

  17. High Temperature Composite Heat Exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckel, Andrew J.; Jaskowiak, Martha H.

    2002-01-01

    High temperature composite heat exchangers are an enabling technology for a number of aeropropulsion applications. They offer the potential for mass reductions of greater than fifty percent over traditional metallics designs and enable vehicle and engine designs. Since they offer the ability to operate at significantly higher operating temperatures, they facilitate operation at reduced coolant flows and make possible temporary uncooled operation in temperature regimes, such as experienced during vehicle reentry, where traditional heat exchangers require coolant flow. This reduction in coolant requirements can translate into enhanced range or system payload. A brief review of the approaches and challengers to exploiting this important technology are presented, along with a status of recent government-funded projects.

  18. HPW/MCM-41 phosphotungstic acid/mesoporous silica composites as novel proton-exchange membranes for elevated-temperature fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Shanfu [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University Singapore (Singapore); School of Chemistry and the Environment, Beihang University Beijing (China); Wang, Deli; Jiang, San Ping; Lu, Jinlin; Zeng, Jie [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University Singapore (Singapore); Xiang, Yan [School of Chemistry and the Environment, Beihang University Beijing (China)

    2010-03-05

    A novel inorganic proton-conducting membrane based on highly ordered MCM-41 mesoporous silica with phosphotungstic acid (HPW) nanoparticles assembled within is successfully fabricated by a vacuum-assisted impregnation method (VIM). The results of HPW impregnation by VIM and a conventional method (CIM) are compared, and the performance of the membranes in fuel cells is reported. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  19. Modeling and off-design performance of a 1 kWe HT-PEMFC (high temperature-proton exchange membrane fuel cell)-based residential micro-CHP (combined-heat-and-power) system for Danish single-family households

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arsalis, Alexandros; Nielsen, Mads Pagh; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2011-01-01

    A novel proposal for the modeling and operation of a micro-CHP (combined-heat-and-power) residential system based on HT-PEMFC (High Temperature-Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell) technology is described and analyzed to investigate its commercialization prospects. An HT-PEMFC operates at elevated...

  20. Reliability of lithium niobate Annealed Proton Exchanged integrated optical circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissa, Karl M.; Eng, Hogan; Lewis, David K.; Rodino, Vincent D.; Suchoski, Paul G., Jr.; Koziarz, Nancy A.

    1995-06-01

    Several studies have been performed recently that demonstrate the reliability of lithium niobate Annealed Proton Exchanged (APE) Integrated Optical Circuits (IOCs). Studies have been performed on APE IOC die as well as pigtailed and packaged devices. The tests indicate that the reliability of APE IOCs meet or surpass the needs of most military and commercial applications.

  1. Hydrogen isotope exchange kinetics of single protons in bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, C.K.; Hilton, B.C.

    1980-10-01

    The exchange kinetics of the slowest exchanging BPTI ..beta..-sheet protons are complex compared to model peptides; the activation energy, E/sub a/, and the pH dependence are temperature dependent. We have measured the exchange kinetics in the range pH 1 to 11, 33 to 71/sup 0/C, particularly the temperature dependence. The data are fit to a model in which exchange of each proton is determined by two discrete dynamical processes, one with E/sub a/ approx. 65 kcal/mol and less than first order dependence on catalyst ion, and one with E/sub a/ 20 to 30 kcal/mol and approaching first order in catalyst ion. The low activation energy process is the mechanism of interest in the native conformation of globular proteins and involves low energy, small amplitude fluctuations; the high activation energy process involves major unfolding. The model is simple, has a precedent in the hydrogen exchange literature, and explains quantitatively the complex feature of the exchange kinetics of single protons in BPTI.

  2. Partially fluorinated electrospun proton exchange membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel porous membrane layer, to a novel method for producing a membrane, and the membranes produced by the novel method. The present invention further relates to a fuel cell comprising the porous layer, as well as any use of the porous layer in a fuel cell...... or in a filter. The porous membrane layer comprises a plurality of randomly oriented fibers manufactured by electrospinning, wherein the fibers comprise a graft copolymer, wherein the graft copolymer comprises a backbone and at least one side chain, wherein the backbone comprises a partially fluorinated...... copolymer, and wherein at least one side chain of the graft copolymer comprises a polymerization product of a polymerizable proton donor group or a precursor thereof....

  3. Bismuth phosphates as intermediate temperature proton conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Yunjie; Christensen, Erik; Shuai, Qin

    2017-01-01

    Proton conducting electrolyte materials operational in the intermediate temperature range of 200-400 °C are of special interest for applications in fuel cells and water electrolysers. Bismuth phosphates in forms of polycrystalline powders and amorphous glasses are synthesized and investigated...

  4. Modelling and validation of Proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohiuddin, A. K. M.; Basran, N.; Khan, A. A.

    2018-01-01

    This paper is the outcome of a small scale fuel cell project. Fuel cell is an electrochemical device that converts energy from chemical reaction to electrical work. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) is one of the different types of fuel cell, which is more efficient, having low operational temperature and fast start up capability results in high energy density. In this study, a mathematical model of 1.2 W PEMFC is developed and simulated using MATLAB software. This model describes the PEMFC behaviour under steady-state condition. This mathematical modeling of PEMFC determines the polarization curve, power generated, and the efficiency of the fuel cell. Simulation results were validated by comparing with experimental results obtained from the test of a single PEMFC with a 3 V motor. The performance of experimental PEMFC is little lower compared to simulated PEMFC, however both results were found in good agreement. Experiments on hydrogen flow rate also been conducted to obtain the amount of hydrogen consumed to produce electrical work on PEMFC.

  5. Correlation between Morphology, Water Uptake, and Proton Conductivity in Radiation-Grafted Proton-Exchange Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balog, Sandor; Gasser, Urs; Mortensen, Kell

    2010-01-01

    An SANS investigation of hydrated proton exchange membranes is presented. Our membranes were synthesized by radiation-induced grafting of ETFE with styrene in the presence of a crosslinker, followed by sulfonation of the styrene. The contrast variation method was used to understand the relationship...

  6. Highly efficient optical parametric generation in proton exchanged PPLN waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Chanvillard, L; Baldi, P; De Micheli, M; Ostrowsky, D B; Huang, L; Bamford, G

    1999-01-01

    Summary form only given. Parametric fluorescence, amplification, and oscillation in PPLN waveguides have already been demonstrated. In all previous experiments, the measured efficiencies were smaller than the theoretically predicted values since the waveguide fabrication process utilized, annealed proton exchange (APE) can reduce or even destroy the nonlinear coefficient and/or the periodic domain orientation in a portion of the guiding structure. In the experiment reported here, we used a 2 cm long, Z-cut PPLN with a 18 mu m domain inversion period. The waveguides are created using a direct proton exchange process in a highly diluted melt, which induces no crystallographic phase transition. This allows preserving both the nonlinear coefficient and the domain orientation while fully benefiting from the power confinement associated with the guided wave configuration. (4 refs).

  7. The Effect of Nitrogen Cross-Over on Water Balance Measurements in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Using Constant Temperature Anemometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Shakhshir, Saher; Berning, Torsten; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2016-01-01

    by introducing 1% of nitrogen concentration to the dry and humidified hydrogen flow simulating the PEMFC anode outlet. The hot wire voltage is measured with and without nitrogen and it was slightly lower with the presence of nitrogen. The effect of the voltage reduction on the measured water balance is small....... This is due to the effect of 1% nitrogen on power law constant’s “m” which can be used in determining the water balance as explained in previous work was extremely low. Thus, the hot wire technique for measuring the PEMFC water balance is still accurate with the nitrogen cross-over......A novel method to obtain an ad-hoc and real time electrical signal of the PEMFC water balance by employing a constant temperature hot wire anemometry has been developed by our fuel cell research group. In this work, the effect of nitrogen-cross over on this method is experimentally demonstrated...

  8. Comparative study of the break in process of post doped and sol–gel high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vang, Jakob Rabjerg; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Araya, Samuel Simon

    2014-01-01

    In this paper six High Temperature PEM (HTPEM) MEAs from two manufacturers have been tested. The MEAs are three Dapozol 77 from Danish Power Systems (DPS) with varying electrode composition and two Celtec P2100 and one Celtec P1000 from BASF. The break in process of the MEAs has been monitored...... using voltage measurements and impedance spectroscopy. The purpose of this study is twofold. One aim is to try and interpret the processes happening during break in. The other aim is to investigate whether the impedance spectra or the voltage profiles contain information that can be used to determine...... when an MEA has been broken in. To aid in the interpretation of the impedance spectra, equivalent circuit models are used. Three models are evaluated. The most detailed models produce the best fits but the most simple model is chosen, since it produces the most consistent results. The processes...

  9. Studies on PVA based nanocomposite Proton Exchange Membrane for Direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahavan Palani, P.; Kannan, R.; Rajashabala, S.; Rajendran, S.; Velraj, G.

    2015-02-01

    Different concentrations of Poly (vinyl alcohol)/Montmorillonite (PVA/MMT) based proton exchange membranes (PEMs) have been prepared by solution casting method. The structural and electrical properties of these composite membranes have been characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) and AC impedance spectroscopic methods. The conductivity of the PEMs has been estimated for the different concentration of MMT. Water/Methanol uptake measurement were also analyzed for the prepared PEMs and presented. The proton conductivity studies were carried out at room temperature with 100% of humidity.

  10. Development and design of experiments optimization of a high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell auxiliary power unit with onboard fuel processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karstedt, Jörg; Ogrzewalla, Jürgen; Severin, Christopher; Pischinger, Stefan

    In this work, the concept development, system layout, component simulation and the overall DOE system optimization of a HT-PEM fuel cell APU with a net electric power output of 4.5 kW and an onboard methane fuel processor are presented. A highly integrated system layout has been developed that enables fast startup within 7.5 min, a closed system water balance and high fuel processor efficiencies of up to 85% due to the recuperation of the anode offgas burner heat. The integration of the system battery into the load management enhances the transient electric performance and the maximum electric power output of the APU system. Simulation models of the carbon monoxide influence on HT-PEM cell voltage, the concentration and temperature profiles within the autothermal reformer (ATR) and the CO conversion rates within the watergas shift stages (WGSs) have been developed. They enable the optimization of the CO concentration in the anode gas of the fuel cell in order to achieve maximum system efficiencies and an optimized dimensioning of the ATR and WGS reactors. Furthermore a DOE optimization of the global system parameters cathode stoichiometry, anode stoichiometry, air/fuel ratio and steam/carbon ratio of the fuel processing system has been performed in order to achieve maximum system efficiencies for all system operating points under given boundary conditions.

  11. Water and proton transport properties of hexafluorinated sulfonated poly(arylenethioethersulfone) copolymers for applications to proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalfan, Amish N.; Sanchez, Luz M.; Kodiweera, Chandana; Greenbaum, Steve G. [Hunter College of the City University of New York, Physics Department, 695 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Bai, Zongwu [University of Dayton Research Institute, University of Dayton, 300 College Park Drive, Dayton, OH 45469 (United States); Dang, Thuy D. [Air Force Research Laboratory/MLBP, Material and Manufacturing Directorate, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433 (United States)

    2007-11-15

    In the present study, we examine the water and proton transport properties of hexafluorinated sulfonated poly(arylenethioethersulfone) (6F-SPTES) copolymer membranes for applications to proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). The 6F-SPTES copolymer membranes build upon the structures of previously studied sulfonated poly(arylenethioethersulfone) (SPTES) copolymer membranes to include CF{sub 3} functional groups in efforts to strengthen water retention and extend membrane performance at elevated temperatures (above 120 C). The 6F-SPTES copolymer membranes sustain higher water self-diffusion and greater proton conductivities than the commercial Nafion {sup registered} membrane. Water diffusion studies of the 6F-SPTES copolymer membranes using the pulsed-field gradient spin-echo NMR technique reveal, however, the fluorinated membranes to be somewhat unfavorable over their non-fluorinated counterparts as high temperature membranes. In addition, proton conductivity measurements of the fluorinated membranes up to 85 C show comparable results with the non-fluorinated SPTES membranes. (author)

  12. Proton Conductive Channel Optimization in Methanol Resistive Hybrid Hyperbranched Polyamide Proton Exchange Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liying Ma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on a previously developed polyamide proton conductive macromolecule, the nano-scale structure of the self-assembled proton conductive channels (PCCs is adjusted via enlarging the nano-scale pore size within the macromolecules. Hyperbranched polyamide macromolecules with different size are synthesized from different monomers to tune the nano-scale pore size within the macromolecules, and a series of hybrid membranes are prepared from these two micromoles to optimize the PCC structure in the proton exchange membrane. The optimized membrane exhibits methanol permeability low to 2.2 × 10−7 cm2/s, while the proton conductivity of the hybrid membrane can reach 0.25 S/cm at 80 °C, which was much higher than the value of the Nafion 117 membrane (0.192 S/cm. By considering the mechanical, dimensional, and the thermal properties, the hybrid hyperbranched polyamide proton exchange membrane (PEM exhibits promising application potential in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC.

  13. Theoretical Energy and Exergy Analyses of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell by Computer Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    I. D. Gimba; Abdulkareem, A. S.; Jimoh, A.; A. S. Afolabi

    2016-01-01

    A mathematical model of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was developed to investigate the effects of operating parameters such as temperature, anode and cathode pressures, reactants flow rates, membrane thickness, and humidity on the performance of the modelled fuel cell. The developed model consisted of electrochemical, heat energy and exergy components which were later simulated using a computer programme. The simulated model for the voltage output of the cell showed good confor...

  14. Proton exchange membranes based on PVDF/SEBS blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokrini, A.; Huneault, M. A.

    Proton-conductive polymer membranes are used as an electrolyte in the so-called proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Current commercially available membranes are perfluorosulfonic acid polymers, a class of high-cost ionomers. This paper examines the potential of polymer blends, namely those of styrene-(ethylene-butylene)-styrene block copolymer (SEBS) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), in the proton exchange membrane application. SEBS/PVDF blends were prepared by twin-screw extrusion and the membranes were formed by calendering. SEBS is a phase-segregated material where the polystyrene blocks can be selectively functionalized offering high ionic conductivity, while PVDF insures good dimensional stability and chemical resistance to the films. Proton conductivity of the films was obtained by solid-state grafting of sulfonic acid moieties. The obtained membranes were characterized in terms of conductivity, ionic exchange capacity and water uptake. In addition, the membranes were characterized in terms of morphology, microstructure and thermo-mechanical properties to establish the blends morphology-property relationships. Modification of interfacial properties between SEBS and PVDF was found to be a key to optimize the blends performance. Addition of a methyl methacrylate-butyl acrylate-methyl methacrylate block copolymer (MMA-BA-MMA) was found to compatibilize the blend by reducing the segregation scale and improving the blend homogeneity. Mechanical resistance of the membranes was also improved through the addition of this compatibilizer. As little as 2 wt.% compatibilizer was sufficient for complete interfacial coverage and lead to improved mechanical properties. Compatibilized blend membranes also showed higher conductivities, 1.9 × 10 -2 to 5.5 × 10 -3 S cm -1, and improved water management.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF NOVEL ELECTROCATALYSTS FOR PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE FUEL CELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamsuddin Ilias

    2001-07-06

    Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) is one of the most promising power sources for space and electric vehicle applications. Platinum (Pt) catalyst is used for both fuel and air electrodes in PEMFCs. The carbon monoxide (CO) contamination of H{sub 2} greatly affects electrocatalysts used at the anode of PEMFCs and decrease the cell performance. This irreversible poisoning of the anode can happen even in CO concentrations as low as few ppm, and therefore, require expensive scrubbing of the H{sub 2}-fuel to reduce the contaminant concentration to acceptable level. In order to commercialize this environmentally sound source of energy/power system, development of suitable CO-tolerant catalyst is needed. In this work, we have synthesized several novel electrocatalysts (Pt/C, Pt/Ru/C Pt/Mo/C, Pt/Ir and Pt/Ru/Mo) for PEMFCs. These catalysts have been tested for CO tolerance in the H{sub 2}/air fuel cell. The concentration of CO in the H{sub 2} fuel varied from 10 ppm to 100 ppm. The performance of the electrodes was evaluated by determining the cell potential against current density. The effect of temperature, catalyst compositions, and electrode film preparation methods on the performance of PEM fuel cell has also been studied. It was found that at 70 C and 3.5 atm pressure at the cathode, Pt-alloy catalysts (10 wt % Pt/Ru/C, 20 wt % Pt/Mo/C) were more CO-tolerant than 20 wt % Pt catalyst alone. It was also observed that spraying method is better for the preparation of electrode film than the brushing technique. Some of these results are summarized in this report.

  16. Stereochemistry-Dependent Proton Conduction in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Devendrachari, Mruthyunjayachari Chattanahalli; Kottaichamy, Alagar Raja; Tiwari, Omshanker; Gaikwad, Pramod; Paswan, Bhuneshwar; Thotiyl, Musthafa Ottakam

    2016-01-12

    Graphene oxide (GO) is impermeable to H2 and O2 fuels while permitting H(+) shuttling, making it a potential candidate for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), albeit with a large anisotropy in their proton transport having a dominant in plane (σIP) contribution over the through plane (σTP). If GO-based membranes are ever to succeed in PEMFC, it inevitably should have a dominant through-plane proton shuttling capability (σTP), as it is the direction in which proton gets transported in a real fuel-cell configuration. Here we show that anisotropy in proton conduction in GO-based fuel cell membranes can be brought down by selectively tuning the geometric arrangement of functional groups around the dopant molecules. The results show that cis isomer causes a selective amplification of through-plane proton transport, σTP, pointing to a very strong geometry angle in ionic conduction. Intercalation of cis isomer causes significant expansion of GO (001) planes involved in σTP transport due to their mutual H-bonding interaction and efficient bridging of individual GO planes, bringing down the activation energy required for σTP, suggesting the dominance of a Grotthuss-type mechanism. This isomer-governed amplification of through-plane proton shuttling resulted in the overall boosting of fuel-cell performance, and it underlines that geometrical factors should be given prime consideration while selecting dopant molecules for bringing down the anisotropy in proton conduction and enhancing the fuel-cell performance in GO-based PEMFC.

  17. Novel structure design of composite proton exchange membranes with continuous and through-membrane proton-conducting channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hang; Tang, Chenxiao; Zhuang, Xupin; Cheng, Bowen; Wang, Wei; Kang, Weimin; Li, Hongjun

    2017-10-01

    The primary goal of this study is to develop a high-performanced proton exchange membrane with the characteristics of through-membrane and continuous solution blown nanofibers as proton-conducting channels. The curled sulfonated phenolphthalein poly (ether sulfone) and poly (vinylidene fluoride) nanofibers were separately fabricated through the solution blowing process which is a new nanofiber fabricating method with high productivity, then they were fabricated into a sandwich-structured mat. Then this sandwich-structured mat was hot-pressed to form the designed structure using different melting temperatures of the two polymers by melting and making poly (vinylidene fluoride) flow into the phenolphthalein poly (ether sulfone) nanofiber mat. The characteristics of the composite membrane, such as morphology and performance of the membrane, were investigated. The characterization results proved the successful preparation of the membrane structure. Performance results showed that the novel structured membrane with through-membrane nanofibers significantly improved water swelling and methanol permeability, though its conductivity is lower than that of Nafion, the cell performance showed comparable results. Therefore, the novel structure design can be considered as a promising method for preparing of proton exchange membranes.

  18. USING KAPPA FUNCTIONS TO CHARACTERIZE OUTER HELIOSPHERE PROTON DISTRIBUTIONS IN THE PRESENCE OF CHARGE-EXCHANGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zirnstein, E. J.; McComas, D. J., E-mail: ezirnstein@swri.edu, E-mail: dmccomas@swri.edu [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States)

    2015-12-10

    Kappa functions have long been used in the analysis and modeling of suprathermal particles in various space plasmas. In situ observations of the supersonic solar wind show its distribution contains a cold ion core and power-law tail, which is well-represented by a kappa function. In situ plasma observations by Voyager, as well as observations of energetic neutral atom (ENA) spectra by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX), showed that the compressed and heated inner heliosheath (IHS) plasma beyond the termination shock can also be represented by a kappa function. IBEX exposes the IHS plasma properties through the detection of ENAs generated by charge-exchange in the IHS. However, charge-exchange modifies the plasma as it flows through the IHS, and makes it difficult to ascertain the parent proton distribution. In this paper we investigate the evolution of proton distributions, initially represented by a kappa function, that experience losses due to charge-exchange in the IHS. In the absence of other processes, it is no longer representable by a single kappa function due to the energy-dependent, charge-exchange process. While one can still fit a kappa function to the evolving proton distribution over limited energy ranges, this yields fitting parameters (pseudo-density, pseudo-temperature, pseudo-kappa index) that depend on the energy range of the fit. We discuss the effects of fitting a kappa function to the IHS proton distribution over limited energy ranges, its dependence on the initial proton distribution properties at the termination shock, and implications for understanding the observations.

  19. Electronic circuit model for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dachuan; Yuvarajan, S.

    The proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell is being investigated as an alternate power source for various applications like transportation and emergency power supplies. The paper presents a novel circuit model for a PEM fuel cell that can be used to design and analyze fuel cell power systems. The PSPICE-based model uses bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) and LC elements available in the PSPICE library with some modification. The model includes the phenomena like activation polarization, ohmic polarization, and mass transport effect present in a PEM fuel cell. The static and dynamic characteristics obtained through simulation are compared with experimental results obtained on a commercial fuel cell module.

  20. Water Soluble Polymers as Proton Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing-Joe Hwang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The relentless increase in the demand for useable power from energy-hungry economies continues to drive energy-material related research. Fuel cells, as a future potential power source that provide clean-at-the-point-of-use power offer many advantages such as high efficiency, high energy density, quiet operation, and environmental friendliness. Critical to the operation of the fuel cell is the proton exchange membrane (polymer electrolyte membrane responsible for internal proton transport from the anode to the cathode. PEMs have the following requirements: high protonic conductivity, low electronic conductivity, impermeability to fuel gas or liquid, good mechanical toughness in both the dry and hydrated states, and high oxidative and hydrolytic stability in the actual fuel cell environment. Water soluble polymers represent an immensely diverse class of polymers. In this comprehensive review the initial focus is on those members of this group that have attracted publication interest, principally: chitosan, poly (ethylene glycol, poly (vinyl alcohol, poly (vinylpyrrolidone, poly (2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid and poly (styrene sulfonic acid. The paper then considers in detail the relationship of structure to functionality in the context of polymer blends and polymer based networks together with the effects of membrane crosslinking on IPN and semi IPN architectures. This is followed by a review of pore-filling and other impregnation approaches. Throughout the paper detailed numerical results are given for comparison to today’s state-of-the-art Nafion® based materials.

  1. Preparation of new proton exchange membranes using sulfonated poly(ether sulfone) modified by octylamine (SPESOS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mabrouk, W. [Societe ERAS Labo, 222 RN 90, 38330, St Nazaire Les Eymes, Grenoble (France); Laboratoire des Materiaux Industriels, Conservatoire National des Arts et Metiers de Paris 75003, Paris (France); Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique et Electrochimie, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus Universitaire 1092, Tunis (Tunisia); Ogier, L. [Societe ERAS Labo, 222 RN 90, 38330, St Nazaire Les Eymes, Grenoble (France); Matoussi, F. [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique et Electrochimie, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus Universitaire 1092, Tunis (Tunisia); Sollogoub, C., E-mail: cyrille.sollogoub@cnam.fr [Laboratoire des Materiaux Industriels, Conservatoire National des Arts et Metiers de Paris 75003, Paris (France); Vidal, S. [Societe ERAS Labo, 222 RN 90, 38330, St Nazaire Les Eymes, Grenoble (France); Dachraoui, M. [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique et Electrochimie, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus Universitaire 1092, Tunis (Tunisia); Fauvarque, J.F. [Laboratoire des Materiaux Industriels, Conservatoire National des Arts et Metiers de Paris 75003, Paris (France)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} New, simple and cheap way to synthesize a membrane. {yields} The membranes combine good proton conductivities with good mechanical properties. {yields} The membrane performances in a fuel cell are similar to the Nafion 117. - Abstract: Sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) (SPES) has received considerable attention in membrane preparation for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). But such membranes are brittle and difficult to handle in operation. We investigated new membranes using SPES grafted with various degrees of octylamine. Five new materials made from sulfonated polyethersulfone sulfonamide (SPESOS) were synthetized with different grades of grafting. They were made from SPES, with initially an ionic exchange capacity (IEC) of 2.4 meq g{sup -1} (1.3 H{sup +} per monomer unit). Pristine SPES with that IEC is water swelling and becomes soluble at 80 deg. C, its proton conductivity is in the range of 0.1 S cm{sup -1} at room temperature in aqueous H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} 1 M, similar to that of Nafion. After grafting with various amounts of octylamine, the material is water insoluble; membranes are less brittle and show sufficient ionic conductivity. Proton transport numbers were measured close to 1.

  2. Polarity governed selective amplification of through plane proton shuttling in proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Manu; Chattanahalli Devendrachari, Mruthyunjayachari; Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Raja Kottaichamy, Alagar; Pottachola Shafi, Shahid; Gaikwad, Pramod; Makri Nimbegondi Kotresh, Harish; Ottakam Thotiyl, Musthafa

    2017-03-15

    Graphene oxide (GO) anisotropically conducts protons with directional dominance of in plane ionic transport (σ IP) over the through plane (σ TP). In a typical H 2 -O 2 fuel cell, since the proton conduction occurs through the plane during its generation at the fuel electrode, it is indeed inevitable to selectively accelerate GO's σ TP for advancement towards a potential fuel cell membrane. We successfully achieved ∼7 times selective amplification of GO's σ TP by tuning the polarity of the dopant molecule in its nanoporous matrix. The coexistence of strongly non-polar and polar domains in the dopant demonstrated a synergistic effect towards σ TP with the former decreasing the number of water molecules coordinated to protons by ∼3 times, diminishing the effects of electroosmotic drag exerted on ionic movements, and the latter selectively accelerating σ TP across the catalytic layers by bridging the individual GO planes via extensive host guest H-bonding interactions. When they are decoupled, the dopant with mainly non-polar or polar features only marginally enhances the σ TP, revealing that polarity factors contribute to fuel cell relevant transport properties of GO membranes only when they coexist. Fuel cell polarization and kinetic analyses revealed that these multitask dopants increased the fuel cell performance metrics of the power and current densities by ∼3 times compared to the pure GO membranes, suggesting that the functional group factors of the dopants are of utmost importance in GO-based proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

  3. Spin-locking vs. chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI for investigating chemical exchange process between water and labile metabolite protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tao; Autio, Joonas; Obata, Takayuki; Kim, Seong-Gi

    2010-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and spin-locking (SL) experiments were both able to probe the exchange process between protons of non-equivalent chemical environments. To compare the characteristics of the CEST and SL approaches in the study of chemical exchange effects, we performed CEST and SL experiments at varied pH and concentrated metabolites with exchangeable amide, amine, and hydroxyl protons at 9.4 T. Our results show that: i) On-resonance SL is most sensitive to chemical exchanges in the intermediate exchange regime and is able to detect hydroxyl and amine protons on a millimolar concentration scale. Off-resonance SL and CEST approaches are sensitive to slow-exchanging protons when an optimal SL or saturation pulse power matches the exchanging rate, respectively. ii) Offset frequency-dependent SL and CEST spectra are very similar, and can be explained well with an SL model recently developed by Trott and Palmer. iii) The exchange rate and population of metabolite protons can be determined from offset-dependent SL or CEST spectra or from on-resonance SL relaxation dispersion measurements. iv) The asymmetry of the magnetization transfer ratio (MTRasym) is highly dependent on the choice of saturation pulse power. In the intermediate exchange regime, MTRasym becomes complicated and should be interpreted with care. PMID:21500270

  4. Spin-locking versus chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI for investigating chemical exchange process between water and labile metabolite protons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tao; Autio, Joonas; Obata, Takayuki; Kim, Seong-Gi

    2011-05-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and spin-locking (SL) experiments were both able to probe the exchange process between protons of nonequivalent chemical environments. To compare the characteristics of the CEST and SL approaches in the study of chemical exchange effects, we performed CEST and SL experiments at varied pH and concentrated metabolite phantoms with exchangeable amide, amine, and hydroxyl protons at 9.4 T. Our results show that: (i) on-resonance SL is most sensitive to chemical exchanges in the intermediate-exchange regime and is able to detect hydroxyl and amine protons on a millimolar concentration scale. Off-resonance SL and CEST approaches are sensitive to slow-exchanging protons when an optimal SL or saturation pulse power matches the exchanging rate, respectively. (ii) Offset frequency-dependent SL and CEST spectra are very similar and can be explained well with an SL model recently developed by Trott and Palmer (J Magn Reson 2002;154:157-160). (iii) The exchange rate and population of metabolite protons can be determined from offset-dependent SL or CEST spectra or from on-resonance SL relaxation dispersion measurements. (iv) The asymmetry of the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR(asym)) is highly dependent on the choice of saturation pulse power. In the intermediate-exchange regime, MTR(asym) becomes complicated and should be interpreted with care. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Tandem cathode for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siahrostami, Samira; Björketun, Mårten E.; Strasser, Peter

    2013-01-01

    tandem cathode design where the full oxygen reduction, involving four electron-transfer steps, is divided into formation (equilibrium potential 0.70 V) followed by reduction (equilibrium potential 1.76 V) of hydrogen peroxide. The two part reactions contain only two electron-transfer steps and one......The efficiency of proton exchange membrane fuel cells is limited mainly by the oxygen reduction reaction at the cathode. The large cathodic overpotential is caused by correlations between binding energies of reaction intermediates in the reduction of oxygen to water. This work introduces a novel...... reaction intermediate each, and they occur on different catalyst surfaces. As a result they can be optimized independently and the fundamental problem associated with the four-electron catalysis is avoided. A combination of density functional theory calculations and published experimental data is used...

  6. Transient response of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weydahl, Helge; Møller-Holst, Steffen; Hagen, Georg; Børresen, Børre

    The transient response of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) supplied with pure hydrogen and oxygen was investigated by load step measurements assisted by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and chronoamperometry. Using an in-house designed resistance board, the uncontrolled response in both cell voltage and current upon step changes in a resistive load was observed. The PEMFC was found to respond quickly and reproducibly to load changes. The transient PEMFC response was limited by a cathodic charge transfer process with a potential-dependent response time. For load steps to high-current densitities, a second transient process with a constant response time was observed. This transient was offset from the charge transfer transient by a temporarily stable plateau. Results from chronoamperometry indicated that the second transient could be related to a diffusion process. Transient paths were plotted in the V- i diagram, matching a predicted pattern with overshooting cell voltage and current during a load step.

  7. Modeling Of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    The objective of this doctoral thesis was to develop reliable steady-state and transient component models suitable to asses-, develop- and optimize proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems. Several components in PEM fuel cell systems were characterized and modeled. The developed component...... cell systems. Consequences of indirectly fueling PEM stacks with hydrocarbons using reforming technology were investigated using a PEM stack model including CO poisoning kinetics and a transient Simulink steam reforming system model. Aspects regarding the optimization of PEM fuel cell systems......- and system models match experimental data from the literature. However, limited data were available for verification so further work is necessary to confirm detailed aspects of the models. It is nonetheless expected that the developed models will be useful for system modeling and optimization of PEM fuel...

  8. A general model of proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Anh Dinh; Zhou, Biao

    In this study, a general model of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was constructed, implemented and employed to simulate the fluid flow, heat transfer, species transport, electrochemical reaction, and current density distribution, especially focusing on liquid water effects on PEMFC performance. The model is a three-dimensional and unsteady one with detailed thermo-electrochemistry, multi-species, and two-phase interaction with explicit gas-liquid interface tracking by using the volume-of-fluid (VOF) method. The general model was implemented into the commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package FLUENT ® v6.2, with its user-defined functions (UDFs). A complete PEMFC was considered, including membrane, gas diffusion layers (GDLs), catalyst layers, gas flow channels, and current collectors. The effects of liquid water on PEMFC with serpentine channels were investigated. The results showed that this general model of PEMFC can be a very useful tool for the optimization of practical engineering designs of PEMFC.

  9. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Reversal: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congwei Qin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The H2/air-fed proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC has two major problems: cost and durability, which obstruct its pathway to commercialization. Cell reversal, which would create irreversible damage to the fuel cell and shorten its lifespan, is caused by reactant starvation, load change, low catalyst performance, and so on. This paper will summarize the causes, consequences, and mitigation strategies of cell reversal of PEMFC in detail. A description of potential change in the anode and cathode and the differences between local starvation and overall starvation are reviewed, which gives a framework for comprehending the origins of cell reversal. According to the root factor of cell starvation, i.e., fuel cells do not satisfy the requirements of electrons and protons of normal anode and cathode chemical reactions, we will introduce specific methods to mitigate or prevent fuel cell damage caused by cell reversal in the view of system management strategies and component material modifications. Based on a comprehensive understanding of cell reversal, it is beneficial to operate a fuel cell stack and extend its lifetime.

  10. A Novel Unitized Regenerative Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, O. J.; Cisar, A. J.; Gonzalez-Martin, A.; Salinas, C. E.; Simpson, S. F.

    1996-01-01

    A difficulty encountered in designing a unitized regenerative proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell lies in the incompatibility of electrode structures and electrocatalyst materials optimized for either of the two functions (fuel cell or electrolyzer) with the needs of the other function. This difficulty is compounded in previous regenerative fuel cell designs by the fact that water, which is needed for proton conduction in the PEM during both modes of operation, is the reactant supplied to the anode in the electrolyzer mode of operation and the product formed at the cathode in the fuel cell mode. Drawbacks associated with existing regenerative fuel cells have been addressed. In a first innovation, electrodes function either as oxidation electrodes (hydrogen ionization or oxygen evolution) or as reduction electrodes (oxygen reduction or hydrogen evolution) in the fuel cell and electrolyzer modes, respectively. Control of liquid water within the regenerative fuel cell has been brought about by a second innovation. A novel PEM has been developed with internal channels that permit the direct access of water along the length of the membrane. Lateral diffusion of water along the polymer chains of the PEM provides the water needed at electrode/PEM interfaces. Fabrication of the novel single cell unitized regenerative fuel cell and results obtained on testing it are presented.

  11. Recent Development of Pd-Based Electrocatalysts for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Meng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This review selectively summarizes the latest developments in the Pd-based cataysts for low temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells, especially in the application of formic acid oxidation, alcohol oxidation and oxygen reduction reaction. The advantages and shortcomings of the Pd-based catalysts for electrocatalysis are analyzed. The influence of the structure and morphology of the Pd materials on the performance of the Pd-based catalysts were described. Finally, the perspectives of future trends on Pd-based catalysts for different applications were considered.

  12. Polymer-zeolite nanocomposite membranes for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Brett Anderson

    2005-07-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) have recently received a great deal of attention for their potential as compact, high efficiency power sources for portable, distributed generation, and transportation applications. Unfortunately, current proton exchange membrane (PEM) technology hinders fuel cell performance by limiting fuel cell operation temperature and methanol feed concentration in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Nafion-zeolite nanocomposite membranes that take advantage of the hydrophilicity, selectivity, and proton conductivity of zeolite nanocrystals have been developed to address these problems. All known zeolite topologies were evaluated as potential additives to Nafion proton exchange membranes. Zeolites Y and beta were determined to have great potential as additives due to their low framework density, three dimensional pore structure, and high hydrophilicity. Zeolite Y nanocrystal syntheses were optimized to enhance yield and produce smaller crystal size. Significant improvement of the acid stability of the zeolite Y nanocrystals was not achieved with both ammonium hexafluorosilicate treatments and direct high silica nanocrystal synthesis. However, control of zeolite Y nanocrystal framework Si/Al ratio was demonstrated in the range of SiO2/Al2O3 = 4.38 to 5.84 by manipulating the tetramethylammonium structure directing agent hydroxide content. Zeolite beta nanocrystals were investigated due to their inherent high silica content and high acid stability. Zeolite beta nanocrystals were hydrothermally synthesized with and without phenethyl (called PE-BEA and BEA respectively) organic functional groups. Sulfonic acid functionalized zeolite beta (SAPE-BEA) was generated by treating the PE-BEA nanocrystals with a concentrated sulfuric acid post synthesis treatment. SAPE-BEA samples demonstrated proton conductivities up to 0.01 S/cm at room temperature under water-saturated conditions using a newly developed characterization technique. With

  13. Sulfonation of cPTFE Film grafted Styrene for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohan Yohan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Sulfonation of γ-ray iradiated and styrene-grafted crosslinked polytetrafluoroethylene film (cPTFE-g-S film have been done. The aim of the research is to make hydropyl membrane as proton exchange membrane fuel cell. Sulfonation was prepared with chlorosulfonic acid in chloroethane under various conditions. The impact of the percent of grafting, the concentration of chlorosulfonic acid, the reaction time,and the reaction temperature on the properties of sulfonated film is examinated. The results show that sulfonation of surface-grafted films is incomplete at room  temperature. The increasing of concentration of chlorosulfonic acid and reaction temperature accelerates the reaction but they also add favor side reactions. These will lead to decreasing of the ion-exchange capacity, water uptake, and proton conductivity but increasing the resistance to oxidation in a perhidrol solution. The cPTFE-g-SS membrane which is resulted has stability in a H2O2 30% solution for 20 hours.

  14. Electrochemical characterization of proton exchange membrane fuel cells; Caracterizacao eletroquimica de celulas a combustivel de membrana polimerica trocadora de protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furtado, Jose Geraldo de Melo; Serra, Eduardo Torres [Centro de Pesquisas de Energia Eletrica (CEPEL), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: furtado@cepel.br; Codeceira Neto, Alcides [Companhia HidroEletrica do Sao Francisco (CHESF), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes the electrochemical behavior of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell in function of temperature and time of operation. Different polarization phenomena are considered in the 30 to 70 deg C temperature range, as well as the degradation of electrochemical behavior of the fuel cell analyzed up to 1260 hours of operation. The results show that there is a tendency for the experimental values approaching the theoretical as it increases the temperature of the membrane electrolyte. The electrochemical behavior of the PEMFC studied proved to be less stable at 70 deg C. On the other hand, at 30 deg C the fuel cell performance proved to be considerably lower than at other temperatures. Also, it was found that in certain current ranges occurs greater overlay in potential-current curves, and in some cases reversing between these curves depending on the electric current required for the data obtained at 60 and 70 deg C, indicating, perhaps, that at 70 deg C the characteristics of the electrolyte are slightly inferior to those at 70 deg C, corresponding to an electrolyte degradation. Additionally, for the system studied, we found that the rate of variation of the potential difference in function of the temperature is quite high at the beginning of the operation process and tends to stabilize in a level of around 2,3-2,5 {mu}V per minute for times greater than 330 hours of operation. (author)

  15. Novel membranes for proton exchange membrane fuel cell operation above 120°C. Final report for period October 1, 1998 to December 31, 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, Supramaniam [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Lee, Seung-Jae [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Costamagna, Paola [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Yang, Christopher [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Adjemian, Kevork [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Bocarsly, Andrew [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Ogden, Joan M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Benziger, Jay [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2000-05-01

    In this project we investigated the experimental performance of three new classes of membranes, composites of perfluorosulfonic acid polymers with heteropolyacides, hydrated oxides and fast proton conducting glasses, which are promising candidates as electrolytes for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), capable of operation at temperatures above 120°C. The motivations for PEMFC's operation at this temperature are to: 1) minimize the CO poisoning problem (adsorption of CO onto the platinum catalyst is greatly reduced at these temperatures), 2) find better solutions for the water and thermal management problems in proton exchange membrane fuel cells, 3) find potentially lower cost materials for proton exchange membranes. We prepared and characterized a variety of novel membrane materials. The most promising of these have been evaluated for performance in a single, small area (5cm2) fuel cell run on hydrogen and oxygen. Our results establish the technical feasibility of PEMFC operation above 120°C.

  16. Improving the Performance Of Single Cells In The Design Of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) When Using Hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    - Mulyazmi; Maria Ulfah; Silvi Octavia

    2017-01-01

    A proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) was developed as a potential solution in power supply applications. In this study, the parameter values such as the relative humidity, the temperature, the pressure, the stoichiometric ratio of hydrogen to oxygen and the mass of catalyst used were varied to determine their effects on the single cell performance of PEMFC. The investigation showed that an increase in the temperature from 353 to 363 K resulted in a modest improvement in the single-cel...

  17. Acid-catalysed deuterium exchange of aromatic protons. Pt. 3; Accelerated exchange by microwave irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeves, G.J. (Centre of Forensic Sciences, Toronto, ON (Canada))

    1994-03-01

    Conventional acid-catalysed [sup 2]H/[sup 1]H exchange in aromatic rings requires long reaction times, high temperatures and pressure. This paper reports that accelerated deuterium exchange can be achieved in a microwave oven. Experiments were carried out on benzodiazepines, tricyclic antidepressants and phenothiazines. The reaction time was decreased from days to minutes, the preparatory work was simpler than with conventional heating and the labelled products were cleaner. (author).

  18. NanoCapillary Network Proton Conducting Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen/Air Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pintauro, Peter [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

    2012-07-09

    The objective of this proposal is to fabricate and characterize a new class of NanoCapillary Network (NCN) proton conducting membranes for hydrogen/air fuel cells that operate under high temperature, low humidity conditions. The membranes will be intelligently designed, where a high density interconnecting 3-D network of nm-diameter electrospun proton conducting polymer fibers is embedded in an inert (uncharged) water/gas impermeable polymer matrix. The high density of fibers in the resulting mat and the high ion-exchange capacity of the fiber polymer will ensure high proton conductivity. To further enhance water retention, molecular silica will be added to the sulfonated polymer fibers. The uncharged matrix material will control water swelling of the high ion-exchange capacity proton conducting polymer fibers and will impart toughness to the final nanocapillary composite membrane. Thus, unlike other fuel cell membranes, the role of the polymer support matrix will be decoupled from that of the proton-conducting channels. The expected final outcome of this 5-year project is the fabrication of fuel cell membranes with properties that exceed the DOE’s technical targets, in particular a proton conductivity of 0.1 S/cm at a temperature less than or equal to120°C and 25-50% relative humidity.

  19. Numerical modeling transport phenomena in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, DongMyung

    To study the coupled phenomena occurring in proton exchange membrane fuel cells, a two-phase, one-dimensional, non-isothermal model is developed in the chapter 1. The model includes water phase change, proton transport in the membrane and electro-osmotic effect. The thinnest, but most complex layer in the membrane electrode assembly, catalyst layer, is considered an interfacial boundary between the gas diffusion layer and the membrane. Mass and heat transfer and electro-chemical reaction through the catalyst layer are formulated into equations, which are applied to boundary conditions for the gas diffusion layer and the membrane. Detail accounts of the boundary equations and the numerical solving procedure used in this work are given. The polarization curve is calculated at different oxygen pressures and compared with the experimental results. When the operating condition is changed along the polarization curve, the change of physicochemical variables in the membrane electrode assembly is studied. In particular, the over-potential diagram presents the usage of the electrochemical energy at each layer of the membrane electrode assembly. Humidity in supplying gases is one of the most important factors to consider for improving the performance of PEMFE. Both high and low humidity conditions can result in a deteriorating cell performance. The effect of humidity on the cell performance is studied in the chapter 2. First, a numerical model based on computational fluid dynamics is developed. Second, the cell performances are simulated, when the relative humidity is changed from 0% to 100% in the anode and the cathode channel. The simulation results show how humidity in the reactant gases affects the water content distribution in the membrane, the over-potential at the catalyst layers and eventually the cell performance. In particular, the rapid enhancement in the cell performance caused by self-hydrating membrane is captured by the simulation. Fully humidifying either H2

  20. Metal Phosphates as Intermediate Temperature Proton Conducting Electrolytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Yunjie; Li, Q.F.; Pan, Chao

    2012-01-01

    A series of metal phosphates were synthesized and screened as potential proton conductor electrolytes for fuel cells and electrolysers operational at intermediate temperatures. Among the selected, niobium and bismuth phosphates exhibited a proton conductivity of 10-2 and 10-7 S cm-1, respectively......, under the anhydrous atmosphere at 250 °C, showing close correlation with the presence of hydroxyl groups in the phosphate phases. At the water partial pressure of above 0.6 atm, both phosphates possessed a proton conductivity to a level of above 3 x 10-2 S cm-1. Reasonable stability of the proton...

  1. Acquisition of 3D temperature distributions in fluid flow using proton resonance frequency thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchenberg, Waltraud B; Wassermann, Florian; Grundmann, Sven; Jung, Bernd; Simpson, Robin

    2016-07-01

    Proton resonance frequency thermometry is well established for monitoring small temperature changes in tissue. Application of the technique to the measurement of complex temperature distributions within fluid flow is of great interest to the engineering community and could also have medical applications. This work presents an experimental approach to reliably measure three-dimensional (3D) temperature fields in fluid flow using proton resonance frequency thermometry. A velocity-compensated three-dimensional gradient echo sequence was used. A flexible pumping system was attached to an MR compatible double pipe heat exchanger. The temperature of two separate flow circuits could be adjusted to produce various three-dimensional spatial temperature distributions within the fluid flow. Validation was performed using MR compatible temperature probes in a uniformly heated flow. A comparative study was conducted with thermocouples in the presence of a spatially varying temperature distribution. In uniformly heated flow, temperature changes were accurately measured to within 0.5 K using proton resonance frequency thermometry, while spatially varying temperature changes measured with MR showed good qualitative agreement with pointwise measurements using thermocouples. Proton resonance frequency thermometry can be used in a variety of complex flow situations to address medical as well as engineering questions. This work makes it possible to gain new insights into fundamental heat transfer phenomena. Magn Reson Med 76:145-155, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell technology for transportation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swathirajan, S. [General Motors R& D Center, Warren, MI (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells are extremely promising as future power plants in the transportation sector to achieve an increase in energy efficiency and eliminate environmental pollution due to vehicles. GM is currently involved in a multiphase program with the US Department of Energy for developing a proof-of-concept hybrid vehicle based on a PEM fuel cell power plant and a methanol fuel processor. Other participants in the program are Los Alamos National Labs, Dow Chemical Co., Ballard Power Systems and DuPont Co., In the just completed phase 1 of the program, a 10 kW PEM fuel cell power plant was built and tested to demonstrate the feasibility of integrating a methanol fuel processor with a PEM fuel cell stack. However, the fuel cell power plant must overcome stiff technical and economic challenges before it can be commercialized for light duty vehicle applications. Progress achieved in phase I on the use of monolithic catalyst reactors in the fuel processor, managing CO impurity in the fuel cell stack, low-cost electrode-membrane assembles, and on the integration of the fuel processor with a Ballard PEM fuel cell stack will be presented.

  3. Fault tolerance control for proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaojuan; Zhou, Boyang

    2016-08-01

    Fault diagnosis and controller design are two important aspects to improve proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) system durability. However, the two tasks are often separately performed. For example, many pressure and voltage controllers have been successfully built. However, these controllers are designed based on the normal operation of PEMFC. When PEMFC faces problems such as flooding or membrane drying, a controller with a specific design must be used. This paper proposes a unique scheme that simultaneously performs fault diagnosis and tolerance control for the PEMFC system. The proposed control strategy consists of a fault diagnosis, a reconfiguration mechanism and adjustable controllers. Using a back-propagation neural network, a model-based fault detection method is employed to detect the PEMFC current fault type (flooding, membrane drying or normal). According to the diagnosis results, the reconfiguration mechanism determines which backup controllers to be selected. Three nonlinear controllers based on feedback linearization approaches are respectively built to adjust the voltage and pressure difference in the case of normal, membrane drying and flooding conditions. The simulation results illustrate that the proposed fault tolerance control strategy can track the voltage and keep the pressure difference at desired levels in faulty conditions.

  4. Microalgae dewatering based on forward osmosis employing proton exchange membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jieun; Sung, Mina; Ryu, Hoyoung; Oh, You-Kwan; Han, Jong-In

    2017-11-01

    In this study, electrically-facilitated forward osmosis (FO) employing proton exchange membrane (PEM) was established for the purpose of microalgae dewatering. An increase in water flux was observed when an external voltage was applied to the FO equipped with the PEM; as expected, the trend became more dramatic with both concentration of draw solution and applied voltage raised. With this FO used for microalgae dewatering, 247% of increase in flux and 86% in final biomass concentration were observed. In addition to the effect on flux improvement, the electrically-facilitated FO exhibited the ability to remove chlorophyll from the dewatered biomass, down to 0.021±0015mg/g cell. All these suggest that the newly suggested electrically-facilitated FO, one particularly employed PEM, can indeed offer a workable way of dewatering of microalgae; it appeared to be so because it can also remove the ever-problematic chlorophyll from extracted lipids in a simultaneous fashion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. High power density proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Oliver J.; Hitchens, G. Duncan; Manko, David J.

    1993-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells use a perfluorosulfonic acid solid polymer film as an electrolyte which simplifies water and electrolyte management. Their thin electrolyte layers give efficient systems of low weight, and their materials of construction show extremely long laboratory lifetimes. Their high reliability and their suitability for use in a microgravity environment makes them particularly attractive as a substitute for batteries in satellites utilizing high-power, high energy-density electrochemical energy storage systems. In this investigation, the Dow experimental PEM (XUS-13204.10) and unsupported high platinum loading electrodes yielded very high power densities, of the order of 2.5 W cm(exp -2). A platinum black loading of 5 mg per cm(exp 2) was found to be optimum. On extending the three-dimensional reaction zone of fuel cell electrodes by impregnating solid polymer electrolyte into the electrode structures, Nafion was found to give better performance than the Dow experimental PEM. The depth of penetration of the solid polymer electrolyte into electrode structures was 50-70 percent of the thickness of the platinum-catalyzed active layer. However, the degree of platinum utilization was only 16.6 percent and the roughness factor of a typical electrode was 274.

  6. A high performance polyamide-based proton exchange membrane fabricated via construction of hierarchical proton conductive channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liying; Cai, Weiwei; Li, Jing; Fan, Kun; Jiang, Yao; Ma, Liang; Cheng, Hansong

    2016-01-01

    A concept of hierarchical proton conductive channel (HPCC) capable of simultaneously boosting proton conductivity and fuel-permeation resistivity is proposed and the HPCC is optimized to improve the performance of the hyperbranched polyamide proton exchange membrane. The HPCC built in-situ in the membrane can be tuned by simply changing two amine groups from the meta-position to the para-position in the monomers. We demonstrate that the small structural difference between the two monomers may result in remarkable differences in mechanical and electrochemical properties upon polymerization, which enable significantly improved performance of direct methanol fuel cells.

  7. Mixing of Proton and Electron Scales - Effects of Proton Temperature Anisotropy on the Electron Firehose Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneva, Y. G.; Lazar, M.; Vinas, A. F.; Poedts, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    We perform kinetic linear theory instability analysis in a non-drifting anisotropic electron-proton plasma to study the effects of proton temperature anisotropies on the electron firehose instability in the collisionless solar wind. We solve the Vlasov linear theory dispersion relation for hot highly anisotropic electron-proton plasma in high-beta regime to study the behavior of the solar wind plasma close to the instability thresholds as observed by different spacecraft at 1 AU. We consider temperature and anisotropy regimes for which the electrons and the protons can interact via the excited electromagnetic fluctuations. For the selected parameters simultaneous electron and proton firehose instabilities can be observed with the growth rate of the electron firehose instability extending towards the proton scales. The co-existance of the proton and the electron firehose and the mixing of scales for the electromagnetic fluctuations excited by the two instabilities depends on the initial temperatures, anisotropies and angle of propagation. In the case of parallel wave propagation both left and right-hand polarized waves are simultaneously excited. As we increase the angle of propagation the electron firehose starts to dominate with excitation of large-amplitude aperiodic fluctuations over a large range of wave-numbers, starting at the protons scales and extending up to the smaller electron scales. We calculate the maximum growth rate of the oblique electron firehose as a function of the proton temperature anisotropy and discuss the implications of the electron-proton scale mixing for the observed plasma properties and instability thresholds in the undisturbed solar wind.

  8. H/D isotope effects in high temperature proton conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonanos, Nikolaos; Huijser, A.; Poulsen, Finn Willy

    2015-01-01

    -H/O-D vibration frequencies, the mobility of H+/D+ carriers, the kinetics of the electrochemical oxidation of H2/D2, the solubilities of H2O/D2O and, finally, the spontaneous electromotive force that appears across H2/D2 cells with proton conducting electrolytes. Comparable work on tritium-exchanged materials...

  9. Water removal characteristics of proton exchange membrane fuel cells using a dry gas purging method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang-Yeop; Kim, Hyoung-Juhn; Jang, Jong Hyun; Oh, In-Hwan; Cho, Eun Ae; Hong, Seong-Ahn; Lim, Tae-Hoon [Center for Fuel Cell Research, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, 39-1 Hawolgok-dong, Sungbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea); Kim, Sang-Uk [Center for Fuel Cell Research, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, 39-1 Hawolgok-dong, Sungbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea); Department of Chemical Engineering, Korea University, Anam-dong, Sungbuk-gu, Seoul 136-701 (Korea); Ko, Jaejun; Lim, Tae-Won [Fuel Cell Vehicle Team 1, Hyundai-Kia Corporate Research and Development Division, 104 Mabuk-Dong, Giheung-Gu, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-do 446-912 (Korea); Lee, Kwan-Young [Department of Chemical Engineering, Korea University, Anam-dong, Sungbuk-gu, Seoul 136-701 (Korea)

    2008-06-01

    Water removal from proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) is of great importance to improve start-up ability and mitigate cell degradation when the fuel cell operates at subfreezing temperatures. In this study, we report water removal characteristics under various shut down conditions including a dry gas-purging step. In order to estimate the dehydration level of the electrolyte membrane, the high frequency resistance of the fuel cell stack was observed. Also, a novel method for measuring the amount of residual water in the fuel cell was developed to determine the amount of water removal. The method used the phase change of liquid water and was successfully applied to examine the water removal characteristics. Based on these works, the effects of several parameters such as purging time, flow rate of purging gas, operation current, and stack temperature on the amount of residual water were investigated. (author)

  10. Synthesis and characterization of nanostructured sulfonated polyimides for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Lijun

    Sulfonated polyimides (SPI) are considered to be good candidates for proton exchange membranes (PEMs) since they exhibit high strength, good film-forming ability, chemical resistance, thermal stability, and, in their hydrated state, relatively high proton conductivity. Despite intense research in the area of SPIs, fundamental investigations of hydrophilic/hydrophobic phase segregation and studies of humidity dependent morphologies are scarce. In an effort to influence the order and distribution of ionic groups in rigid-rod SPIs and to understand the interrelationships between morphology, hydration and proton conductivity, two novel model systems of SPI polymers containing hydrophobic polysiloxane (SPI-PSX) and hydrophilic silica nanoparticles (SPI-Si) were developed. The first model system of sulfonated polyimide containing hydrophobic polysiloxane segmented copolymers was prepared by a one-pot synthesis. SPI-PSX materials were evaluated using 1H NMR, size-exclusion chromatography. The presence of ion-containing diamines in the reaction mixture was found to inhibit stoichiometric incorporation of hydrophobic siloxane segments. Siloxane segments were found to lower the thermal stability of the polyimide host. Equilibrium water sorption studies of free standing films of copolymers with and without siloxane segments show that the presence of siloxane segments does not interfere with water swelling, which suggests a microphase-segregated morphology may exist. TEM and SAXS analyses show evidence of phase-segregation in sulfonated polyimides and reveal that siloxane segments strongly affect ionic clustering. However, proton conductivity only changes slightly when polysiloxane segments are incorporated. Sulfonated polyimides containing hydrophilic silica nanoparticles is our second model system developed for stabilizing the dispersed morphologies to promote proton conductivity. SPI-Si nanocomposites were prepared by a pre-polymer of anhydride-terminated sulfonated

  11. A Review on Cold Start of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongmin Wan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Successful and rapid startup of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs at subfreezing temperatures (also called cold start is of great importance for their commercialization in automotive and portable devices. In order to maintain good proton conductivity, the water content in the membrane must be kept at a certain level to ensure that the membrane remains fully hydrated. However, the water in the pores of the catalyst layer (CL, gas diffusion layer (GDL and the membrane may freeze once the cell temperature decreases below the freezing point (Tf. Thus, methods which could enable the fuel cell startup without or with slight performance degradation at subfreezing temperature need to be studied. This paper presents an extensive review on cold start of PEMFCs, including the state and phase changes of water in PEMFCs, impacts of water freezing on PEMFCs, numerical and experimental studies on PEMFCs, and cold start strategies. The impacts on each component of the fuel cell are discussed in detail. Related numerical and experimental work is also discussed. It should be mentioned that the cold start strategies, especially the enumerated patents, are of great reference value on the practical cold start process.

  12. Multi-block sulfonated poly(phenylene) copolymer proton exchange membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Cy H [Albuquerque, NM; Hibbs, Michael [Albuquerque, NM; Ambrosini, Andrea [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-02-07

    Improved multi-block sulfonated poly(phenylene) copolymer compositions, methods of making the same, and their use as proton exchange membranes (PEM) in hydrogen fuel cells, direct methanol fuel cells, in electrode casting solutions and electrodes. The multi-block architecture has defined, controllable hydrophobic and hydrophilic segments. These improved membranes have better ion transport (proton conductivity) and water swelling properties.

  13. Preparation of Stable Pt-Clay Nanocatalysts for Self-humidifying Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wenjing

    One of the critical challenges in making proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells commercially viable is the inability of Nafion (the most used PEM) to conduct protons at low water content level. Both external humidifier and physical seal of the fixture in commercial products increase the cost...

  14. Analytical Investigation and Improvement of Performance of a Proton Exchange Membrane (Pem) Fuel Cell in Mobile Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Khazaee I.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the performance of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell in mobile applications is investigated analytically. At present the main use and advantages of fuel cells impact particularly strongly on mobile applications such as vehicles, mobile computers and mobile telephones. Some external parameters such as the cell temperature (Tcell ) , operating pressure of gases (P) and air stoichiometry (λair ) affect the performance and voltage losses in the PEM fuel cell. Because of the exis...

