WorldWideScience

Sample records for temperature oil wells

  1. Temperature control of thermal-gas-dynamical installation in cleaning oil-well tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, V. A.; Martemyanov, D. B.; Pshenichnikova, V. V.

    2017-08-01

    The article provides the study results of cleaning oil-well tubes, the oil-well tube failure reasons for service by their types have been considered. The chemical method of cleaning oil-well tubes as the least expensive has been reviewed when acid solution moves to the interptube space mixing up with oil and liquidates paraffin and pitches deposits on the internal pipe surface. Except the chemical method of pipes cleaning the mechanical one was considered as well. Also the disadvantages -such as the low productivity of cleaning and design complexity- of this deposits removal method on the internal oil-well tube surface have been considered. An effective method for cleaning oil-well tubing from paraffin and pitches by the thermodynamic plant based on the aircraft engine has been introduced for the first time. The temperature distribution graph in the gas stream at the engine output has been given.

  2. Distributed temperature sensing (DTS) to characterize the performance of producing oil wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Glynn R.; Brown, George; Hawthorne, William; Hartog, Arthur H.; Waite, Peter C.

    2000-12-01

    This paper describes how distributed temperature sensing (DTS) based on Raman Scattering is being used as an in-situ logging technique in oil and gas wells. Traditional methods of gathering production data to characterize oil and gas well performance have relied on the introduction of electric logging tools into the well. This can be an expensive process in highly deviated or horizontal wells and usually results in the well being shut-in with the loss or deferment of hydrocarbon production. More recently permanently placed pressure sensors based on CMOS technology have been used, but these systems do not easily deliver distributed measurements and reliability has been found to be poor.

  3. Study on temperature distribution along wellbore of fracturing horizontal wells in oil reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjun Cai

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of distributed temperature sensors (DTS to monitor producing zones of horizontal well through a real-time measurement of a temperature profile is becoming increasingly popular. Those parameters, such as flow rate along wellbore, well completion method, skin factor, are potentially related to the information from DTS. Based on mass-, momentum-, and energy-balance equations, this paper established a coupled model to study on temperature distribution along wellbore of fracturing horizontal wells by considering skin factor in order to predict wellbore temperature distribution and analyze the factors influencing the wellbore temperature profile. The models presented in this paper account for heat convective, fluid expansion, heat conduction, and viscous dissipative heating. Arriving temperature and wellbore temperature curves are plotted by computer iterative calculation. The non-perforated and perforated sections show different temperature distribution along wellbore. Through the study on the sensitivity analysis of skin factor and flow rate, we come to the conclusion that the higher skin factor generates larger temperature increase near the wellbore, besides, temperature along wellbore is related to both skin factors and flow rate. Temperature response type curves show that the larger skin factor we set, the less temperature augmenter from toe to heel could be. In addition, larger flow rate may generate higher wellbore temperature.

  4. Bidimensional analysis of the phase behavior of a well-defined surfactant (C10E4)/oil (n-octane)/water-temperature system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzino, Aldo; Molinier, Valérie; Catté, Marianne; Salager, Jean-Louis; Aubry, Jean-Marie

    2009-12-17

    The equilibrium phase behavior of the well-defined system tetraethyleneglycol decyl ether (C(10)E(4))/n-octane/water (SOW) at variable temperature (T) was revisited by careful analysis of the three bidimensional cuts, namely, the gamma (at constant water-oil ratio), chi (at constant surfactant concentration), and Delta (at constant temperature) plots. A straightforward methodology is reported to determine the frontiers of the triphasic (Winsor III) domain on any cut of the SOW-T phase prism. It comes from the systematic analysis of another cut, here gamma at different water-oil ratios and chi at different surfactant concentrations from the knowledge of Delta cuts at different temperatures. The method has been validated through comparison with experimental results. It enables one to show, for the first time, the evolution of a SOW system three-phase body contours with (i) water-oil ratio, (ii) surfactant concentration, and (iii) temperature. It exhibits a strong impact of the surfactant affinity for the pure oil and water phases on the shape of the phase diagrams. The systematic study of the effect of the surfactant concentration on the aspect of the chi plot sheds light on an unusual shape found at low surfactant concentration.

  5. Asphaltene precipitates in oil production wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinitz, W,; Andersen, Simon Ivar

    1998-01-01

    At the beginning of production in a southern German oil field, flow blockage was observed during file initial stage of production from the oil wells. The hindrance was caused by the precipitation of asphaltenes in the proximity of the borehole and in the tubings. The precipitates were of solid...

  6. MARGINAL EXPENSE OIL WELL WIRELESS SURVEILLANCE MEOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason M. Medizade; John R. Ridgely; Donald G. Nelson

    2004-11-01

    A marginal expense oil well wireless surveillance system to monitor system performance and production from rod-pumped wells in real time from wells operated by Vaquero Energy in the Edison Field, Main Area of Kern County in California has been successfully designed and field tested. The surveillance system includes a proprietary flow sensor, a programmable transmitting unit, a base receiver and receiving antenna, and a base station computer equipped with software to interpret the data. First, the system design is presented. Second, field data obtained from three wells is shown. Results of the study show that an effective, cost competitive, real-time wireless surveillance system can be introduced to oil fields across the United States and the world.

  7. The SLIMITRE system: T-P-CCL registry in high temperature oil wells; El sistema SLIMITRE: registro T-P-CCL en pozos petroleros de alta temperatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iglesias R, Eduardo and others [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    PEMEX Exploration and Production (PEP), through its Management of Well Productivity of the Subdivision of Technology and Professional Development (GTDP) and of its Active Luna, faced the problematic of carrying out simultaneous recordings of temperature and pressure in high temperature flowing wells. Capitalizing the experience and know-how of the Gerencia de Geotermia (GG) of the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) in this field, it ordered the resolution of the described problematic, by means of the development of appropriate tools. In order to compliment this order, the GG of the IIE developed the SLIMETRE system, in close collaboration with the personnel of PEP involved in the project. This project framed in the Agreement of Collaboration for the rendering of services between PEMEX Exploration and Production and the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas. In the sections that follow appear the main parameters of design, the architecture of the system is explained, the tools and the subsystem of data acquisition are described; the obtained results are exposed and the conclusions appear. [Spanish] Pemex Exploracion y Produccion (PEP), a traves de su Gerencia de Productividad de Pozos de la Subdireccion de Tecnologia y Desarrollo Profesional (GTDP) y de su Activo Luna, encaro la problematica de efectuar registros simultaneos de temperatura y presion en pozos fluyentes de alta temperatura. Capitalizando la experiencia y know-how de la Gerencia de Geotermia (GG) del Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) en dicho campo, le encargo la resolucion de la problematica descrita, mediante el desarrollo de herramientas apropiadas. Para cumplimentar dicho encargo, la GG del IIE desarrollo el sistema SLIMETRE, en estrecha colaboracion con el personal de PEP involucrado en el proyecto. Este proyecto se enmarco en el Convenio de Colaboracion para la prestacion de servicios entre Pemex Exploracion y Produccion y el Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas. En

  8. High temperature spectral gamma well logging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Normann, R.A.; Henfling, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    A high temperature spectral gamma tool has been designed and built for use in small-diameter geothermal exploration wells. Several engineering judgments are discussed regarding operating parameters, well model selection, and signal processing. An actual well log at elevated temperatures is given with spectral gamma reading showing repeatability.

  9. Pumpabilitiy performance of multigrade oils at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holdack-Janssen, H.

    1983-07-01

    For investigation of the pumpability performance of multigrade oils at low temperatures oil pump experiments were carried through with multicylinder engines. Furthermore the applied reference oils were tested in different viscosimeters. As a function of the rotational speed the measurements in multicylinder engines were accomplished with motored as well as with fired engines. They should give hints to the viscosity requirements of lubricants. Furthermore they should indicate how far the engines show different pumping behaviors. As a dimension for the pumpability performance an oilpump borderline was determined. Furthermore for each oil in each engine a borderline pumping temperature was found out. For laboratory-scale determination of the oil pump borderline viscosity measurements were carried through. Efforts were made to simulate the oilpump performance of multicylinder engines at low temperatures in suitable viscosimeters in order to be in a position to predict the oil pump performance.

  10. Review of Well Operator Files for Hydraulically Fractured Oil and Gas Production Wells: Hydraulic Fracturing Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA conducted a survey of oil and gas production wells hydraulically fractured by nine oil and gas service companies in the United States during 2009 and 2010. This is the second well file review report.

  11. The application of high temperature elastomer PCP in CSS wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S.; Song, F.; Wu, F.; Luo, E. [Petro-China, Liaohe (China). Liaohe Oilfield Co.; Seince, L.; Wu, B. [PCM, Vanves (France); Xiao, J.H. [Andmir Environmental Group, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Progressive cavity pumps (PCPs) are now widely used in oil field applications. This paper discussed the feasibility of using a high temperature elastomer PCP in cyclic steam stimulation (CSS) applications. Data were obtained for fluid yields, speed, and wellhead temperature and dynamics. The study showed that during the initial production phase, wellhead temperature reached 80 degrees C. Water was injected to reduce the temperature to under 70 degrees C. The well has been operational for a period of 10 months. A second trial with a PCP with steam injection parameters of 14.6 MPa, a flow rate of 15.7 ton/h, and total steam injection of 1451 tonnes was then conducted. A set of optical fibres was used to obtain downhole temperature distribution data. The well has now been operational for more than 6 months, yielding 44.7 tonnes of fluid per day, with a daily oil yield of 14.8 tonnes per day. Actual pump-depth temperature before the pump start up was 98 degrees C. After start-up, actual pump depth temperatures reached 145 degrees C, which was decreased over time to 125 degrees C. It was concluded that the pumps are capable of withstanding the high temperature CSS environment. 8 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  12. Geothermal Energy Production from Oil/Gas Wells and Application for Building Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Honggang [Rutgers University; Liu, Xiaobing [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    One significant source of low-temperature geothermal energy is the coproduced hot water from oil/gas field production. In the United States, daily oil production has reached above 8 million barrels in recent years. Considering various conditions of wells, 5-10 times or more water can be coproduced in the range of temperature 120 F to 300 F. Like other geothermal resources, such energy source from oil/gas wells is under-utilized for its typical long distance from consumption sites. Many oil/gas fields, however, are relatively close (less than 10 miles) to consumers around cities. For instance, some petroleum fields in Pennsylvania are only a few miles away from the towns in Pittsburg area and some fields in Texas are quite close to Houston. In this paper, we evaluate geothermal potential from oil/gas wells by conducting numerical simulation and analysis of a fractured oil well in Hastings West field, Texas. The results suggest that hot water can be continuously coproduced from oil wells at a sufficient rate (about 4000 gallons/day from one well) for more than 100 years. Viable use of such geothermal source requires economical transportation of energy to consumers. The recently proposed two-step geothermal absorption (TSGA) system provides a promising energy transport technology that allows large-scale use of geothermal energy from thousands of oil/gas wells.

  13. Unconventional neutron sources for oil well logging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankle, C.M., E-mail: cfrankle@lanl.gov; Dale, G.E.

    2013-09-21

    Americium–Beryllium (AmBe) radiological neutron sources have been widely used in the petroleum industry for well logging purposes. There is strong desire on the part of various governmental and regulatory bodies to find alternate sources due to the high activity and small size of AmBe sources. Other neutron sources are available, both radiological ({sup 252}Cf) and electronic accelerator driven (D–D and D–T). All of these, however, have substantially different neutron energy spectra from AmBe and thus cause significantly different responses in well logging tools. We report on simulations performed using unconventional sources and techniques to attempt to better replicate the porosity and carbon/oxygen ratio responses a well logging tool would see from AmBe neutrons. The AmBe response of these two types of tools is compared to the response from {sup 252}Cf, D–D, D–T, filtered D–T, and T–T sources. -- Highlights: • AmBe sources are widely used for well logging purposes. • Governmental bodies would prefer to minimize AmBe use. • Other neutron sources are available, both radiological and electronic. • Tritium–tritium spectrum neutrons have similar logging tool response to AmBe. • A tritium–tritium neutron generator may be a viable AmBe replacement.

  14. Review of Well Operator Files for Hydraulically Fractured Oil and Gas Production Wells: Well Design and Construction Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA reviewed a statistically representative sample of oil and gas production wells reported by nine service companies to help understand the role of well design and construction practices preventing pathways for subsurface fluid movement.

  15. Treating paraffin deposits in producing oil wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noll, L.

    1992-01-01

    Paraffin deposition has been a problem for operators in many areas since the beginning of petroleum production from wells. An extensive literature search on paraffin problems and methods of control has been carried out, and contact was made with companies which provide chemicals to aid in the treatment of paraffin problems. A discussion of the nature of paraffins and the mechanisms of this deposition is presented. The methods of prevention and treatment of paraffin problems are summarized. Suggested procedures for handling paraffin problems are provided. Suggestions for areas of further research testing are given.

  16. Oil and Natural Gas Wells, Western U.S.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A complete set of wells associated with oil, natural gas, and coal bed natural gas development in the western states as of June 2004. This is a static dataset even...

  17. Oil and Natural Gas Wells, US, 2010, Platts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Oil and Natural Gas Well geospatial dataset contains point features representing permitted locations, most of which have been drilled and completed, or drilled...

  18. Oil, Gas, and Injection Wells in Louisiana, Geographic NAD83, LDNR (2007) [oil_gas_wells_LDNR_2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is a point dataset containing the location of over 230,000 oil and gas and injection wells in the state of Louisiana. It was developed from the DNR Office of...

  19. Performance of high-rate gravel-packed oil wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unneland, Trond

    2001-05-01

    Improved methods for the prediction, evaluation, and monitoring of performance in high-rate cased-hole gravel-packed oil wells are presented in this thesis. The ability to predict well performance prior to the gravel-pack operations, evaluate the results after the operation, and monitor well performance over time has been improved. This lifetime approach to performance analysis of gravel-packed oil wells contributes to increase oil production and field profitability. First, analytical models available for prediction of performance in gravel-packed oil wells are reviewed, with particular emphasis on high-velocity flow effects. From the analysis of field data from three North Sea oil fields, improved and calibrated cased-hole gravel-pack performance prediction models are presented. The recommended model is based on serial flow through formation sand and gravel in the perforation tunnels. In addition, new correlations for high-velocity flow in high-rate gravel-packed oil wells are introduced. Combined, this improves the performance prediction for gravel-packed oil wells, and specific areas can be targeted for optimized well design. Next, limitations in the current methods and alternative methods for evaluation and comparison of well performance are presented. The most widely used parameter, the skin factor, remains a convenient and important parameter. However, using the skin concept in direct comparisons between wells with different reservoir properties may result in misleading or even invalid conclusions. A discussion of the parameters affecting the skin value, with a clarification of limitations, is included. A methodology for evaluation and comparison of gravel-packed well performance is presented, and this includes the use of results from production logs and the use of effective perforation tunnel permeability as a parameter. This contributes to optimized operational procedures from well to well and from field to field. Finally, the data sources available for

  20. Temperature prediction model for a producing horizontal well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawkrajai, Pinan

    Distributed temperature sensors (DTS) are increasingly used for monitoring producing sections of horizontal wells. The temperature data from DTS are reliable, accurate and continuous in time (readings every few minutes) and space (readings every meter). One of the potential uses of DTS is to infer the amount and types of fluid entering horizontal sections. To perform such an inference requires a temperature model. A new analytical model was developed here for predicting the inflow temperature of a fluid entering a horizontal wellbore during production. The distinguishing aspect of the model is that it accounts for subtle thermal energy effects including fluid expansion, viscous dissipative heating, and thermal conduction. Reservoir inflow and wellbore flow are coupled by modeling the reservoir as multi-segmented reservoirs in which the direction of flow in the reservoir is perpendicular (not parallel) to the wellbore. The coupled model is then used to simulate several examples to illustrate how temperature changes with flow rate and type of fluid entering a wellbore. We further develop a numerical temperature model of a bottom water drive reservoir to demonstrate the uses of temperature profiles in detecting water entries. Water in this numerical model is initially located in a deeper and warmer zone below a horizontal well. Results show that oil or water can enter the wellbore 2-3 °F higher, while gas can enter with 5-6 °F lower, than the geothermal temperature. Inflow temperature causes the slope of the wellbore temperature profile to change notably, depending on the flow rates and types of fluid entering. The temperature profile can locate a zone that is producing excessive water or gas if the rate is large. The size of the temperature changes on the profiles is obviously detectable by DTS, which has a resolution as fine as 0.0045 °F for the time and spatial average of 1 hour and 50 feet if the cable range is less than 3,000 feet. This study has confirmed the

  1. Well and Inflow Performance Relationship for Heavy Oil Reservoir under Heating Treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Hakiki, Farizal

    2017-10-17

    Well and Inflow Performance Relationship, termed TPR and IPR, respectively have been the unfailing methods to predict well performance. It is further to determine the schemes on optimising production. The main intention of the study is to explore TPR and IPR under heating treatment for heavy oil well. Klamono is a mature field which mostly has depleted wells, it produces heavy oil within 18.5 °API (>0.95 g/cc oil density), and therefore, artificial lifting method is necessary. Sucker Road Pump (SRP) and Electrical Submersible Pump (ESP) are the most deployed artificial lifting method in this reservoir. To boost the heavy oil production, the application of Electric Downhole Heater (EDH) in Well KLO-X1 is being studied. Whole Klamono\\'s production is more than 100,000 blpd within 97-99% water cut. By installing EDH, oil viscosity is decreased hence oil mobility ratio will play a role to decrease water cut. EDH is installed together with the tubing joint to simplify its application in the wellbore. The study shows that EDH application can elevate fluid (mixed oil and brine) temperature. Oil viscosity confirms a reduction from 68 to 46 cP. The gross well production is up to 12.2 bopd due optimising its outflow performance and reducing 97.5 to 96.9% water cut. The field data gives an incremental of 4.9 bopd. The computational results only show an attainment of net oil production up to 8.3 bopd (2 bopd incremental). The EDH works to lessen both density and viscosity as we hypothesised for the mechanism of thermally induced oil production improvement. The evaluation study on its economics aspect exhibits good result that is 1.4 USD/bbl additional profit margin according to field data despite the challenging annual rig rent cost. Following the field data, the expected net income through analytical model revealed that this project is financially promising.

  2. Oil-well pumping system or the like

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosman, A.H.

    1989-07-18

    This patent describes an oil-well derrick apparatus for reciprocating full-stroke actuation of the polish rod of a subsurface piston in an oil-well casing. It comprises an upstanding plunger/cylinder having a base-mounting lower end and having a single hydraulic fluid connection at the lower end, stabilizing structure for the upper end of the plunger/cylinder and including two rigidly spring means for biasing the second member away from the inlet region, the first member being moveable by the effect of the circulating fluid to reduce the size of the inlet region between the blade rows.

  3. Glass transition and heavy oil dynamics at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abivin, P.; Indo, K.; Cheng, Y.; Freed, D.; Taylor, S. D. [Schlumberger (Canada)], email: PAbivin@slb.com

    2011-07-01

    In the oil industry, the viscosity of crude oils is a key factor as it affects market value, field developments and the design of production strategies. In heavy oils, a glass transition occurs and previous work related this to oil's temperature-viscosity behavior. This study aimed at better characterizing heavy oil dynamics and the temperature dependency of viscosity. Experiments were conducted with differential scanning calorimetry and shear rate sweeps on heavy oils from Asia, South America and North America over a wide range of temperatures to measure their viscosities and characterize their glass transition. The glass transition was observed at around 210K and results showed that the Arrhenius model does not fit the experimental data at low temperatures but the WLF model does. This research provided a better understanding of heavy oil dynamics but further work is required to explain the viscosity-temperature behavior of heavy oils at low temperatures.

  4. Comprehensive Approach to Oil Well Drilling Cost Estimation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The comprehensive approach to oil well drilling cost estimation was presented. A formular was derived from the existing drilling cost estimation formulae that considered a parameter known as host community cost (HCC), which was introduced into the existing formula to make it more comprehensive. The host community ...

  5. Cement for Oil Well Cementing Operations in Ghana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael

    with Imported Class 'G' Cement for Oil Well Cementing Operations in Ghana”, Ghana Mining Journal, Vol. ... to compare the physical properties of locally manufactured cement in Ghana with the class G cement. 2 Materials and Methods. 2.1 Materials. Three brands of .... Rheology of cement slurries is of great importance.

  6. Using capillary properties of oil saturated rock of the Tatar Bobrikov horizon at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukliyev, N.Z.

    1980-01-01

    Comprehensive studies are reported of the capillary properties of the natural oil saturated rock according to speed of capillary imbibition and water-oil displacement in the capillaries heated to 353 k. The laboratory methods are described. It was established that capillaries containing high temperature water are able to displace only the oil that is moving more freely in the porous sandstone canals as well as to localize a significant portion of the oil in the other sections of the sandstone sample.

  7. Composite Coiled Tubing for Extended Reach in Horizontal Oil Wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costache, Andrei; Berggreen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Conventional steel coiled tubing cannot reach along the entire length of very long horizontal oil wells. A lighter and more buoyant coiled tube is made possible using composite materials. The high stiffness to weight ratio of fiber reinforced polymers, coupled with a lower coefficient of friction......, has the potential of greatly extending the reach in horizontal oil wells. This study shows how to design composite coiled tubing and gives a comprehensive discussion about the most influential parameters. Several solutions, using glass-fiber and carbon are considered. Finite element models are used...... to calculate the buckling loads and the corresponding interlaminar stresses. The very positive results obtained during this study show that composite coiled tubing systems are vastly superior to their steel counterparts, and that in the future, these will become the new industry standard....

  8. How to find abandoned oil and gas wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, K.H.; Carroll, H.B.; Heemstra, R.J.; Armstrong, F.E.

    1973-01-01

    This guide was written to furnish the coal industry with a description of techniques, instruments, and clues on how to find abandoned oil and gas wells that have penetrated coal seams. The report includes specific information on searching techniques currently in use by several coal mining companies, gas-transmission companies, and waterflood operators, as well as information on State agencies responsible for the enforcement of laws and the preservation and distribution of data pertaining to the drilling, development, and abandonment of oil and gas wells. Comparative tests were performed with several commercial electronic metal detectors to determine the feasibility of using them to aid in the search for abandoned wells and to determine the instrument most suited for that particular use. The role of methane detectors to locate abandoned wells is described, including a case history. Tests were made to develop an efficient procedure to follow in systematically searching an area for metallic clues or hydrocarbon evidence to abandoned wells. The guide describes, in detail, a search sequence, including the collection of basic data, preparation of the selected area, and the physical search. Methods are given for evaluating the results. (auth)

  9. Experimental Investigation of Nano Alumina and Nano Silica on Strength and Consistency of Oil Well Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Abdul Hadi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In oil and gas well cementing, a strong cement sheath is wanted to insure long-term safety of the wells. Successful completion of cementing job has become more complex, as drilling is being done in highly deviated and high pressure-high temperature wells. Use of nano materials in enhanced oil recovery, drilling fluid, oil well cementing and other applications is being investigated. This study is an attempt to investigate the effect of nano materials on oil well cement properties. Two types of nano materials were investigated, which are Nano silica (>40 nm and Nano Alumina (80 nm and high sulfate-resistant glass G cement is used. The investigated properties of oil well cement included compressive strength, thickening time, density, free water and rheological properties. All tests are conducted according to API specification and proceed in Laboratory of Drilling in Petroleum Technology Department in University of Technology and in Missan Oil Company. The experimental results show that NS and NAL behave like accelerators when added to cement and work to increase the compressive strength at 38°C but these increasing in compressive strength changes when the temperature is increased to 60°C. Also, adding NS and NAL lead to increasing in rheological parameter and reduce free water but the change in density is very small. The results show that the effect of NAL on compressive strength and thickening time is greater than the effect of NS but the effect of NS on free water and rheology is greater than the effect of NAL.

  10. New own design an application of electric heating cable for the Orinoco oil belt wells in Venezuela

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quezada, A; Jorge, L [PDVSA PETROLEOS S.A. (Venezuela)

    2011-07-01

    In the heavy oil industry, thermal recovery processes are common methods to reduce oil viscosity and the oil steaking factor. One of these methods consists of using a heating element to increase the well's temperature.. A new heating system, the down hole electric heating system (CEF), has been developed where the hold cable for the horizontal section is heated and used as a resistive heating element; the aim of this paper is to present this new technology system and its application. The system was installed one of PDVSA's wells in the Zuata Field in the Orinoco oil belt in Venezuela and has now been in use for 8 months. Results showed a production increase of 20% with the use of the down hole electric heating system. Through successful application in a well in Venezuela, this paper showed that the down hole electric heating system can be a good alternative to produce oil from heavy oil reservoirs.

  11. Horizontal oil well applications and oil recovery assessment. Volume 1: Success of horizontal well technology, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deskins, W.G.; McDonald, W.J.; Knoll, R.G.; Springer, S.J.

    1995-03-01

    Horizontal technology has been applied in over 110 formations in the USA. Volume I of this study addresses the overall success of horizontal technology, especially in less-publicized formations, i.e., other than the Austin Chalk, Bakken, and Niobrara. Operators in the USA. and Canada were surveyed on a formation-by-formation basis by means of a questionnaire. Response data were received describing horizontal well projects in 58 formations in the USA. and 88 in Canada. Operators responses were analyzed for trends in technical and economic success based on lithology (clastics and carbonates) and resource type (light oil, heavy oil, and gas). The potential impact of horizontal technology on reserves was also estimated. A forecast of horizontal drilling activity over the next decade was developed.

  12. Low-temperature behaviour of the engine oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtěch Kumbár

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The behaviour of engine oil is very important. In this paper has been evaluated temperature dependence kinematic viscosity of engine oils in the low temperatures. Five different commercially distributed engine oils (primarily intended for automobile engines with viscosity class 0W–40, 5W–40, 10W–40, 15W–40, and 20W–40 have been evaluated. The temperature dependence kinematic viscosity has been observed in the range of temperature from −15 °C to 15 °C (for all oils. Considerable temperature dependence kinematic viscosity was found and demonstrated in case of all samples, which is in accordance with theoretical assumptions and literature data. Mathematical models have been developed and tested. Temperature dependence dynamic viscosity has been modeled using a polynomials 3rd and 4th degree. The proposed models can be used for prediction of flow behaviour of oils. With monitoring and evaluating we can prevent technical and economic losses.

  13. Improving reservoir history matching of EM heated heavy oil reservoirs via cross-well seismic tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Katterbauer, Klemens

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced recovery methods have become significant in the industry\\'s drive to increase recovery rates from oil and gas reservoirs. For heavy oil reservoirs, the immobility of the oil at reservoir temperatures, caused by its high viscosity, limits the recovery rates and strains the economic viability of these fields. While thermal recovery methods, such as steam injection or THAI, have extensively been applied in the field, their success has so far been limited due to prohibitive heat losses and the difficulty in controlling the combustion process. Electromagnetic (EM) heating via high-frequency EM radiation has attracted attention due to its wide applicability in different environments, its efficiency, and the improved controllability of the heating process. While becoming a promising technology for heavy oil recovery, its effect on overall reservoir production and fluid displacements are poorly understood. Reservoir history matching has become a vital tool for the oil & gas industry to increase recovery rates. Limited research has been undertaken so far to capture the nonlinear reservoir dynamics and significantly varying flow rates for thermally heated heavy oil reservoir that may notably change production rates and render conventional history matching frameworks more challenging. We present a new history matching framework for EM heated heavy oil reservoirs incorporating cross-well seismic imaging. Interfacing an EM heating solver to a reservoir simulator via Andrade’s equation, we couple the system to an ensemble Kalman filter based history matching framework incorporating a cross-well seismic survey module. With increasing power levels and heating applied to the heavy oil reservoirs, reservoir dynamics change considerably and may lead to widely differing production forecasts and increased uncertainty. We have shown that the incorporation of seismic observations into the EnKF framework can significantly enhance reservoir simulations, decrease forecasting

  14. Chemical nature of coal hydrogenation oils. II - The effect of temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw, J. R.; Barrass, G.; Du Preez, I. C.; Gray, D.

    1980-05-01

    Hydrogenation of the same coal was carried out at 400, 450, 500, 550, 600, 650 and 700 C. H-1-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the oils (hexane soluble portion) showed an increase in the percentage of aromatic protons and a decrease in the percentage of aliphatic protons as the temperature increases, while the percentage of benzylic protons remained constant. The aromaticity of the oils as calculated by the Brown-Ladner equation increases with the reactor temperature. C-13-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the oils indicates that the long aliphatic chains present decrease in both number and length as the reactor temperature increases. The molecular weight and viscosity of the oil as well as the percentage of polar compounds in the oil decrease with increasing temperature.

  15. TAML level 5 sealed junctions offer solutions for thermal production of heavy oil with multilateral wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fipke, S.R. [Halliburton, Houston, TX (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Multilateral wells are used in heterogenous heavy oil reservoirs to provide increased reservoir exposure. New level 5 junction designs have recently been developed by the Technical Advancement for Multilaterals (TAML) Association to provide the minimum temperature and pressure ratings required to effectively seal junctures and control the steam injection process during enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes. This study described 2 new conceptual multilateral technology (MLT) design alternatives for use in steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) operations, notably stacked multilateral injectors above a multilateral producer, and a multilateral horizontally-applied steam drainage (ML-HASD). The designs addressed the thermal expansion, heat loss, and steam placement challenges caused by the steam flow's close proximity to the cooler oil being produced in the same borehole. It was concluded that both designs avoid the production problems associated with multilateral SAGD operations. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Oil Well Blowout 3D computational modeling: review of methodology and environmental requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Mello Paiva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This literature review aims to present the different methodologies used in the three-dimensional modeling of the hydrocarbons dispersion originated from an oil well blowout. It presents the concepts of coastal environmental sensitivity and vulnerability, their importance for prioritizing the most vulnerable areas in case of contingency, and the relevant legislation. We also discuss some limitations about the methodology currently used in environmental studies of oil drift, which considers simplification of the spill on the surface, even in the well blowout scenario. Efforts to better understand the oil and gas behavior in the water column and three-dimensional modeling of the trajectory gained strength after the Deepwater Horizon spill in 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico. The data collected and the observations made during the accident were widely used for adjustment of the models, incorporating various factors related to hydrodynamic forcing and weathering processes to which the hydrocarbons are subjected during subsurface leaks. The difficulties show to be even more challenging in the case of blowouts in deep waters, where the uncertainties are still larger. The studies addressed different variables to make adjustments of oil and gas dispersion models along the upward trajectory. Factors that exert strong influences include: speed of the subsurface currents;  gas separation from the main plume; hydrate formation, dissolution of oil and gas droplets; variations in droplet diameter; intrusion of the droplets at intermediate depths; biodegradation; and appropriate parametrization of the density, salinity and temperature profiles of water through the column.

  17. An improved cement slurry formulation for oil and geothermal wells

    OpenAIRE

    Fridriksson, Fridrik Hilmar Zimsen

    2017-01-01

    Master's thesis in Petroleum engineering Properly designed cement slurry and good cement job are crucial factors for integrity during a well‘s life cycle. For this, cement must be able to prevent migration of formation fluids, support the well construction and withstand high pressure and temperature. A survey on the Norwegian continental shelf showed that 11% of well integrity issues were due to cement related problems [1]. Another integrity survey in Pennsylvania showed that 2.41% of over...

  18. Equipment and technology for drilling wells and extracting oil at oil deposits of the Tatar SSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    The results are cited of studies in the field of completing wells in carbonate sediments, the hydraulics of circulation of a drilling system and the reinforcement of steam pumping wells. Data are presented about the physical and mechanical properties of heat resistant plugging mixtures, oil field tests of a well head gasket for a sucker rod pump with automatic compression of the seal and studies of the heating depth of a stratum with ignition of a powder charge. A complex stabilizer emulsifier for invert emulsions is examined. Formulas are cited for rating the pressure in a descending stream in the casing annulus of a gas lift well.

  19. Engine Oil Condition Monitoring Using High Temperature Integrated Ultrasonic Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Bird

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work contains two parts. In the first part, high temperature integrated ultrasonic transducers (IUTs made of thick piezoelectric composite films, were coated directly onto lubricant oil supply and sump lines of a modified CF700 turbojet engine. These piezoelectric films were fabricated using a sol-gel spray technology. By operating these IUTs in transmission mode, the amplitude and velocity of transmitted ultrasonic waves across the flow channel of the lubricant oil in supply and sump lines were measured during engine operation. Results have shown that the amplitude of the ultrasonic waves is sensitive to the presence of air bubbles in the oil and that the ultrasound velocity is linearly dependent on oil temperature. In the second part of the work, the sensitivity of ultrasound to engine lubricant oil degradation was investigated by using an ultrasonically equipped and thermally-controlled laboratory testing cell and lubricant oils of different grades. The results have shown that at a given temperature, ultrasound velocity decreases with a decrease in oil viscosity. Based on the results obtained in both parts of the study, ultrasound velocity measurement is proposed for monitoring oil degradation and transient oil temperature variation, whereas ultrasound amplitude measurement is proposed for monitoring air bubble content.

  20. Oil and Gas Wells - U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This geospatial dataset contains oil and gas wells that intersect either the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service interest or approved boundary or both. Oil and gas wells...

  1. Factors affecting the low temperature pumpability of used engine oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, C.J.; Habeeb

    1987-01-01

    A large number of studies have been published on the low temperature pumpability characteristics of fresh oils; however, less is known about the effects of oil aging on this property. In laboratory viscometric tests, fuel dilution, mechanical shearing, oxidative degradation and oil contaminants were all shown to significantly affect low temperature fluidity of multigrade engine oil formulations sensitive to slow cool gelation. Moreover, the cooling and shear rate applied to the test oil was found to play an important role in the overall impact of these factors. For example, fuel dilution may improve cold cranking viscosity while degrading slow-cool MRV performance. These laboratory viscometric studies have been supplemented by full scale All-Weather Chassis Dynamometer testing comparing the pumpability performance of new and used SAE 10W-30 engine oils.

  2. How well do we understand oil spill hazard mapping?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepp Neves, Antonio Augusto; Pinardi, Nadia

    2017-04-01

    In simple terms, we could describe the marine oil spill hazard as related to three main factors: the spill event itself, the spill trajectory and the arrival and adsorption of oil to the shore or beaching. Regarding the first factor, spill occurrence rates and magnitude distribution and their respective uncertainties have been estimated mainly relying on maritime casualty reports. Abascal et al. (2010) and Sepp Neves et al. (2015) demonstrated for the Prestige (Spain, 2002) and Jiyeh (Lebanon, 2006) spills that ensemble numerical oil spill simulations can generate reliable estimaes of the most likely oil trajectories and impacted coasts. Although paramount to estimate the spill impacts on coastal resources, the third component of the oil spill hazard (i.e. oil beaching) is still subject of discussion. Analysts have employed different methodologies to estimate the coastal component of the hazard relying, for instance, on the beaching frequency solely, the time which a given coastal segment is subject to oil concentrations above a certain preset threshold, percentages of oil beached compared to the original spilled volume and many others. Obviously, results are not comparable and sometimes not consistent with the present knowledge about the environmental impacts of oil spills. The observed inconsistency in the hazard mapping methodologies suggests that there is still a lack of understanding of the beaching component of the oil spill hazard itself. The careful statistical description of the beaching process could finally set a common ground in oil spill hazard mapping studies as observed for other hazards such as earthquakes and landslides. This paper is the last of a series of efforts to standardize oil spill hazard and risk assessments through an ISO-compliant framework (IT - OSRA, see Sepp Neves et al., (2015)). We performed two large ensemble oil spill experiments addressing uncertainties in the spill characteristics and location, and meteocean conditions for two

  3. Horizontal oil well applications and oil recovery assessment. Volume 2: Applications overview, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deskins, W.G.; McDonald, W.J.; Knoll, R.G.; Springer, S.J.

    1995-03-01

    Horizontal technology has been applied in over 110 formations in the USA. Volume 1 of this study addresses the overall success of horizontal technology, especially in less-publicized formations, i.e., other than the Austin Chalk, Bakken, and Niobrara. Operators in the USA and Canada were surveyed on a formation-by-formation basis by means of a questionnaire. Response data were received describing horizontal well projects in 58 formations in the USA and 88 in Canada. Operators` responses were analyzed for trends in technical and economic success based on lithology (clastics and carbonates) and resource type (light oil, heavy oil, and gas). The potential impact of horizontal technology on reserves was also estimated. A forecast of horizontal drilling activity over the next decade was developed.

  4. Co-deoxy-liquefaction of biomass and vegetable oil to hydrocarbon oil: Influence of temperature, residence time, and catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yigang; Yang, Fan; Wu, Libin; Wang, Chao; Yang, Zhengyu

    2011-01-01

    Co-deoxy-liquefaction of biomass and vegetable oil was investigated under the conditions of different temperatures (350-500 °C) and residence time as well as catalyst using HZSM-5. Results suggested low temperature was favorable for the formation of diesel-like products, while high temperature caused more gasoline-like products. By the addition of HZSM-5, at 450 °C alkanes content of the obtained oil with low oxygen content of 2.28%, reached a maximum of 56.27%, resulting in the highest HHV of 43.8 MJ kg(-1). High temperature favored cracking activity of HZSM-5 which reduced the char formation and contributed to the removal of carbonyl. Compared to temperature, the effect of residence time on products was relatively less; experiments indicated the optimum residence time was 15 min at which obtained oil with the highest yield of 17.78%, had better properties. Preliminary analysis of mechanisms showed biomass provided hydrogen for vegetable oil, facilitating hydrogenation of CC bonds of vegetable oil. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of ultra-lightweight slurries with high compressive strength for use in oil wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzart, J. Walter P. [Halliburton Company, Houston, TX (United States); Farias, A.C. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Ribeiro, Danilo; Fernandes, Thiago; Santos, Reened [Halliburton Energy Services Aberdeen, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-01

    Formations with low fracture gradients or depleted reservoirs often lead to difficult oil well cementing operations. Commonly employed cement slurries (14.0 to 15.8 lb/gal), generate an equivalent circulating density (ECD) higher than the fracture gradient and ultimately lead to formation damage, lost circulation and a decreased top of cement. Given the high price of oil, companies are investing in those and other wells that are difficult to explore. Naturally, lightweight cement slurries are used to reduce the ECD (10.0 to 14.0 lb/gal), using additives to trap water and stabilize the slurry. However, when the density reaches 11.0 lb/gal, the increase in water content may cause a change in characteristics. The focus of this study is extreme cases where it is necessary to employ ultra-lightweight cement slurries (5.5 to 10.0 lb/gal). Foamed slurries have been widely used, and the objective is to set an alternative by developing cement slurries containing uncompressible microspheres, aiming for a density of 7.5 lb/gal as well as high compressive strength. Another benefit in contrast to preparing foamed cement slurries is that there is no requirement for special equipment in the field. Routine laboratory tests such as fluid-loss control, sedimentation, thickening time, free water, compressive strength, and rheology (at room and high temperatures) were performed. Thus, it was concluded that the proposed cement slurries can be used in oil wells. (author)

  6. Application of oil-field well log interpretation techniques to the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ershaghi, I.; Phillips, L.B.; Dougherty, E.L.; Handy, L.L.

    1979-10-01

    An example is presented of the application of oil-field techniques to the Cerro Prieto Field, Mexico. The lithology in this field (sand-shale lithology) is relatively similar to oil-field systems. The study was undertaken as a part of the first series of case studies supported by the Geothermal Log Interpretation Program (GLIP) of the US Department of Energy. The suites of logs for individual wells were far from complete. This was partly because of adverse borehole conditions but mostly because of unavailability of high-temperature tools. The most complete set of logs was a combination of Dual Induction Laterolog, Compensated Formation Density Gamma Ray, Compensated Neutron Log, and Saraband. Temperature data about the wells were sketchy, and the logs had been run under pre-cooled mud condition. A system of interpretation consisting of a combination of graphic and numerical studies was used to study the logs. From graphical studies, evidence of hydrothermal alteration may be established from the trend analysis of SP (self potential) and ILD (deep induction log). Furthermore, the cross plot techniques using data from density and neutron logs may help in establishing compaction as well as rock density profile with depth. In the numerical method, R/sub wa/ values from three different resistivity logs were computed and brought into agreement. From this approach, values of formation temperature and mud filtrate resistivity effective at the time of logging were established.

  7. The research and practice of boosting oil production by duplicated horizontal wells in thick super heavy oil reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peiwu, Li; Yang Jing, Wangping; Ping, Yuan [Exploration and Development Research Institute of Liaohe Oilfield Company, PetroChina, P.R.China , 124010 (China)

    2011-07-01

    In the oil industry, the extraction of heavy oil and super heavy oil from reservoirs is difficult and production decline and sand production are some of the numerous challenges it faces. The aim of this paper is to show how secondary development can address these issues. A preliminary study was conducted and then a plan of secondary development was applied to M6 Block which is a massive extra-ultra heavy oil reservoir. The plan included 154 wells with 30 new horizontal wells. Results proved SAGD to be a good technique for high oil recovery results with improved production from M6 Block. After the implementation of the secondary development, oil recovery improved by 36.3%. This technique also solved the sand production problem. This study showed that secondary development can be a solution to obtain a better performance from heavy oil reservoirs and provides guidance to other similar reservoir.

  8. Oil and Gas Well locations, Upper Colorado River Basin, 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Federal onshore lands contain an estimated 20 percent of the oil and 25 percent of the undiscovered natural gas resources in the United States (U.S. Bureau of Land...

  9. Relating subsurface temperature changes to microbial activity at a crude oil-contaminated site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Ean; Bekins, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    Crude oil at a spill site near Bemidji, Minnesota has been undergoing aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation for over 30 years, creating a 150–200 m plume of primary and secondary contaminants. Microbial degradation generates heat that should be measurable under the right conditions. To measure this heat, thermistors were installed in wells in the saturated zone and in water-filled monitoring tubes in the unsaturated zone. In the saturated zone, a thermal groundwater plume originates near the residual oil body with temperatures ranging from 2.9 °C above background near the oil to 1.2 °C down gradient. Temperatures in the unsaturated zone above the oil body were up to 2.7 °C more than background temperatures. Previous work at this site has shown that methane produced from biodegradation of the oil migrates upward and is oxidized in a methanotrophic zone midway between the water table and the surface. Enthalpy calculations and observations demonstrate that the temperature increases primarily result from aerobic methane oxidation in the unsaturated zone above the oil. Methane oxidation rates at the site independently estimated from surface CO2 efflux data are comparable to rates estimated from the observed temperature increases. The results indicate that temperature may be useful as a low-cost measure of activity but care is required to account for the correct heat-generating reactions, other heat sources and the effects of focused recharge.

  10. Steam temperature control of essential oil extraction system using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research proposed a closed-loop temperature control using a self-tuning fuzzy fractional-order PI (FOPI) controller to overcome the problem. The controller will regulate the steam temperature at a desired level to protect the oil from excessive heat. Self capability of fuzzy rules was found to facilitate the tuning using only ...

  11. Acoustic Energy: An Innovative Technology for Stimulating Oil Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edgar, Dorland E.; Peters, Robert W.; Johnson, Donald O.; Paulsen, P. David; Roberts, Wayne

    2006-04-30

    The objective of this investigation was to demonstrate the effectiveness of sonication in reducing the viscosity of heavy crude oils. Sonication is the use of acoustic or sound energy to produce physical and/or chemical changes in materials, usually fluids. The goal of the first project phase was to demonstrate a proof of concept for the project objective. Batch tests of three commercially available, single-weight oils (30-, 90-, and 120-wt) were performed in the laboratory. Several observations and conclusions were made from this series of experiments. These include the following: (1) In general, the lower the acoustic frequency, the greater the efficiency in reducing the viscosity of the oils; (2) Sonication treatment of the three oils resulted in reductions in viscosity that ranged from a low of 31% to a high of 75%; and (3) The results of the first phase of the project successfully demonstrated that sonication could reduce the viscosity of oils of differing viscosity. The goal of the second project phase was to demonstrate the ability of sonication to reduce the viscosity of three crude oils ranging from a light crude to a heavy crude. The experiments also were designed to examine the benefits of two proprietary chemical additives used in conjunction with sonication. Acoustic frequencies ranging from 800 Hz to 1.6 kHz were used in these tests, and a reactor chamber was designed for flow-through operation with a capacity of one gallon (3.8 liters). The three crude oils selected for use in the testing program were: (1) a heavy crude from California with a viscosity of approximately 65,000 cP (API gravity about 12{sup o}), (2) a crude from Alabama with a significant water content and a viscosity of approximately 6,000 cP (API gravity about 22 {sup o}), and (3) a light crude from the Middle East with a viscosity of approximately 700 cP (API gravity about 32{sup o}). The principal conclusions derived from the second project phase include the following: (1) The

  12. Compositional effects on the low temperature pumpability of engine oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mac Alpine, G.A.; May, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    An in-depth study of the additive and basestock component factors affecting low temperature viscometrics and oil pumpability of multigrade engine oils has been made. Basestock pour points or residual wax contents alone do not predict low shear viscometric properties of the finished oils under slow cool conditions. Rather, the composition of the wax itself is a key factor with both normal and non-normal paraffins contributing to viscometric increases at low temperatures. It is shown that viscosity index improver and pour depressant selection can prove to be critical in the prevention of oil gelation leading to pumpability failure. The results of these lab viscometric studies have been confirmed in all weather chassis dynamometer tests on five 4-cylinder overhead cam engines.

  13. Evaluation of the Hydrocarbon Maturity Level of Oil Well in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL

    G. Memoir 60: Tulsa, 599 – 614. Emujakporue, O G (2009). Subsidence and geothermal history in the eastern Niger delta with implications for hydrocarbons. Unpublished. Ph. D. Thesis, University of PortHarcourt,. PortHarcourt. Klett, T R; Ahlbrandt, T S; Schmoker, J W; Dolton, J. L (1997). Ranking of the Worlds oil and Gas.

  14. The Application of Biodiesel as an Environmental Friendly Drilling Fluid to Drill Oil and Gas Wells

    OpenAIRE

    Ismail, Abdul Razak

    2014-01-01

    The oil and gas industries need to use oil based drilling fluids to drill troublesome rock layers such as sensitive shale formation or to drill very deep oil and gas wells. However, using oil based drilling fluids will create pollution and therefore, environmental regulations on discharge of such drilling fluids have become more stringent because it will give tremendous impacts on the marine life and ecosystem. This research is conducted to formulate a new environmental friendly drilling flui...

  15. Combined Effect of Pressure and Temperature on the Viscous Behaviour of All-Oil Drilling Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermoso J.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The overall objective of this research was to study the combined influence of pressure and temperature on the complex viscous behaviour of two oil-based drilling fluids. The oil-based fluids were formulated by dispersing selected organobentonites in mineral oil, using a high-shear mixer, at room temperature. Drilling fluid viscous flow characterization was performed with a controlled-stress rheometer, using both conventional coaxial cylinder and non-conventional geometries for High Pressure/High Temperature (HPHT measurements. The rheological data obtained confirm that a helical ribbon geometry is a very useful tool to characterise the complex viscous flow behaviour of these fluids under extreme conditions. The different viscous flow behaviours encountered for both all-oil drilling fluids, as a function of temperature, are related to changes in polymer-oil pair solvency and oil viscosity. Hence, the resulting structures have been principally attributed to changes in the effective volume fraction of disperse phase due to thermally induced processes. Bingham’s and Herschel-Bulkley’s models describe the rheological properties of these drilling fluids, at different pressures and temperatures, fairly well. It was found that Herschel-Bulkley’s model fits much better B34-based oil drilling fluid viscous flow behaviour under HPHT conditions. Yield stress values increase linearly with pressure in the range of temperature studied. The pressure influence on yielding behaviour has been associated with the compression effect of different resulting organoclay microstructures. A factorial WLF-Barus model fitted the combined effect of temperature and pressure on the plastic viscosity of both drilling fluids fairly well, being this effect mainly influenced by the piezo-viscous properties of the continuous phase.

  16. Effect of Temperature, Wettability and Relative Permeability on Oil Recovery from Oil-wet Chalk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Karoussi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available It is customary, for convenience, to use relative permeability data produced at room temperature. This paper shows that this practice underestimates oil recovery rates and ultimate recovery from chalk rocks for high temperature reservoirs. Above a certain temperature (80°C in this work a reduction of oil recovery was observed. The reduction in oil recovery is reflected by the shift of relative permeability data towards more oil-wet at high temperature (tested here 130°C. However, both IFT and contact angle measurements indicate an increase in water wetness as temperature increases, which contradict the results obtained by relative permeability experiments. This phenomenon may be explained based on the total interaction potential, which basically consists of van der Waals attractive and short-range Born repulsive and double layer electrostatic forces. The fluid/rock interactions is shown to be dominated by the repulsive forces above 80°C, hence increase fine detachment enhancing oil trapping. In other words the indicated oil wetness by relative permeability is misleading.

  17. EFFECT OF OIL TEMPERATURE ON THE WAX DEPOSITION OF CRUDE OIL WITH COMPOSITION ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Quan

    Full Text Available Abstract Wax deposition behavior was investigated in a set of one-inch experiment flow loops, using a local crude oil with high wax content. The temperature of the oil phase is chosen as a variable parameter while the temperature of the coolant media is maintained constant. Detailed composition of the deposit is characterized using High Temperature Gas Chromatography. It was found that the magnitude of the diffusion of the heavier waxy components (C35-C50 decreases when the oil temperature decreases, but the magnitude of the diffusion of the lighter waxy components increases. This result means that the diffusion of wax molecules shifts towards lower carbon number, which further proves the concept of molecular diffusion. Meanwhile, a meaningful phenomenon is that the mass of the deposit increases with the oil temperature decrease, which definitely proves the influence of wax solubility on deposition, while the formation of an incipient gel layer reflects the fact that an increase in the mass of the deposit does not mean a larger wax percentage fraction at lower oil temperature.

  18. Geochemical characteristics of oil from well Shacan 2 in the Tarim Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, Yang

    A large amount of oil and gas was discovered from well Shacan 2 on 22 September, 1984. Since then, more oil discoveries have been made from exploration wells. Based on comprehensive studies of the geological and geochemical data, such as physical properties, biomarkers of saturated hydrocarbons and aromatic hydrocarbons, and isotopes of carbon, hydrogen and sulphur, it is found that the oil is characterized by marine algae and lower aquatic organisms. The oil is highly mature, biodegraded and has migrated far from the source. The isomerization of all the biomarkers in the oil is close to or equal to the thermal balance values. In addition, it has some characteristics of Lower Paleozoic oil in the aspects of n-alkane gas chromatography, monoaromatic steroid components and the composition of the isotopes of carbon and sulphur. From geochemical characteristics and an evaluation of the source rocks existing in the area, the oil is postulated to originate from marine Cambrian-Ordovician source rocks.

  19. A Simple Physics-Based Model Predicts Oil Production from Thousands of Horizontal Wells in Shales

    KAUST Repository

    Patzek, Tadeusz

    2017-10-18

    Over the last six years, crude oil production from shales and ultra-deep GOM in the United States has accounted for most of the net increase of global oil production. Therefore, it is important to have a good predictive model of oil production and ultimate recovery in shale wells. Here we introduce a simple model of producing oil and solution gas from the horizontal hydrofractured wells. This model is consistent with the basic physics and geometry of the extraction process. We then apply our model thousands of wells in the Eagle Ford shale. Given well geometry, we obtain a one-dimensional nonlinear pressure diffusion equation that governs flow of mostly oil and solution gas. In principle, solutions of this equation depend on many parameters, but in practice and within a given oil shale, all but three can be fixed at typical values, leading to a nonlinear diffusion problem we linearize and solve exactly with a scaling

  20. Auburn low-temperature geothermal well. Volume 6. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, R.S.; Castor, T.P.

    1983-12-01

    The Auburn well was drilled to explore for low temperature geothermal resources in central New York State. The Auburn site was selected based on: its proximity to the Cayuga County anomaly (30/sup 0/C/km), its favorable local geological conditions and the potential to provide hot water and space heating to two educational facilities. The well was drilled to a total depth of 5250 feet and into the Pre-Cambrian Basement. The well was extensively logged, flow and stress tested, hydraulically stimulated, and pump (pressure transient analysis) tested. The low-temperature geothermal potential was assessed in terms of: geological environment; hydrological conditions; reservoir characteristics; and recoverable hydrothermal reserves. The average geothermal gradient was measured to be as high as 26.7/sup 0/C/km with a bottom-hole temperature of 126/sup 0/ +- 1/sup 0/F. The proved volumetric resources were estimated to be 3.0 x 10/sup 6/ stock tank barrels (STB) with a maximum initial deliverability of approx.11,600 STB/D and a continuous deliverability of approx.3400 STB/D. The proved hydrothermal reserves were estimated to be 21.58 x 10/sup 10/ Btu based on a volumetric component (4.13 x 10/sup 10/ Btu), and a reinjection component (17.45 x 10/sup 10/ Btu). The conclusion was made that the Auburn low-temperature reservoir could be utilized to provide hot water and space heating to the Auburn School District.

  1. Oil and Gas Wells in Southern Louisiana that Penetrated the Lower Miocene 2 Sequence

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The drilling history documents oil and gas wells in the Lower Miocene 2 sequence as a whole and in 10-year intervals. The wells included in this interval are...

  2. Oil and Gas Wells in Southern Louisiana that Penetrated the Middle Miocene Sequence

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The drilling history documents oil and gas wells in the Middle Miocene sequence as a whole and in 10-year intervals. The wells included in this interval are...

  3. Oil and Gas Wells in Southern Louisiana that Penetrated the Upper Miocene Sequence

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The drilling history documents oil and gas wells in the Upper Miocene sequence as a whole and in 10-year intervals. The wells included in this interval are...

  4. Oil and Gas Wells in Southern Louisiana that Penetrated the Lower Miocene 1 Sequence

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The drilling history documents oil and gas wells in the Lower Miocene 1 sequence as a whole and in 10-year intervals. The wells included in this interval are...

  5. Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Natural Gas Wells - Atlantic Region NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains surface locations for oil and gas wells located in the Atlantic federal waters. All wells in the Atlantic Region were completed and abandoned...

  6. Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Natural Gas Wells - Gulf of Mexico Region NAD 27

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains surface locations for oil and gas wells located in the Gulf of Mexico federal waters. Note: Wells are being added or modified continuously;...

  7. Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Natural Gas Wells - Pacific OCS Region NAD 83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains surface locations for oil and gas wells located in the Pacific Coast federal waters. Note: Wells are being added or modified continuously;...

  8. Innovative well-completion strategy for challenging heavy-oil wells within mature fields requiring sand control in Colombia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huimin, YE; Patarroyo, Mauricio [Mansarovar Energy (Colombia); Lopez, Nicolas; Perez, Carlos [Schlumberger (Colombia)

    2011-07-01

    With the depletion of conventional oil resources and the development of new techniques, exploitation of heavy oil wells has become common in Northern South America. Nevertheless those projects face the great challenge of implementing environment and sand management systems while optimizing the production and reservoir's life. The aim of this paper is to present a completion methodology, its results and impacts on the productivity of the reservoir. Different simulations to select the sand control strategy and sensitivity studies to confirm their decision were carried out in the Moriche field, a heavy-oil mature field located in Colombia. Following the simulation results, stainless steel wool based screens were finally chosen and their implementation led to savings in time and costs and the elimination of downhole issues. The use of the completion methodology presented herein on the Moriche wells led to an overall improvement in productivity.

  9. Application of flexible slurries: an alternative for oil wells subject to cyclic steam injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzart, J. Walter P.; Paiva, Maria D.M.; Cunha, Marcelo C.S. [Halliburton Energy Services (HES), Duncan, OK (United States); Farias, Antonio Carlos [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Oil wells that receive cyclic steam injection are subject to high temperature variations during their life cycle. This causes volumetric expansion of the metallic casing which leads to cracks and channels in the formation of the cement. Studies show that volumetric expansion caused by temperature variation may cause wells to rise up to 20-in. at the surface. This paper presents alternative materials that improve the elastic properties of set cement slurries, focusing on maintaining sufficient resilience to maximize the life of the cement. We compare a set of fourteen formulations, some currently in use, selecting those with high flexibility. Analysis was based on the mechanical properties of the set slurries as well as tests according to standards from ABNT and from API Spec 10B. This work contributes new formulations for wells that under-go cyclic steam injection. These new formulations are presented as alternatives to current flexible slurry technology. We can obtain high-quality, more resilient slurries using materials that are more economical, have better cost-benefit, and are easily available in the market. (author)

  10. Hindcast oil spill simulations from the existing offshore wells in the Eastern Mediterranean Levantine Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zodiatis, George; Alves, Tiago M.; Kokinou, Eleni; Radhakrishnan, Hari; Panagiotakis, Costas; Lardner, Robin

    2017-04-01

    Following the expansion of the exploration and exploitation of the hydrocarbons in the Eastern Mediterranean Levantine Basin during the last 5 years, oil spill simulations for 20 existing offshore platforms/wells were carried out based on new and high resolution bathymetric, meteorological, oceanographic, and geomorphological data. The oil spill simulations were carried out using the well known MEDSLIK oil spill model, with the use of high temporal and spatial resolution data for 3D sea currents, winds and waves, provided by the CYCOFOS forecasting system, downscaled from the Copernicus Marine environment monitoring service (CMEMS). The hindcast oil spill simulations from the 20 potential oil spill sources have been prepared for a period of four years, presenting the movement of the spills and the area affected, the fate parameters, the first impact on the coast and the extend of the affected coastline from each location every week. The modeled oil spills took into account the oil spill scenario following the REMPEC MEDEXPOL 2013 experiment. Moreover, a qualitative analysis of the seabed morphology has been applied to examine the direction of the oil slick expansion, shown that the direction of the major axis of the oil spills, in most of the cases examined, is oriented according to the prevailing azimuth of bathymetric features. The oil spill simulations from the existing offshore wells/platforms, show a clear trend for east and northeast movement of the oil spills in the Eastern Mediterranean Levantine Basin, with the first impact at the coast in a time interval between 1 to 20 days after the first oil spilled at sea, depending on the location of the platforms/wells and of the intensity and direction of the meteo-ocean data.

  11. Frying temperatures and minor constituents of oils and fats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boskou, Dimitrios

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Two important classes of minor constituents of oils and fats are tocopherols and sterols. Both these classes are biologically active and they also affect the stability and performance of an oil at elevated temperatures. Tocopherols are phenolic antioxidants that react with free radicals and their concentration is reduced signifantly when the oil is heated. α-TocopheroI is lost faster during deep-fat frying than the beta, gamma and delta homologues. In the presence of stronger antioxidants, natural or synthetic, losses of α-tocopherol can be eliminated. Unchanged phytosterols naturally present in vegetable oils are believed to be beneficial for the health. Depending on the chemical structure, phytosterols may act as prooxidants or antioxidants. Sterols with an ethylidene group in the side chain have been found effective in retarding polymerisation at temperatures similar to those of deep-fat frying. Under unfavourable conditions (high temperature, presence of air oxidation products are formed from sterols and a marked increase in the oxidation rate of the fat is observed. Oxidation products of the main phytosterols, β-sitosterol and stigmasterol, are: hydrocarbons (3,5-diene and 3,5,22-triene, mono-, di- and triunsaturated ketosteroids (4-en-3-one, 3,5-dien-7-one, 3,5,22-trien-7-one, 5,6-epoxy derivatives, 3,7-diols and pregnane derivatives. Other minor constituents which may affect the rate of degradation of unsaturated triacylglycerols at high temperatures are squalene, pigments and phospholipids. Squalene and phospholipids have both been reported to retard the degradation of unsaturated fatty acids under simulated frying conditions. High chlorophyll levels were found to increase the rate of tocopherol decomposition and formation of polymers in rape seed oil heated at 180°C.

  12. Oil and gas wells and pipelines on U.S. wildlife refuges: challenges for managers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Ramirez

    Full Text Available The increased demand for oil and gas places a burden on lands set aside for natural resource conservation. Oil and gas development alters the environment locally and on a much broader spatial scale depending on the intensity and extent of mineral resource extraction. The current increase in oil and gas exploration and production in the United States prompted an update of the number of pipelines and wells associated with oil and gas production on National Wildlife Refuge System (NWRS lands. We obtained geospatial data on the location of oil and gas wells and pipelines within and close to the boundaries of NWRS lands (units acquired as fee simple (i.e. absolute title to the surface land by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. We found that 5,002 wells are located in 107 NWRS units and 595 pipelines transect 149 of the 599 NWRS units. Almost half of the wells (2,196 were inactive, one-third (1,665 were active, and the remainder of the wells were either plugged and abandoned or the status was unknown. Pipelines crossed a total of 2,155 kilometers (1,339 miles of NWRS fee simple lands. The high level of oil and gas activity warrants follow up assessments for wells lacking information on production type or well status with emphasis on verifying the well status and identifying abandoned and unplugged wells. NWRS fee simple lands should also be assessed for impacts from brine, oil and other hydrocarbon spills, as well as habitat alteration associated with oil and gas, including the identification of abandoned oil and gas facilities requiring equipment removal and site restoration.

  13. Oil and gas wells and pipelines on U.S. wildlife refuges: challenges for managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Pedro; Mosley, Sherri Baker

    2015-01-01

    The increased demand for oil and gas places a burden on lands set aside for natural resource conservation. Oil and gas development alters the environment locally and on a much broader spatial scale depending on the intensity and extent of mineral resource extraction. The current increase in oil and gas exploration and production in the United States prompted an update of the number of pipelines and wells associated with oil and gas production on National Wildlife Refuge System (NWRS) lands. We obtained geospatial data on the location of oil and gas wells and pipelines within and close to the boundaries of NWRS lands (units) acquired as fee simple (i.e. absolute title to the surface land) by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. We found that 5,002 wells are located in 107 NWRS units and 595 pipelines transect 149 of the 599 NWRS units. Almost half of the wells (2,196) were inactive, one-third (1,665) were active, and the remainder of the wells were either plugged and abandoned or the status was unknown. Pipelines crossed a total of 2,155 kilometers (1,339 miles) of NWRS fee simple lands. The high level of oil and gas activity warrants follow up assessments for wells lacking information on production type or well status with emphasis on verifying the well status and identifying abandoned and unplugged wells. NWRS fee simple lands should also be assessed for impacts from brine, oil and other hydrocarbon spills, as well as habitat alteration associated with oil and gas, including the identification of abandoned oil and gas facilities requiring equipment removal and site restoration.

  14. Grinding temperature and energy ratio coefficient in MQL grinding of high-temperature nickel-base alloy by using different vegetable oils as base oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Benkai

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Vegetable oil can be used as a base oil in minimal quantity of lubrication (MQL. This study compared the performances of MQL grinding by using castor oil, soybean oil, rapeseed oil, corn oil, sunflower oil, peanut oil, and palm oil as base oils. A K-P36 numerical-control precision surface grinder was used to perform plain grinding on a workpiece material with a high-temperature nickel base alloy. A YDM–III 99 three-dimensional dynamometer was used to measure grinding force, and a clip-type thermocouple was used to determine grinding temperature. The grinding force, grinding temperature, and energy ratio coefficient of MQL grinding were compared among the seven vegetable oil types. Results revealed that (1 castor oil-based MQL grinding yields the lowest grinding force but exhibits the highest grinding temperature and energy ratio coefficient; (2 palm oil-based MQL grinding generates the second lowest grinding force but shows the lowest grinding temperature and energy ratio coefficient; (3 MQL grinding based on the five other vegetable oils produces similar grinding forces, grinding temperatures, and energy ratio coefficients, with values ranging between those of castor oil and palm oil; (4 viscosity significantly influences grinding force and grinding temperature to a greater extent than fatty acid varieties and contents in vegetable oils; (5 although more viscous vegetable oil exhibits greater lubrication and significantly lower grinding force than less viscous vegetable oil, high viscosity reduces the heat exchange capability of vegetable oil and thus yields a high grinding temperature; (6 saturated fatty acid is a more efficient lubricant than unsaturated fatty acid; and (7 a short carbon chain transfers heat more effectively than a long carbon chain. Palm oil is the optimum base oil of MQL grinding, and this base oil yields 26.98 N tangential grinding force, 87.10 N normal grinding force, 119.6 °C grinding temperature, and 42.7% energy

  15. Drilling and operating oil, gas, and geothermal wells in an H/sub 2/S environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dosch, M.W.; Hodgson, S.F.

