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Sample records for temperature laser plasma

  1. Laser Plasma Coupling for High Temperature Hohlraums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruer, W.

    1999-11-04

    Simple scaling models indicate that quite high radiation temperatures can be achieved in hohlraums driven with the National Ignition Facility. A scaling estimate for the radiation temperature versus pulse duration for different size NIF hohlraums is shown in Figure 1. Note that a radiation temperature of about 650 ev is projected for a so-called scale 1 hohlraum (length 2.6mm, diameter 1.6mm). With such high temperature hohlraums, for example, opacity experiments could be carried out using more relevant high Z materials rather than low Z surrogates. These projections of high temperature hohlraums are uncertain, since the scaling model does not allow for the very strongly-driven laser plasma coupling physics. Lasnex calculations have been carried out to estimate the plasma and irradiation conditions in a scale 1 hohlraum driven by NIF. Linear instability gains as high as exp(100) have been found for stimulated Brillouin scattering, and other laser-driven instabilities are also far above their thresholds. More understanding of the very strongly-driven coupling physics is clearly needed in order to more realistically assess and improve the prospects for high temperature hohlraums. Not surprisingly, this regime has been avoided for inertial fusion applications and so is relatively unexplored.

  2. Measurements of plasma temperature and electron density in laser ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Plasma produced by a 355 nm pulsed Nd:YAG laser with a pulse duration of 6 ns focussed onto a copper solid sample in air at atmospheric pressure is studied spectroscopically. The temperature and electron density characterizing the plasma are measured by time-resolved spectroscopy of neutral atom and ion ...

  3. Plasma temperature clamping in filamentation laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Yeak, J.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2015-10-19

    Ultrafast laser filament induced breakdown spectroscopy is a very promising method for remote material detection. We present characteristics of plasmas generated in a metal target by laser filaments in air. Our measurements show that the temperature of the ablation plasma is clamped along the filamentation channel due to intensity clamping in a filament. Nevertheless, significant changes in radiation intensity are noticeable, and this is essentially due to variation in the number density of emitting atoms. The present results also partly explains the reason for the occurrence of atomic plume during fs LIBS in air compared to long-pulse ns LIBS.

  4. High Temperature Plasmas Theory and Mathematical Tools for Laser and Fusion Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Spatschek, Karl-Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Filling the gap for a treatment of the subject as an advanced course in theoretical physics with a huge potential for future applications, this monograph discusses aspects of these applications and provides theoretical methods and tools for their investigation. Throughout this coherent and up-to-date work the main emphasis is on classical plasmas at high-temperatures, drawing on the experienced author's specialist background. As such, it covers the key areas of magnetic fusion plasma, laser-plasma-interaction and astrophysical plasmas, while also including nonlinear waves and phenomena.

  5. Measurement of He neutral temperature in detached plasmas using laser absorption spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Aramaki

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of the heat load onto plasma-facing components by plasma detachment is an inevitable scheme in future nuclear fusion reactors. Since the control of the plasma and neutral temperatures is a key issue to the detached plasma generation, we have developed a laser absorption spectroscopy system for the metastable helium temperature measurements and used together with a previously developed laser Thomson scattering system for the electron temperature and density measurements. The thermal relaxation process between the neutral and the electron in the detached plasma generated in the linear plasma device, NAGDIS-II was studied. It is shown that the electron temperature gets close to the neutral temperature by increasing the electron density. On the other hand, the pressure dependence of electron and neutral temperatures shows the cooling effect by the neutrals. The possibility of the plasma fluctuation measurement using the fluctuation in the absorption signal is also shown.

  6. Influence of sample temperature on the expansion dynamics of laser-induced germanium plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, LIU; Yue, TONG; Ying, WANG; Dan, ZHANG; Suyu, LI; Yuanfei, JIANG; Anmin, CHEN; Mingxing, JIN

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we investigated the influence of sample temperature on the expansion dynamics and the optical emission spectroscopy of laser-induced plasma, and Ge was selected as the test sample. The target was heated from room temperature (22 °C) to 300 °C, and excited in atmospheric environment by using a Q-Switched Nd:YAG pulse laser with the wavelength of 1064 nm. To study the plasma expansion dynamics, we observed the plasma plume at different laser energies (5.0, 7.4 and 9.4 mJ) and different sample temperatures by using time-resolved image. We found that the heated target temperature could accelerate the expansion of plasma plume. Moreover, we also measured the effect of target temperature on the optical emission spectroscopy and signal-to-noise ratio.

  7. Monitoring Temperature in High Enthalpy Arc-heated Plasma Flows using Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Marcel Nations; Chang, Leyen S.; Jeffries, Jay B.; Hanson, Ronald K.; Nawaz, Anuscheh; Taunk, Jaswinder S.; Driver, David M.; Raiche, George

    2013-01-01

    A tunable diode laser sensor was designed for in situ monitoring of temperature in the arc heater of the NASA Ames IHF arcjet facility (60 MW). An external cavity diode laser was used to generate light at 777.2 nm and laser absorption used to monitor the population of electronically excited oxygen atoms in an air plasma flow. Under the assumption of thermochemical equilibrium, time-resolved temperature measurements were obtained on four lines-of-sight, which enabled evaluation of the temperature uniformity in the plasma column for different arcjet operating conditions.

  8. [Plasma temperature calculation and coupling mechanism analysis of laser-double wire hybrid welding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Kai; Li, Huan; Yang, Li-Jun; Gu, Xiao-Yan; Gao, Ying

    2013-04-01

    The plasma radiation of laser-double wire hybrid welding was collected by using fiber spectrometer, the coupling mechanism of arc with laser was studied through high-speed photography during welding process, and the temperature of hybrid plasma was calculated by using the method of Boltzmann plot. The results indicated that with laser hybrid, luminance was enhanced; radiation intensity became stronger; arc was attracted to the laser point; cross section contracted and arc was more stable. The laser power, welding current and arc-arc distance are important factors that have great influence on electron temperature. Increase in the laser power, amplification of welding current and reduction of arc-arc distance can all result in the rise of temperature.

  9. Study on the correlation between plasma electron temperature and penetration depth in laser welding processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sibillano, T.; Ancona, A.; Rizzi, D.; Saludes Rodil, S.; Rodriguez Nieto, J.; Konuk, A.R.; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; Huis in 't Veld, Bert

    2010-01-01

    The plasma electron temperature has been estimated starting from the spectroscopic analysis of the optical emission of the laser-generated plasma plume during quite diverse stainless steel welding procedures (c.w. CO2 and pulsed Nd:YAG). Although the optical emissions present different spectral

  10. A possibility of local measurements of ion temperature in a high-temperature plasma by laser induced ionization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kantor, M.

    2012-01-01

    A new diagnostic for local measurements of ion temperature and drift velocity in fusion plasmas is proposed in the paper. The diagnostic is based on laser induced ionization of excited hydrogen and deuterium atoms from the levels which ionization energy less than the laser photon energy. A high

  11. Temperature and Electron Density Determination on Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Plasmas: A Physical Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najarian, Maya L.; Chinni, Rosemarie C.

    2013-01-01

    This laboratory is designed for physical chemistry students to gain experience using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in understanding plasma diagnostics. LIBS uses a high-powered laser that is focused on the sample causing a plasma to form. The emission of this plasma is then spectrally resolved and detected. Temperature and electron…

  12. Electron density and temperature measurements in a laser produced carbon plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, S.S.; Bindhu, C.V.; Issac, R.C.; Nampoori, V.P.; Vallabhan, C.P. [Laser Division, International School of Photonics, Cochin University of Science Technology, Cochin 682 022 (India)

    1997-09-01

    Plasma generated by fundamental radiation from a Nd:YAG laser focused onto a graphite target is studied spectroscopically. Measured line profiles of several ionic species were used to infer electron temperature and density at several sections located in front of the target surface. Line intensities of successive ionization states of carbon were used for electron temperature calculations. Stark broadened profiles of singly ionized species have been utilized for electron density measurements. Electron density as well as electron temperature were studied as functions of laser irradiance and time elapsed after the incidence of laser pulse. The validity of the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium is discussed in light of the results obtained. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. 0.351 micron Laser Beam propagation in High-temperature Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froula, D; Divol, L; Meezan, N; Ross, J; Berger, R L; Michel, P; Dixit, S; Rekow, V; Sorce, C; Moody, J D; Neumayer, P; Pollock, B; Wallace, R; Suter, L; Glenzer, S H

    2007-12-10

    A study of the laser-plasma interaction processes have been performed in plasmas that are created to emulate the plasma conditions in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion targets. The plasma emulator is produced in a gas-filled hohlraum; a blue 351-nm laser beam propagates along the axis of the hohlraum interacting with a high-temperature (T{sub e} = 3.5 keV), dense (n{sub e} = 5 x 10{sup 20}cm{sup -3}), long-scale length (L {approx} 2 mm) plasma. Experiments at these conditions have demonstrated that the interaction beam produces less than 1% total backscatter resulting in transmission greater than 90% for laser intensities less than I < 2 x 10{sup 15} W-cm{sup -2}. The bulk plasma conditions have been independently characterized using Thomson scattering where the peak electron temperatures are shown to scale with the hohlraum heater beam energy in the range from 2 keV to 3.5 keV. This feature has allowed us to determine the thresholds for both backscattering and filamentation instabilities; the former measured with absolutely calibrated full aperture backscatter and near backscatter diagnostics and the latter with a transmitted beam diagnostics. A plasma length scaling is also investigated extending our measurements to 4-mm long high-temperature plasmas. At intensities I < 5 x 10{sup 14} W-cm{sup -2}, greater than 80% of the energy in the laser is transmitted through a 5-mm long, high-temperature (T{sub e} > 2.5 keV) high-density (n{sub e} = 5 x 10{sup 20} w-cm{sup -3}) plasma. Comparing the experimental results with detailed gain calculations for the onset of significant laser scattering processes shows a stimulated Brillouin scattering threshold (R=10%) for a linear gain of 15; these high temperature, low density experiments produce plasma conditions comparable to those along the outer beams in ignition hohlraum designs. By increasing the gas fill density (n{sub e} = 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}) in these targets, the inner beam ignition hohlraum conditions are

  14. Measurements of plasma temperature and electron density in laser ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    nique to provide remote, in-situ, rapid and multi-elemental analysis of bulk and trace sample in any phase (solid, liquid and gas) with no or minimal sample prepa- ration [2–4]. The characterization of LIPs by determining their temperature and electron den- sity is essential and has gained considerable interest in recent years ...

  15. Laser induced fluorescence measurements of axial velocity, velocity shear, and parallel ion temperature profiles during the route to plasma turbulence in a linear magnetized plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty Thakur, S.; Adriany, K.; Gosselin, J. J.; McKee, J.; Scime, E. E.; Sears, S. H.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-11-01

    We report experimental measurements of the axial plasma flow and the parallel ion temperature in a magnetized linear plasma device. We used laser induced fluorescence to measure Doppler resolved ion velocity distribution functions in argon plasma to obtain spatially resolved axial velocities and parallel ion temperatures. We also show changes in the parallel velocity profiles during the transition from resistive drift wave dominated plasma to a state of weak turbulence driven by multiple plasma instabilities.

  16. On the fundamental relation of laser schlieren deflectometry for temperature measurements in filamentary plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Jan; Bonaventura, Zdeněk; Foest, Rüdiger

    2015-07-01

    Recently, laser schlieren deflectometry (LSD) had been successfully employed as a temperature measurement method to reveal the heat convection generated by micro filaments of a self-organized non-thermal atmospheric plasma jet. Based on the theory of the temperature measurements using LSD, in this work, three approaches for an application of the method are introduced: (i) a hyperbolic-like model of refractive index is applied which allows an analytical theory for the evaluation of the deflection angle to be developed, (ii) a Gaussian shape model for the filament temperature is implemented which is analyzed numerically and (iii) an experimental calibration of the laser deflection with a gas mixture of helium and argon is performed. Thus, these approaches demonstrate that a universal relation between the relative maximum temperature of the filament core (T1/T0) and a the maximum deflection angle δ1 of the laser beam can be written as T1/T0=(1 - δ1/δ0)-1, where δ0 is a parameter that is defined by the configuration of the experiment and by the assumed model for the shape of the temperature profile. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  17. Laser Thomson scattering measurements of electron temperature and density in a hall-effect plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washeleski, Robert L.

    Hall-effect thrusters (HETs) are compact electric propulsion devices with high specific impulse used for a variety of space propulsion applications. HET technology is well developed but the electron properties in the discharge are not completely understood, mainly due to the difficulty involved in performing accurate measurements in the discharge. Measurements of electron temperature and density have been performed using electrostatic probes, but presence of the probes can significantly disrupt thruster operation, and thus alter the electron temperature and density. While fast-probe studies have expanded understanding of HET discharges, a non-invasive method of measuring the electron temperature and density in the plasma is highly desirable. An alternative to electrostatic probes is a non-perturbing laser diagnostic technique that measures Thomson scattering from the plasma. Thomson scattering is the process by which photons are elastically scattered from the free electrons in a plasma. Since the electrons have thermal energy their motion causes a Doppler shift in the scattered photons that is proportional to their velocity. Like electrostatic probes, laser Thomson scattering (LTS) can be used to determine the temperature and density of free electrons in the plasma. Since Thomson scattering measures the electron velocity distribution function directly no assumptions of the plasma conditions are required, allowing accurate measurements in anisotropic and non-Maxwellian plasmas. LTS requires a complicated measurement apparatus, but has the potential to provide accurate, non-perturbing measurements of electron temperature and density in HET discharges. In order to assess the feasibility of LTS diagnostics on HETs non-invasive measurements of electron temperature and density in the near-field plume of a Hall thruster were performed using a custom built laser Thomson scattering diagnostic. Laser measurements were processed using a maximum likelihood estimation method

  18. Electron density and temperature diagnostics in laser-induced hydrogen plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, G.; Parigger, C. G.

    2017-02-01

    Laser-induced optical breakdown is achieved by using Q-switched, Nd:YAG radiation focused into ultra-high-purity (UHP) hydrogen gas at a pressure of 1.08 ± 0.03 × 105 Pa inside a cell. The plasma emission spectra are dispersed by a Czerny-Turner type spectrometer and detected with an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD). Stark-broadened hydrogen Balmer series H α and Hβ line profiles are used as a spectroscopic tool for the determination of electron density and excitation temperature. Spatial variation of electron density and temperature at 0.40 µs are extracted from the recorded intensities of H α and Hβ lines. Temporal variations of electron density and excitation temperature are also presented for the time delay range of 0.15 µs to 1.4 µs.

  19. Temporal evolution of the spectral lines emission and temperatures in laser induced plasmas through characteristic parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bredice, F., E-mail: faustob@ciop.unlp.edu.ar [Centro de Investigaciones Ópticas, P.O. Box 3 C. P.1897 Gonnet, La Plata (Argentina); Pacheco Martinez, P. [Grupo de Espectroscopía Óptica de Emisión y Láser, Universidad del Atlántico, Barranquilla (Colombia); Sánchez-Aké, C.; Villagrán-Muniz, M. [Laboratorio de Fotofísica, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 70-186, México D.F. 04510 (Mexico)

    2015-05-01

    evolution of carbon lines obtained from a plasma generated by a Nd:YAG laser. The plasma was produced in vacuum and was observed at different distances from the target. A good agreement between the temperature calculated by the traditional Boltzmann plot and by this method was obtained. - Highlights: • The time evolution of the spectral lines for each point of the plasma can be expressed by a reduced set of constants B{sub i} and δ{sub i}. • These constants can be used as a criterion for line selection in LIBS and the evaluation of the LTE departure of the plasma. • It is possible to check if any spectral lines are useful for Boltzmann analysis or if they have been properly classified. • The temperature evolution for each point of the plasma depends on its initial temperature T(t{sub 0}) and the constants B{sub i}. • The determination of these constants does not depend on any parameters which are time-independent.

  20. Self-focusing and defocusing of Gaussian laser beams in collisional inhomogeneous plasmas with linear density and temperature ramps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemzadeh, M.

    2018-01-01

    Self-focusing and defocusing of Gaussian laser beams in collisional inhomogeneous plasmas are investigated in the presence of various laser intensities and linear density and temperature ramps. Considering the ponderomotive force and using the momentum transfer and energy equations, the nonlinear electron density is derived. Taking into account the paraxial approximation and nonlinear electron density, a nonlinear differential equation, governing the focusing and defocusing of the laser beam, is obtained. Results show that in the absence of ramps the laser beam is focused between a minimum and a maximum value of laser intensity. For a certain value of laser intensity and initial electron density, the self-focusing process occurs in a temperature range which reaches its maximum at turning point temperature. However, the laser beam is converged in a narrow range for various amounts of initial electron density. It is indicated that the σ2 parameter and its sign can affect the self-focusing process for different values of laser intensity, initial temperature, and initial density. Finally, it is found that although the electron density ramp-down diverges the laser beam, electron density ramp-up improves the self-focusing process.

  1. Picosecond X-ray radiography of superdense high-temperature laser plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, A. A.; Bel'kov, S. A.; Platonov, K. Yu.; Romanov, V. V.; Rogozhnikov, G. S.

    2017-09-01

    The layout of an X-ray source for diagnostics of the compressed state of laser plasma is proposed, and its optimal parameters are calculated under the conditions required for nuclear fusion. Such a source operating in a pulsed regime is intended to be used for determining the spatial distribution of laser-plasma density with high temporal resolution by means of multiframe (pulses follow with a specified time interval) backlight imaging of the main target by X-ray pulses obtained by irradiation of a secondary target by picosecond laser pulses.

  2. Study on the correlation between plasma electron temperature and penetration depth in laser welding processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sibillano, T.; Ancona, A.; Rizzi, D.; Saludes Rodil, S.; Rodriguez Nieto, J.; Konuk, A.R.; Aarts, R.G.K.M.; Huis in 't Veld, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    The plasma electron temperature has been estimated starting from the spectroscopic analysis of the optical emission of the lasergenerated plasma plume during quite diverse stainless steel welding procedures (c.w. CO2 and pulsed Nd:YAG). Although the optical emissions present different spectral

  3. Plasma membrane temperature gradients and multiple cell permeabilization induced by low peak power density femtosecond lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen L. Garner

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Calculations indicate that selectively heating the extracellular media induces membrane temperature gradients that combine with electric fields and a temperature-induced reduction in the electropermeabilization threshold to potentially facilitate exogenous molecular delivery. Experiments by a wide-field, pulsed femtosecond laser with peak power density far below typical single cell optical delivery systems confirmed this hypothesis. Operating this laser in continuous wave mode at the same average power permeabilized many fewer cells, suggesting that bulk heating alone is insufficient and temperature gradients are crucial for permeabilization. This work suggests promising opportunities for a high throughput, low cost, contactless method for laser mediated exogenous molecule delivery without the complex optics of typical single cell optoinjection, for potential integration into microscope imaging and microfluidic systems.

  4. Laser produced plasmas in liquid environments

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Nichola

    2016-01-01

    During the interaction of an intense laser pulse with a solid metal target, a high temperature, high density plasma is formed. Pulsed laser ablation has attracted much interest over the past fifty years with experimental and theoretical work largely focussed on the study of laser produced plasmas in vacuum. The study of pulsed laser ablation has been largely motivated from a materials processing perspective, with the characterisation of thin films using pulsed laser deposition of particular i...

  5. Influence of plasma parameters and substrate temperature on the structural and optical properties of CdTe thin films deposited on glass by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quiñones-Galván, J. G.; Santana-Aranda, M. A.; Pérez-Centeno, A. [Departamento de Física, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Exactas e Ingenierías, Universidad de Guadalajara, Boulevard Marcelino García Barragán 1421, Guadalajara, Jalisco C.P. 44430 (Mexico); Camps, Enrique [Departamento de Física, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027, D.F., C.P. 11801 (Mexico); Campos-González, E.; Guillén-Cervantes, A.; Santoyo-Salazar, J.; Zelaya-Angel, O. [Departamento de Física, CINVESTAV-IPN, Apartado Postal 14-740, D. F. C.P. 07360 (Mexico); Hernández-Hernández, A. [Escuela Superior de Apan, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Calle Ejido de Chimalpa Tlalayote s/n Colonia Chimalpa, Apan Hidalgo (Mexico); Moure-Flores, F. de [Facultad de Química, Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro, Querétaro C.P. 76010 (Mexico)

    2015-09-28

    In the pulsed laser deposition of thin films, plasma parameters such as energy and density of ions play an important role in the properties of materials. In the present work, cadmium telluride thin films were obtained by laser ablation of a stoichiometric CdTe target in vacuum, using two different values for: substrate temperature (RT and 200 °C) and plasma energy (120 and 200 eV). Structural characterization revealed that the crystalline phase can be changed by controlling both plasma energy and substrate temperature; which affects the corresponding band gap energy. All the thin films showed smooth surfaces and a Te rich composition.

  6. Low temperature plasma technology methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Paul K

    2013-01-01

    Written by a team of pioneering scientists from around the world, Low Temperature Plasma Technology: Methods and Applications brings together recent technological advances and research in the rapidly growing field of low temperature plasmas. The book provides a comprehensive overview of related phenomena such as plasma bullets, plasma penetration into biofilms, discharge-mode transition of atmospheric pressure plasmas, and self-organization of microdischarges. It describes relevant technology and diagnostics, including nanosecond pulsed discharge, cavity ringdown spectroscopy, and laser-induce

  7. Measurement of electron density and electron temperature of a cascaded arc plasma using laser Thomson scattering compared to an optical emission spectroscopic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, WANG; Cong, LI; Jielin, SHI; Xingwei, WU; Hongbin, DING

    2017-11-01

    As advanced linear plasma sources, cascaded arc plasma devices have been used to generate steady plasma with high electron density, high particle flux and low electron temperature. To measure electron density and electron temperature of the plasma device accurately, a laser Thomson scattering (LTS) system, which is generally recognized as the most precise plasma diagnostic method, has been established in our lab in Dalian University of Technology. The electron density has been measured successfully in the region of 4.5 × 1019 m-3 to 7.1 × 1020 m-3 and electron temperature in the region of 0.18 eV to 0.58 eV. For comparison, an optical emission spectroscopy (OES) system was established as well. The results showed that the electron excitation temperature (configuration temperature) measured by OES is significantly higher than the electron temperature (kinetic electron temperature) measured by LTS by up to 40% in the given discharge conditions. The results indicate that the cascaded arc plasma is recombining plasma and it is not in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). This leads to significant error using OES when characterizing the electron temperature in a non-LTE plasma.

  8. Determination of the maximum temperature at the center of an optically thick laser-induced plasma using self-reversed spectral lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gornushkin, I B; Omenetto, N; Smith, B W; Winefordner, J D

    2004-09-01

    A method of temperature measurement based on the model developed by Bartels of an optically thick inhomogeneous plasma was applied to a laser plasma induced on a target containing barium. The method involves the intensity ratio measurement of two self-reversed Ba(II) lines. The temperature thus determined corresponds to the maximum temperature in the plasma center. The plasma temperature was measured for delay times between 0.5 micros and 10 micros in two spectrometer operating modes: the scanning mode and the dual-wavelength mode, the latter resulting in better precision. A detailed analysis of experimental errors was performed. The error strongly depended on the wavelength separation of the lines used. The most accurate results were obtained for the largest line separation. Using one line in the UV and the other in the visible region, the relative error was 2-6% for temperatures between 8000 K and 20 000 K. The distribution of the plasma temperature along the plasma height was measured in the same delay time range. The temperature was found to be uniform along the plasma vertical axis, thus confirming the plasma cylindrical symmetry.

  9. Nonlinear laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaw, P. K.

    2017-12-01

    Soon after lasers were invented, there was tremendous curiosity on the nonlinear phenomena which would result in their interaction with a fully ionized plasma. Apart from the basic interest, it was realized that it could be used for the achievement of nuclear fusion in the laboratory. This led us to a paper on the propagation of a laser beam into an inhomogeneous fusion plasma, where it was first demonstrated that light would go up to the critical layer (where the frequency matches the plasma frequency) and get reflected from there with a reflection coefficient of order unity. The reflection coefficient was determined by collisional effects. Since the wave was expected to slow down to near zero group speed at the reflection point, the dominant collision frequency determining the reflection coefficient was the collision frequency at the reflection point. It turned out that the absorption of light was rather small for fusion temperatures. This placed a premium on investigation of nonlinear phenomena which might contribute to the absorption and penetration of the light into high-density plasma. An early investigation showed that electron jitter with respect to ions would be responsible for the excitation of decay instabilities which convert light waves into electrostatic plasma waves and ion waves near the critical frequency. These electrostatic waves would then get absorbed into the plasma even in the collisionless case and lead to plasma heating which is nonlinear. Detailed estimates of this heating were made. Similar nonlinear processes which could lead to stimulated scattering of light in the underdense region (ω >ω _p) were investigated together with a number of other workers. All these nonlinear processes need a critical threshold power for excitation. Another important process which was discovered around the same time had to do with filamentation and trapping of light when certain thresholds were exceeded. All of this work has been extensively verified in

  10. Laser beam-plasma plume interaction during laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jacek; Moscicki, Tomasz; Szymanski, Zygmunt

    2003-10-01

    Laser welding process is unstable because the keyhole wall performs oscillations which results in the oscillations of plasma plume over the keyhole mouth. The characteristic frequencies are equal to 0.5-4 kHz. Since plasma plume absorbs and refracts laser radiation, plasma oscillations modulate the laser beam before it reaches the workpiece. In this work temporary electron densities and temperatures are determined in the peaks of plasma bursts during welding with a continuous wave CO2 laser. It has been found that during strong bursts the plasma plume over the keyhole consists of metal vapour only, being not diluted by the shielding gas. As expected the values of electron density are about two times higher in peaks than their time-averaged values. Since the plasma absorption coefficient scales as ~N2e/T3/2 (for CO2 laser radiation) the results show that the power of the laser beam reaching the metal surface is modulated by the plasma plume oscillations. The attenuation factor equals 4-6% of the laser power but it is expected that it is doubled by the refraction effect. The results, together with the analysis of the colour pictures from streak camera, allow also interpretation of the dynamics of the plasma plume.

  11. Plasma generated during underwater pulsed laser processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jacek; Chrzanowska, Justyna; Moscicki, Tomasz; Radziejewska, Joanna; Stobinski, Leszek; Szymanski, Zygmunt

    2017-09-01

    The plasma induced during underwater pulsed laser ablation of graphite is studied both experimentally and theoretically. The results of the experiment show that the maximum plasma temperature of 25000 K is reached 20 ns from the beginning of the laser pulse and decreases to 6500 K after 1000 ns. The observed OH absorption band shows that the plasma plume is surrounded by the thin layer of dissociated water vapour at a temperature around 5500 K. The hydrodynamic model applied shows similar maximum plasma temperature at delay times between 14 ns and 30 ns. The calculations show also that already at 14th ns, the plasma electron density reaches 0.97·1027 m-3, which is the critical density for 1064 nm radiation. At the same time the plasma pressure is 2 GPa, which is consisted with earlier measurements of the peak pressure exerted on a target in similar conditions.

  12. Development of core ion temperature gradients and edge sheared flows in a helicon plasma device investigated by laser induced fluorescence measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, S. C.; Gosselin, J. J.; McKee, J.; Scime, E. E.; Sears, S. H.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-08-01

    We report experimental observation of ion heating and subsequent development of a prominent ion temperature gradient in the core of a linear magnetized plasma device, and the controlled shear de-correlation experiment. Simultaneously, we also observe the development of strong sheared flows at the edge of the device. Both the ion temperature and the azimuthal velocity profiles are quite flat at low magnetic fields. As the magnetic field is increased, the core ion temperature increases, producing centrally peaked ion temperature profiles and therefore strong radial gradients in the ion temperature. Similarly, we observe the development of large azimuthal flows at the edge, with increasing magnetic field, leading to strong radially sheared plasma flows. The ion velocities and temperatures are derived from laser induced fluorescence measurements of Doppler resolved velocity distribution functions of argon ions. These features are consistent with the previous observations of simultaneously existing radially separated multiple plasma instabilities that exhibit complex plasma dynamics in a very simple plasma system. The ion temperature gradients in the core and the radially sheared azimuthal velocities at the edge point to mechanisms that can drive the multiple plasma instabilities, that were reported earlier.

  13. Low-temperature atmospheric pressure argon plasma treatment and hybrid laser-plasma ablation of barite crown and heavy flint glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhard, Christoph; Roux, Sophie; Brückner, Stephan; Wieneke, Stephan; Viöl, Wolfgang

    2012-06-10

    We report on atmospheric pressure argon plasma-based surface treatment and hybrid laser-plasma ablation of barite crown glass N-BaK4 and heavy flint glass SF5. By pure plasma treatment, a significant surface smoothing, as well as an increase in both the surface energy and the strength of the investigated glass surfaces, was achieved. It was shown that for both glasses, hybrid laser plasma ablation allows an increase in the ablation depth by a factor of 2.1 with respect to pure laser ablation. The ablated volume was increased by an averaged factor of 1.5 for N-BaK4 and 3.7 for SF5.

  14. Temperature measurement of plasma-assisted flames: comparison between optical emission spectroscopy and 2-color laser induced fluorescence techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Lacoste, Deanna A.

    2015-03-30

    Accurate thermometry of highly reactive environments, such as plasma-assisted combustion, is challenging. With the help of conical laminar premixed methane-air flames, this study compares two thermometry techniques for the temperature determination in a combustion front enhanced by nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) plasma discharges. Based on emission spectroscopic analysis, the results show that the rotational temperature of CH(A) gives a reasonable estimate for the adiabatic flame temperature, only for lean and stoichiometric conditions. The rotational temperature of N2(C) is found to significantly underestimate the flame temperature. The 2-color OH-PLIF technique gives correct values of the flame temperature.

  15. Metal surface nitriding by laser induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomann, A. L.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Andreazza-Vignolle, C.; Andreazza, P.; Hermann, J.; Blondiaux, G.

    1996-10-01

    We study a nitriding technique of metals by means of laser induced plasma. The synthesized layers are composed of a nitrogen concentration gradient over several μm depth, and are expected to be useful for tribological applications with no adhesion problem. The nitriding method is tested on the synthesis of titanium nitride which is a well-known compound, obtained at present by many deposition and diffusion techniques. In the method of interest, a laser beam is focused on a titanium target in a nitrogen atmosphere, leading to the creation of a plasma over the metal surface. In order to understand the layer formation, it is necessary to characterize the plasma as well as the surface that it has been in contact with. Progressive nitrogen incorporation in the titanium lattice and TiN synthesis are studied by characterizing samples prepared with increasing laser shot number (100-4000). The role of the laser wavelength is also inspected by comparing layers obtained with two kinds of pulsed lasers: a transversal-excited-atmospheric-pressure-CO2 laser (λ=10.6 μm) and a XeCl excimer laser (λ=308 nm). Simulations of the target temperature rise under laser irradiation are performed, which evidence differences in the initial laser/material interaction (material heated thickness, heating time duration, etc.) depending on the laser features (wavelength and pulse time duration). Results from plasma characterization also point out that the plasma composition and propagation mode depend on the laser wavelength. Correlation of these results with those obtained from layer analyses shows at first the important role played by the plasma in the nitrogen incorporation. Its presence is necessary and allows N2 dissociation and a better energy coupling with the target. Second, it appears that the nitrogen diffusion governs the nitriding process. The study of the metal nitriding efficiency, depending on the laser used, allows us to explain the differences observed in the layer features

  16. Generation conditions of CW Diode Laser Sustained Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Koji; Matsui, Makoto; Ono, Takahiro

    2016-09-01

    Laser sustained plasma was generated using 1 kW class continuous wave diode laser. The laser beam was focused on the seed plasma generated by arc discharge in 1 MPa xenon lamp. The diode laser has advantages of high energy conversion efficiency of 80%, ease of maintenance, compact size and availability of conventional quartz based optics. Therefore, it has a prospect of further development compared with conventional CO2 laser. In this study, variation of the plasma shape caused by laser power is observed and also temperature distribution in the direction of plasma radius is measured by optical emission spectroscopy.

  17. Low Temperature Plasma Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, David

    2013-10-01

    Ionized gas plasmas near room temperature are used in a remarkable number of technological applications mainly because they are extraordinarily efficient at exploiting electrical power for useful chemical and material transformations near room temperature. In this tutorial address, I will focus on the newest area of low temperature ionized gas plasmas (LTP), in this case operating under atmospheric pressure conditions, in which the temperature-sensitive material is living tissue. LTP research directed towards biomedical applications such as sterilization, surgery, wound healing and anti-cancer therapy has seen remarkable growth in the last 3-5 years, but the mechanisms responsible for the biomedical effects have remained mysterious. It is known that LTP readily create reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). ROS and RNS (or RONS), in addition to a suite of other radical and non-radical reactive species, are essential actors in an important sub-field of aerobic biology termed ``redox'' (or oxidation-reduction) biology. I will review the evidence suggesting that RONS generated by plasmas are responsible for their observed therapeutic effects. Other possible bio-active mechanisms include electric fields, charges and photons. It is common in LTP applications that synergies between different mechanisms can play a role and I will review the evidence for synergies in plasma biomedicine. Finally, I will address the challenges and opportunities for plasma physicists to enter this novel, multidisciplinary field.

  18. Laser Plasmas: Optical guiding of laser beam in nonuniform plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A plasma channel produced by a short ionising laser pulse is axially nonuniform resulting from the self-defocusing. Through such preformed plasma channel, when a delayed pulse propagates, the phenomena of diffraction, refraction and self-phase modulation come into play. We have solved the nonlinear parabolic partial ...

  19. Effects of laser polarization in the expansion of plasma waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, N.; Grismayer, T.; Cardoso, L.; Geada, J.; Figueira, G.; Dias, J. M.

    2013-10-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that a column of hydrogen plasma generated by an ultra-short (sub-picosecond), moderate intensity (˜1015-16 W.cm-2) laser, radially expands at a higher velocity when using a circularly polarized laser beam instead of a linearly polarized beam. Interferometry shows that after 1 ns there is a clear shock structure formed, that can be approximated to a cylindrical blast wave. The shock velocity was measured for plasmas created with linearly and circularly polarized laser beams, indicating an approximately 20% higher velocity for plasmas generated with a circularly polarized laser beam, thus implying a higher plasma electron temperature. The heating mechanism was determined to be the Above Threshold Ionization effect. The calculated electrum energy spectrum for a circularly polarized laser beam was broader when compared to the one generated by a linearly polarized laser beam, leading to a higher plasma temperature.

  20. EDITORIAL: Laser and plasma accelerators Laser and plasma accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Robert

    2009-02-01

    This special issue on laser and plasma accelerators illustrates the rapid advancement and diverse applications of laser and plasma accelerators. Plasma is an attractive medium for particle acceleration because of the high electric field it can sustain, with studies of acceleration processes remaining one of the most important areas of research in both laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. The rapid advance in laser and accelerator technology has led to the development of terawatt and petawatt laser systems with ultra-high intensities and short sub-picosecond pulses, which are used to generate wakefields in plasma. Recent successes include the demonstration by several groups in 2004 of quasi-monoenergetic electron beams by wakefields in the bubble regime with the GeV energy barrier being reached in 2006, and the energy doubling of the SLAC high-energy electron beam from 42 to 85 GeV. The electron beams generated by the laser plasma driven wakefields have good spatial quality with energies ranging from MeV to GeV. A unique feature is that they are ultra-short bunches with simulations showing that they can be as short as a few femtoseconds with low-energy spread, making these beams ideal for a variety of applications ranging from novel high-brightness radiation sources for medicine, material science and ultrafast time-resolved radiobiology or chemistry. Laser driven ion acceleration experiments have also made significant advances over the last few years with applications in laser fusion, nuclear physics and medicine. Attention is focused on the possibility of producing quasi-mono-energetic ions with energies ranging from hundreds of MeV to GeV per nucleon. New acceleration mechanisms are being studied, including ion acceleration from ultra-thin foils and direct laser acceleration. The application of wakefields or beat waves in other areas of science such as astrophysics and particle physics is beginning to take off, such as the study of cosmic accelerators considered

  1. Tokamak Plasmas: Electron temperature $(T_ {e}) $ measurements ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thomson scattering technique based on high power laser has already proved its superoirity in measuring the electron temperature (e) and density (e) in fusion plasma devices like tokamaks. The method is a direct and unambiguous one, widely used for the localised and simultaneous measurements of the above ...

  2. Laser-pulsed plasma chemistry: Laser-initiated plasma oxidation of niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, R. F.; Pollak, R. A.; Avouris, Ph.; Lin, C. T.; Théfaine, Y. J.

    1983-03-01

    We report the first observation of the chemical modification of a solid surface exposed to an ambient gas plasma initiated by the interaction of laser radiation with the same surface. A new technique, which we designate laser-pulsed plasma chemistry (LPPC), is proposed for activating heterogeneous chemical reactions at solid surfaces in a gaseous ambient by means of a plasma initiated by laser radiation. Results for niobium metal in one atmosphere oxygen demonstrate single-pulse, self-limiting oxide growth induced by a pulsed CO2 laser. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS or ESCA) was used to monitor surface chemical composition changes and thickness control of thin (1 to 5 nm) reaction product layers. The dependence of single-pulse oxide growth upon laser fluence is observed to be monotonic for oxide thicknesses up to 5 nm. Composition of the oxide Nb2O5-δ, formed by such an optically driven plasma, is similar to that formed by low-temperature oxidation processes such as rf plasma oxidation; however, the valence defect δ of the LPPC oxide is a least two to five times lower. Interdiffusion at the oxide/metal interface becomes important at higher irradiances and is activated by direct optical coupling with the solid or by plasma-mediated thermal coupling. Under ultrahigh vacuum, CO2 laser irradiances greater than 0.9 J cm-2 per pulse thin the surface oxide.

  3. Laser-plasma-based linear collider using hollow plasma channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, C.B., E-mail: CBSchroeder@lbl.gov; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2016-09-01

    A linear electron–positron collider based on laser-plasma accelerators using hollow plasma channels is considered. Laser propagation and energy depletion in the hollow channel is discussed, as well as the overall efficiency of the laser-plasma accelerator. Example parameters are presented for a 1-TeV and 3-TeV center-of-mass collider based on laser-plasma accelerators.

  4. Laser Plasmas: Plasma dynamics from laser ablated solid lithium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These measurements were also used to validate the assumptions underlying the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) model, invoked for the high density laser plasma under study. Some interesting results pertaining to the analysis of plume structure and spatio-temporal behaviour of e and e along the plume length ...

  5. Weak collisionless shocks in laser-plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, R. A.; Bingham, R.; Trines, R. G. M.; Norreys, P.

    2015-04-01

    We obtain a theory describing laminar shock-like structures in a collisionless plasma and examine the parameter limits, in terms of the ion sound Mach number and the electron/ion temperature ratio, within which these structures exist. The essential feature is the inclusion of finite ion temperature with the result that some ions are reflected from a potential ramp. This destroys the symmetry between upstream and downstream regions that would otherwise give the well-known ion solitary wave solution. We have shown earlier (Cairns et al 2014 Phys. Plasmas 21 022112) that such structures may be relevant to problems such as the existence of strong, localized electric fields observed in laser compressed pellets and laser acceleration of ions. Here we present results on the way in which these structures may produce species separation in fusion targets and suggest that it may be possible to use shock ion acceleration for fast ignition.

  6. Ultraintense laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, A.

    Lasers currently under construction or completed carry laser-plasma interactions well into the relativistic regime, with intensities of high 1019 or 1020 Wcm-2. In such cases relativistic effects play a major role and may dominate the physics involved in the interaction. There are many plasma physics related applications which aim to make use of these new ultra intense short pulse lasers. Examples include hard and soft incoherent X-ray generation, coherent short wavelength light sources, particle acceleration via the laser wakefield and fusion via the fast ignitor concept. This thesis is concerned with some of the issues of the fast ignitor; megagauss magnetic field generation, relativistic filamentation and self-focusing and ponderomotive channel boring. In addition some more general comparisons are made on the propagation of both linear and circularly polarised light in plasma targets. The first half of the work is concerned with the propagation of circularly polarised laser light in underdense and near critical density plasmas. A wide range of laser parameters are covered in order to examine aspects of the axial Faraday field generated in such cases. Relativistic filamentation occurs for some parameter combinations, with both temporal and spatial merging of filaments found. The effects of an imposed azimuthal magnetic field are considered in the case of a linearly polarised laser undergoing relativistic filamentation in an underdense plasma. Again filament merging is observed. The final part of the thesis examines the ponderomotive channelling of an ultra-intense picosecond laser pulse into an overdense plasma. Both linear and circularly polarised light are studied. Strong azimuthal magnetic field generation is observed with both polarisations, for the circularly polarised driver this is in addition to the axial field already discussed. The two polarisations show a stark difference in hole boring characteristics; with differences in hole size, hole boring speed

  7. Characterization of laser-sustained plasma behavior during 10 kW laser thruster tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, J.; Krier, H.; Zerkle, D.; Glumb, R. J.

    1992-07-01

    This paper describes some of the important properties and characteristics of laser-sustained plasmas that were generated as part of the experimental tests of a 10 kW laser-powered rocket engine. The high-temperature laser-sustained plasmas were used to heat flows of argon and hydrogen propellants, which were then exhausted through a rocket nozzle to generate thrust. This paper describes some of the detailed plasma analysis that went into the design of the laser thruster, and then summarizes the key performance data acquired during the thruster tests, particularly that data that gives insight into the characteristics of the plasmas. Key findings include demonstrations of specific impulse values of up to 350 seconds at efficiencies near 40 percent using hydrogen plasmas, and the discovery of a low-velocity stability limit for laser-sustained plasmas that has important implications for the design of future laser propulsion systems.

  8. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Plasma heating near a metal target by nanosecond pulses of the first, second, and fourth Nd-laser harmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufetov, Igor'A.; Bufetova, G. A.; Kravtsov, S. B.; Fyodorov, V. B.; Fomin, V. K.

    1995-08-01

    Measurements were made of the electron temperature Te of a laser plasma formed on the surface of a metal target by the action of nanosecond pulses of wavelengths λ = 1060, 530, and 265 nm. The laser radiation intensity was I approx 109—1013 W cm-2. The electron temperature was determined from the emf of a double charge layer at the plasma boundary. Within the limits of the scatter of the experimental results, the plasma temperature was independent of the laser radiation wavelength (in the range 1060-265 nm). The dependence of this temperature on the radiation intensity obeyed approximately Te propto I1/3 throughout the investigated range.

  9. Spectroscopy of Low Temperature Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Ochkin, Vladimir N

    2009-01-01

    Providing an up-to-date overview on spectroscopical diagnostics of low temperature plasma Spectroscopy of Low Temperature Plasma covers the latest developments and techniques. Written by a distinguished scientist and experienced book author this text is applicable to many fields in materials and surface science as well as nanotechnology and contains numerous appendices with indispensable reference data.

  10. Plasma temperature measurements in disruption simulated experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkhipov, N.I. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Bakhtin, V.P. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Safronov, V.M. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Toporkov, D.A. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Vasenin, S.G. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Wurz, H. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, INR (Germany); Zhitlukhin, A.M. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    Results are reported of experiments to measure the temporal and spatial distributions of a temperature and radiation of a near surface plasma cloud appearing in the disruption simulated experiments. These measurements are needed to verificate the different numerical models of vapor shielding layer which appears to arise near the divertor plates surface and prevents them from the bulk of the incoming energy. Experiments with graphite and tungsten samples were carried out at the 2MK-200 plasma facility. Long CUSP trap was used as a source of high temperature deuterium plasma with a power density W = 10 MW/cm{sup 2} and time duration t = 20 mcs. Laser scattering, space and time resolved soft x-ray spectroscopy was employed to measure the plasma cloud temperature and radiation. The different behaviour of shielding layer parameters was shown for a graphite and tungsten samples. For a tungsten the sharp boundary existed between the incoming deuterium plasma and the thin layer of ablated material plasma and the strong gradient of electron temperature took place in this zone. For a graphite this boundary was broadened at the distance and the main part of the screening layer consisted of the mixture of the incoming deuterium and ablated carbon plasma. (orig.).

  11. Spectroscopic diagnostics of plasma during laser processing of aluminium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lober, R.; Mazumder, J.

    2007-10-01

    The role of the plasma in laser-metal interaction is of considerable interest due to its influence in the energy transfer mechanism in industrial laser materials processing. A 10 kW CO2 laser was used to study its interaction with aluminium under an argon environment. The objective was to determine the absorption and refraction of the laser beam through the plasma during the processing of aluminium. Laser processing of aluminium is becoming an important topic for many industries, including the automobile industry. The spectroscopic relative line to continuum method was used to determine the electron temperature distribution within the plasma by investigating the 4158 Å Ar I line emission and the continuum adjacent to it. The plasmas are induced in 1.0 atm pure Ar environment over a translating Al target, using f/7 and 10 kW CO2 laser. Spectroscopic data indicated that the plasma composition and behaviour were Ar-dominated. Experimental results indicated the plasma core temperature to be 14 000-15 300 K over the incident range of laser powers investigated from 5 to 7 kW. It was found that 7.5-29% of the incident laser power was absorbed by the plasma. Cross-section analysis of the melt pools from the Al samples revealed the absence of any key-hole formation and confirmed that the energy transfer mechanism in the targets was conduction dominated for the reported range of experimental data.

  12. Laser production and heating of plasma for MHD application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalufka, N. W.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments have been made on the production and heating of plasmas by the absorption of laser radiation. These experiments were performed to ascertain the feasibility of using laser-produced or laser-heated plasmas as the input for a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator. Such a system would have a broad application as a laser-to-electricity energy converter for space power transmission. Experiments with a 100-J-pulsed CO2 laser were conducted to investigate the breakdown of argon gas by a high-intensity laser beam, the parameters (electron density and temperature) of the plasma produced, and the formation and propagation of laser-supported detonation (LSD) waves. Experiments were also carried out using a 1-J-pulsed CO2 laser to heat the plasma produced in a shock tube. The shock-tube hydrogen plasma reached electron densities of approximately 10 to the 17th/cu cm and electron temperatures of approximately 1 eV. Absorption of the CO2 laser beam by the plasma was measured, and up to approximately 100 percent absorption was observed. Measurements with a small MHD generator showed that the energy extraction efficiency could be very large with values up to 56 percent being measured.

  13. Ideal radiation source for plasma spectroscopy generated by laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Jörg; Grojo, David; Axente, Emanuel; Gerhard, Christoph; Burger, Miloš; Craciun, Valentin

    2017-11-01

    Laboratory plasmas inherently exhibit temperature and density gradients leading to complex investigations. We show that plasmas generated by laser ablation can constitute a robust exception to this. Supported by emission features not observed with other sources, we achieve plasmas of various compositions which are both uniform and in local thermodynamic equilibrium. These properties characterize an ideal radiation source opening multiple perspectives in plasma spectroscopy. The finding also constitutes a breakthrough in the analytical field as fast analyses of complex materials become possible.

  14. [Research on cells ablation characters by laser plasma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jing-hua; Zhang, Xin-gang; Cai, Xiao-tang; Duan, Tao; Feng, Guo-ying; Yang, Li-ming; Zhang, Ya-jun; Wang, Shao-peng; Li, Shi-wen

    2012-08-01

    The study on the mechanism of laser ablated cells is of importance to laser surgery and killing harmful cells. Three radiation modes were researched on the ablation characteristics of onion epidermal cells under: laser direct irradiation, focused irradiation and the laser plasma radiation. Based on the thermodynamic properties of the laser irradiation, the cell temperature rise and phase change have been analyzed. The experiments show that the cells damage under direct irradiation is not obvious at all, but the focused irradiation can cause cells to split and moisture removal. The removal shape is circular with larger area and rough fracture edges. The theoretical analysis found out that the laser plasma effects play a key role in the laser ablation. The thermal effects, radiation ionization and shock waves can increase the deposition of laser pulses energy and impact peeling of the cells, which will greatly increase the scope and efficiency of cell killing and is suitable for the cell destruction.

  15. Laser Plasmas: Multiple charge states of titanium ions in laser ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper presents generation and detection of highly stripped titanium ions (Ti) in laser produced plasma. An Nd:glass laser (KAMETRON) delivering 50 J energy ( = 0.53 m) in 2.5 ns was focused onto a titanium target to produce plasma. This plasma was allowed to drift across a space of ∼ 3 m through a diagnostic ...

  16. An experimental study of laser supported hydrogen plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanzandt, D. M.; Mccay, T. D.; Eskridge, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    The rudiments of a rocket thruster which receives its enthalpy from an energy source which is remotely beamed from a laser is described. An experimental study now partially complete is discussed which will eventually provide a detailed understanding of the physics for assessing the feasibility of using hydrogen plasmas for accepting and converting this energy to enthalpy. A plasma ignition scheme which uses a pulsed CO2 laser has been developed and the properties of the ignition spark documented, including breakdown intensities in hydrogen. A complete diagnostic system capable of determining plasma temperature and the plasma absorptivity for subsequent steady state absorption of a high power CO2 laser beam are developed and demonstrative use is discussed for the preliminary case study, a two atmosphere laser supported argon plasma.

  17. [The Spectral Analysis of Laser-Induced Plasma in Laser Welding with Various Protecting Conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiao; Yang, Li-jun; Liu, Tong; Jiao, Jiao; Wang, Hui-chao

    2016-01-01

    The shielding gas plays an important role in the laser welding process and the variation of the protecting conditions has an obvious effect on the welding quality. This paper studied the influence of the change of protecting conditions on the parameters of laser-induced plasma such as electron temperature and electron density during the laser welding process by designing some experiments of reducing the shielding gas flow rate step by step and simulating the adverse conditions possibly occurring in the actual Nd : YAG laser welding process. The laser-induced plasma was detected by a fiber spectrometer to get the spectral data. So the electron temperature of laser-induced plasma was calculated by using the method of relative spectral intensity and the electron density by the Stark Broadening. The results indicated that the variation of protecting conditions had an important effect on the electron temperature and the electron density in the laser welding. When the protecting conditions were changed, the average electron temperature and the average electron density of the laser-induced plasma would change, so did their fluctuation range. When the weld was in a good protecting condition, the electron temperature, the electron density and their fluctuation were all low. Otherwise, the values would be high. These characteristics would have contribution to monitoring the process of laser welding.

  18. Measurements of electron-induced neutrons as a tool for determination of electron temperature of fast electrons in the task of optimization laser-produced plasma ions acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaki, H; Nishiuchi, M; Maeda, S; Sagisaka, A; Pirozhkov, A S; Pikuz, T; Faenov, A; Ogura, K; Fukami, T; Matsukawa, K; Kanasaki, M; Fukuda, Y; Yogo, A; Esirkepov, T; Kiriyama, H; Shimomura, T; Nakai, Y; Tanoue, M; Torimoto, K; Okamoto, M; Sato, T; Niita, K; Tamura, J; Nishio, K; Sako, H; Yamauchi, T; Watanabe, Y; Bulanov, S; Kondo, K

    2014-02-01

    High intensity laser-plasma interaction has attracted considerable interest for a number of years. The laser-plasma interaction is accompanied by generation of various charged particle beams, such as high-energy proton and ions with high charge to mass ratio (Q/M; same as multi-charged ions). Results of simultaneous novel measurements of electron-induced photonuclear neutrons (photoneutron), which are a diagnostic of the laser-plasma interaction, are proposed to use for optimization of the laser-plasma ion generation. The proposed method is demonstrated by the laser irradiation with the intensity of 1 × 10(21) W/cm(2) on the metal foil target. The photoneutrons are measured by using NE213 liquid scintillation detectors. Heavy-ion signal is registered with the CR-39 track detector simultaneously. The measured signals of the electron-induced photoneutrons are well reproduced by using the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System. The results obtained provide useful approach for analyzing the various laser based ion beams.

  19. Diagnostics of laser ablated plasma plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amoruso, S.; Toftmann, B.; Schou, Jørgen

    2004-01-01

    The effect of an ambient gas on the expansion dynamics of laser ablated plasmas has been studied for two systems by exploiting different diagnostic techniques. First, the dynamics of a MgB2 laser produced plasma plume in an Ar atmosphere has been investigated by space-and time-resolved optical...... of the laser ablated plasma plume propagation in a background gas. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V All rights reserved....

  20. Absorption of a laser light pulse in a dense plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlman-Balloffet, G.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental study of the absorption of a laser light pulse in a transient, high-density, high-temperature plasma is presented. The plasma is generated around a metallic anode tip by a fast capacitive discharge occurring in vacuum. The amount of transmitted light is measured for plasmas made of different metallic ions in the regions of the discharge of high electronic density. Variation of the transmission during the laser pulse is also recorded. Plasma electrons are considered responsible for the very high absorption observed.

  1. Diagnostics of laser-produced plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batani Dimitri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the general challenges of plasma diagnostics for laser-produced plasmas and give a few more detailed examples: spherically bent crystals for X-ray imaging, velocity interferometers (VISAR for shock studies, and proton radiography.

  2. Nonlinear laser energy depletion in laser-plasma accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shadwick, B.A.; Schroeder, C.B.; Esarey, E.

    2009-04-03

    Energy depletion of intense, short-pulse lasers via excitation of plasma waves is investigated numerically and analytically. The evolution of a resonant laser pulse proceeds in two phases. In the first phase, the pulse steepens, compresses, and frequency red-shifts as energy is deposited in the plasma. The second phase of evolution occurs after the pulse reaches a minimum length at which point the pulse rapidly lengthens, losing resonance with the plasma. Expressions for the rate of laser energy loss and rate of laser red-shifting are derived and are found to be in excellent agreement with the direct numerical solution of the laser field evolution coupled to the plasma response. Both processes are shown to have the same characteristic length-scale. In the high intensity limit, for nearly-resonant Gaussian laser pulses, this scale length is shown to be independent of laser intensity.

  3. Laser-plasma interactions and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Neely, David; Bingham, Robert; Jaroszynski, Dino

    2013-01-01

    Laser-Plasma Interactions and Applications covers the fundamental and applied aspects of high power laser-plasma physics. With an internationally renowned team of authors, the book broadens the knowledge of young researchers working in high power laser-plasma science by providing them with a thorough pedagogical grounding in the interaction of laser radiation with matter, laser-plasma accelerators, and inertial confinement fusion. The text is organised such that the theoretical foundations of the subject are discussed first, in Part I. In Part II, topics in the area of high energy density physics are covered. Parts III and IV deal with the applications to inertial confinement fusion and as a driver of particle and radiation sources, respectively. Finally, Part V describes the principle diagnostic, targetry, and computational approaches used in the field. This book is designed to give students a thorough foundation in the fundamental physics of laser-plasma interactions. It will also provide readers with knowl...

  4. Space-dependent characterization of laser-induced plasma plume during fiber laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xianfeng; Song, Lijun; Xiao, Wenjia; Liu, Xingbo

    2016-12-01

    The role of a plasma plume in high power fiber laser welding is of considerable interest due to its influence on the energy transfer mechanism. In this study, the space-dependent plasma characteristics including spectrum intensity, plasma temperature and electron density were investigated using optical emission spectroscopy technique. The plasma temperature was calculated using the Boltzmann plot of atomic iron lines, whereas the electron density was determined from the Stark broadening of the Fe I line at 381.584 nm. Quantitative analysis of plasma characteristics with respect to the laser radiation was performed. The results show that the plasma radiation increases as the laser power increases during the partial penetration mode, and then decreases sharply after the initiation of full penetration. Both the plasma temperature and electron density increase with the increase of laser power until they reach steady state values after full penetration. Moreover, the hottest core of the plasma shifts toward the surface of the workpiece as the penetration depth increases, whereas the electron density is more evenly distributed above the surface of the workpiece. The results also indicate that the absorption and scattering of nanoparticles in the plasma plume is the main mechanism for laser power attenuation.

  5. Plasma Injection Schemes for Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    OpenAIRE

    J. Faure

    2017-01-01

    Plasma injection schemes are crucial for producing high-quality electron beams in laser-plasma accelerators. This article introduces the general concepts of plasma injection. First, a Hamiltonian model for particle trapping and acceleration in plasma waves is introduced; ionization injection and colliding-pulse injection are described in the framework of this Hamiltonian model. We then proceed to consider injection in plasma density gradients.

  6. Nanosecond spectroscopy of expanding laser-produced tin plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Shay, B; Najmabadi, F; Harilal, S S; Tillack, M S [Center for Energy Research, University of California San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0438 (United States)

    2007-04-15

    Time dependent behavior of laser-produced tin plasma has been investigated using gated optical emission spectroscopy. Plasma was generated by focusing 1.064 m Nd:YAG laser light onto a solid density, planar tin target in vacuum at a laser irradiance of 3.8 x 10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2}. Estimates of the electron temperature and density were made by assuming Boltzmann distributed population levels and Stark broadened singly ionized tin spectral lines, respectively. An initial temperature of 1.4 eV and density of 4.1 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} were calculated from the analysis of spectral data. Experimental data were interpreted alongside numerical results from HYADES - a onedimensional radiation hydrodynamics plasma simulation code. An energy balance was calculated to determine the fraction of incident laser energy converted to directed kinetic energy of expansion.

  7. Laser-induced gas plasma machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhadj, Selim; Bass, Isaac Louis; Guss, Gabriel Mark; Matthews, Manyalibo J.

    2017-10-17

    Techniques for removing material from a substrate are provided. A laser beam is focused at a distance from the surface to be treated. A gas is provided at the focus point. The gas is dissociated using the laser energy to generate gas plasma. The substrate is then brought in contact with the gas plasma to enable material removal.

  8. Hollow laser plasma self-confined microjet generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizyuk, Valeryi; Hassanein, Ahmed; Center for Materials under Extreme Environment Team

    2017-10-01

    Hollow laser beam produced plasma (LPP) devices are being used for the generation of the self-confined cumulative microjet. Most important place by this LPP device construction is achieving of an annular distribution of the laser beam intensity by spot. An integrated model is being developed to detailed simulation of the plasma generation and evolution inside the laser beam channel. The model describes in two temperature approximation hydrodynamic processes in plasma, laser absorption processes, heat conduction, and radiation energy transport. The total variation diminishing scheme in the Lax-Friedrich formulation for the description of plasma hydrodynamic is used. Laser absorption and radiation transport models on the base of Monte Carlo method are being developed. Heat conduction part on the implicit scheme with sparse matrixes using is realized. The developed models are being integrated into HEIGHTS-LPP computer simulation package. The integrated modeling of the hollow beam laser plasma generation showed the self-confinement and acceleration of the plasma microjet inside the laser channel. It was found dependence of the microjet parameters including radiation emission on the hole and beam radiuses ratio. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation, PIRE project.

  9. Measurements of egg shell plasma parameters using laser-induced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Measurements of 1064 nm laser-induced egg shell plasma parameters are presented in this paper. Of special interests were its elemental identification and the determination of spectroscopic temperature and electron density. The electron temperature of 5956 K was inferred using an improved iterative Boltzmann plot ...

  10. Characterization of X-ray emission from laser generated plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cannavò Antonino

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available X-ray emission from laser generated plasma was studied at low (1010 W/cm2 and high (1018 W/cm2 intensity using ns and fs laser, respectively. Plasma characteristics were controlled trough the laser parameters, the irradiation conditions and the target properties. The X-ray spectra were acquired using fast detection technique based on SiC diodes with different active regions. The X-ray yield increases with the atomic number of the target, both at low and high intensity, and a similar empirical law has been obtained. The X-ray emission mechanisms from plasma are correlated to the plasma temperature and density and to the Coulomb charge particle acceleration, due to the charge separation effects produced in the non-equilibrium plasma. Functional dependences, theoretical approaches and interpretation of possible mechanism will be presented and discussed.