  15. Influence of water and membrane microstructure on the transport properties of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Ana Rosa

    Proton transport in proton exchange membranes (PEMs) depends on interaction between water and acid groups covalently bound to the polymer. Although the presence of water is important in maintaining the PEM's functions, a thorough understanding of this topic is still lacking. The objective of this work is to provide a better understanding of how the nature water, confined to ionic domains of the polymer, influences the membrane's ability to transport protons, methanol and water. Understanding this topic will facilitate development of new materials with favorable transport properties for fuel cells use. Five classes of polymer membranes were used in this work: polyacrylonitrile-graft-poly(styrenesulfonic) acid (PAN-g-macPSSA); poly(vinylidene difluoride) irradiation-graft-poly(styrenesulfonic) acid (PVDF-g-PSSA); poly(ethylenetetrafluoroethylene) irradiation-graft-poly(styrenesulfonic) acid (ETFE-gPSSA); PVDF-g-PSSA with hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA); and perfluorosulfonic acid membrane (Nafion). The nature of water within the polymers (freezable versus non-freezable states) was measured by systematically freezing samples, and observing the temperature at which water freezes and the amount of heat released in the process. Freezing water-swollen membranes resulted in a 4-fold decrease in the proton conductivity of the PEM. Activation energies of proton transport before and after freezing were ˜ 0.15 eV and 0.5 eV, consistent with proton transport through liquid water and bound water, respectively. Reducing the content of water in membrane samples decreased the amount of freezable and non-freezable water. Calorimetric measurements of membranes in various degrees of hydration showed that water molecules became non-freezable when lambda, (water molecules per sulfonic acid group) was less than ˜14. Proton conduction through membranes containing only non-freezable water was demonstrated to be feasible. Diffusion experiments showed that the permeability of methanol

  16. Novel proton exchange membranes based on structure-optimized poly(ether ether ketone ketone)s and nanocrystalline cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Chuangjiang; Wei, Yingcong; Zhao, Qi; Liu, Baijun; Sun, Zhaoyan; Gu, Yan; Zhang, Mingyao; Hu, Wei

    2018-03-01

    Two sulfonated fluorenyl-containing poly(ether ether ketone ketone)s (SFPEEKKs) were synthesized as the matrix of composite proton exchange membranes by directly sulfonating copolymer precursors comprising non-sulfonatable fluorinated segments and sulfonatable fluorenyl-containing segments. Surface-modified nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) was produced as the "performance-enhancing" filler by treating the microcrystalline cellulose with acid. Two families of SFPEEKK/NCC nanocomposite membranes with various NCC contents were prepared via a solution-casting procedure. Results revealed that the insertion of NCC at a suitable ratio could greatly enhance the proton conductivity of the pristine membranes. For example, the proton conductivity of SFPEEKK-60/NCC-4 (SFPEEKK with 60% fluorenyl segments in the repeating unit, and inserted with 4% NCC) composite membrane was as high as 0.245 S cm-1 at 90 °C, which was 61.2% higher than that of the corresponding pure SFPEEKK-60 membrane. This effect could be attributed to the formation of hydrogen bond networks and proton conduction paths through the interaction between -SO3H/-OH groups on the surface of NCC particles and -SO3H groups on the SFPEEKK backbones. Furthermore, the chemically modified NCC filler and the optimized chemical structure of the SFPEEKK matrix also provided good dimensional stability and mechanical properties of the obtained nanocomposites. In conclusion, these novel nanocomposites can be promising proton exchange membranes for fuel cells at moderate temperatures.

  17. A self-sustained, complete and miniaturized methanol fuel processor for proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mei; Jiao, Fengjun; Li, Shulian; Li, Hengqiang; Chen, Guangwen

    2015-08-01

    A self-sustained, complete and miniaturized methanol fuel processor has been developed based on modular integration and microreactor technology. The fuel processor is comprised of one methanol oxidative reformer, one methanol combustor and one two-stage CO preferential oxidation unit. Microchannel heat exchanger is employed to recover heat from hot stream, miniaturize system size and thus achieve high energy utilization efficiency. By optimized thermal management and proper operation parameter control, the fuel processor can start up in 10 min at room temperature without external heating. A self-sustained state is achieved with H2 production rate of 0.99 Nm3 h-1 and extremely low CO content below 25 ppm. This amount of H2 is sufficient to supply a 1 kWe proton exchange membrane fuel cell. The corresponding thermal efficiency of whole processor is higher than 86%. The size and weight of the assembled reactors integrated with microchannel heat exchangers are 1.4 L and 5.3 kg, respectively, demonstrating a very compact construction of the fuel processor.

  18. High surface area graphite as alternative support for proton exchange membrane fuel cell catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira-Aparicio, P.; Folgado, M.A. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Avda. Complutense 22, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Daza, L. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Avda. Complutense 22, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), C/Marie Curie, 2 Campus de Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    The suitability of a high surface area graphite (HSAG) as proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) catalyst support has been evaluated and compared with that of the most popular carbon black: the Vulcan XC72. It has been observed that Pt is arranged on the graphite surface resulting in different structures which depend on the catalysts synthesis conditions. The influence that the metal particle size and the metal-support interaction exert on the catalysts degradation rate is analyzed. Temperature programmed oxidation (TPO) under oxygen containing streams has been shown to be a useful method to assess the resistance of PEMFC catalysts to carbon corrosion. The synthesized Pt/HSAG catalysts have been evaluated in single cell tests in the cathode catalytic layer. The obtained results show that HSAG can be a promising alternative to the traditionally used Vulcan XC72 carbon black when suitable catalysts synthesis conditions are used. (author)

  19. On-line fault diagnostic system for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riascos, Luis Alberto M. [Federal University of ABC, r. Santa Adelia 166, CEP 09210-170, Santo Andre, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Simoes, Marcelo G. [Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St, 80401 Golden, CO (United States); Miyagi, Paulo E. [Escola Politecnica, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes 2231, CEP 05508-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2008-01-03

    In this paper, a supervisor system, able to diagnose different types of faults during the operation of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell is introduced. The diagnosis is developed by applying Bayesian networks, which qualify and quantify the cause-effect relationship among the variables of the process. The fault diagnosis is based on the on-line monitoring of variables easy to measure in the machine such as voltage, electric current, and temperature. The equipment is a fuel cell system which can operate even when a fault occurs. The fault effects are based on experiments on the fault tolerant fuel cell, which are reproduced in a fuel cell model. A database of fault records is constructed from the fuel cell model, improving the generation time and avoiding permanent damage to the equipment. (author)

  20. On-line fault diagnostic system for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riascos, Luis Alberto M.; Simoes, Marcelo G.; Miyagi, Paulo E.

    In this paper, a supervisor system, able to diagnose different types of faults during the operation of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell is introduced. The diagnosis is developed by applying Bayesian networks, which qualify and quantify the cause-effect relationship among the variables of the process. The fault diagnosis is based on the on-line monitoring of variables easy to measure in the machine such as voltage, electric current, and temperature. The equipment is a fuel cell system which can operate even when a fault occurs. The fault effects are based on experiments on the fault tolerant fuel cell, which are reproduced in a fuel cell model. A database of fault records is constructed from the fuel cell model, improving the generation time and avoiding permanent damage to the equipment.

  1. A review on the performance and modelling of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucetta, A., E-mail: abirboucetta@yahoo.fr; Ghodbane, H., E-mail: h.ghodbane@mselab.org; Bahri, M., E-mail: m.bahri@mselab.org [Department of Electrical Engineering, MSE Laboratory, Mohamed khider Biskra University (Algeria); Ayad, M. Y., E-mail: ayadmy@gmail.com [R& D, Industrial Hybrid Vehicle Applications (France)

    2016-07-25

    Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC), are energy efficient and environmentally friendly alternative to conventional energy conversion for various applications in stationary power plants, portable power device and transportation. PEM fuel cells provide low operating temperature and high-energy efficiency with near zero emission. A PEM fuel cell is a multiple distinct parts device and a series of mass, energy, transport through gas channels, electric current transport through membrane electrode assembly and electrochemical reactions at the triple-phase boundaries. These processes play a decisive role in determining the performance of the Fuel cell, so that studies on the phenomena of gas flows and the performance modelling are made deeply. This paper gives a comprehensive overview of the state of the art on the Study of the phenomena of gas flow and performance modelling of PEMFC.

  2. Performance Analysis of Air Breathing Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Stack (PEMFCS) At Different Operating Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunil, V.; Venkata siva, G.; Yoganjaneyulu, G.; Ravikumar, V. V.

    2017-08-01

    The answer for an emission free power source in future is in the form of fuel cells which combine hydrogen and oxygen producing electricity and a harmless by product-water. A proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell is ideal for automotive applications. A single cell cannot supply the essential power for any application. Hence PEM fuel cell stacks are used. The effect of different operating parameters namely: type of convection, type of draught, hydrogen flow rate, hydrogen inlet pressure, ambient temperature and humidity, hydrogen humidity, cell orientation on the performance of air breathing PEM fuel cell stack was analyzed using a computerized fuel cell test station. Then, the fuel cell stack was subjected to different load conditions. It was found that the stack performs very poorly at full capacity (runs only for 30 min. but runs for 3 hours at 50% capacity). Hence, a detailed study was undertaken to maximize the duration of the stack’s performance at peak load.

  3. Anomalous side-shifted multimode spectra in proton-exchanged LiNbO3 waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Micheli, M; Russell, P S

    1986-11-01

    We report the presence of a curious and highly reproducible effect in multimode lithium niobate waveguides fabricated by proton exchange (PE) in molten benzoic acid at temperatures ranging from 160 degrees C to approximately 250 degrees C. The spectral lines in the mode spectra of these guides (measured using a prism coupler) are anomalously side-shifted out of the expected geometrical plane. Transforming these measurements back into the plane of the waveguide, we find that the direction of scattering (relative to the crystal axis) is extremely precise (<1% deviation about a mean), and that the effect can be explained by postulating the existence of precisely oriented, stress-induced gratinglike structures (with irregular periods in the 10-70-microm range) in the guides.

  4. The applications of 3D-hexagonal mesoporous SiO2 in proton exchange membranes of fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, B.; Tang, H.; Pan, M.; Chen, L.; Liang, C. [Wuhan Univ. of Technology, Wuhan (China). State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing

    2010-07-01

    The advantages of 3D hexagonal ordered mesoporous silica include a homogeneous ordered pore, a large surface area, narrow pore size distribution and excellent thermal stability. Hetropolyacids (HPAs) are high conductivity solid proton conductors that can be loaded onto the channel of mesoporous silica as a carrier for the proton exchange membrane of fuel cells. In this study, an ordered 3D hexagonal structure HPW/SiO{sub 2} nano composite materials was prepared using the sol-gel method with a nonionic surfactant (Brij-76) as the template. The HPW/SiO{sub 2} composite was characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and N2 adsorption-desorption. The study showed that the synthesis method can effectively make the HPW disperse uniformly in mesoporous framework, ensuring that the synthesized material has ordered mesoscopic structure. Impedance analysis revealed that the HPW/silica nano-materials have good proton conductivity without humidification at room temperature.

  5. Proton exchange between oxymethyl radical and acids and bases: semiempirical quantum-chemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Pustolaikina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The reactions with proton participation are widely represented in the analytical, technological and biological chemistry. Quantum-chemical study of the exchange processes in hydrogen bonding complexes will allow us to achieve progress in the understanding of the elementary act mechanism of proton transfer in hydrogen bonding chain as well as the essence of the acid-base interactions. Oxymethyl radical •CH2ОН is small in size and comfortable as a model particle that well transmits protolytic properties of paramagnetic acids having more complex structure. Quantum-chemical modeling of proton exchange reaction oxymethyl radical ∙CH2OH and its diamagnetic analog CH3OH with amines, carboxylic acids and water was carried out using UAM1 method with the help of Gaussian-2009 program. QST2 method was used for the search of transition state, IRC procedure was applied for the calculation of descents along the reaction coordinate. The difference in the structure of transition states of ∙CH2OH/ CH3OH with bases and acids has been shown. It has been confirmed that in the case of bases, consecutive proton exchange mechanism was fixed, and in the case of complexes with carboxylic acids parallel proton exchange mechanism was fixed. The similarity in the reaction behavior of paramagnetic and diamagnetic systems in the proton exchange has been found. It was suggested that the mechanism of proton exchange reaction is determined by the structure of the hydrogen bonding cyclic complex, which is, in turn, depends from the nature of the acid-base interactions partners.

  6. THE USE OF CHLOROSULFONIC ACID ON SULFONATION OF cPTFE FILM GRAFTED STYRENE FOR PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohan Yohan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Sulfonation of g-ray iradiated and styrene-grafted crosslinked polytetrafluoro ethylene film (cPTFE-g-S film have been done. The aim of the research was to make hydrophyl membrane as proton exchange membrane fuel cell. Sulfonation was prepared by using chlorosulfonic acid in chloroethane under various conditions. The impact of the percentage of grafting, the concentration of chlorosulfonic acid, the reaction time,and the reaction temperature on the properties of sulfonated film were examined. The results show that sulfonation of surface-grafted films was incomplete at room temperature. Increasing concentration of chlorosulfonic acid and reaction temperature accelerate the reaction but they also favor side reactions. These lead to the decrease of the ion-exchange capacity, water uptake, and proton conductivity but the increase of the resistance to oxidation in a perhydrol solution. The resulted cPTFE-g-SS membraneis stabile in a H2O2 30% solution for 20 h.   Keywords: Chorosulfonic acid, sulfonation, PTFE film, proton excange membrane.

  7. Linear hygrothermal viscoelastic characterization of Nafion NRE 211 proton exchange membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patankar, K.A. [Macromolecular Science and Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Dillard, D.A.; Case, S.W. [Engineering Science and Mechanics Department, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Ellis, M.W. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Lai, Y.H.; Gittleman, C.S. [Fuel Cell Research Laboratory, General Motors Corporation, Honeoye Falls, NY (United States)

    2012-10-15

    The tensile relaxation modulus of a commercially available proton exchange membrane, Nafion registered NRE 211, was obtained over a range of humidity levels and temperatures using a commercial dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA). Hygral stress relaxation master curves were first constructed, followed by a hygrothermal master curve using the time temperature moisture superposition principle. The hygrothermal master curve was fitted using a 10-term Prony series and validated using longer term stress relaxation tests. To validate the results from the stress relaxation experiments, short and long-term creep compliance was converted into stress relaxation modulus using a well-known viscoelastic conversion formula, and compared with the relaxation modulus obtained under identical conditions. Good agreement was found between the two datasets. It was evident that relaxation data at 2% RH at the test temperatures was not superposable with the master curves obtained at higher relative humidity (10% < RH < 90%) at the temperature range 70 C < T < 90 C. It was observed that the longer term relaxation modulus under humid conditions matched well with the hygrothermal master curve; however, the longer term relaxation modulus under dry conditions was significantly higher than the relaxation master curve obtained under dry conditions, raising the possibility of a physical aging process in the ionomer and/or irreversible morphological changes in the membrane under dry conditions. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Proton exchange membrane materials for the advancement of direct methanol fuel-cell technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Christopher J [Albuquerque, NM

    2006-04-04

    A new class of hybrid organic-inorganic materials, and methods of synthesis, that can be used as a proton exchange membrane in a direct methanol fuel cell. In contrast with Nafion.RTM. PEM materials, which have random sulfonation, the new class of materials have ordered sulfonation achieved through self-assembly of alternating polyimide segments of different molecular weights comprising, for example, highly sulfonated hydrophilic PDA-DASA polyimide segment alternating with an unsulfonated hydrophobic 6FDA-DAS polyimide segment. An inorganic phase, e.g., 0.5 5 wt % TEOS, can be incorporated in the sulfonated polyimide copolymer to further improve its properties. The new materials exhibit reduced swelling when exposed to water, increased thermal stability, and decreased O.sub.2 and H.sub.2 gas permeability, while retaining proton conductivities similar to Nafion.RTM.. These improved properties may allow direct methanol fuel cells to operate at higher temperatures and with higher efficiencies due to reduced methanol crossover.

  9. Modified nanocrystal cellulose/fluorene-containing sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone ketone) composites for proton exchange membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yingcong; Shang, Yabei; Ni, Chuangjiang; Zhang, Hanyu; Li, Xiaobai; Liu, Baijun; Men, Yongfeng; Zhang, Mingyao; Hu, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Highly sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone ketone)s (SFPEEKKs) with sulfonation degrees of 2.34 (SFPEEKK5) and 2.48 (SFPEEKK10) were synthesized through the direct sulfonation of a fluorene-containing poly(ether ether ketone ketone) under a relatively mild reaction condition. Using the solution blending method, sulfonated nanocrystal cellulose (sNCC)-enhanced SFPEEKK composites (SFPEEKK/sNCC) were successfully prepared for investigation as proton exchange membranes. Transmission electron microscopy showed that sNCC was uniformly distributed in the composite membranes. The properties of the composite membranes, including thermal stability, mechanical properties, water uptake, swelling ratio, oxidative stability and proton conductivity were thoroughly evaluated. Results indicated that the insertion of sNCC could contribute to water management and improve the mechanical performance of the membranes. Notably, the proton conductivity of SFPEEKK5/sNCC-5 was as high as 0.242 S cm-1 at 80 °C. All data proved the potential of SFPEEKK/sNCC composites for proton exchange membranes in medium-temperature fuel cells.

  10. Intermolecular hydrogen bonds: From temperature-driven proton ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We have combined neutron scattering and a range of numerical simulations to study hydrogen bonds in condensed matter. Two examples from a recent thesis will be presented. The first concerns proton transfer with increasing temperature in short inter- molecular hydrogen bonds [1,2]. These bonds have unique ...

  11. Electrochemical stability of carbon nanofibers in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, Garbine [Energy Department, CIDETEC-IK4, Po Miramon, 196, 20009 San Sebastian (Spain); Alcaide, Francisco, E-mail: falcaide@cidetec.es [Energy Department, CIDETEC-IK4, Po Miramon, 196, 20009 San Sebastian (Spain); Miguel, Oscar [Energy Department, CIDETEC-IK4, Po Miramon, 196, 20009 San Sebastian (Spain); Cabot, Pere L. [Laboratori d' Electroquimica de Materials i del Medi Ambient, Dept. Quimica Fisica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques, 1-11, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Martinez-Huerta, M.V.; Fierro, J.L.G. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), Marie Curie 2, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-10-30

    This fundamental study deals with the electrochemical stability of several non-conventional carbon based catalyst supports, intended for low temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) cathodes. Electrochemical surface oxidation of raw and functionalized carbon nanofibers, and carbon black for comparison, was studied following a potential step treatment at 25.0 deg. C in acid electrolyte, which mimics the operating conditions of low temperature PEMFCs. Surface oxidation was characterized using cyclic voltammetry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and contact angle measurements. Cyclic voltammograms clearly showed the presence of the hydroquinone/quinone couple. Furthermore, identification of carbonyl, ether, hydroxyl and carboxyl surface functional groups were made by deconvolution of the XPS spectra. The relative increase in surface oxides on carbon nanofibers during the electrochemical oxidation treatment is significantly smaller than that on carbon black. This suggests that carbon nanofibers are more resistant to the electrochemical corrosion than carbon black under the experimental conditions used in this work. This behaviour could be attributed to the differences found in the microstructure of both kinds of carbons. According to these results, carbon nanofibers possess a high potential as catalyst support to increase the durability of catalysts used in low temperature PEMFC applications.

  12. Impact of heat and water management on proton exchange membrane fuel cells degradation in automotive application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandjou, F.; Poirot-Crouvezier, J.-P.; Chandesris, M.; Blachot, J.-F.; Bonnaud, C.; Bultel, Y.

    2016-09-01

    In Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells, local temperature is a driving force for many degradation mechanisms such as hygrothermal deformation and creep of the membrane, platinum dissolution and bipolar plates corrosion. In order to investigate and quantify those effects in automotive application, durability testing is conducted in this work. During the ageing tests, the local performance and temperature are investigated using in situ measurements of a printed circuit board. At the end of life, post-mortem analyses of the aged components are conducted. The experimental results are compared with the simulated temperature and humidity in the cell obtained from a pseudo-3D multiphysics model in order to correlate the observed degradations to the local conditions inside the stack. The primary cause of failure in automotive cycling is pinhole/crack formation in the membrane, induced by high variations of its water content over time. It is also observed that water condensation largely increases the probability of the bipolar plates corrosion while evaporation phenomena induce local deposits in the cell.

  13. Sulfonated polyimides containing triphenylphosphine oxide for proton exchange membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Arun Kumar; Bera, Debaditya; Banerjee, Susanta, E-mail: susanta@matsc.iitkgp.ernet.in

    2016-09-15

    A series of sulfonated co-polyimides (co-SPI) were prepared by one pot polycondensation reaction of a combination of diamines namely; 4,4′-diaminostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid (DSDSA) and prepared non-sulfonated diamine (DATPPO) containing triphenylphosphine oxide with 1,4,5,8-naphthalenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (NTDA). All these soluble co-SPI gave flexible membranes with high thermal stability and showed good mechanical property. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis revealed the microphase separated morphology with well-dispersed hydrophilic (cluster size in the range of 5–55 nm) domains. The co-SPI membranes showed high oxidative and hydrolytic stability with higher proton conductivity. All these co-SPI membranes exhibited low water uptake and swelling ratio. The co-SPI membrane TPPO-60 (60% degree of sulfonation) with IEC{sub W} = 1.84 mequiv g{sup −1} showed high proton conductivity (99 mS cm{sup −1} at 80 °C and 107 mS cm{sup −1} at 90 °C) in water with high oxidative (20 h) and hydrolytic stability (only 5% degradation in 24 h). - Highlights: • Triphenylphosphine oxide containing sulfonated polyimides (SPIs) was synthesized. • The SPIs showed good oxidative and hydrolytic stability and high proton conductivity. • TEM analysis revealed well separated morphology of the SPIs.

  14. Conductivity Measurements of Synthesized Heteropoly Acid Membranes for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Record, K.A.; Haley, B.T.; Turner, J.

    2006-01-01

    Fuel cell technology is receiving attention due to its potential to be a pollution free method of electricity production when using renewably produced hydrogen as fuel. In a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell H2 and O2 react at separate electrodes, producing electricity, thermal energy, and water. A key component of the PEM fuel cell is the membrane that separates the electrodes. DuPont’s Nafion® is the most commonly used membrane in PEM fuel cells; however, fuel cell dehydration at temperatures near 100°C, resulting in poor conductivity, is a major hindrance to fuel cell performance. Recent studies incorporating heteropoly acids (HPAs) into membranes have shown an increase in conductivity and thus improvement in performance. HPAs are inorganic materials with known high proton conductivities. The primary objective of this work is to measure the conductivity of Nafion, X-Ionomer membranes, and National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Developed Membranes that are doped with different HPAs at different concentrations. Four-point conductivity measurements using a third generation BekkTech conductivity test cell are used to determine membrane conductivity. The effect of multiple temperature and humidification levels is also examined. While the classic commercial membrane, Nafion, has a conductivity of approximately 0.10 S/cm, measurements for membranes in this study range from 0.0030 – 0.58 S/cm, depending on membrane type, structure of the HPA, and the relative humidity. In general, the X-ionomer with H6P2W21O71 HPA gave the highest conductivity and the Nafion with the 12-phosphotungstic (PW12) HPA gave the lowest. The NREL composite membranes had conductivities on the order of 0.0013 – 0.025 S/cm.

  15. Tuning a High Transmission Ion Guide to Prevent Gas-Phase Proton Exchange During H/D Exchange MS Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttman, Miklos; Wales, Thomas E.; Whittington, Dale; Engen, John R.; Brown, Jeffery M.; Lee, Kelly K.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry (MS) for protein structural analysis has been adopted for many purposes, including biopharmaceutical development. One of the benefits of examining amide proton exchange by mass spectrometry is that it can readily resolve different exchange regimes, as evidenced by either binomial or bimodal isotope patterns. By careful analysis of the isotope pattern during exchange, more insight can be obtained on protein behavior in solution. However, one must be sure that any observed bimodal isotope patterns are not artifacts of analysis and are reflective of the true behavior in solution. Sample carryover and certain stationary phases are known as potential sources of bimodal artifacts. Here, we describe an additional undocumented source of deuterium loss resulting in artificial bimodal patterns for certain highly charged peptides. We demonstrate that this phenomenon is predominantly due to gas-phase proton exchange between peptides and bulk solvent within the initial stages of high-transmission conjoined ion guides. Minor adjustments of the ion guide settings, as reported here, eliminate the phenomenon without sacrificing signal intensity. Such gas-phase deuterium loss should be appreciated for all HDX-MS studies using such ion optics, even for routine studies not focused on interpreting bimodal spectra.

  16. Application of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell for Lift Trucks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseinzadeh, Elham; Rokni, Masoud

    2011-01-01

    thermodynamically. The system includes a compressor, an air humidifier, set of heat exchangers and a stack which together build up the anode circuit, the cathode circuit and the cooling loop. Since fuel humidification is carried out via water cross over from cathode to anode, there is no humidifier in the anode...

  17. Hygrothermal characterization of the viscoelastic properties of Gore-Select® 57 proton exchange membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patankar, Kshitish A.; Dillard, David A.; Case, Scott W.; Ellis, Michael W.; Lai, Yeh-Hung; Budinski, Michael K.; Gittleman, Craig S.

    2008-09-01

    When a proton exchange membrane (PEM) based fuel cell is placed in service, hygrothermal stresses develop within the membrane and vary widely with internal operating environment. These hygrothermal stresses associated with hygral contraction and expansion at the operating conditions are believed to be critical in membrane mechanical integrity and durability. Understanding and accurately modeling the viscoelastic constitutive properties of a PEM is important for making hygrothermal stress predictions in the cyclic temperature and humidity environment of operating fuel cells. The tensile stress relaxation moduli of a commercially available PEM, Gore-Select® 57, were obtained over a range of humidities and temperatures. These tests were performed using TA Instruments 2980 and Q800 dynamic mechanical analyzers (DMA), which are capable of applying specified tensile loading conditions on small membrane samples at a given temperature. A special humidity chamber was built in the form of a cup that encloses tension clamps of the DMA. The chamber was inserted in the heating furnace of the DMA and connected to a gas humidification unit by means of plastic tubing through a slot in the chamber. Stress relaxation data over a temperature range of 40 90°C and relative humidity range of 30 90% were obtained. Thermal and hygral master curves were constructed using thermal and hygral shift factors and were used to form a hygrothermal master curve using the time temperature moisture superposition principle. The master curve was also constructed independently using just one shift factor. The hygrothermal master curve was fitted with a 10-term Prony series for use in finite element software. The hygrothermal master curve was then validated using longer term tests. The relaxation modulus from longer term data matches well with the hygrothermal master curve. The long term test showed a plateau at longer times, suggesting an equilibrium modulus.

  18. Aligned electrospun nanofibers as proton conductive channels through thickness of sulfonated poly (phthalazinone ether sulfone ketone) proton exchange membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xue; He, Gaohong; Wu, Yao; Zhang, Shikai; Chen, Bo; Dai, Yan; Wu, Xuemei

    2017-08-01

    A novel approach is proposed to fabricate sulfonated poly (phthalazinone ether sulfone ketone) (SPPESK) proton exchange membranes with ordered through-plane electrospinning nanofibers, which provide nano-scale through-plane proton conductive channels along the thickness direction of the membranes, aiming to satisfy the challenging requirement of high through-plane proton conductivity in fuel cell operations. Induced by electrostatic attraction of strong electric field, the negatively charged sulfonic acid groups tend to aggregate towards surface of the electrospun fibers, which is evidenced by TEM and SAXS and further induces aggregation of the sulfonic acid groups in the SPPESK inferfiber voids filler along the surface of the nanofibers. The aligned electrospun nanofibers carries long-range ionic clusters along the thickness direction of the membrane and results in much higher total through-plane conductivity in the thickness aligned electrospun membranes, nearly twice as much as that of the cast SPPESK membrane. With smooth treatment, the thickness aligned electrospun SPPESK membranes exhibit higher single cell power density and tensile strength as compared with Nafion 115 (around 1.2 and 1.5 folds, respectively). Such a design of thickness aligned nano-size proton conductive channels provide feasibility for high performance non-fluorinated PEMs in fuel cell applications.

  19. Hydrogen production and deuterium-proton exchange reactions catalyzed by Desulfovibrio nickel(II)-substituted rubredoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Martin, Pascal; Lespinat, Paul A.; Fauque, Guy; Berlier, Yves; LeGall, Jean; Moura, Isabel; Teixeira, Miguel; Xavier, Antonio V.; Moura, Jose J. G.

    1988-01-01

    The nickel tetrahedral sulfur-coordinated core formed upon metal replacement of the native iron in Desulfovibrio sp. rubredoxins is shown to mimic the reactivity pattern of nickel-containing hydrogenases with respect to hydrogen production, deuterium-proton exchange, and inhibition by carbon monoxide. PMID:16594005

  20. Characterization of proton exchange membrane fuel cell anode catalysts prepared by colloid method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, E.G.; Dantas-Filho, P.L.; Burani, G.F. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IEE/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Eletrotecnica e Energia

    2009-07-01

    Full text: Anode catalysts for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) were synthesized by the colloid method and their structure was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive analyses (EDS), X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The electrochemical behavior of the anode catalyst was analyzed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and polarization curves (UxI). (author)

  1. Model-based fault detection for proton exchange membrane fuel cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, an intelligent model-based fault detection (FD) is developed for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) dynamic systems using an independent radial basis function (RBF) networks. The novelty is that this RBF networks is used to model the PEMFC dynamic systems and residuals are generated based ...

  2. Dissociation between lactate and proton exchange in muscle during intense exercise in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Juel, Carsten; Hellsten, Ylva

    1997-01-01

    , the difference between net proton and lactate release was positive throughout exercise and of similar magnitude in N and H. 5. The present data suggest that (1) H+ exchange in muscle during submaximal exercise can to a large extent occur through mechanisms other than via coupling to lactate; (2) muscle transport...

  3. Cross-linked PEEK-WC proton exchange membrane for fuel cell

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lou, H

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The low cost proton exchange membrane was prepared by cross-linking water soluble sulfonated-sulfinated poly(oxa-p-phenylene-3,3-phthalido-p-phenylene-oxa-p-phenylene-oxyphenylene) (SsPEEK-WC). The prepared cross-linked membrane became insoluble...

  4. Analysing powers and spin correlations in deuteron–proton charge exchange at 726 MeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dymov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The charge exchange of vector polarised deuterons on a polarised hydrogen target has been studied in a high statistics experiment at the COSY-ANKE facility at a deuteron beam energy of Td=726 MeV. By selecting two fast protons at low relative energy Epp, the measured analysing powers and spin correlations are sensitive to interference terms between specific neutron–proton charge-exchange amplitudes at a neutron kinetic energy of Tn≈12Td=363 MeV. An impulse approximation calculation, which takes into account corrections due to the angular distribution in the diproton, describes reasonably the dependence of the data on both Epp and the momentum transfer. This lends broad support to the current neutron–proton partial wave solution that was used in the estimation.

  5. Annealed proton exchanged optical waveguides in lithium niobate differences between the X- and Z-cuts

    CERN Document Server

    Nekvindova, P; Cervena, J; Budnar, M; Razpet, A; Zorko, B; Pelicon, P; 10.1016/S0925-3467(01)00186-0

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes results and assessments of our systematic fabrication and characterization of proton exchanged (PE) and annealed proton exchanged (APE) waveguides in lithium niobate. This study focused on different behavior of crystallographically diverse X(1120) and Z (0001) substrate cuts during waveguide fabrication, and differences in characteristics of the resulting waveguides. Non-toxic adipic acid was used as a proton source, and the waveguides properties were defined by mode spectroscopy (waveguide characteristics) and neutron depth profiling (NDP, lithium concentration and distribution), infrared vibration spectra and elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA, concentration and depth distribution of hydrogen). It was discovered that the X-cut structure is more permeable for moving particles (lithium and hydrogen ions), which leads to a higher effectiveness of the PE process within the X-cut. The explanation of this phenomenon is based on fitting X-cut orientation towards cleavage planes of lithium niobate c...

  6. Study on Corrosion Migrations within Catalyst-Coated Membranes of Proton Exchange Membrane Electrolyzer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Johney [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mo, Jingke [University of Tennessee; Steen, Stuart [University of Tennessee; Kang, Zhenye [University of Tennessee; Yang, Gaoqiang [University of Tennessee; Taylor, Derrick A. [University of Tennessee; Li, Yifan [University of Tennessee; Toops, Todd J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Brady, Michael P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Retterer, Scott T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Cullen, David A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Zhang, Feng-Yuan [University of Tennessee

    2017-10-09

    The corrosion of low-cost, easily manufactured metallic components inside the electrochemical environment of proton exchange membrane electrolyzer cells (PEMECs) has a significant effect on their performance and durability. In this study, 316 stainless steel (SS) mesh was used as a model liquid/gas diffusion layer material to investigate the migration of corrosion products in the catalyst-coated membrane of a PEMEC. Iron and nickel cation particles were found distributed throughout the anode catalyst layer, proton exchange membrane, and cathode catalyst layer, as revealed by scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results indicate the corrosion products of 316 SS are transported from anode to cathode through the nanochannels of the Nafion membrane, resulting in impeded proton transport and overall PEMEC performance loss.

  7. Self assembled 12-tungstophosphoric acid-silica mesoporous nanocomposites as proton exchange membranes for direct alcohol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Haolin; Pan, Mu; Jiang, San Ping

    2011-05-21

    A highly ordered inorganic electrolyte based on 12-tungstophosphoric acid (H(3)PW(12)O(40), abbreviated as HPW or PWA)-silica mesoporous nanocomposite was synthesized through a facile one-step self-assembly between the positively charged silica precursor and negatively charged PW(12)O(40)(3-) species. The self-assembled HPW-silica nanocomposites were characterized by small-angle XRD, TEM, nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms, ion exchange capacity, proton conductivity and solid-state (31)P NMR. The results show that highly ordered and uniform nanoarrays with long-range order are formed when the HPW content in the nanocomposites is equal to or lower than 25 wt%. The mesoporous structures/textures were clearly presented, with nanochannels of 3.2-3.5 nm in diameter. The (31)P NMR results indicates that there are (≡SiOH(2)(+))(H(2)PW(12)O(40)(-)) species in the HPW-silica nanocomposites. A HPW-silica (25/75 w/o) nanocomposite gave an activation energy of 13.0 kJ mol(-1) and proton conductivity of 0.076 S cm(-1) at 100 °C and 100 RH%, and an activation energy of 26.1 kJ mol(-1) and proton conductivity of 0.05 S cm(-1) at 200 °C with no external humidification. A fuel cell based on a 165 μm thick HPW-silica nanocomposite membrane achieved a maximum power output of 128.5 and 112.0 mW cm(-2) for methanol and ethanol fuels, respectively, at 200 °C. The high proton conductivity and good performance demonstrate the excellent water retention capability and great potential of the highly ordered HPW-silica mesoporous nanocomposites as high-temperature proton exchange membranes for direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFCs).

  8. Design, integration and control of proton exchange membrane electrolyzer for wind based renewable energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Kevin W.

    This research endeavor began with the design and construction of a new hydrogen test facility at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). To improve the electrical link of wind-based electrolysis the characterization of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzer under varying input power was performed at NRELs new test facility. The commercially available electrolyzer from Proton Energy Systems (PES) was characterized using constant direct current (DC), sinusoidally varying DC, photovoltaics and variable magnitude and frequency energy from a 10 kW wind turbine. At rated stack current and ˜ 40°C the system efficiency of the commercial electrolyzer was measured to be 55%. At lower stack current it was shown that commercial electrolyzer system efficiency falls because of the continuous hydrogen purge (˜0.1 Nm3 hr-1) used to maintain the hydrogen desiccant drying system. A novel thermoelectric-based dew point controller is designed and modeled to reduce the penalty to renewable sources because they do not always operate at 100% of rated stack current. It is predicted that the thermoelectric design when operated 100% of the time at full current to the thermoelectric modules would consume 3.1 kWh kg -1 of hydrogen. Using the higher heating value of hydrogen and a stack efficiency of 60% to produce the hydrogen that is continuously vented, the desiccant system consumes about 5.7 kWh kg-1. Design of the UND electrolyzer sub-systems responsible for all aspects of water, power to the stack, and hydrogen conditioning enables more flexible and precise experimental data to be obtained than from an off-the-shelf system. Current-voltage (IV) characteristic curves were obtained on the UND system at temperatures between 7--70°C. The anode and cathode exchange current densities are fitted to 2.0 E-06 e0.043T and 0.12 e 0.026T A cm-2 respectively. Stack conductivity was fitted to 0.001T + 0.03 S cm-1. The three coefficients represent physical stack parameters and are

  9. Characterization and Modification of Electrospun Fiber Mats for Use in Composite Proton Exchange Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannarino, Matthew Marchand

    . Post-spin thermal annealing was used to modify the fiber morphology, inter-fiber welding, and crystallinity within the fibers. Morphological changes, in-plane tensile response, friction coefficient, and wear rate were characterized as functions of the annealing temperature. The Young's moduli, yield stresses and toughnesses of the PA 6(3)T nonwoven mats improved by two- to ten-fold when annealed slightly above the glass transition temperature, but at the expense of mat porosity. The mechanical and tribological properties of the thermally annealed P A 6,6 fiber mats exhibited significant improvements through the Brill transition temperature, comparable to the improvements observed for amorphous P A 6(3)T electrospun mats annealed near the glass transition temperature. The wear rates for both polymer systems correlate with the yield properties of the mat, in accordance with a modified Ratner-Lancaster model. The variation in mechanical and tribological properties of the mats with increasing annealing temperature is consistent with the formation of fiber-to-fiber junctions and a mechanism of abrasive wear that involves the breakage of these junctions between fibers. A mechanically robust proton exchange membrane with high ionic conductivity and selectivity is an important component in many electrochemical energy devices such as fuel cells, batteries, and photovoltaics. The ability to control and improve independently the mechanical response, ionic conductivity, and selectivity properties of a membrane is highly desirable in the development of next generation electrochemical devices. In this thesis, the use of layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of polyelectrolytes is used to generate three different polymer film morphologies on highly porous electrospun fiber mats: webbed, conformal coating, and pore-bridging films. Specifically, depending on whether a vacuum is applied to the backside of the mat or not, the spray-LbL assembly either fills the voids of the mat with the proton

  10. Proton-Transfer-Driven Water Exchange Mechanism in the Na+ Solvation Shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellström, Matti; Behler, Jörg

    2017-04-27

    Ligand exchange plays an important role for organic and inorganic chemical reactions. We demonstrate the existence of a novel water exchange mechanism, the "proton transfer pathway" (PTP), around Na+(aq) in basic (high pH) solution, using reactive molecular dynamics simulations employing a high-dimensional neural network potential. An aqua ligand in the first solvation (hydration) shell around a sodium ion is only very weakly acidic, but if a hydroxide ion is present in the second solvation shell, thermal fluctuations can cause the aqua ligand to transfer a proton to the neighboring OH-, resulting in a transient direct-contact ion pair, Na+-OH-, which is only weakly bound and easily dissociates. The extent to which water exchange events follow the PTP is pH-dependent: in dilute NaOH(aq) solutions, only very few exchanges occur, whereas in saturated NaOH(aq) solutions up to a third of water self-exchange events are induced by proton transfer. The principles and results outlined here are expected to be relevant for chemical synthesis involving bases and alkali metal cations.

  11. Insight into ramsdellite LI(2)Ti(3)O(7) and its proton-exchange derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orera, Alodia; Azcondo, M Teresa; García-Alvarado, Flaviano; Sanz, Jesús; Sobrados, Isabel; Rodríguez-Carvajal, Juan; Amador, Ulises

    2009-08-17

    Despite being proven to be a good lithium-ion conductor 30 years ago, the crystal structure of the ramsdellite-like Li(2)Ti(3)O(7) has remained uncertain, with two potential models for locating the lithium ions in the structure. Although the model presently accepted states that both lithium and titanium occupy the octahedral sites in the framework, evidence against this model are provided by (6)Li and (7)Li MAS NMR spectroscopy. Thus, about 14% of these octahedral positions are empty since no lithium in octahedral coordination is present in the material. When Li(2)Ti(3)O(7)-ramsdellite is treated with nitric acid a complete exchange of lithium by protons is produced to yield H(2)Ti(3)O(7). The crystal structure of this proton-exchanged ramsdellite has been re-examined combining X-ray diffraction (XRD), neutron powder diffraction (NPD), and spectroscopic ((1)H and (7)Li MAS NMR) techniques. Two kinds of protons are present in this material with different acidity because of the local environments of oxygen atoms to which protons are bonded, namely, low acidic protons strongly bonded to highly charged oxygen atoms (coordinated to two Ti(4+) and a vacancy); and protons linked to low charged oxygen atoms (bonded to three Ti(4+) ions) which will display a more acidic behavior. H(2)Ti(3)O(7) absorbs water; proton mobility is enhanced by the presence of absorbed water, giving rise to a large improvement of its electrical conductivity in wet atmospheres. Thus, it seems that water molecules enter the tunnels in the structure providing a vehicle mechanism for proton diffusion.

  12. Application of amide proton exchange mass spectrometry for the study of protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, Jeffrey G; Baerga-Ortiz, Abel; Croy, Carrie H; Falick, Arnold M; Komives, Elizabeth A

    2005-06-01

    This protocol describes amide proton exchange experiments that probe for changes in solvent accessibility at protein-protein interfaces. The simplest version of the protocol, termed the "on-exchange" experiment, detects protein-protein interfaces by taking advantage of the fact that solvent deuterium oxide (D2O) molecules are excluded from the surface of a protein to which another protein is bound. A more complete version of the experiment can also be performed in which the rate of surface deuteration is initially measured separately for each of the proteins involved in the interaction, after which the deuterated proteins are allowed to complex and the rate of "off-exchange" (i.e., replacement of surface deuterons by protons from solvent H2O molecules) at the resulting protein-protein interface is measured. This version of the experiment yields additional kinetic information that can help to define the solvent-inaccessible "core" of the interface.

  13. Review on Modification of Sulfonated Poly (-ether-ether-ketone Membranes Used as Proton Exchange Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomin GAO

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC is a type of modern power, but the traditional proton exchange membranes (PEM of PEMFC are limited by high methanol permeability and water uptake. Poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK is a widely used thermoplastic with good cost-effective property. Sulfonated poly (-ether-ether-ketone (SPEEK has high electric conductivity and low methanol permeability, as well as comprehensive property, which is expected to be used as PEMs. However, the proton exchange ability, methanol resistance, mechanical property and thermal stability of SPEEK are closely related to the degree of sulfonation (DS of SPEEK membranes. Additionally, the proton conductivity, methanol permeability, and stability of SPEEK membranes applied in various conditions need to be further improved. In this paper, the research into modification of SPEEK membranes made by SPEEK and other polymers, inorganic materials are introduced. The properties and modification situation of the SPEEK and the composite membranes, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of membranes prepared by different materials are summarized. From the results we know that, the methanol permeability of SPEEK/PES-C membranes is within the order of magnitude, 10-7cm2/s. The proton conductivity of the SPPESK/SPEEK blend membrane reaches 0.212 S cm-1 at 80 °C. The cross-linked SPEEK membranes have raised thermal and dimensional stability. The non-solvent caused aggregation of the SPEEK ionomers. The proton conductivity of SPEEK/50%BMIMPF6/4.6PA membrane maintains stable as 2.0 x 10-2S cm-1 after 600 h at 160 °C. Incorporation of aligned CNT into SPEEK increases the proton conductivity and reduces the methanol permeability of the composite membranes. The PANI improves the hydrothermal stability. More proton transfer sites lead to a more compact structure in the composite membranes. According to the results, the proton exchange capacity, water uptake, and conductivity of

  14. High temperature heat exchange: nuclear process heat applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrable, D.L.

    1980-09-01

    The unique element of the HTGR system is the high-temperature operation and the need for heat exchanger equipment to transfer nuclear heat from the reactor to the process application. This paper discusses the potential applications of the HTGR in both synthetic fuel production and nuclear steel making and presents the design considerations for the high-temperature heat exchanger equipment.

  15. Assessing heat exchanger performance data using temperature ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To ensure operation of heat exchangers, the goal is to verify that the exchanger is performing, or will perform, at its design. This is especially relevant to coolers that typically operate at heat loads reduced from their design basis. In addition, any calculated performance acceptance criteria must also consider uncertainty and ...

  16. Presolvated Electron Reactions with Methyl Acetoacetate: Electron Localization, Proton-Deuteron Exchange, and H-Atom Abstraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Petrovici

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-produced electrons initiate various reaction processes that are important to radiation damage to biomolecules. In this work, the site of attachment of the prehydrated electrons with methyl acetoacetate (MAA, CH3-CO-CH2-COOCH3 at 77 K and subsequent reactions of the anion radical (CH3-CO•−-CH2-COOCH3 in the 77 to ca. 170 K temperature range have been investigated in homogeneous H2O and D2O aqueous glasses by electron spin resonance (ESR spectroscopy. At 77 K, the prehydrated electron attaches to MAA forming the anion radical in which the electron is delocalized over the two carbonyl groups. This species readily protonates to produce the protonated electron adduct radical CH3-C(•OH-CH2-COOCH3. The ESR spectrum of CH3-C(•OH-CH2-COOCH3 in H2O shows line components due to proton hyperfine couplings of the methyl and methylene groups. Whereas, the ESR spectrum of CH3-C(•OH-CH2-COOCH3 in D2O glass shows only the line components due to proton hyperfine couplings of CH3 group. This is expected since the methylene protons in MAA are readily exchangeable in D2O. On stepwise annealing to higher temperatures (ca. 150 to 170 K, CH3-C(•OH-CH2-COOCH3 undergoes bimolecular H-atom abstraction from MAA to form the more stable radical, CH3-CO-CH•-COOCH3. Theoretical calculations using density functional theory (DFT support the radical assignments.

  17. Proton exchange membrane micro fuel cells on 3D porous silicon gas diffusion layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouassi, S.; Gautier, G.; Thery, J.; Desplobain, S.; Borella, M.; Ventura, L.; Laurent, J.-Y.

    2012-10-01

    Since the 90's, porous silicon has been studied and implemented in many devices, especially in MEMS technology. In this article, we present a new approach to build miniaturized proton exchange membrane micro-fuel cells using porous silicon as a hydrogen diffusion layer. In particular, we propose an innovative process to build micro fuel cells from a “corrugated iron like” 3D structured porous silicon substrates. This structure is able to increase up to 40% the cell area keeping a constant footprint on the silicon wafer. We propose here a process route to perform electrochemically 3D porous gas diffusion layers and to deposit fuel cell active layers on such substrates. The prototype peak power performance was measured to be 90 mW cm-2 in a “breathing configuration” at room temperature. These performances are less than expected if we compare with a reference 2D micro fuel cell. Actually, the active layer deposition processes are not fully optimized but this prototype demonstrates the feasibility of these 3D devices.

  18. Nitrogen-Coordinated Single Cobalt Atom Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao Xia; Cullen, David A; Pan, Yung-Tin; Hwang, Sooyeon; Wang, Maoyu; Feng, Zhenxing; Wang, Jingyun; Engelhard, Mark H; Zhang, Hanguang; He, Yanghua; Shao, Yuyan; Su, Dong; More, Karren L; Spendelow, Jacob S; Wu, Gang

    2018-01-24

    Due to the Fenton reaction, the presence of Fe and peroxide in electrodes generates free radicals causing serious degradation of the organic ionomer and the membrane. Pt-free and Fe-free cathode catalysts therefore are urgently needed for durable and inexpensive proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Herein, a high-performance nitrogen-coordinated single Co atom catalyst is derived from Co-doped metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) through a one-step thermal activation. Aberration-corrected electron microscopy combined with X-ray absorption spectroscopy virtually verifies the CoN4 coordination at an atomic level in the catalysts. Through investigating effects of Co doping contents and thermal activation temperature, an atomically Co site dispersed catalyst with optimal chemical and structural properties has achieved respectable activity and stability for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in challenging acidic media (e.g., half-wave potential of 0.80 V vs reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE). The performance is comparable to Fe-based catalysts and 60 mV lower than Pt/C -60 μg Pt cm-2 ). Fuel cell tests confirm that catalyst activity and stability can translate to high-performance cathodes in PEMFCs. The remarkably enhanced ORR performance is attributed to the presence of well-dispersed CoN4 active sites embedded in 3D porous MOF-derived carbon particles, omitting any inactive Co aggregates. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Polycondensation of Tetrahydrofuran with Phthalic Anhydride Induced By a Proton Exchanged Montmorillonite Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Belbachir

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: “Maghnite” a montmorillonite sheet silicate clay, exchanged with protons to produce “H-Maghnite” is an efficient catalyst for polymerization of many vinylic and heterocyclic monomers (Belbachir, M. U.S. Patent. 066969.0101 –2001. The structure compositions of both “Maghnite” and “H-Maghnite” have been developed. This catalyst was used for the polycondensation of the tetrahydrofuran with phthalic anhydride. The polymerization was performed under suitable conditions at temperature (40°C, in presence of acetic anhydride. Experiments revealed that polymerization induced by “H-Maghnite”, proceed in bulk and the conversion increases with increasing “H-Maghnite” proportion.

  20. High-Temperature Proton-Conducting Ceramics Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayir, Ali; Dynys, Frederick W.; Berger, M. H.

    2005-01-01

    High-temperature protonic conductors (HTPC) are needed for hydrogen separation, hydrogen sensors, fuel cells, and hydrogen production from fossil fuels. The HTPC materials for hydrogen separation at high temperatures are foreseen to be metal oxides with the perovskite structure A(sup 2+)B(sup 4+)C(sup 2-, sub 3) and with the trivalent cation (M(sup 3+)) substitution at the B(sup 4+)-site to introduce oxygen vacancies. The high affinity for hydrogen ions (H(sup +)) is advantageous for protonic transport, but it increases the reactivity toward water (H2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2), which can lead to premature membrane failure. In addition, there are considerable technological challenges related to the processing of HTPC materials. The high melting point and multi-cation chemistry of HTPC materials creates difficulties in in achieving high-density, single-phase membranes by solid-state sintering. The presence of secondary phases and grain-boundary interfaces are detrimental to the protonic conduction and environmental stability of polycrystalline HTPC materials.

  1. An Investigation of Proton Conductivity of Vinyltriazole-Grafted PVDF Proton Exchange Membranes Prepared via Photoinduced Grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinan Sezgin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs are considered to be a promising technology for clean and efficient power generation in the twenty-first century. In this study, high performance of poly(vinylidene fluoride (PVDF and proton conductivity of poly(1-vinyl-1,2,4-triazole (PVTri were combined in a graft copolymer, PVDF-g-PVTri, by the polymerization of 1-vinyl-1,2,4-triazole on a PVDF based matrix under UV light in one step. The polymers were doped with triflic acid (TA at different stoichiometric ratios with respect to triazole units and the anhydrous polymer electrolyte membranes were prepared. All samples were characterized by FTIR and 1H-NMR spectroscopies. Their thermal properties were examined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. TGA demonstrated that the PVDF-g-PVTri and PVDF-g-PVTri-(TAx membranes were thermally stable up to 390°C and 330°C, respectively. NMR and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS results demonstrated that PVDF-g-PVTri was successfully synthesized with a degree of grafting of 21%. PVDF-g-PVTri-(TA3 showed a maximum proton conductivity of 6×10-3 Scm−1 at 150°C and anhydrous conditions. CV study illustrated that electrochemical stability domain for PVDF-g-PVTri-(TA3 extended over 4.0 V.

  2. Multiblock copolymers with highly sulfonated blocks containing di- and tetrasulfonated arylene sulfone segments for proton exchange membrane fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamuku, Shogo; Jannasch, Patric [Polymer and Materials Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Lund University (Sweden)

    2012-01-15

    Multiblock copoly(arylene ether sulfone)s with different block lengths and ionic contents are tailored for durable and proton-conducting electrolyte membranes. Two series of fully aromatic copolymers are prepared by coupling reactions between non-sulfonated hydrophobic precursor blocks and highly sulfonated hydrophilic precursor blocks containing either fully disulfonated diarylsulfone or fully tetrasulfonated tetraaryldisulfone segments. The sulfonic acid groups are exclusively introduced in ortho positions to the sulfone bridges to impede desulfonation reactions and give the blocks ion exchange capacities (IECs) of 4.1 and 4.6 meq. g{sup -1}, respectively. Solvent cast block copolymer membranes show well-connected hydrophilic nanophase domains for proton transport and high decomposition temperatures above 310 C under air. Despite higher IEC values, membranes containing tetrasulfonated tetraaryldisulfone segments display a markedly lower water uptake than the corresponding ones with disulfonated diarylsulfone segments when immersed in water at 100 C, presumably because of the much higher chain stiffness and glass transition temperature of the former segments. The former membranes have proton conductivities in level of a perfluorosulfonic acid membrane (NRE212) under fully humidified conditions. A membrane with an IEC of 1.83 meq. g{sup -1} reaches above 6 mS cm{sup -1} under 30% relative humidity at 80 C, to be compared with 10 mS cm{sup -1} for NRE212 under the same conditions. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Intermediate temperature proton conductors for PEM fuel cells based on phosphonic acid as protogenic group: a progress report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steininger, H; Schuster, M; Kreuer, K D; Kaltbeitzel, A; Bingöl, B; Meyer, W H; Schauff, S; Brunklaus, G; Maier, J; Spiess, H W

    2007-04-21

    The melting behaviour and transport properties of straight chain alkanes mono- and difunctionalized with phosphonic acid groups have been investigated as a function of their length. The increase of melting temperature and decrease of proton conductivity with increasing chain length is suggested to be the consequence of an increasing ordering of the alkane segments which constrains the free aggregation of the phosphonic acid groups. However, the proton mobility is reduced to a greater extent than the proton diffusion coefficient indicating an increasing cooperativity of proton transport with increasing length of the alkane segment. The results clearly indicate that the "spacer concept", which had been proven successful in the optimization of the proton conductivity of heterocycle based systems, fails in the case of phosphonic acid functionalized polymers. Instead, a very high concentration of phosphonic acid functional groups forming "bulky" hydrogen bonded aggregates is suggested to be essential for obtaining very high proton conductivity. Aggregation is also suggested to reduce condensation reactions generally observed in phosphonic acid containing systems. On the basis of this understanding, the proton conductivities of poly(vinyl phosphonic acid) and poly(meta-phenylene phosphonic acid) are discussed. Though both polymers exhibit a substantial concentration of phosphonic acid groups, aggregation seems to be constrained to such an extent that intrinsic proton conductivity is limited to values below sigma = 10(-3) S cm(-1) at T = 150 degrees C. The results suggest that different immobilization concepts have to be developed in order to minimize the conductivity reduction compared to the very high intrinsic proton conductivity of neat phosphonic acid under quasi dry conditions. In the presence of high water activities, however, (as usually present in PEM fuel cells) the very high ion exchange capacities (IEC) possible for phosphonic acid functionalized ionomers (IEC

  4. Anisotropic amplification of proton transport in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Fawaz, Mohammed; Devendrachari, Mruthyunjayachari Chattanahalli; Gautam, Manu; Kottaichamy, Alagar Raja; Shafi, Shahid Pottachola; Thotiyl, Musthafa Ottakam

    2017-07-01

    Though graphene oxide (GO) membrane shuttles protons under humid conditions, it suffer severe disintegration and anhydrous conditions lead to abysmal ionic conductivity. The trade-off between mechanical integrity and ionic conductivity challenge the amplification of GO's ionic transport under anhydrous conditions. We show anisotropic amplification of GO's ionic transport with a selective amplification of in plane contribution under anhydrous conditions by doping it with a plant extract, phytic acid (PA). The hygroscopic nature of PA stabilized interlayer water molecules and peculiar geometry of sbnd OH functionalities around saturated hydrocarbon ring anisotropically enhanced ionic transport amplifying the fuel cell performance metrics.

  5. Analysis of heat exchanger network for temperature fluctuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Zunlong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Subject to temperature disturbance, exchangers in heat exchanger network will interact. It is necessary to evaluate the degree of temperature fluctuation in the network. There is inherently linear relationship between output and inlet temperatures of heat exchanger network. Based on this, the concept of temperature-change sensitivity coefficient was put forward. Quantitative influence of temperature fluctuation in the network was carried out in order to examine transmission character of temperature fluctuation in the system. And the information was obtained for improving the design quality of heat exchanger network. Favorable results were obtained by the introduced method compared with the experimental results. These results will assist engineers to distinguish primary and secondary influencing factors, which can be used in observing and controlling influencing factors accurately.

  6. 160 C PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE (PEM) FUEL CELL SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L.G. Marianowski

    2001-12-21

    The objectives of this program were: (a) to develop and demonstrate a new polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) system that operates up to 160 C temperatures and at ambient pressures for stationary power applications, and (b) to determine if the GTI-molded composite graphite bipolar separator plate could provide long term operational stability at 160 C or higher. There are many reasons that fuel cell research has been receiving much attention. Fuel cells represent environmentally friendly and efficient sources of electrical power generation that could use a variety of fuel sources. The Gas Technology Institute (GTI), formerly Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), is focused on distributed energy stationary power generation systems. Currently the preferred method for hydrogen production for stationary power systems is conversion of natural gas, which has a vast distribution system in place. However, in the conversion of natural gas into a hydrogen-rich fuel, traces of carbon monoxide are produced. Carbon monoxide present in the fuel gas will in time cumulatively poison, or passivate the active platinum catalysts used in the anodes of PEMFC's operating at temperatures of 60 to 80 C. Various fuel processors have incorporated systems to reduce the carbon monoxide to levels below 10 ppm, but these require additional catalytic section(s) with sensors and controls for effective carbon monoxide control. These CO cleanup systems must also function especially well during transient load operation where CO can spike 300% or more. One way to circumvent the carbon monoxide problem is to operate the fuel cell at a higher temperature where carbon monoxide cannot easily adsorb onto the catalyst and poison it. Commercially available polymer membranes such as Nafion{trademark} are not capable of operation at temperatures sufficiently high to prevent this. Hence this project investigated a new polymer membrane alternative to Nafion{trademark} that is capable of operation at

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of radiation grafted FEP films as proton exchange membranes: Effects of the side chain length

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xue; Zhao, Yang; Li, Weiwei

    2017-01-01

    In order to study the microstructure of the prepared potential proton exchange membrane (PEM), molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to lucubrate the transport behavior of water molecules and hydronium ions inside the hydrated sulfonated styrene grafted fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP...... was supposed to exhibit the highest proton conductivity, that is 115.69 mS cm-1. All of the supposed membrane models presented good proton conductivity that could definitely meet the application requirements of the proton exchange membranes. The MD simulations can provide an insight to the chain structure...