    1981-01-01

    The following subjects are covered: facts about hydrogen sulfides; drilling and operating oil, gas, and geothermal wells; detection devices and protective equipment; hazard levels and safety procedures; first aid; and H/sub 2/S in California oil, gas, and geothermal fields. (MHR)

  16. Optimization of Well Placement and Production for Large-scale Mature Oil Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Optimal oil field development strategies, especially well locations and production strategies for mature oil fields, should be determined to sustain yields. For a large-scale oil field, these problems are nonlinear, nonconvex, and computationally expensive. In this study, an efficient and robust derivative-free computational framework was developed to determine the optimal number, locations, and injection/production rates of infill wells for mature oil fields. The characteristics of mature fields were briefly described; optimization formulation and computational framework were presented. For this problem, the robust and parallelizable PSwarm, a hybrid of a pattern search algorithm and a particle swarm optimization, was investigated. The approach was applied to a large-scale real oil field that currently includes approximately 200 wells. Our optimized results were compared with those of the current plan provided by the oil industry. In particular, a higher oil production with the same amount of water injection and a higher net present value were obtained by our optimized approach than by the current plan. Therefore, the new derivative-free computational framework can efficiently solve well placement and production optimization problems for large-scale mature oil fields

  17. Performance of Surfactant Methyl Ester Sulphonate solution for Oil Well Stimulation in reservoir sandstone TJ Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eris, F. R.; Hambali, E.; Suryani, A.; Permadi, P.

    2017-05-01

    Asphaltene, paraffin, wax and sludge deposition, emulsion and water blocking are kinds ofprocess that results in a reduction of the fluid flow from the reservoir into formation which causes a decrease of oil wells productivity. Oil well Stimulation can be used as an alternative to solve oil well problems. Oil well stimulation technique requires applying of surfactant. Sodium Methyl Ester Sulphonate (SMES) of palm oil is an anionic surfactant derived from renewable natural resource that environmental friendly is one of potential surfactant types that can be used in oil well stimulation. This study was aimed at formulation SMES as well stimulation agent that can identify phase transitions to phase behavior in a brine-surfactant-oil system and altered the wettability of rock sandstone and limestone. Performance of SMES solution tested by thermal stability test, phase behavioral examination and rocks wettability test. The results showed that SMES solution (SMES 5% + xylene 5% in the diesel with addition of 1% NaCl at TJformation water and SMES 5% + xylene 5% in methyl ester with the addition of NaCl 1% in the TJ formation water) are surfactant that can maintain thermal stability, can mostly altered the wettability toward water-wet in sandstone reservoir, TJ Field.

  18. Proppant-flowback control in high-temperature wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    Proppant flowback following fracturing treatments can be controlled by use of resin-coated proppant, inorganic fibers, or polymer strips. Each of these technologies has limitations. Resin-coated proppants cannot be used above 374 F and require an activator below 158 F. Thermoplastic strips cannot be used at temperatures above their melting point. Glass fibers have been used successfully for proppant-flowback control, but they cannot be used at reservoir temperatures below 302 F, they provide only short-term control in carbonate reservoirs, and they cannot be used in an environment where they would be exposed to HF. A new high-performance fiber for proppant-flow-back control has been developed to overcome these limitations. In laboratory testing, these fibers were resistant to steam, diesel, xylene, HCl, and mud acid at temperatures up to 482 F for periods up to 7 months. Field testing in deep, hot, carbonate reservoirs confirmed the performance of the new fiber. Case histories of gas wells are given.

  19. Automating a submerged pump method for operating oil wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popa, I.

    1984-01-01

    The basic parameters of wells which operate in a mode of submerged operation are presented. The basic systems for measuring and testing the parameters of submerged operation are described. Worldwide experience in solving this particular problem is analyzed. Romanian (SRR) use of systems for automation, remote signaling and remote management is examined.

  20. Macondo-1 well oil in sediment and tarballs from the northern Gulf of Mexico shoreline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Florence L.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Campbell, Pamela L.; Lam, Angela; Lorenson, T.D.; Hostettler, Frances D.; Thomas, Burt

    2011-01-01

    From April 20 through July 15, 2010, an estimated 4.4 million barrels (1 barrel = 42 gallons [~700,000 cu m]) of crude oil spilled into the northern Gulf of Mexico (nGOM) from the ruptured British Petroleum (BP) Macondo-1 (M-1) well after the explosion of the drilling platform Deepwater Horizon. In addition, ~1.84 million gallons (~7,000 cu m) of hydrocarbon-based Corexit dispersants were applied to the oil both on and below the sea surface (Operational Science Advisory Team, 2010). An estimate of the total extent of the surface oil slick, derived from wind, ocean currents, aerial photography, and satellite imagery, was 68,000 square miles (~180,000 sq km; Amos and Norse, 2010). Spilled oil from this event impacted sensitive habitat along the shores of the nGOM. In response to this environmental catastrophe, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected coastal sediment and tarball samples along the shores of the nGOM from Texas to Florida before and after oil made landfall. These sites included priority areas of the nGOM at highest risk for oil contamination. These areas included coastal wetlands, shorelines, and barrier islands that could suffer severe environmental damage if a significant amount of oil came ashore. Samples were collected before oil reached land from 69 sites; 49 were revisited to collect samples after oil landfall. This poster focuses on the samples from locations that were sampled on both occasions. The USGS samples and one M-1 well-oil sample provided by BP were analyzed for a suite of diagnostic geochemical biomarkers. Aided by multivariate statistical analysis, the M-1 well oil was not detected in the samples collected before landfall but have been identified in sediment and tarballs collected from Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi, and Florida after landfall. None of the sediment hydrocarbon extracts from Texas correlated with the M-1 well oil. Oil-impacted sediment is confined to the shoreline adjacent to the cumulative oil slick of the

  1. Temperature and Frequency Dependent Empirical Models of Dielectric Properties of Sunflower and Olive Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vrba

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a known concept and measurement probe geometry for the estimation of the dielectric properties of oils have been adapted. The new probe enables the~measurement in the frequency range of 1 to 3000 MHz. Additionally, the measurement probe has been equipped with a~heat exchanger, which has enabled us to measure the dielectric properties of sunflower and olive oil as well as of two commercial emulsion concentrates. Subsequently, corresponding linear empirical temperature and frequency dependent models of the dielectric properties of the above mentioned oils and concentrates have been created. The dielectric properties measured here as well as the values obtained based on the empirical models created here match the data published in professional literature very well.

  2. The application of microbial combination flooding oil recovery technology in heavy oil reservoir with low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongbin; Wang, Jing; Wang, Yanjun; Ju, Dengfeng; Fu, Yaxiu; Lei, Xiaoyang; Jing, Jizhe; Liu, Guiying

    2017-04-01

    HuabeiBaolige Oilfield belongs to the common heavy oil reservoirs with low temperature, which were tapped by the conventional waterflooding. The formation temperature of Baolige Oilfield is 38~58°C, and the oil viscosity of reservoir is 13.7~2000mPa•s. Thanks to the high oil-water viscosity ratio and strong heterogeneity, the small waterflooding swept volume and serious water breakthrough are caused by waterflooding fingering, causing that the workable reserve cannot be used efficiently during the oilfield development. According to the characteristic that the environment of the reservoirs is fit for the growth and reproduction of microorganism, the microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) technology is used to improve oilfield development status. On the basis of continuous and further studies of MEOR, the industrialized application of MEOR has been fulfilled. By the continuous and further study, the efficient system of the combination flooding technology with oil displacement microbial fields was formed, and MEOR technologies have been enriched. All the above researches could provide technical ideas for the comprehensive treatment for similar blocks.

  3. Influence of reaction temperature on yields of bio-oil from fast pyrolysis of sugarcane residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suntorn Suttibak

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a study on production of pyrolysis oil from sugarcane residues, namely sugarcane bagasse (SB, sugarcane leaves (SL and sugarcane tops (ST. This research investigated the effects of reaction temperature on pyrolysis products of these residues. Pyrolysis oil samples were characterized. Their elemental composition, density, pH value, viscosity and heating values as well as water, solids, ash contents were determined. It was found that the optimal reaction temperatures for pyrolysis of SB, SL and ST were 499°C, 403°C and 402°C, which gave maximal oil yields of 64.6, 53.4, and 52.2 wt.% on a dry biomass basis, respectively.

  4. Oil and Gas Wells in the Wyoming Basins (8/31/2005)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A complete set of wells associated with oil, natural gas, and coal bed natural gas development in the western states as of August 31, 2005. This is a static dataset...

  5. Oil and gas wells data for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI), southwestern Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This feature class was created to assemble oil and gas well information for a comprehensive inventory of energy data pertinent to the Wyoming Landscape Conservation...

  6. Map service: Oil and gas wells for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI), southwestern Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map service was created to assemble oil and gas well information for a comprehensive inventory of energy data pertinent to the Wyoming Landscape Conservation...

  7. A novel model for predicting the temperature profile in gas lift wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Mahdiani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common methods for calculating the production oil rate in a gas lift well is nodal analysis. This manner is an accurate one, but unfortunately it is very time consuming and slow. In some modern studies in petroleum engineering such as close loop control of the wells this slowness makes it impossible to have an online optimization. In fact, before the end of the optimization the input parameters have changed. Thus having a faster model is necessary specially in some of the new studies. One of the sources of slowness of the nodal analysis is the temperature profile estimation of the wells. There are two general approaches for temperature profile estimation, some like heat balance are accurate but slow. Others, similar to linear profile assumption are fast but inaccurate and usually are not used commonly. Here, as a new approach, a combination model of heat balance and linear temperature profile estimation has represented which makes the nodal analysis three times faster and it is as accurate as heat balance calculations. To create this, two points (gas injection point and end of tubing are selected, then using heat balance equations the temperature of those two points are calculated. In normal nodal analysis the temperature of each wanted point in the well is estimated by heat balance and it is the source of slowness but here just two points are calculated using those complex equations. It seems that between these points assuming a linear temperature profile is reasonable because the parameters of the well and production such as physical tubing, and casing shape and properties and gas oil ratio are constants. But of course, it still has some deviation from the complete method of heat balance which using regression and assigning a coefficient to the model even this much of the deviation could be overcame. Finally, the model was tested in various wells and it was compared with the normal nodal analysis with complete heat balance

  8. Validation of ESP Oil Wells Measured Parameters Using Simulation Olga Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganat, T. A.; Hrairi, M.; Hawlader, MNA

    2017-03-01

    The significant challenge in the oil and gas industry is the concurrent measurement of commingled gas, oil and water production, either using three phase test separator or multiphase flow meter (MPFM). A major issue in these applications is the uncertainty of the measurements, due to different measurement operations conditions. A new computational approach has been generated to estimate oil well flow rate of 48 oil wells using Electrical Submersible pump (ESP) from D, G, and W oil fields located in North Africa. The idea is to close the wellhead wing valve and the ESP is kept running normally and the wellhead flowing pressure before shut-in the well and the build-up of wellhead flowing pressure after shut-in the well are measured. OLGA software has been used to make comparison with multiphase flow model available in the OLGA software against each nominated ESP oil well parameters obtained from measured field data. The objective was to verify the obtained shut-in wellhead pressure after closing the choke wing valve (WHPa) from the measured field data with the obtained shut-in wellhead pressure valve from the simulation model. In this paper the simulation results showed that the estimated WHPa are in agreement with the measured WHPa. The relative errors for individual oil field are within accuracy standard specification (typically +/- 10%). The overall relative errors are low and within acceptable uncertainty range, where the aggregate relative error for all wells was less than +/-4% which is considered acceptable. Therefore, the results have demonstrated that the new computational method can work under ESP oil wells conditions and has the ability to perform accurate results even when closing the wellhead wing valve for short time span.

  9. Oil and gas wells of Afghanistan with well logs (welllogafg.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This shapefile contains points that describe the location of hydrocarbon exploration and production wells drilled in Afghanistan; and hyperlinks to scanned images of...

  10. Solubility of crude oil in methane as a function of pressure and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, L.C.; Wenger, L.M.; Ging, T.; Blount, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    solubility, as does the presence of fine grained rocks. The n-paraffin distributions (as well as the overall composition) of the solute condensates are controlled by the temperature and pressure of solution and exsolution, as well as by the composition of the original starting material. It appears quite possible that primary migration by gaseous solution could 'strip' a source rock of crude-oil like components leaving behind a bitumen totally unlike the migrated crude oil. The data of this study demonstrate previous criticisms of primary petroleum migration by gas solution are invalid; that primary migration by gaseous solution cannot occur because methane cannot dissolve sufficient volumes of crude oil or cannot dissolve the highest molecular weight components of petroleum (tars and asphaltenes). ?? 1983.

  11. Temperature data from wells in Long Valley Caldera, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, Christopher; DeAngelo, Jacob; Williams, Colin; Grubb, Frederick; Hurwitz, Shaul

    2010-01-01

    The 30-by-20-km Long Valley Caldera (LVC) in eastern California (fig.1) formed at 0.76 Ma in a cataclysmic eruption that resulted in the deposition of 600 km? of Bishop Tuff outside the caldera rim (Bailey, 1989). By approximately 0.6 Ma, uplift of the central part of the caldera floor and eruption of rhyolitic lava formed the resurgent dome. The most recent eruptive activity in the area occurred approximately 600 yr ago along the Mono-Inyo craters volcanic chain (Bailey, 2004; Hildreth, 2004). LVC hosts an active hydrothermal system that includes hot springs, fumaroles, mineral deposits, and an active geothermal well field and power plant at Casa Diablo along the southwestern boundary of the resurgent dome (Sorey and Lewis, 1976; Sorey and others, 1978; Sorey and others, 1991). Electric power generation began in 1985 with about 10 Mwe net capacity and was expanded to about 40 Mwe (net) in 1991 (Campbell, 2000; Suemnicht and others, 2007). Plans for further expansion are focused mainly on targets in the caldera?s western moat (Sass and Priest, 2002) where the most recent volcanic activity has occurred (Hildreth, 2004). LVC has been the site of extensive research on geothermal resources and volcanic hazards (Bailey and others, 1976; Muffler and Williams, 1976; Miller and others, 1982; Hill and others 2002). The first geothermal exploratory drilling was done in the shallow (cold groundwater recharge that occurs mostly around the caldera margin and beneath the resurgent dome. Reservoir temperatures at Casa Diablo (fig.1) are about 170?C (for example, MBP-3 and Mammoth-1), decreasing to about 100 degrees C in wells near Hot Creek Gorge (for example, MW-4 and CH-10B), and are generally less than 50?C in thermal springs near Lake

  12. Quantification of Methane Leaks from Abandoned Oil and Gas Wells in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebel, E.; Kang, M.; Lu, H.; Jackson, R. B.

    2016-12-01

    Abandoned oil and gas wells can provide a pathway for subterranean methane and other gases to be emitted to the atmosphere. However, abandoned wells are unaccounted for in greenhouse gas emissions inventories. While relatively little is known about abandoned wells, previous studies have shown that emissions from abandoned wells contribute approximately 4-7% of anthropogenic methane emissions in Pennsylvania (Kang et al. 2014) and Ohio, and Wyoming (Townsend-Small et al. 2015). Another study (Boothroyd et al. 2016) has shown that 30% of abandoned wells in the UK have a positive surface methane flux. California has a long history of oil and gas production, beginning from the 1860s, and currently ranks third in oil production by state. As a result, there are more than 100,000 wells across the state. Our study uses static flux chambers to measure individual abandoned wells in California to estimate state-wide methane emissions from these wells. In addition to measuring methane concentrations, we measure ethane, propane, isobutane, n-butane, and 13-CH4 to understand whether this methane has a biogenic or thermogenic source. We hope that our research will determine whether or not abandoned oil and gas wells are a significant source of anthropogenic methane emissions in California. Our results along with measurements in other parts of the United States can be used to scale up methane emission estimates to the national level, accounting for the millions of abandoned wells in the country.

  13. Multisensor Research Technologies of Oil Horizontal Wells on Fields of the Republic of Tatarstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Kh. Khairullin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the Republic of Tatarstan the development widely involves hard-to-recover reserves of hydrocarbons, confined to low-permeable, heterogeneous and dissected reservoirs. Improvement of recovery efficiency of such reserves largely depends on the operational control system based on information about the filtration and thermal properties of the oil reservoir. Issues, related to the interpretation of geological field information, lead to incorrect mathematical problems in terms of Hadamard. The numerical solution of such problems requires the development of special methods. A mathematical model of thermohydrodynamic processes occurring in the ‘horizontal well’ system is constructed in the paper. Based on this model and regularization methods of A.N. Tikhonov, a computational algorithm is proposed for interpreting the results of thermohydrodynamic studies of horizontal wells and layers. Curves of the temperature changes are taken as the initial information, taken simultaneously by several deep instruments installed at different parts of the horizontal part of the wellbore. This approach makes it possible to evaluate the filtration parameters of an inhomogeneous reservoir and to construct an inflow profile along the trunk of a horizontal well.

  14. Unconventional Oil Reserves Development in the Viking Play (Western Canada Using Horizontal Wells and Hydraulic Fracturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.B. Baishev

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Oil production from the Viking play in Saskatchewan province started in the 1950s and continues since that time. Horizontal drilling and multistage fracturing have caused resurgence in development of this play. Based on the production data from several fields, the comparative results of the Viking play development using vertical and horizontal wells are presented. Horizontal wells drilling made it possible to increase oil production in those formation zones that were previously considered predominantly gas-saturated, as well as in the zones affected by water injection using vertical wells in order to maintain reservoir pressure. Infill drilling combined with longer lateral completion length also positively affected the development of oil reserves from the Viking play.

  15. Experimental investigation of temperature effect on yield of a pool of oil possessing viscoelastic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ametov, I.M.; Baidikov, Yu.N.; Berezhnoi, N.I.; Bereryuk, I.M.; Ruzin, L.M.

    1982-02-01

    The effect of temperature on petroleum yield of a pool of viscoelastic oil when displaced by water from a viable porous medium model is considered. Based on experiments, a nonmonotonous character of the dependence of the oil yield on temperature is established. A decrease of oil yield following a rise in temperature is noted. This is explained by an anomaly of viscoelastic properties within that temperature interval.

  16. Spatial Risk Analysis of Hydraulic Fracturing near Abandoned and Converted Oil and Gas Wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownlow, Joshua W; Yelderman, Joe C; James, Scott C

    2017-03-01

    Interaction between hydraulically generated fractures and existing wells (frac hits) could represent a potential risk to groundwater. In particular, frac hits on abandoned oil and gas wells could lead to upward leakage into overlying aquifers, provided migration pathways are present along the abandoned well. However, potential risk to groundwater is relatively unknown because few studies have investigated the probability of frac hits on abandoned wells. In this study, actual numbers of frac hits were not determined. Rather, the probability for abandoned wells to intersect hypothetical stimulated reservoir sizes of horizontal wells was investigated. Well data were compiled and analyzed for location and reservoir information, and sensitivity analyses were conducted by varying assumed sizes of stimulated reservoirs. This study used public and industry data for the Eagle Ford Shale play in south Texas, with specific attention paid to abandoned oil and gas wells converted into water wells (converted wells). In counties with Eagle Ford Shale activity, well-data analysis identified 55,720 abandoned wells with a median age of 1983, and 2400 converted wells with a median age of 1954. The most aggressive scenario resulted in 823 abandoned wells and 184 converted wells intersecting the largest assumed stimulated reservoir size. Analysis showed abandoned wells have the potential to be intersected by multiple stimulated reservoirs, and risks for intersection would increase if currently permitted horizontal wells in the Eagle Ford Shale are actually completed. Results underscore the need to evaluate historical oil and gas activities in areas with modern unconventional oil and gas activities. © 2016, National Ground Water Association.

  17. 25 CFR 226.25 - Gas well drilled by oil lessees and vice versa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the gas lessee does not, within 45 days after receiving notice and cost of drilling, elect to take over such well and reimburse the oil lessee the cost of drilling, including all damages paid and the... notice and cost of drilling, elect to take over the well, he/she must immediately notify the gas lessee...

  18. The Role of Well Control Training in Developing Safe Onshore and Offshore Oil Drilling Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulhassn, Aber

    2016-01-01

    This research investigates the role of the International Well Control Forum (IWCF) Rotary Drilling Well Control Training Program in developing safe oil drilling operations from the perspective of onshore and offshore drilling crews. The research methodology is a qualitative case study. A total of 40 IWCF candidates were interviewed, with 10 from…

  19. An Investigation on Gas Lift Performance Curve in an Oil-Producing Well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deni Saepudin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective in oil production system using gas lift technique is to obtain the optimum gas injection rate which yields the maximum oil production rate. Relationship between gas injection rate and oil production rate is described by a continuous gas lift performance curve (GLPC. Obtaining the optimum gas injection rate is important because excessive gas injection will reduce production rate, and also increase the operation cost. In this paper, we discuss a mathematical model for gas lift technique and the characteristics of the GLPC for a production well, for which one phase (liquid is flowing in the reservoir, and two phases (liquid and gas in the tubing. It is shown that in certain physical condition the GLPC exists and is unique. Numerical computations indicate unimodal properties of the GLPC. It is also constructed here a numerical scheme based on genetic algorithm to compute the optimum oil production.

  20. Non-equilibrium temperature of well-developed quantum turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jou, D. [Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Mongiovi, M.S., E-mail: mongiovi@unipa.i [Dipartimento di Metodi e Modelli Matematici, Universita di Palermo, Facolta di Ingegneria, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy)

    2009-06-22

    A non-equilibrium effective temperature of quantum vortex tangles is defined as the average energy of closed vortex loops. The resulting thermodynamic expressions for the entropy and the energy in terms of the temperature of the tangle are confirmed by a microscopic analysis based on a potential distribution function for the length of vortex loops. Furthermore, these expressions for the entropy and energy in terms of temperature are analogous to those of black holes: this may be of interest for establishing further connections between topological defects in superfluids and cosmology.

  1. Oil deposits: old wells play extra time; Gisements petroliers: les vieux puits jouent les prolongations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepetit, V.

    2006-03-15

    The renewal level of petroleum reserves is decreasing continuously and the number of new field discoveries too. However, the oil companies have to increase their efficiency by a better localisation of hydrocarbons and an improvement of the recovery. 70% of the world hydrocarbon production comes from mature fields exploited since more than 20 years. The world recovery ratio is of about 30 to 35% for conventional oil. For heavy crudes and bitumens it never exceeds 20%. Each percent gained on the recovery level corresponds to 2 years of world consumption or to 20 to 30 billions barrels of additional reserves. The solutions to increase the recovery come from the computerized simulation and the dynamic mapping of the deposits and also from improved well logging, well stimulation and enhanced recovery techniques, like bottom-well hydro-cyclones for the in situ oil-water separation. (J.S.)

  2. Symposium on high-temperature well-logging instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis, B.R. (comp.)

    1986-06-01

    The symposium contains papers about developments in borehole logging instrumentation that can withstand downhole temperatures in excess of 300/sup 0/C and pressures greater than 103 MPa. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual papers. (ACR)

  3. Temperature Dependence of Dark Current in Quantum Well Infrared Detectors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hickey, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    ...) /cu cm were gathered and analyzed for various temperatures. The device was cooled with a closed cycle refrigerator, and the data were acquired using the Agilent 4155B Semiconductor Parameter Analyzer...

  4. A new method to determine oxidative stability of vegetable fats and oils at simulated frying temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gertz Christian

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A new procedure at simulated frying conditions in our laboratory was developed to monitor frying stability of fats and oils. Water-conditioned silica was prepared and added to the fresh vegetable oil, which was heated for two hours at 170°C. The oil stability at frying temperature was then evaluated by determining the amount of formed dimeric triglycerides The results obtained showed that the stability of the vegetable oils at frying temperature could not be explained by the fatty acid composition alone. Corn oil was observed to be more stable than soybean oil, and rapeseed oil was better than olive oil. It was also observed that crude, non-refined oils were found to have a better heat stability than refin-ed oils. To estimate the effectiveness of synthetic and naturally occurring antioxidants, namely various tocopherols, tocopherol acetate and phytosterol fractions, phenolic compounds like quercetin, oryzanol, ferulic acid, gallates, BHT, BHA and other compounds like ascorbic acid 6-palmitate and squalene were added to refined sunflower and rape seed oil, and their oxidative stability at elevated temperature (OSET values determined. Both linoleic and oleic rich oils gave comparable results for the activity of the various compounds. alpha-tocopherol, tocopherol esters and BHA had low effects on oil stability at frying temperature, while ascorbyl palmitate and some phytosterol fractions were found to have the most stabilizing activity under frying conditions.

  5. [Health of women living near oil wells and oil production stations in the Amazon region of Ecuador].

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Sebastián, M; Armstrong, B; Stephens, C

    2001-06-01

    Investigate the environmental conditions in and the state of health of women who live in rural communities surrounded by oil wells and oil production stations in the Amazon region of Ecuador. We used a comparative cross-sectional design, classifying exposure according to the location of the communities with respect to the oil wells and production stations. Water samples from the local rivers were analyzed to determine total petroleum hydrocarbons, and a structured questionnaire was used with the head of each family in the study. The study was performed in rural communities in northeastern Ecuador from November 1998 through April 1999. The study included 9 communities in the exposed area (368 participants) and 14 communities in the unexposed area (291 participants). The rivers of the exposed communities showed contamination levels much above the limits acceptable for human use. Statistically significant differences between the exposed communities and the unexposed communities were found for the prevalence of skin fungi for the two weeks prior to the study (odds ratio (OR) = 1.37; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.01-1.86) as well as for nasal irritation (OR = 2.18, 95% CI = 1.64-2.91) and for throat irritation (OR = 1.68, 95% CI = 1.02-2.75) in the preceding 12 months. Also associated with exposure in the two preceding weeks were fatigue and the category of "other symptoms"; similarly associated with exposure in the preceding 12 months were headaches, eye irritation, earaches, diarrhea, and gastritis. The symptoms found among the participants in the exposed communities match the toxicity symptoms caused by oil. There is an urgent need to establish an adequate environmental control and remediation program in order to prevent unnecessary and unacceptable health hazards for these populations.

  6. Natural gas and temperature structured a microbial community response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Molly C; Valentine, David L

    2012-12-11

    Microbial communities present in the Gulf of Mexico rapidly responded to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. In deep water plumes, these communities were initially dominated by members of Oceanospirillales, Colwellia, and Cycloclasticus. None of these groups were abundant in surface oil slick samples, and Colwellia was much more abundant in oil-degrading enrichment cultures incubated at 4 °C than at room temperature, suggesting that the colder temperatures at plume depth favored the development of these communities. These groups decreased in abundance after the well was capped in July, but the addition of hydrocarbons in laboratory incubations of deep waters from the Gulf of Mexico stimulated Colwellia's growth. Colwellia was the primary organism that incorporated (13)C from ethane and propane in stable isotope probing experiments, and given its abundance in environmental samples at the time that ethane and propane oxidation rates were high, it is likely that Colwellia was active in ethane and propane oxidation in situ. Colwellia also incorporated (13)C benzene, and Colwellia's abundance in crude oil enrichments without natural gas suggests that it has the ability to consume a wide range of hydrocarbon compounds or their degradation products. However, the fact that ethane and propane alone were capable of stimulating the growth of Colwellia, and to a lesser extent, Oceanospirillales, suggests that high natural gas content of this spill may have provided an advantage to these organisms.

  7. Some contrast agents in oil well logging and in medical MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R J

    1993-04-01

    Magnetite particles and paramagnetic ion chelates are used as contrast agents in both nuclear magnetism logging of oil wells and in medical MRI. An analytic expression for reduction of T2 for free precession signal decay (or gradient echoes) by magnetite particles does not depend on diffusion and agrees with published Monte Carlo computations.

  8. Ionic interactions in the water zone at oil well-sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleven, R.

    1996-11-01

    The aim of this doctoral thesis has been to obtain a better understanding of ionic behaviour in a water zone of sedimentary rock exposed to sea-water based drilling fluid and completion fluid. Interaction processes addressed have been ion exchange on the surface of the reservoir rocks and precipitation of divalent cations with sulphate ions from the sea water. Clay minerals are focused on because of their ability to conduct electricity through ion-exchange reactions. The most important parameters that the distribution of ions around a borehole depends upon are suggested to be (1) the ability of the sedimentary rocks to sorb/desorb ions, (2) the effect of added solutions on the sorption/desorption processes, (3) the mobility of ions. The first of four enclosed papers studies ionic interaction, mainly on homo-ionic clay mineral - salt solution, in batch experiments under pH, ionic strength and temperature conditions likely to occur in the field. Paper II investigates the use of tritiated water as a reference tracer in miscible displacement processes in porous sandstone cores. Ionic interaction processes during drilling of oil wells with conventional KCl bentonite mud tagged with HTO were studied by means of measured ionic and HTO concentration of water sampled in the near well-bore region. A tracer method was developed and ``tracer diagrams`` illustrate sorption/desorption processes. The water analyses, sampling procedure, and tracer techniques are presented in the third paper. Paper IV compares the interpretation of laboratory data and field data. 173 refs., 47 figs., 22 tabs.

  9. Temperature Calculation in Respect of Basic Elements of Power Oil Transformer on the Basis of Its Tank Surface Temperature Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Zalizny

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a real-time calculation algorithm of oil, winding and magnetic core temperature of power transformer on the basis of measured values of tank surface temperature and air temperature without measuring current. The algorithm is based on the calculation of the equivalent load factor of the transformer. Imitation simulation has confirmed efficiency of the algorithm. After tests on functioning transformers the algorithm can be used in thermal protection devices and diagnostic devices for power oil transformers.

  10. The Gulf of Mexico ecosystem - Before, during and after the Deepwater Horizon oil well blowout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joye, Samantha B.

    2016-07-01

    The Gulf of Mexico ocean basin represents a highly unique, diverse, and dynamic ecosystem. The Gulf system developed in the Triassic and is underpinned by a large salt body (the widespread Louann salt halite body as well as some locally important sulfur containing evaporates). The Gulf is a prolific hydrocarbon basin, noted by widespread natural seepage of oil and gas through deep sediments to the water column. The Gulf system supports a range of economically critical industries, including recreational tourism, a range of fisheries, and oil and gas industry exploration that, together, form a backbone of the Gulf economy.

  11. Computer-Based Monitoring and Remote Controlling for Oil Well Pumps Using Scada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudi Tjiptadi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The research aims to change manually the monitoring and controlling of oil well pumps into a computer-based system using SCADA (Supervisory and Data Acquisition system. To design the protection system which consists of controller unit and display system, RTU (Remote Terminal Unit and MTU (Master Terminal Unit are used. The research results in a controller unit which is able to communicate to personal computer using RS-232 C and an alarm system to protect oil pump motors by detecting sensors installed at the pumps. 

  12. Synthesis graphene layer at different waste cooking palm oil temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robaiah, M.; Rusop, M.; Abdullah, S.; khusaimi, Z.; Azhan, H.; Asli, N. A.

    2017-09-01

    Graphene is one of the most recent carbon nanomaterials that has attracted attention because of its superior properties. The formation of the graphene on the Ni surface appears due to segregation and precipitation of a high amount of carbon from the source material during the cooling process. The growth of graphene at different waste cooking palm oil (WCPO) temperatures using double thermal chemical vapour deposition method (DTCVD) was investigated. The samples were prepared at various vaporization temperatures of WCPO is range from 250 °C to 450 °C by increment 50 °C and the temperature of Ni substrate constant at 900 °C. The structural of the graphene were characterized by using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Energy Dispersive X-Ray (EDX) Spectroscopy, UV-Visible and Raman's spectroscopy. FESEM images at optimum temperature (350 °C) display hexagonal shapes since the graphene layers were formed after precipitation of the carbon. It the meantime, UV-Visible spectra shows the sharp peak at 250 nm whereupon the highest of reflectivity value. This peak is an indication the presence of the graphene layers on Ni substrate. The position and half width 2D peak of the Raman spectra were subjected to detail analyses in order to determine the quantity and quality of the graphene layer. At the temperature 350°C, the Raman's spectroscopy result shown the multilayer of the graphene based on I2D/IG ratio is approximately constant (equal to˜0.43).

  13. TEMPERATURE, RADIOACTIVE TRACER, AND NOISE LOGGING FOR INJECTION WELL INTEGRITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regulations of the Environmental Protection Agency require that an injection well exhibit both internal and external mechanical integrity. The external mechanical integrity consideration is that there is no significant fluid movement into an underground source of drinking water ...

  14. The Montara Oil Spill: A 2009 Well Blowout in the Timor Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spies, R B; Mukhtasor, M; Burns, K A

    2017-07-01

    A well on the Montara platform on the Australian continental shelf blew out in August 2009 and spilled oil into the Timor Sea for 74 days. The oil, estimated at as much as 23.5 million L in total volume, spread over a large area of the shelf and eventually into Indonesian waters. This paper documents, through published literature, reports of both Australian and Indonesian governments and observations of coastal residents and fishermen the spread of the oil and attempts to estimate its impact. The lack of observers on the ocean and baseline, pre-spill data on populations of marine organisms, and delays in deploying scientific surveys after the spill severely limited efforts by the Australian government to determine damage in its territorial waters. Biological survey work was not done in Indonesian waters, but coastal residents attested to relatively severe impacts to algal farms. In addition fish landings declined in one port in southwest Timor Island.

  15. 75 FR 75995 - Request for Comments on Helium-3 Use in the Oil and Natural Gas Well Logging Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... for Comments on Helium-3 Use in the Oil and Natural Gas Well Logging Industry AGENCY: Office of Fossil...) Office of Oil and Natural Gas is seeking public comments on the volumes and uses of Helium-3 by the oil... Considerations: In developing its allotment process, DOE seeks information on the uses of Helium-3 by members of...

  16. 77 FR 48878 - Approval and Promulgation of Federal Implementation Plan for Oil and Natural Gas Well Production...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-15

    ... Texas, Oil and Gas Division. (xxviii) The initials SCADA mean or refer to Supervisory Control and Data... impeding oil and gas development. This is because of the ] mix of current CAA obligations that currently... Emissions, and Chapter 33-15-20-04 Control of Emissions from Oil and Gas Well Production Facilities. North...

  17. Removal optimization of heavy metals from effluent of sludge dewatering process in oil and gas well drilling by nanofiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayatipour, Mostafa; Jaafarzadeh, Neemat; Ahmadmoazzam, Mehdi

    2017-12-01

    Oil and gas well drilling industries discharge large volumes of contaminated wastewater produced during oil and gas exploration process. In this study, the effect of different operational variables, including temperature, pH and transmembrane pressure on process performance of a commercially available nanofiltration membrane (JCM-1812-50N, USA) for removing Ba, Ni, Cr, NaCl and TDS from produced wastewater by dewatering unit of an oil and gas well drilling industry was evaluated. In optimum experimental conditions (T = 25 °C, P = 170 psi and pH = 4) resulted from Thaguchi method, 85.3, 77.4, 58.5, 79.6 and 56.3% removal efficiencies were achieved for Ba, Ni, Cr, NaCl and TDS, respectively. Also, results from a comparison of the Schuller and Wilcox diagrams revealed that the effluent of the membrane system is usable for drinking water, irrigating and agriculture purposes. Moreover, the process effluent quality showed a scaling feature, according to Langelier saturation index and illustrated that the necessary proceedings should be taken to prevent scaling for industrial application. The nanofiltration membrane process with an acceptable recovery rate of 47.17% represented a good performance in the wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The wells of the Lipinki oil field in the aspect of borehole heat exchangers retrained

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Gonet

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Geological conditions of the Gorlice-Lipinki structure are presented in the paper. The construction of a well in the Lipinki oil field was characterized on this basis. The authors analysed an adaptability of the wells intothe borehole heat exchangers (BHE with its potential heating power estimation on the basis of an example. In the article, a discussion of the heat consumer choose, which can be buildings by a local communite utilization.

  19. Rheological behaviour of aluminosilicate slurries for oil well cementing; Comportamento reologico de pastas a base de aluminossilicatos para a cimentacao de pocos de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinho, E.P.; Martinelli, A.E.; Melo, D.M.A.; Melo, M.A.F.; Garcia, R.B. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil); Araujo, R.G.S. [PETROBRAS, Natal/Fortaleza, RN/CE (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    Steam injection is a technique used to stimulate wells to produce heavy oils, such as those commonly found in Rio Grande do Norte/Brazil. This procedure increases the temperature and the pressure in the well, thus affecting the integrity of its brittle cement. In this work, alternative oil well cements based on the polymerization of aluminosilicates in alkaline environments are proposed. These polymers are both heat- and fire-resistant due to their inorganic structure. However, the use of such materials in oil well cementing is limited due to their plastic viscosity. The results showed that the rheological behavior of the alternative slurries could be adjusted by setting appropriate SiO{sub 2}:Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} molar ratios as well as the nature of the alkali used. (author)

  20. Produced Water Treatment Using Geothermal Energy from Oil and Gas Wells: An Appropriateness of Decommissioned Wells Index (ADWI) Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiaghadi, A.; Rifai, H. S.

    2016-12-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of harnessing geothermal energy from retrofitted oil and gas decommissioned wells to power desalination units and overcome the produced water treatment energy barrier. Previous studies using heat transfer models have indicated that well depth, geothermal gradient, formation heat conductivity, and produced water salt levels were the most important constraints that affect the achievable volume of treated water. Thus, the challenge of identifying which wells would be best suited for retrofit as geothermal wells was addressed by defining an Appropriateness of Decommissioned Wells Index (ADWI) using a 25 km x 25 km grid over Texas. Heat transfer modeling combined with fuzzy logic methodology were used to estimate the ADWI at each grid cell using the scale of Very Poor, Poor, Average, Good and Excellent. Values for each of the four constraints were extracted from existing databases and were used to select 20 representative values that covered the full range of the data. A heat transfer model was run for all the 160,000 possible combination scenarios and the results were regressed to estimate weighting coefficients that indicate the relative effect of well depth, geothermal gradient, heat conductivity, and produced water salt levels on the volume of treated water in Texas. The results indicated that wells located in cells with ADWI of "Average", "Good" or "Excellent" can potentially deliver 35,000, 106,000, or 240,000 L/day of treated water, respectively. Almost 98% of the cells in the Granite Wash, 97% in Eagle Ford Shale, 90% in Haynesville Shale, 79% in Permian Basin, and 78% in Barnett Shale were identified as better than "Average" locations; whereas, south of the Eagle Ford, southwestern Permian Basin, and the center of Granite Wash were "Excellent". Importantly, most of the locations with better than "Average" ADWI are within drought prone agricultural regions that would benefit from this resilient source of clean water.

  1. Variability of oil and gas well productivities for continuous (unconventional) petroleum accumulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpentier, Ronald R.; Cook, Troy A.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, oil and gas well productivities were estimated using decline-curve analysis for thousands of wells as part of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) studies of continuous (unconventional) oil and gas resources in the United States. The estimated ultimate recoveries (EURs) of these wells show great variability that was analyzed at three scales: within an assessment unit (AU), among AUs of similar reservoir type, and among groups of AUs with different reservoir types. Within a particular oil or gas AU (such as the Barnett Shale), EURs vary by about two orders of magnitude between the most productive wells and the least productive ones (excluding those that are dry and abandoned). The distributions of EURs are highly skewed, with most of the wells in the lower part of the range. Continuous AUs were divided into four categories based on reservoir type and major commodity (oil or gas): coalbed gas, shale gas, other low-permeability gas AUs (such as tight sands), and low-permeability oil AUs. Within each of these categories, there is great variability from AU to AU, as shown by plots of multiple EUR distributions. Comparing the means of each distribution within a category shows that the means themselves have a skewed distribution, with a range of approximately one to two orders of magnitude. A comparison of the three gas categories (coalbed gas, shale gas, and other low-permeability gas AUs) shows large overlap in the ranges of EUR distributions. Generally, coalbed gas AUs have lower EUR distributions, shale gas AUs have intermediate sizes, and the other low-permeability gas AUs have higher EUR distributions. The plot of EUR distributions for each category shows the range of variation among developed AUs in an appropriate context for viewing the historical development within a particular AU. The Barnett Shale is used as an example to demonstrate that dividing wells into groups by time allows one to see the changes in EUR distribution. Subdivision into groups

  2. Enhancing results : solid expandable tubulars facilitate high-temperature oil recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel, G.; Nylund, J.; Flaming, S. [Enventure Global Technology LLC, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Steam-based recovery methods can provide a cost-effective approach to developing heavy oil and oil sands energy resources. This paper described a solid expandable tubular system designed to prevent damage without decreases in hole size. The pipe's permanent deformation creates an energized seal that cases off damaged tubulars. The new sealing systems allow for operations in the range of 270 degrees C. The system was comprised of mechanical retainers designed to hold the multi-component, high-temperature seal in place on the expandable casing. The seals are held in place by retainer rings designed to protect the seal in the hole as well as to provide increased anchoring capacity when the pipe is expanded and clad onto the base casing. The retainers are wrapped with a redundant standard seal material. The weight and size of the casings are individually configured for specific wells and are also designed to maintain consistency across multiple weight ranges. Details of the testing protocol used to ensure that the sealing system operated well in various oil production scenarios were presented, as well as the results of case studies conducted to demonstrate the system in the field. 6 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  3. The Gulf of Mexico ecosystem, six years after the Macondo oil well blowout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joye, Samantha B.; Bracco, Annalisa; Özgökmen, Tamay M.; Chanton, Jeffrey P.; Grosell, Martin; MacDonald, Ian R.; Cordes, Erik E.; Montoya, Joseph P.; Passow, Uta

    2016-07-01

    The Gulf of Mexico ecosystem is a hotspot for biological diversity and supports a number of industries, from tourism to fishery production to oil and gas exploration, that serve as the economic backbone of Gulf coast states. The Gulf is a natural hydrocarbon basin, rich with stores of oil and gas that lie in reservoirs deep beneath the seafloor. The natural seepage of hydrocarbons across the Gulf system is extensive and, thus, the system's biological components experience ephemeral, if not, frequent, hydrocarbon exposure. In contrast to natural seepage, which is diffuse and variable over space and time, the 2010 Macondo oil well blowout, represented an intense, focused hydrocarbon infusion to the Gulf's deepwaters. The Macondo blowout drove rapid shifts in microbial populations and activity, revealed unexpected phenomena, such as deepwater hydrocarbon plumes and marine "oil snow" sedimentation, and impacted the Gulf's pelagic and benthic ecosystems. Understanding the distribution and fate of Macondo oil was limited to some degree by an insufficient ability to predict the physical movement of water in the Gulf. In other words, the available physical oceanographic models lacked critical components. In the past six years, much has been learned about the physical oceanography of the Gulf, providing transformative knowledge that will improve the ability to predict the movement of water and the hydrocarbons they carry in future blowout scenarios. Similarly, much has been learned about the processing and fate of Macondo hydrocarbons. Here, we provide an overview of the distribution, fate and impacts of Macondo hydrocarbons and offer suggestions for future research to push the field of oil spill response research forward.

  4. High Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in Geothermal Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabian, Paul [Composite Technology Development, Inc, Lafayette, CO (United States)

    2012-03-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy is leading the development of alternative energy sources that will ensure the long-term energy independence of our nation. One key renewable resource being advanced is geothermal energy which offers an environmentally benign, reliable source of energy for the nation. To utilize this resource, water will be introduced into wells 3 to 10 km deep to create a geothermal reservoir. This approach is known as an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS). The high temperatures and pressures at these depths have become a limiting factor in the development of this energy source. For example, reliable zonal isolation for high-temperature applications at high differential pressures is needed to conduct mini-fracs and other stress state diagnostics. Zonal isolation is essential for many EGS reservoir development activities. To date, the capability has not been sufficiently demonstrated to isolate sections of the wellbore to: 1) enable stimulation; and 2) seal off unwanted flow regions in unknown EGS completion schemes and high-temperature (>200°C) environments. In addition, packers and other zonal isolation tools are required to eliminate fluid loss, to help identify and mitigate short circuiting of flow from injectors to producers, and to target individual fractures or fracture networks for testing and validating reservoir models. General-purpose open-hole packers do not exist for geothermal environments, with the primary barrier being the poor stability of elastomeric seals at high temperature above 175°C. Experimental packer systems have been developed for geothermal environments but they currently only operate at low pressure, they are not retrievable, and they are not commercially available. The development of the high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) zonal isolation device would provide the geothermal community with the capability to conduct mini-fracs, eliminate fluid loss, to help identify and mitigate short circuiting of flow from injectors to

  5. An Assessment of the Options Available to Air Forces’ Commanders to Suppress Smoke from Oil Well Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-22

    specialists extinguished oil well fires with explosives. Typically, a carefully shaped explosive charge (usually dynamite) in a 55-gallon drum is placed...Stream Only Valve Shut 414 Basic Oil Well Fire Fire In Control Fire Snuffed Out 041 Well On Stream Figure 52. Typical sequence of operations using the

  6. Digital representation of oil and natural gas well pad scars in southwest Wyoming: 2012 update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garman, Steven L.; McBeth, Jamie L.

    2015-01-01

    The recent proliferation of oil and natural gas energy development in the Greater Green River Basin of southwest Wyoming has accentuated the need to understand wildlife responses to this development. The location and extent of surface disturbance that is created by oil and natural gas well pad scars are key pieces of information used to assess the effects of energy infrastructure on wildlife populations and habitat. A digital database of oil and natural gas pad scars had previously been generated from 1-meter (m) National Agriculture Imagery Program imagery (NAIP) acquired in 2009 for a 7.7-million hectare (ha) (19,026,700 acres) region of southwest Wyoming. Scars included the pad area where wellheads, pumps, and storage facilities reside and the surrounding area that was scraped and denuded of vegetation during the establishment of the pad. Scars containing tanks, compressors, the storage of oil and gas related equipment, and produced-water ponds were also collected on occasion. This report updates the digital database for the five counties of southwest Wyoming (Carbon, Lincoln, Sublette, Sweetwater, Uinta) within the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI) study area and for a limited portion of Fremont, Natrona, and Albany Counties using 2012 1-m NAIP imagery and 2012 oil and natural gas well permit information. This report adds pad scars created since 2009, and updates attributes of all pad scars using the 2012 well permit information. These attributes include the origination year of the pad scar, the number of active and inactive wells on or near each pad scar in 2012, and the overall status of the pad scar (active or inactive). The new 2012 database contains 17,404 pad scars of which 15,532 are attributed as oil and natural gas well pads. Digital data are stored as shapefiles projected to the Universal Transverse Mercator (zones 12 and 13) coordinate system. These data are available from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at http://dx.doi.org/10

  7. Bluebell Field, Uinta Basin: reservoir characterization for improved well completion and oil recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, S.L.; Morgan, C.D.

    1998-01-01

    Bluefield Field is the largest oil-producing area in the Unita basin of northern Utah. The field inclucdes over 300 wells and has produced 137 Mbbl oil and 177 bcf gas from fractured Paleocene-Eocene lacustrine and fluvial deposits of the Green River and Wasatch (Colton) formations. Oil and gas are produced at depths of 10 500-13 000 ft (3330-3940 m), with the most prolific reservoirs existing in over-pressured sandstones of the Colton Formation and the underlying Flagstaff Member of the lower Green River Formation. Despite a number of high-recovery wells (1-3 MMbbl), overall field recovery remains low, less than 10% original oil in place. This low recovery rate is interpreted to be at least partly a result of completion practices. Typically, 40-120 beds are perforated and stimulated with acid (no proppant) over intervals of up to 3000 ft (900 m). Little or no evaluation of individual beds is performed, preventing identification of good-quality reservoir zones, water-producing zones, and thief zones. As a result, detailed understanding of Bluebell reservoirs historically has been poor, inhibiting any improvements in recovery strategies. A recent project undertaken in Bluebell field as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Class 1 (fluvial-deltaic reservoir) Oil Demonstration program has focused considerable effort on reservoir characterization. This effort has involved interdisciplinary analysis of core, log, fracture, geostatistical, production, and other data. Much valuable new information on reservoir character has resulted, with important implications for completion techniques and recovery expectations. Such data should have excellent applicability to other producing areas in the Uinta Basin withi reservoirs in similar lacustrine and related deposits.Bluebell field is the largest oil-producing area in the Uinta basin of northern Utah. The field includes over 300 wells and has produced 137 MMbbl oil and 177 bcf gas from fractured Paleocene-Eocene lacustrine

  8. New technological developments in oil well fire fighting equipment and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, B.; Matthews, R.T.

    1995-12-31

    Since Drake`s first oil well in 1859, well fires have been frequent and disastrous. Hardly a year has passed in over a century without a well fire somewhere in the world. In the 1920`s the classic method of fire fighting using explosives to starve the fire of oxygen was developed and it has been used extensively ever since. While explosives are still one of the most frequently used methods today, several other methods are used to supplement it where special conditions exist. Tunneling at an angle from a safe distance is used in some cases, especially where the fire is too hot for a close approach on the ground surface. Pumping drilling muds into a well to plug it is another method that has been used successfully for some time. Diverter wells are occasionally used, and sometimes simply pumping enough water on a well fire is sufficient to extinguish it. Of course, prevention is always the best solution. Many advances in blow-out prevention devices have been developed in the last 50 years and the number of fires has been substantially reduced compared to the number of wells drilled. However, very little in new technology has been applied to oil well fire fighting in the 1960s, 1970s, or 1980s. Overall technological progress has accelerated tremendously in this period, of course, but new materials and equipment were not applied to this field for some reason. Saddam Hussein`s environmental holocaust in Kuwait changed that by causing many people throughout the world to focus their creative energy on more efficient oil well fire fighting methods.

  9. Optimization of roasting temperature and time during oil extraction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nutritionally, oils obtained from oilseeds provide the calories, vitamins and essential fatty acids in the human diet in an easily digested form. The rate of vegetable oil consumption is increasing compared with animal fat due to its low sterol. In addition to being nutritious, edible vegetable oils also have industrial uses.

  10. Explaining Spatial Variability in Wellbore Impairment Risk for Pennsylvania Oil and Gas Wells, 2000-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, R.; Ingraffea, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Previous modeling (ingraffea et al. PNAS, 2014) indicated roughly two-times higher cumulative risk for wellbore impairment in unconventional wells, relative to conventional wells, and large spatial variation in risk for oil and gas wells drilled in the state of Pennsylvania. Impairment risk for wells in the northeast portion of the state were found to be 8.5-times greater than that of wells drilled in the rest of the state. Here, we set out to explain this apparent regional variability through Boosted Regression Tree (BRT) analysis of geographic, developmental, and general well attributes. We find that regional variability is largely driven by the nature of the development, i.e. whether conventional or unconventional development is dominant. Oil and natural gas market prices and total well depths present as major influences in wellbore impairment, with moderate influences from well densities and geologic factors. The figure depicts influence paths for predictors of impairments for the state (top left), SW region (top right), unconventional/NE region (bottom left) and conventional/NW region (bottom right) models. Influences are scaled to reflect percent contributions in explaining variability in the model.

  11. Interactive Matching between the Temperature Profile and Secondary Reactions of Oil Shale Pyrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yu; Han, Zhennan; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    degrees C and a shale char bed operating at different temperatures. At low temperatures (550 degrees C), severe cracking occurred, converting both heavy and light oil to carbon and gas. The desirably matched reactor temperature profile for high oil yield is discussed via analysis of the tendency......This article investigates the effect of the reactor temperature profile on the distribution and characteristics of the products from fixed-bed pyrolysis of oil shale. Experiments were performed in a one-stage fixed-bed reactor and in a two-stage fixed-bed reactor. In the one-stage reactor......, the shale oil yield reached 7.40 wt % with a reactor temperature profile from 900 to 550 degrees C and decreased to 2.23 wt % with the reverse temperature profile. The effect of the temperature profile was investigated further in the two-stage fixed-bed reactor combining a pyrolysis stage operating at 550...

  12. Characteristics and propierties of oil-well cements additioned with blast furnace slag

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez, R.; Palacios, M.; Puertas, F.

    2011-01-01

    The present paper addresses the alkali activation of Portland cements containing blast furnace slag (20 and 30% of the cement by weight) with a view to the possible use of these materials in oil well construction. The hydration studies conducted showed that in cement/slag blends, the sodium silicate activating solution partially inhibited the dissolution of the silicate phases in the Portland cement, retarding cement hydration and reducing the precipitation of reaction products. D...

  13. Experimental investigations of mineral and ester-based oils at low temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelković Miloš

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to create references to mineral oil and recommendations for design rules for ester oil applications. Interest in the application of natural and synthetic ester-based fluids in different types of high voltage power equipment has increased over the last years. Most of the parameters relevant to insulation and cooling of high voltage equipment are studied at room or normal operating temperatures. Nevertheless, this equipment has to keep its functionality over the range of various uncommon conditions. For regions with cold climates, an important issue is the behaviour at low temperature. The objective of this work was to determine the insulation strength of mineral- and ester-based oil under a homogenous field at low temperatures for different oil states (moisture content between 5 and 25%. At low temperature (-25°C, the tested ester-based oil is not solidified but in a very thick aggregate state. At this temperature its insulation strength is still very high, even higher than at room temperature. As soon as the ester-based oil becomes solidified (-35°C, its insulation strength drops dramatically. The insulation strength of the tested ester-based oil at a low temperature, when the oil changes its aggregate state, is not dependent on water content.

  14. Productivity Analysis of Volume Fractured Vertical Well Model in Tight Oil Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiahang Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a semianalytical model to simulate the productivity of a volume fractured vertical well in tight oil reservoirs. In the proposed model, the reservoir is a composite system which contains two regions. The inner region is described as formation with finite conductivity hydraulic fracture network and the flow in fracture is assumed to be linear, while the outer region is simulated by the classical Warren-Root model where radial flow is applied. The transient rate is calculated, and flow patterns and characteristic flowing periods caused by volume fractured vertical well are analyzed. Combining the calculated results with actual production data at the decline stage shows a good fitting performance. Finally, the effects of some sensitive parameters on the type curves are also analyzed extensively. The results demonstrate that the effect of fracture length is more obvious than that of fracture conductivity on improving production in tight oil reservoirs. When the length and conductivity of main fracture are constant, the contribution of stimulated reservoir volume (SRV to the cumulative oil production is not obvious. When the SRV is constant, the length of fracture should also be increased so as to improve the fracture penetration and well production.

  15. Asphalts tests using onshore drilling oil wells residues; Ensaios asfalticos utilizando residuos de perfuracao onshore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucena, Adriano Elisio de F.L.; Rodrigues, John Kennedy G.; Ferreira, Heber Carlos; Lucena, Leda Christiane de F.L. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil); Lucena, Luciana de F.L. [Faculdade de Ciencias Sociais Aplicada (FACISA), Campina Grande, PB (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The drilling cuttings are one of the residues produced by the oils industries in large amounts during the drilling of oil wells. An alternative of final disposal of the drilling cutting residue is its utilization in asphalt mixtures. Based on this alternative, it was realized chemical and granulometric analysis and tests (Marshall and indirect tensile strength), on the asphaltic mixture using the residue from the oil drilling wells (well: 1-POTI-4-RN, located at Governador DIX-Sept Rosado - RN - Brazil). The achieved results to Marshall test indicated that for the analyzed mixture, the ideal content of residue that can be incorporated to the asphaltic composition and attend at the DNIT-ES 31 (2006) is 5%. To the indirect tensile strength test, the results showed a strength value higher than the minimum limit requested by the DNIT (0,65 MPa). The achieved results indicated the possibility of the utilization of the drilling cuttings in asphaltic pavements as fine aggregate, obeying the percentage limits, as an alternative to the final disposal. (author)

  16. Identification and characterization of high methane-emitting abandoned oil and gas wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mary; Christian, Shanna; Celia, Michael A; Mauzerall, Denise L; Bill, Markus; Miller, Alana R; Chen, Yuheng; Conrad, Mark E; Darrah, Thomas H; Jackson, Robert B

    2016-11-29

    Recent measurements of methane emissions from abandoned oil/gas wells show that these wells can be a substantial source of methane to the atmosphere, particularly from a small proportion of high-emitting wells. However, identifying high emitters remains a challenge. We couple 163 well measurements of methane flow rates; ethane, propane, and n-butane concentrations; isotopes of methane; and noble gas concentrations from 88 wells in Pennsylvania with synthesized data from historical documents, field investigations, and state databases. Using our databases, we (i) improve estimates of the number of abandoned wells in Pennsylvania; (ii) characterize key attributes that accompany high emitters, including depth, type, plugging status, and coal area designation; and (iii) estimate attribute-specific and overall methane emissions from abandoned wells. High emitters are best predicted as unplugged gas wells and plugged/vented gas wells in coal areas and appear to be unrelated to the presence of underground natural gas storage areas or unconventional oil/gas production. Repeat measurements over 2 years show that flow rates of high emitters are sustained through time. Our attribute-based methane emission data and our comprehensive estimate of 470,000-750,000 abandoned wells in Pennsylvania result in estimated state-wide emissions of 0.04-0.07 Mt (1012 g) CH4 per year. This estimate represents 5-8% of annual anthropogenic methane emissions in Pennsylvania. Our methodology combining new field measurements with data mining of previously unavailable well attributes and numbers of wells can be used to improve methane emission estimates and prioritize cost-effective mitigation strategies for Pennsylvania and beyond.

  17. Identification and characterization of high methane-emitting abandoned oil and gas wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mary; Christian, Shanna; Celia, Michael A.; Mauzerall, Denise L.; Bill, Markus; Miller, Alana R.; Chen, Yuheng; Conrad, Mark E.; Darrah, Thomas H.; Jackson, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    Recent measurements of methane emissions from abandoned oil/gas wells show that these wells can be a substantial source of methane to the atmosphere, particularly from a small proportion of high-emitting wells. However, identifying high emitters remains a challenge. We couple 163 well measurements of methane flow rates; ethane, propane, and n-butane concentrations; isotopes of methane; and noble gas concentrations from 88 wells in Pennsylvania with synthesized data from historical documents, field investigations, and state databases. Using our databases, we (i) improve estimates of the number of abandoned wells in Pennsylvania; (ii) characterize key attributes that accompany high emitters, including depth, type, plugging status, and coal area designation; and (iii) estimate attribute-specific and overall methane emissions from abandoned wells. High emitters are best predicted as unplugged gas wells and plugged/vented gas wells in coal areas and appear to be unrelated to the presence of underground natural gas storage areas or unconventional oil/gas production. Repeat measurements over 2 years show that flow rates of high emitters are sustained through time. Our attribute-based methane emission data and our comprehensive estimate of 470,000–750,000 abandoned wells in Pennsylvania result in estimated state-wide emissions of 0.04–0.07 Mt (1012 g) CH4 per year. This estimate represents 5–8% of annual anthropogenic methane emissions in Pennsylvania. Our methodology combining new field measurements with data mining of previously unavailable well attributes and numbers of wells can be used to improve methane emission estimates and prioritize cost-effective mitigation strategies for Pennsylvania and beyond. PMID:27849603

  18. A simple procedure to evaluate the performance of fats and oils at frying temperatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrera-Arellano, D.

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available A standard procedure is proposed to evaluate the performance of fats and oils at frying temperatures, taking the advantages provided by the Rancimat apparatus, i. e., standard vessels, temperature correction and temperature homogenity in all vessels resulting from the particular characteristics of the heating block. The results obtained in oil samples of 8 g heated at 180° C for 10 h in triplicate gave coefficients of variation lower than 6% for total polar compounds and polymers. In case of limited amount of oil, it is additionally proposed to use only 2 g of sample provided that a similar surface-to-oil volume ratio is maintained, and coefficients of variation of the same order than those for 8 g samples were thus obtained. Advantages of the procedure as well as potential applications for evaluation of frying fats and oils are Included. As an example, the effect of α-tocopherol on performance of sunflower oils was analyzed.

    Se propone un procedimiento estándar para evaluar el comportamiento de aceites y grasas a temperaturas de fritura. En este procedimiento se utilizan las ventajas del aparato Rancimat, que permite el uso de tubos estándar, la corrección de la temperatura, en su caso, y la igualdad de temperatura en todos los tubos dadas las características del bloque de calentamiento. De los resultados obtenidos en muestras de 8 g de aceite calentadas a 180° C durante 10 h, analizadas por triplicado, se obtuvieron coeficientes de variación inferiores al 6% para la determinación de compuestos polares y polímeros. En caso de limitación en la cantidad de aceite, se propone utilizar 2 g de muestra, manteniendo similares valores para la relación superficie a volumen de aceite, lo que permite obtener valores de alteración y coeficientes de variación del mismo orden. Se analizan finalmente las ventajas globales del procedimiento y sus distintas posibilidades en la evaluación de grasas de fritura. Como ejemplo, se aplica el

  19. The Role of Soya Oil Ester in Water-Based PCM for Low Temperature Cool Energy Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Rasta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the preparation of the water-based phase change material (PCM with very small soya oil solution for low temperature latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES. Soya oil ester is soluble very well in water and acts as nucleating agent for a novel solid-liquid PCM candidate that is suitable for low temperature cool storage in the range between −9°C and −6°C. Thermal energy storage properties of the water with very small soya oil ester solution were measured by T-history method. The experimental results show that very small amount of soya oil ester in water can lower the freezing point and trigger ice nucleation for elimination of the supercooling degree. The phase transition temperatures of the water-based PCMs with soya oil as nucleate agent were lower than those of individual water. The thermal properties make it potential PCM for LHTES systems used in low temperature cool energy storage applications.

  20. 26 CFR 1.263(c)-1 - Intangible drilling and development costs in the case of oil and gas wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intangible drilling and development costs in the... Intangible drilling and development costs in the case of oil and gas wells. For rules relating to the option to deduct as expenses intangible drilling and development costs in the case of oil and gas wells, see...

  1. Methods for estimating petrophysical parameters from well logs in tight oil reservoirs: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Peiqiang; Zhuang, Wen; Sun, Zhongchun; Wang, Zhenlin; Luo, Xingping; Mao, Zhiqiang; Tong, Zemin

    2016-02-01

    Estimating petrophysical parameters from well logs plays a significant role in the exploration and development of tight oil resources, but faces challenges. What’s more, the methods for petrophysical parameters from well logs are paid little attention at present. In this paper, the typical tight oil reservoirs of Northwest China are used as an example. Based on the characteristics of mineralogy and fluids in the study field, the rock is assumed into five components which are clays, quartz and feldspar, carbonates, kerogen and pore fluids (porosity). The sum of kerogen content and porosity is defined as the apparent porosity. Then, two porosity log response equations are established. Once the clay content is determined by an individual method, the quartz and feldspar content, carbonate content and apparent porosity are calculated through the established equations. The kerogen content is the difference of the apparent porosity and porosity from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logs. This paper also presents a new approach that combines the complex refractive index method (CRIM) and pseudo Archie method to compute saturation from dielectric logs, which avoids selection for the dielectric constants of each of the minerals. The effectiveness and reliability of these methods are verified by the successful application in the study of the target tight oil play in Northwest China.

  2. Soft-sensing for multilateral wells with downhole pressure and temperature measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruif, B.J. de; Leskens, M.; Linden, R. van der; Alberts, G.J.N.

    2008-01-01

    Real-time monitoring of downhole oil, gas and water flows in wells can significantly improve the production performance of these wells when this flow rate information is used to manipulate inflow control valves. An example of this is the allocation of a gas or water cone to its entrance point in a

  3. The Deterioration Mechanism of Diester Aero Lubricating Oil at High Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Yao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The deterioration of aero lubricating oil at high temperatures was accelerated by using a specific device simulating the operating conditions of engines, where the deterioration mechanism was obtained. Structures of the deteriorated lubricating oils were analyzed by gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer. From the results, it can be concluded that deterioration of aero lubricating oil at high temperatures was composed of thermal pyrolysis, oxidation, and polymerization, with the generation of a variety of products, such as alcohols, aldehydes, acids, and esters, which caused the deterioration of physicochemical properties of the aero lubricating oil.

  4. Two-fluid model for transient analysis of slug flow in oil wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazarez-Candia, O., E-mail: ocazarez@imp.mx [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico D.F. 07730 (Mexico); Instituto Tecnologico de Zacatepec, Depto. de Metal-Mecanica, Calzada Tecnologico, No. 27, Zacatepec, Morelos 62780 (Mexico); Benitez-Centeno, O.C. [Centro Nacional de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico, Depto. de Mecanica, Interior Internado Palmira s/n, Col. Palmira, Cuernavaca, Morelos 62490 (Mexico); Espinosa-Paredes, G. [Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av San Rafael Atlixco No 186, Col. Vicentina 55-534, Mexico D.F. 09340 (Mexico)

    2011-06-15

    In this work it is presented a transient, one-dimensional, adiabatic model for slug flow simulation, which appears when liquid (mixture of oil and water) and gas flow simultaneously through pipes. The model is formed by space and time averaged conservation equations for mass, momentum and energy for each phase, the numerical solution is based on the finite difference technique in the implicit scheme. Velocity, pressure, volumetric fraction and temperature profiles for both phases were predicted for inclination angles from the horizontal to the vertical position (unified model) and ascendant flow. Predictions from the model were validated using field data and ten correlations commonly used in the oil industry. The effects of gas heating or cooling, due to compression and expansion processes, on the predictions and numerical stability, were studied. It was found that when these effects are taken into account, a good behavior of temperature predictions and numerical stability are obtained. The model presents deviations lower than 14% regarding field data and it presents better predictions than most of the correlations.

