WorldWideScience

Sample records for temperature mechanical behavior

  1. Microstructural Evolution and Mechanical Behavior of High Temperature Solders: Effects of High Temperature Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasnine, M.; Tolla, B.; Vahora, N.

    2017-12-01

    This paper explores the effects of aging on the mechanical behavior, microstructure evolution and IMC formation on different surface finishes of two high temperature solders, Sn-5 wt.% Ag and Sn-5 wt.% Sb. High temperature aging showed significant degradation of Sn-5 wt.% Ag solder hardness (34%) while aging has little effect on Sn-5 wt.% Sb solder. Sn-5 wt.% Ag experienced rapid grain growth as well as the coarsening of particles during aging. Sn-5 wt.% Sb showed a stable microstructure due to solid solution strengthening and the stable nature of SnSb precipitates. The increase of intermetallic compound (IMC) thickness during aging follows a parabolic relationship with time. Regression analysis (time exponent, n) indicated that IMC growth kinetics is controlled by a diffusion mechanism. The results have important implications in the selection of high temperature solders used in high temperature applications.

  2. Mechanical properties and fracture behavior of single-layer phosphorene at finite temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Zhen-Dong; Pei, Qing-Xiang; Ding, Zhiwei; Jiang, Jin-Wu; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2015-10-01

    Phosphorene, a new two-dimensional (2D) material beyond graphene, has attracted great attention in recent years due to its superior physical and electrical properties. However, compared to graphene and other 2D materials, phosphorene has a relatively low Young’s modulus and fracture strength, which may limit its applications due to possible structure failures. For the mechanical reliability of future phosphorene-based nanodevices, it is necessary to have a deep understanding of the mechanical properties and fracture behaviors of phosphorene. Previous studies on the mechanical properties of phosphorene were based on first principles calculations at 0 K. In this work, we employ molecular dynamics simulations to explore the mechanical properties and fracture behaviors of phosphorene at finite temperatures. It is found that temperature has a significant effect on the mechanical properties of phosphorene. The fracture strength and strain reduce by more than 65% when the temperature increases from 0 K to 450 K. Moreover, the fracture strength and strain in the zigzag direction is more sensitive to the temperature rise than that in the armchair direction. More interestingly, the failure crack propagates preferably along the groove in the puckered structure when uniaxial tension is applied in the armchair direction. In contrast, when the uniaxial tension is applied in the zigzag direction, multiple cracks are observed with rough fracture surfaces. Our present work provides useful information about the mechanical properties and failure behaviors of phosphorene at finite temperatures.

  3. Progress in understanding the mechanical behavior of pressure-vessel materials at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swindeman, R.W.; Brinkman, C.R.

    1981-01-01

    Progress during the 1970's on the production of high-temperature mechanical properties data for pressure vessel materials was reviewed. The direction of the research was toward satisfying new data requirements to implement advances in high-temperature inelastic design methods. To meet these needs, servo-controlled testing machines and high-resolution extensometry were developed to gain more information on the essential behavioral features of high-temperature alloys. The similarities and differences in the mechanical response of various pressure vessel materials were identified. High-temperature pressure vessel materials that have received the most attention included Type 304 stainless steel, Type 316 stainless steel, 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel, alloy 800H, and Hastelloy X.

  4. Mechanical Properties and Fatigue Behavior of Unitized Composite Airframe Structures at Elevated Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 18-08-2016 2. REPORT TYPE Master’s Thesis 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) September 2014 – September 2016 TITLE ... MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND FATIGUE BEHAVIOR OF UNITIZED COMPOSITE AIRFRAME STRUCTURES AT ELEVATED...TEMPERATURE THESIS Mohamed Noomen, Lieutenant, TNAF AFIT-ENY-MS-16-S-66 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY AIR FORCE INSTITUTE

  5. Mechanical behavior of Be–Ti pebbles at blanket relevant temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurinskiy, Petr, E-mail: petr.kurinskiy@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials—Applied Materials Physics (IAM-AWP), P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Rolli, Rolf [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials—Materials Biomechanics (IAM-WBM), P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Kim, Jae-Hwan; Nakamichi, Masaru [Breeding Functional Materials Development Group, Department of Blanket Fusion Institute, Rokkasho Fusion Institute, Sector of Fusion Research and Development, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Oaza-Obuchi-Aza-Omotedate, Rokkasho-mura, Kamikita-gun, Aoori 039-3212 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Mechanical behavior of two kinds of Be–Ti pebbles in the temperature range of 400–800 °C was investigated. • It was experimentally shown that Be-7 at.%Ti pebbles have the enhanced ductile properties compared to Be-7.7 at.%Ti pebbles. • Brittle failure of both kinds of Be–Ti pebbles was observed by testing at 400 °C using the constant loading with 150 N. - Abstract: Mechanical performance of beryllium-based materials is a matter of a great interest from the point of view of their use as neutron multipliers of the tritium breeding blankets. The compression strains which can occur in beryllium pebble beds under blanket working conditions will lead to deformation or even failure of individual pebbles [1,2] (Reimann et al. 2002; Ishitsuka and Kawamura, 1995). Mechanical behavior of Be–Ti pebbles having chemical contents of Be-7.0 at.% Ti and Be-7.7 at.%Ti was investigated in the temperature range of 400–800 °C. Constant loads varying from 10 up to 150 N were applied uniaxially. It was shown that Be–Ti pebbles compared to pure beryllium pebbles possess much lower ductility, although their strength properties exceed corresponding characteristics of pure beryllium. Also, the influence of titanium content on mechanical behavior of Be–Ti pebbles was investigated. Specific features of deformation of pure beryllium and Be–Ti pebbles having different titanium contents at blanket operation temperatures are discussed.

  6. Mechanical behavior of tungsten–vanadium–lanthana alloys as function of temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palacios, T., E-mail: teresa.palacios@mater.upm.es [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales-CISDEM, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, E.T.S.I. Caminos, Canales y Puertos, C/Professor Aranguren s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pastor, J.Y. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales-CISDEM, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, E.T.S.I. Caminos, Canales y Puertos, C/Professor Aranguren s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Aguirre, M.V. [Departamento de Tecnologías Especiales Aplicadas a la Aeronáutica, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, E.I. Aeronáutica y del Espacio, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Martín, A. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales-CISDEM, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, E.T.S.I. Caminos, Canales y Puertos, C/Professor Aranguren s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Monge, M.A.; Muñóz, A.; Pareja, R. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Leganés (Spain)

    2013-11-15

    The mechanical behavior of three tungsten (W) alloys with vanadium (V) and lanthana (La{sub 2}O{sub 3}) additions (W–4%V, W–1%La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, W–4%V–1%La{sub 2}O{sub 3}) processed by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) have been compared with pure-W to analyze the influence of the dopants. Mechanical characterization was performed by three point bending (TPB) tests in an oxidizing air atmosphere and temperature range between 77 (immersion tests in liquid nitrogen) and 1273 K, through which the fracture toughness, flexural strength, and yield strength as function of temperature were obtained. Results show that the V and La{sub 2}O{sub 3} additions improve the mechanical properties and oxidation behavior, respectively. Furthermore, a synergistic effect of both dopants results in an extraordinary increase of the flexure strength, fracture toughness and resistance to oxidation compared to pure-W, especially at higher temperatures. In addition, a new experimental method was developed to obtain a very small notch tip radius (around 5–7 μm) and much more similar to a crack through the use of a new machined notch. The fracture toughness results were lower than those obtained with traditional machining of the notch, which can be explained with electron microscopy, observations of deformation in the rear part of the notch tip. Finally, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination of the microstructure and fracture surfaces was used to determine and analyze the relationship between the macroscopic mechanical properties and the micromechanisms of failure involved, depending on the temperature and the dispersion of the alloy.

  7. Influence of Temperature on Plastic Deformation Behavior and Mechanism of Bismuth Single Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanaka, Yuichi; Kariya, Yoshiharu; Watanabe, Hirohiko; Hokazono, Hiroaki

    2018-01-01

    Tensile tests were performed on bismuth single crystals in the [0001] ( c-axis), [2\\bar{1}\\bar{1} 0] ( a 1-axis), [10\\bar{1} 0] and [1 \\bar{1} 00] directions of bismuth single crystals to investigate the influence of temperature on plastic deformation behavior. The plastic deformation at 298 K was caused by slip on the secondary slip system in the [0001] direction, or by twinning and slip deformation in twins subsequent to the twining deformation in the [2\\bar{1}\\bar{1} 0] direction. Those mechanisms resulted in ductile characteristics in tension. Only deformation twinning, however, was observed along the [10\\bar{1}0] and [1\\bar{1} 00] directions, which lead to brittle fracture. At elevated temperature (423 K), deformation twinning was not found to occur along any of the examined directions. Crystallographic slip was the predominant deformation mechanism along the [2\\bar{1}\\bar{1} 0], [10\\bar{1} 0] and [1\\bar{1} 00] directions at 423 K. This is attributed to the activation of the {1\\bar{1} 02} or {1\\bar{1} 02} slip system which are inactive at 298 K. Along the [0001] direction at 423 K, the {0\\bar{1} 11} was active and its critical resolved shear stress ( τ crss) does not coincide with that corresponding to the {1\\bar{1} 02} and {1\\bar{1} 02} systems. Therefore, it can be concluded that difference in τ crss between slip systems causes anisotropy in mechanical behavior at 423 K.

  8. Influence of Temperature on Plastic Deformation Behavior and Mechanism of Bismuth Single Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanaka, Yuichi; Kariya, Yoshiharu; Watanabe, Hirohiko; Hokazono, Hiroaki

    2017-10-01

    Tensile tests were performed on bismuth single crystals in the [0001] (c-axis), [2\\bar{1}\\bar{1} 0] (a 1-axis), [10\\bar{1} 0] and [1 \\bar{1} 00] directions of bismuth single crystals to investigate the influence of temperature on plastic deformation behavior. The plastic deformation at 298 K was caused by slip on the secondary slip system in the [0001] direction, or by twinning and slip deformation in twins subsequent to the twining deformation in the [2\\bar{1}\\bar{1} 0] direction. Those mechanisms resulted in ductile characteristics in tension. Only deformation twinning, however, was observed along the [10\\bar{1} 0] and [1\\bar{1} 00] directions, which lead to brittle fracture. At elevated temperature (423 K), deformation twinning was not found to occur along any of the examined directions. Crystallographic slip was the predominant deformation mechanism along the [2\\bar{1}\\bar{1} 0], [10\\bar{1} 0] and [1\\bar{1} 00] directions at 423 K. This is attributed to the activation of the {1\\bar{1} 02} or {1\\bar{1} 02} slip system which are inactive at 298 K. Along the [0001] direction at 423 K, the {0\\bar{1} 11} was active and its critical resolved shear stress (τ crss) does not coincide with that corresponding to the {1\\bar{1} 02} and {1\\bar{1} 02} systems. Therefore, it can be concluded that difference in τ crss between slip systems causes anisotropy in mechanical behavior at 423 K.

  9. Mechanisms Governing the Creep Behavior of High Temperature Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasudevan, Vijay [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Carroll, Laura [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sham, Sam [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-04-06

    This research project, which includes collaborators from INL and ORNL, focuses on the study of alloy 617 and alloy 800H that are candidates for applications as intermediate heat exchangers in GEN IV nuclear reactors, with an emphasis on the effects of grain size, grain boundaries and second phases on the creep properties; the mechanisms of dislocation creep, diffusional creep and cavitation; the onset of tertiary creep; and theoretical modeling for long-term predictions of materials behavior and for high temperature alloy design.

  10. The temperature behavior and mechanism of exciton luminescence in quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatsepin, A F; Biryukov, D Yu

    2017-07-19

    The processes of direct and indirect optical excitation of spatially confined excitons in quantum dots (QDs) embedded in a silica thin-film matrix have been reported and discussed. A generalized scheme for the electronic transitions is employed for a detailed description of luminescence temperature behavior using various excitation methods. This scheme considers three different models of exciton relaxation and substantiates the occupation of the triplet radiative states as a result of singlet-triplet intersystem crossing or excitation energy transfer from free excitons of the matrix. Analytical expressions describing five types of different temperature curves were derived. It is established that their shapes are exactly defined by the excitation mechanism and the parameters involved in the numerical model. The conditions allowing the estimation of the energy and kinetic characteristics of QD photoluminescence are formulated. We have shown that the confinement effect causes a decrease in the thermal activation barriers and frequency characteristics for non-radiative transitions. An application of the developed concepts allows predicting and estimating the temperature dependences for direct and indirect optically excited QD luminescence employing silicon nanoclusters in a silica thin-film matrix as an example.

  11. Mechanical behavior of a triaxially braided textile composite at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mourid, Amine

    The work presented in this thesis aimed at understanding the influence of viscoelasticity, temperature and aging on the mechanical behaviour of a textile composite using experimental, analytical and numerical tools. The studied material was a triaxially braided composite with fibres in the 0°/+/-60° directions. The yarns were made of carbon fibres, embedded in an MVK10 temperature resistant polyimide matrix. The first step consisted in developing analytical and numerical frameworks to predict viscoelastic behaviour in textile composites. Simulations were performed for both braided and woven textile architectures, at different stiffness contrasts and yarns volume fractions. The analytical framework accuracy was verified with the help of the numerical simulations. An important finding of this study was that the analytical framework, combined with the Mori-Tanaka model, leads to relatively accurate predictions for both the permanent and transient parts. Therefore, the authors believe that the Mori-Tanaka model with an adjusted aspect ratio to take into account yarn curvature is reliable for predicting viscoelastic behaviour in textile composites. The textile composite that was studied in this project did not display viscoelastic behaviour, due to the high yarn volume fraction. However, the framework remains relevant for higher temperature applications or lower yarn volume fractions. The second step was to investigate the temperature effect on the tensile behavior of the carbon/MVK10 triaxially braided composite material studied in this project. To achieve this goal, a series of room and high temperature tensile tests on both matrix and composite samples were performed. The tests on composite samples were performed along two different material directions at the maximum service temperature allowed by the Federal Aviation Administration for aircraft components, and a dedicated replication technique was developed in order to track crack densities as a function of

  12. Mechanical behavior of recycled lightweight concrete using EVA waste and CDW under moderate temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Q. R. Santiago

    Full Text Available Many benefits can be achieved by using recycled waste as raw material for construction. Some of them are the reduction of the total cost of the construction, the reduction of the consumption of energy and the decrease in the use of natural materials. The construction sector can also incorporate the waste of the other industries, like the waste of the shoes industry, the Ethylene Vinyl Acetate (EVA. EVA aggregate is obtained by cutting off the waste of EVA expanded sheets used to produce insoles and innersoles of the shoes. In this work two types of recycled aggregate were used - construction and demolition waste (CDW and EVA. The aim of this work was to study the influence of the use of these recycled aggregates, as replacement of the natural coarse aggregate, on mechanical behavior of recycled concrete. The experimental program was developed with two w/c ratio: 0.49 and 0.82. Four mixtures with produced with different aggregates substitution rates (0, 50%EVA, 50%CDW and 25%EVA-25%CDW, by volume. Compressive tests were carried out to evaluable the influence of recycled aggregate on strength, elastic modulus and Poisson coefficient. In addition, it was evaluated the effect of the moderate temperatures (50, 70 and 100º C on stress-strain behavior of concretes studied. The results demonstrated that is possible to use the EVA waste and RCD to produces lightweight concrete. The influence of temperature was more significant only on elastic modulus of the recycled concrete with 50%EVA.

  13. Mechanical Behavior of AZ31B Mg Alloy Sheets under Monotonic and Cyclic Loadings at Room and Moderately Elevated Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngoc-Trung Nguyen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Large-strain monotonic and cyclic loading tests of AZ31B magnesium alloy sheets were performed with a newly developed testing system, at different temperatures, ranging from room temperature to 250 °C. Behaviors showing significant twinning during initial in-plane compression and untwinning in subsequent tension at and slightly above room temperature were recorded. Strong yielding asymmetry and nonlinear hardening behavior were also revealed. Considerable Bauschinger effects, transient behavior, and variable permanent softening responses were observed near room temperature, but these were reduced and almost disappeared as the temperature increased. Different stress–strain responses were inherent to the activation of twinning at lower temperatures and non-basal slip systems at elevated temperatures. A critical temperature was identified to account for the transition between the twinning-dominant and slip-dominant deformation mechanisms. Accordingly, below the transition point, stress–strain curves of cyclic loading tests exhibited concave-up shapes for compression or compression following tension, and an unusual S-shape for tension following compression. This unusual shape disappeared when the temperature was above the transition point. Shrinkage of the elastic range and variation in Young’s modulus due to plastic strain deformation during stress reversals were also observed. The texture-induced anisotropy of both the elastic and plastic behaviors was characterized experimentally.

  14. Modeling the thermo-mechanical behavior of a woven ceramic matrix composite at high temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Enakoutsa, Koffi; Hammi, Youssef; Crawford, John E.; Abraham, Joseph; Magallanes, Joe

    2016-01-01

    This paper aimed at extending a model developed by Ladeveze to capture thermal expansion and coupled thermo-mechanical phenomena, as such as those encountered at elevated and extreme temperatures. In the new model a linear thermal expansion coefficient is added to equation of state to account for the thermal to mechanical coupling effects. The mechanical to thermal effects are introduced by assuming an internal heat generation due to residual strain effects. The constitutive relations of the ...

  15. Comparison of different low-temperature aging protocols: its effects on the mechanical behavior of Y-TZP ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereira, G.K.R.; Muller, C.; Wandscher, V.F.; Rippe, M.P.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Valandro, L.F.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different protocols of low-temperature degradation simulation on the mechanical behavior (structural reliability and flexural strength), the surface topography (roughness), and phase transformation of a Y-TZP ceramic. Disc-shaped specimens (1.2 mm×12 mm, Lava

  16. Mechanical behavior of a Y-TZP ceramic for monolithic restorations: effect of grinding and low-temperature aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereira, G.K.R.; Silvestri, T.; Camargo, R.; Rippe, M.P.; Amaral, M.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Valandro, L.F.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of grinding with diamond burs and low-temperature aging on the mechanical behavior (biaxial flexural strength and structural reliability), surface topography, and phase transformation of a Y-TZP ceramic for monolithic dental restorations. Disc-shaped

  17. Failure Mechanical Behavior of Australian Strathbogie Granite at High Temperatures: Insights from Particle Flow Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Qi Yang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Thermally induced damage has an important influence on rock mechanics and engineering, especially for high-level radioactive waste repositories, geological carbon storage, underground coal gasification, and hydrothermal systems. Additionally, the wide application of geothermal heat requires knowledge of the geothermal conditions of reservoir rocks at elevated temperature. However, few methods to date have been reported for investigating the micro-mechanics of specimens at elevated temperatures. Therefore, this paper uses a cluster model in particle flow code in two dimensions (PFC2D to simulate the uniaxial compressive testing of Australian Strathbogie granite at various elevated temperatures. The peak strength and ultimate failure mode of the granite specimens at different elevated temperatures obtained by the numerical methods are consistent with those obtained by experimentation. Since the tensile force is always concentrated around the boundary of the crystal, cracks easily occur at the intergranular contacts, especially between the b-b and b-k boundaries where less intragranular contact is observed. The intergranular and intragranular cracking of the specimens is almost constant with increasing temperature at low temperature, and then it rapidly and linearly increases. However, the inflection point of intergranular micro-cracking is less than that of intragranular cracking. Intergranular cracking is more easily induced by a high temperature than intragranular cracking. At an elevated temperature, the cumulative micro-crack counts curve propagates in a stable way during the active period, and it has no unstable crack propagation stage. The micro-cracks and parallel bond forces in the specimens with elevated temperature evolution and axial strain have different characteristics than those at lower temperature. More branch fractures and isolated wider micro-cracks are generated with increasing temperature when the temperature is over 400

  18. The influence of temperatures and strain rates on the mechanical behavior of dual phase steel in different conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Cao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with the mechanical behavior of DP steel. A commercial dual phase steel (DP 800 was strained to 3.5% followed by annealing at 180 °C for 30 min to simulate the pressing of the plates and the paint-bake cycle involved in the manufacturing process of automobile body structures. The effect of temperature and strain rate on the mechanical behavior of this material was investigated by uniaxial tensile tests, covering applicable temperatures (−60 °C to 100 °C and strain rates (1 × 10−4 to 1 × 102 s−1 experienced in automotive crash situations. Yield and ultimate tensile strength, ductility, temperature effects and strain rate sensitivity as well as strain hardening rate have been determined and discussed.

  19. Study on vapor film collapse behavior on high temperature particle surface. 2. Effect of subcooling on micro-mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Yutaka [Yamagata University, Dept. of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Yonezawa, Yamagata (Japan); Tochio, Daisuke [Yamagata Univ. (Japan)

    2000-02-01

    Thermal detonation model is proposed to describe vapor explosion. According to this model, vapor film on pre-mixed high temperature droplet surface should be collapsed for the trigger of the vapor explosion. It is pointed out that the vapor film collapse behavior is significantly affected by the subcooling of low temperature liquid. However, the effect of subcooling on micro-mechanism of vapor film collapse behavior is not experimentally well identified. The objective of the present research is to experimentally investigate the effect of subcooling on micro-mechanism of film boiling collapse behavior. As the results, it is experimentally clarified that the vapor film collapse behavior in low subcool condition is qualitatively different from the vapor film collapse behavior in high subcool condition. In high subcool condition, instability of the vapor film dominates the vapor film collapse on the particle surface. On the other hand, micro-mechanism at the interface between vapor and liquid such as micro-jet is dominant in low subcool condition in case of vapor film collapse by pressure pulse. (author)

  20. Mechanical behavior of recrystallized Zircaloy-4 under monotonic loading at room temperature: Tests and simplified anisotropic modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Mozzani, Nathanael; Auzoux, Quentin; Le Boulch, D.; Andrieu, Eric; Blanc, Christine; Scott, Colin; Barnel, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Mechanical behavior of recrystallized Zircaloy-4 was studied at room temperature in the rolling-transverse plane of a thin sheet. Uniaxial constant elongation rate tests (CERTs) were performed along with creep tests, over a wide range of strain rates. Based on a simplified formulation, different sets of parameters for an anisotropic viscoplastic model were found to fit the stress–strain curves. Notched specimen tensile tests were carried out with a digital image correl...

  1. The mechanical behavior and reliability prediction of the HTR graphite component at various temperature and neutron dose ranges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Xiang; Yu, Suyuan [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Haitao, E-mail: wanght@tsinghua.edu.cn [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li, Chenfeng [Civil and Computational Engineering Centre, College of Engineering, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • The mechanical behavior of graphite component in HTRs under high temperature and neutron irradiation conditions is simulated. • The computational process of mechanical analysis is introduced. • Deformation, stresses and failure probability of the graphite component are obtained and discussed. • Various temperature and neutron dose ranges are selected in order to investigate the effect of in-core conditions on the results. - Abstract: In a pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR), nuclear graphite serves as the main structural material of the side reflectors. The reactor core is made up of a large number of graphite bricks. In the normal operation case of the reactor, the maximum temperature of the helium coolant commonly reaches about 750 °C. After around 30 years’ full power operation, the peak value of in-core fast neutron cumulative dose reaches to 1 × 10{sup 22}n cm{sup −2} (EDN). Such high temperature and neutron irradiation strongly impact the behavior of graphite component, causing obvious deformation. The temperature and neutron dose are unevenly distributed inside a graphite brick, resulting in stress concentrations. The deformation and stress concentration can both greatly affect safety and reliability of the graphite component. In addition, most of the graphite properties (such as Young's modulus and coefficient of thermal expansion) change remarkably under high temperature and neutron irradiations. The irradiation-induced creep also plays a very important role during the whole process, and provides a significant impact on the stress accumulation. In order to simulate the behavior of graphite component under various in-core conditions, all of the above factors must be considered carefully. In this paper, the deformation, stress distribution and failure probability of a side graphite component are studied at various temperature points and neutron dose levels. 400 °C, 500 °C, 600 °C and 750 °C are selected

  2. Moisture and temperature influence on mechanical behavior of PPS/buckypapers carbon fiber laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, J. A.; Santos, L. F. P.; Costa, M. L.; Ribeiro, B.; Botelho, E. C.

    2017-07-01

    In this work, multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) were dispersed in water with the assistance of water based surfactant and then sonicated in order to obtain a very well dispersed solution. The suspension was filtrate under vaccum conditions, generating a thin film called buckypapers (BP). Poly (phenylene sulphide) (PPS) reinforced carbon fiber (CF) and PPS reinforced CF/BP composites were manufactured through hot compression molding technique. Subsequently the samples were exposed to extreme humidity (90% of moisture) combined with high temperature (80 °C). The mechanical properties of the laminates were evaluated by dynamic mechanical analysis, compression shear test, interlaminar shear strength and impulse excitation of vibration. Volume fraction of pores were 10.93% for PPS/CF and 16.18% for PPS/BP/CF, indicating that the hot compression molding parameters employed in this investigation (1.4 MPa, 5 min and 330 °C) affected both the consolidation quality of the composites and the mechanical properties of the final laminates.

  3. Coupled DDD-FEM modeling on the mechanical behavior of microlayered metallic multilayer film at elevated temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Minsheng; Li, Zhenhuan

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the mechanical behavior of the microlayered metallic thin films (MMMFs) at elevated temperature, an enhanced discrete-continuous model (DCM), which couples rather than superposes the two-dimensional climb/glide-enabled discrete dislocation dynamics (2D-DDD) with the linearly elastic finite element method (FEM), is developed in this study. In the present coupling scheme, two especial treatments are made. One is to solve how the plastic strain captured by the DDD module is transferred properly to the FEM module as an eigen-strain; the other is to answer how the stress field computationally obtained by the FEM module is transferred accurately to the DDD module to drive those discrete dislocations moving correctly. With these two especial treatments, the interactions between adjacent dislocations and between dislocation pile-ups and inter-phase boundaries (IBs), which are crucial to the strengthening effect in MMMFs, are carefully taken into account. After verified by comparing the computationally predicted results with the theoretical solutions for a dislocation residing in a homogeneous material and nearby a bi-material interface, this 2D-DDD/FEM coupling scheme is used to model the tensile mechanical behaviors of MMMFs at elevated temperature. The strengthening mechanism of MMMFs and the layer thickness effect are studied in detail, with special attentions to the influence of dislocation climb on them.

  4. Influence of Temperature on Mechanical Behavior During Static Restore Processes of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu High Strength Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Kun

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Flow stress behaviors of as-cast Al-Zn-Mg-Cu high strength aluminum alloy during static restore processes were investigated by: Isothermal double-pass compression tests at temperatures of 300-400℃, strain rates of 0.01-1 s-1, strains of 33% +20% with the holding times of 0~900 s after the first pass compression. The results indicate that the deformation temperature has a dramatical effect on mechanical behaviors during static restore processes of the alloy. (1 At 300 ℃ and 330 ℃ lower temperatures, the recovery during the deformation is slow, and deformation energy stored in matrix is higher, flow stresses at the second pass deformation decreased during the recovery and recrystallization, and the stress softening phenomena is observed. Stress softening is increased with the increasing holding time; Precipitation during the holding time inhibites the stress softening. (2 At 360 ℃ and 400 ℃ higher temperatures, the recovery during deformation is rapid, and deformation energy stored in matrix is lower. Solid solubility is higher after holding, so that flow stress at the second pass deformation is increased, stress hardening phenomena is observed. Stress hardening decreased with the increasing holding time duo to the recovery and recrystallization during holding period at 360 ℃; Precipitation during holding also inhibited the stress softening. However, Stress hardening remains constant with the increasing holding time duo to the reasanenal there are no recovery and recrystallization during holding period at 400 ℃.

  5. Mechanical behavior of recrystallized Zircaloy-4 under monotonic loading at room temperature: Tests and simplified anisotropic modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozzani, N., E-mail: nathanael.mozzani@edf.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN/DMN/SEMI/LCMI, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); EDF R and D, Site des Renardières, 77 818 Moret-sur-Loing (France); Auzoux, Q.; Le Boulch, D. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DMN/SEMI/LCMI, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Andrieu, E.; Blanc, C. [Université de Toulouse, CIRIMAT/ENSIACET, UPS/INPT/CNRS, 4 allée Emile Monso, 31432 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Scott, C.P. [AREVA, AREVA NP, 10 rue Juliette Récamier, 69456 Lyon (France); Barnel, N. [EDF R and D, Site des Renardières, 77 818 Moret-sur-Loing (France)

    2014-04-01

    Mechanical behavior of recrystallized Zircaloy-4 was studied at room temperature in the rolling-transverse plane of a thin sheet. Uniaxial constant elongation rate tests (CERTs) were performed along with creep tests, over a wide range of strain rates. Based on a simplified formulation, different sets of parameters for an anisotropic viscoplastic model were found to fit the stress–strain curves. Notched specimen tensile tests were carried out with a digital image correlation (DIC) technique in order to determine the strain field evolution. From these measurements and the determination of Lankford coefficients, the most consistent model was selected and simulated data were successfully compared with the experimental observations.

  6. Mechanical behavior of recrystallized Zircaloy-4 under monotonic loading at room temperature: Tests and simplified anisotropic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozzani, N.; Auzoux, Q.; Le Boulch, D.; Andrieu, E.; Blanc, C.; Scott, C. P.; Barnel, N.

    2014-04-01

    Mechanical behavior of recrystallized Zircaloy-4 was studied at room temperature in the rolling-transverse plane of a thin sheet. Uniaxial constant elongation rate tests (CERTs) were performed along with creep tests, over a wide range of strain rates. Based on a simplified formulation, different sets of parameters for an anisotropic viscoplastic model were found to fit the stress-strain curves. Notched specimen tensile tests were carried out with a digital image correlation (DIC) technique in order to determine the strain field evolution. From these measurements and the determination of Lankford coefficients, the most consistent model was selected and simulated data were successfully compared with the experimental observations.

  7. Experimental study of thermo-mechanical behavior of SiC composite tubing under high temperature gradient using solid surrogate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alva, Luis; Shapovalov, Kirill [University of South Carolina, Mechanical Engineering Department (United States); Jacobsen, George M.; Back, Christina A. [General Atomics (United States); Huang, Xinyu, E-mail: huangxin@mailbox.sc.edu [University of South Carolina, Mechanical Engineering Department (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Nuclear grade silicon carbide fiber (SiC{sub f}) reinforced silicon carbide matrix (SiC{sub m}) composite is a promising candidate material for accident tolerance fuel (ATF) cladding. A major challenge is ensuring the mechanical robustness of the ceramic cladding under accident conditions. In this work the high temperature mechanical response of a SiC{sub f}–SiC{sub m} composite tubing is studied using a novel thermo-mechanical test method. A solid surrogate tube is placed within and bonded to the SiC{sub f}–SiC{sub m} sample tube using a ceramic adhesive. The bonded tube pair is heated from the center using a ceramic glower. During testing, the outer surface temperature of the SiC sample tube rises up to 1274 K, and a steep temperature gradient develops through the thickness of the tube pair. Due to CTE mismatch and the temperature gradient, the solid surrogate tube induces high tensile stress in the SiC sample. During testing, 3D digital image correlation (DIC) method is used to map the strains on the outer surface of the SiC-composite, and acoustic emissions (AE) are monitored to detect the onset and progress of material damage. The thermo-mechanical behavior of SiC-composite sample is compared with that of monolithic SiC samples. Finite element models are developed to estimate stress–strain distribution within the tube assembly. Model predicted surface strain matches the measured surface strain using the DIC method. AE activities indicated a progressive damage process for SiC{sub f}–SiC{sub m} composite samples. For the composites tested in this study, the threshold mechanical hoop strain for matrix micro-cracking to initiate in SiC{sub f}–SiC{sub m} sample is found to be ∼300 microstrain.

  8. Effect of Annealing Temperature on the Mechanical and Corrosion Behavior of a Newly Developed Novel Lean Duplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yanjun; Hu, Jincheng; Li, Jin; Jiang, Laizhu; Liu, Tianwei; Wu, Yanping

    2014-01-01

    The effect of annealing temperature (1000–1150 °C) on the microstructure evolution, mechanical properties, and pitting corrosion behavior of a newly developed novel lean duplex stainless steel with 20.53Cr-3.45Mn-2.08Ni-0.17N-0.31Mo was studied by means of optical metallographic microscopy (OMM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), magnetic force microscopy (MFM), scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), uniaxial tensile tests (UTT), and potentiostatic critical pitting temperature (CPT). The results showed that tensile and yield strength, as well as the pitting corrosion resistance, could be degraded with annealing temperature increasing from 1000 up to 1150 °C. Meanwhile, the elongation at break reached the maximum of 52.7% after annealing at 1050 °C due to the effect of martensite transformation induced plasticity (TRIP). The localized pitting attack preferentially occurred at ferrite phase, indicating that the ferrite phase had inferior pitting corrosion resistance as compared to the austenite phase. With increasing annealing temperature, the pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN) of ferrite phase dropped, while that of the austenite phase rose. Additionally, it was found that ferrite possessed a lower Volta potential than austenite phase. Moreover, the Volta potential difference between ferrite and austenite increased with the annealing temperature, which was well consistent with the difference of PREN. PMID:28788201

  9. Effect of Annealing Temperature on the Mechanical and Corrosion Behavior of a Newly Developed Novel Lean Duplex Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanjun Guo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of annealing temperature (1000–1150 °C on the microstructure evolution, mechanical properties, and pitting corrosion behavior of a newly developed novel lean duplex stainless steel with 20.53Cr-3.45Mn-2.08Ni-0.17N-0.31Mo was studied by means of optical metallographic microscopy (OMM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, magnetic force microscopy (MFM, scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS, uniaxial tensile tests (UTT, and potentiostatic critical pitting temperature (CPT. The results showed that tensile and yield strength, as well as the pitting corrosion resistance, could be degraded with annealing temperature increasing from 1000 up to 1150 °C. Meanwhile, the elongation at break reached the maximum of 52.7% after annealing at 1050 °C due to the effect of martensite transformation induced plasticity (TRIP. The localized pitting attack preferentially occurred at ferrite phase, indicating that the ferrite phase had inferior pitting corrosion resistance as compared to the austenite phase. With increasing annealing temperature, the pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN of ferrite phase dropped, while that of the austenite phase rose. Additionally, it was found that ferrite possessed a lower Volta potential than austenite phase. Moreover, the Volta potential difference between ferrite and austenite increased with the annealing temperature, which was well consistent with the difference of PREN.

  10. Effect of Annealing Temperature on the Mechanical and Corrosion Behavior of a Newly Developed Novel Lean Duplex Stainless Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yanjun; Hu, Jincheng; Li, Jin; Jiang, Laizhu; Liu, Tianwei; Wu, Yanping

    2014-09-12

    The effect of annealing temperature (1000-1150 °C) on the microstructure evolution, mechanical properties, and pitting corrosion behavior of a newly developed novel lean duplex stainless steel with 20.53Cr-3.45Mn-2.08Ni-0.17N-0.31Mo was studied by means of optical metallographic microscopy (OMM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), magnetic force microscopy (MFM), scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), uniaxial tensile tests (UTT), and potentiostatic critical pitting temperature (CPT). The results showed that tensile and yield strength, as well as the pitting corrosion resistance, could be degraded with annealing temperature increasing from 1000 up to 1150 °C. Meanwhile, the elongation at break reached the maximum of 52.7% after annealing at 1050 °C due to the effect of martensite transformation induced plasticity (TRIP). The localized pitting attack preferentially occurred at ferrite phase, indicating that the ferrite phase had inferior pitting corrosion resistance as compared to the austenite phase. With increasing annealing temperature, the pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN) of ferrite phase dropped, while that of the austenite phase rose. Additionally, it was found that ferrite possessed a lower Volta potential than austenite phase. Moreover, the Volta potential difference between ferrite and austenite increased with the annealing temperature, which was well consistent with the difference of PREN.

  11. Mechanical Behavior and Thermal Stability of Acid-Base Phosphate Cements and Composites Fabricated at Ambient Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorado Lopera, Henry Alonso

    This dissertation presents the study of the mechanical behavior and thermal stability of acid-base phosphate cements (PCs) and composites fabricated at ambient temperature. These materials are also known as chemically bonded phosphate ceramics (CBPCs). Among other advantages of using PCs when compared with traditional cements are the better mechanical properties (compressive and flexural strength), lower density, ultra-fast (controllable) setting time, controllable pH, and an environmentally benign process. Several PCs based on wollastonite and calcium and alumino phosphates after thermal exposure up to 1000°C have been investigated. First, the thermo-mechanical and chemical stability of wollastonite-based PC (Wo-PC) exposed to temperatures up to 1000°C in air environment were studied. The effects of processing conditions on the curing and shrinkage of the wollastonite-based PC were studied. The chemical reactions and phase transformations during the fabrication and during the thermal exposure are analyzed in detail using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA Then, the thermo-mechanical and chemical stability of glass, carbon and basalt fiber reinforced Wo-PC composites, were studied using SEM, XRD, TGA. The flexural strength and Weibull statistics were analyzed. A significant strength degradation in the composites were found after the thermal exposure at elevated temperatures due to the interdifusion and chemical reactions across the fibers and the matrix at temperatures over 600°C. To overcome this barrier, we have developed a new PC based on calcium and alumino-phosphates (Ca-Al PCs). The Ca-Al PCs were studied in detail using SEM, XRD, TGA, curing, shrinkage, Weibull statistics, and compression tests. Our study has confirmed that this new composite material is chemically and mechanically stable at temperatures up to 1000°C. Moreover, the compression strength increases after exposure to 1000

  12. Mechanical Properties and Fatigue Behavior of Unitized Composite Airframe Structures at Elevated Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    would like to thank my Lord and Savior Jesus Christ for this opportunity and for sustaining me throughout the past year and a half. I would also like...showing the proportional limit. The bilinear nature of the stress- strain curve is evident . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17...change in the stress-strain curve for PMR-15 neat resin with increasing temperature can be seen in Figure 8. It is evident that the ultimate tensile

  13. Thermo-Mechanical and Thermal Behavior of High-Temperature Structural Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-31

    Cylinders," Phil. Mag. 36 [257] 418-25 (1945). 14. M. P. Heisler , "Transient Thermal Stresses in Slabs and Circular Pressure Vessels," J. Appl. Mech.20...CC 0mn 0 o CRACK-LENGTH (a) Fig. 4. Diagram for crack stability showing ac, amin, amnax and a- and the crack propagation behavior for cracks of... diagrams in Fig. 5 with the nature of strength loss be- havior predicted for the lack of crack interaction shows that the effect of such interaction can

  14. Deposition Mechanisms and Oxidation Behaviors of Ti-Ni Coatings Deposited in Low-Temperature HVOF Spraying Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Q. S.; Zhou, K. S.; Deng, C. M.; Liu, M.; Xu, L. P.; Deng, C. G.

    2014-08-01

    Three kinds of Ti-Ni powders were deposited on 316L stainless steel by low-temperature high-velocity oxygen fuel (LT-HVOF) spraying process, respectively. Deposition mechanisms and oxidation behaviors of the coatings were researched in this paper. The coating deposited from TiNi intermetallic powder had obvious laminar structure and the oxygen content was the highest among the three kinds of coatings. The oxygen content of the coating deposited from small-sized Ni-clad Ti powder was still high due to the melting of parts of particles. However, most of the coarse Ni-clad Ti powder was deposited in solid states without changes of chemical compositions and phase compositions. The oxygen content of the coating deposited from coarse Ni-clad Ti powder was the lowest among the three kinds of coatings. It indicated that the deposition behavior of the coating could effectively preserve the inner titanium from oxidation. The results of the present research demonstrated that it is entirely feasible to deposit active metal materials such as titanium and titanium alloy through the optimizing selection of powder in the LT-HVOF process.

  15. Correlation between Mechanical Behavior and Actuator-type Performance of Ni-Ti-Pd High-temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Glen S.; Padula, Santo A., II; Garg, Anita; Noebe, Ronald D.

    2007-01-01

    High-temperature shape memory alloys in the NiTiPd system are being investigated as lower cost alternatives to NiTiPt alloys for use in compact solid-state actuators for the aerospace, automotive, and power generation industries. A range of ternary NiTiPd alloys containing 15 to 46 at.% Pd has been processed and actuator mimicking tests (thermal cycling under load) were used to measure transformation temperatures, work behavior, and dimensional stability. With increasing Pd content, the work output of the material decreased, while the amount of permanent strain resulting from each load-biased thermal cycle increased. Monotonic isothermal tension testing of the high-temperature austenite and low temperature martensite phases was used to partially explain these behaviors, where a mismatch in yield strength between the austenite and martensite phases was observed at high Pd levels. Moreover, to further understand the source of the permanent strain at lower Pd levels, strain recovery tests were conducted to determine the onset of plastic deformation in the martensite phase. Consequently, the work behavior and dimensional stability during thermal cycling under load of the various NiTiPd alloys is discussed in relation to the deformation behavior of the materials as revealed by the strain recovery and monotonic tension tests.

  16. Fundamental Processes of Coupled Radiation Damage and Mechanical Behavior in Nuclear Fuel Materials for High Temperature Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillpot, Simon; Tulenko, James

    2011-09-08

    The objective of this work has been to elucidate the relationship among microstructure, radiation damage and mechanical properties for nuclear fuel materials. As representative nuclear materials, we have taken an hcp metal (Mg as a generic metal, and Ti alloys for fast reactors) and UO2 (representing fuel). The degradation of the thermo-mechanical behavior of nuclear fuels under irradiation, both the fissionable material itself and its cladding, is a longstanding issue of critical importance to the nuclear industry. There are experimental indications that nanocrystalline metals and ceramics may be more resistant to radiation damage than their coarse-grained counterparts. The objective of this project look at the effect of microstructure on radiation damage and mechanical behavior in these materials. The approach to be taken was state-of-the-art, large-scale atomic-level simulation. This systematic simulation program of the effects of irradiation on the structure and mechanical properties of polycrystalline Ti and UO2 identified radiation damage mechanisms. Moreover, it will provided important insights into behavior that can be expected in nanocrystalline microstructures and, by extension, nanocomposites. The fundamental insights from this work can be expected to help in the design microstructures that are less susceptible to radiation damage and thermomechanical degradation.

  17. Temperature Effects on Tensile and Compressive Mechanical Behaviors of C-S-H Structure via Atomic Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Xin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An atomic scale model of amorphous calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H with Ca/Si ratio of 1.67 is constructed. Effects of temperature on mechanical properties of C-S-H structure under tensile and compressive loading in the layered direction are investigated via molecular dynamics simulations. Results from present simulations show that (1 the tensile strength and Young’s modulus of C-S-H structure significantly decrease with the increase of the temperature; (2 the water layer plays an important role in the mechanical properties of C-S-H structure; (3 the compressive strength is stronger than tensile strength, which corresponds with the characteristic of cement paste.

  18. Fracture mechanical behavior of red sandstone containing a single fissure and two parallel fissures after exposure to different high temperature treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sheng-Qi; Jing, Hong-Wen; Huang, Yan-Hua; Ranjith, P. G.; Jiao, Yu-Yong

    2014-12-01

    A detailed understanding of the brittle deformation behavior of sandstone containing pre-existing flaws at elevated temperatures is a key concern in underground engineering. In this research, uniaxial compression tests were performed to evaluate the effect of high temperature treatments (300, 600 or 900 °C) on the strength, deformability and fracture coalescence behavior of a sandstone containing either a single fissure or two parallel fissures. All experiments focused on rectangular prismatic (80 × 160 × 30 mm) specimens of red sandstone. Constant strain rate experiments were performed on either: (1) specimens that contained a single 2 mm-wide fissure or (2) specimens that contained two 2 mm-wide parallel fissures. The specimens containing either one or two fissures were either left at room temperature (i.e., no heat treatment), or heat treated to 300, 600 or 900 °C prior to experimentation. The results demonstrated that, in all cases, the strength and stiffness of red sandstone was increased at 300 °C, before decreasing up to our maximum temperature of 900 °C. However, the peak strain at failure always showed an increase when the temperature was increased. The crack initiation, propagation and coalescence process were monitored during the deformation using both photographic monitoring and acoustic emission (AE) monitoring techniques. The monitoring results showed that the cracking process depended on both the fissure geometry and the heat treatment temperature. The potential mechanisms causing the differences in the mechanical behavior observed with increasing temperature are discussed, as is the influence of the single fissure and the two parallel fissures on the crack evolution process. These results are important and valuable to understand the fracture mechanism of rock engineering in deep underground mining excavations and nuclear waste depositories.

  19. High temperature materials and mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    The use of high-temperature materials in current and future applications, including silicone materials for handling hot foods and metal alloys for developing high-speed aircraft and spacecraft systems, has generated a growing interest in high-temperature technologies. High Temperature Materials and Mechanisms explores a broad range of issues related to high-temperature materials and mechanisms that operate in harsh conditions. While some applications involve the use of materials at high temperatures, others require materials processed at high temperatures for use at room temperature. High-temperature materials must also be resistant to related causes of damage, such as oxidation and corrosion, which are accelerated with increased temperatures. This book examines high-temperature materials and mechanisms from many angles. It covers the topics of processes, materials characterization methods, and the nondestructive evaluation and health monitoring of high-temperature materials and structures. It describes the ...

  20. Micro-Mechanical Temperature Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tom

    Temperature is the most frequently measured physical quantity in the world. The field of thermometry is therefore constantly evolving towards better temperature sensors and better temperature measurements. The aim of this Ph.D. project was to improve an existing type of micro-mechanical temperature...... sensor or to develop a new one. Two types of micro-mechanical temperature sensors have been studied: Bilayer cantilevers and string-like beam resonators. Both sensor types utilize thermally generated stress. Bilayer cantilevers are frequently used as temperature sensors at the micro-scale, and the goal....... The reduced sensitivity was due to initial bending of the cantilevers and poor adhesion between the two cantilever materials. No further attempts were made to improve the sensitivity of bilayer cantilevers. The concept of using string-like resonators as temperature sensors has, for the first time, been...

  1. Thermo-mechanical behavior of bituminous mixtures at low temperatures. Links between the binder characteristics and the mix properties; Comportement thermomecanique des enrobes bitumeux a basses temperatures: relations entre les proprietes du liant et de l'enrobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olard, F.

    2003-10-01

    This thesis has been realized within the framework of a partnership between the Ecole Nationale des TPE, APPIA and EUROVIA. The company Total has also been associated to this project. The study deals with the thermo-mechanical behavior of bituminous materials at low temperatures. The aim is to establish the links between the characteristics of the binder and the properties of bituminous mixes at low temperatures, and to better understand the existing low-temperature parameters and criteria for binders (or to propose new ones), related to the in-situ behavior of bituminous mixtures. A large experimental campaign has been carried out so as to fulfill this goal. After a bibliographical study on the rheology and the thermo-mechanical properties of (pure or modified) binders, putties and mixes, the experimental campaign carried out both in the small strain domain and in the large strain domain, is presented. The low temperature behavior of binders has been evaluated with three common fundamental tests: i)the complex modulus determination, ii)the Bending Beam Rheometer and iii)the tensile strength at a constant strain rate and constant temperatures. A new three point bending test on pre-notched bitumen beams has also been developed at the ENTPE. The low-temperature fracture properties of bitumens were studied at constant temperatures and cross-head speeds considering the Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM) assumptions. The thermo-mechanical behavior of bituminous mixtures has been studied by performing i)complex modulus tests, ii)measurements of the coefficient of thermal dilatation and contraction, iii)tensile tests at constant temperatures and strain rates, and iv)Thermal Stress Restrained Specimen Tests. Apart from the determination of some pertinent links between binder and mix properties and discriminating characteristics with regard to the thermal cracking of bituminous mixes at low temperatures, the analysis has also consisted in modeling the behavior of

  2. Mechanisms of high-temperature, solid-state flow in minerals and ceramics and their bearing on the creep behavior of the mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, S.H.; Raleigh, C.B.

    1973-01-01

    The problem of applying laboratory silicate-flow data to the mantle, where conditions can be vastly different, is approached through a critical review of high-temperature flow mechanisms in ceramics and their relation to empirical flow laws. The intimate association of solid-state diffusion and high-temperature creep in pure metals is found to apply to ceramics as well. It is shown that in ceramics of moderate grain size, compared on the basis of self-diffusivity and elastic modulus, normalized creep rates compare remarkably well. This comparison is paralleled by the near universal occurrence of similar creep-induced structures, and it is thought that the derived empirical flow laws can be associated with dislocation creep. Creep data in fine-grained ceramics, on the other hand, are found to compare poorly with theories involving the stress-directed diffusion of point defects and have not been successfully correlated by self-diffusion rates. We conclude that these fine-grained materials creep primarily by a quasi-viscous grain-boundary sliding mechanism which is unlikely to predominate in the earth's deep interior. Creep predictions for the mantle reveal that under most conditions the empirical dislocation creep behavior predominates over the mechanisms involving the stress-directed diffusion of point defects. The probable role of polymorphic transformations in the transition zone is also discussed. ?? 1973.

  3. Microstructure Evolution and Mechanical Behavior of Ultrafine Ti-6Al-4V During Low Temperature Superplastic Deformation (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-13

    annealing at 1010 C were worked in the temperature interval of 700/ 475 C using a hydraulic press equipped with isothermal-forging tooling. The nominal...few isolated voids were observed in the vicinity of the fracture surface of specimens tested at 600 C and a strain rate 5 104 s1, while there...rcalculations based on this alternate expression can also not explain why voids were not formed. The presence of a soft layer (such as b) between hard

  4. Studying the effect of Ruthenium on High Temperature Mechanical Properties of Nickel Based Superalloys and Determining the Universal Behavior of Ruthenium at Atomic Scale with respect to alloying elements, Stress and Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriswaroop Dasari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Any property of a material is a function of its microstructure and microstructure is a function of material composition. So, to maximize the desired properties of a material, one has to understand the evolution of microstructure which in turn is nothing but the reflection of the role of alloying elements. Research has not been done to understand the universal behavior of a certain base/alloying element. Let’s take the example of Cl- ion in HCl, we all know that in general, chloride ion can only be replaced by Fluoride or oxygen ion and that no other ion can replace it. But when you consider a metal like Ni, Co, Cr, Fe etc. there is no establishment that it behaves only in a certain way. Though I concord to the fact that discovery of universal behavior of Ni is lot complex than chloride ion, I think that future research should be focused in this direction also. Superalloys are the candidate materials required to improve thermal efficiency of a gas turbine by allowing higher turbine inlet gas temperatures. Gas turbines are the heart of local power systems, next generation jet engines and high performance space rockets. Recent research in superalloys showed that addition of some alloying elements in minor quantities can result in drastic change in properties. Such an alloying element is Ruthenium (Ru. Addition of Ruthenium to superalloys has shown improvement in mechanical properties by an order of magnitude. However reasons for such improvement are not known yet. Hence, there is a need to identify its role and discover the universal behavior of ruthenium to utilize it efficiently. In this proposal, we study materials with different compositions that are derived based on one ruthenium containing superalloy, and different thermomechanical history. Based on the evolution of microstructures and results of mechanical testing, we plan to determine the exact role of Ruthenium and prediction of its behavior with respect to other elements in the material

  5. The Stress Corrosion Resistance and the Cryogenic Temperature Mechanical Behavior of 18-3 Mn (Nitronic 33) Stainless Steel Parent and Welded Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    The ambient and cryogenic temperature mechanical properties and the ambient temperature stress corrosion results of 18-3 Mn (Nitronic 33)stainless steel, longitudinal and transverse, as received and as welded (TIG) material specimens manufactured from 0.063 inch thick sheet material, were described. The tensile test results indicate an increase in ultimate tensile and yield strengths with decreasing temperature. The elongation remained fairly constant to -200 F, but below that temperature the elongation decreased to less than 6.0% at liquid hydrogen temperature. The notched tensile strength (NTS) for the parent metal increased with decreasing temperature to liquid nitrogen temperature. Below -320 F the NTS decreased rapidly. The notched/unnotched (N/U) tensile ratio of the parent material specimens remained above 0.9 from ambient to -200 F, and decreased to approximately 0.65 and 0.62, respectively, for the longitudinal and transverse directions at liquid hydrogen temperature. After 180 days of testing, only those specimens exposed to the salt spray indicated pitting and some degradation of mechanical properties.

  6. Study on vapor film collapse behavior on high temperature particle surface. 2nd Report. Effect of subcooling on micro-mechanism; Koon ryushi hyomenjo no jokimaku hokai ni kansuru kenkyu. 2. Bishiteki hokai kyodo ni oyobosu subcooling no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Y.; Tochio, D. [Yamagata University, Yamagata (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    2000-02-25

    Thermal detonation model is proposed to describe vapor explosion. According to this model, vapor film on pre-mixed high temperature droplet surface should be collapsed for the trigger of the vapor explosion. It is pointed out that the vapor film collapse behavior is significantly affected by the subcooling of low temperature liquid. However, the effect of subcooling on micro-mechanism of vapor film collapse behavior is not experimentally well identified. The objective of the present research is to experimentally investigate the effect of subcooling on micro-mechanism of film boiling collapse behavior. As the results, it is experimentally clarified that the vapor film collapse behavior in low subcool condition is qualitatively different from the vapor film collapse behavior in high subcool condition. In high subcool condition, instability of the vapor film dominates the vapor film collapse on the particle surface. On the other hand, micro-mechanism at the interface between vapor and liquid such as micro-jet is dominant in low subcool condition in case of vapor film collapse by pressure pulse. (author)

  7. Temperature dependence of poly(lactic acid) mechanical properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chengbo; Guo, Huilong; Li, Jingqing

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of polymers are not only determined by their structures, but also related to the temperature field in which they are located. The yield behaviors, Young's modulus and structures of injection-molded poly(lactic acid) (PLA) samples after annealing at different temperatures...

  8. Mechanisms of behavior modification in clinical behavioral medicine in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhiyin; Su, Zhonghua; Ji, Feng; Zhu, Min; Bai, Bo

    2014-08-01

    Behavior modification, as the core of clinical behavioral medicine, is often used in clinical settings. We seek to summarize behavior modification techniques that are commonly used in clinical practice of behavioral medicine in China and discuss possible biobehavioral mechanisms. We reviewed common behavior modification techniques in clinical settings in China, and we reviewed studies that explored possible biobehavioral mechanisms. Commonly used clinical approaches of behavior modification in China include behavior therapy, cognitive therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, health education, behavior management, behavioral relaxation training, stress management intervention, desensitization therapy, biofeedback therapy, and music therapy. These techniques have been applied in the clinical treatment of a variety of diseases, such as chronic diseases, psychosomatic diseases, and psychological disorders. The biobehavioral mechanisms of these techniques involve the autonomic nervous system, neuroendocrine system, neurobiochemistry, and neuroplasticity. Behavior modification techniques are commonly used in the treatment of a variety of somatic and psychological disorders in China. Multiple biobehavioral mechanisms are involved in successful behavior modification.

  9. Creep/Stress Rupture Behavior and Failure Mechanisms of Full CVI and Full PIP SiC/SiC Composites at Elevated Temperatures in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Kiser, J. D.

    2017-01-01

    SiC/SiC composites fabricated by melt infiltration are being considered as potential candidate materials for next generation turbine components. However these materials are limited to 2400 F application because of the presence of residual silicon in the SiC matrix. Currently there is an increasing interest in developing and using silicon free SiC/SiC composites for structural aerospace applications above 2400 F. Full PIP or full CVI or CVI + PIP hybrid SiC/SiC composites can be fabricated without excess silicon, but the upper temperature stress capabilities of these materials are not fully known. In this study, the on-axis creep and rupture properties of the state-of-the-art full CVI and full PIP SiC/SiC composites with Sylramic-iBN fibers were measured at temperatures to 2700 F in air and their failure modes examined. In this presentation creep rupture properties, failure mechanisms and upper temperature capabilities of these two systems will be discussed and compared with the literature data.

  10. Understanding cement mechanical behavior in SAGD wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, J.; Zahacy, T. A. [C-FER Technologies (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    In the heavy oil industry, the steam assisted gravity drainage process is often used to enhance oil recovery but it can cause cracks in the cement sheath. These cracks are the result of high steam temperatures and thermal expansion. In order to mitigate this risk, improved well designs are required. The aim of this paper is to present the mechanical behavior of the cement sheath during the heating phase. An analysis of the impact of design and operating parameters was conducted through thermal hydraulic and thermal mechanical analyses to assess cement integrity. These analyses were then performed on an example of an SAGD project in the southern part of the Athabasca oilsands region to assess the performance of the cement sheath. Results showed that potential damage to the cement can be reduced by slow heating and a lower Young's modulus cement blend. This paper makes recommendations for optimizing cement design in thermal recovery wells.

  11. Low Temperature Resistive Switching Behavior in a Manganite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvo, Christopher; Lopez, Melinda; Tsui, Stephen

    2012-02-01

    The development of new nonvolatile memory devices remains an important field of consumer electronics. A possible candidate is bipolar resistive switching, a method by which the resistance of a material changes when a voltage is applied. Although there is a great deal of research on this topic, not much has been done at low temperatures. In this work, we compare the room temperature and low temperature behaviors of switching in a manganite thin film. The data indicates that the switching is suppressed upon cooling to cryogenic temperatures, and the presence of crystalline charge traps is tied to the physical mechanism.

  12. Concepts on Low Temperature Mechanical Grain Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharon, John Anthony [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Metallurgy and Materials Joining Dept.; Boyce, Brad Lee [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Metallurgy and Materials Joining Dept.

    2013-11-01

    In metals, as grain size is reduced below 100nm, conventional dislocation plasticity is suppressed resulting in improvements in strength, hardness, and wears resistance. Existing and emerging components use fine grained metals for these beneficial attributes. However, these benefits can be lost in service if the grains undergo growth during the component’s lifespan. While grain growth is traditionally viewed as a purely thermal process that requires elevated temperature exposure, recent evidence shows that some metals, especially those with nanocrystalline grain structure, can undergo grain growth even at room temperature or below due to mechanical loading. This report has been assembled to survey the key concepts regarding how mechanical loads can drive grain coarsening at room temperature and below. Topics outlined include the atomic level mechanisms that facilitate grain growth, grain boundary mobility, and the impact of boundary structure, loading scheme, and temperature.

  13. Mechanical behavior of plastic materials for automobile cockpit module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Changsu.; Park, Hyunsung.; Jo, Jinho.

    2013-12-01

    Engineering plastics are used in instrument panels, interior trims, and other vehicle applications, and the thermo-mechanical behaviors of plastic materials are strongly influenced by many environmental factors such as temperature, sunlight, and rain. As the material properties change, the mechanical parts create unexpected noise. In this study, the dynamic mechanical property changes of plastics used in automobiles are measured to investigate the effect of temperature. Visco-elastic properties such as the glass transition temperature and storage modulus and loss factors under temperature and frequency sweeps were measured. The data results were compared with the original ones before aging to analyze the behavioral changes. It was found that as the temperature increased, the storage modulus decreased and the loss factor increased slightly.

  14. Modeling high temperature materials behavior for structural analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Naumenko, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    This monograph presents approaches to characterize inelastic behavior of materials and structures at high temperature. Starting from experimental observations, it discusses basic features of inelastic phenomena including creep, plasticity, relaxation, low cycle and thermal fatigue. The authors formulate constitutive equations to describe the inelastic response for the given states of stress and microstructure. They introduce evolution equations to capture hardening, recovery, softening, ageing and damage processes. Principles of continuum mechanics and thermodynamics are presented to provide a framework for the modeling materials behavior with the aim of structural analysis of high-temperature engineering components.

  15. Mechanical Proprieties of Steel at High Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Diana Ancaş

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental test results obtained in the study of steel mechanical proprieties variation in case of high temperatures (fire are presented. The proprieties are referring to: Young’s modulus, E, the elastic limit, σe, and the characteristic diagram of the material (the rotation stress-strain. Theoretical laws that the model the steel behaviour at high temperature have been elaborated based on the most significant studies presented in the literature.

  16. influence of intercritical annealing temperature on mechanical

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Mechanical testing. (tensile, impact and hardness) of the annealed samples were conducted at room temperature. The fracture surfaces of the impact test samples were examined using the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Micros structural ... improved formability, capacity to absorb crash energy and ability to resist ...

  17. Influence of Intercritical Annealing Temperature on Mechanical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The influence of intercritical annealing temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of an 0.23%C low alloy steel was undertaken in this work. The as-received steel was normalised and afterwards annealed in the (α+γ) region at 730OC, 750OC, 770OC and 790OC followed by quenching in hot water at ...

  18. Experimental and computational investigation of temperature effects on soot mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bi Xiaojie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of initial ambient temperatures on combustion and soot emission characteristics of diesel fuel were investigated through experiment conducted in optical constant volume chamber and simulation using phenomenological soot model. There are four difference initial ambient temperatures adopted in our research: 1000 K, 900 K, 800 K and 700 K. In order to obtain a better prediction of soot behavior, phenomenological soot model was revised to take into account the soot oxidation feedback on soot number density and good agreement was observed in the comparison of soot measurement and prediction. Results indicated that ignition delay prolonged with the decrease of initial ambient temperature. The heat release rate demonstrated the transition from mixing controlled combustion at high ambient temperature to premixed combustion mode at low ambient temperature. At lower ambient temperature, soot formation and oxidation mechanism were both suppressed. But finally soot mass concentration reduced with decreasing initial ambient temperature. Although the drop in ambient temperature did not cool the mean in-cylinder temperature during the combustion, it did shrink the total area of local high equivalence ratio, in which soot usually generated fast. At 700 K initial ambient temperature, soot emissions were almost negligible, which indicates that sootless combustion might be achieved at super low initial temperature operation conditions.

  19. BEHAVIORAL MECHANISMS UNDERLYING NICOTINE REINFORCEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupprecht, Laura E.; Smith, Tracy T.; Schassburger, Rachel L.; Buffalari, Deanne M.; Sved, Alan F.; Donny, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of preventable deaths worldwide and nicotine, the primary psychoactive constituent in tobacco, drives sustained use. The behavioral actions of nicotine are complex and extend well beyond the actions of the drug as a primary reinforcer. Stimuli that are consistently paired with nicotine can, through associative learning, take on reinforcing properties as conditioned stimuli. These conditioned stimuli can then impact the rate and probability of behavior and even function as conditioning reinforcers that maintain behavior in the absence of nicotine. Nicotine can also act as a conditioned stimulus, predicting the delivery of other reinforcers, which may allow nicotine to acquire value as a conditioned reinforcer. These associative effects, establishing non-nicotine stimuli as conditioned stimuli with discriminative stimulus and conditioned reinforcing properties as well as establishing nicotine as a conditioned stimulus, are predicted by basic conditioning principles. However, nicotine can also act non-associatively. Nicotine directly enhances the reinforcing efficacy of other reinforcing stimuli in the environment, an effect that does not require a temporal or predictive relationship between nicotine and either the stimulus or the behavior. Hence, the reinforcing actions of nicotine stem both from the primary reinforcing actions of the drug (and the subsequent associative learning effects) as well as the reinforcement enhancement action of nicotine which is non-associative in nature. Gaining a better understanding of how nicotine impacts behavior will allow for maximally effective tobacco control efforts aimed at reducing the harm associated with tobacco use by reducing and/or treating its addictiveness. PMID:25638333

  20. Film collapse behavior on high temperature particle surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tochio, Daisuke; Abe, Yutaka [Department of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Yamagata University, Yonezawa, Yamagata (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    It is pointed out that large-scale vapor explosion may occurred during a severe accident of a nuclear power plant. It is important to predict the possibility of the vapor explosion for the accident management of the nuclear power plant during a severe accident. The thermal detonation model is proposed to predict the vapor explosion. In the thermal detonation model, vapor explosion is started by a trigger. The trigger is vapor film collapse around high temperature material droplets coarsely pre-mixed in low temperature liquid. In the premixing stage, high temperature material droplets are insulated from low temperature liquid by the vapor film. Once the vapor film is collapsed, very quick and large heat transfer starts followed by the atomization. In order to clarify the trigger condition of the vapor explosion, it is necessary to identify the mechanism of the film collapse on the high temperature droplet surface in low temperature particle surface. Since the steam film on a high temperature droplet is unstable in high subcooling condition of low temperature liquid, the possibility of the self-collapse of the steam film is high. On the other hand, the possibility of the film collapse is not high in low subcooling or saturated condition since the steam film is tough. There are many experimental studies on the vapor film collapse behavior on the high temperature material surface. Most of those studies, vapor film collapse follows by the atomization , since melted droplets are used in those experiments. And the experiments used solid material is limited for the cylindrical or flat plate geometry. At present, there is no experimental database on the microscopic mechanism of steam film collapse behavior in spherical geometry for wide range of subcooling conditions. In the present study, steam film collapse behavior on a stainless steel particle surface is experimentally investigated. The stainless steel particle heated up by a burner is immersed into water in a stainless

  1. Mechanical Behavior of Microelectromechanical Microshutters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Devin Edward; Jones, Justin Scott; Li, Mary J.