  8. Sulfonic acid-functionalized hybrid organic-inorganic proton exchange membranes synthesized by sol-gel using 3-mercaptopropyl trimethoxysilane (MPTMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosa, J.; Durán, A.; Aparicio, M.

    2015-11-01

    Organic/inorganic hybrid membranes based on (3-glycidoxypropyl) trimethoxysilane (GPTMS) and 3-mercaptopropyl trimethoxysilane (MPTMS) have been prepared by sol-gel method and organic polymerisation, as candidate materials for proton exchange membranes in direct alcohol fuel cell (DMFC) applications. The -SH groups of MPTMS are oxidized to sulfonic acid groups, which are attributed to enhance the proton conductivity of hybrid membranes. FTIR, XPS and contact angle were used to characterize and confirm the hybrid structure and oxidation reaction progress. Membranes characterization also includes ion exchange capacity, water uptake, methanol permeability and proton conductivity to confirm their applicability in fuel cells. All the membranes were homogeneous and thermally and chemically resistant. In particular, the hybrid membranes demonstrated proton conductivities as high as 0.16 S cm-1 at high temperature, while exhibiting a low methanol permeability as compared to Nafion®. These results are associated with proton conducting paths through the silica pseudo-PEO network in which sulfonic acid groups work as proton donor.

  9. Chitosan/silica coated carbon nanotubes composite proton exchange membranes for fuel cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hai; Gong, Chunli; Wang, Jie; Liu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Huanli; Cheng, Fan; Wang, Guangjin; Zheng, Genwen; Qin, Caiqin; Wen, Sheng

    2016-01-20

    Silica-coated carbon nanotubes (SCNTs), which were obtained by a simple sol-gel method, were utilized in preparation of chitosan/SCNTs (CS/SCNTs) composite membranes. The thermal and oxidative stability, morphology, mechanical properties, water uptake and proton conductivity of CS/SCNTs composite membranes were investigated. The insulated and hydrophilic silica layer coated on CNTs eliminates the risk of electronic short-circuiting and enhances the interaction between SCNTs and chitosan to ensure the homogenous dispersion of SCNTs, although the water uptake of CS/SCNTs membranes is reduced owing to the decrease of the effective number of the amino functional groups of chitosan. The CS/SCNTs composite membranes are superior to the pure CS membrane in thermal and oxidative stability, mechanical properties and proton conductivity. The results of this study suggest that CS/SCNTs composite membranes exhibit promising potential for practical application in proton exchange membranes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Intermediate Temperature Proton Conductors – Why and How

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qingfeng; Aili, David; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    represented by early fundamental material research for ionic electrolytes. Such materials, most likely based on proton conductors, are expected to bring a new generation of the technologies: fuel cells by direct oxidation or internal splitting of biofuels such as methanol and ethanol, as well as efficient...... water electrolyzer, preferrably a CO2 co-electrolyzer for generation of organic liquid fuels. Such technologies are of essential simplicity and allow for kinetic enhancement so that the need for precious metal catalysts as in low temperature systems might be eliminated. At the same time......The current technologies of fuel cells and electrolzers are based on ionic conducting electrolyte materials exclusively operational either in the low (20 - 200ºC) or high (600 - 1000ºC) temperature ranges. The intermediate temperature window, especially between 200 and 400 ºC, is still only...

  11. Transient computation fluid dynamics modeling of a single proton exchange membrane fuel cell with serpentine channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guilin; Fan, Jianren

    The proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) has become a promising candidate for the power source of electrical vehicles because of its low pollution, low noise and especially fast startup and transient responses at low temperatures. A transient, three-dimensional, non-isothermal and single-phase mathematical model based on computation fluid dynamics has been developed to describe the transient process and the dynamic characteristics of a PEMFC with a serpentine fluid channel. The effects of water phase change and heat transfer, as well as electrochemical kinetics and multicomponent transport on the cell performance are taken into account simultaneously in this comprehensive model. The developed model was employed to simulate a single laboratory-scale PEMFC with an electrode area about 20 cm 2. The dynamic behavior of the characteristic parameters such as reactant concentration, pressure loss, temperature on the membrane surface of cathode side and current density during start-up process were computed and are discussed in detail. Furthermore, transient responses of the fuel cell characteristics during step changes and sinusoidal changes in the stoichiometric flow ratio of the cathode inlet stream, cathode inlet stream humidity and cell voltage are also studied and analyzed and interesting undershoot/overshoot behavior of some variables was found. It was also found that the startup and transient response time of a PEM fuel cell is of the order of a second, which is similar to the simulation results predicted by most models. The result is an important guide for the optimization of PEMFC designs and dynamic operation.

  12. POLYSULFONE COMPOSED OF POLYANILINE NANOPARTICLES AS NANOCOMPOSITE PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE IN MICROBIAL FUEL CELL

    OpenAIRE

    Mostafa Ghasemi; Mostafa Rahimnejad; Chakavak Esmaeili; Wan Ramli Wan Daud; Mohd Shahbudin Masdar; Edy Herianto Majlan; Sedky H.A. Hassan; Javed Alam; Manal Ismail; Mansour Saleh Alhoshan

    2012-01-01

    Proton exchange membranes play a critical role in the performance of Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) but their high price was always a big deal for commercialization of MFCs. In the present study, doped and undoped polyaniline nanoparticles/polysulfone nanocomposites membranes as a new type of PEM, were fabricated and applied in the MFC and their performance was compared with Nafion 117 as a traditional and expensive PEM. The obtained results show that MFC working by undoped Pani/Ps generated 78....

  13. Synthesis and Characterization of Sulfonated Polyimides as Proton Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gunduz, Nazan

    2001-01-01

    Series of homo- and copolyimides containing controlled degrees of sulfonic acid ion conducting pendant groups have been synthesized from both phthalic (five-) and naphthalic (six-membered) dianhydrides and appropriate wholly aromatic diamines and heterocyclic analogues. The goal is to identify thermally and hydrolytically stable ion conducting polymers (ICP) suitable as proton exchange membranes, PEM, for fuel cells. The candidate ICP's have been synthesized and characterized for molecular we...

  14. Intracellular Proton-Transfer Mutants in a CLC Cl-/H+ Exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, H.; Miller, C

    2009-01-01

    CLC-ec1, a bacterial homologue of the CLC family's transporter subclass, catalyzes transmembrane exchange of Cl- and H+. Mutational analysis based on the known structure reveals several key residues required for coupling H+ to the stoichiometric countermovement of Cl-. E148 (Gluex) transfers protons between extracellular water and the protein interior, and E203 (Gluin) is thought to function analogously on the intracellular face of the protein. Mutation of either residue eliminates H+ transport while preserving Cl- transport. We tested the role of Gluin by examining structural and functional properties of mutants at this position. Certain dissociable side chains (E, D, H, K, R, but not C and Y) retain H+/Cl- exchanger activity to varying degrees, while other mutations (V, I, or C) abolish H+ coupling and severely inhibit Cl- flux. Transporters substituted with other nonprotonatable side chains (Q, S, and A) show highly impaired H+ transport with substantial Cl- transport. Influence on H+ transport of side chain length and acidity was assessed using a single-cysteine mutant to introduce non-natural side chains. Crystal structures of both coupled (E203H) and uncoupled (E203V) mutants are similar to wild type. The results support the idea that Gluin is the internal proton-transfer residue that delivers protons from intracellular solution to the protein interior, where they couple to Cl- movements to bring about Cl-/H+ exchange.

  15. Applying hot wire anemometry to directly measure the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell - Part 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Al Shakhshir, Saher

    2015-01-01

    In order to accurately determine the water balance of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell it has recently been suggested to employ constant temperature anemometry (CTA), a frequently used method to measure the velocity of a fluid stream. CTA relies on convective heat transfer around a heated wire...... the equations required to calculate the heat transfer coefficient and the resulting voltage signal as function of the fuel cell water balance. The most critical and least understood part is the determination of the Nusselt number to calculate the heat transfer between the wire and the gas stream. Different...... for all current densities. Therefore, only one curve-fit equation will be required. The voltage curve E0 is an arbitrary calibration curve, and this can be conveniently chosen to be the voltage signal for a dry hydrogen stream at a given temperature and various flow rates which can be easily measured....

  16. Proton exchange fuel cell : the design, construction and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinzen, M.R.; Simoes, G.C.; Da Silva, L. [Univ. do Vale do Itajai, Sao Jose, SC (Brazil). Lab. de Pesquisa em Energia; Fiori, M.A.; Paula, M.M.S. [Univ. do Extremo Sul Catarinense, Santa Catarina (Brazil). Lab. de Sintese de Complexos Multifuncionais; Benavides, R. [Centro de Investigacion en Quimica Aplicada, Coahuila (Mexico)

    2010-07-15

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) convert the chemical energy stored in the fuel directly into electrical energy without intermediate steps. The PEMFC operates at a relatively low operating temperature making it a good choice for mobile applications, but a high power density is needed in order to decrease the total weight of the vehicles. This paper presented a simple methodology to construct a PEMFC-type fuel cell, with particular reference to the gaseous diffuser, cell structure, the fixing plate, mounting bracket, gas distribution plates, and the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). The geometric design and meshing of the PEMFC were also described. The electrode was made using graphite with flow-field geometry. The PEMFC was tested for 100 hour of continuous work, during which time the current and voltage produced were monitored in order to evaluate the performance of the PEMFC. The materials used in the preparation of the fuel cell proved to be suitable. There was no loss of efficiency during the tests. The most relevant aspects affecting the PEMFC design were examined in an effort to optimize the performance of the cell. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Microwave Assisted Reduction of Pt-Catalyst by N-Phenyl-p-Phenylenediamine for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ming-Jer Tsai; Tar-Hwa Hsieh; Yen-Zen Wang; Ko-Shan Ho; Chia-Yun Chang

    2017-01-01

    The presence of N-phenyl-p-phenylenediamine (PPDA: a dimer of aniline) during microwave (MW) irradiation can significantly improve Pt-loading on the XC72 carbon matrix as a catalyst support of proton exchange membrane fuel cells...

  18. Heat exchangers and recuperators for high temperature waste gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, H.

    General considerations on high temperature waste heat recovery are presented. Internal heat recovery through combustion air preheating and external heat recovery are addressed. Heat transfer and pressure drop in heat exchanger design are discussed.

  19. Development of multiblock copolymers with novel hydroquinone-based hydrophilic blocks for proton exchange membrane (PEM) applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae-Seung; Lane, Ozma; McGrath, James E.

    Hydrophilic-hydrophobic sequenced multiblock copolymers were synthesized and evaluated for use as proton exchange membranes (PEMs). The multiblock copolymers were prepared by a coupling reaction between fully disulfonated hydroquinone-based hydrophilic oligomers (HQS100) and unsulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) hydrophobic oligomers (BPS0). The hydroquinone-based hydrophilic oligomers possess several advantages over previously utilized biphenol-based hydrophilic oligomers (BPS100), including higher hydrophilicity, enhanced nano-phase separation with hydrophobic segments, and lower cost. To maintain the hydrophilic-hydrophobic sequences in the system, the coupling reactions were conducted at low temperature (e.g., 105 °C) to avoid ether-ether exchange reactions. The coupling reaction was solvent sensitive due to a low reactivity of the hydroquinone-phenoxide end-group on the HQS100. All copolymers produced tough ductile films when cast from an NMP or DMF solution. Fundamental membrane parameters including water uptake, proton conductivity, and swelling ratio were investigated along with morphology characterizations by atomic force microscopy (AFM).

  20. Towards neat methanol operation of direct methanol fuel cells: a novel self-assembled proton exchange membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Cai, Weiwei; Ma, Liying; Zhang, Yunfeng; Chen, Zhangxian; Cheng, Hansong

    2015-04-18

    We report here a novel proton exchange membrane with remarkably high methanol-permeation resistivity and excellent proton conductivity enabled by carefully designed self-assembled ionic conductive channels. A direct methanol fuel cell utilizing the membrane performs well with a 20 M methanol solution, very close to the concentration of neat methanol.

  1. High-temperature self-circulating thermoacoustic heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhaus, S.; Swift, G. W.; Reid, R. S.

    2005-07-01

    Thermoacoustic and Stirling engines and refrigerators use heat exchangers to transfer heat between the oscillating flow of their thermodynamic working fluids and external heat sources and sinks. An acoustically driven heat-exchange loop uses an engine's own pressure oscillations to steadily circulate its own thermodynamic working fluid through a physically remote high-temperature heat source without using moving parts, allowing for a significant reduction in the cost and complexity of thermoacoustic and Stirling heat exchangers. The simplicity and flexibility of such heat-exchanger loops will allow thermoacoustic and Stirling machines to access diverse heat sources and sinks. Measurements of the temperatures at the interface between such a heat-exchange loop and the hot end of a thermoacoustic-Stirling engine are presented. When the steady flow is too small to flush out the mixing chamber in one acoustic cycle, the heat transfer to the regenerator is excellent, with important implications for practical use.

  2. The production of sulfonated chitosan-sodium alginate found in brown algae (Sargassum sp.) composite membrane as proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wafiroh, Siti; Pudjiastuti, Pratiwi; Sari, Ilma Indana

    2016-03-01

    The majority of energy was used in this period is from fossil fuel, which getting decreased in the future. The objective of this research is production and characterization of sulfonated chitosan-sodium alginate found in brown algae (Sargassum sp.) composite membrane as Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) for alternative energy. PEMFC was produced with 4 variations (w/w) ratio between chitosan and sodium alginate, 8 : 0, 8 : 1, 8 : 2, 8 : 4 (w/w). The production of membrane was mixed sodium alginate solution into chitosan solution and sulfonated with H2SO4 0.72 N. The characterization of the PEM was uses Modulus Young analysis, water swelling, ion exchange capacity, FTIR, SEM, DTA, methanol permeability and proton conductivity. The result of the research, showed that the optimum membrane was with ratio 8 : 2 (w/w) that the Modulus Young 8564 kN/m2, water swelling 31.86%, ion exchange capacity 1.020 meq/g, proton conductivity 8,8 × 10-6 S/cm, methanol permeability 1.90 × 10-8 g/cm2s and glass transition temperature (Tg) 100.9 °C, crystalline temperature (Tc) 227.6 °C, and the melting temperature (Tm) 267.9 °C.

  3. Proton conducting ceramics for use in intermediate temperature proton conducting fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browning, D.; Weston, M.; Lakeman, J. B.; Jones, P. [Qinetiq Haslar Marine Technology Park, Gosport, Hampshire (United Kingdom); Cherry, M. [Cambridge Discovery Chemistry, Merrifield Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Irvine, J. T. S.; Corcoran, D. J. D. [University of St, Andrews, School of Chemistry, (United Kingdom)

    2002-01-01

    A new proton conducting perovskite material Sr{sub 3}CaZr{sub 0}.9Ta{sub 1}.1O{sub 8}.55 (SCZT) was synthesized and the mode of conduction was demonstrated through modelling. Changes in protonic conductivity under fuel cell conditions were examined using AC impedance techniques. Result showed that the material was less conducive than the standard BaCe{sub 0}.95Y{sub 0}.05O{sub 2}.975 material, although it was more stable under reformate conditions. The maximum power output generated by the SCZT85 cell was 0.2mW/sq cm at 600 degrees C. The low power densities reported in this study may be improved upon by utilizing thin film technologies, or even by simple spraying. Results obtained at low temperatures suggest the possibility of developing an intermediate fuel cell capable of bridging the gap between PEM and SOFC/MCFC systems. 8 refs., 1 tab., 10 figs.

  4. Improved durability of proton exchange membrane fuel cells by introducing Sn (IV) oxide into electrodes using an ion exchange method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, M. G.; Larsen, M. J.; Andersen, S. M.

    2017-03-01

    Electrodes of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs), consisting of catalyst-coated gas diffusion layers, were subjected to an optimized ion exchange procedure, in which tin (IV) oxide (SnO2) nanoparticles were introduced into them. Both methanol and sulfuric acid were tested as ion exchange solvents. SnO2 has previously been shown to exhibit radical scavenging abilities towards radicals inside the electrocatalyst layers. Its presence inside the electrodes was confirmed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence. After exposure to an accelerated stress test in a three-electrode setup, the electrodes containing SnO2 were found to have retained approximately 73.0% of their original Pt, while only 53.2% was retained in electrodes treated identically, but without Sn. Similarly, the SnO2-treated electrodes also experienced a smaller loss in electrochemical surface area in comparison to before the accelerated stress test. A membrane electrode assembly (MEA) constructed with a SnO2-containing anode was evaluated over 500 h. The results showed remarkably reduced OCV decay rate and end of test hydrogen crossover compared to the control MEA, indicating that SnO2 aids in impeding membrane thinning and pinhole formation. The results point toward a positive effect of SnO2 on fuel cell durability, by reducing the degradation of the membrane as well as of the ionomer in the electrocatalyst layer.

  5. Synthesis of Highly Sulfonated Poly(arylene ether Containing Multiphenyl for Proton Exchange Membrane Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chiang Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of sterically hindered, sulfonated, poly(arylene ether polymers were synthesized by nucleophilic polycondensation reaction using 4,4′′′′-difluoro-3,3′′′′-bistrifluoromethyl-2′′,3′′,5′′,6′′-tetraphenyl-[1,1′;4′,1′′;4′′,1′′′;4′′′,1′′′′]-pentaphenyl and 4,4′-biphenol and were prepared through postpolymerization sulfonation. The chemical structures were confirmed by 1H NMR. Subsequent to sulfonation, solvent-casting membranes were provided ion exchange capacity (IEC values ranging from 0.39 to 2.90 mmol/g. Proton conductivities of membranes ranged from 143 to 228 mS/cm at 80°C under fully humidified conditions which were higher than that of Nafion 117. The membrane also exhibited considerably dimension stability, oxidative stability, and hydrolytic stability. The microphase structure was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and the ionic aggregation of sulfonic acid groups exhibited spherical ionic clusters with well-developed phase separated morphology. The results indicated that the membranes are promising candidates for application as proton exchange membranes. This investigation demonstrates introducing multiphenylated moieties to create a high free volume polymer that provides dimensionally stable and high proton conductivity membranes.

  6. Proton exchange in Y-cut $LiNbO_{3}$

    CERN Document Server

    Kuneva, M; Pashtrapanska, M; Nedkov, I

    2000-01-01

    In the present work, planar waveguides in Y-cut LiNbO/sub 3/ were obtained using modified proton exchange (PE) conditions of: PE and subsequent annealing (APE), PE in buffered melts (BMPE), APE followed by PE (APE+PE), and PE in vapours (VPE). Benzoic acid was used as the proton source in the PE, BMPE, and (APE+PE) experiments. Cinnamic acid was used for obtaining VPE-waveguides. The main aim was to prevent surface damage of Y-cut crystals due to the strains introduced by proton exchange. The investigations performed showed that the surface etching is probably due to lattice deformation anisotropy leading to higher strains in PE Y-cut samples. Most encouraging results were observed, when an optimized (APE+PE)- procedure was used for waveguide formation. This method is very attractive for the fast preparation of deep high-index and low-loss waveguides in Y-cut LiNbO/sub 3/. This procedure allows passive and active elements to be produced in one and the same Y-cut substrate of LiNbO/sub 3/. Similar preliminary ...

  7. Electrocatalytic reduction of acetone in a proton-exchange-membrane reactor: a model reaction for the electrocatalytic reduction of biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Sara K; Tompsett, Geoffrey A; Kim, Hyung Ju; Bae Kim, Won; Huber, George W

    2012-12-01

    Acetone was electrocatalytically reduced to isopropanol in a proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) reactor on an unsupported platinum cathode. Protons needed for the reduction were produced on the unsupported Pt-Ru anode from either hydrogen gas or electrolysis of water. The current efficiency (the ratio of current contributing to the desired chemical reaction to the overall current) and reaction rate for acetone conversion increased with increasing temperature or applied voltage for the electrocatalytic acetone/water system. The reaction rate and current efficiency went through a maximum with respect to acetone concentration. The reaction rate for acetone conversion increased with increasing temperature for the electrocatalytic acetone/hydrogen system. Increasing the applied voltage for the electrocatalytic acetone/hydrogen system decreased the current efficiency due to production of hydrogen gas. Results from this study demonstrate the commercial feasibility of using PEM reactors to electrocatalytically reduce biomass-derived oxygenates into renewable fuels and chemicals. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Collective proton transfer in ordinary ice: local environments, temperature dependence and deuteration effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drechsel-Grau, Christof; Marx, Dominik

    2017-01-25

    The transfer of multiple protons in hydrogen-bonded networks usually occurs one proton at a time. At sufficiently high temperatures, each proton transfers via thermally activated hopping along its hydrogen bond, thereby moving a charge defect through the network. At low temperatures, quantum-mechanical tunnelling might set in instead, thus avoiding hopping over the energy barriers. In the case of several transferring protons, independent thermal hopping or quantum tunnelling of the individual protons becomes less favourable because of a significant creation of charge defects. In individual molecules or hydrogen-bonded molecular complexes, for instance, double proton transfer is often found to be concerted. Multiple proton transfer that avoids charge defects can occur in cyclic topologies built from several hydrogen bonds that allow for directional chains of proton transfer. This requires perfect proton order within these rings, which imposes handedness and thus chirality, and changes parity upon transfer of all protons. Ordinary ice, which is hexagonal ice Ih, is the most stable form of crystalline ice obtained upon freezing liquid water at ambient pressure and consists of interconnected six rings of oxygen atoms that host six protons each. These hexagonal rings remain proton disordered even down to low temperatures, as heralded by the residual entropy of ice Ih. However, owing to combinatorics, a certain number of these six rings is proton ordered in macroscopic crystals. These chiral hexameric rings might support coherent tunnelling of the hosted protons. Indeed, there is some evidence in the recent literature, both experimental and simulational, that correlated tunnelling of all six protons might be possible in proton-ordered six rings in ice Ih if temperatures are low enough. In this Perspective, the key ideas and previous findings will be reviewed in the light of relevant experiments with a focus on available ab initio path integral simulation work

  9. Diluted melt proton exchange slab waveguides in LiNbO3: A new fabrication and characterization method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veng, Torben; Skettrup, Torben

    1997-01-01

    A method of dilute-melt proton exchange employing a mixture of glycerol and KHSO4 with lithium benzoate added is used to fabricate planar waveguides in c-cut LiNbO3. With this exchange melt system the waveguide refractive index profiles can be fabricated with a high degree of reproducibility. In ...

  10. The Effects of the Heat and Moisture Exchanger on Humidity, Airway Temperature, and Core Body Temperature

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Delventhal, Mary

    1999-01-01

    Findings from several studies have demonstrated that the use of a heat and moisture exchanger increases airway humidity, which in turn increases mean airway temperature and prevents decreases in core body temperature...

  11. Preparation and properties of high performance nanocomposite proton exchange membrane for fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Feng; Yen, Chuan-Yu; Ma, Chen-Chi M.; Liao, Shu-Hang; Hung, Chih-Hung; Hsiao, Yi-Hsiu

    Various spatially enlarged organoclays were prepared by using poly(oxyproplene)-backboned quaternary ammonium salts of various molecular weights M w 230, 400 and 2000 as the intercalating agents for Na +-montmorillonite. The modified MMT was utilized to improve the compatibility with Nafion ®. Sufficient interaction of the modified MMT with Nafion ® was studied by using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS). The performance of the Nafion ®/ m-MMT composite membranes for direct methanol fuel cell (DMFCs) was evaluated in terms of water uptake, ion exchange capacity (IEC), methanol permeability, proton conductivity, and cell performance. The methanol permeability of the composite membrane decreased with the increasing of m-MMT content. The proton conductivity of the membrane was lowered slightly from that of pristine Nafion ® membrane. These results led to an essential improvement in the single-cell performance of DMFCs.

  12. Correlating Humidity-Dependent Ionically Conductive Surface Area with Transport Phenomena in Proton-Exchange Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Qinggang; Kusoglu, Ahmet; Lucas, Ivan T.; Clark, Kyle; Weber, Adam Z.; Kostecki, Robert

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this effort was to correlate the local surface ionic conductance of a Nafion? 212 proton-exchange membrane with its bulk and interfacial transport properties as a function of water content. Both macroscopic and microscopic proton conductivities were investigated at different relative humidity levels, using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and current-sensing atomic force microscopy (CSAFM). We were able to identify small ion-conducting domains that grew with humidity at the surface of the membrane. Numerical analysis of the surface ionic conductance images recorded at various relative humidity levels helped determine the fractional area of ion-conducting active sites. A simple square-root relationship between the fractional conducting area and observed interfacial mass-transport resistance was established. Furthermore, the relationship between the bulk ionic conductivity and surface ionic conductance pattern of the Nafion? membrane was examined.

  13. The application of Dow Chemical's perfluorinated membranes in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisman, G. A.

    1989-01-01

    Dow Chemical's research activities in fuel cells revolve around the development of perfluorosulfonic acid membranes useful as the proton transport medium and separator. Some of the performance characteristics which are typical for such membranes are outlined. The results of tests utilizing a new experimental membrane useful in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells are presented. The high voltage at low current densities can lead to higher system efficiencies while, at the same time, not sacrificing other critical properties pertinent to membrane fuel cell operation. A series of tests to determine response times indicated that on-off cycles are on the order of 80 milliseconds to reach 90 percent of full power. The IR free voltage at 100 amps/sq ft was determined and the results indicating a membrane/electrode package resistance to be .15 ohm-sq cm at 100 amps/sq ft.

  14. A review on the effect of proton exchange membranes in microbial fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Rahimnejad

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms in microbial fuel cells (MFC liberate electrons while the electron donors are consumed. In the anaerobic anode compartment, substrates such as carbohydrates are utilized and as a result bioelectricity is produced in the MFC. MFCs may be utilized as electricity generators in small devices such as biosensors. MFCs still face practical barriers such as low generated power and current density. Recently, a great deal of attention has been given to MFCs due to their ability to operate at mild conditions and using different biodegradable substrates as fuel. The MFC consists of anode and cathode compartments. Active microorganisms are actively catabolized to carbon sources, therefore generating bioelectricity. The produced electron is transmitted to the anode surface but the generated protons must pass through the proton exchange membrane (PEM in order to reach the cathode compartment. PEM as a key factor affecting electricity generation in MFCs has been investigated here and its importance fully discussed.

  15. Correlating humidity-dependent ionically conductive surface area with transport phenomena in proton-exchange membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qinggang; Kusoglu, Ahmet; Lucas, Ivan T; Clark, Kyle; Weber, Adam Z; Kostecki, Robert

    2011-10-13

    The objective of this effort was to correlate the local surface ionic conductance of a Nafion 212 proton-exchange membrane with its bulk and interfacial transport properties as a function of water content. Both macroscopic and microscopic proton conductivities were investigated at different relative humidity levels, using direct-current voltammetry and current-sensing atomic force microscopy (CSAFM). We were able to identify small ion-conducting domains that grew with humidity at the surface of the membrane. Numerical analysis of the surface ionic conductance images recorded at various relative humidity levels helped determine the fractional area of ion-conducting active sites. A simple square-root relationship between the fractional conducting area and observed interfacial mass-transport resistance was established. Furthermore, the relationship between the bulk ionic conductivity and surface ionic conductance pattern of the Nafion membrane was examined.

  16. Biodegradation and proton exchange using natural rubber in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfield, Jonathan; Ieropoulos, Ioannis; Rossiter, Jonathan; Greenman, John; Patton, David

    2013-11-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) generate electricity from waste but to date the technology's development and scale-up has been held-up by the need to incorporate expensive materials. A costly but vital component is the ion exchange membrane (IEM) which conducts protons between the anode and cathode electrodes. The current study compares natural rubber as an alternative material to two commercially available IEMs. Initially, the material proved impermeable to protons, but gradually a working voltage was generated that improved with time. After 6 months, MFCs with natural rubber membrane outperformed those with anion exchange membrane (AEM) but cation exchange membrane (CEM) produced 109 % higher power and 16 % higher current. After 11 months, polarisation experiments showed a decline in performance for both commercially available membranes while natural rubber continued to improve and generated 12 % higher power and 54 % higher current than CEM MFC. Scanning electron microscope images revealed distinct structural changes and the formation of micropores in natural latex samples that had been employed as IEM for 9 months. It is proposed that the channels and micropores formed as a result of biodegradation were providing pathways for proton transfer, reflected by the steady increase in power generation over time. These improvements may also be aided by the establishment of biofilms that, in contrast, caused declining performance in the CEM. The research demonstrates for the first time that the biodegradation of a ubiquitous waste material operating as IEM can benefit MFC performance while also improving the reactor's lifetime compared to commercially available membranes.

  17. Effects of sulfonated polyether-etherketone (SPEEK) and composite membranes on the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erce Senguel; Erdener, Huelya; Akay, R. Gueltekin; Yuecel, Hayrettin; Eroglu, inci [Chemical Engineering Department, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); Bac, Nurcan [Chemical Engineering Department, Yeditepe University, 34755 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2009-05-15

    Sulfonated polyether-etherketone (SPEEK) has a potential for proton exchange fuel cell applications. However, its conductivity and thermohydrolytic stability should be improved. In this study the proton conductivity was improved by addition of an aluminosilicate, zeolite beta. Moreover, thermohydrolytic stability was improved by blending poly-ether-sulfone (PES). Sulfonated polymers were characterized by H-NMR. Composite membranes prepared were characterized by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) for their proton conductivity. Degree of sulfonation (DS) values calculated from H-NMR results, and both proton conductivity and thermohydrolytic stability was found to strongly depend on DS. Therefore, DS values were controlled time in the range of 55-75% by controlling the reaction time. Zeolite beta fillers at different SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratios (20, 30, 40, 50) were synthesized and characterized by XRD, EDX, TGA, and SEM. The proton conductivity of plain SPEEK membrane (DS = 68%) was 0.06 S/cm at 60 C and the conductivity of the composite membrane containing of zeolite beta filled SPEEK was found to increase to 0.13 S/cm. Among the zeolite Beta/SPEEK composite membranes the best conductivity results were achieved with zeolite beta having a SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratio of 50 at 10 wt% loading. Single fuel cell tests performed at different operating temperatures indicated that SPES/SPEEK membrane is more stable hydrodynamically and also performed better than pristine SPEEK membranes which swell excessively. Membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were prepared by gas diffusion layer (GDL) spraying method. The highest performance of 400 mA/cm{sup 2} was obtained for SPEEK membrane (DS 56%) at 0.6 V for a H{sub 2}-O{sub 2}/PEMFC working at 1 atm and 70 C. At the same conditions Nafion {sup registered} 112 gave 660 mA/cm{sup 2}. It was observed that the operating temperature can be increased up to 90 C with polymer blends containing poly

  18. Mathematical Modeling of Cation Contamination in a Proton-exchange Membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Adam; Delacourt, Charles

    2008-09-11

    Transport phenomena in an ion-exchange membrane containing both H+ and K+ are described using multicomponent diffusion equations (Stefan-Maxwell). A model is developed for transport through a Nafion 112 membrane in a hydrogen-pump setup. The model results are analyzed to quantify the impact of cation contamination on cell potential. It is shown that limiting current densities can result due to a decrease in proton concentration caused by the build-up of contaminant ions. An average cation concentration of 30 to 40 percent is required for appreciable effects to be noticed under typical steady-state operating conditions.

  19. Forward two-photon exchange in elastic lepton-proton scattering and hyperfine-splitting correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomalak, Oleksandr [Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet, Institut fuer Kernphysik and PRISMA Cluster of Excellence, Mainz (Germany)

    2017-08-15

    We relate the forward two-photon exchange (TPE) amplitudes to integrals of the inclusive lepton-proton scattering cross sections. These relations yield an alternative way for the evaluation of the TPE correction to hyperfine-splitting (HFS) in the hydrogen-like atoms with an equivalent to the standard approach (Iddings, Drell and Sullivan) result implying the Burkhardt-Cottingham sum rule. For evaluation of the individual effects (e.g., elastic contribution) our approach yields a distinct result. We compare both methods numerically on examples of the elastic contribution and the full TPE correction to HFS in electronic and muonic hydrogen. (orig.)

  20. A Bayesian network fault diagnostic system for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riascos, Luis Alberto M.; Simoes, Marcelo G.; Miyagi, Paulo E.

    This paper considers the effects of different types of faults on a proton exchange membrane fuel cell model (PEMFC). Using databases (which record the fault effects) and probabilistic methods (such as the Bayesian-Score and Markov Chain Monte Carlo), a graphical-probabilistic structure for fault diagnosis is constructed. The graphical model defines the cause-effect relationship among the variables, and the probabilistic method captures the numerical dependence among these variables. Finally, the Bayesian network (i.e. the graphical-probabilistic structure) is used to execute the diagnosis of fault causes in the PEMFC model based on the effects observed.

  1. A Bayesian network fault diagnostic system for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riascos, Luis Alberto M. [Federal University of ABC, r. Santa Adelia, 166, CEP 09210-170, Santo Andre, SP (Brazil); Simoes, Marcelo G. [Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois Street, 80401, Golden, CO (United States); Miyagi, Paulo E. [Escola Politecnica, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2231, CEP 05508-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2007-02-25

    This paper considers the effects of different types of faults on a proton exchange membrane fuel cell model (PEMFC). Using databases (which record the fault effects) and probabilistic methods (such as the Bayesian-Score and Markov Chain Monte Carlo), a graphical-probabilistic structure for fault diagnosis is constructed. The graphical model defines the cause-effect relationship among the variables, and the probabilistic method captures the numerical dependence among these variables. Finally, the Bayesian network (i.e. the graphical-probabilistic structure) is used to execute the diagnosis of fault causes in the PEMFC model based on the effects observed. (author)

  2. Understanding on Interface Contribution to the Electrode Performance of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Shuang Ma; Grahl-Madsen, L.

    2016-01-01

    The commercialization of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is closer to the reality than ever before. Electrode interface development can bring a boost to the last few steps. Here, we explore electrode properties from its interface structure, especially the ionomer phase. Electrodes...... decreased with the increase of the ionomer. The electrode surface studies surprisingly reveal that the ionomer coverage increases linearly with the ionomer loading/content only up to a certain extent (around 30 wt.% in this case); further increase of the ionomer content triggers ionomer agglomeration, which...

  3. Novel niobium carbide/carbon porous nanotube electrocatalyst supports for proton exchange membrane fuel cell cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabil, Y.; Cavaliere, S.; Harkness, I. A.; Sharman, J. D. B.; Jones, D. J.; Rozière, J.

    2017-09-01

    Niobium carbide/carbon nanotubular porous structures have been prepared using electrospinning and used as electrocatalyst supports for proton exchange membrane fuel cells. They were functionalised with 3.1 nm Pt particles synthesised by a microwave-assisted polyol method and characterised for their electrochemical properties. The novel NbC-based electrocatalyst demonstrated electroactivity towards the oxygen reduction reaction as well as greater stability over high potential cycling than a commercial carbon-based electrocatalyst. Pt/NbC/C was integrated at the cathode of a membrane electrode assembly and characterised in a single fuel cell showing promising activity and power density.

  4. Continual Energy Management System of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Hybrid Power Electric Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Current research status in energy management of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM fuel cell hybrid power electric vehicles are first described in this paper, and then build the PEMFC/ lithium-ion battery/ ultra-capacitor hybrid system model. The paper analysis the key factors of the continuous power available in PEM fuel cell hybrid power electric vehicle and hybrid power system working status under different driving modes. In the end this paper gives the working flow chart of the hybrid power system and concludes the three items of the system performance analysis.

  5. Catalytic role of calix[4]hydroquinone in acetone-water proton exchange: a quantum chemical study of proton transfer via keto-enol tautomerism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, M; Masunov, A E; Dreuw, A

    2008-10-16

    Calix[4]hydroquinone has recently attracted considerable interest since it forms stable tubular aggregates mediated solely by hydrogen bonding and pi-pi-stacking interactions. These aggregates trap specifically various small organic molecules and, in particular, catalyze the proton exchange of water with acetone. Using correlated quantum chemical methods, the mechanism of the observed proton exchange mediated by keto-enol tautomerism of acetone is investigated in detail. Starting with an investigation of keto-enol tautomerism of acetone-water clusters, it appears that four catalytic water molecules are optimal for the catalysis and that additional solvent water molecules lead to a decrease in efficiency. Analyses of the partial charges revealed a decrease of the polarization of the reactive hydrogen bonds due to the additional water molecules. As a next step, hydroquinone-acetone-water complexes were studied as models for the situation in the CHQ moieties. However, the computations revealed that the proton transfer reaction becomes less efficient when one catalytic water molecule is replaced by hydroquinone. Although concerted proton transfer via keto-enol tautomerism of acetone seems to be the predominant mechanism in supercritical water, it is no longer the rate-determining reaction mechanism for the catalyzed acetone-water proton exchange observed in tubular CHQ. Nevertheless, a key feature of the catalytic function of tubular CHQ has been identified to be the stiff hydrogen bonding network and the exclusion of additional solvent water molecules.

  6. RADIATION STABILITY OF NAFION MEMBRANES USED FOR ISOTOPE SEPARATION BY PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE ELECTROLYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, E

    2009-05-15

    Proton Exchange Membrane Electrolyzers have potential interest for use for hydrogen isotope separation from water. In order for PEME to be fully utilized, more information is needed on the stability of Nafion when exposed to radiation. This work examines Nafion 117 under varying exposure conditions, including dose rate, total dosage and atmospheric condition. Analytical tools, such as FT-IR, ion exchange capacity, DMA and TIC-TOC were used to characterize the exposed membranes. Analysis of the water from saturated membranes can provide important data on the stability of the membranes during radiation exposure. It was found that the dose rate of exposure plays an important role in membrane degradation. Potential mechanisms for membrane degradation include peroxide formation by free radicals.

  7. Development of proton exchange membranes fuel cells with sulfonated HTPB-phenol; Desenvolvimento de membranas polimericas trocadoras de protons utilizando PBLH-fenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraz, Fernando A.; Oliveira, Angelo R.S.; Cesar-Oliveira, Maria Aparecida F. [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica. Lab. de Polimeros Sinteticos], e-mail: ferraz@quimica.ufpr.br; Cantao, Mauricio P. [LACTEC - Instituto de Tecnologia para o Desenvolvimento, Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Centro Politecnico

    2007-07-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) have been paid attention as promising candidates for vehicle and portable applications. PEMFC employ proton exchange polymer membrane which serves as an electrolyte between anode and cathode. Nafion{sup R} (DuPont), perfluorosulfonic acid/PTFE copolymer membranes are typically used as the polymer electrolyte in PEMFC due to their good chemical and mechanical properties as well as high proton conductivity. However, high cost of these materials is one of main obstacles for commercialization of PEMFC. Extensive efforts have been devoted to develop alternative polymer electrolyte membranes. Our group have investigated the development of proton exchange membranes fuel cells using sulfonated HTPB-Phenyl ether (HTPB-Phenol), making possible the formation of membranes with sulfonated groups amount of 2,4, 2,5 and 2,8 mmol/g of dry polymer from HTPB-Phenol 80, 98 and 117 respectively. These results mean a bigger values than those of the Nafion{sup R} membranes, that possess an ion exchange capacity of 0,67 up to 1,25 mmol/g of sulfonated groups. (author)

  8. Novel proton exchange membrane based on crosslinked poly(vinyl alcohol) for direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chien-Pan; Dai, Chi-An; Chao, Chi-Yang; Chang, Shoou-Jinn

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we report the synthesis and the characterization of poly (vinyl alcohol) based proton conducting membranes. In particular, we describe a novel physically and chemically PVA/HFA (poly (vinyl alcohol)/hexafluoroglutaric acid) blending membranes with BASANa (Benzenesulfonic acid sodium salt) and GA (Glutaraldehyde) as binary reaction agents. The key PEM parameters such as ion exchange capacity (IEC), water uptake, proton conductivity, and methanol permeability were controlled by adjusting the chemical composition of the membranes. The IEC value of the membrane is found to be an important parameter in affecting water uptake, conductivity as well as the permeability of the resulting membrane. Plots of the water uptake, conductivity, and methanol permeability vs. IEC of the membranes show a distinct change in the slope of their curves at roughly the same IEC value which suggests a transition of structural changes in the network. The proton conductivities and the methanol permeability of all the membranes are in the range of 10-3-10-2 S cm-1 and 10-8-10-7 cm2 s-1, respectively, depending on its binary crosslinking density, and it shows great selectivity compared with those of Nafion®-117. The membranes display good mechanical properties which suggest a good lifetime usage of the membranes applied in DMFCs.

  9. Copoly(arlene ether)s containing pendant sulfonic acid groups as proton exchange membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yu Seung [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kim, Dae Sik [CANADA NRC; Robertson, Gilles [CANADA NRC; Guiver, Michael [CANADA NRC

    2008-01-01

    A copoly(arylene ether) (PAE) with high fluorine content and a copoly(arylene ether nitrile) (PAEN) with high nitrile content, each containing pendant phenyl sulfonic acids were synthesized. The P AE and PAEN were prepared from decafluorobiphenyl (DFBP) and difluorobenzonitrile (DFBN) respectively, by polycondensation with 2-phenylhydroquinone (PHQ) by conventional aromatic nucleophilic substitution reactions. The sulfonic acid groups were introduced by mild post-sulfonation exclusively on the para-position of the pendant phenyl ring in PHQ. The membrane properties of the resulting sulfonated copolymers sP AE and sP AEN were compared for fuel cell applications. The copolymers sPAE and sPAEN, each having a degree of sulfonation (DS) of 1.0 had high ion exchange capacities (IEC{sub v}(wet) (volume-based, wet state)) of 1.77 and 2.55 meq./cm{sup 3}, high proton conductivities of 135.4 and 140.1 mS/cm at 80 C, and acceptable volume-based water uptake of 44.5-51.9 vol% at 80 C, respectively, compared to Nafion. The data points of these copolymer membranes are located in the area of outstanding properties in the trade-off plot of alternative hydrocarbon polyelectrolyte membranes (PEM) for the relationship between proton conductivity versus water uptake (weight based or volume based). Furthermore, the relative selectivity derived from proton conductivity and methanol permeability is higher than that of Nafion.

  10. HOGEN{trademark} proton exchange membrane hydrogen generators: Commercialization of PEM electrolyzers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, W.F.; Molter, T.M. [Proton Energy Systems, Inc., Rocky Hill, CT (United States)

    1997-12-31

    PROTON Energy Systems` new HOGEN series hydrogen generators are Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) based water electrolyzers designed to generate 300 to 1000 Standard Cubic Feet Per Hour (SCFH) of high purity hydrogen at pressures up to 400 psi without the use of mechanical compressors. This paper will describe technology evolution leading to the HOGEN, identify system design performance parameters and describe the physical packaging and interfaces of HOGEN systems. PEM electrolyzers have served US and UK Navy and NASA needs for many years in a variety of diverse programs including oxygen generators for life support applications. In the late 1970`s these systems were advocated for bulk hydrogen generation through a series of DOE sponsored program activities. During the military buildup of the 1980`s commercial deployment of PEM hydrogen generators was de-emphasized as priority was given to new Navy and NASA PEM electrolysis systems. PROTON Energy Systems was founded in 1996 with the primary corporate mission of commercializing PEM hydrogen generators. These systems are specifically designed and priced to meet the needs of commercial markets and produced through manufacturing processes tailored to these applications. The HOGEN series generators are the first step along the path to full commercial deployment of PEM electrolyzer products for both industrial and consumer uses. The 300/1000 series are sized to meet the needs of the industrial gases market today and provide a design base that can transition to serve the needs of a decentralized hydrogen infrastructure tomorrow.

  11. NMR resonance splitting of urea in stretched hydrogels: proton exchange and (1)H/(2)H isotopologues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchel, Philip W; Naumann, Christoph; Chapman, Bogdan E; Shishmarev, Dmitry; Håkansson, Pär; Bacskay, George; Hush, Noel S

    2014-10-01

    Urea at ∼12 M in concentrated gelatin gel, that was stretched, gave (1)H and (2)H NMR spectral splitting patterns that varied in a predictable way with changes in the relative proportions of (1)H2O and (2)H2O in the medium. This required consideration of the combinatorics of the two amide groups in urea that have a total of four protonation/deuteration sites giving rise to 16 different isotopologues, if all the atoms were separately identifiable. The rate constant that characterized the exchange of the protons with water was estimated by back-transformation analysis of 2D-EXSY spectra. There was no (1)H NMR spectral evidence that the chiral gelatin medium had caused in-equivalence in the protons bonded to each amide nitrogen atom. The spectral splitting patterns in (1)H and (2)H NMR spectra were accounted for by intra-molecular scalar and dipolar interactions, and quadrupolar interactions with the electric field gradients of the gelatin matrix, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Hydroquinone based sulfonated poly (arylene ether sulfone copolymer as proton exchange membrane for fuel cell applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kiran

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of sulfonated poly (arylene ether sulfone copolymer by direct copolymerization of 4,4'-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl valeric acid, benzene 1,4-diol and synthesized sulfonated 4,4'-difluorodiphenylsulfone and its characterization by using FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared and NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopic techniques have been performed. The copolymer was subsequently cross-linked with 4, 4!(hexafluoroisopropylidenediphenol epoxy resin by thermal curing reaction to synthesize crosslinked membranes. The evaluation of properties showed reduction in water and methanol uptake, ion exchange capacity, proton conductivity with simultaneous enhancement in oxidative stability of the crosslinked membranes as compared to pristine membrane. The performance of the membranes has also been evaluated in terms of thermal stability, morphology, mechanical strength and methanol permeability by using Thermo gravimetric analyzer, Differential scanning calorimetery, Atomic force microscopy, XPERT-PRO diffractometer, universal testing machine and diffusion cell, respectively. The results demonstrated that the crosslinked membranes exhibited high thermal stability with phase separation, restrained crystallinity, acceptable mechanical properties and methanol permeability. Therefore, these can serve as promising proton exchange membranes for fuel cell applications.

  13. Transport in Proton Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cell Applications-A Systematic Non-Equilibrium Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel-Cárdenas, Angie L; Koper, Ger J M

    2017-05-25

    We hypothesize that the properties of proton-exchange membranes for fuel cell applications cannot be described unambiguously unless interface effects are taken into account. In order to prove this, we first develop a thermodynamically consistent description of the transport properties in the membranes, both for a homogeneous membrane and for a homogeneous membrane with two surface layers in contact with the electrodes or holder material. For each subsystem, homogeneous membrane, and the two surface layers, we limit ourselves to four parameters as the system as a whole is considered to be isothermal. We subsequently analyze the experimental results on some standard membranes that have appeared in the literature and analyze these using the two different descriptions. This analysis yields relatively well-defined values for the homogeneous membrane parameters and estimates for those of the surface layers and hence supports our hypothesis. As demonstrated, the method used here allows for a critical evaluation of the literature values. Moreover, it allows optimization of stacked transport systems such as proton-exchange membrane fuel cell units where interfacial layers, such as that between the catalyst and membrane, are taken into account systematically.

  14. Performance of amorphous NiNb-based alloys in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barranco, J.; Pierna, A.R. [Univ. of the Basque Country, San Sebastien (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Environment

    2009-04-15

    A study was conducted to investigate the effectiveness of the spray technique of the different amorphous catalysts nickel niobate (NiNb){sub 9}9 platinum (Pt){sub 1}, and NiNb{sub 9}9 platinum (Pt) tin (Sn){sub 1}, obtained by means of the mechanical alloying, on the polymeric membrane. In particular, it examined the deposition of the catalysts on the proton exchange membrane, which is of significant importance for preparing an efficient membrane electrode assembling, which will be part of a hydrogen fuel cell. The effectiveness of spray was studied by determining the efficacy in hydrogen fuel cells. Different particle sizes were used in the catalytic ink. The deposition over the proton exchange membrane of the alloys was carried out using the airbrush technique, a process of painting the polymeric membrane which offers a homogeneous spread of the catalyst and carbon powders over the polymeric membrane. The paper described the experiment and results. The paper included a characterization of the catalysts and catalytic layers, and described the performance of the simple cells. It was concluded that both cells exhibit better behaviour when the hydrogen flow rate is low. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Transport in Proton Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cell Applications—A Systematic Non-Equilibrium Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angie L. Rangel-Cárdenas

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesize that the properties of proton-exchange membranes for fuel cell applications cannot be described unambiguously unless interface effects are taken into account. In order to prove this, we first develop a thermodynamically consistent description of the transport properties in the membranes, both for a homogeneous membrane and for a homogeneous membrane with two surface layers in contact with the electrodes or holder material. For each subsystem, homogeneous membrane, and the two surface layers, we limit ourselves to four parameters as the system as a whole is considered to be isothermal. We subsequently analyze the experimental results on some standard membranes that have appeared in the literature and analyze these using the two different descriptions. This analysis yields relatively well-defined values for the homogeneous membrane parameters and estimates for those of the surface layers and hence supports our hypothesis. As demonstrated, the method used here allows for a critical evaluation of the literature values. Moreover, it allows optimization of stacked transport systems such as proton-exchange membrane fuel cell units where interfacial layers, such as that between the catalyst and membrane, are taken into account systematically.

  16. In situ measurements of water transfer due to different mechanisms in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husar, Attila; Higier, Andrew; Liu, Hongtan

    Water management is of critical importance in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell, in particular, those based on a sulfonic acid polymer, which requires water to conduct protons. Yet there are limited in situ studies of water transfer through the membrane and no data are available for water transfer due to individual mechanisms through the membrane in an operational fuel cell. Thus it is the objective of this study to measure water transfer through the membrane due to each individual mechanism in an operational PEM fuel cell. The three different mechanisms of water transfer, i.e., electro-osmotic drag, diffusion and hydraulic permeation are isolated by specially imposed boundary conditions. Therefore water transfer through the membrane due to each mechanism is measured separately. In this study, all the data is collected in an actual assembled operational fuel cell. The experimental results show that water transfer due to hydraulic permeation, i.e. the pressure difference between the anode and cathode is at least an order of magnitude lower than those due to the other two mechanisms. The data for water transfer due to diffusion through the membrane are in good agreement with some of the ex situ data in the literature. The data for electro-osmosis show that the number of water molecules dragged per proton increases not only with temperature but also with current density, which is different from existing data in the literature. The methodology used in this study is simple and can be easily adopted for in situ water transfer measurement due to different mechanisms in other PEM fuel cells without any cell modifications.

  17. Copoly(arylene ether)s containing pendant sulfonic acid groups as proton exchange membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dae Sik, Kim [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yu Seung, Kim [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gilles, Robertson [CANADA-NRC; Guiver, Michael D [CANADA-NRC

    2009-01-01

    A copoly(arylene ether) (PAE) with high fluorine content and a copoly(arylene ether nitrile) (PAEN) with high nitrile content, each containing pendant phenyl sulfonic acids were synthesized. The PAE and P AEN were prepared from decafluorobiphenyl (DFBP) and difluorobenzonitrile (DFBN) respectively, by polycondensation with 2phenylhydroquinone (PHQ) by conventional aromatic nucleophilic substitution reactions. sulfonic acid groups were introduced by mild post-sulfonation exclusively on the para-position of the pendant phenyl ring in PHQ. The membrane properties of the resulting sulfonated copolymers sPAE and sPAEN were compared for fuel cell applications. The copolymers sPAE and sPAEN, each having a degree of sulfonation (OS) of 1.0 had high ion exchange capacities (IEC{sub v})(wet) (volume-based, wet state) of 1.77 and 2.55 meq./cm3, high proton conductivities of 135.4 and 140.1 mS/cm at 80 C, and acceptable volume-based water uptake of 44.5 -51.9 vol% at 80 C, respectively, compared to Nafion. The data points of these copolymer membranes are located in the upper left-hand corner in the trade-off plot of alternative hydrocarbon polyelectrolyte membranes (PEM) for the relationship between proton conductivity versus water uptake (weight based or volume based), i.e., high proton conductivity and low water uptake. Furthermore, the relative selectivity derived from proton conductivity and methanol permeability is higher than that of Nafion.

  18. Transport properties of proton-exchange membranes: Effect of supercritical-fluid processing and chemical functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido Ayazo

    NafionRTM membranes commonly used in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC), are tipically limited by high methanol permeability (also known as the cross-over limitation). These membranes have phase segregated sulfonated ionic domains in a perfluorinated backbone, which makes processing challenging and limited by phase equilibria considerations. This study used supercritical fluids (SCFs) as a processing alternative, since the gas-like mass transport properties of SCFs allow a better penetration into the membranes and the use of polar co-solvents influenced their morphology, fine-tuning the physical and transport properties in the membrane. Measurements of methanol permeability and proton conductivity were performed to the NafionRTM membranes processed with SCFs at 40ºC and 200 bar and the co-solvents as: acetone, tetrahydrofuran (THF), isopropyl alcohol, HPLC-grade water, acetic acid, cyclohexanone. The results obtained for the permeability data were of the order of 10 -8-10-9 cm2/s, two orders of magnitude lower than unprocessed Nafion. Proton conductivity results obtained using AC impedance electrochemical spectroscopy was between 0.02 and 0.09 S/cm, very similar to the unprocessed Nafion. SCF processing with ethanol as co-solvent reduced the methanol permeability by two orders of magnitude, while the proton conductivity was only reduced by 4%. XRD analysis made to the treated samples exhibited a decreasing pattern in the crystallinity, which affects the transport properties of the membrane. Also, SAXS profiles of the Nafion membranes processed were obtained with the goal of determining changes produced by the SCF processing in the hydrophilic domains of the polymer. With the goal of searching for new alternatives in proton exchange membranes (PEMs) triblock copolymer of poly(styrene-isobutylene-styrene) (SIBS) and poly(styrene-isobutylene-styrene) SEBS were studied. These sulfonated tri-block copolymers had lower methanol permeabilities, but also lower proton

  19. Experimental determination of monoethanolamine protonation constant and its temperature dependency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma’mun Sholeh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide as one of the major contributors to the global warming problem is produced in large quantities by many important industries and its emission seems to rise from year to year. Aminebased absorption is one of the methods to capture CO2 from its sources. As a reactive system, mass transfer and chemical reaction take place simultaneously. In a vapor-liquid equilibrium model for the CO2-amine-water system, some parameters such as mass transfer coefficients and chemical equilibrium constants need to be known. However, some parameters could be determined experimentally and the rests could be regressed from the model. The protonation constant (pKa, as one of the model parameters, could then be measured experimentally. The purpose of this study is to measure the pKa of monoethanolamine (MEA at a range of temperatures from 303 to 330K by a potentiometric titration method. The experimental data obtained were in a good agreement with the literature data. The pKa data from this work together with those from the literature were then correlated in an empirical correlation to be used for future research.

  20. Thermal-Conductivity Characterization of Gas Diffusion Layer in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells and Electrolyzers Under Mechanical Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamour, M.; Garnier, J. P.; Grandidier, J. C.; Ouibrahim, A.; Martemianov, S.

    2011-05-01

    Accurate information on the temperature field and associated heat transfer rates is particularly important for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) and PEM electrolyzers. An important parameter in fuel cell and electrolyzer performance analysis is the effective thermal conductivity of the gas diffusion layer (GDL) which is a solid porous medium. Usually, this parameter is introduced in modeling and performance analysis without taking into account the dependence of the GDL thermal conductivity λ (in W · m-1 · K-1) on mechanical compression. Nevertheless, mechanical stresses arising in an operating system can change significantly the thermal conductivity and heat exchange. Metrology allowing the characterization of the GDL thermal conductivity as a function of the applied mechanical compression has been developed in this study using the transient hot-wire technique (THW). This method is the best for obtaining standard reference data in fluids, but it is rarely used for thermal-conductivity measurements in solids. The experiments provided with Quintech carbon cloth indicate a strong dependence (up to 300%) of the thermal conductivity λ on the applied mechanical load. The experiments have been provided in the pressure range 0 cloth layers have been provided. The conducted experiments indicate the independence of the measured thermal conductivity on the number of GDL layers and, thus, justify the robustness of the developed method and apparatus for this type of application.

  1. Formation and properties of proton-exchanged and annealed $LiNbO_{3}$ waveguides for surface acoustic wave

    CERN Document Server

    Chien Chuan Cheng; Ying Chung Chen

    2001-01-01

    The proton-exchanged (PE) and annealed PE (APE) z-cut LiNbO/sub 3/ waveguides were fabricated using H/sub 4/P/sub 2/O/sub 7/. The positive strain, c-axis lattice constant change ( Delta c/c), was calculated to be about +0.43%, which was almost independent of the exchanged conditions. The penetration depth of H measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) exhibited a step-like profile, which was assumed to be equal to the waveguide depth (d). The surface acoustic wave (SAW) properties of PE and APE z-cut LiNbO/sub 3/ samples were investigated. The phase velocity (V/sub p/) and electromechanical coupling coefficient (K/sup 2/) of PE samples were significantly decreased by the increase of kd, where k was the wavenumber (2 pi / lambda ). The insertion loss (IL) of PE samples was increased by the increase of kd and became nearly constant at kd >0.064. The temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF) of PE samples allowed an apparent increase with kd, reaching a maximum at kd=0.292, then slightly decreased at h...