  11. Characterization of X-ray emission from laser generated plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannavò, Antonino; Torrisi, Lorenzo; Ceccio, Giovanni; Cutroneo, Mariapompea; Calcagno, Lucia; Sciuto, Antonella; Mazzillo, Massimo

    2018-01-01

    X-ray emission from laser generated plasma was studied at low (1010 W/cm2) and high (1018 W/cm2) intensity using ns and fs laser, respectively. Plasma characteristics were controlled trough the laser parameters, the irradiation conditions and the target properties. The X-ray spectra were acquired using fast detection technique based on SiC diodes with different active regions. The X-ray yield increases with the atomic number of the target, both at low and high intensity, and a similar empirical law has been obtained. The X-ray emission mechanisms from plasma are correlated to the plasma temperature and density and to the Coulomb charge particle acceleration, due to the charge separation effects produced in the non-equilibrium plasma. Functional dependences, theoretical approaches and interpretation of possible mechanism will be presented and discussed.

  12. Laser diagnostics of plasma assisted combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Xing

    In this study, a microwave re-entrant cavity discharge system and a direct current (DC) plasmatron are used to investigate flame enhancement and nitric oxide (NO) formation using laser and optical diagnostics. The uniqueness of this study lies in the direct coupling concept, a novel highly efficient strategy used here for the first time. To investigate combustion dynamics of direct microwave coupled combustion, an atmospheric high-Q re-entrant cavity applicator is used to couple microwave (2.45 GHz) electromagnetic energy directly into the reaction zone of a premixed laminar methane-oxygen flame using a compact torch. When microwave energy increases, a transition from electric field enhancement to microwave plasma discharge is observed. At 6 to 10 Watts, ionization and eventually break-down occurs. 2-D laser induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging of hydroxyl radicals (OH) and carbon monoxide (CO) is conducted in the reaction zone over this transition, as well as spectrally resolved flame emission measurements. These measurements serve to monitor excited state species and derive rotational temperatures using OH chemiluminescence for a range of equivalence ratios (both rich and lean) and total flow rates. Combustion dynamics is also investigated for plasma enhanced methane-air flames in premixed and nonpremixed configurations using a transient arc DC plasmatron. Results for OH and CO PLIF also indicate the differences in stability mechanism, and energy consumption for premixed and nonpremixed modes. It is shown that both configurations are significantly influenced by in-situ fuel reforming at higher plasma powers. Parametric studies are conducted in a plasma assisted methane/air premixed flame for quantitative NO production using a DC plasmatron with PLIF imaging. Quantitative measurements of NO are reported as a function of gas flow rate (20 to 50 SCFH), plasma power (100 to 900 mA, 150 to 750 W) and equivalence ratio (0.7 to 1.3). NO PLIF images and single point NO

  13. Electron acceleration using laser produced plasmas

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Landua, Rolf

    2005-01-01

    Low density plasmas have long been of interest as a potential medium for particle acceleration since relativistic plasma waves are capable of supporting electric fields greater than 100 GeV/m. The physics of particle acceleration using plasmas will be reviewed, and new results will be discussed which have demonstrated that relatively narrow energy spread (<3%) beams having energies greater than 100 MeV can be produced from femtosecond laser plasma interactions. Future experiments and potential applications will also be discussed.

  14. Dynamics of Molecular Emission Features from Nanosecond, Femtosecond Laser and Filament Ablation Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Yeak, J.; Brumfield, Brian E.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-06-15

    The evolutionary paths of molecular species and nanoparticles in laser ablation plumes are not well understood due to the complexity of numerous physical processes that occur simultaneously in a transient laser-plasma system. It is well known that the emission features of ions, atoms, molecules and nanoparticles in a laser ablation plume strongly depend on the laser irradiation conditions. In this letter we report the temporal emission features of AlO molecules in plasmas generated using a nanosecond laser, a femtosecond laser and filaments generated from a femtosecond laser. Our results show that, at a fixed laser energy, the persistence of AlO is found to be highest and lowest in ns and filament laser plasmas respectively while molecular species are formed at early times for both ultrashort pulse (fs and filament) generated plasmas. Analysis of the AlO emission band features show that the vibrational temperature of AlO decays rapidly in filament assisted laser ablation plumes.

  15. Laser-pulsed Plasma Chemistry: Laser-initiated Plasma Oxidation Of Niobium

    OpenAIRE

    Marks R.F.; Pollak R.A.; Avouris Ph.; Lin C.T.; Thefaine Y.J.

    1983-01-01

    We report the first observation of the chemical modification of a solid surface exposed to an ambient gas plasma initiated by the interaction of laser radiation with the same surface. A new technique, which we designate laser-pulsed plasma chemistry (LPPC), is proposed for activating heterogeneous chemical reactions at solid surfaces in a gaseous ambient by means of a plasma initiated by laser radiation. Results for niobium metal in one atmosphere oxygen demonstrate single-pulse, self-limitin...

  16. Collimation of laser-produced plasmas using axial magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Amitava; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Hassan, Syed M.; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomas; Hassanein, A.

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the expansion dynamics of laser-produced plasmas expanding into an axial magnetic field. Plasmas were generated by focusing 1.064 µm Nd:YAG laser pulses onto a planar tin target in vacuum and allowed to expand into a 0.5 T magnetic-filed where field lines were aligned along the plume expansion direction. Gated images employing intensified CCD showed focusing of the plasma plume, which were also compared with results obtained using particle-in-cell modelling methods. The estimated density and temperature of the plasma plumes employing emission spectroscopy revealed significant changes in the presence and absence of the 0.5T magnetic field. In the presence of the field, the electron temperature is increased with distance from the target, while the density showed opposite effects.

  17. Plasma dynamics from laser ablated solid lithium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ) model, invoked for the high density laser plasma under study. Some interesting results pertaining to the analysis of plume structure and spatio-temporal behaviour ofTe and ne along the plume length will be presented and discussed.

  18. Plasma Arc Augmented CO2 laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Andersen, Mikkel; Frederiksen, Niels

    2001-01-01

    In order to reduce the hardness of laser beam welded 2.13 mm medium strength steel CMn 250, a plasma arc has been used simultaneously with a 2.6 kW CO2 laser source. In a number of systematic laboratory tests, the plasma arc current, plasma gas flow and distance to the laser source were varied...... with all laser parameters fixed. The welds were quality assessed and hardness measured transversely to the welding direction in the top, middle and root of the seam. In the seams welded by laser alone, hardness values between 275 and 304 HV1 were measured, about the double of the base material, 150 HV1...

  19. Unifying physics of accelerators, lasers and plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Seryi, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    Unifying Physics of Accelerators, Lasers and Plasma introduces the physics of accelerators, lasers and plasma in tandem with the industrial methodology of inventiveness, a technique that teaches that similar problems and solutions appear again and again in seemingly dissimilar disciplines. This unique approach builds bridges and enhances connections between the three aforementioned areas of physics that are essential for developing the next generation of accelerators.

  20. Physics of Laser-driven plasma-based acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esarey, Eric; Schroeder, Carl B.

    2003-06-30

    The physics of plasma-based accelerators driven by short-pulse lasers is reviewed. This includes the laser wake-field accelerator, the plasma beat wave accelerator, the self-modulated laser wake-field accelerator, and plasma waves driven by multiple laser pulses. The properties of linear and nonlinear plasma waves are discussed, as well as electron acceleration in plasma waves. Methods for injecting and trapping plasma electrons in plasma waves are also discussed. Limits to the electron energy gain are summarized, including laser pulse direction, electron dephasing, laser pulse energy depletion, as well as beam loading limitations. The basic physics of laser pulse evolution in underdense plasmas is also reviewed. This includes the propagation, self-focusing, and guiding of laser pulses in uniform plasmas and plasmas with preformed density channels. Instabilities relevant to intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions, such as Raman, self-modulation, and hose instabilities, are discussed. Recent experimental results are summarized.

  1. Laser-Plasma Acceleration with FLAME and ILIL Ultraintense Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Pathak

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We report on the development of radiation and electron sources based on laser-plasma acceleration for biomedical and nuclear applications, using both the table top TW laser at ILIL and the 220 TW FLAME laser system at LNF. We use the ILIL laser to produce wakefield electrons in a self-focusing dominated regime in a mm scale gas-jet to generate large, uniform beams of MeV electrons for electron radiography and radiobiology applications. This acceleration regime is described in detail and key parameters are given to establish reproducible and reliable operation of this source. We use the FLAME laser to drive laser-plasma acceleration in a cm-scale gas target to obtain stable production of >100 MeV range electrons to drive a Thomson scattering ɣ-ray source for nuclear applications.

  2. Plasma heating power dissipation in low temperature hydrogen plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Komppula, J

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical framework for power dissipation in low temperature plasmas in corona equilibrium is developed. The framework is based on fundamental conservation laws and reaction cross sections and is only weakly sensitive to plasma parameters, e.g. electron temperature and density. The theory is applied to low temperature atomic and molecular hydrogen laboratory plasmas for which the plasma heating power dissipation to photon emission, ionization and chemical potential is calculated. The calculated photon emission is compared to recent experimental results.

  3. LASER PLASMA AND LASER APPLICATIONS: Plasma transparency in laser absorption waves in metal capillaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, V. N.; Kozolupenko, A. P.; Sebrant, A. Yu

    1988-12-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the plasma transparency to heating radiation in capillaries when absorption waves propagated in these capillaries as a result of interaction with a CO2 laser pulse of 5-μs duration. When the length of the capillary was in excess of 20 mm, total absorption of the radiation by the plasma was observed at air pressures of 1-100 kPa. When the capillary length was 12 mm, a partial recovery of the transparency took place. A comparison was made with the dynamics and recovery of the plasma transparency when breakdown of air took place near the free surface.

  4. Parametric dependence of ion temperature and electron density in the SUMMA hot-ion plasma using laser light scattering and emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, A.; Patch, R. W.; Lauver, M. R.

    1980-01-01

    Hot-ion plasma experiments were conducted in the NASA Lewis SUMMA facility. A steady-state modified Penning discharge was formed by applying a radially inward dc electric field of several kilovolts near the magnetic mirror maxima. Results are reported for a hydrogen plasma covering a wide range in midplane magnetic flux densities from 0.5 to 3.37 T. Input power greater than 45 kW was obtained with water-cooled cathodes. Steady-state plasmas with ion kinetic temperatures from 18 to 830 eV were produced and measured spectroscopically. These ion temperatures were correlated with current, voltage, and magnetic flux density as the independent variables. Electron density measurements were made using an unusually sensitive Thomson scattering apparatus. The measured electron densities range from 2.1 x 10 to the 11th to 6.8 x 10 to the 12th per cu cm.

  5. Subsurface plasma in beam of continuous CO2-laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danytsikov, Y. V.; Dymshakov, V. A.; Lebedev, F. V.; Pismennyy, V. D.; Ryazanov, A. V.

    1986-03-01

    Experiments performed at the Institute of Atomic Energy established the conditions for formation of subsurface plasma in substances by laser radiation and its characteristics. A quasi-continuous CO2 laser emitting square pulses of 0.1 to 1.0 ms duration and 1 to 10 kW power as well as a continuous CO2 laser served as radiation sources. Radiation was focused on spots 0.1 to 0.5 mm in diameter and maintained at levels ensuring constant power density during the interaction time, while the temperature of the target surface was measured continuously. Metals, graphite and dielectric materials were tested with laser action taking place in air N2 + O2 mixtures, Ar or He atmosphere under pressures of 0.01 to 1.0 atm. Data on radiation intensity thresholds for evaporation and plasma formation were obtained. On the basis of these thresholds, combined with data on energy balance and the temperature profile in plasma layers, a universal state diagram was constructed for subsurface plasma with nonquantified surface temperature and radiation intensity coordinates.

  6. Interpenetration and stagnation in colliding laser plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shboul, K. F.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassan, S. M.; Hassanein, A.; Costello, J. T.; Yabuuchi, T.; Tanaka, K. A.; Hirooka, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated plasma stagnation and interaction effects in colliding laser-produced plasmas. For generating colliding plasmas, two split laser beams were line-focused onto a hemi-circular target and the seed plasmas so produced were allowed to expand in mutually orthogonal directions. This experimental setup forced the expanding seed plasmas to come to a focus at the center of the chamber. The interpenetration and stagnation of plasmas of candidate fusion wall materials, viz., carbon and tungsten, and other materials, viz., aluminum, and molybdenum were investigated in this study. Fast-gated imaging, Faraday cup ion analysis, and optical emission spectroscopy were used for diagnosing seed and colliding plasma plumes. Our results show that high-Z target (W, Mo) plasma ions interpenetrate each other, while low-Z (C, Al) plasmas stagnate at the collision plane. For carbon seed plasmas, an intense stagnation was observed resulting in longer plasma lifetime; in addition, the stagnation layer was found to be rich with C2 dimers.

  7. Interpenetration and stagnation in colliding laser plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Shboul, K. F. [Center for Materials Under eXtreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid 22110 (Jordan); Harilal, S. S., E-mail: hari@purdue.edu; Hassan, S. M.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under eXtreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Costello, J. T. [School of Physical Sciences and NCPST, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Yabuuchi, T.; Tanaka, K. A. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 5650871 (Japan); Hirooka, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    We have investigated plasma stagnation and interaction effects in colliding laser-produced plasmas. For generating colliding plasmas, two split laser beams were line-focused onto a hemi-circular target and the seed plasmas so produced were allowed to expand in mutually orthogonal directions. This experimental setup forced the expanding seed plasmas to come to a focus at the center of the chamber. The interpenetration and stagnation of plasmas of candidate fusion wall materials, viz., carbon and tungsten, and other materials, viz., aluminum, and molybdenum were investigated in this study. Fast-gated imaging, Faraday cup ion analysis, and optical emission spectroscopy were used for diagnosing seed and colliding plasma plumes. Our results show that high-Z target (W, Mo) plasma ions interpenetrate each other, while low-Z (C, Al) plasmas stagnate at the collision plane. For carbon seed plasmas, an intense stagnation was observed resulting in longer plasma lifetime; in addition, the stagnation layer was found to be rich with C{sub 2} dimers.

  8. Laser Plasmas: Density oscillations in laser produced plasma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... laser intensity in the absence and presence of magnetic field shows appearance of different threshold intensity of laser corresponding to each magnetic field at which this instability or density fluctuation sets on. This instability has been identified as a large Larmor radius instability instead of classical Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) ...

  9. Laser-plasma interactions for fast ignition

    CERN Document Server

    Kemp, A J; Debayle, A; Johzaki, T; Mori, W B; Patel, P K; Sentoku, Y; Silva, L O

    2013-01-01

    In the electron-driven fast-ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion, petawatt laser pulses are required to generate MeV electrons that deposit several tens of kilojoules in the compressed core of an imploded DT shell. We review recent progress in the understanding of intense laser plasma interactions (LPI) relevant to fast ignition. Increases in computational and modeling capabilities, as well as algorithmic developments have led to enhancement in our ability to perform multi-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of LPI at relevant scales. We discuss the physics of the interaction in terms of laser absorption fraction, the laser-generated electron spectra, divergence, and their temporal evolution. Scaling with irradiation conditions such as laser intensity are considered, as well as the dependence on plasma parameters. Different numerical modeling approaches and configurations are addressed, providing an overview of the modeling capabilities and limitations. In addition, we discuss the compa...

  10. Plasma Channel Guided Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, C G

    2005-01-01

    High quality electron beams (several 109 electrons above 80 MeV energy with percent energy spread and low divergence) have been produced for the first time in a compact, high gradient, all-optical laser accelerator by extending the interaction distance using a pre-formed plasma density channel to guide the drive laser pulse. Laser-driven accelerators, in which particles are accelerated by the electric field of a plasma wave (wake) driven by the radiation pressure of an intense laser, have over the past decade demonstrated accelerating fields thousands of times greater than those achievable in conventional radio-frequency accelerators. This has spurred interest in them as compact next- generation sources of energetic electrons and radiation. To date, however, acceleration distances have been severely limited by the lack of a controllable method for extending the propagation distance of the focused laser pulse. The ensuing short acceleration distance resulted in low-energy beams with 100 percent electron energy...

  11. III International Conference on Laser and Plasma Researches and Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    A.P. Kuznetsov and S.V. Genisaretskaya III Conference on Plasma and Laser Research and Technologies took place on January 24th until January 27th, 2017 at the National Research Nuclear University "MEPhI" (NRNU MEPhI). The Conference was organized by the Institute for Laser and Plasma Technologies and was supported by the Competitiveness Program of NRNU MEPhI. The conference program consisted of nine sections: • Laser physics and its application • Plasma physics and its application • Laser, plasma and radiation technologies in industry • Physics of extreme light fields • Controlled thermonuclear fusion • Modern problems of theoretical physics • Challenges in physics of solid state, functional materials and nanosystems • Particle accelerators and radiation technologies • Modern trends of quantum metrology. The conference is based on scientific fields as follows: • Laser, plasma and radiation technologies in industry, energetic, medicine; • Photonics, quantum metrology, optical information processing; • New functional materials, metamaterials, “smart” alloys and quantum systems; • Ultrahigh optical fields, high-power lasers, Mega Science facilities; • High-temperature plasma physics, environmentally-friendly energetic based on controlled thermonuclear fusion; • Spectroscopic synchrotron, neutron, laser research methods, quantum mechanical calculation and computer modelling of condensed media and nanostructures. More than 250 specialists took part in the Conference. They represented leading Russian scientific research centers and universities (National Research Centre "Kurchatov Institute", A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow Institute of Physics and Tecnology and others) and leading scientific centers and universities from Germany, France, USA, Canada, Japan. We would like to thank heartily all of

  12. Model of a laser heated plasma interacting with walls arising in laser keyhole welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tix, C.; Simon, G.

    1994-07-01

    In laser welding with laser intensities of approximately 1011 W/m2, a hole, called a keyhole, is formed in the material. In this keyhole a plasma is detected, which is characterized by high pressure as well as being influenced by the boundary of the keyhole. Experimental data on plasma parameters are rare and difficult to obtain [W. Sokolowski, G. Herziger, and E. Beyer, in High Power Lasers and Laser Machining Technology, edited by A. Quenzer, SPIE Proc. Vol. 1132 (SPIE, Bellingham, WA, 1989), pp. 288-295]. In a previous paper [C. Tix and G. Simon, J. Phys. D 26, 2066 (1993)] we considered just a simple plasma model without excited states and with constant ion-neutral-atom temperature. Therefore we neglected radiative transport of excitations and underestimated the ion-neutral-atom temperature and the ionization rate. Here we extend our previous model for a continuous CO2 laser and iron and take into account radiative transfer of excitations and a variable ion-neutral-atom temperature. We consider singly charged ions, electrons, and three excitation states of neutral atoms. The plasma is divided in plasma bulk, presheath, and sheath. The transport equations are solved with boundary conditions mainly determined through the appearance of walls. Some effort is made to clarify the energy transport mechanism from the laser beam into the material. Dependent on the incident laser power, the mean electron temperature and density are obtained to be 1.0-1.3 eV and 2.5×1023-3×1023 m-3. Radiative transport of excitations does not contribute significantly to the energy transport.

  13. Development of laser ablation plasma by anisotropic self-radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohnishi Naofumi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We have proposed a method for reproducing an accurate solution of low-density ablation plasma by properly treating anisotropic radiation. Monte-Carlo method is employed for estimating Eddington tensor with limited number of photon samples in each fluid time step. Radiation field from ablation plasma is significantly affected by the anisotropic Eddington tensor. Electron temperature around the ablation surface changes with the radiation field and is responsible for the observed emission. An accurate prediction of the light emission from the laser ablation plasma requires a careful estimation of the anisotropic radiation field.

  14. Langmuir probe study of plasma expansion in pulsed laser ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T.N.; Schou, Jørgen; Lunney, J.G.

    1999-01-01

    Langmuir probes were used to monitor the asymptotic expansion of the plasma produced by the laser ablation of a silver target in a vacuum. The measured angular and temporal distributions of the ion flux and electron temperature were found to be in good agreement with the self-similar isentropic a...... and adiabatic solution of the gas dynamics equations describing the expansion. The value of the adiabatic index gamma was about 1.25, consistent with the ablation plume being a low temperature plasma....

  15. Laser-cooling calcium ions in an ultracold neutral plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupper, Stephen; Bergeson, Scott

    2016-10-01

    The temperature in ultracold neutral plasmas is typically limited by nearest-neighbor interactions during the initial formation stage. The heating occurs because the ions are formed from resonantly-ionized laser-cooled atoms. These atoms have a completely flat pair correlation function before ionization occurs. After ionization, a deep hole in the pair correlation function develops at small radius. This increases the ion temperature by two orders of magnitude (10 mK to 3 K) in less than 1 μs. Overcoming this source of heating remains a major priority for this field. It would allow careful measurements of the transport and kinetic properties of the strongly coupled plasma over a wide range in the Coulomb coupling parameter, from 1 to about 30. We have built an experiment to laser-cool the ions in an ultracold neutral calcium plasma. The parameters in which the laser cooling is expected to occur are presented. Cooling is complicated because the Coulomb forces are typically orders of magnitude larger than the optical forces. Results from our initial work in laser cooling the plasma will be presented. Supported in part by NSF (PHY-1404488) and AFOSR (FA9950-12-1-0308).

  16. Spectroscopic Studies of Laser Produced Plasma Metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon Quinones, Roberto; Underwood, Thomas; Cappelli, Mark

    2016-10-01

    In this presentation, we describe the spatial and temporal plasma characteristics of the dense plasma kernels that are used to construct a laser produced plasma metasurface (PM) that is intended to serve as a tunable THz reflector. The PM is an n x n array of plasmas generated by focusing the light from a 2 J/p Q-switched Nd:YAG laser through a multi-lens array (MLA) and into a gas of varying pressure. A gated CCD camera coupled to a high-resolution spectrometer is used to obtain chord-averaged H α broadening data for the cross section of a single plasma element at the lens focal point. The data is then Abel inverted to derive the radial plasma density distribution. Measurements are repeated for a range of pressures, laser energies, and lens f-number, with a time resolution of 100 ns and a gate width of 20 ns. Results are presented for the variation of plasma density and size over these different conditions. Work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR). R. Colon Quinones and T. Underwood acknowledge the support of the Department of Defense (DoD) through the National Defense Science & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program.

  17. Laser-plasma interaction physics for shock ignition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goyon C.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the shock ignition scheme, the ICF target is first compressed with a long (nanosecond pulse before creating a convergent shock with a short (∼100 ps pulse to ignite thermonuclear reactions. This short pulse is typically (∼2.1015–1016 W/cm2 above LPI (Laser Plasma Instabilities thresholds. The plasma is in a regime where the electron temperature is expected to be very high (2–4 keV and the laser coupling to the plasma is not well understood. Emulating LPI in the corona requires large and hot plasmas produced by high-energy lasers. We conducted experiments on the LIL (Ligne d'Integration Laser, 10 kJ at 3ω and the LULI2000 (0.4 kJ at 2ω facilities, to approach these conditions and study absorption and LPI produced by a high intensity beam in preformed plasmas. After introducing the main risks associated with the short pulse propagation, we present the latest experiment we conducted on LPI in relevant conditions for shock ignition.

  18. Low Temperature Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Sterilization Shower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhiraman, R. P.; Beeler, D.; Meyyappan, M.; Khare, B. N.

    2012-10-01

    Low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasma sterilization shower to address both forward and backward biological contamination issues is presented. The molecular effects of plasma exposure required to sterilize microorganisms is also analysed.

  19. Laser induced fluorescence measurements in the Pisces plasma (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettig, C. L.; Peebles, W. A.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Gohil, P.

    1988-08-01

    By resonantly exciting neutrals in a cool plasma, the local neutral density and possibly ion temperature can be measured. If the neutrals are pumped by a laser with an intensity sufficient to saturate the transition, then observation of the fluorescence at the same wavelength will show an enhancement in the spontaneous emission during the laser pulse. The pump radiation changes the excited level population distribution in such a way that theoretical modeling can extract the ground-state population from the measured enhancement. Here, a 350-kW flash-lamp pumped dye laser is being used at 656 and 481 nm to pump the Balmer alpha and beta lines of hydrogen in the continuous Pisces plasma which simulates the edge using a tokamak. The fluorescence is observed with a photomultiplier tube through a narrow-band interference filter. Great care has been taken to reduce stray light to a negligible level. Data will be presented taken from plasmas with densities between 1011 and 1013 cm-3 and electron temperatures between 5 and 25 eV. In addition, by spectrally resolving the fluorescence, local ion temperatures can be inferred from Doppler broadening. However, actual temperatures measured are close to the resolution limit of the spectrometer. Future work could include these temperature measurements in the edge region of a tokamak. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-F03-86-ER-53225.

  20. Laser Pyrometer For Spot Temperature Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elleman, D. D.; Allen, J. L.; Lee, M. C.

    1988-01-01

    Laser pyrometer makes temperature map by scanning measuring spot across target. Scanning laser pyrometer passively measures radiation emitted by scanned spot on target and calibrated by similar passive measurement on blackbody of known temperature. Laser beam turned on for active measurements of reflectances of target spot and reflectance standard. From measurements, temperature of target spot inferred. Pyrometer useful for non-contact measurement of temperature distributions in processing of materials.

  1. Validating Laser-Induced Birefringence Theory with Plasma Interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Cecilia [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2015-09-02

    Intense laser beams crossing paths in plasma is theorized to induce birefringence in the medium, resulting from density and refractive index modulations that affect the polarization of incoming light. The goal of the associated experiment, conducted on Janus at Lawrence Livermore’s Jupiter Laser Facility, was to create a tunable laser-plasma waveplate to verify the relationship between dephasing angle and beam intensity, plasma density, plasma temperature, and interaction length. Interferometry analysis of the plasma channel was performed to obtain a density map and to constrain temperature measured from Thomson scattering. Various analysis techniques, including Fast Fourier transform (FFT) and two variations of fringe-counting, were tried because interferograms captured in this experiment contained unusual features such as fringe discontinuity at channel edges, saddle points, and islands. The chosen method is flexible, semi-automated, and uses a fringe tracking algorithm on a reduced image of pre-traced synthetic fringes. Ultimately, a maximum dephasing angle of 49.6° was achieved using a 1200 μm interaction length, and the experimental results appear to agree with predictions.

  2. Adventures in Laser Produced Plasma Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Key, M

    2006-01-13

    In the UK the study of laser produced plasmas and their applications began in the universities and evolved to a current system where the research is mainly carried out at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory Central Laser Facility ( CLF) which is provided to support the universities. My own research work has been closely tied to this evolution and in this review I describe the history with particular reference to my participation in it.

  3. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of tantalum plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Sidra; Bashir, Shazia; Hayat, Asma; Khaleeq-ur-Rahman, M.; Faizan–ul-Haq [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, GC University, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2013-07-15

    Laser Induced Breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of Tantalum (Ta) plasma has been investigated. For this purpose Q-switched Nd: YAG laser pulses (λ∼ 1064 nm, τ∼ 10 ns) of maximum pulse energy of 100 mJ have been employed as an ablation source. Ta targets were exposed under the ambient environment of various gases of Ar, mixture (CO{sub 2}: N{sub 2}: He), O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and He under various filling pressure. The emission spectrum of Ta is observed by using LIBS spectrometer. The emission intensity, excitation temperature, and electron number density of Ta plasma have been evaluated as a function of pressure for various gases. Our experimental results reveal that the optical emission intensity, the electron temperature and density are strongly dependent upon the nature and pressure of ambient environment. The SEM analysis of the ablated Ta target has also been carried out to explore the effect of ambient environment on the laser induced grown structures. The growth of grain like structures in case of molecular gases and cone-formation in case of inert gases is observed. The evaluated plasma parameters by LIBS analysis such as electron temperature and the electron density are well correlated with the surface modification of laser irradiated Ta revealed by SEM analysis.

  4. Laser-Plasma Interactions in Magnetized Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yuan

    2017-10-01

    Propagation and scattering of lasers present new phenomena and applications when the plasma medium becomes magnetized. Starting from mega-Gauss magnetic fields, laser scattering becomes manifestly anisotropic [arXiv 1705.09758]. By arranging beams at special angles, one may be able to optimize laser-plasma coupling in magnetized environment. In stronger giga-Gauss magnetic field, laser propagation becomes modified by relativistic quantum effects [PRA 94.012124]. The modified wave dispersion relation enables correct interpretation of Faraday rotation measurements of strong magnetic fields, as well as correct extraction of plasma parameters from the X-ray spectra of pulsars. In addition, magnetized plasmas can be utilized to mediate laser pulse compression [PRE 95.023211]. Using magnetic resonances, it is not only possible to produce optic pulses of higher intensity, but also possible to amplify UV and soft X-ray pulses that cannot be compressed using existing technology. This research is supported by NNSA Grant No. DE-NA0002948 and DOE Research Grant No. DEAC02- 09CH11466.

  5. Laser Plasma Physics - Forces and Nonlinear Principle

    CERN Document Server

    Hora, Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    This work is an electronic pre-publication of a book manuscript being under consideration in order to provide information to interested researchers about a review of mechanical forces in plasmas by electro-dynamic fields. Beginning with Kelvin's ponderomotive force of 1845 in electrostatics, the hydrodynamic force in a plasma is linked with quadratic force quantities of electric and magnetic fields. Hydrodynamics is interlinked with single particle motion of plasma particles electric field generation and double layers and sheaths due to properties of inhomogeneous plasmas. Consequences relate to laser driven particle acceleration and fusion energy. Beyond the very broad research field of fusion using nanosecond laser pulses based on thermodynamics, the new picosecond pulses of ultrahigh power opened a categorically different non-thermal interaction finally permitting proton-boron fusion with eliminating problems of nuclear radiation.

  6. Combined impact features for laser plasma generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loktionov, E.; Protasov, Yu; Telekh, V.

    2017-05-01

    Laser-induced plasma has been considered for multiple applications by the moment, and its characteristics strongly depend on laser radiation parameters. Reaching demanded values for the latter might be rather costly, but, in certain cases, similar or even better results could be reached in case of additional impact (optical, electric, magnetic, corpuscular, mechanical etc.). Combined impact effects are mainly based on target properties or interaction mechanism change, and found to decrease plasma generation thresholds by orders of magnitude, improve energy efficiency significantly, and also broaden the range of plasma parameters. Application area, efficiency and optimal regimes for laser plasma generation at such combined impact have been considered. Analysis based on published data and own experiments was performed for both target material and induced plasma flows. Criterial parameters have been suggested to characterize both combined impact and response to it. The data on plasma generation thresholds, controlled parameters, working media supply systems and recovery rate of droplets are very important for technology setups, including those for material modification.

  7. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Microwave generation in an optical breakdown plasma created by modulated laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipov, A. A.; Grasyuk, Arkadii Z.; Losev, Leonid L.; Soskov, V. I.

    1990-06-01

    It was established that when laser radiation, intensity modulated at a frequency of 2.2 GHz, interacted with an optical breakdown plasma which it had created, a microwave component appeared in the thermal emf of the plasma. The amplitude of the microwave thermal emf reached 0.7 V for a laser radiation intensity of 6 GW/cm2. Laser radiation with λL = 1.06 μm was converted to the microwave range with λmω = 13 cm in the optical breakdown plasma. A microwave signal power of ~ 0.5 W was obtained from a laser power of ~ 5 MW.

  8. Studies of Magnetic Reconnection in Colliding Laser-Produced Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Novel images of magnetic fields and measurements of electron and ion temperatures have been obtained in the magnetic reconnection region of high- β, laser-produced plasmas. Experiments using laser-irradiated foils produce expanding, hemispherical plasma plumes carrying MG Biermann-battery magnetic fields, which can be driven to interact and reconnect. Thomson-scattering measurements of electron and ion temperatures in the interaction region of two colliding, magnetized plasmas show no thermal enhancement due to reconnection, as expected for β ~ 8 plasmas. Two different proton radiography techniques used to image the magnetic field structures show deformation, pileup, and annihilation of magnetic flux. High-resolution images reveal unambiguously reconnection-induced jets emerging from the interaction region and show instabilities in the expanding plasma plumes and supersonic, hydrodynamic jets due to the plasma collision. Quantitative magnetic flux data show that reconnection in experiments with asymmetry in the scale size, density, temperature, and plasma flow across the reconnection region occurs less efficiently than in similar, symmetric experiments. This result is attributed to disruption of the Hall mechanism mediating collisionless reconnection. The collision of plasmas carrying parallel magnetic fields has also been probed, illustrating the deformation of magnetic field structures in high-energy-density plasmas in the absence of reconnection. These experiments are particularly relevant to high- β reconnection environments, such as the magnetopause. This work was performed in collaboration with C. Li, F. Séguin, A. Zylstra, H. Rinderknecht, H. Sio, J. Frenje, and R. Petrasso (MIT), I. Igumenshchev, V. Glebov, C. Stoeckl, and D. Froula (LLE), J. Ross and R. Town (LLNL), W. Fox (UNH), and A. Nikroo (GA), and was supported in part by the NLUF, FSC/UR, U.S. DOE, LLNL, and LLE.

  9. Continuous point-like high-temperature laser discharge produced by terahertz free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Kubarev

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A continuous point-like laser discharge of record high temperature has been produced in argon at atmospheric pressure with focusing of the radiation of the Novosibirsk terahertz free electron laser (NovoFEL. According to spectral measurements, the temperature in the center of the millimeter-sized plasma sphere was 28000 K at a plasma density of 1.5×1017 cm-3 and an average NovoFEL power of 200 W at a wavelength of 130 μm (2.3 THz.

  10. Spectroscopic measurements of laser induced plasma during welding with CO2 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, Z.; Kurzyna, J.

    1994-12-01

    Results of spectroscopic measurements of laser-induced plasma under welding conditions are presented. Welding was performed with the use of a continuous-wave CO2 laser operating at a power of 2 kW. Argon or helium was used as a shielding gas. The welding metal was stainless steel or titanium. Emission spectra from plasma were measured with a spectrograph and 1254 Silicon Intensified Target (SIT) detector connected to the optical multichannel analyzer. The plasma electron temperatures were determined from the relative intensities of spectral lines and the electron densities were determined either from Stark broadening of atomic line or the absolute intensity of ionic line. The distributions of the electron temperature and density over the metal surface are presented and the influence of a shielding gas on plasma parameters is demonstrated. The plasma parameters obtained were used to calculate the absorption of a laser beam in the plasma over the metal surface. No significant absorption was found in our experimental conditions.

  11. Direct observation of keyhole plasma characteristics in deep penetration laser welding of aluminum alloy 6016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiangzhong; Zeng, Licheng; Cheng, Yuanyong

    2012-06-01

    Deep penetration laser welding is associated with violent plasma generation which consists of metal vapour, ionized ions and electrons. The plasma resides both outside and inside the keyhole, known as the plasma plume and keyhole plasma, respectively. Plasma plumes have been studied extensively due to the convenience of observing them. However, very little work has been carried out on the investigation of keyhole plasmas. In this paper, a novel experimental set-up is designed to observe the keyhole plasma directly in CW and PW deep penetration laser welding of aluminum alloy 6016. Then on the basis of the experimentally obtained spectra, the electron temperature distribution of the keyhole plasma both in the radial and depth directions of the keyhole is calculated, and the effects of processing parameters such as laser power, welding velocity and defocus on the keyhole plasma temperature are studied. The results show that the electron temperature of the keyhole plasma both in the radial and depth directions is not uniformly distributed. The temperature increases as the laser power increases, decreases as the welding velocity increases and decreases as the location of the laser beam focal point is moved from within to above the keyhole.

  12. Xenon plasma sustained by pulse-periodic laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudoy, I. G.; Solovyov, N. G.; Soroka, A. M.; Shilov, A. O.; Yakimov, M. Yu., E-mail: yakimov@lantanlaser.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, A. Ishlinsky Institute for Problems in Mechanics (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    The possibility of sustaining a quasi-stationary pulse-periodic optical discharge (POD) in xenon at a pressure of p = 10–20 bar in a focused 1.07-μm Yb{sup 3+} laser beam with a pulse repetition rate of f{sub rep} ⩾ 2 kHz, pulse duration of τ ⩾ 200 μs, and power of P = 200–300 W has been demonstrated. In the plasma development phase, the POD pulse brightness is generally several times higher than the stationary brightness of a continuous optical discharge at the same laser power, which indicates a higher plasma temperature in the POD regime. Upon termination of the laser pulse, plasma recombines and is then reinitiated in the next pulse. The initial absorption of laser radiation in successive POD pulses is provided by 5p{sup 5}6s excited states of xenon atoms. This kind of discharge can be applied in plasma-based high-brightness broadband light sources.

  13. Transition from isentropic to isothermal expansion in laser produced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrero, A.; Santartin, J. R.

    1980-07-01

    The transition that the expansion flow of laser-produced plasmas experiences when ones moves from long, low intensity pulses (temperature vanishing at the Isentropic plasma-vacuum front, lying at finite distance) to short, intense ones (non-zero, uni- form temperature at the plasma-vacuum front, lying at infinity) is studied. For planar geometry and large Ion number Z{sub j} the transition occurs for d {phi} / d t {approx_equal} 0.14(27/8)k{sup 7}/2 Z{sub j}{sup 3}/2/m{sub j}{sup 3}/2 K; {phi}, k, m{sub j}, and K are laser intensity, Boltzmann s constant, ion mass, and Spitzer s heat conduction coefficient. This result remains valid for finite Z{sub j} though the numerical factor in d{phi} / d t is different. In spherical geometry a similar transition occurs even in steady conditions. Shorter wavelength lasers and higher Z{sub j} plasmas allow faster rising pulses below transition. (Author) 13 refs.

  14. Spectroscopic characterization of laser-induced tin plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Harilal, S.S.

    2005-01-01

    Optical emission spectroscopic studies have been carried out on a tin plasma generated using 1064-nm, 8-ns pulses from a Nd: yttrium aluminum garnet laser. Temperature and density were estimated from the analysis of spectral data. The temperature measurements have been performed by Boltzmann diagram method using singly ionized Sn lines, while density measurements were made using the Stark broadening method. An initial temperature of 3.2 eV and density of 7.7 1017 cm−3 were measured. Temporal ...

  15. Kinetics and spectroscopy of low temperature plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Loureiro, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    This is a comprehensive textbook designed for graduate and advanced undergraduate students. Both authors rely on more than 20 years of teaching experience in renowned Physics Engineering courses to write this book addressing the students’ needs. Kinetics and Spectroscopy of Low Temperature Plasmas derives in a full self-consistent way the electron kinetic theory used to describe low temperature plasmas created in the laboratory with an electrical discharge, and presents the main optical spectroscopic diagnostics used to characterize such plasmas. The chapters with the theoretical contents make use of a deductive approach in which the electron kinetic theory applied to plasmas with basis on the electron Boltzmann equation is derived from the basic concepts of Statistical and Plasma Physics. On the other hand, the main optical spectroscopy diagnostics used to characterize experimentally such plasmas are presented and justified from the point of view of the Atomic and Molecular Physics. Low temperature plasmas...

  16. Diode Laser Based LIF Diagnostics for Argon and Helium Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg, E.; Boivin, R. F.; Compton, C.; Hardin, R.; Keesee, A.; Kline, J. L.; Scime, E. E.

    2002-11-01

    A diode laser based Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) diagnostic that uses an inexpensive diode laser system is presented. The same diode laser is used to pump Ar II and He I transitions to obtain the ion and the neutral temperature of the respective species. The 1 MHz bandwidth diode laser has a Littrow external cavity with a mode-hop free tuning range up to 15 GHz and with a total power output of about 10 mWatt. The wavelength is measured by a wavemeter and frequent monitoring prevent wavelength drift. For the argon ion population, the laser tuned at 668.61 nm, is used to pump the 3d4F7/2 Ar II metastable level to the 4p4D5/2 excited level. The fluorescence radiation between the 4p4D5/2 and the 4s4P3/2 levels (442.6 nm) is monitored by a photomultiplier detector. For neutral helium, the laser is tuned at 667.82 nm to pump a fraction of the electron population from the 21P state to the 31D upper level. Although the 21P level is not a metastable state, the close proximity of 21S metastable level makes this new He I LIF possible in collisional plasmas. Some electrons of this 31D level undergo collisional excitation transfer (optically allowed transition) to the 31P. In turn, this state decay to the metastable 21S by emitting 501.6 nm fluorescence photons. The new LIF diagnostic has been developed at West Virginia University (WVU) and tested on the Hot hELIcon eXperiment (HELIX) plasma device. Ion and neutral temperatures obtained using this new LIF diagnostic are presented and compared to previous measurements performed with a more expensive and elaborate ring dye laser system.

  17. An experimental study of laser-supported plasmas for laser propulsion: Center director's discretionary fund project DFP-82-33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskridge, R. H.; Mccay, T. D.; Vanzandt, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    The rudiments of a rocket thruster, which receives its enthalpy from an energy source which is remotely beamed from a laser, is described. An experimental study, now partially complete, is discussed which will eventually provide a detailed understanding of the physics for assessing the feasibility of using hydrogen plasmas for accepting and converting this energy to enthalpy. A plasma ignition scheme which uses a pulsed CO2 laser was develped and the properites of the ignition spark documented, including breakdown intensities in hydrogen. A complete diagnostic system capable of determining plasma temperature and the plasma absorptivitiy for subsequent steady-state absorption of a high power CO2 laser beam are developed and demonstrative use is discussed for the preliminary case study, a two atmosphere laser supported argon plasma.

  18. Ion beam control in laser plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, S.; Izumiyama, T.; Sato, D.; Nagashima, T.; Takano, M.; Barada, D.; Gu, Y. J.; Ma, Y. Y.; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Wang, W. M.

    2016-03-01

    By a two-stage successive acceleration in laser ion acceleration, our 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate a remarkable increase in ion energy by a few hundreds of MeV; the maximum proton energy reaches about 250MeV. The ions are accelerated by the inductive continuous post-acceleration in a laser plasma interaction together with the target normal sheath acceleration and the breakout afterburner mechanism. An intense short-pulse laser generates a strong current by high-energy electrons accelerated, when an intense short- pulse laser illuminates a plasma target. The strong electric current creates a strong magnetic field along the high-energy electron current in the plasma. During the increase phase in the magnetic field strength, the moving longitudinal inductive electric field is induced by the Faraday law, and accelerates the forward-moving ions continously. The multi-stage acceleration provides a unique controllability in the ion energy and its quality.

  19. Laser-produced plasma source system development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomenkov, Igor V.; Brandt, David C.; Bykanov, Alexander N.; Ershov, Alexander I.; Partlo, William N.; Myers, David W.; Böwering, Norbert R.; Vaschenko, Georgiy O.; Khodykin, Oleh V.; Hoffman, Jerzy R.; Vargas L., Ernesto; Simmons, Rodney D.; Chavez, Juan A.; Chrobak, Christopher P.

    2007-03-01

    This paper describes the development of laser produced plasma (LPP) technology as an EUV source for advanced scanner lithography applications in high volume manufacturing. EUV lithography is expected to succeed 193 nm immersion technology for critical layer patterning below 32 nm beginning with beta generation scanners in 2009. This paper describes the development status of subsystems most critical to the performance to meet joint scanner manufacturer requirements and semiconductor industry standards for reliability and economic targets for cost of ownership. The intensity and power of the drive laser are critical parameters in the development of extreme ultraviolet LPP lithography sources. The conversion efficiency (CE) of laser light into EUV light is strongly dependent on the intensity of the laser energy on the target material at the point of interaction. The total EUV light generated then scales directly with the total incident laser power. The progress on the development of a short pulse, high power CO2 laser for EUV applications is reported. The lifetime of the collector mirror is a critical parameter in the development of extreme ultra-violet LPP lithography sources. The deposition of target materials and contaminants, as well as sputtering of the collector multilayer coating and implantation of incident particles can reduce the reflectivity of the mirror substantially over the exposure time even though debris mitigation schemes are being employed. The results of measurements of high energy ions generated by a short-pulse CO2 laser on a laser-produced plasma EUV light source with Sn target are presented. Droplet generation is a key element of the LPP source being developed at Cymer for EUV lithography applications. The main purpose of this device is to deliver small quantities of liquid target material as droplets to the laser focus. The EUV light in such configuration is obtained as a result of creating a highly ionized plasma from the material of the

  20. Laser propagation and compton scattering in parabolic plasma channel

    CERN Document Server

    Dongguo, L; Yokoya, K; Hirose, T

    2003-01-01

    A Gaussian laser beam propagating in a parabolic plasma channel is discussed in this paper. For a weak laser, plasma density perturbation induced by interaction between the laser field and plasma is very small, the refractive index can be assumed to be constant with respect to time variable. For a parabolic plasma channel, through the static propagation equation, we obtain an analytical solution of the profile function of the Gaussian laser beam for an unmatched case and give the general condition for the matched case. As the laser intensity increases, an effect due to strong laser fields is included. We discuss how to design and select the distribution of plasma density for a certain experiment in which a plasma channel is utilized to guide a laser beam. The number of scattered photons (X-rays) generated through Compton backscattering in a plasma channel is discussed. (author)

  1. Lateral Energy Transport in Laser-Produced Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vick, Douglas Wade

    A study of lateral energy transport in planar targets irradiated by 0.53 μm laser light was conducted over an intensity range of 3 times 10^{12} -3 times 10^{14 } W/cm^2 and for laser pulse widths varying from 170 to 860 picoseconds. Spatially - and spectrally-resolving x-ray diagnostics were used to obtain the profiles of target emission in the energy bands from 60-250 eV and above 1 keV. The beam focus configurations adopted were of two basic types, consisting of (a) spatially modulated intensity spots (diameter ~300 μm) and (b) a tight focus spots (diameter ~100 mu m). In both cases the aim was to assess the degree of lateral energy transport which occurs outside the nominal laser focus. To this end, special targets were constructed which consisted of plastic substrates with buried tracer layers, or tracer patterns deposited onto the substrate outside the laser focus. The x-ray signature emission recorded from the tracer material allowed the determination of plasma conditions existing in the lateral regions of the target. Observations indicated that only a small fraction of the incident laser energy was available for heating of the lateral substrate. Lateral x-ray signals were dominated by a hot expanding underdense plasma which coupled weakly to the lateral substrate. Under spatially-modulated irradiation conditions, this plasma formed a collisional structure between the laser hot spots at early stages in the interaction which persisted throughout the laser pulse. A two dimensional particle-in-a-cell code was used to aid in interpreting the experiments. The code incorporated models for classical flux-limited electron thermal transport, average ion atomic physics, diffusion -approximated radiation transport, and transport inhibition by magnetic fields. The predicted electron temperatures, density scale lengths and x-ray emission profiles were in good agreement with experimental measurements done with both focal spot configurations.

  2. Tomography of homogenized laser-induced plasma by Radon transform technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschlböck-Fuchs, S.; Demidov, A.; Gornushkin, I. B.; Schmid, T.; Rössler, R.; Huber, N.; Panne, U.; Pedarnig, J. D.

    2016-09-01

    Tomography of a laser-induced plasma in air is performed by inverse Radon transform of angle-resolved plasma images. Plasmas were induced by single laser pulses (SP), double pulses (DP) in collinear geometry, and by a combination of single laser pulses with pulsed arc discharges (SP-AD). Images of plasmas on metallurgical steel slags were taken at delay times suitable for calibration-free laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (CF-LIBS). Delays ranged from few microseconds for SP and DP up to tens of microseconds for SP-AD excitation. The white-light and the spectrally resolved emissivity ε(x,y,z) was reconstructed for the three plasma excitation schemes. The electron number density Ne(x,y,z) and plasma temperature Te(x,y,z) were determined from Mg and Mn emission lines in reconstructed spectra employing the Saha-Boltzmann plot method. The SP plasma revealed strongly inhomogeneous emissivity and plasma temperature. Re-excitation of plasma by a second laser pulse (DP) and by an arc discharge (SP-AD) homogenized the plasma and reduced the spatial variation of ε and Te. The homogenization of a plasma is a promising approach to increase the accuracy of calibration-free LIBS analysis of complex materials.

  3. Analysis of Raman scattering of self-focused Gaussian laser beam in plasma without WKB approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari-Oskooei, Sara S.; Aghamir, Farzin M.

    2017-02-01

    The self-focusing and propagation of intense Gaussian laser beams in plasmas are investigated, and the explicit form of intensity of self-focused laser beams is derived without the use of WKB approximation. Propagation of self-focused laser beams in plasmas is strongly affected by Raman scattering and Brillouin scattering that are expected for hohlraum targets in inertial confinement fusion. The intensity of Raman and Brillouin scattered waves is derived in paraxial approximation where the effect of plasma temperature and Landau damping is considered through the kinetic theory of plasmas. The effect of plasma temperature and its density, as well as laser wavelength and its intensity, on self-focusing and spatial growth of scattered waves is considered.

  4. Optical spectroscopy of emission from CN plasma formed by laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riascos, H.; Franco, L. M.; Pérez, J. A.

    2008-10-01

    The characterization of a plasma plume is a key issue in laser ablation and deposition studies. The formation, composition and propagation of laser-produced plasmas used for pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of CN have been studied under film growth conditions. The plume was generated by focusing 1064 nm, 9 ns pulses from Nd:YAG laser on carbon target under nitrogen ambient. We investigated the different species, such as CII, CI, C2, NII and CN, in laser ablated CN plasma using optical emission spectroscopy. The spectral characteristics of the plasmas were measured to determine the plasma properties as gas pressure was changed from 10-5 to 90 mTorr. The intensities of molecular species did not depend on gas ambient whereas ion intensities did. The vibrational temperature shows dependence with gas pressure.

  5. Optical spectroscopy of emission from CN plasma formed by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riascos, H; Franco, L M; Perez, J A [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Tecnologica de Pereira, A A 097, Pereira (Colombia)], E-mail: hriascos@utp.edu.co

    2008-10-15

    The characterization of a plasma plume is a key issue in laser ablation and deposition studies. The formation, composition and propagation of laser-produced plasmas used for pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of CN have been studied under film growth conditions. The plume was generated by focusing 1064 nm, 9 ns pulses from Nd:YAG laser on carbon target under nitrogen ambient. We investigated the different species, such as CII, CI, C{sub 2}, NII and CN, in laser ablated CN plasma using optical emission spectroscopy. The spectral characteristics of the plasmas were measured to determine the plasma properties as gas pressure was changed from 10{sup -5} to 90 mTorr. The intensities of molecular species did not depend on gas ambient whereas ion intensities did. The vibrational temperature shows dependence with gas pressure.

  6. Is the segmented plasma excitation recombination laser a recombination laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apollonov, V.V.; Sirotkin, A.A. (Institut Obshchei Fiziki, Moscow (USSR))

    1989-10-01

    The role of plasmachemical reactions in the formation of active media in lasers with a sectional plasma source for metal vapor is investigated. It is shown that the population of ionic levels in Cd II and Zn II occurs under recharging with He(+) and in the process of Penning ionization. It is found that these processes are more efficient than recombination and electron impact. 13 refs.

  7. Nuclear Fusion Effects Induced in Intense Laser-Generated Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Torrisi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Deutered polyethylene (CD2n thin and thick targets were irradiated in high vacuum by infrared laser pulses at 1015W/cm2 intensity. The high laser energy transferred to the polymer generates plasma, expanding in vacuum at supersonic velocity, accelerating hydrogen and carbon ions. Deuterium ions at kinetic energies above 4 MeV have been measured by using ion collectors and SiC detectors in time-of-flight configuration. At these energies the deuterium–deuterium collisions may induce over threshold fusion effects, in agreement with the high D-D cross-section valuesaround 3 MeV energy. At the first instants of the plasma generation, during which high temperature, density and ionacceleration occur, the D-D fusions occur as confirmed by the detection of mono-energetic protonsand neutrons with a kinetic energy of 3.0 MeV and 2.5 MeV, respectively, produced by the nuclear reaction. The number of fusion events depends strongly on the experimental set-up, i.e. on the laser parameters (intensity, wavelength, focal spot dimension, target conditions (thickness, chemical composition, absorption coefficient, presence of secondary targets and used geometry (incidence angle, laser spot, secondary target positions.A number of D-D fusion events of the order of 106÷7 per laser shot has been measured.

  8. Hybrid laser-plasma wakefield acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidding, Bernhard; Heinemann, Thomas; Scherkl, Paul; Ullmann, Daniel; Beaton, Andrew

    2017-10-01

    Laser wakefield accelerators (LWFA) can produce electron bunches with characteristics which suggest they are highly suitable to be used as drivers for electron-beam driven plasma wakefield accelerators (PWFA). The presentation will report on recent experimental results and conceptual advanced which substantiate this idea. It looks as if hybrid LWFA-PWFA systems are highly promising systems to harness specific advantages of PWFA (no dephasing, long acceleration distances, wide potential for ionization injection schemes) realized these in truly compact systems.

  9. [Low temperature plasma technology for biomass refinery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaoguo; Chen, Hongzhang

    2014-05-01

    Biorefinery that utilizes renewable biomass for production of fuels, chemicals and bio-materials has become more and more important in chemical industry. Recently, steam explosion technology, acid and alkali treatment are the main biorefinery treatment technologies. Meanwhile, low temperature plasma technology has attracted extensive attention in biomass refining process due to its unique chemical activity and high energy. We systemically summarize the research progress of low temperature plasma technology for pretreatment, sugar platflow, selective modification, liquefaction and gasification in biomass refinery. Moreover, the mechanism of low temperature plasma in biorefinery and its further development were also discussed.

  10. The interaction of high-power lasers with plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Eliezer, Shalom

    2002-01-01

    The Interaction of High-Power Lasers with Plasmas provides a thorough self-contained discussion of the physical processes occurring in laser-plasma interactions, including a detailed review of the relevant plasma and laser physics. The book analyzes laser absorption and propagation, electron transport, and the relevant plasma waves in detail. It also discusses the physics of the electric and magnetic fields in a laser-induced plasma medium, laser-induced shock waves, rarefaction waves, heat waves, and the related hydrodynamic instabilities (Rayleigh-Taylor, Richtmyer-Meshkov, and Kelvin-Helmholtz).A pedagogical presentation, the book addresses the basic physics issues from first principles, using simple models wherever appropriate. The coverage provides a foundation on which the graduate student can build an understanding of the past and present research in this field. For the experienced researcher, the book is a comprehensive and useful presentation of laser-plasma interactions.

  11. Collective behavior of silver plasma during pulsed laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dildar, I. M.; Rehman, S.; Khaleeq-ur-Rahman, M.; Bhatti, K. A.; Shuaib, A.

    2015-07-01

    The present work reports an electrical investigation of silver plasma using a self-fabricated Langmuir probe in air and under a low vacuum (~10-3 torr). A silver target was irradiated with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with the wavelength 1.064 µm, energy 10 mJ, pulse duration 9-14 ns and power 1.1 MW. The collective behavior of a silver plasma plume is studied using a Langmuir probe as an electrical diagnostic technique. By applying different positive and negative voltages to the probe, the respective signals are collected on a four channels digital storage oscilloscope having a frequency of 500 MHz. An I-V curve helps to measure electron temperature and electron density directly and plasma frequency, response time, Debye length and number of particles in ‘Debye’s sphere’ indirectly using the theory of Langmuir probe and mathematical formulas. The floating potential is measured as negative for laser induced silver plasma in air and vacuum, following the theory of plasma.

  12. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Plasma Characterization Generated by Long-Pulse Laser on Soil Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, S.; Duan, W.; Ning, R.; Li, Q.; Jiang, R.

    2017-03-01

    The plasma is generated by focusing a long-pulse (80 μs) Nd:YAG laser on chromium-doped soil samples. The calibration curves are drawn using the intensity ratio of the chromium spectral line at 425.435 nm with the iron spectral line (425.079 nm) as reference. The regression coefficient of the calibration curve is 0.993, and the limit of detection is 16 mg/kg, which is 19% less than that for the case of a Q-switched laser In the method of long-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, the laser-induced plasma had a temperature of 15795.907 K and an electron density of 2.988 × 1017 cm-3, which exceeded the corresponding plasma parameters of the Q-switched laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy by 75% and 24% respectively.

  13. Industrial Applications of Low Temperature Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardsley, J N

    2001-03-15

    The use of low temperature plasmas in industry is illustrated by the discussion of four applications, to lighting, displays, semiconductor manufacturing and pollution control. The type of plasma required for each application is described and typical materials are identified. The need to understand radical formation, ionization and metastable excitation within the discharge and the importance of surface reactions are stressed.

  14. Progress in long scale length laser plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenzer, S. H.; Arnold, P.; Bardsley, G.; Berger, R. L.; Bonanno, G.; Borger, T.; Bower, D. E.; Bowers, M.; Bryant, R.; Buckman, S.; Burkhart, S. C.; Campbell, K.; Chrisp, M. P.; Cohen, B. I.; Constantin, C.; Cooper, F.; Cox, J.; Dewald, E.; Divol, L.; Dixit, S.; Duncan, J.; Eder, D.; Edwards, J.; Erbert, G.; Felker, B.; Fornes, J.; Frieders, G.; Froula, D. H.; Gardner, S. D.; Gates, C.; Gonzalez, M.; Grace, S.; Gregori, G.; Greenwood, A.; Griffith, R.; Hall, T.; Hammel, B. A.; Haynam, C.; Heestand, G.; Henesian, M.; Hermes, G.; Hinkel, D.; Holder, J.; Holdner, F.; Holtmeier, G.; Hsing, W.; Huber, S.; James, T.; Johnson, S.; Jones, O. S.; Kalantar, D.; Kamperschroer, J. H.; Kauffman, R.; Kelleher, T.; Knight, J.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Kruer, W. L.; Labiak, W.; Landen, O. L.; Langdon, A. B.; Langer, S.; Latray, D.; Lee, A.; Lee, F. D.; Lund, D.; MacGowan, B.; Marshall, S.; McBride, J.; McCarville, T.; McGrew, L.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Mahavandi, S.; Manes, K.; Marshall, C.; Menapace, J.; Mertens, E.; Meezan, N.; Miller, G.; Montelongo, S.; Moody, J. D.; Moses, E.; Munro, D.; Murray, J.; Neumann, J.; Newton, M.; Ng, E.; Niemann, C.; Nikitin, A.; Opsahl, P.; Padilla, E.; Parham, T.; Parrish, G.; Petty, C.; Polk, M.; Powell, C.; Reinbachs, I.; Rekow, V.; Rinnert, R.; Riordan, B.; Rhodes, M.; Roberts, V.; Robey, H.; Ross, G.; Sailors, S.; Saunders, R.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, M. B.; Shiromizu, S.; Spaeth, M.; Stephens, A.; Still, B.; Suter, L. J.; Tietbohl, G.; Tobin, M.; Tuck, J.; Van Wonterghem, B. M.; Vidal, R.; Voloshin, D.; Wallace, R.; Wegner, P.; Whitman, P.; Williams, E. A.; Williams, K.; Winward, K.; Work, K.; Young, B.; Young, P. E.; Zapata, P.; Bahr, R. E.; Seka, W.; Fernandez, J.; Montgomery, D.; Rose, H.

    2004-12-01

    The first experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have employed the first four beams to measure propagation and laser backscattering losses in large ignition-size plasmas. Gas-filled targets between 2 and 7 mm length have been heated from one side by overlapping the focal spots of the four beams from one quad operated at 351 nm (3ω) with a total intensity of 2 × 1015 W cm-2. The targets were filled with 1 atm of CO2 producing up to 7 mm long homogeneously heated plasmas with densities of ne = 6 × 1020 cm-3 and temperatures of Te = 2 keV. The high energy in an NIF quad of beams of 16 kJ, illuminating the target from one direction, creates unique conditions for the study of laser-plasma interactions at scale lengths not previously accessible. The propagation through the large-scale plasma was measured with a gated x-ray imager that was filtered for 3.5 keV x-rays. These data indicate that the beams interact with the full length of this ignition-scale plasma during the last ~1 ns of the experiment. During that time, the full aperture measurements of the stimulated Brillouin scattering and stimulated Raman scattering show scattering into the four focusing lenses of 3% for the smallest length (~2 mm), increasing to 10-12% for ~7 mm. These results demonstrate the NIF experimental capabilities and further provide a benchmark for three-dimensional modelling of the laser-plasma interactions at ignition-size scale lengths.