    2014-01-01

    A custom micro-mechanical test system was constructed using off-the-shelf components to characterize the mechanical properties of microshutters. Microshutters are rectangular microelectromechanical apertures which open and close about a narrow torsion bar hinge. Displacement measurements were verified using both capacitive and digital image correlation techniques. Repeatable experiments on Si3N4 cantilever beams verified that the test system operates consistently. Using beam theory, the modulus of elasticity of the low stress Si3N4 was approximately 150 GPa, though significant uncertainty exists for this measurement due primarily to imprecise knowledge of the cantilever thickness. Tests conducted on microshutter arrays concluded that reducing the Si3N4 thickness from 250 nm to 500 nm reduces the torsional stiffness by a factor of approximately four. This is in good agreement with analytical and finite element models of the microshutters.

  2. Mechanical Properties and Deformation Behavior of Bulk Metallic Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Yu. Churyumov

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Metallic glasses demonstrate unique properties, including large elastic limit and high strength, which make them attractive for practical applications. Unlike crystalline alloys, metallic glasses, in general, do not exhibit a strain hardening effect, while plastic deformation at room temperature is localized in narrow shear bands. Room-temperature mechanical properties and deformation behavior of bulk metallic glassy samples and the crystal-glassy composites are reviewed in the present paper.

  3. Mechanical Properties and Deformation Behavior of Bulk Metallic Glasses

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander Yu. Churyumov; Louzguine-Luzgin, Dmitri V.; Larissa V. Louzguina-Luzgina

    2012-01-01

    Metallic glasses demonstrate unique properties, including large elastic limit and high strength, which make them attractive for practical applications. Unlike crystalline alloys, metallic glasses, in general, do not exhibit a strain hardening effect, while plastic deformation at room temperature is localized in narrow shear bands. Room-temperature mechanical properties and deformation behavior of bulk metallic glassy samples and the crystal-glassy composites are reviewed in the present paper.

  4. High Temperature Mechanisms for Venus Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jerri; Narine, Roop; Kumar, Nishant; Singh, Sase; Gorevan, Steven

    Future Venus missions, including New Frontiers Venus In-Situ Explorer and three Flagship Missions - Venus Geophysical Network, Venus Mobile Explorer and Venus Surface Sample Return all focus on searching for evidence of past climate change both on the surface and in the atmospheric composition as well as in the interior dynamics of the planet. In order to achieve these goals and objectives, many key technologies need to be developed for the Venus extreme environment. These key technologies include sample acquisition systems and other high-temperature mechanisms and mobility systems capable of extended operation when directly exposed to the Venus surface or lower atmosphere environment. Honeybee Robotics has developed two types of high temperature motors, the materials and components in both motors were selected based on the requirement to survive temperatures above a minimum of 460° C, at earth atmosphere. The prototype Switched Reluctance Motor (SRM) has been operated non-continuously for over 20 hours at Venus-like conditions (460° C temperature, mostly CO2 gas environment) and it remains functional. A drilling system, actuated by two SRMs was tested in Venus-like conditions, 460° C temperature and mostly CO2 gas environment, for more than 15 hours. The drill successfully completed three tests by drilling into chalk up to 6 inches deep in each test. A first generation Brushless DC (BLDC) Motor and high temperature resolver were also tested and the feasibility of the designs was demonstrated by the extended operation of both devices under Venus-like condition. Further development of the BLDC motor and resolver continues and these devices will, ultimately, be integrated into the development of a high temperature sample acquisition scoop and high temperature joint (awarded SBIR Phase II in October, 2007). Both the SR and BLDC motors will undergo extensive testing at Venus temperature and pressure (TRL6) and are expected to be mission ready before the next New

  5. Simulation of Fatigue Behavior of High Temperature Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Mike T.; Singhal, Suren N.; Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    1996-01-01

    A generalized relatively new approach is described for the computational simulation of fatigue behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites (HT-MMCs). This theory is embedded in a specialty-purpose computer code. The effectiveness of the computer code to predict the fatigue behavior of HT-MMCs is demonstrated by applying it to a silicon-fiber/titanium-matrix HT-MMC. Comparative results are shown for mechanical fatigue, thermal fatigue, thermomechanical (in-phase and out-of-phase) fatigue, as well as the effects of oxidizing environments on fatigue life. These results show that the new approach reproduces available experimental data remarkably well.

  6. Mechanical behavior of cyclically loaded PZT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, G.S.; Hill, M.D.; Freiman, S.W. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Hwang, C.S. [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-31

    Uses of intelligent materials which involve the application of force or the generation of displacements will require the incorporation of some form of actuator material into the overall structure. Typically, these types of applications will result in the generation of cyclic loads on the actuator; depending upon the specific application, the frequency of the loading could be low, e.g., for positioning components, or relatively high, e.g., for damping out vibrations in machining tools. Nevertheless, the cyclic nature of the loading raises the specter of damage and, ultimately, failure arising from cyclic loading processes which would not be predicted by traditional mechanical properties test methods. It has been found that PZT loaded cyclically sometimes fails at loads below its nominal strength, as measured by traditional, monotonically increasing load tests. Damage mechanisms which come into play as a result of the cyclic loading conditions have been postulated as the reasons for this behavior. Recent work investigating the cyclic loading of a PZT-8 material at resonance frequency determined that microcracks were generated in the high stress region of the material. Recent results demonstrate that macrocrack extension appears to be accompanied by domain reorientation whereas microcracks can propagate around PZT grains without affecting the domains, (2) morphology and distribution of microcracks generated under different loading conditions can change dramatically that the qualitative mechanical response of PZT-8 to cyclic loading appears to be insensitive to grain morphology. The results presented imply that stresses generated at the tips of macrocracks are much larger than those at microcracks, that temperature strongly affects the rate of microcrack generation, and that wide distributions in grain size and the presence of large voids do not necessarily result in increased microcrack generation over that seen in 2 {micro}m grain size, small pore material.

  7. Mechanical Behavior of Additively Manufactured Uranium-6 wt. pct. Niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, A. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wraith, M. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Burke, S. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hamza, A. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brown, D. W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Clausen, B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hsiung, L. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McKeown, J. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lindvall, R. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sedillo, E. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Teslich, N. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Torres, S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Urabe, D. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Freeman, D. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Alexander, P. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Iniguez, M. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ryerson, F. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ancheta, D. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lotscher, J. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Young, E. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Evans, C. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Florando, J. N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gallegos, G. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Margraff, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hrousis, C. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Campbell, G. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-15

    This report describes an effort to process uranium-6 weight% niobium using laser powder bed fusion. The chemistry, crystallography, microstructure and mechanical response resulting from this process are discussed with particular emphasis on the effect of the laser powder bed fusion process on impurities. In an effort to achieve homogenization and uniform mechanical behavior from different builds, as well as to induce a more conventional loading response, we explore post-processing heat treatments on this complex alloy. Elevated temperature heat treatment for recrystallization is evaluated and the effect of recrystallization on mechanical behavior in laser powder bed fusion processed U-6Nb is discussed. Wrought-like mechanical behavior and grain sizes are achieved through post-processing and are reported herein.

  8. Structure and mechanical behavior of human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Yang, Wen; Wang, Bin; Meyers, Marc André

    2017-04-01

    The understanding of the mechanical behavior of hair under various conditions broadens our knowledge in biological materials science and contributes to the cosmetic industry. The hierarchical organization of hair is studied from the intermediate filament to the structural levels. The effects of strain rate, relative humidity, and temperature are evaluated. Hair exhibits a high tensile strength, 150-270MPa, which is significantly dependent on strain rate and humidity. The strain-rate sensitivity, approximately 0.06-0.1, is comparable to that of other keratinous materials and common synthetic polymers. The structures of the internal cortex and surface cuticle are affected by the large tensile extension. One distinguishing feature, the unwinding of the α-helix and the possible transformation to β-sheet structure of keratin under tension, which affects the ductility of hair, is analytically evaluated and incorporated into a constitutive equation. A good agreement with the experimental results is obtained. This model elucidates the tensile response of the α-keratin fibers. The contributions of elastic and plastic strains on reloading are evaluated and correlated to structural changes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. High temperature mechanical properties of iron aluminides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris, D. G.

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Considerable attention has been given to the iron aluminide family of intermetallics over the past years since they offer considerable potential as engineering materials for intermediate to high temperature applications, particularly in cases where extreme oxidation or corrosion resistance is required. Despite efforts at alloy development, however, high temperature strength remains low and creep resistance poor. Reasons for the poor high-temperature strength of iron aluminides will be discussed, based on the ordered crystal structure, the dislocation structure found in the material, and the mechanisms of dislocation pinning operating. Alternative ways of improving high temperature strength by microstructural modification and the inclusion of second phase particles will also be considered.

    Durante los últimos años se ha prestado mucha atención a la familia de intermetálicos Fe-Al, puesto que estos constituyen un considerable potencial como materiales de ingeniería en aplicaciones a temperaturas intermedias o altas, sobre todo en casos donde se necesita alta resistencia a la oxidación o corrosión. A pesar del considerable esfuerzo desarrollado para obtener aleaciones con mejores propiedades, su resistencia mecánica a alta temperatura no es muy elevada. Se discutirán los aspectos que contribuyen a la baja resistencia mecánica a temperatura elevada en función de la estructura de dislocaciones y los mecanismos de anclaje que operan en este intermetálico. Se considerarán, también, maneras alternativas para mejorar la resistencia a temperatura elevada mediante la modificación de la microestructura y la incorporación de partículas de segunda fase.

  10. Thermo-mechanical behavior of epoxy shape memory polymer foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Prima, M. A.; Lesniewski, M.; Gall, K.; McDowell, D. L.; Sanderson, T.; Campbell, D.

    2007-12-01

    Shape memory polymer foams have significant potential in biomedical and aerospace applications, but their thermo-mechanical behavior under relevant deformation conditions is not well understood. In this paper we examine the thermo-mechanical behavior of epoxy shape memory polymer foams with an average relative density of nearly 20%. These foams are deformed under conditions of varying stress, strain, and temperature. The glass transition temperature of the foam was measured to be approximately 90 °C and compression and tensile tests were performed at temperatures ranging from 25 to 125 °C. Various shape recovery tests were used to measure recovery properties under different thermo-mechanical conditions. Tensile strain to failure was measured as a function of temperature to probe the maximum recovery limits of the foam in both temperature and strain space. Compression tests were performed to examine compressibility of the material as a function of temperature; these foams can be compacted as much as 80% and still experience full strain recovery over multiple cycles. Furthermore, both tensile strain to failure tests and cyclic compression recovery tests revealed that deforming at a temperature of 80 °C maximizes macroscopic strain recovery. Deformation temperatures above or below this optimal value lead to lower failure strains in tension and the accumulation of non-recoverable strains in cyclic compression. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) scans of the foam at various compressed states were used to understand foam deformation mechanisms. The micro-CT studies revealed the bending, buckling, and collapse of cells with increasing compression, consistent with results from published numerical simulations.

  11. Influência da temperatura no desempenho mecânico de compósitos PEI/fibras de vidro Influence from the temperature on the mechanical behavior of PEI/glass fiber composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo H. Oliveira

    2009-01-01

    processing due to the absence of a cure cycle, low moisture absorption, excellent chemical resistance; higher service temperature; low costs of transport and storage, higher impact resistance; higher stiffness and possibility of recycling. It is therefore important to investigate the mechanical properties at high temperatures since these materials are subjected to large temperature variations in aeronautical applications. This work is aimed at evaluating the mechanical properties (tensile, fatigue and interlaminar shear behavior of PEI reinforced with glass fiber at 25 and 80 °C. The tensile, shear and fatigue stresses for PEI/glass fiber were found to be higher than in epoxy/glass fiber laminates. However, in all cases a significant deterioration in the mechanical properties was observed at 80 °C in comparison to those at room temperature.

  12. Laser metrology in fluid mechanics granulometry, temperature and concentration measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Boutier, Alain

    2013-01-01

    In fluid mechanics, non-intrusive measurements are fundamental in order to improve knowledge of the behavior and main physical phenomena of flows in order to further validate codes.The principles and characteristics of the different techniques available in laser metrology are described in detail in this book.Velocity, temperature and concentration measurements by spectroscopic techniques based on light scattered by molecules are achieved by different techniques: laser-induced fluorescence, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering using lasers and parametric sources, and absorption sp

  13. Temperature as a proximate factor in orientation behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, W.W.

    1977-05-01

    Temperature serves as a proximate factor (cue, guidepost, sign stimulus, or directive factor) affecting locomotor responses of fishes. Although temperature can also serve as an ultimate ecological factor, as in behavioral thermoregulation, nonthermal factors may in some cases provide the ultimate adaptive or ecological value of a temperature response; some examples are habitat selection, intraspecific size segregation, interspecific niche differentiation, isolating mechanisms, predator avoidance, prey location, escape reactions, and migrations (thermoperiodic, diel, seasonal, spawning). Conversely, nonthermal variables such as light intensity or water depth may act as accessory proximate factors in thermoregulation. In spawning migrations, thermal requirements of eggs and larvae may take precedence over the (often different) preferenda or optima of adults. Although thermal responses of fishes are largely innate and species specific, ontogenetic and other changes can occur. Since temperature can serve as an unconditioned reinforcer in operant conditioning, thermal responses are not limited to simple kineses or taxes. Nonthermal factors such as photoperiod, circadian rhythms, currents, social and biotic interactions, stresses, infections, or chemicals can affect thermal responses, and may account for some lack of conformity between laboratory preferenda and field distributions and behaviors.

  14. Creep Behavior of ABS Polymer in Temperature-Humidity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Teagen; Selvaraj, Ramya; Hong, Seokmoo; Kim, Naksoo

    2017-04-01

    Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene (ABS), also known as a thermoplastic polymer, is extensively utilized for manufacturing home appliances products as it possess impressive mechanical properties, such as, resistance and toughness. However, the aforementioned properties are affected by operating temperature and atmosphere humidity due to the viscoelasticity property of an ABS polymer material. Moreover, the prediction of optimum working conditions are the little challenging task as it influences the final properties of product. This present study aims to develop the finite element (FE) models for predicting the creep behavior of an ABS polymeric material. In addition, the material constants, which represent the creep properties of an ABS polymer material, were predicted with the help of an interpolation function. Furthermore, a comparative study has been made with experiment and simulation results to verify the accuracy of developed FE model. The results showed that the predicted value from FE model could agree well with experimental data as well it can replicate the actual creep behavior flawlessly.

  15. Mechanisms of chemotherapy-induced behavioral toxicities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth G Vichaya

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available While chemotherapeutic agents have yielded relative success in the treatment of cancer, patients are often plagued with unwanted and even debilitating side-effects from the treatment which can lead to dose reduction or even cessation of treatment. Common side effects (symptoms of chemotherapy include (i cognitive deficiencies such as problems with attention, memory and executive functioning; (ii fatigue and motivational deficit; and (iii neuropathy. These symptoms often develop during treatment but can remain even after cessation of chemotherapy, severely impacting long-term quality of life. Little is known about the underlying mechanisms responsible for the development of these behavioral toxicities, however, neuroinflammation is widely considered to be one of the major mechanisms responsible for chemotherapy-induced symptoms. Here, we critically assess what is known in regards to the role of neuroinflammation in chemotherapy-induced symptoms. We also argue that, based on the available evidence neuroinflammation is unlikely the only mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of chemotherapy-induced behavioral toxicities. We evaluate two other putative candidate mechanisms. To this end we discuss the mediating role of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs activated in response to chemotherapy-induced cellular damage. We also review the literature with respect to possible alternative mechanisms such as a chemotherapy-induced change in the bioenergetic status of the tissue involving changes in mitochondrial function in relation to chemotherapy-induced behavioral toxicities. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie the emergence of fatigue, neuropathy, and cognitive difficulties is vital to better treatment and long-term survival of cancer patients.

  16. A review of the deformation behavior of tungsten at temperatures less than 0.2 of the melting point /K/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The deformation behavior of tungsten at temperatures below 0.2 times the absolute melting temperature is reviewed with primary emphasis on the temperature dependence of the yield stress and the ductile-brittle transition. It is concluded that a model based on the high Peierls stress of tungsten best accounts for the observed mechanical behavior at low temperatures. Recent research suggests an important role of electron concentration and bonding on the mechanical behavior of tungsten. Future research on tungsten should include studies to define more clearly the correlation between electron concentration and mechanical behavior of alloys of tungsten and other transition metal alloys.

  17. A sphingolipid mechanism for behavioral extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston, Joseph P; Kornhuber, Johannes; Mühle, Christiane; Japtok, Lukasz; Komorowski, Mara; Mattern, Claudia; Reichel, Martin; Gulbins, Erich; Kleuser, Burkhard; Topic, Bianca; De Souza Silva, Maria A; Müller, Christian P

    2016-05-01

    Reward-dependent instrumental behavior must continuously be re-adjusted according to environmental conditions. Failure to adapt to changes in reward contingencies may incur psychiatric disorders like anxiety and depression. When an expected reward is omitted, behavior undergoes extinction. While extinction involves active re-learning, it is also accompanied by emotional behaviors indicative of frustration, anxiety, and despair (extinction-induced depression). Here, we report evidence for a sphingolipid mechanism in the extinction of behavior. Rapid extinction, indicating efficient re-learning, coincided with a decrease in the activity of the enzyme acid sphingomyelinase (ASM), which catalyzes turnover of sphingomyelin to ceramide, in the dorsal hippocampus of rats. The stronger the decline in ASM activity, the more rapid was the extinction. Sphingolipid-focused lipidomic analysis showed that this results in a decline of local ceramide species in the dorsal hippocampus. Ceramides shape the fluidity of lipid rafts in synaptic membranes and by that way can control neural plasticity. We also found that aging modifies activity of enzymes and ceramide levels in selective brain regions. Aging also changed how the chronic treatment with corticosterone (stress) or intranasal dopamine modified regional enzyme activity and ceramide levels, coinciding with rate of extinction. These data provide first evidence for a functional ASM-ceramide pathway in the brain involved in the extinction of learned behavior. This finding extends the known cellular mechanisms underlying behavioral plasticity to a new class of membrane-located molecules, the sphingolipids, and their regulatory enzymes, and may offer new treatment targets for extinction- and learning-related psychopathological conditions. Sphingolipids are common lipids in the brain which form lipid domains at pre- and postsynaptic membrane compartments. Here we show a decline in dorsal hippocampus ceramide species together with a

  18. Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of High-Entropy Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licavoli, Joseph J.; Gao, Michael C.; Sears, John S.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2015-10-01

    High-entropy alloys (HEAs) have generated interest in recent years due to their unique positioning within the alloy world. By incorporating a number of elements in high proportion, usually of equal atomic percent, they have high configurational entropy, and thus, they hold the promise of interesting and useful properties such as enhanced strength and alloy stability. The present study investigates the mechanical behavior, fracture characteristics, and microstructure of two single-phase FCC HEAs CoCrFeNi and CoCrFeNiMn with some detailed attention given to melting, homogenization, and thermo-mechanical processing. Ingots approaching 8 kg in mass were made by vacuum induction melting to avoid the extrinsic factors inherent to small-scale laboratory button samples. A computationally based homogenization heat treatment was given to both alloys in order to eliminate any solidification segregation. The alloys were then fabricated in the usual way (forging, followed by hot rolling) with typical thermo-mechanical processing parameters employed. Transmission electron microscopy was subsequently used to assess the single-phase nature of the alloys prior to mechanical testing. Tensile specimens (ASTM E8) were prepared with tensile mechanical properties obtained from room temperature through 800 °C. Material from the gage section of selected tensile specimens was extracted to document room and elevated temperature deformation within the HEAs. Fracture surfaces were also examined to note fracture failure modes. The tensile behavior and selected tensile properties were compared with results in the literature for similar alloys.

  19. Corrosion and mechanical behavior of materials for coal gasification applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.

    1980-05-01

    A state-of-the-art review is presented on the corrosion and mechanical behavior of materials at elevated temperatures in coal-gasification environments. The gas atmosphere in coal-conversion processes are, in general, complex mixtures which contain sulfur-bearing components (H/sub 2/S, SO/sub 2/, and COS) as well as oxidants (CO/sub 2//CO and H/sub 2/O/H/sub 2/). The information developed over the last five years clearly shows sulfidation to be the major mode of material degradation in these environments. The corrosion behavior of structural materials in complex gas environments is examined to evaluate the interrelationships between gas chemistry, alloy chemistry, temperature, and pressure. Thermodynamic aspects of high-temperature corrosion processes that pertain to coal conversion are discussed, and kinetic data are used to compare the behavior of different commercial materials of interest. The influence of complex gas environments on the mechanical properties such as tensile, stress-rupture, and impact on selected alloys is presented. The data have been analyzed, wherever possible, to examine the role of environment on the property variation. The results from ongoing programs on char effects on corrosion and on alloy protection via coatings, cladding, and weld overlay are presented. Areas of additional research with particular emphasis on the development of a better understanding of corrosion processes in complex environments and on alloy design for improved corrosion resistance are discussed. 54 references, 65 figures, 24 tables.

  20. Monte Carlo studies of supersymmetric matrix quantum mechanics with sixteen supercharges at finite temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostopoulos, Konstantinos N; Hanada, Masanori; Nishimura, Jun; Takeuchi, Shingo

    2008-01-18

    We present the first Monte Carlo results for supersymmetric matrix quantum mechanics with 16 supercharges at finite temperature. The recently proposed nonlattice simulation enables us to include the effects of fermionic matrices in a transparent and reliable manner. The internal energy nicely interpolates the weak coupling behavior obtained by the high temperature expansion, and the strong coupling behavior predicted from the dual black-hole geometry. The Polyakov line asymptotes at low temperature to a characteristic behavior for a deconfined theory, suggesting the absence of a phase transition. These results provide highly nontrivial evidence for the gauge-gravity duality.

  1. Thermal-mechanical behavior of fuel element in SCWR design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, R.; Yetisir, M.; Hamilton, H. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents a study on thermal-mechanical behavior of a fuel element proposed for the Canadian Supercritical Water Cooled Reactor (SCWR). In the Canadian SCWR, the coolant pressure is 25 MPa, and the temperature is 350{sup o}C at the inlet and 625{sup o}C at the outlet of the reactor core. Critical design decisions for fuel design will be the selection of the fuel sheath material and details of the fuel element design options (sheath thickness, pellet-clad gap, internal pressure, etc.). The analysis presented in this paper predicted temperature, stress and strain in the fuel element of the Canadian SCWR with a collapsible sheath using ANSYS. Typical conditions for the evaluation of the fuel behavior, such as linear heat generation rate, coolant temperature and sheath surface heat transfer coefficient, were extracted from core and fuel channel designs. The temperature distribution in the fuel element is predicted by a thermal model and then the thermal model is coupled sequentially with a structural model to predict fuel sheath deformation under the predicted temperature distribution and external (coolant) pressure. Nonlinear thermo-mechanical simulations include nonlinear buckling with elastic-plastic deformation. Three sheath collapse phenomena are considered: (1) elastic collapse by buckling, (2) longitudinal ridging and (3) plastic collapse by yielding. The numerical models are validated against analytical and experimental data. The presented results show the temperature distribution, deformed shape, stress and strain of the fuel element, allowing the designers to select appropriate sheath material and element design options for the SCWR fuel element design. (author)

  2. Mechanics of Protein Adaptation to High Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirnemann, Guillaume; Sterpone, Fabio

    2017-12-07

    Inspired by Somero's corresponding state principle that relates protein enhanced thermal stability with mechanical rigidity, we deployed state of the art computational techniques (based on atomistic steered molecular dynamics and Hamiltonian-replica exchange simulations) to study the in silico realization of mechanical and thermal unfolding of two homologous Csp proteins that have evolved to thrive in different thermal environments. By complementing recent single-molecule experiments, we unambiguously show that, for these homologues whose structures are very similar, the increased thermal resistance of the thermophilic variant is not associated with an increased mechanical stability. Our approach provides microscopic insights that are otherwise inaccessible to experimental techniques, and explains why the protein weak spots for thermal and mechanical denaturation are distinct.

  3. Mechanism of bacterial adaptation to low temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Survival of bacteria at low temperatures provokes scientific interest because of several reasons. Investigations in this area promise insight into one of the mysteries of life science – namely, how the machinery of life operates at extreme environments. Knowledge obtained from these studies is likely to be useful in controlling ...

  4. A master curve-mechanism based approach to modeling the effects of constraint, loading rate and irradiation on the toughness-temperature behavior of a V-4Cr-4Ti alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odette, G.R.; Donahue, E.; Lucas, G.E.; Sheckherd, J.W. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The influence of loading rate and constraint on the effective fracture toughness as a function of temperature [K{sub e}(T)] of the fusion program heat of V-4Cr-4Ti was measured using subsized, three point bend specimens. The constitutive behavior was characterized as a function of temperature and strain rate using small tensile specimens. Data in the literature on this alloy was also analysed to determine the effect of irradiation on K{sub e}(T) and the energy temperature (E-T) curves measured in subsized Charpy V-notch tests. It was found that V-4Cr-4Ti undergoes {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} stress-controlled cleavage fracture below a temperature marking a sharp ductile-to-brittle transition. The transition temperature is increased by higher loading rates, irradiation hardening and triaxial constraint. Shifts in a reference transition temperature due to higher loading rates and irradiation can be reasonably predicted by a simple equivalent yield stress model. These results also suggest that size and geometry effects, which mediate constraint, can be modeled by combining local critical stressed area {sigma}*/A* fracture criteria with finite element method simulations of crack tip stress fields. The fundamental understanding reflected in these models will be needed to develop K{sub e}(T) curves for a range of loading rates, irradiation conditions, structural size scales and geometries relying (in large part) on small specimen tests. Indeed, it may be possible to develop a master K{sub e}(T) curve-shift method to account for these variables. Such reliable and flexible failure assessment methods are critical to the design and safe operation of defect tolerant vanadium structures.

  5. The Deformation Behavior, Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Cast and Extruded Mg-1Mn-xNd (wt%) at Temperatures between 50°C and 250°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakkedath, A.; Bohlen, J.; Yi, S.; Letzig, D.; Chen, Z.; Boehlert, C. J.

    The tensile deformation behavior of as-cast and cast-then-extruded Mg-1Mn-1Nd(wt%) and Mg-1Mn-0.3Nd(wt%) alloys was studied by performing in-situ tests inside a SEM. A slip/twin trace analysis technique was used to identify the distribution of the deformation systems. Cast-then-extruded Mg-1Mn-1Nd(wt%) exhibited superior elevated-temperature strength retention compared to cast-then-extruded Mg-1Mn-0.3Nd(wt%). Basal slip and extension twinning were observed in the as-cast Mg-1Mn-1Nd(wt%) and Mg-1Mn-0.4Nd(wt%) alloys deformed at 50°C. In cast-then-extruded Mg-1Mn-1Nd(wt%), basal slip, prismatic slip, and pyramidal slip were active at all temperatures. In cast-then-extruded Mg-1Mn-0.3Nd(wt%), at lower temperatures, twinning dominated the deformation and no non-basal slip activity was observed. The extent of twinning decreased with increasing temperature and basal slip was the major deformation mode at 150-250°C in both cast-then-extruded materials. The estimated CRSS ratio of extension twinning with respect to basal slip in Mg-1Mn-1Nd(wt%) was close to unity, suggesting that the addition of Nd results in an increase in the CRSS of basal slip.

  6. Behavior of Clostridium perfringens at low temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de A.E.I.; Rombouts, F.M.; Beumer, R.R.

    2004-01-01

    Refrigerated storage is an important step in the preparation of foods and inadequate storage is one of the main causes of food poisoning outbreaks of Clostridium perfringens. Therefore, growth and germination characteristics of C. perfringens in a temperature range of 3-42 degreesC were determined

  7. Influence of temperature on fracture mechanisms of magnesium composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaertnerova, V.; Jaeger, A.; Trojanova, Z. [Dept. of Metal Physics, Charles Univ., Praha (Czech Republic); Chalupova, M. [Dept. of Materials Engineering, Univ. of Zilina, Zilina (Slovakia)

    2005-07-01

    Magnesium alloy AZ91 (9% Al, 1% Zn, 0.2% Mn in wt.%) with different reinforcements has been used to study fracture mechanisms and crack development. SiC particles and/or Saffil fibres were used as the reinforcement. Fracture surfaces of specimens prepared by impact tests in the temperature range from room temperature to 300 C were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Possible mechanisms of fracture are discussed in the relation to the test temperature. (orig.)

  8. Developing Attention: Behavioral and Brain Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael I. Posner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain networks underlying attention are present even during infancy and are critical for the developing ability of children to control their emotions and thoughts. For adults, individual differences in the efficiency of attentional networks have been related to neuromodulators and to genetic variations. We have examined the development of attentional networks and child temperament in a longitudinal study from infancy (7 months to middle childhood (7 years. Early temperamental differences among infants, including smiling and laughter and vocal reactivity, are related to self-regulation abilities at 7 years. However, genetic variations related to adult executive attention, while present in childhood, are poor predictors of later control, in part because individual genetic variation may have many small effects and in part because their influence occurs in interaction with caregiver behavior and other environmental influences. While brain areas involved in attention are present during infancy, their connectivity changes and leads to improvement in control of behavior. It is also possible to influence control mechanisms through training later in life. The relation between maturation and learning may allow advances in our understanding of human brain development.

  9. Mechanical behavior of {sup 238}UO{sub 2}, {sup 238}PuO{sub 2}, and {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} as a function of strain rate and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stout, M.G.; Ellis, R.W.; Pereyra, R.A.

    1994-08-01

    The mechanical response of {sup 238}UO{sub 2} was measured as a function of strain rate and temperature. We evaluated material produced by two processing schedules: hot pressing followed by a grain stabilization; and cold pressing plus a sintering treatment. The response of these two materials was identical, within the scatter of our data. We complemented our data with that published in the literature, after having made the appropriate corrections for grain size, porosity, and stoichiometry. The entire collection of data was used to evaluate the Follansbee-Kocks mechanical threshold stress (MTS) model for the prediction of yield stress as a function of strain rate and temperature. We used this model to predict the yield stress of {sup 238}UO{sub 2} for strain rates between {dot {var_epsilon}} = 10{sup {minus}5} and 10{sup 3} s{sup {minus}1} and temperatures from 800 to 1600C. These predictions provided the basis for constructing a deformation/fracture map for both urania and plutonia. Examination of the maps indicates that for compressive loading and impact strain rates, the {sup 238}UO{sub 2} will be an excellent mock material for {sup 238}PuO{sub 2}. Under these conditions both the strength and deformation and the fracture modes are consistent between these two materials.

  10. influence of intercritical annealing temperature on mechanical

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    of the impact test samples were examined using the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Micros structural evolution of the samples was also examined with an optical microscope. The results showed that all the evaluated mechanical properties were improved by intercritical annealing, with the samples treated at 790OC ...

  11. Effects of Heat-Treated Wood Particles on the Physico-Mechanical Properties and Extended Creep Behavior of Wood/Recycled-HDPE Composites Using the Time–Temperature Superposition Principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng-Chun Yang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effectiveness of heat-treated wood particles for improving the physico-mechanical properties and creep performance of wood/recycled-HDPE composites. The results reveal that the composites with heat-treated wood particles had significantly decreased moisture content, water absorption, and thickness swelling, while no improvements of the flexural properties or the wood screw holding strength were observed, except for the internal bond strength. Additionally, creep tests were conducted at a series of elevated temperatures using the time–temperature superposition principle (TTSP, and the TTSP-predicted creep compliance curves fit well with the experimental data. The creep resistance values of composites with heat-treated wood particles were greater than those having untreated wood particles due to the hydrophobic character of the treated wood particles and improved interfacial compatibility between the wood particles and polymer matrix. At a reference temperature of 20 °C, the improvement of creep resistance (ICR of composites with heat-treated wood particles reached approximately 30% over a 30-year period, and it increased significantly with increasing reference temperature.

  12. Effects of Heat-Treated Wood Particles on the Physico-Mechanical Properties and Extended Creep Behavior of Wood/Recycled-HDPE Composites Using the Time-Temperature Superposition Principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Teng-Chun; Chien, Yi-Chi; Wu, Tung-Lin; Hung, Ke-Chang; Wu, Jyh-Horng

    2017-03-30

    This study investigated the effectiveness of heat-treated wood particles for improving the physico-mechanical properties and creep performance of wood/recycled-HDPE composites. The results reveal that the composites with heat-treated wood particles had significantly decreased moisture content, water absorption, and thickness swelling, while no improvements of the flexural properties or the wood screw holding strength were observed, except for the internal bond strength. Additionally, creep tests were conducted at a series of elevated temperatures using the time-temperature superposition principle (TTSP), and the TTSP-predicted creep compliance curves fit well with the experimental data. The creep resistance values of composites with heat-treated wood particles were greater than those having untreated wood particles due to the hydrophobic character of the treated wood particles and improved interfacial compatibility between the wood particles and polymer matrix. At a reference temperature of 20 °C, the improvement of creep resistance ( ICR ) of composites with heat-treated wood particles reached approximately 30% over a 30-year period, and it increased significantly with increasing reference temperature.

  13. Simulation study of temperature-dependent diffusion behaviors of Ag/Ag(001) at low substrate temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Danyun; Mo, Yunjie [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Electronics and Information Technology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510275 (China); Feng, Xiaofang [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510275 (China); He, Yingyou [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Electronics and Information Technology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510275 (China); Jiang, Shaoji, E-mail: stsjsj@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510275 (China)

    2017-06-01

    Highlights: • The model of combinations of nearest-neighbor atoms of adatom was built to calculate the diffusion barrier of every configuration for Ag/Ag(001). • The complete potential energy curve of a specific diffusion path on the surface was worked out with the help of elementary diffusion behaviors. • The non-monotonic relation between the surface roughness and the substrate temperature (decreasing from 300 K to 100 K) was demonstrated. • A theoretical explanation of diffusion mechanism for the non-monotonic variation of roughness at low substrate temperature was presented. - Abstract: In this study, a model based on the First Principles calculations and Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation were established to study the growth characteristic of Ag thin film at low substrate temperature. On the basis of the interaction between the adatom and nearest-neighbor atoms, some simplifications and assumptions were made to categorize the diffusion behaviors of Ag adatoms on Ag(001). Then the barriers of all possible diffusion behaviors were calculated using the Climbing Image Nudged Elastic Band method (CI-NEB). Based on the Arrhenius formula, the morphology variation, which is attributed to the surface diffusion behaviors during the growth, was simulated with a temperature-dependent KMC model. With this model, a non-monotonic relation between the surface roughness and the substrate temperature (decreasing from 300 K to 100 K) were discovered. The analysis of the temperature dependence on diffusion behaviors presents a theoretical explanation of diffusion mechanism for the non-monotonic variation of roughness at low substrate temperature.

  14. Behavioral responses of Atlantic cod to sea temperature changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Carla; Olsen, Esben Moland; Moland, Even; Ciannelli, Lorenzo; Knutsen, Halvor

    2015-05-01

    Understanding responses of marine species to temperature variability is essential to predict impacts of future climate change in the oceans. Most ectotherms are expected to adjust their behavior to avoid extreme temperatures and minimize acute changes in body temperature. However, measuring such behavioral plasticity in the wild is challenging. Combining 4 years of telemetry-derived behavioral data on juvenile and adult (30-80 cm) Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), and in situ ocean temperature measurements, we found a significant effect of sea temperature on cod depth use and activity level in coastal Skagerrak. During summer, cod were found in deeper waters when sea surface temperature increased. Further, this effect of temperature was stronger on larger cod. Diel vertical migration, which consists in a nighttime rise to shallow feeding habitats, was stronger among smaller cod. As surface temperature increased beyond ∼15°C, their vertical migration was limited to deeper waters. In addition to larger diel vertical migrations, smaller cod were more active and travelled larger distances compared to larger specimens. Cold temperatures during winter tended, however, to reduce the magnitude of diel vertical migrations, as well as the activity level and distance moved by those smaller individuals. Our findings suggest that future and ongoing rises in sea surface temperature may increasingly deprive cod in this region from shallow feeding areas during summer, which may be detrimental for local populations of the species.

  15. Finite-temperature behavior of the Bose polaron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levinsen, Jesper; Parish, Meera M.; Christensen, Rasmus S.

    2017-01-01

    to the critical temperature $T_c$ for Bose-Einstein condensation. These results show that the properties of the impurity vary strongly with temperature. The energy exhibits an intriguing non-monotonic behavior close to $T_c$, and the damping rises sharply close to $T_c$. We finally discuss how these effects can......We consider a mobile impurity immersed in a Bose gas at finite temperature. Using perturbation theory valid for weak coupling between the impurity and the bosons, we derive analytical results for the energy and damping of the impurity for low and high temperatures, as well as for temperatures close...

  16. Thermoforming of tracheal cartilage: viability, shape change, and mechanical behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Yongseok; Protsenko, Dmitriy; Holden, Paul K; Chlebicki, Cara; Wong, Brian J F

    2008-10-01

    Trauma, emergent tracheostomy, and prolonged intubation are common causes of severe deformation and narrowing of the trachea. Laser technology may be used to reshape tracheal cartilage using minimally invasive methods. The objectives of this study were to determine: (1) the dependence of tracheal cartilage shape change on temperature and laser dosimetry using heated saline bath immersion and laser irradiation, respectively, (2) the effect of temperature on the mechanical behavior of cartilage, and (3) tissue viability as a function of laser dosimetry. Ex vivo rabbit trachea cartilage specimens were bent and secured around a cylinder (6 mm), and then immersed in a saline bath (45 and 72 degrees C) for 5-100 seconds. In separate experiments, tracheal specimens were irradiated with a diode laser (lambda = 1.45 microm, 220-400 J/cm(2)). Mechanical analysis was then used to determine the elastic modulus in tension after irradiation. Fluorescent viability assays combined with laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) were employed to image and identify thermal injury regions. Shape change transition zones, between 62 and 66 degrees C in the saline heating bath and above power densities of 350 J/cm(2) (peak temperatures 65+/-10 degrees C) for laser irradiation were identified. Above these zones, the elastic moduli were higher (8.2+/-4 MPa) than at lower temperatures (4.5+/-3 MPa). LSCM identified significant loss of viable chondrocytes within the laser-irradiation zones. Our results indicate a change in mechanical properties occurs with laser irradiation and further demonstrates that significant thermal damage is concurrent with clinically relevant shape change in the elastic cartilage tissues of the rabbit trachea using the present laser and dosimetry parameters. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Influence of compression parameters on mechanical behavior of mozzarella cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogaça, Davi Novaes Ladeia; da Silva, William Soares; Rodrigues, Luciano Brito

    2017-10-01

    Studies on the interaction between direction and degree of compression in the Texture Profile Analysis (TPA) of cheeses are limited. For this reason the present study aimed to evaluate the mechanical properties of Mozzarella cheese by TPA at different compression degrees (65, 75, and 85%) and directions (axes X, Y, and Z). Data obtained were compared in order to identify possible interaction between both factors. Compression direction did not affect any mechanical variable, or rather, the cheese had an isotropic behavior for TPA. Compression degree had a significant influence (p manufacturing is another factor that may directly influence the mechanical properties of food. This can be seen, for instance, in stretched curd cheese, such as Mozzarella. Knowledge on such mechanical properties is highly relevant for food industries due to the mechanical resistance in piling, pressing, manufacture of packages, and food transport, or to melting features presented by the food at high temperatures in preparation of several foods, such as pizzas, snacks, sandwiches, and appetizers. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Research on mechanical behavior of casting slab during dynamic soft reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Qin; Huang, Jianlin; Zhou, Daomou; Yang, Xiaoying

    2017-10-01

    A three-dimensional dynamic solidification model incorporating the thermo-elastic-plastic coupling model has been proposed in this paper by ABAQUS considering the dynamic contact between the slab and rolls. The thermo-mechanical coupling model produces outputs such as temperature and mechanical behavior of the slab. And the stress-strain distribution of the high-temperature slab at the solidification end has been investigated in this paper. The influences of various reduction interval, reduction amount and reduction distribution on mechanical behavior of casting slab have been systematically discussed.

  19. Effect of layer thickness on the high temperature mechanical properties of Al/SiC nanolaminates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotfian, S. [IMDEA Materials Institute, c/Eric Kandel 2, 28906 Getafe, Madrid (Spain); Mayer, C.; Chawla, N. [Materials Science and Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-6106 (United States); Llorca, J. [IMDEA Materials Institute, c/Eric Kandel 2, 28906 Getafe, Madrid (Spain); Department of Materials Science, Polytechnic University of Madrid, E.T.S. de Ingenieros de Caminos, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Misra, A.; Baldwin, J.K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Molina-Aldareguía, J.M., E-mail: jon.molina@imdea.org [IMDEA Materials Institute, c/Eric Kandel 2, 28906 Getafe, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-11-28

    Composite laminates on the nanoscale have shown superior hardness and toughness, but little is known about their high temperature behavior. The mechanical properties (elastic modulus and hardness) were measured as a function of temperature by means of nanoindentation in Al/SiC nanolaminates, a model metal–ceramic nanolaminate fabricated by physical vapor deposition. The influence of the Al and SiC volume fraction and layer thicknesses was determined between room temperature and 150 °C and, the deformation modes were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy, using a focused ion beam to prepare cross-sections through selected indents. It was found that ambient temperature deformation was controlled by the plastic flow of the Al layers, constrained by the SiC, and the elastic bending of the SiC layers. The reduction in hardness with temperature showed evidence of the development of interface-mediated deformation mechanisms, which led to a clear influence of layer thickness on the hardness. - Highlights: • The mechanical behavior of Al/SiC nanolaminates was measured between 28 °C and 150 °C. • Room temperature hardness was controlled by the volume fraction of the constituents. • The hardness of all the nanolaminates decreased rapidly with temperature. • Reduction of hardness with temperature increased as the interface density increased.

  20. Robust design of microelectronics assemblies against mechanical shock, temperature and moisture effects of temperature, moisture and mechanical driving forces

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, E-H

    2015-01-01

    Robust Design of Microelectronics Assemblies Against Mechanical Shock, Temperature and Moisture discusses how the reliability of packaging components is a prime concern to electronics manufacturers. The text presents a thorough review of this important field of research, providing users with a practical guide that discusses theoretical aspects, experimental results, and modeling techniques. The authors use their extensive experience to produce detailed chapters covering temperature, moisture, and mechanical shock induced failure, adhesive interconnects, and viscoelasticity. Useful progr

  1. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Temperature Compensation of the Circadian Clock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Virshup

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available An approximately 24-h biological timekeeping mechanism called the circadian clock is present in virtually all light-sensitive organisms from cyanobacteria to humans. The clock system regulates our sleep–wake cycle, feeding–fasting, hormonal secretion, body temperature, and many other physiological functions. Signals from the master circadian oscillator entrain peripheral clocks using a variety of neural and hormonal signals. Even centrally controlled internal temperature fluctuations can entrain the peripheral circadian clocks. But, unlike other chemical reactions, the output of the clock system remains nearly constant with fluctuations in ambient temperature, a phenomenon known as temperature compensation. In this brief review, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of the posttranslational modifications, especially a phosphoswitch mechanism controlling the stability of PER2 and its implications for the regulation of temperature compensation.

  2. Cortisol involvement in mechanisms of behavioral inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tops, Mattie; Boksem, Maarten A. S.

    We studied whether baseline cortisol is associated with post-error slowing, a measure that depends upon brain areas involved in behavioral inhibition. Moreover, we studied whether this association holds after controlling for positive associations with behavioral inhibition scores and error-related

  3. Heating behavior and crystal growth mechanism in microwave field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gang; Kong, Yan; Hou, Wenhua; Yan, Qijie

    2005-02-03

    A simple microwave solid-state reactor was designed on the basis of a domestic microwave oven by using graphite powder as heating medium. The heating behavior of the reactor was studied by using an on-line computer to monitor the real-time temperature during irradiation. It was found that the temperature (T) was related to the time (t) and that microwave power depended on the duty cycle (x) of microwave irradiation. Two empirical equations were proposed and could be applied to the similar microwave solid-state reactors. Four inorganic layered materials, LiV(3)O(8), KNb(3)O(8), KTiNbO(5), and KSr(2)Nb(3)O(10), were successfully synthesized in the designed reactor at a suitable heating rate and temperature that were fully controlled by the empirical equations. Characterization results of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy, and scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy indicated that the phases of samples prepared by traditional and microwave methods were in good agreement; nevertheless, the heating nature and the morphologies of products were quite different. The samples synthesized in the microwave field had crystallographic defects and showed an incompactly stacking structure of nanosheets. Due to the rapid formation of crystallites and different extended growth rate along the crystal axis of the products in microwave field, the crystal growth mechanism of layered metal oxides was not according to that of the traditional method and is briefly discussed.

  4. The tensile behavior of GH3535 superalloy at elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, F.F.; Zhou, B.M.; Huang, H.F.; Leng, B.; Lu, Y.L. [Thorium Molten Salts Reactor Center, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Dong, J.S. [Superalloy Division, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Li, Z.J., E-mail: lizhijun@sinap.ac.cn [Thorium Molten Salts Reactor Center, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Zhou, X.T. [Thorium Molten Salts Reactor Center, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)

    2016-10-01

    The tensile behavior of GH3535 alloy has been investigated at strain rates of 8.33 × 10{sup −5}/s{sup −1}–8.33 × 10{sup −3}/s{sup −1}, in the temperature range of 25–800 °C. The results showed that the ultimate tensile strength was decreased with increasing temperature and increased with rising strain rate, whereas the yield strength kept almost a constant value at the temperature range from 550 to 800 °C in all strain rates test. The formation of M{sub 12}C carbides at the grain boundary during the tension process played an important role in increasing the yield strength of the alloy at elevated temperatures. But inhomogeneous deformation at 650 °C resulted in the minimum ductility of the alloy. Additionally, various types of serrations were noticed on the stress-strain curves for the alloy tested in the temperature range of 500–800 °C. Normal Portevin-Le Chatelier (PLC) effect and positive strain rate sensitivity were observed in this alloy. Type A and A + B serrations were presented to stress-strain curves at temperatures below 650 °C, whereas type C serration was noticed when the temperature rose above 650 °C. The analysis suggested that the interactions between substitutional solutes migration and mobile dislocations were the main reason for the serrated flow behavior in this alloy. - Highlights: • The tensile behavior of GH3535 alloy at elevated temperature was studied. • The yield strength anomaly was observed in the temperature range from 550 to 800 °C. • The formation of M{sub 12}C improves the grain boundary strength to a certain extent. • Inhomogeneous deformation at 650 °C results in the ductility loss of the alloy. • The interaction between solute atoms and dislocations results in the PLC effect.

  5. Sedentary Behavior and Cardiovascular Disease Risk: Mediating Mechanisms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carter, S.; Hartman, Y.A.W.; Holder, S.; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Hopkins, N.D.

    2017-01-01

    Sedentary behavior has a strong association with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, which may be independent of physical activity. To date, the mechanism(s) that mediate this relationship are poorly understood. We hypothesize that sedentary behavior modifies key hemodynamic, inflammatory, and

  6. The Temperature Effect on the Compressive Behavior of Closed-Cell Aluminum-Alloy Foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movahedi, Nima; Linul, Emanoil; Marsavina, Liviu

    2018-01-01

    In this research, the mechanical behavior of closed-cell aluminum (Al)-alloy foams was investigated at different temperatures in the range of 25-450 °C. The main mechanical properties of porous Al-alloy foams are affected by the testing temperature, and they decrease with the increase in the temperature during uniaxial compression. From both the constant/serrated character of stress-strain curves and macro/microstructural morphology of deformed cellular structure, it was found that Al foams present a transition temperature from brittle to ductile behavior around 192 °C. Due to the softening of the cellular structure at higher temperatures, linear correlations of the stress amplitude and that of the absorbed energy with the temperature were proposed. Also, it was observed that the presence of inherent defects like micropores in the foam cell walls induced further local stress concentration which weakens the cellular structure's strength and crack propagation and cell-wall plastic deformation are the dominant collapse mechanisms. Finally, an energy absorption study was performed and an optimum temperature was proposed.

  7. The Temperature Effect on the Compressive Behavior of Closed-Cell Aluminum-Alloy Foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movahedi, Nima; Linul, Emanoil; Marsavina, Liviu

    2017-12-01

    In this research, the mechanical behavior of closed-cell aluminum (Al)-alloy foams was investigated at different temperatures in the range of 25-450 °C. The main mechanical properties of porous Al-alloy foams are affected by the testing temperature, and they decrease with the increase in the temperature during uniaxial compression. From both the constant/serrated character of stress-strain curves and macro/microstructural morphology of deformed cellular structure, it was found that Al foams present a transition temperature from brittle to ductile behavior around 192 °C. Due to the softening of the cellular structure at higher temperatures, linear correlations of the stress amplitude and that of the absorbed energy with the temperature were proposed. Also, it was observed that the presence of inherent defects like micropores in the foam cell walls induced further local stress concentration which weakens the cellular structure's strength and crack propagation and cell-wall plastic deformation are the dominant collapse mechanisms. Finally, an energy absorption study was performed and an optimum temperature was proposed.

  8. Temperature and time dependence of the electro-mechanical properties of flexible active fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Atitallah, H.; Ounaies, Z.; Muliana, A.

    2016-04-01

    Active fiber composites (AFCs) are comprised of piezoelectric fibers embedded in a polymeric matrix. AFCs use interdigitated electrodes, which produce electric field lines parallel to the fiber direction, thus taking advantage of the larger d 33 piezoelectric coefficient. The polymer volume content of the AFCs is generally more than 50%; since polymers tend to have behaviors affected by their viscoelastic characteristics especially at elevated temperatures, it is necessary to understand the thermo-electro-mechanical behavior of AFCs at different loading rates. In this study, mechanical, electrical and electromechanical properties of AFCs were measured at different isothermal temperatures, namely 25 °C, 50 °C and 75 °C and at different loading rates. The measurements of all the properties of AFCs were done along the fiber direction. It was found that at higher temperatures, the modulus and tensile strength decreased for all strain rates and the strain at failure increased. The remnant polarization increased with decrease in frequency and increase in temperature; however, the coercive field decreased with temperature and was not affected by the frequency. Due to the viscoelastic behavior of the epoxy, the piezoelectric coefficient d 33 increased at higher temperature and lower frequency. It was also noted that this coefficient is dependent on the magnitude of the electric field.

  9. The mechanism behind redox instability of anodes in high-temperature SOFCs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemensø, Trine; Chung, Charissa; Larsen, Peter Halvor

    2005-01-01

    Bulk expansion of the anode upon oxidation is considered to be responsible for the lack of redox stability in high-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The bulk expansion of nickel-yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) anode materials was measured by dilatometry as a function of sample geometry......, ceramic component, temperature, and temperature cycling. The strength of the ceramic network and the degree of Ni redistribution appeared to be key parameters of the redox behavior. A model of the redox mechanism in nickel-YSZ anodes was developed based on the dilatometry data and macro...

  10. Influence of tempering temperature on mechanical properties of cast steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Golański

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of research on the influence of tempering temperature on structure and mechanical properties of bainite hardened cast steel: G21CrMoV4 – 6 (L21HMF and G17CrMoV5 – 10 (L17HMF. Investigated cast steels were taken out from internal frames of steam turbines serviced for long time at elevated temperatures. Tempering of the investigated cast steel was carried out within the temperature range of 690 ÷ 730 C (G21CrMoV4 – 6 and 700 ÷ 740 C (G17CrMoV5 – 10. After tempering the cast steels were characterized by a structure of tempered lower bainite with numerous precipitations of carbides. Performed research of mechanical properties has shown that high temperatures of tempering of bainitic structure do not cause decrease of mechanical properties beneath the required minimum.oo It has also been proved that high-temperature tempering (>720 oC ensures high impact energy at the 20% decrease of mechanical properties.

  11. Thermal Behavior of Cylindrical Buckling Restrained Braces at Elevated Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elnaz Talebi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary focus of this investigation was to analyze sequentially coupled nonlinear thermal stress, using a three-dimensional model. It was meant to shed light on the behavior of Buckling Restraint Brace (BRB elements with circular cross section, at elevated temperature. Such bracing systems were comprised of a cylindrical steel core encased in a strong concrete-filled steel hollow casing. A debonding agent was rubbed on the core’s surface to avoid shear stress transition to the restraining system. The numerical model was verified by the analytical solutions developed by the other researchers. Performance of BRB system under seismic loading at ambient temperature has been well documented. However, its performance in case of fire has yet to be explored. This study showed that the failure of brace may be attributed to material strength reduction and high compressive forces, both due to temperature rise. Furthermore, limiting temperatures in the linear behavior of steel casing and concrete in BRB element for both numerical and analytical simulations were about 196°C and 225°C, respectively. Finally it is concluded that the performance of BRB at elevated temperatures was the same as that seen at room temperature; that is, the steel core yields prior to the restraining system.

  12. Influence of tempering temperature on mechanical properties of cast steels

    OpenAIRE

    G. Golański

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents results of research on the influence of tempering temperature on structure and mechanical properties of bainite hardened cast steel: G21CrMoV4 – 6 (L21HMF) and G17CrMoV5 – 10 (L17HMF). Investigated cast steels were taken out from internal frames of steam turbines serviced for long time at elevated temperatures. Tempering of the investigated cast steel was carried out within the temperature range of 690 ÷ 730 C (G21CrMoV4 – 6) and 700 ÷ 740 C (G17CrMoV5 – 10). After temperin...

  13. Influence of temperature on the rheological behavior of a new fucose-containing bacterial exopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Madalena; Freitas, Filomena; Torres, Cristiana A V; Reis, Maria A M; Alves, Vítor D

    2011-05-01

    The effect of temperature on the rheology of a new fucose-containing extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) was evaluated. The steady state data revealed a shear-thinning behavior, with the viscosity being immediately recovered when the shear rate was decreased. The mechanical spectra indicated viscous solutions with entangled polymer molecules in the range of temperatures studied (from 15 °C to 65 °C). In addition, the Time-Temperature Superposition principle was successfully applied and the Cox-Merz rule was valid, reinforcing the idea of a thermorheologically simple behavior for the EPS in aqueous solution. Furthermore, the viscous and viscoelastic properties at 25 °C were maintained after consecutive heating and cooling cycles, indicating a good thermal stability under temperature fluctuations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Mechanisms of skill in sequential motor behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verwey, W.B.

    1994-01-01

    The statement that practice is the major determinant of skilled behavior is a truism. Yet, it is unclear why practice is so important and what the consequences of practice are. This thesis addresses the theme of acquiring skill from a motor point of view: How is it possible that with practice more

  15. Deflagration Behavior of PBX 9501 at Elevated Temperature and Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maienschein, J L; Koerner, J G

    2008-04-15

    We report the deflagration behavior of PBX 9501 at pressures up to 300 MPa and temperatures of 150-180 C where the sample has been held at the test temperature for several hours before ignition. The purpose is to determine the effect on the deflagration behavior of material damage caused by prolonged exposure to high temperature. This conditioning is similar to that experienced by an explosive while it being heated to eventual explosion. The results are made more complicated by the presence of a significant thermal gradient along the sample during the temperature ramp and soak. Three major conclusions are: the presence of nitroplasticizer makes PBX 9501 more thermally sensitive than LX-04 with an inert Viton binder; the deflagration behavior of PBX 9501 is more extreme and more inconsistent than that of LX-04; and something in PBX 9501 causes thermal damage to 'heal' as the deflagration proceeds, resulting in a decelerating deflagration front as it travels along the sample.

  16. Effects of mine strata thermal behavior and mine initial temperatures on mobile refuge alternative temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yantek, D S; Yan, L; Bissert, P T; Klein, M D

    2017-04-01

    Federal regulations require the installation of refuge alternatives (RAs) in underground coal mines. Mobile RAs have a limited ability to dissipate heat, and heat buildup can lead to a life-threatening condition as the RA internal air temperature and relative humidity increase. The U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) performed heat testing on a 10-person tent-type training RA and contracted ThermoAnalytics Inc. to develop a validated thermal simulation model of the tested RA. The model was used to examine the effects of the constant mine strata temperature assumption, initial mine air temperature, initial mine strata surface temperature (MSST), initial mine strata temperature at depth (MSTD) and mine strata thermal behavior on RA internal air temperature using 117 W (400 Btu/h) of sensible heat input per simulated miner. For the studied RA, when the mine strata temperature was treated as a constant, the final predicted RA internal air temperature was 7.1°C (12.8°F) lower than it was when the mine strata thermal behavior was included in the model. A 5.6°C (10.0°F) increase in the initial MSST resulted in a 3.9°C (7.1°F) increase in the final RA internal air temperature, whereas a 5.6°C (10°F) increase in the initial MSTD yielded a 1.4°C (2.5°F) increase in the final RA internal air temperature. The results indicate that mine strata temperature increases and mine strata initial temperatures must be accounted for in the physical testing or thermal simulations of RAs.

  17. Mechanical behavior and modelisation of Ti-6Al-4V titanium sheet under hot stamping conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirvin, Q.; Velay, V.; Bonnaire, R.; Penazzi, L.

    2017-10-01

    The Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy is widely used for the manufacture of aeronautical and automotive parts (solid parts). In aeronautics, this alloy is employed for its excellent mechanical behavior associated with low density, outstanding corrosion resistance and good mechanical properties up to 600°C. It is especially used for the manufacture of fuselage frames, on the pylon for carrying out the primary structure (machining forged blocks) and the secondary structure in sheet form. In this last case, the sheet metal forming can be done through various methods: at room temperature by drawing operation, at very high temperature (≃900°C) by superplastic forming (SPF) and at intermediate temperature (≥750°C) by hot forming (HF). In order to reduce production costs and environmental troubles, the cycle times reduction associated with a decrease of temperature levels are relevant. This study focuses on the behavior modelling of Ti-6Al-4V alloy at temperatures above room temperature to obtained greater formability and below SPF condition to reduce tools workshop and energy costs. The displacement field measurement obtained by Digital Image Correlation (DIC) is based on innovative surface preparation pattern adapted to high temperature exposures. Different material parameters are identified to define a model able to predict the mechanical behavior of Ti-6Al-4V alloy under hot stamping conditions. The hardening plastic model identified is introduced in FEM to simulate an omega shape forming operation.

  18. Mechanical dissipation at elevated temperatures in tetrahedral amorphous carbon.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, John P.; Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Czaplewski, David A.; Wendt, Joel Robert

    2005-05-01

    We have measured the temperature dependence of mechanical dissipation in tetrahedral amorphous carbon flexural and torsional resonators over the temperature range from 300 to 1023 K. The mechanical dissipation was found to be controlled by defects within the material, and the magnitude and temperature dependence of the dissipation were found to depend on whether flexural or torsional vibrational modes were excited. The defects that were active under flexural stresses have a relatively flat concentration from 0.4 to 0.7 eV with an ever increasing defect concentration up to 1.9 eV. Under shear stresses (torsion), the defect activation energies increase immediately beginning at 0.4 eV, with increasing defect concentration at higher energies.

  19. Micro-mechanism of vapor film collapse on high temperature particle surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Yutaka; Tochio, Daisuke [Dept. of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Yamagata Univ., Yonezawa, Yamagata (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    Thermal detonation model is proposed to describe vapor explosion. According to this model, vapor film on pre-mixed high temperature droplet surface is needed to be collapsed for the trigger of the vapor explosion. It is pointed out that the vapor film collapse behavior is significantly affected by the subcooling of low temperature liquid. However, the effect of subcooling on micro-mechanism of vapor film collapse behavior is not experimentally well identified. The objective of the present research is to experimentally investigate the effect of subcooling on micro-mechanism of film boiling collapse behavior. As the results, it is experimentally clarified that the vapor film collapse behavior in low subcool condition is qualitatively different from the vapor film collapse behavior in high subcooling condition. In high subcooling condition, instability of the vapor film dominates the vapor film collapse on the particle surface. On the other hand, micro-mechanism at the interface between vapor and liquid such as micro-jet is dominant in low subcool condition in case of vapor film collapse by pressure pulse. (author)

  20. Mechanisms underlying temperature extremes in Iberia: a Lagrangian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João A. Santos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms underlying the occurrence of temperature extremes in Iberia are analysed considering a Lagrangian perspective of the atmospheric flow, using 6-hourly ERA-Interim reanalysis data for the years 1979–2012. Daily 2-m minimum temperatures below the 1st percentile and 2-m maximum temperatures above the 99th percentile at each grid point over Iberia are selected separately for winter and summer. Four categories of extremes are analysed using 10-d backward trajectories initialized at the extreme temperature grid points close to the surface: winter cold (WCE and warm extremes (WWE, and summer cold (SCE and warm extremes (SWE. Air masses leading to temperature extremes are first transported from the North Atlantic towards Europe for all categories. While there is a clear relation to large-scale circulation patterns in winter, the Iberian thermal low is important in summer. Along the trajectories, air mass characteristics are significantly modified through adiabatic warming (air parcel descent, upper-air radiative cooling and near-surface warming (surface heat fluxes and radiation. High residence times over continental areas, such as over northern-central Europe for WCE and, to a lesser extent, over Iberia for SWE, significantly enhance these air mass modifications. Near-surface diabatic warming is particularly striking for SWE. WCE and SWE are responsible for the most extreme conditions in a given year. For WWE and SCE, strong temperature advection associated with important meridional air mass transports are the main driving mechanisms, accompanied by comparatively minor changes in the air mass properties. These results permit a better understanding of mechanisms leading to temperature extremes in Iberia.

  1. Consumer behavior as a mechanism for identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Kuzmuk

    2015-03-01

    Given this vital question is presence of  ukrainian society manifestations of contemporary consumer culture in which consumption can be considered as social­communicative function that has qualitative and quantitative characteristics and is mechanism for constructing person’s identity.

  2. 2012 THIN FILM AND SMALL SCALE MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR GRS/GRC, JULY 21-27, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balk, Thomas

    2012-07-27

    The mechanical behavior of materials with small dimension(s) is of both fundamental scientific interest and technological relevance. The size effects and novel properties that arise from changes in deformation mechanism have important implications for modern technologies such as thin films for microelectronics and MEMS devices, thermal and tribological coatings, materials for energy production and advanced batteries, etc. The overarching goal of the 2012 Gordon Research Conference on "Thin Film and Small Scale Mechanical Behavior" is to discuss recent studies and future opportunities regarding elastic, plastic and time-dependent deformation, as well as degradation and failure mechanisms such as fatigue, fracture and wear. Specific topics of interest include, but are not limited to: fundamental studies of physical mechanisms governing small-scale mechanical behavior; advances in test techniques for materials at small length scales, such as nanotribology and high-temperature nanoindentation; in-situ mechanical testing and characterization; nanomechanics of battery materials, such as swelling-induced phenomena and chemomechanical behavior; flexible electronics; mechanical properties of graphene and carbon-based materials; mechanical behavior of small-scale biological structures and biomimetic materials. Both experimental and computational work will be included in the oral and poster presentations at this Conference.

  3. Optical and mechanical response of high temperature optical fiber sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirkis, Jim

    1991-01-01

    The National Aerospace Plane (NASP) will experience temperatures as high as 2500 F at critical locations in its structure. Optical fiber sensors were proposed as a means of monitoring the temperature in these critical regions by either bonding the optical fiber to, or embedding the optical fiber in, metal matrix composite (MMC) components. Unfortunately, the anticipated NASP temperature ranges exceed the glass transition region of the optical fiber glass. The attempt is made to define the operating temperature range of optical fiber sensors from both optical and mechanical perspectives. A full non-linear optical analysis was performed by modeling the optical response of an isolated sensor cyclically driven through the glass transition region.

  4. The “Puzzle” of Water Behavior at Low Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Teixeira

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermodynamic and transport properties of liquid water are not fully understood despite a large amount of research work both experimental and theoretical. The maximum of density and the enhanced anomalies observed at low temperatures are at the origin of several models that, in some cases, predict specific and unique behavior such as spinodal lines or critical points. We show that a careful analysis of the neutron quasi-elastic scattering data, both the incoherent spectra and the dynamic of the partials, is compatible with a polymer-like model, where the hydrogen bond dynamics explains the behavior of water in the non-accessible temperature region extending from −30° C to the glass transition.