  2. Performance of membrane electrode assemblies based on proton exchange membranes prepared by pre-irradiation induced grafting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jingye; Matsuura, Akio; Kakigi, Tomoyuki; Miura, Takaharu; Oshima, Akihiro; Washio, Masakazu [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2006-10-20

    Proton exchange membranes (PEMs) were prepared by pre-irradiation induced grafting of styrene (S) or styrene/divinylbenzene (S/DVB) into the radiation-crosslinked polytetrafluoroethylene (RX-PTFE) films and then sulfonated. The thicknesses of the obtained PEMs were lower than 20{mu}m and the ion exchange capacity (IEC) values were around 2meqg{sup -1}. The surfaces of the PEMs and carbon electrodes were coated with Nafion{sup (R)} dispersion, and then membrane electrode assembles (MEAs) were prepared by hot-pressing them together. A MEA based on a Nafion{sup (R)} 112 membrane was also prepared under same procedure for comparison. The performances of the MEAs in a single cell were tested under different cell temperatures and humidifications. Electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) were measured with ac frequencies which ranged from 100kHz to 1Hz at a dc density of 0.5Acm{sup -2}. The obtained impedance curves in Nyquist representation were semicircular. (author)

  3. Development of an Internal Real-Time Wireless Diagnostic Tool for a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Chen, Chia-Hung; Tsai, Chao-Hsuan; Wang, Yu-Syuan

    2018-01-01

    To prolong the operating time of unmanned aerial vehicles which use proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), the performance of PEMFC is the key. However, a long-term operation can make the Pt particles of the catalyst layer and the pollutants in the feedstock gas bond together (e.g., CO), so that the catalyst loses reaction activity. The performance decay and aging of PEMFC will be influenced by operating conditions, temperature, flow and CO concentration. Therefore, this study proposes the development of an internal real-time wireless diagnostic tool for PEMFC, and uses micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology to develop a wireless and thin (<50 μm) flexible integrated (temperature, flow and CO) microsensor. The technical advantages are (1) compactness and three wireless measurement functions; (2) elastic measurement position and accurate embedding; (3) high accuracy and sensitivity and quick response; (4) real-time wireless monitoring of dynamic performance of PEMFC; (5) customized design and development. The flexible integrated microsensor is embedded in the PEMFC, three important physical quantities in the PEMFC, which are the temperature, flow and CO, can be measured simultaneously and instantly, so as to obtain the authentic and complete reaction in the PEMFC to enhance the performance of PEMFC and to prolong the service life. PMID:29342832

  4. Improving a free air breathing proton exchange membrane fuel cell through the Maximum Efficiency Point Tracking method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuita Cano, Mauricio; Mousli, Mohamed Islam Aniss; Kelouwani, Sousso; Agbossou, Kodjo; Hammoudi, Mhamed; Dubé, Yves

    2017-03-01

    This work investigates the design and validation of a fuel cell management system (FCMS) which can perform when the fuel cell is at water freezing temperature. This FCMS is based on a new tracking technique with intelligent prediction, which combined the Maximum Efficiency Point Tracking with variable perturbation-current step and the fuzzy logic technique (MEPT-FL). Unlike conventional fuel cell control systems, our proposed FCMS considers the cold-weather conditions, the reduction of fuel cell set-point oscillations. In addition, the FCMS is built to respond quickly and effectively to the variations of electric load. A temperature controller stage is designed in conjunction with the MEPT-FL in order to operate the FC at low-temperature values whilst tracking at the same time the maximum efficiency point. The simulation results have as well experimental validation suggest that propose approach is effective and can achieve an average efficiency improvement up to 8%. The MEPT-FL is validated using a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) of 500 W.

  5. Development of an Internal Real-Time Wireless Diagnostic Tool for a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Yuan Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To prolong the operating time of unmanned aerial vehicles which use proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC, the performance of PEMFC is the key. However, a long-term operation can make the Pt particles of the catalyst layer and the pollutants in the feedstock gas bond together (e.g., CO, so that the catalyst loses reaction activity. The performance decay and aging of PEMFC will be influenced by operating conditions, temperature, flow and CO concentration. Therefore, this study proposes the development of an internal real-time wireless diagnostic tool for PEMFC, and uses micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS technology to develop a wireless and thin (<50 μm flexible integrated (temperature, flow and CO microsensor. The technical advantages are (1 compactness and three wireless measurement functions; (2 elastic measurement position and accurate embedding; (3 high accuracy and sensitivity and quick response; (4 real-time wireless monitoring of dynamic performance of PEMFC; (5 customized design and development. The flexible integrated microsensor is embedded in the PEMFC, three important physical quantities in the PEMFC, which are the temperature, flow and CO, can be measured simultaneously and instantly, so as to obtain the authentic and complete reaction in the PEMFC to enhance the performance of PEMFC and to prolong the service life.

  6. Carbon, Helium, and Proton Kinetic Temperatures in a Cygnus Loop Shock Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, John C.; Edgar, Richard J.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Blair, William P.

    2015-06-01

    Observations of SN 1006 have shown that ions and electrons in the plasma behind fast supernova remnant shock waves are far from equilibrium, with the electron temperature much lower than the proton temperature and ion temperatures approximately proportional to ion mass. In the ˜360 km s-1shock waves of the Cygnus Loop, on the other hand, electron and ion temperatures are roughly equal, and there is evidence that the oxygen kinetic temperature is not far from the proton temperature. In this paper, we report observations of the He ii λ1640 line and the C iv λ1550 doublet in a 360 km s-1shock in the Cygnus Loop. While the best-fit kinetic temperatures are somewhat higher than the proton temperature, the temperatures of He and C are consistent with the proton temperature and the upper limits are 0.5 and 0.3 times the mass-proportional temperatures, implying efficient thermal equilibration in this collisionless shock. The equilibration of helium and hydrogen affects the conversion between proton temperatures determined from Hα line profiles and shock speeds, and the efficient equilibration found here reduces the shock speed estimates and the distance estimate to the Cygnus Loop of Medina et al. to about 800 pc.

  7. Effect of Temperature on the Protonation of the TALSPEAK Ligands: Lactic and Diethylenetrinitropentaacetic Acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Guoxin; Rao, Linfeng

    2009-10-20

    The protonation reactions of two ligands that play important roles in the TALSPEAK process for the separation of trivalent actinides from lanthanides, lactic acid and diethylenetrinitropentaacetic acid (DTPA), have been studied at variable temperatures. The protonation constants at 10-70 C were determined by titration potentiometry and the protonation enthalpies were determined at 25 C by titration microcalorimetry. The protonation constants remain essentially unchanged (25-70 C) within the experimental uncertainties, indicating that the effect of temperature on the protonation of lactate is insignificant. In contrast, the protonation constants of DTPA (log {beta}H's) generally decrease as the temperature is increased. Results from this study indicate that the effect of temperature on the protonation of DTPA could alter the speciation of metal ions (actinides and lanthanides) in the TALSPEAK system, since lower values of log{beta}H at higher temperatures suggest that the hydrogen ions would compete less strongly with the metal ions for the complexation of DTPA at higher temperatures.

  8. A Review of Metallic Bipolar Plates for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells: Materials and Fabrication Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Karimi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The proton exchange membrane fuel cell offers an exceptional potential for a clean, efficient, and reliable power source. The bipolar plate is a key component in this device, as it connects each cell electrically, supplies reactant gases to both anode and cathode, and removes reaction products from the cell. Bipolar plates have been fabricated primarily from high-density graphite, but in recent years, much attention has been paid to developing cost-effective and feasible alternative materials. Two different classes of materials have attracted attention: metals and composites. This paper offers a comprehensive review of the current research being carried out on metallic bipolar plates, covering materials and fabrication methods.

  9. Metal oxide nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed laser ablation for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorcioman, G.; Serban, N.; Axente, E.; Sima, F.; Ristoscu, C.; Mihailescu, I.N. [Lasers Department, National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiations Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, PO Box MG-54, RO-77125, Magurele, Ilfov (Romania); Ebrasu, D. [National Research and Development Institute for Cryogenics and Isotopic Technologies - ICSI Rm. Valcea, RO-240050 (Romania); Enculescu, I. [National Institute of Materials Physics, 105 Bis Atomistilor Street, RO-77125, Magurele, Ilfov (Romania)

    2010-12-01

    We report on the development of a modified gas diffusion layer for fuel cells consisting of a simple or teflonized carbon cloth pulsed laser deposited with metal oxide nanostructures designed to operate both as co-catalyst, and oxidic support for other electrochemically active catalysts. We selected TiO{sub 2}, ZnO and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} doped (2 wt.%) ZnO which were uniformly distributed over the surface of gas diffusion layers in order to improve the catalytic activity, stability and lifetime, and reduce the production costs of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. We evidenced by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy that our depositions consisted of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles while in the case of ZnO and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} doped (2 wt.%) ZnO transparent quasi-continuous films were synthesized. (author)

  10. Electrocatalysts and their Supporting Materials for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells: Activity and Durability Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Permyakova, Anastasia Aleksandrovna

    This thesis describes investigations conducted exploring the activity, stability and durability of supported nano-particulate, bulk and thin film electrocatalysts used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). The effects of different factors and conditions on the reactions involved...... in oxygen reduction, carbon monoxide and methanol electro-oxidation reactions were explored. Employed catalysts were characterized electrochemically and physiochemically using techniques such as: cyclic voltammetry, rotating disk electrode technique, SEM, TEM, EDS, XPS, TGA/DTA, Raman, XRD, FTIR-IR among...... other methods. The thesis begins with an introduction in Chapter 1 providing an overview of fuel cells, their associated reaction mechanisms, catalysts and catalysts supports. Chapter 2 presents the theoretical background to the study including equipment and the techniques used to analyse the catalysts...

  11. Electro-optic guided-to-radiation mode conversion in annealed proton-exchanged PPLN waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, J W; Chen, Y H; Tseng, Q H; Chang, W K; Deng, S L; Hsieh, C S

    2010-11-22

    We report the design and experimental demonstration of electro-optically active TM-guided to TE-radiation mode converters in annealed proton-exchanged (APE) periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) channel waveguides in telecom S-C-L bands (1495-1640 nm). A maximum mode conversion efficiency of >95%/cm was obtained at 1520 nm from a 24-μm-period APE PPLN waveguide under an electro-optic (EO) field of ~6.3 V/μm at 35°C. This efficiency has been enhanced by a factor of >4.6 over a waveguide built in the single-domain (unpoled) LiNbO3; it is also to the best of our knowledge the most efficient guided-to-radiation (GTR) mode converter ever reported based on LiNbO3 on-axis waveguides. A conversion bandwidth of ~250 nm was also observed from this EO GTR mode converter.

  12. Multiphase Simulations and Design of Validation Experiments for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten

    2013-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells directly convert into electricity the chemical energy of hydrogen and oxygen from air. The by-products are just water and waste heat. Depending on the operating conditions the water may be in the liquid or gas phase, and liquid water can hence plug the porous...... media in the fuel cell, and, more importantly, the flow channels and outlet ports of a single cell in a stack. These problems may be avoided if the fuel cell operates in a way that both the anode and cathode outlet stream are exactly fully humidified, i.e. the relative humidity is at 100...... %. Such operation can conceivably be obtained by adjusting the operating conditions using dew point diagrams. In this paper numerical results will be presented of two different flow field arrangements, both using the interdigitated flow field. It will be shown that arranging the gas streams in a counter-flow, “x...

  13. Nanochannel arrays as supports for proton exchange membranes in microfluidic fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsworth, Chandelle J.; Yanagisawa, Naoki; Dutta, Debashis

    In this article, we report the use of nanochannel arrays as supports for proton exchange membranes in microfluidic fuel cells. The proposed design has been demonstrated by fabricating a sodium silicate based sol-gel structure within such an array bridging two microchannels containing the fuel (HCOOH) and the oxidant (KMnO 4) streams. A voltage was generated in this system by bringing two platinum electrodes in contact with these solutions and then connecting them through an external circuitry. With this current design, we have been able to generate an open circuit potential of 1.31 V and a maximum current of 31.2 μA at 25 °C.

  14. High-Resolution Neutron Radiography Analysis of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, D. S.; Jacobson, D. L.

    Neutron radiography enables direct visualization and quantification of many water transport phenomena in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). The advantage of the technique is that neutrons have a long penetration length through most common PEMFC materials of construction (with a 1/e length of about 11 cm for aluminum), while having a relatively short 1/e length for water (of order 3 mm). This sensitivity to water enables precise measurements via neutron radiography of the water content in an operating PEMFC that are primarily limited by systematic measurement uncertainties. Recent advances in the spatial resolution of neutron detector technology enable direct measurement of the through-plane water content. This new data provides gas diffusion layer water profiles that can serve as input or comparison data for a large class of one-dimensional PEMFC models. In this article, the technique of neutron radiography is discussed, with an emphasis on the quantitative image analysis of the through-plane water content.

  15. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell diagnosis by spectral characterization of the electrochemical noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maizia, R.; Dib, A.; Thomas, A.; Martemianov, S.

    2017-02-01

    Electrochemical noise analysis (ENA) has been performed for the diagnosis of proton-exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) under various operating conditions. Its interest is related with the possibility of a non-invasive on-line diagnosis of a commercial fuel cell. A methodology of spectral analysis has been developed and an evaluation of the stationarity of the signal has been proposed. It has been revealed that the spectral signature of fuel cell, is a linear slope with a fractional power dependence 1/fα where α = 2 for different relative humidities and current densities. Experimental results reveal that the electrochemical noise is sensitive to the water management, especially under dry conditions. At RHH2 = 20% and RHair = 20%, spectral analysis shows a three linear slopes signature on the spectrum at low frequency range (f fuel cell water balance.

  16. Performance prediction of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell using the ANFIS model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vural, Yasemin; Ingham, Derek B.; Pourkashanian, Mohamed [Centre for Computational Fluid Dynamics, University of Leeds, Houldsworth Building, LS2 9JT Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-15

    In this study, the performance (current-voltage curve) prediction of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) is performed for different operational conditions using an Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS). First, ANFIS is trained with a set of input and output data. The trained model is then tested with an independent set of experimental data. The trained and tested model is then used to predict the performance curve of the PEMFC under various operational conditions. The model shows very good agreement with the experimental data and this indicates that ANFIS is capable of predicting fuel cell performance (in terms of cell voltage) with a high accuracy in an easy, rapid and cost effective way for the case presented. Finally, the capabilities and the limitations of the model for the application in fuel cells have been discussed. (author)

  17. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells for electrical power generation on-board commercial airplanes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curgus, Dita Brigitte; Munoz-Ramos, Karina (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Pratt, Joseph William; Akhil, Abbas Ali (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Schenkman, Benjamin L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-05-01

    Deployed on a commercial airplane, proton exchange membrane fuel cells may offer emissions reductions, thermal efficiency gains, and enable locating the power near the point of use. This work seeks to understand whether on-board fuel cell systems are technically feasible, and, if so, if they offer a performance advantage for the airplane as a whole. Through hardware analysis and thermodynamic and electrical simulation, we found that while adding a fuel cell system using today's technology for the PEM fuel cell and hydrogen storage is technically feasible, it will not likely give the airplane a performance benefit. However, when we re-did the analysis using DOE-target technology for the PEM fuel cell and hydrogen storage, we found that the fuel cell system would provide a performance benefit to the airplane (i.e., it can save the airplane some fuel), depending on the way it is configured.

  18. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board Commercial Airplanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, Joesph W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Klebanoff, Leonard E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Munoz-Ramos, Karina [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Akhil, Abbas A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Curgus, Dita B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schenkman, Benjamin L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Deployed on a commercial airplane, proton exchange membrane fuel cells may offer emissions reductions, thermal efficiency gains, and enable locating the power near the point of use. This work seeks to understand whether on-board fuel cell systems are technically feasible, and, if so, if they offer a performance advantage for the airplane as a whole. Through hardware analysis and thermodynamic and electrical simulation, we found that while adding a fuel cell system using today’s technology for the PEM fuel cell and hydrogen storage is technically feasible, it will not likely give the airplane a performance benefit. However, when we re-did the analysis using DOE-target technology for the PEM fuel cell and hydrogen storage, we found that the fuel cell system would provide a performance benefit to the airplane (i.e., it can save the airplane some fuel), depending on the way it is configured.

  19. An Equivalent Electrical Circuit Model of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Based on Mathematical Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinh An Nguyen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Many of the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC models proposed in the literature consist of mathematical equations. However, they are not adequately practical for simulating power systems. The proposed model takes into account phenomena such as activation polarization, ohmic polarization, double layer capacitance and mass transport effects present in a PEM fuel cell. Using electrical analogies and a mathematical modeling of PEMFC, the circuit model is established. To evaluate the effectiveness of the circuit model, its static and dynamic performances under load step changes are simulated and compared to the numerical results obtained by solving the mathematical model. Finally, the applicability of our model is demonstrated by simulating a practical system.

  20. Diffusion-driven proton exchange membrane fuel cell for converting fermenting biomass to electricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malati, P; Mehrotra, P; Minoofar, P; Mackie, D M; Sumner, J J; Ganguli, R

    2015-10-01

    A membrane-integrated proton exchange membrane fuel cell that enables in situ fermentation of sugar to ethanol, diffusion-driven separation of ethanol, and its catalytic oxidation in a single continuous process is reported. The fuel cell consists of a fermentation chamber coupled to a direct ethanol fuel cell. The anode and fermentation chambers are separated by a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane. Ethanol generated from fermented biomass in the fermentation chamber diffuses through the RO membrane into a glucose solution contained in the DEFC anode chamber. The glucose solution is osmotically neutral to the biomass solution in the fermentation chamber preventing the anode chamber from drying out. The fuel cell sustains >1.3 mW cm(-2) at 47°C with high discharge capacity. No separate purification or dilution is necessary, resulting in an efficient and portable system for direct conversion of fermenting biomass to electricity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Fatigue Analysis of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Stacks Based on Structural Stress Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C. W.; Liu, B.; Wei, M. Y.; Liu, L. F.

    2017-05-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack usually undergoes various vibrations during packing, transportation and serving time, in particular for those used in the automobiles and portable equipment. Based on the Miner fatigue damage theory, the fatigue lives of the fuel cell components are first assessed. Then the component fatigue life contours of the stack are obtained under four working conditions, i.e. the three single-axial (in X-, Y- and Z-axis separately) and multi-axial random vibrations. Accordingly, the component damage under various vibrations is evaluated. The stress distribution on the gasket and PEM will greatly affect their fatigue lives. Finally, we compare the fatigue lives of 4-bolt- and 6-bolt-clamping stacks under the same total clamping force, and find that increasing the bolt number could improve the bolt fatigue lives.

  2. Periodic domain patterning by electron beam of proton exchanged waveguides in lithium niobate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chezganov, D. S.; Vlasov, E. O.; Neradovskiy, M. M.; Gimadeeva, L. V.; Neradovskaya, E. A.; Chuvakova, M. A.; Tronche, H.; Doutre, F.; Baldi, P.; De Micheli, M. P.; Shur, V. Ya.

    2016-05-01

    Formation of domain structure by electron beam irradiation in congruent lithium niobate covered by surface dielectric layer with planar and channel waveguides produced by Soft Proton Exchange (SPE) process has been studied. Formation of domains with arbitrary shapes as a result of discrete switching has been revealed. The fact was attributed to ineffective screening of depolarization field in the crystals with a surface layer modified by SPE process. The dependences of the domain sizes on the dose and the distance between irradiated areas have been revealed. Finally, we have demonstrated that electron beam irradiation of lithium niobate crystals with surface resist layer can produce high quality periodical domain patterns after channel waveguide fabrication. Second harmonic generation with normalized nonlinear conversion efficiency up to 48%/(W cm2) has been achieved in such waveguides.

  3. Periodic domain patterning by electron beam of proton exchanged waveguides in lithium niobate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chezganov, D. S., E-mail: chezganov.dmitry@urfu.ru; Shur, V. Ya. [Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Labfer Ltd., 620014 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Vlasov, E. O.; Neradovskiy, M. M.; Gimadeeva, L. V.; Neradovskaya, E. A.; Chuvakova, M. A. [Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Tronche, H.; Doutre, F.; Baldi, P.; De Micheli, M. P. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée, University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, 06100 Nice (France)

    2016-05-09

    Formation of domain structure by electron beam irradiation in congruent lithium niobate covered by surface dielectric layer with planar and channel waveguides produced by Soft Proton Exchange (SPE) process has been studied. Formation of domains with arbitrary shapes as a result of discrete switching has been revealed. The fact was attributed to ineffective screening of depolarization field in the crystals with a surface layer modified by SPE process. The dependences of the domain sizes on the dose and the distance between irradiated areas have been revealed. Finally, we have demonstrated that electron beam irradiation of lithium niobate crystals with surface resist layer can produce high quality periodical domain patterns after channel waveguide fabrication. Second harmonic generation with normalized nonlinear conversion efficiency up to 48%/(W cm{sup 2}) has been achieved in such waveguides.

  4. A review of proton exchange membrane water electrolysis on degradation mechanisms and mitigation strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qi; Yuan, Xiao-Zi; Liu, Gaoyang; Wei, Bing; Zhang, Zhen; Li, Hui; Wang, Haijiang

    2017-10-01

    Proton exchange membrane water electrolysis (PEMWE) is an advanced and effective solution to the primary energy storage technologies. A better understanding of performance and durability of PEMWE is critical for the engineers and researchers to further advance this technology for its market penetration, and for the manufacturers of PEM water electrolyzers to implement quality control procedures for the production line or on-site process monitoring/diagnosis. This paper reviews the published works on performance degradations and mitigation strategies for PEMWE. Sources of degradation for individual components are introduced. With degradation causes discussed and degradation mechanisms examined, the review emphasizes on feasible strategies to mitigate the components degradation. To avoid lengthy real lifetime degradation tests and their high costs, the importance of accelerated stress tests and protocols is highlighted for various components. In the end, R&D directions are proposed to move the PEMWE technology forward to become a key element in future energy scenarios.

  5. Two-Photon Exchange Effects in Elastic Electron-Proton Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Myriam James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Two methods, Rosenbluth separation and polarization transfer, can be used to extract the proton form factor ratio μp GEp/GMp, but they do not yield the same results. It is thought that the disagreement is due to two photon exchange corrections to the differential cross sections. High precision proton Rosenbluth extractions were carried out at 102 kinematics points spanning 16 values of momentum transfer Q2, from 0.40 to 5.76 GeV2. Reduced cross sections were found to 1.1% or better for Q2 less than 3 GeV2 increasing to 4% at 5.76 GeV2 The form factor ratios were determined to 1:5-3% for Q2 < 1.5 GeV2, increasing to 9% by 3 GeV2 and rapidly above. Our data agrees with prior Rosenbluth, improving upon it the 1.0 - 2.0 GeV2 range to conclusively show a separation from polarization transfer where it had not been certain before. In addition, reduced cross sections at each Q2 were tested for nonlinearity in the angular variable. Such a departure from linearity would be a signature of two photon exchange effects, and prior data had not been sufficiently precise to show nonzero curvature. Our data begins to hint at negative curvature but does not yet show a significant departure from zero.

  6. Does oxidative stress affect the activity of the sodium-proton exchanger?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bober, Joanna; Kedzierska, Karolina; Kwiatkowska, Ewa; Stachowska, Ewa; Gołembiewska, Edyta; Mazur, Olech; Staniewicz, Zdzisław; Ciechanowski, Kazimierz; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2010-01-01

    Accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) takes place in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF). Oxidative stress causes disorders in the activity of the sodium-proton exchanger (NHE). Studies on NHE in CRF produced results that are discrepant and difficult to interpret. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that oxidative stress had an effect on the activity of NHE. We enrolled 87 subjects divided into 4 groups: patients with CRF treated conservatively; patients with CRF hemodialyzed without glucose--HD-g(-); patients with CRF hemodialyzed with glucose--HD-g(+); controls (C). The activity of NHE, the rate of proton efflux V(max), Michaelis constant (Km), and the concentration of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS, an indicator of oxidative stress) in plasma, as well as the concentration of reduced glutathione in blood were determined. The concentration of TBARS was significantly higher in hemodialyzed patients before and after dialysis and in patients with CRF on conservative treatment in comparison with group C. TBARS in plasma correlated negatively with VpH(i)6.4 in group C and with V(max) and VpH(i)6.4 after HD in group HD-g(-). We found that the concentration of creatinine correlated with TBARS (p < 0.0001; r = +0.51) in the conservatively treated group. We observed a marked oxidative stress and decreased NHE activity when dialysis was done without glucose, whereas patients dialyzed with glucose demonstrated a relatively low intensity of oxidative stress.

  7. Instrument for layer-by-layer deposition of catalyst layers directly on proton exchange membrane for direct methanol fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D; Wang, L; Liang, J; Liu, C

    2012-09-01

    A catalyst layer (CL) layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition instrument, consisting of an electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) device and a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fixing device, has been developed. It has been used to deposit anode CL on Nafion membrane under different working distances of 4, 5, and 6 mm. The incorporation of EHDA LbL deposition allowed the generation of the CLs with different structures, where the higher working distance produced more porous CL structure. A catalyst-coated membrane (CCM) was also produced using this EHDA LbL deposition and PEM fixing device. It was observed that the catalyst has been uniformly coated on the Nafion membrane and the CCM presents an uniform surface feature. The performance of a single direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) assembled with the deposited CCM at different working temperatures was analysed. The cell performance increased when the temperature rose. This instrument has the potential of being developed into a powerful device for controlling the deposition of CL of desired structures directly on PEM for DMFCs.

  8. Impact of operating conditions on the acetylene contamination in the cathode of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yunfeng; St-Pierre, Jean

    2017-12-01

    Realistically, proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are operated under varying operating conditions that potentially impact the acetylene contamination reactions. In this paper, the effects of the cell operating conditions on the acetylene contamination in PEMFCs are investigated under different current densities and temperatures with different acetylene concentrations in the cathode. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy is applied during the constant-current operation to analyze the impacts of the operating conditions on the acetylene electrochemical reactions. The experimental results indicate that higher acetylene concentrations, higher current densities and lower cell temperatures decrease the cell performance more. In particular, cathode poisoning becomes more severe at medium cell current densities. The cell cathode potentials at such current densities are not sufficient to completely oxidize the intermediate or sufficiently low to completely reduce the adsorbed acetylene. Based on these investigations, the possible condition-dependent limitations of the acetylene concentration and cell operating voltage are proposed for insight into the acetylene contamination mitigation stratagem. Regarding the barrier conditions, the acetylene reactions change abruptly, and adjusting the cell operation parameters to change the acetylene adsorbate and intermediate accumulation conditions to induce complete oxidation or reduction conditions may mitigate the severe acetylene contamination effects on PEMFCs.

  9. Carbon nanofiber growth optimization for their use as electrocatalyst support in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro, M J; Sebastián, D; Suelves, I; Moliner, R

    2009-07-01

    Carbon nanofiber (CNF) growth by catalytic decomposition of methane in a fixed-bed reactor was studied out to elucidate the influence of some important reaction conditions: temperature, space velocity and reactant partial pressure, in the morphological properties of the carbonaceous material obtained. The main objective is to synthesize a suitable carbonaceous nanomaterial to be used as support in platinum based electrocatalysts for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC) which improves current carbon blacks. High specific surface area is required in an electrocatalyst support since platinum dispersion is enhanced and so a cost-effective usage and high catalytic activity. Good electrical conductivity of carbon support is also required since the fuel cell power density is improved. With this proposal, characterization was carried out by nitrogen physisorption, XRD, SEM and TPO. The results were analysed by a factorial design and analysis of variance (ANOVA) in order to find an empirical correlation between operating conditions and CNF characteristics. It was found that the highest specific surface area and pore volume were found at 823 K and at a space velocity of 10 L gcat(-1) h(-1). The graphitic character of CNF, which is known to influence the electrical conductivity, presented a maximum value at temperatures between 923 K and 973 K. SEM images showed a narrow size distribution of CNF diameter between 40 and 90 nm and homogeneous appearance.

  10. Improvement the equation of polarization curve of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell at different channel geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaee, I.

    2015-12-01

    The polarization curve of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell is an important parameter which is expressed by the change of voltage and current of it that indicates the performance of the cell. The voltage of the cell is a function of temperature that is expressed by the Nernst equation and the equation of voltage losses such as activation loss, ohmic loss and concentration loss. In this study a new correlation for polarization curve is obtained that it in addition to temperature, a new parameter is involved in it that shows the effect of the geometry of cross-section area of channels. For this purpose three PEM fuel cells with different channels geometry of rectangular, elliptical and triangular have constructed. The active area of each cell is 25 cm2 that its weight is 1300 g. The material of the gas diffusion layer is carbon clothes, the membrane is nafion 117 and the catalyst layer is a plane with 0.004 g/cm2 platinum. Also a test bench designed and constructed for testing the cell and a series of experiments are carried out to investigate the influence of the geometry of the cell on performance of the cell. The results show that when the geometry of channel is rectangular the performance of the cell is better than the triangular and elliptical channel.

  11. Recent Progress on the Key Materials and Components for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells in Vehicle Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fuel cells are the most clean and efficient power source for vehicles. In particular, proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs are the most promising candidate for automobile applications due to their rapid start-up and low-temperature operation. Through extensive global research efforts in the latest decade, the performance of PEMFCs, including energy efficiency, volumetric and mass power density, and low temperature startup ability, have achieved significant breakthroughs. In 2014, fuel cell powered vehicles were introduced into the market by several prominent vehicle companies. However, the low durability and high cost of PEMFC systems are still the main obstacles for large-scale industrialization of this technology. The key materials and components used in PEMFCs greatly affect their durability and cost. In this review, the technical progress of key materials and components for PEMFCs has been summarized and critically discussed, including topics such as the membrane, catalyst layer, gas diffusion layer, and bipolar plate. The development of high-durability processing technologies is also introduced. Finally, this review is concluded with personal perspectives on the future research directions of this area.

  12. Importance of Electrode Hot-Pressing Conditions for the Catalyst Performance of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Shuang Ma; Dhiman, Rajnish; Larsen, Mikkel Juul

    2015-01-01

    The catalyst performance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) depends on not only the choice of materials, but also on the electrode structure and in particular on the interface between the components. In this work, we demonstrate that the hot-pressing conditions used during electrode...

  13. Heterodimerization of Arabidopsis calcium/proton exchangers contributes to regulation of guard cell dynamics and plant defense responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    "Arabidopsis thaliana" cation exchangers (CAX1 and CAX3) are closely related tonoplast-localized calcium/proton (Ca(2+)/H+) antiporters that contribute to cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. CAX1 and CAX3 were previously shown to interact in yeast; however, the function of this complex in plants has remain...

  14. Correlated photon-pair generation in a periodically poled MgO doped stoichiometric lithium tantalate reverse proton exchanged waveguide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lobino, M.; Marshall, G.D.; Xiong, C.; Clark, A.S.; Bonneau, D.; Natarajan, C.M.; Tanner, M.G.; Hadfield, R.H.; Dorenbos, S.N.; Zijlstra, T.; Zwiller, V.; Marangoni, M.; Ramponi, R.; Thompson, M.G.; Eggleton, B.J.; O'Brien, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate photon-pair generation in a reverse proton exchanged waveguide fabricated on a periodically poled magnesium doped stoichiometric lithium tantalate substrate. Detected pairs are generated via a cascaded second order nonlinear process where a pump laser at wavelength of 1.55 ?m is first

  15. On the Experimental Investigation of the Clamping Pressure Effects on the Proton Exchange Membrane Water Electrolyser Cell Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Shakhshir, Saher; Frensch, Steffen Henrik; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2017-01-01

    energy sources. The proton exchange membrane water electrolyser(PEMWE) is the most candidate technology to produce hydrogen from renewable energysources. PEMWE cell splits water into hydrogen and oxygen when an electric current is passedthrough it. Electrical current forces the positively charged ions...

  16. Model-space approach to {sup 1}S{sub 0} neutron and proton pairing with the Bonn meson - exchange potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elgaroey, Oe.; Engvik, L.; Osnes, E.; Hjort-Jensen, M.

    1996-03-01

    In this work the authors calculate neutron and proton energy gaps in neutron star matter using the Bonn meson exchange interactions and a model-space approach to the gap equation. This approach allows a consistent calculation of energy gaps and single particle energies with the model-space Brueckner-Hartree-Fock (MBHF) method, without double counting of two-particle correlations. Neutron energy gaps are calculated at zero and finite temperature. Proton energy gaps are calculated at beta equilibrium, and it is shown that the inclusion of muons has a significant effect. The results are compared with those of other works, and the implications for neutron star physics are briefly discussed. 18 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Fouling of proton exchange membrane (PEM) deteriorates the performance of microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Juan; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Luo, Hong-Wei; Li, Wen-Wei; Wang, Long-Fei; Yu, Han-Qing

    2012-04-15

    The fouling characteristics of proton exchange membrane (PEM) in microbial fuel cell (MFC) and the resulting deterioration of MFC performance were explored in this study. It was observed that the ion exchange capacity, conductivity and diffusion coefficients of cations of PEM were reduced significantly after fouling. Imaging analysis coupled with FTIR analysis indicated that the fouling layer attached on PEM consisted of microorganisms encased in extracellular polymers and inorganic salt precipitations. The results clearly demonstrate that PEM fouling deteriorated the performance of MFCs and led to a decrease in electricity generation. Cation transfer limitation might play an important role in the deterioration of MFC performance because of the membrane fouling. This was attributed to the physical blockage of charge transfer in the MFC resulted from the membrane fouling. With the experimental results, the effect of membrane fouling on the electrical generation of MFCs was evaluated. It was found that the decreased diffusion coefficients of cations and cathodic potential loss after membrane fouling contributed mainly to the deterioration of the MFC performance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of poly(vinylphosphonic acid) for proton exchange membranes in fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingoel, Bahar

    2007-07-01

    Vinylphosphonic acid (VPA) was polymerized at 80 C by free radical polymerization to give polymers (PVPA) of different molecular weight depending on the initiator concentration. The highest molecular weight, Mw, achieved was 6.2 x 10{sup 4} g/mol as determined by static light scattering. High resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to gain microstructure information about the polymer chain. Information based on tetrad probabilities was utilized to deduce an almost atactic configuration. In addition, {sup 13}CNMR gave evidence for the presence of head-head and tail-tail links. Refined analysis of the {sup 1}H NMR spectra allowed for the quantitative determination of the fraction of these links (23.5 percent of all links). Experimental evidence suggested that the polymerization proceeded via cyclopolymerization of the vinylphosphonic acid anhydride as an intermediate. Titration curves indicated that high molecular weight poly(vinylphosphonic acid) PVPA behaved as a monoprotic acid. Proton conductors with phosphonic acid moieties as protogenic groups are promising due to their high charge carrier concentration, thermal stability, and oxidation resistivity. Blends and copolymers of PVPA have already been reported, but PVPA has not been characterized sufficiently with respect to its polymer properties. Therefore, we also studied the proton conductivity behaviour of a well-characterized PVPA. PVPA is a conductor; however, the conductivity depends strongly on the water content of the material. The phosphonic acid functionality in the resulting polymer, PVPA, undergoes condensation leading to the formation of phosphonic anhydride groups at elevated temperature. Anhydride formation was found to be temperature dependent by solid state NMR. Anhydride formation affects the proton conductivity to a large extent because not only the number of charge carriers but also the mobility of the charge carriers seems to change. (orig.)

  19. Reversible Heterolytic Cleavage of the H-H Bond by Molybdenum Complexes: Controlling the Dynamics of Exchange Between Proton and Hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shaoguang; Appel, Aaron M.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2017-05-18

    Controlling the heterolytic cleavage of the H-H bond of dihydrogen is critically important in catalytic hydrogenations and in the catalytic oxidation of H2. We show how the rate of reversible heterolytic cleavage of H2 can be controlled over nearly four orders of magnitude at 25 °C, from 2.1 × 103 s-1 to ≥107 s-1. Bifunctional Mo complexes, [CpMo(CO)(κ3-P2N2)]+ (P2N2 = 1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane with alkyl/aryl groups on N and P), have been developed for heterolytic cleavage of H2 into a proton and a hydride, akin to Frustrated Lewis Pairs. The H-H bond cleavage is enabled by the basic amine in the second coordination sphere. The products of heterolytic cleavage of H2, Mo hydride complexes bearing protonated amines, [CpMo(H)(CO)(P2N2H)]+, were characterized by spectroscopic studies and by X-ray crystallography. Variable temperature 1H, 15N and 2-D 1H-1H ROESY NMR spectra indicated rapid exchange of the proton and hydride. The exchange rates are in the order [CpMo(H)(CO)(PPh2NPh2H)]+ > [CpMo(H)(CO)(PtBu2NPh2H)]+ > [CpMo(H)(CO)(PPh2NBn2H)]+ > [CpMo(H)(CO)(PtBu2NBn2H)]+ > [CpMo(H)(CO)(PtBu2NtBu2H)]+. The pKa values determined in acetonitrile range from 9.3 to 17.7, and show a linear correlation with the logarithm of the exchange rates. Thus the exchange dynamics are controlled through the relative acidity of the [CpMo(H)(CO)(P2N2H)]+ and [CpMo(H2)(CO)(P2N2)]+ isomers, providing a design principle for controlling heterolytic cleavage of H2.

  20. Electrochemical properties of proton exchange membranes: the role of composition and microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holdcroft, S.; Beattie, P.D.; Basura, V.I.; Schmeisser, J.; Chuy, C.; Orfino, F.; Ding, J. [Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, BC (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry

    2001-06-01

    To measure electrochemical and proton conduction properties of a large variety of different polyelectrolyte membranes that possess a wide array of equivalent weights and water contents, a number of analytical techniques were employed and the results presented in this paper. At the electrocatalyst/polymer electrolyte interface, kinetic and mass transport parameters play an important role in fuel cell operation, the authors used microelectrodes to study the effects of temperature and pressure on the electrochemical reduction of oxygen at platinum/solid polymer electrolyte interfaces in solid polymer electrolytes under controlled humidity. Under conditions of controlled humidity and temperature, proton conductivity was measured transverse and normal to the membrane surface using an alternate current (a.c.) impedance spectroscopy. A wide array of membranes were investigated, including those based on sulfonated polystyrene-block-hydrogenated butadiene, polystyrenesulfonic acid grafted onto ethylenetetrafluoroethylene, sulfonated trifluorostyrene-copolymers, and a novel series of membranes where the internal biphasic morphology is controlled to yield materials with low water and high conductivity and prepared in house. Transmission electron microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering was used for the analysis of the microstructure of selected membranes. Modelling the scattered intensities was used to quantify aspects of the microstructure.

  1. Proton exchange membranes for application in fuel cells: grafted silica/SPEEK nanocomposite elaboration and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinholdt, Marc X; Kaliaguine, Serge

    2010-07-06

    Hydrogen technologies and especially fuel cells are key components in the battle to find alternate sources of energy to the highly polluting and economically constraining fossil fuels in an aim to preserve the environment. The present paper shows the synthesis of surface functionalized silica nanoparticles, which are used to prepare grafted silica/SPEEK nanocomposite membranes. The nanoparticles are grafted either with hexadecylsilyl or aminopropyldimethylsilyl moieties or both. The synthesized particles are analyzed using XRD, NMR, TEM, and DLS to collect information on the nature of the particles and the functional groups, on the particle sizes, and on the hydrophilic/hydrophobic character. The composite membranes prepared using the synthesized particles and two SPEEK polymers with sulfonation degrees of 69.4% and 85.0% are characterized for their proton conductivity and water uptake properties. The corresponding curves are very similar for the composites prepared with both polymers and the nanoparticles bearing the two functional groups. The composites prepared with the nanoparticles bearing solely the aminopropyldimethylsilyl moiety exhibit lower conductivity and water uptake, possibly due to higher interaction of the polymer sulfonic acid sites with the amine groups. The composites prepared with the nanoparticles bearing solely the hexadecylsilyl moiety were not further investigated because of very high particles segregation. A study of the proton conductivity as a function of temperature was performed on selected membranes and showed that nanocomposites made with nanoparticles bearing both functional moieties have a higher conductivity at higher temperatures.

  2. Characterization of Polyethylene-Graft-Sulfonated Polyarylsulfone Proton Exchange Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Kyu; Zhang, Gang; Nam, Changwoo; Chung, T C Mike

    2015-12-04

    This paper examines polymer film morphology and several important properties of polyethylene-graft-sulfonated polyarylene ether sulfone (PE-g-s-PAES) proton exchange membranes (PEMs) for direct methanol fuel cell applications. Due to the extreme surface energy differences between a semi-crystalline and hydrophobic PE backbone and several amorphous and hydrophilic s-PAES side chains, the PE-g-s-PAES membrane self-assembles into a unique morphology, with many proton conductive s-PAES channels embedded in the stable and tough PE matrix and a thin hydrophobic PE layer spontaneously formed on the membrane surfaces. In the bulk, these membranes show good mechanical properties (tensile strength >30 MPa, Young's modulus >1400 MPa) and low water swelling (λ 3 mmol/g in the s-PAES domains. On the surface, the thin hydrophobic and semi-crystalline PE layer shows some unusual barrier (protective) properties. In addition to exhibiting higher through-plane conductivity (up to 160 mS/cm) than in-plane conductivity, the PE surface layer minimizes methanol cross-over from anode to cathode with reduced fuel loss, and stops the HO• and HO₂• radicals, originally formed at the anode, entering into PEM matrix. Evidently, the thin PE surface layer provides a highly desirable protecting layer for PEMs to reduce fuel loss and increase chemical stability. Overall, the newly developed PE-g-s-PAES membranes offer a desirable set of PEM properties, including conductivity, selectivity, mechanical strength, stability, and cost-effectiveness for direct methanol fuel cell applications.

  3. Characterization of Polyethylene-Graft-Sulfonated Polyarylsulfone Proton Exchange Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Kyu Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines polymer film morphology and several important properties of polyethylene-graft-sulfonated polyarylene ether sulfone (PE-g-s-PAES proton exchange membranes (PEMs for direct methanol fuel cell applications. Due to the extreme surface energy differences between a semi-crystalline and hydrophobic PE backbone and several amorphous and hydrophilic s-PAES side chains, the PE-g-s-PAES membrane self-assembles into a unique morphology, with many proton conductive s-PAES channels embedded in the stable and tough PE matrix and a thin hydrophobic PE layer spontaneously formed on the membrane surfaces. In the bulk, these membranes show good mechanical properties (tensile strength >30 MPa, Young’s modulus >1400 MPa and low water swelling (λ < 15 even with high IEC >3 mmol/g in the s-PAES domains. On the surface, the thin hydrophobic and semi-crystalline PE layer shows some unusual barrier (protective properties. In addition to exhibiting higher through-plane conductivity (up to 160 mS/cm than in-plane conductivity, the PE surface layer minimizes methanol cross-over from anode to cathode with reduced fuel loss, and stops the HO• and HO2• radicals, originally formed at the anode, entering into PEM matrix. Evidently, the thin PE surface layer provides a highly desirable protecting layer for PEMs to reduce fuel loss and increase chemical stability. Overall, the newly developed PE-g-s-PAES membranes offer a desirable set of PEM properties, including conductivity, selectivity, mechanical strength, stability, and cost-effectiveness for direct methanol fuel cell applications.

  4. Graphene oxide based nanohybrid proton exchange membranes for fuel cell applications: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ravi P; Shukla, Geetanjali; Manohar, Murli; Shahi, Vinod K

    2017-02-01

    In the context of many applications, such as polymer composites, energy-related materials, sensors, 'paper'-like materials, field-effect transistors (FET), and biomedical applications, chemically modified graphene was broadly studied during the last decade, due to its excellent electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties. The presence of reactive oxygen functional groups in the grapheme oxide (GO) responsible for chemical functionalization makes it a good candidate for diversified applications. The main objectives for developing a GO based nanohybrid proton exchange membrane (PEM) include: improved self-humidification (water retention ability), reduced fuel crossover (electro-osmotic drag), improved stabilities (mechanical, thermal, and chemical), enhanced proton conductivity, and processability for the preparation of membrane-electrode assembly. Research carried on this topic may be divided into protocols for covalent grafting of functional groups on GO matrix, preparation of free-standing PEM or choice of suitable polymer matrix, covalent or hydrogen bonding between GO and polymer matrix etc. Herein, we present a brief literature survey on GO based nano-hybrid PEM for fuel cell applications. Different protocols were adopted to produce functionalized GO based materials and prepare their free-standing film or disperse these materials in various polymer matrices with suitable interactions. This review article critically discussed the suitability of these PEMs for fuel cell applications in terms of the dependency of the intrinsic properties of nanohybrid PEMs. Potential applications of these nanohybrid PEMs, and current challenges are also provided along with future guidelines for developing GO based nanohybrid PEMs as promising materials for fuel cell applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A durable alternative for proton-exchange membranes: sulfonated poly(benzoxazole thioether sulfone)s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Dan [Center for Innovative Fuel Cell and Battery Technologies, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245 (United States); Lab of PEMFC Key Materials and Technologies, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Liaoning, Dalian 116023 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Li, Jinhuan [Center for Innovative Fuel Cell and Battery Technologies, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245 (United States); College of Materials Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Song, Min-Kyu; Liu, Meilin [Center for Innovative Fuel Cell and Battery Technologies, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245 (United States); Yi, Baolian; Zhang, Huamin [Lab of PEMFC Key Materials and Technologies, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Liaoning, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2011-03-18

    To develop a durable proton-exchange membrane (PEM) for fuel-cell applications, a series of sulfonated poly(benzoxazole thioether sulfone)s (SPTESBOs) are designed and synthesized, with anticipated good dimensional stability (via acid-base cross linking), improved oxidative stability against free radicals (via incorporation of thioether groups), and enhanced inherent stability (via elimination of unstable end groups) of the backbone. The structures and the degree of sulfonation of the copolymers are characterized using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H NMR and {sup 19}F NMR). The electrochemical stabilities of the monomers are examined using cyclic voltammetry in a typical three-electrode cell configuration. The physicochemical properties of the membranes vital to fuel-cell performance are also carefully evaluated under conditions relevant to fuel-cell operation, including chemical and thermal stability, proton conductivity, solubility in different solvents, water uptake, and swelling ratio. The new membranes exhibit low dimensional change at 25 C to 90 C and excellent thermal stability up to 250 C. Upon elimination of unstable end groups, the co-polymers display enhanced chemical resistance and oxidative stability in Fenton's test. Further, the SPTESBO-HFB-60 (HFB-60=hexafluorobenzene, 60 mol% sulfone) membrane displays comparable fuel-cell performance to that of an NRE 212 membrane at 80 C under fully humidified condition, suggesting that the new membranes have the potential to be more durable but less expensive for fuel-cell applications. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. A Durable Alternative for Proton-Exchange Membranes: Sulfonated Poly(Benzoxazole Thioether Sulfone)s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Dan; Li, Jin Hui; Song, Min Kyu; Yi, Baolian; Zhang, Huamin; Liu, Meilin

    2011-02-24

    To develop a durable proton-exchange membrane (PEM) for fuel-cell applications, a series of sulfonated poly(benzoxazole thioether sulfone)s ( SPTESBOs) are designed and synthesized, with anticipated good dimensional stability (via acid–base cross linking), improved oxidative stability against free radicals (via incorporation of thioether groups), and enhanced inherent stability (via elimination of unstable end groups) of the backbone. The structures and the degree of sulfonation of the copolymers are characterized using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H NMR and {sup 19}F NMR). The electrochemical stabilities of the monomers are examined using cyclic voltammetry in a typical three-electrode cell configuration. The physicochemical properties of the membranes vital to fuel-cell performance are also carefully evaluated under conditions relevant to fuel-cell operation, including chemical and thermal stability, proton conductivity, solubility in different solvents, water uptake, and swelling ratio. The new membranes exhibit low dimensional change at 25°C to 90°C and excellent thermal stability up to 250°C. Upon elimination of unstable end groups, the co-polymers display enhanced chemical resistance and oxidative stability in Fenton's test. Further, the SPTESBO-HFB-60 (HFB-60=hexafluorobenzene, 60 mol% sulfone) membrane displays comparable fuel-cell performance to that of an NRE 212 membrane at 80°C under fully humidified condition, suggesting that the new membranes have the potential to be more durable but less expensive for fuel-cell applications.

  7. NMR and computational studies of the configurational properties of spirodioxyselenuranes. Are dynamic exchange processes or temperature-dependent chemical shifts involved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Press, David J; McNeil, Nicole M R; Rauk, Arvi; Back, Thomas G

    2012-10-19

    Spirodioxyselenurane 4a and several substituted analogs revealed unexpected (1)H NMR behavior. The diastereotopic methylene hydrogens of 4a appeared as an AB quartet at low temperature that coalesced to a singlet upon warming to 267 K, suggesting a dynamic exchange process with a relatively low activation energy. However, DFT computational investigations indicated high activation energies for exchange via inversion through the selenium center and for various pseudorotation processes. Moreover, the NMR behavior was unaffected by the presence of water or acid catalysts, thereby ruling out reversible Se-O or benzylic C-O cleavage as possible stereomutation pathways. Remarkably, when 4a was heated beyond 342 K, the singlet was transformed into a new AB quartet. Further computations indicated that a temperature dependence of the chemical shifts of the diastereotopic protons results in convergence upon heating, followed by crossover and divergence at still higher temperatures. The NMR behavior is therefore not due to dynamic exchange processes, but rather to temperature dependence of the chemical shifts of the diastereotopic hydrogens, which are coincidentally equivalent at intermediate temperatures. These results suggest the general need for caution in ascribing the coalescence of variable-temperature NMR signals of diastereotopic protons to dynamic exchange processes that could instead be due to temperature-dependent chemical shifts and highlight the importance of corroborating postulated exchange processes through additional computations or experiments wherever possible.

  8. A noble metal-free proton-exchange membrane fuel cell based on bio-inspired molecular catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, P D; Morozan, A; Archambault, S; Heidkamp, J; Chenevier, P; Dau, H; Fontecave, M; Martinent, A; Jousselme, B; Artero, V

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogen is a promising energy vector for storing renewable energies: obtained from water-splitting, in electrolysers or photoelectrochemical cells, it can be turned back to electricity on demand in fuel cells (FCs). Proton exchange membrane (PEM) devices with low internal resistance, high compactness and stability are an attractive technology optimized over decades, affording fast start-up times and low operating temperatures. However, they rely on the powerful catalytic properties of noble metals such as platinum, while lower cost, more abundant materials would be needed for economic viability. Replacing these noble metals at both electrodes has long proven to be a difficult task, so far incompatible with PEM technologies. Here we take advantage of newly developed bio-inspired molecular H 2 oxidation catalysts and noble metal-free O 2 -reducing materials, to fabricate a noble metal-free PEMFC, with an 0.74 V open circuit voltage and a 23 μW cm -2 output power under technologically relevant conditions. X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements confirm that the catalysts are stable and retain their structure during turnover.

  9. Experimental diagnostics and modeling of inductive phenomena at low frequencies in impedance spectra of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivac, Ivan; Šimić, Boris; Barbir, Frano

    2017-10-01

    Representation of fuel cell processes by equivalent circuit models, involving resistance and capacitance elements representing activation losses on both anode and cathode in series with resistance representing ohmic losses, cannot capture and explain the inductive loop that may show up at low frequencies in Nyquist diagram representation of the electrochemical impedance spectra. In an attempt to explain the cause of the low-frequency inductive loop and correlate it with the processes within the fuel cell electrodes, a novel equivalent circuit model of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell has been proposed and experimentally verified here in detail. The model takes into account both the anode and the cathode, and has an additional resonant loop on each side, comprising of a resistance, capacitance and inductance in parallel representing the processes within the catalyst layer. Using these additional circuit elements, more accurate and better fits to experimental impedance data in the wide frequency range at different current densities, cell temperatures, humidity of gases, air flow stoichiometries and backpressures were obtained.

  10. Degradation of graphene coated copper in simulated proton exchange membrane fuel cell environment: Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Y. J.; Anisur, M. R.; Qiu, W.; He, J. J.; Al-Saadi, S.; Singh Raman, R. K.

    2017-09-01

    Metallic materials are most suitable for bipolar plates of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) because they possess the required mechanical strength, durability, gas impermeability, acceptable cost and are suitable for mass production. However, metallic bipolar plates are prone to corrosion or they can passivate under PEMFC environment and interrupt the fuel cell operation. Therefore, it is highly attractive to develop corrosion resistance coating that is also highly conductive. Graphene fits these criteria. Graphene coating is developed on copper by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with an aim to improving corrosion resistance of copper under PEMFC condition. The Raman Spectroscopy shows the graphene coating to be multilayered. The electrochemical degradation of graphene coated copper is investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution at room temperature. After exposure to the electrolyte for up to 720 h, the charge transfer resistance (Rt) of the graphene coated copper is ∼3 times greater than that of the bare copper, indicating graphene coatings could improve the corrosion resistance of copper bipolar plates.

  11. Analysis of the control structures for an integrated ethanol processor for proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biset, S.; Nieto Deglioumini, L.; Basualdo, M. [GIAIP-CIFASIS (UTN-FRRo-CONICET-UPCAM-UNR), BV. 27 de Febrero 210 Bis, S2000EZP Rosario (Argentina); Garcia, V.M.; Serra, M. [Institut de Robotica i Informatica Industrial, C. Llorens i Artigas 4-6, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate which would be a good preliminary plantwide control structure for the process of Hydrogen production from bioethanol to be used in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) accounting only steady-state information. The objective is to keep the process under optimal operation point, that is doing energy integration to achieve the maximum efficiency. Ethanol, produced from renewable feedstocks, feeds a fuel processor investigated for steam reforming, followed by high- and low-temperature shift reactors and preferential oxidation, which are coupled to a polymeric fuel cell. Applying steady-state simulation techniques and using thermodynamic models the performance of the complete system with two different control structures have been evaluated for the most typical perturbations. A sensitivity analysis for the key process variables together with the rigorous operability requirements for the fuel cell are taking into account for defining acceptable plantwide control structure. This is the first work showing an alternative control structure applied to this kind of process. (author)

  12. A solution-phase synthesis method to highly active Pt-Co/C electrocatalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenzhen; Chen, Zhongwei; Xu, Lianbin; Yan, Yushan

    A solution-phase synthesis method was studied to prepare carbon supported Pt-Co alloy catalysts. The organic precursors of Pt acetylacetonate and Co acetylacetonate were reduced in a high boiling point solvent of octyl ether in the presence of oleic acid (OAc) and oleylamine (OAm) to produce fine Pt-Co nanoparticles, which were subsequently deposited on carbon support to obtain Pt-Co/C catalysts. Thermogravimetric analysis suggests that the stabilizers (OAc and OAm) can be removed by copious ethanol washing and subsequent moderate temperature heat-treatment (250 °C, under Argon atmosphere). X-ray diffraction patterns indicate that the average particle size is around 2.3 nm, and the lattice parameter is 3.868 Å for the heat-treated Pt-Co/C (40 wt%). Transmission electron microscopy images show very small Pt-Co alloy nanoparticles homogeneously dispersed on the carbon support with a particle size distribution of 2-4 nm for all Pt-Co/C samples. The elements composition of Pt and Co in the final Pt-Co/C catalyst can be well controlled, as evidenced by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy analyses. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell tests show the heat-treated Pt-Co/C cathode catalyst has higher mass activity of oxygen reduction reaction than Pt/C at an operation voltage of 0.9 V, this can be attributed to its smaller particle size and reduced lattice parameter.

  13. Application of a self-supporting microporous layer to gas diffusion layers of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Heo, Yun; Ishida, Masayoshi; Nakano, Akihiro; Someya, Satoshi; Munakata, Tetsuo

    2017-02-01

    The intrinsic effect of properties of a self-supporting microporous layer (MPL) on the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is identified. First, a self-supporting MPL is fabricated and applied to a gas diffusion layer (GDL) of a PEMFC, when the GDL is either an integrated sample composed of a gas diffusion backing (GDB, i.e., carbon paper) combined with MPL or a sample with only MPL. Cell performance tests reveal that, the same as the MPL fabricated by the coating method, the self-supporting MPL on the GDB improves the cell performance at high current density. Furthermore, the GDL composed only of the MPL (i.e., GDB-free GDL) shows better performance than does the integrated GDB/MPL GDL. These results along with literature data strongly suggest that the low thermal conductivity of MPL induces a high temperature throughout the GDL, and thus vapor diffusion is dominant in the transport of product water through the MPL.

  14. Isothermal ice crystallization kinetics in the gas-diffusion layer of a proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursch, T J; Ciontea, M A; Radke, C J; Weber, A Z

    2012-01-17

    Nucleation and growth of ice in the fibrous gas-diffusion layer (GDL) of a proton-exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) are investigated using isothermal differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Isothermal crystallization rates and pseudo-steady-state nucleation rates are obtained as a function of subcooling from heat-flow and induction-time measurements. Kinetics of ice nucleation and growth are studied at two polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) loadings (0 and 10 wt %) in a commercial GDL for temperatures between 240 and 273 K. A nonlinear ice-crystallization rate expression is developed using Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) theory, in which the heat-transfer-limited growth rate is determined from the moving-boundary Stefan problem. Induction times follow a Poisson distribution and increase upon addition of PTFE, indicating that nucleation occurs more slowly on a hydrophobic fiber than on a hydrophilic fiber. The determined nucleation rates and induction times follow expected trends from classical nucleation theory. A validated rate expression is now available for predicting ice-crystallization kinetics in GDLs. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  15. Analytical Investigation and Improvement of Performance of a Proton Exchange Membrane (Pem) Fuel Cell in Mobile Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaee, I.

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the performance of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell in mobile applications is investigated analytically. At present the main use and advantages of fuel cells impact particularly strongly on mobile applications such as vehicles, mobile computers and mobile telephones. Some external parameters such as the cell temperature (Tcell ) , operating pressure of gases (P) and air stoichiometry (λair ) affect the performance and voltage losses in the PEM fuel cell. Because of the existence of many theoretical, empirical and semi-empirical models of the PEM fuel cell, it is necessary to compare the accuracy of these models. But theoretical models that are obtained from thermodynamic and electrochemical approach, are very exact but complex, so it would be easier to use the empirical and smi-empirical models in order to forecast the fuel cell system performance in many applications such as mobile applications. The main purpose of this study is to obtain the semi-empirical relation of a PEM fuel cell with the least voltage losses. Also, the results are compared with the existing experimental results in the literature and a good agreement is seen.

  16. Indium doped niobium phosphates as intermediate temperature proton conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Yunjie; Li, Qingfeng; Anfimova, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    that the indium doping promoted formation of the cubic Nb2P4O15 phase instead of the monoclinic Nb5P7O30 phase in the pristine niobium phosphates and enhanced the preservation of OH functional groups in the phosphates. The preserved OH functionalities in the phosphates after the heat treatment at 650 °C...... contributed to the anhydrous proton conductivity. The Nb0.9In0.1 phosphate exhibited a proton conductivity of five times higher than that of the un-doped analog at 250 °C. The conductivity was stabilized at a level of above 0.02 S cm−1 under dry atmosphere at 250 °C during the stability evaluation for 3 days....

  17. Molecular-Level Modeling of the Structure and Proton Transport within the Membrane Electrode Assembly of Hydrogen Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvan, Myvizhi Esai; Keffer, David J.