  15. Molecular formation in the stagnation region of colliding laser-produced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Shboul, K. F.; Hassan, S. M.; Harilal, S. S.

    2016-10-27

    The laser-produced colliding plasmas have numerous attractive applications and stagnation layer formed during collisions between plasmas is a useful system for understanding particle collisions and molecular formation in a controlled way. In this article, we explore carbon dimer formation and its evolutionary paths in a stagnation layer formed during the interaction of two laser-produced plasmas. Colliding laser produced plasmas are generated by splitting a laser beam into two sub-beams and then focus them into either a single flat (laterally colliding plasmas) or a V-shaped graphite targets (orthogonally colliding plasmas). The C2 formation in the stagnation region of both colliding plasma schemes is investigated using optical spectroscopic means and compared with emission features from single seed plasma. Our results show that the collisions among the plasmas followed by the stagnation layer formation lead to rapid cooling causing enhanced carbon dimer formation. In addition, plasma electron temperature, density and C2 molecular temperature were measured for the stagnation zone and compared with seed plasma.

  16. Molecular formation in the stagnation region of colliding laser-produced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shboul, K. F.; Hassan, S. M.; Harilal, S. S.

    2016-12-01

    Laser-produced colliding plasmas have numerous attractive applications, and the stagnation layer formed during collisions between plasmas is a useful system for understanding particle collisions and molecular formation in a controlled way. In this article, we explore carbon dimer formation and its evolutionary paths in a stagnation layer formed during the interaction of two laser-produced plasmas. Colliding laser-produced plasmas are generated by splitting a laser beam into two sub-beams and then focusing them into either a single flat graphite target (laterally colliding plasmas) or a V-shaped graphite target (orthogonally colliding plasmas). C2 formation in the stagnation region of both colliding plasma schemes is investigated using optical spectroscopic means and compared with emission features from a single seed plasma. Our results show that the collisions between the plasmas followed by stagnation layer formation lead to rapid cooling, causing enhanced carbon dimer formation. In addition, plasma electron temperature, density, and C2 vibrational temperature were measured for the stagnation zone and compared with a single seed plasma.

  17. Characteristics of plasma plume in fiber laser welding of aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ming; Chen, Cong; Hu, Ming; Guo, Lianbo; Wang, Zemin; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    To understand the laser-matter interaction in fiber laser welding of aluminum alloys, the effects of laser power on the characteristics of fiber laser induced plasma plume were studied by emission spectroscopic analysis firstly. The plasma characteristic parameters including electron temperature, electron density, ionization degree, and inverse bremsstrahlung linear absorption coefficient were computed according to the spectral data. It was found that the laser power of 5 kW is a turning point. After the laser power reaches 5 kW, the plume changes from a metal vapor dominated weakly ionized plasma to a strongly ionized plasma. The corresponding phenomena are the dramatic increase of the value of characteristic parameters and the appearance of strong plasma shielding effect. The calculation of effective laser power density demonstrated that the plasma shielding effect is dominated by inverse bremsstrahlung absorption. The finding suggested the plasma shielding effect must be considered in fiber laser welding of aluminum alloys, rather than is ignored as claimed in previous view.

  18. The 2017 Plasma Roadmap: Low temperature plasma science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovich, I.; Baalrud, S. D.; Bogaerts, A.; Bruggeman, P. J.; Cappelli, M.; Colombo, V.; Czarnetzki, U.; Ebert, U.; Eden, J. G.; Favia, P.; Graves, D. B.; Hamaguchi, S.; Hieftje, G.; Hori, M.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Kortshagen, U.; Kushner, M. J.; Mason, N. J.; Mazouffre, S.; Mededovic Thagard, S.; Metelmann, H.-R.; Mizuno, A.; Moreau, E.; Murphy, A. B.; Niemira, B. A.; Oehrlein, G. S.; Petrovic, Z. Lj; Pitchford, L. C.; Pu, Y.-K.; Rauf, S.; Sakai, O.; Samukawa, S.; Starikovskaia, S.; Tennyson, J.; Terashima, K.; Turner, M. M.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.; Vardelle, A.

    2017-08-01

    Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics published the first Plasma Roadmap in 2012 consisting of the individual perspectives of 16 leading experts in the various sub-fields of low temperature plasma science and technology. The 2017 Plasma Roadmap is the first update of a planned series of periodic updates of the Plasma Roadmap. The continuously growing interdisciplinary nature of the low temperature plasma field and its equally broad range of applications are making it increasingly difficult to identify major challenges that encompass all of the many sub-fields and applications. This intellectual diversity is ultimately a strength of the field. The current state of the art for the 19 sub-fields addressed in this roadmap demonstrates the enviable track record of the low temperature plasma field in the development of plasmas as an enabling technology for a vast range of technologies that underpin our modern society. At the same time, the many important scientific and technological challenges shared in this roadmap show that the path forward is not only scientifically rich but has the potential to make wide and far reaching contributions to many societal challenges.

  19. Focusing of Intense Laser via Parabolic Plasma Concave Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weimin; Gu, Yuqiu; Wu, Fengjuan; Zhang, Zhimeng; Shan, Lianqiang; Cao, Leifeng; Zhang, Baohan

    2015-12-01

    Since laser intensity plays an important role in laser plasma interactions, a method of increasing laser intensity - focusing of an intense laser via a parabolic plasma concave surface - is proposed and investigated by three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The geometric focusing via a parabolic concave surface and the temporal compression of high harmonics increased the peak intensity of the laser pulse by about two orders of magnitude. Compared with the improvement via laser optics approaches, this scheme is much more economic and appropriate for most femtosecond laser facilities. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11174259, 11175165), and the Dual Hundred Foundation of China Academy of Engineering Physics

  20. Pulse Front Tilt and Laser Plasma Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelberger, Daniel; Thévenet, Maxence; Nakamura, Kei; Lehe, Remi; Gonsalves, Anthony; Benedetti, Carlo; Leemans, Wim

    2017-10-01

    Pulse front tilt (PFT) is potentially present in any CPA laser system, but its effects may be overlooked because spatiotemporal pulse characterization is considerably more involved than measuring only spatial or temporal profile. PFT is particularly important for laser plasma accelerators (LPA) because it influences electron beam injection and steering. In this work, experimental results from the BELLA Center will be presented that demonstrate the effect of optical grating misalignment and optical compression, resulting in PFT, on accelerator performance. Theoretical models of laser and electron beam steering will be introduced based on particle-in-cell simulations showing distortion of the plasma wake. Theoretical predictions will be compared with experiments and complimentary simulations, and tolerances on PFT and optical compressor alignment will be developed as a function of LPA performance requirements. This work was supported by the Office of High Energy Physics, Office of Science, US Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231 and the National Science Foundation under Grant PHY-1415596.

  1. Material measurement method based on femtosecond laser plasma shock wave

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhong, Dong; Li, Zhongming

    2017-01-01

    The acoustic emission signal of laser plasma shock wave, which comes into being when femtosecond laser ablates pure Cu, Fe, and Al target material, has been detected by using the fiber Fabry-Perot (F-P...

  2. Ion Beam Analysis applied to laser-generated plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutroneo, M.; Macková, A.; Havranek, V.; Malinsky, P.; Torrisi, L.; Kormunda, M.; Barchuk, M.; Ullschmied, J.; Dudzak, R.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the research activity on Ion Beam Analysis methods performed at Tandetron Laboratory (LT) of the Institute of Nuclear Physics AS CR, Rez, Czech Republic. Recently, many groups are paying attention to implantation by laser generated plasma. This process allows to insert a controllable amount of energetic ions into the surface layers of different materials modifying the physical and chemical properties of the surface material. Different substrates are implanted by accelerated ions from plasma through terawatt iodine laser, at nominal intensity of 1015 W/cm2, at the PALS Research Infrastructure AS CR, in the Czech Republic. This regime of the laser matter interaction generates, multi-MeV proton beams, and multi-charged ions that are tightly confined in time (hundreds ps) and space (source radius of a few microns). These ion beams have a much lower transverse temperature, a much shorter duration and a much higher current than those obtainable from conventional accelerators. The implementation of protons and ions acceleration driven by ultra-short high intensity lasers is exhibited by adopting suitable irradiation conditions as well as tailored targets. An overview of implanted targets and their morphological and structural characterizations is presented and discussed.

  3. Mono Energetic Beams from Laser Plasma Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Cameron G; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim; Nieter, Chet; Schröder, Carl B; Toth, Csaba; Van Tilborg, Jeroen

    2005-01-01

    A laser driven wakefield accelerator has been tuned to produce high energy electron bunches with low emittance and energy spread by extending the interaction length using a plasma channel. Wakefield accelerators support gradients thousands of times those achievable in RF accelerators, but short acceleration distance, limited by diffraction, has resulted in low energy beams with 100% electron energy spread. In the present experiments on the L’OASIS laser,* the relativistically intense drive pulse was guided over 10 diffraction ranges by a plasma channel. At a drive pulse power of 9 TW, electrons were trapped from the plasma and beams of percent energy spread containing >200pC charge above 80 MeV and with normalized emittance estimated at < 2 pi -mm-mrad were produced.** Data and simulations (VORPAL***) show the high quality bunch was formed when beam loading turned off injection after initial trapping, and when the particles were extracted as they dephased from the wake. Up to 4TW was g...

  4. Radiation from High Temperature Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-09

    PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS IO7PUOAM i. .’- "--"--o TASK AREA & WORK UNIT NUMIERS SI I. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS .... D...8217’ -REPORT OATM September 19 14. MONITOING AGENCY NAME & AOORESS(I! dilfl ,rn lm Controlling Office) IS. SECURITY CLASS. (of tli repot) Unclassified 1S...together (specifically 25-50 X, in aluminum) id show comparable intensities is an indicatiou oE a rather substantial temperatura aradient in the plasma

  5. Accurate Alignment of Plasma Channels Based on Laser Centroid Oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Lin, Chen; Osterhoff, Jens; Shiraishi, Satomi; Schroeder, Carl; Geddes, Cameron; Toth, Csaba; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2011-03-23

    A technique has been developed to accurately align a laser beam through a plasma channel by minimizing the shift in laser centroid and angle at the channel outptut. If only the shift in centroid or angle is measured, then accurate alignment is provided by minimizing laser centroid motion at the channel exit as the channel properties are scanned. The improvement in alignment accuracy provided by this technique is important for minimizing electron beam pointing errors in laser plasma accelerators.

  6. Neutral gas depletion in low temperature plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruchtman, A.

    2017-11-01

    Neutral depletion can significantly affect the steady state of low temperature plasmas. Processes that lead to neutral depletion and the resulting plasma–neutrals steady state are reviewed. Two such processes are due to collisions of neutrals with plasma. One process is the drag by ions that collide with neutrals and push them towards the wall. Another process is neutral-gas heating by collisions with plasma that makes the gas hotter at the discharge center. These processes, which usually occur under (static) pressure balance between plasma and neutrals, are called here ‘neutral pumping’. When collisions are negligible, neutrals that move ballistically between the chamber walls are depleted through ionization, a process called here ‘ion pumping’. The effect of the magnetic field on neutral depletion is explored in plasma in which the dynamics is governed by cross-field diffusion. Finally, neutral depletion in a flowing plasma is analyzed.

  7. Physics considerations for laser-plasma linear colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. B. Schroeder

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Physics considerations for a next-generation linear collider based on laser-plasma accelerators are discussed. The ultrahigh accelerating gradient of a laser-plasma accelerator and short laser coupling distance between accelerator stages allows for a compact linac. Two regimes of laser-plasma acceleration are discussed. The highly nonlinear regime has the advantages of higher accelerating fields and uniform focusing forces, whereas the quasilinear regime has the advantage of symmetric accelerating properties for electrons and positrons. Scaling of various accelerator and collider parameters with respect to plasma density and laser wavelength are derived. Reduction of beamstrahlung effects implies the use of ultrashort bunches of moderate charge. The total linac length scales inversely with the square root of the plasma density, whereas the total power scales proportional to the square root of the density. A 1 TeV center-of-mass collider based on stages using a plasma density of 10^{17}  cm^{-3} requires tens of J of laser energy per stage (using 1  μm wavelength lasers with tens of kHz repetition rate. Coulomb scattering and synchrotron radiation are examined and found not to significantly degrade beam quality. A photon collider based on laser-plasma accelerated beams is also considered. The requirements for the scattering laser energy are comparable to those of a single laser-plasma accelerator stage.

  8. Excitation and Control of Plasma Wakefields by Multiple Laser Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, J.; Thornton, C.; Arran, C.; Shalloo, R. J.; Corner, L.; Cheung, G.; Gregory, C. D.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Matlis, N. H.; Symes, D. R.; Walczak, R.; Hooker, S. M.

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the resonant excitation of plasma waves by trains of laser pulses. We also take an important first step to achieving an energy recovery plasma accelerator by showing that a plasma wave can be damped by an out-of-resonance trailing laser pulse. The measured laser wakefields are found to be in excellent agreement with analytical and numerical models of wakefield excitation in the linear regime. Our results indicate a promising direction for achieving highly controlled, GeV-scale laser-plasma accelerators operating at multikilohertz repetition rates.

  9. Terahertz Acoustics in Hot Dense Laser Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adak, Amitava; Robinson, A. P. L.; Singh, Prashant Kumar; Chatterjee, Gourab; Lad, Amit D.; Pasley, John; Kumar, G. Ravindra

    2015-03-01

    We present a hitherto unobserved facet of hydrodynamics, namely the generation of an ultrahigh frequency acoustic disturbance in the terahertz frequency range, whose origins are purely hydrodynamic in nature. The disturbance is caused by differential flow velocities down a density gradient in a plasma created by a 30 fs, 800 nm high-intensity laser (˜5 ×1016 W /cm2 ). The picosecond scale observations enable us to capture these high frequency oscillations (1.9 ±0.6 THz ) which are generated as a consequence of the rapid heating of the medium by the laser. Adoption of two complementary techniques, namely pump-probe reflectometry and pump-probe Doppler spectrometry provides unambiguous identification of this terahertz acoustic disturbance. Hydrodynamic simulations well reproduce the observations, offering insight into this process.

  10. Laser fusion implosion and plasma interaction experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1977-08-01

    Results related to the propagation, absorption and scattering of laser light by both spherical and planar targets are described. The absorption measurements indicate that for intensities of interest, inverse bremsstrahlung is not the dominant absorption mechanism. The laser light scattered by the plasma is polarization dependent and provides evidence that Brillouin scattering and resonance absorption are operative. Special diagnostics have been designed and experiments have been performed to elucidate the nature of these two processes. Implosion results on glass microshell targets filled with DT gas are also summarized. These experiments are for targets intentionally operated in the portion of parameter space characteristic of exploding pusher events. Experiments have been performed over a yield range from 0 to 10/sup 9/ neutrons per event. It is shown how this data can be normalized with a simple scaling law.

  11. Aluminium plasma production at high laser intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.

    2014-02-01

    Thick and thin films of Al targets were irradiated in vacuum with iodine laser at 1315 nm wavelength, 300 ps pulse duration at a maximum intensity of about 1016 W/cm2 by varying the pulse energy and focal position. The laser-generated plasma was monitored in forward and backward directions by using ion collectors, SiC detectors, Thomson parabola spectrometer, and X-ray streak camera. Ion emission shows maximum proton energy of about 4 MeV in self-focusing conditions and a maximum Al ion energy of about 50 MeV. An evaluation of the electric field driving ions in conditions of target normal sheath acceleration is given.

  12. Aluminium plasma production at high laser intensity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M. [Dip.to di Fisica e S.d.T. Università di Messina, V.S. d' Alcontres 31, 98166 S. Agata (Italy)

    2014-02-28

    Thick and thin films of Al targets were irradiated in vacuum with iodine laser at 1315 nm wavelength, 300 ps pulse duration at a maximum intensity of about 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} by varying the pulse energy and focal position. The laser-generated plasma was monitored in forward and backward directions by using ion collectors, SiC detectors, Thomson parabola spectrometer, and X-ray streak camera. Ion emission shows maximum proton energy of about 4 MeV in self-focusing conditions and a maximum Al ion energy of about 50 MeV. An evaluation of the electric field driving ions in conditions of target normal sheath acceleration is given.

  13. [Study of self-absorption effect on laser-induced metal plasma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin-Zhong; Ma, Rui-Ling; Wang, Jing; Li, Xu; Su, Hong-Xin

    2014-09-01

    In order to reduce the effect of the spectral line self-absorption on the analysis result in the laser induced plasma and enhance the qualities of spectrum, the spectral information was recorded by the spectral analysis system consisting of a modular multifunctional grating spectrometer and a CCD detector etc., and the electron temperature and electron density of the plasma were measured with the spectroscopic methods. A plane mirror device was used to constraint the laser plasma, and a reasonable explanation was got through comparing the linear evolution under different experimental conditions and measuring the temperature, electronic density and sample evaporation. The result shows that when an appropriate plane mirror device was used to constraint the laser plasma, the axial temperature of the plasma increased and the radial distribution of the plasma becomes uniform; the electron density increased dramatically; however, obviously sample evaporation decreased, which may be the reasons for being able to effectively reduce the level of self-absorption spectral lines. Therefore, the plane mirror device could reduce the self-absorption effect in the laser-induced plasma. This makes it possible to choose a sensitive line that acts as analysis line in the quantitative analysis of the major elements. In other words, this promotes the measurement precision in the laser-induced break-down spectroscopy.

  14. Comparison of optical emission from nanosecond and femtosecond laser produced plasma in atmosphere and vacuum conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, J.R., E-mail: freemaj@purdue.edu; Harilal, S.S., E-mail: sharilal@purdue.edu; Diwakar, P.K., E-mail: pdiwakar@purdue.edu; Verhoff, B., E-mail: bverhoff@purdue.edu; Hassanein, A., E-mail: hassanein@purdue.edu

    2013-09-01

    In this study we examine the emission from brass plasma produced by ns and fs laser ablation under both vacuum and atmosphere environments using identical laser fluences in order to better understand the differences in emission features and plasma dynamics. Optical emission spectra show increased continuum and emission from lower-charged ions for ns laser-produced plasma (LPP), while fs plasma emission spectra show emission primarily from excited neutral species with negligible continuum. Plasma excitation temperature and electron density as a function of time show similar trends for both lasers, though fs LPP expansion appears to be approximately two times faster than ns LPP expansion for the conditions studied. Confinement by the ambient gas is shown to significantly enhance and maintain plasma temperature and density and hence, emission, at later times. ICCD images of plasma expansion showed a broader angular distribution for ns LPP, but narrower angular distribution for fs LPP. Images also confirm the significant effect that the ambient environment has in confining plume expansion. - Highlights: • Emission from ns and fs LIBS plumes are compared under different pressure environments. • Ablation mechanisms for each laser are used to explain different emission features. • Ambient pressure plays a critical role in plume temperature and density evolution. • Visible emission from fs LIBS plume is almost entirely from neutral species. • Spectra collection time delay is shown to be very important in improving S/N and S/B.

  15. Study of spatio-temporal dynamics of laser-hole boring in near critical plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochitsky, Sergei; Gong, Chao; Fiuza, Frederico; Pigeon, Jeremy; Joshi, Chan

    2015-11-01

    At high-intensities of light, radiation pressure becomes one of the dominant mechanisms in laser-plasma interaction. The radiation pressure of an intense laser pulse can steepen and push the critical density region of an overdense plasma creating a cavity or a hole. This hole boring phenomenon is of importance in fast-ignition fusion, high-gradient laser-plasma ion acceleration, and formation of collisionless shocks. Here multi-frame picosecond optical interferometry is used for the first direct measurements of space and time dynamics of the density cavity as it is pushed forward by a train of CO2 laser pulses in a helium plasma. The measured values of the hole boring velocity into an overdense plasma as a function of laser intensity are consistent with a theory based on energy and momentum balance between the heated plasma and the laser and with two-dimensional numerical simulations. We show possibility to extract a relative plasma electron temperature within the laser pulse by applying an analytical theory to the measured hole boring velocities. This work was supported by DOE grant DE-SC0010064.

  16. Acoustic and optical emission during laser-induced plasma formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conesa, S.; Palanco, S.; Laserna, J.J. E-mail: laserna@uma.es

    2004-09-20

    Laser ablation is widely used in laser processing and analysis of materials. The laser beam evaporates and ionizes material, creating a plasma plume that expands to variable extent and morphology depending on both the sample and its surrounding gas properties. At ambient pressure a shock wave front appears, traveling at variable velocities which are related to the own plasma formation mechanism. Plasma images as well as the acoustic spectral content of the emission within the aural perception range are related to the plasma formation and evolution dynamics. These results are discussed on the basis of different plasma expansion mechanisms.

  17. Plasma optical modulation for lasers based on the plasma induced by femtosecond pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chao; Fu, Xiquan; Hu, Yonghua; Deng, Yangbao; Shi, Xiaohui; Zhan, Shiping; Xi, Zaifang

    2017-06-26

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of plasma optical modulation for probe lasers based on the plasma induced by pump pulses. This concept relies on two co-propagating laser pulses in carbon disulfide, where a drive laser pulse first excites plasma channels while a following carrier laser pulse is modulated by the plasma. The modulation on the probe beam can be conveniently adjusted through electron density, plasma width, propagation distance of plasma, the power of pump lasers, or the pump beam's profile. The experimental results and theoretical solutions are very consistent, which fully illustrates that this method for plasma optical modulation is reasonable. This pump-probe method is also a potential measurement technique for inferring the on-axis plasma density shape.

  18. Filtering of higher-order laser modes using plasma structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, Blagoje; Benedetti, Carlo; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2017-10-01

    Plasma structures based on leaky channels are proposed to filter higher-order laser mode content. The evolution and propagation of non-Gaussian laser pulses in leaky channels is studied, and it is shown that, for appropriate laser-plasma parameters, the higher-order laser mode content may be removed while the fundamental mode remains well-guided. The behavior of the multi-mode laser pulse is described analytically, including the derivation of the leakage coefficients, and compared to numerical calculations. Gaussian laser pulse propagation, without higher-order mode content, improves guiding in parabolic plasma channels, enabling extended interaction lengths for laser-plasma accelerator applications. This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of High Energy Physics, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  19. Diode-Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of an Optically Thick Plasma in Combination with Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nomura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Distortion of laser-induced fluorescence profiles attributable to optical absorption and saturation broadening was corrected in combination with laser absorption spectroscopy in argon plasma flow. At high probe-laser intensity, saturated absorption profiles were measured to correct probe-laser absorption. At low laser intensity, nonsaturated absorption profiles were measured to correct fluorescence reabsorption. Saturation broadening at the measurement point was corrected using a ratio of saturated to non-saturated broadening. Observed LIF broadening and corresponding translational temperature without correction were, respectively, 2.20±0.05 GHz and 2510±100 K and corrected broadening and temperature were, respectively, 1.96±0.07 GHz and 1990±150 K. Although this correction is applicable only at the center of symmetry, the deduced temperature agreed well with that obtained by LAS with Abel inversion.

  20. Laser Brazing of High Temperature Braze Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y. P.; Seaman, R. F.; McQuillan, T. J.; Martiens, R. F.

    2000-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) consists of 1080 conical tubes, which are furnace brazed themselves, manifolds, and surrounding structural jacket making almost four miles of braze joints. Subsequent furnace braze cycles are performed due to localized braze voids between the coolant tubes. SSME nozzle experiences extremely high heat flux (180 mW/sq m) during hot fire. Braze voids between coolant tubes may result in hot combustion gas escape causing jacket bulges. The nozzle can be disqualified for flight or result in mission failure if the braze voids exceed the limits. Localized braze processes were considered to eliminate braze voids, however, damage to the parent materials often prohibited use of such process. Being the only manned flight reusable rocket engine, it has stringent requirement on the braze process. Poor braze quality or damage to the parent materials limits the nozzle service life. The objective of this study was to develop a laser brazing process to provide quality, localized braze joints without adverse affect on the parent materials. Gold (Au-Cu-Ni-Pd-Mn) based high temperature braze alloys were used in both powder and wire form. Thin section iron base superalloy A286 tube was used as substrate materials. Different Laser Systems including CO2 (10.6 micrometers, 1kW), ND:YAG (1.06 micrometers, 4kW). and direct diode laser (808nm. 150W) were investigated for brazing process. The laser process variables including wavelength. laser power, travel speed and angle of inclination were optimized according to bead geometry and braze alloy wetting at minimum heat input level, The properties of laser brazing were compared to that of furnace brazing. Microhardness profiles were used for braze joint property comparison between laser and furnace brazing. The cooling rate of laser brazing was compared to furnace brazing based on secondary dendritic arm spacing, Both optical and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) were used to evaluate the microstructures of

  1. Non-equilibrium Microwave Plasma for Efficient High Temperature Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bekerom, Dirk; den Harder, Niek; Minea, Teofil; Gatti, Nicola; Linares, Jose Palomares; Bongers, Waldo; van de Sanden, Richard; van Rooij, Gerard

    2017-08-01

    A flowing microwave plasma based methodology for converting electric energy into internal and/or translational modes of stable molecules with the purpose of efficiently driving non-equilibrium chemistry is discussed. The advantage of a flowing plasma reactor is that continuous chemical processes can be driven with the flexibility of startup times in the seconds timescale. The plasma approach is generically suitable for conversion/activation of stable molecules such as CO2, N2 and CH4. Here the reduction of CO2 to CO is used as a model system: the complementary diagnostics illustrate how a baseline thermodynamic equilibrium conversion can be exceeded by the intrinsic non-equilibrium from high vibrational excitation. Laser (Rayleigh) scattering is used to measure the reactor temperature and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) to characterize in situ internal (vibrational) excitation as well as the effluent composition to monitor conversion and selectivity.

  2. Computing Temperatures In Optically Pumped Laser Rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrukh, Usamah O.

    1991-01-01

    Computer program presents new model solving temperature-distribution problem for laser rods of finite length and calculates both radial and axial components of temperature distributions in these rods. Contains several self-checking schemes to prevent over-writing of memory blocks and to provide simple tracing of information in case of trouble. Written in Microsoft FORTRAN 77.

  3. DEVICE FOR INVESTIGATION OF MAGNETRON AND PULSED-LASER PLASMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Burmakov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Various modifications of complex pulsed laser and magnetron deposition thin-film structures unit are presented. They include joint and separate variants of layer deposition. Unit realizes the plasma parameters control and enhances the possibility of laser-plasma and magnetron methods of coatings deposition.

  4. Evolution of the plasma parameters in the expanding laser ablation plume of silver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Schou, Jørgen; Hansen, T.N.

    2002-01-01

    The angular and radial variation of the ion density and electron temperature in the plasma plume produced by laser ablation of silver at fluences of 0.8-1.3 J cm(-2) at 355 nm have been studied using a time-resolving Langmuir probe. The angular dependence of the electron temperature...

  5. Modelling nanoparticles formation in the plasma plume induced by nanosecond pulsed lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girault, M. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne (ICB), UMR 6303 CNRS-Universite de Bourgogne, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications (CELIA), Universite de Bordeaux 1, 43 rue Pierre Noailles, Talence (France); Hallo, L., E-mail: hallo@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr [CEA CESTA, 15 Avenue des Sablieres CS 60001, 33116 Le Barp Cedex (France); Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications (CELIA), Universite de Bordeaux 1, 43 rue Pierre Noailles, Talence (France); Lavisse, L.; Lucas, M.C. Marco de [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne (ICB), UMR 6303 CNRS-Universite de Bourgogne, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Hebert, D. [CEA CESTA, 15 Avenue des Sablieres CS 60001, 33116 Le Barp Cedex (France); Potin, V.; Jouvard, J.-M. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne (ICB), UMR 6303 CNRS-Universite de Bourgogne, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoparticles spatial localization in the plume induced by a pulsed laser. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Plasma plume obtained by laser irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Particles and debris formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Powder generation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conditions of formation. - Abstract: Nanoparticles formation in a laser-induced plasma plume in the ambient air has been investigated by using numerical simulations and physical models. For high irradiances, or for ultrashort laser pulses, nanoparticles are formed by condensation, as fine powders, in the expanding plasma for very high pairs of temperature and pressure. At lower irradiances, or nanosecond laser pulses, another thermodynamic paths are possible, which cross the liquid-gas transition curve while laser is still heating the target and the induced plasma. In this work, we explore the growth of nanoparticles in the plasma plume induced by nanosecond pulsed lasers as a function of the laser irradiance. Moreover, the influence of the ambient gas has also been investigated.

  6. Optical diagnostics of laser-produced aluminium plasmas under water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, N.; Costello, J. T.; Kelly, T. J.

    2017-06-01

    We report on the findings of double-pulse studies performed on an aluminium target submerged in water using Nd:YAG laser pulses. Shadowgraphy measurements were performed to examine the dynamic behaviour of the cavitation bubble that eventually forms some considerable time post-plasma ignition. These measurements were used to inform subsequent investigations designed to probe the bubble environment. The results of time-resolved imaging from within the cavitation bubble following irradiation by a second laser pulse reveal the full dynamic evolution of a plasma formed in such an environment. Rapid displacement of the plasma plume in a direction normal to the target surface followed by a diffusive outwards expansion is observed and a qualitative model is proposed to explain the observed behaviour. Line profiles of several ionic and atomic species were observed within the irradiated cavitation bubble. Electron densities were determined using the Stark broadening of the Al II line at 466.3 nm and electron temperatures inferred using the ratio of the Al II (466.3 nm) and Al I (396.15 nm) lines. Evidence of self-reversal of neutral emission lines was observed at times corresponding to growth and collapse phases of the cavitation bubble suggesting high population density for ground state atoms during these times.

  7. Comparative study on interactions between laser and arc plasma during laser-GTA welding and laser-GMA welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Minghua; Xu, Jiannan; Xin, Lijun; Zhao, Zuofu; Wu, Fufa

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes an investigation on differences in interactions between laser and arc plasma during laser-gas tungsten arc (LT) welding and laser-gas metal arc (LM) welding. The characteristics of LT heat source and LM heat source, such as plasma behavior, heat penetration ability and spectral information were comparably studied. Based on the plasma discharge theory, the interactions during plasma discharge were modeled and analyzed. Results show that in both LT and LM welding, coupling discharge between the laser keyhole plasma and arc happens, which strongly enhance the arc. But, the enhancing effect in LT welding is much more sensitive than that in LM welding when parameters are adjusted.

  8. Plasma Channel Diagnostic Based on Laser Centroid Oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Lin, Chen; Osterhoff, Jens; Shiraishi, Satomi; Schroeder, Carl; Geddes, Cameron; Toth, Csaba; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2010-09-09

    A technique has been developed for measuring the properties of discharge-based plasma channels by monitoring the centroid location of a laser beam exiting the channel as a function of input alignment offset between the laser and the channel. The centroid position of low-intensity (<10{sup 14}Wcm{sup -2}) laser pulses focused at the input of a hydrogen-filled capillary discharge waveguide was scanned and the exit positions recorded to determine the channel shape and depth with an accuracy of a few %. In addition, accurate alignment of the laser beam through the plasma channel can be provided by minimizing laser centroid motion at the channel exit as the channel depth is scanned either by scanning the plasma density or the discharge timing. The improvement in alignment accuracy provided by this technique will be crucial for minimizing electron beam pointing errors in laser plasma accelerators.

  9. Plasma lasers (a strong source of coherent radiation in astrophysics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, K.

    1981-01-01

    The generation of electromagnetic radiation from the free energy available in electron streams is discussed. The fundamental principles involved in a particular class of coherent plasma radiation sources, i.e., plasma lasers, are reviewed, focusing on three wave coupling, nonlinear parametric instabilities, and negative energy waves. The simplest case of plasma lasers, that of an unmagnetized plasma containing a finite level of density fluctuations and electrons streaming with respect to the ions, is dealt with. A much more complicated application of plasma lasers to the case of auroral kilometric radiation is then examined. The concept of free electron lasers, including the role of relativistic scattering, is elucidated. Important problems involving the escape of the excited radiation from its generation region, effects due to plasma shielding and nonlinear limits, are brought out.

  10. Analysis of plasma characteristics and conductive mechanism of laser assisted pulsed arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuangyu; Chen, Shixian; Wang, Qinghua; Li, Yanqing; Zhang, Hong; Ding, Hongtao

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to investigate the arc plasma shape and the spectral characteristics during the laser assisted pulsed arc welding process. The arc plasma shape was synchronously observed using a high speed camera, and the emission spectrum of plasma was obtained by spectrometer. The well-known Boltzmann plot method and Stark broadening were used to calculate the electron temperature and density respectively. The conductive mechanism of arc ignition in laser assisted arc hybrid welding was investigated, and it was found that the plasma current moved to the arc anode under the action of electric field. Thus, a significant parabolic channel was formed between the keyhole and the wire tip. This channel became the main method of energy transformation between the arc and the molten pool. The calculation results of plasma resistivity show that the laser plasma has low resistivity as the starting point of conductive channel formation. When the laser pulse duration increases, the intensity of the plasma radiation spectrum and the plasma electron density will increase, and the electron temperature will decrease.

  11. Influence of irradiation conditions on plasma evolution in laser-surface interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, J.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Dubreuil, B.; Mihailescu, I. N.

    1993-09-01

    The plasma plume induced by pulsed CO2 laser irradiation of a Ti target at power densities up to 4×108 W cm-2 was studied by emission spectroscopy. Time- and space-resolved measurements were performed by varying laser intensity, laser temporal pulse shape, ambient gas pressure, and the nature of the ambient gas. Experimental results are discussed by comparison with usual models. We show that shock wave and plasma propagation depend critically on the ratio Ivap/Ii, Ivap being the intensity threshold for surface vaporization and Ii the plasma ignition threshold of the ambient gas. Spectroscopic diagnostics of the helium breakdown plasma show maximum values of electron temperature and electron density in the order of kTe˜10 eV and ne=1018 cm-3, respectively. The plasma cannot be described by local thermodynamic equilibrium modeling. Nevertheless, excited metal atoms appear to be in equilibrium with electrons, hence, they can be used like a probe to measure the electron temperature. In order to get information on the role of the plasma in the laser-surface interaction, Ti surfaces were investigated by microscopy after irradiation. Thus an enhanced momentum transfer from the plasma to the target due to the recoil pressure of the breakdown plasma could be evidenced.

  12. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Spectroscopic investigation of thermodynamic parameters of a plasma plume formed by the action of cw CO2 laser radiation on a metal substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'chenko, Zh V.; Azharonok, V. V.; Filatova, I. I.; Shimanovich, V. D.; Golubev, V. S.; Zabelin, A. M.

    1996-09-01

    Emission spectroscopy methods were used in an investigation of thermodynamic parameters of a surface plasma formed by the action of cw CO2 laser radiation of (2-5)×106 W cm-2 intensity on stainless steel in a protective He or Ar atmosphere. The spatiotemporal structure and pulsation characteristics of the plasma plume were used to determine the fields of the plasma electron density and temperature.

  13. Spectroscopic diagnostics of high temperature plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moos, W.

    1990-01-01

    A three-year research program for the development of novel XUV spectroscopic diagnostics for magnetically confined fusion plasmas is proposed. The new diagnostic system will use layered synthetic microstructures (LSM) coated, flat and curved surfaces as dispersive elements in spectrometers and narrow band XUV filter arrays. In the framework of the proposed program we will develop impurity monitors for poloidal and toroidal resolved measurements on PBX-M and Alcator C-Mod, imaging XUV spectrometers for electron density and temperature fluctuation measurements in the hot plasma core in TEXT or other similar tokamaks and plasma imaging devices in soft x-ray light for impurity behavior studies during RF heating on Phaedrus T and carbon pellet ablation in Alcator C-Mod. Recent results related to use of multilayer in XUV plasma spectroscopy are presented. We also discuss the latest results reviewed to q{sub o} and local poloidal field measurements using Zeeman polarimetry.

  14. The interaction of intense subpicosecond laser pulses with underdense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coverdale, Christine Ann [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1995-05-11

    Laser-plasma interactions have been of interest for many years not only from a basic physics standpoint, but also for their relevance to numerous applications. Advances in laser technology in recent years have resulted in compact laser systems capable of generating (psec), 1016 W/cm2 laser pulses. These lasers have provided a new regime in which to study laser-plasma interactions, a regime characterized by Lplasma ≥ 2LRayleigh > cτ. The goal of this dissertation is to experimentally characterize the interaction of a short pulse, high intensity laser with an underdense plasma (no ≤ 0.05ncr). Specifically, the parametric instability known as stimulated Raman scatter (SRS) is investigated to determine its behavior when driven by a short, intense laser pulse. Both the forward Raman scatter instability and backscattered Raman instability are studied. The coupled partial differential equations which describe the growth of SRS are reviewed and solved for typical experimental laser and plasma parameters. This solution shows the growth of the waves (electron plasma and scattered light) generated via stimulated Raman scatter. The dispersion relation is also derived and solved for experimentally accessible parameters. The solution of the dispersion relation is used to predict where (in k-space) and at what frequency (in ω-space) the instability will grow. Both the nonrelativistic and relativistic regimes of the instability are considered.

  15. Non-linear theory of laser-plasma interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C.S.

    1980-01-01

    Research progress on each of the following areas is briefly described: (1) optical ray retracing of Brillouin backscattering from a nonisothermal plasma; (2) electromagnetic oscillating two-stream instability of laser radiation; (3) second harmonic generation of upper hybrid radiation in a plasma; (4) nonlinear scattering of upper hybrid laser radiation by electron Bernstein modes in a plasma; and (5) destructive collisions of supersonic solitons. (MOW)

  16. Atomic hydrogen and diatomic titanium-monoxide molecular spectroscopy in laser-induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parigger, Christian G.; Woods, Alexander C.

    2017-03-01

    This article gives a brief review of experimental studies of hydrogen Balmer series emission spectra. Ongoing research aims to evaluate early plasma evolution following optical breakdown in laboratory air. Of interest is as well laser ablation of metallic titanium and characterization of plasma evolution. Emission of titanium monoxide is discussed together with modeling of diatomic spectra to infer temperature. The behavior of titanium particles in plasma draws research interests ranging from the modeling of stellar atmospheres to the enhancement of thin film production via pulsed laser deposition.

  17. Lattice-Boltzmann simulation of laser interaction with weakly ionized helium plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huayu; Ki, Hyungson

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents a lattice Boltzmann method for laser interaction with weakly ionized plasmas considering electron impact ionization and three-body recombination. To simulate with physical properties of plasmas, the authors' previous work on the rescaling of variables is employed and the electromagnetic fields are calculated from the Maxwell equations by using the finite-difference time-domain method. To calculate temperature fields, energy equations are derived separately from the Boltzmann equations. In this way, we attempt to solve the full governing equations for plasma dynamics. With the developed model, the continuous-wave CO2 laser interaction with helium is simulated successfully.

  18. X-ray laser studies using plasmas created by optical field ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krushelnick, K.M.; Tighe, W.; Suckewer, S.

    1995-01-01

    X-ray laser experiments involving the creation of fast recombining plasmas by optical field ionization of preformed targets were conducted. A nonlinear increase in the intensity of the 13.5nm Lyman-{alpha} line in Li III with the length of the target plasma was observed but only for distances less than the laser confocal parameter and for low plasma electron temperatures. Multiphoton pumping of resonant atomic transitions was also examined and the process of multiphoton ionization of FIII was found to be more probable than multiphoton excitation.

  19. Energy analysis of protons emitted from Nd:YAg laser-generated plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.

    2012-06-01

    Hydrogenated targets have been irradiated in vacuum with the pulsed Nd:YAg laser at intensities of the order of 1010 W/cm2. The laser-generated plasma, produced by the interaction with the solid, emits protons and other ions along the normal to the target surface. Ion collectors and ion energy analyzer were used to measure the current, the angular emission and the energy distributions of the emitted protons. Time-of-flight measurements, Coulomb-Boltzmann-distributions and the fits of experimental data were also used in order to evaluate the equivalent ion plasma temperature and the ion acceleration developed in the non-equilibrium-pulsed plasma.

  20. Laser-driven plasma photonic crystals for high-power lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, G.; Spatschek, K. H.

    2017-05-01

    Laser-driven plasma density gratings in underdense plasma are shown to act as photonic crystals for high power lasers. The gratings are created by counterpropagating laser beams that trap electrons, followed by ballistic ion motion. This leads to strong periodic plasma density modulations with a lifetime on the order of picoseconds. The grating structure is interpreted as a plasma photonic crystal time-dependent property, e.g., the photonic band gap width. In Maxwell-Vlasov and particle-in-cell simulations it is demonstrated that the photonic crystals may act as a frequency filter and mirror for ultra-short high-power laser pulses.

  1. Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Lin, C.; Sokollik, T.; Smith, A.; Rodgers, D.; Donahue, R.; Bryne, W.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-11-01

    The electron energy dependence of a scintillating screen (Lanex Fast) was studied with sub-nanosecond electron beams ranging from 106 MeV to 1522 MeV at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron booster accelerator. The sensitivity of the Lanex Fast decreased by 1% per 100 MeV increase of the energy. The linear response of the screen against the charge was verified with charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm2 and 0.4 pC/ps/mm2, respectively. For electron beams from the laser plasma accelerator, a comprehensive study of charge diagnostics has been performed using a Lanex screen, an integrating current transformer, and an activation based measurement. The charge measured by each diagnostic was found to be within ±10%.

  2. Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Lin, C.; Sokollik, T.; Smith, A.; Rodgers, D.; Donahue, R.; Bryne, W.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-06-01

    The electron energy dependence of a scintillating screen (Lanex Fast) was studied with sub-nanosecond electron beams ranging from 106 MeV to 1522 MeV at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron booster accelerator. The sensitivity of the Lanex Fast decreased by 1percent per 100 MeV increase of the energy. The linear response of the screen against the charge was verified with charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm2 and 0.4 pC/ps/mm2, respectively. For electron beams from the laser plasma accelerator, a comprehensive study of charge diagnostics has been performed using a Lanex screen, an integrating current transformer, and an activation based measurement. The charge measured by each diagnostic was found to be within +/-10 percent.

  3. Generation of C6+ in a spark-discharge coupled laser plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balki, Oguzhan; Rahman, Md. Mahmudur; Xiao, Shu; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.

    2017-11-01

    By coupling a spark discharge into a laser-generated carbon plasma, fully-stripped carbon ions with a relatively low laser pulse energy are observed. When spark-discharge energy of ∼ 750 mJ is coupled to the carbon plasma generated by ∼ 50 mJ laser pulse (wavelength 1064 nm, pulse width 8 ns, intensity 5 × 109 W /cm2), enhancement in the total ion charge by a factor of ∼ 6 is observed, along with the increase of maximum charge state from C4+ to C6+. Spark coupling to the laser plasma significantly reduces the laser pulse energy required to generate highly-charged ions. Compared to the laser carbon plasma alone, the spark discharge increases the intensity of the spectral emission of carbon lines, the electron density ne, and the electron temperature Te. The effective ion plasma temperature associated with translational motion along the plume axis Tieff is calculated from the ion time-of-flight signal.

  4. Development of Raman-shifted probe laser beam for plasma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Optical diagnostics of laser-produced plasma requires a coherent, polarized probe beam synchronized with the pump beam. The probe beam should have energy above the background emission of plasma. Though the second harmonic probe beam satisfies most of the requirements, the plasma emission is larger ...

  5. Development of Raman-shifted probe laser beam for plasma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Optical diagnostics of laser-produced plasma requires a coherent, polarized probe beam synchronized with the pump beam. The probe beam should have energy above the background emission of plasma. Though the second harmonic probe beam satisfies most of the requirements, the plasma emission is larger at the ...

  6. Effect of ambient gas pressure and nature on the temporal evolution of aluminum laser-induced plasmas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dawood, M. S; Margot, Joëlle

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved analysis of emission spectra, electron densities and excitation temperatures of Aluminum laser induced plasmas produced in argon, nitrogen and helium at different pressures have been studied experimentally...

  7. [Research on Temporal and Spatial Evolution of Reheating Double-Pulse Laser-Induced Plasma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing-ge; Fu, Hong-bo; Ni, Zhi-bo; He, Wen-gan; Chen, Xing-long; Dong, Feng-zhong

    2016-03-01

    In order to investigate the emission enhancement mechanisms of reheating Double Pulse Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (DP-LIBS), single pulse LIBS (SP-LIBS) and reheating DP-LIBS were carried out on an alloy steel sample respectively. The plasma emission was collected by an Echelle spectrometer with high resolution, while the plasma structure was monitored via fast-photography. The temporal and spatial evolutio ns of the plasma generated by SP-LIBS and reheating DP-LIBS were being studied. It is found that the plasma temperature in reheating DP-LIBS was higher than that of SP-LIBS, and there was a turning point for the decay rate of plasma temperature in reheating DP-LIBS when the delay time was equal to the interpulse time of DP-LIBS. Moreover, the inte nsity of the plasma image was increased by reheating DP-LIBS, and the height and width of the central region of the plasma were increased about 23.5% and 15.1% respectively. The results of spatial distribution showed that the intensity of Fe II and N I lines in the plasma were obviously enhanced by reheating DP-LIBS when the distance from the sample surface was larger than 0.6 mm. While the intensity enhancement for Fe I lines were little, even in some positio ns the intensity of Fe I lines decreased. The plasma temperature of double-pulse configuration was about 2 000 K higher than that of SP-LIBS, and a larger hot region in the plasma was generated. It is evidenced that the emission enhancement mechanisms in reheating DP-LIBS is that the second laser pulse re-excited the plasma induced by the first laser pulse, and the higher plasma temperature resulted from the re-exciting process.

  8. Laser-plasma weapons-effects-simulation progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gusinow, M.A.; Woodall, D.; Anthes, J.P.; Palmer, M.A.; McGuire, E.J.; Matzen, M.K.; Glibert, K.M.

    1978-06-01

    The present goal of the Laser-Plasma Weapons-Effects-Simulation Program is the study of the conversion of laser radiation to x-radiation. The purpose is ultimately to make an intense pulsed source of x-rays to be useful in simulation programs. The requirement of a large conversion efficiency (from Laser to x-radiation) is important in order to minimize the energy requirements, size, and expense of the laser system.

  9. Pathogen reduction in human plasma using an ultrashort pulsed laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsen, Shaw-Wei D; Kingsley, David H; Kibler, Karen; Jacobs, Bert; Sizemore, Sara; Vaiana, Sara M; Anderson, Jeanne; Tsen, Kong-Thon; Achilefu, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Pathogen reduction is a viable approach to ensure the continued safety of the blood supply against emerging pathogens. However, the currently licensed pathogen reduction techniques are ineffective against non-enveloped viruses such as hepatitis A virus, and they introduce chemicals with concerns of side effects which prevent their widespread use. In this report, we demonstrate the inactivation of both enveloped and non-enveloped viruses in human plasma using a novel chemical-free method, a visible ultrashort pulsed laser. We found that laser treatment resulted in 2-log, 1-log, and 3-log reductions in human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis A virus, and murine cytomegalovirus in human plasma, respectively. Laser-treated plasma showed ≥70% retention for most coagulation factors tested. Furthermore, laser treatment did not alter the structure of a model coagulation factor, fibrinogen. Ultrashort pulsed lasers are a promising new method for chemical-free, broad-spectrum pathogen reduction in human plasma.

  10. Pathogen reduction in human plasma using an ultrashort pulsed laser.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw-Wei D Tsen

    Full Text Available Pathogen reduction is a viable approach to ensure the continued safety of the blood supply against emerging pathogens. However, the currently licensed pathogen reduction techniques are ineffective against non-enveloped viruses such as hepatitis A virus, and they introduce chemicals with concerns of side effects which prevent their widespread use. In this report, we demonstrate the inactivation of both enveloped and non-enveloped viruses in human plasma using a novel chemical-free method, a visible ultrashort pulsed laser. We found that laser treatment resulted in 2-log, 1-log, and 3-log reductions in human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis A virus, and murine cytomegalovirus in human plasma, respectively. Laser-treated plasma showed ≥70% retention for most coagulation factors tested. Furthermore, laser treatment did not alter the structure of a model coagulation factor, fibrinogen. Ultrashort pulsed lasers are a promising new method for chemical-free, broad-spectrum pathogen reduction in human plasma.

  11. Confinement Studies in High Temperature Spheromak Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, D N; Mclean, H S; Wood, R D; Casper, T A; Cohen, B I; Hooper, E B; LoDestro, L L; Pearlstein, L D; Romero-Talamas, C

    2006-10-23

    Recent results from the SSPX spheromak experiment demonstrate the potential for obtaining good energy confinement (Te > 350eV and radial electron thermal diffusivity comparable to tokamak L-mode values) in a completely self-organized toroidal plasma. A strong decrease in thermal conductivity with temperature is observed and at the highest temperatures, transport is well below that expected from the Rechester-Rosenbluth model. Addition of a new capacitor bank has produced 60% higher magnetic fields and almost tripled the pulse length to 11ms. For plasmas with T{sub e} > 300eV, it becomes feasible to use modest (1.8MW) neutral beam injection (NBI) heating to significantly change the power balance in the core plasma, making it an effective tool for improving transport analysis. We are now developing detailed designs for adding NBI to SSPX and have developed a new module for the CORSICA transport code to compute the correct fast-ion orbits in SSPX so that we can simulate the effect of adding NBI; initial results predict that such heating can raise the electron temperature and total plasma pressure in the core by a factor of two.

  12. Comparison of optical emission from nanosecond and femtosecond laser produced plasma in atmosphere and vacuum conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, J. R.; Harilal, S. S.; Diwakar, P. K.; Verhoff, B.; Hassanein, A.

    2013-09-01

    In this study we examine the emission from brass plasma produced by ns and fs laser ablation under both vacuum and atmosphere environments using identical laser fluences in order to better understand the differences in emission features and plasma dynamics. Optical emission spectra show increased continuum and emission from lower-charged ions for ns laser-produced plasma (LPP), while fs plasma emission spectra show emission primarily from excited neutral species with negligible continuum. Plasma excitation temperature and electron density as a function of time show similar trends for both lasers, though fs LPP expansion appears to be approximately two times faster than ns LPP expansion for the conditions studied. Confinement by the ambient gas is shown to significantly enhance and maintain plasma temperature and density and hence, emission, at later times. ICCD images of plasma expansion showed a broader angular distribution for ns LPP, but narrower angular distribution for fs LPP. Images also confirm the significant effect that the ambient environment has in confining plume expansion.

  13. Experimental and theoretical study of Al plasma under femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komarov, P S; Ashitkov, S I; Ovchinnikov, A V; Sitnikov, D S; Veysman, M E; Levashov, P R; Povarnitsyn, M E; Agranat, M B; Andreev, N E; Khishchenko, K V; Fortov, V E [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya St. 13, Bd. 2, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: bme@ihed.ras.ru

    2009-05-29

    The amplitude and phase of the complex reflection coefficient of a weak probe laser pulse from strongly coupled Al plasma created on the surface of a metallic target by pump femtosecond laser pulses with intensities I {approx}< 10{sup 15} W cm{sup -2} were measured using femtosecond interference microscopy. A theoretical model developed for the interaction of intense ultrashort laser pulses with solid targets on the basis of a two-temperature equation of state for an irradiated substance was used for numerical simulations of the dynamics of the formation and expansion of the plasma. A comparison of the experimental data with the simulated results shows that the model is suitable up to I {approx} 10{sup 14} W cm{sup -2}. At higher intensities of the heating laser pulse, lower values of the reflection coefficient amplitude of Al plasma are observed in the experiment.

  14. Temperature measurements during laser skin welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Nathaniel M.; Choi, Bernard; Welch, Ashley J.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    1999-06-01

    A thermal camera was used to measure surface temperatures during laser skin welding to provide feedback for optimization of the laser parameters. Two-cm-long, full- thickness incisions were made in guinea pig skin. India ink was used as an absorber. Continuous-wave, 1.06-μm, Nd:YAG laser radiation was scanned over the incisions, producing a pulse duration of approximately 100 ms. Cooling durations between scans of 1.6, 4.0, and 8.0 s were studied with total operation times of 3, 5, and 10 min, respectively. A laser spot diameter of 5 mm was used with the power constant at 10 W. Thermal images were obtained at 30 frames per second with a thermal camera detecting 3.5 micrometers radiation. Surface temperatures were recorded at 0, 1, and 6 mm from the center line of the incision. Cooling durations between scans of 1.6 s and 4.0 s in vitro resulted in temperatures at the weld site remaining above ~65°C for prolonged periods of time. Cooling durations between scans as long as 8.0 s were sufficient both in vitro and in vivo to prevent a significant rise in baseline temperatures at the weld site over time.

  15. Laser-plasma booster for ion post acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoh D.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A remarkable ion energy increase is demonstrated for post acceleration by a laser-plasma booster. An intense short-pulse laser generates a strong current by high-energy electrons accelerated, when this intense short-pulse laser illuminates a plasma target. The strong electric current creates a strong magnetic field along the high-energy electron current in plasma. During the increase phase in the magnetic field, a longitudinal inductive electric field is induced for the forward ion acceleration by the Faraday law. Our 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate a remarkable increase in ion energy by several tens of MeV.

  16. Diagnostics of plasma plume produced by laser ablation using ICCD imaging and transient electrical probe technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihaila, I; Ursu, C; Gegiuc, A; Popa, G, E-mail: ghpopa@uaic.r [Department of Physics, Faculty of Physics, ' Alexandru Ioan Cuza' University, 700506, Iasi (Romania)

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of transient plasmas generated by high-fluence nanosecond laser ablation has been investigated by means of fast ICCD imaging and electrical probes in transient regime. Measurements have been carried out on plasmas produced in vacuum (5x 10{sup -6} Torr residual pressure) by a pulsed Excimer laser (20 ns, XeCl, {lambda}= 308 nm) irradiating stainless steel targets. Two plasma expansion velocities were estimated, one from probe measurements and another from recorded ICCD images. Electron plasma temperature (0.1 - 0.3 eV) and density (1 - 5x10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}) were measured by electrical probes for a laser radiation power density of 6x10{sup 8} W/cm{sup 2}.

  17. A pinhole camera for ultrahigh-intensity laser plasma experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C.; An, H. H.; Xiong, J.; Fang, Z. H.; Wang, Y. W.; Zhang, Z.; Hua, N.; Sun, J. R.; Wang, W.

    2017-11-01

    A pinhole camera is an important instrument for the detection of radiation in laser plasmas. It can monitor the laser focus directly and assist in the analysis of the experimental data. However, conventional pinhole cameras are difficult to use when the target is irradiated by an ultrahigh-power laser because of the high background of hard X-ray emission generated in the laser/target region. Therefore, an improved pinhole camera has been developed that uses a grazing-incidence mirror that enables soft X-ray imaging while avoiding the effect of hard X-ray from hot dense plasmas.

  18. Mid-infrared lasers for energy frontier plasma accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Pogorelsky

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Plasma wake field accelerators driven with solid-state near-IR lasers have been considered as an alternative to conventional rf accelerators for next-generation TeV-class lepton colliders. Here, we extend this study to the mid-IR spectral domain covered by CO_{2} lasers. We conclude that the increase in the laser driver wavelength favors the regime of laser wake field acceleration with a low plasma density and high electric charge. This regime is the most beneficial for gamma colliders to be converted from lepton colliders via inverse Compton scattering. Selecting a laser wavelength to drive a Compton gamma source is essential for the design of such a machine. The revealed benefits from spectral diversification of laser drivers for future colliders and off-spring applications validate ongoing efforts in advancing the ultrafast CO_{2} laser technology.

  19. Mid-infrared lasers for energy frontier plasma accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelsky, I. V.; Polyanskiy, M. N.; Kimura, W. D.

    2016-09-01

    Plasma wake field accelerators driven with solid-state near-IR lasers have been considered as an alternative to conventional rf accelerators for next-generation TeV-class lepton colliders. Here, we extend this study to the mid-IR spectral domain covered by CO2 lasers. We conclude that the increase in the laser driver wavelength favors the regime of laser wake field acceleration with a low plasma density and high electric charge. This regime is the most beneficial for gamma colliders to be converted from lepton colliders via inverse Compton scattering. Selecting a laser wavelength to drive a Compton gamma source is essential for the design of such a machine. The revealed benefits from spectral diversification of laser drivers for future colliders and off-spring applications validate ongoing efforts in advancing the ultrafast CO2 laser technology.

  20. Spatial characterization of laser induced Yb plasma in argon using optical emission spectroscopy: Pressure effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jazmati, A.K.; Alnama, K., E-mail: pscientific21@aec.org.sy; Alkhawwam, A.

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Laser induced Yb plasma at different pressure of Argon is spatially investigated. • O-TOF profiles and excitation temperature are used to characterize the plasma. • At 100 Pa of argon background gas, shock wave begins to be formed. • Drag force expansion describes the plasma propagation at pressures bigger than 1 Pa. • Two components of velocity distribution of the Yb atoms are estimated. - Abstract: Spatial and temporal behavior of laser induced Ytterbium plasma plume is studied using optical emission spectroscopy technique. A third harmonic Nd:YAG nanosecond laser was used to generate Yb plasma plume at different Argon background pressures (1, 10, 10{sup 2}, 10{sup 3} and 10{sup 4} Pa). The plasma dynamics was investigated based on the spatial behavior of the excitation temperature coupled with optical time of flight (O-TOF) profiles of neutral Yb emission line (555.65 nm) along the propagation axe of the plasma plume. Drag force model was appropriate to describe the propagation dynamics at all pressures except of the lowest one (1 Pa) where free expansion model is dominant. The velocity distribution of Yb I atoms were extracted using two terms of Shifted Maxwell–Boltzmann (SMB) distribution. The correlation between the spatial comportment of both excitation temperature and O-TOF profiles is discussed.

  1. Plasma mirror implementation on LFEX laser for ion and fast electron fast ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morace, A.; Kojima, S.; Arikawa, Y.; Fujioka, S.; Yogo, A.; Tosaki, S.; Sakata, S.; Abe, Y.; Lee, S. H.; Matsuo, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Kondo, K.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Norimatsu, T.; Jitsuno, T.; Miyanaga, N.; Shiraga, H.; Nakai, M.; Nishimura, H.; Azechi, H.

    2017-12-01

    In this work we report the successful implementation of plasma mirror (PM) technology on an LFEX laser facility at the Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University. The LFEX laser pulse was successfully refocused at the target chamber center (TCC) by means of a spherical plasma mirror, resulting in 5  ×  1018 W cm-2 laser intensity, with 45% reflectivity at a laser flux of about 90 J cm-2 on the PM. Experimental results show stable focusing and pointing of the LFEX pulse after PM refocusing. The contrast improvement was demonstrated by both cooler fast electron slope temperature distribution as well as by the ability to shoot sub-µm plastic foils obtaining proton beams with maximum energy exceeding 20 MeV. Experimental results are qualitatively reproduced by 2D particle in cell simulations.