  5. Operational efficiency of oil-flooded carbon dioxide screw refrigerating compressor as dependent on the supplied oil temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliev, V. K.; Chernov, G. I.; Sadvakasov, D. Kh.; Panutich, A. A.

    2017-08-01

    The article presents the results of a theoretical study concerning the temperature influence of the oil supplied into the screw oil-flooded compressor on its efficiency under frequency regulation. The results of the research have shown that if the frequency regime of the compressor is changed by varying the oil proportion and the degree of its heating before supplying into the working cavity within certain limits, the new operating point will have the same or the largest value of the effective efficiency at a given new frequency.

  6. Machine Learning for Mapping Groundwater Salinity with Oil Well Log Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, W. H.; Shimabukuro, D.; Gillespie, J. M.; Stephens, M.

    2016-12-01

    An oil field may have thousands of wells with detailed petrophysical logs, and far fewer direct measurements of groundwater salinity. Can the former be used to extrapolate the latter into a detailed map of groundwater salinity? California Senate Bill 4, with its requirement to identify Underground Sources of Drinking Water, makes this a question worth answering. A well-known obstacle is that the basic petrophysical equations describe ideal scenarios ("clean wet sand") and even these equations contain many parameters that may vary with location and depth. Accounting for other common scenarios such as high-conductivity shaly sands or low-permeability diatomite (both characteristic of California's Central Valley) causes parameters to proliferate to the point where the model is underdetermined by the data. When parameters outnumber data points, however, is when machine learning methods are most advantageous. We present a method for modeling a generic oil field, where groundwater salinity and lithology are depth series parameters, and the constants in petrophysical equations are scalar parameters. The data are well log measurements (resistivity, porosity, spontaneous potential, and gamma ray) and a small number of direct groundwater salinity measurements. Embedded in the model are petrophysical equations that account for shaly sand and diatomite formations. As a proof of concept, we feed in well logs and salinity measurements from the Lost Hills Oil Field in Kern County, California, and show that with proper regularization and validation the model makes reasonable predictions of groundwater salinity despite the large number of parameters. The model is implemented using Tensorflow, which is an open-source software released by Google in November, 2015 that has been rapidly and widely adopted by machine learning researchers. The code will be made available on Github, and we encourage scrutiny and modification by machine learning researchers and hydrogeologists alike.

  7. Relevant aspects of radiation protection in oil and gas well logging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, R S; Lopes Gomes, J D R; Costa, M L L; Miranda, M V F E S

    2013-12-01

    Radiation sources have being widely used in industrial applications, but their inappropriate use presents a large potential for hazards to human health and the environment. These hazards can be minimised by development of specific radiation protection rules and adequate procedures for the handling, use and storage of radiation sources, which should be established in a national normative framework. Recently, due to discovery of new oil and gas reservoirs on the Brazilian continental shelf, especially in deep water and the pre-salt layer, there has been a large and rapid increase in the use of radiation sources for well logging. Generic radiation protection regulations have been used for licensing the use of radiation sources for well logging, but these are not comprehensive or technically suitable for this purpose. Therefore it is necessary to establish specific Brazilian safety regulations for this purpose. In this work, an assessment is presented of the relevant radiation protection aspects of nuclear well logging not covered by generic regulations, with the aim of contributing to the future development of specific safety regulations for the licensing of radioactive facilities for oil and gas well logging in Brazil. The conclusions of this work relate to four areas, which include the specific requirements to control (1) radiation sources, (2) radiation survey meters and (3) access to radiation workplaces and (4) to control and identify the workers who are occupationally exposed.

  8. Assessment of non-destructive testing of well casing,, cement and cement bond in high temperature wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knutson, C K; Boardman, C R

    1979-01-01

    Because of the difficulty in bringing geothermal well blowouts under control, any indication of a casing/cement problem should be expeditiously evaluated and solved. There are currently no high temperature cement bond and casing integrity logging systems for geothermal wells with maximum temperatures in excess of 500/sup 0/F. The market is currently insufficient to warrannt the private investment necessary to develop tools and cables capable of withstanding high temperatures. It is concluded that a DOE-funded development program is required to assure that diagnostic tools are available in the interim until geothermal resource development activities are of sufficient magnitude to support developmental work on high temperature casing/cement logging capabilities by industry. This program should be similar to and complement the current DOE program for development of reservoir evaluation logging capabilities for hot wells. The appendices contain annotated bibliographies on the following: high temperature logging in general, cement integrity testing, cosing integrity testing, casing and cement failures, and special and protective treatment techniques. Also included are composite listing of references in alphabetical order by senior author.

  9. Heterogeneous kinetics of vegetable oil transesterification at high temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasreen Sadia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the catalytic efficiency and reusability of the solid base catalysts cannot meet the demand of industrial biodiesel production under low temperature. The purpose of this study is to define the kinetics of heterogeneous transesterification process which might be used for the prediction of the biodiesel synthesis at high temperature and pressure. The focus in this study was paid to recently reported data obtained with different catalysts used for biodiesel synthesis in a batch reactor at high temperatures. It was shown that three kinetic models that include: a irreversible first order reaction; b reaction with changeable order; and c resistances of mass transfer and chemical reaction at active sites of the catalyst could be applied for predicting the effect of high temperature of the transesterification. The apparent reaction rate constant of the irreversible first order reaction was determined, as well as the parameters of the other two, more complicated kinetic models. The best agreement was obtained with the more complicated models and the mean relative percent deviation between calculated and experimentally determined triacylglycerols conversion for these kinetic models is between 3 and 10%. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 45001

  10. Crumb waste tire rubber surface modification by plasma polymerization of ethanol and its application on oil-well cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaowei, Cheng [State Key Laboratory of Oil and Gas Reservoir Geology and Exploitation, Southwest Petroleum University, Chengdu (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, Chengdu (China); Sheng, Huang [State Key Laboratory of Oil and Gas Reservoir Geology and Exploitation, Southwest Petroleum University, Chengdu (China); School of Oil and Natural Gas Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, Chengdu (China); Xiaoyang, Guo, E-mail: guoxiaoyangswpi@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Oil and Gas Reservoir Geology and Exploitation, Southwest Petroleum University, Chengdu (China); School of Oil and Natural Gas Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, Chengdu (China); Wenhui, Duan, E-mail: wenhui.duan@monash.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Melbourne 3800 (Australia)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • The crumb waste tire rubber (WTR) was modified by plasma polymerization of ethanol. • Hydrophilic groups were introduced onto WTR surface and improved its hydrophilia. • The functionalized crumb WTR was applied in oil-well cement. • The mechanical properties of modified oil-well cement were intensively enhanced. - Abstract: Crumb waste tire rubber (WTR) was pretreated by oxygen low temperature plasma (LTP) and modified by LTP polymerization process of ethanol monomer to improve the adhesion property with oil-well cement matrix and the mechanical properties of cement. The surface properties of modified crumb WTR and the mechanical properties and structures of modified oil-well cement were investigated by means of contact angle measurement, dispersion test, attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), mechanics performance tests, permeability test and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was demonstrated that LTP treatment changed both the surface composition and roughness. The contact angle of pretreated crumb WTR dramatically fell from 122° to 34°, and sample with ethanol LPT polymer film decreased even further to 11°. The ATR-FTIR and XPS analysis results demonstrated that hydrophilic groups, such as –COOH, C–OH, and –CHO, were introduced on the WTR surface. The oxygen atomic percent increased from 8.11% to 14.50% and 24.83%. The mechanical properties, porosity and permeability of raw cement were compared to samples modified by untreated crumb WTR, pretreated crumb WTR and ethanol LTP polymerization treated crumb WTR. It was found that after 28 days, the compressive strength of the samples with the untreated crumb WTR decreased to 80% with respect to raw cement. The tensile strength and flexural strength also had a slight reduction compared with the raw cement. On the contrary, after 28 days, the tensile strength of cement modified by LTP polymerization

  11. Evaluation of the aging of polymeric drilling fluids to oil wells; Avaliacao do envelhecimento de fluidos de perfuracao polimericos para pocos de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, K.V.; Amorim, L.V. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia Mecanica, UAEM/CCT - UFCG], e-mail: kassie@dem.ufcg.edu.br; Leite, R.S. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Graduacao Engenharia de Materiais; Lira, H.L. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia de Materiais, UAEMa/ CCT - UFCG

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the aging of polymeric drilling fluids to oil wells, from the rheological, filtration and lubricity properties in the temperatures 100 degree F ({approx} 38 degree C) and 150 degree F ({approx} 66 degree C). The results had been compared with a standard fluid used for the oil industry and had evidenced that the polymeric fluids had presented good thermal stability, presenting a small reduction in the rheological properties and better values of lubricity coefficient that a reference fluid. (author)

  12. Evolution of Hydrocarbon-Degrading Microbial Communities in the Aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Well Blowout in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, G.; Dubinsky, E. A.; Chakraborty, R.; Hollibaugh, J. T.; Hazen, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill created large plumes of dispersed oil and gas that remained deep in the water column and stimulated growth of several deep-sea bacteria that can degrade hydrocarbons at cold temperatures. We tracked microbial community composition before, during and after the 83-day spill to determine relationships between microbial dynamics, and hydrocarbon and dissolved-oxygen concentrations. Dominant bacteria in plumes shifted drastically over time and were dependent on the concentration of hydrocarbons, and the relative quantities of insoluble and soluble oil fractions. Unmitigated flow from the wellhead early in the spill resulted in the highest concentrations of oil and relatively more n-alkanes suspended in the plume as small oil droplets. These conditions resulted in near complete dominance by alkane-degrading Oceanospirillales, Pseudomonas and Shewanella. Six-weeks into the spill overall hydrocarbon concentrations in the plume decreased and were almost entirely composed of BTEX after management actions reduced emissions into the water column. These conditions corresponded with the emergence of Colwellia, Pseudoalteromonas, Cycloclasticus and Halomonas that are capable of degrading aromatic compounds. After the well was contained dominant plume bacteria disappeared within two weeks after the spill and transitioned to an entirely different set of bacteria dominated by Flavobacteria, Methylophaga, Alteromonas and Rhodobacteraceae that were found in anomalous oxygen depressions throughout August and are prominent degraders of both high molecular weight organic matter as well as hydrocarbons. Bio-Sep beads amended with volatile hydrocarbons from MC-252 oil were used from August through September to create hydrocarbon-amended traps for attracting oil-degrading microbes in situ. Traps were placed at multiple depths on a drilling rig about 600-m from the original MC-252 oil spill site. Microbes were isolated on media using MC-252 oil as the sole

  13. Factors affecting bond cement across casing leak zones in oil and gas wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasr, Mohamed; Edbeib, Said [Al-Fateh University, Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya). Dept. of Petroleum Engineering

    2004-07-01

    Casing leaks have been a major concern to the oil industry because of their effect on lowering the production rate in many oil and gas wells. The leaks are the result of deterioration of the casing in the well, which is caused by severe corrosion due to the contact of the casing with high salinity foreign fluid. The objective of this study is to determine the factors influencing the mechanical properties of the hardened cement opposite the casing leak zones. This study is conducted by laboratory measurements of the compressive strength of the hardened cement when the cement slurry was mixed with different percentages of formation water and different concentrations of different cement additives. The results of this study indicate that the compressive strength readings obtained from the cement bond log and the cement evaluation tool against the casing leak zones are lower than those readings recorded in adjacent formations. The low cement compressive strength values observed across casing leak zones are due to the contamination of the cement with saline water present in these formations which, in turn, effects the hardening properties of the cement. The experimental results indicated that the salinity of the formation water when mixed with the cement slurry in the presence of cement additives, decreased the compressive strength of the bond cement and also decreased the thickening time of the cement slurry. It is concluded that casing leaks found in many wells observed in oil fields in Libya were due to the mixing of the cement with high salinity formation water present in the lost circulation zones. The high water salinity in these zones effects the setting time of the cement slurry which, therefore, decreased the hardening properties of the bond cement and caused cracks and channels in the hardened cement across lost circulation zones. (author)

  14. A Real-Time Decision Support System for High Cost Oil-Well Drilling Operations

    OpenAIRE

    Gundersen, Odd Erik; Sørmo, Frode; Aamodt, Agnar; Skalle, Pål

    2012-01-01

    In this article we present DrillEdge — a commercial and award winning software system that monitors oil-well drilling operations in order to reduce non-productive time (NPT). DrillEdge utilizes case-based reasoning with temporal representations on streaming real-time data, pattern matching and agent systems to predict problems and give advice on how to mitigate the problems. The methods utilized, the architecture, the GUI and development cost in addition to two case studies are documented.

  15. Numerical solution of the problem of selecting the optimum method of operating oil wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skryago, A.M.; Chirikov, L.I.; Fridman, G.Sh.; Kolokolov, A.A.; Panteleyev, G.V.; Terent' yev, S.A.; Zabudskiy, G.G.

    1981-01-01

    A mathematical model is studied for selecting the optimum method of operating the wells of an oil field, which is a linear Boolean programming problem. It is shown that this problem is equivalent to the generalized packet problem and a single product variant model of sectoral planning. Numerical calculations on the computer using as the initial problem the modified method of E. Balash, for the generalized packet problem the method of M.F. Kazakovaya, and the single product variant problem of sectoral planning the method of A. Ye. Bakhtin, show the greatest effectiveness for the problem studied of A. Ye. Bakhtin's method.

  16. Development of Tubular Linear Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor Used in Oil-well Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiquan Liu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The tubular linear permanent magnet synchronous motor (TLPMSM is developed to constitute a new oil-well pump system named as linear motor-driven one replacing the normal beam balanced pump system mainly in order to eliminate the damageable steel pole. Its structure is determined based on the real drive demand and the corresponding analysis results are given. At last a small prototyped TLPMSM with stator outer diameter of 140mm, effective stator length of 864mm is designed and manufactured to verify the theoretical analysis and investigate the performance, and make preparation for the large practicable prototype in the future.

  17. Development of three stable isotope dilution assays for the quantitation of (E)-2-butenal (crotonaldehyde) in heat-processed edible fats and oils as well as in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granvogl, Michael

    2014-02-12

    Three stable isotope dilution assays (SIDAs) were developed for the quantitation of (E)-2-butenal (crotonaldehyde) in heat-processed edible fats and oils as well as in food using synthesized [¹³C₄]-crotonaldehyde as internal standard. First, a direct headspace GC-MS method, followed by two indirect methods on the basis of derivatization with either pentafluorophenylhydrazine (GC-MS) or 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (LC-MS/MS), was developed. All methods are also suitable for the quantitation of acrolein using the standard [¹³C₃]-acrolein. Applying these three methods on five different types of fats and oils varying in their fatty acid compositions revealed significantly varying crotonaldehyde concentrations for the different samples, but nearly identical quantitative data for all methods. Formed amounts of crotonaldehyde were dependent not only on the type of oil, e.g., 0.29-0.32 mg/kg of coconut oil or 33.9-34.4 mg/kg of linseed oil after heat-processing for 24 h at 180 °C, but also on the applied temperature and time. The results indicated that the concentration of formed crotonaldehyde seemed to be correlated with the amount of linolenic acid in the oils. Furthermore, the formation of crotonaldehyde was compared to that of its homologue acrolein, demonstrating that acrolein was always present in higher amounts in heat-processed oils, e.g., 12.3 mg of crotonaldehyde/kg of rapeseed oil in comparison to 23.4 mg of acrolein/kg after 24 h at 180 °C. Finally, crotonaldehyde was also quantitated in fried food, revealing concentrations from 12 to 25 μg/kg for potato chips and from 8 to 19 μg/kg for donuts, depending on the oil used.

  18. Experience in North America Tight Oil Reserves Development. Horizontal Wells and Multistage Hydraulic Fracturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R. Ibatullin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The accelerated development of horizontal drilling technology in combination with the multistage hydraulic fracturing of the reservoir has expanded the geological conditions for commercial oil production from tight reservoirs in North America. Geological and physical characteristics of tight reservoirs in North America are presented, as well as a comparison of the geological and physical properties of the reservoirs of the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin and the Volga-Ural oil and gas province, in particular, in the territory of Tatarstan. The similarity of these basins is shown in terms of formation and deposition. New drilling technologies for horizontal wells (HW and multistage hydraulic fracturing are considered. The drilling in tight reservoirs is carried out exclusively on hydrocarbon-based muds The multi-stage fracturing technology with the use of sliding sleeves, and also slick water – a low-viscous carrier for proppant is the most effective solution for conditions similar to tight reservoirs in the Devonian formation of Tatarstan. Tax incentives which are actively used for the development of HW and multistage fracturing technologies in Canada are described. wells, multistage fracturing

  19. An Environmental Assessment of Proposed Geothermal Well Testing in the Tigre Lagoon Oil Field, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1976-03-01

    This report is an environmental assessment of the proposed testing of two geopressured, geothermal aquifers in central coastal Louisiana. On the basis of an analysis of the environmental setting, subsurface characteristics, and the proposed action, potential environmental impacts are determined and evaluated together with potential conflicts with federal, state, and local programs. Oil and gas wells in coastal Louisiana have penetrated a potentially productive geothermal zone of abnormally high-pressured aquifers that also yield large volumes of natural gas. To evaluate the extent to which the geothermal-geopressured water can be used as an alternative energy source and to what extent withdrawal of geopressured water can enhance gas production, it is necessary that flow rates, composition and temperature of fluids and gases, recharge characteristics, pressures, compressibilities, and other hydrodynamic and boundary conditions of the reservoir be determined by means of production tests. Tests are further necessary to evaluate and seek solutions to technological problems.

  20. Effect of olive storage period at two different temperatures on oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the same way, the trend of total phenols, oxidative stability and radical scavenging capacity of the studied olive oils showed a decrease during the fruit storage at ambient temperature. This reduction was more severe in Chemlali olive oils than those of Chétoui cultivar. Storage of fruits at 5°C prevented the fast alteration ...

  1. Effects of Temperature on the Development of Stenoma impressella (Lepidoptera: Elachistidae) on Oil Palm in Colombia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luis C. Martínez; Angelica Plata-Rueda; José C. Zanuncio; Genésio T. Ribeiro; José Eduardo Serrao

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Stenoma impressella Busck (Lepidoptera: Elachistidae) is an important oil palm pest and its life history and life table parameters were studied at various temperatures, from 16 °C to 40 °C...

  2. Theoretical analysis of multiphase flow during oil-well drilling by a conservative model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas-Lopez, Ruben

    2005-11-01

    In order to decrease cost and improve drilling operations is necessary a better understood of the flow mechanisms. Therefore, it was carried out a multiphase conservative model that includes three mass equations and a momentum equation. Also, the measured geothermal gradient is utilized by state equations for estimating physical properties of the phases flowing. The mathematical model is solved by numerical conservative schemes. It is used to analyze the interaction among solid-liquid-gas phases. The circulating system consists as follow, the circulating fluid is pumped downward into the drilling pipe until the bottom of the open hole then it flows through the drill bit, and at this point formation cuttings are incorporated to the circulating fluid and carried upward to the surface. The mixture returns up to the surface by an annular flow area. The real operational conditions are fed to conservative model and the results are matched up to field measurements in several oil wells. Mainly, flow rates, drilling rate, well and tool geometries are data to estimate the profiles of pressure, mixture density, equivalent circulating density, gas fraction and solid carrying capacity. Even though the problem is very complex, the model describes, properly, the hydrodynamics of drilling techniques applied at oil fields. *Authors want to thank to Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo and Petroleos Mexicanos for supporting this research.

  3. Fugitive emissions of methane from abandoned, decommissioned oil and gas wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothroyd, I M; Almond, S; Qassim, S M; Worrall, F; Davies, R J

    2016-03-15

    This study considered the fugitive emissions of methane (CH4) from former oil and gas exploration and production wells drilled to exploit conventional hydrocarbon reservoirs onshore in the UK. This study selected from the 66% of all onshore wells in the UK which appeared to be properly decommissioned (abandoned) that came from 4 different basins and were between 8 and 79 years old. The soil gas above each well was analysed and assessed relative to a nearby control site of similar land use and soil type. The results showed that of the 102 wells considered 30% had soil gas CH4 at the soil surface that was significantly greater than their respective control. Conversely, 39% of well sites had significant lower surface soil gas CH4 concentrations than their respective control. We interpret elevated soil gas CH4 concentrations to be the result of well integrity failure, but do not know the source of the gas nor the route to the surface. Where elevated CH4 was detected it appears to have occurred within a decade of it being drilled. The flux of CH4 from wells was 364 ± 677 kg CO2eq/well/year with a 27% chance that the well would have a negative flux to the atmosphere independent of well age. This flux is low relative to the activity commonly used on decommissioned well sites (e.g. sheep grazing), however, fluxes from wells that have not been appropriately decommissioned would be expected to be higher. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Technical standardization of oil well abandonment: a review of current standards and technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzart, J. Walter P.; Pessoa, Laudemar; Paiva, Maria [Halliburton Energy Services (HES), Duncan, OK (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this study is to provide a new methodology for well abandonment. This practice is becoming more and more important because of the increasing number of production fields being abandoned. We strongly recommend a study of cement slurries properties for specific use in temporary and permanent abandonment plugs based on the estimation of the cement slurry hardened when placed in the well. By using specific additives, it is possible to achieve very stable slurries. For example, when permeability is reduced, formation fluid migration can be blocked and chemical reactions between the fluid and the slurry may be inhibited. With this objective, we present a laboratory investigation model and an example of slurry testing recommendation. During the abandonment operation, all records of the well characteristics should be maintained to include the reason for the abandonment, and location of fresh water, brine, and hydrocarbon zones that may exist. This documentation will also allow the analysis of solutions for the problems that originally caused the abandonment of the well. This data could be important for future use by environmental protection commissions to reopen or to drill an adjacent well. Given the high price of oil, it may now be economically feasible to reopen the well, if the reason for abandonment was low productivity. This way, a critical analysis of the current conditions of well and field abandonment in the country is presented. Based on this information, a review of the current standards is suggested. (author)

  5. Formulation of geopolymer cement using mixture of slag and class f fly ash for oil well cementing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanesan, Dinesh; Ridha, Syahrir; Rao, Prasath

    2017-05-01

    The increase in greenhouse gas emissions has been a factor for the increase in global temperature. Geopolymer cement has been intensively studied to replace conventional ordinary Portland cement, however the focus is limited to civil purposes under atmospheric conditions. This research focuses on the formulation of geopolymer cement to be used in oil well cementing application by taking account the effect of sodium hydroxide (NaoH) molarity, ratio of alkali binder and fly ash, amount of dispersant for oilwell operation under temperature ranging of 80°C and 90C° and pressure of 1000 and 3000psi. The formulated composition is tested for fluid loss where the standard has been from 60 to 80 ml. The cement slurry is cured in a 50mm x 50mm x 50mm mold for period of 24 hours. Four manipulating variables were set in formulating the cement slurry namely, the ratio between fly ash and slag to alkali binder, ratio of sodium hydroxide (NaoH) to sodium silicate, molarity of NaoH and amount of dispersant added. After running a set of 16 experiment, sample (12) was found to possess the best rheological properties and fluid loss according to API RP10B. It was found that as the curing temperature and pressure increase, the compressive strength of the formulated geopolymer cement also increased.

  6. Stability evaluation of quality parameters for palm oil products at low temperature storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramli, Nur Aainaa Syahirah; Mohd Noor, Mohd Azmil; Musa, Hajar; Ghazali, Razmah

    2017-12-18

    Palm oil is one of the major oils and fats produced and traded worldwide. The value of palm oil products is mainly influenced by their quality. According to ISO 17025:2005, accredited laboratories shall have quality control procedure for monitoring the validity of tests for determination of quality parameters. This includes regular use of internal quality control using secondary reference materials. Unfortunately, palm oil reference materials are not currently available. In order to establish internal quality control samples, the stability of quality parameters need to be evaluated. In this study, the stability of quality parameters for palm oil products were examined over a period of ten months at low temperature storage (6 ± 2 °C). The palm oil products tested herein include crude palm oil (CPO), refined, bleached and deodorized (RBD) palm oil (RBDPO), RBD palm olein (RBDPOo), and RBD palm stearin (RBDPS). The quality parameters of the oils, i.e. moisture content, free fatty acid content (FFA), iodine value (IV), fatty acids composition (FAC) and slip melting point (SMP), were determined prior to and throughout the storage period. The moisture, FFA, IV, FAC and SMP for palm oil products changed significantly (P0.05). The stability study indicated that the quality of the palm oil products was stable within the specified limits throughout the storage period at low temperature. The storage condition has preserved the quality of palm oil products throughout the storage period. These findings qualify the use of the palm oil products; CPO, RBDPO, RBDPOo and RBDPS as control samples for validation of test results. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. The Effectof Temperature on the Dynmaic Viscosity of Acetone Sunflower-Seed Oil Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    TOPALLAR, Hüseyin; BAYRAK, Yüksel

    2014-01-01

    The effect of acetone on the dynamic viscosity of sunflower-seed oil was studied under a dynamic heating regime at temeparuters ranging from 25oC to 50oC at 5oC intervals. Acetone dramatically reduced the viscosity of sunflower-seed oil. The reduction of viscosity was far less with further addition of acetone. A linear relationship was found between the density of sunflower-seed oil and temperature. The influence of a solvent on the density of the sunflower-seed oil/acetone solution can be ac...

  8. Effects of Preheating and Storage Temperatures on Aroma Profile and Physical Properties of Citrus-Oil Emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying; Zhao, Chengying; Tian, Guifang; Lu, Chang; Zhao, Shaojie; Bao, Yuming; McClements, David Julian; Xiao, Hang; Zheng, Jinkai

    2017-09-06

    Citrus oils are used as good carrier oil for emulsion fabrication due to their special flavor and various health-promoting functions. In this study, the effects of preheating temperature (30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 °C) and storage temperature (4, 25, and 37 °C) on aroma profiles and physical properties of three citrus-oil (i.e., mandarin, sweet orange, and bergamot oils) emulsions were systematically investigated for the first time. The results demonstrated the significant impact of temperature on aroma profile and physical properties. The abundance of d-limonene was found to be the main factor determining the aroma of the three citrus-oil emulsions at different preheating and storage temperatures, while β-linalool and linalyl acetate were important for the aroma of bergamot oil emulsion. Preheating temperature showed a profound impact on the aroma of citrus-oil emulsions, and the aroma of different citrus oil emulsions showed different sensitivity to preheating temperature. Storage temperature was also able to alter the properties of citrus oil emulsions. The higher was the storage temperature, the more alteration of aroma and more instability of the emulsions there was, which could be attributed to the alteration of the oil components and the properties of emulsions. Among all three emulsions, bergamot-oil emulsion was the most stable and exhibited the most potent ability to preserve the aroma against high temperature. Our results would facilitate the application of citrus-oil emulsions in functional foods and beverages.

  9. A Computation Fluid Dynamic Model for Gas Lift Process Simulation in a Vertical Oil Well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadivar Arash

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Continuous gas-lift in a typical oil well was simulated using computational fluid dynamic (CFD technique. A multi fluid model based on the momentum transfer between liquid and gas bubbles was employed to simulate two-phase flow in a vertical pipe. The accuracy of the model was investigated through comparison of numerical predictions with experimental data. The model then was used to study the dynamic behaviour of the two-phase flow around injection point in details. The predictions by the model were compared with other empirical correlations, as well. To obtain an optimum condition of gas-lift, the influence of the effective parameters including the quantity of injected gas, tubing diameter and bubble size distribution were investigated. The results revealed that increasing tubing diameter, the injected gas rate and decreasing bubble diameter improve gas-lift performance.

  10. MODELLING AND ANALYSIS OF TOWER INTERVENTION EQUIPMENT OF OIL & GAS WELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César A. Chagoyén-Méndez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the modeling and analysis of one tower Workover Rig belonging to a maintenance facility for oil and gas wells is presented. When performing the maintenance of this tower, it is detected that one of the elements of the structure has some deformation. It was decided not to put it into operation and submit it to research. The modeling of invariants as well as ways of modeling soil structure interaction is discussed. It was necessary to determine the material properties with the performing of test of some samples taken on two components of the tower. The structural behavior of the tower to operating loads are then studied, proving that the effect of the deformed element in the structure is not significant for the stresses to which are subject.

  11. Palm oil anionic surfactants based emulsion breaker (Case study of emulsions breaker at Semanggi Field production wells)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhpidah; Hambali, E.; Suryani, A.; Kartika, I. A.

    2017-05-01

    The presence of emulsion in oil production process is undesirable. The emulsion will increase the production costs, transportation and costs related to emulsion separation process between water and oil. The development of palm oil-based surfactant as an emulsion breaker needs to be conducted given the availability of abundant raw materials in Indonesia and as an alternative to petroleum-based surfactant. The purpose of this study is to produce palm oil-based emulsion breaker, assessing the effect of additive application to the emulsion breaker and analyze the performance of the emulsion breaker. This research was conducted by formulating palm oil anionic surfactant in water formation with the addition of co-surfactant additive and co-solvent. Palm oil anionic surfactant-based emulsion breaker with 0.5% concentration in water can reduce 50% of emulsions with the interfacial tension (IFT) of 2.33x10-2 dyne/cm. The addition of co-solvent (toluene: xylene) is able to remove the emulsion formed with a lower IFT namely 10-3 dyne / cm. The resulting emulsion breaker is capable to remove the emulsion between water and oil. The performance test of emulsion breaker show that the emulsion is able to maintain its performance at reservoir temperature with no indicate of plugging and the value generated incremental oil recovery values is 13%.

  12. Optimizing headspace sampling temperature and time for analysis of volatile oxidation products in fish oil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rørbæk, Karen; Jensen, Benny

    1997-01-01

    Headspace-gas chromatography (HS-GC), based on adsorption to Tenax GR(R), thermal desorption and GC, has been used for analysis of volatiles in fish oil. To optimize sam sampling conditions, the effect of heating the fish oil at various temperatures and times was evaluated from anisidine values (......) and HS-CC. AV indicated sample degradations at 90 degrees C but only small alterations between 60 and 75 degrees C. HS-GC showed increasing response with temperature and rime. Purging at 75 degrees C for 45 min was selected as the preferred sampling condition for oxidized fish oil....

  13. Rapid Room-Temperature Gelation of Crude Oils by a Wetted Powder Gelator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Changliang; Shen, Jie; Chen, Feng; Zeng, Huaqiang

    2017-03-27

    Phase-selective organogelators (PSOGs) not only exhibit ability to phase-selectively congeal oil from oily water but also allow easy separation of gelled oil from the body of water. However, all hitherto reported PSOGs either necessitate carrier solvents for their dissolution or suffer from an extremely slow action in gelling oil in the powder form. A previously unexplored generally applicable wetting strategy is now described to dramatically enhance, by up to two orders of magnitude, gelling speed of the resultant wet but non-sticky gelator in the powder form in crude oils of widely ranging viscosities. Such unprecedented rapid gelling speeds enable rapid gelation of six types of (un)weathered crude oils within minutes at room temperature, making PSOGs one step closer to their eventual practical uses as one of important oil spill control technologies. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Influence of the harvesting time, temperature and drying period on basil (Ocimum basilicum L. essential oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz S. Carvalho Filho

    Full Text Available Ocimum basilicum L. essential oil with high concentration of linalool is valuable in international business. O. basilicum essential oil is widely used as seasoning and in cosmetic industry. To assure proper essential oil yield and quality, it is crucial to determine which environmental and processing factors are affecting its composition. The goal of our work is to evaluate the effects of harvesting time, temperature, and drying period on the yield and chemical composition of O. basilicum essential oil. Harvestings were performed 40 and 93 days after seedling transplantation. Harvesting performed at 8:00 h and 12:00 h provided higher essential oil yield. After five days drying, the concentration of linalool raised from 45.18% to 86.80%. O. basilicum should be harvested during morning and the biomass dried at 40ºC for five days to obtain linalool rich essential oil.

  15. Well blowout rates in California Oil and Gas District 4--Update and Trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Preston D.; Benson, Sally M.

    2009-10-01

    Well blowouts are one type of event in hydrocarbon exploration and production that generates health, safety, environmental and financial risk. Well blowouts are variously defined as 'uncontrolled flow of well fluids and/or formation fluids from the wellbore' or 'uncontrolled flow of reservoir fluids into the wellbore'. Theoretically this is irrespective of flux rate and so would include low fluxes, often termed 'leakage'. In practice, such low-flux events are not considered well blowouts. Rather, the term well blowout applies to higher fluxes that rise to attention more acutely, typically in the order of seconds to days after the event commences. It is not unusual for insurance claims for well blowouts to exceed US$10 million. This does not imply that all blowouts are this costly, as it is likely claims are filed only for the most catastrophic events. Still, insuring against the risk of loss of well control is the costliest in the industry. The risk of well blowouts was recently quantified from an assembled database of 102 events occurring in California Oil and Gas District 4 during the period 1991 to 2005, inclusive. This article reviews those findings, updates them to a certain extent and compares them with other well blowout risk study results. It also provides an improved perspective on some of the findings. In short, this update finds that blowout rates have remained constant from 2005 to 2008 within the limits of resolution and that the decline in blowout rates from 1991 to 2005 was likely due to improved industry practice.

  16. Casing Pipe Damage Detection with Optical Fiber Sensors: A Case Study in Oil Well Constructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Zhou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Casing pipes in oil well constructions may suddenly buckle inward as their inside and outside hydrostatic pressure difference increases. For the safety of construction workers and the steady development of oil industries, it is critically important to measure the stress state of a casing pipe. This study develops a rugged, real-time monitoring, and warning system that combines the distributed Brillouin Scattering Time Domain Reflectometry (BOTDR and the discrete fiber Bragg grating (FBG measurement. The BOTDR optical fiber sensors were embedded with no optical fiber splice joints in a fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP rebar and the FBG sensors were wrapped in epoxy resins and glass clothes, both installed during the segmental construction of casing pipes. In situ tests indicate that the proposed sensing system and installation technique can survive the downhole driving process of casing pipes, withstand a harsh service environment, and remain intact with the casing pipes for compatible strain measurements. The relative error of the measured strains between the distributed and discrete sensors is less than 12%. The FBG sensors successfully measured the maximum horizontal principal stress with a relative error of 6.7% in comparison with a cross multipole array acoustic instrument.

  17. Effect of temperature in the transesterification of pulp oil from macauba fruits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Karine Tennis dos [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (DEA/UFV), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica; Drummond, Alessandro Araujo; Martins, Marcio Aredes [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (DEA/UFV), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Agricola], E-mail: aredes@ufv.br; Carneiro, Angelica Cassia de Oliveira [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (DFT/UFV), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Fitotecnia; Coimbra, Jane Selia dos Reis [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (DTA/UFV), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Tecnologia de Alimentos

    2008-07-01

    An alternative to diesel from fossil fuels is the biodiesel, which is a renewable biofuel produced by the transesterification of vegetable oils and animal fats with alcohols. The Macauba is a palm that grows in lower rainfall regimes and its fruits present two different oils, namely pulp oil and nut oil. The nut oil is rich in palmitic oil, valuable oil for cosmetic industry. The pulp oil is used mostly for soap production, and it is considered inadequate for biodiesel production mainly due to its acid value, usually higher than 1%. In this work, the pulp oil from Macauba fruit with acid value of 0.8% was evaluated for biodiesel production. The transesterification was performed using ethanol and methanol, both in a molar ratio to the oil of 6:1. The catalyst employed was the potassium hydroxide at 1 % in oil weigh. The reactions were performed at constant temperatures of 60, 50 and 40 deg C and the reaction time was 30 minutes. Past the reaction time, the mixture was neutralized using hydrochloric acid and it was settled by 24 hours. The lower phase contains glycerol, water and excess of alcohol. The excess of alcohol and water was removed and the glycerol was weighted in order to estimate conversion yield. The transesterification at 60 deg C produces emulsion not allowing phase separation. Conversion yields were 62.0 and 57,7% using methanol at 50 and 40 deg C, respectively. For ethanol, the conversion yields were only 51.1 and 9.48% at 50 and 40 deg C, respectively. The acid value in the upper phase increases with temperature. Higher acid values were verified when ethanol was used in the transesterification. Since the pulp oil from Macauba fruit presents reasonable acid value, deacidification technique should be considered for alkaline catalyst transesterification using both methanol and ethanol. (author)

  18. Numerical simulations of the Macondo well blowout reveal strong control of oil flow by reservoir permeability and exsolution of gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M; Freifeld, Barry M; Pruess, Karsten; Pan, Lehua; Finsterle, Stefan; Moridis, George J

    2012-12-11

    In response to the urgent need for estimates of the oil and gas flow rate from the Macondo well MC252-1 blowout, we assembled a small team and carried out oil and gas flow simulations using the TOUGH2 codes over two weeks in mid-2010. The conceptual model included the oil reservoir and the well with a top boundary condition located at the bottom of the blowout preventer. We developed a fluid properties module (Eoil) applicable to a simple two-phase and two-component oil-gas system. The flow of oil and gas was simulated using T2Well, a coupled reservoir-wellbore flow model, along with iTOUGH2 for sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification. The most likely oil flow rate estimated from simulations based on the data available in early June 2010 was about 100,000 bbl/d (barrels per day) with a corresponding gas flow rate of 300 MMscf/d (million standard cubic feet per day) assuming the well was open to the reservoir over 30 m of thickness. A Monte Carlo analysis of reservoir and fluid properties provided an uncertainty distribution with a long tail extending down to 60,000 bbl/d of oil (170 MMscf/d of gas). The flow rate was most strongly sensitive to reservoir permeability. Conceptual model uncertainty was also significant, particularly with regard to the length of the well that was open to the reservoir. For fluid-entry interval length of 1.5 m, the oil flow rate was about 56,000 bbl/d. Sensitivity analyses showed that flow rate was not very sensitive to pressure-drop across the blowout preventer due to the interplay between gas exsolution and oil flow rate.

  19. Spatial and Temporal Characteristics of Historical Oil and Gas Wells in Pennsylvania: Implications for New Shale Gas Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilmore, Robert M; Sams, James I; Glosser, Deborah; Carter, Kristin M; Bain, Daniel J

    2015-10-20

    Recent large-scale development of oil and gas from low-permeability unconventional formations (e.g., shales, tight sands, and coal seams) has raised concern about potential environmental impacts. If left improperly sealed, legacy oil and gas wells colocated with that new development represent a potential pathway for unwanted migration of fluids (brine, drilling and stimulation fluids, oil, and gas). Uncertainty in the number, location, and abandonment state of legacy wells hinders environmental assessment of exploration and production activity. The objective of this study is to apply publicly available information on Pennsylvania oil and gas wells to better understand their potential to serve as pathways for unwanted fluid migration. This study presents a synthesis of historical reports and digital well records to provide insights into spatial and temporal trends in oil and gas development. Areas with a higher density of wells abandoned prior to the mid-20th century, when more modern well-sealing requirements took effect in Pennsylvania, and areas where conventional oil and gas production penetrated to or through intervals that may be affected by new Marcellus shale development are identified. This information may help to address questions of environmental risk related to new extraction activities.

  20. High-performance computing on GPUs for resistivity logging of oil and gas wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinskikh, V.; Dudaev, A.; Nechaev, O.; Surodina, I.

    2017-10-01

    We developed and implemented into software an algorithm for high-performance simulation of electrical logs from oil and gas wells using high-performance heterogeneous computing. The numerical solution of the 2D forward problem is based on the finite-element method and the Cholesky decomposition for solving a system of linear algebraic equations (SLAE). Software implementations of the algorithm used the NVIDIA CUDA technology and computing libraries are made, allowing us to perform decomposition of SLAE and find its solution on central processor unit (CPU) and graphics processor unit (GPU). The calculation time is analyzed depending on the matrix size and number of its non-zero elements. We estimated the computing speed on CPU and GPU, including high-performance heterogeneous CPU-GPU computing. Using the developed algorithm, we simulated resistivity data in realistic models.

  1. Measuring resistivity changes from within a first cased well to monitor fluids injected into oil bearing geological formations from a second cased well while passing electrical current between the two cased wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vail, III, William B.

    1993-01-01

    A.C. current is conducted through geological formations separating two cased wells in an oil field undergoing enhanced oil recovery operations such as water flooding operations. Methods and apparatus are disclosed to measure the current leakage conducted into a geological formation from within a first cased well that is responsive to fluids injected into formation from a second cased well during the enhanced oil production activities. The current leakage and apparent resistivity measured within the first cased well are responsive to fluids injected into formation from the second cased well provided the distance of separation between the two cased wells is less than, or on the order of, a Characteristic Length appropriate for the problem.

  2. Crumb waste tire rubber surface modification by plasma polymerization of ethanol and its application on oil-well cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaowei, Cheng; Sheng, Huang; Xiaoyang, Guo; Wenhui, Duan

    2017-07-01

    Crumb waste tire rubber (WTR) was pretreated by oxygen low temperature plasma (LTP) and modified by LTP polymerization process of ethanol monomer to improve the adhesion property with oil-well cement matrix and the mechanical properties of cement. The surface properties of modified crumb WTR and the mechanical properties and structures of modified oil-well cement were investigated by means of contact angle measurement, dispersion test, attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), mechanics performance tests, permeability test and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was demonstrated that LTP treatment changed both the surface composition and roughness. The contact angle of pretreated crumb WTR dramatically fell from 122° to 34°, and sample with ethanol LPT polymer film decreased even further to 11°. The ATR-FTIR and XPS analysis results demonstrated that hydrophilic groups, such as -COOH, C-OH, and -CHO, were introduced on the WTR surface. The oxygen atomic percent increased from 8.11% to 14.50% and 24.83%. The mechanical properties, porosity and permeability of raw cement were compared to samples modified by untreated crumb WTR, pretreated crumb WTR and ethanol LTP polymerization treated crumb WTR. It was found that after 28 days, the compressive strength of the samples with the untreated crumb WTR decreased to 80% with respect to raw cement. The tensile strength and flexural strength also had a slight reduction compared with the raw cement. On the contrary, after 28 days, the tensile strength of cement modified by LTP polymerization treated WTR increased 11.03% and 13.36%, and the flexural strength increased 9.65% and 7.31%, respectively. A decrease in the compressive strength also occurred but was inconspicuous. A tight interface bonding for ethanol LTP polymerization treated WTR with cement matrix was observed via an SEM image.

  3. Determining quantity and quality of retained oil in mature marly chalk and marlstone of the Cretaceous Niobrara Formation by low-temperature hydrous pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewan, Michael; Sonnenfeld, Mark D.

    2017-01-01

    Low-temperature hydrous pyrolysis (LTHP) at 300°C (572°F) for 24 h released retained oils from 12- to 20-meshsize samples of mature Niobrara marly chalk and marlstone cores. The released oil accumulated on the water surface of the reactor, and is compositionally similar to oil produced from the same well. The quantities of oil released from the marly chalk and marlstone by LTHP are respectively 3.4 and 1.6 times greater than those determined by tight rock analyses (TRA) on aliquots of the same samples. Gas chromatograms indicated this difference is a result of TRA oils losing more volatiles and volatilizing less heavy hydrocarbons during collection than LTHP oils. Characterization of the rocks before and after LTPH by programmable open-system pyrolysis (HAWK) indicate that under LTHP conditions no significant oil is generated and only preexisting retained oil is released. Although LTHP appears to provide better predictions of quantity and quality of retained oil in a mature source rock, it is not expected to replace the more time and sample-size efficacy of TRA. However, LTHP can be applied to composited samples from key intervals or lithologies originally recognized by TRA. Additional studies on duration, temperature, and sample size used in LTHP may further optimize its utility.

  4. Viscosity of water-in-oil emulsions. Variation with temperature and water volume fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farah, Marco A.; Caldas, Jorge Navaes [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A., Rua General Canabarro, 500, Maracana, Rio, CEP 2057-900 (Brazil); Oliveira, Roberto C. [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A., Cenpes, Cidade Universitaria (Brazil); Rajagopal, Krishnaswamy [LATCA-Laboratorio de Termodinamica e Cinetica Aplicada-Escola de Quimica, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, UFRJ, Cidade Universitaria, C.P. 68452, CEP 21949-900, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2005-09-15

    Water-in-oil emulsions are important in the petroleum industry in production operations, where the water content of the emulsion can be as high as 60% in volume, also in petroleum refining operations where generally the water content is low. The effective viscosity of water-in-oil emulsions depends mainly on the volume fraction of dispersed phase and temperature, along with several minor effects, such as shear rate, average droplet size, droplet size distribution, viscosity and density of oil. Using six different crude oils, the effective viscosities of several synthetic water-in-oil emulsions are measured at atmospheric pressure using a dynamic viscosimeter for different shear rates, temperatures and volume fractions of the dispersed phase. The ASTM equation, method D-341, for describing viscosity as a function of temperature is extended to include the variation of dispersed phase volume fraction. The proposed equation gives good correlation between the measured viscosities of water-in-oil emulsions as a function of temperature and the volume fraction of water.

  5. Extreme temperature and oil contamination shape the relative abundance of copepod species in the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinh, Khuong Van; Nielsen, Torkel Gissel

    The retreat of sea ice in the Arctic under global warming is predicted to intensify oil exploitation and shipping activities in this region, posing the risk of oil contamination. Knowledge on how Arctic secondary producers deal with the combined effects of global warming, particularly the extreme...... and grazing rate in both species and this pattern was independent of temperatures. Notably, exposure to high pyrene resulted in than 70% of mortality in C. finmarchicus that was two times higher than the mortality observed for C. glacialis. These results suggest that extreme temperature under global warming...... temperature and oil exposure is limited. To address this, we exposed females of two copepods species Calanus glacialis and C. finmarchicus to pyrene at three temperatures: 2, 6 and 10°C. Both species co-exist in the Disko Bay, Greenland, but only C. glacialis is a true Arctic specialist while C. finmarchicus...

  6. Economic impact of using nonmetallic materials in low to intermediate temperature geothermal well construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    Four appendices are included. The first covers applications of low-temperature geothermal energy including industrial processes, agricultural and related processes, district heating and cooling, and miscellaneous. The second discusses hydrogeologic factors affecting the design and construction of low-temperature geothermal wells: water quality, withdrawal rate, water depth, water temperature, basic well designs, and hydrogeologic provinces. In the third appendix, properties of metallic and nonmetallic materials are described, including: specific gravity, mechanical strength properties, resistance to physical and biological attack, thermal properties of nonmetallics, fluid flow characteristics, corrosion resistance, scaling resistance, weathering resistance of nonmetallics, and hydrolysis resistance of nonmetallics. Finally, special considerations in the design and construction of low-temperature geothermal wells using nonmetallics materials are covered. These include; drilling methods, joining methods, methods of casing and screen installation, well cementing, and well development. (MHR)

  7. STATIC_TEMP: a useful computer code for calculating static formation temperatures in geothermal wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoyo, E.; Garcia, A.; Espinosa, G.; Hernandez, I.; Santoyo, S.

    2000-03-01

    The development and application of the computer code STATIC_TEMP, a useful tool for calculating static formation temperatures from actual bottomhole temperature data logged in geothermal wells is described. STATIC_TEMP is based on five analytical methods which are the most frequently used in the geothermal industry. Conductive and convective heat flow models (radial, spherical/radial and cylindrical/radial) were selected. The computer code is a useful tool that can be reliable used in situ to determine static formation temperatures before or during the completion stages of geothermal wells (drilling and cementing). Shut-in time and bottomhole temperature measurements logged during well completion activities are required as input data. Output results can include up to seven computations of the static formation temperature by each wellbore temperature data set analysed. STATIC_TEMP was written in Fortran-77 Microsoft language for MS-DOS environment using structured programming techniques. It runs on most IBM compatible personal computers. The source code and its computational architecture as well as the input and output files are described in detail. Validation and application examples on the use of this computer code with wellbore temperature data (obtained from specialised literature) and with actual bottomhole temperature data (taken from completion operations of some geothermal wells) are also presented.

  8. Synthesis of Carboxymethyl Starch for increasing drilling mud quality in drilling oil and gas wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minaev, K. M.; Martynova, D. O.; Zakharov, A. S.; Sagitov, R. R.; Ber, A. A.; Ulyanova, O. S.

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the impact of carboxymethyl starch preparation conditions on physicochemical properties of polysaccharide reagent, widely used as fluid loss reducing agent in drilling mud. Variation of the main parameters of carboxymethylation is researched in the experiment. The following conditions such as temperature and reaction time, amount of water, as well as ratio of NaOH to monochloracetic acid define the characteristics of carboxymethyl starch. The degree of substitution is defined for polysaccharides, as well as the characteristics of samples have been studied by infrared spectroscopy. Rheological characteristics and fluid loss indicator have been investigated to study the impact of the reagents on drilling mud quality.

  9. Integration of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor Technology with Oil Sands Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L.E. Demick

    2011-10-01

    This paper summarizes an evaluation of siting an HTGR plant in a remote area supplying steam, electricity and high temperature gas for recovery and upgrading of unconventional crude oil from oil sands. The area selected for this evaluation is the Alberta Canada oil sands. This is a very fertile and active area for bitumen recovery and upgrading with significant quantities piped to refineries in Canada and the U.S Additionally data on the energy consumption and other factors that are required to complete the evaluation of HTGR application is readily available in the public domain. There is also interest by the Alberta oil sands producers (OSP) in identifying alternative energy sources for their operations. It should be noted, however, that the results of this evaluation could be applied to any similar oil sands area.

  10. PEMANFAATAN METIL ESTER JARAK PAGAR MENJADI SURFAKTAN MES UNTUK APLIKASI SEBAGAI OIL WELL STIMULATION AGENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erliza Hambali

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Year by year, globally the production of petroleum decreases but its demand increases. The world will get the energy crisis including Indonesia if that condition happens continously. Because of that, Indonesia starts to develop IOR (improved oil recovery method for their oil fields. IOR method is an improvement of the secondary phase in which the oil recovery is expected to increase oil production. One method of IOR is chemical injection with surfactant for injection. Surfactant is dissolved with injection water and injected to reservoir. Generally, surfactant of petroleum sulphonates is used for oil recovery. Due to the weaknesses of petroleum suphonates such as not resistant in high salinity and high hardness water, therefore it triggers to get surfactant substitute like MES (methyl ester sulphonates that is synthesized by bio-oil from Jatropha curcas L. The study was aimed to know the performance of MES surfactant formula from jatropha oil for IOR in fluid sample of oil field and synthetic sandstone core. The best condition from this research was surfactant 0.2 PV with the soaking time of 12 hours. This formula gave the highest of incremental total oil recovery 61%. The number were resulted from 48% waterflooding and 13% surfactant injection.

  11. SMART MONITORING AND DECISION MAKING FOR REGULATING ANNULUS BOTTOM HOLE PRESSURE WHILE DRILLING OIL WELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Vega

    Full Text Available Abstract Real time measurements and development of sensor technology are research issues associated with robustness and safety during oil well drilling operations, making feasible the diagnosis of problems and the development of a regulatory strategy. The major objective of this paper is to use an experimental plant and also field data, collected from a basin operation, offshore Brazil, for implementing smart monitoring and decision making, in order to assure drilling inside operational window, despite the commonly observed disturbances that produce fluctuations in the well annulus bottom hole pressure. Using real time measurements, the performance of a continuous automated drilling unit is analyzed under a scenario of varying levels of rate of penetration; aiming pressure set point tracking (inside the operational drilling window and also rejecting kick, a phenomenon that occurs when the annulus bottom hole pressure is inferior to the porous pressure, producing the migration of reservoir fluids into the annulus region. Finally, an empirical model was built, using real experimental data from offshore Brazil basins, enabling diagnosing and regulating a real drilling site by employing classic and advanced control strategies.

  12. Kinetic modeling of cement slurry synthesized with Henna extract in oil well acidizing treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossein Aghajafari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Acidizing treatment in petroleum reservoirs is a short-term and viable strategy to preserve the productivity of a well. There is a major concern for the degradation of cement sheath integrity, leading to poor zonal isolation and environmental issues. Therefore, it is essential to understand how the cement behaves when attacked by hydrochloric acid. In this study, a cement slurry by incorporation of the Henna extract, as an environmentally friendly cement additive, was synthesized as a potential solution to solve this problem. The characteristics of the treated cement slurry were compared with a reference slurry (w/c = 0.44 which is composed of only cement and water. A kinetic study was carried out to evaluate the adsorption behavior of the cement slurries exposed to an acid solution with 0.1 M HCl in a range of 25 to 55 °C conditions. The features of the cement slurries were evaluated by multiple analytical techniques such as XRD, FTIR, TG, and DSC analysis. From the experimental data, it is concluded that the second-order Lagergren kinetic model revealed to be the best in describing kinetic isotherms taken, because the margin between experimental and calculated values was minor for this model. The results of the characterization and HCl interaction kinetic studies underlined the prominent protective role of Henna extract-modified cement slurry in the enhancement of the cement resistance against acid attack and utilization in environmentally favorable oil well acidizing treatments.

  13. Use of temperature dependent Raman spectra to improve accuracy for analysis of complex oil-based samples: lube base oils and adulterated olive oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mooeung; Lee, Sanguk; Chang, Kyeol; Chung, Hoeil; Jung, Young Mee

    2012-10-20

    A simple and effective strategy to improve accuracy for Raman spectroscopic analysis of complex mixture samples by probing a measurement temperature yielding enhanced spectral selectivity has been demonstrated. For the evaluation, the determination of Kinematic Viscosity at 40 °C (KV@40) of lube base oil (LBO) samples was initially attempted. Partial least squares (PLS) was used to determine the KV@40 using Raman spectra of the samples collected at 8 different temperatures from 20 to 90 °C with 10 °C increments. Interestingly, the distinct temperature-induced spectral variation among the samples occurred at 50 °C, thereby resulting in the improved accuracy for determination of KV@40. Two-dimensional (2D) correlation analysis was also performed to find an additional supportive rationale for the improved accuracy. The strategy was further evaluated for the identification of soybean oil-adulterated olive oils using linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Similarly, the discrimination accuracy was improved around 80-90 °C due to the enhanced spectral selectivity between olive and soybean oils. In overall, these two results successfully demonstrate analytical effectiveness of the strategy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of temperature on energy potential of pyrolysis products from oil palm shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina María Romero Millán

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Context: Taking into account that near 220 000 tons of oil palm shells are produced every year in Colombia, as a waste of the Elaeis Guineensis palm oil transformation process, the aim of this work is to determine the energy potential of oil palm shells, when transformed through slow pyrolysis process. Methods: Using a fixed bed lab scale reactor, different oil palm shells pyrolysis tests were performed between 300°C and 500°C. The effect of the temperature in the process product yield and in the energy content of produced solids and gases were analyzed. Results: With a maximum mass yield of 50%, the char is considered the main product of oil palm shells pyrolysis, containing up to 73% of the raw biomass energy. The heating value of char raised with the temperature, from 29,6 MJ/kg at 300°C to 31,34 MJ/kg at 500°C. Moreover, the gas produced in the established temperature range had up to 13% of the energy content of the raw biomass, with a heating value near 12,5 MJ/m3. Conclusions: According to the results, slow pyrolysis can be considered an interesting process for the valorization of residual biomass as oil palm shells, through the production of solids and gases that can be used as fuels, or as precursor of other value-added products.

  15. Characterization of raw and burnt oil shale from Dotternhausen: Petrographical and mineralogical evolution with temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiéry, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.thiery@mines-douai.fr [Mines Douai, LGCgE-GCE, F-59508 Douai (France); Université de Lille (France); Bourdot, Alexandra, E-mail: alexandra.bourdot@gmail.com [Mines Douai, LGCgE-GCE, F-59508 Douai (France); Bulteel, David, E-mail: david.bulteel@mines-douai.fr [Université de Lille (France)

    2015-08-15

    The Toarcian Posidonia shale from Dotternhausen, Germany, is quarried and burnt in a fluidized bed reactor to produce electricity. The combustion residue, namely burnt oil shale (BOS), is used in the adjacent cement work as an additive in blended cements. The starting material is a typical laminated oil shale with an organic matter content ranging from 6 to 18%. Mineral matter consists principally of quartz, feldspar, pyrite and clays. After calcination in the range, the resulting product, burnt oil shale, keeps the macroscopic layered texture however with different mineralogy (anhydrite, lime, iron oxides) and the formation of an amorphous phase. This one, studied under STEM, reveals a typical texture of incipient partial melting due to a long retention time (ca. 30 min) and quenching. An in-situ high temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD) allowed studying precisely the mineralogical changes associated with the temperature increase. - Highlights: • We present oil shale/burnt oil shale characterization. • The Posidonia Shale is burnt in a fluidized bed. • Mineralogical evolution with temperature is complex. • The burnt oil shale is used in composite cements.

  16. Flow Rates Measurement and Uncertainty Analysis in Multiple-Zone Water-Injection Wells from Fluid Temperature Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reges, José E O; Salazar, A O; Maitelli, Carla W S P; Carvalho, Lucas G; Britto, Ursula J B

    2016-07-13

    This work is a contribution to the development of flow sensors in the oil and gas industry. It presents a methodology to measure the flow rates into multiple-zone water-injection wells from fluid temperature profiles and estimate the measurement uncertainty. First, a method to iteratively calculate the zonal flow rates using the Ramey (exponential) model was described. Next, this model was linearized to perform an uncertainty analysis. Then, a computer program to calculate the injected flow rates from experimental temperature profiles was developed. In the experimental part, a fluid temperature profile from a dual-zone water-injection well located in the Northeast Brazilian region was collected. Thus, calculated and measured flow rates were compared. The results proved that linearization error is negligible for practical purposes and the relative uncertainty increases as the flow rate decreases. The calculated values from both the Ramey and linear models were very close to the measured flow rates, presenting a difference of only 4.58 m³/d and 2.38 m³/d, respectively. Finally, the measurement uncertainties from the Ramey and linear models were equal to 1.22% and 1.40% (for injection zone 1); 10.47% and 9.88% (for injection zone 2). Therefore, the methodology was successfully validated and all objectives of this work were achieved.

  17. Flow Rates Measurement and Uncertainty Analysis in Multiple-Zone Water-Injection Wells from Fluid Temperature Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José E. O. Reges

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This work is a contribution to the development of flow sensors in the oil and gas industry. It presents a methodology to measure the flow rates into multiple-zone water-injection wells from fluid temperature profiles and estimate the measurement uncertainty. First, a method to iteratively calculate the zonal flow rates using the Ramey (exponential model was described. Next, this model was linearized to perform an uncertainty analysis. Then, a computer program to calculate the injected flow rates from experimental temperature profiles was developed. In the experimental part, a fluid temperature profile from a dual-zone water-injection well located in the Northeast Brazilian region was collected. Thus, calculated and measured flow rates were compared. The results proved that linearization error is negligible for practical purposes and the relative uncertainty increases as the flow rate decreases. The calculated values from both the Ramey and linear models were very close to the measured flow rates, presenting a difference of only 4.58 m³/d and 2.38 m³/d, respectively. Finally, the measurement uncertainties from the Ramey and linear models were equal to 1.22% and 1.40% (for injection zone 1; 10.47% and 9.88% (for injection zone 2. Therefore, the methodology was successfully validated and all objectives of this work were achieved.

  18. Chicxulub Impact Crater and Yucatan Carbonate Platform - PEMEX Oil Exploratory Wells Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Drago, G.; Gutierrez-Cirlos, A. G.; Pérez-Cruz, L.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.

    2008-12-01

    Geophysical oil exploration surveys carried out by PEMEX in the 1940's revealed occurrence of an anomalous pattern of semi-circular concentric gravity anomalies. The Bouguer gravity anomalies covered an extensive area over the flat carbonate platform in the northwestern Yucatan Peninsula; strong density contrasts were suggestive of a buried igneous complex or basement uplift beneath the carbonates, which was referred as the Chicxulub structure. The exploration program carried out afterwards included a drilling program, starting with Chicxulub-1 well in 1952 and comprising eight deep boreholes through the 1970s. An aeromagnetic survey in late 1970's showed high amplitude anomalies in the gravity anomaly central sector. Thus, research showing Chicxulub as a large complex impact crater formed at the K/T boundary was built on the PEMEX decades-long exploration program. Despite frequent reference to PEMEX information and samples, original data and cores have not been openly available for detailed evaluation and integration with results from recent investigations. Core samples largely remain to be analyzed and interpreted in the context of recent marine, aerial and terrestrial geophysical surveys and the drilling/coring projects of UNAM and ICDP. In this presentation we report on the stratigraphy and paleontological data for PEMEX wells: Chicxulub- 1 (1582m), Sacapuc-1 (1530m), Yucatan-6 (1631m), Ticul-1 (3575m) Yucatan-4 (2398m), Yucatan-2 (3474m), Yucatan-5A (3003m) and Yucatan-1 (3221m). These wells remain the deepest drilled in Chicxulub, providing samples of impact lithologies, carbonate sequences and basement, which give information on post- and pre-impact stratigraphy and crystalline basement. We concentrate on stratigraphic columns, lateral correlations and integration with UNAM and ICDP borehole data. Current plans for deep drilling in Chicxulub crater target the peak ring and central sector, with offshore and onshore boreholes proposed to the IODP and ICDP

  19. Transient pressure analysis of a volume fracturing well in fractured tight oil reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cheng; Wang, Jiahang; Zhang, Cong; Cheng, Minhua; Wang, Xiaodong; Dong, Wenxiu; Zhou, Yingfang

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents a semi-analytical model to simulate transient pressure curves for a vertical well with a reconstructed fracture network in fractured tight oil reservoirs. In the proposed model, the reservoir is a composite system and contains two regions. The inner region is described as a formation with a finite conductivity hydraulic fracture network and the flow in the fracture is assumed to be linear, while the outer region is modeled using the classical Warren–Root model where radial flow is applied. The transient pressure curves of a vertical well in the proposed reservoir model are calculated semi-analytically using the Laplace transform and Stehfest numerical inversion. As shown in the type curves, the flow is divided into several regimes: (a) linear flow in artificial main fractures; (b) coupled boundary flow; (c) early linear flow in a fractured formation; (d) mid radial flow in the semi-fractures of the formation; (e) mid radial flow or pseudo steady flow; (f) mid cross-flow; (g) closed boundary flow. Based on our newly proposed model, the effects of some sensitive parameters, such as elastic storativity ratio, cross-flow coefficient, fracture conductivity and skin factor, on the type curves were also analyzed extensively. The simulated type curves show that for a vertical fractured well in a tight reservoir, the elastic storativity ratios and crossflow coefficients affect the time and the degree of crossflow respectively. The pressure loss increases with an increase in the fracture conductivity. To a certain extent, the effect of the fracture conductivity is more obvious than that of the half length of the fracture on improving the production effect. With an increase in the wellbore storage coefficient, the fluid compressibility is so large that it might cover the early stage fracturing characteristics. Linear or bilinear flow may not be recognized, and the pressure and pressure derivative gradually shift to the right. With an increase in the skin

  20. Wall sticking of high water-cut crude oil transported at temperatures below the gel point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Haimin; Huang, Qiyu; Wang, Changhui

    2015-12-01

    Some high water-cut crude oils can flow in the temperature below the oil gel point, while oil particles may adhere to the pipe wall as paste; this process is known as ‘wall sticking’. This can cause partial or even total blocking of the transportation pipe. Several experiments using a laboratory flow loop were conducted to study the wall sticking characteristics of high water-cut crude oils. The experimental results indicated that the predominant influencing factors of wall sticking included shear stress, water-cut and differences between gel point and wall temperature. The wall sticking rate and occurrence temperature decrease with the increase of water-cut and shear stress. The criterion for the wall sticking occurrence temperature (WSOT), and the regression formula of the wall sticking thickness for high water-cut crude oil were then established. Typical case studies indicated that the prediction results obtained from the WSOT criterion and the wall sticking thickness regression formula were in accordance with the measured values. The wall sticking rate and WSOT vary widely under different conditions and it is necessary to consider its non-uniformity in production.

  1. The rise and fall of methanotrophy following a deepwater oil-well blowout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Medina, M.; Meile, C. D.; Hunter, K. S.; Diercks, A.-R.; Asper, V. L.; Orphan, V. J.; Tavormina, P. L.; Nigro, L. M.; Battles, J. J.; Chanton, J. P.; Shiller, A. M.; Joung, D.-J.; Amon, R. M. W.; Bracco, A.; Montoya, J. P.; Villareal, T. A.; Wood, A. M.; Joye, S. B.