    The creation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) in the early 1960's attracted great interest with the prospect of serving as a highly efficient and eco-friendly power source. This nascent technology found a broad range of applications spanning from spacecrafts to automobiles and electronic devices. The PEMFC in its simplest form consists of an anode, where the hydrogen fuel is catalytically electro-oxidized (dissociated into protons and electrons), a cathode, where oxygen is catalytically electro-reduced (combined with protons to form water) and a polymer electrolyte membrane, which serves as the structural framework of the cell and transports protons from anode to cathode, while the electrons are forced through the external circuit generating electricity. Today, fuel cell remains one of the most promising means of generating energy from alternative fuels, with tremendous potential to reduce oil dependence and carbon emissions. However, current PEMFCs have a relatively narrow operational range and a high cost of production, thus requiring significant experimental and theoretical research to develop a thorough understanding of this technology (at both the molecular and macroscopic scale), which will ultimately render the fuel cell as an economically viable option.

  18. Proton transfer and complex formation of angiotensin I ions with gaseous molecules at various temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonose, Shinji, E-mail: nonose@yokohama-cu.ac.jp; Yamashita, Kazuki; Sudo, Ayako; Kawashima, Minami

    2013-09-23

    Highlights: • Proton transfer from angiotensin I ions (z = 2, 3) to gaseous molecules was studied. • Temperature dependence of absolute reaction rate constants was measured. • Remarkable changes were obtained for distribution of product ions and reaction rate constants. • Proton transfer reaction was enhanced and reduced by complex formation. • Conformation changes are induced by complex formation and or by thermal collision with He. - Abstract: Proton transfer reactions of angiotensin I ions for +2 charge state, [M + 2H]{sup 2+}, to primary, secondary and aromatic amines were examined in the gas phase. Absolute reaction rate constants for proton transfer were determined from intensities of parent and product ions in the mass spectra. Temperature dependence of the reaction rate constants was measured. Remarkable change was observed for distribution of product ions and reaction rate constants. Proton transfer reaction was enhanced or reduced by complex formation of [M + 2H]{sup 2+} with gaseous molecules. The results relate to conformation changes of [M + 2H]{sup 2+} with change of temperature, which are induced by complex formation and or by thermal collision with He. Proton transfer reactions of angiotensin I ions for +3 charge state, [M + 3H]{sup 3+}, were also studied. The reaction rates did not depend on temperature so definitely.

  19. A small portable proton exchange membrane fuel cell and hydrogen generator for medical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlhart, O J; Rohonyi, P; Modroukas, D; Driller, J

    1997-01-01

    Small, lightweight power sources for total artificial hearts (TAH), left ventricular assist devices (LVAD), and other medical products are under development. The new power source will provide 2 to 3 times the capacity of conventional batteries. The implications of this new power source are profound. For example, for the Heartmate LVAD, 5 to 8 hours of operation are obtained with 3 lb of lead acid batteries (Personal Communication Mr. Craig Sherman, Thermo Cardiosystems, Inc TCI 11/29/96). With the same weight, as much as 14 hours of operation appear achievable with the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell power source. Energy densities near 135 watt-hour/L are achievable. These values significantly exceed those of most conventional and advanced primary and secondary batteries. The improvement is mission dependent and even applies for the short deployment cited above. The comparison to batteries becomes even more favorable if the mission length is increased. The higher capacity requires only replacement of lightweight hydride cartridges and logistically available water. Therefore, when one spare 50 L hydride cartridge weighing 115 g is added to the reactant supply the energy density of the total system increases to 230 watt-hour/kg. This new power source is comprised of a hydrogen fueled, air-breathing PEM fuel cell and a miniature hydrogen generator (US Patent No 5,514,353). The fuel cell is of novel construction and differs from conventional bipolar PEM fuel cells by the arrangement of cells on a single sheet of ion-exchange membrane. The construction avoids the weight and volume penalty of conventional bipolar stacks. The hydrogen consumed by the fuel cell is generated load-responsively in the miniature hydrogen generator, by reacting calcium hydride with water, forming in the process hydrogen and lime. The generator is cartridge rechargeable and available in capacities providing up to several hundred watt-hours of electric power.

  20. The study of flow and proton exchange interactions in the cylindrical solid oxide fuel cell

    CERN Document Server

    Saievar-Iranizad, E

    2002-01-01

    The solid oxide fuel cell operates at high temperature of about 1000 deg C. In this temperature, some known materials such as Ni, ... which is abundant in the nature, can be used as a catalyst in the electrodes. The electrolytes of such cell solid oxide fuel cell can be made through non-porous solid ceramics such as Zircon's (ZrO sub 2). It can be stabilized using a doped Yttrium oxide. The importance of Yttria-stabilised Zirconia at high temperature belongs to the transport of oxygen ions through the electrolyte. Oxygen using in the hot cathode side causes a considerable reduction in the concentration of oxygen molecules. The oxygen ions exchange through the electrolyte relates to the molecular oxygen concentration gradient between the anode and cathode. Applying fuels such as hydrogen or natural gas in the anode and its chemical reaction with oxygen ions transfer from cathode through the electrolyte, produce electricity, water and heat. To study the ion exchange and its interaction into solid oxide fuel cel...

  1. Fabrication of Proton-Exchange Waveguide Using Stoichiometric LiTaO3 for Guided Wave Electrooptic Modulators with Polarization-Reversed Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Murata

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical waveguides were fabricated on z-cut stoichiometric LiTaO3 (SLT by using the proton-exchange method. The surface index change for the extraordinary ray on the SLT substrate resulting from the proton exchange was 0.017, which coincided well with congruent LiTaO3 substrates. The proton exchange coefficient in the SLT was 0.25×10−12 cm2/s. The application of the SLT waveguide to a quasi-velocity-matched travelling-wave electrooptic modulator with periodically polarization-reversed structure is also reported.

  2. High temperature active heat exchanger research for latent heat storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alario, J.; Haslett, R.

    1982-02-01

    An active heat exchange method in a latent heat (salt) thermal energy storage system that prevents a low conductivity solid salt layer from forming on heat transfer surfaces was developed. An evaluation of suitable media with melting points in the temperature range of interest (250 to 400 C) limited the candidates to molten salts from the chloride, hydroxide and nitrate families, based on high storage capacity, good corrosion characteristics and availability in large quantities at reasonable cost. The specific salt recommended for laboratory tests was a choride eutectic (20.5KCL o 24.5NaCL o 55.MgCl2% by wt.), with a nominal melting point of 385 C. Various active heat exchange concepts were given a technical and economic comparison to a passive tube shell design for a reference application (300 MW sub t for 6 hours). Test hardware was then built for the most promising concept: a direct contact heat exchanger in which molten salt droplets are injected into a cooler counter flowing stream of liquid metal carrier fluid (lead/Bismuth).

  3. Rechargeable Metal-Air Proton-Exchange Membrane Batteries for Renewable Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Kazuyo; Yamamoto, Yuta; Yamaguchi, Togo; Oogushi, Akihide; Hibino, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Rechargeable proton-exchange membrane batteries that employ organic chemical hydrides as hydrogen-storage media have the potential to serve as next-generation power sources; however, significant challenges remain regarding the improvement of the reversible hydrogen-storage capacity. Here, we address this challenge through the use of metal-ion redox couples as energy carriers for battery operation. Carbon, with a suitable degree of crystallinity and surface oxygenation, was used as an effective anode material for the metal redox reactions. A Sn0.9In0.1P2O7-based electrolyte membrane allowed no crossover of vanadium ions through the membrane. The V4+/V3+, V3+/V2+, and Sn4+/Sn2+ redox reactions took place at a more positive potential than that for hydrogen reduction, so that undesired hydrogen production could be avoided. The resulting electrical capacity reached 306 and 258 mAh g-1 for VOSO4 and SnSO4, respectively, and remained at 76 and 91 % of their respective initial values after 50 cycles.

  4. Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell development with lightweight component materials, phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abens, Sandors

    1995-07-01

    Although the Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell is a leading candidate for an automobile power source through meeting the zero emission requirement, its power density is currently an order of magnitude below the 400 W/kg criterion proposed by the Department of Energy. The major contributors to stack weight are the bipolar gas distribution plates. This effort, performed jointly by Energy Research Corporation (ERC) and Texas A&M University (TAM U), focused on lightweight alternative bipolar plate materials and designs. The electronic conductivity of various candidate materials was evaluated. The emphasis was on conductive plastic materials and porous graphite. Several plastic materials with specific resistance between 0.5 and 0.8 ohm/cm were identified. Preliminary evaluation of lightweight materials was performed in single cell tests. The emphasis was on atmospheric pressure and internally humidified cell operation as a potential means of system simplification and reduction of PEM fuel cell ancillary equipment complexity and weight. The performance of single cells was nearly the same at 1 and 3 atm pressure. At a cell potential of O.6V, a current density of 230 mA/sq cm was reached at 1.7 stoichiometric air flow rate. With lightweight bipolar plates, the DOE power density target may be achieved with unpressurized, internally humidified cell stacks.

  5. Performance of gas diffusion layer from coconut waste for proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widodo, H.; Destyorini, F.; Insiyanda, D. R.; Subhan, A.

    2017-04-01

    The performance of Gas Diffusion Layer (GDL) synthesized from coconut waste. Gas Diffusion Layer (GDL), produced from coconut waste, as a part of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) component, has been characterized. In order to know the performance, the commercial products were used as the remaining parts of PEMFC. The proposed GDL possesses 69% porosity for diffusion of Hydrogen fuel and Oxygen, as well as for transporting electron. With the electrical conductivity of 500 mS.cm-1, it also has hydrophobic properties, which is important to avoid the reaction with water, with the contact angle of 139°. The 5 × 5 cm2 GDL paper was co-assembled with the catalyst, Nafion membrane, bipolar plate, current collector, end plate to obtain single Stack PEMFC. The performance was examined by flowing fuel and gas with the flow rate of 500 and 1000 ml.min-1, respectively, and analyse the I-V polarization curve. The measurements were carried out at 30, 35, and 40°C for 5 cycles to ensure the repeatability. The results shows that the current density and the maximum power density reaches 203 mA.cm-2 and 143 mW.cm-2, respectively, with a given voltage 0.6 V, at 40°C.

  6. A review of fault tolerant control strategies applied to proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijoux, Etienne; Steiner, Nadia Yousfi; Benne, Michel; Péra, Marie-Cécile; Pérez, Brigitte Grondin

    2017-08-01

    Fuel cells are powerful systems for power generation. They have a good efficiency and do not generate greenhouse gases. This technology involves a lot of scientific fields, which leads to the appearance of strongly inter-dependent parameters. This makes the system particularly hard to control and increases fault's occurrence frequency. These two issues call for the necessity to maintain the system performance at the expected level, even in faulty operating conditions. It is called ;fault tolerant control; (FTC). The present paper aims to give the state of the art of FTC applied to the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The FTC approach is composed of two parts. First, a diagnosis part allows the identification and the isolation of a fault; it requires a good a priori knowledge of all the possible faults. Then, a control part allows an optimal control strategy to find the best operating point to recover/mitigate the fault; it requires the knowledge of the degradation phenomena and their mitigation strategies.

  7. Prognostics of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells stack using an ensemble of constraints based connectionist networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Kamran; Gouriveau, Rafael; Zerhouni, Noureddine; Hissel, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) is considered the most versatile among available fuel cell technologies, which qualify for diverse applications. However, the large-scale industrial deployment of PEMFCs is limited due to their short life span and high exploitation costs. Therefore, ensuring fuel cell service for a long duration is of vital importance, which has led to Prognostics and Health Management of fuel cells. More precisely, prognostics of PEMFC is major area of focus nowadays, which aims at identifying degradation of PEMFC stack at early stages and estimating its Remaining Useful Life (RUL) for life cycle management. This paper presents a data-driven approach for prognostics of PEMFC stack using an ensemble of constraint based Summation Wavelet- Extreme Learning Machine (SW-ELM) models. This development aim at improving the robustness and applicability of prognostics of PEMFC for an online application, with limited learning data. The proposed approach is applied to real data from two different PEMFC stacks and compared with ensembles of well known connectionist algorithms. The results comparison on long-term prognostics of both PEMFC stacks validates our proposition.

  8. Development of large aperture projection scatterometry for catalyst loading evaluation in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Michael T.; Barnes, Bryan M.; Sohn, Martin; Stanfield, Eric; Silver, Richard M.

    2017-10-01

    Widespread commercialization of proton exchange membrane fuel cells remains curbed by various manufacturing and infrastructure challenges. One such technical barrier identified by the U. S. Department of Energy is the need for high-speed, in-line process control of platinum-based catalyst layers in the membrane electrode assembly of the fuel cell. Using multiple reflectivity-based optical methods, such as optical scatterometry and large aperture projection scatterometry, we demonstrate in-line-capable catalyst loading measurements of carbon-supported Pt nanoparticle and Pt-alloy nanostructured thin film catalyst coated membranes. Large aperture projection scatterometry is a new high-throughput approach developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology specifically for fuel cell manufacturing metrology. Angle- and wavelength-resolved measurements of these fuel cell soft goods validate the ability of reflectivity-based measurements to produce industrially relevant sensitivities to changes in Pt and Pt-alloy loading. The successful application of these optical methods to fuel cell manufacturing metrology directly addresses the shortage of high-throughput process control approaches needed to facilitate performance improvements and manufacturing cost-reductions required to make fuel cells commercially viable.

  9. An analytical model and parametric study of electrical contact resistance in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zhiliang; Wang, Shuxin; Zhang, Lianhong [School of Mechanical Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Hu, S. Jack [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2125 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    This paper presents an analytical model of the electrical contact resistance between the carbon paper gas diffusion layers (GDLs) and the graphite bipolar plates (BPPs) in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The model is developed based on the classical statistical contact theory for a PEM fuel cell, using the same probability distributions of the GDL structure and BPP surface profile as previously described in Wu et al. [Z. Wu, Y. Zhou, G. Lin, S. Wang, S.J. Hu, J. Power Sources 182 (2008) 265-269] and Zhou et al. [Y. Zhou, G. Lin, A.J. Shih, S.J. Hu, J. Power Sources 163 (2007) 777-783]. Results show that estimates of the contact resistance compare favorably with experimental data by Zhou et al. [Y. Zhou, G. Lin, A.J. Shih, S.J. Hu, J. Power Sources 163 (2007) 777-783]. Factors affecting the contact behavior are systematically studied using the analytical model, including the material properties of the two contact bodies and factors arising from the manufacturing processes. The transverse Young's modulus of chopped carbon fibers in the GDL and the surface profile of the BPP are found to be significant to the contact resistance. The factor study also sheds light on the manufacturing requirements of carbon fiber GDLs for a better contact performance in PEM fuel cells. (author)

  10. An analytical model and parametric study of electrical contact resistance in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhiliang; Wang, Shuxin; Zhang, Lianhong; Hu, S. Jack

    This paper presents an analytical model of the electrical contact resistance between the carbon paper gas diffusion layers (GDLs) and the graphite bipolar plates (BPPs) in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The model is developed based on the classical statistical contact theory for a PEM fuel cell, using the same probability distributions of the GDL structure and BPP surface profile as previously described in Wu et al. [Z. Wu, Y. Zhou, G. Lin, S. Wang, S.J. Hu, J. Power Sources 182 (2008) 265-269] and Zhou et al. [Y. Zhou, G. Lin, A.J. Shih, S.J. Hu, J. Power Sources 163 (2007) 777-783]. Results show that estimates of the contact resistance compare favorably with experimental data by Zhou et al. [Y. Zhou, G. Lin, A.J. Shih, S.J. Hu, J. Power Sources 163 (2007) 777-783]. Factors affecting the contact behavior are systematically studied using the analytical model, including the material properties of the two contact bodies and factors arising from the manufacturing processes. The transverse Young's modulus of chopped carbon fibers in the GDL and the surface profile of the BPP are found to be significant to the contact resistance. The factor study also sheds light on the manufacturing requirements of carbon fiber GDLs for a better contact performance in PEM fuel cells.

  11. Control of proton exchange membrane fuel cell system breathing based on maximum net power control strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Chen, Weirong; Liu, Zhixiang; Guo, Ai; Liu, Shukui

    2013-11-01

    In order to achieve the maximum net power, the analysis for the maximum net power characterization of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) system is carried out. A maximum net power control (MNPC) strategy based on an implicit generalized predictive control (IGPC) and a reference governor is proposed to keep optimal oxygen excess ratio (OER) trajectory. The IGPC based on an effective informed adaptive particle swarm optimization (EIA-PSO) algorithm is developed to solve the predictive control law and reduce the computational complexity in the rolling optimization process. The simulations of three conditional tests are implemented and the results demonstrate that the proposed strategy can track the optimal OER trajectory, reduce the parasitic power and maximize the output net power. The comprehensive comparisons based on three conditional tests verify that the MNPC-IGPC has better robust performance in the presence of large disturbances, time delay and various noises. The experimental comparison with internal control system of Ballard 1.2 kW Nexa Power Module testifies the validity of the MNPC-IGPC for increasing the net power. Hence, this proposed strategy can provide better behavior to guarantee optimal OER trajectory and the maximum net power even though the disturbances and uncertainties occur.

  12. Recovery mechanisms in proton exchange membrane fuel cells after accelerated stress tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Guo, Liejin; Liu, Hongtan

    2015-11-01

    The mechanisms of performance recovery after accelerated stress test (AST) in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are systematically studied. Experiments are carried out by incorporating a well-designed performance recovery procedure right after the AST protocol. The experiment results show that the cell performance recovers significantly from the degraded state after the AST procedure. The results from cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements further show that the performance recovery can be divided into kinetic and mass transport recoveries. It is further determined that the kinetic recovery, i.e. the recovery of electrochemical active area (ECA), is due to two distinct mechanisms: the reduction of platinum oxide and the re-attachment of detached platinum nanoparticles onto the carbon surface. The mass transport resistance is probably due to reduction of hydrophilic oxide groups on the carbon surface and the microstructure change that alleviates flooding. Performance comparisons show that the recovery procedure is highly effective, indicating the results of AST significantly over-estimate the true degradation in a PEM fuel cell. Therefore, a recovery procedure is highly recommended when an AST protocol is used to evaluate cell degradations to avoid over-estimating true performance degradations in PEMFCs.

  13. Using adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) performance modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezazadeh, S.; Mirzaee, I. [Urmia Univ., Urmia (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mehrabi, M. [University of Pretoria, Pretoria (South Africa)

    2012-11-15

    In this paper, an adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) is used for modeling proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) performance using some numerically investigated and compared with those to experimental results for training and test data. In this way, current density I (A/cm{sup 2}) is modeled to the variation of pressure at the cathode side P{sup C} (atm), voltage V (V), membrane thickness (mm), Anode transfer coefficient {alpha}{sup an}, relative humidity of inlet fuel RH{sup a} and relative humidity of inlet air RH{sup c} which are defined as input (design) variables. Then, we divided these data into train and test sections to do modeling. We instructed ANFIS network by 80% of numerical validated data. 20% of primary data which had been considered for testing the appropriateness of the models was entered ANFIS network models and results were compared by three statistical criterions. Considering the results, it is obvious that our proposed modeling by ANFIS is efficient and valid and it can be expanded for more general states.

  14. Development of function-graded proton exchange membrane for PEFC using heavy ion beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiraki, Fumiya; Yoshikawa, Taeko [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Oshima, Akihiro, E-mail: akoshima@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp [The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, 8-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Oshima, Yuji; Takasawa, Yuya; Fukutake, Naoyuki; Gowa Oyama, Tomoko; Urakawa, Tatsuya; Fujita, Hajime; Takahashi, Tomohiro [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Oka, Toshitaka [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakara-Shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kudo, Hisaaki [Nuclear Professional School, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Murakami, Takeshi [National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Hama, Yoshimasa; Washio, Masakazu [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2011-08-01

    The graded energy deposition of heavy ion beam irradiation to polymeric materials was utilized to synthesize a novel proton exchange membrane (PEM) with the graded density of sulfonic acid groups toward the thickness direction. Stacked Poly(tetrafluoroethylene-co-hexafluoropropylene) (FEP) films were irradiated by Xe{sup 54+} ion beam with the energy of 6 MeV/u under a vacuum condition. The induced trapped radicals by the irradiation were measured by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Irradiated films were grafted with styrene monomer and then sulfonated. X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra showed that the densities of sulfonic acid groups were controlled for injection 'Surface' and transmit 'Back' sides of the fabricated PEM. The membrane electrode assembly (MEA) fabricated by the function-graded PEM showed improved fuel cell performance in terms of voltage stability. It was expected that the function-graded PEM could control the graded concentration of sulfonic acid groups in PEM.

  15. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Engineering Model Powerplant. Test Report: Benchmark Tests in Three Spatial Orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyselle, Patricia; Prokopius, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell technology is the leading candidate to replace the aging alkaline fuel cell technology, currently used on the Shuttle, for future space missions. This test effort marks the final phase of a 5-yr development program that began under the Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Program, transitioned into the Next Generation Launch Technologies (NGLT) Program, and continued under Constellation Systems in the Exploration Technology Development Program. Initially, the engineering model (EM) powerplant was evaluated with respect to its performance as compared to acceptance tests carried out at the manufacturer. This was to determine the sensitivity of the powerplant performance to changes in test environment. In addition, a series of tests were performed with the powerplant in the original standard orientation. This report details the continuing EM benchmark test results in three spatial orientations as well as extended duration testing in the mission profile test. The results from these tests verify the applicability of PEM fuel cells for future NASA missions. The specifics of these different tests are described in the following sections.

  16. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell With Enhanced Durability Using Fluorinated Carbon As Electrocatalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Yasser

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the fluorination of a carbon aerogel and its effects on the durability of the resulting electrocatalyst for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC. Fluorine has been introduced before or after platinum deposition. The different electrocatalysts are physico-chemically and electrochemically characterized, and the results discussed by comparison with commercial Pt/XC72 from E-Tek. The results demonstrate that the level of fluorination of the carbon aerogel can be controlled. The fluorination modifies the texture of the carbons by increasing the pore size and decreasing the specific surface area, but the textures remain appropriate for PEMFC applications. Two fluorination sites are observed, leading to both high covalent C-F bond and weakened ones, the quantity of which depends on whether the treatment is done before or after platinum deposition. The order of the different treatments is very important. The presence of platinum contributes to the fluorination mechanism, but leads to amorphous platinum rather inactive towards the Oxygen Reduction Reaction. Finally, a better durability was demonstrated for the fluorinated then platinized catalyst compared both to the same but not fluorinated catalyst and to the reference commercial material (based on the loss of the electrochemical real surface area after accelerated stress tests.

  17. Gas diffusion layer for proton exchange membrane fuel cells - A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cindrella, L. [Fuel Cell Research Laboratory, Department of Engineering Technology, Arizona State University, Mesa, AZ 85212 (United States); Department of Chemistry, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli 620015 (India); Kannan, A.M.; Lin, J.F.; Saminathan, K. [Fuel Cell Research Laboratory, Department of Engineering Technology, Arizona State University, Mesa, AZ 85212 (United States); Ho, Y. [Department of Biotechnology, College of Health Science, Asia University, Taichung 41354 (China); Lin, C.W. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Yunlin 640 (China); Wertz, J. [Hollingsworth and Vose Co., A.K. Nicholson Research Lab, 219 Townsend Road, West Groton, MA 01472 (United States)

    2009-10-20

    Gas diffusion layer (GDL) is one of the critical components acting both as the functional as well as the support structure for membrane-electrode assembly in the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The role of the GDL is very significant in the H{sub 2}/air PEM fuel cell to make it commercially viable. A bibliometric analysis of the publications on the GDLs since 1992 shows a total of 400+ publications (>140 papers in the Journal of Power Sources alone) and reveals an exponential growth due to reasons that PEMFC promises a lot of potential as the future energy source for varied applications and hence its vital component GDL requires due innovative analysis and research. This paper is an attempt to pool together the published work on the GDLs and also to review the essential properties of the GDLs, the method of achieving each one of them, their characterization and the current status and future directions. The optimization of the functional properties of the GDLs is possible only by understanding the role of its key parameters such as structure, porosity, hydrophobicity, hydrophilicity, gas permeability, transport properties, water management and the surface morphology. This paper discusses them in detail to provide an insight into the structural parts that make the GDLs and also the processes that occur in the GDLs under service conditions and the characteristic properties. The required balance in the properties of the GDLs to facilitate the counter current flow of the gas and water is highlighted through its characteristics. (author)

  18. Contact behavior modelling and its size effect on proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Diankai; Peng, Linfa; Yi, Peiyun; Lai, Xinmin; Janßen, Holger; Lehnert, Werner

    2017-10-01

    Contact behavior between the gas diffusion layer (GDL) and bipolar plate (BPP) is of significant importance for proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Most current studies on contact behavior utilize experiments and finite element modelling and focus on fuel cells with graphite BPPs, which lead to high costs and huge computational requirements. The objective of this work is to build a more effective analytical method for contact behavior in fuel cells and investigate the size effect resulting from configuration alteration of channel and rib (channel/rib). Firstly, a mathematical description of channel/rib geometry is outlined in accordance with the fabrication of metallic BPP. Based on the interface deformation characteristic and Winkler surface model, contact pressure between BPP and GDL is then calculated to predict contact resistance and GDL porosity as evaluative parameters of contact behavior. Then, experiments on BPP fabrication and contact resistance measurement are conducted to validate the model. The measured results demonstrate an obvious dependence on channel/rib size. Feasibility of the model used in graphite fuel cells is also discussed. Finally, size factor is proposed for evaluating the rule of size effect. Significant increase occurs in contact resistance and porosity for higher size factor, in which channel/rib width decrease.

  19. Superhydrophobic PAN nanofibers for gas diffusion layers of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salahuddin, Mohammad; Hwang, Gisuk; Asmatulu, Ramazan

    2016-04-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells are considered to be the promising alternatives of natural resources for generating electricity and power. An optimal water management in the gas diffusion layers (GDL) is critical to high fuel cell performance. Its basic functions include transportation of the reactant gas from flow channels to catalyst effectively, draining out the liquid water from catalyst layer to flow channels, and conducting electrons with low humidity. In this study, polyacrylonitrile (PAN) was dissolved in a solvent and electrospun at various conditions to produce PAN nanofibers prior to the stabilization at 280 °C for 1 hour in the atmospheric pressure and carbonization at 850 °C for 1 hour. The surface hydrophobicity values of the carbonized PAN nanofibers were adjusted using superhydrophobic and hydrophilic agents. The thermal, mechanical, and electrical properties of the new GDLs depicted much better results compared to the conventionally used ones. The water condensation tests on the surfaces (superhydrophobic and hydrophilic) of the GDL showed a crucial step towards improved water managements in the fuel cell. This study may open up new possibilities for developing high- performing GDL materials for future PEM fuel cell applications.

  20. Low-Cost and Durable Bipolar Plates for Proton Exchange Membrane Electrolyzers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettenmeier, P.; Wang, R.; Abouatallah, R.; Saruhan, B.; Freitag, O.; Gazdzicki, P.; Morawietz, T.; Hiesgen, R.; Gago, A. S.; Friedrich, K. A.

    2017-03-01

    Cost reduction and high efficiency are the mayor challenges for sustainable H2 production via proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis. Titanium-based components such as bipolar plates (BPP) have the largest contribution to the capital cost. This work proposes the use of stainless steel BPPs coated with Nb and Ti by magnetron sputtering physical vapor deposition (PVD) and vacuum plasma spraying (VPS), respectively. The physical properties of the coatings are thoroughly characterized by scanning electron, atomic force microscopies (SEM, AFM); and X-ray diffraction, photoelectron spectroscopies (XRD, XPS). The Ti coating (50 μm) protects the stainless steel substrate against corrosion, while a 50-fold thinner layer of Nb decreases the contact resistance by almost one order of magnitude. The Nb/Ti-coated stainless steel bipolar BPPs endure the harsh environment of the anode for more than 1000 h of operation under nominal conditions, showing a potential use in PEM electrolyzers for large-scale H2 production from renewables.

  1. Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binek, Christian

    2011-03-01

    Voltage-controlled spintronics is of particular importance to continue progress in information technology through reduced power consumption, enhanced processing speed, integration density, and functionality in comparison with present day CMOS electronics. Almost all existing and prototypical solid-state spintronic devices rely on tailored interface magnetism, enabling spin-selective transmission or scattering of electrons. Controlling magnetism at thin-film interfaces, preferably by purely electrical means, is a key challenge to better spintronics. Currently, most attempts to electrically control magnetism focus on potentially large magnetoelectric effects of multiferroics. We report on our interest in magnetoelectric Cr 2 O3 (chromia). Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias is achieved at room temperature in perpendicular anisotropic Cr 2 O3 (0001)/CoPd exchange bias heterostructures. This discovery promises significant implications for potential spintronics. From the perspective of basic science, our finding serves as macroscopic evidence for roughness-insensitive and electrically controllable equilibrium boundary magnetization in magnetoelectric antiferromagnets. The latter evolves at chromia (0001) surfaces and interfaces when chromia is in one of its two degenerate antiferromagnetic single domain states selected via magnetoelectric annealing. Theoretical insight into the boundary magnetization and its role in electrically controlled exchange bias is gained from first-principles calculations and general symmetry arguments. Measurements of spin-resolved ultraviolet photoemission, magnetometry at Cr 2 O3 (0001) surfaces, and detailed investigations of the unique exchange bias properties of Cr 2 O3 (0001)/CoPd including its electric controllability provide macroscopically averaged information about the boundary magnetization of chromia. Laterally resolved X-ray PEEM and temperature dependent MFM reveal detailed microscopic information of the chromia

  2. Route, mechanism, and implications of proton import during Na+/K+ exchange by native Na+/K+-ATPase pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedovato, Natascia

    2014-01-01

    A single Na+/K+-ATPase pumps three Na+ outwards and two K+ inwards by alternately exposing ion-binding sites to opposite sides of the membrane in a conformational sequence coupled to pump autophosphorylation from ATP and auto-dephosphorylation. The larger flow of Na+ than K+ generates outward current across the cell membrane. Less well understood is the ability of Na+/K+ pumps to generate an inward current of protons. Originally noted in pumps deprived of external K+ and Na+ ions, as inward current at negative membrane potentials that becomes amplified when external pH is lowered, this proton current is generally viewed as an artifact of those unnatural conditions. We demonstrate here that this inward current also flows at physiological K+ and Na+ concentrations. We show that protons exploit ready reversibility of conformational changes associated with extracellular Na+ release from phosphorylated Na+/K+ pumps. Reversal of a subset of these transitions allows an extracellular proton to bind an acidic side chain and to be subsequently released to the cytoplasm. This back-step of phosphorylated Na+/K+ pumps that enables proton import is not required for completion of the 3 Na+/2 K+ transport cycle. However, the back-step occurs readily during Na+/K+ transport when external K+ ion binding and occlusion are delayed, and it occurs more frequently when lowered extracellular pH raises the probability of protonation of the externally accessible carboxylate side chain. The proton route passes through the Na+-selective binding site III and is distinct from the principal pathway traversed by the majority of transported Na+ and K+ ions that passes through binding site II. The inferred occurrence of Na+/K+ exchange and H+ import during the same conformational cycle of a single molecule identifies the Na+/K+ pump as a hybrid transporter. Whether Na+/K+ pump–mediated proton inflow may have any physiological or pathophysiological significance remains to be clarified. PMID

  3. Room temperature skyrmion ground state stabilized through interlayer exchange coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Gong, E-mail: gchenncem@gmail.com; Schmid, Andreas K. [NCEM, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Mascaraque, Arantzazu [Depto. Física de Materiales, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Unidad Asociada IQFR (CSIC) - UCM, 28040 Madrid (Spain); N' Diaye, Alpha T. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Possible magnetic skyrmion device applications motivate the search for structures that extend the stability of skyrmion spin textures to ambient temperature. Here, we demonstrate an experimental approach to stabilize a room temperature skyrmion ground state in chiral magnetic films via exchange coupling across non-magnetic spacer layers. Using spin polarized low-energy electron microscopy to measure all three Cartesian components of the magnetization vector, we image the spin textures in Fe/Ni films. We show how tuning the thickness of a copper spacer layer between chiral Fe/Ni films and perpendicularly magnetized Ni layers permits stabilization of a chiral stripe phase, a skyrmion phase, and a single domain phase. This strategy to stabilize skyrmion ground states can be extended to other magnetic thin film systems and may be useful for designing skyrmion based spintronics devices.

  4. Solid alkaline membrane fuel cell : what are they advantages and drawbacks compared to proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutanceau, C.; Baranton, S.; Simoes, M. [Univ. de Poitiers, Poitiers (France). Laboratoire de Catalyse en Chimie Organique, UMR CNRS

    2010-07-01

    Low temperature fuel cells such as proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) and direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFCs) are promising power sources for portable electronics and transportation applications. However, these fuel cells require high amounts of platinum at the anodes to achieve high cell performance. Although alkaline membrane fuel cells (AFCs) may be an alternative to PEMFCs, the technology of low temperature fuel cells is less developed than that of fuel cells working with a solid acid electrolyte. Interest in solid alkaline membrane fuel cells (SAMFCs) has increased in recent years because it is easier to activate the oxidation and reduction reactions in alkaline medium than in acidic medium. Fewer platinum based catalysts are needed due to higher electrode kinetics. The development of hydroxyl conductive membrane makes this technology available, but the fuel to be used in the system must be considered. Pure hydrogen or hydrogen-rich gases offer high electric efficiency, but their production, storage, and distribution are not sufficient for a large-scale development. This paper discussed the relatively good electroreactivity of polyols such as glycerol and ethylene glycol in a SAMFC, as well as sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) as an alternative. The working principle of SAMFCs was also presented along with considerations regarding the electrochemical reactions occurring at the electrodes, and requirements concerning the catalysts, the triple phase boundary in the electrode and the anionic membrane. Palladium based catalysts were found to be an interesting alternative to platinum in SAMFCs. In situ FTIR measurements and oxidation products analysis was used to determine the electrooxidation pathways of alcohol and NaBH{sub 4}in alkaline medium. The study also included a comparison with oxidation mechanisms in acid medium. 8 refs.

  5. Second-order optical nonlinearities in dilute melt proton exchange waveguides in z-cut LiNbO3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veng, Torben Erik; Skettrup, Torben; Pedersen, Kjeld

    1996-01-01

    Planar optical waveguides with different refractive indices are made in z-cut LiNbO3 with a dilute proton exchange method using a system of glycerol containing KHSO4 and lithium benzoate. The optical second-order susceptibilities of these waveguides are measured by detecting the 266 nm reflected .......013 at the 632.8 nm wavelength, whereas the susceptibilities are strongly reduced for larger index changes. (C) 1996 American Institute of Physics....

  6. Three-dimensional multiphase flow computational fluid dynamics models for proton exchange membrane fuel cell: A theoretical development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Paul Kone

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A review of published three-dimensional, computational fluid dynamics models for proton exchange membrane fuel cells that accounts for multiphase flow is presented. The models can be categorized as models for transport phenomena, geometry or operating condition effects, and thermal effects. The influences of heat and water management on the fuel cell performance have been repeatedly addressed, and these still remain two central issues in proton exchange membrane fuel cell technology. The strengths and weaknesses of the models, the modelling assumptions, and the model validation are discussed. The salient numerical features of the models are examined, and an overview of the most commonly used computational fluid dynamic codes for the numerical modelling of proton exchange membrane fuel cells is given. Comprehensive three-dimensional multiphase flow computational fluid dynamic models accounting for the major transport phenomena inside a complete cell have been developed. However, it has been noted that more research is required to develop models that include among other things, the detailed composition and structure of the catalyst layers, the effects of water droplets movement in the gas flow channels, the consideration of phase change in both the anode and the cathode sides of the fuel cell, and dissolved water transport.

  7. Protic Salt Polymer Membranes: High-Temperature Water-Free Proton-Conducting Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gervasio, Dominic Francis [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2010-09-30

    This research on proton-containing (protic) salts directly addresses proton conduction at high and low temperatures. This research is unique, because no water is used for proton ionization nor conduction, so the properties of water do not limit proton fuel cells. A protic salt is all that is needed to give rise to ionized proton and to support proton mobility. A protic salt forms when proton transfers from an acid to a base. Protic salts were found to have proton conductivities that are as high as or higher than the best aqueous electrolytes at ambient pressures and comparable temperatures without or with water present. Proton conductivity of the protic salts occurs providing two conditions exist: i) the energy difference is about 0.8 eV between the protic-salt state versus the state in which the acid and base are separated and 2) the chemical constituents rotate freely. The physical state of these proton-conducting salts can be liquid, plastic crystal as well as solid organic and inorganic polymer membranes and their mixtures. Many acids and bases can be used to make a protic salt which allows tailoring of proton conductivity, as well as other properties that affect their use as electrolytes in fuel cells, such as, stability, adsorption on catalysts, environmental impact, etc. During this project, highly proton conducting (~ 0.1S/cm) protic salts were made that are stable under fuel-cell operating conditions and that gave highly efficient fuel cells. The high efficiency is attributed to an improved oxygen electroreduction process on Pt which was found to be virtually reversible in a number of liquid protic salts with low water activity (< 1% water). Solid flexible non-porous composite membranes, made from inorganic polymer (e.g., 10%indium 90%tin pyrophosphate, ITP) and organic polymer (e.g., polyvinyl pyridinium phosphate, PVPP), were found that give conductivity and fuel cell performances similar to phosphoric acid electrolyte with no need for hydration at

  8. Conceptual design report for a Direct Hydrogen Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell for transportation application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-05

    This report presents the conceptual design for a Direct-Hydrogen-Fueled Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System for transportation applications. The design is based on the initial selection of the Chrysler LH sedan as the target vehicle with a 50 kW (gross) PEM Fuel Cell Stack (FCS) as the primary power source, a battery-powered Load Leveling Unit (LLU) for surge power requirements, an on-board hydrogen storage subsystem containing high pressure gaseous storage, a Gas Management Subsystem (GMS) to manage the hydrogen and air supplies for the FCS, and electronic controllers to control the electrical system. The design process has been dedicated to the use of Design-to-Cost (DTC) principles. The Direct Hydrogen-Powered PEM Fuel Cell Stack Hybrid Vehicle (DPHV) system is designed to operate on the Federal Urban Driving Schedule (FUDS) and Hiway Cycles. These cycles have been used to evaluate the vehicle performance with regard to range and hydrogen usage. The major constraints for the DPHV vehicle are vehicle and battery weight, transparency of the power system and drive train to the user, equivalence of fuel and life cycle costs to conventional vehicles, and vehicle range. The energy and power requirements are derived by the capability of the DPHV system to achieve an acceleration from 0 to 60 MPH within 12 seconds, and the capability to achieve and maintain a speed of 55 MPH on a grade of seven percent. The conceptual design for the DPHV vehicle is shown in a figure. A detailed description of the Hydrogen Storage Subsystem is given in section 4. A detailed description of the FCS Subsystem and GMS is given in section 3. A detailed description of the LLU, selection of the LLU energy source, and the power controller designs is given in section 5.

  9. Channel geometric scales effect on performance and optimization for serpentine proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youcef, Kerkoub; Ahmed, Benzaoui; Ziari, Yasmina; Fadila, Haddad

    2017-02-01

    A three dimensional computational fluid dynamics model is proposed in this paper to investigate the effect of flow field design and dimensions of bipolar plates on performance of serpentine proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). A complete fuel cell of 25 cm2 with 25 channels have been used. The aim of the work is to investigate the effect of flow channels and ribs scales on overall performance of PEM fuel cell. Therefore, geometric aspect ratio parameter defined as (width of flow channel/width of rib) is used. Influences of the ribs and openings current collector scales have been studied and analyzed in order to find the optimum ratio between them to enhance the production of courant density of PEM fuel cell. Six kind of serpentine designs have been used in this paper included different aspect ratio varying from 0.25 to 2.33 while the active surface area and number of channels are keeping constant. Aspect ratio 0.25 corresponding of (0.4 mm channel width/ 1.6mm ribs width), and Aspect ratio2.33 corresponding of (0.6 mm channel width/ 1.4mm ribs width. The results show that the best flow field designs (giving the maximum density of current) are which there dimensions of channels width is minimal and ribs width is maximal (Γ≈0.25). Also decreasing width of channels enhance the pressure drop inside the PEM fuel cell, this causes an increase of gazes velocity and enhance convection process, therefore more power generation.

  10. Modelling, simulation and control of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) power system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Dabbagh, Ahmad W.; Lu, Lixuan; Mazza, Antonio [Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, ON L1H 7K4 (Canada)

    2010-05-15

    Fuel cell power systems are emerging as promising means of electrical power generation on account of the associated clean electricity generation process, as well as their suitability for use in a wide range of applications. During the design stage, the development of a computer model for simulating the behaviour of a system under development can facilitate the experimentation and testing of that system's performance. Since the electrical power output of a fuel cell stack is seldom at a suitable fixed voltage, conditioning circuits and their associated controllers must be incorporated in the design of the fuel cell power system. This paper presents a MATLAB/Simulink model that simulates the behaviour of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC), conditioning circuits and their controllers. The computer modelling of the PEMFC was based on adopted mathematical models that describe the fuel cell's operational voltage, while accounting for the irreversibilities associated with the fuel cell stack. The conditioning circuits that are included in the Simulink model are a DC-DC converter and DC-AC inverter circuits. These circuits are the commonly utilized power electronics circuits for regulating and conditioning the output voltage from a fuel cell stack. The modelling of the circuits is based on relationships that govern the output voltage behaviour with respect to their input voltages, switching duty cycle and efficiency. In addition, this paper describes a Fuzzy Logic Controller (FLC) design that is aimed at regulating the conditioning circuits to provide and maintain suitable electrical power for a wide range of applications. The model presented demonstrates the use of the FLC in conjunction with the PEMFC Simulink model and that it is the basis for more in-depth analytical models. (author)

  11. Interface modulated currents in periodically proton exchanged Mg doped lithium niobate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumayer, Sabine M.; Rodriguez, Brian J., E-mail: brian.rodriguez@ucd.ie, E-mail: gallo@kth.se [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Manzo, Michele; Gallo, Katia, E-mail: brian.rodriguez@ucd.ie, E-mail: gallo@kth.se [Department of Applied Physics, KTH-Royal Institute of Technology, Roslagstullbacken 21, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Kholkin, Andrei L. [Department of Physics and CICECO-Aveiro Institute of Materials, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal and Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-21

    Conductivity in Mg doped lithium niobate (Mg:LN) plays a key role in the reduction of photorefraction and is therefore widely exploited in optical devices. However, charge transport through Mg:LN and across interfaces such as electrodes also yields potential electronic applications in devices with switchable conductivity states. Furthermore, the introduction of proton exchanged (PE) phases in Mg:LN enhances ionic conductivity, thus providing tailorability of conduction mechanisms and functionality dependent on sample composition. To facilitate the construction and design of such multifunctional electronic devices based on periodically PE Mg:LN or similar ferroelectric semiconductors, fundamental understanding of charge transport in these materials, as well as the impact of internal and external interfaces, is essential. In order to gain insight into polarization and interface dependent conductivity due to band bending, UV illumination, and chemical reactivity, wedge shaped samples consisting of polar oriented Mg:LN and PE phases were investigated using conductive atomic force microscopy. In Mg:LN, three conductivity states (on/off/transient) were observed under UV illumination, controllable by the polarity of the sample and the externally applied electric field. Measurements of currents originating from electrochemical reactions at the metal electrode–PE phase interfaces demonstrate a memresistive and rectifying capability of the PE phase. Furthermore, internal interfaces such as domain walls and Mg:LN–PE phase boundaries were found to play a major role in the accumulation of charge carriers due to polarization gradients, which can lead to increased currents. The insight gained from these findings yield the potential for multifunctional applications such as switchable UV sensitive micro- and nanoelectronic devices and bistable memristors.

  12. Polypyrrole layered SPEES/TPA proton exchange membrane for direct methanol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neelakandan, S.; Kanagaraj, P. [PG & Research Department of Chemistry, Polymeric Materials Research Lab, Alagappa Government Arts College, Karaikudi 630003 (India); Sabarathinam, R.M. [Functional Material Division, Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi 630006 (India); Nagendran, A., E-mail: nagimmm@yahoo.com [PG & Research Department of Chemistry, Polymeric Materials Research Lab, Alagappa Government Arts College, Karaikudi 630003 (India)

    2015-12-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A series of Ppy layered SPEES/TPA composite membranes were prepared. • SPEES/TPA-Ppy hybrid membranes displayed efficient methanol resistance than Nafion 117. • SPEES/TPA-Ppy4 membrane exhibits highest relative selectivity of 2.86 × 104 S cm{sup 3} s. • Increasing Ppy layer on membrane surface reduces the leaching out of tungstophosphoric acid. - Abstract: Hybrid membranes based on sulfonated poly(1,4-phenylene ether ether sulfone) (SPEES)/tungstophosphoric acid (TPA) were prepared. SPEES/TPA membrane surfaces were modified with polypyrrole (Ppy) by in situ polymerization method to reduce the TPA leaching. The morphology and electrochemical property of the surface coated membranes were studied by SEM, AFM, water uptake, ion exchange capacity, proton conductivity, methanol permeability and tensile strength. The water uptake and the swelling ratio of the surface coated membranes decreased with increasing the Ppy layer. The surface roughness of the hybrid membrane was decreased with an increase in Ppy layer on the membrane surface. The methanol permeability of SPEES/TPA-Ppy4 hybrid membrane was significantly suppressed and found to be 2.1 × 10{sup −7} cm{sup 2} s{sup −1}, which is 1.9 times lower than pristine SPEES membrane. The SPEES/TPA-Ppy4 membrane exhibits highest relative selectivity (2.86 × 10{sup 4} S cm{sup −3} s) than the other membrane with low TPA leaching. The tensile strength of hybrid membranes was improved with the introduction of Ppy layer. Combining their lower swelling ratio, high thermal stability and selectivity, SPEES/TPA-Ppy4 membranes could be a promising material as PEM for DMFC applications.

  13. Low-temperature structural phase transition in deuterated and protonated lithium acetate dihydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, F., E-mail: schroeder@kristall.uni-frankfurt.d [Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt am Main, Institut fuer Geowissenschaften, Abt. Kristallographie, Altenhoeferallee 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Winkler, B.; Haussuehl, E. [Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt am Main, Institut fuer Geowissenschaften, Abt. Kristallographie, Altenhoeferallee 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Cong, P.T.; Wolf, B. [Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt am Main, Physikalisches Institut, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Avalos-Borja, M. [Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, A.C. Camino a la Presa San Jose 2055, Col. Lomas 4 seccion CP 78216, San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Quilichini, M.; Hennion, B. [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, CEN Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2010-08-15

    Heat capacity measurements of protonated lithium acetate dihydrate show a structural phase transition at T = 12 K. This finding is in contrast to earlier work, where it was thought that only the deuterated compound undergoes a low temperature structural phase transition. This finding is confirmed by low temperature ultrasound spectroscopy, where the structural phase transition is associated with a velocity decrease of the ultrasonic waves, i.e. with an elastic softening. We compare the thermodynamic properties of the protonated and deuterated compounds and discuss two alternatives for the mechanism of the phase transition based on the thermal expansion measurements.

  14. Interdefect charge exchange in silicon particle detectors at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    MacEvoy, B; Hall, G; Moscatelli, F; Passeri, D; Santocchia, A

    2002-01-01

    Silicon particle detectors in the next generation of experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider will be exposed to a very challenging radiation environment. The principal obstacle to long-term operation arises from changes in detector doping concentration (N/sub eff/), which lead to an increase in the bias required to deplete the detector and hence achieve efficient charge collection. We have previously presented a model of interdefect charge exchange between closely spaced centers in the dense terminal clusters formed by hadron irradiation. This manifestly non-Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) mechanism leads to a marked increase in carrier generation rate and negative space charge over the SRH prediction. There is currently much interest in the subject of cryogenic detector operation as a means of improving radiation hardness. Our motivation, however, is primarily to investigate our model further by testing its predictions over a range of temperatures. We present measurements of spectra from /sup 241/Am alpha par...

  15. Theoretical study of annealed proton-exchanged Nd $LiNbO_{3}$ channel waveguide lasers with variational method

    CERN Document Server

    De Long Zhang; Yuan Guo Xie; Guilan, Ding; Yuming, Cui; Cai He Chen

    2001-01-01

    The controllable fabrication parameters, including anneal time, initial exchange time, channel width, dependences of TM/sub 00/ mode size, corresponding effective refractive index, effective pump area, and coupling efficiency between pump and laser modes in z-cut annealed proton-exchanged (APE) Nd:LiNbO/sub 3/ channel waveguide lasers were studied by using variational method. The effect of channel width on the surface index increment and the waveguide depth was taken into account. The features of mode size and effective refractive index were summarized, discussed, and compared with previously published experimental results. The effective pump area, which is directly proportional to threshold pump power, increases strongly, slightly, and very slightly with the increase of anneal time, channel width, and initial exchange time, respectively. However, the coupling efficiency, which is directly proportional to slope efficiency, remains constant (around 0.82) no matter what changes made to these parameters. The var...

  16. Proton conducting, composite sulfonated polymer membrane for medium temperature and low relative humidity fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Won; Kang, Na Rae; Lee, Kang Hyuck; Cho, Doo Hee; Kim, Ji Hoon; Lee, Won Hyo; Lee, Young Moo

    2014-09-01

    Inorganic-organic composite membranes are fabricated using zirconium acetylacetonate nanoparticles and biphenol-based sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) as an inorganic, proton conducting nanomaterial and a polymer matrix, respectively. An amphiphilic surfactant (Pluronic®) induces distribution of the inorganic nanoparticles over the entire polymer membrane. The composite membranes are thermally stable up to 200 °C. Zirconium acetylacetonate improves inter-chain interactions and the robustness of polymer membranes resulting in excellent membrane mechanical properties. In addition, composite membranes show outstanding proton conductivity compared to that of the pristine membrane at medium temperatures (80-120 °C) and low relative humidity (<50%) conditions. This improvement is due to the presence of acetylacetonate anions, which bind water molecules and act as an additional proton conducting site and/or medium. Therefore, the composite membranes significantly outperform the pristine membrane in fuel cell performance tests at medium temperatures and low relative humidity.

  17. Covalent-ionically cross-linked polyetheretherketone proton exchange membrane for direct methanol fuel cell

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Luo, H

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available cross-linked PEEK-WC membrane, this covalent-ionically cross-linked PEEK-WC membrane exhibits extremely reduced water uptake and methanol permeability, but just slightly sacrificed proton conductivity. The proton conductivity of the covalent...

  18. Synthesis and properties of reprocessable sulfonated polyimides cross-linked via acid stimulation for use as proton exchange membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Boping; Ni, Jiangpeng; Xiang, Xiongzhi; Wang, Lei; Chen, Yongming

    2017-01-01

    Cross-linked sulfonated polyimides are one of the most promising materials for proton exchange membrane (PEM) applications. However, these cross-linked membranes are difficult to reprocess because they are insoluble. In this study, a series of cross-linkable sulfonated polyimides with flexible pendant alkyl side chains containing trimethoxysilyl groups is successfully synthesized. The cross-linkable polymers are highly soluble in common solvents and can be used to prepare tough and smooth films. Before the cross-linking reaction is complete, the membranes can be reprocessed, and the recovery rate of the prepared films falls within an acceptable range. The cross-linked membranes are obtained rapidly when the cross-linkable membranes are immersed in an acid solution, yielding a cross-linking density of the gel fraction of greater than 90%. The cross-linked membranes exhibit high proton conductivities and tensile strengths under hydrous conditions. Compared with those of pristine membranes, the oxidative and hydrolytic stabilities of the cross-linked membranes are significantly higher. The CSPI-70 membrane shows considerable power density in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) test. All of these results suggest that the prepared cross-linked membranes have great potential for applications in proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

  19. Metal foam sandwich structure as a high temperature heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salimijazi, H.R.; Pershin, L.; Coyle, T.W.; Mostaghimi, J.; Chandra, S. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Nickel-based superalloys can be used at temperatures up to 1050 C in air. Superalloy open cell foam sheets with skin layers plasma sprayed on both sides can be used as high temperature heat exchangers provided that the two deposited skins are dense and well adhered to the open cell foam. In this study alloy 625 skins were deposited on each side of a sheet of metal foam by APS and HVOF to form a sandwich structure. Two densities of open cell foams, 20 and 10 pores per linear inch (ppi), were used in this study as the core. The initial Ni foam was converted to an alloy composition by plasma spraying aluminum and chromium on the foam's struts with subsequent diffusion/solutionizing heat treatments before the alloy 625 skins were deposited. The microstructure of the coatings and the interface between the struts and skins was investigated. A layer of Ni-Al alloy was formed near the surface of the struts as a result of the heat treatment. The foam struts were imbedded more deeply into the coatings deposited by HVOF than the coatings deposited by APS. (orig.)

  20. Field-induced transition from room-temperature ferromagnetism to diamagnetism in proton-irradiated fullerene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyu Won; Kweon, Hyocheon; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2013-10-18

    Room-temperature ferromagnetism in proton-irradiated C60 fullerene is demonstrated. The ferromagnetism turns into diamagnetism intrinsic to the fullerene as the magnetic field increases above a critical field. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Novel Composite Proton Exchange Membrane with Connected Long-Range Ionic Nanochannels Constructed via Exfoliated Nafion-Boron Nitride Nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Wei; Tang, Beibei; Wu, Peiyi

    2017-05-03

    Nafion-boron nitride (NBN) nanocomposites with a Nafion-functionalized periphery are prepared via a convenient and ecofriendly Nafion-assisted water-phase exfoliation method. Nafion and the boron nitride nanosheet present strong interactions in the NBN nanocomposite. Then the NBN nanocomposites were blended with Nafion to prepare NBN Nafion composite proton exchange membranes (PEMs). NBN nanocomposites show good dispersibility and have a noticeable impact on the aggregation structure of the Nafion matrix. Connected long-range ionic nanochannels containing exaggerated (-SO3-)n ionic clusters are constructed during the membrane-forming process via the hydrophilic and H-bonding interactions between NBN nanocomposites and Nafion matrix. The addition of NBN nanocomposites with sulfonic groups also provides additional proton transportation spots and enhances the water uptake of the composite PEMs. The proton conductivity of the NBN Nafion composite PEMs is significantly increased under various conditions relative to that of recast Nafion. At 80 °C-95% relative humidity, the proton conductivity of 0.5 NBN Nafion is 0.33 S·cm-1, 6 times that of recast Nafion under the same conditions.

  2. Effect of exact Coulomb-exchange calculations on band-head spectra of odd-proton nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koh Meng-Hock

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous calculations of band-head energy spectra of odd-mass heavy nuclei in the Hartree-Fock-plus-Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (HF-BCS framework showed that the agreement with data is better for odd-neutron as compared to odd-proton nuclei. The reason for a poorer agreement with data for the latter have been ascribed to the possible usage of the Slater approximation in calculating the Coulomb-exchange term. In this work, we report the effect of exact Coulomb-exchange calculations on band-head energy spectra of two odd-proton nuclei (namely 237Np and 241Am as compared to the results obtained using the Slater approximation. We performed self-consistent blocking calculations while taking the breaking of time-reversal symmetry at the mean-field level into account due to the unpaired nucleon. The SkM* and SIII parametrizations of the Skyrme interaction have been employed to approximate the effective nucleon-nucleon interaction while a seniority force is used for the pairing channel. Contrary to what was expected, our preliminary results show no improvement on the band-head spectra as compared to data when the Coulomb-exchange term is calculated exactly.

  3. Analysis and Test of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Power System for Space Power Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Arturo; Varanauski, Donald; Clark, Robert, Jr.

    2000-01-01

    An effort is underway to develop a prototype Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell breadboard system for fuhlre space applications. This prototype will be used to develop a comprehensive design basis for a space-rated PEM fuel cell powerplant. The prototype system includes reactant pressure regulators, ejector-based reactant pumps, a 4-kW fuel cell stack and cooling system, and a passive, membranebased oxygen / water separator. A computer model is being developed concurrently to analytically predict fluid flow in the oxidant reactant system. Fuel cells have historically played an important role in human-rated spacecraft. The Gemini and Apollo spacecraft used fuel cells for vehicle electrical power. The Space Shuttle currently uses three Alkaline Fuel Cell Powerplants (AFCP) to generate all of the vehicle's 15-20kW electrical power. Engineers at the Johnson Space Center have leveraged off the development effort ongoing in the commercial arena to develop PEM fuel cel ls for terrestrial uses. The prototype design originated from efforts to develop a PEM fuel cell replacement for the current Space Shuttle AFCP' s. In order to improve on the life and an already excellent hi storical record of reliability and safety, three subsystems were focused on. These were the fuel cell stack itself, the reactant circulation devices, and reactant / product water separator. PEM fuel cell stack performance is already demonstrating the potential for greater than four times the useful life of the current Shuttle's AFCP. Reactant pumping for product water removal has historically been accomplished with mechanical pumps. Ejectors offer an effective means of reactant pumping as well as the potential for weight reduction, control simplification, and long life. Centrifugal water separation is used on the current AFCP. A passive, membrane-based water separator offers compatibility with the micro-gravity environment of space, and the potential for control simplification, elimination of

  4. Proton-Exchange-Membrane Fuel Cell Powerplants Developed and Tested for Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoberecht, Mark A.; Pham, Nang T.