  2. Spectral Characteristics of Laser-Induced Graphite Plasma in Ambient Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinmei; Zheng, Peichao; Liu, Hongdi; Fang, Liang

    2016-11-01

    An experimental setup of laser-induced graphite plasma was built and the spectral characteristics and properties of graphite plasma were studied. From the temporal behavior of graphite plasma, the duration of CN partials (B2 Σ+ → X2 Σ+) emission was two times longer than that of atomic carbon, and all intensities reached the maximum during the early stage from 0.2 μs to 0.8 μs. The electron temperature decreased from 11807 K to 8755 K, the vibration temperature decreased from 8973 K to 6472 K, and the rotational temperature decreased from 7288 K to 4491 K with the delay time, respectively. The effect of the laser energy was also studied, and it was found that the thresholds and spectral characteristics of CN molecular and C atomic spectroscopy presented great differences. At lower laser energies, the electron excited temperature, the electron density, the vibrational temperature and rotational temperature of CN partials increased rapidly. At higher laser energies, the increasing of electron excited temperature and electron density slow down, and the vibrational temperature and rotational temperature even trend to saturation due to plasma shielding and dissociation of CN molecules. The relationship among the three kinds of temperatures was Telec>Tvib>Trot at the same time. The electron density of the graphite plasma was in the order of 1017 cm-3 and 1018 cm-3. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61205149), Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars of State Education Ministry, Science Research Funds of Chongqing Municipal Education Commission (KJ1500436), Scientific and Technological Talents Training Project of Chongqing (CSTC2013kjrc-qnrc40002), Key Project of Foundation and Advanced Technology Research Project of Chongqing (CSTC2015jcyjB0358), Visiting Scholarship of State Key Laboratory of Power Transmission Equipment & System Security and New Technology (2007DA10512714409)

  3. Numerical simulation for the influence of injected laser power on plasma drag reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Z; Fang, J [Department of Postgraduates, Academy of Equipment Command and Technology, 3380 Post box, Huairou Beijing 101416 (China); Dou, Z G; Huang, H, E-mail: liuzhun0@gmail.com [Department of Basic Theories, Academy of Equipment Command and Technology, 3380 Post box, Huairou Beijing 101416 (China)

    2011-02-01

    Laser plasma drag reduction is a new method to reduce the wave drag of hypersonic flight. Inject laser power is an important parameter. An appropriate laser power should be chosen when laser power was injected to achieve the best drag reduction effect via the minimum laser power. The effect of inject laser power on the performance of laser plasma drag reduction when incoming flight Mach number is 6.5 and at 30km altitude was simulated numerically. The result indicates that the drag can be effectively reduced by energy injection in the upstream flow. The larger the inject power is, the smaller the drag of the blunt body obtained. The energy injection can also influence the pressure and temperature on the surface of blunt body. When laser energy injected, high pressure region on the surface moves to the back of the hemisphere, the pressure of stagnation point decreased. There are two peaks of temperature on the blunt surface, one is the stagnation point and the other is the high pressure region. Temperature of the surface after high pressure region is lower comparison to the condition that no energy injected.

  4. [Research on the identification method of LTE condition in the laser-induced plasma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Juan-juan; Huang, Dan; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Lei; Ma, Wei-guang; Dong, Lei; Yin, Wang-bao; Jia, Suo-tang

    2014-12-01

    Because of the poor accuracy of the commonly used Boltzmann plot method and double-line method, the Boltzmann-Maxwell distribution combined with the Saha-Eggert formula is proposed to improve the measurement accuracy of the plasma temperature; the simple algorithm for determining the linewidth of the emission line was established according to the relationship between the area and the peak value of the Gaussian formula, and the plasma electron density was calculated through the Stark broadening of the spectral lines; the method for identifying the plasma local thermal equilibrium (LTE) condition was established based on the McWhirter criterion. The experimental results show that with the increase in laser energy, the plasma temperature and electron density increase linearly; when the laser energy changes within 127~510 mJ, the plasma electron density changes in the range of 1.30532X10(17)~1.87322X10(17) cm(-3), the plasma temperature changes in the range of 12586~12957 K, and all the plasma generated in this experiment meets the LTE condition threshold according to the McWhirter criterion. For element Al, there exist relatively few observable lines at the same ionization state in the spectral region of the spectrometer, thus it is unable to use the Boltzmann plane method to calculate temperature. One hundred sets of Al plasma spectra were used for temperature measurement by employing the Saha-Boltzmann method and the relative standard deviation (RSD) value is 0.4%, and compared with 1.3% of the double line method, the accuracy has been substantially increased. The methods proposed can be used for rapid plasma temperature and electron density calculation, the LTE condition identification, and are valuable in studies such as free calibration, spectral effectiveness analysis, spectral temperature correction, the best collection location determination, LTE condition distribution in plasma, and so on.

  5. Tunable Laser Plasma Accelerator based on Longitudinal Density Tailoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Lin, Chen; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Shiraishi, Satomi; Sokollik, Thomas; Benedetti, Carlo; Schroeder, Carl; Geddes, Cameron; Tilborg, Jeroen van; Osterhoff, Jens; Esarey, Eric; Toth, Csaba; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-15

    Laser plasma accelerators have produced high-quality electron beams with GeV energies from cm-scale devices and are being investigated as hyperspectral fs light sources producing THz to {gamma}-ray radiation and as drivers for future high-energy colliders. These applications require a high degree of stability, beam quality and tunability. Here we report on a technique to inject electrons into the accelerating field of a laser-driven plasma wave and coupling of this injector to a lower-density, separately tunable plasma for further acceleration. The technique relies on a single laser pulse powering a plasma structure with a tailored longitudinal density profile, to produce beams that can be tuned in the range of 100-400 MeV with percent-level stability, using laser pulses of less than 40 TW. The resulting device is a simple stand-alone accelerator or the front end for a multistage higher-energy accelerator.

  6. A Novel Spectrometer for Measuring Laser-Produced Plasma X-Ray in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Gang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the experimental investigations of inertial confinement fusion, the laser-produced high-temperature plasma contains very abundant information, such as the electron temperature and density, ionization. In order to diagnose laser-plasma distribution in space and evolution in time, an elliptical curved crystal spectrometer has been developed and applied to diagnose X-ray of laser-produced plasma in 0.2~2.46 nm region. According to the theory of Bragg diffraction, four kinds of crystal including LiF, PET, MiCa, and KAP were chosen as dispersive elements. The distance of crystal lattice varies from 0.4 to 2.6 nm. Bragg angle is in the range of 30°~67.5°, and the spectral detection angle is in 55.4°~134°. The curved crystal spectrometer mainly consists of elliptical curved crystal analyzer, vacuum configuration, aligning device, spectral detectors and three-dimensional microadjustment devices. The spectrographic experiment was carried out on the XG-2 laser facility. Emission spectrum of Al plasmas, Ti plasma, and Au plasmas have been successfully recorded by using X-ray CCD camera. It is demonstrated experimentally that the measured wavelength is accorded with the theoretical value.

  7. [Enhancing effect of sample additive on laser-induced plasma radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin-Jing; Chen, Jin-Zhong; Yang, Shao-Peng; Wei, Yan-Hong; Guo, Qing-Lin

    2010-05-01

    In order to improve the radiation characteristic of laser-induced plasma, with the national standard soil taken as the target sample, a laser spectrum analytical system which composed of a high-energy neodymium glass laser, a multifunctional and compact integrated spectrometer, and a CCD detector was used to detect the influence of the NaCl sample additive on the laser plasma radiation intensity. The electron temperature and the electron density of the plasmas were also calculated from the lines intensity and stark broadening of emission spectral line respectively. The experimental results indicated that with the increase in the NaCl additive, the spectral intensity, signal-to-background ratio, the electron temperature, and the electron density all went up firstly and then down. When 15% NaCl was added, the radiation intensity of the plasma reached the maximum value, the spectral lines intensity of element Mn, K, Fe, and Ti increased by 39.2%, 42.5%, 53.9% and 33.8% compared to that without additive respectively, the spectral signal-to-background ratio increased by 64.4%, 84.39, 44.55% and 58.2% respectively, while the electron temperature and the electron density of the plasmas were heightened by 0.17 times and 0.36 times respectively.

  8. Plasma Injection Schemes for Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    OpenAIRE

    Faure, J.

    2017-01-01

    Plasma injection schemes are crucial for producing high-quality electron beams in laser–plasma accelerators. This article introduces the general concepts of plasma injection. First, a Hamiltonian model for particle trapping and acceleration in plasma waves is introduced; ionization injection and colliding-pulse injection are described in the framework of this Hamiltonian model. We then proceed to consider injection in plasma density gradients.

  9. Features of active-medium formation for lasers with a sectioned plasma source of metal vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apollonov, V.V.; Derzhavin, S.I.; Prokhorov, A.M.; Sirotkin, A.A.

    1988-06-01

    Experimental results are presented on active-medium formation mechanisms in a laser with a sectioned plasma source of metal vapor (a SPER laser). The following processes were observed in the laser active medium: buffer-gas preionization; mixing of metal vapor and buffer gas during plasma expansion; plasma-chemical reactions in the expanding plasma; and a collisional mechanism of plasma cooling.

  10. Radial variation of refractive index, plasma frequency and phase velocity in laser induced air plasma

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mathuthu, M

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available induced air plasma to study the spatial variation of plasma parameters in the axial direction of the laser beam. In this paper, the authors report investigation on the radial variation of the refractive index, plasma frequency, and phase velocity of a...

  11. Nanostructured surfaces for nuclear astrophysics studies in laser-plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altana, Carmen; Amarù, Vincenzo; Castro, Giuseppe; Frassetto, Marco; Lanzalone, Gaetano; Malferrari, Luciana; Mascali, David; Muoio, Annamaria; Odorici, Fabrizio; Tudisco, Salvo

    2018-01-01

    The future availability of high-intensity laser facilities capable of delivering tens of petawatts of power (e.g. ELI-NP) into small volumes of matter at high repetition rates will give the unique opportunity to investigate nuclear reactions and fundamental interactions process under extreme plasma conditions [1]. In this context, use of targets with nanostructured surfaces is giving promising indications to reproduce plasma conditions suitable for measurements of thermonuclear reactions rates, in the domain of nanosecond laser pulses.

  12. The interaction of high-power lasers with plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliezer, S

    2003-02-12

    This book deals with the fundamental physics of numerous plasma processes that occur during laser plasma interactions. The subject matter is related to both basic plasma physics and applied physics. The author starts with the essentials of high power lasers whose duration ranges from nanoseconds to femtoseconds, and then builds up an introduction to plasma physics by describing ionization, well known transport coefficients (electrical and thermal conductivities, diffusion, viscosity, energy transport etc), Debye length, plasma oscillations and the properties of the laser induced plasma medium. The book contains plasma dynamical equations for describing the hydrodynamic and kinetic phenomena, and treating particle dynamics by computer simulation. The ponderomotive force is discussed for small amplitude electromagnetic fields in an unmagnetized plasma. However, for intense laser beams one should obtain new expressions for the relativistic ponderomotive force, which are totally absent from this book. Furthermore, in laser plasma interactions strong magnetic fields are produced which will drastically modify the relativistic ponderomotive force expressions. The physics of collisional absorption of electromagnetic waves and their propagation in a nonuniform unmagnetized plasma has been elegantly described. The phenomena of the resonance absorption of laser light is also discussed. Simple models for the parametric processes are developed, while there are no discussions of cavitons/envelope solitons. The latter are usually regarded as possible nonlinear states of the modulational/filamentational instabilities. Rather, the author presents a description of a K-dV equation for nonlinear ion-acoustic waves without the laser field. The description of a non-envelope ion-acoustic soliton has already appeared in many plasma physics textbooks. The book contains a short chapter on the self-similar plasma expansion in vacuum, double layers, and charged particle acceleration. However

  13. Charging and plasma effects under ultrashort pulsed laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgakova, N. M.; Bulgakov, A. V.; Zhukov, V. P.; Marine, W.; Vorobyev, A. Y.; Guo, Chunlei

    2008-05-01

    Based on experiments and a theoretical analysis, we raise questions on two fundamental mechanisms of femtosecond laser desorption/ablation of solids, namely Coulomb explosion (CE) and plasma etching. The effects of laser-induced ionization and surface charging are analyzed which can be responsible for ultrafast ions observed in time-of-flight mass-spectra under ultrashort laser irradiation of solids. The importance of surface charging in formation of velocity distributions of desorbed/ablated species has been revealed for conditions when the CE mechanism is inhibited. The influence of ambient plasma formation on the dynamics of heating of metallic targets by femtosecond laser pulses is studied based on 2D modeling of laser-induced target heating and dynamics of the ambient plasma. The calculations show an intriguing picture of the laser-induced ambient gas motion. We propose a model of laser-induced breakdown of an ambient gas in a region in front of the irradiated target and analyze plasma-chemical processes which can affect laser processing of surfaces in the presence of air or highly reactive media.

  14. Low temperature plasma biomedicine: A tutorial reviewa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, David B.

    2014-08-01

    Gas discharge plasmas formed at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature have recently been shown to be potentially useful for surface and wound sterilization, antisepsis, bleeding cessation, wound healing, and cancer treatment, among other biomedical applications. This tutorial review summarizes the field, stressing the likely role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species created in these plasmas as the biologically and therapeutically active agents. Reactive species, including radicals and non-radical compounds, are generated naturally within the body and are now understood to be essential for normal biological functions. These species are known to be active agents in existing therapies for wound healing, infection control, and cancer treatment. But they are also observed at elevated levels in persons with many diseases and are associated with aging. The physical and chemical complexity of plasma medical devices and their associated biochemical effects makes the development of safe, effective plasma medical devices and procedures a challenge, but encouragingly rapid progress has been reported around the world in the last several years.

  15. Plasma wave undulator for laser-accelerated electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Corde, S; 10.1063/1.3569827

    2011-01-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators have become compact sources of ultrashort electron bunches at energies up to the gigaelectronvolt range thanks to the remarkable progress made over the past decade. A direct application of these electron bunches is the production of short pulse x-ray radiation sources. In this letter, we study a fully optically driven x-ray source based on the combination of a laser-plasma accelerator and a plasma wave undulator. The longitudinal electric field of a laser-generated plasma wave is used to wiggle electrons transversally. The period of this plasma undulator being equal to the plasma wavelength, tunable photon energies in the 10 keV range can be achieved with electron energies in the 100-200 MeV range. Considering a 10s TW class femtosecond laser system, undulators with a strength parameter K~0.5 and with about ten periods can be combined with a laser-plasma accelerator, resulting in several 10^-2 emitted x-ray photons per electron.

  16. Optical guiding of laser beam in nonuniform plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A plasma channel produced by a short ionising laser pulse is axially nonuniform re- sulting from the self-defocusing. Through such preformed plasma channel, when a delayed pulse propagates, the phenomena of diffraction, refraction and self-phase modulation come into play. We have solved the nonlinear ...

  17. High-order harmonic generation in laser plasma: Recent achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeev, R. A.

    2012-07-01

    Recent studies of high-order harmonic generation of laser radiation in laser-produced plasma show new attractive developments in this field. Those include generation of extended harmonics in plasma plumes, new approaches in application of two-color pump, generation of extremely broadened harmonics, further developments in harmonic generation in clusters (fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, in-situ produced nanoparticles), destructive interference of harmonics from different emitters, resonance-induced enhancement of harmonics, applications of high pulse repetition rate lasers for the enhancement of average power of generating harmonics, observation of quantum path signatures, etc. We review some of these recent developments.

  18. On a theory of stimulated scattering in laser plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skoric, M.M.

    1987-02-01

    A linear parametric theory of laser light instabilities including decay, stimulated Raman and Brillouin scattering, etc. is currently well developed. However, attention is drawn to a novel laser light instability against parametric excitation of magneto-static fluctuations. In a collisionless plasma regime, magnetostatic fields are driven by the ponderomotive electron magnetization current. Generally, two types of magneto-static instabilities exist: magneto-modulational instability and stimulated magneto-static scattering instability. Growth rates are calculated which indicate the possible importance for high laser intensity driven hot plasma regimes.

  19. Interaction physics of multipicosecond Petawatt laser pulses with overdense plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, A J; Divol, L

    2012-11-09

    We study the interaction of intense petawatt laser pulses with overdense plasma over several picoseconds, using two- and three-dimensional kinetic particle simulations. Sustained irradiation with non-diffraction-limited pulses at relativistic intensities yields conditions that differ qualitatively from what is experimentally available today. Nonlinear saturation of laser-driven density perturbations at the target surface causes recurrent emissions of plasma, which stabilize the surface and keep absorption continuously high. This dynamics leads to the acceleration of three distinct groups of electrons up to energies many times the laser ponderomotive potential. We discuss their energy distribution for applications like the fast-ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion.

  20. Summary Report of Working Group 1: Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geddes, C.G.R.; Clayton, C.; Lu, W.; Thomas, A.G.R.

    2010-06-01

    Advances in and physics of the acceleration of particles using underdense plasma structures driven by lasers were the topics of presentations and discussions in Working Group 1 of the 2010 Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop. Such accelerators have demonstrated gradients several orders beyond conventional machines, with quasi-monoenergetic beams at MeV-GeV energies, making them attractive candidates for next generation accelerators. Workshop discussions included advances in control over injection and laser propagation to further improve beam quality and stability, detailed diagnostics and physics models of the acceleration process, radiation generation as a source and diagnostic, and technological tools and upcoming facilities to extend the reach of laser-plasma accelerators.

  1. Dependence of laser-induced fluorescence on exciting-laser power: partial saturation and laser - plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voráč, Jan; Dvořák, Pavel; Procházka, Vojtěch; Morávek, Tomas; Ráhel, Jozef

    2015-08-01

    In recent publications on laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), the measurements are usually constricted to the region of weak exciting-laser power - the so called linear LIF. In this work, a practical formula describing the dependence of partially saturated fluorescence on the exciting-laser power is derived, together with practical implementation suggestions and comments on its limitations. In the conclusion, the practical formula F({E}_L)= {α{E}_L}/{1+β {E}_L} is proposed with the limitation for validity β EL ≤ 0.4, where α EL is the hypothetical linear fluorescence without saturation effects, and a more general formula is derived, which is valid for higher values of α EL as well. Extending the range of exciting laser power to the region of partial saturation enhances the signal-to-noise ratio. Such measurements in a surface dielectric barrier discharge further reveal discharge disruption by photoelectrons emitted from the dielectric surface. Methods of control and solution of this problem are discussed. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  2. Diagnostics of Particles emitted from a Laser generated Plasma: Experimental Data and Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa Giuseppe

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The charge particle emission form laser-generated plasma was studied experimentally and theoretically using the COMSOL simulation code. The particle acceleration was investigated using two lasers at two different regimes. A Nd:YAG laser, with 3 ns pulse duration and 1010 W/cm2 intensity, when focused on solid target produces a non-equilibrium plasma with average temperature of about 30-50 eV. An Iodine laser with 300 ps pulse duration and 1016 W/cm2 intensity produces plasmas with average temperatures of the order of tens keV. In both cases charge separation occurs and ions and electrons are accelerated at energies of the order of 200 eV and 1 MeV per charge state in the two cases, respectively. The simulation program permits to plot the charge particle trajectories from plasma source in vacuum indicating how they can be deflected by magnetic and electrical fields. The simulation code can be employed to realize suitable permanent magnets and solenoids to deflect ions toward a secondary target or detectors, to focalize ions and electrons, to realize electron traps able to provide significant ion acceleration and to realize efficient spectrometers. In particular it was applied to the study two Thomson parabola spectrometers able to detect ions at low and at high laser intensities. The comparisons between measurements and simulation is presented and discussed.

  3. Analysis, simulation, and experimental studies of YAG and CO2 laser-produced plasma for EUV lithography sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanein, A.; Sizyuk, V.; Harilal, S. S.; Sizyuk, T.

    2010-04-01

    Efficient laser systems are essential for the realization of high volume manufacturing in extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL). Solid-state Nd:YAG lasers usually have lower efficiency and source suppliers are alternatively investigating the use of high power CO2 laser systems. However, CO2 laser-produced plasmas (LPP) have specific characteristics and features that should be taken into account when considering them as the light source for EUVL. The analysis of recent experimental and theoretical work showed significant differences in the properties of plasma plumes produced by CO2 and the Nd:YAG lasers including EUV radiation emission, source formation, debris generation, and conversion efficiency. The much higher reflectivity of CO2 laser from liquid, vapor, and plasma of a tin target results in the production of optically thinner plumes with higher velocity and in a better formation of plasma properties (temperature and density values) towards more efficient EUV source. However, the spikes in the temporal profiles of current CO2 laser will additionally affect the properties of the produced plasma. We have developed unique combination of state-of-the-art experimental facilities (CMUXE Laboratory) and advanced computer simulation (HEIGHTS) package for studying and optimizing various lasers, discharge produced plasmas (DPP), and target parameters as well as the optical collection system regarding EUV lithography. In this work, detailed characteristics of plasmas produced by CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers were analyzed and compared both experimentally and theoretically for optimizing EUV from LPP sources. The details of lower overheating of plasma produced by CO2 laser are given with time and explain how to utilize the high reflectivity of such lasers in plasmas produced in different target geometries to significantly enhance the conversion efficiency of EUV radiation.

  4. Enhancement mechanism of femtosecond double-pulse laser-induced Cu plasma spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dan; Chen, Anmin; Wang, Xiaowei; Li, Suyu; Wang, Ying; Sui, Laizhi; Jiang, Yuanfei; Jin, Mingxing

    2017-11-01

    A dual-wavelength femtosecond double-pulse laser is used to induce the Cu plasma spectroscopy in air. The laser wavelengths are a fundamental wavelength (800 nm) and a second harmonic wavelength (400 nm) from Ti:sapphire laser. The inter-pulse delay of double-pulse is from -300 ps to 160 ps. The observed spectral intensity is dependent on the inter-pulse delay of the dual-wavelength femtosecond double-pulse. We analyze the characteristics of the plasma temperature and the electron number density on the inter-pulse delay of double-pulse with two different wavelengths. For 800 nm + 400 nm, the spectral emission enhancement is based on more material ablation. For 400 nm + 800 nm, the enhanced mechanism is plasma reheating effect. This study will provide a better way to understand the mechanism of femtosecond double-pulse LIBS.

  5. Interaction of nanosecond ultraviolet laser pulses with reactive dusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetering, F. M. J. H. van de; Oosterbeek, W.; Beckers, J.; Nijdam, S. [Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Gibert, T.; Mikikian, M.; Rabat, H.; Kovačević, E.; Berndt, J. [GREMI, UMR7344, CNRS & Université d' Orléans, Orléans (France)

    2016-05-23

    Even though UV laser pulses that irradiate a gas discharge are small compared to the plasma volume (≲3%) and plasma-on time (≲6 × 10{sup −6}%), they are found to dramatically change the discharge characteristics on a global scale. The reactive argon–acetylene plasma allows the growth of nanoparticles with diameters up to 1 μm, which are formed inside the discharge volume due to spontaneous polymerization reactions. It is found that the laser pulses predominantly accelerate and enhance the coagulation phase and are able to suppress the formation of a dust void.

  6. Plasma high-order-harmonic generation from ultraintense laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Suo; Kumar, Naveen; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2017-05-01

    Plasma high-order-harmonic generation from an extremely intense short-pulse laser is explored by including the effects of ion motion, electron-ion collisions, and radiation reaction force in the plasma dynamics. The laser radiation pressure induces plasma ion motion through the hole-boring effect, resulting in frequency shifting and widening of the harmonic spectra. The classical radiation reaction force slightly mitigates the frequency broadening caused by the ion motion. Based on the results and physical considerations, parameter maps highlighting the optimum regions for generating a single intense attosecond pulse and coherent XUV radiation are presented.

  7. Ion emission in collisions between two laser-produced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, P.; Hayden, P.; Fallon, C.; Kelly, T. J.; McLoughin, C.; Yeates, P.; Mosnier, J. P.; Kennedy, E. T.; Harilal, S. S.; Costello, J. T.

    2011-09-01

    Measurements of the total ion emission from a pair of colliding laser-produced aluminium plasmas were obtained with the aid of a Faraday cup detector. The energy profile width at half height of the kinetic energy distribution for ions emitted normal to the target was found to be 30% narrower for colliding plasmas compared with a single plasma. Similar to ion emission from single plumes, the mean ion kinetic energy is observed to increase with the energy of the incident laser pulse. However, the width of the ion energy distribution increases at a significantly slower rate than in the single plume case.

  8. Colliding laser produced plasmas as novel sources: Optical diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hough, P; McLoughlin, C; Kelly, T J; Hayden, P; Mosnier, J P; Costello, J T [National Centre for Plasma Science and Technology and School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Harilal, S, E-mail: padraighough@gmail.co [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Drive, West Lafayette, IN 40707 (United States)

    2009-11-01

    We have developed a new laboratory facility to investigate and explore the potential applications of colliding laser produced plasmas. Specifically we have employed optical diagnostics such as laser interferometry, spectrally resolved fast photography and optical emission spectroscopy to investigate the dynamics of the collisions between electrons, atoms and ions. Very different collisional behaviors are observed for the different plasma constituents. We present first results on work aimed at exploiting the stagnation layer created at the collision front between the two plasmas as a new optimised source of nano-particles/clusters. A substantial increase in nano-particle deposition is observed with the presence of the stagnation layer.

  9. Ion emission in collisions between two laser-produced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hough, P; Hayden, P; Fallon, C; Kelly, T J; McLoughin, C; Yeates, P; Mosnier, J P; Kennedy, E T; Costello, J T [School of Physical Sciences and National Centre for Plasma Science and Technology (NCPST), Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Harilal, S S, E-mail: padraighough@gmail.com, E-mail: Patrick.Hayden@dcu.ie [School of Nuclear Engineering and Center for Materials under Extreme Environment, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2011-09-07

    Measurements of the total ion emission from a pair of colliding laser-produced aluminium plasmas were obtained with the aid of a Faraday cup detector. The energy profile width at half height of the kinetic energy distribution for ions emitted normal to the target was found to be 30% narrower for colliding plasmas compared with a single plasma. Similar to ion emission from single plumes, the mean ion kinetic energy is observed to increase with the energy of the incident laser pulse. However, the width of the ion energy distribution increases at a significantly slower rate than in the single plume case.

  10. Spectroscopic measurements of the density and electronic temperature at the plasma edge in Tore Supra; Mesures spectroscopiques de la densite et de la temperature electronique au bord du plasma dans Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lediankine, A

    1996-09-30

    The profiles of temperature and electronic density at the plasma edge are important to study the wall-plasma interaction and the radiative layers in the Tokamak plasmas. The laser ablation technique of the lithium allows to measure the profile of electronic density. To measure the profile of temperature, it has been used for the first time, the injection of a fluorine neutral atoms beam. The experiments, the results are described in this work. (N.C.)

  11. Spatial and temporal variations of electron temperatures and densities from EUV-emitting lithium plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coons, R W; Harilal, S S; Polek, M; Hassanein, A

    2011-07-01

    Planar slabs of pure Li were irradiated with 1.064 nm, 6 ns Nd:YAG laser pulses. Determination of plasma densities at both the earliest times of plasma formation and near the target surface was performed using Nomarski interferometry. The plasma parameters at later times were evaluated using optical emission spectroscopy. The space- and time-dependent electron densities and temperatures of the plasma were determined from their Stark broadening and the relative intensities of the spectral lines, respectively. The advantages and disadvantages of both of these techniques are evaluated and discussed.

  12. PW-class laser-driven super acceleration systems in underdense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Masahiro; Zhidkov, Alexei; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2017-10-01

    Probing laser driven super-acceleration systems can be important tool to understand physics related to vacuum, space time, and particle acceleration. We show two proposals to probe the systems through Hawking-like effect using PW class lasers and x-ray free electron lasers. For that we study the interaction of ultrahigh intense laser pulses with intensity 1022 -1024 W/cm2 and underdense plasmas including ion motion and plasma radiation for the first time. While the acceleration w a0ωp /ωL in a wake is not maximal, the pulse propagation is much stable. The effect is that a constantly accelerated detector with acceleration w sees a boson's thermal bath at temperature ℏw / 2 πkB c . We present two designs for x-ray scattering from highly accelerated electrons produced in the plasma irradiated by intense laser pulses for such detection. Properly chosen observation angles enable us to distinguish spectral broadening from Doppler shift with a reasonable photon number. Also, ion motion and radiation damping on the interaction are investigated via fully relativistic 3D particle-in-cell simulation. We observe high quality electron bunches under super-acceleration when transverse plasma waves are excited by ponderomotive force producing plasma channel.

  13. Influence of target structure on laser plasma generation efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loktionov, E.; Telekh, V.

    2017-11-01

    Spatial restrictions on heat transfer imposed in foil and sintered powder titanium targets have resulted in sufficient increase of efficiency of laser plasma generation as compared to bulk Ti targets. Especially at low laser fluences, where target material input in plasma is higher than ambient air’s. Also, the pattern of momentum coupling coefficient C m dependency on laser fluence F has changed from convex to concave. Minimum difference in C m values for bulk and foil targets was 1.68 times, maximum – 1.5 orders of magnitude (always higher for foil). At the impact on sintered porous targets momentum coupling coefficient was lower than for foil, but normalised by mass density, the results were about equal. To our mind, obtained results show that suppression of heat dissipation in porous targets can be same efficient as in foils, but with more benefits for feeding systems and energy efficiency of laser plasma generators.

  14. Plasma channel diagnostic based on laser centroid oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonsalves, A. J.; Nakamura, K.; Lin, C.; Osterhoff, J.; Shiraishi, S.; Schroeder, C. B.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Tóth, Cs.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-05-01

    A technique has been developed for measuring the properties of discharge-based plasma channels by monitoring the centroid location of a laser beam exiting the channel as a function of input alignment offset between the laser and the channel. Experiments were performed using low-intensity (<1014 Wcm-2) laser pulses focused onto the entrance of a hydrogen-filled capillary discharge waveguide. Scanning the laser centroid position at the input of the channel and recording the exit position allows determination of the channel depth with an accuracy of a few percent, measurement of the transverse channel shape, and inference of the matched spot size. In addition, accurate alignment of the laser beam through the plasma channel is provided by minimizing laser centroid motion at the channel exit as the channel depth is scanned either by scanning the plasma density or the discharge timing. The improvement in alignment accuracy provided by this technique will be crucial for minimizing electron beam pointing errors in laser plasma accelerators.

  15. Experimental plasma astrophysics using a T{sup 3} (Table-top Terawatt) laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajima, T.

    1996-11-01

    Lasers that can deliver immense power of Terawatt (10{sup 12}W) and can still compactly sit on a Table-Top (T{sup 3} lasers) emerged in the 1990s. The advent of these lasers allows us to access to regimes of astronomical physical conditions that once thought impossible to realize in a terrestrial laboratory. We touch on examples that include superhigh pressure materials that may resemble the interior of giant planets and white dwarfs and of relativistic temperature plasmas that may exist in the early cosmological epoch and in the neighborhood of the blackhole event horizon.

  16. Temporal behavior of neutral and ionic lines emitted from a laser induced plasma on an aqueous surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, J. Ben; Jaïdane, N.

    2009-05-01

    The temporal behavior of spectral lines emitted from a laser induced plasma has been studied. The plasma was created by using a Nd:YAG pulsed laser in air at atmospheric pressure focused on the surface of an aqueous solution. This work is an extension of previous published work [J. Ben Ahmed, Z. Ben Lakhdar, G. Taieb, Kinetics of laser induced plasma on an aqueous surface, Laser chem. 20 (2002) 123-134.]. The time evolution of lines intensities emitted from Ca, Ca +, Mg and Mg + has been experimentally observed and simulated using a simple theoretical approach based on electron-ion recombination. It was shown that the plasma temperature and electron density are correlated to the dynamics of plasma emission. Finally, the time evolution of the optical depth of Ca + resonance line at 393.4 nm was also studied.

  17. Temporal behavior of neutral and ionic lines emitted from a laser induced plasma on an aqueous surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Ahmed, J. [Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Atomique, Moleculaire et Applications, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia)], E-mail: jbenahmed@yahoo.fr; Jaidane, N. [Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Atomique, Moleculaire et Applications, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia)

    2009-05-15

    The temporal behavior of spectral lines emitted from a laser induced plasma has been studied. The plasma was created by using a Nd:YAG pulsed laser in air at atmospheric pressure focused on the surface of an aqueous solution. This work is an extension of previous published work [J. Ben Ahmed, Z. Ben Lakhdar, G. Taieb, Kinetics of laser induced plasma on an aqueous surface, Laser chem. 20 (2002) 123-134.]. The time evolution of lines intensities emitted from Ca, Ca{sup +}, Mg and Mg{sup +} has been experimentally observed and simulated using a simple theoretical approach based on electron-ion recombination. It was shown that the plasma temperature and electron density are correlated to the dynamics of plasma emission. Finally, the time evolution of the optical depth of Ca{sup +} resonance line at 393.4 nm was also studied.

  18. Thomson parabola spectrometry for gold laser-generated plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.; Ando, L. [Physics Department of Messina University, V.le F. S. D' Alcontres 31, 9816 S. Agata (Italy); Ullschmied, J. [Institute of Physics, ASCR, v.v.i., 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2013-02-15

    The plasma generated from thin gold films irradiated in high vacuum at high intensity ({approx}10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}) laser shot is characterized in terms of ion generation through time-of-flight techniques and Thomson parabola spectrometry. Gold ions and protons, accelerated in forward direction by the electric field developed in non-equilibrium plasma, have been investigated. Measurements, performed at PALS laboratory, give information about the gold charge states distributions, the ion energy distributions and the proton acceleration driven as a function of film thickness, laser parameters, and angular emission. The ion diagnostics of produced plasma in forward direction permits to understand some mechanisms developed during its expansion kinetics. The role of the focal position of a laser beam with respect to the target surface, plasma properties, and the possibility to accelerate protons up to energies above 3 MeV has been presented and discussed.

  19. Thomson parabola spectrometry for gold laser-generated plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.; Andò, L.; Ullschmied, J.

    2013-02-01

    The plasma generated from thin gold films irradiated in high vacuum at high intensity (˜1015 W/cm2) laser shot is characterized in terms of ion generation through time-of-flight techniques and Thomson parabola spectrometry. Gold ions and protons, accelerated in forward direction by the electric field developed in non-equilibrium plasma, have been investigated. Measurements, performed at PALS laboratory, give information about the gold charge states distributions, the ion energy distributions and the proton acceleration driven as a function of film thickness, laser parameters, and angular emission. The ion diagnostics of produced plasma in forward direction permits to understand some mechanisms developed during its expansion kinetics. The role of the focal position of a laser beam with respect to the target surface, plasma properties, and the possibility to accelerate protons up to energies above 3 MeV has been presented and discussed.

  20. [Effects of laser shot frequency on plasma radiation characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin-Zhong; Bai, Jin-Ning; Song, Guang-Ju; Sun, Jiang; Deng, Ze-Chao; Wang, Ying-Long

    2012-11-01

    To improve the quality of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, nanosecond pulse laser generated by Nd:YAG laser was used to excite soil sample. The intensity and signal-to-background ratio of A1 I 394.401 nm, Ba I 455.403 nm, Fe I 430.791 nm and Ti I 498.173 nm were observed using a grating spectrometer and a photoelectric detection system. The effects of laser shot frequency (5, 10 and 15 Hz)on the radiation characteristics of laser-induced plasma was studied. The experimental results show that as compared with the laser shot frequency of 5 Hz, the spectral line intensity of A1, Ba, Fe and Ti increased by about 50.94%, 112.7%, 107.46%, and 99.38% at 15 Hz respectively under the same laser energy, while the spectral signal-to-background ratio increased by about 15.16%, 24.08%, 40.26% and 72.06% respectively. The effects mechanism of the laser shot frequency on radiation characteristics of plasma is explained by measuring plasma parameters.

  1. Femtosecond x rays from laser-plasma accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Corde, S; Beck, A; Lambert, G; Fitour, R; Lefebvre, E; Malka, V; Rousse, A; 10.1103/RevModPhys.85.1

    2013-01-01

    Relativistic interaction of short-pulse lasers with underdense plasmas has recently led to the emergence of a novel generation of femtosecond x-ray sources. Based on radiation from electrons accelerated in plasma, these sources have the common properties to be compact and to deliver collimated, incoherent and femtosecond radiation. In this article we review, within a unified formalism, the betatron radiation of trapped and accelerated electrons in the so-called bubble regime, the synchrotron radiation of laser-accelerated electrons in usual meter-scale undulators, the nonlinear Thomson scattering from relativistic electrons oscillating in an intense laser field, and the Thomson backscattered radiation of a laser beam by laser-accelerated electrons. The underlying physics is presented using ideal models, the relevant parameters are defined, and analytical expressions providing the features of the sources are given. Numerical simulations and a summary of recent experimental results on the different mechanisms a...

  2. Transient Plasma Photonic Crystals for High-Power Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, G; Spatschek, K H

    2016-06-03

    A new type of transient photonic crystals for high-power lasers is presented. The crystal is produced by counterpropagating laser beams in plasma. Trapped electrons and electrically forced ions generate a strong density grating. The lifetime of the transient photonic crystal is determined by the ballistic motion of ions. The robustness of the photonic crystal allows one to manipulate high-intensity laser pulses. The scheme of the crystal is analyzed here by 1D Vlasov simulations. Reflection or transmission of high-power laser pulses are predicted by particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that a transient plasma photonic crystal may act as a tunable mirror for intense laser pulses. Generalizations to 2D and 3D configurations are possible.

  3. Ultra-High Energy Density Relativistic Plasmas by Ultrafast Laser Irradiation of Aligned Nanowire Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, J. J.; Purvis, M. A.; Shlyaptsev, V. N.; Hollinger, R. C.; Bargsten, C.; Pukhov, A.; Keiss, D.; Townsend, A.; Prieto, A.; Wang, Y.; Yin, L.; Wang, S.; Luther, B.; Woolston, M.

    2013-10-01

    Long-lived plasmas that are simultaneously dense and hot (multi-keV) have been created by spherical compression with the world's largest lasers, and by supersonic heating of volumes with densities on the order of Nec using multi-kJ lasers pulses. We demonstrate volumetric heating of near-solid density plasmas to keV temperatures using ultra-high contrast λ = 400 nm femtosecond laser pulses of only 0.5 J energy to irradiate arrays of vertically aligned nanowires with 12% average solid density. X-ray spectra show that irradiation of Ni and Au nanowires arrays with relativistic intensities ionizes plasma volumes several micrometers in depth to the He-like and Co-like (Au 52 +) stages respectively. He- α line emission greatly exceeds that of the Ni K α line. This volumetric plasma heating approach creates a new laboratory plasma regime in which extreme plasma parameters can be accessed with table-top lasers. The increased hydrodynamic-to-radiative lifetime ratio is responsible for a great increase in the x-ray emission. Work supported by Defense Threat Reduction Agency grant HDTRA-1-10-1-0079 and by the HEDLP program of the Office of Science of the U.S Department of Energy. Equipment developed under NSF grant MRI-ARRA 09-561. A.P was supported by DFG-funded project TR18.

  4. Effect of solenoidal magnetic field on drifting laser plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Kazumasa; Sekine, Megumi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Okamura, Masahiro [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States) and RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (United States); Cushing, Eric [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Jandovitz, Peter [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2013-04-19

    An ion source for accelerators requires to provide a stable waveform with a certain pulse length appropriate to the application. The pulse length of laser ion source is easy to control because it is expected to be proportional to plasma drifting distance. However, current density decay is proportional to the cube of the drifting distance, so large current loss will occur under unconfined drift. We investigated the stability and current decay of a Nd:YAG laser generated copper plasma confined by a solenoidal field using a Faraday cup to measure the current waveform. It was found that the plasma was unstable at certain magnetic field strengths, so a baffle was introduced to limit the plasma diameter at injection and improve the stability. Magnetic field, solenoid length, and plasma diameter were varied in order to find the conditions that minimize current decay and maximize stability.

  5. Staging and laser acceleration of ions in underdense plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Antonio; Hafizi, Bahman; Helle, Michael; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Gordon, Daniel; Kaganovich, Dmitri; Polyanskiy, Mikhail; Pogorelsky, Igor; Babzien, Markus; Miao, Chenlong; Dover, Nicholas; Najmudin, Zulfikar; Ettlinger, Oliver

    2017-03-01

    Accelerating ions from rest in a plasma requires extra considerations because of their heavy mass. Low phase velocity fields or quasi-electrostatic fields are often necessary, either by operating above or near the critical density or by applying other slow wave generating mechanisms. Solid targets have been a favorite and have generated many good results. High density gas targets have also been reported to produce energetic ions. It is interesting to consider acceleration of ions in laser-driven plasma configurations that will potentially allow continuous acceleration in multiple consecutive stages. The plasma will be derived from gaseous targets, producing plasma densities slightly below the critical plasma density (underdense) for the driving laser. Such a plasma is experimentally robust, being repeatable and relatively transparent to externally injected ions from a previous stage. When optimized, multiple stages of this underdense laser plasma acceleration mechanism can progressively accelerate the ions to a high final energy. For a light mass ion such as the proton, relativistic velocities could be reached, making it suitable for further acceleration by high phase velocity plasma accelerators to energies appropriate for High Energy Physics applications. Negatively charged ions such as antiprotons could be similarly accelerated in this multi-staged ion acceleration scheme.

  6. Laser-generated plasma by carbon nanoparticles embedded into polyethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrisi, L., E-mail: lorenzo.torrisi@unime.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche MIFT, Università di Messina, V.le F.S. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); Ceccio, G. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche MIFT, Università di Messina, V.le F.S. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); Cutroneo, M. [Nuclear Physics Institute, AS CR, 25068 Rez (Czech Republic)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Advanced targets are prepared using UHMWPE containing CNT at different concentrations. • The composite has different optical, mechanical, electrical and compositional properties with respect to polyethylene. • Higher ion accelerations with respect to the pure polyethylene are obtained from laser generated plasmas at 10{sup 10} W/cm{sup 2} intensity. • High carbon ion yields with respect to the pure polyethylene are obtained from laser generated plasmas at 10{sup 10} W/cm{sup 2} intensity. • Advanced targets were prepared to be irradiated in TNSA regime using laser at 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} intensity. - Abstract: Carbon nanoparticles have been embedded into polyethylene at different concentrations by using chemical–physical processes. The synthesized material was characterized in terms of physical modifications concerning the mechanical, compositional and optical properties. Obtained flat targets have been irradiated by Nd:YAG laser at intensities of the order of 10{sup 10} W/cm{sup 2} in order to generate non-equilibrium plasma in vacuum. The laser–matter interaction produces charge separation effects with consequent acceleration of protons and carbon ions. Plasma was characterized using time-of-flight measurements of the accelerated ions. Applications of the produced targets in order to generate carbon ion beams from laser-generated plasma are presented and discussed.

  7. Reflectivity of plasmas created by high-intensity, ultra-short laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gold, David Michael [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1994-06-01

    Experiments were performed to characterize the creation and evolution of high-temperature (T e~100eV), high-density (ne>1022cm-3) plasmas created with intense (~1012-1016W/cm2), ultra-short (130fs) laser pulses. The principle diagnostic was plasma reflectivity at optical wavelengths (614nm). An array of target materials (Al, Au, Si, SiO2) with widely differing electronic properties tested plasma behavior over a large set of initial states. Time-integrated plasma reflectivity was measured as a function of laser intensity. Space- and time-resolved reflectivity, transmission and scatter were measured with a spatial resolution of ~3μm and a temporal resolution of 130fs. An amplified, mode-locked dye laser system was designed to produce ~3.5mJ, ~130fs laser pulses to create and nonintrusively probe the plasmas. Laser prepulse was carefully controlled to suppress preionization and give unambiguous, high-density plasma results. In metals (Al and Au), it is shown analytically that linear and nonlinear inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption, resonance absorption, and vacuum heating explain time-integrated reflectivity at intensities near 1016W/cm2. In the insulator, SiO2, a non-equilibrium plasma reflectivity model using tunneling ionization, Helmholtz equations, and Drude conductivity agrees with time-integrated reflectivity measurements. Moreover, a comparison of ionization and Saha equilibration rates shows that plasma formed by intense, ultra-short pulses can exist with a transient, non-equilibrium distribution of ionization states. All targets are shown to approach a common reflectivity at intensities ~1016W/cm2, indicating a material-independent state insensitive to atomic or solid-state details.

  8. Development of plasma bolometers using fiber-optic temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinke, M. L.; Han, M.; Liu, G.; van Eden, G. G.; Evenblij, R.; Haverdings, M.; Stratton, B. C.

    2016-11-01

    Measurements of radiated power in magnetically confined plasmas are important for exhaust studies in present experiments and expected to be a critical diagnostic for future fusion reactors. Resistive bolometer sensors have long been utilized in tokamaks and helical devices but suffer from electromagnetic interference (EMI). Results are shown from initial testing of a new bolometer concept based on fiber-optic temperature sensor technology. A small, 80 μm diameter, 200 μm long silicon pillar attached to the end of a single mode fiber-optic cable acts as a Fabry-Pérot cavity when broadband light, λo ˜ 1550 nm, is transmitted along the fiber. Changes in temperature alter the optical path length of the cavity primarily through the thermo-optic effect, resulting in a shift of fringes reflected from the pillar detected using an I-MON 512 OEM spectrometer. While initially designed for use in liquids, this sensor has ideal properties for use as a plasma bolometer: a time constant, in air, of ˜150 ms, strong absorption in the spectral range of plasma emission, immunity to local EMI, and the ability to measure changes in temperature remotely. Its compact design offers unique opportunities for integration into the vacuum environment in places unsuitable for a resistive bolometer. Using a variable focus 5 mW, 405 nm, modulating laser, the signal to noise ratio versus power density of various bolometer technologies are directly compared, estimating the noise equivalent power density (NEPD). Present tests show the fiber-optic bolometer to have NEPD of 5-10 W/m2 when compared to those of the resistive bolometer which can achieve optic bolometer by reducing the pillar height and adding thin metallic coatings, along with improving the spectral resolution of the interrogator.

  9. [A comparative analysis of the passive electric probe detection and spectrum diagnosis of laser-induced plasma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tong; Yang, Li-Jun; Wang, Li-Jun; Wang, Lang-Ping

    2014-02-01

    An approach to detecting laser-induced plasma using passive probe was brought up. The plasma of laser welding was studied by using a synchronous electric and spectral information acquisition system, the laser-induced plasma was detected by a passive electric probe and fiber spectrometer, the electrical signal was analyzed on the basis of the theory of plasma sheath, and the temperature of laser-induced plasma was calculated by using the method of relative spectral intensity. The analysis results from electrical signal and spectral one were compared. Calculation results of three kinds of surface circumstances, which were respectively coated by KF, TiO2 and without coating, were compared. The factors affecting the detection accuracy were studied. The results indicated that the results calculated by passive probe matched that by spectral signal basically, and the accuracy was affected by ions mass of the plasma. The designed passive electric probe can be used to reflect the continuous fluctuation of electron temperature of the generated plasma, and monitor the laser-induced plasma.

  10. Laser-electron Compton interaction in plasma channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogorelsky, I.V.; Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Hirose, T. [Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan). Physics Dept.

    1998-10-01

    A concept of high intensity femtosecond laser synchrotron source (LSS) is based on Compton backscattering of focused electron and laser beams. The short Rayleigh length of the focused laser beam limits the length of interaction to a few picoseconds. However, the technology of the high repetition rate high-average power picosecond lasers required for high put through LSS applications is not developed yet. Another problem associated with the picosecond laser pulses is undesirable nonlinear effects occurring when the laser photons are concentrated in a short time interval. To avoid the nonlinear Compton scattering, the laser beam has to be split, and the required hard radiation flux is accumulated over a number of consecutive interactions that complicates the LSS design. In order to relieve the technological constraints and achieve a practically feasible high-power laser synchrotron source, the authors propose to confine the laser-electron interaction region in the extended plasma channel. This approach permits to use nanosecond laser pulses instead of the picosecond pulses. That helps to avoid the nonlinear Compton scattering regime and allows to utilize already existing technology of the high-repetition rate TEA CO{sub 2} lasers operating at the atmospheric pressure. They demonstrate the advantages of the channeled LSS approach by the example of the prospective polarized positron source for Japan Linear Collider.

  11. Imaging spectroscopy of polymer ablation plasmas for laser propulsion applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Long; Truscott, Benjamin S.; Liu, Hao; Ashfold, Michael N. R.; Ma, Honghao

    2017-01-01

    A number of polymers have been proposed for use as propellants in space launch and thruster applications based on laser ablation, although few prior studies have either evaluated their performance at background pressures representative of the upper atmosphere or investigated interactions with ambient gases other than air. Here, we use spatially and temporally resolved optical emission spectroscopy to compare three polymers, poly(ethylene), poly(oxymethylene), and glycidyl azide polymer, ablated using a 532 nm, nanosecond pulsed laser under Ar and O2 at pressures below 1 Torr. Emission lines from neutrally and positively charged atoms are observed in each case, along with the recombination radiation at the interaction front between the plasma plume and the background gas. C2 radicals arise either as a direct fragmentation product or by a three-body recombination of C atoms, depending on the structure of the polymer backbone, and exhibit a rotational temperature of ≈5000 K. The Sedov-Taylor point blast model is used to infer the energy release relative to the incident laser energy, which for all polymers is greater in the presence of O2, as to be expected based on their negative oxygen balance. Under Ar, plume confinement is seen to enhance the self-reactivity of the ejecta from poly(oxymethylene) and glycidyl azide polymer, with maximum exothermicity close to 0.5 Torr. However, little advantage of the latter, widely considered one of the most promising energetic polymers, is apparent under the present conditions over the former, a common engineering plastic.

  12. Two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; LaHaye, Nicole L.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-08-01

    We use a two-dimensional laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique to measure the coupled absorption and emission properties of atomic species in plasmas produced via laser ablation of solid aluminum targets at atmospheric pressure. Emission spectra from the Al I 394.4 nm and Al I 396.15 nm transitions are measured while a frequency-doubled, continuous-wave, Ti:Sapphire laser is tuned across the Al I 396.15 nm transition. The resulting two-dimensional spectra show the energy coupling between the two transitions via increased emission intensity for both transitions during resonant absorption of the continuous-wave laser at one transition. Time-delayed and gated detection of the emission spectrum is used to isolate the resonantly-excited fluorescence emission from the thermally-excited emission from the plasma. In addition, the tunable continuous-wave laser measures the absorption spectrum of the Al transition with ultra-high resolution after the plasma has cooled, resulting in narrower spectral linewidths than observed in emission spectra. Our results highlight that fluorescence spectroscopy employing continuous-wave laser re-excitation after pulsed laser ablation combines benefits of both traditional emission and absorption spectroscopic methods.

  13. Laser-plasma lens for laser-wakefield accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Lehe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to their compactness and unique properties, laser-wakefield accelerators are currently considered for several innovative applications. However, many of these applications—and especially those that require beam transport—are hindered by the large divergence of laser-accelerated beams. Here we propose a collimating concept that relies on the strong radial electric field of the laser-wakefield to reduce this divergence. This concept utilizes an additional gas jet, placed after the laser-wakefield accelerator. When the laser pulse propagates through this additional gas jet, it drives a wakefield which can refocus the trailing electron bunch. Particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate that this approach can reduce the divergence by at least a factor of 3 for realistic electron bunches.

  14. Investigating the laser heating of underdense plasmas at conditions relevant to MagLIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey-Thompson, Adam

    2015-11-01

    The magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) scheme has achieved thermonuclear fusion yields on Sandia's Z Facility by imploding a cylindrical liner filled with D2 fuel that is preheated with a multi-kJ laser and pre-magnetized with an axial field Bz = 10 T. The challenge of fuel preheating in MagLIF is to deposit several kJ's of energy into an underdense (ne/ncritdynamics of a MagLIF implosion and stagnation, but also to validate magnetized transport models and better understand the physics of laser propagation in magnetized plasmas. In this talk, we present data and analysis of several experiments conducted at OMEGA-EP and at Z to investigate laser propagation and plasma heating in underdense D2 plasmas under a range of conditions, including densities (ne = 0.05-0.1 nc) and magnetization parmaters (ωceτe ~ 0-10). The results show differences in the electron temperature of the heated plasma and the velocity of the laser burn wave with and without an applied magnetic field. We will show comparisons of these experimental results to 2D and 3D HYDRA simulations, which show that the effect of the magnetic field on the electron thermal conduction needs to be taken into account when modeling laser preheat. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  15. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Thresholds of surface plasma formation by the interaction of laser pulses with a metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borets-Pervak, I. Yu; Vorob'ev, V. S.

    1995-04-01

    An analysis is made of a model of the formation of a surface laser plasma which takes account of the heating and vaporisation of thermally insulated surface microdefects. This model is used in an interpretation of experiments in which such a plasma has been formed by irradiation of a titanium target with microsecond CO2 laser pulses. A comparison with the experimental breakdown intensities is used to calculate the average sizes of microdefects and their concentration: the results are in agreement with the published data. The dependence of the delay time of plasma formation on the total energy in a laser pulse is calculated.

  16. Laser-plasma-based Space Radiation Reproduction in the Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidding, B; Karger, O; Königstein, T; Pretzler, G; Manahan, G G; McKenna, P; Gray, R; Wilson, R; Wiggins, S M; Welsh, G H; Beaton, A; Delinikolas, P; Jaroszynski, D A; Rosenzweig, J B; Karmakar, A; Ferlet-Cavrois, V; Costantino, A; Muschitiello, M; Daly, E

    2017-02-08

    Space radiation is a great danger to electronics and astronauts onboard space vessels. The spectral flux of space electrons, protons and ions for example in the radiation belts is inherently broadband, but this is a feature hard to mimic with conventional radiation sources. Using laser-plasma-accelerators, we reproduced relativistic, broadband radiation belt flux in the laboratory, and used this man-made space radiation to test the radiation hardness of space electronics. Such close mimicking of space radiation in the lab builds on the inherent ability of laser-plasma-accelerators to directly produce broadband Maxwellian-type particle flux, akin to conditions in space. In combination with the established sources, utilisation of the growing number of ever more potent laser-plasma-accelerator facilities worldwide as complementary space radiation sources can help alleviate the shortage of available beamtime and may allow for development of advanced test procedures, paving the way towards higher reliability of space missions.

  17. Laser-generated plasma by carbon nanoparticles embedded into polyethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L.; Ceccio, G.; Cutroneo, M.

    2016-05-01

    Carbon nanoparticles have been embedded into polyethylene at different concentrations by using chemical-physical processes. The synthesized material was characterized in terms of physical modifications concerning the mechanical, compositional and optical properties. Obtained flat targets have been irradiated by Nd:YAG laser at intensities of the order of 1010 W/cm2 in order to generate non-equilibrium plasma in vacuum. The laser-matter interaction produces charge separation effects with consequent acceleration of protons and carbon ions. Plasma was characterized using time-of-flight measurements of the accelerated ions. Applications of the produced targets in order to generate carbon ion beams from laser-generated plasma are presented and discussed.

  18. Laser-plasma interaction and future accelerators; Interaction laser-plasma et futurs accelerateurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobin, J.L. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Lab. de Physique Atomique et Nucleaire, 75 - Paris (France)

    2003-08-01

    In particle accelerators, the resistance to magnetic fields of the inner wall of accelerating cavities imposes an upper limit to the acceleration gradient (about a few tens of 10{sup 6} V/m). So to get higher energies implies to get a bigger machine. This evolution towards giantism has a limit: the exponential costs. The interaction between laser and plasma can be used to accelerate electrons in different ways, one of the most promising is the channeling acceleration. Electrons riding on a wave at the proper phase can have their energy boosted to relativistic values as a result of the longitudinal electrical field in the wave. A project at the SLAC (Stanford) aims at producing an acceleration gradient of 1 GeV/m in a plasma whose length is 1,4 m. The authors reviews also different experimental results, in one experiment electrons have been accelerated to 200 MeV over a 1 millimeter long distance, that is to say that the average acceleration gradient was 200 GeV/m. (A.C.)

  19. Laser-Plasma experiments at ELI-NP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghenuche, Petru; Negoita, Florin; Diaconescu, Bogdan; Stutman, Dan

    2017-10-01

    Recent advances in ultra-high power lasers architecture brings unprecedented intensity and pressure regimes within our reach. Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) is a new large laser facility, part of the ELI European research infrastructure that will benefit from these upgrades in the next years. It has the ambitious goal to use extreme electromagnetic fields generated by two 10 PW laser beams for a broad range of research topics in fundamental physics at the frontier of plasma physics, nuclear physics and astrophysics, together with applied research in materials and life sciences. Here we describe the facility implementation status and challenges and the commissioning experiments related with laser-plasma interaction.

  20. Study of Laser Created Metal Vapour Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    one to two intracavity beam expander and a grating . A 50 cm focal length lens was used to slightly focus the laser beam within the Heat-cross oven...cros ed heat pipe. The incident laser energy was 205 rO. FIG. 1 0 Lower trace is from PDl and represents incident laser pulse. Upper trace corresponds...from 100 to below I i 1%. This had the unfortunate effect of also reduc- ing the already weak ion ISE signal. To compen- sate for this the diameter

  1. Oscillating two-stream instability of laser wakefield-driven plasma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Oscillating two-stream instability; plasma wave; laser wakefield accelerator. Abstract. The laser wakefield-driven plasma wave in a low-density plasma is seen to be susceptible to the oscillating two-stream instability (OTSI). The plasma wave couples to two short wavelength plasma wave sidebands. The pump ...

  2. Laser fields in dynamically ionized plasma structures for coherent acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Luu-Thanh, Ph.; Pukhov, A.; Kostyukov, I.

    2015-01-01

    With the emergence of the CAN (Coherent Amplification Network) laser technology, a new scheme for direct particle acceleration in periodic plasma structures has been proposed. By using our full electromagnetic relativistic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code equipped with ionisation module, we simulate the laser fields dynamics in the periodic structures of different materials. We study how the dynamic ionization influences the field structure.

  3. Coulomb implosion mechanism of negative ion acceleration in laser plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, T.; Fukuda, Y.; Yogo, A.; Tampo, M.; Kando, M.; Hayashi, Y.; Kameshima, T.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Pikuz, T. A.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Daido, H.; Bulanov, S. V.

    2008-01-01

    Coulomb implosion mechanism of the negatively charged ion acceleration in laser plasmas is proposed. When a cluster target is irradiated by an intense laser pulse and the Coulomb explosion of positively charged ions occurs, the negative ions are accelerated inward. The maximum energy of negative ions is several times lower than that of positive ions. The theoretical description and Particle-in-Cell simulation of the Coulomb implosion mechanism and the evidence of the negative ion acceleration...

  4. Generation of attosecond electron bunches in a laser-plasma accelerator using a plasma density upramp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weikum, M.K., E-mail: maria.weikum@desy.de [Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron (DESY), Bdg. 30b, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom); Li, F.Y. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom); Assmann, R.W. [Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron (DESY), Bdg. 30b, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Sheng, Z.M. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom); Laboratory for Laser Plasmas and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Jaroszynski, D. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    Attosecond electron bunches and attosecond radiation pulses enable the study of ultrafast dynamics of matter in an unprecedented regime. In this paper, the suitability for the experimental realization of a novel scheme producing sub-femtosecond duration electron bunches from laser-wakefield acceleration in plasma with self-injection in a plasma upramp profile has been investigated. While it has previously been predicted that this requires laser power above a few hundred terawatts typically, here we show that the scheme can be extended with reduced driving laser powers down to tens of terawatts, generating accelerated electron pulses with minimum length of around 166 attoseconds and picocoulombs charge. Using particle-in-cell simulations and theoretical models, the evolution of the accelerated electron bunch within the plasma as well as simple scalings of the bunch properties with initial laser and plasma parameters are presented. - Highlights: • LWFA with an upramp density profile can trap and accelerate sub-fs electron beams. • A reduction of the necessary threshold laser intensity by a factor 4 is presented. • Electron properties are tuned by varying initial laser and plasma parameters. • Simulations predict electron bunch lengths below 200 attoseconds with pC charge. • Strong bunch evolution effects and a large energy spread still need to be improved.