    2014-06-01

    The blowout of the Macondo oil well in the Gulf of Mexico in April 2010 injected up to 500,000 tonnes of natural gas, mainly methane, into the deep sea. Most of the methane released was thought to have been consumed by marine microbes between July and August 2010. Here, we report spatially extensive measurements of methane concentrations and oxidation rates in the nine months following the spill. We show that although gas-rich deepwater plumes were a short-lived feature, water column concentrations of methane remained above background levels throughout the rest of the year. Rates of microbial methane oxidation peaked in the deepwater plumes in May and early June, coincident with a rapid rise in the abundance of known and new methane-oxidizing microbes. At this time, rates of methane oxidation reached up to 5,900 nmol l-1 d-1--the highest rates documented in the global pelagic ocean before the blowout. Rates of methane oxidation fell to less than 50 nmol l-1 d-1 in late June, and continued to decline throughout the remainder of the year. We suggest the precipitous drop in methane consumption in late June, despite the persistence of methane in the water column, underscores the important role that physiological and environmental factors play in constraining the activity of methane-oxidizing bacteria in the Gulf of Mexico.

  2. Sedimentary petrology of oil well rock cores; Petrologia sedimentaria de nucleos de rocas de pozos petroleros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izquierdo M, Georgina; Paredes S, Adriana [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    At the request of PEMEX Exploration and Production (PEP), in the area of Geology of the Gerencia de Geotermia, the necessary methodology has been integrated to carry out the geologic characterization of cores obtained during the oil well drilling. The integrated studies have been of utility for PEMEX, because they provide detailed information on the processes, conditions of deposition and diagenesis that occur in sedimentary rocks. On the other hand, this geologic information contributes to the update of the geologic model of the field in study. [Spanish] A solicitud de PEMEX Exploracion y Produccion (PEP), en el area de Geologia de la Gerencia de Geotermia, se ha integrado la metodologia necesaria para llevar a cabo la caracterizacion geologica de nucleos obtenidos durante la perforacion de pozos petroleros. Los estudios integrados han sido de utilidad para PEMEX, pues proporcionan informacion detallada sobre los procesos, condiciones de depositacion y diagenesis que ocurren en rocas sedimentarias. Por otro lado, esta informacion geologica contribuye a la actualizacion del modelo geologico del campo en estudio.

  3. Economic effectiveness of treating the near-face zone of oil and injection wells in the Tatar ASSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khegay, V.F.; Nekrasova, A.P.; Vostrikova, M.N.

    1979-01-01

    A simplified formula is presented for calculating the economic effectiveness of treating the near-face zone of oil wells. The specific nature of the proposed technique of calculations is such that their result will be more accurate if the economic effect is determined for each well separately, and then the result is summed for the enterprise. In this case, it is necessary to adopt as the base net cost, the net cost of the association, and not of each well, for each well separately influences the indicators of the enterprise not in the size of the economic effect obtained from the individual net cost, but in the size of increase in product and level of outlays to obtain it. An example of analysis of treating the near face zone of oil wells is presented for 191 repair and near-face well zone for injection wells for 1207 repairs.

  4. Temperature Effect on Rheological Behavior of Silicone Oils. A Model for the Viscous Heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Mario R; Cuomo, Francesca; Massarotti, Nicola; Mauro, Alessandro; Salahudeen, Mohamed; Costagliola, Ciro; Ambrosone, Luigi

    2017-07-27

    The rheological behavior of silicone oils, (CH 3 ) 3 SiO-[Si(CH 3 ) 2 O] n -Si(CH 3 ) 3 , and their mixtures is studied. Shear-stress measurements, in the temperature range of 293-313 K, reveal that this polymer family is a group of shear-thinning liquids with a yield stress below which no flow occurs. Experimental diagrams, i.e., shear stress versus shear rate, are satisfactorily described by the Casson fluid model over a wide range of shear rates. In order to monitor the effect of temperature on fluid properties, Casson's rheological model is reformulated using the fictitious shear rate, γ̇ f , and the infinite-shear viscosity, η ∞ , as constitutive parameters. Due to low intermolecular forces and high chain flexibility, γ̇ f varies very little when the temperature increases. For this reason, the apparent material viscosity depends on temperature only through η ∞ , which exponentially decreases until high shear rates are reached, and there is more alignment possible. Interestingly, the temperature sensitivity of this pseudoplastic behavior is the same for all of the silicone oils investigated; therefore, they can be classified according to their tendency to emulsify. Experimental results are then used to model the flow of silicone oils in a cylindrical pipe and estimate the temperature increase due to viscous heating. Numerical results show that the normalized temperature, i.e., ratio of fluid temperature to wall temperature, increases approximately 23%, and the apparent viscosity decreases drastically, going toward the center of the tube. The non-Newtonian nature of fluid is reflected in the presence of a critical region. In this region, the velocity and temperature gradients vanish. Since silicon oil is a surgical tool, we hope that the acquired physicochemical information can provide help to facilitate the removal of this material during surgical procedures.

  5. Economic impact of using nonmetallic materials in low to intermediate temperature geothermal well construction. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    The results are presented of an exhaustive literature search and evaluation concerning the properties and economics of commercially available nonmetallic well casing and screens. These materials were studied in terms of their use in low to intermediate temperature geothermal well construction.

  6. Study on properties and testing methods of thermo-responsive cementing system for well cementing in heavy oil thermal recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lianjiang

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, thermo-responsive cement slurry system were being developed, the properties of conventional cement slurry, compressive strength high temperature of cement sheath, mechanical properties of cement sheath and thermal properties of cement sheath were being tested. Results were being used and simulated by Well-Life Software, Thermo-responsive cement slurry system can meet the requirements of heavy oil thermal recovery production. Mechanical and thermal properties of thermo-responsive cement sheath were being tested. Tensile fracture energy of the thermo-responsive cement sheath is larger than conventional cement. The heat absorption capacity of conventional cement sheath is larger than that of thermo-responsive cement sheath, this means more heat is needed for the unit mass once increasing 1.0 °C, which also indicates that thermo-responsive cement own good heat insulating and preservation effects. The heat conductivity coefficient and thermal expansion coefficient of thermo-responsive cement is less than and conventional cement, this means that thermo-responsive cement have good heat preservation and insulation effects with good thermal expansion stabilities.

  7. Application of optical remote sensing techniques to quantify emissions from urban oil wells, storage tanks, and other small stationary sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikelnaya, O.; Polidori, A.; Tisopulos, L.; Mellqvist, J.; Samuelsson, J.; Robinson, R. A.; Innocenti, F.; Perry, S.

    2016-12-01

    Oil fields in the Los Angeles Basin remain very productive even after more than a century-long history of exploration. There are currently over 5,000 active oil wells the South Coast Air Basin (SCAB), with a large portion placed in close proximity of residences, schools and other sensitive receptors. Gaseous emissions from oil wells and equipment related to oil extraction can have a significant impact on air quality. The South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) and other state regulatory agencies have a number of rules aimed to reduce Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions and to minimize potential impacts to nearby communities. However, little information is available on the effectiveness of current control measures and magnitude of emissions remain largely unknown. To fill this knowledge gap, in the fall of 2015 the SCAQMD, Fluxsense Inc., the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), and Kassay Field Services Inc. conducted a comprehensive five-week study to measure gaseous emissions from oil wells, oil pumps, intermediate storage tanks, and other small point sources. A combination of optical remote sensing (ORS) techniques was used to detect and quantify emissions VOCs, methane, nitrogen oxides (NOx) and other gaseous pollutants. Fluxsense used Solar Occultation Flux (SOF), Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS), and Extractive Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to survey a large number of oil extraction sites and other small emission sources within SCAB. Similarly, Kassay Field Services carried out open-path FTIR measurements to complement observations provided by Fluxsense. Concurrently, NPL operated their Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system on a smaller sub-set of sources to validate the emission results provided by Fluxsense and Kassay. During this presentation we will discuss the results of this joined measurement effort and the potential impacts of the observed emissions on neighboring communities. Additionally

  8. Recovery of low temperature heat in oil mills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carré Patrick

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Energy consumption in oil mills is a major item of costs and a sensitive point in the production of biofuels. To improve their performance, industrials can recover lowtemperature heat thanks to a new technology of heat exchangers suitable for treating granular solid materials. Information about the energy requirements of the rapeseed crushing being not readily available, the article gives a detailed assessment of consumption items (per ton of seed: 263 MJ for preparation operations and 284 MJ for solvent extraction. These exchangers used as pre-conditioners saves about 55 MJ.t−1 of heat by use of steam condensates. We could go further in use of these devices on the one hand to recover heat from press cake and meal, and secondly to use recovered energy to dry and warm up the seeds before pre-pressing. In this configuration, the energy savings could reach 38% of current needs.

  9. Using a dynamic coupled well-reservoir simulator to optimize production of a horizontal well in a thin oil rim

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nennie, E.D.; Alberts, G.J.N.; Peters, E.; Donkelaar, E. van

    2008-01-01

    Stabilization and optimization of production are the key challenges for smart well control. In order to compare the effectiveness of different control strategies, a simulation environment can be used. To study and control the effects of for instance slugging, gas coning and wax deposition, both

  10. Aroma oil therapy in palliative care: a pilot study with physiological parameters in conscious as well as unconscious patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goepfert, Melanie; Liebl, Patrick; Herth, Natalie; Ciarlo, Giancarlo; Buentzel, Jens; Huebner, Jutta

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this pilot study is to analyze the reactions of healthy test persons and conscious as well as unconscious palliative patients to aroma stimuli. In a randomized controlled study, healthy probands, conscious and unconscious palliative patients were exposed to two essential oils (lemon, lavender). Water was used as the control stimulus. Physiological parameters (breathing rate and heart rate, oxygen saturation, systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure) were measured. 10 test persons (control group), 15 conscious patients and 5 unconscious palliative patients were exposed to the stimuli. Healthy test persons reacted to lemon oil with a significant increase in respiration rate, heart rate and diastolic blood pressure, whereas to lavender oil with a significant decrease in respiration rate was measured. There were no significant reactions concerning the other parameters. Conscious and unconscious patients reacted with a significant increase in all measured parameters to lemon oil and with a significant decrease in all parameters except for oxygen saturation to lavender oil. No significant differences in the reactions were measured between the conscious and unconscious patients and no significant reactions to control stimuli were detected. All physiological reactions were very short and only detectable during stimulus presentation. Significant physiological reactions were measured after simulation with aroma oils in all three groups in this study. Healthy probands showed different reactions than palliative patients irrespective to their conscious state.

  11. Influence of temperature and reaction time on the conversion of polystyrene waste to pyrolysis liquid oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miandad, R; Nizami, A S; Rehan, M; Barakat, M A; Khan, M I; Mustafa, A; Ismail, I M I; Murphy, J D

    2016-12-01

    This paper aims to investigate the effect of temperature and reaction time on the yield and quality of liquid oil produced from a pyrolysis process. Polystyrene (PS) type plastic waste was used as a feedstock in a small pilot scale batch pyrolysis reactor. At 400°C with a reaction time of 75min, the gas yield was 8% by mass, the char yield was 16% by mass, while the liquid oil yield was 76% by mass. Raising the temperature to 450°C increased the gas production to 13% by mass, reduced the char production to 6.2% and increased the liquid oil yield to 80.8% by mass. The optimum temperature and reaction time was found to be 450°C and 75min. The liquid oil at optimum conditions had a dynamic viscosity of 1.77mPas, kinematic viscosity of 1.92cSt, a density of 0.92g/cm3, a pour point of -60°C, a freezing point of -64°C, a flash point of 30.2°C and a high heating value (HHV) of 41.6MJ/kg this is similar to conventional diesel. The gas chromatography with mass spectrophotometry (GC-MS) analysis showed that liquid oil contains mainly styrene (48%), toluene (26%) and ethyl-benzene (21%) compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Measurement of temperature-dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity of alumina and titania thermal oil nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieśliński, Janusz T.; Ronewicz, Katarzyna; Smoleń, Sławomir

    2015-12-01

    In this study the results of simultaneous measurements of dynamic viscosity, thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity and pH of two nanofluids, i.e., thermal oil/Al2O3 and thermal oil/TiO2 are presented. Thermal oil is selected as a base liquid because of possible application in ORC systems as an intermediate heating agent. Nanoparticles were tested at the concentration of 0.1%, 1%, and 5% by weight within temperature range from 20 °C to 60 °C. Measurement devices were carefully calibrated by comparison obtained results for pure base liquid (thermal oil) with manufacturer's data. The results obtained for tested nanofluids were compared with predictions made by use of existing models for liquid/solid particles mixtures.

  13. Measurement of temperature-dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity of alumina and titania thermal oil nanofluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cieśliński Janusz T.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study the results of simultaneous measurements of dynamic viscosity, thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity and pH of two nanofluids, i.e., thermal oil/Al2O3 and thermal oil/TiO2 are presented. Thermal oil is selected as a base liquid because of possible application in ORC systems as an intermediate heating agent. Nanoparticles were tested at the concentration of 0.1%, 1%, and 5% by weight within temperature range from 20 °C to 60 °C. Measurement devices were carefully calibrated by comparison obtained results for pure base liquid (thermal oil with manufacturer’s data. The results obtained for tested nanofluids were compared with predictions made by use of existing models for liquid/solid particles mixtures.

  14. Oil in the Gulf of Mexico after the capping of the BP/Deepwater Horizon Mississippi Canyon (MC-252) well.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolian, Steve R; Porter, Scott A; Sammarco, Paul W; Birkholz, Detlef; Cake, Edwin W; Subra, Wilma A

    2015-08-01

    Evidence of fresh oil from the BP/Deepwater Horizon Mississippi Canyon-252 (MC-252) well was found in the northern Gulf of Mexico up to 1 year and 10 months after it was capped on 15 July 2010. Offshore and coastal samples collected after capping displayed ratios of biomarkers matching those of MC-252 crude oil. Pre- and post-capping samples were compared. Little weathering had occurred, based on the abundance of low-molecular-weight (LMW) n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the post-capping samples. The occurrence of fresh oil in offshore waters and coastal areas suggest that the MC-252 well continued to leak hydrocarbons into the Gulf of Mexico at least until 22 May 2012, the end of this study period.

  15. Wheel-well and cargo compartment temperatures of large aircraft in flight: implications for stowaways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Gad

    2002-07-01

    Desperate people sometimes risk journeys as stowaways in aircraft wheel-wells. Some of them survive, despite the risks of being crushed by retracting landing gear, falling when the gear deploys for landing, or experiencing severe hypoxia and hypobaria in-flight. This study evaluates the level of hypothermia to which stowaways in aircraft may be exposed. Miniature dataloggers were used to record in-flight temperatures in aircraft wheel-wells and cargo compartments. Temperatures were measured for front and side wheel-wells (FW and SW, respectively) on 36 flights by C-130 aircraft (mean duration 3.3 h, mean cruise altitude 5588 m (18,333 ft)) and 11 flights by C-141 aircraft (6.7 h and 10,744 m (35,250 ft)). Mean minimum temperatures for the C-130 remained above freezing and averaged 5.1 degrees C for FW and 11.9 degrees C for SW. The higher, longer C-141 flights produced temperatures below freezing with mean minimum temperatures of -18.0 degrees C for FW and -12.4 degrees C for SW. In general, temperatures in wheel-wells remained about 20 degrees C above outside air temperature (OAT) at all altitudes. This increase reflects the fact that wheel-wells are closed spaces within the aircraft body, in addition to which they contain sources of heat such as hydraulic lines and electrical equipment. Cargo compartment minimum temperature was relatively high (mean = 18.6 degrees C for commercial airline). A search of the medical literature and lay press produced information on 46 incidents of people found in wheel-wells after landing where there was no evidence of trauma. The 15 survivors had stowed away on relatively short flights (mean = 4.8 h, maximum = 10 h) compared with fatalities (mean = 7.5 h, range = 3-12 h). Temperatures in wheel-wells during short flights may sustain life. Long flights add severe hypothermia to acute hypoxia and hypobaria as potentially fatal environmental factors faced by wheel-well stowaways.

  16. Risk Associated With The Decompression Of High Pressure High Temperature Fluids - Study On Black Oil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Figueroa, D. C.; Fosbøl, P. L.; Thomsen, K.

    2015-01-01

    that the final temperature of black oil increases upon adiabatic decompression. In the case of the isenthalpic process at initial conditions of the reservoir, e.g. 150°C and 1000 bars, it is found that the final temperature can increase to 173.7°C. At non-isenthalpic conditions the final temperature increases......Fluids produced from deep underground reservoirs may result in exponential increase in temperature. It is a consequence of adiabatic fluid decompression from the inverse Joule Thomson Effect (JTE). The phenomenon requires analysis in order to avoid any operational risks. This study evaluates...

  17. Effect of reaction temperature on biodiesel production from waste cooking oil using lipase as biocatalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istiningrum, Reni Banowati; Aprianto, Toni; Pamungkas, Febria Lutfi Udin

    2017-12-01

    This study aims to determine the effect of temperature on conversion of biodiesel from waste cooking oil enzymatically using lipase extracted from rice bran. The feedstock was simulated waste cooking oil and lipase enzyme was extracted with buffer pH variation. The enzyme activity was titrimetrically determined and the optimum pH buffer was used to study the effect of temperature on the transesterification reaction. Temperature effects were assessed in the range of 45-60 °C and the content of methyl esters in biodiesel was determined by GC-MS. The reaction temperature significantly influences the transesterification reaction with optimum biodiesel conversion occurred at 55 °C with methyl ester content of 81.19%. The methyl ester composition in the resulting biodiesel is methyl palmitate, methyl oleate and methyl stearate.

  18. Effect of temperature in fluidized bed fast pyrolysis of biomass: oil quality assessment in test units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, Roel Johannes Maria; Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria; Kersten, Sascha R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Pine wood was pyrolyzed in a 1 kg/h fluidized bed fast pyrolysis reactor that allows a residence time of pine wood particles up to 25 min. The reactor temperature was varied between 330 and 580 °C to study the effect on product yields and oil composition. Apart from the physical−chemical analysis, a

  19. Volatile organic compounds at oil and natural gas production well pads in Colorado and Texas using passive samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    A pilot study was conducted in application of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Methods 325A/B variant for monitoring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) near two oil and natural gas (ONG) production well pads in the Texas Barnett Shale formation and Colorado Denver&nd...

  20. Comparing the benefits: use of various well head gas coning control strategies to optimize production of a thin oil rim

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nennie, E.D.; Savenko, S.V.; Alberts, G.J.N.; Cargnelutti, M.F.; Donkelaar, E. van

    2009-01-01

    With an increasing number of smart well applications being installed in the field, more knowledge is required to optimize their operation. This paper compares the benefits of various wellhead gas coning control strategies to optimize production of a thin oil rim. This study is performed within the

  1. 26 CFR 1.612-4 - Charges to capital and to expense in case of oil and gas wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.612-4 Charges to capital and to expense in case of oil and gas wells. (a) Option with respect to intangible drilling and development costs. In accordance with the provisions of section 263(c), intangible drilling and development...

  2. Crude oil desulfurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Hsu, G. C.; Ernest, J. B. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    High sulfur crude oil is desulfurized by a low temperature (25-80 C.) chlorinolysis at ambient pressure in the absence of organic solvent or diluent but in the presence of water (water/oil=0.3) followed by a water and caustic wash to remove sulfur and chlorine containing reaction products. The process described can be practiced at a well site for the recovery of desulfurized oil used to generate steam for injection into the well for enhanced oil recovery.

  3. Antibacterial activity of oregano oil against antibiotic resistant Salmonella enterica on organic leafy greens at varying exposure times and storage temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of oregano oil on four organic leafy greens (iceberg and romaine lettuces and mature and baby spinaches) inoculated with Salmonella Newport as a function of treatment exposure times as well as storage temperatures. Leaf samples were wash...

  4. Influence of storage temperature on quality parameters, phenols and volatile compounds of Croatian virgin olive oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brkić Bubola, K.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of low storage temperature (+4 °C and -20 °C and conventional storage room temperature on the quality parameters, phenolic contents and volatile profiles of Buža, Črna and Rosinjola monovarietal virgin olive oils after 12 months of storage was investigated in this study. Virgin olive oils stored at low temperatures maintained better quality parameters than oils stored at room temperature. A negligible decrease in the total phenols was detected after 12 months of storage at all investigated temperatures. The total volatile compounds, aldehydes, alcohols and esters in almost all stored samples were unchanged compared to fresh oils. Total ketones increased after storage, although at a lower temperature these changes were less notable. An increase in the oxidation indicators hexanal and hexanal/E-2-hexenal ratio was the lowest in oils stored at +4 °C.Storage at temperatures lower than room temperature could help to prolong the shelf-life of extra virgin olive oil by maintaining high quality parameters and preserving the fresh oil’s volatile profile.Se ha estudiado la influencia, durante 12 meses, de temperaturas bajas (+4 °C y −20 °C y convencional (ambiente, sobre los parámetros de calidad, contenido fenólico y perfil de volátiles de aceites de oliva vírgenes monovarietales Buža, Črna y Rosinjola. Los aceites de oliva vírgenes almacenados a bajas temperaturas mantienen mejores propiedades de calidad que los aceites almacenados a temperatura ambiente. Se encontró una disminución no significativa de los fenoles totales después de 12 meses de almacenamiento a todas las temperaturas estudiadas. Los compuestos volátiles totales, aldehídos, alcoholes y ésteres, en casi todas las muestras almacenadas, se mantuvieron sin cambios en comparación con los aceites frescos. Las cetonas totales incrementaron tras el almacenamiento, aunque a temperaturasmas bajas estos cambios fueron menos notables. El incremento de los

  5. Well-log based prediction of temperature models in the exploration of sedimentary settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Sven; Förster, Andrea; Wonik, Thomas

    these measurements are not available or only measured to a certain depth so that a temperature model needs to developed. A prerequisite for such a model is the knowledge of the regional heat flow and the geological conditions translated into lithology and thermal rock properties. For the determination of continuous...... borehole temperature profiles we propose a two-step procedure: (1) the use of standard petrophysical well logs and (2) the inversion of predicted TC to temperature gradients by applying Fourier’s law of heat conduction. The prediction of TC is solved by using set of equations (Fuchs & Förster, 2014......) developed for matrix TC of sedimentary rocks. The equations resulted from a statistical analysis of an artificial set of mineral assemblages (consisting of 15 rock-forming minerals) typical for the different types of sedimentary rocks. The matrix TC was transformed into bulk TC by using a well-log derived...

  6. Temperature Dependence of the Polariton Linewidth in a GaAs Quantum Well Microcavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borri, P.; Jensen, Jacob Riis; Langbein, W.

    2000-01-01

    The temperature dependent linewidths of the polariton resonances in a GaAs/AlGaAs single quantum well microcavity are measured. Due to the dominant homogeneous broadening of the investigated resonances, a direct linewidth analysis of the reflectivity spectra allows us to investigate the role of s...

  7. Roughnecks, rock bits and rigs : the evolution of oil well drilling technology in Alberta, 1883-1970

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gow, A.

    2005-07-01

    This book provides a comprehensive review of the evolving technologies related to oil and gas exploration in the province of Alberta. Oil well drilling technology evolved significantly during the era of conventional oil exploration in the province, from 1883 through 1970. Technologies such as drill bits and power sources were developed largely through trial and error to meet the specific needs of individuals working in the oilfield. The competence and resolve to innovate by drill crews was told through accounts of evolution in drilling processes and equipment, along with personal accounts of those who worked on the rigs. The technology of the oilfield was placed into context with a summary of the history and geology of oil and gas in Alberta. The book also presents a considerate view of events in relation to those who invested in the industry, carried out research drilling and serviced the exploration industry. The first part of the book provides the background to the oil and gas industry. Part 2 examines the earliest technology, the standard cable tool drilling rig, the combination rig and some associated developments in drilling. The third part focuses on the rotary drilling rig and the final part outlines the types of challenges faced by the drillers and the hazards of working on Alberta's rigs. refs., tabs., figs.

  8. Characteristics and propierties of oil-well cements additioned with blast furnace slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez, R.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper addresses the alkali activation of Portland cements containing blast furnace slag (20 and 30% of the cement by weight with a view to the possible use of these materials in oil well construction. The hydration studies conducted showed that in cement/slag blends, the sodium silicate activating solution partially inhibited the dissolution of the silicate phases in the Portland cement, retarding cement hydration and reducing the precipitation of reaction products. Due to such partial inhibition, the cement/slag blends had significantly lower mechanical strength than Portland cements hydrated with water. 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR and BSE/EDX studies, in turn, showed that the C-S-H gel forming in the alkali-activated cement/slag pastes contained Al in tetrahedral positions and low Ca/Si ratios.

    En el presente trabajo se ha estudiado la activación alcalina de cementos Pórtland con incorporación de escoria de horno alto (20% y 30% con respecto al peso de cemento para su posible aplicación en la construcción de pozos petrolíferos. Los estudios de hidratación realizados indican que en mezclas cemento/escoria, la disolución activadora de silicato sódico inhibe parcialmente la disolución de las fases silicato del cemento Pórtland originando un retraso de su hidratación así como la menor precipitación de productos de reacción. Dicha parcial inhibición de los procesos reactivos en las mezclas cemento/escoria originan resistencias mecánicas significativamente inferiores a las pastas de cemento Portland hidratadas con agua. Finalmente, los estudios de 29Si y 27Al RMN MAS y BSE/EDX indican que el gel C-S-H formado en pastas de mezcla cemento/escoria activadas alcalinamente presenta Al en posiciones tetraédricas y bajas relaciones Ca/Si.

  9. Torrefaction of oil palm frond: Effects of torrefaction temperature and holding time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaacob, Nurhafizah; Rahman, Norazah Abdul; Matali, Sharmeela; Idris, Siti Shawaliah

    2017-12-01

    In this study, the effects of torrefaction treatment on the physicochemical properties of oil palm frond were investigated. The fibrous oil palm fronds (OPF) were torrefied under mild (250 °C) and severe torrefaction conditions (275 °C and 300 °C) for 30 and 60 minutes holding time in a tube furnace. Based on the observation, solid mass yield of torrefied OPF was reduced as torrefaction temperature and holding time increased. The results also showed that after torrefaction, fixed carbon content and high heating value (HHV) of the solid products increased while O/C and H/O atomic ratios decreased resulted in the buildup of carbon in the solid product. However, torrefaction temperature has more significant effect on torrefied product as compared to that of holding time. On the other hand, the influence of holding time became more apparent at torrefaction temperature >275 °C. It is also observed that oil palm frond has the lowest mass yield but highest fixed carbon content with enhanced HHV value when torrefied at 300 °C at 60 minutes. The present study found out that torrefaction temperature >275 °C resulted to a much better solid fuel than that of lower torrefaction temperature. Therefore, optimization of torrefaction parameters of OPF is highly recommended in future which may include other important fuel characteristics.

  10. Evaluating the effect of temperature on biodiesel production from castor oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Guerrero Fajardo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Problems arising between biofuels and food as raw materials have led to investigating the use of inedible raw materials for their production. This work was aimed at studying the effect of temperature on converting castor oil in biodiesel production. Oil transesterification with methanol was carried out using an alkaline catalyst (0.5% NaOH - water solution for 1 hour using a 6:1 alcohol/oil molar ratio, at atmospheric pressure and taking temperature as a free variable. The temperature was evaluated at 68°F, 86°F, 104°F and 122ºF. The reaction products were analyzed by gas chromatography (CG-FID for quantifying the fatty acid methyl esters (FAME present. The results showed different dispersion depending on temperature, finding that 122°F resulted in less dispersion than the others. CG-FID analysis showed that most FAME content was reached at 122ºF, such temperature giving the highest ricinoleic acid conversion rate. Gas chromatography also revealed that reaction time was adequate, in process conditions, for obtaining ricinoleic acid-based 94.26% con- version.

  11. Effect of contents oil temperature and flow rate in the electrochemical corrosion of the AISI-SAE1020-steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedeño, M. L.; L, E. Vera; Pineda T, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Primary causes of corrosion in components and equipment used in the petroleum industry are due to the density differences present in the multiphase system Water/Hydrocarbon/CO2 as well as the presence of weak particles of carbonic acid. The present research is focus on the study of the corrosion rate of the steel AISI-SAE 1020 under a saturated CO2 multiphase system. The effects of fluid speed, temperature and oil content on the steel corrosion were carried out in an electrode of rotator cylinder and also using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The results show that the effect of oil content in the rate of steel corrosion is inversely proportional with the speed of the rotor. Our observations indicate that increasing the rotor speed in systems containing 60% oil or higher produce a simultaneous increase in the degradation rate of materials. Similarly, temperatures higher than 60°C generate layers of siderite that reduce the electrochemical effect.

  12. Effect of Temperature on Ultrasonic Signal Propagation for Extra Virgin Olive Oil Adulteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alias, N. A.; Hamid, S. B. Abdul; Sophian, A.

    2017-11-01

    Fraud cases involving adulteration of extra virgin olive oil has become significant nowadays due to increasing in cost of supply and highlight given the benefit of extra virgin olive oil for human consumption. This paper presents the effects of temperature variation on spectral formed utilising pulse-echo technique of ultrasound signal. Several methods had been introduced to characterize the adulteration of extra virgin olive oil with other fluid sample such as mass chromatography, standard method by ASTM (density test, distillation test and evaporation test) and mass spectrometer. Pulse-echo method of ultrasound being a non-destructive method to be used to analyse the sound wave signal captured by oscilloscope. In this paper, a non-destructive technique utilizing ultrasound to characterize extra virgin olive oil adulteration level will be presented. It can be observed that frequency spectrum of sample with different ratio and variation temperature shows significant percentages different from 30% up to 70% according to temperature variation thus possible to be used for sample characterization.

  13. Enhancement of yield point at high pressure high temperature wells by using polymer nanocomposites based on ZnO & CaCO3 nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Z. Noah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs and modified calcium carbonate (nano-CaCO3 nanoparticles were successfully prepared and added to polystyrene-butadiene rubber copolymer (PSBR matrix to prepare PSBR nanocomposites. The prepared nanomaterials (ZnO-NPs & nano-CaCO3 were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM, transmission electron microscope (TEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD. Furthermore, the prepared polymer nanocomposites and oil base mud were used for drilling in high pressure high temperature (HPHT wells. The consequence of using polymer nanocomposites based on different loading of ZnO-NPs and nano-CaCO3 on the rheological properties of oil base mud was evaluated and enhanced the yield point at high pressure high temperature wells (HPHT. The using of the polymer with different percentage from (0.5 in all percent the obtained results is very promising; this means that the increase of polymer is reasonable for the increase of apparent viscosity, plastic viscosity and yield point at high temperature. Correspondingly, polymer nanocomposites displayed rise of apparent viscosity, plastic viscosity, and yield point, decreased in fluid loss and increased in electrical stability at high pressure high temperature wells.

  14. Fluvoxamine-based corrosion inhibitors for J55 steel in aggressive oil and gas well treatment fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.B. Ituen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Fluvoxamine (FLU, a non-toxic compound was investigated as an alternative anti-corrosive additive for inhibition of J55 steel corrosion in acidic oil well treatment fluids. The aggressive fluid was simulated using 15% and 1 M HCl. Corrosion of the steel was monitored by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS, Potentiodynamic Polarization (PDP, Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR, Electrochemical Frequency Modulation (EFM and Weight Loss (WL techniques. UV–Vis spectroscopy provided evidence of formation of a complex surface film due to adsorption of FLU on the J55 steel surface. The adsorption process was both physical and chemical in mechanism as best approximated by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The adsorption was also spontaneous and exothermic in the direction of increase in entropy of the bulk phase. Maximum inhibition efficiency was obtained with 1.0 μM FLU and decreased from 91.5% to 78.0% when concentration of HCl was increased from 1 M to 15% at 30 °C. Effectiveness of FLU declined with an increase in temperature and improved with an increase in concentration of FLU. Blending of FLU with some intensifiers improved the efficiency from 68% and 40% to 88% and 72% in 1 M and 15% HCl respectively at 90 °C. EIS measurement reveals that the corrosion process was controlled by charge transfer process. PDP measurements showed that FLU acts as a mixed type inhibitor. Inhibition efficiency values obtained from the different techniques were comparable. SEM micrographs of J55 steel surface indicate good surface protection of FLU. Theoretical calculations were performed using Material Studio Acceryls 7.0 to relate electronic properties of FLU with its structure.

  15. Using Stream Chemistry Measurements by Scientists and Nonscientists to Assess Leakage from Oil and Gas Wells in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, S. L.; Wendt, A.; Sowers, T. A.

    2016-12-01

    The recent controversies concerning the role of hydraulic fracturing in impacting water quality in the United States document that decision-making must include both scientists and nonscientists. The most common water quality problem documented in Pennsylvania with respect to shale gas well development is the occasional migration of methane into private groundwater wells. Assessing the rate of migration is difficult and has led to controversial estimates. We explore the use of nonscientists in helping to collect data from streams for comparison to groundwater data collected by government and academic scientists. Stream waters in upland landscapes generally act as collectors for upwelling groundwater, including both natural and anthropogenic methane. Collection of stream water for methane analysis is simple and robust and can be completed by nonscientists throughout the state. We have discovered several locations in the state where new or legacy gas or oil wells are leaking methane into aquifers and into streams. Methane also seeps out of landfills and from natural sources. We present stream methane data from across the oil and gas development region in Pennsylvania, including sites of release of biogenic gas, natural thermogenic gas, legacy oil/gas well leakage, shale gas well leakage, and landfill leakage, and we assess the natural background of methane in stream water in the state. In some locations we compare methane in streams to methane in groundwater. As the state with the oldest oil wells in the U.S.A., Pennsylvania is a natural laboratory to understand not only the science of methane migration but also how to incorporate citizens into strategies to understand water quality impacts related to hydrocarbon development.

  16. Effect of drilling fluid systems and temperature on oil mist and vapour levels generated from shale shaker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinsvåg, Kjersti; Galea, Karen S; Krüger, Kirsti; Peikli, Vegard; Sánchez-Jiménez, Araceli; Sætvedt, Esther; Searl, Alison; Cherrie, John W; van Tongeren, Martie

    2011-05-01

    Workers in the drilling section of the offshore petroleum industry are exposed to air pollutants generated by drilling fluids. Oil mist and oil vapour concentrations have been measured in the drilling fluid processing areas for decades; however, little work has been carried out to investigate exposure determinants such as drilling fluid viscosity and temperature. A study was undertaken to investigate the effect of two different oil-based drilling fluid systems and their temperature on oil mist, oil vapour, and total volatile organic compounds (TVOC) levels in a simulated shale shaker room at a purpose-built test centre. Oil mist and oil vapour concentrations were sampled simultaneously using a sampling arrangement consisting of a Millipore closed cassette loaded with glass fibre and cellulose acetate filters attached to a backup charcoal tube. TVOCs were measured by a PhoCheck photo-ionization detector direct reading instrument. Concentrations of oil mist, oil vapour, and TVOC in the atmosphere surrounding the shale shaker were assessed during three separate test periods. Two oil-based drilling fluids, denoted 'System 2.0' and 'System 3.5', containing base oils with a viscosity of 2.0 and 3.3-3.7 mm(2) s(-1) at 40°C, respectively, were used at temperatures ranging from 40 to 75°C. In general, the System 2.0 yielded low oil mist levels, but high oil vapour concentrations, while the opposite was found for the System 3.5. Statistical significant differences between the drilling fluid systems were found for oil mist (P = 0.025),vapour (P levels. Oil vapour levels at the test facility exceeded the Norwegian oil vapour occupational exposure limit (OEL) of 30 mg m(-3) when the drilling fluid temperature was ≥50°C. The practice of testing compliance of oil vapour exposure from drilling fluids systems containing base oils with viscosity of ≤2.0 mm(2) s(-1) at 40°C against the Norwegian oil vapour OEL is questioned since these base oils are very similar to white

  17. High performance nature of biodegradable polymeric nanocomposites for oil-well drilling fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek M. Madkour

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT and graphene nanoplatelet reinforced thermoplastic poly(lactic acid (PLA biodegradable nanocomposites were designed and prepared using solution casting techniques. The prepared biodegradable polymers are expected to provide an environmentally friendly alternative to petroleum-based polymers. Both nanocomposite systems exhibited better thermal stability and improved mechanical performance over the unreinforced polymer exhibiting excellent strength and degradability. The addition of graphene nanofiller in varied amounts was aimed to enhance the thermal and mechanical properties of the nanocomposites even further and incorporate the outstanding characteristics of graphene nanoplatelets into the nanocomposites. The polymeric nanocomposites showed also superior advantages for oil drilling relevances, automotive lubricating purposes, membrane technology and food packaging. Scanning electron microscopy images indicated a homogeneous dispersion of the nanofiller within the polymeric matrix at low filler loadings and a cluster formation at higher loadings that could be responsible for the polymeric matrix movement restrictions. The enthalpy of mixing (the polymer and the nanofiller measured could explain the cause of the repulsive interactions between the nanoparticles and the polymeric chains, which created an additional excluded volume that the polymeric segments were restricted to occupy, thus forcing the conformational characteristics of the polymeric chains to deviate away from those of the bulk chains. The prepared polymeric nano composites (poly lactic acid carbon nano tube and poly lactic acid graphene nanoplatelets were utilized in the formulation of oil-base mud as a viscosifier. The rheological, filtration properties and electrical stability of the oil based mud formulation with the new polymeric nanocomposite were studied and the result compared to the oil-based mud formulation with commercial viscosifier.

  18. A Vesicle-to-Worm Transition Provides a New High-Temperature Oil Thickening Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, Matthew J; Mykhaylyk, Oleksandr O; Armes, Steven P

    2017-02-06

    Diblock copolymer vesicles are prepared via RAFT dispersion polymerization directly in mineral oil. Such vesicles undergo a vesicle-to-worm transition on heating to 150 °C, as judged by TEM and SAXS. Variable-temperature 1 H NMR spectroscopy indicates that this transition is the result of surface plasticization of the membrane-forming block by hot solvent, effectively increasing the volume fraction of the stabilizer block and so reducing the packing parameter for the copolymer chains. The rheological behavior of a 10 % w/w copolymer dispersion in mineral oil is strongly temperature-dependent: the storage modulus increases by five orders of magnitude on heating above the critical gelation temperature of 135 °C, as the non-interacting vesicles are converted into weakly interacting worms. SAXS studies indicate that, on average, three worms are formed per vesicle. Such vesicle-to-worm transitions offer an interesting new mechanism for the high-temperature thickening of oils. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Effect of temperature and storage time of wheat germ on the oil tocopherol concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Capitani

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Wheat germ represents approximately 3% of the grain and it contains 8-14% oil, which is a rich source of tocopherols (vitamin E and polyunsaturated fatty acids, mainly linoleic acid. The present work shows the influence of temperature (27ºC and 45ºC and storage time (maximum 35 days of the wheat germ on the concentration of tocopherol in the oil. Their effect on other quality parameters was also investigated. Results indicated that oil oxidation and free fatty acid formation increased markedly with temperature and storage time. The initial sample contained 3134 µg/g total tocopherol, of which 67% was α-tocopherol and, in a lower proportions, β-tocopherol and Γ-tocopherol (30.5% and 2.4%, respectively. In the temperature range studied, tocopherols decreased as a function of storage time following first-order kinetics. The rate constant k for β-tocopherol increased with temperature. The fatty acid composition was not affected by the storage conditions applied.

  20. Temperature-dependent resonance energy transfer from semiconductor quantum wells to graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Young-Jun; Kim, Keun Soo; Nam, Jungtae; Kwon, Se Ra; Byun, Hyeryoung; Lee, Kwanjae; Ryou, Jae-Hyun; Dupuis, Russell D; Kim, Jeomoh; Ahn, Gwanghyun; Ryu, Sunmin; Ryu, Mee-Yi; Kim, Jin Soo

    2015-02-11

    Resonance energy transfer (RET) has been employed for interpreting the energy interaction of graphene combined with semiconductor materials such as nanoparticles and quantum-well (QW) heterostructures. Especially, for the application of graphene as a transparent electrode for semiconductor light emitting diodes, the mechanism of exciton recombination processes such as RET in graphene-semiconductor QW heterojunctions should be understood clearly. Here, we characterized the temperature-dependent RET behaviors in graphene/semiconductor QW heterostructures. We then observed the tuning of the RET efficiency from 5% to 30% in graphene/QW heterostructures with ∼60 nm dipole-dipole coupled distance at temperatures of 300 to 10 K. This survey allows us to identify the roles of localized and free excitons in the RET process from the QWs to graphene as a function of temperature.

  1. Recovery Act: High-Temperature Circuit Boards for use in Geothermal Well Monitoring Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooker, Matthew [Composite Tehcnology Development, Inc., Lafayette, CO (United States); Fabian, Paul [Composite Tehcnology Development, Inc., Lafayette, CO (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is leading the development of alternative energy sources that will ensure the long-term energy independence of our nation. One of the key renewable resources currently being advanced is geothermal energy. To tap into the large potential offered by generating power from the heat of the earth, and for geothermal energy to be more widely used, it will be necessary to drill deeper wells to reach the hot, dry rock located up to 10 km beneath the earth’s surface. In this instance, water will be introduced into the well to create a geothermal reservoir. A geothermal well produced in this manner is referred to as an enhanced geothermal system (EGS). EGS reservoirs are typically at depths of 3 to 10 km, and the temperatures at these depths have become a limiting factor in the application of existing downhole technologies. These high temperatures are especially problematic for electronic systems such as downhole data-logging tools, which are used to map and characterize the fractures and high-permeability regions in underground formations. Information provided by these tools is assessed so that underground formations capable of providing geothermal energy can be identified, and the subsequent drilling operations can be accurately directed to those locations. The mapping of geothermal resources involves the design and fabrication of sensor packages, including the electronic control modules, to quantify downhole conditions (300°C temperature, high pressure, seismic activity, etc.). Because of the extreme depths at which these measurements are performed, it is most desirable to perform the sensor signal processing downhole and then transmit the information to the surface. This approach necessitates the use of high-temperature electronics that can operate in the downhole environment. Downhole signal processing in EGS wells will require the development and demonstration of circuit boards that can withstand the elevated temperatures found at these

  2. A Comparison of Dielectric Properties of Palm Oil with Mineral and Synthetic Types Insulating Liquid under Temperature Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rajab

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Mineral oil is known to have a low biodegradability level and high susceptibility to the fire. These conditions motivate many researchers to look for alternative sources for insulating oil. One of the alternative liquid is palm oil. To verify the suitability of using palm oil as an insulating liquid, it is important to make dielectric properties comparison with the commonly used insulating liquid. This paper presents comparison of temperature effect on dielectric properties of palm oil with mineral type insulating liquid and silicone oil. The measured parameters were breakdown voltage, dissipation factor (tan δ, and dielectric constant. Breakdown voltage measurement was performed in accordance with IEC 156 standard, whereas, the dissipation factor and dielectric constant measurement were conducted based on IEC 60247 standard test methods. The results showed that variations of dielectric properties of palm oil to the temperature change, in general, have the same tendency with those of commonly used insulating liquids i.e. mineral oil and silicone oil. Breakdown voltages and dissipation factors of all tested oils were increased, while their dielectric constants were slightly decreased with the increase of temperature.

  3. The effect of organic solvent, temperature and mixing time on the production of oil from Moringa oleifera seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, Q.; Yasin, N. H. M.

    2016-06-01

    The effect of three different organic solvent, temperature and mixing time on the production of oil from M.oleifera seeds were studied to evaluate the effectiveness in obtaining the high oil yield based on the percentage of oil production. The modified version of Soxhlet extraction method was carried out to extract the oil from M.oleifera seeds by using hexane, heptane and ethanol as the organic solvent. Among the three solvents, it is found that heptane yield higher oil from M.oleifera seeds with maximum oil yield of 36.37% was obtained followed by hexane and ethanol with 33.89% and 18.46%, respectively. By using heptane as a solvent, the temperature (60oC, 70oC, 80oC) and mixing time (6 h, 7 h, and 8 h) were investigated to ensure the high oil yield over the experimental ranges employed and high oil yield was obtained at 600C for 6 h with percentage oil yield of 36.37%. The fatty acid compositions of M.oleifera seeds oil were analyzed using Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). The main components of fatty acid contained in the oil extracted from M.oleifera seeds was oleic acid, followed by palmitic acid and arachidic acid, and small amount of behenic acid and margaric acid.

  4. Petroleum oil removal by immobilized bacterial cells on polyurethane foam under different temperature conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessandrello, Mauricio J; Juárez Tomás, María S; Raimondo, Enzo E; Vullo, Diana L; Ferrero, Marcela A

    2017-09-15

    In this work, a mixed biofilm composed by Pseudomonas monteilii P26 and Gordonia sp. H19 was formed using polyurethane foam (PUF) as immobilization support, for crude oil removal from artificial sea water. Fresh immobilized cells and immobilized cells that were stored at 4°C for two months before use were assessed. The oil removal assays were carried out at microcosm scale at 4, 15 and 30°C. A viability loss of P. monteilii P26 was observed after the storage. The highest removal value (75%) was obtained at 30°C after 7days using fresh immobilized cells on PUF. Enhanced oil bioremoval was obtained at 4°C and 15°C with the previously stored immobilized cells compared to the fresh immobilized cells. Crude oil sorption on the different systems was responsible for the removal of 22-33% oil at the different temperatures. In conclusion, an economic tool for petroleum bioremediation is proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Influence of the Pyrolysis Temperature on Sewage Sludge Product Distribution, Bio-Oil, and Char Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinh, Ngoc Trung; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2013-01-01

    centrifugel reactor (PCR) at 475, 525, 575, and 625 °C. Maxima of both organic oil yield of 41 wt % on a dry ash free feedstock basis (daf) and a sludge oil energy recovery of 50% were obtained at 575 °C. The water-insoluble fraction, molecular-weight distribution, higher heating value (HHV), and thermal......Fast pyrolysis may be used for sewage sludge treatment with the advantages of a significant reduction of solid waste volume and production of a bio-oil that can be used as fuel. A study of the influence of the reaction temperature on sewage sludge pyrolysis has been carried out using a pyrolysis...... of 392 g/mol, and metal concentrations lower than 0.14 wt % on a dry basis (db). Less optimal oil properties with respect to industrial applications were observed for oil samples obtained at 475 and 625 °C. Char properties of the 575 °C sample were an ash content of 81 wt % and a HHV of 6.1 MJ/kg db...

  6. Numerical Simulation of Geostress and Pore Pressure Evolution around Oil or Water Well under Different Injection-Production Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Jian-jun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Geostress evolution in the process of oil field development can directly influence wellbore stability. Therefore, it is significant to strengthen the research of the evolution rule for well drilling and casing protection. Considering the interaction between reservoir seepage and stress fields, a mathematical model to characterize the stress evolution around wellbore was built. Using the FEM Software ABAQUS, through numerical simulation, the authors studied the evolution features of pore pressure and stress changes with time under different injection-production ratio, which disclosed the dynamic change regulation of pore pressure and stress of surrounding rock nearby the injection and production wells. These results may have implications in the treatment of wellbore stability and optimizing the injection and production processes during oil and gas production.

  7. Room-temperature near-field reflection spectroscopy of single quantum wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langbein, Wolfgang Werner; Hvam, Jørn Marcher; Madsen, Steen

    1997-01-01

    . This technique suppresses efficiently the otherwise dominating far-field background and reduces topographic artifacts. We demonstrate its performance on a thin, strained near-surface CdS/ZnS single quantum well at room temperature. The optical structure of these topographically flat samples is due to Cd......S thickness fluctuations, and is observed to be uncorrelated within the spatial resolution of the instrument....

  8. A Fault Diagnosis Method for Oil Well Pump Using Radial Basis Function Neural Network Combined with Modified Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deliang Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new method to diagnose oil well pump faults using a modified radial basis function neural network. With the development of submersible linear motor technology, rodless pumping units have been widely used in oil exploration. However, the ground indicator diagram method cannot be used to diagnose the working conditions of rodless pumping units because it is based on the load change of the polished rod suspension point and its displacement. To solve this problem, this paper presents a new method that is applicable to rodless oil pumps. The advantage of this new method is its use of a simple feature extraction method and advanced genetic algorithm to optimize the threshold and weight of the RBF neural network. In this paper, we extract the characteristic value from the operation parameters of the submersible linear motor and oil wellhead as the input vector of the fault diagnosis model. Through experimental analysis, the proposed method is proven to have good convergence performance, high accuracy, and high reliability.

  9. Peculiar high temperature corrosion of martensite alloy under impact of Estonian oil shale fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallermo, H.; Klevtsov, I. [Thermal Engineering Department of Tallinn Technical University, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1998-12-31

    The superheaters` surfaces of oil shale steam boiler made of pearlitic and austenitic alloys, are subject to intensive corrosion, mainly due to presence of chlorine in external deposits. The applicability of martensitic alloys X1OCrMoVNb91 and X20CrMoV121 for superheaters is examined here and empirical equations allowing to predict alloys` corrosion resistance in the range of operational temperatures are established. Alloy X1OCrMoVNb91 is found been most perspective for superheaters of boilers firing fossil fuel that contain alkaline metals and chlorine. The abnormal dependence of corrosion resistance of martensitic alloys on temperature is revealed, namely, corrosion at 580 deg C in presence of oil shale fly ash is more intensive than at 620 deg C. (orig.) 2 refs.

  10. The effect of shear rate and shear stress on viscosity determinations at low temperatures for engine oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, K.O.; Sicking, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    The viscosity of engine lubricants was measured at multiple shear rates by a unique Scanning Brookfield apparatus. These oils included both pumpability reference oils (PRO) and a selection of today's commercial multigrade oils. It was found that the viscosity of flow-limited oils remained constant when the shear rate decreased. Oils with air-binding properties exhibited an increase in viscosity with decreasing shear rate. The magnitude of a change in slope of the temperature/viscosity profile was found to suggest the degree of air-binding character of an oil. The flow characteristics of PRO 1, 3, 9, 11, and 16 were measured at several shear stresses and temperatures in the mini-rotary viscometer. The Scanning Brookfield technique and the mini-rotary viscometer were found to yield similar results when the shear stress of the mini-rotary viscometer was reduced from 525 to 35 Pascals.

  11. Factors affecting the wettability of different surface materials with vegetable oil at high temperatures and its relation to cleanability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashokkumar, Saranya; Adler-Nissen, Jens; Møller, Per

    2012-01-01

    The main aim of the work was to investigate the wettability of different surface materials with vegetable oil (olive oil) over the temperature range of 25–200°C to understand the differences in cleanability of different surfaces exposed to high temperatures in food processes. The different surface...... different levels of roughness. The cosine of the contact angle of olive oil on different surface materials rises linearly with increasing temperature. Among the materials analyzed, polymers (PTFE, silicone) gave the lowest cosθ values. Studies of the effect of roughness and surface flaws on wettability...

  12. Controlling a rabbet load and air/oil seal temperatures in a turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Mark Christopher

    2002-01-01

    During a standard fired shutdown of a turbine, a loaded rabbet joint between the fourth stage wheel and the aft shaft of the machine can become unloaded causing a gap to occur due to a thermal mismatch at the rabbet joint with the bearing blower turned on. An open or unloaded rabbet could cause the parts to move relative to each other and therefore cause the rotor to lose balance. If the bearing blower is turned off during a shutdown, the forward air/oil seal temperature may exceed maximum design practice criterion due to "soak-back." An air/oil seal temperature above the established maximum design limits could cause a bearing fire to occur, with catastrophic consequences to the machine. By controlling the bearing blower according to an optimized blower profile, the rabbet load can be maintained, and the air/oil seal temperature can be maintained below the established limits. A blower profile is determined according to a thermodynamic model of the system.

  13. Novel Downhole Electromagnetic Flowmeter for Oil-Water Two-Phase Flow in High-Water-Cut Oil-Producing Wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanjun Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available First, the measuring principle, the weight function, and the magnetic field of the novel downhole inserted electromagnetic flowmeter (EMF are described. Second, the basic design of the EMF is described. Third, the dynamic experiments of two EMFs in oil-water two-phase flow are carried out. The experimental errors are analyzed in detail. The experimental results show that the maximum absolute value of the full-scale errors is better than 5%, the total flowrate is 5–60 m3/d, and the water-cut is higher than 60%. The maximum absolute value of the full-scale errors is better than 7%, the total flowrate is 2–60 m3/d, and the water-cut is higher than 70%. Finally, onsite experiments in high-water-cut oil-producing wells are conducted, and the possible reasons for the errors in the onsite experiments are analyzed. It is found that the EMF can provide an effective technology for measuring downhole oil-water two-phase flow.

  14. Temperature Modeling of an Oil-Contaminated Aquifer with Heat from microbial degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, E.; Bekins, B. A.

    2016-12-01

    We have documented temperature increases of 2-3 °C above background values in both the unsaturated and saturated zones of a crude oil-contaminated aquifer near Bemidji, Minnesota. A crude-oil pipeline rupture contaminated the site in 1979 with natural attenuation processes studied there since 1983. A field study and heat transport modeling were conducted to elucidate whether the observed temperature data can be used as an inexpensive proxy for monitoring contaminant biodegradation rates. Biodegradation of the crude oil contaminants creates a methanogenic zone near the source. Besides methanogenesis iron reduction is also important in the plume center with aerobic zones limited to the plume fringes. Methane produced in the crude oil source zone diffuses into the unsaturated zone, where it is oxidized by aerobic methanotrophic bacteria to carbon dioxide (CO2). The CO2 is then discharged to the atmosphere. Some methane also is transported with the groundwater plume where mass-balance evidence suggests it is oxidized in the iron-reducing zone. Other major components of the plume including benzene and partial metabolites from the oil also are degraded in the iron-reducing zone of the plume. The enthalpies of the important reactions are: methanogenic degradation of benzoate (a representative of partial metabolites, -14 kJ), aerobic degradation of methane (-860 kJ), iron-reducing degradation of methane (-560 kJ), and iron-reducing degradation of benzene and benzoate (-2,100 kJ). Enthalpies for aerobic and iron reducing reactions are at least an order of magnitude larger than those for methanogenesis indicating methanogenesis in the crude oil source zone is not a significant source of heat. Heat production and transport in the subsurface were simulated using SUTRA, a finite-element, groundwater flow and energy transport USGS model. The model results show that the observed 2-3 °C temperature increase comes from both the pipelines and aerobic methane oxidation in the

  15. Optimization of Vertical Well Placement for Oil Field Development Based on Basic Reservoir Rock Properties using Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tutuka Ariadji

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Comparing the quality of basic reservoir rock properties is a common practice to locate new infills or development wells for optimizing an oil field development using a reservoir simulation. The conventional technique employs a manual trial and error process to find new well locations, which proves to be time-consuming, especially, for a large field. Concerning this practical matter, an alternative in the form of a robust technique was introduced in order that time and efforts could be reduced in finding best new well locations capable of producing the highest oil recovery. The objective of the research was to apply Genetic Algorithm (GA in determining wells locations using reservoir simulation to avoid the manual conventional trial and error method. GA involved the basic rock properties, i.e., porosity, permeability, and oil saturation, of each grid block obtained from a reservoir simulation model, which was applied into a newly generated fitness function formulated through translating the common engineering practice in the reservoir simulation into a mathematical equation and then into a computer program. The maximum of the fitness value indicated a final searching of the best grid location for a new well location. In order to evaluate the performance of the generated GA program, two fields that had different production profile characteristics, namely the X and Y fields, were applied to validate the proposed method. The proposed GA method proved to be a robust and accurate method to find the best new well locations for field development. The key success of this proposed GA method is in the formulation of the objective function.

  16. Temperature influence on the fast pyrolysis of manure samples: char, bio-oil and gases production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez-Lopez Maria

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fast pyrolysis characterization of three dry manure samples was studied using a pyrolyzer. A heating rate of 600°C/s and a holding time of 10 s were selected to reproduce industrial conditions. The effect of the peak pyrolysis temperature (600, 800 and 1000°C on the pyrolysis product yield and composition was evaluated. Char and bio-oil were gravimetrically quantified. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used to analyse the char structure. H2, CH4, CO and CO2 were measured by means of gas chromatography (GC. A decrease in the char yield and an increase of the gas yield were observed when temperature increased. From 800°C on, it was observed that the char yield of samples Dig R and SW were constant, which indicated that the primary devolatilization reactions stopped. This fact was also corroborated by GC analysis. The bio-oil yield slightly increased with temperature, showing a maximum of 20.7 and 27.8 wt.% for samples Pre and SW, respectively, whereas sample Dig R showed a maximum yield of 16.5 wt.% at 800°C. CO2 and CO were the main released gases whereas H2 and CH4 production increased with temperature. Finally, an increase of char porosity was observed with temperature.

  17. Evaporation of oil-water emulsion drops when heated at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strizhak, P. A.; Piskunov, M. V.; Kuznetsov, G. V.; Voytkov, I. S.

    2017-10-01

    An experimental study on conditions and main characteristics for high-temperature (more than 700 K) evaporation of oil-water drops is presented. The high-temperature water purification from impurities can be the main practical application of research results. Thus, the heating of drops is implemented by the two typical schemes: on a massive substrate (the heating conditions are similar to those achieved in a heating chamber) and in a flow of the heated air. In the latter case, the heating conditions correspond to those attained while moving water drops with impurities in a counter high-temperature gaseous flow in the process of water purification. Evaporation time as function of heating temperature is presented. The influence of oil product concentration in an emulsion drop on evaporation characteristics is discussed. The conditions for intensive flash boiling of an emulsion drop and its explosive breakup with formation of the fine droplets cloud are pointed out. Heat fluxes required for intensive flash boiling and explosive breakup of a drop with further formation of the fine aerosol are determined in the boundary layer of a drop. The fundamental differences between flash boiling and explosive breakup of an emulsion drop when heated on a substrate and in a flow of the heated air are described. The main prospects for the development of the high-temperature water purification technology are detailed taking into account the fast emulsion drop breakup investigated in the paper.

  18. Temperature influence on the fast pyrolysis of manure samples: char, bio-oil and gases production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Lopez, Maria; Anastasakis, Kostas; De Jong, Wiebren; Valverde, Jose Luis; Sanchez-Silva, Luz

    2017-11-01

    Fast pyrolysis characterization of three dry manure samples was studied using a pyrolyzer. A heating rate of 600°C/s and a holding time of 10 s were selected to reproduce industrial conditions. The effect of the peak pyrolysis temperature (600, 800 and 1000°C) on the pyrolysis product yield and composition was evaluated. Char and bio-oil were gravimetrically quantified. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to analyse the char structure. H2, CH4, CO and CO2 were measured by means of gas chromatography (GC). A decrease in the char yield and an increase of the gas yield were observed when temperature increased. From 800°C on, it was observed that the char yield of samples Dig R and SW were constant, which indicated that the primary devolatilization reactions stopped. This fact was also corroborated by GC analysis. The bio-oil yield slightly increased with temperature, showing a maximum of 20.7 and 27.8 wt.% for samples Pre and SW, respectively, whereas sample Dig R showed a maximum yield of 16.5 wt.% at 800°C. CO2 and CO were the main released gases whereas H2 and CH4 production increased with temperature. Finally, an increase of char porosity was observed with temperature.

  19. Optimization of perforated completions for horizontal wells in a high-permeability, thin oil zone : case study : Hassi R'mel oil rim, Algeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourenane, M.; Recham, R. [Sonatrach Production PED, Hydra (Algeria); Tiab, D. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)

    2004-07-01

    The efficiency and economics of horizontal wells has increased significantly in the past twenty years due to advances in drilling and completion technologies. State of the art applications require even better completion designs to optimize production, and ultimate recoverable reserves. Perforation is a common well completion method whose performance depends on the perforation length and its distribution along the horizontal well, perforation density, phasing, depth of penetration and diameter of the individual perforations. This study examined how reservoir heterogeneity and coning problems influence the performance of perforated completions for horizontal wells. Eight horizontal wells from the Hassi R'mel oil rim in Algeria were subjected to a petrophysical evaluation. A numerical solution was developed to optimize the perforated completion wells in heterogeneous reservoirs with large gas caps and an active aquifer. The most relevant reservoir parameters were examined through a sensitivity analysis. In particular, the performance of the HRZ-09 well was simulated because it was completed non-conventionally using an inverted high angle technique. Therefore, it was possible to study the effect of perforating the slated section of the well. The study showed that no extra recovery should be expected from the double perforation of this well. 22 refs., 3 tabs., 17 figs.

  20. Robust technology and system for management of sucker rod pumping units in oil wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliev, T. A.; Rzayev, A. H.; Guluyev, G. A.; Alizada, T. A.; Rzayeva, N. E.

    2018-01-01

    We propose a technology for calculating the robust, normalized correlation functions of the signal from the force sensor on the rod string attached to the hanger of the sucker rod pumping unit. The robust normalized correlation functions are used to form sets of informative attribute combinations, each of which corresponds to a technical condition of the sucker rod pumping unit. We demonstrate how these sets can be used to solve identification and management problems in the oil production process in real time using inexpensive controllers. The results obtained from using the system on real objects are also presented in this paper. It was determined that the energy saved and prolonged overhaul period substantially increased the cost-effectiveness.

  1. Assessment of stability of ceramics type perovskite, Ba{sub 2}MgWO{sub 6}, submerged in crude oil taken from oil wells of Sergipe - Brazil; Avaliacao da estabilidade de ceramicas tipo perovskita, Ba{sub 2}MgWO{sub 6}, submersas em petroleo cru retirado de pocos do estado de Sergipe - Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadava, Y.P.; Sales, D.G.; Lima, M.M.; Ferreira, R.A.S. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)], e-mail: daniella_guedes@yahoo.com.br

    2008-07-01

    Oil wells are harsh environments, thus, it is necessary to find materials that are able to resist the weather imposed by these sites. Many of the new technology incorporating ceramic components because their chemical properties, electrical, mechanical, thermal and structural. The ceramics exhibit high hardness and therefore resistant to high pressure, have high melting point, resisting the high temperatures, and make inert nature in hostile environments. The ceramics, type Perovskite Ba{sub 2}MgWO{sub 6}, were submerged in crude oil for thirty days and then examined by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy and Vickers microhardness to see if there were changes in structural characteristics, microstructural and mechanical properties. This work was evaluated and discussed by these results, the stability of these ceramics when subject to attack by crude oil taken from oil wells of land and sea state of Sergipe, Brazil. (author)

  2. Prediction of aliphatic and aromatic oil-water interfacial tension at temperatures >100 °C using COSMO-RS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Martin Peter; Eckert, F.; Reinisch, J M

    2017-01-01

    As a contribution to the 9th Industrial Fluid Property Simulation Challenge on predicting interfacial tension between water and a set of non-polar oils at temperatures up to 170 °C we have used our first-principles based model, which is based on density functional theory and uses COSMO-RS implicit...... solvent model thermodynamics. Our calculations predict that the oil-water interfacial tension starts to drop significantly for alkanes at temperatures above ∼100 °C, and the oil-water interfacial tension drops significantly with increased temperature already above ∼25 °C for aromatic oils. In the range...... is a good approximation. The agreement of our predictions with the experimental data was overall satisfying, apart from a significant difference in the temperature dependence of the dodecane-water interfacial tension. We provide results derived from other experimental measurements suggesting that the large...

  3. Low temperature carrier redistribution dynamics in InGaN/GaN quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badcock, T. J., E-mail: Thomas.badcock@crl.toshiba.co.uk; Dawson, P.; Davies, M. J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Photon Science Institute, Alan Turing Building, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Kappers, M. J.; Massabuau, F. C.-P.; Oehler, F.; Oliver, R. A.; Humphreys, C. J. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-21

    We have studied the carrier recombination dynamics in an InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well structure as a function of emission energy and excitation density between temperatures of 10 K and 100 K. Under relatively low levels of excitation, the photoluminescence (PL) intensity and decay time of emission on the high energy side of the luminescence spectrum decrease strongly between 10 K and 50 K. In contrast, for emission detected on the low energy side of the spectrum, the PL intensity and decay time increase over the same temperature range. These results are consistent with a thermally activated carrier redistribution process in which the (temperature dependent) average timescale for carrier transfer into or out of a localised state depends on the energy of the given state. Thus, the transfer time out of shallow, weakly localised states is considerably shorter than the arrival time into more deeply localised states. This picture is consistent with carriers hopping between localisation sites in an uncorrelated disorder potential where the density of localised states decreases with increasing localisation depth, e.g., a exponential or Gaussian distribution resulting from random alloy disorder. Under significantly higher levels of excitation, the increased occupation fraction of the localised states results in a greater average separation distance between unoccupied localised states, causing a suppression of the spectral and dynamic signatures of the hopping transfer of carriers.