    2005-01-01

    Proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology has received major attention for terrestrial applications, such as the automotive and residential markets, for the past 20 years. This attention has significantly advanced the maturity of the technology, resulting in ever more compact, efficient, reliable, and inexpensive PEMFC designs. In comparison to the terrestrial operating environment, the space operating environment is much more demanding. Microgravity to high-gravity loads and the need to use pure oxygen (rather than air) as the fuel cell oxidizer place more stringent demands on PEMFC technology. NASA and its partners from industry are leveraging terrestrial PEMFC advancements by conducting parallel space technology development for future exploration missions. A team from the NASA Glenn Research Center, NASA Johnson Space Center, and NASA Kennedy Space Center recently completed the first phase of a PEMFC powerplant development effort for exploration missions. The industry partners for this phase of the development effort were ElectroChem, Inc., and Teledyne Energy Systems, Inc. Under contract to Glenn, both of these industry partners successfully designed, fabricated, and tested a breadboard PEMFC powerplant in the 1- to 5-kW power range. These powerplants were based on existing company-proprietary fuel cell stack designs, combined with off-the-shelf components, which formed the balance of the powerplant design. Subsequent to the contractor development efforts, both powerplants were independently tested at Johnson to verify operational and performance characteristics, and to determine suitability for further technology development in the second phase of the NASA-led effort. Following the independent NASA testing, Teledyne Energy Systems, Inc., was selected to develop an engineering model PEMFC powerplant. This effort was initiated by the 2nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Program Office in 2001; it transitioned to the Next Generation Launch

  5. Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell system for transportation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oei, D.; Adams, J.A.; Kinnelly, A.A. [and others

    1997-07-01

    In partial fulfillment of the U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-ACO2-94CE50389, {open_quotes}Direct Hydrogen-Fueled Proton-Exchange-Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System for Transportation Applications{close_quotes}, this conceptual vehicle design report addresses the design and packaging of battery augmented fuel cell powertrain vehicles. This report supplements the {open_quotes}Conceptual Vehicle Design Report - Pure Fuel Cell Powertrain Vehicle{close_quotes} and includes a cost study of the fuel cell power system. The three classes of vehicles considered in this design and packaging exercise are the same vehicle classes that were studied in the previous report: the Aspire, representing the small vehicle class; the AIV (Aluminum Intensive Vehicle) Sable, representing the mid-size vehicle; and the E-150 Econoline, representing the van-size class. A preliminary PEM fuel cell power system manufacturing cost study is also presented. As in the case of the previous report concerning the {open_quotes}Pure Fuel Cell Powertrain Vehicle{close_quotes}, the same assumptions are made for the fuel cell power system. These assumptions are fuel cell system power densities of 0.33 kW/ka and 0.33 kW/l, platinum catalyst loading of less than or equal to 0.25 mg/cm{sup 2} total, and hydrogen tanks containing compressed gaseous hydrogen under 340 atm (5000 psia) pressure. The batteries considered for power augmentation of the fuel cell vehicle are based on the Ford Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) program. These are state-of-the-art high power lead acid batteries with power densities ranging from 0.8 kW/kg to 2 kW/kg. The results reported here show that battery augmentation provides the fuel cell vehicle with a power source to meet instant high power demand for acceleration and start-up. Based on the assumptions made in this report, the packaging of the battery augmented fuel cell vehicle appears to be as feasible as the packaging of the pure fuel cell powered vehicle.

  6. Modeling and simulation of the dynamic behavior of portable proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziegler, C.

    2005-07-01

    In order to analyze the operational behavior, a mathematical model of planar self-breathing fuel cells is developed and validated in Chapter 3 of this thesis. The multicomponent transport of the species is considered as well as the couplings between the transport processes of heat, charge, and mass and the electrochemical reactions. Furthermore, to explain the oxygen mass transport limitation in the porous electrode of the cathode side an agglomerate model for the oxygen reduction reaction is developed. In Chapter 4 the important issue of liquid water generation and transport in PEMFCs is addressed. One of the major tasks when operating this type of fuel cell is avoiding the complete flooding of the PEMFC during operation. A one-dimensional and isothermal model is developed that is based on a coupled system of partial differential equations. The model contains a dynamic and two-phase description of the proton exchange membrane fuel cell. The mass transport in the gas phase and in the liquid phase is considered as well as the phase transition between liquid water and water vapor. The transport of charges and the electrochemical reactions are part of the model. Flooding effects that are caused by liquid water accumulation are described by this model. Moreover, the model contains a time-dependent description of the membrane that accounts for Schroeder's paradox. The model is applied to simulate cyclic voltammograms. Chapter 5 is focused on the dynamic investigation of PEMFC stacks. Understanding the dynamic behavior of fuel cell stacks is important for the operation and control of fuel cell stacks. Using the single cell model of Chapter 3 and the dynamic model of Chapter 4 as basis, a mathematical model of a PEMFC stack is developed. However, due to the complexity of a fuel cell stack, the spatial resolution and dynamic description of the liquid water transport are not accounted for. These restrictions allow for direct comparison between the solution variables of

  7. Estimation of Membrane Hydration Status for Standby Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems by Impedance Measurement: First Results on Stack Characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bidoggia, Benoit; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    , a precise estimation of hydration status of the fuel cell during standby is important for a fast and safe startup. In this article, the measurement of the complex impedance of the fuel cell is suggested as a method to estimate the membrane hydration status. A 56-cell fuel cell stack has been symmetrically......Fuel cells have started replacing traditional lead-acid battery banks in backup systems. Although these systems are characterized by long periods of standby, they must be able to start at any instant in the shortest time. In the case of low temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems...... was applied, and the relationship between module of impedance and relative humidity was found. The results showed that measuring the impedance of a fuel cell during standby can be a viable way for estimating the hydration status of its membrane....

  8. Hydrogen bonding induced proton exchange reactions in dense D2-NH3 and D2-CH4 mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borstad, Gustav M; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2014-01-28

    We have investigated high-pressure behaviors of simple binary mixtures of NH3 and D2 to 50 GPa and CH4 and D2 to 30 GPa using confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy. The spectral data indicate strong proton exchange reactions occur in dense D2-NH3 mixture, producing different isotopes of ammonia such as NH3, NH2D, NHD2, and ND3. In contrast, the proton exchange process in dense D2-CH4 mixture is highly limited, and no vibration feature is apparent for deuterated methane. The vibrational modes of H2 isotopes in D2-NH3 are blue shifted from those of pure H2 isotopes, whereas the modes of D2-CH4 show overall agreement with those in pure D2 and CH4. In turn, this result advocates the presence of strong repulsion and thereby internal pressure in D2-NH3 mixture, which are absent in D2-CH4. In fact, the bond length of hydrogen molecules in D2-NH3, calculated from the present spectral data, is shorter than that observed in pure hydrogen - supporting the enhanced intermolecular interaction in the mixture. Comparing the present spectral results with those previously observed in D2-H2O mixtures further suggests that the strength of repulsive interaction or the magnitude of internal pressure in the mixtures is proportional to the strength of hydrogen bonding in H2O, NH3, and CH4 in decreasing order. Hence, we suggest that the proton exchange is assisted by hydrogen bonding in these molecules.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of sulfonated poly (arylene ether sulfone) copolymers via direct copolymerization: Candidates for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, William Lamont

    A designed series of directly copolymerized homo- and disulfonated copolymers containing controlled degrees of pendant sulfonic acid groups have been synthesized via nucleophilic step polymerization. Novel sulfonated poly (arylene ether sulfone) copolymers using 4,4'-bisphenol A, 4,4'-biphenol, hexafluorinated (6F) bisphenol AF, and hydroquinone, respectively, with dichlorodiphenyl sulfone (DCDPS) and 3,3'-disodiumsulfonyl-4,4'-dichlorodiphenylsulfone (SDCDPS) were investigated. Molar ratios of DCDPS and SDCDPS were systematically varied to produce copolymers of controlled compositions, which contained up to 70 mol% of disulfonic acid moiety. The goal is to identify thermally, hydrolytically, and oxidatively stable high molecular weight, film-forming, ductile ion conducting copolymers, which had properties desirable for proton exchange membranes (PEM) in fuel cells. Commercially available bisphenols were selected to produce cost effective alternative PEMs. Partially aliphatic bisphenol A and hexafluorinated (6F) bisphenol AF produced amorphous copolymers with different thermal oxidative and surface properties. Biphenol and hydroquinone was utilized to produce wholly aromatic copolymers. The sulfonated copolymers were prepared in the sodium-salt form and converted to the acid moiety via two different methodologies and subsequently investigated as proton exchange membranes for fuel cells. Hydrophilicity increased with the level of disulfonation, as expected. Moreover, water sorption increased with increasing mole percent incorporation of SDCDPS. The copolymers' water uptake was a function of both bisphenol structure and degree of disulfonation. Furthermore, the acidification procedures were shown to influence the Tg values, water uptake, and conductivity of the copolymers. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) in the tapping mode confirmed that the morphology of the copolymers could be designed to display nanophase separation in the hydrophobic and hydrophilic (sulfonated

  10. Platinum catalysts recovery of the proton exchange membrane fuel cell; Recuperacao de catalisadores de platina da celula a combustibel de membrana polimerica trocadora de protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukurozaki, S.H.; Seo, E.S.M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Materiais. Lab. de Processamento de Residuos

    2006-07-01

    Currently, platinum is the most feasible catalyst for the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells - PEMFC. Along with platinum's significant importance in this energy system are the high cost of this noble metal and its detrimental effects on the environment. Therefore, recycling this material seems as an alternative to decrease its impacts on the environment and, at the same time, to provide a reduction of the system's costs. A search was conducted for literature and studies about platinum recycling methods. However, only two techniques of platinum recovery, which are still in development, were found. In face of this situation, a recovery method of platinum from deactivated Membrane Electrode Assembly - MEA's was developed, with attention to aspects related to the environment and the necessary requirements for its primary recycling. The results found showed a high recovery ratio and a possibility to reintroduce this metal into the production cycle. (author)

  11. Photoregenerative I−/I3− couple as a liquid cathode for proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Wang, Yadong; Ai, Xinping; Tu, Wenmao; Pan, Mu

    2014-01-01

    A photoassisted oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) through I−/I3− redox couple was investigated for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell cathode reaction. The I−/I3−-based liquid cathode was used to replace conventional oxygen cathode, and its discharge product I− was regenerated to I3− by photocatalytic oxidation with the participation of oxygen. This new and innovative approach may provide a strategy to eliminate the usage of challenging ORR electrocatalysts, resulting in an avenue for developing low-cost and high-efficiency PEM fuel cells. PMID:25348812

  12. Employing Hot Wire Anemometry to Directly Measure the Water Balance of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shakhshir, Saher Al; Berning, Torsten

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC’s) are currently being commercialized for various applications ranging from automotive to stationary such as powering telecom back-up units. In PEMFC’s, oxygen from air is internally combined with hydrogen to form water and produce electricity and waste...... in hot wire anemometry is the description of the Nusselt number as function of the Reynolds number and the Prandtl number, and in the current application it can be shown it is essential to employ a power-law equation instead of the commonly employed Churchill Bernstein equation. It will be shown...

  13. The Investigation and Development of Low Cost Hardware Components for Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George A. Marchetti

    1999-12-15

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell components, which would have a low-cost structure in mass production, were fabricated and tested. A fuel cell electrode structure, comprising a thin layer of graphite (50 microns) and a front-loaded platinum catalyst layer (600 angstroms), was shown to produce significant power densities. In addition, a PEM bipolar plate, comprising flexible graphite, carbon cloth flow-fields and an integrated polymer gasket, was fabricated. Power densities of a two-cell unit using this inexpensive bipolar plate architecture were shown to be comparable to state-of-the-art bipolar plates.

  14. Intermediate temperature fuel cells based on proton conducting electrolytes. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duval, S.; Holtappels, P.

    2006-03-15

    Solid oxide proton conductors can offer a new intermediate temperature fuel cell technology combining the advantages of polymeric fuel cells and solid oxide fuel cells. Among potential proton conductor materials, Y-doped barium zirconate (BZY) was found to be a promising candidate. This material was synthesised and characterised at EMPA. The synthesis study shows the possibility to use up scalable methods to produce BZY. It was demonstrated that BZY can take up protons and that the protons are the mobile charge carriers that dominate the conductivity. The conductivity of the grain interior (log {sigma} {approx} -3 S.cm{sup -1} at 300 {sup o}C) competes with the conductivity of the best proton conductors. A correlation between the bulk conductivity and the cubic lattice parameter was observed. It was found that controlling the lattice parameter during the synthesis enable to tune the conductivity. The total conductivity of the test material was found to be dominated by the large resistive grain boundary contribution. Neither a clear microstructure/conductivity relationship could be identified nor could be found a blocking secondary phase. Only an exceptional thermal treatment (annealing up to 2200 {sup o}C) showed an improvement of the grain boundary conductivity. A first interpretation presumes an electronic effect arising from the shearing of crystallographic planes that depresses either the proton concentration or the proton mobility in the vicinity of the grain boundaries (i.e. in the so-called 'space charge region'). Consequences for the further development of BZY for fuel cell application are discussed. (author)

  15. Low-temperature switching by photoinduced protonation in photochromic fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faro, Aline Regis; Adam, Virgile; Carpentier, Philippe; Darnault, Claudine; Bourgeois, Dominique; de Rosny, Eve

    2010-02-01

    We have studied the photoswitching behaviour of a number of photochromic fluorescent proteins at cryo-temperature. Spectroscopic investigations at the ensemble level showed that EYFP, Dronpa and IrisFP all exhibit reversible photoswitching at 100 K, albeit with a low quantum yield. The photophysics of the process were studied in more details in the case of EYFP. The data suggest that photoinduced protonation of the chromophore is responsible for off-switching at cryo-temperature, and thus is possible in the absence of significant conformational freedom. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that chromophore protonation may precede large amplitude conformational changes such as cis-trans isomerisation during off-photoswitching at room temperature. However, our data suggest that low-barrier photoinduced protonation pathways may in fact compete with room-temperature off-switching reactions in photochromic fluorescent proteins. The occurrence of reversible photoswitching at low-temperature is of interest to envisage cryo-nanoscopy experiments using genetically encoded fluorophores.

  16. Experimental investigation of stabilization of flowing water temperature with a water-PCM heat exchanger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charvat Pavel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Experiments have been carried out in order to investigate the stabilization of water temperature with a water-PCM heat exchanger. The water-PCM heat exchanger was of a rather simple design. It was a round tube, through which the water flowed, surrounded with an annular layer of PCM. The heat exchanger was divided into one meter long segments (modules and the water temperature was monitored at the outlet of each of the segments. A paraffin-based PCM with the melting temperature of 42 °C was used in the experiments. The experimental set-up consisted of two water reservoirs kept at different temperatures, the water-PCM heat exchanger, PC controlled valves and a data acquisition system. As the first step a response to a step change in the water temperature at the inlet of the heat exchanger was investigated. Subsequently, a series of experiments with a square wave change of temperature at the inlet of the exchanger were carried out. The square wave temperature profile was achieved by periodic switching between the two water reservoirs. Several amplitudes and periods of temperature square wave were used. The results of experiments show that a water-PCM heat exchanger can effectively be used to stabilize the flowing water temperature when the inlet temperature changes are around the melting range of the PCM.

  17. The through-plane thermal conductivity and the contact resistance of the components of the membrane electrode assembly and gas diffusion layer in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhazmi, N.; Ingham, D. B.; Ismail, M. S.; Hughes, K.; Ma, L.; Pourkashanian, M.

    2014-12-01

    The thermal conductivity of the components of the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) and GDL must be accurately estimated in order to better understand the heat transfer processes in the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. In this study, an experimental investigation has been performed to measure the through-plane thermal conductivity and the contact resistance for a number of gas diffusion layer (GDL) materials. The sensitivity of these quantities to the temperature, PTFE content and micro porous layer (MPL) coating has been undertaken. In addition, the through-plane thermal conductivity of the membrane has been measured and reported as a function of temperature and water content. Further, the through-plane thermal conductivity of the catalyst layer has been determined as a function of temperature and platinum loading. It has been found that the through-plane thermal conductivity of the components of the MEA decreases when the temperature increases, and the through-plane thermal conductivity of the GDL is significantly lower than its in-plane thermal conductivity.

  18. Cyclic high temperature heat storage using borehole heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boockmeyer, Anke; Delfs, Jens-Olaf; Bauer, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    The transition of the German energy supply towards mainly renewable energy sources like wind or solar power, termed "Energiewende", makes energy storage a requirement in order to compensate their fluctuating production and to ensure a reliable energy and power supply. One option is to store heat in the subsurface using borehole heat exchangers (BHEs). Efficiency of thermal storage is increasing with increasing temperatures, as heat at high temperatures is more easily injected and extracted than at temperatures at ambient levels. This work aims at quantifying achievable storage capacities, storage cycle times, injection and extraction rates as well as thermal and hydraulic effects induced in the subsurface for a BHE storage site in the shallow subsurface. To achieve these aims, simulation of these highly dynamic storage sites is performed. A detailed, high-resolution numerical simulation model was developed, that accounts for all BHE components in geometrical detail and incorporates the governing processes. This model was verified using high quality experimental data and is shown to achieve accurate simulation results with excellent fit to the available experimental data, but also leads to large computational times due to the large numerical meshes required for discretizing the highly transient effects. An approximate numerical model for each type of BHE (single U, double U and coaxial) that reduces the number of elements and the simulation time significantly was therefore developed for use in larger scale simulations. The approximate numerical model still includes all BHE components and represents the temporal and spatial temperature distribution with a deviation of less than 2% from the fully discretized model. Simulation times are reduced by a factor of ~10 for single U-tube BHEs, ~20 for double U-tube BHEs and ~150 for coaxial BHEs. This model is then used to investigate achievable storage capacity, injection and extraction rates as well as induced effects for

  19. Effect of "bridge" on the performance of organic-inorganic crosslinked hybrid proton exchange membranes via KH550

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hailan; Li, Hai Qiang; Liu, Meiyu; Xu, Lishuang; Xu, Jingmei; Wang, Shuang; Ni, Hongzhe; Wang, Zhe

    2017-02-01

    A series of novel organic-inorganic crosslinked hybrid proton exchange membranes were prepared using sulfonated poly(arylene ether ketone sulfone) polymers containing carboxyl groups (C-SPAEKS), (3-aminopropyl)-triethoxysilane (KH550), and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS). KH550 acted as a "bridge" after reacting with carboxyl and sulfonic groups of C-SPAEKS to form covalent and ionic crosslinked structure between the C-SPAEKS and SiO2 phase. The crosslinked hybrid membranes (C-SPAEKS/K-SiO2) were characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy, TGA, and electrochemistry, etc. The thermal stability, mechanical properties and proton conductivity of the crosslinked hybrid membranes were improved by the presence of both crosslinked structure and inorganic phase. The proton conductivity of C-SPAEKS/K-SiO2-8 was recorded as 0.110 S cm-1, higher than that of Nafion® (0.028 S cm-1) at 120 °C. Moreover, the methanol permeability of the C-SPAEKS/K-SiO2-8 was measured as 3.86 × 10-7 cm2 s-1, much lower than that of Nafion® 117 membranes (29.4 × 10-7 cm2 s-1) at 25 °C.

  20. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells for space and electric vehicle applications: From basic research to technology development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Mukerjee, Sanjeev; Parthasarathy, A.; CesarFerreira, A.; Wakizoe, Masanobu; Rho, Yong Woo; Kim, Junbom; Mosdale, Renaut A.; Paetzold, Ronald F.; Lee, James

    1994-01-01

    The proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is one of the most promising electrochemical power sources for space and electric vehicle applications. The wide spectrum of R&D activities on PEMFC's, carried out in our Center from 1988 to date, is as follows (1) Electrode Kinetic and Electrocatalysis of Oxygen Reduction; (2) Optimization of Structures of Electrodes and of Membrane and Electrode Assemblies; (3) Selection and Evaluation of Advanced Proton Conducting Membranes and of Operating Conditions to Attain High Energy Efficiency; (4) Modeling Analysis of Fuel Cell Performance and of Thermal and Water Management; and (5) Engineering Design and Development of Multicell Stacks. The accomplishments on these tasks may be summarized as follows: (1) A microelectrode technique was developed to determine the electrode kinetic parameters for the fuel cell reactions and mass transport parameters for the H2 and O2 reactants in the proton conducting membrane. (2) High energy efficiencies and high power densities were demonstrated in PEMFCs with low platinum loading electrodes (0.4 mg/cm(exp 2) or less), advanced membranes and optimized structures of membrane and electrode assemblies, as well as operating conditions. (3) The modeling analyses revealed methods to minimize mass transport limitations, particularly with air as the cathodic reactant; and for efficient thermal and water management. (4) Work is in progress to develop multi-kilowatt stacks with the electrodes containing low platinum loadings.

  1. Preliminary Study of the Use of Sulphonated Polyether Ether Ketone (SPEEK as Proton Exchange Membrane for Microbial Fuel Cell (MFC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dani Permana

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Sulfonated polyether ether ketone (SPEEK was utilized as a proton exchange membrane (PEM in Microbial Fuel Cell (MFC. The SPEEK performance in producing electricity had been observed in MFC using wastewater and glucose as substrates. The MFC with catering and tofu wastewater produced maximum power density about 0.31 mW/m2 and 0.03 mW/m2, respectively, lower that of MFC with tapioca average power density of 39.4 W/m2 over 48 h. The power density boosted because of the presence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as inoculum. The study using of S. cerevisiae and Acetobacter acetii, separately, were also conducted in with glucose as substrate. The MFC produced an average power densities were 7.3 and 6.4 mW/m2 for S. cerevisiae and A. acetii, respectively. The results of this study indicated that SPEEK membrane has the potential usage in MFCs and can substitute the commercial membrane, Nafion. Article History: Received: Juni 14th 2017; Received: Sept 25th 2017; Accepted: December 16th 2017; Available online How to Cite This Article: Putra, H.E., Permana, D and Djaenudin, D. (2018 Preliminary Study of the Use of Sulfonated Polyether Ether Ketone (SPEEK as Proton Exchange Membrane for Microbial Fuel Cell (MFC. International Journal of Renewable Energy Development, 7(1, 7-12. https://doi.org/10.14710/ijred.7.1.7-12

  2. Improving the Conductivity of Sulfonated Polyimides as Proton Exchange Membranes by Doping of a Protic Ionic Liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bor-Kuan Chen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Proton exchange membranes (PEMs are a key component of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell. Sulfonated polyimides (SPIs were doped by protic ionic liquid (PIL to prepare composite PEMs with substantially improved conductivity. SPIs were synthesized from diamine, 2,2-bis[4-(4-amino-phenoxyphenyl]propane (BAPP, sulfonated diamine, 4,4'-diamino diphenyl ether-2,2'-disulfonic acid (ODADS and aromatic anhydride. BAPP improved the mechanical and thermal properties of SPIs, while ODADS enhanced conductivity. A PIL, 1-vinylimidazolium trifluoromethane-sulfonate ([VIm][OTf], was utilized. [VIm][OTf] offered better conductivity, which can be attributed to its vinyl chemical structure attached to an imidazolium ring that contributed to ionomer-PIL interactions. We prepared sulfonated polyimide/ionic liquid (SPI/IL composite PEMs using 50 wt% [VIm][OTf] with a conductivity of 7.17 mS/cm at 100 °C, and in an anhydrous condition, 3,3',4,4'-diphenyl sulfone tetracarboxylic dianhydride (DSDA was used in the synthesis of SPIs, leading to several hundred-times improvement in conductivity compared to pristine SPIs.

  3. Experimental Investigation and Discussion on the Mechanical Endurance Limit of Nafion Membrane Used in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xiao

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available As a solution of high efficiency and clean energy, fuel cell technologies, especially proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC, have caught extensive attention. However, after decades of development, the performances of PEMFCs are far from achieving the target from the Department of Energy (DOE. Thus, further understanding of the degradation mechanism is needed to overcome this obstacle. Due to the importance of proton exchange membrane in a PEMFC, the degradation of the membrane, such as hygrothermal aging effect on its properties, are particularly necessary. In this work, a thick membrane (Nafion N117, which is always used as an ionic polymer for the PEMFCs, has been analyzed. Experimental investigation is performed for understanding the mechanical endurance of the bare membranes under different loading conditions. Tensile tests are conducted to compare the mechanical property evolution of two kinds of bare-membrane specimens including the dog-bone and the deeply double edge notched (DDEN types. Both dog-bone and DDEN specimens were subjected to a series of degradation tests with different cycling times and wide humidity ranges. The tensile tests are repeated for both kinds of specimens to assess the strain-stress relations. Furthermore, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, X-ray diffraction (XRD and Scanning electron microscope (SEM observation and water absorption measurement were conducted to speculate the cause of this variation. The initial cracks along with the increasing of bound water content were speculated as the primary cause.

  4. Determination of bidirectional permeability of proton exchange membranes using a {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Ah; Pak, Chanho; Chang, Hyuk; Seung, Doyoung; Choi, Yeong Suk [Energy and Environment Laboratory, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology (SAIT), P.O. Box 111, Suwon 449-600 (Korea); Kim, Tae Kyoung [Research Institute of Chemical and Electronic Materials, Cheil Industries Inc., Uiwang-si 437-711 (Korea)

    2008-05-01

    Bidirectional permeability of proton exchange membranes was measured using a {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique based on the assignment of characteristic peaks and derivation of a relationship between the peak areas and the concentrations of methanol, water and D{sub 2}O. The concentration variations of the liquids determined with NMR spectra showed that both methanol and the water transports were affected by the thickness and the chemical structure of membranes. Molar ratios of methanol to water diffused through membranes elucidated that chemical structures of membranes had a strong influence on the methanol transport, compared to thickness. Reverse-direction diffusion behaviors of membranes, back-diffusions, were also appraised with the D{sub 2}O amounts. The amounts of back-diffusions were much less than those of the water transported from the opposite direction, which is the first report on the direct measurements of back-diffusions. The results suggest that {sup 1}H NMR technique can evaluate bidirectional transports of proton exchange membranes. (author)

  5. Surface modification of a proton exchange membrane and hydrogen storage in a metal hydride for fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Lisa

    Interest in fuel cell technology is rising as a result of the need for more affordable and available fuel sources. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells involve the catalysis of a fuel to release protons and electrons. It requires the use of a polymer electrolyte membrane to transfer protons through the cell, while the electrons pass through an external circuit, producing electricity. The surface modification of the polymer, NafionRTM, commonly researched as a proton exchange membrane, may improve efficiency of a fuel cell. Surface modification can change the chemistry of the surface of a polymer while maintaining bulk properties. Plasma modification techniques such as microwave discharge of an argon and oxygen gas mixture as well as vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photolysis may cause favorable chemical and physical changes on the surface of Nafion for improved fuel cell function. A possible increase in hydrophilicity as a result of microwave discharge experiments may increase proton conductivity. Grafting of acrylic acid from the surface of modified Nafion may decrease the permeation of methanol in a direct methanol fuel cell, a process which can decrease efficiency. Modification of the surface of Nafion samples were carried out using: 1) An indirect Ar/O2 gas mixture plasma investigating the reaction of oxygen radicals with the surface, 2) A direct Ar/O2 gas mixture plasma investigating the reaction of oxygen radicals and VUV radiation with the surface and, 3) VUV photolysis investigating exclusively the interaction of VUV radiation with the surface and any possible oxidation upon exposure to air. Acrylic acid was grafted from the VUV photolysed Nafion samples. All treated surfaces were analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to analyze the grafted Nafion samples. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and contact angle measurements were used to analyze experiments 2 and 3. Using hydrogen as fuel is a

  6. Mechanical and transport properties of layer-by-layer electrospun composite proton exchange membranes for fuel cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannarino, Matthew M; Liu, David S; Hammond, Paula T; Rutledge, Gregory C

    2013-08-28

    Composite membranes composed of highly conductive and selective layer-by-layer (LbL) films and electrospun fiber mats were fabricated and characterized for mechanical strength and electrochemical selectivity. The LbL component consists of a proton-conducting, methanol-blocking poly(diallyl dimethyl ammonium chloride)/sulfonated poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene oxide) (PDAC/sPPO) thin film. The electrospun fiber component consists of poly(trimethyl hexamethylene terephthalamide) (PA 6(3)T) fibers in a nonwoven mat of 60-90% porosity. The bare mats were annealed to improve their mechanical properties, which improvements are shown to be retained in the composite membranes. Spray LbL assembly was used as a means for the rapid formation of proton-conducting films that fill the void space throughout the porous electrospun matrix and create a fuel-blocking layer. Coated mats as thin as 15 μm were fabricated, and viable composite membranes with methanol permeabilities 20 times lower than Nafion and through-plane proton selectivity five and a half times greater than Nafion are demonstrated. The mechanical properties of the spray coated electrospun mats are shown to be superior to the LbL-only system and possess intrinsically greater dimensional stability and lower mechanical hysteresis than Nafion under hydrated conditions. The composite proton exchange membranes fabricated here were tested in an operational direct methanol fuel cell. The results show the potential for higher open circuit voltages (OCV) and comparable cell resistances when compared to fuel cells based on Nafion.

  7. Model-based fault detection for proton exchange membrane fuel cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    In this paper, an intelligent model-based fault detection (FD) is developed for proton ... process behaviors, efficient and advanced automated diagnostic systems .... Finally, the nature and likely cause of the faults are analyzed by the relations ..... Her research interest includes artificial intelligence, fault tolerant control, fault ...

  8. Theoretical study on ground-state proton/H-atom exchange in formic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The ground-state triple proton/H-atom transfer (GSTPT/GSTHAT) reactions in HCOOH complexed cyclically with H₂O, CH₃OH, NH₃ and mixed solvents H₂O-NH₃/CH₃ OH-NH₃ were studied byquantum mechanical methods in heptane. The GSTPT/GSTHAT in HCOOH-(H₂O) ₂, HCOOH-(CH₃OH)₂, ...

  9. Composite electrolyte with proton conductivity for low-temperature solid oxide fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raza, Rizwan, E-mail: razahussaini786@gmail.com [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Department of Energy Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, KTH, Stockholm 10044 (Sweden); Ahmed, Akhlaq; Akram, Nadeem; Saleem, Muhammad; Niaz Akhtar, Majid; Ajmal Khan, M.; Abbas, Ghazanfar; Alvi, Farah; Yasir Rafique, M. [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Sherazi, Tauqir A. [Department of Chemistry, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Abbotabad 22060 (Pakistan); Shakir, Imran [Sustainable Energy Technologies (SET) center, College of Engineering, King Saud University, PO-BOX 800, Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia); Mohsin, Munazza [Department of Physics, Lahore College for Women University, Lahore, 54000 (Pakistan); Javed, Muhammad Sufyan [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Department of Applied Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Zhu, Bin, E-mail: binzhu@kth.se, E-mail: zhubin@hubu.edu.cn [Department of Energy Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, KTH, Stockholm 10044 (Sweden); Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Faculty of Physics and Electronic Science/Faculty of Computer and Information, Hubei University, Wuhan, Hubei 430062 (China)

    2015-11-02

    In the present work, cost-effective nanocomposite electrolyte (Ba-SDC) oxide is developed for efficient low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (LTSOFCs). Analysis has shown that dual phase conduction of O{sup −2} (oxygen ions) and H{sup +} (protons) plays a significant role in the development of advanced LTSOFCs. Comparatively high proton ion conductivity (0.19 s/cm) for LTSOFCs was achieved at low temperature (460 °C). In this article, the ionic conduction behaviour of LTSOFCs is explained by carrying out electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. Further, the phase and structure analysis are investigated by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Finally, we achieved an ionic transport number of the composite electrolyte for LTSOFCs as high as 0.95 and energy and power density of 90% and 550 mW/cm{sup 2}, respectively, after sintering the composite electrolyte at 800 °C for 4 h, which is promising. Our current effort toward the development of an efficient, green, low-temperature solid oxide fuel cell with the incorporation of high proton conductivity composite electrolyte may open frontiers in the fields of energy and fuel cell technology.

  10. Utilizing Proton Resonance Frequency of Isotopes Materials for Ultra-Precise Temperature Measurement: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Monis Abdulmanan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High energy management in nuclear system and refractory metals productions are equipped with challenging procedures in terms of precise and remote controlling. In order to predict occurrence of contamination and avoidance of huge damages, there are often difficulties to access the equipment during their operation. In addition, estimating the precise and remote nucleation critical temperature of decay and growth of radioactive materials in the nuclear system has also proven to be a great challenge. Other than that, the eutectic crystallization temperature of the refractory metals during production also need to provide a precise estimation. However, it has been understood that the conventional temperature sensors are yet to be applicable to work precisely in such harsh environments. On the other hand, proton resonance frequency thermometry phenomenon have not been utilized or developed to serve as temperature sensors; despite the fact that they are capable to measure temperature in quantum level. Therefore, this article provides a review of the prior art on proton resonance frequency thermometry with its application and reliability, and elaborates on the trajectory of ultra-precise temperature measurement as the latest development.

  11. DESIGN OF A COMPACT HEAT EXCHANGER FOR HEAT RECUPERATION FROM A HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. K. Housley; J.E. O' Brien; G.L. Hawkes

    2008-11-01

    Design details of a compact heat exchanger and supporting hardware for heat recuperation in a high-temperature electrolysis application are presented. The recuperative heat exchanger uses a vacuum-brazed plate-fin design and operates between 300 and 800°C. It includes corrugated inserts for enhancement of heat transfer coefficients and extended heat transfer surface area. Two recuperative heat exchangers are required per each four-stack electrolysis module. The heat exchangers are mated to a base manifold unit that distributes the inlet and outlet flows to and from the four electrolysis stacks. Results of heat exchanger design calculations and assembly details are also presented.

  12. Fabrication of High-Temperature Heat Exchangers by Plasma Spraying Exterior Skins on Nickel Foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafeez, P.; Yugeswaran, S.; Chandra, S.; Mostaghimi, J.; Coyle, T. W.

    2016-06-01

    Thermal-sprayed heat exchangers were tested at high temperatures (750 °C), and their performances were compared to the foam heat exchangers made by brazing Inconel sheets to their surface. Nickel foil was brazed to the exterior surface of 10-mm-thick layers of 10 and 40 PPI nickel foam. A plasma torch was used to spray an Inconel coating on the surface of the foil. A burner test rig was built to produce hot combustion gases that flowed over exposed face of the heat exchanger. Cooling air flowed through the foam heat exchanger at rates of up to 200 SLPM. Surface temperature and air inlet/exit temperature were measured. Heat transfer to air flowing through the foam was significantly higher for the thermally sprayed heat exchangers than for the brazed heat exchangers. On an average, thermally sprayed heat exchangers show 36% higher heat transfer than conventionally brazed foam heat exchangers. At low flow rates, the convective resistance is large (~4 × 10-2 m2 K/W), and the effect of thermal contact resistance is negligible. At higher flow rates, the convective resistance decreases (~2 × 10-3 m2 K/W), and the lower contact resistance of the thermally sprayed heat exchanger provides better performance than the brazed heat exchangers.

  13. Hydration of freestanding Nafion membrane in proton and sodium ion exchanged forms probed by infrared spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basnayake, Rukma; Wever, Walter [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409-1061 (United States); Korzeniewski, Carol [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409-1061 (United States)], E-mail: carol.korzeniewski@ttu.edu

    2007-12-20

    Transmission infrared spectroscopy was used to follow the uptake of water into Nafion 112 ({approx}50 {mu}m thick) membrane under conditions that enabled detection of vibrational bands for water in different environments inside membrane pores and channels. The evolution of infrared features for interfacial and weakly hydrogen bonded water were followed upon exposure of initially vacuum dried membranes, exchanged by either Na{sup +} or H{sup +}, to low humidity atmospheres. The rapid uptake of water into H{sup +} exchanged Nafion 112 precluded time resolved spectral measurements. However, the considerably slower timeframe for water incorporation into Na{sup +} exchanged membrane enabled the evolution of different environments for water to be observed. Under approximately 10% relative humidity, the time dependent increases in absorbance for a mode of interfacial water near 3674 cm{sup -1} and a mode of more bulk-like, weakly hydrogen bonded water at 3525 cm{sup -1} in Na{sup +} exchanged Nafion 112 could be fit by a pore diffusion model. The results provide a foundation for the application of multivariate analysis techniques to identify different structures that develop in metal cation exchanged Nafion during changes in hydration state.

  14. Enthalpy analysis and Heat Exchanger Sizing of an Air-cooled Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Xin; Berning, Torsten; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    the warmer exhaust air is used to pre-heat and also humidify the incoming colder and dryer air stream using an enthalpy wheel. It is important to thermodynamically understand such a fuel cell system, and in this work the enthalpy streams and the humidity stream are followed throughout the fuel cell system...... simulations have been carried out to better understand the distribution of the reactant air over the fuel cell stack and the resulting temperature distribution across the stack. These results suggest that the humidifying function of the current enthalpy wheel is negligible and a smaller enthalpy wheel...

  15. Polymer and Composite Membranes for Proton-Conducting, High-Temperature Fuel Cells: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartarone, Eliana; Angioni, Simone; Mustarelli, Piercarlo

    2017-01-01

    Polymer fuel cells operating above 100 °C (High Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells, HT-PEMFCs) have gained large interest for their application to automobiles. The HT-PEMFC devices are typically made of membranes with poly(benzimidazoles), although other polymers, such as sulphonated poly(ether ether ketones) and pyridine-based materials have been reported. In this critical review, we address the state-of-the-art of membrane fabrication and their properties. A large number of papers of uneven quality has appeared in the literature during the last few years, so this review is limited to works that are judged as significant. Emphasis is put on proton transport and the physico-chemical mechanisms of proton conductivity. PMID:28773045

  16. Niobium phosphates as an intermediate temperature proton conducting electrolyte for fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Yunjie; Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Annemette Hindhede

    2012-01-01

    A new proton conductor based on niobium phosphates was synthesized using niobium pentoxide and phosphoric acid as precursors. The existence of hydroxyl groups in the phosphates was confirmed and found to be preserved after heat treatment at 500 °C or higher, contributing to an anhydrous proton...... conductivity of 1.6 × 10−2 S cm−1 at 250 °C. The conductivity increased with water content in the atmosphere and reached 5.8 × 10−2 S cm−1 under pure water vapour at the same temperature. The conductivity showed good stability in the low water partial pressure range of up to 0.05 atm. The metal phosphates...

  17. Plasma Deposited Thin Iron Oxide Films as Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Reduction Reaction in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz JOZWIAK

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of using plasma deposited thin films of iron oxides as electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC was examined. Results of energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS analysis indicated that the plasma deposit consisted mainly of FeOX structures with the X parameter close to 1.5. For as deposited material iron atoms are almost exclusively in the Fe3+ oxidation state without annealing in oxygen containing atmosphere. However, the annealing procedure can be used to remove the remains of carbon deposit from surface. The single cell test (SCT was performed to determine the suitability of the produced material for ORR. Preliminary results showed that power density of 0.23 mW/cm2 could be reached in the tested cell.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.1.14406

  18. Oxygen reduction and methanol oxidation behaviour of SiC based Pt nanocatalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhiman, Rajnish; Stamatin, Serban Nicolae; Andersen, Shuang Ma

    2013-01-01

    Research with proton exchange membrane fuel cells has demonstrated their important potential as providers of clean energy. The commercialization of this type of fuel cell needs a breakthrough in electrocatalyst technology to reduce the relatively large amount of noble metal platinum used...... with the present carbon based substrates. We have recently examined suitably sized silicon carbide (SiC) particles as catalyst supports for fuel cells based on the stable chemical and mechanical properties of this material. In the present study, we have continued our work with studies of the oxygen reduction...... and methanol oxidation reactions of SiC supported catalysts and measured them against commercially available carbon based catalysts. The deconvolution of the hydrogen desorption signals in CV cycles shows a higher contribution of Pt (110) & Pt (111) peaks compared to Pt (100) for SiC based supports than...

  19. Non-noble metal based electro-catalyst compositions for proton exchange membrane based water electrolysis and methods of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumta, Prashant N.; Kadakia, Karan Sandeep; Datta, Moni Kanchan; Velikokhatnyi, Oleg

    2017-02-07

    The invention provides electro-catalyst compositions for an anode electrode of a proton exchange membrane-based water electrolysis system. The compositions include a noble metal component selected from the group consisting of iridium oxide, ruthenium oxide, rhenium oxide and mixtures thereof, and a non-noble metal component selected from the group consisting of tantalum oxide, tin oxide, niobium oxide, titanium oxide, tungsten oxide, molybdenum oxide, yttrium oxide, scandium oxide, cooper oxide, zirconium oxide, nickel oxide and mixtures thereof. Further, the non-noble metal component can include a dopant. The dopant can be at least one element selected from Groups III, V, VI and VII of the Periodic Table. The compositions can be prepared using a surfactant approach or a sol gel approach. Further, the compositions are prepared using noble metal and non-noble metal precursors. Furthermore, a thin film containing the compositions can be deposited onto a substrate to form the anode electrode.

  20. Employing Hot Wire Anemometry to Directly Measure the Water Balance of a Commercial Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Stack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shakhshir, Saher Al; Berning, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    and increased degradation rates. Clearly, a fundamental understanding of all aspects of water management in PEMFC is imperative. This includes the fuel cell water balance, i.e. which fraction of the product water leaves the fuel cell via the anode channels versus the cathode channel. Our research group...... is currently developing a novel technique to obtain an ad-hoc and real time electrical signal of the fuel cell water balance by employing hot wire anemometry. In this work, the hot wire sensor is placed in the anode outlet of a commercial air-cooled fuel cell stack by Ballard Power Systems, and the voltage......Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC’s) are currently being commercialized for various applications ranging from automotive (e.g. the Toyota Mirai) to stationary such as powering telecom backup units. In PEMFC’s, oxygen from air is internally combined with hydrogen to form water and produce...

  1. Employing Hot Wire Anemometry to Directly Measure the Water Balance in a Proton Exchange membrane Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shakhshir, Saher Al; Hussain, Nabeel; Berning, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    Water management in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC’s) remains a critical problem for their durability, cost, and performance. Because the anode side of this fuel cell has the tendency to become dehydrated, measuring the water balance can be an important diagnosis tool during fuel cell...... operation. The water balance indicates how much of the product water leaves at the anode side versus the cathode side. Previous methods of determining the fuel cell water balance often relied on condensing the water in the exhaust gas streams and weighing the accumulated mass which is a time consuming...... process that has limited accuracy. Currently, our group is developing a novel method to accurately determine the water balance in a PEMFC in real time by employing hot-wire anemometry. The amount of heat transferred from the wire to the anode exhaust stream can be translated into a voltage signal which...

  2. Properties and degradation of the gasket component of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basuli, Utpal; Jose, Jobin; Lee, Ran Hee; Yoo, Yong Hwan; Jeong, Kwang-Un; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon; Nah, Changwoon

    2012-10-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell stack requires gaskets and seals in each cell to keep the reactant gases within their respective regions. Gasket performance is integral to the successful long-term operation of a fuel cell stack. This review focuses on properties, performance and degradation mechanisms of the different polymer gasket materials used in PEM fuel cell under normal operating conditions. The different degradation mechanisms and their corresponding representative mitigation strategies are also presented here. Summary of various properties of elastomers and their advantages and disadvantages in fuel cell'environment are presented. By considering the level of chemical degradation, mechanical properties and cost effectiveness, it can be proposed that EPDM is one of the best choices for gasket material in PEM fuel cell. Finally, the challenges that remain in using rubber component as in PEM fuel cell, as well as the prospects for exploiting them in the future are discussed.

  3. Investigating the effects of proton exchange membrane fuel cell conditions on carbon supported platinum electrocatalyst composition and performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Anant; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen; Colbow, Vesna; Dutta, Monica; Harvey, Davie; Wessel, Silvia

    2011-12-01

    Changes that carbon-supported platinum electrocatalysts undergo in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell environment were simulated by ex situ heat treatment of catalyst powder samples at 150 C and 100% relative humidity. In order to study modifications that are introduced to chemistry, morphology, and performance of electrocatalysts, XPS, HREELS and three-electrode rotating disk electrode experiments were performed. Before heat treatment, graphitic content varied by 20% among samples with different types of carbon supports, with distinct differences between bulk and surface compositions within each sample. Following the aging protocol, the bulk and surface chemistry of the samples were similar, with graphite content increasing or remaining constant and Pt-carbide decreasing for all samples. From the correlation of changes in chemical composition and losses in performance of the electrocatalysts, we conclude that relative distribution of Pt particles on graphitic and amorphous carbon is as important for electrocatalytic activity as the absolute amount of graphitic carbon present

  4. Investigating the effects of proton exchange membrane fuel cell conditions on carbon supported platinum electrocatalyst composition and performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Patel; K. Artyushkova; P. Atanassov; V. Colbow; M. Dutta; D. Harvey; S. Wessel

    2012-04-30

    Changes that carbon-supported platinum electrocatalysts undergo in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell environment were simulated by ex situ heat treatment of catalyst powder samples at 150 C and 100% relative humidity. In order to study modifications that are introduced to chemistry, morphology, and performance of electrocatalysts, XPS, HREELS and three-electrode rotating disk electrode experiments were performed. Before heat treatment, graphitic content varied by 20% among samples with different types of carbon supports, with distinct differences between bulk and surface compositions within each sample. Following the aging protocol, the bulk and surface chemistry of the samples were similar, with graphite content increasing or remaining constant and Pt-carbide decreasing for all samples. From the correlation of changes in chemical composition and losses in performance of the electrocatalysts, we conclude that relative distribution of Pt particles on graphitic and amorphous carbon is as important for electrocatalytic activity as the absolute amount of graphitic carbon present

  5. Applying hot-wire anemometry to directly measure the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Shakhshir, Saher; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Berning, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    In order to better understand and more accurately measure the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell, our group has recently proposed to apply hot wire anemometry in the fuel cell's anode outlet. It was theoretically shown that the electrical signal obtained from the hot wire sensor...... can be directly converted into the fuel cell water balance. In this work an ex-situ experimental investigation is performed to examine the effect of the wire diameter and the outlet pipe diameter on the voltage signal. For a laboratory fuel cell where the mass flow rate the anode outlet is small......, it is found important to use a small output pipe diameter to obtain a sufficiently strong convection effect and hence clear voltage readings. Depending on the hot wire diameter and the inner pipe diameter, the resulting values for the exponent of the Reynolds number Re in the determination of the Nusselt...

  6. The Effect of Inhomogeneous Compression on Water Transport in the Cathode of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Christian; Berning, Torsten; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional, multicomponent, two-fluid model developed in the commercial CFD package CFX 13 (ANSYS Inc.) is used to investigate the effect of porous media compression on water transport in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The PEMFC model only consist of the cathode channel, gas....... Furthermore, the presence of irreducible liquid water is taken into account. In order to account for compression, porous media morphology variations are specified based on the gas diffusion layer (GDL) through-plane strain and intrusion which are stated as a function of compression. These morphology...... diffusion layer, microporous layer, and catalyst layer, excluding the membrane and anode. In the porous media liquid water transport is described by the capillary pressure gradient, momentum loss via the Darcy-Forchheimer equation, and mass transfer between phases by a nonequilibrium phase change model...

  7. Technique for characterization of the wettability properties of gas diffusion media for proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurau, Vladimir; Mann, J Adin

    2010-10-15

    In this paper, a measurement technique based on the capillary penetration method is presented for use in estimating the wettability properties of gas diffusion media (GDM), a component for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). The present method solves several critical issues, including the formation of an external meniscus and the evaporation of imbibed solvent, both of which greatly affect the apparent rate of solvent imbibition. Solvent evaporation is prevented by inserting a GDM sample between two thin stainless steel plates to form a tri-layer structure having non-porous evaporation covers on each side of the porous GDM sample. The presence of stainless steel plates in contact with the GDM sample was demonstrated to have a negligible impact on the evaluation of the Washburn material constant. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. SIMULATION OF POROSITY AND PTFE CONTENT IN GAS DIFFUSION LAYER ON PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE FUEL CELL PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NUR H. MASLAN

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous research and development activities have been conducted to optimize the operating parameters of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC by experiments and simulations. This study explains the development of a 3D model by using ANSYS FLUENT 14.5 to determine the optimum PEMFC parameters, namely, porosity and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE content, in the gas diffusion layer (GDL. A 3D model was developed to analyze the properties and effects of GDL. Simulation results showed that the increase in GDL porosity significantly improved the performance of PEMFC in generating electrical power. However, the performance of PEMFC decreased with increasing PTFE content in GDL. Thus, the PTFE content in the GDL must be optimized and the optimum PTFE content should be 5 wt%. The model developed in this simulation showed good capability in simulating the PEMFC parameters to assist the development process of PEMFC design.

  9. Effects of proton exchange membrane on the performance and microbial community composition of air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun-Yeong; Kim, Tae Gwan; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2015-10-10

    This study investigated the effects of proton exchange membranes (PEMs) on performance and microbial community of air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Air-cathode MFCs with reactor volume of 1L were constructed in duplicate with or without PEM (designated as ACM-MFC and AC-MFC, respectively) and fed with a mixture of glucose and acetate (1:1, w:w). The maximum power density and coulombic efficiency did not differ between MFCs in the absence or presence of a PEM. However, PEM use adversely affected maximum voltage production and the rate of organic compound removal (p0.9 and pelectricity generation in MFC systems. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that MFC systems without PEM are more efficient with respect to power production and COD removal as well as exoelectrogen growth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Sodium-proton exchanger isoform-1: synthesis of a potent inhibitor labeled with deuterium and carbon-14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latli, Bachir; Haddad, Nizar; Hrapchak, Matt; Wei, Xudong; Tang, Wenjun; Song, Jinhua J; Senanayake, Chris H

    2013-03-01

    Sodium-proton exchangers, NHEs are plasma membrane proteins that are essential in the regulation of intracellular pH of the myocardium. There are nine known variously expressed isoforms of NHEs with NHE-1 being the predominant isoform in the heart. N-[4-(1-acetyl-piperidin-4-yl)-3-trifluoromethyl-benzoyl]-guanidine (1) is a potent NHE 1-inhibitor with good pharmacokinetics. It was prepared labeled with deuterium and carbon-14 to aid in drug metabolism, pharmacokinetics, and other studies. The combination of Comins' reaction and reduction under deuterium gas was used to access deuterium labeled (1) starting from deuterium labeled pyridine. Carbon-14 labeled zinc cyanide was used to prepare [(14)C]-(1) in three steps, with a specific activity of 55.6 mCi/mmol.

  11. Performance of Platinum Nanoparticles / Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes / Bacterial Cellulose Composite as Anode Catalyst for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Fonda Aritonang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Highly dispersed platinum (Pt nanoparticles / multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs on bacterial cellulose (BC as anode catalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC were prepared with various precursors and their electro-catalytic activities towards hydrogen oxidation at 70 oC under non-humidified conditions. The composite was prepared by deposition of Pt nanoparticles and MWCNTs on BC gel by impregnation method using a water solution of metal precursors and MWCNTs followed by reducing reaction using a hydrogen gas. The composite was characterized by using TEM (transmission electron microscopy, EDS (energy dispersive spectroscopy, and XRD (X-ray diffractometry techniques. TEM images and XRD patterns both lead to the observation of spherical metallic Pt nanoparticles with mean diameter of 3-11 nm well impregnated into the BC fibrils. Preliminary tests on a single cell indicate that renewable BC is a good prospect to be explored as a membrane in fuel cell field. Copyright © 2017 BCREC Group. All rights reserved Received: 21st November 2016; Revised: 26th February 2017; Accepted: 27th February 2017 How to Cite: Aritonang, H.F., Kamu, V.S., Ciptati, C., Onggo, D., Radiman, C.L. (2017. Performance of Platinum Nanoparticles / Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes / Bacterial Cellulose Composite as Anode Catalyst for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 12 (2: 287-292 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.12.2.803.287-292 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.12.2.803.287-292

  12. Physico-chemical study of the degradation of membrane-electrode assemblies in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira-Aparicio, P.; Gallardo-López, B.; Chaparro, A. M.; Daza, L.

    A proton exchange membrane fuel cell stack integrated by 8-elements has been evaluated in an accelerated stress test. The application of techniques such as TEM analyses of ultramicrotome-sliced sections of some samples and XRD, XPS and TGA of spent electrodes reveal the effects of several degradation processes contributing to reduce the cells performance. The reduction of the Pt surface area at the cathode is favored by the oxidation of carbon black agglomerates in the catalytic layer, the agglomeration of Pt particles and by the partial dissolution of Pt, which migrates towards the anode and precipitates within the membrane. In the light of the TEM, EDAX and XPS results, two combined effects are probably responsible of the increase of the internal resistance of the stack cells: (i) a lower proton conductivity of the membranes due to the high affinity of the sulfonic acid groups for ions originated from Pt crystallites and other peripherical elements such as the silicone elastomeric gaskets and (ii) the increment of electrically isolated islands in the cathode gas diffusion electrodes resulting from carbon corrosion and the degradation of the perfluorinated polymers. Water accumulation and inhomogeneous gas distribution throughout the stack cells originate different degradation rates in them.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of sulfonated cardo poly(arylene ether sulfone)s for fuel cell proton exchange membrane application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, M.M.; Jang, H.H.; Lim, Y.D.; Seo, D.W.; Kim, W.G. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Konkuk University, Chungju, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Kim, T.H.; Hong, Y.T. [Energy Material Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, D.M. [Material Engineering and Science, Hongik Univ, Jochiwon-eup, Yeongi-gun, Chungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    Sulfonated cardo poly(arylene ether sulfone)s (SPPA-PES) with various degrees of sulfonation (DS) were prepared by post-sulfonation of synthesized phenolphthalein anilide (PPA; N-phenyl-3,3'-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1-isobenzopyrolidone) poly(arylene ether sulfone)s (PPA-PES) by using concentrated sulfuric acid. PPA-PES copolymers were synthesized by direct polycondensation of PPA with bis-(4-fluorophenyl)-sulfone and 4,4'-sulfonyldiphenol. The DS was varied with different mole ratios of PPA (24, 30, 40, 50 mol.%) in the polymer. The structure of the resulting SPPA-PES copolymers and the different contents of the sulfonated unit were studied by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Sorption experiments were conducted to observe the interaction of sulfonated polymer with water. The ion exchange capacity (IEC) and proton conductivity of SPPA-PES were evaluated according to the increase of DS. The water uptake (WU) of the resulting SPPA-PES membranes was in the range of 20-72%, compared with 28% for Nafion 211 registered. The SPPA-PES membranes showed proton conductivities of 23-82 mS cm{sup -1}, compared with 194 mS cm{sup -1} for Nafion 211 registered, under 100% relative humidity (RH) at 80 C. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. High energy efficiency and high power density proton exchange membrane fuel cells: Electrode kinetics and mass transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Velev, Omourtag A.; Parthasathy, Arvind; Manko, David J.; Appleby, A. John

    1991-01-01

    The development of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell power plants with high energy efficiencies and high power densities is gaining momentum because of the vital need of such high levels of performance for extraterrestrial (space, underwater) and terrestrial (power source for electric vehicles) applications. Since 1987, considerable progress has been made in achieving energy efficiencies of about 60 percent at a current density of 200 mA/sq cm and high power densities (greater than 1 W/sq cm) in PEM fuel cells with high (4 mg/sq cm) or low (0.4 mg/sq cm) platinum loadings in electrodes. The following areas are discussed: (1) methods to obtain these high levels of performance with low Pt loading electrodes - by proton conductor impregnation into electrodes, localization of Pt near front surface; (2) a novel microelectrode technique which yields electrode kinetic parameters for oxygen reduction and mass transport parameters; (3) demonstration of lack of water transport from anode to cathode; (4) modeling analysis of PEM fuel cell for comparison with experimental results and predicting further improvements in performance; and (5) recommendations of needed research and development for achieving the above goals.

  15. Crosslinked poly(ether ether ketone): cost-effective proton exchange ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2018-02-02

    Feb 2, 2018 ... exchange membranes for fuel cell application. SWATI AWASTHI .... C in a hot air oven. The reaction scheme is shown in figure 1. 2.4 Membrane preparation. SPEEK-C membrane was prepared by solution casting method. The dried ... wiped off with a filter paper and immediately weighed. For each testing ...

  16. Proton-exchange biomimetic membranes based on columnar side-chain liquid-crystalline polyethers

    OpenAIRE

    Bhosale, Suryakant

    2013-01-01

    En este proyecto de tesis, se han sintetizado y caracterizado familias de poliéteres cristal líquidode cadena lateral obtenidos a partir de poliepiclorhidrina, poli (óxido de epiclorhidrina-co-etileno) o poliglicidol lineal,que se auto-ensamblan en estructuras supramoleculares. Se obtuvieron diferentes tipos de mesofases y diferentes rangos de estabilidad en función del grado de modificación alcanzado. Para la obtención de membranas orientadas transportadoras de protones a partir de estos p...

  17. Teledyne Energy Systems, Inc., Proton Exchange Member (PEM) Fuel Cell Engineering Model Powerplant. Test Report: Initial Benchmark Tests in the Original Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyselle, Patricia; Prokopius, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell technology is the leading candidate to replace the alkaline fuel cell technology, currently used on the Shuttle, for future space missions. During a 5-yr development program, a PEM fuel cell powerplant was developed. This report details the initial performance evaluation test results of the powerplant.

  18. Insights into the role of wettability in cathode catalyst layer of proton exchange membrane fuel cell : pore scale immiscible flow and transport processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fathi, H.; Raoof, A.; Mansouri, S.H.

    2017-01-01

    The production of liquid water in cathode catalyst layer, CCL, is a significant barrier to increase the efficiency of proton exchange membrane fuel cell. Here we present, for the first time, a direct three-dimensional pore-scale modelling to look at the complex immiscible two-phase flow in CCL.

  19. Process Heat Exchanger Options for Fluoride Salt High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Eung Soo Kim; Michael McKellar; Nolan Anderson

    2011-04-01

    The work reported herein is a significant intermediate step in reaching the final goal of commercial-scale deployment and usage of molten salt as the heat transport medium for process heat applications. The primary purpose of this study is to aid in the development and selection of the required heat exchanger for power production and process heat application, which would support large-scale deployment.

  20. Process Heat Exchanger Options for the Advanced High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Eung Soo Kim; Michael McKellar; Nolan Anderson

    2011-06-01

    The work reported herein is a significant intermediate step in reaching the final goal of commercial-scale deployment and usage of molten salt as the heat transport medium for process heat applications. The primary purpose of this study is to aid in the development and selection of the required heat exchanger for power production and process heat application, which would support large-scale deployment.

  1. Determination of Ground Heat Exchangers Temperature Field in Geothermal Heat Pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhurmilova, I.; Shtym, A.

    2017-11-01

    For the heating and cooling supply of buildings and constructions geothermal heat pumps using low-potential ground energy are applied by means of ground exchangers. The process of heat transfer in a system of ground exchangers is a phenomenon of complex heat transfer. The paper presents a mathematical modeling of heat exchange processes, the temperature fields are built which are necessary for the determination of the ground array that ensures an adequate supply of low potential energy excluding the freezing of soil around the pipes in the ground heat exchangers and guaranteeing a reliable operation of geothermal heat pumps.