  5. Polarization spectroscopy on laser-produced plasmas and Z-pinch plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong E. [POSTECH, Kyungbuk (Korea); Baronova, Elena O. [RRC Kurchatov Institute, Nuclear Fusion Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Jakubowski, Lech [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Swierk-Otwock (Poland)

    2002-08-01

    PPS experiments on laser-produced plasmas are reviewed. Polarization is interpreted in terms of the anisotropic velocity distribution of electrons due to non-local transport. The polarization of an x-ray laser, and recent results regarding the recombining plasma are also presented. X-ray polarization spectroscopy experiments on heliumlike ion lines from a vacuum spark and from a plasma focus are presented: in both cases, the resonance line of the heliumlike ions shows polarization in the direction perpendicular to the discharge axis. Two possible interpretations are suggested. (author)

  6. Plasma scale-length effects on electron energy spectra in high-irradiance laser plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culfa, O; Tallents, G J; Rossall, A K; Wagenaars, E; Ridgers, C P; Murphy, C D; Dance, R J; Gray, R J; McKenna, P; Brown, C D R; James, S F; Hoarty, D J; Booth, N; Robinson, A P L; Lancaster, K L; Pikuz, S A; Faenov, A Ya; Kampfer, T; Schulze, K S; Uschmann, I; Woolsey, N C

    2016-04-01

    An analysis of an electron spectrometer used to characterize fast electrons generated by ultraintense (10^{20}Wcm^{-2}) laser interaction with a preformed plasma of scale length measured by shadowgraphy is presented. The effects of fringing magnetic fields on the electron spectral measurements and the accuracy of density scale-length measurements are evaluated. 2D EPOCH PIC code simulations are found to be in agreement with measurements of the electron energy spectra showing that laser filamentation in plasma preformed by a prepulse is important with longer plasma scale lengths (>8 μm).

  7. Study of a Laser-Produced Plasma by Langmuir Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, C. T.; Hasimi, M.; Pant, H. C.

    1977-01-01

    The structure, the parameters and the expansion of the plasma produced by focusing a 7 J, 20 ns Nd-glass laser on stainless-steel and glass targets suspended in a high-vacuum chamber were investigated by Langmuir probes. It was observed that the probe signals consisted of a photoelectric-emission......The structure, the parameters and the expansion of the plasma produced by focusing a 7 J, 20 ns Nd-glass laser on stainless-steel and glass targets suspended in a high-vacuum chamber were investigated by Langmuir probes. It was observed that the probe signals consisted of a photoelectric...

  8. Angular momentum evolution in laser-plasma accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Thaury, C; Corde, S; Lehe, R; Bouteiller, M Le; Phuoc, K Ta; Davoine, X; Rax, J -M; Rousse, A; Malka, V

    2013-01-01

    The transverse properties of an electron beam are characterized by two quantities, the emittance which indicates the electron beam extend in the phase space and the angular momentum which allows for non-planar electron trajectories. Whereas the emittance of electron beams produced in laser- plasma accelerator has been measured in several experiments, their angular momentum has been scarcely studied. It was demonstrated that electrons in laser-plasma accelerator carry some angular momentum, but its origin was not established. Here we identify one source of angular momentum growth and we present experimental results showing that the angular momentum content evolves during the acceleration.

  9. A "slingshot" laser-driven acceleration mechanism of plasma electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Fiore, Gaetano; Fedele, Renato

    2016-01-01

    We briefly report on the recently proposed [G. Fiore, R. Fedele, U. de Angelis, Phys. Plasmas 21 (2014), 113105], [G. Fiore, S. De Nicola, arXiv:1509.04656] electron acceleration mechanism named "slingshot effect": under suitable conditions the impact of an ultra-short and ultra-intense laser pulse against the surface of a low-density plasma is expected to cause the expulsion of a bunch of superficial electrons with high energy in the direction opposite to that of the pulse propagation; this is due to the interplay of the huge ponderomotive force, huge longitudinal field arising from charge separation, and the finite size of the laser spot.

  10. Experimental study of laser-induced plasma: Influence of laser fluence and pulse duration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Xueshi; Ma, Qianli; Perrier, Maxime; Motto-Ros, Vincent [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR5306 Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Sabourdy, David; Nguyen, Luc; Jalocha, Alain [CILAS Laser Company, Photonics Department, 45000 Orléans (France); Yu, Jin, E-mail: jin.yu@univ-lyon1.fr [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR5306 Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France)

    2013-09-01

    Influence of laser fluence and pulse duration on the morphology and the internal structure of plasma induced by infrared nanosecond laser pulse on an aluminum target placed in an argon ambient gas of one atmosphere pressure was experimentally studied. Dual-wavelength differential spectroscopic imaging was used in the experiment, which allowed observing the detailed structure inside of the ablation plume with distributions of species evaporated from the target as well as contributed by the ambient gas. Different regimes of post-ablation interaction were investigated using different laser fluences and pulse durations. We demonstrate in particular that plasma shielding due to various species localized in different zones inside of the plume leads to different morphologies and internal structures of the plasma. At moderate fluence, the plasma shielding due to the ablation vapor localized in the central part of the plume leads to its nearly spherical expansion with a layered structure of the distribution of different species. At higher fluence, the plasma shielding becomes strongly contributed by ionized ambient gas localized in the propagation front of the plume. An elongated morphology of the plume is observed with a zone of mixing between different species evaporated from the target or contributed by the ambient gas. Finally with extremely strong plasma shielding by ionized ambient gas in the case of a long duration pulse at high fluence, a delayed evaporation from the target is observed due to the ejection of melted material by splashing. - Highlights: • Morphology and internal structure of a plasma were experimentally determined. • Laser fluence and pulse duration are critical parameters for plasma structure. • Plasma shielding due to various species leads to different plasma structures. • Different regimes of laser-support absorption wave are used for interpretation. • Splashing ejection is observed for strong plasma shielding with long pulse.

  11. An accurate and efficient laser-envelope solver for the modeling of laser-plasma accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, C.; Schroeder, C. B.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2018-01-01

    Detailed and reliable numerical modeling of laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs), where a short and intense laser pulse interacts with an underdense plasma over distances of up to a meter, is a formidably challenging task. This is due to the great disparity among the length scales involved in the modeling, ranging from the micron scale of the laser wavelength to the meter scale of the total laser-plasma interaction length. The use of the time-averaged ponderomotive force approximation, where the laser pulse is described by means of its envelope, enables efficient modeling of LPAs by removing the need to model the details of electron motion at the laser wavelength scale. Furthermore, it allows simulations in cylindrical geometry which captures relevant 3D physics at 2D computational cost. A key element of any code based on the time-averaged ponderomotive force approximation is the laser envelope solver. In this paper we present the accurate and efficient envelope solver used in the code INF&RNO (INtegrated Fluid & paRticle simulatioN cOde). The features of the INF&RNO laser solver enable an accurate description of the laser pulse evolution deep into depletion even at a reasonably low resolution, resulting in significant computational speed-ups.

  12. Persistence of uranium emission in laser-produced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaHaye, N. L.; Harilal, S. S.; Diwakar, P. K.; Hassanein, A.

    2014-04-01

    Detection of uranium and other nuclear materials is of the utmost importance for nuclear safeguards and security. Optical emission spectroscopy of laser-ablated U plasmas has been presented as a stand-off, portable analytical method that can yield accurate qualitative and quantitative elemental analysis of a variety of samples. In this study, optimal laser ablation and ambient conditions are explored, as well as the spatio-temporal evolution of the plasma for spectral analysis of excited U species in a glass matrix. Various Ar pressures were explored to investigate the role that plasma collisional effects and confinement have on spectral line emission enhancement and persistence. The plasma-ambient gas interaction was also investigated using spatially resolved spectra and optical time-of-flight measurements. The results indicate that ambient conditions play a very important role in spectral emission intensity as well as the persistence of excited neutral U emission lines, influencing the appropriate spectral acquisition conditions.

  13. Time resolved Nomarski interferometery of laser produced plasma plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hough, P. [School of Physical Sciences and National Centre for Plasma Science and Technology, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland)], E-mail: padraighough@gmail.com; McLoughlin, C.; Kelly, T.J. [School of Physical Sciences and National Centre for Plasma Science and Technology, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Harilal, S.S. [Prism Computational Sciences, Inc., 455 Science Drive, Suite 140, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Mosnier, J.P.; Costello, J.T. [School of Physical Sciences and National Centre for Plasma Science and Technology, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland)

    2009-03-01

    We report results from optical interferometric probing of a laser generated Zn plasma plume. The experiment was performed in a vacuum and O{sub 2} rich environments where the background pressure of O{sub 2} was maintained at 1000 Pa and the results from both regimes are compared. The focus of our work is very much on the early stages in the life of the plasma plume which remains, to date, a largely unexplored area of study, at least in the pulsed laser deposition research domain. It was found that the electron density profile normal to the target is different in the background gas at early times ({approx}30 ns) compared to that of the vacuum case. At later times ({approx}80 ns) both profiles have a very similar shape. We also observe the formation of a shock wave at the plasma-gas interface shortly after plasma breakdown (<15 ns)

  14. Persistence of uranium emission in laser-produced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaHaye, N. L.; Harilal, S. S., E-mail: hari@purdue.edu; Diwakar, P. K.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2014-04-28

    Detection of uranium and other nuclear materials is of the utmost importance for nuclear safeguards and security. Optical emission spectroscopy of laser-ablated U plasmas has been presented as a stand-off, portable analytical method that can yield accurate qualitative and quantitative elemental analysis of a variety of samples. In this study, optimal laser ablation and ambient conditions are explored, as well as the spatio-temporal evolution of the plasma for spectral analysis of excited U species in a glass matrix. Various Ar pressures were explored to investigate the role that plasma collisional effects and confinement have on spectral line emission enhancement and persistence. The plasma-ambient gas interaction was also investigated using spatially resolved spectra and optical time-of-flight measurements. The results indicate that ambient conditions play a very important role in spectral emission intensity as well as the persistence of excited neutral U emission lines, influencing the appropriate spectral acquisition conditions.

  15. Time resolved Nomarski interferometery of laser produced plasma plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, P.; McLoughlin, C.; Kelly, T. J.; Harilal, S. S.; Mosnier, J. P.; Costello, J. T.

    2009-03-01

    We report results from optical interferometric probing of a laser generated Zn plasma plume. The experiment was performed in a vacuum and O 2 rich environments where the background pressure of O 2 was maintained at 1000 Pa and the results from both regimes are compared. The focus of our work is very much on the early stages in the life of the plasma plume which remains, to date, a largely unexplored area of study, at least in the pulsed laser deposition research domain. It was found that the electron density profile normal to the target is different in the background gas at early times (˜30 ns) compared to that of the vacuum case. At later times (˜80 ns) both profiles have a very similar shape. We also observe the formation of a shock wave at the plasma-gas interface shortly after plasma breakdown (<15 ns).

  16. Spectroscopic characterization of laser-induced plasma created during welding with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, D.; Jeandel, G.; Boudot, C.

    1997-05-01

    A spectroscopic study of a laser-induced plume created during the welding of stainless steel and other materials (iron and chromium) has been carried out. A pulsed Nd:YAG laser of 1000 W average power is used. The evolutions of the electron temperature and electron density have been studied for several welding parameters. We use working powers from 300 to 900 W and pulse durations between 1.5 and 5 ms. The influence of shielding gases like nitrogen and argon has been taken into account. Temperature and density calculations are based on the observation of the relative intensities and shapes of the emission peaks. We assume that the plasma is in local thermal equilibrium. The temperature is calculated with the Boltzmann plot method and the density with the Stark broadening of an iron line. The electron temperatures vary in the range of 4500-7100 K, electron density between 3×1022 and 6.5×1022 m-3. The absorption of the laser beam in the plasma is calculated using the Inverse Bremsstrahlung theory.

  17. Optical emission spectra of ZnMnO plasma produced by a pulsed laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzuriaga, J.; Chamorro, J. C.; Marín, R. A.; Riascos, H.

    2012-06-01

    Optical emission lines from the plasma generated by a laser ablation process have been investigated to gather information on the nature of the chemical species present. In particular, the experiments were carried out during the laser ablation of a ZnMnO target, in presence of a controlled oxygen atmosphere. The resolved emission spectra are dominated by the atomic neutral or singly ionized emission lines from Zn species, while the Mn I line was detected in emission spectrum at 40 mTorr only. The background continuum, intensities and widths of all observed lines increased with increasing gas pressure. The electron density and electron temperature were calculated for various gas pressures. The electron density was found to increase with the increment of the argon gas pressure, whereas electron temperature decreased. The electron temperature and density are found to be similar to those obtained in the well-known pulsed laser deposition (PLD) process.

  18. Interferometric measurement of a laser produced plasma using Nomarski interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Seong Y.; Hong, Youngjun; Ha, Sungyong; Kim, Heejin; Lim, Changhwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    It is important to understand its temporal and spatial dynamics for obtaining plasma conditions in each application. Laser interferometry tool has a capability for determining the spatial distribution of electron density at early stages of plume expansion. In this study, the interferometric analysis was carried out with the aim of investigating the characteristics of laser-induced plasma on the surface of titanium (Ti) metal target. We employed the Nomarski interferometry tool to obtain interference fringe patterns from the plasma. The Nomarski interferometry tool can be convenient approach to other common tools such as Michelson and Mach-Zehnder interferometers because it has intrinsic advantages of its compact size and easy alignment. Nomarski interferometry tool is based on the concept that the probe beam passing the laser-produced plasmas is divided by the bi-prism and recombined to generate interference patterns. The spatial and temporal behavior of laser-produced plasma was investigated on the basis of interferometric analysis using Nomarski interferometer. Electron density profile was calculated using Abel inversion equation via Fast Fourier-transformation method.

  19. [Effect of KCI additive on laser-induced soil plasma radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin-zhong; Zhang, Lin-jing; Yang, Shao-peng; Wei, Yan-hong; Li, Xu; Guo, Qing-lin

    2010-10-01

    In order to improve laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for low-level elements testing capability, the enhancement effects of KCl additive on the emission spectra of soil samples were studied. The laser spectrum analytical system is composed of a high-energy neodymium glass laser ablating samples, a multifunctional and automatic scanning spectrometer, and a CCD data acquisition system recording plasma spectra. The electron temperature and electron density of plasmas were calculated by measuring spectral line intensity and stark broadening respectively. The experimental results showed that with the increase in the KCl additive, the spectral intensity, signal-to-background ratio, the electron temperature and the electron density all went up firstly and then down. When 15% KCl was added, the radiation intensity of plasma reached the maximum value, the spectral lines intensity of element Mn, Fe, and Ti increased by 2.23, 1.13 and 2.04 than that without additive respectively, the spectral signal-to-background ratio increased by 1.33, 0.89 and 0.94 times respectively; while the electron temperature and electron density of plasmas were heightened by 14% and 38% respectively.

  20. Laser plasma interaction on rugby hohlraum on the Omega Laser Facility: Comparisons between cylinder, rugby, and elliptical hohlraums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Monteil, M. C.; Tassin, V.; Philippe, F.; Gauthier, P.; Casner, A.; Depierreux, S.; Neuville, C.; Villette, B.; Laffite, S.; Seytor, P.; Fremerye, P.; Seka, W.; Teychenné, D.; Debayle, A.; Marion, D.; Loiseau, P.; Casanova, M.

    2016-02-01

    Gas-filled rugby-shaped hohlraums have demonstrated high performances compared to a classical similar diameter cylinder hohlraum with a nearly 40% increase of x-ray drive, 10% higher measured peak drive temperature, and an increase in neutron production. Experimental comparisons have been done between rugby, cylinder, and elliptical hohlraums. The impact of these geometry differences on the laser plasma instabilities is examined. Using comparisons with hydrodynamic simulations carried out with the code FCI2 and postprocessed by Piranah, we have been able to reproduce the stimulated Raman and Brillouin scattering spectrum of the different beams. Using a methodology based on a statistical analysis for the gain calculations, we show that the behavior of the laser plasma instabilities in rugby hohlraums can be reproduced. The efficiency of laser smoothing techniques to mitigate these instabilities are discussed, and we show that while rugby hohlraums exhibit more laser plasma instabilities than cylinder hohlraum, the latter can be mitigated in the case of an elliptical hohlraum.

  1. Role of spectroscopic diagnostics in studying nanosecond laser-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Miloš; Pantić, Dragan; Nikolić, Zoran; Djeniže, Stevan

    2017-05-01

    We studied the impact of varying the intensity of Nd:YAG nanosecond 1.06 μm laser radiation on the morphology and internal structure of copper plasma plumes were examined. Standard diagnostic techniques used to deduce axial distributions of electron density and temperature revealed effects of a pronounced plasma screening regime. Methods of fast imaging spectroscopy are used to examine the transition from weak- to high-screening plasma, applying irradiance on the order of 109 W cm-2 in helium atmosphere. Behavior of both ionized and neutral species was observed up to 1 μs after the laser pulse. Showing significant differences with an increase of laser irradiance, the change in plasma propagation mechanisms is attributed to internal shockwave dynamics within the plasma plume. Implications of observed behavior to plasma uniformity can affect diagnostics, and are relevant to both modeling and applications. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Physics of Ionized Gases (SPIG 2016)", edited by Goran Poparic, Bratislav Obradovic, Dragana Maric and Aleksandar Milosavljevic.

  2. Determination of Plasma Screening Effects for Thermonuclear Reactions in Laser-generated Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yuanbin; Pálffy, Adriana, E-mail: yuanbin.wu@mpi-hd.mpg.de, E-mail: Palffy@mpi-hd.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-03-20

    Due to screening effects, nuclear reactions in astrophysical plasmas may behave differently than in the laboratory. The possibility to determine the magnitude of these screening effects in colliding laser-generated plasmas is investigated theoretically, having as a starting point a proposed experimental setup with two laser beams at the Extreme Light Infrastructure facility. A laser pulse interacting with a solid target produces a plasma through the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration scheme, and this rapidly streaming plasma (ion flow) impacts a secondary plasma created by the interaction of a second laser pulse on a gas jet target. We model this scenario here and calculate the reaction events for the astrophysically relevant reaction {sup 13}C({sup 4}He, n ){sup 16}O. We find that it should be experimentally possible to determine the plasma screening enhancement factor for fusion reactions by detecting the difference in reaction events between two scenarios of ion flow interacting with the plasma target and a simple gas target. This provides a way to evaluate nuclear reaction cross-sections in stellar environments and can significantly advance the field of nuclear astrophysics.

  3. Filamentation instability of counter-streaming laser-driven plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Fox, W; Bhattacharjee, A; Chang, P -Y; Germaschewski, K; Hu, S X; Nilson, P M

    2013-01-01

    Filamentation due to the growth of a Weibel-type instability was observed in the interaction of a pair of counter-streaming, ablatively-driven plasma flows, in a supersonic, collisionless regime relevant to astrophysical collisionless shocks. The flows were created by irradiating a pair of opposing plastic (CH) foils with 1.8 kJ, 2-ns laser pulses on the OMEGA EP laser system. Ultrafast laser-driven proton radiography was used to image the Weibel-generated electromagnetic fields. The experimental observations are in good agreement with the analytical theory of the Weibel instability and with particle-in-cell simulations.

  4. Interaction of CO2 laser radiation with dense plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Abdel-Raoof, Wasfi Sharkawy

    1980-01-01

    The instabilities which occur in the interaction of CO2 laser radiation with a dense plasma have been studied. A TEA CO2 laser provided pulses of up to 30 joules of energy with a duration of 50 nanoseconds. By focussing the radiation on to a plane target a focal spot of about 180 micrometers diameter was formed with a irradiance of 10 to 10 W cm. The scattered radiation was collected by a laser focussing lens and analysed with a grating spectrometer. Linear relationships have been found betwe...

  5. Coulomb implosion mechanism of negative ion acceleration in laser plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, T., E-mail: nakamura.tatsufumi@jaea.go.j [Kansai Photon Science Institute (JAEA), 8-1 Umemidai, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Fukuda, Y.; Yogo, A.; Tampo, M.; Kando, M.; Hayashi, Y.; Kameshima, T.; Pirozhkov, A.S.; Esirkepov, T.Zh.; Pikuz, T.A.; Faenov, A.Ya.; Daido, H.; Bulanov, S.V. [Kansai Photon Science Institute (JAEA), 8-1 Umemidai, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan)

    2009-07-06

    Coulomb implosion mechanism of the negatively charged ion acceleration in laser plasmas is proposed. When a cluster target is irradiated by an intense laser pulse and the Coulomb explosion of positively charged ions occurs, the negative ions are accelerated inward. The maximum energy of negative ions is several times lower than that of positive ions. We present the theoretical description and Particle-in-Cell simulation results of the Coulomb implosion mechanism, and show the evidence of the negative ion acceleration in the experiments on the high intensity laser pulse interaction with the cluster targets.

  6. Editorial: Focus on Laser- and Beam-Driven Plasma Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Chan; Malka, Victor

    2010-04-01

    The ability of short but intense laser pulses to generate high-energy electrons and ions from gaseous and solid targets has been well known since the early days of the laser fusion program. However, during the past decade there has been an explosion of experimental and theoretical activity in this area of laser-matter interaction, driven by the prospect of realizing table-top plasma accelerators for research, medical and industrial uses, and also relatively small and inexpensive plasma accelerators for high-energy physics at the frontier of particle physics. In this focus issue on laser- and beam-driven plasma accelerators, the latest advances in this field are described. Focus on Laser- and Beam-Driven Plasma Accelerators Contents Slow wave plasma structures for direct electron acceleration B D Layer, J P Palastro, A G York, T M Antonsen and H M Milchberg Cold injection for electron wakefield acceleration X Davoine, A Beck, A Lifschitz, V Malka and E Lefebvre Enhanced proton flux in the MeV range by defocused laser irradiation J S Green, D C Carroll, C Brenner, B Dromey, P S Foster, S Kar, Y T Li, K Markey, P McKenna, D Neely, A P L Robinson, M J V Streeter, M Tolley, C-G Wahlström, M H Xu and M Zepf Dose-dependent biological damage of tumour cells by laser-accelerated proton beams S D Kraft, C Richter, K Zeil, M Baumann, E Beyreuther, S Bock, M Bussmann, T E Cowan, Y Dammene, W Enghardt, U Helbig, L Karsch, T Kluge, L Laschinsky, E Lessmann, J Metzkes, D Naumburger, R Sauerbrey, M. Scḧrer, M Sobiella, J Woithe, U Schramm and J Pawelke The optimum plasma density for plasma wakefield excitation in the blowout regime W Lu, W An, M Zhou, C Joshi, C Huang and W B Mori Plasma wakefield acceleration experiments at FACET M J Hogan, T O Raubenheimer, A Seryi, P Muggli, T Katsouleas, C Huang, W Lu, W An, K A Marsh, W B Mori, C E Clayton and C Joshi Electron trapping and acceleration on a downward density ramp: a two-stage approach R M G M Trines, R Bingham, Z Najmudin

  7. Research progress of laser welding process dynamic monitoring technology based on plasma characteristics signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng WANG

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available During the high-power laser welding process, plasmas are induced by the evaporation of metal under laser radiation, which can affect the coupling of laser energy and the workpiece, and ultimately impact on the reliability of laser welding quality and process directly. The research of laser-induced plasma is a focus in high-power deep penetration welding field, which provides a promising research area for realizing the automation of welding process quality inspection. In recent years, the research of laser welding process dynamic monitoring technology based on plasma characteristics is mainly in two aspects, namely the research of plasma signal detection and the research of laser welding process modeling. The laser-induced plasma in the laser welding is introduced, and the related research of laser welding process dynamic monitoring technology based on plasma characteristics at home and abroad is analyzed. The current problems in the field are summarized, and the future development trend is put forward.

  8. Detection of laser-produced tin plasma emission lines in atmospheric environment by optical emission spectroscopy technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aadim, Kadhim A.

    2017-12-01

    A spectroscopic study on laser-produced tin plasma utilizing the optical emission spectroscopy (OES) technique is presented. Plasma is produced from a solid tin target irradiated with pulsed laser in room environment. Electron temperature is determined at different laser peak powers from the ratio of line intensities, while electron density is deduced from Saha-Boltzmann equation. A limited number of suitable tin lines are detected, and the effect of the laser peak power on the intensity of emission lines is discussed. Electron temperatures are measured in the range of 0.36 eV-0.44 eV with electron densities of the order 1017 cm-3 as the laser peak power is varied from 11 MW to 22 MW.

  9. High-order harmonic generation in laser plasma plumes

    CERN Document Server

    Ganeev, Rashid A

    2013-01-01

    This book represents the first comprehensive treatment of high-order harmonic generation in laser-produced plumes, covering the principles, past and present experimental status and important applications. It shows how this method of frequency conversion of laser radiation towards the extreme ultraviolet range matured over the course of multiple studies and demonstrated new approaches in the generation of strong coherent short-wavelength radiation for various applications. Significant discoveries and pioneering contributions of researchers in this field carried out in various laser scientific centers worldwide are included in this first attempt to describe the important findings in this area of nonlinear spectroscopy. "High-Order Harmonic Generation in Laser Plasma Plumes" is a self-contained and unified review of the most recent achievements in the field, such as the application of clusters (fullerenes, nanoparticles, nanotubes) for efficient harmonic generation of ultrashort laser pulses in cluster-containin...

  10. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy on metallic samples at very low temperature in different ambient gas pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Saeid, R. H.; Abdelhamid, M.; Harith, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    Analysis of metals at very low temperature adopting laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is greatly beneficial in space exploration expeditions and in some important industrial applications. In the present work, the effect of very low sample temperature on the spectral emission intensity of laser-induced plasma under both atmospheric pressure and vacuum has been studied for different bronze alloy samples. The sample was cooled down to liquid nitrogen (LN) temperature 77 K in a special vacuum chamber. Laser-induced plasma has been produced onto the sample surface using the fundamental wavelength of Nd:YAG laser. The optical emission from the plasma is collected by an optical fiber and analyzed by an echelle spectrometer combined with an intensified CCD camera. The integrated intensities of certain spectral emission lines of Cu, Pb, Sn, and Zn have been estimated from the obtained LIBS spectra and compared with that measured at room temperature. The laser-induced plasma parameters (electron number density Ne and electron temperature Te) were investigated at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures for both atmospheric pressure and vacuum ambient conditions. The results suggest that reducing the sample temperature leads to decrease in the emission line intensities under both environments. Plasma parameters were found to decrease at atmospheric pressure but increased under vacuum conditions.

  11. On- and off-axis spectral emission features from laser-produced gas breakdown plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, S. S.; Skrodzki, P. J.; Miloshevsky, A.; Brumfield, B. E.; Phillips, M. C.; Miloshevsky, G.

    2017-06-01

    Laser-heated gas breakdown plasmas or sparks emit profoundly in the ultraviolet and visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum with contributions from ionic, atomic, and molecular species. Laser created kernels expand into a cold ambient with high velocities during its early lifetime followed by confinement of the plasma kernel and eventually collapse. However, the plasma kernels produced during laser breakdown of gases are also capable of exciting and ionizing the surrounding ambient medium. Two mechanisms can be responsible for excitation and ionization of surrounding ambient: viz. photoexcitation and ionization by intense ultraviolet emission from the sparks produced during the early times of its creation and/or heating by strong shocks generated by the kernel during its expansion into the ambient. In this study, an investigation is made on the spectral features of on- and off-axis emission features of laser-induced plasma breakdown kernels generated in atmospheric pressure conditions with an aim to elucidate the mechanisms leading to ambient excitation and emission. Pulses from an Nd:YAG laser emitting at 1064 nm with 6 ns pulse duration are used to generate plasma kernels. Laser sparks were generated in air, argon, and helium gases to provide different physical properties of expansion dynamics and plasma chemistry considering the differences in laser absorption properties, mass density and speciation. Point shadowgraphy and time-resolved imaging were used to evaluate the shock wave and spark self-emission morphology at early and late times while space and time resolved spectroscopy is used for evaluating the emission features as well as for inferring plasma fundaments at on- and off-axis. Structure and dynamics of the plasma kernel obtained using imaging techniques are also compared to numerical simulations using computational fluid dynamics code. The emission from the kernel showed that spectral features from ions, atoms and molecules are separated in

  12. On- and off-axis spectral emission features from laser-produced gas breakdown plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harilal, S. S.; Skrodzki, P. J.; Miloshevsky, A.; Brumfield, B. E.; Phillips, M. C.; Miloshevsky, G.

    2017-06-01

    Laser-heated gas breakdown plasmas or sparks emit profoundly in the ultraviolet and visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum with contributions from ionic, atomic, and molecular species. Laser created kernels expand into a cold ambient with high velocities during their early lifetime followed by confinement of the plasma kernel and eventually collapse. However, the plasma kernels produced during laser breakdown of gases are also capable of exciting and ionizing the surrounding ambient medium. Two mechanisms can be responsible for excitation and ionization of the surrounding ambient: photoexcitation and ionization by intense ultraviolet emission from the sparks produced during the early times of their creation and/or heating by strong shocks generated by the kernel during its expansion into the ambient. In this study, an investigation is made on the spectral features of on- and off-axis emission of laser-induced plasma breakdown kernels generated in atmospheric pressure conditions with an aim to elucidate the mechanisms leading to ambient excitation and emission. Pulses from an Nd:YAG laser emitting at 1064 nm with a pulse duration of 6 ns are used to generate plasma kernels. Laser sparks were generated in air, argon, and helium gases to provide different physical properties of expansion dynamics and plasma chemistry considering the differences in laser absorption properties, mass density, and speciation. Point shadowgraphy and time-resolved imaging were used to evaluate the shock wave and spark self-emission morphology at early and late times, while space and time resolved spectroscopy is used for evaluating the emission features and for inferring plasma physical conditions at on- and off-axis positions. The structure and dynamics of the plasma kernel obtained using imaging techniques are also compared to numerical simulations using the computational fluid dynamics code. The emission from the kernel showed that spectral features from ions, atoms, and

  13. Plasma channels during filamentation of a femtosecond laser pulse with wavefront astigmatism in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dergachev, A A; Kandidov, V P; Shlenov, S A [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ionin, A A; Mokrousova, D V; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V; Sunchugasheva, E S; Shustikova, A P [P N Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-31

    We have demonstrated experimentally and numerically the possibility of controlling parameters of plasma channels formed during filamentation of a femtosecond laser pulse by introducing astigmatism in the laser beam wavefront. It is found that weak astigmatism increases the length of the plasma channel in comparison with the case of aberration-free focusing and that strong astigmatism can cause splitting of the plasma channel into two channels located one after another on the filament axis. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  14. Collisionless Interaction of a Magnetized Ambient Plasma and a Field-Parallel Laser Produced Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, P. V.; Bondarenko, A. S.; Schaeffer, D. B.; Constantin, C. G.; Vincena, S.; Tripathi, S.; Gekelman, W.; Weidl, M.; Winske, D.; Niemann, C.

    2016-10-01

    We present measurements of the collisionless coupling between an exploding laser-produced plasma (LPP) and a large, magnetized ambient plasma. The LPP was created by focusing the Raptor laser (400 J, 40 ns) on a planar plastic target embedded in the ambient Large Plasma Device (LAPD) plasma at the University of California, Los Angeles. The resulting ablated material moved parallel to the background magnetic field, interacting with the ambient plasma along the full 17m length of the LAPD. The amplitude and polarization of waves driven by the interaction were measured by an array of 3-axis magnetic flux probes. Emissive doppler spectroscopy and a high temporal resolution monochrometer were used to observe the velocity and charge state distributions of both ambient and debris ions. Measurements are compared to hybrid simulations of quasi-parallel shocks.

  15. Interaction of cw CO2 laser radiation with plasma near-metallic substrate surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azharonok, V. V.; Astapchik, S. A.; Zabelin, Alexandre M.; Golubev, Vladimir S.; Golubev, V. S.; Grezev, A. N.; Filatov, Igor V.; Chubrik, N. I.; Shimanovich, V. D.

    2000-07-01

    Optical and spectroscopic methods were used in studying near-surface plasma that is formed under the effect CW CO2 laser of (2- 5)x106W/cm2 power density upon stainless steel in He and Ar shielding gases. The variation of plume spatial structure with time has been studied, the outflow of gas-vapor jets from the interaction area has been characterized. The spectra of plasma plume pulsations have been obtained for the frequency range Δf = 0-1 MHz. The temperature and electron concentration of plasma plume have been found under radiation effect upon the target of stainless steel. Consideration has been given to the most probable mechanisms of CW laser radiation-metal non-stationary interaction.

  16. Heat-Flux Measurements in Laser-Produced Plasmas Using Thomson Scattering from Electron Plasma Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henchen, R. J.; Goncharov, V. N.; Cao, D.; Katz, J.; Froula, D. H.; Rozmus, W.

    2017-10-01

    An experiment was designed to measure heat flux in coronal plasmas using collective Thomson scattering. Adjustments to the electron distribution function resulting from heat flux affect the shape of the collective Thomson scattering features through wave-particle resonance. The amplitude of the Spitzer-Härm electron distribution function correction term (f1) was varied to match the data and determines the value of the heat flux. Independent measurements of temperature and density obtained from Thomson scattering were used to infer the classical heat flux (q = - κ∇Te) . Time-resolved Thomson-scattering data were obtained at five locations in the corona along the target normal in a blowoff plasma formed from a planar Al target with 1.5 kJ of 351-nm laser light in a 2-ns square pulse. The flux measured through the Thomson-scattering spectra is a factor of 5 less than the κ∇Te measurements. The lack of collisions of heat-carrying electrons suggests a nonlocal model is needed to accurately describe the heat flux. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  17. First experimental comparisons of laser-plasma interactions between spherical and cylindrical hohlraums at SGIII laser facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaohua Chen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We present our recent laser-plasmas instability (LPI comparison experiment at the SGIII laser facility between the spherical and cylindrical hohlraums. Three kinds of filling are considered: vacuum, gas-filling with or without a capsule inside. A spherical hohlraum of 3.6 mm in diameter, and a cylindrical hohlraum of 2.4 mm × 4.3 mm are used. The capsule diameter is 0.96 mm. A flat-top laser pulse with 3 ns duration and up to 92.73 kJ energy is used. The experiment has shown that the LPI level in the spherical hohlraum is close to that of the outer beam in the cylindrical hohlraum, while much lower than that of the inner beam. The experiment is further simulated by using our 2-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic code LARED-Integration, and the laser back-scattering fraction and the stimulated Raman scatter (SRS spectrum are post-processed by the high efficiency code of laser interaction with plasmas HLIP. According to the simulation, the plasma waves are strongly damped and the SRS is mainly developed at the plasma conditions of electron density from 0.08 nc to 0.1 nc and electron temperature from 1.5 keV to 2.0 keV inside the hohlraums. However, obvious differences between the simulation and experiment are found, such as that the SRS back-scattering is underestimated, and the numerical SRS spectrum peaks at a larger wavelength and at a later time than the data. These differences indicate that the development of a 3D radiation hydrodynamic code, with more accurate physics models, is mandatory for spherical hohlraum study.

  18. Wavelet-analysis for Laser Images of Blood Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANGELSKY, A.-P.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The possibilities of the local wavelet-analysis of polarization-inhomogeneous laser image of human blood plasma were considered. The set of statistics, correlation and fractal parameters of the distributions of wavelet-coefficients that are characterize different scales of the polarization maps of polycrystalline networks of amino acids of blood plasma were defined. The criteria for the differentiation of the transformation of birefringence optical-anisotropic structures of blood plasma at different scales of their geometric dimensions were determined.

  19. Stagnation and interpenetration of laser-created colliding plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollaine, S.M.; Albritton, J.R.; Kauffman, R.; Keane, C.J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Berger, R.L.; Bosch, R.; Delameter, N.D.; Failor, B.H. (KMS Fusion, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI (USA))

    1990-11-05

    A KMS laser experiment collides Aluminum (A1) and Magnesium (Mg) plasmas. The measurements include electron density, time and space resolved Ly-alpha and He-alpha lines of Al and Mg, and x-ray images. These measurements were analyzed with a hydrodynamic code, LASNEX, and a special two-fluid code OFIS. The results strongly suggest that at early times, the Al interpenetrates the counterstreaming Mg and deposits in the dense Mg region. At late times, the Al plasma stagnates against the Mg plasma.

  20. Laser-Plasma Modeling Using PERSEUS Extended-MHD Simulation Code for HED Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, Nathaniel; Seyler, Charles

    2017-10-01

    We discuss the use of the PERSEUS extended-MHD simulation code for high-energy-density (HED) plasmas in modeling the influence of Hall and electron inertial physics on laser-plasma interactions. By formulating the extended-MHD equations as a relaxation system in which the current is semi-implicitly time-advanced using the Generalized Ohm's Law, PERSEUS enables modeling of extended-MHD phenomena (Hall and electron inertial physics) without the need to resolve the smallest electron time scales, which would otherwise be computationally prohibitive in HED plasma simulations. We first consider a laser-produced plasma plume pinched by an applied magnetic field parallel to the laser axis in axisymmetric cylindrical geometry, forming a conical shock structure and a jet above the flow convergence. The Hall term produces low-density outer plasma, a helical field structure, flow rotation, and field-aligned current, rendering the shock structure dispersive. We then model a laser-foil interaction by explicitly driving the oscillating laser fields, and examine the essential physics governing the interaction. This work is supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration stewardship sciences academic program under Department of Energy cooperative agreements DE-FOA-0001153 and DE-NA0001836.

  1. A Novel Source of Mesoscopic Particles for Laser Plasma Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-16

    radiography and thermonuclear fusion, to name a few, has catapulted research in the field of high density, high field science to the forefront in many...Blazevich, A. et al., Ultralow emittance, multi-MeV proton beams from a laser virtual -cathode plasma accelerator, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 204801(2004). 6Mangles

  2. Multiple charge states of titanium ions in laser produced plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    W/cm-¾. ) focused on the solid target creates a hot ( 1 keV) and dense plasma having high ionization state. The multiple charged ions with high current densities produced during laser matter interaction have potential application in accelerators as an ion source. This paper presents generation and detection of highly ...

  3. Plasma-Oxygen Interaction During Thin Films Deposition by Laser ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... pressure is needed to initiate the plume oxygen interaction. This threshold oxygen pressure depends on the ablated material. A clear effect of this threshold pressure on the structural and phase composition of the deposited thin films is shown. Keywords: Laser ablation, Plasma-oxygen interaction, Metal-insulator transition ...

  4. Stability of liquid-nitrogen-jet laser-plasma targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogelqvist, E.; Kördel, M.; Selin, M.; Hertz, H. M.

    2015-11-01

    Microscopic jets of cryogenic substances such as liquid nitrogen are important regenerative high-density targets for high-repetition rate, high-brightness laser-plasma soft x-ray sources. When operated in vacuum such liquid jets exhibit several non-classical instabilities that negatively influence the x-ray source's spatial and temporal stability, yield, and brightness, parameters that all are important for applications such as water-window microscopy. In the present paper, we investigate liquid-nitrogen jets with a flash-illumination imaging system that allows for a quantitative stability analysis with high spatial and temporal resolution. Direct and indirect consequences of evaporation are identified as the key reasons for the observed instabilities. Operating the jets in an approximately 100 mbar ambient atmosphere counteracts the effects of evaporation and produces highly stable liquid nitrogen jets. For operation in vacuum, which is necessary for the laser plasmas, we improve the stability by introducing an external radiative heating element. The method significantly extends the distance from the nozzle that can be used for liquid-jet laser plasmas, which is of importance for high-average-power applications. Finally, we show that laser-plasma operation with the heating-element-stabilized jet shows improved short-term and long-term temporal stability in its water-window x-ray emission.

  5. Dynamics of plasma expansion in the pulsed laser material interaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is seen from present computations that the forward directed nature of the laser evaporation process results from the anisotropic expansion velocities associated with different species. These velocities are mainly controlled by the initial dimension of the expanding plasma. An attempt was undertaken to estimate the length of ...

  6. Investigation of electron heating in laser-plasma interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Parvazian

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available  In this paper, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS and electron heating in laser plasma propagating along the plasma fusion is investigated by particle-in cell simulation. Applying an external magnetic field to plasma, production of whistler waves and electron heating associated with whistler waves in the direction perpendicular to external magnetic field was observed in this simulation. The plasma waves with low phase velocities, generated in backward-SRS and dominateing initially in time and space, accelerated the backward electrons by trapping them. Then these electrons promoted to higher energies by the forward-SRS plasma waves with high phase velocities. This tow-stage electron acceleration is more efficient due to the coexistence of these two instabilities.

  7. Stimulated Brillouin scattering of elliptical laser beam in collisionless plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arvinder; Walia, Keshav

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents an investigation of self-focusing of elliptical laser beam in collisionless plasma and its effect on stimulated Brillouin scattering. The pump beam interacts with a pre-excited ion-acoustic wave leading to Brillouin back-scattered process. The transverse intensity gradient of a pump beam generates a ponderomotive force, which modifies the background plasma density profile in a direction transverse to pump beam axis. This modification in density effects the incident laser beam, ion-acoustic wave and back-scattered beam. Non-linear differential equations for the beam width parameters of pump laser beam, ion-acoustic wave and back-scattered beam are set up and solved numerically. It is observed from the analysis that the focusing of waves enhances the SBS back-reflectivity.

  8. Interplay of Laser-Plasma Interactions and Inertial Fusion Hydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strozzi, D J; Bailey, D S; Michel, P; Divol, L; Sepke, S M; Kerbel, G D; Thomas, C A; Ralph, J E; Moody, J D; Schneider, M B

    2017-01-13

    The effects of laser-plasma interactions (LPI) on the dynamics of inertial confinement fusion hohlraums are investigated via a new approach that self-consistently couples reduced LPI models into radiation-hydrodynamics numerical codes. The interplay between hydrodynamics and LPI-specifically stimulated Raman scatter and crossed-beam energy transfer (CBET)-mostly occurs via momentum and energy deposition into Langmuir and ion acoustic waves. This spatially redistributes energy coupling to the target, which affects the background plasma conditions and thus, modifies laser propagation. This model shows reduced CBET and significant laser energy depletion by Langmuir waves, which reduce the discrepancy between modeling and data from hohlraum experiments on wall x-ray emission and capsule implosion shape.

  9. Temperature-feedback direct laser reshaping of silicon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouassa, M.; Mitsai, E.; Syubaev, S.; Pavlov, D.; Zhizhchenko, A.; Jadli, I.; Hassayoun, L.; Zograf, G.; Makarov, S.; Kuchmizhak, A.

    2017-12-01

    Direct laser reshaping of nanostructures is a cost-effective and fast approach to create or tune various designs for nanophotonics. However, the narrow range of required laser parameters along with the lack of in-situ temperature control during the nanostructure reshaping process limits its reproducibility and performance. Here, we present an approach for direct laser nanostructure reshaping with simultaneous temperature control. We employ thermally sensitive Raman spectroscopy during local laser melting of silicon pillar arrays prepared by self-assembly microsphere lithography. Our approach allows establishing the reshaping threshold of an individual nanostructure, resulting in clean laser processing without overheating of the surrounding area.

  10. EUV laser produced and induced plasmas for nanolithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizyuk, Tatyana; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2017-10-01

    EUV produced plasma sources are being extensively studied for the development of new technology for computer chips production. Challenging tasks include optimization of EUV source efficiency, producing powerful source in 2 percentage bandwidth around 13.5 nm for high volume manufacture (HVM), and increasing the lifetime of collecting optics. Mass-limited targets, such as small droplet, allow to reduce contamination of chamber environment and mirror surface damage. However, reducing droplet size limits EUV power output. Our analysis showed the requirement for the target parameters and chamber conditions to achieve 500 W EUV output for HVM. The HEIGHTS package was used for the simulations of laser produced plasma evolution starting from laser interaction with solid target, development and expansion of vapor/plasma plume with accurate optical data calculation, especially in narrow EUV region. Detailed 3D modeling of mix environment including evolution and interplay of plasma produced by lasers from Sn target and plasma produced by in-band and out-of-band EUV radiation in ambient gas, used for the collecting optics protection and cleaning, allowed predicting conditions in entire LPP system. Effect of these conditions on EUV photon absorption and collection was analyzed. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation, PIRE project.

  11. Simulation of emission spectra from nonuniform reactive laser-induced plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Jörg; Lorusso, Antonella; Perrone, Alessio; Strafella, Francesco; Dutouquet, Christophe; Torralba, Béatrice

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate that chemical reactions leading to the formation of AlO radicals in plasmas produced by ablation of aluminum or Ti-sapphire with ultraviolet nanosecond laser pulses can be predicted by the model of local thermodynamic equilibrium. Therefore, emission spectra recorded with an echelle spectrometer and a gated detector were compared to the spectral radiance computed for uniform and nonuniform equilibrium plasmas. The calculations are based on analytical solutions of the radiation transfer equation. The simulations show that the plasmas produced in argon background gas are almost uniform, whereas temperature and density gradients are evidenced in air. Furthermore, chemical reactions exclusively occur in the cold plume periphery for ablation in air. The formation of AlO is negligible in argon as the plasma temperature is too large in the time interval of interest up to several microseconds. Finally, the validity of local thermodynamic equilibrium is shown to depend on time, space, and on the elemental composition. The presented conclusions are of interest for material analysis via laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and for laser materials processing.

  12. Proton radiography of magnetic fields in a laser-produced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pape, Sebastien; Patel, Pravesh; Chen, Sophia; Town, Richard; Hey, Dan; Mackinnon, Andrew

    2010-12-01

    Magnetic and electric fields generated by the interaction of long-pulse laser beams with plasmas relevant to inertial confinement fusion have been measured. A proton beam generated by the interaction of an ultraintense laser with a thin metallic foil is used to probe laser-produced fields. The proton beam is temporally short (on the order of a picosecond at the source position) and highly laminar, and hence equivalent to a virtual point source which makes it an ideal source for point projection radiography. We have investigated, using face-on and side-on radiography, fields due to the non-collinearity of temperature and density gradients at laser intensities around 5 × 10 13 W/cm 2.

  13. Optimizing conversion efficiency and reducing ion energy in a laser-produced Gd plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummins, Thomas; Li Bowen; O' Gorman, Colm; Dunne, Padraig; Sokell, Emma; O' Sullivan, Gerry [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Otsuka, Takamitsu [Department of Advanced Interdisciplinary Sciences, Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE), and Optical Technology Innovation Center (OpTIC), Utsunomiya University, Yoto 7-1-2, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Yugami, Noboru; Higashiguchi, Takeshi [Department of Advanced Interdisciplinary Sciences, Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE), and Optical Technology Innovation Center (OpTIC), Utsunomiya University, Yoto 7-1-2, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kanagawa, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Jiang Weihua [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Kami-tomiokamachi 1603-1, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan); Endo, Akira [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Okubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2012-02-06

    We have demonstrated an efficient extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source at 6.7 nm by irradiating Gd targets with 0.8 and 1.06 {mu}m laser pulses of 140 fs to 10 ns duration. Maximum conversion efficiency of 0.4% was observed within a 0.6% bandwidth. A Faraday cup observed ion yield and time of flight signals for ions from plasmas generated by each laser. Ion kinetic energy was lower for shorter pulse durations, which yielded higher electron temperatures required for efficient EUV emission, due to higher laser intensity. Picosecond laser pulses were found to be the best suited to 6.7 nm EUV source generation.

  14. Beam characteristics of a large-bore copper laser with a radiatively cooled plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, J.J.; Boley, C.D.; Molander, W.A.; Warner, B.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Martinez, M.W. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1994-01-18

    In a large-bore copper vapor laser (CVL), excessive gas heating at the axial region of the discharge lowers its efficiency by thermally populating the metastable lower laser levels. The associated lower gas density also lengthens the discharge field-diffusion time, leading to weaker axial pumping and undesired beam characteristics. The authors` laboratory has developed a novel approach to circumvent this obstacle by cooling the plasma radiatively via a series of segmented metal plates (septa) placed vertically along the length of the tube. This improved tube design significantly lowers the average gas temperature and shortens the radial delay. A 27% increase in laser power was observed with the addition of septa. The authors have characterized the beam intensity profile, spatial and temporal pulse variation, and beam polarization through extensive laboratory measurements. A detailed computational model of the laser has been used to characterize and interpret the laboratory results.

  15. Progress in the applicability of plasma X-ray lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehl, T., E-mail: T.Kuehl@gsi.de; Aurand, B.; Bagnoud, V.; Ecker, B.; Eisenbarth, U. [GSI (Germany); Guilbaud, O. [Universite Paris Sud (France); Fils, J.; Goette, S. [GSI (Germany); Habib, J. [Universite Paris Sud (France); Hochhaus, D.; Javorkova, D. [GSI (Germany); Neumayer, P. [Extreme Matter Institute, EMMI (Germany); Kazamias, S.; Pittman, M.; Ros, D. [Universite Paris Sud (France); Seres, J.; Spielmann, Ch. [Friedrich Schiller-University (Germany); Zielbauer, B.; Zimmer, D. [GSI (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    Proposed as satellite-based weapons during the 1980s, X-ray lasing was for a long time only achieved with enormous amounts of pump energy in either nuclear explosions or at kilojoule-class laser installations. During the last few years a tremendous development was achieved, most visible in the realisation of the FEL lasers at DESY and SLAC. As important for a wider applicability is the enormous reduction in pump energy for laser pumped plasma X-ray lasers, which now brings such devices into the range of applications for diagnostics and spectroscopy even in smaller laboratories. Main developments were the transient excitation scheme and the optimized pumping concepts. This paper concentrates on developments at the GSI Helmholtzcenter at Darmstadt aiming towards reliable X-ray laser sources in the range from 50 to several 100 eV. The main driving forces for the laser development at GSI are the possible application for the spectroscopy of Li-like ions in the storage ring ESR and the future storage ring NESR at FAIR, and the interest in novel plasma diagnostics.

  16. Optical diagnostics for laser wakefields in plasma channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaul, E. W.; Le Blanc, S. P.; Downer, M. C.

    1998-11-01

    Laser wakefield accelerators can excite large amplitude electrostatic fields (E >= 100 GV/m) which are potentially suitable for compact accelerators and advanced high energy colliders. An accurate diagnostic tool is necessary to test the physical effects in the wakefield predicted by theory and numerical simulations, and to have control over experiments. Frequency domain interferometry (FDI) (C. W. Siders et. al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 3570 (1995) has been developed in previous work. We experimentally demonstrate single-shot FDI as a sensitive diagnostic technique for probing laser wakefields. To generate wakefields longer than the diffraction limit, optical guiding of the laser pulse is necessary. An optical guide is formed by the hydrodynamic expansion of a cylindrical shock wave driven by a laser heated plasma, which is generated by laser pulse focused with an axicon lens (C. G. Durfee and H. M. Milchberg, Phys. Rev. Lett. 71, 2409 (1993)) to intensities of ~= 10^13 W/cm^2. These are too low to reach multi-photon ionization or significant collisional ionization in <= 1 atm helium. We preionize Helium gas with an electrical discharge for efficient inverse bremsstrahlung absorption of the laser pulse and formation of a plasma channel. Spatially resolved chirped pulse interferometry is used to measure the radial electron density profile of the channel.

  17. Laser-plasma interactions in large gas-filled hohlraums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, R.E.; Powers, L.V.; Berger, R.L. [and others

    1996-06-01

    Indirect-drive targets planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser consist of spherical fuel capsules enclosed in cylindrical Au hohlraums. Laser beams, arranged in cylindrical rings, heat the inside of the Au wall to produce x rays that in turn heat and implode the capsule to produce fusion conditions in the fuel. Detailed calculations show that adequate implosion symmetry can be maintained by filling the hohlraum interior with low-density, low-Z gases. The plasma produced from the heated gas provides sufficient pressure to keep the radiating Au surface from expanding excessively. As the laser heats this gas, the gas becomes a relatively uniform plasma with small gradients in velocity and density. Such long-scale-length plasmas can be ideal mediums for stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS). SBS can reflect a large fraction of the incident laser light before it is absorbed by the hohlraum; therefore, it is undesirable in an inertial confinement fusion target. To examine the importance of SBS in NIF targets, the authors used Nova to measure SBS from hohlraums with plasma conditions similar to those predicted for high-gain NIF targets. The plasmas differ from the more familiar exploding foil or solid targets as follows: they are hot (3 keV); they have high electron densities (n{sub e}=10{sup 21}cm{sup {minus}3}); and they are nearly stationary, confined within an Au cylinder, and uniform over large distances (>2 mm). These hohlraums have <3% peak SBS backscatter for an interaction beam with intensities of 1-4 x 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}, a laser wavelength of 0.351{micro}m, f/4 or f/8 focusing optics, and a variety of beam smoothing implementations. Based on these conditions the authors conclude that SBS does not appear to be a problem for NIF targets.

  18. Aerosol beam-focus laser-induced plasma spectrometer device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Meng-Dawn

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus for detecting elements in an aerosol includes an aerosol beam focuser for concentrating aerosol into an aerosol beam; a laser for directing a laser beam into the aerosol beam to form a plasma; a detection device that detects a wavelength of a light emission caused by the formation of the plasma. The detection device can be a spectrometer having at least one grating and a gated intensified charge-coupled device. The apparatus may also include a processor that correlates the wavelength of the light emission caused by the formation of the plasma with an identity of an element that corresponds to the wavelength. Furthermore, the apparatus can also include an aerosol generator for forming an aerosol beam from bulk materials. A method for detecting elements in an aerosol is also disclosed.

  19. Thomson parabola spectrometry of laser generated plasma at PALS laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutroneo, M.; Torrisi, L.; Cavallaro, S.; Ando', L.; Velyhan, A.

    2014-04-01

    Laser generated Plasma has been obtained at PALS laboratory in Prague irradiating thin films by Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) regime. The irradiated targets were polymers and metals with embedded nanostructures and different thicknesses. In the present work, plasma has been characterized by using Thomson Parabola Spectrometer placed in forward direction. The regime of laser intensity was of the order of 1016W/cm2 at 1.3 μm wavelength. Simulations performed by TOSCA code have been employed to compare theoretical prevision with experimental data. This approach permitted the recognition of parabolas and the evaluations of ion charge, energy and mass-to-charge ratio. Results revealed that the maximum ion acceleration is obtained n metallic foils for optimal thickness of the order of 10 μm and for target containing nanostructures responsible for the increase of the plasma electron density and resonant absorption effect, as will be presented and discussed.

  20. Group Velocity Measurements in Laser-Heated Capillary Discharge Waveguides for Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieronek, C. V.; Daniels, J.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Benedetti, C.; Leemans, W. P.

    2017-10-01

    To date, the most energetic electron beams from laser-plasma accelerators have been produced using gas-filled capillary discharge waveguides, which increase the acceleration length by mitigating diffraction of the driving laser pulse. To reach higher electron beam energies, lower plasma density is required to reduce bunch dephasing. However, confinement of the driver is reduced for lower plasma density, reducing the acceleration length. A laser-heated capillary discharge waveguide, where the discharge is heated by a coaxial laser pulse, was proposed to create a steeper density gradient at lower density. Here the first measurements of group velocity in laser-heated capillary discharges, obtained via spectral interferometry, are presented. Increase of the driver group velocity and reduction in on-axis plasma density by laser-heating are shown. Work supported by the U.S. Dept. of Energy, Office of Science, Office of High Energy Physics, under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Additional support by the National Science Foundation under Grant PHY-1415596.

  1. Temperature profile measurement of graphite material using a CO{sub 2} laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, Payal; Sarma, Arun [Pandit Deendayal Petroleum University, Raisan, Gandhinagar-382007, Gujarat (India); Ghosh, Joydeep; Pandya, Shwetang; Pandya, Santosh; Choudhuri, Paritosh; Govindarajan, J [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382428, Gujarat (India); Schrittwieser, C Ionita; Schrittwieser, Roman, E-mail: arun.sarma@spt.pdpu.ac.i [Institute for Ion Physics, University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2010-11-15

    Emissive probes have been used for the direct measurement of plasma potential in many plasma devices and different approaches have been introduced to measure plasma potential using emissive probes. But the biggest disadvantage of the emissive probe is its short lifespan due to its self-arrangement and different plasma environment. For example, filament emissive probes cannot be used in high-temperature plasma devices. A few initiatives have begun to measure the plasma potential by using a laser-heated emissive probe. In these cases, mostly graphite and LaB{sub 6} are being used as a probe tip to emit electrons by heating them with a laser light. However, very few studies aiming to understand the mechanism of the heating process of the graphite material have been performed. The heating dynamics of the graphite material heated by a CW CO{sub 2} laser with a maximum power of 30 W have been investigated in this study. The in situ temperature of the probe tip has been measured by using an infrared camera. Complete theoretical and simulation models have been developed to understand the experimentally measured data. Further, the experimental results are compared with ANSYS simulations.

  2. Oscillating two-stream instability of laser wakefield-driven plasma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The laser wakefield-driven plasma wave in a low-density plasma is seen to be sus- ceptible to the oscillating ... in vacuum) and hence, these plasma waves are highly suitable for high-energy particle acceleration. The plasma ... over an extended interaction length of ∼10 cm for a CO2 laser. Simulations indicate a.

  3. Two-dimensional axisymmetric models of laser induced plasmas relevant to laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shabanov, S.V., E-mail: shabanov@math.ufl.edu [Department of Mathematics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard-Willstätter-Strasse 11, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Gornushkin, I.B. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard-Willstätter-Strasse 11, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-10-01

    A dynamical model of a laser induced plasma with axial symmetry is developed to systematically study the effects of the plasma equation of state, radiation transfer, various transport phenomena (viscosity, thermal conductivity, diffusion), and the ablation surface on the observable quantities such as spectra emitted by LIBS plasmas containing multiple species. Theoretical and numerical foundations of the model are described in detail. It is shown that the plasma spectra simulated with the equation of state based on the energy balance that includes the kinetic (thermal) energy, ionization energy, and energy of electronic excitations in atoms and ions differ significantly from the spectra obtained for plasmas modeled in the ideal gas approximation (where only the kinetic energy is included into the energy balance). Various transport phenomena, such as viscosity, diffusion, and thermal conductivity, are shown to have a little effect on the spectra. Radiation losses are proved to have noticeable effects. The effects of various interactions (adhesion, heat exchange, mass inflows) of the evolving plasma with the ablation surface are also illustrated by numerical simulations for typical LIBS plasmas. The model provides a numerical tool to assess various settings for LIBS plasma experiments as well as to interpret experimental data. - Highlights: • A gas dynamic model of laser induced plasma with axial symmetry is developed. • The effects of the plasma equation of state, radiation transfer, transport phenomena, and the ablation surface on the plasma evolution and the plasma spectra are systematically studied. • Numerous numerical simulations visualize the physical portrait of the plasma at different stages of its evolution. • The model provides a numerical tool to assess various settings for LIBS plasma experiments and to interpret experimental data.

  4. Effect of plasma formation on the double pulse laser excitation of cubic silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otobe, T.; Hayashi, T.; Nishikino, M.