  5. Temperature buffer test. Hydro-mechanical and chemical/ mineralogical characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aakesson, Mattias; Olsson, Siv; Dueck, Ann; Nilsson, Ulf; Karnland, Ola [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden); Kiviranta, Leena; Kumpulainen, Sirpa [BandTech Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Linden, Johan [Aabo Akademi, Aabo (Finland)

    2012-01-15

    The Temperature Buffer Test (TBT) is a joint project between SKB/ANDRA and supported by ENRESA (modeling) and DBE (instrumentation), which aims at improving the understanding and to model the thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of buffers made of swelling clay submitted to high temperatures (over 100 deg C) during the water saturation process. The test has been carried out in a KBS-3 deposition hole at Aspo HRL. It was installed during the spring of 2003. Two steel heaters (3 m long, 0.6 m diameter) and two buffer arrangements have been investigated: the lower heater was surrounded by rings of compacted Wyoming bentonite only, whereas the upper heater was surrounded by a composite barrier, with a sand shield between the heater and the bentonite. The test was dismantled and sampled during the winter of 2009/2010. This report presents the hydro-mechanical and chemical/mineralogical characterization program which was launched subsequent to the dismantling operation. The main goal has been to investigate if any significant differences could be observed between material from the field experiment and the reference material. The field samples were mainly taken from Ring 4 (located at the mid-section around the lower heater), in which the temperature in the innermost part reached 155 deg C. The following hydro-mechanical properties have been determined for the material (test technique within brackets): hydraulic conductivity (swelling pressure device), swelling pressure (swelling pressure device), unconfined compression strength (mechanical press), shear strength (triaxial cell) and retention properties (jar method). The following chemical/mineralogical properties (methods within brackets) were determined: anion analysis of water leachates (IC), chemical composition (ICP/AES+MS, EGA), cation exchange capacity (CEC, Cu-trien method) and exchangeable cations (exchange with NH4, ICPAES), mineralogical composition (XRD and FTIR), element distribution and microstructure (SEM and

  6. A new isotropic cell for studying the thermo-mechanical behavior of unsaturated expansive clays

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Anh Minh; Cui, Yu-Jun; Barnel, Nathalie

    2007-01-01

    International audience; This paper presents a new suction-temperature controlled isotropic cell that can be used to study the thermo-mechanical behavior of unsaturated expansive clays. The vapor equilibrium technique is used to control the soil suction; the temperature of the cell is controlled using a thermostat bath. The isotropic pressure is applied using a volume/pressure controller that is also used to monitor the volume change of soil specimen. Preliminary experimental results showed go...

  7. Interfacial crack behavior in the stationary temperature field conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đoković Jelena M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The brittle coatings, made of different materials, when subjected to elevated temperatures and in the heat exchange conditions, are susceptible to delamination. Those coatings, as well as thin films, can be used for various thermo insulating deposits, e.g. in turbines of thermal power plants., In layers made of different materials, due to the environmental temperature change, thermal stresses appear as a consequence of a difference in their thermal expansion coefficients. In this paper driving forces were analyzed causing delamination of one layer from the other, i.e. the interfacial fracture in the two-layered, bimaterial sample. This analysis was limited to considering the sample behavior when exposed to the stationary temperature field. The energy release rate G, which is the driving force for this interfacial fracture, is changing with temperature and that variation is increasing with increase of the temperature difference between the environment and the sample. Analysis of this relation can be used to predict the maximal temperature difference, which the two-layered sample can be subjected to, without appearance of delamination between layers.

  8. A prototype of behavior selection mechanism based on emotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guofeng; Li, Zushu

    2007-12-01

    In bionic methodology rather than in design methodology more familiar with, summarizing the psychological researches of emotion, we propose the biologic mechanism of emotion, emotion selection role in creature evolution and a anima framework including emotion similar to the classical control structure; and consulting Prospect Theory, build an Emotion Characteristic Functions(ECF) that computer emotion; two more emotion theories are added to them that higher emotion is preferred and middle emotion makes brain run more efficiently, emotional behavior mechanism comes into being. A simulation of proposed mechanism are designed and carried out on Alife Swarm software platform. In this simulation, a virtual grassland ecosystem is achieved where there are two kinds of artificial animals: herbivore and preyer. These artificial animals execute four types of behavior: wandering, escaping, finding food, finding sex partner in their lives. According the theories of animal ethnology, escaping from preyer is prior to other behaviors for its existence, finding food is secondly important behavior, rating is third one and wandering is last behavior. In keeping this behavior order, based on our behavior characteristic function theory, the specific functions of emotion computing are built of artificial autonomous animals. The result of simulation confirms the behavior selection mechanism.

  9. Analytic behavior of the QED polarizability function at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernal, A. [Dept. de Matematica Aplicada i Analisi, Universitat de Barcelona. Av Joan XXIII s/n Edifici A, Escala A, Tercer pis, Matematiques 08028, Barcelona (Spain); Perez, A. [Departament de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Universitat de Valencia-CSIC, Dr. Moliner 50, 46100-Burjassot (Spain)

    2012-03-15

    We revisit the analytical properties of the static quasi-photon polarizability function for an electron gas at finite temperature, in connection with the existence of Friedel oscillations in the potential created by an impurity. In contrast with the zero temperature case, where the polarizability is an analytical function, except for the two branch cuts which are responsible for Friedel oscillations, at finite temperature the corresponding function is non analytical, in spite of becoming continuous everywhere on the complex plane. This effect produces, as a result, the survival of the oscillatory behavior of the potential. We calculate the potential at large distances, and relate the calculation to the non-analytical properties of the polarizability.

  10. Physical mechanisms underlying the strain-rate-dependent mechanical behavior of kangaroo shoulder cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibbotuwawa, Namal; Oloyede, Adekunle; Li, Tong; Singh, Sanjleena; Senadeera, Wijitha; Gu, YuanTong

    2015-09-01

    Due to anatomical and biomechanical similarities to human shoulder, kangaroo was chosen as a model to study shoulder cartilage. Comprehensive enzymatic degradation and indentation tests were applied on kangaroo shoulder cartilage to study mechanisms underlying its strain-rate-dependent mechanical behavior. We report that superficial collagen plays a more significant role than proteoglycans in facilitating strain-rate-dependent behavior of the kangaroo shoulder cartilage. By comparing the mechanical properties of degraded and normal cartilages, it was noted that proteoglycan and collagen degradation significantly compromised strain-rate-dependent mechanical behavior of the cartilage. Superficial collagen contributed equally to the tissue behavior at all strain-rates. This is different to the studies reported on knee cartilage and confirms the importance of superficial collagen on shoulder cartilage mechanical behavior. A porohyperelastic numerical model also indicated that collagen disruption would lead to faster damage of the shoulder cartilage than when proteoglycans are depleted.

  11. High-Temperature Oxide Regrowth on Mechanically-Damaged Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; Lowe, Tracie M [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    Here we report the effects of mechanical damage from a sharp stylus on the regrowth of oxide layers on a Ni-based superalloy known as Pyromet 80A . It was found that the oxide that reformed on the damaged portion of a pre-oxidized surface differed from that which formed on undamaged areas after the equal exposures to elevated temperature in air. These findings have broad implications for modeling the processes of material degradation in applications such as exhaust valves in internal combustion engines because they imply that static oxidation data for candidate materials may not adequately reflect their reaction to operating environments that involve both mechanical contact and oxidation.

  12. Adolescent Suicidal Behavior and Substance Use: Developmental Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Dawes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Adolescent suicidal behaviors and substance use are disturbingly common. Research suggests overlap of some of the etiological mechanisms for both adolescent suicidal behavior and substance use, yet clear understanding of the complex relations between these behaviors and their causal underpinnings is lacking. A growing body of evidence and a diathesis model (Mann et al. 1999; Mann, 2003 highlight the importance of impulse control as a proximal risk factor for adolescent suicidal and substance use behaviors. This literature review extends current theory on the relationships between adolescent suicidal behavior and substance use by: (1 examining how, when, and to what extent adolescent development is affected by poor impulse control, stressful life events, substance use behavior, and biological factors; (2 presenting proposed causal mechanisms by which these risk factors interact to increase risk for suicidal behaviors and substance use; and (3 proposing specific new hypotheses to extend the diathesis model to adolescents at risk for suicide and substance use. More specifically, new hypotheses are presented that predict bidirectional relationships between stressful life events and genetic markers of 5-HT dysregulation; substance use behavior and impulsivity; and substance use behavior and suicide attempts. The importance of distinguishing between different developmental trajectories of suicidal and substance use behaviors, and the effects of specific risk and protective mechanisms are discussed. Use of new statistical approaches that provide for the comparison of latent growth curves and latent class models is recommended to identify differences in developmental trajectories of suicidal behavior and substance use. Knowledge gained from these prospective longitudinal methods should lead to greater understanding on the timing, duration, and extent to which specific risk and protective factors influence the outcomes of suicidal behavior and substance

  13. Behavioral Mechanisms of Context Fear Generalization in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckleberry, Kylie A.; Ferguson, Laura B.; Drew, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    There is growing interest in generalization of learned contextual fear, driven in part by the hypothesis that mood and anxiety disorders stem from impaired hippocampal mechanisms of fear generalization and discrimination. However, there has been relatively little investigation of the behavioral and procedural mechanisms that might control…

  14. Bats Use Geomagnetic Field: Behavior and Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y.; Tian, L.; Zhang, B.; Zhu, R.

    2015-12-01

    It has been known that numerous animals can use the Earth's magnetic field for spatial orientation and long-distance navigation, nevertheless, how animals can respond to the magnetic field remain mostly ambiguous. The intensities of the global geomagnetic field varies between 23 and 66 μT, and the geomagnetic field intensity could drop to 10% during geomagnetic polarity reversals or geomagnetic excursions. Such dramatic changes of the geomagnetic field may pose a significant challenge for the evolution of magnetic compass in animals. For examples, it is vital whether the magnetic compass can still work in such very weak magnetic fields. Our previous experiment has demonstrated that a migratory bat (Nyctalus plancyi) uses a polarity compass for orientation during roosting when exposed to an artificial magnetic field (100 μT). Recently, we experimentally tested whether the N. plancyi can sense very weak magnetic fields that were even lower than those of the present-day geomagnetic field. Results showed: 1) the bats can sense the magnetic north in a field strength of present-day local geomagnetic field (51μT); 2) As the field intensity decreased to only 1/5th of the natural intensity (10 μT), the bats still responded by positioning themselves at the magnetic north. Notably, as the field polarity was artificially reversed, the bats still preferred the new magnetic north, even at the lowest field strength tested (10 μT). Hence, N. plancyi is able to detect the direction of a magnetic field with intensity range from twice to 1/5th of the present-day field strength. This allows them to orient themselves across the entire range of present-day global geomagnetic field strengths and sense very weak magnetic fields. We propose that this high sensitivity might have evolved in bats as the geomagnetic field strength varied and the polarity reversed tens of times over the past fifty million years since the origin of bats. The physiological mechanisms underlying

  15. Description of a system for interlocking elevated temperature mechanical tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, D. T.; Poulter, G. A.

    1995-07-01

    Long term mechanical creep and fatigue testing at elevated temperatures requires reliable systems with safeguards to prevent destruction of equipment, loss of data, and negative environmental impacts. Toward this goal, a computer controlled system has been developed and built for interlocking tests run on elevated temperature mechanical test facilities. Sensors for water flow, water pressure, water leakage, temperature, power, and hydraulic status are monitored to control specimen heating equipment through solid state relays and water solenoid valves. The system is designed to work with the default interlocks present in the RF generators and mechanical tests systems. Digital hardware consists of two National Instruments I/O boards mounted in a Macintosh IIci computer. Software is written in National Instruments LabVIEW. Systems interlocked include two MTS closed loop servo controlled hydraulic test frames, one with an RF generator and one with both an RF generator and a quartz lamp furnace. Control for individual test systems is modularized making the addition of more systems simple. If any of the supporting utilities fail during tests, heating systems, chill water, and hydraulics are powered down, minimizing specimen damage and eliminating equipment damage. The interlock control is powered by an uninterruptible power supply. Upon failure the cause is documented in an ASCII file.

  16. Dynamic mechanical behaviors of Fangshan marble

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic strength parameters are extensively used in mining engineering and rock mechanics. However, there are no widely accepted dynamic failure models for rocks. In this study, the dynamic punching shear strength, uniaxial compressive strength (UCS and tensile strength of fine-grained Fangshan marble (FM are first measured by using a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB system. The pulse-shaping technique is then implemented to maintain the dynamic force balance in SHPB tests. Experimental results show that the dynamic punching shear strength, UCS and tensile strength increase with the loading rate. A recently developed dynamic Mohr-Coulomb theory is then used to interpret the testing data. In this model, the angle of internal friction ϕ is assumed to be independent of loading rate and is obtained using the static strength values. According to the dynamic Mohr-Coulomb theory, the dynamic UCS and the dynamic tensile strength are predicted from the dynamic punching shear strength. Furthermore, based on this dynamic theory, the dynamic UCS is predicted from the dynamic tensile strength. The consistency between the predicted and measured dynamic strengths demonstrates that the dynamic Mohr-Coulomb theory is applicable to FM.

  17. Effect of cyclic strain on the mechanical behavior of virgin ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanzini, A

    2011-10-01

    Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) is a polymeric material employed in critical biomedical applications. Knowledge of its mechanical behavior is essential in order to obtain accurate prediction of stresses and deformations in real components, in particular when cyclic loading is considered. In the present research the effects of alternating and pulsating cyclic strain on the mechanical response of UHMWPE were studied by means of an experimental procedure based on tests carried out in strain control at different mean cyclic strain levels. During the tests the temperature increase due to hysteretic heating was controlled by means of a compressed air cooling apparatus specifically devised. By taking advantage of the possibility to control and stabilize temperature, cyclic steady-state mechanical response was investigated at room temperature and at 37 and 50 °C, comparing the effects of alternating and pulsating loading cycles. A transient thermal analysis using the finite element method (FEM) was also carried out to analyze temperature distribution within the specimen. UHMWPE exhibited cyclic softening as a result of a thermal contribution due to temperature increase and of a mechanical contribution related to the effects of applied load on the microstructure. The material exhibited different peak stress percent reductions for pulsating and alternating loading and during tensile and compressive loading phases. For pulsating tests significant cyclic mean stress relaxation was also observed. Based on the experimental procedure described the cyclic curve was determined as a function of temperature and fitted with a Ramberg-Osgood type constitutive equation, in which material parameters are temperature dependent. In this way the combined effects of temperature rises, such as those that might occur in biological environments or due to frictional heating, and mechanical loads could effectively be taken into account for constitutive modeling purposes of

  18. Hydrogen permeation behavior through F82H at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, S.; Katayama, K.; Shimozori, M.; Fukada, S. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, Kyushu (Japan); Ushida, H. [Energy Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, Kyushu (Japan); Nishikawa, M. [Malaysia-Japan International Institute of Technology, UTM, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-03-15

    F82H is a primary candidate of structural material and coolant pipe material in a blanket of a fusion reactor. Understanding tritium permeation behavior through F82H is important. In a normal operation of a fusion reactor, the temperature of F82H will be controlled below 550 C. degrees because it is considered that F82H can be used up to 30,000 hours at 550 C. degrees. However, it is necessary to assume the situation where F82H is heated over 550 C. degrees in a severe accident. In this study, hydrogen permeation behavior through F82H was investigated in the temperature range from 500 to 800 C. degrees. In some cases, water vapor was added in a sample gas to investigate an effect of water vapor on hydrogen permeation. The permeability of hydrogen in the temperature range from 500 to 700 C. degrees agreed well with the permeability reported by E. Serra et al. The degradation of the permeability by water vapor was not observed. After the hydrogen permeation reached in a steady state at 700 C. degrees, the F82H sample was heated to 800 C. degrees. The permeability of hydrogen through F82H sample which was once heated up to 800 C. degrees was lower than that of the original one. (authors)

  19. Use of Distributed Temperature Sensing Technology to Characterize Fire Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Cram

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the potential of a fiber optic cable connected to distributed temperature sensing (DTS technology to withstand wildland fire conditions and quantify fire behavior parameters. We used a custom-made ‘fire cable’ consisting of three optical fibers coated with three different materials—acrylate, copper and polyimide. The 150-m cable was deployed in grasslands and burned in three prescribed fires. The DTS system recorded fire cable output every three seconds and integrated temperatures every 50.6 cm. Results indicated the fire cable was physically capable of withstanding repeated rugged use. Fiber coating materials withstood temperatures up to 422 °C. Changes in fiber attenuation following fire were near zero (−0.81 to 0.12 dB/km indicating essentially no change in light gain or loss as a function of distance or fire intensity over the length of the fire cable. Results indicated fire cable and DTS technology have potential to quantify fire environment parameters such as heat duration and rate of spread but additional experimentation and analysis are required to determine efficacy and response times. This study adds understanding of DTS and fire cable technology as a potential new method for characterizing fire behavior parameters at greater temporal and spatial scales.

  20. Sulfidation behavior and mechanism of zinc silicate roasted with pyrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yong; Peng, Ning; Xue, Ke; Min, Xiaobo; Chai, Liyuan; Pan, Qinglin; Liang, Yanjie; Xiao, Ruiyang; Wang, Yunyan; Tang, Chongjian; Liu, Hui

    2018-03-01

    Sulfidation roasting followed by flotation is widely known as a possible generic technology for enriching valuable metals in low-grade Zn-Pb oxide ores. Zn2SiO4 is the primary Zn phase in willemite. Zn4Si2O7(OH)2(H2O), the main Zn phase in hemimorphite, transforms into Zn2SiO4 at temperatures above 600 °C. To enrich the Zn in willemite and hemimorphite, the Zn species should first be converted to ZnS. Therefore, a thorough understanding of the sulfidation reaction of Zn2SiO4 during roasting with pyrite is of vital important. In this study, the sulfidation behavior and reaction mechanisms of a Zn2SiO4-pyrite roasting system were determined using HSC 5.0 software, TG-FTIR spectroscopy, XRD, XPS and SEM-EDS. The results indicate that the sulfidation process can be divided into three steps: the decomposition of pyrite and formation of a sulfur-rich environment, the sulfur-induced migration of O2- and transformation of sulfur vapor, and the sulfidation reaction via oxygen-sulfur exchange. During the sulfidation roasting process, pyrite was converted to loose and porous Fe3O4, whereas Zn2SiO4 was transformed into ZnS and SiO2 in situ. These findings provide theoretical support for controlling the sulfidation roasting process of willemite and hemimorphite.

  1. Transition in Deformation Mechanism of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy during High-Temperature Tensile Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Noda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium alloys can be used for reducing the weight of various structural products, because of their high specific strength. They have attracted considerable attention as materials with a reduced environmental load, since they help to save both resources and energy. In order to use Mg alloys for manufacturing vehicles, it is important to investigate the deformation mechanism and transition point for optimizing the material and vehicle design. In this study, we investigated the transition of the deformation mechanism during the high-temperature uniaxial tensile deformation of the AZ31 Mg alloy. At a test temperature of 523 K and an initial strain rate of 3×10−3 s-1, the AZ31 Mg alloy (mean grain size: ~5 μm exhibited stable deformation behavior and the deformation mechanism changed to one dominated by grain boundary sliding.

  2. Behavioral and neural Darwinism: selectionist function and mechanism in adaptive behavior dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, J J

    2010-05-01

    An evolutionary theory of behavior dynamics and a theory of neuronal group selection share a common selectionist framework. The theory of behavior dynamics instantiates abstractly the idea that behavior is selected by its consequences. It implements Darwinian principles of selection, reproduction, and mutation to generate adaptive behavior in virtual organisms. The behavior generated by the theory has been shown to be quantitatively indistinguishable from that of live organisms. The theory of neuronal group selection suggests a mechanism whereby the abstract principles of the evolutionary theory may be implemented in the nervous systems of biological organisms. According to this theory, groups of neurons subserving behavior may be selected by synaptic modifications that occur when the consequences of behavior activate value systems in the brain. Together, these theories constitute a framework for a comprehensive account of adaptive behavior that extends from brain function to the behavior of whole organisms in quantitative detail. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A micro-mechanical analysis and an experimental characterisation of the behavior and the damaging processes of a 16MND5 pressure vessel steel at low temperature; Etude micromecanique et caracterisation experimentale du comportement et de l'endommagement de l'acier de cuve 16MND5 a basses temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesci, R

    2004-06-15

    As part of an important experimental and numerical research program launched by Electricite De France on the 16MND5 pressure vessel steel, sequenced and in-situ tensile tests are realized at low temperatures [-196 C;-60 C]. They enable to associate the observation of specimens, the complete cartography of which has been made with a scanning electron microscope (damaging processes, initiation and propagation of microcracks), with the stress states determined by X-ray diffraction, in order to establish relevant criteria. All these measurements enable to supply a two-scale polycrystalline modeling of behavior and damage (Mori-Tanaka/self-consistent) which is developed concurrently with the experimental characterization. This model proves to be a very efficient one, since it correctly reproduces the influence of temperature experimentally defined: the stress state in ferrite remains less important than in bainite (the difference never exceeds 150 MPa), whereas it is much higher in cementite. The heterogeneity of strains and stresses for each crystallographic orientation is well rendered; so is cleavage fracture normal to the {l_brace}100{r_brace} planes in ferrite (planes identified by electron back scattered diffraction during an in-situ tensile test at -150 C), which occurs sooner when temperature decreases, for a constant stress of about 700 MPa in this phase. (author)

  4. High temperature heterogeneous reaction kinetics and mechanisms of tungsten oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabourin, Justin L.

    Tungsten, which is a material used in many high temperature applications, is limited by its susceptibility to oxidation at elevated temperatures. Although tungsten has the highest melting temperature of any metal, at much lower temperatures volatile oxides are formed during oxidation with oxygen containing species. This differs from many heterogeneous oxidation reactions involving metals since most reactions form very stable oxides that have higher melting or boiling points than the pure metal (e.g., aluminum, iron). Understanding heterogeneous oxidation and vaporization processes may allow for the expansion and improvement of high temperature tungsten applications. In order to increase understanding of the oxidation processes of tungsten, there is a need to develop reaction mechanisms and kinetics for oxidation processes involving oxidizers and environmental conditions of interest. Tungsten oxidation was thoroughly studied in the past, and today there is a good phenomenological understanding of these processes. However, as the design of large scale systems increasingly relies on computer modeling there becomes a need for improved descriptions of chemical reactions. With the increase in computing power over the last several decades, and the development of quantum chemistry and physics theories, heterogeneous systems can be modeled in detail at the molecular level. Thermochemical parameters that may not be measured experimentally may now be determined theoretically, a tool that was previously unavailable to scientists and engineers. Additionally, chemical kinetic modeling software is now available for both homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. This study takes advantage of these new theoretical tools, as well as a thermogravimetric (TG) flow reactor developed as part of this study to learn about mechanisms and kinetics of tungsten oxidation. Oxidizers of interest are oxygen (O2), carbon dioxide (CO 2), water (H2O), and other oxidizers present in combustion and

  5. High Temperature Damping Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier and Protective Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2010-01-01

    A high temperature damping test apparatus has been developed using a high heat flux CO 2 laser rig in conjunction with a TIRA S540 25 kHz Shaker and Polytec OFV 5000 Vibrometer system. The test rig has been successfully used to determine the damping performance of metallic and ceramic protective coating systems at high temperature for turbine engine applications. The initial work has been primarily focused on the microstructure and processing effects on the coating temperature-dependence damping behavior. Advanced ceramic coatings, including multicomponent tetragonal and cubic phase thermal barrier coatings, along with composite bond coats, have also been investigated. The coating high temperature damping mechanisms will also be discussed.

  6. High Temperature Deformation and Continuous Dynamic Recrystallization Behaviors of AA6082 using Processing Maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang-Min; Lee, Ji-Woon; Choi, Hyun-Jin; Hyun, Soong-Keun [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Torsion tests were performed on AA6082 samples to investigate their flow softening behavior and to determine optimum process conditions. Based on the experimental data and dynamic materials model, high strain processing maps were established which demonstrate the constitutive relationships among temperature, strain rate, strain and stress. The flow curves exhibited a single and smooth maximum, followed by a softening stage. Power dissipation efficiency increased with increasing deformation temperature, and decreased with increasing strain rate. The main softening mechanism was continuous dynamic recrystallization. The power dissipation efficiency could be divided into three stages. Two flow instability domains occurred. One was found at deformation temperatures ranging from 623 to 673 K. The other flow instability domain was found at deformation temperatures ranging from 673 to 773 K, and with strain rates ranging from 0.5 to 5/s at strains from 1.0 to 3.0, which were mainly located in the upper part of the processing maps.

  7. Mechanical characteristics of the porcine retina in low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kinon; Weiland, James D

    2012-04-01

    We previously observed that the stiffness of the porcine retina was significantly higher when deforming at room temperature than at body temperature. The present study further investigates this phenomenon by examining the mechanical properties of the retina in saline at temperature lower than room temperature. Tensile testing was performed on a total of 15 retinal strips dissected from pig eyes. Equal amount of strips from the dissection were tested at 37.0 ± 0.3°C, 26.1 ± 0.1°C, and 7.8 ± 1.2°C. Their transition modulus, stress, and strain were measured for statistical analysis. The transition modulus, the transition stress, and the transition strain of the retinal strips were found to be 11.12 ± 6.10 kPa, 0.12 ± 0.07 kPa, and 0.016 ± 0.001, respectively, at 37.0°C. These values were 111.25 ± 88.16 kPa, 1.11 ± 0.85 kPa, and 0.016 ± 0.001 at 26.1°C, and 125.13 ± 63.61 kPa, 1.30 ± 0.50 kPa, and 0.017 ± 0.003 at 7.8°C, respectively. The differences of the transition modulus and the transition stress at between 37.0°C and 26.1°C and at between 37.0°C and 7.8°C were statistically significant (P retina from body temperature is potentially useful to decrease retinal damage in posterior eye surgeries by increasing the resistance of the retina to mechanical deformation.

  8. Importance of the habitat choice behavior assumed when modeling the effects of food and temperature on fish populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildhaber, Mark L.; Lamberson, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    Various mechanisms of habitat choice in fishes based on food and/or temperature have been proposed: optimal foraging for food alone; behavioral thermoregulation for temperature alone; and behavioral energetics and discounted matching for food and temperature combined. Along with development of habitat choice mechanisms, there has been a major push to develop and apply to fish populations individual-based models that incorporate various forms of these mechanisms. However, it is not known how the wide variation in observed and hypothesized mechanisms of fish habitat choice could alter fish population predictions (e.g. growth, size distributions, etc.). We used spatially explicit, individual-based modeling to compare predicted fish populations using different submodels of patch choice behavior under various food and temperature distributions. We compared predicted growth, temperature experience, food consumption, and final spatial distribution using the different models. Our results demonstrated that the habitat choice mechanism assumed in fish population modeling simulations was critical to predictions of fish distribution and growth rates. Hence, resource managers who use modeling results to predict fish population trends should be very aware of and understand the underlying patch choice mechanisms used in their models to assure that those mechanisms correctly represent the fish populations being modeled.

  9. Compressive behavior of bulk metallic glass under different conditions --- Coupled effect of temperature and strain rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Weihua

    Metallic glass was first reported in 1960 by rapid quenching of Au-Si alloys. But, due to the size limitation, this material did not attract remarkable interest until the development of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) with specimen sizes in excess of 1 mm. BMGs are considered to be promising engineering materials because of their ultrahigh strength, high elastic limit and wear resistance. However, they usually suer from a strong tendency for localized plastic deformation with catastrophic failure. Many basic questions, such as the origin of shear softening and the strain rate eect remain unclear. In this thesis, the mechanical behavior of the Zr55Al 10Ni5Cu30 bulk metallic glass and a metallic glass composite is investigated. The stress-strain relationship for Zr55Al10Ni 5Cu30 over a wide range of strain rate (5x10 --5 to 2x103 s--1) was investigated in uniaxial compression loading using both MTS servo-hydraulic system (quasi-static) and compression Kolsky bar system (dynamic). The effect of the strain rate on the fracture stress at room temperature was discussed. Based on the experimental results, the strain rate sensitivity of the bulk metallic glass changes from a positive value to a negative value at high strain rate, which is a consequence of the significant adiabatic temperature rise during the dynamic testing. In order to characterize the temperature eect on the mechanical behavior of the metallic glass, a synchronically assembled heating unit was designed to be attached onto the Kolsky bar system to perform high temperature and high strain rate mechanical testing. A transition from inhomogeneous deformation to homogeneous deformation has been observed during the quasi-static compressive experiments at testing temperatures close to the glass transition temperature. However, no transition has been observed at high strain rates at all the testing temperatures. A free volume based model is applied to analyze the stress-strain behavior of the homogeneous

  10. Low Temperature Mechanical Properties of Boron - Single-Crystal Silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailovich, Robert Emilio

    We have investigated, using mechanical resonator techniques, the importance of electronic states in the scattering of audio-frequency sound waves at low temperatures. Such states are known to exist in the energy-split ground state of holes bound to acceptor impurities in semiconductors. Accordingly, we studied the mechanical response of double-paddle resonators fabricated from single-crystal silicon wafers, doped to boron concentrations of 5.6 times 10^{13}/cc, 1.4 times 10^{15}/cc, 1.1 times 10^{16 }/cc, and 5.7 times 10 ^{16}/cc. The three highest dopant oscillators show a low -strain mechanical response that is dominated by scattering from such electronic hole states. All three oscillators show a dissipation maximum at 70-100mK, whose peak value increases with doping level. The normalized period change of all oscillators exhibits crystal softening below 10K, with this period change increasing with the doping level. The acoustic scattering from the holes is very strong. The oscillator made from our highest dopant sample, with about 1ppm boron impurities, has a peak dissipation of 2 times 10^{-5} at 65mK, and a period change of 3 times 10^{-3} below 1K. The dissipation data suggests that for these three oscillators, the hole level-splittings originate in the elastic strains from oxygen impurities. The response of the lowest doping oscillator shows very low dissipation and small normalized period shifts. We obtain a dissipation at 22mK of 3 times 10^{-8}. Such oscillators, then, would be very sensitive platforms for the study of small-dissipation processes at low temperatures. In addition, we observe in all our oscillators a high-strain nonlinear response which is more pronounced below about 0.3K. This nonlinearity was studied in the frequency shift of the resonance curve peak with amplitude. These "pulled" resonance curves are well described by classical nonlinear equations. Using these equations, we have mapped out the temperature dependence of this nonlinearity

  11. Temperature Effects on Mechanical Properties of Woven Thermoplastic Composites for Secondary Aircraft Structure Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yue

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of temperature on the mechanical behavior of 8-H satin woven glass fabric/polyethylene sulfide (GF/PPS was investigated in this paper. Static-tensile tests were both conducted on notched and unnotched specimens at typical temperatures (ambient, 95°C and 125°C based on the glass transition temperatures (Tg of the neat resin and composite, their strength and moduli were obtained and compared. The damage patterns of failed specimens of notched and unnotched were examined with the aid of high-definition camera and stereomicroscope. The results of stress-strain relationships showed that the slight nonlinearity of the curves were observed for these two specimens, which was associated with the plastic deformation of localized resin. The damage patterns of notched and unnotched specimens at different temperatures proved that damage and plastic deformation were two simultaneous mechanisms and it was prominent in the notched. It was the overstress accommodation mechanism that led to a relative high strength rentention for the notched and a reduction of the hole sensitivity. The results obtained in this paper indicated that GF/PPS can be used as secondary aircraft structures at elevated temperatures higher than its Tg.

  12. Temperature dependence of the deformation behavior of 316 stainless steel after low temperature neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel-Robertson, J.E.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Grossbeck, M.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    The effects of low temperature neutron irradiation on the tensile behavior of 316 stainless steel have been investigated. A single heat of solution annealed 316 was irradiated to 7 and 18 dpa at 60, 200, 330, and 400{degrees}C. The tensile properties as a function of dose and as a function of temperature were examined. Large changes in yield strength, deformation mode, strain to necking, and strain hardening capacity were seen in this irradiation experiment. The magnitudes of the changes are dependent on both irradiation temperature and neutron dose. Irradiation can more than triple the yield strength over the unirradiated value and decrease the strain to necking (STN) to less than 0.5% under certain conditions. A maximum increase in yield strength and a minimum in the STN occur after irradiation at 330{degrees}C but the failure mode remains ductile.

  13. Mechanism of boron uptake by hydrocalumite calcined at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xinhong; Sasaki, Keiko; Takaki, Yu; Hirajima, Tsuyoshi; Ideta, Keiko; Miyawaki, Jin

    2015-04-28

    Hydrocalumite (Ca-Al-layered double hydroxide (LDH)) was prepared and applied for the removal of borate. The properties of Ca-Al-LDH calcined at different temperatures were diverse, which affected the sorption density and mechanism of boron species. The sorption density increased with increase in calcined temperature and the sample calcined at 900°C (Ca-Al-LDH-900) showed the maximum sorption density in this work. The solid residues after sorption were characterized by (11)B NMR, (27)Al NMR, SEM, and XRD to investigate the sorption mechanism. Dissolution-reprecipitation was the main mechanism for sorption of borate in Ca-Al-LDH. For Ca-Al-LDH calcined at 300 and 500°C, regeneration occurred in a short time and the newly forming LDHs were decomposed to release Ca(2+) ions and formed ettringite with borate. Two stages occurred in the sorption of boron by Ca-Al-LDH calcined at 900°C. In the first stage, boron species adsorbed on the alumina gel resulting from the hydration of calcined products. In this stage, borate was included as an interlayer anion into the newly forming LDHs in the following stage, and then immobilized as HBO3(2-) into the interlayer, most the LDHs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Determining mechanical behavior of solid materials using miniature specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manahan, M.P.; Argon, A.S.; Harling, O.K.

    1986-02-04

    A Miniaturized Bend Test (MBT) capable of extracting and determining mechanical behavior information from specimens only so large as to have at least a volume or smallest dimension sufficient to satisfy continuum behavior in all directions is disclosed. The mechanical behavior of the material is determined from the measurements taken during the bending of the specimen and is processed according to the principles of linear or nonlinear material mechanics or both. In a preferred embodiment the determination is carried out by a code which is constructed according to the finite element method, and the specimen used for the determinations is a miniature disk simply supported for central loading at the axis on the center of the disk. 51 figs.

  15. Characterization of High Temperature Mechanical Properties Using Laser Ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Hurley; Stephen Reese; Farhad Farzbod; Rory Kennedy

    2012-05-01

    Mechanical properties are controlled to a large degree by defect structures such as dislocations and grain boundaries. These microstructural features involve a perturbation of the perfect crystal lattice (i.e. strain fields). Viewed in this context, high frequency strain waves (i.e. ultrasound) provide a natural choice to study microstructure mediated mechanical properties. In this presentation we use laser ultrasound to probe mechanical properties of materials. This approach utilizes lasers to excite and detect ultrasonic waves, and as a consequence has unique advantages over other methods—it is noncontacting, requires no couplant or invasive sample preparation (other than that used in metallurgical analysis), and has the demonstrated capability to probe microstructure on a micron scale. Laser techniques are highly reproducible enabling sophisticated, microstructurally informed data analysis. Since light is being used for generation and detection of the ultrasonic wave, the specimen being examined is not mechanically coupled to the transducer. As a result, laser ultrasound can be carried out remotely, an especially attractive characteristic for in situ measurements in severe environments. Several examples involving laser ultrasound to measure mechanical properties in high temperature environments will be presented. Emphasis will be place on understanding the role of grain microstructure.

  16. Temperature-dependent mechanical deformation of silicon at the nanoscale: Phase transformation versus defect propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiran, M. S. R. N., E-mail: kiran.mangalampalli@anu.edu.au; Tran, T. T.; Smillie, L. A.; Subianto, D.; Williams, J. S.; Bradby, J. E. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Australian Capital Territory, Canberra 2601 (Australia); Haberl, B. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Australian Capital Territory, Canberra 2601 (Australia); Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2015-05-28

    This study uses high-temperature nanoindentation coupled with in situ electrical measurements to investigate the temperature dependence (25–200 °C) of the phase transformation behavior of diamond cubic (dc) silicon at the nanoscale. Along with in situ indentation and electrical data, ex situ characterizations, such as Raman and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, have been used to reveal the indentation-induced deformation mechanisms. We find that phase transformation and defect propagation within the crystal lattice are not mutually exclusive deformation processes at elevated temperature. Both can occur at temperatures up to 150 °C but to different extents, depending on the temperature and loading conditions. For nanoindentation, we observe that phase transformation is dominant below 100 °C but that deformation by twinning along (111) planes dominates at 150 °C and 200 °C. This work, therefore, provides clear insight into the temperature dependent deformation mechanisms in dc-Si at the nanoscale and helps to clarify previous inconsistencies in the literature.

  17. Creep Behavior of UFG CP Ti at Room Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lei; Zhao, Xicheng; Liu, XiaoYan; Yang, Xirong

    2017-10-01

    Ultra-fine grained commercial purity titanium (UFG CP Ti) is processed by Composite refining process (Equal channel angular pressing (ECAP), cold rolling and rotary swaging) at room temperature. The grain size is refined from 19 μm to 180 nm, and the ultimate tensile strength increase to 870 MPa. Creep tests were carried out on Ultra-fine grained commercial purity titanium with the stresses of 640, 660, 680, 700, 720, 740, 760 MPa at room temperature. Steady state creep rate and stress exponent n at various stresses were calculated for Ultra-fine grained commercial purity titanium, and creep deformation mechanism was also investigated. (With the rise of stress, the steady creep rate increases while the creep time decrease). The steady state creep rate reached maximum 1.416×10-6 s-1 (under) stress of 760 MPa. The stress exponent is 17.3 when the stress was 640 ∼ 700MPa, while the stress exponent is 55.7 when the stress was 700 ∼ 760MPa, UFG CP Ti shows good creep property at room temperature. The creep deformation mechanism of UFG CP Ti is the dislocation creep.

  18. The central mechanisms of secretin in regulating multiple behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li eZhang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Secretin (SCT was firstly discovered as a gut peptide hormone in stimulating pancreatic secretion, while its novel neuropeptide role has drawn substantial research interests in recent years. SCT and its receptor (SCTR are widely expressed in different brain regions, where they exert multiple cellular functions including neurotransmission, gene expression regulation, neurogenesis and neural protection. As all these neural functions ultimately can affect behaviors, it is hypothesized that SCT controls multiple behavioral paradigms. Current findings support this hypothesis as SCT-SCTR axis participates in modulating social interaction, spatial learning, water and food intake, motor coordination and motor learning behaviors. This mini-review focuses on various aspects of SCT and SCTR in hippocampus, hypothalamus and cerebellum including distribution profiles, cellular functions and behavioral phenotypes to elucidate the link between cellular mechanisms and behavioral control.

  19. Mechanical Behavior of Tough Hydrogels for Structural Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illeperuma, Widusha Ruwangi Kaushalya

    novel applications. This thesis aims to investigate the broader applications, well beyond those investigated so far. We show fiber reinforced tough hydrogels can dissipate a significant amount of energy at a tunable level of stress, making them suitable for energy absorbing applications such as inner layer of helmets. We develop inexpensive fire-retarding materials using tough hydrogels that provide superior protection from burn injuries. We also study hydrogels as actuators that can be used in soft robotics. Hydrogels contain mostly water and they freeze when the temperature drops below 00C and lose its functions. We demonstrate a new class of hydrogels that do not freeze and hydrogels that partially freeze below water freezing temperature. Partially freezing hydrogels are ideal for cooling applications such as gel packs and non-freezing hydrogels are useful in all the structural applications at low temperatures. This thesis will enable the use of inexpensive hydrogels in a new class of non-traditional structural applications where the mechanical behavior of the hydrogel is of prime importance.

  20. Influence of strain rates on the mechanical behaviors of shape memory polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaogang; Liu, Liwu; Zhou, Bo; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2015-09-01

    In the last few decades, shape memory polymers have demonstrated their major advantages of extremely high recovery strain, low density and low cost. Generally, the mechanical behavior of shape memory polymers is strongly dependent on the loading strain rates. Uniaxial tensile experiments were conducted on one kind of typical shape memory polymer (epoxy) at several different temperatures (348 K, 358 K, 368 K and 378 K) and true strain rates (0.25% s-1, 1.25% s-1 and 2.5% s-1). Thus, the influence of strain rate and temperature on the mechanical behavior of epoxy, in particular on the post yield stresses and the strain hardening behavior, were investigated through this experimental study. Based on our previous work Guo (2014 Smart Mater. Struct. 23 105019), a simplified model which can explain the shape memory effect of epoxy was proposed to predict the strain hardening behavior of the shape memory polymer. Based on the suggestion of Rault (1998 J. Non-Cryst. Solids 235-7 737-41), a linear compensation model was introduced to indicate the change in yield stresses with the increase of strain rate and temperature. Finally, the new model predictions for the true strain and stress behavior of epoxy were compared with the experimental results.

  1. Investigation of the rate-controlling mechanism(s) for high temperature creep and the relationship between creep and melting by use of high pressure as a variable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    Using high pressure as a variable, the rate-controlling mechanism for high temperature creep and the relationship between creep and melting is investigated for silicon and nickel. An apparatus is used in which the samples are heated to melting point and subjected to 1 to 3 GigaPascal pressure. The stress behavior of the materials are then studied.

  2. Modeling of the viscoelastic behavior of a polyimide matrix at elevated temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crochon, Thibaut

    Use of Polymer Matrix Composite Materials (PMCMs) in aircraft engines requires materials able to withstand extreme service conditions, such as elevated temperatures, high mechanical loadings and an oxidative environment. In such an environment, the polymer matrix is likely to exhibit a viscoelastic behavior dependent on the mechanical loading and temperature. In addition, the combined effects of elevated temperature and the environment near the engines are likely to increase physical as well as chemical aging. These various parameters need to be taken into consideration for the designer to be able to predict the material behavior over the service life of the components. The main objective of this thesis was to study the viscoelastic behavior of a high temperature polyimide matrix and develop a constitutive theory able to predict the material behavior for every of service condition. Then, the model had to have to be implemented into commercially available finite-element software such as ABAQUS or ANSYS. Firstly, chemical aging of the material at service temperature was studied. To that end, a thermogravimetric analysis of the matrix was conducted on powder samples in air atmosphere. Two kinds of tests were performed: i) kinetic tests in which powder samples were heated at a constant rate until complete sublimation; ii) isothermal tests in which the samples were maintained at a constant temperature for 24 hours. The first tests were used to develop a degradation model, leading to an excellent fit of the experimental data. Then, the model was used to predict the isothermal data but which much less success, particularly for the lowest temperatures. At those temperatures, the chemical degradation was preceded by an oxidation phase which the model was not designed to predict. Other isothermal degradation tests were also performed on tensile tests samples instead of powders. Those tests were conducted at service temperature for a much longer period of time. The samples

  3. Temperature dependence of Young's modulus of titanium dioxide (TIO2) nanotubes: Molecular mechanics modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukyanov, S. I.; Bandura, A. V.; Evarestov, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Temperature dependence of the Young's modulus of cylindrical single-wall nanotubes with zigzag and armchair chiralities and consolidated-wall nanotubes has been studied by the molecular mechanics method with the use of the atom-atom potential. The nanotubes have been obtained by rolling up of crystal layers (111) of TiO2 with fluorite structure. Calculations have been performed for isothermal conditions on the basis of calculating the Helmholtz free energy of the system. The dependence of the Helmholtz free energy of nanotubes on the period has been calculated in the quasi-harmonic approximation as a result of calculation of phonon frequencies. It has been shown that the temperature dependence of the stiffness of nanotubes is determined by their chirality, and some nanotubes exibit anomalous behavior of both the Young's modulus and the period of unit cell with variation in temperature.

  4. Influence of notch orientation and temperature on the impact behavior of a dual hardness steel composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, R.P. [Seção de Engenharia Mecânica e de Materiais/Instituto Militar de Engenharia/ Praça General Tibúrcio, 80, 22290-270 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Chawla, K.K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering/The University of Alabama at Birmingham/Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Miguez Suarez, J.C., E-mail: jmiguez@ime.eb.br [Seção de Engenharia Mecânica e de Materiais/Instituto Militar de Engenharia/ Praça General Tibúrcio, 80, 22290-270 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-09-15

    The need for materials with good characteristics for critical applications, such as in defense and aerospace, has led to the development of new metallic materials. In the present work the impact fracture behavior of a dual hardness steel composite was studied in two geometries, “crack arrester” and “crack divider”. The composite was produced by forging and rolling followed by treatments of quenching and tempering and then annealing. The composite was characterized by optical microscopy as well as hardness, microhardness, tensile and impact tests. The failure mechanisms in impact at different temperatures were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that the mechanical behavior was significantly affected by the heat treating processes, with higher impact resistance associated with the crack arrester orientation. These results are analyzed in terms of the state of stress at the crack tip.

  5. Maturing Brain Mechanisms and Developing Behavioral Language Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Manuela; Friederici, Angela D.

    2010-01-01

    The relation between the maturation of brain mechanisms responsible for the N400 elicitation in the event-related brain potential (ERP) and the development of behavioral language skills was investigated in 12-month-old infants. ERPs to words presented in a picture-word priming paradigm were analyzed according to the infants' production and…

  6. Ablation behavior and mechanism analysis of C/SiC composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Ablation is an erosive phenomenon with removal of material by a combination of thermo-mechanical, thermo-chemical, and thermo-physical factors with high temperature, pressure, and velocity of combustion flame. Materials with outstanding thermo-mechanical and thermo-chemical properties are required for future high-temperature components. C/SiC is a kind of great potential high-temperature structural material in aeronautics and astronautics with low specific weight, high specific strength, good thermal stability, oxidation resistance and excellent resistance to ablation. In this paper, the ablation phenomenon and mechanisms were summarized adequately. The ablated surface of C/SiC composites could be divided into three regions from center to external. In general, the higher the density, the lower the ablation rate; the lower the ablation temperature and less time, the lower the ablation rate, and the preparation methods also had a great influence on the ablation property. Thermo-physical and thermo-mechanical attacks were the main ablation behavior in the center region; oxidation was the main ablation behavior in the transition region and the border oxidation region.

  7. Numerical simulation of mechanical behavior of composite materials

    CERN Document Server

    Oller, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    An original mechanical formulation to treat nonlinear orthotropic behavior of composite materials is presented in this book. It also examines different formulations that allow us to evaluate the behavior of composite materials through the composition of its components, obtaining a new composite material. Also two multiple scale homogenization methods are given, one based on the analytical study of the cells (Ad-hoc homogenization), and other one, more general based on the finite element procedure applied on the macro scale (upper-scale) and in the micro scale (sub-scale). A very general formulation to simulate the mechanical behavior for traditional composite structures (plywood, reinforced concrete, masonry, etc.), as well as the new composite materials reinforced with long and short fibers, nanotubes, etc., are also shown in this work. Typical phenomena occurring in composite materials are also described in this work, including fiber-matrix debounding, local buckling of fibers and its coupling with the over...

  8. Characterization of Bitumen Micro-Mechanical Behaviors Using AFM, Phase Dynamics Theory and MD Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Hou

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental understanding of micro-mechanical behaviors in bitumen, including phase separation, micro-friction, micro-abrasion, etc., can help the pavement engineers better understand the bitumen mechanical performances at macroscale. Recent researches show that the microstructure evolution in bitumen will directly affect its surface structure and micro-mechanical performance. In this study, the bitumen microstructure and micro-mechanical behaviors are studied using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM experiments, Phase Dynamics Theory and Molecular Dynamics (MD Simulation. The AFM experiment results show that different phase-structure will occur at the surface of the bitumen samples under certain thermodynamic conditions at microscale. The phenomenon can be explained using the phase dynamics theory, where the effects of stability parameter and temperature on bitumen microstructure and micro-mechanical behavior are studied combined with MD Simulation. Simulation results show that the saturates phase, in contrast to the naphthene aromatics phase, plays a major role in bitumen micro-mechanical behavior. A high stress zone occurs at the interface between the saturates phase and the naphthene aromatics phase, which may form discontinuities that further affect the bitumen frictional performance.

  9. Mechanical behavior of novel W alloys produced by HIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastor, J.Y.; Martin, A.; Llorca, J. [Madrid Univ. Politecnica, Dept de Ciencia de Materiales (Spain); Monge, M.A.; Pareja, R. [Madrid Univ. Carlos 3, Dept. de Fisica (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: W appears to be one of the candidate materials being considered for making plasma-facing components (PFCs) in a future fusion power reactor because of its refractory characteristics, low tritium retention and low sputtering yielding. However, its use in PFCs requires the development of W materials that, in addition to these properties, maintains good mechanical properties at high temperatures. In W, high temperature strength and creep resistance may be effectively increased by solid-solution and dispersion strengthening. Sintering could be a suitable method to produce solid-solution and dispersion strengthening in W alloys for these applications if their recrystallization temperature is high enough and the grain growth is restrained. The aim of the present work is to investigate the mechanical properties of W materials produced by liquid phase sintering using Ti as sintering activator and nanoparticles of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as strengthening dispersoids. The mechanical behaviour of pure W and W alloys, having 0.5 wt % Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, X Wt % Ti and 0.5 wt % Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} + X wt % Ti prepared by powder metallurgy have been studied (0{<=}X{<=}4). Three point bending tests have been performed on 2 x 2 x 25 mm{sup 3} specimens cut from ingots consolidated by a two-stage hot isostatic pressing process. The bending strength, fracture toughness and elastic modulus have been determined as a function of temperature. The fracture surfaces have been analyzed to find the fracture mode and investigate the temperature dependence of the mechanical properties and fracture mechanisms. The effect of the Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion and Ti content on the mechanical properties is also investigated. (authors)

  10. Species diversity and the evolution of behavioral controlling mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, D

    1997-01-15

    One of the first things that we are impressed by is the great variety of animals, particularly their behaviors and their physiologies. With so many differences, are there any generalities? With the establishment of evolutionary theory, evidence of "unity in diversity" comes with discoveries of common anatomical features, the cell cycle, conservation of intermediary metabolism, and the genetic code, to name but a few. In vertebrates there appears to be a conservation of the neural circuits underlying sexual behavior, but it is still too early to state the extent to which this concept can be extended to the hormonal mechanisms underlying behavior. Much of our conceptual understanding of behavioral neuroendocrinology stems from extensive studies on relatively few species. When an evolutionary perspective is applied to behavioral neuroscience, the breadth and validity of our assumptions about the mechanisms that control species-typical behaviors are challenged. This is not the same thing as saying that there are few unitary explanations that apply to all mammals, amniotes, or even vertebrates. Considerable information has been gathered about the neuroendocrine bases of behavior in a few species, but to uncover truly broad generalizations, we must look with equal intensity and rigor at other organisms. The pattern of evolution is best illustrated in the diversity of organisms, and the ecological and evolutionary perspective illuminates the utility of various "experiments of nature." By studying (1) closely related species that live in different habitats, we can see if the adaptational responses are similar, and (2) distantly related species that live in the same habitat, we can see if the solutions are analogous. The unique qualities of each species also give us a deeper understanding of the constraints in fundamental processes. When basic conflicts exist, control mechanisms adapt or the species goes extinct. Interestingly, although the neural circuits themselves do not

  11. Epigenetic mechanisms modulate differences in Drosophila foraging behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anreiter, Ina; Kramer, Jamie M; Sokolowski, Marla B

    2017-11-21

    Little is known about how genetic variation and epigenetic marks interact to shape differences in behavior. The foraging (for) gene regulates behavioral differences between the rover and sitter Drosophila melanogaster strains, but the molecular mechanisms through which it does so have remained elusive. We show that the epigenetic regulator G9a interacts with for to regulate strain-specific adult foraging behavior through allele-specific histone methylation of a for promoter (pr4). Rovers have higher pr4 H3K9me dimethylation, lower pr4 RNA expression, and higher foraging scores than sitters. The rover-sitter differences disappear in the presence of G9a null mutant alleles, showing that G9a is necessary for these differences. Furthermore, rover foraging scores can be phenocopied by transgenically reducing pr4 expression in sitters. This compelling evidence shows that genetic variation can interact with an epigenetic modifier to produce differences in gene expression, establishing a behavioral polymorphism in Drosophila.

  12. Epigenetic mechanisms in experience-driven memory formation and behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckett, Rosemary E; Lubin, Farah D

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms have long been associated with the regulation of gene-expression changes accompanying normal neuronal development and cellular differentiation; however, until recently these mechanisms were believed to be statically quiet in the adult brain. Behavioral neuroscientists have now begun to investigate these epigenetic mechanisms as potential regulators of gene-transcription changes in the CNS subserving synaptic plasticity and long-term memory (LTM) formation. Experimental evidence from learning and memory animal models has demonstrated that active chromatin remodeling occurs in terminally differentiated postmitotic neurons, suggesting that these molecular processes are indeed intimately involved in several stages of LTM formation, including consolidation, reconsolidation and extinction. Such chromatin modifications include the phosphorylation, acetylation and methylation of histone proteins and the methylation of associated DNA to subsequently affect transcriptional gene readout triggered by learning. The present article examines how such learning-induced epigenetic changes contribute to LTM formation and influence behavior. In particular, this article is a survey of the specific epigenetic mechanisms that have been demonstrated to regulate gene expression for both transcription factors and growth factors in the CNS, which are critical for LTM formation and storage, as well as how aberrant epigenetic processing can contribute to psychological states such as schizophrenia and drug addiction. Together, the findings highlighted in this article support a novel role for epigenetic mechanisms in the adult CNS serving as potential key molecular regulators of gene-transcription changes necessary for LTM formation and adult behavior. PMID:22126252

  13. Epigenetic mechanisms in experience-driven memory formation and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckett, Rosemary E; Lubin, Farah D

    2011-10-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms have long been associated with the regulation of gene-expression changes accompanying normal neuronal development and cellular differentiation; however, until recently these mechanisms were believed to be statically quiet in the adult brain. Behavioral neuroscientists have now begun to investigate these epigenetic mechanisms as potential regulators of gene-transcription changes in the CNS subserving synaptic plasticity and long-term memory (LTM) formation. Experimental evidence from learning and memory animal models has demonstrated that active chromatin remodeling occurs in terminally differentiated postmitotic neurons, suggesting that these molecular processes are indeed intimately involved in several stages of LTM formation, including consolidation, reconsolidation and extinction. Such chromatin modifications include the phosphorylation, acetylation and methylation of histone proteins and the methylation of associated DNA to subsequently affect transcriptional gene readout triggered by learning. The present article examines how such learning-induced epigenetic changes contribute to LTM formation and influence behavior. In particular, this article is a survey of the specific epigenetic mechanisms that have been demonstrated to regulate gene expression for both transcription factors and growth factors in the CNS, which are critical for LTM formation and storage, as well as how aberrant epigenetic processing can contribute to psychological states such as schizophrenia and drug addiction. Together, the findings highlighted in this article support a novel role for epigenetic mechanisms in the adult CNS serving as potential key molecular regulators of gene-transcription changes necessary for LTM formation and adult behavior.

  14. Simulation of Weld Mechanical Behavior to Include Welding-Induced Residual Stress and Distortion: Coupling of SYSWELD and Abaqus Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    2011, Vol. 88, pg. 45-56. 7. Z.H. Guo, X.Y. Ou, G.W. Shuai, and Y.H. Chen, Numerical Simulation of Temperature Field for TIG Welding of Aluminum Alloy...Memorandum Simulation of Weld Mechanical Behavior to Include Welding -Induced Residual Stress and Distortion: Coupling of SYSWELD and Abaqus Codes... Weld Mechanical Behavior to Include Welding -Induced Residual Stress and Distortion: Coupling of SYSWELD and Abaqus Codes by Charles R. Fisher

  15. Simulation of Weld Mechanical Behavior to Include Welding Induced Residual Stress and Distortion: Coupling of SYSWELD and Abaqus Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    2011, Vol. 88, pg. 45-56. 7. Z.H. Guo, X.Y. Ou, G.W. Shuai, and Y.H. Chen, Numerical Simulation of Temperature Field for TIG Welding of Aluminum Alloy...Memorandum Simulation of Weld Mechanical Behavior to Include Welding -Induced Residual Stress and Distortion: Coupling of SYSWELD and Abaqus Codes... Weld Mechanical Behavior to Include Welding -Induced Residual Stress and Distortion: Coupling of SYSWELD and Abaqus Codes by Charles R. Fisher

  16. Caractérisation expérimentale du comportement mécanique d'assemblage haute température pour l'électronique de puissance Experimental characterization of the mechanical behavior of high-temperature assembly for power electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baazaoui Ahlem

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Le comportement mécanique de deux types de connexion haute température mises en œuvre pour l'assemblage de composants d'électronique de puissance a été étudié : une jonction réalisée par brasage en phase liquide transitoire (TLPB d'Ag-In et une autre par brasage d'un eutectique Au88Ge12. Les connexions réalisées à partir d'inserts de cuivre sont caractérisées mécaniquement au moyen d'essais de cisaillement. Une analyse de la microstructure des jonctions en coupe et des faciès de rupture des deux connexions a également été menée. The mechanical behavior of two types of high-temperature connection implemented in the assembly of electronic power components was studied: a joint made by brazing transient liquid phase (TLPB Ag-In and in another by brazing Au88Ge12. Connections made are mechanically characterized using shear tests. The microstructure of the junction section and the fracture surfaces of both connections was also observed.

  17. Anisotropic and Mechanical Behavior of 22MnB5 in Hot Stamping Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turetta, A.; Bruschi, S.; Ghiotti, A.

    2007-04-01

    The hot stamping of quenchable High Strength Steels offers the possibility of weight reduction in structural components maintaining the safety requirements together with enhanced accuracy and formability of sheets. The proper design of this technology requires a deep understanding of material behavior during the entire process chain, in terms of microstructural evolution and mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, in order to perform reliable FE simulations and obtain the desired characteristic on final parts. In particular, the analysis of technical-scientific literature shows that accurate data on material rheological behavior are difficult to find; while the lack of knowledge about anisotropic behavior at elevated temperatures is even more evident. To overcome these difficulties, a new experimental set-up was developed to reproduce the thermo-mechanical conditions of the industrial process and evaluate the influence of temperature and strain rate on 22MnB5 flow curves through uniaxial tensile tests; an optical strain measurement system was utilized to evaluate the effective strain after necking. From the same data, plastic anisotropy evolution was determined by means of a specially developed procedure. The influence of different cooling rates was taken into account and the rheological properties were correlated with microstructural changes occurring during deformation, previously evaluated through a dilatometric analysis performed in the same range of temperatures.

  18. Mechanical Behavior and Fracture Properties of NiAl Intermetallic Alloy with Different Copper Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao-Hsing Chen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The deformation behavior and fracture characteristics of NiAl intermetallic alloy containing 5~7 at% Cu are investigated at room temperature under strain rates ranging from 1 × 10−3 to 5 × 103 s−1. It is shown that the copper contents and strain rate both have a significant effect on the mechanical behavior of the NiAl alloy. Specifically, the flow stress increases with an increasing copper content and strain rate. Moreover, the ductility also improves as the copper content increases. The change in the mechanical response and fracture behavior of the NiAl alloy given a higher copper content is thought to be the result of the precipitation of β-phase (Ni,CuAl and γ'-phase (Ni,Cu3Al in the NiAl matrix.

  19. Mechanical behavior in living cells consistent with the tensegrity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, N.; Naruse, K.; Stamenovic, D.; Fredberg, J. J.; Mijailovich, S. M.; Tolic-Norrelykke, I. M.; Polte, T.; Mannix, R.; Ingber, D. E.

    2001-01-01

    Alternative models of cell mechanics depict the living cell as a simple mechanical continuum, porous filament gel, tensed cortical membrane, or tensegrity network that maintains a stabilizing prestress through incorporation of discrete structural elements that bear compression. Real-time microscopic analysis of cells containing GFP-labeled microtubules and associated mitochondria revealed that living cells behave like discrete structures composed of an interconnected network of actin microfilaments and microtubules when mechanical stresses are applied to cell surface integrin receptors. Quantitation of cell tractional forces and cellular prestress by using traction force microscopy confirmed that microtubules bear compression and are responsible for a significant portion of the cytoskeletal prestress that determines cell shape stability under conditions in which myosin light chain phosphorylation and intracellular calcium remained unchanged. Quantitative measurements of both static and dynamic mechanical behaviors in cells also were consistent with specific a priori predictions of the tensegrity model. These findings suggest that tensegrity represents a unified model of cell mechanics that may help to explain how mechanical behaviors emerge through collective interactions among different cytoskeletal filaments and extracellular adhesions in living cells.

  20. Helium-filled proportional counter and its operation mechanism at low temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Isozumi, Y; Kishimoto, S

    2002-01-01

    The operation mechanism of helium-filled proportional counter (HFPC) at about 4.2 K is explained. Unstable behavior of HFPC is caused by releasing secondary-electron from the cathode by four kinds of active particles such as He sub n sup + , non-resonance photon from excited helium atom, non-resonance photon from He sub 2 sup * (A sup 1 Su sup +) and He sub 2 sup m (a sup 3 Su sup +). On experiments of HFPC behavior at low temperature, the following facts were observed; 1) main charge formation process in the electron avalanche is direct ionization by electron without Hornbeck-Molnar process. Accordingly, the gas amplification factor becomes small at low temperature. 2) Stable helium cation is He sub 2 sup + at room temperature, but cluster at low temperature. Large after-pulse is observed in output signal depends on cluster ion. The probability of secondary-electron emission decreased. The gas gain increased with increasing anode voltage. 3) By decreasing reaction rate of atom and molecule collision at low t...

  1. Mechanical behavior of fabric-reinforced elastomer straight flexible hoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manach P. Y.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a model applicable to large strain analysis of composite materials such as flexible hoses. A three-dimensional constitutive law, which uses the concept of convected coordinate frame, is developed for materials presenting non linear elastic and linear orthotropic behaviors in the large deformation field. The proposed model is implemented in a finite element home code and the formulation of both the hyperelastic and the orthotropic constitutive laws is presented. Finally, in order to validate our numerical results, an experimental device is developed to exhibit the mechanical behavior of straight flexible hoses in the case of elementary tests. The model is then compared to these experimental results.

  2. A mechanical cooler for dual-temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gully, W.; Carrington, H.; Kiehl, W.; Byrne, Kevin

    1998-01-01

    Ball Aerospace has been developing Stirling cycle mechanical cryocoolers specifically for space applications. These coolers are special in that they are designed from the beginning for power efficiency, high reliability, and compatibility with sensitive instruments. We have delivered several of these coolers to NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and are currently assembling one for the High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) program. In our current research effort, funded by the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO), we are tailoring our basic design to new requirements from the Air Force Research Laboratory and its customers. We describe our success in optimizing a cooler to efficiently provide refrigeration at two different temperatures simultaneously. This two-temperature application requires 0.4 W of cooling at 35 K, and 0.6 W of cooling at 60 K. We have met these requirements with an input power of approximately 70 W from a dc source with a breadboard version of the cooler. We expect to deliver the protoflight version of this cooler to the Air Force Research Laboratory in January 1998.

  3. Temperature Dependence of Laser-Induced Demagnetization in Ni: A Key for Identifying the Underlying Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Roth

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The microscopic mechanisms responsible for the ultrafast loss of magnetic order triggered in ferromagnetic metals by optical excitation are still under debate. One of the ongoing controversies is about the thermal origin of ultrafast demagnetization. Although different theoretical investigations support a main driving mechanism of thermal origin, alternative descriptions in terms of coherent interaction between the laser and the spin system or superdiffusive spin transport have been proposed. Another important matter of debate originates from the experimental observation of two time scales in the demagnetization dynamics of the 4f ferromagnet gadolinium. Here, it is still unclear whether it is necessary to invoke two distinct microscopic mechanisms to explain such behavior, or if one single mechanism is indeed sufficient. To uncover the physics behind these two unsolved issues, we explore the dependence of ultrafast-demagnetization dynamics in nickel through a survey of different laser intensities and ambient temperatures. Measurements in a large range of these external parameters are performed by means of the time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect and display a pronounced change in the maximum loss of magnetization and in the temporal profile of the demagnetization traces. The most striking observation is that the same material system (nickel can show a transition from a one-step (one time scale to a two-step (two time scales demagnetization, occurring on increasing the ambient temperature. We find that the fluence and the temperature dependence of ultrafast demagnetization—including the transition from one-step to two-step dynamics—are reproduced theoretically assuming only a single scattering mechanism coupling the spin system to the temperature of the electronic system. This finding means that the origin of ultrafast demagnetization is thermal and that only a single microscopic channel is sufficient to describe magnetization dynamics

  4. Impact of annealing temperature on the mechanical and electrical properties of sputtered aluminum nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillinger, M.; Schneider, M.; Bittner, A.; Schmid, U. [Institute of Sensor and Actuator Systems, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna 1040 (Austria); Nicolay, P. [CTR Carinthian Tech Research AG, Villach 9524 (Austria)

    2015-02-14

    Aluminium nitride (AlN) is a promising material for challenging sensor applications such as process monitoring in harsh environments (e.g., turbine exhaust), due to its piezoelectric properties, its high temperature stability and good thermal match to silicon. Basically, the operational temperature of piezoelectric materials is limited by the increase of the leakage current as well as by enhanced diffusion effects in the material at elevated temperatures. This work focuses on the characterization of aluminum nitride thin films after post deposition annealings up to temperatures of 1000 °C in harsh environments. For this purpose, thin film samples were temperature loaded for 2 h in pure nitrogen and oxygen gas atmospheres and characterized with respect to the film stress and the leakage current behaviour. The X-ray diffraction results show that AlN thin films are chemically stable in oxygen atmospheres for 2 h at annealing temperatures of up to 900 °C. At 1000 °C, a 100 nm thick AlN layer oxidizes completely. For nitrogen, the layer is stable up to 1000 °C. The activation energy of the samples was determined from leakage current measurements at different sample temperatures, in the range between 25 and 300 °C. Up to an annealing temperature of 700 °C, the leakage current in the thin film is dominated by Poole-Frenkel behavior, while at higher annealing temperatures, a mixture of different leakage current mechanisms is observed.