  2. Low temperature annealing effects on the performance of proton irradiated GaAs detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanni, P.; Nava, F.; Canali, C.; Castaldini, A.; Cavallini, A.; Polenta, L.; Lanzieri, C

    1999-08-01

    Semi-insulating, undoped, Liquid Encapsulated Czochralski (SI-U LEC) GaAs detectors have been irradiated with 24 GeV/c protons at the fluence of 5.6x10{sup 13} p/cm{sup 2}. The detector charge collection efficiency (CCE), for both electrons and holes is remarkably reduced after irradiation while the reverse current increases. The effect of annealing the detectors at temperatures ranging from 220 deg. C to 280 deg. C has been seen to reduce the reverse current and to increase the electron CCE, while the recovery of the hole CCE is negligible in irradiated detectors. Deep electron traps have been followed in their evolution with the heat treatment temperature by P-DLTS and C-V measurements. They recover by increasing the heat treatment temperature and this can explain the restoration observed in electron CCE.

  3. Microwave Assisted Reduction of Pt-Catalyst by N-Phenyl-p-Phenylenediamine for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Jer Tsai

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The presence of N-phenyl-p-phenylenediamine (PPDA: a dimer of aniline during microwave (MW irradiation can significantly improve Pt-loading on the XC72 carbon matrix as a catalyst support of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs. PPDA is converted to an emeraldine base state during MW-assisted redox reaction, which is characterized by both FTIR and Raman spectra. The increased degree of conjugation from the formation of quinone-state of PPDA is confirmed by UV-VIS spectra. TEM micrographs and residue weights obtained from the TGA thermograms illustrate the particle size and Pt-loading percent of Pt nanoparticles (NPs after MW irradiation, respectively. X-ray diffraction patterns indicate Pt NPs are successfully loaded on XC72 by MW irradiation corresponding to hydrothermal method. The single cell performance demonstrates an increasing power and maximum current density when Pt-catalyst of membrane exchanged assembly (MEA is prepared by MW-assisted reduction in the presence of PPDA.

  4. Non-covalent bonding interaction of surfactants with functionalized carbon nanotubes in proton exchange membranes for fuel cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayeed, M Abu; Kim, Young Ho; Park, Younjin; Gopalan, A I; Lee, Kwang-Pill; Choi, Sang-June

    2013-11-01

    Dispersion of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in proton exchange membranes (PEMs) was conducted via non-covalent bonding between benzene rings of various surfactants and functionalized MWCNTs. In the solution casting method, dispersion of functionalized MWCNTs in PEMs such as Nafion membranes is a critical issue. In this study, 1 wt.% pristine MWCNTs (p-MWCNTs) and oxidized MWCNTs (ox-MWCNTs) were reinforced in Nafion membranes by adding 0.1-0.5 wt.% of a surfactant such as benzalkonium chloride (BKC) as a cationic surfactant with a benzene ring, Tween-80 as a nonanionic surfactant without a benzene ring, sodium dodecylsulfonate (SDS) as an anionic surfactant without a benzene ring, or sodium dodecylben-zenesulfonate (SDBS) as an anionic surfactant with a benzene ring and their effects on the dispersion of nanocomposites were then observed. Among these surfactants, those with benzene rings such as BKC and SDBS produced enhanced dispersion via non-covalent bonding interaction between CNTs and surfactants. Specifically, the surfactants were adsorbed onto the surface of functionalized MWCNTs, where they prevented re-aggregation of MWCNTs in the nanocomposites. Furthermore, the prepared CNTs reinforced nanocomposite membranes showed reduced methanol uptake values while the ion exchange capacity values were maintained. The enhanced properties, including thermal property of the CNTs reinforced PEMs with surfactants, could be applicable to fuel cell applications.

  5. Transient Performance Behavior of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell by Configuration of Membrane and Gas Diffusion Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sang Soon; Han, Sang Seok; Lee, Pil Hyong; Park, Bong Il

    A single-phase, fully three-dimensional transient numerical simulation was performed to analyze the dynamic response of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) with single serpentine flow channels. . In addition, the effects of the membrane and gas diffusion layer thickness on current density transient behavior were investigated using numerical simulation. An overshoot of current density is observed for all thicknesses of the membrane and gas diffusion layer at an abrupt change of operating voltage from 0.7 V to 0.5 V. The peak of the overshoot and the elapsed thickness time to reach to the steady state value increase with decreasing membrane thickness. It is thought that the thin membrane facilitates the transport of water and ions through the membrane, resulting in an increase in current density and humidification of the membrane. The elapsed time to reach steady state voltage become shorter and the peak of the overshoot decreases as the thickness of the gas diffusion layer decreases. We suggest that this occurs because a thick gas diffusion layer increases the distance between the current collector (as heat exchanger) and catalyst layer (as heat source), resulting in a low transport rate of heat generated by the electrochemical reaction at the catalyst layer.

  6. High-temperature supercapacitor with a proton-conducting metal pyrophosphate electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibino, Takashi; Kobayashi, Kazuyo; Nagao, Masahiro; Kawasaki, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Expanding the range of supercapacitor operation to temperatures above 100°C is important because this would enable capacitors to operate under the severe conditions required for next-generation energy storage devices. In this study, we address this challenge by the fabrication of a solid-state supercapacitor with a proton-conducting Sn0.95Al0.05H0.05P2O7 (SAPO)-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) composite electrolyte and a highly condensed H3PO4 electrode ionomer. At a temperature of 200°C, the SAPO-PTFE electrolyte exhibits a high proton conductivity of 0.02 S cm−1 and a wide withstanding voltage range of ±2 V. The H3PO4 ionomer also has good wettability with micropore-rich activated carbon, which realizes a capacitance of 210 F g−1 at 200°C. The resulting supercapacitor exhibits an energy density of 32 Wh kg−1 at 3 A g−1 and stable cyclability after 7000 cycles from room temperature to 150°C. PMID:25600936

  7. The Role of Cation/Proton Exchanger NHE9 in Synaptic Transmission & Autism

    OpenAIRE

    Ullman, Julia Collier

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are neurodevelopmental syndromes that affect an estimated 1.5 million people in the United States alone. While ASDs arising from single gene mutations are rare, the study of these conditions provides a powerful and effective approach toward understanding the molecular basis for ASD as well as normal social behaviors. Recently, the cation/hydrogen exchanger Nhe9 has surfaced as a locus for inherited autism, with mutations confirmed to abolish expression. In addi...

  8. The development and implementation of high-throughput tools for discovery and characterization of proton exchange membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Keith Gregory

    The need for sustainable energy use has motivated the exploration of renewable alternative fuels and fuel conversion technology on a global scale. Fuel cells, which convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy with high efficiency and low emissions, provide a promising strategy for achieving energy sustainability. The current progress in fuel cell commercialization is mainly in portable and stationary applications, but fuel cell technology for transportation applications, which make up a substantial portion of the global energy market, have seen little commercial success. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) have high potential for addressing the future energy needs of the transportation energy sector. However, one of the prevailing limitations of the PEMFC is the availability of high-performance, cost-effective electrolyte materials. These materials may be realized in the near future by developing multifunctional polymer blends targeted at specific performance capabilities. Since the number of available polymer combinations and numerous processing variations provide an almost infinite source of PEMFC membrane candidates, efficient methods of discovering high-performance PEM materials are necessary. Combinatorial methods meet these needs using gradient or discrete techniques to capture process variations such as annealing temperature, thickness, and chemical composition into a single polymer sample that serves as a library of materials. To characterize these heterogeneous samples for fuel cell performance, specific high-throughput measurement techniques are necessary. In this work, a high-throughput mass transport assay (HT-MTA) has been developed to characterize water flux and permeability at multiple sample locations in parallel. The functionality of HT-MTA was evaluated using standard NafionRTM films and a model semi-interpenetrated polymer network with commercial polyvinylidine fluoride as the host matrix for a proprietary polyelectrolyte

  9. Thermodynamics for proton binding of phytate in KNO{sub 3(aq)} at different temperatures and ionic strengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bretti, Clemente; De Stefano, Concetta, E-mail: cdestefano@unime.it; Lando, Gabriele; Sammartano, Silvio

    2013-08-20

    Highlights: • Protonation data were modeled in a wide range of temperatures and ionic strengths. • Protonation values decrease with increasing ionic strength and temperature. • In KNO{sub 3} proton binding process is slightly exothermic, but less than in NaCl. • The major contribution for the proton association is entropic in nature. • Results are in agreement with previous findings for KCl and NaCl. - Abstract: Potentiometric measurements were performed in KNO{sub 3(aq)}, to determine the apparent protonation constants of phytate at different temperatures (278.15 ≤ T (K) ≤ 323.15) and ionic strengths (0.25 ≤ I (mol) dm{sup −3} ≤ 3.0) values. In general, the protonation constants decrease with increasing both temperature and ionic strength. The data reported were critically compared with previous results obtained in KCl and the values are in a good agreement, considering the experimental errors and slight differences between the activity coefficients of the various species in KCl and KNO{sub 3}. Experimental data were then modeled as a function of temperature and ionic strength using, with comparable results, two approaches: the extended Debye–Hückel equation and the specific ion interaction theory (SIT). The single specific ion interaction coefficients, ε, were also determined. The corresponding values are higher than those in Na{sup +} media. The protonation constants were also analyzed considering a simplified weak interaction model using an empirical equation that contains an additional term which takes into account the formation of weak complexes. The results obtained for the modeling of the protonation constants are in agreement with the literature findings. Thermodynamic protonation parameters were also obtained at different temperatures and ionic strengths. The proton association process is slightly exothermic and the enthalpic contribution is less negative than that in NaCl solution. As observed in other cases for phytate anion, the

  10. Modeling the dynamic behavior of proton-exchange membrane fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llapade, Peter O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Davey, John R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Meyers, Jeremy P [UNIV OF TEXAS-AUSTIN

    2010-01-01

    A two-phase transient model that incorporates the permanent hysteresis observed in the experimentally measured capillary pressure of GDL has been developed. The model provides explanation for the difference in time constant between membrane hydration and dehydration observed in the HFR experiment conducted at LANL. When there is liquid water at the cathode catalyst layer, time constant of the water content in the membrane is closely tied to that of liquid water saturation in the CCL, as the vapor is already saturated. The water content in the membrane will not reach steady state as long as the liquid water flow in the CCL is not at steady state. Also, Increased resistance to proton transport in the membrane is observed when the cell voltage is stepped down to a very low value.

  11. Differences in proton pumping and Na/H exchange at the leaf cell tonoplast between a halophyte and a glycophyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katschnig, Diana; Jaarsma, Rinse; Almeida, Pedro; Rozema, Jelte; Schat, Henk

    2014-01-01

    The tonoplast Na+/H+ antiporter and tonoplast H+ pumps are essential components of salt tolerance in plants. The objective of this study was to investigate the transport activity of the tonoplast Na+/H+ antiporter and the tonoplast V-H+-ATPase and V-H+-PPase in a highly tolerant salt-accumulating halophyte, Salicornia dolichostachya, and to compare these transport activities with activities in the related glycophyte Spinacia oleracea. Vacuolar membrane vesicles were isolated by density gradient centrifugation, and the proton transport and hydrolytic activity of both H+ pumps were studied. Furthermore, the Na+/H+-exchange capacity of the vesicles was investigated by 9-amino-6-chloro-2-methoxyacridine fluorescence. Salt treatment induced V-H+-ATPase and V-H+-PPase activity in vesicles derived from S. oleracea, whereas V-H+-ATPase and V-H+-PPase activity in S. dolichostachya was not affected by salt treatment. Na+/H+-exchange capacity followed the same pattern, i.e. induced in response to salt treatment (0 and 200 mM NaCl) in S. oleracea and not influenced by salt treatment (10 and 200 mM NaCl) in S. dolichostachya. Our results suggest that S. dolichostachya already generates a high tonoplast H+ gradient at low external salinities, which is likely to contribute to the high cellular salt accumulation of this species at low external salinities. At high external salinities, S. dolichostachya showed improved growth compared with S. oleracea, but V-H+-ATPase, V-H+-PPase and Na+/H+-exchange activities were comparable between the species, which might imply that S. dolichostachya more efficiently retains Na+ in the vacuole. PMID:24887002

  12. Crystalline polyoxometalate (POM)–polyethylene glycol (PEG) composites aimed as non-humidified intermediate-temperature proton conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuboi, Masaki [Department of Basic Sciences, School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Hibino, Mitsuhiro; Mizuno, Noritaka [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Uchida, Sayaka, E-mail: csayaka@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Basic Sciences, School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); JST-PRESTO, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    Crystalline polyoxometalate (POM)–polyethylene glycol (PEG) composites aimed as non-humidified intermediate-temperature proton conductors were synthesized and characterized by single crystal and powder XRD, solid state MASNMR, and TG-DTA measurements. Among the POM–PEG composites, Cs{sub 2.7}H{sub 0.3}[PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}]·1.2PEG1000 (CsHPW-PEG1000) possessed one-dimensional channels with diameters of ca. 6 and 8 Å, where PEG probably resided, and showed the best performance as a proton conductor (1.2×10{sup −5} S cm{sup −1} at 443 K). Proton conductivities of POM–PEG composites decreased by the increase in molecular weights of PEG (CsHPW-PEG12,000) or anion charges (CsHSiW-PEG1000). Variable contact time {sup 13}C-CP (cross polarization) MASNMR revealed that local mobility (i.e., segmental motion) of PEG is related to the trends in proton conductivities. These results show that amount of acidic protons (H{sup +}) is not the primary factor in proton conduction and that segmental motion of PEG assists the proton hopping among POMs in the crystal lattice of POM–PEG composites. - Graphical abstract: Non-humidified intermediate-temperature proton conduction in crystalline polyoxometalate (POM)–polyethylene (PEG) composites are assisted by the segmental motion of PEG. - Highlights: • Crystalline polyoxometalate–polyethlene glycol (PEG) composites were synthesized. • CsHPW-PEG1000 possessed one-dimensional channels and showed the highest proton conductivity. • {sup 13}C CPMASNMR revealed that segmental motion of PEG is related to the proton conduction.

  13. Influence on Heat Transfer Coefficient of Heat Exchanger by Velocity and Heat Transfer Temperature Difference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Fang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aimed to insufficient heat transfer of heat exchanger, research the influence on the heat transfer coefficient impacted by velocity and heat transfer temperature difference of tube heat exchanger. According to the different heat transfer temperature difference and gas velocity,the experimental data were divided into group. Using the control variable method,the above two factors were analyzed separately. K一△T and k一:fitting curve were clone to obtain empirical function. The entire heat exchanger is as the study object,using numerical simulation methods,porous media,k一£model,second order upwind mode,and pressure一velocity coupling with SIMPLE algorithm,the entire heat exchanger temperature field and the heat transfer coefficient distribution were given. Finally the trend of the heat transfer coefficient effected by the above two factors was gotten.

  14. Ion-Exchange-Induced Selective Etching for the Synthesis of Amino-Functionalized Hollow Mesoporous Silica for Elevated-High-Temperature Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Liu, Jian; Lu, Shanfu; Zhu, Haijin; Aili, David; De Marco, Roland; Xiang, Yan; Forsyth, Maria; Li, Qingfeng; Jiang, San Ping

    2017-09-20

    As differentiated from conventional synthetic processes, amino-functionalized hollow mesoporous silica (NH2-HMS) has been synthesized using a new and facile strategy of ion-exchange-induced selective etching of amino-functionalized mesoporous silica (NH2-meso-silica) by an alkaline solution. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and in situ time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) reveal that ion-exchange-induced selective etching arises from the gradient distribution of OH- in the NH2-meso-silica nanospheres. Moreover, the ion-exchange-induced selective etching mechanism is verified through a successful synthesis of hollow mesoporous silica. After infiltration with phosphotungstic acid (PWA), PWA-NH2-HMS nanoparticles are dispersed in the poly(ether sulfone)-polyvinylpyrrolidone (PES-PVP) matrix, forming a hybrid PWA-NH2-HMS/PES-PVP nanocomposite membrane. The resultant nanocomposite membrane with an optimum loading of 10 wt % of PWA-NH2-HMS showed an enhanced proton conductivity of 0.175 S cm-1 and peak power density of 420 mW cm-2 at 180 °C under anhydrous conditions. Excellent durability of the hybrid composite membrane fuel cell has been demonstrated at 200 °C. The results of this study demonstrated the potential of the facile synthetic strategy in the fabrication of NH2-HMS with controlled mesoporous structure for application in nanocomposite membranes as a technology platform for elevated-temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

  15. Polypropylene (PP) based proton exchange membrane for use in fuel cell; Obtencao de membrana trocadora de protons para uso em celula a combustivel, a base de polipropileno (PP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zen, Heloisa Augusto

    2008-07-01

    The radiation-induced graft of styrene onto polypropylene (PP) films was carried out by simultaneous irradiation method in a cobalt-60 source. The PP films were immersed in a solution of styrene with toluene (1:1 and 4:1, v/v) under inert atmosphere and at room temperature and then submitted at 20, 40, 80 and 100 kGy. After graft reaction the films were kept at room temperature under inert atmosphere for periods of 7, 14, 21 and 28 days in order to evaluate the degree of grafting. At the end of each period the films were sulfonated to provide the hydrophilic property to PP. The degree of grafting (DOG) was gravimetric determined and the chemical changes in the grafted and sulfonated films were characterized by Infrared Spectroscopy, Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Differential Scanning Calorimetry and the Ion Exchange Capacity (IEC) was calculated. The greatest DOG was obtained after 21 days of post-irradiation. By TGA the grafted films exhibited a decrease in the thermal stability, while the sulfonated exhibited an increase. By DSC was possible to verify that matrix polymeric did not suffer any drastic change in the melting temperature after grafting and sulfonation reactions. The IEC calculated shows that the new membrane developed has ionic conductivity property. (author)

  16. PEE-PEO block copolymer exchange rate between micelles is detergent and temperature activated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schantz, Allen; Saboe, Patrick; Lee, Hee-Young; Sines, Ian; Butler, Paul; Bishop, Kyle; Maranas, Janna; Kumar, Manish

    We examine the kinetics of polymer chain exchange between polymer/detergent micelles, a system relevant to the synthesis of protein-containing biomimetic membranes. Although chain exchange between polymer aggregates in water is too slow to observe, adding detergent allows us to determine chain exchange rates using time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering (TR-SANS). We examine a membrane-protein-relevant, vesicle-forming ultra-short polymer, Poly(ethyl ethylene)20-Poly(ethylene oxide)18 (PEE20-PEO18). PEE20-PEO18 is solubilized in mixed micelles with the membrane-protein-compatible non-ionic detergent octyl- β -D-glucoside (OG). We show that OG activates block copolymer exchange, and obtain rate constants at two detergent concentrations above the CMC (critical micellar concentration) of OG. We find that chain exchange increases two orders of magnitude when temperature increases from 308 to 338 K, and that even a 1 mg/mL increase in OG concentration leads to a noticeable increase in exchange rate. We also calculate the activation energy for chain exchange and find that it is much higher than for lipid exchange. These findings explain the need for high detergent concentration and/or temperature to synthesize densely packed polymer/protein membranes.

  17. Doubling the critical current density of high temperature superconducting coated conductors through proton irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Y.; LeRoux, M.; Miller, D. J.; Wen, J. G.; Kwok, W. K.; Welp, U. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Rupich, M. W.; Li, X.; Sathyamurthy, S.; Fleshler, S.; Malozemoff, A. P. [American Superconductor Corp., 64 Jackson Road, Devens, Massachusetts 01434 (United States); Kayani, A. [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49008-5252 (United States); Ayala-Valenzuela, O.; Civale, L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS-K764, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2013-09-16

    The in-field critical current of commercial YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} coated conductors can be substantially enhanced by post-fabrication irradiation with 4 MeV protons. Irradiation to a fluence of 8 × 10{sup 16} p/cm{sup 2} induces a near doubling of the critical current in fields of 6 T || c at a temperature of 27 K, a field and temperature range of interest for applications, such as rotating machinery. A mixed pinning landscape of preexisting precipitates and twin boundaries and small, finely dispersed irradiation induced defects may account for the improved vortex pinning in high magnetic fields. Our data indicate that there is significant head-room for further enhancements.

  18. Hydrocarbon and partially fluorinated sulfonated copolymer blends as functional membranes for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, Natalie Y.; Harrison, William L.; Badami, Anand S.; Roy, Abhishek; Lane, Ozma; Cromer, Frank; Dong, Limin; McGrath, James E.

    Polymer blending is recognized as a valuable technique used to modify and improve the mechanical, thermal, and surface properties of two different polymers or copolymers. This paper investigated the solution properties and membrane properties of a biphenol-based disulfonated poly (arylene ether sulfone) random copolymer (BPS-35) with hexafluoroisopropylidene bisphenol based sulfonated poly (arylene ether sulfone) copolymers (6FSH) and an unsulfonated biphenol-based poly (arylene ether sulfone)s. The development of blended membranes with desirable surface characteristics, reduced water swelling and similar proton conductivity is presented. Polymer blends were prepared both in the sodium salt and acid forms from dimethylacetamide (DMAc). Water uptake, specific conductivity, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and contact angles were used to characterize the blended films. Surface enrichment of the fluorinated component is illustrated by an significant increase in the water-surface contact angle was observed when 10 wt.% 6FBPA-00 (106°) was added to BPS 35 (80°). Water weight gain was reduced by a factor of 2.

  19. Surface-fluorinated proton-exchange membrane with high electrochemical durability for direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Hyun; Lee, So Young; Lee, Young Moo; Lee, Sang Yun; Rhim, Ji Won; Lane, Ozma; McGrath, James E

    2009-05-01

    Random disulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone)-silica nanocomposite (FSPAES-SiO2) membranes were physicochemically tuned via surface fluorination. Surface fluorination for 30 min converted about 20% of the C-H bonds on the membrane surface into C-F bonds showing hydrophobicity and electronegativity at the same time. The membranes with hydrophobic surface properties showed high dimensional stability and low methanol permeability when hydrated for direct methanol fuel cell applications. In particular, the surface enrichment of fluorine atoms led to anisotropic swelling behavior, associated with a stable electrode interface formation. Interestingly, in spite of the use of a random copolymer as a polymer matrix, the low surface free energy of the C-F bonds induced a well-defined continuous ionic channel structure, similar to those of multiblock copolymers. In addition to the morphological transition, fluorine atoms with high electron-withdrawing capability promoted the dissociation of sulfonic acid (-SO3H) groups. Consequently, FSPAES-SiO2 membranes exhibited improved proton conductivity. Thus, FSPAES-SiO2 membranes exhibited significantly improved single-cell performances (about 200%) at a constant voltage of 0.4 V in comparison with those of Nafion 117 and nonfluorinated membranes. Surprisingly, their good electrochemical performances were maintained with very low nonrecovery loss over the time period of 1400 h and interfacial resistances 380% times lower than those of conventional membrane-electrode assemblies comprising the control hydrocarbon membrane and a Nafion binder for the electrodes.

  20. Determination of the efficiency of ethanol oxidation in a proton exchange membrane electrolysis cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altarawneh, Rakan M.; Majidi, Pasha; Pickup, Peter G.

    2017-05-01

    Products and residual ethanol in the anode and cathode exhausts of an ethanol electrolysis cell (EEC) have been analyzed by proton NMR and infrared spectrometry under a variety of operating conditions. This provides a full accounting of the fate of ethanol entering the cell, including the stoichiometry of the ethanol oxidation reaction (i.e. the average number of electrons transferred per ethanol molecule), product distribution and the crossover of ethanol and products through the membrane. The reaction stoichiometry (nav) is the key parameter that determines the faradaic efficiency of both EECs and direct ethanol fuel cells. Values determined independently from the product distribution, amount of ethanol consumed, and a simple electrochemical method based on the dependence of the current on the flow rate of the ethanol solution are compared. It is shown that the electrochemical method yields results that are consistent with those based on the product distribution, and based on the consumption of ethanol when crossover is accounted for. Since quantitative analysis of the cathode exhaust is challenging, the electrochemical method provides a valuable alternative for routine determination of nav, and hence the faradaic efficiency of the cell.

  1. Survey on the phase transitions and their effect on the ion-exchange and on the proton-conduction properties of a flexible and robust Zr phosphonate coordination polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, Ferdinando; Donnadio, Anna; Casciola, Mario

    2012-06-18

    The flexible zirconium tetraphosphonate coordination polymer with formula Zr(O(3)PCH(2))(2)N-C(6)H(10)-N(O(3)CH(2)P)(2)X(2-x)H(2+x)·nH(2)O (X = H, Li, Na, K, 0 metals hydroxides. 1 is a very robust coordination polymer because it can be regenerated in H- form using strong acid solutions and ri-exchanged several times without hydrolysis and loss of crystallinity. The flexibility of 1 has been also studied by means of TDXD (temperature dependent X-ray diffraction) evidencing remarkable phase transformations that lead to a different disposition of the water molecules. These transformations also influence the accessibility of the cations on the P-OH groups placed inside the channels and thus the ion-exchange properties. The dependence of the proton conductivity properties on these phase transitions has been also investigated and discussed.

  2. Review on the Recent Developments of Photovoltaic Thermal (PV/T and Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC Based Hybrid System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulkepli Afzam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Photovoltaic Thermal (PV/T system emerged as one of the convenient type of renewable energy system acquire the ability to generate power and thermal energy in the absence of moving parts. However, the power output of PV/T is intermittent due to dependency on solar irradiation condition. Furthermore, its efficiency decreases because of cells instability at high temperature. On the other hand, fuel cell co-generation system (CGS is another technology that can generate power and heat simultaneously. Integration of PV/T and fuel cell CGS could enhance the reliability and sustainability of both systems as well as increasing the overall system performance. Hence, this paper intended to present the parameters that affect performance of PV/T and Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC CGS. Moreover, recent developments on PV/T-fuel cell hybrid system are also presented. Based on literates, mass flow rate of moving fluid in PV/T was found to affect the system efficiency. For the PEMFC, when the heat is utilized, the system performance can be increased where the heat efficiency is similar to electrical efficiency which is about 50%. Recent developments of hybrid PV/T and fuel cell show that most of the studies only focus on the power generation of the system. There are less study on the both power and heat utilization which is indeed necessary in future development in term of operation strategy, optimization of size, and operation algorithm.

  3. Local potential evolutions during proton exchange membrane fuel cell operation with dead-ended anode - Part II: Aging mitigation strategies based on water management and nitrogen crossover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbou, S.; Dillet, J.; Maranzana, G.; Didierjean, S.; Lottin, O.

    2017-02-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells operate with dead-ended anode in order to reduce system cost and complexity when compared with hydrogen re-circulation systems. In the first part of this work, we showed that localized fuel starvation events may occur, because of water and nitrogen accumulation in the anode side, which could be particularly damaging to the cell performance. To prevent these degradations, the anode compartment must be purged which may lead to an overall system efficiency decrease because of significant hydrogen waste. In the second part, we present several purge strategies in order to minimize both hydrogen waste and membrane-electrode assembly degradations during dead-ended anode operation. A linear segmented cell with reference electrodes was used to monitor simultaneously the current density distribution along the gas channel and the time evolution of local anode and cathode potentials. To asses MEA damages, Platinum ElectroChemical Surface Area (ECSA) and cell performance were periodically measured. The results showed that dead-end mode operation with an anode plate maintained at a temperature 5 °C hotter than the cathode plate limits water accumulation in the anode side, reducing significantly purge frequency (and thus hydrogen losses) as well as MEA damages. As nitrogen contribution to hydrogen starvation is predominant in this thermal configuration, we also tested a microleakage solution to discharge continuously most the nitrogen accumulating in the anode side while ensuring low hydrogen losses and minimum ECSA losses provided the right microleakage flow rate is chosen.

  4. Design of Incremental Conductance Sliding Mode MPPT Control Applied by Integrated Photovoltaic and Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell System under Various Operating Conditions for BLDC Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jehun Hahm

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an integrated photovoltaic (PV and proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC system for continuous energy harvesting under various operating conditions for use with a brushless DC motor. The proposed scheme is based on the incremental conductance (IncCond algorithm combined with the sliding mode technique. Under changing atmospheric conditions, the energy conversion efficiency of a PV array is very low, leading to significant power losses. Consequently, increasing efficiency by means of maximum power point tracking (MPPT is particularly important. To manage such a hybrid system, control strategies need to be established to achieve the aim of the distributed system. Firstly, a Matlab/Simulink based model of the PV and PEMFC is developed and validated, as well as the incremental conductance sliding (ICS MPPT technique; then, different MPPT algorithms are employed to control the PV array under nonuniform temperature and insolation conditions, to study these algorithms effectiveness under various operating conditions. Conventional techniques are easy to implement but produce oscillations at MPP. Compared to these techniques, the proposed technique is more efficient; it produces less oscillation at MPP in the steady state and provides more precise tracking.

  5. Preparation and characterization of polymer blend based on sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone) and polyetherimide (SPEEK/PEI) as proton exchange membranes for fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashim, Nordiana; Ali, Ab Malik Marwan [Ionic Material and Devices Research Laboratory, Institute of Science, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam (Malaysia); Lepit, Ajis; Rasmidi, Rosfayanti [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA Sabah, Beg Berkunci 71, 88997 Kota Kinabalu (Malaysia); Subban, Ri Hanum Yahaya [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam (Malaysia); Institute of Science, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam (Malaysia); Yahya, Muhd Zu Azhan [Faculty of Defence Science & Technology, Universiti Pertahanan Nasional Malaysia, 57000 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-08-28

    Blends of sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) and polyetherimide (PEI) were prepared in five different weight ratios using N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) as solvent by the solution cast technique. The degree of sulfonation (DS) of the sulfonated PEEK was determined from deuterated dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO-d{sub 6}) solution of the purified polymer using {sup 1}H NMR method. The properties studied in the present investigation includes conductivity, water uptake, thermal stability and structure analysis of pure SPEEK as well as SPEEK-PEI polymer blend membranes. The experimental results show that the conductivity of the membranes increased with increase in temperature from 30 to 80°C, except for that of pure SPEEK membrane which increased with temperature from 30 to 60°C while its conductivity decreased with increasing temperature from 60 to 80°C. The conductivity of 70wt.%SPEEK-30wt.%PEI blend membrane at 80% relative humidity (RH) is found to be 1.361 × 10{sup −3} Scm{sup −1} at 30°C and 3.383 × 10{sup −3} Scm{sup −1} at 80°C respectively. It was also found that water uptake and thermal stability of the membranes slightly improved upon blending with PEI. Structure analysis was carried out using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy which revealed considerable interactions between sulfonic acid group of SPEEK and imide groups of PEI. Modification of SPEEK by blending with PEI shows good potential for improving the electrical and physical properties of proton exchange membranes.

  6. Issues associated with modelling of proton exchange membrane fuel cell by computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarek, Tomasz; Tsotridis, Georgios

    2017-03-01

    The objective of the current study is to highlight possible limitations and difficulties associated with Computational Fluid Dynamics in PEM single fuel cell modelling. It is shown that an appropriate convergence methodology should be applied for steady-state solutions, due to inherent numerical instabilities. A single channel fuel cell model has been taken as numerical example. Results are evaluated for quantitative as well qualitative points of view. The contribution to the polarization curve of the different fuel cell components such as bi-polar plates, gas diffusion layers, catalyst layers and membrane was investigated via their effects on the overpotentials. Furthermore, the potential losses corresponding to reaction kinetics, due to ohmic and mas transport limitations and the effect of the exchange current density and open circuit voltage, were also investigated. It is highlighted that the lack of reliable and robust input data is one of the issues for obtaining accurate results.

  7. Low stoichiometry operation of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell employing the interdigitated flow field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2012-01-01

    cell, and the only possibility to prevent membrane dry-out is to operate at or below 70 °C. The cell is generally better humidified at an elevated pressure, and here it is found that the cathode channels will become flooded when the operating temperature is too low, e.g. 70 °C, while membrane hydration...

  8. Heat exchanger design considerations for high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, C.F.; Vrable, D.L.; Van Hagan, T.H.; King, J.H.; Spring, A.H.

    1980-02-01

    Various aspects of the high-temperature heat exchanger conceptual designs for the gas turbine (HTGR-GT) and process heat (HTGR-PH) plants are discussed. Topics include technology background, heat exchanger types, surface geometry, thermal sizing, performance, material selection, mechanical design, fabrication, and the systems-related impact of installation and integration of the units in the prestressed concrete reactor vessel. The impact of future technology developments, such as the utilization of nonmetallic materials and advanced heat exchanger surface geometries and methods of construction, is also discussed.

  9. Sulfated Titania-Silica Reinforced Nafion Nanocomposite Membranes for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Sayeed, M D; Kim, Hee Jin; Gopalan, A I; Kim, Young Ho; Lee, Kwang-Pill; Choi, Sang-June

    2015-09-01

    Sulfated titania-silica (SO4(2-)-/TiO2-SiO2) composites were prepared by a sol-gel method with sulfate reaction and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The nanometric diameter and geometry of the sulfated titania-silica (STS) was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A small amount of the STS composite in the range of 0.5-3 wt% was then added as reinforcing into the Nafion membrane by water-assisted solution casting method to prepare STS reinforced Nafion nanocomposite membranes (STS-Nafion nanocomposite membranes). The additional functional groups, sulfate groups, of the nanocomposite membrane having more surface oxygenated groups enhanced the fuel cell membrane properties. The STS-Nafion nanocomposite membranes exhibited improved water uptake compared to that of neat Nafion membranes, whereas methanol uptake values were decreased dramatically improved thermal property of the prepared nanocomposite membranes were measured by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Furthermore, increased ion exchange capacity values were obtained by thermoacidic pretreatment of the nanocomposite membranes.

  10. Proton Adsorption Selectivity of Zeolites in Aqueous Media: Effect of Exchangeable Cation Species of Zeolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses Wazingwa Munthali

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The saturation of negative charges of zeolites by specific cations to modify their physicochemical and catalytic properties has broadened the applications of zeolites. The adsorption behavior of H+ to Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+ and Cs+-saturated Linde-type A, Na-P1, mordenite, X type and Y type zeolites was evaluated at different pH-pM, where pH-pM is equal to log {(M+/(H+} and M+ represents either Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, or Cs+. In all cases, with decreasing pH-pM, the amounts of alkali metal retention decreased due to the adsorption of H+ via cation exchange reaction. The adsorption selectivity of H+ into the zeolites had a negative correlation with the Si/Al ratio of the zeolites. In each zeolite species, Cs+-saturated zeolite showed the lowest H+ selectivity, and this suggested that Cs+ had the strongest adsorption energy in the alkali metal cations. The adsorption of H+ was strongly affected by diameter and hydration energy of the alkali metal cations, and was also affected by the framework type and Si/Al ratio of the zeolites. The adsorption of H+ into zeolites decreases the amount of cation retention other than with H+ and may cause the elution of Si and Al into aqueous solutions.

  11. Thermal and electrochemical durability of carbonaceous composites used as a bipolar plate of proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinumoto, Taro; Nagano, Keita; Tsumura, Tomoki; Toyoda, Masahiro

    Thermal and electrochemical durability of carbonaceous composite plates, which are made from graphite powders and a resin for use as bipolar plates of PEMFC (proton exchange membrane fuel cell), were investigated. The thermal durability was investigated by TG (thermal gravimetry) coupled with DTA (differential thermal analysis) technique under air up to 600 °C. A weight loss was significant over 300 °C, but the hydrophobicity was decreased after heated at 80 °C for 192 h. The electrochemical durability was investigated in 10 μmol dm -3 of hydrochloric acid solution under nitrogen or oxygen atmosphere by means of potential holding test from 0.8 to 1.5 V against RHE (reversible hydrogen electrode) at 80 °C. During the potential holding tests, CO 2 production due to the corrosion was quantified by a GC (gas-chromatography) and the production was detectable above 1.3 V irrespective with atmosphere; on the other hand, it was clarified from the contact angle measurements that the hydrophobicity was changed below 1.3 V. The results of this study showed that the carbonaceous composite plates were electrochemically degraded under PEMFC condition and were seriously degraded in URFC (unitized regenerative fuel cell) condition.

  12. Alumina-carbon nanofibers nanocomposites obtained by spark plasma sintering for proton exchange membrane fuel cell bipolar plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrell, A.; Torrecillas, R. [Centro de Investigacion en Nanomateriales y Nanotecnologia (CINN) Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Oviedo, Principado de Asturias, Parque Tecnologico de Asturias, Llanera Asturias (Spain); Rocha, V.G.; Fernandez, A. [ITMA Materials Technology, Parque Tecnologico de Asturias, Llanera Asturias (Spain)

    2012-08-15

    There is an increasing demand of multifunctional materials for a wide variety of technological developments. Bipolar plates for proton exchange membrane fuel cells are an example of complex functionality components that must show among other properties high mechanical strength, electrical, and thermal conductivity. The present research explored the possibility of using alumina-carbon nanofibers (CNFs) nanocomposites for this purpose. In this study, it was studied for the first time the whole range of powder compositions in this system. Homogeneous powders mixtures were prepared and subsequently sintered by spark plasma sintering. The materials obtained were thoroughly characterized and compared in terms of properties required to be used as bipolar plates. The control on material microstructure and composition allows designing materials where mechanical or electrical performances are enhanced. A 50/50 vol.% alumina-CNFs composite appears to be a very promising material for this kind of application. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Experimental study on the optimal purge duration of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell with a dead-ended anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Fen; Chen, Yong-Song

    2017-02-01

    When a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is operated with a dead-ended anode, impurities gradually accumulate within the anode, resulting in a performance drop. An anode purge is thereby ultimately required to remove impurities within the anode. A purge strategy comprises purge interval (valve closed) and purge duration (valve is open). A short purge interval causes frequent and unnecessary activation of the valve, whereas a long purge interval leads to excessive impurity accumulation. A short purge duration causes an incomplete performance recovery, whereas a long purge duration results in low hydrogen utilization. In this study, a series of experimental trials was conducted to simultaneously measure the hydrogen supply rate and power generation of a PEMFC at a frequency of 50 Hz for various operating current density levels and purge durations. The effect of purge duration on the cell's energy efficiency was subsequently analyzed and discussed. The results showed that the optimal purge duration for the PEMFC was approximately 0.2 s. Based on the results of this study, a methodical process for determining optimal purge durations was ultimately proposed for widespread application. Purging approximately one-fourth of anode gas can obtain optimal energy efficiency for a PEMFC with a dead-ended anode.

  14. Influence of the cathode architecture in the frequency response of self-breathing proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira-Aparicio, P.; Chaparro, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Self-breathing proton exchange membrane fuel cells are apparently simple devices, but efficient water management is critical for their performance. The cathode configuration should guarantee balanced rates between O2 accessibility from the circumventing air and H2O removal, and a good electric contact between catalyst layers and current collectors at the same time. By applying progressive modifications to the initial concept of a conventional PEMFC, the effect of the cathode architecture on cell performance has been analyzed. Frequency response analyses of the cell during steady-state potentiostatic stepping have yielded relevant information regarding limitations originated by the cathode impedance under high current load conditions. The primitive cell design has been optimized for self-breathing operation by means of this diagnostic tool. The thickness of the perforated plate in the cathode has been found to be one of the main factors contributing to limit oxygen accessibility when a high current load is demanded. Adequate cathode architecture is critical for reducing mass transport limitations in the catalytic layer and enhancing performance under self-breathing conditions.

  15. CO-Tolerant Pt–BeO as a Novel Anode Electrocatalyst in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyungjung Kwon

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Commercialization of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs requires less expensive catalysts and higher operating voltage. Substantial anodic overvoltage with the usage of reformed hydrogen fuel can be minimized by using CO-tolerant anode catalysts. Carbon-supported Pt–BeO is manufactured so that Pt particles with an average diameter of 4 nm are distributed on a carbon support. XPS analysis shows that a peak value of the binding energy of Be matches that of BeO, and oxygen is bound with Be or carbon. The hydrogen oxidation current of the Pt–BeO catalyst is slightly higher than that of a Pt catalyst. CO stripping voltammetry shows that CO oxidation current peaks at ~0.85 V at Pt, whereas CO is oxidized around 0.75 V at Pt–BeO, which confirms that the desorption of CO is easier in the presence of BeO. Although the state-of-the-art PtRu anode catalyst is dominant as a CO-tolerant hydrogen oxidation catalyst, this study of Be-based CO-tolerant material can widen the choice of PEMFC anode catalyst.

  16. Direct alcohol fuel cells: toward the power densities of hydrogen-fed proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanxin; Bellini, Marco; Bevilacqua, Manuela; Fornasiero, Paolo; Lavacchi, Alessandro; Miller, Hamish A; Wang, Lianqin; Vizza, Francesco

    2015-02-01

    A 2 μm thick layer of TiO2 nanotube arrays was prepared on the surface of the Ti fibers of a nonwoven web electrode. After it was doped with Pd nanoparticles (1.5 mgPd  cm(-2) ), this anode was employed in a direct alcohol fuel cell. Peak power densities of 210, 170, and 160 mW cm(-2) at 80 °C were produced if the cell was fed with 10 wt % aqueous solutions of ethanol, ethylene glycol, and glycerol, respectively, in 2 M aqueous KOH. The Pd loading of the anode was increased to 6 mg cm(-2) by combining four single electrodes to produce a maximum peak power density with ethanol at 80 °C of 335 mW cm(-2) . Such high power densities result from a combination of the open 3 D structure of the anode electrode and the high electrochemically active surface area of the Pd catalyst, which promote very fast kinetics for alcohol electro-oxidation. The peak power and current densities obtained with ethanol at 80 °C approach the output of H2 -fed proton exchange membrane fuel cells. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Hybrid approach combining multiple characterization techniques and simulations for microstructural analysis of proton exchange membrane fuel cell electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cetinbas, Firat C.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.; Kariuki, Nancy; De Andrade, Vincent; Fongalland, Dash; Smith, Linda; Sharman, Jonathan; Ferreira, Paulo; Rasouli, Somaye; Myers, Deborah J.

    2017-03-01

    The cost and performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells strongly depend on the cathode electrode due to usage of expensive platinum (Pt) group metal catalyst and sluggish reaction kinetics. Development of low Pt content high performance cathodes requires comprehensive understanding of the electrode microstructure. In this study, a new approach is presented to characterize the detailed cathode electrode microstructure from nm to μm length scales by combining information from different experimental techniques. In this context, nano-scale X-ray computed tomography (nano-CT) is performed to extract the secondary pore space of the electrode. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is employed to determine primary C particle and Pt particle size distributions. X-ray scattering, with its ability to provide size distributions of orders of magnitude more particles than TEM, is used to confirm the TEM-determined size distributions. The number of primary pores that cannot be resolved by nano-CT is approximated using mercury intrusion porosimetry. An algorithm is developed to incorporate all these experimental data in one geometric representation. Upon validation of pore size distribution against gas adsorption and mercury intrusion porosimetry data, reconstructed ionomer size distribution is reported. In addition, transport related characteristics and effective properties are computed by performing simulations on the hybrid microstructure.

  18. In-situ diagnostics and degradation mapping of a mixed-mode accelerated stress test for proton exchange membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yeh-Hung; Fly, Gerald W.

    2015-01-01

    With increasing availability of more durable membrane materials for proton exchange membrane fuel cells, there is a need for a more stressful test that combines chemical and mechanical stressors to enable accelerated screening of promising membrane candidates. Equally important is the need for in-situ diagnostic methods with sufficient spatial resolution that can provide insights into how membranes degrade to facilitate the development of durable fuel cell systems. In this article, we report an accelerated membrane stress test and a degradation diagnostic method that satisfy both needs. By applying high-amplitude cycles of electrical load to a fuel cell fed with low-RH reactant gases, a wide range of mechanical and chemical stressful conditions can be created within the cell which leads to rapid degradation of a mechanically robust Ion Power™ N111-IP membrane. Using an in-situ shorting/crossover diagnostic method on a segmented fuel cell fixture that provides 100 local current measurements, we are able to monitor the progression and map the degradation modes of shorting, thinning, and crossover leak over the entire membrane. Results from this test method have been validated by conventional metrics of fluoride release rates, physical crossover leak rates, pinhole mapping, and cross-sectional measurements.

  19. Effects of propylene, methyl methacrylate and isopropanol poisoning on spatial performance of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetenko, Tatyana V.; St-Pierre, Jean

    2018-02-01

    This paper studies the effects of propylene, methyl methacrylate (MMA) and isopropanol (IPA) in air on the spatial performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). The introduction of 100 ppm C3H6 into the oxidant stream resulted in a performance decrease of 130 mV at 1.0 A cm-2, whereas 20 ppm MMA caused a voltage loss of 80 mV. A moderate performance decline of 60 mV was detected in the presence of 5.3ṡ103 ppm IPA in air. Spatial electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) data showed an increase in charge and mass transfer resistances under exposure to C3H6 and MMA, although IPA did not affect the impedance. The observed PEMFC performances, local current redistributions and EIS data can be explained by the adsorption of contaminants on the Pt surface, their subsequent transformations, and their impacts on the electrochemical surface area and oxygen reduction mechanism. It was assumed that the studied contaminants were oxidized mainly to CO2 via electrochemical and chemical pathways under the operating conditions and at the cathode potential. Self-recovery of PEMFC performance was observed for each contaminant after halting its introduction into the air. Possible contaminant oxidation/reduction mechanisms and their correlations with spatial performance and EIS are presented and discussed.

  20. On controllability and system constraints of the linear models of proton exchange membrane and solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radisavljevic, Verica

    2011-10-01

    In this paper we first show that the linear models of proton exchange membrane (polymer electrolyte membrane, PEM) and solid oxide (SO) fuel cells, commonly used in power and energy literature, are not controllable. The source of uncontrollability is the equation for pressure of the water vapor that is only affected by the fuel cell current, which in fact is a disturbance in this system and cannot be controlled by the given model inputs: inlet molar flow rates of hydrogen and oxygen. Being uncontrollable these models are not good candidates for studying control of dynamic processes in PEM and SO fuel cells. However, due to their simplicity, they can be used in hybrid configurations with other energy producing devices such as photovoltaic (solar) cells, wind turbine, micro gas turbine, battery (ultra capacitor) to demonstrate some other phenomena, but not for control purposes unless the hybrid models formed in such hybrid configurations are controllable. Testing controllability of such hybrid models is mandatory. Secondly, we introduce some algebraic constraints that follow from the model dynamics and the Nernst open-loop fuel cell voltage formula. These constraints must be satisfied in simulation of considered fuel cell modes, for example, via MATLAB/Simulink or any other computer software package.

  1. Gas diffusion electrode based on electrospun Pani/CNF nanofibers hybrid for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hezarjaribi, M.; Jahanshahi, M.; Rahimpour, A.; Yaldagard, M.

    2014-03-01

    A novel hybrid system has been investigated based on polyaniline/carbon nanofiber (Pani/CNF) electrospun nanofibers for modification of gas diffusion electrode (GDE) in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). Pani/CNF hybrid nanofibers were synthesized directly on carbon paper by electrospinning method. For preparation of catalyst ink, 20 wt.% Pt/C electrocatalyst with a platinum loading of 0.4 mg cm-2 was prepared by polyol technique. SEM studies applied for morphological study of the modified GDE with hybrid nanofibers. This technique indicated that the electrospun nanofibers had a diameter of roughly 100 nm. XRD patterns also showed that the average size of Pt nanoparticles was about 2 nm. Subsequently, comparison of the hybrid electrode electrochemical behavior and 20 wt.% Pt/C commercial one was studied by cyclic voltammetry experiment. The electrochemical data indicated that the hybrid electrode exhibited higher current density (about 15 mA cm-2) and ESA (160 m2 gr-1) than commercial Pt/C with amount of about 10 mA cm-2 and 114 m2 gr-1, respectively. The results herein demonstrate that Pani/CNF nanofibers can be used as a good alternative electrode material for PEMFCs.

  2. Gas diffusion electrode based on electrospun Pani/CNF nanofibers hybrid for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hezarjaribi, M.; Jahanshahi, M., E-mail: mjahan@nit.ac.ir; Rahimpour, A.; Yaldagard, M.

    2014-03-01

    A novel hybrid system has been investigated based on polyaniline/carbon nanofiber (Pani/CNF) electrospun nanofibers for modification of gas diffusion electrode (GDE) in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). Pani/CNF hybrid nanofibers were synthesized directly on carbon paper by electrospinning method. For preparation of catalyst ink, 20 wt.% Pt/C electrocatalyst with a platinum loading of 0.4 mg cm{sup −2} was prepared by polyol technique. SEM studies applied for morphological study of the modified GDE with hybrid nanofibers. This technique indicated that the electrospun nanofibers had a diameter of roughly 100 nm. XRD patterns also showed that the average size of Pt nanoparticles was about 2 nm. Subsequently, comparison of the hybrid electrode electrochemical behavior and 20 wt.% Pt/C commercial one was studied by cyclic voltammetry experiment. The electrochemical data indicated that the hybrid electrode exhibited higher current density (about 15 mA cm{sup −2}) and ESA (160 m{sup 2} gr{sup −1}) than commercial Pt/C with amount of about 10 mA cm{sup −2} and 114 m{sup 2} gr{sup −1}, respectively. The results herein demonstrate that Pani/CNF nanofibers can be used as a good alternative electrode material for PEMFCs.

  3. Influence of various carbon nano-forms as supports for Pt catalyst on proton exchange membrane fuel cell performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Abha; Cheruvally, Gouri

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we discuss the influence of various carbon supports for Pt on proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell performance. Here, Pt supported on various carbon nano-forms [Pt/carbon black (Pt/CB), Pt/single-walled carbon nanotubes (Pt/SWCNT), Pt/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (Pt/MWCNT) and Pt/graphene (Pt/G)] are synthesized by a facile, single step, microwave-assisted, modified chemical reduction route. Their physical, chemical and electrochemical characteristics pertaining to oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalytic activity and stability in PEM fuel cell are studied in detail by various techniques and compared. The study shows that the different carbon supports does not significantly affect the Pt particle size during synthesis, but leads to different amount of defective sites in the carbon framework which influence both the availability of active metal nano-catalysts and metal-support interaction. In-situ electrochemical investigations reveal that the different carbon supports influence both ORR catalytic activity and stability of the catalyst. This is further corroborated by the demonstration of varying polarization characteristics on PEM fuel cell performance by different carbon supported Pt catalysts. This study reveals MWCNT as the most suitable carbon support for Pt catalyst, exhibiting high activity and stability for ORR in PEM fuel cell.

  4. Application of proton exchange membrane fuel cells for the monitoring and direct usage of biohydrogen produced by Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oncel, S.; Vardar-Sukan, F.

    Photo-biologically produced hydrogen by Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is integrated with a proton exchange (PEM) fuel cell for online electricity generation. To investigate the fuel cell efficiency, the effect of hydrogen production on the open circuit fuel cell voltage is monitored during 27 days of batch culture. Values of volumetric hydrogen production, monitored by the help of the calibrated water columns, are related with the open circuit voltage changes of the fuel cell. From the analysis of this relation a dead end configuration is selected to use the fuel cell in its best potential. After the open circuit experiments external loads are tested for their effects on the fuel cell voltage and current generation. According to the results two external loads are selected for the direct usage of the fuel cell incorporating with the photobioreactors (PBR). Experiments with the PEM fuel cell generate a current density of 1.81 mA cm -2 for about 50 h with 10 Ω load and 0.23 mA cm -2 for about 80 h with 100 Ω load.

  5. Compact Design of 10 kW Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Stack Systems with Microcontroller Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiaokang Ma

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, fuel, oxidant supply and cooling systems with microcontroller units (MCU are developed in a compact design to fit two 5 kW proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC stacks. At the initial stage, the testing facility of the system has a large volume (2.0 m × 2.0 m × 1.5 m with a longer pipeline and excessive control sensors for safe testing. After recognizing the performance and stability of stack, the system is redesigned to fit in a limited space (0.4 m × 0.5 m × 0.8 m. Furthermore, the stack performance is studied under different hydrogen recycling modes. Then, two similar 5 kW stacks are directly coupled with diodes to obtain a higher power output and safe operation. The result shows that the efficiency of the 5 kW stack is 43.46% with a purge period of 2 min with hydrogen recycling and that the hydrogen utilization rate µf is 66.31%. In addition, the maximum power output of the twin-coupled module (a power module with two stacks in electrical cascade/parallel arrangement is 9.52 kW.

  6. Numerical simulation and experimental validation of liquid water behaviors in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell cathode with serpentine channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Anh Dinh; Zhou, Biao; Shiu, Huan-Ruei; Lee, Chun-I.; Chang, Wen-Chen

    The volume-of-fluid (VOF) approach is one of the most promising methods of investigating water transport and water management in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). A general PEMFC model combined with the VOF method has been developed by our group to simulate the mechanisms of fluid flows, mass and heat transport, and electrochemical reactions in a PEMFC, and it is necessary to validate the numerical model through experiments. In this paper, both the numerical model and an experimental visualization that can simulate the motion and transport behavior of liquid water in a cathode flow channel of a PEMFC are presented. Direct optical visualization is used in this work to capture the droplets' motions with high spatial and temporal resolutions. The numerical model and experimental setup have similar geometric dimensions and operating conditions, and the results of the experiment are in good agreement with numerical simulations. Moreover, the physics of droplet and liquid water behavior based on certain material and liquid properties and the operating conditions in the fuel cell channel are also addressed. This analysis also offers some basic understanding of the mechanism of liquid droplet dynamics in numerical and experimental studies of micro-fluidics.

  7. Channel aspect ratio effect for serpentine proton exchange membrane fuel cell: Role of sub-rib convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Dong; Duan, Yuan-Yuan; Yan, Wei-Mon; Lee, Duu-Jong; Su, Ay; Chi, Pei-Hung

    A complete three-dimensional, two-phase, non-isothermal model for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells was used to investigate the effect of the sub-rib convection on the performances for the single and triple serpentine flow fields at various channel aspect ratios and different thermal constraints. The occurrence of sub-rib convection, which is affected by the serpentine flow field, significantly influences the cell performance if the oxygen supply or membrane moisture content was limited. For single serpentine flow field in which sub-rib convection presents under all ribs, changing channel aspect ratio has minimal effects on cell performance since the oxygen supply is sufficient. For triple serpentine flow field or for serpentine cell with poor external heat loss, owing to limited sub-rib convection or to low membrane moisture content, decrease in channel aspect ratio significantly enhances cell performance. Blocking up the sub-rib convection markedly reduces cell performance. Flow field design for PEM fuel cell should take into consideration the effects of sub-rib convection flow on cell performance.

  8. Highly Stable and Active Pt/Nb-TiO2 Carbon-Free Electrocatalyst for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhui Sun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The current materials used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs are not sufficiently durable for commercial deployment. One of the major challenges lies in the development of an inexpensive, efficient, and highly durable and active electrocatalyst. Here a new type of carbon-free Pt/Nb-TiO2 electrocatalyst has been reported. Mesoporous Nb-TiO2 hollow spheres were synthesized by the sol-gel method using polystyrene (PS sphere templates. Pt nanoparticles (NPs were then deposited onto mesoporous Nb-TiO2 hollow spheres via a simple wet-chemical route in aqueous solution, without the need for surfactants or potentiostats. The growth densities of Pt NPs on Nb-TiO2 supports could be easily modulated by simply adjusting the experimental parameters. Electrochemical studies of Pt/Nb-TiO2 show much enhanced activity and stability than commercial E-TEK Pt/C catalyst. PtNP/Nb-TiO2 is a promising new cathode catalyst for PEMFC applications.

  9. Modeling two-phase flow in three-dimensional complex flow-fields of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinyong; Luo, Gang; Wang, Chao-Yang

    2017-10-01

    3D fine-mesh flow-fields recently developed by Toyota Mirai improved water management and mass transport in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell stacks, suggesting their potential value for robust and high-power PEM fuel cell stack performance. In such complex flow-fields, Forchheimer's inertial effect is dominant at high current density. In this work, a two-phase flow model of 3D complex flow-fields of PEMFCs is developed by accounting for Forchheimer's inertial effect, for the first time, to elucidate the underlying mechanism of liquid water behavior and mass transport inside 3D complex flow-fields and their adjacent gas diffusion layers (GDL). It is found that Forchheimer's inertial effect enhances liquid water removal from flow-fields and adds additional flow resistance around baffles, which improves interfacial liquid water and mass transport. As a result, substantial improvements in high current density cell performance and operational stability are expected in PEMFCs with 3D complex flow-fields, compared to PEMFCs with conventional flow-fields. Higher current density operation required to further reduce PEMFC stack cost per kW in the future will necessitate optimizing complex flow-field designs using the present model, in order to efficiently remove a large amount of product water and hence minimize the mass transport voltage loss.

  10. Energy dispersive X-ray diffraction applied to laboratory investigation on proton exchange membrane water content in working fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isopo, A.; Rossi Albertini, V. [Istituto di Struttura della Materia - CNR, Roma (Italy); Nobili, F. [Scuola di Scienze e Tecnologie - Sezione Chimica, Universita degli Studi di Camerino (Italy)

    2012-10-15

    An original method, based on the energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction, has been recently proposed as a possible laboratory tool to accomplish long time resolved investigation of the water content in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell. However, this method has never been applied to a real working fuel cell. Therefore, a clear comprehension of its effectiveness in terms of relevant parameters such as time and space resolution, sensitivity, and reproducibility has not yet been achieved. In this paper, all these aspects are discussed and clarified. In order to focus on the method overall effectiveness and on the extent of possible improvements, a basic experimental configuration for both the electrochemical station and the X-ray equipment has been set. The method is described with particular attention to its operating principle and to the evaluation of the errors introduced in data assessment. Finally, applications to some model experiments, in particular working states of the device, are provided and the obtained results are discussed. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Dynamic environmental transmission electron microscopy observation of platinum electrode catalyst deactivation in a proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kenta; Xudong, Zhang; Bright, Alexander N; Saitoh, Koh; Tanaka, Nobuo

    2013-02-15

    Spherical-aberration-corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy (AC-ETEM) was applied to study the catalytic activity of platinum/amorphous carbon electrode catalysts in proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). These electrode catalysts were characterized in different atmospheres, such as hydrogen and air, and a conventional high vacuum of 10(-5) Pa. A high-speed charge coupled device camera was used to capture real-time movies to dynamically study the diffusion and reconstruction of nanoparticles with an information transfer down to 0.1 nm, a time resolution below 0.2 s and an acceleration voltage of 300 kV. With such high spatial and time resolution, AC-ETEM permits the visualization of surface-atom behaviour that dominates the coalescence and surface-reconstruction processes of the nanoparticles. To contribute to the development of robust PEMFC platinum/amorphous carbon electrode catalysts, the change in the specific surface area of platinum particles was evaluated in hydrogen and air atmospheres. The deactivation of such catalysts during cycle operation is a serious problem that must be resolved for the practical use of PEMFCs in real vehicles. In this paper, the mechanism for the deactivation of platinum/amorphous carbon electrode catalysts is discussed using the decay rate of the specific surface area of platinum particles, measured first in a vacuum and then in hydrogen and air atmospheres for comparison.