  4. Density dependence of spin relaxation in GaAs quantum well at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, L. H.; Zhang, P.; Lai, T. S.; Wu, M. W.

    2008-10-01

    Carrier density dependence of electron spin relaxation in an intrinsic GaAs quantum well is investigated at room temperature using time-resolved circularly polarized pump-probe spectroscopy. It is revealed that the spin relaxation time first increases with density in the relatively low-density regime where the linear D'yakonov-Perel' spin-orbit coupling terms are dominant, and then tends to decrease when the density is large and the cubic D'yakonov-Perel' spin-orbit coupling terms become important. These features are in good agreement with theoretical predictions on density dependence of spin relaxation by Lüet al. (Phys. Rev. B, 73 (2006) 125314). A fully microscopic calculation based on numerically solving the kinetic spin Bloch equations with both the D'yakonov-Perel' and the Bir-Aronov-Pikus mechanisms included, reproduces the density dependence of spin relaxation very well.

  5. Effect of drying temperature on essential oil content and composition of sweet wormwood (Artemisia annua) growing wild in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khangholil, Shahpour; Rezaeinodehi, Ayatollah

    2008-03-15

    Studies were conducted to show the effect of different temperatures in the drying process on the amount and quality of essential oils of sweet wormwood (Artemisia annua L.). The sweet wormwood aerial parts were harvested in full blooming time from an area around the Siahkal city in north of Iran in September 2005. In order to complete drying, the aerial parts were placed at shade (room temperature) and in oven at 35, 45, 55 and 65 degrees C temperatures. The aerial parts essential oil was extracted by hydrodistillation in a Clevenger apparatus and analyzed by GC/MS. Results showed that higher drying temperatures decreased the essential oil content, from 1.12% (room temperature) 0.88% (35 degrees C), 0.55% (45 degrees C) to 0.50% (55 degrees C) and 0.37% (65 degrees C). Thirty-five components were determined in essential oils, which were mostly monoterpenes. The drying temperatures had a significant effect on the essential oils composition and proportion of the various components, as when the temperature increased, the monoterpenes content gradually decreased and vice versa for sesquiterpenes. The major components were artemisia ketone and 1, 8 cineol for room and 45 degrees C; artemisia ketone, 1, 8 cineol and camphor for 35 and 55 degrees C and beta-caryophyllene and germacrene D for 65 degrees C temperatures.

  6. Borehole temperatures in deep wells of Western Siberia, Russia, 1960-1995, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set is a database of the permafrost and geothermal conditions of the oil and gas deposits of Western Siberia. Data were taken from 736 plots, each having...

  7. Effect of temperature towards lipid oxidation and non-enzymatic browning reactions in krill oil upon storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Henna Fung Sieng; Bruheim, I.; Haugsgjerd, B.O.

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the effect of temperature towards lipid oxidation and non-enzymatic browning reactions in krill oil upon storage. Krill oil was incubated at two different temperatures (20 and 40°C) for 28 or 42 days. The oxidative stability of krill oil...... firstly increased the lipid oxidation in krill oil and subsequently the non-enzymatic browning reactions. The occurrence of these reactions was most likely due to the reaction between α-dicarbonyl or carbonyl compounds with amino acids or ammonia. In addition to tocopherol and astaxanthin esters......, the formation of pyrroles might help to protect the krill oil against lipid oxidation. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  8. High temperature annealing of fission tracks in fluorapatite, Santa Fe Springs oil field, Los Angeles Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeser, Nancy D.; Crowley, Kevin D.; McCulloh, Thane H.; Reaves, Chris M.; ,

    1990-01-01

    Annealing of fission tracks is a kinetic process dependent primarily on temperature and to a laser extent on time. Several kinetic models of apatite annealing have been proposed. The predictive capabilities of these models for long-term geologic annealing have been limited to qualitative or semiquantitative at best, because of uncertainties associated with (1) the extrapolation of laboratory observations to geologic conditions, (2) the thermal histories of field samples, and (3) to some extent, the effect of apatite composition on reported annealing temperatures. Thermal history in the Santa Fe Springs oil field, Los Angeles Basin, California, is constrained by an exceptionally well known burial history and present-day temperature gradient. Sediment burial histories are continuous and tightly constrained from about 9 Ma to present, with an important tie at 3.4 Ma. No surface erosion and virtually no uplift were recorded during or since deposition of these sediments, so the burial history is simple and uniquely defined. Temperature gradient (???40??C km-1) is well established from oil-field operations. Fission-track data from the Santa Fe Springs area should thus provide one critical field test of kinetic annealing models for apatite. Fission-track analysis has been performed on apatites from sandstones of Pliocene to Miocene age from a deep drill hole at Santa Fe Springs. Apatite composition, determined by electron microprobe, is fluorapatite [average composition (F1.78Cl0.01OH0.21)] with very low chlorine content [less than Durango apatite; sample means range from 0.0 to 0.04 Cl atoms, calculated on the basis of 26(O, F, Cl, OH)], suggesting that the apatite is not unusually resistant to annealing. Fission tracks are preserved in these apatites at exceptionally high present-day temperatures. Track loss is not complete until temperatures reach the extreme of 167-178??C (at 3795-4090 m depth). The temperature-time annealing relationships indicated by the new data

  9. Algorithm to determine electrical submersible pump performance considering temperature changes for viscous crude oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valderrama, A. [Petroleos de Venezuela, S.A., Distrito Socialista Tecnologico (Venezuela); Valencia, F. [Petroleos de Venezuela, S.A., Instituto de Tecnologia Venezolana para el Petroleo (Venezuela)

    2011-07-01

    In the heavy oil industry, electrical submersible pumps (ESPs) are used to transfer energy to fluids through stages made up of one impeller and one diffuser. Since liquid temperature increases through the different stages, viscosity might change between the inlet and outlet of the pump, thus affecting performance. The aim of this research was to create an algorithm to determine ESPs' performance curves considering temperature changes through the stages. A computational algorithm was developed and then compared with data collected in a laboratory with a CG2900 ESP. Results confirmed that when the fluid's viscosity is affected by the temperature changes, the stages of multistage pump systems do not have the same performance. Thus the developed algorithm could help production engineers to take viscosity changes into account and optimize the ESP design. This study developed an algorithm to take into account the fluid viscosity changes through pump stages.

  10. The effect of compression, stretching, and cooking temperature on free oil formation in mozzarella curd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowney, M K; Roupas, P; Hickey, M W; Everett, D W

    2003-02-01

    The effect of the extent and rate of compression and stretching on free oil formation in Mozzarella cheese curd was investigated at 55, 65, and 75 degrees C. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to determine the maximum cross-sectional diameter, cross-sectional area, elongation factor (maximum divided by minimum cross-sectional diameter), and circularity of fat globules in the cheese curd at the different temperatures, and after stretching or compression. Free oil was not significantly affected by the rate of biaxial compression from 50 to 2000 mm/min at 65 degrees C, the rate of tensile stretching from 1000 to 2500 mm/min at 60 degrees C, or the extent of biaxial compression from 40 to 80% of the original height at 1000 mm/min and 65 degrees C. Increasing the rate of stretching from 1000 to 2500 mm/min increased the elongation factor from 1.91 to 2.61. Cross-sectional area, maximum diameter, and circularity were not affected by the rate of biaxial compression. The extent of curd compression had no effect on the milk fat globule size and shape. Increasing the extent of stretching at 60 degrees C and at 1000 mm/min increased the free oil content (on a fat basis) from 23.8% (curd stretched by 1.4x) to 32.3% (stretched by 4.6x) and the elongation factor of the globules, but did not affect any of the other globule parameters. Increasing the temperature of the cooking-stretching water increased the cross-sectional area, diameter of the globules, and free oil content from 24.1% at 55 degrees C to 34.5% at 75 degrees C for curd compressed to 50% height at 1000 mm/min.

  11. Influence of storage time and temperature on the chemical composition of the essential oil of Hyptis pectinata L. Poit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. JESUS

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Hyptis pectinata, popularly known as “sambacaitá”, is a native medicinal herb used by local people for treating disease. Its pharmacological, antimicrobial, and medicinal properties have been reported in several studies. The essential oil of the leaves is rich in terpene compounds responsible for its properties. Because there are factors that can influence the chemical composition of essential oils, the objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of storage on Hyptis pectinata essential oil for 360 days at two different temperatures. The essential oil was distilled from dried leaves of seven-month-old plants using the hydrodistillation method, and the chemical composition was determined using GC-MS and GC/FID. The effects of storage on the essential oil Hyptis pectinata were tested over the course of a year (0, 15, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, 240, 300, and 360 days, using two temperatures: room (±32ºC and freezer (-20ºC. The predominant compounds in the essential oil are β–caryophyllene, caryophyllene oxide, and germancrene D. The concentration of the chemical constituents of the essential oil varied depending on the storage temperature, and over the 360 days. The storage of the essential oil at room temperature over one year resulted in higher concentrations of β-elemene, α-copaene, germacrene D, caryophyllene oxide, and (E,E-α-farnesene and lower content of α-humulene and β-caryophyllene, compared to the results obtained from storing the essential oil in a freezer. These results indicate that the essential oil should be stored in a freezer, which provides greater stability to the concentration of the chemical constituents.

  12. Study of waste generation in the drilling and cementing operations during construction of offshore oil and gas wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Ferraço de Campos

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This literature review aims to present drilling and cementing activities which take place during the construction of offshore oil and gas wells, listing the waste generated in each step. IBAMA, the environmental agency that regulates the activity, allows two disposal options for these wastes: disposal in open sea or treatment followed by disposal on shore. The documentary research applied in this article details the destination options showing that the monitoring required by the environmental agency is a way to track the actual results of the activities described.

  13. Bacterial population and biodegradation potential in chronically crude oil-contaminated marine sediments are strongly linked to temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Bargiela, Rafael

    2015-06-29

    Two of the largest crude oil-polluted areas in the world are the semi-enclosed Mediterranean and Red Seas, but the effect of chronic pollution remains incompletely understood on a large scale. We compared the influence of environmental and geographical constraints and anthropogenic forces (hydrocarbon input) on bacterial communities in eight geographically separated oil-polluted sites along the coastlines of the Mediterranean and Red Seas. The differences in community compositions and their biodegradation potential were primarily associated (P < 0.05) with both temperature and chemical diversity. Furthermore, we observed a link between temperature and chemical and biological diversity that was stronger in chronically polluted sites than in pristine ones where accidental oil spills occurred. We propose that low temperature increases bacterial richness while decreasing catabolic diversity and that chronic pollution promotes catabolic diversification. Our results further suggest that the bacterial populations in chronically polluted sites may respond more promptly in degrading petroleum after accidental oil spills.

  14. Baseline Experimental Results on the Effect of Oil Temperature on Shrouded Meshed Spur Gear Windage Power Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Irebert R.; Hurrell, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Rotorcraft gearbox efficiencies are reduced at increased surface speeds due to viscous and impingement drag on the gear teeth. This windage power loss can affect overall mission range, payload, and frequency of transmission maintenance. Experimental and analytical studies on shrouding for single gears have shown it to be potentially effective in mitigating windage power loss. Efficiency studies on unshrouded meshed gears have shown the effect of speed, oil viscosity, temperature, load, lubrication scheme, etc. on gear windage power loss. The open literature does not contain experimental test data on shrouded meshed spur gears. Gear windage power loss test results are presented on shrouded meshed spur gears at elevated oil inlet temperatures and constant oil pressure both with and without shrouding. Shroud effectiveness is compared at four oil inlet temperatures. The results are compared to the available literature and follow-up work is outlined.

  15. Viability study of a system for filtercake remotion in pay zone of oil wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang ZhaoZheng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the essential ideas of an experimental procedure performed in order to check the filter-cake removal system is suitable for use like filter-cake removal system for pay zone. This system is made on aqueous phase and its concentration depend of the quantity of filtercake estimated in the wellbore of horizontal wells. This optimized the wellbore cleaning and increase the worth of well. The results of tests show that system could work, but it needs further analysis for determine the compatibility with fluids and rock from reservoir.

  16. Health and wellness trends in the oil and gas sector : insights from the Shepell-fgi Research Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    This report discussed health and wellness trends in the oil and gas sector in relation to employee assistance program (EAP) data. The data were derived from oil and gas client organizations across Canada for 2008, and represented a population base of 14,685 employees. The data demonstrated that EAP utilization in the petroleum industry increased by approximately 5 per cent from 2006 to 2008. The sector's utilization was 34 per cent higher than the Canadian norm in 2006, and 40 per cent higher than in 2007 and 2008. Females used the EAP to a greater extent than males. A higher proportion of the spouses of workers accessed EAP than the national norm. Employees accessed EAP for assistance with work-life issues; family support services; and substance abuse interventions. Weight management and dietary consultations in relation to disease control were also of concern within the sector. A 66 per cent increase in childcare issues was noted, as well as a 148 per cent increase in eldercare issues, and a 112 per cent increase in addiction issues. The findings indicated that the EAP is being effectively communicated as a relevant and accessible tool. As the industry continues to develop in remote regions, new services and resources will be required to retain existing workforces and attract new employees. Prevention-focused training and services and program for at-risk groups are needed to ensure that employee health and productivity is maintained. 1 tab., 4 figs.

  17. 78 FR 48893 - Information Collection Activities: Oil and Gas Well-Completion Operations; Proposed Collection...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    .... Records 506 Record dates and times of well-completion 0.5 operations safety meetings. 511 Record results... test pressures........ 0.75 517(c), (i) Record time, date, and results of all 5 pressure tests, crew..., inaccurate, or misleading reports, records, or other information. Because the Secretary has delegated some of...

  18. Evaluation of cement thixotropy for the cement of oil wells in areas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... economical for cementing job operations in wells with loss zones. The results also show that the effect of LHF is positive, since in addition to his contribution to long term performances, especially the durability of hardened concrete, it improves the thixotropy of cement made of plaster. Keywords: cementing; lost circulation; ...

  19. 78 FR 68079 - Information Collection Activities: Oil and Gas Well-Completion Operations; Submitted for Office...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-13

    ... 106 requests....... 398 from the District Manager to displace kill- weight fluids to an underbalanced... results of all recordings = 1,440. pressure tests, crew drills, actuations, and inspections of the BOP in... 741 postings....... 1,112 stands of drill pipe/collars that may be pulled and equivalent well- control...

  20. The nonlinear oil-water two-phase flow behavior for a horizontal well in triple media carbonate reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Tao, Zhengwu; Chen, Liang; Ma, Xin

    2017-10-01

    Carbonate reservoir is one of the important reservoirs in the world. Because of the characteristics of carbonate reservoir, horizontal well has become a key technology for efficiently developing carbonate reservoir. Establishing corresponding mathematical models and analyzing transient pressure behaviors of this type of well-reservoir configuration can provide a better understanding of fluid flow patterns in formation as well as estimations of important parameters. A mathematical model for a oil-water two-phase flow horizontal well in triple media carbonate reservoir by conceptualizing vugs as spherical shapes are presented in this article. A semi-analytical solution is obtained in the Laplace domain using source function theory, Laplace transformation, and superposition principle. Analysis of transient pressure responses indicates that seven characteristic flow periods of horizontal well in triple media carbonate reservoir can be identified. Parametric analysis shows that water saturation of matrix, vug and fracture system, horizontal section length, and horizontal well position can significantly influence the transient pressure responses of horizontal well in triple media carbonate reservoir. The model presented in this article can be applied to obtain important parameters pertinent to reservoir by type curve matching.

  1. Propagation of Measurement-While-Drilling Mud Pulse during High Temperature Deep Well Drilling Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Signal attenuates while Measurement-While-Drilling (MWD mud pulse is transmited in drill string during high temperature deep well drilling. In this work, an analytical model for the propagation of mud pulse was presented. The model consists of continuity, momentum, and state equations with analytical solutions based on the linear perturbation analysis. The model can predict the wave speed and attenuation coefficient of mud pulse. The calculated results were compared with the experimental data showing a good agreement. Effects of the angular frequency, static velocity, mud viscosity, and mud density behavior on speed and attenuation coefficients were included in this paper. Simulated results indicate that the effects of angular frequency, static velocity, and mud viscosity are important, and lower frequency, viscosity, and static velocity benefit the transmission of mud pulse. Influenced by density behavior, the speed and attenuation coefficients in drill string are seen to have different values with respect to well depth. For different circulation times, the profiles of speed and attenuation coefficients behave distinctly different especially in lower section. In general, the effects of variables above on speed are seen to be small in comparison.

  2. Development of Ecofriendly Corrosion Inhibitors for Application in Acidization of Petroleum Oil Well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yadav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation the protective ability of 1-(2-aminoethyl-2-octadecylimidazoline (AEODI and 1-(2-octadecylamidoethyl-2-octadecylimidazoline (ODAEODI as corrosion inhibitors for N80 steel in 15% hydrochloric acid has been studied, which may find application as ecofriendly corrosion inhibitors in acidizing processes in petroleum industry. Different concentration of synthesized inhibitors AEODI and ODAEODI was added to test solution (15% HCl, and corrosion inhibition of N80 steel was tested by weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization, and AC impedance measurements. Influence of temperature (298 to 323 K on the inhibition behaviour was studied. Surface studies were performed by using SEM. It was found that both the inhibitors were effective inhibitors, and their inhibition efficiency was significantly increased with increasing their concentration. Polarization curves revealed that the used inhibitors represent mixed-type inhibitors. The adsorption of used inhibitors led to a reduction in the double-layer capacitance and an increase in the charge transfer resistance. The adsorption of used compounds was found to obey Langmuir isotherm. The adsorption of the corrosion inhibitors at the surface of N80 steel is the root cause of corrosion inhibition.

  3. Effects of Temperature and Stirring on Mass Transfer to Maximize Biodiesel Production from Jatropha curcas Oil: A Mathematical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Al Basir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel, the most promising renewable and alternative energy, is produced through transesterification of vegetable oils. One of the most cost effective sources of biodiesel is Jatropha curcas oil. Transesterification of Jatropha oil depends significantly on reaction parameters such as reaction time, temperature, molar ratio, catalyst amount, and stirrer speed. Among these parameters temperature and stirring have noteworthy effect on mass transfer. In this research article, we have shown the simultaneous effect of temperature and stirring on mass transfer by considering a mathematical model. The optimal profiles of temperature and stirring are determined as a combined parameter, for which maximum biodiesel can be obtained. Further, we have shown that this pair exists and is unique for the optimality of the system.

  4. Effect of Temperature on Wettability and Optimum Wetting Conditions for Maximum Oil Recovery in Carbonate Reservoir System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohal, Muhammad Adeel Nassar; Thyne, Geoffrey; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    2017-01-01

    The additional oil recovery from fractured & oil-wet carbonates by ionically modified water is principally based on changing wettability and often attributed to an improvement in water wetness. The influence of different parameters like dilution of salinity, potential anions, temperature, pressure......, lithology, pH, oil acid and base numbers to improve water wetting has been tested in recovery experiments. In these studies temperature is mainly investigated to observe the reactivity of potential anions (SO42-, PO33-, and BO33-) at different concentrations. But the influence of systematically increasing...... temperature on wetting conditions has not been thoroughly investigated. In this experimental study the effect of different temperatures on wettability for brines of different ionic strength and composition has been investigated in depth. A series of flotation experiments were conducted at 23, 50 and 100o...

  5. Well selection in depleted oil and gas fields for a safe CO2 storage practice: A case study from Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad Raza

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon capture and sequestration technology is recognized as a successful approach taken to mitigate the amount of greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere. However, having a successful storage practice requires wise selection of suitable wells in depleted oil or gas fields to reduce the risk of leakage and contamination of subsurface resources. The aim of this paper is to present a guideline which can be followed to provide a better understanding of sophisticated wells chosen for injection and storage practices. Reviewing recent studies carried out on different aspects of geosequestration indicated that the fracture pressure of seals and borehole conditions such as cement-sheath integrity, distance from faults and fractures together with the depth of wells are important parameters, which should be part of the analysis for well selection in depleted reservoirs. A workflow was then designed covering these aspects and it was applied to a depleted gas field in Malaysia. The results obtained indicated that Well B in the field may have the potential of being a suitable conduit for injection. Although more studies are required to consider other aspects of well selections, it is recommended to employ the formation integrity analysis as part of the caprock assessment before making any decisions.

  6. Pre-treatment of oil palm frond biomass via extensive high temperature drying for gasification process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mat Razali Nur Hazwani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oil palm frond has been utilized as a solid biomass fuel for gasification to produce synthesis gas or syngas to be used for heat and power generation. A fuel pre-treatment method by means of extensively-drying OPF blocks at 150°C and 200°C for 4 hours was implemented to investigate the effects of the fuel in terms of drying efficiency and gasification performances. Tar, pyrolysis oil and condensates were found to be squeezed out by heat during drying, signifying volatilization of fuel at temperatures between water boiling point at 100°C and fuel pyrolysis point at 280°C. Syngas produced from the updraft gasification of extensively-dried OPF blocks was analyzed and tested for sustainable gas flares. The syngas was found to be composed of 16.5% CO, 10% CO2, 4% H2 and 0.9% CH4 and was produced at gasification temperatures lower than that exhibited by normal OPF blocks.

  7. Investigating temperature effects on extra virgin olive oil using fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, M.; Ahmad, Naveed; Ali, H.; Bilal, M.; Khan, Saranjam; Ullah, Rahat; Ahmed, M.; Mahmood, S.

    2017-12-01

    The potential of fluorescence spectroscopy has been utilized to study the heating effects on extra virgin olive oil (EVOO). Through a series of experiments, a temperature range from 140 °C  ‑  150 °C has been found where cooking with EVOO is possible without destroying its natural ingredients. Fluorescence emission spectra from all heated and non-heated EVOO samples were recorded using an excitation source at 350 nm, where emission bands in non-heated EVOO at 380, 440, 455, and 525 nm are labelled for vitamin E and a band at 673 nm is assigned for chlorophyll a. The emission band at 525 nm is also responsible for beta carotenoids (vitamin A). As a result of heating, prominent intensity variations have been observed in all spectral bands, but it is particularly affected at 525 nm, indicating the deterioration of vitamin E and beta carotenoids. However, if the temperature of oil can be maintained in the above defined range, then frying food with EVOO is possible by preserving its natural ingredients. The spectral variations resulting from the heating effects have been further highlighted by using principal component analysis for classification purposes.

  8. Monitoring and Modeling CO2 Dynamics in the Vadose Zone near an Abandoned Historic Oil Well: Implications for Detecting CO2 Leakage at Geological CO2 Sequestration Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C.; Romanak, K.; Hovorka, S.; Reedy, R. C.; Trevino, R.; Scanlon, B. R.

    2010-12-01

    Soil-gas monitoring is proposed for detecting CO2 leakage at geological CO2 sequestration sites. At the Cranfield oil field, about 25 km east of Natchez, Mississippi, an integrated near-surface monitoring program is being implemented where supercritical CO2 is being injected for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). The purpose of the study is to understand how natural factors may affect soil CO2 monitoring at geologic carbon storage sites. A near-surface observatory, constructed on an engineered well pad near a 1950’s era open pit and plugged and abandoned well, was used to monitor atmospheric parameters such as air temperature, relative humility, barometric pressure, wind speed and direction, solar radiation, and precipitation. Soil temperature, soil CO2 concentrations, water content, and matric potential were also monitored at various depths to a maximum of 5 m in the vadose zone. The integrated monitoring system was installed in September 2009 and continued collecting data each half hour for about 240 days. CO2 concentrations measured at 1.5 m depth are about two times that of atmospheric CO2 concentrations and show daily fluctuations. However, CO2 concentrations measured at 3 m depth decreased from 11% in November 2009 to 9% in January 2010, then gradually increased to 10.5% in June 2010. There should be no CO2 contribution from root respiration because the engineered pad is bare of vegetation. Monitored CO2 in the vadose zone at this site most likely is derived from oxidation of methane with a suspected source related to the 1950’s era plugged and abandoned well. A 1-D numerical model was also used to simulate variably saturated water flow, CO2 transport, CH4 oxidation for understanding mechanisms that dominate CO2 transport at this site. Results of this study suggest that CO2 transport in the vadose zone is very complicated and can be affected by many factors including precipitation, barometric pressure, soil temperature, oxidation of methane, and therefore may

  9. Barium and sodium in sunflower plants cultivated in soil treated with wastes of drilling of oil well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jésus Sampaio Junior

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThis study aimed to evaluate the effects of the application of two types of oil drilling wastes on the development and absorption of barium (Ba and sodium (Na by sunflower plants. The waste materials were generated during the drilling of the 7-MGP-98D-BA oil well, located in the state of Bahia, Brazil. The treatments consisted of: Control – without Ba application, comprising only its natural levels in the soil; Corrected control – with fertilization and without wastes; and the Ba doses of 300, 3000 and 6000 mg kg-1, which were equivalent to the applications of 16.6, 165.9 and 331.8 Mg ha-1 of waste from the dryer, and 2.6, 25.7 and 51.3 Mg ha-1 of waste from the centrifugal. Plants cultivated using the first dose of dryer waste and the second dose of centrifugal waste showed growth and dry matter accumulation equal to those of plants under ideal conditions of cultivation (corrected control. The highest doses of dryer and centrifugal wastes affected the development of the plants. The absorption of Ba by sunflower plants was not affected by the increase in the doses. Na proved to be the most critical element present in the residues, interfering with sunflower development.

  10. Parametric analysis applied to perforating procedures of oil wells; Analise parametrica aplicada a procedimentos de canhoneio de pocos de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baioco, Juliana Souza; Seckler, Carolina dos Santos; Silva, Karinna Freitas da; Jacob, Breno Pinheiro [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Lab. de Metodos Computacionais e Sistemas Offshore; Silvestre, Jose Roberto; Soares, Antonio Claudio; Freitas, Sergio Murilo Santos [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    2008-07-01

    The perforation process is an important in well construction. It provides contact between the reservoir rock and the well, allowing oil production. The procedure consists in using explosive charges to bore a hole into the casing and the rock, so that the reservoir fluid can flow to the well. Therefore, the right choice of both the gun and the charge type is extremely important, knowing that many factors influence on the process, affecting the productivity, such as shot density, penetration depth, hole diameter, etc. The objective of this paper is to present the results of some parametric study to evaluate the influence of some parameters related to the explosive charges on well productivity, since there are many types of charges with different properties, which provide specific characteristics to the perforated area. For that purpose, a commercial program will be used, which allows the simulation of the flow problem, along with a finite element mesh generator that uses a pre-processor and a program that enables the construction of reservoir, well and perforation models. It can be observed that the penetration depth has bigger influence than the hole diameter, being an important factor when choosing the charge to be used in the project. (author)

  11. Variability of 4-Monomethylsterols and 4,4'-Dimethylsterols in Olive Oil and Their Use as Indicators of Olive Variety, Ripening Degree, and Oil Storage Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukić, Marina; Lukić, Igor; Sladonja, Barbara; Piližota, Vlasta

    2015-06-10

    To investigate the variability of 4-monomethylsterols and 4,4'-dimethylsterols in olive oil as a result of variety, ripening, and storage temperature, 36 samples were subjected to gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID) and with mass spectrometric detection (GC-MS), and results were processed by univariate and multivariate statistics. Relative amounts (percent) of β-amyrin, cycloartenol, and 24-methylenecycloartanol accounted for the most variation due to variety, while citrostadienol (percent) and 24-methylenecycloartanol (milligrams per 100 g) were strongly affected by ripening. Multivariate statistics differentiated olive oils regardless of storage conditions, which implied the possibility to use 4-monomethyl- and 4,4'-dimethylsterols as indicators of variety and ripening degree for fresh and stored oils. Absolute changes in 4-monomethyl- and 4,4'-dimethylsterols after storage were of a much smaller magnitude, meaning the investigated olive oils essentially retained health-beneficial features that derive from these compounds. Relative changes caused by storage were specific for each storage temperature and were useful in discriminating oils by linear discriminant analysis.

  12. Effects of crude oil exposure and elevated temperature on the liver transcriptome of polar cod (Boreogadus saida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Øivind; Frantzen, Marianne; Rosland, Marte; Timmerhaus, Gerrit; Skugor, Adrijana; Krasnov, Aleksei

    2015-08-01

    Petroleum-related activities in the Arctic have raised concerns about the adverse effects of potential oil spill on the environment and living organisms. Polar cod plays a key role in the Arctic marine ecosystem and is an important species for monitoring oil pollution in this region. We examined potential interactions of oil pollution and global warming by analysing liver transcriptome changes in polar cod exposed to crude oil at elevated temperature. Adult males and females were kept at high (11°C) or normal (4°C) temperature for 5 days before exposure to mechanically dispersed crude oil for 2 days followed by recovery in clean sea water for 11 days at the two temperatures. Genome-wide microarray analysis of liver samples revealed numerous differentially expressed genes induced by uptake of oil as confirmed by increased levels of bile polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) metabolites. The hepatic response included genes playing important roles in xenobiotic detoxification and closely related biochemical processes, but also of importance for protein stress response, cell repair and immunity. Though magnitude of transcriptome responses was similar at both temperatures, the upregulated expression of cyp1a1 and several chaperone genes was much stronger at 11°C. Most gene expression changes returned to basal levels after recovery. The microarray results were validated by qPCR measurement of eleven selected genes representing both known and novel biomarkers to assess exposure to anthropogenic threats on polar cod. Strong upregulation of the gene encoding fibroblast growth factor 7 is proposed to protect the liver of polar fish with aglomerular kidneys from the toxic effect of accumulated biliary compounds. The highly altered liver transcriptome patterns after acute oil exposure and recovery suggests rapid responses in polar cod to oil pollutants and the ability to cope with toxicity in relatively short time. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessment of the footprint and carrying capacity of oil and gas well sites: the implications for limiting hydrocarbon resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Sarah; Worrall, Fred; Davies, Richard; Gluyas, Jon

    2017-04-01

    The rapid growth of shale gas developments within the United States and the possibility of developments within Europe have raised concerns about the impact and potential environmental cost. In this study we estimated the likely physical footprint of well pads if shale gas or oil developments were to go forward in Europe and used these estimates to understand the impact upon existing infrastructure; the carrying capacity of the environment and how this may limit the proportion of resources that are accessible estimates. Conventional well pads in UK, The Netherlands and Poland were examined. For the existing UK conventional well pads the current minimum setback from a building for a currently producing well was measured. To assess the carrying capacity of the land surface, well pads, of the average well pad footprint, with recommended setbacks, were randomly placed into the licensed blocks covering the Bowland Shale, UK, and the extent to which they would interact or disrupt existing infrastructure assessed. The average conventional well site footprints were: 10800 m2 (1.08 ha) in the UK; 44600 m2 (4.46 ha) in The Netherlands; and 3000 m2 (0.30 ha) in Poland. The average area per well was: 541 m^2/well (0.05 ha/well) for the UK; 2870 m^2/well (0.29 ha/well) for Poland; and 6370 m^2/well (0.64 ha/well) for The Netherlands. Average access road lengths were: 230 m in the UK; 250 m in Poland; and 310 m in The Netherlands. The minimum setback from a building for a currently producing well was 21 m and 46 m from a house, though the mean setback was 329 and 447 m, respectively. When the surface and sub-surface footprints were considered our approach found that the carrying capacity of the sites and the restrictions from infrastructure over the currently licensed blocks covering the Bowland Shale (UK) was between 5 and 42%, with a mean of 26%. Using Cuadrilla's predicted recoverable reserves estimate of 8.5 x 10^11 m3 for the Bowland Basin, the carrying capacity of the

  14. Abstract of report on increasing the oil yield in low temperature carbonization by the addition of catalyst and superheated steam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1943-04-29

    In a letter dated February 2, 1943, Hydro-works Poelitz stated that in practical operation, as well as in the laboratory, an increased oil yield in low-temperature carbonization had been obtained by the simultaneous addition of superheated steam and sulfur. Other experiments with the same objective were later performed at Gelsenberg, Scholven, and Ludwigshafen. The laboratory experimental results and operating experimental results were discussed in this report. Poelitz found that it could increase its yield from 71.5% to 79.3% by the addition of 1.2% sulfur and an increase in the steam from 150 kg/hr to 320 kg/hr when carbonizing centrifuge residue from coal and, at the time, increased the throughput in the ball kiln from 3.5 to 3.8 tons/hr. Some properties of the heavy oils were given. The use of these results in mass production depended on two factors. The first was the extent to which the quantity of steam could be increased without too great an increase in the dust content of the precooler oil. The second factor was the economy of increased steam consumption and the cost of catalysts. Most of the beneficial effect of the additions seemed to be due to the steam, but the catalyst added some effect to that of the steam; without the use of steam, catalyst alone seemed to have essentially no effect. Replacement of part of the sulfur in the catalyst by small amounts of sodium sulfide and soda seemed to give the same effect as the sulfur alone, and the alkaline addition seemed to have the additional benefit of preventing the kiln residue from becoming plastic.

  15. Effect of pyrolysis temperature on characteristics and aromatic contaminants adsorption behavior of magnetic biochar derived from pyrolysis oil distillation residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Mahyoub, Samah Awadh Ali; Liao, Wenjie; Xia, Shuqian; Zhao, Hechuan; Guo, Mengya; Ma, Peisheng

    2017-01-01

    The magnetic biochars were easily fabricated by thermal pyrolysis of Fe(NO3)3 and distillation residue derived from rice straw pyrolysis oil at 400, 600 and 800°C. The effects of pyrolysis temperature on characteristics of magnetic biochars as well as adsorption capacity for aromatic contaminants (i.e., anisole, phenol and guaiacol) were investigated carefully. The degree of carbonization of magnetic biochars become higher as pyrolysis temperature increasing. The magnetic biochar reached the largest surface area and pore volume at the pyrolysis temperature of 600°C due to pores blocking in biochar during pyrolysis at 800°C. Based on batch adsorption experiments, the used adsorbent could be magnetically separated and the adsorption capacity of anisole on magnetic biochars was stronger than that of phenol and guaiacol. The properties of magnetic biochar, including surface area, pore volume, aromaticity, grapheme-like-structure and iron oxide (γ-Fe2O3) particles, showed pronounced effects on the adsorption performance of aromatic contaminants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of Asymmetric Barrier Layers in the Waveguide Region on the Temperature Characteristics of QuantumWell Lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhukov, A. E.; Asryan, L. V.; Shernyakov, Yu. M.

    2012-01-01

    The temperature sensitivity of the threshold-current density in quantum-well lasers is studied and the factors affecting the characteristic temperature and its dependence on optical losses are analyzed. It is shown that the inclusion of asymmetric potential barriers (one barrier on each side...... of the quantum well), which prevent the formation of bipolar carrier population in the waveguide region and lead to weakening of the temperature dependences of the transparency-current density, the gain-saturation parameter and, consequently, to a higher characteristic temperature for both long- and short...

  17. Lacunarity of geophysical well logs in the Cantarell oil field, Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arizabalo, Ruben Dario [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Oleschko, Klavdia [Centro de Geociencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Juriquilla, Queretaro (Mexico); Korvin, Gabor [King Fahd University, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Lozada, Manuel [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Castrejon, Ricardo [Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Ronquillo, Gerardo [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2006-04-15

    Lacunarity and fractal variations in geophysical well logs are associated with stratigraphic and petrophysical properties of the naturally fractured Cantarell field in the Gulf of Mexico. Neutron porosity (NPHI), density (RHOB, DRHO, PEF), resistivity (LLD, LLS, MSFL), natural radioactivity (GR, CGR, URAN, POTA, THOR) and caliper (CALI) logs are studied. The resistivity logs yielded remarkably high lacunarity values, especially in the hydrocarbon source- and reservoir rocks. Lacunarity {delta} was found to depend on the resolution and radial depth of penetration of the logging method. It systematically increased in the following order: {delta}(RHOB) < {delta}(CALI) < {delta}(PEF) < {delta}(URAN) < {delta}(GR) < {delta}(NPHI) < {delta}(POTA) < {delta}(CGR) < {delta}(THOR) < {delta}(MSFL) < {delta}(DRHO) < {delta}(LLS) < {delta}(LLD). [Spanish] En este trabajo fueron analizadas las variaciones fractales y de lagunaridad de los registros geofisicos de pozo, con el fin de asociarlos con las propiedades estratigraficas y petrofisicas del yacimiento naturalmente fracturado de Cantarell, en el Golfo de Mexico. Los registros considerados fueron: porosidad neutron (NPHI), densidad (RHOB, DRHO, PEF), resistividad (LLD, LLS, MSFL), radiactividad natural (GR, CGR, URAN, POTA, THOR) y caliper (CALI). Los registros de resistividad produjeron valores de lagunaridad notablemente altos, especialmente en las rocas generadoras y almacenadoras, a diferencia de los demas registros, cuya homogeneidad de traza implico una baja lagunaridad. Los resultados indican que la lagunaridad observada depende de la resolucion y profundidad radial de penetracion del metodo geofisico estudiado y aumenta sistematicamente en el siguiente orden: {delta}(RHOB) < {delta}(CALI) < {delta}(PEF) < {delta}(URAN) < {delta}(GR) < {delta}(NPHI) < {delta}(POTA) < {delta}(CGR) < {delta}(THOR) < {delta}(MSFL) < {delta}(DRHO) < {delta}(LLS) < {delta}(LLD).

  18. Influence of temperature on gas well testing; Einfluss von Temperatureffekten beim Testen von Gasbohrungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littmann, W. [Consulting Reservoir Engineering, Wunstorf (Germany)

    2001-06-01

    The flow of gas into a wellbore is calculated by the back-pressure or deliverability equation. The exponent n, which accounts for the deviation from the ideal Darcy flow, is usually attributed to turbulence in the reservoir. It is shown, that turbulence in gas wells does only occur in very extreme cases, and that the exponent n can be assigned to temperature changes during the expansion of the gas. The exponent n then is similar to the reciprocal of the exponent in the equation of state that describes the adiabatic reversible expansion of a perfect gas. (orig.) [German] Bei der Berechnung der Foerderraten einer Gasbohrung mit der 'back-pressure'-Gleichung wird die Abweichung vom 'idealen' Darcy-Verhalten durch den Exponenten n beschrieben. Diese Abweichung wird in der Literatur ueberwiegend dem Auftreten turbulenter Stroemung im bohrlochsnahen Bereich der Lagerstaette zugeschrieben. Es wird gezeigt, dass Turbulenz in Gasbohrungen nur in extremen Ausnahmefaellen auftritt, und das Abweichen, das durch den Exponenten n beschrieben wird, auf Temperaturaenderungen bei der Entspannung des Gases zurueckgefuehrt werden kann. Der Exponent n entspricht dann dem reziproken Wert des Exponenten in der Gleichung fuer die adiabatisch reversible Zustandsaenderung eines idealen Gases (Poissonsche-Gleichung). (orig.)

  19. STATIC{sub T}EMP: a useful computer code for calculating static formation temperatures in geothermal wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoyo, E. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Temixco (Mexico); Garcia, A.; Santoyo, S. [Unidad Geotermia, Inst. de Investigaciones Electricas, Temixco (Mexico); Espinosa, G. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Co. Vicentina (Mexico); Hernandez, I. [ITESM, Centro de Sistemas de Manufactura, Monterrey (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    The development and application of the computer code STATIC{sub T}EMP, a useful tool for calculating static formation temperatures from actual bottomhole temperature data logged in geothermal wells is described. STATIC{sub T}EMP is based on five analytical methods which are the most frequently used in the geothermal industry. Conductive and convective heat flow models (radial, spherical/radial and cylindrical/radial) were selected. The computer code is a useful tool that can be reliably used in situ to determine static formation temperatures before or during the completion stages of geothermal wells (drilling and cementing). Shut-in time and bottomhole temperature measurements logged during well completion activities are required as input data. Output results can include up to seven computations of the static formation temperature by each wellbore temperature data set analysed. STATIC{sub T}EMP was written in Fortran-77 Microsoft language for MS-DOS environment using structured programming techniques. It runs on most IBM compatible personal computers. The source code and its computational architecture as well as the input and output files are described in detail. Validation and application examples on the use of this computer code with wellbore temperature data (obtained from specialised literature) and with actual bottomhole temperature data (taken from completion operations of some geothermal wells) are also presented. (Author)

  20. SCAMS/Nimbus-6 Level 2 Water Vapor and Temperature, as well as Antenna and Brightness Temperature V001 (SCAMSN6L2) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Nimbus-6 Scanning Microwave Spectrometer (SCAMS) Level 2 data product contains water vapor and temperature profiles, as well as antenna and brightness...

  1. Effect of temperature, water content and free fatty acid on reverse micelle formation of phospholipids in vegetable oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtinen, Olli-Pekka; Nugroho, Robertus Wahyu N; Lehtimaa, Tuula; Vierros, Sampsa; Hiekkataipale, Panu; Ruokolainen, Janne; Sammalkorpi, Maria; Österberg, Monika

    2017-12-01

    The self-assembly of phospholipids in oil, specifically lecithin in rapeseed oil, was investigated by combining experimental and computational methods The influence of temperature, water, and free fatty acids on the onset of lecithin aggregation in the rapeseed oil was determined using the 7,7,8,8 -tetracyanoquinodimethane dye (TCNQ) solubilization method and the size and shape of the self-assembled lecithin structures were investigated by small-angle X-ray scattering and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy. In the absence of excess water in the system (0.03wt-% water in oil), stable cylindrical lecithin reverse micelles were observed above the critical micelle concentration (CMC). Comparing the aggregation response in room temperature and at 70°C revealed that CMC decreased with increasing temperature. Furthermore, already a modest amount of added water (0.3wt-% water in oil) was sufficient to induce the formation of lamellar lecithin structures, that phase separated from the oil. In low water content, oleic acid suppressed the formation of lecithin reverse micelles whereas in the presence of more water, the oleic acid stabilized the reverse micelles. Consequently, more water was needed to induce phase separation in the presence of oleic acid. Molecular dynamics simulations indicated that the stabilizing effect of oleic acid resulted from oleic acid enhancing phospholipid solubilization in the oil by forming a solvating shell around the phosphate head group. The findings showed that the response of the mixed surfactant system is a delicate interplay of the different components and variables. The significance of the observations is that multiple parameters need to be controlled for desired system response, for example towards vegetable oil purification or phospholipid based microemulsions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Temperature measurement of geothermal wells by optical fiber sensor; Hikari fiber sensor wo mochiita chinetsusei no ondo bunpu keisoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushima, N.; Sakaguchi, K. [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Experiments of temperature measurement were conducted in high temperature and high pressure geothermal wells using optical fiber sensor. A temperature measurement system using optical fiber sensor was applied to geothermal wells. Working availability was confirmed under the condition up to the depth of 1,750 m and the temperature of 240 centigrade. Observed values agreed well with those observed by the conventional temperature logging. Durability of the optical fiber sensor was also sufficient. The maximum standard deviations of measured values were 1.3 centigrade at the depth of 1,750 m at 195 centigrade for the loop-type sensor, and 3.7 centigrade at the depth of 365 m at about 200 centigrade for the single-end sensor. Although the accuracy was inferior to the conventional measurement using a thermo couple, it was enough to be applied to usual temperature logging. Furthermore, for this system, the temperature profile in the whole well can be monitored, simultaneously. Through the experiments, the detailed successive change of temperature profile accompanied with the water injection can be clearly illustrated. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Oxidative stability of waste cooking oil and white diesel upon storage at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezergianni, Stella; Chrysikou, Loukia P

    2012-12-01

    Renewable diesel fuels are alternative fuels produced from vegetable oils or animal fats. Catalytic hydrotreating of waste cooking oil (WCO) was carried out at pilot-plant scale and a paraffinic diesel, called "white" diesel was obtained. The white diesel and WCO samples were stored for one year at room temperature under normal atmospheric conditions, but not exposed to sunlight. Viscosity, total acid number (TAN), induction period (IP), carbonaceous deposits, density, cold flow properties, distillation and water content were monitored. TAN and density of the white diesel stored in conventional bottles changed from 0 to 0.221 mg KOH/g and from 787 to 838 kg/m(3), respectively. The remaining parameters did not vary significantly. Water content of WCO increased from 482 to 2491 mg/kg, TAN from 0.744 to 0.931 mg KOH/g, whereas viscosity, IP and carbon residues fluctuated mildly. The results are indicative of the white diesel's stability, rendering it suitable for prolonged storage. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. OPTIMAL SYSNTHESIS PROCESSES OF LOW-TEMPERATURE CONDENSATION ASSOCIATED OIL GAS PLANT REFRIGERATION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Ostapenko

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Design of modern high-efficient systems is a key priority for the Energy Sector of Ukraine. The cooling technological streams of gas and oil refineries, including air coolers, water cooling and refrigeration systems for specific refrigerants are the objectives of the present study. Improvement of the refrigeration unit with refrigerant separation into fractions is mandatory in order to increase cooling capacity, lowering the boiling point of coolant and increasing the coefficient of target hydrocarbons extraction from the associated gas flow. In this paper it is shown that cooling temperature plays significant role in low-temperature condensation process. Two operation modes for refrigeration unit were proposed: permanent, in which the concentration of the refrigerant mixture does not change and dynamic, in which the concentration of refrigerant mixtures depends on the ambient temperature. Based on the analysis of exergy losses the optimal concentration of refrigerant mixtures propane/ethane for both modes of operation of the refrigeration unit has been determined. On the basis of the conducted pinch-analysis the modification of refrigeration unit with refrigerant separation into fractions was developed. Additional recuperative heat exchangers for utilization heat were added to the scheme. Several important measures to increase the mass flow rate of refrigerant through the second section of the refrigeration centrifugal compressor from 22.5 to 25 kg/s without violating the agreed operational mode of the compressor sections were implemented.

  5. Defining the temperature range for cooking with extra virgin olive oil using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Naveed; Saleem, M.; Ali, H.; Bilal, M.; Khan, Saranjam; Ullah, Rahat; Ahmed, M.; Mahmood, S.

    2017-09-01

    Using the potential of Raman spectroscopy, new findings regarding the effects of heating on extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) during frying/cooking are presented. A temperature range from 140 to 150 °C has been defined within which EVOO can be used for cooking/frying without much loss of its natural molecular composition. Raman spectra from the EVOO samples were recorded using an excitation laser at 785 nm in the range from 540 to 1800 cm-1. Due to heating, prominent variations in intensity are observed at Raman bands from 540 to 770 cm-1, 790 to 1170 cm-1 and 1267 and 1302 cm-1. The Raman bands at 1267 and 1302 cm-1 represent cis unsaturated fats and their ratio is used to investigate the effects of temperature on the molecular composition of EVOO. In addition, principal component analysis has been applied on all the groups of data to classify the heated EVOO samples at different temperatures and for different times. In addition, it has been found that use of EVOO for frying twice does not have any prominent effect on its molecular composition.

  6. Effect of oxidation on base liquids of oil and synthetic-based drilling fluids at high pressure and high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahbazi, K.; Mehta, S.A.; Moore, R.G.; Ursenbach, M.G. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    Diesels and distillates are used as a base liquid for most oil-based drilling fluids in conventional drilling and as the liquid phase in gasified liquids in some underbalanced drilling operations. They are also used as friction reducing agents to free stuck pipes. It is important to understand the true downhole rheological properties because they affect equivalent circulating density, hole cleaning, barite sag, surge/swab pressures during tripping, pump pressure and bit hydraulics. Also, gelation and high viscosity are major concerns, particularly at high temperatures. An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the effect of oxidation on some base liquids for oil-based and synthetic-based drilling fluids at high pressures and high temperatures. Gas and liquid phases were characterized and the solid phase was measured along with viscosity measurements at temperatures and pressures ranging from 20 to 152 degrees C at atmospheric pressures to 103.4 MPa. The viscosity of the liquid samples after aging was compared with that of corresponding fresh samples. The results indicate that the degree of oxidation plays an important role in increasing the sample viscosity. The increase in viscosity depends on temperature, and is more significant at low temperatures. Agitation of samples during aging with air resulted in increased amounts of solid precipitation while lowering the viscosity of the liquid phase. This study demonstrated that oxidation has an important influence on rheological properties of the oil, because it affects the mobility of the oil and therefore the recovery factor. 11 refs., 7 tabs., 22 figs.

  7. EFFECT OF WATER CONTENT, TEMPERATURE AND AVERAGE DROPLET SIZE ON THE SETTLING VELOCITY OF WATER-IN-OIL EMULSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Souza

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractWater-in-oil (W/O emulsions are complex mixtures generally found in crude oil production in reservoirs and processing equipment. Sedimentation studies of water-oil emulsions enable the analysis of the fluid dynamic behavior concerning separation of this system composed of two immiscible liquids. Gravitational settling was evaluated in this article for a model emulsion system consisting of water and a Brazilian crude oil diluted in a clear mineral oil as organic phase. The effects of water content and temperature were considered in the study of sedimentation velocity of water-oil emulsions. Water contents between 10% and 50 % and temperatures of 25, 40 and 60 ºC were evaluated, and a Richardson-Zaki type correlation was obtained to calculate settling velocities as a function of the process variables investigated. Water contents and average droplet sizes were monitored at different levels in the settling equipment, thus enabling identification of the effect of these variables on the phenomena of sedimentation and coalescence of the emulsions studied. The results showed that the emulsion stability during sedimentation was governed by the emulsion water content, which yielded high settling velocities at low water contents, even when very small droplets were present. A quantitative analysis of the combined effects of drop size and droplet concentration supports the conclusion that a stronger effect is produced by the higher concentration of particles, compared with the relatively smaller effect of increasing the size of the droplets.

  8. Effect of temperature towards lipid oxidation and non-enzymatic browning reactions in krill oil upon storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, F S H; Bruheim, I; Haugsgjerd, B O; Jacobsen, C

    2014-08-15

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the effect of temperature towards lipid oxidation and non-enzymatic browning reactions in krill oil upon storage. Krill oil was incubated at two different temperatures (20 and 40 °C) for 28 or 42 days. The oxidative stability of krill oil was assessed by peroxide value and anisidine value, measurement of lipid derived volatiles, lipid classes and antioxidants. The non-enzymatic browning reactions were assessed through the measurement of pyrroles, free amino acids content and Strecker-derived volatiles. The increase of incubation temperature firstly increased the lipid oxidation in krill oil and subsequently the non-enzymatic browning reactions. The occurrence of these reactions was most likely due to the reaction between α-dicarbonyl or carbonyl compounds with amino acids or ammonia. In addition to tocopherol and astaxanthin esters, the formation of pyrroles might help to protect the krill oil against lipid oxidation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Application of high-temperature simulated distillation to the residuum oil supercritical extraction process in petroleum refining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raia; Villalanti; Subramanian; Williams

    2000-01-01

    The gas chromatographic method of high-temperature simulated distillation (HTSD) is described, and the results are presented for the application of HTSD to the characterization of petroleum refinery feed and products from solvent deasphalting operations. Results are presented for refinery residual feed, deasphalted oil, and asphaltene fractions from the residual oil supercritical extraction process. Asphaltene removal from petroleum residuum using solvent deasphalting results in the improved quality and high recovery of deasphalted oil product for use as lube oil, fluid catalytic cracking, or hydrocracker feedstocks. The HTSD procedure presented here proves valuable for characterizing the fractions from the deasphalting process to obtain the percentage yield with boiling point data over the range from approximately 36 degrees C (97 degrees F) to 733 degrees C (1352 degrees F), which covers the boiling range of n-paraffins of carbon number C5 to C108.

  10. Processes of heat transference during the construction of oil wells: inverse problem; Procesos de transferencia de calor durante la construccion de pozos petroleros: problema inverso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olea Gonzalez, Ulises

    2007-08-15

    In the oil industry and during the drilling and completion of oil wells, it is indispensable to count on reliable temperature estimations of the formation; its relevance and application are found in many areas of the geophysics, of the reservoir engineering and oil engineering. Unfortunately, the temperatures registered during the runs normally are lower than the real temperature of the formation, this is due to the fact that the times of interruption and flow circulation and circulation in the well are too short so that they do not allow the mud at the well bottom reaches the heat balance, which usually requires several days or weeks, economically non feasible situation to determine temperature profiles, since the times and costs of services of drilling would exceed the programmed technical economic limits. In order to confront this critical process a numerical code was developed, which consists of an analytical and numerical solution of the equations of heat transfer which they govern a system well-formation, which are used to model the thermal stabilization of an oil well after the drilling fluid flow has been stopped, supposing that the formation consists of an homogenous porous medium. The mathematical context is to find the initial conditions of the ensemble of partial differential equations that govern the phenomena of heat transference in the well and the formation. These equations form a bi-dimensional model in transient state. The mathematical model is established for four regions in the system well-formation and the border conditions and the initial conditions tie the partial differential equations for the well as for the formation. With the previous thing a generated methodology is obtained to determine the field of formation temperatures. Later, a particular analysis based on the thermo physical properties of the well geometry, the border conditions and the initial condition is proposed, parameter that is indeed the incognito of the problem. Ahead of

  11. Influence of formulated neem seed oil and jatropha curcas seed oil on wire drawing of mild steel and medium carbon steel at elevated temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamuda Muhammad

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available So many facets of hot wire drawing process, despite its extensive and long time employment in the industries, still remain unclear, due to want of systematic investigation of the process. This work investigated the influence of formulated neem seed and jatropha seed oil as lubricants, using antimony dialkyl dithiocarbamates (ADTC as an additive, on wire drawing process. The suitability of the bio-based oils in friction and wear control during wire drawing process were investigated, using a four ball tester. Experimental drawing process, using a Tungsten Carbide die and the formulated lubricants was carried out on mild steel and medium carbon steel rod (6 and 8mm diameter respectively at temperatures from 20OC to 750OC, on a drawing bench. The stresses and the temperature distribution profiles along the work-piece were reported. Up to 45% of reductions in area, without wire fracture, achieved on the drawing of the medium carbon steel have equally been reported.

  12. A feasibility study to estimate minimum surface-casing depths of oil and gas wells to prevent ground-water contamination in four areas of western Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckwalter, T.F.; Squillace, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrologic data were evaluated from four areas of western Pennsylvania to estimate the minimum depth of well surface casing needed to prevent contamination of most of the fresh ground-water resources by oil and gas wells. The areas are representative of the different types of oil and gas activities and of the ground-water hydrology of most sections of the Appalachian Plateaus Physiographic Province in western Pennsylvania. Approximate delineation of the base of the fresh ground-water system was attempted by interpreting the following hydrologic data: (1) reports of freshwater and saltwater in oil and gas well-completion reports, (2) water well-completion reports, (3) geophysical logs, and (4) chemical analyses of well water. Because of the poor quality and scarcity of ground-water data, the altitude of the base of the fresh ground-water system in the four study areas cannot be accurately delineated. Consequently, minimum surface-casing depths for oil and gas wells cannot be estimated with confidence. Conscientious and reliable reporting of freshwater and saltwater during drilling of oil and gas wells would expand the existing data base. Reporting of field specific conductance of ground water would greatly enhance the value of the reports of ground water in oil and gas well-completion records. Water-bearing zones in bedrock are controlled mostly by the presence of secondary openings. The vertical and horizontal discontinuity of secondary openings may be responsible, in part, for large differences in altitudes of freshwater zones noted on completion records of adjacent oil and gas wells. In upland and hilltop topographies, maximum depths of fresh ground water are reported from several hundred feet below land surface to slightly more than 1,000 feet, but the few deep reports are not substantiated by results of laboratory analyses of dissolved-solids concentrations. Past and present drillers for shallow oil and gas wells commonly install surface casing to below the

  13. Soy Sauce Residue Oil Extracted by a Novel Continuous Phase Transition Extraction under Low Temperature and Its Refining Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lichao; Zhang, Yong; He, Liping; Dai, Weijie; Lai, Yingyi; Yao, Xueyi; Cao, Yong

    2014-04-09

    On the basis of previous single-factor experiments, extraction parameters of soy sauce residue (SSR) oil extracted using a self-developed continuous phase transition extraction method at low temperature was optimized using the response surface methodology. The established optimal conditions for maximum oil yield were n-butane solvent, 0.5 MPa extraction pressure, 45 °C temperature, 62 min extraction time, and 45 mesh raw material granularity. Under these conditions, the actual yield was 28.43% ± 0.17%, which is relatively close to the predicted yield. Meanwhile, isoflavone was extracted from defatted SSR using the same method, but the parameters and solvent used were altered. The new solvent was 95% (v/v) ethanol, and extraction was performed under 1.0 MPa at 60 °C for 90 min. The extracted isoflavones, with 0.18% ± 0.012% yield, mainly comprised daidzein and genistein, two kinds of aglycones. The novel continuous phase transition extraction under low temperature could provide favorable conditions for the extraction of nonpolar or strongly polar substances. The oil physicochemical properties and fatty acids compositions were analyzed. Results showed that the main drawback of the crude oil was the excess of acid value (AV, 63.9 ± 0.1 mg KOH/g) and peroxide value (POV, 9.05 ± 0.3 mmol/kg), compared with that of normal soybean oil. However, through molecular distillation, AV and POV dropped to 1.78 ± 0.12 mg KOH/g and 5.9 ± 0.08 mmol/kg, respectively. This refined oil may be used as feedstuff oil.

  14. 75 FR 60800 - Discharge of Oil From Deepwater Horizon/Macondo Well, Gulf of Mexico; Intent To Conduct...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., Florida, and Texas. Pursuant to section 1006 of the Oil Pollution Act (``OPA''), 33 U.S.C. 2701 et seq.... Statutes, and Section 403.161, Fla. Statutes; the Mississippi Air and Water Pollution Control Law, Miss... ACTION: Notice of intent. ] SUMMARY: Under the Oil Pollution Act (OPA), Federal and State trustees for...

  15. Factors affecting the wettability of different surface materials with vegetable oil at high temperatures and its relation to cleanability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashokkumar, Saranya, E-mail: saras@food.dtu.dk [Accoat A/S, Munkegardsvej 16, 3490 Kvistgard (Denmark); Food Production Engineering, DTU FOOD, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Adler-Nissen, Jens [Food Production Engineering, DTU FOOD, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Moller, Per [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, DTU Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Plot of cos {theta} versus temperature for metal and ceramic surfaces where cos {theta} rises linearly with increase in temperature. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cos {theta} of olive oil on different surface materials rises linearly with increase in temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Slopes are much higher for quasicrystalline and polymers than for ceramics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increase in surface roughness and surface flaws increases surface wettability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Contact angle values gave information for grouping easy-clean polymers from other materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Contact angle measurements cannot directly estimate the cleanability of a surface. - Abstract: The main aim of the work was to investigate the wettability of different surface materials with vegetable oil (olive oil) over the temperature range of 25-200 Degree-Sign C to understand the differences in cleanability of different surfaces exposed to high temperatures in food processes. The different surface materials investigated include stainless steel (reference), PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene), silicone, quasicrystalline (Al, Fe, Cr) and ceramic coatings: zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}), zirconium nitride (ZrN) and titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN). The ceramic coatings were deposited on stainless steel with two different levels of roughness. The cosine of the contact angle of olive oil on different surface materials rises linearly with increasing temperature. Among the materials analyzed, polymers (PTFE, silicone) gave the lowest cos {theta} values. Studies of the effect of roughness and surface flaws on wettability revealed that the cos {theta} values increases with increasing roughness and surface flaws. Correlation analysis indicates that the measured contact angle values gave useful information for grouping easy-clean polymer materials from the other materials; for the latter group, there is no direct relation between

  16. Absolute Viscosities of Vegetable Oils at Different Temperatures and Shear Rate Range of 64.5 to 4835 s−1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemuel M. Diamante

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out to determine the effect of higher shear rates (64.5 to 4835 s−1 on the absolute viscosities of different vegetable oils at different temperatures (26 to 90°C. The absolute viscosities of the different vegetable oils were determined using a Lamy Viscometer RM100, a rotating viscometer with coaxial cylinder. The torque of each sample at different temperatures was recorded at different shear rates. Based on the rheograms (plot of mean shear stress against shear rate, all of the vegetable oils studied were found to be Newtonian fluids. Rice bran oil was the most viscous (0.0398 Pa·s at 38°C while walnut oil was the least viscous (0.0296 Pa·s at 38°C among the oils studied. The higher shear range used did not significantly affect the absolute viscosities of the vegetable oils at the different temperatures. The absolute viscosities of the vegetable oils decreased with increasing temperature and can be fitted with an Arrhenius type relationship. The activation energies for the different vegetable oils ranged from 21 to 30 kJ/mole. The peanut and safflower oils had the highest and lowest activation energies, respectively. This means that greater energy was needed to effect a viscosity change in the peanut oil.

  17. Calculation of the density of solutions (sunflower oil + n-hexane) over a wide range of temperatures and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarov, M. M.; Abdukhamidova, Z.

    1995-09-01

    We present the results from an experimental investigation of the density of the sunflower oil system as a function of the mass concentration of n-hexane in the ranges of temperatures T=290 520 K and pressures P=0.101 98.1 MPa. A method of hydrostatic weighing was used to measure the density of the solutions under study.

  18. Temperature-induced Coalescence of Droplets Manipulated by Optical Trapping in an Oil-in-Water Emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsunobu, Manami; Kobayashi, Sakurako; Takeyasu, Nobuyuki; Kaneta, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Coalescence of oil droplets in an oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion was achieved with heating and optical trapping. Three types of O/W emulsions were prepared by adding a mixture of butanol and n-decane to an aqueous solution containing a cationic surfactant (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, CTAB), an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS), or a neutral hydrophilic polymer (polyethylene glycol, PEG) as an emulsifier. Two oil droplets in the emulsions were randomly trapped in a square capillary tube by two laser beams in order to induce coalescence. Coalescence of the droplets could not be achieved at room temperature (25°C) regardless of the type of emulsifier. Conversely, the droplets prepared with PEG coalesced at a temperature higher than 30°C, although the droplets with ionic surfactants CTAB and SDS did not coalesce even at the elevated temperature due to their electrostatic repulsion. The size of the resultant coalesced droplet was consistent with that calculated from the size of the two droplets of oil, which indicated successful coalescence of the two droplets. We also found that the time required for the coalescence could be correlated with the temperature using an Arrhenius plot.

  19. Combination of Well-Logging Temperature and Thermal Remote Sensing for Characterization of Geothermal Resources in Hokkaido, Northern Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingwei Tian

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Geothermal resources have become an increasingly important source of renewable energy for electrical power generation worldwide. Combined Three Dimension (3D Subsurface Temperature (SST and Land Surface Temperature (LST measurements are essential for accurate assessment of geothermal resources. In this study, subsurface and surface temperature distributions were combined using a dataset comprised of well logs and Thermal Infrared Remote sensing (TIR images from Hokkaido island, northern Japan. Using 28,476 temperature data points from 433 boreholes sites and a method of Kriging with External Drift or trend (KED, SST distribution model from depths of 100 to 1500 m was produced. Regional LST was estimated from 13 scenes of Landsat 8 images. Resultant SST ranged from around 50 °C to 300 °C at a depth of 1500 m. Most of western and part of the eastern Hokkaido are characterized by high temperature gradients, while low temperatures were found in the central region. Higher temperatures in shallower crust imply the western region and part of the eastern region have high geothermal potential. Moreover, several LST zones considered to have high geothermal potential were identified upon clarification of the underground heat distribution according to 3D SST. LST in these zones showed the anomalies, 3 to 9 °C higher than the surrounding areas. These results demonstrate that our combination of TIR and 3D temperature modeling using well logging and geostatistics is an efficient and promising approach to geothermal resource exploration.

  20. Preparation of well-dispersed Pt/SiO2 catalysts using low-temperature treatments.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radivojevic, D.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Lefferts, Leonardus

    2006-01-01

    This work explores methods to prepare platinum on silica catalyst using temperatures as low as possible. Therefore, thermal stability in both oxidizing and reducing atmosphere of eight different precursors was studied with thermo-gravimetric analyses (TGA-MS). Based on these data, the precursors

  1. Parametric Study to Determine the Effect of Temperature on Oil Soldifier Performance and the Development of a new Empirical Correlation for Predicting Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temperature can play a significant role in the efficacy of solidifiers in removing oil slicks on water. We studied and quantified the effect of temperature on the performance of several solidifiers using 5 different types of oils under a newly developed testing protocol by condu...

  2. Parametric Study to Determine the Effect of Temperature on Oil Solidifier Performance and the Development of a New Empirical Correlation for Predicting Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temperature can play a significant role in the efficacy of solidifiers in removing oil slicks on water. We studied and quantified the effect of temperature on the performance of several solidifiers using 5 different types of oils under a newly developed testing protocol by conduc...