    2017-10-01

    We calculate the electron excitation in cubic silicon carbide caused by the intense femtosecond laser double pulses using the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). After the first pulse ends, excited electrons should be relaxed by collisional processes. Because TDDFT does not include scattering processes, thermalization is mimicked by following three assumptions. First, we assume no collisions and relaxation processes. Second, we assume the partially thermalized electronic state defined by two quasi-temperatures in the conduction and valence bands individually. Third, we assume the thermalized electron distribution, which is expressed by single electron temperature. Our results indicate that the plasma frequency (ωpl) formed by the first pulse is the key parameter in energy absorption in the second pulse. When the plasma frequency of the plasma formed by the first laser approaches the frequency of the laser, resonant excitation by the second pulse occurs. The lower electron temperature shows higher ωpl and higher efficient energy absorption because the effective mass of the electron becomes smaller.

  5. High Heat Flux Interactions and Tritium Removal from Plasma Facing Components by a Scanning Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.H. Skinner; C.A. Gentile; A. Hassanein

    2002-01-28

    A new technique for studying high heat flux interactions with plasma facing components is presented. The beam from a continuous wave 300 W neodymium laser was focused to 80 W/mm2 and scanned at high speed over the surface of carbon tiles. These tiles were previously used in the TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] inner limiter and have a surface layer of amorphous hydrogenated carbon that was codeposited during plasma operations. Laser scanning released up to 84% of the codeposited tritium. The temperature rise of the codeposit on the tiles was significantly higher than that of the manufactured material. In one experiment, the codeposit surface temperature rose to 1,770 C while for the same conditions, the manufactured surface increased to only 1,080 C. The peak temperature did not follow the usual square-root dependence on heat pulse duration. Durations of order 100 ms resulted in brittle destruction and material loss from the surface, while a duration of approximately 10 ms showed minimal change. A digital microscope imaged the codeposit before, during, and after the interaction with the laser and revealed hot spots on a 100-micron scale. These results will be compared to analytic modeling and are relevant to the response of plasma facing components to disruptions and vertical displacement events (VDEs) in next-step magnetic fusion devices.

  6. Transport Processes in High Temperature QCD Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Juhee

    The transport properties of high temperature QCD plasmas can be described by kinetic theory based on the Boltzmann equation. At a leading-log approximation, the Boltzmann equation is reformulated as a Fokker-Planck equation. First, we compute the spectral densities of Tµν and Jµ by perturbing the system with weak gravitational and electromagnetic fields. The spectral densities exhibit a smooth transition from free-streaming quasi-particles to hydrodynamics. This transition is analyzed with hydrodynamics and diffusion equation up to second order. We determine all of the first and second order transport coefficients which characterize the linear response in the hydrodynamic regime. Second, we simulate the wake of a heavy quark moving through the plasmas. At long distances, the energy density and flux distributions show sound waves and a diffusion wake. The kinetic theory calculations based on the Boltzmann equation at weak coupling are compared to the strong coupling results given by the AdS/CFT correspondence. By using the hard-thermal-loop effective theory, we determine the photon emission rate at next-to-leading order (NLO), i.e., at order g2mD /T. There are three mechanisms which contribute to the leading-order photon emission: (2 ↔ 2) elastic scatterings, (1 ↔ 2) collinear bremsstrahlung, and (1 ↔ 1) quark-photon conversion due to soft fermion exchange. At NLO, these three mechanisms are not completely independent. When the transverse momentum between quark and photon becomes soft, the Compton scattering with a soft gluon reduces to wide-angle bremsstrahlung. Similarly, bremsstrahlung reduces to the quark-photon conversion process when the photon carries most of the incoming momentum. Therefore, the rates should be matched to determine the wide-angle NLO correction. Collinear bremsstrahlung can be accounted for by solving an integral equation which corresponds to summing ladder diagrams. With O(g) corrections in the collision kernel and the asymptotic

  7. Nitric Oxide Studies in Low Temperature Plasmas Generated with a Nanosecond Pulse Sphere Gap Electrical Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnette, David Dean

    This dissertation presents studies of NO kinetics in a plasma afterglow using various nanosecond pulse discharges across a sphere gap. The discharge platform is developed to produce a diffuse plasma volume large enough to allow for laser diagnostics in a plasma that is rich in vibrationally-excited molecules. This plasma is characterized by current and voltage traces as well as ICCD and NO PLIF images that are used to monitor the plasma dimensions and uniformity. Temperature and vibrational loading measurements are performed via coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). Absolute NO concentrations are obtained by laser-induce fluorescence (LIF) measurements, and N and O densities are found using two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF). For all dry air conditions studied, the NO behavior is characterized by a rapid rate of formation consistent with an enhanced Zeldovich process involving electronically-excited nitrogen species that are generated within the plasma. After several microseconds, the NO evolution is entirely controlled by the reverse Zeldovich process. These results show that under the chosen range of conditions and even in extreme instances of vibrational loading, there is no formation channel beyond ~2 musec. Both the NO formation and consumption mechanisms are strongly affected by the addition of fuel species, producing much greater NO concentrations in the afterglow.

  8. Dense monoenergetic proton beams from chirped laser-plasma interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Galow, Benjamin J; Liseykina, Tatyana V; Harman, Zoltan; Keitel, Christoph H

    2011-01-01

    Interaction of a frequency-chirped laser pulse with single protons and a hydrogen plasma cell is studied analytically and by means of particle-in-cell simulations, respectively. Feasibility of generating ultra-intense (10^7 particles per bunch) and phase-space collimated beams of protons (energy spread of about 1 %) is demonstrated. Phase synchronization of the protons and the laser field, guaranteed by the appropriate chirping of the laser pulse, allows the particles to gain sufficient kinetic energy (around 250 MeV) required for such applications as hadron cancer therapy, from state-of-the-art laser systems of intensities of the order of 10^21 W/cm^2.

  9. Simulation of intense short-pulse laser-plasma interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamagiwa, Mitsuru [Advanced Photon Research Center, Kansai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kizu, Kyoto (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    We have completed the massive parallelization of a 2-dimensional giga-particle code and have achieved a 530-fold acceleration rate with 512 processing elements (PE's). Using this we have implemented a simulation of the interaction of a solid thin film and a high intensity laser and have discovered a phenomenon in which high quality short pulses from the far ultraviolet to soft X-rays are generated at the back surface of the thin layer. We have also introduced the atomic process database code (Hullac) and have the possibility for high precision simulations of X-ray laser radiation. With respect to laser acceleration we have the possibility to quantitatively evaluate relativistic self-focusing assumed to occur in higher intensity fields. Ion acceleration from a solid target and an underdense plasma irradiated by an intense and an ultra intense laser, respectively, has also been studied by particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. (author)

  10. Laser safety and hazard analysis for the temperature stabilized BSLT ARES laser system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2003-08-01

    A laser safety and hazard analysis was performed for the temperature stabilized Big Sky Laser Technology (BSLT) laser central to the ARES system based on the 2000 version of the American National Standards Institute's (ANSI) Standard Z136.1, for Safe Use of Lasers and the 2000 version of the ANSI Standard Z136.6, for Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. As a result of temperature stabilization of the BSLT laser the operating parameters of the laser had changed requiring a hazard analysis based on the new operating conditions. The ARES laser system is a Van/Truck based mobile platform, which is used to perform laser interaction experiments and tests at various national test sites.

  11. Development of plasma bolometers using fiber-optic temperature sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinke, M. L., E-mail: reinkeml@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Han, M.; Liu, G. [University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Eden, G. G. van [Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, De Zaale 20, 5612 AJ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Evenblij, R.; Haverdings, M. [Technobis, Pyrietstraat 2, 1812 SC Alkmaar (Netherlands); Stratton, B. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Measurements of radiated power in magnetically confined plasmas are important for exhaust studies in present experiments and expected to be a critical diagnostic for future fusion reactors. Resistive bolometer sensors have long been utilized in tokamaks and helical devices but suffer from electromagnetic interference (EMI). Results are shown from initial testing of a new bolometer concept based on fiber-optic temperature sensor technology. A small, 80 μm diameter, 200 μm long silicon pillar attached to the end of a single mode fiber-optic cable acts as a Fabry–Pérot cavity when broadband light, λ{sub o} ∼ 1550 nm, is transmitted along the fiber. Changes in temperature alter the optical path length of the cavity primarily through the thermo-optic effect, resulting in a shift of fringes reflected from the pillar detected using an I-MON 512 OEM spectrometer. While initially designed for use in liquids, this sensor has ideal properties for use as a plasma bolometer: a time constant, in air, of ∼150 ms, strong absorption in the spectral range of plasma emission, immunity to local EMI, and the ability to measure changes in temperature remotely. Its compact design offers unique opportunities for integration into the vacuum environment in places unsuitable for a resistive bolometer. Using a variable focus 5 mW, 405 nm, modulating laser, the signal to noise ratio versus power density of various bolometer technologies are directly compared, estimating the noise equivalent power density (NEPD). Present tests show the fiber-optic bolometer to have NEPD of 5-10 W/m{sup 2} when compared to those of the resistive bolometer which can achieve <0.5 W/m{sup 2} in the laboratory, but this can degrade to 1-2 W/m{sup 2} or worse when installed on a tokamak. Concepts are discussed to improve the signal to noise ratio of this new fiber-optic bolometer by reducing the pillar height and adding thin metallic coatings, along with improving the spectral resolution of the interrogator.

  12. Waves and Fine Structure in Expanding Laser-Produced Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collette, Andrew; Gekelman, Walter

    2009-11-01

    The behavior of expanding dense plasmas has long been a topic of interest in space plasma research, particularly in the case of expansion within a magnetized background. Previous laser-plasma experiments at the UCLA Large Plasma Device have observed the creation of strong (δBB > 50%) diamagnetic cavities, along with large-scale wave activity and hints of fine-scale structure. A new series of experiments conducted recently at the LaPD performs direct measurement of the fields inside the expanding plasma via a novel 2D probe drive system. This system combines small-scale (0.5mm-1mm) magnetic and electric field probes with high-accuracy vacuum ceramic motors, to allow measurement of the plasma volume over a 2000-point grid at 1mm resolution. The data reveal both coherent high-amplitude waves associated with the formation of these magnetic features, and complicated small-scale structure in both the magnetic field and floating potential. In addition, we will present correlation techniques using multiple independent B and E field probes. This reveals behavior of turbulent, non-phase-locked phenomena. Both the case of a single expanding plasma and two colliding plasmas were studied.

  13. Experimental and theoretical investigation of a self-absorbed spectral line emitted from laser-induced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Ahmed, Jalloul; Cowpe, John

    2010-06-20

    Using well-known expressions describing radiative transfer, we have established an expression predicting the spectral profile of a self-absorbed Ca{sup ++}393.4 nm emission line as emitted by a transient laser-induced plasma. In this approach, the plasma was approximated as comprising five distinct layers, each of thickness 0.5 mm, and each characterized by a unique uniform electron density, electron temperature, and optical depth. The validity of the theoretical model was confirmed by successful comparison with experimental data. Inhomogeneous laser-induced plasmas were produced on the surface of an aqueous CaCl2 (0.01 mol/l) solution using a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. Optical emission spectra were collected in such a way as to allow for temporal and spatial diagnostics of the plasma plumes.

  14. Femtosecond optical diagnostics and hydrodynamic simulation of Ag plasma created by laser irradiation of a solid target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veysman, M E; Agranat, M B; Andreev, N E; Ashitkov, S I; Fortov, V E; Khishchenko, K V; Kostenko, O F; Levashov, P R; Ovchinnikov, A V; Sitnikov, D S [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya 13 bldg 2, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: bme@ihed.ras.ru

    2008-06-28

    A combined experimental-theoretical method of diagnostics of the plasma created on a surface of Ag target irradiated by intense femtosecond laser pulses is proposed. The method is based on semiempirical wide-range models of optical, transport and thermodynamic properties of Ag plasma. Numerical coefficients in these models are chosen so as to ensure the best accordance of simulations to measurements of a complex absorption coefficient of Ag plasma by means of femtosecond interference microscopy. A two-temperature hydrodynamic modelling of non-stationary laser-produced Ag plasma is carried out; calculated results are presented in comparison with experiments. Unexpectedly high values of the phase of the complex reflection coefficient at short (200 fs) time delay between pump and probe laser pulses are obtained experimentally; possible explanations of this phenomenon are discussed.

  15. Electron temperature dynamics of TEXTOR plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Udintsev, Victor Sergeevich

    2003-01-01

    To study plasma properties in the presence of large and small MHD modes, new high-resolution ECE diagnostics have been installed at TEXTOR tokamak, and some of the already existing systems have been upgraded. Two models for the plasma transport properties inside large m/n = 2/1 MHD islands have been

  16. High Power Laser Laboratory at the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion: equipment and preliminary research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaraś-Szydłowska Agnieszka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present the newly-opened High Power Laser Laboratory (HPLL at the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion (IPPLM. This article describes the laser, the main laboratory accessories and the diagnostic instruments. We also present preliminary results of the first experiment on ion and X-ray generation from laser-produced plasma that has been already performed at the HPLL.

  17. Experimental Investigation of Laser-sustained Plasma in Supersonic Argon Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperber, David; Eckel, Hans-Albert; Moessinger, Peter; Fasoulas, Stefanos

    2011-11-01

    Laser-induced energy deposition is widely discussed as a flow control technique in supersonic transportation. In case of thermal laser-plasma upstream of a blunt body, a substantial adaptation of shock wave geometry and magnitude of wave drag is predicted. Related to the research on laser supported detonation, the paper describes the implementation of laser-sustained plasma in a supersonic Argon jet. The stable plasma state is generated by the intersection of a Q-switched Nd:YAG-laser and a continuous wave CO2-laser beams, for ignition and maintenance of the plasma respectively. A miniature supersonic Ludwieg tube test facility generates a supersonic jet at velocities of Mach 2.1. Modifications of the flow and plasma conditions are investigated and characterized by Schlieren flow visualisation, laser energy transmission and plasma radiation measurements. The results include the discussions of the flow field as well as the required laser and gas parameters.

  18. Laser plasma interaction in rugby-shaped hohlraums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson-Laborde, P.-E.; Philippe, F.; Tassin, V.; Monteil, M.-C.; Gauthier, P.; Casner, A.; Depierreux, S.; Seytor, P.; Teychenne, D.; Loiseau, P.; Freymerie, P.

    2014-10-01

    Rugby shaped-hohlraum has proven to give high performance compared to a classical similar-diameter cylinder hohlraum. Due to this performance, this hohlraum has been chosen as baseline ignition target for the Laser MegaJoule (LMJ). Many experiments have therefore been performed during the last years on the Omega laser facility in order to study in details the rugby hohlraum. In this talk, we will discuss the interpretation of these experiments from the point of view of the laser plasma instability problem. Experimental comparisons have been done between rugby, cylinder and elliptical shape rugby hohlraums and we will discuss how the geometry differences will affect the evolution of laser plasma instabilities (LPI). The efficiency of laser smoothing techniques on these instabilities will also be discussed as well as gas filling effect. The experimental results will be compared with FCI2 hydroradiative calculations and linear postprocessing with Piranah. Experimental Raman and Brillouin spectrum, from which we can infer the location of the parametric instabilities, will be compared to simulated ones, and will give the possibility to compare LPI between the different hohlraum geometries.

  19. Combustion and Plasma Synthesis of High-Temperature Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, Z. A.; Holt, J. B.

    1997-04-01

    , et al.). Combustion Synthesis in the Ti-C-Ni-Al System (S. Dunmead, et al.). Combustion Synthesis Dynamics Modeling (T. Kottke, et al.). Elementary Processes in SiO2-Al Thermite-Type Reactions Activated or Induced by Mechanochemical Treatment (G. Hida & I. Lin). Combustion Synthesis of Ceramic Preforms for Molten-Metal Infiltration (D. Halverson, et al.). Combustion Characteristics of Solid-Solid Systems: Experiments and Modeling (S. Kumar, et al.). Microstructure of TiB2 Sintered by the Self-Combustion Method (K. Urabe, et al..). A Laser-Ignition Study of Gasless Reactions Using Thermography (C. Chow & J. Mohler). Shock-Induced Reaction Synthesis-Assisted Processing of Ceramics (R. Ward, et al.). Summary Assessment of the Application of SPS and Related Reaction Processing to Produce Dense Ceramics (R. Rice). Shock Consolidation of Combustion-Synthesized Ceramics (A. Niiler, et al.). High-Pressure Burning Rate of Silicon in Nitrogen (M. Costantino & J. Holt). Preparation of a TiC Single Crystal by the Floating-Zone Method from a Self-Combustion Rod (S. Otani, et al.). PLASMA AND GAS-PHASE SYNTHESIS. Thermal Plasma Synthesis of Ceramic Powders and Coatings (T. Yoshida). A Theoretical Comparison of Conventional and Hybrid RF-Plasma Reactors (J. McKelliget & N. El-Kaddah). Homogeneous Nucleation and Particle Growth in Thermal Plasma Synthesis (S. Girshick & C.-P. Chiu). Formation of Refractory Aerosol Particles (R. Flagan, et al.). Ceramic-Powder Synthesis in an Aerosol Reactor (M. Alam, et al.). Silica-Particle Formation Using the Counter-Flow Diffusion Flame Burner (J. Katz, et al.). Synthesis and Properties of Low-Carbon Boron Carbides (C. Adkins, et al.). Synthesis of Si, SiC, and Si3N4 Powders Under High Number Density Conditions (J. Haggerty & J. Flint). Rapid Preparation of Titanium and Other Transition-Metal Nitride- and Carbide Powders by a Carbo-Reduction Method Using Arc-Image Heating (M. Yoshimura, et al.). Microwave Plasma Densification of Aluminum Nitride

  20. Diamagnetism and neutrals depletion in low temperature plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruchtman, Amnon; Shinohara, Shunjiro; Kuwahara, Daisuke

    2017-10-01

    Recent study has shown that diamagnetism may be suppressed in low temperature plasma due to neutrals depletion. Diamagnetism and neutrals depletion in low temperature plasma are explored here theoretically. Cylindrical plasma is considered with radial cross-field transport. Conditions are found for either diamagnetism or neutrals depletion being dominant. An unexpected non-monotonic variation of the plasma density with the plasma particle flux is demonstrated. It is shown that as plasma generation (and particle flux) increase, the plasma density first increases, as expected, but then, as particle flux is increased further, the plasma density surprisingly decreases. The decrease follows a decrease of plasma confinement due to increased plasma diamagnetism. In addition, it is shown that an increase of the magnetic field as the plasma density is kept constant results in a decrease of neutrals depletion, as suggested previously, while an increase of the magnetic field as the plasma particle flux is kept constant results in constant neutrals depletion. Supported by JSPS under Contract No. S14033, by the ISF, Grants No. 765/11 and 1581/16, and by NIFS budget code NIFS17KBA.

  1. Foundations of low-temperature plasma physics—an introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Keudell, A.; Schulz-von der Gathen, V.

    2017-11-01

    The use of plasmas as a reactive mixture of ions, electrons and neutrals is at the core of numerous technologies in industry, enabling applications in microelectronics, automotives, packaging, environment and medicine. Recently, even the use of plasmas in medical applications has made great progress. The dominant character of a plasma is often its non equilibrium nature with different temperatures for the individual species in a plasma, the ions, electrons and neutrals. This opens up a multitude of reaction pathways which are inaccessible to conventional methods in chemistry, for example. The understanding of plasmas requires expertise in plasma physics, plasma chemistry and in electrical engineering. This first paper in a series of foundation papers on low temperature plasma science is intended to provide the very basics of plasmas as a common starting point for the more in-depth discussion of particular plasma generation methods, plasma modeling and diagnostics in the other foundation papers. In this first paper of the series, the common terminology, definitions and main concepts are introduced. The covered aspects start with the basic definitions and include further plasma equilibria, particle collisions and transport, sheaths and discharge breakdowns.

  2. Nuclear Fusion Effects Induced in Intense Laser-Generated Plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenzo Torrisi; Salvatore Cavallaro; Mariapompea Cutroneo; Josef Krasa

    2013-01-01

    Deutered polyethylene (CD2)n thin and thick targets were irradiated in high vacuum by infrared laser pulses at 1015W/cm2 intensity. The high laser energy transferred to the polymer generates plasma, expanding in vacuum at supersonic velocity, accelerating hydrogen and carbon ions. Deuterium ions at kinetic energies above 4 MeV have been measured by using ion collectors and SiC detectors in time-of-flight configuration. At these energies the deuterium–deuterium collisions may induce over thres...

  3. Electron Generation and Transport in Intense Relativistic Laser-Plasma Interactions Relevant to Fast Ignition ICF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Tammy Yee Wing [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The reentrant cone approach to Fast Ignition, an advanced Inertial Confinement Fusion scheme, remains one of the most attractive because of the potential to efficiently collect and guide the laser light into the cone tip and direct energetic electrons into the high density core of the fuel. However, in the presence of a preformed plasma, the laser energy is largely absorbed before it can reach the cone tip. Full scale fast ignition laser systems are envisioned to have prepulses ranging between 100 mJ to 1 J. A few of the imperative issues facing fast ignition, then, are the conversion efficiency with which the laser light is converted to hot electrons, the subsequent transport characteristics of those electrons, and requirements for maximum allowable prepulse this may put on the laser system. This dissertation examines the laser-to-fast electron conversion efficiency scaling with prepulse for cone-guided fast ignition. Work in developing an extreme ultraviolet imager diagnostic for the temperature measurements of electron-heated targets, as well as the validation of the use of a thin wire for simultaneous determination of electron number density and electron temperature will be discussed.

  4. Time-resolved electron thermal conduction by probing of plasma formation in transparent solids with high power subpicosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vu, Brian -Tinh Van [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1994-02-01

    This dissertation work includes a series of experimental measurements in a search for better understanding of high temperature (104-106K) and high density plasmas (1022-1024cm-3) produced by irradiating a transparent solid target with high intensity (1013 - 1015W/cm2) and subpicosecond (10-12-10-13s) laser pulses. Experimentally, pump and probe schemes with both frontside (vacuum-plasma side) and backside (plasma-bulk material side) probes are used to excite and interrogate or probe the plasma evolution, thereby providing useful insights into the plasma formation mechanisms. A series of different experiments has been carried out so as to characterize plasma parameters and the importance of various nonlinear processes. Experimental evidence shows that electron thermal conduction is supersonic in a time scale of the first picosecond after laser irradiation, so fast that it was often left unresolved in the past. The experimental results from frontside probing demonstrate that upon irradiation with a strong (pump) laser pulse, a thin high temperature (~40eV) super-critical density (~1023/cm3) plasma layer is quickly formed at the target surface which in turn becomes strongly reflective and prevents further transmission of the remainder of the laser pulse. In the bulk region behind the surface, it is also found that a large sub-critical (~1018/cm3) plasma is produced by inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption and collisional ionization. The bulk underdense plasma is evidenced by large absorption of the backside probe light. A simple and analytical model, modified from the avalanche model, for plasma evolution in transparent materials is proposed to explain the experimental results. Elimination of the bulk plasma is then experimentally illustrated by using targets overcoated with highly absorptive films.

  5. Plasma channel undulator excited by high-order laser modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingwei; Schroeder, Carl; Zepf, Matt; Rykovanov, Sergey

    2017-10-01

    The possibility of utilizing plasma undulators and plasma accelerators to produce compact and economical ultraviolet and X-ray radiation sources has attracted considerable interest for a few decades. This interest has been driven by the great potential to decrease the threshold for accessing such sources, which are now mainly provided by a very few dedicated large-scale synchrotron or free-electron laser (FEL) facilities. However, the typically broad radiation bandwidth of such plasma devices limits the source brightness and makes it difficult for the FEL instability to develop. Here, using multi-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations, we demonstrate that a plasma undulator generated by the beating of a mixture of high-order laser modes propagating inside a plasma channel, leads to a few percent radiation bandwidth. The strength of the undulator can reach unity, the period can be less than a millimeter, and the total number of undulator periods can be significantly increased by a phase locking technique based on the longitudinal density modulation. According to analytical estimates and simulations, in the fully beam loaded regime, the electron current in the undulator can reach 0.3 kA, making such an undulator a potential candidate towards a table-top FEL.

  6. Compton Scattering in Plasma: Multiple Scattering Effects and Application to Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Ravindra

    2013-01-01

    We explore the physics of electron acceleration in a plasma medium in an effective field theory framework. Employing a multiple Compton scattering mechanism, it is found that the acceleration can be sustained in such a medium so as to attain the energies up to the order of $O(100 \\rm{MeV})$ within a centimeter. Also, the collimation and mono-energetic electron spectrum can be obtained by proper tuning of the plasma parameters with the photon frequency. The present work is potentially useful in understanding the physics of laser-plasma accelerators.

  7. Plasma column development in the CO2 laser-heated solenoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tighe, W.; Offenberger, A. A.; Capjack, C. E.

    1987-08-01

    Axial and radial plasma dynamics in the CO2 laser-heated solenoid have been studied experimentally and numerically. The axial behavior is found to be well described by a self-regulated bleaching wave model. The radial expansion is found to be strongly dependent on the focusing ratio of the input laser beam. With a fast focus ( f/5), the early radial expansion rate is twice that found with a slower focusing arrangement ( f/15). The faster focusing ratio also results in a significantly wider plasma column. On the other hand, no significant dependence of f/♯ on the axial propagation was found. A finite ionization time and the rapid formation of a density minimum on axis are observed and verify earlier experimental results. Detailed comparisons are made with a 2-D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and laser propagation code. The axial and radial plasma behavior and, in particular, the dependence of the radial behavior on the focal ratio of the laser are reasonably well supported by the simulation results. Computational results are also in good agreement with experimental measurements of temperature and density using stimulated scattering (Brillouin, Raman) and interferometry diagnostic techniques.

  8. Gas laser with dual plasma mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnaduwage, Lal A.

    1999-01-01

    A gas laser includes an enclosure forming a first chamber, a second chamber and a lasing chamber which communicates through a first opening to the first chamber and through a second opening to the second chamber. The lasing chamber has a pair of reflectors defining a Fabry-Perot cavity. Separate inlets enable different gases to be introduced into the first and second chambers. A first cathode within the first chamber is provided to produce positive ions which travel into the lasing chamber and a second cathode of a pin-hollow type within the second chamber is provided to produce negative ions which travel into the lasing chamber. A third inlet introduces a molecular gas into the lasing chamber, where the molecular gas becomes excited by the positive and negative ions and emits light which lases in the Fabry-Perot cavity.

  9. Colliding laser-produced plasmas as targets for laser-generated extreme ultraviolet sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummins, T.; O' Gorman, C.; Dunne, P.; Sokell, E.; O' Sullivan, G. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Hayden, P., E-mail: patrick.hayden@physics.org [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); School of Physical Sciences and National Centre for Plasma Science and Technology, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland)

    2014-07-28

    Colliding plasmas produced by neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG) laser illumination of tin wedge targets form stagnation layers, the physical parameters of which can be controlled to optimise coupling with a carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) heating laser pulse and subsequent extreme ultraviolet (EUV) production. The conversion efficiency (CE) of total laser energy into EUV emission at 13.5 nm ± 1% was 3.6%. Neglecting both the energy required to form the stagnation layer and the EUV light produced before the CO{sub 2} laser pulse is incident results in a CE of 5.1% of the CO{sub 2} laser energy into EUV light.

  10. Laser fluence dependence on emission dynamics of ultrafast laser induced copper plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anoop, K. K.; Harilal, S. S.; Philip, Reji; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S.

    2016-11-01

    The characteristic emission features of a laser-produced plasma depend strongly on the laser fluence. We investigated the spatial and temporal dynamics of neutrals and ions in a femtosecond laser (800 nm, ˜40 fs, Ti:Sapphire) induced copper plasma in vacuum using both optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and spectrally resolved two-dimensional (2D) imaging over a wide fluence range of 0.5-77.5 J/cm2. 2D fast gated monochromatic images showed a distinct plume splitting between the neutrals and ions, especially at moderate to higher fluence. OES studies at low to moderate laser fluence confirm intense neutral line emission over ion emission, whereas this trend changes at higher laser fluence with dominance of the latter. This evidences a clear change in the physical processes involved in the femtosecond laser-matter interaction at high input laser intensity. The obtained ion dynamics resulting from OES and spectrally resolved 2D imaging are compared with charged particle measurement employing Faraday cup and Langmuir probe; results showed good correlation.

  11. Laser fluence dependence on emission dynamics of ultrafast laser induced copper plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anoop, K. K.; Harilal, S. S.; Philip, Reji; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S.

    2016-11-14

    The characteristic emission features of a laser-produced plasma strongly depend strongly on the laser fluence. We investigated the spatial and temporal dynamics of neutrals and ions in femtosecond laser (800 nm, ≈ 40 fs, Ti:Sapphire) induced copper plasma in vacuum using both optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and spectrally resolved two-dimensional (2D) imaging methods over a wide fluence range of 0.5 J/cm2-77.5 J/cm2. 2D fast gated monochromatic images showed distinct plume splitting between the neutral and ions especially at moderate to higher fluence ranges. OES studies at low to moderate laser fluence regime confirm intense neutral line emission over the ion emission whereas this trend changes at higher laser fluence with dominance of the latter. This evidences a clear change in the physical processes involved in femtosecond laser matter interaction at high input laser intensity. The obtained ion dynamics resulting from the OES, and spectrally resolved 2D imaging are compared with charged particle measurement employing Faraday cup and Langmuir probe and results showed good correlation.

  12. [Study of the effect of heat source separation distance on plasma physical properties in laser-pulsed GMAW hybrid welding based on spectral diagnosis technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wei; Hua, Xue-Ming; Zhang, Wang; Li, Fang

    2014-05-01

    In the present paper, the authors calculated the plasma's peak electron temperatures under different heat source separation distance in laser- pulse GMAW hybrid welding based on Boltzmann spectrometry. Plasma's peak electron densities under the corresponding conditions were also calculated by using the Stark width of the plasma spectrum. Combined with high-speed photography, the effect of heat source separation distance on electron temperature and electron density was studied. The results show that with the increase in heat source separation distance, the electron temperatures and electron densities of laser plasma did not changed significantly. However, the electron temperatures of are plasma decreased, and the electron densities of are plasma first increased and then decreased.

  13. A Superintense Laser-Plasma Interaction Theory Primer

    CERN Document Server

    Macchi, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The continuous trend towards higher and higher laser intensities has opened the way to new physical regimes and advanced applications of laser-plasma interactions, thus stimulating novel connections with ultrafast optics, astrophysics, particle physics, and biomedical applications. This book is primarily oriented towards students and young researchers who need to acquire rapidly a basic knowledge of this active and rapidly changing research field. To this aim, the presentation is focused on a selection of basic models and inspiring examples, and includes topics which emerged recently such as ion acceleration, "relativistic engineering" and radiation friction. The contents are presented in a self-contained way assuming only a basic knowledge of classical electrodynamics, mechanics and relativistic dynamics at the undergraduate (Bachelor) level, without requiring any previous knowledge of plasma physics. Hence, the book may serve in several ways: as a compact textbook for lecture courses, as a short and accessi...

  14. Direct acceleration of electrons by a CO2 laser in a curved plasma waveguide

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Longqing; Pukhov, Alexander; Shen, Baifei

    2016-01-01

    Laser plasma interaction with micro-engineered targets at relativistic intensities has been greatly promoted by recent progress in the high contrast lasers and the manufacture of advanced micro- and nano-structures. This opens new possibilities for the physics of laser-matter interaction. Here we propose a novel approach that leverages the advantages of high-pressure CO$_{2}$ laser, laser-waveguide interaction, as well as micro-engineered plasma structure to accelerate electrons to peak energ...

  15. Optimal laser wavelength for efficient laser power converter operation over temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhn, O.; Walker, A. W.; Bett, A. W.; Helmers, H.

    2016-06-01

    A temperature dependent modeling study is conducted on a GaAs laser power converter to identify the optimal incident laser wavelength for optical power transmission. Furthermore, the respective temperature dependent maximal conversion efficiencies in the radiative limit as well as in a practically achievable limit are presented. The model is based on the transfer matrix method coupled to a two-diode model, and is calibrated to experimental data of a GaAs photovoltaic device over laser irradiance and temperature. Since the laser wavelength does not strongly influence the open circuit voltage of the laser power converter, the optimal laser wavelength is determined to be in the range where the external quantum efficiency is maximal, but weighted by the photon flux of the laser.

  16. Plasma experiments with 1. 06-. mu. m lasers at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.; Holzrichter, J.F.; Manes, K.R.; Storm, E.K.; Boyle, M.J.; Brooks, K.M.; Haas, R.A.; Phillion, D.W.; Rupert, V.C.

    1976-12-20

    Recent laser fusion experiments at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory have provided basic data concerning: laser beam propagation and absorption in high temperature plasmas, electron energy transport processes that transfer the absorbed laser energy to the high-density ablation region, the general fluid dynamic expansion and compression of the heated plasma, and the processes responsible for the production of 14-MeV neutrons during implosion experiments. Irradiation experiments were performed with Nd:YAG glass laser systems: the two-beam Janus (less than or equal to40 J/100 ps, approx.0.4 TW) and Argus (less than or equal to140 J, 35 ps, approx.4 TW), and the single beam Cyclops (less than or equal to70 J/100 ps, approx.0.7 TW). Two classes of targets have been used: glass microshells (approx.40 to 120 ..mu..m in diameter with approx.0.75-..mu..m-thick walls) filled with an equimolar deuterium-tritium mixture, and disks (approx.160 to 600 ..mu..m in diameter and approx. 10 ..mu..m thick) of several compositions. The targets were supported in vacuum (pressure less than or equal to10/sup -5/ Torr) by thin glass stalks. This paper reports on results related to the propagation, absorption, and scattering of laser light by both spherical and planar targets.

  17. Study of the effect of low-power pulse laser on arc plasma and magnesium alloy target in hybrid welding by spectral diagnosis technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liming; Hao, Xinfeng

    2008-10-01

    In order to study the effect of laser pulses on arc plasma and target metal in the hybrid welding process, the spectra of the plasmas in the welding process of magnesium alloys are analysed in this paper. The acquisition system of plasma spectra is set up and the spectral lines of welding plasma are acquired. Compared with tungsten-inert gas (TIG) welding, the intensities of the spectral lines of magnesium increase sharply while those of Ar decrease for strong evaporation and ionization of magnesium alloys in low-power laser/arc hybrid welding. The electron temperature and density are estimated by the Boltzmann plot method and the Stark broadening effect. The result shows that the electron temperature of arc plasma in the hybrid welding process is much lower than that in TIG welding, especially in the laser beam-affected zone. In contrast, the electron density of the plasma is enhanced. The influences of laser parameters on electron temperature are also studied. The changes in electron temperature and density indicate that the effect of laser pulse on the target metal is the dominant factor influencing the electron temperature and density in low-power laser/arc hybrid welding.

  18. Measurement of the energy loss of heavy ions in laser-produced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knobloch-Maas, Renate

    2009-11-25

    The interaction of ions with plasma is not yet fully understood today, although it is important for inertial fusion technology. During recent years, the energy loss of heavy ions in plasma has therefore been a subject of research in the Laser and Plasma Physics group of Darmstadt University of Technology. Several experiments were carried out at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) in Darmstadt using laser-created plasma, thereby taking advantage of the unique combination of GSI's accelerator facility and the laser system nhelix, which is also described in this work. The experiments focus on the measurement of the energy loss of medium heavy ions in a plasma created by directly heating a thin carbon foil with the nhelix laser, at an energy of about 50 J. In order to measure the energy loss using a time-of-flight method, a stop detector is used to register the arrival of the ion pulses after passing the plasma and a 12 m drift space. At the beginning of the work on this thesis, the ion detector types formerly used were found to be inadequately suited to the difficult task; this was changed during this thesis. The ion detector has to be able to temporarily resolve ion pulses with a frequency of 108 MHz and a width (FWHM) of 3 ns at a very low current. It also has to withstand the X-ray burst from the plasma with a dead time shorter than the difference between the X-ray and the ion time of flight between the plasma and the detector. In order to satisfy these and other demands, a new diamond detector was designed and has now been used for several measurements. In addition to the new detector, other improvements were made concerning the diagnostics and the laser. The laser-created plasma now reaches a maximum temperature exceeding 200 eV and a free electron density of up to 10{sup 22} cm{sup -3}. With this greatly improved setup, energy loss data could be obtained with a temporal resolution several times better than before, using an ion beam with a

  19. Solitary versus Shock Wave Acceleration in Laser-Plasma Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Macchi, Andrea; Nindrayog, Amritpal Singh; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    The excitation of nonlinear electrostatic waves, such as shock and solitons, by ultraintense laser interaction with overdense plasmas and related ion acceleration are investigated by numerical simulations. Stability of solitons and formation of shock waves is strongly dependent on the velocity distribution of ions. Monoenergetic components in ion spectra are produced by "pulsed" reflection from solitary waves. Possible relevance to recent experiments on "shock acceleration" is discussed.

  20. Solitary versus shock wave acceleration in laser-plasma interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchi, Andrea; Nindrayog, Amritpal Singh; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2012-04-01

    The excitation of nonlinear electrostatic waves, such as shock and solitons, by ultraintense laser interaction with overdense plasmas and related ion acceleration are investigated by numerical simulations. Stability of solitons and formation of shock waves is strongly dependent on the velocity distribution of ions. Monoenergetic components in ion spectra are produced by "pulsed" reflection from solitary waves. Possible relevance to recent experiments on "shock acceleration" is discussed.

  1. Laser Ion Acceleration Using Few Times Critical Density Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helle, Michael; Gordon, Daniel; Kaganovich, Dmitri; Ting, Antonio

    2011-10-01

    The generation of high energy ions by means of high intensity laser irradiation of solid targets has been a subject of active research for over a decade. More recently, experimental groups at both Brookhaven National Laboratory and UCLA have shown ion acceleration using CO2 lasers interacting with gas jets that, when ionized, yield plasma densities that are a few times critical density. The advantages of such targets are that they are relatively simple and can be easily operated at high repetition rates. The physics that drive this type of acceleration is not yet well understood. Of particular interest is the scaling of such acceleration to various laser pulse parameters (including multiple pulses) and the effect of the longitudinal plasma density profile on the acceleration process. Additionally, since the plasma is only a few times critical density, frequency upshifted radiation is able to propagate deeper into the target which could lead to interesting new physics in itself. We will discuss various methods of extending this type of acceleration to optical wavelength and present fully 3D simulations as well as preliminary experimental results conducted at the Naval Research Laboratory. This work is supported by the Department of Energy and Office of Naval Research.

  2. Proton beams emission from laser-generated plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Torrisi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available An alternative method employing large dimension ion accelerator systems to generate proton beams can be the production of ions by using a power pulsed laser, operating at high intensity, irradiating in vacuum hydrogenated targets and by extracting the ions of interest from the generated plasma. The choice of the adequate target, of the laser pulse intensity regime and of the ion current obtainable, is strongly dependent of the type of experimental apparatus, as will be discussed in the article. Proton beam emission from experiments conduced at low and high laser intensities are presented, in order to generate protons from about 100 eV, as that prepared at the Physics Department of Messina University, up to about 100 keV, as prepared at INFN-LNS of Catania, and up to about 1 MeV obtained at the international PALS Laboratory of Prague, Czech Republic.

  3. 2nd Workshop on Laser Interaction and Related Plasma Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Hora, Heinrich

    1972-01-01

    Paul Harteck Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Troy, New York When the Maser and the Laser Were discovered, people were speculating if this was the beginning of a new page, or even a new chapter, in the Book of Physics. The Second Workshop on "Laser Interaction and Related Plasma Phenomena" held in Hartford made it clear that the perspective had changed, that people now question if the consequences of these discoveries constitute a new chapter, or possibly a new era in Physics. While the papers presented were all stimulating and of out­ standing quality, of special interest were the experiments which demonstrated that triggering of thermonuclear fusion by Laser techniques is indeed in the realm of the possible. Along these lines, I enjoy recalling an anecdote concerning the late F. G. Houtermans. I think that all who knew him will agree that he was an unusual genius and at the same time a very amusing colleague.

  4. Recent advances in ultrafast-laser-based spectroscopy and imaging for reacting plasmas and flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Anil K.; Adamovich, Igor; Gord, James R.; Roy, Sukesh

    2017-10-01

    Reacting flows and plasmas are prevalent in a wide array of systems involving defense, commercial, space, energy, medical, and consumer products. Understanding the complex physical and chemical processes involving reacting flows and plasmas requires measurements of key parameters, such as temperature, pressure, electric field, velocity, and number densities of chemical species. Time-resolved measurements of key chemical species and temperature are required to determine kinetics related to the chemical reactions and transient phenomena. Laser-based, noninvasive linear and nonlinear spectroscopic approaches have proved to be very valuable in providing key insights into the physico-chemical processes governing reacting flows and plasmas as well as validating numerical models. The advent of kilohertz rate amplified femtosecond lasers has expanded the multidimensional imaging of key atomic species such as H, O, and N in a significant way, providing unprecedented insight into preferential diffusion and production of these species under chemical reactions or electric-field driven processes. These lasers not only provide 2D imaging of chemical species but have the ability to perform measurements free of various interferences. Moreover, these lasers allow 1D and 2D temperature-field measurements, which were quite unimaginable only a few years ago. The rapid growth of the ultrafast-laser-based spectroscopic measurements has been fueled by the need to achieve the following when measurements are performed in reacting flows and plasmas. They are: (1) interference-free measurements (collision broadening, photolytic dissociation, Stark broadening, etc), (2) time-resolved single-shot measurements at a rate of 1-10 kHz, (3) spatially-resolved measurements, (4) higher dimensionality (line, planar, or volumetric), and (5) simultaneous detection of multiple species. The overarching goal of this article is to review the current state-of-the-art ultrafast-laser-based spectroscopic

  5. Laser system for measuring small changes in plasma tracer concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaesner, J W; Pou, N A; Parker, R E; Galloway, R L; Roselli, R J

    1996-01-01

    The authors developed a laser-diode system that can be used for on-line optical concentration measurements in physiologic systems. Previous optical systems applied to whole blood have been hampered by artifacts introduced by red blood cells (RBCs). The system introduced here uses a commercially available filter cartridge to separate RBCs from plasma before plasma concentration measurements are made at a single wavelength. The filtering characteristics of the Cellco filter cartridge (#4007-10, German-town, MD) were adequate for use in the on-line measurement system. The response time of the filter cartridge was less than 40 seconds, and the sieving characteristics of the filter for macromolecules were excellent, with filtrate-to-plasma albumin ratios of 0.98 +/- 0.11 for studies in sheep and 0.94 +/- 0.15 for studies in dogs. The 635-nm laser diode system developed was shown to be more sensitive than the spectrophotometer used in previous studies (Klaesner et al., Annals of Biomedical Engineering, 1994; 22, 660-73). The new system was used to measure the product of filtration coefficient (Kfc) and reflection coefficient for albumin (delta f) in an isolated canine lung preparation. The delta fKfc values [mL/(cmH2O.min.100 g dry lung weight)] measured with the laser diode system (0.33 +/- 0.22) compared favorably with the delta fKfc obtained using a spectrophotometer (0.27 +/- 0.20) and with the Kfc obtained using the blood-corrected gravimetric method (0.32 +/- 0.23). Thus, this new optical system was shown to accurately measure plasma concentration changes in whole blood for physiologic levels of Kfc. The same system can be used with different optical tracers and different source wavelengths to make optical plasma concentration measurements for other physiologic applications.

  6. [Plasma spectral analysis of laser cleaning process in air].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yan-Qun; Zhang, Yong-Kang; Yao, Hong-Bing; Meng, Chun-Mei; Guan, Hai-Bing

    2011-09-01

    It is quick and accurate to on-line monitor the sample condition of laser cleaning by means of laser-induced plasma spectrum in air. In the present article, the echelle grating spectrometer was used to detect the plasma spectral lines induced by pulsed laser interaction with copper coin samples with or without contamination. The spectrogram showed that there were clear Cu I spectrum lines and air atom spectrum lines of N I and O I. In order to eliminate the uncertainty of single measurement, the statistical regularity of N I and O I spectrum lines was analyzed. Their intensity distribution laws were consistent and their relative standard deviations were the same basically. So a single measurement spectrum could be used to monitor cleaning process. The spectra of copper samples with contamination consisted of many elements atomic spectral lines and continuous spectral lines. But there are Cu I spectral lines in the spectra of clean copper samples. As a result, the authors could detect the change of spectral lines to judge whether the laser cleaning samples were clean.

  7. Laser Plasmas: Effect of rippled laser beam on excitation of ion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... superimposed on a Gaussian laser beam in collisional unmagnetised plasma is investigated. From numerical computation, it is observed that self-focusing of main beam as well as ripple determine the growth dynamics of ripple with the distance of propagation. The effect of growing ripple on excitation of ion acoustic wave ...

  8. Sapphire capillaries for laser-driven wakefield acceleration in plasma. Fs-laser micromachining and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwinkendorf, Jan-Patrick

    2012-08-15

    Plasma wakefields are a promising approach for the acceleration of electrons with ultrahigh (10 to 100 GV/m) electric fields. Nowadays, high-intensity laser pulses are routinely utilized to excite these large-amplitude plasma waves. However, several detrimental effects such as laser diffraction, electron-wake dephasing and laser depletion may terminate the acceleration process. Two of these phenomena can be mitigated or avoided by the application of capillary waveguides, e.g. fabricated out of sapphire for longevity. Capillaries may compensate for laser diffraction like a fiber and allow for the creation of tapered gas-density profiles working against the dephasing between the accelerating wave and the particles. Additionally, they offer the possibility of controlled particle injection. This thesis is reporting on the set up of a laser for fs-micromachining of capillaries of almost arbitrary shapes and a test stand for density-profile characterization. These devices will permit the creation of tailored gas-density profiles for controlled electron injection and acceleration inside plasma.

  9. Laser trapped single fine particle as a probe of plasma parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Daisuke; Soejima, Masahiro; Ito, Teppei; Seo, Hyunwoong; Itagaki, Naho; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2015-09-01

    Here we report evaluation of electron density and temperature using optically trapped single fine particle. Experiments were carried out with a radio frequency low pressure plasma reactor, where we set two quartz windows as top and bottom flanges to irradiate an infrared laser light of 1064 nm wavelength from the bottom side. Ar plasmas were generated between a powered ring-electrode set at the bottom of the reactor and a grounded mesh placed at the center of the reactor at 100 Pa by applying 13.56 MHz voltage. The particles injected into the plasmas were monodisperse methyl methacrylate-polymer spheres of 10 μm in diameter. A negatively charged particle, which is suspended plasma sheath boundary, was trapped at the focal point of the irradiated laser light due to the transfer of momentum from the scattering of incident photons. At the beginning of the trapping, particle of 10 μm in size was trapped above 505 μm from the bottom window. After 230 min, the size and position were 9.56 μm and 520 μm, respectively. From the results, the electron density and temperature are deduced to be 1.7×109 cm-3 and 1.9 eV.

  10. Effect of low-temperature plasma treatment on tailorability and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    treatment [1]. Low-temperature plasma (LTP) treatment can be an alternative to traditional wet processes in textile preparation and finishing [2–4]. Nowadays commercial production of plasma-treated wool .... defined as the percentage change in dimensions of the relaxed fabric from wet to dry. HE-1 and HE-2 are the hygral ...

  11. Tokamak Plasmas: Measurement of temperature fluctuations and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Temperature fluctuations; anomalous transport; plasma rotation. ... S K Saha1. Plasma Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Calcutta 700 064, India ... Proceedings of the International Workshop/Conference on Computational Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science

  12. The effects of laser plasma discharge on a separating boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Kevin Patrick

    Modification of the separation and drag characteristics of a laminar airfoil using a remotely located high-power laser was experimentally investigated in a low speed, low-turbulence wind tunnel. It was proposed that pulsed laser energy could be used to cause a disturbance in the boundary layer of a laminar airfoil thus modifying the flow by inducing a cross exchange of momentum within the boundary layer. The result is a unique zero net mass flux and zero net momentum flux actuator for delaying separation. A 500 mm chord length laminar airfoil was designed and fabricated to closely emulate in the wind tunnel the flight characteristics of a Cessna 177 at cruise speed. At zero degrees angle of attack the airfoil was determined to have an incipient laminar separation bubble on its lifting surface between 67 and 80% chord. By focusing the collimated laser beam emitted from a 900mW Q-switched YAG laser a strong plasma pulse was generated from the optical breakdown of the air. The plasma was focused to a location approximately 2 mm in front of the airfoil. High temperature plasma produced by each pulse generates a shockwave and volume of heated turbulent air which interacts with the airfoil and travels along its lifting surface. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system was used as the primary data collection method. Determining the effects of the plasma on the flow over the airfoil requires measuring the behavior deep within the boundary layer which is typically less than 2 mm thick. Custom optics were used to capture flow behavior in a 6 mm x 6 mm field of view along the centerline of the airfoil. The PIV system was electronically triggered by the plasma laser. By varying the trigger delay time a range of data captured the onset, peak and decay of the plasma with fine spatial resolution. Results of this investigation show that a burst of turbulence generated by the pulsed plasma exchanges significant momentum between the freestream and the incipient separation bubble

  13. Contribution to the beam plasma material interactions during material processing with TEA CO2 laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaschek, Rainer; Konrad, Peter E.; Mayerhofer, Roland; Bergmann, Hans W.; Bickel, Peter G.; Kowalewicz, Roland; Kuttenberger, Alfred; Christiansen, Jens

    1995-03-01

    The TEA-CO2-laser (transversely excited atmospheric pressure) is a tool for the pulsed processing of materials with peak power densities up to 1010 W/cm2 and a FWHM of 70 ns. The interaction between the laser beam, the surface of the work piece and the surrounding atmosphere as well as gas pressure and the formation of an induced plasma influences the response of the target. It was found that depending on the power density and the atmosphere the response can take two forms. (1) No target modification due to optical break through of the atmosphere and therefore shielding of the target (air pressure above 10 mbar, depending on the material). (2) Processing of materials (air pressure below 10 mbar, depending on the material) with melting of metallic surfaces (power density above 0.5 109 W/cm2), hole formation (power density of 5 109 W/cm2) and shock hardening (power density of 3.5 1010 W/cm2). All those phenomena are usually linked with the occurrence of laser supported combustion waves and laser supported detonation waves, respectively for which the mechanism is still not completely understood. The present paper shows how short time photography and spatial and temporal resolved spectroscopy can be used to better understand the various processes that occur during laser beam interaction. The spectra of titanium and aluminum are observed and correlated with the modification of the target. If the power density is high enough and the gas pressure above a material and gas composition specific threshold, the plasma radiation shows only spectral lines of the background atmosphere. If the gas pressure is below this threshold, a modification of the target surface (melting, evaporation and solid state transformation) with TEA-CO2- laser pulses is possible and the material specific spectra is observed. In some cases spatial and temporal resolved spectroscopy of a plasma allows the calculation of electron temperatures by comparison of two spectral lines.

  14. Laser-based diagnostics applications for plasma-surface interaction studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meiden, H. J.; van den Berg, M. A.; Brons, S.; Ding, H.; van Eck, H. J. N.; Hoen, M. H. J. 't; Karhunen, J.; de Kruif, T. M.; Laan, M.; Li, C.; Lissovski, A.; Morgan, T. W.; Paris, P.; K Piip,; van de Pol, M.J.; Scannell, R.; Scholten, J.; Smeets, P. H. M.; Spork, C.; van Emmichoven, P. A. Zeijlma; Zoomers, R.; De Temmerman, G. C.

    2013-01-01

    Several laser based diagnostics are implemented on to the linear plasma generator Magnum-PSI, wherein ITER divertor relevant plasma-wall conditions are realized. Laser Induced Desorption Quadrupole Mass Spectroscopy (LID-QMS) and Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) are installed to measure

  15. Emission of strong Terahertz pulses from laser wakefields in weakly coupled plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Divya, E-mail: dsingh@rajdhani.du.ac.in [PWAPA Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110 016 (India); Department of Physics & Electronics, Rajdhani College, University of Delhi, Raja Garden, Ring Road, New Delhi 110015 (India); Malik, Hitendra K. [PWAPA Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110 016 (India)

    2016-09-01

    The present paper discusses the laser plasma interaction for the wakefield excitation and the role of external magnetic field for the emission of Terahertz radiation in a collisional plasma. Flat top lasers are shown to be more appropriate than the conventional Gaussian lasers for the effective excitation of wakefields and hence, the generation of strong Terahertz radiation through the transverse component of wakefield.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Temperature Field in Selective Laser Sintering

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jian; Li, Deying; Li, Jianyun; Zhao, Longzhi

    2010-01-01

    International audience; The laser sintering process of multi-component powder W/Cu is simulated by ANSYS software based on the factors of radiation, convection and thermal physical parameters on temperature. The laser power and scanning velocity which are the key process parameters to affect directly in sintering molding are studied in paper. The results show that when the scanning velocity is constant, the sintering depth is rising with the increase of laser power; In addition, when the lase...

  17. The BErkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA): A 10 GeV Laser Plasma Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leemans, W.P.; Duarte, R.; Esarey, E.; Fournier, S.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Lockhart, D.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, C.; Vay, J.-L.; Zimmermann, S.

    2010-06-01

    An overview is presented of the design of a 10 GeV laser plasma accelerator (LPA) that will be driven by a PW-class laser system and of the BELLA Project, which has as its primary goal to build and install the required Ti:sapphire laser system for the acceleration experiments. The basic design of the 10 GeV stage aims at operation in the quasi-linear regime, where the laser excited wakes are largely sinusoidal and offer the possibility of accelerating both electrons and positrons. Simulations show that a 10 GeV electron beam can be generated in a meter scale plasma channel guided LPA operating at a density of about 1017 cm-3 and powered by laser pulses containing 30-40 J of energy in a 50- 200 fs duration pulse, focused to a spotsize of 50-100 micron. The lay-out of the facility and laser system will be presented as well as the progress on building the facility.

  18. Preliminary scaling laws for plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density in the NASA Lewis bumpy torus plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Parametric variation of independent variables which may affect the characteristics of bumpy torus plasma have identified those which have a significant effect on the plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density, and those which do not. Empirical power law correlations of the plasma current, and the ion kinetic temperature and number density were obtained as functions of potential applied to the midplane electrode rings, the background neutral gas pressure, and the magnetic field strength. Additional parameters studied included the type of gas, the polarity of the midplane electrode rings, the mode of plasma operation, and the method of measuring the plasma number density. No significant departures from the scaling laws appear to occur at the highest ion kinetic temperatures or number densities obtained to date.

  19. Effects of emitted electron temperature on the plasma sheath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheehan, J. P., E-mail: sheehanj@umich.edu [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Kaganovich, I. D.; Wang, H.; Raitses, Y. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Sydorenko, D. [Physics Department, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E9 (Canada); Hershkowitz, N. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    It has long been known that electron emission from a surface significantly affects the sheath surrounding that surface. Typical fluid theory of a planar sheath with emitted electrons assumes that the plasma electrons follow the Boltzmann relation and the emitted electrons are emitted with zero energy and predicts a potential drop of 1.03T{sub e}/e across the sheath in the floating condition. By considering the modified velocity distribution function caused by plasma electrons lost to the wall and the half-Maxwellian distribution of the emitted electrons, it is shown that ratio of plasma electron temperature to emitted electron temperature significantly affects the sheath potential when the plasma electron temperature is within an order of magnitude of the emitted electron temperature. When the plasma electron temperature equals the emitted electron temperature the emissive sheath potential goes to zero. One dimensional particle-in-cell simulations corroborate the predictions made by this theory. The effects of the addition of a monoenergetic electron beam to the Maxwellian plasma electrons were explored, showing that the emissive sheath potential is close to the beam energy only when the emitted electron flux is less than the beam flux.

  20. Determination of flame temperature using laser induced fluorescence (LIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Lina Augusta Martins Ramos da [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA/DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Barreta, Gilberto; Carinhana Junior, Dermeval; Toledo, Antonio Osny de [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv/DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: Laser Induced Fluorescence, LIF, is one of the most used techniques in combustion diagnostics. The excitation method is based on the spontaneous spectrum from atoms or molecules that were excited by laser radiation. In general, intermediated combustion species, as OH and CH radicals, are used as temperature probes. Usually, several rotational levels are used by tuning the laser afterwards across the corresponding absorption transitions. The emission spectrum is detected in a convenient spectral range. The accuracy of measurements depends on the laser linewidth, the delay between the laser excitation and spectra detection and, mainly, the spectral interval of laser excitation. In this work, OH LIF spectra from stoichiometric LPG (Liquefied Petroleum Gas) flames were obtained using a tuned laser with a spectral range set from 282 nm up to 283 nm. This corresponds to the rotation levels of the 0-1 vibration band of OH radical. The laser energy was ca. 0.2 mJ. The emission spectrum was collected in the spectral range of the 305-310 nm, which corresponds to the region of the 0-0 band. The temperature was determined by the Boltzmann method. This is based on the measurement of the relative peak intensities of the emission spectrum. A plot of natural logarithm of line intensities versus energy level returns a straight line, whose slope is the inverse of the rotational temperature. The flame temperature was ca. 2300 K. This value is consistent with previous results obtained in our laboratory. (author)

  1. Plasma Physics Issues in Gas Discharge Laser Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    halide ions as possible gas temperature to 11)0) K results in the gaia coefficient rising VUV laser-active media. Following the trend toward higher...breakdown studies by the school of Meek and Craggs [831. To [94]. At high pressures, CO,. is the dominant negative ion. avoid extremely high voltages

  2. Characterization of laser-induced plasmas as a complement to high-explosive large-scale detonations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimblin, Clare; Trainham, Rusty; Capelle, Gene A.; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.

    2017-09-01

    Experimental investigations into the characteristics of laser-induced plasmas indicate that LIBS provides a relatively inexpensive and easily replicable laboratory technique to isolate and measure reactions germane to understanding aspects of high-explosive detonations under controlled conditions. Spectral signatures and derived physical parameters following laser ablation of aluminum, graphite and laser-sparked air are examined as they relate to those observed following detonation of high explosives and as they relate to shocked air. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) reliably correlates reactions involving atomic Al and aluminum monoxide (AlO) with respect to both emission spectra and temperatures, as compared to small- and large-scale high-explosive detonations. Atomic Al and AlO resulting from laser ablation and a cited small-scale study, decay within ˜10-5 s, roughly 100 times faster than the Al and AlO decay rates (˜10-3 s) observed following the large-scale detonation of an Al-encased explosive. Temperatures and species produced in laser-sparked air are compared to those produced with laser ablated graphite in air. With graphite present, CN is dominant relative to N2+. In studies where the height of the ablating laser's focus was altered relative to the surface of the graphite substrate, CN concentration was found to decrease with laser focus below the graphite surface, indicating that laser intensity is a critical factor in the production of CN, via reactive nitrogen.

  3. Analysis of induced stress on materials exposed to laser-plasma radiation during high-intensity laser experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scisciò, M.; Barberio, M.; Liberatore, C.; Veltri, S.; Laramée, A.; Palumbo, L.; Legaré, F.; Antici, P.

    2017-11-01

    In this work, we investigate the damage produced in materials when exposed to a laser-generated plasma. The plasma was generated by interaction of a high-intensity laser with Oxygen. We demonstrate that the stress induced on the target surface of a Tantalum target (typical materials used as Plasma Facing Material) after 10 h of plasma exposure is equivalent to the stress induced during 1 h of conventional laser ablation using a pulsed 0.5 J laser. In both cases we obtain a surface erosion in the tens of μm, and a change in the surface roughness in the tens of nm for the stressed materials. The erosion rate of 1 nm/s, explained in terms of surface fragmentation at thermodynamic equilibrium, generates a slow damage to the materials exposed to the plasma. Our method allows indicating safety parameters for the maintenance of materials used in high-intensity laser experiments.