  12. Ion temperatures in HIP-1 and SUMMA from charge-exchange neutral optical emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patch, R. W.; Lauver, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    Ion temperatures were obtained from observations of the H sub alpha, D sub alpha, and He 587.6 nm lines emitted from hydrogen, deuterium, and helium plasmas in the SUMMA and HIP-1 mirror devices at Lewis Research Center. Steady state discharges were formed by applying a radially inward dc electric field between cylindrical or annular anodes and hollow cathodes located at the peaks of the mirrors. The ion temperatures were found from the Doppler broadening of the charge-exchange components of spectral lines. A statistical method was developed for obtaining scaling relations of ion temperature as a function of current, voltage, and magnetic flux density. Derivations are given that take into account triangular monochromator slit functions, loss cones, and superimposed charge-exchange processes. In addition, the Doppler broadening was found to be sensitive to the influence of drift on charge-exchange cross section. The effects of finite ion-cyclotron radius, cascading, and delayed emission are reviewed.

  13. Dynamic Simulation of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell System For Automotive Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabbani, Raja Abid; Rokni, Masoud

    2012-01-01

    are implemented into the code and are based on adopted mathematical models describing the voltages and current densities and their dependence on operating pressures, temperatures and stoichiometric ratios of the reactant gases. As a result, this model can predict both steady and transient states. The model...... and operating conditions. Simulation results for system start-up and variable loads are discussed. Results for system efficiency, auxiliary power consumption, feed flow effects and water crossover are presented. Transitory effects of liquid water saturation at cathode are also determined. This study can provide...

  14. Water management in a single cell proton exchange membrane fuel cells with a serpentine flow field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Nik Suhaimi Mat; Daud, Wan Ramli Wan; Sopian, Kamaruzzaman; Sahari, Jaafar

    Gas and water management is the key to achieving good performance from a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack. Imbalance between production and evaporation rates can result in either flooding of the electrodes or membrane dehydration, both of which severely limit fuel cell performance. In the present study, a mathematical model was developed to evaluate moisture profiles of hydrogen and air flows in the flow field channels of both the anode and the cathode. For model validation, a single fuel cell was designed with an active area of 200 cm 2. Six humidity sensors were installed in the flow fields of both the anode and the cathode at 457 mm, 1266 mm and 2532 mm from the inlets. The experiment was performed using an Arbin Fuel Cell Test Station. The temperature was varied (25 °C, 40 °C, 50 °C and 60 °C), while hydrogen and air velocities were fixed at 3 L min -1 and 6 L min -1, respectively, during the operation of the single cell. The feed relative humidity at the anode was fixed at 1.0, while the feed relative humidity at the cathode was fixed at 0.005 (dry air). All humidity sensor readings were taken at steady state after 2 h of operation. Model predictions were then compared with experimental results by using the least squares algorithm. The moisture content was found to decrease along the flow field at the anode, but to increase at the cathode. The moisture content profile at the anode was shown to depend on the moisture Peclet number, which decreased with temperature. On the other hand, the moisture profile at the cathode was shown to depend on both the Peclet number and the Damkohler number. The trend of the Peclet number in the cathode followed closely that of the anode. The Damkohler number decreased with temperature, indicating increasing moisture mass transfer with temperature. The moisture profile models were successfully validated by the published data of the estimated overall mass transfer coefficient and moisture effective

  15. Influence of Silica/Sulfonated Polyether-Ether Ketone as Polymer Electrolyte Membrane for Hydrogen Fueled Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Handayani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The operation of non-humidified condition of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC using composite sPEEK-silica membrane is reported. Sulfonated membrane of PEEK is known as hydrocarbon polyelectrolyte membrane for PEMFC and direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC. The state of the art of fuel cells is based on the perluorosulfonic acid membrane (Nafion. Nafion has been the most used in both PEMFC and DMFC due to good performance although in low humidified condition showed poor current density. Here we reported the effect of silica in hydrocarbon sPEEK membrane that contributes for a better water management system inside the cell, and showed 0.16 W/cm2 of power density which is 78% higher than that of non-silica modified [Keywords: composite membrane, polyether-ether ketone, silica, proton exchange membrane fuel cell].

  16. Surface area loss mechanisms of Pt3Co nanocatalysts in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouli, S.; Ortiz Godoy, R. A.; Yang, Z.; Gummalla, M.; Ball, S. C.; Myers, D.; Ferreira, P. J.

    2017-03-01

    Pt3Co catalyst nanoparticles of 4.9 nm size present on the cathode side of a PEMFC membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy after 10 K voltage cycles under different operating conditions. The operating conditions include baseline (0.4-0.95 V, 80° C, 100% Relative Humidity (RH)), high potential (0.4-1.05 V, 80° C, 100% RH), high temperature (0.4-0.95 V, 90° C, 100% RH), and low humidity (0.4-0.95 V, 80° C, 30% RH). Particle growth and particle loss to the membrane is more severe in the high potential sample than in the high temperature and baseline MEAs, while no significant particle growth and particle precipitation in the membrane can be observed in the low humidity sample. Particles with different morphologies were seen in the cathode including: 1-Spherical individual particles resulting from modified electro-chemical Ostwald ripening and 2-aggregated and coalesced particles resulting from either necking of two or more particles or preferential deposition of Pt between particles with consequent bridging. The difference in the composition of these morphologies results in composition variations through the cathode from cathode/diffusion media (DM) to the cathode/membrane interface.

  17. Effect of heat treatment on the activity and stability of carbon supported PtMo alloy electrocatalysts for hydrogen oxidation in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ayaz; Carreras, Alejo; Trincavelli, Jorge; Ticianelli, Edson Antonio

    2014-02-01

    The effect of heat treatment on the activity, stability and CO tolerance of PtMo/C catalysts was studied, due to their applicability in the anode of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). To this purpose, a carbon supported PtMo (60:40) alloy electrocatalyst was synthesized by the formic acid reduction method, and samples of this catalyst were heat-treated at various temperatures ranging between 400 and 700 °C. The samples were characterized by temperature programmed reduction (TPR), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), cyclic voltammetry (CV), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WDS). Cyclic voltammetry was used to study the stability, and polarization curves were used to investigate the performance of all materials as CO tolerant anode on a PEM single cell text fixture. The catalyst treated at 600 °C, for which the average crystallite size was 16.7 nm, showed the highest hydrogen oxidation activity in the presence of CO, giving an overpotential induced by CO contamination of 100 mV at 1 Acm-2. This catalyst also showed a better stability up to 5000 potential cycles of cyclic voltammetry, as compared to the untreated catalyst. CV, SEM and WDS results indicated that a partial dissolution of Mo and its migration/diffusion from the anode to the cathode occurs during the single cell cycling. Polarization results showed that the catalytic activity and the stability can be improved by a heat treatment, in spite of a growth of the catalyst particles.

  18. Low-temperature TCT characterization of heavily proton irradiated p-type magnetic Czochralski silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Härkönen, J; Luukka, P; Kassamakov, I; Autioniemi, M; Tuominen, E; Sane, P; Pusa, P; Räisänen, J; Eremin, V; Verbitskaya, E; Li, Z

    2007-01-01

    n+/p−/p+ pad detectors processed at the Microelectronics Center of Helsinki University of Technology on boron-doped p-type high-resistivity magnetic Czochralski (MCz-Si) silicon substrates have been investigated by the transient current technique (TCT) measurements between 100 and 240 K. The detectors were irradiated by 9 MeV protons at the Accelerator Laboratory of University of Helsinki up to 1 MeV neutron equivalent fluence of 2×1015 n/cm2. In some of the detectors the thermal donors (TD) were introduced by intentional heat treatment at 430 °C. Hole trapping time constants and full depletion voltage values were extracted from the TCT data. We observed that hole trapping times in the order of 10 ns were found in heavily (above 1×1015 neq/cm2) irradiated samples. These detectors could be fully depleted below 500 V in the temperature range of 140–180 K.

  19. High Efficiency Heat Exchanger for High Temperature and High Pressure Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sienicki, James J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Lv, Qiuping [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Moisseytsev, Anton [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division

    2017-09-29

    CompRex, LLC (CompRex) specializes in the design and manufacture of compact heat exchangers and heat exchange reactors for high temperature and high pressure applications. CompRex’s proprietary compact technology not only increases heat exchange efficiency by at least 25 % but also reduces footprint by at least a factor of ten compared to traditional shell-and-tube solutions of the same capacity and by 15 to 20 % compared to other currently available Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger (PCHE) solutions. As a result, CompRex’s solution is especially suitable for Brayton cycle supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) systems given its high efficiency and significantly lower capital and operating expenses. CompRex has already successfully demonstrated its technology and ability to deliver with a pilot-scale compact heat exchanger that was under contract by the Naval Nuclear Laboratory for sCO2 power cycle development. The performance tested unit met or exceeded the thermal and hydraulic specifications with measured heat transfer between 95 to 98 % of maximum heat transfer and temperature and pressure drop values all consistent with the modeled values. CompRex’s vision is to commercialize its compact technology and become the leading provider for compact heat exchangers and heat exchange reactors for various applications including Brayton cycle sCO2 systems. One of the limitations of the sCO2 Brayton power cycle is the design and manufacturing of efficient heat exchangers at extreme operating conditions. Current diffusion-bonded heat exchangers have limitations on the channel size through which the fluid travels, resulting in excessive solid material per heat exchanger volume. CompRex’s design allows for more open area and shorter fluid proximity for increased heat transfer efficiency while sustaining the structural integrity needed for the application. CompRex is developing a novel improvement to its current heat exchanger design where fluids are directed to alternating

  20. Synthesis and Characterization of Hydrophobic-Hydrophilic  Multiblock Copolymers for Proton Exchange Membrane and Segmented Copolymer Precursors for Reverse Osmosis Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Mehta, Ishan

    2014-01-01

    High performance engineering materials, poly(arylene ether)s, having very good mechanical properties, excellent oxidative and hydrolytic stability are promising candidates for alternative materials used in the field of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs) and Reverse Osmosis (RO) applications. In particular, wholly aromatic sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone)s are of considerable interest in the field of PEMFCs and RO, due to their affordability, high Tg, and the ease of sulfonatio...

  1. A COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS ANALYSIS OF AIR FLOW THROUGH A TELECOM BACK-UP UNIT POWERED BY AN AIR-COOLED PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE FUEL CELL

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Xin; Berning, Torsten; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2016-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC’s) are currently being commercialized for various applications ranging from automotive to stationary such as powering telecom back-up units. In PEMFC’s, oxygen from air is internally combined with hydrogen to form water and produce electricity and heat. This product heat has to be effectively removed from the fuel cell, and while automotive fuel cells are usually liquid-cooled using a secondary coolant loop similar to the internal combustion engines,...

  2. Protonation of carboxyl groups in EuDOTA-tetraamide complexes results in catalytic prototropic exchange and quenching of the CEST signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Evbuomwan, Osasere M.; Tieu, Michael; Zhao, Piyu; Martins, Andre F.; Sherry, A. Dean

    2017-10-01

    The CEST properties of EuDOTA-tetraamide complexes bearing pendant carboxylate and carboxyl ethyl esters were measured as a function of pH. The CEST signal from the Eu3+-bound water molecule decreased in intensity between pH 8.5 and 4.5 while the proton exchange rates (kex) increased over this same pH range. In comparison, the CEST signal in the corresponding carboxyl ester derivatives was nearly constant. Both observations are consistent with stepwise protonation of the four carboxylic acid groups over this same pH range. This indicates that negative charges on the carboxyl groups above pH 6 facilitate the formation of a strong hydrogen-bonding network in the coordination second sphere above the single Eu3+-bound water molecule, thereby decreasing prototropic exchange of protons on the bound water molecule with bulk water protons. The percentage of square antiprismatic versus twisted square antiprism coordination isomers also decreased as the appended carboxylic acid groups were positioned further away from the amide. The net effect of lowering the pH was an overall increase in kex and a quenching of the CEST signal. This article is part of the themed issue 'Challenges for chemistry in molecular imaging'.

  3. Synthesis, crystal structure, and H/D exchange of the inside protonated form of the cage imine 4,8,12-triaza-1-azoniatricyclo[6.6.3.2(4,12)]nonadec-1(15)-ene. A model for proton transfer through an aliphatic membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, Johan; Nielsen, Bente; Olsen, Carl Erik

    2002-01-01

    , which gave K-im = 1.57(1) x 10(-5) M at 25 degreesC, DeltaSdegrees = -83(1) J mol(-1) K-1 and DeltaHdegrees = 2,6(3) kJ mol(-1) at 1 = 1.0 M (NaCl). The inside coordinated proton in 3 is labile in basic solution and the rate for NH/ND exchange was determined by H-1 NMR at three different temperatures....... The reaction followed the expression k(obs) = k(ex)[OD-] with k(ex) = 0.0978(30) dm(3) mol (1) s(-1) at 25 degreesC, DeltaSdegrees = 87(4) J mol(-1) K-1, and DeltaHdegrees = 104.9(11) kJ mol(-1) at I = 1.0 M (NaCl). The exchange rate is more than 5 x 106 times faster than that of the parent saturated cage 1....... In basic solution the imine reacts fast to give a quantitative formation of the inside protonated form of the hemiaminal 1,4,8,12-tetraazatricyclo[6.6.3,2(4.12)]nonadecan-5-ol (3). The equilibrium constant K-im = [3][H+]/[2] was determined at three different temperatures from potentiometric measurements...

  4. Demonstrating hydrogen production from ammonia using lithium imide - Powering a small proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Hazel M. A.; Makepeace, Joshua W.; Wood, Thomas J.; Mylius, O. Simon; Kibble, Mark G.; Nutter, Jamie B.; Jones, Martin O.; David, William I. F.

    2016-10-01

    Accessing the intrinsic hydrogen content within ammonia, NH3, has the potential to play a very significant role in the future of a CO2-free sustainable energy supply. Inexpensive light metal imides and amides are effective at decomposing ammonia to hydrogen and nitrogen (2NH3 → 3H2 + N2), at modest temperatures, and thus represent a low-cost approach to on-demand hydrogen production. Building upon this discovery, this paper describes the integration of an ammonia cracking unit with a post-reactor gas purification system and a small-scale PEM fuel cell to create a first bench-top demonstrator for the production of hydrogen using light metal imides.

  5. Efficiency of Adaptive Temperature-Based Replica Exchange for Sampling Large-Scale Protein Conformational Transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weihong; Chen, Jianhan

    2013-06-11

    Temperature-based replica exchange (RE) is now considered a principal technique for enhanced sampling of protein conformations. It is also recognized that existence of sharp cooperative transitions (such as protein folding/unfolding) can lead to temperature exchange bottlenecks and significantly reduce the sampling efficiency. Here, we revisit two adaptive temperature-based RE protocols, namely, exchange equalization (EE) and current maximization (CM), that were previously examined using atomistic simulations (Lee and Olson, J. Chem. Physics2011, 134, 24111). Both protocols aim to overcome exchange bottlenecks by adaptively adjusting the simulation temperatures, either to achieve uniform exchange rates (in EE) or to maximize temperature diffusion (CM). By designing a realistic yet computationally tractable coarse-grained protein model, one can sample many reversible folding/unfolding transitions using conventional constant temperature molecular dynamics (MD), standard REMD, EE-REMD, and CM-REMD. This allows rigorous evaluation of the sampling efficiency, by directly comparing the rates of folding/unfolding transitions and convergence of various thermodynamic properties of interest. The results demonstrate that both EE and CM can indeed enhance temperature diffusion compared to standard RE, by ∼3- and over 10-fold, respectively. Surprisingly, the rates of reversible folding/unfolding transitions are similar in all three RE protocols. The convergence rates of several key thermodynamic properties, including the folding stability and various 1D and 2D free energy surfaces, are also similar. Therefore, the efficiency of RE protocols does not appear to be limited by temperature diffusion, but by the inherent rates of spontaneous large-scale conformational rearrangements. This is particularly true considering that virtually all RE simulations of proteins in practice involve exchange attempt frequencies (∼ps(-1)) that are several orders of magnitude faster than the

  6. Three order state space modeling of proton exchange membrane fuel cell with energy function definition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becherif, M. [University of Technology of Belfort-Montbeliard, SeT-FCLab, UTBM, 90010 Belfort Cedex (France); Hissel, D. [University of Franche Comte, FEMTO-ST/FCLab, UMR CNRS 6174, 90010 Belfort Cedex (France); Gaagat, S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, IIT Guwahati, Assam (India); Wack, M. [SeT, UTBM, 90010 Belfort Cedex (France)

    2010-10-01

    The fuel cell is a complex system which is the centre of a lot of multidisciplinary research activities since it involves intricate application of various fields of study. The operation of a fuel cell depends on a wide range of parameters. The effect of one cannot be studied in isolation without disturbing the system which makes it very difficult to comprehend, analyze and predict various phenomena occurring in the fuel cell. In the current work, we present an equivalent electrical circuit of the pneumatics and fluidics in a fuel cell stack. The proposed model is based on the physical phenomena occurring inside fuel cell stack where we define the fluidic-electrical and pneumatic-electrical analogy. The effect of variation in temperature and relative humidity on the cell are considered in this model. The proposed model, according to the considered hypothesis, is a simple three order state space model which is suitable for the control purpose where a desired control structure can be formulated for high-end applications of the fuel cell as a subpart of a larger system, for instance, in hybrid propulsion of vehicles coupled with batteries and supercapacitors. Another key point of our work is the definition of the natural fuel cell stack energy function. The circuit analysis equations are presented and the simulated model is validated using the experimental data obtained using the fuel cell test bench available in Fuel Cell Laboratory, France. (author)

  7. Perfluoropolyether-functionalized gas diffusion layers for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gola, Massimo; Sansotera, Maurizio; Navarrini, Walter; Bianchi, Claudia L.; Gallo Stampino, Paola; Latorrata, Saverio; Dotelli, Giovanni

    2014-07-01

    Linear perfluoropolyether (PFPE) peroxide was used to confer superhydrophobic surface properties to gas diffusion layer (GDL) by means of direct functionalization of a GDL based on carbon cloth (CC) material. The thermal decomposition of a linear PFPE peroxide produces linear PFPE radicals that covalently bond the unsaturated moieties on the surface. Perfluorinated radicals are directly and covalently bound to the carbonaceous structure of the CC without any spacer that could decrease both thermal and chemical stability of the GDL. The obtained CC hydrophobicity exceeded the superhydrophobicity threshold and was enduringly stable. The relationship between the linkage of fluorinated chains and the variations of surface chemical-physical properties were studied combining X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), resistivity measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and contact angle measurements. Despite the excellent insulating properties of the PFPE polymer, the functionalized carbonaceous materials substantially retained their conductive properties. The PFPE-modified GDLs were tested in a single fuel cell at the lab scale. The cell tests were run at two temperatures (60 °C and 80 °C) with a relative humidity (RH) of hydrogen and air feeding gases equal to 80/100% and 60/100%, respectively.

  8. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell degradation: A parametric analysis using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozden, Ender; Tari, Ilker

    2016-02-01

    A Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cell is numerically investigated both as fresh and as degraded with the help of observed degradation patterns reported in the literature. The fresh fuel cell model is validated and verified with the data from the literature. Modifying the model by varying the parameters affected by degradation, a degraded PEM fuel cell model is created. The degraded fuel cell is parametrically analyzed by using a commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software. The investigated parameters are the membrane equivalent weight, the Catalyst Layer (CL) porosity and viscous resistance, the Gas Diffusion Layer (GDL) porosity and viscous resistance, and the bipolar plate contact resistance. It is shown for the first time that PEM fuel cell overall degradation can be numerically estimated by combining experimental data from degraded individual components. By comparing the simulation results for the fresh and the degraded PEM fuel cells for two years of operation, it is concluded that the effects of overall degradation on cell potential is significant - estimated to be 17% around the operating point of the fuel cell at 0.95 V open circuit voltage and 70 °C operating temperature.

  9. Three order state space modeling of proton exchange membrane fuel cell with energy function definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becherif, M.; Hissel, D.; Gaagat, S.; Wack, M.

    The fuel cell is a complex system which is the centre of a lot of multidisciplinary research activities since it involves intricate application of various fields of study. The operation of a fuel cell depends on a wide range of parameters. The effect of one cannot be studied in isolation without disturbing the system which makes it very difficult to comprehend, analyze and predict various phenomena occurring in the fuel cell. In the current work, we present an equivalent electrical circuit of the pneumatics and fluidics in a fuel cell stack. The proposed model is based on the physical phenomena occurring inside fuel cell stack where we define the fluidic-electrical and pneumatic-electrical analogy. The effect of variation in temperature and relative humidity on the cell are considered in this model. The proposed model, according to the considered hypothesis, is a simple three order state space model which is suitable for the control purpose where a desired control structure can be formulated for high-end applications of the fuel cell as a subpart of a larger system, for instance, in hybrid propulsion of vehicles coupled with batteries and supercapacitors. Another key point of our work is the definition of the natural fuel cell stack energy function. The circuit analysis equations are presented and the simulated model is validated using the experimental data obtained using the fuel cell test bench available in Fuel Cell Laboratory, France.

  10. Temperatures and Heat Flows in a Soil Enclosing a Slinky Horizontal Heat Exchanger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Neuberger

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Temperature changes and heat flows in soils that host “slinky”-type horizontal heat exchangers are complex, but need to be understood if robust quantification of the thermal energy available to a ground-source heat pump is to be achieved. Of particular interest is the capacity of the thermal energy content of the soil to regenerate when the heat exchangers are not operating. Analysis of specific heat flows and the specific thermal energy regime within the soil, including that captured by the heat-exchangers, has been characterised by meticulous measurements. These reveal that high concentrations of antifreeze mix in the heat-transfer fluid of the heat exchanger have an adverse impact on heat flows discharged into the soil.

  11. Method of fabricating electrode catalyst layers with directionally oriented carbon support for proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Di-Jia; Yang, Junbing

    2010-07-20

    A method of making a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) having an anode and a cathode and a proton conductive membrane there between. A bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated in the nanotubes forms at least one portion of the MEA and is in contact with the membrane. A combination selected from one or more of a hydrocarbon and an organometallic compound containing an catalytically active transition metal and a nitrogen containing compound and an inert gas and a reducing gas is introduced into a first reaction zone maintained at a first reaction temperature for a time sufficient to vaporize material therein. The vaporized material is transmitted to a second reaction zone maintained at a second reaction temperature for a time sufficient to grow longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes. The nanotubes are in contact with a portion of the MEA at production or being positioned in contact thereafter. Methods of forming a PEMFC are also disclosed.

  12. Decentralized generation of electricity from biomass with proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toonssen, Richard; Woudstra, Nico; Verkooijen, Adrian H. M.

    Biomass can be applied as the primary source for the production of hydrogen in the future. The biomass is converted in an atmospheric fluidized bed gasification process using steam as the gasifying agent. The producer gas needs further cleaning and processing before the hydrogen can be converted in a fuel cell; it is assumed that the gas cleaning processes are able to meet the requirements for a PEM-FC. The compressed hydrogen is supplied to a hydrogen grid and can be used in small-scale decentralized CHP units. In this study it is assumed that the CHP units are based on low temperature PEM fuel cells. For the evaluation of alternative technologies the whole chain of centralized hydrogen production from biomass up to and including decentralized electricity production in PEM fuel cells is considered. Two models for the production of hydrogen from biomass and three models for the combined production of electricity and heat with PEM fuel cells are built using the computer program Cycle-Tempo. Two different levels of hydrogen purity are considered in this evaluation: 60% and 99.99% pure hydrogen. The purity of the hydrogen affects both the efficiencies of the hydrogen production as well as the PEM-FC systems. The electrical exergy efficiency of the PEM-FC system without additional heat production is calculated to be 27.66% in the case of 60% hydrogen and 29.06% in the case of 99.99% pure hydrogen. The electrical exergy efficiencies of the whole conversion chain appear to be 21.68% and 18.74%, respectively. The high losses during purification of the hydrogen gas result in a higher efficiency for the case with low purity hydrogen. The removal of the last impurities strongly increases the overall exergy losses of the conversion chain.

  13. Seasonal hysteresis of net ecosystem exchange in response to temperature change: Patterns and causes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niu, S.; Luo, Y.; Montagnani, L.; Janssens, I.A.; Gielen, B.; Rambal, S.; Moors, E.J.; Matteucci, G.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how net ecosystem exchange (NEE) changes with temperature is central to the debate on climate change-carbon cycle feedbacks, but still remains unclear. Here, we used eddy covariance measurements of NEE from 20 FLUXNET sites (203 site-years of data) in mid- and high-latitude forests to

  14. Surface composition of magnetron sputtered Pt-Co thin film catalyst for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorokhta, Mykhailo, E-mail: vorohtam@gmail.com [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Surface and Plasma Science, V Holešovičkách 2, 18000 Prague (Czech Republic); Khalakhan, Ivan; Václavů, Michal [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Surface and Plasma Science, V Holešovičkách 2, 18000 Prague (Czech Republic); Kovács, Gábor; Kozlov, Sergey M. [Departament de Química Física and Institut de Química Teòrica i Computacional (IQTCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, c/ Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Kúš, Peter; Skála, Tomáš; Tsud, Natalia; Lavková, Jaroslava [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Surface and Plasma Science, V Holešovičkách 2, 18000 Prague (Czech Republic); Potin, Valerie [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Université Bourgogne, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); and others

    2016-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Nanostructured Pt-Co thin catalyst films were grown on carbon by magnetron sputtering. • The surface composition of the nanostructured Pt-Co films was investigated by surface analysis techniques. • We carried out modeling of Pt-Co nanoalloys by computational methods. • Both experiment and modeling based on density functional theory showed that the surface of Pt-Co nanoparticles is almost exclusively composed of Pt atoms. - Abstract: Recently we have tested a magnetron sputtered Pt-Co catalyst in a hydrogen-fed proton exchange membrane fuel cell and showed its high catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction. Here we present further investigation of the magnetron sputtered Pt-Co thin film catalyst by both experimental and theoretical methods. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy experiments confirmed the nanostructured character of the catalyst. The surface composition of as-deposited and annealed at 773 K Pt-Co films was investigated by surface analysis techniques, such as synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Modeling based on density functional theory showed that the surface of 6 nm large 1:1 Pt-Co nanoparticles is almost exclusively composed of Pt atoms (>90%) at typical operation conditions and the Co content does not exceed 20% at 773 K, in agreement with the experimental characterization of such films annealed in vacuum. According to experiment, the density of valence states of surface atoms in Pt-Co nanostructures is shifted by 0.3 eV to higher energies, which can be associated with their higher activity in the oxygen reduction reaction. The changes in electronic structure caused by alloying are also reflected in the measured Pt 4f, Co 3p and Co 2p photoelectron peak binding energies.

  15. Carbon corrosion of proton exchange membrane fuel cell catalyst layers studied by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchcock, Adam P.; Berejnov, Viatcheslav; Lee, Vincent; West, Marcia; Colbow, Vesna; Dutta, Monica; Wessel, Silvia

    2014-11-01

    Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) at the C 1s, F 1s and S 2p edges has been used to investigate degradation of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEM-FC) membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) subjected to accelerated testing protocols. Quantitative chemical maps of the catalyst, carbon support and ionomer in the cathode layer are reported for beginning-of-test (BOT), and end-of-test (EOT) samples for two types of carbon support, low surface area carbon (LSAC) and medium surface area carbon (MSAC), that were exposed to accelerated stress testing with upper potentials (UPL) of 1.0, 1.2, and 1.3 V. The results are compared in order to characterize catalyst layer degradation in terms of the amounts and spatial distributions of these species. Pt agglomeration, Pt migration and corrosion of the carbon support are all visualized, and contribute to differing degrees in these samples. It is found that there is formation of a distinct Pt-in-membrane (PTIM) band for all EOT samples. The cathode thickness shrinks due to loss of the carbon support for all MSAC samples that were exposed to the different upper potentials, but only for the most aggressive testing protocol for the LSAC support. The amount of ionomer per unit volume significantly increases indicating it is being concentrated in the cathode as the carbon corrosion takes place. S 2p spectra and mapping of the cathode catalyst layer indicates there are still sulfonate groups present, even in the most damaged material.

  16. Preparation and characterization of sulfonated amine-poly(ether sulfone)s for proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Dong-Wan; Lim, Young-Don; Lee, Soon-Ho; Jeong, Young-Gi; Kim, Whan-Gi [Department of Applied Chemistry/RIC-ReSEM, Konkuk University, Chungju-si, Chungbuk 380-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Tae-Whan [Department of Materials Sci and Engineering/RIC-ReSEM, Chungju National University, Chungju, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    Sulfonated amine-poly(ether sulfone)s (S-APES)s were prepared by nitration, reduction and sulfonation of poly(ether sulfone) (ultrason {sup registered} -S6010). Poly(ether sulfone) was reacted with ammonium nitrate and trifluoroacetic anhydride to produce the nitrated poly(ether sulfone), and was followed by reduction using tin(II)chloride and sodium iodide as reducing agents to give the amino-poly(ether sulfone). The S-APES was obtained by reaction of 1,3-propanesultone and the amino-poly(ether sulfone) (NH{sub 2}-PES) with sodium methoxide. The different degrees of nitration and reduction of poly(ether sulfone) were successfully synthesized by an optimized process. The reduction of nitro group to amino was done quantitatively, and this controlled the contents of the sulfonic acid group. The films were converted from salt to acid forms with dilute hydrochloric acid. Different contents of sulfonated unit of the S-APES were studied by FT-IR, {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). Sorption experiments were conducted to observe the interaction of sulfonated polymers with water and methanol. The ion exchange capacity (IEC), a measure of proton conductivity, was evaluated. The S-APES membranes exhibit conductivities (25 C) from 1.05 x 10{sup -3} to 4.83 x 10{sup -3} S/cm, water swell from 30.25 to 66.50%, IEC from 0.38 to 0.82 meq/g, and methanol diffusion coefficients from 3.10 x 10{sup -7} to 4.82 x 10{sup -7} cm{sup 2}/S at 25 C. (author)

  17. A dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor ameliorates hypertensive cardiac remodeling via angiotensin-II/sodium-proton pump exchanger-1 axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Haruya; Bando, Yasuko K; Nishimura, Kazuyuki; Aoyama, Morihiko; Monji, Akio; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2016-09-01

    To address the impact of antidiabetic drugs on cardiovascular safety is a matter of clinical concern. Preclinical studies revealed that various protective effects of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor (DPP4i) on cardiovascular disease; however, its impact of on hypertension remains controversial. Teneligliptin (TEN; 10mg/kg/day/p.o.) ameliorates hypertension and cardiac remodeling by normalizing a rise of angiotensin-II (AngII) that specifically observed in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). TEN had no effects on vasculature and concentrations of the DPP4-related vasoactive peptides (bradykinin, neuropeptide Y, and atrial natriuretic peptide). The primary action of TEN on BP lowering was due to restoring the AngII-induced manifestation of congestive heart failure observed in SHR. Sodium-proton pump exchanger type 1 (NHE-1) is a regulator of intracellular acidity (pHi) and implicated pathophysiological role in cardiac remodeling occurred in diseased myocardium. Cardiac NHE-1 expression level was increased in SHR and this was restored in TEN-treated SHR. AngII directly augmented cardiac NHE-1 expression and its activity that contributed to hypertrophic response. TEN attenuated the AngII-induced cardiac hypertrophy with decline in pHi via suppression of NHE-1. Loss of NHE-1 activity by specific inhibitor or RNA silencing promoted intracellular acidification and consistently attenuated the AngII-mediated cardiac hypertrophy. The present study revealed the protective actions of TEN on hypertension and comorbid cardiac remodeling via AngII/NHE-1 axis and the novel pathophysiological roles of intracellular acidification via NHE-1 in cardiac hypertrophy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Final report on LDRD project : elucidating performance of proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells via computational modeling with experimental discovery and validation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chao Yang (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA); Pasaogullari, Ugur (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA); Noble, David R.; Siegel, Nathan P.; Hickner, Michael A.; Chen, Ken Shuang

    2006-11-01

    In this report, we document the accomplishments in our Laboratory Directed Research and Development project in which we employed a technical approach of combining experiments with computational modeling and analyses to elucidate the performance of hydrogen-fed proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). In the first part of this report, we document our focused efforts on understanding water transport in and removal from a hydrogen-fed PEMFC. Using a transparent cell, we directly visualized the evolution and growth of liquid-water droplets at the gas diffusion layer (GDL)/gas flow channel (GFC) interface. We further carried out a detailed experimental study to observe, via direct visualization, the formation, growth, and instability of water droplets at the GDL/GFC interface using a specially-designed apparatus, which simulates the cathode operation of a PEMFC. We developed a simplified model, based on our experimental observation and data, for predicting the onset of water-droplet instability at the GDL/GFC interface. Using a state-of-the-art neutron imaging instrument available at NIST (National Institute of Standard and Technology), we probed liquid-water distribution inside an operating PEMFC under a variety of operating conditions and investigated effects of evaporation due to local heating by waste heat on water removal. Moreover, we developed computational models for analyzing the effects of micro-porous layer on net water transport across the membrane and GDL anisotropy on the temperature and water distributions in the cathode of a PEMFC. We further developed a two-phase model based on the multiphase mixture formulation for predicting the liquid saturation, pressure drop, and flow maldistribution across the PEMFC cathode channels. In the second part of this report, we document our efforts on modeling the electrochemical performance of PEMFCs. We developed a constitutive model for predicting proton conductivity in polymer electrolyte membranes and compared

  19. Structural Studies of NH4-exchanged Natrolites at Ambient Conditions and High Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y Lee; D Seoung; Y Jang; J Bai; Y Lee

    2011-12-31

    We report here for the first time that fully and partially NH{sub 4}-exchanged natrolites can be prepared in hydrated states using the solution exchange method with potassium-natrolite. The structural models of the as-prepared hydrated phases and their dehydrated forms at elevated temperature were refined in space group Fdd2 using in situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data and Rietveld methods. The unit-cell volumes of the hydrated NH{sub 4}-exchanged natrolites at ambient conditions, (NH{sub 4}){sub 16(2)}Al{sub 16}Si{sub 24}O{sub 80}{center_dot}14.1(9)H{sub 2}O and (NH{sub 4}){sub 5.1(1)}K{sub 10.9(1)}Al{sub 16}Si{sub 24}O{sub 80}{center_dot}15.7(3)H{sub 2}O, are found to be larger than that the original sodium-natrolite by ca. 15.6% and 12.8%, respectively. Upon temperature increase, the fully NH{sub 4}-exchanged natrolite undergoes dehydration at ca. 150 C with ca. 16.4% contraction in the unit-cell volume. The dehydrated phase of the fully NH{sub 4}-exchanged natrolite exhibits marginal volume expansion up to 425 C and then becomes amorphized during temperature decrease and exposure to atmospheric condition. In the case of the partially NH{sub 4}-exchanged natrolite, the dehydration starts from ca. 175 C with {approx}15.1% volume contraction and leads to a partial phase separation to show a phase related to the dehydrated K-natrolite. The degree of the phase separation decreases with temperature increase up to 475 C, concomitant to the gradual volume contraction occurring in the partially NH{sub 4}-exchanged natrolite in the dehydrared state. Upon temperature decrease and exposure to atmospheric condition, only the dehydrated K-natrolite is recovered as a crystalline phase from the partially NH{sub 4}-exchanged natrolite. In the hydrated model of the fully NH{sub 4}-exchanged natrolite, the ammonium cations and water molecules are statistically distributed along the elliptical channels, similar to the disordered pattern observed in natrolites exchanged

  20. New Method for Nucleophilic Substitution on Hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene by Allylamine Using an Algerian Proton Exchanged Montmorillonite Clay (Maghnite-H+ as a Green Solid Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lahouaria Medjdoub

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nucleophilic substitution on hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene (HCCTP with allylamine in order to give hexa(allylaminocyclotriphosphazene (HACTP  is performed for the first time under mild conditions by using diethylether as solvent to replace benzene which is very toxic. The reaction time is reduced to half and also performed at room temperature but especially in the presence of an eco-catalyst called Maghnite-H+. This catalyst has a significant role in the industrial scale. In fact, the use of Maghnite is preferred for its many advantages: a very low purchase price compared to other catalysts, the easy removal of the reaction mixture. Then, Maghnite-H+ is became an excellent catalyst for many chemical reactions. The structure of HACTP synthesized in the presence of Maghnite-H+ to 5% by weight is confirmed by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, 31P-NMR (Nuclear magnetic resonance and FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. MALDI-TOF (Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation-time-of-flight mass spectrometry is used to establish the molecular weight of HACTP which is 471 g/mol. DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimetery and TGA (Thermogravimetric Analysis show that HACTP is a crystalline product with a melting point of 88 °C. It is reactive after melting but is degraded from 230 °C. Copyright © 2016 BCREC GROUP. All rights reserved Received: 28th September 2015; Revised: 5th December 2015; Accepted: 4th January 2016 How to Cite: Medjdoub, L., Mohammed, B. (2016. New Method for Nucleophilic Substitution on Hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene by Allylamine Using an Algerian Proton Exchanged Montmorillonite Clay (Maghnite-H+ as a Green Solid Catalyst. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 11 (2: 151-160 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.11.2.541.151-160 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.11.2.541.151-160

  1. Oxygen evolution catalysts on supports with a 3-D ordered array structure and intrinsic proton conductivity for proton exchange membrane steam electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Junyuan; Aili, David; Li, Qingfeng

    2014-01-01

    , composite support materials for iridium oxide are synthesized via in situ phosphorization reaction on tin doped indium oxide and possess functionalities of high electronic and intrinsic proton conductivity. At 130 °C under a water vapor atmosphere an overall conductivity of 0.72 S cm−1 is achieved...

  2. [Effect of air temperature and rainfall on wetland ecosystem CO2 exchange in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xiao-jing; Han, Guang-xuan

    2015-10-01

    Wetland can be a potential efficient sink to reduce global warming due to its higher primary productivity and lower carbon decomposition rate. While there has been a series progress on the influence mechanism of ecosystem CO2 exchange over China' s wetlands, a systematic metaanalysis of data still needs to be improved. We compiled data of ecosystem CO2 exchange of 21 typical wetland vegetation types in China from 29 papers and carried out an integrated analysis of air temperature and precipitation effects on net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE), ecosystem respiration (Reco), gross primary productivity (GPP), the response of NEE to PAR, and the response of Reco to temperature. The results showed that there were significant responses (Pair temperature and enhanced precipitation on the annual scale. On the growing season scale, air temperature accounted for 50% of the spatial variation of NEE, 36% of GPP and 19% of Reco, respectively. Both NEE (R2 = 33%) and GPP (R2 =25%) were correlated positively with precipitation (P0.05). Across different Chinese wetlands, both precipitation and temperature had no significant effect on apparent quantum yield (α) or ecosystem respiration in the daytime (Reco,day, P>0.05). The maximum photosynthesis rate (Amax) was remarkably correlated with precipitation (P air temperature. Besides, there was no significant correlation between basal respiration (Rref) and precipitation (P>0.05). Precipitation was negatively correlated with temperature sensitivity of Reco (Q10, P<0.05). Furthermore, temperature accounted for 35% and 46% of the variations in temperature sensitivity of Reco (Q10) and basal respiration (Rref P<0.05), respectively.

  3. Experiment and simulation of temperature characteristics of intermittently-controlled ground heat exchanges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Qing; Li, Ming; Yu, Ming [Department of Thermal Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun (China)

    2010-06-15

    Because of poor heat transfer coefficients of soil/rock, ground source heat pumps (GSHP) or underground thermal energy storage (UTES) systems always occupy a large area and need many ground heat exchangers. This initial energy investment is so heavy that it cannot be used on a large-scale. Intermittent operation can reduce the extreme temperatures around the ground heat exchangers (GHEs) and keep the temperature in reasonable range. The aim of this study is to implement an experiment and develop a dynamic model of hydronic heating systems of GSHP in order to get a more fair comparison of energy efficiency between continuously controlled and intermittently controlled systems. Factors such as thermal inertia, temperature levels and lag time are also considered to see how they affect the efficiency. It is shown that temperature variation is related to the intermittent period and that intermittence prolongs the heat transfer without reaching at an utmost temperature (operation limitation). An effectively controlled intermittent process can optimize the capacity of heat exchange units so as to achieve better application of the ground energy. Additionally, the intermittent control can decrease the number of GHEs of GSHP and UTES systems and keep better working conditions. (author)

  4. Dual temperature dual pressure water-hydrogen chemical exchange for water detritiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, Takahiko, E-mail: t-sugiyama@nucl.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Engineering, Nagoya University, Fro-cho 1, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Takada, Akito; Morita, Youhei [Faculty of Engineering, Nagoya University, Fro-cho 1, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Kotoh, Kenji [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, Moto-oka 744, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Munakata, Kenzo [Faculty of Engineering and Resource Science, Akita University, Tegata-gakuen-machi 1-1, Akita 010-8502 (Japan); Taguchi, Akira [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Gofuku 3190, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Kawano, Takao; Tanaka, Masahiro; Akata, Naofumi [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi-cho 322-6, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    Experimental and analytical studies on hydrogen-tritium isotope separation by a dual temperature dual pressure catalytic exchange (DTDP-CE) with liquid phase chemical exchange columns were carried out in order to apply it to a part of the water detritiation system for DEMO fuel cycle. A prototype DTDP-CE apparatus was successfully operated and it was confirmed that tritium was separated by the apparatus as significantly distinguishable. A calculation code was developed based on the channeling stage model. The values of separation factors and the effects of some operating parameters were well predicted by the separative analyses with the code.

  5. Temperatures and Heat Flows in a Soil Enclosing a Slinky Horizontal Heat Exchanger

    OpenAIRE

    Pavel Neuberger; Radomír Adamovský; Michaela Šeďová

    2014-01-01

    Temperature changes and heat flows in soils that host “slinky”-type horizontal heat exchangers are complex, but need to be understood if robust quantification of the thermal energy available to a ground-source heat pump is to be achieved. Of particular interest is the capacity of the thermal energy content of the soil to regenerate when the heat exchangers are not operating. Analysis of specific heat flows and the specific thermal energy regime within the soil, including that captured by the ...

  6. Finite line-source model for borehole heat exchangers. Effect of vertical temperature variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandos, Tatyana V.; Fernandez, Esther; Santander, Juan Luis G.; Isidro, Jose Maria; Perez, Jezabel; Cordoba, Pedro J. Fernandez de [Instituto Universitario de Matematica Pura y Aplicada, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Montero, Alvaro; Urchueguia, Javier F. [Instituto de Ingenieria Energetica, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2009-06-15

    A solution to the three-dimensional finite line-source (FLS) model for borehole heat exchangers (BHEs) that takes into account the prevailing geothermal gradient and allows arbitrary ground surface temperature changes is presented. Analytical expressions for the average ground temperature are derived by integrating the exact solution over the line-source depth. A self-consistent procedure to evaluate the in situ thermal response test (TRT) data is outlined. The effective thermal conductivity and the effective borehole thermal resistance can be determined by fitting the TRT data to the time-series expansion obtained for the average temperature. (author)

  7. Temperature effects in exchange-biased planar Hall sensors for bioapplications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Christian Danvad; Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas; Freitas, S.C.

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependence of exchange biased planar Hall effect sensors is investigated between T = −10 and 70 °C. It is shown that a single domain model describes the system well and that the temperature coefficient of the low-field sensitivity at T = 25 °C is 0.32%/°C. A procedure...... for temperature correction by use of a reference sensor is demonstrated. Consequences for magnetic biosensing are exemplified with calculations on M-280 Dynabeads®....

  8. Proton content and nature in perovskite ceramic membranes for medium temperature fuel cells and electrolysers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomban, Philippe; Zaafrani, Oumaya; Slodczyk, Aneta

    2012-07-25

    Recent interest in environmentally friendly technology has promoted research on green house gas-free devices such as water steam electrolyzers, fuel cells and CO2/syngas converters. In such applications, proton conducting perovskite ceramics appear especially promising as electrolyte membranes. Prior to a successful industrial application, it is necessary to determine/understand their complex physical and chemical behavior, especially that related to proton incorporation mechanism, content and nature of bulk protonic species. Based on the results of quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QNS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Raman and IR measurements we will show the complexity of the protonation process and the importance of differentiation between the protonic species adsorbed on a membrane surface and the bulk protons. The bulk proton content is very low, with a doping limit (~1-5 × 10-3 mole/mole), but sufficient to guarantee proton conduction below 600 °C. The bulk protons posses an ionic, covalent bond free nature and may occupy an interstitial site in the host perovskite structure.

  9. Proton Content and Nature in Perovskite Ceramic Membranes for Medium Temperature Fuel Cells and Electrolysers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Slodczyk

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent interest in environmentally friendly technology has promoted research on green house gas-free devices such as water steam electrolyzers, fuel cells and CO2/syngas converters. In such applications, proton conducting perovskite ceramics appear especially promising as electrolyte membranes. Prior to a successful industrial application, it is necessary to determine/understand their complex physical and chemical behavior, especially that related to proton incorporation mechanism, content and nature of bulk protonic species. Based on the results of quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QNS, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, Raman and IR measurements we will show the complexity of the protonation process and the importance of differentiation between the protonic species adsorbed on a membrane surface and the bulk protons. The bulk proton content is very low, with a doping limit (~1–5 × 10−3 mole/mole, but sufficient to guarantee proton conduction below 600 °C. The bulk protons posses an ionic, covalent bond free nature and may occupy an interstitial site in the host perovskite structure.

  10. Degradation modeling of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells using dual time scale simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, E.; Maximini, M.; Bauschulte, A.; vom Schloß, J.; Hermanns, R. T. E.

    2015-02-01

    HT-PEM fuel cells suffer from performance losses due to degradation effects. Therefore, the durability of HT-PEM is currently an important factor of research and development. In this paper a novel approach is presented for an integrated short term and long term simulation of HT-PEM accelerated lifetime testing. The physical phenomena of short term and long term effects are commonly modeled separately due to the different time scales. However, in accelerated lifetime testing, long term degradation effects have a crucial impact on the short term dynamics. Our approach addresses this problem by applying a novel method for dual time scale simulation. A transient system simulation is performed for an open voltage cycle test on a HT-PEM fuel cell for a physical time of 35 days. The analysis describes the system dynamics by numerical electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Furthermore, a performance assessment is performed in order to demonstrate the efficiency of the approach. The presented approach reduces the simulation time by approximately 73% compared to conventional simulation approach without losing too much accuracy. The approach promises a comprehensive perspective considering short term dynamic behavior and long term degradation effects.

  11. Modelling of the batch biosorption system: study on exchange of protons with cell wall-bound mineral ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    The interchange of the protons with the cell wall-bound calcium and magnesium ions at the interface of solution/bacterial cell surface in the biosorption system at various concentrations of protons has been studied in the present work. A mathematical model for establishing the correlation between concentration of protons and active sites was developed and optimized. The sporadic limited residence time reactor was used to titrate the calcium and magnesium ions at the individual data point. The accuracy of the proposed mathematical model was estimated using error functions such as nonlinear regression, adjusted nonlinear regression coefficient, the chi-square test, P-test and F-test. The values of the chi-square test (0.042-0.017), P-test (proton concentrations. The zeta potential of the bacterium surface at various concentrations of protons was observed to validate the denaturation of active sites.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of poly(vinyl alcohol proton exchange membranes modified with 4,4-diaminodiphenylether-2,2-disulfonic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A proton-exchange membrane for a direct methanol fuel cell was prepared by modifying the chemical structure of poly(vinyl alcohol (PVA by means of sulfonation. We report the synthesis of a new proton-conducting polymer membrane with poly (vinyl alcohol and diamine-containing organic molecules immobilized to PVA. The sulfonation was carried out by using 4,4-diaminodiphenyl ether-2,2-disulfonic acid (ODADS. A sulfonated diamine monomer, ODADS, was successfully synthesized by direct sulfonation of a commercially available diamine, 4,4-diaminodiphenyl ether (ODA, using fuming sulfuric acid as the sulfonating reagent. The chemical structure and thermal stability of the sulfonated PVA were studied by using FTIR and thermogravimetric analysis techniques, respectively. The proton conductivities of membranes were investigated as a function of ODADS content. The thermal decomposition of PVA-ODADS membranes started at 220°C. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC results indicated the homogeneity of the blends. Proton conductivity values of the sulfonated PVA membranes ranged between 8.25 and 16.53 mS/cm and the conductivities of PVA-ODADS membranes increased with the increasing ODADS content.

  13. Temperature evolution of nickel sulphide phases from thiourea complex and their exchange bias effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Nitesh [Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit and International Centre for Materials Science, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore-560 064 (India); Raman, N. [Department of Chemistry, VHNSN College, Virudhunagar-626 001 (India); Sundaresan, A., E-mail: sundaresan@jncasr.ac.in [Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit and International Centre for Materials Science, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore-560 064 (India)

    2013-12-15

    Considering the very complex phase diagram of nickel sulphide, it is quite challenging to stabilize pure phases from a single precursor. Here, we obtain nanoparticles of various phases of nickel sulphide by decomposing nickel–thiourea complex at different temperatures. The first phase in the evolution is the one with the maximum sulphur content, namely, NiS{sub 2} nanoparticles obtained at 400 °C. As the temperature is increased, nanoparticles of phases with lesser sulphur content, NiS (600 °C) and Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} (800 °C) are formed. NiS{sub 2} nanoparticles exhibit weak ferromagnetic transition at 30 K and show a large exchange bias at 2 K. NiS nanoparticles are antiferromagnetic and show relatively smaller exchange bias effect. On the other hand, Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} nanoparticles exhibit very weak temperature dependent magnetization. Electrical measurements show that both NiS{sub 2} and NiS are semiconductors whereas Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} is a metal. - Graphical abstract: Pure phases of NiS{sub 2}, NiS and Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} have been obtained by thermal decomposition of nickel–thiourea complex wherein, NiS{sub 2} nanoparticles exhibit remarkable exchange bias effect at 2 K. - Highlights: • NiS{sub 2}, NiS and Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} nanoparticles are obtained by thermal decomposition of nickel–thiourea complex at different temperatures. • As the temperature is increased, nickel sulphide phase with lesser sulphur content is obtained. • NiS{sub 2} nanoparticles show good exchange bias property which can be explained by antiferromagnetic core and ferromagnetic shell model. • NiS{sub 2} and NiS are semiconducting while Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} shows metallic behavior.

  14. Studies on the application of temperature-responsive ion exchange polymers with whey proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharjan, Pankaj; Campi, Eva M; De Silva, Kirthi; Woonton, Brad W; Jackson, W Roy; Hearn, Milton T W

    2016-03-18

    Several new types of temperature-responsive ion exchange resins of different polymer composition have been prepared by grafting the products from the co-polymerisation of N-phenylacrylamide, N-iso-propylacrylamide and acrylic acid derivatives onto cross-linked agarose. Analysis of the binding isotherms for these different resins obtained under batch adsorption conditions indicated that the resin based on N-iso-propylacrylamide containing 5% (w/w) N-phenylacrylamide and 5% (w/w) acrylic acid resulted in the highest adsorption capacity, Bmax, for the whey protein, bovine lactoferrin, e.g. 14 mg bovine lactoferrin/mL resin at 4 °C and 62 mg bovine lactoferrin/mL resin at 40 °C, respectively. Under dynamic loading conditions at 40 °C, 94% of the loaded bovine lactoferrin on a normalised mg protein per mL resin basis was adsorbed by this new temperature-responsive ion-exchanger, and 76% was eluted by a single cycle temperature shift to 4 °C without varying the composition of the 10mM sodium dihydrogen phosphate buffer, pH 6.5, or the flow rate. The binding characteristics of these different ion exchange resins with bovine lactoferrin were also compared to results obtained using other resins based on N-isopropylacrylamide but contained N-tert-butylacrylamide rather than N-phenylacrylamide, where the corresponding dynamic capture and release properties for bovine lactoferrin required different temperature conditions of 20 °C and 50 °C, respectively for optimal desorption/adsorption. The cationic protein, bovine lactoperoxidase, was also adsorbed and desorbed with these temperature-responsive resins under similar conditions of changing temperature, whereas the anionic protein, bovine β-lactoglobulin, was not adsorbed under this regime of temperature conditions but instead eluted in the flow-through. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. High Temperature Gas-to-Gas Heat Exchanger Based on a Solid Intermediate Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Amirante

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the design of an innovative high temperature gas-to-gas heat exchanger based on solid particles as intermediate medium, with application in medium and large scale externally fired combined power plants fed by alternative and dirty fuels, such as biomass and coal. An optimization procedure, performed by means of a genetic algorithm combined with computational fluid dynamics (CFD analysis, is employed for the design of the heat exchanger: the goal is the minimization of its size for an assigned heat exchanger efficiency. Two cases, corresponding to efficiencies equal to 80% and 90%, are considered. The scientific and technical difficulties for the realization of the heat exchanger are also faced up; in particular, this work focuses on the development both of a pressurization device, which is needed to move the solid particles within the heat exchanger, and of a pneumatic conveyor, which is required to deliver back the particles from the bottom to the top of the plant in order to realize a continuous operation mode. An analytical approach and a thorough experimental campaign are proposed to analyze the proposed systems and to evaluate the associated energy losses.

  16. Ionic Hamiltonians for transition metal atoms: effective exchange coupling and Kondo temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, F.; Goldberg, E. C.

    2017-02-01

    An ionic Hamiltonian for describing the interaction between a metal and a d-shell transition metal atom having an orbital singlet state is introduced and its properties analyzed using the Schrieffer-Wolf transformation (exchange coupling) and the poor man’s scaling method (Kondo temperature). We find that the effective exchange coupling between the metal and the atom has an antiferromagnetic or a ferromagnetic interaction depending on the kind of atomic fluctuations, either S\\to S-1/2 or S\\to S+1/2 , associated with the metal-atom coupling. We present a general scheme for all those processes and calculate, for the antiferromagnetic interaction, the corresponding Kondo-temperature.

  17. High throughput study of fuel cell proton exchange membranes: Poly(vinylidene fluoride)/acrylic polyelectrolyte blends and nanocomposites with zirconium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata B., Pedro Jose

    Sustainability is perhaps one of the most heard buzzwords in the post-20 th century society; nevertheless, it is not without a reason. Our present practices for energy supply are largely unsustainable if we consider their environmental and social impact. In view of this unfavorable panorama, alternative sustainable energy sources and conversion approaches have acquired noteworthy significance in recent years. Among these, proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are being considered as a pivotal building block in the transition towards a sustainable energy economy in the 21st century. The polyelectrolyte membrane or proton exchange membrane (PEM) is a vital component, as well as a performance-limiting factor, of the PEMFC. Consequently, the development of high-performance PEM materials is of utmost importance for the advance of the PEMFC field. In this work, alternative PEM materials based on semi-interpenetrated networks from blends of poly(vinyledene fluoride) (PVDF) (inert phase) and sulfonated crosslinked acrylic polyelectrolytes (PE) (proton-conducting phase), as well as tri-phase PVDF/PE/zirconium-based composites, are studied. To alleviate the burden resulting from the vast number of possible combinations of the different precursors utilized in the preparation of the membranes (PVDF: 5x, PE: 2x, Nanoparticle: 3x), custom high-throughput (HT) screening systems have been developed for their characterization. By coupling the data spaces obtained via these systems with the appropriate statistical and data analysis tools it was found that, despite not being directly involved in the proton transport process, the inert PVDF phase plays a major role on proton conductivity. Particularly, a univocal inverse correlation between the PVDF crystalline characteristics (i.e., crystallinity and crystallite size) and melt viscosity, and membrane proton conductivity was discovered. Membranes based on highly crystalline and viscous PVDF homopolymers exhibited reduced proton

  18. Development of heat exchanger for high temperature energy storage with bulk materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boura, Cristiano Teixeira; Niederwestberg, Stefan; McLeod, Jacqueline; Herrmann, Ulf; Hoffschmidt, Bernhard

    2016-05-01

    This paper gives a general overview of the concept of a high temperature gas-to-particle heat exchanger, the corresponding test facilities and the results of laboratory tests. A description of the optimal bulk material and separator properties and their influences on the operating conditions is also given. The three phenomena pinning, blistering and blocking could be observed during the tests and were analysed in more detail using simulation software.

  19. Platinum Activated IrO2/SnO2 Nanocatalysts and Their Electrode Structures for High Performance Proton Exchange Membrane Water Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Junyuan; Li, Qingfeng; Christensen, Erik

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve proton exchange membrane water electrolysis performance, anode catalyst and catalyst layer were examined in this work. SnO2 supported IrO2 nanocatalyst and its analogue with platinum enhancement were firstly synthesized for the oxygen evolution reaction. The effect of the intr...... improved due to the appropriate porosity and pore size distribution. The highest electrolyser performance of 1.63 V at 2 A cm-2 was achieved at 80 °C for optimized catalyst layers containing platinum activated IrO2/SnO2 catalyst....

  20. Oxygen-17-induced proton relaxation rates for alcohols and alcohol solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrar Thomas C.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of 17O enriched samples of alcohols to measure the correlation time of the OH internuclear vector works well when the hydroxyl proton exchanges rapidly. For alcohols such as methanol and ethanol the hydroxyl exchange rate for neat samples is relatively slow even at room temperature and significant systematic errors result if slow exchange effects are not considered. For slow exchange the hydroxyl proton, 17OH, signal is a relatively complex function of the chemical exchange rate of the hydroxyl proton, the OH spin coupling (about 80 Hz for alcohols and water and the relaxation time for the oxygen. The OH linewidth can become so large due to scalar relaxation with the rapidly relaxing oxygen nucleus that the signal becomes very difficult to detect. For neat 17O enriched ethanol at room temperature the oxygen relaxation time is about 3.0 ms and the hydroxyl proton linewidth is over 1000 Hz.