  3. Effect of some prepared superplasticizers (Cyclohexanone Based on compressive strength and physico-chemical properties of oil well cement pastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Aiad

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Two different superplasticizers particularly cyclohexanone formaldehyde sulfanilate (CFS and cyclohexanone glyoxylic sulfanilate (CGS were prepared; also, their effect on mechanical and physico-chemical properties of oil well cement was assessed. The chemical structures were affirmed by FTIR technique. The designed chemical compounds were predestined as superplasticizers for cement pastes. The pastes were made by superplasticizer (CFS or CGS addition to cement by the ratios of 0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, and l.00 as mass% of cement. The water of consistency, setting time, chemically combined water content (Wn, the hydration rate and compressive strength of the admixed hardened pastes were predestined at various time periods. The phase composition was intended by DSC and XRD techniques. The results revealed that as the admixture dose rate increases the demand cement paste water of consistency decreases. Also, as the admixture addition rate increases the chemically combined water content decreases, so the rate of hydration decreases; meanwhile compressive strength magnitudes increase accounting for the low water/cement (initial porosity of the sample.

  4. Acute and subchronic toxicity as well as mutagenic evaluation of essential oil from turmeric (Curcuma longa L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liju, Vijayasteltar B; Jeena, Kottarapat; Kuttan, Ramadasan

    2013-03-01

    The present study investigated the acute, subchronic and genotoxicity of turmeric essential oil (TEO) from Curcuma longa L. Acute administration of TEO was done as single dose up to 5 g of TEO per kg body weight and subchronic toxicity study for thirteen weeks was done by daily oral administration of TEO at doses 0.1, 0.25 and 0.5 g/kg b.wt. in Wistar rats. There were no mortality, adverse clinical signs or changes in body weight; water and food consumption during acute as well as subchronic toxicity studies. Indicators of hepatic function such as aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine amino transferase (ALT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were unchanged in treated animals compared to untreated animals. Oral administration of TEO for 13 weeks did not alter total cholesterol, triglycerides, markers of renal function, serum electrolyte parameters and histopathology of tissues. TEO did not produce any mutagenicity to Salmonella typhimurium TA-98, TA-100, TA-102 and TA-1535 with or without metabolic activation. Administration of TEO to rats (1 g/kg b.wt.) for 14 days did not produce any chromosome aberration or micronuclei in rat bone marrow cells and did not produce any DNA damage as seen by comet assay confirming the non toxicity of TEO. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Well blowout rates and consequences in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991 to 2005: Implications for geological storage of carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Preston; Jordan, Preston D.; Benson, Sally M.

    2008-05-15

    Well blowout rates in oil fields undergoing thermally enhanced recovery (via steam injection) in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991 to 2005 were on the order of 1 per 1,000 well construction operations, 1 per 10,000 active wells per year, and 1 per 100,000 shut-in/idle and plugged/abandoned wells per year. This allows some initial inferences about leakage of CO2 via wells, which is considered perhaps the greatest leakage risk for geological storage of CO2. During the study period, 9% of the oil produced in the United States was from District 4, and 59% of this production was via thermally enhanced recovery. There was only one possible blowout from an unknown or poorly located well, despite over a century of well drilling and production activities in the district. The blowout rate declined dramatically during the study period, most likely as a result of increasing experience, improved technology, and/or changes in safety culture. If so, this decline indicates the blowout rate in CO2-storage fields can be significantly minimized both initially and with increasing experience over time. Comparable studies should be conducted in other areas. These studies would be particularly valuable in regions with CO2-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and natural gas storage.

  6. Effects of Fe3+ and Antioxidants on Glycidyl Ester Formation in Plant Oil at High Temperature and Their Influencing Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Weiwei; Liu, Guoqin; Liu, Xinqi

    2017-05-24

    This research investigated the effects of Fe3+ and antioxidants on the formation of glycidyl esters (GEs) and the free radical mediated mechanisms involving the recognition of cyclic acyloxonium free radical intermediate (CAFRI) for GE formation in both the plant oil model (palm oil, camellia oil, soybean oil, and linseed oil) system and the chemical model (dipalmitin and methyl linoleate) system heated at 200 °C. Results show that Fe3+ can promote the formation of GEs, which can be inhibited by antioxidants in plant oil during high-temperature exposure. Based on the monitoring of cyclic acyloxonium and ester carbonyl group by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, the promotion of Fe3+ and the inhibition of antioxidants (tert-butylhydroquinone and α-tocopherol) for GE formation occurred not only through lipid oxidation but also through directly affecting the formation of cyclic acyloxonium intermediate. Additionally, a quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry measurement was conducted to identify the presence of radical adduct captured by 5,5-dimethylpyrroline N-oxide, which provided strong evidence for the formation of CAFRI. Thus, one possible influencing mechanism can be that free radical generated in lipid oxidation may be transferred to dipalmitin and promote CAFRI formation. Fe3+ can catalyze free radical generation while antioxidants can scavenge free radical, and therefore they also can directly affect CAFRI formation.

  7. TEMLOPI: a thermal simulator for estimation of drilling mud and formation temperatures during drilling of geothermal wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, A.; Hernandez, I.; Espinosa, G.; Santoyo, E.

    1998-06-01

    This paper describes the development and application of the numerical code TEMLOPI v1.0, a useful tool for estimating the temperature distribution of the fluids employed for drilling geothermal wells. The simulator also allows estimation of the thermal disturbance of the surrounding rock caused by fluid circulation and well shut-in. TEMLOPI v1.0 is based on a mathematical model which considers the main heat transfer mechanisms and the heat exchange between the circulating fluid and the surrounding rock formation that occur during drilling of geothermal wells. The simulator was written in Fortran 77 using modular (block) programming. It runs on most IBM compatible personal computers and can be used in-situ. Input data includes the well geometry, the fluid and flow characteristics and the initial (undisturbed) formation temperature. Output files contain the transient temperature distribution (temperature vs depth) in the fluid flowing down the drill pipe and the annulus, the well inner face and the radial distribution in the surrounding rock. The software code model, architecture, input and output files and the solution algorithm are described in detail. Results obtained were validated by comparison with data published in the specialized literature and with data from well Az-29 from the Los Azufres Mexican geothermal field.

  8. Use of Biostratigraphy to Increase Production, Reduce Operating Costs and Risks and Reduce Environmental Concerns in Oil Well Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward Marks

    2005-09-09

    In the Santa Maria Basin, Santa Barbara County, California, four wells were processed and examined to determine the age and environment parameters in the oil producing sections. From west to east, we examined Cabot No. 1 Ferrero-Hopkins,from 3917.7 m (12850 ft) to 4032 m (13225 ft); Sun No. 5 Blair, from 3412 m (11190 ft) to 3722.5 m (12210 ft); Triton No. 10 Blair, from 1552 m (5090 ft) to 1863 m (6110 ft); and OTEC No. 1 Boyne, from 2058 m (6750 ft) to 2528 m (8293 ft). Lithic reports with lithic charts were prepared and submitted on each well. These tested for Sisquoc Fm lithology to be found in the Santa Maria area. This was noted in the OTEC No. 1 Boyne interval studied. The wells also tested for Monterey Fm. lithology, which was noted in all four wells examined. Composite samples of those intervals [combined into 9.15 m (30 foot) intervals] were processed for paleontology. Although the samples were very refractory and siliceous, all but one (Sun 5 Blair) yielded index fossil specimens, and as Sun 5 Blair samples below 3686 m (12090 ft) were processed previously, we were able to make identifications that would aid this study. The intervals examined were of the Sisquoc Formation, the Low Resistivity and the High Resistivity sections of the Monterey Formation. The Lower Sisquoc and the top of the late Miocene were identified by six index fossils: Bolivina barbarana, Gyroidina soldanii rotundimargo, Bulimina montereyana, Prunopyle titan, Axoprunum angelinum and Glyphodiscus stellatus. The Low Resistivity Monterey Fm. was identified by eight index fossils, all of which died out at the top of the late Miocene, late Mohnian: Nonion goudkoffi, Brizalina girardensis, Cibicides illingi, Siphocampe nodosaria, Stephanogonia hanzawai, Uvigerina modeloensis, Buliminella brevior, Tytthodiscus sp.and the wide geographic ranging index pelagic fossil, Sphaeroidinellopsis subdehiscens. The High Resistivity Monterey Fm. was identified by eight index fossils, all of which died

  9. Constraining the abundance of high emitters is critical to mitigating the effect of abandoned oil and gas wells on methane emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend-Small, A.; Ferrara, T.; Fries, A. E.

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies have suggested that methane inventories may underrepresent emissions from the oil and gas supply chain, and this has led to an effort by several groups to assess whether abandoned wells are a significant source. Our work has shown that unplugged wells are a larger source than plugged wells, and that a small percentage of unplugged wells likely make up the majority of emissions. Preliminary work also suggests that the oldest oil and gas producing region, the Appalachian Basin, has the largest emitters. However, many of these wells are over 100 years old and state databases lack accurate plugging and location data. Our current work is focused on determining the proportion of high emitters among abandoned wells in the Appalachian basin of Ohio. We are also making component-level measurements of conventional oil and gas wells on federal land for comparison. Our methods include analysis of gas composition to identify the relative contributions of biogenic and thermogenic methane to emissions. Identifying the location and emission rate of abandoned wells will not only mitigate a potential regionally important methane source, but will also help prevent interactions of these older wells with new drilling for shale gas as well as groundwater.

  10. A robust, superhydrophobic graphene aerogel as a recyclable sorbent for oils and organic solvents at various temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Rui-Peng; Li, Wei; Lv, Yong-Kang

    2017-08-15

    To address oil spillage and organic contaminant problems, the preparation of efficient sorbent materials is of great importance for global environment and water source protection. Despite extensive studies, sorbents with both high efficiency and recyclability are still desired, particularly with the outstanding sorption performance for different temperature environmental conditions. Herein, we report a robust reduced graphene aerogel (rGA) as an efficient and recyclable sorbent for oils and organic solvents, which shows highly efficient absorption of various oils and organic solvents (up to 19-26 times of its own weight) and excellent recyclability (>5 times) by heat treatment. Moreover, the absorption ability of rGA can be maintained over a wide temperature range of -40°C to 240°C, which can be attributed to the inherent excellent thermal stability of graphene and goodheat dispersal of three dimensional network structure. Based on these excellent properties, the rGA is considered to be an ideal material can be employed for separation and absorption of waste oil and organic contaminants from the water surface at various temperatures. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Effects of essential oil treatment, gas atmosphere, and storage temperature on Listeria monocytogenes in a model vegetable system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scollard, Johann; Francis, Gillian A; O'Beirne, David

    2009-06-01

    Natural antimicrobials such as plant essential oils (EOs) may be useful for controlling pathogenic bacteria on fresh-cut vegetables. The antilisterial properties of EOs (thyme, oregano, and rosemary), in combination with different storage atmospheres (air, 5% CO2-2% O2-93% N2, and 20% CO2-1% O2-79% N2) and temperatures (4 and 80C), were examined using a gas flow-through system combined with a vegetable agar model. The antimicrobial effects of the EOs varied depending on the oil, the Listeria strain and species, the method of application, and the storage conditions tested. Using the disk diffusion assay, the antilisterial effectiveness of the oils was in the following order: thyme EO > oregano EO > rosemary EO. Volatiles released from the EOs resulted in very small antilisterial effects, indicating that the oils needed to be in direct contact with cultures in order to be effective. There were strain and species effects, with L. innocua NCTC 11288 exhibiting the strongest resistance to EOs, and L. monocytogenes NCTC 7973 being the most sensitive strain. In addition, the effectiveness of the EOs was influenced by storage atmosphere and temperature. Use of EOs in combination with a gas atmosphere of 20% CO2-1% O2-79% N2 had the greatest antilisterial effect, suggesting that high CO2 atmospheres enhanced the antilisterial properties of EOs. Lowering the storage temperature from 8 to 4OC improved the antilisterial activity of thyme oil. It is concluded that thyme and oregano EOs display strong inhibitory effects against Listeria and that increasing CO2 levels and lowering storage temperatures further enhance these antilisterial effects.

  12. Complete Fiber/Copper Cable Solution for Long-Term Temperature and Pressure Measurement in Supercritical Reservoirs and EGS Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastouret, Alan [Draka Cableteq USA, Inc., North Dighton, MA (United States); Gooijer, Frans [Draka Cableteq USA, Inc., North Dighton, MA (United States); Overton, Bob [Draka Cableteq USA, Inc., North Dighton, MA (United States); Jonker, Jan [Draka Cableteq USA, Inc., North Dighton, MA (United States); Curley, Jim [Draka Cableteq USA, Inc., North Dighton, MA (United States); Constantine, Walter [Draka Cableteq USA, Inc., North Dighton, MA (United States); Waterman, Kendall Miller [Draka Cableteq USA, Inc., North Dighton, MA (United States)

    2015-11-13

    High Temperature insulated wire and optical fiber cable is a key enabling technology for the Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP). Without insulated electrical wires and optical fiber, downhole temperature and pressure sensors, flow meters and gauges cannot communicate with the surface. Unfortunately, there are currently no insulated electrical wire or fiber cable constructions capable of surviving for extended periods of deployment in a geothermal well (240-325°C) or supercritical (374°C) reservoir. This has severely hindered engineered reservoir creation, management and utilization, as hot zones and cool water intrusions cannot be understood over time. The lack of a insulated electrical wire and fiber cable solution is a fundamental limitation to the viability of this energy source. The High Temperature Downhole Tools target specification is development of tools and sensors for logging and monitoring wellbore conditions at depths of up to 10,000 meters and temperatures up to 374oC. It well recognized in the industry that no current electronic or fiber cable can be successfully deployed in a well and function successfully for more a few days at temperatures over 240oC. The goal of this project was to raise this performance level significantly. Prysmian Group’s objective in this project was to develop a complete, multi-purpose cable solution for long-term deployment in geothermal wells/reservoirs that can be used with the widest variety of sensors. In particular, the overall project objective was to produce a manufacturable cable design that can perform without serious degradation: • At temperatures up to 374°C; • At pressures up to 220 bar; • In a hydrogen-rich environment; and • For the life of the well (> 5 years). This cable incorporates: • Specialty optical fibers, with specific glass chemistry and high temperature and pressure protective coatings for data communication and distributed temperature and pressure sensing, and • High-temperature

  13. Modelling Chemical Kinetics of Soybean Oil Transesterification Process for Biodiesel Production: An Analysis of Molar Ratio between Alcohol and Soybean Oil Temperature Changes on the Process Conversion Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maicon Tait

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model describing chemical kinetics of transesterification of soybean oil for biodiesel production has been developed. The model is based on the reverse mechanism of transesterification reactions and describes dynamics concentration changes of triglycerides, diglycerides, monoglycerides, biodiesel, and glycerol production. Reaction rate constants were written in the Arrhenius form. An analysis of key process variables such as temperature and molar ratio soybean oil- alcohol using response surface analysis was performed to achieve the maximum soybean conversion rate to biodiesel. The predictive power of the developed model was checked for the very wide range of operational conditions and parameters values by fitting different experimental results for homogeneous catalytic and non-catalytic processes published in the literature. A very good correlation between model simulations and experimental data was observed.

  14. High-temperature explosive development for geothermal well stimulation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, E.W.; Mars, J.E.; Wang, C.

    1978-03-31

    A two-component, temperature-resistant liquid explosive called HITEX has been developed which is capable of withstanding 561/sup 0/K (550/sup 0/F) for 24 hours in a geothermal environment. The explosive is intended for the stimulation of nonproducing or marginally producing geothermal (hot dry rock, vapor-dominated or hydrothermal) reservoirs by fracturing the strata in the vicinity of a borehole. The explosive is inherently safe because it is mixed below ground downhole from two nondetonable liquid components. Development and safety tests included differential scanning calorimetry, thermal stability, minerals compatibility, drop-weight sensitivity, adiabatic compression, electrostatic discharge sensitivity, friction sensitivity, detonation arrest capability, cook-off tests, detonability at ambient and elevated pressure, detonation velocity and thin film propagation in a wedge.

  15. Experimental investigation of quench and re-wetting temperatures of hot horizontal tubes well above the limiting temperature for solid–liquid contact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takrouri, Kifah, E-mail: takroukj@mcmaster.ca [Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Luxat, John, E-mail: luxatj@mcmaster.ca [Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Hamed, Mohamed [Thermal Processing Laboratory (TPL), Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada)

    2017-01-15

    . The effects of initial surface temperature, water subcooling (in the range 15–80 °C) and jet velocity (in the range 0.15–1.60 m/s) on the quench process were investigated. The quench and the re-wetting temperature (the temperature at which the liquid establishes wet contact with the solid) were found to greatly depend on water subcooling. One of the main findings in this study is the existence of a critical water subcooling range within which any small change in water subcooling has a considerable effect on both the quench and the re-wetting temperatures. Empirical correlations have been developed and provided good fit of the experimental data and agreed well with correlations developed by other researchers for curved surfaces. The quench temperature was found to decrease by increasing surface curvature and solid thermal conductivity. However, the re-wetting temperature is a weak function of both variables. Effect of spatial location on the surface of the tube was also studied. The stagnation point showed higher quench and re-wetting temperatures compared to other locations on the tube surface.

  16. Low-threshold room-temperature AlGaAs/GaAs nanowire/single-quantum-well heterostructure laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xin; Wei, Wei; Tang, Fengling; Wang, Xi; Li, Luying; Zhang, Xia; Ren, Xiaomin

    2017-02-01

    Near-infrared nanowire lasers are promising as ultrasmall, low-consumption light emitters in on-chip optical communications and computing systems. Here, we report on a room-temperature near-infrared nanolaser based on an AlGaAs/GaAs nanowire/single-quantum-well heterostructure grown by Au-catalyzed metal organic chemical vapor deposition. When subjects to pulsed optical excitation, the nanowire exhibits lasing, with a low threshold of 600 W/cm2, a narrow linewidth of 0.39 nm, and a high Q factor of 2000 at low temperature. Lasing is observed up to 300 K, with an ultrasmall temperature dependent wavelength shift of 0.045 nm/K. This work paves the way towards ultrasmall, low-consumption, and high-temperature-stability near-infrared nanolasers.

  17. Analysis and investigation of temperature and hydrostatic pressure effects on optical characteristics of multiple quantum well slow light devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolhosseini, Saeed; Kohandani, Reza; Kaatuzian, Hassan

    2017-09-10

    This paper represents the influences of temperature and hydrostatic pressure variations on GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well slow light systems based on coherence population oscillations. An analytical model in non-integer dimension space is used to study the considerable effects of these parameters on optical properties of the slow light apparatus. Exciton oscillator strength and fractional dimension constants have special roles on the analytical model in fractional dimension. Hence, the impacts of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on exciton oscillator strength and fractional dimension quantity are investigated theoretically in this paper. Based on the achieved results, temperature and hydrostatic pressure play key roles on optical parameters of the slow light systems, such as the slow down factor and central energy of the device. It is found that the slope and value of the refractive index real part change with alterations of temperature and hydrostatic pressure in the range of 5-40 deg of Kelvin and 1 bar to 2 kbar, respectively. Thus, the peak value of the slow down factor can be adjusted by altering these parameters. Moreover, the central energy of the device shifts when the hydrostatic pressure is applied to the slow light device or temperature is varied. In comparison with previous reported experimental results, our simulations follow them successfully. It is shown that the maximum value of the slow down factor is estimated close to 5.5×104 with a fine adjustment of temperature and hydrostatic pressure. Meanwhile, the central energy shift of the slow light device rises up to 27 meV, which provides an appropriate basis for different optical devices in which multiple quantum well slow light is one of their essential subsections. This multiple quantum well slow light device has potential applications for use as a tunable optical buffer and pressure/temperature sensors.

  18. Effect of temperature on mycelial growth of Trichoderma, Sclerotinia minor and S. sclerotiorum, as well as on mycoparasitism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Victor Pessoni Fernandes Domingues

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Environmental conditions are very important for the biological control of plant diseases. In a previous study, isolates of Trichoderma asperellum (IBLF 897, IBLF 904 and IBLF 914 and T. asperelloides (IBLF 908 were selected as antagonists of S. minor and S. sclerotiorum, causal agents of lettuce drop, one of the most relevant diseases affecting the lettuce crop. In this subsequent study, the mycelial growth of these isolates and pathogens, as well as the mycoparasitism of isolate IBLF 914, was evaluated at different temperatures. The mycelial growth of the isolates of T. asperellum and T. asperelloides, as well as of S. minor and S. sclerotiorum, was evaluated at temperatures ranging from 7 to 42oC. The parasitism of propagules of S. minor and S. sclerotiorum by the isolate IBLF 914, as well as the number of lettuce seedlings surviving drop, was evaluated at 12, 17, 22, 27 and 32oC, in gerboxes containing substrate. S. minor and S. sclerotiorum showed mycelial growth at temperatures ranging from 7 to 27°C, but no growth occurred at 32 °C, and both pathogens had greater mycelial growth at 22°C. The isolates of Trichoderma grew at temperatures ranging from 12 to 37°C, with maximum growth at 27°C. The isolate IBLF 914 had mycoparasitism and reduced the disease in lettuce seedlings at temperatures ranging from 22 to 32°C. Since lettuce drop occurs when mild temperatures and high humidity prevail and the antagonist was more effective at higher temperatures, it is recommended that Trichoderma is applied in lettuce fields in Brazil also during warmer months of the year to reduce the inoculum remaining in the soil before planting the winter crop, which is more affected by the disease.

  19. Emulation and Control of Slugging Flows in a Gas-Lifted Offshore Oil Production Well Through a Lab-sized Facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Kasper Lund; Hansen, Leif; Mai, Christian

    2013-01-01

    In the oil and gas industry, the gas-lift assist approach is often used in the roduction wells when the reservoir pressure is insufficient to ensure cost-effective production. However the side-effect of this approach is the often occurrence of regular/irregular large oscillations of the productio...... is originally open-loop unstable....

  20. Report on the explosion, fire, and oil spill resulting in one fatality and injury on September 21, 1978, at Well 6 of Cavern 6 at the West Hackberry, Louisiana, oil storage site of the strategic petroleum reserve. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-11-01

    The following report is the independent product of the Accident Investigation Committee which was commissioned by the Department of Energy following the accident on September 21, 1978, at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve site at West Hackberry, Louisiana. This Committee is charged with the task of determining the nature, extent, and causes of that accident, which resulted in loss of life, injury and property damage, and the need for corrective action. A nonburning oil spill went into nearby Black Lake, but was contained by the deployment of a series of oil spill containment booms and a prevailing wind from the northeast that kept the oil spill in a restricted area near shore. Because of the rapid and effective containment and cleanup of the oil spill by the Rapid Response Team, it appears very likely at this time that Black Lake will not sustain any permanent environmental damage. Cavern 6 initially contained approximately 7,000,000 barrels of oil at a pressure of 650 psig measured at the well head. As of September 29, 1978, the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Office - New Orleans (SPRO) estimated that oil expulsion from Cavern 6 was 67,510 barrels. Of this, 34,620 barrels of oil are accounted for, including 31,200 barrels of oil released into Black Lake and subsequently recovered. The remainder (32,890 barrels) was assumed by SPRO to have been burned. The total loss is presently estimated by the Accident Investigation Committee 's consultant to be $12 million. An assessment of the technical problems present at the time of the accident is given. Recommendations for improved safety procedures are included.

  1. Oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobbett, G.T.B.

    1907-07-08

    Crude petroleum having a density of 850 to 900 is purified with sulfuric acid, decanted, mixed with benzine or petrol, and again treated with sulfuric acid and decanted. The remaining acid and coloring-matter are removed by washing with water, or treating with oxalic acid, zinc carbonate, lead carbonate, calcium carbonate, or oxide of zinc. The product is used as a fuel for internal-combustion engines. Specifications No. 28,104, A.D. 1906, and No. 12,606, A.D. 1907, are referred to. According to the Provisional Specification, the process is applicable to shale or schist oil.

  2. Calculation of Estimated Ultimate Recovery for wells in continuous-type oil and gas accumulations of the Uinta-Piceance Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, T.

    2003-01-01

    The calculation of Estimated Ultimate Recovery (EUR) from oil and gas production data of individual wells and the development of EUR distributions from all producing wells in an assessment unit are important steps in the quantitative assessment of continuous-type hydrocarbon resources. The U.S. Geological Survey has developed a method of calculating EURs for wells in continuous-type accumulations, including coal-bed gas accumulations. The EUR distribution of producing wells is used as a guide for the estimation of an EUR distribution for potential wells in areas of undiscovered resources. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Antimicrobial activity of oregano oil against antibiotic-resistant Salmonella enterica on organic leafy greens at varying exposure times and storage temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore-Neibel, Katherine; Gerber, Colin; Patel, Jitendra; Friedman, Mendel; Jaroni, Divya; Ravishankar, Sadhana

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of oregano oil on four organic leafy greens (Iceberg and Romaine lettuces and mature and baby spinaches) inoculated with Salmonella Newport as a function of treatment exposure times as well as storage temperatures. Leaf samples were washed, dip inoculated with S. Newport (6-log CFU/ml) and dried. Oregano oil was prepared at 0.1, 0.3, and 0.5% concentrations in sterile phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Inoculated leaves were immersed in the treatment solution for 1 or 2 min, and individually incubated at 4 or 8 °C. Samples were taken at day 0, 1, and 3 for enumeration of survivors. The results showed that oregano oil was effective against S. Newport at all concentrations. S. Newport showed reductions from the PBS control of 0.7-4.8 log CFU/g (Romaine lettuce), 0.8-4.8 log CFU/g (Iceberg lettuce), 0.8-4.9 log CFU/g (mature spinach), and 0.5-4.7 log CFU/g (baby spinach), respectively. The antibacterial activity also increased with exposure time. Leaf samples treated for 2 min generally showed greater reductions (by 1.4-3.2 log CFU/g), than those samples treated for 1 min; however, there was minimal difference in antimicrobial activity among samples stored under refrigeration and abuse temperatures. This study demonstrates the potential of oregano oil to inactivate S. Newport on organic leafy greens. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Geological structure and temperature mode of the Mozambique oil and gas basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sal' man, G.B.

    1984-01-01

    The basin is made of sedimentary deposits of Cretaceous and Cenozoic age separated by a considerable space from the underlying basalts of the Stormberg series of Karru (upper Carboniferous-lower Jurassic). The thickness of the sedimentary mantle increases to the east and reaches 10,000-12,000 m on the shelf and in the delta trough of the Zambezi river. The average values of vertical geothermal gradient change from 1.47 to 2.72/sup 0/C/100 m, increasing with depth within the studied part of the section. Three complexes of deposits are isolated with different temperature mode. The upper encompasses the Cenozoic deposits and the upper Cretaceous (Grudhzha series). It extends to depth 1200-1800 m in the continental part of the basin and to 4000 m on the shelf in the delta of the Zambezi river. The middle complex within the dry land lies in the depth interval of 1800-5000 m and more, and includes the lower part of the Grudzha series, the upper and lower argillites of Domo, the Sena and Maputu series. The lower complex forms an independent temperature level. It includes volcanogenic-sedimentary formations of the Stormberg series. The temperature mode of this complex was studied only in some wells and at a slight depth. The lower complex is characterized by overall increase in temperatures as compared to the sedimentary complexes at the same depths. In a regional aspect, the highest temperatures are confined to the trough of the Zambezi river delta. Part of the basin encompassing almost all the regions on the dry land is heated somewhat less. Increase in temperature is confined to a continuation of the grabens in the East African groove system.

  5. High Temperature, High Pressure Equation of State: Solidification of Hydrocarbons and Measurement of Krytox Oil Using Rolling-Ball Viscometer Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamwo, Isaac K. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Burgess, Ward [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Tapriyal, Deepak [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States)

    2014-10-03

    The global consumption of oil and gas continues to rise and has led to the search and recovery of petroleum sources from reservoirs exhibiting increasingly high-temperature, high-pressure conditions. For example, ultra-deep petroleum formations found at depths of approximately 5 km or more, can exhibit pressure and temperature values as high as 240 MPa (35,000 psi) and 533 K (260°C). The hydrocarbons produced from these ultra-deep formations experience significant decreases in temperature and pressure from reservoir to platform conditions. Hence, it is highly desirable to develop accurate equation of state models (EOS) and fluid properties databases that covers the entire temperature and pressure ranges associated with this process to promote the efficient, safe, and environmentally responsible production from these reservoirs at extreme conditions. Currently available databases and EOS models are generally limited to approximately 69 MPa and do not correlate accurately when extrapolated to the extreme environments associated with ultra-deep reservoirs where temperatures can reach as high as 533 K and pressures up to 240 MPa. Despite recent exploration and production of petroleum from ultra-deep formations, there are major gaps in the databases for pure and mixture density and viscosity of hydrocarbons. These are the most important fluid properties that enable accurate booking of reserves as well as the design of size and equipment to safely bring these fluids to the platform. The overall objective of this project is to develop methodologies to provide crude oil thermodynamic and transport properties—including density, viscosity, and phase composition— at extreme temperature and pressure conditions. The knowledge of these crude oil properties reduces uncertainties associated with deep drilling and promotes safer and reliable access to domestic energy resources. This report is an extension of work reported in our first Technical Report Series (TRS) released

  6. Enhanced heavy oil recovery for carbonate reservoirs integrating cross-well seismic–a synthetic Wafra case study

    KAUST Repository

    Katterbauer, Klemens

    2015-07-14

    Heavy oil recovery has been a major focus in the oil and gas industry to counter the rapid depletion of conventional reservoirs. Various techniques for enhancing the recovery of heavy oil were developed and pilot-tested, with steam drive techniques proven in most circumstances to be successful and economically viable. The Wafra field in Saudi Arabia is at the forefront of utilizing steam recovery for carbonate heavy oil reservoirs in the Middle East. With growing injection volumes, tracking the steam evolution within the reservoir and characterizing the formation, especially in terms of its porosity and permeability heterogeneity, are key objectives for sound economic decisions and enhanced production forecasts. We have developed an integrated reservoir history matching framework using ensemble based techniques incorporating seismic data for enhancing reservoir characterization and improving history matches. Examining the performance on a synthetic field study of the Wafra field, we could demonstrate the improved characterization of the reservoir formation, determining more accurately the position of the steam chambers and obtaining more reliable forecasts of the reservoir’s recovery potential. History matching results are fairly robust even for noise levels up to 30%. The results demonstrate the potential of the integration of full-waveform seismic data for steam drive reservoir characterization and increased recovery efficiency.

  7. Salinity-dependent contact angle alteration in oil/brine/silicate systems : The effect of temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haagh, Martin E.J.; Schilderink, Nathalie; Duits, Michel H.G.; Siretanu, Igor; Mugele, Frieder; Collins, Ian R.

    2017-01-01

    To understand the success of low salinity water flooding in improving oil recovery, it is important to identify the molecular scale mechanisms that control the wettability and thus the adhesion between oil and rock. Previous experiments have attributed the wettability alteration in core flood

  8. Laboratory Study on the Potential EOR Use of HPAM/VES Hybrid in High-Temperature and High-Salinity Oil Reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Dingwei Zhu; Jichao Zhang; Yugui Han; Hongyan Wang; Yujun Feng

    2013-01-01

    Polymer flooding represents one of the most efficient processes to enhance oil recovery, and partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM) is a widely used oil-displacement agent, but its poor thermal stability, salt tolerance, and mechanical degradation impeded its use in high-temperature and high-salinity oil reservoirs. In this work, a novel viscoelastic surfactant, erucyl dimethyl amidobetaine (EDAB), with improved thermal stability and salinity tolerance, was complexed with HPAM to overcome...

  9. Optical properties of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in surface and pore waters adjacent to an oil well in a southern California salt marsh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Jennifer C; Clark, Catherine D; Keller, Jason K; De Bruyn, Warren J

    2017-01-15

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) optical properties were measured in surface and pore waters as a function of depth and distance from an oil well in a southern California salt marsh. Higher fluorescence and absorbances in pore vs. surface waters suggest soil pore water is a reservoir of CDOM in the marsh. Protein-like fluorophores in pore waters at distinct depths corresponded to variations in sulfate depletion and Fe(II) concentrations from anaerobic microbial activity. These variations were supported by fluorescence indexes and are consistent with differences in optical molecular weight and aromaticity indicators. Fluorescence indices were consistent with autochthonous material of aquatic origin in surface waters, with more terrestrial, humified allochthonous material in deeper pore waters. CDOM optical properties were consistent with significantly enhanced microbial activity in regions closest to the oil well, along with a three-dimensional excitation/emission matrix fluorescence spectrum peak attributable to oil, suggesting anaerobic microbial degradation of oil. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Temperature-Dependent Fumigant Toxicity of Some Essential Oils and Their Main Constituents Against Two-Spotted Spider Mite, Tetranychus urticae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumigant toxicity assays of 34 commercial essential oils were conducted on female adults and eggs of the two-spotted spider mite (TSM) at 3 temperatures (5, 15, 25 deg C). Common thyme and cinnamon oils resulted in > or = 90% mortality of adults at 5 and 10 uL/L air at 25 deg C. At 15 deg C, lemongr...

  11. Microbial water diversion technique-designed for near well treatment in low temperature sandstone reservoirs in the North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulsen, J.E.; Vatland, A. [RF-Rogaland Research, Stavanger (Norway); Sorheim, R. [SINTEF, Oslo (Norway)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    A Norwegian Research Program on Improved Oil Recovery (IOR) in North Sea reservoirs was launched in 1992. Microbial methods, applied in this context, is a part of this program. The scope, the methodological approach, and results from the three first years are presented. Water profile control, using biomass to block high permeable zones of a reservoir, has been investigated using nitrate-reducing bacteria in the injected sea water as plugging agents. Emphasis has been put on developing a process that does not have disadvantages secondary to the process itself, such as souring and impairment of the overall injectivity of the field. Data from continuous culture studies indicate that souring may successfully be mitigated by adding nitrite to the injected seawater. The morphology and size of generic-nitrate-reducing seawater bacteria have been investigated. Screening of growth-promoting nutrients has been carried out, and some sources were detected as favorable. Transport and penetration of bacteria in porous media have been given special attention. Investigations with sand packs, core models, and pore micromodels have been carried out. The inherent problems connected with permeability contrasts and flow patterns, versus bacterial behavior, are believed to be critical for the success of this technology. Data from the transport and blocking experiments with the porous matrices confirm this concern. The technology is primarily being developed for temperatures less than 40{degrees}C.

  12. Effect of temperature in hydrocracking of light cycle oil on a noble metal-supported catalyst for fuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, A.; Arandes, J.M.; Castano, P.; Olazar, M.; Bilbao, J. [Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV-EHU), Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Bilbao (Spain); Barona, A. [Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV-EHU), Escuela de Ingenieria, Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Medio Ambiente, Alda, Urkijo s/n, Bilbao (Spain)

    2012-04-15

    The effect of temperature has been studied in hydrocracking of light cycle oil (LCO), byproduct of fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC) units on a bifunctional catalyst (Pt-Pd/HY zeolite). The increase in both temperature and H{sub 2} partial pressure have an important attenuating effect on catalyst deactivation, given that they decrease sulfur equilibrium adsorption and enhance hydrocracking of coke precursors. Therefore, the catalyst maintains significant hydrodesulfurization and hydrocracking activity. As the temperature is increased, hydrocracking conversion and naphtha selectivity increase, although there is no significant dearomatization of the medium distillate fraction in the range of the studied experimental conditions. 400 C is the more suitable temperature for obtaining a high yield of naphtha with a high content of i-paraffins. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Improved photoluminescence characteristics of order-disorder AlGaInP quantum wells at room and elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Kunal; Deotare, Parag B.; Fitzgerald, Eugene A.

    2015-04-01

    A set of nominally undoped CuPt-B type ordered (AlxGa1-x)0.5In0.5P quantum-wells with disordered (Al0.7Ga0.3)0.5In0.5P barriers were grown and characterized using transmission electron microscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Such structures are potentially beneficial for light emitting devices due to the possibility of greater carrier confinement, reduced scattering into the indirect valleys, and band-offset adjustment beyond what is possible with strain and composition. Furthermore, the possibility of independently tuning the composition and the order-parameter of the quantum-well allows for the decoupling of the carrier confinement and the aluminum content and aids in the identification of carrier loss mechanisms. In this study, sharp order-disorder interfaces were achieved via the control of growth temperature between 650 °C and 750 °C using growth pauses. Improved high-temperature (400 K) photoluminescence intensity was obtained from quantum-wells with ordered Ga0.5In0.5P as compared to disordered Ga0.5In0.5P due to greater confinement. Additionally, in the ordered samples with a higher Al/Ga ratio to counter the band-gap reduction, the photoluminescence intensity at high temperature was as bright as that from conventional disordered heterostructures and had slightly improved wavelength stability. Room-temperature time-resolved luminescence measurements indicated a longer radiative lifetime in the ordered quantum-well with reduced scattering into the barrier. These results show that in samples of good material quality, the property controlling the luminescence intensity is the carrier confinement and not the presence of ordering or the aluminum content.

  14. Improved photoluminescence characteristics of order-disorder AlGaInP quantum wells at room and elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Kunal; Fitzgerald, Eugene A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Deotare, Parag B. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-04-06

    A set of nominally undoped CuPt-B type ordered (Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}){sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P quantum-wells with disordered (Al{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}){sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P barriers were grown and characterized using transmission electron microscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Such structures are potentially beneficial for light emitting devices due to the possibility of greater carrier confinement, reduced scattering into the indirect valleys, and band-offset adjustment beyond what is possible with strain and composition. Furthermore, the possibility of independently tuning the composition and the order-parameter of the quantum-well allows for the decoupling of the carrier confinement and the aluminum content and aids in the identification of carrier loss mechanisms. In this study, sharp order-disorder interfaces were achieved via the control of growth temperature between 650 °C and 750 °C using growth pauses. Improved high-temperature (400 K) photoluminescence intensity was obtained from quantum-wells with ordered Ga{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P as compared to disordered Ga{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P due to greater confinement. Additionally, in the ordered samples with a higher Al/Ga ratio to counter the band-gap reduction, the photoluminescence intensity at high temperature was as bright as that from conventional disordered heterostructures and had slightly improved wavelength stability. Room-temperature time-resolved luminescence measurements indicated a longer radiative lifetime in the ordered quantum-well with reduced scattering into the barrier. These results show that in samples of good material quality, the property controlling the luminescence intensity is the carrier confinement and not the presence of ordering or the aluminum content.

  15. A Computational Design of UHS Maraging Stainless Steels Incorporating Composition as well as Austenitisation and Ageing Temperatures as Optimisation Parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Wei; Rivera-Diaz-Del-Castillo, P.E. J.; van der Zwaag, Sybrand

    2009-01-01

    Abstract An extended integral alloy design approach for the development of new ultra high strength maraging steels is presented which incorporates not only chemical composition effects but also criteria accounting for the influence of the entire heat treatment. The approach accounts for the desired strengthening precipitates formed during the final ageing treatment as well as undesirable equilibrium phases present during the preceding high temperature homogenisation treatment. The...

  16. Light-trapping for room temperature Bose-Einstein condensation in InGaAs quantum wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudev, Pranai; Jiang, Jian-Hua; John, Sajeev

    2016-06-27

    We demonstrate the possibility of room-temperature, thermal equilibrium Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of exciton-polaritons in a multiple quantum well (QW) system composed of InGaAs quantum wells surrounded by InP barriers, allowing for the emission of light near telecommunication wavelengths. The QWs are embedded in a cavity consisting of double slanted pore (SP2) photonic crystals composed of InP. We consider exciton-polaritons that result from the strong coupling between the multiple quantum well excitons and photons in the lowest planar guided mode within the photonic band gap (PBG) of the photonic crystal cavity. The collective coupling of three QWs results in a vacuum Rabi splitting of 3% of the bare exciton recombination energy. Due to the full three-dimensional PBG exhibited by the SP2 photonic crystal (16% gap to mid-gap frequency ratio), the radiative decay of polaritons is eliminated in all directions. Due to the short exciton-phonon scattering time in InGaAs quantum wells of 0.5 ps and the exciton non-radiative decay time of 200 ps at room temperature, polaritons can achieve thermal equilibrium with the host lattice to form an equilibrium BEC. Using a SP2 photonic crystal with a lattice constant of a = 516 nm, a unit cell height of 2a=730nm and a pore radius of 0.305a = 157 nm, light in the lowest planar guided mode is strongly localized in the central slab layer. The central slab layer consists of 3 nm InGaAs quantum wells with 7 nm InP barriers, in which excitons have a recombination energy of 0.944 eV, a binding energy of 7 meV and a Bohr radius of aB = 10 nm. We take the exciton recombination energy to be detuned 35 meV above the lowest guided photonic mode so that an exciton-polariton has a photonic fraction of approximately 97% per QW. This increases the energy range of small-effective-mass photonlike states and increases the critical temperature for the onset of a Bose-Einstein condensate. With three quantum wells in the central slab layer

  17. Carrier trapping induced abnormal temperature dependent photoluminescence properties of novel sandwiched structure InGaN quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Juan; Li, Ding; Rajabi, K.; Yang, Wei; Hu, Xiaodong [State Key Laboratory for Artificial Microstructure and Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Liu, Lei [Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, CAS, Suzhou 215125 (China)

    2014-04-15

    A dual-wavelength LED sample with novel sandwiched structure in high-In-content MQWs is studied by temperature dependent photoluminescence (TDPL) and the abnormal temperature dependence of emission intensity is obtained. The novel MQWs structure which contains staggered quantum wells and an ultra-thin InN interlayer in the wells shows better luminescence property than the reference sample which has conventional quantum wells. Under 325 nm continuous wave laser excitation the LED sample of novel structure exhibits unexpected increasing luminescence intensity as temperature goes up from 140 K to 220 K and reaches its maximum at 220 K. This could be attributed to (1) the carrier redistribution and the novel sandwiched MQWs' high carrier trapping capability; (2) the intrinsic emission property of the MQWs enhanced by improvement of electron-hole overlap and reduction of quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE) and compositional fluctuation. TDPL under 405 nm laser excitation is also measured to support this view. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Low-temperature geothermal water in Utah: A compilation of data for thermal wells and springs through 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackett, R.E.

    1994-07-01

    The Geothermal Division of DOE initiated the Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources and Technology Transfer Program, following a special appropriation by Congress in 1991, to encourage wider use of lower-temperature geothermal resources through direct-use, geothermal heat-pump, and binary-cycle power conversion technologies. The Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT), the University of Utah Research Institute (UURI), and the Idaho Water Resources Research Institute organized the federally-funded program and enlisted the help of ten western states to carry out phase one. This first phase involves updating the inventory of thermal wells and springs with the help of the participating state agencies. The state resource teams inventory thermal wells and springs, and compile relevant information on each sources. OIT and UURI cooperatively administer the program. OIT provides overall contract management while UURI provides technical direction to the state teams. Phase one of the program focuses on replacing part of GEOTHERM by building a new database of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal systems for use on personal computers. For Utah, this involved (1) identifying sources of geothermal date, (2) designing a database structure, (3) entering the new date; (4) checking for errors, inconsistencies, and duplicate records; (5) organizing the data into reporting formats; and (6) generating a map (1:750,000 scale) of Utah showing the locations and record identification numbers of thermal wells and springs.

  19. Oil Well Bottom Hole Locations, This GIS data set was produced as a general reference for the Department of Natural Resources, the oil and gas industry, environmental and regulatory agencies, landowners, and the public., Published in 2007, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Louisiana State University (LSU).

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Oil Well Bottom Hole Locations dataset current as of 2007. This GIS data set was produced as a general reference for the Department of Natural Resources, the oil and...

  20. Influence of sliding surface roughness and oil temperature on piston ring pack operation of an automotive IC engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, A.

    2016-09-01

    In the paper a comprehensive model of a piston ring pack motion on an oil film has been presented. The local oil film thickness can be compared to height of the combined roughness of sliding surfaces of piston rings and cylinder liner. Equations describing the mixed lubrication problem based on the empirical mathematical model formulated in works of Patir, Cheng and Greenwood, Tripp have been combined and used in this paper. The developed model takes the following phenomena into account: hydrodynamic and contact forces, spring and gas forces acting on piston rings. The rings motion concerning low and high temperature of cylinder surface has been compared. These results concern cases of hydrodynamic and mixed lubrication. Changes of oil wetted area and contact zone of piston rings have been shown. In addition the oil film thickness distribution along cylinder liner and all the forces acting on piston rings have been analysed and discussed. The results have been presented in form of relevant diagrams. The developed model and software can be utilized for optimization of piston rings design.

  1. Ageing and Partial Discharge Patterns in Oil-Impregnated Paper and Pressboard Insulation at High Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    R. H. Khawaja; T. R. Blackburn; M. Rehan Arif

    2009-01-01

    The power transformer is the most expensive, indispensable and arguably the most important equipment item in a power system Insulation failure in transformers can cause long term interruption to supply and loss of revenue and the condition assessment of the insulation is thus an important maintenance procedure. Oil-impregnated transformer insulation consists of mainly organic materials including mineral oil and cellulose-base paper and pressboard. The operating life of cellulose-based insulat...

  2. Development and characterization of high collapse boron alloys heat treated pipes for oil wells; Tubos de aco TiB para aplicacao em revestimento de pocos de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Fabio A.; Silva, Ronaldo; Chad, Luis [Tenaris Confab, Pindamonhangaba SP (Brazil); Fritz, Marcelo C. [Tenaris Confab, Pindamonhangaba SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia do Produto

    2008-07-01

    The utilization of OCTG (Oil Country Tubular Goods) pipes will increase with the discovery of new oil wells in ultra deep waters. This study aims to evaluate the mechanical and microstructural performance of welded and heat treated pipes through quenching and tempering using a steel project based in titanium/boron for casing pipes. The objective of this development is to present a set of techniques used during the manufacturing of heated treated ERW pipes boron allowing, discussing mechanical and metallurgical aspects of the steel project, coil conformation, heat treatment and test procedures. The results are within the limits set by the API 5CT standard. It was found that the pipes obtained good geometry and uniformity of mechanical properties, showing that this product can be applied safely and reliability as wells' casing. (author)

  3. Artificial lifting supervision: successes solutions apply for 3.000 oil wells; Supervisao na elevacao artificial: uma solucao aplicada com sucesso em 3.000 pocos de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Rutacio O. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Souza, Rodrigo B. [RN TECNOLOGIA, Natal, RN (Brazil); Maitelli, Andre L. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The gathering of information in industrial automation is essential to maintain and control the industrial processes. In the automation of oil wells, each artificial elevation method has its own variables to be monitored. Thus, several automation companies have developed specific controllers with its own communication protocol and supervisory software. However, in an ideal case, all information about oil elevation should be available in one single application. The SISAL is a SCADA system able to collect processes data and deliver them to the users or other system, regardless of the technique used for artificial elevation, controllers and connecting devices to the wells. This paper is about the application, progress and results using this software in PETROBRAS. (author)

  4. Effects of temperature and moisture during semi-hermetic storage on the quality evaluation parameters of soybean grain and oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valmor Ziegler

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The soybean (Glycine max (L. Merrill is the most cultivated oilseed in the world, being of major importance in food, feed and biodiesel production. The quality of the product being marketed is directly influenced by storage techniques, and the grain moisture, temperature and storage time are primarily responsible for most of the amendments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of temperature and humidity during the semi-hermetic storage on chemical and technological parameters for assessing the quality of soybean. The kernels were stored for 12 months in semi-hermetic system with two combinations temperature (15 to 25 °C and humidity (12 and 16% and then evaluated for the occurrence of plagues, variations in humidity, levels of lipids and proteins, protein solubility, oil quality, carotenoids, color, enthalpy and thousand grain weight. The results showed that the increase in storage time leads to changes in chemical and technological parameters. The preservation of the parameters of acid oil and thousand grain weight was dependent reductions in moisture, while the incidence of pests, protein solubility, enthalpy, carotenoid levels and parameters of color preservation were preserved by reducing temperature.

  5. Effects of high temperature frying of Spinach leaves in sunflower oil on carotenoids, chlorophylls and tocopherol composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeb, Alam; Nisar, Parveen

    2017-03-01

    Spinach is one of the highly consumed vegetable, with significant nutritional and beneficial properties. This study revealed for the first time, the effects of high temperature frying on the carotenoids, chlorophylls and tocopherol contents of spinach leaves. Spinach leaves were thermally processed in the sunflower oil for 15, 30, 45 and 60 min at 250 °C. HPLC-DAD results revealed a total of eight carotenoids, four chlorophylls and α-tocopherol in the spinach leaves. Lutein, neoxanthin, violaxanthin and β-carotene-5,6-epoxide were the major carotenoids, while chlorophyll a and b' were present in higher amounts. Frying of spinach leaves increased significantly the amount of α-tocopherol, β-carotene-5,6-epoxide, luteoxanthin, lutein and its Z-isomers and chlorophyll b' isomer. There was a dose dependent decrease in the amounts of neoxanthin, violaxanthin, chlorophyll b, b' and chlorophyll a with increase of frying time. The increase of frying time increased the total phenolic contents in spinach leaves and fried sunflower oil samples. Chemical characteristics such as peroxide values, free fatty acids, conjugated dienes, conjugated trienes and radical scavenging activity were significantly affected by frying, while spinach leaves increased the stability of the frying oil. This study can be used to improve the quality of fried vegetable leaves or their products at high temperature frying in food industries for increasing consumer acceptability.

  6. Bio-oil and bio-char from low temperature pyrolysis of spent grains using activated alumina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, Aimaro; Li, Sujing; Linforth, Rob; Smart, Katherine A; Andrésen, John M

    2011-11-01

    The pyrolysis of wheat and barley spent grains resulting from bio-ethanol and beer production respectively was investigated at temperatures between 460 and 540 °C using an activated alumina bed. The results showed that the bio-oil yield and quality depend principally on the applied temperature where pyrolysis at 460 °C leaves a bio-oil with lower nitrogen content in comparison with the original spent grains and low oxygen content. The viscosity profile of the spent grains indicated that activated alumina could promote liquefaction and prevent charring of the structure between 400 and 460 °C. The biochar contains about 10-12% of original carbon and 13-20% of starting nitrogen resulting very attractive as a soil amendment and for carbon sequestration. Overall, value can be added to the spent grains opening a new market in bio-fuel production without the needs of external energy. The bio-oil from spent grains could meet about 9% of the renewable obligation in the UK. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. WHTSubmersible: a simulator for estimating transient circulation temperature in offshore wells with the semi-submersible platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xun-cheng; Liu, Yong-wang; Guan, Zhi-chuan

    2015-10-01

    Offshore wellbore temperature field is significant to drilling fluids program, equipment selection, evaluations on potential risks caused by casing thermal stress, etc. This paper mainly describes the theoretical basis, module structure and field verification of the simulator WHTSubmersible. This computer program is a useful tool for estimating transient temperature distribution of circulating drilling fluid on semi-submersible platform. WHTSubmersible is based on a mathematical model which is developed to consider radial and axial two-dimensional heat exchange of the inner drill pipe, the annulus, the drill pipe wall, the sea water and the formation in the process of drilling fluid circulation. The solution of the discrete equations is based on finite volume method with an implicit scheme. This scheme serves to demonstrate the numerical solution procedure. Besides, the simulator also considers the heating generated by drilling fluid circulation friction, drill bit penetrating rocks, friction between the drill column and the borehole wall, and the temperature effect on thermal physical properties and rheology of the drilling fluid. These measures ensure more accurate results. The simulator has been programmed as a dynamic link library using Visual C++, the routine interface is simple, which can be connected with other computer programs conveniently. The simulator is validated with an actual well temperature filed developed on a semi-submersible platform in South China, and the error is less than 5 %.

  8. Investigation of high-temperature, igneous-related hydraulic fracturing as a reservoir control in the Blackburn and Grant Canyon/Bacon Flat oil fields, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulen, J.B.

    1991-01-01

    Research in progress to evaluate natural, igenous-related hydrothermal fracturing as a reservoir control in two eastern Nevada oil fields has revealed evidence of a far more comprehensive role for moderate- to high-temperature hydrothermal systems in Basin-and-Range oil-reservoir evolution. Fluid-inclusion and petrographic studies have shown that (now) oil-bearing dolomite breccias of the Blackburn field (Pine Valley, Eureka County) were formed when overpressured, magmatically-heated, high-temperature (>350{degrees}C) hydrothermal brines explosively ruptured their host rocks; similar studies of texturally identical breccias of the Grant Canyon/Bacon Flat field (Railroad Valley, Nye County) so far do not support such an explosive origin. At Grant Canyon, however, hydrothermal, breccia-cementing quartz hosts primary oil, aqueous/oil, and aqueous fluid inclusions (homogenization temperature = 120{degrees}C) which document a direct geothermal connection for oil migration and entrapment. Moreover, at both Blackburn and Grant Canyon/Bacon Flat, the oil reservoirs are top- and side-sealed by hydrothermally altered Tertiary ignimbrites and epiclastic rocks. Contemporary geothermal activity is also apparent at grant Canyon/Bacon Flat, where subsurface water temperatures reach 171{degrees}C, and at Blackburn, above which a petroleum-providing hot spring issues at a temperature of 90{degrees}C. We suggest that in the Basin and Range province, hydrothermal systems may have: (1) matured oil from otherwise submature source rocks; (2) transported oil to ultimate entrapment sites by convection in moderate-to high-temperature fluids; and (3) sealed reservoir traps through hydrothermal alteration of overlying Tertiary caprocks. 69 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Oxidative stability and shelf-life evaluation of selected culinary oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochhar, S Parkash; Henry, C Jeya K

    2009-01-01

    Four out of eight 'healthier' oils-namely, almond oil, avocado oil, hazelnut oil and macadamia nut oil-studied were rich sources of monounsaturated fatty acids like olive oil. Grape seed oil, rice barn oil (marketed recently), toasted sesame oil and walnut oil contained high levels of essential fatty acids. The order of oxidative stability determined by Rancimat measuring of the induction period at four temperatures (90 degrees C, 100 degrees C, 110 degrees C, and 120 degrees C) was found to be macadamia oil > rice bran oil approximately toasted sesame oil > avocado oil > almond oil > hazelnut oil > grape seed oil > walnut oil. High-level monounsaturated fatty acid oils gave a linear relationship between 100 times the reciprocal of the induction period against the total unsaturated fatty acid content obtained as %C18:2 + 0.08 x C18:1 + 2.08 x %C18:3, while the polyunsaturated fatty acid oils gave an exponential relationship. In the case of rice bran and hazelnut oils, shelf-life prediction from the extrapolation of the Arrhenius plots and the Q(10) factors was compared well with that of storage time given by the oil producers. In the cases of the other oils (with an exception of macadamia nut oil), the predicted shelf-lives were significantly lower than that of the storage times; especially, walnut oil (very prone to oxidation) gave 15-20 times lower shelf-life than the best-before storage life.

  10. Optimization of stimulation and cleaning works with coiled tubing equipments in low productivity wells of the Zuata Field, Junin Block Orinoco oil belt, Venezuela

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, H.; Amaya, R.; Bernard, J. St. [PDVSA (Venezuela)

    2011-07-01

    The Zuata Field in the Orinoco oil belt, Venezuela, has important recoverable reserves but faces sand production and low reservoir pressures in many cases. Thus solid removal and cleaning are necessary and increase stimulation time and cost. The aim of this paper is to present a new technique for minimizing the rig time/cost. This new scheme of completion uses a cleaning technology with CCTU WellVac SandVac to clean the filling and remove formation damage from low pressure wells. Field tests were conducted in the Zuata Field on two wells operated by PDVSA. The new methodology proved successful in stimulating low pressure reservoirs and results showed that sediments were removed without significant loss of fluids, the CAPEX/OPEX per well was reduced and profitability in low and medium production wells increased. The methodology proposed herein was shown to be a good alternative for stimulating and cleaning low productivity wells.

  11. A Simplified Top-Oil Temperature Model for Transformers Based on the Pathway of Energy Transfer Concept and the Thermal-Electrical Analogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Hakirin Roslan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an alternative approach to determine the simplified top-oil temperature (TOT based on the pathway of energy transfer and thermal-electrical analogy concepts. The main contribution of this study is the redefinition of the nonlinear thermal resistance based on these concepts. An alternative approximation of convection coefficient, h, based on heat transfer theory was proposed which eliminated the requirement of viscosity. In addition, the lumped capacitance method was applied to the thermal-electrical analogy to derive the TOT thermal equivalent equation in differential form. The TOT thermal model was evaluated based on the measured TOT of seven transformers with either oil natural air natural (ONAN or oil natural air forced (ONAF cooling modes obtained from temperature rise tests. In addition, the performance of the TOT thermal model was tested on step-loading of a transformer with an ONAF cooling mode obtained from previous studies. A comparison between the TOT thermal model and the existing TOT Thermal-Electrical, Exponential (IEC 60076-7, and Clause 7 (IEEE C57.91-1995 models was also carried out. It was found that the measured TOT of seven transformers are well represented by the TOT thermal model where the highest maximum and root mean square (RMS errors are 6.66 °C and 2.76 °C, respectively. Based on the maximum and RMS errors, the TOT thermal model performs better than Exponential and Clause 7 models and it is comparable with the Thermal-Electrical 1 (TE1 and Thermal-Electrical 2 (TE2 models. The same pattern is found for the TOT thermal model under step-loading where the maximum and RMS errors are 5.77 °C and 2.02 °C.

  12. Biodegradation of dispersed oil in seawater is not inhibited by a commercial oil spill dispersant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakstad, Odd G; Ribicic, Deni; Winkler, Anika; Netzer, Roman

    2017-10-24

    Chemical dispersants are well-established as oil spill response tools. Several studies have emphasized their positive effects on oil biodegradation, but recent studies have claimed that dispersants may actually inhibit the oil biodegradation process. In this study, biodegradation of oil dispersions in natural seawater at low temperature (5°C) was compared, using oil without dispersant, and oil premixed with different concentrations of Slickgone NS, a widely used oil spill dispersant in Europe. Saturates (nC10-nC36 alkanes), naphthalenes and 2- to 5-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were biotransformed at comparable rates in all dispersions, both with and without dispersant. Microbial communities differed primarily between samples with or without oil, and they were not significantly affected by increasing dispersant concentrations. Our data therefore showed that a common oil spill dispersant did not inhibit biodegradation of oil at dispersant concentrations relevant for response operations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Low-threshold room-temperature AlGaAs/GaAs nanowire/single-quantum-well heterostructure laser

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Xin; Wei, Wei; Tang, Fengling; Wang, Xi; Li, Luying

    2017-01-01

    Near-infrared nanowire lasers are promising as ultrasmall, low-consumption light emitters in on-chip optical communications and computing systems. Here, we report on a room-temperature near-infrared nanolaser based on an AlGaAs/GaAs nanowire/single-quantum-well heterostructure grown by Au-catalyzed metal organic chemical vapor deposition. When subjects to pulsed optical excitation, the nanowire exhibits lasing, with a low threshold of 600 W/cm2, a narrow linewidth of 0.39 nm, and a high Q fac...

  14. Wellbore and soil thermal simulation for geothermal wells: development of computer model and acquisition of field temperature data. Part I report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooley, G.R.

    1980-03-01

    A downhole thermal simulator has been developed to improve understanding of the high downhole temperatures that affect many design factors in geothermal wells. This development is documented and field temperature data presented for flowing and shut-in conditions.

  15. Chitosan encapsulation of essential oil "cocktails" with well-defined binary Zn(II)-Schiff base species targeting antibacterial medicinal nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halevas, Eleftherios; Nday, Christiane M; Chatzigeorgiou, Evanthia; Varsamis, Vasileios; Eleftheriadou, Despoina; Jackson, Graham E; Litsardakis, Georgios; Lazari, Diamanto; Ypsilantis, Konstantinos; Salifoglou, Athanasios

    2017-11-01

    The advent of biodegradable nanomaterials with enhanced antibacterial activity stands as a challenge to the global research community. In an attempt to pursue the development of novel antibacterial medicinal nanotechnology, we herein a) synthesized ionic-gelated chitosan nanoparticles, b) compared and evaluated the antibacterial activity of essential oils extracted from nine different herbs (Greek origin) and their combinations with a well-defined antibacterial Zn(II)-Schiff base compound, and c) encapsulated the most effective hybrid combination of Zn(II)-essential oils inside the chitosan matrix, thereby targeting well-formulated nanoparticles of distinct biological impact. The empty and loaded chitosan nanoparticles were physicochemically characterized by FT-IR, Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), with the entrapment and drug release studies being conducted through UV-Visible and atomic absorption techniques. The antimicrobial properties of the novel hybrid materials were demonstrated against Gram positive (S. aureus, B. subtilis, and B. cereus) and Gram negative (E. coli and X. campestris) bacteria using modified agar diffusion methods. The collective physicochemical profile of the hybrid Zn(II)-essential oil cocktails, formulated so as to achieve optimal activity when loaded to chitosan nanoparticles, signifies the importance of design in the development of efficient nanomedicinal pharmaceuticals a) based on both natural products and biogenic metal ionic cofactors, and b) targeting bacterial infections and drug resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Reduction in the protein level and addition of oil in diets for finishing pugs under different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nair Elizabeth Barreto Rodrigues

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of reducing the crude protein (CP with the use of amino acids in diets with the same amount of calories anddifferent levels of soybean oil (SO for finishing pigs kept in two different ambient temperatures. A total of 120 barrows (initial weight of 68.0±1.9 kg were utilized for the experiment. The design was of randomized blocks in a 2 × 3 × 2 factorial arrangement (two levels of CP, 16.2 and 13.7%; three levels of SO, 1.5; 3.0 and 4.5%; and two ambient temperatures, 19 and 31 ºC, totaling twelve treatments with five replicates for thirty days. The heat reduced feed intake (FI of the animals, regardless of the levels of CP and SO used, and reduced weight gain (WG in diets with reduced CP and SO or higher SO. The increased level of CP and SO improved feed conversion (FC when the animals were kept in thermoneutral environment and given a diet with higher protein content. The reduction in CP increased FI only in the thermoneutral environment. In the heat, WG increased in diets with higher levels of SO, without influencing FC. The manipulation of diet and temperature did not affect most carcass traits. The SO reduced backfat thickness (BT only in diets with high CP and animals kept in thermoneutral environment. The reduction of CP increased the BT only in diets with high content of SO, both in hot and thermoneutral environments. Heat reduces FI and the inclusion of SO does not improve performance or carcass characteristics in these conditions. The reduction in CP improves WG only in diets with high oil content; however, it increases BT. In thermoneutral environment, increasing the SO is beneficial for performance and carcass characteristics, except when diets with reduced CP are used. The reduction in CP improves performance only in diets with low oil content.

  17. Sociological dimension in the handling habit and sanitary quality of hand-dug well water from oil-producing area of Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejechi, Eucharia O; Ejechi, Bernard O

    2007-11-01

    A previous report showed that the physical and sanitary quality of hand-dug wells from an oil-producing area of Nigeria was poor in spite of the presence of well protective features. The hypothesis that handling habits is associated with the well water quality was therefore, tested. A structured questionnaire with scales for measuring handling habits was administered to 60 female (>18 years) hand-dug well users/owners randomly selected from three towns in the oil-producing area. The respondents' wells were analysed for coliform bacteria. The findings showed that poor handling habits were the trend (habit score: Mean, 9.23 vs. 20 total available points). Handling habit indicated by scores, significantly negatively correlated (-0.89; P water, widespread skepticism of the potential hazards of non-drinking domestic uses (e.g., cooking, washing of plates, cups, cutleries etc.) was evident. Discontent with some aspects of science was indicated. It is concluded that there is need for social discourse and more public health campaign aimed at transforming skepticism to consent.

  18. Oil Shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdwell, Justin E.

    2017-01-01

    Oil shales are fine-grained sedimentary rocks formed in many different depositional environments (terrestrial, lacustrine, marine) containing large quantities of thermally immature organic matter in the forms of kerogen and bitumen. If defined from an economic standpoint, a rock containing a sufficient concentration of oil-prone kerogen to generate economic quantities of synthetic crude oil upon heating to high temperatures (350–600 °C) in the absence of oxygen (pyrolysis) can be considered an oil shale.