  4. Relativistic self-focusing of an intense laser pulse with hot magnetized plasma in the presence of a helical magnetostatic wiggler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi-Varaki, M.; Jafari, S.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we study the nonlinear interaction of a circularly polarized laser pulse propagating through a hot magnetized plasma in the presence of a helical magnetostatic wiggler. A non-linear equation that describes the spot-size of the laser beam for both left- and right-hand polarizations has been derived. Non-linear dispersion relation describing the evolution of the laser frequency propagating through the hot magnetized plasma has been obtained. The effect of the wiggler magnetic field strength on the evolution of the laser spot-size has been discussed. The results indicate that for the right-hand polarization with increasing wiggler magnetic field strength, the laser spot-size decreases and the laser pulse becomes more focused. On the contrary, for the left-hand polarization, the self-focusing decreases with increasing wiggler magnetic field strength. Besides, it was found that in the right-hand polarization, the laser spot-size increases with the increasing plasma temperature, and the laser beam becomes more defocused. Furthermore, for the left-hand polarization, the laser self-focusing increases with the decreasing plasma temperature. Further numerical results revealed that by increasing the wiggler field strength, the normalized laser power increases significantly.

  5. Food powder analysis by using transversely excited atmospheric CO2 laser-induced plasma spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khumaeni, Ali; Sukra Lie, Zener; Setiabudi, Wahyu; Hendrik Kurniawan, Koo; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2015-06-01

    A direct and sensitive analysis of food powder sample has successfully been carried out by utilizing the special characteristics of pulsed transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO2 laser. In this study, a food powder was placed in a container made of copper plate and covered by a metal mesh. The container was perpendicularly attached on a metal surface. A high-temperature luminous plasma was induced on a metal surface 5 mm above the mesh. Once the plasma was produced, a strong shock wave was induced, blowing-off of the powder from the container to enter into the plasma to be dissociated and excited. By using this method, a semi-quantitative analysis of food powder was made. The detection limits of Cr in the powdered agar and Cd in the powdered rice were 9 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg, respectively.

  6. Investigation of femtosecond laser-produced plasma from various metallic targets using the Langmuir probe characteristic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nica, P.; Gurlui, S.; Osiac, M.; Agop, M.; Ziskind, M.; Focsa, C.

    2017-10-01

    The Langmuir probe is used to characterize the plasma produced by fs-laser ablation from pure metallic targets. Time dependence of the probe current and the total collected charge is discussed in terms of a shifted Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution function, and from probe characteristics the plasma temperature and average charge state are calculated. Target materials of various physical properties (atomic mass, thermal constants) are used to find possible correlations with resulting plasma parameters. By positively biasing the probe, the collected charge -probe voltage characteristic is in general vertically shifted, and for low negative probe potentials an effect consisting in an abnormal decrease of the ion current is observed. Periodic falls of the total collected charge vs. probe voltage are experimentally recorded, the effect being more significant at high background pressure. They are tentatively attributed to secondary ionization.

  7. Plasma temperature rise toward the plasma-facing surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nishijima, D.; Doerner, R. P.; Seraydarian, R. P.; De Temmerman, G.; van der Meiden, H. J.

    2015-01-01

    Detailed measurements of axial electron temperature, Te, profiles in the presheath region were carried out using a Langmuir probe and the line intensity ratio technique for both He I (728.1 nm/706.5 nm) and Be II (467.3 nm/313.1 nm). The results show that Te

  8. Note: Zeeman splitting measurements in a high-temperature plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golingo, R. P.; Shumlak, U.; Den Hartog, D. J. [Aerospace and Energetics Research Program, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-2250 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    The Zeeman effect has been used for measurement of magnetic fields in low-temperature plasma, but the diagnostic technique is difficult to implement in a high-temperature plasma. This paper describes new instrumentation and methodology for simultaneous measurement of the entire Doppler-broadened left and right circularly polarized Zeeman spectra in high-temperature plasmas. Measurements are made using spectra emitted parallel to the magnetic field by carbon impurities in high-temperature plasma. The Doppler-broadened width is much larger than the magnitude of the Zeeman splitting, thus simultaneous recording of the two circularly polarized Zeeman line profiles is key to accurate measurement of the magnetic field in the ZaP Z-pinch plasma device. Spectral data are collected along multiple chords on both sides of the symmetry axis of the plasma. This enables determination of the location of the current axis of the Z-pinch and of lower-bound estimates of the local magnetic field at specific radial locations in the plasma.

  9. Development mechanism of high pressure argon plasma produced by irradiation of excimer laser. Ekishima reza ni yori seiseishita koatsuryoku arugon purazuma no seicho kiko

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, J.; Tsuda, N.; Uchida, Y.; Furuhashi, H. (Aichi Inst. of Technology, Aichi (Japan)); Sahashi, T. (Daido Inst. of Technology, Aichi (Japan))

    1994-04-20

    The studies of a high temperature and high density laser plasma are being carried out centering around solid targets, but a high density plasma can be generated also by focused irradiation of a laser light onto a high pressure gas target. However, in this case, studies on a high pressure laser plasma using the ultra-violet beam are seldom conducted. In this paper, the generation mechanism of a plasma generated mainly behind the focal point of the lens is mentioned in case when the ultra violet laser beam is focused and irradiated onto a high pressure argon gas, and it has been compared for study with the plasma generated by a ruby laser. Part of the obtained results is as follows; it has been elucidated that the plasma generated behind the focal point by focusing and irradiating an ultra violet laser beam onto a high pressure argon gas is growing simultaneously by the radiation supported shock wave and the breakdown wave, same as the case of a visible laser beam. When the ultra violet beam with frequency higher than the plasma frequency is irradiated, a plasma grows in front of the focal point too. 6 refs., 9 figs.

  10. 3D transient model to predict temperature and ablated areas during laser processing of metallic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak. B. Naghshine

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Laser processing is one of the most popular small-scale patterning methods and has many applications in semiconductor device fabrication and biomedical engineering. Numerical modelling of this process can be used for better understanding of the process, optimization, and predicting the quality of the final product. An accurate 3D model is presented here for short laser pulses that can predict the ablation depth and temperature distribution on any section of the material in a minimal amount of time. In this transient model, variations of thermal properties, plasma shielding, and phase change are considered. Ablation depth was measured using a 3D optical profiler. Calculated depths are in good agreement with measured values on laser treated titanium surfaces. The proposed model can be applied to a wide range of materials and laser systems.

  11. Laser induced aluminiun plasma analysis by optical emission spectroscopy in a nitrogen background gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorro, J. C.; Uzuriaga, J.; Riascos, H.

    2012-06-01

    We studied an Al plasma generated by a Nd:YAG laser with a laser fluence of 4 J/cm2, a wavelength of 1064 nm, energy pulse of 500 mJ and 10 Hz repetition rate. We studied their spectral characteristics at various ambient nitrogen pressures by optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The N2 gas pressure was varied from 20 mTorr to 150 mTorr. In Al plume, both atomic and ionic spectra were observed. The electron temperature and electron number density of the plume as of the function ambient gas pressure were determined. The electron temperature was calculated by using the Boltzmann-plot method and the number density was calculated considering the stark effect as dominating on the emission lines.

  12. Cooling expansion in an inhomogeneous ultracold plasma created by using space shaped laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharodi, Vikram; Murillo, Michael

    2017-10-01

    The ultracold neutral plasmas (UCNP) are created by photoionizing the laser cooled atoms. Here, our main goal is to enhance the coupling strength of UCNP and also try to mitigate the disorder induced heating (DIH). For this, we considered an inhomogeneous UCNP which has been created by using the space shaped laser pulses. An adiabatic expansion of this UCNP from higher dense regions to lower dense regions have been studied. A particle based approach has been employed to explore the dynamical evolution of UCNP. The lighter electron density is presumed to follow the Boltzman relation while the heavy ions interact through a Yukawa potential. The spatial average properties (central moments) like density, velocity and temperature have been studied. In the preliminary results, it is observed that as the ions undergo expansion, ion temperature gets lower in higher density regions and vice versa. Several cases of ion flow configuration have been considered for this study.

  13. Angular emission of ions and mass deposition from femtosecond and nanosecond laser-produced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhoff, B.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    We investigated the angular distribution of ions and atoms emanating from femto- and nanosecond laser-produced metal plasmas under similar laser fluence conditions. For producing plasmas, aluminum targets are ablated in vacuum employing pulses from a Ti:Sapphire ultrafast laser (40 fs, 800 nm) and an Nd:YAG laser (6 ns, 1064 nm). The angular distribution of ion emission as well as the kinetic energy distribution is characterized by a Faraday cup, while a quartz microbalance is used for evaluating deposited mass. The ion and deposited mass features showed that fs laser ablated plasmas produced higher kinetic energy and more mass per pulse than ns plumes over all angles. The ion flux and kinetic energy studies show fs laser plasmas produce narrower angular distribution while ns laser plasmas provide narrower energy distribution.

  14. Angular emission of ions and mass deposition from femtosecond and nanosecond laser-produced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoff, B.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the angular distribution of ions and atoms emanating from femto- and nanosecond laser-produced metal plasmas under similar laser fluence conditions. For producing plasmas, aluminum targets are ablated in vacuum employing pulses from a Ti:Sapphire ultrafast laser (40 fs, 800 nm) and an Nd:YAG laser (6 ns, 1064 nm). The angular distribution of ion emission as well as the kinetic energy distribution is characterized by a Faraday cup, while a quartz microbalance is used for evaluating deposited mass. The ion and deposited mass features showed that fs laser ablated plasmas produced higher kinetic energy and more mass per pulse than ns plumes over all angles. The ion flux and kinetic energy studies show fs laser plasmas produce narrower angular distribution while ns laser plasmas provide narrower energy distribution.

  15. Effects of excitation laser wavelength on Ly-{alpha} and He-{alpha} line emission from nitrogen plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, S. S.; Miloshevsky, G. V.; Sizyuk, T.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Laser-produced nitrogen plasmas emitting radiation at 2.48 nm (Ly-{alpha}) and 2.88 nm (He-{alpha}) are considered potential efficient sources for water-window (WW) microscopy. The atomic and optical properties of nitrogen plasma and influence of the laser wavelength on the line emission in the WW range are investigated. It is found that the optimal temperatures for maximum emission from Ly-{alpha} and He-{alpha} spectral lines are 40-60 eV and 80-100 eV, respectively. The WW line emission and the conversion efficiency (CE) are estimated for three distinct Nd:YAG laser wavelengths (1064 nm, 532 nm, and 266 nm). The calculated CEs are compared with experimentally observed CE values. It is found that 1064 nm wavelength provides the highest CE from laser to Ly-{alpha} and He-{alpha} radiation.

  16. Effects of excitation laser wavelength on Ly-α and He-α line emission from nitrogen plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harilal, S. S.; Miloshevsky, G. V.; Sizyuk, T.; Hassanein, A.

    2013-01-01

    Laser-produced nitrogen plasmas emitting radiation at 2.48 nm (Ly-α) and 2.88 nm (He-α) are considered potential efficient sources for water-window (WW) microscopy. The atomic and optical properties of nitrogen plasma and influence of the laser wavelength on the line emission in the WW range are investigated. It is found that the optimal temperatures for maximum emission from Ly-α and He-α spectral lines are 40-60 eV and 80-100 eV, respectively. The WW line emission and the conversion efficiency (CE) are estimated for three distinct Nd:YAG laser wavelengths (1064 nm, 532 nm, and 266 nm). The calculated CEs are compared with experimentally observed CE values. It is found that 1064 nm wavelength provides the highest CE from laser to Ly-α and He-α radiation.

  17. Development of Laser Plasma X-ray Microbeam Irradiation System and Radiation Biological Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Katsutoshi; Nishikino, Masaharu; Numasaki, Hodaka; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Teshima, Teruki; Nishimura, Hiroaki

    Laser plasma x-ray source has the features such as ultra short pulse, high brilliance, monochromaticity, and focusing ability. These features are excellent compared with conventional x-ray source. In order to apply the laser plasma x-ray source to the biomedical study and to more closely research the radiobilogical responce of the cancer cell such as radiation induced bystander effect, we have developed x-ray microbeam system using laser plasma x-ray source. The absorbed dose of laser plasma x-ray was estimated with Gafchromic EBT film and DNA double strand breaks on the cells were detected by immunofluorescence staining. When the cells were irradiated with laser plasma x-ray, the circular regions existing γ-H2AX positive cells were clearly identified. The usefulness of the laser plasma x-ray on the radiobiological study was proved in this research.

  18. Deflagration of Energetic Materials Initiated by Electrostatic Discharges and Laser-Induced Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Eric; Gottfried, Jennifer

    2017-06-01

    A laser-induced plasma and an electrostatic discharge were used for the ignition of small quantities (5-10 mg) of energetic materials. The laser-induced plasma was generated from a ns-pulsed Nd:YAG laser with energy output of 0.8 J per pulse and the electrostatic discharge was generated from a 0.035 μF capacitor that was charged to energy levels of up to 10 J. Although the durations and energy outputs of these two ignition mechanisms are very different, similarities in the initiation of the energetic materials include particle ejection from the target, heating of particles in the air from the plasma and spark, and a shockwave formation. The shock wave was measured and analyzed at various energy levels using schlieren imaging with a high speed camera. Diagnostics used to measure time-resolved temperatures, energy generation, and emission signatures of the deflagrations were high speed camera pyrometry, visible and infrared photo receivers, and a high-resolution spectrometer, respectively.

  19. Characteristics of laser produced plasmas of hafnium and tantalum in the 1-7 nm region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bowen; Otsuka, Takamitsu; Sokell, Emma; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Hara, Hiroyuki; Arai, Goki; Tamura, Toshiki; Ono, Yuichi; Dinh, Thanh-Hung; Higashiguchi, Takeshi

    2017-11-01

    Soft X-ray (SXR) spectra from hafnium and tantalum laser produced plasmas were recorded in the 1-7 nm region using two Nd:YAG lasers with pulse lengths of 170 ps and 10 ns, respectively, operating at a range of power densities. The maximum focused peak power density was 2. 3 × 1014 W cm-2 for 170 ps pulses and 1. 8 × 1012 W cm-2 for 10 ns pulses, respectively. Two intense quasicontinuous intensity bands resulting from n = 4 - n = 4 and n = 4 - n = 5 unresolved transition arrays (UTAs) dominate both sets of experimental spectra. Comparison with calculations performed with the Cowan suite of atomic structure codes as well as consideration of previous experimental and theoretical results aided identification of the most prominent features in the spectra. For the 10 ns spectrum, the highest ion stage that could be identified from the n = 4 - n = 5 arrays were lower than silver-like Hf25+ and Ta26+ (which has a 4 d 104 f ground configuration) indicating that the plasma temperature attained was too low to produce ions with an outermost 4 d subshell, while for the 170 ps plasmas the presence of significantly higher stages was deduced and lines due to 4 d-5 p transitions were clearly evident. Furthermore, we show an enhancement of emission from tantalum using dual laser irradiation, and the effect of pre-pulse durations and delay times between two pulses are demonstrated.

  20. Effects of plasma spatial profile on conversion efficiency of laser produced plasma sources for EUV lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanein, A.; Sizyuk, V.; Sizyuk, T.; Harilal, S.

    2009-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography devices that use laser produced plasma (LPP), discharge produced plasma (DPP), and hybrid devices need to be optimized to achieve sufficient brightness with minimum debris generation to support the throughput requirements of High-Volume Manufacturing (HVM) lithography exposure tools with long lifetime. Source performance, debris mitigation, and reflector system are all critical to efficient EUV collection and component lifetime. Enhanced integrated models are continued to be developed using HEIGHTS computer package to simulate EUV emission at high power and debris generation and transport in multiple and colliding LPP. A new center for materials under extreme environments (CMUXE) is established to benchmark HEIGHTS models for various EUV related issues. The models being developed and enhanced include, for example, new ideas and parameters of multiple laser beams in different geometrical configurations and with different pre-pulses to maximize EUV production. Recent experimental and theoretical work show large influence of the hydrodynamic processes on EUV generation. The effect of plasma hydrodynamics evolution on the EUV radiation generation was analyzed for planar and spherical geometry of a tin target in LPP devices. The higher efficiency of planar target in comparison to the spherical geometry was explained with better hydrodynamic containment of the heated plasma. This is not the case if the plasma is slightly overheated. Recent experimental results of the conversion efficiency (CE) of LPP are in good agreement with HEIGHTS simulation.

  1. Neutron Generation by Laser-Driven Spherically Convergent Plasma Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, G.; Yan, J.; Liu, J.; Lan, K.; Chen, Y. H.; Huo, W. Y.; Fan, Z.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, J.; Chen, Z.; Jiang, W.; Chen, L.; Tang, Q.; Yuan, Z.; Wang, F.; Jiang, S.; Ding, Y.; Zhang, W.; He, X. T.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate a new laser-driven spherically convergent plasma fusion scheme (SCPF) that can produce thermonuclear neutrons stably and efficiently. In the SCPF scheme, laser beams of nanosecond pulse duration and 1 014- 1 015 W /cm2 intensity uniformly irradiate the fuel layer lined inside a spherical hohlraum. The fuel layer is ablated and heated to expand inwards. Eventually, the hot fuel plasmas converge, collide, merge, and stagnate at the central region, converting most of their kinetic energy to internal energy, forming a thermonuclear fusion fireball. With the assumptions of steady ablation and adiabatic expansion, we theoretically predict the neutron yield Yn to be related to the laser energy EL, the hohlraum radius Rh, and the pulse duration τ through a scaling law of Yn∝(EL/Rh1.2τ0.2 )2.5. We have done experiments at the ShengGuangIII-prototype facility to demonstrate the principle of the SCPF scheme. Some important implications are discussed.

  2. Next Generation Driver for Attosecond and Laser-plasma Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, D E; Borot, A; Cardenas, D E; Marcus, G; Gu, X; Herrmann, D; Xu, J; Tan, J; Kormin, D; Ma, G; Dallari, W; Tsakiris, G D; Földes, I B; Chou, S-W; Weidman, M; Bergues, B; Wittmann, T; Schröder, H; Tzallas, P; Charalambidis, D; Razskazovskaya, O; Pervak, V; Krausz, F; Veisz, L

    2017-07-12

    The observation and manipulation of electron dynamics in matter call for attosecond light pulses, routinely available from high-order harmonic generation driven by few-femtosecond lasers. However, the energy limitation of these lasers supports only weak sources and correspondingly linear attosecond studies. Here we report on an optical parametric synthesizer designed for nonlinear attosecond optics and relativistic laser-plasma physics. This synthesizer uniquely combines ultra-relativistic focused intensities of about 1020 W/cm2 with a pulse duration of sub-two carrier-wave cycles. The coherent combination of two sequentially amplified and complementary spectral ranges yields sub-5-fs pulses with multi-TW peak power. The application of this source allows the generation of a broad spectral continuum at 100-eV photon energy in gases as well as high-order harmonics in relativistic plasmas. Unprecedented spatio-temporal confinement of light now permits the investigation of electric-field-driven electron phenomena in the relativistic regime and ultimately the rise of next-generation intense isolated attosecond sources.

  3. Long Scalelength Plasmas for LPI Studies at the Nike Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, J. L.; Oh, J.; Bates, J. W.; Schmitt, A. J.; Kehne, D. M.; Wolford, M. F.; Obenschain, S. P.; Serlin, V.; Lehmberg, R. H.; Follett, R. K.; Shaw, J. G.; Myatt, J. F.; McKenty, P. W.; Wei, M. S.; Reynolds, H.; Williams, J.; Tsung, F.

    2017-10-01

    Studies of laser plasma instabilities (LPI) at the Nike laser have mainly used short pulses, small focal spots, and solid plastic (CH) targets that have yielded maximum gradient scalelengths below 200 microns. The current experimental effort aims to produce larger volume plasmas with 5-10x reduction in the density and velocity gradients as a platform for SBS, SRS, and TPD studies. The next campaign will concentrate on the effects of wavelength shifting and bandwidth changes on CBET in low density (5-10 mg/cm3) CH foam targets. This poster will discuss the development of this new LPI target platform based on modelling with the LPSE code developed at LLE. The presentation will also discuss alternative target schemes (e.g. exploding foils) and improvements to the LPI diagnostic suite and laser operations; for example, a new set of etalons will be available for the next campaign that should double the range of available wavelength shifting. Upgrades to the scattered light spectrometers in general use for LPI studies will also be presented. Work supported by DoE/NNSA.

  4. Spectroscopic study of emission coal mineral plasma produced by laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, L. P.; Pérez, J. A.; Riascos, H.

    2014-05-01

    Spectroscopic analysis of plasma produced by laser ablation of coal samples using 1064 nm radiation pulses from a Q-switched Nd:YAG on different target under air ambient, was performed. The emission of molecular band systems such as C2 Swan System (d3Πg→a3Πu), the First Negative System N2 (Band head at 501,53 nm) and emission lines of the C I, C II, were investigated using the optical emission spectroscopy technique. The C2 molecular spectra (Swan band) were analyzed to determine vibrational temperature (0,62 eV); the density and electron temperature of the plasma have been evaluated using Stark broadening and the intensity of the nitrogen emission lines N II, the found values of 1,2 eV and 2,2 x1018 cm-3 respectively.

  5. Evolution analysis of EUV radiation from laser-produced tin plasmas based on a radiation hydrodynamics model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, M G; Min, Q; Cao, S Q; Sun, D X; Hayden, P; O'Sullivan, G; Dong, C Z

    2017-03-23

    One of fundamental aims of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is to maximize brightness or conversion efficiency of laser energy to radiation at specific wavelengths from laser produced plasmas (LPPs) of specific elements for matching to available multilayer optical systems. Tin LPPs have been chosen for operation at a wavelength of 13.5 nm. For an investigation of EUV radiation of laser-produced tin plasmas, it is crucial to study the related atomic processes and their evolution so as to reliably predict the optimum plasma and experimental conditions. Here, we present a simplified radiation hydrodynamic model based on the fluid dynamic equations and the radiative transfer equation to rapidly investigate the evolution of radiation properties and dynamics in laser-produced tin plasmas. The self-absorption features of EUV spectra measured at an angle of 45° to the direction of plasma expansion have been successfully simulated and explained, and the evolution of some parameters, such as the plasma temperature, ion distribution and density, expansion size and velocity, have also been evaluated. Our results should be useful for further understanding of current research on extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray source development for applications such as lithography, metrology and biological imaging.

  6. Measurement of Laser Weld Temperatures for 3D Model Input

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagel, Daryl [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grossetete, Grant [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Maccallum, Danny O. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Laser welding is a key joining process used extensively in the manufacture and assembly of critical components for several weapons systems. Sandia National Laboratories advances the understanding of the laser welding process through coupled experimentation and modeling. This report summarizes the experimental portion of the research program, which focused on measuring temperatures and thermal history of laser welds on steel plates. To increase confidence in measurement accuracy, researchers utilized multiple complementary techniques to acquire temperatures during laser welding. This data serves as input to and validation of 3D laser welding models aimed at predicting microstructure and the formation of defects and their impact on weld-joint reliability, a crucial step in rapid prototyping of weapons components.

  7. Radial acceleration of ions by a laser pulse in a plasma channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, V. F.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.

    2015-07-01

    The approximate analytic solution of the Cauchy problem is constructed for a system of kinetic equations of an electron-ion plasma that describe the acceleration of ions and the collisionless heating of electrons caused by the radial ponderomotive force of a laser beam that propagates in the transparent plasma of a gas or other low-density target. Under conditions where the Debye radius, r De , of the electrons is considerably smaller than the characteristic localization scale, L, of the laser beam along the radius, ɛ = r De / L ≪ 1, this solution is found by a group transformation that is specified by the operator of approximate renormalization-group symmetries over small parameters, , of the initial distribution functions of particles. For an axially symmetric geometry of the laser beam, the temporal and spatial dependences of the distribution functions of particles are obtained and their integral characteristics, such as the density, mean velocity, temperature, and energy spectrum, are found. The formation of a cylindrical density cusp and the localized heating of electrons at the laser-channel boundary are analytically described.

  8. Modeling laser pulse evolution in ionizing gas and plasma with application to laser wakefield acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, James Hamilton

    The interaction of high intensity laser pulses with matter is of current research interest not only for potential applications but also due to the interesting non-linear process that can occur with current experimental facilities. Understanding many of the non-linear processes requires significant modeling and simulation effort. We explore several aspects of laser pulse evolution and plasma response in simulations ranging from modeling laser wakefield accelerators to modeling basic ionization processes. First, we present a model that describes the onset and growth of axial modulation found experimentally during the formation of plasma channels formed using an axicon lens. We provide a systematic development that describes this new type of parametric instability and explains the pressure dependence and the mechanism for formation of these axial modulations in the channel. Next, we describe details of a new three-dimensional laser pulse evolution code that we have developed to model propagation in tenuous gas and plasma and we provide relevant information about the validation and testing of the code. We then use this new code to examine the three-dimensional structure of the laser pulse evolving in the presence of ionizing gas. In particular we present results from the first three-dimensional study of the ionization scattering instability. Finally, we examine injecting electrons into laser wakefield accelerators. We examine in detail the injection and trapping characteristics for an electron beam with an initially broad energy distribution and look at the effect of beam loading on the trapping efficiency. We present estimates for the maximum charge that can be trapped from a low energy beam with a Boltzmann type energy distribution.

  9. Atmospheric turbulence temperature on the laser wavefront properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras López, J. C.; Ballesteros Díaz, A.; Tíjaro Rojas, O. J.; Torres Moreno, Y.

    2017-06-01

    Temperature is a physical magnitude that if is higher, the refractive index presents more important random fluctuations, which produce a greater distortion in the wavefront and thus a displacement in its centroid. To observe the effect produced by the turbulent medium strongly influenced by temperature on propagation laser beam, we experimented with two variable and controllable temperature systems designed as optical turbulence generators (OTG): a Turbulator and a Parallelepiped glass container. The experimental setup use three CMOS cameras and four temperature sensors spatially distributed to acquire synchronously information of the laser beam wavefront and turbulence temperature, respectively. The acquired information was analyzed with MATLAB® software tool, that it allows to compute the position, in terms of the evolution time, of the laser beam center of mass and their deviations produced by different turbulent conditions generated inside the two manufactured systems. The results were reflected in the statistical analysis of the centroid shifting.

  10. Enhanced acceleration of injected electrons in a laser-beat-wave-induced plasma channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochitsky, S Ya; Narang, R; Filip, C V; Musumeci, P; Clayton, C E; Yoder, R B; Marsh, K A; Rosenzweig, J B; Pellegrini, C; Joshi, C

    2004-03-05

    Enhanced energy gain of externally injected electrons by a approximately 3 cm long, high-gradient relativistic plasma wave (RPW) is demonstrated. Using a CO2 laser beat wave of duration longer than the ion motion time across the laser spot size, a laser self-guiding process is initiated in a plasma channel. Guiding compensates for ionization-induced defocusing (IID) creating a longer plasma, which extends the interaction length between electrons and the RPW. In contrast to a maximum energy gain of 10 MeV when IID is dominant, the electrons gain up to 38 MeV energy in a laser-beat-wave-induced plasma channel.

  11. effect of the plasma ion channel on self-focusing of a Gaussian laser pulse in underdense plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh Irani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available  We have considered the self-focusing of a Gaussian laser pulse in unmagnetized plasma. High-intensity electromagnetic fields cause the variation of electron density in plasma. These changes in the special conditions cause the acceleration of electrons to the higher energy and velocities. Thus the equation of plasma density evolution was obtained considering the electrons ponderomotive force. Then, an equation for the width of laser pulse with a relativistic mass correction term and the effect of ion channel were derived and the propagation of high-intensity laser pulse in an underdense plasma with weak relativistic approximation was investigated. It is shown that the ratio of ion channel radius to spot size could result in different forms of self focusing for the laser pulse in plasma.

  12. Measurement of skin temperature after infrared laser stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leandri, M; Saturno, M; Spadavecchia, L; Iannetti, G D; Cruccu, G; Truini, A

    2006-01-01

    Several types of lasers are available for eliciting laser evoked responses (LEPs). In order to understand advantages and drawbacks of each one, and to use it properly, it is important that the pattern of skin heating is known and duly considered. This study was aimed at assessing the skin temperature during and immediately after irradiation with pulses by Nd:YAP and CO(2) lasers. The back of the non-dominant hand was irradiated in 8 subjects. Temperatures were measured by a fast analogical pyrometer (5 ms response time). Stimuli were tested on natural colour (white) and blackened skin. Nd:YAP pulses yielded temperatures that were correlated with pulse energy, but not with pulse duration; much higher temperatures were obtained irradiating blackened skin than white skin (ranges 100-194 degrees C vs 35-46 degrees C). Temperature decay was extremely slow in white skin, reaching its basal value in more than 30 s. CO(2) pulses delivered with power of 3W and 6W yielded temperatures of 69-87 degrees C on white skin, and 138-226 degrees C on blackened skin. Temperature decay was very fast (4-8 ms). Differences in peak temperatures and decay times between lasers and tested conditions depend on energy and volume of heated skin. The highest temperatures are reached with lesser degree of penetration, as in the case of CO(2) laser and blackened skin. Taking into account the temperature decay time of the skin, the minimum interstimulus interval to get reliable LEPs should be no less than 10 s for Nd:YAP and 100 ms for CO(2) laser. Another important practical consequence of the heating pattern is that the Nd:YAP pulses will activate warmth receptors more easily than CO(2).

  13. Finite temperature static charge screening in quantum plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliasson, B., E-mail: bengt.eliasson@strath.ac.uk [SUPA, Physics Department, John Anderson Building, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG, Scotland (United Kingdom); Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M. [Faculty of Sciences, Department of Physics, Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, 51745-406 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-07-29

    The shielding potential around a test charge is calculated, using the linearized quantum hydrodynamic formulation with the statistical pressure and Bohm potential derived from finite temperature kinetic theory, and the temperature effects on the force between ions is assessed. The derived screening potential covers the full range of electron degeneracy in the equation of state of the plasma electrons. An attractive force between shielded ions in an arbitrary degenerate plasma exists below a critical temperature and density. The effect of the temperature on the screening potential profile qualitatively describes the ion–ion bound interaction strength and length variations. This may be used to investigate physical properties of plasmas and in molecular-dynamics simulations of fermion plasma. It is further shown that the Bohm potential including the kinetic corrections has a profound effect on the Thomson scattering cross section in quantum plasmas with arbitrary degeneracy. - Highlights: • Screening around test charge in a partially degenerate electron plasma is considered. • Quantum fluid theory derived via low-frequency expansion of kinetic theory. • Theory based on Wigner formalism consistent with gradient corrected orbital-free density functional theory.

  14. Laser produced plasma for efficient extreme ultraviolet light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, Tony; Cummins, Thomas; O' Gorman, Colm; Li Bowen; Harte, Colm S.; O' Reilly, Fergal; Sokell, Emma; Dunne, Padraig; O' Sullivan, Gerry [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2012-05-25

    Extreme ultraviolet emission from laser produced plasma and their relevance to EUV source development is discussed. The current state of the field for Sn LPP sources operating at 13.5 nm is described and initial results are given for EUV emission from CO{sub 2} laser irradiation of a bulk Sn target. A maximum conversion efficiency of 1.7% has been measured and the influence of the CO{sub 2} laser temporal profile on the CE is discussed. A double pulse irradiation scheme is shown to increase CE up to a maximum value of 2.1% for an optimum prepulse - pulse delay of 150 ns. The emergence of a new EUVL source wavelength at 6.7 nm based on Gd and Tb LPPs has been outlined. An initial experiment investigating picosecond laser irradiation as a means to produce strong 6.7 nm emission from a Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} target has been performed and verified.

  15. Software for automatization of IEA-analysis of plasma-laser spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caridi, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Messina, Ctr. Papardo 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); INFN-Sez. CT, Gr. Coll. Messina, Ctr. Papardo 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy)], E-mail: fcaridi@unime.it; Torrisi, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Messina, Ctr. Papardo 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); INFN-LNS of Catania, V.S. Sofia 64, 95125 Catania (Italy); Ando, L. [INFN-LNS of Catania, V.S. Sofia 64, 95125 Catania (Italy); Margarone, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Messina, Ctr. Papardo 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); INFN-LNS of Catania, V.S. Sofia 64, 95125 Catania (Italy); Borrielli, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Messina, Ctr. Papardo 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); INFN-Sez. CT, Gr. Coll. Messina, Ctr. Papardo 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy)

    2008-11-15

    A software has been developed in order to automatize the ion energy analyzer (IEA) spectra analysis of laser-generated plasmas. A Nd:Yag laser operating at an intensity of the order of 10{sup 10} W/cm{sup 2}, 9 ns pulse width and energy of the order of 600 mJ, has been employed to irradiate different metallic targets (Al, Ti, W) and to produce plasma pulses. The ion emission from the plasma is monitored through an IEA instrument permitting time-of-flight (TOF) measurements to determine the ion energy distributions as a function of the charge state. The software program consists in two sections. The first one permits to identify the IEA ion peaks corresponding to different charge states as a function of the theoretical TOF values. The second section permits to plot the ion velocity and energy distributions as a function of the charge state. The obtained distributions are fitted using the 'Coulomb-Boltzamnn shifted' function approach through the 'Peakfit' code. The fit of the experimental data permits to estimate the equivalent plasma temperature and the average energy shift of the distributions as a function of the ion charge state.

  16. A model of early formation of uranium molecular oxides in laser-ablated plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finko, Mikhail; Curreli, Davide; Azer, Magdi; Weisz, David; Crowhurst, Jonathan; Rose, Timothy; Koroglu, Batikan; Radousky, Harry; Zaug, Joseph; Armstrong, Mike

    2017-10-01

    An important problem within the field of nuclear forensics is fractionation: the formation of post-detonation nuclear debris whose composition does not reflect that of the source weapon. We are investigating uranium fractionation in rapidly cooling plasma using a combined experimental and modeling approach. In particular, we use laser ablation of uranium metal samples to produce a low-temperature plasma with physical conditions similar to a condensing nuclear fireball. Here we present a first plasma-chemistry model of uranium molecular species formation during the early stage of laser ablated plasma evolution in atmospheric oxygen. The system is simulated using a global kinetic model with rate coefficients calculated according to literature data and the application of reaction rate theory. The model allows for a detailed analysis of the evolution of key uranium molecular species and represents the first step in producing a uranium fireball model that is kinetically validated against spatially and temporally resolved spectroscopy measurements. This project was sponsored by the DoD, Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Grant HDTRA1-16- 1-0020. This work was performed in part under the auspices of the U.S. DoE by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52- 07NA27344.

  17. A thermodynamic model of plasma generation by pulsed laser irradiation in vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Tosto, S

    2003-01-01

    This paper introduces a thermodynamic model to determine composition, temperature and pressure of the plasma cloud induced by pulsed laser irradiation in the case where a relevant thermal sputtering mechanism is operating at the surface of a molten layer. The model concerns in particular pulse lengths of the order of several nanoseconds and completes the results of a previous paper concerning the physics of the evaporation and boiling driven thermal sputtering (Tosto S 2002 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 35); the recession rate and temperature at the molten surface are linked to the pulse fluence and plasma properties in the frame of a unique physical model. This paper shows that the plasma properties depend critically on the non-equilibrium character of the surface evaporation and boiling mechanisms. The extension of the model to the case of continuous laser irradiation is also discussed. Some examples of computer simulation aim to show the results available in the particular case of a metal target; the comparison ...

  18. Correlation between the OES Plasma Composition and ZnMnO films properties during Pulsed Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riascos, H.; Ramírez, D.; Franco, L. M.

    2014-05-01

    Manganese doped zinc oxide was ablated on (100) silicon using the fundamental harmonics of Nd:YAG laser at various oxygen ambient gas pressures and temperature substrate was kept at room temperature during the deposition. In all experiments we used ZnMnO target. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) is used to survey the plasma composition during deposition. The intensities of the Znl and ZnlI emission lines are correlated to the oxygen gas pressure and composition and morphology of the films deposited. Strong emission lines of Znl, Zn II and neutral oxygen are observed. Oxygen and Mn emission lines in its atomic or ionic states have not been detected in this investigation, which is thought ZnMnO as being exclusively produced on the substrate surface and not generated into the plasma, which is in agreement with previous studies of ZnO plasma plume. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is used to study the influence of oxygen gas pressure on the ZnMnO film morphology. An X-ray diffraction was tried to verify a crystal structure of the sample. We have demonstrated that gas pressure is an important parameter for the quality and performances of ZnMnO structures obtained by pulsed laser deposition.

  19. Characterization of ultrafast laser-ablation plasma plumes at various Ar ambient pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwakar, P. K.; Harilal, S. S.; Phillips, M. C.; Hassanein, A.

    2015-07-01

    Recently, we reported morphological changes in ultrafast laser ablation plumes in varying ambient pressures [Diwakar et al., J. Appl. Phys. 116, 133301 (2014)]. In this paper, we report the emission features of fs laser ablated brass plasma plumes at various Ar background pressure levels ranging from vacuum to atmospheric conditions and correlated to changes in plume morphology. Spatially resolved wavelength dispersed images of the plume were recorded for characterizing the spectral features at various pressure levels and also used for obtaining spatial distribution of Cu I and Zn I species in the plume, signal-to-noise ratios, and fundamental parameters of the plasma, specifically temperature and density. The spatial evolution of plasma temperature and density showed significant changes at various ambient pressure levels; these results were correlated to morphological changes seen in the plume images. Optical time-of-flight profiles were used to study time evolution of various species in the plume and indicated oscillations of ablation plumes at intermediate pressure levels. Possible mechanisms for observed changes in plume shape, optical emission intensity, and dual peak structures in time-of-flight profiles are discussed.

  20. Two color laser driven THz generation in clustered plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Rakhee; Uma, R.; Kumar, Pawan

    2017-07-01

    A scheme of terahertz (THz) generation, using nonlinear mixing of two color laser (fundamental ω1 and slightly frequency shifted second harmonic ω2 ) in clustered plasma, is investigated. The lasers exert ponderomotive force on cluster electrons and drive density perturbations at 2 ω1 and ω2-ω1 . The density perturbations beat with the oscillatory velocities to produce nonlinear current at ω2-2 ω1 , generating THz radiation. The radiation is enhanced due to cluster plasmon resonance and by phase matching introduced through a density ripple. The generation involves third order nonlinearity and does not require a magnetic field or inhomogeneity to sustain it. We report THz power conversion efficiency ˜ 10-4 at 1 μm and 0.5 μm wavelengths with intensity ˜ 3 ×1014W/cm 2 .

  1. Characterization of laser-induced plasmas as a complement to high-explosive large-scale detonations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Kimblin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Experimental investigations into the characteristics of laser-induced plasmas indicate that LIBS provides a relatively inexpensive and easily replicable laboratory technique to isolate and measure reactions germane to understanding aspects of high-explosive detonations under controlled conditions. Spectral signatures and derived physical parameters following laser ablation of aluminum, graphite and laser-sparked air are examined as they relate to those observed following detonation of high explosives and as they relate to shocked air. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS reliably correlates reactions involving atomic Al and aluminum monoxide (AlO with respect to both emission spectra and temperatures, as compared to small- and large-scale high-explosive detonations. Atomic Al and AlO resulting from laser ablation and a cited small-scale study, decay within ∼10-5 s, roughly 100 times faster than the Al and AlO decay rates (∼10-3 s observed following the large-scale detonation of an Al-encased explosive. Temperatures and species produced in laser-sparked air are compared to those produced with laser ablated graphite in air. With graphite present, CN is dominant relative to N2+. In studies where the height of the ablating laser’s focus was altered relative to the surface of the graphite substrate, CN concentration was found to decrease with laser focus below the graphite surface, indicating that laser intensity is a critical factor in the production of CN, via reactive nitrogen.

  2. Laser-plasma interactions in NIF-scale plasmas (HLP5 and HLP6)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacGowan, B.; Berger, R.; Fernandez, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-06-01

    The understanding of laser-plasma interactions in ignition-scale inertial confinement fusion (ICF) hohlraum targets is important for the success of the proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF). The success of an indirect-drive ICF ignition experiment depends on the ability to predict and control the history and spatial distribution of the x-radiation produced by the laser beams that are absorbed by the inside of the hohlraum wall. Only by controlling the symmetry of this x-ray drive is it possible to obtain the implosion symmetry in the fusion pellet necessary for ignition. The larger hohlraums and longer time scales required for ignition-scale targets result in the presence of several millimeters of plasma (electron density n{sub e} {approximately} 0.1 n{sub c} {approximately} 10{sup 21} cm{sup {minus}3}), through which the 3{omega} (351-nm) laser beams must propagate before they are absorbed at the hohlraum wall. Hydrodynamic simulations show this plasma to be very uniform [density-gradient scalelength L{sub n} = n{sub e}(dn{sub e}/dx){sup {minus}1}{approximately} 2mm] and to exhibit low velocity gradients [velocity-gradient scale-length L{sub v} = c{sub s}(dv/dx){sup {minus}1} > 6 mm].

  3. Particle physicist's dreams about PetaelectronVolt laser plasma accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesztergombi, G.

    2012-07-01

    Present day accelerators are working well in the multi TeV energy scale and one is expecting exciting results in the coming years. Conventional technologies, however, can offer only incremental (factor 2 or 3) increase in beam energies which does not follow the usual speed of progress in the frontiers of high energy physics. Laser plasma accelerators theoretically provide unique possibilities to achieve orders of magnitude increases entering the PetaelectronVolt (PeV) energy range. It will be discussed what kind of new perspectives could be opened for the physics at this new energy scale. What type of accelerators would be required?.

  4. Hybrid Ray/Wave Optics for Laser-Plasma Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratowsky, R.P.; Kallman, J.S.; Afeyan, B.B.; Feit, M.D.

    1999-02-18

    This aim of this FY 1998 LDRD project was to create a computational tool which bridges the gap between wave and ray optical regimes, important for application areas such as laser propagation in plasma and multimode photonics. We used phase space methods, where a set of rays distributed in a particular way in position and angle retain many essential features of wave optics. To characterize and enhance our understanding of the method, we developed a GUI-based photonics tool which can analyze light propagation in systems with a variety of axial and transverse refractive index distributions.

  5. Aerospace propulsion using laser-driven plasma generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Daozhi (Beijing Univ. of Aeronautics and Astronautics (People' s Republic of China))

    1989-04-01

    The use of a remote pulsed laser beam for aerospace vehicle propulsion is suggested. The engine will be of variable cycle type using a plasma generator, and the vehicle will be of rotary plate type. It will be launched using an external radiated-heated VTOL thruster, lifted by an MHD fanjet, and accelerated by a rotary rocket pulsejet. It is speculated that, sending the same payload into low earth orbit, the vehicle mass at liftoff will be 1/20th that of the Space Shuttle, and the propellant mass carried by the new vehicle will be only 1/40th that of the Shuttle. 40 refs.

  6. Ultrafast Diagnostics for Electron Beams from Laser Plasma Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlis, N. H.; Bakeman, M.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Gonsalves, T.; Lin, C.; Nakamura, K.; Osterhoff, J.; Plateau, G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Shiraishi, S.; Sokollik, T.; van Tilborg, J.; Toth, Cs.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-06-01

    We present an overview of diagnostic techniques for measuring key parameters of electron bunches from Laser Plasma Accelerators (LPAs). The diagnostics presented here were chosen because they highlight the unique advantages (e.g., diverse forms of electromagnetic emission) and difficulties (e.g., shot-to-shot variability) associated with LPAs. Non destructiveness and high resolution (in space and time and energy) are key attributes that enable the formation of a comprehensive suite of simultaneous diagnostics which are necessary for the full characterization of the ultrashort, but highly-variable electron bunches from LPAs.

  7. Angular-Momentum Evolution in Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Thaury, Cédric; Corde, Sébastien; Lehe, Rémi; Le Bouteiller, Madeleine; Ta Phuoc, Kim; Davoine, Xavier; Rax, J. M.; Rousse, Antoine; Malka, Victor

    2013-01-01

    The transverse properties of an electron beam are characterized by two quantities, the emittance which indicates the electron beam extent in the phase space and the angular momentum which allows for non-planar electron trajectories. Whereas the emittance of electron beams produced in laserplasma accelerator has been measured in several experiments, their angular momentum has been scarcely studied. It was demonstrated that electrons in laser-plasma accelerator carry some angular momentum, but its origin was not established. Here we identify one source of angular momentum growth and we present experimental results showing that the angular momentum content evolves during the acceleration.

  8. Design Considerations for Plasma Accelerators Driven by Lasers or Particle Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Benedetti, C.; Toth, Cs.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-06-01

    Plasma accelerators may be driven by the ponderomotive force of an intense laser or the space-charge force of a charged particle beam. The implications for accelerator design and the different physical mechanisms of laser-driven and beam-driven plasma acceleration are discussed. Driver propagation is examined, as well as the effects of the excited plasma wave phase velocity. The driver coupling to subsequent plasma accelerator stages for high-energy physics applications is addressed.

  9. Rayleigh-Taylor analysis in a laser-induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, R. A.; Gonzales, C. A.; Riascos, H.

    2012-06-01

    We report the conditions (plasma parameters) under which the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) develops in an Al plasma produced by a Nd:Yag pulsed laser with a fluence range of 1 to 4 J/cm2, wavelength of 1064nm and 10Hz repetition rate. The used data correspond to different pressure values of the ambient N atmosphere. From previous works, we took the RTI growth rate form as From the perturbation theory the instability amplitude is proportional to e-ηt. Using the drag model, we calculated the plume dynamics equations integrating the instability term and plotted the instability growth profile with the delay time values to get critical numbers for it, in order to show under which conditions the RTI appears.

  10. Peculiarities of Efficient Plasma Generation in Air and Water by Short Duration Laser Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Floyd, Bertram M.

    2017-01-01

    We have conducted experiments to demonstrate an efficient generation of plasma discharges by focused nanosecond pulsed laser beams in air and provided recommendations on the design of optical systems to implement such plasma generation. We have also demonstrated generation of the secondary plasma discharge using the unused energy from the primary one. Focused nanosecond pulsed laser beams have also been utilized to generate plasma in water where we observed self-focusing and filamentation. Furthermore, we applied the laser generated plasma to the decomposition of methylene blue dye diluted in water.

  11. Metal surface temperature induced by moving laser beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Römer, Gerardus Richardus, Bernardus, Engelina; Meijer, J.

    1994-01-01

    Whenever a metal is irradiated with a laser beam, electromagnetic energy is transformed into heat in a thin surface layer. The maximum surface temperature is the most important quantity which determines the processing result. Expressions for this maximum temperature are provided by the literature

  12. Temperature diagnostics of a non-thermal plasma jet at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Jan

    2013-09-01

    The study reflects the concept of the temperature as a physical quantity resulting from the second thermodynamic law. The reliability of different approaches of the temperature diagnostics of open non-equilibrium systems is discussed using examples of low temperature atmospheric pressure discharges. The focus of this work is a miniaturized non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet for local surface treatment at ambient atmosphere. The micro-discharge is driven with a capacitively coupled radio frequency electric field at 27.12 MHz and fed with argon at rates of about 1 slm through the capillary with an inner diameter of 4 mm. The discharge consists of several contracted filaments with diameter around 300 μm which are rotating azimuthally in the capillary in a self-organized manner. While the measured temperatures of the filament core exceed 700 K, the heat impact on a target below the plasma jet remains limited leading to target temperatures below 400 K. Different kinds of temperatures and energy transport processes are proposed and experimentally investigated. Nevertheless, a reliable and detailed temperature diagnostics is a challenge. We report on a novel diagnostics approach for the spatially and temporally resolved measurement of the gas temperature based on the optical properties of the plasma. Laser Schlieren Deflectometry is adapted to explore temperature profiles of filaments and their behaviour. In parallel, the method demonstrates a fundamental Fermat's principle of minimal energy. Information acquired with this method plays an important role for the optimization of local thin film deposition and surface functionalization by means of the atmospheric pressure plasma jet. The work was supported in part by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft within SFB-TR 24.

  13. Flexible temperature and flow sensor from laser-induced graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Marengo, Marco

    2017-12-25

    Herein we present a flexible temperature sensor and a flow speed sensor based on laser-induced graphene. The main benefits arise from peculiar electrical, thermal and mechanical performances of the material thus obtained, along with a cheap and simple fabrication process. The temperature sensor is a negative temperature coefficient thermistor with non-linear response typical of semi-metals. The thermistor shows a 4% decrease of the resistance in a temperature range of 20–60 °C. The flow sensor exploits the piezoresistive properties of laser-induced graphene and can be used both in gaseous and liquid media thanks to a protective polydimethylsiloxane coating. Main characteristics are ultra-fast response and versatility in design offered by the laser technology.

  14. The effect of excitation wavelength on dynamics of laser-produced tin plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harilal, S. S.; Sizyuk, T.; Hassanein, A.; Campos, D.; Hough, P.; Sizyuk, V.

    2011-03-01

    We investigated the effect of the excitation wavelength on the density evolution of laser-produced tin plasmas, both experimentally and numerically. For producing plasmas, Sn targets were excited with either 10.6 μm CO2 laser or 1.06 μm Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet laser; both are considered to be potential excitation lasers for extreme ultraviolet lithography laser-produced plasma light sources. The electron density of the plasma during the isothermal expansion regime was estimated using an interferometric technique. The Stark broadening of isolated singly-ionized emission was employed for deducing the density during the plasma adiabatic expansion regime. Our results indicate that the excitation source wavelength determines the initial density of the plasma, as well the plume expansion dynamics. Numerical simulation using HEIGHTS simulation package agrees well with the experimentally measured density profile.

  15. Development of Laser Based Plasma Diagnostics for Fusion Research on NSTX-U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchfeld, Robert Adam

    plasma diagnostics. Plasma diagnostics collect data from fusion reactors in a number of different ways. Among these are far infrared (FIR) laser based systems. By probing a fusion plasma with FIR lasers, many properties can be measured, such as density and density fluctuations. This dissertation discusses the theory and design of two laser based diagnostic instruments: 1) the Far Infrared Tangential Interferometer and Polarimeter (FIReTIP) systems, and 2) the High-ktheta Scattering System. Both of these systems have been designed and fabricated at UC Davis for use on the National Spherical Torus Experiment - Upgrade (NSTX-U), located at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). These systems will aid PPPL scientists in fusion research. The FIReTIP system uses 119 ?m methanol lasers to pass through the plasma core to measure a chord averaged plasma density through interferometry. It can also measure the toroidal magnetic field strength by the way of polarimetery. The High-ktheta Scattering System uses a 693 GHz formic acid laser to measure electron scale turbulence. Through collective Thomson scattering, as the probe beam passes through the plasma, collective electron motion will scatter power to a receiver with the angle determined by the turbulence wavenumber. This diagnostic will measure ktheta from 7 to 40 cm-1 with a 4-channel receiver array. The High-ktheta Scattering system was designed to facilitate research on electron temperature gradient (ETG) modes, which are believed to be a major contributor to anomalous transport on NSTX-U. The design and testing of these plasma diagnostics are described in detail. There are a broad range of components detailed including: optically pumped gas FIR lasers, overmoded low loss waveguide, launching and receiving optical designs, quasi-optical mixers, electronics, and monitoring and control systems. Additionally, details are provided for laser maintenance, alignment techniques, and the fundamentals of nano-CNC-machining.

  16. The role of laser wavelength on plasma generation and expansion of ablation plumes in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussein, A. E. [Center for Materials under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 0G4 (Canada); Diwakar, P. K.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2013-04-14

    We investigated the role of excitation laser wavelength on plasma generation and the expansion and confinement of ablation plumes at early times (0-500 ns) in the presence of atmospheric pressure. Fundamental, second, and fourth harmonic radiation from Nd:YAG laser was focused on Al target to produce plasma. Shadowgraphy, fast photography, and optical emission spectroscopy were employed to analyze the plasma plumes, and white light interferometry was used to characterize the laser ablation craters. Our results indicated that excitation wavelength plays a crucial role in laser-target and laser-plasma coupling, which in turn affects plasma plume morphology and radiation emission. Fast photography and shadowgraphy images showed that plasmas generated by 1064 nm are more cylindrical compared to plasmas generated by shorter wavelengths, indicating the role of inverse bremsstrahlung absorption at longer laser wavelength excitation. Electron density estimates using Stark broadening showed higher densities for shorter wavelength laser generated plasmas, demonstrating the significance of absorption caused by photoionization. Crater depth analysis showed that ablated mass is significantly higher for UV wavelengths compared to IR laser radiation. In this experimental study, the use of multiple diagnostic tools provided a comprehensive picture of the differing roles of laser absorption mechanisms during ablation.

  17. The role of laser wavelength on plasma generation and expansion of ablation plumes in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, A. E.; Diwakar, P. K.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the role of excitation laser wavelength on plasma generation and the expansion and confinement of ablation plumes at early times (0-500 ns) in the presence of atmospheric pressure. Fundamental, second, and fourth harmonic radiation from Nd:YAG laser was focused on Al target to produce plasma. Shadowgraphy, fast photography, and optical emission spectroscopy were employed to analyze the plasma plumes, and white light interferometry was used to characterize the laser ablation craters. Our results indicated that excitation wavelength plays a crucial role in laser-target and laser-plasma coupling, which in turn affects plasma plume morphology and radiation emission. Fast photography and shadowgraphy images showed that plasmas generated by 1064 nm are more cylindrical compared to plasmas generated by shorter wavelengths, indicating the role of inverse bremsstrahlung absorption at longer laser wavelength excitation. Electron density estimates using Stark broadening showed higher densities for shorter wavelength laser generated plasmas, demonstrating the significance of absorption caused by photoionization. Crater depth analysis showed that ablated mass is significantly higher for UV wavelengths compared to IR laser radiation. In this experimental study, the use of multiple diagnostic tools provided a comprehensive picture of the differing roles of laser absorption mechanisms during ablation.

  18. Atmospheric Pressure Low Temperature Plasma System for Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnette, Matthew; Staack, David

    2016-09-01

    There is growing interest in using plasmas for additive manufacturing, however these methods use high temperature plasmas to melt the material. We have developed a novel technique of additive manufacturing using a low temperature dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) jet. The jet is attached to the head of a 3D printer to allow for precise control of the plasma's location. Various methods are employed to deposit the material, including using a vaporized precursor or depositing a liquid precursor directly onto the substrate or into the plasma via a nebulizer. Various materials can be deposited including metals (copper using copper (II) acetylacetonate), polymers (PMMA using the liquid monomer), and various hydrocarbon compounds (using alcohols or a 100% methane DBD jet). The rastering pattern for the 3D printer was modified for plasma deposition, since it was originally designed for thermoplastic extrusion. The design constraints for fill pattern selection for the plasma printer are influenced by substrate heating, deposition area, and precursor consumption. Depositions onto pressure and/or temperature sensitive substrates can be easily achieved. Deposition rates range up to 0.08 cm3/hr using tris(2-methoxyethoxy)(vinyl)silane, however optimization can still be done on the system to improve the deposition rate. For example higher concentration of precursor can be combined with faster motion and higher discharge powers to increase the deposition rate without overheating the substrate.

  19. Measurement of MTF target plasma temperature using filtered photodiodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taccetti, J.M.; Wysocki, F.J.; Idzorek, G.; Oona, H.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Lindemuth, I.R.; Sheehey, P.T.; Thio, F.Y.

    1999-07-01

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) is an approach to fusion where a preheated and magnetized plasma is adiabatically compressed to fusion conditions. Successful MTF requires a suitable initial target plasma with a magnetic field of at least 5 T in a closed-field-line topology, a density of roughly 10{sup 18} cm{sup {minus}3}, a temperature of at least 50 eV but preferably closer to 300 eV, and must e free of impurities which would raise radiation losses. The goal of these experiments is to demonstrate plasma conditions meeting the requirements for an MTF initial target plasma. The plasma is produced by driving a z-directed current of 1--2 MA through either a static gas fill or a 38 {micro}m diameter polyethylene fiber. The data obtained from an array of filtered photodiodes is used to estimate the plasma temperature. The filter material and thickness for each diode is chosen such that the lowest absorption edge for each is at a successively higher energy, covering the range from a few eV to 5 keV. The analysis assumes a fully stripped optically thin plasma which radiates as either a blackbody, a bremsstrahlung emitter, or a group of emission lines (gaussian-like).

  20. Plasma mediated ablation of biological tissues with ultrashort laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oraevsky, A.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)]|[Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; DaSilva, L.B.; Feit, M.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-03-08

    Plasma mediated ablation of collagen gels and porcine cornea was studied at various laser pulse durations in the range from 350 fs to 1 ns at 1,053 nm wavelength. A time resolved stress detection technique was employed to measure transient stress profiles and amplitudes. Optical microscopy was used to characterize ablation craters qualitatively, while a wide band acoustic transducer helped to quantify tissue mechanical response and the ablation threshold. The ablation threshold was measured as a function of laser pulse duration and linear absorption coefficient. For nanosecond pulses the ablation threshold was found to have a strong dependence on the linear absorption coefficient of the material. As the pulse length decreased into the subpicosecond regime the ablation threshold became insensitive to the linear absorption coefficient. The ablation efficiency was found to be insensitive to both the laser pulse duration and the linear absorption coefficient. High quality ablation craters with no thermal or mechanical damage to surrounding material were obtained with 350 fs laser pulses. The mechanism of optical breakdown at the tissue surface was theoretically investigated. In the nanosecond regime, optical breakdown proceeds as an electron collisional avalanche ionization initiated by thermal seed electrons. These seed electrons are created by heating of the tissue by linear absorption. In the ultrashort pulse range, optical breakdown is initiated by the multiphoton ionization of the irradiated medium (6 photons in case of tissue irradiated at 1,053 nm wavelength), and becomes less sensitive to the linear absorption coefficient. The energy deposition profile is insensitive to both the laser pulse duration and the linear absorption coefficient.

  1. High-temperature laser annealing for thin film polycrystalline silicon solar cell on glass substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, A.; Slaoui, A. [InESS-UdS-CNRS, Strasbourg (France); Schneider, J. [CSG Solar AG, Thalheim (Germany); Fraunhofer Centre for Silicon Photovoltaics, Halle (Germany); Dore, J. [CSG Solar AG, Thalheim (Germany); Suntech R and D Australia Pty Ltd, Sydney (Australia); Mermet, F. [IREPA Laser, Strasbourg (France)

    2012-06-15

    Thin film polycrystalline silicon films grown on glass substrate were irradiated with an infrared continuous wave laser for defects annealing and/or dopants activation. The samples were uniformly scanned using an attachment with the laser system. Substrate temperature, scan speed and laser power were varied to find suitable laser annealing conditions. The Raman spectroscopy and Suns-V{sub oc} analysis were carried out to qualify the films quality after laser annealing. A maximum enhancement of the open circuit voltage V{sub oc} of about 100 mV is obtained after laser annealing of as-grown polysilicon structures. A strong correlation was found between the full width half maximum of the Si crystalline peak and V{sub oc}. It is interpreted as due to defects annealing as well as to dopants activation in the absorbing silicon layer. The maximum V{sub oc} reached is 485 mV after laser treatment and plasma hydrogenation, thanks to defects passivation. (orig.)

  2. High temperature thermographic measurements of laser heated silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elhadj, S; Yang, S T; Matthews, M J; Cooke, D J; Bude, J D; Johnson, M; Feit, M; Draggoo, V; Bisson, S E

    2009-11-02

    In situ spatial and temporal surface temperature profiles of CO{sub 2} laser-heated silica were obtained using a long wave infrared (LWIR) HgCdTe camera. Solutions to the linear diffusion equation with volumetric and surface heating are shown to describe the temperature evolution for a range of beam powers, over which the peak surface temperature scales linearly with power. These solutions were used with on-axis steady state and transient experimental temperatures to extract thermal diffusivity and conductivity for a variety of materials, including silica, spinel, sapphire, and lithium fluoride. Experimentally-derived thermal properties agreed well with reported values and, for silica, thermal conductivity and diffusivity are shown to be approximately independent of temperature between 300 and 2800K. While for silica our analysis based on a temperature independent thermal conductivity is shown to be accurate, for other materials studied this treatment yields effective thermal properties that represent reasonable approximations for laser heating. Implementation of a single-wavelength radiation measurement in the semi-transparent regime is generally discussed, and estimates of the apparent temperature deviation from the actual outer surface temperature are also presented. The experimental approach and the simple analysis presented yield surface temperature measurements that can be used to validate more complex physical models, help discriminate dominant heat transport mechanisms, and to predict temperature distribution and evolution during laser-based material processing.