  5. Dynamic mechanical response and a constitutive model of Fe-based high temperature alloy at high temperatures and strain rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiang; Wang, Gang; Li, Jianfeng; Rong, Yiming

    2016-01-01

    The effects of strain rate and temperature on the dynamic behavior of Fe-based high temperature alloy was studied. The strain rates were 0.001-12,000 s(-1), at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 800 °C. A phenomenological constitutive model (Power-Law constitutive model) was proposed considering adiabatic temperature rise and accurate material thermal physical properties. During which, the effects of the specific heat capacity on the adiabatic temperature rise was studied. The constitutive model was verified to be accurate by comparison between predicted and experimental results.

  6. High Temperature Deformation Mechanisms in a DLD Nickel Superalloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Davies

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The realisation of employing Additive Layer Manufacturing (ALM technologies to produce components in the aerospace industry is significantly increasing. This can be attributed to their ability to offer the near-net shape fabrication of fully dense components with a high potential for geometrical optimisation, all of which contribute to subsequent reductions in material wastage and component weight. However, the influence of this manufacturing route on the properties of aerospace alloys must first be fully understood before being actively applied in-service. Specimens from the nickel superalloy C263 have been manufactured using Powder Bed Direct Laser Deposition (PB-DLD, each with unique post-processing conditions. These variables include two build orientations, vertical and horizontal, and two different heat treatments. The effects of build orientation and post-process heat treatments on the materials’ mechanical properties have been assessed with the Small Punch Tensile (SPT test technique, a practical test method given the limited availability of PB-DLD consolidated material. SPT testing was also conducted on a cast C263 variant to compare with PB-DLD derivatives. At both room and elevated temperature conditions, differences in mechanical performances arose between each material variant. This was found to be instigated by microstructural variations exposed through microscopic and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS analysis. SPT results were also compared with available uniaxial tensile data in terms of SPT peak and yield load against uniaxial ultimate tensile and yield strength.

  7. High Temperature Deformation Mechanisms in a DLD Nickel Superalloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Sean; Jeffs, Spencer; Lancaster, Robert; Baxter, Gavin

    2017-04-26

    The realisation of employing Additive Layer Manufacturing (ALM) technologies to produce components in the aerospace industry is significantly increasing. This can be attributed to their ability to offer the near-net shape fabrication of fully dense components with a high potential for geometrical optimisation, all of which contribute to subsequent reductions in material wastage and component weight. However, the influence of this manufacturing route on the properties of aerospace alloys must first be fully understood before being actively applied in-service. Specimens from the nickel superalloy C263 have been manufactured using Powder Bed Direct Laser Deposition (PB-DLD), each with unique post-processing conditions. These variables include two build orientations, vertical and horizontal, and two different heat treatments. The effects of build orientation and post-process heat treatments on the materials' mechanical properties have been assessed with the Small Punch Tensile (SPT) test technique, a practical test method given the limited availability of PB-DLD consolidated material. SPT testing was also conducted on a cast C263 variant to compare with PB-DLD derivatives. At both room and elevated temperature conditions, differences in mechanical performances arose between each material variant. This was found to be instigated by microstructural variations exposed through microscopic and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis. SPT results were also compared with available uniaxial tensile data in terms of SPT peak and yield load against uniaxial ultimate tensile and yield strength.

  8. Mechanical behavior of fast reactor fuel pin cladding subjected to simulated overpower transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, G.D.; Hunter, C.W.

    1978-06-01

    Cladding mechanical property data for analysis and prediction of fuel pin transient behavior were obtained under experimental conditions in which the temperature ramps of reactor transients were simulated. All cladding specimens were 20% CW Type 316 stainless steel and were cut from EBR-II irradiated fuel pins. It was determined that irradiation degraded the cladding ductility and failure strength. Specimens that had been adjacent to the fuel exhibited the poorest properties. Correlations were developed to describe the effect of neutron fluence on the mechanical behavior of the cladding. Metallographic examinations were conducted to characterize the failure mode and to establish the nature of internal and external surface corrosion. Various mechanisms for the fuel adjacency effect were examined and results for helium concentration profiles were presented. Results from the simulated transient tests were compared with TREAT test results.

  9. Geomechaical Behavior of Shale Rocks Under High Pressure and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamor Lora, R.; Ghazanfari, E.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanical properties of shale are demanding parameters for a number of engineering and geomechanical purposes. Borehole stability modeling, geophysics, shale oil and shale gas reservoirs, and underground storage of CO2 in shale formations are some of these potential applications to name a few. The growing interest in these reservoirs, as a source for hydrocarbons production, has resulted in an increasing demand for fundamental rock property data. These rocks are known to be non-linear materials. There are many factors, including induced cracks and their orientation, partial saturation, material heterogeneity and anisotropy, plasticity, strain rate, and temperature that may have an impact on the geomechanical behaviour of these shales.Experimental results and theoretical considerations have shown that the elastic moduli are not single-value, well-defined parameters for a given rock. Finding suitable values for these parameters is of vital importance in many geomechanical applications. In this study, shale heterogeneity and its geomechanical properties are explored through an extensive laboratory experimental program. A series of hydrostatic and triaxial tests were performed in order to evaluate the elasticity, viscoplasticity, yielding and failure response of Marcellus shale samples as a function of pressure and temperature. Additional characterization includes mineralogy, porosity, and permeability measurements. The shale samples were taken from a Marcellus outcrop at State Game Lands 252, located in Lycoming and Union counties, Allenwood, Pennsylvania. Laboratory experiments have shown that creep behaviour is highly sensitive to temperature. Furthermore, the non-linear nature of these rocks reveals interesting behaviour of the elastic moduli highly dependent on stress history of the rock. Results from cyclic triaxial tests point out the different behaviour between 1st-loading and unloading-reloading cycles. Experimental results of these Marcellus shales are

  10. The effect of irradiation, annealing temperature, and artificial aging on the oxidation, mechanical properties, and fracture mechanisms of UHMWPE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luisetto, Yannick; Wesslen, Bengt; Maurer, Frans; Lidgren, Lars

    2003-12-01

    UHMWPE crosslinked using Gamma radiation is believed to have improved wear properties, and this has been extensively studied during the past 10 years. Mechanical properties, oxidation, and wear properties of UHMWPE materials subjected to various thermal treatments have been investigated immediately after irradiation as well as after several years of aging. Nevertheless, the relationship between all these parameters is not yet fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the thermal treatments that could be applied to irradiated UHMWPE [lower (gamma 60) or higher (gamma 150) than 140 degrees C, the melting temperature of the polymer] and the mechanical properties, the oxidation and the fracture behavior of the material. The effect of artificial aging on these properties was also investigated. This study concludes that immediately after the annealing, the mechanical properties (UTS and epsilon) of the irradiated and annealed material are improved compared with those of nonirradiated material. Although nonirradiated material has higher fracture toughness than irradiated and annealed materials, the materials break according to the same mechanism of fracture. After aging, no changes could be observed in any of the measured properties for nonirradiated material. On the other hand, important changes could be seen in both irradiated and annealed material after aging. Both UTS and epsilon decreased, much more so in the case of gamma 60. Furthermore, the aging induced a subsurface peak of oxidation in both irradiated and annealed materials, twice as intense for gamma 60 than for gamma 150. The mechanism of fracture of these materials changed drastically after aging, probably due to the presence of the oxidation peak, which seems to occur at a location where cracks initiate easily compared with the nonoxidized bulk of the material. In the case of gamma 60, it seems clear that a correlation between mechanical property, oxidation, and

  11. Mechanical Behavior of 316L Stainless Steel after Strain Hardening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Kaishang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of strain hardening on the mechanical behavior of 316L stainless steel were studied in the paper. The original and different strain hardening materials were compared to investigate the mechanical behavior. The results demonstrate that the yield strengths increase with the magnitude of strain hardening significantly, but the ultimate strengths of the original and different strain hardening materials are closed. In addition, the plastic parameters of 316L stainless steel including fracture elongation and fracture surface shrinkage decrease with the magnitude of strain hardening. Finally, the Ramberg-Osgood equation is used to predict the stress-strain curves after strain hardening, and the results indicate that the predicted values agree with the experimental values.

  12. Mechanisms of Choice Behavior Shift Using Cue-approach Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkour, Akram; Leuker, Christina; Hover, Ashleigh M; Giles, Nathan; Poldrack, Russell A; Schonberg, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Cue-approach training has been shown to effectively shift choices for snack food items by associating a cued button-press motor response to particular food items. Furthermore, attention was biased toward previously cued items, even when the cued item is not chosen for real consumption during a choice phase. However, the exact mechanism by which preferences shift during cue-approach training is not entirely clear. In three experiments, we shed light on the possible underlying mechanisms at play during this novel paradigm: (1) Uncued, wholly predictable motor responses paired with particular food items were not sufficient to elicit a preference shift; (2) Cueing motor responses early - concurrently with food item onset - and thus eliminating the need for heightened top-down attention to the food stimulus in preparation for a motor response also eliminated the shift in food preferences. This finding reinforces our hypothesis that heightened attention at behaviorally relevant points in time is key to changing choice behavior in the cue-approach task; (3) Crucially, indicating choice using eye movements rather than manual button presses preserves the effect, thus demonstrating that the shift in preferences is not governed by a learned motor response but more likely via modulation of subjective value in higher associative regions, consistent with previous neuroimaging results. Cue-approach training drives attention at behaviorally relevant points in time to modulate the subjective value of individual items, providing a mechanism for behavior change that does not rely on external reinforcement and that holds great promise for developing real world behavioral interventions.

  13. Inelastic material behavior and fracture mechanics a variational approach

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, L

    1999-01-01

    A variational principle is presented, which relates the macroscopic fracture response of a mechanical component to its microscopic, inelastic material behavior. The principle allows a comparison between the crack driving force, expressed by the J-integral, and an integral expression of the fracture resistance. On this basis, the critical values of J are calculated for a Griffith crack under mixed- mode loading. The preliminary check with data available in literature shows a fairly good agreement. (8 refs).

  14. Weaning in an Arctic wolf pack: behavioral mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, J.M.; Mech, L.D.; Ream, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    If behavioral mechanisms controlling suckling have been shaped by parent-offspring conflict in the ultimate sense, then proximate behavioral determinants of conflict should occur throughout lactation, with greatest intensity in the terminal phase, and offspring should have tactics for overcoming parental resistance. We observed the weaning process in a habituated wild wolf pack (Canis lupus) on Ellesmere Island, Canada, from estimated ages 5 through 10 weeks (including a continuous record for 192 h). The following variables declined with age: percentage of suckling bouts initiated by the nurser, persistence by pups, and mean duration of suckling bouts. Variables that increased with age were interbout interval, percentage of suckling bouts terminated by the nurser, and wincing or agonistic actions of the nurser. Behavioral conflict appeared in the develop mental stage (estimated age 7 -8 weeks) during which pups could feed on opened carcasses. Countertactics by pups to obtain milk were not apparent, although the pups developed diverse tactics for obtaining and sharing meat. In this group of wolves, weaning mechanisms were a complex function of food-delivery by adults, discomfort of the nursing female as pups developed, and declining persistence of pups. If there is a conflict over what is optimal for pups and for the nurser in the ultimate sense, behavioral conflict is more likely to be expressed with regard to access to meat, or as conditional tactics dependent on food availability, rather than weaning conflict being controlleg by fixed rules in this species.

  15. Nonlinear Inelastic Mechanical Behavior Of Epoxy Resin Polymeric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yekani Fard, Masoud

    Polymer and polymer matrix composites (PMCs) materials are being used extensively in different civil and mechanical engineering applications. The behavior of the epoxy resin polymers under different types of loading conditions has to be understood before the mechanical behavior of Polymer Matrix Composites (PMCs) can be accurately predicted. In many structural applications, PMC structures are subjected to large flexural loadings, examples include repair of structures against earthquake and engine fan cases. Therefore it is important to characterize and model the flexural mechanical behavior of epoxy resin materials. In this thesis, a comprehensive research effort was undertaken combining experiments and theoretical modeling to investigate the mechanical behavior of epoxy resins subject to different loading conditions. Epoxy resin E 863 was tested at different strain rates. Samples with dog-bone geometry were used in the tension tests. Small sized cubic, prismatic, and cylindrical samples were used in compression tests. Flexural tests were conducted on samples with different sizes and loading conditions. Strains were measured using the digital image correlation (DIC) technique, extensometers, strain gauges, and actuators. Effects of triaxiality state of stress were studied. Cubic, prismatic, and cylindrical compression samples undergo stress drop at yield, but it was found that only cubic samples experience strain hardening before failure. Characteristic points of tensile and compressive stress strain relation and load deflection curve in flexure were measured and their variations with strain rate studied. Two different stress strain models were used to investigate the effect of out-of-plane loading on the uniaxial stress strain response of the epoxy resin material. The first model is a strain softening with plastic flow for tension and compression. The influence of softening localization on material behavior was investigated using the DIC system. It was found that

  16. On the significance of microtubule flexural behavior in cytoskeletal mechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Mehrbod

    Full Text Available Quantitative description of cell mechanics has challenged biological scientists for the past two decades. Various structural models have been attempted to analyze the structure of the cytoskeleton. One important aspect that has been largely ignored in all these modeling approaches is related to the flexural and buckling behavior of microtubular filaments. The objective of this paper is to explore the influence of this flexural and buckling behavior in cytoskeletal mechanics.In vitro the microtubules are observed to buckle in the first mode, reminiscent of a free, simply-supported beam. In vivo images of microtubules, however, indicate that the buckling mostly occurs in higher modes. This buckling mode switch takes place mostly because of the lateral support of microtubules via their connections to actin and intermediate filaments. These lateral loads are exerted throughout the microtubule length and yield a considerable bending behavior that, unless properly accounted for, would produce erroneous results in the modeling and analysis of the cytoskeletal mechanics.One of the promising attempts towards mechanical modeling of the cytoskeleton is the tensegrity model, which simplifies the complex network of cytoskeletal filaments into a combination merely of tension-bearing actin filaments and compression-bearing microtubules. Interestingly, this discrete model can qualitatively explain many experimental observations in cell mechanics. However, evidence suggests that the simplicity of this model may undermine the accuracy of its predictions, given the model's underlying assumption that "every single member bears solely either tensile or compressive behavior," i.e. neglecting the flexural behavior of the microtubule filaments. We invoke an anisotropic continuum model for microtubules and compare the bending energy stored in a single microtubule with its axial strain energy at the verge of buckling. Our results suggest that the bending energy can

  17. Thermomechanical behavior of different Ni-base superalloys during cyclic loading at elevated temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The material behavior of three Ni-base superalloys (Inconel® 718, Allvac® 718PlusTM and Haynes® 282® during in-phase cyclic mechanical and thermal loading was investigated. Stress controlled thermo-mechanical tests were carried out at temperatures above 700 ∘C and different levels of maximum compressive stress using a Gleeble® 3800 testing system. Microstructure investigations via light optical microscopy (LOM and field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM as well as numerical precipitation kinetics simulations were performed to interpret the obtained results. For all alloys, the predominant deformation mechanism during deformation up to low plastic strains was identified as dislocation creep. The main softening mechanism causing progressive increase of plastic strain after preceding linear behavior is suggested to be recrystallization facilitated by coarsening of grain boundary precipitates. Furthermore, coarsening and partial transformation of strengthening phases was observed. At all stress levels, Haynes® 282® showed best performance which is attributable to its stable microstructure containing a high phase fraction of small, intermetallic precipitates inside grains and different carbides evenly distributed along grain boundaries.

  18. Investigation on multilayer failure mechanism of RPV with a high temperature gradient from core meltdown scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jianfeng, Mao, E-mail: jianfeng-mao@163.com [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Engineering Research Center of Process Equipment and Remanufacturing, Ministry of Education (China); Xiangqing, Li [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Shiyi, Bao, E-mail: bsy@zjut.edu.cn [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Engineering Research Center of Process Equipment and Remanufacturing, Ministry of Education (China); Lijia, Luo [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Zengliang, Gao [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Engineering Research Center of Process Equipment and Remanufacturing, Ministry of Education (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • The multilayer failure mechanism is investigated for RPV under CHF. • Failure time and location of RPV are predicted under various SA scenarios. • The structural behaviors are analyzed in depth for creep and plasticity. • The effect of internal pressure and temperature gradient is considered. • The structural integrity of RPV is secured within the required 72 creep hours. - Abstract: The Fukushima accident shows that in-vessel retention (IVR) of molten core debris has not been appropriately assessed, and a certain pressure (up to 8.0 MPa) still exists inside the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). In the traditional concept of IVR, the pressure is supposed to successfully be released, and the temperature distributed among the wall thickness is assumed to be uniform. However, this concept is seriously challenged by reality of Fukushima accident with regard to the existence of both internal pressure and high temperature gradient. Therefore, in order to make the IVR mitigation strategy succeed, the numerical investigation of the lower head behavior and its failure has been performed for several internal pressures under high temperature gradient. According to some requirements in severe accident (SA) management of RPV, it should be ensured that the IVR mitigation takes effect in preventing the failure of the structure within a period of 72 h. Subsequently, the failure time and location have to be predicted under the critical heat flux (CHF) loading condition for lower head, since the CHF is limit thermal boundary before the melt-through of RPV. In illustrating the so called ‘multilayer failure mechanism’, the structural behaviors of RPV are analyzed in terms of the stress, creep strain, deformation, damage on selected paths.

  19. Creep Behavior of High-Strength Concrete Subjected to Elevated Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Minho; Kim, Gyuyong; Kim, Youngsun; Lee, Taegyu; Choe, Gyeongcheol; Hwang, Euichul; Nam, Jeongsoo

    2017-07-11

    Strain is generated in concrete subjected to elevated temperatures owing to the influence of factors such as thermal expansion and design load. Such strains resulting from elevated temperatures and load can significantly influence the stability of a structure during and after a fire. In addition, the lower the water-to-binder (W-B) ratio and the smaller the quantity of aggregates in high-strength concrete, the more likely it is for unstable strain to occur. Hence, in this study, the compressive strength, elastic modulus, and creep behavior were evaluated at target temperatures of 100, 200, 300, 500, and 800 °C for high-strength concretes with W-B ratios of 30%, 26%, and 23%. The loading conditions were set as non-loading and 0.33f cu . It was found that as the compressive strength of the concrete increased, the mechanical characteristics deteriorated and transient creep increased. Furthermore, when the point at which creep strain occurred at elevated temperatures after the occurrence of transient creep was considered, greater shrinkage strain occurred as the compressive strength of the concrete increased. At a heating temperature of 800 °C, the 80 and 100 MPa test specimens showed creep failure within a shrinkage strain range similar to the strain at the maximum load.

  20. Creep Behavior of High-Strength Concrete Subjected to Elevated Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minho Yoon

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Strain is generated in concrete subjected to elevated temperatures owing to the influence of factors such as thermal expansion and design load. Such strains resulting from elevated temperatures and load can significantly influence the stability of a structure during and after a fire. In addition, the lower the water-to-binder (W–B ratio and the smaller the quantity of aggregates in high-strength concrete, the more likely it is for unstable strain to occur. Hence, in this study, the compressive strength, elastic modulus, and creep behavior were evaluated at target temperatures of 100, 200, 300, 500, and 800 °C for high-strength concretes with W–B ratios of 30%, 26%, and 23%. The loading conditions were set as non-loading and 0.33fcu. It was found that as the compressive strength of the concrete increased, the mechanical characteristics deteriorated and transient creep increased. Furthermore, when the point at which creep strain occurred at elevated temperatures after the occurrence of transient creep was considered, greater shrinkage strain occurred as the compressive strength of the concrete increased. At a heating temperature of 800 °C, the 80 and 100 MPa test specimens showed creep failure within a shrinkage strain range similar to the strain at the maximum load.

  1. High temperature indentation behavior of eutectic lead-free solder materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Worrack H.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Electronic malfunction caused by thermal stresses is one major problem in modern electronic industries. Therefore, the precise knowledge of the mechanical solder material properties as a function of temperature is required. Nanoindentation and its potential of recording load-displacement curves is a widely-used miniature test for the determination of Young’s modulus and hardness values. Furthermore, such tests can be performed in a temperature range from Room Temperature (RT up to +500°C by using a Hot-Stage add on. In this paper the lead-free solder alloys Sn91Zn9 and Sn42Bi58, and also copper and fused silica, which is used for the indenter calibration are investigated. The results for quartz and copper agree with the published values in several references. However, the Young’s modulus of Sn42Bi58 as a function of temperature differs from the values presented in the literature. Due to delayed material response in the unloading regime it must be assumed that creep effects lead to an incorrect automatic data evaluation. Investigation and understanding of the creep behavior is part of this paper. For this purpose a visco-elastic material model is used to model the indentation response at elevated temperatures and to determine the corresponding viscous material constants.

  2. Plastic behavior of medium carbon vanadium microalloyed steel at temperatures near g « a transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourenço N.J.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Dilatometric techniques were used to build the continuous cooling transformation (CCT diagram for a medium carbon microalloyed steel; the microstructure and hardness were determined at different cooling rates. The mechanical behavior of the steel in the austenite field and at temperatures approaching austenite to ferrite transformation was measured by means of hot torsion tests under isothermal and continuous cooling conditions. The no recrystallization temperatures, Tnr, and start of phase transformation, Ar3, were determined under continuous cooling condition using mean flow stress vs. inverse of absolute temperature diagrams. Interruption of static recrystallization within the interpass time in the austenite field indicated that the start of vanadium carbonitride precipitation occurred under 860 °C. Austenite transformation was found to start at around 710 °C, a temperature similar to that measured by dilatometry, suggesting that interphase precipitation delays the transformation of deformed austenite. Pearlite was observed at temperatures ranging from 650 °C to 600 °C, with the flow curves taking on a particular shape, i.e., stress rose sharply as strain was increased, reaching peak stress at low deformation, around 0.2, followed by an extensive softening region after peak stress.

  3. Studies of Water Absorption Behavior of Plant Fibers at Different Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Dip

    2010-05-01

    Moisture absorption of natural fiber plastic composites is one major concern in their outdoor applications. The absorbed moisture has many detrimental effects on the mechanical performance of these composites. A knowledge of the moisture diffusivity, permeability, and solubility is very much essential for the application of natural fibers as an excellent reinforcement in polymers. An effort has been made to study the water absorption behavior of some natural fibers such as bowstring hemp, okra, and betel nut at different temperatures to improve the long-term performance of composites reinforced with these fibers. The gain in moisture content in the fibers due to water absorption was measured as a function of exposure time at temperatures ranging from 300 K to 340 K. The thermodynamic parameters of the sorption process, such as diffusion coefficients and corresponding activation energies, were estimated.

  4. Effect of Ambient Temperature on Hydrophobic Recovery Behavior of Silicone Rubber Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiangyang; Li, Zijian; Zheng, Feng; Zhang, Ni; Huang, Zhen; Fang, Pengfei

    A series of silicone rubber samples with different cyclosiloxanes contents have been successfully prepared, and their hydrophobic recovery behaviors and mechanism were investigated in detail. The gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy technique after Soxhlet extraction was utilized to examine the low molecular weight siloxanes in the sample, SEM was used to observe the surface morphology of the silicone rubber influenced by plasma treatment, and contact angle measurement was applied to probe the hydrophobic recovery of the sample surface after plasma treatment at different storage temperatures. The storage time-dependent contact angle of water can be well fitted by the diffusion model calculated from Fick’s second law. The results imply that the hydrophobic recovery of silicone rubber is related to the diffusion of low molecular weight siloxanes, while larger content or higher temperature can induce faster hydrophobic recovery.

  5. Rheological behavior of Brazilian Cherry (Eugenia uniflora L. pulp at pasteurization temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Santos Lopes

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The rheological behavior of Brazilian Cherry (Eugenia uniflora L. pulp in the range of temperatures used for pasteurization (83 to 97 °C was studied. The results indicated that Brazilian Cherry pulp presented pseudoplastic behavior, and the Herschel-Bulkley model was considered more adequate to represent the rheological behavior of this pulp in the range of temperatures studied. The fluid behavior index (n varied in the range from 0.448 to 0.627. The effect of temperature on the apparent viscosity was described by an equation analogous to Arrhenius equation, and a decrease in apparent viscosity with an increase in temperature was observed.

  6. Mechanisms of transgenerational inheritance of addictive-like behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassoler, F M; Sadri-Vakili, G

    2014-04-04

    Genetic factors are implicated in the heritability of drug abuse. However, even with advances in current technology no specific genes have been identified that are critical for the transmission of drug-induced phenotypes to subsequent generations. It is now evident that epigenetic factors contribute to disease heritability and represent a link between genes and the environment. Recently, epigenetic mechanisms have been shown to underlie drug-induced structural, synaptic, and behavioral plasticity by coordinating the expression of gene networks within the brain. Therefore, the epigenome provides a direct mechanism for drugs of abuse to influence the genetic events involved in the development of addiction as well as its heritability to subsequent generations. In this review we discuss the mechanisms underlying intergenerational epigenetic transmission, highlight studies that demonstrate this phenomenon with particular attention to the field of addiction, and identify gaps for future studies. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Mechanisms of Behavioral and Affective Treatment Outcomes in a Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Jeffrey D; Loeber, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Evidence for effective treatment for behavioral problems continues to grow, yet evidence about the effective mechanisms underlying those interventions has lagged behind. The Stop Now and Plan (SNAP) program is a multicomponent intervention for boys between 6 and 11. This study tested putative treatment mechanisms using data from 252 boys in a randomized controlled trial of SNAP versus treatment as usual. SNAP includes a 3 month group treatment period followed by individualized intervention, which persisted through the 15 month study period. Measures were administered in four waves: at baseline and at 3, 9 and 15 months after baseline. A hierarchical linear modeling strategy was used. SNAP was associated with improved problem-solving skills, prosocial behavior, emotion regulation skills, and reduced parental stress. Prosocial behavior, emotion regulation skills and reduced parental stress partially mediated improvements in child aggression. Improved emotion regulation skills partially mediated treatment-related child anxious-depressed outcomes. Improvements in parenting behaviors did not differ between treatment conditions. The results suggest that independent processes may drive affective and behavioral outcomes, with some specificity regarding the mechanisms related to differing treatment outcomes.

  8. Thermomechanical modeling of the thermo-order-mechanical coupling behaviors in liquid crystal elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lihua; Zeng, Zhi; Huo, Yongzhong

    2010-11-01

    Liquid crystal elastomer is a kind of anisotropic polymeric material, with complicated micro-structures and thermo-order-mechanical coupling behaviors. In this paper, we propose a method to systematically model these coupling behaviors. We derive the constitutive model in full tensor structure according to the Clausius-Duhem inequality. Two of the constitutive equations represent the mechanical equilibrium and the other two represent the phase equilibrium. Choosing the total free energy as the combination of the neo-classical free energy and the Landau-de Gennes nematic free energy, we obtain the Cauchy stress-deformation gradient relation and the order-mechanical coupling equations. We find the analytical homogeneous solutions of the deformation for the typical mechanical loadings, such as uniaxial stretch, and simple shear in any directions. We also compare the compression behavior of prolate liquid crystal elastomers with the stretch behavior of oblate liquid crystal elastomers. As a result, the stress, strain, temperature, order parameter, biaxiality and the direction of the director of liquid crystal elastomers couple with each other. When the prolate liquid crystal elastomer sample is stretched in the direction parallel to its director, the deviatoric stress makes the mesogens more order and increase the transition temperature. When the sample is sheared or stretched in the direction non-parallel to the director, the director of the liquid crystal elastomer will rotate, and the biaxiality will be induced. Because of the order-mechanical coupling, under infinitesimal deformation, liquid crystal elastomer has anisotropic Young's modulus and zero shear modulus in the direction parallel or perpendicular to the director. While for the oblate liquid crystal elastomers, the stretch parallel to the director will cause the rotation of the director and induce the biaxiality.

  9. Self-brazing Mechanism of Aluminum Alloy at Medium Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHENG Fang-jie

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available ZnCl2 and SnCl2 were added to the AlF3-CsF eutectic flux, which can be used for connecting aluminum alloy sheet by self-brazing at medium temperature. The influence of the amount of ZnCl2 and SnCl2 and the size of the T-joint area on the interface microstructure and the self-brazing joint mechanical properties was investigated. The interface microstructure, chemical compositions, defects and tensile fractography of the self-brazing joints were analyzed by metallographic microscope, scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results show that the joints are soundly bonded when both the mass fractions of ZnCl2 and SnCl2 are about 4%; the replacement reactions between Zn2+, Sn2+ of flux and Al atoms of base metal occur during brazing, then the liquid metals of Sn and Zn appear, a great degree of Zn which has high solid solution with Al spreads rapidly to the base metal; Sn is distributed along the interface forming a low melting point metal layer with Zn and Al; the brazing of joints with small area can be realized easily; there are a lot of dimples on the fracture surface and the tensile strength of the brazing joint reaches (58±5MPa.

  10. High temperature deformation behavior and microstructural evolutions of a high Zr containing WE magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asqardoust, Sh.; Zarei-Hanzaki, A. [School of Metallurgical & Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fatemi, S.M., E-mail: mfatemi@ut.ac.ir [Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moradjoy-Hamedani, M. [School of Metallurgical & Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-06-05

    Magnesium alloys containing RE elements (WE grade) are considered as potential materials for high temperature structural applications. To this end, it is crucial to study the flow behavior and the microstructural evolution of these alloys at high temperatures. In present work, the hot compression testing was employed to investigate the deformation behavior of a rolled WE54 magnesium alloy at elevated temperatures. The experimental material failed to deform to target strain of 0.6 at 250 and 300 °C, while the straining was successfully performed at 350 °C. A flow softening was observed at 350 °C, which was related to the depletion of RE strengthener elements, particularly Y atoms, from the solid solution and dynamic precipitation of β phases. It was suggested that the Zener pinning effect of the latter precipitates might retard the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization. As the temperature increased to 450 and 500 °C, the RE elements dissolved in the matrix and thus dynamic recrystallization could considerably progress in the microstructure. The comparative study of specimens cut along transverse ad normal direction (TD and ND specimens) implied that the presence of RE elements might effectively reduce the yield anisotropy in WE54 rolled alloy. Microstructural observations indicated a higher fraction of dynamically-recrystallized grains for the ND specimens. This was discussed relying on the different shares of deformation mechanism during compressing the TD and ND specimens. - Highlights: • Deformation behavior of a high Zr WE alloy was addressed at low strain rate. • Dynamic precipitation was realized at 350 °C. • The occurrence of DRX was retarded due to Zener pinning effect. • A higher DRX fraction was obtained in ND specimens comparing with TD ones.

  11. Mechanical Properties of Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aklonis, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    Mechanical properties (stress-strain relationships) of polymers are reviewed, taking into account both time and temperature factors. Topics include modulus-temperature behavior of polymers, time dependence, time-temperature correspondence, and mechanical models. (JN)

  12. Influence of partitioning on mechanical behavior of Q&P steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arlazarov, A., E-mail: artem.arlazarov@arcelormittal.com [ArcelorMittal Global Research and Development, Voie Romaine, BP30320, 57283 Maizières-lès-Metz Cedex (France); Ollat, M. [ArcelorMittal Global Research and Development, Voie Romaine, BP30320, 57283 Maizières-lès-Metz Cedex (France); MATEIS, 25 Avenue Jean Capelle, INSA de LYON, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Masse, J.P. [ArcelorMittal Global Research and Development, Voie Romaine, BP30320, 57283 Maizières-lès-Metz Cedex (France); Constellium C-TEC, Parc Economique Centr’alp, 38341 Voreppe Cedex (France); Bouzat, M. [ArcelorMittal Global Research and Development, Voie Romaine, BP30320, 57283 Maizières-lès-Metz Cedex (France)

    2016-04-20

    The effect of partitioning conditions during Quenching and Partitioning (Q&P) annealing on mechanical behavior of cold rolled 0.2C-2.22Mn-1.44Si-0.21Cr steels was studied. Q&P heat treatments followed by tensile tests were performed. The evolution of mechanical properties as a function of partitioning temperature and time was analyzed. Microstructure and retained austenite fraction in the initial state and after interrupted tensile tests were characterized by SEM and magnetic measurements. Tensile tests were also performed on tempered martensite to assess the mechanical properties of partitioned martensite. Finally, efforts were made to bring results together and explain the microstructure and mechanical properties of Q&P steels.

  13. Microscale Mechanical Deformation Behaviors and Mechanisms in Bulk Metallic Glasses Investigated with Micropillar Compression Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jianchao

    2011-12-01

    Over the past years of my PhD study, the focused-ion-beam (FIB) based microcompression experiment has been thoroughly investigated with respect to the small-scale deformation in metallic glasses. It was then utilized to explore the elastic and plastic deformation mechanisms in metallic glasses. To this end, micropillars with varying sample sizes and aspect ratios were fabricated by the FIB technique and subsequently compressed on a modified nanoindentation system. An improved formula for the measurement of the Young's modulus was derived by adding a geometrical prefactor to the Sneddon's solution. Through the formula, geometry-independent Young's moduli were extracted from microcompression experiments, which are consistent with nanoindentation results. Furthermore, cyclic microcompression was developed, which revealed reversible inelastic deformation in the apparent elastic regime through high-frequency cyclic loading. The reversible inelastic deformation manifests as hysteric loops in cyclic microcompression and can be captured by the Kelvin-type viscoelastic model. The experimental results indicate that the free-volume zones behave essentially like supercooled liquids with an effective viscosity on the order of 1 x 108 Pas. The microscopic yield strengths were first extracted with a formula derived based on the Mohr-Coulomb law to account for the geometrical effects from the tapered micropillar and the results showed a weak size effect on the yield strengths of a variety of metallic-glass alloys, which can be attributed to Weibull statistics. The nature of the yielding phenomenon was explored with the cyclic micro-compression approach. Through cyclic microcompression of a Zr-based metallic glass, it can be demonstrated that its yielding stress increases at higher applied stress rate but its yielding strain is kept at a constant of ~ 2%. The room-temperature post-yielding deformation behavior of metallic glasses is characterized by flow serrations, which were

  14. Temperature Dependence of the Oxygen Reduction Mechanism in Nonaqueous Li–O 2 Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Bin [Energy; Xu, Wu [Energy; Zheng, Jianming [Energy; Yan, Pengfei [Environmental; Walter, Eric D. [Environmental; Isern, Nancy [Environmental; Bowden, Mark E. [Environmental; Engelhard, Mark H. [Environmental; Kim, Sun Tai [Energy; Department; Read, Jeffrey [Power; Adams, Brian D. [Energy; Li, Xiaolin [Energy; Cho, Jaephil [Department; Wang, Chongmin [Environmental; Zhang, Ji-Guang [Energy

    2017-10-11

    The temperature dependence of the oxygen reduction mechanism in Li-O2 batteries was investigated using carbon nanotube-based air electrodes and 1,2-dimethoxyethane-based electrolyte within a temperature range of 20C to 40C. It is found that the discharge capacity of the Li-O2 batteries decreases from 7,492 mAh g-1 at 40C to 2,930 mAh g-1 at 0C. However, a sharp increase in capacity was found when the temperature was further decreased and a very high capacity of 17,716 mAh g-1 was observed at 20C at a current density of 0.1 mA cm-2. When the temperature increases from 20C to 40C, the morphologies of the Li2O2 formed varied from ultra-small spherical particles to small flakes and then to large flake-stacked toroids. The lifetime of superoxide and the solution pathway play a dominate role on the battery capacity in the temperature range of -20C to 0C, but the electrochemical kinetics of oxygen reduction and the surface pathway dominate the discharge behavior in the temperature range of 0C to 40C. These findings provide fundamental understanding on the temperature dependence of oxygen reduction process in a Li-O2 battery and will enable a more rational design of Li-O2 batteries.

  15. NUMERICAL SIMULATION FOR MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF U10MO MONOLITHIC MINIPLATES FOR RESEARCH AND TEST REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakan Ozaltun & Herman Shen

    2011-11-01

    This article presents assessment of the mechanical behavior of U-10wt% Mo (U10Mo) alloy based monolithic fuel plates subject to irradiation. Monolithic, plate-type fuel is a new fuel form being developed for research and test reactors to achieve higher uranium densities within the reactor core to allow the use of low-enriched uranium fuel in high-performance reactors. Identification of the stress/strain characteristics is important for understanding the in-reactor performance of these plate-type fuels. For this work, three distinct cases were considered: (1) fabrication induced residual stresses (2) thermal cycling of fabricated plates; and finally (3) transient mechanical behavior under actual operating conditions. Because the temperatures approach the melting temperature of the cladding during the fabrication and thermal cycling, high temperature material properties were incorporated to improve the accuracy. Once residual stress fields due to fabrication process were identified, solution was used as initial state for the subsequent simulations. For thermal cycling simulation, elasto-plastic material model with thermal creep was constructed and residual stresses caused by the fabrication process were included. For in-service simulation, coupled fluid-thermal-structural interaction was considered. First, temperature field on the plates was calculated and this field was used to compute the thermal stresses. For time dependent mechanical behavior, thermal creep of cladding, volumetric swelling and fission induced creep of the fuel foil were considered. The analysis showed that the stresses evolve very rapidly in the reactor. While swelling of the foil increases the stress of the foil, irradiation induced creep causes stress relaxation.

  16. Molecular Mechanisms of Opioid Receptor-Dependent Signaling and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hasani, Ream; Bruchas, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Opioid receptors have been targeted for the treatment of pain and related disorders for thousands of years, and remain the most widely used analgesics in the clinic. Mu (μ), kappa (κ), and delta (δ) opioid receptors represent the originally classified receptor subtypes, with opioid receptor like-1 (ORL1) being the least characterized. All four receptors are G-protein coupled, and activate inhibitory G-proteins. These receptors form homo- and hetereodimeric complexes, signal to kinase cascades, and scaffold a variety of proteins. In this review, we discuss classical mechanisms and developments in understanding opioid tolerance, opioid receptor signaling, and highlight advances in opioid molecular pharmacology, behavioral pharmacology, and human genetics. We put into context how opioid receptor signaling leads to the modulation of behavior with the potential for therapeutic intervention. Finally, we conclude that there is a continued need for more translational work on opioid receptors in vivo. PMID:22020140

  17. Motivation and cognitive control: from behavior to neural mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botvinick, Matthew; Braver, Todd

    2015-01-03

    Research on cognitive control and executive function has long recognized the relevance of motivational factors. Recently, however, the topic has come increasingly to center stage, with a surge of new studies examining the interface of motivation and cognitive control. In the present article we survey research situated at this interface, considering work from cognitive and social psychology and behavioral economics, but with a particular focus on neuroscience research. We organize existing findings into three core areas, considering them in the light of currently vying theoretical perspectives. Based on the accumulated evidence, we advocate for a view of control function that treats it as a domain of reward-based decision making. More broadly, we argue that neuroscientific evidence plays a critical role in understanding the mechanisms by which motivation and cognitive control interact. Opportunities for further cross-fertilization between behavioral and neuroscientific research are highlighted.

  18. Effect of temperature on the mechanical properties of polymer mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Marciano Laredo dos Reis

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of an experimental program to investigate the effect of temperature on the performance of epoxy and unsaturated polyester polymer mortars (PM. PM is a composite material in which polymeric materials are used to bond the aggregates in a fashion similar to that used in the preparation of Portland cement concrete. For this purpose, prismatic and cylindrical specimens were prepared for flexural and compressive tests, respectively, at different temperatures. Measurements of the temperature-dependent elastic modulus and the compressive and flexural strength were conducted using a thermostatic chamber attached to a universal test machine for a range of temperatures varying from room temperature to 90 ºC. The flexural and compressive strength decreases as temperature increases, especially after matrix HDT. Epoxy polymer mortars are more sensitive to temperature variation than unsaturated polyester ones.

  19. Perinatal programming of neuroendocrine mechanisms connecting feeding behavior and stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J Spencer

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Feeding behavior is closely regulated by neuroendocrine mechanisms that can be influenced by stressful life events. However, the feeding response to stress varies among individuals with some increasing and others decreasing food intake after stress. In addition to the impact of acute lifestyle and genetic backgrounds, the early life environment can have a life-long influence on neuroendocrine mechanisms connecting stress to feeding behavior and may partially explain these opposing feeding responses to stress. In this review I will discuss the perinatal programming of adult hypothalamic stress and feeding circuitry. Specifically I will address how early life (prenatal and postnatal nutrition, early life stress, and the early life hormonal profile can program the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, the endocrine arm of the body’s response to stress long-term and how these changes can, in turn, influence the hypothalamic circuitry responsible for regulating feeding behavior. Thus, over- or under-feeding and / or stressful events during critical windows of early development can alter glucocorticoid (GC regulation of the HPA axis, leading to changes in the GC influence on energy storage and changes in GC negative feedback on HPA axis-derived satiety signals such as corticotropin-releasing-hormone. Furthermore, peripheral hormones controlling satiety, such as leptin and insulin are altered by early life events, and can be influenced, in early life and adulthood, by stress. Importantly, these neuroendocrine signals act as trophic factors during development to stimulate connectivity throughout the hypothalamus. The interplay between these neuroendocrine signals, the perinatal environment, and activation of the stress circuitry in adulthood thus strongly influences feeding behavior and may explain why individuals have unique feeding responses to similar stressors.

  20. Mechanical Behavior of Quasi-sinusoidal Corrugated Composite sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouyan Ghabezi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An aircraft wing needs to display different mechanical behavior in different directions. 1- stiffness in the spanwise (transverse to the corrugation direction which enables the aerodynamic and inertial loads to be carried. 2- compliance in the chordwise (corrugation direction which would allow shape changes and increases in surface area; whereas a corrugated sheet due to their special geometry has potential to use in morphing applications. Therefore, in this paper the mechanical behaviour of quasi-sinusoidal corrugated composites is studied by commercial FEM software ABAQUS and a simple analytical model which is used for the initial stiffness of the quasi-sinusoidal corrugated composites (Yokozeki model. The elongation and effective stiffness in longitudinal and transverse directions of quasi-sinusoidal  corrugated  skins  and fat  composites  are  calculated  and  compared together.  Using  frst  and  second  Castigliano’s  theorem  and  Bernoulli-Euler  beam theorem can be used to calculate the defection and rotational angle of a beam (sheet. In this research, different dimensions of quasi-sinusoidal element for unidirectional and woven composites of E-glass/epoxy are investigated. FEM results and analytical model are compared together. Then, the analytical model is validated by experimental results of plain woven E-glass/epoxy composites. The results of FEM, experimental and analytical simulations show that how a corrugated composite can afford with certainty larger deformation than the fat composite in using this analytical model to predict the mechanical behavior of quasi-sinusoidal corrugated composites. It was found that the corrugated composites display extremely high anisotropic behavior and have high  tensile and fexural stiffness  in  transverse direction while exhibiting  low stiffness in longitudinal direction of corrugation.

  1. A Vesicle-to-Worm Transition Provides a New High-Temperature Oil Thickening Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, Matthew J; Mykhaylyk, Oleksandr O; Armes, Steven P

    2017-02-06

    Diblock copolymer vesicles are prepared via RAFT dispersion polymerization directly in mineral oil. Such vesicles undergo a vesicle-to-worm transition on heating to 150 °C, as judged by TEM and SAXS. Variable-temperature 1 H NMR spectroscopy indicates that this transition is the result of surface plasticization of the membrane-forming block by hot solvent, effectively increasing the volume fraction of the stabilizer block and so reducing the packing parameter for the copolymer chains. The rheological behavior of a 10 % w/w copolymer dispersion in mineral oil is strongly temperature-dependent: the storage modulus increases by five orders of magnitude on heating above the critical gelation temperature of 135 °C, as the non-interacting vesicles are converted into weakly interacting worms. SAXS studies indicate that, on average, three worms are formed per vesicle. Such vesicle-to-worm transitions offer an interesting new mechanism for the high-temperature thickening of oils. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Mechanical behavior of nanoporous Au with fine ligaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pia, Giorgio; Delogu, Francesco

    2015-08-01

    A theoretical model relating the overall mechanical behavior of NP metals to the bending response of thick ligaments is developed based on an idealized regular lattice of massive cubic nodes and thick ligaments with square cross section. The model predictions are compared with the Young's modulus and yield strength of nanoporous Au with ligaments a few nanometers in size obtained by numerical simulation and available in literature. It is shown that the model provides a quantitative description of the elastic and plastic deformation of nanoporous Au, reproducing to a considerable extent the numerically estimated Young's modulus and yield strength values.

  3. Bending Mechanical Behavior of Polyester Matrix Reinforced with Fique Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altoé, Giulio Rodrigues; Netto, Pedro Amoy; Barcelos, Mariana; Gomes, André; Margem, Frederico Muylaert; Monteiro, Sergio Neves

    Environmentally correct composites, made from natural fibers, are among the most investigated and applied today. In this paper, we investigate the mechanical behavior of polyester matrix composites reinforced with continuous fique fibers, through bending tensile tests. Specimens containing 0, 10, 20 and 30% in volume of fique fiber were aligned along the entire length of a mold to create plates of these composites, those plates were cut following the ASTM standard to obtained bending tests specimens. The test was conducted in a Instron Machine and the fractured specimens were analyzed by SEM, the results showed the increase in the materials tensile properties with the increase of fiber amount.

  4. Dynamic Mechanical Behaviors of 6082-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Yibo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural components of high speed trains are usually made of aluminum alloys, for example, 6082. The dynamic mechanical behavior of the material is one of key factors considered in structural design and safety assessment. In this paper, dynamic mechanical experiments were conducted with strain rate ranging from 0.001 s−1 to 100 s−1 using Instron tensile testing machine. The true stress-strain curves were fitted based on experimental data. Johnson-Cook model of 6082-T6 aluminum alloy was built to investigate the effect of strain and strain rate on flow stress. It has shown that the flow stress was sensitive to the strain rate. Yield strength and tensile strength increased with a high strain rate, which showed strain rate effect to some extent. Fracture analysis was carried out by using Backscattered Electron imaging (BSE. As strain rate increased, more precipitates were generated in fracture.

  5. Influence of test parameters on the thermal-mechanical fatigue behavior of a superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malpertu, J. L.; Rémy, L.

    1990-01-01

    The thermal-mechanical fatigue (TMF) behavior of IN-100, a cast nickel-base superalloy, was investigated with a basic mechanical strain-temperature loop applied in a temperature range from 600 °C to 1050 °C (873 to 1323 K). Peak strains were applied at intermediate temperatures, giving a faithful simulation of real component parts. Tests with or without a mean strain were used; other tests involved a longer period or a tensile hold time, and they were compared with conventional “in-phase” TMF cycles. An interrupted test procedure was used with a plastic replication technique to define a conventional TMF life to 0.3-mm crack depth, as well as a life to 50-µm, crack depth, to characterize the crack initiation period. Some stress-strain hysteresis loops were reported. Thermal-mechanical fatigue life was found to be dependent upon test parameters, while the life to crack initiation was not. Oxidation of specimens and micro-cracks was found to be important in all the tests. These results were then discussed and compared with those under low cycle fatigue at high temperature.

  6. Compression Deformation Behavior of AZ81 Magnesium Alloy at Elevated Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoping Luo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The hot deformation behavior of an AZ81 magnesium alloy was investigated by hot compressive testing on a Gleeble-1500 thermal mechanical simulator in the temperature range from 200 to 400°C and in the strain rate range of 0.001–5 s−1. The relationships among flow stress, strain rate, and deformation temperature were analyzed, and the deformation activation energy and stress exponent were calculated. The microstructure evolution of the AZ81 magnesium alloy under high deformation was examined. The results indicated that the maximum value of the flow stress increased with the decrease of deformation temperature and the increase of strain rate. When the deformation temperature is constant, the flow stress of the AZ81 magnesium alloy increases with the increase of strain rate, which can be demonstrated by a Zener-Hollomon parameter in a hyperbolic-sine-type equation with a hot compression deformation activation energy of 176.01 KJ/mol and basic hot deformation material factors A, n, and a in the analytical expression of the AZ81 magnesium alloy flow stress of 3.21227×1014 s−1, 7.85, and 0.00866 MPa, respectively.

  7. Effect of post-curing on thermal and mechanical behavior of GFRP composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, D. S.; Shukla, M. J.; Mahato, K. K.; Rathore, D. K.; Prusty, R. K.; Ray, B. C.

    2015-02-01

    Curing cycle has a strong impact on the thermal and mechanical behavior of thermosetting polymers. The extent of cross-linking which is a strong function of curing temperature and time is directly linked to the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the thermosetting polymer. This transition temperature speaks about the transformation of the polymer from glassy state to rubbery state, hence decides the applicability of the material at certain temperature with certain degree of safety and reliability. Hence assessment of Tg and its possible improvement is quite essential from material point of view. The present study is emphasized on the impact of post curing parameters on thermal as well as mechanical behavior of glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite. Post curing was carried out at 3 different temperatures (80°C, 110°C and 140°C) for different time periods (2h, 4h, 6h, 8h and 12h). Short beam Shear (SBS) test was performed on each of the post cured samples to determine the apparent Interlaminar Shear Strength (ILSS) and the corresponding Tg was also evaluated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis. The results revealed that the ILSS and Tg are significantly affected with post curing parameters. No significant change in ILSS was obtained at 80°C over the entire curing time. In case of 110°C a smooth increment in ILSS was observed with time (even till 12 hrs). For samples post cured at 140°C a rapid improvement in ILSS takes place with time followed by saturation. With all the possible combinations of curing temperature and time, optimum values are noticed at 140°C for 6 hrs.

  8. Creep Behavior of High Temperature Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xingshuo

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is one of the leading concepts of the Generation IV nuclear reactor development, which is the core component of Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The major challenge in the research and development of NGNP is the performance and reliability of structure materials at high temperature. Alloy 617, with an exceptional combination of high temperature strength and oxidation resistance, has been selected as a primary candidate material for structural use, particularly in Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) which has an outlet temperature in the range of 850 to 950°C and an inner pressure from 5 to 20MPa. In order to qualify the material to be used at the operation condition for a designed service life of 60 years, a comprehensive scientific understanding of creep behavior at high temperature and low stress regime is necessary. In addition, the creep mechanism and the impact factors such as precipitates, grain size, and grain boundary characters need to be evaluated for the purpose of alloy design and development. In this study, thermomechanically processed specimens of alloy 617 with different grain sizes were fabricated, and creep tests with a systematic test matrix covering the temperatures of 850 to 1050°C and stress levels from 5 to 100MPa were conducted. Creep data was analyzed, and the creep curves were found to be unconventional without a well-defined steady-state creep. Very good linear relationships were determined for minimum creep rate versus stress levels with the stress exponents determined around 3-5 depending on the grain size and test condition. Activation energies were also calculated for different stress levels, and the values are close to 400kJ/mol, which is higher than that for self-diffusion in nickel. Power law dislocation climb-glide mechanism was proposed as the dominant creep mechanism in the test condition regime. Dynamic recrystallization happening at high strain range enhanced dislocation climb and

  9. When the Heat Is On: The Effect of Temperature on Voter Behavior in Presidential Elections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasper Van Assche

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hot temperatures lead to heightened arousal. According to excitation transfer theory, arousal can increase both antisocial and prosocial behavior, depending on the context. Although many studies have shown that hot temperatures can increase antisocial behavior, very few studies have investigated the relationship between temperature and prosocial behavior. One important prosocial behavior is voting. We analyzed state-level data from the United States presidential elections (N = 761. Consistent with excitation transfer theory, which proposes that heat-induced arousal can transfer to other activities and strengthen those activities, changes in temperature and voter turnout were positively related. Moreover, a positive change in temperature was related to a positive change in votes for the incumbent party. These findings add to the literature on the importance of non-ideological and non-rational factors that influence voting behavior.

  10. Aligning laboratory and field compaction practices for asphalt - the influence of compaction temperature on mechanical properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijleveld, Frank; Miller, Seirgei Rosario; de Bondt, A.H.; Doree, Andries G.

    2015-01-01

    The approach used to identify a compaction temperature in the laboratory, based on binder viscosity, provides a single compaction temperature whereas, on-site, a roller operates within a temperature window. The effect on the density and mechanical properties of rolling during a temperature window

  11. On the Mechanical Behavior of Advanced Composite Material Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinson, Jack

    During the period between 1993 and 2004, the author, as well as some colleagues and graduate students, had the honor to be supported by the Office of Naval Research to conduct research in several aspects of the behavior of structures composed of composite materials. The topics involved in this research program were numerous, but all contributed to increasing the understanding of how various structures that are useful for marine applications behaved. More specifically, the research topics focused on the reaction of structures that were made of fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites when subjected to various loads and environmental conditions. This included the behavior of beam, plate/panel and shell structures. It involved studies that are applicable to fiberglass, graphite/carbon and Kevlar fibers imbedded in epoxy, polyester and other polymeric matrices. Unidirectional, cross-ply, angle ply, and woven composites were involved, both in laminated, monocoque as well as in sandwich constructions. Mid-plane symmetric as well as asymmetric laminates were studied, the latter involving bending-stretching coupling and other couplings that only can be achieved with advanced composite materials. The composite structures studied involved static loads, dynamic loading, shock loading as well as thermal and hygrothermal environments. One major consideration was determining the mechanical properties of composite materials subjected to high strain rates because the mechanical properties vary so significantly as the strain rate increases. A considerable number of references are cited for further reading and study for those interested.

  12. Experimental study on dynamic mechanical behaviors of polycarbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Gao, Yubo; Ye, Nan; Huang, Wei; Li, Dacheng

    2017-01-01

    Polycarbonate (PC) is a widely used engineering material in aerospace field, since it has excellent mechanical and optical property. In present study, both compressive and tensile tests of PC were conducted at high strain rates by using a split Hopkinson pressure bar. The high-speed camera and 2D Digital Image Correlation method (DIC) were used to analyze the dynamic deformation behavior of PC. Meanwhile, the plate impact experiment was carried out to measure the equation of state of PC in a single-stage gas gun, which consists of asymmetric impact technology, manganin gauges, PVDF, electromagnetic particle velocity gauges. The results indicate that the yield stress of PC increased with the strain rates in both dynamic compression and tension tests. The same phenomenon was similar to elasticity modulus at different strain rate. A constitutive model was used to describe the mechanical behaviors of PC accurately in different strain rates by contrast with the results of 2D-DIC. At last, The D-u Hugoniot curve of polycarbonate in high pressure was fitted by the least square method.

  13. Design, microstructure, and high-temperature behavior of silicon nitride sintered with rate-earth oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciniculk, M.K. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering)

    1991-08-01

    The processing-microstructure-property relations of silicon nitride ceramics sintered with rare-earth oxide additives have been investigated with the aim of improving their high-temperature behavior. The additions of the oxides of Y, Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, or Yb were compositionally controlled to tailor the intergranular phase. The resulting microstructure consisted of {beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} grains and a crystalline secondary phase of RE{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7}, with a thin residual amorphous phase present at grain boundaries. The lanthanide oxides were found to be as effective as Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} in densifying Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, resulting in identical microstructures. The crystallization behavior of all six disilicates was similar, characterized by a limited nucleation and rapid growth mechanism resulting in large single crystals. Complete crystallization of the intergranular phase was obtained with the exception of a residual amorphous, observed at interfaces and believed to be rich in impurities, the cause of incomplete devitrification. The low resistance to oxidation of these materials was attributed to the minimization of amorphous phases via devitrification to disilicates, compatible with SiO{sub 2}, the oxidation product of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. The strength retention of these materials at 1300{degrees}C was found to be between 80% and 91% of room-temperature strength, due to crystallization of the secondary phase and a residual but refractory amorphous grain-boundary phase. The creep behavior was found to be strongly dependent on residual amorphous phase viscosity as well as on the oxidation behavior, as evidenced by the nonsteady-state creep rates of all materials. 122 refs., 51 figs., 12 tabs.

  14. Hygrothermal effects on dynamic mechanical snalysis and fracture behavior of polymeric composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Leali Costa

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Polymer composites used above their glass transition temperatures Tg present a substantial degradation of physical properties; therefore a material's glass transition temperature and its change with moisture absorption are of practical importance. Little attention has been paid to the role of the adhesive bonding between the reinforcing fiber and matrix, particularly for BMI matrix. In this work the effect of moisture on the dynamic mechanical behavior and the fiber/matrix interface was investigated. Two systems were evaluated: carbon fabric/epoxy and carbon fabric/bismaleimide laminates. The results demonstrated that the moisture absorbed by the laminates causes either reversible or irreversible plasticization of the matrix. The humidity combined with the temperature effects may cause significant changes in the Tg matrix and toughness affecting the laminate strength. Moisture absorption was correlated to the fracture mode of the laminate demonstrating the deleterious effect of moisture on the interface. This leads to debonding between fiber and matrix. This behavior was investigated by scanning electron microscopy and dynamic mechanical analysis.

  15. Numerical Investigation on the Thermo-mechanical Behavior of a Quadratic Cross Section Pile Heat Exchanger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagola, Maria Alberdi; Madsen, Søren; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2017-01-01

    and, therefore, there is a need to develop guidelines to design them properly. This paper contributes by studying the thermo-mechanical behavior of the precast piles which are 15-meter long and have a quadratic cross section and a W-shape pipe heat exchanger. This article aims to numerically assess...... the additional changes in the pile load transfer generated by its heating and cooling. In addressing this objective, a preliminary multi-physical finite element analysis is conducted which serves as a tool for exploring: i) the thermally induced mechanical stresses within the concrete and on the pile-soil axial...... on the geotechnical capacity of a single energy pile. However, ground thermal loads need to be considered in the design phase to account for potential extreme temperature changes, which could generate thermal stresses that equalize the mechanically generated ones....

  16. Effect of Moisture Absorption Behavior on Mechanical Properties of Basalt Fibre Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amuthakkannan Pandian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of mechanical properties of fibre reinforced polymeric materials under different environmental conditions is much important. This is because materials with superior ageing resistance can be satisfactorily durable. Moisture effects in fibre reinforced plastic composites have been widely studied. Basalt fibre reinforced unsaturated polyester resin composites were subjected to water immersion tests using both sea and normal water in order to study the effects of water absorption behavior on mechanical properties. Composites specimens containing woven basalt, short basalt, and alkaline and acid treated basalt fibres were prepared. Water absorption tests were conducted by immersing specimens in water at room temperature for different time periods till they reached their saturation state. The tensile, flexural, and impact properties of water immersed specimens were conducted and compared with dry specimens as per the ASTM standard. It is concluded that the water uptake of basalt fibre is considerable loss in the mechanical properties of the composites.

  17. High-temperature thermoelectric behavior of lead telluride

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Usefulness of a material in thermoelectric devices is temperature specific. The central problem in thermoelectric material research is the selection of materials with high figure-of-merit in the given temperature range of operation. It is of considerable interest to know the utility range of the material, which is decided by the ...

  18. High temperature deformation behavior of a stainless steel fiber-reinforced copper matrix composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, A.S., E-mail: atef.hamada@suezuniv.edu.eg [Centre for Advanced Steels Research, University of Oulu, Box 4200, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Metallurgy and Materials Engineering Department, Faculty of Petroleum & Mining Engineering, Suez University, Box 43721, Suez (Egypt); Khosravifard, A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz Branch, IAU, Box 71993-1, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kisko, A.P. [Centre for Advanced Steels Research, University of Oulu, Box 4200, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Ahmed, E. [Metallurgy and Materials Engineering Department, Faculty of Petroleum & Mining Engineering, Suez University, Box 43721, Suez (Egypt); Porter, D.A. [Centre for Advanced Steels Research, University of Oulu, Box 4200, 90014 Oulu (Finland)

    2016-07-04

    Hot deformation behavior of stainless steel fiber-reinforced copper matrix composite and the associated microstructural changes have been investigated using compression tests in the temperature range 700–1000 °C and strain rate range 0.001–1 s{sup −1}. The metallographic observations by electron-backscattered diffraction revealed that dynamic recrystallization of stainless steel fibers is the dominant mechanism with inducing ultrafine-grained structures. Deformation bending and cracking through stainless steel fibers and the interfaces were observed to be the hot deformation-induced microstructural features in the concerned composite. The hot deformation behavior was modeled using the dislocation density based Bergstrom's equation which could be applied up to the peak strain. After the peak strain, Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation could successfully predict the hot flow stresses of the studied composite. At different test conditions (temperatures and strain rates), slight variations in Avrami exponent were observed which could be related to transition from cyclic to single peak recrystallization.

  19. Mechanical Behavior of a Series of Copolyester Blends near the Glass Transition: Monotonic and Load-Hold Behavior in Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurucharan Chandrasekaran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Monotonic loading tests were conducted on five commercial blends of poly(ethylene terephthalate (PET and poly(1,4-cyclohexylenedimethylene terephthalate (PCT at temperatures of 90°C and 100°C and strain rates of 0.1/s, 0.05/s, and 0.005/s in uniaxial and plane strain compression. On comparing the mechanical behavior of the five materials, it was found that the behavior of the low-PCT content materials was different from the high-PCT content materials only at conditions that favored strain-induced crystallization, particularly in plane strain compression. Load-hold tests were also conducted on three of the blends with similar results to the monotonic tests. Material differences were only pronounced at certain conditions, and in these cases the low-PCT content materials showed increased strain hardening after the hold period while the high-PCT content material did not. Therefore, it was found that the addition of a hold period was not exclusively required to observe differences in the crystallizable materials over the noncrystallizing blends. The increased strain hardening likely associated with crystallization in PET was only observed when the following conditions were met: (i strain rates of 0.1/s and above, (ii temperatures of 90°C–100°C, (iii plane strain compression, and (iv after a certain level of deformation.

  20. Mechanical Behavior of Homogeneous and Composite Random Fiber Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahsavari, Ali

    Random fiber networks are present in many biological and non-biological materials such as paper, cytoskeleton, and tissue scaffolds. Mechanical behavior of networks is controlled by the mechanical properties of the constituent fibers and the architecture of the network. To characterize these two main factors, different parameters such as fiber density, fiber length, average segment length, nature of the cross-links at the fiber intersections, ratio of bending to axial behavior of fibers have been considered. Random fiber networks are usually modeled by representing each fiber as a Timoshenko or an Euler-Bernoulli beam and each cross-link as either a welded or rotating joint. In this dissertation, the effect of these modeling options on the dependence of the overall linear network modulus on microstructural parameters is studied. It is concluded that Timoshenko beams can be used for the whole range of density and fiber stiffness parameters, while the Euler-Bernoulli model can be used only at relatively low densities. In the low density-low bending stiffness range, elastic strain energy is stored in the bending mode of the deformation, while in the other extreme range of parameters, the energy is stored predominantly in the axial and shear deformation modes. It is shown that both rotating and welded joint models give the same rules for scaling of the network modulus with different micromechanical parameters. The elastic modulus of sparsely cross-linked random fiber networks, i.e. networks in which the degree of cross-linking varies, is studied. The relationship between the micromechanical parameters - fiber density, fiber axial and bending stiffness, and degree of cross-linking - and the overall elastic modulus is presented in terms of a master curve. It is shown that the master plot with various degrees of cross-linking can be collapsed to a curve which is also valid for fully cross-linked networks. Random fiber networks in which fibers are bonded to each other are

  1. Mechanical behavior of intragranular, nano-porous electrodeposited zinc oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghavan, Rejin, E-mail: r.raghavan@mpie.de [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Mechanics of Materials and Nanostructures, Feuerwerkstrasse 39, 3602 Thun (Switzerland); Elias, Jamil [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Mechanics of Materials and Nanostructures, Feuerwerkstrasse 39, 3602 Thun (Switzerland); Erni, Rolf; Parlinska, Magdalena [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Electron Microscopy Center, Ueberlandstrasse 129, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Philippe, Laetitia; Michler, Johann [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Mechanics of Materials and Nanostructures, Feuerwerkstrasse 39, 3602 Thun (Switzerland)

    2015-03-02

    The mechanical properties and deformation mechanisms of nano-porous ZnO thin films electrodeposited on glass substrates were determined by nanoindentation and in situ scanning electron microscope (SEM) micropillar compression. The intragranular nature of the nanoscale porosity within the individual mono-crystals of the films was probed at nano- and micro-scales for determining their mechanical response. The hardness (3.5 GPa) and reduced elastic modulus (65 GPa) of the compact thin film were found to decrease by increasing the intragranular porosity controlled by the electrochemical deposition potential of ZnO. Focused ion beam (FIB) cross-sections of residual imprints reveal that the decrease in hardness and elastic modulus observed is primarily due to compaction of the nano-porous structure. In situ SEM compression of FIB machined micropillars reveals brittle fracture and near theoretical strengths in the compact film (~ 2 GPa), and a higher flaw tolerant response despite lower failure stress in the most porous film. - Highlights: • Micromechanical behavior of intragranular, nanoporous electrodeposited ZnO thin films • Densification by closure of porosity during indentation • Resistance to fracture by crack deflection and blunting in porous films during microcompression.