  19. Fatty acid composition of soybean/sunflower mix oil, fish oil and butterfat applying the AOCS Ce 1j-07 method with a modified temperature program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masson, L.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Gas-Liquid Chromatography (GLC methods such as AOAC Fat in foods 966.06 (2005, AOCS Official Methods Ce 1h-05 (2005, Ce 1j-07 (2007, allow for analyzing the fatty acids (FAs in dietary fats using highly polar liquid phase capillary columns. However, there are still difficulties in completely separating butiric acid from solvent, FA critical pairs with similar polarity, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA isomers, and long chainpolyunsaturated FAs (LC-PUFAs. Therefore, the selection of the temperature program to be employed is important. This work aimed to improve the AOCS Ce 1j-07 Method for the FA composition of a mixture of soybean and sunflower oil, fish oil, and butterfat, using a modified temperature program, tested among five laboratories. It takes more time, but it allows to completely separate butyric acid from the solvent, trans-18:1 from cis-18:1, 20:1 isomers from 18:3 n-3, 22:1 n-9 from 20:4 n-6, 20:5 n-3 from 24:0 and the main CLA isomers, thus permitting FA quantification in fats and oils for different purposes such as nutritional labeling, quality control and research.Métodos por cromatografía gas-líquido, AOAC 966.06 (2005, AOCS Ce 1h-05 (2005, Ce 1j-07 (2007 permiten determinar ácidos grasos (AG en matrices grasas usando columnas capilares altamente polares y distintos programas de temperatura. No obstante, aún existen dificultades para separar ácido butírico del solvente, pares críticos de AG con polaridades similares, isómeros del ácido linoleico conjugado (CLA, AG de cadena larga poliinsaturados (LC-PUFAs. El objetivo fue mejorar el Método AOCS Ce 1j-07 aplicándolo a la composición en AG de mezcla de aceite soja/girasol, aceite de pescado, mantequilla, usando un programa de temperatura modificado, entre cinco laboratorios. El programa de temperatura elegido, si bien emplea más tiempo, permite separar completamente ácido butírico del solvente, trans-18:1 de cis-18:1, isómeros 20:1 de 18:3 n-3, 22:1 n-9 de 20:4 n-6

  20. Experimental Study and Stabilization Mechanisms of Silica Nanoparticles Based Brine Mud with High Temperature Resistance for Horizontal Shale Gas Wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-yu Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies showed that silica nanoparticles based fresh water drilling muds had good thermal stability up to 160°C; however its performance at high salt concentration was rather poor. Therefore, high performance silica nanoparticles based brine mud (NPBMs with high temperature resistance for horizontal shale gas wells was proposed. Thermal stability tests from ambient temperature to 180°C, along with pressure transmission tests and rheology analysis, were performed to evaluate comprehensive properties of the NPBMs. Results show that the NPBMs embody excellent salt tolerance and thermal resistance for their rheological parameters did not suffer significant fluctuation. Fluid loss of the NPBM-1 (4% NaCl plus 3% KCl at 180°C was only 7.6 mL while the NPBM-2 (10% NaCl plus 3% KCl had a fluid loss of 6.6 mL at 150°C. Low water activity and good lubricity of the NPBMs were beneficial to improve wellbore stability and reduce friction resistance. Pressure transmission tests on the NPBM-1 show that it can mitigate or even prevent the transmission of drilling mud pressure into shale thus improving wellbore stability. Additionally, optimal rheological models for the NPBM-1 and the NPBM-2 were Herschel-Bulkley model and Power Law model separately.

  1. Room temperature continuous wave InGaAsN quantum well vertical cavity lasers emitting at 1.3 um

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHOQUETTE,KENT D.; KLEM,JOHN F.; FISCHER,ARTHUR J.; SPAHN,OLGA B.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.; FRITZ,IAN J.; KURTZ,STEVEN R.; BREILAND,WILLIAM G.; SIEG,ROBERT M.; GEIB,KENT M.; SCOTT,J.W.; NAONE,R.L.

    2000-06-05

    Selectively oxidized vertical cavity lasers emitting at 1294 nm using InGaAsN quantum wells are reported for the first time which operate continuous wave at and above room temperature. The lasers employ two n-type Al{sub 0.94}Ga{sub 0.06}As/GaAs distributed Bragg reflectors each with a selectively oxidized current aperture adjacent to the optical cavity, and the top output mirror contains a tunnel junction to inject holes into the active region. Continuous wave single mode lasing is observed up to 55 C. These lasers exhibit the longest wavelength reported to date for vertical cavity surface emitting lasers grown on GaAs substrates.

  2. Optimation Pressure Loss to Oil Production System with Electrical Submersible Pump (ESP) at the Well A SW Field Bojonegoro, East Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilmah, A. M.; Hendrajaya, L.

    2017-07-01

    Study about oil and gas well A and SW fields have been conducted in Bojonegoro area, East Java Province. From the research, it is known that one of the constrain in oil and gas production process is a pressure drop, so that is necessary to set Electrical Submersible Pump (ESP) as an artificial lift pump at low pressure wells. It is needed to analyze the production well pressure as an effort to optimize the fluid production. It is in describe to relations between IPR (Inflow Performance Relationship ) curve with TPR (Tubing Performance Relationship), are getting down point cut TPR curve with IPR curve, fluid rate its optimal, so need tubing’s diameter variation and the number of stage pump ESP variation to can the most optimal fluid rate. Produced that to tubing variation are 2,441 ID is 876,729 bpd, 2,991 is 961,197 bpd, 3,476 id is 996, 26 Bpd, while on the number of stage pump esp variation The most high is stage 400 with fluid rate 961,197 by comparison stage 338 it has value fluid rate 921,165 bpd, stage 200 it has fluid rate 827,889 bpd, and stage 169 has fluid rate 774,646 bpd. Of some variation tubing and stage pumps that has the most influence to fluid rate optimalize is the change number of stage pump.

  3. Diversity and Composition of Sulfate-Reducing Microbial Communities Based on Genomic DNA and RNA Transcription in Production Water of High Temperature and Corrosive Oil Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Xiao; Liu, Jin-Feng; Zhou, Lei; Mbadinga, Serge M.; Yang, Shi-Zhong; Gu, Ji-Dong; Mu, Bo-Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Deep subsurface petroleum reservoir ecosystems harbor a high diversity of microorganisms, and microbial influenced corrosion is a major problem for the petroleum industry. Here, we used high-throughput sequencing to explore the microbial communities based on genomic 16S rDNA and metabolically active 16S rRNA analyses of production water samples with different extents of corrosion from a high-temperature oil reservoir. Results showed that Desulfotignum and Roseovarius were the most abundant genera in both genomic and active bacterial communities of all the samples. Both genomic and active archaeal communities were mainly composed of Archaeoglobus and Methanolobus. Within both bacteria and archaea, the active and genomic communities were compositionally distinct from one another across the different oil wells (bacteria p = 0.002; archaea p = 0.01). In addition, the sulfate-reducing microorganisms (SRMs) were specifically assessed by Sanger sequencing of functional genes aprA and dsrA encoding the enzymes adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate reductase and dissimilatory sulfite reductase, respectively. Functional gene analysis indicated that potentially active Archaeoglobus, Desulfotignum, Desulfovibrio, and Thermodesulforhabdus were frequently detected, with Archaeoglobus as the most abundant and active sulfate-reducing group. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that the SRM communities in petroleum reservoir system were closely related to pH of the production water and sulfate concentration. This study highlights the importance of distinguishing the metabolically active microorganisms from the genomic community and extends our knowledge on the active SRM communities in corrosive petroleum reservoirs. PMID:28638372

  4. Diversity and Composition of Sulfate-Reducing Microbial Communities Based on Genomic DNA and RNA Transcription in Production Water of High Temperature and Corrosive Oil Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Xiao Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Deep subsurface petroleum reservoir ecosystems harbor a high diversity of microorganisms, and microbial influenced corrosion is a major problem for the petroleum industry. Here, we used high-throughput sequencing to explore the microbial communities based on genomic 16S rDNA and metabolically active 16S rRNA analyses of production water samples with different extents of corrosion from a high-temperature oil reservoir. Results showed that Desulfotignum and Roseovarius were the most abundant genera in both genomic and active bacterial communities of all the samples. Both genomic and active archaeal communities were mainly composed of Archaeoglobus and Methanolobus. Within both bacteria and archaea, the active and genomic communities were compositionally distinct from one another across the different oil wells (bacteria p = 0.002; archaea p = 0.01. In addition, the sulfate-reducing microorganisms (SRMs were specifically assessed by Sanger sequencing of functional genes aprA and dsrA encoding the enzymes adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate reductase and dissimilatory sulfite reductase, respectively. Functional gene analysis indicated that potentially active Archaeoglobus, Desulfotignum, Desulfovibrio, and Thermodesulforhabdus were frequently detected, with Archaeoglobus as the most abundant and active sulfate-reducing group. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that the SRM communities in petroleum reservoir system were closely related to pH of the production water and sulfate concentration. This study highlights the importance of distinguishing the metabolically active microorganisms from the genomic community and extends our knowledge on the active SRM communities in corrosive petroleum reservoirs.

  5. Properties of Palm Oil Fuel Ash (POFA) Geopolymer Mortar Cured at Ambient Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Olivia Monita; Mona Tambunan Lora; Saputra Edy

    2017-01-01

    Geopolymer material needs high temperature curing to produce good microstructure, high strength, and durable product. However, curing at ambient temperature is more preferable and practical in application for cast in situ geopolymer. In order to allow curing at ambient temperature, the geopolymer is mixed with mineral additives that has high calcium content such as slag, Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) and high calcium fly ash. In this study, the Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) was added in the...

  6. A new cement slurry modified with chitosan/alginate interpenetrating networks and hydroxyapatite: structural characteristics after long-term contact with hyper-saline produced water from oil well operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Ivory Marcos Gomes dos; Santos, Danilo Oliveira; Cestari, Antonio Reinaldo, E-mail: ivorymarcos@hotmail.com, E-mail: danilo.quimico@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: rcestari@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil). Departamento de Ciencia dos Materiais; Ribeiro, Joenesson Filip Santos, E-mail: joenesson.joe@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil). Lab, Materiais e Calorimetria; Alves, Jose do Patrocinio Hora; Ferreira, Angelica Baganha, E-mail: jphalves@uol.com.br, E-mail: angelica.bferreira@itps.se.gov.br [Instituto Tecnologico e de Pesquisas do Estado de Sergipe (ITPS), Aracaju, SE (Brazil)

    2017-01-15

    Oil is an important source of energy, mainly in developing countries. Important research has been conducted to find cementing procedures that guarantee safe and cost-effective oil exploration below pre-salt layers. This work aimed to make a new cement paste with cement, seawater, silica, biopolymers (chitosan and sodium alginate) and hydroxyapatite (HA), found in nature. For comparison purposes, slurry without additives was prepared and characterized. The HA used was extracted from fish scales (Cynoscion acoupa) in optimized condition NaOH concentration, temperature and reaction time. Both slurry were prepared with ratios water/cement (w/c) and silica/cement (s/c) equal to 0.50 and 0.35, respectively. The new cement slurry was obtained with proportions of 5% of each biopolymer and HA with respect to the total weight of the cement. In the immersion tests, specimens were immersed in samples of hyper production of saline water by 35°C for 15 days. Thereafter, they were washed, dried and its surface layers were scraped. Before, the resulting materials were characterized. The values of the ratios Ca/Si of new cement slurry (3.38 ± 0.06) were superior compared to standard (2.58 ± 0.05). The new slurry had high thermal stability and low amounts of small crystallite-type portlandite (35.70 nm). Conversely, a slurry standard formed larger crystals of about 50.3 nm. Significantly, after continuous long-term contact of both slurries with hyper-saline produced water from oil well fields operations, in comparison with standard slurry structural characteristics, the new slurry has practically maintained its pristine chemical structure, as well as has shown crystallite-type particles of NaCl and Friedel’s/Kuzel’s salts with lower proportion. The presence of the biopolymers and HA has driven the improved the self-healing properties observed in the new cement slurry. In this first study, the new slurry has shown adequate characteristics to contribute to cost effective and

  7. Salt mechanical behavior numeric simulation in oil wells; Simulacao numerica do comportamento mecanico do sal em pocos de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gravina, Carlos Cabral

    1997-10-01

    Drilling incidents such as stuck pipe and collapsed casing string take place when when some type of salt formations are drilled because of the high pronounced plastic behavior of the salt and the creep behavior as a function of this type of rock. The creep behavior becomes faster and more severe if temperature an/or pressure acting on the salt go up. The deeper the salt is found, the earlier and more intense the troubles caused by salt creep will be evidence. (author)

  8. Hot Spot Temperature and Grey Target Theory-Based Dynamic Modelling for Reliability Assessment of Transformer Oil-Paper Insulation Systems: A Practical Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lefeng Cheng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a novel dynamic correction method for the reliability assessment of large oil-immersed power transformers. First, with the transformer oil-paper insulation system (TOPIS as the target of evaluation and the winding hot spot temperature (HST as the core point, an HST-based static ageing failure model is built according to the Weibull distribution and Arrhenius reaction law, in order to describe the transformer ageing process and calculate the winding HST for obtaining the failure rate and life expectancy of TOPIS. A grey target theory based dynamic correction model is then developed, combined with the data of Dissolved Gas Analysis (DGA in power transformer oil, in order to dynamically modify the life expectancy calculated by the built static model, such that the corresponding relationship between the state grade and life expectancy correction coefficient of TOPIS can be built. Furthermore, the life expectancy loss recovery factor is introduced to correct the life expectancy of TOPIS again. Lastly, a practical case study of an operating transformer has been undertaken, in which the failure rate curve after introducing dynamic corrections can be obtained for the reliability assessment of this transformer. The curve shows a better ability of tracking the actual reliability level of transformer, thus verifying the validity of the proposed method and providing a new way for transformer reliability assessment. This contribution presents a novel model for the reliability assessment of TOPIS, in which the DGA data, as a source of information for the dynamic correction, is processed based on the grey target theory, thus the internal faults of power transformer can be diagnosed accurately as well as its life expectancy updated in time, ensuring that the dynamic assessment values can commendably track and reflect the actual operation state of the power transformers.

  9. Long-term modelling of fly ash and radionuclide emissions as well as deposition fluxes due to the operation of large oil shale-fired power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaasma, Taavi; Kaasik, Marko; Loosaar, Jüri; Kiisk, Madis; Tkaczyk, Alan H

    2017-11-01

    Two of the world's largest oil shale-fired power plants (PPs) in Estonia have been operational over 40 years, emitting various pollutants, such as fly ash, SOx, NOx, heavy metals, volatile organic compounds as well as radionuclides to the environment. The emissions from these PPs have varied significantly during this period, with the maximum during the 1970s and 1980s. The oil shale burned in the PPs contains naturally occurring radionuclides from the (238)U and (232)Th decay series as well as (40)K. These radionuclides become enriched in fly ash fractions (up to 10 times), especially in the fine fly ash escaping the purification system. Using a validated Gaussian-plume model, atmospheric dispersion modelling was carried out to determine the quantity and a real magnitude of fly ash and radionuclide deposition fluxes during different decades. The maximum deposition fluxes of volatile radionuclides ((210)Pb and (210)Po) were around 70 mBq m(-2) d(-1) nearby the PPs during 1970s and 1980s. Due to the reduction of burned oil shale and significant renovations done on the PPs, the deposition fluxes were reduced to 10 mBq m(-2) d(-1) in the 2000s and down to 1.5 mBq m(-2) d(-1) in 2015. The maximum deposition occurs within couple of kilometers of the PPs, but the impacted area extends to over 50 km from the sources. For many radionuclides, including (210)Po, the PPs have been larger contributors of radionuclides to the environment via atmospheric pathway than natural sources. This is the first time that the emissions and deposition fluxes of radionuclides from the PPs have been quantified, providing the information about their radionuclide deposition load on the surrounding environment during various time periods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Studi Eksperimental Pengaruh Variasi Temperatur dan Debit Thermal Oil Sebagai Heater Generator Terhadap Performansi Mesin Pendingin Difusi Absorpsi R22-DMF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Aryanto

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sistem pendingin saat ini sudah menjadi salah satu kebutuhan yang sangat penting untuk menunjang berbagai aktifitas manusia. Salah satu teknologi pendinginan yang ada saat ini adalah sistem refrijerasi difusi absorpsi atau DAR (Diffusion Absorption Refrigeration. Sistem ini menggunakan generator untuk menjalankan sistemnya sebagai pengganti kompresor pada sistem kompresi uap. Pada penelitian ini digunakan thermal oil yang dipanaskan dengan menggunakan electric heater sebagai sumber panas pada generator.  Fluida kerja yang digunakan dalam sistem adalah pasangan refrijeran-absorben R22-DMF (Dimethylformamide dengan konsentrasi massa 60%-40% serta gas hidrogen sebagai gas inert. Pengujian sistem dilakukan dengan mengkombinasikan 3 variasi debit thermal oil yang masuk ke generator yaitu sebesar 6 liter/jam, 8 liter/jam dan 10 liter/jam dengan 3 variasi temperatur thermal oil sebesar 90ºC, 110 ºC dan 130 ºC. Hasil unjuk kerja terbaik dari sistem difusi absorpsi ini yaitu nilai COP terbesar 0.612 didapatkan pada temperatur thermal oil sebesar 130ºC dengan debit thermal oil sebesar 8 liter/jam. Untuk nilai kapasitas pendinginan terbesar diperoleh sebesar 139,1 watt, laju perpindahan panas pada generator ( 233 watt, laju perpindahan panas pada kondensor 143 watt, laju alir massa refrijeran 0.000721 kg/s serta efisiensi generator 0,233 yang didapatkan pada temperatur thermal oil sebesar 130ºC dan debit 6 liter/jam.

  11. Influence of Stratigraphic Conditions on the Deformation Characteristics of Oil/Gas Wells Piercing Longwall Pillars and Mining Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun Liang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocarbon wells drilled vertically through longwall coal pillars are vulnerable to severe deformation and potential failure as a result of underground coal mining. The lithology of the host rocks play a critical role in well stability. In this study, a two dimensional finite element method is employed to investigate the horizontal shear offset, vertical delamination, and compression at the weak interface between neighboring soft and stiff layers after the sequential extraction of longwall panels flanking the protective coal pillar. The influence of stratigraphic conditions, including the single rock layer thickness (SRLT, seam mining height (SMH, and seam dip angle (SDA, on deformation of hydrocarbon wells is explored. An optimization of mining sequence along strike and for panel advance direction along dip is also performed. Finally, some recommendations regarding coal mining and peripheral support measures are suggested.

  12. Determination of oil well production performance using artificial neural network (ANN linked to the particle swarm optimization (PSO tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Ahmadi

    2015-06-01

    In this work, novel and rigorous methods based on two different types of intelligent approaches including the artificial neural network (ANN linked to the particle swarm optimization (PSO tool are developed to precisely forecast the productivity of horizontal wells under pseudo-steady-state conditions. It was found that there is very good match between the modeling output and the real data taken from the literature, so that a very low average absolute error percentage is attained (e.g., <0.82%. The developed techniques can be also incorporated in the numerical reservoir simulation packages for the purpose of accuracy improvement as well as better parametric sensitivity analysis.

  13. Relationship between Mood Change, Odour and Its Physiological Effects in Humans While Inhaling the Fragrances of Essential Oils as well as Linalool and Its Enantiomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomi Matumura

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Humans can detect and discriminate a vast number of odours. The number perceived as distinguishable is estimated to be more than ten thousand. Humans are capable of distinguishing even slight alterations in the structure of an odorous molecule. A pair of enantiomers of an odorant, which possess the same molecular structures except for the chiral position, can trigger profoundly different odour perceptions. How precisely can humans and their olfactory system detect and discriminate such a great variety of odours and such subtle differences in the molecular structures? In a series of studies, we have attempted to examine the relationship between mood change, odour and its physiological effects, by focusing on the possible verbal and non-verbal changes in humans induced by smelling the fragrances of essential oils as well as linalool and its enantiometric isomers. In this article, we provide an overview of our recent verbal and non-verbal studies. We then discuss how our findings may contribute to the assessment of psychophysiological responses of essential oils as well as how our research can contribute to the study of human chemoreception science, by shedding light on the sophistication of the olfactory system in its ability to detect and discriminate odors.

  14. Design and development of a low-temperature reactor system for biorefining waste oil

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Hans Olav

    2017-01-01

    The background for this master’s thesis is the focus on bioenergy and biofuels at NMBU. This has, among others, resulted in a prototype of a small-scale biorefinery, which uses methanol and waste cooking oil to produce biodiesel. The purpose of this thesis is to develop a reactor system that serves as a platform for reactors to operate on and a technological alternative for a periodically on-site clean of catalysts. The purpose of the catalysts wash is to extend their lifetime, in order to ma...

  15. 75 FR 68817 - BOEMRE Information Collection Activity: 1010-0067, Oil and Gas Well-Completion Operations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-09

    ... responses......... 560 Record Records 506 Record dates and times of \\1/2\\ 647 completions x 4 1,294 well-completion operations meetings = 2,588. safety meetings. 511 Record results of weekly 1 647 completions x 2 1... \\1/2\\ 54 recordings......... 27 BOP test in driller's report. 516(i) Record time, date, and 5 647...

  16. Effect of temperature on methanogenesis stage of two-stage anaerobic digestion of palm oil mill effluent (POME) into biogas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trisakti, B.; Irvan, Mahdalena; Taslim; Turmuzi, M.

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of temperature on methanogenesis stage of conversion of palm oil mill effluent into biogas. Methanogenesis is the second stage of methanogenic anaerobic digestion. Improved performance of the methanogenesis process was determined by measuring the growth of microorganisms, degradation of organic materials, biogas production and composition. Initially, the suitable loading up was determined by varying the HRT 100, 40, 6, and 4.0 days in the continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with mixing rate 100 rpm, pH 6.7-7.5 at room temperature. Next, effect of temperature on the process was determined by varying temperature at mesophilic range (30-42°C) and thermophilic range (43-55°C). Analysis of total solids (TS), volatile solids (VS), total suspended solids (TSS), volatile suspended solids (VSS), and chemical oxygen demand (COD) were conducted in order to study the growth of microorganisms and their abilities in converting organic compound to produce biogas. Degradation of organic content i.e. VS decomposition and COD removal increased with the increasing of temperature. At mesophilic range, VS decomposition and COD removal were 51.56 ± 8.30 and 79.82 ± 6.03, respectively. Meanwhile at thermopilic range, VS decomposition and COD removal were 67.44 ± 3.59 and 79.16 ± 1.75, respectively. Biogas production and its methane content also increased with the increasing of temperature, but CO2 content also increased. Biogas production at mesophilic range was 31.77 ± 3.46 L/kg-ΔVS and methane content was 75 . Meanwhile, biogas production at thermopilic range was 37.03 ± 5.16 L/kg-ΔVS and methane content was 62.25 ± 5.50 .

  17. A comparison of burial, maturity and temperature histories of selected wells from sedimentary basins in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelskamp, S.; David, P.; Littke, R.

    2008-01-01

    Sedimentary basins in The Netherlands contain significant amounts of hydrocarbon resources, which developed in response to temperature and pressure history during Mesozoic and Cenozoic times. Quantification and modelling of burial, maturity and temperature histories are the major goals of this

  18. A Review of the Evaluation, Control, and Application Technologies for Drill String Vibrations and Shocks in Oil and Gas Well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangjian Dong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Drill string vibrations and shocks (V&S can limit the optimization of drilling performance, which is a key problem for trajectory optimizing, wellbore design, increasing drill tools life, rate of penetration, and intelligent drilling. The directional wells and other special trajectory drilling technologies are often used in deep water, deep well, hard rock, and brittle shale formations. In drilling these complex wells, the cost caused by V&S increases. According to past theories, indoor experiments, and field studies, the relations among ten kinds of V&S, which contain basic forms, response frequency, and amplitude, are summarized and discussed. Two evaluation methods are compared systematically, such as theoretical and measurement methods. Typical vibration measurement tools are investigated and discussed. The control technologies for drill string V&S are divided into passive control, active control, and semiactive control. Key methods for and critical equipment of three control types are compared. Based on the past development, a controlling program of drill string V&S is devised. Application technologies of the drill string V&S are discussed, such as improving the rate of penetration, controlling borehole trajectory, finding source of seismic while drilling, and reducing the friction of drill string. Related discussions and recommendations for evaluating, controlling, and applying the drill string V&S are made.

  19. Combined Effect of Pressure and Temperature on the Viscous Behaviour of All-Oil Drilling Fluids

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hermoso, J; Martínez-Boza, F; Gallegos, C

    2014-01-01

    .... Drilling fluid viscous flow characterization was performed with a controlled-stress rheometer, using both conventional coaxial cylinder and non-conventional geometries for High Pressure/High Temperature (HPHT) measurements...

  20. Oil biodegradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahsepar, Shokouhalsadat; Langenhoff, Alette A.M.; Smit, Martijn P.J.; Eenennaam, van Justine S.; Murk, Tinka; Rijnaarts, Huub H.M.

    2017-01-01

    During the Deepwater Horizon (DwH) oil spill, interactions between oil, clay particles and marine snow lead to the formation of aggregates. Interactions between these components play an important, but yet not well understood, role in biodegradation of oil in the ocean water. The aim of this study

  1. Research on the static experiment of super heavy crude oil demulsification and dehydration using ultrasonic wave and audible sound wave at high temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenjun; Gu, Simin; Zhou, Long

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, the static experiment of super heavy crude oil demulsification and dehydration using ultrasonic irradiation at high temperatures is carried out. How the all factors, such as ultrasonic frequency, sound intensity, ultrasonic power, ultrasonic treatment time, sedimentation time, temperature and water ratio, affect ultrasonic crude oil demulsification and dehydration are summarized though this experiment. In addition, recent progress on ultrasonic demulsification equipment in China are reviewed. The purpose of this paper is to provide equipment and technical support for the extensive application of the technique of ultrasonic demulsification and dehydration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Fish oil extracted from fish-fillet by-products is weakly linked to the extraction temperatures but strongly linked to the omega-3 content of the raw material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honold, Philipp; Nouard, Marie-Louise; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    was to investigate whether different extraction temperatures (70 and 90°C) during production of crude fish oil from two fractions (HBT and intestines) separately or together affected the quality of the oil. The quality of the oil was measured by determination of peroxide value, anisidine value, volatile oxidation...

  3. Performance analysis of progressive cavity pumps in oil wells with high BSW (Basic Sediment Water); Analise do desempenho de elastometros do bombeio de cavidades progressivas em pocos de petroleo com elavado BSW (Basic Sediment Water)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Cindi Alves; Santos, Joao Paulo Lobo dos; Lobato, Ana Katerine de Carvalho Lima; Santos, Luiz Carlos Lobato dos [Universidade Federal da Bahia, BA (Brazil); Duarte, Lindemberg de Jesus Nogueira [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, RN (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    One of the most important equipment in the progressing cavity pump (PCP) is the subsurface pump, which comprises a rotor and a stator covered internally by an elastomer. This is responsible for sealing the pump and, consequently, for elevating the fluids. In fact, this polymer is used because of the ability to generate pressure in the pump by the seals formed between the cavities. In order to guarantee that the elastomer will have a good performance in the PCP system certain requirements need to be checked, such as: stress, elongation, hardness, resilience, permeability and adhesion. The fluids and solids handled by the PCP system, allied to high temperatures can cause premature wear in the elastomers. The most common reactions which are also observed in most of the wells are swelling, shrinkage, softening, hardening and explosive decompression. In this sense, the aim of this work is to study some elastomers which were chosen based on compatibility tests conducted by a major oil company. The problems that occurred in the wells will be analyzed in order to verify whether the choice of the elastomer had some influence on system failure. For this purpose, the intervention reports, efficiency tests and failure analysis reports will be used. At the end of this work, it was possible to diagnose the causes, consequences and solutions to inherent problems at various oil wells in a field that is in an advanced stage of recovery. Finally, it was concluded that simple changes in the process of compatibility analysis would help to increase the reliability level of the tests, especially the problems observed during the PCP operation in hostile environments. (author)

  4. Experimental Studies on the Synthesis and Performance of Boron-containing High Temperature Resistant Resin Modified by Hydroxylated Tung Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J. X.; Y Ren, Z.; Zheng, G.; Wang, H. F.; Jiang, L.; Fu, Y.; Yang, W. Q.; He, H. H.

    2017-12-01

    In this work, hydroxylated tung oil (HTO) modified high temperature resistant resin containing boron and benzoxazine was synthesized. HTO and ethylenediamine was used to toughen the boron phenolic resin with specific reaction. The structure of product was studied by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy(FTIR), and the heat resistance was tested by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric Analysis(TGA). The results indicated that the conjugated triene structure of HTO was involved in the crosslinking of the heating curing progress, and in addition, the open-loop polymerization reaction of benzoxazine resin during heating can effectively reduce the curing temperature of the resin and reduce the release of small molecule volatiles, which is advantageous to follow-up processing. DSC data showed that the initial decomposition temperature of the resin is 350-400 °C, the carbon residue rate under 800 °C was 65%. It indicated that the resin has better heat resistance than normal boron phenolic resin. The resin can be used as an excellent ablative material and anti-friction material and has a huge application market in many fields.

  5. Water and clay based drilling fluids for oil wells; Fluidos hidroargilosos para perfuracao de pocos de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, R.C.A. de; Amorim, L.V.; Santana, L.N. de L. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil)], e-mail: nalealves@hotmail.com

    2008-07-01

    In the onshore drilling of wells are commonly used aqueous fluids containing bentonite clays. However, to perform their functions generally there is the necessity of additives to drilling fluids, like viscositying, filtered reducer and lubricant. Thus, this work aims to develop water and clay base drilling fluids with low solid text, and with polymeric and lubricants additives. Were studied a sample of industrialized sodium bentonite clays, three polymeric compounds in the ternary form and a sample of lubricant, in different concentrations. Were determined the flow curves, the apparent and plastic viscosities, the yield limit and gel force in Fann 35A viscometer, the filtered volume in API filter-press and the lubricity coefficient in Ofite lubricimeter. The results showed that the fluid had pseudoplastic behavior, the polymeric additives adjusts their rheological properties and filtration and the addition of 1% of lubricant is sufficient to improve the lubricity of fluids. (author)

  6. Kinetics of coffee industrial residue pyrolysis using distributed activation energy model and components separation of bio-oil by sequencing temperature-raising pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nanwei; Ren, Jie; Ye, Ziwei; Xu, Qizhi; Liu, Jingyong; Sun, Shuiyu

    2016-12-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the kinetics of coffee industrial residue (CIR) pyrolysis, the effect of pyrolysis factors on yield of bio-oil component and components separation of bio-oil. The kinetics of CIR pyrolysis was analyzed using distributed activation energy model (DAEM), based on the experiments in thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA), and it indicated that the average of activation energy (E) is 187.86kJ·mol-1. The bio-oils were prepared from CIR pyrolysis in vacuum tube furnace, and its components were determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Among pyrolysis factors, pyrolysis temperature is the most influential factor on components yield of bio-oil, directly concerned with the volatilization and yield of components (palmitic acid, linoleic acid, oleic acid, octadecanoic acid and caffeine). Furthermore, a new method (sequencing temperature-raising pyrolysis) was put forward and applied to the components separation of bio-oil. Based on experiments, a solution of components separation of bio-oil was come out. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluations of Radionuclides of Uranium, Thorium, and Radium Associated with Produced Fluids, Precipitates, and Sludges from Oil, Gas, and Oilfield Brine Injection Wells in Mississippi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ericksen, R.L.

    1999-10-28

    There is an unsurpassed lack of scientific data with respect to the concentrations and isotopic compositions of uranium, thorium, and radium in the produced formation fluids (brine), precipitates, and sludges generated with the operation of oil and gas wells in Mississippi. These radioactive elements when contained in the formation fluids have been given the term NORM, which is an acronym for naturally occurring radioactive materials. When they are technologically enhanced during oil and gas production activities resulting in the formation of scale (precipitates) and sludges they are termed TENORM (technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials). As used in this document, NORM and TENORM will be considered equivalent terms and the occurrence of NORM in the oilfield will be considered the result of production operations. As a result of the lack of data no scientifically sound theses may be developed concerning the presence of these radionuclides in the fluid brine, precipitate (scale), or sludge phases. Over the period of just one year, 1997 for example, Mississippi produced over 39,372,963,584 liters (10,402,368,186 gallons or 247,675,433 barrels) of formation water associated with hydrocarbon production from 41 counties across the state.

  8. Influence of High Temperature and Duration of Heating on the Sunflower Seed Oil Properties for Food Use and Bio-diesel Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuffrè, Angelo Maria; Capocasale, Marco; Zappia, Clotilde; Poiana, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Two important problems for the food industry are oil oxidation and oil waste after frying. Sunflower seed oil is one of the vegetable oils most commonly used in the food industry. Two variables were applied to the low oleic sunflower seed oil in this work i.e. heating temperature (180-210-240°C) and time of heating (15-30-60-120 minutes), to study from the edible point of view the variations of its physico-chemical properties. After 120 minutes heating at 240°C the following was found: refractive index (1.476), free acidity (0.35%), K232 (2.87), K270 (3.71), antiradical activity (45.90% inhibition), total phenols (523 mg kg(-1)), peroxide value (17.00 meq kg(-1)), p-anisidine value (256.8) and Totox (271.7), all of which showed a constant deterioration. In relation to the use as a feedstock for bio-diesel production, after 120 minutes heating at 240℃ the following was found: acid value 0.70 mg KOH g(-1) oil, iodine value 117.83 g I2 100 g(-1) oil, oil stability index 0.67 h, kinematic viscosity (at 40°C) 77.85 mm(2) s(-1), higher heating value 39.86 MJ kg(-1), density 933.34 kg/m(3) and cetane number 67.04. The parameters studied in this work were influenced, in different ways, by the applied variables. Heating temperature between 180 and 210°C and 120 min heating duration were found to be the most appropriate conditions for sunflower seed oil both from the deep frying point of view and from a subsequent use as feedstock for bio-diesel production. In light of the vegetable oils' International standards for an edible use and for a bio-diesel production, findings of this work can be used to set heating temperature and heating duration to preserve as long possible the physico-chemical properties of a low oleic sunflower seed oil for both its edible use as a fat during cooking and for its re-use after frying.

  9. Temperature Increase Negatively Affects the Fatty Acid Bioconversion Capacity of Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Fed a Linseed Oil-Based Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellery, Julie; Geay, Florian; Tocher, Douglas R.; Kestemont, Patrick; Debier, Cathy; Rollin, Xavier; Larondelle, Yvan

    2016-01-01

    Aquaculture is meant to provide fish rich in omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LC-PUFA). This objective must be reached despite (1) the necessity to replace the finite and limited fish oil in feed production and (2) the increased temperature of the supply water induced by the global warming. The objective of the present paper was to determine to what extent increased water temperature influences the fatty acid bioconversion capacity of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed a plant-derived diet. Fish were fed two diets formulated with fish oil (FO) or linseed oil (LO) as only added lipid source at the optimal water temperature of 15°C or at the increased water temperature of 19°C for 60 days. We observed that a temperature increase close to the upper limit of the species temperature tolerance range negatively affected the feed efficiency of rainbow trout fed LO despite a higher feed intake. The negative impact of increased water temperature on fatty acid bioconversion capacity appeared also to be quite clear considering the reduced expression of fatty acid desaturase 2 in liver and intestine and the reduced Δ6 desaturase enzymatic activity in intestinal microsomes. The present results also highlighted a negative impact of increased temperature on the apparent in vivo enzymatic activity of Δ5 and Δ6 desaturases of fish fed LO. Interestingly, this last parameter appeared less affected than those mentioned above. This study highlights that the increased temperature that rainbow trout may face due to global warming could reduce their fatty acid bioconversion capacity. The unavoidable replacement of finite fish oil by more sustainable, readily available and economically viable alternative lipid sources in aquaculture feeds should take this undeniable environmental issue on aquaculture productivity into account. PMID:27736913

  10. Depositional environments signatures, maturity and source weathering of Niger Delta sediments from an oil well in southeastern Delta State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Oluwaseun Oni

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Attempts have been made to classify the sediment on their degree of maturity. Compositional maturity is a reflection of intensity of weathering and a function of labile grains, unstable/stable rock fragments and stable quartz arenites. The main aim of this study is to investigate maturity and area of deposition and attempt to shed light on source area paleo-weathering conditions. Twenty one samples of shales and sandstones units were collected from a depth precisely between 1160 to 11,480m at a well in western Niger Delta, grinded, pulverized and sieved with less than 75μm. About 10g was packed and sent to Acme analytical Laboratory LTD., Vancouver, Canada. From the results, various plots and indexes inferring maturity and area of deposition were utilized. Using the A-K-F ternary plots of Englund and Jørgensen (1973, the depositional environment is transition zone. The silicate weathering indexes CIA, CIW and PIA values ranges from 45-65, on average indicates low to moderate weathering in the source area with extreme weathering of some sand fraction. Various calculated values of the weathering indices: Chemical Index of Alteration (CIA, Plagioclase Index of Alteration (PIA, Chemical Index of Weathering (CIW and scatter plots of formulated ratios of Al/Na, K/Na, and Rb/K vs chemical index of alteration (CIA were plotted. The moderate values below average suggest low to moderate weathering conditions in the source area or during transportation. This also inferred their recycling processes are insignificant. The clay content is low and feldspars are averagely high implying immaturity. The calculated ZTR index for the sand ranges from 36.4-75.0 from with an average mode of 55.5% implying almost all contain mineralogically immature sediments. The calculated Zircon- Tourmaline-Rutile (ZTR index shows that majority of the sample depths have >43% ZTR index but below 75% which corresponds to generally immature sediments.

  11. Novel high glass temperature sugar-based epoxy resins: Characterization and comparison to mineral oil-based aliphatic and aromatic resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Niedermann

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Curing and rheological behaviour, glass transition temperature, mechanical and thermal properties of two newly synthesized glucopyranoside- (GPTE and glucofuranoside- (GFTE based renewable epoxy resin (EP components were investigated and compared to aromatic and aliphatic EPs. The glucose-based EPs can be successfully cured with amine and anhydride type curing agents, their gel times are suitable for processing and can be well-adopted to the needs of the common composite preparation methods. GPTE showed the highest glass transition temperature (Tg among all investigated resins, followed by GFTE and DGEBA. Below the Tg there was no significant difference between the storage modulus values of the EP systems. The glucose-based EPs had lower tensile and bending strength, but their tensile modulus values are not significantly different from the mineral oil based EPs. The thermal stability of the synthesized GPTE and GFTE is between DGEBA and the aliphatic resins. In applications where bending stresses are dominant over the tensile ones, and outstanding Tg is required, these glucose-based resins offer a feasible renewable option.

  12. Interaction of Temperature and Photoperiod Increases Growth and Oil Content in the Marine Microalgae Dunaliella viridis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soundarya Srirangan

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic marine microalgae like Dunaliella spp. have great potential as a feedstock for liquid transportation fuels because they grow fast and can accumulate high levels of triacylgycerides with little need for fresh water or land. Their growth rates vary between species and are dependent on environmental conditions. The cell cycle, starch and triacylglycerol accumulation are controlled by the diurnal light:dark cycle. Storage compounds like starch and triacylglycerol accumulate in the light when CO2 fixation rates exceed the need of assimilated carbon and energy for cell maintenance and division during the dark phase. To delineate environmental effects, we analyzed cell division rates, metabolism and transcriptional regulation in Dunaliella viridis in response to changes in light duration and growth temperatures. Its rate of cell division was increased under continuous light conditions, while a shift in temperature from 25 °C to 35 °C did not significantly affect the cell division rate, but increased the triacylglycerol content per cell several-fold under continuous light. The amount of saturated fatty acids in triacylglycerol fraction was more responsive to an increase in temperature than to a change in the light regime. Detailed fatty acid profiles showed that Dunaliella viridis incorporated lauric acid (C12:0 into triacylglycerol after 24 hours under continuous light. Transcriptome analysis identified potential regulators involved in the light and temperature-induced lipid accumulation in Dunaliella viridis.

  13. Dynamic reservoir well interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturm, W.L.; Belfroid, S.P.C.; Wolfswinkel, O. van; Peters, M.C.A.M.; Verhelst, F.J.P.C.M.

    2004-01-01

    In order to develop smart well control systems for unstable oil wells, realistic modeling of the dynamics of the well is essential. Most dynamic well models use a semi-steady state inflow model to describe the inflow of oil and gas from the reservoir. On the other hand, reservoir models use steady

  14. Characteristics and properties of oil-well cements auditioned with blast furnace slag; Cementos petroleros con adicion de escoria de horno alto. Caracteristicas y propiedades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, R.; Palacios, M.; Puertas, F.

    2011-07-01

    The present paper addresses the alkali activation of Portland cements containing blast furnace slag (20 and 30% by cement weight) with a view to the possible use of these materials in oil well construction. The hydration studies conducted showed that in cement/slag blends, the sodium silicate activator partially inhibited the dissolution of the silicate phases in the Portland cement, retarding cement hydration and reducing the precipitation of reaction products. Due to such partial inhibition, the cement/slag blends had significantly lower mechanical strength than Portland cements hydrated with water. {sup 2}9Si and {sup 2}7Al MAS NMR and BSE/EDX studies, in turn, showed that the CSH gel forming in the alkali-activated cement/slag pastes contained Al in tetrahedral positions and low Ca/Si ratios. (Author) 29 refs.

  15. Effects of temperature and fertilization on the structure of total versus active bacterial communities from sub-Antarctic seawater exposed to crude oil and diesel fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Rodríguez-Blanco

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Polar environments are exposed to the risk of oil pollution. However, there is limited knowledge regarding how the variation of physicochemical factors influencing biodegradation may affect bacterial community structure. The effects of temperature (4, 10 and 20°C and organic fertilization (Inipol EAP 22 on community structure and diversity of bacteria inhabiting Kerguelen sub-Antarctic waters were studied in crude- and diesel-amended microcosms. Dynamics of total (i.e., 16S rDNA-based and metabolically active (i.e., 16S rRNA-based bacterial community structure and diversity were monitored using capillary-electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism. Results showed that total and active community structures were differently influenced by temperature and fertilization in the presence of hydrocarbons. Both fertilization and temperature induced changes in total community structure in the presence of crude oil and diesel. However, temperature showed a limited influence on active community structure, and fertilization induced changes in the presence of crude oil only. Simpson's index decreased for total bacterial communities at all temperatures in the presence of crude oil and diesel, whereas a lower reduction was observed for active bacterial populations. In the presence of fertilizer, the diversity of the whole community approached control values after seven incubation weeks; this was not observed for the active bacterial community. This study evidenced qualitative differences in total and active bacterial community structures of Kerguelen seawaters in the presence of hydrocarbons and different responses relative to variation in temperature and fertilization. These factors and hydrocarbons composition have to be taken into account to understand bacterial community dynamics after an oil spill.

  16. The Influence of Concentration and Temperature on the Formation of ¿-Oryzanol + ß-Sitosterol Tubules in Edible Oil Organogels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sawalha, H.I.M.; Venema, P.; Bot, A.; Flöter, E.; Linden, van der E.

    2011-01-01

    The gelation process of mixtures of ¿-oryzanol and sitosterol structurants in sunflower oil was studied using light scattering, rheology, and micro-scanning calorimetry (Micro-DSC). The relation between temperature and the critical aggregation concentration (CAC) of tubule formation of ¿-oryzanol

  17. Bio-lubricants derived from waste cooking oil with improved oxidation stability and low-temperature properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weimin; Wang, Xiaobo

    2015-01-01

    Waste cooking oil (WCO) was chemically modified via epoxidation using H2O2 followed by transesterification with methanol and branched alcohols (isooctanol, isotridecanol and isooctadecanol) to produce bio-lubricants with improved oxidative stability and low temperature properties. Physicochemical properties of synthesized bio-lubricants such as pour point (PP), cloud point (CP), viscosity, viscosity index (VI), oxidative stability, and corrosion resistant property were determined according to standard methods. The synthesized bio-lubricants showed improved low temperature flow performances compared with WCO, which can be attributing to the introduction of branched chains in their molecular structures. What's more, the oxidation stability of the WCO showed more than 10 folds improvement due to the elimination of -C=C-bonds in the WCO molecule. Tribological performances of these bio-lubricants were also investigated using four-ball friction and wear tester. Experimental results showed that derivatives of WCO exhibited favorable physicochemical properties and tribological performances which making them good candidates in formulating eco-friendly lubricants.

  18. The performance of polymer beads in water-based mud and its application in high-temperature well

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mamat, Nur Suriani; Ismail, Issham; Hashim, Shahrir; Kamis, Azmi; Abdul Razak, Aizal Haziq

    2013-01-01

    The major concern in multilateral drilling is the torque and drag that arises as we drill deeper coupled with the escalation of bottomhole temperature, which can be overcome through the use of a lubricant...

  19. EVALUATION OF CEMENT THIXOTROPY FOR THE CEMENT OF OIL WELLS IN AREAS WITH LOSSES: EFFECT OF PLASTER AND DAIRY OF HIGH FURNACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bouziani

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cementing of oil and gas wells can be a very delicate operation. Among the concerns of service companies, during this operation are the nature and conditions of the formations in well. This is the case of cementing operations in southern Algeria, specifically on the fields of In-Amen, where the formations in lost zones are naturally weak and highly permeable. In these areas, drilling fluids (muds and cements pumped will be, completely or partially lost, what we call "lost circulation". Thixotropic cements are useful to overcome lost circulation problems. They are characterized by a special rheological behavior, allowing it to plug lost zones when they are pumped. Our work aims to assess the thixotropy of cements perapred with two types of cement (class G Asland cement and CEM I 42.5 portland cement with the plaster, using a viscometer with coaxial cylinder (couette type. Moreover, the effect of blast furnace slag (LHF on the properties and thixotropic mixtures prepared was also studied. The results show that portland cement (available locally can produce mixes with higher and more stable thixotropy than the class G cement (from importation, which is a practical and economical for cementing job operations in wells with loss zones. The results also show that the effect of LHF is positive, since in addition to his contribution to long term performances, especially the durability of hardened concrete, it improves the thixotropy of cement made of plaster.

  20. EVALUATION OF THE THIXOTROPY OF OIL-WELL CEMENTS USED FOR CEMENTING LOST CIRCULATION ZONES: EFFECT OF PLASTER AND BLAST FURNACE SLAG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bouziani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cementing of oil and gas wells can be a very delicate operation. Among the concerns of service companies, during this operation are the nature and conditions of the formations in well. This is the case of cementing operations in southern Algeria, specifically on the fields of In-Amen, where the formations in lost zones are naturally weak and highly permeable. In these areas, drilling fluids (muds and cements pumped will be, completely or partially lost, what we call "lost circulation". Thixotropic cements are useful to overcome lost circulation problems. They are characterized by a special rheological behavior, allowing it to plug lost zones when they are pumped.Our work aims to assess the thixotropy of cements perapred with two types of cement (class G Asland cement and CEM I 42.5 portland cement with the plaster, using a viscometer with coaxial cylinder (couette type. Moreover, the effect of blast furnace slag (LHF on the properties and thixotropic mixtures prepared was also studied. The results show that portland cement (available locally can produce mixes with higher and more stable thixotropy than the class G cement (from importation, which is a practical and economical for cementing job operations in wells with loss zones. The results also show that the effect of LHF is positive, since in addition to his contribution to long term performances, especially the durability of hardened concrete, it improves the thixotropy of cement made of plaster.

  1. Exploration of process parameters for continuous hydrolysis of canola oil, camelina oil and algal oil

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Weicheng

    2012-07-01

    Thermal hydrolysis of triglycerides to form free fatty acid (FFA) is a well-established industry practice. Recently, this process has been employed as a first step in the production of biofuels from lipids. To that end, batch and continuous hydrolysis of various feedstocks has been examined at the laboratory scale. Canola, the primary feedstock in this paper, camelina and algal oils were converted to high quality FFA. For the different reaction temperatures, the continuous hydrolysis system was found to provide better yields than the laboratory batch system. In addition, CFD simulation with ANSYS-CFX was used to model the performance and reactant/product separation in the continuous, counter-flow reactor. The effects of reaction temperature, water-to-oil ratio (ratio of water and oil volumetric inflow rate), and preheating of the reactants were examined experimentally. Optimization of these parameters has resulted in an improved, continuous process with high mass yields (89-93%, for reactor temperature of 260°C and water-to-oil ratio of 4:1) and energy efficiency (76%, for reactor temperature of 250°C and water-to-oil ratio of 2:1). Based on the product quality and energy efficiency considerations, the reactor temperature of 260°C and water-to-oil ratio of 4:1 have provided the optimal condition for the lab scale continuous hydrolysis reaction. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Final report on Technical Demonstration and Economic Validation of Geothermally-Produced Electricity from Coproduced Water at Existing Oil/Gas Wells in Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luchini, Chris B. [Universal GeoPower LLC, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The initial geothermal brine flow rate and temperature from the re-worked well were insufficient, after 2.5 days of flow testing, to justify advancing past Phase I of this project. The flow test was terminated less than 4 hours from the Phase I deadline for activity, and as such, additional flow tests of 2+ months may be undertaken in the future, without government support.

  3. Obtaining fuel oils from the low temperature conversion of biomass waste; Obtencao de oleo combustivel a partir da conversao a baixa temperatura de biomassa residual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Roberto Guimaraes; Cinelli, Leonardo Rodrigues [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica]. E-mail: temrobe@vm.uff.br; Romeiro, Gilberto Alves; Damasceno, Raimundo Nonato [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Organica. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Quimica Organica]. E-mail: gilbertoromeiro@ig.com.br; Senra, Paulo Mauricio de Albuquerque [Light Servicos de Eletricidade S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Gerencia de Estudos e Gestao de Geracao]. E-mail: paulo.senra@light.com.br

    2004-07-01

    This paper refers to the characterization and application of oil obtained through the 'Low Temperature Conversion Process' applied to industrial waste generated in the treatment of effluent from the petrochemical industry. Physical and chemical parameters, such as viscosity, density, sulfur content, flash point, point of fluidity were obtained. The characterization of the oil obtained indicates the possibility of classifying it as oil fuel. Also, studying the application of the oil in engines. Developed from studies on the feasibility of producing biodiesel from sludge of sewage treatment plants in Germany of the 1980s, the 'Low Temperature Conversion-LTC' technique, is a thermo chemical process, whose main goal is to extend the life of liabilities environment. The LTC is being applied in various biomass of urban, industrial and agricultural origin, looking up through the thermal conversion transform them into products of potential commercial value. Depending on the type of biomass used in the process, are obtained a fraction lipophilic and a carbonaceous solid waste in a varying of proportions, plus a fraction hydrophilic and conversion gas. The lipophilic fraction is targeted to studies about the feasibility of its application as fuel or other compounds with possible commercial application (such as greases, oils, resins, etc.), while the carbonaceous residue is directed to studies about its activation for the used as activated charcoal, in addition to the possible direct use as energy.

  4. Laboratory Study on the Potential EOR Use of HPAM/VES Hybrid in High-Temperature and High-Salinity Oil Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dingwei Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer flooding represents one of the most efficient processes to enhance oil recovery, and partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM is a widely used oil-displacement agent, but its poor thermal stability, salt tolerance, and mechanical degradation impeded its use in high-temperature and high-salinity oil reservoirs. In this work, a novel viscoelastic surfactant, erucyl dimethyl amidobetaine (EDAB, with improved thermal stability and salinity tolerance, was complexed with HPAM to overcome the deficiencies of HPAM. The HPAM/EDAB hybrid samples were studied in comparison with HPAM and EDAB in synthetic brine regarding their rheological behaviors and core flooding experiments under simulated high-temperature and high-salinity oil reservoir conditions (T: 85°C; total dissolved solids: 32,868 mg/L; [Ca2+] + [Mg2+]: 873 mg/L. It was found that the HPAM/EDAB hybrids exhibited much better heat- and salinity-tolerance and long-term thermal stability than HPAM. Core flooding tests showed that the oil recovery factors of HPAM/EDAB hybrids are between those of HPAM and EDAB. These results are attributed to the synergistic effect between HPAM and EDAB in the hybrid.

  5. Well stimulation by downhole thermal methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farouq Ali, S.M.

    1973-10-01

    Well-bore thermal stimulation is effective in wells producing either a low gravity, viscous crude, or a high gravity, paraffinic oil. An increase in temperature causes a large decrease in oil viscosity, and solution of waxy deposits, thus eliminating any skin effect. Production problems to be remedied will determine the type of treatment. The degree of production response depends on the formation and fluid characteristics as well as current producing rates. Thermal stimulation can be accomplished by electric or hot water heaters, gas burners, by limited in situ combustion, by hot water or steam injection, and by use of explosives. Each method is briefly described.

  6. Molecular Dynamic Simulations of Glass Transition Temperature and Mechanical Properties in the Amorphous Region of Oil-Immersed Transformer Insulation Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, You-Yuan; Yang, Tao; Liao, Rui-Jin

    2012-07-01

    The glass transition temperature (Tg) in the amorphous region of an insulation paper is one of the most important characteristics for thermal stability. Molecular dynamic simulations have been performed on three micro-structural models, namely, amorphous pure cellulose, amorphous cellulose with water and amorphous cellulose with oil, to study the microscopic mechanism of the glass transition process for oil-immersed transformer insulation paper. Using the method of specific volume versus temperature curve, the Tg of amorphous pure cellulose, cellulose with water, and cellulose with oil was determined as 448, 418 and 440 K, respectively. The current study may provide some information for thermal aging. The simulation results show that during the glass transition process, both the chain motion and mechanical properties of cellulose changes significantly. Relative to the oil molecules, water molecules immersed in the amorphous region of insulation paper can disrupt hydrogen bonds between cellulose chains. This phenomenon results in a significant reduction in the glass transition temperature and affects the thermal stability of the insulation paper.

  7. Effect of Rock Properties on ROP Modeling Using Statistical and Intelligent Methods: A Case Study of an Oil Well in Southwest of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezminabadi, Sina Norouzi; Ramezanzadeh, Ahmad; Esmaeil Jalali, Seyed-Mohammad; Tokhmechi, Behzad; Roustaei, Abbas

    2017-03-01

    Rate of penetration (ROP) is one of the key indicators of drilling operation performance. The estimation of ROP in drilling engineering is very important in terms of more accurate assessment of drilling time which affects operation costs. Hence, estimation of a ROP model using operational and environmental parameters is crucial. For this purpose, firstly physical and mechanical properties of rock were derived from well logs. Correlation between the pair data were determined to find influential parameters on ROP. A new ROP model has been developed in one of the Azadegan oil field wells in southwest of Iran. The model has been simulated using Multiple Nonlinear Regression (MNR) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN). By adding the rock properties, the estimation of the models were precisely improved. The results of simulation using MNR and ANN methods showed correlation coefficients of 0.62 and 0.87, respectively. It was concluded that the performance of ANN model in ROP prediction is fairly better than MNR method.

  8. Enhanced oil recovery utilizing high-angle wells in the Frontier Formation, Badger Basin Field, Park County, Wyoming. Final report for the period October 1992--October 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, J.P.; Fortmann, R.G.

    1994-12-01

    Badger Basin Field, discovered in 1931, produces at stripper rates from low-permeability fractured sandstones of the Upper Cretaceous Frontier Formation. Only 15% of the estimated 25 million barrels of oil originally in-place will be produced from the twenty-two attempted vertical completions. This project will increase recoverable reserves through a better understanding of the reservoir and factors which control production. Characterization of the reservoir has been accomplished through an integrated engineering, geological and geophysical approach. Production data, drilling and completion techniques, and relative location of wells on the anticline were reviewed and related to productivity. Literature was reviewed for interpretations on preferred flow directions on anticlinal structures. A structure map of the producing Frontier reservoir was constructed. Porosity development and its relationship to fracture networks was examined petrographically. Fractures in core were described and oriented using paleomagnetic techniques. Azimuths of fractures in outcrop were compared to fracture azimuths measured in the core. A 17 square-mile 3D seismic survey was designed, acquired and processed. Interpretation is being performed on a Sun workstation using Landmark Graphics software. Time-structure and amplitude-distribution maps will be constructed on three Frontier horizons. A location for a high-angle well will be chosen. The slant/horizontal test will be drilled and completed to increase recovery of reserves. Transfer of successful technologies will be accomplished by technical publications and presentations, and access to project materials, data, and field facilities.

  9. Photonic-band-gap architectures for long-lifetime room-temperature polariton condensation in GaAs quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jian-Hua; Vasudev, Pranai; John, Sajeev

    2017-10-01

    We describe AlGaAs photonic-crystal architectures that simultaneously realize strong exciton-photon coupling, long polariton lifetime, and room-temperature polariton Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC). Strong light trapping, induced by a 3D photonic band gap (PBG), leads to peak field intensity 20 times as large as that in an AlGaAs Fabry-Pérot microcavity and exciton-photon coupling as large as 20 meV (i.e., vacuum Rabi splitting 40 meV). The strong exciton-photon coupling, small polariton effective mass, and long polariton lifetime lead to possible realizations of equilibrium room-temperature BEC. We also consider the influence of polarization degeneracy and symmetry breaking in the ground state on the BEC-onset temperature and condensate fraction. Woodpile and slanted-pore PBG structures that break X-Y symmetry facilitate larger condensate fractions at moderate temperatures. The effects of electronic and photonic disorder are marginal, thanks to the 3D photonic band gap.

  10. A new simulator for the calculation of the in situ temperature profile during well stimulation fracturing treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamphius, H.; Davies, D.R.; Roodhart, L.P

    1993-05-01

    Many essential parameters in hydraulic fracturing operations, such as the viscosity of the fracturing fluid and the effectiveness of certain breakers, are stongly dependent on temperature. A finite-difference computer program has been developed that accurately computes temperature profiles in a propagating fracture, and is based on a rigorous description of the heat transfer processes involved. The heat influx from the fracture wall is computed numerically via a special coordinate transformation of the energy balance equations of the rock. The temperature of the frac fluid and the adjacent rock face are allowed to be different, and local time derivatives in the energy balance are fully accounted for. The code and underlying model are valid for the full range of conditions encountered in the field, such as high leakoff rates of the fracturing fluid (high permeability rock) and low heat conductivity of the rock (certain carbonates). It was found that fractures are often significantly cooler than previously reported results. Consequently, the proppant carrying capacity of the frac fluid will be better and it is possible to carry out successful treatments (good proppant placement and reduced impairment) more cost-effectively. The size of prepad stages for cooling can often be reduced. Further, the temperature recovery profile after proppant placement can aid in design of resin coated proppant systems. 20 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Effects of quantum well growth temperature on the recombination efficiency of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells that emit in the green and blue spectral regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammersley, S.; Dawson, P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Photon Science Institute, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Kappers, M. J.; Massabuau, F. C.-P.; Sahonta, S.-L.; Oliver, R. A.; Humphreys, C. J. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-28

    InGaN-based light emitting diodes and multiple quantum wells designed to emit in the green spectral region exhibit, in general, lower internal quantum efficiencies than their blue-emitting counter parts, a phenomenon referred to as the “green gap.” One of the main differences between green-emitting and blue-emitting samples is that the quantum well growth temperature is lower for structures designed to emit at longer wavelengths, in order to reduce the effects of In desorption. In this paper, we report on the impact of the quantum well growth temperature on the optical properties of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells designed to emit at 460 nm and 530 nm. It was found that for both sets of samples increasing the temperature at which the InGaN quantum well was grown, while maintaining the same indium composition, led to an increase in the internal quantum efficiency measured at 300 K. These increases in internal quantum efficiency are shown to be due reductions in the non-radiative recombination rate which we attribute to reductions in point defect incorporation.

  12. Low temperature pyrolysis of coal or oil shale in the presence of calcium compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. Rashid

    1988-01-01

    A coal pyrolysis technique or process is described in which particulate coal is pyrolyzed in the presence of about 5 to 21 wt. % of a calcium compound selected from calcium oxide, calcined (hydrate) dolomite, or calcined calcium hydrate to produce a high quality hydrocarbon liquid and a combustible product gas which are characterized by low sulfur content. The pyrolysis is achieved by heating the coal-calcium compound mixture at a relatively slow rate at a temperature of about 450.degree. to 700.degree. C. over a duration of about 10 to 60 minutes in a fixed or moving bed reactor. The gas exhibits an increased yield in hydrogen and C.sub.1 -C.sub.8 hydrocarbons and a reduction in H.sub.2 S over gas obtainable by pyrolyzing cola without the calcium compound. The liquid product obtained is of a sufficient quality to permit its use directly as a fuel and has a reduced sulfur and oxygen content which inhibits polymerization during storage.

  13. Temperature Effect of Crystalinity in Cellulose Nanocrystal from Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch (OPEFB using Sonication-Hydrothermal Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulnazri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Production of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs from cellulose of oil palm empty fruit bunches (OPEFB have been done. The delignification of OPEFB was mixed with 17,5% NaOH and carried out in the three-neck flask with refluxed for 2 hour at 80oC. Further the suspension was bleached with NaOCl 2% for 1 hour at 70oC. Then, to produce CNCs, Cellulose was firstly sonicated for 30 minutes at 40oC. After that cellulose was hydrolized at hydrothermal reactor for 0,1,2,3,4,5, hours at 110 and 120oC respectively. After filtration and washing, CNCs was analyzed by X-Ray Diffraction and the result shows that the grade of the highest CNCs crystalinity at consentration of HCL 2 M at a temperature of 110oC with reaction time of 2 hours is equal to 75.87%. It can be concluded that sonication-hydrothermal can increase the grade of crystalinity of cellulose nanocrystal.

  14. Bio-synthesis of triangular and hexagonal gold nanoparticles using palm oil fronds’ extracts at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, Adamu Ibrahim; Aziz, Azlan Abdul; Abu Noqta, Osama

    2018-01-01

    Development of bio-reduction techniques for nanoparticles (NPs) synthesis in medical application remains a challenge to numerous researchers. This work reports a novel technique for the synthesis of triangular and hexagonal gold nanoparticles (AuNP) using palm oil fronds’ (POFs) extracts. The functional groups in the POFs’ extracts operate as a persuasive capping and reducing agent to growth AuNPs. The prepared AuNPs were characterized using UV–vis spectrophotometry, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The analysis of FTIR validates the coating of alkynes and phenolic composites on the AuNPs. This shows a feasible function of biomolecules for efficient stabilization of the AuNPs. EFTEM clearly show the triangular and hexagonal shapes of the prepared AuNPs. The XRD patterns display the peaks of fcc crystal structures at (111), (200), (220), (311) and (222), with average particle sizes of 66.7 and 79.02 nm for 1% and 5% POFs extracts concentrations respectively at room temperature. While at 120 °C the average particles size recorded for 1% and 5% of POFs extract concentrations were 32.17 nm and 45.66 nm respectively, and the reaction completed in less than 2 min. The prepared NPs could be potentially applied in biomedical application, due to their excellent stability and refine morphology without agglomeration.

  15. A kinetic study of the depyritization of oil shale HCl-kerogen concentrate by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans at different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLGA CVETKOVIC

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available The results of kinetic studies of bacterial depyritization of HCl-kerogen concentrate of Aleksinac (Serbia oil shale by the chemolithoautotrophic thionic bacteria Thiobacillus ferrooxidans under discontinuous laboratory conditions at various temperatures (0, 20, 28 and 37°C at a pH of ca. 1.5 are presented in this paper. Low pH prevents the occurrence of the precipitation of iron(III-ion hydrolysis products on the substrate particles and thereby reduces the process efficiency. Bacterial depyritization is developed as per kinetics of the first order. The activation energy which points to a successive mechanism of pyrite biooxidation, was computed from the Arrhenius plot. The biochemical kinetics indicators point to a high affinity of the bacteria toward pyrite but small values of Vmax, which are probably the result of decelerated metabolic processes due to the low pH value of the environment resp. the large difference of the pH between the external medium and the cell interior.

  16. Problem with estimating the pseudo-activation energy of kerogen thermal maturation from Connan's time-temperature relation in oil genesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    Connan's time-temperature relation in oil genesis as derived from first-order reaction kinetics is algebraically correct, but its application to natural petroleum generation is invalidated by the assumption that the ratio of initial kerogen concentration to degraded kerogen concentration is constant from deposition to the initiation of intense oil generation. The ratio can only remain constant if no reaction is occurring and, therefore, Connan's data on ''reaction time'' in petroleum generation (assumed to be the age of the sediment) only measures the time elapsed since the system formed. Thus, the widely cited psuedo-activation energy of 11-14 kcal/mole computed from Connan's equation for the start of oil generation from kerogen is meaningless.

  17. A problem with estimating the pseudo-activation energy of kerogen thermal maturation from Connan's time-temperature relation in oil genesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    Connan's time-temperature relation in oil genesis as derived from first-order reaction kinetics is algebraically correct, but its application to natural petroleum generation is invalidated by the assumption that the ratio of initial kerogen concentration to degraded kerogen concentration is constant from deposition to the initiation of intense oil generation. The ratio can only remain constant if no reaction is occurring and, therefore, Connan's data on ''reaction time'' in petroleum generation (assumed to be the age of the sediment) only measures the time elapsed since the system formed. Thus, the widely cited pseudo-activation energy of 11-14 kcal/mole computed from Connan's equation for the start of oil generation from kerogen is meaningless.