  3. Er:YAG crystal temperature influence on laser output characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Němec, Michal; Å ulc, Jan; Hubka, Zbyněk.; Hlinomaz, Kryštof; Jelínková, Helena

    2017-02-01

    The main goal of this work was to investigate the influence of the temperature of the Er:YAG active medium on laser properties in eye-safe spectral region for three various pump wavelengths. The tested Er:YAG sample doped by 0.5% of Er3+ ions had a cylindrical shape with 25mm in length and 5mm in diameter. The absorption spectrum of the Er:YAG active medium in the range from 1400nm up to 1700nm for temperatures 80K and 300K was measured. The crystal was placed inside the vacuum chamber of a liquid nitrogen cooled cryostat. The temperature was controlled within the 80 - 340K temperature range. Three pump sources generating at 1535, 1452, and 1467nm were applied. The first one was flash lamp pumped Er:glass laser (repetition rate 0.5 Hz, pulse duration 1 ms, pulse energy 148 mJ). The further two sources were fiber coupled laser diodes (repetition rate 10 Hz, pulse duration 10 ms, maximum pulse energies 106mJ and 195 mJ). The semi-hemispherical laser resonator consisted of a pump curved mirror and output plan coupler with a reflectivity of 90% @ 1645 nm. The laser output characteristics were investigated in dependence on temperature of active medium for three laser pumping systems. The output energy has an optimum in dependence on active medium temperature and pump wavelengths. The maximal generated laser energies were 16.2mJ (90 K), 28.7mJ (120 K), and 33.2mJ (220 K), for pump wavelengths 1452 nm, 1467 nm, and 1535 nm, respectively.

  4. Laser Diagnostic Method for Plasma Sheath Potential Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Sean P.

    Electric propulsion systems are gaining popularity in the aerospace field as a viable option for long term positioning and thrusting applications. In particular, Hall thrusters have shown promise as the primary propulsion engine for space probes during interplanetary journeys. However, the interaction between propellant xenon ions and the ceramic channel wall continues to remain a complex issue. The most significant source of power loss in Hall thrusters is due to electron and ion currents through the sheath to the channel wall. A sheath is a region of high electric field that separates a plasma from a wall or surface in contact. Plasma electrons with enough energy to penetrate the sheath may result emission of a secondary electron from the wall. With significant secondary electron emission (SEE), the sheath voltage is reduced and so too is the electron retarding electric field. Therefore, a lower sheath voltage further increases the particle loss to the wall of a Hall thruster and leads to plasma cooling and lower efficiency. To further understand sheath dynamics, laser-induced fluorescence is employed to provide a non-invasive, in situ, and spatially resolved technique for measuring xenon ion velocity. By scanning the laser wavelength over an electronic transition of singly ionized xenon and collecting the resulting fluorescence, one can determine the ion velocity from the Doppler shifted absorption. Knowing the velocity at multiple points in the sheath, it can be converted to a relative electric potential profile which can reveal a lot about the plasma-wall interaction and the severity of SEE. The challenge of adequately measuring sheath potential profiles is optimizing the experiment to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. A strong signal with low noise, enables high resolution measurements and increases the depth of measurement in the sheath, where the signal strength is lowest. Many improvements were made to reduce the background luminosity, increase the

  5. Impacts of Ambient and Ablation Plasmas on Short- and Ultrashort-Pulse Laser Processing of Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadezhda M. Bulgakova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the fact that more than five decades have passed since the invention of laser, some topics of laser-matter interaction still remain incompletely studied. One of such topics is plasma impact on the overall phenomenon of the interaction and its particular features, including influence of the laser-excited plasma re-radiation, back flux of energetic plasma species, and massive material redeposition, on the surface quality and processing efficiency. In this paper, we analyze different plasma aspects, which go beyond a simple consideration of the well-known effect of plasma shielding of laser radiation. The following effects are considered: ambient gas ionization above the target on material processing with formation of a “plasma pipe”; back heating of the target by both laser-driven ambient and ablation plasmas through conductive and radiative heat transfer; plasma chemical effects on surface processing including microstructure growth on liquid metals; complicated dynamics of the ablation plasma flow interacting with an ambient gas that can result in substantial redeposition of material around the ablation spot. Together with a review summarizing our main to-date achievements and outlining research directions, we present new results underlining importance of laser plasma dynamics and photoionization of the gas environment upon laser processing of materials.

  6. EMF generation in low-temperature plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Alexander; Babichev, Valery; Dyatko, Nikolay; Filippov, Anatoly; Starostin, Andrey

    2016-09-01

    EMF generation in plasma created by an e-beam in electropositive gases at atmospheric pressure was investigated experimentally and numerically. It was found that propagation of 120 keV e-beam with cross-section 1 . 2 × 2 cm2 and current of 240 μA through argon at 105 Pa gas pressure between an aluminum exit window and an iron collector was followed by 360 μA current of opposite direction. A numerical modeling of the current flux was performed in an one-dimensional approximation along the axis z in the direction of e-beam propagation. It is seen, that the current density grows with increasing the ionization rate and the largest effect takes place in argon. The discovered effect of the current flux is determined by nonuniform gas ionization resulting in different diffusion electron fluxes near different electrodes and, therefore, in different near-electrodes potential falls. This difference creates a steady current flux in the inter-electrode gap. The mechanism of EMF generation is analogous to the Dember effect at the nonuniform photoexcitation of semiconductors. The work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation, Project No. 16-12-10511.

  7. Determination of the temporal structure of femtosecond laser pulses by means of laser-induced air plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Bao, Wen-Xia; Yang, Jing-Hui; Zhu, Xiao-Nong

    2013-05-01

    A new approach is presented to reveal the temporal structure of femtosecond laser pulses by recording the corresponding time-resolved shadowgraphs of the laser-induced air plasma. It is shown that the temporal structures of femtosecond laser pulses, normally not observable by the ordinary intensity autocorrelator, can be detected through intuitively analyzing the ultrafast evolution process of the air plasma induced by the femtosecond laser pulses under examination. With this method, existence of pre- and post-pulses has been clearly unveiled within the time window of ±150 fs in reference with the main 50-fs laser pulses output from a commercial 1-kHz femtosecond laser amplifier. The unique advantage of the proposed method is that it can directly provide valuable information about the pulse temporal structures' effect on the laser-induced ionization or material ablation.

  8. COMPUTER MODEL OF TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION IN OPTICALLY PUMPED LASER RODS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrukh, U. O.

    1994-01-01

    Managing the thermal energy that accumulates within a solid-state laser material under active pumping is of critical importance in the design of laser systems. Earlier models that calculated the temperature distribution in laser rods were single dimensional and assumed laser rods of infinite length. This program presents a new model which solves the temperature distribution problem for finite dimensional laser rods and calculates both the radial and axial components of temperature distribution in these rods. The modeled rod is either side-pumped or end-pumped by a continuous or a single pulse pump beam. (At the present time, the model cannot handle a multiple pulsed pump source.) The optical axis is assumed to be along the axis of the rod. The program also assumes that it is possible to cool different surfaces of the rod at different rates. The user defines the laser rod material characteristics, determines the types of cooling and pumping to be modeled, and selects the time frame desired via the input file. The program contains several self checking schemes to prevent overwriting memory blocks and to provide simple tracing of information in case of trouble. Output for the program consists of 1) an echo of the input file, 2) diffusion properties, radius and length, and time for each data block, 3) the radial increments from the center of the laser rod to the outer edge of the laser rod, and 4) the axial increments from the front of the laser rod to the other end of the rod. This program was written in Microsoft FORTRAN77 and implemented on a Tandon AT with a 287 math coprocessor. The program can also run on a VAX 750 mini-computer. It has a memory requirement of about 147 KB and was developed in 1989.

  9. Laser beam coupling with capillary discharge plasma for laser wakefield acceleration applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagdasarov, G. A.; Sasorov, P. V.; Gasilov, V. A.; Boldarev, A. S.; Olkhovskaya, O. G.; Benedetti, C.; Bulanov, S. S.; Gonsalves, A.; Mao, H.-S.; Schroeder, C. B.; van Tilborg, J.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Levato, T.; Margarone, D.; Korn, G.

    2017-08-01

    One of the most robust methods, demonstrated to date, of accelerating electron beams by laser-plasma sources is the utilization of plasma channels generated by the capillary discharges. Although the spatial structure of the installation is simple in principle, there may be some important effects caused by the open ends of the capillary, by the supplying channels etc., which require a detailed 3D modeling of the processes. In the present work, such simulations are performed using the code MARPLE. First, the process of capillary filling with cold hydrogen before the discharge is fired, through the side supply channels is simulated. Second, the simulation of the capillary discharge is performed with the goal to obtain a time-dependent spatial distribution of the electron density near the open ends of the capillary as well as inside the capillary. Finally, to evaluate the effectiveness of the beam coupling with the channeling plasma wave guide and of the electron acceleration, modeling of the laser-plasma interaction was performed with the code INF&RNO.

  10. Time dependent temperature distribution in pulsed Ti:sapphire lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buoncristiani, A. Martin; Byvik, Charles E.; Farrukh, Usamah O.

    1988-01-01

    An expression is derived for the time dependent temperature distribution in a finite solid state laser rod for an end-pumped beam of arbitrary shape. The specific case of end pumping by circular (constant) or Gaussian beam is described. The temperature profile for a single pump pulse and for repetitive pulse operation is discussed. The particular case of the temperature distribution in a pulsed titanium:sapphire rod is considered.

  11. Calibration approach for extremely variable laser induced plasmas and a strategy to reduce the matrix effect in general

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazic, V.; De Ninno, A.

    2017-11-01

    The laser induced plasma spectroscopy was applied on particles attached on substrate represented by a silica wafer covered with a thin oil film. The substrate itself weakly interacts with a ns Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) while presence of particles strongly enhances the plasma emission, here detected by a compact spectrometer array. Variations of the sample mass from one laser spot to another exceed one order of magnitude, as estimated by on-line photography and the initial image calibration for different sample loadings. Consequently, the spectral lines from particles show extreme intensity fluctuations from one sampling point to another, between the detection threshold and the detector's saturation in some cases. In such conditions the common calibration approach based on the averaged spectra, also when considering ratios of the element lines i.e. concentrations, produces errors too large for measuring the sample compositions. On the other hand, intensities of an analytical and the reference line from single shot spectra are linearly correlated. The corresponding slope depends on the concentration ratio and it is weakly sensitive to fluctuations of the plasma temperature inside the data set. A use of the slopes for constructing the calibration graphs significantly reduces the error bars but it does not eliminate the point scattering caused by the matrix effect, which is also responsible for large differences in the average plasma temperatures among the samples. Well aligned calibration points were obtained after identifying the couples of transitions less sensitive to variations of the plasma temperature, and this was achieved by simple theoretical simulations. Such selection of the analytical lines minimizes the matrix effect, and together with the chosen calibration approach, allows to measure the relative element concentrations even in highly unstable laser induced plasmas.

  12. The effect of laser wavelength on emission and particle dynamics of Sn plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, D.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2010-12-01

    We investigated the effects of laser wavelength on the atomic, ionic, and radiative emission from laser-produced tin plasmas. For generating plasmas, planar tin targets were excited using either high intensity neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG, 1.06 μm) or carbon dioxide (CO2, 10.6 μm) laser pulses; both are considered to be potential excitation lasers for an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography laser-produced plasma light source. Various diagnostic tools were utilized for investigating ionic, neutral, and radiative emission from Sn plasmas including Faraday cup, witness plate in conjunction with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), EUV, and visible emission spectroscopy and photography. Atomic and ionic analysis showed that the amount of debris emitted by the Nd:YAG generated plasmas was considerably higher than the CO2 laser-produced plasmas. The angular distributions of both atomic and ionic debris were found to be more forward-centric for the 1.06 μm generated plasma while being much more uniform for the 10.6 μm heated plasma. EUV and visible emission images of the plasma also showed a forward-centric appearance for 1.06 μm heated plasmas. The strength of excited neutral emission was considerably lower for the case of the 10.6 μm plasma while the kinetic energies of ions debris were found to be much higher for CO2 generated plasmas. Surface analysis of the craters created by the lasers showed that the mass ablation rate is 3.6 times higher for Nd:YAG laser generated plasmas compared to CO2 generated plasmas at maximum EUV emission.

  13. Laser metrology in fluid mechanics granulometry, temperature and concentration measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Boutier, Alain

    2013-01-01

    In fluid mechanics, non-intrusive measurements are fundamental in order to improve knowledge of the behavior and main physical phenomena of flows in order to further validate codes.The principles and characteristics of the different techniques available in laser metrology are described in detail in this book.Velocity, temperature and concentration measurements by spectroscopic techniques based on light scattered by molecules are achieved by different techniques: laser-induced fluorescence, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering using lasers and parametric sources, and absorption sp

  14. Laser-assisted control of molecular orientation at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, Dmitry V.; Zadkov, Victor N.

    2008-01-01

    A method of laser-assisted field-free dynamic molecular orientation employing a short, moderately intense three-color phase-locked laser pulse is proposed. Numerical simulations show that it provides an exceedingly effective control of orientation in molecular gases even at room temperatures. The underlying mechanism is based on the specific laser-induced orientation-dependent selective excitation of molecules and subsequent self-transformation of the induced geometrical orientation into a dynamical one. It is shown that this mechanism is significantly more powerful than the widely investigated kick mechanism.

  15. Stabilization effect of Weibel modes in relativistic laser fusion plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belghit, Slimen, E-mail: Belghit.slimen@gmail.com; Sid, Abdelaziz, E-mail: Sid-abdelaziz@hotmail.com [Laboratoire de Physique des rayonnements et de leurs interactions avec la matière (PRIMALAB), département de Physique, faculté des Sciences de la Matière, Université de Batna 1, 05000DZ, Batna (Algeria)

    2016-06-15

    In this work, the Weibel instability (WI) due to inverse bremsstrahlung (IB) absorption in a laser fusion plasma has been investigated. The stabilization effect due to the coupling of the self-generated magnetic field by WI with the laser wave field is explicitly shown. In this study, the relativistic effects are taken into account. Here, the basic equation is the relativistic Fokker-Planck (F-P) equation. The main obtained result is that the coupling of self-generated magnetic field with the laser wave causes a stabilizing effect of excited Weibel modes. We found a decrease in the spectral range of Weibel unstable modes. This decreasing is accompanied by a reduction of two orders in the growth rate of instable Weibel modes or even stabilization of these modes. It has been shown that the previous analysis of the Weibel instability due to IB has overestimated the values of the generated magnetic fields. Therefore, the generation of magnetic fields by the WI due to IB should not affect the experiences of an inertial confinement fusion.

  16. Confinement and dynamics of laser-produced plasma expanding across a transverse magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harilal, S S; Tillack, M S; O'Shay, B; Bindhu, C V; Najmabadi, F

    2004-02-01

    The dynamics and confinement of laser-created plumes expanding across a transverse magnetic field have been investigated. 1.06 microm, 8 ns pulses from a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser were used to create an aluminum plasma which was allowed to expand across a 0.64 T magnetic field. Fast photography, emission spectroscopy, and time of flight spectroscopy were used as diagnostic tools. Changes in plume structure and dynamics, enhanced emission and ionization, and velocity enhancement were observed in the presence of the magnetic field. Photographic studies showed that the plume is not fully stopped and diffuses across the field. The temperature of the plume was found to increase due to Joule heating and adiabatic compression. The time of flight studies showed that all of the species are slowed down significantly. A multiple peak temporal distribution was observed for neutral species.

  17. Single laser based pump-probe technique to study plasma shielding during nanosecond laser ablation of copper thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nammi, Srinagalakshmi; Vasa, Nilesh J.; Gurusamy, Balaganesan; Mathur, Anil C.

    2017-09-01

    A plasma shielding phenomenon and its influence on micromachining is studied experimentally and theoretically for laser wavelengths of 355 nm, 532 nm and 1064 nm. A time resolved pump-probe technique is proposed and demonstrated by splitting a single nanosecond Nd3+:YAG laser into an ablation laser (pump laser) and a probe laser to understand the influence of plasma shielding on laser ablation of copper (Cu) clad on polyimide thin films. The proposed nanosecond pump-probe technique allows simultaneous measurement of the absorption characteristics of plasma produced during Cu film ablation by the pump laser. Experimental measurements of the probe intensity distinctly show that the absorption by the ablated plume increases with increase in the pump intensity, as a result of plasma shielding. Theoretical estimation of the intensity of the transmitted pump beam based on the thermo-temporal modeling is in qualitative agreement with the pump-probe based experimental measurements. The theoretical estimate of the depth attained for a single pulse with high pump intensity value on a Cu thin film is limited by the plasma shielding of the incident laser beam, similar to that observed experimentally. Further, the depth of micro-channels produced shows a similar trend for all three wavelengths, however, the channel depth achieved is lesser at the wavelength of 1064 nm.

  18. X-ray High-resolution Spectroscopy for Laser-produced Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbato, F.; Scarpellini, D.; Malizia, A.; Gaudio, P.; Richetta, M.; Antonelli, L.

    The study of the emission spectrum gives information about the material generating the spectrum itself and the condition in which this is generated. The wavelength spectra lines are linked to the specific element and plasma conditions (electron temperature, density), while their shape is influenced by several physical effects like Stark and Doppler ones. In this work we study the X-ray emission spectra of a copper laser-produced plasma by using a spherical bent crystal spectrometer to measure the electron temperature. The facility used is the laser TVLPS, at the Tor Vergata University in Rome. It consists of a Nd:Glass source (in first harmonic - 1064 nm) whose pulse parameters are: 8 J in energy, time duration of 15 ns and a focal spot diameter of 200 μm. The adopted spectrometer is based on a spherical bent crystal of muscovite. The device combines the focusing property of a spherical mirror with the Bragg's law. This allows to obtain a great power resolution but a limited range of analysis. In our case the resolution is on average 80 eV. As it is well-known, the position of the detector on the Rowland's circle is linked to the specific spectral range which has been studied. To select the area to be investigated, we acquired spectra by means of a flat spectrometer. The selected area is centered on 8.88 Å. To calibrate the spectrum we wrote a ray-tracing MATLAB code, which calculates the detector alignment parameters and calibration curve. We used the method of line ratio to measure the electron temperature. This is possible because we assumed the plasma to be in LTE condition. The temperature value was obtained comparing the experimental one, given by the line ratio, with the theoretical one, preceded by FLYCHK simulations.

  19. Modifications of the laser beam coherence inertial confinement fusion plasmas; Modifications des proprietes de coherence des faisceaux laser dans les plasmas de fusion par confinement inertiel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grech, M

    2007-06-15

    Inertial confinement fusion by laser requires smoothed laser beam with well-controlled coherence properties. Such beams are made of many randomly distributed intensity maxima: the so-called speckles. As the laser beam propagates through plasma its temporal and spatial coherence can be reduced. This phenomenon is called plasma induced smoothing. For high laser intensities, instabilities developing independently inside the speckles are responsible for the coherence loss. At lower intensities, only collective effects, involving many speckles, can lead to induced smoothing. This thesis is a theoretical, numerical and experimental study of these mechanisms. Accounting for the partially incoherent behavior of the laser beams requires the use of statistical description of the laser-plasma interaction. A model is developed for the multiple scattering of the laser light on the self-induced density perturbations that is responsible for a spreading of the temporal and spatial spectra of the transmitted light. It also serves as a strong seed for the instability of forward stimulated Brillouin scattering that induces both, angular spreading and red-shift of the transmitted light. A statistical model is developed for this instability. A criterion is obtained that gives a laser power (below the critical power for filamentation) above which the instability growth is important. Numerical simulations with the interaction code PARAX and an experiment performed on the ALISE laser facility confirm the importance of these forward scattering mechanisms in the modification of the laser coherence properties. (author)

  20. Operating Regime for a Backward Raman Laser Amplifier in Preformed Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel S. Clark; Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2003-02-06

    A critical issue in the generation of ultra-intense, ultra-short laser pulses by backward Raman scattering in plasma is the stability of the pumping pulse to premature backscatter from thermal fluctuations in the preformed plasma. Malkin et al. [V.M. Malkin, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84 (6):1208-1211, 2000] demonstrated that density gradients may be used to detune the Raman resonance in such a way that backscatter of the pump from thermal noise can be stabilized while useful Raman amplification persists. Here plasma conditions for which the pump is stable to thermal Raman backscatter in a homogeneous plasma and the density gradients necessary to stabilize the pump for other plasma conditions are quantified. Other ancillary constraints on a Raman amplifier are also considered to determine a specific region in the Te-he plane where Raman amplification is feasible. By determining an operability region, the degree of uncertainty in density or temperature tolerable for an experimental Raman amplifier is thus also identified. The fluid code F3D, which includes the effects of thermal fluctuations, is used to verify these analytic estimates.

  1. Leveraging Microscience to Manipulate Laser-Plasma Interactions at Relativistic Intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Joseph

    diameter Micro-channel Plate (MCP) as a target for a 1021 Wcm-2 laser pulse, the electron energy, high energy electron yield, and electron slope temperature were greatly enhanced compared to traditional flat targets. For example, the MCP structured targets converted more than 130 times more energy to electrons above 1 MeV than an unstructured target of equivalent thickness and material. PIC simulations detail the guiding mechanism of the tube which results in a well collimated, highly energetic electron beam. Not only does this work constitute a proof-of-principle experiment for MTP structured interfaces, but it demonstrates the applicability of structured interfaces to actively manipulate and enhance the laser plasma interaction.

  2. Controlled laser cleaning of artworks via low resolution plasma spectroscopy and linear correlation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lentjes, M.

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis a system has been developed to prevent polluted artworks for over-cleaning during laser cleaning. One method to monitor the laser cleaning process in-situ is spectroscopic analyzing of the in-process induced plasma emission. The characteristic plasma emission spectrum depends on the

  3. COMPARATIVE RESEARCHES OF THE HIGH-STRENGTH CAST IRON MICROSTRUCTURE OF AFTER LASER AND PLASMA PROCESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Gurinovich

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The comparative researches of microstructure of highstrength cast iron after laser and plasma processing are carried out. It is shown that the peculiarity of plasma processing is formation of deeper layers with hardness 950010000 MPa. At laser processing the depth of the strengthened layers is less (about 0,5-0,8 mm, and their hardness is higher (to 11000 MPa.

  4. Pondermotive absorption of a short intense laser pulse in a non-uniform plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreev, A.A.; Platonov, K.Yu. [Inst. for Laser Physics, SC `Vavilov State Optical Inst.` 12, Birzhevaya line, St Petersburg (Russian Federation); Tanaka, K.A.

    1998-03-01

    An analytical description of the pondermotive absorption mechanism at a short high intense laser pulse interaction with a strong inhomogeneous plasma is presented. The optimal conditions for the maximum of resonance absorption of laser pulse interaction with non-uniform plasma at normal incidence are founded. (author)

  5. Extreme UV lithography: A new laser plasma target concept and fabrication of multilayer reflection masks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Bijkerk,; Shmaenok, L. A.; E. Louis,; Voorma, H. J.; Koster, N. B.; Bruineman, C.; Bastiaensen, Rkfj; van der Drift, E. W. J. M.; Romijn, J.; de Groot, L. E. M.; Rousseeuw, B. A. C.; Zijlstra, T.; Platonov, Y. Y.; Salashchenko, N. N.

    1996-01-01

    Results are reported on the development of a laser plasma source and the fabrication of multilayer reflection masks for extreme ultra-violet lithography (EUVL). A new concept of a target for a laser plasma source is presented including experimental evidence of elimination of macro debris particles

  6. Volume effect of laser produced plasma on X-ray emissions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    journal of. Nov. & Dec. 2000 physics pp. 789–795. Volume effect of laser produced plasma on X-ray emissions. V K SENECHA, Y B S R PRASAD, M P KAMATH, A S JOSHI, G S SOLANKI,. A P KULKARNI, S GUPTA, R PAREEK and H C PANT. Laser Plasma Division, Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 103, India.

  7. Emission features of femtosecond laser ablated carbon plasma in ambient helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shboul, K. F.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the optical emission features of plasmas produced by 800 nm, 40 fs ultrafast laser pulses on a carbon target in the presence of ambient helium or nitrogen gases at varied pressures. Fast photography employing intensified charge coupled device, optical emission spectroscopy, and temporally spatially resolved optical time of flight emission spectroscopy were used as diagnostic tools. Spatio-temporal contours of excited neutral, ionic, as well as molecular carbon species in the plume were obtained using time of flight emission spectroscopy. These contours provided detailed account of molecular species evolution and expansion dynamics and indicate that three-body recombination is a major mechanism for carbon dimers generation in ultrafast laser ablation plumes in the presence of ambient gas. A systematic comparison of the emission features from ns and fs laser ablation carbon plumes as well as their expansion in ambient helium is also given. C2 vibrational temperatures were estimated during carbon plasma expansion with lower values in ambient helium compared to nitrogen and showed decreasing values with respect to space and ambient gas pressure.

  8. Principle of radial transport in low temperature annular plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yunchao, E-mail: yunchao.zhang@anu.edu.au; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Bldg 60, Mills Road, Australian Capital Territory 2601 (Australia)

    2015-07-15

    Radial transport in low temperature annular plasmas is investigated theoretically in this paper. The electrons are assumed to be in quasi-equilibrium due to their high temperature and light inertial mass. The ions are not in equilibrium and their transport is analyzed in three different situations: a low electric field (LEF) model, an intermediate electric field (IEF) model, and a high electric field (HEF) model. The universal IEF model smoothly connects the LEF and HEF models at their respective electric field strength limits and gives more accurate results of the ion mobility coefficient and effective ion temperature over the entire electric field strength range. Annular modelling is applied to an argon plasma and numerical results of the density peak position, the annular boundary loss coefficient and the electron temperature are given as functions of the annular geometry ratio and Paschen number.

  9. Prediction of Skin Temperature Distribution in Cosmetic Laser Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Kuen; Chen, Kuen-Tasnn; Cheng, Shih-Feng; Lin, Wen-Shiung; Chang, Cheng-Ren

    2008-01-01

    The use of lasers in cosmetic surgery has increased dramatically in the past decade. To achieve minimal damage to tissues, the study of the temperature distribution of skin in laser irradiation is very important. The phenomenon of the thermal wave effect is significant due to the highly focused light energy of lasers in very a short time period. The conventional Pennes equation does not take the thermal wave effect into account, which the thermal relaxation time (τ) is neglected, so it is not sufficient to solve instantaneous heating and cooling problem. The purpose of this study is to solve the thermal wave equation to determine the realistic temperature distribution during laser surgery. The analytic solutions of the thermal wave equation are compared with those of the Pennes equation. Moreover, comparisons are made between the results of the above equations and the results of temperature measurement using an infrared thermal image instrument. The thermal wave equation could likely to predict the skin temperature distribution in cosmetic laser surgery.

  10. Kinetic Simulations of Laser Parametric Amplification in Magnetized Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Qing; Shi, Yuan; Qin, Hong; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2017-10-01

    Laser pulse compression using magnetized resonance near the upper-hybrid frequency is promising for achieving higher output intensity in regimes previously thought impossible using unmagnetized plasmas. Using one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we verify that, by partially replacing plasma with an external transverse magnetic field of megagauss scale, the output pulse can be intensified by a factor of a few, due to the increased allowable amplification time despite a decreased growth rate. Further improvement is impeded by the generation of an electromagnetic wakefield, to which the amplified pulse loses more energy than it does in the unmagnetized case. This limitation can however be circumvented by the use of a stronger pump. In contrast to unmagnetized compression, the magnetized amplification remains efficient when the pump intensity is well above the wavebreaking threshold, until a higher phase-mixing threshold is exceeded. This surprising resilience to wavebreaking in magnetized plasma is of great benefit for magnetized compression. Work supported by the NNSA Grant No. DE274-FG52-08NA28553 and AFOSR Grant No. FA9550-15-1-0391.

  11. Deposition and sputtering yields on EUV collector mirror from Laser Plasma Extreme Ultraviolet Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Tao [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, School of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Rao Zhiming [Depart of Computer Science, Jiangxi University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanchang 330004, Jiangxi (China); Wang Shifang, E-mail: flatime@163.com [School of Physics and Electric Information, Hubei University of Education 1 Nanhuan Road, Wuhan East High-Tech. Zone, Wuhan 430205, Hubei (China)

    2011-02-01

    Based on the self-similar solution of gas dynamic equations, spherical expansion of the highly ionized plasma with limited mass into a vacuum is investigated for the droplet target laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet (LPP-EUV) sources. Using partially numerical and partially analytical technology, the velocity, the temperature and the density profiles in the plume versus ionization degree, adiabatic index and initial conditions are presented. Furthermore, the spatial thickness variations of the deposited substrate witness and ion sputtering yields for Ru, Mo, and Si under Sn ion bombardment are theoretically calculated, which can be useful to enable LPP-EUV sources suppliers to estimate collector lifetime and improve debris mitigation systems.

  12. Optical pyrometer system for collisionless shock experiments in high-power laser-produced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, T.; Sakawa, Y.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Sano, T.; Takabe, H. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Dono, S.; Ide, T.; Tanji, H.; Shiroshita, A. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 1-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Shibata, S.; Aoki, H. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikane-yama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Waugh, J. N.; Woolsey, N. C. [Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Gregory, C. D. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, Route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2012-10-15

    A temporally and spatially resolved optical pyrometer system has been fielded on Gekko XII experiments. The system is based on the self-emission measurements with a gated optical imager (GOI) and a streaked optical pyrometer (SOP). Both detectors measure the intensity of the self-emission from laser-produced plasmas at the wavelength of 450 nm with a bandpass filter with a width of {approx}10 nm in FWHM. The measurements were calibrated with different methods, and both results agreed with each other within 30% as previously reported [T. Morita et al., Astrophys. Space Sci. 336, 283 (2011)]. As a tool for measuring the properties of low-density plasmas, the system is applicable for the measurements of the electron temperature and density in collisionless shock experiments [Y. Kuramitsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 175002 (2011)].

  13. Ionic and atomic characterization of laser-generated plasmas at 5 × 109 W/cm2 pulse intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caridi, F.; Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.

    2013-05-01

    A Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm wavelength, 150 mJ pulse energy and 3 ns pulse width, was employed to produce a non-equilibrium plasma by ablating several different targets (silicon, titanium, copper and germanium) at 5 × 109 W/cm2 pulse intensity. The ion emission from the plasma was monitored through time-of-flight (TOF) measurements, performed by using an ion collector (IC) placed along the normal to the target surface. The deconvolution of the IC experimental spectra with a Coulomb-Boltzmann-shifted function permitted to evaluate the equivalent ion temperature and acceleration voltage, and the mean ion charge state developed inside the non-equilibrium plasma. A classical mass quadrupole spectrometer (MQS) was employed to detect ion charge states and plasma neutrals at various detection angles. The plasma fractional ionization, the ions and neutrals angular distribution and the ablation yield, as estimated through a MQS calibration process, were also evaluated.

  14. Laser-induced fluorescence analysis of plasmas for epitaxial growth of YBiO3 films with pulsed laser deposition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Orsel, K; Groenen, Rik; Bastiaens, Hubertus M.J; Koster, Gertjan; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M; Boller, Klaus J

    2016-01-01

    ... the influence of oxygen present in the background gas during pulsed laser deposition to the oxidation of plasma species as well as the formation of epitaxial YBiO 3 films. With spatiotemporal LIF mapping of ...

  15. Sharpening of the 6.8 nm peak in an Nd:YAG laser produced Gd plasma by using a pre-formed plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Yong; Song, Xiaolin; Xie, Zhuo; Gao, Jian; Dou, Yinping; Li, Bochao; Lin, Jingquan, E-mail: linjinquan@cust.edu.cn [School of Science, Changchun University of Science and Technology, No.7089, Weixing Road, Changchun, 13022 (China); Tomie, Toshihisa, E-mail: tomie@cust.edu.cn [School of Science, Changchun University of Science and Technology, No.7089, Weixing Road, Changchun, 13022 (China); Nanoelectronics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 2, 1-1-1, Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8562 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    For effective use of a laser-produced-plasma (LPP) light source, an LPP is desired to emit a narrow spectral peak because the reflection spectrum of multilayer mirrors for guiding emission from the source is very narrow. While a Gd plasma has been studied extensively as an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light source at around 6.8 nm, where La/B{sub 4}C multilayer is reported to have a high reflectivity with a bandwidth of about 0.6 %, all previous works using an Nd:YAG laser reported very broad spectra. This paper reports the first narrowing of the 6.8 nm peak in the case of using an Nd:YAG laser to generate a Gd plasma by using a pre-pulse. The best peak narrowing is observed when a pre-formed plasma is heated by a 1064 nm main laser pulse with a duration of 10 ns at the irradiation density of 4x 10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2} at a delay time of 50 ns after the pre-pulse irradiation. The observed spectral width of about 0.3 nm is about one fifth of the value for no pre-formed plasma. The peak wavelength of the 6.8 nm band shifted to a longer wavelength side and the peak was broadened both for lower and higher laser irradiation density. It is discussed that this robustness of the peak position of the 6.8 nm Gd peak against temperature change is suitable to achieve a narrow bandwidth from an LPP generated on solid. The observed spectra are compared with those previously reported in various conditions.

  16. Image feature analysis of plasma spot produced from femtosecond laser ablation for silicon wafer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fu-bin; Zhao, Li-hong; Tu, Paul; Liu, Yang; Chen, Jian-xiong

    2017-04-01

    When using a femtosecond laser to machine a single-crystal silicon wafer, it is accompanied with a diffraction spot of plasma. The existing literature reports that the brightness of the image of plasma can be used as an indicator to online measure the depth of the machined groove on a micrometer scale. Because the plasma spot is influenced by eruption and partial occlusion of ablated material, this method, which simply relies on the spot image brightness as a feedback parameter, is not reliable or accurate. The pixel area, perimeter, and brightness characteristics of the plasma spot image need to be comprehensively analyzed to provide a reliable and accurate feedback to establish close-loop micromachining technology. Therefore, we first analyze the chirped amplification principle of generating a femtosecond laser and the application of the diffraction spot of plasma during the micromachining processing using the femtosecond laser. Second, we experiment using femtosecond laser ablation with a piece of 10×10 mm and thickness of 650±10 μm single-crystal silicon wafer to obtain the corresponding relational data among parameters of laser processing power, processing speed, and laser spot image of plasma. Third, aiming at the characteristic of dim target of the laser spot image, the two-dimensional Otsu (maximum class square error method) is used to segment the laser spot image to improve the segmentation accuracy of the laser spot image. Finally, we analyze the relationship among area, perimeter of the laser spot image, and laser energy; the relationship among area, perimeter of the laser spot image, and the machined depth of groove; the relationship between brightness of the laser spot image and laser output power; and the relationship between brightness of laser spot image and machining speed.

  17. Particle sources with high-intensity lasers: a tool for plasma diagnostics and an innovative source for applications; Sources de particules avec des lasers de haute intensite: un outil pour les diagnostics plasma et une source innovante pour les applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzler, S

    2003-09-15

    This work is an experimental study on particle generation with high-intensity lasers. This document is divided into 4 parts, whereas the first is dedicated to theoretical basics of particle generation and acceleration mechanisms during relativistic laser plasma interactions, the 3 other parts cover experimental studies on neutron, electron as well as proton generation. In the first part basic laser and plasma characteristics will be introduced as well as physical processes of interest during the interaction of a relativistic high-intensity laser with an underdense / overdense plasma. In the second part we introduce methodological basics of neutron generation by D(d,n)He{sup 3} reactions since this can reveal information about ion kinetics and possible ion heating mechanisms in plasmas. Subsequently the set-up for this experiment, pursued in the underdense regime, will be described in detail. The experimental results will be discussed for the gas jet interaction as well as for the beam target model since it was deduced that plasma ions are heated during the interaction to fusion temperatures of about 1 keV. The third part describes the generation of an electron beam with an energy up to 200 MeV in a new regime termed 'forced laser Wakefield'. Here, the presented experimental results were for the first time fully explained and even extended by the numerical modelling of this interaction in terms of energy, yield, angular divergence, emittance as well as bunch length of this electron beam. In the last part we present a 10 MeV proton beam generation using foil targets and a 10 Hz laser. Again the kinematic simulation of this experiment is in agreement with the experimental results by means of yield and angular divergence.

  18. Single laser pulse compression via strongly coupled stimulated Brillouin scattering in plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, H.; Wu, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. M. [Laser Fusion Research Center, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-988, Mianyang 621900 (China); Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 919-988, Mianyang 621900 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of IFSA (CICIFSA), Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zuo, Y. L.; Zhou, K. N.; Su, J. Q., E-mail: Sujingqin@caep.ac.cn [Laser Fusion Research Center, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-988, Mianyang 621900 (China); Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 919-988, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2016-07-15

    Laser amplification in plasma, including stimulated Raman scattering amplification and strongly coupled stimulated Brillouin scattering (sc-SBS) amplification, is very promising to generate ultrahigh-power and ultrashort laser pulses. But both are quite complex in experiments: at least three different laser pulses must be prepared; temporal delay and spatial overlap of these three pulses are difficult. We propose a single pulse compression scheme based on sc-SBS in plasma. Only one moderately long laser is applied, the front part of which ionizes the gas to produced plasma, and gets reflected by a plasma mirror at the end of the gas channel. The reflected front quickly depletes the remaining part of the laser by sc-SBS in the self-similar regime. The output laser is much stronger and shorter. This scheme is at first considered theoretically, then validated by using 1D PIC simulations.

  19. Refractive Index Seen by a Probe Beam Interacting with a Laser-Plasma System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, D.; Goyon, C.; Kemp, G. E.; Pollock, B. B.; Mariscal, D.; Divol, L.; Ross, J. S.; Patankar, S.; Moody, J. D.; Michel, P.

    2017-01-01

    We report the first complete set of measurements of a laser-plasma optical system's refractive index, as seen by a second probe laser beam, as a function of the relative wavelength shift between the two laser beams. Both the imaginary and real refractive index components are found to be in good agreement with linear theory using plasma parameters measured by optical Thomson scattering and interferometry; the former is in contrast to previous work and has implications for crossed-beam energy transfer in indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion, and the latter is measured for the first time. The data include the first demonstration of a laser-plasma polarizer with 85 %- 87 % extinction for the particular laser and plasma parameters used in this experiment, complementing the existing suite of high-power, tunable, and ultrafast plasma-based photonic devices.

  20. Plasma Mirrors for Cleaning Laser Pulses from the Infrared to the Ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Földes, István B.; Gilicze, Barnabás; Kovács, Zsolt; Szatmári, Sándor

    2018-01-01

    Ultrashort laser pulses are generally preceded by prepulses which - in case of high main pulse intensities - may generate preplasmas on solid surfaces, thus making the initial conditions for the interactions ambiguous. Infrared laser systems applied successfully, with high efficiency self-induced plasma mirrors for improving the contrast of the beam. Short wavelength laser beams however have a larger critical density in the plasma, and due to their deeper penetration the absorption is higher, the reflectivity, and the corresponding plasma mirror efficiency is lower. We show herewith that with carefully planned boundary conditions plasma mirrors can reach up to 70% efficiency even for KrF laser radiation. Our observations can be qualitatively explained by the classical Drude model. The high reflectivity allows the use of plasma mirrors even after the final amplification or before the last amplifier. Different arrangement proposals for its integration to our high power KrF laser system are given as well.

  1. Angular distribution of debris from CO2 and YAG laser-produced tin plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, D.; Coons, R. W.; Fields, M. D.; Crank, M.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2010-04-01

    We investigated the angular dependence of atomic and ionic debris from CO2 and YAG laser-produced tin plasmas. Several diagnostic techniques were employed for this study including a Faraday cup, witness plates and subsequent x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis, optical emission spectroscopy etc. It was found that the debris emission from the Nd:YAG laser-produced plasmas fell sharply from the target normal. In contrast, the debris emission from the CO2 laser-produced plasmas was almost constant at short angles from the target normal. Our results also indicated that the plasma produced by the CO2 laser emitted less atomic and ionic debris compared to a plasma produced by Nd:YAG laser.

  2. Dust accelerators and their applications in high-temperature plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhehui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ticos, Catakin M [NILPRP, ROMANIA

    2010-01-01

    The perennial presence of dust in high-temperature plasma and fusion devices has been firmly established. Dust inventory must be controlled, in particular in the next-generation steady-state fusion machines like ITER, as it can pose significant safety hazards and potentially interfere with fusion energy production. Much effort has been devoted to gening rid of the dust nuisance. We have recognized a number of dust-accelerators applications in magnetic fusion, including in plasma diagnostics, in studying dust-plasma interactions, and more recently in edge localized mode (ELM)'s pacing. With the applications in mind, we will compare various acceleration methods, including electrostatic, gas-drag, and plasma-drag acceleration. We will also describe laboratory experiments and results on dust acceleration.

  3. Use of extended laser plasma for generation of high-order harmonics of picosecond duration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganeev, R A; Boltaev, G S; Reyimbaev, Sh; Sherniyozov, Kh; Usmanov, T [Institute of Ion-Plasma and Laser Technologies, Uzbekistan Academy of Sciences, Akademgorodok, Tashkent 100125 (Uzbekistan)

    2015-07-31

    We report the results of experimental investigations on the generation of picosecond radiation harmonics in extended laser plasma produced on the surface of different metal targets. The effect of plasma length, heating pulse duration and delay between the heating and transformable pulses on the efficiency of conversion to higher harmonics is studied. The λ = 1064 nm radiation conversion to a short-wavelength (down to 50 nm, 21st harmonic) range in extended plasma of several metals is demonstrated. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  4. Ion Acceleration by Laser Plasma Interaction from Cryogenic Microjets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Propp, Adrienne [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2015-08-16

    Processes that occur in extreme conditions, such as in the center of stars and large planets, can be simulated in the laboratory using facilities such as SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). These facilities allow scientists to investigate the properties of matter by observing their interactions with high-power lasers. Ion acceleration from laser plasma interaction is gaining greater attention today due to its widespread potential applications, including proton beam cancer therapy and fast ignition for energy production. Typically, ion acceleration is achieved by focusing a high power laser on thin foil targets through a mechanism called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration. However, this mechanism is not ideal for creating the high-energy proton beams needed for future applications. Based on research and recent experiments, we hypothesized that a pure liquid cryogenic jet would be an ideal target for exploring new regimes of ion acceleration. Furthermore, it would provide a continuous, pure target, unlike metal foils which are consumed in the interaction and easily contaminated. In an effort to test this hypothesis, we used the 527 nm split beam, frequency-doubled TITAN laser at JLF. Data from the cryogenic jets was limited due to the flow of current up the jet into the nozzle during the interaction, heating the jet and damaging the orifice. However, we achieved a pure proton beam with evidence of a monoenergetic feature. Furthermore, data from gold and carbon wires showed surprising and interesting results. Preliminary analysis of data from two ion emission diagnostics, Thomson parabola spectrometers (TPs) and radio chromic films (RCFs), suggests that shockwave acceleration occurred rather than target normal sheath acceleration, the standard mechanism of ion acceleration. Upon completion of the experiment at TITAN, I researched the possibility of transforming our liquid cryogenic

  5. Dual – Temperature Electron distribution in a Laboratory Plasma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The dual-temperature distribution function is used to investigate theoretically the effect of a perturbation of Maxwell distribution function on density ratios in a laboratory plasma produced solely by collision. By assuming a foreknowledge of collision coefficients and cross-sections and an atomic model which sets at two ...

  6. Mid-IR lasers for energy frontier plasma accelerators and colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelsky, I. V.; Babzien, M.; Polyanskiy, M. N.; Kimura, W. D.

    2017-03-01

    Plasma wakefield accelerators driven by solid-state, near-IR lasers have been considered as an alternative to conventional RF accelerators for next-generation TeV-class lepton colliders. Here, we extend this study to the mid-IR spectral domain covered by CO2 lasers. We show that the increase in the laser driver wavelength favors the regime of electron acceleration at a low plasma density and high bunch charge. The revealed benefits from spectral diversification of laser drivers for future colliders and offspring applications validate our reported ongoing efforts in advancing the enabling CO2 laser technology.

  7. The TELEC - A plasma type of direct energy converter. [Thermo-Electronic Laser Energy Converter for electric power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, E. J.

    1978-01-01

    The Thermo-Electronic Laser Energy Converter (TELEC) is a high-power density plasma device designed to convert a 10.6-micron CO2 laser beam into electric power. Electromagnetic radiation is absorbed in plasma electrons, creating a high-electron temperature. Energetic electrons diffuse from the plasma and strike two electrodes having different areas. The larger electrode collects more electrons and there is a net transport of current. An electromagnetic field is generated in the external circuit. A computer program has been designed to analyze TELEC performance allowing parametric variation for optimization. Values are presented for TELEC performance as a function of cesium pressure and for current density and efficiency as a function of output voltage. Efficiency is shown to increase with pressure, reaching a maximum over 45%.

  8. Laser wavelength dependence on angular emission dynamics of Nd : YAG laser-produced Sn plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, J. R.; Harilal, S. S.; Verhoff, B.; Hassanein, A.; Rice, B.

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the laser wavelength effect on angular atomic and ionic emission from laser-produced Sn plasma, since it is regarded as a viable candidate for an EUV lithography source. For producing plasmas, the fundamental, second and fourth harmonics radiation from a Nd : YAG laser were used. The angular variation of atomic and ionic particle analysis was carried out using quartz crystal microbalance and Faraday cups by moving them in a circular path at a constant distance from the target normal. Along with atomic and ionic emission, we also compared the plasma emission features in the visible and EUV spectral regions. Results indicate strong forward bias in atomic and ionic plasma debris at all wavelengths. Shorter wavelength plasmas are found to generate more atomic particles while ion flux showed a similar trend irrespective of the excitation wavelength.

  9. Interaction of ultra-short ultra-intense laser pulses with under-dense plasmas; Interaction d'impulsions laser ultra-courtes et ultra-intenses avec des plasmas sous denses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solodov, A

    2000-12-15

    Different aspects of interaction of ultra-short ultra-intense laser pulses with underdense plasmas are studied analytically and numerically. These studies can be interesting for laser-driven electron acceleration in plasma, X-ray lasers, high-order harmonic generation, initial confinement fusion with fast ignition. For numerical simulations a fully-relativistic particle code WAKE was used, developed earlier at Ecole Polytechnique. It was modified during the work on the thesis in the part of simulation of ion motion, test electron motion, diagnostics for the field and plasma. The studies in the thesis cover the problems of photon acceleration in the plasma wake of a short intense laser pulse, phase velocity of the plasma wave in the Self-Modulated Laser Wake-Field Accelerator (SM LWFA), relativistic channeling of laser pulses with duration of the order of a plasma period, ion dynamics in the wake of a short intense laser pulse, plasma wave breaking. Simulation of three experiments on the laser pulse propagation in plasma and electron acceleration were performed. Among the main results of the thesis, it was found that reduction of the plasma wave phase velocity in the SM LWFA is crucial for electron acceleration, only if a plasma channel is used for the laser pulse guiding. Self-similar structures describing relativistic guiding of short laser pulses in plasmas were found and relativistic channeling of initially Gaussian laser pulses of a few plasma periods in duration was demonstrated. It was shown that ponderomotive force of a plasma wake excited by a short laser pulse forms a channel in plasma and plasma wave breaking in the channel was analyzed in detail. Effectiveness of electron acceleration by the laser field and plasma wave was compared and frequency shift of probe laser pulses by the plasma waves was found in conditions relevant to the current experiments. (author)

  10. A temperature study of laser-irradiated bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Jon Philip

    A method for predicting the temperature of laser-irradiated bone has been developed. The method uses a numerical model to predict temperature in a bone sample irradiated with a particular wavelength of light. The model was based on the heat conduction equation with the laser radiation accounted for by a volumetric heat generation term based on the absorption coefficient at the wavelength being used and Beer's Law of exponential absorption. Two beam profiles, top hat and Gaussian, were used to model the incident beam, so the effect of beam profile on temperature distribution could be examined. Experimental runs were performed by irradiating samples of bone with two different laser wavelengths and measuring the temperature of the bone at four locations. A COsb2 laser at 10.6 mum and a Nd:YAG laser at 1.06 mum were used at powers from 5 to 40 Watts using approximately a 10 mm diameter beam. Additional experiments were performed to ascertain the accuracy of reported values for the absorption of 1.06 mum wavelength light by bone. The results of the experiments led to a value for the absorption coefficient for bone at 1.06 mum wavelength of 279/m and a reflectivity of 0.18. Using this value for the absorption coefficient, the model results were reconciled to the YAG experimental data. Charts plotting temperature against time for several locations have been generated and included as a reference for further research. Possibilities for laser-bone applications include cutting, drilling, bone shaping, thermal therapy, welding, and diagnostics and this research may enhance the development of such applications.

  11. High-temperature diode laser pumps for directed energy fiber lasers (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanskar, Manoj; Bao, Ling; Chen, Zhigang; DeVito, Mark; Dong, Weimin; Grimshaw, Mike P.; Guan, Xinguo; Hemenway, David M.; Martinsen, Robert; Zhang, Jim; Zhang, Shiguo

    2017-05-01

    Kilowatt-class fiber lasers and amplifiers are becoming increasingly important building blocks for power-scaling laser systems in various different architectures for directed energy applications. Currently, state-of-the-art Yb-doped fiber lasers operating near 1060 nm operate with optical-to-optical power-conversion efficiency of about 66%. State-of-the-art fiber-coupled pump diodes near 975 nm operate with about 50% electrical-to-fiber-coupled optical power conversion efficiency at 25C heatsink temperature. Therefore, the total system electrical-to-optical power conversion efficiency is about 33%. As a result, a 50-kW fiber laser will generate 75 kW of heat at the pump module and 25 kW at the fiber laser module with a total waste heat of 100 kW. It is evident that three times as much waste heat is generated at the pump module. While improving the efficiency of the diodes primarily reduces the input power requirement, increasing the operating temperature primarily reduces the size and weight for thermal management systems. We will discuss improvement in diode laser design, thermal resistance of the package as well as improvement in fiber-coupled optical-to-optical efficiency to achieve high efficiency at higher operating temperature. All of these factors have a far-reaching implication in terms of significantly improving the overall SWAP requirements thus enabling DEW-class fiber lasers on airborne and other platforms.

  12. Optically pumped room-temperature GaAs nanowire lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Dhruv; Mokkapati, Sudha; Parkinson, Patrick; Jiang, Nian; Gao, Qiang; Tan, Hark Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2013-12-01

    Near-infrared lasers are important for optical data communication, spectroscopy and medical diagnosis. Semiconductor nanowires offer the possibility of reducing the footprint of devices for three-dimensional device integration and hence are being extensively studied in the context of optoelectronic devices. Although visible and ultraviolet nanowire lasers have been demonstrated widely, progress towards room-temperature infrared nanowire lasers has been limited because of material quality issues and Auger recombination. (Al)GaAs is an important material system for infrared lasers that is extensively used for conventional lasers. GaAs has a very large surface recombination velocity, which is a serious issue for nanowire devices because of their large surface-to-volume ratio. Here, we demonstrate room-temperature lasing in core-shell-cap GaAs/AlGaAs/GaAs nanowires by properly designing the Fabry-Pérot cavity, optimizing the material quality and minimizing surface recombination. Our demonstration is a major step towards incorporating (Al)GaAs nanowire lasers into the design of nanoscale optoelectronic devices operating at near-infrared wavelengths.

  13. Temperature-dependent thermal properties of spark plasma sintered alumina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saheb Nouari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we report temperature-dependent thermal properties of alumina powder and bulk alumina consolidated by spark plasma sintering method. The properties were measured between room temperature and 250ºC using a thermal constants analyzer. Alumina powder had very low thermal properties due to the presence of large pores and absence of bonding between its particles. Fully dense alumina with a relative density of 99.6 % was obtained at a sintering temperature of 1400°C and a holding time of 10 min. Thermal properties were found to mainly dependent on density. Thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and specific heat of the fully dense alumina were 34.44 W/mK, 7.62 mm2s-1, and 1.22 J/gK, respectively, at room temperature. Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity decreased while specific heat increased with the increase in temperature from room temperature to 250ºC.

  14. Nonlinear evolution of the plasma beat wave: Compressing the laser beat notes via electromagnetic cascading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmykov, Serguei; Shvets, Gennady

    2006-04-01

    The near-resonant beat wave excitation of an electron plasma wave (EPW) can be employed for generating the trains of few-femtosecond electromagnetic (EM) pulses in rarefied plasmas. The EPW produces a comoving index grating that induces a laser phase modulation at the difference frequency. As a result, the cascade of sidebands red and blue shifted by integer multiples of the beat frequency is generated in the laser spectrum. The bandwidth of the phase-modulated laser is proportional to the product of the plasma length, laser wavelength, and amplitude of the electron density perturbation. When the beat frequency is lower than the electron plasma frequency, the redshifted spectral components are advanced in time with respect to the blueshifted ones near the center of each laser beat note. The group velocity dispersion of plasma compresses so chirped beat notes to a few-laser-cycle duration thus creating a train of sharp EM spikes with the beat periodicity. Depending on the plasma and laser parameters, chirping and compression can be implemented either concurrently in the same, or sequentially in different plasmas. Evolution of the laser beat wave and electron density perturbations is described in time and one spatial dimension in a weakly relativistic approximation. Using the compression effect, we demonstrate that the relativistic bistability regime of the EPW excitation [G. Shvets, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 195004 (2004)] can be achieved with the initially subthreshold beat wave pulse.

  15. Controlled laser cleaning of artworks via low resolution plasma spectroscopy and linear correlation

    OpenAIRE

    Lentjes, M.

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis a system has been developed to prevent polluted artworks for over-cleaning during laser cleaning. One method to monitor the laser cleaning process in-situ is spectroscopic analyzing of the in-process induced plasma emission. The characteristic plasma emission spectrum depends on the elemental constitution of the plasma plume which represents the ablated layer. In this thesis a (low cost) fibre optic spectrometer with a large bandwidth and low resolution was applied. This spectr...

  16. Phonon-Limited-Linewidth of Brillouin Lasers at Cryogenic Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Myoung-Gyun; Yang, Qi-Fan; Vahala, Kerry J.

    2017-10-01

    Laser linewidth is of central importance in spectroscopy, frequency metrology, and all applications of lasers requiring high coherence. It is also of fundamental importance, because the Schawlow-Townes laser linewidth limit is of quantum origin. Recently, a theory of stimulated Brillouin laser (SBL) linewidth has been reported. While the SBL linewidth formula exhibits power and optical Q factor dependences that are identical to the Schawlow-Townes formula, a source of noise not present in conventional lasers, phonon occupancy of the Brillouin mechanical mode is predicted to be the dominant SBL linewidth contribution. Moreover, the quantum limit of the SBL linewidth is predicted to be twice the Schawlow-Townes limit on account of phonon participation. To help confirm this theory the SBL fundamental linewidth is measured at cryogenic temperatures in a silica microresonator. Its temperature dependence and the SBL linewidth theory are combined to predict the number of thermomechanical quanta at three temperatures. The result agrees with the Bose-Einstein phonon occupancy of the microwave-rate Brillouin mode in support of the SBL linewidth theory prediction.

  17. Theory of laser-induced demagnetization at high temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Manchon, Aurelien

    2012-02-17

    Laser-induced demagnetization is theoretically studied by explicitly taking into account interactions among electrons, spins, and lattice. Assuming that the demagnetization processes take place during the thermalization of the subsystems, the temperature dynamics is given by the energy transfer between the thermalized interacting baths. These energy transfers are accounted for explicitly through electron-magnon and electron-phonon interactions, which govern the demagnetization time scale. By properly treating the spin system in a self-consistent random phase approximation, we derive magnetization dynamic equations for a broad range of temperature. The dependence of demagnetization on the temperature and pumping laser intensity is calculated in detail. In particular, we show several salient features for understanding magnetization dynamics near the Curie temperature. While the critical slowdown in dynamics occurs, we find that an external magnetic field can restore the fast dynamics. We discuss the implication of the fast dynamics in the application of heat-assisted magnetic recording.

  18. Elevated temperature lasing from injection microdisk lasers on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryzhanovskaya, N. V.; Moiseev, E. I.; Polubavkina, Y. S.; Maximov, M. V.; Mokhov, D. V.; Morozov, I. A.; Kulagina, M. M.; Zadiranov, Y. M.; Lipovskii, A. A.; Tang, M.; Liao, M.; Wu, J.; Chen, S.; Liu, H.; Zhukov, A. E.

    2018-01-01

    The combination of high operation temperatures and small diode lasers directly grown on silicon substrates is essential for their application in future photonic integrated circuits. In this letter, results are presented for quantum dot III–V-on-Si microdisk diode lasers tested at elevated temperatures. To the best of our knowledge, we have demonstrated the first uncooled microlasers with diameter of 30 µm capable of operating in the continuous wave regime at 60 °C. In the lasing regime, the emission spectra contain one very intense line with a full-width at half-maximum of 30 pm; the side mode suppression ratio reaches 18 dB. Because of self-heating, the actual temperature of the active region is close to 100 °C. Under pulsed excitation, the maximal lasing temperature is 110 °C.

  19. Clearing of ventilating emissions in low temperature environment of plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansurov, R. Sh; Rafalskaya, T. A.

    2017-11-01

    The method of high-temperature processing of streams of the ventilating air which is a subject clearing from organic pollutions is developed. Data about its efficiency, including on a number of economic parameters are obtained. Results of work are recommended for use, first of all, by development clearing plasma-thermal reactors (CPTR) for clearing air, especially from toxic substances, and also for large technological clearing installations, containing organic ventilating emissions (OVE). It is created experimental CPTR. Laws of the expiration of a plasma jet in stream of OVE limited by cylindrical walls, water-cooled channel are experimentally investigated. Dependences of a trajectory and long-range the plasma jet blown radially in stream of OVE are received. Heat exchange of stream of OVE with walls of CPTR after blowing a plasma jet is experimentally investigated; dependences of distribution of temperatures on length of a reactor and a thermal stream in a wall of channel of CPTR are received. Are investigated chemical compound of OVE after plasma-thermal clearing, some experimental data by formation of oxides of nitrogen and mono-oxide of carbon during clearing are received.

  20. Short intense laser pulse collapse in near-critical plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylla, F; Flacco, A; Kahaly, S; Veltcheva, M; Lifschitz, A; Malka, V; d'Humières, E; Andriyash, I; Tikhonchuk, V

    2013-02-22

    It is observed that the interaction of an intense ultrashort laser pulse with a near-critical gas jet results in the pulse collapse and the deposition of a significant fraction of the energy. This deposition happens in a small and well-localized volume in the rising part of the gas jet, where the electrons are efficiently accelerated and heated. A collisionless plasma expansion over ~ 150 μm at a subrelativistic velocity (~ c/3) has been optically monitored in time and space, and attributed to the quasistatic field ionization of the gas associated with the hot electron current. Numerical simulations in good agreement with the observations suggest the acceleration in the collapse region of relativistic electrons, along with the excitation of a sizable magnetic dipole that sustains the electron current over several picoseconds.