  2. Quantum Mechanical Corrections to Simulated Shock Hugoniot Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, N; Reed, E; Fried, L E

    2009-07-17

    The authors present a straightforward method for the inclusion of quantum nuclear vibrational effects in molecular dynamics calculations of shock Hugoniot temperatures. Using a grueneisen equation of state and a quasi-harmonic approximation to the vibrational energies, they derive a simple, post-processing method for calculation of the quantum corrected Hugoniot temperatures. They have used our novel technique on ab initio simulations of both shock compressed water and methane. Our results indicate significantly closer agreement with all available experimental temperature data for these two systems. Our formalism and technique can be easily applied to a number of different shock compressed molecular liquids or covalent solids, and has the potential to decrease the large uncertainties inherent in many experimental Hugoniot temperature measurements of these systems.

  3. Experimental study of the mechanical behavior of self-compacting concrete based on fracture mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. O. RIBEIRO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Considering the physical nonlinearity of concrete and the fundamentals of fracture mechanics for quasi-brittle materials, the objective of this study was to determine the fracture energy and the length of the fracture process zone (FPZ as well as the modulus of elasticity, the tensile strength and the compressive strength of self-compacting concrete (SCC to characterize its mechanical behavior. A series of tests, including a three-point bending test of SCC and conventional vibrated concrete (CVC specimens, with a notch at mid-span, and tensile and compressive tests were performed. The mechanical parameters obtained from the CVC specimens were considered as a comparative reference. The effect of the following variables was evaluated and considered at two levels: compressive strength (30 and 50 MPa, granular composition (fine and coarse particle size and maximum diameter of the aggregate (12 and 20 mm. The effect of these variables on the mechanical behaviors of the SCC specimens was evaluated based on the test results of specimens of four types of concrete, which were obtained from the combination of the variables. The bending tests were performed according to the RILEM TC 89-FMT recommendations, which are based on the size-effect method.

  4. High temperature deformation mechanisms of cemented carbides and cermets

    OpenAIRE

    Buss, Katharina

    2004-01-01

    The motivation of this work derives from the need of the cutting tool industry to improve its products in order to support harder and harder working conditions, namely increasing cutting speeds and working on stronger modern materials. The lifetime of the tools is limited by plastic deformation that occurs at the cutting edge under working conditions, which involve high temperatures and stresses. The high temperature deformation of the materials that are used for the production of cutting too...

  5. Neuroimaging mechanisms of change in psychotherapy for addictive behaviors: emerging translational approaches that bridge biology and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldstein Ewing, Sarah W; Chung, Tammy

    2013-06-01

    Research on mechanisms of behavior change provides an innovative method to improve treatment for addictive behaviors. An important extension of mechanisms of change research involves the use of translational approaches, which examine how basic biological (i.e., brain-based mechanisms) and behavioral factors interact in initiating and sustaining positive behavior change as a result of psychotherapy. Articles in this special issue include integrative conceptual reviews and innovative empirical research on brain-based mechanisms that may underlie risk for addictive behaviors and response to psychotherapy from adolescence through adulthood. Review articles discuss hypothesized mechanisms of change for cognitive and behavioral therapies, mindfulness-based interventions, and neuroeconomic approaches. Empirical articles cover a range of addictive behaviors, including use of alcohol, cigarettes, marijuana, cocaine, and pathological gambling and represent a variety of imaging approaches including fMRI, magneto-encephalography, real-time fMRI, and diffusion tensor imaging. Additionally, a few empirical studies directly examine brain-based mechanisms of change, whereas others examine brain-based indicators as predictors of treatment outcome. Finally, two commentaries discuss craving as a core feature of addiction, and the importance of a developmental approach to examining mechanisms of change. Ultimately, translational research on mechanisms of behavior change holds promise for increasing understanding of how psychotherapy may modify brain structure and functioning and facilitate the initiation and maintenance of positive treatment outcomes for addictive behaviors. 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  6. Multi-scale mechanism based life prediction of polymer matrix composites for high temperature airframe applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyaya, Priyank

    A multi-scale mechanism-based life prediction model is developed for high-temperature polymer matrix composites (HTPMC) for high temperature airframe applications. In the first part of this dissertation the effect of Cloisite 20A (C20A) nano-clay compounding on the thermo-oxidative weight loss and the residual stresses due to thermal oxidation for a thermoset polymer bismaleimide (BMI) are investigated. A three-dimensional (3-D) micro-mechanics based finite element analysis (FEA) was conducted to investigate the residual stresses due to thermal oxidation using an in-house FEA code (NOVA-3D). In the second part of this dissertation, a novel numerical-experimental methodology is outlined to determine cohesive stress and damage evolution parameters for pristine as well as isothermally aged (in air) polymer matrix composites. A rate-dependent viscoelastic cohesive layer model was implemented in an in-house FEA code to simulate the delamination initiation and propagation in unidirectional polymer composites before and after aging. Double cantilever beam (DCB) experiments were conducted (at UT-Dallas) on both pristine and isothermally aged IM-7/BMI composite specimens to determine the model parameters. The J-Integral based approach was adapted to extract cohesive stresses near the crack tip. Once the damage parameters had been characterized, the test-bed FEA code employed a micromechanics based viscoelastic cohesive layer model to numerically simulate the DCB experiment. FEA simulation accurately captures the macro-scale behavior (load-displacement history) simultaneously with the micro-scale behavior (crack-growth history).

  7. Mechanical behavior of nanocellulose coated jute/green epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar, A.; Militký, J.; Ali, A.; Usman Javed, M.

    2017-10-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the effect of nanocellulose coating on the mechanical behavior of jute/green epoxy composites. Cellulose was purified from waste jute fibers, converted to nanocellulose by acid hydrolysis and subsequently 3, 5 and 10 wt % of nanocellulose suspensions were coated over woven jute reinforcement. The composites were prepared by hand layup and compression molding technique. The surface topologies of treated jute fibers, jute cellulose nanofibrils (CNF), nanocellulose coated jute fabrics and fractured surfaces of composites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The prepared composites were evaluated for tensile, flexural, fatigue and fracture toughness properties. The results revealed the improvement in tensile modulus, flexural strength, flexural modulus, fatigue life and fracture toughness of composites with the increase in concentration of nanocellulose coating over jute reinforcement except the decrease in tensile strength.

  8. Study of the Mechanical Behavior of a Hyperelastic Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bourbaba Houaria

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The benefits in emloying plastics material in microfluidic devices manufactures are extremely attractive that include reduced cost and simplified manufacturing procedures, particularly when compared to silicon. An additional benefit is the wide range of available plastic materials which allow the manufacturer to choose materials' properties suitable for their specific application. The Polydimethylsiloxane is commonly used in a wide range of microfluidic applications due to its flexibility and low cost. In addition the properties of the Polymethyl methacrylate such as the low cost, high transparency, and good chemical properties are needed in microfluidics applications. In this paper, we have used Finit Elements method to simulate the mechanical behavior of Polydimethylsiloxane and Polymethylmethacrylate using hyper elastic and linear elastic model. Sevral parameters have been studied; such as, thickness and number of mesh in order to optimize the dimension of the membrane. Also, we have studied the impact of the mesh form on the membrane’s displacement.

  9. Mechanisms of temperature sensitivity of attenuated Urabe mumps virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinkel, Stephanie C Burke; Rubin, Steven; Wright, Kathryn E

    2017-01-02

    Temperature sensitivity is a phenotype often associated with attenuation of viruses. Previously, we purified several mumps variants from an incompletely attenuated Urabe strain live attenuated vaccine. Here we characterize one isolate that is sensitive to growth at high temperature. This virus was attenuated in a small animal model of mumps virulence, and we identified unique coding substitutions in the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN), the viral polymerase (L) gene, and a non-coding substitution close to the anti-genome promoter sequences. At the non-permissive temperature, transcription of viral mRNAs and production of the replication intermediate were reduced compared to events at the permissive temperature and to a non-ts virulent Urabe virus. As well, synthesis of viral proteins was also reduced at the higher temperature. While the actual sequence substitutions in the ts virus were unique, the pattern of substitutions in HN, L and genome end sequences is similar to another attenuated Urabe virus previously described by us. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Mechanical Properties of Thixoforged In Situ Mg2Sip/AM60B Composite at Elevated Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suqing Zhang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical behaviors of the thixoforged in situ Mg2Sip/AM60B composite at elevated temperatures were evaluated. The results indicated that the thixoforged composite exhibits higher UTS (ultimate tensile strength than that of the thixoforged AM60B at the cost of elongation. As the testing temperature rises from 25 to 300 °C, the UTS of both these two materials decreases while their elongations increases. The enhanced dislocation motion ability, the softened eutectic β phase at 120 °C, the activated non-basal slipping and the dynamic recovery and recrystallization mechanisms at 150 °C are responsible for the change in tensile properties with testing temperatures. The fracture mode transforms from the ductile into the brittle as the initial strain rate increases from 0.01 to 0.2 s−1 at 200 °C.

  11. Enhancing mechanical behaviors of collapsible soil using two biopolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ayeldeen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the possibility of using biopolymer (environmental friendly material to enhance the mechanical behaviors of collapsible soil. Two types of biopolymers were (xanthan gum and guar gum used in this study due to their stable behaviors under severe conditions and their availability with reasonable prices. The experimental program focused on three major soil properties, i.e. compaction characterizations, collapsible potential and shear parameters. These three properties are essential in process of soil improvement. Different biopolymer concentrations were used in this study and the experimental program was performed at two curing periods (soon after mixing the soil with the biopolymer and after one week curing time. Shear parameters were measured for the treated specimens under both soaked and unsoaked conditions, while a collapsible potential test was performed under different mixing conditions (wet mix and dry mix. A numerical model was built to predict the behavior of the treated collapsible soil after and before water immersing. The results indicated that the ability of both xanthan gum and guar gum can be used as improvement materials for collapsible soil treatment. The collapsible potential has been reduced from 9% to 1% after mixing the soil with 2% biopolymer concentration in the wet case. After one week curing, the cohesion has been increased from 8.5 kPa to 105 kPa by increasing the xanthan gum concentration from zero to 2%, leading to an overall improvement in soil shear strength. It also proves that the guar gum is superior to the xanthan gum. The shear strength of soil can be increased by about 30% when using the guar gum in comparison with the xanthan gum at the same conditions; however, the collapsible potential of soil material will be reduced by about 20%.

  12. Experimental study on the dynamic mechanical behaviors of polycarbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Gao, Yubo; Cai, Xuanming; Ye, Nan; Huang, Wei; Hypervelocity Impact Research Center Team

    2015-06-01

    Polycarbonate (PC) is a widely used engineering material in aerospace field, since it has excellent mechanical and optical property. In present study, both compress and tensile tests of PC were conducted at high strain rates by using a split Hopkinson pressure bar. The high-speed camera and 2D digital speckle correlation method (DIC) were used to analyze the dynamic deformation behavior of PC. Meanwhile, the plate impact experiment was carried out to measure the equation of state of PC in a single-stage gas gun, which consists of asymmetric impact technology, manganin gauges, PVDF, electromagnetic particle velocity gauges. The results indicate that the yield stress of PC increased with the strain rates. The strain softening occurred when the stress over yield point except the tensile tests in the strain rates of 1076s-1 and 1279s-1. The ZWT model can describe the constitutive behaviors of PC accurately in different strain rates by contrast with the results of 2D-DIC. At last, The D-u Hugoniot curve of polycarbonate in high pressure was fitted by the least square method. And the final results showed more closely to Cater and Mash than other previous data.

  13. Phase behavior, rheological and mechanical properties of hydrophilic polymer dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Sushila; Bunt, Craig; Rathbone, Michael; Alany, Raid G

    2011-06-01

    Liquid polymeric systems that can undergo phase change (sol to gel) upon administration into the teat canal of cow's mammary gland can serve as a physical barrier to invading pathogens and can also serve as a reservoir for controlled release of therapeutic agents. The aim of the study was to investigate the phase behavior, rheological and mechanical properties of selected in situ gelling systems. Six in situ gelling polymer formulations were identified using phase behavior studies. Rheological studies revealed pseudoplastic flow with thixotropy. All six formulations showed significantly different viscosity, pseudoplasticity and thixotropy values except for CMC1 and HPMC2 which where statistically similar. The gel strength was dependent on the solvent system used and amount of water in the system. These in situ gelling systems have the potential to serve as a platform for development of intramammary formulations intended for administration into the teat canal of the cow's mammary gland. They can serve as a physical barrier or a matrix for controlled drug release.

  14. Mechanical Behavior and Analytical Modeling of Melt-Infiltrated SiC/SiC Woven Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, J.; Sankar, J.; Kelkar, A. D.; Bhatt, R. T.; Baaklini, G.; Lua, J.

    1998-01-01

    The desirable properties in ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), such as high temperature strength, corrosion resistance, high toughness, low density, or good creep resistance have led to increased use of CMCs in high-speed engine structural components and structures that operate in extreme temperature and hostile aero-thermo-chemical environments. Ceramic matrix composites have been chosen for turbine material in the design of 21st century civil propulsion systems to achieve high fuel economy, improved reliability, extended life, and reduced cost. Most commercial CMCs are manufactured using a chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process. However, a lower cost fabrication known as melt-infiltration process is also providing CMCs marked for use in hot sections of high-speed civil transports. Limited samples of a SiC/SiC melt-infiltrated woven composites are being investigated at room and elevated temperature below and above matrix cracking. These samples show graceful failure and toughness at room temperature with a reduction in strength and modulus at elevated temperatures. A generic finite element model is also being developed to predict monotonic and cyclic loading behavior of the woven composite. Use of the initial test data from the woven composite is being used for the development of the analytical model. This model is the first of a iterative process leading towards the development the model's capability to predict behavior at room and elevated temperature for monotonic and cyclic loading. The purpose of this paper is to report on the material and mechanical findings of the SiC/SiC melt-infiltrated woven composite and progress on the development of the finite element model.

  15. High Temperature Advanced Structural Composites. Volume 3. Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-02

    funcions of 00. For an incrase in temperature and stress denoted by A6, and so, we can now write do, - BAz; 6) do + b.(x; 9,) Ae, (5.1) with b,(x 9...Plasticity Theory of Fibrous Composite Materials," Metal Matriz Composites: Testig, Ana44iis, an Faiure Modes, ASTM STP 1032, W.S. Johnson, ed., American...diagraams of matriz material at various temperatures. 420 Table 1. Elastic Properties for Boron and Graphite Fibers Properties B Gr (****) E13 (MPa

  16. Corrosion Behavior of L80Steel in Different Temperature and Sulfur Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhichao; Xiong, Chunming; Yi, Ran; Ye, Zhengrong

    2017-10-01

    To understand the corrosion behavior of L80 steel in different temperature and sulfur content, the experiment which simulated the downhole corrosive environment was conducted. From the experiment result, when other factors were constant, the lowest corrosion rate was appeared when the temperature was 90°C. The influence of sulfur was complex. When temperature was low, the corrosion rate was decreased with the increase of sulfur content and the experimental result was opposite when temperature was high.

  17. Effects of Curing Temperature and Pressure on the Chemical, Physical, and Mechanical Properties of Portland Cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xueyu

    a hydration kinetics curve is represented by an unknown function, the effect of curing condition on the curve can be modeled by incorporating a simple scale factor in this function. The relationship between this scale factor and curing condition is described by chemical kinetics laws. While the proposed new approach of modeling cement hydration kinetics has the advantage of being widely applicable to different types of cement, it only explains one influence factor of cement hydration (i.e. the curing condition). In order to take into account other influence factors and to further understand the fundamental mechanisms of cement hydration, a more complex particle-based numerical hydration model is developed by combining the two well-known cement hydration mechanisms, namely the nucleation and growth controlled mechanism and the diffusion controlled mechanism. The model is applied to experimental data of both C3S hydration in dilute suspensions and Class H cement paste hydration. Excellent agreement is observed between experimental and modeled results. Three rate-controlling parameters with clear physical meanings can be identified from the proposed model. Fitted model parameters are found to be in reasonable agreement with experimental observation. The dependencies of these parameters on particle size, cement composition, w/c ratio, and curing condition are also investigated. Finally, the importance of cement hydration kinetics is illustrated by showing their close correlations with the physical and mechanical properties. The various influence factors, including the curing temperature and pressure, of physical and mechanical property test results (particularly density and tensile strength) are evaluated. Potential damage mechanisms of cement paste specimens during depressurization are studied by analyzing the deformation behavior of the entire system consisting of the cement paste and pressurizing water.

  18. Mechanical properties, morphology, and hydrolytic degradation behavior of polylactic acid / natural rubber blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buys, Y. F.; Aznan, A. N. A.; Anuar, H.

    2018-01-01

    Due to its biodegradability and renewability, polylactic acid (PLA) has been receiving enormous attention as a potential candidate to replace petroleum based polymers. However, PLA has limitation due to its inherent brittleness. In order to overcome this limitation, blending PLA with elastomeric materials such as natural rubber (NR) are commonly reported. In previous, several researches on PLA/NR blend had been reported, with most of them evaluated the mechanical properties. On the other hand, study of degradation behavior is significance of importance, as controlling materials degradation is required in some applications. This research studied the effect of blend composition on mechanical properties, morphology development, and hydrolytic degradation behavior of PLA/NR blends. Various compositions of PLA/NR blends were prepared by melt blending technique. Tensile test and impact test of the blends were performed to evaluate the mechanical properties. Addition of NR improved the elongation at break and impact strength of the blends, but reduced the tensile strength and stiffness of the specimens. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) measurements of the blends displayed two peaks at temperature -70˚C which corresponded to T g of NR and 65˚C which corresponded to T g of PLA. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) micrograph of 70/30 PLA/NR specimen also showed two distinct phases, which lead to indication that PLA/NR blends are immiscible. Hydrolytic degradation behavior was evaluated by measuring the remaining weight of the samples immersed in sodium hydroxide solution for a predetermined times. It was shown that the degradation behavior of PLA/NR blends is affected by composition of the blends, with 100 PLA and 70/30 PLA/NR blend showed the fastest degradation rate and 100 NR displayed the slowest one.

  19. High-temperature corrosion behavior of coatings and ODS alloys based on Fe{sub 3}Al

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Pint, B.A.; Wright, I.G.

    1996-06-01

    Iron aluminides containing greater than about 20-25 @ % Al have oxidation/sulfidation resistance at temperatures well above those at which these alloys have adequate mechanical strength. In addition to alloying modifications for improved creep resistance of wrought material, this strength limitation is being addressed by development of oxide-dispersion- strengthened (ODS) iron aluminides and by evaluation of Fe{sub 3}Al alloy compositions as coatings or claddings on higher-strength, less corrosion-resistant materials. As part of these efforts, the high-temperature corrosion behavior of iron-aluminide weld overlays and ODS alloys is being characterized and compared to previous results for ingot-processed material.

  20. Degradation mechanism of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs during high temperature operation stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y. Q.; Liao, X. Y.; Zeng, C.; Peng, C.; Liu, Y.; Li, R. G.; En, Y. F.; Huang, Y.

    2018-01-01

    The degradation behavior and its physical mechanism of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) during high temperature operation (HTO) stress were investigated in this paper. The results show that the gate leakage current of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs after 1000 h HTO stress is two orders of magnitude larger than that of the fresh ones. The maximum transconductance of the AlGaN/GaN HEMTs obviously decreases from 0.31 to 0.21 s after 1000 h HTO stress, which indicates the gate degraded seriously. The mechanism for the gate degradation could be attributed to the Au diffusion that degrades the barrier. Moreover, the output characteristics are also deteriorated seriously, and the maximum variation of drain-to-source current is up to 119 mA under the conditions of gate-to-source voltage of 0 V and drain-to-source voltage of 5 V. The reason for the deterioration of output characteristics could be attributed to two mechanisms of gate degradation and structural damage such as pit-like, crack-like damages. The results may be useful in the design and application of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs.

  1. (Nano-)mechanical properties of intermetallic phases in the Fe-Mo system at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeders, Sebastian; Korte-Kerzel, Sandra [Institut fuer Metallkunde und Metallphysik, RWTH Aachen University (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Topologically close packed (TCP) intermetallic phases which precipitate in nickel-base superalloys are suspected to cause a deterioration of the mechanical properties of the γ - γ* matrix. Although the existing intermetallics, namely Laves-, R-, sigma- and mue-phases are well understood in terms of their structure, their mechanical properties have still not been investigated in detail due to their size and pronounced brittleness. In order to investigate the plastic deformation behavior of these phases, but exclude the effect of complex phase composition in the first instance, the Fe-Mo system was chosen as a model system, where all phases are available as binary alloys. Using nanomechanical testing methods like nanoindentation and micropillar-compression, the experimental challenges of high brittleness and anisotropy encountered in conventional testing can be disregarded and plastic deformation can be achieved due to the confining pressure in nanoindentation and the reduction in specimen size in microcompression. This work aims to examine the mechanical properties such as elastic modulus, yield and flow stress of intermetallic Fe-Mo phases over a range of temperatures. To this end, tests were performed in vacuum. Based on this type of study it is envisaged to form a better understanding of the way hard TCP precipitates influence the performance of superalloys.

  2. Volumetric influence on the mechanical behavior of organic solids: The case of aspirin and paracetamol addressed via dispersion corrected DFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Kapil; Flurchick, Kenneth M.; Valenzano, Loredana

    2015-06-01

    The elastic and mechanical properties of the most stable polymorphs of aspirin and paracetamol are obtained at B3LYP-D2* level of theory to show how effects arising from volumetric expansions related to thermal variations influence the behavior of these materials. Results are in fair agreement with experimental values reported at temperatures far from 0 K, showing that the proposed approach can describe the elastic response of molecular crystals as rationalized in terms of inter-molecular forces. The computational approach, despite its semi-empirical nature, allows achieving a qualitative chemical understanding of the macroscopic mechanical properties of molecular crystals with respect to changes in temperature.

  3. Barrel Temperature Effects on the Mechanical Properties of Injection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An existing mould was used for the production of tension and deflection test specimen. Then a plunger type of injection machine was used to mould test specimens at various barrel temperatures ranging from 1600C to 2800C, keeping all other process variables constant. The tensile and deflection test carried out on the ...

  4. Low temperature mechanical properties of metallic glasses - Connection with structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bengus, VZ; Tabachnikova, ED; Duhaj, P; Ocelik, Vaclav

    1997-01-01

    Available data on plasticity and strength of metallic glasses below the room temperature (down to 0.5 K) are considered and explained on the basis of the polycluster model of amorphous solids especially with taking into consideration possible atomic structure of clusters and defects of intercluster

  5. Patch Departure Behavior of Bumble Bees: Rules and Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale E. Taneyhill

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available I present an increment-decay model for the mechanism of bumble bees' decision to depart from inflorescences. The probability of departure is the consequence of a dynamic threshold level of stimuli necessary to elicit a stereotyped landing reaction. Reception of floral nectar lowers this threshold, making the bee less likely to depart. Concurrently the threshold increases, making departure from the inflorescence more probable. Increments to the probability of landing are an increasing, decelerating function of nectar volume, and are worth less, in sequence, for the same amount of nectar. The model is contrasted to threshold departure rules, which predict that bees will depart from inflorescences if the amount of nectar in the last one or two flowers visited is below a given level. Field tests comparing the two models were performed with monkshood (Aconitum columbianum. Treated flowers contained a descending series of nectar volumes (6 to 0 L of 30 % sucrose solution. The more nectar that bees encountered in the treated flowers, the more likely they were to remain within the inflorescence after subsequently visiting one to three empty flowers. I discuss the differences between rules and mechanisms in regard to cognitive models of foraging behavior.

  6. Behavior of duplex stainless steel casting defects under mechanical loadings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayet-Gendrot, S. [Electricite de France, 77 - Moret-sur-Loing (France). Dept. of Materials Study; Gilles, P.; Migne, C. [Societe Franco-Americaine de Constructions Atomiques (FRAMATOME), 92 - Paris-La-Defense (France)

    1997-04-01

    Several components in the primary circuit of pressurized water reactors are made of cast duplex stainless steels. This material contains small casting defects, mainly shrinkage cavities, due to the manufacturing process. In safety analyses, the structural integrity of the components is studied. In order to assess the real severity of the casting defects under mechanical loadings, an experimental program was carried out. It consisted of testing, under both cyclic and monotonic solicitations, three-point bend specimens containing either a natural defect (in the form of a localized cluster of cavities) or a machined notch having the dimensions of the cluster`s envelope. The tests are analyzed in order to develop a method that takes into account the behavior of castings defects in a more realistic fashion than by an envelope crack. Various approaches are investigated, including the search of equivalent defects or of criteria based on continuum mechanics concepts, and compared with literature data. This study shows the conservatism of current safety analyses in modelling casting defects by envelope semi-elliptical cracks and contributes to the development of alternative approaches. (author) 18 refs.

  7. Effect of Water on the Thermo-Mechanical Behavior of Carbon Cloth Phenolic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Roy M.; Stokes, Eric; Baker, Eric H.

    2011-01-01

    The results of thermo-mechanical experiments, which were conducted previously by one of the authors, are reviewed. The strain in the direction normal to the fabric plane was measured as a function of temperature for a variety of initial moisture contents and heating rates. In this paper, the general features of the thermo-mechanical response are discussed and the effect of heating rate and initial moisture content are highlighted. The mechanical interaction between the phenolic polymer and water trapped within its free volumes as the polymer is heated to high temperatures is discussed. An equation for the internal stresses which are generated within the polymer due to trapped water is obtained from the total stress expression for a binary mixture of polymer and water. Numerical solutions for moisture diffusion in the thermo-mechanical experiments were performed and the results of these solutions are presented. The results of the moisture diffusion solutions help to explain the effects of heating rate and moisture content on the strain behavior normal to the fabric plane.

  8. Elevated Temperature Behavior of Metal-Matrix Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-01

    in the absence of axial shear. The one dimensional stress- strain relation may be written in the Ramberg - Osgood form PT PT m-l T T =G l( + ( -T) (3...relations in terms of the initial yield stresses TTo and TAo’ the Ramberg - Osgood parameters sT’ m, sA and n and the elastic shear moduli GT and GA. We... Ramberg - Osgood parameters for that temperature. Thus, if the shear stress-strain relations at temperature are ex- pressed as 23 + 2 ( - -23 - 2GT (W

  9. Mechanical performance of hemp fiber polypropylene composites at different operating temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdi Tajvidi; Nazanin Motie; Ghonche Rassam; Robert H. Falk; Colin Felton

    2010-01-01

    In order to quantify the effect of temperature on the mechanical properties of hemp fiber polypropylene composites, formulations containing 25% and 40% (by weight) hemp fiber were produced and tested at three representative temperatures of 256, 296, and 336 K. Flexural, tensile, and impact tests, as well as dynamic mechanical analysis, were performed and the reduction...

  10. Effect of cellulose fiber reinforcement on the temperature dependent mechanical performance of nylon 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdi Tajvidi; Mokhtar Feizmand; Robert H. Falk; Colin Felton

    2009-01-01

    In order to quantify the effect of temperature on the mechanical properties of pure nylon 6 and its composite with cellulose fibers (containing 25 wt% cellulose fibers), the materials were sampled and tested at three representative temperatures of 256, 296, and 336 K. Flexural and tensile tests were performed and the reductions in mechanical properties were evaluated....

  11. Relative Effects of Temperature, Light, and Humidity on Clinging Behavior of Metacercariae-Infected Ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botnevik, C F; Malagocka, J; Jensen, A B; Fredensborg, B L

    2016-10-01

    The lancet fluke, Dicrocoelium dendriticum, is perhaps the best-known example of parasite manipulation of host behavior, which is manifested by a radically changed behavior that leaves infected ants attached to vegetation at times when transmission to an herbivore host is optimal. Despite the publicity surrounding this parasite, curiously little is known about factors inducing and maintaining behavioral changes in its ant intermediate host. This study examined the importance of 3 environmental factors on the clinging behavior of red wood ants, Formica polyctena , infected with D. dendriticum . This behavior, hypothesized to involve cramping of the mandibular muscles in a state of tetany, was observed in naturally infected F. polyctena under controlled temperature, light, and humidity conditions. We found that low temperature significantly stimulated and maintained tetany in infected ants while light, humidity, ant size, and infection intensity had no influence on this behavior. Under none of the experimental conditions did uninfected ants attach to vegetation, demonstrating that tetany was induced by D. dendriticum . Temperature likely has a direct impact on the initiation of clinging behavior, but it may also serve as a simple but reliable indicator of the encounter rate between infected ants and ruminant definitive hosts. In addition, temperature-sensitive behavior manipulation may protect infected ants from exposure to temperatures in the upper thermal range of the host.

  12. Sintering behavior, microstructure and mechanical properties of vacuum sintered SiC/spinel nanocomposite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guoqiang, E-mail: lguoqi1@lsu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Southern University, Baton Rouge, LA 70813 (United States); Tavangarian, Fariborz [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Bulk SiC/spinel nanocomposite was synthesized from talc, aluminum and graphite powders. • Sintering behavior and mechanical properties of SiC/spinel nanocomposite was studied. • The obtained bulk SiC/spinel nanocomposite had a mean crystallite size of about 34 nm. - Abstract: A mixture of SiC and spinel (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanopowder was prepared through the ball milling of talc, aluminum and graphite powder. The powder was uniaxially pressed into the form of pellets and the prepared specimens were annealed at various temperatures for different holding times. The prepared samples were investigated through X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nanoindentation test, cold crushing strength (CCS) test and Archimedes principle test. The obtained results showed that the hardness, CCS and bulk density did not follow the same trend at different temperatures due to the interaction among various parameters. The detailed investigation of microstructure, phase changes and experimental conditions revealed the mechanisms behind these behaviors. The best sample obtained after annealing at 1200 °C for 1 h in vacuum had the mean hardness of 1.6 GPa and the mean CCS of 118 MPa.

  13. Temperature-related Intraspecific Variability in the Behavioral Manipulation of Acanthocephalan Parasites on Their Gammarid Hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labaude, Sophie; Cézilly, Frank; Rigaud, Thierry

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the effect of temperature on ecologically important species has become a major challenge in the context of global warming. However, the consequences of climate change cannot be accurately predicted without taking into consideration biotic interactions. Parasitic infection, in particular, constitutes a widespread biotic interaction, and parasites impact their hosts in multiple ways, eventually leading to consequences for communities and ecosystems. We explored the effect of temperature on the anti-predator behavior of a keystone freshwater invertebrate, the amphipod Gammarus fossarum. Gammarids regularly harbor manipulative acanthocephalan parasites that modify their anti-predator behavior in ways that potentially increase the probability of trophic transmission to their definitive hosts. We investigated the impact of temperature on gammarids infected by two acanthocephalan parasites, Pomphorhynchus tereticollis and Polymorphus minutus. Uninfected and naturally infected gammarids were acclimatized to different temperatures, and their behavior was measured. Our results showed that the effect of infection on the phototaxis of gammarids increased with increasing temperature, with a stronger effect induced by P. tereticollis. In contrast, temperature had no effect on the alteration of refuge use or geotaxis observed in infected gammarids. Our results provide the first direct evidence that temperature can affect the extent of behavioral alteration brought about by certain parasite species. However, the consequences of increased trophic transmission remain elusive; the supposedly key anti-predatory behavior was not significantly affected by exposure of gammarids to different temperatures.

  14. Corrosion behavior of construction materials for intermediate temperature steam electrolysers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikiforov, Aleksey; Petrushina, Irina; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2013-01-01

    Different corrosion resistant stainless steels, nickel-based alloys, pure nickel, Ta-coated stainless steel (AISI 316L), niobium, platinum and gold rods were evaluated as possible materials for use in the intermediate temperature (200-400 °C) acidic water electrolysers. The corrosion resistance w...

  15. High-temperature thermoelectric behavior of lead telluride

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Applicability of a thermoelectric device (generator or refrigerator) is temperature specific. ... A parabolic band model usually provides a good description of electron (hole) energy bands. This simplification arises from the inclusion of only first term of a ... pends upon the mean free path lengths between successive collisions.

  16. Mechanism of death at high temperatures in Helix and Patella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grainger, J.N.R.

    1975-10-01

    In Patella vulgata and Helix aspersa which had been killed by exposure to high temperatures, the rates of oxygen consumption of gill, foot muscle and hepatopancreas are remarkably steady when measured at lower temperatures, although the absolute levels are in some cases different from normal animals. These tissues are thus substantially metabolically intact in heat dead individuals. In Helix there is a fall in blood sodium and a rise in blood potassium during heat death. In Patella there is a marked rise in blood Na/sup +/ and a consequent disturbance of the Na/sup +//K/sup +/ ratio. These ionic disturbances are thought to be a prime cause of heat death. The significance of the results is discussed.

  17. Mechanical behavior of materials engineering methods for deformation, fracture, and fatigue

    CERN Document Server

    Dowling, Norman E

    2012-01-01

    For upper-level undergraduate engineering courses in Mechanical Behavior of Materials. Mechanical Behavior of Materials, 4/e introduces the spectrum of mechanical behavior of materials, emphasizing practical engineering methods for testing structural materials to obtain their properties, and predicting their strength and life when used for machines, vehicles, and structures. With its logical treatment and ready-to-use format, it is ideal for upper-level undergraduate students who have completed elementary mechanics of materials courses.

  18. A novel excitonic mechanism for high temperature superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesanovic, Z.; Bishop, A.R.; Martin, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    We propose a novel mechanism for superconductivity, based on intra and interband Cu/longleftrightarrow/O charge transfer excitations in oxide superconductors. The dynamic polarizability of the environment surrounding CuO/sup 2/ planes plays an important role in enhancing T/sub c/. The ''sandwich'' structure in which CuO/sub 2/ planes are separated by a highly polarizable medium is ideally suited for this mechanism. Our proposal is consistent with a variety of available data, and suggests several new experimental directions. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Investigation of Comfort Temperature and Occupant Behavior in Japanese Houses during the Hot and Humid Season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hom B. Rijal

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to clarify the comfort temperature and to investigate the behavioral adaptation in Japanese houses, we have conducted a thermal comfort survey and occupant behavior survey in 30 living rooms during the hot and humid season in the Kanto region of Japan. We collected 3991 votes from 52 subjects. The comfort temperature was predicted by Griffiths’ method. They are analyzed according to humidity levels and compared with the adaptive model. The logistic regression analysis was conducted in order to understand occupant behavior. The mean comfort temperature in naturally ventilated mode is 27.6 °C which is within the acceptable zone of the adaptive model. The comfort temperature is related with skin moisture sensation. The results showed that the residents adapt to the hot and humid environments by increasing the air movement using behavioral adaptation such as window opening and fan use.

  20. Refeeding signal in fasting-incubating king penguins: changes in behavior and egg temperature

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    R. Groscolas; F. Decrock; M.-A. Thil; C. Fayolle; C. Boissery; J.-P. Robin

    2000-01-01

    .... Behavior and egg temperature (Tegg) were continuously monitored by video monitoring and biotelemetry, respectively, in fasting-incubating king penguins kept in a pen to prevent relief by the partner until spontaneous egg abandonment...

  1. The Mechanical Behavior of Soils from Ugwueme Landslide, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Hiroshi; Igwe, Ogbonnaya

    2010-05-01

    Climate change and global warming effects are getting obvious in Nigeria by increasing floods and landslides. Authors have launched joint research on evaluation of susceptibility change of landslides under extreme rainfall conditions in Nigeria. Igwe sampled soils from sliding surface of the Ugwueme Landslide, induced by torrential rainfall in 2008. In this abstract, engineering properties of soils from the landslide site are presented. The sample was red, sandy tropical soils. The shear behavior and the dominant factors controlling the deformation of the soils were investigated by means of a new ring shear apparatus. This series of tests were purposed to reveal the detailed pore pressure generation under fully saturated condition to simulate the landslide onset behavior under heavy rainfall condition. Undrained and drained tests at different normal stresses were conducted on normally and over-consolidated soils having the same relative density. Following the consolidation of saturated sample, shear stress was applied until the sample reached the steady state after failure and long shear displacement. Test results show that liquefaction is the major mechanism controlling the deformation of the soils and that the higher the normal stress or over-consolidation ratio the greater the brittleness index. Normally and over-consolidated soils all liquefied regardless of normal stress and over-consolidation ratio, with over-consolidated specimens having higher values of brittleness index than normally consolidated ones. This research found that whereas increase in either normal stress or over-consolidation ratio resulted in a corresponding increase in peak strength, the steady state strength of the soils was unaffected. Normally and over-consolidated specimens all reached the same steady state strength indicating that in highly liquefiable soils, changes in normal stress or over-consolidation ratio has little effect on steady state strength, and by implication, on the

  2. Interplay between quantum phase transitions and the behavior of quantum correlations at finite temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Werlang, T.; Ribeiro, G. A. P.; Rigolin, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    We review the main results and ideas showing that quantum correlations at finite temperatures (T), in particular quantum discord, are useful tools in characterizing quantum phase transitions that only occur, in principle, at the unattainable absolute zero temperature. We first review some interesting results about the behavior of thermal quantum discord for small spin-1/2 chains and show that they already give us important hints of the infinite chain behavior. We then study in detail and in t...

  3. Microstructures and High-Temperature Mechanical Properties of a Martensitic Heat-Resistant Stainless Steel 403Nb Processed by Thermo-Mechanical Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liqing; Zeng, Zhouyu; Zhao, Yang; Zhu, Fuxian; Liu, Xianghua

    2013-11-01

    Thermo-mechanical treatments (TMT) at different rolling deformation temperatures were utilized to process a martensitic heat-resistant stainless steel 403Nb containing 12 wt pct Cr and small additions of Nb and V. Microstructures and mechanical properties at room and elevated temperatures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and hardness, tensile, and creep tests. The results showed that high-temperature mechanical behavior after TMT can be greatly improved and microstructures with refined martensitic lath and finely dispersed nanosized MX carbides could be produced. The particle sizes of M23C6 and MX carbides in 403Nb steel after conventional normalizing and tempering (NT) treatments are about 50 to 160 and 10 to 20 nm, respectively, while those after TMT at 1123 K (850 °C) and subsequent tempering at 923 K (650 °C) for 2 hours reach about 25 to 85 and 5 to 10 nm, respectively. Under the condition of 260 MPa and 873 K (600 °C), the tensile creep rupture life of 403Nb steel after TMT at 1123 K (850 °C) is 455 hours, more than 3 times that after conventional NT processes. The mechanisms for improving mechanical properties at elevated temperature were analyzed in association with the existence of finely dispersed nanosized MX particles within martensitic lath. It is the nanosized MX particles having the higher stability at elevated temperature that assist both dislocation hardening and sub-grain hardening for longer duration by pinning the movement of dislocations and sub-grain boundary migration.

  4. Mechanical Characterization of Adhesive Bonded Sheet Metal Joints at Elevated Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Kiyomi; Azimin, Muhd; Tanaka, Masashi; Ikeda, Takashi

    A new approach is expected for heat resisting metal joints with inorganic adhesive. In the present study, the mechanical characterization of the inorganic adhesive and the strength evaluation of metal joints are realized by an experimental procedure that includes a static test for single lap joints bonded with inorganic adhesives. The inorganic adhesive can be cured at 150°C, and the maximum temperature resistance proposed is up to 1,200°C. A tensile shear test for the joints with a nickel adherend is performed at an elevated temperature of up to 400°C. The effect of material property, overlap length, and thickness of adherend on the joint strength is discussed based on stress analysis for corresponding joint models using a Finite Element Method. It is important to confirm whether fracture occurred in the adhesive layer or at the interface between the adhesive and the adherend. Therefore, the deformation and fracture behavior of the adhesive layer is investigated microscopically by the photographs of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) for the fracture surface.

  5. Change in the microstructure and mechanical properties of drawn pearlitic steel with low-temperature aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakami, D.; Ushioda, K.; Manabe, T.; Noguchi, K.; Takai, K.; Hata, Y.; Hata, S.; Nakashima, H.

    2017-07-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement is a serious problem in high-strength steels. Drawn pearlitic steel shows excellent resistance to hydrogen embrittlement despite its high strength, and aging treatment at a low temperature can simultaneously improve its strength and hydrogen-embrittlement resistance. To clarify the mechanism for this we have used thermal desorption analysis (TDA) and the newly developed precession electron diffraction analysis method in the transmission electron microscope. After aging at 100 °C for 10 min, the amount of hydrogen seen amount on the TDA curve reduced at around 100 °C. In contrast, when aging was performed at 300 °C, the hydrogen amount further reduced at around 100 °C and the unevenly deformed lamellar ferrite zone was locally recovered. For the samples that were aged at the low temperature, we confirmed that their yield strength and relaxation stress ratios increased simultaneously with improvement in the hydrogen-embrittlement property. We infer that segregation of carbon or formation of very fine carbide in dislocations during aging is the cause of these behaviors.

  6. The behavior of the planetary rings under the Kozai Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucerquia, M. A.; Ramírez, C. V.; Zuluaga, J. I.

    2017-07-01

    Rings are one of the main feature of almost all giant planets in the Solar System. Even though thousands of exoplanets have been discovered to date, no evidence of exoplanetary rings have been found despite the effort made in the development and enhancing of techniques and methods for direct or indirect detection. In the transit of a ringed planet, the dynamic of the ring itself could play a meaningful role due to the so called Kozai Mechanism (KM) acting on each particle of it. When some specific initial conditions of the ring are fulfilled (as a ring inclination greater than ˜ 39°), KM generates short periodic changes in the inclination and eccentricity of each particle, leading to a meaningful characteristic collective behavior of the ring: it changes its width, inclination and optical depth. These changes induce periodic variations on the eclipsed area of the parent star, generating slight changes in the observed transit signal. Under this mechanism, light curves depths and shapes oscillate according to the fluctuations of the ring. To show this effect we have performed numerical simulations of the dynamic of a system of particles to asses the ring inclination and width variations over time. We have calculated the expected variations in the transit depth and finally, we have estimated the effect on the light curve of a hypothetical ringed exoplanet affected by the KM. The detection of this effect could be used as an alternative method to detect/confirm exoplanetary rings, and also it could be considered as a way to explain anomalous light curves patterns of exoplanets, as the case of KIC 8462852 star.

  7. Rheological Properties with Temperature Response Characteristics and a Mechanism of Solid-Free Polymer Drilling Fluid at Low Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The rheological properties of drilling fluid have important effects during drilling in natural gas hydrate at low temperatures. The present study was performed using theoretical analysis. Experiments and micro-analyses were carried out to determine the rheological properties with temperature response characteristics and the mechanism involved in solid-free polymer drilling fluid (SFPDF at low temperatures when drilling in permafrost with natural gas hydrates (NGH. The curves of shear stress with the shear rates of three kinds of polymer drilling fluids, Semen Lepidii natural vegetable gum, polyacrylamide, and xanthan gum, were drawn. Then, statistical and related analyses of test data were performed using Matlab ver. 8.0. Through regression analysis, the Herschel–Bulkley model was used to characterize the rheological characteristics of SFPDF. On this basis, the laws regarding the rheological properties of the three kinds of SFPDF under changing temperatures were analyzed and rheological properties with temperature response state equations were established. Next, the findings of previous studies on rheological properties with temperature response characteristics of the SFPDF were reviewed. Finally, the rheological properties with temperature response mechanisms were assessed using scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectrum analysis.

  8. Mechanical Behavior of Low Porosity Carbonate Rock: From Brittle Creep to Ductile Creep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, A.; Fortin, J.; Gueguen, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Mechanical compaction and associated porosity reduction play an important role in the diagenesis of porous rocks. They may also affect reservoir rocks during hydrocarbon production, as the pore pressure field is modified. This inelastic compaction can lead to subsidence, cause casing failure, trigger earthquake, or change the fluid transport properties. In addition, inelastic deformation can be time - dependent. In particular, brittle creep phenomena have been deeply investigated since the 90s, especially in sandstones. However knowledge of carbonates behavior is still insufficient. In this study, we focus on the mechanical behavior of a 14.7% porosity white Tavel (France) carbonate rock (>98% calcite). The samples were deformed in a triaxial cell at effective confining pressures ranging from 0 MPa to 85 MPa at room temperature and 70°C. Experiments were carried under dry and water saturated conditions in order to explore the role played by the pore fluids. Two types of experiments have been carried out: (1) a first series in order to investigate the rupture envelopes, and (2) a second series with creep experiments. During the experiments, elastic wave velocities (P and S) were measured to infer crack density evolution. Permeability was also measured during creep experiments. Our results show two different mechanical behaviors: (1) brittle behavior is observed at low confining pressures, whereas (2) ductile behavior is observed at higher confining pressures. During creep experiments, these two behaviors have a different signature in term of elastic wave velocities and permeability changes, due to two different mechanisms: development of micro-cracks at low confining pressures and competition between cracks and microplasticity at high confining pressure. The attached figure is a summary of 20 triaxial experiments performed on Tavel limestone under different conditions. Stress states C',C* and C*' and brittle strength are shown in the P-Q space: (a) 20°C and dry

  9. Analysis of mechanical behavior and hysteresis heat generating mechanism of PDM motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Changshuai; Zhu, Xiaohua; Tang, Liping [Southwest Petroleum University, Chengdu (China); Deng, Juan [Avic Chengdu Engine (Group) Co.,Ltd, Chengdu (China)

    2017-03-15

    Positive displacement motor (PDM), which is prone to high temperature fatigue failure, can be weakened in its application in deep and superdeep well. In order to study the forced state, deformation regularity and thermal hysteresis of PDM motor, the paper established the three-dimensional thermal-mechanical coupled Finite element model (FEM). Based on the theoretical research, experimental study and numerical simulation, the study found that the displacement of stator lining shows a sinusoidal variation under internal pressure, when adapting the general form of sine function to fitting inner contour line deformation function. Then the paper analyzed the hysteresis heat generating mechanism of the motor, learning that hysteresis thermogenous of stator lining occurs due to the viscoelastic of rubber material and cyclic loading of stator lining. A heartburn happens gradually in the center of the thickest part of the stator lining as temperature increases, which means work efficiency and service life of PDM will be decreased when used in deep or superdeep well. In this paper, we established a theory equation for the choice of interference fit and motor line type optimization design, showing hysteresis heat generating analyzing model and method are reasonable enough to significantly improve PDM’s structure and help better use PDM in deep and surdeep well.

  10. Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical Behavior of Single Fractures in EGS Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyvoloski, G.; Kelkar, S.; Yoshioka, K.; Rapaka, S.

    2010-12-01

    Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) rely on the creation a connected fracture system or the enhancement of existing (natural) fractures by hydraulic and chemical treatments. EGS studies at Fenton Hill (New Mexico, USA) and Hijiori (Japan) have revealed that only a limited number of fractures contribute to the effective heat transfer surface area. Thus, the economic viability of EGS depends strongly on the creation and spacing of single fractures in order to efficiently mine heat from given volume of rock. Though there are many similarities between EGS and natural geothermal reservoirs, a major difference between the reservoir types is the (typically) high pumping pressures and induced thermal stresses at the injection wells of an EGS reservoir. These factors can be responsible for fracture dilation/extension and thermal short circuiting and depend strongly on the surrounding state of stress in the reservoir and mechanical properties. We will present results from our study of the thermal-hydrologic-mechanical (THM) behavior of a single fracture in a realistic subsurface stress field. We will show that fracture orientation, the stress environment, fracture permeability structure, and the relationship between permeability changes in a fracture resulting from mechanical displacement are all important when designing and managing an EGS reservoir. Lastly, we present a sensitivity analysis of the important parameters that govern fracture behavior with respect to field measurements. Temperature in high permeability fracture in an EGS reservoir

  11. The Effect of Cold Plastic Straining of Submicrocrystalline and Coarse-Grained Titanium on the Temperature Behavior of Flow Stress in the Stage of Microplastic Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudarev, E. F.; Pochivalova, G. P.; Kolobov, Yu. R.; Bakach, G. P.; Skosyrskii, A. B.; Zhorovkov, M. F.; Goraynov, А. А.

    2013-10-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of the effect of mechanical-thermal treatment of submicrocrystalline and coarse-grained titanium on the deformation behavior in the stage of microplastic deformation at room and elevated temperatures are reported. The structural factors giving rise to the flowstress changes in the stage of microplastic deformation as a result of mechanical-thermal treatment are discussed. The general tendencies and special features of the effect of annealing and testing temperatures on the deformation behavior and flow stress in the first and second stages of microplastic deformation of submicrocrystalline and coarse-grained titanium subjected to large plastic deformation at 295 K are clarified.

  12. Roles of nanofiller structure on mechanical behavior of thermoplastic nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weon, Jong Il

    The roles of nanofiller structural parameters, such as filler shape, aspect ratio and orientation, on mechanical properties of thermoplastic nanocomposites have been studied. A commercial grade nylon-6/clay nanocomposite is subjected to a large-scale simple shear orientation process and the resulting morphology is investigated on various length scale levels. Both the orientation and the aspect ratio of nanoclays, which can be altered by the simple shear process, have been studied. The incorporation of well-dispersed nanoclays into the nylon-6 matrix greatly reduces the chain mobility as well as the crystallinity of nylon-6. The exfoliated nanocomposites show that the global orientation of clay layers dictates the orientation of crystalline lamellae. Two types of lamellar orientation are observed, as revealed by small-angle X-ray scattering. One type of lamellae is oriented ˜41° away from the clay surface, whereas the simple shear process induces another weak preferred lamellar orientation nearly perpendicular to the clay surface. The formation of those lamellar orientations appears to be related to both orientation of the clay in the nanocomposite and the simple shear process. It is found that the modulus, strength, and heat distortion temperature of the nanocomposites decrease as the clay aspect ratio and degree of orientation are reduced. The micromechanics-based models accurately describe the relationship between clay structural parameters and the corresponding moduli for exfoliated nanocomposites. The impact fracture mechanisms of polypropylene (PP)-calcium carbonate (CaCO3) nanoparticles have been investigated. A detailed investigation reveals that the CaCO 3 nanoparticles act as stress concentrators to initiate massive crazes, followed by shear banding in the PP matrix.

  13. Investigation of intercritical heat treatment temperature effect on microstructure and mechanical properties of dual phase (DP steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Davari

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the effect of intercritical heat treatment temperature on the tensile properties and work hardening behavior of ferritic-martensitic dual-phase steel have been investigated utilizing tensile test, microhardness measurement and microscopic observation. Plain carbon steel sheet with a thickness of 2 mm was heat treated at 760, 780, 800, 820 and 840 °C intercritical temperatures. The results showed that martensite volume fraction (Vm increases from 32 to 81%with increasing temperature from 760 to 840 °C. The mechanical properties of samples were examined by tensile and microhardness tests. The results revealed that yield strength was increased linearly with the increase in Vm, but the ultimate strength was increased up to 55% Vm and then decreased afterward. Analyzing the work hardening behavior in term of Hollomon equation showed that in samples with less than 55% Vm, the work hardening took place in one stage and the work hardening exponent increased with increasing Vm. More than one stage was observed in the work hardening behavior when Vm was increased. The results of microhardness test showed that microhardness of the martensite is decreased by increase in heat treatment temperature while the ferrite microhardness is nearly constant for all heat-treated samples.

  14. Room temperature fatigue behavior of OFHC copper and CuAl25 specimens of two sizes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singhal, A.; Stubbins, J.F.; Singh, B.N.

    1994-01-01

    requiring an understanding of their fatigue behavior.This paper describes the room temperature fatigue behavior of unirradiated OFHC (oxygen-free high-conductivity) copper and CuAl25 (copper strengthened with a 0.25% atom fraction dispersion of alumina). The response of two fatigue specimen sizes to strain...... controlled fatigue loading is examined, and differences in behavior are discussed. Specimens with the smaller size are now being irradiated in several reactors...

  15. Effect of ceramic thickness, grinding, and aging on the mechanical behavior of a polycrystalline zirconia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Diniz PRADO

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Monolithic restorations of Y-TZP have been recommended as a restorative alternative on prosthetic dentistry as it allows a substantial reduction of ceramic thickness, which means a greater preservation of tooth structure. However, the influence of grinding and aging when using a thinner layer of the material is unclear. This investigation aimed to evaluate and compare the effects of ceramic thickness (0.5 mm and 1.0 mm, grinding and aging (low-temperature degradation on the mechanical behavior and surface characteristics of a full-contour Y-TZP ceramic. Y-TZP disc-shaped specimens (15 mm diameter were manufactured with both thicknesses and randomly assigned into 4 groups considering the factors ‘grinding with diamond bur’ and ‘aging in autoclave’. Surface topography (roughness, 3D profilometry and SEM, phase transformation, flexural strength and structural reliability (Weibull analyses were executed. Grinding affected the surface topography, while aging did not promote any effect. An increase in m-phase content was observed after grinding and aging, although different susceptibilities were observed. Regardless of zirconia’s thickness, no deleterious effect of grinding or aging on the mechanical properties was observed. Thus, in our testing assembly, reducing the thickness of the Y-TZP ceramic did not alter its response to grinding and low temperature degradation and did not impair its mechanical performance.

  16. Studying the influence of substitutional elements on mechanical behavior of Alloy 718

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In nickel-based superalloys, substitutional solute species have a strong impact on in service mechanical properties as well as on oxidation and corrosion resistances. In alloy 718, recent studies carried out by tensile tests highlighted the fact that refractory solute species are able to interact strongly with mobile dislocations during plastic deformation, generating dynamic strain ageing, and, in wide ranges of tests temperatures and strain rates, Portevin-Le Chatelier effect. The precise nature of the substitutional element responsible for such a dynamic interaction is still subject to debate. We addressed this question by means of mechanical spectroscopy studies of alloy 718 and various related alloys corresponding to monitored changes in the chemical composition. Only a single internal friction relaxation peak has been observed for all the studied alloys. By analyzing the damping behavior of these alloys at different imposed solicitation frequencies by sweeping a large temperatures range, the activation energies of the relaxation process and the type of mechanism involved have been determined. The process is a “Zener relaxation” in the alloys, i.e. a substitutional atoms dipole reorientation under applied stress. The results tend to prove that Niobium is not involved in the relaxation process whereas Molybdenum content seems to play an important role in the relaxation intensity.

  17. Effect of ceramic thickness, grinding, and aging on the mechanical behavior of a polycrystalline zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Rodrigo Diniz; Pereira, Gabriel Kalil Rocha; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Melo, Renata Marques de; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2017-11-06

    Monolithic restorations of Y-TZP have been recommended as a restorative alternative on prosthetic dentistry as it allows a substantial reduction of ceramic thickness, which means a greater preservation of tooth structure. However, the influence of grinding and aging when using a thinner layer of the material is unclear. This investigation aimed to evaluate and compare the effects of ceramic thickness (0.5 mm and 1.0 mm), grinding and aging (low-temperature degradation) on the mechanical behavior and surface characteristics of a full-contour Y-TZP ceramic. Y-TZP disc-shaped specimens (15 mm diameter) were manufactured with both thicknesses and randomly assigned into 4 groups considering the factors 'grinding with diamond bur' and 'aging in autoclave'. Surface topography (roughness, 3D profilometry and SEM), phase transformation, flexural strength and structural reliability (Weibull) analyses were executed. Grinding affected the surface topography, while aging did not promote any effect. An increase in m-phase content was observed after grinding and aging, although different susceptibilities were observed. Regardless of zirconia's thickness, no deleterious effect of grinding or aging on the mechanical properties was observed. Thus, in our testing assembly, reducing the thickness of the Y-TZP ceramic did not alter its response to grinding and low temperature degradation and did not impair its mechanical performance.

  18. High-resolution analysis of the mechanical behavior of tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudnut, Alexa W.; Armani, Andrea M.

    2017-06-01

    The mechanical behavior and properties of biomaterials, such as tissue, have been directly and indirectly connected to numerous malignant physiological states. For example, an increase in the Young's Modulus of tissue can be indicative of cancer. Due to the heterogeneity of biomaterials, it is extremely important to perform these measurements using whole or unprocessed tissue because the tissue matrix contains important information about the intercellular interactions and the structure. Thus, developing high-resolution approaches that can accurately measure the elasticity of unprocessed tissue samples is of great interest. Unfortunately, conventional elastography methods such as atomic force microscopy, compression testing, and ultrasound elastography either require sample processing or have poor resolution. In the present work, we demonstrate the characterization of unprocessed salmon muscle using an optical polarimetric elastography system. We compare the results of compression testing within different samples of salmon skeletal muscle with different numbers of collagen membranes to characterize differences in heterogeneity. Using the intrinsic collagen membranes as markers, we determine the resolution of the system when testing biomaterials. The device reproducibly measures the stiffness of the tissues at variable strains. By analyzing the amount of energy lost by the sample during compression, collagen membranes that are 500 μm in size are detected.

  19. Mechanical behavior of an osteotomized mandible with distraction orthodontic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccaccio, A; Lamberti, L; Pappalettere, C; Carano, A; Cozzani, M

    2006-01-01

    This work analyzes the mechanical behavior of a human mandible when distraction orthodontic devices are used for correcting problems of dental overcrowding and/or arch shrinkage. The mandible 3D model is reconstructed from CT scan data and meshed into finite elements. The distractor is also modeled. FEM analysis included geometric non-linearity. Displacement field of healthy and osteotomized mandibles are compared. Progressive expansion of the distractor and effects of mastication are also analyzed. Finally, we compare two distraction protocols PROT1 and PROT2 where device is, respectively, expanded by 0.6 or 1.2mm/day. The global displacement is 6mm according to clinical recommendations. It came out that mastication forces generate displacements compatible with bone remodeling. However, parasitic rotations of the mandible arms due to mastication may counteract arch expansion induced by the device. Stress concentrations occurred where the device is fixed: stress peaks stay however below yield limit. Finally, PROT2 reduced by about 10% stresses in mandible and reproduces better than PROT1 the displacement field imposed by the device.

  20. Relative effects of temperature, light, and humidity on clinging behavior of metacercariae-infected ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Botnevik, C.F.; Malagocka, Joanna; Jensen, Annette Bruun

    2016-01-01

    . This behavior, hypothesized to involve cramping of the mandibular muscles in a state of tetany, was observed in naturally infected F. polyctena under controlled temperature, light, and humidity conditions. We found that low temperature significantly stimulated and maintained tetany in infected ants while light...

  1. Modifications of operant thermoregulatory behavior of the young pig by environmental temperature and food availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiergiel, A H

    1997-12-31

    Piglets (Sus scrofa domesticus) were weaned at 14 days and acclimated to 10 ("cold animals") or 35 degrees C ("warm animals"). Cold animals were either fed ad lib. (10HH) or maintained on a high (10H) or low (10L) nutrition plane. Warm animals were maintained on a high (35H), low (35L), or a very low (35LL) nutrition plane. After 3 weeks of acclimation, operant thermoregulatory behavior (animals pressed a lever to turn on a heater) at 15 degrees C was assessed immediately following or 22 h after a meal. It was found that cold piglets or those on low nutrition planes produced more heat reinforcements than warm piglets and those on high nutrition planes. All animals tested 22 h after a meal produced more reinforcements than when tested immediately after a meal. Rectal temperature before the sessions of operant heating was lower in cold animals and those on low nutrition planes than in warm animals and those on high nutrition planes, but the difference dissipated after 90 min of access to heat. Piglets were then "deacclimated" for 24 h at 25 degrees C and their behavior observed once again. Deacclimation eliminated the effect of acclimation temperature on body temperature and behavior but it did not eliminate the effect due to nutrition. There was no interaction between temperature of acclimation and nutrition. The experiments demonstrate that the body temperature of the pig is independently affected by environmental temperature, the quantity of food eaten by the animal, and a possibility to use behavior. The behavioral drive is to reach body temperature which can be defined as a thermal set-point (temperature at which there is no need for a thermoregulatory response to occur) for behavioral thermoregulatory responses. Adaptation to different environmental conditions does not affect this behavioral set-point, but it can involve a temporary shift in the set points for specific autonomic thermoregulatory responses.

  2. Optical, mechanical and thermal behaviors of Nitrilotriacetic acid single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepa, B.; Philominathan, P.

    2017-11-01

    An organic nonlinear single crystal of Nitrilotriacetic acid (NTAA) was grown for the first time by employing a simple slow evaporation technique. Single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis reveals that the grown crystal belongs to the monoclinic system with noncentrosymmetric space group CC. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectral study ascertains the presence of functional groups in NTAA. The molecular structure of the grown crystal was confirmed by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectral analysis. The optical parameters such as transmittance, absorption coefficient and band gap were calculated from UV-Visible and fluorescence studies. Dielectric measurements were carried out for different frequency and temperature. The mechanical strength of the grown crystal was measured using Vickers microhardness test. The high thermal stability and the melting point of the grown crystal were also estimated using thermogravimetric (TGA) and differential thermal analyses (DTA). The confirmation of the grown crystals belonging to nonlinear optical crystals was performed by Kurtz-Perry technique and found as suitable candidate for optoelectronics applications.

  3. Modeling of High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of FeCrAl Alloy by using Artificial Neural Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Joon; Ryu, Ho Jin [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Refractory alloys are candidate materials for replacing current zirconium-base cladding of light water reactors and they retain significant creep resistance and mechanical strength at high temperatures up to 1500 ℃ due to their high melting temperature. Thermal neutron cross sections of refractory metals are higher than that of zirconium, however the loss of neutron can be overcome by reducing cladding thickness which can be facilitated with enhanced mechanical properties. However, most refractory metals show the poor oxidation resistance at a high temperature. Oxidation behaviors of the various compositions of FeCrAl alloys in high temperature conditions were modeled by using Bayesian neural network. The automatic relevance determination (ARD) technique represented the influence of the composition of alloying elements on the oxidation resistance of FeCrAl alloys. This model can be utilized to understand the tendency of oxidation behavior along the composition of each element and prove the applicability of neural network modeling for the development of new cladding material of light water reactors.

  4. Mechanisms of defect complex formation and environmental-assisted fracture behavior of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, B.R.; Muratov, L.S.; Kang, B.S.J.; Li, K.Z. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Iron aluminide has excellent corrosion resistance in high-temperature oxidizing-sulfidizing environments; however, there are problems at room and medium temperature with hydrogen embrittlement as related to exposure to moisture. In this research, a coordinated computational modeling/experimental study of mechanisms related to environmental-assisted fracture behavior of selected iron aluminides is being undertaken. The modeling and the experimental work will connect at the level of coordinated understanding of the mechanisms for hydrogen penetration and for loss of strength and susceptibility to fracture. The focus of the modeling component at this point is on the challenging question of accurately predicting the iron vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}A{ell} and the subsequent tendency, if present, for vacancy clustering. The authors have successfully performed, on an ab initio basis, the first calculation of the vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}A{ell}. These calculations include lattice relaxation effects which are quite large. This has significant implications for vacancy clustering effects with consequences to be explored for hydrogen diffusion. The experimental work at this stage has focused on the relationship of the choice and concentration of additives to the improvement of resistance to hydrogen embrittlement and hence to the fracture behavior. For this reason, comparative crack growth tests of FA-186, FA-187, and FA-189 iron aluminides (all with basic composition of Fe-28A{ell}-5Cr, at % with micro-alloying additives of Zr, C or B) under, air, oxygen, or water environment have been performed. These tests showed that the alloys are susceptible to room temperature hydrogen embrittlement in both B2 and DO{sub 3} conditions. Test results indicated that FA-187, and FA-189 are intrinsically more brittle than FA-186.