  18. User's manual for GEOTEMP, a computer code for predicting downhole wellbore and soil temperatures in geothermal wells. Appendix to Part I report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooley, G.R.

    1980-03-01

    GEOTEMP is a computer code that calculates downhole temperatures in and surrounding a well. Temperatures are computed as a function of time in a flowing stream, in the wellbore, and in the soil. Flowing options available in the model include the following: injection/production, forward/reverse circulation, and drilling. This manual describes how to input data to the code and what results are printed out, provides six examples of both input and output, and supplies a listing of the code. The user's manual is an appendix to the Part I report Development of Computer Code and Acquisition of Field Temperature Data.

  19. Digital archive of drilling mud weight pressures and wellbore temperatures from 49 regional cross sections of 967 well logs in Louisiana and Texas, onshore Gulf of Mexico basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Lauri A.; Kinney, Scott A.; Kola-Kehinde, Temidayo B.

    2011-01-01

    This document provides the digital archive of in-situ temperature and drilling mud weight pressure data that were compiled from several historical sources. The data coverage includes the states of Texas and Louisiana in the Gulf of Mexico basin. Data are also provided graphically, for both Texas and Louisiana, as plots of temperature as a function of depth and pressure as a function of depth. The minimum, arithmetic average, and maximum values are tabulated for each 1,000-foot depth increment for temperature as well as pressure in the Texas and Louisiana data.

  20. How well can a convection-permitting climate model reproduce decadal statistics of precipitation, temperature and cloud characteristics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lipzig, Nicole; Brisson, Erwan; Van Weverberg, Kwinten; Demuzere, Matthias; Devis, Annemarie; Saeed Saeed, Sajjad; Stengel, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Convection-permitting climate model are promising tools for improved representation of extremes, but the number of regions for which these models have been evaluated are still rather limited to make robust conclusions. In addition, an integrated interpretation of near-surface characteristics (typically temperature and precipitation) together with cloud properties is limited. The objective of this presentation is to comprehensively evaluate the performance of a 'state-of-the-art' regional convection-permitting climate model for a mid-latitude coastal region with little orographic forcing. For this purpose, an 11-year integration with the COSMO-CLM model at Convection-Permitting Scale (CPS) using a grid spacing of 2.8 km was compared with in-situ and satellite-based observations of precipitation, temperature, cloud properties and radiation (both at the surface and the top of the atmosphere). CPS clearly improves the representation of precipitation, in especially the diurnal cycle, intensity and spatial distribution of hourly precipitation. Improvements in the representation of temperature are less obvious. In fact the CPS integration overestimates both low and high temperature extremes. The underlying cause for the overestimation of high temperature extremes was attributed to deficiencies in the cloud properties: The modelled cloud fraction is only 46 % whereas a cloud fraction of 65 % was observed. Surprisingly, the effect of this deficiency was less pronounced at the radiation balance at the top of the atmosphere due to a compensating error, in particular an overestimation of the reflectivity of clouds when they are present. Overall, a better representation of convective precipitation and a very good representation of the daily cycle in different cloud types were demonstrated. However, to overcome remaining deficiencies, additional efforts are necessary to improve cloud characteristics in CPS. This will be a challenging task due to compensating deficiencies that

  1. Quantitative determination of epoxy acids, keto acids and hydroxy acids formed in fats and oils at frying temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmesat, S; Velasco, J; Dobarganes, M C

    2008-11-21

    A method based on derivatization to fatty acid methyl esters and GC is proposed for the quantitative analysis of hydroxy acids, keto acids and epoxy acids in fats and oils. Isolation of the analytes by solid-phase extraction is proposed to prevent analytical interferences caused by non-altered fatty acids naturally occurring in oils. In addition, hydrogenation is required before the GC analysis to improve repeatability. The analytical method was applied to thermoxidized samples of high linoleic sunflower oil, high oleic sunflower oil and high palmitic sunflower oil. Results showed total levels of these compounds in the order of mg/g of oil in samples with contents of polar compounds ranging from 6.7 to 25.7%. The compounds analyzed constituted major fractions of the oxidized fatty acids.

  2. Concurrent elevation of CO2, O3 and temperature severely affects oil quality and quantity in rapeseed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Namazkar, Shahla; Stockmarr, Anders; Frenck, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Plant oil is an essential dietary and bio-energy resource. Despite this, the effects of climate change on plant oil quality remain to be elucidated. The present study is the first to show changes in oil quality and quantity of four rapeseed cultivars in climate scenarios with elevated [CO2], [O3...... FAs remained unchanged or even increased. Most reduced was the FA essential for human nutrition, C18:3-ω3, which decreased by 39% and 45% in the combined scenarios with elevated [CO2]+T+[O3] and [CO2]+T, respectively. Average oil content decreased 3–17%. When [CO2] and T were elevated concurrently......, the seed biomass was reduced by half, doubling the losses in FAs and oil content. This corresponded to a 58% reduction in the oil yield per hectare, and C18:3-ω3 decreased by 77%. Furthermore, the polyunsaturated FAs were significantly decreased. The results indicate undesirable consequences for production...

  3. Well-resolved oil-soluble Au-doped ZnCdS quantum dots and enhancing doping emission with In-codoping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Ruosheng, E-mail: zengrsh@gznu.edu.cn [School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin 541004 (China); School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Guizhou Normal University, Guiyang 550001 (China); Sun, Zhiguo [School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Guizhou Normal University, Guiyang 550001 (China); Zhou, Chunjiao [College of Science, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Fang, Cheng; Han, Guo-Cheng [School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin 541004 (China); Chen, Zhencheng, E-mail: chenzhcheng@guet.edu.cn [School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin 541004 (China)

    2016-06-25

    Highly emissive semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) with tunable color are valuable in many applications such as solid state lighting and bio-imaging. Herein, we report a facile synthetic method to Au:ZnCdS and Au:ZnCdS/ZnS core/shell QDs with tunable emission color. The highly active Au precursor (HAuCl{sub 4}) is prevented to be decomposed at high reaction temperature using 1-dodecanethiol (DDT) as the surface ligand. High-quality Au:ZnCdS/ZnS core/shell QDs are prepared and the highest photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY) can achieve 42% by overcoating of ZnS layer over the bare Au:ZnCdS core QDs. Furthermore, through using Au{sup +} ion as the primary dopants and trivalent cation In{sup 3+} as co-dopants, the PL QY can be enhanced significantly because compensation of In{sup 3+} ion-codoping for the charge imbalance from Au{sup +}-doping. This codoping strategy may be applied to other related optical materials to control the optical properties based on our understanding for physical mechanism. - Highlights: • High-quality oil-soluble Au:ZnCdS/ZnS QDs were prepared for the first time. • The highly active HAuCl4 is prevented to decompose by using 1-dodecanethiol. • The highest PL QY of Au:ZnCdS/ZnS QDs can achieve 42% by overcoating ZnS layer. • The PL QY of QDs can be significantly enhanced by Au{sup +}, In{sup 3+}-codoping.

  4. Room temperature observation of photocurrent dependence on applied bias in Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}/Si multiquantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, A.A.; Rashed, M.M.; Maziar, C.M. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)] [and others

    1993-07-01

    We report the observation of the dependence of photocurrent on applied bias in Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}/Si multiquantum wells at room temperature. The photocurrents were measured on reverse biased p-i-n diodes containing an intrinsic region comprised of Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}/Si multiquantum wells. These Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}/Si multiquantum. wells were grown by the remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method. Using the technique employed by Park et al. to analyze similar experimental observations at lower temperature (77 K), we have estimated the absorption edges from the photocurrents and showed a large transition energy shift under electric field. The observed shape of the absorption coefficient as a function of the photon energy differs from that observed previously at lower temperature. 21 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Antimicrobial Effect of Mentha spicata and Mentha pulegium Essential Oils in Two Storage Temperatures on the Survival of Debaryomyces hansenii in Iranian Doogh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guity Karim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Doogh is an Iranian preferred dairy drink, especially in warm seasons. Blowing by yeasts is a common occurring spoilage when this product is kept outside the refrigerator in warm temperature. Natural additives such as herbal essential oils, which also induce the desired flavor and color, may solve this problem and retard yeast growth. Spearmint, pennyroyal and some other herbs and their extracts were traditionally used in this product. In the current study, the antimicrobial effect of Mentha spicata and Mentha pulegium essential oils on the survival of Debaryomyces hansenii was evaluated in two different storage temperatures. Materials and Methods: Iranian Doogh was prepared according to the national standard method with different concentrations of the mentioned essential oils. Then all the samples were inoculated with yeast inocula to achieve a yeast count of >3×106 CFUml-1. Viability of Debaryomyces hansenii was investigated during the storage time (0-28 days of Doogh samples at 4°C and 25°C at different intervals. Statistical analysis was performed using the one-way Analysis of Variance and Tukey’s post hoc methods. Also α level was considered equal to 0.05. Results and Conclusion: Different concentrations of Mentha spicata and Mentha pulegium essential oils had significant effect on the growth of the yeast. Increasing the concentration of these essential oils decreased the logarithm of number of microorganisms. The essential oils of Mentha spicata and Mentha pulegium in low concentrations have antimicrobial effect on spoilage yeast and can improve the sensory properties of Doogh. Therefore, they can be the best alternative preservatives for hazardous chemical compounds.

  6. Charge carrier dynamics of GaAs/AlGaAs asymmetric double quantum wells at room temperature studied by optical pump terahertz probe spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afalla, Jessica; Ohta, Kaoru; Tokonami, Shunrou; Prieto, Elizabeth Ann; Catindig, Gerald Angelo; Cedric Gonzales, Karl; Jaculbia, Rafael; Vasquez, John Daniel; Somintac, Armando; Salvador, Arnel; Estacio, Elmer; Tani, Masahiko; Tominaga, Keisuke

    2017-11-01

    Two asymmetric double quantum wells of different coupling strengths (barrier widths) were grown via molecular beam epitaxy, both samples allowing tunneling. Photoluminescence was measured at 10 and 300 K to provide evidence of tunneling, barrier dependence, and structural uniformity. Carrier dynamics at room temperature was investigated by optical pump terahertz probe (OPTP) spectroscopy. Carrier population decay rates were obtained and photoconductivity spectra were analyzed using the Drude model. This work demonstrates that carrier, and possibly tunneling dynamics in asymmetric double quantum well structures may be studied at room temperature through OPTP spectroscopy.

  7. Effects of Deepwater Horizon crude oil exposure, temperature and developmental stage on oxygen consumption of embryonic and larval mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasparakis, Christina; Mager, Edward M; Stieglitz, John D; Benetti, Daniel; Grosell, Martin

    2016-12-01

    The timing and location of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) incident within the Gulf of Mexico resulted in crude oil exposure of many commercially and ecologically important fish species, such as mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus), during the sensitive early life stages. Previous research has shown that oil exposure during the embryonic stage of predatory pelagic fish reduces cardiac function - a particularly important trait for fast-swimming predators with high aerobic demands. However, it is unclear whether reductions in cardiac function translate to impacts on oxygen consumption in these developing embryos and larvae. A 24-channel optical-fluorescence oxygen-sensing system for high-throughput respiration measurements was used to investigate the effects of oil exposure, temperature and developmental stage on oxygen consumption rates in embryonic and larval mahi-mahi. Oil-exposed developing mahi-mahi displayed increased oxygen consumption, despite clear cardiac deformities and bradycardia, confirming oxygen uptake and delivery from a source other than the circulatory system. In addition to metabolic rate measurements, nitrogenous waste excretion was measured to test the hypothesis that increased energy demand was fueled by protein catabolism. This is the first study to our knowledge that demonstrates increased energy demand and energy depletion in oil-exposed developing mahi-mahi. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Influence of Oil Viscosity on Alkaline Flooding for Enhanced Heavy Oil Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Du

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Oil viscosity was studied as an important factor for alkaline flooding based on the mechanism of “water drops” flow. Alkaline flooding for two oil samples with different viscosities but similar acid numbers was compared. Besides, series flooding tests for the same oil sample were conducted at different temperatures and permeabilities. The results of flooding tests indicated that a high tertiary oil recovery could be achieved only in the low-permeability (approximately 500 mD sandpacks for the low-viscosity heavy oil (Zhuangxi, 390 mPa·s; however, the high-viscosity heavy oil (Chenzhuang, 3450 mPa·s performed well in both the low- and medium-permeability (approximately 1000 mD sandpacks. In addition, the results of flooding tests for the same oil at different temperatures also indicated that the oil viscosity put a similar effect on alkaline flooding. Therefore, oil with a high-viscosity is favorable for alkaline flooding. The microscopic flooding test indicated that the water drops produced during alkaline flooding for oils with different viscosities differed significantly in their sizes, which might influence the flow behaviors and therefore the sweep efficiencies of alkaline fluids. This study provides an evidence for the feasibility of the development of high-viscosity heavy oil using alkaline flooding.

  9. Interpretation of Tracer Experiments on Inverted Five-Spot Well-Patterns within the Western Half of the Farnsworth Unit Oil Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Mark D.; Esser, Richard P.; McPherson, Brian J.; Balch, Robert S.; Liu, Ning; Rose, Peter; Garcia, Leonard; Ampomah, William

    2017-07-03

    The Southwest Carbon Partnership (SWP), one of the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships, is currently working to demonstrate the utilization and storage of CO2 in the Farnsworth Unit (FWU) Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) site under the final development phase of this U.S. DOE initiative. A component of the research is to use fluid tracers to understand the multifluid flow patterns that develop between injection and production wells via collected field data and supporting numerical reservoir models. The FWU, located in the Anadarko Basin, Ochiltree County, Texas, and being operated by Chaparral Energy, is a mature EOR water-flood field, which is currently being converted to a CO2 flow, with inverted 5-spot patterns transitioning from pure water to alternating CO2 and water floods (i.e., water alternating gas (WAG)) at an approximate rate of one every 6 to 10 months. The SWP tracer program is conducting a suite of tracer injections into the active 5-spot patterns at the FWU. Tracers have been selected to be nonreactive and either principally soluble in CO2 (gas soluble) or water (aqueous soluble). In addition to characterizing the multifluid flow behaviour within reservoir, the gas and aqueous tracers have roles in detecting any leakage from the reservoir. A total of seven unique perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) compounds make up the suite of gas soluble tracers and eight unique naphthalene sulfonate tracer (NPT) compounds comprise the aqueous soluble tracers. All selected tracers are significantly detectable below the parts per billion concentrations, allowing for high resolution for the inter-well tests at relatively low injection volumes.

  10. No evidence found for Diels-Alder reaction products in soybean oil oxidized at the frying temperature by NMR study

    Science.gov (United States)

    It has been generally accepted that the Diels-Alder reaction mechanism is one of the major reaction mechanisms to produce dimers and polymers during heating process of vegetable oil. Soybean oil oxidized at 180 °C for 24 hrs with 1.45 surface area-to-volume ratio showed 36.1% polymer peak area in g...

  11. Expansion of oil palm and other cash crops causes an increase of the land surface temperature in the Jambi province in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabajo, Clifton R.; le Maire, Guerric; June, Tania; Meijide, Ana; Roupsard, Olivier; Knohl, Alexander

    2017-10-01

    Indonesia is currently one of the regions with the highest transformation rate of land surface worldwide related to the expansion of oil palm plantations and other cash crops replacing forests on large scales. Land cover changes, which modify land surface properties, have a direct effect on the land surface temperature (LST), a key driver for many ecological functions. Despite the large historic land transformation in Indonesia toward oil palm and other cash crops and governmental plans for future expansion, this is the first study so far to quantify the impacts of land transformation on the LST in Indonesia. We analyze LST from the thermal band of a Landsat image and produce a high-resolution surface temperature map (30 m) for the lowlands of the Jambi province in Sumatra (Indonesia), a region which suffered large land transformation towards oil palm and other cash crops over the past decades. The comparison of LST, albedo, normalized differenced vegetation index (NDVI) and evapotranspiration (ET) between seven different land cover types (forest, urban areas, clear-cut land, young and mature oil palm plantations, acacia and rubber plantations) shows that forests have lower surface temperatures than the other land cover types, indicating a local warming effect after forest conversion. LST differences were up to 10.1 ± 2.6 °C (mean ± SD) between forest and clear-cut land. The differences in surface temperatures are explained by an evaporative cooling effect, which offsets the albedo warming effect. Our analysis of the LST trend of the past 16 years based on MODIS data shows that the average daytime surface temperature in the Jambi province increased by 1.05 °C, which followed the trend of observed land cover changes and exceeded the effects of climate warming. This study provides evidence that the expansion of oil palm plantations and other cash crops leads to changes in biophysical variables, warming the land surface and thus enhancing the increase of the air

  12. Expansion of oil palm and other cash crops causes an increase of the land surface temperature in the Jambi province in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Sabajo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia is currently one of the regions with the highest transformation rate of land surface worldwide related to the expansion of oil palm plantations and other cash crops replacing forests on large scales. Land cover changes, which modify land surface properties, have a direct effect on the land surface temperature (LST, a key driver for many ecological functions. Despite the large historic land transformation in Indonesia toward oil palm and other cash crops and governmental plans for future expansion, this is the first study so far to quantify the impacts of land transformation on the LST in Indonesia. We analyze LST from the thermal band of a Landsat image and produce a high-resolution surface temperature map (30 m for the lowlands of the Jambi province in Sumatra (Indonesia, a region which suffered large land transformation towards oil palm and other cash crops over the past decades. The comparison of LST, albedo, normalized differenced vegetation index (NDVI and evapotranspiration (ET between seven different land cover types (forest, urban areas, clear-cut land, young and mature oil palm plantations, acacia and rubber plantations shows that forests have lower surface temperatures than the other land cover types, indicating a local warming effect after forest conversion. LST differences were up to 10.1 ± 2.6 °C (mean ± SD between forest and clear-cut land. The differences in surface temperatures are explained by an evaporative cooling effect, which offsets the albedo warming effect. Our analysis of the LST trend of the past 16 years based on MODIS data shows that the average daytime surface temperature in the Jambi province increased by 1.05 °C, which followed the trend of observed land cover changes and exceeded the effects of climate warming. This study provides evidence that the expansion of oil palm plantations and other cash crops leads to changes in biophysical variables, warming the land surface and thus

  13. Aerated drilling cutting transport analysis in geothermal well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakhyudin, Aris; Setiawan, Deni; Dwi Marjuan, Oscar

    2017-12-01

    Aeratad drilling widely used for geothermal drilling especially when drilled into predicted production zone. Aerated drilling give better performance on preventing lost circulation problem, improving rate of penetration, and avoiding drilling fluid invasion to productive zone. While well is drilled, cutting is produced and should be carried to surface by drilling fluid. Hole problem, especially pipe sticking will occur while the cutting is not lifted properly to surface. The problem will effect on drilling schedule; non-productive time finally result more cost to be spent. Geothermal formation has different characteristic comparing oil and gas formation. Geothermal mainly has igneous rock while oil and gas mostly sedimentary rock. In same depth, formation pressure in geothermal well commonly lower than oil and gas well while formation temperature geothermal well is higher. While aerated drilling is applied in geothermal well, Igneous rock density has higher density than sedimentary rock and aerated drilling fluid is lighter than water based mud hence minimum velocity requirement to transport cutting is larger than in oil/gas well drilling. Temperature and pressure also has impact on drilling fluid (aerated) density. High temperature in geothermal well decrease drilling fluid density hence the effect of pressure and temperature also considered. In this paper, Aerated drilling cutting transport performance on geothermal well will be analysed due to different rock and drilling fluid density. Additionally, temperature and pressure effect on drilling fluid density also presented to merge.

  14. Influence of Commercial Saturated Monoglyceride, Mono-/Diglycerides Mixtures, Vegetable Oil, Stirring Speed, and Temperature on the Physical Properties of Organogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Gerardo Rocha-Amador

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of gelator, vegetable oil, stirring speed, and temperature on the physical properties of obtained organogels. They were prepared under varying independent conditions and applying a fractional experimental design. From there a rheological characterization was developed. The physical characterization also included polarized light microscopy and calorimetric analysis. Once these data were obtained, X-Ray diffraction was applied to selected samples and a microstructure lattice was confirmed. Commonly, the only conditions that affect crystallization have been analyzed (temperature, solvent, gelator, and cooling rate. We found that stirring speed is the most important parameter in the organogel preparation.

  15. Influence of Commercial Saturated Monoglyceride, Mono-/Diglycerides Mixtures, Vegetable Oil, Stirring Speed, and Temperature on the Physical Properties of Organogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha-Amador, Omar Gerardo; Huang, Qingrong; Rocha-Guzman, Nuria Elizabeth; Moreno-Jimenez, Martha Rocio; Gonzalez-Laredo, Ruben F.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of gelator, vegetable oil, stirring speed, and temperature on the physical properties of obtained organogels. They were prepared under varying independent conditions and applying a fractional experimental design. From there a rheological characterization was developed. The physical characterization also included polarized light microscopy and calorimetric analysis. Once these data were obtained, X-Ray diffraction was applied to selected samples and a microstructure lattice was confirmed. Commonly, the only conditions that affect crystallization have been analyzed (temperature, solvent, gelator, and cooling rate). We found that stirring speed is the most important parameter in the organogel preparation. PMID:26904637

  16. Mesozoic-Cenozoic course of temperatures on the earth's surface and geothermal regime of the Jurassic oil source deposits (southern paleoclimatic zone of West Siberia)

    OpenAIRE

    Isaev, V.I.; Iskorkina, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    In a review the state of studies of the influence of the secular course of temperatures on the earth's surface on the thermal history of deep oil source deposits is characterized as a state of scientific research. The aim of research is generalization of the known data about Mesozoic-Cenozoic climate of southeastern part of West Siberia and the assessment of impact of the secular course of temperature of the earth's surface on the geothermal regime, the degree of realization of generation pot...

  17. Study of stability of the ceramic Ba{sub 2}NiWO{sub 6} in crude petroleum drew back from state - Brazil oil wells; Microestrutura e propriedades mecanicas da ceramica Ba{sub 2}NiWO{sub 6} apos imersao em petroleo cru retirado de pocos de prtroleo do estado de Sergipe - Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadava, Y.P.; Bezerra, L.P.; Diniz, M.J.L.; Ferreira, R.A.S. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEM/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica], e-mail: yadava@ufpe.br

    2008-07-01

    The necessity of developing technologies which make practical the oil-well exploration is notorious. Knowing that those are hostile places is necessary to find materials which are capable to resist to the inclemency caused by those environments. Pondering that the ceramics show the required characteristics to this purpose the present assignment views the elaboration of complex perovskite ceramic Ba{sub 2}NiWO{sub 6} to produce ceramics components parts of temperature sensors to oil-well. To this purpose we studied the ceramic stability when they are vulnerable to the attack of the crude petroleum drew back from ocean and earth's oil-wells of Sergipe state-Brazil. The ceramics were submersed in the mentioned petroleum during thirty days and then they were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, optics microscopy and microhardness Vickers to verify if changes happened in the structure, microstructure and mechanics proprieties characteristics. These results are showed and discussed in this assignment. (author)

  18. Chemical stability of extra-virgin olive oil added with oregano essential oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio, Claudia M; Nepote, Valeria; Grosso, Nelson R

    2011-09-01

    Extra virgin olive oil is highly consumed and well known for its nutritional and health benefits. However, it is fatty food highly susceptible to lipid oxidation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the preserving effect of oregano (Origanum vulgare L. spp vulgare called "oregano compacto") essential oil on physical and chemical properties in extra virgin olive oil during storage. Oregano essential oil composition was analyzed by GC-MS. This essential oil was added into extra virgin olive oil at 0.05%. The samples were stored in 3 different conditions: darkness, light exposure, and temperature (60 °C). Chemical indicators of lipid oxidation (peroxide value, p-anisidine value, conjugated dienes, free fatty acidity, and carotenoid and chlorophyll contents) were measured. High content in carvomenthol (22.52%), terpinolene (19.77%), thymol (13.51%), and γ-terpinene (10.30%) were detected in oregano essential oil. Olive oil samples without oregano essential oil stored at 60 °C and exposure at artificial light had the highest peroxide values during storage. Higher p-anisidine and K232 values after day 7 of storage were detected in temperature, darkness, and light exposure treatments. Light treatment was the main factor that degraded chlorophyll causing loss of color. The highest chlorophyll content (3.87 mg/kg) was observed in olive oil with essential oil at the end of storage. In general, olive oil samples added with oregano essential oil had lower peroxide, conjugated dienes, and p-anisidine values and higher chlorophyll and carotenoid contents during storage. Oregano essential oil retards lipid oxidation process in olive oil prolonging its shelf life. Oregano essential oil was and is used with the purpose of flavoring and aromatizing food. This essential oil due to its composition has shown antioxidant activity. Synthetic antioxidants such as butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) are thought to be promoters of carcinogenesis

  19. Performance analysis of proportional-integral feedback control for the reduction of stick-slip-induced torsional vibrations in oil well drillstrings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Hugo L. S.; Trindade, Marcelo A.

    2017-06-01

    The stick-slip phenomenon, in the process of drilling oil wells, can lead to large fluctuations in drill-bit angular velocity, due to the interaction between drill-bit and rock formation, and, thus, cause irreparable damage to the process. In this work, the performance of control laws applied to the rotary table (responsible for moving the drillstring) is analyzed, in order to reduce stick-slip and drill-bit angular velocity oscillations. The control laws implemented are based on a PI (Proportional-Integral) controller, for which the torque applied to the rotating table has components proportional and integral to the table angular velocity with constant or variable WOB (Weight-On-Bit). For the drillstring, a finite element model with a linear interpolation for the torsional motion was proposed. The torque at drill-bit was modeled considering a non-regularized dry friction model, with parameters that were adjusted using empirical data proposed in literature. Several performance criteria were analyzed and it was observed that a minimization of the mean deviation of the drill-bit angular velocity relative to the target one would provide the best operating condition. Parametric analyses of proportional and integral control gains were performed, yielding level curves for the mean deviation of drill-bit angular velocity. From these curves, stability regions were defined in which the deviation is acceptable. These regions were observed to be wider for smaller values of WOB and higher values of target angular velocity and vice-versa. In addition, the inclusion of a controlled dynamic WOB was proposed leading to reduced levels of mean deviation of angular velocity and, thus, improving stability regions for the drilling process.

  20. Salinization in a stratified aquifer induced by heat transfer from well casings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lopik, J.H.; Hartog, N.; Zaadnoordijk, Willem Jan; Cirkel, D. Gijsbert; Raoof, A.

    2015-01-01

    The temperature inside wells used for gas, oil and geothermal energy production, as well as steam injection, is in general significantly higher than the groundwater temperature at shallower depths. While heat loss from these hot wells is known to occur, the extent to which this heat loss may result

  1. Establishment of equilibrium of electrostatic potential by photo-irradiation in a GaAs quantum well at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Masumi; Nomura, Shintaro; Delbecq, Matthieu; Tamura, Hiroyuki; Akazaki, Tatsushi, E-mail: m-yama@will.brl.ntt.co.j [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT corp. 3-1 Morinosato-Wakamiya, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan)

    2010-02-01

    We measured photoluminescence (PL) spectra from a 20-nm GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well (QW) grown on an n-type substrate by selectively exciting the GaAs at 2 K. We observed a two-stage change of PL spectra as a function of the total amount of photo-irradiation (p x t) after cooling down. This corresponds to the process of establishing the equilibrium of electrostatic potential between the sample surface and QW and between the QW and n-doped substrate.

  2. Investigation on Crude and High-Temperature Heated Coffee Oil by ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy along with Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Nicoleta Raba

    Full Text Available The coffee oil has a promising potential to be used in food industry, but an efficient use, especially in products that required high-temperature heating, depends on its chemical composition and the changes induced by processing. Since there is little information on this topic, the aim of our study was to investigate the crude green and roasted coffee oil (GCO, RCO and heated (HGCO, HRCO for 1 h at 200°C, by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and in terms of antioxidant and antimicrobial properties. The results of FTIR spectroscopy revealed that no statistically significant differences (one-way ANOVA, p>0.05 in the oxidative status of GCO and RCO were found. The coffee oils heating induced significant spectral changes in the regions 3100-3600 cm(-1, 2800-3050 cm(-1 and 1680-1780 cm(-1 proved by the differences in the absorbance ratios A 3009 cm(-1/A 2922 cm(-1, A 3009 cm(-1/A 2853 cm(-1, A 3009 cm(-1/A 1744 cm(-1, A 1744 cm(-1/A 2922 cm(-1. These alterations were related to the reduction of the unsaturation degree due to primary and secondary oxidation processes of the lipid fraction. The radical scavenging ability of oils investigated by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH assay revealed that the IC50 value of GCO was significantly lower than of RCO (p0.05. Also, HGCO and HRCO showed significantly different inhibitory potential related to the control (p<0.05. The heating induced statistically significant decreases in the effectiveness of coffee oils against the tested bacteria. GCO proved to be the most effective among investigated coffee oils against the tested bacteria.

  3. Investigating patterns and controls of groundwater up-welling in a lowland river by combining Fibre-optic Distributed Temperature Sensing with observations of vertical hydraulic gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Krause

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the patterns and controls of aquifer–river exchange in a fast-flowing lowland river by the conjunctive use of streambed temperature anomalies identified with Fibre-optic Distributed Temperature Sensing (FO-DTS and observations of vertical hydraulic gradients (VHG.

    FO-DTS temperature traces along this lowland river reach reveal discrete patterns with "cold spots" indicating groundwater up-welling. In contrast to previous studies using FO-DTS for investigation of groundwater–surface water exchange, the fibre-optic cable in this study was buried in the streambed sediments, ensuring clear signals despite fast flow and high discharges. During the observed summer baseflow period, streambed temperatures in groundwater up-welling locations were found to be up to 1.5 °C lower than ambient streambed temperatures. Due to the high river flows, the cold spots were sharp and distinctly localized without measurable impact on down-stream surface water temperature.

    VHG patterns along the stream reach were highly variable in space, revealing strong differences even at small scales. VHG patterns alone are indicators of both, structural heterogeneity of the stream bed as well as of the spatial heterogeneity of the groundwater–surface water exchange fluxes and are thus not conclusive in their interpretation. However, in combination with the high spatial resolution FO-DTS data we were able to separate these two influences and clearly identify locations of enhanced exchange, while also obtaining information on the complex small-scale streambed transmissivity patterns responsible for the very discrete exchange patterns. The validation of the combined VHG and FO-DTS approach provides an effective strategy for analysing drivers and controls of groundwater–surface water exchange, with implications for the quantification of biogeochemical cycling and contaminant transport at aquifer–river interfaces.

  4. Characterisation of temperature dependent parameters of multi-quantum well (MQW) Ti/Au/n-AlGaAs/n-GaAs/n-AlGaAs Schottky diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filali, Walid; Sengouga, Nouredine; Oussalah, Slimane; Mari, Riaz H.; Jameel, Dler; Al Saqri, Noor Alhuda; Aziz, Mohsin; Taylor, David; Henini, Mohamed

    2017-11-01

    Forward and reverse current-voltage (Isbnd V) of Ti/Au/n-Al0.33Ga0.67As/n-GaAs/n-Al0.33Ga0.67As multi-quantum well (MQW) Schottky diodes were measured over a range of temperatures from 20 to 400 K by a step of 20 K. The Schottky diodes parameters were then extracted from these characteristics. The Cheung method is used for this purpose, assuming a thermionic conduction mechanism. The extracted ideality factor decrease with increasing temperatures. But their values at low temperatures were found to be unrealistic. In order to explain this uncertainty, three assumptions were explored. Firstly an assumed inhomogeneous barrier height gave better parameters especially the Richardson constant but the ideality factor is still unrealistic at low temperatures. Secondly, by using numerical simulation, it was demonstrated that defects including interface states are not responsible for the apparent unrealistic Schottky diode parameters. The third assumption is the tunnelling mechanism through the barrier in the low temperature range. At these lower temperatures, the tunnelling mechanism was more suitable to explain the extracted parameters values.

  5. Project and evaluation of a 2000 meter offshore horizontal well production extra-heavy oil; Projeto e avaliacao de um poco offshore com 2000 m de trecho horizontal produtor de oleo extra-pesado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueta, Eduardo M.; Kato, Edson T.; Tinoco, Francisco L.; Vieira, Paulo M.F. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    The project was proposed to acquire reservoir data, for the development of the Member (Mb) Siri in the concession of Badejo in Campos Basin, having extra-heavy oil, through long and large bore horizontal well. The main objectives were: to obtain the petrophysical properties through continuous coring of the oil and water zones; water sampling for the characterization; to verify the effective length of the horizontal well through production logging; to obtain the reservoir productivity and permeability through formation test; to obtain the oil PVT properties through monophasic sampling and to know the lateral variability of the accumulation. New technologies were used as geochemical geosteering, diversionary acidification and chemical tracer production logging. The well test analysis showed permeability and productivity values better than as expected and making possible the development of pilot project in order to evaluate the aquifer behavior, the long term well productivity and performance of the elevation and behavior of the extra-heavy oil offloading for subsequent development of the reservoir. (author)

  6. Effect of variability in lighting and temperature environments for mature gilts housed in gestation crates on measures of reproduction and animal well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canaday, D C; Salak-Johnson, J L; Visconti, A M; Wang, X; Bhalerao, K; Knox, R V

    2013-03-01

    The effects of room temperature and light intensity before breeding and into early gestation were evaluated on the reproductive performance and well-being of gilts housed individually in crates. In eight replicates, estrus was synchronized in mature gilts (n = 198) and after last feeding of Matrix were randomly assigned to a room temperature of 15°C (COLD), 21°C (NEUTRAL), or 30°C (HOT) and a light intensity of 11 (DIM) or 433 (BRIGHT) lx. Estrous detection was performed daily and gilts inseminated twice. Blood samples were collected before and after breeding for determination of immune measures and cortisol concentrations. Gilt ADFI, BW, and body temperature were measured. On d 30 postbreeding, gilts were slaughtered to recover reproductive tracts to evaluate pregnancy and litter characteristics. There were no temperature × light intensity interactions for any response variable. Reproductive measures of follicle development, expression of estrus, ovulation rate, pregnancy rate (83.2%), litter size (14.3 ± 0.5), and fetal measures were not affected by temperature or lighting (P > 0.10). Gilts in COLD (37.6°C) had a lower (P gilts kept in HOT than those in NEUTRAL or COLD environments. Cortisol was greater (P gilts kept in COLD compared with those kept in the HOT room. Gilts housed in the HOT environment made more postural changes (P Gilts kept in the HOT temperature spent more total time lying and more time lying ventrally compared with those gilts housed in the NEUTRAL or COLD rooms. Total white blood cells and the percentage of neutrophils as well as neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio were all influenced (P 0.10) of light or interaction with temperature on other immune cells or measures. These results indicate that temperatures in the range of 15 to 30°C or light intensity at 11 to 433 lx do not impact reproduction during the follicular phase and into early gestation for mature gilts housed in gestation crates. However, room temperature does impact

  7. A Promising Material by Using Residue Waste from Bisphenol A Manufacturing to Prepare Fluid-Loss-Control Additive in Oil Well Drilling Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Lei Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The residues mixture from Bisphenol A manufacturing process was analyzed. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR were used to characterize the residues. The results indicated that the residues were complex mixture of several molecules. 3-(2-Hydroxyphenyl-1,1,3-trimethyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-5-ol and phenol were the main components of the residues. The technical feasibility of using it as phenol replacement in fluid-loss-control additive production was also investigated. The fluid-loss-control capacity of the novel additive was systematically investigated. It was discovered that the well fluid-loss performance of the prepared additive can be achieved, especially at high temperature.

  8. Analysis of impact of temperature and saltwater on Nannochloropsis salina bio-oil production by ultra high resolution APCI FT-ICR MS

    KAUST Repository

    Sanguineti, Michael Mario

    2015-05-01

    Concentrated Nannochloropsis salina paste was reconstituted in distilled water and synthetic saltwater and processed at 250°C and 300°C via hydrothermal liquefaction. The resulting bio-oils yielded a diverse distribution of product classes, as analyzed by ultra high resolution APCI FT-ICR MS. The organic fractions were analyzed and both higher temperatures and distilled water significantly increase the number of total compounds present and the number of product classes. Major bio-oil products consisted of N1O1, hydrocarbon, and O2 classes, while O1, O4, S1, N1O2, and N2O2 classes represented the more significant minor classes. Both chlorine and sulfur containing compounds were detected in both distilled and saltwater reactions, while fewer numbers of chlorine and sulfur containing products were present in the organic fraction of the saltwater reactions. Further refinement to remove the chlorine and sulfur contents appears necessary with marine microalgal bio-oils produced via hydrothermal liquefaction. The higher heating value (MJ/kg) as calculated by the Boie equation of classes of interest in the bio-oil reveals a significant potential of algal hydrothermal liquefaction products as a sustainable and renewable fuel feedstock. © 2015.

  9. Influence of Surfactant Structure on the Stability of Water-in-Oil Emulsions under High-Temperature High-Salinity Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhalim I. A. Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Emulsified water-in-oil (W/O systems are extensively used in the oil industry for water control and acid stimulation. Emulsifiers are commonly utilized to emulsify a water-soluble material to form W/O emulsion. The selection of a particular surfactant for such jobs is critical and certainly expensive. In this work, the impact of surfactant structure on the stability of W/O emulsions is investigated using the hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB of the surfactant. Different commercial surfactants were evaluated for use as emulsifiers for W/O systems at high-temperature (up to 120°C high-salinity (221,673 ppm HTHS conditions. Diverse surfactants were examined including ethoxylates, polyethylene glycols, fluorinated surfactants, and amides. Both commercial Diesel and waste oil are used for the oleic phase to prepare the emulsified system. Waste oil has shown higher stability (less separation in comparison with Diesel. This work has successfully identified stable emulsified W/O systems that can tolerate HTHS environments using HLB approach. Amine Acetate family shows higher stability in comparison with Glycol Ether family and at even lower concentration. New insights into structure-surfactant stability relationship, beyond the HLB approach, are provided for surfactant selection.

  10. Influence of storage time and temperature on the chemical composition of the essential oil of Hyptis pectinata L. Poit

    OpenAIRE

    JESUS,A.S.; BLANK,A.F.; ALVES,M.F.; ARRIGONI-BLANK,M.F.; LIMA,R.N.; ALVES,P.B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hyptis pectinata, popularly known as “sambacaitá”, is a native medicinal herb used by local people for treating disease. Its pharmacological, antimicrobial, and medicinal properties have been reported in several studies. The essential oil of the leaves is rich in terpene compounds responsible for its properties. Because there are factors that can influence the chemical composition of essential oils, the objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of storage on H...

  11. Effect of heating at frying temperature on the quality characteristics of regular and high-oleic acid sunflower oils

    OpenAIRE

    M Abbas Ali; Ali Hassan Ali Najmaldien; Razam Abd Latip; Noor Hidayu Othman; Fadzilah Adibah Abdul Majid; Liza Md Salleh

    2013-01-01

    Background.Understanding of oil deterioration during heating/frying process is important as oils are nor- mally kept hot at commercial food outlets during intermittent frying cycles. An increased level of consumer awareness toward fat composition and its impact on human health could have an effect on selection of fats in the food industry. The rate of quality deterioration during heating depends on fatty acid composition and also the content and composition of minor components. Therefore, the...

  12. Room Temperature Electroluminescence from Tensile-Strained Si0.13Ge0.87/Ge Multiple Quantum Wells on a Ge Virtual Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyang Lin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Direct band electroluminescence (EL from tensile-strained Si0.13Ge0.87/Ge multiple quantum wells (MQWs on a Ge virtual substrate (VS at room temperature is reported herein. Due to the competitive result of quantum confinement Stark effect and bandgap narrowing induced by tensile strain in Ge wells, electroluminescence from Γ1-HH1 transition in 12-nm Ge wells was observed at around 1550 nm. As injection current density increases, additional emission shoulders from Γ2-HH2 transition in Ge wells and Ge VS appeared at around 1300–1400 nm and 1600–1700 nm, respectively. The peak energy of EL shifted to the lower energy side superquadratically with an increase of injection current density as a result of the Joule heating effect. During the elevation of environmental temperature, EL intensity increased due to a reduction of energy between L and Γ valleys of Ge. Empirical fitting of the relationship between the integrated intensity of EL (L and injection current density (J with L~Jm shows that the m factor increased with injection current density, suggesting higher light emitting efficiency of the diode at larger injection current densities, which can be attributed to larger carrier occupations in the Γ valley and the heavy hole (HH valance band at higher temperatures.

  13. Influence of fatty acid composition on the formation of polar glycerides and polar fatty acids in sunflower oils heated at frying temperatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge, N.

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available Conventional and high oleic sunflower oils as well as 50% mixture of both of them were heated at different temperatures under well-controlled conditions. Total polar compounds, the main groups of polar glycerides, total polar fatty acids, the main groups of polar fatty acids and the loss of initial fatty acids were quantitated. The most outstanding results demonstrated the primacy of the formation of glyceridic polymerization compounds during heating at high temperatures. After transesterification of the samples dimeric fatty acids was the most significant group of compounds obtained. As expected, linoleic acid was preferentially involved in the formation of polar fatty acids, although the participation of oleic acid became very important at low concentration of linoleic acid. Finally good statistical figures were obtained for the regression of polar fatty acids on polar compounds.

    Aceites de girasol convencional y alto oleico así como una mezcla al 50% de ambos fueron calentados a diferentes temperaturas bajo condiciones controladas. Se cuantificaron los compuestos polares totales, los grupos principales de glicéridos, ácidos grasos polares totales, los grupos principales de ácidos grasos polares y la pérdida de ácidos grasos iniciales. Los resultados más relevantes demostraron la primacía de la formación de compuestos de polimerización glicerídicos durante el calentamiento a altas temperaturas. Después de la transesterificación de las muestras, los ácidos diméricos constituyeron el grupo más significativo de compuestos obtenidos. Como era esperado, el ácido linoleico contribuyó preferentemente en la formación de los ácidos grasos polares, si bien la participación del ácido oleico fue muy importante a bajas concentraciones de ácido linoleico. Finalmente, se obtuvieron buenos resultados estadísticos para la regresión entre ácidos grasos polares y compuestos polares.

  14. Influence of Fuel Moisture Content and Reactor Temperature on the Calorific Value of Syngas Resulted from Gasification of Oil Palm Fronds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atnaw, Samson Mekbib; Sulaiman, Shaharin Anwar; Yusup, Suzana

    2014-01-01

    Biomass wastes produced from oil palm mills and plantations include empty fruit bunches (EFBs), shells, fibers, trunks, and oil palm fronds (OPF). EFBs and shells are partially utilized as boiler fuel while the rest of the biomass materials like OPF have not been utilized for energy generation. No previous study has been reported on gasification of oil palm fronds (OPF) biomass for the production of fuel gas. In this paper, the effect of moisture content of fuel and reactor temperature on downdraft gasification of OPF was experimentally investigated using a lab scale gasifier of capacity 50 kW. In addition, results obtained from equilibrium model of gasification that was developed for facilitating the prediction of syngas composition are compared with experimental data. Comparison of simulation results for predicting calorific value of syngas with the experimental results showed a satisfactory agreement with a mean error of 0.1 MJ/Nm3. For a biomass moisture content of 29%, the resulting calorific value for the syngas was found to be only 2.63 MJ/Nm3, as compared to nearly double (4.95 MJ/Nm3) for biomass moisture content of 22%. A calorific value as high as 5.57 MJ/Nm3 was recorded for higher oxidation zone temperature values. PMID:24578617

  15. Influence of Fuel Moisture Content and Reactor Temperature on the Calorific Value of Syngas Resulted from Gasification of Oil Palm Fronds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samson Mekbib Atnaw

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomass wastes produced from oil palm mills and plantations include empty fruit bunches (EFBs, shells, fibers, trunks, and oil palm fronds (OPF. EFBs and shells are partially utilized as boiler fuel while the rest of the biomass materials like OPF have not been utilized for energy generation. No previous study has been reported on gasification of oil palm fronds (OPF biomass for the production of fuel gas. In this paper, the effect of moisture content of fuel and reactor temperature on downdraft gasification of OPF was experimentally investigated using a lab scale gasifier of capacity 50 kW. In addition, results obtained from equilibrium model of gasification that was developed for facilitating the prediction of syngas composition are compared with experimental data. Comparison of simulation results for predicting calorific value of syngas with the experimental results showed a satisfactory agreement with a mean error of 0.1 MJ/Nm3. For a biomass moisture content of 29%, the resulting calorific value for the syngas was found to be only 2.63 MJ/Nm3, as compared to nearly double (4.95 MJ/Nm3 for biomass moisture content of 22%. A calorific value as high as 5.57 MJ/Nm3 was recorded for higher oxidation zone temperature values.

  16. The effect of drying temperatures on antioxidant activity, phenolic compounds, fatty acid composition and tocopherol contents in citrus seed and oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Juhaimi, Fahad; Özcan, Mehmet Musa; Uslu, Nurhan; Ghafoor, Kashif

    2018-01-01

    In this study, the effect of drying temperature on antioxidant activity, phenolic compounds, fatty acid composition and tocopherol content of citrus seeds and oils were studied. Kinnow mandarin seed, dried at 60 °C, exhibited the highest antioxidant activity. Orlendo orange seed had the maximum total phenolic content and α-tocopherol content, with a value of 63.349 mg/100 g and 28.085 mg/g (control samples), respectively. The antioxidant activity of Orlendo orange seed (63.349%) was higher than seeds of Eureka lemon (55.819%) and Kinnow mandarin (28.015%), while the highest total phenolic content was found in seeds of Kinnow mandarin, followed by Orlendo orange and Eureka lemon (113.132). 1.2-Dihydroxybenzene (13.171), kaempferol (10.780), (+)-catechin (9.341) and isorhamnetin (7.592) in mg/100 g were the major phenolic compounds found in Kinnow mandarin. Among the unsaturated fatty acids, linoleic acid was the most abundant acid in all oils, which varied from 44.4% (dried at 80 °C) to 46.1% (dried at 70 °C), from 39.0% (dried at 60 °C) to 40.0% (dried at 70 °C). The total phenolic content, antioxidant activity and phenolic compounds of citrus seeds and tocopherol content of seed oils were significantly affected by drying process and varied depending on the drying temperature.

  17. The role of silica nanoparticles on long-term room-temperature stabilization of water-in-oil emulsions containing microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, L; Scher, H; VanderGheynst, J S

    2015-12-01

    Prior research has demonstrated that microalgae can be stored for extended periods of time at room temperature in water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions stabilized by surface modified silica nanoparticles. However, little research has been done to examine the impact of nanoparticle concentration on emulsion stability. Such information is important for large-scale production of emulsions for microalgae storage and delivery. Studies were done to examine the impact of silica nanoparticle concentration on emulsion stability and identify the lower limit for nanoparticle concentration. Emulsion physical stability was determined using internal phase droplet size measurements and biological stability was evaluated using cell density measurements. The results demonstrate that nanoparticle concentrations as low as 0·5wt% in the oil phase can be used without significant losses in emulsion stability and microalgae viability. Stabilization technologies are needed for long-term storage and application of microalgae in agricultural-scale systems. While prior work has demonstrated that water-in-oil emulsions containing silica nanoparticles offer a promising solution for long-term microalgae storage at room temperature, little research has been done to examine the impact of nanoparticle concentration on emulsion stability. Here, we show the effects of silica nanoparticle concentration on maintaining physical stability of emulsions and sustaining viable cells. The results enable informed decisions to be made regarding production of emulsions containing silica nanoparticles and associated impacts on stabilization of microalgae. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. Temperature dependent investigation of carrier transport, injection, and densities in 808 nm AlGaAs multi-quantum-well active layers for VCSELs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Andreas P.; Kolb, Johanna S.; Römer, Friedhard; Weichmann, Ulrich; Moench, Holger; Witzigmann, Bernd

    2014-05-01

    The electro-optical efficiency of semiconductor vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) strongly depends on the efficient carrier injection into the quantum wells (QWs) in the laser active region. However, carrier injection degrades with increasing temperature which limits the VCSEL performance particularly in high power applications where self heating imposes high temperatures in operation. By simulation we investigate the transport of charge carriers in 808 nm AlGaAs multi-quantum-well active layers with special attention to the temperature dependence of carrier injection into the QWs. Experimental reference data was extracted from oxide-confined, top-emitting VCSELs. The transport simulations follow a drift-diffusion-model complemented by a customized, energy-resolved, semi-classical carrier capture theory. QW gain was calculated in the screened Hartree-Fock approximation with band structures from 8x8 k.p-theory. Using the gain data and by setting losses and the optical confinement factor according to experimental reference results, the appropriate threshold condition and threshold carrier densities in the QWs for a VCSEL are established in simulation for all transport considerations. With the combination of gain and transport model, we can explain experimental reference data for the injection efficiency and threshold current density. Our simulations show that the decreasing injection efficiency with temperature is not solely due to increased thermionic escape of carriers from the QWs. Carrier injection is also hampered by state filling in the QWs initiated from higher threshold carrier densities with temperature. Consequently, VCSEL properties not directly related to the active layer design like optical out-coupling or internal losses link the temperature dependent carrier injection to VCSEL mirror design.

  19. Assessment of recycled PET properties for application on oil wells as sand control agents; Avaliacao de propriedades de PET reciclado para aplicacao em pocos de petroleo como agente de contencao de areia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Alexandre Zacarias Ignacio [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Delpech, Marcia Cerqueira [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (IQ/UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica], e-mail: mcd@uerj.br

    2008-07-01

    The Sand Control is fundamental for oil production in unconsolidated sandstone formations. It consists of the installation of a filter made of stainless steel screens and grained materials (sand control agents) which are, normally, high density inorganic substances (sand, ceramic, bauxite). Shallow formations, near to the sea bed, are more sensitive and need different kinds of sand control agents with low density. The objective of this work was the evaluation of recycled poly(ethylene terephthalate), PET, as sand control agent for oil wells. Pack permeability and thermal stability tests results, after up to six months of exposure to sea water and crude oil, have indicated that the recycled PET kept the necessary characteristics for the proposed application. Also, it was observed that the PET grain pack did not presented significant property modifications in the exposure conditions, when compared to the non-exposed samples. (author)

  20. Accompaniment of the biomass growth and synthesis of biosurfactants by microorganism isolated in oil wells; Acompanhamento do crescimento da biomassa e sintese de biosurfactantes por microorganismos isolados de pocos de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobato, Ana Katerine de Carvalho Lima; Araujo, Manuelle Meike Silva de [Rio Grande do Norte Univ., Natal, RN (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Engenharia Quimica]. E-mail: manuelle@eq.ufrn.br; Macedo, Gorete Ribeiro de [Rio Grande do Norte Univ., Natal, RN (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica

    2003-07-01

    Biosurfactants are structurally diversified groups of active surface molecules synthesized by microorganisms as bacteria and fungi, cultivated in several carbon sources such as sucrose and hydrocarbons. These molecules, composed by a part hydrophilic and other hydrophobic one, they act preferentially in the interface among the flowing phases with different polarities linking interfaces oil/water or water/oil reducing the superficial tensions and interfacial among these phases. They have been used in environmental applications, such as bioremediation of soils, treatment of contaminated water fountains and in cleaning process of tanks and equipment. Oil reservoirs present conditions where some microorganisms can grow. These microorganisms when isolated and cultivated at laboratory can be characterized with relation to surfactants production. In this work, microorganisms were isolated of oil wells and the biosurfactants producers were selected, among the isolated ones, to form a culture bank with potential application in environmental pollution treatment and advanced oil recovery. A microorganism stump of the developed bank was cultivated in sucrose and hydrocarbon medium and the biosurfactant production was evaluated by superficial tension measurement. The microorganism biomass production was evaluated by optical density using a spectrophotometer and the substratum consumption by Dns method. (author)

  1. SOVENT BASED ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY FOR IN-SITU UPGRADING OF HEAVY OIL SANDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munroe, Norman

    2009-01-30

    With the depletion of conventional crude oil reserves in the world, heavy oil and bitumen resources have great potential to meet the future demand for petroleum products. However, oil recovery from heavy oil and bitumen reservoirs is much more difficult than that from conventional oil reservoirs. This is mainly because heavy oil or bitumen is partially or completely immobile under reservoir conditions due to its extremely high viscosity, which creates special production challenges. In order to overcome these challenges significant efforts were devoted by Applied Research Center (ARC) at Florida International University and The Center for Energy Economics (CEE) at the University of Texas. A simplified model was developed to assess the density of the upgraded crude depending on the ratio of solvent mass to crude oil mass, temperature, pressure and the properties of the crude oil. The simplified model incorporated the interaction dynamics into a homogeneous, porous heavy oil reservoir to simulate the dispersion and concentration of injected CO2. The model also incorporated the characteristic of a highly varying CO2 density near the critical point. Since the major challenge in heavy oil recovery is its high viscosity, most researchers have focused their investigations on this parameter in the laboratory as well as in the field resulting in disparaging results. This was attributed to oil being a complex poly-disperse blend of light and heavy paraffins, aromatics, resins and asphaltenes, which have diverse behaviors at reservoir temperature and pressures. The situation is exacerbated by a dearth of experimental data on gas diffusion coefficients in heavy oils due to the tedious nature of diffusivity measurements. Ultimately, the viscosity and thus oil recovery is regulated by pressure and its effect on the diffusion coefficient and oil swelling factors. The generation of a new phase within the crude and the differences in mobility between the new crude matrix and the

  2. Origin of temperature-induced luminescence peak shifts from semipolar (11 2 ¯2 ) InxGa1 -xN quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Takuya; Funato, Mitsuru; Kawakami, Yoichi

    2017-09-01

    Observed temperature-induced peak shifts in photoluminescence (PL) originating from InxGa1 -xN single quantum wells grown on semipolar (11 2 ¯2 ) GaN bulk substrates are discussed in terms of a numerical exciton hopping model based on the Monte Carlo method. The experimentally observed PL peak shifts cannot be reproduced by conventional simulation models developed for the polar (0001) plane, where the recombination lifetime is assumed to be temperature independent, and blue-shifts in PL signal are found to be induced by exciton thermal repopulation. Therefore, we incorporate temperature-dependent radiative and nonradiative recombination processes into the model, in which temperature-induced reductions in recombination lifetimes effectively limit the exciton motion. This model is found to be a much better fit for the data, indicating that, in addition to the thermal repopulation process, the reduction of lifetime with increasing temperature can also contribute to the PL blue-shift because shortened lifetimes suppress the exciton motion and therefore produce smaller Stokes shifts. We propose that the dominant factor responsible for the PL blue-shifts depends on the degree of potential fluctuation.

  3. Enhanced room-temperature 3.5 µm photoluminescence in stress-balanced metamorphic In(Sb,As)/In(Ga,Al)As/GaAs quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, Mikhail Yu.; Solov’ev, Victor A.; Komkov, Oleg S.; Firsov, Dmitriy D.; Meltser, Boris Ya.; Yagovkina, Maria A.; Baidakova, Marina V.; Kop’ev, Petr S.; Ivanov, Sergey V.

    2017-12-01

    In this Letter, we report on the design optimization of metamorphic InSb/InAs/In(Ga,Al)As/GaAs heterostructures with type-II-in-type-I quantum well (QW) active regions, aimed at the enhancement of their room-temperature photoluminescence (PL). The strong influence of the design of the convex-graded metamorphic buffer layer (MBL) and the value of the MBL inverse step in the range from 2 to 14 mol % In on stresses in such heterostructures, as well as their PL intensity, are discussed. The optimized metamorphic In(Sb,As)/In0.63Ga0.37As/In0.75Al0.25As/MBL/GaAs structure with the inverse step of 10 mol % demonstrates 3.2–3.5 µm mid-IR PL intensity quenching from liquid-nitrogen to room temperature by a factor of 12.

  4. Generation of Desired Aroma-Active as Well as Undesired Toxicologically Relevant Compounds during Deep-Frying of Potatoes with Different Edible Vegetable Fats and Oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thürer, Alice; Granvogl, Michael

    2016-11-30

    Deep-frying leads to the generation of various degradation products providing desired properties, like aroma, taste, or color, but some can have adverse effects on human health. The study investigated the influence of frying oils differing in their fatty acid compositions on the generation of desirable and undesirable compounds during deep-frying of potato chips. Selected key odorants and toxicologically relevant compounds (acrolein, acrylamide, furan, and glycidamide) were quantitated by stable isotope dilution assays. Significantly higher concentrations of (E,E)-2,4-decadienal and (E,Z)-2,4-decadienal were found in chips fried with oils rich in linoleic acid, the precursor of the 2,4-decadienals. In contrast, the amounts of Strecker aldehydes and pyrazines were similar. Oils rich in linolenic acid revealed the highest amounts of the toxicologically relevant (E)-2-alkenal acrolein, whereas oils mainly consisting of monounsaturated or saturated fatty acids led to a clearly lower amount. Acrylamide and glycidamide concentrations in chips also showed a clear dependence on the used frying medium, in contrast to furan, whose amount was more or less similar in all chips.

  5. EVALUATIONS OF RADIONUCLIDES OF URANIUM, THORIUM, AND RADIUM ASSOCIATED WITH PRODUCED FLUIDS, PRECIPITATES, AND SLUDGES FROM OIL, GAS, AND OILFIELD BRINE INJECTION WELLS IN MISSISSIPPI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles Swann; John Matthews; Rick Ericksen; Joel Kuszmaul

    2004-03-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) are known to be produced as a byproduct of hydrocarbon production in Mississippi. The presence of NORM has resulted in financial losses to the industry and continues to be a liability as the NORM-enriched scales and scale encrusted equipment is typically stored rather than disposed of. Although the NORM problem is well known, there is little publically available data characterizing the hazard. This investigation has produced base line data to fill this informational gap. A total of 329 NORM-related samples were collected with 275 of these samples consisting of brine samples. The samples were derived from 37 oil and gas reservoirs from all major producing areas of the state. The analyses of these data indicate that two isotopes of radium ({sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra) are the ultimate source of the radiation. The radium contained in these co-produced brines is low and so the radiation hazard posed by the brines is also low. Existing regulations dictate the manner in which these salt-enriched brines may be disposed of and proper implementation of the rules will also protect the environment from the brine radiation hazard. Geostatistical analyses of the brine components suggest relationships between the concentrations of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra, between the Cl concentration and {sup 226}Ra content, and relationships exist between total dissolved solids, BaSO{sub 4} saturation and concentration of the Cl ion. Principal component analysis points to geological controls on brine chemistry, but the nature of the geologic controls could not be determined. The NORM-enriched barite (BaSO{sub 4}) scales are significantly more radioactive than the brines. Leaching studies suggest that the barite scales, which were thought to be nearly insoluble in the natural environment, can be acted on by soil microorganisms and the enclosed radium can become bioavailable. This result suggests that the landspreading means of scale disposal

  6. Simplified pesticide multiresidue analysis of soybean oil by low-temperature cleanup and dispersive solid-phase extraction coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Xu, Yanjun; Pan, Canping; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Jianc, Shuren; Liu, Fengmao

    2007-01-01

    A simple, fast, and economical method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of 28 various types of pesticides in soybean oil. Pesticides of low molecular mass were separated from the fat of the oil, which has a high molecular mass, by using low-temperature fat precipitation, followed by a cleanup process based on dispersive solid-phase extraction with primary secondary amine and C18 as sorbents and magnesium sulfate for the removal of residual water. The results for all pesticides determined by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry in the selected-ion monitoring mode were linear, and the matrix effect of the method was evaluated. Recoveries of most pesticides were acceptable at fortification levels of 0.02, 0.05, 0.2, and 1 mg/kg. The relative standard deviation was <20% even for determinations without internal standards. Limits of quantitation ranged from 20 to 250 microg/kg.

  7. Preparation and properties of ZnSe/(Zn, Cd)Se multi-quantum-well microcavities for room temperature polariton emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlis, A.; Kharchenko, A.; Husberg, O.; Lischka, K.; Schikora, D.

    2004-09-01

    Due to their large oscillator strengths, ZnSe microcavities with (Zn, Cd)Se quantum wells are particularly suited for investigation of the photon-exciton coupling behaviour in semiconductors. We have observed a strong coupling between the excitonic and photonic modes in a ZnSe microcavity with four (Zn, Cd)Se quantum wells and distributed Bragg mirrors of ZnS and YF3. A very large Rabi splitting \\hbar \\Omega>40 meV was observed in temperature dependent photoluminescence investigations.

  8. Preparation and properties of ZnSe/(Zn, Cd)Se multi-quantum-well microcavities for room temperature polariton emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawlis, A; Kharchenko, A; Husberg, O; Lischka, K; Schikora, D [Department of Physics, University of Paderborn, Warburger Strasse 100, D-33098 Paderborn (Germany)

    2004-09-08

    Due to their large oscillator strengths, ZnSe microcavities with (Zn, Cd)Se quantum wells are particularly suited for investigation of the photon-exciton coupling behaviour in semiconductors. We have observed a strong coupling between the excitonic and photonic modes in a ZnSe microcavity with four (Zn, Cd)Se quantum wells and distributed Bragg mirrors of ZnS and YF{sub 3}. A very large Rabi splitting {Dirac_h}{omega} >40 meV was observed in temperature dependent photoluminescence investigations.

  9. Effect of transverse electric field and temperature on light absorption in GaAs/AlGaAs tunnel-coupled quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firsov, D. A.; Vorobjev, L. E.; Vinnichenko, M. Ya., E-mail: mvin@spbstu.ru; Balagula, R. M. [Peter the Great Saint-Petersburg Polytechnic University (Russian Federation); Kulagina, M. M.; Vasil’iev, A. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    The photoluminescence and intersubband absorption spectra are studied in GaAs/AlGaAs tunnel- coupled quantum well structures. The peak positions in the photoluminescence and absorption spectra are consistent with the theoretically calculated energies of optical carrier transitions. The effect of a transverse electric field and temperature on intersubband light absorption is studied. It is caused by electron redistribution between the size-quantization levels and a variation in the energy spectrum of quantum wells. The variation in the refractive index in the energy region of observed intersubband transitions is estimated using Kramers–Kronig relations.

  10. TEMLOPI/V.2: a computer program for estimation of fully transient temperatures in geothermal wells during circulation and shut-in

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Paredes, G.; Garcia, A.; Santoyo, E.; Hernandez, I.

    2001-04-01

    This paper describes the development, validation and application of the TEMLOPI/V.2 computer program. This program is a useful tool for estimating in-situ the transient temperature distribution of the fluids employed for drilling geothermal wells. TEMLOPI/V.2 is based on a mathematical model which is developed to consider two-dimensional transient heat transfer during drilling and shut-in conditions in and around a geothermal well. The solution of the partial differential equations is based on the finite-difference technique with an implicit scheme. This scheme serves to demonstrate the numerical solution procedure. Each radial grid node is placed in a different thermal region: flow inside the pipe, metal pipe wall, flow inside annulus, and the surrounding formation. The program was written in FORTRAN 77 using modular programming and runs on most IBM compatible personal computers. The software code, its architecture, input and output files, the solution algorithm, flow diagrams and source programs are described in detail. From validation tests, computed temperatures differ by less than 5°C from analytically obtained temperatures. Comparison of results from the fully transient TEMLOPI/V.2 simulator and the pseudo-transient version, TEMLOPI/V.1, with measured data shows that the fully transient model provides better results. Application of TEMLOPI/V.2 is demonstrated in a practical application study of well EAZ-2 from Los Azufres Mexican geothermal field.

  11. Dual Effort to Correlate the Electron Field Emission Performance of Carbon Nanotubes with Synthesis As Well As Annealing Temperature: Theoretical Support of the Experimental Finding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Supratim; Banerjee, Diptonil; Das, Nirmalya Sankar; Chattopadhyay, Kalyan Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Here a dual approach has been adopted to study the effect of both synthesis as well as annealing temperature on the electron field emission property of differently synthesized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) that include solid state chemical reaction as well as chemical vapour deposition (CVD). Experimental findings were supported by theoretical simulation. All the samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). XRD as well as TEM study confirms the amorphous nature (aCNTs) of the samples for both the synthesis techniques which is attributed to lower synthesis temperature. Prominent morphological differences of these two types of aCNTs are clearly observed from both FESEM and TEM images. It is found that electron field emission characteristics of aCNTs synthesized by CVD shows better field emission properties as compared to aCNTs synthesized by solid state reaction. Finite element based simulation shows that temperature has prominent effect on morphology, screening effect or degree of graphitization that leads to improved field emission characteristics for the CVD synthesized aCNTs.

  12. Exploration of a mechanism for the production of highly unsaturated fatty acids in Scenedesmus sp. at low