  5. Effect of mold temperature on the mechanical durability of titanium casting clasp model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iiyama, Kenichi; Doi, Hisashi; Hanawa, Takao

    2009-09-01

    Titanium is widely used in dental applications. This study investigated the effects of casting conditions on the mechanical characteristics of cast titanium, with a special focus on mold temperature. As such, the mechanical characteristics of specimens prepared at various mold temperatures of 23, 200, 400, 600 and 800 degrees C were compared. On tensile strength, a significant decrease was observed at mold temperatures above 400 degrees C as well as an increase in the scattering of the measured values at higher mold temperatures. On the durability of cast titanium which was assessed by simulating the actual clasp movement during cyclic flexural test, it was found to decrease as the mold temperature increased. When compared with Type 4 dental gold alloy, titanium which was cast at room temperature exhibited equivalent or better durability. Based on the results of this study, it is recommended to perform casting at lower mold temperatures in order to produce highly fatigue-proof cast titanium clasps.

  6. Behavioral flexibility as a mechanism for coping with climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beever, Erik; Hall, L. Embere; Varner, Johanna; Loosen, Anne E.; Dunham, Jason; Gahl, Megan K.; Smith, Felisa A.; Lawler, Joshua J.

    2017-01-01

    Of the primary responses to contemporary climate change – “move, adapt, acclimate, or die” – that are available to organisms, “acclimate” may be effectively achieved through behavioral modification. Behavioral flexibility allows animals to rapidly cope with changing environmental conditions, and behavior represents an important component of a species’ adaptive capacity in the face of climate change. However, there is currently a lack of knowledge about the limits or constraints on behavioral responses to changing conditions. Here, we characterize the contexts in which organisms respond to climate variability through behavior. First, we quantify patterns in behavioral responses across taxa with respect to timescales, climatic stimuli, life-history traits, and ecology. Next, we identify existing knowledge gaps, research biases, and other challenges. Finally, we discuss how conservation practitioners and resource managers can incorporate an improved understanding of behavioral flexibility into natural resource management and policy decisions.

  7. Peak Temperature Reduction by Physical Information Driven Behavioral Synthesis with Resource Usage Allocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Junbo; Zhou, Qiang; Qu, Gang; Bian, Jinian

    High temperature adversely impacts on circuit's reliability, performance, and leakage power. During behavioral synthesis, both resource usage allocation and resource binding influence thermal profile. Current thermal-aware behavioral syntheses do not utilize location information of resources from floorplan and in addition only focus on binding, ignoring allocation. This paper proposes thermal-aware behavioral synthesis with resource usage allocation. Based on a hybrid metric of physical location information and temperature, we rebind operations and reallocate the number of resources under area constraint. Our approach effectively controls peak temperature and creates even power densities among resources of different types and within resources of the same type. Experimental results show an average of 8.6°C drop in peak temperature and 5.3% saving of total power consumption with little latency overhead.

  8. Mechanical Deformation of Sintered Porous Ag Die Attach at High Temperature and Its Size Effect for Wide-Bandgap Power Device Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuantong; Nagao, Shijo; Zhang, Hao; Jiu, Jinting; Sugahara, Tohru; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Iwashige, Tomohito; Sugiura, Kazuhiko; Tsuruta, Kazuhiro

    2017-03-01

    The mechanical properties of sintered Ag paste with microporous structure have been investigated by tensile and shear tests, focusing on the temperature-dependent plastic deformation at various temperatures from 25°C to 300°C, corresponding to the target operating temperature range of emerging wide-bandgap semiconductor devices. Specimens were prepared by sintering hybrid Ag paste consisting of microflake and submicron spherical Ag particles, simulating a typical bonding process for power semiconductor die attach. Mechanical tests revealed that the unique microstructure caused a brittle-to-ductile transition at temperature of around 160°C, remarkably lower than that of bulk Ag. The obtained Young's modulus and shear modulus values indicate obvious softening with increasing temperature, together with a remarkable decrease in Poisson's ratio. These plastic behaviors at elevated temperature can be explained based on Coble creep in the microporous network structure. Fracture surfaces after tensile and shear tests indicated unique features on scanning electron microscopy, reflecting the variation in the ductile behavior with the test temperature. Furthermore, these temperature-dependent mechanical parameters were employed in three-dimensional finite-element analysis of the thermomechanical stress distribution in wide-bandgap semiconductor module structures including Ag paste die attach of different sizes. Detailed thermal stress analysis enabled precise evaluation of the packaging design for wide-bandgap semiconductor modules for use in high-temperature applications.

  9. Mechanical robustness of cryogenic temperature sensors packaged in a flat, hermetically-sealed package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courts, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Much of the work to develop internationally recognized temperature scales over the past 50 years was performed with thermometers whose sensing elements were constructed from platinum wire, rhodium-iron wire, or doped germanium elements. For high stability, the best results were obtained when the sensing element was strain-free mounted which reduced the effects of temperature-induced mechanical stress and deformation. Unfortunately, the devices were still highly susceptible to mechanical damage, and, barring a catastrophic mechanical shock, damage to the temperature sensors could go unnoticed as it could continue to operate with degraded accuracy. While not at the same level of stability as standards grade thermometers, many of the most commonly used cryogenic thermometers today are far more resistant to mechanical handling. This work examines the calibration offsets on three models of cryogenic temperature sensors resulting from mechanical shock and vibration. The models tested in this work were all obtained from Lake Shore Cryotronics, Inc., and included Cemox™ resistance thermometer models CX-1050-SD and CX-1050-AA, and a diode temperature sensor model DT-670-SD. Mechanical treatments were performed via a simple drop test (heights 20 cm, 50 cm, 1 m, and 4 m), random vibration per MIL-STD-202, Method 214, Table 2, Condition H, and mechanical shock per MIL-STD-883, Method 2002, Condition B. Each sensor was calibrated pre- and post-mechanical treatment and the effect of the treatment on each test sensor was quantified in terms of the equivalent temperature calibration shift. This work details the calibration shift of each sensor type following each treatment type over the 1.4 K to 325 K temperature range. No effects from the testing were discemable for Cemox and diode sensors packaged in the -SD package, a flat, hermetically sealed package, while small calibration offsets of less than 0.15% of temperature at higher temperatures were observed for Cemox sensors

  10. Properties, sustainability and elevated temperature behavior of concrete containing Portland limestone cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hawary, Moetaz; Ahmed, Mahmoud

    2017-09-01

    The utilization of some type of cheap filler as partial cement replacement is an effective way of improving concrete sustainability. With the recent trends to reduce water to cement ratio and improve compaction, there is no enough space or water for complete hydration of cement. This means that actually, a portion of mixed cement acts as expensive filler. Replacing this portion with cheaper filler that requires less energy to produce is, therefore, beneficial. Crushed limestone is the most promising filler. This work is to investigate the effect of the amount of limestone fillers on the sustainability and the fresh and mechanical properties of the resulting concrete. A rich mix is designed with a low water/cement ratio of 0.4. Lime is introduced as a replacement percentage of cement. Ratios of 0, 10, 20 and 30% were used. Slump, compressive strength, specific gravity and water absorption are evaluated for every mix. In addition, the effect of the amount of lime on the residual strength of concrete subjected to elevated temperatures is also investigated. Samples are subjected to six different temperature stations of 20, 100, 200, 300, 500 and 700°C for six hours before being cooled and subsequently tested for compressive strength and specific gravity. Sustainability of the tested mixes is evaluated through reductions in the emitted carbon dioxide, energy and reduction in cost. Based on the annual use of concrete in Kuwait, the sustainability benefits resulting from the use of limestone filler in Kuwait are evaluated and assessed. The paper is concluded with the recommendation of the use of 15% limestone filler as partial cement replacement where the properties and the behavior under high temperature of the resulting concrete are almost the same as those of conventional concrete with considerable cost and sustainability benefits.

  11. Rheological and Mechanical Behavior of Silk Fibroin Reinforced Waterborne Polyurethane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongzhen Tao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Waterborne polyurethane (WPU is a versatile and environment-friendly material with growing applications in both industry and academia. Silk fibroin (SF is an attractive material known for its structural, biological and hemocompatible properties. The SF reinforced waterborne polyurethane (WPU is a promising scaffold material for tissue engineering applications. In this work, we report synthesis and characterization of a novel nanocomposite using SF reinforced WPU. The rheological behaviors of WPU and WPU-SF dispersions with different solid contents were investigated with steady shear and dynamic oscillatory tests to evaluate the formation of the cross-linked gel structure. The average particle size and the zeta potential of WPU-SF dispersions with different SF content were examined at 25 °C to investigate the interaction between SF and WPU. FTIR, SEM, TEM and tensile testing were performed to study the effects of SF content on the structural morphology and mechanical properties of the resultant composite films. Experimental results revealed formation of gel network in the WPU dispersions at solid contents more than 17 wt %. The conjugate reaction between the WPU and SF as well as the hydrogen bond between them helped in dispersing the SF powder into the WPU matrix as small aggregates. Addition of SF to the WPU also improved the Young’s modulus from 0.30 to 3.91 MPa, tensile strength from 0.56 to 8.94 MPa, and elongation at break from 1067% to 2480%, as SF was increased up to 5 wt %. Thus, significant strengthening and toughening can be achieved by introducing SF powder into the WPU formulations.

  12. Dynamic mechanical and dielectric behavior of banana–glass hybrid fiber reinforced polyester composites.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pothan, LA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid composites of glass and banana fiber (obtained from the pseudo stem of Musa sapientum) in polyester matrix, are subjected to dynamic mechanical analysis over a range of temperature and three different frequencies. The effect of temperature...

  13. Densification behavior, nanocrystallization, and mechanical properties of spark plasma sintered Fe-based bulk amorphous alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ashish Kumar

    Fe-based amorphous alloys are gaining increasing attention due to their exceptional wear and corrosion resistance for potential structural applications. Two major challenges that are hindering the commercialization of these amorphous alloys are difficulty in processing of bulk shapes (diameter > 10 mm) and lack of ductility. Spark plasma sintering (SPS) is evolving as a promising technique for processing bulk shapes of amorphous and nanocrystalline materials. The objective of this work is to investigate densification behavior, nanocrystallization, and mechanical properties of SPS sintered Fe-based amorphous alloys of composition Fe48Cr15Mo14Y2C15B6. SPS processing was performed in three distinct temperature ranges of amorphous alloys: (a) below glass transition temperature (Tg), (b) between Tg and crystallization temperature (Tx), and (c) above Tx. Punch displacement data obtained during SPS sintering was correlated with the SPS processing parameters such as temperature, pressure, and sintering time. Powder rearrangement, plastic deformation below T g, and viscous flow of the material between Tg and Tx were observed as the main densification stages during SPS sintering. Micro-scale temperature distributions at the point of contact and macro-scale temperature distribution throughout the sample during SPS of amorphous alloys were modeled. The bulk amorphous alloys are expected to undergo structural relaxation and nanocrystallization during SPS sintering. X-ray diffraction (XRD), small angle neutron scattering (SANS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed to investigate the evolution of nanocrystallites in SPS sintered Fe-based bulk amorphous alloys. The SANS analysis showed significant scattering for the samples sintered in the supercooled region indicating local structural and compositional changes with the profuse nucleation of nano-clusters (~4 nm). Compression tests and microhardness were performed on the samples sintered at different

  14. Study of Solid Particle Behavior in High Temperature Gas Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, A.; Bauder, U.; Stindl, T.; Fertig, M.; Herdrich, G.; Röser, H.-P.

    2009-01-01

    The Euler-Lagrangian approach is used for the simulation of solid particles in hypersonic entry flows. For flow field simulation, the program SINA (Sequential Iterative Non-equilibrium Algorithm) developed at the Institut für Raumfahrtsysteme is used. The model for the effect of the carrier gas on a particle includes drag force and particle heating only. Other parameters like lift Magnus force or damping torque are not taken into account so far. The reverse effect of the particle phase on the gaseous phase is currently neglected. Parametric analysis is done regarding the impact of variation in the physical input conditions like position, velocity, size and material of the particle. Convective heat fluxes onto the surface of the particle and its radiative cooling are discussed. The variation of particle temperature under different conditions is presented. The influence of various input conditions on the trajectory is explained. A semi empirical model for the particle wall interaction is also discussed and the influence of the wall on the particle trajectory with different particle conditions is presented. The heat fluxes onto the wall due to impingement of particles are also computed and compared with the heat fluxes from the gas.

  15. The effect of pressure on the Curie temperature in Fe-Ni Invar mechanical alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, S; Zach, R; Matsushita, M; Takahashi, A; Inoue, H; Ono, F; Maeta, H; Iwase, A; Endo, S

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of the temperature dependence of the AC susceptibility were made for Fe-Ni Invar mechanical alloys under hydrostatic pressures up to 1.5 GPa. The Curie temperatures decreased linearly with pressure. The rate of decrease became larger for specimens annealed at higher temperatures. The temperature of annealing after ball milling has been directly related to the extent of the chemical concentration fluctuation, and the extent becomes smaller for specimens annealed at higher temperature. This tendency can be explained by assuming a Gaussian distribution function.

  16. Influence of mechanically-induced dilatation on the shape memory behavior of amorphous polymers at large deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanzon, Drew W.; Lu, Haibao; Yakacki, Christopher M.; Yu, Kai

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we explore the influence of mechanically-induced dilatation on the thermomechanical and shape memory behavior of amorphous shape memory polymers (SMPs) at large deformation. The uniaxial tension, glass transition, stress relaxation and free recovery behaviors are examined with different strain levels (up to 340% engineering strain). A multi-branched constitutive model that incorporates dilatational effects on the polymer relaxation time is established and applied to assist in discussions and understand the nonlinear viscoelastic behaviors of SMPs. It is shown that the volumetric dilatation results in an SMP network with lower viscosity, faster relaxation, and lower Tg. The influence of the dilatational effect on the thermomechanical behaviors is significant when the polymers are subject to large deformation or in a high viscosity state. The dilation also increases the free recovery rate of SMP at a given recovery temperature. Even though the tested SMPs are far beyond their linear viscoelastic region when a large programming strain is applied, the free recovery behavior still follows the time-temperature superposition (TTSP) if the dilatational effect is considered during the transformation of time scales; however, if the programming strain is different, TTSP fails in predicting the recovery behavior of SMPs because the network has different entropy state and driving force during shape recovery. Since most soft active polymers are subject to large deformation in practice, this study provides a theoretical basis to better understand their nonlinear viscoelastic behaviors, and optimize their performance in engineering applications.

  17. Effect of processing parameters on the microstructure and mechanical behavior of silica-calcium phosphate nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xueran; Ei-Ghannam, Ahmed

    2010-07-01

    Silica-calcium phosphate nanocomposite (SCPC) is a bioactive ceramic characterized by superior bone regenerative capacity and resorbability when compared to traditional bioactive ceramics. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effect of processing parameters on the microstructure and mechanical properties of SCPC. Cylinders were prepared by pressing the ceramic powder at 200, 300 or 400 MPa and sintering at 900, 1000 or 1100 degrees C for 3 h, respectively. XRD results indicate that the crystalline structure of the material is made of beta-NaCaPO(4) and alpha-cristobalite solid solutions. The increase in sintering temperature results in an increase in the grain size and the formation of a melting phase that coats the grains. TEM analyses reveal that the melting phase is amorphous and rich in silicon. The mechanical properties of SCPC cylinders are dependent on the content of the melting phase and the microstructure of the material. The ranges of compressive strength and modulus of elasticity of the SCPC are 62-204 MPa and 6-14 GPa, respectively, which are comparable to those of cortical bone. The results suggest that the interaction between crystalline and amorphous phases modulated the mechanical behavior of SCPC. It is possible to engineer the mechanical properties of SCPC by controlling the processing parameters to synthesize various fixation devices for orthopedic and cranio-maxillofacial applications.

  18. From faces to prosocial behavior: cues, tools, and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolphs, Ralph; Tusche, Anita

    2017-06-01

    In this review we ask how looking at people's faces can influence prosocial behaviors towards them. Components of this process have often been studied by disparate literatures: one focused on perception and judgment of faces, using both psychological and neuroscience approaches; and a second focused on actual social behaviors, as studied in behavioral economics and decision science. Bridging these disciplines requires a more mechanistic account of how processing of particular face attributes or features influences social judgments and behaviors. Here we review these two lines of research, and suggest that combining some of their methodological tools can provide the bridging mechanistic explanations.

  19. Transport mechanisms and interface properties of W/ p-InP Schottky diode at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sri Silpa, D.; Sreehith, P.; Rajagopal Reddy, V.; Janardhanam, V.

    2016-04-01

    We have investigated the electrical properties and current transport mechanisms of W/ p-InP Schottky diode using current-voltage ( I- V), capacitance-voltage-frequency ( C- V- f) and conductance-frequency ( G- f) techniques at room temperature. The W/ p-InP Schottky diode exhibits a good rectifying behavior. Measurements show that the Schottky barrier height (SBH) and ideality factor of the W/ p-InP Schottky diode are 0.84 eV ( I- V)/0.98 eV ( C- V) and 1.24, respectively. Also, the SBH and series resistance R s of the diode are extracted by Cheung's functions and the values are in good agreement with each other. Ohmic and space charge-limited conduction mechanisms are found to govern the current flow in the W/ p-InP Schottky diode at low and high forward bias conditions, respectively. Experimental results reveal that the Poole-Frenkel mechanism is found to be dominant in the reverse bias region of W/ p-InP Schottky diode. Further, the interface state density N ss and their relaxation times τ of the W/ p-InP Schottky diode are estimated from the forward bias C- f and G- f characteristics and the values are in the range from 1.95 × 1013 eV-1 cm-2 and 3.38 × 10-5 s at (0.81- E V ) eV to 1.78 × 1013 eV-1 cm-2 and 2.78 × 10-6 s at (0.30- E V ) eV, respectively. Both the N ss and τ show an exponential rise with bias from the top of the valance band toward the mid gap.

  20. Strain rate effects on the mechanical behavior of two Dual Phase steels in tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadoni, E.; Singh, N. K.; Forni, D.; Singha, M. K.; Gupta, N. K.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on the strain rate sensitivity of Dual Phase steel 1200 (DP1200) and Dual Phase steel 1400 (DP1400) under uni-axial tensile loads in the strain rate range from 0.001 s-1 to 600 s-1. These materials are advanced high strength steels (AHSS) having high strength, high capacity to dissipate crash energy and high formability. Flat sheet specimens of the materials having gauge length 10 mm, width 4 mm and thickness 2 mm (DP1200) and 1.25 mm (DP1400), are tested at room temperature (20∘C) on electromechanical universal testing machine to obtain their stress-strain relation under quasi-static condition (0.001 s-1), and on Hydro-Pneumatic machine and modified Hopkinson bar to study their mechanical behavior at medium (3 s-1, and 18 s-1) and high strain rates (200 s-1, 400 s-1, and 600 s-1) respectively. Tests under quasi-static condition are performed at high temperature (200∘C) also, and found that tensile flow stress is a increasing function of temperature. The stress-strain data has been analysed to determine the material parameters of the Cowper-Symonds and the Johnson-Cook models. A simple modification of the Johnson-Cook model has been proposed in order to obtain a better fit of tests at high temperatures. Finally, the fractographs of the broken specimens are taken by scanning electron microscope (SEM) to understand the fracture mechanism of these advanced high strength steels at different strain rates.

  1. Ceramic Composite Mechanical Fastener System for High-Temperature Structural Assemblies Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Under Phase I, the feasibility of a novel thermal stress-free ceramic composite mechanical fastener system suitable for assembly of high-temperature composite...

  2. Evaluation of seawater exposure on mechanical properties and failure behavior of E-Glass/BMI composite for marine use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yian; Wang, Zhiying; Seah, Leong Keey; Chai, Gin Boay

    2015-03-01

    Since composite material is playing an increasingly important role in the marine and offshore drilling industry, it is essential to have a good understanding on degradation of the material in the seawater environment. This study investigates the influence of seawater exposure on the mechanical and failure behavior of E-Glass/BMI composite. The water diffusion behavior in the composite has been studied through immersing the specimens in seawater under different conditions. The diffusion rate accelerates with increase of temperature, and the material shows irreversible damage due to seawater absorption at the temperature of 80°C. It is also found that external stress would significantly increase the water absorption. The water uptake in the specimen at 50°C showed a two stage behavior dominated by Fickian law and polymeric relaxation respectively, and saturation was not achieved in 8 months. After diffusion, the Tg of the material is considerably lowered due to plasticization effect. However the effect was found to be reversible after drying the specimen. Based on the testing results of tensile, flexure and fatigue properties of the composites, it is concluded that seawater exposure especially at elevated temperature leads to significant degradation on mechanical properties of the composite. However, the flexural strength of BMI composite with seawater absorption becomes less susceptible to temperature change. It is also found that the seawater absorption doesn't show significant effect on the stiffness of the material.

  3. Self-compacting concrete containing different powders at elevated temperatures - Mechanical properties and changes in the phase composition of the paste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakhtiyari, S., E-mail: bakhtiyari@bhrc.ac.ir [School of Chemical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Allahverdi, A., E-mail: ali.allahverdi@iust.ac.ir [Cement Research Center, School of Chemical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran 16846-13114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rais-Ghasemi, M., E-mail: raissghasemi@bhrc.ac.ir [Dep. of Concrete Technology, Building and Housing Research Center (BHRC), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zarrabi, B.A., E-mail: zarrabi@chalmers.se [Fire Technology Dep., SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden (Sweden); Parhizkar, T., E-mail: parhizkar@bhrc.ac.ir [Dep. of Concrete Technology, Building and Housing Research Center (BHRC), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-02-20

    Fire resistance of self-compacting concretes (SCC) containing limestone and quartz powders, with two different compressive strengths, were evaluated and compared with normal concretes (NC). The residual mechanical strengths of the mixes at different temperatures were measured. The changes in the phase composition of the cement pastes at high temperatures were examined with thermal analysis and X-ray diffractometry methods. The SCC mixes showed a higher susceptibility to spalling at high temperatures but the NC mixes suffered much more from loss of the mechanical strengths. Both the powder types and the compressive strength notably influenced the fire behavior of the SCC. The quartz powder accelerated the hydration of the SCC cement paste at high temperatures, up to 500 {sup o}C. However, the quartz-contained SCC showed the highest risk of spalling among all the mixes. The results showed that the thermal analysis could be a useful device for evaluating the fire behavior of building materials.

  4. Effect of high ambient temperature on behavior of sheep under semi-arid tropical environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Kalyan; Kumar, Davendra; Saxena, Vijay Kumar; Thirumurugan, Palanisamy; Naqvi, Syed Mohammed Khursheed

    2017-07-01

    High environmental temperature is a major constraint in sheep production under semi-arid tropical environment. Behavior is the earliest indicator of animal's adaptation and responses to the environmental alteration. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the effects of high ambient temperature on the behavior of sheep under a semi-arid tropical environment. The experiment was conducted for 6 weeks on 16 Malpura cross (Garole × Malpura × Malpura (GMM)) rams. The rams were divided equally into two groups, designated as C and T. The rams of C were kept in comfortable environmental conditions served as control. The rams of T were exposed to a different temperature at different hours of the day in a climatic chamber, to simulate a high environmental temperature of summer in semi-arid tropic. The behavioral observations were taken by direct instantaneous observation at 15-min intervals for each animal individually. The feeding, ruminating, standing, and lying behaviors were recorded twice a week from morning (0800 hours) to afternoon (1700 hours) for 6 weeks. Exposure of rams to high temperature (T) significantly ( P animals of T spent significantly ( P behavior of sheep which is directed to circumvent the effect of the stressor.

  5. High-temperature mechanical properties of aluminium alloys reinforced with boron carbide particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onoro, J. [Dept. Ingenieria y Ciencia de los Materiales, ETSI Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, c/Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: javier.onoro@upm.es; Salvador, M.D. [Dept. Ingenieria Mecanica y de Materiales, ETSI Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Cambronero, L.E.G. [Dept. Ingenieria de Materiales, ETSI Minas, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, c/Rios Rosas 21, 28003 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-01-15

    The mechanical properties of particulate-reinforced metal-matrix composites based on aluminium alloys (6061 and 7015) at high temperatures were studied. Boron carbide particles were used as reinforcement. All composites were produced by hot extrusion. The tensile properties and fracture analysis of these materials were investigated at room temperature and at high temperature to determine their ultimate strength and strain to failure. The fracture surface was analysed by scanning electron microscopy.

  6. Characterization of Tensile Mechanical Behavior of MSCs/PLCL Hybrid Layered Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizah Intan Pangesty

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A layered construct was developed by combining a porous polymer sheet and a cell sheet as a tissue engineered vascular patch. The primary objective of this study is to investigate the influence of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs sheet on the tensile mechanical properties of porous poly-(l-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone (PLCL sheet. The porous PLCL sheet was fabricated by the solid-liquid phase separation method and the following freeze-drying method. The MSCs sheet, prepared by the temperature-responsive dish, was then layered on the top of the PLCL sheet and cultured for 2 weeks. During the in vitro study, cellular properties such as cell infiltration, spreading and proliferation were evaluated. Tensile test of the layered construct was performed periodically to characterize the tensile mechanical behavior. The tensile properties were then correlated with the cellular properties to understand the effect of MSCs sheet on the variation of the mechanical behavior during the in vitro study. It was found that MSCs from the cell sheet were able to migrate into the PLCL sheet and actively proliferated into the porous structure then formed a new layer of MSCs on the opposite surface of the PLCL sheet. Mechanical evaluation revealed that the PLCL sheet with MSCs showed enhancement of tensile strength and strain energy density at the first week of culture which is characterized as the effect of MSCs proliferation and its infiltration into the porous structure of the PLCL sheet. New technique was presented to develop tissue engineered patch by combining MSCs sheet and porous PLCL sheet, and it is expected that the layered patch may prolong biomechanical stability when implanted in vivo.

  7. Electrical and mechanical behavior of PMN-PT/CNT based polymer composite film for energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Satyabati; Biswal, Asutya Kumar; Parida, Kalpana; Choudhary, R. N. P.; Roy, Amritendu

    2018-01-01

    The pyrochlore-free 30-PMN-PT/CNT/PVDF based piezoelectric flexible composite film has been synthesized for potential application in piezoelectric energy harvesting. Electrical characterization reveals that the maximum output voltage and current generated by the 30 vol.% PMN-PT/CNT/PVDF composite is ∼4 V and 30 nA respectively, comparable with the available literature. Further, impedance analysis has revealed a significant improvement in permittivity at low frequency and high temperature with a minimal dielectric loss. AC conductivity behavior fits well with Johnscher's universal power law that predicts the motion of the charge carriers is translational with sudden hopping. The Nyquist plots indicate the contributions of both grain and grain boundaries at lower temperature (25-100 °C) and additional electrode effect of higher temperature (100-150 °C) on the capacitive and resistive properties of the composite. Mechanical characterization of the composite shows an increase in Young's modulus of 705 MPa compared to 597 MPa in pure PVDF.

  8. Mechanical behavior of saturated, consolidated, alumina powder compacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, George Vincent, Jr.

    Alumina slurries were prepared with three differing particle pair potentials produced by adjusting pH and salt concentration. The three pair potentials investigated were repulsive, strongly attractive and weakly attractive. Bodies were consolidated by pressure filtration, at applied pressures between 0.25 MPa and 150 MPa. The mechanical properties of these bodies were investigated by uniaxial compressive loading. High consolidation pressures lead to high forces at particle contacts which can push the particles together to form a strong touching network even when the particles are separated by a potential barrier in the slurry state. When particles are pushed into adhesive contact, the saturated, consolidated powder compacts are brittle. When a short ranged repulsive interparticle potential persists after consolidation, the specimens are plastic. Saturated bodies formed from strongly attractive slurries (flocculated at the isoelectric point pH 9) were plastic at low relative densities but were brittle at higher relative densities. Bodies formed from the repulsive slurries (dispersed at pH 4) were always brittle. Bodies consolidated from weakly attractive slurries (coagulated at pH 4, 5, 6, or 12 with additions of salt) were plastic at low consolidation pressures but became brittle at high consolidation pressures. This plastic-to-brittle transition depends on the shape of the pair potential, the size and morphology of the powder. The plastic specimens had stress-strain behavior characterized by a peak stress, followed by a lower flow stress. The peak stress reduced to the flow stress upon several reloading cycles. The effect of the slope of the repulsive potential barrier on the plastic-to-brittle transition was investigated. Alumina slurries coagulated at pH 12 with 0.5 M of Lisp+, Cssp+ and tetraethylammoniumsp+ chlorides were consolidated by pressure filtration. Consolidation pressures required to push particles together were greater for smaller counterions. The

  9. Relationship Between Unusual High-Temperature Fatigue Crack Growth Threshold Behavior in Superalloys and Sudden Failure Mode Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telesman, Jack; Smith, Timothy M.; Gabb, Timothy P.; Ring, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    An investigation of high temperature cyclic fatigue crack growth (FCG) threshold behavior of two advanced nickel disk alloys was conducted. The focus of the study was the unusual crossover effect in the near-threshold region of these type of alloys where conditions which produce higher crack growth rates in the Paris regime, produce higher resistance to crack growth in the near threshold regime. It was shown that this crossover effect is associated with a sudden change in the fatigue failure mode from a predominant transgranular mode in the Paris regime to fully intergranular mode in the threshold fatigue crack growth region. This type of a sudden change in the fracture mechanisms has not been previously reported and is surprising considering that intergranular failure is typically associated with faster crack growth rates and not the slow FCG rates of the near-threshold regime. By characterizing this behavior as a function of test temperature, environment and cyclic frequency, it was determined that both the crossover effect and the onset of intergranular failure are caused by environmentally driven mechanisms which have not as yet been fully identified. A plausible explanation for the observed behavior is proposed.

  10. The effect of different rare earth elements content on microstructure, mechanical and wear behavior of Mg-Al-Zn alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meshinchi Asl, Kaveh, E-mail: kaveh_mesh@yahoo.co.uk [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Masoudi, Afshin; Khomamizadeh, Farzad [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-03-25

    The effect of Rare earths addition to AZ91 magnesium alloy and its influence on the microstructure and mechanical properties was investigated in this study. Addition of cerium rich misch metal to AZ91 alloy resulted in formation of needle shape particles, which had a very high thermal stability, providing superior mechanical properties compared to AZ91 magnesium alloy. As a result, the grain boundaries were less susceptible for grain boundary sliding at high temperatures. The steady state creep rates were specified and for the AZ91 alloy and the results indicate a mixed mode of creep behavior, with some grain boundary effects contributing to the overall behavior. However for the RE added samples, sliding of grain boundaries was greatly suppressed and the dislocation climb controlled creep was the dominant deformation mechanism. Dry sliding wear tests were also performed to investigate the effect of Rare Earth additives on wear response of AZ91 magnesium alloy. Weight loss values were determined and wear mechanisms of the alloys with different amount of REs were investigated. Abrasion, delamination and gross plastic deformation were identified as prevailing wear mechanisms. Abrasive wear that activated at lower loads and sliding speeds increased wear rates for less ductile specimens of Rare Earth enriched. However AZ91 alloy containing Rare Earth contents show superior resistance to gross plastic deformation which operated at more severe wear conditions. This is due to existence of Al{sub 11}RE{sub 3} phase that posses attractive mechanical properties at elevated temperatures.

  11. Strain and mechanical behavior measurements of soft tissues with digital speckle method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Jin, G C; Meng, L B; Jian, L H; Wang, A Y; Lu, S B

    2005-01-01

    Soft tissues of the body are composite, typically being made up of collagen and elastin fibers with high water contents. The strain measurement in soft tissues has proven to be a difficult task. The digital speckle method, combined with the image processing technique, has many advantages such as full field, noncontact, and real time. We focus on the use of an improved digital speckle correlation method (DSCM) and time-sequence electric speckle pattern interferometry (TSESPI) to noninvasively obtain continual strain measurements on cartilage and vessel tissues. Monoaxial tensile experiments are well designed and performed under constant temperature and the necessary humidity with smart sensors. Mechanical behaviors such as the tensile modulus and Poisson ratio of specimens are extracted based on the deformation information. A comparison of the advantages and the disadvantages of these techniques as well as some problems concerning strain measurements in soft tissues are also discussed. 2005 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

  12. The effect of the impactor diameter and temperature on low velocity impact behavior of CFRP laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evci, C.; Uyandıran, I.

    2017-02-01

    Impact damage is one of the major concerns that should be taken into account with the new aircraft and spacecraft structures which employ ever-growing use of composite materials. Considering the thermal loads encountered at different altitudes, both low and high temperatures can affect the properties and impact behavior of composite materials. This study aims to investigate the effect of temperature and impactor diameter on the impact behavior and damage development in balanced and symmetrical CFRP laminates which were manufactured by employing vacuum bagging process with autoclave cure. Instrumented drop-weight impact testing system is used to perform the low velocity impact tests in a range of temperatures ranged from 60 down to -50 °C. Impact tests for each temperature level were conducted using three different hemispherical impactor diameters varying from 10 to 20 mm. Energy profile method is employed to determine the impact threshold energies for damage evolution. The level of impact damage is determined from the dent depth on the impacted face and delamination damage detected using ultrasonic C-Scan technique. Test results reveal that the threshold of penetration energy, main failure force and delamination area increase with impactor diameter at all temperature levels. No clear influence of temperature on the critical force thresholds could be derived. However, penetration threshold energy decreased as the temperature was lowered. Drop in the penetration threshold was more obvious with quite low temperatures. Delamination damage area increased while the temperature decreased from +60 °C to -50 °C.

  13. Investigation of the rate-controlling mechanism(s) for high temperature creep and the relationship between creep and melting by use of high pressure as a variable. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    Using high pressure as a variable, the rate-controlling mechanism for high temperature creep and the relationship between creep and melting is investigated for silicon and nickel. An apparatus is used in which the samples are heated to melting point and subjected to 1 to 3 GigaPascal pressure. The stress behavior of the materials are then studied.

  14. Mechanical, Rheological and Release Behaviors of a Poloxamer 407/ Poloxamer 188/Carbopol 940 Thermosensitive Composite Hydrogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyu Su

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to prepare a thermosensitive composite hydrogel (TCH by mixing 24% (w/v poloxamer 407 (P407, 16% (w/v poloxamer 188 (P188 and 0.1% (w/v carbopol 940 (C940, and to determine the effect of natural borneol/ (2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (NB/HP-β-CD inclusion complex on the phase transition temperature, mechanical, rheological properties, and release behaviors of the TCH using the tube inversion method, a texture analyzer, a rheometer, and in vitro release , respectively. The results showed that as the concentration of NB/HP-β-CD increased, the phase transition temperature of the TCH was increased from 37.26 to 38.34 °C and the mechanical properties of the TCH showed that the hardness, cohesiveness, strength, and adhesiveness were increased from 0.025 to 0.064 kg, 0.022 to 0.064 kg, 0.110 to 0.307 kg and 0.036 to 0.105 kg, respectively, but the rheological properties of the TCH showed that G′, G′′ and η were decreased from 7,760 to 157.50 Pa, 1,274 to 36.28 Pa and 1,252 to 25.37 Pas, respectively. The in vitro release showed that an increasing NB/HP-β-CD concentration decreased the release rate of NB from the TCH, but the amount of NB released was more than 96% at 60 min, which showed the TCH had good release behavior.

  15. Mechanical, rheological and release behaviors of a poloxamer 407/ poloxamer 188/carbopol 940 thermosensitive composite hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianping; Zhou, Rong; Li, Lin; Li, Bing; Zhang, Xia; Su, Jianyu

    2013-10-08

    The aims of this study were to prepare a thermosensitive composite hydrogel (TCH) by mixing 24% (w/v) poloxamer 407 (P407), 16% (w/v) poloxamer 188 (P188) and 0.1% (w/v) carbopol 940 (C940), and to determine the effect of natural borneol/ (2-hydroxypropyl)-β-cyclodextrin (NB/HP-β-CD) inclusion complex on the phase transition temperature, mechanical, rheological properties, and release behaviors of the TCH using the tube inversion method, a texture analyzer, a rheometer, and in vitro release , respectively. The results showed that as the concentration of NB/HP-β-CD increased, the phase transition temperature of the TCH was increased from 37.26 to 38.34 °C and the mechanical properties of the TCH showed that the hardness, cohesiveness, strength, and adhesiveness were increased from 0.025 to 0.064 kg, 0.022 to 0.064 kg, 0.110 to 0.307 kg and 0.036 to 0.105 kg, respectively, but the rheological properties of the TCH showed that G', G'' and η were decreased from 7,760 to 157.50 Pa, 1,274 to 36.28 Pa and 1,252 to 25.37 Pas, respectively. The in vitro release showed that an increasing NB/HP-β-CD concentration decreased the release rate of NB from the TCH, but the amount of NB released was more than 96% at 60 min, which showed the TCH had good release behavior.

  16. High-Temperature Tribological and Self-Lubricating Behavior of Copper Oxide-Doped Y-TZP Composite Sliding Against Alumina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valefi, Mahdiar; de Rooij, Matthias B.; Schipper, Dirk J.; Winnubst, Aloysius J.A.

    2011-01-01

    The tribological behavior of 5 wt% copper oxide-doped tetragonal zirconia polycrystal composite has been investigated while it slides against an alumina counterface under high temperature conditions. The effects of load (1, 2.5, and 5 N) and velocity (0.05 and 0.1 m/s) on the wear mechanism have

  17. Efficient modeling of metallic interconnects for thermo-mechanical simulation of SOFC stacks: homogenized behaviors and effect of contact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tadesse Molla, Tesfaye; Kwok, Kawai; Frandsen, Henrik Lund

    2016-01-01

    Currently thermo-mechanical analysis of the entire solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack at operational conditions is computationally challenging if the geometry of metallic interconnects is considered explicitly. This is particularly the case when creep deformations in the interconnect are considered...... model to calculate the homogenized mechanical response of corrugated metallic interconnects at high temperatures.Thereafter, a constitutive law for the homogenized structure (effective material law) is developed. In order to properly describe the mechanical behavior of the interconnect at high...... temperature, deformations involving the elastic, creep as well as effect of changes in the geometry due to contact should be accounted for. The constitutive law can be applied using 3D modeling, but for simple presentation of the theory, 2D plane strain formulation is used to model the corrugated metallic...

  18. Mechanical degradation of coating systems in high-temperature cyclic oxidation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pennefather, RC

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available temperature, an extensive testing programme was undertaken. During testing an observation was made that in addition to the usual oxidation of the coating, another degradation mechanism was pragmatic; a mechanical effect caused by the instability of the coating...

  19. Temperature Effects on the Friction and Wear Behaviors of SiCp/A356 Composite against Semimetallic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Like Pan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the low density and high temperature resistance, the SiCp/A356 composites have great potential for weight reduction and braking performance using the brake disc used in trains and automobiles. But the friction coefficient and braking performance are not stable in the braking process because of temperature rising. In this paper, friction and wear behaviors of SiCp/A356 composite against semimetallic materials were investigated in a ring-on-disc configuration in the temperature range of 30°C to 300°C. Experiments were conducted at a constant sliding speed of 1.4 m/s and an applied load of 200 N. Worn surface, subsurface, and wear debris were also examined by using SEM and EDS techniques. The third body films (TBFs lubricated wear transferred to the third body abrasive wear above 200°C, which was a transition temperature. The friction coefficient decreased and weight of semimetallic materials increased with the increase of temperature and the temperature had almost no effect on the weight loss of composites. The dominant wear mechanism of the composites was microploughing and slight adhesion below 200°C, while being controlled by cutting grooves, severe adhesion, and delamination above the 200°C.

  20. EFFECTS OF TEMPERATURE AND ENVIRONMENT ON MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF TWO CHOPPED-FIBER AUTOMOTIVE STRUCTURAL COMPOSITES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggles-Wrenn, M.B.

    2003-10-06

    The Durability of Lightweight Composite Structures Project was established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by the U.S. Department of Energy to provide the experimentally-based, durability-driven design guidelines necessary to assure long-term structural integrity of automotive composite components. The initial focus of the ORNL Durability Project was on composite materials consisting of polyurethane reinforced with E-glass. Current focus of the project is on composite materials reinforced with carbon fibers. The primary purpose of this report is to provide the individual specimen test date. Basic mechanical property testing and results for two chopped-fiber composite materials, one reinforced with glass- and the other with carbon fiber are provided. Both materials use the same polyurethane matrix. Preforms for both materials were produced using the P4 process. Behavioral trends, effects of temperature and environment, and corresponding design knockdown factors are established for both materials. Effects of prior short-time loads and of prior thermal cycling are discussed.

  1. All-acrylic superelastomers: facile synthesis and exceptional mechanical behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Wei [Department of Chemistry; University of Tennessee; Knoxville; USA; Goodwin, Andrew [Department of Chemistry; University of Tennessee; Knoxville; USA; Wang, Yangyang [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Oak Ridge; USA; Yin, Panchao [Chemical and Engineering Materials Division; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Oak Ridge; USA; Wang, Weiyu [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Oak Ridge; USA; Zhu, Jiahua [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Oak Ridge; USA; Wu, Ting [Department of Materials Science and Engineering; University of Tennessee; Knoxville; USA; Lu, Xinyi [Department of Chemistry; University of Tennessee; Knoxville; USA; Hu, Bin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering; University of Tennessee; Knoxville; USA; Hong, Kunlun [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Oak Ridge; USA; Kang, Nam-Goo [Department of Chemistry; University of Tennessee; Knoxville; USA; Mays, Jimmy [Department of Chemistry; University of Tennessee; Knoxville; USA

    2018-01-01

    All-acrylic multigraft copolymers made by a facile synthesis procedure exhibit elongation at break >1700% and strain recovery behavior far exceeding those of commercial acrylic and styrenic triblock copolymers.

  2. Mechanisms Linking Ethical Leadership to Ethical Sales Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Chi

    2017-06-01

    This study investigated the relationship between ethical leadership and ethical sales behavior. A total of 248 matched surveys with participant responses from insurance agents and their customers were collected. The insurance agents were asked to rate the ethical leadership of their leaders, the ethical climate in their organization, and their individual moral identity. Customers were asked to rate the perceived ethical sales behavior of the insurance agents. This empirical study utilized moderated mediation techniques to analyze the data. Results indicated that ethical climate mediated the relationship between ethical leadership and ethical sales behavior when moral identity was high, however, did not when moral identity was low. The research framework including contextual effects (i.e., ethical climate) and individual differences in moral judgment (i.e., moral identity) can provide a comprehensive picture of how ethical leadership influences ethical sales behavior. Theoretical and practical implications of these findings are also discussed.

  3. Effects of cold and hot temperature on dehydration: a mechanism of cardiovascular burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Youn-Hee; Park, Min-Seon; Kim, Yoonhee; Kim, Ho; Hong, Yun-Chul

    2015-08-01

    The association between temperature (cold or heat) and cardiovascular mortality has been well documented. However, few studies have investigated the underlying mechanism of the cold or heat effect. The main goal of this study was to examine the effect of temperature on dehydration markers and to explain the pathophysiological disturbances caused by changes of temperature. We investigated the relationship between outdoor temperature and dehydration markers (blood urea nitrogen (BUN)/creatinine ratio, urine specific gravity, plasma tonicity and haematocrit) in 43,549 adults from Seoul, South Korea, during 1995-2008. We used piece-wise linear regression to find the flexion point of apparent temperature and estimate the effects below or above the apparent temperature. Levels of dehydration markers decreased linearly with an increase in the apparent temperature until a point between 22 and 27 °C, which was regarded as the flexion point of apparent temperature, and then increased with apparent temperature. Because the associations between temperature and cardiovascular mortality are known to be U-shaped, our findings suggest that temperature-related changes in hydration status underlie the increased cardiovascular mortality and morbidity during high- or low-temperature conditions.

  4. Neuronal mechanisms and circuits underlying repetitive behaviors in mouse models of autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyopil; Lim, Chae-Seok; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2016-01-20

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) refers to a broad spectrum of neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by three central behavioral symptoms: impaired social interaction, impaired social communication, and restricted and repetitive behaviors. However, the symptoms are heterogeneous among patients and a number of ASD mouse models have been generated containing mutations that mimic the mutations found in human patients with ASD. Each mouse model was found to display a unique set of repetitive behaviors. In this review, we summarize the repetitive behaviors of the ASD mouse models and variations found in their neural mechanisms including molecular and electrophysiological features. We also propose potential neuronal mechanisms underlying these repetitive behaviors, focusing on the role of the cortico-basal ganglia-thalamic circuits and brain regions associated with both social and repetitive behaviors. Further understanding of molecular and circuitry mechanisms of the repetitive behaviors associated with ASD is necessary to aid the development of effective treatments for these disorders.

  5. Fracture behavior of C/SiC composites at elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Dong Hyun; Lee, Jeong Won; Kim, Jae Hoon; Shin, Ihn Cheol; Lim, Byung Joo [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    The fracture behavior of carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) composites used in rocket nozzles has been investigated under tension, compression, and fracture conditions at room temperature, 773 K and 1173 K. The C/SiC composites used in this study were manufactured by liquid silicon infiltration process at ~1723 K. All experiments were conducted using two types of specimens, considering fiber direction and oxidation condition. Experimental results show that temperature, fiber direction, and oxidation condition affect the behavior of C/SiC composites. Oxidation was found to be the main factor that changes the strength of C/SiC composites. By applying an anti-oxidation coating, the tensile and compressive strengths of the C/SiC composites increased with temperature. The fracture toughness of the C/SiC composites also increased with increase temperature. A fractography analysis of the fractured specimens was conducted using a scanning electron microscope.

  6. Effect of austenitizing temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Nb–Ti microalloyed steel

    OpenAIRE

    Fu Guiqin; Jin Duo; Zhu Miaoyong

    2015-01-01

    The effect of austenitizing temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Nb–Ti microalloyed steel was investigated. Steels were subjected to different austenitizing treatments (temperatures ranging from 850 °C to 1250 °C for 5-120 min) and rolled after being austenitized at different temperatures (i.e. 1020 °C, 1070 °C and 1150 °C). The results showed that austenite grain coarsening temperature was around 1000 °C. The mean grain size of the rolled steels initially ...

  7. Two-phase chromium-niobium alloys exhibiting improved mechanical properties at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chain T.; Takeyama, Masao

    1994-01-01

    The specification discloses chromium-niobium alloys which exhibit improved mechanical properties at high temperatures in the range of 1250.degree. C. and improved room temperature ductility. The alloys contain a Cr.sub.2 Nb-rich intermetallic phase and a Cr-rich phase with an overall niobium concentration in the range of from about 5 to about 18 at. %. The high temperature strength is substantially greater than that of state of the art nickel-based superalloys for enhanced high temperature service. Further improvements in the properties of the compositions are obtained by alloying with rhenium and aluminum; and additional rare-earth and other elements.

  8. Tensile properties and fracturing behavior of weld joints in the CLAM at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Yucheng [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Xiao, Chengwen, E-mail: emoryxiao@163.com [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Wang, Xu; Yue, Jiajia; Zhu, Qiang [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • We use the stress triaxiality theory to explain the plastic deformation and facture behavior of the joints during the short term tensile tests at high temperature. • The tensile strength of CLAM welded joint at high temperature is lower compared with that at room temperature. • We explained the formation of crack and the reason of fracture. - Abstract: The tensile properties and fracturing behavior of weld joints in the Chinese low activation martensitic steel (CLAM) at high temperatures were studied. The result revealed that the cracks of weld joints in the base metal would appear in the heat-affected zone, after post-weld heat treatment for the high-temperature tensile test. The microstructure in the fractured frontier had different deformation and directions, and the fractured surface had different angles, a result associating with the normal faulting and shear fracturing. The tri-axial theory of stress can well explain the deformation and fracturing behavior of weld joints in the high-temperature tensile.

  9. Sex Differences in Behavioral Outcomes Following Temperature Modulation During Induced Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Injury in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L. Smith

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal hypoxia ischemia (HI; reduced oxygen and/or blood flow to the brain can cause various degrees of tissue damage, as well as subsequent cognitive/behavioral deficits such as motor, learning/memory, and auditory impairments. These outcomes frequently result from cardiovascular and/or respiratory events observed in premature infants. Data suggests that there is a sex difference in HI outcome, with males being more adversely affected relative to comparably injured females. Brain/body temperature may play a role in modulating the severity of an HI insult, with hypothermia during an insult yielding more favorable anatomical and behavioral outcomes. The current study utilized a postnatal day (P 7 rodent model of HI injury to assess the effect of temperature modulation during injury in each sex. We hypothesized that female P7 rats would benefit more from lowered body temperatures as compared to male P7 rats. We assessed all subjects on rota-rod, auditory discrimination, and spatial/non-spatial maze tasks. Our results revealed a significant benefit of temperature reduction in HI females as measured by most of the employed behavioral tasks. However, HI males benefitted from temperature reduction as measured on auditory and non-spatial tasks. Our data suggest that temperature reduction protects both sexes from the deleterious effects of HI injury, but task and sex specific patterns of relative efficacy are seen.

  10. Accurate Behavioral Simulator of All-Digital Time-Domain Smart Temperature Sensors by Using SIMULINK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Chi Chen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a new behavioral simulator that uses SIMULINK for all-digital CMOS time-domain smart temperature sensors (TDSTSs for performing rapid and accurate simulations. Inverter-based TDSTSs offer the benefits of low cost and simple structure for temperature-to-digital conversion and have been developed. Typically, electronic design automation tools, such as HSPICE, are used to simulate TDSTSs for performance evaluations. However, such tools require extremely long simulation time and complex procedures to analyze the results and generate figures. In this paper, we organize simple but accurate equations into a temperature-dependent model (TDM by which the TDSTSs evaluate temperature behavior. Furthermore, temperature-sensing models of a single CMOS NOT gate were devised using HSPICE simulations. Using the TDM and these temperature-sensing models, a novel simulator in SIMULINK environment was developed to substantially accelerate the simulation and simplify the evaluation procedures. Experiments demonstrated that the simulation results of the proposed simulator have favorable agreement with those obtained from HSPICE simulations, showing that the proposed simulator functions successfully. This is the first behavioral simulator addressing the rapid simulation of TDSTSs.

  11. Temperature-dependent dynamic mechanical properties of magnetorheological elastomers under magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Benxiang, E-mail: jubenxiang@qq.com [National Instrument Functional Materials Engineering Technology Research Center, Chongqing 400707 (China); Tang, Rui; Zhang, Dengyou; Yang, Bailian [National Instrument Functional Materials Engineering Technology Research Center, Chongqing 400707 (China); Yu, Miao; Liao, Changrong [College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Both anisotropic and isotropic magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) samples were fabricated by using as-prepared polyurethane (PU) matrix and carbonyl iron particles. Temperature-dependent dynamic mechanical properties of MRE were investigated and analyzed. Due to the unique structural features of as-prepared matrix, temperature has a greater impact on the properties of as-prepared MRE, especially isotropic MRE. With increasing of temperature and magnetic field, MR effect of isotropic MRE can reach up to as high as 4176.5% at temperature of 80 °C, and the mechanism of the temperature-dependent in presence of magnetic field was discussed. These results indicated that MRE is a kind of temperature-dependent material, and can be cycled between MRE and MR plastomer (MRP) by varying temperature. - Highlights: • Both anisotropic and isotropic MRE were fabricated by using as-prepared matrix. • Temperature-dependent properties of MRE under magnetic field were investigated. • As-prepared MRE can transform MRE to MRP by adjusting temperature.

  12. Understanding the Personality and Behavioral Mechanisms Defining Hypersexuality in Men Who Have Sex with Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Michael H.; Romine, Rebecca Swinburne; Raymond, Nancy; Janssen, Erick; MacDonald, Angus; Coleman, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate personality factors and behavioral mechanisms that are relevant to hypersexuality in men who have sex with men. Method A sample of 242 men who have sex with men were recruited from various sites in a moderate size mid-western city. Participants were assigned to hypersexuality or control group using a SCID-type interview. Self-report inventories were administered that measured the broad band personality constructs of positive emotionality, negative emotionality and constraint, and more narrow constructs related to sexual behavioral control, behavioral activation, behavioral inhibition, sexual excitation, sexual inhibition, impulsivity, ADHD, and sexual behavior. Hierarchical logistic regression was used to determine the relationship between these personality and behavioral variables and group membership. Results A hierarchical logistic regression, controlling for age, revealed a significant positive relationship between hypersexuality and negative emotionality and a negative relationship with constraint. None of the behavioral mechanism variables entered this equation. However, a hierarchical multiple regression predicting sexual behavioral control indicated that lack of such control was positively related to sexual excitation and sexual inhibition due to the threat of performance failure and negatively related to sexual inhibition due to the threat of performance consequences and general behavioral inhibition Conclusions Hypersexuality was found to be related to two broad personality factors that are characterized by emotional reactivity, risk-taking, and impulsivity. The associated lack of sexual behavior control is influenced by both sexual excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms, but not general behavioral activation and inhibitory mechanisms. PMID:27486137

  13. Micro-mechanisms of Surface Defects Induced on Aluminum Alloys during Plastic Deformation at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gali, Olufisayo A.

    Near-surface deformed layers developed on aluminum alloys significantly influence the corrosion and tribological behavior as well as reduce the surface quality of the rolled aluminum. The evolution of the near-surface microstructures induced on magnesium containing aluminum alloys during thermomechanical processing has been investigated with the aim generating an understanding of the influence of individual forming parameters on its evolution and examine the microstructure of the roll coating induced on the mating steel roll through material transfer during rolling. The micro-mechanisms related to the various features of near-surface microstructure developed during tribological conditions of the simulated hot rolling process were identified. Thermomechanical processing experiments were performed with the aid of hot rolling (operating temperature: 550 to 460 °C, 4, 10 and 20 rolling pass schedules) and hot forming (operating temperature: 350 to 545 °C, strain rate: 4 x 10-2 s-1) tribo-simulators. The surface, near-surface features and material transfer induced during the elevated temperature plastic deformation were examined and characterized employing optical interferometry, SEM/EDS, FIB and TEM. Near-surface features characterized on the rolled aluminum alloys included; cracks, fractured intermetallic particles, aluminum nano-particles, oxide decorated grain boundaries, rolled-in oxides, shingles and blisters. These features were related to various individual rolling parameters which included, the work roll roughness, which induced the formation of shingles, rolling marks and were responsible for the redistribution of surface oxide and the enhancements of the depth of the near-surface damage. The enhanced stresses and strains experienced during rolling were related to the formation and propagation of cracks, the nanocrystalline structure of the near-surface layers and aluminum nano-particles. The mechanism of the evolution of the near-surface microstructure were

  14. Temperature tolerance and stress proteins as mechanisms of invasive species success.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robyn A Zerebecki

    Full Text Available Invasive species are predicted to be more successful than natives as temperatures increase with climate change. However, few studies have examined the physiological mechanisms that theoretically underlie this differential success. Because correlative evidence suggests that invasiveness is related to the width of a species' latitudinal range, it has been assumed--but largely untested--that range width predicts breadth of habitat temperatures and physiological thermotolerances. In this study, we use empirical data from a marine community as a case study to address the hypotheses that (1 geographic temperature range attributes are related to temperature tolerance, leading to greater eurythermality in invasive species, and (2 stress protein expression is a subcellular mechanism that could contribute to differences in thermotolerance. We examined three native and six invasive species common in the subtidal epibenthic communities of California, USA. We assessed thermotolerance by exposing individuals to temperatures between 14°C and 31°C and determining the temperature lethal to 50% of individuals (LT(50 after a 24 hour exposure. We found a strong positive relationship between the LT(50 and both maximum habitat temperatures and the breadth of temperatures experience across the species' ranges. In addition, of the species in our study, invasives tended to inhabit broader habitat temperature ranges and higher maximum temperatures. Stress protein expression may contribute to these differences: the more thermotolerant, invasive species Diplosoma listerianum expressed higher levels of a 70-kDa heat-shock protein than the less thermotolerant, native Distaplia occidentalis for which levels declined sharply above the LT(50. Our data highlight differences between native and invasive species with respect to organismal and cellular temperature tolerances. Future studies should address, across a broader phylogenetic and ecosystem scope, whether this

  15. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of direct metal laser sintered Inconel alloy 718

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Derek H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Bicknell, Jonathan; Jorgensen, Luke [Turbocam Energy Solutions, Turbocam International, Dover, NH 03820 (United States); Patterson, Brian M.; Cordes, Nikolaus L. [Materials Science Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Tsukrov, Igor [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Knezevic, Marko, E-mail: marko.knezevic@unh.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    In this paper, we investigate microstructure and quasi-static mechanical behavior of the direct metal laser sintered Inconel 718 superalloy as a function of build direction (BD). The printed material was further processed by annealing and double-aging, hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and machining. We characterize porosity fraction and distribution using micro X-ray computed tomography (μXCT), grain structure and crystallographic texture using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD), and mechanical response in quasi-static tension and compression using standard mechanical testing at room temperature. Analysis of the μXCT imaging shows that majority of porosity develops in the outer layer of the printed material. However, porosity inside the material is also present. The EBSD measurements reveal formation of columnar grains, which favor < 001 > fiber texture components along the BD. These measurements also show evidence of coarse-grained microstructure present in the samples treated by HIP. Finally, analysis of grain boundaries reveal that HIP results in a large number of annealing twins compared to that in samples that underwent annealing and double-aging. The yield strength varies with the testing direction by approximately 7%, which is governed by a combination of grain morphology and crystallographic texture. In particular, we determine tension–compression asymmetry in the yield stress as well as anisotropy of the material flow during compression. We find that HIP lowers yield stress but improves ductility relative to the annealed and aged material. These results are discussed and critically compared with the data reported for wrought material in the same condition. - Highlights: • Microstructure and mechanical properties of DMLS Inconel 718 are studied in function of build direction. • Inhomogeneity of microstructure in the material in several conditions is quantified by μXCT and EBSD. • Anisotropy and asymmetry in the mechanical response are

  16. Effect of high ambient temperature on behavior of sheep under semi-arid tropical environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Kalyan; Kumar, Davendra; Saxena, Vijay Kumar; Thirumurugan, Palanisamy; Naqvi, Syed Mohammed Khursheed

    2017-07-01

    High environmental temperature is a major constraint in sheep production under semi-arid tropical environment. Behavior is the earliest indicator of animal's adaptation and responses to the environmental alteration. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the effects of high ambient temperature on the behavior of sheep under a semi-arid tropical environment. The experiment was conducted for 6 weeks on 16 Malpura cross (Garole × Malpura × Malpura (GMM)) rams. The rams were divided equally into two groups, designated as C and T. The rams of C were kept in comfortable environmental conditions served as control. The rams of T were exposed to a different temperature at different hours of the day in a climatic chamber, to simulate a high environmental temperature of summer in semi-arid tropic. The behavioral observations were taken by direct instantaneous observation at 15-min intervals for each animal individually. The feeding, ruminating, standing, and lying behaviors were recorded twice a week from morning (0800 hours) to afternoon (1700 hours) for 6 weeks. Exposure of rams to high temperature (T) significantly (P < 0.05) decreased the proportion of time spent in feeding during the observation period in most of the hours of the day as compared to the C. The proportion of time spent in rumination and lying was significantly (P < 0.05) lower in the T group compared to the C. The animals of T spent significantly (P < 0.05) more time in rumination in standing position as compared to the C. The overall proportion of time spent in standing, panting in each hour, and total panting time was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the T as compared to the C. The result of the study indicates that the exposure of sheep to high ambient temperature severely modulates the behavior of sheep which is directed to circumvent the effect of the stressor.

  17. Spatio-temporal behavior of brightness temperature in Tel-Aviv and its application to air temperature monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelta, Ran; Chudnovsky, A Alexandra; Schwartz, Joel

    2016-01-01

    This study applies remote sensing technology to assess and examine the spatial and temporal Brightness Temperature (BT) profile in the city of Tel-Aviv, Israel over the last 30 years using Landsat imagery. The location of warmest and coldest zones are constant over the studied period. Distinct diurnal and temporal BT behavior divide the city into four different segments. As an example of future application, we applied mixed regression models with daily random slopes to correlate Landsat BT data with monitored air temperature (Tair) measurements using 14 images for 1989-2014. Our preliminary results show a good model performance with R(2) = 0.81. Furthermore, based on the model's results, we analyzed the spatial profile of Tair within the study domain for representative days. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The spatial and temporal behavior of brightness temperature in Tel-Aviv and its application to air temperature monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelta, Ran; Chudnovsky, A. Alexandra; Schwarts, Joel

    2016-01-01

    This study applies remote sensing technology to assess and examine the spatial and temporal Brightness Temperature (BT) profile in the city of Tel-Aviv, Israel over the last 30 years using Landsat imagery. The location of warmest and coldest zones are constant over the studied period. Distinct diurnal and temporal BT behavior divide the city into four different segments. As an example of future application, we applied mixed regression models with daily random slopes to correlate Landsat BT data with monitored air temperature (Tair) measurements using 14 images for 1989–2014. Our preliminary results show a good model performance with R2 = 0.81. Furthermore, based on the model’s results, we analyzed the spatial profile of Tair within the study domain for representative days. PMID:26499933

  19. Inspired gas humidity and temperature during mechanical ventilation with the Stephanie ventilator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preo, Bianca L; Shadbolt, Bruce; Todd, David A

    2013-11-01

    To measure inspired gas humidity and temperature delivered by a Stephanie neonatal ventilator with variations in (i) circuit length; (ii) circuit insulation; (iii) proximal airway temperature probe (pATP) position; (iv) inspiratory temperature (offset); and (v) incubator temperatures. Using the Stephanie neonatal ventilator, inspired gas humidity and temperature were measured during mechanical ventilation at the distal inspiratory limb and 3 cm down the endotracheal tube. Measurements were made with a long or short circuit; with or without insulation of the inspiratory limb; proximal ATP (pATP) either within or external to the incubator; at two different inspiratory temperature (offset) of 37(-0.5) and 39(-2.0)°C; and at three different incubator temperatures of 32, 34.5, and 37°C. Long circuits produced significantly higher inspired humidity than short circuits at all incubator settings, while only at 32°C was the inspired temperature higher. In the long circuits, insulation further improved the inspired humidity especially at 39(-2.0)°C, while only at incubator temperatures of 32 and 37°C did insulation significantly improve inspired temperature. Positioning the pATP outside the incubator did not result in higher inspired humidity but did significantly improve inspired temperature. An inspiratory temperature (offset) of 39(-2.0)°C delivered significantly higher inspired humidity and temperature than the 37(-0.5)°C especially when insulated. Long insulated Stephanie circuits should be used for neonatal ventilation when the infant is nursed in an incubator. The recommended inspiratory temperature (offset) of 37(-0.5)°C produced inspired humidity and temperature below international standards, and we suggest an increase to 39(-2.0)°C. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Low Temperature Mechanical Testing of Carbon-Fiber/Epoxy-Resin Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Biss, Emily J.

    1996-01-01

    The use of cryogenic fuels (liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen) in current space transportation vehicles, in combination with the proposed use of composite materials in such applications, requires an understanding of how such materials behave at cryogenic temperatures. In this investigation, tensile intralaminar shear tests were performed at room, dry ice, and liquid nitrogen temperatures to evaluate the effect of temperature on the mechanical response of the IM7/8551-7 carbon-fiber/epoxy-resin system. Quasi-isotropic lay-ups were also tested to represent a more realistic lay-up. It was found that the matrix became both increasingly resistant to microcracking and stiffer with decreasing temperature. A marginal increase in matrix shear strength with decreasing temperature was also observed. Temperature did not appear to affect the integrity of the fiber-matrix bond.

  1. Modeling of high homologous temperature deformation behavior for stress and life-time analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krempl, E. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Stress and lifetime analyses need realistic and accurate constitutive models for the inelastic deformation behavior of engineering alloys at low and high temperatures. Conventional creep and plasticity models have fundamental difficulties in reproducing high homologous temperature behavior. To improve the modeling capabilities {open_quotes}unified{close_quotes} state variable theories were conceived. They consider all inelastic deformation rate-dependent and do not have separate repositories for creep and plasticity. The viscoplasticity theory based on overstress (VBO), one of the unified theories, is introduced and its properties are delineated. At high homologous temperature where secondary and tertiary creep are observed modeling is primarily accomplished by a static recovery term and a softening isotropic stress. At low temperatures creep is merely a manifestation of rate dependence. The primary creep modeled at low homologous temperature is due to the rate dependence of the flow law. The model is unaltered in the transition from low to high temperature except that the softening of the isotropic stress and the influence of the static recovery term increase with an increase of the temperature.

  2. Changes of chemical and mechanical behavior of torrefied wheat straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shang, Lei; Ahrenfeldt, Jesper; Holm, Jens Kai

    2012-01-01

    wheat straw and torrefied wheat straw showed a clear reduction with increasing torrefaction temperature. In addition, Hardgrove Grindability Index (HGI) of wheat straw torrefied at different conditions was determined on a standard Hardgrove grinder. Both results showed an improvement of grindability......The purpose of the study was to investigate the influence of torrefaction on the grindability of wheat straw. Straw samples were torrefied at temperatures between 200 °C and 300 °C and with residence times between 0.5 and 3 h. Spectroscopic information obtained from ATR-FTIR indicated that below...

  3. Effect of Temperature on the Deformation Behavior of B2 Austenite in a Polycrystalline Ni49.9Ti50.1 (at.Percent) Shape Memory Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, A.; Benafan, O.; Noebe, R. D.; Padula, S. A., II; Clausen, B.; Vogel, S.; Vaidyanathan, R.

    2013-01-01

    Superelasticity in austenitic B2-NiTi is of great technical interest and has been studied in the past by several researchers [1]. However, investigation of temperature dependent deformation in B2-NiTi is equally important since competing mechanisms of stress-induced martensite (SIM), retained martensite, plastic and deformation twinning can lead to unusual mechanical behaviors. Identification of the role of various mechanisms contributing to the overall deformation response of B2-NiTi is imperative to understanding and maturing SMA-enabled technologies. Thus, the objective of this work was to study the deformation of polycrystalline Ni49.9Ti50.1 (at. %) above A(sub f) (105 C) in the B2 state at temperatures between 165-440 C, and generate a B2 deformation map showing active deformation mechanisms in different temperature-stress regimes.

  4. Mechanics of Granular Materials : Constitutive Behavior and Pattern Transformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Göncü, F.

    2012-01-01

    From pharmaceutical to mining or traveling desert dunes to earthquakes, granular materials are at the heart of many industries and natural phenomena. Improving the efficiency of the machines handling them or, constructing safer buildings requires a critical understanding of their behavior. However,

  5. Investigation of austenitizing temperature on wear behavior of austempered gray iron (AGI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, T.; Sutradhara, G.

    2016-09-01

    This study is about finding the effect of austenitizing temperature on microstructure and wear behavior of copper alloyed austempered gray iron (AGI), and then comparing it with an as- cast (solidified) state. Tensile and wear tests specimens are prepared from as-cast gray iron material, and austenitized at different temperatures and then austempered at a fixed austempering temperature. Resulting microstructures are characterized through optical microscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-Ray diffraction. Wear test is carried out using a block-on-roller multi-tribotester with sliding speed of 1.86 m/sec. In this investigation, wear behavior of all these austempered materials are determined and co-related with the micro structure. Hence the wear surface under scanning electron microscope showed that wear occurred mainly due to adhesion and delamination under dry sliding condition. The test results indicate that the austenitizing temperature has remarkable effect on resultant micro structure and wear behavior of austempered materials. Wear behavior is also found to be dependent on the hardness, tensile strength, austenite content and carbon content in austenite. It is shown that coarse ausferrite micro structure exhibited higher wear depth than fine ausferrite microstructure.

  6. Foraging behavior and physiological changes in precocial quail chicks in response to low temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijgsveld, KL; Visser, GH; Daan, S

    We examined whether low ambient temperatures influence foraging behavior of precocial Japanese quail chicks and alter the balance between investment in growth and thermogenic function. To test this, one group of chicks was exposed to 7 degreesC and one group to 24 degreesC during foraging throughout

  7. Phase behavior of polymer-diluent systems characterized by temperature modulated differential scanning calorimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, P.C.; Mulder, M.H.V.; Wessling, Matthias

    2001-01-01

    The thermodynamic phase behavior of a polymer–diluent system (atactic polystyrene–1-dodecanol) forms the fundamental basis of the description of thermally-induced demixing processes. In this paper, we demonstrate that temperature modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC) can accurately

  8. Analysis of identification of unsafe behavior in mechanical operation of first line workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Jian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of mechanical accidents in petroleum enterprises is closely related to the operation of frontline workers. Based on the behavior observation method, the paper takes a petroleum enterprise as objective to identify the unsafe behavior of the operation workers and its contributing factors. The influences of the different factor on the mechanical operation are investigated by using the analytic hierarchy process. The results show that there are eight kinds of unsafe behaviors of the mechanical operation in the petroleum enterprise. The factors that induce the unsafe behaviors include safety knowledge, safety consciousness, emotion, physiological conditions, safety attitude, manager behavior, management system, production task and human environment. Among them, safety attitude, safety consciousness, manager behavior and production task are the most important factors. Therefore, the safety production capacity of the frontline workers in petroleum enterprises should be improved through safety education training, manager lead demonstration, enterprise safety culture construction.

  9. Analysis of the Mechanical Behavior, Creep Resistance and Uniaxial Fatigue Strength of Martensitic Steel X46Cr13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brnic, Josip; Krscanski, Sanjin; Lanc, Domagoj; Brcic, Marino; Turkalj, Goran; Canadija, Marko; Niu, Jitai

    2017-04-06

    The article deals with the analysis of the mechanical behavior at different temperatures, uniaxial creep and uniaxial fatigue of martensitic steel X46Cr13 (1.4034, AISI 420). For the purpose of considering the aforementioned mechanical behavior, as well as determining the appropriate resistance to creep and fatigue strength levels, numerous uniaxial tests were carried out. Tests related to mechanical properties performed at different temperatures are presented in the form of engineering stress-strain diagrams. Short-time creep tests performed at different temperatures and different stress levels are presented in the form of creep curves. Fatigue tests carried out at stress ratios R = 0.25 and R = - 1 are shown in the form of S-N (fatigue) diagrams. The finite fatigue regime for each of the mentioned stress ratios is modeled by an inclined log line, while the infinite fatigue regime is modeled by a horizontal line, which represents the fatigue limit of the material and previously was calculated by the modified staircase method. Finally, the fracture toughness has been calculated based on the Charpy V-notch impact energy.

  10. Analysis of the Mechanical Behavior, Creep Resistance and Uniaxial Fatigue Strength of Martensitic Steel X46Cr13

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josip Brnic

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the analysis of the mechanical behavior at different temperatures, uniaxial creep and uniaxial fatigue of martensitic steel X46Cr13 (1.4034, AISI 420. For the purpose of considering the aforementioned mechanical behavior, as well as determining the appropriate resistance to creep and fatigue strength levels, numerous uniaxial tests were carried out. Tests related to mechanical properties performed at different temperatures are presented in the form of engineering stress-strain diagrams. Short-time creep tests performed at different temperatures and different stress levels are presented in the form of creep curves. Fatigue tests carried out at stress ratios R = 0.25 and R = − 1 are shown in the form of S–N (fatigue diagrams. The finite fatigue regime for each of the mentioned stress ratios is modeled by an inclined log line, while the infinite fatigue regime is modeled by a horizontal line, which represents the fatigue limit of the material and previously was calculated by the modified staircase method. Finally, the fracture toughness has been calculated based on the Charpy V-notch impact energy.

  11. Tribological Behavior of Mg97Zn1Y2 Alloy at Elevated Temperatures of 50-200 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, J.; Feng, J. H.; Yan, X. H.; Li, R. G.

    2017-10-01

    The tribological behavior of Mg97Zn1Y2 alloy was investigated using a pin-on-disk wear machine at wear temperatures of 50-200 °C. Morphologies and chemical compositions of worn surfaces were analyzed using scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer. The microstructural evolution and hardness change in subsurfaces were examined by optical microscopy and hardness tester. The results showed that the wear temperature had significant influence on the coefficient of friction and wear rate. At wear temperatures of 50-200 °C, with increasing applied load, the coefficient of friction went down rapidly then turned to decrease slowly in the mild wear regime, and continuously decreased modestly until the largest applied load in the severe wear regime. Increasing wear temperature from 50 to 200 °C decreased the mild to severe wear transition load linearly from 120 to 60 N. In the mild wear regime, the main wear mechanisms were identified as abrasion + oxidation and delamination + surface oxidation at 50-150 °C, and delamination at 200 °C, while in the severe wear regime, the main wear mechanisms were identified as severe plastic deformation + spallation of oxide layer and surface melting at 50-150 °C, and severe plastic deformation and surface melting at 200 °C. The microstructural transformation from the deformed to the dynamically recrystallized (DRX), and hardness change from the strain hardening to softening were found in the subsurfaces before and after mild to severe transition. The DRX softening mechanism was determined for mild to severe wear transition at 50-200 °C. A wear transition map was constructed for Mg97Zn1Y2 alloy on applied load versus wear temperature.

  12. Underlying Mechanisms of Improving Physical Activity Behavior after Rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ploeg, Hidde P.; Streppel, Kitty R.M.; van der Beek, Allard J.; Woude, Luc H.V.; van Harten, Willem H.; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam Marie Rosé; van Mechelen, Willem

    2008-01-01

    Background: Regular physical activity is beneficial for the health and functioning of people with a disability. Effective components of successful physical activity promotion interventions should be identified and disseminated. Purpose: To study the underlying mechanisms of the combined sport

  13. Underlying mechanisms of improving physical activity behavior after rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ploeg, H.P.; Streppel, K.R.; van der Beek, A.J.; van der Woude, L.H.V.; van Harten, W.H.; van Mechelen, W.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Regular physical activity is beneficial for the health and functioning of people with a disability. Effective components of successful physical activity promotion interventions should be identified and disseminated. Purpose: To study the underlying mechanisms of the combined sport

  14. Parasite manipulation of the proximate mechanisms that mediate social behavior in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Sabra L

    2003-08-01

    Paul MacLean was instrumental in establishing the brain regions that mediate the expression of social behaviors in vertebrates. Pathogens can exploit these central mechanisms to alter host social behaviors, including aggressive, reproductive, and parental behaviors. Although some behavioral changes after infection are mediated by the host (e.g., sickness behaviors), other behavioral modifications are mediated by the pathogen to facilitate transmission. The goal of this review is to provide examples of parasite-mediated changes in social behavior and to illustrate that parasites affect host behavior by infecting neurons, causing central nervous system (CNS) inflammation, and altering neurotransmitter and hormonal communication. Secondarily, a comparative approach will be used to demonstrate that the effects of parasites on social behavior are retained across several classes of vertebrates possibly because parasites affect the phylogenetically primitive structures of the limbic system and related neurochemical systems.

  15. Anisotropic properties of high-temperature polyimide thin films: Dielectric and thermal-expansion behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ree, M.; Chen, K.-J.; Kirby, D. P.; Katzenellenbogen, N.; Grischkowsky, D.

    1992-09-01

    Multilayer poly(p-phenylene biphenyltetracarboximide) (BPDA-PDA) polyimide films of 172 μm total thickness (11.4 μm per layer) were prepared from the poly(amic acid) precursor solution through repetition of a spin-coat/softbake/cure process. Wide-angle x-ray diffraction results indicate that the polyimide molecules in the multilayer films are highly ordered along the chain axes as well as in the lateral direction and furthermore are highly oriented in the film plane as observed in a single-layer film of 11.4 μm thickness. The multilayer films showed the same dynamic mechanical properties and glass transition behavior (Tg = 330 °C) as a single-layer film. For the multilayer films both the in-plane dielectric constant (ɛ'XY) and out-of-plane thermal-expansion coefficient (αZ) were measured using time-domain spectroscopy and conventional thermal mechanical analysis, respectively. The ɛ'XY at room temperature was 3.69 (±0.08) over a frequency range of 0.35-2.50 THz. A similar ɛ'XY is predicted at frequencies of ≤0.35 THz. In contrast to the ɛ'XY, a relatively lower out-of-plane dielectric constant (ɛ'Z) was observed: ɛ'Z = 2.96-3.03 (±0.02) at 1 MHz, depending on moisture content in the film. The dielectric loss ɛ`Z at 1 MHz was 0.011-0.014 (±0.001), depending on moisture content. The measured αZ was 74 ppm/°C over the temperature range of 25-150 °C, which was much higher than αXY = 2.6-5 ppm/°C. Consequently, large anisotropic ɛ' and α have been observed in the in plane and out of plane of the thermally imidized BPDA-PDA films. The anisotropic ɛ' and α were caused by high in-plane orientation of the polyimide molecules highly ordered along the chain axes in the films.

  16. Mechanical and Microstructural Evaluations of Lightweight Aggregate Geopolymer Concrete before and after Exposed to Elevated Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulkareem, Omar A; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Hussin, Kamarudin; Ismail, Khairul Nizar; Binhussain, Mohammed

    2013-10-09

    This paper presents the mechanical and microstructural characteristics of a lightweight aggregate geopolymer concrete (LWAGC) synthesized by the alkali-activation of a fly ash source (FA) before and after being exposed to elevated temperatures, ranging from 100 to 800 °C. The results show that the LWAGC unexposed to the elevated temperatures possesses a good strength-to-weight ratio compared with other LWAGCs available in the published literature. The unexposed LWAGC also shows an excellent strength development versus aging times, up to 365 days. For the exposed LWAGC to the elevated temperatures of 100 to 800 °C, the results illustrate that the concretes gain compressive strength after being exposed to elevated temperatures of 100, 200 and 300 °C. Afterward, the strength of the LWAGC started to deteriorate and decrease after being exposed to elevated temperatures of 400 °C, and up to 800 °C. Based on the mechanical strength results of the exposed LWAGCs to elevated temperatures of 100 °C to 800 °C, the relationship between the exposure temperature and the obtained residual compressive strength is statistically analyzed and achieved. In addition, the microstructure investigation of the unexposed LWAGC shows a good bonding between aggregate and mortar at the interface transition zone (ITZ). However, this bonding is subjected to deterioration as the LWAGC is exposed to elevated temperatures of 400, 600 and 800 °C by increasing the microcrack content and swelling of the unreacted silicates.

  17. Temperature Effect on Rheological Behavior of Silicone Oils. A Model for the Viscous Heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Mario R; Cuomo, Francesca; Massarotti, Nicola; Mauro, Alessandro; Salahudeen, Mohamed; Costagliola, Ciro; Ambrosone, Luigi

    2017-07-27

    The rheological behavior of silicone oils, (CH 3 ) 3 SiO-[Si(CH 3 ) 2 O] n -Si(CH 3 ) 3 , and their mixtures is studied. Shear-stress measurements, in the temperature range of 293-313 K, reveal that this polymer family is a group of shear-thinning liquids with a yield stress below which no flow occurs. Experimental diagrams, i.e., shear stress versus shear rate, are satisfactorily described by the Casson fluid model over a wide range of shear rates. In order to monitor the effect of temperature on fluid properties, Casson's rheological model is reformulated using the fictitious shear rate, γ̇ f , and the infinite-shear viscosity, η ∞ , as constitutive parameters. Due to low intermolecular forces and high chain flexibility, γ̇ f varies very little when the temperature increases. For this reason, the apparent material viscosity depends on temperature only through η ∞ , which exponentially decreases until high shear rates are reached, and there is more alignment possible. Interestingly, the temperature sensitivity of this pseudoplastic behavior is the same for all of the silicone oils investigated; therefore, they can be classified according to their tendency to emulsify. Experimental results are then used to model the flow of silicone oils in a cylindrical pipe and estimate the temperature increase due to viscous heating. Numerical results show that the normalized temperature, i.e., ratio of fluid temperature to wall temperature, increases approximately 23%, and the apparent viscosity decreases drastically, going toward the center of the tube. The non-Newtonian nature of fluid is reflected in the presence of a critical region. In this region, the velocity and temperature gradients vanish. Since silicon oil is a surgical tool, we hope that the acquired physicochemical information can provide help to facilitate the removal of this material during surgical procedures.

  18. Nondestructive Methods to Characterize Rock Mechanical Properties at Low-Temperature: Applications for Asteroid Capture Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Kara A.

    Recent government initiatives and commercial activities have targeted asteroids for in situ material characterization, manipulation, and possible resource extraction. Most of these activities and missions have proposed significant robotic components, given the risks and costs associated with manned missions. To successfully execute these robotic activities, detailed mechanical characteristics of the target space bodies must be known prior to contact, in order to appropriately plan and direct the autonomous robotic protocols. Unfortunately, current estimates of asteroid mechanical properties are based on limited direct information, and significant uncertainty remains specifically concerning internal structures, strengths, and elastic properties of asteroids. One proposed method to elucidate this information is through in situ, nondestructive testing of asteroid material immediately after contact, but prior to any manipulation or resource extraction activities. While numerous nondestructive rock characterization techniques have been widely deployed for terrestrial applications, these methods must be adapted to account for unique properties of asteroid material and environmental conditions of space. For example, asteroid surface temperatures may range from -100°C to 30°C due to diurnal cycling, and these low temperatures are especially noteworthy due to their deleterious influence on non-destructive testing. As a result, this thesis investigates the effect of low temperature on the mechanical characteristics and nondestructive technique responses of rock material. Initially, a novel method to produce low temperature rock samples was developed. Dry ice and methanol cooling baths of specific formulations were used to decrease rock to temperatures ranging from -60°C to 0°C. At these temperatures, shale, chalk, and limestone rock samples were exposed to several nondestructive and conventional mechanical tests, including Schmidt hammer, ultrasonic pulse velocity, point

  19. Influence of temperature and addition of fiber in the flow behavior of orange juice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Siche

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study the influence of the addition of orange fiber in the flow behavior of orange juice was evaluated, using for this the Herschel-Bulkley model parameters. It was observed that the flow behavior of the juices changed due to the addition of fiber, from Newtonian to Pseudoplastic when its fiber content was 5% and the temperature changed from 30 °C to 20 °C, and from Pseudoplastic to Herschel-Bulkley when its fiber content was 12.5% and the temperature changed from 10 °C to 0 °C. The increase in fiber content resulted in a progressive increase of consistency and a decrease of the flow behavior index.

  20. Wear Behavior of Mechanically Alloyed Ti-Based Bulk Metallic Glass Composites Containing Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Sheng Lin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The present paper reports the preparation and wear behavior of mechanically alloyed Ti-based bulk metallic glass composites containing carbon nanotube (CNT particles. The differential scanning calorimeter results show that the thermal stability of the amorphous matrix is affected by the presence of CNT particles. Changes in glass transition temperature (Tg and crystallization temperature (Tx suggest that deviations in the chemical composition of the amorphous matrix occurred because of a partial dissolution of the CNT species into the amorphous phase. Although the hardness of CNT/Ti50Cu28Ni15Sn7 bulk metallic glass composites is increased with the addition of CNT particles, the wear resistance of such composites is not directly proportional to their hardness, and does not follow the standard wear law. A worn surface under a high applied load shows that the 12 vol. % CNT/Ti50Cu28Ni15Sn7 bulk metallic glass composite suffers severe wear compared with monolithic Ti50Cu28Ni15Sn7 bulk metallic glass.

  1. Mechanical properties of biaxially strained poly(L-lactide) tubes: Strain rate and temperature dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvdal, Alexandra Liv Vest; Andreasen, Jens Wenzel; Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    2017-01-01

    their Tg for improvement of their strength, in a two-step process (sequential straining). Mechanical properties and crystal morphology were investigated as a function of processing strain rate and temperature. DSC revealed that a low processing strain rate allows molecular chain relaxation in the direction...... of strain and the crystallization is suppressed. Faster strain rates on the other hand suppress chain relaxation, and results in crystalline tubes. The mechanical properties are influenced by both processing strain rate and temperature. Low strain rates allow chain relaxation resulting in the lowest...... strength and stiffness, whereas a larger stiffness and strength is achieved by increasing strain rate and temperature. Isotropic mechanical properties are only observed at high processing strain rates....

  2. Thermal fluctuations affect the transcriptome through mechanisms independent of average temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Jesper Givskov Sørensen; Mads Fristrup Schou; Torsten Nygaard Kristensen; Volker Loeschcke

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial ectotherms are challenged by variation in both mean and variance of temperature. Phenotypic plasticity (thermal acclimation) might mitigate adverse effects, however, we lack a fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms of thermal acclimation and how they are affected by fluctuating temperature. Here we investigated the effect of thermal acclimation in Drosophila melanogaster on critical thermal maxima (CTmax) and associated global gene expression profiles as induced by ...

  3. A Comprehensive Study on the Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Nanoclay Reinforced Polymers at Various Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    A Comprehensive Study on the Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Nanoclay Reinforced Polymers at Various Temperatures*† Selen Bayar, Ph.D...thermal properties of nanoclay reinforced polymer resins are investigated at various temperatures. The effect of nanoclay reinforcement was elicited by...The results indicate that the addition of nanoclay to PP leads to a stronger and stiffer nanocomposite. It was also found that the strength and

  4. Investigation of Electrical Latchup and SEL Mechanisms at Low Temperature for Applications Down to 50 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, A. Al; Artola, L.; Ducret, S.; Hubert, G.; Perrier, F.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a physical investigation of the mechanisms induced by the low temperature on single-event latchup in CMOS inverters for a range of technology nodes (250 nm from Sofradir and 180 nm from IBM). For the first time, the TCAD simulations show a good agreement of latchup characteristics with the experimental measurements at cryogenic temperatures. Additionally, a more robust technology provided by Sofradir was demonstrated.

  5. Behavioral addictions in addiction medicine: from mechanisms to practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banz, Barbara C; Yip, Sarah W; Yau, Yvonne H C; Potenza, Marc N

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress has been made in our understanding of nonsubstance or "behavioral" addictions, although these conditions and their most appropriate classification remain debated and the knowledge basis for understanding the pathophysiology of and treatments for these conditions includes important gaps. Recent developments include the classification of gambling disorder as a "Substance-Related and Addictive Disorder" in the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) and proposed diagnostic criteria for Internet Gaming Disorder in Section 3 of DSM-5. This chapter reviews current neuroscientific understandings of behavioral addictions and the potential of neurobiological data to assist in the development of improved policy, prevention, and treatment efforts. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Neurobiology of Consummatory Behavior: Mechanisms Underlying Overeating and Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barson, Jessica R.; Morganstern, Irene; Leibowitz, Sarah F.

    2013-01-01

    Consummatory behavior is driven not just by caloric need but also by emotional need. In the last several decades, a wide variety of models have been used to study the systems that drive food and drug intake. These include selective breeding for a specific trait, manipulation of gene expression, forced or voluntary exposure to a substance, and identification of biomarkers that predict which animals are prone to overconsuming specific substances. From this research, numerous brain areas and neurochemicals have been identified that drive consummatory behavior. While energy homeostasis is primarily mediated by the hypothalamus, reinforcement is more strongly mediated by nuclei outside of the hypothalamus, in mesocorticolimbic regions. Orexigenic neurochemicals that control food intake can provide a general signal for promoting caloric intake or a more specific signal for stimulating consumption of a particular macronutrient, fat, carbohydrate or protein. Those involved in controlling fat ingestion, including galanin, enkephalin, orexin, melanin-concentrating hormone and the endocannabinoids, show positive feedback with this macronutrient, with these peptides both increasing fat intake and being further stimulated by its intake. This positive relationship offers some explanation for why foods high in fat are so often overconsumed. Consumption of ethanol, a drug of abuse that also contains calories, is similarly driven by these neurochemical systems involved in fat intake, consistent with evidence closely relating fat and ethanol consumption. Further understanding of these systems involved in consummatory behavior will allow researchers to develop effective therapies for the treatment of overeating as well as drug abuse. PMID:23520598

  7. Effect of Temperature on Microstructure and Fracture Mechanisms in Friction Stir Welded Al6061 Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorbane, A.; Ayoub, G.; Mansoor, B.; Hamade, R. F.; Imad, A.

    2017-05-01

    Aluminum and its alloys are widely used in different industries due to such attractive properties as adequate strength, ductility, and low density. It is desirable to characterize welds of aluminum alloys obtained using "friction stir welding" at high temperatures. Al-to-Al (both 6061-T6) butt joints are produced by friction stir welding at tool rotation speed of 1600 rpm and four levels of tool advancing speeds: 250, 500, 750, and 1000 mm/min. Microstructural properties of the different welds are investigated. Observed are noticeable differences in microstructure characteristics between the various weld zones. Mechanical properties of these welded joints are characterized under tensile tests at temperatures of 25, 100, 200, and 300 °C, at a constant strain rate of 10-3/s. The optimum microstructural and mechanical properties were obtained for the samples FS welded with 1600 rpm tool rotation speed at 1000 mm/min tool advancing speed. The studied welds exhibited yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, and strain to failure with values inferior of those of the base material. Observations of postmortem samples revealed that in the temperature range of 25-200 °C the locus of failure originates at the region between the thermo-mechanically affected zone and the heat-affected zones. However, at higher temperatures (300 °C), the failure occurs in the stir zone. A change in the crack initiation mechanism with temperature is suggested to explain this observation.

  8. Effect of Firing Temperature on Mechanical Properties of Fired Masonry Bricks Produced from Ipetumodu Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatai Olufemi ARAMIDE

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of varied firing temperature on the mechanical properties of fired masonry bricks samples produced from Ipetumodu clay was investigated. The clay sample was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM for the evaluation of the morphology of the sample using secondary electron imaging; and the phases/compositions of the samples using energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX analysis, X-ray diffractometer (XRD, X-ray fluorescence (XRF and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS. The brick samples of standard dimensions were prepared from the clay slurry. The prepared samples were sun dried for 72 hours and then fired at varied temperature (held for an hour and then allowed to cool to room temperature in the furnace. The mechanical properties (compression strength, shear strength, modulus of rupture, density and hardness of the samples were then investigated. It was observed that the mechanical properties of the fired brick samples varied with varying firing temperature due to phase changes/chemical reaction between the phases in the clay sample. It was concluded that the optimum mechanical property for brick samples within the temperature range considered is obtained at 950oC.

  9. Numerical simulation of the mechanical behavior of ultrafine- and coarse-grained Zr-Nb alloys over a wide range of strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbenta, V. A.; Skripnyak, N. V.; Skripnyak, V. A.; Skripnyak, E. G.

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents the results on the development of theoretical methods of evaluation and prediction of mechanical properties of Zr-Nb alloys over a range of strain rates from 10-3 to 103 s-1. The mechanical behavior of coarse- and ultrafine-grained Zr-1Nb (E110) was investigated numerically. The ranges of strain rates and temperatures in which the mechanical behavior of Zr-1Nb alloy can be described using modified models of Johnson-Cook and Zerilli-Armstrong were defined. The results can be used in engineering analysis of designed technical systems for nuclear reactors.

  10. Effects of environmental temperature on oviposition behavior in three blow fly species of forensic importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ody, Helen; Bulling, Mark T; Barnes, Kate M

    2017-06-01

    A number of factors are known to affect blow fly behavior with respect to oviposition. Current research indicates that temperature is the most significant factor. However temperature thresholds for oviposition in forensically important blow flies have not been well studied. Here, the oviposition behavior of three species of forensically important blow fly species (Calliphora vicina, Calliphora vomitoria and Lucilia sericata,) was studied under controlled laboratory conditions over a range of temperatures (10-40°C). Lower temperature thresholds for oviposition of 16°C and 17.5°C were established for C. vomitoria and L. sericata respectively, whilst C. vicina continued to lay eggs at 10°C. C. vomitoria and L. sericata both continued to lay eggs at 40°C, whilst the highest temperature at which oviposition occurred in C. vicina was 35°C. Within these thresholds there was considerable variation in the number of surviving pupae, with a general pattern of a single peak within the range of temperatures at which eggs were laid, but with the pattern being much less distinct for L. sericata. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization of pre-curing behavior of urea-formaldehyde resin affected by different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y. Z.; Xiao, H.

    2017-07-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was applied to investigate the thermal behavior of pre-curing urea-formaldehyde (UF) resin as affected by different temperatures; the activation energies (Ea) in different stages during the pre-curing course were analyzed by Kissinger method. The results indicated that the curing time was decreased with temperature increasing. Under isothermal temperature, the DSC curves of pre-curing UF resin shifted to shorter time, the conversion increased with increasing temperature. In dynamic scanning, with the pre-curing degree increasing, the DSC curves shifted to lower temperature, while both the onset and peak temperature decreased due to the cross-linking degree increased. The Ea and Z value decreased obviously firstly due to the concentration and reactivity of the reactants increased with water evaporation in the first stage, and then the increasing cross-linking degree and the formation of the network structure lead to both the Ea and Z value increasing in the second stage, indicating that the pre-curing behavior appeared.

  12. Exploring Managerial Mechanisms That Influence Innovative Work Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bysted, Rune; Jespersen, Kristina Risom

    2014-01-01

    Increasing employees’ innovative work behaviour is a complex process of developing an internal climate supportive of idea generation and realization through use of financial, participative, and decentralization mechanisms. This article investigates the effectiveness of these managerial mechanisms...... in a public versus private context. In a survey in Scandinavia, 8,310 full-time employees were split into public and private employees and analysed with regression models for differences in effectiveness. From the results, two distinct perceptions emerged. Public employees perceive innovative work behaviour...... as extra-role behaviour to be compensated for. Private employees recognize innovative work behaviour as necessary behaviour for career advancement....

  13. Mechanical behavior of a fluid-sensitive material during liquid diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widiastuti, Indah; Sbarski, Igor; Masood, S. H.

    2014-05-01

    This paper described the analytical study that we performed in an attempt to understand the combined effect of liquid diffusion and temperature on the mechanical response of viscoelastic liquid-sensitive material. A constitutive equation for linear viscoelasticity, which includes the effect of liquid diffusion, is used to model the mechanical response of a fluid-sensitive polymer such as PLA-based bioplastic. The viscoelastic characteristics which represent material degradation due to liquid diffusion were expressed using a creep-based formulation represented by Burger's model. Creep experiment data were fitted to the Burgers model to provide a liquid content-dependent set of input data for subsequent time-dependent analysis. Further, analytical solutions for stresses and deformations were obtained from the corresponding elastic solution by applying the Correspondence Principle, using previously defined material characteristics. Spatial and time variations of stress and deformation were evaluated to give a precise description of the material behavior under hygroscopic conditions. We propose a stress concentration factor to take into account the liquid diffusion-induced stress that may result in a failure of an application. The results emphasize the importance of considering liquid diffusion and viscoelastic properties in the design of components using liquid-absorbable material.

  14. Mechanical properties and tritium release behavior of neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishitsuka, E.; Kawamura, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Terai, T.; Tanaka, S. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan)

    2000-04-01

    Beryllium pebbles are expected as a neutron multiplier of a fusion reactor blanket. Mechanical properties and tritium release behaviors of the neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles were tested as a post irradiation examination (PIE). Two kinds of beryllium specimens (diameter:1 mm, grain size: about 0.5 mm), which were fabricated by the rotating electrode method (REM) and by the Mg reduction method (MRM), were irradiated with a total fast neutron fluence of 1.6 x 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} (E>0.1 MeV) at 673, 773 and 873 K. The estimated helium concentration and dpa value were about 1 x 10{sup 3} appmHe and 10 dpa, respectively. Compression tests were carried out at the room temperature in the Beryllium PIE facility of JMTR (Japan materials testing reactor) hot laboratory. Compression speed was 0.2 mm/min in ten tests for each specimen. From the results of compression test, no significant difference in the compression strength was observed between two kinds of beryllium pebbles. Additionally, it was clear that not only helium concentration but also dpa value was an important factor on the mechanical properties, because the compression strength of the high dpa specimens (10 dpa) was smaller than that of the low dpa specimens (6 dpa) with similar helium concentration (about 1 x 10{sup 3} appmHe). Also, the tritium release experiment will be carried out for these specimens, and results will be presented in this workshop. (orig.)

  15. Age hardening, fracture behavior and mechanical properties of QE22 Mg alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Khan MD

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure, mechanical properties and fracture behavior of an as-received QE22 alloy have been investigated under different thermal conditions, including solution treated (ST, under aged (UA, peak aged (PA and over aged (OA conditions. A significant increase in hardness of 27%, yield strength of 60% and ultimate tensile strength of 19% was observed in peak aged sample as compared to solution treated sample. The improvements of mechanical strength properties are mainly associated with the metastable λ and β′ precipitates. Grain growth was not observed in the ST samples after subjecting to UA and PA treatments due to the presence of eutectic Mg12Nd particles along the grain boundaries. In over aged sample, significant grain growth occurred because of dissolution of eutectic phase particles. Different natures of crack initiation and propagation were observed under different thermal conditions during tensile testing at room temperature. The mode of failure of solution treated sample is transgranular, cleavage and twin boundary fractures. A mixed mode of transgranular, intergranular, cleavage and twin boundary failure is observed in both peak aged and over aged samples.

  16. Mechanical behavior of a lanthanum-doped magnesium alloy at different strain rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28223-0001 (United States); School of Aeronautics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Yin, W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28223-0001 (United States); Kondoh, K. [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaragi, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Jones, Tyrone L.; Kecskes, L.J. [WMRD, US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Deer Creek Loop, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5069 (United States); Yarmolenko, S.N. [NSF-ERC, Department of Mechanical Engineering, NC A& T State University, 1601 E. Market Street, Greensboro, NC 27411 (United States); Wei, Q., E-mail: qwei@uncc.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28223-0001 (United States)

    2015-02-25

    The mechanical behavior of a lanthanum doped Mg alloy, AZXE7111, (Mg–7Al–1Zn–1Ca–1La, all in wt%) extruded at different temperatures has been investigated under both quasi-static (strain rate ~1×10{sup −3} s{sup −1}) and dynamic (strain rate ~4×10{sup 3} s{sup −1}) compressive loading. Comparison has been made against the experimental results of two conventional Mg alloys, AZ91E and WE43. It was observed via transmission electron microscopy (TEM) that the nanoscale intermetallic compounds of Al{sub 2}Ca and Al{sub 11}La{sub 3}, have presumably formed during the hot extrusion process. These compounds are believed to contribute significantly to the strength by reducing the grain size and acting as dislocation barriers. Additionally, twinning has been considered as the main mechanism for the higher strain hardening rate at high strain rates than that at low strain rates. It has been found that the ultimate strength of the alloy is only ~10% higher at dynamic loading rate than at quasi-static loading rate. Localized micro-shear fracture was observed and adiabatic shear mode was suggested by further examination of dynamically loaded specimens. The shear localization is further discussed in detail and it is suggested that reduced strain hardening rate is responsible for shear localization and subsequent fracture at both low and high strain rates.

  17. Adsorption behavior and mechanism of methyl blue on zinc oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Lan, Jing; Yang, Ye; Wei, Tiefeng; Tan, Ruiqin; Song, Weijie

    2013-11-01

    The adsorption behavior and mechanism of methyl blue (MB) on zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles were investigated in this work. The adsorption capacity of MB on the ZnO nanoparticles reached 10.70 ± 0.80 mmol/g, which was the highest among today's adsorbents for removing MB. The adsorption process was independent of pH and temperature in the experimental range. The adsorption kinetics was elucidated by the pseudo-second-order model and exhibited 2-stage intra-particle diffusion model. The adsorption isotherm fitted well with the Temkin model. The calculated parameter from Temkin model indicated the adsorption process was spontaneous with a uniform distribution of binding energies. The mechanism studies by XPS analysis confirmed that ionic bonding between Zn2+ in Zn(OH)+ and sulfonic groups of MB was the major interaction between MB and ZnO nanoparticles. The adsorption for MB by ZnO nanoparticles was selective. This work indicates that ZnO nanoparticles are promising adsorbents for removal of MB from waste water.

  18. Adsorption behavior and mechanism of methyl blue on zinc oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Fan [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo Institute of Material Technology and Engineering (China); Lan, Jing [Qingdao Agricultural University, College of Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences (China); Yang, Ye; Wei, Tiefeng [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo Institute of Material Technology and Engineering (China); Tan, Ruiqin [Ningbo University, Faculty of Information Science and Engineering (China); Song, Weijie, E-mail: weijiesong@nimte.ac.cn [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo Institute of Material Technology and Engineering (China)

    2013-11-15

    The adsorption behavior and mechanism of methyl blue (MB) on zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles were investigated in this work. The adsorption capacity of MB on the ZnO nanoparticles reached 10.70 ± 0.80 mmol/g, which was the highest among today’s adsorbents for removing MB. The adsorption process was independent of pH and temperature in the experimental range. The adsorption kinetics was elucidated by the pseudo-second-order model and exhibited 2-stage intra-particle diffusion model. The adsorption isotherm fitted well with the Temkin model. The calculated parameter from Temkin model indicated the adsorption process was spontaneous with a uniform distribution of binding energies. The mechanism studies by XPS analysis confirmed that ionic bonding between Zn{sup 2+} in Zn(OH){sup +} and sulfonic groups of MB was the major interaction between MB and ZnO nanoparticles. The adsorption for MB by ZnO nanoparticles was selective. This work indicates that ZnO nanoparticles are promising adsorbents for removal of MB from waste water.

  19. Ultrasonic and mechanical behavior of green and partially sintered alumina: Effects of slurry consolidation chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schilling, C.H.; Garcia, V.J.; Smith, R.M. [Ames Lab., IA (United States)]|[Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Roberts, R.A. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1998-10-01

    Green and partially sintered compacts of {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder were made by filtration of aqueous suspensions under three conditions: (i) electrostatic stabilization without any organic additive, (ii) strong flocculation near the isoelectric point without any organic additive, and (iii) weak flocculation by the use of maltodextrin or oxalic acid additives. The authors evaluated relationships between the macroscopic and interparticle mechanical behavior of these compacts using model correlations with measurements of diametral compression, ultrasonic velocity, and ultrasonic attenuation. Although type iii green specimens were less dense than type i, type iii exhibited significant increases in velocity, macroscopic Young`s modulus, interparticle-contact stiffness, and diametral compressive strength, suggesting that the mechanism of stiffening/strengthening entailed interparticle bridging of maltodextrin or oxalic acid. These properties were significantly reduced upon heating type iii specimens to 500 C, suggesting that pyrolysis of surface-adsorbed maltodextrin and oxalic acid may have reduced the interparticle stiffness and strength. In contrast, negligible changes in these properties occurred upon heating type i specimens to the same temperature. Despite small increases in packing density, significant decreases in attenuation and significant increases in velocity, interparticle-contact stiffness, and Young`s modulus occurred upon heating all specimens to {ge}700 C, suggesting the formation of interparticle necks by solid-state sintering.

  20. Social carry-over effects on non-social behavioral variation: mechanisms and consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petri Toivo Niemelä

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The field of animal personality is interested in decomposing behaviors into different levels of variation, with its present focus on the ecological and evolutionary causes and consequences of expressed variation. Recently the role of the social environment, i.e. social partners, has been suggested to affect behavioral variation and induce selection on animal personality. Social partner effects exist because characters of social partners (e.g. size, behavior, affect the behavioral expression of a focal individual. Here, we 1 first review the proximate mechanisms underlying the social partner effects on behavioral expression and the timescales at which such effects might take place. We then 2 discuss how within- and among-individual variation in single behaviors and covariation between multiple behaviors, caused by social partners, can carry-over to non-social behaviors expressed outside the social context. Finally, we 3 highlight evolutionary consequences of social carry-over effects to non-social behaviors and 4 suggest study designs and statistical approaches which can be applied to study the nature and evolutionary consequences of social carry-over effects on non-social behaviors. Understanding the proximate mechanisms underpinning the social partner effects is important since it opens a door for deeper understanding of how social environments can affect behavioral variation and covariation at multiple levels, and the evolution of non-social behaviors (i.e. exploration, activity, boldness that are affected by social interactions.

  1. Nanoindentation Investigation of Temperature Effects on the Mechanical Properties of Nafion® 117

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Re Xia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Operating temperature can be a limiting factor in reliable applications of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM fuel cells. Nanoindentation tests were performed on perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA membranes (Nafion® 117 in order to study the influence of the temperature condition on their mechanical properties. The hardness and reduced modulus of Nafion® 117 were measured within a certain temperature range, from 10 to 70 °C. The results indicate that both hardness and elastic modulus show non-monotonic transition with the increase of the test temperature, with reaching peak values of 0.143 and 0.833 GPa at 45 °C. It also found that the membranes have a shape memory effect and a temperature dependent shape recovery ratio.

  2. Mechanisms for chemostatic behavior in catchments: implications for CO2 consumption by mineral weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clow, David W.; Mast, M. Alisa

    2010-01-01

    Concentrations of weathering products in streams often show relatively little variation compared to changes in discharge, both at event and annual scales. In this study, several hypothesized mechanisms for this “chemostatic behavior” were evaluated, and the potential for those mechanisms to influence relations between climate, weathering fluxes, and CO2 consumption via mineral weathering was assessed. Data from Loch Vale, an alpine catchment in the Colorado Rocky Mountains, indicates that cation exchange and seasonal precipitation and dissolution of amorphous or poorly crystalline aluminosilicates are important processes that help regulate solute concentrations in the stream; however, those processes have no direct effect on CO2 consumption in catchments. Hydrograph separation analyses indicate that old water stored in the subsurface over the winter accounts for about one-quarter of annual streamflow, and almost one-half of annual fluxes of Na and SiO2 in the stream; thus, flushing of old water by new water (snowmelt) is an important component of chemostatic behavior. Hydrologic flushing of subsurface materials further induces chemostatic behavior by reducing mineral saturation indices and increasing reactive mineral surface area, which stimulate mineral weathering rates. CO2 consumption by carbonic acid mediated mineral weathering was quantified using mass-balance calculations; results indicated that silicate mineral weathering was responsible for approximately two-thirds of annual CO2 consumption, and carbonate weathering was responsible for the remaining one-third. CO2 consumption was strongly dependent on annual precipitation and temperature; these relations were captured in a simple statistical model that accounted for 71% of the annual variation in CO2 consumption via mineral weathering in Loch Vale.

  3. Effects of thermal aging on thermo-mechanical behavior of a glass sealant for solid oxide cell applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdoli, Hamid; Alizadeh, Parvin; Boccaccini, Dino

    2014-01-01

    Thermo-mechanical properties of a silicate based glass and its potential use for sealing application in intermediate temperature solid oxide cell (SOC) are presented in this paper. Effects of thermal aging are discussed on structural and microstructural evolution, thermal expansion, viscosity......, modulus of elasticity, and high-temperature deformation of the glass. The balance between the viscosity and viscous flowing behavior was explored for the non-aged and aged glasses as it is essential to have a successful sealing for a SOC stack. The results reveal a temperature dependence of Young......'s modulus in which a transition between a slow softening (elastic) regime and a rapid softening one was observed. Crystallization induced by thermal aging led to higher creep resistance, but lower capability of crack healing when inspected by electron microscopy. However, potential of stress relaxation...

  4. Thermal fluctuations affect the transcriptome through mechanisms independent of average temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Schou, Mads Fristrup; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard; Loeschcke, Volker

    2016-08-04

    Terrestrial ectotherms are challenged by variation in both mean and variance of temperature. Phenotypic plasticity (thermal acclimation) might mitigate adverse effects, however, we lack a fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms of thermal acclimation and how they are affected by fluctuating temperature. Here we investigated the effect of thermal acclimation in Drosophila melanogaster on critical thermal maxima (CTmax) and associated global gene expression profiles as induced by two constant and two ecologically relevant (non-stressful) diurnally fluctuating temperature regimes. Both mean and fluctuation of temperature contributed to thermal acclimation and affected the transcriptome. The transcriptomic response to mean temperatures comprised modification of a major part of the transcriptome, while the response to fluctuations affected a much smaller set of genes, which was highly independent of both the response to a change in mean temperature and to the classic heat shock response. Although the independent transcriptional effects caused by fluctuations were relatively small, they are likely to contribute to our understanding of thermal adaptation. We provide evidence that environmental sensing, particularly phototransduction, is a central mechanism underlying the regulation of thermal acclimation to fluctuating temperatures. Thus, genes and pathways involved in phototransduction are likely of importance in fluctuating climates.

  5. Rheological and Mechanical Property Measurements of PMDI Foam at Elevated Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemer, Martin Bernard [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Thermal and Fluid Sciences; Brooks, Carlton F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Thermal and Fluid Sciences; Shelden, Bion [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Thermal and Fluid Sciences; Soehnel, Melissa Marie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Thermal and Fluid Sciences; Barringer, David Alan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Thermal and Fluid Sciences

    2014-10-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the viscosity of liquefied 20 lb/ft3 poly methylene diisocyanate (PMDI) foam and the stress required to puncture solid PMDI foam at elevated temperatures. For the rheological measurements the foam was a priori liquefied in a pressure vessel such that the volatiles were not lost in the liquefaction process. The viscosity of the liquefied PMDI foam was found to be Newtonian with a power law dependence on temperature log10(μ/Pa s) = 20.6 – 9.5 log10(T/°C) for temperatures below 170 °C. Above 170 °C, the viscosity was in the range of 0.3 Pa s which is close to the lower measurement limit (≈ 0.1 Pa s) of the pressurized rheometer. The mechanical pressure required to break through 20lb/ft3 foam was 500-800 psi at temperatures from room temperature up to 180 °C. The mechanical pressure required to break through 10 lb/ft3 was 170-300 psi at temperatures from room temperature up to 180 °C. We have not been able to cause gas to break through the 20 lb/ft3 PMDI foam at gas pressures up to 100 psi.

  6. Theoretical Modeling of Mechanical Behavior and Release Properties of Microcapsules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sagis, L.M.C.

    2015-01-01

    Microcapsules in food often have a shell with a complex microstructure; the mechanical and structural properties of these shells affect the response of the capsules to deforming forces and the release kinetics of encapsulated components. In this chapter we will discuss a number of models which are

  7. Toward a quantitative understanding of mechanical behavior of nanocrystalline metals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dao, M.; Lu, L.; Asaro, R. J.; De Hosson, J. T. M.; Ma, E.

    Focusing on nanocrystalline (nc) pure face-centered cubic metals, where systematic experimental data are available, this paper presents a brief overview of the recent progress made in improving mechanical properties of nc materials, and in quantitatively and mechanistically understanding the

  8. Size effects in the mechanical behavior of cellular materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tekoglu, C; Onck, PR

    2005-01-01

    Effective mechanical properties of cellular materials depend strongly on the specimen size to the cell size ratio. Experimental studies performed on aluminium foams show that under uniaxial compression, the stiffness of these materials falls below the corresponding bulk value, when the ratio of the

  9. Bending behavior of thermoplastic composite sheets viscoelasticity and temperature dependency in the draping process

    CERN Document Server

    Ropers, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Within the scope of this work, Steffen Ropers evaluates the viscoelastic and temperature-dependent nature of the bending behavior of thermoplastic composite sheets in order to further enhance the predictability of the draping simulation. This simulation is a useful tool for the development of robust large scale processes for continuously fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRP). The bending behavior thereby largely influences the size and position of wrinkles, which are one of the most common processing defects for continuously fiber-reinforced parts. Thus, a better understanding of the bending behavior of thermoplastic composite sheets as well as an appropriate testing method along with corresponding material models contribute to a wide-spread application of CFRPs in large scale production. Contents Thermoplastic Prepregs Draping Simulation of Thermoplastic Prepregs Bending Characterization of Textile Composites Modeling of Bending Behavior Target Groups Researchers and students in the field of polymer, lightweight,...

  10. Evaluation of the mechanical performance of silicon carbide in TRISO fuel at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohbeck, Nadia, E-mail: nadia.rohbeck@manchester.ac.uk; Xiao, Ping, E-mail: p.xiao@manchester.ac.uk

    2016-09-15

    The HTR design envisions fuel operating temperatures of up to 1000 °C and in case of an accident even 1600 °C are conceivable. To ensure safety in all conditions a thorough understanding of the impact of an extreme temperature environment is necessary. This work assesses the high temperature mechanical performance of the silicon carbide (SiC) layer within the tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particle as it poses the main barrier against fission product release into the primary circuit. Therefore, simulated fuel was fabricated by fluidized bed chemical vapour deposition; varying the deposition conditions resulted in strongly differing SiC microstructures for the various samples. Subsequently the TRISO particles were annealed in inert atmosphere at temperatures ranging from 1600 °C up to 2200 °C. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy showed that strong disintegration of the SiC layer occurred from 2100 °C onwards, but initial signs of porosity formation were visible already at 1800 °C. Still, the elastic modulus and hardness as measured by nanoindentation were hardly impaired. After annealing stoichiometric SiC coatings showed a reduction in fracture strength as determined by a modified crush test, however the actual annealing temperature from 1600 °C to 2000 °C had no measureable effect. Furthermore, a technique was developed to measure the elastic modulus and hardness in situ up to 500 °C using a high temperature nanoindentation facility. This approach allows conducting tests while the specimen and indenter tip are heated to a specific measurement temperature, thus obtaining reliable values for the temperature dependent mechanical properties of the material. For the SiC layer in TRISO particles it was found that the elastic modulus decreased slightly from room temperature up to 500 °C, whereas the hardness was reduced more severely to approximately half of its ambient temperature value.

  11. Theoretical Models in the Study of Temperature Effect on Steel Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Gorbănescu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The governing laws adopted by two high qualified scientific organizations (D.T.U. and Eurocode for the variation of steel mechanical properties at high temperatures are presented. There are no significant differences between them, but generally, the items advanced by Eurocode 3, part 1.2, are dopted in the most works that approach the thermical-mechanical analysis of steel structures.

  12. Behavioral and mechanical determinants of collective subsurface nest excavation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaenkova, Daria; Gravish, Nick; Rodriguez, Greggory; Kutner, Rachel; Goodisman, Michael A D; Goldman, Daniel I

    2015-05-01

    Collective construction of topologically complex structures is one of the triumphs of social behavior. For example, many ant species construct underground nests composed of networks of tunnels and chambers. Excavation by these 'superorganisms' depends on the biomechanics of substrate manipulation, the interaction of individuals, and media stability and cohesiveness. To discover principles of robust social excavation, we used X-ray computed tomography to monitor the growth in three dimensions of nests built by groups of fire ants (Solenopsis invicta) in laboratory substrates composed of silica particles, manipulating two substrate properties: particle size and gravimetric moisture content. Ants were capable of nest construction in all substrates tested other than completely dry or fully saturated; for a given particle size, nest volume was relatively insensitive to moisture content. Tunnels were deepest at intermediate moisture content and the maximum tunnel depth correlated with measured yield force on small rod-shaped intruders (a proxy for cohesive strength). This implies that increased cohesive strength allowed creation of tunnels that were resistant to perturbation but did not decrease individual excavation ability. Ants used two distinct behaviors to create pellets composed of wetted particles, depending on substrate composition. However, despite the ability to create larger stable pellets in more cohesive substrates, pellet sizes were similar across all conditions. We posit that this pellet size balances the individual's load-carrying ability with the need to carry this pellet through confined crowded tunnels. We conclude that effective excavation of similarly shaped nests can occur in a diversity of substrates through sophisticated digging behaviors by individuals which accommodate both differing substrate properties and the need to work within the collective. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Differential effects of dopamine and opioid receptor blockade on motivated Coca-Cola drinking behavior and associated changes in brain, skin and muscle temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyatkin, E A

    2010-05-05

    Although pharmacological blockade of both dopamine (DA) and opiate receptors has an inhibiting effect on appetitive motivated behaviors, it is still unclear which physiological mechanisms affected by these treatments underlie the behavioral deficit. To clarify this issue, we examined how pharmacological blockade of either DA (SCH23390+eticlopride at 0.2 mg/kg each) or opioid receptors (naloxone 1 mg/kg) affects motor activity and temperature fluctuations in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), temporal muscle, and facial skin associated with motivated Coca-Cola drinking behavior in rats. In drug-free conditions, presentation of a cup containing 5 ml of Coca-Cola induced locomotor activation and rapid NAcc temperature increases, which both transiently decreased during drinking, and phasically increased again after the cup was emptied. Muscle temperatures followed this pattern, but increases were weaker and more delayed than those in the NAcc. Skin temperature rapidly dropped after cup presentation, remained at low levels during consumption, and slowly restored during post-consumption behavioral activation. By itself, DA receptor blockade induced robust decrease in spontaneous locomotion, moderate increases in brain and muscle temperatures, and a relative increase in skin temperatures, suggesting metabolic activation coupled with adynamia. Following this treatment (approximately 180 min), motor activation to cup presentation and Coca-Cola consumption were absent, but rats showed NAcc and muscle temperature increases following cup presentation comparable to control. Therefore, DA receptor blockade does not affect significantly central and peripheral autonomic responses to appetitive stimuli, but eliminates their behavior-activating effects, thus disrupting appetitive behavior and blocking consumption. Naloxone alone slightly decreased brain and muscle temperatures and increased skin temperatures, pointing at the enhanced heat loss and possible minor inhibition of basal

  14. Egg turning behavior and incubation temperature in Forster’s terns in relation to mercury contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Gregory T.; Ackerman, Joshua T.; Shaffer, Scott A.

    2018-01-01

    Egg turning behavior is an important determinant of egg hatchability, but it remains relatively understudied. Here, we examined egg turning rates and egg temperatures in Forster’s terns (Sterna forsteri). We used artificial eggs containing a data logger with a 3-D accelerometer, a magnetometer, and a temperature thermistor to monitor parental incubation behavior of 131 tern nests. Overall, adults turned their eggs an average (±SD) of 3.8 ± 0.8 turns h-1, which is nearly two times higher than that of other seabirds. Egg turning rates increased with nest initiation date. We also examined egg turning rates and egg temperatures in relation to egg mercury contamination. Mercury contamination has been shown to be associated with reduced egg hatchability, and we hypothesized that mercury may decrease egg hatchability via altered egg turning behavior by parents. Despite the high variability in egg turning rates among individuals, the rate of egg turning was not related to mercury concentrations in sibling eggs. These findings highlight the need for further study concerning the potential determinants of egg turning behavior.

  15. Coupling behavior of the pH/temperature sensitive hydrogels for the inhomogeneous and homogeneous swelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaheri, H.; Baghani, M.; Naghdabadi, R.; Sohrabpour, S.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, a model is developed to continuously predict homogeneous and inhomogeneous swelling behavior of pH/temperature sensitive PNIPAM hydrogels. Employing the model, homogeneous swelling of the pH/temperature sensitive hydrogel is investigated for free and biaxial constrained swelling cases. Comparing the model results with the experimental data available in the literature, the validity of the model is confirmed. The model is then employed to investigate inhomogeneous swelling of a spherical shell on a hard core both analytically and numerically for pH or temperature variations. In this regard, numerical tools are developed via preparing a user defined subroutine in ABAQUS software. Then, the complicated problem of contact between the hydrogel shell and a micro-channel with rigid walls is also investigated. Considering the results, we can say that the model is applicable for solving engineering boundary value problem of pH/temperature sensitive hydrogels.

  16. Molecular Mechanism: ERK Signaling, Drug Addiction, and Behavioral Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei-Lun; Quizon, Pamela M; Zhu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Addiction to psychostimulants has been considered as a chronic psychiatric disorder characterized by craving and compulsive drug seeking and use. Over the past two decades, accumulating evidence has demonstrated that repeated drug exposure causes long-lasting neurochemical and cellular changes that result in enduring neuroadaptation in brain circuitry and underlie compulsive drug consumption and relapse. Through intercellular signaling cascades, drugs of abuse induce remodeling in the rewarding circuitry that contributes to the neuroplasticity of learning and memory associated with addiction. Here, we review the role of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase, and its related intracellular signaling pathways in drug-induced neuroadaptive changes that are associated with drug-mediated psychomotor activity, rewarding properties and relapse of drug seeking behaviors. We also discuss the neurobiological and behavioral effects of pharmacological and genetic interferences with ERK-associated molecular cascades in response to abused substances. Understanding the dynamic modulation of ERK signaling in response to drugs may provide novel molecular targets for therapeutic strategies to drug addiction. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Mechanical behavior of a composite interface: Calcium-silicate-hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palkovic, Steven D.; Moeini, Sina; Büyüköztürk, Oral, E-mail: obuyuk@mit.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Yip, Sidney [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-07-21

    The generalized stacking fault (GSF) is a conceptual procedure historically used to assess shear behavior of defect-free crystalline structures through molecular dynamics or density functional theory simulations. We apply the GSF technique to the spatially and chemically complex quasi-layered structure of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H), the fundamental nanoscale binder within cementitious materials. A failure plane is enforced to calculate the shear traction-displacement response along a composite interface containing highly confined water molecules, hydroxyl groups, and calcium ions. GSF simulations are compared with affine (homogeneous) shear simulations, which allow strain to localize naturally in response to the local atomic environment. Comparison of strength and deformation behavior for the two loading methods shows the composite interface controls bulk shear deformation. Both models indicate the maximum shear strength of C-S-H exhibits a normal-stress dependency typical of cohesive-frictional materials. These findings suggest the applicability of GSF techniques to inhomogeneous structures and bonding environments, including other layered systems such as biological materials containing organic and inorganic interfaces.

  18. Temperature effects on the behavior of carbon 14 in nuclear graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silbermann, G. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, 4 Rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); EDF/DIN/CIDEN/DIE, 154 Avenue Thiers, CS 60018, Lyon 69458 (France); Moncoffre, N., E-mail: n.moncoffre@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, 4 Rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Toulhoat, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, 4 Rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Commissariat à l’énergie atomique CEA/DEN, Centre de Saclay, Gif sur Yvette 91191 (France); Bérerd, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, 4 Rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Institut Universitaire de Technologie, Université Lyon 1, 94 Bd. Niels Bohr, Villeurbanne 69622 (France); Perrat-Mabilon, A. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, 4 Rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Laurent, G. [EDF/DIN/CIDEN/DIE, 154 Avenue Thiers, CS 60018, Lyon 69458 (France); and others

    2014-08-01

    The dismantling of the 1st French generation UNGG (Uranium Naturel Graphite Gas) nuclear reactors operated by the French utility, EDF (Electricité de France) will generate around 17,000 tons of irradiated graphite wastes that have to be disposed of. {sup 14}C is one of the main radioactive dose contributors over 10,000 years. For the management of this waste, it is mandatory to get an accurate estimation of {sup 14}C. The general aim of our work is therefore to simulate the behavior of {sup 14}C in nuclear graphite and to elucidate the coupled and decoupled effects of temperature, irradiation and radiolytic corrosion that mainly influence {sup 14}C behavior in graphite during reactor operation. This paper focuses on the behavior of {sup 13}C implanted into nuclear graphite and used to simulate the presence of {sup 14}C displaced from its original structural site through recoil during neutron irradiation. It aims at evaluating both the temperature and the disorder level of the implanted graphite structure effects on {sup 13}C migration using two complementary techniques, NRA and SIMS, to evaluate the {sup 13}C distribution at the millimeter and micrometer lateral scales respectively. Raman micro-spectroscopy is used to check the graphite structure evolution. The results show that {sup 13}C is not released up to 1600 °C whatever the initial structural disorder level of the implanted graphite. This might be due to the fact that {sup 13}C might be trapped into interstitial clusters. The extrapolation of our results to the behavior of {sup 14}C shows that reactor temperatures (200–500 °C) did not induce any {sup 14}C release. Moreover, as long as there is no gasification of the graphite matrix, high temperatures tend to stabilize {sup 14}C into the remaining graphite structure. This fact has to be considered in case of high temperature purification of {sup 14}C from irradiated graphite.

  19. Mechanical characterisation of tungsten–1 wt.% yttrium oxide as a function of temperature and atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palacios, T.; Jiménez, A. [Materials Science Department, Technical University of Madrid, E.T.S. de Ingenieros de Caminos, Canales y Puertos, C/Profesor Aranguren s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Muñóz, A.; Monge, M.A.; Ballesteros, C. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Leganés (Spain); Pastor, J.Y. [Materials Science Department, Technical University of Madrid, E.T.S. de Ingenieros de Caminos, Canales y Puertos, C/Profesor Aranguren s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-11-15

    This study evaluates the mechanical behaviour of an Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-dispersed tungsten (W) alloy and compares it to a pure W reference material. Both materials were processed via mechanical alloying (MA) and subsequent hot isostatic pressing (HIP). We performed non-standard three-point bending (TPB) tests in both an oxidising atmosphere and vacuum across a temperature range from 77 K, obtained via immersion in liquid nitrogen, to 1473 K to determine the mechanical strength, yield strength and fracture toughness. This research aims to evaluate how the mechanical behaviour of the alloy is affected by oxides formed within the material at high temperatures, primarily from 873 K, when the materials undergo a massive thermal degradation. The results indicate that the alloy is brittle to a high temperature (1473 K) under both atmospheres and that the mechanical properties degrade significantly above 873 K. We also used Vickers microhardness tests and the dynamic modulus by impulse excitation technique (IET) to determine the elastic modulus at room temperature. Moreover, we performed nanoindentation tests to determine the effect of size on the hardness and elastic modulus; however, no significant differences were found. Additionally, we calculated the relative density of the samples to assess the porosity of the alloy. Finally, we analysed the microstructure and fracture surfaces of the tested materials via field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In this way, the relationship between the macroscopic mechanical properties and micromechanisms of failure could be determined based on the temperature and oxides formed.

  20. Vibration and Deflection Behavior of a Coal Auger Working Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songyong Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Because coal auger working mechanism faces problems such as excessive vibration, serious deflection, and low drilling efficiency, a new five-bit coal auger working mechanism test model was established to explore the influence factor on vibration and deflection under different conditions. Additionally, a simulation model was built to further research the effect of partial load and stabilizer arrangement, the correctness of which was proved by experiments. The results show that the vibration and deflection increase with drilling depth in the x direction, and they first increase and then gradually become stable in the y direction. In addition, the vibration, deflection, and deflection force increase with the partial load. By arranging the stabilizer every five drill-rod section intervals, the vibration and deflection can be decreased by 30% and 40% in the x direction and by 14.3% and 65.7% in y direction, respectively.

  1. Mechanical behavior of chemically treated Jute/Polymer composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murali B

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Fiber which serves as a reinforcement in reinforced plastics may be synthetic or natural past studies show that only artificial fibers such as glass, carbon etc., have been used in fiber reinforced plastics. Although glass and other synthetic fiber reinforced plastics possess high specific strength, their fields of application are very limited because of their inherent higher cost of production. In this connection, an investigation has been carried out to make use of jute , a natural fiber abundantly available in India. Natural fibers are not only strong and lightweight but also relatively very cheap. In the present work, jute composites are developed and their mechanical properties are evaluated. Mechanical properties of jute/polymer and compared with glass fiber/epoxy. These results indicate that jute can be used as a potential reinforcing material for making low load bearing thermoplastic composites.

  2. Mechanical properties and impact behavior of a microcellular structural foam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Avalle

    Full Text Available Structural foams are a relatively new class of materials with peculiar characteristics that make them very attractive in some energy absorption applications. They are currently used for packaging to protect goods from damage during transportation in the case of accidental impacts. Structural foams, in fact, have sufficient mechanical strength even with reduced weight: the balance between the two antagonist requirements demonstrates that these materials are profitable. Structural foams are generally made of microcellular materials, obtained by polymers where voids at the microscopic level are created. Although the processing technologies and some of the material properties, including mechanical, are well known, very little is established for what concerns dynamic impact properties, for the design of energy absorbing components made of microcellular foams. The paper reports a number of experimental results, in different loading conditions and loading speed, which will be a basis for the structural modeling.

  3. Study Of The Mechanical Behavior Of Elastomer Protective Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotfi Harrabi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the mechanical behaviour of elastomers at large deformations a theoretical description was developed for the loading-unloading hysteresis loop at large deformations and as a function of the strain rate. Bergstrm and Boyces proposition that the elastomer behaviour is controlled by two contributions the first one corresponding to the equilibrium state and the second one to a non-linear rate-dependent deviation from that equilibrium state and their use of Zeners rheological model were applied to an uniaxial tension configuration. A validation of the description was performed with nitrile rubber. A good agreement of the theoretical description with experimental results was obtained. This simple description of the hysteresis behaviour of elastomers as a function of the strain rate provides a useful tool for estimating the mechanical behaviour at various strain rates with potential application in the design of protective gloves.

  4. Mechanical Behavior of Tough Hydrogels for Structural Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Illeperuma, Widusha Ruwangi Kaushalya

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogels are widely used in many commercial products including Jell-O, contact lenses, and superabsorbent diapers. In recent decades, hydrogels have been under intense development for biomedical applications, such as scaffolds in tissue engineering, carriers for drug delivery, and valves in microfluidic systems. But the scope is severely limited as conventional hydrogels are weak and brittle and are not very stretchable. This thesis investigates the approaches that enhance the mechanical pro...

  5. Chaotic behavior of seismic mechanisms: experiment and observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mourad Bezzeghoud

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available

    To simulate the dynamics of earthquakes, a mechanical prototype was constructed that was inspired by the Burridge-Knopoff model and equipped with accurate instrumental devices. The data obtained by the prototype appeared to be consistent with seismic data from the San Andreas Fault, California, USA, which were analyzed using two different methodologies: seismology and modern developments of chaos theory. Perspectives for future work are also presented.

  6. Role of Polymer Segregation on the Mechanical Behavior of All-Polymer Solar Cell Active Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balar, Nrup; Xiong, Yuan; Ye, Long; Li, Sunsun; Nevola, Daniel; Dougherty, Daniel B; Hou, Jianhui; Ade, Harald; O'Connor, Brendan T

    2017-12-20

    An all-polymer bulk heterojunction (BHJ) active layer that removes the use of commonly used small molecule electron acceptors is a promising approach to improve the thermomechanical behavior of organic solar cells. However, there has been limited research on their mechanical properties. Here, we report on the mechanical behavior of high-performance blade-coated all-polymer BHJ films cast using eco-friendly solvents. The mechanical properties considered include the elastic modulus, crack onset strain, and cohesive fracture energy. We show that the mechanical behavior of the blend is largely unaffected by significant changes in the segregation characteristics of the polymers, which was varied systematically through solvent formulation. In comparison to a polymer:fullerene BHJ counterpart, the all-polymer films were found to have lower stiffness and increased ductility. Yet, the fracture energy of the all-polymer films is not significantly improved compared to that of the polymer:fullerene films. This study highlights that improved mechanical behavior of all-polymer systems cannot be assumed, and that details of the molecular structure, molecular weight, and film morphology play an important role in both the optoelectronic and mechanical properties. Furthermore, we show that simple composite modeling provides a predictive tool for the mechanical properties of the polymer blend films, providing a framework to guide future optimization of the mechanical behavior.

  7. How Do Apps Work? An Analysis of Physical Activity App Users' Perceptions of Behavior Change Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoj, Taylor H; Covey, Emarie L; Jones, Allyn C; Haines, Amanda C; Hall, P Cougar; Crookston, Benjamin T; West, Joshua H

    2017-08-03

    Physical activity apps are commonly used to increase levels of activity and health status. To date, the focus of research has been to determine the potential of apps to influence behavior, to ascertain the efficacy of a limited number of apps to change behavior, and to identify the characteristics of apps that users prefer. The purpose of this study was to identify the mechanisms by which the use of physical activity apps may influence the users' physical activity behavior. This study used a cross-sectional survey of users of health-related physical activity apps during the past 6 months. An electronic survey was created in Qualtrics' Web-based survey software and deployed on Amazon Mechanical Turk. Individuals who had used at least one physical activity app in the past 6 months were eligible to respond. The final sample comprised 207 adults living in the United States. 86.0% (178/207) of respondents were between the ages of 26 and 54 years, with 51.2% (106/207) of respondents being female. Behavior change theory informed the creation of 20 survey items relating to the mechanisms of behavior change. Respondents also reported about engagement with the apps, app likeability, and physical activity behavior. Respondents reported that using a physical activity app in the past 6 months resulted in a change in their attitudes, beliefs, perceptions, and motivation. Engagement with the app (Papp use (P=.03), and app price (P=.01) were related to the reported impact of the behavior change theory or mechanisms of change. The mechanisms of change were associated with self-reported physical activity behaviors (Papps may impact behavior. App developers may wish to incorporate these mechanisms in an effort to increase impact. Practitioners should consider the extent to which behavior change theory is integrated into a particular app when they consider making recommendations to others wishing to increase levels of physical activity.

  8. Sexual behavior and Down syndrome: the biological mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-DeLeon, P A; Williams, M B

    1987-07-01

    Sufficient evidence of a correlation between infrequent coitus and Down syndrome (DS) has now accumulated to warrant reevaluation of the suggested biological mechanisms. The evidence provides no support for delayed fertilization as the mechanism responsible for this correlation, as was originally proposed by German [Nature 217:516-519, 1968]. A better explanation of this association is provided by the sperm aging hypothesis, which gains its support from both animal studies and chromosomal findings of a paternal contribution to DS. The animal studies supporting this hypothesis show an increased incidence of sperm-derived trisomies resulting from sperm stored for prolonged periods in the male tract. The chromosomal findings show a paternal origin in 20% of DS infants; the sperm aging hypothesis concerns the biological mechanism in this 20%. In addition to explaining the excess of DS for older mothers, the sperm aging hypothesis explains the excess for teenage unwed mothers and indicates that sperm aging from decreased ejaculatory frequency may be a cause of DS in all age groups. Testable directly in humans against German's delayed fertilization hypothesis, the sperm aging hypothesis has immediate clinical implications. It suggests 1) an approach to reduce the incidence of DS and miscarriages and 2) clinical research that will increase knowledge of the circumstances indicating a need for antenatal monitoring.

  9. Lead-free BNT-based composite materials: enhanced depolarization temperature and electromechanical behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Wangfeng; Zheng, Peng; Wen, Fei; Zhang, Jingji; Chen, Daqin; Zhai, Jiwei; Ji, Zhenguo

    2017-11-14

    The development of (Bi0.5Na0.5)TiO3-based solid solutions with both high depolarization temperature Td and excellent piezoelectric and electromechanical properties for practical application is intractable because improved thermal stability is usually accompanied by a deterioration in piezoelectric and electromechanical performance. Herein, we report a 0-3 type 0.93(Bi0.5Na0.5)TiO3-0.07BaTiO3 : 30 mol%ZnO composite (BNT-7BT : 0.3ZnO), in which the ZnO nanoparticles exist in two forms, to resolve the abovementioned long-standing obstacle. In this composite, Zn ions fill the boundaries of BNT-7BT grains, and residual Zn ions diffuse into the BNT-7BT lattice, as confirmed by XRD, Raman spectroscopy, and microstructure analysis. The BNT-7BT composite ceramics with a 0-3 type connectivity exhibited enhanced frequency-dependent electromechanical properties, fatigue characteristics, and thermal stabilities. More importantly, low poling field-driven large piezoelectric properties were observed for the composite ceramics as compared to the case of the pure BNT-7BT solid solution. A mechanism related to the ZnO-driven phase transition from the rhombohedral to tetragonal phase and built-in electric field to partially compensate the depolarization field was proposed to explain the achieved outstanding piezoelectric performance. This is the first time that the thermal stability, electromechanical behavior, and low poling field-driven high piezoelectric performance of BNT-based ceramics have been simultaneously optimized. Thus, our study provides a referential methodology to achieve novel piezoceramics with excellent piezoelectricity by composite engineering and opens up a new development window for the utilization of conventional BNT-based and other lead-free ceramics in practical applications.

  10. Phase-field study on geometry-dependent migration behavior of voids under temperature gradient in UO2 crystal matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weijin; Peng, Yuyi; Li, Xu'an; Chen, Kelang; Ma, Jun; Wei, Lingfeng; Wang, Biao; Zheng, Yue

    2017-10-01

    In this work, a phase-field model is established to capture the void migration behavior under a temperature gradient within a crystal matrix, with an appropriate consideration of the surface diffusion mechanism and the vapor transport mechanism. The interfacial energy and the coupling between the vacancy concentration field and the crystal order parameter field are carefully modeled. Simulations are performed on UO2. The result shows that for small voids (with an area ≤ πμm2), the well-known characteristics of void migration, in consistence with the analytical model, can be recovered. The migration is manifested by a constant velocity and a minor change of the void shape. In contrast, for large voids (with an area of ˜10 μm2) initially in circular shapes, significant deformation of the void from a circular to cashew-like shape is observed. After long-time migration, the deformed void would split into smaller voids. The size-dependent behavior of void migration is due to the combined effect of the interfacial energy (which tends to keep the void in circular shape) and the surface diffusion flow (which tends to deform the void due to the nonuniform diffusion along the surface). Moreover, the initial shape of the void modifies the migration velocity and the time point when splitting occurs (for large voids) at the beginning of migration due to the shape relaxation of the void. However, it has a minor effect on the long-time migration. Our work reveals novel void migration behaviors in conditions where the surface-diffusion mechanism is dominant over the vapor transport mechanism; meanwhile, the size of the void lies at a mediate size range.

  11. Influence of Cryogenic Temperatures on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Magnesium Alloys: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajo Dieringa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium alloys have been used in the automotive industry and 3C (computer, communication, and consumer electronics for many years. Their room temperature properties combined with their low density offer a wide range of applications, especially when processed by High Pressure Die Casting (HPDC. The use of magnesium alloys at higher temperatures is well-studied; special creep resistant alloys containing the rare earth elements silver or yttrium are needed. However, when it comes to very low temperatures, only a few studies have been performed to determine the property-microstructure relationship. The possible fields of application at low temperatures are aerospace and satellite parts and tanks for liquefied gases. This review shall not only examine mechanical properties at low temperatures, but also the permanent effects of cyclic or long-lasting cryogenic treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties. It was found that cryogenic treatment is able to influence the precipitate concentration and grain orientation in some magnesium alloys. Reduction in the number of brittle phases is improving ductility in some cases. It is well-known that high speed tool steels, in particular, can be influenced by cryogenic treatment. Whether this is possible with magnesium alloys and what the mechanisms are shall be reviewed.

  12. Mechanisms of femtosecond LIPSS formation induced by periodic surface temperature modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurevich, Evgeny L., E-mail: gurevich@lat.rub.de

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • Possible mechanisms of LIPSS formation by single fs-laser ablation are considered. • We suppose that the surface temperature profile is periodically modulated. • Hydrodynamic instabilities transform the temperature to the height profile. • LIPSS cannot appear due to convection induced by either gravity or surface tension. • Ablative instabilities can explain the LIPSS formation. - Abstract: Here we analyze the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on metal surfaces upon single femtosecond laser pulses. Most of the existing models of the femtosecond LIPSS formation discuss only the appearance of a periodic modulation of the electron and ion temperatures. However the mechanism how the inhomogeneous surface temperature distribution induces the periodically-modulated surface profile under the conditions corresponding to ultrashort-pulse laser ablation is still not clear. Estimations made on the basis of different hydrodynamic instabilities allow to sort out mechanisms, which can bridge the gap between the temperature modulation and the LIPSS. The proposed theory shows that the periodic structures can be generated by single ultrashort laser pulses due to ablative instabilities. The Marangoni and Rayleigh–Bénard convection on the contrary cannot cause the LIPSS formation.

  13. High temperature mechanical performance of a hot isostatically pressed silicon nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wereszczak, A.A.; Ferber, M.K.; Jenkins, M.G.; Lin, C.K.J. [and others

    1996-01-01

    Silicon nitride ceramics are an attractive material of choice for designers and manufacturers of advanced gas turbine engine components for many reasons. These materials typically have potentially high temperatures of usefulness (up to 1400{degrees}C), are chemically inert, have a relatively low specific gravity (important for inertial effects), and are good thermal conductors (i.e., resistant to thermal shock). In order for manufacturers to take advantage of these inherent properties of silicon nitride, the high-temperature mechanical performance of the material must first be characterized. The mechanical response of silicon nitride to static, dynamic, and cyclic conditions at elevated temperatures, along with reliable and representative data, is critical information that gas turbine engine designers and manufacturers require for the confident insertion of silicon nitride components into gas turbine engines. This final report describes the high-temperature mechanical characterization and analyses that were conducted on a candidate structural silicon nitride ceramic. The high-temperature strength, static fatigue (creep rupture), and dynamic and cyclic fatigue performance were characterized. The efforts put forth were part of Work Breakdown Structure Subelement 3.2.1, {open_quotes}Rotor Data Base Generation.{close_quotes} PY6 is comparable to other hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) silicon nitrides currently being considered for advanced gas turbine engine applications.

  14. The High Temperature Tensile and Creep Behaviors of High Entropy Superalloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Te-Kang; Yeh, An-Chou; Kuo, Chen-Ming; Kakehi, Koji; Murakami, Hideyuki; Yeh, Jien-Wei; Jian, Sheng-Rui

    2017-10-04

    This article presents the high temperature tensile and creep behaviors of a novel high entropy alloy (HEA). The microstructure of this HEA resembles that of advanced superalloys with a high entropy FCC matrix and L1 2 ordered precipitates, so it is also named as "high entropy superalloy (HESA)". The tensile yield strengths of HESA surpass those of the reported HEAs from room temperature to elevated temperatures; furthermore, its creep resistance at 982 °C can be compared to those of some Ni-based superalloys. Analysis on experimental results indicate that HESA could be strengthened by the low stacking-fault energy of the matrix, high anti-phase boundary energy of the strengthening precipitate, and thermally stable microstructure. Positive misfit between FCC matrix and precipitate has yielded parallel raft microstructure during creep at 982 °C, and the creep curves of HESA were dominated by tertiary creep behavior. To the best of authors' knowledge, this article is the first to present the elevated temperature tensile creep study on full scale specimens of a high entropy alloy, and the potential of HESA for high temperature structural application is discussed.

  15. Influence of dehydration temperature on water vapor adsorption, dissolution behavior and surface property of ampicillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moribe, Kunikazu; Wongmekiat, Arpansiree; Hyakutake, Yuki; Tozuka, Yuichi; Oguchi, Toshio; Yamamoto, Keiji

    2005-01-20

    Several specimens of anhydrous ampicillin were prepared by heating the ampicillin trihydrate at 100, 120, 140 and 160 degrees C. The effects of dehydration temperature on water vapor adsorption, dissolution behavior and surface property were investigated. The water vapor adsorption of anhydrous ampicillin was studied at 89% relative humidity, 40 degrees C and the water vapor adsorption rate was found to decrease with increase of dehydration temperature. Dissolution profiles of the various anhydrous specimens were investigated in 96% ethanol at 35 degrees C by the static disk method. The anhydrous form prepared at higher dehydration temperature exhibited faster dissolution rate. Solid phase transformation from the anhydrous form to the trihydrate form occurred during the dissolution test. The rate of phase transformation during the dissolution test decreased with increasing dehydration temperature. Topographic difference of the anhydrous forms prepared at 100 and 160 degrees C was not observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM); however, difference of the microstructural properties was apparently observed by the AFM phase image. Surface free energy study revealed that when ampicillin was dehydrated at high temperature, the sample surface became more hydrophobic resulting in less interaction force with water and slow water sorption rate. From the results, we concluded that the polarity of sample surface induced by dehydration of ampicillin would affect the phase transformation and dissolution behavior.

  16. A Study on Flow Behavior of AA5086 Over a Wide Range of Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgharzadeh, A.; Jamshidi Aval, H.; Serajzadeh, S.

    2016-03-01

    Flow stress behavior of AA5086 was determined using tensile testing at different temperatures from room temperature to 500 °C and strain rates varying between 0.002 and 1 s-1. The strain rate sensitivity parameter and occurrence of dynamic strain aging were then investigated in which an Arrhenius-type model was employed to study the serrated flow. Additionally, hot deformation behavior at temperatures higher than 320 °C was evaluated utilizing hyperbolic-sine constitutive equation. Finally, a feed forward artificial neural network model with back propagation learning algorithm was proposed to predict flow stress for all deformation conditions. The results demonstrated that the strain rate sensitivity at temperature range of 25-270 °C was negative due to occurrence of dynamic strain aging leading to significant reduction in fracture strain. The serrated yielding activation energy was found to be 46.1 kJ/mol. It indicated that the migration of Mg-atoms could be the main reason for this phenomenon. The hot deformation activation energy of AA5086 was also calculated about 202.3 kJ/mol while the dynamic recovery was the main softening process. Moreover, the ANN model having two hidden layers was shown to be an efficient structure for determining flow stress of the examined alloy for all temperatures and strain rates.

  17. Mechanical properties of long carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic (LFT) at elevated temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiushi

    Long fiber reinforced thermoplastics (LFT) possess high specific modulus and strength, superior damage tolerance and fracture toughness and have found increasing use in transportation, military, and aerospace applications. However, one of the impediments to utilizing these materials is the lack of performance data in harsh conditions, especially at elevated temperature. In order to quantify the effect of temperature on the mechanical properties of carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites, carbon fiber PAA composite plates containing 20% and 30% carbon fiber were produced using extrusion/compression molding process and tested at three representative temperatures, room temperature (RT 26°C), middle temperature (MID 60°C) and glass transition temperature (Tg 80°C). A heating chamber was designed and fabricated for the testing at elevated temperature. As temperature increases, flexural modulus, flexural strength, tensile modulus and tensile strength decrease. The highest reduction observed in stiffness (modulus) values of 30% CF/PAA at Tg in the 00 orientation is 75%. The reduction values were larger for the transverse (perpendicular to flow direction) samples than the longitudinal (flow direction) samples. The property reduction in 30% CF/PAA is larger than 20% CF/PAA. Furthermore, an innovative method was developed to calculate the fiber content in carbon fiber reinforced composites by burning off the neat resin and sample in a tube furnace. This method was proved to be accurate (within 1.5 wt. % deviation) by using burning off data obtained from CF/Epoxy and CF/Vinyl Ester samples. 20% and 30% carbon/PAA samples were burned off and carbon fiber content was obtained using this method. The results of the present study will be helpful in determining the end-user applications of these composite materials. Keywords: Long Carbon Fibers, Elevated Temperature, Mechanical Properties, Burn off Test.

  18. Mechanisms Linking Violence Exposure to Health Risk Behavior in Adolescence: Motivation to Cope and Sensation Seeking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Sonya S.; Donenberg, Geri R.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study examined two potential mechanisms linking violence exposure and health risk behavior among adolescents in psychiatric care: sensation seeking and coping with stress through escape behavior. Method: Male (59%) and female adolescents (N = 251), ages 12 to 19 years, from diverse ethnic backgrounds (61% African American, 19%…

  19. Feeding Behavior of Aplysia: A Model System for Comparing Cellular Mechanisms of Classical and Operant Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Douglas A.; Byrne, John H.

    2006-01-01

    Feeding behavior of Aplysia provides an excellent model system for analyzing and comparing mechanisms underlying appetitive classical conditioning and reward operant conditioning. Behavioral protocols have been developed for both forms of associative learning, both of which increase the occurrence of biting following training. Because the neural…

  20. Methylphenidate and Atomoxetine Inhibit Social Play Behavior through Prefrontal and Subcortical Limbic Mechanisms in Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, E. J. Marijke|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341477524; van Kerkhof, Linda W. M.; Damsteegt, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314104631; Trezza, Viviana; Vanderschuren, Louk J. M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Positive social interactions during the juvenile and adolescent phases of life, in the form of social play behavior, are important for social and cognitive development. However, the neural mechanisms of social play behavior remain incompletely understood. We have previously shown that

  1. Methylphenidate and atomoxetine inhibit social play behavior through prefrontal and subcortical limbic mechanisms in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, E J Marijke; van Kerkhof, Linda W M; Damsteegt, Ruth; Trezza, Viviana; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J

    2015-01-01

    Positive social interactions during the juvenile and adolescent phases of life, in the form of social play behavior, are important for social and cognitive development. However, the neural mechanisms of social play behavior remain incompletely understood. We have previously shown that

  2. Effect of Temperature Cycling on Conduction Mechanisms in CdTe Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastav, V.; Pal, R.; Saini, N.; Saxena, R. S.; Bhan, R. K.; Sareen, L.; Singh, K. P.; Sharma, R. K.; Venkataraman, V.

    2013-03-01

    CdTe thin films of 500 Å thickness prepared by thermal evaporation technique were analyzed for leakage current and conduction mechanisms. Metal-insulator-metal (MIM) capacitors were fabricated using these films as a dielectric. These films have many possible applications, such as passivation for infrared diodes that operate at low temperatures (80 K). Direct-current (DC) current-voltage ( I- V) and capacitance-voltage ( C- V) measurements were performed on these films. Furthermore, the films were subjected to thermal cycling from 300 K to 80 K and back to 300 K. Typical minimum leakage currents near zero bias at room temperature varied between 0.9 nA and 0.1 μA, while low-temperature leakage currents were in the range of 9.5 pA to 0.5 nA, corresponding to resistivity values on the order of 108 Ω-cm and 1010 Ω-cm, respectively. Well-known conduction mechanisms from the literature were utilized for fitting of measured I- V data. Our analysis indicates that the conduction mechanism in general is Ohmic for low fields conduction mechanism for fields >6 × 104 V cm-1 is modified Poole-Frenkel (MPF) and Fowler-Nordheim (FN) tunneling at room temperature. At 80 K, Schottky-type conduction dominates. A significant observation is that the film did not show any appreciable degradation in leakage current characteristics due to the thermal cycling.

  3. International round robin test for mechanical properties of REBCO superconductive tapes at room temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osamura, K.; Shin, H.S.; Weiss, K.; Nyilas, A.; Nijhuis, Arend; Yamamoto, K.; Machiya, S.; Nishijima, G.

    2014-01-01

    An international round robin test was promoted to establish a test method for room temperature mechanical properties of commercial REBCO superconductive tapes. Seven laboratories practiced a tensile test under the direction of guideline REBCO13 for four different kinds of REBCO tape. From the stress

  4. Influence of oxidation on the high-temperature mechanical properties of zirconia/nickel cermets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales-Rodriguez, A. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes s/n, Facultad de Fisica, 41012 Seville (Spain)]. E-mail: amr@us.es; Bravo-Leon, A. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes s/n, Facultad de Fisica, 41012 Seville (Spain); Richter, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Metallforschung, Stuttgart (Germany); Ruehle, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Metallforschung, Stuttgart (Germany); Dominguez-Rodriguez, A. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes s/n, Facultad de Fisica, 41012 Seville (Spain); Jimenez-Melendo, M. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes s/n, Facultad de Fisica, 41012 Seville (Spain)

    2006-06-15

    influence of an oxidizing atmosphere on the high-temperature plasticity of zirconia/nickel cermets has been studied by conducting creep tests in air. The resulting microstructure has been characterized by scanning, conventional and high-resolution electron microscopy. Despite the large microstructural changes, the composites do not exhibit mechanical degradation.

  5. Behaviors and mechanism of electrolyte electrophoresis during electrophoretic deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciou, Sian-Jie; Fung, Kuan-Zong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101 (China); Chiang, Kai-Wei [Department of Geomatics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101 (China)

    2008-01-03

    Electrochemical experiments, including cyclic voltammetry (CV) experiments, galvanostatic experiments, potentiostatic experiments, and kinetic experiments of the LSM electrode, were used to investigate the influence of a deposit on the electrode surface on the electrophoresis of protons in a porous media during electrophoretic deposition (EPD). In the kinetic experiments, the deposit reduced the electrochemical reaction rate of the LSM electrode according to the Tafel plots for the cathode where the YSZ was deposited. It was also observed that hydrogen was reduced at the cathode from the cyclic voltammogram. In the galvanostatic experiments, the proton concentration increased near the cathode because the deposit obstructed the electrode reaction. In the potentiostatic experiments, similar phenomena were observed. The deposit from the EPD became an obstacle to the electrochemical reaction, resulting in unusual kinetic behaviors of proton electrophoresis during electrolysis. (author)

  6. High-temperature plastic behavior of reaction-bonded CuO and TiO{sub 2} co-doped alumina-zirconia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales-Rodriguez, A.; Jimenez-Melendo, M.; Dominguez-Rodriguez, A.; Bravo-Leon, A

    2004-12-15

    The high-temperature plastic behavior of reaction-bonded alumina doped with equimolar amounts of copper and titanium oxides has been studied by means of creep and stress relaxation tests in air. Deformation results have been correlated with microstructural observations and X-ray diffraction studies in order to deduce the mechanism responsible for the deformation. The material exhibits plasticity at temperatures as low as 900 deg. C in contrast with other aluminas. At temperatures near 1000 deg. C a linear relation between the strain rate and the stress has been detected (corresponding to mechanism with a stress exponent n equal to one) but both above and below this temperature higher values of n have been observed.

  7. Effects of long-term elevated temperature on covering, sheltering and righting behaviors of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus intermedius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lisheng; Zhang, Lingling; Shi, Dongtao; Wei, Jing; Chang, Yaqing

    2017-01-01

    Increases in ocean temperature due to climate change are predicted to change the behaviors of marine invertebrates. Altered behaviors of keystone ecosystem engineers such as echinoderms will have consequences for the fitness of individuals, which are expected to flow on to the local ecosystem. Relatively few studies have investigated the behavioral responses of echinoderms to long-term elevated temperature. We investigated the effects of exposure to long-term (∼31 weeks) elevated temperature (∼3 °C above the ambient water temperature) on covering, sheltering and righting behaviors of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus intermedius. Long-term elevated temperature showed different effects on the three behaviors. It significantly decreased covering behavior, including both covering behavior reaction (time to first covering) and ability (number of covered sea urchins and number of shells used for covering). Conversely, exposure to long-term elevated temperature significantly increased sheltering behavior. Righting response in S. intermedius was not significantly different between temperature treatments. The results provide new information into behavioral responses of echinoderms to ocean warming. PMID:28348933

  8. Design and fabrication of a cryostat for low temperature mechanical testing for the Mechanical and Materials Engineering group at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviles Santillana, I.; Betemps, R.; Gerardin, A.; Guinchard, M.; Langeslag, S. A. E.; Sgobba, S.

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical testing of materials at low temperatures is one of the cornerstones of the Mechanical and Materials Engineering (MME) group at CERN. A long tradition of more than 20 years and a unique know - how of such tests has been developed with an 18 kN double-walled cryostat. Large campaigns of material qualification have been carried out and the mechanical behaviour of materials at 4 K has been vastly studied in sub - size samples for projects like LEP, LHC and its experiments. With the aim of assessing the mechanical properties of materials of higher strength and/or issued from heavy gauge products for which testing standardized specimens of larger cross section might be more adapted, a new 100 kN cryostat capable of hosting different shapes of normalized samples has been carefully designed and fabricated inhouse together with the associated tooling and measurement instrumentation. It has been conceived to be able to adapt to different test frames both dynamic and static, which will be of paramount importance for future studies of fracture mechanics at low temperatures. The cryostat features a double-walled vessel consisting of a central cylindrical section with a convex lower end and a flat top end closure. The transmission of the load is guaranteed by a 4 column system and its precise monitoring is assured by an internal load cell positioned next to the sample in the load train. This innovative approach will be discussed together with other nonconventional instrumentation solutions. A validation of the whole system has been carried out, where bending efforts on instrumented samples have been measured. Additionally, dedicated tooling has been fabricated for the device's optimization. The preliminary results obtained confirm an excellent performance of the system and enhance the analysis of materials under extreme conditions with state of the art instrumentation.

  9. Dynamic behavior of the HTR-10 reactor: Dual temperature feedback model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosseini Seyed Ali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The current work aims at presenting a simple model for PBM-type reactors' dynamic behavior analysis. The proposed model is based on point kinetics equations coupled with feedbacks from fuel and moderator temperatures. The temperature reactivity coefficients were obtained through MCNP code and via available experimental data. Parameters such as heat capacity and heat conductivity were carefully analyzed and the final system of equations was numerically solved. The obtained results, while in partial agreement with previously proposed models, suggest lower sensitivity to step reactivity insertion as compared to other reactor designs and inherent safety of the design.

  10. Electrochemical behavior of titanium in saline environments: The effects of temperature, pH, and microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanVliet, K.J.; Wang, Z.F.; Briant, C.L.; Kumar, K.S. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States). Div. of Engineering

    1998-12-31

    This research investigates the effects of temperature, pH, degree of salinity, galvanic coupling, microstructure, and composition on the electrochemical behavior of commercially pure titanium in a saline environment. Essentially, the findings establish that increased temperature, altered microstructure, decreased pH, and decreased purity of titanium all serve to increase the corrosion potential and cathodic reaction rate, thus making the metal more susceptible to hydrogen absorption. Further, the data indicate that galvanic coupling with certain metals such as naval brass and stainless steel can anodically polarize titanium, whereas coupling with metals such as aluminum, HY80 steel, and zinc catholically polarizes titanium, thus promoting hydrogen evolution on the titanium surface.

  11. High-Temperature Performance and Multiscale Damage Mechanisms of Hollow Cellulose Fiber-Reinforced Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spalling resistance properties and their damage mechanisms under high temperatures are studied in hollow cellulose fiber-reinforced concrete (CFRC used in tunnel structures. Measurements of mass loss, relative dynamic elastic modulus, compressive strength, and splitting tensile strength of CFRC held under high temperatures (300, 600, 800, and 1050°C for periods of 2.5, 4, and 5.5 h were carried out. The damage mechanism was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, mercury intrusion porosimetry, thermal analysis, and X-ray diffraction phase analysis. The results demonstrate that cellulose fiber can reduce the performance loss of concrete at high temperatures; the effect of holding time on the performance is more noticeable below 600°C. After exposure to high temperatures, the performance of ordinary concrete deteriorates faster and spalls at 700–800°C; in contrast, cellulose fiber melts at a higher temperature, leaving a series of channels in the matrix that facilitate the release of the steam pressure inside the CFRC. Hollow cellulose fibers can thereby slow the damage caused by internal stress and improve the spalling resistance of concrete under high temperatures.

  12. Enzymatic mechanisms of soil-carbon response to temperature on Mt. Kilimanjaro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Blagodatskiy, Sergey; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-04-01

    Short-term acceleration of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition by increasing temperature contradicts the acclimation observed in long-term studies. We used the unique altitudinal gradient (from colline tropical zone to subalpine zone) on Mt. Kilimanjaro to demonstrate the mechanisms of short- and long-term acclimation of extra- and intracellular enzymes that decompose polymers (cellulose, chitin, phytate) and oxidize monomers (14C-glucose). Basing on Michaelis-Menten kinetics we determined the enzymes affinity to substrate (Km) and mineralization potential of heterotrophic microorganisms (Vmax) 1) for three hydrolytic enzymes: β-1,4-glucosidase, N-acetyl- β -D-glucosaminidase and phosphatase by the application of fluorogenically labeled substrates and 2) for mineralization of 14C-labeled glucose by substrate-dependent respiratory response. Here we show that the amount of available substrate is responsible for temperature sensitivity of hydrolysis of polymers in soil, whereas monomers oxidation to CO2 does not depend on substrate amount and is mainly temperature governed. We also found that substrate affinity of enzymes (which is usually decreases with the temperature) differently responded to warming for the process of depolymerisation versus monomers oxidation. We suggest the mechanism to temperature acclimation based on different temperature sensitivity of enzymes kinetics for hydrolysis of polymers and for monomers oxidation

  13. Effects of substrate temperature on bonding structure and mechanical properties of amorphous carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, S.; Laugier, M.T.; Rahman, I.Z

    2004-01-30

    Diamond-like carbon thin films were prepared at different substrate temperatures by RF magnetron sputtering of a graphite target. The chemical bonding of the carbon structure was characterised by Raman spectroscopy. Raman measurements showed that sp{sup 3} bonded carbon fraction increases from 50 to 80 deg. C temperatures and an increase in the substrate temperature after 80 deg. C results in an increase in the sp{sup 2}-bonded carbon atoms in DLC thin films. Mechanical properties, namely hardness and Young's modulus were determined by CSM{sup TM} nanohardness tester. The hardness (H) and Young's modulus (E) were found in the range of 11-22 and 110-160 GPa, respectively, at different substrate temperatures and increased with increase of substrate temperature up to 125 deg. C and decreased thereafter. These results indicate that substrate temperature has a strong influence on the bonding properties of the deposited films and the changes in bonding ratio (sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2}) were correlated with changes in the mechanical properties.

  14. Effects of cryomilling on the microstructures and high temperature mechanical properties of oxide dispersion strengthened steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwon, Jin-Han; Kim, Jeoung-Han; Lee, Kee-Ahn

    2015-04-01

    The effects of cryomilling on the microstructures and high temperature mechanical properties of oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steel were examined. Cryomilling was newly tried on this ODS steel to control oxides, grains, and dislocation microstructures. Fe-14Cr-3W-0.4Ti (wt.%) alloy powder and 0.3 wt.%Y2O3 powder were mixed and were mechanically alloyed (MA) through ball milling at each of room temperature (RT) and -150 °C and then hot isostatic pressing (HIP), hot rolling, and annealing processes were implemented to manufacture two types of ODS ferritic steel, K1 (RT) and K4 (-150 °C). Oxide particles were shown to be finer and more uniformly distributed in K4 (5-10 nm size distribution) than in K1 (average size 30 nm). The two alloys were subjected to high temperature compression (RT ∼ 900 °C) tests. K4 represented higher yield strength under all temperature conditions. However, K4 showed rapid strength decreases at high temperatures exceeding 700 °C and showed similar levels of strengths to K1 at 900 °C. This is considered attributable to the fact that although cryomilling increased the number density of oxide particles, it simultaneously reduced grain sizes too much, so that grain boundary weakening at high temperatures could not be sufficiently prevented.

  15. Effects of cryomilling on the microstructures and high temperature mechanical properties of oxide dispersion strengthened steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwon, Jin-Han [Dept. of Advanced Mat. Eng., Andong National University, Andong 760-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeoung-Han [Dept. of Advanced Mat. Eng., Hanbat National University, Daejeon 305-719 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kee-Ahn, E-mail: keeahn@andong.ac.kr [Dept. of Advanced Mat. Eng., Andong National University, Andong 760-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    The effects of cryomilling on the microstructures and high temperature mechanical properties of oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steel were examined. Cryomilling was newly tried on this ODS steel to control oxides, grains, and dislocation microstructures. Fe–14Cr–3W–0.4Ti (wt.%) alloy powder and 0.3 wt.%Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder were mixed and were mechanically alloyed (MA) through ball milling at each of room temperature (RT) and −150 °C and then hot isostatic pressing (HIP), hot rolling, and annealing processes were implemented to manufacture two types of ODS ferritic steel, K1 (RT) and K4 (−150 °C). Oxide particles were shown to be finer and more uniformly distributed in K4 (5–10 nm size distribution) than in K1 (average size 30 nm). The two alloys were subjected to high temperature compression (RT ∼ 900 °C) tests. K4 represented higher yield strength under all temperature conditions. However, K4 showed rapid strength decreases at high temperatures exceeding 700 °C and showed similar levels of strengths to K1 at 900 °C. This is considered attributable to the fact that although cryomilling increased the number density of oxide particles, it simultaneously reduced grain sizes too much, so that grain boundary weakening at high temperatures could not be sufficiently prevented.

  16. The stress corrosion resistance and the cryogenic temperature mechanical properties of annealed Nitronic 60 bar material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano, J. W. L.

    1977-01-01

    Ambient and cryogenic temperature mechanical properties and the ambient temperature stress corrosion properties of annealed, straightened, and centerless ground Nitronic 60 stainless steel alloy bar material are presented. The mechanical properties of longitudinal specimens were evaluated at test temperatures from ambient to liquid hydrogen. The tensile test data indicated increasing strength with decreasing temperature to -196 C. Below liquid nitrogen temperature the smooth tensile and notched tensile strengths decreased slightly while the elongation and reduction of area decreased drastically. The Charpy V-notched impact energy decreased steadily with decreasing test temperature. Stress corrosion tests were performed on longitudinal tensile specimens and transverse C-ring specimens exposed to: alternate immersion in a 3.5% NaCl bath; humidity cabinet; and a 5% salt spray atmosphere. The longitudinal tensile specimens experienced no corrosive attack. Approximately 3/4 of the transverse C-rings exposed to alternate immersion and to salt spray experienced a pitting attack on the top and bottom ends. Additional stress corrosion tests were performed on transverse tensile specimens. No failures occurred in the 90% stressed specimens exposed for 90 days in the alternate immersion and salt spray environments

  17. Mechanical behavior of nanotwinned materials – experimental and computational approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yavas, Hakan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-12-17

    Nanotwinned materials exhibit high strength combined with excellent thermal stability, making them potentially attractive for numerous applications. When deposited on cold substrates at high rates, for example, silver films can be prepared with a high-density of growth twins with an average twin boundary spacing of less than 10 nm. These films show a very strong {111} texture, with the twin boundaries being perpendicular to the growth direction. The origins of superior mechanical and thermal properties of nanotwinned materials, however, are not yet fully understood and need further improvements.

  18. Computational analysis of the mechanical behavior of textile composite reinforcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badel, Pierre; Vidal-Sallé, Emmanuelle; Boisse, Philippe

    2007-04-01

    The knowledge of the mechanical behaviour of woven fabrics is necessary in many applications in particular for the simulation of textile composite forming. This mechanical behaviour is very specific due to the possible motions between the fibres and the yarns. In this paper, the biaxial tension and in-plane shear behaviours are analysed from virtual tests on the Representative Unit Cell. The in-plane shear strains can be very large (up to 50°) in case of draping on a double curved surface. These virtual tests avoid performing tricky experimental tests. The presented 3D finite element analyses involve two main specific aspects. Firstly the boundary conditions have to render the periodicity at large deformations and, in some cases, the evolution of contacts between neighbouring yarns during the motion. Secondly the yarn that is made of thousand of fibres is modelled as a continuous medium but its constitutive law has to take its fibrous nature into account. For that reason a rate constitutive equation using a specific objective stress rate is used. It is based on the rotation of the fibre. The analysis is performed for different unit cells. Both results are in good agreement with the experiments, but the use of some cells turns out to be much easier.

  19. Temperature Coefficients of Electrical Conductivity and Conduction Mechanisms in Butyl Rubber-Carbon Black Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzamil, M. A.; Alfaramawi, K.; Abboudy, S.; Abulnasr, L.

    2017-12-01

    Electrical properties of butyl rubber filled with General Purpose Furnace (GPF) carbon black were studied. The carbon black concentration (X) in the compound was X = 40, 60, 70, 80, and 100 parts by weight per hundred parts by weight of rubber (phr). The corresponding volume fractions of GPF carbon black were 0.447 ± 0.022, 0.548 ± 0.027, 0.586 ± 0.029, 0.618 ± 0.031 and 0.669 ± 0.034, respectively. The concentration dependence of conductivity ( σ ) at constant temperature showed that σ follows a percolation theory; σ ∝ ( {X - Xo } )^{γ } , where X o is the concentration at percolation threshold. The exponent γ was found as 6.6 (at room temperature 30°C). This value agrees with other experimental values obtained by many authors for different rubber-carbon black systems. Electron tunneling between the aggregates, which are dispersed in the insulator rubber, was mainly the conduction process proposed at constant temperature in the butyl-GPF carbon black composites. Temperature dependence of conductivity was investigated in the temperature range from 30°C up to 120°C. All samples exhibit negative temperature coefficients of conductivity (NTCC). The values obtained are - 0.130°C-1, - 0.019°C-1, - 0.0082°C-1, - 0.0094°C-1, and - 0.072°C-1 for carbon black concentrations of 40 phr, 60 phr, 70 phr, 80 phr, and 100 phr, respectively. The samples of concentrations 40 phr and 60 phr have also positive temperature coefficients of conductivity (PTCC) of values + 0.031 and + 0.013, respectively. Electrical conduction at different temperatures showed various mechanisms depending on the carbon black concentration and/or the interval of temperature. The hopping conduction mechanism was noticed at the lower temperature region while carrier thermal activation mechanisms were recorded at the higher temperature range.

  20. High temperature deformation mechanisms of L12-containing Co-based superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, Michael Shaw

    Ni-based superalloys have been used as the structural material of choice for high temperature applications in gas turbine engines since the 1940s, but their operating temperature is becoming limited by their melting temperature (Tm =1300degrees C). Despite decades of research, no viable alternatives to Ni-based superalloys have been discovered and developed. However, in 2006, a ternary gamma' phase was discovered in the Co-Al-W system that enabled a new class of Co-based superalloys to be developed. These new Co-based superalloys possess a gamma-gamma' microstructure that is nearly identical to Ni-based superalloys, which enables these superalloys to achieve extraordinary high temperature mechanical properties. Furthermore, Co-based alloys possess the added benefit of exhibiting a melting temperature of at least 100degrees C higher than commercial Ni-based superalloys. Superalloys used as the structural materials in high pressure turbine blades must withstand large thermomechanical stresses imparted from the rotating disk and hot, corrosive gases present. These stresses induce time-dependent plastic deformation, which is commonly known as creep, and new superalloys must possess adequate creep resistance over a broad range of temperature in order to be used as the structural materials for high pressure turbine blades. For these reasons, this research focuses on quantifying high temperature creep properties of new gamma'-containing Co-based superalloys and identifying the high temperature creep deformation mechanisms. The high temperature creep properties of new Co- and CoNi-based alloys were found to be comparable to Ni-based superalloys with respect to minimum creep rates and creep-rupture lives at 900degrees C up to the solvus temperature of the gamma' phase. Co-based alloys exhibited a propensity for extended superlattice stacking fault formation in the gamma' precipitates resulting from dislocation shearing events. When Ni was added to the Co-based compositions

  1. Temperature Coefficients of Electrical Conductivity and Conduction Mechanisms in Butyl Rubber-Carbon Black Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzamil, M. A.; Alfaramawi, K.; Abboudy, S.; Abulnasr, L.

    2018-02-01

    Electrical properties of butyl rubber filled with General Purpose Furnace (GPF) carbon black were studied. The carbon black concentration ( X) in the compound was X = 40, 60, 70, 80, and 100 parts by weight per hundred parts by weight of rubber (phr). The corresponding volume fractions of GPF carbon black were 0.447 ± 0.022, 0.548 ± 0.027, 0.586 ± 0.029, 0.618 ± 0.031 and 0.669 ± 0.034, respectively. The concentration dependence of conductivity ( σ ) at constant temperature showed that σ follows a percolation theory; σ ∝ ( {X - Xo } )^{γ } , where X o is the concentration at percolation threshold. The exponent γ was found as 6.6 (at room temperature 30°C). This value agrees with other experimental values obtained by many authors for different rubber-carbon black systems. Electron tunneling between the aggregates, which are dispersed in the insulator rubber, was mainly the conduction process proposed at constant temperature in the butyl-GPF carbon black composites. Temperature dependence of conductivity was investigated in the temperature range from 30°C up to 120°C. All samples exhibit negative temperature coefficients of conductivity (NTCC). The values obtained are - 0.130°C-1, - 0.019°C-1, - 0.0082°C-1, - 0.0094°C-1, and - 0.072°C-1 for carbon black concentrations of 40 phr, 60 phr, 70 phr, 80 phr, and 100 phr, respectively. The samples of concentrations 40 phr and 60 phr have also positive temperature coefficients of conductivity (PTCC) of values + 0.031 and + 0.013, respectively. Electrical conduction at different temperatures showed various mechanisms depending on the carbon black concentration and/or the interval of temperature. The hopping conduction mechanism was noticed at the lower temperature region while carrier thermal activation mechanisms were recorded at the higher temperature range.

  2. Effects of W on microstructure and high-temperature oxidation behavior of ferritic stainless steel weldment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yijie; Xie, Yuye; Zhu, Shuangchun; Yan, Biao

    2017-07-01

    With the promotion of fuel economy policy and automobile lightweight concept, ferritic stainless steels applied in vehicles’ exhaust hot end systems have been developed. This paper simulated the high-temperature environment at which the automobile exhaust system serviced in for high-temperature corrosion. Kinetic curves were conducted in isothermal environments at 1000∘C. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectrometer were used to study the oxidation behavior of ferritic stainless steels and the effects of tungsten (W) addition. The results show that, with increasing oxidation time, the rate of weight gains increase and the main failure is spalling of surface oxide layer. The addition of W has a complicated effect on the oxidation behavior of ferritic stainless steel weldment.

  3. MODELING HIGH TEMPERATURE FLOW BEHAVIOR OF AN AL 6061 ALUMINIUM ALLOY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Badami

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hot deformation behavior of a medium Cr/Mn Al6061 aluminum alloy was studied by isothermal compression test at temperatures range of 320 to 480 °C and strain rates range of 0.001 to 0.1 s −1. The true stresstrue strain curves were analyzed to characterize the flow stress of Al6061. Plastic behavior, as a function of both temperature and strain rate for Al6061, was also modeled using a hyperbolic sinusoidal type equation. For different values of material constant α in the range of 0.001 to 0.4, values of A, n and Q were calculated based on mathematical relationships. The best data fit with minimum error was applied to define constitutive equation for the alloy. The predicted results of the proposed model were found to be in reasonable agreement with the experimental results, which could be used to predict the required deformation forces in hot deformation processes

  4. Low temperature mechanical properties of 316L type stainless steel after hydrostatic extrusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarkowski, P., E-mail: paczar@gmail.com [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Woloska 141, Warsaw 02-507 (Poland); Krawczynska, A.T.; Slesinski, R.; Brynk, T.; Budniak, J.; Lewandowska, M.; Kurzydlowski, K.J. [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Woloska 141, Warsaw 02-507 (Poland)

    2011-10-15

    316L-type stainless steel is commonly used in fusion devices. Its mechanical properties at cryogenic temperatures, for rolled or forged products possessing a grain size of tens of micrometers have been widely reported. In this paper we present the properties of this steel after multi-pass hydrostatic extrusion (HE), which brought about significant grain refinement to the nanometer scale. Such grain refinement of 316L-type stainless steel would be expected to improve the yield and ultimate tensile strength and may also result in a better resistance to irradiation. The microstructure of the HE processed samples was determined by electron microscopy and the mechanical properties evaluated by its microhardness under a load of 200 g and by tensile tests at room temperature and after immersion in liquid nitrogen. The observed improvements of the mechanical properties are discussed in terms of the microstructural changes arising from the hydrostatic extrusion.

  5. Effect of reclaimed sand additions on mechanical properties and fracture behavior of furan no-bake resin sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-lei Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the effects of reclaimed sand additions on the microstructure characteristics, mechanical properties and fracture behavior of furan no-bake resin sand have been investigated systematically within the temperature range from 25 to 600 篊. The addition of 20%-100% reclaimed sand showed dramatic strength deterioration effect at the same temperature, which is associated with the formation of bonding bridges. Both the ultimate tensile strength (UTS and compressive strength (CS of the moulding sand initially increase with the increase of temperature, and then sharply decrease with the further increase of temperature, which is attributed to the thermal decomposition of furan resin. The addition amount of reclaimed sand has a remarkable effect on the room temperature fracture mode, i.e., with the addition of 0-20% reclaimed sand, the fracture mode was mainly cohesive fracture; the fracture mode converts to be mixture fracture mode as the addition of reclaimed sand increases to 35%-70%; further increasing the addition to 100% results in the fracture mode of typical adhesive fracture. The fracture surface of the bonding bridge changes from a semblance of cotton or holes to smooth with the increase of test temperature.

  6. Analysis of the austenitic stainless steel's r-value behavior at elevated temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan Arsić

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of the anisotropy properties of austenitic steel AISI 304 (X5CrNi18-10 at elevated temperatures is presented in this paper. Considerations of the anisotropy problems are presented in the theoretical part of the paper, as well as the procedure for determination of the normal anisotropy coefficient. The experimental part of the paper describes the plan, methodology and equipment for testing of material's normal anisotropy and mechanical characteristics. The objective of conducting the experiments was to investigate influence of temperature on normal anisotropy, as well as on the mechanical properties of the considered material. The normal anisotropy was monitored by the coefficient – the so-called "r-value". Besides that, the tensile strength, yield stress and elongation at break were monitored, also. The tests were done on the 0.7 mm thick sheet metal within the temperature range 20 to 700°C.

  7. Universal scaling of the temperature dependence of the strength of crystals governed by the Peierls mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, S.; Suzuki, T.

    2010-07-01

    The temperature dependences of the critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) governed by the Peierls mechanism in pure NaCl type crystals, those in pure bcc transition metals, those by dissociated dislocations in covalent crystals of the diamond and the zinc blende structures and those by perfect dislocations at low temperatures in zinc blende crystals have been demonstrated to be roughly scalable with respect to the non-dimensional normalization of the CRSS by the shear modulus G and the temperature by Gb3/kB, where b is the strength of the Burgers vector and kB the Boltzmann constant. Furthermore, CRSS vs. T relations have been shown to be scaled universally by normalizing respectively the CRSS by the estimated Peierls stress τp and the temperature by the kink-pair energy parameter of (τp/G)1/2(bd)3/2G/kB, where d is the period of the Peierls potential.

  8. Improved Mechanical Properties of Various Fabric-Reinforced Geocomposite at Elevated Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Sneha; Phan Thanh, Nhan; Petríková, Iva; Marvalová, Bohadana

    2015-07-01

    This article signifies the improved performance of the various types of fabric reinforcement of geopolymer as a function of physical, thermal, mechanical, and heat-resistant properties at elevated temperatures. Geopolymer mixed with designed Si:Al ratios of 15.6 were synthesized using three different types of fabric reinforcement such as carbon, E-glass, and basalt fibers. Heat testing was conducted on 3-mm-thick panels with 15 × 90 mm surface exposure region. The strength of carbon-based geocomposite increased toward a higher temperature. The basalt-reinforced geocomposite strength decreased due to the catastrophic failure in matrix region. The poor bridging effect and dissolution of fabric was observed in the E-glass-reinforced geocomposite. At an elevated temperature, fiber bridging was observed in carbon fabric-reinforced geopolymer matrix. Among all the fabrics, carbon proved to be suitable candidate for the high-temperature applications in thermal barrier coatings and fire-resistant panels.

  9. Physiological and molecular mechanisms associated with cross tolerance between hypoxia and low temperature in Thaumatotibia leucotreta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boardman, Leigh; Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Terblanche, John S

    2015-01-01

    hardening and cross tolerance responses. Given that combined exposure to hypoxia and low temperature is used to sterilize commodities in post-harvest pest management programs, researchers can now exploit these mechanisms involved in cross tolerance to develop more targeted control methods....... identified to date. Using larvae of false codling moth Thaumatotibia leucotreta, a pest of southern Africa, we investigated the physiological and molecular responses to hypoxia or temperature stress pre-treatments, followed by a standard low temperature exposure. Survival rates were significantly influenced...... by pretreatment conditions, although T. leucotreta shows relatively high basal resistance to various stressors (4% variation in larval survival across all pre-treatments). Results showed that mild pre-treatments with chilling and hypoxia increased resistance to low temperatures and that these responses were...

  10. Investigation of high-temperature charge transport mechanism in Al-Gd2O3-Al-based metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasiq, M. F.; Mahmood, Khalid; Aen, Faiza; Warsi, Muhammad Farooq; Khan, Muhammad Azhar

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, the charge conduction mechanism at high temperature in Al-Gd2O3 (MIM) structure has been investigated by performing temperature-dependent current-voltage measurements in the temperature range 280-390 K. MIM structure is realized by electron beam evaporation system where thin films of Gd2O3 (40, 60 and 80 nm) and Al metal on both sides of dielectric film were deposited on glass substrate. The possibility of different transport mechanisms has been testified by plotting various graphs. The nonlinear behavior of Ln V versus Ln I and V 1/2 versus Ln V/ I graphs ruled out the possibility of space-charge-limited conduction (SCLC) and Poole-Frenkel mechanism in Al-Gd2O3-Al MIM structure. The straight lines Ln I- V 1/2 graphs at various temperatures confirmed that Schottky emission is the dominant transport mechanism in Al-Gd2O3-Al structure. The calculated values of field barrier lowering coefficient at different measurement temperatures were in good agreement with the theoretical prediction confirming conduction is via Schottky emission. The field-dependent Ln( I/ T 2) versus 1000/ T plots were obeyed a linear relationship according to Schottky emission theory. Furthermore, the dielectric thickness dependence room-temperature current-voltage characteristics of Al-Gd2O3-Al MIM structure were showed strong dependence of current on dielectric film thickness according to Schottky emission theory of conduction current.

  11. The Behavior Of Asymmetric Frontal Couplings With Permanent Magnets In Magnetic Powder And High Temperature Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion DOBROTA

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is the comparative analysis of the behavior of frontal couplings with Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets in difficult environments, specific to metallurgy – such as environments with magnetic powders and high temperature – in two constructive variants: symmetric couplings and asymmetric couplings (with divided poles. The results show the superior performance of asymmetric couplings under the given conditions

  12. The mechanical behavior of two warm-mix asphalts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. Rondón-Quintana

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results stemming from a comparative experimental analysis of two warm-mix asphalts (WMA and a dense-graded hot-mix asphalt (HMA. In order to evaluate asphalt mixture behavior, physical and rheological tests were conducted, including tests on resilient modulus, resistance to moisture-induced damage, resistance to fatigue and resistance to permanent deformation. Samples studied were subjected to short (STOA and long-term (LTOA aging. As far as asphalt mixture composition is concerned, the same particle size distribution and coarse aggregate were employed for both mixture types. The control HMA mixture was produced with AC 60-70, and the WMAs used the same asphalt cement modified with two chemical additives (Rediset WMX® and Cecabase RT®. The modified mixtures exhibited better resistance to permanent deformation, aging and moisture-induced damage (versus the control mixture. Likewise, WMAs generally saw increased fatigue resistance under controlled-stress loading, which rheological characterization showed is mainly attributable to binder additives and their concomitant modifications.

  13. Enhanced strength and temperature dependence of mechanical properties of Li at small length scales and its implications for Li metal anodes

    CERN Document Server

    and, Chen Xu; Aryanfar, Asghar; Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Greer, Julia R

    2016-01-01

    Most next-generation Li-ion battery chemistries require a functioning lithium metal (Li) anode. However, its application in secondary batteries has been inhibited because of uncontrollable dendrite growth during cycling. Mechanical suppression of dendrite growth through solid polymer electrolytes (SPE) or through robust separators has shown the most potential for alleviating this problem. Studies of the mechanical behavior of Li at any length scale and temperature are virtually non-existent because of its extreme reactivity, which renders sample preparation, transfer, microstructure characterization and mechanical testing prohibitively challenging. We conduct nano-mechanical experiments in an in-situ Scanning Electron Microscope and show that micron-sized Li attains extremely high strengths of 105 MPa at room temperature and of 35MPa at 90$^\\circ$C. We demonstrate that single crystalline Li exhibits a power-law size-effect at the micron- and sub-micron length scales, with the strengthening exponent of -0.68 a...

  14. Tribological behavior and self-healing functionality of TiNbCN-Ag coatings in wide temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarev, A. V.; Kiryukhantsev-Korneev, Ph. V.; Levashov, E. A.; Shtansky, D. V.

    2017-02-01

    Ag- and Nb-doped TiCN coatings with about 2 at.% of Nb and Ag contents varied between 4.0 and 15.1 at.% were designed as promising materials for tribological applications in a wide temperature range. We report on the structure, mechanical, and tribological properties of TiNbCN-Ag coatings fabricated by simultaneous co-sputtering of TiC0.5 + 10%Nb2C and Ag targets in comparison with those of Ag-free coating. The tribological characteristics were evaluated during constant-temperature tests both at room temperature and 300 °C, as well as during dynamic temperature ramp tests in the range of 25-700 °C. The coating structure and elemental composition were studied by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy. The coating microstructures and elemental compositions inside wear tracks, as well as the wear products, were examined by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. We demonstrate that simultaneous alloying with Nb and Ag permits to overcome the main drawbacks of TiCN coatings such as their relatively high values of friction coefficient at elevated temperatures and low oxidation resistance. It is shown that a relatively high amount of Ag (15 at.%) is required to provide enhanced tribological behavior in a wide temperature range of 25-700 °C. In addition, the prepared Ag-doped coatings demonstrated active oxidation protection and self-healing functionality due to the segregation of Ag metallic particles in damage areas such as cracks, pin-holes, or oxidation sites.

  15. Sociocognitive self-regulatory mechanisms governing transgressive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandura, A; Caprara, G V; Barbaranelli, C; Pastorelli, C; Regalia, C

    2001-01-01

    This longitudinal research examined a structural model of the self-regulatory mechanisms governing transgressive conduct. Perceived academic and self-regulatory efficacy concurrently and longitudinally deterred transgressiveness both directly and by fostering prosocialness and adherence to moral self-sanctions for harmful conduct. The impact of perceived social self-efficacy was mediated through prosocialness. Moral disengagement and prosocialness affected transgressiveness through the mediating influence of irascible affectivity and hostile rumination. Ruminative affectivity, in turn, both concurrently and longitudinally affected transgressiveness. Moral disengagement also contributed independently to variance in transgressiveness over time. This pattern of relations was obtained after controlling for prior transgressiveness. The structural model was replicated across gender and provided a better fit to the data than did several alternative models.

  16. Stress and Memory: Behavioral Effects and Neurobiological Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandi, Carmen; Pinelo-Nava, M. Teresa

    2007-01-01

    Stress is a potent modulator of learning and memory processes. Although there have been a few attempts in the literature to explain the diversity of effects (including facilitating, impairing, and lack of effects) described for the impact of stress on memory function according to single classification criterion, they have proved insufficient to explain the whole complexity of effects. Here, we review the literature in the field of stress and memory interactions according to five selected classifying factors (source of stress, stressor duration, stressor intensity, stressor timing with regard to memory phase, and learning type) in an attempt to develop an integrative model to understand how stress affects memory function. Summarizing on those conditions in which there was enough information, we conclude that high stress levels, whether intrinsic (triggered by the cognitive challenge) or extrinsic (induced by conditions completely unrelated to the cognitive task), tend to facilitate Pavlovian conditioning (in a linear-asymptotic manner), while being deleterious for spatial/explicit information processing (which with regard to intrinsic stress levels follows an inverted U-shape effect). Moreover, after reviewing the literature, we conclude that all selected factors are essential to develop an integrative model that defines the outcome of stress effects in memory processes. In parallel, we provide a brief review of the main neurobiological mechanisms proposed to account for the different effects of stress in memory function. Glucocorticoids were found as a common mediating mechanism for both the facilitating and impairing actions of stress in different memory processes and phases. Among the brain regions implicated, the hippocampus, amygdala, and prefrontal cortex were highlighted as critical for the mediation of stress effects. PMID:18060012

  17. Stress and Memory: Behavioral Effects and Neurobiological Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Sandi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress is a potent modulator of learning and memory processes. Although there have been a few attempts in the literature to explain the diversity of effects (including facilitating, impairing, and lack of effects described for the impact of stress on memory function according to single classification criterion, they have proved insufficient to explain the whole complexity of effects. Here, we review the literature in the field of stress and memory interactions according to five selected classifying factors (source of stress, stressor duration, stressor intensity, stressor timing with regard to memory phase, and learning type in an attempt to develop an integrative model to understand how stress affects memory function. Summarizing on those conditions in which there was enough information, we conclude that high stress levels, whether intrinsic (triggered by the cognitive challenge or extrinsic (induced by conditions completely unrelated to the cognitive task, tend to facilitate Pavlovian conditioning (in a linear-asymptotic manner, while being deleterious for spatial/explicit information processing (which with regard to intrinsic stress levels follows an inverted U-shape effect. Moreover, after reviewing the literature, we conclude that all selected factors are essential to develop an integrative model that defines the outcome of stress effects in memory processes. In parallel, we provide a brief review of the main neurobiological mechanisms proposed to account for the different effects of stress in memory function. Glucocorticoids were found as a common mediating mechanism for both the facilitating and impairing actions of stress in different memory processes and phases. Among the brain regions implicated, the hippocampus, amygdala, and prefrontal cortex were highlighted as critical for the mediation of stress effects.

  18. Elevated temperature, nano-mechanical testing in situ in the scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, J. M.; Michler, J. [EMPA - Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Mechanics of Materials and Nanostructures, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, Thun CH-3602 (Switzerland)

    2013-04-15

    A general nano-mechanical test platform capable of performing variable temperature and variable strain rate testing in situ in the scanning electron microscope is described. A variety of test geometries are possible in combination with focused ion beam machining or other fabrication techniques: indentation, micro-compression, cantilever bending, and scratch testing. The system is intrinsically displacement-controlled, which allows it to function directly as a micro-scale thermomechanical test frame. Stable, elevated temperature indentation/micro-compression requires the indenter tip and the sample to be in thermal equilibrium to prevent thermal displacement drift due to thermal expansion. This is achieved through independent heating and temperature monitoring of both the indenter tip and sample. Furthermore, the apex temperature of the indenter tip is calibrated, which allows it to act as a referenced surface temperature probe during contact. A full description of the system is provided, and the effects of indenter geometry and of radiation on imaging conditions are discussed. The stabilization time and temperature distribution throughout the system as a function of temperature is characterized. The advantages of temperature monitoring and thermal calibration of the indenter tip are illustrated, which include the possibility of local thermal conductivity measurement. Finally, validation results using nanoindentation on fused silica and micro-compression of <100> silicon micro-pillars as a function of temperature up to 500 Degree-Sign C are presented, and procedures and considerations taken for these measurements are discussed. A brittle to ductile transition from fracture to splitting then plastic deformation is directly observed in the SEM for silicon as a function of temperature.

  19. Mechanical Performance of Asphalt Mortar Containing Hydrated Lime and EAFSS at Low and High Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Hoon Moon

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the possibility of improving the global response of asphalt materials for pavement applications through the use of hydrated lime and Electric Arc-Furnace Steel Slag (EAFSS was investigated. For this purpose, a set of asphalt mortars was prepared by mixing two different asphalt binders with fine granite aggregate together with hydrated lime or EAFSS at three different percentages. Bending Beam Rheometer (BBR creep tests and Dynamic Shear Rheometer (DSR complex modulus tests were performed to evaluate the material response both at low and high temperature. Then, the rheological Huet model was fitted to the BBR creep results for estimating the impact of filler content on the model parameters. It was found that an addition of hydrated lime and EAFSS up to 10% and 5%, respectively, results in satisfactory low-temperature performance with a substantial improvement of the high-temperature behavior.

  20. Mechanical Performance of Asphalt Mortar Containing Hydrated Lime and EAFSS at Low and High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Ki Hoon; Wang, Di; Riccardi, Chiara; Wistuba, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the possibility of improving the global response of asphalt materials for pavement applications through the use of hydrated lime and Electric Arc-Furnace Steel Slag (EAFSS) was investigated. For this purpose, a set of asphalt mortars was prepared by mixing two different asphalt binders with fine granite aggregate together with hydrated lime or EAFSS at three different percentages. Bending Beam Rheometer (BBR) creep tests and Dynamic Shear Rheometer (DSR) complex modulus tests were performed to evaluate the material response both at low and high temperature. Then, the rheological Huet model was fitted to the BBR creep results for estimating the impact of filler content on the model parameters. It was found that an addition of hydrated lime and EAFSS up to 10% and 5%, respectively, results in satisfactory low-temperature performance with a substantial improvement of the high-temperature behavior. PMID:28773100

  1. Creep Crack Growth Behavior of Alloys 617 and 800H in Air and Impure Helium Environments at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grierson, D. S.; Cao, G.; Brooks, P.; Pezzi, P.; Glaudell, A.; Kuettel, D.; Fischer, G.; Allen, T.; Sridharan, K.; Crone, W. C.

    2017-03-01

    The environmental degradation of intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) materials in impure helium has been identified as an area with major ramifications on the design of very high-temperature reactors (VHTR). It has been reported that in some helium environments, non-ductile failure is a significant failure mode for Alloy 617 with long-term elevated-temperature service. Non-ductile failure of intermediate exchangers can result in catastrophic consequences; unfortunately, the knowledge of creep crack initiation and creep crack growth (CCG) in candidate alloys is limited. Current codes and code cases for the candidate alloys do not provide specific guidelines for effects of impure helium on the high-temperature behavior. The work reported here explores creep crack growth characterization of Alloy 617 and Alloy 800H at elevated temperatures in air and in impure helium environments, providing information on the reliability of these alloys in VHTR for long-term service. Alloy 617 was found to exhibit superior CCG resistance compared to Alloy 800H. For Alloy 617 tested at 973 K (700 °C), a notable increase in the resistance to crack growth was measured in air compared to that measured in the helium environment; CCG results for Alloy 800H suggest that air and helium environments produce similar behavior. Testing of grain boundary-engineered (GBE) Alloy 617 samples revealed that, although the technique produces superior mechanical properties in many respects, the GBE samples exhibited inferior resistance to creep crack growth compared to the other Alloy 617 samples tested under similar conditions. Grain size is noted as a confounding factor in creep crack growth resistance.

  2. Mechanical behavior and failure mechanism of resistance spot welded DP1000 dual phase steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chabok, A.; Van der Aa, Ellen; de Hosson, J.T.M.; Pei, Y.T.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on the microstructural evolution of resistance spot welded 1000 MPa dual phase steel under two different welding conditions, and their relation to the mechanical performance and failure mechanisms. It is shown that a double pulse weld scheme leads to an enhancement in

  3. Polyploidization mechanisms: temperature environment can induce diploid gamete formation in Rosa sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pécrix, Yann; Rallo, Géraldine; Folzer, Hélène; Cigna, Mireille; Gudin, Serge; Le Bris, Manuel

    2011-06-01

    Polyploidy is an important evolutionary phenomenon but the mechanisms by which polyploidy arises still remain underexplored. There may be an environmental component to polyploidization. This study aimed to clarify how temperature may promote diploid gamete formation considered an essential element for sexual polyploidization. First of all, a detailed cytological analysis of microsporogenesis and microgametogenesis was performed to target precisely the key developmental stages which are the most sensitive to temperature. Then, heat-induced modifications in sporad and pollen characteristics were analysed through an exposition of high temperature gradient. Rosa plants are sensitive to high temperatures with a developmental sensitivity window limited to meiosis. Moreover, the range of efficient temperatures is actually narrow. 36 °C at early meiosis led to a decrease in pollen viability, pollen ectexine defects but especially the appearance of numerous diploid pollen grains. They resulted from dyads or triads mainly forme